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Sample records for model jedi ii

  1. Jobs and Economic Development Impacts from Small Wind: JEDI Model in the Works (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Tegen, S.

    2012-06-01

    This presentation covers the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's role in economic impact analysis for wind power Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, JEDI results, small wind JEDI specifics, and a request for information to complete the model.

  2. JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    S. Hendrickson; S.Tegen

    2009-12-01

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local(usually state) level. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering America program to model wind energy jobs and impacts, JEDI has been expanded to biofuels,concentrating solar power, coal, and natural gas power plants.

  3. JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, M.; Previsic, M.

    2011-04-01

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI) for Marine and Hydrokinetics (MHK) is a user-friendly spreadsheet-based tool designed to demonstrate the economic impacts associated with developing and operating MHK power systems in the United States. The JEDI MHK User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the sources and parameters used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

  4. JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2009-12-01

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local (usually state) level. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering America program to model wind energy jobs and impacts, JEDI has been expanded to biofuels, concentrating solar power, coal, and natural gas power plants. Based on project-specific and default inputs (derived from industry norms), JEDI estimates the number of jobs and economic impacts to a local area (usually a state) that could reasonably be supported by a power generation project. For example, JEDI estimates the number of in-state construction jobs from a new wind farm. This fact sheet provides an overview of the JEDI model as it pertains to wind energy projects.

  5. JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local (usually state) level. First developed by NREL’s researchers to model wind energy jobs and impacts, JEDI has been expanded to also estimate the economic impacts of biofuels, coal, conventional hydro, concentrating solar power, geothermal, marine and hydrokinetic power, natural gas, photovoltaics, and transmission lines. This fact sheet focuses on JEDI for wind energy projects.

  6. Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: Offshore Wind User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, E.; Goldberg, M.; Keyser, D.

    2013-06-01

    The Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed by NREL and MRG & Associates, is a spreadsheet based input-output tool. JEDI is meant to be a user friendly and transparent tool to estimate potential economic impacts supported by the development and operation of offshore wind projects. This guide describes how to use the model as well as technical information such as methodology, limitations, and data sources.

  7. Assessment of the Value, Impact, and Validity of the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Suite of Models

    SciTech Connect

    Billman, L.; Keyser, D.

    2013-08-01

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), use input-output methodology to estimate gross (not net) jobs and economic impacts of building and operating selected types of renewable electricity generation and fuel plants. This analysis provides the DOE with an assessment of the value, impact, and validity of the JEDI suite of models. While the models produce estimates of jobs, earnings, and economic output, this analysis focuses only on jobs estimates. This validation report includes an introduction to JEDI models, an analysis of the value and impact of the JEDI models, and an analysis of the validity of job estimates generated by JEDI model through comparison to other modeled estimates and comparison to empirical, observed jobs data as reported or estimated for a commercial project, a state, or a region.

  8. Transmission Line Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, M.; Keyser, D.

    2013-10-01

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are freely available, user-friendly tools that estimate the potential economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation projects for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The Transmission Line JEDI model can be used to field questions about the economic impacts of transmission lines in a given state, region, or local community. This Transmission Line JEDI User Reference Guide was developed to provide basic instruction on operating the model and understanding the results. This guide also provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data contained in the model.

  9. Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) User Reference Guide: Fast Pyrolysis Biorefinery Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Goldberg, M.

    2015-02-01

    This guide -- the JEDI Fast Pyrolysis Biorefinery Model User Reference Guide -- was developed to assist users in operating and understanding the JEDI Fast Pyrolysis Biorefinery Model. The guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and data sources used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted. Based on project-specific inputs from the user, the JEDI Fast Pyrolysis Biorefinery Model estimates local (e.g., county- or state-level) job creation, earnings, and output from total economic activity for a given fast pyrolysis biorefinery. These estimates include the direct, indirect and induced economic impacts to the local economy associated with the construction and operation phases of biorefinery projects.Local revenue and supply chain impacts as well as induced impacts are estimated using economic multipliers derived from the IMPLAN software program. By determining the local economic impacts and job creation for a proposed biorefinery, the JEDI Fast Pyrolysis Biorefinery Model can be used to field questions about the added value biorefineries might bring to a local community.

  10. Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model Geothermal User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.; Augustine, C.; Goldberg, M.

    2012-09-01

    The Geothermal Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is an Excel-based user-friendly tools that estimates the economic impacts of constructing and operating hydrothermal and Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) power generation projects at the local level for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Model Geothermal User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

  11. Petroleum Refinery Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, M.

    2013-12-31

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are user-friendly tools utilized to estimate the economic impacts at the local level of constructing and operating fuel and power generation projects for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Petroleum Refinery Model User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in employing and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted. Based on project-specific inputs from the user, the model estimates job creation, earning and output (total economic activity) for a given petroleum refinery. This includes the direct, indirect and induced economic impacts to the local economy associated with the refinery's construction and operation phases. Project cost and job data used in the model are derived from the most current cost estimations available. Local direct and indirect economic impacts are estimated using economic multipliers derived from IMPLAN software. By determining the regional economic impacts and job creation for a proposed refinery, the JEDI Petroleum Refinery model can be used to field questions about the added value refineries may bring to the local community.

  12. von Willebrand factor, Jedi knight of the bloodstream.

    PubMed

    Springer, Timothy A

    2014-08-28

    When blood vessels are cut, the forces in the bloodstream increase and change character. The dark side of these forces causes hemorrhage and death. However, von Willebrand factor (VWF), with help from our circulatory system and platelets, harnesses the same forces to form a hemostatic plug. Force and VWF function are so closely intertwined that, like members of the Jedi Order in the movie Star Wars who learn to use "the Force" to do good, VWF may be considered the Jedi knight of the bloodstream. The long length of VWF enables responsiveness to flow. The shape of VWF is predicted to alter from irregularly coiled to extended thread-like in the transition from shear to elongational flow at sites of hemostasis and thrombosis. Elongational force propagated through the length of VWF in its thread-like shape exposes its monomers for multimeric binding to platelets and subendothelium and likely also increases affinity of the A1 domain for platelets. Specialized domains concatenate and compact VWF during biosynthesis. A2 domain unfolding by hydrodynamic force enables postsecretion regulation of VWF length. Mutations in VWF in von Willebrand disease contribute to and are illuminated by VWF biology. I attempt to integrate classic studies on the physiology of hemostatic plug formation into modern molecular understanding, and point out what remains to be learned. PMID:24928861

  13. von Willebrand factor, Jedi knight of the bloodstream

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    When blood vessels are cut, the forces in the bloodstream increase and change character. The dark side of these forces causes hemorrhage and death. However, von Willebrand factor (VWF), with help from our circulatory system and platelets, harnesses the same forces to form a hemostatic plug. Force and VWF function are so closely intertwined that, like members of the Jedi Order in the movie Star Wars who learn to use “the Force” to do good, VWF may be considered the Jedi knight of the bloodstream. The long length of VWF enables responsiveness to flow. The shape of VWF is predicted to alter from irregularly coiled to extended thread-like in the transition from shear to elongational flow at sites of hemostasis and thrombosis. Elongational force propagated through the length of VWF in its thread-like shape exposes its monomers for multimeric binding to platelets and subendothelium and likely also increases affinity of the A1 domain for platelets. Specialized domains concatenate and compact VWF during biosynthesis. A2 domain unfolding by hydrodynamic force enables postsecretion regulation of VWF length. Mutations in VWF in von Willebrand disease contribute to and are illuminated by VWF biology. I attempt to integrate classic studies on the physiology of hemostatic plug formation into modern molecular understanding, and point out what remains to be learned. PMID:24928861

  14. The Jupiter Energetic Particle Detector Instrument (JEDI) Investigation for the Juno Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, B. H.; Haggerty, D. K.; Jaskulek, S. E.; Schlemm, C. E.; Brown, L. E.; Cooper, S. A.; Gurnee, R. S.; Hammock, C. M.; Hayes, J. R.; Ho, G. C.; Hutcheson, J. C.; Jacques, A. D.; Kerem, S.; Kim, C. K.; Mitchell, D. G.; Nelson, K. S.; Paranicas, C. P.; Paschalidis, N.; Rossano, E.; Stokes, M. R.

    2013-11-01

    The Jupiter Energetic Particle Detector Instruments (JEDI) on the Juno Jupiter polar-orbiting, atmosphere-skimming, mission to Jupiter will coordinate with the several other space physics instruments on the Juno spacecraft to characterize and understand the space environment of Jupiter's polar regions, and specifically to understand the generation of Jupiter's powerful aurora. JEDI comprises 3 nearly-identical instruments and measures at minimum the energy, angle, and ion composition distributions of ions with energies from H:20 keV and O: 50 keV to >1 MeV, and the energy and angle distribution of electrons from <40 to >500 keV. Each JEDI instrument uses microchannel plates (MCP) and thin foils to measure the times of flight (TOF) of incoming ions and the pulse height associated with the interaction of ions with the foils, and it uses solid state detectors (SSD's) to measure the total energy (E) of both the ions and the electrons. The MCP anodes and the SSD arrays are configured to determine the directions of arrivals of the incoming charged particles. The instruments also use fast triple coincidence and optimum shielding to suppress penetrating background radiation and incoming UV foreground. Here we describe the science objectives of JEDI, the science and measurement requirements, the challenges that the JEDI team had in meeting these requirements, the design and operation of the JEDI instruments, their calibrated performances, the JEDI inflight and ground operations, and the initial measurements of the JEDI instruments in interplanetary space following the Juno launch on 5 August 2011. Juno will begin its prime science operations, comprising 32 orbits with dimensions 1.1×40 RJ, in mid-2016.

  15. User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Coal, Natural Gas, and Wind: The Expanded Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI II); Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Tegen, S.; Goldberg, M.; Milligan, M.

    2006-06-01

    In this paper we examine the impacts of building new coal, gas, or wind plants in three states: Colorado, Michigan, and Virginia. Our findings indicate that local/state economic impacts are directly related to the availability and utilization of local industries and services to build and operate the power plant. For gas and coal plants, the economic benefit depends significantly on whether the fuel is obtained from within the state, out of state, or some combination. We also find that the taxes generated by power plants can have a significant impact on local economies via increased expenditures on public goods.

  16. Beyond the Standard Model II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, Kimball A.; Kantowski, Ronald; Samuel, Mark A.

    1991-07-01

    Future Prospects * Quantum Mechanics at the Black Hole Horizon * Target-Space Duality and the Curse of the Wormhole * Mass Enhancement and Critical Behavior in Technicolor Theories * Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Elastic Scattering at High Energies - Theory, Phenomenology, and Experiment * Gauge Masses in String Field Theory * An Introduction to Bosonic Technicolor * Anyonic Superconductivity * Hunting the Higgs Boson at LEP with OPAL * Beyond the Standard Model - The Sextet Quarks Way * Dynamical Breakdown of Z2 and Parity in QED3 with Fermion Self-Coupling * Scaling Properties of QED3 with Fermion Self-Couplings * Wheeler-DeWitt Quantum Gravity in (2+1) Dimensions * Kac-Moody Algebras from Covariantization of the Lax Operators * An Upper Bound on the Higgs Mass * Suppression of the Vacuum Energy Expectation Value * Lorentz Covariance of Quantum Fluctuations in Quantum Field Theory * The Gauge Invariance of the Critical Curve in Strong-coupling Gauge Theory * Heavy W Decays into Sfermions and a Photon * New Insights on Majoron Models * Program of Beyond the Standard Model II * List of Participants

  17. Juno JEDI high latitude snapshot of Earth's energetic charged particle distributions during the coordinated Juno spacecraft encounter with Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranicas, C.; Mauk, B.; Haggerty, D. K.; Schlemm, C.; Jaskulek, S.; Kim, C.; Brown, L. E.; Bagenal, F.; Thorne, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    NASA's Juno spacecraft will begin its orbit of Jupiter in mid-2016. During Juno's gravity assist encounter with Earth on October 9, 2013, the Jupiter Energetic Particle Detector Instrument (JEDI) will take measurements of the energetic electron and ion distributions at relatively high latitudes. These measurements will contribute substantially to a coordinated activity to obtain a comprehensive characterization of Earth's space environment during the encounter period. Here we present and describe the JEDI measurements and discuss them in the context of measurements taken at the same time, including those obtained by the Van Allen Probes mission. JEDI comprises three nearly identical energetic charged particle sensors. Each sensor detects energetic electrons (above 25 keV up to > 1000 keV) and energetic ions (about 20 keV to > 1 MeV for protons, and 50 keV to > 10 MeV for oxygen and sulfur) with high energy, time, and angular resolution. Two of the sensors are fans viewing almost entirely in the plane perpendicular to Juno's high-gain antenna. The third fan is perpendicular to this plane, so that combined with the spacecraft spin rate of about 2 rpm, nearly the whole sky is sampled every 30 s. During the gravitational assist encounter of Earth, JEDI obtains continuous data from about 3 days prior to closest approach through at least 2 weeks after closest approach. This will include data obtained outside and through the bow shock and magnetosheath, to deep within the magnetosphere. Due to the low flyby altitude of about 560 km, JEDI will operate its high voltage (thereby obtaining ion composition information) only outside of a few RE geocentric distances. Also, by using the so-called witness detectors, on one of the three sensors, the instrument is expected to obtain an integral channel measurement inside the radiation belts.

  18. ExodusII Finite Element Data Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-05-14

    EXODUS II is a model developed to store and retrieve data for finite element analyses. It is used for preprocessing (problem definition), postprocessing (results visualization), as well as code to code data transfer. An EXODUS II data file is a random access, machine independent, binary file that is written and read via C, C++, or Fortran library routines which comprise the Application Programming Interface. (exodus II is based on netcdf)

  19. Hearing on H.R. 2246, Jobs for Employable Dependent Individuals "JEDI." Hearing before the Subcommittee on Employment Opportunities of the Committee on Education and Labor. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    This hearing reviews testimony concerning H.R. 2246, the Jobs for Employable Dependent Individuals Act (JEDI). JEDI is a voluntary program whereby states receive additional funds to fight the problem of chronic welfare dependency and poverty. The bill would require the existing Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) to target job training efforts at…

  20. Inert doublet model and LEP II limits

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstroem, Erik; Gustafsson, Michael; Edsjoe, Joakim

    2009-02-01

    The inert doublet model is a minimal extension of the standard model introducing an additional SU(2) doublet with new scalar particles that could be produced at accelerators. While there exists no LEP II analysis dedicated for these inert scalars, the absence of a signal within searches for supersymmetric neutralinos can be used to constrain the inert doublet model. This translation however requires some care because of the different properties of the inert scalars and the neutralinos. We investigate what restrictions an existing DELPHI Collaboration study of neutralino pair production can put on the inert scalars and discuss the result in connection with dark matter. We find that although an important part of the inert doublet model parameter space can be excluded by the LEP II data, the lightest inert particle still constitutes a valid dark matter candidate.

  1. Line emission from H II blister models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    Numerical techniques to calculate the thermal and geometric properties of line emission from H II 'blister' regions are presented. It is assumed that the density distributions of the H II regions are a function of two dimensions, with rotational symmetry specifying the shape in three-dimensions. The thermal and ionization equilibrium equations of the problem are solved by spherical modeling, and a spherical sector approximation is used to simplify the three-dimensional treatment of diffuse ionizing radiation. The global properties of H II 'blister' regions near the edges of a molecular cloud are simulated by means of the geometry/density distribution, and the results are compared with observational data. It is shown that there is a monotonic increase of peak surface brightness from the i = 0 deg (pole-on) observational position to the i = 90 deg (edge-on) position. The enhancement of the line peak intensity from the edge-on to the pole-on positions is found to depend on the density, stratification, ionization, and electron temperature weighting. It is found that as i increases, the position of peak line brightness of the lower excitation species is displaced to the high-density side of the high excitation species.

  2. Physical properties of solar chromospheric plages. III - Models based on Ca II and Mg II observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelch, W. L.; Linsky, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    Solar plages are modeled using observations of both the Ca II K and the Mg II h and k lines. A partial-redistribution approach is employed for calculating the line profiles on the basis of a grid of five model chromospheres. The computed integrated emission intensities for the five atmospheric models are compared with observations of six regions on the sun as well as with models of active-chromosphere stars. It is concluded that the basic plage model grid proposed by Shine and Linsky (1974) is still valid when the Mg II lines are included in the analysis and the Ca II and Mg II lines are analyzed using partial-redistribution diagnostics.

  3. Modeling Topaz-II system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.H.; Klein, A.C. )

    1993-01-01

    The US acquisition of the Topaz-11 in-core thermionic space reactor test system from Russia provides a good opportunity to perform a comparison of the Russian reported data and the results from computer codes such as MCNP (Ref. 3) and TFEHX (Ref. 4). The comparison study includes both neutronic and thermionic performance analyses. The Topaz II thermionic reactor is modeled with MCNP using actual Russian dimensions and parameters. The computation of the neutronic performance considers several important aspects such as the fuel enrichment and location of the thermionic fuel elements (TFES) in the reactor core. The neutronic analysis included the calculation of both radial and axial power distribution, which are then used in the TFEHX code for electrical performance. The reactor modeled consists of 37 single-cell TFEs distributed in a 13-cm-radius zirconium hydride block surrounded by 8 cm of beryllium metal reflector. The TFEs use 90% enriched [sup 235]U and molybdenum coated with a thin layer of [sup 184]W for emitter surface. Electrons emitted are captured by a collector surface with a gap filled with cesium vapor between the collector and emitter surfaces. The collector surface is electrically insulated with alumina. Liquid NaK provides the cooling system for the TFEs. The axial thermal power distribution is obtained by dividing the TFE into 40 axial nodes. Comparison of the true axial power distribution with that produced by electrical heaters was also performed.

  4. Climate Model Datasets on Earth System Grid II (ESG II)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Earth System Grid (ESG) is a project that combines the power and capacity of supercomputers, sophisticated analysis servers, and datasets on the scale of petabytes. The goal is to provide a seamless distributed environment that allows scientists in many locations to work with large-scale data, perform climate change modeling and simulation,and share results in innovative ways. Though ESG is more about the computing environment than the data, still there are several catalogs of data available at the web site that can be browsed or search. Most of the datasets are restricted to registered users, but several are open to any access.

  5. PARALLEL MEASUREMENT AND MODELING OF TRANSPORT IN THE DARHT II BEAMLINE ON ETA II

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, F W; Raymond, B A; Falabella, S; Lee, B S; Richardson, R A; Weir, J T; Davis, H A; Schultze, M E

    2005-05-31

    To successfully tune the DARHT II transport beamline requires the close coupling of a model of the beam transport and the measurement of the beam observables as the beam conditions and magnet settings are varied. For the ETA II experiment using the DARHT II beamline components this was achieved using the SUICIDE (Simple User Interface Connecting to an Integrated Data Environment) data analysis environment and the FITS (Fully Integrated Transport Simulation) model. The SUICIDE environment has direct access to the experimental beam transport data at acquisition and the FITS predictions of the transport for immediate comparison. The FITS model is coupled into the control system where it can read magnet current settings for real time modeling. We find this integrated coupling is essential for model verification and the successful development of a tuning aid for the efficient convergence on a useable tune. We show the real time comparisons of simulation and experiment and explore the successes and limitations of this close coupled approach.

  6. Modeling of copper(II) and zinc(II) extraction from chloride media with Kelex 100

    SciTech Connect

    Bogacki, M.B.; Zhivkova, S.; Kyuchoukov, G.; Szymanowski, J.

    2000-03-01

    The extraction of copper(II) and zinc(II) from acidic chloride solutions with protonated Kelex 100 (HL) was studied and the extraction isotherms were determined for systems containing individual metal ions and their mixtures. A chemical model was proposed and verified. It considers the coextraction of the following species: MCl{sub 4}(H{sub 2}L){sub 2}, MCl{sub 4}(H{sub 2}L){sub 2}{center_dot}HCl, MCl{sub 3}(H{sub 2}L), ML{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}L{center_dot}HCl. Zinc(II) is extracted as the metal ion pairs, while copper(II) can be extracted as the metal ion pair and the chelate. The model can be used to predict the effect of experimental conditions on extraction and coextraction of the metal ions considered.

