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Sample records for model dye systems

  1. Dye system for dye laser applications

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Peter R.

    1991-01-01

    A dye of the DCM family, [2-methyl-6-[2-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1-methyl-6-quinolinyl)ethenyl]-4H-pyran -4-ylidene]-propanedinitrile, dissolved in 2-phenoxyethanol, is non-mutagenic, stable and efficient, particularly in a pumped continuous wave laser system.

  2. Picosecond spectroscopic studies of energy transfer in phycobiliproteins and model dye systems

    SciTech Connect

    Switalski, S.C.

    1987-02-01

    Energy transfer was investigated in the ..cap alpha beta.. monomer and separated ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of C-phycocyanin from Anabaena variabilis and Anacystis nidulans, using steady-state and picosecond spectroscopy. Fluorescence excitation polarization spectra were consistent with a sensitizing (s) - fluorescing (f) model using a Forster energy transfer mechanism. The rise in polarization across the absorption band towards longer wavelength for the ..beta.. subunit and the ..cap alpha beta.. monomer was attributed to energy transfer among the three chromophores in the ..cap alpha beta.. monomer and between the 2 chromophores in the ..beta.. subunit. The constant polarization of the ..cap alpha.. subunit, with one chromophore, is consistent with a lack of any possibility of energy transfer. Fluorescence emission maxima were at 640 nm for the ..cap alpha beta.. monomer and the separated subunits of Anabaena variabilis, and 645 nm for the ..beta.. subunit, 640 nm for the ..cap alpha.. subunit, and 644 nm for ..cap alpha beta.. monomer of Anacystis nidulans. We have shown that the labels s and f are not consistent with all the steady-state spectroscopic results. 171 refs., 32 figs., 15 tabs.

  3. Genetic algorithm-artificial neural network and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system modeling of antibacterial activity of annatto dye on Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Yolmeh, Mahmoud; Habibi Najafi, Mohammad B; Salehi, Fakhreddin

    2014-01-01

    Annatto is commonly used as a coloring agent in the food industry and has antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. In this study, genetic algorithm-artificial neural network (GA-ANN) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) models were used to predict the effect of annatto dye on Salmonella enteritidis in mayonnaise. The GA-ANN and ANFIS were fed with 3 inputs of annatto dye concentration (0, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4%), storage temperature (4 and 25°C) and storage time (1-20 days) for prediction of S. enteritidis population. Both models were trained with experimental data. The results showed that the annatto dye was able to reduce of S. enteritidis and its effect was stronger at 25°C than 4°C. The developed GA-ANN, which included 8 hidden neurons, could predict S. enteritidis population with correlation coefficient of 0.999. The overall agreement between ANFIS predictions and experimental data was also very good (r=0.998). Sensitivity analysis results showed that storage temperature was the most sensitive factor for prediction of S. enteritidis population. PMID:24566279

  4. Thermal damage assessment of blood vessels in a hamster skin flap model by fluorescence measurement of a liposome-dye system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordon, Serge R.; Desmettre, Thomas; Devoisselle, Jean-Marie; Soulie-Begu, Sylvie

    1997-06-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of thermal damage assessment of blood vessels by using laser-induced release of liposome-encapsulated dye. Experiments were performed in a hamster skin flap model. Laser irradiation was achieved with a 300micrometers fiber connected to a 805nm diode laser after potentiation using a specific indocyanine green (ICG) formulation. Liposomes- encapsulated carboxyfluorescein were prepared by the sonication procedure. Carboxyfluorescein was loaded at high concentration in order to quench its fluorescence. The measurements were performed after i.v. injection of DSPC liposomes and lasted 40 minutes. Fluorescence emission was measured with an ultra high sensitivity intensified camera. Three different shapes of fluorescent spots were identified depending on target and energy deposition in tissue: (i) intravascular fluorescence, (ii) transient low fluorescence circular spot and (iii) persistent high intense fluorescence spot. These images are correlated with histological data. The advantages of this liposome-dye system are (1) direct measurements can be obtained, (2) several repeated readings can be made from one injection, (3) continuous monitoring of the fluorescence can be made, (4) temperature-sensitive range can be adapted using different liposomes compositions, (5) circulation times of several hours can be achieved using DSPC liposomes (6) the tissue microcirculation and the vessel macrocirculation can be investigated simultaneously, therefore changes in response to a treatment regimen and/or ICG formulations can be detected. One main constraint exists: the fluorescent dye encapsulated into the liposomes has to be carefully chosen in order to avoid any direct absorption by the dye itself. In conclusion, one of the most significant applications of this experimental technique is the evaluation of various degrees of tissue thermal damage. It could be possible to consider the application of this technique in

  5. Adsorption kinetics and isotherm of anionic dyes onto organo-bentonite from single and multisolute systems.

    PubMed

    Shen, Dazhong; Fan, Jianxin; Zhou, Weizhi; Gao, Baoyu; Yue, Qinyan; Kang, Qi

    2009-12-15

    The performances of polydiallydimethylammonium modified bentonite (PDADMA-bentonite) as an adsorbent to remove anionic dyes, namely Acid Scarlet GR (AS-GR), Acid Turquoise Blue 2G (ATB-2G) and Indigo Carmine (IC), were investigated in single, binary and ternary dye systems. In adsorption from single dye solutions with initial concentration of 100 micromol/L, the dosage of PDADMA-bentonite needed to remove 95% dye was 0.42, 0.68 and 0.75 g/L for AS-GR, ATB-2G and IC, respectively. The adsorption isotherms of the three dyes obeyed the Langmuir isotherm model with the equilibrium constants of 0.372, 0.629 and 4.31 L/micromol, the saturation adsorption amount of 176.3, 149.2 and 228.7 micromol/g for ATB-2G, IC and AS-GR, respectively. In adsorption from mixed dye solutions, the isotherm of each individual dye followed an expanded Langmuir isotherm model and the relationship between the total amount of dyes adsorbed and the total equilibrium dye concentration was interpreted well by Langmuir isotherm model. In the region of insufficient dosage of PDADMA-bentonite, the dye with a larger affinity was preferentially removed by adsorption. Desorption was observed in the kinetic curve of the dye with lower affinity on PDADMA-bentonite surface by the competitive adsorption. The kinetics in single dye solution and the total adsorption of dyes in binary and ternary dye systems nicely followed pseudo-second-order kinetic model. PMID:19631461

  6. Third row metal complexes as an alternative dye in dye sensitized solar cell system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahyuningsih, S.; Ramelan, A. H.; Badriyah, I.; Kristy, I. O.; Dewi, N. S.; Rahardjo, S. B.

    2013-10-01

    Copper(II), Cobalt (II) and Iron (II) complexes as photosensitizer on Dye Sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC) had been investigated. The aim of this research is to find out the respond addition of those dyes on FTO/TiO2 (FTO = fluorine Tin Oxide) thin film to visible light and the effect of various third row complexes to DSSC performance. Slip casting method was used to fabricate FTO/TiO2 and FTO/carbon thin film. The result from FTO/TiO2 UV-Vis spectra show no absorption on visible light. Dye solution was synthesized from free metal ions of Cu(II), Co(II), and Fe(II) in methanol with diphenylamine (dpa), 2,2,bypiridine (bpy), 1,10, phenathroline (phen), 4,4'-dicarboxylic acid-2,2'-bipyridine (dcbq), and anthocyanin (ant) ligands, respectively. UV-Vis spectrophotometry was used to identify FTO/TiO2/dye with various sensitizer dyes. The performance of DSSC was determined by I (current) - V (voltage) curve using Keithley 2602 A System Source. In this research, DSSCs are able to convert photon energy become electrical energy. Dye used in DSSC is greatly effect in photon to current efficiency (IPCE). The greater absorption in visible region of alternative dye used gains higher IPCE spectra. TiO2 character can help spread the absorption in whole visible region. The nanosize mesoporous TiO2 of TiO2/SiPA/CoII-PAR (SiPA = silylpropilamine) have greater value than P25 TiO2/SiPA-CoII-PAR. The SiPA/FeII-PAR and SiPA/CoII-PAR dyes are better dye than tpa.

  7. [Transporting models of reactive X-3B red dye in water-soil-crop continuums].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qixing

    2002-02-01

    Reactive X-3B red dye entering into environment is a typical persistent organic pollutant(POPs). Transport of the dye from water to soil and from soil to crop compartment is a continuous ecological process. According to the cognitionm, the quantitative depiction of the process using mathematical models was theoretically discussed. Some of the mathematical models were also verified using burozem-soybean, cinnamon soil-wheat, krasnozem-radish, aquorizem-rice systems. In particular, transference of the dye from water compartment to soil compartment by way of adsorbent mechanisms was accorded with the Langmuir model, and movement of the dye from soil compartment to crop compartment on the basis of root-absorbing mechanisms could be expressed using logarithmic crop-soil accumulation factor(CSAF) models. PMID:11993110

  8. Optimization of Biosorptive Removal of Dye from Aqueous System by Cone Shell of Calabrian Pine

    PubMed Central

    Deniz, Fatih

    2014-01-01

    The biosorption performance of raw cone shell of Calabrian pine for C.I. Basic Red 46 as a model azo dye from aqueous system was optimized using Taguchi experimental design methodology. L9 (33) orthogonal array was used to optimize the dye biosorption by the pine cone shell. The selected factors and their levels were biosorbent particle size, dye concentration, and contact time. The predicted dye biosorption capacity for the pine cone shell from Taguchi design was obtained as 71.770 mg g−1 under optimized biosorption conditions. This experimental design provided reasonable predictive performance of dye biosorption by the biosorbent (R 2: 0.9961). Langmuir model fitted better to the biosorption equilibrium data than Freundlich model. This displayed the monolayer coverage of dye molecules on the biosorbent surface. Dubinin-Radushkevich model and the standard Gibbs free energy change proposed physical biosorption for predominant mechanism. The logistic function presented the best fit to the data of biosorption kinetics. The kinetic parameters reflecting biosorption performance were also evaluated. The optimization study revealed that the pine cone shell can be an effective and economically feasible biosorbent for the removal of dye. PMID:25405213

  9. 3-D Modeling of a Nearshore Dye Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, A. R.; Hibler, L. F.; Miller, L. M.

    2006-12-01

    The usage of computer modeling software in predicting the behavior of a plume discharged into deep water is well established. Nearfield plume spreading in coastal areas with complex bathymetry is less commonly studied; in addition to geometry, some of the difficulties of this environment include: tidal exchange, temperature, and salinity gradients. Although some researchers have applied complex hydrodynamic models to this problem, nearfield regions are typically modeled by calibration of an empirical or expert system model. In the present study, the 3D hydrodynamic model Delft3D-FLOW was used to predict the advective transport from a point release in Sequim Bay, Washington. A nested model approach was used, wherein a coarse model using a mesh extending to nearby tide gages (cell sizes up to 1 km) was run over several tidal cycles in order to provide boundary conditions to a smaller area. The nested mesh (cell sizes up to 30 m) was forced on two open boundaries using the water surface elevation derived from the coarse model. Initial experiments with the uncalibrated model were conducted in order to predict plume propagation based on the best available field data. Field experiments were subsequently carried out by releasing rhodamine dye into the bay at near-peak flood tidal current and near high slack tidal conditions. Surface and submerged releases were carried out from an anchored vessel. Concurrently collected data from the experiment include temperature, salinity, dye concentration, and hyperspectral imagery, collected from boats and aircraft. A REMUS autonomous underwater vehicle was used to measure current velocity and dye concentration at varying depths, as well as to acquire additional bathymetric information. Preliminary results indicate that the 3D hydrodynamic model offers a reasonable prediction of plume propagation speed and shape. A sensitivity analysis is underway to determine the significant factors in effectively using the model as a predictive tool

  10. Modelling of microcracks image treated with fluorescent dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebov, Victor; Lashmanov, Oleg U.

    2015-06-01

    The main reasons of catastrophes and accidents are high level of wear of equipment and violation of the production technology. The methods of nondestructive testing are designed to find out defects timely and to prevent break down of aggregates. These methods allow determining compliance of object parameters with technical requirements without destroying it. This work will discuss dye penetrant inspection or liquid penetrant inspection (DPI or LPI) methods and computer model of microcracks image treated with fluorescent dye. Usually cracks on image look like broken extended lines with small width (about 1 to 10 pixels) and ragged edges. The used method of inspection allows to detect microcracks with depth about 10 or more micrometers. During the work the mathematical model of image of randomly located microcracks treated with fluorescent dye was created in MATLAB environment. Background noises and distortions introduced by the optical systems are considered in the model. The factors that have influence on the image are listed below: 1. Background noise. Background noise is caused by the bright light from external sources and it reduces contrast on the objects edges. 2. Noises on the image sensor. Digital noise manifests itself in the form of randomly located points that are differing in their brightness and color. 3. Distortions caused by aberrations of optical system. After passing through the real optical system the homocentricity of the bundle of rays is violated or homocentricity remains but rays intersect at the point that doesn't coincide with the point of the ideal image. The stronger the influence of the above-listed factors, the worse the image quality and therefore the analysis of the image for control of the item finds difficulty. The mathematical model is created using the following algorithm: at the beginning the number of cracks that will be modeled is entered from keyboard. Then the point with random position is choosing on the matrix whose size is

  11. Modeling of the dye loading time influence on the electrical impedance of a dye-sensitized solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugliese, D.; Shahzad, N.; Sacco, A.; Tresso, E.; Alexe-Ionescu, A. L.

    2013-09-01

    A hemisquaraine dye molecule (CT1) was used as TiO2 sensitizer. The influence of the dye-adsorption time on the electrical impedance of a CT1-based dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) was analyzed. Differently from what we observed with commercial Ru dye-based DSC, a non-monotonic effect of the impregnation time on the impedance has been found and the dye loading time is much reduced, a desirable outcome in economic grounds. This feature is analyzed in terms of the dye molecules tendency to aggregate close to the TiO2/electrolyte interface. A physical model that fits well the experimental data is proposed, which also takes into account a correction related to the difference between the illuminated area of the cell and the total area available in the electrical measurements.

  12. Tailoring of organic dyes with oxidoreductive compounds to obtain photocyclic radical generator systems exhibiting photocatalytic behavior

    PubMed Central

    Christmann, Julien; Ibrahim, Ahmad; Stefano, Luciano H Di; Allonas, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Summary The combination of a dye which absorbs the photon, an electron acceptor and an electron donor leading to energy conversion through electron transfer, was the basis of the so called three-component systems. In this paper, an experimental work combining Rose bengal dye with a triazine derivative as electron acceptor and ethyl 4-(dimethylamino)benzoate as electron donor, will underline the benefit of the photocyclic behavior of three-component systems leading to the dye regeneration. A thermodynamic approach of the photocycle is presented, followed by a mechanistic and computational study of ideal photocycles, in order to outline the specific kinetics occuring in so called photocatalytic systems. The simple kinetic model used is enough to outline the benefit of the cyclic system and to give the basic requirements in term of chemical combination needed to be fulfilled in order to obtain a photocatalytic behavior. PMID:24991243

  13. A model of twenty one lines DFB dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, N.; Abas, N.

    2009-02-01

    Multiple tunable laser lines were obtained by pumping solution of Rh6G in ethanol (1mM) by five pairs of the second harmonic of a passively Q. switched and mode locked Nd:YAG laser. The time delays among the excitation pulses were varied within coherence length of 1cm. Twenty one equally spaced lines were obtained by pumping dye solution with ten pairs of excitation beams derived from the same source. It was possible to tune the wavelengths by a microcontroller based mirror mounted stage. Number of lasing lines varied from minimum five to maximum twenty one. The wavelength of output lines varied from 540 to 590nm. The pulse lengths were measured, using Hadland Streak Camera, to vary from minimum 10 to maximum 30ps. The experimental results have lead to maturity of a 21-lines model of a distributed feedback dye laser. The dye cell was excited by the 2nd harmonic of a laboratory built passively Q. switched and mode-locked Nd:YAG laser to induce simultaneous temperature phase grating in the dye solution. This work on distributed feedback dye laser is in agreement with most of the published results on semiconductor DFB lasers. Simultaneous operation of 21-lines of slightly varying wavelengths opens a new era of research in biosensors, multiphoton ignition and measurements. This multi-wavelength operation of DFDL is based on mutual couplings of five overwritten dynamic gratings.

  14. Kinetic modelling and simulation of laccase catalyzed degradation of reactive textile dyes.

    PubMed

    Cristóvão, Raquel O; Tavares, Ana P M; Ribeiro, Adriano S; Loureiro, José M; Boaventura, Rui A R; Macedo, Eugénia A

    2008-07-01

    A kinetic model based on Michaelis-Menten equation was developed to simulate the dye decolourisation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5), Reactive Blue 114 (RB114), Reactive Yellow 15 (RY15), Reactive Red 239 (RR239) and Reactive Red 180 (RR180) dyes by commercial laccase. The unusual kinetic behavior of some of these reactions suggests that the kinetic model must consider the activation of the laccase-mediator system. Several reactions at different concentrations of each dye were performed in batch reactors and time courses were obtained. A LSODE code to solve the differential equation obtained from the batch reactor was combined with an optimization Fortran program to obtain the theoretical time courses. The time courses obtained from the developed program were compared with the experimentally obtained ones to estimate the kinetic constants that minimized the difference between them. The close correlation between the predicted and the experimental results seems to support the reliability of the established models. PMID:17986393

  15. Molecular surface area based predictive models for the adsorption and diffusion of disperse dyes in polylactic acid matrix.

    PubMed

    Xu, Suxin; Chen, Jiangang; Wang, Bijia; Yang, Yiqi

    2015-11-15

    Two predictive models were presented for the adsorption affinities and diffusion coefficients of disperse dyes in polylactic acid matrix. Quantitative structure-sorption behavior relationship would not only provide insights into sorption process, but also enable rational engineering for desired properties. The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for three disperse dyes were measured. The predictive model for adsorption affinity was based on two linear relationships derived by interpreting the experimental measurements with molecular structural parameters and compensation effect: ΔH° vs. dye size and ΔS° vs. ΔH°. Similarly, the predictive model for diffusion coefficient was based on two derived linear relationships: activation energy of diffusion vs. dye size and logarithm of pre-exponential factor vs. activation energy of diffusion. The only required parameters for both models are temperature and solvent accessible surface area of the dye molecule. These two predictive models were validated by testing the adsorption and diffusion properties of new disperse dyes. The models offer fairly good predictive ability. The linkage between structural parameter of disperse dyes and sorption behaviors might be generalized and extended to other similar polymer-penetrant systems. PMID:26197108

  16. Induction of NAD(P)H:quinone reductase in murine hepatoma cells by phenolic antioxidants, azo dyes, and other chemoprotectors: a model system for the study of anticarcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    De Long, M.J.; Prochaska, H.J.; Talalay, P.

    1986-02-01

    Exposure of murine hepatoma (Hepa 1c1c7) cells to a variety of chemical agents known to protect animals against the neoplastic, mutagenic, and other toxic effects of chemical carcinogens results in dose- and time-dependent inductions of NAD(P)H:quinone reductase (EC 1.6.99.2). This enzyme protects against quinone toxicity by promoting obligatory two-electron reductions that divert quinones from oxidative cycling or direct interactions with critical nucleophiles. Quinone reductase levels are stable in culture, are easily measured, and are useful markers for the inductive effects of chemoprotective agents. The Hepa 1c1c7 system responds to chemoprotective compounds such as phenolic antioxidants /e.g., BHA (3(2)-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole), BHT (3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxytoluene), and tert-butylhydroquinone/, lipophilic azo dyes belonging to the 1,1'-azonaphthalene, Sudan I (1-phenylazo-2-naphthol), and Sudan III (1-(4-phenylazophenylazo)-2-naphthol) families, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, coumarin and various other lactones, flavonoids, and certain sulfur compounds (e.g., benzylisothiocyanate, dithiolthiones, and dithiocarbamates), all of which are recognized enzyme inducers and chemoprotectors in vivo. Quinone reductase induction in Hepa 1c1c7 cells therefore provides a simple, versatile, and reliable system for the evaluation of the potency, kinetics, and mechanism of action of anticarcinogens.

  17. Click assembly of dye-functionalized octasilsesquioxanes for highly efficient and photostable photonic systems.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ojeda, M Eugenia; Trastoy, Beatriz; López-Arbeloa, Íñigo; Bañuelos, Jorge; Costela, Ángel; García-Moreno, Inmaculada; Chiara, Jose Luis

    2011-11-18

    New hybrid organic-inorganic dyes based on an azide-functionalized cubic octasilsesquioxane (POSS) as the inorganic part and a 4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene (BDP) chromophore as the organic component have been synthesized by copper(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of azides to alkynes. We have studied the effects of the linkage group of BDP to the POSS unit and the degree of functionalization of this inorganic core on the ensuing optical properties by comparison with model dyes. The high fluorescence of the BDP dye is preserved in spite of the linked chain at its meso position, even after attaching one BDP moiety to the POSS core. The laser action of the new dyes has been analyzed under transversal pumping at 532 nm in both the liquid phase and when incorporated into solid polymeric matrices. The monosubstituted new hybrid dye exhibits high lasing efficiency of up to 56 % with high photostability, with its laser output remaining at the initial value after 4×10(5) pump pulses in the same position of the sample at a repetition rate of 30 Hz. However, functionalization of the POSS core with eight fluorophores leads to dye aggregation, as quantum mechanical simulation has revealed, worsening the optical properties and extinguishing the laser action. The new hybrid systems based on dye-linked POSS nanoparticles open up the possibility of using these new photonic materials as alternative sources for optoelectronic devices, competing with dendronized or grafted polymers. PMID:22012888

  18. 10-Hz kilowatt-class dye laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimek, Daniel E.; Aldag, Henry R.

    1993-06-01

    Textron Defense Systems (Formerly Avco Research Laboratory) has developed a kilowatt class dye laser. The device is a transverse flow, flashlamp pumped laser that operates at greater than 100 Joules per pulse, and at a repetition rate up to 10 Hz. Operating at 10 Hz, an average power of 1.04 kW was obtained at 585 nm using rhodamine 590 in a methanol/water solvent mixture. The output power was increased to 1.4 kW by adding the triplet quencher cyclooctatetraene to the solution. Under these conditions, the measured efficiency (average laser pulse energy/energy stored in flashlamp capacitors) was 1.8%. A limited series of experiments using alternative dyes was also carried out. Comparable energies and average powers were obtained at 610 nm using rhodamine 610, and 660 nm using sulforhodamine 640.

  19. Genotoxicity assessment of reactive and disperse textile dyes using human dermal equivalent (3D cell culture system).

    PubMed

    Leme, Daniela Morais; Primo, Fernando Lucas; Gobo, Graciely Gomides; da Costa, Cleber Rafael Vieira; Tedesco, Antonio Claudio; de Oliveira, Danielle Palma

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of dyes are marketed daily for different purposes, including textile dyeing. However, there are several studies reporting attributing to dyes deleterious human effects such as DNA damage. Humans may be exposed to toxic dyes through either ingestion of contaminated waters or dermal contact with colored garments. With respect to dermal exposure, human skin equivalents are promising tools to assess in vitro genotoxicity of dermally applied chemicals using a three-dimensional (3D) model to mimic tissue behavior. This study investigated the sensitivity of an in-house human dermal equivalent (DE) for detecting genotoxicity of textile dyes. Two azo (reactive green 19 [RG19] and disperse red 1[DR1]) dyes and one anthraquinone (reactive blue 2 [RB2]) dye were analyzed. RG19 was genotoxic for DE in a dose-responsive manner, whereas RB2 and DR1 were nongenotoxic under the conditions tested. These findings are not in agreement with previous genotoxicological assessment of these dyes carried out using two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures, which showed that DR1 was genotoxic in human hepatoma cells (HepG2) and RG19 was nongenotoxic for normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF). These discrepant results probably may be due to differences between metabolic activities of each cell type (organ-specific genotoxicity, HepG2 and fibroblasts) and the test setup systems used in each study (fibroblasts cultured at 2D and three-dimensional [3D] culture systems). Genotoxicological assessment of textile dyes in context of organ-specific genotoxicity and using in vitro models that more closely resemble in vivo tissue architecture and physiology may provide more reliable estimates of genotoxic potential of these chemicals. PMID:25785560

  20. Accidental injection of patent blue dye during gynaecological surgery: Lack of knowledge constitutes a system error.

    PubMed

    Laukaityte, Edita; Bruyère, Marie; Bull, Amanda; Benhamou, Dan

    2015-02-01

    The authors report a case in which an intravenous injection of Patent Blue V dye instead of Indigo Carmine was given during routine gynaecological surgery. The patient presented with temporary arterial (spurious) desaturation and skin discoloration over a 48-hour period. Pharmacological differences between these dyes are described. Root cause analysis based on the ALARM (Association of Litigation and Risk Management) model is presented. The authors emphasise that use of this model should not be limited solely to describing and correcting well known systems errors such as working conditions or teamwork and communication. Furthermore, they conclude that insufficient knowledge must also be recognised as a systems error and as such should be sought out and corrected using similar strategies to those used to discover other contributory factors, without allocation of blame to any individual. PMID:25829317

  1. Spectral behaviour of linked heterocyclic systems and related dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savarino, Piero; Viscardi, Guido; Quagliotto, Pierluigi; Barni, Ermanno

    1993-08-01

    A wide series of electronic spectra of assembled heterocyclic systems (pyridine or quinoline, benzoor pyrido-X-azole), of their quaternary salts and of the related polymethine dyes has been considered in the light of general relationships obtained. The position and the intensity of the main bands depend on electronic and steric factors according to the relative positions of the linked rings, the nature of heteroatoms, the number and the position of positive charges and the length of the chromogens. A self-consistent set of simple rules was obtained, which explained and justified peculiar behaviours and/or apparent exceptions.

  2. Kinetics of photoinduced ordering in azo-dye films: Two-state and diffusion models

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, Alexei D.; Chigrinov, Vladimir G.; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2009-07-15

    We theoretically study the kinetics of photoinduced ordering in azo-dye photoaligning layers and present the results of modeling performed using two different phenomenological approaches. A phenomenological two-state model is deduced from the master equation for the one-particle distribution functions of an ensemble of two-level molecular systems by specifying the angular redistribution probabilities and by expressing the order parameter correlation functions in terms of the order parameter tensor. Using an alternative approach that describes light-induced reorientation of azo-dye molecules in terms of a rotational Brownian motion, we formulate the two-dimensional diffusion model as the free energy Fokker-Planck equation simplified for the limiting regime of purely in-plane reorientation. The models are employed to interpret the irradiation time dependence of the absorption order parameters defined in terms of the principal extinction (absorption) coefficients. Using the exact solution to the light transmission problem for a biaxially anisotropic absorbing layer, these coefficients are extracted from the absorbance-vs-incidence angle curves measured at different irradiation doses for the probe light linearly polarized parallel and perpendicular to the plane of incidence. It is found that, in the azo-dye films, the transient photoinduced structures are biaxially anisotropic whereas the photosteady and the initial states are uniaxial.

  3. Supramolecular guest-host systems: combining high dye doping level with low aggregation tendency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priimagi, Arri; Cattaneo, Stefano; Ras, Robin H. A.; Valkama, Sami; Ikkala, Olli; Kauranen, Martti

    2006-08-01

    We demonstrate that the aggregation tendency of dye molecules in a host polymer can be significantly reduced by exploiting non-covalent interactions between the host polymer and guest dye molecules. Such interactions occur spontaneously with no need for chemical synthesis, and could thus be utilized to combine the ease of processing of traditional guest-host systems with the high dye concentrations achievable in covalently linked systems. We studied the aggregation properties of the common azo-dye Disperse Red 1 in polymers with different functional groups. Compared to a nonpolar polymer (polystyrene), dye aggregation tendency is substantially reduced in polar polymer matrices containing hydrogen-bond donating [poly(vinylphenol)] or hydrogen-bond accepting [poly(4-vinylpyridine)] functional sites. Furthermore, by forming a polyelectrolyte-dye complex [Disperse Red 1/poly(styrenesulfonic acid)], a dye monomer can be attached to approximately each polymer unit, resulting in dye concentration of 63 wt. %. Complexation through proton transfer was further studied by using a fluorescent dye 5-phenyl-2-(4-pyridyl)oxazole. Our results indicate that polymer-dye complexes could provide a facile route for new type of optical materials, with potential applications in various fields of optics and photonics.

  4. A constructed wetland model for synthetic reactive dye wastewater treatment by narrow-leaved cattails (Typha angustifolia Linn.).

    PubMed

    Nilratnisakorn, S; Thiravetyan, P; Nakbanpote, W

    2009-01-01

    Textile wastewater is contaminated by reactive dye causing unattractive levels of wastewater color, high pH and high salt content when discharged into public water systems. Decolorization of textile wastewater by plant, phytoremediation, is an alternative, sustainable method which is suitable for long term operation. Narrow-leaved cattails are one species of wetland plant with efficiency for decolorizing and remediating textile wastewater. In addition, chemical oxygen demand (COD) can be lowered and dye residue can be removed. The plant also showed a good salt tolerance even after being exposed to a salt solution for 15 days. The narrow-leaved cattails were set up in a constructed wetland model with a vertical flow system operating from bottom to top for synthetic reactive dye wastewater (SRDW) removal. Narrow-leaved cattails could achieve the removal of SRDW at approximately 0.8 g(SRDW) m(-2) day(-1). Decolorization of SRDW by this plant was approximately 60%. The advantage of this method is that it is suitable for textile wastewater management and improvement of wetland. These plants could lower COD, remove dye, sodium and total dissolved solids (TDS) whereas other biological and chemical methods could not remove TDS and dye in the same time. These results suggested that the spongy cell structure of this plant has the ability to absorb large amounts of water and nutrients. Physico-chemical analysis revealed increasing amounts of sulfur, silicon, iron and calcium in the plant leafs and roots after exposure to wastewater. Proteins or amide groups in the plant might help in textile dye removal. Regarding decolorization, this plant accumulates dye in the intercellular space and still grows in this SRDW condition. Hence, it can be noted here that narrow-leaved cattails are efficient for textile dye wastewater treatment. PMID:19759459

  5. Device modeling of dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Bisquert, Juan; Marcus, Rudolph A

    2014-01-01

    We review the concepts and methods of modeling of the dye-sensitized solar cell, starting from fundamental electron transfer theory, and using phenomenological transport-conservation equations. The models revised here are aimed at describing the components of the current-voltage curve of the solar cell, based on small perturbation experimental methods, and to such an end, a range of phenomena occurring in the nanoparticulate electron transport materials, and at interfaces, are covered. Disorder plays a major role in the definition of kinetic parameters, and we introduce single particle as well as collective function definitions of diffusion coefficient and electron lifetime. Based on these fundamental considerations, applied tools of analysis of impedance spectroscopy are described, and we outline in detail the theory of recombination via surface states that is successful to describe the measured recombination resistance and lifetime. PMID:24085559

  6. Reductive decolourisation of sulphonated mono and diazo dyes in one- and two-stage anaerobic systems.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Marcos Erick Rodrigues; Firmino, Paulo Igor Milen; dos Santos, André Bezerra

    2013-05-01

    This work assessed the application of one- and two-stage mesophilic anaerobic systems to colour removal of sulphonated mono and diazo dyes with ethanol as electron donor. The dyes Congo Red (CR), Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and Reactive Red 2 (RR2) were selected as model compounds and tested separately in seven different periods. The one-stage system (R(1)) consisted of a single up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor, whereas the two-stage system (R(2)) consisted of an acidogenic UASB reactor (R(A)), a settler and a methanogenic UASB reactor (R(M)). For CR and RB5, no remarkable difference was observed between the colour removal performance of both anaerobic systems R(1) and R(2). The experiments with RR2 revealed that R(2) was more efficient on colour removal than R(1), showing efficiencies almost 2-fold (period VI) and 2.5-fold (period VII) higher than those found by R(1). Additionally, R(2) showed a higher stability, giving a good prospect for application to textile wastewaters. Finally, the acidogenic reactor (R(A)) had an important role in the overall decolourisation achieved by R(2) during the experiments with CR and RB5 (>78 %), whereas for RR2, a more recalcitrant dye, R(A) was responsible for up to 38 % of the total colour removal. PMID:23456307

  7. Development of tunable flashlamp excited dye laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhanthumnavin, V.; Apikitmata, S.; Kochareon, P.

    1991-05-01

    A tunable flashlamp excited dye laser (FEDL) was successfully developed for the first time in Thailand by Thai scientists at KMIT Thonburi (Bangmod). The Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethyl alcohol was utilized as a laser medium and circulated by a pump through a laser head. The dye cuvette had an inner diameter of 4.0 mm and was 90 mm long. The cavity mirrors M(sub 1), and M(sub 2) were concave mirrors with reflectivities of 100 and 73 percent respectively. A power supply of 0-20 kV and current of 0-50 mA charged a capacitor of 0.3 micro-f at 10-15 kV which was then discharged via a spark gap through the flashlamp. The output laser wavelengths was tunable from lambda = 550-640 nm. It is the first FEDL system, locally developed, which has a tunable wavelength for the laser output. The laser pulse width is about 1.0 microsecond with energy of 20 mJ and peak power pf 20 KW. The repetition rate of the laser is 1/15 Hz.

  8. A computational model for transient temperature rise in a dye laser gain medium pumped by a copper vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, V. S.; Gantayet, L. M.; Sridhar, G.; Singh, S.

    2014-02-01

    Spectrally stable dye lasers play an important role in techniques based on high resolution spectroscopy and atomic spectroscopy. The spectral purity of a dye laser is affected when the pump power to it is increased beyond the threshold. When the pump power is increased beyond the threshold, two mode oscillations occur which decrease the spectral purity of the dye laser. The effect of higher pump pulse energies on transient thermal effects has been studied using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model and the disturbances to the laser cavity have been studied using commercially available ray tracing software. The change in the cavity length was determined from the CFD model for several dye concentrations and pump powers. The results of the CFD model have been verified by published results and experimental results from our system. Our study shows that in the longitudinally pumped single mode laser change in the cavity length is a more dominant disturbance than thermal blooming. Our model is useful for the design of the dye cell.

  9. Time-Resolved Study on Xanthene Dye-Sensitized Carbon Nitride Photocatalytic Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huiyu; Li, Shuang; Lu, Rong; Yu, Anchi

    2015-10-01

    Dye sensitization is a promising strategy to extend the visible light absorption of carbon nitride (C3N4) and increase the photocatalytic hydrogen evolution efficiency of C3N4 under visible light irradiation. However, the interaction dynamics between C3N4 and a sensitized dye has not been reported in the literature. Herein, we selected four commonly used xanthene dyes such as fluorescein, dibromofluorescein, eosin Y, and erythrosine B and prepared their corresponding dye-sensitized-C3N4 composites. For the first time, we derived the electron transfer rate from the LUMO of each photoexcited xanthene dye to the conduction band of C3N4 using picoesecond time-resolved fluorescence measurements. We also obtained the reduction potentials of all selected xanthene dyes and C3N4 with cyclic voltammetry measurements. The cyclic voltammetry measurements gave a consistent result with the picosecond time-resolved fluorescence measurements. Besides, the possibility of the selected xanthene dye as an acceptor for the hole of the photoexcited C3N4 was also discussed. We believe this study is significant for the researcher to understanding the fundamental aspects in the xanthene dye-sensitized-C3N4 photocatalytic systems. PMID:26389679

  10. Synthesis of Charge Transfer Dyes for Use as Molecular Sensors in Biological Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christie, Joseph J.

    2003-01-01

    This is a continuation of last year's project to synthesize tetraaryl substituted benzodifurans for use as molecular probes in biological systems. The project will involve the synthesis and chemical characterization of dyes and precursor molecules.

  11. Predictive modeling of an azo metal complex dye sorption by pumpkin husk.

    PubMed

    Çelekli, Abuzer; Bozkurt, Hüseyin

    2013-10-01

    Effective disposal of pumpkin husk (PH) as a redundant waste is a significant work for environmental protection and full utilization of resource. Predictive modeling of sorption of Lanaset Red (LR) G on PH was investigated in a batch system as functions of particle size, adsorbent dose, pH, temperature, and initial dye concentration. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy attenuated total reflectance spectra of PH powders before and after the sorption of LR G were determined. Sorption process was found to be dependent on particle size, adsorbent dose, pH, temperature, initial dye concentration, and contact time. Amine and amide groups of PH had significant effect on the sorption process. The pHzpc of PH was found as 6.4. Sorption process was very fast initially and reached equilibrium within 60 min. Dynamic behavior of sorption was well represented by logistic and Avrami models. The sorption of LR G on PH was excellently described by Langmuir model, indicating a homogeneous phenomenon. Monolayer sorption capacity decreased from 440.78 to 436.28 mg g(-1) with increasing temperature. Activation energy, thermodynamic, and desorption studies showed that this process was physical character, exothermic, and spontaneous. This study confirmed that PH as an effective and low-cost adsorbent had a great potential for the removal of LR G as an alternative eco-friendly process. PMID:23625123

  12. Spectroscopic studies of interactions between dyes and model molecules of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhaddaoui, A.; Delacourte, A.; Turrell, S.

    1993-06-01

    Raman, FTIR, fluorescence, and UV-visible spectra are used to study interactions between amuloid-labelling dyes and poly-L-lysine and bovine insulin, two proteins which play the role of models of (beta) amyloid of Alzheimers disease. It is found that though the (beta) conformation of the peptide is not essential, it helps to encourage binding which appears to be stable and specific in nature, involving SO3- groups of the dyes and NH2 groups of the proteins.

  13. Modeling and characterization of dye-doped guest-host liquid crystal eyewear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutino, Pedro Coutino

    This thesis explores the use of dye-doped guest-host liquid crystals in variable transmission eyewear devices that protect against rapid and abrupt changes in lighting conditions. Some of their unique characteristics such as millisecond time response, low power consumption, fail-safe operation, and wide color palette make them the only available technology that meets the basic requirements for fast, adaptative eyewear applications. Despite these unique features, there are limitations in the technology which have hindered its use for more advanced eyewear applications. It is the aim of this dissertation to explore these limitations and provide experimental and numerical characterization tools necessary to surpass them. First, several techniques are described to evaluate materials and devices performance in terms of their photopic transmission, haze, birefringence, and distortion. The results are used to demonstrate that by choosing and combining the right materials, it is possible to improve the optical quality of the eyewear. Then, a simulation instrument which combines and integrates all the necessary elements to model the electro-optical response of dye-doped guest-host liquid crystal eyewear was constructed. This program is capable of reproducing with high accuracy experimental results, to predict the performance of devices, and to mimic the spectral curve of a target color. Numerical experiments were performed to study some of the most common limitations of the e-Tint mode or single cell technology including photopic transmission window, and polarization dependence and demonstrate that optimizing parameters such as birefringence, d/p, and concentration of dyes helps to overcome these limitations and enhance system performance. A guest-host double cell system is proposed as a new alternative mode for most advanced eyewear applications. Particular attention was placed on a switchable crossed polarizers configuration which offered superior optical characteristics

  14. Functional behavior of bio-electrochemical treatment system with increasing azo dye concentrations: Synergistic interactions of biocatalyst and electrode assembly.

    PubMed

    Sreelatha, S; Velvizhi, G; Naresh Kumar, A; Venkata Mohan, S

    2016-08-01

    Treatment of dye bearing wastewater through biological machinery is particularly challenging due to its recalcitrant and inhibitory nature. In this study, functional behavior and treatment efficiency of bio-electrochemical treatment (BET) system was evaluated with increasing azo dye concentrations (100, 200, 300 and 500mg dye/l). Maximum dye removal was observed at 300mg dye/l (75%) followed by 200mg dye/l (65%), 100mg dye/l (62%) and 500mg dye/l (58%). Concurrent increment in dye load resulted in enhanced azo reductase and dehydrogenase activities respectively (300mg dye/l: 39.6U; 4.96μg/ml). Derivatives of cyclic voltammograms also supported the involvement of various membrane bound redox shuttlers, viz., cytochrome-c, cytochrome-bc1 and flavoproteins during the electron transfer. Bacterial respiration during BET operation utilized various electron acceptors such as electrodes and dye intermediates with simultaneous bioelectricity generation. This study illustrates the synergistic interaction of biocatalyst with electrode assembly for efficient treatment of azo dye wastewater. PMID:27067459

  15. Circularly polarized laser emission induced in isotropic and achiral dye systems.

    PubMed

    Cerdán, Luis; García-Moreno, Sara; Costela, Angel; García-Moreno, Inmaculada; de la Moya, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    The production of efficient, tunable, and switchable circularly polarized laser emission would have far reaching implications in optical communications or biophotonics. In this work, it is demonstrated the direct generation of circularly polarized (CP) laser emission in achiral and isotropic dye laser systems without the use of extracavity polarizing elements, and without resorting to chiral dyes, chiral liquid crystal matrices, or interferometric methods. The origin of this ellipticity arises from the dynamic birefringence induced by the strong and polarized laser pumping and the subsequent orientation anisotropy of the excited molecular dipoles. A complete polarimetric characterization of the polarization state of conventional dye laser oscillators as a function of different experimental parameters is performed and it is shown that the generated light always possesses a certain level of circularity that changes in a distinctive way with pump energy and polarization. These results demonstrate that it is possible to generate and modulate CP laser light from efficient and photostable conventional laser dyes. PMID:27350073

  16. Circularly polarized laser emission induced in isotropic and achiral dye systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdán, Luis; García-Moreno, Sara; Costela, Angel; García-Moreno, Inmaculada; de La Moya, Santiago

    2016-06-01

    The production of efficient, tunable, and switchable circularly polarized laser emission would have far reaching implications in optical communications or biophotonics. In this work, it is demonstrated the direct generation of circularly polarized (CP) laser emission in achiral and isotropic dye laser systems without the use of extracavity polarizing elements, and without resorting to chiral dyes, chiral liquid crystal matrices, or interferometric methods. The origin of this ellipticity arises from the dynamic birefringence induced by the strong and polarized laser pumping and the subsequent orientation anisotropy of the excited molecular dipoles. A complete polarimetric characterization of the polarization state of conventional dye laser oscillators as a function of different experimental parameters is performed and it is shown that the generated light always possesses a certain level of circularity that changes in a distinctive way with pump energy and polarization. These results demonstrate that it is possible to generate and modulate CP laser light from efficient and photostable conventional laser dyes.

  17. Circularly polarized laser emission induced in isotropic and achiral dye systems

    PubMed Central

    Cerdán, Luis; García-Moreno, Sara; Costela, Angel; García-Moreno, Inmaculada; de la Moya, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    The production of efficient, tunable, and switchable circularly polarized laser emission would have far reaching implications in optical communications or biophotonics. In this work, it is demonstrated the direct generation of circularly polarized (CP) laser emission in achiral and isotropic dye laser systems without the use of extracavity polarizing elements, and without resorting to chiral dyes, chiral liquid crystal matrices, or interferometric methods. The origin of this ellipticity arises from the dynamic birefringence induced by the strong and polarized laser pumping and the subsequent orientation anisotropy of the excited molecular dipoles. A complete polarimetric characterization of the polarization state of conventional dye laser oscillators as a function of different experimental parameters is performed and it is shown that the generated light always possesses a certain level of circularity that changes in a distinctive way with pump energy and polarization. These results demonstrate that it is possible to generate and modulate CP laser light from efficient and photostable conventional laser dyes. PMID:27350073

  18. Characteristics of a dye laser amplifier transversely pumped by copper vapor lasers with a two-dimensional calculation model

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, A.; Nakayama, T.; Kato, M.; Maruyama, Y.

    1997-08-01

    A two-dimensional rate equation model, taking into consideration the transverse absorption loss of pump laser power, is proposed to evaluate the characteristics of a dye laser amplifier with a large input laser beam diameter pumped by high average power copper vapor lasers. The calculations are in good agreement with the measurements taken with a Rhodamine 6G dye, and the model can be used for evaluation of the dye concentration at any wavelength. {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  19. A model-dye comparison experiment in the tidal mixing front zone on the southern flank of Georges Bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changsheng; Xu, Qichun; Houghton, Robert; Beardsley, Robert C.

    2008-02-01

    A process-oriented model-dye comparison experiment was conducted to examine the ability of a numerical ocean model to simulate the observed movement of dye across the tidal mixing front on the southern flank of Georges Bank during 22-26 May 1999. The experiment was made using the unstructured-grid Finite-Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) with varying horizontal resolution. The results indicate that the observed cross-isobath movement of the dye patch was primarily controlled by meso-scale temporal and spatial variability of the water temperature and salinity fields. Onset of vertical stratification tended to slow down an upward stretching of the dye column and trapped the dye within the bottom mixed layer. To reach a convergent numerical solution that reproduced the observed lateral turbulent dispersion of dye, the FVCOM grid required a horizontal resolution of ˜500 m in the dye study region. Within the tidal mixing front of Georges Bank, the movement of the center of the dye patch was mainly driven by the ensemble velocity integrated over the dye volume, with a first-order contribution from vertical shear of the dye's horizontal velocity.

  20. Interfacial Properties of a Hydrophobic Dye in the Tetrachloroethylene-Water-Glass Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, D.M.

    1999-02-23

    Interfacial effects play an important role in governing multiphase fluid behavior in porous media. Strongly hydrophobic organic dyes, used in many experimental studies to facilitate visual observation of the phase distributions, have generally been implicitly assumed to have no influence on the interfacial properties of the various phases in porous media. Sudan IV is the most commonly used dye for non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in laboratory experiments. It has also been used in at least one field experiment. The effects of this dye on the tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-water-glass system were investigated to test the assumption that the dye does not effect the interfacial properties and therefore PCE mobility. The results indicate that the dye does indeed change the interfacial relationships.The effect of the dye on the interfacial relationships is a complex function of the dye concentration, the solid phase composition, and the dynamic rate of new interface formation. The dye caused a slight (<10 percent) increase in interfacial tension at low concentrations (<0.1 g/L) and high rates of new interface formation. The dye reduced interfacial tension between PCE and water at low rates of new interface formation for all dye concentrations tested (0.00508 to 5.08 g/L). At the highest dye concentration, the PCE-water interfacial tension was significantly reduced regardless of the rate of new interface formation. The apparent interfacial tension increase at low dye concentrations is suspected to be an artifact of a low measured IFT value for the undyed PCE caused by leaching of rubber o-rings by the PCE prior to testing in the final drop-volume configuration.In addition to reducing interfacial tension, the dye was found to significantly alter the wetting relationship between PCE and water on a glass surface at and above the range of reported dye concentrations cited in the literature (1.1 to 1.7 g/L). The wetting relationship was rendered neutral from a water-wet initial

  1. Unusual and tunable one-photon nonlinearity in gold-dye plexcitonic Fano systems.

    PubMed

    Nan, Fan; Zhang, Ya-Fang; Li, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Xiao-Tian; Li, Hang; Zhang, Xinhui; Jiang, Ruibin; Wang, Jianfang; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Li; Wang, Jia-Hong; Wang, Qu-Quan; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies of the coupling between the plasmonic excitations of metallic nanostructures with the excitonic excitations of molecular species have revealed a rich variety of emergent phenomena known as plexcitonics. Here, we use a combined experimental and theoretical approach to demonstrate new and intriguing aspects in the ultrafast nonlinear responses of strongly coupled hybrid Fano systems consisting of gold nanorods decorated with near-infrared dye molecules. We show that the severely suppressed linear absorption around the Fano dip significantly enhances the unidirectional energy transfer from the plasmons to the excitons and further allows one-photon nonlinearity to be drastically and reversibly tuned. These striking observations are interpreted within a microscopic model stressing on two competing processes: saturated plasmonic absorption and weakened destructive Fano interference from the bleached excitonic absorption. The unusually strong one-photon nonlinearity revealed here provides a promising strategy in fabricating nanoplasmonic devices with both pronounced nonlinearities and good figures of merit. PMID:25756956

  2. Aromatic amine degradation in a UASB/CSTR sequential system treating Congo Red dye.

    PubMed

    Işik, Mustafa; Sponza, Delia Teresa

    2003-01-01

    In this study an anaerobic (upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor)/aerobic (completely stirred tank reactor) sequential system was used to treat a synthetic wastewater with minerals and co-substrate together with 100-4000 mg L(-1) of Congo Red dye (Direct red 28) (CR), which is a banned azo dye in Turkey. The effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) on the decolorization and the COD removal efficiency was investigated at constant 100 mg L(-1) Congo Red concentration. 77% of COD and 95% of color was removed at a HRT of 0.486 days and a maximum organic loading rate of 6.656 kg COD m(-3) day(-1) in the anaerobic/aerobic stage. In the continuous operations, 88% of COD, 99% of color and 91% of total aromatic amine (TAA) were removed at a HRT of 3.60 days and at a CR concentration of 4000 mg L(-1). This corresponds to an organic loading rate of 1.81 kg COD m(-3) day(-1), and a CR dye loading rate of 46.37 g dye m(-3) h(-1), respectively, in the whole system. The TAA produced under anaerobic conditions was ultimately removed in the aerobic stage, resulting in very low aromatic amine recoveries (5-18%) in the last one. Therefore the aerobic effluents exhibited higher IC50 and specific methanogenic activities (SMA) compared to anaerobic and dye containing samples, indicating the reduced toxicity. PMID:14524683

  3. First principles modeling of panchromatic dyes for solar cells applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Felice, Rosa; Calzolari, Arrigo; Dong, Rui; Buongiorno Nardelli, Marco

    2013-03-01

    The state-of-the-art dye in Grätzel solar cells, N719, exhibits a total solar-to-electric conversion efficiency of 11.2%. However, it severely lacks absorption in the red and the near infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, which represent more than 70% of the solar radiation spectrum. Using calculations from first principles in the time-dependent domain, we have studied the electronic and optical response of a novel class of panchromatic sensitizers that can harvest solar energy efficiently across the visible and near infrared regions, which have been recently synthesized [A. El-Shafei, M. Hussain, A. Atiq, A. Islam, and L. Han, J. Mater. Chem. 22, 24048 (2012)]. Our calculations show that, by tuning the properties of antenna groups, one can achieve a substantial improvement of the optical properties.

  4. Dye Sensitized Solar Cells for Economically Viable Photovoltaic Systems.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyun Suk; Lee, Jung-Kun

    2013-05-16

    TiO2 nanoparticle-based dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have attracted a significant level of scientific and technological interest for their potential as economically viable photovoltaic devices. While DSSCs have multiple benefits such as material abundance, a short energy payback period, constant power output, and compatibility with flexible applications, there are still several challenges that hold back large scale commercialization. Critical factors determining the future of DSSCs involve energy conversion efficiency, long-term stability, and production cost. Continuous advancement of their long-term stability suggests that state-of-the-art DSSCs will operate for over 20 years without a significant decrease in performance. Nevertheless, key questions remain in regards to energy conversion efficiency improvements and material cost reduction. In this Perspective, the present state of the field and the ongoing efforts to address the requirements of DSSCs are summarized with views on the future of DSSCs. PMID:26282979

  5. Laser beam control and diagnostic systems for the copper-pumped dye laser system at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, E.S.; Peterson, R.L.; Salmon, J.T.; Thomas, R.A.

    1992-11-01

    The laser system described in the previous paper is used for experiments in which success requires tight tolerances on beam position, direction, and wavefront. Indeed, the optimum performance of the laser itself depends on careful delivery of copper laser light to the dye amplifiers, precise propagation of dye laser beams through restricted amplifier apertures, and accurate monitoring of laser power at key locations. This paper describes the alignment systems, wavefront correction systems, and laser diagnostics systems which ensure that the control requirements of both the laser and associated experiments are met. Because laser isotope separation processes utilize more than one wavelength, these systems monitor and control multiple wavelengths simultaneously.

  6. Development of an activated carbon-packed microbial bioelectrochemical system for azo dye degradation.

    PubMed

    Cardenas-Robles, Arely; Martinez, Eduardo; Rendon-Alcantar, Idelfonso; Frontana, Carlos; Gonzalez-Gutierrez, Linda

    2013-01-01

    A microbial bioelectrochemical reactor (BER) was employed for the degradation of azo dyes without the use of an external electron donor, using activated carbon (GAC) as a redox mediator. Contribution of pH values, open circuit potential (OCP), dye concentration and applied current were individually studied. A batch system and an upflow fixed bed bioreactor were built for analyzing the effect of the applied current on biodegradation of the azo dye Reactive Red 272. The presence of GAC (20% w/v) regulated both pH and OCP values in solution and led to a removal efficiency of 98%. Cyclic voltammetry results indicate a dependence of the electron transfer mechanism with the concentration of the azo compound. With these results, a continuous flow reactor operating with J=0.045 mA cm(-2), led to removal rates of 95% (± 3.5%) in a half-residence time of 1 hour. PMID:23128299

  7. Dyes in Liquid Crystals: Experimental and Computational Studies of a Guest-Host System Based on a Combined DFT and MD Approach.

    PubMed

    Sims, Mark T; Abbott, Laurence C; Cowling, Stephen J; Goodby, John W; Moore, John N

    2015-07-01

    Practical applications of guest-host liquid crystal systems are critically dependent on the alignment of the guest species within the liquid crystal host. UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy shows that the 1,5-dihydroxy-2,6-bis-(4-propylphenyl)-9,10-anthraquinone dye aligns within the E7 nematic host, giving an experimental dichroic ratio of 9.40 and dye order parameter of 0.74. This alignment was modelled by using a combination of density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics (MD) computational approaches that do not require the input of experimental data. Time-dependent DFT calculations show that the electronic transition dipole moment is highly aligned with the long molecular axis of the dye. Fully atomistic MD simulations show that the long axis of the dye is less highly aligned within the E7 host, indicating that this contribution limits the overall dye alignment and, thereby, the potential practical applications of this particular system. Importantly, this study demonstrates an experimental and combined DFT and MD computational approach that may be applied generally to guest-host systems, providing a potential route to their rational design. PMID:26031244

  8. The Design of Auto-control System on Overflow Dyeing Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shuiying

    The composition and working principle of DCS system are introduced, as well as its configuration, function and basic language. An account of the design of auto-control system on dyeing machine is narrated, and the advancement of the system and the importance of cascade control are further put forward. Its control rate can achieve above 95%, which can reduce labor intensity and improve working environment.

  9. Performance of microbial fuel cell coupled constructed wetland system for decolorization of azo dye and bioelectricity generation.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhou; Song, Hai-Liang; Cang, Ning; Li, Xian-Ning

    2013-09-01

    A microbial fuel cell coupled constructed wetland (planted with Ipomoea aquatica) system (planted CW-MFC) was used for azo dye decolorization. Electricity was simultaneously produced during the co-metabolism process of glucose and azo dye. A non-planted and an open-circuit system were established as reference to study the roles of plants and electrodes in azo dye decolorization and electricity production processes, respectively. The results indicated that plants grown in cathode enhanced the cathode potential and slightly promoted dye decolorization efficiency. The electrodes promoted the dye decolorization efficiency in the anode. The planted CW-MFC system achieved the highest decolorization rate of about 91.24% and a voltage output of about 610 mV. The connection of external circuit promoted the growth of electrogenic bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens and Beta Proteobacteria, and inhibited the growth of Archaea in anode. PMID:23867535

  10. Construction of a high efficiency copper adsorption bacterial system via peptide display and its application on copper dye polluted wastewater.

    PubMed

    Maruthamuthu, Murali Kannan; Nadarajan, Saravanan Prabhu; Ganesh, Irisappan; Ravikumar, Sambandam; Yun, Hyungdon; Yoo, Ik-Keun; Hong, Soon Ho

    2015-11-01

    For the construction of an efficient copper waste treatment system, a cell surface display strategy was employed. The copper adsorption ability of recombinant bacterial strains displaying three different copper binding peptides were evaluated in LB Luria-Bertani medium (LB), artificial wastewater, and copper phthalocyanine containing textile dye industry wastewater samples. Structural characteristics of the three peptides were also analyzed by similarity-based structure modeling. The best binding peptide was chosen for the construction of a dimeric peptide display and the adsorption ability of the monomeric and dimeric peptide displayed strains were compared. The dimeric peptide displayed strain showed superior copper adsorption in all three tested conditions (LB, artificial wastewater, and textile dye industry wastewater). When the strains were exposed to copper phthalocyanine dye polluted wastewater, the dimeric peptide display [543.27 µmol/g DCW dry cell weight (DCW)] showed higher adsorption of copper when compared with the monomeric strains (243.53 µmol/g DCW). PMID:26219270

  11. Comparison of a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody conjugated with visible or near-infrared fluorescent dyes for imaging pancreatic cancer in orthotopic nude mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maawy, Ali A.; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Luiken, George A.; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a set of visible and near-infrared dyes conjugated to a tumor-specific chimeric antibody for high-resolution tumor imaging in orthotopic models of pancreatic cancer. BxPC-3 human pancreatic cancer was orthotopically implanted into pancreata of nude mice. Mice received a single intravenous injection of a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody conjugated to one of the following fluorophores: 488-nm group (Alexa Fluor 488 or DyLight 488); 550-nm group (Alexa Fluor 555 or DyLight 550); 650-nm group (Alexa Fluor 660 or DyLight 650), or the 750-nm group (Alexa Fluor 750 or DyLight 755). After 24 h, the Olympus OV100 small-animal imaging system was used for noninvasive and intravital fluorescence imaging of mice. Dyes were compared with respect to depth of imaging, resolution, tumor-to-background ratio (TBR), photobleaching, and hemoglobin quenching. The longer wavelength dyes had increased depth of penetration and ability to detect the smallest tumor deposits and provided the highest TBRs, resistance to hemoglobin quenching, and specificity. The shorter wavelength dyes were more photostable. This study showed unique advantages of each dye for specific cancer imaging in a clinically relevant orthotopic model.

  12. Revealing characteristics of mixed consortia for azo dye decolorization: Lotka-Volterra model and game theory.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bor-Yann

    2007-10-22

    This study provides a novel explanation to put forward, in Lotka-Volterra competition model and game theory, interspecific competition in bioaugmentation using constructed mixed consortia for azo dye decolorization. As mixed cultures are regularly used in industrial dye-laden wastewater treatment, understanding species competition of mixed consortia is apparently of great importance to azo dye decolorization. In aerobic growth conditions, Escherichia coli DH5alpha owned a growth advantage to out-compete Pseudomonas luteola due to preferential growth rate of DH5alpha. However, in static decolorization conditions DH5alpha surrendered some proportion of its advantage (i.e., a decrease in its competitive power for metabolite stimulation) to enhance color removal of P. luteola for total coexistence. In aerobic growth, DH5alpha had its growth advantage to exclude P. luteola for dominance (i.e, conflict strategy) according to competitive exclusion principle. In static decolorization conditions, as the removal of a common dye threat was crucial to both species for survival, both species selected cooperation strategy through metabolite stimulation of DH5alpha to enhance effective decolorization of P. luteola for long-term sustainable management. This analysis of game theory clearly unlocked unsolved mysteries in previous studies. PMID:17499918

  13. Organic acids enhanced decoloration of azo dye in gas phase surface discharge plasma system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiecheng; Qu, Guangzhou; Ren, Jingyu; Sun, Qiuhong; Liang, Dongli; Hu, Shibin

    2016-01-25

    A gas phase surface discharge plasma combined with organic acids system was developed to enhance active species mass transfer and dye-containing wastewater treatment efficacy, with Acid Orange II (AO7) as the model pollutant. The effects of discharge voltage and various organic acid additives (acetic acid, lactic acid and nonoic acid) on AO7 decoloration efficiency were evaluated. The experimental results showed that an AO7 decoloration efficiency of approximately 69.0% was obtained within 4 min of discharge plasma treatment without organic acid addition, which was improved to 82.8%, 83.5% and 88.6% within the same treatment time with the addition of acetic acid, lactic acid and nonoic acid, respectively. The enhancement effects on AO7 decoloration efficiency could be attributed to the decrease in aqueous surface tension, improvement in bubble distribution and shape, and increase in ozone equivalent concentration. The AO7 wastewater was biodegradable after discharge plasma treatment with the addition of organic acid. AO7 decomposition intermediates were analyzed by UV-vis spectrometry and GC-MS; 2-naphthol, 1,4-benzoquinone, phthalic anhydride, coumarin, 1,2-naphthoquinone, and 2-formyl-benzoic acid were detected. A possible pathway for AO7 decomposition in this system was proposed. PMID:26444488

  14. A home-made system for IPCE measurement of standard and dye-sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, Giuseppina; Cozzarini, Luca; Capria, Ennio; Fraleoni-Morgera, Alessandro E-mail: afraleoni@units.it

    2015-01-15

    A home-made system for incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency (IPCE) characterization, based on a double-beam UV-Vis spectrophotometer, has been set up. In addition to its low cost (compared to the commercially available apparatuses), the double-beam configuration gives the advantage to measure, autonomously and with no need for supplementary equipment, the lamp power in real time, compensating possible variations of the spectral emission intensity and quality, thus reducing measurement times. To manage the optical and electronic components of the system, a custom software has been developed. Validations carried out on a common silicon-based photodiode and on a dye-sensitized solar cell confirm the possibility to adopt this system for determining the IPCE of solar cells, including dye-sensitized ones.

  15. A home-made system for IPCE measurement of standard and dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palma, Giuseppina; Cozzarini, Luca; Capria, Ennio; Fraleoni-Morgera, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    A home-made system for incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency (IPCE) characterization, based on a double-beam UV-Vis spectrophotometer, has been set up. In addition to its low cost (compared to the commercially available apparatuses), the double-beam configuration gives the advantage to measure, autonomously and with no need for supplementary equipment, the lamp power in real time, compensating possible variations of the spectral emission intensity and quality, thus reducing measurement times. To manage the optical and electronic components of the system, a custom software has been developed. Validations carried out on a common silicon-based photodiode and on a dye-sensitized solar cell confirm the possibility to adopt this system for determining the IPCE of solar cells, including dye-sensitized ones.

  16. FATE OF DYES IN AQUATIC SYSTEMS. 1. SOLUBILITY AND PARTITIONING OF SOME HYDROPHOBIC DYES AND RELATED COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solubilities and vapor pressures from the literature are combined with calculated octanol/water partition coefficients, K (sub ow), to assess the expected environmental behavior of about 50 dyes. The solubility suggests the potential for a 30- to 150-fold concentration enhancemen...

  17. Quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis of substituted arylazo pyridone dyes in photocatalytic system: Experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Dostanić, J; Lončarević, D; Zlatar, M; Vlahović, F; Jovanović, D M

    2016-10-01

    A series of arylazo pyridone dyes was synthesized by changing the type of the substituent group in the diazo moiety, ranging from strong electron-donating to strong electron-withdrawing groups. The structural and electronic properties of the investigated dyes was calculated at the M062X/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory. The observed good linear correlations between atomic charges and Hammett σp constants provided a basis to discuss the transmission of electronic substituent effects through a dye framework. The reactivity of synthesized dyes was tested through their decolorization efficiency in TiO2 photocatalytic system (Degussa P-25). Quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis revealed a strong correlation between reactivity of investigated dyes and Hammett substituent constants. The reaction was facilitated by electron-withdrawing groups, and retarded by electron-donating ones. Quantum mechanical calculations was used in order to describe the mechanism of the photocatalytic oxidation reactions of investigated dyes and interpret their reactivities within the framework of the Density Functional Theory (DFT). According to DFT based reactivity descriptors, i.e. Fukui functions and local softness, the active site moves from azo nitrogen atom linked to benzene ring to pyridone carbon atom linked to azo bond, going from dyes with electron-donating groups to dyes with electron-withdrawing groups. PMID:27209516

  18. Development of an image processing support system based on fluorescent dye to prevent elderly people with dementia from wandering.

