Science.gov

Sample records for model gas-phase peptide

  1. Structural exploration and Frster theory modeling for the interpretation of gas-phase FRET measurements: Chromophore-grafted amyloid-? peptides.

    PubMed

    Kulesza, Alexander; Daly, Steven; MacAleese, Luke; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe

    2015-07-14

    The distance-dependence of excitation energy transfer, e.g., being described by Frster theory (Frster resonance energy transfer (FRET)), allows the use of optical techniques for the direct observation of structural properties. Recently, this technique has been successfully applied in the gas phase. The detailed interpretation of the experimental FRET results, however, relies on the comparison with structural modeling. We therefore present a complete first-principles modeling approach that explores the gas-phase structure of chromophore-grafted peptides and achieves accurate predictions of FRET efficiencies. We apply the approach to amyloid-? 12-28 fragments, known to be involved in amyloid plaque formation connected to Alzheimer's disease. We sample structures of the peptides that are grafted with 5-carboxyrhodamine 575 (Rh575) and QSY-7 chromophores by means of replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations upon an Amber-type forcefield parametrization as a function of the charge state. The generated ensembles provide chromophore-distance and -orientation distributions which are used with the spectral parameters of the Rh575/QSY-7 chromophores to model FRET-efficiencies for the systems. The theoretical values agree with the experimental average "action"-FRET efficiencies and motivate to use the herein reported parametrization, sampling, and FRET-modeling technique in future studies on the structural properties and aggregation-behavior of related systems. PMID:26178129

  2. Structural exploration and Förster theory modeling for the interpretation of gas-phase FRET measurements: Chromophore-grafted amyloid-β peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulesza, Alexander; Daly, Steven; MacAleese, Luke; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    The distance-dependence of excitation energy transfer, e.g., being described by Förster theory (Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)), allows the use of optical techniques for the direct observation of structural properties. Recently, this technique has been successfully applied in the gas phase. The detailed interpretation of the experimental FRET results, however, relies on the comparison with structural modeling. We therefore present a complete first-principles modeling approach that explores the gas-phase structure of chromophore-grafted peptides and achieves accurate predictions of FRET efficiencies. We apply the approach to amyloid-β 12-28 fragments, known to be involved in amyloid plaque formation connected to Alzheimer's disease. We sample structures of the peptides that are grafted with 5-carboxyrhodamine 575 (Rh575) and QSY-7 chromophores by means of replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations upon an Amber-type forcefield parametrization as a function of the charge state. The generated ensembles provide chromophore-distance and -orientation distributions which are used with the spectral parameters of the Rh575/QSY-7 chromophores to model FRET-efficiencies for the systems. The theoretical values agree with the experimental average "action"-FRET efficiencies and motivate to use the herein reported parametrization, sampling, and FRET-modeling technique in future studies on the structural properties and aggregation-behavior of related systems.

  3. Gas Phase Hydration of Model Peptide Chains: Far/mid Infrared Signature of Water Intermolecular Motions in the Monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirtog, M.; Loquais, Y.; Brenner, V.; Tardivel, B.; Mons, M.; Gloaguen, E.; Rijs, A. M.

    2012-06-01

    The far/mid infrared region (100 - 800 cm-1) of two hydrated conformations of the model peptide chain N-acetyl-phenylalanine-amide (Ac-Phe-NH_2) have been investigated in a supersonic jet expansion by conformational selective double-resonance IR/UV spectroscopy, using the free electron laser FELIX for the far IR tunability. The two folded conformations (identified in a previous work share the same H-bonding network, with the water molecule bridging the peptide ends as a donor and acceptor but differ by the orientation of the free hydrogen. By comparison with the isolated peptide, hydration gives rise to new spectroscopic features locate in three different spectral regions namely around 160, 400 and 600 cm-1. The analysis of a series of quantum chemical harmonic frequency calculations using various approaches (DFT and DFT-D) suggests that this spectral region constitutes a real challenge to the theory. As expected, the low frequency modes present a strong anharmonicity and sensitivity to the position of the water molecule. It has nevertheless allowed us to assign the new experimental signatures to a direct excitation of normal modes widely involving intermolecular libration and wagging motions of the water molecule in the complex, and revealed an extended coupling with the peptide backbone deformation motions. H.S. Biswal, Y. Loquais, B. Tardivel, E. Gloaguen and M. Mons, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 133, 3931 (2011). S. Jaeqx, M. Schmit, W.J. van der Zande, and A.M. Rijs, manuscript in preparation

  4. Gas-Phase Dissociation Pathways of Multiply Charged Peptide Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Jurchen, John C.; Garcia, David E.; Williams, Evan R.

    2005-01-01

    Numerous studies of cluster formation and dissociation have been conducted to determine properties of matter in the transition from the condensed phase to the gas phase using materials as diverse as atomic nuclei, noble gasses, metal clusters, and amino acids. Here, electrospray ionization is used to extend the study of cluster dissociation to peptides including leucine enkephalin with 7–19 monomer units and 2–5 protons, and somatostatin with 5 monomer units and 4 protons under conditions where its intramolecular disulfide bond is either oxidized or reduced. Evaporation of neutral monomers and charge separation by cluster fission are the competing dissociation pathways of both peptides. The dominant fission product for all leucine enkephalin clusters studied is a proton-bound dimer, presumably due to the high gas-phase stability of this species. The branching ratio of the fission and evaporation processes for leucine enkephalin clusters appears to be determined by the value of z2/n for the cluster where z is the charge and n the number of monomer units in the cluster. Clusters with low and high values of z2/n dissociate primarily by evaporation and cluster fission respectively, with a sharp transition between dissociation primarily by evaporation and primarily by fission measured at a z2/n value of ~0.5. The dependence of the dissociation pathway of a cluster on z2/n is similar to the dissociation of atomic nuclei and multiply charged metal clusters indicating that leucine enkephalin peptide clusters exist in a state that is more disordered, and possibly fluid, rather than highly structured in the dissociative transition state. The branching ratio, but not the dissociation pathway of [somatostatin5 + 4H]4+ is altered by the reduction of its internal disulfide bond indicating that monomer conformational flexibility plays a role in peptide cluster dissociation. PMID:14652186

  5. Gas-phase separations of complex tryptic peptide mixtures.

    PubMed

    Taraszka, J A; Counterman, A E; Clemmer, D E

    2001-02-01

    High-resolution ion mobility and time-of-flight mass spectrometry techniques have been used to analyze complex mixtures of peptides generated from tryptic digestion of fourteen common proteins (albumin, bovine, dog, horse, pig, and sheep; aldolase, rabbit; beta-casein, bovine; cytochrome c, horse; beta-lactoglobulin, bovine; myoglobin, horse; hemoglobin, human, pig, rabbit, and sheep). In this approach, ions are separated based on differences in mobilities in helium in a drift tube and on differences in their mass-to-charge ratios in a mass spectrometer. From data recorded for fourteen individual proteins (over a m/z range of 405 to 1,000), we observe 428 peaks, of which 205 are assigned to fragments that are expected from tryptic digestion. In a separate analysis, the fourteen mixtures have been combined and analyzed as one system. In the single dataset, we resolve 260 features and are able to assign 168 peaks to unique peptide sequences. Many other unresolved features are observed. Methods for assigning peptides based on the use of m/z information and existing mobilities or mobilities that are predicted by use of intrinsic size parameters are described. PMID:11293699

  6. Improved machine learning method for analysis of gas phase chemistry of peptides

    PubMed Central

    Gehrke, Allison; Sun, Shaojun; Kurgan, Lukasz; Ahn, Natalie; Resing, Katheryn; Kafadar, Karen; Cios, Krzysztof

    2008-01-01

    Background Accurate peptide identification is important to high-throughput proteomics analyses that use mass spectrometry. Search programs compare fragmentation spectra (MS/MS) of peptides from complex digests with theoretically derived spectra from a database of protein sequences. Improved discrimination is achieved with theoretical spectra that are based on simulating gas phase chemistry of the peptides, but the limited understanding of those processes affects the accuracy of predictions from theoretical spectra. Results We employed a robust data mining strategy using new feature annotation functions of MAE software, which revealed under-prediction of the frequency of occurrence in fragmentation of the second peptide bond. We applied methods of exploratory data analysis to pre-process the information in the MS/MS spectra, including data normalization and attribute selection, to reduce the attributes to a smaller, less correlated set for machine learning studies. We then compared our rule building machine learning program, DataSqueezer, with commonly used association rules and decision tree algorithms. All used machine learning algorithms produced similar results that were consistent with expected properties for a second gas phase mechanism at the second peptide bond. Conclusion The results provide compelling evidence that we have identified underlying chemical properties in the data that suggest the existence of an additional gas phase mechanism for the second peptide bond. Thus, the methods described in this study provide a valuable approach for analyses of this kind in the future. PMID:19055745

  7. Efficient Covalent Bond Formation in Gas-Phase Peptide-Peptide Ion Complexes with the Photoleucine Stapler.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Christopher J; Andrikopoulos, Prokopis C; Řezáč, Jan; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Tureček, František

    2016-04-01

    Noncovalent complexes of hydrophobic peptides GLLLG and GLLLK with photoleucine (L*) tagged peptides G(L* n L m )K (n = 1,3, m = 2,0) were generated as singly charged ions in the gas phase and probed by photodissociation at 355 nm. Carbene intermediates produced by photodissociative loss of N2 from the L* diazirine rings underwent insertion into X-H bonds of the target peptide moiety, forming covalent adducts with yields reaching 30%. Gas-phase sequencing of the covalent adducts revealed preferred bond formation at the C-terminal residue of the target peptide. Site-selective carbene insertion was achieved by placing the L* residue in different positions along the photopeptide chain, and the residues in the target peptide undergoing carbene insertion were identified by gas-phase ion sequencing that was aided by specific (13)C labeling. Density functional theory calculations indicated that noncovalent binding to GL*L*L*K resulted in substantial changes of the (GLLLK + H)(+) ground state conformation. The peptide moieties in [GL*L*LK + GLLLK + H](+) ion complexes were held together by hydrogen bonds, whereas dispersion interactions of the nonpolar groups were only secondary in ground-state 0 K structures. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for 100 ps trajectories of several different conformers at the 310 K laboratory temperature showed that noncovalent complexes developed multiple, residue-specific contacts between the diazirine carbons and GLLLK residues. The calculations pointed to the substantial fluidity of the nonpolar side chains in the complexes. Diazirine photochemistry in combination with Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics is a promising tool for investigations of peptide-peptide ion interactions in the gas phase. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26817657

  8. Resonance Energy Transfer Relates the Gas-Phase Structure and Pharmacological Activity of Opioid Peptides.

    PubMed

    Kopysov, Vladimir; Boyarkin, Oleg V

    2016-01-11

    Enkephalins are efficient pain-relief drugs that bind to transmembrane opioid receptors. One key structural parameter that governs the pharmacological activity of these opioid peptides and is typically determined from condensed-phase structures is the distance between the aromatic rings of their Tyr and Phe residues. We use resonance energy transfer, detected by a combination of cold ion spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, to estimate the Tyr-Phe spacing for enkephalins in the gas phase. In contrast to the condensed-phase structures, these distances appear to differ substantially in enkephalins with different pharmacological efficiencies, suggesting that gas-phase structures might be a better pharmacophoric metric for ligand peptides. PMID:26783061

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulation for the Dynamics and Kinetics of Folding Peptides in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Litinas, Iraklis; Koutselos, Andreas D

    2015-12-31

    The conformations of flexible molecular species, such as oligomers and oligopeptides, and their interconversion in the gas phase have been probed by ion mobility spectrometry measurements. The ion motion is interpreted through the calculation of effective cross sections in the case of stable conformations of the macromolecules. However, when the molecular structures transform to each other as the ions collide with gas atoms during their flight through the drift tube, the introduction of an average cross section is required. To provide a direct way for the reproduction of the ion motion, we employ a nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation method and consider a molecular model that consists of two connected stiff cylindrical bodies interacting through an intramolecular model potential. With this procedure we have calculated the ion mobility as a function of temperature for a prototype peptide that converts between a helical and an extended globular form. The results are in good agreement with ion mobility spectrometry data confirming that an angular vibration coordinate can be used for the interpretation of the shifting of the drift-time distributions at high temperatures. The approach produces mean kinetic energies as well as various combined distributions of the ion degrees of freedom. It is easily applied to flexible macromolecular ions and can be extended to include additional degrees of freedom. PMID:26641107

  10. Going clean: structure and dynamics of peptides in the gas phase and paths to solvation.

    PubMed

    Baldauf, Carsten; Rossi, Mariana

    2015-12-16

    The gas phase is an artificial environment for biomolecules that has gained much attention both experimentally and theoretically due to its unique characteristic of providing a clean room environment for the comparison between theory and experiment. In this review we give an overview mainly on first-principles simulations of isolated peptides and the initial steps of their interactions with ions and solvent molecules: a bottom up approach to the complexity of biological environments. We focus on the accuracy of different methods to explore the conformational space, the connections between theory and experiment regarding collision cross section evaluations and (anharmonic) vibrational spectra, and the challenges faced in this field. PMID:26598600

  11. Going clean: structure and dynamics of peptides in the gas phase and paths to solvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldauf, Carsten; Rossi, Mariana

    2015-12-01

    The gas phase is an artificial environment for biomolecules that has gained much attention both experimentally and theoretically due to its unique characteristic of providing a clean room environment for the comparison between theory and experiment. In this review we give an overview mainly on first-principles simulations of isolated peptides and the initial steps of their interactions with ions and solvent molecules: a bottom up approach to the complexity of biological environments. We focus on the accuracy of different methods to explore the conformational space, the connections between theory and experiment regarding collision cross section evaluations and (anharmonic) vibrational spectra, and the challenges faced in this field.

  12. Reagent Cluster Anions for Multiple Gas-Phase Covalent Modifications of Peptide and Protein Cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, Boone M.; Stutzman, John R.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2013-07-01

    Multiple gas phase ion/ion covalent modifications of peptide and protein ions are demonstrated using cluster-type reagent anions of N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide acetate (sulfo-NHS acetate) and 2-formyl-benzenesulfonic acid (FBMSA). These reagents are used to selectively modify unprotonated primary amine functionalities of peptides and proteins. Multiple reactive reagent molecules can be present in a single cluster ion, which allows for multiple covalent modifications to be achieved in a single ion/ion encounter and at the `cost' of only a single analyte charge. Multiple derivatizations are demonstrated when the number of available reactive sites on the analyte cation exceeds the number of reagent molecules in the anionic cluster (e.g., data shown here for reactions between the polypeptide [K10 + 3H]3+ and the reagent cluster [5R5Na - Na]-). This type of gas-phase ion chemistry is also applicable to whole protein ions. Here, ubiquitin was successfully modified using an FBMSA cluster anion which, upon collisional activation, produced fragment ions with various numbers of modifications. Data for the pentamer cluster are included as illustrative of the results obtained for the clusters comprised of two to six reagent molecules.

  13. Multiscale Aspects of Modeling Gas-Phase Nanoparticle Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Buesser, B.; Gröhn, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol reactors are utilized to manufacture nanoparticles in industrially relevant quantities. The development, understanding and scale-up of aerosol reactors can be facilitated with models and computer simulations. This review aims to provide an overview of recent developments of models and simulations and discuss their interconnection in a multiscale approach. A short introduction of the various aerosol reactor types and gas-phase particle dynamics is presented as a background for the later discussion of the models and simulations. Models are presented with decreasing time and length scales in sections on continuum, mesoscale, molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics models. PMID:23729992

  14. Gas-Phase Chemical Models of Interstellar Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ho-Hsin

    A large gas-phase chemical model of interstellar molecular clouds containing almost 4,000 gas-phase reactions involving 409 species are developed. The calculated results are in excellent agreement with observed abundances in TMC1. The effects of rapid neutral-neutral reactions in the gas phase on the synthesis of complex species is studied via a series of model calculations. Reactions between O or N atoms and carbon clusters C n are critical in hindering the synthesis of complex species. Neutral-neutral reactions involving molecular hydrogen (HAARs) are shown to aid molecular synthesis. Bistability in large gas-phase chemical networks of dense clouds is examined. The dependence of bistability on the parameter ζn H for a wide range of elemental depletions is investigated. We confirm that bistability can exist at steady-state for a range of ζn H, and the range of bistability is dependent on elemental depletions and networks utilized. The steady-state results for a variety of molecules in both the HIP and LIP solutions at a high density near 3 104 cm-3 with a standard cosmic ionization rate are also present. A model of time-dependent gas-phase chemistry in a spatially inhomogeneous cloud which is exposed on one side to an isotropic radiation field is presented. Shielding due to H2, CO and dust particles are fully considered. The cloud hydrogen number density is a function of cloud depth varying as (1-cr)-2 where r is the depth into the cloud. The cloud temperature is kept constant at 30 K. The cloud is divided into 43 slabs, which are defined so that the photodissociation rate of CO is halved as one proceeds to the next slab. Models with three different sets of initial conditions regarding hydrogen are presented here. The first model starts with atomic hydrogen in all slabs, the second starts with molecular hydrogen, and the third utilizes an H/H2 fraction with larger value in the outer slabs. The fractional abundance profiles and integrated column densities for selected species as functions of cloud depth at different times are discussed. A comparison between fractional abundances with observations in TMC1 is given. Total integrated column densities obtained via a weighting procedure are designed for unresolved distant sources.

  15. Nonstatistical UV Fragmentation of Gas-Phase Peptides Reveals Conformers and Their Structural Features.

    PubMed

    Kopysov, Vladimir; Makarov, Alexander; Boyarkin, Oleg V

    2016-03-17

    Solving the 3D structure of a biomolecule requires recognition of its conformers and measurements of their individual structural identities, which can be compared with calculations. We employ the phenomenon of nonstatistical photofragmentation, detected by a combination of UV cold ion spectroscopy and high-resolution mass spectrometry, to identify the main conformers of gas-phase peptides and to recover individual UV absorption and mass spectra of all of these conformers in a single laser scan. We first validate this approach with a benchmark dipeptide, Tyr-Ala, and then apply it to a decapeptide, gramicidin S. The revealed characteristic structural difference between the conformers of the latter identifies some of the previously calculated structures of gramicidin S as the most likely geometries of its remaining unsolved conformer. PMID:26950179

  16. On the Zwitterionic Nature of Gas-Phase Peptides and Protein Ions

    PubMed Central

    Marchese, Roberto; Grandori, Rita; Carloni, Paolo; Raugei, Simone

    2010-01-01

    Determining the total number of charged residues corresponding to a given value of net charge for peptides and proteins in gas phase is crucial for the interpretation of mass-spectrometry data, yet it is far from being understood. Here we show that a novel computational protocol based on force field and massive density functional calculations is able to reproduce the experimental facets of well investigated systems, such as angiotensin II, bradykinin, and tryptophan-cage. The protocol takes into account all of the possible protomers compatible with a given charge state. Our calculations predict that the low charge states are zwitterions, because the stabilization due to intramolecular hydrogen bonding and salt-bridges can compensate for the thermodynamic penalty deriving from deprotonation of acid residues. In contrast, high charge states may or may not be zwitterions because internal solvation might not compensate for the energy cost of charge separation. PMID:20463874

  17. Probing the Gas Phase Folding Kinetics of Peptide Ions by IR Activated DR-ECD

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng; Cournoyer, Jason J.; OConnor, Peter B.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of infrared (IR) irradiation on the electron capture dissociation (ECD) fragmentation pattern of peptide ions was investigated. IR heating increases the internal energy of the precursor ion, which often amplifies secondary fragmentation, resulting in the formation of w-type ions as well as other secondary fragments. Improved sequence coverage was observed with IR irradiation before ECD, likely due to the increased conformational heterogeneity upon IR heating, rather than faster breakdown of the initially formed product ion complex, as IR heating after ECD did not have similar effect. Although the ECD fragment ion yield of peptide ions does not typically increase with IR heating, in double resonance (DR) ECD experiments, fragment ion yield may be reduced by fast resonant ejection of the charge reduced molecular species, and becomes dependent on the folding state of the precursor ion. In this work, the fragment ion yield was monitored as a function of the delay between IR irradiation and the DR-ECD event to study the gas phase folding kinetics of the peptide ions. Furthermore, the degree of intra-complex hydrogen transfer of the ECD fragment ion pair was used to probe the folding state of the precursor ion. Both methods gave similar refolding time constants of ~1.5 s?1, revealing that gaseous peptide ions often refold in less than a second, much faster than their protein counterparts. It was also found from the IR-DR-ECD study that the intra-molecular H transfer rate can be an order of magnitude higher than that of the separation of the long-lived c/z product ion complexes, explaining the common observation of c and z type ions in ECD experiments. PMID:18400512

  18. Probing secondary structures of peptide chains using gas phase laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mons, Michel

    2006-03-01

    A bottom-up approach involving conformer-specific IR studies of short peptide sequences enables us to map the intramolecular interactions that shape the peptide backbone, in particular those H-bonds that are responsible for stability and formation of secondary structures in proteins, like turns or helices. The combination of laser-desorption of solid samples coupled to the efficient cooling in a supersonic expansion makes it possible to isolate in the gas phase the lowest conformations of the energy landscape of small flexible biomolecules. The low temperature achieved enables spectroscopists to record UV spectra in which the contribution of each conformer populated can be distinguished and the corresponding conformation identified using IR/UV double resonance spectroscopy. Data collected are directly comparable to the best quantum chemistry calculations on these species and therefore constitute a severe test for the theoretical methods used. It will be shown how investigation of sequences with an increasing number of building blocks permits to deduce the robust structural trends of a peptide backbone: i) local conformational preference of the backbone in one-residue chains, ii) in capped dipeptides, the competition between a succession of local conformational preferences and overall folded structures, in which a different type of H-bonding scheme, involving distant H-bonding sites along the backbone, takes place: in particular beta-turns, the secondary structure responsible for chain reversals, and finally iii) evidence for the spontaneous helical folding (short 3-10 helix) of three-residue chains will be presented, illustrating the relative weakness of the H-bonding in these molecular assemblies.

  19. Gas-Phase Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Labeling of Select Peptide Ion Conformer Types: a Per-Residue Kinetics Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Tafreshian, Amirmahdi; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2015-07-01

    The per-residue, gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX) kinetics for individual amino acid residues on selected ion conformer types of the model peptide KKDDDDDIIKIIK have been examined using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and HDX-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques. The [M + 4H]4+ ions exhibit two major conformer types with collision cross sections of 418 Å2 and 446 Å2; the [M + 3H]3+ ions also yield two different conformer types having collision cross sections of 340 Å2 and 367 Å2. Kinetics plots of HDX for individual amino acid residues reveal fast- and slow-exchanging hydrogens. The contributions of each amino acid residue to the overall conformer type rate constant have been estimated. For this peptide, N- and C-terminal K residues exhibit the greatest contributions for all ion conformer types. Interior D and I residues show decreased contributions. Several charge state trends are observed. On average, the D residues of the [M + 3H]3+ ions show faster HDX rate contributions compared with [M + 4H]4+ ions. In contrast the interior I8 and I9 residues show increased accessibility to exchange for the more elongated [M + 4H]4+ ion conformer type. The contribution of each residue to the overall uptake rate showed a good correlation with a residue hydrogen accessibility score model calculated using a distance from charge site and initial incorporation site for nominal structures obtained from molecular dynamic simulations (MDS).

  20. Gas-phase ion/ion reactions of peptides and proteins: acid/base, redox, and covalent chemistries

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Boone M.

    2013-01-01

    Gas-phase ion/ion reactions are emerging as useful and flexible means for the manipulation and characterization of peptide and protein biopolymers. Acid/base-like chemical reactions (i.e., proton transfer reactions) and reduction/oxidation (redox) reactions (i.e., electron transfer reactions) represent relatively mature classes of gas-phase chemical reactions. Even so, especially in regards to redox chemistry, the widespread utility of these two types of chemistries is undergoing rapid growth and development. Additionally, a relatively new class of gas-phase ion/ion transformations is emerging which involves the selective formation of functional-group-specific covalent bonds. This feature details our current work and perspective on the developments and current capabilities of these three areas of ion/ion chemistry with an eye towards possible future directions of the field. PMID:23257901

  1. Formation of gas-phase peptide ions and their dissociation in MALDI: insights from kinetic and ion yield studies.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jeong Hee; Yoon, Sohee; Bae, Yong Jin; Kim, Myung Soo

    2015-01-01

    Insights on mechanisms for the generation of gas-phase peptide ions and their dissociation in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) gained from the kinetic and ion yield studies are presented. Even though the time-resolved photodissociation technique was initially used to determine the dissociation kinetics of peptide ions and their effective temperature, it was replaced by a simpler method utilizing dissociation yields from in-source decay (ISD) and post-source decay (PSD). The ion yields for a matrix and a peptide were measured by repeatedly irradiating a region on a sample and collecting ion signals until the sample in the region was completely depleted. Matrix- and peptide-derived gas-phase cations were found to be generated by pre-formed ion emission or by ion-pair emission followed by anion loss, but not by laser-induced ionization. The total number of ions, that is, matrix plus peptide, was found to be equal to the number of ions emitted from a pure matrix. A matrix plume was found to cool as it expanded, from around 800-1,000?K to 400-500?K. Dissociation of peptide ions along b/y channels was found to occur statistically, that is, following RRKM behavior. Small critical energy (E0 ?=?0.6-0.7?eV) and highly negative critical entropy (?S() ?=?-30 to -25?eu) suggested that the transition structure was stabilized by multiple intramolecular interactions. PMID:24863621

  2. Electron Transfer versus Proton Transfer in Gas-Phase Ion/Ion Reactions of Polyprotonated Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Gunawardena, Harsha P.; He, Min; Chrisman, Paul A.; Pitteri, Sharon J.; Hogan, Jason M.; Hodges, Brittany D. M.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2005-01-01

    The ion/ion reactions of several dozen reagent anions with triply protonated cations of the model peptide KGAILKGAILR have been examined to evaluate predictions of a LandauZener-based model for the likelihood for electron transfer. Evidence for electron transfer was provided by the appearance of fragment ions unique to electron transfer or electron capture dissociation. Proton transfer and electron transfer are competitive processes for any combination of anionic and cationic reactants. For reagent anions in reactions with protonated peptides, proton transfer is usually significantly more exothermic than electron transfer. If charge transfer occurs at relatively long distances, electron transfer should, therefore, be favored on kinetic grounds because the reactant and product channels cross at greater distances, provided conditions are favorable for electron transfer at the crossing point. The results are consistent with a model based on LandauZener theory that indicates both thermodynamic and geometric criteria apply for electron transfer involving polyatomic anions. Both the model and the data suggest that electron affinities associated with the anionic reagents greater than about 6070 kcal/mol minimize the likelihood that electron transfer will be observed. Provided the electron affinity is not too high, the FranckCondon factors associated with the anion and its corresponding neutral must not be too low. When one or the other of these criteria is not met, proton transfer tends to occur essentially exclusively. Experiments involving ion/ion attachment products also suggest that a significant barrier exists to the isomerization between chemical complexes that, if formed, lead to either proton transfer or electron transfer. PMID:16144411

  3. Using Gas-Phase Guest-Host Chemistry to Probe the Structures of b Ions of Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyi, rpd; Harrison, Alex G.; Paizs, Bla

    2012-12-01

    Middle-sized b n ( n ? 5) fragments of protonated peptides undergo selective complex formation with ammonia under experimental conditions typically used to probe hydrogen-deuterium exchange in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). Other usual peptide fragments like y, a, a*, etc., and small b n ( n ? 4) fragments do not form stable ammonia adducts. We propose that complex formation of b n ions with ammonia is characteristic to macrocyclic isomers of these fragments. Experiments on a protonated cyclic peptide and N-terminal acetylated peptides fully support this hypothesis; the protonated cyclic peptide does form ammonia adducts while linear b n ions of acetylated peptides do not undergo complexation. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations on the proton-bound dimers of all-Ala b 4 , b 5 , and b 7 ions and ammonia indicate that the ionizing proton initially located on the peptide fragment transfers to ammonia upon adduct formation. The ammonium ion is then solvated by N+-HO H-bonds; this stabilization is much stronger for macrocyclic b n isomers due to the stable cage-like structure formed and entropy effects. The present study demonstrates that gas-phase guest-host chemistry can be used to selectively probe structural features (i.e., macrocyclic or linear) of fragments of protonated peptides. Stable ammonia adducts of b 9 , b 9 -A, and b 9 -2A of A8YA, and b 13 of A20YVFL are observed indicating that even these large b-type ions form macrocyclic structures.

  4. The gas-phase thermal chemistry of tetralin and related model systems

    SciTech Connect

    Malandra, J.

    1993-05-01

    The thesis is divided into 5 papers: gas-phase thermal decomposition of tetralin; flash vacuum pyrolysis of 3-benzocycloheptenone and 1,3, 4,5-tetrahydro-2-benzothiepin-2,2-dioxide (model systems for gas-phase pyrolysis of tetralin); high-temperature gas-phase reactions of o-allylbenzyl radicals generated by flash vacuum pyrolysis of is(o-allylbenzyl) oxalate; flash vacuum pyrolysis of 1,4-diphenylbutane; and flash vacuum pyrolysis of o-allyltoluene, o-(3-butenyl)toluene and o-(pentenyl)toluene were also used.

  5. High-sensitivity gas phase sequence analysis of proteins and peptides on PVDF membranes using short cycle times.

    PubMed

    Reim, D F; Speicher, D W

    1993-10-01

    An optimized sequencer program with a cycle time of 38 min which is specifically tailored for analysis using polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membranes has been developed. The program was developed using a pulsed liquid-phase instrument which was converted to gas-phase acid delivery. Gas-phase acid delivery minimized sample extraction from PVDF membranes and improved tryptophan yields in at least some cases. Other modifications which contributed to reliable high sensitivity sequencer performance included use of a Blott cartridge, substitution of ethyl acetate:heptane (1:1, v/v) instead of butyl chloride as the extraction solvent, use of a modified 100-microliters injection loop with an internal restrictor to reliably inject nearly 90% of the sample, and an HPLC gradient which resolved tryptophan from diphenylurea. These shortened cycle times were achieved at the conventional gas-phase reaction temperature. A slight increase in lag or carryover at prolines was compensated by reduced background from nonspecific acid cleavage which facilitated extended and/or high sensitivity sequencing of large proteins. Reproducible high initial and repetitive cycle yields were obtained with a wide range of experimental peptides which were electroblotted from either 1D or 2D polyacrylamide gels onto high retention PVDF membranes. Initial yields of the majority of the experimental samples analyzed with this program were less than 5 pmol. In addition, most samples with initial yields below 1-2 pmol yielded sufficient sequence information to identify the protein by comparison to protein sequence data-bases or to design oligonucleotide probes. PMID:8250259

  6. Fragmentation mechanism of UV-excited peptides in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Zabuga, Aleksandra V. Kamrath, Michael Z.; Boyarkin, Oleg V.; Rizzo, Thomas R.

    2014-10-21

    We present evidence that following near-UV excitation, protonated tyrosine- or phenylalanine–containing peptides undergo intersystem crossing to produce a triplet species. This pathway competes with direct dissociation from the excited electronic state and with dissociation from the electronic ground state subsequent to internal conversion. We employ UV-IR double-resonance photofragment spectroscopy to record conformer-specific vibrational spectra of cold peptides pre-excited to their S{sub 1} electronic state. The absorption of tunable IR light by these electronically excited peptides leads to a drastic increase in fragmentation, selectively enhancing the loss of neutral phenylalanine or tyrosine side-chain, which are not the lowest dissociation channels in the ground electronic state. The recorded IR spectra evolve upon increasing the time delay between the UV and IR pulses, reflecting the dynamics of the intersystem crossing on a timescale of ∼80 ns and <10 ns for phenylalanine- and tyrosine-containing peptides, respectively. Once in the triplet state, phenylalanine-containing peptides may live for more than 100 ms, unless they absorb IR photons and undergo dissociation by the loss of an aromatic side-chain. We discuss the mechanism of this fragmentation channel and its possible implications for photofragment spectroscopy and peptide photostability.

  7. Liquid hot NAGMA cooled to 0.4 K: benchmark thermochemistry of a gas-phase peptide.

    PubMed

    Leavitt, Christopher M; Moore, Kevin B; Raston, Paul L; Agarwal, Jay; Moody, Grant H; Shirley, Caitlyne C; Schaefer, Henry F; Douberly, Gary E

    2014-10-16

    Vibrational spectroscopy and helium nanodroplet isolation are used to determine the gas-phase thermochemistry for isomerization between conformations of the model dipeptide, N-acetylglycine methylamide (NAGMA). A two-stage oven source is implemented to produce a gas-phase equilibrium distribution of NAGMA conformers, which is preserved when individual molecules are captured and cooled to 0.4 K by He nanodroplets. With polarization spectroscopy, the IR spectrum in the NH stretch region is assigned to a mixture of two conformers having intramolecular hydrogen bonds composed of either five- or seven-membered rings, C5 and C7, respectively. The C5 to C7 interconversion enthalpy and entropy, obtained from a van't Hoff analysis, are -4.52 0.12 kJ/mol and -12.4 0.2 J/(mol K), respectively. The experimental thermochemistry is compared to high-level electronic structure theory computations. PMID:25244309

  8. Electronic Relaxation of the Phenylalanine Residue in Gas Phase Peptides: Role of the Neighbouring Amide Groups in the Photophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loquais, Y.; Biswal, H. S.; Tardivel, B.; Brenner, V.; Mons, M.; Gloaguen, E.; Jouvet, C.; Broquier, M.; Malis, M.; Ljubic, I.; Doslic, N.

    2012-06-01

    Protein absorption in the near UV is mainly due to the presence of aromatic systems on the side chain of three residues: phenylalanine, tryptophan and tyrosine. It is generally expected that the photophysics of these UV chromophores depends on their immediate environment within the molecule and thus on the conformation of these flexible molecules. This property may in particular be used as an optical diagnostic of the conformational state of the peptide chain. The structure of peptide chains isolated in the gas phase can be characterized by UV and IR laser spectroscopy. These measurements allow us to distinguish the spectral contributions of the different conformers and thus provide us with an elegant way to address the issue of the conformational dependence on the photophysics. For this purpose, the dynamics of relaxation of the ??* excited state of several peptides containing a phenylalanine residue have been studied using two-colour resonant two-photon ionization (2C-R2PI) in the ns time scale at CEA and ps at CLUPS and laser-induced fluorescence as well. The lifetime of the ??* excited state is found to strongly depend on the conformation adopted by the molecule and on the excess energy in the excited state, with measured lifetimes ranging from 1 ns to 80 ns. W. Chin; F. Piuzzi; I. Dimicoli and M. Mons, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 8, pp 1033-1048 (2006)

  9. Gas-Phase Structure of Amyloid-β (12 - 28) Peptide Investigated by Infrared Spectroscopy, Electron Capture Dissociation and Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Thi Nga; Poully, Jean Christophe; Lecomte, Frédéric; Nieuwjaer, Nicolas; Manil, Bruno; Desfrançois, Charles; Chirot, Fabien; Lemoine, Jerome; Dugourd, Philippe; van der Rest, Guillaume; Grégoire, Gilles

    2013-12-01

    The gas-phase structures of doubly and triply protonated Amyloid-β12-28 peptides have been investigated through the combination of ion mobility (IM), electron capture dissociation (ECD) mass spectrometry, and infrared multi-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy together with theoretical modeling. Replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to explore the conformational space of these protonated peptides, from which several classes of structures were found. Among the low-lying conformers, those with predicted diffusion cross-sections consistent with the ion mobility experiment were further selected and their IR spectra simulated using a hybrid quantum mechanical/semiempirical method at the ONIOM DFT/B3LYP/6-31 g(d)/AM1 level. In ECD mass spectrometry, the c/z product ion abundance (PIA) has been analyzed for the two charge states and revealed drastic differences. For the doubly protonated species, N - Cα bond cleavage occurs only on the N and C terminal parts, while a periodic distribution of PIA is clearly observed for the triply charged peptides. These PIA distributions have been rationalized by comparison with the inverse of the distances from the protonated sites to the carbonyl oxygens for the conformations suggested from IR and IM experiments. Structural assignment for the amyloid peptide is then made possible by the combination of these three experimental techniques that provide complementary information on the possible secondary structure adopted by peptides. Although globular conformations are favored for the doubly protonated peptide, incrementing the charge state leads to a conformational transition towards extended structures with 310- and α-helix motifs.

  10. Assessment of amide I spectroscopic maps for a gas-phase peptide using IR-UV double-resonance spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, J. K.; Roy, S.; Skinner, J. L.; Zabuga, A. V.; Rizzo, T. R.

    2014-06-14

    The spectroscopy of amide I vibrations has become a powerful tool for exploring protein structure and dynamics. To help with spectral interpretation, it is often useful to perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To connect spectroscopic experiments to simulations in an efficient manner, several researchers have proposed maps, which relate observables in classical MD simulations to quantum spectroscopic variables. It can be difficult to discern whether errors in the theoretical results (compared to experiment) arise from inaccuracies in the MD trajectories or in the maps themselves. In this work, we evaluate spectroscopic maps independently from MD simulations by comparing experimental and theoretical spectra for a single conformation of the ?-helical model peptide Ac-Phe-(Ala){sub 5}-Lys-H{sup +} in the gas phase. Conformation-specific experimental spectra are obtained for the unlabeled peptide and for several singly and doubly {sup 13}C-labeled variants using infrared-ultraviolet double-resonance spectroscopy, and these spectra are found to be well-modeled by density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G** level. We then compare DFT results for the deuterated and {sup 13}C{sup 18}O-labeled peptide with those from spectroscopic maps developed and used previously by the Skinner group. We find that the maps are typically accurate to within a few cm{sup ?1} for both frequencies and couplings, having larger errors only for the frequencies of terminal amides.

  11. Assessment of amide I spectroscopic maps for a gas-phase peptide using IR-UV double-resonance spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, J. K.; Zabuga, A. V.; Roy, S.; Rizzo, T. R.; Skinner, J. L.

    2014-06-01

    The spectroscopy of amide I vibrations has become a powerful tool for exploring protein structure and dynamics. To help with spectral interpretation, it is often useful to perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To connect spectroscopic experiments to simulations in an efficient manner, several researchers have proposed "maps," which relate observables in classical MD simulations to quantum spectroscopic variables. It can be difficult to discern whether errors in the theoretical results (compared to experiment) arise from inaccuracies in the MD trajectories or in the maps themselves. In this work, we evaluate spectroscopic maps independently from MD simulations by comparing experimental and theoretical spectra for a single conformation of the ?-helical model peptide Ac-Phe-(Ala)5-Lys-H+ in the gas phase. Conformation-specific experimental spectra are obtained for the unlabeled peptide and for several singly and doubly 13C-labeled variants using infrared-ultraviolet double-resonance spectroscopy, and these spectra are found to be well-modeled by density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G** level. We then compare DFT results for the deuterated and 13C18O-labeled peptide with those from spectroscopic maps developed and used previously by the Skinner group. We find that the maps are typically accurate to within a few cm-1 for both frequencies and couplings, having larger errors only for the frequencies of terminal amides.

  12. R vs. S fluoroproline ring substitution: trans/cis effects on the formation of b2 ions in gas-phase peptide fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Matthew C; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Wysocki, Vicki H

    2016-01-21

    The b2 structures of model systems Xxx-Flp-Ala (Flp = 4R-fluoroproline) and Xxx-flp-Ala (flp = 4S-fluoroproline) (where Xxx is Val or Tyr) were studied by action IRMPD spectroscopy. Proline ring substitutions influence the trans/cis isomerization of the precursor ion, resulting in different b2 fragment ion structures by collision induced dissociation. Vibrational spectra of the b2 ions of Val-Flp and Val-flp exhibit highly intense bands at ~1970 cm(-1), revealing that the dominant ion in each case is an oxazolone. The major difference between the spectra of b2 ions for R vs. S fluoroproline is a collection of peaks at 1690 and 1750 cm(-1), characteristic of a diketopiperazine structure, which were only present in the 4S-fluoroproline (flp) cases. This suggests only one b2 ion structure (oxazolone) is being formed for Flp-containing peptides, whereas flp-containing peptides produce a mixture of a dominant oxazolone with a lower population of diketopiperazine. In solution, Flp is known to possess a higher trans percentage in the N-terminally adjacent peptide bond, with flp inducing a greater proportion of the cis conformation. The diketopiperazine formation observed here correlates directly with the Ktrans/cis trend previously shown in solution, highlighting that the trans/cis isomerization likelihood for proline residues modified in the 4(th) position is retained in the gas-phase. PMID:26690386

  13. Peptide salt bridge stability: from gas phase via microhydration to bulk water simulations.

    PubMed

    Pluha?ov, Eva; Marsalek, Ondrej; Schmidt, Burkhard; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2012-11-14

    The salt bridge formation and stability in the terminated lysine-glutamate dipeptide is investigated in water clusters of increasing size up to the limit of bulk water. Proton transfer dynamics between the acidic and basic side chains is described by DFT-based Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations. While the desolvated peptide prefers to be in its neutral state, already the addition of a single water molecule can trigger proton transfer from the glutamate side chain to the lysine side chain, leading to a zwitterionic salt bridge state. Upon adding more water molecules we find that stabilization of the zwitterionic state critically depends on the number of hydrogen bonds between side chain termini, the water molecules, and the peptidic backbone. Employing classical molecular dynamics simulations for larger clusters, we observed that the salt bridge is weakened upon additional hydration. Consequently, long-lived solvent shared ion pairs are observed for about 30 water molecules while solvent separated ion pairs are found when at least 40 or more water molecules hydrate the dipeptide. These results have implications for the formation and stability of salt bridges at partially dehydrated surfaces of aqueous proteins. PMID:23163393

  14. Peptide salt bridge stability: From gas phase via microhydration to bulk water simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluha?ov, Eva; Marsalek, Ondrej; Schmidt, Burkhard; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2012-11-01

    The salt bridge formation and stability in the terminated lysine-glutamate dipeptide is investigated in water clusters of increasing size up to the limit of bulk water. Proton transfer dynamics between the acidic and basic side chains is described by DFT-based Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations. While the desolvated peptide prefers to be in its neutral state, already the addition of a single water molecule can trigger proton transfer from the glutamate side chain to the lysine side chain, leading to a zwitterionic salt bridge state. Upon adding more water molecules we find that stabilization of the zwitterionic state critically depends on the number of hydrogen bonds between side chain termini, the water molecules, and the peptidic backbone. Employing classical molecular dynamics simulations for larger clusters, we observed that the salt bridge is weakened upon additional hydration. Consequently, long-lived solvent shared ion pairs are observed for about 30 water molecules while solvent separated ion pairs are found when at least 40 or more water molecules hydrate the dipeptide. These results have implications for the formation and stability of salt bridges at partially dehydrated surfaces of aqueous proteins.

  15. METHODS FOR SIMULATING GAS PHASE SO2 OXIDATION IN ATMOSPHERIC MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two different approaches are presented for simulating gas phase sulfur dioxide oxidation in atmospheric models. The first approach was to develop an empirical relationship based on rate data collected at four coal-fired power plants during 11 separate studies. Cosine functions we...

  16. Combining UV photodissociation action spectroscopy with electron transfer dissociation for structure analysis of gas-phase peptide cation-radicals.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Christopher J; Pepin, Robert; Ture?ek, Frantiek

    2015-12-01

    We report the first example of using ultraviolet (UV) photodissociation action spectroscopy for the investigation of gas-phase peptide cation-radicals produced by electron transfer dissociation. z-Type fragment ions (?) Gly-Gly-Lys(+) , coordinated to 18-crown-6-ether (CE), are generated, selected by mass and photodissociated in the 200-400?nm region. The UVPD action spectra indicate the presence of valence-bond isomers differing in the position of the C? radical defect, (?-Gly)-Gly-Lys(+) (CE), Gly-(?-Gly)-Lys(+) (CE) and Gly-Gly-(?-Lys(+) )(CE). The isomers are readily distinguishable by UV absorption spectra obtained by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations. In contrast, conformational isomers of these radical types are calculated to have similar UV spectra. UV photodissociation action spectroscopy represents a new tool for the investigation of transient intermediates of ion-electron reactions. Specifically, z-type cation radicals are shown to undergo spontaneous hydrogen atom migrations upon electron transfer dissociation. Copyright 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26634979

  17. Liquid Gas Phase Transition for Asymmetric Nuclear Matter in the Zimanyi Moszkowski Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu-Ming; Qian, Wei-Liang; Su, Ru-Keng

    2004-07-01

    By using the improved Zimanyi-Moszkowski (ZM) model including the freedom of nucleons, sigma mesons, omega mesons and rho mesons, we investigate the liquid-gas phase transition for asymmetric nuclear matter. It is found that the phase transition for asymmetric nuclear matter in the improved ZM model with the isospin vector rho meson degree of freedom is well defined. The binodal surface, which is essential in the study of the phase transition process, is addressed.

  18. Dissociation Behavior of Tryptic and Intramolecular Disulfide-linked Peptide Ions Modified in the Gas Phase via Ion/Ion Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Stutzman, John R.; Hassell, Kerry M.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    Protonated tryptic peptides, somatostatin-14, and oxytocin have been subjected to reactions with doubly deprotonated 4-formyl-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid (FBDSA) in the gas phase. The major product is a negatively-charged complex comprised of the peptide and the reagent. Upon dehydration of the complex, all peptides show evidence for Schiff base formation involving a primary amine of the peptide. Some peptides also show evidence for the formation of a relatively strong electrostatic interaction without Schiff base formation (i.e., a mixture of isomeric precursor ions is generated upon dehydration of the complex). Ion trap collision-induced dissociation of the dehydration products from all peptides examined gave distinct product ion spectra relative to the deprotonated and protonated forms of the peptides. The distinct behavior of the modified ions is attributed to the highly stable charge carrying sulfonate group, which tends to inhibit intramolecular proton transfer in negatively charged species. Modified anions of the peptides with an intramolecular disulfide linkage show evidence for cleavage of both the disulfide linkage and an amide bond in the loop defined by the disulfide bond. Modification of protonated peptides via charge inversion with FBDSA is a useful means for generating novel and distinct ion-types that can provide complementary structural information upon subsequent activation to that obtained from dissociation of protonated or deprotonated forms of the peptide. PMID:22408389

  19. Gas-Phase Reactivity of Peptide Thiyl (RS), Perthiyl (RSS), and Sulfinyl (RSO) Radical Ions Formed from Atmospheric Pressure Ion/Radical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Lei; Xia, Yu

    2013-04-01

    In this study, we demonstrated the formation of gas-phase peptide perthiyl (RSS) and thiyl (RS) radical ions besides sulfinyl radical (RSO) ions from atmospheric pressure (AP) ion/radical reactions of peptides containing inter-chain disulfide bonds. The identity of perthiyl radical was verified from characteristic 65 Da (SSH) loss in collision-induced dissociation (CID). This signature loss was further used to assess the purity of peptide perthiyl radical ions formed from AP ion/radical reactions. Ion/molecule reactions combined with CID were carried out to confirm the formation of thiyl radical. Transmission mode ion/molecule reactions in collision cell (q2) were developed as a fast means to estimate the population of peptide thiyl radical ions. The reactivity of peptide thiyl, perthiyl, and sulfinyl radical ions was evaluated based on ion/molecule reactions toward organic disulfides, allyl iodide, organic thiol, and oxygen, which followed in order of thiyl (RS) > perthiyl (RSS) > sulfinyl (RSO). The gas-phase reactivity of these three types of sulfur-based radicals is consistent with literature reports from solution studies.

  20. Liquid-gas phase transition in strange hadronic matter with relativistic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, James R.; Gulminelli, F.; Menezes, Débora P.

    2016-02-01

    Background: The advent of new dedicated experimental programs on hyperon physics is rapidly boosting the field, and the possibility of synthesizing multiple strange hypernuclei requires the addition of the strangeness degree of freedom to the models dedicated to nuclear structure and nuclear matter studies at low energy. Purpose: We want to settle the influence of strangeness on the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition. Because of the large uncertainties concerning the hyperon sector, we do not aim at a quantitative estimation of the phase diagram but rather at a qualitative description of the phenomenology, as model independent as possible. Method: We analyze the phase diagram of low-density matter composed of neutrons, protons, and Λ hyperons using a relativistic mean field (RMF) model. We largely explore the parameter space to pin down generic features of the phase transition, and compare the results to ab initio quantum Monte Carlo calculations. Results: We show that the liquid-gas phase transition is only slightly quenched by the addition of hyperons. Strangeness is seen to be an order parameter of the phase transition, meaning that dilute strange matter is expected to be unstable with respect to the formation of hyperclusters. Conclusions: More quantitative results within the RMF model need improved functionals at low density, possibly fitted to ab initio calculations of nuclear and Λ matter.

  1. The modeling of gas phase permeation through iron and nickel membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, David K.; Shanabarger, Mickey R.

    1989-01-01

    The gas phase permeation of hydrogen through metal membranes encompasses many kinetic processes. This paper reviews a permeation model which incorporates second order gas-surface reaction kinetics with simple bulk diffusion. The model is used to investigate the effect of this particular surface reaction of steady-state permeation. The dependence of the steady-state permeation flux on temperature, pressure, and thickness of the membrane has been calculated. The model predicts that the bulk controlled steady-state flux will change to a surface limited steady-state flux as either the temperature or thickness of the membrane is reduced. Finally, using independently derived parameters, the model is compared with permeation measurements on iron and nickel membranes.

  2. Models of Gas-phase and Surface Chemistry for Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeks, Ellen

    1996-10-01

    Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition for inter-metal-layer gap-fill processes are increasingly important in semiconductor device manufacture, as the devices include increasing numbers of metal layers with decreasing linewidth and spacing. Optimization of these processes requires knowledge of the microscopic consequences of variations in reactor operating conditions. Topographical simulation can address the gap-fill performance of a depositing film, but the predictive capabiliities are limited by the ability of the model user to accurately supply ion and radical fluxes at a gas/surface interface. Critical to determining this information are the chemical kinetics between gas-phase species and the deposition surfaces. Recent improvements and extensions to the CHEMKIN and Surface CHEMKIN software allow general inclusion of detailed chemical mechanisms in plasma simulations and in models of plasma-surface interactions. In the results presented here (This work represents a collaboration with R. Larson and P. Ho at Sandia, J. Rey and J. Li at TMA, S. M. Han and E. Aydil of UCSB, and S. Huang at Lam Research Corporation), we have used a CHEMKIN-based well mixed reactor model of a high-density SiH_4/O_2/Ar plasma to predict and characterize species fluxes, oxide-deposition rates, and ion-milling rates on a flat surface. These calculated rates can be used as direct input to a topographical simulator. The gas-phase chemistry in the plasma reactor model is comprised of electron impact reactions with silane, oxygen, hydrogen, and argon, as well as neutral radical recombination, abstraction, and oxidation reactions. The surface reaction mechanism contains four classes of reactions: silicon-containing radical deposition, radical abstraction, ion-induced desorption, and physical ion sputtering. We include relative thermochemistry of the surface and gas species to allow reversible reaction dynamics. The plasma model results show good agreement with measured ion densities, as well as with measured net deposition rates.

  3. Modeling of gas phase and surface reactions in an aluminum nitride growth system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, D.; Zheng, L. L.; Zhang, H.; Tassev, V. L.; Bliss, D. F.

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents systematic study of an improved vapor-phase expitaxy systema halide vapor transport epitaxy (HVTE) system [D.F. Bliss, V.L. Tassev, D. Weyburne, J.S. Bailey, J. Crystal Growth 250 (2003) 1]. A numerical model has been developed, which is capable of describing multi-component fluid flow, gas/surface chemistry, conjugate heat transfer, and species transport, and it has been applied to the HVTE system for optimal design. The investigation has been conducted to study the effects of the gas-phase reactions, the reactor wall deposition, the adduct boat and the three-zone furnace temperature, the carrier gas flow rate and the distance between the adduct boat and the substrate on the aluminum nitride deposition rate/deposition uniformity.

  4. Development and evaluation of the aerosol dynamic and gas phase chemistry model ADCHEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldin, P.; Swietlicki, E.; Schurgers, G.; Arneth, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Boy, M.; Kulmala, M.

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a model ideally suited for detailed studies on aerosol dynamics, gas and particle phase chemistry within urban plumes, from local scale (11 km2) to regional or global scale. This article describes and evaluates the trajectory model for Aerosol Dynamics, gas and particle phase CHEMistry and radiative transfer (ADCHEM), which has been developed and used at Lund University since 2007. The model treats both vertical and horizontal dispersion perpendicular to an air mass trajectory (2-space dimensions), which is not treated in Lagrangian box-models (0-space dimensions). The Lagrangian approach enables a more detailed representation of the aerosol dynamics, gas and particle phase chemistry and a finer spatial and temporal resolution compared to that of available regional 3D-CTMs. These features make it among others ideally suited for urban plume studies. The aerosol dynamics model includes Brownian coagulation, dry deposition, wet deposition, in-cloud processing, condensation, evaporation, primary particle emissions and homogeneous nucleation. The gas phase chemistry model calculates the gas phase concentrations of 63 different species, using 119 different chemical reactions. Daily isoprene and monoterpene emissions from European forests were simulated separately with the vegetation model LPJ-GUESS, and included as input to ADCHEM. ADCHEM was used to simulate the ageing of the urban plumes from the city of Malm in Southern Sweden (280 000 inhabitants). Several sensitivity tests were performed concerning the number of size bins, size structure method, coupled or uncoupled condensation, the volatility basis set (VBS) or traditional 2-product model for secondary organic aerosol formation, different aerosol dynamic processes and vertical and horizontal mixing. The simulations show that the full-stationary size structure gives accurate results with little numerical diffusion when more than 50 size bins are used between 1.5 and 2500 nm, while the moving-center method is preferable when only a few size bins are selected. The particle number size distribution in the center of the urban plume from Malm is mainly affected by dry deposition, coagulation and condensation, and is relatively insensitive to moderate variations in the vertical and horizontal mixing, as long as the mixing height is relatively uniform. The modeled PM2.5 was dominated by organics, nitrate, sulfate and ammonium. If treating the condensation of HNO3 and NH3 as a coupled process (pH independent) the model gave lower nitrate PM2.5 values than if considering uncoupled condensation. However, both methods gave similar and significant temporal variation in the particulate nitrate content, primarily due to fluctuation in the relative humidity.

  5. Histidyl-glycyl containing peptides. Characterization complexation properties of H(L-His-Gly)2-R with hydrogen and alkali metal ions in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Georgi, G; Ginanneschi, M; Chelli, M; Papini, A M; Laschi, F; Borghi, E

    1996-01-01

    The two histidyl-glycyl containing peptides, H(L-His-Gly)2-OH and its methyl ester (H(L-His-Gly)2-OCH3, have been structurally characterized by liquid secondary-ion mass spectrometry. Both high-internal-energy ion fragmentations produced in the source and metastable decompositions occurring in the first field-free region have been studied. The mass spectra show the presence of y-, a- and b-type ions, a1 being the most abundant fragment ion. The metastable decompositions are dominated by the loss of a water molecule and by y-type ions. The interactions of the two peptides with alkali metal ions (Li, Na, K) have been evaluated both by normal mass spectrometry and by tandem mass spectrometry to obtain selected daughter-ion spectra. The occurrence of mono-, bi- and trimetallated species has been detected in the gas phase. While, in the case of the protonated species, y-type ions are predominant, in the presence of an alkali metal ion (Cat), they show lower abundances (Cat = Li) or are absent (Cat = Na, K) both in the mass spectra produced in the source and in metastable decompositions. In most of these cases, a very intense low-internal-energy ion, which is represented by [a3 + Cat - H]+ and which can be produced by interaction of the metal with a deprotonated amide nitrogen, is recorded. This mechanism should be favored by the anchoring effect exerted by the imidazole ring of the histidine which promotes interaction with metals. Other metastable decompositions yield abundant [b3 + Cat - H]+ ions or involve the loss of the side-chain of the histidine. The formation of [b3 + Cat +OH]+ ions, observed only in the case of the free acid peptide, is due to the interaction of the metal ion with the C-terminus carboxyl group. Bi- and trimetallated species have also been detected in the gas phase and characterized. PMID:8814769

  6. Measuring Uptake Coefficients and Henry's Law Constants of Gas-Phase Species with Models for Secondary Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairhurst, M. C.; Waring-Kidd, C.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) are oxidized in the atmosphere and their products contribute to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. These particles have been shown to have effects on visibility, climate, and human health. Current models typically under-predict SOA concentrations from field measurements. Underestimation of these concentrations could be a result of how models treat particle growth. It is often assumed that particles grow via instantaneous thermal equilibrium partitioning between liquid particles and gas-phase species. Recent work has shown that growth may be better represented by irreversible, kinetically limited uptake of gas-phase species onto more viscous, tar-like SOA. However, uptake coefficients for these processes are not known. The goal of this project is to measure uptake coefficients and solubilities for different gases onto models serving as proxies for SOA and determine how they vary based on the chemical composition of the gas and the condensed phase. Experiments were conducted using two approaches: attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and a flow system coupled to a mass spectrometer. The ATR crystal was coated with the SOA proxy and the gas-phase species introduced via a custom flow system. Uptake of the gas-phase species was characterized by measuring the intensity of characteristic IR bands as a function of time, from which a Henry's law constant and initial estimate of uptake coefficients could be obtained. Uptake coefficients were also measured in a flow system where the walls of the flow tube were coated with the SOA proxy and gas-phase species introduced via a moveable inlet. Uptake coefficients were derived from the decay in gas-phase species measured by mass spectrometry. The results of this work will establish a structure-interaction relationship for uptake of gases into SOA that can be implemented into regional and global models.

  7. Two in vitro models for gas-phase exposure to volatile compounds.

    PubMed

    Bonsi, Paola; Zucco, Flavia; Stammati, Annalaura

    2002-01-01

    Two experimental models suitable for the screening of volatile compounds were set up. The first consisted of a glass-chamber slide with eight wells, one carrying the test compound, and the others carrying cells in monolayers. In the second model, the cells were cultured in a glass Petri dish, and the test compound was poured onto a filter lying on a glass cover-slip, supported by a metal ring. Four plant volatiles [carvacrol, S-(+)- carvone, thymol and decanal] and one essential oil (caraway oil) were chosen as test compounds. The toxicity rankings obtained with the two models were compared with that obtained in a previous study performed with the same compounds under conventional culture conditions. Differences in the toxicity ranking were observed between the conventional culture conditions and the gas-phase models, confirming the importance of correct exposure conditions for the evaluation of toxicity. Both models have advantages that make them suitable as a preliminary step in the toxicity screening of volatile compounds, or for use in a test battery when combined with conventional approaches. PMID:11971752

  8. Peptide Bond Formation through Gas-phase Reactions in the Interstellar Medium: Formamide and Acetamide as Prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, Pilar; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2014-09-01

    A theoretical study of the reactions of NH_4+ with formaldehyde and CH_5+ with formamide is carried out. The viability of these gas-phase ion-molecule reactions as possible sources of formamide and acetamide under the conditions of interstellar medium is evaluated. We report a theoretical estimation of the reaction enthalpies and an analysis of their potential energy surfaces. Formation of protonated formamide from the reaction between ammonium cation and formaldehyde is an exothermic process, but all the channels located on the potential energy surface leading to this product present net activation energies. For the reaction between methanium and formamide, different products are possible from a thermodynamic point of view. An analysis of its potential energy surface showed that formation of protonated acetamide and amino acetaldehyde takes place through barrier-free paths. Therefore, this reaction could be a feasible source of acetamide and amino acetaldehyde in space.

  9. Peptide bond formation through gas-phase reactions in the interstellar medium: formamide and acetamide as prototypes

    SciTech Connect

    Redondo, Pilar; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2014-09-20

    A theoretical study of the reactions of NH{sub 4}{sup +} with formaldehyde and CH{sub 5}{sup +} with formamide is carried out. The viability of these gas-phase ion-molecule reactions as possible sources of formamide and acetamide under the conditions of interstellar medium is evaluated. We report a theoretical estimation of the reaction enthalpies and an analysis of their potential energy surfaces. Formation of protonated formamide from the reaction between ammonium cation and formaldehyde is an exothermic process, but all the channels located on the potential energy surface leading to this product present net activation energies. For the reaction between methanium and formamide, different products are possible from a thermodynamic point of view. An analysis of its potential energy surface showed that formation of protonated acetamide and amino acetaldehyde takes place through barrier-free paths. Therefore, this reaction could be a feasible source of acetamide and amino acetaldehyde in space.

  10. Modeled occupational exposures to gas-phase medical laser-generated air contaminants.

    PubMed

    Lippert, Julia F; Lacey, Steven E; Jones, Rachael M

    2014-01-01

    Exposure monitoring data indicate the potential for substantive exposure to laser-generated air contaminants (LGAC); however the diversity of medical lasers and their applications limit generalization from direct workplace monitoring. Emission rates of seven previously reported gas-phase constituents of medical laser-generated air contaminants (LGAC) were determined experimentally and used in a semi-empirical two-zone model to estimate a range of plausible occupational exposures to health care staff. Single-source emission rates were generated in an emission chamber as a one-compartment mass balance model at steady-state. Clinical facility parameters such as room size and ventilation rate were based on standard ventilation and environmental conditions required for a laser surgical facility in compliance with regulatory agencies. All input variables in the model including point source emission rates were varied over an appropriate distribution in a Monte Carlo simulation to generate a range of time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations in the near and far field zones of the room in a conservative approach inclusive of all contributing factors to inform future predictive models. The concentrations were assessed for risk and the highest values were shown to be at least three orders of magnitude lower than the relevant occupational exposure limits (OELs). Estimated values do not appear to present a significant exposure hazard within the conditions of our emission rate estimates. PMID:24762065

  11. Experimental and modeling study of the selective homogeneous gas phase oxidation of methane to methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Loedeng, R.; Lindvaag, O.A.; Soeraker, P.; Roterud, P.T.; Onsager, O.T.

    1995-04-01

    The partial oxidation of CH{sub 4} to CH{sub 3}OH with air has been. investigated experimentally and theoretically. Experimentally, the homogeneous gas phase reaction was studied at pressures in the range 40 {times} 10{sup 5}--60 {times} 10{sup 5} Pa, temperatures in the range 723--823 K, and O{sub 2} concentrations in the range 2.6--4.4% relative to CH{sub 4}. CH{sub 3}OH selectivities between 35 and 55% were obtained at low conversions, 1.2--2.6%. A kinetic model, based on 61 elementary reactions, was able to reproduce experimental observations, indicating that only moderate selectivities to CH{sub 3}OH (50--65%) are obtainable at low CH{sub 4} conversion (<4%). The model is used to investigate an extended span of temperatures, pressures, and O{sub 2} concentrations in search of favorable conditions for CH{sub 3}OH formation. The model predicts CH{sub 3}OH formation to be favored by high pressure, moderate temperature 673--723 K, and low O{sub 2} concentrations 2--4%. The predicted effects are discussed and illustrated in a mechanistic perspective.

  12. A hybrid formalism of aerosol gas phase interaction for 3-D global models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benduhn, F.

    2009-04-01

    Aerosol chemical composition is a relevant factor to the global climate system with respect to both atmospheric chemistry and the aerosol direct and indirect effects. Aerosol chemical composition determines the capacity of aerosol particles to act as cloud condensation nuclei both explicitly via particle size and implicitly via the aerosol hygroscopic property. Due to the primary role of clouds in the climate system and the sensitivity of cloud formation and radiative properties to the cloud droplet number it is necessary to determine with accuracy the chemical composition of the aerosol. Dissolution, although a formally fairly well known process, may be subject to numerically prohibitive properties that result from the chemical interaction of the species engaged. So-far approaches to model the dissolution of inorganics into the aerosol liquid phase in the framework of a 3-D global model were based on an equilibrium, transient or hybrid equilibrium-transient approach. All of these methods present the disadvantage of a priori assumptions with respect to the mechanism and/or are numerically not manageable in the context of a global climate system model. In this paper a new hybrid formalism to aerosol gas phase interaction is presented within the framework of the H2SO4/HNO3/HCl/NH3 system and a modal approach of aerosol size discretisation. The formalism is distinct from prior hybrid approaches in as much as no a priori assumption on the nature of the regime a particular aerosol mode is in is made. Whether a particular mode is set to be in the equilibrium or the transitory regime is continuously determined during each time increment against relevant criteria considering the estimated equilibration time interval and the interdependence of the aerosol modes relative to the partitioning of the dissolving species. Doing this the aerosol composition range of numerical stiffness due to species interaction during transient dissolution is effectively eluded, and the numerical expense of dissolution in the transient regime is reduced through the minimisation of the number of modes in this regime and a larger time step. Containment of the numerical expense of the modes in the equilibrium regime is ensured through the usage of either an analytical equilibrium solver that requires iteration among the equilibrium modes, or a simple numerical solver based on a differential approach that requires iteration among the chemical species. Both equilibrium solvers require iteration over the water content and the activity coefficients. Decision for using either one or the other solver is made upon the consideration of the actual equilibrating mechanism, either chemical interaction or gas phase partial pressure variation, respectively. The formalism should thus ally appropriate process simplification resulting in reasonable computation time to a high degree of real process conformity as it is ensured by a transitory representation of dissolution. The resulting effectiveness and limits of the formalism are illustrated with numerical examples.

  13. CHEMICAL TRANSFORMATION MODULES FOR EULERIAN ACID DEPOSITION MODELS. VOLUME 1. THE GAS-PHASE CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study focuses on the review and evaluation of mechanistic and kinetic data for the gas-phase reactions that lead to the production of acidic substances in the environment. A master mechanism is designed that treats oxides, sulfur dioxide, ozone, hydrogen peroxide, ammonia, t...

  14. Comparison of gas-phase free-radical populations in tobacco smoke and model systems by HPLC.

    PubMed Central

    Flicker, T M; Green, S A

    2001-01-01

    We used an improved method for trapping carbon-centered radicals (.R) from the gas-phase to compare radical suites trapped from various tobacco smoke and model smoke systems. Using a nitroxide trap, 3-amino-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrrolidinyloxy (3AP), on solid support, we trapped radicals directly from the gas phase, washed them off the support, and analyzed them with HPLC. Separation of the trapped radicals showed that each tobacco type produced a unique radical suite of 4-10 distinct peaks. Gas mixtures used to model tobacco smoke consisted of nitric oxide, air, isoprene, and methanol. The model systems produced radical suites of four major and several minor peaks, two of which matched peaks in tobacco smoke chromatograms. Quantities of radicals trapped from tobacco smoke were: 54 +/- 2 nmol .R per Marlboro cigarette, 66 +/- 9 nmol .R per Djarum clove cigarette, and 185 +/- 9 nmol .R per Swisher Sweet cigar. In these experiments oxygen competes with the nitroxide trap for gas-phase radicals. A kinetic analysis of the O2 competition shows that actual radical concentrations in the smoke were approximately 100-fold higher than measured. PMID:11564610

  15. Infrared fingerprint spectroscopy and theoretical studies of potassium ion tagged amino acids and peptides in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Polfer, Nick C; Paizs, Bla; Snoek, Lavina C; Compagnon, Isabelle; Suhai, Sndor; Meijer, Gerard; von Helden, Gert; Oomens, Jos

    2005-06-15

    Infrared multiple-photon dissociation spectroscopy is effected on the K(+) tagged aromatic amino acids tyrosine and phenylalanine, as well as the K(+) tagged peptides bradykinin fragment 1-5 and [Leu]-enkephalin. The fingerprint (800-1800 cm(-1)) infrared spectra of these species are compared to density-functional theory (DFT) calculated spectra to determine whether the complex is in the charge solvation (CS) or salt bridge (SB) (i.e. zwitterionic) configuration. For the aromatic amino acids the CS structure is favored and the tridentate N/O/ring structure is found to be the preferred binding geometry for K(+). The experimental and theoretical evidence for bradykinin fragment 1-5 tagged with K(+) suggests that the SB structure is favored; the calculations indicate a head-to-tail looped structure stabilized by a salt bridge between the protonated guanidine group and the deprotonated C-terminus, which allows K(+) to sit in a binding pocket with five C=O electrostatic interactions. For K(+) tagged [Leu]-enkephalin the spectroscopic evidence is not as clear. While the calculations clearly favor a CS structure and the observation of a weak carboxylic acid C=O stretching band in the infrared spectrum matches this finding, the prominence of a band at 1600 cm(-1) renders the analysis more ambiguous, and hence the presence of some salt bridge ions cannot be excluded. Another striking feature in the [Leu]-enkephalin spectrum is the high infrared activity of the tyrosine side-chain modes, which can be clearly identified from comparison to the [Tyr + K](+) experimental spectrum, but which is not reproduced by the DFT calculations. PMID:15941293

  16. Energetics and structural characterization of isomers using ion mobility and gas-phase H/D exchange: Learning from lasso peptides.

    PubMed

    Hanozin, Emeline; Morsa, Denis; De Pauw, Edwin

    2015-08-01

    State-of-the-art characterization of proteins using MS namely relies on fragmentation methods that allow exploring featured dissociative reaction pathways. These pathways are often initiated by a series of potentially informative mass-constant conformational changes that are nonetheless frequently overlooked by lack of adequate investigation techniques. In the present study, we propose a methodology to readily address both structural and energetic aspects of stereoisomerization reactions using ion mobility coupled with MS. To this end, a commercial spectrometer was used as a reactor comprising an energy resolved collisional activation step intended at promoting controlled conformational changes and a structural assignment step dedicated to the identification of the generated isomers. This identification relies on ion mobility and other on-line coupled techniques, namely an originally designed gas-phase H/D exchange experiment. We here apply this methodology to characterize the isomerization kinetics of capistruin, a 19-residue long lasso-folded peptide. We expect this approach to bring insights into the physical origin of global dissociation thresholds monitored in MS/MS experiments and to set a promising basis for quantitative investigations of the stability of different molecular folds. PMID:25821205

  17. Enantioselective supramolecular devices in the gas phase. Resorcin[4]arene as a model system

    PubMed Central

    Letzel, Matthias C; Filippi, Antonello; Speranza, Maurizio; Mattay, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Summary This review describes the state-of-art in the field of the gas-phase reactivity of diastereomeric complexes formed between a chiral artificial receptor and a biologically active molecule. The presented experimental approach is a ligand-displacement reaction carried out in a nano ESI-FT-ICR instrument, supported by a thermodynamic MS-study and molecular-mechanics and molecular-dynamics (MM/MD) computational techniques. The noncovalent ionmolecule complexes are ideal for the study of chiral recognition in the absence of complicating solvent and counterion effects. PMID:22563353

  18. Enantioselective supramolecular devices in the gas phase. Resorcin[4]arene as a model system.

    PubMed

    Fraschetti, Caterina; Letzel, Matthias C; Filippi, Antonello; Speranza, Maurizio; Mattay, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    This review describes the state-of-art in the field of the gas-phase reactivity of diastereomeric complexes formed between a chiral artificial receptor and a biologically active molecule. The presented experimental approach is a ligand-displacement reaction carried out in a nano ESI-FT-ICR instrument, supported by a thermodynamic MS-study and molecular-mechanics and molecular-dynamics (MM/MD) computational techniques. The noncovalent ion-molecule complexes are ideal for the study of chiral recognition in the absence of complicating solvent and counterion effects. PMID:22563353

  19. CASCADER: An M-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model. Volume 4 -- Users guide to CASCADR9

    SciTech Connect

    Cawlfield, D.E.; Emer, D.F.; Lindstrom, F.T.; Shott, G.J.

    1993-09-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes through advection and/or dispersion. Additionally during the transport of parent and daughter radionuclides in soil, radionuclide decay may occur. This version of CASCADER called CASCADR9 starts with the concepts presented in volumes one and three of this series. For a proper understanding of how the model works, the reader should read volume one first. Also presented in this volume is a set of realistic scenarios for buried sources of radon gas, and the input and output file structure for CASCADER9.

  20. An Effective Continuum Model for the Liquid-to-Gas Phase Change in a Porous Medium Driven by Solute Diffusion: II. Constant Liquid Withdrawal Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis N.; Yortsos, Yanis C.

    2001-08-15

    This report describes the development of an effective continuum model to describe the nucleation and subsequent growth of a gas phase from a supersaturated, slightly compressible binary liquid in a porous medium, driven by solute diffusion.This report also focuses on the processes resulting from the withdrawal of the liquid at a constant rate. As before, the model addresses two stages before the onset of bulk gas flow, nucleation and gas phase growth. Because of negligible gradients due to gravity or viscous forces, the critical gas saturation, is only a function of the nucleation fraction.

  1. Implementation and evaluation of online gas-phase chemistry within a regional climate model (RegCM-CHEM4)

    SciTech Connect

    Shalaby, A. K.; Zakey, A. S.; Tawfik, A. B.; Solmon, F.; Giorgi, Filippo; Stordal, F.; Sillman, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Steiner, A. L.