  7. Modeling the Arm II core in MicroCap IV

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, A.C.

    1996-11-01

    This paper reports on how an electrical model for the core of the Arm II machine was created and how to use this model. We wanted to get a model for the electrical characteristics of the ARM II core, in order to simulate this machine and to assist in the design of a future machine. We wanted this model to be able to simulate saturation, variable loss, and reset. Using the Hodgdon model and the circuit analysis program MicroCap IV, this was accomplished. This paper is written in such a way as to allow someone not familiar with the project to understand it.

  8. Test cell modeling and optimization for FPD-II

    SciTech Connect

    Haney, S.W.; Fenstermacher, M.E.

    1985-04-10

    The Fusion Power Demonstration, Configuration II (FPD-II), will ba a DT burning tandem mirror facility with thermal barriers, designed as the next step engineering test reactor (ETR) to follow the tandem mirror ignition test machines. Current plans call for FPD-II to be a multi-purpose device. For approximately the first half of its lifetime, it will operate as a high-Q ignition machine designed to reach or exceed engineering break-even and to demonstrate the technological feasibility of tandem mirror fusion. The second half of its operation will focus on the evaluation of candidate reactor blanket designs using a neutral beam driven test cell inserted at the midplane of the 90 m long cell. This machine called FPD-II+T, uses an insert configuration similar to that used in the MFTF-..cap alpha..+T study. The modeling and optimization of FPD-II+T are the topic of the present paper.

  9. Aqueous Solution Vessel Thermal Model Development II

    SciTech Connect

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen

    2015-10-28

    The work presented in this report is a continuation of the work described in the May 2015 report, “Aqueous Solution Vessel Thermal Model Development”. This computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model aims to predict the temperature and bubble volume fraction in an aqueous solution of uranium. These values affect the reactivity of the fissile solution, so it is important to be able to calculate them and determine their effects on the reaction. Part A of this report describes some of the parameter comparisons performed on the CFD model using Fluent. Part B describes the coupling of the Fluent model with a Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) neutron transport model. The fuel tank geometry is the same as it was in the May 2015 report, annular with a thickness-to-height ratio of 0.16. An accelerator-driven neutron source provides the excitation for the reaction, and internal and external water cooling channels remove the heat. The model used in this work incorporates the Eulerian multiphase model with lift, wall lubrication, turbulent dispersion and turbulence interaction. The buoyancy-driven flow is modeled using the Boussinesq approximation, and the flow turbulence is determined using the k-ω Shear-Stress-Transport (SST) model. The dispersed turbulence multiphase model is employed to capture the multiphase turbulence effects.

  10. On The Modeling of Educational Systems: II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grauer, Robert T.

    1975-01-01

    A unified approach to model building is developed from the separate techniques of regression, simulation, and factorial design. The methodology is applied in the context of a suburban school district. (Author/LS)

  11. Nyala and Bushbuck II: A Harvesting Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.; Greeff, Johanna C.

    1999-01-01

    Adds a cropping or harvesting term to the animal overpopulation model developed in Part I of this article. Investigates various harvesting strategies that might suggest a solution to the overpopulation problem without actually culling any animals. (ASK)

  12. Predictive Models and Computational Toxicology (II IBAMTOX)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s ‘virtual embryo’ project is building an integrative systems biology framework for predictive models of developmental toxicity. One schema involves a knowledge-driven adverse outcome pathway (AOP) framework utilizing information from public databases, standardized ontologies...

  13. NGC1300 dynamics - II. The response models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalapotharakos, C.; Patsis, P. A.; Grosbøl, P.

    2010-10-01

    We study the stellar response in a spectrum of potentials describing the barred spiral galaxy NGC1300. These potentials have been presented in a previous paper and correspond to three different assumptions as regards the geometry of the galaxy. For each potential we consider a wide range of Ωp pattern speed values. Our goal is to discover the geometries and the Ωp supporting specific morphological features of NGC1300. For this purpose we use the method of response models. In order to compare the images of NGC1300 with the density maps of our models, we define a new index which is a generalization of the Hausdorff distance. This index helps us to find out quantitatively which cases reproduce specific features of NGC1300 in an objective way. Furthermore, we construct alternative models following a Schwarzschild-type technique. By this method we vary the weights of the various energy levels, and thus the orbital contribution of each energy, in order to minimize the differences between the response density and that deduced from the surface density of the galaxy, under certain assumptions. We find that the models corresponding to Ωp ~ 16 and 22 kms-1kpc-1 are able to reproduce efficiently certain morphological features of NGC1300, with each one having its advantages and drawbacks. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile: programme ESO 69.A-0021. E-mail: ckalapot@phys.uoa.gr (CK); patsis@academyofathens.gr (PAP); pgrosbol@eso.org (PG)

  14. Implementing the Ecosystem Model: Phase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuh, John H.

    1978-01-01

    The ecosystem model was used to assess student perceptions of certain aspects of residential life at a large university. Over 70 percent of questionnaires were returned. From the data, aspects of the environment were changed according to student recommendations. A great need for more information communication was found. (RPG)

  15. PEP-II vacuum system pressure profile modeling using EXCEL

    SciTech Connect

    Nordby, M.; Perkins, C.

    1994-06-01

    A generic, adaptable Microsoft EXCEL program to simulate molecular flow in beam line vacuum systems is introduced. Modeling using finite-element approximation of the governing differential equation is discussed, as well as error estimation and program capabilities. The ease of use and flexibility of the spreadsheet-based program is demonstrated. PEP-II vacuum system models are reviewed and compared with analytical models.

  16. Dynamical models of a sample of Population II stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levison, H. F.; Richstone, D. O.

    1986-09-01

    Dynamical models are constructed in order to investigate the implications of recent kinematic data of distant Population II stars on the emissivity distribution of those stars. Models are constructed using a modified Schwarzschild method in two extreme scale-free potentials, spherical and E6 elliptical. Both potentials produce flat rotation curves and velocity dispersion profiles. In all models, the distribution of stars in this sample is flat. Moreover, it is not possible to construct a model with a strictly spheroidal emissivity distribution. Most models have dimples at the poles. The dynamics of the models indicate that the system is supported by both the third integral and z angular momentum.

  17. Multiwell experiment: reservoir modeling analysis, Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, A.I.

    1985-05-01

    This report updates an ongoing analysis by reservoir modelers at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of well test data from the Department of Energy's Multiwell Experiment (MWX). Results of previous efforts were presented in a recent METC Technical Note (Horton 1985). Results included in this report pertain to the poststimulation well tests of Zones 3 and 4 of the Paludal Sandstone Interval and the prestimulation well tests of the Red and Yellow Zones of the Coastal Sandstone Interval. The following results were obtained by using a reservoir model and history matching procedures: (1) Post-minifracture analysis indicated that the minifracture stimulation of the Paludal Interval did not produce an induced fracture, and extreme formation damage did occur, since a 65% permeability reduction around the wellbore was estimated. The design for this minifracture was from 200 to 300 feet on each side of the wellbore; (2) Post full-scale stimulation analysis for the Paludal Interval also showed that extreme formation damage occurred during the stimulation as indicated by a 75% permeability reduction 20 feet on each side of the induced fracture. Also, an induced fracture half-length of 100 feet was determined to have occurred, as compared to a designed fracture half-length of 500 to 600 feet; and (3) Analysis of prestimulation well test data from the Coastal Interval agreed with previous well-to-well interference tests that showed extreme permeability anisotropy was not a factor for this zone. This lack of permeability anisotropy was also verified by a nitrogen injection test performed on the Coastal Red and Yellow Zones. 8 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Competitive sorption of Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) on carbonaceous nanofibers: A spectroscopic and modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Ding, Congcong; Cheng, Wencai; Wang, Xiangxue; Wu, Zhen-Yu; Sun, Yubing; Chen, Changlun; Wang, Xiangke; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-08-01

    The competitive sorption of Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) on the uniform carbonaceous nanofibers (CNFs) was investigated in binary/ternary-metal systems. The pH-dependent sorption of Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) on CNFs was independent of ionic strength, indicating that inner-sphere surface complexation dominated sorption Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) on CNFs. The maximum sorption capacities of Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) on CNFs in single-metal systems at a pH 5.5±0.2 and 25±1°C were 3.84 (795.65mg/g), 3.21 (204.00mg/g) and 2.67 (156.70mg/g)mmol/g, respectively. In equimolar binary/ternary-metal systems, Pb(II) exhibited greater inhibition of the sorption of Cu(II) and Ni(II), demonstrating the stronger affinity of CNFs for Pb(II). The competitive sorption of heavy metals in ternary-metal systems was predicted quite well by surface complexation modeling derived from single-metal data. According to FTIR, XPS and EXAFS analyses, Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) were specifically adsorbed on CNFs via covalent bonding. These observations should provide an essential start in simultaneous removal of multiple heavy metals from aquatic environments by CNFs, and open the doorways for the application of CNFs. PMID:27108273

  19. Bow shock models of ultracompact H II regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Van Buren, Dave; Wood, Douglas O. S.; Churchwell, ED

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents models of ultracompact H II regions as the bow shocks formed by massive stars, with strong stellar winds, moving supersonically through molecular clouds. The morphologies, sizes and brightnesses of observed objects match the models well. Plausible models are provided for the ultracompact H II regions G12.21 - 0.1, G29.96 - 0.02, G34.26 + 0.15, and G43.89 - 0.78. To do this, the equilibrium shape of the wind-blown shell is calculated, assuming momentum conservation. Then the shell is illuminated with ionizing radiation from the central star, radiative transfer for free-free emission through the shell is performed, and the resulting object is visualized at various angles for comparison with radio continuum maps. The model unifies most of the observed morphologies of ultracompact H II regions, excluding only those objects with spherical shells. Ram pressure confinement greatly lengthens the life of ultracompact H II regions, explaining the large number that exist in the Galaxy despite their low apparent kinematic ages.

  20. End-to-end modelling of He II flow systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mord, A. J.; Snyder, H. A.; Newell, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    A practical computer code has been developed which uses the accepted two-fluid model to simulate He II flow in complicated systems. The full set of equations are used, retaining the coupling between the pressure, temperature and velocity fields. This permits modeling He II flow over the full range of conditions, from strongly or weakly driven flow through large pipes, narrow channels and porous media. The system may include most of the components used in modern superfluid flow systems: non-ideal thermomechanical pumps, tapered sections, constrictions, lines with heated side walls and heat exchangers. The model is validated by comparison with published experimental data. It is applied to a complex system to show some of the non-intuitive feedback effects that can occur. This code is ready to be used as a design tool for practical applications of He II. It can also be used for the design of He II experiments and as a tool for comparison of experimental data with the standard two-fluid model.

  1. Computing Models of CDF and D0 in Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Lammel, S.

    1997-05-01

    The next collider run of the Fermilab Tevatron, Run II, is scheduled for autumn of 1999. Both experiments, the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and the D0 experiment are being modified to cope with the higher luminosity and shorter bunch spacing of the Tevatron. New detector components, higher event complexity, and an increased data volume require changes from the data acquisition systems up to the analysis systems. In this paper we present a summary of the computing models of the two experiments for Run II.

  2. Predictive data modeling of human type II diabetes related statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaenisch, Kristina L.; Jaenisch, Holger M.; Handley, James W.; Albritton, Nathaniel G.

    2009-04-01

    During the course of routine Type II treatment of one of the authors, it was decided to derive predictive analytical Data Models of the daily sampled vital statistics: namely weight, blood pressure, and blood sugar, to determine if the covariance among the observed variables could yield a descriptive equation based model, or better still, a predictive analytical model that could forecast the expected future trend of the variables and possibly eliminate the number of finger stickings required to montior blood sugar levels. The personal history and analysis with resulting models are presented.

  3. SDSS-II: Determination of shape and color parameter coefficients for SALT-II fit model

    SciTech Connect

    Dojcsak, L.; Marriner, J.; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    In this study we look at the SALT-II model of Type IA supernova analysis, which determines the distance moduli based on the known absolute standard candle magnitude of the Type IA supernovae. We take a look at the determination of the shape and color parameter coefficients, {alpha} and {beta} respectively, in the SALT-II model with the intrinsic error that is determined from the data. Using the SNANA software package provided for the analysis of Type IA supernovae, we use a standard Monte Carlo simulation to generate data with known parameters to use as a tool for analyzing the trends in the model based on certain assumptions about the intrinsic error. In order to find the best standard candle model, we try to minimize the residuals on the Hubble diagram by calculating the correct shape and color parameter coefficients. We can estimate the magnitude of the intrinsic errors required to obtain results with {chi}{sup 2}/degree of freedom = 1. We can use the simulation to estimate the amount of color smearing as indicated by the data for our model. We find that the color smearing model works as a general estimate of the color smearing, and that we are able to use the RMS distribution in the variables as one method of estimating the correct intrinsic errors needed by the data to obtain the correct results for {alpha} and {beta}. We then apply the resultant intrinsic error matrix to the real data and show our results.

  4. Modelling Ar II spectral emission from the ASTRAL helicon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz Burgos, Jorge; Boivin, Robert; Loch, Stuart; Kamar, Ola; Ballance, Connor; Pindzola, Mitch

    2008-11-01

    We describe our spectral modeling of ArII emission from the ASTRAL helicon plasma at Auburn University. Collisional-radiative theory is used to model the emitted spectrum, with account being taken for the density and temperature variation along the line of sight. This study has two main aims. Firstly to test the atomic data used in the model and secondly to identify spectral line ratios in the 200 nm - 1000 nm range that could be used as temperature diagnostics. Using the temperature at which Ar II emission starts to be seen we have been able to test recent ionization and recombination data. Using selected spectral lines we were then able to test the importance of the continuum-coupling effects included in the most recent Ar+ electron impact excitation data. Selected spectral line ratios have been identified that show a strong temperature variation and have potential as a temperature diagnostic.

  5. Comprehensive Modeling of the Apache With CAMRAD II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Henry E.; Kunz, Donald L.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a report of a multi year study of the U.S. Army LONGBOW APACHE (AH-64D) aircraft. The goals of this study were to provide the Apache Project Managers Office (PMO) with a broad spectrum of calibrated comprehensive and CFD models of the AH-64D aircraft. The goal of this paper is to present an overview of the comprehensive model which has been developed. The CAMRAD II computer code was chosen to complete this task. The paper first discusses issues that must be addressed when modeling the Apache using CAMRAD. The work required the acquisition of a data base for the aircraft and the development and application of a multidisciplinary computer model. Sample results from various parts of the model are presented. Conclusions with regard to the strengths and weaknesses of simulations based on this model are discussed.

  6. Comprehensive Modeling of the Apache with CAMRAD II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Henry E.; Kunz, Donald L.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a report of a multi year study of the U.S. Army LONGBOW APACHE (AH-64D) aircraft. The goals of this study were to provide the Apache Project Managers Office (PMO) with a broad spectrum of calibrated comprehensive and CFD models of the AH-64D aircraft. The goal of this paper is to present an overview of the comprehensive model which has been developed. The CAMRAD II computer code was chosen to complete this task. The paper first discusses issues that must be addressed when modeling the Apache using CAMRAD. The work required the acquisition of a data base for the aircraft and the development and application of a multidisciplinary computer model. Sample results from various parts of the model are presented. Conclusions with regard to the strengths and weaknesses of simulations based on this model are discussed.

  7. An integrated model of the TOPAZ-II electromagnetic pump

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.S.; Paramonov, D.V. . Inst. of Space Nuclear Power Studies)

    1994-11-01

    A detailed model of the electromagnetic pump of the TOPAZ-II space nuclear reactor power system is developed and compared with experimental data. The magnetic field strength in the pump depends not only on the current supplied by the pump thermionic fuel elements in the reactor core but also on the temperature of the coolant, the magnetic coil, and the pump structure. All electric and thermal properties of the coolant, wall material of the pump ducts, and electric leads are taken to be temperature dependent. The model predictions are in good agreement with experimental data.

  8. Photon number conserving models of H II bubbles during reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Aseem; Choudhury, T. Roy; Padmanabhan, Hamsa

    2016-08-01

    Traditional excursion-set-based models of H II bubble growth during the epoch of reionization are known to violate photon number conservation, in the sense that the mass fraction in ionized bubbles in these models does not equal the ratio of the number of ionizing photons produced by sources and the number of hydrogen atoms in the intergalactic medium. E.g. for a Planck13 cosmology with electron scattering optical depth τ ≃ 0.066, the discrepancy is ˜15 per cent for x_{H II}=0.1 and ˜5 per cent for x_{H II}=0.5. We demonstrate that this problem arises from a fundamental conceptual shortcoming of the excursion-set approach (already recognized in the literature on this formalism) which only tracks average mass fractions instead of the exact, stochastic source counts. With this insight, we build an approximately photon number conserving Monte Carlo model of bubble growth based on partitioning regions of dark matter into haloes. Our model, which is formally valid for white noise initial conditions (ICs), shows dramatic improvements in photon number conservation, as well as substantial differences in the bubble size distribution, as compared to traditional models. We explore the trends obtained on applying our algorithm to more realistic ICs, finding that these improvements are robust to changes in the ICs. Since currently popular seminumerical schemes of bubble growth also violate photon number conservation, we argue that it will be worthwhile to pursue new, explicitly photon number conserving approaches. Along the way, we clarify some misconceptions regarding this problem that have appeared in the literature.

  9. A MODEL STUDY OF TRANSVERSE MODE COUPLING INSTABILITY AT NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE-II (NSLS-II).

    SciTech Connect

    BLEDNYKH, A.; WANG, J.M.

    2005-05-15

    The vertical impedances of the preliminary designs of National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) Mini Gap Undulators (MGU) are calculated by means of GdfidL code. The Transverse Mode Coupling Instability (TMCI) thresholds corresponding to these impedances are estimated using an analytically solvable model.

  10. Bound on Z{sup '} mass from CDMS II in the dark left-right gauge model II

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, Shaaban; Lee, Hye-Sung; Ma, Ernest

    2010-03-01

    With the recent possible signal of dark matter from the CDMS II experiment, the Z{sup '} mass of a new version of the dark left-right gauge model (DLRM II) is predicted to be at around a TeV. As such, it has an excellent discovery prognosis at the operating Large Hadron Collider.

  11. Radiation model for row crops: II. Model evaluation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Relatively few radiation transfer studies have considered the impact of varying vegetation cover that typifies row crops, and meth¬ods to account for partial row crop cover have not been well investigated. Our objective was to evaluate a widely used radiation model that was modified for row crops ha...

  12. Kinetic modelling for zinc (II) ions biosorption onto Luffa cylindrica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oboh, I.; Aluyor, E.; Audu, T.

    2015-03-01

    The biosorption of Zinc (II) ions onto a biomaterial - Luffa cylindrica has been studied. This biomaterial was characterized by elemental analysis, surface area, pore size distribution, scanning electron microscopy, and the biomaterial before and after sorption, was characterized by Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectrometer. The kinetic nonlinear models fitted were Pseudo-first order, Pseudo-second order and Intra-particle diffusion. A comparison of non-linear regression method in selecting the kinetic model was made. Four error functions, namely coefficient of determination (R2), hybrid fractional error function (HYBRID), average relative error (ARE), and sum of the errors squared (ERRSQ), were used to predict the parameters of the kinetic models. The strength of this study is that a biomaterial with wide distribution particularly in the tropical world and which occurs as waste material could be put into effective utilization as a biosorbent to address a crucial environmental problem.

  13. Kinetic modelling for zinc (II) ions biosorption onto Luffa cylindrica

    SciTech Connect

    Oboh, I.; Aluyor, E.; Audu, T.