    PubMed

    Nishigaki, Yutaka; Tanaka, Kentaro; Kim, Juhyon; Nakajima, Kazuki

    2013-01-01

    The wandering of elderly people with dementia is a significant behavioral problem and is a heavy burden on caregivers in residential and nursing homes. Thus, warning systems have been developed to prevent elderly people with dementia from leaving the premises. Some of these systems use radio waves. However, systems based on radio waves present several practical problems. For instance, the transmitter must be carried and may become lost; in addition, the battery of the transmitter must be changed. To solve these problems, we developed a support system that prevents elderly people with dementia from wandering. The system employs image processing technology based on fluorescent dye. The composition of the support system can be described as follows: fluorescent dye is painted in a simple shape on the clothes of an elderly person. The fluorescent color becomes visible by irradiation with a long wavelength of ultraviolet light. In the present paper, the relationship between the color of the dye and the cloth was investigated. A 3D video camera was used to acquire a 3D image and detect the simple shape. As a preliminary experiment, 3 colors (red, green and blue) of fluorescent dye were applied to cloths of 9 different colors. All fluorescent colors were detected on 6 of the cloths, but red and blue dye could not be detected on the other 3 cloths. In contrast, green dye was detectable on all 9 of the cloths. Additionally, we determined whether green dye could be detected in an actual environment. A rectangular shaped patch of green fluorescent dye was painted on the shoulder area of a subject, from the scapula to the clavicle. As a result, the green dye was detected on all 9 different colored cloths. PMID:24111431

  19. Computational study of diketopyrrolopyrrole-based organic dyes for dye sensitized solar cell applications.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenjie; Tan, Dazhi; Zhang, Qijian; Wang, Huaxing

    2015-04-01

    Four diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP)-based organic dyes utilizing the donor-π-acceptor motif were investigated by density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) approaches. The four dyes were composed of different donor groups, i.e. indoline, carbazole, triphenylamine, and coumarin. We investigated the effects of the DPP unit and different donors on the spectra and electrochemical properties of the dyes, respectively. In comparison with the model dye which adopts a phenylene unit as the π-spacer, the DPP dyes all display remarkably enhanced spectral responses in the visible region of the solar spectrum. The key to this increase was the incorporation of electron-deficient DPP moieties to the molecular core, which significantly lowers LUMO levels and therefore reduces the band gap. The dye/(TiO2)46 anatase nanoparticle systems were also simulated to show the electronic structures at the interface. We studied some key properties including absorption spectra, light-harvesting efficiency, molecular orbital distributions, and injection time of electrons from the excited state of dye to the conduction band of TiO2. The dye DPP-I with indoline moiety as the electron donor demonstrates desirable energetic, electronic, and spectroscopic parameters for dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) applications. Our theoretical study is expected to provide valuable insights into the molecular design of novel DPP-based organic dyes for the optimizations of DSSCs. PMID:25662565

  20. Dye-Free Porcine Model of Experimental Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion: A Suitable Approach for Retinal Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen Cehofski, Lasse; Kruse, Anders; Kjærgaard, Benedict; Stensballe, Allan; Honoré, Bent; Vorum, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Branch retinal vein occlusion induces complex biological processes in the retina that are generated by a multitude of interacting proteins. These proteins and their posttranslational modifications can effectively be studied using modern proteomic techniques. However, no method for studying large-scale protein changes following branch retinal vein occlusion has been available until now. Obtainment of retinal tissue exposed to branch retinal vein occlusion is only available through experimental animal models. Traditional models of experimental branch retinal vein occlusion require the use of Rose Bengal dye combined with argon laser photocoagulation. The use of Rose Bengal dye is problematic in proteomic studies as the dye can induce multiple protein modifications when irradiated. This paper presents a novel technique for proteomic analysis of porcine retinal tissue with branch retinal vein occlusion combining a dye-free experimental model with label-free liquid chromatography mass spectrometry based proteomics. PMID:26064675

  1. Accurate simulation of optical properties in dyes.

    PubMed

    Jacquemin, Denis; Perpète, Eric A; Ciofini, Ilaria; Adamo, Carlo

    2009-02-17

    Since Antiquity, humans have produced and commercialized dyes. To this day, extraction of natural dyes often requires lengthy and costly procedures. In the 19th century, global markets and new industrial products drove a significant effort to synthesize artificial dyes, characterized by low production costs, huge quantities, and new optical properties (colors). Dyes that encompass classes of molecules absorbing in the UV-visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum now have a wider range of applications, including coloring (textiles, food, paintings), energy production (photovoltaic cells, OLEDs), or pharmaceuticals (diagnostics, drugs). Parallel to the growth in dye applications, researchers have increased their efforts to design and synthesize new dyes to customize absorption and emission properties. In particular, dyes containing one or more metallic centers allow for the construction of fairly sophisticated systems capable of selectively reacting to light of a given wavelength and behaving as molecular devices (photochemical molecular devices, PMDs).Theoretical tools able to predict and interpret the excited-state properties of organic and inorganic dyes allow for an efficient screening of photochemical centers. In this Account, we report recent developments defining a quantitative ab initio protocol (based on time-dependent density functional theory) for modeling dye spectral properties. In particular, we discuss the importance of several parameters, such as the methods used for electronic structure calculations, solvent effects, and statistical treatments. In addition, we illustrate the performance of such simulation tools through case studies. We also comment on current weak points of these methods and ways to improve them. PMID:19113946

  2. Comparison of color removal from reactive dye contaminated water by systems containing fungal biosorbent, active carbon and their mixture.

    PubMed

    Gül, Ulküye Dudu; Silah, Hülya

    2014-01-01

    The adsorption of Everzol Black (EB) from synthetic aqueous solution onto active carbon (AC) and dried fungal biosorbent (Rhizopus arrhizus) was studied under the same experimental conditions. The effects of initial dye concentration, adsorbent dosage and contact time were examined at a batch-scale level. As an alternative to AC, fungus was investigated as a low-cost adsorbent for dye removal. The amount of EB adsorbed onto AC was lower compared with fungal biosorbent; dye adsorption capacity of AC and fungal biosorbent were 94.48 and 106.61 mg/g, respectively. The adsorbent dosage experiments showed that 4 g/L biosorbent removed 100% of EB (Co: 114.39 mg/L) after 2 hours. The results obtained from this study showed that biosorbent effectively removed reactive dye from dye-containing water in a short time period. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models were used for mathematical description of the biosorption equilibrium data; the Freundlich model was found to exhibit good fits to the experimental data. According to the Freundlich isotherm, the maximum dye adsorption capacities of AC and biosorbent were calculated as 344.82 and 357.14 mg/g, respectively. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectral analysis showed the involvement of functional groups for dye bindings. PMID:25325540

  3. Tracer gauge: an automated dye dilution gauging system for ice-affected streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clow, D.W.; Fleming, A.C.

    2008-01-01

    In-stream flow protection programs require accurate, real-time streamflow data to aid in the protection of aquatic ecosystems during winter base flow periods. In cold regions, however, winter streamflow often can only be estimated because in-channel ice causes variable backwater conditions and alters the stage-discharge relation. In this study, an automated dye dilution gauging system, a tracer gauge, was developed for measuring discharge in ice-affected streams. Rhodamine WT is injected into the stream at a constant rate, and downstream concentrations are measured with a submersible fluorometer. Data loggers control system operations, monitor key variables, and perform discharge calculations. Comparison of discharge from the tracer gauge and from a Cipoletti weir during periods of extensive ice cover indicated that the root-mean-square error of the tracer gauge was 0.029 m3 s−1, or 6.3% of average discharge for the study period. The tracer gauge system can provide much more accurate data than is currently available for streams that are strongly ice affected and, thus, could substantially improve management of in-stream flow protection programs during winter in cold regions. Care must be taken, however, to test for the validity of key assumptions, including complete mixing and conservative behavior of dye, no changes in storage, and no gains or losses of water to or from the stream along the study reach. These assumptions may be tested by measuring flow-weighted dye concentrations across the stream, performing dye mass balance analyses, and evaluating breakthrough curve behavior.

  4. Correlated aggregate model of self-healing in dye-doped polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzyk, Mark G.; Ramini, Shiva

    2012-10-01

    Self healing of chromophores in a dye-doped polymer after photodegradation is a counterintuitive process based on the nearly universal observation that molecular damage is a thermodynamically irreversible process. We propose a new simple model of this phenomenon that takes into account all observations, including the effects of concentration, temperature, and bystander states. Critical to this model are correlations between chromophores, perhaps mediated by the polymer, which actively favors the undamaged species in analogy to Bose-Einstein condensation. We use this model to predict the behavior of decay and recovery experiments as measured with amplified spontaneous emission and absorption spectroscopy.

  5. Demonstrations in Solute Transport Using Dyes: Part II. Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butters, Greg; Bandaranayake, Wije

    1993-01-01

    A solution of the convection-dispersion equation is used to describe the solute breakthrough curves generated in the demonstrations in the companion paper. Estimation of the best fit model parameters (solute velocity, dispersion, and retardation) is illustrated using the method of moments for an example data set. (Author/MDH)

  6. Modeling Solvent Broadening on the Vibronic Spectra of a Series of Coumarin Dyes. From Implicit to Explicit Solvent Models.

    PubMed

    Cerezo, Javier; Avila Ferrer, Francisco J; Prampolini, Giacomo; Santoro, Fabrizio

    2015-12-01

    We present a protocol to estimate the solvent-induced broadening of electronic spectra based on a model that explicitly takes into account the environment embedding the solute. Starting from a classical approximation of the solvent contribution to the spectrum, the broadening arises from the spread of the excitation energies due to the fluctuation of the solvent coordinates, and it is represented as a Gaussian line shape that convolutes the vibronic spectrum of the solute. The latter is computed in harmonic approximation at room temperature with a time-dependent approach. The proposed protocol for the computation of spectral broadening exploits molecular dynamics (MD) simulations performed on the solute-solvent system, keeping the solute degrees of freedom frozen, followed by the computation of the excitation properties with a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach. The factors that might influence each step of the protocol are analyzed in detail, including the selection of the empirical force field (FF) adopted in the MD simulations and the QM/MM partition of the system to compute the excitation energies. The procedure is applied to a family of coumarin dyes, and the results are compared with experiments and with the predictions of a very recent work (Cerezo et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2015, 17, 11401-11411), where an implicit model was adopted for the solvent. The final spectra of the considered coumarins were obtained without including ad hoc phenomenological parameters and indicate that the broadenings computed with explicit and implicit models both follow the experimental trend, increasing as the polarity change from the initial to the final state increases. More in detail, the implicit model provides larger estimations of the broadening that are closer to the experimental evidence, while explicit models appear to better capture relative differences arising from different solvents or different solutes. Possible inaccuracies of the adopted

  7. Process and kinetics of azo dye decolourization in bioelectrochemical systems: effect of several key factors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hou-Yun; He, Chuan-Shu; Li, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Shen, Jin-You; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the influence of several key factors on the process and kinetics of azo dye decolourization in bioelectrochemical systems (BESs), including cathode potential, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of catholyte and biofilm formed on the cathode. The results show that azo dye methyl orange (MO) decolourization in the BES could be well described with the pseudo first-order kinetics. The MO decolourization efficiency increased from 0 to 94.90 ± 0.01% and correspondingly the reaction rate constant increased from 0 to 0.503 ± 0.001 h(-1) with the decrease in cathodic electrode potential from -0.2 to -0.8 V vs Ag/AgCl. On the contrary, DO concentration of the catholyte had a negative impact on MO decolourization in the BES. When DO concentration increased from zero to 5.80 mg L(-1), the MO decolourization efficiency decreased from 87.19 ± 4.73% to 27.77 ± 0.06% and correspondingly the reaction rate constant reduced from 0.207 ± 0.042 to 0.033 ± 0.007 h(-1). Additionally, the results suggest that the biofilm formed on the cathode could led to an adverse rather than a positive effect on azo dye decolourization in the BES in terms of efficiency and kinetics. PMID:27270398

  8. Local delivery of fluorescent dye for fiber-optics confocal microscopy of the living heart

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao; Kaza, Aditya K.; Hitchcock, Robert W.; Sachse, Frank B.

    2014-01-01

    Fiber-optics confocal microscopy (FCM) is an emerging imaging technology with various applications in basic research and clinical diagnosis. FCM allows for real-time in situ microscopy of tissue at sub-cellular scale. Recently FCM has been investigated for cardiac imaging, in particular, for discrimination of cardiac tissue during pediatric open-heart surgery. FCM relies on fluorescent dyes. The current clinical approach of dye delivery is based on systemic injection, which is associated with high dye consumption, and adverse clinical events. In this study, we investigated approaches for local dye delivery during FCM imaging based on dye carriers attached to the imaging probe. Using three-dimensional confocal microscopy, automated bench tests, and FCM imaging we quantitatively characterized dye release of carriers composed of open-pore foam only and foam loaded with agarose hydrogel. In addition, we compared local dye delivery with a model of systemic dye delivery in the isolated perfused rodent heart. We measured the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of images acquired in various regions of the heart. Our evaluations showed that foam-agarose dye carriers exhibited a prolonged dye release vs. foam-only carriers. Foam-agarose dye carriers allowed reliable imaging of 5–9 lines, which is comparable to 4–8 min of continuous dye release. Our study in the living heart revealed that the SNR of FCM images using local and systemic dye delivery is not different. However, we observed differences in the imaged tissue microstructure with the two approaches. Structural features characteristic of microvasculature were solely observed for systemic dye delivery. Our findings suggest that local dye delivery approach for FCM imaging constitutes an important alternative to systemic dye delivery. We suggest that the approach for local dye delivery will facilitate clinical translation of FCM, for instance, for FCM imaging during pediatric heart surgery. PMID:25309455

  9. Thermodynamic study of β-cyclodextrin-dye inclusion complexes using gradient flow injection technique and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Izadmanesh, Y; Ghasemi, Jahan B

    2016-08-01

    Gradient flow injection technique-diode array spectrophotometry was applied for β-cyclodextrin (β-CD)-dye inclusion complex studies. A single injection of a small amount of mixed β-CD-dye solution (100μl) into the carrier solution of the dye and recording the spectra gave the titration data. The mole ratio data were calculated by calibrating the dispersion pattern using a calibrator dye (rose bengal). Model-based multivariate methods were used to analyze the spectral-mole ratio data and, as a result, estimate stability constants and concentration-spectral profiles. Reliability was tested by applying this method to study the β-CD host-guest complexes with several dyes as guest molecules. Singular value decomposition (SVD) was used to select the chemical model and reduce noise. Molecular modeling provided the ability to predict the guest conformation-orientation (posing) within the cavity of β-CD and the nature of the involved interactions. Among those dyes showing observable spectral variation, the stoichiometric ratio of β-CD: dye (and log Kf) of methyl orange, fluorescein, phenol red, 4-(2-pyridylazo) resorcinol (PAR), and crystal violet were calculated to be 1:1 (4.26±0.01), 1:1 (1.53±0.08), 1:1 (3.11±0.04), 1:1 (1.06±0.12), and 2:1 (5.27±0.03), respectively. Compared with the classical method of titration, this method is simple and fast and has the advantage of needing reduced human interference. Molecular modeling facilitates a better understanding of the type of interactions and conformation of guest molecules in the β-CD cavity. The details of the proposed method are discussed in this paper. PMID:27111153

  10. Thermodynamic study of β-cyclodextrin-dye inclusion complexes using gradient flow injection technique and molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izadmanesh, Y.; Ghasemi, Jahan B.

    2016-08-01

    Gradient flow injection technique-diode array spectrophotometry was applied for β-cyclodextrin (β-CD)-dye inclusion complex studies. A single injection of a small amount of mixed β-CD-dye solution (100 μl) into the carrier solution of the dye and recording the spectra gave the titration data. The mole ratio data were calculated by calibrating the dispersion pattern using a calibrator dye (rose bengal). Model-based multivariate methods were used to analyze the spectral-mole ratio data and, as a result, estimate stability constants and concentration-spectral profiles. Reliability was tested by applying this method to study the β-CD host-guest complexes with several dyes as guest molecules. Singular value decomposition (SVD) was used to select the chemical model and reduce noise. Molecular modeling provided the ability to predict the guest conformation-orientation (posing) within the cavity of β-CD and the nature of the involved interactions. Among those dyes showing observable spectral variation, the stoichiometric ratio of β-CD: dye (and log Kf) of methyl orange, fluorescein, phenol red, 4-(2-pyridylazo) resorcinol (PAR), and crystal violet were calculated to be 1:1 (4.26 ± 0.01), 1:1 (1.53 ± 0.08), 1:1 (3.11 ± 0.04), 1:1 (1.06 ± 0.12), and 2:1 (5.27 ± 0.03), respectively. Compared with the classical method of titration, this method is simple and fast and has the advantage of needing reduced human interference. Molecular modeling facilitates a better understanding of the type of interactions and conformation of guest molecules in the β-CD cavity. The details of the proposed method are discussed in this paper.

  11. Optimization of a Raman shifted dye laser system for DIAL applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Chu, Zhiping; Mahon, Rita; Wilkerson, Thomas D.

    1990-01-01

    An efficient Raman shifted dye laser system that generates tunable radiation at 765 and 940 nm with a bandwidth of 0.03/cm is described. Operating a Raman cell at hydrogen pressure below 14 atm, optimum first Stokes energy conversions of 45 percent and of 37 percent at 765 and 940 nm, respectively, were recorded. Optical depth measurements made at the centers of twenty-five absorption lines in the P branch of the oxygen A band imply a high spectral purity for both the laser and the Raman shifted radiation, and thus indicate the feasibility of using the stimulated Raman scattered radiation for differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements.

  12. Effect of electrode position on azo dye removal in an up-flow hybrid anaerobic digestion reactor with built-in bioelectrochemical system

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Min-Hua; Cui, Dan; Lee, Hyung-Sool; Liang, Bin; Wang, Ai-Jie; Cheng, Hao-Yi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, two modes of hybrid anaerobic digestion (AD) bioreactor with built-in BESs (electrodes installed in liquid phase (R1) and sludge phase (R2)) were tested for identifying the effect of electrodes position on azo dye wastewater treatment. Alizarin yellow R (AYR) was used as a model dye. Decolorization efficiency of R1 was 90.41 ± 6.20% at influent loading rate of 800 g-AYR/ m3·d, which was 39% higher than that of R2. The contribution of bioelectrochemical reduction to AYR decolorization (16.23 ± 1.86% for R1 versus 22.24 ± 2.14% for R2) implied that although azo dye was mainly removed in sludge zone, BES further improved the effluent quality, especially for R1 where electrodes were installed in liquid phase. The microbial communities in the electrode biofilms (dominant by Enterobacter) and sludge (dominant by Enterococcus) were well distinguished in R1, but they were similar in R2. These results suggest that electrodes installed in liquid phase in the anaerobic hybrid system are more efficient than that in sludge phase for azo dye removal, which give great inspirations for the application of AD-BES hybrid process for various refractory wastewaters treatment. PMID:27121278

  13. Effect of electrode position on azo dye removal in an up-flow hybrid anaerobic digestion reactor with built-in bioelectrochemical system.

    PubMed

    Cui, Min-Hua; Cui, Dan; Lee, Hyung-Sool; Liang, Bin; Wang, Ai-Jie; Cheng, Hao-Yi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, two modes of hybrid anaerobic digestion (AD) bioreactor with built-in BESs (electrodes installed in liquid phase (R1) and sludge phase (R2)) were tested for identifying the effect of electrodes position on azo dye wastewater treatment. Alizarin yellow R (AYR) was used as a model dye. Decolorization efficiency of R1 was 90.41 ± 6.20% at influent loading rate of 800 g-AYR/ m(3)·d, which was 39% higher than that of R2. The contribution of bioelectrochemical reduction to AYR decolorization (16.23 ± 1.86% for R1 versus 22.24 ± 2.14% for R2) implied that although azo dye was mainly removed in sludge zone, BES further improved the effluent quality, especially for R1 where electrodes were installed in liquid phase. The microbial communities in the electrode biofilms (dominant by Enterobacter) and sludge (dominant by Enterococcus) were well distinguished in R1, but they were similar in R2. These results suggest that electrodes installed in liquid phase in the anaerobic hybrid system are more efficient than that in sludge phase for azo dye removal, which give great inspirations for the application of AD-BES hybrid process for various refractory wastewaters treatment. PMID:27121278

  14. Dye tracing techniques used to determine ground-water flow in a carbonate aquifer system near Elizabethtown, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mull, D.S.; Smoot, J.L.; Liebermann, T.D.

    1988-01-01

    Because of the vulnerability of karst aquifers to contamination and the need for water managers to know recharge areas and groundwater flow characteristics for springs and wells used for public water supply, qualitative and quantitative dye tracing techniques were used during a groundwater investigation in the Elizabethtown area, Hardin County, in north-central Kentucky. The principal aquifer in the Elizabethtown area is thick, nearly horizontal beds of limestone, and thin beds of shale of Mississippi age. As much as 65% of all water pumped for the city water supply is obtained from two springs and two wells that obtain water from these rocks. Sinkholes were classified according to their ability to funnel runoff directly into the groundwater flow system, based primarily on the nature of the swallet draining the sinkhole. The presence of bedrock in the sinkhole nearly always ensured a well defined swallet leading to the subsurface. Qualitative and quantitative dye tracing techniques and equipment are discussed in detail. Qualitative dye tracing with fluorescein dye and passive dye detectors, consisting of activated coconut charcoal identified point to point connection between representative sinkholes, sinking streams, and karst windows and the city springs and wells. Qualitative tracing confirmed the presence of infiltrated surface water from a perennial stream, Valley Creek, in water from city wells and generally confirmed the direction of groundwater flow as shown by a water level contour map. Quantitative dye tracing with rhodamin WT, automatic samplers, discharge measurements, and fluorometric analyses were used to determine flow characteristics such as traveltime for arrival of the leading edge, peak concentration, trailing edge, and persistence of the dye cloud at the spring resurgence. Analyses of the dye recovery curves for quantitative dye traces completed between the same sinkholes and a city spring, and during different flow conditions showed that the

  15. Extrapolation of systemic bioavailability assessing skin absorption and epidermal and hepatic metabolism of aromatic amine hair dyes in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Manwaring, John; Rothe, Helga; Obringer, Cindy; Foltz, David J.; Baker, Timothy R.; Troutman, John A.; Hewitt, Nicola J.; Goebel, Carsten

    2015-09-01

    Approaches to assess the role of absorption, metabolism and excretion of cosmetic ingredients that are based on the integration of different in vitro data are important for their safety assessment, specifically as it offers an opportunity to refine that safety assessment. In order to estimate systemic exposure (AUC) to aromatic amine hair dyes following typical product application conditions, skin penetration and epidermal and systemic metabolic conversion of the parent compound was assessed in human skin explants and human keratinocyte (HaCaT) and hepatocyte cultures. To estimate the amount of the aromatic amine that can reach the general circulation unchanged after passage through the skin the following toxicokinetically relevant parameters were applied: a) Michaelis–Menten kinetics to quantify the epidermal metabolism; b) the estimated keratinocyte cell abundance in the viable epidermis; c) the skin penetration rate; d) the calculated Mean Residence Time in the viable epidermis; e) the viable epidermis thickness and f) the skin permeability coefficient. In a next step, in vitro hepatocyte K{sub m} and V{sub max} values and whole liver mass and cell abundance were used to calculate the scaled intrinsic clearance, which was combined with liver blood flow and fraction of compound unbound in the blood to give hepatic clearance. The systemic exposure in the general circulation (AUC) was extrapolated using internal dose and hepatic clearance, and C{sub max} was extrapolated (conservative overestimation) using internal dose and volume of distribution, indicating that appropriate toxicokinetic information can be generated based solely on in vitro data. For the hair dye, p-phenylenediamine, these data were found to be in the same order of magnitude as those published for human volunteers. - Highlights: • An entirely in silico/in vitro approach to predict in vivo exposure to dermally applied hair dyes • Skin penetration and epidermal conversion assessed in human

  16. Conical Intersections, charge localization, and photoisomerization pathway selection in a minimal model of a degenerate monomethine dye

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Seth; McKenzie, Ross H.

    2009-12-21

    We propose a minimal model Hamiltonian for the electronic structure of a monomethine dye, in order to describe the photoisomerization of such dyes. The model describes interactions between three diabatic electronic states, each of which can be associated with a valence bond structure. Monomethine dyes are characterized by a charge-transfer resonance; the indeterminacy of the single-double bonding structure dictated by the resonance is reflected in a duality of photoisomerization pathways corresponding to the different methine bonds. The possible multiplicity of decay channels complicates mechanistic models of the effect of the environment on fluorescent quantum yields, as well as coherent control strategies. We examine the extent and topology of intersection seams between the electronic states of the dye and how they relate to charge localization and selection between different decay pathways. We find that intersections between the S{sub 1} and S{sub 0} surfaces only occur for large twist angles. In contrast, S{sub 2}/S{sub 1} intersections can occur near the Franck-Condon region. When the molecule has left-right symmetry, all intersections are associated with con- or disrotations and never with single bond twists. For asymmetric molecules (i.e., where the bridge couples more strongly to one end) the S{sub 2} and S{sub 1} surfaces bias torsion about different bonds. Charge localization and torsion pathway biasing are correlated. We relate our observations with several recent experimental and theoretical results, which have been obtained for dyes with similar structure.

  17. Kinetic modeling of liquid-phase adsorption of Congo red dye using guava leaf-based activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojedokun, Adedamola Titi; Bello, Olugbenga Solomon

    2016-02-01

    Guava leaf, a waste material, was treated and activated to prepare adsorbent. The adsorbent was characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) and Energy-Dispersive X-ray (EDX) techniques. The carbonaceous adsorbent prepared from guava leaf had appreciable carbon content (86.84 %). The adsorption of Congo red dye onto guava leaf-based activated carbon (GLAC) was studied in this research. Experimental data were analyzed by four different model equations: Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms and it was found to fit Freundlich equation most. Adsorption rate constants were determined using pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich and intraparticle diffusion model equations. The results clearly showed that the adsorption of CR dye onto GLAC followed pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Intraparticle diffusion was involved in the adsorption process. The mean energy of adsorption calculated from D-R isotherm confirmed the involvement of physical adsorption. Thermodynamic parameters were obtained and it was found that the adsorption of CR dye onto GLAC was an exothermic and spontaneous process at the temperatures under investigation. The maximum adsorption of CR dye by GLAC was found to be 47.62 mg/g. The study shows that GLAC is an effective adsorbent for the adsorption of CR dye from aqueous solution.

  18. Dichromated poly(vinyl alchohol)-xanthene dye systems: holographic characterization and electron spin resonance spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manivannan, Gurusamy; Changkakoti, Rupak; Lessard, Roger A.; Mailhot, Gilles; Bolte, Michel

    1994-01-01

    Dichromated poly(vinyl alcohol)-xanthene dye (DCPVA-XD) systems have been employed as real-time holographic recording materials. In this paper, holographic characterization of dichromated poly(vinyl alcohol) with fluorescein (Fl), eosin Y (EY) and Rose Bengal (RB) is presented. In addition, a systematic ESR spectroscopic investigation was also performed on these systems. The photochemical evolution of Cr(V), Cr(III), polymer radical and dye radical in these systems has been monitored and a comparison is made.

  19. Process and kinetics of azo dye decolourization in bioelectrochemical systems: effect of several key factors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hou-Yun; He, Chuan-Shu; Li, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Shen, Jin-You; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the influence of several key factors on the process and kinetics of azo dye decolourization in bioelectrochemical systems (BESs), including cathode potential, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of catholyte and biofilm formed on the cathode. The results show that azo dye methyl orange (MO) decolourization in the BES could be well described with the pseudo first-order kinetics. The MO decolourization efficiency increased from 0 to 94.90 ± 0.01% and correspondingly the reaction rate constant increased from 0 to 0.503 ± 0.001 h−1 with the decrease in cathodic electrode potential from −0.2 to −0.8 V vs Ag/AgCl. On the contrary, DO concentration of the catholyte had a negative impact on MO decolourization in the BES. When DO concentration increased from zero to 5.80 mg L−1, the MO decolourization efficiency decreased from 87.19 ± 4.73% to 27.77 ± 0.06% and correspondingly the reaction rate constant reduced from 0.207 ± 0.042 to 0.033 ± 0.007 h−1. Additionally, the results suggest that the biofilm formed on the cathode could led to an adverse rather than a positive effect on azo dye decolourization in the BES in terms of efficiency and kinetics. PMID:27270398

  20. Why the Particle-in-a-Box Model Works Well for Cyanine Dyes but Not for Conjugated Polyenes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Autschbach, Jochen

    2007-01-01

    We investigate why the particle-in-a-box (PB) model works well for calculating the absorption wavelengths of cyanine dyes and why it does not work for conjugated polyenes. The PB model is immensely useful in the classroom, but owing to its highly approximate character there is little reason to expect that it can yield quantitative agreement with…

  1. Sentinel lymph nodes detection with an imaging system using Patent Blue V dye as fluorescent tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellier, F.; Steibel, J.; Chabrier, R.; Rodier, J. F.; Pourroy, G.; Poulet, P.

    2013-03-01

    Sentinel lymph node biopsy is the gold standard to detect metastatic invasion from primary breast cancer. This method can help patients avoid full axillary chain dissection, thereby decreasing the risk of morbidity. We propose an alternative to the traditional isotopic method, to detect and map the sentinel lymph nodes. Indeed, Patent Blue V is the most widely used dye in clinical routine for the visual detection of sentinel lymph nodes. A Recent study has shown the possibility of increasing the fluorescence quantum yield of Patent Blue V, when it is bound to human serum albumin. In this study we present a preclinical fluorescence imaging system to detect sentinel lymph nodes labeled with this fluorescent tracer. The setup is composed of a black and white CCD camera and two laser sources. One excitation source with a laser emitting at 635 nm and a second laser at 785 nm to illuminate the region of interest. The prototype is operated via a laptop. Preliminary experiments permitted to determine the device sensitivity in the μmol.L-1 range as regards the detection of PBV fluorescence signals. We also present a preclinical evaluation performed on Lewis rats, during which the fluorescence imaging setup detected the accumulation and fixation of the fluorescent dye on different nodes through the skin.

  2. Efficient industrial dye decolorization by Bacillus sp. VUS with its enzyme system.

    PubMed

    Dawkar, Vishal V; Jadhav, Umesh U; Tamboli, Dhawal P; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2010-10-01

    This work presents role of different enzymes in decolorization of industrial dye Orange T4LL by Bacillus sp. VUS. Bacillus sp. strain VUS decolorized dye Orange T4LL, under static anoxic condition in 24 h. During decolorization of Orange T4LL a significant induction in the activities of lignin peroxidase, tyrosinase, and reductases (NADH-DCIP, azo, and riboflavin) was observed. The biodegradation was monitored by Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and high performance liquid chromatography. The final products 4-methyl-2-o-tolylazo-benzene-1,3-diamine and [3-(phenyl-hydrazono)-cyclohexa-1,4-dienyl]-methanol were characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Phytotoxicity, COD, and BOD revealed non-toxicity of degraded products. Phytotoxicity study demonstrated non-toxicity of the biodegraded products for crop plants with respect to Triticum aestivum and Sorghum bicolor. Bacillus sp. VUS with its enzyme system could be a useful tool for textile effluent treatment. PMID:20655588

  3. Accelerated azo dye removal by biocathode formation in single-chamber biocatalyzed electrolysis systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, You-Zhao; Wang, Ai-Jie; Liu, Wen-Zong; Kong, De-Yong; Tan, Wen-Bo; Liu, Chong

    2013-10-01

    Biocatalyzed electrolysis systems (BES) have been the topic of a great deal of research. However, the biocathodes formed in single-chamber BES without extra inocula have not previously been researched. Along with the formation of biocathodes, the polarization current increased to 1.76 mA from 0.35 mA of abio-cathodes at -1.2 V (vs. SCE). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) results also indicated that the charge transfer resistance (Rct) was decreased to 148.9 Ω, less than 1978 Ω of the abio-cathodes cleared. The performance of the biocathodes was tested for azo dye decolorization, and the dye removal efficiency was 13.3±3.2% higher than abio-cathodes with a 0.5 V direct current (DC) power supply. These aspects demonstrate that biocathode accelerates the rate of electrode reaction in BES and comparing with noble metal catalysts, biocathodes have low toxicity or non-toxic and reproducible properties, which can be widely applied in bioelectrochemical field in the future. PMID:23948224

  4. Hair dye poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... temporary dyes are: Arsenic Bismuth Denatured alcohol Lead ( lead poisoning ) Mercury Pyrogallol Silver Hair dyes may contain other ... infection. Continued exposure to lead or mercury can lead to permanent brain and nervous system damage. Alternative ... References Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger ...

  5. From force-fields to photons: MD simulations of dye-labeled nucleic acids and Monte Carlo modeling of FRET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldner, Lori

    2012-02-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful technique for understanding the structural fluctuations and transformations of RNA, DNA and proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide a window into the nature of these fluctuations on a different, faster, time scale. We use Monte Carlo methods to model and compare FRET data from dye-labeled RNA with what might be predicted from the MD simulation. With a few notable exceptions, the contribution of fluorophore and linker dynamics to these FRET measurements has not been investigated. We include the dynamics of the ground state dyes and linkers in our study of a 16mer double-stranded RNA. Water is included explicitly in the simulation. Cyanine dyes are attached at either the 3' or 5' ends with a 3 carbon linker, and differences in labeling schemes are discussed.[4pt] Work done in collaboration with Peker Milas, Benjamin D. Gamari, and Louis Parrot.

  6. Development of new near-infrared and leuco-dye optical systems for forensic and crime fighting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patonay, Gabor; Strekowski, Lucjan; Salon, Jozef; Medou-Ovono, Martial; Krutak, James J.; Leggitt, Jeffrey; Seubert, Heather; Craig, Rhonda

    2004-12-01

    New chemistry for leuco fluorescin and leuco rhodamine for latent bloodstain and fingerprint detection has been developed in our laboratories. The use of these leuco dyes results in excellent contrast for several hours. The FBI's Evidence Response Team and DNA I unit collaborated with Georgia State University to validate the new fluorescin chemistry for use in the field. In addition, several new NIR dyes have been developed in our laboratories that can be used to detect different chemical residues, e.g., pepper spray, latent fingerprint, latent blood, metal ions, or other trace evidence during crime scene investigations. Proof of principle experiments showed that NIR dyes reacting with such residues can be activated with appropriately filtered semiconductor lasers and LEDs to emit NIR fluorescence that can be observed using optimally filtered night vision intensifiers or pocket scopes, digital cameras, CCD and CMOS cameras, or other NIR detection systems. The main advantage of NIR detection is that the color of the background has very little influence on detection and that there are very few materials that would interfere by exhibiting NIR fluorescence. The use of pocket scopes permits sensitive and convenient detection. Once the residues are located, digital images of the fluorescence can be recorded and samples obtained for further analyses. NIR dyes do not interfere with subsequent follow-up or confirmation methods such as DNA or LC/MS analysis. Near-infrared absorbing dyes will be summarized along with detection mechanisms.

  7. Dye Painting!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Ann

    This resource provides practical instructions for applying color and design directly to fabric. Basic information about the dye painting process is given. The guide addresses the technical aspects of fabric dye and color use and offers suggestions for fabric manipulation and dye application in order to achieve various design effects. This…

  8. Conjugate systems using delocalized cationic dyes as a carrier of photosensitizers to mitochondria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Youngjae; Ngen, Ethel J.; Rajaputra, Pallavi

    2009-06-01

    Following Photofrin, the first generation photosensitizer, several second generation photosensitizers have been developed with improved characteristics. More recently, third generation photosensitizers are proposed to achieve higher selectivity toward cancer cells/ tumor tissue. Elevated mitochondrial membrane potential of malignant cells has tested as a tool for preferential uptake of certain photosensitizers to cancer cells. In the same line, we designed new conjugate systems where delocalized cationic moiety delivers a photosensitizer to mitochondria. To prove our concept, two prototype conjugates (TPP-Rh and TPP-AO) were prepared using two cationic dyes (Rhodamine and Acridine Orange) and a photosensitizer (tetraphenylporphyrin, TPP). The two conjugates generated singlet oxygen quite well. Interestingly, the two conjugates showed higher cellular uptake by mover than 8 times than TPP-OH as well as higher phototoxicity. In particular, TPP-Rh showed closer localization pattern to mitochondria than TPP-OH.

  9. Decoloration and mineralization of reactive dyes using electron beam irradiation, Part I: Effect of the dye structure, concentration and absorbed dose (single, binary and ternary systems)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahdat, Ali; Bahrami, S. Hajir; Arami, M.; Bahjat, A.; Tabakh, F.; Khairkhah, M.

    2012-07-01

    In this study, three different reactive dyes (C.I. Reactive Red 4, C.I. Reactive Blue 2 and C.I. Reactive Yellow 4) and their blend solutions were irradiated with 10 MeV electron beam. Effect of absorbed dose, dye structure and primary solution concentrations on the pH value changes, degree of decoloration and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal of solutions were investigated. Results show that this method is effective in decomposition and decoloration of the dyes solutions. This method can be applied in mineralization of wastewater containing different dyes.

  10. Encapsulation of dye molecules and nanoparticles in hollow organogel fibers of a nonchiral polyurethane model compound.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mostofa Kamal; Sundararajan, Pudupadi

    2011-01-24

    We present the case of a nonchiral organogelator that forms hollow fibers and encapsulates silver nanoparticles (SNP) and a dye molecule. The biscarbamate molecule (a model compound for polyurethanes), which has two hydrogen-bonding motifs symmetrically attached to n-dodecyl side chains (C(12)), gels benzonitrile with hollow fibrillar morphology. The C(12) molecules form sheets that eventually wrap into hollow fibers to form the gel network. Herein, two-component gels were prepared with C(12) as one component and SNP, phthalocyanine (Pc), or perylene (Pe) as the other. Microscopic analysis and partial melting experiments confirmed the inclusion of the silver nanoparticles and phthalocyanine into the hollow fibers. On the other hand, Pe molecules tend to form crystals at the outer surface of the C(12) fibers, which results in a significant increase in the width of the gel fibers. This difference in the behavior of Pc and Pe molecules were accounted for by their crystal geometry and significantly different crystal growth rate compared with that of C(12) fiber formation in the gels. Pc crystallizes in a needle shape that facilitates occlusion in the gel fibers, whereas Pe forms large platelets. X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic analysis of the two-component gels along with their neat components confirmed that there was no change in the packing behavior of the Pc and Pe molecules in the gels. Therefore, these are examples of two-component physical gels in which the Pc crystals are occluded within the hollow fibers of C(12) by physical mixing of the components without the aid of any inter-molecular interactions between the different components. We have thus shown that lumen-loaded gel fibers with nanoparticles and dye molecules can be prepared by the two-component gel route, provided that the above growth rate, shape, and size conditions are satisfied. PMID:21243684

  11. Solid state dye laser for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldag, Henry R.

    1994-06-01

    The development of solid state dye lasers could lead to a major breakthrough in the cost and compactness of a medical device. Advantages include: elimination of the flow system for the gain medium; ease with which to implement wavelength agility or the replacement of a degraded rod or sheet; and toxicity and flammability become a non-issue. Dye lasers have played a role in cardiology, dermatology, and urology. Of these cardiology is of interest to Palomar. The Palomar Model 3010 flashlamp-pumped dye laser medical device was used during phase 1 FDA clinical trials to break-up blood clots that cause heart attacks, a process known as coronary laser thrombolysis. It is the objective of this research and development effort to produce solid matrix lasers that will replace liquid dye lasers in these medical specialties.

  12. Biodegradation of direct blue 129 diazo dye by Spirodela polyrrhiza: An artificial neural networks modeling.

    PubMed

    Movafeghi, A; Khataee, A R; Moradi, Z; Vafaei, F

    2016-01-01

    Phytoremediation potential of the aquatic plant Spirodela polyrrhiza was examined for direct blue 129 (DB129) azo dye. The dye removal efficiency was optimized under the variable conditions of the operational parameters including removal time, initial dye concentration, pH, temperature and amount of plant. The study reflected the significantly enhanced dye removal efficiency of S. polyrrhiza by increasing the temperature, initial dye concentration and amount of plant. Intriguingly, artificial neural network (ANN) predicted the removal time as the most dominant parameter on DB129 removal efficiency. Furthermore, the effect of dye treatment on some physiologic indices of S. polyrrhiza including growth rate, photosynthetic pigments content, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes were studied. The results revealed a reduction in photosynthetic pigments content and in multiplication of fronds after exposure to dye solution. In contrast, malondialdehyde content as well as catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) activities significantly increased that was probably due to the ability of plant to overcome oxidative stress. As a result of DB129 biodegradation, a number of intermediate compounds were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) analysis. Accordingly, the probable degradation pathway of DB129 in S. polyrrhiza was postulated. PMID:26540563

  13. FATE OF DYES IN AQUATIC SYSTEMS. PART 3: THE ROLE OF SUSPENDEDSEDIMENTS IN ADSORPTION AND REACTION OF ACID AND DIRECT DYES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The behavior of nine acid and five direct dyes was examined in suspensions of lake and river sediments. even of the dyes demonstrated variable kinetics of loss from water. n most cases, there was an initial drop in water concentration due to sorption. ransformation kinetics of CI...

  14. Lanthanide and actinide doped glasses as reference standards for dye doped systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, E.J.A.; Hentschel, A.

    1996-12-31

    Organic dye molecules are well known to be subject to chemical and optical bleaching damage, temperature instability, and other forms of optical degradation. Currently recognized methods of referencing rely upon fluorescent salt solutions, such as quinine sulfate. In this paper, optically-active lanthanide and actinide doped gel-glasses are compared as reference standards for dye doped polymers. Samples are subjected to continuous illumination by 254 nm UV radiation. While dye-doped polymers exhibited approximately 65 percent decline in fluorescence intensity after 96 hours of irradiation, glass samples and glass powder in resin showed no decline in fluorescence intensities.

  15. Hair dye treatment use and clinical course in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and cutaneous lupus.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Alonso, J; Sabio, J M; Pérez-Alvarez, F; Reche, I; Hidalgo, C; Jáimez, L

    2002-01-01

    The etiological role of hair dye treatment (HDT), some of them such as permanent hair dyes containing aromatic amines, in the development of SLE has been previously ruled out. However, the possible influence of HDT use on the course and prognosis of lupus patients has been assessed only in one short-term study. Since HDT is very extensive among the population, the knowledge of this possible negative effect may be very important. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the long-term influence of several HDTs on the course and clinical severity of patients with both systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and cutaneous lupus (CL). In this longitudinal case series study, 91 SLE patients and 22 CL patients were prospectively studied from October 1988 to May 2000. They were divided into three groups: (a) non-HDT users--patients who have never used HDT (n = 65); (b) P-HDT users--HDT permanent type users, alone or in combination with other types of HDT (n = 28); (c) non P-HDT--users of other treatments different from permanent tinting (bleach, lowlights, etc; n = 20). In each patient we determined: (1) number of flares/year in SLE patients and worsening of cutaneous lesions for CL; (2) Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology (SLICC/ACR) damage index; (3) predominant damaged organs/systems according to the HDT use and type of HDT; and (4) subjective impression about the disease evolution in relation to HDT use. No significant differences were found with respect to flares/year and SLICC/ACR damage index between the study groups. Non-HDT group presented more renal involvement and serositis than both HDT-user groups. No patient related the HDT use to the worsening of his disease. Therefore, in this study no evidence of an association between the long-term use of several types of HDT and the clinical activity and course of SLE and CL was found. PMID:12195784

  16. Does the position of the electron-donating nitrogen atom in the ring system influence the efficiency of a dye-sensitized solar cell? A computational study.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Abul Kalam; Barik, Sunirmal; Das, Amitava; Ganguly, Bishwajit

    2016-06-01

    We have reported a number of new metal-free organic dyes (2-6) that have cyclic asymmetric benzotripyrrole derivatives as donor groups with peripheral nitrogen atoms in the ring, fluorine and thiophene groups as π-spacers, and a cyanoacrylic acid acceptor group. Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) calculations were employed to examine the influence of the position of the donor nitrogen atom and π-conjugation on solar cell performance. The calculated electron-injection driving force (ΔG inject), electron-regeneration driving force (ΔG regen), light-harvesting efficiency (LHE), dipole moment (μ normal), and number of electrons transferred (∆q) indicate that dyes 3, 4, and 6 have significantly higher efficiencies than reference dye 1, which exhibits high efficiency. We also extended our comparison to some other reported dyes, 7-9, which have a donor nitrogen atom in the middle of the ring system. The computed results suggest that dye 6 possesses a higher incident photon to current conversion efficiency (IPCE) than reported dyes 7-9. Thus, the use of donor groups with peripheral nitrogen atoms appears to lead to more efficient dyes than those in which the nitrogen atom is present in the middle of the donor ring system. Graphical Abstract The locations of the nitrogen atoms in the donor groups in the designed dye molecules have an important influence on DSSC efficiency. PMID:27155868

  17. Optical modeling of bulk-heterojunction organic solar cells based on squarine dye as electron donor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitova, S.; Stoyanova, D.; Dikova, J.; Kandinska, M.; Vasilev, A.; Angelova, S.

    2014-12-01

    The potentiality of a squarine dye (Sq1) for using as electron donor component in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells (BHJ) has been studied from the optical point of view. The soluble n-type fullerene, (6,6)-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PC61MB) was chosen as acceptor. Optical modelling based on transfer matrix method was carried out to predict and improve photovoltaic performance of a BHJ device with blended Sq1/PC61MB active layer. The dependence of the absorption and the calculated maximum short circuit photocurrent (Jscmax) on the thickness of the active layer (dact), was investigated for two weight ratios of Sq1 and PC61MB. Thus, the optimal dact was calculated to be about 100 nm, which provides an efficient overlapping of the total absorption with solar spectrum in the range between 580 and 900 nm. Besides, it is found that the insertion of ZnO or C60 spacer layer shifts Jscmax peak to lower dact and significantly enhances Jscmax for active layers with dact < 50 nm, which is mainly due to improved light absorption by a factor of 5 to 10. Simultaneously, for dact <100 nm the optical effect of inserted PEDOT:PSS hole transporting layer is negligible.

  18. Application of novel DNA-based dye tracers to determine the subglacial drainage system structure and morphology of Storglaciären, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Andrew; Dahlke, Helen; Arnold, Neil

    2014-05-01

    Storglaciären, Sweden, is a 3.22km2 polythermal valley glacier. Its extensive datasets provide a unique prospect for assessing cryospheric response to climate change over recent years and into the future. Storglaciären has predominantly temperate thermal regime (~85% temperate ice) with a cold surface layer of mostly ~20m thickness, but ~60m thickness at the terminus and margins (Gusmeroli et al., 2012, Journal of Glaciology). Subglacial hydrology exerts important controls on a glacier. Modelling future ice-mass dynamics needs sound understanding of glaciers' subglacial drainage systems, especially the variety of potential structures and morphologies adopted over time and space. Proglacial-runoff changes may result from shifts in subglacial drainage systems over time; these changes have important implications for glacierised catchments' populations. Moreover, knowledge acquired from valley glaciers can be applied to ice sheets. In most studies, subglacial water pressure (Pw) is assumed to equal ice-overburden pressure, yet recent studies suggest a lower long-term value may be more appropriate (e.g. Willis et al., 2008, 2012, Hydrological Processes). Research to date using Shreve's (1972, Journal of Glaciology) hydraulic-potential theory and comparing modelled drainage systems with empirical observations ascertained that Storglaciären's steady-state subglacial Pw is likely adjusted to 70-80% of ice-overburden pressure (Williamson, unpublished undergraduate thesis). Further work using an alternative modelling approach is necessary to determine Storglaciären's spatiotemporal Pw variations. Dye tracing is widely employed to determine subglacial drainage systems' structure and morphology through analysing breakthrough curves and through delimiting the extent of proglacial streams' watersheds. 25 dye-tracing experiments using conventional synthetic tracers (Rhodamine WT and Uranine) were conducted from 12 injection sites during summer 2012. As with all present dye

  19. Cationic cetylpyridinium micelle as a novel electrolyte system for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanacharoenchumrut, Sakon; Angboonpong, Natee; Pakawatpanurut, Pasit

    2016-03-01

    The charge transfer process within the electrolyte system is an active area for further improving the conversion efficiency of the dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). In this work, micelle formed by cationic surfactant cetylpyridinium (CP) chloride was used in the electrolyte to enhance the ion transport of the redox couple. Using a mixed solvent of ethylene glycol and acetonitrile at 1:9 volume ratio and 0.50 M CP, an 83% improvement in DSSC efficiency was observed. Because of a strong correlation between the efficiency and the current density as a function of the CP concentration, the presence of CP micelle likely caused a favorable shift in the ion transport within the electrolyte. According to the cyclic voltammetry, such improved ion transport can be attributed to a faster diffusion of the redox couple, particularly the I3- diffusion. In addition, the impedance analysis also revealed a short electron lifetime for the diffusion process in the presence of the CP micelle. From these results, it is plausible that the CP micelle in the electrolyte provides an extensive network of positively-charged interfaces, which facilitates the diffusion of the redox couple and enhances the overall performance of the DSSC.

  20. Dye removal using modified copper ferrite nanoparticle and RSM analysis.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodi, Niyaz Mohammad; Soltani-Gordefaramarzi, Sajjad; Sadeghi-Kiakhani, Moosa

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, copper ferrite nanoparticle (CFN) was synthesized, modified by cetyl trimethylammonium bromide, and characterized. Dye removal ability of the surface modified copper ferrite nanoparticle (SMCFN) from single system was investigated. The physical characteristics of SMCFN were studied using Fourier transform infrared, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Acid Blue 92, Direct Green 6, Direct Red 23, and Direct Red 80 were used as model compounds. The effect of operational parameters (surfactant concentration, adsorbent dosage, dye concentration, and pH) on dye removal was evaluated. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used for the analysis of the dye removal data. The experimental checking in these optimal conditions confirms good agreements with RSM results. The results showed that the SMCFN being a magnetic adsorbent might be a suitable alternative to remove dyes from colored aqueous solutions. PMID:23852534

  1. Aqueous two-phase systems: an efficient, environmentally safe and economically viable method for purification of natural dye carmine.

    PubMed

    Mageste, Aparecida Barbosa; de Lemos, Leandro Rodrigues; Ferreira, Guilherme Max Dias; da Silva, Maria do Carmo Hespanhol; da Silva, Luis Henrique Mendes; Bonomo, Renata Cristina Ferreira; Minim, Luis Antonio

    2009-11-01

    Partition of the natural dye carmine has been studied in aqueous two-phase systems prepared by mixing aqueous solutions of polymer or copolymer with aqueous salt solutions (Na(2)SO(4) and Li(2)SO(4)). The carmine dye partition coefficient was investigated as a function of system pH, polymer molar mass, hydrophobicity, system tie-line length and nature of the electrolyte. It has been observed that the carmine partition coefficient is highly dependent on the electrolyte nature and pH of the system, reaching values as high as 300, indicating the high potential of the two-phase extraction with ATPS in the purification of carmine dye. The partition relative order was Li(2)SO(4)"Na(2)SO(4). Carmine molecules were concentrated in the polymer-rich phase, indicating an enthalpic specific interaction between carmine and the pseudopolycation, which is formed by cation adsorption along the macromolecule chain. When the enthalpic carmine-pseudopolycation interaction decreases, entropic forces dominate the natural dye-transfer process, and the carmine partitioning coefficient decreases. The optimization of the extraction process was obtained by a central composite face-centered (CCF) design. The CCF design was used to evaluate the influence of Li(2)SO(4) and PEO 1500 concentration and of the pH on the partition coefficient of carmine. The conditions that maximize the partition of carmine into the top phase were determined to be high concentrations of PEO and Li(2)SO(4) and low pH values within the ranges studied. PMID:19800067

  2. Mediator-assisted decolorization and detoxification of textile dyes/dye mixture by Cyathus bulleri laccase.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Meenu; Mishra, Saroj; Sreekrishnan, T R

    2008-12-01

    Laccase from basidiomycete fungus Cyathus bulleri was evaluated for its ability to decolorize a number of reactive and acidic dyes in the presence of natural and synthetic mediators. The extent of decolorization was monitored at different mediator/dye concentrations and incubation time. Among the synthetic mediators, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) was effective at low mediator/dye ratios and resulted in 80-95% decolorization at rates that varied from 226 +/- 4 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for Reactive Orange 1 to 1,333 +/- 15 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for Reactive Red 198. Other synthetic mediators like 1-hydroxybenzotriazole and violuric acid showed both concentration- and time-dependent increases in percent decolorization. Natural mediators like vanillin, on the other hand, were found to be less effective on all the dyes except Reactive Orange 1. Computed rates of decolorization were about twofold lower than that with ABTS. The laccase-ABTS system also led to nearly 80% decolorization for the simulated dye mixture. No clear correlation between laccase activity on the mediator and its ability to decolorize dyes was found, but pH had a significant effect: Optimum pH for decolorization coincided with the optimum pH for mediator oxidation. The treated samples were also evaluated for toxicity in model microbial systems. The laccase-mediator system appears promising for treatment of textile wastewaters. PMID:18506632

  3. Decolorization of Solophenyl Red 3BL Polyazo Dye by Laccase-Mediator System: Optimization through Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Neifar, Mohamed; Jaouani, Atef; Kamoun, Amel; Ellouze-Ghorbel, Raoudha; Ellouze-Chaabouni, Semia

    2011-01-01

    The decolorization of direct Solophenyl red 3BL (SR), a polyazo dye extensively used in textile industry was studied. The Fomes fomentarius laccase alone did not decolorize SR. The natural redox mediator, acetosyringone (AS), was necessary for decolorization to occur. Box-Behnken design was used to evaluate the effects of three parameters, namely, enzyme concentration (0.5–2.5 U mL−1), redox mediator concentration (3–30 μM), and incubation time (1–24 h), on the SR decolorization yield. The fitted mathematical model allowed us to plot response surfaces as well as isoresponse curves and to determine optimal decolorization conditions. The results clearly indicated that the AS concentration was the main factor influencing the SR decolorization yield. The selected optimal conditions were enzyme concentration 0.8 U mL−1, mediator concentration 33 μM, and time 14 h 30 min. These conditions allowed 79.66% of SR decolorization versus 80.70% for the predicted value. These results showed a promising future of applying laccase-AS system for industrial wastewater bioremediation. PMID:21869923

  4. Decolorization potential of some reactive dyes with crude laccase and laccase-mediated system.

    PubMed

    Saşmaz, Samet; Gedikli, Serap; Aytar, Pınar; Güngörmedi, Gökhan; Cabuk, Ahmet; Hür, Evrim; Unal, Arzu; Kolankaya, Nazif

    2011-02-01

    In this study, decolorization of dyestuffs, such as Reactive Red 198, Rem Blue RR, Dylon Navy 17, Rem Red RR, and Rem Yellow RR was studied using laccase and laccase-mediated system. The laccases are known to have an important potential for remediation of pollutants. Among these dyestuffs, decolorization of Rem Blue RR and Dylon Navy 17 was performed with crude laccase under optimized conditions. Vanillin was selected as laccase mediator after screening six different compounds with Rem Yellow RR, Reactive Red 198, and Rem Red RR as substrates. However, Rem Yellow RR was not decolorized by either laccase or laccase-mediated system. It is observed that the culture supernatant contained high laccase activity after treatment with catalase that was responsible for the decolorization. Besides, culture supernatant with high laccase activity as enzyme source was treated with catalase; in this way, the hypothesis that laccase was the enzyme responsible for decolorization was supported. The Rem Blue RR was decolorized with 64.84% under the optimum conditions and Dylon Navy 17 with 75.43% with crude laccase. However, using the laccase and vanillin, the decolorization of Reactive Red 198 and Rem Red RR was found to be 62% and 68%, respectively. Our study demonstrated that the decolorization abilities of laccase and/or laccase mediator systems were based on the types of mediator, the dye structure, and the standard experimental conditions. Also, the electrochemical behaviors of some samples were studied. The redox potentials of these samples were determined using cyclic voltammetry on glassy carbon electrode in phosphate buffer (pH 6) solution. PMID:20669054

  5. Degradation of Synthetic Dyeing Wastewater by Underwater Electrical Discharge Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D. Kim, S.; I. Jang, D.; J. Lim, B.; B. Lee, S.; S. Mok, Y.

    2013-07-01

    Electrical discharge treatments of synthetic dyeing wastewater were carried out with two different systems: underwater pulsed electrical discharge (UPED) and underwater dielectric barrier discharge (UDBD). Reactive Blue 4 (RB4) and Acid Red 4 (AR4) were used as model contaminants for the synthetic wastewater. The performance of the aforementioned systems was compared with respect to the chromaticity removal and the energy requirement. The results showed that the present electrical discharge systems were very effective for degradation of the dyes. The dependences of the dye degradation rate on treatment time, initial dye concentration, electrical energy, and the type of working gas including air, O2, and N2 were examined. The change in the initial dye concentration did not largely affect the degradation of either RB4 or AR4. The energy delivered to the UPED system was only partially utilized for generating reactive species capable of degrading the dyes, leading to higher energy requirement than the UDBD system. Among the working gases, the best performance was observed with O2. As the degradation proceeded, the concentration of total dissolved solids and the solution conductivity kept increasing while pH showed a decreasing trend, revealing that the dyes were effectively mineralized.

  6. Tumor implantation model for rapid testing of lymphatic dye uptake from paw to node in small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DSouza, Alisha V.; Elliott, Jonathan T.; Gunn, Jason R.; Barth, Richard J.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2015-03-01

    Morbidity and complexity involved in lymph node staging via surgical resection and biopsy calls for staging techniques that are less invasive. While visible blue dyes are commonly used in locating sentinel lymph nodes, since they follow tumor-draining lymphatic vessels, they do not provide a metric to evaluate presence of cancer. An area of active research is to use fluorescent dyes to assess tumor burden of sentinel and secondary lymph nodes. The goal of this work was to successfully deploy and test an intra-nodal cancer-cell injection model to enable planar fluorescence imaging of a clinically relevant blue dye, specifically methylene blue - used in the sentinel lymph node procedure - in normal and tumor-bearing animals, and subsequently segregate tumor-bearing from normal lymph nodes. This direct-injection based tumor model was employed in athymic rats (6 normal, 4 controls, 6 cancer-bearing), where luciferase-expressing breast cancer cells were injected into axillary lymph nodes. Tumor presence in nodes was confirmed by bioluminescence imaging before and after fluorescence imaging. Lymphatic uptake from the injection site (intradermal on forepaw) to lymph node was imaged at approximately 2 frames/minute. Large variability was observed within each cohort.

  7. Near Infrared Heptamethine Cyanine Dye-Mediated Cancer Imaging*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaojian; Shi, Chunmeng; Tong, Rong; Qian, Weiping; Zhau, Haiyen E.; Wang, Ruoxiang; Zhu, Guodong; Cheng, Jianjun; Yang, Vincent W.; Cheng, Tianmin; Henary, Maged; Strekowski, Lucjan; Chung, Leland W.K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging has great potential for noninvasive in vivo imaging of tumors. In this study, we demonstrate the preferential uptake and retention of two hepatamethine cyanine dyes, IR-783 and MHI-148, in tumor cells and tissues. Experimental Design IR-783 and MHI-148 were investigated for their ability to accumulate in human cancer cells, tumor xenografts and spontaneous mouse tumors in transgenic animals. Time- and concentration-dependent dye uptake and retention in normal and cancer cells and tissues were compared, and subcellular localization of the dyes and mechanisms of the dye uptake and retention in tumor cells were evaluated using organelle-specific tracking dyes and bromosulfophthalein (BSP), a competitive inhibitor of organic anion transporting peptides (OATPs). These dyes were used to detect human cancer metastases in a mouse model and differentiate cancer cells from normal cells in blood. Results These NIR hepatamethine cyanine dyes were retained in cancer cells but not normal cells, in tumor xenografts, and in spontaneous tumors in transgenic mice. They can be used to detect cancer metastasis and cancer cells in blood with a high degree of sensitivity. The dyes were found to concentrate in the mitochondria and lysosomes of cancer cells, probably through OATPs since the dye uptake and retention in cancer cells can be blocked completely by BSP. These dyes, when injected to mice, did not cause systemic toxicity. Conclusions These two heptamethine cyanine dyes are promising imaging agents for human cancers and can be further exploited to improve cancer detection, prognosis and treatment. PMID:20410058

  8. Synthesis of magnetic γ-Fe2O3-based nanomaterial for ultrasonic assisted dyes adsorption: Modeling and optimization.

    PubMed

    Asfaram, Arash; Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Hajati, Shaaker; Goudarzi, Alireza

    2016-09-01

    γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were synthesized and loaded on activated carbon. The prepared nanomaterial was characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticle-loaded activated carbon (γ-Fe2O3-NPs-AC) was used as novel adsorbent for the ultrasonic-assisted removal of methylene blue (MB) and malachite green (MG). Response surface methodology and artificial neural network were applied to model and optimize the adsorption of the MB and MG in their individual and binary solutions followed by the investigation on adsorption isotherm and kinetics. The individual effects of parameters such as pH, mass of adsorbent, ultrasonication time as well as MB and MG concentrations in addition to the effects of their possible interactions on the adsorption process were investigated. The numerical optimization revealed that the optimum adsorption (>99.5% for each dye) is obtained at 0.02g, 15mgL(-1), 4min and 7.0 corresponding to the adsorbent mass, each dye concentration, sonication time and pH, respectively. The Freundlich, Langmuir, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms were studied. The Langmuir was found to be most applicable isotherm which predicted maximum monolayer adsorption capacities of 195.55 and 207.04mgg(-1) for the adsorption of MB and MG, respectively. The pseudo-second order model was found to be applicable for the adsorption kinetics. Blank experiments (without any adsorbent) were run to investigate the possible degradation of the dyes studied in presence of ultrasonication. No dyes degradation was observed. PMID:27150788

  9. Human systemic exposure to [¹⁴C]-paraphenylenediamine-containing oxidative hair dyes: Absorption, kinetics, metabolism, excretion and safety assessment.

    PubMed

    Nohynek, Gerhard J; Skare, Julie A; Meuling, Wim J A; Wehmeyer, Kenneth R; de Bie, Albertus Th H J; Vaes, Wouter H J; Dufour, Eric K; Fautz, Rolf; Steiling, Winfried; Bramante, Mario; Toutain, Herve

    2015-07-01

    Systemic exposure was measured in humans after hair dyeing with oxidative hair dyes containing 2.0% (A) or 1.0% (B) [(14)C]-p-phenylenediamine (PPD). Hair was dyed, rinsed, dried, clipped and shaved; blood and urine samples were collected for 48 hours after application. [(14)C] was measured in all materials, rinsing water, hair, plasma, urine and skin strips. Plasma and urine were also analysed by HLPC/MS/MS for PPD and its metabolites (B). Total mean recovery of radioactivity was 94.30% (A) or 96.21% (B). Mean plasma Cmax values were 132.6 or 97.4 ng [(14)C]-PPDeq/mL, mean AUC(0-∞) values 1415 or 966 ng [(14)C]-PPDeq/mL*hr in studies A or B, respectively. Urinary excretion of [(14)C] mainly occurred within 24 hrs after hair colouring with a total excretion of 0.72 or 0.88% of applied radioactivity in studies A or B, respectively. Only N,N'-diacetylated-PPD was detected in plasma and the urine. A TK-based human safety assessment estimated margins of safety of 23.3- or 65-fold relative to respective plasma AUC or Cmax values in rats at the NOAEL of a toxicity study. Overall, hair dyes containing PPD are unlikely to pose a health risk since they are used intermittently and systemic exposure is limited to the detoxified metabolite N,N'-diacetyl-PPD. PMID:25846501

  10. Optical fibre spectroscopy sensor for the quantitative determination of industrial textile dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubillas, Ana M.; Conde, Olga M.; Anuarbe, Pedro; Gutierrez, Monica; Martinez, Vicente; Lopez-Higuera, Jose M.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, an extrinsic optical fibre sensor (OFS) for the quantitative determination of dyes used in the textile industry is presented. The system proposed is based on absorption spectroscopy and multivariate calibration methods to infer the concentration of different textile dyes. The performance of the sensor has been successfully assessed using calibrated dyes, with a very good correlation between the multivariate calibration models and the predicted values. The sensor system here demonstrated could be used to predict the colour of dye mixtures during the dyebath and, therefore, reduce the manufacturing costs.