    2012-05-22

    The RegCM-CHEM4 is a new online climate-chemistry model based on the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) regional climate model (RegCM4). Tropospheric gas-phase chemistry is integrated into the climate model using the condensed version of the Carbon Bond Mechanism (CBM-Z; Zaveri and Peters, 1999) with a fast solver based on radical balances. We evaluate the model over Continental Europe for two different time scales: (1) an event-based analysis of the ozone episode associated with the heat wave of August 2003 and (2) a climatological analysis of a sixyear simulation (2000-2005). For the episode analysis, model simulations show good agreement with European Monitoring and Evaluation Program (EMEP) observations of hourly ozone over different regions in Europe and capture ozone concentrations during and after the August 2003 heat wave event. For long-term climate simulations, the model captures the seasonal cycle of ozone concentrations with some over prediction of ozone concentrations in non-heat wave summers. Overall, the ozone and ozone precursor evaluation shows the feasibility of using RegCM-CHEM4 for decadal-length simulations of chemistry-climate interactions.

  2. Gas Phase Nanoparticle Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granqvist, Claes; Kish, Laszlo; Marlow, William

    This book deals with gas-phase nanoparticle synthesis and is intended for researchers and research students in nanomaterials science and engineering, condensed matter physics and chemistry, and aerosol science. Gas-phase nanoparticle synthesis is instrumental to nanotechnology - a field in current focus that raises hopes for environmentally benign, resource-lean manufacturing. Nanoparticles can be produced by many physical, chemical, and even biological routes. Gas-phase synthesis is particularly interesting since one can achieve accurate manufacturing control and hence industrial viability.

  3. DSMC Simulations Assessing the ES-BGK Kinetic Model for Gas-Phase Transport between Parallel Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallis, M. A.; Torczynski, J. R.

    2011-11-01

    Bird's Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is used to simulate gas-phase diffusive transport at near-continuum conditions. The molecules collide using either the Boltzmann collision term or the ellipsoidal-statistical Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (ES-BGK) kinetic model. Momentum, heat, and mass transport between parallel walls (i.e., Couette, Fourier, and Fickian flows) are investigated. The ES-BGK model produces values of the viscosity and the thermal conductivity outside the Knudsen layers that agree closely with the corresponding values from the Boltzmann collision term (also implemented in DSMC). However, the ES-BGK model produces less accurate values for the mass self-diffusivity, with a modest difference for the Maxwell interaction but a large difference for the hard-sphere interaction. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. SENSITIVITY OF THE CMAQ MERCURY MODEL TO GAS-PHASE OXIDATION CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Simulations of the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model for mercury have shown the vast majority of the mercury deposited in the United States to be in the form of oxidized mercury. However, most of this simulated oxidized mercury was the result of atmospheric oxidatio...

  5. Gas phase kinetics during normal combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, C. F.; Boggs, T. L.; Eisel, J. L.; Atwood, A. I.; Zurn, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    The role of gas phase kinetics during combustion was explored in the steady state modeling efforts and in the analysis of ignition phenomena. In both cases it was shown that the combustion characteristics of some high energy ingredients and propellants are strongly affected, if not dictated, by the gas phase reactions which take place.

  6. MODELING AEROSOL FORMATION FROM ALPHA-PINENE + NOX IN THE PRESENCE OF NATURAL SUNLIGHT USING GAS PHASE KINETICS AND GAS-PARTICLE PARTITIONING THEORY. (R826771)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A kinetic mechanism was used to link and model the gas-phase reactions and
    aerosol accumulation resulting from src="/ncer/pubs/images/alpha.gif">-pinene reactions in the presence of sunlight,
    ozone (O3), and oxides of nitrogen
    (NO

  7. Effects of inert species in the gas phase in a model for the catalytic oxidation of CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buenda, G. M.; Rikvold, P. A.

    2012-03-01

    We study by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide on a surface in the presence of contaminants in the gas phase. The process is simulated by a Ziff-Gulari-Barshad (ZGB) model that has been modified to include the effect of the contaminants and to eliminate an unphysical oxygen poisoned phase at very low CO partial pressures. The impurities can adsorb and desorb on the surface but otherwise remain inert. We find that if the impurities cannot desorb, no matter how small their proportion in the gas mixture, the reactive window and discontinuous transition to a CO poisoned phase at high CO pressures that characterize the original ZGB model disappear. The coverages become continuous, and once the surface has reached a steady state there is no production of CO2. This is quite different from the behavior of systems in which the surface presents a fixed percentage of impurities. When the contaminants are allowed to desorb, the reactive phase appears again for CO pressures below a value that depends on the proportion of contaminants in the gas and on their desorption rate.

  8. High Resolution Stark Spectroscopy of Model Donor-Acceptor Aminobenzonitriles in the Gas Phase.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleisher, Adam J.; Clements, Casey L.; Bird, Ryan G.; Pratt, David W.; Alvarez-Valtierra, Leonardo

    2011-06-01

    Electronic communication between donor-acceptor systems is prevalent in many chemical processes. Unfortunately, an accurate description of the changes in molecular geometry responsible for intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) is difficult to ascertain. Reported here are the S0, LA, and LB electronic state structures and dipole moments of two model ICT systems, 4-(1H-pyrrol-l-yl)benzonitrile (PBN) and 4-(1-pyrrolidinyl)benzonitrile (PDBN), as measured by rotationally resolved electronic spectroscopy. As was observed for phenylpyrrole, the unsaturted rings of PBN become collectively more planar following excitation with UV light, in support of the planar ICT model. However, in PDBN the twist/inversion angle between rings is nearly zero in both the ground and excited electronic states. The unperturbed dipole moments measured here, taken in conjunction with available solvatochromism data, provide an estimate for the polarization, dispersion, and charge transfer contributions to solvent-mediated excited state stabilization. J.A. Thomas, J.W. Young, A.J. Fleisher, L. lvarez-Valtierra, and D.W. Pratt, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 1, 2017 (2010).

  9. The gas-phase chemistry of carbon chains in dark cloud chemical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loison, Jean-Christophe; Wakelam, Valentine; Hickson, Kevin M.; Bergeat, Astrid; Mereau, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    We review the reactions between carbon chain molecules and radicals, namely Cn, CnH, CnH2, C2n+1O, CnN, HC2n+1N, with C, N and O atoms. Rate constants and branching ratios for these processes have been re-evaluated using experimental and theoretical literature data. In total 8 new species have been introduced, 41 new reactions have been proposed and 122 rate coefficients from kida.uva.2011 have been modified. We test the effect of the new rate constants and branching ratios on the predictions of gas-grain chemical models for dark cloud conditions using two different C/O elemental ratios. We show that the new rate constants produce large differences in the predicted abundances of carbon chains since the formation of long chains is less effective. The general agreement between the model predictions and observed abundances in the dark cloud TMC-1 (CP) is improved by the new network and we find that C/O ratios of 0.7 and 0.95 both produce a similar agreement for different times. The general agreement for L134N (N) is not significantly changed. The current work specifically highlights the importance of O + CnH and N + CnH reactions. As there are very few experimental or theoretical data for the rate constants of these reactions, we highlight the need for experimental studies of the O + CnH and N + CnH reactions, particularly at low temperature.

  10. Gas-phase heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation of ethanol: Pathways and kinetic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Nimlos, M.R.; Wolfrum, E.J.; Brewer, M.L.; Fennell, J.A.; Bintner, G.

    1996-10-01

    The kinetics of photocatalytic oxidation of ethanol has been studied, and the formation and destruction rates of products have been measured. The important intermediates were identified as acetaldehyde, acetic acid, formaldehyde, and formic acid. Minor reaction channels resulted in the formation of methyl formate, ethyl formate, and methyl acetate. Kinetic and `dark` adsorption parameters were measured for ethanol and all of the important intermediates. We have modeled the complete oxidation process using a sequential chemical reaction mechanism. This mechanism is based primarily upon known homogeneous chemistry. However, the formation of acids from aldehydes in photocatalytic oxidation is different from known homogeneous chemistry and demonstrates the ability of the solid surface to stabilize energized transient species. We have measured the adsorption isotherms for ethanol and the oxidized intermediates and have concluded that there are two adsorption sites for some of the chemical species. We think it is possible that the adsorption properties of the compounds will change when the solid is illuminated. 42 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Intercomparison of the gas-phase chemistry in several chemistry and transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, M.; Builtjes, P. J. H.; Poppe, D.; Simpson, D.; Stockwell, W. R.; Andersson-Skold, Y.; Baart, A.; Das, M.; Fiedler, F.; Hov, .; Kirchner, F.; Makar, P. A.; Milford, J. B.; Roemer, M. G. M.; Ruhnke, R.; Strand, A.; Vogel, B.; Vogel, H.

    An intercomparison of nine chemical mechanisms (e.g. ADOM, CBM-IV, EMEP, RADM2) as used by 12 contributing groups was conducted. The results for three scenarios are presented covering remote situations with a net O 3 loss of around 2.7 ppb (LAND and FREE) and a moderately polluted situation with O 3 formation of around 100 ppb (PLUMEI) over a 5 day simulation period. The overall tendencies (i.e. the total net production/loss over 5 days) for O 3 show a r.m.s. error of 38, 15 and 16%; for H 2O 2 the errors are 76, 23 and 30% (for LAND, FREE, PLUMEI). In terms of ozone production in PLUME1, the most productive mechanisms are EMEP and IVL, the RADM-type mechanisms lie in the mid-range and the CBM-1V type mechanisms fall at the bottom of the range. The differences in H 2O 2 can partly be explained by an incorrect use of the HO 2 + HO 2 rate constant and by differences in the treatment of the peroxy radical interactions. In the PLUME1 case the r.m.s. error of the PAN tendency was found to be 29%. Differences between mechanisms for the HO radical are 10, 15 and 19% and for the NO 3 radical 35, 16 and 40% (for LAND, FREE, PLUME1) in terms of the r.m.s. error of the results for a 12 h time period centred around the last noon (HO), respectively, a 8 h time period centred around the last midnight (NO 3) of simulation. Especially for NO 3 some differences are due to different numerical treatment of photolytic processes in the models. Large differences between mechanisms are observed for higher organic peroxides and higher aldehydes with a r.m.s. error of around 50% for the final concentration in PLUME1. The protocol of the intercomparison is given in the appendix, so that the comparison could be repeated for the purpose of mechanism development and sensitivity studies.

  12. Structural investigation of naturally occurring peptides by electron capture dissociation and AMBER force field modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polfer, Nick C.; Haselmann, Kim F.; Langridge-Smith, Pat R. R.; Barran, Perdita E.

    We present a detailed analysis of the relative yields in dissociation products of doubly protonated polypeptide cations obtained via electron capture dissociation (ECD). These experimental studies are complemented by molecular dynamics force field modelling, using the AMBER force field, to correlate with putative gas-phase conformations for these peptides. It is shown that the highest gas-phase basicity amino acid residue (i.e. arginine) is included in all the charged fragments. This is of particular use in determining the primary structure tryptic digest peptides, which will ordinarily posses a high basicity C-terminal residue (i.e. arginine or lysine). Further, these results suggest that the relative ECD dissociation pattern is related to the secondary structure of the peptide. In particular, the ECD fragmentation pattern in gonadatropin releasing hormone (GnRH) variants appears to depend on whether a ?-turn or an extended ?-helical structure is formed. In the peptide bradykinin, modelling suggests that the C-terminal arginine engages in much more extended solvation of the backbone than the N-terminal arginine. This strongly correlates with the observed dominance of c over z fragments. This work forms the first attempt at a systematic qualitative correlation of the low-energy structures of modelled gas-phase polypeptides, and their corresponding ECD dissociation pattern.

  13. A unified model for simulating liquid and gas phase, intermolecular energy transfer: N? + C?F? collisions.

    PubMed

    Paul, Amit K; Kohale, Swapnil C; Pratihar, Subha; Sun, Rui; North, Simon W; Hase, William L

    2014-05-21

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used to study relaxation of a vibrationally excited C6F6* molecule in a N2 bath. Ab initio calculations were performed to develop N2-N2 and N2-C6F6 intermolecular potentials for the simulations. Energy transfer from "hot" C6F6 is studied versus the bath density (pressure) and number of bath molecules. For the large bath limit, there is no heating of the bath. As C6F6* is relaxed, the average energy of C6F6* is determined versus time, i.e., ?E(t)?, and for each bath density ?E(t)? is energy dependent and cannot be fit by a single exponential. In the long-time limit C6F6 is fully equilibrated with the bath. For a large bath and low pressures, the simulations are in the fixed temperature, independent collision regime and the simulation results may be compared with gas phase experiments of collisional energy transfer. The derivative d[?E(t)?]/dt divided by the collision frequency ? of the N2 bath gives the average energy transferred from C6F6* per collision ??E(c)?, which is in excellent agreement with experiment. For the ~100-300 ps simulations reported here, energy transfer from C6F6* is to N2 rotation and translation in accord with the equipartition model, with no energy transfer to N2 vibration. The energy transfer dynamics from C6F6* is not statistically sensitive to fine details of the N2-C6F6 intermolecular potential. Tests, with simulation ensembles of different sizes, show that a relatively modest ensemble of only 24 trajectories gives statistically meaningful results. PMID:24852526

  14. A unified model for simulating liquid and gas phase, intermolecular energy transfer: N2 + C6F6 collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Amit K.; Kohale, Swapnil C.; Pratihar, Subha; Sun, Rui; North, Simon W.; Hase, William L.

    2014-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used to study relaxation of a vibrationally excited C6F6* molecule in a N2 bath. Ab initio calculations were performed to develop N2-N2 and N2-C6F6 intermolecular potentials for the simulations. Energy transfer from "hot" C6F6 is studied versus the bath density (pressure) and number of bath molecules. For the large bath limit, there is no heating of the bath. As C6F6* is relaxed, the average energy of C6F6* is determined versus time, i.e., ?E(t)?, and for each bath density ?E(t)? is energy dependent and cannot be fit by a single exponential. In the long-time limit C6F6 is fully equilibrated with the bath. For a large bath and low pressures, the simulations are in the fixed temperature, independent collision regime and the simulation results may be compared with gas phase experiments of collisional energy transfer. The derivative d[?E(t)?]/dt divided by the collision frequency ? of the N2 bath gives the average energy transferred from C6F6* per collision ??Ec?, which is in excellent agreement with experiment. For the 100-300 ps simulations reported here, energy transfer from C6F6* is to N2 rotation and translation in accord with the equipartition model, with no energy transfer to N2 vibration. The energy transfer dynamics from C6F6* is not statistically sensitive to fine details of the N2-C6F6 intermolecular potential. Tests, with simulation ensembles of different sizes, show that a relatively modest ensemble of only 24 trajectories gives statistically meaningful results.

  15. Di-Tyrosine Cross-Link Decreases the Collisional Cross-Section of Aβ Peptide Dimers and Trimers in the Gas Phase: An Ion Mobility Study

    PubMed Central

    Sitkiewicz, Ewa; Olędzki, Jacek; Poznański, Jarosław; Dadlez, Michał

    2014-01-01

    Oligomeric forms of Aβ peptide are most likely the main synaptotoxic and neurotoxic agent in Alzheimer’s disease. Toxicity of various Aβ oligomeric forms has been confirmed in vivo and also in vitro. However, in vitro preparations were found to be orders of magnitude less toxic than oligomers obtained from in vivo sources. This difference can be explained by the presence of a covalent cross-link, which would stabilize the oligomer. In the present work, we have characterized the structural properties of Aβ dimers and trimers stabilized by di- and tri-tyrosine cross-links. Using ion mobility mass spectrometry we have compared the collisional cross-section of non-cross-linked and cross-linked species. We have found that the presence of cross-links does not generate new unique forms but rather shifts the equilibrium towards more compact oligomer types that can also be detected for non-cross-linked peptide. In consequence, more extended forms, probable precursors of off-pathway oligomeric species, become relatively destabilized in cross-linked oligomers and the pathway of oligomer evolution becomes redirected towards fibrillar structures. PMID:24945725

  16. Vibrational Spectroscopy and Gas-Phase Thermochemistry of the Model Dipeptide N-Acetyl Glycine Methyl Amide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavitt, Christopher; Raston, Paul; Moody, Grant; Shirley, Caitlyne; Douberly, Gary

    2014-06-01

    The structure-function relationship in proteins is widely recognized, motivating numerous investigations of isolated neutral and ionic polypeptides that generally employ conformation specific, multidimensional UV and IR spectroscopies. This data taken in conjunction with computed harmonic frequencies has provided a snapshot of the underlying molecular physics at play in many polypeptides, but few experiments have been able to probe the energetics of these systems. In this study, we use vibrational spectroscopy to measure the gas-phase enthalpy change for isomerization between two conformations of the dipeptide N-acetyl glycine methyl amide (NAGMA). A two-stage oven source is implemented producing a gas-phase equilibrium distribution of NAGMA molecules that is flash frozen upon pickup by He nanodroplets. Using polarization spectroscopy, the IR spectrum is assigned to a mixture of two conformers having intramolecular hydrogen bonds made up of either five- or seven-membered rings, C5 and C7, respectively. The interconversion enthalpy, obtained from the van't Hoff relation, is 4.52{}0.12 kJ/mol for isomerization from the C7 to the C5-conformer. This experimental measurement is compared to computations employing a broad range of theoretical methods.

  17. CASCADER: An m-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model. Volume 2, User`s manual for CASCADR8

    SciTech Connect

    Cawlfield, D.E.; Been, K.B.; Emer, D.F.; Lindstrom, F.T.; Shott, G.J.

    1993-06-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes through advection and/or diffusion. Furthermore, parent and daughter radionuclides may decay as they are transported in the soil. This is volume two to the CASCADER series, titled CASCADR8. It embodies the concepts presented in volume one of this series. To properly understand how the CASCADR8 model works, the reader should read volume one first. This volume presents the input and output file structure for CASCADR8, and a set of realistic scenarios for buried sources of radon gas.

  18. On the crystallographic accuracy of structure prediction by implicit water models: Tests for cyclic peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldtzvik, Yonathan; Goldstein, Moshe; Benny Gerber, R.

    2013-03-01

    Five small cyclic peptides and four implicit water models, were selected for this study. DEEPSAM, a structure prediction algorithm built upon TINKER, was used. Structures predicted using implicit water models were compared with experimental data, and with predictions calculated in the gas phase. The existence of very accurate X-ray crystallographic data allowed firm and conclusive comparisons between predictions and experiment. The introduction of implicit water models into the calculations improved the RMSD from experiment by about 13% compared with computations neglecting the presence of water. GBSA is shown to be consistently the best implicit water model.

  19. Gas-phase separations of protease digests.

    PubMed

    Valentine, S J; Counterman, A E; Hoaglund, C S; Reilly, J P; Clemmer, D E

    1998-11-01

    A mixture of peptides from a complete tryptic digest of ubiquitin has been analyzed by ion mobility/time-of-flight mass spectrometry techniques. All components of the mixture were electrosprayed and ions were separated in the gas phase based on differences in their mobilities through helium before being dispersed into a time-of-flight mass spectrometer for mass-to-charge analysis. The data show that ions separate into families primarily according to differences in their charge states and, to a lesser extent, differences in conformation. This approach reduces spectral congestion typically associated with electrosprayed mixtures and provides charge assignments for mass-to-charge ratio data. Gas-phase separations of ions appear to provide a new physical basis for characterizing components of biological mixtures. PMID:9794086

  20. Nonaligned carbon nanotubes anchored on porous alumina: formation, process modeling, gas-phase analysis, and field-emission properties.

    PubMed

    Lysenkov, Dmitry; Engstler, Jrg; Dangwal, Arti; Popp, Alexander; Mller, Gnter; Schneider, Jrg J; Janardhanan, Vinod M; Deutschmann, Olaf; Strauch, Peter; Ebert, Volker; Wolfrum, Jrgen

    2007-06-01

    We have developed a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process for the catalytic growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), anchored in a comose-type structure on top of porous alumina substrates. The mass-flow conditions of precursor and carrier gases and temperature distributions in the CVD reactor were studied by transient computational fluid dynamic simulation. Molecular-beam quadrupole mass spectroscopy (MB-QMS) has been used to analyze the gas phase during ferrocene CVD under reaction conditions (1073 K) in the boundary layer near the substrate. Field-emission (FE) properties of the nonaligned CNTs were measured for various coverages and pore diameters of the alumina. Samples with more dense CNT populations provided emitter-number densities up to 48,000 cm(-2) at an electric field of 6 V microm(-1). Samples with fewer but well-anchored CNTs in 22-nm pores yielded the highest current densities. Up to 83 mA cm(-2) at 7 V microm(-1) in dc mode and more than 200 mA cm(-2) at 11 V microm(-1) in pulsed diode operation have been achieved from a cathode size of 24 mm2. PMID:17514768

  1. Simulation of aromatic SOA formation using the lumping model integrated with explicit gas-phase kinetic mechanisms and aerosol-phase reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Y.; Jang, M.; Beardsley, R. L.

    2014-04-01

    The Unified Partitioning-Aerosol phase Reaction (UNIPAR) model has been developed to predict the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation through multiphase reactions. The model was evaluated with aromatic SOA data produced from the photooxidation of toluene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (135-TMB) under various concentrations of NOx and SO2 using an outdoor reactor (University of Florida Atmospheric PHotochemical Outdoor Reactor (UF-APHOR) chamber). When inorganic species (sulfate, ammonium and water) are present in aerosol, the prediction of both toluene SOA and 135-TMB SOA, in which the oxygen-to-carbon (O : C) ratio is lower than 0.62, are approached under the assumption of a complete organic/electrolyte-phase separation below a certain relative humidity. An explicit gas-kinetic model was employed to express gas-phase oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons. Gas-phase products are grouped based on their volatility (6 levels) and reactivity (5 levels) and exploited to construct the stoichiometric coefficient (αi,j) matrix, the set of parameters used to describe the concentrations of organic compounds in multiphase. Weighting of the αi,j matrix as a function of NOx improved the evaluation of NOx effects on aromatic SOA. The total amount of organic matter (OMT) is predicted by two modules in the UNIPAR model: OMP by a partitioning process and OMAR by aerosol-phase reactions. The OMAR module predicts multiphase reactions of organic compounds, such as oligomerization, acid-catalyzed reactions, and organosulfate (OS) formation. The model reasonably simulates SOA formation under various aerosol acidities, NOx concentrations, humidities and temperatures. Furthermore, the OS fractions in the SOA predicted by the model were in good agreement with the experimentally measured OS fractions.

  2. Receptors useful for gas phase chemical sensing

    DOEpatents

    Jaworski, Justyn W; Lee, Seung-Wuk; Majumdar, Arunava; Raorane, Digvijay A

    2015-02-17

    The invention provides for a receptor, capable of binding to a target molecule, linked to a hygroscopic polymer or hydrogel; and the use of this receptor in a device for detecting the target molecule in a gaseous and/or liquid phase. The invention also provides for a method for detecting the presence of a target molecule in the gas phase using the device. In particular, the receptor can be a peptide capable of binding a 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) or 2,4,-dinitrotoluene (DNT).

  3. EPA GAS PHASE CHEMISTRY CHAMBER STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas-phase smog chamber experiments are being performed at EPA in order to evaluate a number of current chemical mechanisms for inclusion in EPA regulatory and research models. The smog chambers are 9000 L in volume and constructed of 2-mil teflon film. One of the chambers is co...

  4. OZONE CALIBRATION AND AUDIT BY GAS PHASE TITRATION IN EXCESS OZONE. BENDIX (TRADE NAME) TRANSPORTABLE FIELD CALIBRATION SYSTEM, MODELS 8861D AND 8861DA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detailed procedures for the dynamic calibration and audit of chemiluminescence ozone analyzers are presented. The calibrations and audits are performed by means of a gas phase titration technique using the rapid gas phase reaction between nitric oxide and ozone with excess ozone ...

  5. Impact of Gas-Phase Mechanisms on Weather Research Forecasting Model with Chemistry (WRF/Chem) Predictions: Mechanism Implementation and Comparative Evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas-phase mechanisms provide important oxidant and gaseous precursors for secondary aerosol formation. Different gas-phase mechanisms may lead to different predictions of gases, aerosols, and aerosol direct and indirect effects. In this study, WRF/Chem-MADRID simulations are cond...

  6. Gas-phase chemical dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, R.E. Jr.; Sears, T.J.; Preses, J.M.

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program is directed towards the spectroscopy of small free radicals and reactive molecules and the state-to-state dynamics of gas phase collision, energy transfer, and photodissociation phenomena. Work on several systems is summarized here.

  7. Transient-state studies and neural modeling of the removal of a gas-phase pollutant mixture in a biotrickling filter.

    PubMed

    Lpez, M Estefana; Boger, Zvi; Rene, Eldon R; Veiga, Mara C; Kennes, Christian

    2014-03-30

    The removal efficiency (RE) of gas-phase hydrogen sulfide (H), methanol (M) and ?-pinene (P) in a biotrickling filter (BTF) was modeled using artificial neural networks (ANNs). The inlet concentrations of H, M, P, unit flow and operation time were used as the model inputs, while the outputs were the RE of H, M and P, respectively. After testing and validating the results, an optimal network topology of 5-8-3 was obtained. The model predictions were analyzed using Casual index (CI) values. M removal in the BTF was influenced positively by the inlet concentration of M in mixture (CI=3.79), while the removal of P and H were influenced more by the time of BTF operation (CI=25.36, 15.62). The BTF was subjected to different types of short-term shock-loads: 5-h shock-load of HMP mixture simultaneously, and 2.5-h shock-load of either H, M, or P, individually. It was observed that, short-term shock-loads of individual pollutants (M or H) did not significantly affect their own removal, but the removal of P was affected by 50%. The results from this study also show the sensitiveness of the well-acclimated BTF to handle sudden load variations and also revival capability of the BTF when pre-shock conditions were restored. PMID:24315813

  8. Monitoring CO2 gas-phase injection in a shallow sand aquifer using cross borehole GPR and modeled with T2VOC multi-phase code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassen, R. N.; Jensen, K.; Looms, M. C.; Sonnenborg, T.; Gudbjerg, J.

    2013-12-01

    Risk assessment of potential leakage is an important issue that needs attention in designing effective storage schemes for CO2 storage. Leaking gas may threat groundwater resources and be a liability if pooled up in buildings. We have designed an experiment where we were track the movement of an injected CO2 gas-phase using cross borehole GPR in an unconfined sandy aquifer located in the southwestern part of Denmark. The geology at the field site has been determined using GPR- data, natural gamma ray logging in boreholes, cores sampled with a Geoprobe soil-sampling tool and grain size analysis of the cores. From these measurements the field site geology can be divided into three geological zones. The first zone is an approximately 4 m fine aeolian sand; the second zone is poorly sorted glacial deposits dominated by sand down to 9 m; and the the last zone from 9 m and down consist of well-sorted medium melt water sand. In total we conducted four short injection experiments all of them producing very similar results. The screen of the injection well was 10 m below ground level or 8 m below the water table. An array of six GPR boreholes was installed around the injection well and downwards of dominating gas flow direction. GPR-data were acquired in zero-offset (1D) and multiple-offset (2D) configurations prior and during the injection. All sets of GPR data showed that a plume developed at the depth of the injection screen and that the injected gas primarily spread towards South-East and never breach a barrier around 5 m depth. This corresponded very well with the natural gamma logs, which resulted in higher readings from 4-6.5 m depth. The grain size analyses confirmed that there is a fine sediment layer throughout the area at 4-6 meters depth. We guesstimated van Genucthen parameters from the grain size analysis and used as input to the numerical model and GPR data were used for calibration. The numerical model enabled us to test minimum entry pressure required for the fine sediment layer to function as a barrier and the 'leakage' rate required for the gas phase to breach the barrier.

  9. Analysis of uncertainties in the regional acid deposition model, version 2 (RADM2), gas-phase chemical mechanism. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, D.; Milford, J.B.; Stockwell, W.R.

    1996-04-01

    This report describes the results of a detailed analysis of uncertainties in the RADM2 chemical mechanism, which was developed by Stockwell et al. (1990) for use in urban and regional scale models of the formation and transport of ozone and other photochemical air pollutants. The uncertainty analysis was conducted for box model simulations of chemical conditions representing summertime smog episodes in polluted rural and urban areas. Estimated uncertainties in the rate parameters and product yields of the mechanism were propagated through the simulations using Monte Carlo analysis with a Latin Hypercube Sampling scheme. Uncertainty estimates for the mechanism parameters were compiled from published reviews, supplemented as necessary by original estimates. Correlations between parameters were considered in the analysis as appropriate.

  10. Back Propagation Neural Network Model for Predicting the Performance of Immobilized Cell Biofilters Handling Gas-Phase Hydrogen Sulphide and Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Rene, Eldon R.; Lpez, M. Estefana; Kim, Jung Hoon; Park, Hung Suck

    2013-01-01

    Lab scale studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of two simultaneously operated immobilized cell biofilters (ICBs) for removing hydrogen sulphide (H2S) and ammonia (NH3) from gas phase. The removal efficiencies (REs) of the biofilter treating H2S varied from 50 to 100% at inlet loading rates (ILRs) varying up to 13?g H2S/m3h, while the NH3 biofilter showed REs ranging from 60 to 100% at ILRs varying between 0.5 and 5.5?g NH3/m3h. An application of the back propagation neural network (BPNN) to predict the performance parameter, namely, RE (%) using this experimental data is presented in this paper. The input parameters to the network were unit flow (per min) and inlet concentrations (ppmv), respectively. The accuracy of BPNN-based model predictions were evaluated by providing the trained network topology with a test dataset and also by calculating the regression coefficient (R2) values. The results from this predictive modeling work showed that BPNNs were able to predict the RE of both the ICBs efficiently. PMID:24307999

  11. Concentrations of a water soluble, gas-phase mercury species in ambient air: Results from measurements and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, S.E.; Stratton, W.J.; Pai, P.; Allan, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    There are few reliable data on the speciation of Hg in ambient air, although this information is critical to understanding the fate of Hg once released from point sources. The water soluble species of Hg that are thought to exist in flue gases would be subject to far greater local removal rates than is elemental Hg vapor, but methods are lacing to quantify this species. The authors developed a method using refluxing mist chambers to measure the airborne concentrations of reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) in short-term samples under ambient conditions. The method exhibits an effective detection limit of 0.02 ng/m{sup 3} and a precision for ambient concentration levels of {+-}20--30%. Using a model that simulates atmospheric transport and fate of anthropogenic mercury emissions over the contiguous United States, the authors generated 24-hr RGM concentrations to compare to the measurement data. The average RGM concentrations measured with their mist chambers at sites in Tennessee (TN) and Indiana (IN) were 0.065 ng/m{sup 3} and 0.100 ng/m{sup 3}, respectively. These averages represent about 3% of total gaseous mercury (TGM), and RGM generally exceeds regional particulate Hg. The 24-hr model-simulated RGM concentration averages in the modeling grid cells representing TN and IN are 0.051 ng/m{sup 3} and 0.098 ng/m{sup 3} respectively, in good agreement with the data. The measured concentrations at the two sites exhibit weak positive correlations with temperature, solar radiation, O{sub 3}, SO{sub 2}, and TGM. These concentrations are high enough to suggest that RGM can play an important role in both wet and dry deposition on a regional scale.

  12. A model for gas phase chemistry in interstellar clouds. II - Nonequilibrium effects and effects of temperature and activation energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, S. S.; Huntress, W. T., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The chemical evolution of diffuse and dense interstellar clouds is examined via the time-dependent model outlined by Prasad and Huntress (1980). This paper presents specific results for CH, CO, CH4, O2, CH2O, CN, C2, C2H, HC3N, and NH3. Comparison with observations and predictions of other contemporary models show that cloud temperature plays a very important role through the inverse temperature dependence of radiative association reactions and through activation energies in neutral reactions and selected ion-molecule reactions. The observed fractional abundance of CN with respect to H2 and more accurate recent laboratory data on CN + O and CN + O2 reactions suggest that there is an unidentified, yet efficient, mechanism for conversion of O and O2 into polyatomic species. C2H and HC3N are synthesized early in the history of dense clouds. The value of the fractional abundance of C2H remains high, because as the cloud cools down the activation energy in the C2H + O reaction closes down this most important loss channel. A rapidly decreasing fractional abundance of O with time can also accomplish the same result. The value of the fractional abundance of HC3N remains high because it is an unreactive molecule and probably does not condense readily onto grains.

  13. Gas Phase Reactivity of Carboxylates with N-Hydroxysuccinimide Esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhou; McGee, William M.; Bu, Jiexun; Barefoot, Nathan Z.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) esters have been used for gas-phase conjugation reactions with peptides at nucleophilic sites, such as primary amines (N-terminus, ?-amine of lysine) or guanidines, by forming amide bonds through a nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl carbon. The carboxylate has recently been found to also be a reactive nucleophile capable of initiating a similar nucleophilic attack to form a labile anhydride bond. The fragile bond is easily cleaved, resulting in an oxygen transfer from the carboxylate-containing species to the reagent, nominally observed as a water transfer. This reactivity is shown for both peptides and non-peptidic species. Reagents isotopically labeled with O18 were used to confirm reactivity. This constitutes an example of distinct differences in reactivity of carboxylates between the gas phase, where they are shown to be reactive, and the solution phase, where they are not regarded as reactive with NHS esters.

  14. Gas Phase Reactivity of Carboxylates with N-Hydroxysuccinimide Esters

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhou; McGee, William M.; Bu, Jiexun; Barefoot, Nathan Z.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) esters have been used for gas phase conjugation reactions with peptides at nucleophilic sites, such as primary amines (N-terminus, ε-amine of lysine) or guanidines, by forming amide bonds through a nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl carbon. The carboxylate has recently been found to also be a reactive nucleophile capable of initiating a similar nucleophilic attack to form a labile anhydride bond. The fragile bond is easily cleaved, resulting in an oxygen transfer from the carboxylate-containing species to the reagent, nominally observed as a water transfer. This reactivity is shown for both peptides and non-peptidic species. Reagents isotopically labeled with O18 were used to confirm reactivity. This constitutes an example of distinct differences in reactivity of carboxylates between the gas-phase, where they are shown to be reactive, and the solution-phase, where they are not regarded as reactive with NHS esters. PMID:25338221

  15. Gas-phase chemistry in Oxidation Flow Reactors for the study of secondary organic aerosols systematically examined by modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Z.; Day, D. A.; Ortega, A. M.; Hu, W.; Palm, B. B.; Li, R.; De Gouw, J. A.; Brune, W. H.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Oxidation Flow Reactors (OFRs) using OH produced from low-pressure Hg lamps at 254 nm (OFR254) or both 185 and 254 nm (OFR185) are commonly used in atmospheric chemistry and other fields. OFR254 requires addition of externally formed O3 since OH is formed mainly from O3 photolysis, while OFR185 does not since OH can also be formed from H2O photolysis. In this study we use a plug-flow kinetic model to investigate OFR properties under a very wide range of conditions applicable to both field and laboratory studies. We show that radical chemistry in OFRs can be characterized as a function of 3 main parameters: UV light intensity, H2O concentration, and total external OH reactivity (e.g. from VOCs, NOx, and SO2). In OFR185, OH exposure is more sensitive to external OH reactivity than in OFR254, because injected O3 in OFR254 greatly promotes the recycling of HO2 to OH, making external perturbations to the radical chemistry less significant. The uncertainties of modeled OH, O3, and H2O2 due to uncertain kinetic parameters are within 40% in most cases. Sensitivity analysis shows that most of the uncertainty is contributed by photolysis and reactions involving OH and HO2, e.g. 2HO2→H2O2+O2 and OH+O3→HO2+O2. Reactants of atmospheric interest are dominantly consumed by OH, except some biogenics that can have substantial contributions from O3. Other highly reactive species (UV photons, O(1D), and O(3P)) only contribute for some species under conditions low H2O concentration and/or high external OH reactivity, which can be avoided by experimental planning. OFR185 and OFR254 are comparable in terms of non-OH oxidants' influence. In OFRs NO is fast oxidized. RO2 fate is similar to that in the atmosphere under low NO conditions. A comprehensive comparison of OFRs with typical environmental chamber studies with UV blacklights and with the atmosphere is also performed. OFRs' key advantages are their short experimental time scales, portability to field sites, and generally good performance in terms of controllable and predicable radical chemistry.

  16. In Silico Models for Designing and Discovering Novel Anticancer Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Atul; Kapoor, Pallavi; Kumar, Rahul; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, G. P. S.

    2013-10-01

    Use of therapeutic peptides in cancer therapy has been receiving considerable attention in the recent years. Present study describes the development of computational models for predicting and discovering novel anticancer peptides. Preliminary analysis revealed that Cys, Gly, Ile, Lys, and Trp are dominated at various positions in anticancer peptides. Support vector machine models were developed using amino acid composition and binary profiles as input features on main dataset that contains experimentally validated anticancer peptides and random peptides derived from SwissProt database. In addition, models were developed on alternate dataset that contains antimicrobial peptides instead of random peptides. Binary profiles-based model achieved maximum accuracy 91.44% with MCC 0.83. We have developed a webserver, which would be helpful in: (i) predicting minimum mutations required for improving anticancer potency; (ii) virtual screening of peptides for discovering novel anticancer peptides, and (iii) scanning natural proteins for identification of anticancer peptides (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/anticp/).

  17. REMOVAL OF ALDEHYDES FROM INDOOR AIR: ELUCIDATING ADSORPTION MECHANISMS, MODELING COMPETITIVE ADSORPTION, AND PREDICTING REMOVAL IN GAS-PHASE AIR CLEANERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research project will identify specific chemical and physical characteristics of activated carbon surfaces that promote the removal of gas-phase, polar organic pollutants. It is expected that basic and acidic functional groups will influence aldehyde adsorption through di...

  18. A model of the gas-phase chemistry of boron nitride CVC from BCl{sub 3} and NH{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, M.D.; Melius, C.F.; Osterheld, T.H.

    1995-12-01

    The kinetics of gas-phase reactions occurring during the CVD of boron nitride (BN) from BCl{sub 3} and NH{sub 3} are investigated using an elementary reaction mechanism whose rate constants were obtained from theoretical predictions and literature sources. Plug-flow calculations using this mechanism predict that unimolecular decomposition of BCl{sub 3} is not significant under typical CVD conditions, but that some NH{sub 3} decomposition may occur, especially for deposition occurring at atmospheric pressure. Reaction of BCl{sub 3} with NH{sub 3} is rapid under CVD conditions and yields species containing both boron and nitrogen. One of these compounds, Cl{sub 2}BNH{sub 2}, is predicted to be a key gas-phase precursor to BN.

  19. Gas-Phase Reactivity of Carboxylic Acid Functional Groups with Carbodiimides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, Boone M.; Gilbert, Joshua D.; Stutzman, John R.; Forrest, William P.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Gas-phase modification of carboxylic acid functionalities is performed via ion/ion reactions with carbodiimide reagents [ N-cyclohexyl- N'-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide (CMC) and [3-(3-Ethylcarbodiimide-1-yl)propyl]trimethylaminium (ECPT)]. Gas-phase ion/ion covalent chemistry requires the formation of a long-lived complex. In this instance, the complex is stabilized by an electrostatic interaction between the fixed charge quaternary ammonium group of the carbodiimide reagent cation and the analyte dianion. Subsequent activation results in characteristic loss of an isocyanate derivative from one side of the carbodiimide functionality, a signature for this covalent chemistry. The resulting amide bond is formed on the analyte at the site of the original carboxylic acid. Reactions involving analytes that do not contain available carboxylic acid groups (e.g., they have been converted to sodium salts) or reagents that do not have the carbodiimide functionality do not undergo a covalent reaction. This chemistry is demonstrated using PAMAM generation 0.5 dendrimer, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and the model peptide DGAILDGAILD. This work demonstrates the selective gas-phase covalent modification of carboxylic acid functionalities.

  20. Gas-phase photolysis of tungsten hexachloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullmer, R.

    1994-07-01

    The laser-induced decomposition of WCl6 in the gas-phase is investigated by means of absorption, Raman and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. With visible Ar+-laser radiation dissociation of WCl6 into WCl4 and Cl2 has been observed. Further decomposition can be achieved in the presence of H2 employing ultraviolet Ar+-laser radiation at 360 nm. A complete reduction to W requires even shorter wavelengths. The experimental results are analyzed on the basis of model calculations. Implications on the Laser-induced Chemical Vapor Deposition (LCVD) of W are discussed.

  1. An adaptive classification model for peptide identification

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Peptide sequence assignment is the central task in protein identification with MS/MS-based strategies. Although a number of post-database search algorithms for filtering target peptide spectrum matches (PSMs) have been developed, the discrepancy among the output PSMs is usually significant, remaining a few disputable PSMs. Current studies show that a number of target PSMs which are close to decoy PSMs can hardly be separated from those decoys by only using the discrimination function. Results In this paper, we assign each target PSM a weight showing its possibility of being correct. We employ a SVM-based learning model to search the optimal weight for each target PSM and develop a new score system, CRanker, to rank all target PSMs. Due to the large PSM datasets generated in routine database searches, we use the Cholesky factorization technique for storing a kernel matrix to reduce the memory requirement. Conclusions Compared with PeptideProphet and Percolator, CRanker has identified more PSMs under similar false discover rates over different datasets. CRanker has shown consistent performance on different test sets, validated the reasonability the proposed model. PMID:26578406

  2. Peptide folding and aggregation studied using a simplified atomic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irbäck, Anders

    2005-05-01

    Using an atomic model with a simplified sequence-based potential, the folding properties of several different peptides are studied. Both α-helical (Trp cage, Fs) and β-sheet (GB1p, GB1m2, GB1m3, Betanova, LLM) peptides are considered. The model is able to fold these different peptides for one and the same choice of parameters, and the melting behaviour of the peptides (folded population against temperature) is in very good agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, using the same model with unchanged parameters, the aggregation behaviour of a fibril-forming fragment of the Alzheimer's A β peptide is studied, with very promising results.

  3. Rate processes in gas phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. F.

    1983-01-01

    Reaction-rate theory and experiment are given a critical review from the engineers' point of view. Rates of heavy-particle, collision-induced reaction in gas phase are formulated in terms of the cross sections and activation energies for reaction. The effect of cross section function shape and of excited state contributions to reaction both cause the slope of Arrhenius plots to differ from the true activation energy, except at low temperature. The master equations for chemically reacting gases are introduced, and dissociation and ionization reactions are shown to proceed primarily from excited states about kT from the dissociation or ionization limit. Collision-induced vibration, vibration-rotation, and pure rotation transitions are treated, including three-dimensional effects and conservation of energy, which have usually been ignored. The quantum theory of transitions at potential surface crossing is derived, and results are found to be in fair agreement with experiment in spite of some questionable approximations involved.

  4. Computational modeling of peptide-aptamer binding.

    PubMed

    Rhinehardt, Kristen L; Mohan, Ram V; Srinivas, Goundla

    2015-01-01

    Evolution is the progressive process that holds each living creature in its grasp. From strands of DNA evolution shapes life with response to our ever-changing environment and time. It is the continued study of this most primitive process that has led to the advancement of modern biology. The success and failure in the reading, processing, replication, and expression of genetic code and its resulting biomolecules keep the delicate balance of life. Investigations into these fundamental processes continue to make headlines as science continues to explore smaller scale interactions with increasing complexity. New applications and advanced understanding of DNA, RNA, peptides, and proteins are pushing technology and science forward and together. Today the addition of computers and advances in science has led to the fields of computational biology and chemistry. Through these computational advances it is now possible not only to quantify the end results but also visualize, analyze, and fully understand mechanisms by gaining deeper insights. The biomolecular motion that exists governing the physical and chemical phenomena can now be analyzed with the advent of computational modeling. Ever-increasing computational power combined with efficient algorithms and components are further expanding the fidelity and scope of such modeling and simulations. This chapter discusses computational methods that apply biological processes, in particular computational modeling of peptide-aptamer binding. PMID:25555731

  5. Peptide-Ligand Binding Modeling of siRNA with Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Garca-Sosa, Alfonso T.; Langel, lo

    2014-01-01

    The binding affinity of a series of cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) was modeled through docking and making use of the number of intermolecular hydrogen bonds, lipophilic contacts, and the number of sp3 molecular orbital hybridization carbons. The new ranking of the peptides is consistent with the experimentally determined efficiency in the downregulation of luciferase activity, which includes the peptides' ability to bind and deliver the siRNA into the cell. The predicted structures of the complexes of peptides to siRNA were stable throughout 10?ns long, explicit water molecular dynamics simulations. The stability and binding affinity of peptide-siRNA complexes was related to the sidechains and modifications of the CPPs, with the stearyl and quinoline groups improving affinity and stability. The reranking of the peptides docked to siRNA, together with explicit water molecular dynamics simulations, appears to be well suited to describe and predict the interaction of CPPs with siRNA. PMID:25147791

  6. Establishing Effective Simulation Protocols for β- and α/β-Mixed Peptides. I. QM and QM/MM Models.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao; Yethiraj, Arun; Cui, Qiang

    2007-07-01

    A quantum mechanical (QM) model for non-natural β- and α/β-mixed peptides is investigated using an approximate density functional method (called SCC-DFTB). In the gas phase the predictions of the model for cyclic and acyclic dipeptides and several acyclic heptapeptides are compared to ab initio B3LYP and LMP2 calculations. The SCC-DFTB reproduces the global minimum of the configurations with the root-mean-square (rms) error in the key dihedral angles of less than 14 degrees. The relative energies of different conformers are also well described in general, with the typical rms error of 2-3 kcal/mol relative to LMP2 energies at either B3LYP or LMP2 optimized structures. The dipole moments are reproduced with a systematic underestimate of less than 15%. The QM model is also used with a molecular mechanical (MM) model of the solvent. For a tetrameric α/β-peptide in water, the SCC-DFTB/MM energies are well correlated with B3LYP/6-31+G**/MM single point energies for a wide range of structures sampled in 2 ns of SCC-DFTB/MM molecular dynamics. For an octameric α/β-peptide in methanol the predicted structures are in qualitative agreement with experimental NOE data. These results suggest that the SCC-DFTB model provides a fairly accurate representation of the structure and thermodynamics of these peptides. PMID:26633224

  7. Modelling amphetamine/receptor interactions: a gas-phase study of complexes formed between amphetamine and Some chiral amido[4]resorcinarenes.

    PubMed

    Botta, Bruno; Tafi, Andrea; Caporuscio, Fabiana; Botta, Maurizio; Nevola, Laura; D'Acquarica, Ilaria; Fraschetti, Caterina; Speranza, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    Diastereomeric proton-bound complexes formed between (R)- and (S)-amphetamine and some chiral amido[4]resorcinarene receptors display significant enantioselectivities when reacting with the enantiomers of 2-aminobutane in the gas phase. The origins of the measured enantioselectivities are discussed in the light of molecular mechanics calculations and molecular dynamics simulations and are ascribed to a combination of structural and dynamic factors, including the lengths and the isomeric structures of the host asymmetric pendants and the frequencies and amplitudes of their motion, as well as those of the proton-bonded amphetamine guests. The emerging picture may represent a starting point for deeper comprehension of the factors determining the different affinities of (R)- and (S)-amphetamine towards various chiral receptors, their selective binding to the monoamine transporters, and their sensitivity to specific inorganic ions. PMID:18297667

  8. Unprecedented gas-phase chiroselective logic gates.

    PubMed

    Botta, Bruno; Fraschetti, Caterina; D'Acquarica, Ilaria; Sacco, Fabiola; Mattay, Jochen; Letzel, Matthias C; Speranza, Maurizio

    2011-03-21

    The gas-phase encounters between 2-aminobutane and proton-bound chiral resorcin[4]arene/nucleoside complexes behave in the gas phase as supramolecular "chiroselective logic gates" by releasing the nucleoside depending on the resorcin[4]arene and the 2-aminobutane configurations. PMID:21279226

  9. Oscillatory burning of solid propellants including gas phase time lag.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    T'Ien, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis has been performed for oscillatory burning of solid propellants including gas phase time lag. The gaseous flame is assumed to be premixed and laminar with a one-step overall chemical reaction. The propellant is assumed to decompose according to the Arrenhius Law, with no condensed phase reaction. With this model, strong gas phase resonance has been found in certain cases at the characteristic gas-phase frequencies, but the peaking of the acoustic admittance is in the direction favoring the damping of pressure waves. At still higher frequencies, moderate wave-amplifying ability was found. The limit of low frequency response obtained previously by Denison and Baum was recovered, and the limitations of the quasi-steady theory were investigated.

  10. Peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, S.

    1986-01-01

    This text includes tables on the following topics: gas chromatography; liquid chromatography; paper chromatography; thin layer chromatography. The techniques of high performance liquid chromatography; gel permeation chromatography; peptide mapping; prediction of peptide retention times in HPLC; fluorescence techniques for the detection of peptides; electrochemical detection. Also included are techniques for the detection of peptides; electrochemical detection and detection reagents, method of sample preparation, products and sources of chromatographic materials, chromatography book directory reviews of chromatographic methods and equipment.

  11. Analysis of the gas phase reactivity of chlorosilanes.

    PubMed

    Ravasio, Stefano; Masi, Maurizio; Cavallotti, Carlo

    2013-06-27

    Trichlorosilane is the most used precursor to deposit silicon for photovoltaic applications. Despite of this, its gas phase and surface kinetics have not yet been completely understood. In the present work, it is reported a systematic investigation aimed at determining what is the dominant gas phase chemistry active during the chemical vapor deposition of Si from trichlorosilane. The gas phase mechanism was developed calculating the rate constant of each reaction using conventional transition state theory in the rigid rotor-harmonic oscillator approximation. Torsional vibrations were described using a hindered rotor model. Structures and vibrational frequencies of reactants and transition states were determined at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level, while potential energy surfaces and activation energies were computed at the CCSD(T) level using aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets extrapolating to the complete basis set limit. As gas phase and surface reactivities are mutually interlinked, simulations were performed using a microkinetic surface mechanism. It was found that the gas phase reactivity follows two different routes. The disilane mechanism, in which the formation of disilanes as reaction intermediates favors the conversion between the most stable monosilane species, and the radical pathway, initiated by the decomposition of Si2HCl5 and followed by a series of fast propagation reactions. Though both mechanisms are active during deposition, the simulations revealed that above a certain temperature and conversion threshold the radical mechanism provides a faster route for the conversion of SiHCl3 into SiCl4, a reaction that favors the overall Si deposition process as it is associated with the consumption of HCl, a fast etchant of Si. Also, this study shows that the formation of disilanes as reactant intermediates promotes significantly the gas phase reactivity, as they contribute both to the initiation of radical chain mechanisms and provide a catalytic route for the conversion between the most stable monosilanes. PMID:23731215

  12. EVALUATION OF THE GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL MECHANISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A program was conducted to evaluate the gas-phase mechanism developed for the Regional Acid Deposition Model (RADM). n initial review of the mechanism was carried out, resulting in several modifications being made prior to its further evaluation. ew methods were developed for pro...

  13. Effect of structural parameters on the electron capture dissociation and collision-induced dissociation pathways of copper(II)-peptide complexes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangfeng; Wang, Ze; Li, Wan; Wong, Y L Elaine; Chan, T-W Dominic

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase dissociation pathways of proteins/peptides are usually affected by the nature of the charge carrier and the sequence of amino acid residues. The effects of peptide structural parameters, including peptide composition, chain length and amide hydrogen, on the gas-phase dissociation of Cu(II)-model peptide complexes were explored in this study. Polyglycine peptides with flexible frames were used as probes to reduce the complexity of the system and illustrate the mechanism. Results revealed that the types of fragment ions generated in the electron capture dissociation (ECD) of Cu(II)-adducted peptides changed according to the basic amino acid residue composition. Charged or neutral tryptophan side-chain losses were observed in the collision-induced dissociation (CID) of Cu(II)-peptide complexes. Internal electron transfer between tryptophan and metal ion within the complex occurred during the CID reaction, leaving the charge-reduced Cu(+) as a closed d-shell stable electron configuration. The choice of the reaction channel was then determined by the gas-phase basicity of the peptide. Amide hydrogen was critical in the formation of metalated b-/y-ions in the ECD process as determined through mutation of the backbone amide group. Increasing the chain length suppressed the ECD of Cu-metalated peptide species. Our results indicate that the structural parameters of peptides play important roles in the gas-phase dissociation processes of Cu-peptide complexes. PMID:26353987

  14. Modelling water molecules inside cyclic peptide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiangtrong, Prangsai; Thamwattana, Ngamta; Baowan, Duangkamon

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic peptide nanotubes occur during the self-assembly process of cyclic peptides. Due to the ease of synthesis and ability to control the properties of outer surface and inner diameter by manipulating the functional side chains and the number of amino acids, cyclic peptide nanotubes have attracted much interest from many research areas. A potential application of peptide nanotubes is their use as artificial transmembrane channels for transporting ions, biomolecules and waters into cells. Here, we use the Lennard-Jones potential and a continuum approach to study the interaction of a water molecule in a cyclo[(- D-Ala- L-Ala)_4-] peptide nanotube. Assuming that each unit of a nanotube comprises an inner and an outer tube and that a water molecule is made up of a sphere of two hydrogen atoms uniformly distributed over its surface and a single oxygen atom at the centre, we determine analytically the interaction energy of the water molecule and the peptide nanotube. Using this energy, we find that, independent of the number of peptide units, the water molecule will be accepted inside the nanotube. Once inside the nanotube, we show that a water molecule prefers to be off-axis, closer to the surface of the inner nanotube. Furthermore, our study of two water molecules inside the peptide nanotube supports the finding that water molecules form an array of a 1-2-1-2 file inside peptide nanotubes. The theoretical study presented here can facilitate thorough understanding of the behaviour of water molecules inside peptide nanotubes for applications, such as artificial transmembrane channels.

  15. Modelling water molecules inside cyclic peptide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiangtrong, Prangsai; Thamwattana, Ngamta; Baowan, Duangkamon

    2015-03-01

    Cyclic peptide nanotubes occur during the self-assembly process of cyclic peptides. Due to the ease of synthesis and ability to control the properties of outer surface and inner diameter by manipulating the functional side chains and the number of amino acids, cyclic peptide nanotubes have attracted much interest from many research areas. A potential application of peptide nanotubes is their use as artificial transmembrane channels for transporting ions, biomolecules and waters into cells. Here, we use the Lennard-Jones potential and a continuum approach to study the interaction of a water molecule in a cyclo[(-uc(D)-Ala-uc(L)-Ala)_4 -] peptide nanotube. Assuming that each unit of a nanotube comprises an inner and an outer tube and that a water molecule is made up of a sphere of two hydrogen atoms uniformly distributed over its surface and a single oxygen atom at the centre, we determine analytically the interaction energy of the water molecule and the peptide nanotube. Using this energy, we find that, independent of the number of peptide units, the water molecule will be accepted inside the nanotube. Once inside the nanotube, we show that a water molecule prefers to be off-axis, closer to the surface of the inner nanotube. Furthermore, our study of two water molecules inside the peptide nanotube supports the finding that water molecules form an array of a 1-2-1-2 file inside peptide nanotubes. The theoretical study presented here can facilitate thorough understanding of the behaviour of water molecules inside peptide nanotubes for applications, such as artificial transmembrane channels.

  16. Gas-phase magnetohydrodynamic disk accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozdnyakov, G. A.

    2007-06-01

    A pulsed gas-phase magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) disk accelerator with a radial initial gas flow and radial electric current direction is described. Some working regime parameters and characteristics of the accelerated natural gas flow are reported. MHD accelerators of this type can be used for the investigation of chemical kinetics. Another promising application is related to the development of supersonic gas-phase endothermal chemical reactors with gasdynamic control.

  17. Magnetic field dependence of the product yields of cycloheptanone photolysis in the dilute gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stich, E. M.; Baumeister, W. F.; Huber, J. Robert

    1984-07-01

    The product yields of the gas-phase photolysis of cycloheptanone were measured in magnetic fields up to 10 kG. The magnetic-field effect is explained in terms of the radical pair model. A reaction mechanism is proposed that explains the magnetic field dependence, pressure dependence, and excitation enegy dependence of the gas-phase photochemistry of cycloheptanone.

  18. Aerosol formation by gas-phase-ozonolysis of small vinylethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadezky, A.; Mellouki, A.; Winterhalter, R.; Rmpp, A.; Moortgat, G.

    2003-04-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is formed in the troposphere by ozonolysis of biogenic VOC. The gas-phase processes however, which follow the ozonolysis reaction and lead to the formation of the nucleating compounds are so far poorly understood. A wide range of different primary or secondary products of gas-phase ozonolyses has so far been suggested as potential precursor of nucleation, such as secondary ozonides, dicarboxylic acids and their dimers, and peroxy compounds, such as peroxyhemiacetales or diacylperoxides. In order to assess the influences of oxygen groups in the neighborhood of the alkene double bond on reaction products and particle formation, gas-phase ozonolysis reactions of small vinylethers are investigated in this work. The observations might allow to draw conclusion on the likelihood of potential particle precursors to be formed in the gas phase and to have a sufficiently low vapour pressure for nucleation. Experiments have been carried out in a flow reactor of 1 m length in order to observe SOA formation during the first minute of the reaction, and in a 570 l spherical glass reactor in order to study nucleation or product formation dependent on the reaction time longer than 1 min. Particle size distributions are measured with a scanning mobility particle analyser (SMPS, Model 3936, TSI Inc.), product formation in the gas-phase is analysed by FTIR, and in the particle phase by LC-MS-MS. Threshold alkene conversions necessary for nucleation and initial particle formation are determined in the flow reactor by varying alkene concentrations at constant ozone concentrations and reaction times. Moreover, the influence of experimental conditions, such as relative humidity, is studied.

  19. Modeling vapor uptake induced mobility shifts in peptide ions observed with transversal modulation ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Vivek K; Vidal-de-Miguel, Guillermo; Hogan, Christopher J

    2015-10-21

    Low field ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) techniques exhibit low orthogonality, as inverse mobility often scales with mass to charge ratio. This inadequacy can be mitigated by adding vapor dopants, which may cluster with analyte ions and shift their mobilities by amounts independent of both mass and mobility of the ion. It is therefore important to understand the interactions of vapor dopants with ions, to better quantify the extent of dopant facilitated mobility shifts. Here, we develop predictive models of vapor dopant facilitated mobility shifts, and compare model calculations to measurements of mobility shifts for peptide ions exposed to variable gas phase concentrations of isopropanol. Mobility measurements were made at atmospheric pressure and room temperature using a recently developed transversal modulation ion mobility spectrometer (TMIMS). Results are compared to three separate models, wherein mobility shifts due to vapor dopants are attributed to changes in gas composition and (I) no vapor dopant uptake is assumed, (II) site-specific dopant uptake by the ion is assumed (approximated via a Langmuir adsorption model), and (III) site-unspecific dopant uptake by the ion is assumed (approximated via a classical nucleation model). We find that mobility shifts in peptide ions are in excellent agreement with model II, site-specific binding predictions. Conversely, mobility shifts of tetraalkylammonium ions from previous measurements were compared with these models and best agreement was found with model III predictions, i.e. site-unspecific dopant uptake. PMID:26051323

  20. Liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter including strangeness

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P.; Leinweber, D.B.; Williams, A.G.; Thomas, A.W.

    2004-11-01

    We apply the chiral SU(3) quark mean field model to study the properties of strange hadronic matter at finite temperature. The liquid-gas phase transition is studied as a function of the strangeness fraction. The pressure of the system cannot remain constant during the phase transition, since there are two independent conserved charges (baryon and strangeness number). In a range of temperatures around 15 MeV (precise values depending on the model used) the equation of state exhibits multiple bifurcates. The difference in the strangeness fraction f{sub s} between the liquid and gas phases is small when they coexist. The critical temperature of strange matter turns out to be a nontrivial function of the strangeness fraction.

  1. Liquid-gas phase transition of strange hadronic matter

    SciTech Connect

    P. Wang; D. B. Leinweber; A. W. Thomas; A. G. Williams

    2004-11-01

    We apply the chiral SU(3) quark mean field model to study the properties of strange hadronic matter at finite temperature. The liquid-gas phase transition is studied as a function of the strangeness fraction. The pressure of the system cannot remain constant during the phase transition, since there are two independent conserved charges (baryon and strangeness number). In a range of temperatures around 15 MeV (precise values depending on the model used) the equation of state exhibits multiple bifurcates. The difference in the strangeness fraction f{sub s} between the liquid and gas phases is small when they coexist. The critical temperature of strange matter turns out to be a non-trivial function of the strangeness fraction.

  2. Comparing the gas-phase fragmentation reactions of protonated and radical cations of the tripeptides GXR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, Sheena; O'Hair, Richard A. J.; McFadyen, W. David

    2004-05-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry of methanolic solutions of mixtures of the copper salt (2,2':6',2''-terpyridine)copper(II) nitrate monohydrate ([Cu(II)(tpy)(NO3)2].H2O) and a tripeptide GXR (where X = 1 of the 20 naturally occurring amino acids) yielded [Cu(II)(tpy)(GXR)][radical sign]2+ ions, which were then subjected to collision induced dissociation (CID). In all but one case (GRR), these [Cu(II)(tpy)(GXR)][radical sign]2+ ions fragment to form odd electron GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations with sufficient abundance to examine their gas-phase fragmentation reactions. The GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations undergo a diverse range of fragmentation reactions which depend on the nature of the side chain of X. Many of these reactions can be rationalized as arising from the intermediacy of isomeric distonic ions in which the charge (i.e. proton) is sequestered by the highly basic arginine side chain and the radical site is located at various positions on the tripeptide including the peptide back bone and side chains. The radical sites in these distonic ions often direct the fragmentation reactions via the expulsion of small radicals (to yield even electron ions) or small neutrals (to form radical cations). Both classes of reaction can yield useful structural information, allowing for example, distinction between leucine and isoleucine residues. The gas-phase fragmentation reactions of the GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations are also compared to their even electron [GXR+H]+ and [GXR+2H]2+ counterparts. The [GXR+H]+ ions give fewer sequence ions and more small molecule losses while the [GXR+2H]2+ ions yield more sequence information, consistent with the [`]mobile proton model' described in previous studies. In general, all three classes of ions give complementary structural information, but the GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations exhibit a more diverse loss of small species (radicals and neutrals). Finally, links between these gas-phase results and key radical species derived from amino acids, peptides and proteins described in the literature are made.

  3. Biomimetic peptide-based models of [FeFe]-hydrogenases: utilization of phosphine-containing peptides.

    PubMed

    Roy, Souvik; Nguyen, Thuy-Ai D; Gan, Lu; Jones, Anne K

    2015-09-01

    Two synthetic strategies for incorporating diiron analogues of [FeFe]-hydrogenases into short peptides via phosphine functional groups are described. First, utilizing the amine side chain of lysine as an anchor, phosphine carboxylic acids can be coupled via amide formation to resin-bound peptides. Second, artificial, phosphine-containing amino acids can be directly incorporated into peptides via solution phase peptide synthesis. The second approach is demonstrated using three amino acids each with a different phosphine substituent (diphenyl, diisopropyl, and diethyl phosphine). In total, five distinct monophosphine-substituted, diiron model complexes were prepared by reaction of the phosphine-peptides with diiron hexacarbonyl precursors, either (?-pdt)Fe2(CO)6 or (?-bdt)Fe2(CO)6 (pdt = propane-1,3-dithiolate, bdt = benzene-1,2-dithiolate). Formation of the complexes was confirmed by UV/Vis, FTIR and (31)P NMR spectroscopy. Electrocatalysis by these complexes is reported in the presence of acetic acid in mixed aqueous-organic solutions. Addition of water results in enhancement of the catalytic rates. PMID:26223293

  4. Peptide fragmentation as an approach in modeling of an active peptide and designing a competitive inhibitory peptide for HMG-CoA reductase.

    PubMed

    Pak, Valeriy V; Koo, Minseon; Kwon, Dae Young; Shakhidoyatov, Khusnutdin M; Yun, Lyubov

    2010-06-15

    This study presents a simple method to design an active peptide based on a description of the structural preferences of peptide via its peptide fragments. In a previous design, while searching for lead peptide candidates, the efficacy of a design approach that was based on the use of a cyclic peptide as a model of linear analog was demonstrated. Analysis of the conformational behavior of the peptide models showed that an analogical approach could be applied in order to assess the conformational space that was occupied by a peptide by using peptide fragments. In order to assess the proposed method, a design of a competitive inhibitor for HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR) was performed. Two starting points were used in the design: (1) determined recognized residues and (2) the structural preference of a peptide, such as a beta-turn conformation in the present design. Two sets of peptides were developed based on the different location of a beta-turn structure relative to a recognized residue. Set 1 contains peptides in which a recognized residue is included in turn conformation. In Set 2, the turn structure is located distantly from the recognized residues. The design parameter 'V' that was applied in previous studies was slightly modified for the purpose of the current research. The 17 previously and 8 newly designed peptides were estimated by this parameter. In each set, one sequence was selected as a lead peptide candidate for each set: GF(4-fluoro)PEGG for Set 1 and DFGYVAE for Set 2. The inhibitory activities improved in each set. The IC(50) for the GF(4-fluoro)PEGG peptide was found to be 0.75 microM, while the linear DFGYVAE peptide (IC(50)=0.16 microM) showed a 3000-fold increase in inhibitory activity compared to the first isolated LPYP peptide (IC(50)=484 microM) from soybeans. The comparison of the structure-activity relationship (SAR) data between Set 1 and 2 provided an opportunity to design the peptides in terms of peptide selectivity. A structural analysis of the modeled peptides confirmed the appropriateness of the proposed method for the design of active peptides. PMID:20494585

  5. Gas-Phase Infrared; JCAMP Format

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 35 NIST/EPA Gas-Phase Infrared; JCAMP Format (PC database for purchase)   This data collection contains 5,228 infrared spectra in the JCAMP-DX (Joint Committee for Atomic and Molecular Physical Data "Data Exchange") format.

  6. Continuous-Flow Gas-Phase Bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Donald L.; Trantolo, Debra J.

    1994-01-01

    Continuous-flow gas-phase bioreactors proposed for biochemical, food-processing, and related industries. Reactor contains one or more selected enzymes dehydrated or otherwise immobilized on solid carrier. Selected reactant gases fed into reactor, wherein chemical reactions catalyzed by enzyme(s) yield product biochemicals. Concept based on discovery that enzymes not necessarily placed in traditional aqueous environments to function as biocatalysts.

  7. Importance of the gas phase role to the prediction of energetic material behavior: An experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, A.N.; Son, S.F.; Asay, B.W.; Sander, R.K.

    2005-03-15

    Various thermal (radiative, conductive, and convective) initiation experiments are performed to demonstrate the importance of the gas phase role in combustion modeling of energetic materials (EM). A previously published condensed phase model that includes a predicted critical irradiance above which ignition is not possible is compared to experimental laser ignition results for octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). Experimental results conflict with the predicted critical irradiance concept. The failure of the model is believed to result from a misconception about the role of the gas phase in the ignition process of energetic materials. The model assumes that ignition occurs at the surface and that evolution of gases inhibits ignition. High speed video of laser ignition, oven cook-off and hot wire ignition experiments captures the ignition of HMX and TNT in the gas phase. A laser ignition gap test is performed to further evaluate the effect of gas phase laser absorption and gas phase disruption on the ignition process. Results indicate that gas phase absorption of the laser energy is probably not the primary factor governing the gas phase ignition observations. It is discovered that a critical gap between an HMX pellet and a salt window of 6 mm{+-}0.4 mm exists below which ignition by CO{sub 2} laser is not possible at the tested irradiances of 29 W/cm{sup 2} and 38 W/cm{sup 2} for HMX ignition. These observations demonstrate that a significant disruption of the gas phase, in certain scenarios, will inhibit ignition, independent of any condensed phase processes. These results underscore the importance of gas phase processes and illustrate that conditions can exist where simple condensed phase models are inadequate to accurately predict the behavior of energetic materials.

  8. Importance of the gas phase role to the prediction of energetic material behavior: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A. N.; Son, S. F.; Asay, B. W.; Sander, R. K.

    2005-03-01

    Various thermal (radiative, conductive, and convective) initiation experiments are performed to demonstrate the importance of the gas phase role in combustion modeling of energetic materials (EM). A previously published condensed phase model that includes a predicted critical irradiance above which ignition is not possible is compared to experimental laser ignition results for octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). Experimental results conflict with the predicted critical irradiance concept. The failure of the model is believed to result from a misconception about the role of the gas phase in the ignition process of energetic materials. The model assumes that ignition occurs at the surface and that evolution of gases inhibits ignition. High speed video of laser ignition, oven cook-off and hot wire ignition experiments captures the ignition of HMX and TNT in the gas phase. A laser ignition gap test is performed to further evaluate the effect of gas phase laser absorption and gas phase disruption on the ignition process. Results indicate that gas phase absorption of the laser energy is probably not the primary factor governing the gas phase ignition observations. It is discovered that a critical gap between an HMX pellet and a salt window of 6mm0.4mm exists below which ignition by CO2 laser is not possible at the tested irradiances of 29W /cm2 and 38W/cm2 for HMX ignition. These observations demonstrate that a significant disruption of the gas phase, in certain scenarios, will inhibit ignition, independent of any condensed phase processes. These results underscore the importance of gas phase processes and illustrate that conditions can exist where simple condensed phase models are inadequate to accurately predict the behavior of energetic materials.

  9. Gas phase dynamics of triplet formation in benzophenone.

    PubMed

    Spighi, Gloria; Gaveau, Marc-André; Mestdagh, Jean-Michel; Poisson, Lionel; Soep, Benoît

    2014-05-28

    Benzophenone is a prototype molecule for photochemistry in the triplet state through its high triplet yield and reactivity. We have investigated its dynamics of triplet formation under the isolated gas phase conditions via femtosecond and nanosecond time resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. This represents the complete evolution from the excitation in S2 to the final decay of T1 to the ground state S0. We have found that the triplet formation can be described almost as a direct process in preparing T1, the lowest reacting triplet state, from the S1 state after S2 → S1 internal conversion. The molecule was also deposited by a pick-up technique on cold argon clusters providing a soft relaxation medium without evaporation of the molecule and the mechanism was identical. This cluster technique is a model for medium influenced electronic relaxation and provides a continuous transition from the isolated gas phase to the relaxation dynamics in solution. PMID:24728443

  10. Revisiting a many-body model for water based on a single polarizable site: from gas phase clusters to liquid and air/liquid water systems.

    PubMed

    Ral, Florent; Vallet, Valrie; Flament, Jean-Pierre; Masella, Michel

    2013-09-21

    We present a revised version of the water many-body model TCPE [M. Masella and J.-P. Flament, J. Chem. Phys. 107, 9105 (1997)], which is based on a static three charge sites and a single polarizable site to model the molecular electrostatic properties of water, and on an anisotropic short range many-body energy term specially designed to accurately model hydrogen bonding in water. The parameters of the revised model, denoted TCPE/2013, are here developed to reproduce the ab initio energetic and geometrical properties of small water clusters (up to hexamers) and the repulsive water interactions occurring in cation first hydration shells. The model parameters have also been refined to reproduce two liquid water properties at ambient conditions, the density and the vaporization enthalpy. Thanks to its computational efficiency, the new model range of applicability was validated by performing simulations of liquid water over a wide range of temperatures and pressures, as well as by investigating water liquid/vapor interfaces over a large range of temperatures. It is shown to reproduce several important water properties at an accurate enough level of precision, such as the existence liquid water density maxima up to a pressure of 1000 atm, the water boiling temperature, the properties of the water critical point (temperature, pressure, and density), and the existence of a "singularity" temperature at about 225 K in the supercooled regime. This model appears thus to be particularly well-suited for characterizing ion hydration properties under different temperature and pressure conditions, as well as in different phases and interfaces. PMID:24070292

  11. A new method for measurement of gas-phase ammonia and amines in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, M. L.; Gomez, A.; Arquero, K. D.; Perraud, V. M.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    Accurately predicting particle formation and growth from gas phase precursors is an essential component of modeling the impact of particulate matter on human health, visibility and climate. While the reactions of ammonia with nitric and sulfuric acids to form particulate nitrate and sulfate particles is well known, it has been recently recognized that gas-phase amines, even at low ppb levels, significantly enhance particle formation from common atmospheric acids. As a result, accurate data on the sources, sinks and typical background concentrations of gas-phase amines, are crucial to predicting new particle formation in the atmosphere. However, gas-phase amines are notoriously difficult to measure, as they have a tendency to stick to surfaces, including sampling lines and inlets. In addition, background amine concentrations in the atmosphere are typically a few ppb or lower, requiring low detection limits for ambient sampling techniques. Here we report the development of a simple, reliable method for detection of gas-phase amines at atmospherically relevant concentrations using collection on a cation exchange sorbent followed by in-line extraction and ion chromatography. Gas-phase standards of several amines and ammonia are used to characterize the technique and results from ambient samples in an agricultural area are presented. The application of this technique to field measurements as well as to laboratory measurements of new particle formation from gas-phase ammonia and amines are discussed.