    2015-03-30

    The biosorption of Zinc (II) ions onto a biomaterial - Luffa cylindrica has been studied. This biomaterial was characterized by elemental analysis, surface area, pore size distribution, scanning electron microscopy, and the biomaterial before and after sorption, was characterized by Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectrometer. The kinetic nonlinear models fitted were Pseudo-first order, Pseudo-second order and Intra-particle diffusion. A comparison of non-linear regression method in selecting the kinetic model was made. Four error functions, namely coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}), hybrid fractional error function (HYBRID), average relative error (ARE), and sum of the errors squared (ERRSQ), were used to predict the parameters of the kinetic models. The strength of this study is that a biomaterial with wide distribution particularly in the tropical world and which occurs as waste material could be put into effective utilization as a biosorbent to address a crucial environmental problem.

  14. Modeling the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II using non-parametric item response models.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Garre, Francisca; Hidalgo, María Dolores; Guilera, Georgina; Pino, Oscar; Rojo, J Emilio; Gómez-Benito, Juana

    2015-03-01

    The World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHO-DAS II) is a multidimensional instrument developed for measuring disability. It comprises six domains (getting around, self-care, getting along with others, life activities and participation in society). The main purpose of this paper is the evaluation of the psychometric properties for each domain of the WHO-DAS II with parametric and non-parametric Item Response Theory (IRT) models. A secondary objective is to assess whether the WHO-DAS II items within each domain form a hierarchy of invariantly ordered severity indicators of disability. A sample of 352 patients with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder is used in this study. The 36 items WHO-DAS II was administered during the consultation. Partial Credit and Mokken scale models are used to study the psychometric properties of the questionnaire. The psychometric properties of the WHO-DAS II scale are satisfactory for all the domains. However, we identify a few items that do not discriminate satisfactorily between different levels of disability and cannot be invariantly ordered in the scale. In conclusion the WHO-DAS II can be used to assess overall disability in patients with schizophrenia, but some domains are too general to assess functionality in these patients because they contain items that are not applicable to this pathology. PMID:25524862

  15. Homology modeling, binding site identification and docking study of human angiotensin II type I (Ang II-AT1) receptor.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Vivek K; Ghate, Manjunath; Patel, Kinjal; Qureshi, Gulamnizami; Shah, Surmil

    2015-08-01

    Ang II-AT1 receptors play an important role in mediating virtually all of the physiological actions of Ang II. Several drugs (SARTANs) are available, which can block the AT1 receptor effectively and lower the blood pressure in the patients with hypertension. Currently, there is no experimental Ang II-AT1 structure available; therefore, in this study we modeled Ang II-AT1 receptor structure using homology modeling followed by identification and characterization of binding sites and thereby assessing druggability of the receptor. Homology models were constructed using MODELLER and I-TASSER server, refined and validated using PROCHECK in which 96.9% of 318 residues were present in the favoured regions of the Ramachandran plots. Various Ang II-AT1 receptor antagonist drugs are available in the market as antihypertensive drug, so we have performed docking study with the binding site prediction algorithms to predict different binding pockets on the modeled proteins. The identification of 3D structures and binding sites for various known drugs will guide us for the structure-based drug design of novel compounds as Ang II-AT1 receptor antagonists for the treatment of hypertension. PMID:26349961

  16. Eagle II: A prototype for multi-resolution combat modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, D.R.; Hutchinson, J.L.

    1993-02-01

    Eagle 11 is a prototype analytic model derived from the integration of the low resolution Eagle model with the high resolution SIMNET model. This integration promises a new capability to allow for a more effective examination of proposed or existing combat systems that could not be easily evaluated using either Eagle or SIMNET alone. In essence, Eagle II becomes a multi-resolution combat model in which simulated combat units can exhibit both high and low fidelity behavior at different times during model execution. This capability allows a unit to behave in a highly manner only when required, thereby reducing the overall computational and manpower requirements for a given study. In this framework, the SIMNET portion enables a highly credible assessment of the performance of individual combat systems under consideration, encompassing both engineering performance and crew capabilities. However, when the assessment being conducted goes beyond system performance and extends to questions of force structure balance and sustainment, then SISMNET results can be used to ``calibrate`` the Eagle attrition process appropriate to the study at hand. Advancing technologies, changes in the world-wide threat, requirements for flexible response, declining defense budgets, and down-sizing of military forces motivate the development of manpower-efficient, low-cost, responsive tools for combat development studies. Eagle and SIMNET both serve as credible and useful tools. The integration of these two models promises enhanced capabilities to examine the broader, deeper, more complex battlefield of the future with higher fidelity, greater responsiveness and low overall cost.

  17. Eagle II: A prototype for multi-resolution combat modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, D.R.; Hutchinson, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    Eagle 11 is a prototype analytic model derived from the integration of the low resolution Eagle model with the high resolution SIMNET model. This integration promises a new capability to allow for a more effective examination of proposed or existing combat systems that could not be easily evaluated using either Eagle or SIMNET alone. In essence, Eagle II becomes a multi-resolution combat model in which simulated combat units can exhibit both high and low fidelity behavior at different times during model execution. This capability allows a unit to behave in a highly manner only when required, thereby reducing the overall computational and manpower requirements for a given study. In this framework, the SIMNET portion enables a highly credible assessment of the performance of individual combat systems under consideration, encompassing both engineering performance and crew capabilities. However, when the assessment being conducted goes beyond system performance and extends to questions of force structure balance and sustainment, then SISMNET results can be used to calibrate'' the Eagle attrition process appropriate to the study at hand. Advancing technologies, changes in the world-wide threat, requirements for flexible response, declining defense budgets, and down-sizing of military forces motivate the development of manpower-efficient, low-cost, responsive tools for combat development studies. Eagle and SIMNET both serve as credible and useful tools. The integration of these two models promises enhanced capabilities to examine the broader, deeper, more complex battlefield of the future with higher fidelity, greater responsiveness and low overall cost.

  18. Enhanced Stability of the Fe(II)/Mn(II) State in a Synthetic Model of Heterobimetallic Cofactor Assembly.

    PubMed

    Kerber, William D; Goheen, Joshua T; Perez, Kaitlyn A; Siegler, Maxime A

    2016-01-19

    Heterobimetallic Mn/Fe cofactors are found in the R2 subunit of class Ic ribonucleotide reductases (R2c) and R2-like ligand binding oxidases (R2lox). Selective cofactor assembly is due at least in part to the thermodynamics of M(II) binding to the apoprotein. We report here equilibrium studies of Fe(II)/Mn(II) discrimination in the biomimetic model system H5(F-HXTA) (5-fluoro-2-hydroxy-1,3-xylene-α,α'-diamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid). The homobimetallic F-HXTA complexes [Fe(H2O)6][1]2·14H2O and [Mn(H2O)6][2]2·14H2O (1 = [Fe(II)2(F-HXTA)(H2O)4](-); 2 = [Mn(II)2(F-HXTA)(H2O)4](-)) were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. NMR data show that 1 retains its structure in solution (2 is NMR silent). Metal exchange is facile, and the heterobimetallic complex [Fe(II)Mn(II)(F-HXTA)(H2O)4](-) (3) is formed from mixtures of 1 and 2. (19)F NMR was used to quantify 1 and 3 in the presence of excess M(II)(aq) at various metal ratios, and equilibrium constants for Fe(II)/Mn(II) discrimination were calculated from these data. Fe(II) is preferred over Mn(II) with K1 = 182 ± 13 for complete replacement (2 ⇌ 1). This relatively modest preference is attributed to a hard-soft acid-base mismatch between the divalent cations and the polycarboxylate ligand. The stepwise constants for replacement are K2 = 20.1 ± 1.3 (2 ⇌ 3) and K3 = 9.1 ± 1.1 (3 ⇌ 1). K2 > K3 demonstrates enhanced stability of the heterobimetallic state beyond what is expected for simple Mn(II) → Fe(II) replacement. The relevance to Fe(II)/Mn(II) discrimination in R2c and R2lox proteins is discussed. PMID:26709740

  19. The subthalamic nucleus part II: modelling and simulation of activity.

    PubMed

    Heida, Tjitske; Marani, Enrico; Usunoff, Kamen G

    2008-01-01

    Part I of The Subthalamic Nucleus (volume 198) (STN) accentuates the gap between experimental animal and human information concerning subthalamic development, cytology, topography and connections.The light and electron microscopical cytology focuses on the open nucleus concept and the neuronal types present in the STN. The cytochemistry encompasses enzymes, NO, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), calcium binding proteins, and receptors (dopamine, cannabinoid, opioid, glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), serotonin, cholinergic, and calcium channels). The ontogeny of the subthalamic cell cord is also reviewed. The topography concerns the rat, cat, baboon and human STN. The descriptions of the connections are also given from a historical point of view. Recent tracer studies on the rat nigro-subthalamic connection revealed contralateral projections. This monograph (Part II of the two volumes) on the subthalamic nucleus (STN) starts with a systemic model of the basal ganglia to evaluate the position of the STN in the direct, indirect and hyperdirect pathways. A summary of in vitro studies is given, describing STN spontaneous activity as well as responses to depolarizing and hyperpolarizing inputs and high-frequency stimulation. STN bursting activity and the underlying ionic mechanisms are investigated. Deep brain stimulation used for symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease is discussed in terms of the elements that are influenced and its hypothesized mechanisms. This part of the monograph explores the pedunculopontine-subthalamic connections and summarizes attempts to mimic neurotransmitter actions of the pedunculopontine nucleus in cell cultures and high-frequency stimulation on cultured dissociated rat subthalamic neurons. STN cell models - single- and multi-compartment models and system-level models are discussed in relation to subthalamic function and dysfunction. Parts I and II are compared. PMID:18727495

  20. LHC phenomenology of SO(10) models with Yukawa unification. II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandakrishnan, Archana; Bryant, B. Charles; Raby, Stuart

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we study Yukawa-unified SO(10) supersymmetric (SUSY) grand unified theories (GUTs) with two types of SO(10) boundary conditions: (i) universal gaugino masses and (ii) nonuniversal gaugino masses with effective "mirage" mediation. With these boundary conditions, we perform a global χ2 analysis to obtain the parameters consistent with 11 low energy observables, including the top, bottom, and tau masses. Both boundary conditions have universal scalar masses and "just so" splitting for the up- and down-type Higgs masses. In these models, the third family scalars are lighter than the first two families and the gauginos are lighter than all the scalars. We therefore focus on the gluino phenomenology in these models. In particular, we estimate the lowest allowed gluino mass in our models coming from the most recent LHC data and compare this to limits obtained using simplified models. We find that the lower bound on Mg ˜ in Yukawa-unified SO(10) SUSY GUTs is generically ˜1.2 TEV at the 1σ level unless there is considerable degeneracy between the gluino and the lightest supersymmetric particle, in which case the bounds are much weaker. Hence many of our benchmark points are not ruled out by the present LHC data and are still viable models which can be tested at LHC 14.

  1. Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power: A Comparative Analysis of Impacts within the Western Governors' Association States; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Tegen, S.; Milligan, M.; Goldberg, M.

    2007-06-01

    This paper uses NREL's newest Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI II) model to assess economic impacts from alternative power technologies, with a focus on wind energy, for a variety of states.

  2. Variables Affecting Economic Development of Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

    2008-07-01

    NREL's JEDI Wind model performed an analysis of wind-power-related economic development drivers. Economic development benefits for wind and coal were estimated using NREL's JEDI Wind and JEDI Coal models.

  3. Evaluating the performance of copula models in phase I-II clinical trials under model misspecification

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Traditionally, phase I oncology trials are designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), defined as the highest dose with an acceptable probability of dose limiting toxicities(DLT), of a new treatment via a dose escalation study. An alternate approach is to jointly model toxicity and efficacy and allow dose escalation to depend on a pre-specified efficacy/toxicity tradeoff in a phase I-II design. Several phase I-II trial designs have been discussed in the literature; while these model-based designs are attractive in their performance, they are potentially vulnerable to model misspecification. Methods Phase I-II designs often rely on copula models to specify the joint distribution of toxicity and efficacy, which include an additional correlation parameter that can be difficult to estimate. We compare and contrast three models for the joint probability of toxicity and efficacy, including two copula models that have been proposed for use in phase I-II clinical trials and a simple model that assumes the two outcomes are independent. We evaluate the performance of the various models through simulation both when the models are correct and under model misspecification. Results Both models exhibited similar performance, as measured by the probability of correctly identifying the optimal dose and the number of subjects treated at the optimal dose, regardless of whether the data were generated from the correct or incorrect copula, even when there is substantial correlation between the two outcomes. Similar results were observed for a simple model that assumes independence, even in the presence of strong correlation. Further simulation results indicate that estimating the correlation parameter in copula models is difficult with the sample sizes used in Phase I-II clinical trials. Conclusions Our simulation results indicate that the operating characteristics of phase I-II clinical trials are robust to misspecification of the copula model but that a simple

  4. USER'S GUIDE TO THE MESOPUFF II MODEL AND RELATED PROCESSOR PROGRAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A complete set of user instructions are provided for the MESOPUFF II regional-scale air quality modeling package. The MESOPUFF II model is a Lagrangian variable-trajectory puff superposition model suitable for modeling the transport, diffusion, and removal of air pollutants from ...

  5. Comparison with CLPX II airborne data using DMRT model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, X.; Liang, D.; Andreadis, K.M.; Tsang, L.; Josberger, E.G.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we considered a physical-based model which use numerical solution of Maxwell Equations in three-dimensional simulations and apply into Dense Media Radiative Theory (DMRT). The model is validated in two specific dataset from the second Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX II) at Alaska and Colorado. The data were all obtain by the Ku-band (13.95GHz) observations using airborne imaging polarimetric scatterometer (POLSCAT). Snow is a densely packed media. To take into account the collective scattering and incoherent scattering, analytical Quasi-Crystalline Approximation (QCA) and Numerical Maxwell Equation Method of 3-D simulation (NMM3D) are used to calculate the extinction coefficient and phase matrix. DMRT equations were solved by iterative solution up to 2nd order for the case of small optical thickness and full multiple scattering solution by decomposing the diffuse intensities into Fourier series was used when optical thickness exceed unity. It was shown that the model predictions agree with the field experiment not only co-polarization but also cross-polarization. For Alaska region, the input snow structure data was obtain by the in situ ground observations, while for Colorado region, we combined the VIC model to get the snow profile. ??2009 IEEE.

  6. Type II Supernovae: Model Light Curves and Standard Candle Relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasen, Daniel; Woosley, S. E.

    2009-10-01

    A survey of Type II supernovae explosion models has been carried out to determine how their light curves and spectra vary with their mass, metallicity, and explosion energy. The presupernova models are taken from a recent survey of massive stellar evolution at solar metallicity supplemented by new calculations at subsolar metallicity. Explosions are simulated by the motion of a piston near the edge of the iron core and the resulting light curves and spectra are calculated using full multi-wavelength radiation transport. Formulae are developed that describe approximately how the model observables (light curve luminosity and duration) scale with the progenitor mass, explosion energy, and radioactive nucleosynthesis. Comparison with observational data shows that the explosion energy of typical supernovae (as measured by kinetic energy at infinity) varies by nearly an order of magnitude—from 0.5 to 4.0 × 1051 ergs, with a typical value of ~0.9 × 1051 ergs. Despite the large variation, the models exhibit a tight relationship between luminosity and expansion velocity, similar to that previously employed empirically to make SNe IIP standardized candles. This relation is explained by the simple behavior of hydrogen recombination in the supernova envelope, but we find a sensitivity to progenitor metallicity and mass that could lead to systematic errors. Additional correlations between light curve luminosity, duration, and color might enable the use of SNe IIP to obtain distances accurate to ~20% using only photometric data.

  7. TYPE II SUPERNOVAE: MODEL LIGHT CURVES AND STANDARD CANDLE RELATIONSHIPS

    SciTech Connect

    Kasen, Daniel; Woosley, S. E.

    2009-10-01

    A survey of Type II supernovae explosion models has been carried out to determine how their light curves and spectra vary with their mass, metallicity, and explosion energy. The presupernova models are taken from a recent survey of massive stellar evolution at solar metallicity supplemented by new calculations at subsolar metallicity. Explosions are simulated by the motion of a piston near the edge of the iron core and the resulting light curves and spectra are calculated using full multi-wavelength radiation transport. Formulae are developed that describe approximately how the model observables (light curve luminosity and duration) scale with the progenitor mass, explosion energy, and radioactive nucleosynthesis. Comparison with observational data shows that the explosion energy of typical supernovae (as measured by kinetic energy at infinity) varies by nearly an order of magnitude-from 0.5 to 4.0 x 10{sup 51} ergs, with a typical value of approx0.9 x 10{sup 51} ergs. Despite the large variation, the models exhibit a tight relationship between luminosity and expansion velocity, similar to that previously employed empirically to make SNe IIP standardized candles. This relation is explained by the simple behavior of hydrogen recombination in the supernova envelope, but we find a sensitivity to progenitor metallicity and mass that could lead to systematic errors. Additional correlations between light curve luminosity, duration, and color might enable the use of SNe IIP to obtain distances accurate to approx20% using only photometric data.

  8. Research on mouse model of grade II corneal alkali burn

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jun-Qiang; Qin, Hai-Feng; Zhao, Shi-Hong

    2016-01-01

    AIM To choose appropriate concentration of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution to establish a stable and consistent corneal alkali burn mouse model in grade II. METHODS The mice (n=60) were randomly divided into four groups and 15 mice each group. Corneal alkali burns were induced by placing circle filter paper soaked with NaOH solutions on the right central cornea for 30s. The concentrations of NaOH solutions of groups A, B, C, and D were 0.1 mol/L, 0.15 mol/L, 0.2 mol/L, and 1.0 mol/L respectively. Then these corneas were irrigated with 20 mL physiological saline (0.9% NaCl). On day 7 postburn, slit lamp microscope was used to observe corneal opacity, corneal epithelial sodium fluorescein staining positive rate, incidence of corneal ulcer and corneal neovascularization, meanwhile pictures of the anterior eyes were taken. Cirrus spectral domain optical coherence tomography was used to scan cornea to observe corneal epithelial defect and corneal ulcer. RESULTS Corneal opacity scores (x±s) were not significantly different between the group A and group B (P=0.097). Incidence of corneal ulcer in group B was significantly higher than that in group A (P=0.035). Incidence of corneal ulcer and perforation rate in group B was lower than that in group C. Group C and D had corneal neovascularization, and incidence of corneal neovascularization in group D was significantly higher than that in group C (P=0.000). CONCLUSION Using 0.15 mol/L NaOH can establish grade II mouse model of corneal alkali burns. PMID:27162717

  9. Branch Flow Model: Relaxations and Convexification-Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Farivar, M; Low, SH

    2013-08-01

    We propose a branch flow model for the analysis and optimization of mesh as well as radial networks. The model leads to a new approach to solving optimal power flow (OPF) that consists of two relaxation steps. The first step eliminates the voltage and current angles and the second step approximates the resulting problem by a conic program that can be solved efficiently. For radial networks, we prove that both relaxation steps are always exact, provided there are no upper bounds on loads. For mesh networks, the conic relaxation is always exact but the angle relaxation may not be exact, and we provide a simple way to determine if a relaxed solution is globally optimal. We propose convexification of mesh networks using phase shifters so that OPF for the convexified network can always be solved efficiently for an optimal solution. We prove that convexification requires phase shifters only outside a spanning tree of the network and their placement depends only on network topology, not on power flows, generation, loads, or operating constraints. Part I introduces our branch flow model, explains the two relaxation steps, and proves the conditions for exact relaxation. Part II describes convexification of mesh networks, and presents simulation results.

  10. Higgs potential in the type II seesaw model

    SciTech Connect

    Arhrib, A.; Benbrik, R.; Chabab, M.; Rahili, L.; Ramadan, J.; Moultaka, G.; Peyranere, M. C.