  11. Encapsulation of thiazolyazoresorcinol and thiazolyazocresol dyes with α- and β-cyclodextrin cavities: Spectral and molecular modeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendiran, N.; Venkatesh, G.; Sankaranarayanan, R. K.

    2014-08-01

    Encapsulation behavior of 4-(2-thiazolyazo)resorcinol (TAR) and 2-(2-thiazolyazo)-p-cresol (TAC) with two cyclodextrins (α-CD and β-CD) were analyzed by UV-visible, fluorescence, time resolved fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) and molecular modeling methods. With an increase in the CD concentrations, no considerable absorbance difference was observed in TAR and TAC but the fluorescence intensity increased. Compared to water solution, both azo dyes show longer life time in CD solutions. In non-polar solvent, the absorption wavelength observed at 440 nm suggests intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IHB) present between the sbnd OH⋯Ndbnd Nsbnd groups. The chemical shift values suggest that thiazole ring of the dye is included in the CD cavities and the phenol ring present to edge of the CD cavities. In TAC, SEM image revealed the presence of irregular shape crystals agglomerated rod with CD. Binding energy, ΔH and ΔG values indicate that both azo dyes form stable inclusion complex.

  12. Characterization of the effects of heat stress on the DNA-intercalating dye EvaGreen for potential use with the joint biological agent identification and diagnostic system.

    PubMed

    Nowadly, Craig D; David, Jason W; Grogger, Melanie L M; Demkowicz, Erik R; Atchley, Daniel H; Veverka, Donald V

    2014-06-01

    Although advances in real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology and equipment have facilitated field research, only a limited selection of reagents do not require cold storage. This study explored the temperature stability of the commercially available DNA-intercalating dye EvaGreen after exposure to a spectrum of temperatures for 176 days by analyzing quantification cycle (Cq) and end fluorescence levels during amplification of the invA gene of Salmonella typhimurium. To further characterize potential dye stability, the effects of small differences in dye volume were examined and dye samples were subjected to an Air Force deployment to the Middle East. Significant differences in Cq and end fluorescence were found; however, the magnitude of mean Cq differences was less than one cycle and the magnitude of mean fluorescence differences was less than that attributable to a difference of 0.25 μL of dye per 25 μL reaction. Liquid EvaGreen dye may thus be stable at temperatures as high as 65°C for up to 6 months for use in real-time PCR. These results warrant further investigation by using liquid EvaGreen dye to adapt traditional lab-based real-time PCR assays for Joint Biological Agent Identification and Diagnostic System use and testing the assays in the field. PMID:24902129

  13. [Vision engineering--photoelectric dye-based retinal prostheses: Okayama University model].

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Toshihiko

    2007-04-01

    Patients with retinitis pigmentosa lose photoreceptor cells by genetic abnormalities and hence become blind. Neurons such as bipolar cells and ganglion cells still remain alive even in the retina of these patients, and ganglion cells send axons to the brain as the optic nerve. The replacement of dead photoreceptor cells with something artificial is the basic concept of retinal prostheses. The remaining retinal neurons can be stimulated by either electric current or electric potential. Photodiode array and electrode array are two main ways to stimulate retinal neurons as retinal prostheses. These retinal prostheses have problems such as low sensitivity and requiring outer electric sources (batteries). To overcome the problems, we are developing photoelectric dye-based retinal prostheses which absorb light and convert photon energy to electric potentials. The prototype, photoelectric dye-coupled polyethylene film, could generate intracellular calcium elevation in photoreceptor-lacking retinal tissues and also in cultured retinal neurons. The photoelectric dye-based retinal prostheses are thin and soft, and therefore, a sheet of the film in a large size, corresponding to wide visual field, can be inserted into the vitreous and then to the subretinal space through a small opening by rolling up the film. After the production control and the quality control have been established, clinical trials of the photoelectric dye-based retinal prostheses would be planned in concordance with the Drugs and Medical Devices Law to prove the safety and the efficacy. PMID:17447519

  14. Dye removal from textile dye wastewater using recycled alum sludge.

    PubMed

    Chu, W

    2001-09-01

    The removal of dyes from textile dying wastewater by recycled alum sludge (RAS) generated by the coagulation process itself was studied and optimized. One hydrophobic and one hydrophilic dye were used as probes to examine the performance of this process. It was found that RAS is a good way of removing hydrophobic dye in wastewater, while simultaneously reducing the fresh alum dosage, of which one third of the fresh alum can be saved. The back-diffusion of residued dye from the recycling sludge is detected but is easily controlled as long as a small amount of fresh alum is added to the system. The use of RAS is not recommended for the removal of hydrophilic dyes, since the high solubility characteristics of such dyes can cause deterioration in the water quality during recycling. PMID:11487111

  15. Nanotubular Halloysite Clay as Efficient Water Filtration System for Removal of Cationic and Anionic Dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yafei; Abdullayev, Elshad; Lvov, Yuri

    2014-08-01

    Halloysite nanotubes, chemically similar to kaolinite, are formed by rolling of kaolinite layers in tubes with diameter of 50 nm and length of ca. 1 μm. Halloysite has negative SiO2 outermost and positive Al2O3 inner lumen surface, which enables it to be used as potential absorbent for both cationic and anionic dyes due to the efficient bivalent adsorbancy. An adsorption study using cationic Rhodamine 6G and anionic Chrome azurol S has shown approximately two times better dye removal for halloysite as compared to kaolinite. Halloysite filters have been effectively regenerated up to 50 times by burning the adsorbed dyes. Overall removal efficiency of anionic Chrome azurol S exceeded 99.9% for 5th regeneration cycle of halloysite. Chrome azurol S adsorption capacity decreases with the increase of ionic strength, temperature and pH. For cationic Rhodamine 6G, higher ionic strength, temperature and initial solution concentration were favorable to enhanced adsorption with optimal pH 8. These results indicate a potential to utilize halloysite for the removal of ionic dyes from environmental waters.

  16. Specific tumor labeling enhanced by polyethylene glycol linkage of near infrared dyes conjugated to a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody in a nude mouse model of human pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maawy, Ali A.; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhang, Yong; Luiken, George A.; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Labeling of metastatic tumors can aid in their staging and resection of cancer. Near infrared (NIR) dyes have been used in the clinic for tumor labeling. However, there can be a nonspecific uptake of dye by the liver, lungs, and lymph nodes, which hinders detection of metastasis. In order to overcome these problems, we have used two NIR dyes (DyLight 650 and 750) conjugated to a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody to evaluate how polyethylene glycol linkage (PEGylation) can improve specific tumor labeling in a nude mouse model of human pancreatic cancer. The conjugated PEGylated and non-PEGylated DyLight 650 and 750 dyes were injected intravenously into non-tumor-bearing nude mice. Serum samples were collected at various time points in order to determine serum concentrations and elimination kinetics. Conjugated PEGylated dyes had significantly higher serum dye concentrations than non-PEGylated dyes (p=0.005 for the 650 dyes and p<0.001 for the 750 dyes). Human pancreatic tumors subcutaneously implanted into nude mice were labeled with antibody-dye conjugates and serially imaged. Labeling with conjugated PEGylated dyes resulted in significantly brighter tumors compared to the non-PEGylated dyes (p<0.001 for the 650 dyes; p=0.01 for 750 dyes). PEGylation of the NIR dyes also decreased their accumulation in lymph nodes, liver, and lung. These results demonstrate enhanced selective tumor labeling by PEGylation of dyes conjugated to a tumor-specific antibody, suggesting their future clinical use in fluorescence-guided surgery.

  17. Failure of the IDA in FRET Systems at Close Inter-Dye Distances Is Moderated by Frequent Low κ(2) Values.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, J Dominik; Fulle, Simone; Kleinschmidt, Martin; Gohlke, Holger; Marian, Christel M

    2016-09-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is analyzed in terms of distance- and orientation-dependent interactions between the transition dipole moments of the involved donor and acceptor molecules. However, the ideal dipole approximation (IDA) is known to fail at short donor-acceptor distances. In this work, we model FRET in a Cy5- and Alexa Fluor 488-labeled double-stranded RNA by means of combined molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and quantum-chemical calculations involving the IDA as well as the more sophisticated monomer transition density (MTD) approach. To this end, the relaxed ground-state geometries of the dyes were fitted to the MD-based structures. Although substantial deviations between IDA and MTD results can be observed for individual snapshots, the statistical impact of the failure on the FRET rates is negligible in the chosen examples. Our results clearly demonstrate that the IDA-based Förster model can still be applied to systems with small donor-acceptor distances, provided that the dyes are not trapped in arrangements with a high IDA failure and that the distribution of the relative transition dipole orientations is fairly isotropic. PMID:27490865

  18. TEXTILE DYEING WASTEWATERS: CHARACTERIZATION AND TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an examination of the biological, chemical, and physical treatability of wastewaters from selected typical dye baths. Twenty systems providing a broad cross section of dye classes, fibers, and application techniques, were examined. Wastes, produced usi...

  19. Binding of fluorescent acridine dyes acridine orange and 9-aminoacridine to hemoglobin: Elucidation of their molecular recognition by spectroscopy, calorimetry and molecular modeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sabyasachi; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2016-06-01

    The molecular interaction between hemoglobin (HHb), the major human heme protein, and the acridine dyes acridine orange (AO) and 9-aminoacridine (9AA) was studied by various spectroscopic, calorimetric and molecular modeling techniques. The dyes formed stable ground state complex with HHb as revealed from spectroscopic data. Temperature dependent fluorescence data showed the strength of the dye-protein complexation to be inversely proportional to temperature and the fluorescence quenching was static in nature. The binding-induced conformational change in the protein was investigated using circular dichroism, synchronous fluorescence, 3D fluorescence and FTIR spectroscopy results. Circular dichroism data also quantified the α-helicity change in hemoglobin due to the binding of acridine dyes. Calorimetric studies revealed the binding to be endothermic in nature for both AO and 9AA, though the latter had higher affinity, and this was also observed from spectroscopic data. The binding of both dyes was entropy driven. pH dependent fluorescence studies revealed the existence of electrostatic interaction between the protein and dye molecules. Molecular modeling studies specified the binding site and the non-covalent interactions involved in the association. Overall, the results revealed that a small change in the acridine chromophore leads to remarkable alteration in the structural and thermodynamic aspects of binding to HHb. PMID:27077554

  20. Towards modelling of stochastic kinetics for process related to photochromic dye semi-intercalation in DNA-based polymer matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitus, Antoni C.; Pawlik, Grzegorz; Kordas, Wojciech; Mysliwiec, Jaroslaw; Miniewicz, Andrzej; Kajzar, Francois; Rau, Ileana; Grote, James G.

    2011-09-01

    The semi-intercalation of an azo-dye Disperse Red 1 (DR1) molecule into a biopolymeric material made of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) complexed with the cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethyl-ammonium chloride (CTMA) formulated recently1-3 has successfully explained the main experimental results4 of laser dynamic inscription of diffraction gratings: short response time, low diffraction efficiency, single-exponential kinetics and flat wavelength dependence.5 In this paper we generalize the analytic model of Ref.2 to account for a more realistic dynamics of DNA-CTMA matrix. To this end we extend the model of paper5 by including into it probabilistic features of local free volume in DNA matrix which characterize, in a simple way, the spatial distribution of local voids which, in turn play the central role for the kinetics of photoinduced trans-cis-trans cycles of DR1 dye under the polarized laser light illumination. We discuss a stochastic master equation which generalizes the simple model of Ref.2 and address briefly the topic of non-exponential grating inscription in modelling and in recent experiments.

  1. Developmental Validation of a novel 5 dye Y-STR System comprising the 27 YfilerPlus loci

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Rufeng; Liu, Yaju; Li, Zheng; Jin, Haiying; Tian, Qinghua; Shi, Meisen; Ma, Shuhua

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a new STRtyper-27 system, including the same Yfiler Plus loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385a/b, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, Y-GATA H4, DYS449, DYS460, DYS481, DYS518, DYS533, DYS570, DYS576, DYS627 and DYF387S1a/b), was established using a set of 5 fluorescent dye labels. Primers, internal size standard, allelic ladders and matrix standard set were designed and created in-house for this multiplex system. This paper describes the validation studies conducted with the STRtyper-27Y system using a 3130XL genetic analyzer for fragment length detection that included the analysis of the following parameters and aspects: sensitivity, species specificity, inhibition, haplotype concordance, precision, stutter, DNA mixtures, and stability studies with crime scene samples. The studies demonstrated, that the STRtyper-27Y system provided equivalent overall performance comparable to the latest Yfiler Plus kit, but with enhanced compatibility in terms of instrument platforms and software allowing forensic laboratories to conduct its forensic application and evaluate its performance, all in their own 5 dye Y-STR chemistry system /environment without software or instrument upgrades. PMID:27406339

  2. Developmental Validation of a novel 5 dye Y-STR System comprising the 27 YfilerPlus loci.

    PubMed

    Bai, Rufeng; Liu, Yaju; Li, Zheng; Jin, Haiying; Tian, Qinghua; Shi, Meisen; Ma, Shuhua

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a new STRtyper-27 system, including the same Yfiler Plus loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385a/b, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, Y-GATA H4, DYS449, DYS460, DYS481, DYS518, DYS533, DYS570, DYS576, DYS627 and DYF387S1a/b), was established using a set of 5 fluorescent dye labels. Primers, internal size standard, allelic ladders and matrix standard set were designed and created in-house for this multiplex system. This paper describes the validation studies conducted with the STRtyper-27Y system using a 3130XL genetic analyzer for fragment length detection that included the analysis of the following parameters and aspects: sensitivity, species specificity, inhibition, haplotype concordance, precision, stutter, DNA mixtures, and stability studies with crime scene samples. The studies demonstrated, that the STRtyper-27Y system provided equivalent overall performance comparable to the latest Yfiler Plus kit, but with enhanced compatibility in terms of instrument platforms and software allowing forensic laboratories to conduct its forensic application and evaluate its performance, all in their own 5 dye Y-STR chemistry system /environment without software or instrument upgrades. PMID:27406339

  3. Evaluating environmental strategies in a textile printing and dyeing enterprise by an agent-based simulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lei; Ding, Yongsheng; Li, Fang

    2013-05-01

    To improve the capabilities of saving energy and reducing pollutant emission of textile printing and dyeing (PD) industry, this article presents a novel agent-based simulation model for assessing the impacts of environmental strategies on a PD enterprise. Two typical PD enterprises in China are simulated with different modelling granularities: one is at a module level, while the other is at an enterprise level. The module-level simulation model depicts detailed production processes in a PD enterprise and evaluates five candidate strategies on their capabilities of improving energy usage and waste emission. The enterprise-level simulation model views a PD enterprise as an agent and assesses three tax strategies for waste discharge. The simulation results show that the proposed general model could be a valuable tool to explore potential solutions to saving energy and reducing waste emission in PD enterprises, after being calibrated to a real case.

  4. Complete degradation of the azo dye Acid Orange-7 and bioelectricity generation in an integrated microbial fuel cell, aerobic two-stage bioreactor system in continuous flow mode at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Eustace; Keshavarz, Taj; Kyazze, Godfrey

    2014-03-01

    In this study, the commercially used model azo dye Acid Orange-7 (AO-7) was fully degraded into less toxic intermediates using an integrated microbial fuel cell (MFC) and aerobic bioreactor system. The integrated bioreactor system was operated at ambient temperature and continuous-flow mode. AO-7 loading rate was varied during experiments from 70gm(-3)day(-1) to 210gm(-3)day(-1). Colour and soluble COD removal rates reached>90% under all AO-7 loading rates. The MFC treatment stage prompted AO-7 to undergo reductive degradation into its constituent aromatic amines. HPLC-MS analysis of metabolite extracts from the aerobic stage of the bioreactor system indicated further oxidative degradation of the resulting aromatic amines into simpler compounds. Bioluminescence based Vibrio fischeri ecotoxicity testing demonstrated that aerobic stage effluent exhibited toxicity reductions of approximately fivefold and ten-fold respectively compared to the dye wastewater influent and MFC-stage effluent. PMID:24495541

  5. Structure-based modeling of dye-fiber affinity with SOM-4D-QSAR paradigm: application to set of anthraquinone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Bak, Andrzej; Wyszomirski, Miroslaw; Magdziarz, Tomasz; Smolinski, Adam; Polanski, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    A comparative structure-affinity study of anthraquinone dyes adsorption on cellulose fibre is presented in this paper. We used receptor-dependent 4D-QSAR methods based on grid and neural (SOM) methodology coupled with IVEPLS procedure. The applied RD 4D-QSAR approach focuses mainly on the ability of mapping dye properties to verify the concept of tinctophore in dye chemistry. Moreover, the stochastic SMV procedure to investigate the predictive ability of the method for a large population of 4D-QSAR models was employed. The obtained findings were compared with the previously published RI 3D/4D-QSAR models for the corresponding anthraquinone trainings sets. The neutral (protonated) and anionic (deprotonated) forms of anthraquinone scaffold were examined in order to deal with the uncertainty of the dye ionization state. The results are comparable to both the neutral and anionic dye sets regardless of the occupancy and charge descriptors applied, respectively. It is worth noting that the SOM-4D-QSAR behaves comparably to the cubic counterpart which is observed in each training/test subset specification (4D-QSAR-Jo vs SOM- 4D-QSARo and 4D-QSAR-Jq vs SOM-4D-QSARq). Additionally, an attempt was made to specify a common set of variables contributing significantly to dye-fiber binding affinity; it was simultaneously performed for some arbitrary chosen SMV models. The presented RD 4D-QSAR methodology together with IVE-PLS procedure provides a robust and predictive modeling technique, which facilitates detailed specification of the molecular motifs significantly contributing to the fiber-dye affinity. PMID:24499310

  6. Polymer electrolyte system based on carrageenan-poly(3,4- ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) composite for dye sensitized solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. A.; Camacho, D. H.

    2015-06-01

    Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT)-κ-carregeenan polymer electrolyte blend was prepared and incorporated as the electrolyte system in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC). Polymer blends prepared with different κ-carrageenan concentrations and molecular weights were investigated. It was found that the conductivity of the polymer blend increases with higher κ-carrageenan concentration, and lowers with degraded κ-carregeenan. The polymer blend was incorporated in a DSSC and yielded a solar cell with efficiency (η) of 0.421%.

  7. A Transient Diffusion Model Yields Unitary Gap Junctional Permeabilities from Images of Cell-to-Cell Fluorescent Dye Transfer Between Xenopus Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nitsche, Johannes M.; Chang, Hou-Chien; Weber, Paul A.; Nicholson, Bruce J.

    2004-01-01

    As ubiquitous conduits for intercellular transport and communication, gap junctional pores have been the subject of numerous investigations aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying permeability and selectivity. Dye transfer studies provide a broadly useful means of detecting coupling and assessing these properties. However, given evidence for selective permeability of gap junctions and some anomalous correlations between junctional electrical conductance and dye permeability by passive diffusion, the need exists to give such studies a more quantitative basis. This article develops a detailed diffusion model describing experiments (reported separately) involving transport of fluorescent dye from a “donor” region to an “acceptor” region within a pair of Xenopus oocytes coupled by gap junctions. Analysis of transport within a single oocyte is used to determine the diffusion and binding characteristics of the cellular cytoplasm. Subsequent double-cell calculations then yield the intercellular junction permeability, which is translated into a single-channel permeability using concomitant measurements of intercellular conductance, and known single-channel conductances of gap junctions made up of specific connexins, to count channels. The preceding strategy, combined with use of a graded size series of Alexa dyes, permits a determination of absolute values of gap junctional permeability as a function of dye size and connexin type. Interpretation of the results in terms of pore theory suggests significant levels of dye-pore affinity consistent with the expected order of magnitude of typical (e.g., van der Waals) intermolecular attractions. PMID:15041648

  8. Continuous system modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cellier, Francois E.

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive and systematic introduction is presented for the concepts associated with 'modeling', involving the transition from a physical system down to an abstract description of that system in the form of a set of differential and/or difference equations, and basing its treatment of modeling on the mathematics of dynamical systems. Attention is given to the principles of passive electrical circuit modeling, planar mechanical systems modeling, hierarchical modular modeling of continuous systems, and bond-graph modeling. Also discussed are modeling in equilibrium thermodynamics, population dynamics, and system dynamics, inductive reasoning, artificial neural networks, and automated model synthesis.

  9. Hair dye toxicity--a review.

    PubMed

    Marzulli, F N; Green, S; Maibach, H I

    1978-01-01

    This article reviews local and systemic effects which relate to hair dye formulation and hair dye ingredient tests and experiences in man and animals. Mutagenic and carcinogenic aspects are discussed. In a very limited way, safety and hazards of using hair dyes are interpreted for consumers. PMID:363966

  10. Challenges in the simulation of dye-sensitized ZnO solar cells: quantum confinement, alignment of energy levels and excited state nature at the dye/semiconductor interface.

    PubMed

    Amat, Anna; De Angelis, Filippo

    2012-08-14

    We report a first principles density functional theory/time-dependent density functional theory (DFT/TDDFT) computational investigation on a prototypical perylene dye anchored to realistic ZnO nanostructures, approaching the size of the ZnO nanowires used in dye-sensitized solar cells devices. DFT calculations were performed on (ZnO)(n) clusters of increasing size, with n up to 222, of 1.3 × 1.5 × 3.4 nm dimensions, and for the related dye-sensitized models. We show that quantum confinement in the ZnO nanostructures substantially affects the dye/semiconductor alignment of energy levels, with smaller ZnO models providing unfavourable electron injection. An increasing broadening of the dye LUMO is found moving to larger substrates, substantially contributing to the interfacial electronic coupling. TDDFT excited state calculations for the investigated dye@(ZnO)(222) system are fully consistent with experimental data, quantitatively reproducing the red-shift and broadening of the visible absorption spectrum observed for the ZnO-anchored dye compared to the dye in solution. TDDFT calculations on the fully interacting system also introduce a contribution to the dye/semiconductor admixture, due to configurational excited state mixing. Our results highlight the importance of quantum confinement in dye-sensitized ZnO interfaces, and provide the fundamental insight lying at the heart of the associated DSC devices. PMID:22743544

  11. Theoretical modeling of the series resistance effect on dye-sensitized solar cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yang; Dai, Songyuan; Chen, Shuanghong; Zhang, Changneng; Sui, Yifeng; Xiao, Shangfeng; Hu, Linhua

    2009-12-01

    Based on the continuity equations and the equivalent circuit, the conductivity of substrates and the resistances of silver grid in dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) are investigated. The complete I-V characteristics of DSC are obtained with different internal resistances. The theoretical and experimental results show internal resistances dominate the fill factor of DSC. At the same time, DSC module is investigated by numerical simulation under parallel connection with different illumination intensities. It can be found the high resistivity of substrates and the high illumination intensity lead to a lower optimal width in the DSC module.

  12. Saturable and Reverse Saturable Absorption in Nanocomposite Films of Naphthol Green B Dye-polymer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, S. Maya; Sreeja, S.; Frobel, P. G. Louie; Suresh, S. R.; Muneera, C. I.

    2011-10-01

    Naphthol Green B dye-polyvinyl alcohol composite films were fabricated and their nonlinear absorption properties were investigated using the Z-scan technique under excitation with 5ns laser light pulses at 532 nm. The samples displayed a switchover from saturable absorption to reverse saturable absorption with increase in either intensity or concentration. The measured values of β and IS were found to be of the order of 10-7 cm/W and 109 W/cm2 respectively. The atomic force microscopic analysis of the composite films revealed homogeneous distribution of aggregated nanoclusters marked by a low average surface roughness ≈1.8 nm.

  13. Computer-aided design and modeling of nickel dithiolene near-infrared dyes. 1998 summer research program for high school juniors at the University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics: Student research reports

    SciTech Connect

    Corsello, S.

    1999-03-01

    Recent advances in computational chemistry have made it feasible to design many types of molecules and predict their properties theoretically. The author applied these techniques to the design of organometallic transition-metal dyes absorbing in the near-infrared region of the spectrum which possess the combination of a large molar extinction coefficient, good chemical and thermal stability, and a high solubility in liquid crystal (LC) hosts. These properties are required for the dye to function as a near-infrared (IR) attenuator in a liquid crystal point diffraction interferometer (LCPDI) device that will be used as a beam diagnostic on the 60-beam OMEGA solid-state Nd:glass laser system at the University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics. Using commercially available software, both the absorption spectra and solubility characteristics of bis[1,2-di-(p-n alkoxyphenyl)ethane-1,2-dithione] nickel dye complexes were modeled in an isotropic host (cyclohexane) and, in most cases, excellent agreement was found with experimental data. Two additional compounds utilizing the same nickel dithiolene core but with alkylthio and phenylalkylthio terminal groups have been designed and show excellent potential to produce dramatic improvements in both solubility and optical density (absorbance) in liquid crystalline hosts. Based upon my work, a new dye not previously reported, 2(C{sub 4}S)2(C{sub 4}SPh)DTNi, has been proposed to satisfy the LCPDI device requirements. The nickel dithiolene dyes may also find important applications in other technology areas such as near-IR photography and laser-based near-IR communications.

  14. Synthesis, Characterization, Molecular Modeling, and DNA Interaction Studies of Copper Complex Containing Food Additive Carmoisine Dye.

    PubMed

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Akbari, Alireza; Jamshidbeigi, Mina; Khodarahmi, Reza

    2016-06-01

    A copper complex of carmoisine dye; [Cu(carmoisine)2(H2O)2]; was synthesized and characterized by using physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The binding of this complex with calf thymus (ct) DNA was investigated by circular dichroism, absorption studies, emission spectroscopy, and viscosity measurements. UV-vis results confirmed that the Cu complex interacted with DNA to form a ground-state complex and the observed binding constant (2× 10(4) M(-1)) is more in keeping with the groove bindings with DNA. Furthermore, the viscosity measurement result showed that the addition of complex causes no significant change on DNA viscosity and it indicated that the intercalation mode is ruled out. The thermodynamic parameters are calculated by van't Hoff equation, which demonstrated that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions played major roles in the reaction. The results of circular dichroism (CD) suggested that the complex can change the conformation of DNA from B-like form toward A-like conformation. The cytotoxicity studies of the carmoisine dye and its copper complex indicated that both of them had anticancer effects on HT-29 (colon cancer) cell line and they may be new candidates for treatment of the colon cancer. PMID:27152751

  15. Degradation of a model azo dye in submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR) operated with powdered activated carbon (PAC).

    PubMed

    Baêta, B E L; Luna, H J; Sanson, A L; Silva, S Q; Aquino, S F

    2013-10-15

    This work investigated the anaerobic degradation of the model azo dye Remazol Yellow Gold RNL in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASB) and two submerged anaerobic membrane (SAMBR) bioreactors, one of which (SAMBR-1) was operated with powdered activated carbon (PAC) in its interior. The reactors were operated at 35 °C with a hydraulic retention time of 24 h in three operational phases, aimed to assess the effect of external sources of carbon (glucose) or redox mediator (yeast extract) on the removal or color and organic matter. The results showed that removal efficiencies of COD (73-94%) and color (90-94%) were higher for SAMBR-1 when compared to SAMBR-2 (operated without PAC) and UASB reactors. In addition, the presence of PAC in SAMBR-1 increased reactor stability, thereby leading to a lower accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFA). The microfiltration membrane was responsible for an additional removal of ~50% of soluble residual COD in the form of VFA, thus improving permeate quality. On its turn, PAC exhibited the ability to adsorb byproducts (aromatic amines) of azo dye degradation as well as to act as source of immobilized redox mediator (quinone groups on its surface), thereby enhancing color removal. PMID:23810998

  16. Synthesis, spectral characterization, molecular modeling and antimicrobial studies of tridentate azo-dye Schiff base metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaghaz, Abdel-Nasser M. A.; Zayed, Mohamed E.; Alharbi, Suliman A.

    2015-03-01

    Nine mononuclear Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and Pt(IV) complexes of azo-dye Schiff's base ligand were synthesized and determined by different physical techniques. All the nine metal complexes are reported using elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic susceptibility, IR, UV-Vis, thermal analysis and 1H NMR, 13C NMR, mass, SEM, TEM, EDX, XRD spectral studies. The molar conductance measurements of all the complexes in DMF solution correspond to non-electrolytic nature. All complexes were of the high-spin type and found to have six-coordinate octahedral geometry except the Cu(II) complex which was four coordinate, square planar. Quantum chemical calculations were performed with semi-empirical method to find the optimum geometry of the ligand and its complexes. In molecular modeling the geometries of azo-dye Schiff base ligand HL and its metal (II/III/IV) complexes were fully optimized with respect to the energy using the 6-31G basis set. These ligand and its metal complexes have also been screened for their in vitro antimicrobial activities.

  17. Mathematical modelling and optimization of synthetic textile dye removal using soil composites as highly competent liner material.

    PubMed

    Das, Papita; Banerjee, Priya; Mondal, Sandip

    2015-01-01

    Soil is widely used as adsorbent for removing toxic pollutants from their aqueous solutions due to its wide availability and cost efficiency. This study investigates the potential of soil and soil composites for removal of crystal violet (CV) dye from solution on a comparative scale. Optimisation of different process parameters was carried out using a novel approach of response surface methodology (RSM) and a central composite design (CCD) was used for determining the optimum experimental conditions, as well as the result of their interactions. Around 99.85 % removal of CV was obtained at initial pH 6.4, which further increased to 99.98 % on using soil and cement composite proving it to be the best admixture of those selected. The phenomenon was found to be represented best by the Langmuir isotherm at different temperatures. The process followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and was determined to be spontaneous chemisorption in nature. This adsorbent can hence be suggested as an appropriate liner material for the removal of CV dye. PMID:25138552

  18. Characteristics of a Broadband Dye Laser Using Pyrromethene and Rhodamine Dyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedder, Sarah A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Wheeler, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    A broadband dye laser pumped by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser with a full-width half-maximum (FWHM) from 592 to 610 nm was created for the use in a dual-pump broadband CARS system called WIDECARS. The desired broadband dye laser was generated with a mixture of Pyrromethene dyes as an oscillator gain medium and a spectral selective optic in the oscillator cavity. A mixture of Rhodamine dyes were used in the amplifier dye cell. To create this laser a study was performed to characterize the spectral behavior of broadband dye lasers created with Rhodamine dyes 590, 610, and 640, Pyrromethene dyes 597 and 650 as well as mixture of these dyes.

  19. Patterning microparticles on a template of aggregated cationic dye.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Allan; Switalski, Steven; Bennett, Grace; Lindner, Kimberly; Baptiste, Kenny; Slater, Gary

    2015-02-01

    Patternwise aggregation of charged molecules on a surface is potentially a facile approach to generate a template on which to pattern oppositely charged microparticles. We report on the patterning of silica microparticles by a system comprising a photopatternable copolymer and an aggregate forming penta-cationic cyanine dye. A thin film of the copolymer, composed of a molar excess of styrenesulfonic acid oxime ester to cross-linkable glycidyl methacrylate monomomers, was exposed through a mask and neutralized, resulting in a pattern of hydrophobic areas, and where exposed, a hydrophilic cross-linked film with sodium poly(styrenesulfonate) domains. The occurrence and locus of aggregation of an aqueous solution of the dye, applied to the patterned surface was established by absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. In exposed areas, dye is imbibed and aggregation induced in sodium styrenesulfonate domains internal to the layer, whereas in the unexposed areas the dye aggregates on the hydrophobic surface. Aqueous anionic silica microparticles applied to the dye treated patterned surface and then rinsed, are retained in the unexposed areas having cationic surface aggregates, but rejected from the exposed areas with internal dye aggregates as these areas retain net negative charge. Mask exposure, absent dye treatment, did not result in patterning as negatively charged microparticles were nowhere retained, and positively charged particles were everywhere retained. The extent of surface coverage by the dye in unexposed areas was deposition time dependent, and ranged from isolated patches covering about 20 percent of the polymer surface to a surface saturated layer, with silica particle patterning robust over the range of dye surface coverages studied. The force requirements to pattern the denser than water silica microparticles are identified, and particle and polymer film surface potentials that meet the critical repulsion force requirement

  20. Efficient azo dye decolorization in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with built-in bioelectrochemical system.

    PubMed

    Cui, Min-Hua; Cui, Dan; Gao, Lei; Cheng, Hao-Yi; Wang, Ai-Jie

    2016-10-01

    A continuous stirred tank reactor with built-in bioelectrochemical system (CSTR-BES) was developed for azo dye Alizarin Yellow R (AYR) containing wastewater treatment. The decolorization efficiency (DE) of the CSTR-BES was 97.04±0.06% for 7h with sludge concentration of 3000mg/L and initial AYR concentration of 100mg/L, which was superior to that of the sole CSTR mode (open circuit: 54.87±4.34%) and the sole BES mode (without sludge addition: 91.37±0.44%). The effects of sludge concentration and sodium acetate (NaAc) concentration on azo dye decolorization were investigated. The highest DE of CSTR-BES for 4h was 87.66±2.93% with sludge concentration of 12,000mg/L, NaAc concentration of 2000mg/L and initial AYR concentration of 100mg/L. The results in this study indicated that CSTR-BES could be a practical strategy for upgrading conventional anaerobic facilities against refractory wastewater treatment. PMID:27497830

  1. Carcinogenicity of hair dye components.

    PubMed

    Van Duuren, B L

    1980-03-01

    The available animal carcinogenicity data on hair dye components was reviewed. From this review it became clear that certain hair dye components, some of which are still in hair dye formulations now on the market, are animal carcinogens. The compounds of concern that are still in use are: 3-amino-4-methoxyaniline, 2-nitro-4-aminoaniline and 3-nitro-4-hydroxyaniline. Certain azo dyes formerly used, and related compounds still in use, contain the benzidine moiety. Two of these compounds, Direct Blue 6 and Direct Black 38, have been shown to be metabolized in animals to the human carcinogen benzidine. Furthermore, skin absorption studies carried out with radiolabeled hair dye components applied to animal or human skin have conclusively shown that these compounds are systemically absorbed and excreted. Known cocarcinogens such as catechol and pyrogallol, which enhance benzo(a)pyrene carcinogenicity on mouse skin, are used as hair dye components. It is not known whether such compounds will enhance the carcinogenicity of substituted aniline hair dye chemicals. The available epidemiologic data are not sufficient to link hair dye use with an increased incidence in human cancer. PMID:6993608

  2. pH-Insensitive FRET voltage dyes.

    PubMed

    Maher, Michael P; Wu, Nyan-Tsz; Ao, Hong

    2007-08-01

    Many high-throughput ion channel assays require the use of voltage-sensitive dyes to detect channel activity in the presence of test compounds. Dye systems employing Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between 2 membrane-bound dyes are advantageous in combining high sensitivity, relatively fast response, and ratiometric output. The most widely used FRET voltage dye system employs a coumarin fluorescence donor whose excitation spectrum is pH dependent. The authors have validated a new class of voltage-sensitive FRET donors based on a pyrene moiety. These dyes are significantly brighter than CC2-DMPE and are not pH sensitive in the physiological range. With the new dye system, the authors demonstrate a new high-throughput assay for the acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) family. They also introduce a novel method for absolute calibration of voltage-sensitive dyes, simultaneously determining the resting membrane potential of a cell. PMID:17517905

  3. Association constants and distribution functions for ion pairs in binary solvent mixtures: Application to a cyanine dye system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odinokov, A. V.; Basilevsky, M. V.; Nikitina, E. A.

    2011-10-01

    The computations of the association constants Kass were performed at the microscopic level for the ion pair Cy+I- composed of the complex cyanine dye cation Cy+ coupled to the negative iodine counterion. The wide array of Kass values is arranged by a variation of the composition of the binary solvent mixtures toluene/dimethylsulfoxide with the accompanying change of the solvent polarity. The potentials of mean force (PMFs) are calculated for a set of interionic separations R in the Cy+I- by a methodology which combines the quantum-chemical techniques for the treatment of the electronic structure of the Cy+I- system with the recent dielectric continuum approach which accounts for the solvation effects. For a given solute/solvent system the probability function P(R), which describes the distribution of interionic separations, is constructed in terms of the PMFs and implemented for the evaluation of the Kass.

  4. Influence of operational key parameters on the photocatalytic decolorization of Rhodamine B dye using Fe2+/H2O2/Nb2O5/UV system.

    PubMed

    Hashemzadeh, Fatemeh; Rahimi, Rahmatollah; Gaffarinejad, Ali

    2014-04-01

    The present research deals with the development of a new heterogeneous photocatalysis and Fenton hybrid system for the removal of color from textile dyeing wastewater as Rhodamine B (RhB) solutions by using Fe(2+)/H2O2/Nb2O5 as a photocatalytic system. The application of this photocatalytic system for the decolorization of dye contaminants is not reported in the literature yet. Different parameters like dye concentration, Nb2O5/Fe(2+) catalyst amount, pH, and H2O2 concentration have been studied. The optimum conditions for the decolorization of the dye were initial concentration of 10 mg L(-1) of dye, pH 4, and Nb2O5/Fe(2+) catalyst concentration of 0.5 g L(-1)/50 mg L(-1). The optimum value of H2O2 concentration for the conditions used in this study was 700 mg L(-1). Moreover, the efficiency of the Nb2O5/photo-Fenton hybrid process in comparison to photo-Fenton alone and a dark Fenton process as a control experiment to decolorize the RhB solution has been investigated. The combination of photo-Fenton and Nb2O5 catalysts has been proved to be the most effective for the treatment of such type of wastewaters. The results revealed that the RhB dye was decolorized in a higher percent (78 %) by the Nb2O5/photo-Fenton hybrid process (Fe(2+)/H2O2/Nb2O5/UV) than by the photo-Fenton process alone (37 %) and dark Fenton process (14 %) after 120 min of treatment. Moreover, the Nb2O5 catalyst as a heterogeneous part of the photocatalytic system was demonstrated to have good stability and reusability. PMID:24374619

  5. A standardized model for predicting flap failure using indocyanine green dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Terence M.; Moore, Lindsay S.; Warram, Jason M.; Greene, Benjamin J.; Nakhmani, Arie; Korb, Melissa L.; Rosenthal, Eben L.

    2016-03-01

    Techniques that provide a non-invasive method for evaluation of intraoperative skin flap perfusion are currently available but underutilized. We hypothesize that intraoperative vascular imaging can be used to reliably assess skin flap perfusion and elucidate areas of future necrosis by means of a standardized critical perfusion threshold. Five animal groups (negative controls, n=4; positive controls, n=5; chemotherapy group, n=5; radiation group, n=5; chemoradiation group, n=5) underwent pre-flap treatments two weeks prior to undergoing random pattern dorsal fasciocutaneous flaps with a length to width ratio of 2:1 (3 x 1.5 cm). Flap perfusion was assessed via laser-assisted indocyanine green dye angiography and compared to standard clinical assessment for predictive accuracy of flap necrosis. For estimating flap-failure, clinical prediction achieved a sensitivity of 79.3% and a specificity of 90.5%. When average flap perfusion was more than three standard deviations below the average flap perfusion for the negative control group at the time of the flap procedure (144.3+/-17.05 absolute perfusion units), laser-assisted indocyanine green dye angiography achieved a sensitivity of 81.1% and a specificity of 97.3%. When absolute perfusion units were seven standard deviations below the average flap perfusion for the negative control group, specificity of necrosis prediction was 100%. Quantitative absolute perfusion units can improve specificity for intraoperative prediction of viable tissue. Using this strategy, a positive predictive threshold of flap failure can be standardized for clinical use.

  6. Communication system modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, L. D.; Walsh, J. R., Jr.; Wetherington, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    This report presents the results of work on communications systems modeling and covers three different areas of modeling. The first of these deals with the modeling of signals in communication systems in the frequency domain and the calculation of spectra for various modulations. These techniques are applied in determining the frequency spectra produced by a unified carrier system, the down-link portion of the Command and Communications System (CCS). The second modeling area covers the modeling of portions of a communication system on a block basis. A detailed analysis and modeling effort based on control theory is presented along with its application to modeling of the automatic frequency control system of an FM transmitter. A third topic discussed is a method for approximate modeling of stiff systems using state variable techniques.

  7. Thermochromic Properties of Mixture Systems of Octadecylphosphonic Acid and Fluoran Dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Kyoji; Yamaguchi, Takehito; Sato, Kiyotaka

    1994-10-01

    We have examined the thermochromic behavior of thin films formed by mixing a fluoran dye (FD: 2‧-( o-chloroanilino)-6‧-di- n-butylaminospiro[isobenzofuran-1(3 H),9‧-[9 H]xanthene]-3-one) and octadecylphosphonic acid (P18). The coloring and discoloring states were revealed to be controllable by changing the rate of cooling from the colored mixture liquid ( 100°C); quenching at 0°C maintained the solidified colored state, yet discoloring occurred after slow cooling at the rate of 4°C/min. We confirmed by X-ray diffraction and FT-IR spectra that the solidified colored state is produced by formation of the supramolecules, in which seven molecules of P18 and one molecule of FD combined, whose aggregates are in a lamellar structure. In the discoloring state, the supramolecule is decomposed to P18 and FD due to the fractional crystallization of P18.

  8. Charge transfer in graphene oxide-dye system for photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongu, Sudhakara Reddy; Bisht, Prem B.; Thu, Tran V.; Sandhu, Adarsh

    2014-02-01

    The fluorescence of a standard dye Rhodamine 6G (R6G) in solution decreases on addition of reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The absorption spectra and lifetime measurements confirm that no excited-state but a ground-state complex formation is responsible for this effect. For silver decorated rGO (Ag-rGO), the quenching efficiency and ground state complex formation process is small. Z-scan measurements have been done to study the optical nonlinearity at 532 nm under ps time scale. Remarkable reduction in the saturable absorption (SA) effect of R6G indicates no nonlinear contribution from the ground state complex. The results have been explained with varying charge transfer rates and non-fluorescence nature of the complex.

  9. Charge transfer in graphene oxide-dye system for photonic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bongu, Sudhakara Reddy Bisht, Prem B.; Thu, Tran V.; Sandhu, Adarsh

    2014-02-20

    The fluorescence of a standard dye Rhodamine 6G (R6G) in solution decreases on addition of reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The absorption spectra and lifetime measurements confirm that no excited-state but a ground-state complex formation is responsible for this effect. For silver decorated rGO (Ag-rGO), the quenching efficiency and ground state complex formation process is small. Z-scan measurements have been done to study the optical nonlinearity at 532 nm under ps time scale. Remarkable reduction in the saturable absorption (SA) effect of R6G indicates no nonlinear contribution from the ground state complex. The results have been explained with varying charge transfer rates and non-fluorescence nature of the complex.

  10. Experimental model: dye penetration of extensive interim restorations used during endodontic treatment while under load in a multiple axis chewing simulator.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Arna-Lee; Abbott, Paul V

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to design an experimental model that allowed extensive endodontic interim restorations to be tested for dye penetration while under simulated masticatory load. Extracted premolar teeth had standardized mesio-occluso-distal cavities prepared, and the root canals were instrumented. A cotton wool pellet was placed in the pulp chamber, and the cavities were restored with Cavit, IRM, Ketac-Fil Plus, Ketac-Silver, or composite resin (Z100). They were subjected to the equivalent of 3 months of clinical load while exposed to methylene blue dye. Results of this study could not support IRM as a suitable interim endodontic restorative material to use in extensive cavities. The dye penetration in the Ketac-Fil Plus and Ketac-Silver specimens was not predictable, and the results suggested Cavit and Z100 composite resin require further investigations as potentially useful materials for this purpose. PMID:17889699

  11. Extrapolation of systemic bioavailability assessing skin absorption and epidermal and hepatic metabolism of aromatic amine hair dyes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Manwaring, John; Rothe, Helga; Obringer, Cindy; Foltz, David J; Baker, Timothy R; Troutman, John A; Hewitt, Nicola J; Goebel, Carsten

    2015-09-01

    Approaches to assess the role of absorption, metabolism and excretion of cosmetic ingredients that are based on the integration of different in vitro data are important for their safety assessment, specifically as it offers an opportunity to refine that safety assessment. In order to estimate systemic exposure (AUC) to aromatic amine hair dyes following typical product application conditions, skin penetration and epidermal and systemic metabolic conversion of the parent compound was assessed in human skin explants and human keratinocyte (HaCaT) and hepatocyte cultures. To estimate the amount of the aromatic amine that can reach the general circulation unchanged after passage through the skin the following toxicokinetically relevant parameters were applied: a) Michaelis-Menten kinetics to quantify the epidermal metabolism; b) the estimated keratinocyte cell abundance in the viable epidermis; c) the skin penetration rate; d) the calculated Mean Residence Time in the viable epidermis; e) the viable epidermis thickness and f) the skin permeability coefficient. In a next step, in vitro hepatocyte Km and Vmax values and whole liver mass and cell abundance were used to calculate the scaled intrinsic clearance, which was combined with liver blood flow and fraction of compound unbound in the blood to give hepatic clearance. The systemic exposure in the general circulation (AUC) was extrapolated using internal dose and hepatic clearance, and Cmax was extrapolated (conservative overestimation) using internal dose and volume of distribution, indicating that appropriate toxicokinetic information can be generated based solely on in vitro data. For the hair dye, p-phenylenediamine, these data were found to be in the same order of magnitude as those published for human volunteers. PMID:26028483

  12. Dye laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Moses, Edward I.

    1992-01-01

    An improved dye laser amplifier is disclosed. The efficiency of the dye lr amplifier is increased significantly by increasing the power of a dye beam as it passes from an input window to an output window within the dye chamber, while maintaining the intensity of the dye beam constant.

  13. Dye laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    An improved dye laser amplifier is disclosed. The efficiency of the dye laser amplifier is increased significantly by increasing the power of a dye beam as it passes from an input window to an output window within the dye chamber, while maintaining the intensity of the dye beam constant. 3 figs.

  14. Surface Binding and Organization of Sensitizing Dyes on Metal Oxide Single Crystal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Parkinson, Bruce

    2010-06-04

    Even though investigations of dye-sensitized nanocrystalline semiconductors in solar cells has dominated research on dye-sensitized semiconductors over the past two decades. Single crystal electrodes represent far simpler model systems for studying the sensitization process with a continuing train of studies dating back more than forty years. Even today single crystal surfaces prove to be more controlled experimental models for the study of dye-sensitized semiconductors than the nanocrystalline substrates. We analyzed the scientific advances in the model sensitized single crystal systems that preceded the introduction of nanocrystalline semiconductor electrodes. It then follows the single crystal research to the present, illustrating both their striking simplicity of use and clarity of interpretation relative to nanocrystalline electrodes. Researchers have employed many electrochemical, photochemical and scanning probe techniques for studying monolayer quantities of sensitizing dyes at specific crystallographic faces of different semiconductors. These methods include photochronocoulometry, electronic spectroscopy and flash photolysis of dyes at potential-controlled semiconductor electrodes and the use of total internal reflection methods. In addition, we describe the preparation of surfaces of single crystal SnS2 and TiO2 electrodes to serve as reproducible model systems for charge separation at dye sensitized solar cells. This process involves cleaving the SnS2 electrodes and a photoelectrochemical surface treatment for TiO2 that produces clean surfaces for sensitization (as verified by AFM) resulting in near unity yields for electron transfer from the molecular excited dyes into the conduction band.

  15. Mathematical circulatory system model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakin, William D. (Inventor); Stevens, Scott A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system and method of modeling a circulatory system including a regulatory mechanism parameter. In one embodiment, a regulatory mechanism parameter in a lumped parameter model is represented as a logistic function. In another embodiment, the circulatory system model includes a compliant vessel, the model having a parameter representing a change in pressure due to contraction of smooth muscles of a wall of the vessel.

  16. Biopolymer based system doped with nonlinear optical dye as a medium for amplified spontaneous emission and lasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sznitko, Lech; Mysliwiec, Jaroslaw; Karpinski, Pawel; Palewska, Krystyna; Parafiniuk, Kacper; Bartkiewicz, Stanislaw; Rau, Ileana; Kajzar, Francois; Miniewicz, Andrzej

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we present results of detailed studies on amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) and lasing achieved in a double-layer system consisted of a biopolymer based matrix loaded with 3-(1,1-dicyanoethenyl1)-1phenyl-4,5dihydro-1H-pyrazole organic nonlinear optical dye and photochromic polymer. The laser action was achieved via distributed feedback configuration with third order of Bragg scattering on surface relief grating generated in photochromic polymer. To excite the luminescence, we have used 6 ns pulses of Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm. The ASE and lasing thresholds were estimated to be 17 mJ/cm2 and 11 mJ/cm2, respectively.

  17. Helquat Dyes: Helicene-like Push-Pull Systems with Large Second-Order Nonlinear Optical Responses.

    PubMed

    Coe, Benjamin J; Rusanova, Daniela; Joshi, Vishwas D; Sánchez, Sergio; Vávra, Jan; Khobragade, Dushant; Severa, Lukáš; Císařová, Ivana; Šaman, David; Pohl, Radek; Clays, Koen; Depotter, Griet; Brunschwig, Bruce S; Teplý, Filip

    2016-03-01

    Helquat dyes combine a cationic hemicyanine with a helicene-like motif to form a new blueprint for chiral systems with large and tunable nonlinear optical (NLO) properties. We report a series of such species with characterization, including determination of static first hyperpolarizabilities β0 via hyper-Rayleigh scattering and Stark spectroscopy. The measured β0 values are similar to or substantially larger than that of the commercial chromophore E-4'-(dimethylamino)-N-methyl-4-stilbazolium. Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations on two of the new cations are used to probe their molecular electronic structures and optical properties. Related molecules are expected to show bulk second-order NLO effects in even nonpolar media, overcoming a key challenge in developing useful materials. PMID:26844587

  18. Super vasomol hair dye poisoning.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Praveen A S; Talari, Keerthi; Dutta, T K

    2012-01-01

    Hair dye poisoning is not rare but is an emerging poisoning in India. The main component of hair dye causing toxicity is paraphenylenediamine (PPD). Acute poisoning by PPD causes characteristic severe angioedema of the upper airway accompanied by a swollen, dry, hard, and protruding tongue. Systemic intoxication results in multisystem involvement and can cause rhabdomyolysis, acute renal failure (ARF). PPD consumption is an uncommon cause of ARF. There is no specific antidote for PPD and treatment is mainly supportive. We report a case of suicidal ingestion of hair dye that presented with cervicofascial edema and later developed rhabdomyolysis and ARF. Our patient improved with dialysis and symptomatic management. PMID:22736909

  19. Dye-enhanced multimodal confocal microscopy for noninvasive detection of skin cancers in mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jesung; Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.

    2010-03-01

    Skin cancer is the most common form of human cancer. Its early diagnosis and timely treatment is of paramount importance for dermatology and surgical oncology. In this study, we evaluate the use of reflectance and fluorescence confocal microscopy for detecting skin cancers in an in-vivo trial with B16F10 melanoma and SCCVII squamous cell carcinoma in mice. For the experiments, the mice are anesthetized, then the tumors are infiltrated with aqueous solution of methylene blue and imaged. Reflectance images are acquired at 658 nm. Fluorescence is excited at 658 nm and registered in the range between 690 and 710 nm. After imaging, the mice are sacrificed. The tumors are excised and processed for hematoxylin and eosin histopathology, which is compared to the optical images. The results of the study indicate that in-vivo reflectance images provide valuable information on vascularization of the tumor, whereas the fluorescence images mimic the structural features seen in histopathology. Simultaneous dye-enhanced reflectance and fluorescence confocal microscopy shows promise for the detection, demarcation, and noninvasive monitoring of skin cancer development.

  20. A novel biosorbent for dye removal: extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) of Proteus mirabilis TJ-1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Xia, Siqing; Wang, Xuejiang; Yang, Aming; Xu, Bin; Chen, Ling; Zhu, Zhiliang; Zhao, Jianfu; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Leonard, Didier

    2009-04-15

    This paper deals with the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) of Proteus mirabilis TJ-1 used as a novel biosorbent to remove dye from aqueous solution in batch systems. As a widely used and hazardous dye, basic blue 54 (BB54) was chosen as the model dye to examine the adsorption performance of the EPS. The effects of pH, initial dye concentration, contact time and temperature on the sorption of BB54 to the EPS were examined. At various initial dye concentrations (50-400 mg/L), the batch sorption equilibrium can be obtained in only 5 min. Kinetic studies suggested that the sorption followed the internal transport mechanism. According to the Langmuir model, the maximum BB54 uptake of 2.005 g/g was obtained. Chemical analysis of the EPS indicated the presence of protein (30.9%, w/w) and acid polysaccharide (63.1%, w/w). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that the EPS with a crystal-linear structure was whole enwrapped by adsorbed dye molecules. FTIR spectrum result revealed the presence of adsorbing groups such as carboxyl, hydroxyl and amino groups in the EPS. High-molecular weight of the EPS with more binding-sites and stronger van der Waals forces together with its specific construct leads to the excellent performance of dye adsorption. The EPS shows potential board application as a biosorbent for both environmental protection and dye recovery. PMID:18718709

  1. System Advisor Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-03-01

    The System Advisor Model (SAM) is a performance and economic model designed to facilitate decision making for people involved in the renewable energy industry, ranging from project managers and engineers to incentive program designers, technology developers, and researchers.

  2. Hair dye poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hair tint poisoning ... Different types of hair dye contain different harmful ingredients. The harmful ingredients in permanent dyes are: Naphthylamine Other aromatic amino compounds Phenylenediamines Toluene ...

  3. Short Time Exposure (STE) test in conjunction with Bovine Corneal Opacity and Permeability (BCOP) assay including histopathology to evaluate correspondence with the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) eye irritation classification of textile dyes.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Gisele Augusto Rodrigues; Ducas, Rafael do Nascimento; Teixeira, Gabriel Campos; Batista, Aline Carvalho; Oliveira, Danielle Palma; Valadares, Marize Campos

    2015-09-01

    Eye irritation evaluation is mandatory for predicting health risks in consumers exposed to textile dyes. The two dyes, Reactive Orange 16 (RO16) and Reactive Green 19 (RG19) are classified as Category 2A (irritating to eyes) based on the UN Globally Harmonized System for classification (UN GHS), according to the Draize test. On the other hand, animal welfare considerations and the enforcement of a new regulation in the EU are drawing much attention in reducing or replacing animal experiments with alternative methods. This study evaluated the eye irritation of the two dyes RO16 and RG19 by combining the Short Time Exposure (STE) and the Bovine Corneal Opacity and Permeability (BCOP) assays and then comparing them with in vivo data from the GHS classification. The STE test (first level screening) categorized both dyes as GHS Category 1 (severe irritant). In the BCOP, dye RG19 was also classified as GHS Category 1 while dye RO16 was classified as GHS no prediction can be made. Both dyes caused damage to the corneal tissue as confirmed by histopathological analysis. Our findings demonstrated that the STE test did not contribute to arriving at a better conclusion about the eye irritation potential of the dyes when used in conjunction with the BCOP test. Adding the histopathology to the BCOP test could be an appropriate tool for a more meaningful prediction of the eye irritation potential of dyes. PMID:26026500

  4. Superiority of D-A-D over D-A type of organic dyes for the application in dye-sensitized solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Santu; Pramanik, Anup; Ahmed, Tasnim; Sahoo, Suman Kalyan; Sarkar, Pranab

    2016-04-01

    We study the optoelectronic properties of some recently synthesized D-A-D chromophores which are susceptible for superior intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) property. Our first principle calculations reveal that, the chromophores have enhanced charge transfer probability in the excited state in comparison to their corresponding ground states indicating faster electron injection at the interface of dye-semiconductor composites. We compute the photovoltaic properties of the dyes with and without substitution and way out a root for optimizing the device performance. Finally, dye-TiO2 QD composite systems are studied as a model for realistic photovoltaic device.

  5. Just Dyeing to Find Out.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monhardt, Becky Meyer

    1996-01-01

    Presents a multidisciplinary unit on natural dyes designed to take advantage of the natural curiosity of middle school students. Discusses history of dyes, natural dyes, preparation of dyes, and the dyeing process. (JRH)

  6. Evaluation of quantum dot immunofluorescence and a digital CMOS imaging system as an alternative to conventional organic fluorescence dyes and laser scanning for quantifying protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Jain, Aarti; Taghavian, Omid; Vallejo, Derek; Dotsey, Emmanuel; Schwartz, Dan; Bell, Florian G; Greef, Chad; Davies, D Huw; Grudzien, Jennipher; Lee, Abraham P; Felgner, Philip L; Liang, Li

    2016-04-01

    Organic fluorescent dyes are widely used for the visualization of bound antibody in a variety of immunofluorescence assays. However, the detection equipment is often expensive, fragile, and hard to deploy widely. Quantum dots (Qdot) are nanocrystals made of semiconductor materials that emit light at different wavelengths according to the size of the crystal, with increased brightness and stability. Here, we have evaluated a small benchtop "personal" optical imager (ArrayCAM) developed for quantification of protein arrays probed by Qdot-based indirect immunofluorescence. The aim was to determine if the Qdot imager system provides equivalent data to the conventional organic dye-labeled antibody/laser scanner system. To do this, duplicate proteome microarrays of Vaccinia virus, Brucella melitensis and Plasmodium falciparum were probed with identical samples of immune sera, and IgG, IgA, and IgM profiles visualized using biotinylated secondary antibodies followed by a tertiary reagent of streptavidin coupled to either P3 (an organic cyanine dye typically used for microarrays) or Q800 (Qdot). The data show excellent correlation for all samples tested (R > 0.8) with no significant change of antibody reactivity profiles. We conclude that Qdot detection provides data equivalent to that obtained using conventional organic dye detection. The portable imager offers an economical, more robust, and deployable alternative to conventional laser array scanners. PMID:26842269

  7. Development of injection-seeded optical parametric laser systems with pulsed dye amplifiers for high-spectral-resolution combustion diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuiyan, Aizaz Hossain

    The development and application of optical parametric (OP) systems with pulsed dye amplifiers producing single frequency mode (SFM), narrow linewidth, and tunable laser radiation for high-spectral-resolution laser diagnostics is described. An optical parametric generator (OPG) was developed, consisting of a pair of counter-rotating β barium borate (β-BBO) crystals pumped by third-harmonic output of an injection-seeded Nd:YAG laser. The OPG crystals themselves are injection-seeded using a continuous wave (cw) distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser or external cavity diode laser (ECDL) at idler wavelength. The OPG is converted for some applications into an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) by incorporating a feedback cavity. The signal output from the OP system is amplified using pulsed dye amplifiers. The PDAs are pumped either by second-harmonic or third-harmonic output of the Nd:YAG laser depending on the OP output wavelength and the dye solution used in PDAs. The linewidth of the laser beam produced using OP/PDA systems is 200 MHz and the spatial beam profile is nearly Gaussian. Initial application of OP/PDA system included two-photon laser induced fluorescence (LIF) of atomic oxygen in counter-flow flames, dual pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) for N2 and CO2, and nitric oxide (NO) planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) in compressible flowfield. A two-photon pump polarization spectroscopy probe (TPP-PSP) laser system has also been developed using two SFM OPG/PDA systems for the detection of atomic hydrogen (H-atom) in flames. In TPP-PSP, a 243-nm pump beam excites the 1S-2S two photon transition and the excited atoms in 2S level are probed by polarization spectroscopy between n=2 and n=3 manifolds using a circularly polarized 656-nm pump and a linearly polarized 656-nm probe laser beam. Using the TPP-PSP scheme, atomic hydrogen was detected at concentrations as low as 11 ppm. The use of injection-seeded OPG/PDAs as SFM sources for the

  8. Optimized matching modes of bioelectrochemical module and anaerobic sludge in the integrated system for azo dye treatment.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanying; Wang, Aijie; Ren, Hong-Yu

    2015-09-01

    In this work, three matching modes (relative positions, catholyte flow sequences, and flow regimes) of bioelectrochemical module and anaerobic sludge were evaluated and optimized for azo dye treatment in the integrated system with embedding modular bioelectrochemical system into anaerobic sludge reactor. Results showed that it was favorable to operate this integrated system under the condition of 1/4 cathode soaking into sludge with spiral distributor in down-flow direction. Current, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and pH clearly demonstrated the important role of 1/4 soaking in electron/proton transfer. The down-flow direction flowed through electrode zone and then sludge zone could benefit to the efficient use of cathode and improve AO7 treatment. Furthermore, the positive effect of spiral catholyte distributor might be due to its promoting role in mixing and creating a spiral flow channel around the cathode electrode-microbes-solution interface. These results exhibited great potential for matching modular bioelectrochemical system with anaerobic treatment process. PMID:26080106

  9. A cascaded QSAR model for efficient prediction of overall power conversion efficiency of all-organic dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongzhi; Zhong, Ziyan; Li, Lin; Gao, Rui; Cui, Jingxia; Gao, Ting; Hu, Li Hong; Lu, Yinghua; Su, Zhong-Min; Li, Hui

    2015-05-30

    A cascaded model is proposed to establish the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) between the overall power conversion efficiency (PCE) and quantum chemical molecular descriptors of all-organic dye sensitizers. The cascaded model is a two-level network in which the outputs of the first level (JSC, VOC, and FF) are the inputs of the second level, and the ultimate end-point is the overall PCE of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The model combines quantum chemical methods and machine learning methods, further including quantum chemical calculations, data division, feature selection, regression, and validation steps. To improve the efficiency of the model and reduce the redundancy and noise of the molecular descriptors, six feature selection methods (multiple linear regression, genetic algorithms, mean impact value, forward selection, backward elimination, and +n-m algorithm) are used with the support vector machine. The best established cascaded model predicts the PCE values of DSSCs with a MAE of 0.57 (%), which is about 10% of the mean value PCE (5.62%). The validation parameters according to the OECD principles are R(2) (0.75), Q(2) (0.77), and Qcv2 (0.76), which demonstrate the great goodness-of-fit, predictivity, and robustness of the model. Additionally, the applicability domain of the cascaded QSAR model is defined for further application. This study demonstrates that the established cascaded model is able to effectively predict the PCE for organic dye sensitizers with very low cost and relatively high accuracy, providing a useful tool for the design of dye sensitizers with high PCE. PMID:25773984

  10. MLS: Airplane system modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, A. D.; Stapleton, B. P.; Walen, D. B.; Rieder, P. F.; Moss, D. G.

    1981-01-01

    Analysis, modeling, and simulations were conducted as part of a multiyear investigation of the more important airplane-system-related items of the microwave landing system (MLS). Particular emphasis was placed upon the airplane RF system, including the antenna radiation distribution, the cabling options from the antenna to the receiver, and the overall impact of the airborne system gains and losses upon the direct-path signal structure. In addition, effort was expended toward determining the impact of the MLS upon the airplane flight management system and developing the initial stages of a fast-time MLS automatic control system simulation model. Results ot these studies are presented.

  11. Basic Red 51, a permitted semi-permanent hair dye, is cytotoxic to human skin cells: Studies in monolayer and 3D skin model using human keratinocytes (HaCaT).