  12. NMR-derived model for a peptide-antibody complex

    SciTech Connect

    Zilber, B.; Scherf, T.; Anglister, J. ); Levitt, M. )

    1990-10-01

    The TE34 monoclonal antibody against cholera toxin peptide 3 (CTP3; VEVPGSQHIDSQKKA) was sequenced and investigated by two-dimensional transferred NOE difference spectroscopy and molecular modeling. The V{sub H} sequence of TE34, which does not bind cholera toxin, shares remarkable homology to that of TE32 and TE33, which are both anti-CTP3 antibodies that bind the toxin. However, due to a shortened heavy chain CDR3, TE34 assumes a radically different combining site structure. The assignment of the combining site interactions to specific peptide residues was completed by use of AcIDSQRKA, a truncated peptide analogue in which lysine-13 was substituted by arginine, specific deuteration of individual polypeptide chains of the antibody, and a computer model for the Fv fragment of TE34. NMR-derived distance restraints were then applied to the calculated model of the Fv to generate a three-dimensional structure of the TE34/CTP3 complex. The combining site was found to be a very hydrophobic cavity composed of seven aromatic residues. Charged residues are found in the periphery of the combining site. The peptide residues HIDSQKKA form a {beta}-turn inside the combining site. The contact area between the peptide and the TE34 antibody is 388 {Angstrom}{sup 2}, about half of the contact area observed in protein-antibody complexes.

  13. A mathematical model for kinetic study of analyte permeation from both liquid and gas phases through hollow fiber membranes into vacuum

    PubMed

    Sysoev

    2000-09-01

    A mathematical model and a Matlab-5 computer code have been developed to study the dynamic response of the hollow fiber membrane probe. The depletion layer formation at the sample/membrane interface is taken into consideration by the mathematical model for the liquid mobile phase. The code produces concentration profiles within a sample feed stream and in the membrane. Flux values at the vacuum side of the membrane can also be calculated as a function of time. The method can be applied both for gas and liquid feed streams. Concentration profiles in a mobile phase and the flux of analytes through the hollow fiber membrane inlet have been studied with this simulation technique as a function of the liquid-phase flow rate. The influence of the formation of a layer of the analyte depletion during the dynamic response has been considered. The shape of the depleted layer and selectivity of permeation from a liquid mobile phase through the membrane into the vacuum are shown to be dependent on the mobile-phase flow rate. In addition, for studied conditions, formation of a depletion layer is demonstrated to be fast compared with membrane diffusion. Thus, if a homogeneous aqueous sample is coming through the inlet cross-section of a hollow fiber membrane containing pure water, the response time mostly depends on analyte diffusivity in the membrane. However, if the aqueous sample is coming through the inlet cross-section of a hollow fiber membrane containing clean air, response time also depends on equilibrium analyte concentration in the depletion layer. PMID:10994987

  14. Gas phase chemistry of chlorine nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Okumura, M.; Moore, T.A.; Crellin, K.C.

    1995-12-31

    Chlorine nitrate (ClONO{sub 2}) is a reservoir of both ClO{sub x} and NO{sub x} radicals in Earth`s stratosphere, and its decomposition is important in determining the abundance of stratospheric ozone. We present experimental and theoretical studies that explore the mechanisms and dynamics of processes leading to ClONO{sub 2} destruction in the stratosphere. Molecular beam photodissociation experiments have been performed to determine the decomposition pathways of ClONO{sub 2} upon excitation at 308 nm and to explore the possibility of a long-lived excited state. We have also investigated the reaction of chlorine nitrate with chloride ions Cl{sup -} in the gas phase. The gas phase ionic reaction may elucidate ionic mechanisms of heterogeneous reactions occurring on the surfaces of Polar Stratospheric Cloud particles and also raise doubts about proposed schemes to mitigate ozone depletion by electrifying the stratosphere.

  15. Activated carbon for gas phase arsenic capture

    SciTech Connect

    Jadhav, R.; Gupta, H.; Misro, S.; Agnihotri, R.; Fan, L.S.

    1999-07-01

    Investigation of activated carbon as a multifunctional sorbent for trace metal capture is the focus of this study. In addition to mercury and halides, selenium and arsenic represent two of the most volatile trace species that remain in gas phase in substantial amounts. In this work, fundamental sorption characteristics of the activated carbon for arsenic removal from the gas phase are investigated. Activated carbons with different structural properties are studied for their usefulness in removing arsenic species from flue gas. Arsenic oxide (As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is used as the source of arsenic. Preliminary sorption studies indicate that arsenic removal occurs by physical adsorption, with increased capture by carbons with higher surface areas.

  16. Infrared spectroscopic and modeling studies of H2/CH4 microwave plasma gas phase from low to high pressure and power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rond, C.; Hamann, S.; Wartel, M.; Lombardi, G.; Gicquel, A.; Rpcke, J.

    2014-09-01

    InfraRed Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy technique has been implemented in a H2/CH4 Micro-Wave (MW frequency f = 2.45 GHz) plasma reactor dedicated to diamond deposition under high pressure and high power conditions. Parametric studies such as a function of MW power, pressure, and admixtures of methane have been carried out on a wide range of experimental conditions: the pressure up to 270 mbar and the MW power up to 4 kW. These conditions allow high purity Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond deposition at high growth rates. Line integrated absorption measurements have been performed in order to monitor hydrocarbon species, i.e., CH3, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6. The densities of the stable detected species were found to vary in the range of 1012-1017 molecules cm-3, while the methyl radical CH3 (precursor of diamond growth under these conditions) measured into the plasma bulk was found up to 1014 molecules cm-3. The experimental densities have been compared to those provided by 1D-radial thermochemical model for low power and low pressure conditions (up to 100 mbar/2 kW). These densities have been axially integrated. Experimental measurements under high pressure and power conditions confirm a strong increase of the degree of dissociation of the precursor, CH4, associated to an increase of the C2H2 density, the most abundant reaction product in the plasma.

  17. Infrared spectroscopic and modeling studies of H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} microwave plasma gas phase from low to high pressure and power

    SciTech Connect

    Rond, C. Lombardi, G.; Gicquel, A.; Hamann, S.; Röpcke, J.; Wartel, M.

    2014-09-07

    InfraRed Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy technique has been implemented in a H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} Micro-Wave (MW frequency f = 2.45 GHz) plasma reactor dedicated to diamond deposition under high pressure and high power conditions. Parametric studies such as a function of MW power, pressure, and admixtures of methane have been carried out on a wide range of experimental conditions: the pressure up to 270 mbar and the MW power up to 4 kW. These conditions allow high purity Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond deposition at high growth rates. Line integrated absorption measurements have been performed in order to monitor hydrocarbon species, i.e., CH{sub 3}, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. The densities of the stable detected species were found to vary in the range of 10{sup 12}–10{sup 17} molecules cm{sup −3}, while the methyl radical CH{sub 3} (precursor of diamond growth under these conditions) measured into the plasma bulk was found up to 10{sup 14} molecules cm{sup −3}. The experimental densities have been compared to those provided by 1D-radial thermochemical model for low power and low pressure conditions (up to 100 mbar/2 kW). These densities have been axially integrated. Experimental measurements under high pressure and power conditions confirm a strong increase of the degree of dissociation of the precursor, CH{sub 4}, associated to an increase of the C{sub 2}H{sub 2} density, the most abundant reaction product in the plasma.

  18. Investigation of condensed and early stage gas phase hypergolic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Jacob Daniel

    Traditional hypergolic propellant combinations, such as those used on the space shuttle orbital maneuvering system first flown in 1981, feature hydrazine based fuels and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) based oxidizers. Despite the long history of hypergolic propellant implementation, the processes that govern hypergolic ignition are not well understood. In order to achieve ignition, condensed phase fuel and oxidizer must undergo simultaneous physical mixing and chemical reaction. This process generates heat, intermediate condensed phase species, and gas phase species, which then may continue to react and generate more heat until ignition is achieved. The process is not well understood because condensed and gas phase reactions occur rapidly, typically in less than 200 ?s, on much faster timescales than traditional diagnostic methods can observe. A detailed understanding of even the gas phase chemistry is lacking, but is critical for model development. Initial research has provided confidence that a study of condensed phase hypergolic reactions is useful and possible. Results obtained using an impinging jet apparatus have shown a critical residence time of 0.3 ms is required for the reaction between monomethylhydrazine (MMH) and red fuming nitric acid (RFNA, ~85% HNO3 + 15% N2O4) to achieve conditions favorable for ignition. This critical residence time spans the time required for liquid phase reactions to occur at the fuel/oxidizer interface and can give some insight into the reaction rates for this propellant combination. Experiments performed in a forced mixing constant volume reactor have demonstrated that the chamber pressurization rate for MMH/RFNA can be significantly reduced by diluting the MMH with deionized water. This result indicates that propellant dilution can slow the chemical reaction rates to occur over observable time scales. The research described in this document consists of two efforts that contribute knowledge to the propulsion community regarding the hypergolic liquid propellant combination of MMH and RFNA or pure nitric acid. The first and most important effort focuses on furthering the understanding of condensed phase reactions between MMH and nitric acid. To accomplish this goal diluted MMH and nitric acid were studied in a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. By tracking the generation or destruction of specific chemical species in the reacting fluid we can measure the reaction progress as a function of reactant concentration and temperature. This work provides the propulsion community with a quantitative global condensed phase reaction rate equation for MMH/nitric acid. The second effort focuses on improving understanding the recently proposed gas phase hypergolic reaction mechanisms using a streak camera based ultraviolet and visible spectrometer. The time resolution on the streak camera system allows for detailed investigation of the pre-ignition and early stage gas phase species present during the reaction between MMH and RFNA.

  19. Evolutionary Sequence Modeling for Discovery of Peptide Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Sonmez, Kemal; Zaveri, Naunihal T.; Kerman, Ilan A.; Burke, Sharon; Neal, Charles R.; Xie, Xinmin; Watson, Stanley J.; Toll, Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    There are currently a large number of orphan G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) whose endogenous ligands (peptide hormones) are unknown. Identification of these peptide hormones is a difficult and important problem. We describe a computational framework that models spatial structure along the genomic sequence simultaneously with the temporal evolutionary path structure across species and show how such models can be used to discover new functional molecules, in particular peptide hormones, via cross-genomic sequence comparisons. The computational framework incorporates a priori high-level knowledge of structural and evolutionary constraints into a hierarchical grammar of evolutionary probabilistic models. This computational method was used for identifying novel prohormones and the processed peptide sites by producing sequence alignments across many species at the functional-element level. Experimental results with an initial implementation of the algorithm were used to identify potential prohormones by comparing the human and non-human proteins in the Swiss-Prot database of known annotated proteins. In this proof of concept, we identified 45 out of 54 prohormones with only 44 false positives. The comparison of known and hypothetical human and mouse proteins resulted in the identification of a novel putative prohormone with at least four potential neuropeptides. Finally, in order to validate the computational methodology, we present the basic molecular biological characterization of the novel putative peptide hormone, including its identification and regional localization in the brain. This species comparison, HMM-based computational approach succeeded in identifying a previously undiscovered neuropeptide from whole genome protein sequences. This novel putative peptide hormone is found in discreet brain regions as well as other organs. The success of this approach will have a great impact on our understanding of GPCRs and associated pathways and help to identify new targets for drug development. PMID:19132080

  20. Selective Covalent Bond Formation in Polypeptide Ions via Gas-Phase Ion/Ion Reaction Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hongling; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    Primary amines present in protonated polypeptides can be covalently modified via gas-phase ion/ion reactions using bifunctional reagent ions. The use of reagent anions with a charge bearing site that leads to strong interactions with the polypeptide, such as sulfonic acid, gives rise to the formation of a long-lived adduct. A distinct reactive functional group, an aldehyde in the present case, can then undergo a reaction with the peptide. Collisional activation of the adduct ion formed from a reagent with an aldehyde group and a peptide ion with a primary amine gives rise to water loss in conjunction with imine (Schiff base) formation. The covalently-bound modification is retained upon subsequent collisional activation. This work demonstrates the ability to selectively modify polypeptide ions in the gas-phase within the context of a multi-stage mass spectrometry experiment. PMID:19702304

  1. Combining Laser Spectroscopy and Mass Spectrometry for Conformation-Specific Studies of Gas-Phase Biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Thomas R.; Boyarkin, Oleg V.; Stearns, Jaime A.; Guidi, Monia; Seaiby, Caroline; Nagornova, Natalia; Svendsen, Annette

    2010-06-01

    Developments over the last few years at the interface between laser spectroscopy and mass spectrometry have opened up new horizons for the spectroscopic study of biological molecules. The combination of electrospray ionization for producing large biological molecules in the gas phase with cooled ion traps and multiple-resonance laser schemes are allowing spectroscopic investigation of individual conformers of peptides of increasing size. Highly resolved infrared spectra of single conformations of such species provide important benchmarks for testing the accuracy of theoretical calculations. This talk will give an overview of techniques employed in our laboratory for measuring conformer-selected vibrational spectroscopy of cold, gas-phase peptides of increasing size and complexity. I will show examples that demonstrate the power of these techniques and evaluate the challenges to extending them to still larger biological molecules.

  2. Oxidation of Methionine Residues in Polypeptide Ions Via Gas-Phase Ion/Ion Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilo, Alice L.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2014-06-01

    The gas-phase oxidation of methionine residues is demonstrated here using ion/ion reactions with periodate anions. Periodate anions are observed to attach in varying degrees to all polypeptide ions irrespective of amino acid composition. Direct proton transfer yielding a charge-reduced peptide ion is also observed. In the case of methionine and, to a much lesser degree, tryptophan-containing peptide ions, collisional activation of the complex ion generated by periodate attachment yields an oxidized peptide product (i.e., [M + H + O]+), in addition to periodic acid detachment. Detachment of periodic acid takes place exclusively for peptides that do not contain either a methionine or tryptophan side chain. In the case of methionine-containing peptides, the [M + H + O]+ product is observed at a much greater abundance than the proton transfer product (viz., [M + H]+). Collisional activation of oxidized Met-containing peptides yields a signature loss of 64 Da from the precursor and/or product ions. This unique loss corresponds to the ejection of methanesulfenic acid from the oxidized methionine side chain and is commonly used in solution-phase proteomics studies to determine the presence of oxidized methionine residues. The present work shows that periodate anions can be used to `label' methionine residues in polypeptides in the gas phase. The selectivity of the periodate anion for the methionine side chain suggests several applications including identification and location of methionine residues in sequencing applications.

  3. Improved short peptide identification using HILIC-MS/MS: retention time prediction model based on the impact of amino acid position in the peptide sequence.

    PubMed

    Le Maux, Solène; Nongonierma, Alice B; FitzGerald, Richard J

    2015-04-15

    Short peptides can have interesting beneficial effects but they are difficult to identify in complex mixtures. We developed a method to improve short peptide identification based on HILIC-MS/MS. The apparent hydrophilicity of peptides was determined as a function of amino acid position in the sequence. This allowed the differentiation of peptides with the same amino acid composition but with a different sequence (homologous peptides). A retention time prediction model was established using the hydrophilicity and peptide length of 153 di- to tetrapeptides. This model was proven to be reliable (R(2)=0.992), it was validated using statistical methods and a mixture of 14 synthetic peptides. A whey protein hydrolysate was analysed to assess the ability of the model to identify unknown peptides. In parallel to milk protein database and de novo searches, the retention time prediction model permitted reduction and ranking of potential short peptides, including homologous peptides, present in the hydrolysate. PMID:25466098

  4. Gas phase thermochemistry of organogermanium compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.P.

    1993-12-07

    A variety of silyl- and alkyl-germylene precursors have been synthesized and subsequently pyrolyzed in the gas phase. Arrhenius parameters were obtained employing a pulsed-stirred flow reactor for these unimolecular decompositions. These precursors are divided into two major categories by mechanism of germylene extrusion: {alpha}-elimination precursors and germylacetylenes. The extrusion of germylenes from germylacetylene precursors is of primary interest. A mechanism is proposed employing a germacyclopropene intermediate. Evidence supporting this mechanism is presented. In the process of exploring germylacetylenes as germylene precursors, an apparent dyatropic rearrangement between germanium and silicon was observed. This rearrangement was subsequently explored.

  5. Learning Peptide-Spectrum Alignment Models for Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Halloran, John T; Bilmes, Jeff A; Noble, William S

    2014-01-01

    We present a peptide-spectrum alignment strategy that employs a dynamic Bayesian network (DBN) for the identification of spectra produced by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Our method is fundamentally generative in that it models peptide fragmentation in MS/MS as a physical process. The model traverses an observed MS/MS spectrum and a peptide-based theoretical spectrum to calculate the best alignment between the two spectra. Unlike all existing state-of-the-art methods for spectrum identification that we are aware of, our method can learn alignment probabilities given a dataset of high-quality peptide-spectrum pairs. The method, moreover, accounts for noise peaks and absent theoretical peaks in the observed spectrum. We demonstrate that our method outperforms, on a majority of datasets, several widely used, state-of-the-art database search tools for spectrum identification. Furthermore, the proposed approach provides an extensible framework for MS/MS analysis and provides useful information that is not produced by other methods, thanks to its generative structure. PMID:25298752

  6. Learning Peptide-Spectrum Alignment Models for Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Halloran, John T.; Bilmes, Jeff A.; Noble, William S.

    2014-01-01

    We present a peptide-spectrum alignment strategy that employs a dynamic Bayesian network (DBN) for the identification of spectra produced by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Our method is fundamentally generative in that it models peptide fragmentation in MS/MS as a physical process. The model traverses an observed MS/MS spectrum and a peptide-based theoretical spectrum to calculate the best alignment between the two spectra. Unlike all existing state-of-the-art methods for spectrum identification that we are aware of, our method can learn alignment probabilities given a dataset of high-quality peptide-spectrum pairs. The method, moreover, accounts for noise peaks and absent theoretical peaks in the observed spectrum. We demonstrate that our method outperforms, on a majority of datasets, several widely used, state-of-the-art database search tools for spectrum identification. Furthermore, the proposed approach provides an extensible framework for MS/MS analysis and provides useful information that is not produced by other methods, thanks to its generative structure. PMID:25298752

  7. Peptide immunotherapies in Type 1 diabetes: lessons from animal models.

    PubMed

    Fierabracci, A

    2011-01-01

    Insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (Type 1 diabetes, T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disorder characterized by the destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells by proinflammatory autoreactive T cells. In the past, several therapeutic approaches have been exploited by immunologists aiming to regulate the autoimmune response; this can occur by deleting lymphocyte subsets and/or re-establishing immune tolerance via activation of regulatory T cells. The use of broad immunosuppressive drugs was the first approach to be explored. Subsequently, antibody-based immunotherapies failed to discriminate between autoreactive versus non-autoimmune effectors. Antigen-based immunotherapy is a third approach developed to manipulate beta cell autoimmunity. This approach allows the selective targeting of disease-relevant T cells, while leaving the remainder of the immune system intact. Animal models have been successfully employed to prevent or treat T1D by injection of either the self proteins or peptides derived from them. Peptide immunotherapies have been mainly experimented in the NOD mouse spontaneous model of disease. In this review we therefore report the main approaches that rely on the use of peptides obtained from relevant autoantigens such as glutamic acid decarboxylase, isoform 65 (GAD65), insulin, proinsulin and islet-specific glucose 6 phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein (IGRP). Protective peptides have proven to be effective in treating or delaying the diabetic process. We also highlight the main difficulties encountered in extrapolating data to guide clinical translational investigations in humans. PMID:21143110

  8. Application of peptide-mediated ring current shifts to the study of neurophysin-peptide interactions: a partial model of the neurophysin-peptide complex

    SciTech Connect

    Peyton, D.; Sardana, V.; Breslow, E.

    1987-03-24

    Perdeuteriated peptides were synthesized that are capable of binding to the hormone binding site of neurophysin but that differ in the position of aromatic residues. The binding of these peptides to bovine neurophysin I and its des-1-8 derivative was studied by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in order to identify protein residues near the binding site through the observation of differential ring current effects on assignable protein resonances. Phenylalanine in position 3 of bound peptides was shown to induce significant ring current shifts in several resonances assignable to the 1-8 sequence, including those of Leu-3 and/or Leu-5, but was without effect on Tyr-49 ring protons. The magnitude of these shifts was dependent on the identify of peptide residue 1. By contrast, the sole demonstrable direct effect of an aromatic residue in position 1 was a downfield shift in Tyr-49 ring protons. Study of peptide binding to des-1-8-neurophysin demonstrated similar conformations of native and des-1-8 complexes except for the environment of Tyr-49, confirmed the peptide-induced ring current shift assignments in native neurophysin, and indicated an effect of binding on Thr-9. These observations are integrated with other results to provide a partial model of neurophysin-peptide complexes that places the ring of Tyr-49 at a distance 5-10 A from residue 1 of bound peptide and that places both the 1-8 sequence and the protein backbone region containing Tyr-49 proximal to each other and to peptide residue 3. The peptide-protein topographical relationships deduced from the ring current shift data support and extend the preliminary model suggested by spin-label data and indicate that systematically introduced ring current shifts can be employed to provide a qualitative picture of protein topography.

  9. Multinuclear NMR spectroscopy in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackowski, K.

    2006-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of some nuclei (e.g. 1H, 13C, 19F, 29Si or 31P, I=1/2) gives strong signals which allow analytical studies of gaseous compounds. The other magnetic nuclei have low natural abundance or/and contain an electric quadrupole moment and their NMR signals are rather weak. In our laboratory we have developed new experimental techniques, which permit us to monitor several micrograms of chemical compounds in gaseous matrices. Applying this approach we have observed magnetic shielding of various nuclei, including 17O and 33S at the natural abundance, in the gas phase as a function of density. Density-dependent spin-spin couplings were also found for many chemical compounds. It has been shown that NMR gas-phase studies can easily be extended on molecules, which exhibit strong intermolecular interactions and are liquids at room temperature. All the latter NMR experimental results obtained for gaseous matrices are reviewed in this paper.

  10. Theoretical and experimental investigation of the energetics of cis-trans proline isomerization in peptide models.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Olivia E; Carper, Emily; Wind, Joshua J; Poutsma, Jennifer L; Etzkorn, Felicia A; Poutsma, John C

    2006-05-25

    The energetics of cis-trans proline isomerization in small peptide models have been investigated using the hybrid density functional theory method B3LYP with a 6-31+G* basis set. The molecules studied are models for the phospho-Ser/Thr-Pro substrate for Pin-1, a peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase) involved in cell division. Pin-1 requires phosphorylation of a Ser or Thr residue adjacent to a Pro residue in the substrate and catalyzes cis-trans isomerization about the proline amide bond. The dihedral angle that would correspond to the reaction coordinate for isomerization of the omega peptide bond was investigated for several small models. Relaxed potential energy scans for this dihedral angle in N-methylacetamide, 1, N,N-dimethylacetamide, 2, acetylpyrrolidine, 3 and acetylproline, 4, were carried out in 20 degrees steps using the B3LYP/6-31+G* level of theory. In addition, similar scans were carried out for 1-4 protonated on the acetylamide carbonyl oxygen. Optimized structures for 1-4 protonated on the amide nitrogen were also obtained at B3LYP/6-31+G*. Relative proton affinities were determined for each site at various angles along the reaction coordinate for isomerization. The relative proton affinities were anchored to experimental gas phase proton affinities, which were taken from the literature for 1 and 2, or determined in an electrospray ionization-quadrupole ion trap instrument using the extended kinetic method for 3 and 4. Proton affinities of 925 +/- 10 and 911 +/- 12 kJ/mol were determined for 3 and 4, respectively. These studies suggest that the nitrogen atom in these amides becomes the most basic site in the molecule at a dihedral angle of ca. 130 degrees . In addition, the nitrogen atoms in 2-4 are predicted to attain basicities in the range 920-950 kJ/mol, making them basic enough to be the preferred site for hydrogen bonding in the Pin-1 active site, in support of the proposed mechanism for PPIases. PMID:16706410

  11. Formation of complex organic molecules in cold objects: the role of gas-phase reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balucani, Nadia; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Taquet, Vianney

    2015-04-01

    While astrochemical models are successful in reproducing many of the observed interstellar species, they have been struggling to explain the observed abundances of complex organic molecules. Current models tend to privilege grain surface over gas-phase chemistry in their formation. One key assumption of those models is that radicals trapped in the grain mantles gain mobility and react on lukewarm ( ≳ 30 K) dust grains. Thus, the recent detections of methyl formate (MF) and dimethyl ether (DME) in cold objects represent a challenge and may clarify the respective role of grain-surface and gas-phase chemistry. We propose here a new model to form DME and MF with gas-phase reactions in cold environments, where DME is the precursor of MF via an efficient reaction overlooked by previous models. Furthermore, methoxy, a precursor of DME, is also synthesized in the gas phase from methanol, which is desorbed by a non-thermal process from the ices. Our new model reproduces fairly well the observations towards L1544. It also explains, in a natural way, the observed correlation between DME and MF. We conclude that gas-phase reactions are major actors in the formation of MF, DME and methoxy in cold gas. This challenges the exclusive role of grain-surface chemistry and favours a combined grain-gas chemistry.

  12. Peptide neuromodulation in invertebrate model systems

    PubMed Central

    Taghert, Paul H.; Nitabach, Michael N.

    2012-01-01

    Neuropeptides modulate neural circuits controlling adaptive animal behaviors and physiological processes, such as feeding/metabolism, reproductive behaviors, circadian rhythms, central pattern generation, and sensorimotor integration. Invertebrate model systems have enabled detailed experimental analysis using combined genetic, behavioral, and physiological approaches. Here we review selected examples of neuropeptide modulation in crustaceans, mollusks, insects, and nematodes, with a particular emphasis on the genetic model organisms Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans, where remarkable progress has been made. On the basis of this survey, we provide several integrating conceptual principles for understanding how neuropeptides modulate circuit function, and also propose that continued progress in this area requires increased emphasis on the development of richer, more sophisticated behavioral paradigms. PMID:23040808

  13. Gas phase methylation of methyl acetoacetate. Experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morizur, J.-P.; Martigny, I.; Taphanel, M.-H.; Tortajada, J.; Geribaldi, S.; Decouzon, M.

    1992-04-01

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and tandem mass spectrometry, complemented by semiempirical molecular orbital calculations, have been used to study gas phase methylation of methyl acetoacetate as a mixture of the keto form 1 and the enol form 2. The daughter ion spectra of the ion/molecule reaction products were compared with those of model ions generated by electron impact or chemical ionization, in order to determine the site(s) of nucleophilic reaction for the mixture. The data indicate that the site of attachment in the keto form 1 is the keto-carbonyl oxygen. For the enol form 2, no C-methylation occurs in the gas phase; the only product corresponds to O-alkylation. The results derived from D- and 13C-labelled precursors have been used to study the fragmentation mechanisms of model ions a, CH3C+ (OCH3)CH2CO2CH3; and b, CH3COCH2C+(OCH3)2. Experimental results indicate that an irreversible isomerization a --> b occurs under collisional conditions. Unimolecularly both a and b ions eliminate a neutral molecule of ketene but by different pathways. Calculations of charge distributions in 1 and 2 as well as the enthalpies of the neutral and the adduct ions are discussed.

  14. Gas phase equilibrium structure of histamine.

    PubMed

    Tikhonov, Denis S; Rykov, Anatolii N; Grikina, Olga E; Khaikin, Leonid S

    2016-02-17

    The first gas electron diffraction (GED) experiment for histamine was carried out. The equilibrium structure of histamine in the gas phase was determined on the basis of the data obtained. The refinement was also supported by the rotational constants obtained in previous studies [B. Vogelsanger, et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 1991, 113, 7864-7869; P. Godfrey, et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 1998, 120, 10724-10732] and quantum chemical calculations. The proposed mechanism of tautomerization by simultaneous intermolecular transfer of hydrogens in a histamine dimer helps to explain the distribution of tautomers in different experiments. The estimations of the conformational interconversion times provided the explanation for the absence of some conformers in the rotational spectroscopy experiments. PMID:26845147

  15. Kinetic studies of gas phase free radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittig, C.; Reisler, H.

    1982-11-01

    Detailed studies of elementary unimolecular and bimolecular gas phase processes were carried out using the time resolved techniques of laser photolysis and laser induced fluorescence. Bimolecular reactions of diatomic and triatomic carbon and the ethynyl radical with small polyatomic molecules were investigated, and rate coefficients and energy disposal into product degrees of freedom were determined. The study of unimolecular reactions induced by multiple photon excitation concentrated on simple bond fission reactions. Nascent rovibronic state distributions in the dissociation products of trifluoroacetonitrile were determined as a function of laser fluence and intensity. The rate of the unimolecular reaction of 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane was measured following dye laser excitation, and found to be faster than the rate deduced from thermal activation experiments.

  16. CHAOS II. Gas-phase Abundances in NGC 5194

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croxall, Kevin V.; Pogge, Richard W.; Berg, Danielle A.; Skillman, Evan D.; Moustakas, John

    2015-07-01

    We have observed NGC 5194 (M51a) as part of the CHemical Abundances of Spirals project. Using the Multi Object Double Spectrographs on the Large Binocular Telescope we are able to measure one or more of the temperature-sensitive auroral lines ([O iii] ?4363, [N ii] ?5755, [S iii] ?6312) and thus measure direct gas-phase abundances in 29 individual H ii regions. [O iii] ?4363 is only detected in two H ii regions, both of which show indications of excitation by shocks. We compare our data to previous direct abundances measured in NGC 5194 and find excellent agreement ({{? }}[{log}({{O}}/{{H}})]? 0.05) for all but one region. We find no evidence of trends in Ar/O, Ne/O, or S/O within NGC 5194 or compared to other galaxies. We find modest negative gradients in both O/H and N/O with very little scatter (? ? 0.08 dex), most of which can be attributed to random error and not to intrinsic dispersion. The gas-phase abundance gradient is consistent with the gradients observed in other interacting galaxies, which tend to be shallower than gradients measured in isolated galaxies. The N/O ratio (< {log}({{N}}/{{O}})> =-0.62) suggests secondary nitrogen production is responsible for a significantly larger fraction of nitrogen (e.g., factor of 8-10), relative to primary production mechanisms than predicted by theoretical models.

  17. Folding of gas-phase polyalanines in a static electric field: alignment, deformations, and polarization effects.

    PubMed

    Calvo, F; Dugourd, P

    2008-07-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of the temperature-induced unfolding of small gas-phase polyalanines in a static, homogeneous electric field are reported, based on the AMBER ff96 force field. The peptides exhibit a structural transition from the native alpha-helix state to entropically favored beta-sheet conformations, before eventually turning to extended coil at higher temperatures. Upon switching the electric field, the molecules undergo preferential alignment of their dipole moment vector toward the field axis and a shift of the alpha-beta transition to higher temperatures. At higher field strengths (>10(8) V/m) the molecules stretch and the alpha-beta and beta-coil transitions merge. A simple three-state model is shown to account for the observed behavior. Under even higher fields, density functional theory calculations and a polarizable force field both show that electronic rearrangements tend to further increase the dipole moment, polarization effects being approximately half in magnitude with respect to stretching effect. Finally a tentative (temperature, field-strength) phase diagram is sketched. PMID:18223004

  18. Gas-Phase Amidation of Carboxylic Acids with Woodward's Reagent K Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhou; Pilo, Alice L.; Luongo, Carl A.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-06-01

    Gas-phase amidation of carboxylic acids in multiply-charged peptides is demonstrated via ion/ion reactions with Woodward's reagent K (wrk) in both positive and negative mode. Woodward's reagent K, N-ethyl-3-phenylisoxazolium-3'-sulfonate, is a commonly used reagent that activates carboxylates to form amide bonds with amines in solution. Here, we demonstrate that the analogous gas-phase chemistry occurs upon reaction of the wrk ions and doubly protonated (or doubly deprotonated) peptide ions containing the carboxylic acid functionality. The reaction involves the formation of the enol ester intermediate in the electrostatic complex. Upon collisional activation, the ethyl amine on the reagent is transferred to the activated carbonyl carbon on the peptide, resulting in the formation of an ethyl amide (addition of 27 Da to the peptide) with loss of a neutral ketene derivative. Further collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the products and comparison with solution-phase amidation product confirms the structure of the ethyl amide.

  19. Gas-Phase Chemistry of Multiply Charged Bioions in Analytical Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Teng-Yi; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    Ion chemistry has long played an important role in molecular mass spectrometry (MS), as it is central to the use of MS as a structural characterization tool. With the advent of ionization methods capable of producing gaseous ions from large biomolecules, the chemistry of gaseous bioions has become a highly active area of research. Gas-phase biomolecule-ion reactions are usually driven by interactions with neutral molecules, photons, electrons, ions, or surfaces. Ion dissociation or transformation into different ion types can be achieved. The types of reaction products observed depend on the characteristics of the ions, the transformation methods, and the time frame of observation. This review focuses on the gas-phase chemistries of ions derived from the electrospray ionization of peptides, proteins, and oligonucleotides, with particular emphasis on their utility in bioanalysis. Various ion-transformation strategies, which further facilitate structural interrogation by converting ions from one type to another, are also summarized. PMID:20636047

  20. VUV action spectroscopy of protonated leucine-enkephalin peptide in the 6-14 eV range

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ranković, M. Lj.; Canon, F.; Nahon, L.; Giuliani, A.; Milosavljević, A. R.

    2015-12-29

    We have studied the VUV photodissociation of gas-phase protonated leucine-enkephalin peptide ion in the 5.7 to 14 eV photon energy range by coupling a linear quadrupole ion trap with a synchrotron radiation source. We report VUV activation tandem mass spectra at 6.7, 8.4 and 12.8 eV photon energies and photodissociation yields for a number of selected fragments. The obtained results provide insights into both near VUV radiation damage and electronic properties of a model peptide. We could distinguish several absorption bands and assign them to particular electronic transitions, according to previous theoretical studies. Furthermore, the photodissociation yields appear to bemore » very different for the various observed fragmentation channels, depending both on the type of fragments and their position along the peptide backbone. The present results are discussed in light of recent gas-phase spectroscopic data on peptides.« less

  1. VUV action spectroscopy of protonated leucine-enkephalin peptide in the 6-14 eV range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankovi?, M. Lj.; Canon, F.; Nahon, L.; Giuliani, A.; Milosavljevi?, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    We have studied the Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) photodissociation of gas-phase protonated leucine-enkephalin peptide ion in the 5.7 to 14 eV photon energy range by coupling a linear quadrupole ion trap with a synchrotron radiation source. We report VUV activation tandem mass spectra at 6.7, 8.4, and 12.8 eV photon energies and photodissociation yields for a number of selected fragments. The obtained results provide insight into both near VUV radiation damage and electronic properties of a model peptide. We could distinguish several absorption bands and assign them to particular electronic transitions, according to previous theoretical studies. The photodissociation yields appear to be very different for the various observed fragmentation channels, depending on both the types of fragments and their position along the peptide backbone. The present results are discussed in light of recent gas-phase spectroscopic data on peptides.

  2. VUV action spectroscopy of protonated leucine-enkephalin peptide in the 6-14 eV range

    SciTech Connect

    Ranković, M. Lj.; Canon, F.; Nahon, L.; Giuliani, A.; Milosavljević, A. R.

    2015-12-29

    We have studied the VUV photodissociation of gas-phase protonated leucine-enkephalin peptide ion in the 5.7 to 14 eV photon energy range by coupling a linear quadrupole ion trap with a synchrotron radiation source. We report VUV activation tandem mass spectra at 6.7, 8.4 and 12.8 eV photon energies and photodissociation yields for a number of selected fragments. The obtained results provide insights into both near VUV radiation damage and electronic properties of a model peptide. We could distinguish several absorption bands and assign them to particular electronic transitions, according to previous theoretical studies. Furthermore, the photodissociation yields appear to be very different for the various observed fragmentation channels, depending both on the type of fragments and their position along the peptide backbone. The present results are discussed in light of recent gas-phase spectroscopic data on peptides.

  3. VUV action spectroscopy of protonated leucine-enkephalin peptide in the 6-14 eV range.

    PubMed

    Ranković, M Lj; Canon, F; Nahon, L; Giuliani, A; Milosavljević, A R

    2015-12-28

    We have studied the Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) photodissociation of gas-phase protonated leucine-enkephalin peptide ion in the 5.7 to 14 eV photon energy range by coupling a linear quadrupole ion trap with a synchrotron radiation source. We report VUV activation tandem mass spectra at 6.7, 8.4, and 12.8 eV photon energies and photodissociation yields for a number of selected fragments. The obtained results provide insight into both near VUV radiation damage and electronic properties of a model peptide. We could distinguish several absorption bands and assign them to particular electronic transitions, according to previous theoretical studies. The photodissociation yields appear to be very different for the various observed fragmentation channels, depending on both the types of fragments and their position along the peptide backbone. The present results are discussed in light of recent gas-phase spectroscopic data on peptides. PMID:26723675

  4. The influence of the gas phase chemistry of volatilised particulate phase components on gas phase budgets of radicals, NOx, and ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, T. M.; Fountoukis, C.; Lawrence, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    Organic compounds have been shown to be a major component of atmospheric aerosol particles. A large fraction of these organic compounds are secondary in nature, being formed from primary emitted compounds through chemical reactions in the atmospheric gaseous and particulate phases. Volatile organic compounds from both anthropogenic and biogenic sources can undergo gas phase reactions which increase their level of oxidation, lowering their volatility and making them more likely to partition into the particulate phase. It is also recognised that many low- and semi- volatile compounds, which are emitted primarily in the particulate phase, can also evaporate into the gas phase, where they undergo similar oxidation chemistry. The aging of atmospheric organic aerosol includes a continuous process of evaporation, chemical reaction in the gas phase, and condensation back into the particulate phase. The identity of the molecules involved in these processes remains largely unknown; atmospheric organic aerosol is an uncharacterised mixture. Several modelling frameworks have been developed to simulate this chemical aging of atmospheric organic aerosol. These frameworks focus on simulation of characteristics such as the volatility and oxidation level of particulate phase constituents. As the nature of the organic mixture is unconstrained, a large number of possible aging schemes can account for the observed properties of atmospheric organic aerosol. This work focuses on a different aspect than the usual assessment of aerosol particle chemistry; here we instead focus on the potential impact of these aging processes on traditional ozone production chemistry, examining the extent to which this aerosol aging chemistry impacts the budgets of radicals, NOx (oxides of nitrogen, NO and NO2), and ozone. Studies are performed using a box modelling framework with a near- explicit gas phase chemical mechanism coupled to an aerosol aging framework from a state of the art chemical transport model. Several alternative aerosol aging schemes are implemented in order to gauge the sensitivity of the traditional gas phase chemistry to the inclusion of the chemistry of the volatilised organic aerosol components.

  5. Hydrocarbon radical thermochemistry: Gas-phase ion chemistry techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ervin, Kent M.

    2014-03-21

    Final Scientific/Technical Report for the project "Hydrocarbon Radical Thermochemistry: Gas-Phase Ion Chemistry Techniques." The objective of this project is to exploit gas-phase ion chemistry techniques for determination of thermochemical values for neutral hydrocarbon radicals of importance in combustion kinetics.

  6. Pressure Dependence of Gas-Phase Reaction Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Persis, Stephanie; Dollet, Alain; Teyssandier, Francis

    2004-01-01

    It is presented that only simple concepts, mainly taken from activated-complex or transition-state theory, are required to explain and analytically describe the influence of pressure on gas-phase reaction kinetics. The simplest kind of elementary gas-phase reaction is a unimolecular decomposition reaction.

  7. A phosphohistidine proteomics strategy based on elucidation of a unique gas-phase phosphopeptide fragmentation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Oslund, Rob C; Kee, Jung-Min; Couvillon, Anthony D; Bhatia, Vivek N; Perlman, David H; Muir, Tom W

    2014-09-17

    Protein histidine phosphorylation is increasingly recognized as a critical posttranslational modification (PTM) in central metabolism and cell signaling. Still, the detection of phosphohistidine (pHis) in the proteome has remained difficult due to the scarcity of tools to enrich and identify this labile PTM. To address this, we report the first global proteomic analysis of pHis proteins, combining selective immunoenrichment of pHis peptides and a bioinformatic strategy based on mechanistic insight into pHis peptide gas-phase fragmentation during LC-MS/MS. We show that collision-induced dissociation (CID) of pHis peptides produces prominent characteristic neutral losses of 98, 80, and 116 Da. Using isotopic labeling studies, we also demonstrate that the 98 Da neutral loss occurs via gas-phase phosphoryl transfer from pHis to the peptide C-terminal ?-carboxylate or to Glu/Asp side chain residues if present. To exploit this property, we developed a software tool that screens LC-MS/MS spectra for potential matches to pHis-containing peptides based on their neutral loss pattern. This tool was integrated into a proteomics workflow for the identification of endogenous pHis-containing proteins in cellular lysates. As an illustration of this strategy, we analyzed pHis peptides from glycerol-fed and mannitol-fed Escherichia coli cells. We identified known and a number of previously speculative pHis sites inferred by homology, predominantly in the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar transferase system (PTS). Furthermore, we identified two new sites of histidine phosphorylation on aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE) and pyruvate kinase (PykF) enzymes, previously not known to bear this modification. This study lays the groundwork for future pHis proteomics studies in bacteria and other organisms. PMID:25156620

  8. A Phosphohistidine Proteomics Strategy Based on Elucidation of a Unique Gas-Phase Phosphopeptide Fragmentation Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein histidine phosphorylation is increasingly recognized as a critical posttranslational modification (PTM) in central metabolism and cell signaling. Still, the detection of phosphohistidine (pHis) in the proteome has remained difficult due to the scarcity of tools to enrich and identify this labile PTM. To address this, we report the first global proteomic analysis of pHis proteins, combining selective immunoenrichment of pHis peptides and a bioinformatic strategy based on mechanistic insight into pHis peptide gas-phase fragmentation during LC–MS/MS. We show that collision-induced dissociation (CID) of pHis peptides produces prominent characteristic neutral losses of 98, 80, and 116 Da. Using isotopic labeling studies, we also demonstrate that the 98 Da neutral loss occurs via gas-phase phosphoryl transfer from pHis to the peptide C-terminal α-carboxylate or to Glu/Asp side chain residues if present. To exploit this property, we developed a software tool that screens LC–MS/MS spectra for potential matches to pHis-containing peptides based on their neutral loss pattern. This tool was integrated into a proteomics workflow for the identification of endogenous pHis-containing proteins in cellular lysates. As an illustration of this strategy, we analyzed pHis peptides from glycerol-fed and mannitol-fed Escherichia coli cells. We identified known and a number of previously speculative pHis sites inferred by homology, predominantly in the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar transferase system (PTS). Furthermore, we identified two new sites of histidine phosphorylation on aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE) and pyruvate kinase (PykF) enzymes, previously not known to bear this modification. This study lays the groundwork for future pHis proteomics studies in bacteria and other organisms. PMID:25156620

  9. Regenerable Air Purification System for Gas-Phase Contaminant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinescu, Ileana C.; Qi, Nan; LeVan, M. Douglas; Finn, Cory K.; Finn, John E.; Luna, Bernadette (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A regenerable air purification system (RAPS) that uses water vapor to displace adsorbed contaminants from an. adsorbent column into a closed oxidation loop is under development through cooperative R&D between Vanderbilt University and NASA Ames Research Center. A unit based on this design can be used for removing trace gas-phase contaminants from spacecraft cabin air or from polluted process streams including incinerator exhaust. Recent work has focused on fabrication and operation of a RAPS breadboard at NASA Ames, and on measurement of adsorption isotherm data for several important organic compounds at Vanderbilt. These activities support the use and validation of RAPS modeling software also under development at Vanderbilt, which will in turn be used to construct a prototype system later in the project.

  10. Photodissociation and spectroscopy of gas phase bimetallic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, M.A.

    1992-05-01

    Focus of the research program is the study of gas phase metal clusters for modeling fundamental interactions on metal surfaces. We characterize the chemical bonding between component atoms in clusters as well as the bonding in adsorption on cluster surfaces. Electronic spectra, vibrational frequencies and bond dissociation energies are measured for both neutral and ionized clusters with laser/mass spectrometry techniques. Small bimetallic cluster cations containing Bi/Cr, Bi/Fe, Sn/Bi, and Pb/Sb were photodissociated at various uv wavelengths. Silver dimer van der Waals complexes were produced with a series of rare gas atoms (Ar, Kr, Xe), and their vibrational frequencies and dissociation energies were obtained. (DLC)

  11. Optical properties of anthocyanins in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xiaochuan; Calzolari, Arrigo; Baroni, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase optical properties of the six most common anthocyanins are studied using time-dependent density-functional theory. Different anthocyanins are classified into three groups, according to the number of low-frequency peaks displayed in the UV-vis spectrum. This behavior is analyzed in terms of one-electron transitions and interaction effects, the latter being rationalized using a suitable double-pole model. Moving from PBE to hybrid exchange-correlation functionals results in a hypsochromic shift of the optical gap. While the colors thus predicted do not quite match those observed in solution, thus highlighting the importance of solvation effects, adoption of hybrid functionals remarkably determines a greater chromatic uniformity of different molecules, in qualitative agreement with experimental evidence in acidic solutions.

  12. Gas-phase reactions of halogen species of atmospheric importance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heard, Anne C.

    A low-pressure discharge-flow technique, with various optical detection methods, has been used to determine bimolecular rate coefficients for a number of reactions in the gas-phase between OH radicals and organic halogen-containing molecules and between NO3 radicals and the iodine species I2 and I. These experiments have shown that: (1) the reaction of methyl iodide with OH accounts for approximately 2 percent of the removal of CH3I from the troposphere as compared with photolysis; (2) abstraction of I-atoms from a C-I bond by OH is probable in the gas-phase; (3) the halogen-containing anaesthetic substances halothane CF3CClBrH, enflurane CF2HOCF2CFClH, isoflurane CF2HOCClHCF3 and sevoflurane (CF3)2CHOCFH2 have significantly shorter tropospheric lifetimes than the fully halogenated CFCs and halons because of reaction with the OH radical and are thus unlikely to be transported up to the stratosphere where they could contribute to the depletion of ozone. Data obtained for reactions between OH and some 'CFC alternatives' along with measurements of the integrated absorption cross-sections of the compounds in the spectral region 800-1200 cm(exp -1) were used to calculate ozone depletion potentials (ODP) and greenhouse warming potentials relative to CFCl3 for each compound. The study of the reactions between OH and CF3CFBrH and CF2BrH was used to provide a useful first estimate of the environmental acceptability of these compounds in the context of their possible use as replacements for the conventional CFCs. A method was developed to provide a first estimate of the ODP of a halogenated alkane without use of a complicated (and expensive) computer modeling scheme. A reaction between molecular iodine and the nitrate radical in the gas-phase was discovered and the kinetics of this reaction have been studied. No temperature or pressure dependence was observed for the rate of reaction, the rate constant of which was found to be (1.5 +/- 0.5) x 10(exp -12)/cu cm/molecule/s. The reaction between I and NO3 was found to occur at a rate of about 60 percent of the hard-sphere collision frequency for the two species. The rate constant for reaction between I and NO3 was found to be (4.5 +/- 1.9) x 10(exp -10)/cu cm/molecule/s. An upper limit for the heat of formation of IONO2 of (21 +/- 3) kJmol(exp -1) was also derived.

  13. Gas-phase nitronium ion affinities.

    PubMed Central

    Cacace, F; de Petris, G; Pepi, F; Angelelli, F

    1995-01-01

    Evaluation of nitronium ion-transfer equilibria, L1NO2+ + L2 = L2NO2+ + L1 (where L1 and L2 are ligands 1 and 2, respectively) by Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry and application of the kinetic method, based on the metastable fragmentation of L1(NO2+)L2 nitronium ion-bound dimers led to a scale of relative gas-phase nitronium ion affinities. This scale, calibrated to a recent literature value for the NO2+ affinity of water, led for 18 ligands, including methanol, ammonia, representative ketones, nitriles, and nitroalkanes, to absolute NO2+ affinities, that fit a reasonably linear general correlation when plotted vs. the corresponding proton affinities (PAs). The slope of the plot depends to a certain extent on the specific nature of the ligands and, hence, the correlations between the NO2+ affinities, and the PAs of a given class of compounds display a better linearity than the general correlation and may afford a useful tool for predicting the NO2+ affinity of a molecule based on its PA. The NO2+ binding energies are considerably lower than the corresponding PAs and well below the binding energies of related polyatomic cations, such as NO+, a trend consistent with the available theoretical results on the structure and the stability of simple NO2+ complexes. The present study reports an example of extension of the kinetic method to dimers, such as L1(NO2+)L2, bound by polyatomic ions, which may considerably widen its scope. Finally, measurement of the NO2+ affinity of ammonia allowed evaluation of the otherwise inaccessible PA of the amino group of nitramide and, hence, direct experimental verification of previous theoretical estimates. PMID:11607578

  14. Non-Equilibrium Isomer Distribution of the Gas-Phase Photoactive Yellow Protein Chromophore.

    PubMed

    Almasian, Mitra; Grzetic, Josipa; van Maurik, Johanne; Steill, Jeffrey D; Berden, Giel; Ingemann, Steen; Buma, Wybren Jan; Oomens, Jos

    2012-08-16

    The conjugate base of para-coumaric acid, which can be conveniently generated in the gas phase by electrospray ionization (ESI), is a commonly used model system for the chromophore of the photoactive yellow protein. Here we report its gas-phase IR spectrum, which shows that the anion easily adopts a carboxylate structure lying 60 kJ/mol higher in energy than the global minimum phenoxide structure. Generation of the biologically more relevant phenoxide isomer by ESI can be achieved using dry acetonitrile as solvent. PMID:26295780

  15. Prediction of Antimicrobial Activity of Synthetic Peptides by a Decision Tree Model

    PubMed Central

    Lira, Felipe; Perez, Pedro S.; Baranauskas, Jos A.

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a persistent problem in the public health sphere. However, recent attempts to find effective substitutes to combat infections have been directed at identifying natural antimicrobial peptides in order to circumvent resistance to commercial antibiotics. This study describes the development of synthetic peptides with antimicrobial activity, created in silico by site-directed mutation modeling using wild-type peptides as scaffolds for these mutations. Fragments of antimicrobial peptides were used for modeling with molecular modeling computational tools. To analyze these peptides, a decision tree model, which indicated the action range of peptides on the types of microorganisms on which they can exercise biological activity, was created. The decision tree model was processed using physicochemistry properties from known antimicrobial peptides available at the Antimicrobial Peptide Database (APD). The two most promising peptides were synthesized, and antimicrobial assays showed inhibitory activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Colossomin C and colossomin D were the most inhibitory peptides at 5 ?g/ml against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The methods described in this work and the results obtained are useful for the identification and development of new compounds with antimicrobial activity through the use of computational tools. PMID:23455341

  16. A computational model for predicting fusion peptide of retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sijia; Han, Jiuqiang; Liu, Ruiling; Liu, Jun; Lv, Hongqiang

    2016-04-01

    As a pivotal domain within envelope protein, fusion peptide (FP) plays a crucial role in pathogenicity and therapeutic intervention. Taken into account the limited FP annotations in NCBI database and absence of FP prediction software, it is urgent and desirable to develop a bioinformatics tool to predict new putative FPs (np-FPs) in retroviruses. In this work, a sequence-based FP model was proposed by combining Hidden Markov Method with similarity comparison. The classification accuracies are 91.97% and 92.31% corresponding to 10-fold and leave-one-out cross-validation. After scanning sequences without FP annotations, this model discovered 53,946 np-FPs. The statistical results on FPs or np-FPs reveal that FP is a conserved and hydrophobic domain. The FP software programmed for windows environment is available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/fptool/files/?source=navbar. PMID:26963379

  17. Ultrafast gas-phase electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Joseph Charles

    1998-03-01

    The temporal resolution of pump-probe, gas-phase electron diffraction (GED) has been extended to the picosecond time scale, a three order-of-magnitude improvement. With such resolution, GED can now be applied to structural studies of fundamental chemical dynamics, providing complementary information to conventional time-resolved spectroscopy techniques. This thesis gives a thorough theoretical and experimental treatment of ultrafast GED. Simulations of coherent chemical dynamics demonstrated that the evolution of molecular spatial coordinates can be determined with fs GED. Similarly, ps GED can reveal the structure of short-lived intermediates in kinetic processes, and the circular symmetries of GED patterns were predicted to break during ps rotational coherences. 620-nm output from an amplified femtosecond laser (2.5 mJ; 300 fs) was split into pump and probe arms and frequency-doubled. 95% of the laser intensity was focused onto a molecular beam. The remaining 5% was directed onto a back-illuminated 450-A silver cathode, where ultrafast electron pulses were created via the photoelectric effect and accelerated to 18 keV. Space-charge effects forced a compromise between electron number density and temporal resolution: streaking experiments revealed that the pulse duration increased by 1 ps for every 1,000 electrons. The electrons intersected the pump laser directly underneath the molecular beam orifice. Approximately 10% of the electrons scattered elastically from sample molecules within the interaction region, and the resulting diffraction pattern was recorded with a scintillator/fused fiber optic/image intensifier/charge- coupled device imaging system. Single-electron sensitivity across two-dimensions was necessary because of the extremely low electron flux, and the measured detective quantum efficiency of the imaging system was better than 0.5. Ground-state GED patterns of several molecules were recorded using ps electron pulses. Time zero for the pump-probe experiment was identified to within 1 ps using photoionization-induced lensing (PIL) of the unscattered electron beam. The first ultrafast GED investigation studied diiodomethane, and diffraction patterns were recorded at several time steps around time zero. The resulting structural transients showed that 10% of the CH2I2 dissociated into CH2I + I following excitation with the 310-nm pump laser. The estimated temporal resolution was 5 to 10 ps.

  18. Primary amphipathic cell-penetrating peptides: structural requirements and interactions with model membranes.

    PubMed

    Deshayes, Sbastien; Plnat, Thomas; Aldrian-Herrada, Gudrun; Divita, Gilles; Le Grimellec, Christian; Heitz, Frdric

    2004-06-22

    To identify rules for the design of efficient cell-penetrating peptides that deliver therapeutic agents into subcellular compartments, we compared the properties of two closely related primary amphipathic peptides that mainly differ by their conformational state. On the basis of a peptide Pbeta that is nonstructured in water and that promotes efficient cellular uptake of nucleic acids through noncovalent association, we have designed a peptide [Palpha] that is predicted to adopt a helical conformation. We show that [Pbeta] undergoes a lipid-induced conformational transition into a sheet structure, while [Palpha] remains helical. Penetration experiments show that both peptides can spontaneously insert into phospholipid membranes. Analysis of compression isotherms indicates that both peptides interact with phospholipids in the liquid expanded and liquid condensed states. AFM observations reveal that the peptides strongly disrupt the lipid organization of the monolayers and that the conformational state can influence the uptake by model membranes. PMID:15196012

  19. Rosetta FlexPepDock web server--high resolution modeling of peptide-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    London, Nir; Raveh, Barak; Cohen, Eyal; Fathi, Guy; Schueler-Furman, Ora

    2011-07-01

    Peptide-protein interactions are among the most prevalent and important interactions in the cell, but a large fraction of those interactions lack detailed structural characterization. The Rosetta FlexPepDock web server (http://flexpepdock.furmanlab.cs.huji.ac.il/) provides an interface to a high-resolution peptide docking (refinement) protocol for the modeling of peptide-protein complexes, implemented within the Rosetta framework. Given a protein receptor structure and an approximate, possibly inaccurate model of the peptide within the receptor binding site, the FlexPepDock server refines the peptide to high resolution, allowing full flexibility to the peptide backbone and to all side chains. This protocol was extensively tested and benchmarked on a wide array of non-redundant peptide-protein complexes, and was proven effective when applied to peptide starting conformations within 5.5 Å backbone root mean square deviation from the native conformation. FlexPepDock has been applied to several systems that are mediated and regulated by peptide-protein interactions. This easy to use and general web server interface allows non-expert users to accurately model their specific peptide-protein interaction of interest. PMID:21622962

  20. Anti-inflammatory effect of a retrovirus-derived immunosuppressive peptide in mouse models

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Short dimeric or mulitmeric peptides derived from a highly conserved stretch of amino acids from gammaretroviral envelope proteins has been found to have immunosuppressive properties in vitro. Here we test the hypothesis that such immunosuppressive peptides may serve as immunomodulatory reagents for treatment of inflammatory disorders. Results The anti-inflammatory effect of a synthetic retrovirus-derived immunosuppressive peptide of 17 amino acids was tested in two murine skin inflammation models, a TPA-induced acute toxic contact eczema model and an oxazolone-induced allergic contact dermatitis. Overall, mice (n?=?24) treated with a topically applied cream containing the dimeric immunosuppressive peptide exhibited a reduction of 28.8% in ear thickness (range 20.1-42.5), whereas the application of a scrambled peptide dimer or a monomer of the immunosuppressive peptide remained without effect (p?=?0.028). Furthermore, ear biopsies from mice treated with the dimeric immunosuppressive peptide showed a significant reduction in mRNA of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-?, IL-17C, and IL-6 as well as the chemokine CXCL2 compared to mice treated with control peptides. Conclusion Using two murine skin inflammation models, we show that an immunosuppressive retroviral peptide is capable of reducing inflammatory disorders. The results indicate that virus-derived immunosuppressive peptides capable of down-regulating several proinflammatory cytokines may represent a novel class of drugs for the treatment of excess inflammation. PMID:24245569

  1. Interaction of peptides with cell membranes: insights from molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen-Lu; Ding, Hong-Ming; Ma, Yu-Qiang

    2016-03-01

    The investigation of the interaction of peptides with cell membranes is the focus of active research. It can enhance the understanding of basic membrane functions such as membrane transport, fusion, and signaling processes, and it may shed light on potential applications of peptides in biomedicine. In this review, we will present current advances in computational studies on the interaction of different types of peptides with the cell membrane. Depending on the properties of the peptide, membrane, and external environment, the peptide-membrane interaction shows a variety of different forms. Here, on the basis of recent computational progress, we will discuss how different peptides could initiate membrane pores, translocate across the membrane, induce membrane endocytosis, produce membrane curvature, form fibrils on the membrane surface, as well as interact with functional membrane proteins. Finally, we will present a conclusion summarizing recent progress and providing some specific insights into future developments in this field. PMID:26828575

  2. Biophysical properties of membrane-active peptides based on micelle modeling: a case study of cell-penetrating and antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Hong, Gongyi; Johnson, Glenn R; Pachter, Ruth; Cheung, Margaret S

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms of short peptides interacting with membrane-mimetic systems. Three short peptides were selected for this study: penetratin as a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP), and temporin A and KSL as antimicrobial peptides (AMP). We investigated the detailed interactions of the peptides with dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles, and the subsequent peptide insertion based on free energy calculations by using all-atomistic molecular dynamics simulations with the united atom force field and explicit solvent models. First, we found that the free energy barrier to insertion for the three peptides is dependent on the chemical composition of the micelles. Because of the favorable electrostatic interactions between the peptides and the headgroups of lipids, the insertion barrier into an SDS micelle is less than a DPC micelle. Second, the peptides' secondary structures may play a key role in their binding and insertion ability, particularly for amphiphilic peptides such as penetratin and KSL. The secondary structures with a stronger ability to bind with and insert into micelles are the ones that account for a smaller surface area of hydrophobic core, thus offering a possible criterion for peptide design with specific functionalities. PMID:20939546

  3. Computational Modeling Studies of Peptides and Proteins on Inorganic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Barry

    2013-03-01

    Biological moieties offer exquisite sensitivity and selectivity in their interactions with small molecules, offering considerable potential in applications as chemical sensors. To detect binding events between the peptide and the intended molecule, a transduction mechanism is needed. This often involves an association of the peptide with an inorganic surface, such as a metal nanoparticle, a carbon nanotube, or graphene. Understanding the nature of the association of the peptide with the surface and its effect on the conformational (and thus, binding) properties of the peptide are key to optimizing the sensing mechanism. We utilized computational approaches ranging from ab initio to molecular dynamics to bond-fluctuation Monte Carlo methods to study the adsorption of peptides and proteins on inorganic surfaces to develop an understanding of the role that composition and substrate character plays in the adsorption process, and in turn, the effects on the binding events with the molecules of interest.

  4. Interaction of peptides with cell membranes: insights from molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen-lu; Ding, Hong-ming; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2016-03-01

    The investigation of the interaction of peptides with cell membranes is the focus of active research. It can enhance the understanding of basic membrane functions such as membrane transport, fusion, and signaling processes, and it may shed light on potential applications of peptides in biomedicine. In this review, we will present current advances in computational studies on the interaction of different types of peptides with the cell membrane. Depending on the properties of the peptide, membrane, and external environment, the peptide–membrane interaction shows a variety of different forms. Here, on the basis of recent computational progress, we will discuss how different peptides could initiate membrane pores, translocate across the membrane, induce membrane endocytosis, produce membrane curvature, form fibrils on the membrane surface, as well as interact with functional membrane proteins. Finally, we will present a conclusion summarizing recent progress and providing some specific insights into future developments in this field.

  5. Modeling the QSAR of ACE-Inhibitory Peptides with ANN and Its Applied Illustration

    PubMed Central

    He, Ronghai; Ma, Haile; Zhao, Weirui; Qu, Wenjuan; Zhao, Jiewen; Luo, Lin; Zhu, Wenxue

    2012-01-01

    A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model of angiotensin-converting enzyme- (ACE-) inhibitory peptides was built with an artificial neural network (ANN) approach based on structural or activity data of 58 dipeptides (including peptide activity, hydrophilic amino acids content, three-dimensional shape, size, and electrical parameters), the overall correlation coefficient of the predicted versus actual data points is R = 0.928, and the model was applied in ACE-inhibitory peptides preparation from defatted wheat germ protein (DWGP). According to the QSAR model, the C-terminal of the peptide was found to have principal importance on ACE-inhibitory activity, that is, if the C-terminal is hydrophobic amino acid, the peptide's ACE-inhibitory activity will be high, and proteins which contain abundant hydrophobic amino acids are suitable to produce ACE-inhibitory peptides. According to the model, DWGP is a good protein material to produce ACE-inhibitory peptides because it contains 42.84% of hydrophobic amino acids, and structural information analysis from the QSAR model showed that proteases of Alcalase and Neutrase were suitable candidates for ACE-inhibitory peptides preparation from DWGP. Considering higher DH and similar ACE-inhibitory activity of hydrolysate compared with Neutrase, Alcalase was finally selected through experimental study. PMID:21822439

  6. Gas-Phase Reactions of Halogen Species of Atmospheric Importance.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heard, Anne C.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. A low-pressure discharge-flow technique, with various optical detection methods, has been used to determine bimolecular rate coefficients for a number of reactions in the gas-phase between OH radicals and organic halogen -containing molecules and between NO_3 radicals and the iodine species I_2 and I. These experiments have shown that: (i) the reaction of methyl iodide with OH accounts for approximately 2% of the removal of CH_3I from the troposphere as compared with photolysis; (ii) abstraction of I-atoms from a C-I bond by OH is probable in the gas -phase; (iii) the halogen-containing anaesthetic substances halothane CF_3CCl BrH, enflurane CF_2HOCF _2CFClH, isoflurane CF_2HOCClHCF _3 and sevoflurane (CF_3) _2CHOCFH_2 have significantly shorter tropospheric lifetimes than the fully halogenated CFCs and halons because of reaction with the OH radical and are thus unlikely to be transported up to the stratosphere where they could contribute to the depletion of ozone. Data obtained for reactions between OH and some 'CFC alternatives' along with measurements of the integrated absorption cross -sections of the compounds in the spectral region 800-1200 cm^{-1} were used to calculate ozone depletion potentials (ODP) and greenhouse warming potentials relative to CFCl_3 for each compound. The study of the reactions between OH and CF_3CFBrH and CF _2BrH was used to provide a useful first estimate of the environmental acceptability of these compounds in the context of their possible use as replacements for the conventional CFCs. A method was developed to provide a first estimate of the ODP of a halogenated alkane without use of a complicated (and expensive) computer modeling scheme. A reaction between molecular iodine and the nitrate radical in the gas-phase was discovered and the kinetics of this reaction have been studied. No temperature or pressure dependence was observed for the rate of reaction, the rate constant of which was found to be (1.5 +/- 0.5) times 10 ^{-12}cm^{ -3}molecule^{-1}s ^{-1}. The reaction between I and NO_3 was found to occur at a rate of about 60% of the hard-sphere collision frequency for the two species. The rate constant for reaction between I and NO_3 was found to be (4.5 +/- 1.9) times 10^{-10}cm^3 molecule^{-1}s ^{-1}. An upper limit for the heat of formation of IONO_2 of (21 +/- 3) kJmol^ {-1} was also derived. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  7. ENGINE EXHAUST PARTICULATE AND GAS PHASE CONTRIBUTIONS TO VASCULAR TOXICITY

    PubMed Central

    Campen, Matthew; Robertson, Sarah; Lund, Amie; Lucero, Joann; McDonald, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular health effects of near-roadway pollution appear more substantial than other sources of air pollution. The underlying cause of this phenomenon may simply be concentration-related, but the possibility remains that gases and particulate matter (PM) may physically interact and further enhance systemic vascular toxicity. To test this, we utilized a common hypercholesterolemic mouse model (Apolipoprotein E-null) exposed to mixed vehicular emissions (MVE; combined gasoline and diesel exhausts) for 6 h/d × 50 days, with additional permutations of removing PM by filtration and also removing gaseous species from PM by denudation. Several vascular bioassays, including matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) protein, 3-nitrotyrosine, and plasma-induced vasodilatory impairments, highlighted that the whole emissions, containing both particulate and gaseous components, was collectively more potent than MVE-derived PM or gas mixtures, alone. Thus, we conclude that inhalation of fresh whole emissions induce greater systemic vascular toxicity than either the particulate or gas phase alone. These findings lend credence to the hypothesis that the near-roadway environment may have a more focused public health impact due to gas-particle interactions. PMID:24730681

  8. Estimation of gas phase mixing in packed beds

    SciTech Connect

    Frigerio, S.; Thunman, H.; Leckner, B.; Hermansson, S.

    2008-04-15

    An improved model is presented for estimation of the mixing of gaseous species in a packed bed for fuel conversion. In particular, this work clarifies the main characteristics of mixing of volatiles and oxidizers in a burning bed of high-volatile solid fuel. Expressions are introduced to represent the active role of degradation of the solid particles in the mixing within the gas phase. During drying and devolatilization the solids modify the behavior of the gas flow: the volatiles released from the surface of the particles increase the turbulence in the system, and hence the rates of the homogeneous reactions under mixing-limited conditions. Numerical experiments are carried out to test the validity of this conclusion regarding mixing in different geometries. The flow of volatiles leaving the fuel particles is shown to contribute significantly to mixing, especially at low air flows through a bed. However, the fraction of the particle surface where volatiles are released and its orientation in the bed should be better determined in order to increase the accuracy of the estimates of turbulent mixing. (author)

  9. Surface plasmon sensing of gas phase contaminants using optical fiber.

    SciTech Connect

    Thornberg, Steven Michael; White, Michael I.; Rumpf, Arthur Norman; Pfeifer, Kent Bryant

    2009-10-01

    Fiber-optic gas phase surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection of several contaminant gases of interest to state-of-health monitoring in high-consequence sealed systems has been demonstrated. These contaminant gases include H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and moisture using a single-ended optical fiber mode. Data demonstrate that results can be obtained and sensitivity is adequate in a dosimetric mode that allows periodic monitoring of system atmospheres. Modeling studies were performed to direct the design of the sensor probe for optimized dimensions and to allow simultaneous monitoring of several constituents with a single sensor fiber. Testing of the system demonstrates the ability to detect 70mTorr partial pressures of H{sub 2} using this technique and <280 {micro}Torr partial pressures of H{sub 2}S. In addition, a multiple sensor fiber has been demonstrated that allows a single fiber to measure H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and H{sub 2}O without changing the fiber or the analytical system.

  10. Engine exhaust particulate and gas phase contributions to vascular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Campen, Matthew; Robertson, Sarah; Lund, Amie; Lucero, Joann; McDonald, Jacob

    2014-05-01

    Cardiovascular health effects of near-roadway pollution appear more substantial than other sources of air pollution. The underlying cause of this phenomenon may simply be concentration-related, but the possibility remains that gases and particulate matter (PM) may physically interact and further enhance systemic vascular toxicity. To test this, we utilized a common hypercholesterolemic mouse model (Apolipoprotein E-null) exposed to mixed vehicle emission (MVE; combined gasoline and diesel exhausts) for 6 h/d × 50 d, with additional permutations of removing PM by filtration and also removing gaseous species from PM by denudation. Several vascular bioassays, including matrix metalloproteinase-9 protein, 3-nitrotyrosine and plasma-induced vasodilatory impairments, highlighted that the whole emissions, containing both particulate and gaseous components, was collectively more potent than MVE-derived PM or gas mixtures, alone. Thus, we conclude that inhalation of fresh whole emissions induce greater systemic vascular toxicity than either the particulate or gas phase alone. These findings lend credence to the hypothesis that the near-roadway environment may have a more focused public health impact due to gas-particle interactions. PMID:24730681

  11. Statistical Characterization of the Charge State and Residue Dependence of Low-Energy CID Peptide Dissociation Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yingying; Triscari, Joseph M.; Tseng, George C.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Wysocki, Vicki H.

    2005-09-01

    Data mining was performed on 28 330 unique peptide tandem mass spectra for which sequences were assigned with high confidence. By dividing the spectra into different sets based on structural features and charge states of the corresponding peptides, chemical interactions involved in promoting specific cleavage patterns in gas-phase peptides were characterized. Pairwise fragmentation maps describing cleavages at all Xxx-Zzz residue combinations for b and y ions reveal that the difference in basicity between Arg and Lys results in different dissociation patterns for singly charged Arg- and Lys-ending tryptic peptides. While one dominant protonation form (proton localized) exists for Arg-ending peptides, a heterogeneous population of different protonated forms or more facile interconversion of protonated forms (proton partially mobile) exists for Lys-ending peptides. Cleavage C-terminal to acidic residues dominates spectra from peptides that have a localized proton and cleavage N-terminal to Pro dominates those that have a mobile or partially mobile proton. When Pro is absent from peptides that have a mobile or partially mobile proton, cleavage at each peptide bond becomes much more prominent. Whether the above patterns can be found in b ions, y ions, or both depends on the location of the proton holder(s). Enhanced cleavages C-terminal to branched aliphatic residues (Ile, Val, Leu) are observed in both b and y ions from peptides that have a mobile proton, as well as in y ions from peptides that have a partially mobile proton; enhanced cleavages N-terminal to these residues are observed in b ions from peptides that have a partially mobile proton. Statistical tools have been designed to visualize the fragmentation maps and measure the similarity between them. The pairwise cleavage patterns observed expand our knowledge of peptide gas-phase fragmentation behaviors and should be useful in algorithm development that employs improved models to predict fragment ion intensities.

  12. Probing the Binding Interfaces of Protein Complexes Using Gas-Phase H/D Exchange Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mistarz, Ulrik H; Brown, Jeffery M; Haselmann, Kim F; Rand, Kasper D

    2016-02-01

    Fast gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange mediated by ND3 gas and measured by mass spectrometry (gas-phase HDX-MS) is a largely unharnessed, fast, and sensitive method for probing primary- and higher-order polypeptide structure. Labeling of heteroatom-bound non-amide hydrogens in a sub-millisecond time span after electrospray ionization by ND3 gas can provide structural insights into protein conformers present in solution. Here, we have explored the use of gas-phase HDX-MS for probing the higher-order structure and binding interfaces of protein complexes originating from native solution conditions. Lysozyme ions bound by an oligosaccharide incorporated less deuterium than the unbound ion. Similarly, trypsin ions showed reduced deuterium uptake when bound by the peptide ligand vasopressin. Our results are in good agreement with crystal structures of the native protein complexes, and illustrate that gas-phase HDX-MS can provide a sensitive and simple approach to measure the number of heteroatom-bound non-amide side-chain hydrogens involved in the binding interface of biologically relevant protein complexes. PMID:26749447

  13. Mechanical unfolding pathway of a model ?-peptide foldamer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, Lalita; Jaschonek, Stefan; Gauss, Jrgen; Diezemann, Gregor

    2015-05-01

    Foldamers constructed from oligomers of ?-peptides form stable secondary helix structures already for small chain lengths, which makes them ideal candidates for the investigation of the (un)folding of polypeptides. Here, the results of molecular simulations of the mechanical unfolding of a ?-heptapeptide in methanol solvent revealing the detailed unfolding pathway are reported. The unfolding process is shown to proceed via a stable intermediate even for such a small system. This result is arrived at performing non-equilibrium force ramp simulations employing different pulling velocities and also using standard calculations of the potential of mean force, i.e., the free energy as a function of the helix elongation. It is thus demonstrated that even with the rather large pulling velocities employed in the force ramp simulations relevant information about the equilibrium kinetics can be obtained. The smallness of the system allows a detailed analysis of the unfolding pathway, which is characterized by an opening of the terminal loops followed by the unfolding of the center. This sequence is in accord with the configurational preferences of the system that also are responsible for the stability of the 314-helix. From an analysis of the distributions of rupture forces and the force spectra, the kinetic rates for both transitions were determined and common models were used to extract geometric quantities describing the free energy landscape of the system.

  14. Measuring the hydrogen/deuterium exchange of proteins at high spatial resolution by mass spectrometry: overcoming gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium scrambling.