    2011-11-01

    The standard model Higgs sector, extended by one weak gauge triplet of scalar fields with a very small vacuum expectation value, is a very promising setting to account for neutrino masses through the so-called type II seesaw mechanism. In this paper we consider the general renormalizable doublet/triplet Higgs potential of this model. We perform a detailed study of its main dynamical features that depend on five dimensionless couplings and two mass parameters after spontaneous symmetry breaking, and highlight the implications for the Higgs phenomenology. In particular, we determine (i) the complete set of tree-level unitarity constraints on the couplings of the potential and (ii) the exact tree-level boundedness from below constraints on these couplings, valid for all directions. When combined, these constraints delineate precisely the theoretically allowed parameter space domain within our perturbative approximation. Among the seven physical Higgs states of this model, the mass of the lighter (heavier) CP{sub even} state h{sup 0} (H{sup 0}) will always satisfy a theoretical upper (lower) bound that is reached for a critical value {mu}{sub c} of {mu} (the mass parameter controlling triple couplings among the doublet/triplet Higgses). Saturating the unitarity bounds, we find an upper bound m{sub h}{sup 0} or approx. {mu}{sub c} and {mu} < or approx. {mu}{sub c}. In the first regime the Higgs sector is typically very heavy, and only h{sup 0} that becomes SM-like could be accessible to the LHC. In contrast, in the second regime, somewhat overlooked in the literature, most of the Higgs sector is light. In particular, the heaviest state H{sup 0} becomes SM-like, the lighter states being the CP{sub odd} Higgs, the (doubly) charged Higgses, and a decoupled h{sup 0}, possibly

  11. Higgs potential in the type II seesaw model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arhrib, A.; Benbrik, R.; Chabab, M.; Moultaka, G.; Peyranère, M. C.; Rahili, L.; Ramadan, J.

    2011-11-01

    The standard model Higgs sector, extended by one weak gauge triplet of scalar fields with a very small vacuum expectation value, is a very promising setting to account for neutrino masses through the so-called type II seesaw mechanism. In this paper we consider the general renormalizable doublet/triplet Higgs potential of this model. We perform a detailed study of its main dynamical features that depend on five dimensionless couplings and two mass parameters after spontaneous symmetry breaking, and highlight the implications for the Higgs phenomenology. In particular, we determine (i) the complete set of tree-level unitarity constraints on the couplings of the potential and (ii) the exact tree-level boundedness from below constraints on these couplings, valid for all directions. When combined, these constraints delineate precisely the theoretically allowed parameter space domain within our perturbative approximation. Among the seven physical Higgs states of this model, the mass of the lighter (heavier) CPeven state h0 (H0) will always satisfy a theoretical upper (lower) bound that is reached for a critical value μc of μ (the mass parameter controlling triple couplings among the doublet/triplet Higgses). Saturating the unitarity bounds, we find an upper bound mh0

  12. Multiscale model of light harvesting by photosystem II in plants

    PubMed Central

    Amarnath, Kapil; Bennett, Doran I. G.; Schneider, Anna R.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2016-01-01

    The first step of photosynthesis in plants is the absorption of sunlight by pigments in the antenna complexes of photosystem II (PSII), followed by transfer of the nascent excitation energy to the reaction centers, where long-term storage as chemical energy is initiated. Quantum mechanical mechanisms must be invoked to explain the transport of excitation within individual antenna. However, it is unclear how these mechanisms influence transfer across assemblies of antenna and thus the photochemical yield at reaction centers in the functional thylakoid membrane. Here, we model light harvesting at the several-hundred-nanometer scale of the PSII membrane, while preserving the dominant quantum effects previously observed in individual complexes. We show that excitation moves diffusively through the antenna with a diffusion length of 50 nm until it reaches a reaction center, where charge separation serves as an energetic trap. The diffusion length is a single parameter that incorporates the enhancing effect of excited state delocalization on individual rates of energy transfer as well as the complex kinetics that arise due to energy transfer and loss by decay to the ground state. The diffusion length determines PSII’s high quantum efficiency in ideal conditions, as well as how it is altered by the membrane morphology and the closure of reaction centers. We anticipate that the model will be useful in resolving the nonphotochemical quenching mechanisms that PSII employs in conditions of high light stress. PMID:26787911

  13. Model selection as a science driver for dark energy surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Pia; Parkinson, David; Corasaniti, Pier Stefano; Liddle, Andrew R.; Kunz, Martin

    2006-07-01

    A key science goal of upcoming dark energy surveys is to seek time-evolution of the dark energy. This problem is one of model selection, where the aim is to differentiate between cosmological models with different numbers of parameters. However, the power of these surveys is traditionally assessed by estimating their ability to constrain parameters, which is a different statistical problem. In this paper, we use Bayesian model selection techniques, specifically forecasting of the Bayes factors, to compare the abilities of different proposed surveys in discovering dark energy evolution. We consider six experiments - supernova luminosity measurements by the Supernova Legacy Survey, SNAP, JEDI and ALPACA, and baryon acoustic oscillation measurements by WFMOS and JEDI - and use Bayes factor plots to compare their statistical constraining power. The concept of Bayes factor forecasting has much broader applicability than dark energy surveys.

  14. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume II. Detailed description of the model

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01

    This document is the second of a seven volume series of our Phase II Final Report. This volume deals with detailed descriptions of the structure of each program member (subroutines and functions), the interrelation between the members of a submodel, and the interrelation between the various submodels as such. The systems model for fluidized bed combustors (FBC-II) consists of a systematic combination of the following interrelated areas: fluid mechanics and bubble growth, char combustion and associated kinetics for particle burnout, sulfur capture, NO/sub x/ formation and reduction, freeboard reactions, and heat transfer. Program outline is shown in Figure 1.1. Input variables (supplied by the user are inspected to check that they lie inside the allowed range of values and are input to the various routines as needed. The necessary physical and fluid mechanical properties are calculated and utilized in estimating char combustion and sulfur capture in the bed and the freeboard. NO/sub x/ and CO emissions are estimated by taking into account all relevant chemical reactions. A material and energy balance is made over the bed. Figure 1.1 shows a block diagram of the systems program. In this diagram, the overall structure of the FBC program is illustrated in terms of the various submodels that together constitute the systems program. A more detailed outline of the systems program is shown in Figure 1.2. In this figure, all important subroutine members of the FBC program are shown, and their linkage to each other, as well as to the main program is indicated. A description of the exact sequence in which these various routines are called at time of program execution is provided in Chapter 8 under the executive routine MAIN.

  15. Learning Objects, Type II Applications, and Embedded Pedagogical Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadanidis, George; Schindler, Karen

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we consider the extent to which learning objects that focus on higher level thinking might be seen as Type II applications, as defined by Maddux, Johnson, and Willis (2001). We conclude that learning objects are at best hybrid applications, with some Type I and some Type II characteristics. We also consider whether the educational…

  16. Longitudinal Stability of the Beck Depression Inventory II: A Latent Trait-State-Occasion Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Pei-Chen

    2016-01-01

    In a six-wave longitudinal study with two cohorts (660 adolescents and 630 young adults), this study investigated the longitudinal stability of the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) using the Trait-State-Occasion (TSO) model. The results revealed that the full TSO model was the best fitting representation of the depression measured by the…

  17. Modeling adsorption of copper(II), cadmium(II) and lead(II) on purified humic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, A.; Gonzalez, R.D.

    2000-04-18

    In this study, a system consisting of Pb, Cu and Cd as typical heavy metal pollutants, and purified Aldrich humic acid as a representative of natural organic materials were selected as prototypes to model the environmental system. The effect of environmental factors such as pH, salinity, and concentration on the interaction between metals and humic acid were investigated in detail. The experimental results show that pH and ionic strength are the most important variables in controlling metal adsorption on humic acid. The results also show a high complexation capacity of humic acid for the metals, especially Cu and Pb. The strength of binding of the three metals is in the sequence of Pb > Cu > Cd. A theoretical model featured by surface complexation reactions and double layer theory combined with the Poisson-Boltzmann equation was applied to simulate the experimental data. Titration data of humic acid with NaOH and Ba(OH){sub 2} were used as concentrations of strong and weak acid groups on HA and the input data for the model calculations. Intrinsic adsorption constants and capacitance are estimated based on literature values and optimized to obtain the best agreement between the experimental and the model results. The model was also used to predict surface properties such as the speciation of the metals adsorbed on humic acid. Good agreement between theoretical modeling results and experimental data suggests the applicability of the theoretical model to this system. Given these parameters, theoretical calculations obtained using the model proposed in this study can give a detailed picture of the actual environmental conditions. Also, the model calculations will help in the evaluation of the actual toxicity of heavy metal pollutants in the aquasystem.

  18. Molecular Models of Ruthenium(II) Organometallic Complexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, William F.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the featured molecules for the month of March, which appear in the paper by Ozerov, Fafard, and Hoffman, and which are related to the study of the reactions of a number of "piano stool" complexes of ruthenium(II). The synthesis of compound 2a offers students an alternative to the preparation of ferrocene if they are only…

  19. CORA-II model of PWR corrosion-product transport

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.; Sejvar, J.

    1985-09-01

    The revised CORA-II computer code, which predicts corrosion-product transport and radiation field buildup in PWRs, incorporates recent advances in scientific understanding of these processes. Designers and engineers can use the code to assess the relative effects of plant design, operation, and coolant chemistry changes on radiation-field buildup.

  20. Analysis of the photosystem II by modelling the fluorescence yield transients during 10 seconds after a 10 ns pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaeva, Natalya E.; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Paschenko, Vladimir Z.; Riznichenko, Galina Yu.; Rubin, Andrew B.

    2014-10-01

    The dynamics of the photosystem II (PS II) redox states is imitated over nine orders of magnitude in time. Our simulations focus on the information of the chlorophyll a fluorescence induced by a 10 ns laser flash. The PS II model analyzes differences in the PS II reaction between leaves (A. Thaliana, spinach) and thermophilic Chlorella cells.

  1. NSLS-II: Nonlinear Model Calibration for Synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bengtsson, J.

    2010-10-08

    This tech note is essentially a summary of a lecture we delivered to the Acc. Phys. Journal Club Apr, 2010. However, since the estimated accuracy of these methods has been naive and misleading in the field of particle accelerators, i.e., ignores the impact of noise, we will elaborate on this in some detail. A prerequisite for a calibration of the nonlinear Hamiltonian is that the quadratic part has been understood, i.e., that the linear optics for the real accelerator has been calibrated. For synchrotron light source operations, this problem has been solved by the interactive LOCO technique/tool (Linear Optics from Closed Orbits). Before that, in the context of hadron accelerators, it has been done by signal processing of turn-by-turn BPM data. We have outlined how to make a basic calibration of the nonlinear model for synchrotrons. In particular, we have shown how this was done for LEAR, CERN (antiprotons) in the mid-80s. Specifically, our accuracy for frequency estimation was {approx} 1 x 10{sup -5} for 1024 turns (to calibrate the linear optics) and {approx} 1 x 10{sup -4} for 256 turns for tune footprint and betatron spectrum. For a comparison, the estimated tune footprint for stable beam for NSLS-II is {approx}0.1. Since the transverse damping time is {approx}20 msec, i.e., {approx}4,000 turns. There is no fundamental difference for: antiprotons, protons, and electrons in this case. Because the estimated accuracy for these methods in the field of particle accelerators has been naive, i.e., ignoring the impact of noise, we have also derived explicit formula, from first principles, for a quantitative statement. For e.g. N = 256 and 5% noise we obtain {delta}{nu} {approx} 1 x 10{sup -5}. A comparison with the state-of-the-arts in e.g. telecomm and electrical engineering since the 60s is quite revealing. For example, Kalman filter (1960), crucial for the: Ranger, Mariner, and Apollo (including the Lunar Module) missions during the 60s. Or Claude Shannon et al

  2. Alternative Models of Service, Centralized Machine Operations. Phase II Report. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology Management Corp., Alexandria, VA.

    A study was conducted to determine if the centralization of playback machine operations for the national free library program would be feasible, economical, and desirable. An alternative model of playback machine services was constructed and compared with existing network operations considering both cost and service. The alternative model was…

  3. An optimisation model for regional integrated solid waste management II. Model application and sensitivity analyses.

    PubMed

    Najm, M Abou; El-Fadel, M; Ayoub, G; El-Taha, M; Al-Awar, F

    2002-02-01

    Increased environmental concerns and the emphasis on material and energy recovery are gradually changing the orientation of MSW management and planning. In this context, the application of optimisation techniques have been introduced to design the least cost solid waste management systems, considering the variety of management processes (recycling, composting, anaerobic digestion, incineration, and landfilling), and the existence of uncertainties associated with the number of system components and their interrelations. This study presents a model that was developed and applied to serve as a solid waste decision support system for MSW management taking into account both socio-economic and environmental considerations. The model accounts for solid waste generation rates, composition, collection, treatment, disposal as well as potential environmental impacts of various MSW management techniques. The model follows a linear programming formulation with the framework of dynamic optimisation. The model can serve as a tool to evaluate various MSW management alternatives and obtain the optimal combination of technologies for the handling, treatment and disposal of MSW in an economic and environmentally sustainable way. The sensitivity of various waste management policies is also addressed. The work is presented in a series of two papers: (I) model formulation, and (II) model application and sensitivity analysis. PMID:12020095

  4. Modeling the Adsorption of Mercury(II) on (Hydr)oxides II: alpha-FeOOH (Goethite) and Amorphous Silica.

    PubMed

    Bonnissel-Gissinger; Alnot; Lickes; Ehrhardt; Behra

    1999-07-15

    The surface complexation model is used to describe sorption experiments of inorganic mercury(II) in the presence of an amorphous silica, Aerosil 200, or an iron (hydr)oxide, the goethite alpha-FeOOH (Bayferrox 910). In the simulations, one assumes the formation of a monodentate surface complex &tbond;S&bond;OHg(+) and of ternary surface complexes with OH(-) surface groups, &tbond;S&bond;OHgOH and &tbond;S&bond;OHgCl, when chlorides are present in solution. Participation of the complex &tbond;S&bond;OHgCl has been especially evidenced. The mercury(II) surface complexation on oxides can be described by the following equilibria (298.15 K, I = 0): with log 5.8 and 8.0 for amorphous silica and goethite, respectively. Comparisons with other data from the literature have been made to investigate the influence of the nature of the oxide on the mechanism of mercury(II) adsorption. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize the surface of the (hydr)oxides prior to adsorption and to observe when possible the mercury surface compounds. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10419666

  5. A model for the separation of cloud and aerosol in SAGE II occultation data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, G. S.; Winker, D. M.; Osborn, M. T.; Skeens, K. M.

    1993-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II satellite experiment measures the extinction due to aerosols and thin cloud, at wavelengths of 0.525 and 1.02 micrometers, down to an altitude of 6 km. The wavelength dependence of the extinction due to aerosols differs from that of the extinction due to cloud and is used as the basis of a model for separating these two components. The model is presented and its validation using airborne lidar data, obtained coincident with SAGE II observations, is described. This comparison shows that smaller SAGE II cloud extinction values correspond to the presence of subvisible cirrus cloud in the lidar record. Examples of aerosol and cloud data products obtained using this model to interpret SAGE II upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric data are also shown.

  6. Available for the Apple II: FIRM: Florida InteRactive Modeler.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, C. Michael; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The Apple II microcomputer program described allows instructors with minimal programing experience to construct computer models of psychological phenomena for students to investigate. Use of these models eliminates need to maintain/house/breed animals or purchase sophisticated laboratory equipment. Several content models are also described,…

  7. Making Science Data Available While Building an Instrument: A Heliolib Uniform Data Model Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, L. E.; Vandegriff, J. D.; Haggerty, D. K.; Hill, M. E.; Mauk, B. H.

    2010-12-01

    The Heliolib uniform data model is a powerful and flexible approach to filling an important need of the virtual observatory community (see "Uniform Access to Heliophysics Time Series Data", SM19), but its usefulness does not stop there. We present an implementation of the Heliolib uniform data model as part of the science data pipeline for the JUNO/JEDI and New Horizons/PEPSSI instruments. JUNO/JEDI, New Horizons/PEPSSI and other upcoming instruments use the multimission telemetry processing framework Conduit to unpack the raw telemetry data into internal data structures which can be written out as science data products. It is useful during integration and testing on the ground or in flight, to be able to load these data structures directly into the final science analysis software. The JEDI science team analysis software, MIDL, uses Heliolib. Thus, since the telemetry data structures can be easily adapted to Heliolib data structures, the "wrapped" telemetry data is then automatically supported as fully described science data types, available for instrument team scientists to analyze even during early stages of instrument integration and testing. This allows the science team to potentially spot and correct errors much more efficiently than waiting until they are analyzing flight data, when discovered errors may require complex and expensive reprogramming of the instrument in flight. Examples from JEDI and PEPSSI team experiences will be described. The "wrapped" telemetry data can also be ingested into any other system that uses the Heliolib model. As an example, we present a simple spreadsheet style viewer for Heliolib "ITable" data.

  8. Pharmacophore modeling studies of type I and type II kinase inhibitors of Tie2.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qing-Qing; Xie, Huan-Zhang; Ren, Ji-Xia; Li, Lin-Li; Yang, Sheng-Yong

    2009-02-01

    In this study, chemical feature based pharmacophore models of type I and type II kinase inhibitors of Tie2 have been developed with the aid of HipHop and HypoRefine modules within Catalyst program package. The best HipHop pharmacophore model Hypo1_I for type I kinase inhibitors contains one hydrogen-bond acceptor, one hydrogen-bond donor, one general hydrophobic, one hydrophobic aromatic, and one ring aromatic feature. And the best HypoRefine model Hypo1_II for type II kinase inhibitors, which was characterized by the best correlation coefficient (0.976032) and the lowest RMSD (0.74204), consists of two hydrogen-bond donors, one hydrophobic aromatic, and two general hydrophobic features, as well as two excluded volumes. These pharmacophore models have been validated by using either or both test set and cross validation methods, which shows that both the Hypo1_I and Hypo1_II have a good predictive ability. The space arrangements of the pharmacophore features in Hypo1_II are consistent with the locations of the three portions making up a typical type II kinase inhibitor, namely, the portion occupying the ATP binding region (ATP-binding-region portion, AP), that occupying the hydrophobic region (hydrophobic-region portion, HP), and that linking AP and HP (bridge portion, BP). Our study also reveals that the ATP-binding-region portion of the type II kinase inhibitors plays an important role to the bioactivity of the type II kinase inhibitors. Structural modifications on this portion should be helpful to further improve the inhibitory potency of type II kinase inhibitors. PMID:19138543

  9. Multidimensional realistic modelling of Cepheid-like variables - II. Analysis of a Cepheid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundprecht, Eva; Muthsam, Herbert J.; Kupka, Friedrich

    2015-05-01

    Non-local, time-dependent convection models have been used to explain the location of double-mode pulsations in Cepheids in the HR diagram as well as the existence and location of the red edge of the instability strip. These properties are highly sensitive to model parameters. We use 2D radiation-hydrodynamical simulations with realistic microphysics and grey radiative transfer to model a short-period Cepheid. The simulations show that the strength of the convection zone varies significantly over the pulsation period and exhibits a phase shift relative to the variations in radius. We evaluate the convective flux and the work integral as predicted by the most common convection models. It turns out that over one pulsation cycle the model parameter αc, has to be varied by up to a factor of beyond 2 to match the convective flux obtained from the simulations. To bring convective fluxes integrated over the He II convection zone and the overshoot zone below into agreement, this parameter has to be varied by a factor of up to ˜7.5 (Kuhfuß). We then present results on the energetics of the convection and overshoot zone by radially symmetric and fluctuating quantities. To successfully model this scenario by a static, 1D or even by a simple time-dependent model appears extremely challenging. We conclude that significant improvements are needed to make predictions based on 1D models more robust and to improve the reliability of conclusions on the convection-pulsation coupling drawn from them. Multidimensional simulations can provide guidelines for developing descriptions of convection then applied in traditional 1D modelling.

  10. SCIENTIFIC UNCERTAINTIES IN ATMOSPHERIC MERCURY MODELS III: BOUNDARY AND INITIAL CONDITIONS, MODEL GRID RESOLUTION, AND HG(II) REDUCTION MECHANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study we investigate the CMAQ model response in terms of simulated mercury concentration and deposition to boundary/initial conditions (BC/IC), model grid resolution (12- versus 36-km), and two alternative Hg(II) reduction mechanisms. The model response to the change of g...