    PubMed

    Zanoni, Thalita B; Tiago, Manoela; Faião-Flores, Fernanda; de Moraes Barros, Silvia B; Bast, Aalt; Hageman, Geja; de Oliveira, Danielle Palma; Maria-Engler, Silvya S

    2014-06-01

    The use of hair dyes is closely associated with the increase of cancer, inflammation and other skin disorders. The recognition that human skin is not an impermeable barrier indicates that there is the possibility of human systemic exposure. The carcinogenic potential of hair dye ingredients has attracted the attention of toxicologists for many decades, mainly due to the fact that some ingredients belong to the large chemical family of aromatic amines. Herein, we investigated the cytotoxicity of Basic Red 51 (BR51) in immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT). BR51 is a temporary hair dye that belongs to the azo group (NN); the cleavage of this bond may result in the release of toxic aromatic amines. The half maximal effective concentration (EC50) in HaCaT cells is 13μg/mL. BR51 induced a significant decrease on expression of p21 in a dose dependent manner. p53 was not affected, whereas BR51 decreased procaspase 8 and cleaved procaspase 9. These results proved that caspase 3 is fully involved in BR51-induced apoptosis. The dye was also able to stop this cell cycle on G2 in sub-toxic doses. Moreover, we reconstructed a 3D artificial epidermis using HaCaT cells; using this model, we observed that BR51 induced cell injury and cells were undergoing apoptosis, considering the fragmented nuclei. Subsequently, BR51 induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to an increase on the levels of 8-oxo-dG. In conclusion, we provide strong evidence that consumer and/or professional exposure to BR51 poses risk to human health. PMID:24657526

  12. Ultrasound energy to accelerate dye uptake and dye-fiber interaction of reactive dye on knitted cotton fabric at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Tissera, Nadeeka D; Wijesena, Ruchira N; de Silva, K M Nalin

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic cavitation formed due to propagation of ultrasound wave inside a dye bath was successfully used to dye cotton fabric with a reactive dye at lower temperatures. The energy input to the system during sonication was 0.7 W/cm(2). This was within the energy range that contributes towards forming cavitation during ultra-sonication. The influence of ultrasound treatment on dye particle size and fiber morphology is discussed. Particle size analysis of the dye bath revealed ultra-sonication energy was capable of de-agglomeration of hydrolyzed dye molecules during dyeing. SEM micrograph and AFM topographical image of the fiber surface revealed fiber morphology remains unchanged after the sonication. The study was extended in understanding the contribution of ultrasound method of dyeing towards achieving good color strength on the fabric, compared to the normal heating method of dyeing. Study showed color strength obtained using ultra sound method of dyeing is higher compared to normal heating dyeing. Ultrasound energy was able to achieve the good color strength on cotton fabric at very low temperature such as 30 °C, which was approximately 230% more than the color strength achieved in normal heating method of dyeing. This indicates that energy input to the system using ultrasound was capable of acting as an effective alternative method of dyeing knitted cotton fabrics with reactive dye. PMID:26585007

  13. Integrated Workforce Modeling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moynihan, Gary P.

    2000-01-01

    There are several computer-based systems, currently in various phases of development at KSC, which encompass some component, aspect, or function of workforce modeling. These systems may offer redundant capabilities and/or incompatible interfaces. A systems approach to workforce modeling is necessary in order to identify and better address user requirements. This research has consisted of two primary tasks. Task 1 provided an assessment of existing and proposed KSC workforce modeling systems for their functionality and applicability to the workforce planning function. Task 2 resulted in the development of a proof-of-concept design for a systems approach to workforce modeling. The model incorporates critical aspects of workforce planning, including hires, attrition, and employee development.

  14. Oral Triphenylmethane Food Dye Analog, Brilliant Blue G, Prevents Neuronal Loss in APPSwDI/NOS2-/- Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Jacob A; Erisir, Alev; Kwon, Inchan

    2016-01-01

    Reducing amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation is a promising strategy for developing Alzheimer's Disease (AD) therapeutics. We recently reported that a triphenylmethane food dye analog, Brilliant Blue G (BBG), is a dose-dependent modulator of in vitro amyloid-β aggregation and cytotoxicity in cell-based assays. Following up on this recent work, we sought to further evaluate this novel modulator in a therapeutically-relevant AD transgenic mouse model. BBG was orally administered to APPSwDI/NOS2-/- mice for three months in order to assess its biocompatibility, its permeability across the blood-brain barrier, and its efficacy at rescuing AD pathology. The results showed that BBG was well-tolerated, caused no significant weight change/unusual behavior, and was able to significantly cross the AD blood-brain barrier in APPSwDI/NOS2-/- mice. Immunohistochemical and electron microscopic analysis of the brain sections revealed that BBG was able to significantly prevent neuronal loss and reduce intracellular APP/Aβ in hippocampal neurons. This is the first report of 1) the effect of Brilliant Blue G on neuronal loss in a transgenic animal model of AD, 2) oral administration of BBG to affect a protein conformation/aggregation disease, and 3) electron microscopic ultrastructural analysis of AD pathology in APPSwDI/NOS2-/- mice. PMID:26852943

  15. Artificial neural network modeling of photocatalytic removal of a disperse dye using synthesized of ZnO nanoparticles on montmorillonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kıranşan, Murat; Khataee, Alireza; Karaca, Semra; Sheydaei, Mohsen

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the photocatalytic ability of ZnO/Montmorilonite (ZnO/MMT) nanocomposite under UV-A, UV-B and UV-C radiation was investigated. ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized on the surface of MMT and used as photocatalyst in decolorization of Disperse Red 54 (DR54) solution. Synthesized nanocomposite was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques and nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms curves. The average width of synthesized ZnO particles is in the range of 30-45 nm. Effect of UV light regions, initial dye concentration, initial dosage of nanocomposite, and reusability of catalyst was studied on decolorization efficiency. The highest decolorization efficiency was achieved under UV-C radiation. A three-layered feed forward back propagation artificial neural network model was developed to predict the photocatalysis of DR54 under UV-C radiation. According to ANN model the ZnO/MMT dosage with a relative importance of 49.21% is the most influential parameter in the photocatalytic decolorization process.

  16. The Earth System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark; Rood, Richard B.; Hildebrand, Peter; Raymond, Carol

    2003-01-01

    The Earth System Model is the natural evolution of current climate models and will be the ultimate embodiment of our geophysical understanding of the planet. These models are constructed from components - atmosphere, ocean, ice, land, chemistry, solid earth, etc. models and merged together through a coupling program which is responsible for the exchange of data from the components. Climate models and future earth system models will have standardized modules, and these standards are now being developed by the ESMF project funded by NASA. The Earth System Model will have a variety of uses beyond climate prediction. The model can be used to build climate data records making it the core of an assimilation system, and it can be used in OSSE experiments to evaluate. The computing and storage requirements for the ESM appear to be daunting. However, the Japanese ES theoretical computing capability is already within 20% of the minimum requirements needed for some 2010 climate model applications. Thus it seems very possible that a focused effort to build an Earth System Model will achieve succcss.

  17. Integration of dye-sensitized solar cells, thermoelectric modules and electrical storage loop system to constitute a novel photothermoelectric generator.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ho; Yu, Zhi-Rong

    2012-08-01

    This study self-develops a novel type of photothermoelectric power generation modules. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) serve as the photoelectric conversion system and a copper (Cu) heat-transfer nanofilm coating on both sides of the thermoelectric generator (TEG) acts as a thermoelectric conversion system. Thus module assembly absorbs light and generates electricity by DSSCs, and also recycles waste heat and generates power by the TEG. In addition, a set of pulsating heat pipes (PHP) filled with Cu nanofluid is placed on the cooling side to increase cooling effects and enhance the power generation efficiency. Results show that when the heat source of thermoelectric modules reaches 90 degrees C, TEG power output is increased by 85.7%. Besides, after thermoelectric modules are heated by additional heat source at 80 degrees C, the electrical energy generated by them can let a NiMH cell (1.25 V) be sufficiently charged in about 30 minutes. When photothermoelectric modules is illumined by simulated light, the temperature difference of two sides of TEG can reach 7 degrees C and the thermoelectric conversion efficiency is 2.17%. Furthermore, the power output of the thermoelectric modules is 11.48 mW/cm2, enhancing 1.4 % compared to merely using DSSCs module. PMID:22962827

  18. Twisting in the excited state of an N-methylpyridinium fluorescent dye modulated by nano-heterogeneous micellar systems.

    PubMed

    Cesaretti, A; Carlotti, B; Gentili, P L; Germani, R; Spalletti, A; Elisei, F

    2016-04-13

    A push-pull N-methylpyridinium fluorescent dye with a pyrenyl group as the electron-donor portion was investigated within the nano-heterogeneous media provided by some micellar systems. The molecule was studied by stationary and time-resolved spectroscopic techniques in spherical micellar solutions and viscoelastic hydrogels, in order to throw light on the role played by twisting in its excited state deactivation. As proven by femtosecond fluorescence up-conversion and transient absorption experiments, the excited state dynamics of the molecule is ruled by charge transfer and twisting processes, which, from the locally excited (LE) state initially populated upon excitation, progressively lead to twisted (TICT) and planar (PICT) intramolecular charge transfer states. The inclusion within micellar aggregates was found to slow down and/or limit the rotation of the molecule with respect to what had previously been observed in water, while its confinement within the hydrophobic domains of the gel matrixes prevents any molecular torsion. The increasing viscosity of the medium, when passing from water to micellar systems, implies that the detected steady-state fluorescence comes from an excited state which is not fully relaxed, as is the case with the TICT state in micelles or the LE state in hydrogels, where the detected emission changes its usual orange colour to yellow. PMID:26982966

  19. Model-Based Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, Harold P.

    2007-01-01

    Engineers, who design systems using text specification documents, focus their work upon the completed system to meet Performance, time and budget goals. Consistency and integrity is difficult to maintain within text documents for a single complex system and more difficult to maintain as several systems are combined into higher-level systems, are maintained over decades, and evolve technically and in performance through updates. This system design approach frequently results in major changes during the system integration and test phase, and in time and budget overruns. Engineers who build system specification documents within a model-based systems environment go a step further and aggregate all of the data. They interrelate all of the data to insure consistency and integrity. After the model is constructed, the various system specification documents are prepared, all from the same database. The consistency and integrity of the model is assured, therefore the consistency and integrity of the various specification documents is insured. This article attempts to define model-based systems relative to such an environment. The intent is to expose the complexity of the enabling problem by outlining what is needed, why it is needed and how needs are being addressed by international standards writing teams.

  20. Synthesis, spectral characterization, thermal analysis, molecular modeling and antimicrobial activity of new potentially N2O2 azo-dye Schiff base complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaghaz, Abdel-Nasser M. A.; Ammar, Yousry A.; Bayoumi, Hoda A.; Aldhlmani, Sharah A.

    2014-09-01

    The azo-dye Schiff's base of N2O2 dibasic ligand, H2L [N,N‧-bis(5-(4-sulfanilamidophenylazosalicylidene)ethylenediamine] was prepared by the condensation of ethylenediamine with [5-(4-sulfanilamidophenylazo-salicylaldehyde] in ethanol. New complexes of with metal ions Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Mn(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), Pt(IV), Fe(III) and Cr(III) are synthesized. Elemental, spectroscopic and thermal analyses as well as conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements are used to elucidate the structure of the newly prepared metal complexes. The azo-dye Schiff's base behaves as a di-negative N2O2 tetradentate ligand. The metal complexes exhibited square planar, tetrahedral and octahedral geometrical arrangements, the molar conductivity data indicates that all complexes are neutral. The thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermoanalysis (DTA) of the Cu(II), Mn(II), Cr(III) and Co(II) complexes were carried out in the range of 30-800 °C. The complexes were decomposed in one and two stages of the Cu(II), Mn(II), Cr(III) and Co(II) complexes, respectively. Also, decomposition of the synthesized complexes is related to the Schiff's base characteristics. The thermal decomposition of the studied reactions was first order. The kinetic parameters for the decomposition steps in Cu(II), Mn(II), Cr(III) and Co(II) complexes thermograms have been calculated using Broido's method. In molecular modeling the geometries of azo-dye Schiff base ligand H2L and its metal(II/III/IV) complexes were fully optimized with respect to the energy using the 6-31G basis set. Antimicrobial activities of the azo-dye Schiff's base ligand and its corresponding metal complexes were screened against various organisms. The azo-dye Schiff's base ligand and some of its complexes were found to be biologically inactive.

  1. Mathematical modeling of selective photothermolysis to aid the treatment of vascular malformations and hemangioma with pulsed dye laser.

    PubMed

    Shafirstein, Gal; Buckmiller, Lisa M; Waner, Milton; Bäumler, Wolfgang

    2007-06-01

    Pulsed dye lasers (PDL) are the standard of care in the treatment of cutaneous vascular disorders such as the port-wine strains or hemangiomas of infancy. Nonetheless, there is still uncertainty regarding the specific laser parameters that are likely to yield optimal clinical outcomes. Using mathematical modeling, we explain and associate clinical outcomes with laser wavelength, radiant exposure, and pulse time and shape. The model's prediction that a continuous PDL pulse of 0.45 ms with a radiant exposure of 6 J/cm(2) is equivalent to delivering a 1.5-ms pulse consisting of three pulses with a radiant exposure of 12 J/cm(2) is in agreement with clinical studies. The model also suggests that for vascular malformations involving vessel diameters in the range of 150-500 microm, one should use a PDL at a wavelength of 595 nm with a radiant exposure of at least 12 J/cm(2) and pulse time of 1.5 ms, delivered in three pulses. Whereas it is calculated that malformations with vessels smaller than 50 microm will not respond to PDL in any clinical setting, an excellent response to PDL treatment at either a 585- or 595-nm wavelength can be expected for malformations with vessel diameters of 50-150 microm. Epidermal cooling is highly recommended for all settings to minimize pain and the risk of side effects. Finally, the model is used to generate a reference table that suggests specific PDL parameters for the treatment of various malformations and hemangiomas. The table cannot replace a clinician's experience with respect to which and how parameters should be changed, but provides a defined window of parameters that should be tried to improve clinical response. PMID:17268765

  2. Passive adoptive transfer of antitumor immunity induced by laser-dye-immunoadjuvant treatment in a rat metastatic breast cancer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Liu, Hong; Singhal, Anil K.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2000-06-01

    The ideal cancer treatment modalities should not only cause tumor regression and eradication but also induce a systemic anti-tumor immunity. This is essential for control of metastatic tumors and for long-term tumor resistance. Laser immunotherapy using a laser, a laser-absorbing dye and an immunoadjuvant has induced such a long-term immunity in treatment of a mammary metastatic tumor. The successfully treated rats established total resistance to multiple subsequent tumor challenges. For further mechanistic studies of the antitumor immunity induced by this novel treatment modality, passive adoptive transfer was performed using splenocytes as immune cells. The spleen cells harvested from successfully treated tumor-bearing rats provided 100% immunity in the naive recipients. The passively protected first cohort rats were immune to tumor challenge with an increased tumor dose; their splenocytes also prevented the establishment of tumor in the second cohort of naive recipient rats. This immunity transfer was accomplished without the usually required T-cell suppression in recipients.

  3. An inhibitory effect of self-assembled soft systems on Fenton driven degradation of xanthene dye Rhodamine B.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Uzma; Chat, Oyais Ahmad; Dar, Aijaz Ahmad

    2014-03-01

    Rhodamine B (RhB) is known to be a common organic pollutant despite having various technical applications. Treatment of effluents containing such compounds is important so as to minimize their effect on environment. Advanced Oxidation Processes (Fenton and Fenton like reactions) are such methods that can oxidize the contaminants powerfully and non-selectively. This work investigates the oxidation kinetics of dye RhB by hydroxyl radical (OH) generated via Fenton reaction in presence of surfactant assemblies of varying architectures using spectrophotometric, spectrofluorometic and tensiometric methods. The presence of surfactants viz. cationics, non-ionics and some binary mixtures in the pre-micellar and post micellar concentration ranges were found to inhibit the degradation of RhB to a varying degree. However, the reaction was totally inhibited in anionic surfactant. The experimental data was fitted to a pseudo first order kinetic model and the kinetic parameters obtained thereof were explained on the basis of the nature and type of interaction between the cationic form of RhB and the surfactants of varying architectures. The work has a critical significance in view of the fact that degradation studied in presence of surfactant assemblies is more representative than studied in aqueous solution because such conditions compare well with the conditions prevailing in the environment. PMID:24287263

  4. Comparing Quantitative Values of Two Generations of Laser-Assisted Indocyanine Green Dye Angiography Systems: Can We Predict Necrosis?

    PubMed Central

    Fourman, Mitchell S.; Rivara, Andrew; Dagum, Alexander B.; Huston, Tara L.; Ganz, Jason C.; Bui, Duc T.; Khan, Sami U.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Several devices exist today to assist the intraoperative determination of skin flap perfusion. Laser-Assisted Indocyanine Green Dye Angiography (LAICGA) has been shown to accurately predict mastectomy skin flap necrosis using quantitative perfusion values. The laser properties of the latest LAICGA device (SPY Elite) differ significantly from its predecessor system (SPY 2001), preventing direct translation of previous published data. The purpose of this study was to establish a mathematical relationship of perfusion values between these 2 devices. Methods: Breast reconstruction patients were prospectively enrolled into a clinical trial where skin flap evaluation and excision was based on quantitative SPY Q values previously established in the literature. Initial study patients underwent mastectomy skin flap evaluation using both SPY systems simultaneously. Absolute perfusion unit (APU) values at identical locations on the breast were then compared graphically. Results: 210 data points were identified on the same patients (n = 4) using both SPY systems. A linear relationship (y = 2.9883x + 12.726) was identified with a high level or correlation (R2 = 0.744). Previously published values using SPY 2001 (APU 3.7) provided a value of 23.8 APU on the SPY Elite. In addition, postoperative necrosis in these patients correlated to regions of skin identified with the SPY Elite with APU less than 23.8. Conclusion: Intraoperative comparison of LAICGA systems has provided direct correlation of perfusion values predictive of necrosis that were previously established in the literature. An APU value of 3.7 from the SPY 2001 correlates to a SPY Elite APU value of 23.8. PMID:25525483

  5. Multiscale Cloud System Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Moncrieff, Mitchell W.

    2009-01-01

    The central theme of this paper is to describe how cloud system resolving models (CRMs) of grid spacing approximately 1 km have been applied to various important problems in atmospheric science across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales and how these applications relate to other modeling approaches. A long-standing problem concerns the representation of organized precipitating convective cloud systems in weather and climate models. Since CRMs resolve the mesoscale to large scales of motion (i.e., 10 km to global) they explicitly address the cloud system problem. By explicitly representing organized convection, CRMs bypass restrictive assumptions associated with convective parameterization such as the scale gap between cumulus and large-scale motion. Dynamical models provide insight into the physical mechanisms involved with scale interaction and convective organization. Multiscale CRMs simulate convective cloud systems in computational domains up to global and have been applied in place of contemporary convective parameterizations in global models. Multiscale CRMs pose a new challenge for model validation, which is met in an integrated approach involving CRMs, operational prediction systems, observational measurements, and dynamical models in a new international project: the Year of Tropical Convection, which has an emphasis on organized tropical convection and its global effects.

  6. Unveiling characteristics of a bioelectrochemical system with polarity reversion for simultaneous azo dye treatment and bioelectricity generation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian; Zhang, Yaping; Liu, Guoguang; Ning, Xunan; Wang, Yujie; Liu, Jingyong

    2015-09-01

    A novel bioelectrochemical system (BES) operated with polarity reversion was explored for simultaneous anaerobic/aerobic treatment of azo dye and production of bioelectricity under extremely low buffer. The Congo red was first decolorized in anode, with completed color removal in 35 h. The resultant decolorization intermediates were then mineralized after the anode reversed to aerobic biocathode, evidenced by 55 % chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal in 200 h. The mineralization efficiency was further increased to 70 % when the period of the half-cycle was prolonged to 375 h. Meanwhile, the BES produced a continuous stable positive/negative alternate voltage output under 5 mM phosphate buffer because of the self-neutralization of the accumulated protons and hydroxyl ions in electrolyte. The electrode performance was significantly improved, which was indicated by alleviated electrode polarization, due to in situ use of accumulated protons and hydroxyl ions and enhanced electron transfer in the presence of Congo red and its degradation intermediates, which resulted in 1.05-fold increases in maximum power density (67.5 vs. 32.9 mW/m(2)). An analysis of the microbial diversity in the biofilm revealed that the biofilm was dominated by facultative bacteria with functional roles in contaminant degradation and electricity generation. PMID:25957151

  7. Canister Model, Systems Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-09-29

    This packges provides a computer simulation of a systems model for packaging nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel in canisters. The canister model calculates overall programmatic cost, number of canisters, and fuel and waste inventories for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (other initial conditions can be entered).

  8. Dyeing behaviour of gamma irradiated cotton fabric using Lawson dye extracted from henna leaves (Lawsonia inermis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Fazal-ur; Adeel, Shahid; Qaiser, Summia; Ahmad Bhatti, Ijaz; Shahid, Muhammad; Zuber, Mohammad

    2012-11-01

    Dyeing behavior of gamma irradiated cotton fabric using Lawson dye extracted from henna leaves has been investigated. Cotton and dye powder are irradiated to different absorbed doses of 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 kGy using Cs-137 gamma irradiator. The dyeing parameters such as dyeing time, electrolyte (salt) concentration and mordant concentrations using copper and iron as mordants are optimized. Dyeing is performed using un-irradiated and irradiated cotton with dye solutions and their color strength values are evaluated in CIE Lab system using Spectraflash -SF650. Methods suggested by International Standard Organization (ISO) have been employed to investigate the colourfastness properties such as colourfastness to light, washing and rubbing of irradiated dyed fabric. It is found that gamma ray treatment of cotton dyed with extracts of henna leaves has significantly improved the color strength as well as enhanced the rating of fastness properties.

  9. The Ideal Solvent for Paper Chromatography of Food Dyes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markow, Peter G.

    1988-01-01

    Uses paper chromatography with food dyes to provide a simple and inexpensive basis for teaching chromatography. Provides experimental methodology and tabled results. Includes a solvent system comparison (Rf) for seven dyes and twenty-two solvents. (MVL)

  10. First principles modeling of eosin-loaded ZnO films: a step toward the understanding of dye-sensitized solar cell performances.

    PubMed

    Labat, Frédéric; Ciofini, Ilaria; Hratchian, Hrant P; Frisch, Mike; Raghavachari, Krishnan; Adamo, Carlo

    2009-10-14

    A theoretical investigation of eosin-Y (EY) loaded ZnO thin films, the basic components of a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC), is presented. The EY/ZnO wurtzite (10-10) system has been fully described within a periodic approach using density functional theory (DFT) and a hybrid exchange-correlation functional. Reduced systems were also analyzed to simulate an electron transfer from the dye to the substrate. Injection times from dye to the semiconductor were calculated using the Newns-Anderson approach. Finally, the UV-visible spectra of EY/ZnO films were simulated using a time-dependent DFT approach and compared to that of the EY molecule computed in solution. The results obtained highlight that EY strongly adsorbs on the ZnO substrate contributing significantly to the electronic structure of the adsorbed system. The UV-visible spectral signature of the isolated EY molecule is still found when adsorbed on ZnO but the analysis of Gamma-point crystalline orbitals reveals that a direct HOMO-->LUMO excitation cannot lead to a direct electron injection into the semiconductor, the first unoccupied orbital with contributions from the ZnO substrate being the LUMO + 1. As a consequence, a two photon injection mechanism is proposed explaining the low efficiency of the EY/ZnO solar cells. On this basis, possible strategies for enhancing the cell efficiency are presented and discussed. PMID:19761184

  11. Critical Infrastructure Modeling System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-10-01

    The Critical Infrastructure Modeling System (CIMS) is a 3D modeling and simulation environment designed to assist users in the analysis of dependencies within individual infrastructure and also interdependencies between multiple infrastructures. Through visual cuing and textual displays, a use can evaluate the effect of system perturbation and identify the emergent patterns that evolve. These patterns include possible outage areas from a loss of power, denial of service or access, and disruption of operations. Method ofmore » Solution: CIMS allows the user to model a system, create an overlay of information, and create 3D representative images to illustrate key infrastructure elements. A geo-referenced scene, satellite, aerial images or technical drawings can be incorporated into the scene. Scenarios of events can be scripted, and the user can also interact during run time to alter system characteristics. CIMS operates as a discrete event simulation engine feeding a 3D visualization.« less

  12. Critical Infrastructure Modeling System

    SciTech Connect

    2004-10-01

    The Critical Infrastructure Modeling System (CIMS) is a 3D modeling and simulation environment designed to assist users in the analysis of dependencies within individual infrastructure and also interdependencies between multiple infrastructures. Through visual cuing and textual displays, a use can evaluate the effect of system perturbation and identify the emergent patterns that evolve. These patterns include possible outage areas from a loss of power, denial of service or access, and disruption of operations. Method of Solution: CIMS allows the user to model a system, create an overlay of information, and create 3D representative images to illustrate key infrastructure elements. A geo-referenced scene, satellite, aerial images or technical drawings can be incorporated into the scene. Scenarios of events can be scripted, and the user can also interact during run time to alter system characteristics. CIMS operates as a discrete event simulation engine feeding a 3D visualization.

  13. Coadsorption of Doxorubicin and Selected Dyes on Carbon Nanotubes. Theoretical Investigation of Potential Application as a pH-Controlled Drug Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Panczyk, Tomasz; Wolski, Pawel; Lajtar, Leszek

    2016-05-17

    This work shows results of a theoretical survey, based on molecular dynamics simulation, of potential applicability of doxorubicin coadsorption with various dyes molecules on/in carbon nanotubes as a drug delivery system. The central idea is to take advantage of the dyes charge distribution change upon switching the pH of the environment from neutral (physiological 7.4) to acidic one (∼5.5 which is typical for tumor tissues). This work discusses results obtained for four dye molecules revealing more or less interesting behavior. These were bromothymol blue, methyl red, neutral red, and p-phenylenediamine. All of them reveal pKa in the range 5-7 and thus will undergo protonation in that pH range. We considered coadsorption on external walls of carbon nanotubes and sequential filling of the nanotubes inner hollow space by drug and dyes. The latter approach, with the application of neutral red and p-phenylenediamine as blockers of doxorubicin, led to the most promising results. Closer analysis of these systems allowed us to state that neutral red can be particularly useful as a long-term blocker of doxorubicin encapsulated in the inner cavity of (30,0) carbon nanotube at neutral pH. At acidic pH we observed a spontaneous release of neutral red from the nanotube and unblocking of doxorubicin. We also confirmed, by analysis of free energy profiles, that unblocked doxorubicin can spontaneously leave the nanotube interior at the considered conditions. Thus, that system can realize pH controlled doxorubicin release in acidic environment of tumor tissues. PMID:27133585

  14. Modeling and optimization of the flocculation processes for removal of cationic and anionic dyes from water by an amphoteric grafting chitosan-based flocculant using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hu; Yang, Ran; Li, Ruihua; Long, Chao; Yang, Hu; Li, Aimin

    2015-09-01

    In this study, an amphoteric grafting chitosan-based flocculant (carboxymethyl chitosan-graft-poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl) trimethyl ammonium chloride, denoted as CMC-g-PDMC) was applied to removal of the anionic and cationic dyes, acid Green 25 (AG25) and Basic Bright Yellow (7GL), from water. Flocculation conditions have been optimized by response surface methodology (RSM) on the basis of central composite design (CCD) using flocculant dosage, initial solution pH and temperature as input variables. The second-order and cubic regression models, which have been both tested by the analysis of variance (ANOVA), were constructed to link the output response (the dye removal factor) with the aforementioned input variables, respectively. The second-order regression model well described the process of AG25 removal, whereas the cubic one is more suitable for that of 7GL. The effects of those variables on the flocculation performance of CMC-g-PDMC for removal of the two dyes containing opposite charges from aqueous solutions have been studied, and the flocculation mechanisms including the interactive effects between various influencing factors have been discussed in detail also. PMID:25921759

  15. Facile realization of efficient blocking from ZnO/TiO2 mismatch interface in dye-sensitized solar cells and precise microscopic modeling adapted by circuit analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameri, Mohsen; Samavat, Feridoun; Mohajerani, Ezeddin; Fathollahi, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-06-01

    In the present research, the effect of \\text{ZnO} -based blocking layers on the operational features of \\text{Ti}{{\\text{O}}2} -based dye-sensitized solar cells is investigated. A facile solution-based coating method is applied to prepare an interfacial highly transparent \\text{ZnO} compact blocking layer (CBL) to enhance the efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells. Different precursor molar concentration were tested to find the optimum concentration. Optical and electrical measurements were carried out to confirm the operation of the CBLs. Morphological characterizations were performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the structure of the compact layers. We have also developed a set of modeling procedures to extract the effective electrical parameters including the parasitic resistances and charged carrier profiles to investigate the effect of CBLs on the dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) performance. The adopted modeling approach should establish a versatile framework for diagnosis of DSSCs and facilitates the exploration of critical factors influencing device performance.

  16. Modeling Sustainable Food Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Thomas; Prosperi, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    The processes underlying environmental, economic, and social unsustainability derive in part from the food system. Building sustainable food systems has become a predominating endeavor aiming to redirect our food systems and policies towards better-adjusted goals and improved societal welfare. Food systems are complex social-ecological systems involving multiple interactions between human and natural components. Policy needs to encourage public perception of humanity and nature as interdependent and interacting. The systemic nature of these interdependencies and interactions calls for systems approaches and integrated assessment tools. Identifying and modeling the intrinsic properties of the food system that will ensure its essential outcomes are maintained or enhanced over time and across generations, will help organizations and governmental institutions to track progress towards sustainability, and set policies that encourage positive transformations. This paper proposes a conceptual model that articulates crucial vulnerability and resilience factors to global environmental and socio-economic changes, postulating specific food and nutrition security issues as priority outcomes of food systems. By acknowledging the systemic nature of sustainability, this approach allows consideration of causal factor dynamics. In a stepwise approach, a logical application is schematized for three Mediterranean countries, namely Spain, France, and Italy.

  17. Modeling Sustainable Food Systems.

    PubMed

    Allen, Thomas; Prosperi, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    The processes underlying environmental, economic, and social unsustainability derive in part from the food system. Building sustainable food systems has become a predominating endeavor aiming to redirect our food systems and policies towards better-adjusted goals and improved societal welfare. Food systems are complex social-ecological systems involving multiple interactions between human and natural components. Policy needs to encourage public perception of humanity and nature as interdependent and interacting. The systemic nature of these interdependencies and interactions calls for systems approaches and integrated assessment tools. Identifying and modeling the intrinsic properties of the food system that will ensure its essential outcomes are maintained or enhanced over time and across generations, will help organizations and governmental institutions to track progress towards sustainability, and set policies that encourage positive transformations. This paper proposes a conceptual model that articulates crucial vulnerability and resilience factors to global environmental and socio-economic changes, postulating specific food and nutrition security issues as priority outcomes of food systems. By acknowledging the systemic nature of sustainability, this approach allows consideration of causal factor dynamics. In a stepwise approach, a logical application is schematized for three Mediterranean countries, namely Spain, France, and Italy. PMID:26932834

  18. Visible-light-driven hydrogen production in a dye sensitized polyoxometalate system without noble metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xing; Li, Yuexiang; Peng, Shaoqin; Lai, Hua; Yi, Zhengji

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a noble-metal-free homogeneous system was constructed in one step with Keggin-type polyoxometalate (POM) SiW12O404- as a catalyst, Eosin Y as a photosensitizer, and triethanolamine (TEOA) as a sacrificial electron donor for water splitting to produce hydrogen under visible-light irradiation. A two-electron reduced heteropoly blue SiW12O406- is produced by photosensitization under visible-light irradiation. The effect of various component concentrations and POMs with different central atoms (PW12O403-, GeW12O404-, etc.) on hydrogen production was discussed. This simple system made of earth-abundant elements is expected to contribute toward the development of functional and efficient artificial photosynthetic system.

  19. A Dual Colorimetric/Fluorescence System for Determining pH Based on the Nucleophilic Addition Reaction of an o-Hydroxymerocyanine Dye.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yongkang; Huo, Fangjun; Lee, Songyi; Yin, Caixia; Yoon, Juyoung; Chao, Jianbin; Zhang, Yongbin; Cheng, Fangqin

    2016-01-22

    Owing to their ability to monitor pH in a precise and rapid manner, optical probes have widely been developed for biological and nonbiological applications. The strategies thus far employed to determine pH rely on two types of processes including reversible protonation of amine nitrogen atoms and deprotonation of phenols. We have developed a novel dual, colorimetric/fluorescence system for determining the pH of a solution. This system utilizes an o-hydroxymerocyanine dye that undergoes a nucleophilic addition reaction that subsequently causes reversible structural changes interconverting a merocyanine to a spirocyanine and a spirocyanine to a spiropyran. It was demonstrated that the dye can be employed to measure the pH of solutions in the 2.5-5.75 and 9.6-11.8 ranges with color changes from yellow to dark blue and then to lavender. Moreover, the fluorescence response associated with the spirocyanine-spiropyran transformation of the dye occurring in alkaline solutions provides a precise method. PMID:26603952

  20. Optical systems integrated modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, Robert R.; Laskin, Robert A.; Brewer, SI; Burrows, Chris; Epps, Harlan; Illingworth, Garth; Korsch, Dietrich; Levine, B. Martin; Mahajan, Vini; Rimmer, Chuck

    1992-01-01

    An integrated modeling capability that provides the tools by which entire optical systems and instruments can be simulated and optimized is a key technology development, applicable to all mission classes, especially astrophysics. Many of the future missions require optical systems that are physically much larger than anything flown before and yet must retain the characteristic sub-micron diffraction limited wavefront accuracy of their smaller precursors. It is no longer feasible to follow the path of 'cut and test' development; the sheer scale of these systems precludes many of the older techniques that rely upon ground evaluation of full size engineering units. The ability to accurately model (by computer) and optimize the entire flight system's integrated structural, thermal, and dynamic characteristics is essential. Two distinct integrated modeling capabilities are required. These are an initial design capability and a detailed design and optimization system. The content of an initial design package is shown. It would be a modular, workstation based code which allows preliminary integrated system analysis and trade studies to be carried out quickly by a single engineer or a small design team. A simple concept for a detailed design and optimization system is shown. This is a linkage of interface architecture that allows efficient interchange of information between existing large specialized optical, control, thermal, and structural design codes. The computing environment would be a network of large mainframe machines and its users would be project level design teams. More advanced concepts for detailed design systems would support interaction between modules and automated optimization of the entire system. Technology assessment and development plans for integrated package for initial design, interface development for detailed optimization, validation, and modeling research are presented.

  1. Distributed generation systems model

    SciTech Connect

    Barklund, C.R.

    1994-12-31

    A slide presentation is given on a distributed generation systems model developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and its application to a situation within the Idaho Power Company`s service territory. The objectives of the work were to develop a screening model for distributed generation alternatives, to develop a better understanding of distributed generation as a utility resource, and to further INEL`s understanding of utility concerns in implementing technological change.

  2. Climate system modeling program

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The Climate System Modeling Project is a component activity of NSF's Climate Modeling, Analysis and Prediction Program, supported by the Atmospheric Sciences Program, Geosciences Directorate. Its objective is to accelerate progress toward reliable prediction of global and regional climate changes in the decades ahead. CSMP operates through workshops, support for post-docs and graduate students and other collaborative activities designed to promote interdisciplinary and strategic work in support of the overall objective (above) and specifically in three areas, (1) Causes of interdecadal variability in the climate system, (2) Interactions of regional climate forcing with global processes, and (3) Scientific needs of climate assessment.

  3. Modeling the earth system

    SciTech Connect

    Ojima, D.

    1992-12-31

    The 1990 Global Change Institute (GCI) on Earth System Modeling is the third of a series organized by the Office for Interdisciplinary Earth Studies to look in depth at particular issues critical to developing a better understanding of the earth system. The 1990 GCI on Earth System Modeling was organized around three themes: defining critical gaps in the knowledge of the earth system, developing simplified working models, and validating comprehensive system models. This book is divided into three sections that reflect these themes. Each section begins with a set of background papers offering a brief tutorial on the subject, followed by working group reports developed during the institute. These reports summarize the joint ideas and recommendations of the participants and bring to bear the interdisciplinary perspective that imbued the institute. Since the conclusion of the 1990 Global Change Institute, research programs, nationally and internationally, have moved forward to implement a number of the recommendations made at the institute, and many of the participants have maintained collegial interactions to develop research projects addressing the needs identified during the two weeks in Snowmass.

  4. Vital-dye-enhanced multimodal imaging of neoplastic progression in a mouse model of oral carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellebust, Anne; Rosbach, Kelsey; Wu, Jessica Keren; Nguyen, Jennifer; Gillenwater, Ann; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    In this longitudinal study, a mouse model of 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide chemically induced tongue carcinogenesis was used to assess the ability of optical imaging with exogenous and endogenous contrast to detect neoplastic lesions in a heterogeneous mucosal surface. Widefield autofluorescence and fluorescence images of intact 2-NBDG-stained and proflavine-stained tissues were acquired at multiple time points in the carcinogenesis process. Confocal fluorescence images of transverse fresh tissue slices from the same specimens were acquired to investigate how changes in tissue microarchitecture affect widefield fluorescence images of intact tissue. Widefield images were analyzed to develop and evaluate an algorithm to delineate areas of dysplasia and cancer. A classification algorithm for the presence of neoplasia based on the mean fluorescence intensity of 2-NBDG staining and the standard deviation of the fluorescence intensity of proflavine staining was found to separate moderate dysplasia, severe dysplasia, and cancer from non-neoplastic regions of interest with 91% sensitivity and specificity. Results suggest this combination of noninvasive optical imaging modalities can be used in vivo to discriminate non-neoplastic from neoplastic tissue in this model with the potential to translate this technology to the clinic.

  5. Experimental design and modeling of ultrasound assisted simultaneous adsorption of cationic dyes onto ZnS: Mn-NPs-AC from binary mixture.

    PubMed

    Asfaram, Arash; Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Yousefi, Fakhri; Dastkhoon, Mehdi

    2016-11-01

    The manganese impregnated zinc sulfide nanoparticles deposited on activated carbon (ZnS: Mn-NPs-AC) which fully was synthesized and characterized successfully applied for simultaneous removal of malachite green and methylene blue in binary situation. The effects of variables such as pH (2.0-10.0), sonication time (1-5min), adsorbent mass (0.005-0.025g) and MB and MG concentration (4-20mgL(-1)) on their removal efficiency was studied dy central composite design (CCD) to correlate dyes removal percentage to above mention variables that guides amongst the maximum influence was seen by changing the sonication time and adsorbent mass. Sonication time, adsorbent mass and pH in despite of dyes concentrations has positive relation with removal percentage. Multiple regression analysis of the experimental results is associated with 3-D response surface and contour plots that guide setting condition at pH of 7.0, 3min sonication time, 0.025g Mn: ZnS-NPs-AC and 15mgL(-1) of MB and MG lead to achievement of removal efficiencies of 99.87% and 98.56% for MG and MB, respectively. The pseudo-second-order model as best choice efficiency describe the dyes adsorption behavior, while MG and MB maximum adsorption capacity according to Langmuir was 202.43 and 191.57mgg(-1). PMID:27245959

  6. Response surface methodology (RSM) modeling of microwave-assisted extraction of natural dye from Swietenia mahagony: A comparation between Box-Behnken and central composite design method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusuma, Heri Septya; Sudrajat, Robby Ginanjar Margo; Susanto, David Febrilliant; Gala, Selfina; Mahfud, Mahfud

    2015-12-01

    The increasing demand of non-toxic and environmentally friendly dyes, colorants that come from natural source have risen as an alternative of sintetic poisonous dyes. In this research natural dye from S. mahagony was extracted using microwave-assisted extraction method under different operating condition such as extraction time (10-30min), plant material to solvent ratio (0.03-0.05g/mL) and microwave power level (100-380 watt). Box-Behnken method and central composite design (CCD) method is widely used for modeling response surface methodology (RSM), both methods show good prediction performance. In this study response surface methodology was performed to optimize the process, both methods were performed by the help Statgraphics Centurion 16 to evaluate the effects of different operating parameters. Finally, both methods were statistically compared by root mean square error (RMSE) and absolute average deviation (AAD) based on validation data set. Further, result suggests that CCD has better performance as compared to Box-Behnken method. The maximum yield obtained for Box-Behnken is 3.7647% (380 watt, 0.0339g/mL, 28.8899min) and 3.7506% (379.986 watt, 0.0378g/mL, 30min) for central composite design method.

  7. Electronic Education System Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloete, Elsabe

    2001-01-01

    Discusses electronic learning efforts and problems in implementing computers in schools. Defines and describes an electronic educational system model that was developed to assist the designers of different electronic learning settings to plan and successfully implement a specific learning situation, with the focus on the individual requirements of…

  8. Sequential decolorization of azo dye and mineralization of decolorization liquid coupled with bioelectricity generation using a pH self-neutralized photobioelectrochemical system operated with polarity reversion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian; Hu, Yongyou; Li, Wanjun; Zhang, Yaping; Chen, Jie; Deng, Feng

    2015-05-30

    A novel photobioelectrochemical system (PBES) was developed by acclimating algal-bacterial biofilm in both anode and cathode using Chlorella vulgaris and indigenous wastewater bacteria as inoculums. The PBES was operated in polarity reversion mode depend on dark/light alternate reaction to achieve simultaneous pH self-neutralization, azo dye degradation (Congo red) and bioelectricity generation. The anodic accumulated acidity and cathodic accumulated alkalinity were self-neutralized after polarity reversion and hence eliminate the membrane pH gradient. The Congo red was first decolored in the dark anode and the resultant decolorization liquid was subsequently mineralized after the dark anode changing to the photo-biocathode. The presence of C. vulgaris significantly enhanced the two-stage degradation of Congo red, with 93% increases in decolorization rates and 8% increases in mineralization compared to the algae-free BES. The PBES continuously generated stable voltage output over four months under repeatedly reversion of polarity. The maximum power density produced before and after polarity reversion was 78 and 61 mW/m(2), respectively. The synergy between C. vulgaris and mixed bacteria was responsible for the successful operation of the PBES which can be potentially applied to treat wastewater containing azo dye with benefits of enhanced azo dye degradation, high net power output and buffer minimization. PMID:25723885

  9. Modelling resonant planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emel'yanenko, V.

    2012-09-01

    Many discovered multi-planet systems are in meanmotion resonances. The aim of this work is to study dynamical processes leading to the formation of resonant configurations on the basis of a unified model described earlier [1]. The model includes gravitational interactions of planets and migration of planets due to the presence of a gas disc. For the observed systems 24 Sex, HD 37124, HD 73526, HD 82943, HD 128311, HD 160691, Kepler 9, NN Ser with planets moving in the 2:1 resonance, it is shown that the capture in this resonance occurs at very wide ranges of parameters of both type I and type II migration. Conditions of migration leading to the formation of the resonant systems HD 45364 и HD 200964 (3:2 and 4:3, respectively) are obtained. Formation scenarios are studied for the systems HD 102272, HD 108874, HD 181433, HD 202206 with planets in high order resonances. We discuss also how gravitational interactions of planets and planetesimal discs lead to the breakup of resonant configurations and the formation of systems similar to the 47 UMa system.

  10. Dye energy transfer in xerogel matrices and application to solid-state dye lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nhung, Tran Hong; Canva, Michael; Chaput, Frédéric; Goudket, Hélène; Roger, Gisèle; Brun, Alain; Manh, Dang Duc; Hung, Nguyen Dai; Boilot, Jean-Pierre

    2004-03-01

    Laser dyes Rhodamine B and Perylene Red were incorporated at different relative concentrations into hybrid matrices synthesized using the sol-gel process. Energy transfer from Rhodamine B-donor to Perylene Red-acceptor molecules was observed. Using the different co-doped samples, solid-state dye laser systems were achieved with tuning band position control and increased efficiency with respect to the materials using solely one type of dye.

  11. Application of central composite design and artificial neural network in modeling of reactive blue 21 dye removal by photo-ozonation process.

    PubMed

    Mehrizad, Ali; Gharbani, Parvin

    2016-01-01

    The present study deals with use of central composite design (CCD) and artificial neural network (ANN) in modeling and optimization of reactive blue 21 (RB21) removal from aqueous media under photo-ozonation process. Four effective operational parameters (including: initial concentration of RB21, O(3) concentration, UV light intensity and reaction time) were chosen and the experiments were designed by CCD based on response surface methodology (RSM). The obtained results from the CCD model were used in modeling the process by ANN. Under optimum condition (O(3) concentration of 3.95 mg L(-1), UV intensity of 20.5 W m(-2), reaction time of 7.77 min and initial dye concentration of 40.21 mg L(-1)), RB21 removal efficiency reached to up 98.88%. A topology of ANN with a three-layer consisting of four input neurons, 14 hidden neurons and one output neuron was designed. The relative significance of each major factor was calculated based on the connection weights of the ANN model. Dye and ozone concentrations were the most important variables in the photo-ozonation of RB21, followed by reaction time and UV light intensity. The comparison of predicted values by CCD and ANN with experimental results showed that both methods were highly efficient in the modeling of the process. PMID:27386996

  12. NEP systems model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Jeffrey A.

    1993-01-01

    A new nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) systems analysis code is discussed. The new code is modular and consists of a driver code and various subsystem models. The code models five different subsystems: (1) reactor/shield; (2) power conversion; (3) heat rejection; (4) power management and distribution (PMAD); and (5) thrusters. The code optimizes for the following design criteria: minimum mass; minimum radiator area; and low mass/low area. The code also optimizes the following parameters: separation distance; temperature ratio; pressure ratio; and transmission frequency. The discussion is presented in vugraph form.

  13. Electronic and optical properties of dye-sensitized TiO₂ interfaces.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Mariachiara; Selloni, Annabella; Fantacci, Simona; De Angelis, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) represent a promising approach to the direct conversion of sunlight to electrical energy at low cost and high efficiency. DSCs are based on a film of anatase TiO₂ nanoparticles covered by adsorbed molecular dyes and immersed in a liquid redox electrolyte. Upon photoexcitation of the chemisorbed dye, electrons are injected into the TiO₂ conduction band and can travel across the nanostructured film to reach the counter-electrode, while the oxidized dye is regenerated by the redox electrolyte. In this review we present a summary of recent computational studies of the electronic and optical properties of dye-sensitized TiO2 interfaces, with the aim of providing the basic understanding of the operation principles of DSCs and establishing the conceptual basis for their design and optimization.We start with a discussion of isolated dyes in solution, focusing on the dye's atomic structure, ground and excited state oxidation potentials, and optical absorption spectra. We examine both Ru(II)-polypyridyl complexes and organic "push-pull" dyes with a D-π-A structure, where the donor group (D) is an electron-rich unit, linked through a conjugated linker (π) to the electron-acceptor group (A). We show that a properly calibrated computational approach based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) combined with Time Dependent DFT (TD-DFT) can provide a good description of both the absorption spectra and ground and excited state oxidation potential values of the Ru(II) complexes. On the other hand, organic push-pull dyes are not well described by the standard DFT/TD-DFT approach. For these dyes, an excellent description of the electronic structure in gas phase can be obtained by the many body perturbation theory GW method, which has, however, a much higher computational cost.We next consider interacting dye/semiconductor systems. Key properties are the dye adsorption structure onto the semiconductor, the nature and localization of the dye

  14. Laser dye stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, N.

    1980-06-01

    Lasing characteristics and bleaching of four Eastman Kodak ir dyes have been examined in dimethyl sulfoxide. These ir dyes are shown to improve in performance in the absence of oxygen. Their photochemical stability was found to be comparable to the quinolone laser dyes when exposed to flashlamp excitation. Photodecomposition of the ir dyes under lasing conditions was found to vary between 1.6 and 6×10-10 moles of dye for each joule (electrical) of input energy; in comparison, the photodecomposition values for the better coumarin dyes was 0.2 to 1.0×10-10 moles/J at a concentration of 1.0×10-4 M in ethanol. It was also found that increasing the concentration of these tricarbocyanine dyes gives a marked improvement in the useful lifetime of these solutions as lasing media in the absence of oxygen.

  15. Ultrasonic dyeing of cellulose nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Muzamil; Ahmed, Farooq; Jatoi, Abdul Wahab; Mahar, Rasool Bux; Khatri, Zeeshan; Kim, Ick Soo

    2016-07-01

    Textile dyeing assisted by ultrasonic energy has attained a greater interest in recent years. We report ultrasonic dyeing of nanofibers for the very first time. We chose cellulose nanofibers and dyed with two reactive dyes, CI reactive black 5 and CI reactive red 195. The cellulose nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning of cellulose acetate (CA) followed by deacetylation. The FTIR results confirmed complete conversion of CA into cellulose nanofibers. Dyeing parameters optimized were dyeing temperature, dyeing time and dye concentrations for each class of the dye used. Results revealed that the ultrasonic dyeing produced higher color yield (K/S values) than the conventional dyeing. The color fastness test results depicted good dye fixation. SEM analysis evidenced that ultrasonic energy during dyeing do not affect surface morphology of nanofibers. The results conclude successful dyeing of cellulose nanofibers using ultrasonic energy with better color yield and color fastness results than conventional dyeing. PMID:26964959

  16. Determination of effective optical gap in dye/TiO{sub 2} systems inspired by p-n junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Kyung-Jun; Jeong, Yonkil E-mail: widipark@gist.ac.kr; Park, Dong-Won E-mail: widipark@gist.ac.kr

    2015-04-06

    The effective optical gap and device current limits of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) were investigated. Optical gap determination was based on an approach that assumes the presence of a nanoscale p-n junction in the DSCs between the bulk TiO{sub 2} semiconductor and the dye-cluster with quantum size effect. On the basis of this approach, the effective optical gap of the dye-absorber was extracted from a relation between external quantum efficiency and photon energy. The short-circuit current density of the fabricated DSCs showed a current loss in the range from 3.7 to 5.1 mA cm{sup −2} compared to the device current limit. This current loss can be mainly attributed to the light reflection of the window layer and the native charge-transfer loss by device imperfections, including subsidiary charge-transfer loss by a nanoscale Schottky junction between TiO{sub 2} and the electrolyte.

  17. Kinetic and calorimetric study of the adsorption of dyes on mesoporous activated carbon prepared from coconut coir dust.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Jeremias de Souza; da Costa Júnior, Nivan Bezerra; Almeida, Luis Eduardo; Vieira, Eunice Fragoso da Silva; Cestari, Antonio Reinaldo; Gimenez, Iara de Fátima; Villarreal Carreño, Neftali Lênin; Barreto, Ledjane Silva

    2006-06-15

    Mesoporous activated carbon has been prepared from coconut coir dust as support for adsorption of some model dye molecules from aqueous solutions. The methylene blue (MB) and remazol yellow (RY) molecules were chosen for study of the adsorption capacity of cationic and anionic dyes onto prepared activated carbon. The adsorption kinetics was studied with the Lagergren first- and pseudo-second-order kinetic models as well as the intraparticle diffusion model. The results for both dyes suggested a multimechanism sorption process. The adsorption mechanisms in the systems dyes/AC follow pseudo-second-order kinetics with a significant contribution of intraparticle diffusion. The samples simultaneously present acidic and basic sites able to act as anchoring sites for basic and acidic dyes, respectively. Calorimetric studies reveal that dyes/AC interaction forces are correlated with the pH of the solution, which can be related to the charge distribution on the AC surface. These AC samples also exhibited very short equilibrium times for the adsorption of both dyes, which is an economically favorable requisite for the activated carbon described in this work, in addition to the local abundance of the raw material. PMID:16497318

  18. Physical Modeling of Scaled Water Distribution System Networks.

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hern, Timothy J.; Hammond, Glenn Edward; Orear, Leslie ,; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart G.; Paul Molina; Ross Johnson

    2005-10-01

    Threats to water distribution systems include release of contaminants and Denial of Service (DoS) attacks. A better understanding, and validated computational models, of the flow in water distribution systems would enable determination of sensor placement in real water distribution networks, allow source identification, and guide mitigation/minimization efforts. Validation data are needed to evaluate numerical models of network operations. Some data can be acquired in real-world tests, but these are limited by 1) unknown demand, 2) lack of repeatability, 3) too many sources of uncertainty (demand, friction factors, etc.), and 4) expense. In addition, real-world tests have limited numbers of network access points. A scale-model water distribution system was fabricated, and validation data were acquired over a range of flow (demand) conditions. Standard operating variables included system layout, demand at various nodes in the system, and pressure drop across various pipe sections. In addition, the location of contaminant (salt or dye) introduction was varied. Measurements of pressure, flowrate, and concentration at a large number of points, and overall visualization of dye transport through the flow network were completed. Scale-up issues that that were incorporated in the experiment design include Reynolds number, pressure drop across nodes, and pipe friction and roughness. The scale was chosen to be 20:1, so the 10 inch main was modeled with a 0.5 inch pipe in the physical model. Controlled validation tracer tests were run to provide validation to flow and transport models, especially of the degree of mixing at pipe junctions. Results of the pipe mixing experiments showed large deviations from predicted behavior and these have a large impact on standard network operations models.3

  19. Optofluidic circular grating distributed feedback dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan; Li, Zhenyu; Henry, M. David; Scherer, Axel

    2009-07-01

    We demonstrate an optically pumped surface emitting optofluidic dye laser using a second-order circular grating distributed feedback resonator. We present a composite bilayer soft lithography technique specifically developed for the fabrication of our dye laser and investigate a hybrid polymer material system [poly(dimethylsiloxane)/perfluoropolyether] to construct high-resolution Bragg gratings. Our lasers emit single frequency light at low lasing thresholds of 6 μJ/mm2. These optofluidic dye lasers can serve as low-cost and compact coherent light sources that are fully integrated within microfluidic analysis chips and provide an efficient approach to construct compact spectroscopy systems.

  20. System of systems modeling and analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, James E.; Anderson, Dennis James; Longsine, Dennis E.; Shirah, Donald N.

    2005-01-01

    This report documents the results of an LDRD program entitled 'System of Systems Modeling and Analysis' that was conducted during FY 2003 and FY 2004. Systems that themselves consist of multiple systems (referred to here as System of Systems or SoS) introduce a level of complexity to systems performance analysis and optimization that is not readily addressable by existing capabilities. The objective of the 'System of Systems Modeling and Analysis' project was to develop an integrated modeling and simulation environment that addresses the complex SoS modeling and analysis needs. The approach to meeting this objective involved two key efforts. First, a static analysis approach, called state modeling, has been developed that is useful for analyzing the average performance of systems over defined use conditions. The state modeling capability supports analysis and optimization of multiple systems and multiple performance measures or measures of effectiveness. The second effort involves time simulation which represents every system in the simulation using an encapsulated state model (State Model Object or SMO). The time simulation can analyze any number of systems including cross-platform dependencies and a detailed treatment of the logistics required to support the systems in a defined mission.

  1. Molecular structure-adsorption study on current textile dyes.

    PubMed

    Örücü, E; Tugcu, G; Saçan, M T

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the adsorption of a diverse set of textile dyes onto granulated activated carbon (GAC). The adsorption experiments were carried out in a batch system. The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were applied to experimental data and the isotherm constants were calculated for 33 anthraquinone and azo dyes. The adsorption equilibrium data fitted more adequately to the Langmuir isotherm model than the Freundlich isotherm model. Added to a qualitative analysis of experimental results, multiple linear regression (MLR), support vector regression (SVR) and back propagation neural network (BPNN) methods were used to develop quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models with the novel adsorption data. The data were divided randomly into training and test sets. The predictive ability of all models was evaluated using the test set. Descriptors were selected with a genetic algorithm (GA) using QSARINS software. Results related to QSPR models on the adsorption capacity of GAC showed that molecular structure of dyes was represented by ionization potential based on two-dimensional topological distances, chromophoric features and a property filter index. Comparison of the performance of the models demonstrated the superiority of the BPNN over GA-MLR and SVR models. PMID:25529487

  2. Enhancement of dye-sensitized photocurrents by gold nanoparticles: effects of dye-particle spacing.

    PubMed

    Kawawaki, Tokuhisa; Takahashi, Yukina; Tatsuma, Tetsu

    2011-07-01

    Photocurrents of a ruthenium dye-TiO(2) system are enhanced by gold nanoparticles (100 or 40 nm diameter) embedded in TiO(2). As dye-particle spacing decreases to 10 nm, enhancement factor and intensity of localized electric fields at the TiO(2) surface increase. A further decrease in the spacing suppresses the enhancement. PMID:21681292

  3. Photoelectrocatalytic/photoelectro-Fenton coupling system using a nanostructured photoanode for the oxidation of a textile dye: Kinetics study and oxidation pathway.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Lucio C; Silva, Bianca F; Zanoni, Maria V B

    2015-10-01

    In this study, a coupled photoelectrocatalytic/photoelectro-Fenton reactor was designed to enhance the degradation efficiency of organic pollutants and tested using the azo dye Orange G as a model compound. Pt-decorated TiO2 nanotubes were used as a photoanode with an air-diffusion polytetrafluoroethylene cathode for H2O2 generation. The sum of individual effects of coupling the photoelectrocatalytic and photoelectro-Fenton processes was evaluated as a function of the decolorization and mineralization of Orange G solutions. The dye solutions were only completely decolorized in more acidic conditions (pH 3.0). The mineralization of the Orange G solutions increased in the sequence photoelectrocatalyticdye by the coupled process. PMID:25935699

  4. Sodium heat transfer system modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, A. F.; Fewell, M. E.

    1983-11-01

    The sodium heat transfer system of the international energy agency (IEA) small solar power systems (SSPS) central receiver system (CRS), which includes the heliostat field, receiver, hot and cold storage vessels, and sodium/water steam generator was modeled. The computer code SOLTES (simulator of large thermal energy systems), was used to model this system. The results from SOLTES are compared to measured data.

  5. Measurement of Quantum Yield, Quantum Requirement, and Energetic Efficiency of the O2-Evolving System of Photosynthesis by a Simple Dye Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros Barcelò, A.; Zapata, J. M.

    1996-11-01

    Photosynthesis is the conversion of absorbed radiant energy from sunlight into various forms of chemical energy by the chloroplasts of higher green plants. The overall process of photosynthesis consists of the oxidation of water (with the release of O2 as a product) and the reduction of CO2 to form carbohydrates. In the test tube electrons produced by the photolytic cleavage of H2) may be deviated from their true acceptor by inserting a suitable dye in the electron chain; i.e.; 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol (DCPIP) (E'o = + 0.217 V), which is blue in the oxidized quinone form and which becomes colorless when reduced to the phenolic form. This dye-electrom acceptor also has the advantage that it accepts electroms directly from the quinone (Qa) electron-acceptor of the photosystem II< the reaction center associated with the O2-evolving (or water-slplitting) system. Based in the bleaching of DCPIP by illuminated spinach leaf chloroplasts, a classroom laboratory protocol has been developed to determine the quantum yield (QY = micromol O2 s-1 / micromol photons s-1, the quantum requirement (1/QY) and the energetic efficiency (f = chemical energy stored / light energy supplied) of the O2-evolving system of photosynthesis. Although values for the quantum yield, the quantum requirement and the energetic efficiency calculated in the classroom laboratory differ widely from those expected theoretically, these calculations are useful for illustrating the transformation of light energy into chemical energy by the chloroplasts of green plants.

  6. Expert system modeling of a vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reihani, Kamran; Thompson, Wiley E.

    1992-05-01

    The proposed artificial intelligence-based vision model incorporates natural recognition processes depicted as a visual pyramid and hierarchical representation of objects in the database. The visual pyramid, with based and apex representing pixels and image, respectively, is used as an analogy for a vision system. This paper provides an overview of recognition activities and states in the framework of an inductive model. Also, it presents a natural vision system and a counterpart expert system model that incorporates the described operations.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of gold graphene composite with dyes as model substrates for decolorization: A surfactant free laser ablation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai Siddhardha, R. S.; Lakshman Kumar, V.; Kaniyoor, Adarsh; Sai Muthukumar, V.; Ramaprabhu, S.; Podila, Ramakrishna; Rao, A. M.; Ramamurthy, Sai Sathish

    2014-12-01

    A facile surfactant free laser ablation mediated synthesis (LAMS) of gold-graphene composite is reported here. The material was characterized using transmission electron microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, powdered X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Zeta potential measurements and UV-Visible spectroscopic techniques. The as-synthesized gold-graphene composite was effectively utilized as catalyst for decolorization of 4 important textile and laser dyes. The integration of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with high surface area graphene has enhanced the catalytic activity of AuNPs. This enhanced activity is attributed to the synergistic interplay of pristine gold's electronic relay and π-π stacking of graphene with the dyes. This is evident when the Rhodamine B (RB) reduction rate of the composite is nearly twice faster than that of commercial citrate capped AuNPs of similar size. In case of Methylene blue (MB) the rate of reduction is 17,000 times faster than uncatalyzed reaction. This synthetic method opens door to laser ablation based fabrication of metal catalysts on graphene for improved performance without the aid of linkers and surfactants.

  8. Analysis of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity on E. coli, human blood cells and Allium cepa suggests a greater toxic potential of hair dye.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Swati; Sasmal, Kankaayan; Sinha, Sudarson Sekhar; Singh, Mukesh

    2016-02-01

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are among the most important emerging environmental contaminants in recent time. PPCPs include wide range of cosmetics, among which hair dyes, are immensely popular in modern society. However, impact of hair dye and its residual discharged to the environment in relation to human health and ecological imbalance have not been widely studied. Based on the result of initial survey among the group of populations of eastern India, three most popular and commonly used permanent hair dyes are selected. Working sample of dye is prepared as recommended on the instructions booklet of the hair dye. The effect of three dyes is studied on Escherichia coli, human red blood cells (RBC), white blood cells (WBC) and Allium cepa bulbs by growth inhibition, hemolysis, 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and A. cepa micronuclei assays respectively. The Lethal dose (LD) demonstrated significant differences among three dyes and the model systems. In vitro hemolytic assays performed on RBC, and MTT assays on WBC show the cytotoxic effects of hair dye. Significant growth inhibition of E. coli has also been noted. In addition, the root tips of A. cepa treated with the dye have shown major chromosomal abnormalities coupled with cell division retardation. Here low mitotic index confirm cell division retardation. Finally, results of in vitro studies of dye-DNA interactions demonstrate electrostatic interaction. Combing all these results it confirms that hair dyes are cytotoxic and may cause mutagenic effect on living cells irrespective of microbes, plant and animal system. PMID:26544094

  9. The antioxidant glutathione in the fish cell lines EPC and BCF-2: response to model pro-oxidants as measured by three different fluorescent dyes.

    PubMed

    Jos, A; Cameán, A M; Pflugmacher, S; Segner, H

    2009-04-01

    Reduced glutathione (GSH) protects cells against injury by oxidative stress and maintains a range of vital functions. In vitro cell cultures have been used as experimental models to study the role of GSH in chemical toxicity in mammals; however, this approach has been rarely used with fish cells to date. The present study aimed to evaluate sensitivity and specificity of three fluorescent dyes for measuring pro-oxidant-induced changes of GSH contents in fish cell lines: monochlorobimane (mBCl), 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate (CMFDA) and 7-amino-4-chloromethylcoumarin (CMAC-blue). Two cell lines were studied, the EPC line established from a skin tumour of carp Cyprinus carpio, and BF-2 cells established from fins of bluegill sunfish Lepomis macrochirus. The cells were exposed for 6 and 24 h to low cytotoxic concentrations of pro-oxidants including hydrogen peroxide, paraquat (PQ), copper and the GSH synthesis inhibitor, L-buthionine-SR-sulfoximine (BSO). The results indicate moderate differences in the GSH response between EPC and BF-2 cells, but distinct differences in the magnitude of the GSH response for the four pro-oxidants. Further, the choice of GSH dye can critically affect the results, with CMFDA appearing to be less specific for GSH than mBCl and CMAC-blue. PMID:19444932

  10. Potential of the aquatic fern Azolla filiculoides in biodegradation of an azo dye: modeling of experimental results by artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Khataee, A R; Movafeghi, A; Vafaei, F; Lisar, S Y Salehi; Zarei, M

    2013-01-01

    The potential of an aquatic fern, Azolla filiculoides, in phytoremediation of a mono azo dye solution, C.I. Acid Blue 92 (AB92), was studied. The effects of operational parameters such as reaction time, initial dye concentration, fern fresh weight, pH, temperature and reusability of the fern on biodegradation efficiency were investigated. The intermediate compounds produced by biodegradation process were analyzed using GC-MS analysis. An artificial neural network (ANN) model was developed to predict the biodegradation efficiency. The findings indicated that ANN provides reasonable predictive performance (R2 = 0.961). The effects of AB92 solutions (10 and 20 mg L(-1)) on growth, chlorophylls and carotenoids content, activity of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, peroxidase and catalase and formation of malondialdehyde were analyzed. AB92 generally showed inhibitory effects on the growth. Moreover, photosynthetic pigments in the fronds significantly decreased in the treatments. An increase was detected for lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes activity, suggesting that AB92 caused reactive oxygen species production in Azolla fronds, which were scavenged by induced activities of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:23819271

  11. A Microcomputer Dynamical Modelling System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogborn, Jon; Wong, Denis

    1984-01-01

    Presents a system that permits students to engage directly in the process of modelling and to learn some important lessons about models and classes of models. The system described currently runs on RML 380Z and 480Z, Apple II and IIe, and BBC model B microcomputers. (JN)

  12. Rapid screening of textile dyes employed as affinity ligands to purify enzymes from yeast.

    PubMed

    Raya-Tonetti, G; Perotti, N

    1999-04-01

    A rapid method for screening potential dye ligands for use in affinity chromatography is described. Textile dyes were non-covalently coupled to a cross-linked polysaccharide Sepharose(R) matrix. Yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was used as the model protein for evaluating the screening system. A homogenate from baker's yeast was used as the crude source of enzyme. Batchwise adsorption and elution were used to evaluate the individual dyes. The influence of pH and ionic strength in the binding and elution steps was evaluated. Batch isotherms were used to evaluate parameter characteristics. Experimental data obtained were fitted to Langmuir isotherms to determine the maximum binding capacity and the dissociation constant for each dye evaluated in this study. A dynamic binding capacity of 107.6 units of ADH/g of resin was determined for Procion Turquoise MXG dye by frontal analysis. Specific elution with NAD+ and non-specific elution with 50 mM Tris/HCl buffer, pH 8.5, were tested when Procion Turquoise MXG was used, giving purification factors of 53.5 and 4.4 respectively. This screening technique is inexpensive and can be performed in a few hours. It was possible to predict the performance of different reactive dyes in this way, and the influence of pH and salt on the binding behaviour was demonstrated. PMID:10075911

  13. Ultrasonic enhancement of the simultaneous removal of quaternary toxic organic dyes by CuO nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon: Central composite design, kinetic and isotherm study.