    PubMed

    Rand, Kasper D; Zehl, Martin; Jrgensen, Thomas J D

    2014-10-21

    Proteins are dynamic molecules that exhibit conformational flexibility to function properly. Well-known examples of this are allosteric regulation of protein activity and ligand-induced conformational changes in protein receptors. Detailed knowledge of the conformational properties of proteins is therefore pertinent to both basic and applied research, including drug development, since the majority of drugs target protein receptors and a growing number of drugs introduced to the market are therapeutic peptides or proteins. X-ray crystallography provides a static picture at atomic resolution of the lowest-energy structure of the native ensemble. There is a growing need for sensitive analytical tools to explore all of the significant molecular structures in the conformational landscape of proteins. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) has recently emerged as a powerful method for characterizing protein conformational dynamics. The basis of this method is the fact that backbone amides in stable hydrogen-bonded structures (e.g., ?-helices and ?-sheets) are protected against exchange with the aqueous solvent. All protein structures are dynamic, however, and eventually all of the protecting hydrogen bonds will transiently break as the protein--according to thermodynamic principles--cycles through partially unfolded states that correspond to excited free energy levels. As a result, all of the backbone amides will eventually become temporarily solvent-exposed and exchange-competent over time. Consequently, a folded protein in D2O will gradually incorporate deuterium into its backbone amides, and the kinetics of the process can be readily monitored by mass spectrometry. The deuterium uptake kinetics for the intact protein (global exchange kinetics) represents the sum of the exchange kinetics for the individual backbone amides. Local exchange kinetics is typically achieved by using pepsin digestion under quench conditions (i.e., under cold acidic conditions where the amide hydrogen exchange rate is slowed by many orders of magnitude). The ability to localize the individual deuterated residues (the spatial resolution) is determined by the size (typically ?7-15 residues) and the number of peptic peptides. These peptides provide a relatively coarse-grained picture of the protein dynamics. A fundamental understanding of the relationship between protein function/dysfunction and conformational dynamics requires in many cases higher resolution and ultimately single-residue resolution. In this Account, we summarize our efforts to achieve single-residue deuterium levels in proteins by electron-based or laser-induced gas-phase fragmentation methods. A crucial analytical requirement for this approach is that the pattern of deuterium labeling from solution is retained in the gas-phase fragment ions. It is therefore essential to control and minimize any occurrence of gas-phase randomization of the solution deuterium label (H/D scrambling) during the MS experiment. For this purpose, we have developed model peptide probes to accurately measure the onset and extent of H/D scrambling. Our analytical procedures to control the occurrence of H/D scrambling are detailed along with the physical parameters that induce it during MS analysis. In light of the growing use of gas-phase dissociation experiments to measure the HDX of proteins in order to obtain a detailed characterization and understanding of the dynamic conformations and interactions of proteins at the molecular level, we discuss the perspectives and challenges of future high-resolution HDX-MS methodology. PMID:25171396

  15. Exxon gains gas-phase patent, makes LLDPE

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.

    1995-04-26

    Exxon chemical says it has made linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE) using metallocene catalysts at its world-scale gas-phase plant in Mont Belvieu, TX. Exxon also says it has received a broad US patent that covers the use of metallocenes in gas-phase reactors that use condensing mode technology and that it plans to license the know-how. The moves, say industry experts, greatly strengthen Exxon`s position in metallocenes, particularly in pushing metallocene-based PE into commodity markets. The use of gas-phase technology {open_quotes}had to happen{close_quotes} to allow metallocene polymers to compete as commodities, says David Highfield, v.p. at Catalyst Consultants (Spring House, PA). {open_quotes}It`s very important and very significant in widening the scope of [metallocene] technology.{close_quotes}

  16. Semisupervised model-based validation of peptide identifications in mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyungwon; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I

    2008-01-01

    Development of robust statistical methods for validation of peptide assignments to tandem mass (MS/MS) spectra obtained using database searching remains an important problem. PeptideProphet is one of the commonly used computational tools available for that purpose. An alternative simple approach for validation of peptide assignments is based on addition of decoy (reversed, randomized, or shuffled) sequences to the searched protein sequence database. The probabilistic modeling approach of PeptideProphet and the decoy strategy can be combined within a single semisupervised framework, leading to improved robustness and higher accuracy of computed probabilities even in the case of most challenging data sets. We present a semisupervised expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm for constructing a Bayes classifier for peptide identification using the probability mixture model, extending PeptideProphet to incorporate decoy peptide matches. Using several data sets of varying complexity, from control protein mixtures to a human plasma sample, and using three commonly used database search programs, SEQUEST, MASCOT, and TANDEM/k-score, we illustrate that more accurate mixture estimation leads to an improved control of the false discovery rate in the classification of peptide assignments. PMID:18159924

  17. Interaction of the Alzheimer Aβ(25-35) peptide segment with model membranes.

    PubMed

    Cuco, Andreia; Serro, Ana Paula; Farinha, José Paulo; Saramago, Benilde; da Silva, Amélia Gonçalves

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the presence of amyloid plaques in the brain. The main components of these plaques are the Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) peptides but the Aβ(25-35) sequence is the most frequently studied fragment because it represents a biologically active region of the longer Aβ peptides. In the present work, the interactions of Aβ(25-35) peptide with model membranes were investigated, taking into consideration the aggregation state of the peptide. Monolayers and liposomes were taken as model membranes with two lipid compositions: the equimolar ternary mixture of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), sphingomyelin (SM), and cholesterol (Chol) and the equimolar POPC/SM binary mixture. The interaction of Aβ(25-35) with the monolayers, investigated at low concentrations (0.25-4μM), suggested a three step mechanism: adsorption-monomers or dimers adsorb at the polar region of the lipid monolayer; nucleation-adsorbed peptides act as nucleation sites for higher aggregates; and penetration-these aggregates insert in the hydrophobic region of the monolayer. Chol slightly enhances the peptide-lipid monolayer interaction. The large aggregates nucleated in the bulk solution evidenced a weak interaction with monolayers. The interaction of Aβ(25-35) with liposomes, followed by a Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D) in a large range of peptide concentrations (10-80μM), was very small, independently of the peptide concentration. PMID:26816349

  18. Negative ion gas-phase chemistry of arenes.

    PubMed

    Danikiewicz, Witold; Zimnicka, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Reactions of aromatic and heteroaromatic compounds involving anions are of great importance in organic synthesis. Some of these reactions have been studied in the gas phase and are occasionally mentioned in reviews devoted to gas-phase negative ion chemistry, but no reviews exist that collect all existing information about these reactions. This work is intended to fill this gap. In the first part of this review, methods for generating arene anions in the gas phase and studying their physicochemical properties and fragmentation reactions are presented. The main topics in this part are as follows: processes in which gas-phase arene anions are formed, measurements and calculations of the proton affinities of arene anions, proton exchange reactions, and fragmentation processes of substituted arene anions, especially phenide ions. The second part is devoted to gas-phase reactions of arene anions. The most important of these are reactions with electrophiles such as carbonyl compounds and ?,?-unsaturated carbonyl and related compounds (Michael acceptors). Other reactions including oxidation of arene anions and halogenophilic reactions are also presented. In the last part of the review, reactions of electrophilic arenes with nucleophiles are discussed. The best known of these is the aromatic nucleophilic substitution (SN Ar) reaction; however, other processes that lead to the substitution of a hydrogen atom in the aromatic ring are also very important. Aromatic substrates in these reactions are usually but not always nitroarenes bearing other substituents in the ring. The first step in these reactions is the formation of an anionic ?-adduct, which, depending on the substituents in the aromatic ring and the structure of the attacking nucleophile, is either an intermediate or a transition state in the reaction path. In the present review, we attempted to collect the results of both experimental and computational studies of the aforementioned reactions conducted since the very beginning of gas-phase negative ion chemistry. 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 35: 123-146, 2016. PMID:25851641

  19. Gas phase acetaldehyde production in a continuous bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Soon Ook . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Trantolo, D.J. . Center for Biotechnology Engineering); Wise, D.L. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA . Center for Biotechnology Engineering)

    1993-08-20

    The gas phase continuous production of acetaldehyde was studied with particular emphasis on the development of biocatalyst (alcohol oxidase on solid phase support materials) for a fixed bed reactor. Based on the experimental results in a batch bioreactor, the biocatalysts were prepared by immobilization of alcohol oxidase on Amberlite IRA-400, packed into a column, and the continuous acetaldehyde production in the gas phase by alcohol oxidase was performed. The effects of the reaction temperature, flow rates of gaseous stream, and ethanol vapor concentration on the performance of the continuous bioreactor were investigated.

  20. An Experimental and Computational Study of the Gas-Phase Acidities of the Common Amino Acid Amides.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Chelsea E; Stover, Michele L; Bokatzian, Samantha S; Davis, John T M; Dixon, David A; Cassady, Carolyn J

    2015-07-30

    Using proton-transfer reactions in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer and correlated molecular orbital theory at the G3(MP2) level, gas-phase acidities (GAs) and the associated structures for amides corresponding to the common amino acids have been determined for the first time. These values are important because amino acid amides are models for residues in peptides and proteins. For compounds whose most acidic site is the C-terminal amide nitrogen, two ions populations were observed experimentally with GAs that differ by 4-7 kcal/mol. The lower energy, more acidic structure accounts for the majority of the ions formed by electrospray ionization. G3(MP2) calculations predict that the lowest energy anionic conformer has a cis-like orientation of the [-C(?O)NH](-) group whereas the higher energy, less acidic conformer has a trans-like orientation of this group. These two distinct conformers were predicted for compounds with aliphatic, amide, basic, hydroxyl, and thioether side chains. For the most acidic amino acid amides (tyrosine, cysteine, tryptophan, histidine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid amides) only one conformer was observed experimentally, and its experimental GA correlates with the theoretical GA related to side chain deprotonation. PMID:26196065

  1. Gas phase radiative effects in diffusion flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedir, Hasan

    Several radiation models are evaluated for a stagnation point diffusion flame of a solid fuel in terms of accuracy and computational time. Narrowband, wideband, spectral line weighted sum of gray gases (SLWSGG), and gray gas models are included in the comparison. Radiative heat flux predictions by the nongray narrowband, wideband, and SLWSGG models are found to be in good agreement with each other, whereas the gray gas models are found to be inaccurate. The narrowband model, the most complex among the models evaluated, is then applied first to a solid fuel and second to a pure gaseous diffusion flame. A polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) diffusion flame in a stagnation point geometry is solved with the narrowband model with COsb2, Hsb2O, and MMA vapor included in participating species. A detailed account of the emission and absorption from these species as well as the radiative heat fluxes are given as a function of the stretch rate. It is found that at low stretch rate the importance of radiation is increased due to an increase in the optical thickness, and a decrease in the conductive heat flux. Results show that COsb2 is the biggest emitter and absorber in the flame, MMA vapor is the second and Hsb2O is the least important. A pure gaseous flame in an opposed jet configuration is solved with the narrowband radiation model with CO as the fuel, and Osb2 as the oxidizer. Detailed. chemical kinetics and transport are incorporated into the combustion model with the use of the CHEMKIN and TRANSPORT software packages. The governing equations are solved with a modified version of the OPPDIF code. Dry and wet CO flames as well as COsb2 dilution are studied. Comparison of the results with and without the consideration of radiation reveals that the radiation is important for the whole flammable range of dry CO flames and for the low stretch rates of wet flames. Without the consideration of radiation the temperature and the species mole fractions (especially of minor species) predictions are different in comparison to the results with the inclusion of the radiation in the model. A flammability map with added Hsb2O fraction and stretch rate as coordinates is drawn. The flammability map contains a blow off extinction boundary at high stretch rate and a quenching extinction boundary at low stretch rate. With increasing Hsb2O addition the quenching boundary shifts to lower stretch rates and the blow off boundary shifts to higher stretch rates, hence the range of flammable stretch rates increases. COsb2 dilution of the fuel (CO) jet is found to decrease the flame temperature. A flammability map with COsb2 mole fraction in the fuel jet and the stretch rate as coordinates is also drawn. With increasing COsb2 dilution the range of flammable stretch rate decreases. For the dry CO-Osb2 case, when COsb2 dilution exceeds 17%, the system is nonflammable for any stretch rate. The most flammable stretch rate is around 2 ssp{-1}.

  2. A toy model of prebiotic peptide evolution: the possible role of relative amino acid abundances.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Carlos; Buhse, Thomas; Samaniego, Jos Lino; Castan Gonzlez, Jorge Alberto

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical-computational toy model based on the assumed dynamic principles of prebiotic peptide evolution. Starting from a pool of amino acid monomers, the model describes in a generalized manner the generation of peptides and their sequential information. The model integrates the intrinsic and dynamic key elements of the initiation of biopolymerization, such as the relative amino acid abundances and polarities, as well as the oligomer reversibility, i.e. fragmentation and recombination, and peptide self-replication. Our modeling results suggest that the relative amino acid abundances, as indicated by Miller-Urey type electric discharge experiments, played a principal role in the early sequential information of peptide profiles. Moreover, the computed profiles display an astonishing similarity to peptide profiles observed in so-called biological common ancestors found in the following three microorganisms; E. coli, M. jannaschii, and S. cereviasiae. The prebiotic peptide fingerprint was obtained by the so-called polarity index method that was earlier reported as a tool for the identification of cationic amphipathic antibacterial short peptides. PMID:23741717

  3. The Decomposition of Hydrazine in the Gas Phase and over an Iridium Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Michael W.; Gordon, Mark S.

    2013-09-30

    Hydrazine is an important rocket fuel, used as both a monopropellant and a bipropellant. This paper presents theoretical results to complement the extensive experimental studies of the gas phase and Ir catalyzed decompositions involved in the monopropellant applications of hydrazine. Gas phase electronic structure theory calculations that include electron correlation predict that numerous molecular and free radical reactions occur within the same energy range as the basic free radical pathways: NN bond breaking around 65 kcal/mol and NH bond breaking around 81 kcal/mol. The data suggest that a revision to existing kinetics modeling is desirable, based on the energetics and the new elementary steps reported herein. A supported Ir-6 octahedron model for the Shell 405 Iridium catalyst used in thrusters was developed. Self-Consistent Field and electron correlation calculations (with core potentials and associated basis sets) find a rich chemistry for hydrazine on this catalyst model. The model catalyst provides dramatically lower NN and NH bond cleavage energies and an even smaller barrier to breaking the NH bond by NH2 abstractions. Thus, the low temperature decomposition over the catalyst is interpreted in terms of consecutive NH2 abstractions to produce ammonia and nitrogen. The higher temperature channel, which has hydrogen and nitrogen products, may be due to a mixture of two mechanisms. These two mechanisms are successive NH cleavages with surface H + H recombinations, and the same type of assisted H-2 eliminations found to occur in the gas phase part of this study.

  4. Zwitterionic states in gas-phase polypeptide ions revealed by 157-nm ultra-violet photodissociation.

    PubMed

    Kjeldsen, Frank; Silivra, Oleg A; Zubarev, Roman A

    2006-10-16

    A new method of detecting the presence of deprotonation and determining its position in gas-phase polypeptide cations is described. The method involves 157-nm ultra-violet photodissociation (UVPD) and is based on monitoring the losses of CO2 (44 Da) from electronically excited deprotonated carboxylic groups relative to competing COOH losses (45 Da) from neutral carboxylic groups. Loss of CO2 is a strong indication of the presence of a zwitterionic [(+)...(-)...(+)] salt bridge in the gas-phase polypeptide cation. This method provides a tool for studying, for example, the nature of binding within polypeptide clusters. Collision-activated dissociation (CAD) of decarboxylated cations localizes the position of deprotonation. Fragment abundances can be used for the semiquantitative assessment of the branching ratio of deprotonation among different acidic sites, however, the mechanism of the fragment formation should be taken into account. Cations of Trp-cage proteins exist preferentially as zwitterions, with the deprotonation position divided between the Asp9 residue and the C terminus in the ratio 3:2. The majority of dications of the same molecule are not zwitterions. Furthermore, 157-nm UVPD produces abundant radical cations M*+ from protonated molecules through the loss of a hydrogen atom. This method of producing M*+ ions is general and can be applied to any gas-phase peptide cation. The abundance of the molecular radical cations M*+ produced is sufficient for further tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), which, in the cases studied, yielded side-chain loss of a basic amino acid as the most abundant fragmentation channel together with some backbone cleavages. PMID:16871505

  5. Gas-phase chemistry in dense interstellar clouds including grain surface molecular depletion and desorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergin, E. A.; Langer, W. D.; Goldsmith, P. F.

    1995-01-01

    We present time-dependent models of the chemical evolution of molecular clouds which include depletion of atoms and molecules onto grain surfaces and desorption, as well as gas-phase interactions. We have included three mechanisms to remove species from the grain mantles: thermal evaporation, cosmic-ray-induced heating, and photodesorption. A wide range of parameter space has been explored to examine the abundance of species present both on the grain mantles and in the gas phase as a function of both position in the cloud (visual extinction) and of evolutionary state (time). The dominant mechanism that removes molecules from the grain mantles is cosmic-ray desorption. At times greater than the depletion timescale, the abundances of some simple species agree with abundances observed in the cold dark cloud TMC-1. Even though cosmic-ray desorption preserves the gas-phase chemistry at late times, molecules do show significant depletions from the gas phase. Examination of the dependence of depletion as a function of density shows that when the density increases from 10(exp 3)/cc to 10(exp 5)/cc several species including HCO(+), HCN, and CN show gas-phase abundance reductions of over an order of magnitude. The CO: H2O ratio in the grain mantles for our standard model is on the order of 10:1, in reasonable agreement with observations of nonpolar CO ice features in rho Ophiuchus and Serpens. We have also examined the interdependence of CO depletion with the space density of molecular hydrogen and binding energy to the grain surface. We find that the observed depletion of CO in Taurus in inconsistent with CO bonding in an H2O rich mantle, in agreement with observations. We suggest that if interstellar grains consist of an outer layer of CO ice, then the binding energies for many species to the grain mantle may be lower than commonly used, and a significant portion of molecular material may be maintained in the gas phase.

  6. Numerical analysis of an impinging jet reactor for the CVD and gas-phase nucleation of titania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Stewart, Gregory D.; Collins, Joshua; Rosner, Daniel E.

    1994-06-01

    We model a cold-wall atmospheric pressure impinging jet reactor to study the CVD and gas-phase nucleation of TiO2 from a titanium tetra-iso-propoxide (TTIP)/oxygen dilute source gas mixture in nitrogen. The mathematical model uses the computational code FIDAP and complements our recent asymptotic theory for high activation energy gas-phase reactions in thin chemically reacting sublayers. The numerical predictions highlight deviations from ideality in various regions inside the experimental reactor. Model predictions of deposition rates and the onset of gas-phase nucleation compare favorably with experiments. Although variable property effects on deposition rates are not significant (approximately 11 percent at 1000 K), the reduction rates due to Soret transport is substantial (approximately 75 percent at 1000 K).

  7. Numerical Analysis of an Impinging Jet Reactor for the CVD and Gas-Phase Nucleation of Titania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Stewart, Gregory D.; Collins, Joshua; Rosner, Daniel E.

    1994-01-01

    We model a cold-wall atmospheric pressure impinging jet reactor to study the CVD and gas-phase nucleation of TiO2 from a titanium tetra-iso-propoxide (TTIP)/oxygen dilute source gas mixture in nitrogen. The mathematical model uses the computational code FIDAP and complements our recent asymptotic theory for high activation energy gas-phase reactions in thin chemically reacting sublayers. The numerical predictions highlight deviations from ideality in various regions inside the experimental reactor. Model predictions of deposition rates and the onset of gas-phase nucleation compare favorably with experiments. Although variable property effects on deposition rates are not significant (approximately 11 percent at 1000 K), the reduction rates due to Soret transport is substantial (approximately 75 percent at 1000 K).

  8. Selected Examples of Gas-Phase Ion Chemistry Studies

    PubMed Central

    Nibbering, Nico M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Gas-phase ion chemistry is an area in mass spectrometry that has received much research interest since the mid fifties of the last century. Although the focus of mass spectrometric research has shifted the last twenty years largely to life science studies, including proteomics, genomics and metabolomics, there are still several groups in the world active in gas-phase ion chemistry of both positive and negative ions, either unimolecularly and/or bimolecularly. In this tutorial lecture the formation and determination of tautomeric ion structures and intra-ionic catalyzed tautomerization in the gas phase will be discussed. In addition, an example of formation of different tautomeric structures in protic and aprotic solvents under electrospray ionization conditions will be given, as established by gas-phase infrared multiphoton dissociation spectroscopy. This will be followed by presenting an example of time-resolved MS/MS which enables to identify the structure of an ion, generated at a particular molecular ion lifetime. At the end of the lecture the power of ion mobility will be shown in elucidating the mechanism of epimerization of bis-Trger bases having chiral nitrogen centers. PMID:24349921

  9. Ion-Molecule Reactions in Gas Phase Radiation Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Clive

    1981-01-01

    Discusses some aspects of the radiation chemistry of gases, focusing on the ion-molecule and charge neutralization reactions which set study of the gas phase apart. Uses three examples that illustrate radiolysis, describing the radiolysis of (1) oxygen, (2) carbon dioxide, and (3) acetylene. (CS)

  10. INVESTIGATION OF GAS-PHASE OZONE AS A POTENTIAL BIOCIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents data on the effect of ozone on both vegetative and spore-forming fungi as well as on spore-forming bacteria. (NOTE: Despite the wide use of ozone generators in indoor air cleaning, there is little research data on ozone's biocidal activity in the gas phase.) Dr...

  11. Fluorescence probe of polypeptide conformational dynamics in gas phase and in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iavarone, Anthony T.; Meinen, Jan; Schulze, Susanne; Parks, Joel H.

    2006-07-01

    Fluorescence measurements of polypeptides derivatized with the fluorescent dye BODIPY TMR have been used to probe the polypeptide conformational dynamics as a function of temperature and charge state. Measurements of (BODIPY TMR)-[Pro]n-Arg-Trp and (BODIPY TMR)-[Gly-Ser]m-Arg-Trp have been performed for charge states 1+ and 2+ of n = 4 and 10 and m = 2 and 5. The 2+ charge states of both of these polypeptides exhibit similar temperature dependences for equal chain lengths (n = 4, m = 2 and n = 10, m = 5) and suggest conformations dominated by Coulomb repulsion. In the absence of such Coulomb repulsion, the 1+ charge state conformations appear to be characterized by the flexibility of the polypeptide chain for which [Gly-Ser]m > [Pro]n. Comparisons of these gas phase polypeptide measurements with corresponding measurements in solution provide a direct measure of the effects of solvent on the conformational dynamics. The change in fluorescence as a function of temperature in the gas phase is two orders of magnitude greater than that in solution, a dramatic result we attribute to the restrictions on intramolecular dynamics imposed by diffusion-limited kinetics and the lack of shielding by solvent. Measurements were also made of unsolvated Pron peptides without the tryptophan (Trp) residue to isolate the interaction of the fluorescent dye with charges.

  12. Two-Dimensional Gas-Phase Separations Coupled to Mass Spectrometry for Analysis of Complex Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Keqi; Li, Fumin; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Strittmatter, Eric F.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-10-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has been explored for decades, and its versatility in separation and identification of gas-phase ions, including in isomeric mixtures, is well established. Recently, field asymmetric waveform IMS (FAIMS) has been gaining acceptance in similar applications. Coupled to mass spectrometry (MS), both IMS and FAIMS have shown the potential for broad utility in proteomics and other biological analyses. A major attraction of these separations is extremely high speed, exceeding that of condensed-phase alternatives by orders of magnitude. However, modest separation peak capacities have limited the utility of FAIMS and IMS for analyses of complex mixtures. We report 2-D gas-phase separations that join FAIMS to IMS, in conjunction with high-resolution and accuracy time-of-flight MS. Evaluation of FAIMS/IMS/TOF performance using a protein mixture tryptic digest reveals high orthogonality between FAIMS and IMS dimensions, and hence the benefit of FAIMS filtering prior to IMS/MS. The effective overall peak capacities are ~500 for FAIMS/IMS separations, and ~106 for 3-D FAIMS/IMS/MS analyses of tryptic peptides. Implementation of FAIMS/IMS and IMS/MS interfaces using electrodynamic ion funnels greatly improves sensitivity, making FAIMS/IMS/MS a potential platform for ultrahigh-throughput analyses of complex mixtures.

  13. Gas-phase basicities of polyfunctional molecules. Part 4: Carbonyl groups as basic sites.

    PubMed

    Bouchoux, Guy

    2015-01-01

    This article constitutes the fourth part of a general review of the gas-phase protonation thermochemistry of polyfunctional molecules (Part 1: Theory and methods, Mass Spectrom Rev 2007, 26:775-835, Part 2: Saturated basic sites, Mass Spectrom Rev 2012, 31:353-390, Part 3: Amino acids, Mass Spectrom Rev 2012, 31:391-435). This fourth part is devoted to carbonyl containing polyfunctional molecules. After a short reminder of the methods of determination of gas-phase basicity and the underlying physicochemical concepts, specific examples are examined under two major chapters. In the first one, aliphatic and unsaturated (conjugated and cyclic) ketones, diketones, ketoalcohols, and ketoethers are considered. A second chapter describes the protonation energetic of gaseous acids and derivatives including diacids, diesters, diamides, anhydrides, imides, ureas, carbamates, amino acid derivatives, and peptides. Experimental data were re-evaluated according to the presently adopted basicity scale. Structural and energetic information given by G3 and G4 quantum chemistry computations on typical systems are presented. PMID:24399766

  14. Two-Dimensional Gas-Phase Separations Coupled to Mass Spectrometry for Analysis of Complex Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Keqi; Li, Fumin; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Strittmatter, Eric F.; Smith*, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has been explored for decades, and its versatility in separation and identification of gas-phase ions is well established. Recently, field asymmetric waveform IMS (FAIMS) has been gaining acceptance in similar applications. Coupled to mass spectrometry (MS), both IMS and FAIMS have shown the potential for broad utility in proteomics and other biological analyses. A major attraction of these separations is extremely high speed, exceeding that of condensed-phase alternatives by orders of magnitude. However, modest separation peak capacities have limited the utility of FAIMS and IMS for analyses of complex mixtures. We report 2-D gas-phase separations that join FAIMS to IMS, in conjunction with high-resolution and accuracy time-of-flight MS. Implementation of FAIMS/IMS and IMS/MS interfaces using electrodynamic ion funnels greatly improves sensitivity. Evaluation of FAIMS/IMS/TOF performance for a protein mixture tryptic digest reveals high orthogonality between FAIMS and IMS dimensions, and hence the benefit of FAIMS filtering prior to IMS/MS. The effective peak capacities in analyses of tryptic peptides are ~500 for FAIMS/IMS separations and ~106 for 3-D FAIMS/IMS/MS, providing a potential platform for ultrahigh-throughput analyses of complex mixtures. PMID:16194103

  15. Gas-Phase Theoretical Kinetics for Astrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klippenstein, Stephen

    2013-05-01

    We will survey a number of our applications of ab initio theoretical kinetics to reactions of importance to astrochemistry. Illustrative examples will be taken from our calculations for (i) interstellar chemistry, (ii) Titan's atmospheric chemistry, and (iii) the chemistry of extrasolar giant planets. For low temperature interstellar chemistry, careful consideration of the long-range expansion of the potential allows for quantitative predictions of the kinetics. Our recent calculations for the reactions of H3+ with O(3P) and with CO suggest an increase of the predicted destruction rate of H3+ by a factor of 2.5 to 3.0 for temperatures that are typical of dense clouds. Further consideration of the interplay between spin-orbit and multipole terms for open-shell atomic fragments allows us to predict the kinetics for a number of the reactions that have been listed as important reactions for interstellar chemical modeling [V. Wakelam, I. W. M. Smith, E. Herbst, J. Troe, W. Geppert, et al. Space Science Rev., 156, 13-72, 2010]. Our calculations for Titan's atmosphere demonstrate the importance of radiative emission as a stabilization process in the low-pressure environment of Titan's upper atmosphere. Theory has also helped to illuminate the role of various reactions in both Titan's atmosphere and in extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Comparisons between theory and experiment have provided a more detail understanding of the kinetics of PAH dimerization. High level predictions of thermochemical properties are remarkably accurate, and allow us to provide important data for studying P chemistry in planetary atmospheres. Finally, our study of O(3P) + C3 provides an example of a case where theory provides suggestive but not definitive results, and further experiments are clearly needed.

  16. Gas Phase Theoretical Kinetics for Astrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klippenstein, Stephen J.; Georgievskii, Y.; Harding, L. B.

    2012-05-01

    We will survey a number of our applications of ab initio theoretical kinetics to reactions of importance to astrochemistry. Illustrative examples will be taken from our calculations for (i) interstellar chemistry, (ii) Titans atmospheric chemistry, and (iii) the chemistry of extrasolar giant planets. For low temperature interstellar chemistry, careful consideration of the long-range expansion of the potential allows for quantitative predictions of the kinetics. Our recent calculations for the reactions of H3+ with O(3P) and with CO suggest an increase of the predicted destruction rate of H3+ by a factor of 2.5 to 3.0 for temperatures that are typical of dense clouds. Further consideration of the interplay between spin-orbit and multipole terms for open-shell atomic fragments allows us to predict the kinetics for a number of the reactions that have been listed as important reactions for interstellar chemical modeling [V. Wakelam, I. W. M. Smith, E. Herbst, J. Troe, W. Geppert, et al. Space Science Rev., 156, 13-72, 2010]. Our calculations for Titans atmosphere demonstrate the importance of radiative emission as a stabilization process in the low-pressure environment of Titans upper atmosphere. Theory has also helped to illuminate the role of various reactions in both Titans atmosphere and in extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Comparisons between theory and experiment have provided a more detail understanding of the kinetics of PAH dimerization. High level predictions of thermochemical properties are remarkably accurate, and allow us to provide important data for studying P chemistry in planetary atmospheres. Finally, our study of O(3P) + C3 provides an example of a case where theory provides suggestive but not definitive results, and further experiments are clearly needed.

  17. Effect of duty-cycles on the air plasma gas-phase of dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barni, R.; Biganzoli, I.; Dell'Orto, E. C.; Riccardi, C.

    2015-10-01

    An experimental investigation concerning the effects of a duty-cycle in the supply of a dielectric barrier discharge in atmospheric pressure air has been performed. Electrical characteristics of the discharge have been measured, focusing mainly on the statistical properties of the current filaments and on dielectric surface charging, both affected by the frequent repetition of breakdown imposed by the duty-cycle. Information on the gas-phase composition was gathered too. In particular, a strong enhancement in the ozone formation rate is observed when suitable long pauses separate the active discharge phases. A simulation of the chemical kinetics in the gas-phase, based on a simplified discharge modeling, is briefly described in order to shed light on the observed increase in ozone production. The effect of a duty-cycle on surface modification of polymeric films in order to increase their wettability has been investigated too.

  18. Gas phase glyoxal and methylglyoxal yields from the oxidation of isoprene and first generation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, Melissa; Loza, Christine; Yee, Lindsay; Chan, Arthur; Crounse, John; Wennberg, Paul; Seinfeld, John; Keutsch, Frank

    2010-05-01

    α-dicarbonyls such as glyoxal and methylglyoxal are of increasing interest due to their importance in atmospheric processes and their ability to partition from the gas to aerosol phase. Isoprene oxidation is a major source of glyoxal and methylglyoxal in the atmosphere. However, the reaction pathways for these compounds are not well known, nor are the yields. Incorporation of the formation rates and yields of these compounds determined from our studies will allow us to improve chemical models that include isoprene oxidation. To achieve this, we performed experiments at the Caltech environmental chambers to determine the gas phase yields of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and formaldehyde from isoprene and its primary reaction products, methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein, under varied oxidation conditions. Gas phase glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and formaldehyde yields from the oxidation of these precursors will be presented as well as analysis of first generation glyoxal formation from isoprene oxidation.

  19. Probing Gas Phase Chemistry above Ice Surfaces with Millimeter/submillimeter Spectrosocpy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesko, AJ; Wagner, Ian C.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Widicus Weaver, Susanna L.

    2014-06-01

    Chemical reactions involving the icy mantles of interstellar dust grains have been invoked in astrochemical models to explain the formation of complex organic molecules in interstellar clouds. Interstellar ices can act as a substrate to encourage reactions in three ways: reactions within the bulk ice, reactions between mobile species on the ice surface, or gas-phase reactions that are initiated by thermal desorption or photodesorption of the ice. We are building a new experiment that uses millimeter/submillimeter absorption spectroscopy to probe the gas-phase chemistry directly above the ice surface during thermal- or photo-processing. We will present the experimental design and preliminary results for pure water ices and water+ methanol ice mixtures.

  20. Experimental and Simulation Studies of Gas Phase Reaction in Planar Microwave Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasaka, Yasuyoshi; Sakae, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Naoki; Takeno, Hiromasa

    2006-10-01

    It is necessary to supply nitrogen radical fluxes in high uniformity to form high-quality nitrogen-incorporated films. An experiment on gas phase chemical reaction using a microwave discharge device with a multi-slotted planar antenna is performed. We use a three-dimensional simulation code, which calculates wave propagation in plasma obtained by the finite difference time domain method, power deposition, and plasma transport using a fluid model. The code can reproduce experimental results to a large extent. The code is capable of calculating several types of gas-phase reaction of neutral species. The results of both the experiment and the simulation show that the uniformity of the density distribution of nitrogen radicals strongly depends on the uniformity of the plasma.

  1. Development of a gas-phase stereochemical protocol. Intrinsic diastereoselectivity in hydride reductions of cyclohexanones

    SciTech Connect

    Yeunghaw Ho; Squires, R.R. )

    1992-12-30

    A common feature of classical, intuitive models and modern molecular orbital-based theories for diastereoselectivity in ketone reduction reactions is an emphasis on the structural and electronic properties of the substrate, despite the fact that the stereochemical outcome of these reactions often displays marked sensitivity to the solvent and the type of counter-ion employed with ionic and polar reducing agents. One way to separate intrinsic and extrinsic effects on the stereochemistry of ketone reduction reactions is to examine them in the gas phase, where solvent and counterion effects are absent. The authors describe here an experimental method for distinguishing the diastereomeric products of gas-phase hydride reduction reactions, and its application in determining the intrinsic diastereoselectivity involved in reductions of alkyl-substituted cyclohexanones. 1 tab.

  2. Ion yields for some salts in MALDI: mechanism for the gas-phase ion formation from preformed ions.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jeong Hee; Shin, Young Sik; Bae, Yong Jin; Kim, Myung Soo

    2012-01-01

    Preformed ion emission is the main assumption in one of the prevailing theories for peptide and protein ion formation in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI). Since salts are in preformed ion forms in the matrix-analyte mixture, they are ideal systems to study the characteristics of preformed ion emission. In this work, a reliable method to measure the ion yield (IY) in MALDI was developed and used for a solid salt benzyltriphenylphosphonium chloride and two room-temperature ionic liquids 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate and trihexyltetradecylphosphonium bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)phosphinate. IY for the matrix (?-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, CHCA) was also measured. Taking 1 pmol salts in 25 nmol CHCA as examples, IYs for three salts were similar, (4-8) 10(-4), and those for CHCA were (0.8-1.2) 10(-7). Even though IYs for the salts and CHCA remained virtually constant at low analyte concentration, they decreased as the salt concentrations increased. Two models, Model 1 and Model 2, were proposed to explain low IYs for the salts and the concentration dependences. Both models are based on the fact that the ion-pair formation equilibrium is highly shifted toward the neutral ion pair. In Model 1, the gas-phase analyte cations were proposed to originate from the same cations in the solid that were dielectrically screened from counter anions by matrix neutrals. In Model 2, preformed ions were assumed to be released from the solid sample in the form of neutral ion pairs and the anions in the ion pairs were assumed to be eliminated via reactions with matrix-derived cations. PMID:22048904

  3. Ion Yields for Some Salts in MALDI: Mechanism for the Gas-Phase Ion Formation from Preformed Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Jeong Hee; Shin, Young Sik; Bae, Yong Jin; Kim, Myung Soo

    2012-01-01

    Preformed ion emission is the main assumption in one of the prevailing theories for peptide and protein ion formation in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI). Since salts are in preformed ion forms in the matrix-analyte mixture, they are ideal systems to study the characteristics of preformed ion emission. In this work, a reliable method to measure the ion yield (IY) in MALDI was developed and used for a solid salt benzyltriphenylphosphonium chloride and two room-temperature ionic liquids 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate and trihexyltetradecylphosphonium bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)phosphinate. IY for the matrix (?-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, CHCA) was also measured. Taking 1 pmol salts in 25 nmol CHCA as examples, IYs for three salts were similar, (4-8) 10-4, and those for CHCA were (0.8-1.2) 10-7. Even though IYs for the salts and CHCA remained virtually constant at low analyte concentration, they decreased as the salt concentrations increased. Two models, Model 1 and Model 2, were proposed to explain low IYs for the salts and the concentration dependences. Both models are based on the fact that the ion-pair formation equilibrium is highly shifted toward the neutral ion pair. In Model 1, the gas-phase analyte cations were proposed to originate from the same cations in the solid that were dielectrically screened from counter anions by matrix neutrals. In Model 2, preformed ions were assumed to be released from the solid sample in the form of neutral ion pairs and the anions in the ion pairs were assumed to be eliminated via reactions with matrix-derived cations.

  4. The Gas-Phase Deuterium Fractionation of Formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osamura, Yoshihiro; Roberts, Helen; Herbst, Eric

    2005-03-01

    The dominant mechanism for the deuteration of formaldehyde in the gas phase of low-temperature interstellar cloud cores occurs via reaction with the deuterating ions H2D+, HD+2, and D+3. Until now, it has been assumed that deuteration leads to an ion that, on recombination with electrons, can produce a deuterated neutral species with a statistical branching fraction. Quantum chemical calculations reported here, however, show an entirely different picture, in which the deuteration of formaldehyde leads to the molecular ion H2COD+, where the deuterium binds only on the oxygen side of the molecule. The structure is quite stable, while an alternative structure, H2DCO+, cannot be produced in a straightforward manner. Dissociative recombination of H2COD+ to reproduce a formaldehyde structure then removes the deuteration if the dissociation is direct, i.e., it occurs without change of structure. There are several possible indirect mechanisms by which dissociative recombination can lead to HDCO, however. For example, if the direct products are HCOD+H, it is possible that subsequent isomerization to HDCO can occur, although this involved process is unlikely. Another possibility is isomerization during the actual dissociation of the H2COD intermediate. Models of deuterium fractionation in which dissociative recombination is predominantly direct are presented, and it is found that the deuterium fractionation of formaldehyde to form both HDCO and D2CO can still occur via other mechanisms, although with less efficiency than previously obtained. If the dissociative recombination is half indirect, however, then we can recover the previously calculated efficiency.

  5. Gas-Phase Combustion Synthesis of Nonoxide Nanoparticles in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelbaum, R. L.; Kumfer, B. M.; Sun, Z.; Chao, B. H.

    2001-01-01

    Gas-phase combustion synthesis is a promising process for creating nanoparticles for the growing nanostructure materials industry. The challenges that must be addressed are controlling particle size, preventing hard agglomerates, maintaining purity, and, if nonoxides are synthesized, protecting the particles from oxidation and/or hydrolysis during post-processing. Sodium-halide Flame Encapsulation (SFE) is a unique methodology for producing nonoxide nanoparticles that addresses these challenges. This flame synthesis process incorporates sodium and metal-halide chemistry, resulting in nanoparticles that are encapsulated in salt during the early stages of their growth in the flame. Salt encapsulation has been shown to allow control of particle size and morphology, while serving as an effective protective coating for preserving the purity of the core particles. Metals and compounds that have been produced using this technology include Al, W, Ti, TiB2, AlN, and composites of W-Ti and Al-AlN. Oxygen content in SFE synthesized nano- AlN has been measured by neutron activation analysis to be as low as 0.54wt.%, as compared to over 5wt.% for unprotected AlN of comparable size. The overall objective of this work is to study the SFE process and nano-encapsulation so that they can be used to produce novel and superior materials. SFE experiments in microgravity allow the study of flame and particle dynamics without the influence of buoyancy forces. Spherical sodium-halide flames are produced in microgravity by ejecting the halide from a spherical porous burner into a quiescent atmosphere of sodium vapor and argon. Experiments are performed in the 2.2 sec Drop Tower at the NASA-Glenn Research Center. Numerical models of the flame and particle dynamics were developed and are compared with the experimental results.

  6. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry to investigate endogenous peptides in an animal model of Usher's disease.

    PubMed

    Chatterji, Bijon; Dickhut, Clarissa; Mielke, Svenja; Krger, Jonas; Just, Ingo; Glage, Silke; Meier, Martin; Wedekind, Dirk; Pich, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    Imaging MS (MSI) has emerged as a valuable tool to study the spatial distribution of biomolecules in the brain. Herein, MALDI-MSI was used to determine the distribution of endogenous peptides in a rat model of Usher's disease. This rare disease is considered as a leading cause of deaf-blindness in humans worldwide. Cryosections of brain tissue were analyzed by MALDI-MSI to differentiate between healthy and diseased rats. MSI results were highly reproducible. Tissue-specific peptides were identified by MS/MS using LC-Orbitrap and MALDI-TOF/TOF analyses. These peptides were proposed for histological classification due to their particular spatial distribution in the brain, for example, substantia nigra, corpus callosum, and hippocampus. Several endogenous peptides showed significantly increased ion densities, particularly in the colliculi superiores and in the substantia nigra of diseased rats, including peptides derived from Fsd1, dystrobrevin-?, and ProSAAS. Furthermore, several proteolytic degradation products of the myelin basic protein were identified, of which one peptide is most likely mediated by calpain-2. Our findings contribute to the characterization of this animal model and include possible peptide markers of disease. PMID:24841751

  7. Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide Structural Motifs: From Solution to Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is involved in important metabolic reactions where the biological function is intrinsically related to changes in conformation. In the present work, FAD conformational changes were studied in solution and in gas phase by measuring the fluorescence decay time and ion-neutral collision cross sections (CCS, in a trapped ion mobility spectrometer, TIMS) as a function of the solvent conditions (i.e., organic content) and gas-phase collisional partner (i.e., N2 doped with organic molecules). Changes in the fluorescence decay suggest that FAD can exist in four conformations in solution, where the abundance of the extended conformations increases with the organic content. TIMS-MS experiments showed that FAD can exist in the gas phase as deprotonated (M = C27H31N9O15P2) and protonated forms (M = C27H33N9O15P2) and that multiple conformations (up to 12) can be observed as a function of the starting solution for the [M + H]+ and [M + Na]+molecular ions. In addition, changes in the relative abundances of the gas-phase structures were observed from a stack to a close conformation when organic molecules were introduced in the TIMS cell as collision partners. Candidate structures optimized at the DFT/B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) were proposed for each IMS band, and results showed that the most abundant IMS band corresponds to the most stable candidate structure. Solution and gas-phase experiments suggest that the driving force that stabilizes the different conformations is based on the interaction of the adenine and isoalloxazine rings that can be tailored by the solvation effect created with the organic molecules. PMID:25222439

  8. Peptide Pores in Lipid Bilayers: Voltage Facilitation Pleads for a Revised Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadda, G. C.; Lairez, D.; Guennouni, Z.; Koutsioubas, A.

    2013-07-01

    We address the problem of antimicrobial peptides that create pores in lipid bilayers, focusing on voltage-temperature dependence of pore opening. Two novel experiments (voltage clamp with alamethicin as an emblematic representative of these peptides and neutron reflectivity of lipid monolayer at solid-water interface under electric field) serve to revise the only current theoretical model. We introduce a general contribution of peptide adsorption and electric field as being responsible for an unbalanced tension of the two bilayer leaflets and we claim that the main entropy cost of one pore opening is due to the corresponding excluded area for lipid translation.

  9. Peptide pores in lipid bilayers: voltage facilitation pleads for a revised model.

    PubMed

    Fadda, G C; Lairez, D; Guennouni, Z; Koutsioubas, A

    2013-07-12

    We address the problem of antimicrobial peptides that create pores in lipid bilayers, focusing on voltage-temperature dependence of pore opening. Two novel experiments (voltage clamp with alamethicin as an emblematic representative of these peptides and neutron reflectivity of lipid monolayer at solid-water interface under electric field) serve to revise the only current theoretical model. We introduce a general contribution of peptide adsorption and electric field as being responsible for an unbalanced tension of the two bilayer leaflets and we claim that the main entropy cost of one pore opening is due to the corresponding excluded area for lipid translation. PMID:23889447

  10. Gas phase laser synthesis and processing of calcium phosphate nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bapat, Parimal V.

    Biochemical processes make pervasive use of calcium and phosphate ions. Calcium phosphate salts that are naturally nontoxic and bioactive have been used for several medical applications in form of coatings and micropowders. Nanoparticle-based calcium phosphates have been shown to be internalized by living cells and be effective in DNA transfection, drug delivery, and transport of fluorophores for imaging of intracellular processes. They are also expected to interact strongly with cell adhesive proteins and are therefore promising elements in approaches to mimic the complex environment of the extra cellular matrix of bone. Harnessing this biomedical potential requires the ability to control the numerous characteristics of nanophase calcium phosphates that affect biological response, including nanoparticle chemical composition, crystal phase, crystallinity, crystallographic orientation of exposed faces, size, shape, surface area, number concentration, and degree of aggregation. This dissertation focuses on the use of laser-induced gas-phase synthesis for creation of calcium phosphate nanoparticles, and corresponding nanoparticle-based substrates that could offer new opportunities for guiding biological responses through well-controlled biochemical and topological cues. Gas-phase synthesis of nanoparticles has several characteristics that could enhance control over particle morphology, crystallinity, and surface area, compared to liquid-phase techniques. Synthesis from gas-phase precursors can be carried out at high temperatures and in high-purity inert or reactive gas backgrounds, enabling good control of chemistry, crystal structure, and purity. Moreover, the particle mean free path and number concentration can be controlled independently. This allows regulation of interparticle collision rates, which can be adjusted to limit aggregation. High-temperature synthesis of well-separated particles is therefore possible. In this work high power lasers are employed to vaporize microcrystalline calcium phosphate materials to generate an aerosol of nanoparticles which is further processed and deposited using principles of aerosol mechanics. Particles and resulting particle-based systems are analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and optical absorption. Obtained substrates are functionalized with cell adhesive peptides. Findings show that laser-induced gas-phase synthesis provides attractive new dimensions in the controlled fabrication of calcium phosphate nanoparticles, including manipulation not only of size and chemical composition, but also crystal phase make-up, fractal structure, and nanotopography of derived substrates.

  11. FragBuilder: an efficient Python library to setup quantum chemistry calculations on peptides models

    PubMed Central

    Hamelryck, Thomas; Jensen, Jan H.

    2014-01-01

    We present a powerful Python library to quickly and efficiently generate realistic peptide model structures. The library makes it possible to quickly set up quantum mechanical calculations on model peptide structures. It is possible to manually specify a specific conformation of the peptide. Additionally the library also offers sampling of backbone conformations and side chain rotamer conformations from continuous distributions. The generated peptides can then be geometry optimized by the MMFF94 molecular mechanics force field via convenient functions inside the library. Finally, it is possible to output the resulting structures directly to files in a variety of useful formats, such as XYZ or PDB formats, or directly as input files for a quantum chemistry program. FragBuilder is freely available at https://github.com/jensengroup/fragbuilder/ under the terms of the BSD open source license. PMID:24688855

  12. Exploration of Peptide Inhibitors of Human Squalene Synthase through Molecular Modeling and Phage Display Technique.

    PubMed

    Shiuan, David; Lin, Hwan-Kang; Chen, Yue-Hao; Chang, Ding-Kwo; Huang, Kao-Jean; Farh, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the role of elevated levels of serum cholesterol in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Various drugs targeting the key enzymes involved in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway have been investigated for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Human squalene synthase has been one of the most important targets for therapeutic intervention. In the present study, we used the recombinant human squalene synthase as the lure for screening the peptide inhibitors from phage-displayed random peptide library. The tightly bound phages and their derived peptides were further evaluated based on their potential binding capabilities, molecular modeling characteristics and predicted absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, toxicity (ADMET) properties. Several hexa-peptides and tetra-peptides were finally synthesized to assay their inhibitory effects toward the recombinant human squalene synthase. The results demonstrated that the hexa-peptide FTACNW and tetra-peptide VACL can inhibit human squalene synthase effectively (with IC50 values near 100 μM) and may have potential to develop further as future hypocholesterolemia agents. PMID:26438313

  13. A Gas-phase Formation Route to Interstellar Trans-methyl Formate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Callie A.; Wehres, Nadine; Yang, Zhibo; Thomsen, Ditte L.; Snow, Theodore P.; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2012-07-01

    The abundance of methyl formate in the interstellar medium has previously been underpredicted by chemical models. Additionally, grain surface chemistry cannot account for the relative abundance of the cis- and trans-conformers of methyl formate, and the trans-conformer is not even formed at detectable abundance on these surfaces. This highlights the importance of studying formation pathways to methyl formate in the gas phase. The rate constant and branching fractions are reported for the gas-phase reaction between protonated methanol and formic acid to form protonated trans-methyl formate and water as well as adduct ion: Rate constants were experimentally determined using a flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube apparatus at 300 K and a pressure of 530 mTorr helium. The results indicate a moderate overall rate constant of (3.19 ± 0.39) × 10-10 cm3 s-1 (± 1σ) and an average branching fraction of 0.05 ± 0.04 for protonated trans-methyl formate and 0.95 ± 0.04 for the adduct ion. These experimental results are reinforced by ab initio calculations at the MP2(full)/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory to examine the reaction coordinate and complement previous density functional theory calculations. This study underscores the need for continued observational studies of trans-methyl formate and for the exploration of other gas-phase formation routes to complex organic molecules.

  14. Evidence of Microporous Carbon Nanosheets Showing Fast Kinetics in both Gas Phase and Liquid Phase Environments.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhen-Yu; Xu, Yuan-Yuan; Sun, Qiang; Lu, An-Hui

    2015-10-01

    Despite the great advantages of microporous carbons for applications in gas phase separation, liquid phase enrichment, and energy storage devices, direct experiment data and theoretical calculations on the relevance of properties and structures are quite limited. Herein, two model carbon materials are designed and synthesized, i.e., microporous carbon nanosheets (MCN) and microporous carbon spheres (MCS). They both have nearly same composition, surface chemistry, and specific surface area, known morphology, but distinguishable diffusion paths. Based on these two types of materials, a reliable relationship between the morphology with different diffusion paths and adsorption kinetics in both gas phase and liquid phase environments is established. When used for CO2 capture, MCN shows a high saturated CO2 capacity of 8.52 ?mol m(-2) and 18.4 mmol cm(-3) at 273 K and ambient pressure, and its calculated first-order rate constant is ?7.4 times higher than that of MCS. Moreover, MCN shows a quick and high uptake of Cr (VI) and a higher-rate performance for supercapacitors than MCS does. These results strongly confirm that MCN exhibits improved kinetics in gas phase separation, liquid phase enrichment, and energy storage devices due to its shorter diffusion paths and larger exposed geometrical area resulting from the nanosheet structure. PMID:26192395

  15. A GAS-PHASE FORMATION ROUTE TO INTERSTELLAR TRANS-METHYL FORMATE

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Callie A.; Wehres, Nadine; Yang Zhibo; Thomsen, Ditte L.; Bierbaum, Veronica M.; Snow, Theodore P. E-mail: Nadine.Wehres@colorado.edu E-mail: Veronica.Bierbaum@colorado.edu E-mail: dlt@chem.ku.dk

    2012-07-20

    The abundance of methyl formate in the interstellar medium has previously been underpredicted by chemical models. Additionally, grain surface chemistry cannot account for the relative abundance of the cis- and trans-conformers of methyl formate, and the trans-conformer is not even formed at detectable abundance on these surfaces. This highlights the importance of studying formation pathways to methyl formate in the gas phase. The rate constant and branching fractions are reported for the gas-phase reaction between protonated methanol and formic acid to form protonated trans-methyl formate and water as well as adduct ion: Rate constants were experimentally determined using a flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube apparatus at 300 K and a pressure of 530 mTorr helium. The results indicate a moderate overall rate constant of (3.19 {+-} 0.39) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} ({+-} 1{sigma}) and an average branching fraction of 0.05 {+-} 0.04 for protonated trans-methyl formate and 0.95 {+-} 0.04 for the adduct ion. These experimental results are reinforced by ab initio calculations at the MP2(full)/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory to examine the reaction coordinate and complement previous density functional theory calculations. This study underscores the need for continued observational studies of trans-methyl formate and for the exploration of other gas-phase formation routes to complex organic molecules.

  16. Attachment of Metal Trications to Peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Jones, R C.

    2004-03-01

    Gas-phase complexes of triply charged metal ions with peptides may be readily produced using electrospray ionization, including for small peptides such as bradykinin and peptides with no basic residues such as insulin chain A. Attachment without charge-reduction is demonstrated for all trications studied: La3+, Al3+, Ga3+, Fe3+, V3+, and Cr3+. The intensities of adducts are often comparable to, or even exceed, those of protonated analogs in any charge state.

  17. ESEEM Studies of Peptide Nitrogen Hyperfine Coupling in Tyrosyl Radicals and Model Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Vassiliev, Ilya R.; Yang, En-Che; Range, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Tyrosyl radicals are important in long-range electron transfer in several enzymes, but the protein environmental factors that control midpoint potential and electron transfer rate are not well understood. To develop a more detailed understanding of the effect of protein sequence, we have performed 14N and 15N electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) measurements on tyrosyl radical, generated either in polycrystalline tyrosinate or in its 15N labeled isotopomer, by UV photolysis. 14N ESEEM was also performed on tyrosyl radical generated in tyrosine-containing pentapeptide samples. Simulation of the 14N and 15N tyrosyl radical ESEEM measurements yielded no significant isotropic hyperfine splitting to the amine or amide nitrogen; the amplitude of the anisotropic, nitrogen hyperfine coupling (0.21 MHz) was consistent with a dipole-dipole distance of 3.0 . Density functional theory was used to calculate the isotropic and anisotropic hyperfine couplings to the amino nitrogen in four different tyrosyl radical conformers. Comparison with the simulated data suggested that the lowest energy radical conformer, generated in tyrosine at pH 11, has a 76 C?-C?-C1?-C2? ring and a ?73 C-C?-C?-C1? backbone dihedral angle. In addition, the magnitude, orientation, and asymmetry of the nuclear quadrupole coupling tensor were derived from analysis of the tyrosyl radical 14N ESEEM. The simulations showed differences in the coupling and orientation of the nuclear quadrupole tensor, when the tyrosinate and pentapeptide samples were compared. These results suggest sequence- or conformation-induced changes in the ionic character of the NH bond in different tyrosine-containing peptides. PMID:17518496

  18. Computer Modeling of Protocellular Functions: Peptide Insertion in Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez-Gomez, D.; Darve, E.; Pohorille, A.

    2006-01-01

    Lipid vesicles became the precursors to protocells by acquiring the capabilities needed to survive and reproduce. These include transport of ions, nutrients and waste products across cell walls and capture of energy and its conversion into a chemically usable form. In modem organisms these functions are carried out by membrane-bound proteins (about 30% of the genome codes for this kind of proteins). A number of properties of alpha-helical peptides suggest that their associations are excellent candidates for protobiological precursors of proteins. In particular, some simple a-helical peptides can aggregate spontaneously and form functional channels. This process can be described conceptually by a three-step thermodynamic cycle: 1 - folding of helices at the water-membrane interface, 2 - helix insertion into the lipid bilayer and 3 - specific interactions of these helices that result in functional tertiary structures. Although a crucial step, helix insertion has not been adequately studied because of the insolubility and aggregation of hydrophobic peptides. In this work, we use computer simulation methods (Molecular Dynamics) to characterize the energetics of helix insertion and we discuss its importance in an evolutionary context. Specifically, helices could self-assemble only if their interactions were sufficiently strong to compensate the unfavorable Free Energy of insertion of individual helices into membranes, providing a selection mechanism for protobiological evolution.

  19. On Utilizing Optimal and Information Theoretic Syntactic Modeling for Peptide Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aygün, Eser; Oommen, B. John; Cataltepe, Zehra

    Syntactic methods in pattern recognition have been used extensively in bioinformatics, and in particular, in the analysis of gene and protein expressions, and in the recognition and classification of bio-sequences. These methods are almost universally distance-based. This paper concerns the use of an Optimal and Information Theoretic (OIT) probabilistic model [11] to achieve peptide classification using the information residing in their syntactic representations. The latter has traditionally been achieved using the edit distances required in the respective peptide comparisons. We advocate that one can model the differences between compared strings as a mutation model consisting of random Substitutions, Insertions and Deletions (SID) obeying the OIT model. Thus, in this paper, we show that the probability measure obtained from the OIT model can be perceived as a sequence similarity metric, using which a Support Vector Machine (SVM)-based peptide classifier, referred to as OIT_SVM, can be devised.

  20. Development of Monopole Interaction Models for Ionic Compounds. Part I: Estimation of Aqueous Henry’s Law Constants for Ions and Gas Phase pKa Values for Acidic Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) physicochemical mechanistic models for neutral compounds have been extended to estimate Henry’s Law Constant (HLC) for charged species by incorporating ionic electrostatic interaction models. Combinations of absolute aq...

  1. Development of Monopole Interaction Models for Ionic Compounds. Part I: Estimation of Aqueous Henrys Law Constants for Ions and Gas Phase pKa Values for Acidic Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) physicochemical mechanistic models for neutral compounds have been extended to estimate Henrys Law Constant (HLC) for charged species by incorporating ionic electrostatic interaction models. Combinations of absolute aq...

  2. Copper-catalyzed reactions: Research in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Tsybizova, Alexandra; Roithov, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is becoming an important tool for mechanistic studies in organic and organometallic chemistry. It allows investigation of reaction mixtures including monitoring of reactants, products, and intermediates, studying properties of the intermediates and their reactivity. Studying the reactive species in the gas phase can be advantageously combined with theoretical calculations. This review is focused on ESI-MS studies of copper-catalyzed reactions. Possible effects of the electrospray process on the transfer of the copper complexes to the gas phase are discussed. The plethora of mass spectrometric approaches is demonstrated on copper mediated C-H activations, cross coupling reactions, rearrangements, organocuprate chemistry, and other examples. 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 35: 85-110, 2016. PMID:25975564

  3. Para-Hydrogen-Enhanced Gas-Phase Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Louis-S.; Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Burt, Scott R.; Anwar,M. Sabieh; Koptyug, Igor V.; Sagdeev, Renad Z.; Pines, Alexander

    2007-02-23

    Herein, we demonstrate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inthe gas phase using para-hydrogen (p-H2)-induced polarization. A reactantmixture of H2 enriched in the paraspin state and propylene gas is flowedthrough a reactor cell containing a heterogenized catalyst, Wilkinson'scatalyst immobilized on modified silica gel. The hydrogenation product,propane gas, is transferred to the NMR magnet and is spin-polarized as aresult of the ALTADENA (adiabatic longitudinal transport and dissociationengenders net alignment) effect. A polarization enhancement factor of 300relative to thermally polarized gas was observed in 1D1H NMR spectra.Enhancement was also evident in the magnetic resonance images. This isthe first demonstration of imaging a hyperpolarized gaseous productformed in a hydrogenation reaction catalyzed by a supported catalyst.This result may lead to several important applications, includingflow-through porous materials, gas-phase reaction kinetics and adsorptionstudies, and MRI in low fields, all using catalyst-free polarizedfluids.

  4. Hydration of Gas-Phase Ions Formed by Electrospray Ionization

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Cruz, Sandra E.; Klassen, John S.; Williams, Evan R.

    2005-01-01

    The hydration of gas-phase ions produced by electrospray ionization was investigated. Evidence that the hydrated ions are formed by two mechanisms is presented. First, solvent condensation during the expansion inside the electrospray source clearly occurs. Second, some solvent evaporation from more extensively solvated ions or droplets is apparent. To the extent that these highly solvated ions have solution-phase structures, then the final isolated gas-phase structure of the ion will be determined by the solvent evaporation process. This process was investigated for hydrated gramicidin S in a Fourier-transform mass spectrometer. Unimolecular dissociation rate constants of isolated gramicidin S ions with between 2 and 14 associated water molecules were measured. These rate constants increased from 16 to 230 s−1 with increasing hydration, with smaller values corresponding to magic numbers. PMID:10497808

  5. Substituent effects on the gas-phase acidity of silane

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, M.S.; Volk, D.E. ); Gano, D.R. )

    1989-12-20

    In a previous paper, the gas-phase acidities of XH{sub n} compounds (X = C, N, O, F, Si, P, S, Cl) were predicted with ab initio wave functions. At the MP4{sup 2} level of theory with extended basis sets acidities for these species were determined to be within 2 kcal/mol of experimental value. In the present work, with 6-31G(d) geometries and full MP4/MC-311++G{sup 6}(3df,2pd) energies, the effects of CH{sub 3}, NH{sub 2}, OH, F, SiH{sub 3}, PH{sub 2}, SH, and Cl on the gas-phase acidity of silane are examined. Only a few related calculations have been carried out. All calculations were performed with Gaussian86, and all structures were verified as minima by diagonalizing the analytically determined hessians. Only the valence electrons were correlated in the perturbation theory calculations.

  6. Gas-phase clustering of protonated amino acids with acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wincel, Henryk

    2010-03-01

    The gas-phase clustering reactions of protonated amino acids, AAH + (AA = Ala, Val, Ser, Phe, Pro, Gln, Lys and Arg) with acetonitrile were studied with a pulsed ion-beam high-pressure mass spectrometer. The bond energies of the AAH +(CH 3CN) complexes range from 20 to 11 kcal/mol. While for AlaH +, ValH +, SerH +, PheH +, ProH + and GlnH +, the solvation free energies decrease linearly with increasing gas-phase basicity of AA, deviations from the correlation are observed for LysH + and ArgH +. The bonding free energies for AAH +(CH 3CN) are compared with those for AAH +(H 2O) and AAH +(NH 3).

  7. Gas-Phase Studies of Formamidopyrimidine Glycosylase (Fpg) Substrates.

    PubMed

    Kiruba, G S M; Xu, Jiahui; Zelikson, Victoria; Lee, Jeehiun K

    2016-03-01

    Gas-phase thermochemical properties (tautomerism, acidity, and proton affinity) have been measured and calculated for a series of nucleobase derivatives that have not heretofore been examined under vacuum. The studied species are substrates for the enzyme formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (Fpg), which cleaves damaged nucleobases from DNA. The gas-phase results are compared and contrasted to solution-phase data, to afford insight into the Fpg mechanism. Calculations are also used to probe the energetics of various possible mechanisms and to predict isotope effects that could potentially allow for discrimination between different mechanisms. Specifically, (18) O substitution at the ribose O4' is predicted to result in a normal kinetic isotope effect (KIE) for a ring-opening "endocyclic" mechanism and an inverse KIE for a direct base excision "exocyclic" pathway. PMID:26894440

  8. Gas phase fractionation method using porous ceramic membrane

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Reid A. (Madison, WI); Hill, Jr., Charles G. (Madison, WI); Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI)

    1996-01-01

    Flaw-free porous ceramic membranes fabricated from metal sols and coated onto a porous support are advantageously used in gas phase fractionation methods. Mean pore diameters of less than 40 .ANG., preferably 5-20 .ANG. and most preferably about 15 .ANG., are permeable at lower pressures than existing membranes. Condensation of gases in small pores and non-Knudsen membrane transport mechanisms are employed to facilitate and increase membrane permeability and permselectivity.

  9. Gas-phase terpene oxidation products: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calogirou, A.; Larsen, B. R.; Kotzias, D.

    Terpenes are emitted in large quantities from vegetation into the troposphere, where they react readily with ozone, OH and NO 3 radicals leading to a number of oxidation products. The current knowledge about gas-phase terpene oxidation products is reviewed. Their formation and decomposition pathways, their products and their relevance for the troposphere, and their chemical analysis are discussed. Data on oxidation kinetics, and product yields is presented for 23 terpenes and 65 oxidation products. A total of 84 references are quoted.

  10. Gas phase chemical detection with an integrated chemical analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    CASALNUOVO,STEPHEN A.; FRYE-MASON,GREGORY CHARLES; KOTTENSTETTE,RICHARD; HELLER,EDWIN J.; MATZKE,CAROLYN M.; LEWIS,PATRICK R.; MANGINELL,RONALD P.; BACA,ALBERT G.; HIETALA,VINCENT M.

    2000-04-12

    Microfabrication technology has been applied to the development of a miniature, multi-channel gas phase chemical laboratory that provides fast response, small size, and enhanced versatility and chemical discrimination. Each analysis channel includes a sample preconcentrator followed by a gas chromatographic separator and a chemically selective surface acoustic wave detector array to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity. The performance of the components, individually and collectively, is described.

  11. Simulation Approach for Microscale Noncontinuum Gas-Phase Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torczynski, J. R.; Gallis, M. A.

    2008-11-01

    In microscale thermal actuators, gas-phase heat transfer from the heated beams to the adjacent unheated substrate is often the main energy-loss mechanism. Since the beam-substrate gap is comparable to the molecular mean free path, noncontinuum gas effects are important. A simulation approach is presented in which gas-phase heat transfer is described by Fourier's law in the bulk gas and by a wall boundary condition that equates the normal heat flux to the product of the gas-solid temperature difference and a heat transfer coefficient. The dimensionless parameters in this heat transfer coefficient are determined by comparison to Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) results for heat transfer from beams of rectangular cross section to the substrate at free-molecular to near-continuum gas pressures. This simulation approach produces reasonably accurate gas-phase heat-transfer results for wide ranges of beam geometries and gas pressures. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Relative participation of the gas phase and total particulate matter in the imbalance in prostacyclin and thromboxane formation seen following chronic cigarette smoke exposure.

    PubMed

    Sherratt, A J; Culpepper, B T; Lubawy, W C

    1988-10-01

    Chronic exposure to cigarette smoke causes an imbalance in the ratio of PGI2 and TXA2 production and is believed to favor the development of atherosclerosis. Components of the particulate phase of smoke (especially nicotine) as well as the gas phase of smoke have been shown to adversely alter arachidonic acid metabolism. To determine the relative participation of nicotine, particulate and gas phases in eliciting an imbalance in TXA2 formation, male Sprague-Dawley rats were chronically exposed (7 days/wk/mo.) to freshly generated whole smoke or gas phase from University of Kentucky Reference cigarettes and allowed access to regular drinking water or to water supplemented with nicotine (10 micrograms/ml). COHb levels were monitored to confirm smoke or gas phase inhalation. All treatment groups had lower body weights than shams. No differences in body weights were observed between smoke (+/- oral nicotine) and gas phase (+/- oral nicotine) treatment groups but all were significantly lower than oral nicotine treated animals. Platelet TXA2 production was elevated in all treatment groups compared to shams. No differences in TXA2 production were observed between smoke (+/- oral nicotine), gas phase and oral nicotine treated animals. Animals receiving gas phase/oral nicotine exhibited significantly higher platelet TXA2 production compared to the other treatments. Constituents of the gas phase as well as the particulate phase of whole smoke were both shown to elevate platelet TXA2 formation. Components of the particulate matter appear to modulate the effects of nicotine and the gas phase in the perturbation of TXA2 production in the rat smoking model. PMID:3068679

  13. A computer model for one-dimensional mass and energy transport in and around chemically reacting particles, including complex gas-phase chemistry, multicomponent molecular diffusion, surface evaporation, and heterogeneous reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, S. Y.; Yetter, R. A.; Dryer, F. L.

    1992-01-01

    Various chemically reacting flow problems highlighting chemical and physical fundamentals rather than flow geometry are presently investigated by means of a comprehensive mathematical model that incorporates multicomponent molecular diffusion, complex chemistry, and heterogeneous processes, in the interest of obtaining sensitivity-related information. The sensitivity equations were decoupled from those of the model, and then integrated one time-step behind the integration of the model equations, and analytical Jacobian matrices were applied to improve the accuracy of sensitivity coefficients that are calculated together with model solutions.

  14. Charged supramolecular assemblies of surfactant molecules in gas phase.

    PubMed

    Bongiorno, David; Ceraulo, Leopoldo; Indelicato, Sergio; Turco Liveri, Vincenzo; Indelicato, Serena

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to critically analyze recent literature on charged supramolecular assemblies formed by surfactant molecules in gas phase. Apart our specific interest on this research area, the stimuli to undertake the task arise from the widespread theoretical and applicative benefits emerging from a comprehensive view of this topic. In fact, the study of the formation, stability, and physicochemical peculiarities of non-covalent assemblies of surfactant molecules in gas phase allows to unveil interesting aspects such as the role of attractive, repulsive, and steric intermolecular interactions as driving force of supramolecular organization in absence of interactions with surrounding medium and the size and charge state dependence of aggregate structural and dynamical properties. Other interesting aspects worth to be investigated are joined to the ability of these assemblies to incorporate selected solubilizates molecules as well as to give rise to chemical reactions within a single organized structure. In particular, the incorporation of large molecules such as proteins has been of recent interest with the objective to protect their structure and functionality during the transition from solution to gas phase. Exciting fall-out of the study of gas phase surfactant aggregates includes mass and energy transport in the atmosphere, origin of life and simulation of supramolecular aggregation in the interstellar space. Moreover, supramolecular assemblies of amphiphilic molecules in gas phase could find remarkable applications as atmospheric cleaning agents, nanosolvents and nanoreactors for specialized chemical processes in confined space. Mass spectrometry techniques have proven to be particularly suitable to generate these assemblies and to furnish useful information on their size, size polydispersity, stability, and structural organization. On the other hand molecular dynamics simulations have been very useful to rationalize many experimental findings and to furnish a vivid picture of the structural and dynamic features of these aggregates. Thus, in this review, we will focus on the most important achievements gained in recent years by both these investigative tools. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 35: 170-187, 2016. PMID:26113001

  15. MOLECULAR SPECTROSCPY AND REACTIONS OF ACTINIDES IN THE GAS PHASE AND CRYOGENIC MATRICES

    SciTech Connect

    Heaven, Michael C.; Gibson, John K.; Marcalo, Joaquim

    2009-02-01

    In this chapter we review the spectroscopic data for actinide molecules and the reaction dynamics for atomic and molecular actinides that have been examined in the gas phase or in inert cryogenic matrices. The motivation for this type of investigation is that physical properties and reactions can be studied in the absence of external perturbations (gas phase) or under minimally perturbing conditions (cryogenic matrices). This information can be compared directly with the results from high-level theoretical models. The interplay between experiment and theory is critically important for advancing our understanding of actinide chemistry. For example, elucidation of the role of the 5f electrons in bonding and reactivity can only be achieved through the application of experimentally verified theoretical models. Theoretical calculations for the actinides are challenging due the large numbers of electrons that must be treated explicitly and the presence of strong relativistic effects. This topic has been reviewed in depth in Chapter 17 of this series. One of the goals of the experimental work described in this chapter has been to provide benchmark data that can be used to evaluate both empirical and ab initio theoretical models. While gas-phase data are the most suitable for comparison with theoretical calculations, there are technical difficulties entailed in generating workable densities of gas-phase actinide molecules that have limited the range of species that have been characterized. Many of the compounds of interest are refractory, and problems associated with the use of high temperature vapors have complicated measurements of spectra, ionization energies, and reactions. One approach that has proved to be especially valuable in overcoming this difficulty has been the use of pulsed laser ablation to generate plumes of vapor from refractory actinide-containing materials. The vapor is entrained in an inert gas, which can be used to cool the actinide species to room temperature or below. For many spectroscopic measurements, low temperatures have been achieved by co-condensing the actinide vapor in rare gas or inert molecule host matrices. Spectra recorded in matrices are usually considered to be minimally perturbed. Trapping the products from gas-phase reactions that occur when trace quantities of reactants are added to the inert host gas has resulted in the discovery of many new actinide species. Selected aspects of the matrix isolation data were discussed in chapter 17. In the present chapter we review the spectroscopic matrix data in terms of its relationship to gas-phase measurements, and update the description of the new reaction products found in matrices to reflect the developments that have occurred during the past two years. Spectra recorded in matrix environments are usually considered to be minimally perturbed, and this expectation is borne out for many closed shell actinide molecules. However, there is growing evidence that significant perturbations can occur for open shell molecules, resulting in geometric distortions and/or electronic state reordering. Studies of actinide reactions in the gas phase provide an opportunity to probe the relationship between electronic structure and reactivity. Much of this work has focused on the reactions of ionic species, as these may be selected and controlled using various forms of mass spectrometry. As an example of the type of insight derived from reaction studies, it has been established that the reaction barriers for An+ ions are determined by the promotion energies required to achieve the 5fn6d7s configuration. Gas-phase reaction studies also provide fundamental thermodynamic properties such as bond dissociation and ionization energies. In recent years, an increased number of gas-phase ion chemistry studies of bare (atomic) and ligated (molecular) actinide ions have appeared, in which relevant contributions to fundamental actinide chemistry have been made. These studies were initiated in the 1970's and carried out in an uninterrupted way over the course of the past three decades. Initial studies unsurprisingly focused on naturally occurring U (and Th) and were later extended (starting ten years ago) to Pa and several of the more abundant members of the transuranium series, Np through Es. The main purpose of the reaction dynamics section of this chapter is to summarize (up to late 2008) the work done in the gas phase involving ionic species, with an emphasis on the key accomplishments. This topic was recently reviewed in a comprehensive way (Gibson 2002a; Gibson and Marcalo 2006). The small number of studies reported for gas-phase reactions of neutral actinide species are also briefly summarized.