  11. Low-order dynamic modeling of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II

    SciTech Connect

    Berkan, R.C. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Upadhyaya, B.R.; Kisner, R.A. )

    1990-07-01

    This report describes the development of a low-order, linear model of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), including the primary system, intermediate heat exchanger, and steam generator subsystems. The linear model is developed to represent full-power steady state dynamics for low-level perturbations. Transient simulations are performed using model building and simulation capabilities of the computer software Matrix{sub x}. The inherently safe characteristics of the EBR-II are verified through the simulation studies. The results presented in this report also indicate an agreement between the linear model and the actual dynamics of the plant for several transients. Such models play a major role in the learning and in the improvement of nuclear reactor dynamics for control and signal validation studies. This research and development is sponsored by the Advanced Controls Program in the Instrumentation and Controls Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. 17 refs., 67 figs., 15 tabs.

  12. Surface complexation modeling calculation of Pb(II) adsorption onto the calcined diatomite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shu-Cui; Zhang, Ji-Lin; Sun, De-Hui; Liu, Gui-Xia

    2015-12-01

    Removal of noxious heavy metal ions (e.g. Pb(II)) by surface adsorption of minerals (e.g. diatomite) is an important means in the environmental aqueous pollution control. Thus, it is very essential to understand the surface adsorptive behavior and mechanism. In this work, the Pb(II) apparent surface complexation reaction equilibrium constants on the calcined diatomite and distributions of Pb(II) surface species were investigated through modeling calculations of Pb(II) based on diffuse double layer model (DLM) with three amphoteric sites. Batch experiments were used to study the adsorption of Pb(II) onto the calcined diatomite as a function of pH (3.0-7.0) and different ionic strengths (0.05 and 0.1 mol L-1 NaCl) under ambient atmosphere. Adsorption of Pb(II) can be well described by Freundlich isotherm models. The apparent surface complexation equilibrium constants (log K) were obtained by fitting the batch experimental data using the PEST 13.0 together with PHREEQC 3.1.2 codes and there is good agreement between measured and predicted data. Distribution of Pb(II) surface species on the diatomite calculated by PHREEQC 3.1.2 program indicates that the impurity cations (e.g. Al3+, Fe3+, etc.) in the diatomite play a leading role in the Pb(II) adsorption and dominant formation of complexes and additional electrostatic interaction are the main adsorption mechanism of Pb(II) on the diatomite under weak acidic conditions.

  13. Standard model Higgs boson searches at CDF in Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Shan-Huei; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2004-10-01

    The SM Higgs boson has been searched in two channels: (1) q{bar q} {yields} WH {yields} {ell}{nu}b{bar b} for Higgs masses 110 < M{sub H} < 150 GeV and (2) gg {yields} H {yields} WW {yields} {ell}{nu}{ell}{nu} for 140 M{sub H} < 180 GeV, where {ell} {element_of} {l_brace}e,{mu}{r_brace}, using about 200 pb{sup -1} CDF Run II data. 95% C.L. limits on each Higgs production at Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV were set as a function of Higgs mass by fitting the distribution of dijet mass (1) and dilepton azimuthal angular separation (2). They have significantly advanced the sensitivity to the SM Higgs boson cf. Run I.

  14. Review: Lessons from in vitro studies and a related intracellular angiotensin II transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Re, Richard N.

    2012-01-01

    In the classical renin-angiotensin system, circulating ANG II mediates growth stimulatory and hemodynamic effects through the plasma membrane ANG II type I receptor, AT1. ANG II also exists in the intracellular space in some native cells, and tissues and can be upregulated in diseases, including hypertension and diabetes. Moreover, intracellular AT1 receptors can be found associated with endosomes, nuclei, and mitochondria. Intracellular ANG II can function in a canonical fashion through the native receptor and also in a noncanonical fashion through interaction with alternative proteins. Likewise, the receptor and proteolytic fragments of the receptor can function independently of ANG II. Participation of the receptor and ligand in alternative intracellular pathways may serve to amplify events that are initiated at the plasma membrane. We review historical and current literature relevant to ANG II, compared with other intracrines, in tissue culture and transgenic models. In particular, we describe a new transgenic mouse model, which demonstrates that intracellular ANG II is linked to high blood pressure. Appreciation of the diverse, pleiotropic intracellular effects of components of the renin-angiotensin system should lead to alternative disease treatment targets and new therapies. PMID:22170617

  15. Picosecond electron transfer in diporphyrin models of Photosystem II of green plants

    SciTech Connect

    Netzel, T L; Fujita, I; Wang, C B; Fajer, J

    1980-01-01

    Green plants and photosynthetic bacteria efficiently transform the energy of an absorbed photon into redox products. Current in vivo and in vitro studies on Photosystem II (PS II) suggest the electron donor is a chlorophyll monomer, ligated to produce the high oxidation potential of P680, and the electron acceptor is pheophytin, a metal-free chlorophyll. This study probes the behavior of this PS II model in solvents of high dielectric constant and tests the sensitivity of its charge transfer reactions to increases in linking chain length as well as to changes in the relative orientation of the porphyrin subunits. (ACR)

  16. Aluminum Deoxidation Equilibria in Liquid Iron: Part II. Thermodynamic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paek, Min-Kyu; Pak, Jong-Jin; Kang, Youn-Bae

    2015-10-01

    Al deoxidation equilibria in liquid iron over the whole composition range from very low Al ([pct Al] = 0.0027) to almost pure liquid Al were thermodynamically modeled for the first time using the Modified Quasichemical Model in the pair approximation for the liquid phase. The present modeling is distinguished from previous approaches in many ways. First, very strong attractions between metallic components, Fe and Al, and non-metallic component, O, were taken into account explicitly in terms of Short-Range Ordering. Second, the present thermodynamic modeling does not distinguish solvent and solutes among metallic components, and the model calculation can be applied from pure liquid Fe to pure liquid Al. Therefore, this approach is thermodynamically self-consistent, contrary to the previous approaches using interaction parameter formalism. Third, the present thermodynamic modeling describes an integral Gibbs energy of the liquid alloy in the framework of CALPHAD; therefore, it can be further used to develop a multicomponent thermodynamic database for liquid steel. Fourth, only a small temperature-independent parameter for ternary liquid was enough to account for the Al deoxidation over wide concentration (0.0027 < [pct Al] < 100) and wide temperature range [1823 K to 2139 K (1550 °C to 1866 °C)]. Gibbs energies of Fe-O and Al-O binary liquid solutions at metal-rich region (up to oxide saturation) were modeled, and relevant model parameters were optimized. By merging these Gibbs energy descriptions with that of Fe-Al binary liquid modeled by the same modeling approach, the Gibbs energy of ternary Fe-Al-O solution at metal-rich region was obtained along with one small ternary parameter. It was shown that the present model successfully reproduced all available experimental data for the Al deoxidation equilibria. Limit of previously used interaction parameter formalism at high Al concentration is discussed.

  17. Rhode Island Model Evaluation & Support System: Support Professional. Edition II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Rhode Island educators believe that implementing a fair, accurate, and meaningful evaluation and support system for support professionals will help improve student outcomes. The primary purpose of the Rhode Island Model Support Professional Evaluation and Support System (Rhode Island Model) is to help all support professionals do their best work…

  18. AGRICULTURAL RUNOFF MANAGEMENT (ARM) MODEL VERSION II: REFINEMENT AND TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Agricultural Runoff Management (ARM) Model has been refined and tested on small agricultural watersheds in Georgia and Michigan. The ARM Model simulates the hydrologic, sediment production, pesticide, and nutrient processes on the land surface and in the soil profile that det...

  19. Multiscale geometric modeling of macromolecules II: Lagrangian representation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xin; Xia, Kelin; Chen, Zhan; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Geometric modeling of biomolecules plays an essential role in the conceptualization of biolmolecular structure, function, dynamics and transport. Qualitatively, geometric modeling offers a basis for molecular visualization, which is crucial for the understanding of molecular structure and interactions. Quantitatively, geometric modeling bridges the gap between molecular information, such as that from X-ray, NMR and cryo-EM, and theoretical/mathematical models, such as molecular dynamics, the Poisson-Boltzmann equation and the Nernst-Planck equation. In this work, we present a family of variational multiscale geometric models for macromolecular systems. Our models are able to combine multiresolution geometric modeling with multiscale electrostatic modeling in a unified variational framework. We discuss a suite of techniques for molecular surface generation, molecular surface meshing, molecular volumetric meshing, and the estimation of Hadwiger’s functionals. Emphasis is given to the multiresolution representations of biomolecules and the associated multiscale electrostatic analyses as well as multiresolution curvature characterizations. The resulting fine resolution representations of a biomolecular system enable the detailed analysis of solvent-solute interaction, and ion channel dynamics, while our coarse resolution representations highlight the compatibility of protein-ligand bindings and possibility of protein-protein interactions. PMID:23813599

  20. FABRIC FILTER MODEL FORMAT CHANGE; VOLUME II. USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes an improved mathematical model for use by control personnel to determine the adequacy of existing or proposed filter systems designed to minimize coal fly ash emissions. Several time-saving steps have been introduced to facilitate model application by Agency ...

  1. A Primary Prevention Program: Teaching Models I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlan, Nancy T; Tschiderer, Patricia A.

    Two teaching models of a service delivery program designed to prevent speech-language problems in lower socioeconomic children were compared. Specific goals included increasing mothers' awareness of the sensory input to which infants are responsive and increasing mothers' abilities to read infant nonverbal signals. In Model 1, two speech-language…

  2. Multiscale geometric modeling of macromolecules II: Lagrangian representation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xin; Xia, Kelin; Chen, Zhan; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2013-09-15

    Geometric modeling of biomolecules plays an essential role in the conceptualization of biolmolecular structure, function, dynamics, and transport. Qualitatively, geometric modeling offers a basis for molecular visualization, which is crucial for the understanding of molecular structure and interactions. Quantitatively, geometric modeling bridges the gap between molecular information, such as that from X-ray, NMR, and cryo-electron microscopy, and theoretical/mathematical models, such as molecular dynamics, the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, and the Nernst-Planck equation. In this work, we present a family of variational multiscale geometric models for macromolecular systems. Our models are able to combine multiresolution geometric modeling with multiscale electrostatic modeling in a unified variational framework. We discuss a suite of techniques for molecular surface generation, molecular surface meshing, molecular volumetric meshing, and the estimation of Hadwiger's functionals. Emphasis is given to the multiresolution representations of biomolecules and the associated multiscale electrostatic analyses as well as multiresolution curvature characterizations. The resulting fine resolution representations of a biomolecular system enable the detailed analysis of solvent-solute interaction, and ion channel dynamics, whereas our coarse resolution representations highlight the compatibility of protein-ligand bindings and possibility of protein-protein interactions. PMID:23813599

  3. [Collaboration among health professionals (II). Usefulness of a model].

    PubMed

    D'Amour, Danielle; San Martín Rodríguez, Leticia

    2006-09-01

    This second article provides a model which helps one to better understand the process of collaboration by interprofessional teams and makes it possible to evaluate the quality of the aforementioned collaboration. To this end, the authors first present a structural model of inter-professional collaboration followed by a typology of collaboration which is derived from the functionality of said model. This model is composed by four interrelated dimensions; the functionality of these has given rise to a typology of collaboration at three intensities: in action, in construction and collaboration during inertia. The model and the typology constitute a useful tool for managers and for health professionals since they help to better understand, manage and develop collaboration among the distinct professionals inside of the same organization as among those who belong to distinct organizations. PMID:17061473

  4. Comparison of Factor Structure Models for the Beck Depression Inventory--II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, L. Charles

    2006-01-01

    Factor analyses of the Beck Depression Inventory--II (A. T. Beck, R. A. Steer, & G. K. Brown, 1996) have frequently produced 2 different 2-factor oblique structures. The author used confirmatory factor analyses to compare these structures with a general-factor model with 2 orthogonal group factors. The general-factor model fit as well as or better…

  5. The Clinical Teacher for Special Education. Final Report: Volume II; Evaluating the Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Louis; Oseroff, Andrew

    Effectiveness of the clinical teaching model (CTM) developed at Florida State University is documented in Volume II of the project's final report. Reviewed is literature related to teacher effectiveness and conceptual changes, conceptual models and instructional systems, and evaluation research in education. Research design and procedures are…

  6. Test/analysis correlation and model updating of the STARS I II missile systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fulcher, C.W.; Marek, E.L.; Mayes, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    The testing, modeling, and test/analysis correlation of the STARS I II missile systems is reviewed. The STARS project is described. The system identification methodology is discussed. A series of modal tests designed to characterize the various structural components is summmarized. The development and updating of detailed finite element models, in a test/analysis correlation process, is presented.

  7. Conceptual Modeling in the Time of the Revolution: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mylopoulos, John

    Conceptual Modeling was a marginal research topic at the very fringes of Computer Science in the 60s and 70s, when the discipline was dominated by topics focusing on programs, systems and hardware architectures. Over the years, however, the field has moved to centre stage and has come to claim a central role both in Computer Science research and practice in diverse areas, such as Software Engineering, Databases, Information Systems, the Semantic Web, Business Process Management, Service-Oriented Computing, Multi-Agent Systems, Knowledge Management, and more. The transformation was greatly aided by the adoption of standards in modeling languages (e.g., UML), and model-based methodologies (e.g., Model-Driven Architectures) by the Object Management Group (OMG) and other standards organizations. We briefly review the history of the field over the past 40 years, focusing on the evolution of key ideas. We then note some open challenges and report on-going research, covering topics such as the representation of variability in conceptual models, capturing model intentions, and models of laws.

  8. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.

    1993-06-01

    A two dimensional, steady-state model for describing a variety of reactive and nonreactive flows, including pulverized coal combustion and gasification, is presented. The model, referred to as 93-PCGC-2 is applicable to cylindrical, axi-symmetric systems. Turbulence is accounted for in both the fluid mechanics equations and the combustion scheme. Radiation from gases, walls, and particles is taken into account using a discrete ordinates method. The particle phase is modeled in a lagrangian framework, such that mean paths of particle groups are followed. A new coal-general devolatilization submodel (FG-DVC) with coal swelling and char reactivity submodels has been added.

  9. The structural and functional effects of Hg(II) and Cd(II) on lipid model systems and human erythrocytes: A review.

    PubMed

    Payliss, Brandon J; Hassanin, Mohamed; Prenner, Elmar J

    2015-12-01

    The anthropogenic mobilization of mercury and cadmium into the biosphere has led to an increased and ineludible entry of these metals into biological systems. Here we discuss the impact of Hg(II) and Cd(II) on lipid model systems and human erythrocytes from a biophysical perspective. After a brief introduction to their implications on human health, studies that have investigated the effects of Hg(II) and Cd(II) on lipid model systems and human erythrocytes are discussed. In terms of lipids as toxicological target sites, predominantly variations in lipid head groups have been the source of investigation. However, as research in this field progresses, the effects of Hg(II) and Cd(II) on other structural features, such as acyl chain length and unsaturation, and other important lipid components and complex biomimetic lipid mixtures, will require further examinations. This review provides an analysis of what has been learned collectively from the diverse methodologies and experimental conditions used thus far. Consequently, there is a need for more comprehensive and thorough investigations into the effects of Hg(II) and Cd(II) on lipid membranes under consistent experimental conditions such as pH, ionic strength, temperature, and choice of lipid model system. PMID:26455331

  10. Comprehensive computer model for magnetron sputtering. II. Charged particle transport

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, Francisco J. Dew, Steven K.; Field, David J.

    2014-11-01

    Discharges for magnetron sputter thin film deposition systems involve complex plasmas that are sensitively dependent on magnetic field configuration and strength, working gas species and pressure, chamber geometry, and discharge power. The authors present a numerical formulation for the general solution of these plasmas as a component of a comprehensive simulation capability for planar magnetron sputtering. This is an extensible, fully three-dimensional model supporting realistic magnetic fields and is self-consistently solvable on a desktop computer. The plasma model features a hybrid approach involving a Monte Carlo treatment of energetic electrons and ions, along with a coupled fluid model for thermalized particles. Validation against a well-known one-dimensional system is presented. Various strategies for improving numerical stability are investigated as is the sensitivity of the solution to various model and process parameters. In particular, the effect of magnetic field, argon gas pressure, and discharge power are studied.

  11. Red supergiants in the LMC - II. Spectrophotometry and model atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oestreicher, M. O.; Schmidt-Kaler, Th.

    1998-09-01

    Spectrophotometric observations for 88 red supergiant candidates in the Large Magellanic Cloud are presented. The spectra range from 4800 to 7700Angstroms with a resolution of 10Angstroms. The error in the absolute fluxes is 0.04 to 0.05mag. The molecular bands of the member stars are often rather weak, i.e. many of these are not M- but K-type supergiants. The data are available on the Strasbourg stellar data base (CDS). Most of the red (super)giant model atmospheres available up to now do not reproduce the observations well. The models of Kurucz and Lejeune, Cuisinier & Buser - often applied especially to population synthesis - correctly describe the strengths of atomic lines and the overall increase of the flux towards the red, but strongly underestimate the strengths of molecular bands. The models presented by Plez, however, tend to reproduce the observed spectra well, except for the blue, as they include a more complete list of opacity sources. Concerning physical properties, only the Plez models give reliable results. Considering the relation between effective temperature and the strengths of molecular bands, both the Kurucz and Lejeune models predict much higher temperatures than derived from the interferometric radius measurements discussed by Schmidt-Kaler and Dyck et al. The temperatures given by the Plez models show a much better agreement with these observations. Furthermore, the relation between T_eff and molecular absorption is much more clearly defined. When considering metallicities, however, the Plez models also fail, as they predict a [Fe/H] distribution that is much too broad, and furthermore an increase of T_eff with increasing [Fe/H] which clearly contradicts models of stellar evolution. The effective temperatures based on the Plez models range mostly from 3500 to 4100K. The surface gravities derived on the basis of the Geneva evolutionary models range from logg=-0.3 to 0.3, while the bolometric luminosities based on BVRIJHK observations range

  12. Spatial modelling of type II diabetes outcomes: a systematic review of approaches used

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Jannah; White, Nicole; Mengersen, Kerrie

    2015-01-01

    With the rising incidence of type II diabetes mellitus (DM II) worldwide, methods to identify high-risk geographical areas have become increasingly important. In this comprehensive review following Cochrane Collaboration guidelines, we outline spatial methods, outcomes and covariates used in all spatial studies involving outcomes of DM II. A total of 1894 potentially relevant citations were identified. Studies were included if spatial methods were used to explore outcomes of DM II or type I and 2 diabetes combined. Descriptive tables were used to summarize information from included studies. Ten spatial studies conducted in the USA, UK and Europe met selection criteria. Three studies used Bayesian generalized linear mixed modelling (GLMM), three used classic generalized linear modelling, one used classic GLMM, two used geographic information systems mapping tools and one compared case:provider ratios across regions. Spatial studies have been effective in identifying high-risk areas and spatial factors associated with DM II outcomes in the USA, UK and Europe, and would be useful in other parts of the world for allocation of additional services to detect and manage DM II early. PMID:26543572

  13. Analysis of a model for the dynamics of prions II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engler, Hans; Pruss, Jan; Webb, Glenn F.

    2006-12-01

    A new mathematical model for the dynamics of prion proliferation involving an ordinary differential equation coupled with a partial integro-differential equation is analyzed, continuing the work in [J. Pruss, L. Pujo-Menjouet, G.F. Webb, R. Zacher, Analysis of a model for the dynamics of prions, Discrete Contin. Dyn. Syst. 6 (2006) 225-235]. We show the well-posedness of this problem in its natural phase space , i.e., there is a unique global semiflow on Z+ associated to the problem. A theorem of threshold type is derived for this model which is typical for mathematical epidemics. If a certain combination of kinetic parameters is below or at the threshold, there is a unique steady state, the disease-free equilibrium, which is globally asymptotically stable in Z+; above the threshold it is unstable, and there is another unique steady state, the disease equilibrium, which inherits that property.