    PubMed

    Dashamiri, Somayeh; Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Dashtian, Kheibar; Rahimi, Mahmood Reza; Goudarzi, Alireza; Jannesar, Ramin

    2016-07-01

    Copper oxide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon (CuO-NPs-AC) were prepared and fully analyzed and characterized with FE-SEM, XRD and FT-IR. Subsequently, this novel material was used for simultaneous ultrasound-assisted adsorption of brilliant green (BG), auramine O (AO), methylene blue (MB) and eosin yellow (EY) dyes. Problems regard to dyes spectra overlap in quaternary solution of this dyes were omitted by derivative spectrophotometric method. The best pH in quaternary system was studied by using one at a time method to achieved maximum dyes removal percentage. Subsequently, sonication time, adsorbent dosage and initial dyes concentrations influence on dyes removal was optimized by central composite design (CCD) combined with desirability function approach (DFA). Desirability score of 0.978 show optimum conditions set at sonication time (4.2 min), adsorbent mass (0.029 g), initial dyes concentration (4.5 mg L(-1)). Under this optimum condition the removal percentage for MB, AO, EY and BG dyes 97.58, 94.66, 96.22 and 94.93, respectively. The adsorption rate well fitted by pseudo second-order while adsorption capacity according to the Langmuir model as best equilibrium isotherm model for BG, MB, AO and EY was 20.48, 21.26, 22.34 and 21.29 mg g(-1), respectively. PMID:26964982

  14. Formation of a leuco spirolactone from 4-(2-carboxyphenyl)-7-diethylamino-4'-dimethylamino-1-benzopyrylium: design of a phase-change thermochromic system based on a flavylium dye.

    PubMed

    Gavara, Raquel; Laia, César A T; Parola, A Jorge; Pina, Fernando

    2010-07-12

    A phase-change thermochromic system was designed through the reversible transformation of the 4-substituted flavylium dye 4-(2-carboxyphenyl)-7-diethylamino-4'-dimethylamino-1-benzopyrylium into its leuco form, in the presence of a developer (ethyldiisopropylamine) and a suitable solvent (e.g., acetonitrile, n-pentadecanonitrile). The leuco form of the flavylium-based dye is a spirolactone species whose ring opens at low temperature (below the solvent melting point) to form the blue flavylium cation. Decarboxylation of the lactone to give 4-phenyl-7-diethylamino-4'-dimethylamino-1-benzopyrylium was observed upon irradiation of the system with UV light, erasing the thermochromic effect. PMID:20509126

  15. Comparative laser performances of pyrromethene 567 and rhodamine 6G dyes in copper vapour laser pumped dye lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, A. K.; Kundu, S.; Sasikumar, S.; Rao, C. S.; Mula, S.; Sinha, S.; Dasgupta, K.

    2007-05-01

    Narrowband laser performances and photochemical stability of alcoholic solutions of pyrromethene 567 and rhodamine 6G dyes, under high-repetition rate copper vapour laser (at 510 nm), as well as, high-peak intensity Nd:YAG laser (at 532 nm) excitation have been investigated. We have observed that pyrromethene 567 dye solutions offer higher efficiency, wider tuning range, but lower photochemical stability and higher lasing threshold than that of rhodamine 6G dye solutions. An addition of about 100 mM DABCO, as a singlet oxygen quencher, in pyrromethene 567 dye solutions improved its photochemical stability close to that of rhodamine 6G. The observation of higher slope efficiency, in spite of higher threshold pump energy for pyrromethene 567 dye than that of rhodamine 6G dye solutions, was explained by a predictive model on gain characteristics of both dye solutions as a function of pump energy.

  16. Integrating a Triplet-triplet Annihilation Up-conversion System to Enhance Dye-sensitized Solar Cell Response to Sub-bandgap Light

    PubMed Central

    Nattestad, Andrew; Cheng, Yuen Yap; MacQueen, Rowan W.; Wallace, Gordon G.; Schmidt, Timothy W.

    2014-01-01

    The poor response of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) to red and infrared light is a significant impediment to the realization of higher photocurrents and hence higher efficiencies. Photon up-conversion by way of triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA-UC) is an attractive technique for using these otherwise wasted low energy photons to produce photocurrent, while not interfering with the photoanodic performance in a deleterious manner. Further to this, TTA-UC has a number of features, distinct from other reported photon up-conversion technologies, which renders it particularly suitable for coupling with DSC technology. In this work, a proven high performance TTA-UC system, comprising a palladium porphyrin sensitizer and rubrene emitter, is combined with a high performance DSC (utilizing the organic dye D149) in an integrated device. The device shows an enhanced response to sub-bandgap light over the absorption range of the TTA-UC sub-unit resulting in the highest figure of merit for up-conversion assisted DSC performance to date. PMID:25285452

  17. (Dibenzoylmethanato)boron difluoride derivatives containing triphenylamine moieties: a new type of electron-donor/π-acceptor system for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Yisilamu, Yilihamu; Yamaguchi, Tomoya; Tomura, Masaaki; Funaki, Takashi; Sugihara, Hideki; Ono, Katsuhiko

    2014-10-01

    (Dibenzoylmethanato)boron difluoride derivatives containing triphenylamine moieties were synthesized as a new type of electron-donor/π-acceptor system. These new compounds exhibited long-wavelength absorptions in the UV/Vis spectra, and reversible oxidation and reduction waves in cyclic voltammetry experiments. Their amphoteric redox properties are based on their resonance hybrid forms, in which a positive charge is delocalized on the triphenylamine moieties and a negative charge is localized on the boron atoms. Molecular orbital (MO) calculations indicate that their HOMO and LUMO energies vary with the number of phenylene rings connected to the difluoroboron-chelating ring. This is useful for optimizing the HOMO and LUMO levels to an iodine redox (I(-)/I3(-)) potential and a titanium dioxide conduction band, respectively. Dye-sensitized solar cells fabricated by using these compounds as dye sensitizers exhibited solar-to-electric power conversion efficiencies of 2.7-4.4 % under AM 1.5 solar light. PMID:25170797

  18. Oxazine laser dyes

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Peter R.; Field, George F.

    1992-01-01

    New oxazine compounds useful as dye laser media in solution, are superiior to prior art materials. The oxazine dyes useful when pumped by the 578.2 nm copper line to operate in the 700-800 nm range are described by formula I ##STR1##

  19. Effect of mercerization and gamma irradiation on the dyeing behaviour of cotton using stilbene based direct dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatti, Ijaz Ahmad; Adeel, Shahid; Fazal-ur-Rehman; Irshad, Misbah; Abbas, Muhammad

    2012-07-01

    The dyeing behaviour of mercerized and gamma irradiated cotton fabric using stilbene based direct dye has been investigated. The fabric was treated with different concentrations of alkali to optimize the mercerization. The optimum mercerized cotton fabric was irradiated to absorbed doses of 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 kGy using Cs-137 gamma irradiator. Dyeing was performed using irradiated and un-irradiated cotton with dye solutions. The dyeing parameters such as temperature, time of dyeing, pH of dyeing solutions and salt concentration were optimized. The colour strength values of dyed fabrics were evaluated by comparing irradiated and un-irradiated cotton in CIE Lab system using Spectra flash SF650. Methods suggested by International Standard Organization (ISO) were employed to study the effect of gamma irradiation on the colourfastness properties of dyed fabric. It was found that mercerized and irradiated cotton have not only improved the colour strength but enhanced the rating of fastness properties also.

  20. Alignment of the dye's molecular levels with the TiO2 band edges in dye-sensitized solar cells: a DFT TDDFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeAngelis, Filippo; Fantacci, Simona; Selloni, Annabella

    2008-10-01

    We present a theoretical study of the lineup of the LUMO of Ru(II)-polypyridyl (N3 and N719) molecular dyes with the conduction band edge of a TiO2 anatase nanoparticle. We use density functional theory (DFT) and the Car-Parrinello scheme for efficient optimization of the dye-nanoparticle systems, followed by hybrid B3LYP functional calculations of the electronic structure and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) determination of the lowest vertical excitation energies. The electronic structure and TDDFT calculations are performed in water solution, using a continuum model. Various approximate procedures to compute the excited state oxidation potential of dye sensitizers are discussed. Our calculations show that the level alignment for the interacting nanoparticle-sensitizer system is very similar, within about 0.1 eV, to that for the separated TiO2 and dye. The excellent agreement of our results with available experimental data indicates that the approach of this work could be used as an efficient predictive tool to help the optimization of dye-sensitized solar cells.

  1. Monolithic dye laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1993-01-01

    A fluid dye laser amplifier for amplifying a dye beam by pump beams has a channel structure defining a channel through which a laseable fluid flows and the dye and pump beams pass transversely to one another through a lasing region. The channel structure is formed with two pairs of mutually spaced-apart and mutually confronting glass windows, which are interlocked and make surface-contacts with one another and surround the lasing region. One of the glass window pairs passes the dye beam and the other passes the pump beams therethrough and through the lasing region. Where these glass window pieces make surface-contacts, glue is used to join the pieces together to form a monolithic structure so as to prevent the dye in the fluid passing through the channel from entering the space between the mutually contacting glass window pieces.

  2. Monolithic dye laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1993-03-30

    A fluid dye laser amplifier for amplifying a dye beam by pump beams has a channel structure defining a channel through which a laseable fluid flows and the dye and pump beams pass transversely to one another through a lasing region. The channel structure is formed with two pairs of mutually spaced-apart and mutually confronting glass windows, which are interlocked and make surface-contacts with one another and surround the lasing region. One of the glass window pairs passes the dye beam and the other passes the pump beams therethrough and through the lasing region. Where these glass window pieces make surface-contacts, glue is used to join the pieces together to form a monolithic structure so as to prevent the dye in the fluid passing through the channel from entering the space between the mutually contacting glass window pieces.

  3. Universal low-temperature MWCNT-COOH-based counter electrode and a new thiolate/disulfide electrolyte system for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Hilmi, Abdulla; Shoker, Tharallah A; Ghaddar, Tarek H

    2014-06-11

    A new thiolate/disulfide organic-based electrolyte system composed of the tetrabutylammonium salt of 2-methyl-5-trifluoromethyl-2H-[1,2,4]triazole-3-thiol (S(-)) and its oxidized form 3,3'-dithiobis(2-methyl-5-trifluoromethyl-2H-[1,2,4]triazole) (DS) has been formulated and used in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The electrocatalytic activity of different counter electrodes (CEs) has been evaluated by means of measuring J-V curves, cyclic voltammetry, Tafel plots, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A stable and low-temperature CE based on acid-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-COOH) was investigated with our S(-)/DS, I(-)/I3(-), T(-)/T2, and Co(II/III)-based electrolyte systems. The proposed CE showed superb electrocatalytic activity toward the regeneration of the different electrolytes. In addition, good stability of solar cell devices based on the reported electrolyte and CE was shown. PMID:24819923

  4. A flashlamp pumped zig-zag slab dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dearth, J. J.; Vaughn, V. V.; McGowan, R. B.; Ehrlich, J.; Conrad, R. W.

    In the experiments reported here, the zig-zag principle is extended from solid slab to liquid dye lasers. A zig-zag dye laser is constructed, and the laser beam quality is observed for both straight-through and zig-zag paths. The zig-zag dye cell and its associated flashlamp pumping system are described, and thermally induced effects in the system are discussed.

  5. Study of the release of a microencapsulated acid dye in polyamide dyeing using mixed cationic liposomes.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Isabel S C; Castanheira, Elisabete M S; Rocha Gomes, Jaime I N; Real Oliveira, M Elisabete C D

    2011-06-01

    The main objective of this work was to increase the retarding effect of the acid dye Telon(®) Blue RR (C.I. Acid Blue 62; DyStar, Frankfurt, Germany) release on polyamide fibres dyeing by encapsulation of the dye in liposomes as an alternative to synthetic auxiliaries, in order to reduce effluent pollution. The retarding effect achieved with the use of mixed cationic liposomes of dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB)/soybean lecithin (containing a 10% molar fraction of DODAB) was better in comparison with either pure soybean lecithin liposomes or synthetic auxiliaries. The retarding effect of liposomes on the dye release was analysed through changes in the absorption and fluorescence spectra of the acid dye at different conditions. The effect of temperature (in the range of 25 °C - 70 °C) on the spectroscopic behaviour of the dye in the absence and in presence of polyamide was also studied, in order to simulate the dyeing conditions. Exhaustion curves obtained in dyeing experiments showed that, below 45 °C, the retarding effect of the mixed liposomes (lecithin/DODAB (9:1)) was similar to that of the auxiliaries, but better than the one of pure lecithin liposomes. At higher temperatures (above 45 °C), the system lecithin/DODAB presents a better performance, achieving a higher final exhaustion level when compared with the commercial leveling agent without losing the smoothing effect of lecithin. PMID:20550462

  6. Rapid double-dye-layer coating for dye-sensitized solar cells using a new method.

    PubMed

    Jung, Cho-long; Han, Chi-Hwan; Moon, Doo Kyung; Jun, Yongseok

    2014-10-01

    Intensive research with the specific aim of developing inexpensive renewable energy sources is currently being undertaken. In dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) production, the most time-consuming process is coating the dye on working electrodes: absorption of ruthenium-based dyes [e.g., N719=bis(trtrabutylammonium)-cis-di(thiocyanato)-N,N'-bis(4-carboxylato-4'-carboxylic acid-2,2'-bipyridine) ruthenium(II)] on a photoanode takes a long time. We report a simple dye-coating method using a mixed solvent of ethylene glycol (EG) and glycerol (Gly). According to our experiments, dye-coating time can be reduced to 5 min from several hours. Maximum performance was obtained with an EG/Gly ratio of 1:1. This mixture of solvents gave a performance of 9.1%. Furthermore, the viscous solvent system could control coating depth; positioning dye coatings to a specific depth was rapid and facile. A cell containing two different dyes (N719+black dye) had an efficiency of 9.4%. PMID:25154611

  7. TEXTILE DYES AND DYEING EQUIPMENT: CLASSIFICATION, PROPERTIES, AND ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of available information on textile dyeing equipment, dyeing procedures, and dye chemistry, to serve as background data for estimating the properties and evaluating the associated risks of new commercial dyestuffs. It reports properties of dyes...

  8. Artificial evolution of coumarin dyes for dye sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Vishwesh; Abburu, Sailesh; Alsberg, Bjørn Kåre

    2015-11-01

    The design and discovery of novel molecular structures with optimal properties has been an ongoing effort for materials scientists. This field has in general been dominated by experiment driven trial-and-error approaches that are often expensive and time-consuming. Here, we investigate if a de novo computational design methodology can be applied to the design of coumarin-based dye sensitizers with improved properties for use in Grätzel solar cells. To address the issue of synthetic accessibility of the designed compounds, a fragment-based assembly is employed, wherein the combination of chemical motifs (derived from the existing databases of structures) is carried out with respect to user-adaptable set of rules. Rather than using computationally intensive density functional theory (DFT)/ab initio methods to screen candidate dyes, we employ quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models (calibrated from empirical data) for rapid estimation of the property of interest, which in this case is the product of short circuit current (Jsc) and open circuit voltage (Voc). Since QSPR models have limited validity, pre-determined applicability domain criteria are used to prevent unacceptable extrapolation. DFT analysis of the top-ranked structures provides supporting evidence of their potential for dye sensitized solar cell applications. PMID:26428071

  9. Significance of hair-dye base-induced sensory irritation.

    PubMed

    Fujita, F; Azuma, T; Tajiri, M; Okamoto, H; Sano, M; Tominaga, M

    2010-06-01

    Oxidation hair-dyes, which are the principal hair-dyes, sometimes induce painful sensory irritation of the scalp caused by the combination of highly reactive substances, such as hydrogen peroxide and alkali agents. Although many cases of severe facial and scalp dermatitis have been reported following the use of hair-dyes, sensory irritation caused by contact of the hair-dye with the skin has not been reported clearly. In this study, we used a self-assessment questionnaire to measure the sensory irritation in various regions of the body caused by two model hair-dye bases that contained different amounts of alkali agents without dyes. Moreover, the occipital region was found as an alternative region of the scalp to test for sensory irritation of the hair-dye bases. We used this region to evaluate the relationship of sensitivity with skin properties, such as trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL), stratum corneum water content, sebum amount, surface temperature, current perception threshold (CPT), catalase activities in tape-stripped skin and sensory irritation score with the model hair-dye bases. The hair-dye sensitive group showed higher TEWL, a lower sebum amount, a lower surface temperature and higher catalase activity than the insensitive group, and was similar to that of damaged skin. These results suggest that sensory irritation caused by hair-dye could occur easily on the damaged dry scalp, as that caused by skin cosmetics reported previously. PMID:20557579

  10. Thermal treatment of dyes from military munitions

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed thermal treatment equipment to treat Navy smoke and dye compounds. Navy smokes were burned in the Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) in the early 1980s. These test results were used in the development of a portable system consisting of a Thermal Treatment Unit (TTU), feed preparation and pumping skid, utility skid, and control trailer. This equipment was started up at Navy facilities at China Lake, CA where several destruction removal efficiency tests were completed in 1993 burning smoke compositions. The equipment was set up at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in 1996 where tests were completed burning green Navy spotting dyes. Operating and test results from the NTS efforts resulted in clearer understanding of equipment deficiencies, dye characteristics and composition, and secondary wastes generated. Future tests, scheduled for July, 1996 will demonstrate higher bum rates, better pH measurement and control, and stack emission test results for other colored dyes.

  11. Solvatochromic dyes detect the presence of homeopathic potencies.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Steven J

    2016-02-01

    A systematic approach to the design of simple, chemical systems for investigating the nature of homeopathic medicines has led to the development of an experimental protocol in which solvatochromic dyes are used as molecular probes of serially diluted and agitated solutions. Electronic spectroscopy has been used to follow changes in the absorbance of this class of dyes across the visible spectrum in the presence of homeopathic potencies. Evidence is presented using six different solvatochromic dyes in three different solvent systems. In all cases homeopathic potencies produce consistent and reproducible changes in the spectra of the dyes. Results suggest that potencies influence the supramolecular chemistry of solvatochromic dyes, enhancing either dye aggregation or disaggregation, depending upon dye structure. Comparable dyes lacking the intramolecular charge transfer feature of solvatochromic dyes are unaffected by homeopathic potencies, suggesting potencies require the oscillating dipole of solvatochromic dyes for effective interaction. The implications of the results presented, both for an eventual understanding of the nature of homeopathic medicines and their mode of action, together with future directions for research in this area, are discussed. PMID:26827998

  12. Modeling methodologies for intelligent systems

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.

    1988-01-01

    Attempts are made to solve real-world problems by developing problem-solving paradigms using artificial intelligence (AI) technology. An important concept permeating the dissertation is the view that considers most AI issues as modeling tasks. Based on this concept, the dissertation is organized around the notion of model: model of physical system, model of human mental knowledge, and model of human learning process. Thus, the problem-solving paradigms developed are called modeling methodologies. These modeling methodologies, although developed for two specific systems, i.e., (1) a Power Distribution Training System, and (2) a Statistical Process Control Advisory System, address several fundamental issues in AI. Qualitative modeling techniques are used for modeling physical systems, and a generic architecture is proposed and implemented for building qualitative simulation models for a variety of distribution networks. A complete example in the domain of power distribution systems is given. A rule-based expert system is implemented for modeling the instructor and student in the mode-based Power Distribution Training System.

  13. Statistical Optimization of Conditions for Decolorization of Synthetic Dyes by Cordyceps militaris MTCC 3936 Using RSM

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Baljinder; Kumar, Balvir; Kaur, Navneet

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the biobleaching potential of white rot fungus Cordyceps militaris MTCC3936 was investigated. For preliminary screening, decolorization properties of C. militaris were comparatively studied using whole cells in agar-based and liquid culture systems. Preliminary investigation in liquid culture systems revealed 100% decolorization achieved within 3 days of incubation for reactive yellow 18, 6 days for reactive red 31, 7 days for reactive black 8, and 11 days for reactive green 19 and reactive red 74. RSM was further used to study the effect of three independent variables such as pH, incubation time, and concentration of dye on decolorization properties of cell free supernatant of C. militaris. RSM based statistical analysis revealed that dye decolorization by cell free supernatants of C. militaris is more efficient than whole cell based system. The optimized conditions for decolorization of synthetic dyes were identified as dye concentration of 300 ppm, incubation time of 48 h, and optimal pH value as 5.5, except for reactive red 31 (for which the model was nonsignificant). The maximum dye decolorizations achieved under optimized conditions for reactive yellow 18, reactive green 19, reactive red 74, and reactive black 8 were 73.07, 65.36, 55.37, and 68.59%, respectively. PMID:25722980

  14. Biosorption of Azo dyes by spent Rhizopus arrhizus biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvi, Neeta A.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, spent Rhizopus arrhizus biomass was used for the removal of six azo dyes from aqueous solutions. The dye removal capacity of the biomass was evaluated by conducting batch tests as a function of contact time, biomass dosage, pH and initial dye concentrations. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model fitted well with the experimental data with correlation coefficients greater than 0.999, suggesting that chemisorptions might be the rate limiting step. The equilibrium sorption data showed good fit to the Langmuir isotherm model. Among the six dyes tested, the maximum monolayer adsorption capacity for fast red A and metanil yellow was found to be 108.8 and 128.5 mg/g, respectively. These encouraging results suggest that dead Rhizopus arrhizus biomass could be a potential biomaterial for the removal of azo dyes from aqueous dye solution.

  15. Wavelet neural network modeling in QSPR for prediction of solubility of 25 anthraquinone dyes at different temperatures and pressures in supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Tabaraki, R; Khayamian, T; Ensafi, A A

    2006-09-01

    A wavelet neural network (WNN) model in quantitative structure property relationship (QSPR) was developed for predicting solubility of 25 anthraquinone dyes in supercritical carbon dioxide over a wide range of pressures (70-770 bar) and temperatures (291-423 K). A large number of descriptors were calculated with Dragon software and a subset of calculated descriptors was selected from 18 classes of Dragon descriptors with a stepwise multiple linear regression (MLR) as a feature selection technique. Six calculated and two experimental descriptors, pressure and temperature, were selected as the most feasible descriptors. The selected descriptors were used as input nodes in a wavelet neural network (WNN) model. The wavelet neural network architecture and its parameters were optimized simultaneously. The data was randomly divided to the training, prediction and validation sets. The predictive ability of the model was evaluated using validation data set. The root mean squares error (RMSE) and mean absolute errors were 0.339 and 0.221, respectively, for the validation data set. The performance of the WNN model was also compared with artificial neural network (ANN) model and the results showed the superiority of the WNN over ANN model. PMID:16337156

  16. Efficiency enhancement in solid state dye sensitized solar cells by including inverse opals with controlled layer thicknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hanbin; Shah, Said Karim; Abbas, Mamatimin; Ly, Isabelle; Rivera, Thomas; Almeida, Rui M.; Hirsch, Lionel; Toupance, Thierry; Ravaine, Serge

    2016-09-01

    The photoconversion efficiency of dye sensitized solar cells can be enhanced by the incorporation of light management nanostructures such as photonic crystals. Here, we present a facile route to incorporate titania inverse opals into solid state dye sensitized solar cells and report photoconversion efficiency enhancements of up to 56% compared with a model system without the inverse opal. Our approach is based on the precise design of titania inverse opals with a predetermined thickness that can be controlled at the individual layer level. By choosing an inverse opal exhibiting a photonic bandgap which overlaps the absorption bands of the dye, our results show that there is an optimal thickness of the inverse opal structure for maximum efficiency enhancement of the cell. This is the first experimental proof that the thickness of a titania inverse opal plays a pivotal role in cell efficiency enhancement in solid state dye sensitized solar cells.

  17. Dyeing of Polyester with Disperse Dyes: Part 2. Synthesis and Dyeing Characteristics of Some Azo Disperse Dyes for Polyester Fabrics.

    PubMed

    Al-Etaibi, Alya M; Alnassar, Huda S; El-Apasery, Morsy Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to utilize carrier for accelerating the rate of dyeing not only to enhance dyeing of polyester fabrics dyed with disperse dyes 3a,b, but also to save energy. Both the color strength expressed as dye uptake and the fastness properties of the dyed fabrics were evaluated. PMID:27367659

  18. Photoelectrochemical cell/dye-sensitized solar cell tandem water splitting systems with transparent and vertically aligned quantum dot sensitized TiO2 nanorod arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Kahee; Yoo, Ji-Beom; Park, Jong Hyeok

    2013-03-01

    The present work reports fabrication of vertically aligned CdS sensitized TiO2 nanorod arrays grown on transparent conducting oxide substrate with high transparency as a photoanode in photoelectrochemical cell for water splitting. To realize an unassisted water splitting system, the photoanode and dye-sensitized solar cell tandem structures are tried and their electrochemical behaviors are also investigated. The hydrothermally grown TiO2 nanorod arrays followed by CdS nanoparticle decoration can improve the light absorption of long wavelength light resulting in increased photocurrent density. Two different techniques (electrodeposition and spray pyrolysis deposition) of CdS nanoparticle sensitization are carried out and their water splitting behaviors in the tandem cell are compared.

  19. EXPOSURE ANALYSIS MODELING SYSTEM (EXAMS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Exposure Analysis Modeling System (EXAMS), first published in 1982 (EPA-600/3-82-023), provides interactive computer software for formulating aquatic ecosystem models and rapidly evaluating the fate, transport, and exposure concentrations of synthetic organic chemicals--pesti...

  20. Kinetics of sonophotocatalytic degradation of anionic dyes with Nano-TiO2.

    PubMed

    Vinu, R; Madras, Giridhar

    2009-01-15

    The current research work focuses on the combination of photocatalytic and sonocatalytic (sonophotocatalytic) degradation of anionic dyes, viz., Orange G, Remazol Brilliant Blue R, Alizarin Red S, Methyl Blue, and Indigo Carmine, with solution combustion synthesized TiO2 (CS TiO2) and commercial Degussa P-25 TiO2 (DP-25). The rate of sonophotocatalytic degradation of all the dyes and the reduction of total organic carbon was higher compared to the individual photo- and sonocatalytic processes. The effect of dissolved gases and ultrasonic intensity on the sonophotocatalytic degradation of the dyes was evaluated. A dual-pathway network mechanism of sonophotocatalytic degradation was proposed for the first time, and the rate equations were modeled using the network reduction technique. The kinetic rate coefficients of the individual steps were evaluated for all the systems by fitting the model with experimental data. PMID:19238982

  1. Dynamic Modeling of ALS Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of dynamic modeling and simulation of Advanced Life Support (ALS) systems is to help design them. Static steady state systems analysis provides basic information and is necessary to guide dynamic modeling, but static analysis is not sufficient to design and compare systems. ALS systems must respond to external input variations and internal off-nominal behavior. Buffer sizing, resupply scheduling, failure response, and control system design are aspects of dynamic system design. We develop two dynamic mass flow models and use them in simulations to evaluate systems issues, optimize designs, and make system design trades. One model is of nitrogen leakage in the space station, the other is of a waste processor failure in a regenerative life support system. Most systems analyses are concerned with optimizing the cost/benefit of a system at its nominal steady-state operating point. ALS analysis must go beyond the static steady state to include dynamic system design. All life support systems exhibit behavior that varies over time. ALS systems must respond to equipment operating cycles, repair schedules, and occasional off-nominal behavior or malfunctions. Biological components, such as bioreactors, composters, and food plant growth chambers, usually have operating cycles or other complex time behavior. Buffer sizes, material stocks, and resupply rates determine dynamic system behavior and directly affect system mass and cost. Dynamic simulation is needed to avoid the extremes of costly over-design of buffers and material reserves or system failure due to insufficient buffers and lack of stored material.

  2. Chemical stabilization of laser dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Tad H.

    1987-05-01

    Coumarin laser dyes upon excitation degrade to produce products which absorb at the lasing wavelength. This results in attenuation of dye laser output through interference of stimulated emission. The roles of singlet oxygen and excitation intensity on dye degradation were explored. Singlet oxygen is formed but its reactions with the dye do not appear to be a major cause of dye laser output deterioration. High light intensity results in dye sensitized, solvent oligomerization to yield materials which interfere with dye stimulated emission. 1, 4-Diazabicyclo2,2,2octane (DABCO)inhibits this oligomerization.

  3. Statistical validation of system models

    SciTech Connect

    Barney, P.; Ferregut, C.; Perez, L.E.; Hunter, N.F.; Paez, T.L.

    1997-01-01

    It is common practice in system analysis to develop mathematical models for system behavior. Frequently, the actual system being modeled is also available for testing and observation, and sometimes the test data are used to help identify the parameters of the mathematical model. However, no general-purpose technique exists for formally, statistically judging the quality of a model. This paper suggests a formal statistical procedure for the validation of mathematical models of systems when data taken during operation of the system are available. The statistical validation procedure is based on the bootstrap, and it seeks to build a framework where a statistical test of hypothesis can be run to determine whether or not a mathematical model is an acceptable model of a system with regard to user-specified measures of system behavior. The approach to model validation developed in this study uses experimental data to estimate the marginal and joint confidence intervals of statistics of interest of the system. These same measures of behavior are estimated for the mathematical model. The statistics of interest from the mathematical model are located relative to the confidence intervals for the statistics obtained from the experimental data. These relative locations are used to judge the accuracy of the mathematical model. An extension of the technique is also suggested, wherein randomness may be included in the mathematical model through the introduction of random variable and random process terms. These terms cause random system behavior that can be compared to the randomness in the bootstrap evaluation of experimental system behavior. In this framework, the stochastic mathematical model can be evaluated. A numerical example is presented to demonstrate the application of the technique.

  4. Dye-promoted precipitation of serum proteins. Mechanism and application.

    PubMed

    Birkenmeier, G; Kopperschläger, G

    1991-11-01

    Immobilized dyes have been used primarily for purification of nucleotide dependent enzymes and proteins from plasma and other sources. Due to their low costs, high protein binding capacity and resistance to degradation dyes bear the potential as ligand for affinity separation of proteins on a large scale. In this paper dyes have been used for precipitation of proteins. Using albumin, prealbumin, alpha 1-acid glycoprotein and immunoglobulin G as model proteins we could demonstrate that dye-promoted precipitation depends on several factors which include the structure of the dye, the pH of the solution, the dye/protein molar ratio and the intrinsic properties of the proteins. It revealed that most of the dyes tested were endowed with the precipitating potential. The efficacy of precipitation was found to increase with the complexity of the dye structure. However, the amount of a dye required for total precipitation was found to be different for a given protein. Electrostatic as well as hydrophobic forces are involved in the mechanism of precipitation. It was demonstrated that by optimizing the conditions, mixtures of proteins can be resolved by dye-promoted precipitation. The high sensitivity of the reaction offers the possibility of using this method for rapid concentration of very diluted protein solutions. PMID:1367693

  5. Detoxification of azo dyes in the context of environmental processes.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Deepak; Mishra, Vandana; Sharma, Radhey Shyam

    2016-07-01

    Azo dyes account for >70% of the global industrial demand (∼9 million tons). Owing to their genotoxic/carcinogenic potential, the annual disposal of ∼4,500,000 tons of dyes and/or degraded products is an environmental and socio-economic concern. In comparison to physico-chemical methods, microbe-mediated dye degradation is considered to be low-input, cost-effective and environmentally-safe. However, under different environmental conditions, interactions of chemically diverse dyes with metabolically diverse microbes produce metabolites of varying toxicity. In addition, majority of studies on microbial dye-degradation focus on decolorization with least attention towards detoxification. Therefore, the environmental significance of microbial dye detoxification research of past >3 decades is critically evaluated with reference to dye structure and the possible influence of microbial interactions in different environments. In the absence of ecosystem-based studies, the results of laboratory-based studies on dye degradation, metabolite production and their genotoxic impact on model organisms are used to predict the possible fate and consequences of azo dyes/metabolites in the environment. In such studies, the predominance of fewer numbers of toxicological assays that too at lower levels of biological organization (molecular/cellular/organismic) suggests its limited ecological significance. Based on critical evaluation of these studies the recommendations on inclusion of multilevel approach (assessment at multiple levels of biological organization), multispecies microcosm approach and native species approach in conjunction with identification of dye metabolites have been made for future studies. Such studies will bridge the gap between the fundamental knowledge on dye-microbe-environment interactions and its application to combat dye-induced environmental toxicity. Thus an environmental perspective on dye toxicity in the background of dye structure and effects of

  6. Non-equilibrium partitioning tracer transport in porous media: 2-D physical modelling and imaging using a partitioning fluorescent dye.

    PubMed

    Jones, Edward H; Smith, Colin C

    2005-12-01

    This paper describes an investigation into non-equilibrium partitioning tracer transport and interaction with non-aqueous-phase liquid (NAPL) contaminated water-saturated porous media using a two-dimensional (2-D) physical modelling methodology. A fluorescent partitioning tracer is employed within a transparent porous model which when imaged by a CCD digital camera can provide full spatial tracer concentrations and tracer breakthrough curves. Quasi one-dimensional (1-D) benchmarking tests in models packed with various combinations of clean quartz sand and NAPL are described. These modelled residual NAPL saturations, S(n), of 0-15%. Results demonstrated that the fluorescent partitioning tracer was able to detect and quantify the presence of NAPL at low flow rates. At larger flow rates and/or higher NAPL saturations, the tracer increasingly underpredicted the NAPL volume as expected and this is attributed primarily to non-equilibrium partitioning. Despite little change in permeability, change in NAPL saturations from 4% to 8% resulted in significant NAPL saturation underestimates at the same flow rates implying coalescence of NAPL into wider separated but larger ganglia. A 2-D investigation of an idealised heterogeneous residual NAPL contaminated flow field indicated little permeability change in the NAPL contaminated zone and thus little flow bypassing, leading to reduced underpredictions of NAPL saturations than for equivalent quasi 1-D cases. This was attributed to increased 'sampling' of the NAPL by the tracer. The process is clearly visually identifiable from the experimental images. This rapid and relatively inexpensive experimental method is of value in laboratory studies of partitioning tracer behaviour in porous media; in particular, the ability to observe full field concentrations makes it valuable for the study of complex heterogeneous systems. PMID:16298415

  7. Modelling a Simple Mechanical System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morland, Tim

    1999-01-01

    Provides an example of the modeling power of Mathematics, demonstrated in a piece of A-Level student coursework which was undertaken as part of the MEI Structured Mathematics scheme. A system of two masses and two springs oscillating in one dimension is found to be accurately modeled by a system of linear differential equations. (Author/ASK)

  8. A Model for Systemic Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaninger, Markus; Ambroz, Kristjan; Olaya, Camilo

    2006-06-01

    Where should one begin with a design for the self-control of social systems? That is the question addressed by this paper. The traditional concepts of control rest on the feedback loop; control is essential to the attainment of goals. However, the simple feedback loop is insufficient for the modeling of a control system for an organization or other social system. For those systems, which search for multiple goals, it is necessary to design multilevel control systems incorporating the notion of pre-control. This eminently anticipatory function has hardly been considered by past research. Pre-control as understood here is a higher-order control that takes place between different logical levels of a control system. The Model of Systemic Control (MSC), a framework for multilevel control with pre-control relationships, is expounded and illustrated by means of a System Dynamics model.

  9. Propulsive Reaction Control System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugarolas, Paul; Phan, Linh H.; Serricchio, Frederick; San Martin, Alejandro M.

    2011-01-01

    This software models a propulsive reaction control system (RCS) for guidance, navigation, and control simulation purposes. The model includes the drive electronics, the electromechanical valve dynamics, the combustion dynamics, and thrust. This innovation follows the Mars Science Laboratory entry reaction control system design, and has been created to meet the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry, descent, and landing simulation needs. It has been built to be plug-and-play on multiple MSL testbeds [analysis, Monte Carlo, flight software development, hardware-in-the-loop, and ATLO (assembly, test and launch operations) testbeds]. This RCS model is a C language program. It contains two main functions: the RCS electronics model function that models the RCS FPGA (field-programmable-gate-array) processing and commanding of the RCS valve, and the RCS dynamic model function that models the valve and combustion dynamics. In addition, this software provides support functions to initialize the model states, set parameters, access model telemetry, and access calculated thruster forces.

  10. Effect of some process parameters in enzymatic dyeing of wool.

    PubMed

    Tzanov, Tzanko; Silva, Carla Joana; Zille, Andrea; Oliveira, Jovita; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2003-10-01

    This article reports on the dyeing of wool using an enzymatic system comprising laccase; dye precursor, 2,5-diaminobenzenesulfonic acid; and dye modifiers, catechol and resorcinol. Enzymatic dyeing was performed as a batchwise process at the temperature and pH of maximum enzyme activity. The effects of the process variables reaction time, enzyme, and modifier concentration on fabric color were studied, according to an appropriate experimental design. Different hues and depths of shades could be achieved by varying the concentration of the modifiers and the time of laccase treatment. The duration of the enzymatic reaction appeared to be the most important factor in the dyeing process. Thus, the dyeing process, performed at low temperature and mild pH, was advantageous in terms of reduced enzyme and chemical dosage. PMID:14566065

  11. Expert system for groundwater modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Venoge, T.P. de; Stauffer, T.B.; Medina, M.; Jacobs, T.

    1994-12-31

    Hazardous waste site remedial investigations and feasibility studies generally involve some degree of groundwater modeling. A plethora of models exist and most models are difficult to use. An expert system has been developed to lead the user to the appropriate model(s) based on responses to questions about site conditions and data availability. The system is menu driven, user friendly, and provides assistance in estimating input parameters where field measurements are lacking. The system contains twelve models, both analytical and numerical models, that are in the public domain. Some of the models included in the system are MOC, MODFLOW, BIOPLUME, RESSQ, TDAST and PLUME2D. Preprocessors and post processors have been written to permit easy data input and to provide understandable and interpretable data output. There are two versions of the expert system that are available. One version is a UNIX based system that works through the windows environment and provides excellent graphics capabilities. The other version is DOS based and will run on a 386 processor or higher system with 10 megabytes of available hard disk space.

  12. Model systems in neurotoxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Shahar, A. ); Goldberg, A.M. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 33 papers. Some of the titles are: Establishment of cell lines from primary cultures by transfection with SV40 large T antigen gene; Molecular cloning of human cholinesterase genes: Potential applications in neurotoxicology; Neurotoxicity testing of chlorinated hydrocarbons by measuring specific neuronal and glial cell functions; Genetic and pharmacological models of muscle inactivity; and Overexpression of the human CuZnSOD gene in transfected cells: Implication to Down Syndrome.

  13. Launch systems operations cost modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Mark K.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the launch systems operations modeling portion of a larger model development effort, NASA's Space Operations Cost Model (SOCM), led by NASA HQ. The SOCM study team, which includes cost and technical experts from each NASA Field Center and various contractors, has been tasked to model operations costs for all future NASA mission concepts including planetary and Earth orbiting science missions, space facilities, and launch systems. The launch systems operations modeling effort has near term significance for assessing affordability of our next generation launch vehicles and directing technology investments, although it provides only a part of the necessary inputs to assess life cycle costs for all elements that determine affordability for a launch system. Presented here is a methodology to estimate requirements associated with a launch facility infrastructure, or Spaceport, from start-up/initialization into steady-state operation. Included are descriptions of the reference data used, the unique estimating methodology that combines cost lookup tables, parametric relationships, and constructively-developed correlations of cost driver input values to collected reference data, and the output categories that can be used by economic and market models. Also, future plans to improve integration of launch vehicle development cost models, reliability and maintainability models, economic and market models, and this operations model to facilitate overall launch system life cycle performance simulations will be presented.

  14. Energy transfer versus charge separation in hybrid systems of semiconductor quantum dots and Ru-dyes as potential co-sensitizers of TiO2-based solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giménez, Sixto; Rogach, Andrey L.; Lutich, Andrey A.; Gross, Dieter; Poeschl, Andreas; Susha, Andrei S.; Mora-Seró, Ivan; Lana-Villarreal, Teresa; Bisquert, Juan

    2011-07-01

    Hybrid structures of colloidal quantum dots (QDs) with Ru-dyes have been studied as candidates for panchromatic sensitizers for TiO2-based solar cells. Steady-state and time resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy and photocurrent measurements have been employed to identify the prevailing transfer mechanisms for photogenerated excitons between CdSe QDs capped with a traditional bulky organic ligand trioctylphosphine and Ru-dyes (N3 or Ru505) deposited onto inert glass or mesoporous TiO2 substrates. The type II energy level alignment between the QDs and both N3 and Ru505 offers a possibility for the directional charge separation, with electrons transferred to the QDs and holes to the dye. This scenario is indeed valid for the QD/Ru505 and TiO2/QD/Ru505 hybrid systems, with the negligible spectral overlap between the emission of the QDs and the absorption of the Ru505 dye. For the QD/N3 and TiO2/QD/N3 hybrid systems, the spectral overlap favors the longer range energy transfer from the QDs to N3, independently of the presence of the electron acceptor TiO2.

  15. Design of Far-Red Sensitizing Squaraine Dyes Aiming Towards the Fine Tuning of Dye Molecular Structure.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Takuya; Fujikawa, Naotaka; Ogomi, Yuhei; Pandey, Shyam S; Ma, Tingli; Hayase, Shuzi

    2016-04-01

    Model squaraine dyes having sharp and narrow absorptions mainly in the far-red wavelength region has been logically designed, synthesized and used for their application as sensitizer in the dyesensitized solar cells (DSSC). In order to have fine control on energetics, dyes having same mother core and alkyl chain length varying only in molecular symmetry and position of substituent were designed. It has been found that even keeping all other structural factor constant, only positional variation of substituent leads to not only in the variation of energetics by 0.1 eV but affects the photovoltaic characteristics also. Optimum concentration of dye de-aggregating agent was found to be 100 times with respect to the sensitizing dye concentration. Amongst dyes utilized in this work best performance was obtained for unsymmetrical dye SQ-40 giving a photoconversion efficiency of 4.01% under simulated solar irradiation at global AM 1.5. PMID:27451618

  16. Energy transfer between a biological labelling dye and gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racknor, Chris; Singh, Mahi R.; Zhang, Yinan; Birch, David J. S.; Chen, Yu

    2014-03-01

    We have demonstrated energy transfer between a biological labelling dye (Alexa Fluor 405) and gold nanorods experimentally and theoretically. The fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and density matrix method are used to study a hybrid system of dye and nanorods under one- and two-photon excitations. Energy transfer between dye and nanorods via the dipole-dipole interaction is found to cause a decrease in the fluorescence lifetime change. Enhanced energy transfer from dye to nanorods is measured in the presence of an increased density of nanorods. This study has potential applications in fluorescence lifetime-based intra-cellular sensing of bio-analytes as well as nuclear targeting cancer therapy.

  17. Biodegradation of textile azo-dyes byPhanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Capalash, N; Sharma, P

    1992-05-01

    Of 18 commercially used textile dyes, eight were degraded by the white rot fungus,Phanerochaete chrysosporium, by 40 to 73% based on decrease of colour. Both the lignin-degrading enzyme system ofP. chrysosporium and adsorption to its cell mass were involved in the degradation of the diazo dye, Reactofix Gold Yellow. Degradation was best achieved by adding the dye to the medium and then inoculating with pre-grown mycelium; inoculation with spores resulted mainly in dye adsorption. PMID:24425485

  18. ASN reputation system model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, Steve; Erbacher, Robert F.

    2015-05-01

    Network security monitoring is currently challenged by its reliance on human analysts and the inability for tools to generate indications and warnings for previously unknown attacks. We propose a reputation system based on IP address set membership within the Autonomous System Number (ASN) system. Essentially, a metric generated based on the historic behavior, or misbehavior, of nodes within a given ASN can be used to predict future behavior and provide a mechanism to locate network activity requiring inspection. This will provide reinforcement of notifications and warnings and lead to inspection for ASNs known to be problematic even if initial inspection leads to interpretation of the event as innocuous. We developed proof of concept capabilities to generate the IP address to ASN set membership and analyze the impact of the results. These results clearly show that while some ASNs are one-offs with individual or small numbers of misbehaving IP addresses, there are definitive ASNs with a history of long term and wide spread misbehaving IP addresses. These ASNs with long histories are what we are especially interested in and will provide an additional correlation metric for the human analyst and lead to new tools to aid remediation of these IP address blocks.

  19. Multi-scale biomarker evaluation of the toxicity of a commercial azo dye (Disperse Red 1) in an animal model, the freshwater cnidarian Hydra attenuata.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Laetitia; Pech, Nicolas; de Aragão Umbuzeiro, Gisela; Moreau, Xavier

    2016-06-01

    Acute (24 h, 48 h, 72 h) and chronic (7 days) tests have been performed to evaluate the effects of the commercial azo dye Disperse Red 1 (DR1) using various biomarkers in the freshwater invertebrate Hydra attenuata. Morphological changes have been selected to calculate ecotoxicological thresholds for sublethal and lethal DR1 concentrations. A multinomial logistic model showed that the probability of each morphological stage occurrence was function of concentration, time and interaction between both. Results of oxidative balance parameter measurements (72 h and 7 days) suggest that polyps set up defense mechanisms to limit lipid peroxidation caused by DR1. DR1 exposure at hormetic concentrations induces increase of asexual reproductive rates. This result suggests (1) an impact on the fitness-related phenotypical traits and (2) trade-offs between reproduction and maintenance to allow the population to survive harsher conditions. Changes in serotonin immuno-labeling in polyps showing alterations in feeding behavior suggest that chronic DR1 exposure impaired neuronal processes related to ingesting behavior in H. attenuata. This ecotoxicity study sheds light on the possible serotonin function in Hydra model and reports for the first time that serotonin could play a significant role in feeding behavior. This study used a multi-scale biomarker approach investigating biochemical, morphological, reproductive and behavioral endpoints in Hydra attenuata. This organism is proposed for a pertinent animal model to assess ecotoxicological impact of pollutant mixtures in freshwater environment. PMID:27019466

  20. Design of hybrid nanoheterostructure systems for enhanced quantum and solar conversion efficiencies in dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kılıç, Bayram; Telli, Hakan; Tüzemen, Sebahattin; Başaran, Ali; Pirge, Gursev

    2015-04-01

    Dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) with an innovative design involving controlled-morphology vertically aligned (VA) ZnO nanowires within mesoporous TiO2 structures with ultrahigh surface area for implementation as photoanodes are herein reported. Although TiO2 nanostructures exhibit excellent power conversion efficiency, the electron transport rate is low owing to low electron mobility. To overcome this, ZnO nanowires with high electron mobility have been investigated as potential candidates for photoanodes. However, the power conversion efficiency of ZnO nanowires is still lower than that of TiO2 owing to their low internal surface area. Consequently, in this work, vertical growth of ZnO nanowires within mesoporous TiO2 structures is carried out to increase their solar power conversion efficiency. The photovoltaic performance of solar cells using ZnO nanowires, mesoporous TiO2, and TiO2/ZnO hybrid structures are compared. The VA TiO2/ZnO hybrid structures are found to provide direct electron transfer compared with the tortuous pathway of zero-dimensional nanostructures, resulting in an increased conversion efficiency. It is demonstrated that the light scattering of the photoanode film is increased and electron recombination is decreased when an appropriate amount of mesoporous TiO2 is used as a substrate for ZnO nanowires. The DSSC fabricated with the TiO2/ZnO hybrid photoanode prepared with 15.8 wt. % TiO2 showed the highest conversion efficiency of 7.30%, approximately 5%, 18%, and 40% higher than that of DSSCs fabricated with 3.99 wt. % TiO2, pure TiO2, and pure ZnO photoanodes, respectively.

  1. Design of hybrid nanoheterostructure systems for enhanced quantum and solar conversion efficiencies in dye-sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kılıç, Bayram E-mail: kbayramkilic@gmail.com; Telli, Hakan; Başaran, Ali; Pirge, Gursev; Tüzemen, Sebahattin

    2015-04-07

    Dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) with an innovative design involving controlled-morphology vertically aligned (VA) ZnO nanowires within mesoporous TiO{sub 2} structures with ultrahigh surface area for implementation as photoanodes are herein reported. Although TiO{sub 2} nanostructures exhibit excellent power conversion efficiency, the electron transport rate is low owing to low electron mobility. To overcome this, ZnO nanowires with high electron mobility have been investigated as potential candidates for photoanodes. However, the power conversion efficiency of ZnO nanowires is still lower than that of TiO{sub 2} owing to their low internal surface area. Consequently, in this work, vertical growth of ZnO nanowires within mesoporous TiO{sub 2} structures is carried out to increase their solar power conversion efficiency. The photovoltaic performance of solar cells using ZnO nanowires, mesoporous TiO{sub 2}, and TiO{sub 2}/ZnO hybrid structures are compared. The VA TiO{sub 2}/ZnO hybrid structures are found to provide direct electron transfer compared with the tortuous pathway of zero-dimensional nanostructures, resulting in an increased conversion efficiency. It is demonstrated that the light scattering of the photoanode film is increased and electron recombination is decreased when an appropriate amount of mesoporous TiO{sub 2} is used as a substrate for ZnO nanowires. The DSSC fabricated with the TiO{sub 2}/ZnO hybrid photoanode prepared with 15.8 wt. % TiO{sub 2} showed the highest conversion efficiency of 7.30%, approximately 5%, 18%, and 40% higher than that of DSSCs fabricated with 3.99 wt. % TiO{sub 2}, pure TiO{sub 2}, and pure ZnO photoanodes, respectively.

  2. Formic acid enhanced effective degradation of methyl orange dye in aqueous solutions under UV-Vis irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Bai, Renbi

    2016-09-15

    Developing efficient technologies to treat recalcitrant organic dye wastewater has long been of great research and practical interest. In this study, a small molecule, formic acid (FA), was applied as a process enhancer for the degradation of methyl orange (MO) dye as a model recalcitrant organic pollutant in aqueous solutions under the condition of UV-Vis light irradiation and air aeration at the ambient temperature of 25 °C. It was found that the decolouration of the dye solutions can be rapidly achieved, reducing the time, for example, from around 17.6 h without FA to mostly about less than 2 h with the presence of FA. The mineralization rate of MO dye reached as high as 81.8% in 1.5 h in the case of initial MO dye concentration at 25 mg L(-1), which is in contrast to nearly no mineralization of the MO dye for a similar system without the FA added. The study revealed that the generation of the H2O2 species in the system was enhanced and the produced OH radicals effectively contributed to the degradation of the MO dye. Process parameters such as the initial concentration of MO dye, FA dosage and solution pH were all found to have some effect on the degradation efficiency under the same condition of UV-Vis light irradiation and air aeration. The MO dye degradation performance was found to follow a first-order reaction rate to the MO dye concentration in most cases and there existed a positive correlation between the reaction rate constant and the initial FA concentration. Compared to the traditional H2O2/UV-Vis oxidation system, the use of FA as a process-enhancing agent can have the advantages of low cost, easy availability, and safe to use. The study hence demonstrates a promising approach to use a readily available small molecule of FA to enhance the degradation of recalcitrant organic pollutants, such as MO dye, especially for their pre-treatment. PMID:27258621

  3. Immobilized fluorescent dyes for sensitive pH measurements on enamel surfaces with fiber optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumphorst, A.; Seeger, Stefan; Duschner, H.

    1996-01-01

    Information on the pH directly on surfaces of dental enamel is an important aspect in research on tooth decay. As an alternative to pH-electrodes our approach to the problem is the optical determination of pH by pH sensitive fluorescent dyes immobilized to tooth surfaces. In this study a model for measuring pH either on aminated cellulose substrates or on enamel (in vitro) with a fluorescein type dye is presented. The experimental realization is a fiber optic sensor with a nitrogen-pumped dye laser system and photodiode for the detection of the emitted fluorescence light. The surface pH values in the range between 4 and 7 were derived from the ratios of the excitation bands at 490 nm and 460 nm.

  4. A Simplified, Light Emitting Diode (LED) Based, Modular System to be Used for the Rapid Evaluation of Fruit and Vegetable Quality: Development and Validation on Dye Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Civelli, Raffaele; Giovenzana, Valentina; Beghi, Roberto; Naldi, Ezio; Guidetti, Riccardo; Oberti, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    NIR spectroscopy has proven to be one of the most efficient and ready to transfer tools to monitor product’s quality. Portable VIS/NIR instruments are particularly versatile and suitable for field use to monitor the ripening process or quality parameters. The aim of this work is to develop and evaluate a new simplified optoelectronic system for potential measurements on fruit and vegetables directly in the field. The development, characterization and validation of an operative prototype is discussed. LED technology was chosen for the design, and spectral acquisition at four specific wavelengths (630, 690, 750 and 850 nm) was proposed. Nevertheless, attention was given to the modularity and versatility of the system. Indeed, the possibility to change the light sources module with other wavelengths allows one to adapt the use of the same device for different foreseeable applications and objectives, e.g., ripeness evaluation, detection of particular diseases and disorders, chemical and physical property prediction, shelf life analysis, as well as for different natures of products (berry, leaf or liquid). Validation tests on blue dye water solutions have shown the capability of the system of discriminating low levels of reflectance, with a repeatability characterized by a standard deviation proportional to the measured intensity and in general limited to 2%–4%. PMID:26371002

  5. Identification of a Novel Dye-Decolorizing Peroxidase, EfeB, Translocated by a Twin-Arginine Translocation System in Streptococcus thermophilus CGMCC 7.179

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chenchen; Xin, Yongping; Wang, Yue; Guo, Tingting; Lu, Shiyi

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus is a facultative anaerobic bacterium that has the ability to grow and survive in aerobic environments, but the mechanism for this remains unclear. In this study, the efeB gene, encoding a dye-decolorizing peroxidase, was identified in the genome of Streptococcus thermophilus CGMCC 7.179, and purified EfeB was able to decolorize reactive blue 5. Strikingly, genes encoding two components (TatA and TatC) of the twin-arginine translocation (TAT) system were also found in the same operon with the efeB gene. Knocking out efeB or tatC resulted in decreased growth of the strain under aerobic conditions, and complementation of the efeB-deficient strains with the efeB gene enhanced the biomass of the hosts only in the presence of the tatC gene. Moreover, it was proved for both S. thermophilus CGMCC 7.179 and Escherichia coli DE3 that EfeB could be translocated by the TAT system of S. thermophilus. In addition, the transcriptional levels of efeB and tatC increased when the strain was cultured under aerobic conditions. Overall, these results provide the first evidence that EfeB plays a role in protecting cells of S. thermophilus from oxidative stress, with the assistance of the TAT system. PMID:26092460

  6. System Cost Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1996-03-27

    SCM is used for estimation of the life-cycle impacts (costs, health and safety risks) of waste management facilities for mixed low-level, low-level, and transuranic waste. SCM uses parametric cost functions to estimate life-cycle costs for various treatment, storage, and disposal modules which reflect planned and existing waste management facilities at Department of Energy (DOE) installations. SCM also provides transportation costs for intersite transfer of DOE wastes. SCM covers the entire DOE waste management complex tomore » allow system sensitivity analysis including: treatment, storage, and disposal configuration options; treatment technology selection; scheduling options; transportation options; waste stream and volume changes; and site specific conditions.« less

  7. Hydronic distribution system computer model

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.W.; Strasser, J.J.

    1994-10-01

    A computer model of a hot-water boiler and its associated hydronic thermal distribution loop has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). It is intended to be incorporated as a submodel in a comprehensive model of residential-scale thermal distribution systems developed at Lawrence Berkeley. This will give the combined model the capability of modeling forced-air and hydronic distribution systems in the same house using the same supporting software. This report describes the development of the BNL hydronics model, initial results and internal consistency checks, and its intended relationship to the LBL model. A method of interacting with the LBL model that does not require physical integration of the two codes is described. This will provide capability now, with reduced up-front cost, as long as the number of runs required is not large.

  8. Dye adsorption behavior of Luffa cylindrica fibers.

    PubMed

    Demir, H; Top, A; Balköse, D; Ulkü, S

    2008-05-01

    Using natural Luffa cylindrica fibers as adsorbent removal of methylene blue dye from aqueous solutions at different temperatures and dye concentrations was investigated in this study. Thermodynamics and kinetics of adsorption were also investigated. The adsorption isotherms could be well defined with Langmuir model instead of Freundlich model. The thermodynamic parameters of methylene blue (MB) adsorption indicated that the adsorption is exothermic and spontaneous. The average MB adsorption capacity was found out as 49 mg/g and average BET surface area of fibers was calculated as 123 m(2)/g. PMID:17919814

  9. Data management system performance modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiser, Larry M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses analytical techniques that have been used to gain a better understanding of the Space Station Freedom's (SSF's) Data Management System (DMS). The DMS is a complex, distributed, real-time computer system that has been redesigned numerous times. The implications of these redesigns have not been fully analyzed. This paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages for static analytical techniques such as Rate Monotonic Analysis (RMA) and also provides a rationale for dynamic modeling. Factors such as system architecture, processor utilization, bus architecture, queuing, etc. are well suited for analysis with a dynamic model. The significance of performance measures for a real-time system are discussed.

  10. Dynamic modeling of power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, M.; White, J.

    1995-12-01

    Morgantown Energy Technology Center`s (METC) Process and Project Engineering (P&PE) personnel continue to refine and modify dynamic modeling or simulations for advanced power systems. P&PE, supported by Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc. (G/C), has adapted PC/TRAX commercial dynamic software to include equipment found in advanced power systems. PC/TRAX`s software contains the equations that describe the operation of standard power plant equipment such as gas turbines, feedwater pumps, and steam turbines. The METC team has incorporated customized dynamic models using Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL) code for pressurized circulating fluidized-bed combustors, carbonizers, and other components that are found in Advanced Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustion (APFBC) systems. A dynamic model of a commercial-size APFBC power plant was constructed in order to determine representative operating characteristics of the plant and to gain some insight into the best type of control system design. The dynamic model contains both process and control model components. This presentation covers development of a model used to describe the commercial APFBC power plant. Results of exercising the model to simulate plant performance are described and illustrated. Information gained during the APFBC study was applied to a dynamic model of a 1-1/2 generation PFBC system. Some initial results from this study are also presented.

  11. Comparative performance evaluation of Aspergillus lentulus for dye removal through bioaccumulation and biosorption.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Prachi; Malik, Anushree

    2013-05-01

    Dyes used in various industries are discharged into the environment and pose major environmental concern. In the present study, fungal isolate Aspergillus lentulus was utilized for the treatment of various dyes, dye mixtures and dye containing effluent in dual modes, bioaccumulation (employing growing biomass) and biosorption (employing pre-cultivated biomass). The effect of dye toxicity on the growth of the fungal isolate was studied through phase contrast and scanning electron microscopy. Dye biosorption was studied using first and second-order kinetic models. Effects of factors influencing adsorption and isotherm studies were also conducted. During bioaccumulation, good removal was obtained for anionic dyes (100 mg/l), viz. Acid Navy Blue, Fast Red A and Orange-HF dye (99.4 %, 98.8 % and 98.7 %, respectively) in 48 h. Cationic dyes (10 mg/l), viz. Rhodamine B and Methylene Blue, had low removal efficiency (80.3 % [48 h] and 92.7 % [144 h], respectively) as compared to anionic dyes. In addition to this, fungal isolate showed toxicity response towards Methylene Blue by producing larger aggregates of fungal pellets. To overcome the limitations of bioaccumulation, dye removal in biosorption mode was studied. In this mode, significant removal was observed for anionic (96.7-94.3 %) and cationic (35.4-90.9 %) dyes in 24 h. The removal of three anionic dyes and Rhodamine B followed first-order kinetic model whereas removal of Methylene Blue followed second-order kinetic model. Overall, fungal isolate could remove more than 90 % dye from different dye mixtures in bioaccumulation mode and more than 70 % dye in biosorption mode. Moreover, significant color removal from handmade paper unit effluent in bioaccumulation mode (86.4 %) as well as in biosorption mode (77.1 %) was obtained within 24 h. This study validates the potential of fungal isolate, A. lentulus, to be used as the primary organism for treating dye containing wastewater. PMID:22996821

  12. Efficient dye regeneration at low driving force achieved in triphenylamine dye LEG4 and TEMPO redox mediator based dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenxing; Vlachopoulos, Nick; Hao, Yan; Hagfeldt, Anders; Boschloo, Gerrit

    2015-06-28

    Minimizing the driving force required for the regeneration of oxidized dyes using redox mediators in an electrolyte is essential to further improve the open-circuit voltage and efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Appropriate combinations of redox mediators and dye molecules should be explored to achieve this goal. Herein, we present a triphenylamine dye, LEG4, in combination with a TEMPO-based electrolyte in acetonitrile (E(0) = 0.89 V vs. NHE), reaching an efficiency of up to 5.4% under one sun illumination and 40% performance improvement compared to the previously and widely used indoline dye D149. The origin of this improvement was found to be the increased dye regeneration efficiency of LEG4 using the TEMPO redox mediator, which regenerated more than 80% of the oxidized dye with a driving force of only ∼0.2 eV. Detailed mechanistic studies further revealed that in addition to electron recombination to oxidized dyes, recombination of electrons from the conducting substrate and the mesoporous TiO2 film to the TEMPO(+) redox species in the electrolyte accounts for the reduced short circuit current, compared to the state-of-the-art cobalt tris(bipyridine) electrolyte system. The diffusion length of the TEMPO-electrolyte based DSSCs was determined to be ∼0.5 μm, which is smaller than the ∼2.8 μm found for cobalt-electrolyte based DSSCs. These results show the advantages of using LEG4 as a sensitizer, compared to previously record indoline dyes, in combination with a TEMPO-based electrolyte. The low driving force for efficient dye regeneration presented by these results shows the potential to further improve the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of DSSCs by utilizing redox couples and dyes with a minimal need of driving force for high regeneration yields. PMID:26016854

  13. Dye- and quantum dot-sensitized solar cells based on nanostructured wide-bandgap semiconductors via an integrated experimental and modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Xukai

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) and quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) are two promising alternative, cost-effective concepts for solar-to-electric energy conversion that have been offered to challenge conventional Si solar cells over the past decade. The configuration of a DSSC or a QDSSC consists of sintered TiO2 nanoparticle films, ruthenium-based dyes or quantum dots (QDs) (i.e., sensitizers), and electrolytes. Upon the absorption of photons, the dyes or QDs generate excitons (i.e., electron-hole pairs). Subsequently, the electrons inject into the TiO2 photoanode to generate photocurrent; scavenged by a redox couple, holes transport to the cathode. The overall power conversion efficiency (PCE) of a DSSC or QDSSC is dictated by the light harvest efficiency, quantum yield for charge injection, and charge collection efficiency at the electrodes. The goal of our research is to understand the fundamental physics and performance of DSSCs and QDSSCs with improved PCE at the low cost based on rational engineering of TiO2 nanostructures, sensitizers, and electrodes through an integrated experimental and modeling study. In this presentation, I will discuss three aspects that I have accomplished over the last several years. (1) Effects of surface treatment and structural modification of photoanode on the performance of DSSCs. First, our research indicates that the surface treatment with both TiCl4 and oxygen plasma yields the most efficient dye-sensitized TiO2-nanoparticle solar cells. A maximum PCE is achieved with a 21 microm thick TiO2 film; the PCE further increases to 8.35% after TiCl4 and O 2 plasma treatments, compared to the untreated TiO2 ( PCE = 3.86%). Second, we used a layer of TiO2 nanoparticle film coated on the FTO glass, and a bilayer of TiO2nanoparticle/freestanding TiO2 nanotube film deposited on the FTO glass as photoanodes. The J˜V parameter analysis acquired by equivalent circuit model simulation reveals that nanotubular structures are

  14. Suppression of cucurbit scab on cucumber leaves by photodynamic dyes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of this study was to test the ability of the photodynamic dyes bengal rose, toluidine blue, and methylene blue, to protect systemically cucumber plants from cucurbit scab. At the stage of one true leaf, water or aqueous solutions of the dyes were applied to the leaf as droplets. When the se...