  16. Computational comparison of cation coordination to human prion peptide models.

    PubMed

    Riihimki, Eva-Stina; Kloo, Lars

    2006-10-16

    The coordination of the cations Cu(II), Co(II), Rh(III), Ir(III), Ni(II), Pd(II), Pt(II), and Zn(II) to the copper-binding octapeptide region in the human prion protein has been compared through structural optimization. The initial coordination mode used in the calculations is a five-coordinated mode obtained from previously published crystallographic data for Cu(II). The computational results show that, among these cations, the coordinations of Co(II) and Rh(III) are the most similar to that of Cu(II). The cations Ni(II), Pd(II), and Pt(II) prefer a four-coordinate square-planar coordination by the peptide ligand. The paramagnetic Co(II) ion with its large quadrupole moment is not a good substitute for Cu(II) to be used in NMR spectroscopic studies of the coordinated peptide region. Rh(III) has more attractive NMR spectroscopic characteristics than Cu(II) and Co(II) and may represent a suitable substitute for Cu(II) in these types of studies. Some preliminary experimental studies using NMR spectroscopic methods indicate that Rh(III) coordinates the copper-binding octapeptide region of the human prion protein, although further studies are required to determine the mode of interaction in detail. PMID:17029361

  17. Lipid Tail Protrusion in Simulations Predicts Fusogenic Activity of Influenza Fusion Peptide Mutants and Conformational Models

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Per; Kasson, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Fusion peptides from influenza hemagglutinin act on membranes to promote membrane fusion, but the mechanism by which they do so remains unknown. Recent theoretical work has suggested that contact of protruding lipid tails may be an important feature of the transition state for membrane fusion. If this is so, then influenza fusion peptides would be expected to promote tail protrusion in proportion to the ability of the corresponding full-length hemagglutinin to drive lipid mixing in fusion assays. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of influenza fusion peptides in lipid bilayers, comparing the X-31 influenza strain against a series of N-terminal mutants. As hypothesized, the probability of lipid tail protrusion correlates well with the lipid mixing rate induced by each mutant. This supports the conclusion that tail protrusion is important to the transition state for fusion. Furthermore, it suggests that tail protrusion can be used to examine how fusion peptides might interact with membranes to promote fusion. Previous models for native influenza fusion peptide structure in membranes include a kinked helix, a straight helix, and a helical hairpin. Our simulations visit each of these conformations. Thus, the free energy differences between each are likely low enough that specifics of the membrane environment and peptide construct may be sufficient to modulate the equilibrium between them. However, the kinked helix promotes lipid tail protrusion in our simulations much more strongly than the other two structures. We therefore predict that the kinked helix is the most fusogenic of these three conformations. PMID:23505359

  18. Contribution of Electrostatics in the Fibril Stability of a Model Ionic-Complementary Peptide.

    PubMed

    Owczarz, Marta; Casalini, Tommaso; Motta, Anna C; Morbidelli, Massimo; Arosio, Paolo

    2015-12-14

    In this work we quantified the role of electrostatic interactions in the self-assembly of a model amphiphilic peptide (RADA 16-I) into fibrillar structures by a combination of size exclusion chromatography and molecular simulations. For the peptide under investigation, it is found that a net charge of +0.75 represents the ideal condition to promote the formation of regular amyloid fibrils. Lower net charges favor the formation of amorphous precipitates, while larger net charges destabilize the fibrillar aggregates and promote a reversible dissociation of monomers from the ends of the fibrils. By quantifying the dependence of the equilibrium constant of this reversible reaction on the pH value and the peptide net charge, we show that electrostatic interactions contribute largely to the free energy of fibril formation. The addition of both salt and a charged destabilizer (guanidinium hydrochloride) at moderate concentration (0.3-1 M) shifts the monomer-fibril equilibrium toward the fibrillar state. Whereas the first effect can be explained by charge screening of electrostatic repulsion only, the promotion of fibril formation in the presence of guanidinium hydrochloride is also attributed to modifications of the peptide conformation. The results of this work indicate that the global peptide net charge is a key property that correlates well with the fibril stability, although the peptide conformation and the surface charge distribution also contribute to the aggregation propensity. PMID:26594824

  19. Probing Site-Specific Structural Information of Peptides at Model Membrane Interface In Situ.

    PubMed

    Ding, Bei; Panahi, Afra; Ho, Jia-Jung; Laaser, Jennifer E; Brooks, Charles L; Zanni, Martin T; Chen, Zhan

    2015-08-19

    Isotope labeling is a powerful technique to probe detailed structures of biological molecules with a variety of analytical methods such as NMR and vibrational spectroscopies. It is important to obtain molecular structural information on biological molecules at interfaces such as cell membranes, but it is challenging to use the isotope labeling method to study interfacial biomolecules. Here, by individually (13)C?(16)O labeling ten residues of a peptide, Ovispirin-1, we have demonstrated for the first time that a site-specific environment of membrane associated peptide can be probed by the submonolayer surface sensitive sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy in situ. With the peptide associated with a single lipid bilayer, the sinusoidal trend of the SFG line width and peak-center frequency suggests that the peptide is located at the interface beneath the lipid headgroup region. The constructive interferences between the isotope labeled peaks and the main peptide amide I peak contributed by the unlabeled components were used to determine the membrane orientation of the peptide. From the SFG spectral peak-center frequency, line width, and polarization dependence of the isotope labeled units, we deduced structural information on individual units of the peptide associated with a model cell membrane. We also performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to understand peptide-membrane interactions. The physical pictures described by simulation agree well with the SFG experimental result. This research demonstrates the feasibility and power of using isotope labeling SFG to probe molecular structures of interfacial biological molecules in situ in real time. PMID:26241117

  20. Evaluation of Chemical Interactions between Small Molecules in the Gas Phase Using Chemical Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jieun; Ju, Soomi; Kim, In Tae; Jung, Sun-Hwa; Min, Sun-Joon; Kim, Chulki; Sim, Sang Jun; Kim, Sang Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Chemical force microscopy analyzes the interactions between various chemical/biochemical moieties in situ. In this work we examined force-distance curves and lateral force to measure the interaction between modified AFM tips and differently functionalized molecular monolayers. Especially for the measurements in gas phase, we investigated the effect of humidity on the analysis of force-distance curves and the images in lateral force mode. Flat chemical patterns composed of different functional groups were made through micro-contact printing and lateral force mode provided more resolved analysis of the chemical patterns. From the images of 1-octadecanethiol/11-mercapto-1-undecanoic acid patterns, the amine group functionalized tip brought out higher contrast of the patterns than an intact silicon nitride tip owing to the additional chemical interaction between carboxyl and amine groups. For more complex chemical interactions, relative chemical affinities toward specific peptides were assessed on the pattern of 1-octadecanethiol/phenyl-terminated alkanethiol. The lateral image of chemical force microscopy reflected specific preference of a peptide to phenyl group as well as the hydrophobic interaction. PMID:26690165

  1. Evaluation of Chemical Interactions between Small Molecules in the Gas Phase Using Chemical Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jieun; Ju, Soomi; Kim, In Tae; Jung, Sun-Hwa; Min, Sun-Joon; Kim, Chulki; Sim, Sang Jun; Kim, Sang Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Chemical force microscopy analyzes the interactions between various chemical/biochemical moieties in situ. In this work we examined force-distance curves and lateral force to measure the interaction between modified AFM tips and differently functionalized molecular monolayers. Especially for the measurements in gas phase, we investigated the effect of humidity on the analysis of force-distance curves and the images in lateral force mode. Flat chemical patterns composed of different functional groups were made through micro-contact printing and lateral force mode provided more resolved analysis of the chemical patterns. From the images of 1-octadecanethiol/11-mercapto-1-undecanoic acid patterns, the amine group functionalized tip brought out higher contrast of the patterns than an intact silicon nitride tip owing to the additional chemical interaction between carboxyl and amine groups. For more complex chemical interactions, relative chemical affinities toward specific peptides were assessed on the pattern of 1-octadecanethiol/phenyl-terminated alkanethiol. The lateral image of chemical force microscopy reflected specific preference of a peptide to phenyl group as well as the hydrophobic interaction. PMID:26690165

  2. Valorization of cruor slaughterhouse by-product by enzymatic hydrolysis for the production of antibacterial peptides: focus on ? 1-32 family peptides mechanism and kinetics modeling.

    PubMed

    Hedhili, K; Dimitrov, K; Vauchel, P; Sila, A; Chataign, G; Dhulster, P; Nedjar, N

    2015-10-01

    Bovine hemoglobin is the major component of the cruor (slaughterhouse by-product) and can be considered as an important source of active peptides that could be obtained by pepsic hydrolysis. The kinetics of appearance and disappearance of several antibacterial peptides from ? 1-32 family during hydrolysis of synthesized ? 1-32 peptide, of purified bovine hemoglobin and of cruor was studied, and reaction scheme for the hydrolysis of ? 1-32 family peptides from these three sources was determined. On this basis, a mathematical model was proposed to predict the concentration of each peptide of interest of this family depending on hydrolysis time, and also on temperature (in the range 15-37 C), pH (in the range 3.5-5.5) and enzyme to substrate ratio (in the range 1/50-1/200 for the synthesized peptide and 1/5-1/20 for purified bovine hemoglobin and cruor). Apparent rate constants of reactions were determined by applying the model on a set of experimental data and it was shown that they depended on the temperature according to Arrhenius's law, that their dependence on the pH was linear, and that enzyme to substrate ratio influence was limited (in the studied range). PMID:26099509

  3. Influence of end-capping on the self-assembly of model amyloid peptide fragments.

    PubMed

    Castelletto, Valeria; Hamley, Ian W; Cenker, Çelen; Olsson, Ulf; Adamcik, Jozef; Mezzenga, Raffaele; Miravet, Juan F; Escuder, Beatriu; Rodríguez-Llansola, Francisco

    2011-03-10

    The influence of charge and aromatic stacking interactions on the self-assembly of a series of four model amyloid peptides has been examined. The four model peptides are based on the KLVFF motif from the amyloid β peptide, Aβ(16-20) extended at the N terminus with two β-alanine residues. We have studied NH(2)-βAβAKLVFF-COOH (FF), NH(2)-βAβAKLVF-COOH (F), CH(3)CONH-βAβAKLVFF-CONH(2) (CapF), and CH(3)CONH-βAβAKLVFF-CONH(2) (CapFF). The former two are uncapped (net charge +2) and differ by one hydrophobic phenylalanine residue; the latter two are the analogous capped peptides (net charge +1). The self-assembly characteristics of these peptides are remarkably different and strongly dependent on concentration. NMR shows a shift from carboxylate to carboxylic acid forms upon increasing concentration. Saturation transfer measurements of solvent molecules indicate selective involvement of phenylalanine residues in driving the self-assembly process of CapFF due presumably to the effect of aromatic stacking interactions. FTIR spectroscopy reveals β-sheet features for the two peptides containing two phenylalanine residues but not the single phenylalanine residue, pointing again to the driving force for self-assembly. Circular dichroism (CD) in dilute solution reveals the polyproline II conformation, except for F which is disordered. We discuss the relationship of this observation to the significant pH shift observed for this peptide when compared the calculated value. Atomic force microscopy and cryogenic-TEM reveals the formation of twisted fibrils for CapFF, as previously also observed for FF. The influence of salt on the self-assembly of the model β-sheet forming capped peptide CapFF was investigated by FTIR. Cryo-TEM reveals that the extent of twisting decreases with increased salt concentration, leading to the formation of flat ribbon structures. These results highlight the important role of aggregation-induced pK(a) shifts in the self-assembly of model β-sheet peptides. PMID:21309578

  4. Phosphorylation-mediated RNA/peptide complex coacervation as a model for intracellular liquid organelles.

    PubMed

    Aumiller, William M; Keating, Christine D

    2016-02-01

    Biological cells are highly organized, with numerous subcellular compartments. Phosphorylation has been hypothesized as a means to control the assembly/disassembly of liquid-like RNA- and protein-rich intracellular bodies, or liquid organelles, that lack delimiting membranes. Here, we demonstrate that charge-mediated phase separation, or complex coacervation, of RNAs with cationic peptides can generate simple model liquid organelles capable of reversibly compartmentalizing biomolecules. Formation and dissolution of these liquid bodies was controlled by changes in peptide phosphorylation state using a kinase/phosphatase enzyme pair. The droplet-generating phase transition responded to modification of even a single serine residue. Electrostatic interactions between the short cationic peptides and the much longer polyanionic RNAs drove phase separation. Coacervates were also formed on silica beads, a primitive model for localization at specific intracellular sites. This work supports phosphoregulation of complex coacervation as a viable mechanism for dynamic intracellular compartmentalization in membraneless organelles. PMID:26791895

  5. Phosphorylation-mediated RNA/peptide complex coacervation as a model for intracellular liquid organelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumiller, William M.; Keating, Christine D.

    2016-02-01

    Biological cells are highly organized, with numerous subcellular compartments. Phosphorylation has been hypothesized as a means to control the assembly/disassembly of liquid-like RNA- and protein-rich intracellular bodies, or liquid organelles, that lack delimiting membranes. Here, we demonstrate that charge-mediated phase separation, or complex coacervation, of RNAs with cationic peptides can generate simple model liquid organelles capable of reversibly compartmentalizing biomolecules. Formation and dissolution of these liquid bodies was controlled by changes in peptide phosphorylation state using a kinase/phosphatase enzyme pair. The droplet-generating phase transition responded to modification of even a single serine residue. Electrostatic interactions between the short cationic peptides and the much longer polyanionic RNAs drove phase separation. Coacervates were also formed on silica beads, a primitive model for localization at specific intracellular sites. This work supports phosphoregulation of complex coacervation as a viable mechanism for dynamic intracellular compartmentalization in membraneless organelles.

  6. Charge transfer and charge localization in extended radical cations: Investigation of model molecules for peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinkauf, Rainer; Lehrer, Florian

    1998-12-01

    Molecules consisting of a flexible tail and an aromatic chromophore are used as model systems to understand the situation of a single chromophore in a small peptide. Their S0-S1 resonant multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra show, that in neutral molecules the tail-chromophore interaction is weak and electronic excitation is localized at the chromophore. For molecules, where the ionization energy of the tail is considerable higher than that of the chromophore, by high resolution REMPI photoelectron spectroscopy we find the charge to be localized on the aromatic chromophore. This scheme also in suitable peptides allows local ionization at the aromatic chromophore. An estimate for various charge positions in peptide chains, however, shows, that for most of the amino acids electron hole positions in the nitrogen and oxygen "lone pair" orbitals of the peptide bond are nearly degenerate. REMPI photoelectron spectra of phenylethylamine, which as a model system contains such two degenerate charge positions, show small energetic shift of the ionization energy but strong geometry changes upon electron removal. This result is interpreted as direct ionization into a mixed charge delocalized state. Consequences for the charge transfer mechanism in peptides are discussed.

  7. Characterization of Model Peptide Adducts with Reactive Metabolites of Naphthalene by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Nathalie T.; Jewell, William T.; Morin, Dexter; Jones, A. Daniel; Buckpitt, Alan R.

    2012-01-01

    Naphthalene is a volatile polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon generated during combustion and is a ubiquitous chemical in the environment. Short term exposures of rodents to air concentrations less than the current OSHA standard yielded necrotic lesions in the airways and nasal epithelium of the mouse, and in the nasal epithelium of the rat. The cytotoxic effects of naphthalene have been correlated with the formation of covalent protein adducts after the generation of reactive metabolites, but there is little information about the specific sites of adduction or on the amino acid targets of these metabolites. To better understand the chemical species produced when naphthalene metabolites react with proteins and peptides, we studied the formation and structure of the resulting adducts from the incubation of model peptides with naphthalene epoxide, naphthalene diol epoxide, 1,2-naphthoquinone, and 1,4-naphthoquinone using high resolution mass spectrometry. Identification of the binding sites, relative rates of depletion of the unadducted peptide, and selectivity of binding to amino acid residues were determined. Adduction occurred on the cysteine, lysine, and histidine residues, and on the N-terminus. Monoadduct formation occurred in 39 of the 48 reactions. In reactions with the naphthoquinones, diadducts were observed, and in one case, a triadduct was detected. The results from this model peptide study will assist in data interpretation from ongoing work to detect peptide adducts in vivo as markers of biologic effect. PMID:22870282

  8. Binding of a C-end rule peptide to neuropilin-1 receptor: A molecular modeling approach

    PubMed Central

    Haspel, Nurit; Zanuy, David; Nussinov, Ruth; Teesalu, Tambet; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Aleman, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) is a receptor that plays an essential role in angiogenesis, vascular permeability and nervous system development. Previous studies have shown that peptides with an N-terminal Arg, especially peptides with the four residue consensus sequence R/K/XXR/K bind to NRP-1 cell surfaces. Peptides containing such consensus sequences promote binding and internalization into cells, while blocking the C-terminal Arg (or Lys) prevents the internalization. In this study we use molecular dynamics simulations to model the structural properties of the NRP-1 complex with a prototypic CendR peptide, RPAR. Our simulations show that RPAR binds NRP-1 through specific interactions of the RPAR C-terminus: three hydrogen bonds and a salt bridge anchor the ligand in the receptor pocket. The modeling results were used as the starting point for a systematic computational study of new RPAR analogs based on chemical modifications of its natural amino acids. Comparison of the structural properties of the new peptide - receptor complexes with the original organization suggest that some of the analogs can increase the binding affinity while reducing the natural sensitivity of RXXR to endogenous proteases. PMID:21247217

  9. Strategies for Generating Peptide Radical Cations via Ion/Ion Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Joshua D.; Fisher, Christine M.; Bu, Jiexun; Prentice, Boone M.; Redwine, James G.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Several approaches for the generation of peptide radical cations using ion/ion reactions coupled with either collision induced dissociation (CID) or ultraviolet photo dissociation (UVPD) are described here. Ion/ion reactions are used to generate electrostatic or covalent complexes comprised of a peptide and a radical reagent. The radical site of the reagent can be generated multiple ways. Reagents containing a carbon-iodine (C-I) bond are subjected to UVPD with 266 nm photons, which selectively cleaves the C-I bond homolytically. Alternatively, reagents containing azo functionalities are collisionally activated to yield radical sites on either side of the azo group. Both of these methods generate an initial radical site on the reagent, which then abstracts a hydrogen from the peptide while the peptide and reagent are held together by either electrostatic interactions or a covalent linkage. These methods are demonstrated via ion/ion reactions between the model peptide RARARAA (doubly protonated) and various distonic anionic radical reagents. The radical site abstracts a hydrogen atom from the peptide while the charge site abstracts a proton. The net result is the conversion of a doubly protonated peptide to a peptide radical cation. The peptide radical cations have been fragmented via CID and the resulting product ion mass spectra are compared to the control CID spectrum of the singly protonated, even-electron species. This work is then extended to bradykinin, a more broadly studied peptide, for comparison with other radical peptide generation methods. The work presented here provides novel methods for generating peptide radical cations in the gas phase through ion/ion reaction complexes that do not require modification of the peptide in solution or generation of non-covalent complexes in the electrospray process. PMID:25800024

  10. Strategies for generating peptide radical cations via ion/ion reactions.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Joshua D; Fisher, Christine M; Bu, Jiexun; Prentice, Boone M; Redwine, James G; McLuckey, Scott A

    2015-02-01

    Several approaches for the generation of peptide radical cations using ion/ion reactions coupled with either collision induced dissociation (CID) or ultraviolet photo dissociation (UVPD) are described here. Ion/ion reactions are used to generate electrostatic or covalent complexes comprised of a peptide and a radical reagent. The radical site of the reagent can be generated multiple ways. Reagents containing a carbon-iodine (C-I) bond are subjected to UVPD with 266-nm photons, which selectively cleaves the C-I bond homolytically. Alternatively, reagents containing azo functionalities are collisionally activated to yield radical sites on either side of the azo group. Both of these methods generate an initial radical site on the reagent, which then abstracts a hydrogen from the peptide while the peptide and reagent are held together by either electrostatic interactions or a covalent linkage. These methods are demonstrated via ion/ion reactions between the model peptide RARARAA (doubly protonated) and various distonic anionic radical reagents. The radical site abstracts a hydrogen atom from the peptide, while the charge site abstracts a proton. The net result is the conversion of a doubly protonated peptide to a peptide radical cation. The peptide radical cations have been fragmented via CID and the resulting product ion mass spectra are compared to the control CID spectrum of the singly protonated, even-electron species. This work is then extended to bradykinin, a more broadly studied peptide, for comparison with other radical peptide generation methods. The work presented here provides novel methods for generating peptide radical cations in the gas phase through ion/ion reaction complexes that do not require modification of the peptide in solution or generation of non-covalent complexes in the electrospray process. PMID:25800024

  11. Gas-phase chemistry of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shiwei; Wang, Yang; Qin, Zhi; Fan, Fangli; Haba, Hiromitsu; Komori, Yukiko; Wu, Xiaolei; Tan, Cunmin; Zhang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Short-lived ruthenium and rhodium isotopes were produced from a (252)Cf spontaneous fission (SF) source. Their volatile carbonyl complexes were formed in gas-phase reactions in situ with the carbon-monoxide containing gas. A gas-jet system was employed to transport the volatile carbonyls from the recoil chamber to the chemical separation apparatus. The gas-phase chemical behaviors of these carbonyl complexes were studied using an online low temperature isothermal chromatography (IC) technique. Long IC columns made up of FEP Teflon were used to obtain the chemical information of the high-volatile Ru and Rh carbonyls. By excluding the influence of precursor effects, short-lived isotopes of (109-110)Ru and (111-112)Rh were used to represent the chemical behaviours of Ru and Rh carbonyls. Relative chemical yields of about 75% and 20% were measured for Ru(CO)5 and Rh(CO)4, respectively, relative to the yields of KCl aerosols transported in Ar gas. The adsorption enthalpies of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes on a Teflon surface were determined to be around ΔHads = -33 kJ mol(-1) and -36 kJ mol(-1), respectively, by fitting the breakthrough curves of the corresponding carbonyl complexes with a Monte Carlo simulation program. Different from Mo and Tc carbonyls, a small amount of oxygen gas was found to be not effective for the chemical yields of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes. The general chemical behaviors of short-lived carbonyl complexes of group VI-IX elements were discussed, which can be used in the future study on the gas-phase chemistry of superheavy elements - Bh, Hs, and Mt carbonyls. PMID:26573993

  12. Gas-phase synthesis of zinc oxide nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagamadova, A. M.; Omaev, A. K.

    2015-09-01

    Gas-phase synthesis of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods on silicon and glass substrates has been studied. Using the proposed method, arrays of ZnO nanorods can be grown on these substrates without preliminary deposition of a thin ZnO sublayer and/or metal catalyst. The influence of the temperature regime, substrate arrangement, and growth time on the synthesis is considered. The shape, dimensions, and orientation of nanorods have been studied by electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Luminescence spectra and X-ray diffraction patterns of oriented arrays of nanorods have been investigated.

  13. The solar system/interstellar medium connection - Gas phase abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutz, Barry L.

    1987-01-01

    Gas-phase abundances in the outer solar system are presented as diagnostics of the interstellar medium at the time of the solar system formation, some 4.55 billion years ago. Possible influences of the thermal and chemical histories of the primitive solar nebula and of the processes which led to the formation and evolution of the outer planets and comets on the elemental and molecular composition of the primordial matter are outlined. The major components of the atmospheres of the outer planets and of the comae of comets are identified, and the cosmogonical and cosmological implications are discussed.

  14. Gas Phase Chemical Detection with an Integrated Chemical Analysis System

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, Albert G.; Casalnuovo, Stephen A.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Heller, Edwin J.; Hietala, Susan L.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Kottenstette, Richard J.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Matzke, Carloyn M.; Reno, John L.; Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Schubert, W. Kent

    1999-07-08

    Microfabrication technology has been applied to the development of a miniature, multi-channel gas phase chemical laboratory that provides fast response, small size, and enhanced versatility and chemical discrimination. Each analysis channel includes a sample concentrator followed by a gas chromatographic separator and a chemically selective surface acoustic wave detector array to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity. The performance of the components, individually and collectively, is described. The design and performance of novel micromachined acoustic wave devices, with the potential for improved chemical sensitivity, are also described.

  15. Neurotransmitters in the Gas Phase: La-Mb Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabezas, C.; Mata, S.; Lpez, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2011-06-01

    LA-MB-FTMW spectroscopy combines laser ablation with Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy in supersonic jets overcoming the problems of thermal decomposition associated with conventional heating methods. We present here the results on LA-MB-FTMW studies of some neurotransmitters. Six conformers of dopamine, four of adrenaline, five of noradrenaline and three conformers of serotonin have been characterized in the gas phase. The rotational and nuclear quadrupole coupling constants extracted from the analysis of the rotational spectrum are directly compared with those predicted by ab initio methods to achieve the conclusive identification of different conformers and the experimental characterization of the intramolecular forces at play which control conformational preferences.

  16. An all gas-phase iodine laser based on amine chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Taizo; Nakamura, Tomonari; Endo, Masamori; Uchiyama, Taro

    2009-07-01

    Laser action has been demonstrated for the 2P1/2-2P3/2 transition of iodine atom pumped by energy transfer from NCl(a1?) produced by a set of amine-based, all gas-phase chemical reactions. Continuous-wave laser output of 50 mW with 40% duty factor is obtained from a stable optical resonator consisting of two 99.99% reflective mirrors. The observed laser characteristics are reasonably explained by numerical model calculations.

  17. Photodissociation and spectroscopy of gas phase bimetallic clusters. Final report, September 15, 1990--September 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, M.A.

    1993-12-31

    Focus is the study of gas phase metal clusters to evaluate their potential to model fundamental interactions on metal surfaces. Chemical bonding between component atoms in metal clusters and physisorption on cluster surfaces are studied. Electronic spectra, vibrational frequencies, and bond dissociation energies are measured for both neutral and ionized clusters using laser/mass spectrometry. Interest is on bimetallic cluster systems and how they compare to pure metal clusters. The following were studied: Bi/Cr, Bi/Fe, Pb/Sb, Ag{sub 2}-rare gas, Ag-Al, Ag-K, Ag-Na, Ag-Li, and Ag{sub 3}.

  18. Critical temperature for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition (from multifragmentation and fission)

    SciTech Connect

    Karnaukhov, V. A.; Oeschler, H.; Budzanowski, A.; Avdeyev, S. P.; Botvina, A. S.; Cherepanov, E. A.; Karcz, W.; Kirakosyan, V. V.; Rukoyatkin, P. A.; Skwirczynska, I.; Norbeck, E.

    2008-12-15

    Critical temperature T{sub c} for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition is estimated from both the multifragmentation and fission data. In the first case, the critical temperature is obtained by analysis of the intermediate-mass-fragment yields in p(8.1 GeV) + Au collisions within the statistical model of multifragmentation. In the second case, the experimental fission probability for excited {sup 188}Os is compared with the calculated one with T{sub c} as a free parameter. It is concluded for both cases that the critical temperature is higher than 15 MeV.

  19. Tuning a High Transmission Ion Guide to Prevent Gas-Phase Proton Exchange During H/D Exchange MS Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttman, Miklos; Wales, Thomas E.; Whittington, Dale; Engen, John R.; Brown, Jeffery M.; Lee, Kelly K.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for protein structural analysis has been adopted for many purposes, including biopharmaceutical development. One of the benefits of examining amide proton exchange by mass spectrometry is that it can readily resolve different exchange regimes, as evidenced by either binomial or bimodal isotope patterns. By careful analysis of the isotope pattern during exchange, more insight can be obtained on protein behavior in solution. However, one must be sure that any observed bimodal isotope patterns are not artifacts of analysis and are reflective of the true behavior in solution. Sample carryover and certain stationary phases are known as potential sources of bimodal artifacts. Here, we describe an additional undocumented source of deuterium loss resulting in artificial bimodal patterns for certain highly charged peptides. We demonstrate that this phenomenon is predominantly due to gas-phase proton exchange between peptides and bulk solvent within the initial stages of high-transmission conjoined ion guides. Minor adjustments of the ion guide settings, as reported here, eliminate the phenomenon without sacrificing signal intensity. Such gas-phase deuterium loss should be appreciated for all HDX-MS studies using such ion optics, even for routine studies not focused on interpreting bimodal spectra.

  20. Tuning a High Transmission Ion Guide to Prevent Gas-Phase Proton Exchange During H/D Exchange MS Analysis.

    PubMed

    Guttman, Miklos; Wales, Thomas E; Whittington, Dale; Engen, John R; Brown, Jeffery M; Lee, Kelly K

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for protein structural analysis has been adopted for many purposes, including biopharmaceutical development. One of the benefits of examining amide proton exchange by mass spectrometry is that it can readily resolve different exchange regimes, as evidenced by either binomial or bimodal isotope patterns. By careful analysis of the isotope pattern during exchange, more insight can be obtained on protein behavior in solution. However, one must be sure that any observed bimodal isotope patterns are not artifacts of analysis and are reflective of the true behavior in solution. Sample carryover and certain stationary phases are known as potential sources of bimodal artifacts. Here, we describe an additional undocumented source of deuterium loss resulting in artificial bimodal patterns for certain highly charged peptides. We demonstrate that this phenomenon is predominantly due to gas-phase proton exchange between peptides and bulk solvent within the initial stages of high-transmission conjoined ion guides. Minor adjustments of the ion guide settings, as reported here, eliminate the phenomenon without sacrificing signal intensity. Such gas-phase deuterium loss should be appreciated for all HDX-MS studies using such ion optics, even for routine studies not focused on interpreting bimodal spectra. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26810432

  1. Characterization of a DAPI-RIT-DAPI system for gas-phase ion/molecule and ion/ion reactions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ziqing; Tan, Lei; Garimella, Sandilya; Li, Linfan; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Xu, Wei; Xia, Yu; Ouyang, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    The discontinuous atmospheric pressure interface (DAPI) has been developed as a facile means for efficiently introducing ions generated at atmospheric pressure to an ion trap in vacuum [e.g., a rectilinear ion trap (RIT)] for mass analysis. Introduction of multiple beams of ions or neutral species through two DAPIs into a single RIT has been previously demonstrated. In this study, a home-built instrument with a DAPI-RIT-DAPI configuration has been characterized for the study of gas-phase ion/molecule and ion/ion reactions. The reaction species, including ions or neutrals, can be introduced from both ends of the RIT through the two DAPIs without complicated ion optics or differential pumping stages. The primary reactant ions were isolated prior to reaction and the product ions were mass analyzed after controlled reaction time period. Ion/molecule reactions involving peptide radical ions and proton-transfer ion/ion reactions have been carried out using this instrument. The gas dynamic effect due to the DAPI operation on internal energy deposition and the reactivity of peptide radical ions has been characterized. The DAPI-RIT-DAPI system also has a unique feature for allowing the ion reactions to be carried out at significantly elevated pressures (in 10(-1) Torr range), which has been found to be helpful to speed up the reactions. The viability and flexibility of the DAPI-RIT-DAPI system for the study of gas-phase ion reactions have been demonstrated. PMID:24150848

  2. Toluene gas phase biofiltration by Paecilomyces lilacinus and isolation and identification of a hydrophobin protein produced thereof.

    PubMed

    Vigueras, Gabriel; Shirai, Keiko; Martins de Souza, Daniel; Martins, Daniel; Franco, Telma Teixeira; Fleuri, Luciana Francisco; Revah, Sergio

    2008-08-01

    Paecilomyces lilacinus consumed toluene as the sole carbon source in a gas-phase biofilter packed with perlite obtaining an average elimination capacity of 50 g m(-3) h(-1), a removal efficiency of 53%, and a final biomass of 31.6 mg biomass g dry support(-1). Hydrophobin proteins from the mycelium produced in the biofilter were purified by formic acid extraction and precipitated by electrobubbling, and the molecular weight was found to be 10.6 +/- 0.3 kDa. The peptide mass fingerprinting analysis of the purified hydrophobin by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight resulted in the identification of two peptides that presented high homology with sequences of class I hydrophobin proteins from other ascomycetous fungi when compared against the National Center for Biotechnology Information database. The yield of hydrophobin (PLHYD) from P. lilacinus was 1.1 mg PLHYD g biomass(-1). These proteins modified the hydrophobicity of Teflon by lowering the contact angle from 130.1 (+/-2) degrees to 57.0 (+/-5) degrees supporting hot sodium dodecyl sulfate washing. This work is the first report about biodegradation of toluene by the nematophagous fungus P. lilacinus in a gas-phase biofilter and the identification of its hydrophobin protein. PMID:18443779

  3. Support Vector Machine Classification of Probability Models and Peptide Features for Improved Peptide Identification from Shotgun Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Oehmen, Chris S.; Cannon, William R.

    2007-12-01

    Proteomics is a rapidly advancing field offering a new perspective to biological systems. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a popular experimental approach because it allows global protein characterization of a sample in a high-throughput manner. The identification of a protein is based on the spectral signature of fragments of the constituent proteins, i.e., peptides. This peptide identification is typically performed with a computational database search algorithm; however, these database search algorithms return a large number of false positive identifications. We present a new scoring algorithm that uses a SVM to integrate database scoring metrics with peptide physiochemical properties, resulting in an improved ability to separate true from false peptide identification from MS. The Peptide Identification Classifier SVM (PICS) score using only five variables is significantly more accurate than the single best database metric, quantified as the area under a Receive Operating Characteristic curve of ~0.94 versus ~0.90.

  4. Cell selectivity and anti-inflammatory activity of a Leu/Lys-rich alpha-helical model antimicrobial peptide and its diastereomeric peptides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Nan, Yong Hai; Yang, Sung-Tae; Kang, Shin Won; Kim, Yangmee; Park, Il-Seon; Hahm, Kyung-Soo; Shin, Song Yub

    2010-07-01

    To investigate the effect of the number and distribution of d-amino acids introduced into non-cell-selective alpha-helical antimicrobial peptides on the cell selectivity, protease stability and anti-inflammatory activity, we synthesized an 18-meric Leu/Lys-rich alpha-helical model peptide (K(9)L(8)W) and d-amino acid-containing diastereomeric peptides. Increasing in cell selectivity of the peptides was increased in parallel with increasing in the number of d-amino acids introduced. Despite having the same number of d-amino acids, D(9)-K(9)L(8)W-1 had better cell selectivity than D(9)-K(9)L(8)W-2, indicating that a dispersed distribution of d-amino acids in diastereomeric peptides is more effective for cell selectivity than their segregated distribution. D(3)-K(9)L(8)W-2, D(6)-K(9)L(8)W, D(9)-K(9)L(8)W-1 and D(9)-K(9)L(8)W-2 showed complete resistance to tryptic digestion. Furthermore, K(9)L(8)W and all of its diastereomeric peptides significantly inhibited nitric oxide (NO) production, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA expression and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) release in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage cells at a lower concentration than bactericidal concentration. The order of anti-inflammatory activity for the peptides was K(9)L(8)W approximately D(3)-K(9)L(8)W-1 approximately D(3)-K(9)L(8)W-2 approximately D(6)-K(9)L(8)W approximately D(9)-K(9)L(8)W-2>D(4)-K(9)L(8)W>D(9)-K(9)L(8)W-1. Increasing in hydrophobicity or alpha-helicity of the peptides was more closely correlated with increasing in hemolytic activity and anti-inflammatory activity than antimicrobial and LPS-disaggregation activities. Collectively, we successfully developed several d-amino acid-containing antimicrobial peptides (D(4)-K(9)L(8)W, D(6)-K(9)L(8)W and D(9)-K(9)L(8)W-1) with good cell selectivity, protease stability and potent anti-inflammatory activity. These antimicrobial peptides could serve as templates for the development of peptide antibiotics for the treatment of sepsis, as well as microbial infection. PMID:20363271

  5. Modeling of conformational transitions of fibrillogenic peptide, homologous to beta-domain of human alpha-lactalbumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadochnikov, V. V.; Egorov, V. V.; Shvetsov, A. V.; Kuklin, A. I.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.; Lebedev, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of the peptide corresponding to beta domain of human alpha-lactalbumin (GYDTQAIVENNESTEYG, WT) has been simulated by the molecular dynamics method. It is shown that, within the model considered, the monomer of this peptide does not tend to form a stable secondary structure; however, simulation of the behavior of several peptide molecules revealed the occurrence of beta structures due to the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Since the aforementioned interactions involve the terminal portions of peptides, the influence of the tetrapeptide corresponding to the N-terminal portion of WT, TDYG (R), on the secondary structure has been analyzed. The model calculations show that the interaction of this peptide with WT monomer facilitates formation of beta-structures. It is suggested that peptide R may affect the quaternary structure of WT.

  6. Peptide neuroregulators: the opioid system as a model.

    PubMed Central

    Barchas, J. D.; Evans, C.; Elliott, G. R.; Berger, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    Aaron Lerner's work provides a stunning set of examples of substances that help to transmit information in the brain and body. His characterization of alpha-MSH and melatonin and his sparking of interest in the further discovery of previously unknown substances have been of inestimable value for the field of neurobiology. Efforts such as those that Lerner undertook so successfully in the field of investigative dermatology now constitute a major research thrust in the field of behavioral neurochemistry and are directly related to advances in psychiatry and neurology. This review considers aspects of research on the neuropeptides, with particular attention to the endogenous opioid (morphine-like) peptides that are active on neural tissue. Neuropeptide research can be categorized broadly as efforts to discover and characterize new families and classes of active agents, investigations of their genetic and molecular processing, and studies of their relationships to behavior in animals and human beings. This review selectively considers some key research questions and strategies that arise from such research. PMID:2938344

  7. Amyloid? Peptides in interaction with raft-mime model membranes: a neutron reflectivity insight.

    PubMed

    Rondelli, Valeria; Brocca, Paola; Motta, Simona; Messa, Massimo; Colombo, Laura; Salmona, Mario; Fragneto, Giovanna; Cant, Laura; Del Favero, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The role of first-stage ?-amyloid aggregation in the development of the Alzheimer disease, is widely accepted but still unclear. Intimate interaction with the cell membrane is invoked. We designed Neutron Reflectometry experiments to reveal the existence and extent of the interaction between ?-amyloid (A?) peptides and a lone customized biomimetic membrane, and their dependence on the aggregation state of the peptide. The membrane, asymmetrically containing phospholipids, GM1 and cholesterol in biosimilar proportion, is a model for a raft, a putative site for amyloid-cell membrane interaction. We found that the structured-oligomer of A?(1-42), its most acknowledged membrane-active state, is embedded as such into the external leaflet of the membrane. Conversely, the A?(1-42) unstructured early-oligomers deeply penetrate the membrane, likely mimicking the interaction at neuronal cell surfaces, when the A?(1-42) is cleaved from APP protein and the membrane constitutes a template for its further structural evolution. Moreover, the smaller A?(1-6) fragment, the N-terminal portion of A?, was also used. A? N-terminal is usually considered as involved in oligomer stabilization but not in the peptide-membrane interaction. Instead, it was seen to remove lipids from the bilayer, thus suggesting its role, once in the whole peptide, in membrane leakage, favouring peptide recruitment. PMID:26880066

  8. Amyloidβ Peptides in interaction with raft-mime model membranes: a neutron reflectivity insight

    PubMed Central

    Rondelli, Valeria; Brocca, Paola; Motta, Simona; Messa, Massimo; Colombo, Laura; Salmona, Mario; Fragneto, Giovanna; Cantù, Laura; Del Favero, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The role of first-stage β–amyloid aggregation in the development of the Alzheimer disease, is widely accepted but still unclear. Intimate interaction with the cell membrane is invoked. We designed Neutron Reflectometry experiments to reveal the existence and extent of the interaction between β–amyloid (Aβ) peptides and a lone customized biomimetic membrane, and their dependence on the aggregation state of the peptide. The membrane, asymmetrically containing phospholipids, GM1 and cholesterol in biosimilar proportion, is a model for a raft, a putative site for amyloid-cell membrane interaction. We found that the structured-oligomer of Aβ(1-42), its most acknowledged membrane-active state, is embedded as such into the external leaflet of the membrane. Conversely, the Aβ(1-42) unstructured early-oligomers deeply penetrate the membrane, likely mimicking the interaction at neuronal cell surfaces, when the Aβ(1-42) is cleaved from APP protein and the membrane constitutes a template for its further structural evolution. Moreover, the smaller Aβ(1-6) fragment, the N-terminal portion of Aβ, was also used. Aβ N-terminal is usually considered as involved in oligomer stabilization but not in the peptide-membrane interaction. Instead, it was seen to remove lipids from the bilayer, thus suggesting its role, once in the whole peptide, in membrane leakage, favouring peptide recruitment. PMID:26880066

  9. What Determines the Activity of Antimicrobial and Cytolytic Peptides in Model Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Kim S.; Svetlovics, James; McKeown, Alesia N.; Huskins, Laura; Almeida, Paulo F.

    2011-01-01

    We previously proposed three hypotheses relating the mechanism of antimicrobial and cytolytic peptides in model membranes to the Gibbs free energies of binding and insertion into the membrane [Almeida, P.F., and Pokorny, A. (2009) Biochemistry 48, 80838093]. Two sets of peptides were designed to test those hypotheses, by mutating the sequences of ?-lysin, cecropin A, and magainin 2. Peptide binding and activity were measured on phosphatidylcholine membranes. In the first set, the peptide charge was changed by mutating basic to acidic residues or vice versa, but the amino acid sequence was not altered much otherwise. The type of dye release changed from graded to all-or-none according to prediction. However, location of charged residues in the sequence with the correct spacing to form salt bridges failed to improve binding. In the second set, the charged and other key residues were kept in the same positions, whereas most of the sequence was significantly but conservatively simplified, maintaining the same hydrophobicity and amphipathicity. This set behaved completely different from predicted. The type of release, which was expected to be maintained, changed dramatically from all-or-none to graded in the mutants of cecropin and magainin. Finally, contrary to the hypotheses, the results indicate that the Gibbs energy of binding to the membrane, not the Gibbs energy of insertion, is the primary determinant of peptide activity. PMID:21870782

  10. Gas-Phase Fragmentation Analysis of Nitro-Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Bonacci, Gustavo; Asciutto, Eliana K.; Woodcock, Steven R.; Salvatore, Sonia R.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Schopfer, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Nitro-fatty acids are electrophilic signaling mediators formed in increased amounts during inflammation by nitric oxide and nitrite-dependent redox reactions. A more rigorous characterization of endogenously-generated species requires additional understanding of their gas-phase induced fragmentation. Thus, collision induced dissociation (CID) of nitroalkane and nitroalkene groups in fatty acids were studied in the negative ion mode to provide mass spectrometric tools for their structural characterization. Fragmentation of nitroalkanes occurred mainly through loss of the NO2? anion or neutral loss of HNO2. The CID of nitroalkenes proceeds via a more complex cyclization, followed by fragmentation to nitrile and aldehyde products. Gas-phase fragmentation of nitroalkene functional groups with additional ? or ? unsaturation occurred through a multiple step cyclization reaction process, leading to 5 and 6 member ring heterocyclic products and carbon chain fragmentation. Cyclization products were not obtained during nitroalkane fragmentation, highlighting the role of double bond ? electrons during NO2? rearrangements, stabilization and heterocycle formation. The proposed structures, mechanisms and products of fragmentation are supported by analysis of 13C and 15N labeled parent molecules, 6 different nitroalkene positional isomers, 6 nitroalkane positional isomers, accurate mass determinations at high resolution and quantum mechanics calculations. Multiple key diagnostic ion fragments were obtained through this analysis, allowing for the precise placement of double bonds and sites of fatty acid nitration, thus supporting an ability to predict nitro positions in biological samples. PMID:21953257

  11. Ultrafast non-radiative decay of gas-phase nucleosides.

    PubMed

    De Camillis, Simone; Miles, Jordan; Alexander, Grace; Ghafur, Omair; Williams, Ian D; Townsend, Dave; Greenwood, Jason B

    2015-09-28

    The ultrafast photo-physical properties of DNA are crucial in providing a stable basis for life. Although the DNA bases efficiently absorb ultraviolet (UV) radiation, this energy can be dissipated to the surrounding environment by the rapid conversion of electronic energy to vibrational energy within about a picosecond. The intrinsic nature of this internal conversion process has previously been demonstrated through gas phase experiments on the bases, supported by theoretical calculations. De-excitation rates appear to be accelerated when individual bases are hydrogen bonded to solvent molecules or their complementary Watson-Crick pair. In this paper, the first gas-phase measurements of electronic relaxation in DNA nucleosides following UV excitation are reported. Using a pump-probe ionization scheme, the lifetimes for internal conversion to the ground state following excitation at 267 nm are found to be reduced by around a factor of two for adenosine, cytidine and thymidine compared with the isolated bases. These results are discussed in terms of a recent proposition that a charge transfer state provides an additional internal conversion pathway mediated by proton transfer through a sugar to base hydrogen bond. PMID:26299204

  12. Preconceptual design of the gas-phase decontamination demonstration cart

    SciTech Connect

    Munday, E.B.

    1993-12-01

    Removal of uranium deposits from the interior surfaces of gaseous diffusion equipment will be a major portion of the overall multibillion dollar effort to decontaminate and decommission the gaseous diffusion plants. Long-term low-temperature (LTLT) gas-phase decontamination is being developed at the K-25 Site as an in situ decontamination process that is expected to significantly lower the decontamination costs, reduce worker exposure to radioactive materials, and reduce safeguard concerns. This report documents the preconceptual design of the process equipment that is necessary to conduct a full-scale demonstration of the LTLT method in accordance with the process steps listed above. The process equipment and method proposed in this report are not intended to represent a full-scale production campaign design and operation, since the gas evacuation, gas charging, and off-gas handling systems that would be cost effective in a production campaign are not cost effective for a first-time demonstration. However, the design presented here is expected to be applicable to special decontamination projects beyond the demonstration, which could include the Deposit Recovery Program. The equipment will therefore be sized to a 200 ft size 1 converter (plus a substantial conservative design margin), which is the largest item of interest for gas phase decontamination in the Deposit Recovery Program. The decontamination equipment will allow recovery of the UF{sub 6}, which is generated from the reaction of ClF{sub 3} with the uranium deposits, by use of NaF traps.

  13. Gas-Phase Fragmentation Analysis of Nitro-Fatty Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonacci, Gustavo; Asciutto, Eliana K.; Woodcock, Steven R.; Salvatore, Sonia R.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Schopfer, Francisco J.

    2011-09-01

    Nitro-fatty acids are electrophilic signaling mediators formed in increased amounts during inflammation by nitric oxide and nitrite-dependent redox reactions. A more rigorous characterization of endogenously-generated species requires additional understanding of their gas-phase induced fragmentation. Thus, collision induced dissociation (CID) of nitroalkane and nitroalkene groups in fatty acids were studied in the negative ion mode to provide mass spectrometric tools for their structural characterization. Fragmentation of nitroalkanes occurred mainly through loss of the NO{2/-} anion or neutral loss of HNO2. The CID of nitroalkenes proceeds via a more complex cyclization, followed by fragmentation to nitrile and aldehyde products. Gas-phase fragmentation of nitroalkene functional groups with additional ? or ? unsaturation occurred through a multiple step cyclization reaction process, leading to 5 and 6 member ring heterocyclic products and carbon chain fragmentation. Cyclization products were not obtained during nitroalkane fragmentation, highlighting the role of double bond ? electrons during NO{2/-} rearrangements, stabilization and heterocycle formation. The proposed structures, mechanisms and products of fragmentation are supported by analysis of 13C and 15N labeled parent molecules, 6 different nitroalkene positional isomers, 6 nitroalkane positional isomers, accurate mass determinations at high resolution and quantum mechanics calculations. Multiple key diagnostic ion fragments were obtained through this analysis, allowing for the precise placement of double bonds and sites of fatty acid nitration, thus supporting an ability to predict nitro positions in biological samples.

  14. Star formation and gas phase history of the cosmic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snedden, Ali; Coughlin, Jared; Phillips, Lara Arielle; Mathews, Grant; Suh, In-Saeng

    2016-01-01

    We present a new method of tracking and characterizing the environment in which galaxies and their associated circumgalactic medium evolve. We have developed a structure finding algorithm that uses the rate of change of the density gradient to self-consistently parse and follow the evolution of groups/clusters, filaments and voids in large-scale structure simulations. We use this to trace the complete evolution of the baryons in the gas phase and the star formation history within each structure in our simulated volume. We vary the structure measure threshold to probe the complex inner structure of star-forming regions in poor clusters, filaments and voids. We find that the majority of star formation occurs in cold, condensed gas in filaments at intermediate redshifts (z ˜ 3). We also show that much of the star formation above a redshift z = 3 occurs in low-contrast regions of filaments, but as the density contrast increases at lower redshift, star formation switches to the high-contrast regions, or inner parts, of filaments. Since filaments bridge the void and cluster regions, it suggests that the majority of star formation occurs in galaxies in intermediate density regions prior to the accretion on to groups/clusters. We find that both filaments and poor clusters are multiphase environments distinguishing themselves by different distributions of gas phases.

  15. Gas phase oxidation downstream of a catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.; Anderson, D. N.

    1979-01-01

    Effect of the length available for gas-phase reactions downstream of the catalytic reactor on the emission of CO and unburned hydrocarbons was investigated. A premixed, prevaporized propane/air feed to a 12/cm/diameter catalytic/reactor test section was used. The catalytic reactor was made of four 2.5 cm long monolithic catalyst elements. Four water cooled gas sampling probes were located at positions between 0 and 22 cm downstream of the catalytic reactor. Measurements of unburned hydrocarbon, CO, and CO2 were made. Tests were performed with an inlet air temperature of 800 K, a reference velocity of 10 m/s, pressures of 3 and 600,000 Pa, and fuel air equivalence ratios of 0.14 to 0.24. For very lean mixtures, hydrocarbon emissions were high and CO continued to be formed downstream of the catalytic reactor. At the highest equivalence ratios tested, hydrocarbon levels were much lower and CO was oxidized to CO2 in the gas phase downstream. To achieve acceptable emissions, a downstream region several times longer than the catalytic reactor could be required.

  16. High resolution dissociative electron attachment to gas phase adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, D.; Beikircher, M.; Denifl, S.; Zappa, F.; Matejcik, S.; Bacher, A.; Grill, V.; Maerk, T. D.; Scheier, P.

    2006-08-28

    The dissociative electron attachment to the gas phase nucleobase adenine is studied using two different experiments. A double focusing sector field mass spectrometer is utilized for measurements requiring high mass resolution, high sensitivity, and relative ion yields for all the fragment anions and a hemispherical electron monochromator instrument for high electron energy resolution. The negative ion mass spectra are discussed at two different electron energies of 2 and 6 eV. In contrast to previous gas phase studies a number of new negative ions are discovered in the mass spectra. The ion efficiency curves for the negative ions of adenine are measured for the electron energy range from about 0 to 15 eV with an electron energy resolution of about 100 meV. The total anion yield derived via the summation of all measured fragment anions is compared with the total cross section for negative ion formation measured recently without mass spectrometry. For adenine the shape of the two cross section curves agrees well, taking into account the different electron energy resolutions; however, for thymine some peculiar differences are observed.

  17. Gas-Phase Acidities of Phosphorylated Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Stover, Michele L; Plummer, Chelsea E; Miller, Sean R; Cassady, Carolyn J; Dixon, David A

    2015-11-19

    Gas-phase acidities and heats of formation have been predicted at the G3(MP2)/SCRF-COSMO level of theory for 10 phosphorylated amino acids and their corresponding amides, including phospho-serine (pSer), -threonine (pThr), and -tyrosine (pTyr), providing the first reliable set of these values. The gas-phase acidities (GAs) of the three named phosphorylated amino acids and their amides have been determined using proton transfer reactions in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometer. Excellent agreement was found between the experimental and predicted GAs. The phosphate group is the deprotonation site for pSer and pThr and deprotonation from the carboxylic acid generated the lowest energy anion for pTyr. The infrared spectra were calculated for six low energy anions of pSer, pThr, and pTyr. For deprotonated pSer and pThr, good agreement is found between the experimental IRMPD spectra and the calculated spectra for our lowest energy anion structure. For pTyr, the IR spectra for a higher energy phosphate deprotonated structure is in good agreement with experiment. Additional experiments tested electrospray ionization (ESI) conditions for pTyr and determined that variations in solvent, temperature, and voltage can result in a different experimental GA value, indicating that ESI conditions affect the conformation of the pTyr anion. PMID:26492552

  18. DSMC Convergence for Microscale Gas-Phase Heat Conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rader, D. J.; Gallis, M. A.; Torczynski, J. R.

    2004-11-01

    The convergence of Bird's Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is investigated for gas-phase heat conduction at typical microscale conditions. A hard-sphere gas is confined between two fully accommodating walls of unequal temperature. Simulations are performed for small system and local Knudsen numbers, so continuum flow exists outside the Knudsen layers. The ratio of the DSMC thermal conductivity to the Chapman-Enskog value in the central region is determined for over 200 combinations of time step, cell size, and number of computational molecules per cell. In the limit of vanishing error, this ratio approaches 1.000 to within the correlation uncertainty. In the limit of infinite computational molecules per cell, the difference from unity depends quadratically on time step and cell size as these quantities become small. The coefficients of these quadratic terms are in good agreement with Green-Kubo values found by Hadjiconstantinou, Garcia, and co-workers. These results demonstrate that DSMC can accurately simulate microscale gas-phase heat conduction. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Gas-phase reactivity of novel Ziegler-Natta catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Alameddin, N.G.; Eyler, J.R.; Richardson, D.E.

    1994-12-31

    The discovery of soluble group 4 metallocene-based catalysts for the Ziegler-Natta polymerization of olefins has generated considerable interest in the field. In particular, the versatility of the Cp (cyclopentadienyl) ligand has made practical the development of a host of novel catalysts which can produce extremely regiospecific and stereospecific polymers. With further improvements in activity and stability, these catalysts are expected to make a major impact on the polymerization industry. Presently, catalyst design is driven by using the steric and electronic properties of the ligands to guide the monomer addition. However, since these ligands have considerable steric bulk, the choice of solvent will significantly affect their catalytic properties. Therefore, an understanding of the intrinsic reactivity of these catalysts independent of a solvent is one of the first steps to building a better catalyst. The work in progress is a study of the reactivity of zircononene-based catalysts in the gas phase. The authors are in the process of studying the rates of reaction of a series of these compounds with H{sub 2} as well as with a number of olefins. In the gas phase, the intrinsic reactivity of these catalysts is revealed and their chemistry can be studied in detail.

  20. Measurement and speciation of gas phase peroxides in the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.H.; Leahy, D.F.; Tang, I.N.; Newman, L. )

    1993-02-20

    An improved gas phase sampler and a recently developed nonenzymatic measurement method for H[sub 2]O[sub 2] and HOCH[sub 2]OOH(HMHP) are described. The gas phase sampler is equipped with a surfaceless intake to alleviate heterogeneous loss of H[sub 2]O[sub 2] in the sampling line. The nonenzymatic method makes use of the aqueous phase Fention reaction for H[sub 2]O[sub 2] measurement and is capable of speciation between H[sub 2]O[sub 2] and HMHP, using a dual channel technique. By adding a third channel employing the well-established method of p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (POHPAA) and horseradish peroxidase for total peroxide measurement, it is possible to differentiate H[sub 2]O[sub 2], HMHP, and other organic peroxides, if present. The measurement technique was successfully deployed in a field study at George L. Smith III State Park, Georgia (82[degrees]20[prime]W, 32[degrees]30[prime]N). Preliminary data analysis indicates that the measured total peroxides range from 0.4 to [approximately]6 ppbv, depending on meteorological conditions, and that organic peroxides, mostly HMHP, constitute between 20 and 80% of the total peroxides. The work reported here represents the first continuous and real-time measurements for these peroxides in the atmosphere. 28 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Gas phase contributions to topochemical hydride reduction reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Yoji; Li, Zhaofei; Hirai, Kei; Tassel, Cdric; Loyer, Franois; Ichikawa, Noriya; Abe, Naoyuki; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Shimakawa, Yuichi; and others

    2013-11-15

    Alkali and alkali earth hydrides have been used as solid state reductants recently to yield many interesting new oxygen-deficient transition metal oxides. These reactions have tacitly been assumed to be a solid phase reaction between the reductant and parent oxide. We have conducted a number of experiments with physical separation between the reductant and oxides, and find that in some cases reduction proceeds even when the reagents are physically separated, implying reactions with in-situ generated H{sub 2} and, to a lesser extent, getter mechanisms. Our findings change our understanding of these topochemical reactions, and should enhance the synthesis of additional new oxides and nanostructures. - Graphical abstract: Topochemical reductions with hydrides: Solid state or gas phase reaction? Display Omitted - Highlights: SrFeO{sub 2} and LaNiO{sub 2} were prepared by topochemical reduction of oxides. Separating the reducing agent (CaH{sub 2}, Mg metal) from the oxide still results in reduction. Such topochemical reactions can occur in the gas phase.

  2. Gas-phase Dissociation of homo-DNA Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stucki, Silvan R.; Dsiron, Camille; Nyakas, Adrien; Marti, Simon; Leumann, Christian J.; Schrch, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    Synthetic modified oligonucleotides are of interest for diagnostic and therapeutic applications, as their biological stability, pairing selectivity, and binding strength can be considerably increased by the incorporation of unnatural structural elements. Homo-DNA is an oligonucleotide homologue based on dideoxy-hexopyranosyl sugar moieties, which follows the Watson-Crick A-T and G-C base pairing system, but does not hybridize with complementary natural DNA and RNA. Homo-DNA has found application as a bioorthogonal element in templated chemistry applications. The gas-phase dissociation of homo-DNA has been investigated by ESI-MS/MS and MALDI-MS/MS, and mechanistic aspects of its gas-phase dissociation are discussed. Experiments revealed a charge state dependent preference for the loss of nucleobases, which are released either as neutrals or as anions. In contrast to DNA, nucleobase loss from homo-DNA was found to be decoupled from backbone cleavage, thus resulting in stable products. This renders an additional stage of ion activation necessary in order to generate sequence-defining fragment ions. Upon MS3 of the primary base-loss ion, homo-DNA was found to exhibit unspecific backbone dissociation resulting in a balanced distribution of all fragment ion series.

  3. On the design of zinc-finger models with cyclic peptides bearing a linear tail.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Aurlie; Mettra, Bastien; Lebrun, Vincent; Latour, Jean-Marc; Snque, Olivier

    2013-03-18

    Cyclic peptides with a linear tail (CPLT) have been successfully used to model two zinc fingers (ZFs) adopting the treble-clef- and loosened zinc-ribbon folds. In this article, we examine the factors that may influence the design of such ZF models: mutations in the sequence, size of the cycle, and size of the tail. For this purpose, several peptides derived from the CPLT-based models of the treble-clef- and loosened zinc-ribbon ZF were synthesized and studied. CPLT-based models appear to be robust toward mutations, accommodate various cycle sizes, and are sensible to the size of the linking region of the tail located between the cycle and the coordinating amino acids. Based on these criteria, we describe the design of a new CPLT-based model for the zinc-ribbon ZFs, LZR , and compare it to a linear analogue, LZR(lin) . The model complex Zn?LZR is able to fold correctly around the metal ion contrary to Zn?LZR(lin) , suggesting that CPLT-based models are more likely to yield structurally meaningful models of ZF sites than linear peptide models. Finally, we draw some rules that could allow the design of new CPLT-based metallopeptides with a controlled fold. PMID:23436718

  4. Action spectroscopy of a protonated peptide in the ultraviolet range.

    PubMed

    Canon, Francis; Milosavljević, Aleksandar R; Nahon, Laurent; Giuliani, Alexandre

    2015-10-21

    Action spectroscopy of protonated substance P, a model undecapeptide, has been probed from 5.2 eV to 20 eV. For photon energy above the ionization threshold measured at 10.3 ± 0.1 eV, the radical dication is observed along with side chain losses and abundant formation of all kinds of sequence ions. Below the photoionization threshold, the photoproducts involve side chain cleavages and backbone cleavages into a-, b-/y-, and c-sequence ions. Different electronic excited states appear to produce different fragment ions. Norrish type I and II reactions are proposed to account for some photoproducts. This study bridges the gap between laser activation and electron-induced dissociation of peptides. Moreover, our results report for the first time a comprehensive picture of the photochemical fragmentation of a gas phase peptide in a wide photon energy range. PMID:25586594

  5. Position for determining gas phase volatile organic compound concentrations in transuranic waste containers. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, M.J.; Liekhus, K.J.; Djordjevic, S.M.; Loehr, C.A.; Spangler, L.R.

    1995-08-01

    In the conditional no-migration determination (NMD) for the test phase of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) imposed certain conditions on the US Department of Energy (DOE) regarding gas phase volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in the void space of transuranic (TRU) waste containers. Specifically, the EPA required the DOE to ensure that each waste container has no layer of confinement that contains flammable mixtures of gases or mixtures of gases that could become flammable when mixed with air. The EPA also required that sampling of the headspace of waste containers outside inner layers of confinement be representative of the entire void space of the container. The EPA stated that all layers of confinement in a container would have to be sampled until DOE can demonstrate to the EPA that sampling of all layers is either unnecessary or can be safely reduced. A test program was conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to demonstrate that the gas phase VOC concentration in the void space of each layer of confinement in vented drums can be estimated from measured drum headspace using a theoretical transport model and that sampling of each layer of confinement is unnecessary. This report summarizes the studies performed in the INEL test program and extends them for the purpose of developing a methodology for determining gas phase VOC concentrations in both vented and unvented TRU waste containers. The methodology specifies conditions under which waste drum headspace gases can be said to be representative of drum gases as a whole and describes a method for predicting drum concentrations in situations where the headspace concentration is not representative. The methodology addresses the approach for determining the drum VOC gas content for two purposes: operational period drum handling and operational period no-migration calculations.

  6. Position for determining gas-phase volatile organic compound concentrations in transuranic waste containers. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, M.J.; Liekhus, K.J.; Djordjevic, S.M.; Loehr, C.A.; Spangler, L.R.

    1998-06-01

    In the conditional no-migration determination (NMD) for the test phase of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) imposed certain conditions on the US Department of Energy (DOE) regarding gas phase volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in the void space of transuranic (TRU) waste containers. Specifically, the EPA required the DOE to ensure that each waste container has no layer of confinement that contains flammable mixtures of gases or mixtures of gases that could become flammable when mixed with air. The EPA also required that sampling of the headspace of waste containers outside inner layers of confinement be representative of the entire void space of the container. The EPA stated that all layers of confinement in a container would have to be sampled until DOE can demonstrate to the EPA that sampling of all layers is either unnecessary or can be safely reduced. A test program was conducted at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to demonstrate that the gas phase VOC concentration in the void space of each layer of confinement in vented drums can be estimated from measured drum headspace using a theoretical transport model and that sampling of each layer of confinement is unnecessary. This report summarizes the studies performed in the INEEL test program and extends them for the purpose of developing a methodology for determining gas phase VOC concentrations in both vented and unvented TRU waste containers. The methodology specifies conditions under which waste drum headspace gases can be said to be representative of drum gases as a whole and describes a method for predicting drum concentrations in situations where the headspace concentration is not representative. The methodology addresses the approach for determining the drum VOC gas content for two purposes: operational period drum handling and operational period no-migration calculations.

  7. Determinants of Gas-Phase Disassembly Behavior in Homodimeric Protein Complexes with Related yet Divergent Structures

    PubMed Central

    Dodds, Eric D.; Blackwell, Anne E.; Jones, Christopher M.; Holso, Katie L.; OBrien, Dawne J.; Cordes, Matthew H. J.; Wysocki, Vicki H.

    2011-01-01

    The overall structure of a protein-protein complex reflects an intricate arrangement of non-covalent interactions. While intramolecular interactions confer secondary and tertiary structure to individual subunits, intermolecular interactions lead to quaternary structure - the ordered aggregation of separate polypeptide chains into multi-subunit assemblies. The specific ensemble of non-covalent contacts dictates the stability of subunit folds, enforces protein-protein binding specificity, and determines multimer stability. Consequently, non-covalent architecture is likely to play a role in the gas-phase dissociation of these assemblies during tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). To further advance the applicability of MS/MS to analytical problems in structural biology, a better understanding of the interplay between the structures and fragmentation behaviors of non-covalent protein complexes is essential. The present work constitutes a systematic study of model protein homodimers (bacteriophage N15 Cro; bacteriophage ? Cro; bacteriophage P22 Arc) with related but divergent structures, both in terms of subunit folds and protein-protein interfaces. Because each of these dimers has a well-characterized structure (solution and / or crystal structure), specific non-covalent features could be correlated with gas-phase disassembly patterns as studied by collision-induced dissociation, surface-induced dissociation, and ion mobility. Of the several respects in which the dimers differed in structure, the presence or absence of intermolecular electrostatic contacts exerted the most significant influence on the gas-phase dissociation behavior. This is attributed to the well-known enhancement of ionic interactions in the absence of bulk solvent. Because salt bridges are general contributors to both intermolecular and intramolecular stability in protein complexes, these observations are broadly applicable to aid in the interpretation or prediction of dissociation spectra for non-covalent protein assemblies. PMID:21486017

  8. The peptide agonist-binding site of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor based on site-directed mutagenesis and knowledge-based modelling.

    PubMed

    Dods, Rachel L; Donnelly, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36)amide (GLP-1) plays a central role in regulating blood sugar levels and its receptor, GLP-1R, is a target for anti-diabetic agents such as the peptide agonist drugs exenatide and liraglutide. In order to understand the molecular nature of the peptide-receptor interaction, we used site-directed mutagenesis and pharmacological profiling to highlight nine sites as being important for peptide agonist binding and/or activation. Using a knowledge-based approach, we constructed a 3D model of agonist-bound GLP-1R, basing the conformation of the N-terminal region on that of the receptor-bound NMR structure of the related peptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating protein (PACAP21). The relative position of the extracellular to the transmembrane (TM) domain, as well as the molecular details of the agonist-binding site itself, were found to be different from the model that was published alongside the crystal structure of the TM domain of the glucagon receptor, but were nevertheless more compatible with published mutagenesis data. Furthermore, the NMR-determined structure of a high-potency cyclic conformationally-constrained 11-residue analogue of GLP-1 was also docked into the receptor-binding site. Despite having a different main chain conformation to that seen in the PACAP21 structure, four conserved residues (equivalent to His-7, Glu-9, Ser-14 and Asp-15 in GLP-1) could be structurally aligned and made similar interactions with the receptor as their equivalents in the GLP-1-docked model, suggesting the basis of a pharmacophore for GLP-1R peptide agonists. In this way, the model not only explains current mutagenesis and molecular pharmacological data but also provides a basis for further experimental design. PMID:26598711

  9. Caspase-3 binds diverse P4 residues in peptides as revealed by crystallography and structural modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Bin; Fu, Guoxing; Agniswamy, Johnson; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T.

    2009-03-31

    Caspase-3 recognition of various P4 residues in its numerous protein substrates was investigated by crystallography, kinetics, and calculations on model complexes. Asp is the most frequent P4 residue in peptide substrates, although a wide variety of P4 residues are found in the cellular proteins cleaved by caspase-3. The binding of peptidic inhibitors with hydrophobic P4 residues, or no P4 residue, is illustrated by crystal structures of caspase-3 complexes with Ac-IEPD-Cho, Ac-WEHD-Cho, Ac-YVAD-Cho, and Boc-D(OMe)-Fmk at resolutions of 1.9-2.6 {angstrom}. The P4 residues formed favorable hydrophobic interactions in two separate hydrophobic regions of the binding site. The side chains of P4 Ile and Tyr form hydrophobic interactions with caspase-3 residues Trp206 and Trp214 within a non-polar pocket of the S4 subsite, while P4 Trp interacts with Phe250 and Phe252 that can also form the S5 subsite. These interactions of hydrophobic P4 residues are distinct from those for polar P4 Asp, which indicates the adaptability of caspase-3 for binding diverse P4 residues. The predicted trends in peptide binding from molecular models had high correlation with experimental values for peptide inhibitors. Analysis of structural models for the binding of 20 different amino acids at P4 in the aldehyde peptide Ac-XEVD-Cho suggested that the majority of hydrophilic P4 residues interact with Phe250, while hydrophobic residues interact with Trp206, Phe250, and Trp214. Overall, the S4 pocket of caspase-3 exhibits flexible adaptation for different residues and the new structures and models, especially for hydrophobic P4 residues, will be helpful for the design of caspase-3 based drugs.

  10. Gas Phase Chromatography of some Group 4, 5, and 6 Halides

    SciTech Connect

    Sylwester, Eric Robert

    1998-10-01

    Gas phase chromatography using The Heavy Element Volatility Instrument (HEVI) and the On Line Gas Apparatus (OLGA III) was used to determine volatilities of ZrBr{sub 4}, HfBr{sub 4}, RfBr{sub 4}, NbBr{sub 5}, TaOBr{sub 3}, HaCl{sub 5}, WBr{sub 6}, FrBr, and BiBr{sub 3}. Short-lived isotopes of Zr, Hf, Rf, Nb, Ta, Ha, W, and Bi were produced via compound nucleus reactions at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and transported to the experimental apparatus using a He gas transport system. The isotopes were halogenated, separated from the other reaction products, and their volatilities determined by isothermal gas phase chromatography. Adsorption Enthalpy ({Delta}H{sub a}) values for these compounds were calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation program modeling the gas phase chromatography column. All bromides showed lower volatility than molecules of similar molecular structures formed as chlorides, but followed similar trends by central element. Tantalum was observed to form the oxybromide, analogous to the formation of the oxychloride under the same conditions. For the group 4 elements, the following order in volatility and {Delta}H{sub a} was observed: RfBr{sub 4} > ZrBr{sub 4} > HfBr{sub 4}. The {Delta}H{sub a} values determined for the group 4, 5, and 6 halides are in general agreement with other experimental data and theoretical predictions. Preliminary experiments were performed on Me-bromides. A new measurement of the half-life of {sup 261}Rf was performed. {sup 261}Rf was produced via the {sup 248}Cm({sup 18}O, 5n) reaction and observed with a half-life of 74{sub -6}{sup +7} seconds, in excellent agreement with the previous measurement of 78{sub -6}{sup +11} seconds. We recommend a new half-life of 75{+-}7 seconds for {sup 261}Rf based on these two measurements. Preliminary studies in transforming HEVI from an isothermal (constant temperature) gas phase chromatography instrument to a thermochromatographic (variable temperature) instrument have been completed. Thermochromatography is a technique that can be used to study the volatility and {Delta}H{sub a} of longer-lived isotopes off-line, Future work will include a comparison between the two techniques and the use of thermochromatography to study isotopes in a wider range of half-lives and molecular structures.

  11. Multipole correction of atomic monopole models of molecular charge distribution. I. Peptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokalski, W. A.; Keller, D. A.; Ornstein, R. L.; Rein, R.

    1993-01-01

    The defects in atomic monopole models of molecular charge distribution have been analyzed for several model-blocked peptides and compared with accurate quantum chemical values. The results indicate that the angular characteristics of the molecular electrostatic potential around functional groups capable of forming hydrogen bonds can be considerably distorted within various models relying upon isotropic atomic charges only. It is shown that these defects can be corrected by augmenting the atomic point charge models by cumulative atomic multipole moments (CAMMs). Alternatively, sets of off-center atomic point charges could be automatically derived from respective multipoles, providing approximately equivalent corrections. For the first time, correlated atomic multipoles have been calculated for N-acetyl, N'-methylamide-blocked derivatives of glycine, alanine, cysteine, threonine, leucine, lysine, and serine using the MP2 method. The role of the correlation effects in the peptide molecular charge distribution are discussed.