  14. GSTARS computer models and their applications, Part II: Applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simoes, F.J.M.; Yang, C.T.

    2008-01-01

    In part 1 of this two-paper series, a brief summary of the basic concepts and theories used in developing the Generalized Stream Tube model for Alluvial River Simulation (GSTARS) computer models was presented. Part 2 provides examples that illustrate some of the capabilities of the GSTARS models and how they can be applied to solve a wide range of river and reservoir sedimentation problems. Laboratory and field case studies are used and the examples show representative applications of the earlier and of the more recent versions of GSTARS. Some of the more recent capabilities implemented in GSTARS3, one of the latest versions of the series, are also discussed here with more detail. ?? 2008 International Research and Training Centre on Erosion and Sedimentation and the World Association for Sedimentation and Erosion Research.

  15. Detection of chromoluminance patterns on chromoluminance pedestals II: model.

    PubMed

    Chen, C; Foley, J M; Brainard, D H

    2000-01-01

    A model for chromoluminance pattern detection and pedestal effects is described. This model has five stages. The stimulus is first processed by the cone array and then by color-spatial linear operators. The outputs of the linear operators may be expressed as weighted sums of cone contrasts over space. There are three opposite sign pairs of linear spatial operators in the model. Their spectral tuning at each point in space is similar to the luminance, green/red and blue/yellow mechanisms in color opponent models, but their sensitivity to cone inputs varies as a function of space. The operators in each pair are the same except that the signs of the cone inputs in one are the opposite of those in the other. A non-linear response operator follows each linear operator. It receives two inputs, one excitatory and the other divisive inhibitory. The excitatory input is the half-wave rectified output of one of the linear operators. The inhibitory input is a non-linear sum of all linear operator outputs. The non-linear response operator raises the excitatory input to a power, and divides it by the inhibitory input plus a constant to produce the response. The detection variable is computed by combining the difference in response to target-plus-pedestal and pedestal alone across the three non-linear operators. The model accounts well for the large data set presented in the companion paper and is generally consistent with other results in the literature. The spectral sensitivities of the inferred chromoluminance pattern mechanisms are similar to those obtained with different methods. The data set is shown to be inconsistent with several other models. PMID:10683456

  16. Spatial Moran models, II: cancer initiation in spatially structured tissue

    PubMed Central

    Foo, J; Leder, K

    2016-01-01

    We study the accumulation and spread of advantageous mutations in a spatial stochastic model of cancer initiation on a lattice. The parameters of this general model can be tuned to study a variety of cancer types and genetic progression pathways. This investigation contributes to an understanding of how the selective advantage of cancer cells together with the rates of mutations driving cancer, impact the process and timing of carcinogenesis. These results can be used to give insights into tumor heterogeneity and the “cancer field effect,” the observation that a malignancy is often surrounded by cells that have undergone premalignant transformation. PMID:26126947

  17. A numerical model of acoustic choking. II - Shocked solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkington, N. J.; Eversman, W.

    1986-01-01

    The one dimensional equations of gas dynamics are used to model subsonic acoustic choking. This model can accommodate non-linear distortion of waves and the eventual formation of shock waves. Several finite differencing schemes are adapted to obtain solutions. The results obtained with the various schemes are compared with the asymptotic results available. The results suggest that no one finite differencing scheme gives solutions significantly better than the others and that most of the difference solutions are close to the asymptotic results. If the acoustic shock wave is sufficiently strong it almost annihilates the acoustic wave; in this situation numerical errors may dominate the results. Such solutions involve very large acoustic attenuations.

  18. Autocorrelation and regularization in digital images. II - Simple image models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jupp, David L. B.; Strahler, Alan H.; Woodcock, Curtis E.

    1989-01-01

    The variogram function used in geostatistical analysis is a useful statistic in the analysis of remotely sensed images. Using the results derived by Jupp et al. (1988), the basic second-order, or covariance, properties of scenes modeled by simple disks of varying size and spacing after imaging into disk-shaped pixels are analyzed to explore the relationship betwee image variograms and discrete object scene structure. The models provide insight into the nature of real images of the earth's surface and the tools for a complete analysis of the more complex case of three-dimensional illuminated discrete-object images.

  19. Modeling an electro-photographic printer, part II: color systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriss, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper will outline a simplified model for the development of toner dots on a reflective support in a color electro-photographic system. A model developed for a monochrome system will be adapted to a color imaging system where four pigments, each capable of scatting light, is used to form a digital halftone image. The combination of physical and optical dot gains, interlayer scattering, on-dot and off-dot digital halftones will be explored and the results demonstrated in terms color shifts due to layer order and dot gain due to halftone geometry.

  20. The use of MAVIS II to integrate the modeling and analysis of explosive valve interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, R.; Kwon, D.M.

    1998-12-31

    The MAVIS II computer program provides for the modeling and analysis of explosive valve interactions. This report describes the individual components of the program and how MAVIS II is used with other available tools to integrate the design and understanding of explosive valves. The rationale and model used for each valve interaction is described. Comparisons of the calculated results with available data have demonstrated the feasibility and accuracy of using MAVIS II for analytical studies of explosive valve interactions. The model used for the explosive or pyrotechnic used as the driving force in explosive valves is the most critical to be understood and modeled. MAVIS II is an advanced version that incorporates a plastic, as well as elastic, modeling of the deformations experienced when plungers are forced into a bore. The inclusion of a plastic model has greatly expanded the use of MAVIS for all categories (opening, closure, or combined) of valves, especially for the closure valves in which the sealing operation requires the plastic deformation of either a plunger or bore over a relatively large area. In order to increase its effectiveness, the use of MAVIS II should be integrated with the results from available experimental hardware. Test hardware such as the Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) and Velocity Generator test provide experimental data for accurate comparison of the actual valve functions. Variable Explosive Chamber (VEC) and Constant Explosive Volume (CEV) tests are used to provide the proper explosive equation-of-state for the MAVIS calculations of the explosive driving forces. The rationale and logistics of this integration is demonstrated through an example. A recent valve design is used to demonstrate how MAVIS II can be integrated with experimental tools to provide an understanding of the interactions in this valve.

  1. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells - Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Manohar Motwani

    2011-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential,, within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, non-equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  2. Demonstrations in Solute Transport Using Dyes: Part II. Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butters, Greg; Bandaranayake, Wije

    1993-01-01

    A solution of the convection-dispersion equation is used to describe the solute breakthrough curves generated in the demonstrations in the companion paper. Estimation of the best fit model parameters (solute velocity, dispersion, and retardation) is illustrated using the method of moments for an example data set. (Author/MDH)

  3. Nutrient Dynamics in Flooded Wetlands. II: Model Application

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper we applied and evaluated the wetland nutrient model described in an earlier paper. Hydrologic and water quality data from a small restored wetland located on Kent Island, Maryland, which is part of the Delmarva Peninsula on the Eastern shores of the Chesapeake Bay...

  4. The use of model potentials in molecular calculations. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Y.; Huzinaga, S.

    1982-03-01

    The model potential method is applied to CO, HCl, P2, Cl2, SH2, Cu2, Br2, Ni(CO)4, and Pd(CO)4. The results are generally very satisfactory. Reduction of computing cost is substantial for molecules containing heavy atoms.

  5. Numerical modelling of mesoscale atmospheric dispersion. (Volumes I and II)

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, M.D.

    1992-01-01

    Mesoscale atmospheric dispersion is more complicated than smaller-scale dispersion because the mean wind field can no longer be considered steady or horizontally homogeneous over mesoscale time and space scales. Wind shear also plays an important role on the mesoscale, and horizontal dispersion can be enhanced and even dominated by vertical wind shear through either the simultaneous or delayed interaction of horizontal differential advection and vertical mixing. The CSU mesoscale atmospheric dispersion modelling system has been used in this study to simulate the transport and diffusion of a perfluorocarbon gas for episodic releases made during two mesoscale dispersion field experiments. The physiography of the two experimental domains was quite different, permitting isolation and examination of the roles of terrain forcing and differential advection in mesoscale atmospheric dispersion. Suites of numerical experiments of increasing complexity were carried out for both case studies. The experiments differed in the realism of their representation of both the synoptic-scale flow and the underlying terrain. The contributions of differential advection and mesoscale deformation to mesoscale dispersion dominated those of small-scale turbulent diffusion for both cases, and Pasquill's (1962) delayed-shear-enhancement mechanism for lateral dispersion was found to be particularly important. This study was also the first quantitative evaluation of the CSU mesoscale dispersion modelling system with episodic mesoscale dispersion field data. The modelling system showed considerable skill in predicting quantitative tracer-cloud characteristics such as peak concentration, maximum cloud width, arrival time, transit time, and crosswind integrated exposure. Model predictions also compared favorably with predictions made by a number of other mesoscale dispersion models for the same two case studies.

  6. Model scattering envelopes of young stellar objects. II - Infalling envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Barbara A.; Hartmann, Lee

    1993-01-01

    We present scattered light images for models of young stellar objects surrounded by dusty envelopes. The envelopes are assumed to have finite angular momentum and are falling in steady flow onto a disk. The model envelopes include holes, such as might be created by energetic bipolar flows. We calculate images using the Monte Carlo method to follow the light scattered in the dusty envelope and circumstellar disk, assuming that the photons originate from the central source. Adopting typical interstellar medium dust opacities and expected mass infall rates for protostars of about 10 exp -6 solar mass/yr, we find that detectable amounts of optical radiation can escape from envelopes falling into a disk as small as about 10-100 AU, depending upon the viewing angle and the size of the bipolar flow cavity. We suggest that the extended optical and near-IR light observed around several young stars is scattered by dusty infalling envelopes rather than disks.

  7. Differential geometry based solvation model II: Lagrangian formulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhan; Baker, Nathan A; Wei, G W

    2011-12-01

    Solvation is an elementary process in nature and is of paramount importance to more sophisticated chemical, biological and biomolecular processes. The understanding of solvation is an essential prerequisite for the quantitative description and analysis of biomolecular systems. This work presents a Lagrangian formulation of our differential geometry based solvation models. The Lagrangian representation of biomolecular surfaces has a few utilities/advantages. First, it provides an essential basis for biomolecular visualization, surface electrostatic potential map and visual perception of biomolecules. Additionally, it is consistent with the conventional setting of implicit solvent theories and thus, many existing theoretical algorithms and computational software packages can be directly employed. Finally, the Lagrangian representation does not need to resort to artificially enlarged van der Waals radii as often required by the Eulerian representation in solvation analysis. The main goal of the present work is to analyze the connection, similarity and difference between the Eulerian and Lagrangian formalisms of the solvation model. Such analysis is important to the understanding of the differential geometry based solvation model. The present model extends the scaled particle theory of nonpolar solvation model with a solvent-solute interaction potential. The nonpolar solvation model is completed with a Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory based polar solvation model. The differential geometry theory of surfaces is employed to provide a natural description of solvent-solute interfaces. The optimization of the total free energy functional, which encompasses the polar and nonpolar contributions, leads to coupled potential driven geometric flow and PB equations. Due to the development of singularities and nonsmooth manifolds in the Lagrangian representation, the resulting potential-driven geometric flow equation is embedded into the Eulerian representation for the purpose of

  8. Differential geometry based solvation model II: Lagrangian formulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhan; Baker, Nathan A.; Wei, G. W.

    2010-01-01

    Solvation is an elementary process in nature and is of paramount importance to more sophisticated chemical, biological and biomolecular processes. The understanding of solvation is an essential prerequisite for the quantitative description and analysis of biomolecular systems. This work presents a Lagrangian formulation of our differential geometry based solvation model. The Lagrangian representation of biomolecular surfaces has a few utilities/advantages. First, it provides an essential basis for biomolecular visualization, surface electrostatic potential map and visual perception of biomolecules. Additionally, it is consistent with the conventional setting of implicit solvent theories and thus, many existing theoretical algorithms and computational software packages can be directly employed. Finally, the Lagrangian representation does not need to resort to artificially enlarged van der Waals radii as often required by the Eulerian representation in solvation analysis. The main goal of the present work is to analyze the connection, similarity and difference between the Eulerian and Lagrangian formalisms of the solvation model. Such analysis is important to the understanding of the differential geometry based solvation model. The present model extends the scaled particle theory (SPT) of nonpolar solvation model with a solvent-solute interaction potential. The nonpolar solvation model is completed with a Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory based polar solvation model. The differential geometry theory of surfaces is employed to provide a natural description of solvent-solute interfaces. The minimization of the total free energy functional, which encompasses the polar and nonpolar contributions, leads to coupled potential driven geometric flow and Poisson-Boltzmann equations. Due to the development of singularities and nonsmooth manifolds in the Lagrangian representation, the resulting potential-driven geometric flow equation is embedded into the Eulerian representation for

  9. Solving seismological problems using sgraph program: II-waveform modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelwahed, Mohamed F.

    2012-09-26

    One of the seismological programs to manipulate seismic data is SGRAPH program. It consists of integrated tools to perform advanced seismological techniques. SGRAPH is considered a new system for maintaining and analyze seismic waveform data in a stand-alone Windows-based application that manipulate a wide range of data formats. SGRAPH was described in detail in the first part of this paper. In this part, I discuss the advanced techniques including in the program and its applications in seismology. Because of the numerous tools included in the program, only SGRAPH is sufficient to perform the basic waveform analysis and to solve advanced seismological problems. In the first part of this paper, the application of the source parameters estimation and hypocentral location was given. Here, I discuss SGRAPH waveform modeling tools. This paper exhibits examples of how to apply the SGRAPH tools to perform waveform modeling for estimating the focal mechanism and crustal structure of local earthquakes.

  10. A GLOBAL MAGNETIC TOPOLOGY MODEL FOR MAGNETIC CLOUDS. II

    SciTech Connect

    Hidalgo, M. A.

    2013-04-01

    In the present work, we extensively used our analytical approach to the global magnetic field topology of magnetic clouds (MCs), introduced in a previous paper, in order to show its potential and to study its physical consistency. The model assumes toroidal topology with a non-uniform (variable maximum radius) cross-section along them. Moreover, it has a non-force-free character and also includes the expansion of its cross-section. As is shown, the model allows us, first, to analyze MC magnetic structures-determining their physical parameters-with a variety of magnetic field shapes, and second, to reconstruct their relative orientation in the interplanetary medium from the observations obtained by several spacecraft. Therefore, multipoint spacecraft observations give the opportunity to infer the structure of this large-scale magnetic flux rope structure in the solar wind. For these tasks, we use data from Helios (A and B), STEREO (A and B), and Advanced Composition Explorer. We show that the proposed analytical model can explain quite well the topology of several MCs in the interplanetary medium and is a good starting point for understanding the physical mechanisms under these phenomena.

  11. Slag Behavior in Gasifiers. Part II: Constitutive Modeling of Slag

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, Mehrdad; Wang, Ping

    2013-02-07

    The viscosity of slag and the thermal conductivity of ash deposits are among two of the most important constitutive parameters that need to be studied. The accurate formulation or representations of the (transport) properties of coal present a special challenge of modeling efforts in computational fluid dynamics applications. Studies have indicated that slag viscosity must be within a certain range of temperatures for tapping and the membrane wall to be accessible, for example, between 1,300 °C and 1,500 °C, the viscosity is approximately 25 Pa·s. As the operating temperature decreases, the slag cools and solid crystals begin to form. Since slag behaves as a non-linear fluid, we discuss the constitutive modeling of slag and the important parameters that must be studied. We propose a new constitutive model, where the stress tensor not only has a yield stress part, but it also has a viscous part with a shear rate dependency of the viscosity, along with temperature and concentration dependency, while allowing for the possibility of the normal stress effects. In Part I, we reviewed, identify and discuss the key coal ash properties and the operating conditions impacting slag behavior.

  12. THE FORMATION OF IRIS DIAGNOSTICS. I. A QUINTESSENTIAL MODEL ATOM OF Mg II AND GENERAL FORMATION PROPERTIES OF THE Mg II h and k LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Leenaarts, J.; Pereira, T. M. D.; Carlsson, M.; De Pontieu, B.; Uitenbroek, H. E-mail: tiago.pereira@astro.uio.no E-mail: bdp@lmsal.com

    2013-08-01

    NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) space mission will study how the solar atmosphere is energized. IRIS contains an imaging spectrograph that covers the Mg II h and k lines as well as a slit-jaw imager centered at Mg II k. Understanding the observations will require forward modeling of Mg II h and k line formation from three-dimensional (3D) radiation-MHD models. This paper is the first in a series where we undertake this forward modeling. We discuss the atomic physics pertinent to h and k line formation, present a quintessential model atom that can be used in radiative transfer computations, and discuss the effect of partial redistribution (PRD) and 3D radiative transfer on the emergent line profiles. We conclude that Mg II h and k can be modeled accurately with a four-level plus continuum Mg II model atom. Ideally radiative transfer computations should be done in 3D including PRD effects. In practice this is currently not possible. A reasonable compromise is to use one-dimensional PRD computations to model the line profile up to and including the central emission peaks, and use 3D transfer assuming complete redistribution to model the central depression.

  13. Power Oscillator Circuit Modeling And Redesign For The Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA-II) Switch Trigger Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David L.; Hamil, Roy A.; Prestwich, Kenneth R.; Rohwein, Gerald J.; Donovan, Guy L.; Schaub, Charles M.

    1987-05-01

    The energy output and reliability of the multi-joule, injection-locked KrF laser used to trigger the PBFA II accelerator gas switches were improved through modifications identified in modeling the Blumlein driver circuit for the power oscillator. A combination of the SCEPTRE1 network solver code and JASON2 electrostatic field code were used to model the laser pulse-forming circuit in its single-channel rail gap configuration and modified versions with three or five discrete switches across the 1.45-m-wide, water-insulated transmission line. Three regularly spaced trigatron spark gaps resulted in a more uniformly driven laser volume with lower variations in voltages (10%) and rise times (9%) along its length. With the new configuration, over 3000 shots have been recorded without a single misfire compared to an average of ---25 shots before a prefire with the original design. The gas mix and pressure had to be optimized to match a given driver pulse voltage and rise time to achieve maximum performance from the laser. We summarize the model results which led to our decision to change the Blumlein switch configuration.

  14. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume IV. FBC-Model-II manual

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01

    This document is the fourth of the seven volume series of our Phase II Final Report. The purpose of this manual is to describe how to access and use M.I.T.'s Fluidized Bed Combustor (FBC) System Program. Presently, the FBC program is stored in a Honeywell Computer System and can be accessed using the Multics interactive system. The intention in writing this manual is to answer the questions that may arise regarding the mechanics of operating the system program, as well as warn the user of possible pitfalls and mistakes that could be made. No attempt is made here to describe the internals of the systems program. The manual describes the procedures an individual would follow to become an active user of the system program. It then explains the various options available for reaching the Multics interactive system on Honeywell 6180 computer on which the program runs. For users outside the Metropolitan Boston area, a public network for data communications is described which is relatively inexpensive. As the system program is approached through Multics using a special command facility TPSA, a separate introduction is provided for Multics TPSA. This facility allows commands appropriate for testing the program and carrying out parametric studies to be executed in a convenient way. Multics TPSA was formulated to meet the needs of the FBC project in particular. Finally, some sample sessions are presented which illustrate the login and logout procedures, the command language, and the data manipulation features of the FBC program. The use of commands helpful in debugging the program is also illustrated.

  15. Modeling direct interband tunneling. II. Lower-dimensional structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Andrew; Chui, Chi On

    2014-08-07

    We investigate the applicability of the two-band Hamiltonian and the widely used Kane analytical formula to interband tunneling along unconfined directions in nanostructures. Through comparisons with k·p and tight-binding calculations and quantum transport simulations, we find that the primary correction is the change in effective band gap. For both constant fields and realistic tunnel field-effect transistors, dimensionally consistent band gap scaling of the Kane formula allows analytical and numerical device simulations to approximate non-equilibrium Green's function current characteristics without arbitrary fitting. This allows efficient first-order calibration of semiclassical models for interband tunneling in nanodevices.