  15. CLOSED-CYCLE TEXTILE DYEING: FULL-SCALE HYPERFILTRATION DEMONSTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a project of joining a full-scale dynamic-membrane hyperfiltration (HF) system with an operating dye range. (HF is a membrane separation technique that has been used successfully to desalinate natural water. The dye range is a multi-purpose unit with a...

  16. Modeling approaches for active systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herold, Sven; Atzrodt, Heiko; Mayer, Dirk; Thomaier, Martin

    2006-03-01

    To solve a wide range of vibration problems with the active structures technology, different simulation approaches for several models are needed. The selection of an appropriate modeling strategy is depending, amongst others, on the frequency range, the modal density and the control target. An active system consists of several components: the mechanical structure, at least one sensor and actuator, signal conditioning electronics and the controller. For each individual part of the active system the simulation approaches can be different. To integrate the several modeling approaches into an active system simulation and to ensure a highly efficient and accurate calculation, all sub models must harmonize. For this purpose, structural models considered in this article are modal state-space formulations for the lower frequency range and transfer function based models for the higher frequency range. The modal state-space formulations are derived from finite element models and/or experimental modal analyses. Consequently, the structure models which are based on transfer functions are directly derived from measurements. The transfer functions are identified with the Steiglitz-McBride iteration method. To convert them from the z-domain to the s-domain a least squares solution is implemented. An analytical approach is used to derive models of active interfaces. These models are transferred into impedance formulations. To couple mechanical and electrical sub-systems with the active materials, the concept of impedance modeling was successfully tested. The impedance models are enhanced by adapting them to adequate measurements. The controller design strongly depends on the frequency range and the number of modes to be controlled. To control systems with a small number of modes, techniques such as active damping or independent modal space control may be used, whereas in the case of systems with a large number of modes or with modes that are not well separated, other control

  17. Microcolumn studies of dye adsorption onto manganese oxides modified diatomite.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghouti, M A; Khraisheh, M A M; Ahmad, M N; Allen, S J

    2007-07-19

    The method described here cannot fully replace the analysis of large columns by small test columns (microcolumns). The procedure, however, is suitable for speeding up the determination of adsorption parameters of dye onto the adsorbent and for speeding up the initial screening of a large adsorbent collection that can be tedious if a several adsorbents and adsorption conditions must be tested. The performance of methylene blue (MB), a basic dye, Cibacron reactive black (RB) and Cibacron reactive yellow (RY) was predicted in this way and the influence of initial dye concentration and other adsorption conditions on the adsorption behaviour were demonstrated. On the basis of the experimental results, it can be concluded that the adsorption of RY onto manganese oxides modified diatomite (MOMD) exhibited a characteristic "S" shape and can be simulated effectively by the Thomas model. It is shown that the adsorption capacity increased as the initial dye concentration increased. The increase in the dye uptake capacity with the increase of the adsorbent mass in the column was due to the increase in the surface area of adsorbent, which provided more binding sites for the adsorption. It is shown that the use of high flow rates reduced the time that RY in the solution is in contact with the MOMD, thus allowing less time for adsorption to occur, leading to an early breakthrough of RY. A rapid decrease in the column adsorption capacity with an increase in particle size with an average 56% reduction in capacity resulting from an increase in the particle size from 106-250 microm to 250-500 microm. The experimental data correlated well with calculated data using the Thomas equation and the bed depth-service time (BDST) equation. Therefore, it might be concluded that the Thomas equation and the BDST equations can produce accurate predication for variation of dye concentration, mass of the adsorbent, flow rate and particle size. In general, the values of adsorption isotherm capacity

  18. Water soluble laser dyes

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Peter R.; Feeman, James F.; Field, George F.

    1998-01-01

    Novel water soluble dyes of the formula I are provided ##STR1## wherein R.sup.1 and R.sup.4 are alkyl of 1 to 4 carbon atoms or hydrogen; or R.sup.1 -R.sup.2 or R.sup.2 -R.sup.4 form part of aliphatic heterocyclic rings; R.sup.2 is hydrogen or joined with R.sup.1 or R.sup.4 as described above; R.sup.3 is --(CH.sub.2).sub.m --SO.sub.3.sup.-, where m is 1 to 6; X is N, CH or ##STR2## where Y is 2 --SO.sub.3.sup.- ; Z is 3, 4, 5 or 6 --SO.sub.3.sup.-. The novel dyes are particularly useful as the active media in water solution dye lasers.

  19. Water soluble laser dyes

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, P.R.; Feeman, J.F.; Field, G.F.

    1998-08-11

    Novel water soluble dyes of the formula 1 are provided by the formula described in the paper wherein R{sup 1} and R{sup 4} are alkyl of 1 to 4 carbon atoms or hydrogen; or R{sup 1}--R{sup 2} or R{sup 2}--R{sup 4} form part of aliphatic heterocyclic rings; R{sup 2} is hydrogen or joined with R{sup 1} or R{sup 4} as described above; R{sup 3} is --(CH{sub 2}){sub m}--SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, where m is 1 to 6; X is N, CH or formula 2 given in paper where Y is 2 --SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ; Z is 3, 4, 5 or 6 --SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. The novel dyes are particularly useful as the active media in water solution dye lasers.

  20. Laser dye technology

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, P R

    1999-09-01

    The author has worked with laser dyes for a number of years. A first interest was in the Navy blue-green program where a flashlamp pumped dye laser was used as an underwater communication and detection device. It made use of the optical window of sea-water--blue for deep ocean, green for coastal water. A major activity however has been with the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation Program (AVLIS) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The aim here has been enriching isotopes for the nuclear fuel cycle. The tunability of the dye laser is utilized to selectively excite one isotope in uranium vapor, and this isotope is collected electrostatically as shown in Figure 1. The interests in the AVLIS program have been in the near ultra-violet, violet, red and deep-red.

  1. Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... products. If you have a bad reaction to hair dyes and relaxers, you should: Stop using the ...

  2. Photovoltaic Systems Modeling and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mir Shahed

    2010-11-01

    This thesis deals with the implementation of generalized photovoltaic model and integration of the same with 7-bus electrical utility system to evaluate the impact that the photovoltaic generator have on the utility system. Among all the impacts that the photovoltaic generator have on the utility system, voltage rise of the power distribution line at the position where the Photovoltaic generator is connected due to reverse power flow from the photovoltaic model has been one of the major problem. Therefore, this thesis proposes the steady-state simulations to evaluate the effectiveness of battery-integrated PV system on avoiding the over voltage problem. Further, fault analysis is done to study the effect of the PV model on the utility network during faults and it is deduced that the impact of the PV model on the utility system voltage during faults is nominal. The photovoltaic model/generator and the 7-bus utility system is developed using Matlab/Simulink software package. The developed photovoltaic model can be represented as PV cell, module or an array. The model is developed with icons that are easy to understand. The developed model takes into consideration cell's working temperature, amount of sunlight (irradiance) available, voltage of the circuit when the circuit is open and current of the circuit when it is shorted. The developed Photovoltaic model is then integrated with a Li-ion battery, over here battery serves two purposes first it will store the excess power from the Photovoltaic generator if any, during the day time and in night the battery acts as an generator and deliver the power to the utility or connected load with the help of an invertors.

  3. Hair care and dyeing.

    PubMed

    Draelos, Zoe Diana

    2015-01-01

    Alopecia can be effectively camouflaged or worsened through the use of hair care techniques and dyeing. Proper hair care, involving hair styling and the use of mild shampoos and body-building conditioners, can amplify thinning scalp hair; however, chemical processing, including hair dyeing, permanent waving, and hair straightening, can encourage further hair loss through breakage. Many patients suffering from alopecia attempt to improve their hair through extensive manipulation, which only increases problems. Frequent haircuts to minimize split ends, accompanied by gentle handling of the fragile fibers, is best. This chapter offers the dermatologist insight into hair care recommendations for the alopecia patient. PMID:26370650

  4. Dye filled security seal

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Dennis C. W.

    1982-04-27

    A security seal for providing an indication of unauthorized access to a sealed object includes an elongate member to be entwined in the object such that access is denied unless the member is removed. The elongate member has a hollow, pressurizable chamber extending throughout its length that is filled with a permanent dye under greater than atmospheric pressure. Attempts to cut the member and weld it together are revealed when dye flows through a rupture in the chamber wall and stains the outside surface of the member.

  5. Response surface optimization for efficient dye removal by isolated strain Pseudomonas sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthilkumar, Shanmugam; Perumalsamy, Muthiah; Prabhuy, Harinarayan; AhmedBasha, Chiya; Anantharaman, Narayan

    2012-09-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) involving the central composite design (CCD) was employed to optimize three important process variables for the decolourization of synthetic dye solutions containing Remazol Turquoise Blue (RTB) and Reactive Black 5 (RB5) with isolated bacterial strain Pseudomonas sp. The interaction between three variables i.e. Initial concentration of dye, carbon source and nitrogen source were studied and modeled. According to the Analysis of variance (ANOVA) results the predicted results were found to be in good agreement with experimental results (R 2: 0.9726; Adj R 2: 0.9480 for RTB and R 2: 0.9789; Adj R 2: 0.9750 for RB5) which indicated excellent evaluation of experimental data from the second order polynomial regression model. Mathematical models were developed by the proposed system, for each process variable showed the effect of each factor and their interactions on biodecolourization process. The optimum concentrations of Dye, Carbon source, and Nitrogen source were found to be 20 mgL-1, 1.5 g/L and 1.5 g/L, respectively for RTB and RB5 to obtain maximum dye removing capacity. Predicted values were validated with experimental results, which indicated appropriateness of the employed model and the success of RSM.

  6. Response surface optimization for efficient dye removal by isolated strain Pseudomonas sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthilkumar, Shanmugam; Perumalsamy, Muthiah; Prabhuy, Harinarayan Janardhana; AhmedBasha, Chiya; Anantharaman, Narayan

    2012-09-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) involving the central composite design (CCD) was employed to optimize three important process variables for the decolourization of synthetic dye solutions containing Remazol Turquoise Blue (RTB) and Reactive Black 5 (RB5) with isolated bacterial strain Pseudomonas sp. The interaction between three variables i.e. Initial concentration of dye, carbon source and nitrogen source were studied and modeled. According to the Analysis of variance (ANOVA) results the predicted results were found to be in good agreement with experimental results ( R 2: 0.9726; Adj R 2: 0.9480 for RTB and R 2: 0.9789; Adj R 2: 0.9750 for RB5) which indicated excellent evaluation of experimental data from the second order polynomial regression model. Mathematical models were developed by the proposed system, for each process variable showed the effect of each factor and their interactions on biodecolourization process. The optimum concentrations of Dye, Carbon source, and Nitrogen source were found to be 20 mgL-1, 1.5 g/L and 1.5 g/L, respectively for RTB and RB5 to obtain maximum dye removing capacity. Predicted values were validated with experimental results, which indicated appropriateness of the employed model and the success of RSM.

  7. Studies on the use of power ultrasound in leather dyeing.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Venkatasubramanian; Rao, Paruchuri Gangadhar

    2003-03-01

    Uses of power ultrasound for acceleration/performing the chemical as well as physical processes are gaining importance. In conventional leather processing, the diffusion of chemicals through the pores of the skin/hide is achieved by the mechanical agitation caused by the paddle or drumming action. In this work, the use of power ultrasound in the dyeing of leather has been studied with the aim to improve the exhaustion of dye for a given processing time, to reduce the dyeing time and to improve the quality of dyed leather. The effect of power ultrasound in the dyeing of full chrome cow crust leather in a stationary condition is compared with dyeing in the absence of ultrasound as a control experiment both in a stationary as well as conventional drumming condition. An ultrasonic cleaner (150 W and 33 kHz) was used for the experiments. Actual power dissipated into the system was calculated from the calorimetric measurement. Experiments were carried out with variation in type of dye, amount of dye offer, temperature and time. The results show that there is a significant improvement in the percentage exhaustion of dye due to the presence of ultrasound, when compared to dyeing in absence of ultrasound. Experiments on equilibrium dye uptake carried out with or without ultrasound suggest that ultrasound help to improve the kinetics of leather dyeing. The results indicate that leathers dyed in presence of ultrasound have higher colour values, better dye penetration and fastness properties compared to control leathers. The physical testing results show that strength properties of the dyed leathers are not affected due to the application of ultrasound under the given process conditions. Apparent diffusion coefficient during the initial stage of dyeing process, both in presence and in absence of ultrasound was calculated. The values show that ultrasound helps in improving the apparent diffusion coefficient more for the difficult dyeing conditions such as in the case of metal

  8. Role of N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone on the thermoresponsive behavior of PNIPAm hydrogel and its release kinetics using dye and vitamin-B12 as model drug.

    PubMed

    Maheswari, B; Babu, P E Jagadeesh; Agarwal, Mayank

    2014-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive hydrogels hold great promise in biological applications as they can respond to changes in physiological temperature to produce a desired effect like controlled drug delivery. In this study, a series of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone) thermosensitive hydrogels were synthesized by radical copolymerization of NIPAm with 1-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NVP). By altering the initial NIPAm/NVP mole ratios, copolymers were synthesized to have their own distinctive lower critical solution temperature which was established using differential scanning calorimetry. The swelling behavior of the hydrogel was analyzed gravimetrically and it was observed that reswelling rate increases with increasing NVP mole ratio. Further characterizations of the hydrogels were performed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Release kinetics with respect to temperature was studied using methylene blue dye solution and vitamin B12. Kinetic modeling of the release profile revealed that the release mechanism is a non-Fickian diffusion mechanism. These results suggested that this material has potential application as intelligent drug carriers. The quantities of residual monomers in the PIV4 hydrogel were determined by HPLC method, and the results show almost complete conversion. PMID:24219566

  9. Hair Dyes and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... including aromatic amines that were found to cause cancer in animals. In the mid- to late 1970s, however, manufacturers changed the components in dye products to eliminate some of these chemicals ... in hair dyes can cause cancer. Given the widespread use of hair dye products, ...

  10. A new technology for harnessing the dye polluted water and dye collection in a chemical factory.

    PubMed

    Pu, J P; Pu, P M; Hu, C H; Qian, J L; Pu, J X; Hua, J K

    2001-04-01

    A new technology for harnessing the dye polluted water and dye collection was developed. It is based on the enhanced evaporation by using solar, wind and air temperature energy and additional heat-electric energy. It consists of four parts: (1) evaporation carrier system (evaporation carrier and frame for evaporation carrier) for polluted water; (2) polluted water circulating system (pumping-spraying-collecting); (3) heating system; (4) workshop with polluted water reservoir-tanks and rainfall prevention roof. The polluted water was (heated in case necessary) sprayed to the evaporation carrier system and the water was evaporated when it moved in the space and downward along the carrier mainly by using natural (solar, wind and air temperature energy). In case, when there is no roof for the carrier system, the polluted water can be stored in the reservoirs (storage volume for about 20 days). The first 10-25 mm rainfall also need to be stored in the reservoirs to meet the state standard for discharging wastewater. The dye may be collected at the surface in the reservoir-tanks and the crystallized salt may be collected at the bottom plate. The black-color wastewater released by the factory is no more discharged to the surface water system of Taihu Lake Basin. About 2 kg dye and 200 kg industrial salt may be collected from each tone of the polluted water. The non-pollution production of dye may be realized by using this technology with environmental, economical and social benefits. PMID:11590742

  11. Physical and chemical investigations on natural dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acquaviva, S.; D'Anna, E.; de Giorgi, M. L.; Della Patria, A.; Baraldi, P.

    2010-09-01

    Natural dyes have been used extensively in the past for many purposes, such us to colour fibers and to produce inks, watercolours and paints, but their use declined rapidly after the discovery of synthetic colours. Nowadays we witness a renewed interest, as natural dyes are neither toxic nor polluting. In this work, physical and chemical properties of four selected dyes, namely red (Madder), yellow (Weld and Turmeric) and blue (Woad) colours, produced by means of traditional techniques at the Museo dei Colori Naturali (Lamoli, Italy), have been investigated. The chromatic properties have been studied through the reflectance spectroscopy, a non-invasive technique for the characterisation of chromaticity. Reflection spectra both from powders and egg-yolk tempera models have been acquired to provide the typical features of the dyes in the UV-vis spectral range. Moreover, to assess the feasibility of laser cleaning procedures, tempera layers were investigated after irradiation with an excimer laser. Micro Raman spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive X-Ray analyses have complemented the survey, returning compositional and morphological information as well. Efforts have been made to give scientific feedback to the production processes and to support the research activity in the restoration of the artworks where these dyes were employed.

  12. Isomerization controlled photopolymerization: effect of dye photophysics on photoinitiation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Ley, C; Ibrahim, A; Allonas, X

    2016-08-01

    The efficiency of free radical polymerization by photoinitiating systems based on two Astrazon orange cyanine dyes was shown to be directly related to the isomerization process of the dye in the excited states. The impact of resin viscosity on photopolymerization reactions was measured and related to the overall radical quantum yields. The quantum yields were calculated according to the photocyclic behaviour of the initiating systems based on the Astrazon orange dyes. These dyes are characterized by a viscosity dependent photophysics, which leads to an isomerization-diffusion-controlled photopolymerization. Besides this demonstration, Astrazon orange dyes appeared to be very good candidates for free radical photopolymerization in the visible, presenting high absorption coefficient, low cost and good sensitivity. PMID:27443964

  13. Performance impact of novel polymeric dyes in photoresist applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ping-Hung; Mehtsun, Salem; Sagan, John P.; Shan, Jianhui; Gonzalez, Eleazar; Ding, Shuji; Khanna, Dinesh N.

    1999-06-01

    Dye compounds are commonly used in photoresists as a low cost and effective way to control swing and/or standing wave effect caused by thin film interference as well as reflective notching by reflective light from highly reflective substrate and topography. Convention dyes are typically a monomeric compound with high absorptivity at the wavelength of exposure light and compatible with the resist system selected. Because of the monomeric nature, conventional dyes are relatively low in molecular weight hence their thermal stability and sublimination propensity has always been an issue of concern. We recently synthesize several highly thermal stable diazotized polymeric dyes. Their thermal properties as well as compatibility with resist system were investigated. The impact of polymeric dyes on the resists lithographic performance, swing reduction and reflective notching control are discussed.

  14. Passive apparatus for stabilizing a flashlamp-pumped dye laser

    SciTech Connect

    De Wilde, M.A.; Decker, L.J.

    1986-04-29

    A flash lamp pumped, dye laser apparatus is described which consists of a flash lamp and a liquid dye solution in a transparent compartment proximate to the flash lamp. The compartment is also connected to a tubular circulatory system for moving the liquid dye. The dye solution is activated by flashing of the lamp for lasing to emit light, the lamp and compartment enclosed in a cooling first water jacket, the jacket enclosing deionized water for cooling, an improved cooling system wherein the temperature of the deionized water and the liquid dye solution are maintained within 0.5/sup 0/C of one another, enabling the laser for pulsing at a stabilized 10 pulses per second rate.

  15. Kinetic Modeling of Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Petzold, Linda; Pettigrew, Michel F.

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of how the constituent components of a natural system interact defines the spatio-temporal response of the system to stimuli. Modeling the kinetics of the processes that represent a biophysical system has long been pursued with the aim of improving our understanding of the studied system. Due to the unique properties of biological systems, in addition to the usual difficulties faced in modeling the dynamics of physical or chemical systems, biological simulations encounter difficulties that result from intrinsic multiscale and stochastic nature of the biological processes. This chapter discusses the implications for simulation of models involving interacting species with very low copy numbers, which often occur in biological systems and give rise to significant relative fluctuations. The conditions necessitating the use of stochastic kinetic simulation methods and the mathematical foundations of the stochastic simulation algorithms are presented. How the well-organized structural hierarchies often seen in biological systems can lead to multiscale problems, and possible ways to address the encountered computational difficulties are discussed. We present the details of the existing kinetic simulation methods, and discuss their strengths and shortcomings. A list of the publicly available kinetic simulation tools and our reflections for future prospects are also provided. PMID:19381542

  16. Ecofriendly biosorption of dyes and metals by bacterial biomass of Aeromonas hydrophila RC1.

    PubMed

    Busi, Siddhardha; Chatterjee, Rahul; Rajkumari, Jobina; Hnamte, Sairengpuii

    2016-03-01

    The ability of dried bacterial biomass in azo dye and heavy metal removal from aqueous solution was explored. Biosorption of three textile dyes, Eriochrome black T (EBT), Acid Red 26 (AR) and Trypan blue (TB) and heavy metals (Pb and Cr) by dried biomass of Aeromonas hydrophila RC1, was investigated in a batch system under various parameters such as dye concentration, contact time, concentration of biomass, pH, and temperature. The experimental results showed that the extent of biosorption for dyes increased with increase in initial concentration of dyes, biomass concentration, contact time, temperature and decreased with increase in pH. The experimental isotherms data were analyzed using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm equations. The Langmuir model yielded good fit to the experimental data (R² approximately 0.794, 0.844 and 0.969 for the dyes, EBT, AR and TB, respectively) with maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of 58.8 mg g⁻¹ for AR. Similarly results were obtained for heavy metals and the data fit in Langmuir model (R² value of 0.849 and 0.787) with q(m) value of 40 mg g⁻¹ for Pb. The results fit in pseudo first order kinetics with removal upto 96.67 % for Pb. Involvement of the surface characteristics of the biomass in biosorption was studied using scanning electron micrographs, FTIR, EDX and XRD analysis. Thus, use ofA. hydrophila RC1 biomass can be extensively employed in water treatment plants in order to get desired water quality in the most economical way. PMID:27097447

  17. SYSTEMS BIOLOGY MODEL DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    System biology models holistically describe, in a quantitative fashion, the relationships between different levels of a biologic system. Relationships between individual components of a system are delineated. System biology models describe how the components of the system inter...

  18. Polarization temporal dynamics in a dye microlaser

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, A.; De Martini, F.; Mataloni, P.

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the temporal dynamics of the output polarization of a dye microlaser operating in a transient regime, i.e., under femtosecond excitation. In these conditions the dipole angular diffusion has an important role in the formation of the microlaser pulse, as is shown in a theoretical model. By performing the experiment for different values of the microcavity length and varying the polarization angle, we measured threshold and buildup time of the microlaser and compared the results obtained with two dye solutions of different viscosity. The agreement between theory and experimental results is adequate. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  19. Stirling Engine Dynamic System Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakis, Christopher G.

    2004-01-01

    The Thermo-Mechanical systems branch at the Glenn Research Center focuses a large amount time on Stirling engines. These engines will be used on missions where solar power is inefficient, especially in deep space. I work with Tim Regan and Ed Lewandowski who are currently developing and validating a mathematical model for the Stirling engines. This model incorporates all aspects of the system including, mechanical, electrical and thermodynamic components. Modeling is done through Simplorer, a program capable of running simulations of the model. Once created and then proven to be accurate, a model is used for developing new ideas for engine design. My largest specific project involves varying key parameters in the model and quantifying the results. This can all be done relatively trouble-free with the help of Simplorer. Once the model is complete, Simplorer will do all the necessary calculations. The more complicated part of this project is determining which parameters to vary. Finding key parameters depends on the potential for a value to be independently altered in the design. For example, a change in one dimension may lead to a proportional change to the rest of the model, and no real progress is made. Also, the ability for a changed value to have a substantial impact on the outputs of the system is important. Results will be condensed into graphs and tables with the purpose of better communication and understanding of the data. With the changing of these parameters, a more optimal design can be created without having to purchase or build any models. Also, hours and hours of results can be simulated in minutes. In the long run, using mathematical models can save time and money. Along with this project, I have many other smaller assignments throughout the summer. My main goal is to assist in the processes of model development, validation and testing.

  20. Optimization of working cathode position in sleeve-type bioelectrochemical system with inner chamber/outer chamber for azo dye treatment.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanying; Wang, Aijie; Ren, Hong-Yu

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the optimization of working cathode position in sleeve-type bioelectrochemical system (BES) was evaluated with inner/outer chamber for azo dye decolorization. Results showed that the working position in outer chamber performed better with decolorization efficiencies of 97.8 ± 2.1% (7h) and 94.0 ± 2.3% (16 h) than that in inner chamber as the volume ratio Vcathode:Vanode=1:1 and 3:1, respectively. The current and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis indicated that the proton/electron transfer and anolyte diffusion could be improved using outer chamber as working position. The decolorization with increased volume ratio could be further improved through the strategy of increasing substrate concentration, which would provide enough electrons and decrease diffusion resistance, further improving the whole performance with increased outer cathode volume. It has the great potential in sleeve-type configuration application and would create more challenges for process optimization and maintenance. PMID:26409856

  1. Toxicity and human health risk of hair dyes.

    PubMed

    Nohynek, Gerhard J; Fautz, Rolf; Benech-Kieffer, Florence; Toutain, Herve

    2004-04-01

    Hair dyes and their ingredients have moderate to low acute toxicity. Human poisoning accidents are rare and have only been reported following oral ingestion. Contact sensitisation to hair dyes has been a safety issue, mainly as a consequence of unprotected professional exposure. Although the use of hair dyes has dramatically increased in industrialised countries during the last decades, the prevalence of sensitisation to hair dyes in the general and professional populations has stabilised or declined. In vitro genotoxicity tests on hair dye ingredients frequently had positive results, although their correlation with in vivo carcinogenicity for the chemical class of oxidative hair dye ingredients (aromatic amines) is uncertain. Positive in vivo genotoxicity results on hair dyes are rare. Studies in man found no evidence of genotoxic effects of hair dyes or their ingredients. On the basis of mechanistic studies, some in vivo positive hair dye ingredients (p-aminophenol, Lawsone) have been shown to pose no or negligible risk to human health. Although a recent case-control epidemiology study suggested an association of hair dye use and bladder cancer, a number of other studies, including prospective investigations on large populations, found no or negative correlations for bladder or other cancers. Although in vivo topical carcinogenicity studies on hair dye ingredients or commercial formulations yielded no evidence for systemic toxicity or carcinogenicity, oral carcinogenicity studies on hair dye ingredients at oral doses up to the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) suggested that some ingredients are carcinogenic in rodents. Human systemic exposure to various (14)C-labelled oxidative hair dyes under conditions of use was below 1.0% of the amount applied. Conservative risk assessments suggested no or negligible cancer risk, including for ingredients that were found to be positive in oral carcinogenicity studies. The results of reproductive toxicity studies and

  2. Electrochemical and optical studies of model photosynthetic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-15

    The objective of this research is to obtain a better understanding of the relationship between the structural organization of photosynthetic pigments and their spectroscopic and electrochemical properties. Defined model systems were studied first. These included the least ordered (solutions) through the most highly ordered (Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayers and self-assembled monolayers) systems containing BChl, BPheo, and UQ. Molecules other than the photosynthetic pigments and quinones were also examined, including chromophores (i.e. surface active cyanine dyes and phtahlocyanines) an redox active compounds (methyl viologen (MV) and surfactant ferrocenes), in order to develop the techniques needed to study the photosynthetic components. Because the chlorophylls are photosensitive and labile, it was easier first to develop procedures using stable species. Three different techniques were used to characterize these model systems. These included electrochemical techniques for determining the standard oxidation and reduction potentials of the photosynthetic components as well as methods for determining the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants for BChl and BPheo at metal electrodes (Pt and Au). Resonance Raman (RR) and surface enhanced resonance Raman (SERR) spectroscopy were used to determine the spectra of the photosynthetic pigments and model compounds. SERRS was also used to study several types of photosynthetic preparations.

  3. Generalized Environment for Modeling Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2012-02-07

    -04) created at INL to work inside SharePoint. The GUI tool links slider bars and drop downs to specific inputs and output of the ModelCenter model that is executable from SharePoint. The modeler also creates in SAS, dashboards, graphs and tables that are exposed by links and SAS and ModelCenter Web Parts into the SharePoint system. The user can then log into SharePoint, move slider bars and select drop down lists to configure the model parameters, click to run the model, and then view the output results that are based on their particular input choices. The main point is that GEMS eliminates the need for a programmer to connect and create the web artifacts necessary to implement and deliver an executable model or decision aid to customers.

  4. Generalized Environment for Modeling Systems

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-02-07

    Part (CW-12-04) created at INL to work inside SharePoint. The GUI tool links slider bars and drop downs to specific inputs and output of the ModelCenter model that is executable from SharePoint. The modeler also creates in SAS, dashboards, graphs and tables that are exposed by links and SAS and ModelCenter Web Parts into the SharePoint system. The user can then log into SharePoint, move slider bars and select drop down lists to configure the model parameters, click to run the model, and then view the output results that are based on their particular input choices. The main point is that GEMS eliminates the need for a programmer to connect and create the web artifacts necessary to implement and deliver an executable model or decision aid to customers.« less

  5. Alzheimer's Dye Test?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) scientists have developed a new dye that could offer noninvasive early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, a discovery that could aid in monitoring the progression of the disease and in studying the efficacy of new treatments to stop it. The work is published in Angewandte Chemie. Today, doctors can only…

  6. Vegetable Dyeing of Wool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Pearl

    1976-01-01

    In keeping with the Bicentennial celebration, many art teachers will find themselves "looking back" to crafts of the American past. Dyeing is certainly one that was used extensively and here a professor in a Fine Arts Department details how the process takes place. (Author/RK)

  7. Nonlinear optical properties of multipyrrole dyes

    PubMed Central

    Frenette, Mathieu; Hatamimoslehabadi, Maryam; Bellinger-Buckley, Stephanie; Laoui, Samir; Bag, Seema; Dantiste, Olivier; Rochford, Jonathan; Yelleswarapu, Chandra

    2014-01-01

    The nonlinear optical properties of a series of pyrrolic compounds consisting of BODIPY and aza-BODIPY systems are investigated using 532 nm nanosecond laser and the Z-scan technique. Results show that 3,5-distyryl extension of BODIPY to the red shifted MeO2BODIPY dye has a dramatic impact on its nonlinear absorption properties changing it from a saturable absorber to an efficient reverse saturable absorbing material with a nonlinear absorption coefficient of 4.64 × 10−10 m/W. When plotted on a concentration scale per mole of dye in solution MeO2BODIPY far outperforms the recognized zinc(II) phthalocyanine dye and is comparable to that of zinc(II) tetraphenylporphyrin. PMID:25242819

  8. Estimation of Fluorescent Dye Amount in Tracer Dye Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekkan, Emrah; Balkan, Erman; Balkan, Emir

    2015-04-01

    Karstic groundwater is more influenced by human than the groundwater that disperse in pores. On the other hand karstic groundwater resources, in addition to providing agricultural needs, livestock breeding, drinking and domestic water in most of the months of the year, they also supply drinking water to the wild life at high altitudes. Therefore sustainability and hydrogeological investigation of karstic resources is critical. Tracing techniques are widely used in hydrologic and hydrogeologic studies to determine water storage, flow rate, direction and protection area of groundwater resources. Karanfil Mountain (2800 m), located in Adana, Turkey, is one of the karstic recharge areas of the natural springs spread around its periphery. During explorations of the caves of Karanfil mountain, a 600 m deep cave was found by the Turkish and Polish cavers. At the bottom of the cave there is an underground river with a flow rate of approximately 0.5 m3/s during August 2014. The main spring is located 8 km far from the cave's entrance and its mean flow rate changes between 3.4 m3/s and 0.21 m3/s in March and September respectively according to a flowrate observation station of Directorate of Water Works of Turkey. As such frequent storms, snowmelt and normal seasonal variations in rainfall have a significant and rapid effect on the volume of this main spring resource. The objective of our research is to determine and estimate dye amount before its application on the field inspired from the previously literature on the subject. This estimation is intended to provide a preliminary application of a tracer test of a karstic system. In this study dye injection, inlet point will be an underground river located inside the cave and the observation station will be the spring that is approximately 8 km far from the cave entrance. On the other hand there is 600 meter elevation difference between cave entrance and outlet spring. In this test Rodamin-WT will be used as tracer and the

  9. Effect of dyeing on antibacterial efficiency of silver coated cotton fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahidi, Sheila; Rezaee, Sahar; Hezavehi, Emadaldin

    2014-04-01

    Despite numerous investigations during recent decades in the field of antimicrobial treating textile fibers using silver, many obscurities remain regarding the durability and dyeing ability and the influences of dyeing on the antimicrobial effectiveness of silver-treated fibers. In this research work, the cotton fabrics were sputtered using DC magnetron sputtering system for different times of exposure by silver. Then the silver coated samples were dyed by different classes of synthetic and natural dyes. The dye ability of coated samples was compared with untreated cotton. The reflective spectrophotometer was used for this purpose. The morphology of the cotton fabrics before and after dyeing was observed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The antibacterial activity of samples before and after dyeing, were investigated and compared. For antibacterial investigation, the antibacterial counting tests were used. It was concluded that, dyeing does not have any negative effect on antibacterial activity of coated samples and very good antibacterial activity was achieved after dyeing.

  10. Salicylic Acid-Based Organic Dyes Acting as the Photosensitizer for Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sungjun; Park, Jae-Hyeong; Han, Ah-Reum; Ko, Kwan-Woo; Eom, Jin Hee; Namgoong, Sung Keon; Lo, Alvie S V; Gordon, Keith C; Yoon, Sungho; Han, Chi-Hwan

    2016-05-01

    A D-π-A metal-free organic dye, featuring salicylic acid as a novel acceptor/anchoring unit, has been designed, synthesized and applied to dye-sensitized solar cell. The detailed photophysical, electrochemical, photovoltaic and sensitizing properties of the organic dye were investigated, in addition to the computational studies of the dye and dye-(TiO2)6 system. A solar cell device using this new organic dye as a sensitizer produced a solar to electric power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.49% (J(sc) = 6.69 mAcm-2, V(oc) = 0.74 V and ff = 0.70) under 100 mWcm(-2) simulated AM 1.5 G solar irradiation, demonstrating that the salicylic acid-based organic dye is a suitable alternative to currently used organometallic dyes. PMID:27483839

  11. Oxidative degradation of azo dyes using tourmaline.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cuiping; Zhang, Yanwei; Yu, Li; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Sun, Hongwen

    2013-09-15

    This study aimed to investigate the catalyzed degradation ability of tourmaline on the dyes methylene blue (MB), rhodamine B (RhB), and congo red (CR) at different pH values. Interestingly, tourmaline strongly adsorbed anionic dyes, but it did not adsorb cationic dyes. When H₂O₂ was introduced into the tourmaline-dye systems, the degradation percentage for CR catalysis by tourmaline was lower than the percentage of adsorption, whereas the opposite was true for MB and RhB systems. Notably, the catalyzed degradation decreased from 100% to 45% for MB, 100% to 15% for RhB and 100% to 25% for CR as the pH increased from 3.0 to 10.0, respectively, which was much greater than the degradation obtained for previously reported materials at pH values ranging from 4.0 to 10.0. Tourmaline catalytically degraded the dyes over a broad range of pH values, which was attributed to tourmaline automatically adjusting the pH of the dye solutions to approximately 5.5 from an initial range of 4.2-10.0. An electron paramagnetic resonance spin trapping technique observed peroxyl (ROO·) and alkoxy (RO·) or alkyl (R·) radicals originated from the attack of ·OH radicals and O₂(·-) radicals, indicating that these radicals were involved in the catalyzed degradation of MB. Importantly, four intermediate products of MB at m/z 383, 316, 203 and 181 were observed by LC/MS. PMID:23876254

  12. Video distribution system cost model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gershkoff, I.; Haspert, J. K.; Morgenstern, B.

    1980-01-01

    A cost model that can be used to systematically identify the costs of procuring and operating satellite linked communications systems is described. The user defines a network configuration by specifying the location of each participating site, the interconnection requirements, and the transmission paths available for the uplink (studio to satellite), downlink (satellite to audience), and voice talkback (between audience and studio) segments of the network. The model uses this information to calculate the least expensive signal distribution path for each participating site. Cost estimates are broken downy by capital, installation, lease, operations and maintenance. The design of the model permits flexibility in specifying network and cost structure.

  13. A comparative examination of the adsorption mechanism of an anionic textile dye (RBY 3GL) onto the powdered activated carbon (PAC) using various the isotherm models and kinetics equations with linear and non-linear methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Açıkyıldız, Metin; Gürses, Ahmet; Güneş, Kübra; Yalvaç, Duygu

    2015-11-01

    The present study was designed to compare the linear and non-linear methods used to check the compliance of the experimental data corresponding to the isotherm models (Langmuir, Freundlich, and Redlich-Peterson) and kinetics equations (pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order). In this context, adsorption experiments were carried out to remove an anionic dye, Remazol Brillant Yellow 3GL (RBY), from its aqueous solutions using a commercial activated carbon as a sorbent. The effects of contact time, initial RBY concentration, and temperature onto adsorbed amount were investigated. The amount of dye adsorbed increased with increased adsorption time and the adsorption equilibrium was attained after 240 min. The amount of dye adsorbed enhanced with increased temperature, suggesting that the adsorption process is endothermic. The experimental data was analyzed using the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Redlich-Peterson isotherm equations in order to predict adsorption isotherm. It was determined that the isotherm data were fitted to the Langmuir and Redlich-Peterson isotherms. The adsorption process was also found to follow a pseudo second-order kinetic model. According to the kinetic and isotherm data, it was found that the determination coefficients obtained from linear method were higher than those obtained from non-linear method.

  14. Polyphosphazenes with Immobilized Dyes as Potential Color Filter Materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongjing; Allcock, Harry R

    2015-06-24

    Red, green, and blue dye molecules were linked covalently to polyphosphazenes to generate soluble, film-forming materials appropriate for the formation of patterned tricolor filters for possible use in liquid crystalline and other display devices or in camera sensors. The monofunctional dyes (a red 1-[(E)-(4-nitrophenyl)diazenyl]-2-naphthol, a green tetraphenylporphyrin [5-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin], and a toluidine blue dye) were employed as representative chromophores. The cosubstituents employed included 2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy with and without aryloxy groups or cyclopentanoxy groups. The optical densities were varied by adopting several dye-to-cosubstituent side group ratios. These dyes are models for a wide range of different chromophores that can be linked to polyphosphazene chains. PMID:26018938

  15. Parametric Modeling for Fluid Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Martinez, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Fluid Systems involves different projects that require parametric modeling, which is a model that maintains consistent relationships between elements as is manipulated. One of these projects is the Neo Liquid Propellant Testbed, which is part of Rocket U. As part of Rocket U (Rocket University), engineers at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida have the opportunity to develop critical flight skills as they design, build and launch high-powered rockets. To build the Neo testbed; hardware from the Space Shuttle Program was repurposed. Modeling for Neo, included: fittings, valves, frames and tubing, between others. These models help in the review process, to make sure regulations are being followed. Another fluid systems project that required modeling is Plant Habitat's TCUI test project. Plant Habitat is a plan to develop a large growth chamber to learn the effects of long-duration microgravity exposure to plants in space. Work for this project included the design and modeling of a duct vent for flow test. Parametric Modeling for these projects was done using Creo Parametric 2.0.

  16. Resonance energy transfer in DNA duplexes labeled with localized dyes.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Paul D; Khachatrian, Ani; Buckhout-White, Susan; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Goldman, Ellen R; Medintz, Igor L; Melinger, Joseph S

    2014-12-18

    The growing maturity of DNA-based architectures has raised considerable interest in applying them to create photoactive light harvesting and sensing devices. Toward optimizing efficiency in such structures, resonant energy transfer was systematically examined in a series of dye-labeled DNA duplexes where donor-acceptor separation was incrementally changed from 0 to 16 base pairs. Cyanine dyes were localized on the DNA using double phosphoramidite attachment chemistry. Steady state spectroscopy, single-pair fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence, and ultrafast two-color pump-probe methods were utilized to examine the energy transfer processes. Energy transfer rates were found to be more sensitive to the distance between the Cy3 donor and Cy5 acceptor dye molecules than efficiency measurements. Picosecond energy transfer and near-unity efficiencies were observed for the closest separations. Comparison between our measurements and the predictions of Förster theory based on structural modeling of the dye-labeled DNA duplex suggest that the double phosphoramidite linkage leads to a distribution of intercalated and nonintercalated dye orientations. Deviations from the predictions of Förster theory point to a failure of the point dipole approximation for separations of less than 10 base pairs. Interactions between the dyes that alter their optical properties and violate the weak-coupling assumption of Förster theory were observed for separations of less than four base pairs, suggesting the removal of nucleobases causes DNA deformation and leads to enhanced dye-dye interaction. PMID:25397906

  17. Catalyzed degradation of azo dyes under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin-Ming; Wen, Wei

    2010-12-01

    Phase-pure layered perovskite La(4)Ni(3)O(10) powders were synthesized by a solution combustion approach. It is found that, in the presence of the La(4)Ni(3)O(10) powders, aqueous azo dyes can be degraded catalytically and efficiently under ambient conditions. Neither light nor additional reagents are needed in the catalytic reaction. The dye degradation procedure can be accelerated markedly by magnetic stirring. A systemic series of chemical and electrochemical experiments suggested that the dye degradation proceeds through electron transfers from the dye molecules to the catalyst and then to electron acceptors such as dissolved oxygen. The present catalytic degradation requires no additional reagents or external energy input, which hence provides a potentially low-cost alternative for the remediation of azo-dye effluents. PMID:21049925

  18. Vegetable-based dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Calogero, Giuseppe; Bartolotta, Antonino; Di Marco, Gaetano; Di Carlo, Aldo; Bonaccorso, Francesco

    2015-05-21

    There is currently a large effort to improve the performance of low cost renewable energy devices. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are emerging as one of the most promising low cost photovoltaic technologies, addressing "secure, clean and efficient solar energy conversion". Vegetable dyes, extracted from algae, flowers, fruit and leaves, can be used as sensitizers in DSSCs. Thus far, anthocyanin and betalain extracts together with selected chlorophyll derivatives are the most successful vegetable sensitizers. This review analyses recent progress in the exploitation of vegetable dyes for solar energy conversion and compares them to the properties of synthetic dyes. We provide an in-depth discussion on the main limitation of cell performance e.g. dye degradation, effective electron injection from the dye into the conduction band of semiconducting nanoparticles, such as titanium dioxide and zinc oxide, outlining future developments for the use of vegetable sensitizers in DSSCs. We also discuss the cost of vegetable dyes and how their versatility can boost the advancement of new power management solutions, especially for their integration in living environments, making the practical application of such systems economically viable. Finally, we present our view on future prospects in the development of synthetic analogues of vegetable dyes as sensitizers in DSSCs. PMID:25855097

  19. Biological waste-water treatment of azo dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Shaul, G.M.; Dempsey, C.R.; Dostal, K.A.

    1988-05-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Office of Toxic Substances evaluates existing chemicals under Section 4 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and Premanufacture Notification (PMN) submissions under Section 5 of TSCA. Azo dyes constitute a significant portion of these PMN submissions and specific azo dyes have recently been added to the priority list for considerations in the development of test rules under Section 4. Azo dyes are of concern because some of the dyes, dye precurors, and/or their degradation products such as aromatic amines (which are also dye precurors) have been shown to be, or are suspected to be, carcinogenic. The fate of azo dyes in biological waste-water treatment systems was studied to aid in the review of PMN submissions and to assist in the possible development of test rules. Results from extensive pilot-scale activated-sludge process testing for 18 azo dyes are presented. Results from fate studies of C.I. Disperse Blue 79 in aerobic and anaerobic waste-water treatment will also be presented.

  20. Extrapyramidal system neurotoxicity: animal models.

    PubMed

    Dorman, David

    2015-01-01

    The central nervous system's extrapyramidal system provides involuntary motor control to the muscles of the head, neck, and limbs. Toxicants that affect the extrapyramidal system are generally clinically characterized by impaired motor control, which is usually the result of basal ganglionic dysfunction. A variety of extrapyramidal syndromes are recognized in humans and include Parkinson's disease, secondary parkinsonism, other degenerative diseases of the basal ganglia, and clinical syndromes that result in dystonia, dyskinesia, essential tremor, and other forms of tremor and chorea. This chapter briefly reviews the anatomy of the extrapyramidal system and discusses several naturally occurring and experimental models that target the mammalian (nonhuman) extrapyramidal system. Topics discussed include extrapyramidal syndromes associated with antipsychotic drugs, carbon monoxide, reserpine, cyanide, rotenone, paraquat, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), and manganese. In most cases, animals are used as experimental models to improve our understanding of the toxicity and pathogenesis of these agents. Another agent discussed in this chapter, yellowstar thistle poisoning in horses, however, represents an important spontaneous cause of parkinsonism that naturally occurs in animals. The central focus of the chapter is on animal models, especially the concordance between clinical signs, neurochemical changes, and neuropathology between animals and people. PMID:26563791

  1. Systems modeling for laser IFE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, W. R.; Raffray, A. R.; Sviatoslavsky, I. N.

    2006-06-01

    A systems model of a laser-driven IFE power plant is being developed to assist in design trade-offs and optimization. The focus to date has been on modeling the fusion chamber, blanket and power conversion system. A self-consistent model has been developed to determine key chamber and thermal cycle parameters (e.g., chamber radius, structure and coolant temperatures, cycle efficiency, etc.) as a function of the target yield and pulse repetition rate. Temperature constraints on the tungsten armor, ferritic steel wall, and structure/coolant interface are included in evaluating the potential design space. Results are presented for a lithium cooled first wall coupled with a Brayton power cycle. LLNL work performed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy by the University of California LLNL under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  2. Marine systems analysis and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedra, K.

    1995-03-01

    Oceanography and marine ecology have a considerable history in the use of computers for modeling both physical and ecological processes. With increasing stress on the marine environment due to human activities such as fisheries and numerous forms of pollution, the analysis of marine problems must increasingly and jointly consider physical, ecological and socio-economic aspects in a broader systems framework that transcends more traditional disciplinary boundaries. This often introduces difficult-to-quantify, “soft” elements, such as values and perceptions, into formal analysis. Thus, the problem domain combines a solid foundation in the physical sciences, with strong elements of ecological, socio-economic and political considerations. At the same time, the domain is also characterized by both a very large volume of some data, and an extremely datapoor situation for other variables, as well as a very high degree of uncertainty, partly due to the temporal and spatial heterogeneity of the marine environment. Consequently, marine systems analysis and management require tools that can integrate these diverse aspects into efficient information systems that can support research as well as planning and also policy- and decisionmaking processes. Supporting scientific research, as well as decision-making processes and the diverse groups and actors involved, requires better access and direct understanding of the information basis as well as easy-to-use, but powerful tools for analysis. Advanced information technology provides the tools to design and implement smart software where, in a broad sense, the emphasis is on the man-machine interface. Symbolic and analogous, graphical interaction, visual representation of problems, integrated data sources, and built-in domain knowledge can effectively support users of complex and complicated software systems. Integration, interaction, visualization and intelligence are key concepts that are discussed in detail, using an

  3. NiO(111) nanosheets as efficient and recyclable adsorbents for dye pollutant removal from wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhi; Chen, Lifang; Hu, Juncheng; Richards, Ryan

    2009-07-01

    Semiconductor single-crystalline polar NiO(111) nanosheets with well-defined hexagonal holes have been investigated for application in dye adsorption and combustion processes. With regard to adsorption technologies, high surface area metal oxides have an advantage over activated carbon in that the adsorbed species can be combusted and the adsorbent reused in the case of metal oxides while regeneration of activated carbon remains challenging and thus the adsorbent/adsorbate system must be disposed of. Here, three typical textile dyes, reactive brilliant red X-3B, congo red and fuchsin red, were studied for removal from wastewater with two NiO systems and activated carbon. These studies revealed that the NiO(111) nanosheets exhibited much more favorable adsorptive properties than conventionally prepared nickel oxide powder (CP-NiO) obtained from thermal decomposition of nickel nitrate. The maximum adsorption capabilities of the three dyes on NiO(111) nanosheets reached 30.4 mg g-1, 35.15 mg g-1 and 22 mg g-1 for reactive brilliant red X-3B, congo red and fuchsin acid, respectively, while the maximum adsorption capabilities of the three dyes on CP-NiO were only 8.4, 13.2 and 12 mg g-1 for reactive brilliant red X-3B, congo red and fuchsin acid. To simulate the adsorption isotherm, two commonly employed models, the Langmuir and the Freundlich isotherms, were selected to explicate the interaction of the dye and NiO(111). The isotherm evaluations revealed that the Langmuir model demonstrated better fit to experimental equilibrium data than the Freundlich model. The maximum predicted adsorption capacity was 36.1 mg g-1. In addition, adsorption kinetic data of NiO(111) followed a pseudo-second-order rate for congo red. These studies infer that NiO(111) nanosheets possess desirable properties for application in adsorption and combustion applications.

  4. Photoactive dye enhanced tissue ablation for endoscopic laser prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Minwoo; Nguyen, Trung Hau; Nguyen, Van Phuc; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2015-02-01

    Laser light has been widely used as a surgical tool to treat benign prostate hyperplasia with high laser power. The purpose of this study was to validate the feasibility of photoactive dye injection to enhance light absorption and eventually to facilitate tissue ablation with low laser power. The experiment was implemented on chicken breast due to minimal optical absorption Amaranth (AR), black dye (BD), hemoglobin powder (HP), and endoscopic marker (EM), were selected and tested in vitro with a customized 532-nm laser system with radiant exposure ranging from 0.9 to 3.9 J/cm2. Light absorbance and ablation threshold were measured with UV-VIS spectrometer and Probit analysis, respectively, and compared to feature the function of the injected dyes. Ablation performance with dye-injection was evaluated in light of radiant exposure, dye concentration, and number of injection. Higher light absorption by injected dyes led to lower ablation threshold as well as more efficient tissue removal in the order of AR, BD, HP, and EM. Regardless of the injected dyes, ablation efficiency principally increased with input parameter. Among the dyes, AR created the highest ablation rate of 44.2+/-0.2 μm/pulse due to higher absorbance and lower ablation threshold. Preliminary tests on canine prostate with a hydraulic injection system demonstrated that 80 W with dye injection yielded comparable ablation efficiency to 120 W with no injection, indicating 33 % reduced laser power with almost equivalent performance. In-depth comprehension on photoactive dye-enhanced tissue ablation can help accomplish efficient and safe laser treatment for BPH with low power application.

  5. INTEGRATED HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEM MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, B

    2007-11-16

    Hydrogen storage is recognized as a key technical hurdle that must be overcome for the realization of hydrogen powered vehicles. Metal hydrides and their doped variants have shown great promise as a storage material and significant advances have been made with this technology. In any practical storage system the rate of H2 uptake will be governed by all processes that affect the rate of mass transport through the bed and into the particles. These coupled processes include heat and mass transfer as well as chemical kinetics and equilibrium. However, with few exceptions, studies of metal hydrides have focused primarily on fundamental properties associated with hydrogen storage capacity and kinetics. A full understanding of the complex interplay of physical processes that occur during the charging and discharging of a practical storage system requires models that integrate the salient phenomena. For example, in the case of sodium alanate, the size of NaAlH4 crystals is on the order of 300nm and the size of polycrystalline particles may be approximately 10 times larger ({approx}3,000nm). For the bed volume to be as small as possible, it is necessary to densely pack the hydride particles. Even so, in packed beds composed of NaAlH{sub 4} particles alone, it has been observed that the void fraction is still approximately 50-60%. Because of the large void fraction and particle to particle thermal contact resistance, the thermal conductivity of the hydride is very low, on the order of 0.2 W/m-{sup o}C, Gross, Majzoub, Thomas and Sandrock [2002]. The chemical reaction for hydrogen loading is exothermic. Based on the data in Gross [2003], on the order of 10{sup 8}J of heat of is released for the uptake of 5 kg of H{sub 2}2 and complete conversion of NaH to NaAlH{sub 4}. Since the hydride reaction transitions from hydrogen loading to discharge at elevated temperatures, it is essential to control the temperature of the bed. However, the low thermal conductivity of the hydride

  6. System modelling for LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Aguiló, Marc; Grynagier, Adrien; Rais, Boutheina

    LISA Pathfinder is the technology demonstrator for LISA, a space-borne gravitational waves observatory. The goal of the mission is to characterise the dynamics of the LISA Technology Package (LTP) to prove that on-board experimental conditions are compatible with the de-tection of gravitational waves. The LTP is a drag-free dynamics experiment which includes a control loop with sensors (interferometric and capacitive), actuators (capacitive actuators and thrusters), controlled disturbances (magnetic coils, heaters) and which is subject to various endogenous or exogenous noise sources such as infrared pressure or solar wind. The LTP experiment features new hardware which was never flown in space. The mission has a tight operation timeline as it is constrained to about 100 days. It is therefore vital to have efficient and precise means of investigation and diagnostics to be used during the on-orbit operations. These will be conducted using the LTP Data Analysis toolbox (LTPDA) which allows for simulation, parameter identification and various analyses (covariance analysis, state estimation) given an experimental model. The LTPDA toolbox therefore contains a series of models which are state-space representations of each component in the LTP. The State-Space Models (SSM) are objects of a state-space class within the LTPDA toolbox especially designed to address all the requirements of this tool. The user has access to a set of linear models which represent every satellite subsystem; the models are available in different forms representing 1D, 2D and 3D systems, each with settable symbolic and numeric parameters. To limit the possible errors, the models can be automatically linked to produce composite systems and closed-loops of the LTP. Finally, for the sake of completeness, accuracy and maintainability of the tool, the models contain all the physical information they mimic (i.e. variable units, description of parameters, description of inputs/outputs, etc). Models

  7. Graph modeling systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Neergaard, Mike

    2015-10-13

    An apparatus and a method for vulnerability and reliability modeling are provided. The method generally includes constructing a graph model of a physical network using a computer, the graph model including a plurality of terminating vertices to represent nodes in the physical network, a plurality of edges to represent transmission paths in the physical network, and a non-terminating vertex to represent a non-nodal vulnerability along a transmission path in the physical network. The method additionally includes evaluating the vulnerability and reliability of the physical network using the constructed graph model, wherein the vulnerability and reliability evaluation includes a determination of whether each terminating and non-terminating vertex represents a critical point of failure. The method can be utilized to evaluate wide variety of networks, including power grid infrastructures, communication network topologies, and fluid distribution systems.

  8. An ultrastructural analysis of endothelial change paralleling platelet aggregation in a light/dye model of microvascular insult.

    PubMed Central

    Povlishock, J. T.; Rosenblum, W. I.; Sholley, M. M.; Wei, E. P.

    1983-01-01

    Those microvascular endothelial events that parallel the evolution of platelet aggregation were evaluated in a well-controlled animal model. Cat pial microvessels were observed through a cranial window while local platelet aggregation was produced by intravenous injection of sodium fluorescein and simultaneous exposure of the pial vessels to light from a filtered mercury lamp that excited the fluorescein. The vessels were fixed in situ when the in vivo observations of a preselected vessel indicated early, intermediate, or advanced aggregation in that vessel. The preselected vessel was then harvested for ultrastructural study together with adjacent vessels from the illuminated field. These vessels and appropriate controls were compared in semiserial thin sections. The onset of platelet aggregation in both venules and arterioles was accompanied by focal endothelial lucency, vacuole formation, luminal membrane rupture, and swelling of the nuclear envelope. These changes were not found in control material. With intermediate aggregation these changes were more common, while with advanced aggregation these abnormalities occurred together with focal endothelial denudation. Thus, in this model denudation occurred only with advanced aggregation and was not a prerequisite for aggregation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:6824062

  9. The emergent neural modeling system.

    PubMed

    Aisa, Brad; Mingus, Brian; O'Reilly, Randy

    2008-10-01

    Emergent (http://grey.colorado.edu/emergent) is a powerful tool for the simulation of biologically plausible, complex neural systems that was released in August 2007. Inheriting decades of research and experience in network algorithms and modeling principles from its predecessors, PDP++ and PDP, Emergent has been redesigned as an efficient workspace for academic research and an engaging, easy-to-navigate environment for students. The system provides a modern and intuitive interface for programming and visualization centered around hierarchical, tree-based navigation and drag-and-drop reorganization. Emergent contains familiar, high-level simulation constructs such as Layers and Projections, a wide variety of algorithms, general-purpose data handling and analysis facilities and an integrated virtual environment for developing closed-loop cognitive agents. For students, the traditional role of a textbook has been enhanced by wikis embedded in every project that serve to explain, document, and help newcomers engage the interface and step through models using familiar hyperlinks. For advanced users, the software is easily extensible in all respects via runtime plugins, has a powerful shell with an integrated debugger, and a scripting language that is fully symmetric with the interface. Emergent strikes a balance between detailed, computationally expensive spiking neuron models and abstract, Bayesian or symbolic systems. This middle level of detail allows for the rapid development and successful execution of complex cognitive models while maintaining biological plausibility. PMID:18684591

  10. Fiberized fluorescent dye microtubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladev, Veselin; Eftimov, Tinko

    2013-03-01

    In the present work we study the effect of the length of fluorescent dye-filled micro-capillaries on the fluorescence spectra. Two types of micro-capillaries have been studied: a 100 μm inner diameter fused silica capillary with a transparent coating and one of the holes of a fiber optic glass ferrule with 125 μm inner diameter. The tubes were filled with solutions of Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethanol and then in glycerin. Experimental data show that the maximum fluorescence and the largest spectral widths are observed for a sample length of about 0.25 mm for the used concentration. This results show that miniature tunable fiberized dye lasers can be developed using available standard micro-and fibre-optic components.

  11. Azaquinolone dye lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Peter R.; Atkins, Ronald L.; Henry, Ronald A.; Fletcher, Aaron N.

    1978-01-01

    A dye laser comprising a laser dye solution of a compound having the general structure: ##STR1## wherein at least one of the 5, 6 and 8 ring positions is occupied by a nitrogen atom in lieu of the corresponding CR group and X is OH, alkoxy, or amino including amino substituted by at least one of the following: alkyl, aryl, acyl, aracyl, a group which taken together with the nitrogen atom of the amino group forms a heterocyclic ring, or part of one or two 5 or 6 membered aliphatic heterocyclic rings attached to ring A at positions 6 or 8 or both depending on where the N in ring A is located. R.sub.1, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, R.sub.6 and R.sub.8 are hydrogen or other groups as defined below. The compounds lase in the blue to near ultraviolet region.

  12. Azacoumarin dye lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Peter R.; Atkins, Ronald L.; Henry, Ronald A.; Fletcher, Aaron N.

    1978-01-01

    A dye laser comprising a laser dye solution of a compound having the general structure: ##STR1## wherein at least one of the 5, 6 and 8 ring positions is occupied by a nitrogen atom in lieu of the corresponding CR group and X is OH, alkoxy, or amino including amino substituted by at least one of the following: alkyl, aryl, acyl, aracyl, a group which taken together with the nitrogen atom of the amino group forms a heterocyclic ring, or part of one or two 5 or 6 membered aliphatic heterocyclic rings attached to ring A at positions 6 or 8 or both depending on where the N in ring A is located. R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, R.sub.6 and R.sub.8 are hydrogen or other groups as defined below. The compounds lase in the blue-green to near ultraviolet region.

  13. J-aggregation and its characterization in Langmuir-Blodgett films of merocyanine dyes.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Shin-ichi

    2004-12-13

    Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films are constructed by successively transferring monomolecular layers formed at the air-water interface onto solid substrates. One of the advantages of the LB technique in fabricating molecular aggregates lies in the fact that it can employ various kinds of molecules by mixing them at the air-water interface. The mixed system may exhibit new properties that are not observed for individual components. This method would be useful, for example, in the studies of the formation and control of the J-aggregates of functional dyes that attract attention both in science and technology. In this paper, I review this subject mainly based on our recent results in merocyanines. LB films of merocyanine dyes, mixed with arachidic acid (C(20)), exhibit J-aggregate formation and have been serving as typical systems in revealing the physical and structural aspects of nanosized molecular aggregates constructed as monolayers. In the case of LB films of a merocyanine dye having benzothiazole as donor nucleus (abbreviated as DS), electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy has been successful in determining the characteristic in-plane orientation of dye molecules with respect to the dipping direction, which led to the discovery of the flow orientation effect during the dipping process of LB films as the origin of optical dichroism often observed in LB films. In this article, after an introduction of ESR spectroscopy, three major topics on the merocyanine J-aggregation and its characterization in mixed films are discussed. The first topic is the observation and control of the size of J-aggregates in the dilution limit of dyes in arachidic acid matrix for a methyl-substituted DS (6-Me-DS). Dependence of atomic force microscopy (AFM) patterns on the molar ratio allows the identification of dye domains. J-band optical peak analysis based on the Kuhn's extended dipole model, supplemented by a novel application of femtosecond pump-probe optical spectroscopy, yields the

  14. Modeling Advance Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Marvin; Sager, John; Loader, Coleen; Drysdale, Alan

    1996-01-01

    Activities this summer consisted of two projects that involved computer simulation of bioregenerative life support systems for space habitats. Students in the Space Life Science Training Program (SLSTP) used the simulation, space station, to learn about relationships between humans, fish, plants, and microorganisms in a closed environment. One student complete a six week project to modify the simulation by converting the microbes from anaerobic to aerobic, and then balancing the simulation's life support system. A detailed computer simulation of a closed lunar station using bioregenerative life support was attempted, but there was not enough known about system restraints and constants in plant growth, bioreactor design for space habitats and food preparation to develop an integrated model with any confidence. Instead of a completed detailed model with broad assumptions concerning the unknown system parameters, a framework for an integrated model was outlined and work begun on plant and bioreactor simulations. The NASA sponsors and the summer Fell were satisfied with the progress made during the 10 weeks, and we have planned future cooperative work.

  15. Probabilistic models for feedback systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, Matthew D.; Boggs, Paul T.

    2011-02-01

    In previous work, we developed a Bayesian-based methodology to analyze the reliability of hierarchical systems. The output of the procedure is a statistical distribution of the reliability, thus allowing many questions to be answered. The principal advantage of the approach is that along with an estimate of the reliability, we also can provide statements of confidence in the results. The model is quite general in that it allows general representations of all of the distributions involved, it incorporates prior knowledge into the models, it allows errors in the 'engineered' nodes of a system to be determined by the data, and leads to the ability to determine optimal testing strategies. In this report, we provide the preliminary steps necessary to extend this approach to systems with feedback. Feedback is an essential component of 'complexity' and provides interesting challenges in modeling the time-dependent action of a feedback loop. We provide a mechanism for doing this and analyze a simple case. We then consider some extensions to more interesting examples with local control affecting the entire system. Finally, a discussion of the status of the research is also included.