  12. Oxo-exchange of gas-phase uranyl, neptunyl, and plutonyl with water and methanol.

    PubMed

    Lucena, Ana F; Odoh, Samuel O; Zhao, Jing; Maralo, Joaquim; Schreckenbach, Georg; Gibson, John K

    2014-02-17

    A challenge in actinide chemistry is activation of the strong bonds in the actinyl ions, AnO2(+) and AnO2(2+), where An = U, Np, or Pu. Actinyl activation in oxo-exchange with water in solution is well established, but the exchange mechanisms are unknown. Gas-phase actinyl oxo-exchange is a means to probe these processes in detail for simple systems, which are amenable to computational modeling. Gas-phase exchange reactions of UO2(+), NpO2(+), PuO2(+), and UO2(2+) with water and methanol were studied by experiment and density functional theory (DFT); reported for the first time are experimental results for UO2(2+) and for methanol exchange, as well as exchange rate constants. Key findings are faster exchange of UO2(2+) versus UO2(+) and faster exchange with methanol versus water; faster exchange of UO2(+) versus PuO2(+) was quantified. Computed potential energy profiles (PEPs) are in accord with the observed kinetics, validating the utility of DFT to model these exchange processes. The seemingly enigmatic result of faster exchange for uranyl, which has the strongest oxo-bonds, may reflect reduced covalency in uranyl as compared with plutonyl. PMID:24484174

  13. Algorithmically designed peptides ameliorate behavioral defects in animal model of ADHD by an allosteric mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kinkead, Becky; Selz, Karen A; Owens, Michael J; Mandell, Arnold J

    2006-02-15

    This study exemplifies the use of three ADHD-relevant methodological innovations. (1) The use of novel, patented, computational peptide design techniques to generate peptides targeting the extra-cellular and para-transmembrane amino acid loops of the putatively ADHD-involved, D(2) dopamine receptor, D(2)DAR; (2) experimental evidence that these peptides in L-amino acid/ortho ordered or D-amino acid/reverse ordered (retro-inverso), D(2)DAR, hydrophobic eigenmode matched forms, evoked positive allosteric and indirect agonist influences on in vitro stably receptor transfected CHO and LtK cells and on in vivo, brain mediated activity; (3) a representative 15 residue all-D-amino acid, D(2) mode matched peptide, given parenterally, was found to "repair" a key aberrant ADHD behavioral characteristic in a standard animal model of ADHD, the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat, SHR, relative to its progenitor species control, the Wistar-Kyoto rat, WKY. The representative, retro-inverso peptide, all-D-LLYKNKPRYPKRNRE, reversed SHR's relative deficiency in sensory motor gating (pre-pulse inhibition, PPI) while leaving SHR's nonselective attention (rearings), impulsive behavior (time in center), and activity level (timed total motor behavior) unchanged. Amphetamine also reversed SHRs sensory gating defect, but with significant increases in nonselective attention, impulsivity and hyperactivity. These preliminary results suggest the possibility of a new, "softer" pharmacological approach to ADHD: hydrophobic mode matched peptide allosteric augmentation of the activity of indigenous dopamine with respect to D(2)DAR mediated function, in place of stimulant drug-induced presynaptic dopamine release or impairment of dopamine uptake. PMID:16423408

  14. Ion/Ion Reactions with "Onium" Reagents: An Approach for the Gas-phase Transfer of Organic Cations to Multiply-Charged Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Joshua D.; Prentice, Boone M.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-05-01

    The use of ion/ion reactions to effect gas-phase alkylation is demonstrated. Commonly used fixed-charge "onium" cations are well-suited for ion/ion reactions with multiply deprotonated analytes because of their tendency to form long-lived electrostatic complexes. Activation of these complexes results in an SN2 reaction that yields an alkylated anion with the loss of a neutral remnant of the reagent. This alkylation process forms the basis of a general method for alkylation of deprotonated analytes generated via electrospray, and is demonstrated on a variety of anionic sites. SN2 reactions of this nature are demonstrated empirically and characterized using density functional theory (DFT). This method for modification in the gas phase is extended to the transfer of larger and more complex R groups that can be used in later gas-phase synthesis steps. For example, N-cyclohexyl- N'-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide (CMC) is used to transfer a carbodiimide functionality to a peptide anion containing a carboxylic acid. Subsequent activation yields a selective reaction between the transferred carbodiimide group and a carboxylic acid, suggesting the carbodiimide functionality is retained through the transfer process. Many different R groups are transferable using this method, allowing for new possibilities for charge manipulation and derivatization in the gas phase.

  15. Ion/ion reactions with "onium" reagents: an approach for the gas-phase transfer of organic cations to multiply-charged anions.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Joshua D; Prentice, Boone M; McLuckey, Scott A

    2015-05-01

    The use of ion/ion reactions to effect gas-phase alkylation is demonstrated. Commonly used fixed-charge "onium" cations are well-suited for ion/ion reactions with multiply deprotonated analytes because of their tendency to form long-lived electrostatic complexes. Activation of these complexes results in an SN2 reaction that yields an alkylated anion with the loss of a neutral remnant of the reagent. This alkylation process forms the basis of a general method for alkylation of deprotonated analytes generated via electrospray, and is demonstrated on a variety of anionic sites. SN2 reactions of this nature are demonstrated empirically and characterized using density functional theory (DFT). This method for modification in the gas phase is extended to the transfer of larger and more complex R groups that can be used in later gas-phase synthesis steps. For example, N-cyclohexyl-N'-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide (CMC) is used to transfer a carbodiimide functionality to a peptide anion containing a carboxylic acid. Subsequent activation yields a selective reaction between the transferred carbodiimide group and a carboxylic acid, suggesting the carbodiimide functionality is retained through the transfer process. Many different R groups are transferable using this method, allowing for new possibilities for charge manipulation and derivatization in the gas phase. PMID:25652935

  16. Model-based description of peptide retention on doped reversed-phase media.

    PubMed

    Khalaf, Rushd; Forrer, Nicola; Buffolino, Gianluca; Butté, Alessandro; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2015-08-14

    Reversed-phase (RP) chromatography is one of the main tools for the preparative purification of therapeutic peptides. In previous works [1,2], a new type of RP chromatography, doped reversed-phase chromatography (DRP) was presented. By adding small amounts (up to 15% of the surface ligands) of repulsive ion exchange ligands to a traditional RP material, significant improvements in peptide purification performance were observed, at the same or in similar operating conditions. These improvements included increases in selectivity in diluted conditions (up to twice as high), increases in yield in preparative conditions (up to 20% higher) and in productivity in preparative conditions (up to twice as high), when compared to RP materials [2]. A proper physical model is developed in this work to quantitatively explain and rationalize this behavior. The developed model is then used to correctly fit the retention data of several peptides in different buffering conditions. The increase in selectivity is related to a controlled decrease in free surface area available for adsorption due to the ionic ligands creating a repulsive sphere the analytes cannot enter. This decrease in adsorption surface is calculated using Debye-Hückel theory, and in combination with linear solvent strength theory, allows for the quantitative description of peptide retention on DRP media. PMID:26150253

  17. Ion Trap Collisional Activation of c and z Ions Formed via Gas-Phase Ion/Ion Electron Transfer Dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hongling; Xia, Yu; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    A series of c- and z-type product ions formed via gas-phase electron transfer ion/ion reactions between protonated polypeptides with azobenzene radical anions are subjected to ion trap collision activation in a linear ion trap. Fragment ions including a-, b-, y-type and ammonia-loss ions are typically observed in collision induced dissociation (CID) of c ions, showing almost identical CID patterns as those of the C-terminal amidated peptides consisting of the same sequences. Collisional activation of z species mainly gives rise to side-chain losses and peptide backbone cleavages resulting in a-, b-, c-, x-, y-and z-type ions. Most of the fragmentation pathways of z species upon ion trap CID can be accounted for by radical driven processes. The side-chain losses from z species are different from the small losses observed from the charge-reduced peptide molecular species in electron transfer dissociation (ETD), which indicates rearrangement of the radical species. Characteristic side-chain losses are observed for several amino acid residues, which are useful to predict their presence in peptide/protein ions. Furthermore, the unique side-chain losses from leucine and isoleucine residues allow facile distinction of these two isomeric residues. PMID:17608403

  18. Dissociation of Peptides by Ions and Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bari, Sadia

    2015-05-01

    Little is known about biological radiation action on the molecular level. The response of isolated biomolecules upon energetic photons is of great interest i.e. for astrobiology and radiobiology. Key questions concern ion chemistry in the interstellar medium, possible transport of biomolecules from space to earth and molecular mechanisms underlying biological radiation damage. Experiments with small biomolecules in the gas phase have the advantage of studying ionization and fragmentation dynamics in finite systems but are less realistic radiation damage models. To be able to investigate more complex biomolecular systems, such as peptides and proteins, we have developed a new apparatus in which a home-made electrospray source can be interfaced with a low energy (keV) ion beamline or different photon beamlines (e.g. of synchrotrons or free electron lasers). Spectra of peptides obtained with this set-up will be presented. Dependencies on energy and polarization of the radiation as well as peptide length and structure will be thereby discussed.

  19. Urea unfolding of peptide helices as a model for interpreting protein unfolding.

    PubMed Central

    Scholtz, J M; Barrick, D; York, E J; Stewart, J M; Baldwin, R L

    1995-01-01

    To provide a model system for understanding how the unfolding of protein alpha-helices by urea contributes to protein denaturation, urea unfolding was measured for a homologous series of helical peptides with the repeating sequence Ala-Glu-Ala-Ala-Lys-Ala and chain lengths varying from 14 to 50 residues. The dependence of the helix propagation parameter of the Zimm-Bragg model for helix-coil transition theory (s) on urea molarity ([urea]) was determined at 0 degree C with data for the entire set of peptides, and a linear dependence of In s on [urea] was found. The results were fitted by the binding-site model and by the solvent-exchange model for the interaction of urea with the peptides. Each of these thermodynamic models is able to describe the data quite well and we are not able to discern any difference between the ability of each model to fit the data. Thus a linear relation, ln s = ln s0 - (m/RT).[urea], fits the data for alpha-helix unfolding, just as others have found for protein unfolding. When the m value determined here for alpha-helix unfolding is multiplied by the number of helical residues in partly helical protein molecules, the resulting values agree within a factor of 2 with observed m values for these proteins. This result indicates that the interaction between urea and peptide groups accounts for a major part of the denaturing action of urea on proteins, as predicted earlier by some model studies with small molecules. PMID:7816813

  20. Regenerable Air Purification System for Gas-Phase Contaminant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinescu, Ileana C.; Finn, John E.; LeVan, M. Douglas; Lung, Bernadette (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Tests of a pre-prototype regenerable air purification system (RAPS) that uses water vapor to displace adsorbed contaminants from an adsorbent column have been performed at NASA Ames Research Center. A unit based on this design can be used for removing trace gas-phase contaminants from spacecraft cabin air or from polluted process streams including incinerator exhaust. During the normal operation mode, contaminants are removed from the air on the column. Regeneration of the column is performed on-line. During regeneration, contaminants are displaced and destroyed inside the closed oxidation loop. In this presentation we discuss initial experimental results for the performance of RAPS in the removal and treatment of several important spacecraft contaminant species from air.

  1. Gas-phase synthesis of magnetic metal/polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starsich, Fabian H. L.; Hirt, Ann M.; Stark, Wendelin J.; Grass, Robert N.

    2014-12-01

    Highly magnetic metal Co nanoparticles were produced via reducing flame spray pyrolysis, and directly coated with an epoxy polymer in flight. The polymer content in the samples varied between 14 and 56 wt% of nominal content. A homogenous dispersion of Co nanoparticles in the resulting nanocomposites was visualized by electron microscopy. The size and crystallinity of the metallic fillers was not affected by the polymer, as shown by XRD and magnetic hysteresis measurements. The good control of the polymer content in the product nanocomposite was shown by elemental analysis. Further, the successful polymerization in the gas phase was demonstrated by electron microscopy and size measurements. The presented effective, dry and scalable one-step synthesis method for highly magnetic metal nanoparticle/polymer composites presented here may drastically decrease production costs and increase industrial yields.

  2. Silicon Nanowire-Based Devices for Gas-Phase Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Anping; Sudhölter, Ernst J.R.; de Smet, Louis C.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Since their introduction in 2001, SiNW-based sensor devices have attracted considerable interest as a general platform for ultra-sensitive, electrical detection of biological and chemical species. Most studies focus on detecting, sensing and monitoring analytes in aqueous solution, but the number of studies on sensing gases and vapors using SiNW-based devices is increasing. This review gives an overview of selected research papers related to the application of electrical SiNW-based devices in the gas phase that have been reported over the past 10 years. Special attention is given to surface modification strategies and the sensing principles involved. In addition, future steps and technological challenges in this field are addressed. PMID:24368699

  3. Conformational Study of Taurine in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortijo, Vanessa; Sanz, M. Eugenia; Lpez, Juan C.; Alonso, Jos L.

    2009-08-01

    The conformational preferences of the amino sulfonic acid taurine (NH2-CH2-CH2-SO3H) have been investigated in the gas phase by laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (LA-MB-FTMW) in the 6-14 GHz frequency range. One conformer has been observed, and its rotational, centrifugal distortion, and hyperfine quadrupole coupling constants have been determined from the analysis of its rotational spectrum. Comparison of the experimental constants with those calculated theoretically identifies the detected conformer unambiguously. The observed conformer of taurine is stabilized by an intramolecular hydrogen bond O-HN between the hydrogen of the sulfonic acid group and the nitrogen atom of the amino group.

  4. Low-energy electron collisions with gas-phase uracil.

    PubMed

    Winstead, Carl; McKoy, Vincent

    2006-11-01

    We have studied gas-phase collisions between slow electrons and uracil molecules with a view to understanding the resonance structure of the scattering cross section. Our symmetry-resolved results for elastic scattering, computed in the fixed-nuclei, static-exchange and static-exchange-plus-polarization approximations, provide locations for the expected pi* shape resonances and indicate the possible presence of a low-energy sigma* resonance as well. Electron-impact excitation calculations were carried out for low-lying triplet and singlet excitation channels and yield a very large singlet cross section. We discuss the connection between the resonances found in our elastic cross section and features observed in dissociative attachment. PMID:17100436

  5. Ceramic microreactors for heterogeneously catalysed gas-phase reactions.

    PubMed

    Knitter, Regina; Liauw, Marcel A

    2004-08-01

    The high surface to volume ratio of microchannel components offers many advantages in micro chemical engineering. It is obvious, however, that the reactor material and corrosion phenomena play an important role when applying these components. For chemical reactions at very high temperatures or/and with corrosive reactants involved, microchannel components made of metals or polymers are not suited. Hence, a modular microreactor system made of alumina was developed and fabricated using a rapid prototyping process chain. With exchangeable inserts the system can be adapted to the requirements of various reactions. Two heterogeneously catalysed gas-phase reactions (oxidative coupling of methane, isoprene selective oxidation to citraconic anhydride) were investigated to check the suitability of the system at temperatures of up to 1000 degrees C. Apart from the high thermal and chemical resistance, the lack of any blind activity was found to be another advantage of ceramic components. PMID:15269808

  6. Reduced-background gas-phase absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sweetser, J.N.; Trebino, R.

    1998-08-01

    We propose and demonstrate a new method for single-shot multiplex absorption spectroscopy that permits enhanced sensitivity in the simultaneous measurement of multiple spectral lines in rapidly changing gas-phase media, such as turbulent flames. It uses an ultrashort laser pulse that propagates through the absorbing medium, for which the relevant absorption information resides in the free-induction decay that is trailing behind the transmitted pulse. Time gating out most of the transmitted pulse, but not the free-induction decay, enhances the relative fraction of light that contains absorption information when the spectrum is measured. This procedure reduces the background associated with the input light, thus enhancing detection sensitivity. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital Optical Society of America}

  7. Structures of platinum oxide clusters in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Kerpal, Christian; Harding, Dan J; Hermes, Alexander C; Meijer, Gerard; Mackenzie, Stuart R; Fielicke, Andr

    2013-02-14

    The structures of small gas-phase Pt(n)O(2m)(+) (n = 1-6, m = 1, 2) cluster cations have been investigated in a combined infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) study. On the basis of the infrared spectra obtained, it is concluded that in most clusters oxygen is bound dissociatively, preferring 2-fold bridge binding motifs, sometimes combined with singly coordinated terminal binding. Comparison of the oxide cluster structures with those of bare cationic platinum clusters reported previously reveals major structural changes induced in the platinum core upon oxygen binding. For some cluster sizes the presence of the Ar messenger atom(s) is found to induce a significant change in the observed cluster structure. PMID:22894744

  8. Synthesis and Gas Phase Thermochemistry of Germanium-Containing Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan Robert Classen

    2002-12-31

    The driving force behind much of the work in this dissertation was to gain further understanding of the unique olefin to carbene isomerization observed in the thermolysis of 1,1-dimethyl-2-methylenesilacyclobutane by finding new examples of it in other silicon and germanium compounds. This lead to the examination of a novel phenylmethylenesilacyclobut-2-ene, which did not undergo olefin to carbene rearrangement. A synthetic route to methylenegermacyclobutanes was developed, but the methylenegermacyclobutane system exhibited kinetic instability, making the study of the system difficult. In any case the germanium system decomposed through a complex mechanism which may not include olefin to carbene isomerization. However, this work lead to the study of the gas phase thermochemistry of a series of dialkylgermylene precursors in order to better understand the mechanism of the thermal decomposition of dialkylgermylenes. The resulting dialkylgermylenes were found to undergo a reversible intramolecular {beta} C-H insertion mechanism.

  9. Infrared photodissociation spectroscopy of protonated neurotransmitters in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, N. A.; Simons, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    Protonated neurotransmitters have been produced in the gas phase via a novel photochemical scheme: complexes of the species of interest, 1-phenylethylamine, 2-amino-1-phenylethanol and the diastereo-isomers, ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, with a suitable proton donor, phenol (or indole), are produced in a supersonic expansion and ionized by resonant two photon ionization of the donor. Efficient proton transfer generates the protonated neurotransmitters, complexed to a phenoxy radical. Absorption of infrared radiation, and subsequent evaporation of the phenoxy tag, coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry, provides vibrational spectra of the protonated (and also hydrated) complexes for comparison with the results of quantum chemical computation. Comparison with the conformational structures of the neutral neurotransmitters (established previously) reveals the effect of protonation on their structure. The photochemical proton transfer strategy allows spectra to be recorded from individual laser shots and their quality compares favourably with that obtained using electro-spray or matrix assisted laser desorption ion sources.

  10. Delayed luminescence of indole derivatives in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhodola, A. A.

    2008-07-01

    Spectral and kinetic characteristics of delayed luminescence of indole derivatives in the gas phase have been studied. The mechanism for delayed luminescence has been shown to depend on the disposition of the two lowest excited singlet ??*-states, 1La and 1Lb. For vapors of 3-methyl-and 2,3-dimethylindole having a small 1La-2Lb energy gap ?E (?E < 500 cm-1), prolonged light emissions with maxima at 525 and 540 nm, respectively, have been observed and interpreted as luminescence of free radicals formed due to dissociation of an N-H bond. For vapors of 5-methoxyindole having ?E ? 3700 cm-1, annihilation of delayed luminescence has been observed. The lifetimes for triplet states of 3-methyl-, 2,3-dimethyl-, and 5-methoxyindole at T = 373 K equal to 30, 26, and 65 sec, respectively, were calculated from the kinetics of the delayed luminescence.

  11. Surfactants from the gas phase may promote cloud droplet formation.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Neha; Schwier, Allison N; Lathem, Terry L; Nenes, Athanasios; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-02-19

    Clouds, a key component of the climate system, form when water vapor condenses upon atmospheric particulates termed cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Variations in CCN concentrations can profoundly impact cloud properties, with important effects on local and global climate. Organic matter constitutes a significant fraction of tropospheric aerosol mass, and can influence CCN activity by depressing surface tension, contributing solute, and influencing droplet activation kinetics by forming a barrier to water uptake. We present direct evidence that two ubiquitous atmospheric trace gases, methylglyoxal (MG) and acetaldehyde, known to be surface-active, can enhance aerosol CCN activity upon uptake. This effect is demonstrated by exposing acidified ammonium sulfate particles to 250 parts per billion (ppb) or 8 ppb gas-phase MG and/or acetaldehyde in an aerosol reaction chamber for up to 5 h. For the more atmospherically relevant experiments, i.e., the 8-ppb organic precursor concentrations, significant enhancements in CCN activity, up to 7.5% reduction in critical dry diameter for activation, are observed over a timescale of hours, without any detectable limitation in activation kinetics. This reduction in critical diameter enhances the apparent particle hygroscopicity up to 26%, which for ambient aerosol would lead to cloud droplet number concentration increases of 8-10% on average. The observed enhancements exceed what would be expected based on Khler theory and bulk properties. Therefore, the effect may be attributed to the adsorption of MG and acetaldehyde to the gas-aerosol interface, leading to surface tension depression of the aerosol. We conclude that gas-phase surfactants may enhance CCN activity in the atmosphere. PMID:23382211

  12. Gas-phase structure and reactivity of the keto tautomer of the deoxyguanosine radical cation.

    PubMed

    Feketeov, Linda; Chan, Bun; Khairallah, George N; Steinmetz, Vincent; Matre, Philippe; Radom, Leo; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2015-10-21

    Guanine radical cations are formed upon oxidation of DNA. Deoxyguanosine (dG) is used as a model, and the gas-phase infrared (IR) spectroscopic signature and gas-phase unimolecular and bimolecular chemistry of its radical cation, dG?(+), A, which is formed via direct electrospray ionisation (ESI/MS) of a methanolic solution of Cu(NO3)2 and dG, are examined. Quantum chemistry calculations have been carried out on 28 isomers and comparisons between their calculated IR spectra and the experimentally-measured spectra suggest that A exists as the ground-state keto tautomer. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of A proceeds via cleavage of the glycosidic bond, while its ionmolecule reactions with amine bases occur via a number of pathways including hydrogen-atom abstraction, proton transfer and adduct formation. A hidden channel, involving isomerisation of the radical cation via adduct formation, is revealed through the use of two stages of CID, with the final stage of CID showing the loss of CH2O as a major fragmentation pathway from the reformed radical cation, dG?(+). Quantum chemistry calculations on the unimolecular and bimolecular reactivity are also consistent with A being present as a ground-state keto tautomer. PMID:25942055

  13. The gas-phase iron abundance in Herbig-Haro objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck-Winchatz, B.; Bohm, K. H.; Noriega-Crespo, A.

    1994-01-01

    The gas-phase abundance ratios Fe/S and Fe/O have been determined for the Herbig-Haro objects HH 1, HH 7, HH 11, HH 43A, and 'Burnham's Nebula' (HH 255). It is the purpose of this study to decide whether a sizeable fraction of the Fe in these HH objects is still bound in dust grains or whether the observed matter has gone through sufficiently fast shock waves so that the dust grains have been essentially destroyed and most of the iron has gone back into the gas phase. We have determined the abundance ratios using statistical equilibrium calculations for the ions Fe(+), S(+), and O(+). (These are the most abundant ions of the elements in question.) Abundance determinations have been made using homogeneous models of the HH objects for which electron temperatures and densities have been determined observationally from forbidden line ratios. The results show that the Fe/S ratio in the objects HH 1, HH 7, HH 11, and HH 43A agrees very well with the Population I abundance ratio. Only Burnham's Nebula (HH255) shows an Fe/S ratio which is about three times lower indicating a shock-wave history which is quite different from that of the other HH objects.

  14. Can an ab initio three-body virial equation describe the mercury gas phase?

    PubMed

    Wiebke, J; Wormit, M; Hellmann, R; Pahl, E; Schwerdtfeger, P

    2014-03-27

    We report a sixth-order ab initio virial equation of state (EOS) for mercury. The virial coefficients were determined in the temperature range from 500 to 7750 K using a three-body approximation to the N-body interaction potential. The underlying two-body and three-body potentials were fitted to highly accurate Coupled-Cluster interaction energies of Hg2 (Pahl, E.; Figgen, D.; Thierfelder, C.; Peterson, K. A.; Calvo, F.; Schwerdtfeger, P. J. Chem. Phys. 2010, 132, 114301-1) and equilateral-triangular configurations of Hg3. We find the virial coefficients of order four and higher to be negative and to have large absolute values over the entire temperature range considered. The validity of our three-body, sixth-order EOS seems to be limited to small densities of about 1.5 g cm(-3) and somewhat higher densities at higher temperatures. Termwise analysis and comparison to experimental gas-phase data suggest a small convergence radius of the virial EOS itself as well as a failure of the three-body interaction model (i.e., poor convergence of the many-body expansion for mercury). We conjecture that the nth-order term of the virial EOS is to be evaluated from the full n-body interaction potential for a quantitative picture. Consequently, an ab initio three-body virial equation cannot describe the mercury gas phase. PMID:24547987

  15. Neutral-Neutral Gas-Phase Reactions In Extraterrestrial Environments: Laboratory Investigations By Crossed Molecular Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balucani, Nadia; Casavecchia, Piergiorgio

    2006-09-01

    In this contribution we report experimental results obtained by the crossed molecular beam technique with mass spectrometric detection on several neutral-neutral gas-phase reactions of relevance in astrochemistry. More specifically, we provide experimental evidence that the reactions of electronically excited state nitrogen atoms, N(2D), with several hydrocarbons observed in the atmosphere of Titan can generate molecular products containing a novel CN bond, thus suggesting possible routes towards the production of gas-phase nitriles in that environment. We also report on the reaction between C(3P) and acetylene, an important neutral-neutral reaction in the chemistry of interstellar clouds. The branching ratio between the cyclic and linear C3H isomers has been derived for a collision energy of 3.5 kJ mol-1. Further evidence of the occurrence of the C3 formation channel is given. Finally we report on recent studies of reactions involving two open shell species, namely O+CH3 and O+C3H5. Products other than those already considered in the modeling of planetary atmospheres and interstellar medium have been identified.

  16. Novel Detox Gel Depot sequesters β-Amyloid Peptides in a mouse model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Ranjini K; Kasinathan, Chinnaswamy; Stein, Stanley; Sundaram, Pazhani

    2012-06-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD), a debilitating neurodegenerative disease is caused by aggregation and accumulation of a 39-43 amino acid peptide (amyloid β or Aβ) in brain parenchyma and cerebrovasculature. The rational approach would be to use drugs that interfere with Aβ-Aβ interaction and disrupt polymerization. Peptide ligands capable of binding to the KLVFF (amino acids 16-20) region in the Aβ molecule have been investigated as possible drug candidates. Retro-inverso (RI) peptide of this pentapeptide, ffvlk, has been shown to bind artificial fibrils made from Aβ with moderate affinity. We hypothesized that a 'detox gel', which is synthesized by covalently linking a tetrameric version of RI peptide ffvlk to poly (ethylene glycol) polymer chains will act like a 'sink' to capture Aβ peptides from the surrounding environment. We previously demonstrated that this hypothesis works in an in vitro system. The present study extended this hypothesis to an in vivo mouse model of Alzheimer's Disease and determined the therapeutic effect of our detox gel. We injected detox gel subcutaneously to AD model mice and analyzed brain levels of Aβ-42 and improvement in memory parameters. The results showed a reduction of brain amyloid burden in detox gel treated mice. Memory parameters in the treated mice improved. No undesirable immune response was observed. The data strongly suggest that our detox gel can be used as an effective therapy to deplete brain Aβ levels. Considering recent abandonment of failed antibody based therapies, our detox gel appears to have the advantage of being a non-immune based therapy. PMID:22712003

  17. QSAR modeling of the antimicrobial activity of peptides as a mathematical function of a sequence of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Toropova, Mariya A; Veselinovi?, Aleksandar M; Veselinovi?, Jovana B; Stojanovi?, Duica B; Toropov, Andrey A

    2015-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides have emerged as new therapeutic agents for fighting multi-drug-resistant bacteria. However, the process of optimizing peptide antimicrobial activity and specificity using large peptide libraries is both tedious and expensive. Therefore, computational techniques had to be applied for process optimization. In this work, the representation of the molecular structure of peptides (mastoparan analogs) by a sequence of amino acids has been used to establish quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for their antibacterial activity. The data for the studied peptides were split three times into the training, calibration and test sets. The Monte Carlo method was used as a computational technique for QSAR models calculation. The statistical quality of QSAR for the antibacterial activity of peptides for the external validation set was: n=7, r(2)=0.8067, s=0.248 (split 1); n=6, r(2)=0.8319, s=0.169 (split 2); and n=6, r(2)=0.6996, s=0.297 (split 3). The stated statistical parameters favor the presented QSAR models in comparison to 2D and 3D descriptor based ones. The Monte Carlo method gave a reasonably good prediction for the antibacterial activity of peptides. The statistical quality of the prediction is different for three random splits. However, the predictive potential is reasonably well for all cases. The presented QSAR modeling approach can be an attractive alternative of 3D QSAR at least for the described peptides. PMID:26454621

  18. Sol-gel transition of charged fibrils composed of a model amphiphilic peptide.

    PubMed

    Owczarz, Marta; Bolisetty, Sreenath; Mezzenga, Raffaele; Arosio, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    We characterized the sol-gel transition of positively charged fibrils composed of the model amphiphilic peptide RADARADARADARADA (RADA 16-I) using a combination of microscopy, light scattering, microrheology and rheology techniques, and we investigated the dependence of the hydrogel formation on fibril concentration and ionic strength. The peptide is initially present as a dispersion of short rigid fibrils with average length of about 100 nm. During incubation, the fibrils aggregate irreversibly into longer fibrils and fibrillar aggregates. At peptide concentrations in the range 3-6.5 g/L, the fibrillar aggregates form a weak gel network which can be destroyed upon dilution. Percolation occurs without the formation of a nematic phase at a critical peptide concentration which decreases with increasing ionic strength. The gel structure can be well described in the frame of the fractal gel theory considering the network as a collection of fibrillar aggregates characterized by self-similar structure with a fractal dimension of 1.34. PMID:25441357

  19. Platinum-mediated coupling of methane and small nucleophiles (H{sub 2}O, PH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}S, CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}) as a model for C-N, C-O, C-P, and C-S bond formation in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Broenstrup, M.; Schroeder, D.; Schwarz, H.

    1999-05-10

    The reactions of Pt{sup +} and PtCH{sub 2}{sup +} with the nucleophiles H{sub 2}O, PH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}S, HCl, CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3}OH are studied by Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry. In the reactions of PtCH{sub 2}{sup +}, carbon-heteroatom bond formation can be accomplished for all substrates except CH{sub 3}OH and HCl. The reaction of PtCH{sub 2}{sup +} with two molecules of water yields Pt(CO)(H{sub 2}O){sup +} and constitutes a gas-phase model for the platinum-mediated generation of water gas according to CH{sub 4} + H{sub 2}O {r_arrow} CO + 3H{sub 2}. In the reactions with PH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}S, carbon-phosphorus and carbon-sulfur bond formation to PtCPH{sup +} and PtCS{sup +} competes with demethanation and dehydrogenation of the substrates to yield PtS{sub n}{sup +} (n = 1--4) and PtP{sub n}H{sub m}{sup +} (n = 1--6; m = 0--3) compounds, respectively. For organic nucleophiles such as CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2} and CH{sub 3}OH, C-N and C-O coupling is much less efficient than platinum-mediated C-H bond activation of the substrates.

  20. High resolution ion mobility measurements for gas phase proteins: correlation between solution phase and gas phase conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudgins, Robert R.; Woenckhaus, Jürgen; Jarrold, Martin F.

    1997-11-01

    Our high resolution ion mobility apparatus has been modified by attaching an electrospray source to perform measurements for biological molecules. While the greater resolving power permits the resolution of more conformations for BPTI and cytochrome c, the resolved features are generally much broader than expected for a single rigid conformation. A major advantage of the new experimental configuration is the much gentler introduction of ions into the drift tube, so that the observed gas phase conformations appear to more closely reflect those present in solution. For example, it is possible to distinguish between the native state of cytochrome c and the methanol-denatured form on the basis of the ion mobility measurements; the mass spectra alone are not sensitive enough to detect this change. Thus this approach may provide a quick and sensitive tool for probing the solution phase conformations of biological molecules.

  1. Comparative modeling of human kappa opioid receptor and docking analysis with the peptide YFa.

    PubMed

    Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Kumar, Krishan; Pasha, Santosh; Chopra, Madhu

    2012-03-01

    The kappa opioid receptor belongs to the super family of G protein - coupled receptors that are of utmost significance in the development of potent analgesic drugs for the treatment of severe pain. An accurate evaluation of the ligand binding pathways into this receptor at molecular level may play a key role in the design of new molecules with more desirable properties and reduced side effects. In this study, homology model of the human kappa opioid receptor was developed by MODELLER using the X-ray crystal structure of bovine rhodopsin as template. Initial structure of the receptor was refined computationally with energy minimization and molecular dynamics simulation at 300 K in a pre-equilibrated phospholipid bilayer by GROMACS. The Met-enkaphalin-Arg-Phe based opioid peptide YFa (YGGFMKKKFMRF) designed and characterized by our laboratory was docked into the optimized model and the critical amino acids responsible for binding were identified. A number of low energy binding poses of YFa with the receptor were assessed after the molecular docking in which the peptide was observed to interact with the receptor's extracellular amino acids through hydrogen bonds. The human kappa opioid receptor model optimized in a phospholipid bilayer should provide a good starting point for further characterization of the binding modes of other opioid ligands. Furthermore, the biologically favorable molecular interactions between YFa and human kappa opioid receptor observed by our study might be able to justify the specificity of this peptide. PMID:22172315

  2. The peptide agonist-binding site of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor based on site-directed mutagenesis and knowledge-based modelling

    PubMed Central

    Dods, Rachel L.; Donnelly, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7–36)amide (GLP-1) plays a central role in regulating blood sugar levels and its receptor, GLP-1R, is a target for anti-diabetic agents such as the peptide agonist drugs exenatide and liraglutide. In order to understand the molecular nature of the peptide–receptor interaction, we used site-directed mutagenesis and pharmacological profiling to highlight nine sites as being important for peptide agonist binding and/or activation. Using a knowledge-based approach, we constructed a 3D model of agonist-bound GLP-1R, basing the conformation of the N-terminal region on that of the receptor-bound NMR structure of the related peptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating protein (PACAP21). The relative position of the extracellular to the transmembrane (TM) domain, as well as the molecular details of the agonist-binding site itself, were found to be different from the model that was published alongside the crystal structure of the TM domain of the glucagon receptor, but were nevertheless more compatible with published mutagenesis data. Furthermore, the NMR-determined structure of a high-potency cyclic conformationally-constrained 11-residue analogue of GLP-1 was also docked into the receptor-binding site. Despite having a different main chain conformation to that seen in the PACAP21 structure, four conserved residues (equivalent to His-7, Glu-9, Ser-14 and Asp-15 in GLP-1) could be structurally aligned and made similar interactions with the receptor as their equivalents in the GLP-1-docked model, suggesting the basis of a pharmacophore for GLP-1R peptide agonists. In this way, the model not only explains current mutagenesis and molecular pharmacological data but also provides a basis for further experimental design. PMID:26598711

  3. Basic amphipathic model peptides: Structural investigations in solution, studied by circular dichroism, fluorescence, analytical ultracentrifugation and molecular modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangavel, C.; Sy, D.; Reynaud, J. A.

    1999-05-01

    A twenty amino acid residue long amphipathic peptide made of ten leucine and ten lysine residues and four derivatives, in which a tryptophan, as a fluorescent probe, is substituted for a leucine, are studied. The peptides in water are mainly in an unordered conformation (~90%), and undergo a two state reversible transition upon heating, leading to a partially helical conformation (cold denaturation). Time resolved fluorescence results show that fluorescence decay for the four Trp containing peptides is best described by triple fluorescence decay kinetics. In TFE/water mixture, peptides adopt a single α-helix conformation but the Leu-Trp9 substitution leads to an effective helix destabilizing effect. In salted media, the peptides are fully helical and present a great tendency to self associate by bringing the hydrophobic faces of helices into close contact. This proceeds in non-cooperative multisteps leading to the formation of α helix aggregates with various degrees of complexation. Using modelling, the relative hydrophobic surface areas accessible to water molecules in n-mer structures are calculated and discussed. Nous avons étudié un peptide amphipathique composé de dix lysine et dix leucine, ainsi que quatre dérivés comportant un résidu tryptophane pour les études par fluorescence. Dans l'eau, les peptides ne sont pas structurés (~90%), et se structurent partiellement en hélice α par chauffage (dénaturation froide). Les mesures de déclin de fluorescence font apparaître une cinétique à trois temps de vie. Dans un mélange eau/TFE, les peptides adoptent une conformation en hélice α, mais la substitution Leu-Trp9 possède un effet déstabilisant. En mileu salin, les peptides sont totalement hélicoïdaux et ont tendance à s'agréger de façon à regrouper leur face hydrophobe. Ce processus se fait en plusieurs étapes avec des agrégats de taille variable. L'existence de tels agrégats est discutée sur la base de la modélisation moléculaire complétée par des calculs d'accessibilité des surfaces hydrophobes.

  4. Infrared spectroscopy of pyrrole-2-carboxaldehyde and its dimer: A planar β-sheet peptide model?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Corey A.; Dauster, Ingo; Suhm, Martin A.

    2007-04-01

    Intermolecular interactions relevant for antiparallel β-sheet formation between peptide strands are studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of the low temperature, vacuum-isolated model compound pyrrole-2-carboxaldehyde and its dimer in the N-H and C O stretching range. Comparison to quantum chemical predictions shows that even for some triple-zeta quality basis sets, hybrid density functionals and Møller-Plesset perturbation calculations fail to provide a consistent and fully satisfactory description of hydrogen bond induced frequency shifts and intensity ratios in the double-harmonic approximation. The latter approach even shows problems in reproducing the planar structure of the dimer and the correct sign of the C O stretching shift for standard basis sets. The effect of matrix isolation is modeled by condensing layers of Ar atoms on the isolated monomer and dimer. The dimer structure is discussed in the context of the peptide β-sheet motif.

  5. Identification of Guest-Host Inclusion Complexes in the Gas Phase by Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendes, De´bora C.; Ramamurthy, Vaidhyanathan; Da Silva, Jose´ P.

    2015-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students follow a step-by-step procedure to prepare and study guest-host complexes in the gas phase using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Model systems are the complexes of hosts cucurbit[7]uril (CB7) and cucurbit[8]uril (CB8) with the guest 4-styrylpyridine (SP). Aqueous solutions of CB7 or CB8…

  6. Identification of Guest-Host Inclusion Complexes in the Gas Phase by Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendes, Debora C.; Ramamurthy, Vaidhyanathan; Da Silva, Jose P.

    2015-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students follow a step-by-step procedure to prepare and study guest-host complexes in the gas phase using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Model systems are the complexes of hosts cucurbit[7]uril (CB7) and cucurbit[8]uril (CB8) with the guest 4-styrylpyridine (SP). Aqueous solutions of CB7 or CB8

  7. Peptide identification

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  8. Rapid Sampling of Folding Equilibria of ?-Peptides in Methanol Using a Supramolecular Solvent Model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Riniker, Sereina; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2014-06-10

    Molecular dynamics simulation of biomolecules in solvent using an atomic model for both the biomolecules and the solvent molecules is still computationally rather demanding considering the time scale of the biomolecular motions. The use of a supramolecular coarse-grained (CG) model can speed up the simulation considerably, but it also reduces the accuracy inevitably. Combining an atomic fine-grained (FG) level of modeling for the biomolecules and a supramolecular CG level for the solvent into a hybrid system, the increased computational efficiency may outweigh the loss of accuracy with respect to the biomolecular properties in the hybrid FG/CG simulation. Here, a previously published CG methanol model is reparametrized, and then a 1:1 mixture of FG and CG methanol is used to calibrate the FG-CG interactions using thermodynamic and dielectric screening data for liquid methanol. The FG-CG interaction parameter set is applied in hybrid FG/CG solute/solvent simulations of the folding equilibria of three ?-peptides that adopt different folds. The properties of the peptides are compared with those obtained in FG solvent simulations and with experimental NMR data. The comparison shows that the folding equilibria in the pure CG solvent simulations are different from those in the FG solvent simulations because of the lack of hydrogen-bonding partners in the supramolecular CG solvent. Next, we introduced an FG methanol layer around the peptides in CG solvent to recover the hydrogen-bonding pattern of the FG solvent simulations. The result shows that with the FG methanol layer, the folding equilibria of the three ?-peptides are very similar to those in the FG solvent simulations, while the computational efficiency is at least 3 times higher and the cutoff radius for nonbonded interactions could be increased from 1.4 to 2.0 nm. PMID:26580745

  9. Influence of the choice of gas-phase mechanism on predictions of key gaseous pollutants during the AQMEII phase-2 intercomparison

    EPA Science Inventory

    The formulations of tropospheric gas-phase chemistry (mechanisms)used in the regional-scale chemistry-transport models participating in theAir Quality Modelling Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) Phase2 are intercompared by the means of box model studies. Simulations ...

  10. Purification, identification and structural modelling of DPP-IV inhibiting peptides from barbel protein hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Sila, Assaad; Alvarez, Oscar Martinez; Haddar, Anissa; Frikha, Fakher; Dhulster, Pascal; Nedjar-Arroume, Naima; Bougatef, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of DPP-IV may improve glycemic control in diabetics by preventing the rapid breakdown and there by prolonging the physiological action of incretin hormones. Barbel muscle protein hydrolysate (BMPH) was noted to exhibit DPP-IV inhibitory activity, with an IC50 value of 1.94mg/mL. It was fractionated into five major fractions (FI-FV) by size exclusion chromatography using a Superdex peptide. The FIII fraction was noted to display the highest inhibitory activity, with an IC50 value of 1.23mg/mL, and was, therefore, further fractionated by RP-HPLC. Four major peptide sub-fractions were selected. The results revealed that the SF4 sub-fraction showed the highest DPP-IV inhibitory activity, with an IC50 value of 0.21mg/mL. This sub-fraction was submitted to RP-HPLC, ESI-MS, and ESI-MS/MS analyses. The findings indicated that SF4 consisted of two peptides (IC50=96μg/mL), namely PP1 and PP2, whose structures were identified as Trp-Ser-Gly (330Da) and Phe-Ser-Asp (349Da), respectively. This is the first report of these sequences from barbel proteins. The structural modelling through docking simulations results with DPP-IV showed that the Trp-Ser-Gly peptide bound to DPP-IV with high affinity. Overall, the results suggested that BMPH can be considered as a promising natural source of DPP-IV inhibitory peptides. PMID:26687732

  11. CS-AMPPred: An Updated SVM Model for Antimicrobial Activity Prediction in Cysteine-Stabilized Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Porto, William F.; Pires, llan S.; Franco, Octavio L.

    2012-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptides (AMP) have been proposed as an alternative to control resistant pathogens. However, due to multifunctional properties of several AMP classes, until now there has been no way to perform efficient AMP identification, except through in vitro and in vivo tests. Nevertheless, an indication of activity can be provided by prediction methods. In order to contribute to the AMP prediction field, the CS-AMPPred (Cysteine-Stabilized Antimicrobial Peptides Predictor) is presented here, consisting of an updated version of the Support Vector Machine (SVM) model for antimicrobial activity prediction in cysteine-stabilized peptides. The CS-AMPPred is based on five sequence descriptors: indexes of (i) ?-helix and (ii) loop formation; and averages of (iii) net charge, (iv) hydrophobicity and (v) flexibility. CS-AMPPred was based on 310 cysteine-stabilized AMPs and 310 sequences extracted from PDB. The polynomial kernel achieves the best accuracy on 5-fold cross validation (85.81%), while the radial and linear kernels achieve 84.19%. Testing in a blind data set, the polynomial and radial kernels achieve an accuracy of 90.00%, while the linear model achieves 89.33%. The three models reach higher accuracies than previously described methods. A standalone version of CS-AMPPred is available for download at and runs on any Linux machine. PMID:23240023

  12. Energy and Entropy Effects in Dissociation of Peptide Radical Anions

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Yang, Zhibo; Lam, Corey; Chu, Ivan K.

    2012-04-15

    Time- and collision energy-resolved surface-induced dissociation (SID) of peptide radical anions was studied for the first time using a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) configured for SID experiments. Peptide radical cations and anions were produced by gas-phase fragmentation of CoIII(salen)-peptide complexes. The effect of the charge, radical, and the presence of a basic residue on the energetics and dynamics of dissociation of peptide ions was examined using RVYIHPF (1) and HVYIHPF (2) as model systems. Comparison of the survival curves for of [M+H]{sup +}, [M-H]{sup -}, M{sup +{sm_bullet}}, and [M-2H]{sup -{sm_bullet}} ions of these precursors demonstrated that even-electron ions are more stable towards fragmentation than their odd-electron counterparts. RRKM modeling of the experimental data demonstrated that the lower stability of the positive radicals is mainly attributed to lower dissociation thresholds while entropy effects are responsible the relative instability of the negative radicals. Substitution of arginine with less basic histidine residue has a strong destabilizing effect on the [M+H]{sup +} ions and a measurable stabilizing effect on the odd-electron ions. Lower threshold energies for dissociation of both positive and negative radicals of 1 are attributed to the presence of lower-energy dissociation pathways that are most likely promoted by the presence of the basic residue.

  13. Numerical simulation of an all gas-phase iodine laser based on NCl3 reaction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Taizo; Endo, Masamori; Uchiyama, Taro

    2008-03-01

    A numerical simulation code for an all gas-phase iodine laser based on the NCl3 reaction system is developed. The model is a one-dimensional, multiple-leaky-stream-tubes kinetics code combined with all the known rate equations to date. To confirm the validity of this simulation code, the calculated results are compared with the experimental results obtained in other laboratories. The results of computer calculations utilizing this model are in good agreement with those experimental results. This agreement shows that the code is capable of precisely predicting the small signal gain and laser output for a given set of flow conditions. Using this simulation code, we defined the flow rates and the nozzle configuration that should allow laser oscillation based on NCl3 reaction system to be achieved. The calculations suggest that a laser output power of 410 mW can be obtained under optimum conditions with facilities available in our laboratory.

  14. LSENS, a general chemical kinetics and sensitivity analysis code for gas-phase reactions: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Bittker, David A.

    1993-01-01

    A general chemical kinetics and sensitivity analysis code for complex, homogeneous, gas-phase reactions is described. The main features of the code, LSENS, are its flexibility, efficiency and convenience in treating many different chemical reaction models. The models include static system, steady, one-dimensional, inviscid flow, shock initiated reaction, and a perfectly stirred reactor. In addition, equilibrium computations can be performed for several assigned states. An implicit numerical integration method, which works efficiently for the extremes of very fast and very slow reaction, is used for solving the 'stiff' differential equation systems that arise in chemical kinetics. For static reactions, sensitivity coefficients of all dependent variables and their temporal derivatives with respect to the initial values of dependent variables and/or the rate coefficient parameters can be computed. This paper presents descriptions of the code and its usage, and includes several illustrative example problems.

  15. Sensitivity of local hydration behaviour and conformational preferences of peptides to choice of water model.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Divya; Chakravarty, Charusita

    2014-06-01

    Hydration of the 16-residue ?-hairpin fragment of the protein in the folded and unfolded ensembles is studied with mTIP3P and TIP4P solvent models using the CHARMM22 protein force-field. mTIP3P is a three-site water model which is used for parameterization of the CHARMM force-field and is known to exhibit liquid-state anomalies of water at temperatures about 80 K lower than the experimental temperature. TIP4P is a four-site water model which gives a better description of the experimental phase diagram and liquid-state anomalies of water. At a temperature of 250 K, where the folded ensemble of the peptide is stable and the unfolded ensemble is metastable, secondary structure metrics are much more sensitive to the choice of solvent model in the unfolded, rather than folded, ensemble. In particular, mean values as well as variation in the positional root mean square displacements (RMSD) and configurational entropy are greater in mTIP3P compared to the TIP4P solvent. The peptide structure is relatively more compact in the TIP4P solvent, which supports unfolded as well as hydrophobic core states. In terms of average local order and binding energy of the water surrounding the peptide, strong deviations from bulk behaviour are restricted to the first hydration shell and differences between the folded and unfolded ensembles in the two solvents are small. The strong coupling between the solvent and the peptide is demonstrated, however, by the dependence of the unfolding temperature on the water model (400 K in mTIP3P and 465 K in TIP4P) and the qualitatively different temperature dependence of the hydration layer occupancy signalling the unfolding transition in the two solvents. A residue-wise decomposition of different contributions to the configurational energy indicates that the TIP4P solvent shows far greater variation in the interaction with charged sidegroups of amino acid residues than the mTIP3P solvent. The implications of sequence-dependent sensitivity of peptide secondary structures to the choice of water models for simulating folding-unfolding equilibria and free energy landscapes are discussed. PMID:24695799

  16. Insights into gas-phase reaction mechanisms of small carbon radicals using isomer-resolved product detection.

    PubMed

    Trevitt, Adam J; Goulay, Fabien

    2016-02-17

    For reactive gas-phase environments, including combustion, extraterrestrials atmospheres and our Earth's atmosphere, the availability of quality chemical data is essential for predictive chemical models. These data include reaction rate coefficients and product branching fractions. This perspective overviews recent isomer-resolved production detection experiments for reactions of two of the most reactive gas phase radicals, the CN and CH radicals, with a suite of small hydrocarbons. A particular focus is given to flow-tube experiments using synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry. Coupled with computational studies and other experiment techniques, flow tube isomer-resolved product detection have provided significant mechanistic details of these radical + neutral reactions with some general patterns emerging. PMID:26841339

  17. Sortase A-mediated synthesis of ligand-grafted cyclized peptides for modulating a model protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Nagamune, Teruyuki

    2015-09-01

    Specific ligand-grafted cyclic peptides are promising drug candidates that can modulate protein-protein interactions (PPIs) with increased proteolytic stability. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate that Sortase A (SrtA)-mediated peptide transpeptidation can be applied to produce bioactive sequence-grafted, stable, cyclic peptides. A naturally occurring cyclic peptide, sunflower trypsin inhibitor 1 (SFTI-1), was selected as the scaffold, and a tetrapeptide motif, Glu-Ser-Asp-Val (ESDV), was grafted into the scaffold as a model ligand. The linear precursor of the grafted peptide with SrtA-recognition motifs at the N- and C-termini was cyclized in good yield simply by co-incubation with SrtA. The ESDV-grafted cyclic SFTI-1 obtained was confirmed to have high stability against proteolysis by human serum and bound to the target PDZ2 domain of postsynaptic density-95 protein. An optimized sequence-grafted cyclic SFTI-1 could competitively suppress the interaction of PDZ2 with its natural ligand, the C-terminal peptide of the NR2B subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor. These results show that a strategy combining peptide grafting into the SFTI-1 scaffold with SrtA-catalyzed cyclization can be a simple and effective method for producing stable peptide drugs. PMID:25913771

  18. Peptide-nucleotide microdroplets as a step towards a membrane-free protocell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Shogo; Williams, David S.; Perriman, Adam W.; Mann, Stephen

    2011-09-01

    Although phospholipid bilayers are ubiquitous in modern cells, their impermeability, lack of dynamic properties, and synthetic complexity are difficult to reconcile with plausible pathways of proto-metabolism, growth and division. Here, we present an alternative membrane-free model, which demonstrates that low-molecular-weight mononucleotides and simple cationic peptides spontaneously accumulate in water into microdroplets that are stable to changes in temperature and salt concentration, undergo pH-induced cycles of growth and decay, and promote ?-helical peptide secondary structure. Moreover, the microdroplets selectively sequester porphyrins, inorganic nanoparticles and enzymes to generate supramolecular stacked arrays of light-harvesting molecules, nanoparticle-mediated oxidase activity, and enhanced rates of glucose phosphorylation, respectively. Taken together, our results suggest that peptide-nucleotide microdroplets can be considered as a new type of protocell model that could be used to develop novel bioreactors, primitive artificial cells and plausible pathways to prebiotic organization before the emergence of lipid-based compartmentalization on the early Earth.

  19. Aggregation of peptides in the tube model with correlated sidechain orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Nguyen Ba; Hoang, Trinh Xuan

    2015-06-01

    The ability of proteins and peptides to aggregate and form toxic amyloid fibrils is associated with a range of diseases including BSE (or mad cow), Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases. In this study, we investigate the the role of amino acid sequence in the aggregation propensity by using a modified tube model with a new procedure for hydrophobic interaction. In this model, the amino acid sidechains are not considered explicitly, but their orientations are taken into account in the formation of hydrophobic contact. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations for systems of short peptides are carried out with the use of parallel tempering technique. Our results show that the propensity to form and the structures of the aggregates strongly depend on the amino acid sequence and the number of peptides. Some sequences may not aggregate at all at a presumable physiological temperature while other can easily form fibril-like, β-sheet struture. Our study provides an insight into the principles of how the formation of amyloid can be governed by amino acid sequence.

  20. A viral peptide that targets mitochondria protects against neuronal degeneration in models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Szelechowski, Marion; Bétourné, Alexandre; Monnet, Yann; Ferré, Cécile A; Thouard, Anne; Foret, Charlotte; Peyrin, Jean-Michel; Hunot, Stéphane; Gonzalez-Dunia, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common feature of many neurodegenerative disorders, notably Parkinson's disease. Consequently, agents that protect mitochondria have strong therapeutic potential. Here, we sought to divert the natural strategy used by Borna disease virus (BDV) to replicate in neurons without causing cell death. We show that the BDV X protein has strong axoprotective properties, thereby protecting neurons from degeneration both in tissue culture and in an animal model of Parkinson's disease, even when expressed alone outside of the viral context. We also show that intranasal administration of a cell-permeable peptide derived from the X protein is neuroprotective. We establish that both the X protein and the X-derived peptide act by buffering mitochondrial damage and inducing enhanced mitochondrial filamentation. Our results open the way to novel therapies for neurodegenerative diseases by targeting mitochondrial dynamics and thus preventing the earliest steps of neurodegenerative processes in axons. PMID:25333748

  1. Gas phase plasma impact on phenolic compounds in pomegranate juice.

    PubMed

    Herceg, Zoran; Kova?evi?, Danijela Bursa?; Kljusuri?, Jasenka Gajdo; Jambrak, Anet Reek; Zori?, Zoran; Dragovi?-Uzelac, Verica

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of gas phase plasma on phenolic compounds in pomegranate juice. The potential of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy combined with partial least squares for monitoring the stability of phenolic compounds during plasma treatment was explored, too. Experiments are designed to investigate the effect of plasma operating conditions (treatment time 3, 5, 7 min; sample volume 3, 4, 5 cm(3); gas flow 0.75, 1, 1.25 dm(3) min(-1)) on phenolic compounds and compared to pasteurized and untreated pomegranate juice. Pasteurization and plasma treatment resulted in total phenolic content increasing by 29.55% and 33.03%, respectively. Principal component analysis and sensitivity analysis outputted the optimal treatment design with plasma that could match the pasteurized sample concerning the phenolic stability (5 min/4 cm(3)/0.75 dm(3) min(-1)). Obtained results demonstrate the potential of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy that can be successfully used to evaluate the quality of pomegranate juice upon plasma treatment considering the phenolic compounds. PMID:26213024

  2. Gas-phase Chemistry of the Cyanate Ion, OCN-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Callie A.; Wang, Zhe-Chen; Snow, Theodore P.; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2015-10-01

    Cyanate (OCN-) is the only ion to date whose presence has been confirmed in the icy mantles that coat interstellar dust grains. Understanding the chemical behavior of cyanate at a fundamental level is therefore integral to the advancement of astrochemistry. We seek to unravel the chemistry of this intriguing anion through a combination of gas-phase experiments and theoretical explorations. Our approach is twofold: first, employing a flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube apparatus, the reactions between OCN- and three of the most abundant atomic species in the interstellar medium, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen, are examined. Hydrogen atoms readily react by associative detachment, but the remarkable stability of OCN- does not give rise to an observable reaction with either nitrogen or oxygen atoms. To explain these results, the potential energy surfaces of several reactions are investigated at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. Second, collision induced dissociation experiments involving deprotonated uracil, thymine, and cytosine in an ion trap mass spectrometer reveal an interesting connection between these pyrimidine nucleobase anions and OCN-. Theoretical calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory are performed to delineate the mechanisms of dissociation and explore the possible role of OCN- as a biomolecule precursor.

  3. Visible and ultraviolet spectroscopy of gas phase rhodamine 575 cations.

    PubMed

    Daly, Steven; Kulesza, Alexander; Knight, Geoffrey; MacAleese, Luke; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    The visible and ultraviolet spectroscopy of gas phase rhodamine 575 cations has been studied experimentally by action-spectroscopy in a modified linear ion trap between 220 and 590 nm and by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations. Three bands are observed that can be assigned to the electronic transitions S0 → S1, S0 → S3, and S0 → (S8,S9) according to the theoretical prediction. While the agreement between theory and experiment is excellent for the S3 and S8/S9 transitions, a large shift in the value of the calculated S1 transition energy is observed. A theoretical analysis of thermochromism, potential vibronic effects, and-qualitatively-electron correlation revealed it is mainly the latter that is responsible for the failure of TDDFT to accurately reproduce the S1 transition energy, and that a significant thermochromic shift is also present. Finally, we investigated the nature of the excited states by analyzing the excitations and discussed their different fragmentation behavior. We hypothesize that different contributions of local versus charge transfer excitations are responsible for 1-photon versus 2-photon fragmentation observed experimentally. PMID:25961329

  4. Gas Phase Conformations of Tetrapeptide Glycine-Phenylalanine-Glycine-Glycine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui-bin; Wang, Yao; Chen, Xin; Lin, Zi-jing

    2012-02-01

    Systematic search of the potential energy surface of tetrapeptide glycine-phenylalanine-glycine-glycine (GFGG) in gas phase is conducted by a combination of PM3, HF and BHandHLYP methods. The conformational search method is described in detail. The relative electronic energies, zero point vibrational energies, dipole moments, rotational constants, vertical ionization energies and the temperature dependent conformational distributions for a number of important conformers are obtained. The structural characteristics of these conformers are analyzed and it is found that the entropic effect is a dominating factor in determining the relative stabilities of the conformers. The measurements of dipole moments and some characteristic IR mode are shown to be effective approaches to verify the theoretical prediction. The structures of the low energy GFGG conformers are also analyzed in their connection with the secondary structures of proteins. Similarity between the local structures of low energy GFGG conformers and the ?-helix is discussed and many ?- and ?-turn local structures in GFGG conformers are found.

  5. Full field gas phase velocity measurements in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Devon W.; Yanis, William

    1995-01-01

    Measurement of full-field velocities via Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) is common in research efforts involving fluid motion. While such measurements have been successfully performed in the liquid phase in a microgravity environment, gas-phase measurements have been beset by difficulties with seeding and laser strength. A synthesis of techniques developed at NASA LeRC exhibits promise in overcoming these difficulties. Typical implementation of PIV involves forming the light from a pulsed laser into a sheet that is some fraction of a millimeter thick and 50 or more millimeters wide. When a particle enters this sheet during a pulse, light scattered from the particle is recorded by a detector, which may be a film plane or a CCD array. Assuming that the particle remains within the boundaries of the sheet for the second pulse and can be distinguished from neighboring particles, comparison of the two images produces an average velocity vector for the time between the pulses. If the concentration of particles in the sampling volume is sufficiently large but the particles remain discrete, a full field map may be generated.

  6. Gas phase synthesis of two ensembles of silicon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, A.; de Jong, M. M.; Poulios, I.; Schropp, R. E. I.; Rath, J. K.

    2015-09-01

    Dusty plasmas provide a very favorable environment for the growth of silicon nanocrystals. For application of silicon nanocrystals in a solar cell, the fabrication of monodisperse silicon quantum dots has been challenging. We report a single step method to synthesize silicon (Si) nanoparticles in a custom designed dedicated plasma reactor. The nanoparticles produced in the gas phase belong to two different phases exhibiting different structural and optical properties. Particles made in the bulk of the plasma are aggregates of crystalline particles with a mean size of 100 nm. Particles made in locally enhanced plasma regions produced at holes present in the grounded electrode contain free-standing quantum sized particles with crystallites (with mean size of 2.95 nm) embedded within an amorphous matrix. We provide insight on different plasma processes leading to the formation of aggregates and free-standing particles. We hypothesize that the free standing particles are formed due to the excess energetic electrons present in locally enhanced discharges.

  7. Gas phase production and loss of isoprene epoxydiols.

    PubMed

    Bates, Kelvin H; Crounse, John D; St Clair, Jason M; Bennett, Nathan B; Nguyen, Tran B; Seinfeld, John H; Stoltz, Brian M; Wennberg, Paul O

    2014-02-20

    Isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) form in high yields from the OH-initiated oxidation of isoprene under low-NO conditions. These compounds contribute significantly to secondary organic aerosol formation. Their gas-phase chemistry has, however, remained largely unexplored. In this study, we characterize the formation of IEPOX isomers from the oxidation of isoprene by OH. We find that cis-β- and trans-β-IEPOX are the dominant isomers produced, and that they are created in an approximate ratio of 1:2 from the low-NO oxidation of isoprene. Three isomers of IEPOX, including cis-β- and trans-β, were synthesized and oxidized by OH in environmental chambers under high- and low-NO conditions. We find that IEPOX reacts with OH at 299 K with rate coefficients of (0.84 ± 0.07) × 10(-11), (1.52 ± 0.07) × 10(-11), and (0.98 ± 0.05) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for the δ1, cis-β, and trans-β isomers. Finally, yields of the first-generation products of IEPOX + OH oxidation were measured, and a new mechanism of IEPOX oxidation is proposed here to account for the observed products. The substantial yield of glyoxal and methylglyoxal from IEPOX oxidation may help explain elevated levels of those compounds observed in low-NO environments with high isoprene emissions. PMID:24476509

  8. Gas-phase structures of neutral silicon clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haertelt, Marko; Lyon, Jonathan T.; Claes, Pieterjan; de Haeck, Jorg; Lievens, Peter; Fielicke, Andr

    2012-02-01

    Vibrational spectra of neutral silicon clusters Sin, in the size range of n = 6-10 and for n = 15, have been measured in the gas phase by two fundamentally different IR spectroscopic methods. Silicon clusters composed of 8, 9, and 15 atoms have been studied by IR multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy of a cluster-xenon complex, while clusters containing 6, 7, 9, and 10 atoms have been studied by a tunable IR-UV two-color ionization scheme. Comparison of both methods is possible for the Si9 cluster. By using density functional theory, an identification of the experimentally observed neutral cluster structures is possible, and the effect of charge on the structure of neutrals and cations, which have been previously studied via IR multiple photon dissociation, can be investigated. Whereas the structures of small clusters are based on bipyramidal motifs, a trigonal prism as central unit is found in larger clusters. Bond weakening due to the loss of an electron leads to a major structural change between neutral and cationic Si8.

  9. Microwave spectrum and gas phase structure of maleimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejlovas, Aaron M.; Oncer, Onur; Kang, Lu; Kukolich, Stephen G.

    2016-01-01

    The rotational spectrum of maleimide was measured in the 5-12 GHz range using a Flygare-Balle type, pulsed-beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Rotational transitions were measured for the parent, all unique singly substituted 13C isotopologues, and an sbnd ND, deuterium substituted isotopologue. The parent (or normal isotopologue) rotational constants, centrifugal distortion constants, and quadrupole coupling constants are A = 6815.3251(12) MHz, B = 2361.85011(64) MHz, C = 1754.32750(64) MHz, DJ = 0.232(24) kHz, DJK = 0.546(54) kHz, 1.5?aa = 2.4227(53) MHz, and 0.25(?bb-?cc) = 1.3679(15) MHz. A best fit gas phase structure was determined using the experimental rotational constants of the isotopologues and some parameters from calculations. The inertial defect is ? = -0.054 amu 2, indicating a planar structure for maleimide, with no large amplitude motions observed on the sbnd NH hydrogen atom. Calculations using B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ provided rotational constants which are much closer (within 1-2%) to the experimental values compared to the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ calculated values.

  10. Synthesis of Cu nanopowders by condensation from the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepkasov, IV; Gafner, Yu Ya; Zobov, K. V.; Batoroev, S. B.; Bardakhanov, S. P.

    2016-02-01

    In order to determine the most efficient regimes of copper nanoparticles synthesis, a series of experiments were conducted by evaporation and subsequent condensation of the raw material in an argon atmosphere. During the tests it was found that an increase of evaporation rate increases significantly the average size of the synthesized particles. However, the study of the dependence of dimensional parameters of the produced clusters on the intensity of the buffer gas flow rate has encountered significant difficulties associated because the results significantly divergent from the previously conducted experiments on the synthesis of transition metal oxides. In order to solve this contradiction the computer simulation was held of copper atoms condensation from the gas phase for the three different cooling rates and for the two final temperatures T = 373 K and T = 77 K. It was found after analysis that the rate of cooling of the gas mixture and the final temperature directly influences the number and the size of particles produced. For instance, with the 10 times of cooling rate decreases the average size of the particles obtained had increased by 2.7 times at a final temperature of 77 K and by 3.1 times at Tf = 373 K.

  11. Project ARGO: Gas phase formation in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Michael R.; Waligora, James M.; Norfleet, William T.; Kumar, K. Vasantha

    1993-01-01

    The ARGO study investigated the reduced incidence of joint pain decompression sickness (DCS) encountered in microgravity as compared with an expected incidence of joint pain DCS experienced by test subjects in Earth-based laboratories (unit gravity) with similar protocols. Individuals who are decompressed from saturated conditions usually acquire joint pain DCS in the lower extremities. Our hypothesis is that the incidence of joint pain DCS can be limited by a significant reduction in the tissue gas micronuclei formed by stress-assisted nucleation. Reductions in dynamic and kinetic stresses in vivo are linked to hypokinetic and adynamic conditions of individuals in zero g. We employed the Doppler ultrasound bubble detection technique in simulated microgravity studies to determine quantitatively the degree of gas phase formation in the upper and lower extremities of test subjects during decompression. We found no evidence of right-to-left shunting through pulmonary vasculature. The volume of gas bubble following decompression was examined and compared with the number following saline contrast injection. From this, we predict a reduced incidence of DCS on orbit, although the incidence of predicted mild DCS still remains larger than that encountered on orbit.

  12. Gas-phase enantioselectivity of chiral amido[4]resorcinarene receptors.

    PubMed

    Botta, Bruno; Caporuscio, Fabiana; D'Acquarica, Ilaria; Delle Monache, Giuliano; Subissati, Deborah; Tafi, Andrea; Botta, Maurizio; Filippi, Antonello; Speranza, Maurizio

    2006-10-25

    Diastereomeric proton-bound [1(L)HA]+ complexes between selected amino acids (A=phenylglycine (Phg), tryptophan (Trp), tyrosine methyl ester (TyrOMe), threonine (Thr), and allothreonine (AThr)) and a chiral amido[4]resorcinarene receptor (1(L)) display a significant enantioselectivity when undergoing loss of the amino acid guest A by way of the enantiomers of 2-aminobutanes (B) in the gas phase. The enantioselectivity of the B-to-A displacement is ascribed to a combination of thermodynamic and kinetic factors related to the structure and the stability of the diastereomeric [1(L)HA]+ complexes and of the reaction transition states. The results of the present and previous studies allow classification of the [1(L)HA]+ complexes in three main categories wherein: i) guest A does not present any additional functionalities besides the amino acid one (alanine (Ala), Phg, and phenylalanine (Phe)); ii) guest A presents an additional alcohol function (serine (Ser), Thr, and AThr); and iii) guest A contains several additional functionalities on its aromatic ring (tyrosine (Tyr), TyrOMe, Trp, and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA)). Each category exhibits a specific enantioselectivity depending upon the predominant [1(L)HA]+ structures and the orientation of the 2-aminobutane reactant in the relevant adducts observed. The results may contribute to the understanding of the exceptional selectivity and catalytic properties of enzyme mimics towards unsolvated biomolecules. PMID:16881028

  13. Microwave spectrum and the gas phase structure of phthalimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejlovas, Aaron M.; Lin, Wei; Oncer, Onur; Kukolich, Stephen G.

    2015-11-01

    The microwave spectrum of phthalimide (PhI) was measured in the 4.8-9.5 GHz range using a Flygare-Balle type, pulsed-beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Rotational transitions were measured for the parent and all unique single 13C substituted isotopologues. The rotational (MHz), centrifugal distortion (kHz), and quadrupole coupling constants (MHz) were determined for the parent to be A = 1745.6655(10), B = 1199.3309(6), C = 711.0864(3), DJ = 0.012(7), DJK = -0.05(9), 1.5?aa = 2.719(11), and 0.25(?bb - ?cc) = 1.236(3). Using the measured rotational constants of the isotopologues, a nonlinear least squares fit was performed to obtain the best fit gas phase structure. The inertial defect is ? = -0.175 amu 2, indicating a planar structure for PhI. Calculations using B3LYP/aug-cc-pVQZ provided rotational constants which are much closer to the experimental values compared to the MP2/6-311++G?? calculated values.

  14. Chemistry in protoplanetary disks: the gas-phase CO/H2 ratio and the carbon reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reboussin, L.; Wakelam, V.; Guilloteau, S.; Hersant, F.; Dutrey, A.

    2015-07-01

    Context. The gas mass of protoplanetary disks and the gas-to-dust ratio are two key elements driving the evolution of these disks and the formation of planetary system. Aims: We explore to what extent CO (or its isotopologues) can be used as a tracer of gas mass. Methods: We use a detailed gas-grain chemical model and study the evolution of the disk composition, starting from a dense prestellar core composition. We explore a range of disk temperature profiles, cosmic-ray ionization rates, and disk ages for a disk model representative of T Tauri stars. Results: At the high densities that prevail in disks, we find that because of fast reactions on grain surfaces, CO can be converted to less volatile forms (principally s-CO2, and to a lesser extent s-CH4) instead of being evaporated over a wide range of temperature. The canonical gas-phase abundance of 10-4 is only reached above about 30-35 K. The dominant carbon bearing entity depends on the temperature structure and age of the disk. The chemical evolution of CO is also sensitive to the cosmic-ray ionization rate. Larger gas phase CO abundances are found in younger disks. Initial conditions, such as parent cloud age and density, have a limited impact. Conclusions: This study reveals that CO gas-phase abundance is heavily dependent on grain surface processes, which remain very incompletely understood so far. The strong dependence on dust temperature profile makes CO a poor tracer of the gas-phase content of disks.

  15. Reaction mechanisms in the radiolysis of peptides, polypeptides, and proteins. I. Reactions of the peptide main-chain in model systems

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, W.M.

    1982-08-01

    The object of this review is to bring together and to correlate our present knowledge of products and mechanisms in the radiolysis of peptides, polypeptides and proteins in both aqueous and solid-state systems. Results obtained with various experimental techniques such as product analysis, competition kinetics, ESR spectroscopy and pulse radiolysis are included. Here in part I the emphasis is on the various radiation-induced reactions of the peptide main-chain in model systems. In part II the emphasis is on the radiation chemistry of side-chain loci of the aliphatic, sulfur-containing, aromatic and other unsaturated amino acid residues in similar systems. And, in part III this information on model systems is used in interpreting the mechanisms of chemical change in the radiolysis of proteins in aqueous solution and in the solid state. 60 references.

  16. DETERMINATION OF GAS-PHASE DIMETHYL SULFATE AND MONOMETHYL HYDROGEN SULFATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analytical techniques have been developed for the collection and determination of gas phase dimethyl sulfate and monomethyl sulfuric acid in the flue lines and plumes of power plants and in the ambient atmosphere. The techniques involve the collection of the gas phase species in ...

  17. GAS PHASE SELECTIVE PHOTOXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TITANIUM DIOXIDE AND MOLECULAR OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas Phase Selective Oxidation of Alcohols Using Light-Activated Titanium Dioxide and Molecular Oxygen

    Gas phase selective oxidations of various primary and secondary alcohols are studied in an indigenously built stainless steel up-flow photochemical reactor using ultravi...

  18. Determination of the location of positive charges in gas-phase polypeptide polycations by tandem mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjeldsen, Frank; Savitski, Mikhail M.; Adams, Christopher M.; Zubarev, Roman A.

    2006-06-01

    Location of protonated sites in electrospray-ionized gas-phase peptides and proteins was performed with tandem mass spectrometry using ion activation by both electron capture dissociation (ECD) and collisional activation dissociation (CAD). Charge-carrying sites were assigned based on the increment in the charge state of fragment ions compared to that of the previous fragment in the same series. The property of ECD to neutralize preferentially the least basic site was confirmed by the analysis of three thousand ECD mass spectra of doubly charged tryptic peptides. Multiply charged cations of bradykinin, neurotensin and melittin were studied in detail. For n+ precursors, ECD revealed the positions of (n - 1) most basic sites, while CAD could in principle locate alln charges. However, ECD introduced minimal proton mobilization and produced more conclusive data than CAD, for which N- and C-terminal data often disagreed. Consistent with the dominance of one charge conformer and its preservation in ECD, the average charge states of complementary fragments of n+ ions almost always added up to (n - 1)+, while the similar figure in CAD often deviated from n+, indicating extensive charge isomerization under collisional excitation. For bradykinin and neurotensin, the charge assignments were largely in agreement with the intrinsic gas-phase basicity of the respective amino acid residues. For melittin ions in higher charge states, ECD revealed the charging at both intrinsically basic as well as at less basic residues, which was attributed to charge sharing with other groups due to the presence of secondary and higher order structures in this larger polypeptide.

  19. Photodissociation and spectroscopy of gas phase bimetallic clusters. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, M.A.

    1992-05-01

    Focus of the research program is the study of gas phase metal clusters for modeling fundamental interactions on metal surfaces. We characterize the chemical bonding between component atoms in clusters as well as the bonding in adsorption on cluster surfaces. Electronic spectra, vibrational frequencies and bond dissociation energies are measured for both neutral and ionized clusters with laser/mass spectrometry techniques. Small bimetallic cluster cations containing Bi/Cr, Bi/Fe, Sn/Bi, and Pb/Sb were photodissociated at various uv wavelengths. Silver dimer van der Waals complexes were produced with a series of rare gas atoms (Ar, Kr, Xe), and their vibrational frequencies and dissociation energies were obtained. (DLC)

  20. Gas-phase acidity and C H bond energy of diacetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yang; Ervin, Kent M.

    2000-02-01

    Threshold energies for the proton transfer reaction C 4H -+C 2H 2 ? C 4H 2+C 2H - and for competitive collision-induced dissociation of the proton-bound complex of diacetylide and acetaldehyde, [HC 4HCH 2CHO] -, are measured using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry. From the bimolecular proton transfer threshold, the gas-phase acidity of diacetylene is ? acidH0(C 4H 2)?15008 kJ/mol as a lower limit. The competitive dissociation is modeled using RRKM theory, yielding ? acidH0(C 4H 2)=150812 kJ/mol. Using the literature electron affinity of C 4H, the derived bond dissociation energy of diacetylene is D0(HC 4-H)=53912 kJ/mol.