  16. Energy deposition via magnetoplasmadynamic acceleration: II. modeling and performance predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikellides, P. G.; England, B.; Gilland, J. H.

    2009-02-01

    A time-dependent, two-dimensional, axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamics code is employed to model, validate and extend the experimentally-limited performance characteristics of a gigawatt-level plasma source that utilized magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) acceleration for gas energy deposition. Accurate modeling required an upgrade of the code's circuit routines to properly capture the pulse-forming-network current waveform which also serves as the primary variable for validation. Comparisons with experimentally deduced current waveforms were in good agreement for all power levels. The simulations also produced values for the plasma voltage which were compared with the measured voltage across the electrodes. The trend agreement was encouraging while the magnitude of the discrepancy is approximately constant and interpreted as a representation of the electrode fall voltage. Force computations captured the expected electromagnetic acceleration trends and serve as further verification. They also allow examination of the device as a very high power MPD thruster operating at power levels in excess of 180 MW. The computations offer insights into the plasma's characteristics at different power levels through two-dimensional distributions of pertinent parameters and identify design guidelines for effective stagnation temperature values as a function of the mass-flow rate.

  17. Modeling downstream fining in sand-bed rivers. II: Application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, S.; Parker, G.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the model presented in the companion paper, Wright and Parker (2005) is applied to a generic river reach typical of a large, sand-bed river flowing into the ocean in order to investigate the mechanisms controlling longitudinal profile development and downstream fining. Three mechanisms which drive downstream fining are studied: a delta prograding into standing water, sea-level rise, and tectonic subsidence. Various rates of sea-level rise (typical of the late Holocene) and tectonic subsidence are modeled in order to quantify their effects on the degree of profile concavity and downstream fining. Also, several other physical mechanisms which may affect fining are studied, including the relative importance of the suspended versus bed load, the effect of the loss of sediment overbank, and the influence of the delta bottom slope. Finally, sensitivity analysis is used to show that the grain-size distribution at the interface between the active layer and substrate has a significant effect on downstream fining. ?? 2005 International Association of Hydraulic Engineering and Research.

  18. Numerical modeling of radiation physics in kinetic plasmas [II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraschiv, Ioana; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Mancini, Roberto

    2014-10-01

    X-ray radiation is an important feature of ultra-intense laser interactions with high Z materials. In order to take into account the radiation effects in the high energy density plasmas created by such interactions, we have modified the collisional particle-in-cell code PICLS to self-consistently model the x-ray radiation transport (RT). Solving the equation of radiation transport requires the creation of a non-LTE database of emissivities and opacities as functions of photon frequency for given densities, bulk electron temperatures, hot electron temperatures, and hot electron fractions. The database was generated using results computed by a non-equilibrium, collisional-radiative atomic kinetics code. Using the two-dimensional RT-PICLS code we have studied the X-ray transport in an ultrafast heated target and the dependence of the emitted K- α radiation on the fast electron dynamics in the solid target. The details of these results obtained from the implementation of the radiation transport model into the PICLS calculations will be reported in this presentation. Work supported by the DOE Office of Science Grant No. DE-SC0008827 and by the NNSA/DOE Grants No. DE-FC52-06NA27616 and DE-NA0002075.

  19. DETAILED DECOMPOSITION OF GALAXY IMAGES. II. BEYOND AXISYMMETRIC MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Chien Y.; Ho, Luis C.; Impey, Chris D.; Rix, Hans-Walter E-mail: lho@obs.carnegiescience.ed E-mail: rix@mpia-hd.mpg.d

    2010-06-15

    We present a two-dimensional (2D) fitting algorithm (GALFIT, ver. 3) with new capabilities to study the structural components of galaxies and other astronomical objects in digital images. Our technique improves on previous 2D fitting algorithms by allowing for irregular, curved, logarithmic and power-law spirals, ring, and truncated shapes in otherwise traditional parametric functions like the Sersic, Moffat, King, Ferrer, etc., profiles. One can mix and match these new shape features freely, with or without constraints, and apply them to an arbitrary number of model components of numerous profile types, so as to produce realistic-looking galaxy model images. Yet, despite the potential for extreme complexity, the meaning of the key parameters like the Sersic index, effective radius, or luminosity remains intuitive and essentially unchanged. The new features have an interesting potential for use to quantify the degree of asymmetry of galaxies, to quantify low surface brightness tidal features beneath and beyond luminous galaxies, to allow more realistic decompositions of galaxy subcomponents in the presence of strong rings and spiral arms, and to enable ways to gauge the uncertainties when decomposing galaxy subcomponents. We illustrate these new features by way of several case studies that display various levels of complexity.

  20. Modeling the distribution of Mg II absorbers around galaxies using background galaxies and quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Bordoloi, R.; Lilly, S. J.; Kacprzak, G. G.; Churchill, C. W.

    2014-04-01

    We present joint constraints on the distribution of Mg II absorption around high redshift galaxies obtained by combining two orthogonal probes, the integrated Mg II absorption seen in stacked background galaxy spectra and the distribution of parent galaxies of individual strong Mg II systems as seen in the spectra of background quasars. We present a suite of models that can be used to predict, for different two- and three-dimensional distributions, how the projected Mg II absorption will depend on a galaxy's apparent inclination, the impact parameter b and the azimuthal angle between the projected vector to the line of sight and the projected minor axis. In general, we find that variations in the absorption strength with azimuthal angles provide much stronger constraints on the intrinsic geometry of the Mg II absorption than the dependence on the inclination of the galaxies. In addition to the clear azimuthal dependence in the integrated Mg II absorption that we reported earlier in Bordoloi et al., we show that strong equivalent width Mg II absorbers (W{sub r} (2796) ≥ 0.3 Å) are also asymmetrically distributed in azimuth around their host galaxies: 72% of the absorbers in Kacprzak et al., and 100% of the close-in absorbers within 35 kpc of the center of their host galaxies, are located within 50° of the host galaxy's projected semi minor axis. It is shown that either composite models consisting of a simple bipolar component plus a spherical or disk component, or a single highly softened bipolar distribution, can well represent the azimuthal dependencies observed in both the stacked spectrum and quasar absorption-line data sets within 40 kpc. Simultaneously fitting both data sets, we find that in the composite model the bipolar cone has an opening angle of ∼100° (i.e., confined to within 50° of the disk axis) and contains about two-thirds of the total Mg II absorption in the system. The single softened cone model has an exponential fall off with azimuthal

  1. nIFTy galaxy cluster simulations - II. Radiative models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sembolini, Federico; Elahi, Pascal Jahan; Pearce, Frazer R.; Power, Chris; Knebe, Alexander; Kay, Scott T.; Cui, Weiguang; Yepes, Gustavo; Beck, Alexander M.; Borgani, Stefano; Cunnama, Daniel; Davé, Romeel; February, Sean; Huang, Shuiyao; Katz, Neal; McCarthy, Ian G.; Murante, Giuseppe; Newton, Richard D. A.; Perret, Valentin; Puchwein, Ewald; Saro, Alexandro; Schaye, Joop; Teyssier, Romain

    2016-07-01

    We have simulated the formation of a massive galaxy cluster (M_{200}^crit = 1.1 × 1015 h-1 M⊙) in a Λ cold dark matter universe using 10 different codes (RAMSES, 2 incarnations of AREPO and 7 of GADGET), modelling hydrodynamics with full radiative subgrid physics. These codes include smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH), spanning traditional and advanced SPH schemes, adaptive mesh and moving mesh codes. Our goal is to study the consistency between simulated clusters modelled with different radiative physical implementations - such as cooling, star formation and thermal active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback. We compare images of the cluster at z = 0, global properties such as mass, and radial profiles of various dynamical and thermodynamical quantities. We find that, with respect to non-radiative simulations, dark matter is more centrally concentrated, the extent not simply depending on the presence/absence of AGN feedback. The scatter in global quantities is substantially higher than for non-radiative runs. Intriguingly, adding radiative physics seems to have washed away the marked code-based differences present in the entropy profile seen for non-radiative simulations in Sembolini et al.: radiative physics + classic SPH can produce entropy cores, at least in the case of non cool-core clusters. Furthermore, the inclusion/absence of AGN feedback is not the dividing line -as in the case of describing the stellar content - for whether a code produces an unrealistic temperature inversion and a falling central entropy profile. However, AGN feedback does strongly affect the overall stellar distribution, limiting the effect of overcooling and reducing sensibly the stellar fraction.

  2. The Accretion Wind Model of Fermi Bubbles. II. Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Guobin; Yuan, Feng; Gan, Zhaoming; Sun, Mouyuan

    2015-09-01

    In a previous work, we have shown that the formation of Fermi bubbles can be due to the interaction between winds launched from the hot accretion flow in Sgr A* and the interstellar medium (ISM). In that work, we focus only on the morphology. In this paper we continue our study by calculating the gamma-ray radiation. Some cosmic-ray protons (CRp) and electrons (CRe) must be contained in the winds, which are likely formed by physical processes such as magnetic reconnection. We have performed MHD simulations to study the spatial distribution of CRp, considering the advection and diffusion of CRp in the presence of magnetic field. We find that a permeated zone is formed just outside of the contact discontinuity between winds and the ISM, where the collisions between CRp and thermal nuclei mainly occur. The decay of neutral pions generated in the collisions, combined with the inverse Compton scattering of background soft photons by the secondary leptons generated in the collisions and primary CRe, can well explain the observed gamma-ray spectral energy distribution. Other features such as the uniform surface brightness along the latitude and the boundary width of the bubbles are also explained. The advantage of this “accretion wind” model is that the adopted wind properties come from the detailed small-scale MHD numerical simulation of accretion flows and the value of mass accretion rate has independent observational evidences. The success of the model suggests that we may seriously consider the possibility that cavities and bubbles observed in other contexts such as galaxy clusters may be formed by winds rather than jets.

  3. Electronic structure of nickel(II) and zinc(II) borohydrides from spectroscopic measurements and computational modeling.

    PubMed

    Desrochers, Patrick J; Sutton, Christopher A; Abrams, Micah L; Ye, Shengfa; Neese, Frank; Telser, Joshua; Ozarowski, Andrew; Krzystek, J

    2012-03-01

    The previously reported Ni(II) complex, Tp*Ni(κ(3)-BH(4)) (Tp* = hydrotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borate anion), which has an S = 1 spin ground state, was studied by high-frequency and -field electron paramagnetic resonance (HFEPR) spectroscopy as a solid powder at low temperature, by UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy in the solid state and in solution at room temperature, and by paramagnetic (11)B NMR. HFEPR provided its spin Hamiltonian parameters: D = 1.91(1) cm(-1), E = 0.285(8) cm(-1), g = [2.170(4), 2.161(3), 2.133(3)]. Similar, but not identical parameters were obtained for its borodeuteride analogue. The previously unreported complex, Tp*Zn(κ(2)-BH(4)), was prepared, and IR and NMR spectroscopy allowed its comparison with analogous closed shell borohydride complexes. Ligand-field theory was used to model the electronic transitions in the Ni(II) complex successfully, although it was less successful at reproducing the zero-field splitting (zfs) parameters. Advanced computational methods, both density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio wave function based approaches, were applied to these Tp*MBH(4) complexes to better understand the interaction between these metals and borohydride ion. DFT successfully reproduced bonding geometries and vibrational behavior of the complexes, although it was less successful for the spin Hamiltonian parameters of the open shell Ni(II) complex. These were instead best described using ab initio methods. The origin of the zfs in Tp*Ni(κ(3)-BH(4)) is described and shows that the relatively small magnitude of D results from several spin-orbit coupling (SOC) interactions of large magnitude, but with opposite sign. Spin-spin coupling (SSC) is also shown to be significant, a point that is not always appreciated in transition metal complexes. Overall, a picture of bonding and electronic structure in open and closed shell late transition metal borohydrides is provided, which has implications for the use of these complexes in catalysis and

  4. Double Higgs production at LHC, see-saw type-II and Georgi-Machacek model

    SciTech Connect

    Godunov, S. I. Vysotsky, M. I. Zhemchugov, E. V.

    2015-03-15

    The double Higgs production in the models with isospin-triplet scalars is studied. It is shown that in the see-saw type-II model, the mode with an intermediate heavy scalar, pp → H + X → 2h + X, may have the cross section that is comparable with that in the Standard Model. In the Georgi-Machacek model, this cross section could be much larger than in the Standard Model because the vacuum expectation value of the triplet can be large.

  5. Competitive sorption and selective sequence of Cu(II) and Ni(II) on montmorillonite: Batch, modeling, EPR and XAS studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shitong; Ren, Xuemei; Zhao, Guixia; Shi, Weiqun; Montavon, Gilles; Grambow, Bernd; Wang, Xiangke

    2015-10-01

    Heavy metal ions that leach from various industrial and agricultural processes are simultaneously present in the contaminated soil and water systems. The competitive sorption of these toxic metal ions on the natural soil components and sediments significantly influences their migration, bioavailability and ecotoxicity in the geochemical environment. In this study, the competitive sorption and selectivity order of Cu(II) and Ni(II) on montmorillonite are investigated by combining the batch experiments, X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), surface complexation modeling and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). The batch experimental data show that the coexisting Ni(II) exhibits a negligible influence on the sorption behavior of Cu(II), whereas the coexisting Cu(II) reduces the Ni(II) sorption percentage and changes the shape of the Ni(II) sorption isotherm. The sorption species of Cu(II) and Ni(II) on montmorillonite over the acidic and near-neutral pH range are well simulated by the surface complexation modeling. However, this model cannot identify the occurrence of surface nucleation and the co-precipitation processes at a highly alkaline pH. Based on the results of the EPR and XAS analyses, the microstructures of Cu(II) on montmorillonite are identified as the hydrated free Cu(II) ions at pH 5.0, inner-sphere surface complexes at pH 6.0 and the surface dimers/Cu(OH)2(s) precipitate at pH 8.0 in the single-solute and the binary-solute systems. For the Ni(II) sorption in the single-solute system, the formed microstructure varies from the hydrated free Ni(II) ions at the pH values of 5.0 and 6.0 to the inner-sphere surface complexes at pH 8.0. For the Ni(II) sorption in the binary-solute system, the coexisting Cu(II) induces the formation of the inner-sphere complexes at pH 6.0. In contrast, Ni(II) is adsorbed on montmorillonite via the formation of Ni phyllosilicate co-precipitate/α-Ni(OH)2(s) precipitate at pH 8.0. The selective sequence

  6. Multifrequency monitoring of RU Lupi. II. The model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamzin, S. A.; Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.; Errico, L.; Giovannelli, F.; Katysheva, N. A.; Rossi, C.; Vittone, A. A.

    1996-02-01

    The data obtained during multifrequency monitoring of extreme T Tauri star RU Lupi and presented in Giovannelli et al. (1995), are explained by a model in which a young star with a moderately strong global magnetic field is actively accreting mass from a circumstellar disk. We argue that the magnetic field pressure stops the accretion disk at the height ~R_*_ above the stellar surface. A part of the matter from the innermost regions of the accretion disk freezes into the global stellar magnetic field lines and then slides along them, accelerating via gravity up to velocity V_0_~300km/s. Finally the matter is stopped near the stellar surface via shock wave mechanism. The temperature and density of the gas immediately after the shock front are of the order of 10^6^K and 3x10^13^cm^-3^, respectively. Thermal energy of the shock is carried away via radiation, which cools the decelerating post-shock gas almost to the effective temperature of the star. A half of liberated thermal energy radiates away from the star, so that extreme UV and soft X-ray quanta heat and ionize inflowing gas of pre-shock zone. Thus we suppose that there are at least two regions with different physical conditions where the observed emission lines are formed: before and after shock front. The second half of radiation flux from post-shock zone moves inward and is absorbed in upper, still dense layers of stellar atmosphere (N>10^15^cm^-3^), forming a kind of transition region. A ring-like accretion belt around the magnetic pole is formed in each hemisphere of the star at gas temperature near 6500K. We argue that in the case of RU Lupi these two "spots" occupy ~30% of the stellar surface, and that these are the regions where observed optical and UV "veiling" continuum form. The model explains the continuum emission at λ>0.9μm as a result of the radiation of the accretion disk heated by viscous dissipation and the absorption of radiation from the stellar surface. The main parameters of RU Lupi as a

  7. Catalytic Oxygen Evolution by a Bioinorganic Model of the Photosystem II Oxygen-Evolving Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Derrick L.; Tinoco, Arthur D.; Brudvig, Gary W.; Vrettos, John S.; Allen, Bertha Connie

    2005-01-01

    Bioinorganic models of the manganese Mn4 cluster are important not only as aids in understanding the structure and function of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), but also in developing artificial water-oxidation catalysts. The mechanism of water oxidation by photosystem II (PSII) is thought to involve the formation of a high-valent terminal Mn-oxo…

  8. NCASI (NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR AIR AND STREAM IMPROVEMENT) ENHANCEMENTS OF QUAL-II MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mathematical water quality model QUAL-II was modified to reflect advances in the understanding of algal, nutrient, and light interactions. Code changes also were made to incorporate hydraulic, boundary condition, water quality constituent, and rate coefficient features that h...

  9. EVALUATION AND SENSITIVITY ANALYSES RESULTS OF THE MESOPUFF II MODEL WITH CAPTEX MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The MESOPUFF II regional Lagrangian puff model has been evaluated and tested against measurements from the Cross-Appalachian Tracer Experiment (CAPTEX) data base in an effort to assess its abilIty to simulate the transport and dispersion of a nonreactive, nondepositing tracer plu...

  10. Theory of stellar convection II: first stellar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasetto, S.; Chiosi, C.; Chiosi, E.; Cropper, M.; Weiss, A.

    2016-04-01

    We present here the first stellar models on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (HRD), in which convection is treated according to the new scale-free convection theory (SFC theory) by Pasetto et al. (2014). The aim is to compare the results of the new theory with those from the classical, calibrated mixing-length (ML) theory to examine differences and similarities. We integrate the equations describing the structure of the atmosphere from the stellar surface down to a few percent of the stellar mass using both ML theory and SFC theory. The key temperature over pressure gradients, the energy fluxes, and the extension of the convective zones are compared in both theories. The analysis is first made for the Sun and then extended to other stars of different mass and evolutionary stage. The results are adequate: the SFC theory yields convective zones, temperature gradients ∇ and ∇e, and energy fluxes that are very similar to those derived from the "calibrated" MT theory for main sequence stars. We conclude that the old scale dependent ML theory can now be replaced with a self-consistent scale-free theory able to predict correct results, as it is more physically grounded than the ML theory. Fundamentally, the SFC theory offers a deeper insight of the underlying physics than numerical simulations.

  11. Triad model of education (II) and instructional engineering.

    PubMed

    Vargas, E A

    2007-11-01

    Despite the money and sweat that go into new instructional technologies, they do not produce the overall high level of student performances that societies seek. More effective teaching calls for a profound solution. It requires a coordinate triad of factors: a proper science, the correct organizational structure, and an engineering instructional technology. This second of a series of articles on the Triad Model of Education concentrates on instructional engineering. The instructional engineering drawn from the science is contingency-based. Contingency-based instructional systems always handle the inevitable two components of instruction: the repertoires of students and the setups that shape those repertoires. The setup component features five elements: subject matter, objectives, quality control, presentation modes, and logistics. The repertoire component consists of the governance of repertoires-event and lingual governed, the type of repertoire-knowing, solving, and creating, and the variability of the repertoire--convergent and divergent. These elements, and their required engineering, reveal an instructional task more complex than previously considered. Progress with such complexity occurs only when all components of the triad are in place. PMID:17992958

  12. Theory of stellar convection - II. First stellar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasetto, S.; Chiosi, C.; Chiosi, E.; Cropper, M.; Weiss, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present here the first stellar models on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, in which convection is treated according to the new scale-free convection theory (SFC theory) by Pasetto et al. The aim is to compare the results of the new theory with those from the classical, calibrated mixing-length (ML) theory to examine differences and similarities. We integrate the equations describing the structure of the atmosphere from the stellar surface down to a few per cent of the stellar mass using both ML theory and SFC theory. The key temperature over pressure gradients, the energy fluxes, and the extension of the convective zones are compared in both theories. The analysis is first made for the Sun and then extended to other stars of different mass and evolutionary stage. The results are adequate: the SFC theory yields convective zones, temperature gradients ∇ and ∇e, and energy fluxes that are very similar to those derived from the `calibrated' MT theory for main-sequence stars. We conclude that the old scale dependent ML theory can now be replaced with a self-consistent scale-free theory able to predict correct results, as it is more physically grounded than the ML theory. Fundamentally, the SFC theory offers a deeper insight of the underlying physics than numerical simulations.