  16. Modulating dye aggregation by incorporation into 1D-MgAPO nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Virginia; García, Raquel; Gómez-Hortigüela, Luis; Pérez-Pariente, Joaquín; López-Arbeloa, Iñigo

    2013-07-22

    The fluorescing dye Pyronine Y has been incorporated by crystallization inclusion into three different one-dimensional microporous aluminophosphate host materials. A computer-aided rational choice of the framework of the host material made it possible to modulate the aggregation state of the guest dye molecules. Undesirable H-type dimers of Pyronine Y are included within the large channels of the AFI structure, which allow the inclusion of any of the aggregated species of the dye. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that H-type aggregate formation is suppressed within the ATS framework. Experimental results indicate that red-emissive J-type aggregates are formed instead, offering a one-directional, organized, multicolour emission system that is interesting for energy transport. Complete suppression of aggregation is achieved by the inclusion of Pyronine Y within the AEL-type structure, due to its particular topology and channel dimensions This results in a highly fluorescent hybrid system with extraordinarily preferential alignment of the chromophores. Here, we report experimental evidence and modelling insights for how the "cage effect" of the nanochannels can tune the optical properties of the hybrid composite material by influencing the aggregation state of the dye. PMID:23780893

  17. Detoxification of azo dyes by bacterial oxidoreductase enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Shahid; Khalid, Azeem; Arshad, Muhammad; Mahmood, Tariq; Crowley, David E

    2016-08-01

    Azo dyes and their intermediate degradation products are common contaminants of soil and groundwater in developing countries where textile and leather dye products are produced. The toxicity of azo dyes is primarily associated with their molecular structure, substitution groups and reactivity. To avoid contamination of natural resources and to minimize risk to human health, this wastewater requires treatment in an environmentally safe manner. This manuscript critically reviews biological treatment systems and the role of bacterial reductive and oxidative enzymes/processes in the bioremediation of dye-polluted wastewaters. Many studies have shown that a variety of culturable bacteria have efficient enzymatic systems that can carry out complete mineralization of dye chemicals and their metabolites (aromatic compounds) over a wide range of environmental conditions. Complete mineralization of azo dyes generally involves a two-step process requiring initial anaerobic treatment for decolorization, followed by an oxidative process that results in degradation of the toxic intermediates that are formed during the first step. Molecular studies have revealed that the first reductive process can be carried out by two classes of enzymes involving flavin-dependent and flavin-free azoreductases under anaerobic or low oxygen conditions. The second step that is carried out by oxidative enzymes that primarily involves broad specificity peroxidases, laccases and tyrosinases. This review focuses, in particular, on the characterization of these enzymes with respect to their enzyme kinetics and the environmental conditions that are necessary for bioreactor systems to treat azo dyes contained in wastewater. PMID:25665634

  18. Dry-spray deposition of TiO2 for a flexible dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) using a nanoparticle deposition system (NPDS).

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Saeng; Chun, Doo-Man; Choi, Jung-Oh; Lee, Jong-Cheon; Kim, Yang Hee; Kim, Kwang-Su; Lee, Caroline Sunyong; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2012-04-01

    TiO2 powders were deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates for application to the photoelectrode of a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). In the conventional DSSC manufacturing process, a semiconductor oxide such as TiO2 powder requires a sintering process at higher temperature than the glass transition temperature (T(g)) of polymers, and thus utilization of flexible polymer substrates in DSSC research has been constrained. To overcome this restriction related to sintering, we used a nanoparticle deposition system (NPDS) that could produce a thin coating layer through a dry-spray method under atmospheric pressure at room temperature. The powder was sprayed through a slit-type nozzle having a 0.4 x 10 mm2 rectangular outlet. In order to determine the deposited TiO2 thickness, five kinds of TiO2 layered specimens were prepared, where the specimens have single and double layer structures. Deposited powders on the ITO coated PET substrates were observed using FE-SEM and a scan profiler The thicker TiO2 photoelectrode with a DSSC having a double layer structure showed higher energy efficiency than the single layer case. The highest fabricated flexible DSSC displayed a short circuit current density J(sc) = 1.99 mA cm(-2), open circuit voltage V(oc) = 0.71 V, and energy efficiency eta = 0.94%. These results demonstrate the possibility of utilizing the dry-spray method to fabricate a TiO2 layer on flexible polymer substrates at room temperature under atmospheric pressure. PMID:22849129

  19. Discrete modelling of drapery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoeni, Klaus; Giacomini, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Drapery systems are an efficient and cost-effective measure in preventing and controlling rockfall hazards on rock slopes. The simplest form consists of a row of ground anchors along the top of the slope connected to a horizontal support cable from which a wire mesh is suspended down the face of the slope. Such systems are generally referred to as simple or unsecured draperies (Badger and Duffy 2012). Variations such as secured draperies, where a pattern of ground anchors is incorporated within the field of the mesh, and hybrid systems, where the upper part of an unsecured drapery is elevated to intercept rockfalls originating upslope of the installation, are becoming more and more popular. This work presents a discrete element framework for simulation of unsecured drapery systems and its variations. The numerical model is based on the classical discrete element method (DEM) and implemented into the open-source framework YADE (Šmilauer et al., 2010). The model takes all relevant interactions between block, drapery and slope into account (Thoeni et al., 2014) and was calibrated and validated based on full-scale experiments (Giacomini et al., 2012).The block is modelled as a rigid clump made of spherical particles which allows any shape to be approximated. The drapery is represented by a set of spherical particle with remote interactions. The behaviour of the remote interactions is governed by the constitutive behaviour of the wire and generally corresponds to a piecewise linear stress-strain relation (Thoeni et al., 2013). The same concept is used to model wire ropes. The rock slope is represented by rigid triangular elements where material properties (e.g., normal coefficient of restitution, friction angle) are assigned to each triangle. The capabilities of the developed model to simulate drapery systems and estimate the residual hazard involved with such systems is shown. References Badger, T.C., Duffy, J.D. (2012) Drapery systems. In: Turner, A.K., Schuster R

  20. Studies of Model Immiscible Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Facemire, B. R.; Witherow, W. K.; Fanning, U.; Kaukler, W. F.

    1985-01-01

    The objectives are to use model transparent monotectics to obtain fundamental information applicable to two-phase systems in general, to apply this understanding to materials of interest in the Microgravity Science and Applications program, and to interpret results of flight experimental involving monotectic alloys. A number of model immiscible systems are in use to study various aspects of two-phase behavior within the miscibility gap and during solidification. Particle growth, coalescence and particle motions are under investigation using a holographic microscopy system. The system is capable of working with particle densities up to 10 to the 7th power particles/cubic centimeters through a 100 micron depth and can resolve particles of the order of 2 to 3 micron in diameter throughout the entire cell volume. Particle size, distribution changes with respect to time and temperature are observable from sequential holograms. Initial experiments using diethylene glycol/ethyl salicylate (DEG/ES) have demonstrated the usefulness of the technique. The thermal system controls temperature to at least plus or minus 0.001 K over the course of an experiment. A time-lapse film, made from holograms, of a succinonitrile/water solution shows particle size and number distribution changes with time under isothermal conditions. The observations are consistent with Ostwald ripening theory.

  1. Irradiation treatment of azo dye containing wastewater: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnárovits, László; Takács, Erzsébet

    2008-03-01

    The radiation-induced decolouration and degradation of aqueous solutions of azo dyes and their model compounds (anilines, phenols, triazines) are reviewed together with practical applications and the experimental methods (pulse radiolysis, steady-state gamma radiolysis, as well as end-product analysis) used for studying the reactions. The proposed mechanisms and the rate coefficients for the reactions of rad OH, e aq- and rad H water radiolysis intermediates with the dye molecules and with model compounds are summarized.

  2. On the performance of ruthenium dyes in dye sensitized solar cells: a free cluster approach based on theoretical indexes.

    PubMed

    Barrera, M; Crivelli, I; Loeb, B

    2016-05-01

    The performance of ruthenium dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC) with different types of ligand was studied by means of a theoretical model where the ruthenium complex is bound to two [Ti(OH)3](+) units, instead of the more usual cluster TiO2 model. Electron injection is proposed to proceed from a thermalized (3)MLCT state rather than from higher vibrational excited states. The efficiency of the dye linked to the two [Ti(OH)3](+) units was determined in terms of a global index (ξ), calculated as the product of three theoretical indexes (FI) built from the results of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations. The index considers the harvested and delivered energy (F1), the charge transferred to the semiconductor (F2), and dye regeneration (F3). The results show that this set of parameters is unique for each dye, and allows the comparative evaluation of the performance of a series of dyes, with a different ancillary ligand at each stage of the cell operation. The method provides insights that can help explain the improved performance of N3 and black dyes compared to other dyes. Graphical abstract Calculated global efficiency for complexes C1-C6. Inset General structure of the interacting model. PMID:27138946

  3. REMOVAL OF AZO DYES BY THE ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water Engineering Research Laboratory, Office of Research & Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is conducting research designed to develop techniques for predicting the fate of azo dyes in typical wastewater treatment systems which are treating wastewater ...

  4. Optimization and modelling of synthetic azo dye wastewater treatment using Graphene oxide nanoplatelets: Characterization toxicity evaluation and optimization using Artificial Neural Network.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Priya; Sau, Shubhra; Das, Papita; Mukhopadhayay, Aniruddha

    2015-09-01

    Azo dyes pose a major threat to current civilization by appearing in almost all streams of wastewater. The present investigation was carried out to examine the potential of Graphene oxide (GO) nanoplatelets as an efficient, cost-effective and non-toxic azo dye adsorbent for efficient wastewater treatment. The treatment process was optimized using Artificial Neural Network for maximum percentage dye removal and evaluated in terms of varying operational parameters, process kinetics and thermodynamics. A brief toxicity assay was also designed using fresh water snail Bellamya benghalensis to analyze the quality of the treated solution. 97.78% removal of safranin dye was obtained using GO as adsorbent. Characterization of GO nanoplatelets (using SEM, TEM, AFM and FTIR) reported the changes in its structure as well as surface morphology before and after use and explained its prospective as a good and environmentally benign adsorbent in very low quantities. The data recorded when subjected to different isotherms best fitted the Temkin isotherm. Further analysis revealed the process to be endothermic and chemisorption in nature. The verdict of the toxicity assay rendered the treated permeate as biologically safe for discharge or reuse in industrial and domestic purposes. PMID:25966335

  5. Models for multimegawatt space power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Edenburn, M.W.

    1990-06-01

    This report describes models for multimegawatt, space power systems which Sandia's Advanced Power Systems Division has constructed to help evaluate space power systems for SDI's Space Power Office. Five system models and models for associated components are presented for both open (power system waste products are exhausted into space) and closed (no waste products) systems: open, burst mode, hydrogen cooled nuclear reactor -- turboalternator system; open, hydrogen-oxygen combustion turboalternator system; closed, nuclear reactor powered Brayton cycle system; closed, liquid metal Rankine cycle system; and closed, in-core, reactor therminonic system. The models estimate performance and mass for the components in each of these systems. 17 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs.

  6. Identification of small-scale low and high permeability layers using single well forced-gradient tracer tests: fluorescent dye imaging and modelling at the laboratory-scale.

    PubMed

    Barns, Gareth L; Thornton, Steven F; Wilson, Ryan D

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneity in aquifer permeability, which creates paths of varying mass flux and spatially complex contaminant plumes, can complicate the interpretation of contaminant fate and transport in groundwater. Identifying the location of high mass flux paths is critical for the reliable estimation of solute transport parameters and design of groundwater remediation schemes. Dipole flow tracer tests (DFTTs) and push-pull tests (PPTs) are single well forced-gradient tests which have been used at field-scale to estimate aquifer hydraulic and transport properties. In this study, the potential for PPTs and DFTTs to resolve the location of layered high- and low-permeability layers in granular porous media was investigated with a pseudo 2-D bench-scale aquifer model. Finite element fate and transport modelling was also undertaken to identify appropriate set-ups for in situ tests to determine the type, magnitude, location and extent of such layered permeability contrasts at the field-scale. The characteristics of flow patterns created during experiments were evaluated using fluorescent dye imaging and compared with the breakthrough behaviour of an inorganic conservative tracer. The experimental results show that tracer breakthrough during PPTs is not sensitive to minor permeability contrasts for conditions where there is no hydraulic gradient. In contrast, DFTTs are sensitive to the type and location of permeability contrasts in the host media and could potentially be used to establish the presence and location of high or low mass flux paths. Numerical modelling shows that the tracer peak breakthrough time and concentration in a DFTT is sensitive to the magnitude of the permeability contrast (defined as the permeability of the layer over the permeability of the bulk media) between values of 0.01-20. DFTTs are shown to be more sensitive to deducing variations in the contrast, location and size of aquifer layered permeability contrasts when a shorter central packer is used

  7. Identification of small-scale low and high permeability layers using single well forced-gradient tracer tests: Fluorescent dye imaging and modelling at the laboratory-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barns, Gareth L.; Thornton, Steven F.; Wilson, Ryan D.

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneity in aquifer permeability, which creates paths of varying mass flux and spatially complex contaminant plumes, can complicate the interpretation of contaminant fate and transport in groundwater. Identifying the location of high mass flux paths is critical for the reliable estimation of solute transport parameters and design of groundwater remediation schemes. Dipole flow tracer tests (DFTTs) and push-pull tests (PPTs) are single well forced-gradient tests which have been used at field-scale to estimate aquifer hydraulic and transport properties. In this study, the potential for PPTs and DFTTs to resolve the location of layered high- and low-permeability layers in granular porous media was investigated with a pseudo 2-D bench-scale aquifer model. Finite element fate and transport modelling was also undertaken to identify appropriate set-ups for in situ tests to determine the type, magnitude, location and extent of such layered permeability contrasts at the field-scale. The characteristics of flow patterns created during experiments were evaluated using fluorescent dye imaging and compared with the breakthrough behaviour of an inorganic conservative tracer. The experimental results show that tracer breakthrough during PPTs is not sensitive to minor permeability contrasts for conditions where there is no hydraulic gradient. In contrast, DFTTs are sensitive to the type and location of permeability contrasts in the host media and could potentially be used to establish the presence and location of high or low mass flux paths. Numerical modelling shows that the tracer peak breakthrough time and concentration in a DFTT is sensitive to the magnitude of the permeability contrast (defined as the permeability of the layer over the permeability of the bulk media) between values of 0.01-20. DFTTs are shown to be more sensitive to deducing variations in the contrast, location and size of aquifer layered permeability contrasts when a shorter central packer is used

  8. Use of RSM modeling for optimizing decolorization of simulated textile wastewater by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain ZM130 capable of simultaneous removal of reactive dyes and hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Maqbool, Zahid; Hussain, Sabir; Ahmad, Tanvir; Nadeem, Habibullah; Imran, Muhammad; Khalid, Azeem; Abid, Muhammad; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice

    2016-06-01

    Remediation of colored wastewater loaded with dyes and metal ions is a matter of interest nowadays. In this study, 220 bacteria isolated from textile wastewater were tested for their potential to decolorize each of the four reactive dyes (reactive red-120, reactive black-5, reactive yellow-2, and reactive orange-16) in the presence of a mixture of four different heavy metals (Cr, Zn, Pb, Cd) commonly found in textile effluents. Among the tested bacteria, the isolate ZM130 was found to be the most efficient in decolorizing reactive dyes in the presence of the mixture of heavy metals and was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain ZM130 by 16S rRNA gene analysis. The strain ZM130 was highly effective in simultaneously removing hexavalent chromium (25 mg L(-1)) and the azo dyes (100 mg L(-1)) from the simulated wastewater even in the presence of other three heavy metals (Zn, Pb, Cd). Simultaneous removal of chromium and azo dyes ranged as 76.6-98.7 % and 51.9-91.1 %, respectively, after 180 h incubation. On the basis of quadratic polynomial equation and response surfaces given by the response surface methodology (RSM), optimal salt content, pH, carbon co-substrate content, and level of multi-metal mixtures for decolorization of reactive red-120 in a simulated textile wastewater by the strain ZM130 were predicted to be 19.8, 7.8, and 6.33 g L(-1) and a multi-metal mixture (Cr 13.10 mg L(-1), Pb 26.21 mg L(-1), Cd 13.10 mg L(-1), Zn 26.21 mg L(-1)), respectively. Moreover, the strain ZM130 also exhibited laccase and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced)-dichlorophenolindophenol reductase (NADH-DCIP reductase) activity during the decolorization of reactive red-120. However, the laccase activity was found to be maximum in the presence of 300 mg L(-1) of the dye as compared to other concentrations. Hence, the isolation of this strain might serve as a potential bio-resource required for developing the strategies aiming at bioremediation of the

  9. Anaerobic/aerobic treatment of selected azo dyes in wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Seshadri, S.; Bishop, P.L. . Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering); Agha, A.M. . Faculty of Civil Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    Azo dyes represent the largest class of dyes in use today. Current environmental concern with these dyes revolves around the potential carcinogenic health risk presented by these dyes or their intermediate biodegradation products when exposed to microflora in the human digestive tract. These dyes may build up in the environment, since many wastewater treatment plants allow these dyes to pass through the system virtually untreated. The initial step in the degradation of these dyes is the cleavage of the Azo bond. This cleavage is often impossible under aerobic conditions, but has been readily demonstrated under anaerobic conditions. The focus of the study was to determine the feasibility of using an anaerobic fluidized-bed reactor to accomplish this cleavage. The effects of typical process variables such as hydraulic retention time (HRT), influent dye concentration levels, and degree of bed fluidization on removal efficiencies were also studied. The four dyes selected for this study were Acid-Orange 7, Acid-Orange 8, Acid-Orange 10, and Acid-Red 14. The effectiveness of using a bench-scale-activated sludge reactor as a sequenced second stage was also examined. Results indicate that nearly complete cleavage of the Azo bond is easily accomplished for each of the four dyes under hydraulic retention times of either 12 or 24 h. Initial results indicate, though, that aromatic amine by-products remain. The sequenced second stage was able to remove the remaining Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) load to acceptable levels. Work is presently underway to determine the face of the anaerobic by-products in the aerobic second stage.

  10. Cold Pad-Batch dyeing method for cotton fabric dyeing with reactive dyes using ultrasonic energy.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Zeeshan; Memon, Muhammad Hanif; Khatri, Awais; Tanwari, Anwaruddin

    2011-11-01

    Reactive dyes are vastly used in dyeing and printing of cotton fibre. These dyes have a distinctive reactive nature due to active groups which form covalent bonds with -OH groups of cotton through substitution and/or addition mechanism. Among many methods used for dyeing cotton with reactive dyes, the Cold Pad Batch (CPB) method is relatively more environment friendly due to high dye fixation and non requirement of thermal energy. The dyed fabric production rate is low due to requirement of at least twelve hours batching time for dye fixation. The proposed CPB method for dyeing cotton involves ultrasonic energy resulting into a one third decrease in batching time. The dyeing of cotton fibre was carried out with CI reactive red 195 and CI reactive black 5 by conventional and ultrasonic (US) method. The study showed that the use of ultrasonic energy not only shortens the batching time but the alkalis concentrations can considerably be reduced. In this case, the colour strength (K/S) and dye fixation (%F) also enhances without any adverse effect on colour fastness of the dyed fabric. The appearance of dyed fibre surface using scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed relative straightening of fibre convolutions and significant swelling of the fibre upon ultrasonic application. The total colour difference values ΔE (CMC) for the proposed method, were found within close proximity to the conventionally dyed sample. PMID:21550289

  11. Dye-coated europium monosulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, Srotoswini; Dollahon, Norman R.; Stoll, Sarah L.

    2011-05-15

    Nanoparticles of EuS were synthesized using europium dithiocarbamate complexes. The resulting nanoparticles were coated with the dye, 1-pyrene carboxylic acid and the resulting material was characterized using X-ray powder diffraction, TEM, and UV-visible spectroscopy. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine the relative energy of the conduction band edge to the excited state energy of the dye. -- Graphical abstract: Dye sensitized magnetic semiconductor materials were prepared by synthesizing EuS nanoparticles using single source precursors and coating with the dye, 1-pyrene carboxylic acid. Display Omitted highlights: > Synthesized EuS nanoparticles, 11{+-}2.4 nm characterized using XRD, TEM, and UV-vis. spect. > Grafted a dye to the surface and characterized the product using XRD, FTIR, UV-vis., and TEM. > Studied the photophysical properties using fluorescence spectroscopy. > Determined the relative dye excited state to the conduction band of the semiconductor.

  12. Photobleaching effect in azo-dye containing epoxy resin films: the potentiality of carbon nanotubes as azo-dye dispensers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Costanzo, Guadalupe; Goyanes, Silvia; Ledesma, Silvia

    2015-04-01

    Azo-dye molecules may suffer from bleaching under certain illumination conditions. When this photoinduced process occurs, it generates an irreversible effect that is characterized by the loss of absorption of the dye molecule. Moreover, the well-known isomerization of azodye molecules does not occur anymore. In this work it is shown how the addition of a small amount of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) helps to decrease the bleaching effect in a photosensitive guest-host azo-polymer film. Two different systems were fabricated using an epoxy resin as polymer matrix. An azo-dye, Disperse Orange 3, was used as photosensitive material in both systems and MWCNTs were added into one of them. The optical response of the polymeric systems was studied considering the degree of photoinduced birefringence. Photobleaching of the azo-dye was observed in all cases however, the effect is lower for the composite material containing 0.2 wt % MWCNTs. The weak interaction between MWCNTs and dye molecules is less favorable when the material is heated. The optical behavior of the heated composite material suggests that carbon nanotubes can be potentially used as azo dye dispensers. The results are interpreted in terms of the non-covalent interaction between azo-dye molecules and MWCNTs.

  13. Comprehensive investigation of the excited-state dynamics of push-pull triphenylamine dyes as models for photonic applications.

    PubMed

    Ishow, Eléna; Clavier, Gilles; Miomandre, Fabien; Rebarz, Mateusz; Buntinx, Guy; Poizat, Olivier

    2013-09-01

    A series of emitting push-pull triarylamine derivatives, models of their widely used homologues in photonics and organic electronics, was investigated by steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopy. Their structural originality stems from the sole change of the electron-withdrawing substituent X (-H: 1, -CN: 2, -NO2: 3, -CHC(CN)2: 4), giving rise to efficient emission tuning from blue to red upon increasing the X electron-withdrawing character. All compounds are highly fluorescent in alkanes. The more polar compounds 2-4 undergo considerable Stokes shift and emission quenching in polar solvents. Femtosecond transient absorption data allowed us to identify the nature of the emissive state which varies as a function of the compound and surrounding polarity. A long-lived ππ* excited state with weak charge transfer character was found for 1. This excited state evolves into a long-lived ICT state with red-shifted emission for 2 in polar solvents. For 3 and 4, the ICT state is directly populated in all solvents. Long-lived and emissive in n-hexane, it relaxes in toluene to a new ICT' conformation with stronger charge transfer character and enhanced Stokes shift. In more polar THF, ethanol, and nitrile solvents, ICT relaxes to a dark excited state ICT'' with viscosity-dependent kinetics (<10 ps). The ICT'' state lifetime drops with increasing solvent polarity (150 ps for 3 in THF, 8.5 ps in butyronitrile, 1.9 ps in acetonitrile), denoting an efficient radiationless deactivation to the ground state (back charge transfer). This result reveals a very small S0-S1 energy gap at the relaxed ICT'' geometry, with a possible close-lying S0-S1 conical intersection, which suggests that the ICT → ICT'' process results from a structural change involving a large-amplitude molecular distortion. This fast structural change can account for the strong fluorescence quenching observed for 3 and 4 in polar solvents. Finally, the magnitude of intersystem crossing between the singlet and

  14. Merocyanine dyes with improved photostability.

    PubMed

    Toutchkine, Alexei; Nguyen, Dan-Vinh; Hahn, Klaus M

    2007-07-19

    Merocyanine dyes have proven valuable for live cell fluorescence imaging applications, but many structures have been limited by rapid photobleaching. We show that photostability is substantially enhanced for merocyanines having a cyano group at a specific position in the central polymethine chain. Evidence is presented that this is due to reduction in reactivity of the dyes with singlet oxygen. These results point toward cyano-substitution as a general strategy for improving dye performance in imaging applications. PMID:17583344

  15. Propulsion System Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Jimmy C. M.; McClure, Erin K.; Mavris, Dimitri N.; Burg, Cecile

    2002-01-01

    The Aerospace Systems Design Laboratory at the School of Aerospace Engineering in Georgia Institute of Technology has developed a core competency that enables propulsion technology managers to make technology investment decisions substantiated by propulsion and airframe technology system studies. This method assists the designer/manager in selecting appropriate technology concepts while accounting for the presence of risk and uncertainty as well as interactions between disciplines. This capability is incorporated into a single design simulation system that is described in this paper. This propulsion system design environment is created with a commercially available software called iSIGHT, which is a generic computational framework, and with analysis programs for engine cycle, engine flowpath, mission, and economic analyses. iSIGHT is used to integrate these analysis tools within a single computer platform and facilitate information transfer amongst the various codes. The resulting modeling and simulation (M&S) environment in conjunction with the response surface method provides the designer/decision-maker an analytical means to examine the entire design space from either a subsystem and/or system perspective. The results of this paper will enable managers to analytically play what-if games to gain insight in to the benefits (and/or degradation) of changing engine cycle design parameters. Furthermore, the propulsion design space will be explored probabilistically to show the feasibility and viability of the propulsion system integrated with a vehicle.

  16. Modeling software systems by domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dippolito, Richard; Lee, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    The Software Architectures Engineering (SAE) Project at the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) has developed engineering modeling techniques that both reduce the complexity of software for domain-specific computer systems and result in systems that are easier to build and maintain. These techniques allow maximum freedom for system developers to apply their domain expertise to software. We have applied these techniques to several types of applications, including training simulators operating in real time, engineering simulators operating in non-real time, and real-time embedded computer systems. Our modeling techniques result in software that mirrors both the complexity of the application and the domain knowledge requirements. We submit that the proper measure of software complexity reflects neither the number of software component units nor the code count, but the locus of and amount of domain knowledge. As a result of using these techniques, domain knowledge is isolated by fields of engineering expertise and removed from the concern of the software engineer. In this paper, we will describe kinds of domain expertise, describe engineering by domains, and provide relevant examples of software developed for simulator applications using the techniques.

  17. Automated parking garage system model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A one-twenty-fifth scale model of the key components of an automated parking garage system is described. The design of the model required transferring a vehicle from an entry level, vertically (+Z, -Z), to a storage location at any one of four storage positions (+X, -X, +Y, +Y, -Y) on the storage levels. There are three primary subsystems: (1) a screw jack to provide the vertical motion of the elevator, (2) a cam-driven track-switching device to provide X to Y motion, and (3) a transfer cart to provide horizontal travel and a small amount to vertical motion for transfer to the storage location. Motive power is provided by dc permanent magnet gear motors, one each for the elevator and track switching device and two for the transfer cart drive system (one driving the cart horizontally and the other providing the vertical transfer). The control system, through the use of a microprocessor, provides complete automation through a feedback system which utilizes sensing devices.

  18. Modeling multicomputer systems with PARET

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, K.M.; Edmark, J.T.

    1988-05-01

    Parallel computing has become a reality in both commercial and research machines. Two of the most difficult problems in the design and analysis of such systems are handling their complexity and developing intuition about the parallel environment. Visual tools can provide the means for solving both of these problems. The Parallel Architecture Research and Evaluation Tool is one such tool-a software package that provides a multicomputer system laboratory for studying the interaction of algorithms and architectures; the effects of varying physical resources on system performance; and alternate mapping, scheduling, and routing strategies, both static and dynamic. To handle the complexity of the problem and explore performance questions, PARET provides an interactive and animated environment in which the user exercises multicomputer models. PARET runs on Sun workstations, employing color graphics, mouse input, and pop-up menus to control and display a simulation engine. It provides both runtime and summary statistics from the simulation.

  19. Wastewater treatment: Dye and pigment industry. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning treatment of wastewater containing dyes and pigments. The citations discuss the of dyes and pigments in wastewater treatment systems, biodegradation of dyes, absorption and adsorption processes to remove dyes from wastewater, environmental effects from the disposal of dye-containing wastes, and methods of analysis for dyes in waste streams. Treatment methods such as ozonation, reverse osmosis, activated charcoal filtration, activated sludge, electrochemical treatments, thermal treatments, simple filtration, and absorption media are included. (Contains a minimum of 112 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. Quantitative Predictive Models for Systemic Toxicity (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Models to identify systemic and specific target organ toxicity were developed to help transition the field of toxicology towards computational models. By leveraging multiple data sources to incorporate read-across and machine learning approaches, a quantitative model of systemic ...

  1. Selective adsorption and separation of organic dyes from aqueous solution on polydopamine microspheres.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jianwei; Xin, Qianqian; Wu, Xuechen; Chen, Zhonghui; Yan, Ya; Liu, Shujun; Wang, Minghuan; Xu, Qun

    2016-01-01

    Polydopamine (PDA) microspheres, synthesized by a facile oxidation polymerization route, were evaluated as a potential adsorbent for selective adsorption and separation of organic dyes. The adsorption processes towards nine water-soluble dyes (anionic dyes: methyl orange (MO), eosin-Y (EY), eosin-B (EB), acid chrome blue K (ACBK), neutral dye: neutral red (NR), and cationic dyes: rhodamine B (RhB), malachite green (MG), methylene blue (MB), safranine T (ST)) were thoroughly investigated. The adsorption selectivity of organic dyes onto PDA microspheres was successfully applied for the separation of dyes mixtures. Various influential factors such as solution pH, temperature, and contact time were employed to ascertain the optimal condition for adsorption of representative organic dyes including MB, MG and NR. The pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetics models were used to fit the adsorption kinetics process. Five isothermal adsorption models (Langmuir, Dubnin-Radushkevich, Temkin, Freundlich and Harkins-Jura) were used to investigate the adsorption thermodynamics properties. The results showed that the PDA microspheres owned good selective adsorption ability towards cationic dyes. The adsorption kinetics process conformed to the pseudo-second-order kinetics model and the Langmuir isotherm model was more appropriate for tracing the adsorption behavior than other isotherm models. Thus, we can conclude PDA microspheres may be a high-efficiency selective adsorbent towards some cationic dyes. PMID:26407057

  2. Image analysis of dye stained patterns in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogner, Christina; Trancón y Widemann, Baltasar; Lange, Holger

    2013-04-01

    Quality of surface water and groundwater is directly affected by flow processes in the unsaturated zone. In general, it is difficult to measure or model water flow. Indeed, parametrization of hydrological models is problematic and often no unique solution exists. To visualise flow patterns in soils directly dye tracer studies can be done. These experiments provide images of stained soil profiles and their evaluation demands knowledge in hydrology as well as in image analysis and statistics. First, these photographs are converted to binary images classifying the pixels in dye stained and non-stained ones. Then, some feature extraction is necessary to discern relevant hydrological information. In our study we propose to use several index functions to extract different (ideally complementary) features. We associate each image row with a feature vector (i.e. a certain number of image function values) and use these features to cluster the image rows to identify similar image areas. Because images of stained profiles might have different reasonable clusterings, we calculate multiple consensus clusterings. An expert can explore these different solutions and base his/her interpretation of predominant flow mechanisms on quantitative (objective) criteria. The complete workflow from reading-in binary images to final clusterings has been implemented in the free R system, a language and environment for statistical computing. The calculation of image indices is part of our own package Indigo, manipulation of binary images, clustering and visualization of results are done using either build-in facilities in R, additional R packages or the LATEX system.

  3. Towards low temperature sintering methods for dye sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, Sukanya

    Access to economically viable renewable energy sources is essential for the development of a globally sustainable society. Solar energy has a large potential to satisfy the future need for renewable energy sources. Dye sensitized solar cells are a third generation of photovoltaic technologies with the potential for low cost environmentally safe energy production. Commercialization of this technology requires that dye sensitized solar cells with higher efficiencies can be fabricated on flexible substrates. The commonly used material for the anode in a Dye Sensitized Solar Cell consists of titanium dioxide nanoparticles covered with a layer of light sensitizing dye. For efficient electron transport throughout the nanoparticle network, good particle interconnections are necessary. For low temperature processing these interconnections can be achieved through a hydrothermal process. The focus of this research is to understand at a fundamental level this reaction-based sintering process. A titanium alkoxide precursor was mixed with commercial titania nanoparticles and coated on a transparent conductive oxide substrate. The product of the hydrolysis and condensation of the alkoxide served to connect the nanoparticles thus improving the electrical conduction of the titania electrode; this was confirmed by solar cell testing and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. To further understand the formation of interconnections during reactive sintering, a model system based on inert silica particles was investigated. Titanium alkoxide precursor was mixed with commercial silica particles and reacted. Three different types of silica particles were used: each with a different morphology. The silica-titania multilayers/powders were characterized using SEM, XRD and BET. The efficiency of DSSCs is higher when larger non-porous silica particles are used and thin nanocrystalline titania is coated on this superstructure. This gave insight into the locations where the reactive liquid

  4. A tunable dual frequency dye laser - dual frequency oscillator design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abury, Y.

    1983-01-01

    The pulsed dye laser offers a tunable oscillator, followed by three amplifiers. It is pumped by a dual frequency Nd:YAG laser. Tuning and spectral width are controlled by a holographic network connected to a high power telescope. The modified two wavelength dye laser allows for absorption lidar techniques for remote sensing of the atmosphere. Line switching is achieved by electrooptical commutation. A feasibility experiment was performed with the original oscillator. A model was then built, and tested with different dyes. After a few modifications were made to improve the conversion efficiency, this oscillator was inserted in the laser to check whether the amplifier stages were correctly adjusted.

  5. Models of Multiple System Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Fellner, Lisa; Wenning, Gregor K.; Stefanova, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a predominantly sporadic, adult-onset, fatal neurodegenerative disease of unknown etiology. MSA is characterized by autonomic failure, levodopa-unresponsive parkinsonism, cerebellar ataxia and pyramidal signs in any combination. MSA belongs to a group of neurodegenerative disorders termed α-synucleinopathies, which also include Parkinson’s disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. Their common pathological feature is the occurrence of abnormal α-synuclein positive inclusions in neurons or glial cells. In MSA, the main cell type presenting aggregates composed of α-synuclein are oligodendroglial cells. This pathological hallmark, also called glial cytoplasmic inclusions (GCIs), is associated with progressive and profound neuronal loss in various regions of the brain. The development of animal models of MSA is justified by the limited understanding of the mechanisms of neurodegeneration and GCIs formation, which is paralleled by a lack of therapeutic strategies. Two main types of rodent models have been generated to replicate different features of MSA neuropathology. On one hand, neurotoxin-based models have been produced to reproduce neuronal loss in substantia nigra pars compacta and striatum. On the other hand, transgenic mouse models with overexpression of α-synuclein in oligodendroglia have been used to reproduce GCIs-related pathology. This chapter gives an overview of the atypical Parkinson’s syndrome MSA and summarizes the currently available MSA animal models and their relevance for pre-clinical testing of disease-modifying therapies. PMID:24338664

  6. ISSM: Ice Sheet System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larour, Eric; Schiermeier, John E.; Seroussi, Helene; Morlinghem, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    In order to have the capability to use satellite data from its own missions to inform future sea-level rise projections, JPL needed a full-fledged ice-sheet/iceshelf flow model, capable of modeling the mass balance of Antarctica and Greenland into the near future. ISSM was developed with such a goal in mind, as a massively parallelized, multi-purpose finite-element framework dedicated to ice-sheet modeling. ISSM features unstructured meshes (Tria in 2D, and Penta in 3D) along with corresponding finite elements for both types of meshes. Each finite element can carry out diagnostic, prognostic, transient, thermal 3D, surface, and bed slope simulations. Anisotropic meshing enables adaptation of meshes to a certain metric, and the 2D Shelfy-Stream, 3D Blatter/Pattyn, and 3D Full-Stokes formulations capture the bulk of the ice-flow physics. These elements can be coupled together, based on the Arlequin method, so that on a large scale model such as Antarctica, each type of finite element is used in the most efficient manner. For each finite element referenced above, ISSM implements an adjoint. This adjoint can be used to carry out model inversions of unknown model parameters, typically ice rheology and basal drag at the ice/bedrock interface, using a metric such as the observed InSAR surface velocity. This data assimilation capability is crucial to allow spinning up of ice flow models using available satellite data. ISSM relies on the PETSc library for its vectors, matrices, and solvers. This allows ISSM to run efficiently on any parallel platform, whether shared or distrib- ISSM: Ice Sheet System Model NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California uted. It can run on the largest clusters, and is fully scalable. This allows ISSM to tackle models the size of continents. ISSM is embedded into MATLAB and Python, both open scientific platforms. This improves its outreach within the science community. It is entirely written in C/C++, which gives it flexibility in its

  7. The Chemistry of Plant and Animal Dyes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sequin-Frey, Margareta

    1981-01-01

    Provides a brief history of natural dyes. Chemical formulas are provided for flavonoids, luteolin, genistein, brazilin, tannins, terpenes, naphthoquinone, anthraquinone, and dyes with an alkaloid structure. Also discusses chemical background of different dye processes. (CS)

  8. Interaction of protonated merocyanine dyes with amines in organic solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Eduardo Alberton; Sidooski, Thiago; Nandi, Leandro Guarezi; Machado, Vanderlei Gageiro

    2011-10-01

    2,6-Diphenyl-4-(2,4,6-triphenylpyridinium-1-yl)phenolate ( 1a) and 4-[(1-methyl-4(1 H)-pyridinylidene)-ethylidene]-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-one ( 2a) were protonated in organic solvents (dichloromethane, acetonitrile, and DMSO) to form 1b and 2b, respectively. The appearance of the solvatochromic bands of 1a and 2a was studied UV-vis spectrophotometrically by deprotonation of 1b and 2b in solution in the presence of the following amines: aniline (AN), N-methylaniline (NMAN), N, N-dimethylaniline (NDAN), n-butylamine (BA), diethylamine (DEA), and triethylamine (TEA). Titrations of 1b and 2b with the amines were carried out and the binding constants were determined from the titration curves in each solvent, using a mathematical model adapted from the literature which considers the simultaneous participation of two dye: amine stoichiometries, 1:1 and 1:2. The data obtained showed the following base order for the two compounds in DMSO: BA > DEA > TEA, while aromatic amines did not cause any effect. In dichloromethane, the following base order for 1b was verified: TEA > DEA > BA ≫NDAN, while for 2b the order was: TEA > DEA > BA, suggesting that 1b is more acidic than 2b. The data in acetonitrile indicated for 1b and 2b the following order for the amines: DEA > TEA > BA. The diversity of the experimental data were explained based on a model that considers the level of interaction of the protonated dyes with the amines to be dependent on three aspects: (a) the basicity of the amine, which varies according to their molecular structure and the solvent in which it is dissolved, (b) the molecular structure of the dye, and (c) the solvent used to study the system.

  9. Simulation of dye adsorption by beech sawdust as affected by pH.

    PubMed

    Batzias, F A; Sidiras, D K

    2007-03-22

    The effect of pH on the batch kinetics of methylene blue adsorption on beech sawdust was simulated, in order to evaluate sawdust potential use as low cost adsorbent for wastewater dye removal. The zero point of charge pH(pzc) of the sawdust, in order to explain the effect of pH in terms of pH(pzc), was measured by the mass titration and the automatic titration methods. The adsorption capacity, estimated according to Freundlich's model, indicate that increase of the pH enhances the adsorption behaviour of the examined material. The lower adsorption of methylene blue at acidic pH is due to the presence of excess H(+) ions that compete with the dye cation for adsorption sites. As the pH of the system increases, the number of positively charged sites decreases while the number of the negatively charged sites increases. The negatively charged sites favour the adsorption of dye cation due to electrostatic attraction. The increase in initial pH from 8.0 to 11.5 increases the amount of dye adsorbed. PMID:16934396

  10. High-value zeolitic material from bagasse fly ash: utilization for dye elimination.

    PubMed

    Shah, Bhavna A; Shah, Ajay V; Patel, Harendra D; Mistry, Chirag B

    2013-06-01

    Bagasse fly ash (BFA), a sugar industry waste, was used to prepare zeolitic material (ZFA) by means of alkaline hydrothermal treatment. ZFA showed improved morphology as a result of this treatment. The adsorption of the reactive dyes turquoise blue (TB) and brilliant magenta (BM), on both BFA and ZFA, was investigated in a batch contact system. A series of batch experiments revealed that optimal dye removal occurs at a 200 mg/L to 300 mg/L solute concentration, 60 minutes of agitation time, 5 g/L to 10 g/L adsorbent dose, a pH level of 2 to 4, and a temperature of 298 K. ZFA showed enhanced adsorption capacity as compared to BFA. According to the Langmuir equation, the maximum adsorption capacity was 12.66 mg/g and 45.45 mg/g for turquoise blue and brilliant magenta dyes, respectively, on BFA; and 21.74 mg/g and 100.00 mg/g for turquoise blue and brilliant magenta dyes, respectively, on ZFA. Kinetic studies showed that the correlation coefficients best fit with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, confirming that the adsorption rate was controlled by a hemisorptions process. PMID:23833819

  11. Harvesting of microalgae cell using oxidized dye wastewater.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yeong Hwan; Park, Doyoung; Oh, You-Kwan; Yoon, Sukhwan; Han, Jong-In

    2015-09-01

    In this study, oxidized dye wastewaters were tested for their potential to be used as a cheap coagulant for microalgae harvesting. Two dyes (methylene blue (MB) and methyl orange (MO)) were selected as model dyes, and the Fenton-like reaction under high temperature (90 °C, 1 min) employed as an oxidative treatment option. A maximum harvesting efficiency over 90% was obtained with both MB and MO at a dilution ratio of 5:1 (dye wastewater: cell culture), when the optimal oxidation condition was 20 mg/L of dye, 1 mM of FeCl3, and 0.5% of H2O2 concentration. This phenomenon could be explained by the possibility that amine groups are formed and exposed in oxidized dyes, which act as a kind of amine-based coagulant just like chitosan. This study clearly showed that dye wastewater, when properly oxidized, could serve as a potent coagulant for microalgae harvesting, potentially rendering the harvesting cost reduced to a substantial degree. PMID:26077359

  12. Synthesis and characterization of a Noble metal Enhanced Optical Nanohybrid (NEON): a high brightness detection platform based on a dye-doped silica nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Roy, Shibsekhar; Dixit, Chandra K; Woolley, Robert; O'Kennedy, Richard; McDonagh, Colette

    2012-05-29

    A highly bright and photostable, fluorescent nanohybrid particle is presented which consists of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) embedded in dye-doped silica in a core-shell configuration. The dye used is the near-infrared emitting 4,5-benzo-5'-(iodoacetaminomethyl)-1',3,3,3',3'-pentamethyl-1-(4-sulfobutyl) indodicarbo cyanine. The nanohybrid architecture comprises a GNP core which is separated from a layer of dye molecules by a 15 nm buffer layer and has an outer protective, undoped silica shell. Using this architecture, a brightness factor of 550 has been achieved compared to the free dye. This hybrid system, referred to as Noble metal Enhanced Optical Nanohybrid (NEON) in this paper, is the first nanohybrid construct to our knowledge which demonstrates such tunable fluorescence property. NEON has enhanced photostability compared to the free dye and compared to a control particle without GNPs. Furthermore, the NEON particle, when used as a fluorescent label in a model bioassay, shows improved performance over assays using a conventional single dye molecule label. PMID:22568772

  13. Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Di

    2010-01-01

    Dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is the only solar cell that can offer both the flexibility and transparency. Its efficiency is comparable to amorphous silicon solar cells but with a much lower cost. This review not only covers the fundamentals of DSSC but also the related cutting-edge research and its development for industrial applications. Most recent research topics on DSSC, for example, applications of nanostructured TiO2, ZnO electrodes, ionic liquid electrolytes, carbon nanotubes, graphene and solid state DSSC have all been included and discussed. PMID:20480003

  14. Dye sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Di

    2010-01-01

    Dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is the only solar cell that can offer both the flexibility and transparency. Its efficiency is comparable to amorphous silicon solar cells but with a much lower cost. This review not only covers the fundamentals of DSSC but also the related cutting-edge research and its development for industrial applications. Most recent research topics on DSSC, for example, applications of nanostructured TiO(2), ZnO electrodes, ionic liquid electrolytes, carbon nanotubes, graphene and solid state DSSC have all been included and discussed. PMID:20480003

  15. Zinc ferrite nanoparticle as a magnetic catalyst: Synthesis and dye degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoodi, Niyaz Mohammad

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Photocatalytic degradation of Reactive Red 198 and Reactive Red 120 by the synthesized zinc ferrite nanoparticle. - Highlights: • Magnetic zinc ferrite nanoparticle was synthesized and characterized. • Photocatalytic dye degradation by magnetic nanoparticle was studied. • Formate, acetate and oxalate were detected as dominant dye degradation aliphatic intermediates. • Nitrate and sulfate ions were detected as mineralization products of dyes. • Zinc ferrite nanoparticle was an effective magnetic photocatalyst to degrade dyes. - Abstract: In this paper, magnetic zinc ferrite (ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticle was synthesized and its photocatalytic dye degradation ability from colored wastewater was studied. Reactive Red 198 (RR198) and Reactive Red 120 (RR120) were used as model dyes. The characteristics of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} were investigated using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Photocatalytic dye degradation by ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} was studied by UV–vis spectrophotometer and ion chromatography (IC). The effects of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} dosage, initial dye concentration and salt on dye degradation were evaluated. Formate, acetate and oxalate anions were detected as dominant aliphatic intermediate. Inorganic anions (nitrate and sulfate anions) were detected as dye mineralization products. The results indicated that ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} could be used as a magnetic photocatalyst to degrade dyes from colored wastewater.

  16. Dye adsorption of cotton fabric grafted with PPI dendrimers: Isotherm and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Salimpour Abkenar, Samera; Malek, Reza Mohammad Ali; Mazaheri, Firouzmehr

    2015-11-01

    In this research, the cotton fabrics grafted with two generations of the poly(propylene imine) dendrimers were applied to adsorb textile dyes from aqueous solutions. Direct Red 80 (anionic dye), Disperse Yellow 42 (nonionic dye) and Basic Blue 9 (cationic dye) were selected as model dyes. The effect of various experimental parameters such as initial concentration of dyes, charge of dyes molecule, salt and pH was investigated on the adsorption process. Furthermore, kinetics and equilibrium of the adsorption process on the grafted samples were studied. It was found that maximum adsorption of anionic and disperse dyes took place at around pH 3, while cationic dye could be adsorbed at around pH 11. The Langmuir equation was able to describe the mechanism of dyes adsorption. In addition, the second-order equation was found to be fit with the kinetics data. Interestingly, it seems that the dye adsorption of the grafted fabrics is strongly pH dependent. PMID:26292774

  17. NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEM COST MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Francesco Ganda; Brent Dixon

    2012-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program is preparing to perform an evaluation of the full range of possible Nuclear Energy Systems (NES) in 2013. These include all practical combinations of fuels and transmuters (reactors and sub-critical systems) in single and multi-tier combinations of burners and breeders with no, partial, and full recycle. As part of this evaluation, Levelized Cost of Electricity at Equilibrium (LCAE) ranges for each representative system will be calculated. To facilitate the cost analyses, the 2009 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis Report is being amended to provide up-to-date cost data for each step in the fuel cycle, and a new analysis tool, NE-COST, has been developed. This paper explains the innovative “Island” approach used by NE-COST to streamline and simplify the economic analysis effort and provides examples of LCAE costs generated. The Island approach treats each transmuter (or target burner) and the associated fuel cycle facilities as a separate analysis module, allowing reuse of modules that appear frequently in the NES options list. For example, a number of options to be screened will include a once-through uranium oxide (UOX) fueled light water reactor (LWR). The UOX LWR may be standalone, or may be the first stage in a multi-stage system. Using the Island approach, the UOX LWR only needs to be modeled once and the module can then be reused on subsequent fuel cycles. NE-COST models the unit operations and life cycle costs associated with each step of the fuel cycle on each island. This includes three front-end options for supplying feedstock to fuel fabrication (mining/enrichment, reprocessing of used fuel from another island, and/or reprocessing of this island’s used fuel), along with the transmuter and back-end storage/disposal. Results of each island are combined based on the fractional energy generated by each islands in an equilibrium system. The cost analyses use the probability

  18. The Nature of the Donor Motif in Acceptor-Bridge-Donor Dyes as an Influence in the Electron Photo-Injection Mechanism in DSSCs.

    PubMed

    Zarate, Ximena; Schott-Verdugo, Stephan; Rodriguez-Serrano, Angela; Schott, Eduardo

    2016-03-10

    The combination and balance of acceptor(A)-bridge-donor(D) architecture of molecules confer suitable attributes and/or properties to act as efficient light-harvesting and sensitizers in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). An important process in a DSSC performance is the electron photoinjection (PI) mechanism which can take place either via type I (indirect), that consists in injecting from the excited state of the dye to the semiconductor, or type II (direct), where the PI is from the ground state of the dye to the semiconductor upon photoexcitation. Here, we present a computational study about the role of the donor motif in the PI mechanisms displayed from a family of 11 A-bridge-D structured dyes to a (TiO2)15 anatase cluster. To this end, different donor motifs (D1-D11) were evaluated while the A and bridge motifs remained the same. All the computations were carried out within the DFT framework, using the B3LYP, PW91, PBE, M06L and CAM-B3LYP functionals. The 6-31G(d) basis set was employed for nonmetallic atoms and the LANL2DZ pseudopotential for Ti atoms. The solvation effects were incorporated using the polarized continuum model (PCM) for acetonitrile. As benchmark systems, alizarin and naphthalenediol dyes were analyzed, as they are known to undergo Type I and Type II PI pathways in DSSCs, respectively. Donors in the studied family of dyes could influence to drive Type I or II PI since it was found that D2 could show some Type II PI route, showing a new absorption band, although with CAM-B3LYP this shows a very low oscillator strength, while the remaining dyes behave according to Type I photoinjectors. Finally, the photovoltaic parameters that govern the light absorption process were evaluated, as the use of these criteria could be applied to predict the efficiency of the studied dyes in DSSCs devices. PMID:26900717

  19. Dye laser traveling wave amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, F.

    1983-01-01

    A flash lamp pumped dye laser suitable for use as an amplifier stage was developed. The desired output laser pulses are of nanosecond duration, tunable in center frequency, and of good optical quality. Its usefulness as a laser oscillator is emphasized, because it constitutes a compact, relatively efficient source of tunable dye laser light.

  20. National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer-based, energy-economy modeling system of U.S. through 2030. NEMS projects the production, imports, conversion, consumption, and prices of energy, subject to assumptions on macroeconomic and financial factors, world energy markets, resource availability and costs, behavioral and technological choice criteria, cost and performance characteristics of energy technologies, and demographics. NEMS was designed and implemented by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). NEMS can be used to analyze the effects of existing and proposed government laws and regulations related to energy production and use; the potential impact of new and advanced energy production, conversion, and consumption technologies; the impact and cost of greenhouse gas control; the impact of increased use of renewable energy sources; and the potential savings from increased efficiency of energy use; and the impact of regulations on the use of alternative or reformulated fuels. NEMS has also been used for a number of special analyses at the request of the Administration, U.S. Congress, other offices of DOE and other government agencies, who specify the scenarios and assumptions for the analysis. Modules allow analyses to be conducted in energy topic areas such as residential demand, industrial demand, electricity market, oil and gas supply, renewable fuels, etc.

  1. Electromagnetic antenna modeling (EAM) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packer, Malcolm; Powers, Robert; Tsitsopoulos, Paul

    1994-12-01

    The determination of foreign communications capabilities and intent is an important assessment function performed by the USAF National Air Intelligence Center (NAIC). In this context, Rome Laboratory became the NAIC engineering agent for the development of an NAIC requirement for the rapid analysis and evaluation of antenna structures based on often vague to sometimes detailed dimensional information. To this end, the Rome Laboratory sponsored development of the Electromagnetic Antenna Modeling (EAM) System, a state-of-the-art Pascal program with an MS Windows graphical user interface (GUI) pre- and post-processor. Users of NAIC capabilities initiate antenna analysis efforts that range from simple parametric studies to more complex, detailed antenna design and communication-system evaluations. Accordingly, EAM provides a modeling capability 'matched' to the sophistication of the individual analyst, with features appropriate for users ranging from nontechnical analysts to experienced antenna engineers. This capability is particularly valuable in the military-intelligence environment, in which high-speed assessments are required. In particular, EAM meets the specific antenna-analysis requirements of NAIC with a versatile graphical user interface.

  2. Geochemical Modeling Of Aqueous Systems

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-09-07

    EQ3/6 is a software package for geochemical modeling of aqueous systems. This description pertains to version 7.2b. It addresses aqueous speciation, thermodynamic equilibrium, disequilibrium, and chemical kinetics. The major components of the package are EQ3NR, a speciation-solubility code, and EQ6 a reaction path code. EQ3NR is useful for analyzing groundwater chemistry data, calculating solubility limits, and determining whether certain reactions are in states of equilibrium or disequilibrium. It also initializes EQ6 calculations. EQ6 models themore » consequences of reacting an aqueous solution with a specified set of reactants (e.g., minerals or waste forms). It can also model fluid mixing and the effects of changes in temperature. Each of five supporting data files contain both standard state and activity coefficient-related data. Three support the use of the Davies or B-dot equations for the activity coefficients; the other two support the use of Pitzer''s equations. The temperature range of the thermodynamic data on the data files varies from 25 degrees C only to 0-300 degrees C.« less

  3. Fluorometric procedures for dye tracing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, James F.; Cobb, Ernest D.; Kilpatrick, F.A.

    1986-01-01

    This manual describes the current fluorometric procedures used by the U.S. Geological Survey in dye tracer studies such as time of travel, dispersion, reaeration, and dilution-type discharge measurements. The advantages of dye tracing are (1) low detection and measurement limits and (2) simplicity and accuracy in measuring dye tracer concentrations using fluorometric techniques. The manual contains necessary background information about fluorescence, dyes, and fluorometers and a description of fluorometric operation and calibration procedures as a guide for laboratory and field use. The background information should be useful to anyone wishing to experiment with dyes, fluorometer components, or procedures different from those described. In addition, a brief section on aerial photography is included because of its possible use to supplement ground-level fluorometry.

  4. Fluorometric procedures for dye tracing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, James E., Jr.; Cobb, E.D.; Kilpatrick, F.A.

    1984-01-01

    This manual describes the current fluorometric procedures used by the U.S. Geological Survey in dye tracer studies such as time of travel, dispersion, reaeration, and dilution-type discharge measurements. The outstanding characteristics of dye tracing are: (1) the low detection and measurement limits, and (2) the simplicity and accuracy of measuring dye tracer concentrations using fluorometric techniques. The manual contains necessary background information about fluorescence, dyes, and fluorometers and a description of fluorometric operation and calibration procedures as a general guide for laboratory and field use. The background information should be useful to anyone wishing to experiment with dyes, fluorometer components, or procedures different from those described. In addition, a brief section is included on aerial photography because of its possible use to supplement ground-level fluorometry. (USGS)

  5. Fluorometric procedures for dye tracing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, James F.

    1968-01-01

    This manual describes the current fluorometric procedures used by the U.S. Geological Survey in dye tracer studies such as time of travel, dispersion, reaeration, and dilution-type discharge measurements. The advantages of dye tracing are (1) low detection and measurement limits and (2) simplicity and accuracy in measuring dye tracer concentrations using fluorometric techniques. The manual contains necessary background information about fluorescence, dyes, and fluorometers and a description of fluorometric operation and calibration procedures as a guide for laboratory and field use. The background information should be useful to anyone wishing to experiment with dyes, fluorometer components, or procedures different from those described. In addition, a brief section on aerial photography is included because of its possible use to supplement ground-level fluorometry.

  6. Strategies for reducing dye aggregation in luminescent host-guest systems: Rhodamine 6G incorporated in new mesoporous sol-gel hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Queiroz, Thiago B.; Botelho, Moema B. S.; De Boni, Leonardo; Eckert, Hellmut; de Camargo, Andrea S. S.

    2013-03-01

    Aiming at the design of new luminescent host-guest materials with minimized aggregation effects, two classes of sol-gel derived mesoporous materials were explored as hosts for Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) dye: The first consists of pure (SiO2) and phenyl-modified silica (Ph0.17SiO1.915) xerogels, prepared via sol-gel reaction using an ionic liquid as catalytic agent. The second consists of mesoporous sodium aluminosilicate glasses with Si to Al ratio in the range of 6 ≤ Si/Al ≤ 9. Characterization through high resolution solid state NMR proved the successful obtention of the designed host matrices. Following Rh6G-loading in various concentrations, the resulting materials were characterized by their luminescence and excitation spectra, excited state lifetimes, and quantum yields. The dye doped silica xerogels presented high quantum yield values (up to 87%), with no substantial decrease in efficiency with increasing dye concentration. At suitable Rh6G contents, all the final materials presented laser action under 532 nm excitation from a Q-switched frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser. The phenyl silicate sample presents the highest laser photostability with a half-life of 6560 pulses, under 2 mJ/pulse pump power, and 10 Hz repetition rate. The laser experiments provided further insights on the photodegradation mechanisms of such organic species.

  7. High performance biosorbent (Caulerpa lentillifera) for basic dye removal.

    PubMed

    Marungrueng, Khanidtha; Pavasant, Prasert

    2007-05-01

    The sorptions of three basic dyes, Astrazon((R)) Blue FGRL (AB), Astrazon((R)) Red GTLN (AR), and methylene blue (MB) onto green macroalga Caulerpa lentillifera were investigated. The results were compared to the sorption performance of a commercial activated carbon (CARBON). The results revealed that the alga exhibited greater sorption capacities than activated carbon for the three basic dyes investigated in this work. The sorption process for all mixture systems (ALGA/AB, ALGA/AR, ALGA/MB, CARBON/AB, CARBON/AR, and CARBON/MB) obeyed the pseudo-second order kinetic model. C. lentillifera could more rapidly sequester AR when compared with activated carbon, but was more slowly in the sorption of AB. For the sorption of MB, both ALGA and CARBON seemed to have the same sorption rate. The sorption processes were initially controlled by both film and pore-diffusion, and only were limited by pore diffusion in the later stage. The isotherms followed Langmuir model which suggested that the sorption was monolayer coverage. PMID:16920355

  8. Hydrothermal conversion of urban food waste to chars for removal of textile dyes from contaminated waters.

    PubMed

    Parshetti, Ganesh K; Chowdhury, Shamik; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    2014-06-01

    Hydrothermal carbonization of urban food waste was carried out to prepare hydrochars for removal of Acridine Orange and Rhodamine 6G dyes from contaminated water. The chemical composition and microstructure properties of the synthesized hydrochars were investigated in details. Batch adsorption experiments revealed that hydrochars with lower degree of carbonization were more efficient in adsorption of dyes. Operational parameters such as pH and temperature had a strong influence on the dye uptake process. The adsorption equilibrium data showed excellent fit to the Langmuir isotherm. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model provided a better correlation for the experimental kinetic data in comparison to the pseudo-first-order kinetic model. Thermodynamic investigations suggested that dye adsorption onto hydrochars was spontaneous and endothermic. The mechanism of dye removal appears to be associated with physisorption. An artificial neural network (ANN)-based modelling was further carried out to predict the dye adsorption capacity of the hydrochars. PMID:24727353

  9. Quantitative television fluoroangiography - the optical measurement of dye concentrations and estimation of retinal blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, M.; Thomas, A.L. Jr.

    1985-06-01

    The development of a system for the measurement of dye concentrations from single retinal vessels during retinal fluorescein angiography is presented and discussed. The system uses a fundus camera modified for TV viewing. Video gating techniques define the areas of the retina to be studied, and video peak detection yields dye concentrations from retinal vessels. The time course of dye concentration is presented and blood flow into the retina is estimated by a time of transit technique.

  10. Modeling the Earth System, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ojima, Dennis (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered fall under the following headings: critical gaps in the Earth system conceptual framework; development needs for simplified models; and validating Earth system models and their subcomponents.

  11. Electron Injection at Dye-Sensitized Semiconductor Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, David F.; Meyer, Gerald J.

    2005-05-01

    Electron injection at dye-sensitized semiconductors is reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on theoretical and photoelectrochemical studies of dye-sensitized planar and single-crystal electrodes. The accepted mechanism of electron injection, which was derived from these classical studies, is introduced. Selected photoelectrochemical studies of dye-sensitized nanocrystalline semiconductors are reviewed; emphasis is given to factors that influence the efficiencies of electron injection and charge recombination. The development of quasi-solid-state nanocrystalline dye-sensitized solar cells is also discussed. Recent time-resolved spectroscopic studies of electron injection and charge recombination are reviewed. These studies have led to a better understanding of electron injection mechanisms, and have revealed the limitations of the classical models.

  12. Nanofiltration in the manufacture of liquid dyes production.

    PubMed

    Mikulásek, P; Cuhorka, J

    2010-01-01

    In the manufacture of liquid dyes, almost complete desalting, which helps to improve the stability of the product, enhances the solubility of the dye. Diafiltration is used to allow a high level of desalting to be achieved. The process of desalination of aqueous dye-salt solutions by polymeric nanofiltration membranes using commercially available modules was studied. The influence of dye and salt concentration on the salt rejection and pressure applied on the flux as well as comparison of individual NF membranes for desalting purposes is presented. The great interest is also devoted to the mathematical modelling of nanofiltration and description of discontinuous diafiltration by periodically adding solvent at constant pressure difference. PMID:20371946

  13. New synthetic strategies for xanthene-dye-appended cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Milo; Darcsi, Andras; Balint, Mihaly; Benkovics, Gabor; Sohajda, Tamas; Beni, Szabolcs

    2016-01-01

    Xanthene dyes can be appended to cyclodextrins via an ester or amide bridge in order to switch the fluorescence on or off. This is made possible through the formation of nonfluorescent lactones or lactams as the fluorophore can reversibly cyclize. In this context we report a green approach for the synthesis of switchable xanthene-dye-appended cyclodextrins based on the coupling agent 4-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-4-methylmorpholinium chloride (DMT-MM). By using 6-monoamino-β-cyclodextrin and commercially available inexpensive dyes, we prepared rhodamine- and fluorescein-appended cyclodextrins. The compounds were characterized by NMR and IR spectroscopy and MS spectrometry, their UV-vis spectra were recorded at various pH, and their purity was determined by capillary electrophoresis. Two potential models for the supramolecular assembly of the xanthene-dye-appended cyclodextrins were developed based on the set of data collected by the extensive NMR characterization. PMID:27340446

  14. Dye-Sensitized Approaches to Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grätzel, Michael

    2008-03-01

    Sensitization of wide band-gap semiconductors to photons of energy less than the band-gap is a key step in two technically important processes - panchromatic photography and photoelectrochemical solar cells. In both cases the photosensitive species is not the semiconductor - silver halide or metal oxide - but rather an electrochemically active dye. The gap between the highest occupied molecular level (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular level (LUMO) is less than the band-gap of the semiconductor with which it is associated. It can therefore absorb light of a wavelength longer than that to which the semiconductor itself is sensitive. The electrochemical process is initiated when the dye molecule relaxes from its photoexcited level by electron injection into the semiconductor, which therefore acts as a photoanode. If the dye is in contact with a redox electrolyte, the negative charge represented by the lost electron can be recovered from the reduced state of the redox system, which in return is regenerated by charge transfer from a cathode. An external load completes the electrical circuit. The system therefore represents a conversion of the energy of absorbed photons into an electrical current by a regenerative device in every functional respect analogous to a solid-state photovoltaic cell. As in any engineering system, choice of materials, their optimization and their synergy are essential to efficient operation. While a semiconductor-electrolyte contact is analogous to a Schottky contact, in that a barrier is established between two materials of different conduction mechanism, with the possibility of optical absorption, charge carrier pair generation and separation, it should be remembered that the photogenerated valence band hole in the semiconductor represents a powerful oxidizing agent. Given that the band-gap is related to the strength and therefore the stability of chemical bonding within the semiconductor, for narrow-gap materials the most likely

  15. Modeling of Spacecraft Advanced Chemical Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benfield, Michael P. J.; Belcher, Jeremy A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper outlines the development of the Advanced Chemical Propulsion System (ACPS) model for Earth and Space Storable propellants. This model was developed by the System Technology Operation of SAIC-Huntsville for the NASA MSFC In-Space Propulsion Project Office. Each subsystem of the model is described. Selected model results will also be shown to demonstrate the model's ability to evaluate technology changes in chemical propulsion systems.