  1. Empirical parameterization of a model for predicting peptide helix/coil equilibrium populations.

    PubMed

    Andersen, N H; Tong, H

    1997-09-01

    A modification of the Lifson-Roig formulation of helix/coil transitions is presented; it (1) incorporates end-capping and coulombic (salt bridges, hydrogen bonding, and side-chain interactions with charged termini and the helix dipole) effects, (2) helix-stabilizing hydrophobic clustering, (3) allows for different inherent termination probabilities of individual residues, and (4) differentiates helix elongation in the first versus subsequent turns of a helix. Each residue is characterized by six parameters governing helix formation. The formulation of the conditional probability of helix initiation and termination that we developed is essentially the same as one presented previously (Shalongo W, Stellwagen, E. 1995. Protein Sci 4:1161-1166) and nearly the mathematical equivalent of the new capping formulation incorporated in the model presented by Rohl et al. (1996. Protein Sci 5:2623-2637). Side-chain/side-chain interactions are, in most cases, incorporated as context dependent modifications of propagation rather than nucleation parameters. An alternative procedure for converting [theta]221 values to experimental fractional helicities () is presented. Tests of the program predictions suggest this method may have some advantages both for designed peptides and for the analysis of secondary structure preferences that could drive the formation of molten-globule intermediates on protein folding pathways. The model predicts the fractional helicity of 385 peptides with a root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) of 0.050 and locates (with precise definition of the termini in many cases) helices in proteins as well as competing methods. The propagation and nucleation parameters were derived from NMR data and from the CD data for a 79 peptide "learning set" for which an excellent fit resulted (RMSD = 0.0295). The current set of parameter corrections for capping boxes, helix dipole interactions, and side-chain/side-chain interactions (coulombic, hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic clustering), although still under development provide a significant improvement in both helix/coil equilibrium prediction for peptides and helix location in protein sequences. This is clearly evident in the rms deviations between CD measures and calculated values of fractional helicity for different classes of peptides before and after applying the corrections: for peptides lacking capping boxes and i/i + 3 and i/i + 4 side-chain/side-chain interactions RMSD = 0.044 (n = 164) versus RMSD = 0.054 (0.172 without the corrections, n = 221) for peptides that required context-dependent corrections of the parameters. If we restrict the analysis to N-acylated peptides with helix stabilizing side-chain/side-chain interactions (including N-capping boxes), the degree to which our corrections account for the stabilizing interaction can be judged from the change in helicity underestimation, (calc-CD): -0.15 +/- 0.10, which is reduced to -0.018 +/- 0.048 (n = 191) upon applying the corrections. PMID:9300492

  2. Modeling of Platinum-Aryl Interaction with Amyloid-β Peptide.

    PubMed

    Turner, Matthew; Platts, James A; Deeth, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    Ligand field molecular mechanics (LFMM), density functional theory (DFT), and semiempirical PM7 methods are used to study the binding of two Pt(II)-L systems to an N-terminal fragment of the amyloid-β peptide, where L = 2,2-bipyridyl or 1,10-phenanthroline. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to explore the conformational freedom of the peptide using LFMM combined with AMBER molecular mechanics parameters. We establish a modeling protocol, allowing for identification and analysis of favorable platinum-binding modes and peptide conformations. Preferred binding modes are identified for each ligand investigated; metal coordination occurs via Nε in His residues for both ligands - His6ε-His13ε and His6ε-His14ε for the bipyridyl and phenanthroline ligands, respectively. The observed change in binding mode for the different ligands suggests that the binding mode of these platinum-based structures can be controlled by the choice of ligand. In the bipy systems, Boltzmann population at 310 K is dominated by a single conformer, while in the phenanthroline case, three conformations make significant contributions to the ensemble. The relative stability of these conformations is due to the inherent stability of binding platinum via Nε in addition to subtle H-bonding effects. PMID:26756469

  3. A Peptide to Reduce Pulmonary Edema in a Rat Model of Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Finsterwalder, Richard; Friedl, Heinz P.; Rauscher, Sabine; Gröger, Marion; Kocher, Alfred; Wagner, Christine; Wagner, Stephan N.; Fischer, Gottfried; Schultz, Marcus J.; Wiedemann, Dominik; Petzelbauer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite significant advances in organ preservation, surgical techniques and perioperative care, primary graft dysfunction is a serious medical problem in transplantation medicine in general and a specific problem in patients undergoing lung transplantation. As a result, patients develop lung edema, causing reduced tissue oxygenation capacity, reduced lung compliance and increased requirements for mechanical ventilatory support. Yet, there is no effective strategy available to protect the grafted organ from stress reactions induced by ischemia/reperfusion and by the surgical procedure itself. Methods We assessed the effect of a cingulin-derived peptide, XIB13 or a random peptide in an established rat model of allogeneic lung transplantation. Donor lungs and recipients received therapeutic peptide at the time of transplantation and outcome was analyzed 100min and 28 days post grafting. Results XIB13 improved blood oxygenation and reduced vascular leak 100min post grafting. Even after 28 days, lung edema was significantly reduced by XIB13 and lungs had reduced fibrotic or necrotic zones. Moreover, the induction of an allogeneic T cell response was delayed indicating a reduced antigen exchange between the donor and the host. Conclusions In summary, we provide a new tool to strengthen endothelial barrier function thereby improving outcomes in lung transplantation. PMID:26536466

  4. Investigating the inclusion properties of aromatic amino acids complexing beta-cyclodextrins in model peptides.

    PubMed

    Caso, Jolanda Valentina; Russo, Luigi; Palmieri, Maddalena; Malgieri, Gaetano; Galdiero, Stefania; Falanga, Annarita; Isernia, Carla; Iacovino, Rosa

    2015-10-01

    Cyclodextrins are commonly used as complexing agents in biological, pharmaceutical, and industrial applications since they have an effect on protein thermal and proteolytic stability, refolding yields, solubility, and taste masking. ?-cyclodextrins (?-CD), because of their cavity size are a perfectly suited complexing agent for many common guest moieties. In the case of peptide-cyclodextrin and protein-cyclodextrin host-guest complexes the aromatic amino acids are reported to be the principal responsible of the interaction. For these reasons, we have investigated the inclusion properties of nine designed tripeptides, obtained permuting the position of two L-alanines (Ala, A) with that of one L-tryptophan (Trp, W), L-phenylalanine (Phe, F), or L-tyrosine (Tyr, Y), respectively. Interestingly, the position of the aromatic side-chain in the sequence appears to modulate the ?-CD:peptide binding constants, determined via UV-Vis and NMR spectroscopy, which in turn assumes values higher than those reported for the single amino acid. The tripeptides containing a tyrosine showed the highest binding constants, with the central position in the Ac-AYA-NH2 peptide becoming the most favorite for the interaction. A combined NMR and Molecular Docking approach permitted to build detailed complex models, highlighting the stabilizing interactions of the neighboring amino acids backbone atoms with the upper rim of the ?-CD. PMID:25985927

  5. LSPRAY: Lagrangian Spray Solver for Applications With Parallel Computing and Unstructured Gas-Phase Flow Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Manthena S.

    1998-01-01

    Sprays occur in a wide variety of industrial and power applications and in the processing of materials. A liquid spray is a phase flow with a gas as the continuous phase and a liquid as the dispersed phase (in the form of droplets or ligaments). Interactions between the two phases, which are coupled through exchanges of mass, momentum, and energy, can occur in different ways at different times and locations involving various thermal, mass, and fluid dynamic factors. An understanding of the flow, combustion, and thermal properties of a rapidly vaporizing spray requires careful modeling of the rate-controlling processes associated with the spray's turbulent transport, mixing, chemical kinetics, evaporation, and spreading rates, as well as other phenomena. In an attempt to advance the state-of-the-art in multidimensional numerical methods, we at the NASA Lewis Research Center extended our previous work on sprays to unstructured grids and parallel computing. LSPRAY, which was developed by M.S. Raju of Nyma, Inc., is designed to be massively parallel and could easily be coupled with any existing gas-phase flow and/or Monte Carlo probability density function (PDF) solver. The LSPRAY solver accommodates the use of an unstructured mesh with mixed triangular, quadrilateral, and/or tetrahedral elements in the gas-phase solvers. It is used specifically for fuel sprays within gas turbine combustors, but it has many other uses. The spray model used in LSPRAY provided favorable results when applied to stratified-charge rotary combustion (Wankel) engines and several other confined and unconfined spray flames. The source code will be available with the National Combustion Code (NCC) as a complete package.

  6. Characterizing the Structures and Folding of Free Proteins Using 2-D Gas-Phase Separations: Observation of Multiple Unfolded Conformers

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Li, Fumin; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-05-15

    Understanding the 3-D structure and dynamics of proteins and other biological macromolecules in various environments is among the central challenges of chemistry. Electrospray ionization (ESI) can transfer ions from solution to gas phase with only limited structural distortion, allowing their profiling using mass spectrometry and other gas phase approaches. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) can be used to separate and characterize macroion conformations with high sensitivity and speed. However, IMS separation power has proven insufficient for full resolution of major structural variants of protein ions and elucidation of their interconversion dynamics. Here we report characterization of macromolecular conformations using field asymmetric waveform IMS (FAIMS) coupled to conventional IMS in conjunction with mass spectrometry. The controlled activation of ions in the electrodynamic funnel trap between FAIMS and IMS stages enables investigating the structural evolution of particular isomeric precursors as a function of the extent and duration of activation that can be varied over a large range. These new capabilities are demonstrated for bovine ubiquitin, a common model for study of structure and folding of gas-phase proteins. For nearly all charge states, two-dimensional FAIMS/IMS separations distinguish many more conformations than either FAIMS or IMS alone, including some species with very low abundance. The unfolding of specific ubiquitin conformers has been studied employing ion heating in the FAIMS/IMS interface.

  7. THEORETICAL STUDY ON THE INTERACTION BETWEEN XENON AND POSITIVE SILVER CLUSTERS IN GAS PHASE AND ON THE (001) CHABAZITE SURFACE

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, D.

    2009-03-16

    A systematic study on the adsorption of xenon on silver clusters in the gas phase and on the (001) surface of silver-exchanged chabazite is reported. Density functional theory at the B3LYP level with the cluster model was employed. The results indicate that the dominant part of the binding is the {sigma} donation, which is the charge transfer from the 5p orbital of Xe to the 5s orbital of Ag and is not the previously suggested d{sub {pi}}-d{sub {pi}} back-donation. A correlation between the binding energy and the degree of {sigma} donation is found. Xenon was found to bind strongly to silver cluster cations and not to neutral ones. The binding strength decreases as the cluster size increases for both cases, clusters in the gas-phase and on the chabazite surface. The Ag{sup +} cation is the strongest binding site for xenon both in gas phase and on the chabazite surface with the binding energies of 73.9 and 14.5 kJ/mol, respectively. The results also suggest that the smaller silver clusters contribute to the negative chemical shifts observed in the {sup 129}Xe NMR spectra in experiments.

  8. Molecular modeling of hair keratin/peptide complex: Using MM-PBSA calculations to describe experimental binding results.

    PubMed

    Azoia, Nuno G; Fernandes, Margarida M; Micalo, Nuno M; Soares, Cludio M; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2012-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a keratin/peptide complex have been conducted to predict the binding affinity of four different peptides toward human hair. Free energy calculations on the peptides' interaction with the keratin model demonstrated that electrostatic interactions are believed to be the main driving force stabilizing the complex. The molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area methodology used for the free energy calculations demonstrated that the dielectric constant in the protein's interior plays a major role in the free energy calculations, and the only way to obtain accordance between the free energy calculations and the experimental binding results was to use the average dielectric constant. PMID:22275089

  9. A polysialic acid mimetic peptide promotes functional recovery in a mouse model of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Marino, Philippe; Norreel, Jean-Chrtien; Schachner, Melitta; Rougon, Genevive; Amoureux, Marie-Claude

    2009-09-01

    Contrary to lower species that recapitulate some of the developmental programs, in mammals, functional recovery after spinal cord injury is impaired by a non-permissive environment and the lack of plasticity of adult neurons. The developmental plasticity associated linear homopolymer of alpha 2,8-linked sialic acid (PolySialic Acid, PSA), represents a permissive determinant that could contribute to recovery. We previously showed that a PSA cyclic mimetic peptide (PR-21) displayed PSA-like biological functions (Torregrossa, P., Buhl, L., Bancila, M., Durbec, P., Schafer, C., Schachner, M., Rougon, G., 2004. Selection of poly-alpha 2,8-sialic acid mimotopes from a random phage peptide library and analysis of their bioactivity. J. Biol. Chem. 279, 30707-30714.). In the present study we investigated the therapeutic potential of PR-21 in young adult mice after dorsal hemisection at the T9 level. We show that PR-21 fulfills several criteria for an in vivo use as it is not toxic, not immunogenic and displays good stability in biological fluids or tissue. Delivery of PR-21 to the lesion site decreased the time of the animals' return to continence, and enhanced motor functions, sensorimotor control and coordination of hindlimbs with forelimbs when compared to a control peptide. At the cellular level, PR-21 increased serotonergic axon density at and caudal to the lesion site, and decreased reactive gliosis in vivo. In an in vitro model of reactive astrocytes, PR-21 increased NCAM expression in strongly GFAP positive cells. Our data point to the unique features of a carbohydrate mimicking peptide, and support the notion that PSA can be considered as an important factor in recovery from spinal cord injury. PMID:19445935

  10. Novel bioluminescent receptor-binding assays for peptide hormones: using ghrelin as a model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Zhang, Lei; Song, Ge; Liu, Ya-Li; Xu, Zeng-Guang; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2015-10-01

    Peptide hormones perform important biological functions by binding specific cell membrane receptors. For hormone-receptor interaction studies, receptor-binding assays are widely used. However, conventional receptor-binding assays rely on radioactive tracers that have drawbacks. In recent studies, we established novel non-radioactive receptor-binding assays for some recombinant protein hormones based on the ultrasensitive bioluminescence of a newly developed nanoluciferase (NanoLuc) reporter. In the present work, we extended the novel bioluminescent receptor-binding assay to peptide hormones that have small size and can be conveniently prepared by chemical synthesis. Human ghrelin, a 28-amino acid peptide hormone carrying a special O-fatty acid modification, was used as a model. To prepare a bioluminescent ghrelin tracer, a chemically synthesized ghrelin analog with a unique cysteine residue at the C-terminus was site-specifically conjugated with an engineered NanoLuc with a unique exposed cysteine residue at the C-terminus via a reversible disulfide linkage. The NanoLuc-conjugated ghrelin retained high binding affinity with the ghrelin receptor GHSR1a (K d = 1.14 ± 0.13 nM, n = 3) and was able to sensitively monitor the receptor-binding of various GHSR1a ligands. The novel bioluminescent receptor-binding assay will facilitate the interaction studies of ghrelin with its receptor. We also proposed general procedures for convenient conjugation of other peptide hormones with NanoLuc for novel bioluminescent receptor-binding assays. PMID:26002812

  11. Ion channel models based on self-assembling cyclic peptide nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Montenegro, Javier

    2013-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Compartmentalization and isolation from external media facilitates the sophisticated functionality and connectivity of all the different biological processes accomplished by living entities. The lipid bilayer membranes are the dynamic structural motifs selected by Nature to individualize cells and keep ions, proteins, biopolymers and metabolites confined in the appropriate location. However, cellular interaction with the exterior and the regulation of its internal environment requires the assistance of minimal energy short cuts for the transport of molecules across membranes. Ion channels and pores stand out from all other possible transport mechanisms due to their high selectivity and efficiency in discriminating and transporting ions or molecules across membrane barriers. Nevertheless, the complexity of these smart membrane holes has been a significant driving force to develop artificial structures with comparable performance to the natural systems. The emergence of the broad range of supramolecular interactions as efficient tools for the rational design and preparation of stable 3D superstructures has boosted the possibilities and stimulated the creativity of chemists to design synthetic mimics of natural active macromolecules and even to develop artificial functions and properties. In this account we highlight results from our laboratories on the construction of artificial ion channel models that exploit the self-assembling of flat cyclic peptides into supramolecular nanotubes. The straightforward synthesis of the cyclic peptide monomers and the complete control over the internal diameter and external surface properties of the resulting hollow tubular suprastructure make CPs the optimal candidates for the fabrication of ion channels. Ion channel activities and selective transport of small molecules are examples of the huge potential of cyclic peptide nanotubes for the construction of functional transmembrane ion channels or pores. Our experience to date suggests that the topological control over cyclic peptide assembly together with the lumen functionalization should be the next steps to achieve conceptual devices with better performance and selectivity. PMID:23898935

  12. Measurement of soil/dust arsenic by gas phase chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Sawalha, Maather F; Sengupta, Mrinal K; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Idowu, Ademola D; Gill, Thomas E; Rojo, Lila; Barnes, Melanie; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2008-10-19

    A gas phase chemiluminescence (GPCL)-based method for trace measurement of arsenic has been recently described for the measurement of arsenic in water. The principle is based on the reduction of inorganic As to AsH(3) at a controlled pH (the choice of pH governs whether only As(III) or all inorganic As is converted) and the reaction of AsH(3) with O(3) to produce chemiluminescence (Idowu et al., Anal. Chem. 78 (2006) 7088-7097). The same general principle has also been used in postcolumn reaction detection of As, where As species are separated chromatographically, then converted into inorganic As by passing through a UV photochemical reactor followed by AsH(3) generation and CL reaction with ozone (Idowu and Dasgupta, Anal. Chem. 79 (2007) 9197-9204). In the present paper we describe the measurement of As in different soil and dust samples by serial extraction with water, citric acid, sulfuric acid and nitric acid. We also compare parallel measurements for total As by induction coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). As(V) was the only species found in our samples. Because of chloride interference of isobaric ArCl(+) ICP-MS analyses could only be carried out by standard addition; these results were highly correlated with direct GPCL and LC-GPCL results (r(2)=0.9935 and 1.0000, respectively). The limit of detection (LOD) in the extracts was 0.36 microg/L by direct GPCL compared to 0.1 microg/L by ICP-MS. In sulfuric acid-based extracts, the LC-GPCL method provided LODs inferior to those previously observed for water-based standards and were 2.6, 1.3, 6.7, and 6.4 microg/L for As(III), As(V), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), respectively. PMID:18804648

  13. IV-VI semiconductor lasers for gas phase biomarker detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Patrick; Namjou, Khosrow; Roller, Chad; McMillen, Gina; Kamat, Pratyuma

    2007-09-01

    A promising absorption spectroscopy application for mid-IR lasers is exhaled breath analysis where sensitive, selective, and speedy measurement of small gas phase biomarker molecules can be used to diagnose disease and monitor therapies. Many molecules such as nitric oxide, ethane, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, carbonyl sulfide, and carbon disulfide have been connected to diseases or conditions such as asthma, oxidative stress, breast cancer, lung cancer, diabetes, organ transplant rejection, and schizophrenia. Measuring these and other, yet to be discovered, biomarker molecules in exhaled breath with mid-IR lasers offers great potential for improving health care since such tests are non-invasive, real-time, and do not require expensive consumables or chemical reagents. Motivated by these potential benefits, mid-IR laser spectrometers equipped with presently available cryogenically-cooled IV-VI lasers mounted in compact Stirling coolers have been developed for clinical research applications. This paper will begin with a description of the development of mid-IR laser instruments and their use in the largest known exhaled breath clinical study ever performed. It will then shift to a description of recent work on the development of new IV-VI semiconductor quantum well materials and laser fabrication methods that offer the promise of low power consumption (i.e. efficient) continuous wave emission at room temperature. Taken together, the demonstration of compelling clinical applications with large market opportunities and the clear identification of a viable pathway to develop low cost mid-IR laser instrumentation can create a renewed focus for future research and development efforts within the mid-IR materials and devices area.

  14. Gas phase selective hydrogenation over oxide supported Ni-Au.

    PubMed

    Crdenas-Lizana, Fernando; Keane, Mark A

    2015-11-14

    The chemoselective continuous gas phase (T = 573 K; P = 1 atm) hydrogenation of nitroarenes (p-chloronitrobenzene (p-CNB) and m-dinitrobenzene (m-DNB)) has been investigated over a series of oxide (Al2O3 and TiO2) supported Au and Ni-Au (1?:?10 mol ratio; 0.1-1 mol% Au) catalysts. Monometallic supported Au with mean particle size 3-9 nm promoted exclusive formation of p-chloroaniline (p-CAN) and m-nitroaniline (m-NAN). Selective hydrogenation rate was higher over smaller Au particles and can be attributed to increased surface hydrogen (from TPD measurements) at higher metal dispersion. (S)TEM analysis has confirmed an equivalent metal particle size for the supported bimetallics at the same Au loading where TPR indicates Ni-Au interaction and EDX surface mapping established Ni in close proximity to Au on isolated nanoparticles with a composition (Au/Ni) close to the bulk value (= 10). Increased spillover hydrogen due to the incorporation of Ni in the bimetallics resulted in elevated -NO2 group reduction rate. Full selectivity to p-CAN was maintained over all the bimetallic catalysts. Conversion of m-DNB over the lower loaded Ni-Au/Al2O3 generated m-NAN as sole product. An increase in Ni content (0.01 ? 0.1 mol%) or a switch from Al2O3 to TiO2 as support resulted in full -NO2 reduction (to m-phenylenediamine). Our results demonstrate the viability of Ni-promotion of Au in the continuous production of functionalised anilines. PMID:25752655

  15. Infrared spectroscopy of ionized corannulene in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galu, Hctor Alvaro; Rice, Corey A.; Steill, Jeffrey D.; Oomens, Jos

    2011-02-01

    The gas-phase infrared spectra of radical cationic and protonated corannulene were recorded by infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy using the IR free electron laser for infrared experiments. Electrospray ionization was used to generate protonated corannulene and an IRMPD spectrum was recorded in a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer monitoring H-loss as a function of IR frequency. The radical cation was produced by 193-nm UV photoionization of the vapor of corannulene in a 3D quadrupole trap and IR irradiation produces H, H2, and C2Hx losses. Summing the spectral response of the three fragmentation channels yields the IRMPD spectrum of the radical cation. The spectra were analyzed with the aid of quantum-chemical calculations carried out at various levels of theory. The good agreement of theoretical and experimental spectra for protonated corannulene indicates that protonation occurs on one of the peripheral C-atoms, forming an sp3 hybridized carbon. The spectrum of the radical cation was examined taking into account distortions of the C5v geometry induced by the Jahn-Teller effect as a consequence of the degenerate 2E1 ground electronic state. As indicated by the calculations, the five equivalent Cs minima are separated by marginal barriers, giving rise to a dynamically distorted system. Although in general the character of the various computed vibrational bands appears to be in order, only a qualitative match to the experimental spectrum is found. Along with a general redshift of the calculated frequencies, the IR intensities of modes in the 1000-1250 cm-1 region show the largest discrepancy with the harmonic predictions. In addition to CH "in-plane" bending vibrations, these modes also exhibit substantial deformation of the pentagonal inner ring, which may relate directly to the vibronic interaction in the radical cation.

  16. Dissociative electron attachment to the gas-phase nucleobase hypoxanthine

    SciTech Connect

    Dawley, M. Michele; Tanzer, Katrin; Denifl, Stephan E-mail: Sylwia.Ptasinska.1@nd.edu; Carmichael, Ian; Ptasińska, Sylwia E-mail: Sylwia.Ptasinska.1@nd.edu

    2015-06-07

    We present high-resolution measurements of the dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to isolated gas-phase hypoxanthine (C{sub 5}H{sub 4}N{sub 4}O, Hyp), a tRNA purine base. The anion mass spectra and individual ion efficiency curves from Hyp were measured as a function of electron energy below 9 eV. The mass spectra at 1 and 6 eV exhibit the highest anion yields, indicating possible common precursor ions that decay into the detectable anionic fragments. The (Hyp − H) anion (C{sub 5}H{sub 3}N{sub 4}O{sup −}) exhibits a sharp resonant peak at 1 eV, which we tentatively assign to a dipole-bound state of the keto-N1H,N9H tautomer in which dehydrogenation occurs at either the N1 or N9 position based upon our quantum chemical computations (B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) and U(MP2-aug-cc-pVDZ+)) and prior studies with adenine. This closed-shell dehydrogenated anion is the dominant fragment formed upon electron attachment, as with other nucleobases. Seven other anions were also observed including (Hyp − NH){sup −}, C{sub 4}H{sub 3}N{sub 4}{sup −}/C{sub 4}HN{sub 3}O{sup −}, C{sub 4}H{sub 2}N{sub 3}{sup −}, C{sub 3}NO{sup −}/HC(HCN)CN{sup −}, OCN{sup −}, CN{sup −}, and O{sup −}. Most of these anions exhibit broad but weak resonances between 4 and 8 eV similar to many analogous anions from adenine. The DEA to Hyp involves significant fragmentation, which is relevant to understanding radiation damage of biomolecules.

  17. Measurement of Gas-phase Acids in Diesel Exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentzell, J. J.; Liggio, J.; Li, S.; Vlasenko, A. L.; Staebler, R. M.; Brook, J.; Lu, G.; Poitras, M.; Chan, T.

    2012-12-01

    Gas-phase acids were measured using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) as part of the Diesel Engine Emission Research Experiment (DEERE). The CIMS technique, utilizing acetate ion (CH3COO-) as a reagent ion, proved to be a rapid (measurements on the order of seconds) and sensitive (several counts/pptv) method of quantifying the acid emissions. Diluted diesel exhaust measurements were made from a Constant Volume Sampling dilution tunnel using a light duty (1.9L turbocharged Volkswagen Jetta TDI) diesel engine equipped with an OEM diesel oxidation catalyst and exhaust gas recirculation, mounted on an engine dynamometer. Acids measured included isocyanic, nitrous, nitric, propionic and sum of lactic and oxalic, as well as other unidentified compounds. Complimentary measurements of CO, CO2, Total Hydrocarbon (THC), and NOx, were also performed. Several engine modes (different engine rpm and torque outputs) at steady state were examined to determine their effect on acid emissions. Emission rates with respect to NOx and fuel based emission factors were determined. Measurements of HONO fuel emission factors agree well with real-world measurements within a traffic tunnel.1 The first estimate of isocyanic acid emission factors from a diesel engine is reported, and suggests that the emission of this highly toxic compound in diesel exhaust should not be ignored. 1. Kurtenbach, R., Becker, K. H., Gomes, J. A. G., Kleffmann, J.,Lorzer, J. C., Spittler, M., Wiesen, P., Ackermann, R., Geyer, A.,and Platt, U.: Investigations of emissions and heterogeneous formation of HONO in a road traffic tunnel, Atmos. Environ., 35, 3385-3394, doi:10.1016/S1352-2310(01)00138-8, 2001.

  18. Gas-Phase Combustion Synthesis of Aluminum Nitride Powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelbaum, R. L.; Lottes, C. R.; Huertas, J. I.; Rosen, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    Due to its combined properties of high electrical resistivity and high thermal conductivity aluminum nitride (AlN) is a highly desirable material for electronics applications. Methods are being sought for synthesis of unagglomerated, nanometer-sized powders of this material, prepared in such a way that they can be consolidated into solid compacts having minimal oxygen content. A procedure for synthesizing these powders through gas-phase combustion is described. This novel approach involves reacting AlCl3, NH3, and Na vapors. Equilibrium thermodynamic calculations show that 100% yields can be obtained for these reactants with the products being AlN, NaCl, and H2. The NaCl by-product is used to coat the AlN particles in situ. The coating allows for control of AlN agglomeration and protects the powders from hydrolysis during post-flame handling. On the basis of thermodynamic and kinetic considerations, two different approaches were employed to produce the powder, in co-flow diffusion flame configurations. In the first approach, the three reactants were supplied in separate streams. In the second, the AlCl3 and NH3 were premixed with HCl and then reacted with Na vapor. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra of as-produced powders show only NaCl for the first case and NaCl and AlN for the second. After annealing at 775 C tinder dynamic vacuum, the salt was removed and XRD spectra of powders from both approaches show only AlN. Aluminum metal was also produced in the co-flow flame by reacting AlCl3 with Na. XRD spectra of as-produced powders show the products to be only NaCl and elemental aluminum.

  19. Gas-phase interactions of organotin compounds with glycine.

    PubMed

    Latrous, Latifa; Tortajada, Jeanine; Haldys, Violette; Lon, Emmanuelle; Correia, Catarina; Salpin, Jean-Yves

    2013-07-01

    Gas-phase interactions of organotins with glycine have been studied by combining mass spectrometry experiments and quantum calculations. Positive-ion electrospray spectra show that the interaction of di- and tri-organotins with glycine results in the formation of [(R)2Sn(Gly)-H](+) and [(R)3Sn(Gly)](+) ions, respectively. Di-organotin complexes appear much more reactive than those involving tri-organotins. (MS/MS) spectra of the [(R)3Sn(Gly)](+) ions are indeed simple and only show elimination of intact glycine, generating the [(R)3Sn](+) carbocation. On the other hand, MS/MS spectra of [(R)2Sn(Gly)-H](+) complexes are characterized by numerous fragmentation processes. Six of them, associated with elimination of H2O, CO, H2O?+?CO and formation of [(R)2SnOH](+) (-57?u),[(R)2SnNH2](+) (-58?u) and [(R)2SnH](+) (-73?u), are systematically observed. Use of labeled glycines notably concludes that the hydrogen atoms eliminated in water and H2O?+?CO are labile hydrogens. A similar conclusion can be made for hydrogens of [(R2)SnOH](+) and [(R2)SnNH2](+) ions. Interestingly, formation [(R)2SnH](+) ions is characterized by a migration of one the ? hydrogen of glycine onto the metallic center. Finally, several dissociation routes are observed and are characteristic of a given organic substituent. Calculations indicated that the interaction between organotins and glycine is mostly electrostatic. For [(R)2Sn(Gly)-H](+) complexes, a preferable bidentate interaction of the type ?(2)-O,NH2 is observed, similar to that encountered for other metal ions. [(R)3Sn](+) ions strongly stabilize the zwitterionic form of glycine, which is practically degenerate with respect to neutral glycine. In addition, the interconversion between both forms is almost barrierless. Suitable mechanisms are proposed in order to account for the most relevant fragmentation processes. PMID:23832935

  20. Models of Self-Peptide Sampling by Developing T Cells Identify Candidate Mechanisms of Thymic Selection

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Iren; van Santen, Hisse M.; Seddon, Benedict; Yates, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Conventional and regulatory T cells develop in the thymus where they are exposed to samples of self-peptide MHC (pMHC) ligands. This probabilistic process selects for cells within a range of responsiveness that allows the detection of foreign antigen without excessive responses to self. Regulatory T cells are thought to lie at the higher end of the spectrum of acceptable self-reactivity and play a crucial role in the control of autoimmunity and tolerance to innocuous antigens. While many studies have elucidated key elements influencing lineage commitment, we still lack a full understanding of how thymocytes integrate signals obtained by sampling self-peptides to make fate decisions. To address this problem, we apply stochastic models of signal integration by T cells to data from a study quantifying the development of the two lineages using controllable levels of agonist peptide in the thymus. We find two models are able to explain the observations; one in which T cells continually re-assess fate decisions on the basis of multiple summed proximal signals from TCR-pMHC interactions; and another in which TCR sensitivity is modulated over time, such that contact with the same pMHC ligand may lead to divergent outcomes at different stages of development. Neither model requires that T and T are differentially susceptible to deletion or that the two lineages need qualitatively different signals for development, as have been proposed. We find additional support for the variable-sensitivity model, which is able to explain apparently paradoxical observations regarding the effect of partial and strong agonists on T and T development. PMID:23935465

  1. Absolute Standard Hydrogen Electrode Potential Measured by Reduction of Aqueous Nanodrops in the Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    Donald, William A.; Leib, Ryan D.; O'Brien, Jeremy T.; Bush, Matthew F.; Williams, Evan R.

    2008-01-01

    In solution, half-cell potentials are measured relative to those of other half cells, thereby establishing a ladder of thermochemical values that are referenced to the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE), which is arbitrarily assigned a value of exactly 0 V. Although there has been considerable interest in, and efforts toward, establishing an absolute electrochemical half-cell potential in solution, there is no general consensus regarding the best approach to obtain this value. Here, ion-electron recombination energies resulting from electron capture by gas-phase nanodrops containing individual [M(NH3)6]3+, M = Ru, Co, Os, Cr, and Ir, and Cu2+ ions are obtained from the number of water molecules that are lost from the reduced precursors. These experimental data combined with nanodrop solvation energies estimated from Born theory and solution-phase entropies estimated from limited experimental data provide absolute reduction energies for these redox couples in bulk aqueous solution. A key advantage of this approach is that solvent effects well past two solvent shells, that are difficult to model accurately, are included in these experimental measurements. By evaluating these data relative to known solution-phase reduction potentials, an absolute value for the SHE of 4.2 0.4 V versus a free electron is obtained. Although not achieved here, the uncertainty of this method could potentially be reduced to below 0.1 V, making this an attractive method for establishing an absolute electrochemical scale that bridges solution and gas-phase redox chemistry. PMID:18288835

  2. Gas Phase Thz Spectroscopy of Organosulfide and Organophosphorous Compounds Using a Synchrotron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuisset, Arnaud; Smirnova, Irina; Bocquet, Robin; Hindle, Francis; Mouret, Gael; Sadovskii, Dmitrii A.; Pirali, Olivier; Roy, Pascale

    2011-06-01

    This study concerns the gas phase rovibrational spectroscopy of organosulfide and organophosphorous which are considered as non toxic model compounds in the analysis of chemical weapon materials, high pathogenic and mutagenic agents, and other environmentally interesting air-borne species. The coupling of the synchrotron radiation with multipass cells and the FTIR spectrometer allowed to obtain very conclusive results in term of sensitivity and resolution and improved the previous results obtained with classical sources. For DMSO, using an optical path of 150 m the spectra have been recorded at the ultimate resolution of 0.001 Cm-1 allowing to fully resolve the rotational structure of the lowest vibrational modes observed in the THz region. In the 290 - 420 Cm-1 region, the rovibrational spectrum of the "perpendicular" and "parallel" vibrational bands associated with, respectively, the asymmetric ?23 and symmetric ?11 bending modes of DMSO have been recorded with a resolution of 1.5 10-3 Cm-1. The gas phase vibrational spectra of organophosphorous compounds were measured by FTIR spectroscopy using the vapor pressure of the compounds. Except for TBP, the room temperature vapor pressure was sufficient to detect all active vibrational modes from THz to NIR domain. Contrary to DMSO, the rotational patterns of alkyl phosphates and alkyl phosphonates could not be resolved; only a vibrational analysis may be performed. Nevertheless, the spectral fingerprints observed in the THz region allowed a clear discrimination between the molecules and between the different molecular conformations. A. Cuisset, G. Mouret, O. Pirali, P. Roy, F. Cazier, H. Nouali, J. Demaison, J. Phys. Chem. B, 2008, 112:, 12516-12525 A. Cuisset, L. Nanobashvili, I. Smirnova, R. Bocquet, F. Hindle, G. Mouret, O. Pirali, P. Roy and D. A. Sadovski, Chem. Phys. Lett., 2010, 492: 30-34 I. Smirnova, A. Cuisset, R. Bocquet, F. Hindle, G. Mouret, O. Pirali, P. Roy, J. Phys. Chem. B, 2010, 114: 16936-16947.

  3. Towards the chemometric dissection of peptide--HLA-A*0201 binding affinity: comparison of local and global QSAR models.

    PubMed

    Doytchinova, Irini A; Walshe, Valerie; Borrow, Persephone; Flower, Darren R

    2005-03-01

    The affinities of 177 nonameric peptides binding to the HLA-A*0201 molecule were measured using a FACS-based MHC stabilisation assay and analysed using chemometrics. Their structures were described by global and local descriptors, QSAR models were derived by genetic algorithm, stepwise regression and PLS. The global molecular descriptors included molecular connectivity chi indices, kappa shape indices, E-state indices, molecular properties like molecular weight and log P, and three-dimensional descriptors like polarizability, surface area and volume. The local descriptors were of two types. The first used a binary string to indicate the presence of each amino acid type at each position of the peptide. The second was also position-dependent but used five z-scales to describe the main physicochemical properties of the amino acids forming the peptides. The models were developed using a representative training set of 131 peptides and validated using an independent test set of 46 peptides. It was found that the global descriptors could not explain the variance in the training set nor predict the affinities of the test set accurately. Both types of local descriptors gave QSAR models with better explained variance and predictive ability. The results suggest that, in their interactions with the MHC molecule, the peptide acts as a complicated ensemble of multiple amino acids mutually potentiating each other. PMID:16059672

  4. Thrombospondin peptide ABT-898 inhibits inflammation and angiogenesis in a colitis model

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Linda S; Ling, Jun; Nye, Derek; Papathomas, Konstantina; Dickinson, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of the improved thrombospondin mimetic peptide ABT-898 in a murine model of ulcerative colitis. METHODS: The dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) was used for the induction of colitis in both TSP-1 deficient (TSP-1-/-) and wild type (WT) mice during 7 d. While mice were receiving the DSS dissolved in the drinking water, the ABT-898 peptide was dissolved in sterile 5% glucose solution and delivered using mini pumps subcutaneously implanted. Plasma samples were analyzed for interleukin (IL)-6 by ELISA assay and colonic tissues were harvested, fixed and processed for histological evaluation. Immunohistochemistry using antibodies for the detection of CD31 and MECA in endothelial cells was performed. Inflammation was graded in colonic sections and the number of microvessels in each lesion was assessed. Activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in colonic samples was quantified by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting using antibodies against total STAT3 and phosphorylated STAT3 (pSTAT3) (Ser727). RESULTS: Treatment with ABT-898 considerably diminished the inflammatory response in WT and TSP-1-/- mice (P < 0.0001 in both groups vs control). Identification of blood vessels highlighted by CD31/MECA immunohistochemistry, showed significantly reduced vessel counts in colitic lesions of WT and TSP-1-/- mice treated with ABT898 (TSP-1-/- controls/TSP-1-/- treated, P = 0.0002; WT controls/WT treated, P = 0.0005). Consistently, IL-6 was significantly diminished in plasma samples of TSP-1-/- and WT treated with the peptide when compared to the control mice (P = 0.0002 and P = 0.0148, respectively). pSTAT3 positive cells were quantified in WT and TSP-1-/- treated with ABT-898. A significant decrease in positive cells for pSTAT3 was observed in treated mice (TSP-1-/- controls/TSP-1-/- treated, P = 0.0089; WT/WT treated, P = 0.0110). These results were confirmed by Western blotting analyses showing lower levels of pSTAT3 in colitic lesions from mice treated with the peptide ABT-898. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that the new peptide ABT-898 ameliorates inflammation and angiogenesis and might be a therapeutic alternative in IBD and inflammatory diseases. PMID:26034351

  5. Implications of Low Volatility SOA and Gas-Phase Fragmentation Reactions on SOA Loadings and their Spatial and Temporal Evolution in the Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, Dan; Easter, Richard C.; Beranek, Josef; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Fast, Jerome D.

    2013-04-27

    Recent laboratory and field measurements by a number of groups show that secondary organic aerosol (SOA) evaporates orders of magnitude slower than traditional models assume. In addition, chemical transport models using volatility basis set (VBS) SOA schemes neglect gas-phase fragmentation reactions, which are known to be extremely important. In this work, we present modeling studies to investigate the implications of non-evaporating SOA and gas-phase fragmentation reactions. Using the 3-D chemical transport model, WRF-Chem, we show that previous parameterizations, which neglect fragmentation during multi-generational gas-phase chemistry of semi-volatile/inter-mediate volatility organics ("aging SIVOC"), significantly over-predict SOA as compared to aircraft measurements downwind of Mexico City. In sharp contrast, the revised models, which include gas-phase fragmentation, show much better agreement with measurements downwind of Mexico City. We also demonstrate complex differences in spatial SOA distributions when we transform SOA to non-volatile secondary organic aerosol (NVSOA) to account for experimental observations. Using a simple box model, we show that for same amount of SOA precursors, earlier models that do not employ multi-generation gas-phase chemistry of precursors ("non-aging SIVOC"), produce orders of magnitude lower SOA than "aging SIVOC" parameterizations both with and without fragmentation. In addition, traditional absorptive partitioning models predict almost complete SOA evaporation at farther downwind locations for both "non-aging SIVOC" and "aging SIVOC" with fragmentation. In contrast, in our revised approach, SOA transformed to NVSOA implies significantly higher background concentrations as it remains in particle phase even under highly dilute conditions. This work has significant implications on understanding the role of multi-generational chemistry and NVSOA formation on SOA evolution in the atmosphere.

  6. Interaction(s) of rotavirus non-structural protein 4 (NSP4) C-terminal peptides with model membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huan; Schroeder, Friedhelm; Estes, Mary K; McPherson, Tanya; Ball, Judith M

    2004-01-01

    Rotavirus is the major cause of dehydrating gastroenteritis in children and young animals. NSP4 (non-structural protein 4), a rotaviral non-structural glycoprotein and a peptide NSP4(114-135) (DKLTTREIEQVELLKRIYDKLT), corresponding to NSP4 amino acids 114-135, induce diarrhoeal disease in a neonatal mouse model and interact with model membranes that mimic caveolae. Correlation of the mechanisms of diarrhoea induction and membrane interactions by NSP4 protein and peptide remain unclear. Several additional NSP4 peptides were synthesized and their interactions with membranes studied by (i) CD, (ii) a filtration-binding assay and (iii) a fluorescent molecule leakage assay. Model membranes that varied in lipid compositions and radius of curvature were utilized to determine the compositional and structural requirements for optimal interaction with the peptides of NSP4. Similar to the intact protein and NSP4(114-135), peptides overlapping residues 114-135 had significantly higher affinities to membranes rich in negatively charged lipids, rich in cholesterol and with a high radius of curvature. In the leakage assay, small and large unilamellar vesicles loaded with the fluorophore/quencher pair 8-aminonaphthalene-1,3,6-trisulphonic acid disodium salt/p -xylene-bis-pyridinium bromide were incubated with the NSP4 peptides and monitored for membrane disruption by lipid reorganization or by pore formation. At a peptide concentration of 15 microM, none of the NSP4 peptides caused leakage. These results confirm that NSP4 interacts with caveolae-like membranes and the alpha-helical region of NSP4(114-135) comprises a membrane interaction domain that does not induce membrane disruption at physiological concentrations. PMID:15012630

  7. Use of electrochemical oxidation and model peptides to study nucleophilic biological targets of reactive metabolites: the case of rimonabant.

    PubMed

    Thorsell, Annika; Isin, Emre M; Jurva, Ulrik

    2014-10-20

    Electrochemical oxidation of drug molecules is a useful tool to generate several different types of metabolites. In the present study we developed a model system involving electrochemical oxidation followed by characterization of the oxidation products and their propensity to modify peptides. The CB1 antagonist rimonabant was chosen as the model drug. Rimonabant has previously been shown to give high covalent binding to proteins in human liver microsomes and hepatocytes and the iminium ion and/or the corresponding aminoaldehyde formed via P450 mediated ?-carbon oxidation of rimonabant was proposed to be a likely contributor. This proposal was based on the observation that levels of covalent binding were significantly reduced when iminium species were trapped as cyanide adducts but also following addition of methoxylamine expected to trap aldehydes. Incubation of electrochemically oxidized rimonabant with peptides resulted in peptide adducts to the N-terminal amine with a mass increment of 64 Da. The adducts were shown to contain an addition of C5H4 originating from the aminopiperidine moiety of rimonabant. Formation of the peptide adducts required further oxidation of the iminium ion to short-lived intermediates, such as dihydropyridinium species. In addition, the metabolites and peptide adducts generated in human liver microsomes were compared with those generated by electrochemistry. Interestingly, the same peptide modification was found when rimonabant was coincubated with one of the model peptides in microsomes. This clearly indicated that reactive metabolite(s) of rimonabant identical to electrochemically generated species are also present in the microsomal incubations. In summary, electrochemical oxidation combined with peptide trapping of reactive metabolites identified a previously unobserved bioactivation pathway of rimonabant that was not captured by traditional trapping agents and that may contribute to the in vitro covalent binding. PMID:25210840

  8. Antimicrobial Peptide, Lumbricusin, Ameliorates Motor Dysfunction and Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration in a Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Hong; Lee, Ik Hwan; Nam, Seung Taek; Hong, Ji; Zhang, Peng; Lu, Li Fang; Hwang, Jae Sam; Park, Ki Cheol; Kim, Ho

    2015-10-28

    We recently reported that the antimicrobial peptide Lumbricusin (NH2-RNRRWCIDQQA), isolated from the earthworm, increases cell proliferation in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Here, we investigated whether Lumbricusin has neurotropic activity in mouse neural stem cells (MNSCs) and a protective effect in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease (PD). In MNSCs isolated from mouse brains, Lumbricusin treatment significantly increased cell proliferation (up to 12%) and reduced the protein expression of p27(Kip1) through proteasomal protein degradation but not transcriptional regulation. Lumbricusin inhibited the 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis of MNSCs, and also showed neuroprotective effects in a mouse PD model, ameliorating the motor impairments seen in the pole, elevated body swing, and rotation tests. These results suggest that the Lumbricusin-induced promotion of neural cell proliferation via p27(Kip1) degradation has a protective effect in an experimental PD model. Thus, the antimicrobial peptide Lumbricusin could possibly be developed as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of PD. PMID:26215270

  9. Quantum chemical analysis of the energy of proton transfer from phenol and chlorophenols to H2O in the gas phase and in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrmann, Gerrit

    1998-12-01

    Proton transfer energies of phenol and 14 chlorophenols with H2O as a base are analyzed in the gas phase and in solution using quantum chemical methods at the semiempirical and ab initio level of computation. The effect of aqueous solution was accounted for by applying the density functional theory (DFT) implementation of the conductor-like screening model (COSMO) as well as semiempirical continuum-solvation models. The results reveal substantial and systematic overestimations of the free energies of proton transfer as derived from experimental solution-phase pKa data. This can be traced back to both deficiencies in the current model parameterization as well as to limitations of the underlying gas-phase quantum chemical models, which is further illustrated by additional complete-basis-set (CBS) calculations for the proton transfer reaction with phenol. In contrast, the relative pKa trend is reflected well by COSMO-DFT calculations with correlation coefficients (adjusted for degrees of freedom) of 0.96. Decomposition of the dissociation energy in aqueous solution into a gas-phase term and a term summarizing the solvation contributions provides new insights into the effect of solvation on proton transfer energies, and yields mechanistic explanations for the observed differences in the gas-phase and solution-phase acidity orders of various subgroups of the compounds.

  10. Uptake of organic gas phase species by 1-methylnaphthalene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H Z; Davidovits, P; Williams, L R; Kolb, C E; Worsnop, D R

    2005-05-01

    Organic compounds are a significant component of tropospheric aerosols. In the present study, 1-methylnaphthalene was selected as a surrogate for aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) found in tropospheric aerosols. Mass accommodation coefficients (alpha) on 1-methylnaphthalene were determined as a function of temperature (267 K to 298 K) for gas-phase m-xylene, ethylbenzene, butylbenzene, alpha-pinene, gamma-terpinene, p-cymene, and 2-methyl-2-hexanol. The gas uptake studies were performed with droplets maintained under liquid-vapor equilibrium conditions using a droplet train flow reactor. The mass accommodation coefficients for all of the molecules studied in these experiments exhibit negative temperature dependence. The upper and lower values of alpha at 267 and 298 K respectively are as follows: for m-xylene 0.44 +/- 0.05 and 0.26 +/- 0.03; for ethylbenzene 0.37 +/- 0.03 and 0.22 +/- 0.04; for butylbenzene 0.47 +/- 0.06 and 0.31 +/- 0.04; for alpha-pinene 0.47 +/- 0.07 and 0.10 +/- 0.05; for gamma-terpinene 0.37 +/- 0.04 and 0.12 +/- 0.06; for p-cymene 0.74 +/- 0.05 and 0.36 +/- 0.07; for 2-methyl-2-hexanol 0.44 +/- 0.06 and 0.29 +/- 0.06. The uptake measurements also yielded values for the product HD(l)(1/2) for most of the molecules studied (H = Henry's law constant, D(l) = liquid-phase diffusion coefficient). Using calculated values of D(l), the Henry's law constants (H) for these molecules were obtained as a function of temperature. The H values at 298 K in units 10(3) M atm(-1) are as follows: for m-xylene (0.48 +/- 0.05); for ethylbenzene (0.50 +/- 0.08); for butylbenzene (3.99 +/- 0.93); for alpha-pinene (0.53 +/- 0.07); for p-cymene (0.23 +/- 0.07); for 2-methyl-2-hexanol (1.85 +/- 0.29). PMID:16833713

  11. Gas phase chemistry of bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)samarium

    SciTech Connect

    Marcalo, J.; Matos, A.P. de; Evans, W.

    1996-01-09

    The gas phase chemistry of bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)samarium, (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}Sm, was studied by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR/MS). Positive electron impact (EI) spectra showed the formation of (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2} Sm{sup +}, (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5})Sm{sup +}, and Sm{sup +}. All three ions reacted with (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}Sm by charge transfer, as verified by double-resonance techniques, and (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5})Sm{sup +} also formed the (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 3}Sm{sub 2}{sup +} ion in a condensation reaction with neutral (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}Sm. The laser desorption/ionization (LDI) spectra showed, in addition to (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}Sm{sup +}, (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5})Sm{sup +}, and Sm{sup +}, the formation of (C{sub 5}Me{sub 4}H)Sm{sup +} and (C{sub 5}Me{sub 4}CH{sub 2})Sm{sup +}. The latter species most probably involves a tetramethylfulvenide ligand. Access to all of the ionic species cited here could also be obtained by reacting laser-desorbed Sm{sup +} ions with pentamethylcyclopentadiene, C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}H. (C{sub 5}Me{sub 4}CH{sub 2})Sm{sup +}, (C{sub 5}Me{sub 4}H)Sm{sup +}, and (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5})Sm{sup +} were formed as primary products, and the metallocene ion (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}Sm{sup +} resulted from the rapid addition of C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}H to (C{sub 5}Me{sub 4}CH{sub 2})Sm{sup +}. 34 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Gas-phase lithium cation affinity of glycine.

    PubMed

    Bourcier, Sophie; Chiaa, Ru Xuan; Mimbong, Rosa Ngo Biboum; Bouchoux, Guy

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase lithium cation binding thermochemistry of glycine has been determined theoretically by quantum chemical calculations at the G4 level and experimentally by the extended kinetic method using electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. The lithium cation affinity of glycine, ?(Li)H(298)(GLY), i.e. the?(Li)H(298) of the reaction GlyLi(+)? Gly + Li(+)) given by the G4 method is equal to 241.4 kJ.mol(-1) if only the most stable conformer of glycine is considered or to 242.3 kJ.mol(-1) if the 298K equilibrium mixture of neutral conformers is included in the calculation. The ?(Li)H(298)(GLY) deduced from the extended kinetic method is obviously dependent on the choice of the Li(+) affinity scale, thus?(Li)H(298)(GLY) is equal to 228.70.9(2.0) kJ.mol(- 1) if anchored to the recently re-evaluated lithium cation affinity scale but shifted to 235.41.0 kJ.mol(-1) if G4 computed lithium cation affinities of the reference molecules is used. This difference of 6.3 kJ.mol(-1) may originate from a compression of the experimental lithium affinity scale in the high ?(Li)H(298) region. The entropy change associated with the reaction GlyLi(+)?Gly + Li(+) reveals a gain of approximately 15 J.mol(-) 1.K(-1) with respect to monodentate Li(+) acceptors. The origin of this excess entropy is attributed to the bidentate interaction between the Li(+) cation and both the carbonyl oxygen and the nitrogen atoms of glycine. The computed G4 Gibbs free energy,?(Li)G(298)(GLY) is equal to 205.3 kJ.mol(-1), a similar result, 201.03.4 kJ.mol(-1), is obtained from the experiment if the?(Li)G(298) of the reference molecules is anchored on the G4 results. PMID:26307695

  13. Gas-phase spectroscopy of a vinylheptafulvene chromophore.

    PubMed

    Elm, Jonas; Stockett, Mark; Houmøller, Jørgen; Åxman Petersen, Michael; Mikkelsen, Kurt V; Brøndsted Nielsen, Mogens; Brøndsted Nielsen, Steen

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic spectral properties of the dihydroazulene (DHA)/vinylheptafulvene (VHF) photo/thermoswitch, free of solvent interactions, were investigated both experimentally and theoretically. A quaternary ammonium group was incorporated via an ethylene bridge to allow for the transfer of charged molecules to the gas phase by electrospray ionization, leaving the chromophore part itself neutral. Absorption by the two isomers was identified from ion dissociation (i.e., action spectroscopy) using a home-built sector instrument. Several fragment ions were observed, and dissociation occurred both at the charge tag side chain and at the chromophore unit itself. We measured an absorption band of VHF with a maximum at 430 ± 20 nm (2.9 eV ± 0.1 eV) but no band was discernible for the DHA in the visible region. This shows that little interconversion between the two isomers occurs during the electrospray and the subsequent trapping in an octopole for 25 ms; the latter is needed to produce ion bunches for spectroscopy where a pulsed laser system is used. For comparison, density functional theoretical calculations predicted lowest-energy vertical excitations of 3.33 eV to 3.48 eV for the DHA and 3.02 eV to 3.08 eV for the VHF (the ranges are based on the use of different functionals), which correspond to a maximal deviation between theory and experiment of 0.1 eV in the case of the VHF. The absorption by the bare ions is significantly blue-shifted compared to that by VHF in acetonitrile solution (2.64 eV), but similar within the experimental uncertainty to that by VHF in cyclohexane (2.78 eV); the transition, therefore has a significant charge-transfer character. Finally, we find that the absorption of two photons is needed to cause fragmentation of the VHF on the microsecond time scale, which indicates that prompt fragmentation from the electronically excited state or prior to the intramolecular vibrational redistribution of the excess energy plays no role. This is of particular importance for the use of the photosystem in advanced materials or molecular electronics where high photostability is required to allow for numerous isomerization cycles. PMID:26307736

  14. Detection methods for atoms and radicals in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hack, W.

    This report lists atoms and free radicals in the gas phase which are of interest for environmental and flame chemistry and have been detected directly. The detection methods which have been used are discussed with respect to their range of application, specificity and sensitivity. In table 1, detection methods for the five atoms of group IV (C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) and about 60 radicals containing at least one atom of group IV are summarized (CH, Cd, Cf, CC1, CBr, Cn, Cs, CSe, CH2, CD2, Chf, Cdf, CHC1, CHBr, CF2, CC12, CBr2, CFC1, CFBr, CH3, CD3, CF3, CH2F, CH2C1, CH2Br, CHF2, CHC12, CHBr2, Hco, Fco, CH30, CD30, CH2OH, CH3S, Nco, CH4N, CH302, CF302; C2, C2N, C2H, C20, C2HO, C2H3, C2F3, C2H5, C2HsO, C2H4OH, CH3CO, CD3CO, C2H3O, C2H502, CH3COO2, C2H4N, C2H6N, C3; Si, SiF, SiF2, SiO, SiC, Si2; Ge, GeC, GeO, GeF, GeF2, GeCl2, Sn, SnF, SnO, SnF2, Pb, PbF, PbF2, PbO, PbS). In table 2 detection methods for about 25 other atoms and 60 radicals are listed: (H, D, O, O2, Oh, Od, HO2, DO2, F, Ci, Br, I, Fo, Cio, BrO, Io, FO2, C1O2, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, N, N3, Nh, Nd, Nf, Nci, NBr, NH2, ND2, Nhd, Nhf, NF2, NC12, N2H3, No, NO2, NO3, Hno, Dno, P, Ph, Pd, Pf, Pci, PH2, PD2, PF2, Po, As, AsO, AsS, Sb, Bi, S, S2, Sh, Sd, Sf, SF2, So, Hso, Dso, Sn, Se, Te, Se2, SeH, SeD, SeF, SeO, SeS, SeN, TeH, TeO, Bh, BH2, Bo, Bn, B02, Cd, Hg, UF5). The tables also cite some recent kinetic applications of the various methods.

  15. Full membrane spanning self-assembled monolayers as model systems for UHV-based studies of cell-penetrating peptides

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Johannes; Graham, Daniel J.; Schmser, Lars; Baio, Joe E.; Lelle, Marco; Peneva, Kalina; Mllen, Klaus; Castner, David G.; Bonn, Mischa; Weidner, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Biophysical studies of the interaction of peptides with model membranes provide a simple yet effective approach to understand the transport of peptides and peptide based drug carriers across the cell membrane. Herein, the authors discuss the use of self-assembled monolayers fabricated from the full membrane-spanning thiol (FMST) 3-((14-((4?-((5-methyl-1-phenyl-35-(phytanyl)oxy-6,9,12,15,18,21,24,27,30,33,37-undecaoxa-2,3-dithiahenpentacontan-51-yl)oxy)-[1,1?-biphenyl]-4-yl)oxy)tetradecyl)oxy)-2-(phytanyl)oxy glycerol for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) based experiments. UHV-based methods such as electron spectroscopy and mass spectrometry can provide important information about how peptides bind and interact with membranes, especially with the hydrophobic core of a lipid bilayer. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data showed that FMST forms UHV-stable and ordered films on gold. XPS and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiles indicated that a proline-rich amphipathic cell-penetrating peptide, known as sweet arrow peptide is located at the outer perimeter of the model membrane. PMID:25708639

  16. Molecular modeling approach to explore the role of cathepsin B from Hordeum vulgare in the degradation of Aβ peptides.

    PubMed

    Dhanavade, Maruti J; Parulekar, Rishikesh S; Kamble, Subodh A; Sonawane, Kailas D

    2015-12-15

    The pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease is the accumulation of Aβ peptides in human brains. These Aβ peptides can be degraded by several enzymes such as hACE, hECE, hIDE and cathepsin B. Out of which cathepsin B also belongs to the papain super family and has been found in human brains, it has a role in Aβ peptide degradation through limited proteolysis. The Aβ concentrations are maintained properly by its production and clearance via receptor-mediated cellular uptake and direct enzymatic degradation. However, the reduced production of Aβ degrading enzymes as well as their Aβ degrading activity in human brains initiate the process of accumulation of Aβ peptides. So it becomes essential to investigate the molecular interactions involved in the process of Aβ degradation in detail at the atomic level. Hence, homology modeling, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation techniques have been used to explore the possible role of cathepsin B from Hordeum vulgare in the degradation of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides. The homology model of cathepsin B from Hordeum vulgare shows good similarity with human cathepsin B. Molecular docking and MD simulation results revealed that the active site residues Cys32, HIS112, HIS113 are involved in the catalytic activity of cathepsin B. The sulfhydryl group of the Cys32 residue of cathepsin B from Hordeum vulgare cleaves the Aβ peptide from the carboxylic end of Glu11. Hence, this structural study might be helpful in designing alternative strategies for the treatment of AD. PMID:26568474

  17. Hemagglutinin fusion peptide mutants in model membranes: structural properties, membrane physical properties, and PEG-mediated fusion.

    PubMed

    Haque, Md Emdadul; Chakraborty, Hirak; Koklic, Tilen; Komatsu, Hiroaki; Axelsen, Paul H; Lentz, Barry R

    2011-09-01

    While the importance of viral fusion peptides (e.g., hemagglutinin (HA) and gp41) in virus-cell membrane fusion is established, it is unclear how these peptides enhance membrane fusion, especially at low peptide/lipid ratios for which the peptides are not lytic. We assayed wild-type HA fusion peptide and two mutants, G1E and G13L, for their effects on the bilayer structure of 1,2-dioleoyl-3-sn-phosphatidylcholine/1,2-dioleoyl-3-sn-phosphatidylethanolamine/Sphingomyelin/Cholesterol (35:30:15:20) membranes, their structures in the lipid bilayer, and their effects on membrane fusion. All peptides bound to highly curved vesicles, but fusion was triggered only in the presence of poly(ethylene glycol). At low (1:200) peptide/lipid ratios, wild-type peptide enhanced remarkably the extent of content mixing and leakage along with the rate constants for these processes, and significantly enhanced the bilayer interior packing and filled the membrane free volume. The mutants caused no change in contents mixing or interior packing. Circular dichroism, polarized-attenuated total-internal-reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy measurements, and membrane perturbation measurements all conform to the inverted-V model for the structure of wild-type HA peptide. Similar measurements suggest that the G13L mutant adopts a less helical conformation in which the N-terminus moves closer to the bilayer interface, thus disrupting the V-structure. The G1E peptide barely perturbs the bilayer and may locate slightly above the interface. Fusion measurements suggest that the wild-type peptide promotes conversion of the stalk to an expanded trans-membrane contact intermediate through its ability to occupy hydrophobic space in a trans-membrane contact structure. While wild-type peptide increases the rate of initial intermediate and final pore formation, our results do not speak to the mechanisms for these effects, but they do leave open the possibility that it stabilizes the transition states for these events. PMID:21889446

  18. ESEEM Analysis of Multi-Histidine Cu(II)-Coordination in Model Complexes, Peptides, and Amyloid-?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We validate the use of ESEEM to predict the number of 14N nuclei coupled to a Cu(II) ion by the use of model complexes and two small peptides with well-known Cu(II) coordination. We apply this method to gain new insight into less explored aspects of Cu(II) coordination in amyloid-? (A?). A? has two coordination modes of Cu(II) at physiological pH. A controversy has existed regarding the number of histidine residues coordinated to the Cu(II) ion in component II, which is dominant at high pH (?8.7) values. Importantly, with an excess amount of Zn(II) ions, as is the case in brain tissues affected by Alzheimers disease, component II becomes the dominant coordination mode, as Zn(II) selectively substitutes component I bound to Cu(II). We confirm that component II only contains single histidine coordination, using ESEEM and set of model complexes. The ESEEM experiments carried out on systematically 15N-labeled peptides reveal that, in component II, His 13 and His 14 are more favored as equatorial ligands compared to His 6. Revealing molecular level details of subcomponents in metal ion coordination is critical in understanding the role of metal ions in Alzheimers disease etiology. PMID:25014537

  19. Energetics and Dynamics of Dissociation of Deprotonated Peptides: Fragmentation of Angiotensin Analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Yang, Zhibo

    2011-12-01

    We present a first study of the energetics and dynamics of dissociation of deprotonated peptides using time- and collision-energy resolved surface-induced dissociation (SID) experiments. SID of four model peptides: RVYIHPF, HVYIHPF, DRVYIHPF, and DHVYIHPF was studied using a specially designed Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) configured for studying ion-surface collisions. Energy and entropy effects for the overall decomposition of the precursor ion were deduced by modeling the time- and collision energy-resolved survival curves using an RRKM based approach developed in our laboratory. The results were compared to the energetics and dynamics of dissociation of the corresponding protonated species. We demonstrate that acidic peptides are less stable in the negative mode because of the low threshold associated with the kinetically hindered loss of H2O from [M-H]- ions. Comparison between the two basic peptides indicates that the lower stability of the [M-H]- ion of RVYIHPF as compared to HVYIHPF towards fragmentation is attributed to the differences in fragmentation mechanisms. Specifically, threshold energy associated with losses of NH3 and NHCNH from RVYIHPF is lower than the barrier for backbone fragmentation that dominates gas-phase decomposition of HVYIHPF. The results provide a first quantitative comparison between the energetics and dynamics of dissociation of [M+H]+ and [M-H]- ions of acidic and basic peptides.

  20. Modeling the electrophoresis of peptides and proteins: improvements in the "bead method" to include ion relaxation and "finite size effects".

    PubMed

    Xin, Yao; Hess, Richard; Ho, Nhi; Allison, Stuart

    2006-12-14

    A bead model methodology developed in our lab (Xin et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2006, 110, 1038) and applicable to modeling the free solution electrophoretic mobility of peptides and proteins is generalized in two significant ways. First, an approximate account is taken of the relaxation effect, which makes the methodology applicable to more highly charged peptides and proteins than was previously possible. Second, a more accurate account is taken of the finite size of the beads making up the model structure. This improvement makes the method applicable at higher salt concentrations and/or to models consisting of larger sized subunits. The relaxation effect is accounted for by correcting "unrelaxed" mobilities on the basis of model size and average electrostatic surface, or zeta potential. Correction factors are estimated using those of spheres with the same hydrodynamic radius and zeta potential as the model structure. The correction factors of spheres are readily determined. The more general methodology is first applied to two sets of peptides (74 different peptides total) varying in size from 2 to 42 amino acids. The sets also cover a wide range of net charges. It is shown that accounting for finite bead size results in a small change in model mobilities under the conditions of the experiments (35 mM monovalent salt). The correction for ion relaxation, however, can be significant for highly charged peptides and improves agreement between model and experimental mobilities. Our correction procedure is also tested by examining the electrophoretic mobility of a particular protein "charge ladder" (Carbeck et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1999, 121, 10,671), where the protein charge is varied over a wide range yet the conformation remains essentially constant. In summary, the effects of ion relaxation can be significant if the absolute electrophoretic mobility of a peptide exceeds approximately 0.20 cm2/(kV s). PMID:17149927

  1. Effects of Gas-Phase Radiation and Detailed Kinetics on the Burning and Extinction of a Solid Fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhatigan, Jennifer L.

    2001-01-01

    This is the first attempt to analyze both radiation and detailed kinetics on the burning and extinction of a solid fuel in a stagnation-point diffusion flame. We present a detailed and comparatively accurate computational model of a solid fuel flame along with a quantitative study of the kinetics mechanism, radiation interactions, and the extinction limits of the flame. A detailed kinetics model for the burning of solid trioxane (a trimer of formaldehyde) is coupled with a narrowband radiation model, with carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and water vapor as the gas-phase participating media. The solution of the solid trioxane diffusion flame over the flammable regime is presented in some detail, as this is the first solution of a heterogeneous trioxane flame. We identify high-temperature and low-temperature reaction paths for the heterogeneous trioxane flame. We then compare the adiabatic solution to solutions that include Surface radiation only and gas-phase and surface radiation using a black surface model. The analysis includes discussion of detailed flame chemistry over the flammable regime and, in particular, at the low stretch extinction limit. We emphasize the low stretch regime of the radiatively participating flame, since this is the region representative of microgravity flames. When only surface radiation is included, two extinction limits exist (the blow-off limit, and the low stretch radiative limit), and the burning rate and maximum flame temperatures are lower, as expected. With the inclusion of surface and gas-phase radiation, results show that, while flame temperatures are lower, the burning rate of the trioxane diffusion flame may actually increase at low stretch rate due to radiative feedback from the flame to the surface.

  2. Solvent effects on the conformational transition of a model polyalanine peptide

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Marchut, Alexander J.; Hall, Carol K.

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the folding of polyalanine by combining discontinuous molecular dynamics simulation with our newly developed off-lattice intermediate-resolution protein model. The thermodynamics of a system containing a single Ac-KA14K-NH2 molecule has been explored by using the replica exchange simulation method to map out the conformational transitions as a function of temperature. We have also explored the influence of solvent type on the folding process by varying the relative strength of the side-chains hydrophobic interactions and backbone hydrogen bonding interactions. The peptide in our simulations tends to mimic real polyalanine in that it can exist in three distinct structural states: ?-helix, ?-structures (including ?-hairpin and ?-sheetlike structures), and random coil, depending upon the solvent conditions. At low values of the hydrophobic interaction strength between nonpolar side-chains, the polyalanine peptide undergoes a relatively sharp transition between an ?-helical conformation at low temperatures and a random-coil conformation at high temperatures. As the hydrophobic interaction strength increases, this transition shifts to higher temperatures. Increasing the hydrophobic interaction strength even further induces a second transition to a ?-hairpin, resulting in an ?-helical conformation at low temperatures, a ?-hairpin at intermediate temperatures, and a random coil at high temperatures. At very high values of the hydrophobic interaction strength, polyalanines become ?-hairpins and ?-sheetlike structures at low temperatures and random coils at high temperatures. This study of the folding of a single polyalanine-based peptide sets the stage for a study of polyalanine aggregation in a forthcoming paper. PMID:15498937

  3. On Prognosis of Epitaxy from Gas Phase Process to Improve Properties of Epitaxial Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratov, E. L.; Bulaeva, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we analyzed mass and heat transport in a reactor from gas phase during growth an epitaxial layer. Based on results of the analysis we analyzed dependences of properties of grown layers on parameters of technological process.

  4. GAS PHASE EXPOSURE HISTORY DERIVED FROM MATERIAL PHASE CONCENTRATION PROFILES USING SOLID PHASE MICRO-EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA Identifier: F8P31059
    Title: Gas Phase Exposure History Derived from Material Phase Concentration Profiles Using Solid Phase Micro-Extraction
    Fellow (Principal Investigator): Jonathan Lewis McKinney
    Institution: University of Missouri - ...

  5. Gas-phase water-mediated equilibrium between methylglyoxal and its geminal diol

    PubMed Central

    Axson, Jessica L.; Takahashi, Kaito; De Haan, David O.; Vaida, Veronica

    2010-01-01

    In aqueous solution, aldehydes, and to a lesser extent ketones, hydrate to form geminal diols. We investigate the hydration of methylglyoxal (MG) in the gas phase, a process not previously considered to occur in water-restricted environments. In this study, we spectroscopically identified methylglyoxal diol (MGD) and obtained the gas-phase partial pressures of MG and MGD. These results, in conjunction with the relative humidity, were used to obtain the equilibrium constant, KP, for the water-mediated hydration of MG in the gas phase. The Gibbs free energy for this process, ?G, obtained as a result, suggests a larger than expected gas-phase diol concentration. This may have significant implications for understanding the role of organics in atmospheric chemistry. PMID:20142510

  6. Non-stationary filtration mode during chemical reactions with the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavialov, Ivan; Konyukhov, Andrey; Negodyaev, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    An experimental and numerical study of filtration accompanied by chemical reactions between displacing fluid and solid skeleton is considered. Glass balls (400-500 μm in diameter) were placed in 1 cm gap between two glass sheets and were used as model porous medium. The baking soda was added to the glass balls. The 70% solution of acetic acid was used as the displacer. The modeling porous medium was saturated with a mineral oil, and then 70% solution of colored acetic acid was pumped through the medium. The glass balls and a mineral oil have a similar refractive index, so the model porous medium was optically transparent. During the filtration, the gas phase was generated by the chemical reactions between the baking soda and acetic acid, and time-dependent displacement of the chemical reaction front was observed. The front of the chemical reaction was associated with the most intensive gas separation. The front moved, stopped, and then moved again to the area where it had been already. We called this process a secondary oxidation wave. To describe this effect, we added to the balance equations a term associated with the formation and disappearance of phases due to chemical reactions. The equations were supplemented by Darcy's law for multiphase filtration. Nonstationarity front propagation of the chemical reaction in the numerical experiment was observed at Damköhler numbers greater than 100. The mathematical modelling was agreed well with the experimental results.

  7. Ultrafast electronic relaxation of excited state vitamin B 12 in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafizadeh, Niloufar; Poisson, Lionel; Soep, Beno?t

    2008-06-01

    The time evolution of electronically excited vitamin B 12 (cyanocobalamin) has been observed for the first time in the gas phase. It reveals an ultrafast decay to a state corresponding to metal excitation. This decay is interpreted as resulting from a ring to metal electron transfer. This opens the observation of the excited state of other complex biomimetic systems in the gas phase, the key to the characterisation of their complex evolution through excited electronic states.

  8. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall,G.E.; Sears, T.J.

    2009-04-03

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. High-resolution spectroscopy, augmented by theoretical and computational methods, is used to investigate the structure and collision dynamics of chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry. Applications and methods development are equally important experimental components of this work.

  9. An atmospheric pressure flow reactor: Gas phase kinetics and mechanism in tropospheric conditions without wall effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L.; Davis, Dennis D.; Hansen, Merrill

    1988-01-01

    A new type of gas phase flow reactor, designed to permit the study of gas phase reactions near 1 atm of pressure, is described. A general solution to the flow/diffusion/reaction equations describing reactor performance under pseudo-first-order kinetic conditions is presented along with a discussion of critical reactor parameters and reactor limitations. The results of numerical simulations of the reactions of ozone with monomethylhydrazine and hydrazine are discussed, and performance data from a prototype flow reactor are presented.

  10. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G.E.

    2011-05-31

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  11. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall G. E.; Goncharov, V.