  16. Next generation system modeling of NTR systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buksa, John J.; Rider, William J.

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) modeling challenges; current approaches; shortcomings of current analysis method; future needs; and present steps to these goals.

  17. The CICT Earth Science Systems Analysis Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pell, Barney; Coughlan, Joe; Biegel, Bryan; Stevens, Ken; Hansson, Othar; Hayes, Jordan

    2004-01-01

    Contents include the following: Computing Information and Communications Technology (CICT) Systems Analysis. Our modeling approach: a 3-part schematic investment model of technology change, impact assessment and prioritization. A whirlwind tour of our model. Lessons learned.

  18. Modeling Power Systems as Complex Adaptive Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chassin, David P.; Malard, Joel M.; Posse, Christian; Gangopadhyaya, Asim; Lu, Ning; Katipamula, Srinivas; Mallow, J V.

    2004-12-30

    Physical analogs have shown considerable promise for understanding the behavior of complex adaptive systems, including macroeconomics, biological systems, social networks, and electric power markets. Many of today's most challenging technical and policy questions can be reduced to a distributed economic control problem. Indeed, economically based control of large-scale systems is founded on the conjecture that the price-based regulation (e.g., auctions, markets) results in an optimal allocation of resources and emergent optimal system control. This report explores the state-of-the-art physical analogs for understanding the behavior of some econophysical systems and deriving stable and robust control strategies for using them. We review and discuss applications of some analytic methods based on a thermodynamic metaphor, according to which the interplay between system entropy and conservation laws gives rise to intuitive and governing global properties of complex systems that cannot be otherwise understood. We apply these methods to the question of how power markets can be expected to behave under a variety of conditions.

  19. Dye-sensitized solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Skotheim, T.A.

    1980-03-04

    A low-cost dye-sensitized Schottky barrier solar cell is comprised of a substrate of semiconductor with an ohmic contact on one face, a sensitizing dye adsorbed onto the opposite face of the semiconductor, a transparent thin-film layer of a reducing agent over the dye, and a thin-film layer of metal over the reducing agent. The ohmic contact and metal layer constitute electrodes for connection to an external circuit and one or the other or both are made transparent to permit light to penetrate to the dye and be absorbed therein for generating electric current. The semiconductor material chosen to be the substrate is one having a wide bandgap and which therefore is transparent; the dye selected is one having a ground state within the bandgap of the semiconductor to generate carriers in the semiconductor, and a first excited state above the conduction band edge of the semiconductor to readily conduct electrons from the dye to the semiconductor; the reducing agent selected is one having a ground state above the ground state of the sensitizer to provide a plentiful source of electrons to the dye during current generation and thereby enhance the generation; and the metal for the thin-film layer of metal is selected to have a Fermi level in the vicinity of or above the ground state of the reducing agent to thereby amply supply electrons to the reducing agent. 3 figs.

  20. Dye-sensitized solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Skotheim, Terje A. [Berkeley, CA

    1980-03-04

    A low-cost dye-sensitized Schottky barrier solar cell comprised of a substrate of semiconductor with an ohmic contact on one face, a sensitizing dye adsorbed onto the opposite face of the semiconductor, a transparent thin-film layer of a reducing agent over the dye, and a thin-film layer of metal over the reducing agent. The ohmic contact and metal layer constitute electrodes for connection to an external circuit and one or the other or both are made transparent to permit light to penetrate to the dye and be absorbed therein for generating electric current. The semiconductor material chosen to be the substrate is one having a wide bandgap and which therefore is transparent; the dye selected is one having a ground state within the bandgap of the semiconductor to generate carriers in the semiconductor, and a first excited state above the conduction band edge of the semiconductor to readily conduct electrons from the dye to the semiconductor; the reducing agent selected is one having a ground state above the ground state of the sensitizer to provide a plentiful source of electrons to the dye during current generation and thereby enhance the generation; and the metal for the thin-film layer of metal is selected to have a Fermi level in the vicinity of or above the ground state of the reducing agent to thereby amply supply electrons to the reducing agent.

  1. Utilization of carbon nanotubes for the removal of rhodamine B dye from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Bhanjana, Gaurav; Jangra, Kavita; Dilbaghi, Neeraj; Umar, Ahmad

    2014-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are attracting increasing research interest as promising adsorbents for harmful cations, anions, and other organic and inorganic impurities present in natural sources of water. This study examined the feasibility of removing Rhodamine B dye from aqueous solutions using multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The effects of dye concentration, pH and contact time on adsorption of direct dye by CNTs were also evaluated. The study used the Langmuir and Temkin isotherms to describe equilibrium adsorption. Additionally, pseudo second-order model was adopted to evaluate experimental data and thereby elucidate the kinetic adsorption process. The adsorption percentage of dye increased as contact time increased. Conversely, the adsorption percentage of dye decreased as dye concentration increased. The pseudo second-order model best represented adsorption kinetics. The capacity of CNTs to adsorb Rhodamine B was 65-90% at different pH values. PMID:24738392

  2. Model mount system for testing flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, M. G. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A wind tunnel model mount system is disclosed for effectively and accurately determining the effects of attack and airstream velocity on a model airfoil or aircraft. The model mount system includes a rigid model attached to a splitter plate which is supported away from the wind tunnel wall several of flexible rods. Conventional instrumentation is employed to effect model rotation through a turntable and to record model flutter data as a function of the angle of attack versus dynamic pressure.

  3. NASA's SPICE System Models the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, Charles

    1996-01-01

    SPICE is NASA's multimission, multidiscipline information system for assembling, distributing, archiving, and accessing space science geometry and related data used by scientists and engineers for mission design and mission evaluation, detailed observation planning, mission operations, and science data analysis.

  4. Spectral shifting by dyes to enhance algae growth.

    PubMed

    Prokop, A; Quinn, M F; Fekri, M; Murad, M; Ahmed, S A

    1984-11-01

    The photosynthetic growth action spectrum of a green alga at three bands of visible light (blue, orange, and red) at fixed quanta input and under light-limiting conditions was measured in a batch cultivation system. Quantum efficiencies (biomass dry weight increment per quanta absorbed) were better in the yellow-red region than in the blue region. Results served as a basis for the design and optimization of a dye system that would shift the energy of solar radiation to the required wavelength range by absorbing ultraviolet to blue radiation and emitting in the yellow-red, thus enhancing algae growth. Direct incorporation of dyes into the growth medium, although theoretically expected to enhance growth, in fact resulted in dye decomposition, toxicity to algae and consequently in growth inhibition. Indirect application of dyes in a double tubular reactor (algae inside and dye solution outside) demonstrated growth enhancement for certain dyes with high quantum yields and stability, which had suitable absorption/emission spectra for artificial light sources used. The maximum indirect growth enhancement was obtained using rhodamine 6G at a concentration of 3x10(-5)M with tungsten filament lamp sources. PMID:18551655

  5. Generic CSP Performance Model for NREL's System Advisor Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, M. J.; Zhu, G.

    2011-08-01

    The suite of concentrating solar power (CSP) modeling tools in NREL's System Advisor Model (SAM) includes technology performance models for parabolic troughs, power towers, and dish-Stirling systems. Each model provides the user with unique capabilities that are catered to typical design considerations seen in each technology. Since the scope of the various models is generally limited to common plant configurations, new CSP technologies, component geometries, and subsystem combinations can be difficult to model directly in the existing SAM technology models. To overcome the limitations imposed by representative CSP technology models, NREL has developed a 'Generic Solar System' (GSS) performance model for use in SAM. This paper discusses the formulation and performance considerations included in this model and verifies the model by comparing its results with more detailed models.

  6. Dyeing Properties of Natural Dye Syzygium cuminii on Silk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayana Swamy, V.; Ninge Gowda, K. N.; Sudhakar, R.

    2014-04-01

    Dyeing behavior of natural dye extracted from the bark of Syzygium cuminii L has been studied on silk fabric. Colour values and colour co-ordinates were examined in terms of K/S and L* a* b* C and h. A range of shades were obtained by using various mordants and mordanting techniques. Dye was tested for some of the eco-parameters using atomic absorption spectrophotometry and GC/MS. The test results were compared with the set standards to determine the eco-friendliness of natural dye. Their concentrations were much below the stipulated limits. Dyed samples were tested for antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and were found to possess antibacterial activity.

  7. Hair dye poisoning and rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Bokutz, Munira; Nasir, Nosheen; Mahmood, Faisal; Sajid, Sara

    2015-04-01

    Hair dye ingestion is a rare cause of toxicity in Pakistan. We are presenting the case report of a 55 year old male who presented with accidental hair dye ingestion and developed laryngeal oedema requiring emergent tracheostomy. He had also developed aspiration pneumonitis and chemical oesophagitis. However, the most alarming manifestation was rhabdomyolysis. Hair dye toxicity can be fatal if not recognized early. There is no antidote available. Rhabdomyolysis is a complication and needs to be managed aggressively in order to prevent long term morbidity. PMID:25976581

  8. Dye laser in ophthalmic disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, K S; Wei, Y H; Zhang, M H; Shi, X H; Shi, H Y

    1982-01-01

    From September 1978 to May 1980, dye lasers have been used in the treatment of 56 cases of eye disease (60 eyes), including among others peripheral retinal breaks, macular breaks, prebreak stage degeneration, congenital iris residual membrane, incomplete surgical iridectomy, secondary glaucoma iris bombé, closed-angle glaucoma, vireous hemorrhage, periphlebitis retinae, Coats disease, thrombosis of central and branch retinal vein. Most of the results are satisfactory. Dye laser irradiation has the advantage in iridotomy. Only one pulse can perforate the iris and no serious complication has been encountered. There is a definite therapeutic effect in treatment of vitreous hemorrhage by dye laser. PMID:7109813

  9. A photoelectric amplifier as a dye detector

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ebel, Wesley J.

    1962-01-01

    A dye detector, based on a modified photoelectric amplifier, has been planned, built, and tested. It was designed to record automatically the time of arrival of fluorescein dye at predetermined points in a stream system. Laboratory tests and stream trials proved the instrument to be efficient. Small changes in color can be detected in turbid or clear water. The unit has been used successfully for timing intervals of more than 17 hours; significant savings of time and manpower have resulted. Replacement of the clock, included in the original device, with a recording milliammeter increases the efficiency of the unit by contin,!ously recording changes in turbidity. The addition of this component would increase the cost from $75 to approximately $105.

  10. Metabolism of azo dyes: implication for detoxication and activation.

    PubMed

    Levine, W G

    1991-01-01

    Azo dyes are consumed and otherwise utilized in varying quantities in many parts of the world. Such widely used chemicals are of great concern with regard to their potential toxicity and carcinogenic properties. Their metabolism has been studied extensively and is significant for detoxication and metabolic activation. Both oxidative and reductive pathways are involved in these processes. The majority of azo dyes undergo reduction catalyzed by enzymes of the intestinal microorganisms and/or hepatic enzymes including microsomal and soluble enzymes. The selectivity of substrate and enzyme may to a large extent be determined by the oxygen sensitivity of reduction since a normal liver is mainly aerobic in all areas, whereas the microorganisms of the lower bowel exist in an anaerobic environment. However, it should be pointed out that the pO2 of centrilobular cells within the liver is only a fraction that of air, where pO2 = 150 torr. Therefore, an azo dye reduction experiment performed aerobically may not be an accurate predictor of reductive metabolism in all areas of the liver. Many of the azo dyes in common use today have highly charged substituents such as sulfonate. These resist enzymic attack and for the most part are poorly absorbed from the intestinal tract, providing poor access to the liver, the major site of the mixed-function oxidase system. Lipophilic dyes, such as DAB, which are often carcinogenic, readily access oxidative enzymes and are activated by both mixed-function oxidase and conjugating systems. Reduction of the carcinogenic dyes usually leads to loss of carcinogenic activity. By contrast, most of the highly charged water-soluble dyes become mutagenic only after reduction. Even then, most of the fully reduced amines required oxidative metabolic activation. An outstanding example is the potent human bladder carcinogen benzidine, which derives from the reduction of several azo dyes. Many problems regarding mutagenic and carcinogenic activation remain

  11. Biosorption of water-soluble dyes on magnetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae subsp. uvarum cells.

    PubMed

    Safaríková, M; Ptácková, L; Kibriková, I; Safarík, I

    2005-05-01

    Brewer's yeast (bottom yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae subsp. uvarum) cells were magnetically modified using water based magnetic fluid stabilized with perchloric acid. Magnetically modified yeast cells efficiently adsorbed various water soluble dyes. The dyes adsorption can be described by the Langmuir adsorption model. The maximum adsorption capacity of the magnetic cells differed substantially for individual dyes; the highest value was found for aniline blue (approx. 220 mg per g of dried magnetic adsorbent). PMID:15811411

  12. Modeling of Nonlinear Systems using Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Kayoko; Yamamoto, Toru; Kawada, Kazuo

    In this paper, a newly modeling system by using Genetic Algorithm (GA) is proposed. The GA is an evolutionary computational method that simulates the mechanisms of heredity or evolution of living things, and it is utilized in optimization and in searching for optimized solutions. Most process systems have nonlinearities, so it is necessary to anticipate exactly such systems. However, it is difficult to make a suitable model for nonlinear systems, because most nonlinear systems have a complex structure. Therefore the newly proposed method of modeling for nonlinear systems uses GA. Then, according to the newly proposed scheme, the optimal structure and parameters of the nonlinear model are automatically generated.

  13. Computer modeling of properties of complex molecular systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkova, E.Yu.; Khrenova, M.G.; Polyakov, I.V.

    2015-03-10

    Large molecular aggregates present important examples of strongly nonhomogeneous systems. We apply combined quantum mechanics / molecular mechanics approaches that assume treatment of a part of the system by quantum-based methods and the rest of the system with conventional force fields. Herein we illustrate these computational approaches by two different examples: (1) large-scale molecular systems mimicking natural photosynthetic centers, and (2) components of prospective solar cells containing titan dioxide and organic dye molecules. We demonstrate that modern computational tools are capable to predict structures and spectra of such complex molecular aggregates.

  14. Synthesis of nickel–zinc ferrite magnetic nanoparticle and dye degradation using photocatalytic ozonation

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoodi, Niyaz Mohammad; Bashiri, Marziyeh; Moeen, Shirin Jebeli

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Nickel–zinc ferrite magnetic nanoparticle (NZFMN) was synthesized and characterized. ► Dye degradation by photocatalytic ozonation using NZFMN was studied. ► Formate, acetate and oxalate were detected as dominant dye degradation aliphatic intermediates. ► Nitrate, sulfate and chloride ions were detected as mineralization products of dyes. ► NZFMN was an effective magnetic nanocatalyst to degrade dyes. -- Abstract: In this paper, nickel–zinc ferrite magnetic nanoparticle (NZFMN) was synthesized and its dye degradation ability using photocatalytic ozonation was investigated. The NZFMN was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopic (SEM), Fourier transforms infrared (FTIR) and alternative gradient force magnetometer (AGFM). Reactive Red 198 (RR198) and Direct Green 6 (DG6) were used as dye models. UV–vis and ion chromatography (IC) analyses were employed to study dye degradation. The effects of operational parameters on decolorization such as NZFMN dosage, dye concentration, salt and pH were studied. RR198 and DG6 were completely decolorized (100%) by photocatalytic ozonation using NZFMN. Formate, acetate and oxalate anions were detected as dominant aliphatic intermediates. Nitrate, sulfate and chloride ions were detected as mineralization products of dyes. Results showed that the photocatalytic ozonation using NZFMN was a very effective method for dye degradation.

  15. A new model system swims into focus: using the zebrafish to visualize intestinal metabolism in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Carten, Juliana D; Farber, Steven A

    2009-01-01

    Many fundamental questions remain regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of digestive lipid metabolism. One major impediment to answering important questions in the field has been the lack of a tractable and sufficiently complex model system. Until recently, most studies of lipid metabolism have been performed in vitro or in mice, yet each approach possesses certain limitations. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) offers an excellent model system in which to study lipid metabolism in vivo, owing to its small size, genetic tractability and optical clarity. Fluorescent lipid dyes and optical reporters of lipid-modifying enzymes are now being used in live zebrafish to generate visible readouts of digestive physiology. Here we review recent advances in visualizing intestinal lipid metabolism in live larval zebrafish. PMID:20174460

  16. Analysis hierarchical model for discrete event systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciortea, E. M.

    2015-11-01

    The This paper presents the hierarchical model based on discrete event network for robotic systems. Based on the hierarchical approach, Petri network is analysed as a network of the highest conceptual level and the lowest level of local control. For modelling and control of complex robotic systems using extended Petri nets. Such a system is structured, controlled and analysed in this paper by using Visual Object Net ++ package that is relatively simple and easy to use, and the results are shown as representations easy to interpret. The hierarchical structure of the robotic system is implemented on computers analysed using specialized programs. Implementation of hierarchical model discrete event systems, as a real-time operating system on a computer network connected via a serial bus is possible, where each computer is dedicated to local and Petri model of a subsystem global robotic system. Since Petri models are simplified to apply general computers, analysis, modelling, complex manufacturing systems control can be achieved using Petri nets. Discrete event systems is a pragmatic tool for modelling industrial systems. For system modelling using Petri nets because we have our system where discrete event. To highlight the auxiliary time Petri model using transport stream divided into hierarchical levels and sections are analysed successively. Proposed robotic system simulation using timed Petri, offers the opportunity to view the robotic time. Application of goods or robotic and transmission times obtained by measuring spot is obtained graphics showing the average time for transport activity, using the parameters sets of finished products. individually.

  17. Model-Based Prognostics of Hybrid Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Matthew; Roychoudhury, Indranil; Bregon, Anibal

    2015-01-01

    Model-based prognostics has become a popular approach to solving the prognostics problem. However, almost all work has focused on prognostics of systems with continuous dynamics. In this paper, we extend the model-based prognostics framework to hybrid systems models that combine both continuous and discrete dynamics. In general, most systems are hybrid in nature, including those that combine physical processes with software. We generalize the model-based prognostics formulation to hybrid systems, and describe the challenges involved. We present a general approach for modeling hybrid systems, and overview methods for solving estimation and prediction in hybrid systems. As a case study, we consider the problem of conflict (i.e., loss of separation) prediction in the National Airspace System, in which the aircraft models are hybrid dynamical systems.

  18. Batch and fixed-bed adsorption of tartrazine azo-dye onto activated carbon prepared from apricot stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albroomi, H. I.; Elsayed, M. A.; Baraka, A.; Abdelmaged, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    This work describes the potential of utilizing prepared activated carbon from apricot stones as an efficient adsorbent material for tartrazine (TZ) azo-dye removal in a batch and dynamic adsorption system. The results revealed that activated carbons with well-developed surface area (774 m2/g) and pore volume (1.26 cm3/g) can be manufactured from apricot stones by H3PO4 activation. In batch experiments, effects of the parameters such as initial dye concentration and temperature on the removal of the dye were studied. Equilibrium was achieved in 120 min. Adsorption capacity was found to be dependent on the initial concentration of dye solution, and maximum adsorption was found to be 76 mg/g at 100 mg/L of TZ. The adsorption capacity at equilibrium (q e) increased from 22.6 to 76 mg/g with an increase in the initial dye concentrations from 25 to 100 mg/L. The thermodynamic parameters such as change in free energy (ΔG 0), enthalpy (ΔH 0) and entropy (ΔS 0) were determined and the positive value of (ΔH) 78.1 (K J mol-1) revealed that adsorption efficiency increased with an increase in the process temperature. In fixed-bed column experiments, the effect of selected operating parameters such as bed depth, flow rate and initial dye concentration on the adsorption capacity was evaluated. Increase in bed height of adsorption columns leads to an extension of breakthrough point as well as the exhaustion time of adsorbent. However, the maximum adsorption capacities decrease with increases of flow rate. The breakthrough data fitted well to bed depth service time and Thomas models with high coefficient of determination, R 2 ≥ 94.

  19. Human systems dynamics: Toward a computational model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eoyang, Glenda H.

    2012-09-01

    A robust and reliable computational model of complex human systems dynamics could support advancements in theory and practice for social systems at all levels, from intrapersonal experience to global politics and economics. Models of human interactions have evolved from traditional, Newtonian systems assumptions, which served a variety of practical and theoretical needs of the past. Another class of models has been inspired and informed by models and methods from nonlinear dynamics, chaos, and complexity science. None of the existing models, however, is able to represent the open, high dimension, and nonlinear self-organizing dynamics of social systems. An effective model will represent interactions at multiple levels to generate emergent patterns of social and political life of individuals and groups. Existing models and modeling methods are considered and assessed against characteristic pattern-forming processes in observed and experienced phenomena of human systems. A conceptual model, CDE Model, based on the conditions for self-organizing in human systems, is explored as an alternative to existing models and methods. While the new model overcomes the limitations of previous models, it also provides an explanatory base and foundation for prospective analysis to inform real-time meaning making and action taking in response to complex conditions in the real world. An invitation is extended to readers to engage in developing a computational model that incorporates the assumptions, meta-variables, and relationships of this open, high dimension, and nonlinear conceptual model of the complex dynamics of human systems.

  20. Comparison of Photovoltaic Models in the System Advisor Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, N. J.; Dobos, A. P.; Gilman, P.

    2013-08-01

    The System Advisor Model (SAM) is free software developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for predicting the performance of renewable energy systems and analyzing the financial feasibility of residential, commercial, and utility-scale grid-connected projects. SAM offers several options for predicting the performance of photovoltaic (PV) systems. The model requires that the analyst choose from three PV system models, and depending on that choice, possibly choose from three module and two inverter component models. To obtain meaningful results from SAM, the analyst must be aware of the differences between the model options and their applicability to different modeling scenarios. This paper presents an overview the different PV model options and presents a comparison of results for a 200-kW system using different model options.

  1. Aggregation and adsorption of reactive dyes in the presence of an anionic surfactant on mesoporous aminopropyl silica.

    PubMed

    Cestari, Antonio R; Vieira, Eunice F S; Vieira, Gláucia S; Almeida, Luis E

    2007-05-15

    A surface tension technique was used to determine the critical aggregation concentration (cac) of a yellow and a red dye in relation to the presence of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS) and to temperature changes in buffered aqueous solutions. The cac values of the yellow dye increase from 25 to 45 degrees C (from 41.37 to 50.32 mg L-1) and decrease from 45 to 55 degrees C (from 50.32 to 38.72 mg L-1). The cac values for the red dye/DBS aggregates decrease (from 124.52 to 88.50 mg L-1) from 25 to 55 degrees C. Adsorption of the two dyes onto a mesoporous aminopropyl silica (Sil-NH2) was also studied. The adsorption of the yellow dye increases with an increase in temperature from 25 to 55 degrees C. In the presence of DBS the adsorption on Sil-NH2 for the yellow dye decreases, and for the red dye increases from 25 to 55 degrees C. Adsorptions occurred below and above the cac of the anionic dyes/DBS aggregates. Adsorption of the dyes onto Sil-NH2 fitted well to the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Redlich-Peterson adsorption models. However, in the presence of DBS, only the Freundlich model fit the experimental adsorption data at low dye concentrations (less than 400 mg L-1). In this case, the Redlich-Peterson model was only fitted to the red dye adsorption data. The magnitude of the Dubinin-Radushkevich energetic parameters (E, from 7.00 to 15.00 kJ mol-1) indicates that the adsorption of the dyes onto Sil-NH2, in the absence and in the presence of DBS, is controlled by water adsorbed/dye in solution ion-exchange interactions. It is observed that the values of DeltaadsH are positive for both dyes and the values are quite similar to each other. The exception is the adsorption of the yellow dye in the presence of DBS, which is slightly exothermic. The DeltaadsG values are all negative. However, the interactions of the dyes with Sil-NH2 silica are more spontaneous in the presence of the surfactant. The positive adsorption entropy values (Deltaads

  2. Cell tracing dyes significantly change single cell mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Lulevich, Valentin; Shih, Yi-Ping; Lo, Su Hao; Liu, Gang-yu

    2009-01-01

    Cell tracing dyes are very frequently utilized in cellular biology research because they provide highly sensitive fluorescent tags that do not compromise cellular functions such as growth and proliferation. In many investigations concerning cellular adhesion and mechanics, fluorescent dyes have been employed with the assumption of little impact on the results. Using the single-cell compression technique developed by our team, the single-cell mechanics of MDA-MB-468 and MLC-SV40 cells were investigated as a function of dye uptake. Cell tracing dyes increase living cell stiffness 3-6 times and cell-to-probe adhesion up to 7 times. These results suggest a more significant effect than toxins, such as Thrombin. A simple analytical model was derived to enable the extraction of the Young’s moduli of the cell membrane and cytoskeleton from the force-deformation profiles measured for individual cells. The increase in Young’s modulus of the membrane is 3-7 times, which is more significant than that of the cytoskeleton (1.1-3.4 times). We propose that changes in cell mechanics upon the addition of fluorescent tracing dye are primarily due to incorporation of amphiphilic dye molecules into the cellular plasma membrane, which increases the lateral interaction among phospholipid chains and thus enhances their rigidity and adhesion. PMID:19366241

  3. Laser photolysis of fluorone dyes in a chitosan matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Slyusareva, E A; Sizykh, A G; Gerasimova, M A; Slabko, V V; Myslivets, S A

    2012-08-31

    Kinetics of laser-induced photobleaching of fluorone dyes (fluorescein, dibromofluorescein, eosin Y, erythrosin B, Rose Bengal) is studied in a chitosan matrix. For all dyes the bleaching kinetics at the intensities of laser radiation 0.7 - 11.9 W cm{sup -2} demonstrates quasi-monomolecular behaviour. The results are analysed using a kinetic model, based on the four-level (S{sub 0}, S{sub 1}, T{sub 1}, T{sub n}) scheme of the dye with chemically active triplet states taken into account. It is shown that the rate constants of the chemical reaction involving higher triplet states in the dyes studied amount to (3.9 - 18.6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} s{sup -1} and exceed the analogous values for the reaction involving the first lower triplet states by nine orders of magnitude. The rate of reaction involving the first triplet states appeared to be higher by one - two orders of magnitude than that in the case of higher triplet states involved because of low population of the latter. The possible mechanism of dye bleaching with participation of chitosan that consists in reduction of the dye to the leuco form by transfer of hydrogen from the chitosan matrix is discussed. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasmas)

  4. Induced murine models of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuan; Zeumer, Leilani; Reeves, Westley H; Morel, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    Induced mouse models of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have been developed to complement the spontaneous models. This chapter describes the methods used in the pristane-induced model and the chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) model, both of which have been extensively used. We will also outline the specific mechanisms of systemic autoimmunity that can be best characterized using each of these models. PMID:24497358

  5. Removal of ionic dyes from water by solvent extraction using reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Pandit, P; Basu, S

    2004-04-15

    Several methods (e.g., UV/H2O2 oxidation, adsorption, flocculation-precipitation) are normally employed to remove dye from water. A new technique based on liquid/liquid extraction using reverse micelles is proposed whereby recovery of solvent and reuse of dye is possible. Experiments were conducted by mixing a known quantity of dye in aqueous phase and solvent-containing surfactants in a simple mixer. The separation of solvent phase, containing encapsulated dye in reverse micelles, from aqueous phase due to gravity results in separation of dye from water. The removal of different ionic dyes (e.g., eosin yellow, methylene blue, malachite green, methyl orange, orange G) from aqueous phase in the presence of different cationic and anionic surfactants [e.g., sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate, sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide, and cetyl pyridinium chloride] in different solvents (e.g., amyl alcohol, benzyl alcohol, methyl benzoate, and isooctane) were studied by conducting experiments. The percentage removal of dye from aqueous phase increases with the decrease in dye concentration or with the increase in surfactants concentration. Furthermore, the percentage COD removal of dye is increased with the increase in surfactant concentration. The nature of solvent has minimal effect on percentage removal of dye. The ratio of solventto aqueous phase volume required for the removal of dye decreases with the increase in surfactant concentration. It is possible to back-extract dye into aqueous phase and recover solvent by using counterionic surfactants. The separation of aqueous phase from the aqueous-phase solvent dispersion is faster for amyl alcohol as compared to benzyl alcohol and methyl benzoate. A theoretical model based on ion-exchange reaction between surfactants and dye is used to analyze the experimental data. PMID:15116851

  6. Paraphenylenediamine Containing Hair Dye: An Emerging Household Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Patra, Ambika Prasad; Shaha, Kusa Kumar; Rayamane, Anand P; Dash, Shreemanta Kumar; Mohanty, Manoj Kumar; Mohanty, Sachidananda

    2015-09-01

    Paraphenylenediamine poisoning is among one of the emerging causes of poisoning in Asian countries, because it is a constituent of hair dye formulations and is easily available in market at low cost. Hair dyes are rampantly used in Asian households compared with the western world. Locally, hair dye constituents may have allergic adverse effects, and acute systemic poisoning presents with characteristic angioedema, upper airway obstruction, rhabdomyolysis, methemoglobinemia, myoglobinuria, and acute renal failure. This study reports about the death of a 24-year-old Indian housewife who committed suicide by taking hair dye emulsion. She had an argument with her husband, and because of fit of rage, took a bowlful (80 mL) of hair dye emulsion kept prepared for the use by husband. She developed angioedema, cervical swelling, and rhabdomyolysis and died of acute renal failure within 24 hours. Toxicological analysis of viscera and blood revealed varying levels of paraphenylenediamine. Histopathological samples of kidney showed features of acute tubular necrosis and myoglobin casts in renal tubules. The aim of the study is to create awareness about the adverse effects of the hair dye, its poisoning outcome, and possible preventive measures. PMID:26056768

  7. Investigation of optoelectronic properties of N3 dye-sensitized TiO2 nano-crystals by hybrid methods: ONIOM (QM/MM) calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oftadeh, Mohsen; Tavakolizadeh, Leila

    2013-04-01

    In this article, Ru(4,4'-dicarboxy-2,2'-bipyridine)2(NCS)2 dye (N3) and some derivatives were investigated using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations in solution to elucidate the influence of the environment and substituted groups on electronic properties. Full geometry optimization and investigation of electronic properties of N3 dye and some derivatives were performed using DFT and HF calculations. The singlet ground state geometries were fully optimized at the B3LYP/3-21G** level of theory through the Gaussian 98 program. Based on the computed results, the optoelectronic properties are sensitive to chemical solvent environments. Moreover, the properties of anatase cluster (TiO2) models have been investigated, and N3 dyes have been adsorbed on TiO2 nano-particle with diprotonated states. The modified N3 dyes highly affected the electronic structure. This leads to significant changes in the adsorption spectra as compared to the N3 dyes. Through hybrid methods, the properties of interfacial electronic coupling of the combined system were estimated. The results of some combined systems showed that the electronic coupling, lowest lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals, and the TiO2 conduction band resided in the visible region.

  8. NIR fluorescent dyes: versatile vehicles for marker and probe applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patonay, Gabor; Chapman, Gala; Beckford, Garfield; Henary, Maged

    2013-02-01

    The use of the NIR spectral region (650-900 nm) is advantageous due to the inherently lower background interference and the high molar absorptivities of NIR chromophores. Near-Infrared (NIR) dyes are increasingly used in the biological and medical field. The binding characteristics of NIR dyes to biomolecules are possibly controlled by several factors, including hydrophobicity, size and charge just to mention a few parameters. Binding characteristics of symmetric carbocyanines and found that the hydrophobic nature of the NIR dye is only partially responsible for the binding strength. Upon binding to biomolecules significant fluorescence enhancement can be observed for symmetrical carbocyanines. This fluorescence amplification facilitates the detection of the NIR dye and enhances its utility as NIR reporter. This manuscript discusses some probe and marker applications of such NIR fluorescent dyes. One application discussed here is the use of NIR dyes as markers. For labeling applications the fluorescence intensity of the NIR fluorescent label can significantly be increased by enclosing several dye molecules in nanoparticles. To decrease self quenching dyes that have relatively large Stokes' shift needs to be used. This is achieved by substituting meso position halogens with amino moiety. This substitution can also serve as a linker to covalently attach the dye molecule to the nanoparticle backbone. We report here on the preparation of NIR fluorescent silica nanoparticles. Silica nanoparticles that are modified with aminoreactive moieties can be used as bright fluorescent labels in bioanalytical applications. A new bioanalytical technique to detect and monitor the catalytic activity of the sulfur assimilating enzyme using NIR dyes is reported as well. In this spectroscopic bioanalytical assay a family of Fischer based n-butyl sulfonate substituted dyes that exhibit distinct variation in absorbance and fluorescence properties and strong binding to serum albumin as its

  9. A model for plant lighting system selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciolkosz, D. E.; Albright, L. D.; Sager, J. C.; Langhans, R. W.

    2002-01-01

    A decision model is presented that compares lighting systems for a plant growth scenario and chooses the most appropriate system from a given set of possible choices. The model utilizes a Multiple Attribute Utility Theory approach, and incorporates expert input and performance simulations to calculate a utility value for each lighting system being considered. The system with the highest utility is deemed the most appropriate system. The model was applied to a greenhouse scenario, and analyses were conducted to test the model's output for validity. Parameter variation indicates that the model performed as expected. Analysis of model output indicates that differences in utility among the candidate lighting systems were sufficiently large to give confidence that the model's order of selection was valid.

  10. An online model composition tool for system biology models

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There are multiple representation formats for Systems Biology computational models, and the Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) is one of the most widely used. SBML is used to capture, store, and distribute computational models by Systems Biology data sources (e.g., the BioModels Database) and researchers. Therefore, there is a need for all-in-one web-based solutions that support advance SBML functionalities such as uploading, editing, composing, visualizing, simulating, querying, and browsing computational models. Results We present the design and implementation of the Model Composition Tool (Interface) within the PathCase-SB (PathCase Systems Biology) web portal. The tool helps users compose systems biology models to facilitate the complex process of merging systems biology models. We also present three tools that support the model composition tool, namely, (1) Model Simulation Interface that generates a visual plot of the simulation according to user’s input, (2) iModel Tool as a platform for users to upload their own models to compose, and (3) SimCom Tool that provides a side by side comparison of models being composed in the same pathway. Finally, we provide a web site that hosts BioModels Database models and a separate web site that hosts SBML Test Suite models. Conclusions Model composition tool (and the other three tools) can be used with little or no knowledge of the SBML document structure. For this reason, students or anyone who wants to learn about systems biology will benefit from the described functionalities. SBML Test Suite models will be a nice starting point for beginners. And, for more advanced purposes, users will able to access and employ models of the BioModels Database as well. PMID:24006914

  11. Experimental study of dye removal from industrial wastewater by membrane technologies of reverse osmosis and nanofiltration.

    PubMed

    Abid, Mohammad Fadhil; Zablouk, Mumtaz Abdulahad; Abid-Alameer, Abeer Muhssen

    2012-01-01

    Currently, biological method has been utilized in the treatment of wastewater -containing synthetic dyes used by textile industries in Iraq. The present work was devoted to study the operating feasibility using reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane systems as an alternative treatment method of wastewater discharged from Iraqi textile mills. Acid red, reactive black and reactive blue dyes were selected, based on the usage rate in Iraq. Effects of dye concentration, pH of solution, feed temperature, dissolved salts and operating pressure on permeate flux and dye rejection were studied. Results at operating conditions of dye concentration = 65 mg/L, feed temperature = 39°C and pressure = 8 bar showed the final dye removal with RO membrane as 97.2%, 99.58% and 99.9% for acid red, reactive black and reactive blue dyes, respectively. With NF membrane, the final dye removal were as 93.77%, 95.67%, and 97% for red, black and blue dyes, respectively. The presence of salt (particularly NaCl) in the dye solution resulted in a higher color removal with a permeate flux decline. It was confirmed that pH of solution had a positive impact on dye removal while feed temperature showed a different image. A comparison was made between the results of dye removal in biological and membrane methods. The results showed that membrane method had higher removal potential with lower effective cost. The present study indicates that the use of NF membrane in dye removal from the effluent of Iraqi textile mills is promising. PMID:23369335

  12. Experimental study of dye removal from industrial wastewater by membrane technologies of reverse osmosis and nanofiltration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Currently, biological method has been utilized in the treatment of wastewater -containing synthetic dyes used by textile industries in Iraq. The present work was devoted to study the operating feasibility using reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane systems as an alternative treatment method of wastewater discharged from Iraqi textile mills. Acid red, reactive black and reactive blue dyes were selected, based on the usage rate in Iraq. Effects of dye concentration, pH of solution, feed temperature, dissolved salts and operating pressure on permeate flux and dye rejection were studied. Results at operating conditions of dye concentration = 65 mg/L, feed temperature = 39°C and pressure = 8 bar showed the final dye removal with RO membrane as 97.2%, 99.58% and 99.9% for acid red, reactive black and reactive blue dyes, respectively. With NF membrane, the final dye removal were as 93.77%, 95.67%, and 97% for red, black and blue dyes, respectively. The presence of salt (particularly NaCl) in the dye solution resulted in a higher color removal with a permeate flux decline. It was confirmed that pH of solution had a positive impact on dye removal while feed temperature showed a different image. A comparison was made between the results of dye removal in biological and membrane methods. The results showed that membrane method had higher removal potential with lower effective cost. The present study indicates that the use of NF membrane in dye removal from the effluent of Iraqi textile mills is promising. PMID:23369335

  13. Designing control system information models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panin, K. I.; Zinchenko, V. P.

    1973-01-01

    Problems encountered in modeling information models are discussed, Data cover condition, functioning of the object of control, and the environment involved in the control. Other parameters needed for the model include: (1) information for forming an image of the real situation, (2) data for analyzing and evaluating an evolving situation, (3) planning actions, and (4) data for observing and evaluating the results of model realization.

  14. Electronic Education System Model-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Güllü, Fatih; Kuusik, Rein; Laanpere, Mart

    2015-01-01

    In this study we presented new EES Model-2 extended from EES model for more productive implementation in e-learning process design and modelling in higher education. The most updates were related to uppermost instructional layer. We updated learning processes object of the layer for adaptation of educational process for young and old people,…

  15. Building a generalized distributed system model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, Ravi

    1991-01-01

    A number of topics related to building a generalized distributed system model are discussed. The effects of distributed database modeling on evaluation of transaction rollbacks, the measurement of effects of distributed database models on transaction availability measures, and a performance analysis of static locking in replicated distributed database systems are covered.

  16. Dispersion Modeling in Complex Urban Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Models are used to represent real systems in an understandable way. They take many forms. A conceptual model explains the way a system works. In environmental studies, for example, a conceptual model may delineate all the factors and parameters for determining how a particle move...

  17. Identifiability Of Systems With Modeling Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaegh, Yadolah " fred" ; Bekey, George A.

    1988-01-01

    Advances in theory of modeling errors reported. Recent paper on errors in mathematical models of deterministic linear or weakly nonlinear systems. Extends theoretical work described in NPO-16661 and NPO-16785. Presents concrete way of accounting for difference in structure between mathematical model and physical process or system that it represents.

  18. Applying Modeling Tools to Ground System Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Di Pasquale, Peter

    2012-01-01

    As part of a long-term effort to revitalize the Ground Systems (GS) Engineering Section practices, Systems Modeling Language (SysML) and Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN) have been used to model existing GS products and the procedures GS engineers use to produce them.

  19. Adaptive System Modeling for Spacecraft Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Justin

    2011-01-01

    This invention introduces a methodology and associated software tools for automatically learning spacecraft system models without any assumptions regarding system behavior. Data stream mining techniques were used to learn models for critical portions of the International Space Station (ISS) Electrical Power System (EPS). Evaluation on historical ISS telemetry data shows that adaptive system modeling reduces simulation error anywhere from 50 to 90 percent over existing approaches. The purpose of the methodology is to outline how someone can create accurate system models from sensor (telemetry) data. The purpose of the software is to support the methodology. The software provides analysis tools to design the adaptive models. The software also provides the algorithms to initially build system models and continuously update them from the latest streaming sensor data. The main strengths are as follows: Creates accurate spacecraft system models without in-depth system knowledge or any assumptions about system behavior. Automatically updates/calibrates system models using the latest streaming sensor data. Creates device specific models that capture the exact behavior of devices of the same type. Adapts to evolving systems. Can reduce computational complexity (faster simulations).

  20. NASA Lewis Wind Tunnel Model Systems Criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, Ronald H.; Haller, Henry C.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes criteria for the design, analysis, quality assurance, and documentation of models or test articles that are to be tested in the aeropropulsion facilities at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The report presents three methods for computing model allowable stresses on the basis of the yield stress or ultimate stress, and it gives quality assurance criteria for models tested in Lewis' aeropropulsion facilities. Both customer-furnished model systems and in-house model systems are discussed. The functions of the facility manager, project engineer, operations engineer, research engineer, and facility electrical engineer are defined. The format for pretest meetings, prerun safety meetings, and the model criteria review are outlined Then, the format for the model systems report (a requirement for each model that is to be tested at NASA Lewis) is described, the engineers that are responsible for developing the model systems report are listed, and the time table for its delivery to the facility manager is given.

  1. Experimental studies on output, spatial, and spectral characteristics of a microdroplet dye laser containing intralipid as a highly scattering medium

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Hiroshi; Tanosaki, Shinji; Tsujita, Kazuhiro; Inaba, Humio

    1996-11-01

    Lasing characteristics of Rhodamine 6G dye-doped microdroplets containing highly scattering fat emulsion Intralipid-10% are studied experimentally. Noteworthy findings are that well-defined lasing threshold can be observed and one order or more magnitude enhancement of emission intensity with suitable (optimum) conditions of the Intralipid mixing ratio, in comparison with original neat-dye lasing microdroplets. The authors present and discuss the measured results of input-output intensities for different dye concentrations and dye-Intralipid mixing ratios in this high-gain laser dye-soft scatterer system and microscope images of spatial distribution of light emission from both the microdroplets containing neat-dye and dye-Intralipid mixture. It was found that almost no-lasing neat-dye microdroplets, which have either much higher or much lower dye concentration, can achieve lasing by substituting suitably certain amounts of the Intralipid, causing multiple light scattering. Spectral measurements of lasing outputs from the Rhodamine 6G dye-Intralipid microdroplets show the tendency of the disappearance of the well-known mode structures, owing to the morphology-dependent resonances of this microspherical cavity inherent to the neat-dye microdroplets. It is their belief that the present results make this novel method of dye-Intralipid microsystem very attractive for a variety of future applications, including diagnostic tools for highly sensitive detection and identification of small quantity objects and species embedded or hidden in highly scattering media.

  2. Laser beam modeling in optical storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treptau, J. P.; Milster, T. D.; Flagello, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    A computer model has been developed that simulates light propagating through an optical data storage system. A model of a laser beam that originates at a laser diode, propagates through an optical system, interacts with a optical disk, reflects back from the optical disk into the system, and propagates to data and servo detectors is discussed.

  3. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Refinery Model

    EIA Publications

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) Refinery Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  4. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Industrial Model

    EIA Publications

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) World Industrial Model (WIM). It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  5. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Refinery Model

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) Refinery Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  6. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Natural Gas Model

    EIA Publications

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) Natural Gas Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  7. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Main Model

    EIA Publications

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) Main Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  8. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: District Heat Model

    EIA Publications

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) District Heat Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  9. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Residential Model

    EIA Publications

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) Residential Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  10. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: World Electricity Model

    EIA Publications

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) World Electricity Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  11. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Greenhouse Gases Model

    EIA Publications

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) Greenhouse Gases Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  12. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Coal Model

    EIA Publications

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) Coal Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  13. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Transportation Model

    EIA Publications

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) International Transportation model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  14. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Commercial Model

    EIA Publications

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) Commercial Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  15. Network and adaptive system of systems modeling and analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Craig R.; Campbell, James E. Dr.; Anderson, Dennis James; Eddy, John P.

    2007-05-01

    This report documents the results of an LDRD program entitled ''Network and Adaptive System of Systems Modeling and Analysis'' that was conducted during FY 2005 and FY 2006. The purpose of this study was to determine and implement ways to incorporate network communications modeling into existing System of Systems (SoS) modeling capabilities. Current SoS modeling, particularly for the Future Combat Systems (FCS) program, is conducted under the assumption that communication between the various systems is always possible and occurs instantaneously. A more realistic representation of these communications allows for better, more accurate simulation results. The current approach to meeting this objective has been to use existing capabilities to model network hardware reliability and adding capabilities to use that information to model the impact on the sustainment supply chain and operational availability.

  16. Oxidation of Levafix CA reactive azo-dyes in industrial wastewater of textile dyeing by electro-generated Fenton's reagent.

    PubMed

    El-Desoky, Hanaa S; Ghoneim, Mohamed M; El-Sheikh, Ragaa; Zidan, Naglaa M

    2010-03-15

    The indirect electrochemical removal of pollutants from effluents has become an attractive method in recent years. Removal (decolorization and mineralization) of Levafix Blue CA and Levafix Red CA reactive azo-dyes from aqueous media by electro-generated Fenton's reagent (Fe(2+)/H(2)O(2)) using a reticulated vitreous carbon cathode and a platinum gauze anode was optimized. Progress of oxidation (decolorization and mineralization) of the investigated azo-dyes with time of electro-Fenton's reaction was monitored by UV-visible absorbance measurements, Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal and HPLC analysis. The results indicated that the electro-Fenton's oxidation system is efficient for treatment of such types of reactive dyes. Oxidation of each of the investigated azo-dyes by electro-generated Fenton's reagent up to complete decolorization and approximately 90-95% mineralization was achieved. Moreover, the optimized electro-Fenton's oxidation was successfully applied for complete decolorization and approximately 85-90% mineralization of both azo-dyes in real industrial wastewater samples collected from textile dyeing house at El-Mahalla El-Kobra, Egypt. PMID:19926217

  17. EXPOSURE ANALYSIS MODELING SYSTEM (EXAMS): USER MANUAL AND SYSTEM DOCUMENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Exposure Analysis Modeling System, first published in 1982 (EPA-600/3-82-023), provides interactive computer software for formulating aquatic ecosystem models and rapidly evaluating the fate, transport, and exposure concentrations of synthetic organic chemicals - pesticides, ...

  18. Dye laser amplifier including a dye cell contained within a support vessel

    DOEpatents

    Davin, James

    1992-01-01

    A large (high flow rate) dye laser amplifier in which a continous replenished supply of dye is excited by a first light beam, specifically a copper vapor laser beam, in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam, specifically a dye beam, passing through the dye is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a dye cell defining a dye chamber through which a continuous stream of dye is caused to pass at a flow rate of greater than 30 gallons/minute at a static pressure greater than 150 pounds/square inch and a specifically designed support vessel for containing the dye cell.

  19. Dye laser amplifier including a dye cell contained within a support vessel

    DOEpatents

    Davin, J.

    1992-12-01

    A large (high flow rate) dye laser amplifier in which a continuous replenished supply of dye is excited by a first light beam, specifically a copper vapor laser beam, in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam, specifically a dye beam, passing through the dye is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a dye cell defining a dye chamber through which a continuous stream of dye is caused to pass at a flow rate of greater than 30 gallons/minute at a static pressure greater than 150 pounds/square inch and a specifically designed support vessel for containing the dye cell. 6 figs.

  20. Structural systematic features of photoelectric effect in aromatic polymers with polymethine dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrova, E. L.

    2007-12-15

    The structural systematic features of quantum-yield variation in charge-carrier photogeneration are investigated for polymer systems with molecules into which polymethine dyes of various structures had been introduced. The correlations between the quantum yields and the second-harmonic-generation efficiency in the media containing such dyes are revealed, and relations of the quantum yields to such dye-molecule structural parameters as the ionization potential of its donor fragment, the electron affinity of its acceptor fragment, and the electron-transfer distance between donor and acceptor fragments of the dye molecule are established.

  1. The aqueous-polyelectrolyte dye solution as an active laser medium

    SciTech Connect

    Akimov, A I; Saletskii, A M

    2000-11-30

    The spectral, luminescent, and lasing properties of aqueous solutions of a cationic dye rhodamine 6G with additions of anion polyelectrolytes - polyacrylic and polymethacrylic acids - are studied. It is found that the energy and spectral properties of lasing of these solutions depend on the ratio of concentrations of polyelectrolyte and molecules. It is also found that the lasing parameters of aqueous-polyelectrolyte dye solutions can be controlled by changing the structure of the molecular system. The variation in the structure of aqueous-polyelectrolyte dye solutions of rhodamine 6G resulted in an almost five-fold increase in the lasing efficiency compared to that in aqueous dye solutions. (lasers, active media)

  2. Generic Model Host System Design

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Chungming; Wu, Juhao; Qiang, Ji; Shen, Guobao; /Brookhaven

    2012-06-22

    There are many simulation codes for accelerator modelling; each one has some strength but not all. A platform which can host multiple modelling tools would be ideal for various purposes. The model platform along with infrastructure support can be used not only for online applications but also for offline purposes. Collaboration is formed for the effort of providing such a platform. In order to achieve such a platform, a set of common physics data structure has to be set. Application Programming Interface (API) for physics applications should also be defined within a model data provider. A preliminary platform design and prototype is discussed.

  3. Influence of particle size and salinity on adsorption of basic dyes by agricultural waste: dried seagrape (Caulerpa lentillifera).

    PubMed

    Punjongharn, Pimol; Meevasana, Khanidtha; Pavasant, Prasert

    2008-01-01

    Green macroalga Caulerpa lentillifera was found to have reasonable adsorption capacity for basic dyes, Astrazon Blue FGRL (AB), Astrazon Red GTLN (AR), and Astrazon Golden Yellow GL-E (AY). The initial dye concentration was in the range of 100-1,800 mg/L. The dried algal sorbent was ground and sieved into 3 sizes: S (0.1-0.84 mm), M (0.84-2.0 mm), and L sizes (larger than 2.0 mm). For all conditions examined in this work (at 25 degrees C in batch systems), the adsorption reached equilibrium within the first hour. The kinetic data corresponded well with the pseudo second order kinetic model where the rate constant, k2, decreased as the sorbent size increased for all dyes. The adsorption isotherms followed both Langmuir and Freundlich models. Among three sorbent sizes, S size gave the highest adsorption capacity followed by M and L sizes. A reduction of sorbent size increased the specific surface area for mass transfer, and also increased the total pore volume, thus providing more active sites for adsorption. The adsorption of AB was adversely influenced by the protonation of algal surface at low pH. On the other hand, the adsorption of AR and AY could be due to weak electrostatic interaction, which was not significantly affected by pH. Increasing salinity of the system caused a decrease in adsorption capacity possibly due to the competition between Na+ and the dye cations for the binding sites on algal surface. Moreover, an increase in salinity generated a compressed electrical double layer on the algal surface which exerted repulsive force, retarding the adsorption of positive charged molecules such as the basic dyes. PMID:18763573

  4. Photocatalytic degradation of Azure and Sudan dyes using nano TiO2.

    PubMed

    Aarthi, T; Narahari, Prashanthi; Madras, Giridhar

    2007-11-19

    The present study investigates the dependence of photocatalytic rate on molecular structure of the substrate that is degraded. The photocatalytic degradation of Azure (A and B) and Sudan (III and IV) dyes, having similar structure, but different functional groups, were investigated with two catalysts. The photocatalytic activity of solution combustion synthesized TiO(2) (CS TiO(2)) was compared with that of Degussa P-25 for degrading these dyes. The effect of solvents and mixed-solvent system on photodegradation of Sudan III was investigated. The photodegradation rate was found to be higher in solvents with higher polarity. The effect of pH and the presence of metal ions in the form of chloride and nitrate salt, on degradation rate of Azure A was also investigated. The metal ions significantly reduced the photocatalysis rates. A detailed Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic model has been developed to explain the effect of metal ions on degradation rate of the substrate. This model elucidates the contribution of holes and electrons towards degradation of the dye. PMID:17540499

  5. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Commercial Model

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    The Commercial Model of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) is an energy demand modeling system of the world commercial end?use sector at a regional level. This report describes the version of the Commercial Model that was used to produce the commercial sector projections published in the International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016). The Commercial Model is one of 13 components of the WEPS system. The WEPS is a modular system, consisting of a number of separate energy models that are communicate and work with each other through an integrated system model. The model components are each developed independently, but are designed with well?defined protocols for system communication and interactivity. The WEPS modeling system uses a shared database (the “restart” file) that allows all the models to communicate with each other when they are run in sequence over a number of iterations. The overall WEPS system uses an iterative solution technique that forces convergence of consumption and supply pressures to solve for an equilibrium price.

  6. Error Propagation in a System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schloegel, Kirk (Inventor); Bhatt, Devesh (Inventor); Oglesby, David V. (Inventor); Madl, Gabor (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Embodiments of the present subject matter can enable the analysis of signal value errors for system models. In an example, signal value errors can be propagated through the functional blocks of a system model to analyze possible effects as the signal value errors impact incident functional blocks. This propagation of the errors can be applicable to many models of computation including avionics models, synchronous data flow, and Kahn process networks.

  7. Hubble Space Telescope electrical power system model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baggett, Randy; Miller, Jim; Leisgang, Tom

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes one of the most comprehensive models ever developed for a spacecraft electrical power system (EPS). The model was developed for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to evaluate vehicle power system performance and to assist in scheduling maintenance and refurbishment missions by providing data needed to forecast EPS power and energy margins for the mission phases being planned. The EPS model requires a specific mission phase description as the input driver and uses a high granularity database to produce a multi-orbit power system performance report. The EPS model accurately predicts the power system response to various mission timelines over the entire operational life of the spacecraft.

  8. Mechanisms of Alizarin Red S and Methylene blue biosorption onto olive stone by-product: Isotherm study in single and binary systems.

    PubMed

    Albadarin, Ahmad B; Mangwandi, Chirangano

    2015-12-01

    The biosorption process of anionic dye Alizarin Red S (ARS) and cationic dye methylene blue (MB) as a function of contact time, initial concentration and solution pH onto olive stone (OS) biomass has been investigated. Equilibrium biosorption isotherms in single and binary systems and kinetics in batch mode were also examined. The kinetic data of the two dyes were better described by the pseudo second-order model. At low concentration, ARS dye appeared to follow a two-step diffusion process, while MB dye followed a three-step diffusion process. The biosorption experimental data for ARS and MB dyes were well suited to the Redlich-Peterson isotherm. The maximum biosorption of ARS dye, qmax = 16.10 mg/g, was obtained at pH 3.28 and the maximum biosorption of MB dye, qmax = 13.20 mg/g, was observed at basic pH values. In the binary system, it was indicated that the MB dye diffuses firstly inside the biosorbent particle and occupies the biosorption sites forming a monodentate complex and then the ARS dye enters and can only bind to untaken sites; forms a tridentate complex with OS active sites. PMID:26355260

  9. Efficiency enhancement in dye sensitized solar cells using gel polymer electrolytes based on a tetrahexylammonium iodide and MgI2 binary iodide system.

    PubMed

    Bandara, T M W J; Dissanayake, M A K L; Jayasundara, W J M J S R; Albinsson, I; Mellander, B-E

    2012-06-28

    Quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells have drawn the attention of scientists and technologists as a potential candidate to supplement future energy needs. The conduction of iodide ions in quasi-solid-state polymer electrolytes and the performance of dye sensitized solar cells containing such electrolytes can be enhanced by incorporating iodides having appropriate cations. Gel-type electrolytes, based on PAN host polymers and mixture of salts tetrahexylammonium iodide (Hex4N(+)I(-)) and MgI2, were prepared by incorporating ethylene carbonate and propylene carbonate as plasticizers. The salt composition in the binary mixture was varied in order to optimize the performance of solar cells. The electrolyte containing 120% Hex4N(+)I(-) with respect to weight of PAN and without MgI2 showed the highest conductivity out of the compositions studied, 2.5 × 10(-3) S cm(-1) at 25 °C, and a glass transition at -102.4 °C. However, the electrolyte containing 100% Hex4N(+)I(-) and 20% MgI2 showed the best solar cell performance highlighting the influence of the cation on the performance of the cell. The predominantly ionic behaviour of the electrolytes was established from the dc polarization data and all the electrolytes exhibit iodide ion transport. Seven different solar cells were fabricated employing different electrolyte compositions. The best cell using the electrolyte with 100% Hex4N(+)I(-) and 20% MgI2 with respect to PAN weight showed 3.5% energy conversion efficiency and 8.6 mA cm(-2) short circuit current density. PMID:22618351

  10. Physical description of the impregnation mechanism of dye molecules in contact with porous electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzad, N.; Alexe-Ionescu, A. L.; Tresso, E.; Barbero, G.

    2013-05-01

    We propose and discuss two models that take into account the decreasing of the bulk density of dyes molecules in contact with a porous electrode. We show that the models based on the standard adsorption phenomenon have to be considered just as fitting models, of limited physical significance. A more physical model has to take into account the diffusion of dye molecules into the channels present in the porous electrode and also the adsorption of dye molecules on the lateral surfaces of these channels. The agreement between the theoretical prediction of such a model and the experimental data is reasonably good.

  11. Modeling of power electronic systems with EMTP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Kwa-Sur; Dravid, Narayan V.

    1989-01-01

    In view of the potential impact of power electronics on power systems, there is need for a computer modeling/analysis tool to perform simulation studies on power systems with power electronic components as well as to educate engineering students about such systems. The modeling of the major power electronic components of the NASA Space Station Freedom Electric Power System is described along with ElectroMagnetic Transients Program (EMTP) and it is demonstrated that EMTP can serve as a very useful tool for teaching, design, analysis, and research in the area of power systems with power electronic components. EMTP modeling of power electronic circuits is described and simulation results are presented.

  12. Very Large System Dynamics Models - Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Leonard Malczynski

    2008-10-01

    This paper provides lessons learned from developing several large system dynamics (SD) models. System dynamics modeling practice emphasize the need to keep models small so that they are manageable and understandable. This practice is generally reasonable and prudent; however, there are times that large SD models are necessary. This paper outlines two large SD projects that were done at two Department of Energy National Laboratories, the Idaho National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories. This paper summarizes the models and then discusses some of the valuable lessons learned during these two modeling efforts.

  13. Modeling of the DZero data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect

    Angstadt, R.; Johnson, M. Manning, I.L. ); Wightman, J.A. . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-08-01

    A queuing theory model was used in the initial design of the DZero data acquisition system. It was mainly used for the front end electronic systems. Since then the model has been extended to include the entire data path for the tracking system. The tracking system generates the most data so we expect this system to determine the overall transfer rate. The model was developed using both analytical and simulation methods for solving a series of single server queues. This paper describes the model and the methods used to develop it. The authors present results form the original models, updated calculations representing the system as built and comparisons with measurements made with the hardware in place for the cosmic ray test run.

  14. Modeling of the DZero data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect

    Angstadt, R.; Johnson, M.; Manning, I.L.; Wightman, J.A. |

    1991-12-01

    A queuing theory model was used in the initial design of the D0 data acquisition system. It was mainly used for the front end electronic systems. Since then the model has been extended to include the entire data path for the tracking system. The tracking system generates the most data so we expect this system to determine the overall transfer rate. The model was developed using both analytical and simulation methods for solving a series of single server queues. We describe the model and the methods used to develop it. We also present results from the original models, updated calculations representing the system as built and comparisons with measurements made with the hardware in place for the cosmic ray test run. 3 refs.

  15. Stirling System Modeling for Space Nuclear Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.; Johnson, Paul K.

    2008-01-01

    A dynamic model of a high-power Stirling convertor has been developed for space nuclear power systems modeling. The model is based on the Component Test Power Convertor (CTPC), a 12.5-kWe free-piston Stirling convertor. The model includes the fluid heat source, the Stirling convertor, output power, and heat rejection. The Stirling convertor model includes the Stirling cycle thermodynamics, heat flow, mechanical mass-spring damper systems, and the linear alternator. The model was validated against test data. Both nonlinear and linear versions of the model were developed. The linear version algebraically couples two separate linear dynamic models; one model of the Stirling cycle and one model of the thermal system, through the pressure factors. Future possible uses of the Stirling system dynamic model are discussed. A pair of commercially available 1-kWe Stirling convertors is being purchased by NASA Glenn Research Center. The specifications of those convertors may eventually be incorporated into the dynamic model and analysis compared to the convertor test data. Subsequent potential testing could include integrating the convertors into a pumped liquid metal hot-end interface. This test would provide more data for comparison to the dynamic model analysis.

  16. Stirling System Modeling for Space Nuclear Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.; Johnson, Paul K.

    2007-01-01

    A dynamic model of a high-power Stirling convertor has been developed for space nuclear power systems modeling. The model is based on the Component Test Power Convertor (CTPC), a 12.5-kWe free-piston Stirling convertor. The model includes the fluid heat source, the Stirling convertor, output power and heat rejection. The Stirling convertor model includes the Stirling cycle thermodynamics, heat flow, mechanical mass-spring damper systems, and the linear alternator. The model was validated against test data. Both nonlinear and linear versions of the model were developed. The linear version algebraically couples two separate linear dynamic models; one model of the Stirling cycle and one model of the thermal system, through the pressure factors. Future possible uses of the Stirling system dynamic model are discussed. A pair of commercially available 1-kWe Stirling convertors is being purchased by NASA Glenn Research Center. The specifications of those convertors may eventually be incorporated into the dynamic model and analysis compared to the convertor test data. Subsequent potential testing could include integrating the convertors into a pumped liquid metal hot-end interface. This test would provide more data for comparison to the dynamic model analysis.

  17. NEAR-INFRARED DYES: Probe Development and Applications in Optical Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nolting, Donald D.; Gore, John C.; Pham, Wellington

    2010-01-01

    The recent emergence of optical imaging has brought forth a unique challenge for chemists: development of new biocompatible dyes that fluoresce in the near-infrared (NIR) region for optimal use in biomedical applications. This review describes the synthesis of NIR dyes and the design of probes capable of noninvasively imaging molecular events in small animal models. PMID:21822405

  18. NASA Glenn Wind Tunnel Model Systems Criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, Ronald H.; Roeder, James W.; Stark, David E.; Linne, Alan A.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes criteria for the design, analysis, quality assurance, and documentation of models that are to be tested in the wind tunnel facilities at the NASA Glenn Research Center. This report presents two methods for computing model allowable stresses on the basis of the yield stress or ultimate stress, and it defines project procedures to test models in the NASA Glenn aeropropulsion facilities. Both customer-furnished and in-house model systems are discussed. The functions of the facility personnel and customers are defined. The format for the pretest meetings, safety permit process, and model reviews are outlined. The format for the model systems report (a requirement for each model that is to be tested at NASA Glenn) is described, the engineers responsible for developing the model systems report are listed, and the timetable for its delivery to the project engineer is given.

  19. Systems Modeling in Developmental Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    An individual starts off as a single cell, the progeny of which form complex structures that are themselves integrated into progressively larger systems. Developmental biology is concerned with how this cellular complexity and patterning arises through orchestration of cell divi...

  20. UNCERTAIN SYSTEM MODELING OF SNS RF CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    S. KWON; A. REGAN; ET AL

    2001-06-01

    This paper addresses the modeling problem of the linear accelerator RF system for SNS. The cascade of the klystron and the cavity is modeled as a nominal system. In the real world, high voltage power supply ripple, Lorentz Force Detuning, microphonics, cavity RF parameter perturbations, distortions in RF components, and loop time delay imperfection exist inevitably, which must be analyzed. The analysis is based on the accurate modeling of the disturbances and uncertainties. In this paper, a modern control theory is applied for modeling the disturbances, uncertainties, and for analyzing the closed loop system robust performance.