    2012-05-29

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  12. Organophosphate vapor detection on gold electrodes using peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Baker, Peter A; Goltz, Mark N; Schrand, Amanda M; Yoon, Do Young; Kim, Dong-Shik

    2014-11-15

    Peptide nanotubes (PNTs) encapsulating horseradish peroxidase and surface coated with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) were attached to gold screen printed electrodes to construct a novel gas phase organophosphate (OP) biosensor. When the sensor with the AChE enzyme is put in contact with acetylthiocholine (ATCh), the ATCh is hydrolyzed to produce thiocholine, which is then oxidized by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Direct electron transfer between HRP and electrode is achieved through PNTs. The signal produced by the electron transfer is measured with cyclic voltammetry (CV). The presence of an OP compound inhibits this signal by binding with the AChE enzyme. In this study, gas phase malathion was used as a model OP due to the fact that it displays the identical binding mechanism with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) as its more potent counterparts such as sarin and VX, but has low toxicity, making it more practical and safer to handle. The CV signal was proportionally inhibited by malathion vapor concentrations as low as 12 ppbv. Depending on the method used in their preparation, the electrodes maintained their activity for up to 45 days. This research demonstrates the potential of applying nano-modified biosensors for the detection of low levels of OP vapor, an important development in countering weaponized organophosphate nerve agents and detecting commercially-used OP pesticides. PMID:24861572

  13. Statistical estimation of statistical mechanical models: helix-coil theory and peptide helicity prediction.

    PubMed

    Schmidler, Scott C; Lucas, Joseph E; Oas, Terrence G

    2007-12-01

    Analysis of biopolymer sequences and structures generally adopts one of two approaches: use of detailed biophysical theoretical models of the system with experimentally-determined parameters, or largely empirical statistical models obtained by extracting parameters from large datasets. In this work, we demonstrate a merger of these two approaches using Bayesian statistics. We adopt a common biophysical model for local protein folding and peptide configuration, the helix-coil model. The parameters of this model are estimated by statistical fitting to a large dataset, using prior distributions based on experimental data. L(1)-norm shrinkage priors are applied to induce sparsity among the estimated parameters, resulting in a significantly simplified model. Formal statistical procedures for evaluating support in the data for previously proposed model extensions are presented. We demonstrate the advantages of this approach including improved prediction accuracy and quantification of prediction uncertainty, and discuss opportunities for statistical design of experiments. Our approach yields a 39% improvement in mean-squared predictive error over the current best algorithm for this problem. In the process we also provide an efficient recursive algorithm for exact calculation of ensemble helicity including sidechain interactions, and derive an explicit relation between homo- and heteropolymer helix-coil theories and Markov chains and (non-standard) hidden Markov models respectively, which has not appeared in the literature previously. PMID:18047425

  14. An isolated cryptic peptide influences osteogenesis and bone remodeling in an adult mammalian model of digit amputation.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Vineet; Kelly, Jeremy; Tottey, Stephen; Daly, Kerry A; Johnson, Scott A; Siu, Bernard F; Reing, Janet; Badylak, Stephen F

    2011-12-01

    Biologic scaffolds composed of extracellular matrix (ECM) have been used successfully in preclinical models and humans for constructive remodeling of functional, site-appropriate tissue after injury. The mechanisms underlying ECM-mediated constructive remodeling are not completely understood, but scaffold degradation and site-directed recruitment of progenitor cells are thought to play critical roles. Previous studies have identified a cryptic peptide derived from the C-terminal telopeptide of collagen III? that has chemotactic activity for progenitor cells. The present study characterized the osteogenic activity of the same peptide in vitro and in vivo in an adult murine model of digit amputation. The present study showed that the cryptic peptide increased calcium deposition, alkaline phosphatase activity, and osteogenic gene expression in human perivascular stem cells in vitro. Treatment with the cryptic peptide in a murine model of mid-second phalanx digit amputation led to the formation of a bone nodule at the site of amputation. In addition to potential therapeutic implications for the treatment of bone injuries and facilitation of reconstructive surgical procedures, cryptic peptides with the ability to alter stem cell recruitment and differentiation at a site of injury may serve as powerful new tools for influencing stem cell fate in the local injury microenvironment. PMID:21740273

  15. Apoptosis imaging studies in various animal models using radio-iodinated peptide.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Wonjung; Ha, Yeong Su; Soni, Nisarg; Lee, Woonghee; Park, Se-Il; Ahn, Heesu; An, Gwang Il; Kim, In-San; Lee, Byung-Heon; Yoo, Jeongsoo

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis has a role in many medical disorders and treatments; hence, its non-invasive evaluation is one of the most riveting research topics. Currently annexin V is used as gold standard for imaging apoptosis. However, several drawbacks, including high background, slow body clearance, make it a suboptimum marker for apoptosis imaging. In this study, we radiolabeled the recently identified histone H1 targeting peptide (ApoPep-1) and evaluated its potential as a new apoptosis imaging agent in various animal models. ApoPep-1 (CQRPPR) was synthesized, and an extra tyrosine residue was added to its N-terminal end for radiolabeling. This peptide was radiolabeled with (124)I and (131)I and was tested for its serum stability. Surgery- and drug-induced apoptotic rat models were prepared for apoptosis evaluation, and PET imaging was performed. Doxorubicin was used for xenograft tumor treatment in mice, and the induced apoptosis was studied. Tumor metabolism and proliferation were assessed by [(18)F]FDG and [(18)F]FLT PET imaging and compared with ApoPep-1 after doxorubicin treatment. The peptide was radiolabeled at high purity, and it showed reasonably good stability in serum. Cell death was easily imaged by radiolabeled ApoPep-1 in an ischemia surgery model. And, liver apoptosis was more clearly identified by ApoPep-1 rather than [(124)I]annexin V in cycloheximide-treated models. Three doxorubicin doses inhibited tumor growth, which was evaluated by 30-40% decreases of [(18)F]FDG and [(18)F]FLT PET uptake in the tumor area. However, ApoPep-1 demonstrated more than 200% increase in tumor uptake after chemotherapy, while annexin V did not show any meaningful uptake in the tumor compared with the background. Biodistribution data were also in good agreement with the microPET imaging results. All of the experimental data clearly demonstrated high potential of the radiolabeled ApoPep-1 for in vivo apoptosis imaging. PMID:25430587

  16. Antimicrobial peptide Cathelicidin-BF prevents intestinal barrier dysfunction in a mouse model of endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Song, Deguang; Zong, Xin; Zhang, Haiwen; Wang, Tenghao; Yi, Hongbo; Luan, Chao; Wang, Yizhen

    2015-03-01

    Intestinal barrier functions are altered during the development of sepsis. Cathelicidin antimicrobial peptides, such as LL-37 and mCRAMP, can protect animals against intestinal barrier dysfunction. Cathelicidin-BF (C-BF), a new cathelicidin peptide purified from the venom of the snake Bungarus fasciatus, has been shown to have both antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. This study investigated whether C-BF pretreatment could protect the intestinal barrier against dysfunction in a mouse model of endotoxemia, induced by intraperitoneal injection of LPS (10mg/kg). Mice were treated with low or high dose C-BF before treatment with LPS, and samples were collected 5h after LPS treatment. C-BF reduced LPS induced intestinal histological damage and gut permeability to 4 KD Fluorescein-isothiocyanate-conjugated dextran. Pretreatment with C-BF prevented LPS induced intestinal tight junction disruption and epithelial cell apoptosis. Moreover, C-BF down regulated the expression and secretion of TNF-α, a process involving the NF-κB signaling pathway. C-BF also reduced LPS induced TNF-α expression through the NF-κB signaling pathway in mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages. These findings indicate that C-BF can prevent gut barrier dysfunction induced by LPS, suggesting that C-BF may be used to develop a prophylactic agent for intestinal injury in endotoxemia. PMID:25639228

  17. Selective Removal of Alkali Metal Cations from Multiply-Charged Ions via Gas-Phase Ion/Ion Reactions Using Weakly Coordinating Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luongo, Carl A.; Bu, Jiexun; Burke, Nicole L.; Gilbert, Joshua D.; Prentice, Boone M.; Cummings, Steven; Reed, Christopher A.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-03-01

    Selective removal of alkali metal cations from mixed cation multiply-charged peptide ions is demonstrated here using gas-phase ion/ion reactions with a series of weakly coordinating anions (WCAs), including hexafluorophosphate (PF6 -), tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate (BARF), tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)borate (TPPB), and carborane (CHB11Cl11 -). In all cases, a long-lived complex is generated by dication/anion condensation followed by ion activation to compare proton transfer with alkali ion transfer from the peptide to the anion. The carborane anion was the only anion studied to undergo dissociation exclusively through loss of the metallated anion, regardless of the studied metal adduct. All other anions studied yield varying abundances of protonated and metallated peptide depending on the peptide sequence and the metal identity. Density functional theory calculations suggest that for the WCAs studied, metal ion transfer is most strongly favored thermodynamically, which is consistent with the experimental results. The carborane anion is demonstrated to be a robust reagent for the selective removal of alkali metal cations from peptide cations with mixtures of excess protons and metal cations.

  18. Source apportionment of wintertime gas-phase and particle-phase air pollutants using organic compounds as tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, J.J.; Cass, G.R.

    2000-05-01

    Two chemical mass balance receptor models are developed which can determine the source contributions to atmospheric pollutant concentrations using organic compounds as tracers. The first model uses particle-phase organic compounds to apportion the primary source contribution to atmospheric fine particulate organic carbon concentrations and fine particle mass concentrations. The second receptor model simultaneously uses both volatile gas-phase hydrocarbon and particle-phase organic compounds as tracers to determine source contributions to non-methane organic gases in the atmosphere. Both models are applied to data collected in California's San Joaquin Valley during two severe wintertime air pollution episodes. Source contributions to fine particle air quality are calculated for two urban sites, Fresno and Bakersfield, and one background site, Kern Wildlife Refuge. Primary particle emissions from hardwood combustion, softwood combustion, diesel engines, meat cooking, and gasoline-powered motor vehicles contribute on average 79% of the airborne fine particle organic compound mass at the urban sites during both episodes with smaller but still measurable contributions from fine particle road dust and natural gas combustion aerosol. Anthropogenic primary particle sources contribute less than 10% of the fine particle mass concentration at the background site. The combined gas-phase and particle-phase organic compound receptor model shows that gasoline-powered motor vehicle exhaust and gasoline vapors are the largest contributors to nonmethane organic gases concentrations followed by natural gas leakage. Smaller but statistically significant contributions to organic vapors from wood combustion, meat cooking, and diesel exhaust also are quantified.

  19. Density and pressure effects on the transport of gas phase chemicals in unsaturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altevogt, Andrew S.; Rolston, Dennis E.; Venterea, Rodney T.

    2003-03-01

    The density of gas phase contaminants may be responsible for several important transport phenomena in porous media. One-dimensional laboratory experiments were conducted to explore the transport of a dense gas (Freon-113) through an air-dry sand. Gas densities were measured and fluxes were estimated during transport through a column filled with oso-flaco sand. Significant differences in density profiles and fluxes were observed for the three primary flow directions (horizontal, vertically upward, and vertically downward) at high source densities. Estimates indicate that pressure gradients of up to 20 Pa/m measured in the first 2.5 cm of the column were possibly due to the nonequimolar diffusion of Freon and air. Simulated Freon densities from numerical models based on the standard Darcy-Fickian transport equation did not compare well against measured density data. Density profiles generated by the model differed from the data by up to 400%. Numerical simulations indicated that slip flow may be significant relative to Darcy advective flow, but the slip phenomenon did not account for the discrepancy between model simulations and data. Further research and equation development will be necessary in order to ascertain why the standard theory does not adequately describe the diffusive and advective transport processes for dense gases.

  20. Simulation of gas phase transport of carbon-14 at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, N.; Ross, B.

    1994-01-01

    We have simulated gas phase transport of Carbon-14 at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Three models were established to calculate travel time of Carbon-14 from the potential repository to the mountain surface: a geochemical model for retardation factors, a coupled gas-flow and heat transfer model for temperature and gas flow fields, and a particle tracker for travel time calculation. The simulations used three parallel, east-west cross-sections that were taken from the Sandia National Laboratories Interactive Graphics Information System (IGIS). Assuming that the repository is filled with 30- year-old waste at an initial areal power density of 57 kw/acre, we found that repository temperatures remain above 60??C for more than 10,000 years. For a tuff permeability of 10-7 cm2, Carbon-14 travel times to the surface are mostly less than 1,000 years, for particles starting at any time within the first 10,000 years. If the tuff permeability is 10-8 cm2, however, Carbon- 14 travel times to the surface range from 3,000 to 12,000 years, for particle starting within the 10,000 years.

  1. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  2. Modeling the temperature-dependent peptide vibrational spectra based on implicit-solvent model and enhance sampling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tianmin, Wu; Tianjun, Wang; Xian, Chen; Bin, Fang; Ruiting, Zhang; Wei, Zhuang

    2016-01-01

    We herein review our studies on simulating the thermal unfolding Fourier transform infrared and two-dimensional infrared spectra of peptides. The peptide–water configuration ensembles, required forspectrum modeling, aregenerated at a series of temperatures using the GBOBC implicit solvent model and the integrated tempering sampling technique. The fluctuating vibrational Hamiltonians of the amide I vibrational band are constructed using the Frenkel exciton model. The signals are calculated using nonlinear exciton propagation. The simulated spectral features such as the intensity and ellipticity are consistent with the experimental observations. Comparing the signals for two beta-hairpin polypeptides with similar structures suggests that this technique is sensitive to peptide folding landscapes. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 21203178), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 21373201), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 21433014), the Science and Technological Ministry of China (Grant No. 2011YQ09000505), and “Strategic Priority Research Program” of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant Nos. XDB10040304 and XDB100202002).

  3. Gas-Phase Synthesis of Gold- and Silica-Coated Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boies, Adam Meyer

    2011-12-01

    Composite nanoparticles consisting of separate core-shell materials are of interest for a variety of biomedical and industrial applications. By combining different materials at the nanoscale, particles can exhibit enhanced or multi-functional behavior such as plasmon resonance combined with superparamagnetism. Gas-phase nanoparticle synthesis processes are promising because they can continuously produce particles with high mass-yield rates. In this dissertation, new methods are investigated for producing gas-phase coatings of nanoparticles in an "assembly-line" fashion. Separate processes are developed to create coatings from silica and gold that can be used with a variety of core-particle chemistries. A photoinduced chemical vapor deposition (photo-CVD) method is used to produce silica coatings from tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) on the surface of nanoparticles (diameter 5--70 nm). Tandem differential mobility analysis (TDMA) of the process demonstrates that particle coatings can be produced with controllable thicknesses (1--10 nm) by varying system parameters such as precursor flow rate. Electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy confirm that the photo-CVD films uniformly coat the particles and that the coatings are silica. In order to describe the coating process a chemical mechanism is proposed that includes gas-phase, surface and photochemical reactions. A chemical kinetics model of the mechanism indicates that photo-CVD coating proceeds primarily through the photodecomposition of TEOS which removes ethyl groups, thus creating activated TEOS species. The activated TEOS then adsorbs onto the surface of the particle where a series of subsequent reactions remove the remaining ethyl groups to produce a silica film with an open site for further attachment. The model results show good agreement with the experimentally measured coating trends, where increased TEOS flow increases coating thickness and increased nitrogen flow decreases coating thickness. Gold decoration of nanoparticles is accomplished by evaporation of solid gold in the presence of an aerosol flow. A hot-wire generation method is developed where gold particles are produced from a composite gold-platinum wire. Investigations of the hot-wire generator show that it can produce particles with a range of sizes and that more uniform, non-agglomerated particles are produced when using smaller diameter tubes where gas velocities across the wire are higher and recirculation zones are diminished. When gold is evaporated in the presence of silica nanoparticles, the silica aerosol is decorated by gold through either homogeneous gold nucleation and subsequent scavenging by the silica nanoparticles, or by heterogeneous nucleation on the silica surface in which the gold "balls up" due to the high surface tension of gold on silica. In both cases the resulting particles exhibit a plasmon absorbance resonance typical of gold nanoparticles (lambda550 nm). Finally, the silica coating and gold decoration processes are combined with a thermal plasma technique for synthesizing iron-oxide to produce tri-layer nanoparticles.

  4. Metabolic cleavage of cell-penetrating peptides in contact with epithelial models: human calcitonin (hCT)-derived peptides, Tat(47–57) and penetratin(43–58)

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    We assessed the metabolic degradation kinetics and cleavage patterns of some selected CPP (cell-penetrating peptides) after incubation with confluent epithelial models. Synthesis of N-terminal CF [5(6)-carboxyfluorescein]-labelled CPP, namely hCT (human calcitonin)-derived sequences, Tat(47–57) and penetratin(43–58), was through Fmoc (fluoren-9-ylmethoxycarbonyl) chemistry. Metabolic degradation kinetics of the tested CPP in contact with three cell-cultured epithelial models, MDCK (Madin–Darby canine kidney), Calu-3 and TR146, was evaluated by reversed-phase HPLC. Identification of the resulting metabolites of CF-hCT(9–32) was through reversed-phase HPLC fractionation and peak allocation by MALDI–TOF-MS (matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization–time-of-flight mass spectrometry) or direct MALDI–TOF-MS of incubates. Levels of proteolytic activity varied highly between the investigated epithelial models and the CPP. The Calu-3 model exhibited the highest proteolytic activity. The patterns of metabolic cleavage of hCT(9–32) were similar in all three models. Initial cleavage of this peptide occurred at the N-terminal domain, possibly by endopeptidase activity yielding both the N- and the C-terminal counterparts. Further metabolic degradation was by aminopeptidase, endopeptidase and/or carboxypeptidase activities. In conclusion, when in contact with epithelial models, the studied CPP were subject to efficient metabolism, a prerequisite of cargo release on the one hand, but with potential for premature cleavage and loss of the cargo as well on the other. The results, particularly on hCT(9–32), may be used as a template to suggest structural modifications towards improved CPP performance. PMID:15193145

  5. The impact of meteorological forcings on gas phase air pollutants over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Laura; Lacressonnière, Gwendoline; Gauss, Michael; Engardt, Magnuz; Andersson, Camilla; Josse, Béatrice; Marécal, Virginie; Nyiri, Agnes; Sobolowski, Stefan; Siour, Guillaume; Vautard, Robert

    2015-10-01

    The impact of meteorological forcings on gas phase air pollutants (ozone and nitrogen dioxide) over Europe was studied using four offline chemistry transport models (CTMs) as part of the IMPACT2C project. This study uses long (20- and 30-year) simulations to evaluate the present-day performance of the CTMs, which is a necessary first step before undertaking any analysis of future air quality impacts. Two sets of meteorological forcings were used for each model: reanalysis of past observation data (ERA-Interim) and Global Climate Model (GCM) output. The results for the simulations forced by reanalysis data were assessed in relation to AirBase v7 measurement data, and it was determined that all four models slightly overpredict annual O3 values (mean biases range between 0.7 and 6.6 ppb) and three out of the four models underpredict observed annual NO2 (mean biases range between -3.1 and -5.2 ppb). The simulations forced by climate models result in spatially averaged monthly concentrations of O3 that are generally between 0 and 5 ppb higher than the values obtained from simulations forced by reanalysis data; therefore it was concluded that the use of climate models introduces an additional bias to the results, but this bias tends not to be significant in the majority of cases. The bias in O3 results appears to be correlated mainly to differences in temperature and boundary layer height between the two types of simulations, whereas the less significant bias in NO2 is negatively correlated to temperature and boundary layer height. It is also clear that the selection of chemical boundary conditions is an important factor in determining the variability of O3 model results. These results will be used as a baseline for the interpretation of future work, which will include an analysis of future climate scenarios upon European air quality.

  6. Matrix metalloproteinase 9 targeting peptides: syntheses, 68Ga-labeling, and preliminary evaluation in a rat melanoma xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Ujula, Tiina; Huttunen, Merja; Luoto, Pauliina; Perkyl, Hannu; Simpura, Ilkka; Wilson, Ian; Bergman, Mathias; Roivainen, Anne

    2010-09-15

    Biopanning of tumor cells was used in order to identify matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) targeting peptides. The tumor cell targeting peptide (TCTP-1) and two modified versions thereof were evaluated as imaging agents for positron emission tomography (PET) using a rat melanoma xenograft model. For the PET imaging purposes, the 3 peptides were 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclo-dodecane-N',N'',N''',N''''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) conjugated and labeled with Gallium-68 ((68)Ga) and preliminarily evaluated: (1) cyclic (68)Ga-DOTA-TCTP-1 with cystine bridge, (2) cyclic (68)Ga-DOTA-lactam-TCTP-1 with a lactam bridge, and (3) linear (68)Ga-DOTA-lin-TCTP-1. The whole-body distribution kinetics and tumor targeting of the intravenously administered (68)Ga-DOTA-peptides were evaluated in vivo by PET and ex vivo by measuring the radioactivity of excised tissues. In addition, the in vivo stability of the radiolabeled peptides in rat plasma, tumor tissue, and urine was studied. All (68)Ga-DOTA-peptides were cleared via the liver and kidneys, and approximately 44% of injected radioactivity was excreted in urine during 120 min after injection. Ex vivo biodistribution studies showed a tumor-to-muscle ratio of 5.5 1.3 (mean SD) for (68)Ga-DOTA-TCTP-1, 3.2 0.2 for (68)Ga-DOTA-lactam-TCTP-1, and 3.2 0.6 for (68)Ga-DOTA-lin-TCTP-1 at 120 min after injection. The (68)Ga-DOTA-lactam-TCTP-1 peptide appeared to be the most stable in vivo. The fraction of intact (68)Ga-DOTA-lactam-TCTP-1 in tumor was 59 4.2% at 120 min after injection. The stability was moderate for (68)Ga-DOTA-TCTP-1 and poor for (68)Ga-DOTA-lin-TCTP-1. The possibility of imaging tumors that overexpress MMP-9, such as melanoma, by using radiolabeled TCTP peptides in PET imaging makes these peptides highly attractive for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. However, further modifications to improve the stability and affinity of the peptides are needed. PMID:20795647

  7. Fusion of cell-penetrating peptides to thermally responsive biopolymer improves tumor accumulation of p21 peptide in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Walker, Leslie R; Ryu, Jung Su; Perkins, Eddie; McNally, Lacey R; Raucher, Drazen

    2014-01-01

    Current therapies for the treatment of pancreatic cancer are limited. The limitations of this type of treatment are abundant. The majority of chemotherapeutic agents used in clinics are highly toxic to both tumor cells and normal tissues due to the lack of specificity. Resistance can develop due to overexposure of these agents. To address these issues, these agents must be made more exclusive toward the tumor site. We have developed a macromolecular carrier based on the sequence of the biopolymer elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) that is able to aggregate upon reaching the externally heated tumor environment. This carrier is specific to the tumor as it only aggregates at the heated tumor site. ELP is soluble below its transition temperature but will aggregate when the temperature is raised above its transition temperature. ELP was modified by p21, a cell cycle inhibitory peptide, and the addition of Bac, a cell-penetrating peptide with nuclear localization capabilities. In this study, p21-ELP-Bac and its control, ELP-p21, were used in cell proliferation studies using the pancreatic cancer cell lines Panc-1, MiaPaca-2, and S2013. ELP-p21 had little effect on proliferation, while the half maximal inhibitory concentration of p21-ELP-Bac was ∼30 μM. As translocation across the plasma membrane is a limiting step for delivery of macromolecules, these polypeptides were utilized in a pancreatic xenograft model to study the plasma clearance, biodistribution, tumor accumulation, and tumor reduction capabilities of the polypeptide with and without a cell-penetrating peptide. PMID:25336913

  8. Elementary Reactions and Their Role in Gas-Phase Prebiotic Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Balucani, Nadia

    2009-01-01

    The formation of complex organic molecules in a reactor filled with gaseous mixtures possibly reproducing the primitive terrestrial atmosphere and ocean demonstrated more than 50 years ago that inorganic synthesis of prebiotic molecules is possible, provided that some form of energy is provided to the system. After that groundbreaking experiment, gas-phase prebiotic molecules have been observed in a wide variety of extraterrestrial objects (including interstellar clouds, comets and planetary atmospheres) where the physical conditions vary widely. A thorough characterization of the chemical evolution of those objects relies on a multi-disciplinary approach: 1) observations allow us to identify the molecules and their number densities as they are nowadays; 2) the chemistry which lies behind their formation starting from atoms and simple molecules is accounted for by complex reaction networks; 3) for a realistic modeling of such networks, a number of experimental parameters are needed and, therefore, the relevant molecular processes should be fully characterized in laboratory experiments. A survey of the available literature reveals, however, that much information is still lacking if it is true that only a small percentage of the elementary reactions considered in the models have been characterized in laboratory experiments. New experimental approaches to characterize the relevant elementary reactions in laboratory are presented and the implications of the results are discussed. PMID:19564951

  9. Simple model for the simulation of peptide folding and aggregation with different sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enciso, Marta; Rey, Antonio

    2012-06-01

    We present a coarse-grained interaction potential that, using just one single interaction bead per amino acid and only realistic interactions, can reproduce the most representative features of peptide folding. We combine a simple hydrogen bond potential, recently developed in our group, with a reduced alphabet for the amino acid sequence, which takes into account hydrophobic interactions. The sequence does not pose any additional influence in the torsional properties of the chain, as it often appears in previously published work. Our model is studied in equilibrium simulations at different temperatures and concentrations. At low concentrations the effect of hydrophobic interactions is determinant, as ?-helices (isolated or in bundles) or ?-sheets are the most populated conformations, depending on the simulated sequence. On the other hand, an increase in concentration translates into a higher influence of the hydrogen bond interactions, which mostly favor the formation of ?-type aggregates, in agreement with experimental observations. These aggregates, however, still keep some distinct characteristics for different sequences.

  10. Modeling of hydroxyapatite-peptide interaction based on fragment molecular orbital method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Koichiro; Fukuzawa, Kaori; Mochizuki, Yuji

    2015-06-01

    We have applied the four-body corrected fragment molecular orbital (FMO4) calculations to analyze the interaction between a designed peptide motif (Glu1-Ser2-Gln3-Glu4-Ser5) and the hydroxyapatite (HA) solid mimicked by a cluster model consisting of 1408 atoms. To incorporate statistical fluctuations, a total of 30 configurations were generated through classical molecular dynamics simulation with water molecules and were subjected to FMO4 calculations at the MP2 level. It was found that Ser5 plays a leading role in interacting with the phosphate moieties of HA via charge transfer and also that negatively charged Glu1 and Glu4 provide electrostatic stabilizations with the calcium ions.

  11. Protein matrices for improved wound healing: elastase inhibition by a synthetic peptide model.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Andreia; Pgo, Ana Paula; Henriques, Lara; Lamghari, Meriem; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2010-09-13

    The unique properties of silk fibroin were combined with keratin to develop new wound-dressing materials. Silk fibroin/keratin (SF/K) films were prepared to reduce high levels of elastase found on chronic wounds. This improved biological function was achieved by the incorporation of a small peptide synthesized based on the reactive-site loop of the Bowman-Birk Inhibitor (BBI) protein. In vitro degradation and release were evaluated using porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) solution as a model of wound exudate. It was found that biological degradation and release rate are highly dependent on film composition. Furthermore, the level of PPE activity can be tuned by changing the film composition, thus showing an innovative way of controlling the elastase-antielastase imbalance found on chronic wounds. PMID:20690591

  12. Conformationally specific enhancement of receptor-mediated LDL binding and internalization by peptide models of a conserved anionic N-terminal domain of human apolipoprotein E.

    PubMed

    Braddock, D T; Mercurius, K O; Subramanian, R M; Dominguez, S R; Davies, P F; Meredith, S C

    1996-11-01

    In this paper, we test the hypothesis that peptide models of a highly conserved domain of apolipoprotein E (amino acids 41-60 in human apo E) modulate the binding and internalization of LDL to cell surface receptors in a conformationally specific manner. Three peptides were compared: peptide I containing the natural sequence of amino acids 41-60 of human apo E; peptide III containing side-chain lactam cross-links designed to enhance alpha-helical structure; and peptide II containing cross-links designed to prevent formation of alpha-helices. Peptide III was shown previously to consist of two short alpha-helical domains linked by a turn and to have more alpha-helical content than peptide I, while peptide II was shown to have less helical content than either peptide III or I(Luo et al., 1994). Peptide III induced a 30-fold increase in the specific binding of 125I-LDL to normal human skin fibroblasts and a 60-fold increase in the binding to fibroblasts lacking the LDL-R. This same peptide also restored the binding to normal fibroblasts of 125I-LDL from a patient with familial defective apolipoprotein B, the R3500-->Q mutation. Analysis of binding indicated an increase in the apparent number of binding sites, with little effect on the affinity of 125I-LDL for the cell surface. Heparinase treatment of the cells did not abrogate this effect, suggesting that the increased binding is not mediated by cell surface glycans. LDL internalization but not degradation was also increased by peptide III. Similar but smaller effects were also induced by peptide I. Peptide II was much less active than peptide I or III. Thus, the order of biological activity was the same as the order of alpha-helical content, i.e., peptide III > peptide I > peptide II. These results suggest a hitherto unknown biological function for a highly conserved domain of apolipoprotein E, and this bioactivity was shown by peptide models to be specific to the alpha-helical conformation. PMID:8909295

  13. Spider peptide Ph?1? induces analgesic effect in a model of cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Rigo, Flavia Karine; Trevisan, Gabriela; Rosa, Fernanda; Dalmolin, Gerusa D; Otuki, Michel Fleith; Cueto, Ana Paula; de Castro Junior, Clio Jos; Romano-Silva, Marco Aurelio; Cordeiro, Marta do N; Richardson, Michael; Ferreira, Juliano; Gomez, Marcus V

    2013-09-01

    The marine snail peptide ziconotide (?-conotoxin MVIIA) is used as an analgesic in cancer patients refractory to opioids, but may induce severe adverse effects. Animal venoms represent a rich source of novel drugs, so we investigated the analgesic effects and the side-effects of spider peptide Ph?1? in a model of cancer pain in mice with or without tolerance to morphine analgesia. Cancer pain was induced by the inoculation of melanoma B16-F10 cells into the hind paw of C57BL/6 mice. After 14 days, painful hypersensitivity was detected and Ph?1? or ?-conotoxin MVIIA (10-100 pmol/site) was intrathecally injected to evaluate the development of antinociception and side-effects in control and morphine-tolerant mice. The treatment with Ph?1? or ?-conotoxin MVIIA fully reversed cancer-related painful hypersensitivity, with long-lasting results, at effective doses 50% of 48 (32-72) or 33 (21-53) pmol/site, respectively. Ph?1? produced only mild adverse effects, whereas ?-conotoxin MVIIA induced dose-related side-effects in mice at analgesic doses (estimated toxic dose 50% of 30 pmol/site). In addition, we observed that Ph?1? was capable of controlling cancer-related pain even in mice tolerant to morphine antinociception (100% of inhibition) and was able to partially restore morphine analgesia in such animals (56 5% of inhibition). In this study, Ph?1? was as efficacious as ?-conotoxin MVIIA in inducing analgesia in a model of cancer pain without producing severe adverse effects or losing efficacy in opioid-tolerant mice, indicating that Ph?1? has a good profile for the treatment of cancer pain in patients. PMID:23718272

  14. A semi-implicit solvent model for the simulation of peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Basdevant, Nathalie; Borgis, Daniel; Ha-Duong, Tap

    2004-06-01

    We present a new model of biomolecules hydration based on macroscopic electrostatic theory, that can both describe the microscopic details of solvent-solute interactions and allow for an efficient evaluation of the electrostatic hydration free energy. This semi-implicit model considers the solvent as an ensemble of polarizable pseudoparticles whose induced dipole describe both the electronic and orientational solvent polarization. In the presented version of the model, there is no mutual dipolar interaction between the particles, and they only interact through short-ranged Lennard-Jones interactions. The model has been integrated into a molecular dynamics code, and offers the possibility to simulate efficiently the conformational evolution of biomolecules. It is able to provide estimations of the electrostatic solvation free energy within short time windows during the simulation. It has been applied to the study of two small peptides, the octaalanine and the N-terminal helix of ribonuclease A, and two proteins, the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and the B1 immunoglobin-binding domain of streptococcal protein G. Molecular dynamics simulations of these biomolecules, using a slightly modified Amber force field, provide stable and meaningful trajectories in overall agreement with experiments and all-atom simulations. Correlations with respect to Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatic solvation free energies are also presented to discuss the parameterization of the model and its consequences. PMID:15067677

  15. Competitive threshold collision-induced dissociation: Gas-phase acidities and bond dissociation energies for a series of alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    DeTuri, V.F.; Ervin, K.M.

    1999-09-02

    Energy-resolved competitive collision-induced dissociation methods are used to measure the gas-phase acidities of a series of alcohols (methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, and 2-methyl-2-propanol). The competitive dissociation reactions of fluoride-alcohol, [F{sup {minus}}{center{underscore}dot}HOR], alkoxide-water, [RO{sup {minus}}{center{underscore}dot}HOH], and alkoxide-methanol [RO{+-}{center{underscore}dot}HOCH{sub 3}] proton-bound complexes are studied using a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer. The reaction cross sections and product branching fractions to the two proton transfer channels are measured as a function of collision energy. The enthalpy difference between the two product channels is found by modeling the reaction cross sections near threshold using RRKM theory to account for the energy-dependent product branching ratio and kinetic shift. From the enthalpy difference, the alcohol gas-phase acidities are determined relative to the well-known values of HF and H{sub 2}O. The measured gas-phase acidities are {Delta}{sub acid}H{sub 298}(CH{sub 3}OH) = 1599 {+-} 3 kJ/mol, {Delta}{sub acid}H{sub 298}(CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH) = 1586 {+-} 5 kJ/mol, {Delta}{sub acid}H{sub 298}((CH{sub 3}){sub 2}CHOH) = 1576 {+-} 4 kJ/mol, and {Delta}{sub acid}H{sub 298}((CH{sub 3}){sub 3}COH) = 1573 {+-} 3 kJ/mol.

  16. Speciation of gas-phase and fine particle emissions from burning of foliar fuels.

    PubMed

    Hays, Michael D; Geron, Christopher D; Linna, Kara J; Smith, N Dean; Schauer, James J

    2002-06-01

    Fine particle matter with aerodynamic diameter <2.5 microm (PM2.5) and gas-phase emissions from open burning of six fine (foliar) fuels common to fire-prone U.S. ecosystems are investigated. PM2.5 distribution is unimodal within the 10-450 nm range, indicative of an accumulation mode. Smoldering relative to flaming combustion shows smaller particle number density per unit time and median size. Over 100 individual organic compounds in the primarily carbonaceous (>70% by mass) PM2.5 are chemically speciated by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Expressed as a percent of PM2.5 mass, emission ranges by organic compound class are as follows: n-alkane (0.1-2%), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) (0.02-0.2%), n-alkanoic acid (1-3%), n-alkanedioic acid (0.06-0.3%), n-alkenoic acid (0.3-3%), resin acid (0.5-6%), triterpenoid (0.2-0.5%), methoxyphenol (0.5-3%), and phytosterol (0.2-0.6%). A molecular tracer of biomass combustion, the sugar levoglucosan is abundant and constitutes a remarkably narrow PM2.5 mass range (2.8-3.6%). Organic chemical signatures in PM2.5 from open combustion of fine fuels differ with those of residential wood combustion and other related sources, making them functional for source-receptor modeling of PM. Inorganic matter [PM2.5 - (organic compounds + elemental carbon)] on average is estimated to make up 8% of the PM2.5. Wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and ion chromatography identify 3% of PM2.5 as elements and water-soluble ions, respectively. Compared with residential wood burning, the PM2.5 of fine fuel combustion is nitrate enriched but shows lower potassium levels. Gas-phase C2-C13 hydrocarbon and C2-C9 carbonyl emissions are speciated by respective EPA Methods T0-15 and T0-11A. They comprise mainly low molecular weight C2-C3 compounds and hazardous air pollutants (48 wt % of total quantified volatile organic carbon). PMID:12075778

  17. The role of stabilised Criegee intermediate in gas phase H2SO4 formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novelli, A.; Hens, K.; Kubistin, D.; Tatum Ernest, C.; Trawny, K.; Rudolf, M.; Auld, J.; Axinte, R.; Hosaynali Beygi, Z.; Nlscher, A.; Paasonen, P.; Sipil, M.; Keronen, P.; Petdjd, T. T.; Adame, J.; Elste, T.; Werner, A.; Englert, J.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Fischer, H.; Williams, J.; Vereecken, L.; Martinez, M.; Lelieveld, J.; Harder, H. D.

    2012-12-01

    Sulfuric acid in the gas phase plays a central role in new particle formation and in particle growth. Fine particles directly affect human health via inhalation and have an important impact on climate. In the gas phase, sulfuric acid is known to be formed from the oxidation of SO2 by the OH radical in the presence of oxygen and water. In the last decade, new measurements of OH and H2SO4 have shown relatively high concentrations of H2SO4 during nighttime when the corresponding concentration of OH radicals was too low to explain such high concentrations of sulfuric acid. New laboratory experiments, in addition to theoretical studies, have shown that a possible candidate for the oxidation of SO2 is Stabilized Criegee Intermediates (SCIs) arising from the ozonolysis of alkenes. The rate coefficient for the reaction of CH2OO + SO2 has been measured at 3.9 x 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 indicating a probable competing role for the SCI in the production of sulfuric acid. Measurements of a fraction of atmospheric SCIs with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) have been made using a chemical subtraction method both in the laboratory and in the field. The SCIs undergo unimolecular decomposition at low pressure inside the instrument forming OH that is then detected. Model results and laboratory tests confirm our findings. This new instrumental setup has been used in several environments including Finland (HUMPPA-COPEC), Spain (DOMINO HOx) and Germany (HOPE 2012) revealing a unique SCI signal strongly influenced by different kinds of vegetation and meteorological conditions. Results from the HUMPPA campaign show a missing H2SO4 production after taking into account the contribution of the OH radical. The SCIs signal measured with our instrument shows a good correlation with this missing production confirming the important role of the SCI in the oxidation of SO2 and in the formation of sulfuric acid. Using the missing H2SO4 production rate together with the rate coefficient for the reaction CH2COO + SO2, it has been possible to calculate a lower limit for the concentration of SCIs in the atmosphere, while the estimated VOCs concentration from the total OH reactivity provides an upper limit.

  18. TOPICAL REVIEW: The behaviour of nanostructured magnetic materials produced by depositing gas-phase nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binns, C.; Trohidou, K. N.; Bansmann, J.; Baker, S. H.; Blackman, J. A.; Bucher, J.-P.; Kechrakos, D.; Kleibert, A.; Louch, S.; Meiwes-Broer, K.-H.; Pastor, G. M.; Perez, A.; Xie, Y.

    2005-11-01

    Depositing pre-formed gas-phase nanoparticles, whose properties can be widely varied, onto surfaces enables the production of films with designed properties. The films can be nanoporous or, if co-deposited with an atomic vapour, granular, allowing independent control over the size and volume fraction of the grains. This high degree of control over the nanostructure of the film enables the production of thin films with a wide variety of behaviour, and the technique is destined to make a significant contribution to the production of high-performance magnetic materials. Here we review the behaviour of magnetic nanoparticle assemblies on surfaces and in non-magnetic and magnetic matrices deposited from the gas phase at densities from the dilute limit to pure nanoparticle films with no matrix. At sufficiently low volume fractions (~1%), and temperatures well above their blocking temperature, nanoparticle assemblies in non-magnetic matrices show ideal superparamagnetism. At temperatures below the blocking temperature, the magnetization behaviour of both Fe and Co particles is consistent with a uniaxial intra-particle magnetic anisotropy and an anisotropy constant several times higher than the bulk magnetocrystalline value. At relatively low volume fractions (>=5%) the effect of inter-particle interactions becomes evident, and the magnetization behaviour becomes characteristic of agglomerates of nanoparticles exchange coupled to form magnetic grains larger than a single particle that interact with each other via dipolar forces. The evolution of the magnetic behaviour with volume fraction is predicted by a Monte-Carlo model that includes exchange and dipolar couplings. Above the percolation threshold the films become magnetically softer, and films of pure clusters have a magnetic ground state that obeys the predicted magnetization behaviour of a correlated super-spin glass characteristic of random anisotropy materials. Magnetic nanoparticles in non-magnetic matrices show giant magnetoresistance behaviour, and the magnetotransport in deposited nanoparticle films is reviewed. Assembling Fe nanoparticles in Co matrices and vice versa is a promising technique for producing magnetic materials with a saturation magnetization that exceeds the Slater-Pauling limit. Structural studies reveal that the particles' atomic structure is dependent on the matrix material, and it is possible to prepare Fe nanoparticles with an fcc structure and, unusually, Co particles with a bcc structure. We also look to the future and discuss applications for materials made from more complex bi-metallic and core-shell nanoparticles.

  19. Conformational Sampling with Implicit Solvent Models: Application to the PHF6 Peptide in Tau Protein

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Austin; Stultz, Collin M.

    2007-01-01

    Implicit solvent models approximate the effects of solvent through a potential of mean force and therefore make solvated simulations computationally efficient. Yet despite their computational efficiency, the inherent approximations made by implicit solvent models can sometimes lead to inaccurate results. To test the accuracy of a number of popular implicit solvent models, we determined whether implicit solvent simulations can reproduce the set of potential energy minima obtained from explicit solvent simulations. For these studies, we focus on a six-residue amino-acid sequence, referred to as the paired helical filament 6 (PHF6), which may play an important role in the formation of intracellular aggregates in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Several implicit solvent models form the basis of this worktwo based on the generalized Born formalism, and one based on a Gaussian solvent-exclusion model. All three implicit solvent models generate minima that are in good agreement with minima obtained from simulations with explicit solvent. Moreover, free-energy profiles generated with each implicit solvent model agree with free-energy profiles obtained with explicit solvent. For the Gaussian solvent-exclusion model, we demonstrate that a straightforward ranking of the relative stability of each minimum suggests that the most stable structure is extended, a result in excellent agreement with the free-energy profiles. Overall, our data demonstrate that for some peptides like PHF6, implicit solvent can accurately reproduce the set of local energy minimum arising from quenched dynamics simulations with explicit solvent. More importantly, all solvent models predict that PHF6 forms extended ?-structures in solution, a finding consistent with the notion that PHF6 initiates neurofibrillary tangle formation in patients with Alzheimer's disease. PMID:17040986

  20. Peptide inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A: design, inhibition, cocrystal structures, structure-activity relationship and pharmacophore modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar G.; Swaminathan S.; Kumaran, D.; Ahmed, S. A.

    2012-05-01

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins are classified as Category A bioterrorism agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The seven serotypes (A-G) of the botulinum neurotoxin, the causative agent of the disease botulism, block neurotransmitter release by specifically cleaving one of the three SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins and induce flaccid paralysis. Using a structure-based drug-design approach, a number of peptide inhibitors were designed and their inhibitory activity against botulinum serotype A (BoNT/A) protease was determined. The most potent peptide, RRGF, inhibited BoNT/A protease with an IC{sub 50} of 0.9 {micro}M and a K{sub i} of 358 nM. High-resolution crystal structures of various peptide inhibitors in complex with the BoNT/A protease domain were also determined. Based on the inhibitory activities and the atomic interactions deduced from the cocrystal structures, the structure-activity relationship was analyzed and a pharmacophore model was developed. Unlike the currently available models, this pharmacophore model is based on a number of enzyme-inhibitor peptide cocrystal structures and improved the existing models significantly, incorporating new features.

  1. Biofunctionalization of electrospun PCL-based scaffolds with perlecan domain IV peptide to create a 3-D pharmacokinetic cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Olga; Zhang, Chu; Adams, Elizabeth L.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Petrelli, Nicholas J.; Chase, Bruce D.; Rabolt, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Because prostate cancer cells metastasize to bone and exhibit osteoblastic features (osteomimicry), the interrelationships between bone-specific microenvironment and prostate cancer cells at sites of bone metastasis are critical to disease progression. In this work the bone marrow microenvironment in vitro was recreated both by tailoring scaffolds physical properties and by functionalizing electrospun polymer fibers with a bioactive peptide derived from domain IV of perlecan heparan sulfate proteoglycan. Electrospun poly (?-caprolactone) (PCL) fibers and PCL/gelatin composite scaffolds were modified covalently with perlecan domain IV (PlnDIV) peptide. The expression of tight junction protein (E-cadherin) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation on tyrosine 397 also were investigated. The described bioactive motif significantly enhanced adherence and infiltration of the metastatic prostate cancer cells on all modified electrospun substrates by day 5 post-seeding. Cells cultured on PlnDIV-modified matrices organized stress fibers and increased proliferation at statistically significant rates. Additional findings suggest that presence of PlnDIV peptide in the matrix reduced expression of tight junction protein and binding to PlnDIV peptide was accompanied by increased focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation on tyrosine 397. We conclude that PlnDIV peptide supports key signaling events leading to proliferation, survival, and migration of C4-2B cancer cells; hence its incorporation into electrospun matrix is a key improvement to create a successful three-dimensional (3-D) pharmacokinetic cancer model. PMID:20417554

  2. A Survey of Peptides with Effective Therapeutic Potential in Alzheimer’s Disease Rodent Models or in Human Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sun, N; Funke, SA; Willbold, D

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder and the most common cause of dementia. Today, only palliative therapies are available. The pathological hallmarks of AD are the presence of neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid plaques, mainly composed of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), in the brains of the patients. Several lines of evidence suggest that the increased production and/or decreased cleavage of Aβ and subsequent accumulation of Aβ oligomers and aggregates play a fundamental role in the disease progress. Therefore, substances which bind to Aβ and influence aggregation thereof are of great interest. A wide range of Aβ binding peptides were investigated to date for therapeutic purposes. Only very few were shown to be effective in rodent AD models or in clinical studies. Here, we review those peptides and discuss their possible mechanisms of action. PMID:22303971

  3. Some Fundamental Experiments on Apparent Dissolution Rate of Gas Phase in the Groundwater Recovery Processes of the Geological Disposal System - 12146

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshii, Taiki; Niibori, Yuichi; Mimura, Hitoshi

    2012-07-01

    The apparent dissolution rates of gas phase in the co-presence of solid phase were examined by in-room experiments in this study. The apparent dissolution rate of gas phase q (mol/m{sup 3}.s) was generally defined by q=aK{sub L}(?P{sub g}-c), where a (1/m) is specific surface area of the interface between gas and liquid phases, K{sub L} (m/s) is overall mass transfer coefficient, ? (mol/(Pa.m{sup 3})) is reciprocal number of Henry constant, P{sub g} (Pa) is partial pressure of gas phase, and c (mol/m{sup 3}) is the concentration of gas component in liquid phase. As a model gas, CO{sub 2} gas was used. For evaluating the values of K{sub L}, this study monitored pH or the migration rate of the interface between water/gas phases, using some experiments such as the packed beds and the micro channel consisting of granite chip and rubber sheet including a slit. In the results, the values of K{sub L} were distributed in the range from 5.0x10{sup -6} m/s to 5.0x10{sup -7} m/s. These values were small, in comparison with that (7.8x10{sup -4} m/s) obtained from the bubbling test where gas phase was continually injected into deionized water without solid phase. This means that the solid phase limits the local mixing of water phase near gas-liquid interfaces. (authors)

  4. The gas-phase structure of bis (trifluorosulfur) difluoromethane CF 2(SF 3) 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Ilse; Oberhammera, Heinz; Viets, Detlef; Mews, Rdiger; Waterfeld, Alfred

    1991-08-01

    The gas-phase structure of CF 2(SF 3) 2 has been determined by electron diffraction. The experimental intensities were fitted with a model of C2 symmetry and the following geometric parameters ( rg distances in and ? ? angles in degrees with 3? error limits) were obtained: C?F=1.318 (5) , S?F eq=1.562 (6) , S?F ax=1.664 (4) , S?C=1.888 (7) , ?SCS=108.2 (5), ?FCF=109.8 (18), (?CSF ax) mean=87.1 (3), ?CSF eq=97.2 (11), ?F eqSF ax=88.1 (3) and dihedral angle ? (SCSF eq)=130.8 (9). The two SF 3 groups are slightly tilted away from the CF 2 group resulting in a difference between the two CSF ax angles of 4.0 (10). The remarkably small SCS angle of 108.2 (5) results in a very short non-bonded contact between sulfur and one axial fluorine of the opposite SF 3 group (2.66 ) which possibly indicates the presence of an S?FS bridge.

  5. Output power enhancement of all gas-phase iodine laser by addition of hydrocarbon gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, T.; Nakamura, T.; Endo, M.

    2011-06-01

    In this work, we studied the output power enhancement of an all gas-phase iodine laser (AGIL) by the addition of hydrocarbon gases. Enhancement is expected because hydrocarbon gases might scavenge Cl atoms, which are strong quenchers of the upper state of the laser medium, I(2 P 1/2). In AGILs, suppression of the Cl atom concentration is the key to improving the efficiency of the operation of the laser because Cl atoms are inherently generated by the self-annihilation of the energy donor, NCl(a1 ?). We found that the addition of CH4 gave the best results, because of its high scavenging rate constant and inertness to I(2 P 1/2). An enhancement of 10% was observed in the output power when CH4 was added at a flow rate twice that of NCl3. On the other hand, when C2H4 or C2H2 were added at the same flow rate as that of CH4, the output power reduced despite their fast removal rate of Cl atoms. The reason for the reduced output power was that the unsaturated bonds scavenged not only the Cl atoms but also the H atoms, resulting in a low density of H atoms, and this decelerated the production of NCl(a1 ?). The observed laser characteristics could reasonably be explained by numerical model calculations. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful output power enhancement of an AGIL using a chemical agent.

  6. Gas-phase formation of the prebiotic molecule formamide: insights from new quantum computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, V.; Latouche, C.; Skouteris, D.; Vazart, F.; Balucani, N.; Ceccarelli, C.; Lefloch, B.

    2015-10-01

    New insights into the formation of interstellar formamide, a species of great relevance in prebiotic chemistry, are provided by electronic structure and kinetic calculations for the reaction NH2 + H2CO ? NH2CHO + H. Contrarily to what previously suggested, this reaction is essentially barrierless and can, therefore, occur under the low temperature conditions of intestellar objects thus providing a facile formation route of formamide. The rate coefficient parameters for the reaction channel leading to NH2CHO + H have been calculated to be A = 2.6 10-12 cm3 s-1, ? = -2.1 and ? = 26.9 K in the range of temperatures 10-300 K. Including these new kinetic data in a refined astrochemical model, we show that the proposed mechanism can well reproduce the abundances of formamide observed in two very different interstellar objects: the cold envelope of the Sun-like protostar IRAS16293-2422 and the molecular shock L1157-B2. Therefore, the major conclusion of this Letter is that there is no need to invoke grain-surface chemistry to explain the presence of formamide provided that its precursors, NH2 and H2CO, are available in the gas phase.

  7. Doppler indices of gas phase formation in hypobaric environments: Time-intensity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Michael R.

    1991-01-01

    A semi-quantitative method to analyze decompression data is described. It possesses the advantage that it allows a graded response to decompression rather than the dichotomous response generally employed. A generalized critical volume (C-V), or stoichiometric time-dependent equilibrium model is examined that relates the constant of the equation P sub i equals m P sub f plus b to variable tissue supersaturation and gas washout terms. The effects of the tissue ratio on gas phase formation indicate that a decreased ratio yields fewer individuals with Doppler detectable gas bubbles, but those individuals still present with Spencer Grade 3 or 4. This might indicate a local collapse of tissue saturation. The individuals with Grade 3 or 4 could be at risk for type 2 decompression sickness by transpulmonic arterialization. The primary regulator of the problems of decompression sickness is the reduction of local supersaturation, presumably governed by the presence and number of gas micronuclei. It is postulated that a reduction in these nuclei will favor a low incidence of decompression sickness in microgravity secondary to hypokinesia and adynamia.

  8. Evaluation of the potentials of humic acid removal in water by gas phase surface discharge plasma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiecheng; Qu, Guangzhou; Ren, Jingyu; Yan, Qiuhe; Sun, Qiuhong; Liang, Dongli; Hu, Shibin

    2016-02-01

    Degradation of humic acid (HA), a predominant type of natural organic matter in ground water and surface waters, was conducted using a gas phase surface discharge plasma system. HA standard and two surface waters (Wetland, and Weihe River) were selected as the targets. The experimental results showed that about 90.9% of standard HA was smoothly removed within 40 min's discharge plasma treatment at discharge voltage 23.0 kV, and the removal process fitted the first-order kinetic model. Roles of some active species in HA removal were studied by evaluating the effects of solution pH and OH radical scavenger; and the results presented that O3 and OH radical played significant roles in HA removal. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and FTIR analysis showed that HA surface topography and molecular structure were changed during discharge plasma process. The mineralization of HA was analyzed by UV-Vis spectrum, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), specific UV absorbance (SUVA), UV absorption ratios, and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence. The formation of disinfection by-products during HA sample chlorination was also identified, and CHCl3 was detected as the main disinfection by-product, but discharge plasma treatment could suppress its formation to a certain extent. In addition, approximately 82.3% and 67.9% of UV254 were removed for the Weihe River water and the Wetland water after 40 min of discharge plasma treatment. PMID:26624519

  9. Gas-Phase Retinal Spectroscopy: Temperature Effects Are But a Mirage.

    PubMed

    Valsson, Omar; Filippi, Claudia

    2012-04-01

    We employ state-of-the-art first-principle approaches to investigate whether temperature effects are responsible for the unusually broad and flat spectrum of protonated Schiff base retinal observed in photodissociation spectroscopy, as has recently been proposed. We first carefully calibrate how to construct a realistic geometrical model of retinal and show that the exchange-correlation M06-2X functional yields an accurate description while the commonly used complete active space self-consistent field method (CASSCF) is not adequate. Using modern multiconfigurational perturbative methods (NEVPT2) to compute the excitations, we then demonstrate that conformations with different orientations of the β-ionone ring are characterized by similar excitations. Moreover, other degrees of freedom identified as active in room-temperature molecular dynamics simulations do not yield the shift required to explain the anomalous spectral shape. Our findings indicate that photodissociation experiments are not representative of the optical spectrum of retinal in the gas phase and call for further experimental characterization of the dissociation spectra. PMID:26286419

  10. Decomposition of gas-phase diphenylether at 473 K by electron beam generated plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Ha; Hakoda, Teruyuki; Kojima, Takuji

    2003-03-01

    Decomposition of gas-phase diphenylether (DPE) in the order of several parts per million by volume (ppmv) was studied as a model compound of dioxin using a flow-type electron-beam reactor at an elevated temperature of 473 K. The ground state oxygen (3P) atoms played an important role in the decomposition of DPE resulting in the formation of 1,4-hydroquinone (HQ) as a major ring retaining product. The high yield of hydroquinone indicated that the breakage of ether bond (C-O) is important in the initial step of DPE decomposition. Ring cleavage products were CO and CO2, and NO2 was also produced from background N2-O2. The sum of the yields of HQ, CO2 and CO accounts for over 90% of the removed DPE. Hydroxyl radicals (OH) were less important in the dilute DPE decomposition at a high water content, and were mostly consumed by recombination reactions to form hydrogen peroxide. The smaller the initial DPE concentrations, the higher the decomposition efficiency and the lower the yields of primary products. NO scavenges oxygen atoms and decreases the DPE decomposition, while the addition of n-butane causes positive effect on the decomposition of DPE due to the several secondary radicals (HO2, alkyl and alkoxy radicals) produced during the decomposition of n-butane.

  11. Investigation of the gas-phase emitter effect of dysprosium in ceramic metal halide lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langenscheidt, O.; Westermeier, M.; Reinelt, J.; Mentel, J.; Awakowicz, P.

    2008-07-01

    The behaviour of electrodes operated with ac-currents in ceramic metal halide lamps containing Hg + NaTlDy iodide has been investigated experimentally. Using transparent YAG lamp tubes with the so-called Bochum model lamp as an outer bulb phase resolved measurements were performed of the electrode temperature and Dy density in dependence on the cold-spot temperature of the salt filling. The electrode tip temperature and electrode power loss are deduced from the temperature profile measured along the electrode axis. The Dy density in front of the electrode is determined by spatially resolved spectroscopic measurements of absolute line intensities. It is found that doping of a mercury lamp only with Dy iodide generates at low operation frequencies a pronounced emitter effect at the cathode but it declines with increasing frequency. In a lamp doped with NaTlDy iodide the formation and movement of Dy ions are hampered by Na ions accumulated in front of the cathode due to cataphoresis. As a consequence the lowering of the power loss by Dy is in part diminished. It is shown that a gas-phase emitter effect of Dy is effective for standard operation conditions of lamps in spite of the counteracting effects of a long time constant of the emitter effect and Na accumulation.

  12. Organic acids enhanced decoloration of azo dye in gas phase surface discharge plasma system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiecheng; Qu, Guangzhou; Ren, Jingyu; Sun, Qiuhong; Liang, Dongli; Hu, Shibin

    2016-01-25

    A gas phase surface discharge plasma combined with organic acids system was developed to enhance active species mass transfer and dye-containing wastewater treatment efficacy, with Acid Orange II (AO7) as the model pollutant. The effects of discharge voltage and various organic acid additives (acetic acid, lactic acid and nonoic acid) on AO7 decoloration efficiency were evaluated. The experimental results showed that an AO7 decoloration efficiency of approximately 69.0% was obtained within 4 min of discharge plasma treatment without organic acid addition, which was improved to 82.8%, 83.5% and 88.6% within the same treatment time with the addition of acetic acid, lactic acid and nonoic acid, respectively. The enhancement effects on AO7 decoloration efficiency could be attributed to the decrease in aqueous surface tension, improvement in bubble distribution and shape, and increase in ozone equivalent concentration. The AO7 wastewater was biodegradable after discharge plasma treatment with the addition of organic acid. AO7 decomposition intermediates were analyzed by UV-vis spectrometry and GC-MS; 2-naphthol, 1,4-benzoquinone, phthalic anhydride, coumarin, 1,2-naphthoquinone, and 2-formyl-benzoic acid were detected. A possible pathway for AO7 decomposition in this system was proposed. PMID:26444488

  13. Toward industrial scale synthesis of ultrapure singlet nanoparticles with controllable sizes in a continuous gas-phase process

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jicheng; Biskos, George; Schmidt-Ott, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Continuous gas-phase synthesis of nanoparticles is associated with rapid agglomeration, which can be a limiting factor for numerous applications. In this report, we challenge this paradigm by providing experimental evidence to support that gas-phase methods can be used to produce ultrapure non-agglomerated “singlet” nanoparticles having tunable sizes at room temperature. By controlling the temperature in the particle growth zone to guarantee complete coalescence of colliding entities, the size of singlets in principle can be regulated from that of single atoms to any desired value. We assess our results in the context of a simple analytical model to explore the dependence of singlet size on the operating conditions. Agreement of the model with experimental measurements shows that these methods can be effectively used for producing singlets that can be processed further by many alternative approaches. Combined with the capabilities of up-scaling and unlimited mixing that spark ablation enables, this study provides an easy-to-use concept for producing the key building blocks for low-cost industrial-scale nanofabrication of advanced materials. PMID:26511290

  14. Toward industrial scale synthesis of ultrapure singlet nanoparticles with controllable sizes in a continuous gas-phase process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jicheng; Biskos, George; Schmidt-Ott, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Continuous gas-phase synthesis of nanoparticles is associated with rapid agglomeration, which can be a limiting factor for numerous applications. In this report, we challenge this paradigm by providing experimental evidence to support that gas-phase methods can be used to produce ultrapure non-agglomerated “singlet” nanoparticles having tunable sizes at room temperature. By controlling the temperature in the particle growth zone to guarantee complete coalescence of colliding entities, the size of singlets in principle can be regulated from that of single atoms to any desired value. We assess our results in the context of a simple analytical model to explore the dependence of singlet size on the operating conditions. Agreement of the model with experimental measurements shows that these methods can be effectively used for producing singlets that can be processed further by many alternative approaches. Combined with the capabilities of up-scaling and unlimited mixing that spark ablation enables, this study provides an easy-to-use concept for producing the key building blocks for low-cost industrial-scale nanofabrication of advanced materials.

  15. Toward industrial scale synthesis of ultrapure singlet nanoparticles with controllable sizes in a continuous gas-phase process.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jicheng; Biskos, George; Schmidt-Ott, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Continuous gas-phase synthesis of nanoparticles is associated with rapid agglomeration, which can be a limiting factor for numerous applications. In this report, we challenge this paradigm by providing experimental evidence to support that gas-phase methods can be used to produce ultrapure non-agglomerated "singlet" nanoparticles having tunable sizes at room temperature. By controlling the temperature in the particle growth zone to guarantee complete coalescence of colliding entities, the size of singlets in principle can be regulated from that of single atoms to any desired value. We assess our results in the context of a simple analytical model to explore the dependence of singlet size on the operating conditions. Agreement of the model with experimental measurements shows that these methods can be effectively used for producing singlets that can be processed further by many alternative approaches. Combined with the capabilities of up-scaling and unlimited mixing that spark ablation enables, this study provides an easy-to-use concept for producing the key building blocks for low-cost industrial-scale nanofabrication of advanced materials. PMID:26511290

  16. Spectroscopic studies of kinetically trapped conformations in the gas phase: the case of triply protonated bradykinin.

    PubMed

    Voronina, Liudmila; Rizzo, Thomas R

    2015-10-21

    Understanding the relation between the gas-phase structure of biological molecules and their solution-phase structure is important when attempting to use gas-phase techniques to address biologically relevant questions. Directly after electrospray ionization, molecules can be kinetically trapped in a state that retains some "memory" of its conformation in solution and is separated from the lowest-energy gas-phase structure by barriers on the potential energy surface. In order to identify and characterize kinetically trapped structures, we have explored the conformational space of triply protonated bradykinin in the gas phase by combining field-asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) with cold ion spectroscopy. We isolate three distinct conformational families and characterize them by recording their UV-photofragment spectra and vibrational spectra. Annealing of the initial conformational distribution produced by electrospray reveals that one of the conformational families is kinetically trapped, while two others are stable, gas-phase structures. We compare our results to previously published results obtained using drift-tube ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and propose a correspondence between the conformational families separated by FAIMS and those by IMS. PMID:25940085

  17. Gas-Phase Oxidation Products From the Photooxidation of Fifteen Biogenic Terpenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, A.; Goldstein, A. H.; Ng, N. L.; Kroll, J. H.; Varutbangkul, V.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2005-12-01

    Biogenic emissions of terpene compounds influence atmospheric chemistry through the formation of tropospheric ozone and the production of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). We conducted photooxidation experiments at the Caltech Indoor Chamber Facility to examine the gas-phase products and secondary aerosol yields from isoprene, eight monoterpenes, four sesquiterpenes, and three oxygenated C10 terpenes. Terpenes were reacted with OH in the presence of NOx, with hydrocarbon to NOx ratios consistent with ratios typically observed in the ambient forested environments. The real-time formation of gas-phase oxidation products was monitored using a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS), which identified compounds by their mass to charge ratio and showed multi-step oxidation pathways from these reactions. The photooxidation of terpenes resulted in the formation of numerous gas-phase oxidation products that were not observed from our previous ozonolysis experiments, as well as the formation of gas-phase organic nitrogen compounds. These gas-phase oxidation products can contribute to tropospheric chemistry through further oxidation reactions in the atmosphere, or may influence the biosphere through the deposition of organic nitrogen compounds downwind. Possible reaction mechanisms and products from the photooxidation of these terpene compounds will be presented, and the relevance of these laboratory experiments to recent observations of rapid within-canopy chemistry will be discussed.

  18. Functional and metabolic properties of alveolar macrophages in response to the gas phase of tobacco smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Drath, D.B.; Shorey, J.M.; Huber, G.L.

    1981-10-01

    The effect of whole tobacco smoke and the gas phase of tobacco smoke on the metabolism and phagocytic ability of alveolar macrophages was monitored over a 30-day exposure period. It was demonstrated that both the gas phase and whole tobacco smoke induced a weight loss in exposed rats. Alveolar macrophage oxygen consumption was markedly increased by both exposure regimens. Superoxide generation was not affected by whole tobacco smoke exposure but was increased in response to the filtered gas phase. Hexose monophosphate shunt activity was not altered by either treatment. When metabolic alterations were seen in response to the separate exposures, they were seen only after a phagocytic challenge to the macrophage and not when the cell was unchallenged. Neither whole tobacco smoke nor the gas phase had any significant effect on the ability of alveolar macrophages to phagocytize a viable challenge of Staphylococcus aureus. Our results suggest that many of the metabolic and functional effects of tobacco smoke on alveolar macrophages can be attributed to the gas-phase component of whole tobacco smoke.

  19. A Colloidal Description of Intermolecular Interactions Driving Fibril-Fibril Aggregation of a Model Amphiphilic Peptide.

    PubMed

    Owczarz, Marta; Motta, Anna C; Morbidelli, Massimo; Arosio, Paolo

    2015-07-14

    We apply a kinetic analysis platform to study the intermolecular interactions underlying the colloidal stability of dispersions of charged amyloid fibrils consisting of a model amphiphilic peptide (RADA 16-I). In contrast to the aggregation mechanisms observed in the large majority of proteins and peptides, where several elementary reactions involving both monomers and fibrils are present simultaneously, the system selected in this work allows the specific investigation of the fibril-fibril aggregation process. We examine the intermolecular interactions driving the aggregation reaction at pH 2.0 by changing the buffer composition in terms of salt concentration, type of ion as well as type and concentration of organic solvent. The aggregation kinetics are followed by dynamic light scattering, and the experimental data are simulated by Smoluchowski population balance equations, which allow to estimate the energy barrier between two colliding fibrils in terms of the Fuchs stability ratio (W). When normalized on a dimensionless time weighted on the Fuchs stability ratio, the aggregation profiles under a broad range of conditions collapse on a single master curve, indicating that the buffer composition modifies the aggregation kinetics without affecting the aggregation mechanism. Our results show that the aggregation process does not occur under diffusion-limited conditions. Rather, the reaction rate is limited by the presence of an activation energy barrier that is largely dominated by electrostatic repulsive interactions. Such interactions could be reduced by increasing the concentration of salt, which induces charge screening, or the concentration of organic solvent, which affects the dielectric constant. It is remarkable that the dependence of the activation energy on the ionic strength can be described quantitatively in terms of charge screening effects in the frame of the DLVO theory, although specific anion and cation effects are also observed. While anion effects are mainly related to the binding to the positive groups of the fibril surface and to the resulting decrease of the surface charge, cation effects are more complex and involve additional solvation forces. PMID:26125620

  20. Gaussian process: a promising approach for the modeling and prediction of Peptide binding affinity to MHC proteins.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yanrong; Chen, Xiaolin; Feng, Ming; Wang, Qiang; Zhou, Peng

    2011-07-01

    On the basis of Bayesian probabilistic inference, Gaussian process (GP) is a powerful machine learning method for nonlinear classification and regression, but has only very limited applications in the new areas of computational vaccinology and immunoinformatics. In the current work, we present a paradigmatic study of using GP regression technique to quantitatively model and predict the binding affinities of over 7000 immunodominant peptide epitopes to six types of human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. In this procedure, the sequence patterns of diverse peptides are characterized quantitatively and the resulting variables are then correlated with the experimentally measured affinities between different MHC and their peptide ligands, by using a linearity- and nonlinearity-hybrid GP approach. We also make systematical comparisons between the GP and two sophisticated modeling methods as partial least square (PLS) regression and support vector machine (SVM) with respect to their fitting ability, predictive power and generalization capability. The results suggest that GP could be a new and effective tool for the modeling and prediction of MHC-peptide interactions and would be promising in the field of computer-aided vaccine design (CAVD). PMID:21413918

  1. Modeling of protein-peptide interactions using the CABS-dock web server for binding site search and flexible docking.

    PubMed

    Blaszczyk, Maciej; Kurcinski, Mateusz; Kouza, Maksim; Wieteska, Lukasz; Debinski, Aleksander; Kolinski, Andrzej; Kmiecik, Sebastian

    2016-01-15

    Protein-peptide interactions play essential functional roles in living organisms and their structural characterization is a hot subject of current experimental and theoretical research. Computational modeling of the structure of protein-peptide interactions is usually divided into two stages: prediction of the binding site at a protein receptor surface, and then docking (and modeling) the peptide structure into the known binding site. This paper presents a comprehensive CABS-dock method for the simultaneous search of binding sites and flexible protein-peptide docking, available as a user's friendly web server. We present example CABS-dock results obtained in the default CABS-dock mode and using its advanced options that enable the user to increase the range of flexibility for chosen receptor fragments or to exclude user-selected binding modes from docking search. Furthermore, we demonstrate a strategy to improve CABS-dock performance by assessing the quality of models with classical molecular dynamics. Finally, we discuss the promising extensions and applications of the CABS-dock method and provide a tutorial appendix for the convenient analysis and visualization of CABS-dock results. The CABS-dock web server is freely available at http://biocomp.chem.uw.edu.pl/CABSdock/. PMID:26165956

  2. Affecting proton mobility in activated peptide and whole protein ions via lysine guanidination.

    PubMed

    Pitteri, Sharon J; Reid, Gavin E; McLuckey, Scott A

    2004-01-01

    We have evaluated the effect of lysine guanidination in peptides and proteins on the dissociation of protonated ions in the gas phase. The dissociation of guanidinated model peptide ions compared to their unmodified forms showed behavior consistent with concepts of proton mobility as a major factor in determining favored fragmentation channels. Reduction of proton mobility associated with lysine guanidination was reflected by a relative increase in cleavages occurring C-terminal to aspartic acid residues as well as increases in small molecule losses. To evaluate the effect of guanidination on the dissociation behavior of whole protein ions, bovine ubiquitin was selected as a model. Essentially, all of the amide bond cleavages associated with the +10 charge state of fully guanidinated ubiquitin were observed to occur C-terminal to aspartic acid residues, unlike the dissociation behavior of the +10 ion of the unmodified protein, where competing cleavage N-terminal to proline and nonspecific amide bond cleavages were also observed. The +8 and lower charge states of the guanidinated protein showed prominent losses of small neutral molecules. This overall fragmentation behavior is consistent with current hypotheses regarding whole protein dissociation that consider proton mobility and intramolecular charge solvation as important factors in determining favored dissociation channels, and are also consistent with the fragmentation behaviors observed for the guanidinated model peptide ions. Further evaluation of the utility of condensed phase guanidination of whole proteins is necessary but the results described here confirm that guanidination can be an effective strategy for enhancing C-terminal aspartic acid cleavages. Gas phase dissociation exclusively at aspartic acid residues, especially for whole protein ions, could be useful in identifying and characterizing proteins via tandem mass spectrometry of whole protein ions. PMID:14998162

  3. Device for two-dimensional gas-phase separation and characterization of ion mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Keqi; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-12-12

    The present invention relates to a device for separation and characterization of gas-phase ions. The device incorporates an ion source, a field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) analyzer, an ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) drift tube, and an ion detector. In one aspect of the invention, FAIMS operating voltages are electrically floated on top of the IMS drift voltage. In the other aspect, the FAIMS/IMS interface is implemented employing an electrodynamic ion funnel, including in particular an hourglass ion funnel. The present invention improves the efficiency (peak capacity) and sensitivity of gas-phase separations; the online FAIMS/IMS coupling creates a fundamentally novel two-dimensional gas-phase separation technology with high peak capacity, specificity, and exceptional throughput.

  4. OMVPE growth and gas-phase reactions of AlGaN for UV emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Han, J.; Figiel, J.J.; Crawford, M.H.; Banas, M.A.; Bartram, M.E.; Biefeld, R.M.; Song, Y.K.; Nurmikko, A.V.

    1998-06-01

    Gas-phase parasitic reactions among TMG, TMA, and NH3, are investigated by monitoring of the growth rate/incorporation efficiency of GaN and AlN using an in-situ optical reflectometer. It is suggested that gas phase adduct (TMA: NH{sub 3}) reactions not only reduce the incorporation efficiency of TMA but also affect the incorporation behavior of TMGa. The observed phenomena can be explained by either a synergistic gas-phase scavenging effect or a surface site-blocking effect. Relatively low reactor pressures (30--50 Torr) are employed to grow an AlGaN/GaN QW p-n diode structure. The UV emission at 354 nm (FWHM {approximately} 6 nm) represents the first report of LED operation from an indium-free GaN QW diode.

  5. Laser-induced carbon plasma emission spectroscopic measurements on solid targets and in gas-phase optical breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Nemes, Laszlo; Keszler, Anna M.; Hornkohl, James O.; Parigger, Christian

    2005-06-20

    We report measurements of time- and spatially averaged spontaneous-emission spectra following laser-induced breakdown on a solid graphite/ambient gas interface and on solid graphite in vacuum, and also emission spectra from gas-phase optical breakdown in allene C3H4 and helium, and in CO2 and helium mixtures. These emission spectra were dominated by CII (singly ionized carbon), CIII (doubly ionized carbon), hydrogen Balmer beta (H{sub b}eta), and Swan C2 band features. Using the local thermodynamic equilibrium and thin plasma assumptions, we derived electron number density and electron temperature estimates. The former was in the 1016 cm{sup -3} range, while the latter was found to be near 20000 K. In addition, the vibration-rotation temperature of the Swan bands of the C2 radical was determined to be between 4500 and 7000 K, using an exact theoretical model for simulating diatomic emission spectra. This temperature range is probably caused by the spatial inhomogeneity of the laser-induced plasma plume. Differences are pointed out in the role of ambient CO2 in a solid graphite target and in gas-phase breakdown plasma.

  6. Real-Time Optical Monitoring of Flow Kinetics and Gas Phase Reactions Under High-Pressure OMCVD Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, N.; McCall, S.; Bachmann, K. J.

    2001-01-01

    This contribution addresses the real-time optical characterization of gas flow and gas phase reactions as they play a crucial role for chemical vapor phase depositions utilizing elevated and high pressure chemical vapor d