  13. Control of gravitropic orientation. II. Dual receptor model for gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaMotte, Clifford E.; Pickard, Barbara G.

    2004-01-01

    Gravitropism of vascular plants has been assumed to require a single gravity receptor mechanism. However, based on the evidence in Part I of this study, we propose that maize roots require two. The first mechanism is without a directional effect and, by itself, cannot give rise to tropism. Its role is quantitative facilitation of the second mechanism, which is directional like the gravitational force itself and provides the impetus for tropic curvature. How closely coupled the two mechanisms may be is, as yet, unclear. The evidence for dual receptors supports a general model for roots. When readiness for gravifacilitation, or gravifacilitation itself, is constitutive, orthogravitropic curvature can go to completion. If not constitutively enabled, gravifacilitation can be weak in the absence of light and water deficit or strong in the presence of light and water deficit. In either case, it can decay and permit roots to assume reproducible non-vertical orientations (plagiogravitropic or plagiotropic orientations) without using non-vertical setpoints. In this way roots are deployed in a large volume of soil. Gravitropic behaviours in shoots are more diverse than in roots, utilising oblique and horizontal as well as vertical setpoints. As a guide to future experiments, we assess how constitutive v. non-constitutive modes of gravifacilitation might contribute to behaviours based on each kind of setpoint.

  14. Unified Model of the rf Plasma Sheath, Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Merle

    1996-10-01

    By developing an approximation to the first integral of the Poisson equation, one can obtain solutions for the current-voltage characteristics of an rf plasma sheath that are valid over the whole range of inertial response of the ions to an imposed rf voltage or current. (M.E.Riley, 1995 GEC, abstract QA5, published in Bull. Am. Phys. Soc., 40, 1587 (1995).) The theory has been shown to adequately reproduce current-voltage characteristics of two extreme cases (M.A. Lieberman, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 16, 638 (1988). A. Metze, D.W. Ernie, and H.J.Oskam, J.Appl.Phys., 60, 3081 (1986).) of ion response. In this work I show the effect of different conventions for connecting the sheath model to the bulk plasma. Modifications of the Mach number and a finite electric field at the Bohm point are natural choices. The differences are examined for a sheath in a high density Ar plasma and are found to be insignificant. A theoretical argument favors the electric field modification. *Work performed at Sandia National Labs and supported by US DoE under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. An Extended Equation of State Modeling Method II. Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrin, G.; Marchi, P.; Stringari, P.; Richon, D.

    2006-09-01

    This work is the extension of previous work dedicated to pure fluids. The same method is extended to the representation of thermodynamic properties of a mixture through a fundamental equation of state in terms of the Helmholtz energy. The proposed technique exploits the extended corresponding-states concept of distorting the independent variables of a dedicated equation of state for a reference fluid using suitable scale factor functions to adapt the equation to experimental data of a target system. An existing equation of state for the target mixture is used instead of an equation for the reference fluid, completely avoiding the need for a reference fluid. In particular, a Soave-Redlich-Kwong cubic equation with van der Waals mixing rules is chosen. The scale factors, which are functions of temperature, density, and mole fraction of the target mixture, are expressed in the form of a multilayer feedforward neural network, whose coefficients are regressed by minimizing a suitable objective function involving different kinds of mixture thermodynamic data. As a preliminary test, the model is applied to five binary and two ternary haloalkane mixtures, using data generated from existing dedicated equations of state for the selected mixtures. The results show that the method is robust and straightforward for the effective development of a mixture- specific equation of state directly from experimental data.

  16. Active region upflows. II. Data driven magnetohydrodynamic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galsgaard, K.; Madjarska, M. S.; Vanninathan, K.; Huang, Z.; Presmann, M.

    2015-12-01

    Context. Observations of many active regions show a slow systematic outflow/upflow from their edges lasting from hours to days. At present no physical explanation has been proven, while several suggestions have been put forward. Aims: This paper investigates one possible method for maintaining these upflows assuming, that convective motions drive the magnetic field to initiate them through magnetic reconnection. Methods: We use Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) data to provide an initial potential 3D magnetic field of the active region NOAA 11123 on 2010 November 13 where the characteristic upflow velocities are observed. A simple 1D hydrostatic atmospheric model covering the region from the photosphere to the corona is derived. Local correlation tracking of the magnetic features in the HMI data is used to derive a proxy for the time dependent velocity field. The time dependent evolution of the system is solved using a resistive 3D magnetohydrodynamic code. Results: The magnetic field contains several null points located well above the photosphere, with their fan planes dividing the magnetic field into independent open and closed flux domains. The stressing of the interfaces between the different flux domains is expected to provide locations where magnetic reconnection can take place and drive systematic flows. In this case, the region between the closed and open flux is identified as the region where observations find the systematic upflows. Conclusions: In the present experiment, the driving only initiates magneto-acoustic waves without driving any systematic upflows at any of the flux interfaces. Movie is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. ESEEM Analysis of Multi-Histidine Cu(II)-Coordination in Model Complexes, Peptides, and Amyloid-β

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We validate the use of ESEEM to predict the number of 14N nuclei coupled to a Cu(II) ion by the use of model complexes and two small peptides with well-known Cu(II) coordination. We apply this method to gain new insight into less explored aspects of Cu(II) coordination in amyloid-β (Aβ). Aβ has two coordination modes of Cu(II) at physiological pH. A controversy has existed regarding the number of histidine residues coordinated to the Cu(II) ion in component II, which is dominant at high pH (∼8.7) values. Importantly, with an excess amount of Zn(II) ions, as is the case in brain tissues affected by Alzheimer’s disease, component II becomes the dominant coordination mode, as Zn(II) selectively substitutes component I bound to Cu(II). We confirm that component II only contains single histidine coordination, using ESEEM and set of model complexes. The ESEEM experiments carried out on systematically 15N-labeled peptides reveal that, in component II, His 13 and His 14 are more favored as equatorial ligands compared to His 6. Revealing molecular level details of subcomponents in metal ion coordination is critical in understanding the role of metal ions in Alzheimer’s disease etiology. PMID:25014537

  18. Flight Model Development of Tokyo Tech Nano-Satellite Cute-1.7 + APD II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashida, Hiroki; Nishida, Junichi; Omagari, Kuniyuki; Fujiwara, Ken; Konda, Yasumi; Yamanaka, Tomio; Tanaka, Yohei; Maeno, Masaki; Fujihashi, Kota; Inagawa, Shinichi; Miura, Yoshiyuki; Matunaga, Saburo

    The Laboratory for Space Systems at the Tokyo Institute of Technology has developed the nano-satellite Cute-1.7+APD. The satellite was launched by JAXA M-V-8 rocket on February 22, 2006 and operated for about a month. A successor to the Cute-1.7+APD was developed and is named Cute-1.7+APD II. This new satellite is based on its predecessor but has some modifications. In this paper an overview of the Cute-1.7 series and flight model development of Cute-1.7+APD II are introduced.

  19. Line profile studies of hydrodynamical models of cometary compact H II regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Feng-Yao; Zhu, Qing-Feng

    2015-06-01

    We simulate the evolution of cometary H II regions based on several champagne flow models and bow shock models, and calculate the profiles of the [Ne II] fine-structure line at 12.81 μm, the H30α recombination line and the [Ne III] fine-structure line at 15.55 μm for these models at different inclinations of 0°, 30° and 60°. We find that the profiles in the bow shock models are generally different from those in the champagne flow models, but the profiles in the bow shock models with lower stellar velocity (≤ 5 km s-1) are similar to those in the champagne flow models. In champagne flow models, both the velocity of peak flux and the flux weighted central velocities of all three lines point outward from molecular clouds. In bow shock models, the directions of these velocities depend on the speed of stars. The central velocities of these lines are consistent with the stellar motion in the high stellar speed cases, but they are opposite directions from the stellar motion in the low speed cases. We notice that the line profiles from the slit along the symmetrical axis of the projected 2D image of these models are useful for distinguishing bow shock models from champagne flow models. It is also confirmed by the calculation that the flux weighted central velocity and the line luminosity of the [Ne III] line can be estimated from the [Ne II] line and the H30α line.

  20. Cosmological parameter uncertainties from SALT-II type Ia supernova light curve models

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.; Sako, M.; Guy, J.; Astier, P.; Betoule, M.; El-Hage, P.; Pain, R.; Regnault, N.; Marriner, J.; Biswas, R.; Kuhlmann, S.; Schneider, D. P.

    2014-09-20

    We use simulated type Ia supernova (SN Ia) samples, including both photometry and spectra, to perform the first direct validation of cosmology analysis using the SALT-II light curve model. This validation includes residuals from the light curve training process, systematic biases in SN Ia distance measurements, and a bias on the dark energy equation of state parameter w. Using the SN-analysis package SNANA, we simulate and analyze realistic samples corresponding to the data samples used in the SNLS3 analysis: ∼120 low-redshift (z < 0.1) SNe Ia, ∼255 Sloan Digital Sky Survey SNe Ia (z < 0.4), and ∼290 SNLS SNe Ia (z ≤ 1). To probe systematic uncertainties in detail, we vary the input spectral model, the model of intrinsic scatter, and the smoothing (i.e., regularization) parameters used during the SALT-II model training. Using realistic intrinsic scatter models results in a slight bias in the ultraviolet portion of the trained SALT-II model, and w biases (w {sub input} – w {sub recovered}) ranging from –0.005 ± 0.012 to –0.024 ± 0.010. These biases are indistinguishable from each other within the uncertainty; the average bias on w is –0.014 ± 0.007.

  1. Cosmological Parameter Uncertainties from SALT-II Type Ia Supernova Light Curve Models

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.; Guy, J.; Kessler, R.; Astier, P.; Marriner, J.; Betoule, M.; Sako, M.; El-Hage, P.; Biswas, R.; Pain, R.; Kuhlmann, S.; Regnault, N.; Frieman, J. A.; Schneider, D. P.

    2014-08-29

    We use simulated type Ia supernova (SN Ia) samples, including both photometry and spectra, to perform the first direct validation of cosmology analysis using the SALT-II light curve model. This validation includes residuals from the light curve training process, systematic biases in SN Ia distance measurements, and a bias on the dark energy equation of state parameter w. Using the SN-analysis package SNANA, we simulate and analyze realistic samples corresponding to the data samples used in the SNLS3 analysis: ~120 low-redshift (z < 0.1) SNe Ia, ~255 Sloan Digital Sky Survey SNe Ia (z < 0.4), and ~290 SNLS SNe Ia (z ≤ 1). To probe systematic uncertainties in detail, we vary the input spectral model, the model of intrinsic scatter, and the smoothing (i.e., regularization) parameters used during the SALT-II model training. Using realistic intrinsic scatter models results in a slight bias in the ultraviolet portion of the trained SALT-II model, and w biases (w (input) – w (recovered)) ranging from –0.005 ± 0.012 to –0.024 ± 0.010. These biases are indistinguishable from each other within the uncertainty, the average bias on w is –0.014 ± 0.007.

  2. Two Higgs doublet model of type II facing flavor physics data

    SciTech Connect

    Deschamps, Olivier; Monteil, Stephane; Niess, Valentin; Descotes-Genon, Sebastien; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tisserand, Vincent

    2010-10-01

    We discuss tests of the charged Higgs sector of the two Higgs doublet model (2HDM) of type II in the light of recent flavor physics data. Particular attention is paid to recent measurement of purely leptonic decays of heavy-light mesons, which depart more or less significantly from the standard model (SM) predictions. We derive constraints on the parameters of the 2HDM type II from leptonic and semileptonic {Delta}F=1 decays as well as loop processes (b{yields}s{gamma}, BB mixing, or Z{yields}bb) sensitive to charged Higgs contributions. The outcome of this work is that while 2HDM type II can fit the individual observable through fine-tuning schemes, in a combined analysis it does not perform better than the standard model by favoring a decoupling solution. Assuming that 2HDM type II is realized in nature, constraints on its parameters (m{sub H}{sup +} and tan{beta}) are derived. A limit on the charged Higgs mass m{sub H}{sup +}>316 GeV at 95% CL is obtained irrespective of the value of tan{beta}. This limit is dominated by the b{yields}s{gamma} branching ratio measurement. All results have been obtained with the CKMfitter analysis package, featuring the frequentist statistical approach Rfit to handle theoretical uncertainties.

  3. Statistics of SU(5) D-brane models on a type II orientifold

    SciTech Connect

    Gmeiner, Florian; Stein, Maren

    2006-06-15

    We perform a statistical analysis of models with SU(5) and flipped SU(5) gauge group in a type II orientifold setup. We investigate the distribution and correlation of properties of these models, including the number of generations and the hidden sector gauge group. Compared to the recent analysis [F. Gmeiner, R. Blumenhagen, G. Honecker, D. Luest, and T. Weigand, J. High Energy Phys. 01 (2006) 004; F. Gmeiner, Fortschr. Phys. 54, 391 (2006).] of models with a standard model-like gauge group, we find very similar results.

  4. Statistics of SU(5) D-brane models on a type II orientifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gmeiner, Florian; Stein, Maren

    2006-06-01

    We perform a statistical analysis of models with SU(5) and flipped SU(5) gauge group in a type II orientifold setup. We investigate the distribution and correlation of properties of these models, including the number of generations and the hidden sector gauge group. Compared to the recent analysis [F. Gmeiner, R. Blumenhagen, G. Honecker, D. Lüst, and T. Weigand, J. High Energy Phys.JHEPFG1029-8479 01 (2006) 004; F. Gmeiner, Fortschr. Phys.FPYKA60015-8208 54, 391 (2006).10.1088/1126-6708/2006/01/004] of models with a standard model-like gauge group, we find very similar results.

  5. Photochemical oxidation of coals and some selected model compounds by using copper(II) chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, M.

    1999-12-01

    The H-donor ability of different rank coals was examined by using a copper(II)chloride-acetonitrile system as the dehydrogenator. A bituminous coal and two lignites were irradiated in the UV in the presence of copper(II)chloride in acetonitrile. The coal was dehydrogenated while the Cu(II) was reduced to CU(I). Considerable amounts of aliphatic or alicyclic hydrogen were removed from the coals. In the process, while the oxygen contents of coals do not increase, more condensed aromatic products occur. It was concluded that lignites are better reducing agents than bituminous coals. A photooxidation mechanism is proposed on the basis of the model compound reaction. Photooxidation of alcohols (ethanol, 2-propanol, benzyl alcohol, 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol, and diphenyl carbinol), a hydroaromatic compound (tetrahydronaphthalene), and an aromatic ether (dibenzyl ether) was performed under similar reaction conditions.

  6. Controlling FAMA by the Ptolemy II model of ion beam transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balvanović, R.; Rađenović, B.; Beličev, P.; Nešković, N.

    2009-08-01

    FAMA is a facility for modification and analysis of materials with ion beams. Due to the wide range of ion beams and energies used in the facility and its future expansion, the need has arisen for faster tuning of ion beams transport control parameters. With this aim, a new approach to modeling ion-beam transport system was developed, based on the Ptolemy II modeling and design framework. A model in Ptolemy II is a hierarchical aggregation of components called actors, which communicate with other actors using tokens, or pieces of data. Each ion optical element is modeled by a composite actor implementing beam matrix transformation function, while tokens carry beam matrix data. A basic library of models of typical ion optical elements is developed, and a complex model of FAMA ion beam transport system is hierarchically integrated with bottom-up approach. The model is extended to include control functions. The developed model is modular, flexible and extensible. The results obtained by simulation on the model demonstrate easy and efficient tuning of beam line control parameters. Fine tuning of control parameters, due to uncertainties inherent to modeling, still has to be performed on-line.

  7. Comparing Geant4 hadronic models for the WENDI-II rem meter response function.

    PubMed

    Vanaudenhove, T; Dubus, A; Pauly, N

    2013-01-01

    The WENDI-II rem meter is one of the most popular neutron dosemeters used to assess a useful quantity of radiation protection, namely the ambient dose equivalent. This is due to its high sensitivity and its energy response that approximately follows the conversion function between neutron fluence and ambient dose equivalent in the range of thermal to 5 GeV. The simulation of the WENDI-II response function with the Geant4 toolkit is then perfectly suited to compare low- and high-energy hadronic models provided by this Monte Carlo code. The results showed that the thermal treatment of hydrogen in polyethylene for neutron <4 eV has a great influence over the whole detector range. Above 19 MeV, both Bertini Cascade and Binary Cascade models show a good correlation with the results found in the literature, while low-energy parameterised models are not suitable for this application. PMID:22972796

  8. Development and comparison of a TOPAZ-II system model with experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Paramonov, D.V.; El-Genk, M.S. . Inst. for Space Nuclear Power Studies)

    1994-11-01

    An integrated model of the TOPAZ-II space nuclear reactor system is developed and compared with measurements from the TOPAZ-II, V-71 unit tests. For a given reactor thermal power, the model calculates the coolant flow rate, temperature, and pressure throughout the system; load electric power; and overall system efficiency. Model predictions showed good agreement with the experimental data. The calculated coolant temperatures and pressure are within 15 K (< 2%) and 12% of the measurements, respectively. Analysis showed that at the nominal operating thermal power of the system (115 kW), and NaK coolant is highly subcooled. The largest subcooling of 365 K occurs at the exit of the electromagnetic pump, where coolant pressure is highest, and the lowest subcooling of 275 K occurs at the exit of the reactor core, where coolant temperature is highest.

  9. Schizosaccharomyces pombe and its Ni(II)-insensitive mutant GA1 in Ni(II) uptake from aqueous solutions: a biodynamic model.

    PubMed

    Sayar, Nihat Alpagu; Durmaz-Sam, Selcen; Kazan, Dilek; Sayar, Ahmet Alp

    2014-08-01

    In the present study, Ni(II) uptake from aqueous solution by living cells of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe haploid 972 with h (-) mating type and a Ni(II)-insensitive mutant GA1 derived from 972 was investigated at various initial glucose and Ni(II) concentrations. A biodynamic model was developed to predict the unsteady and steady-state phases of the uptake process. Gompertz growth and uptake process parameters were optimized to predict the maximum growth rate μ m and the process metric C r, the remaining Ni(II) content in the aqueous solution. The simulated overall metal uptake values were found to be in acceptable agreement with experimental results. The model validation was done through regression statistics and uncertainty and sensitivity analyses. To gain insight into the phenomenon of Ni(II) uptake by wild-type and mutant S. pombe, probable active and passive metal transport mechanisms in yeast cells were discussed in view of the simulation results. The present work revealed the potential of mutant GA1 to remove Ni(II) cations from aqueous media. The results obtained provided new insights for understanding the combined effect of biosorption and bioaccumulation processes for metal removal and offered a possibility for the use of growing mutant S. pombe cell in bioremediation. PMID:24752843

  10. Mn(II) and Cu(II) complexes of a bidentate Schiff's base ligand: Spectral, thermal, molecular modelling and mycological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Monika; Chandra, Sulekh; Tyagi, Prateek

    2014-01-01

    Complexes of manganese(II) and copper(II) of general composition M(L)2X2 have been synthesized [L = 2-acetyl thiophene thiosemicarbazone and X = Cl- and NO3-]. The elemental analysis, molar conductance measurements, magnetic susceptibility measurements, mass, IR, UV, NMR and EPR spectral studies of the compounds led to the conclusion that the ligand acts as a bidentate manner. The Schiff's base ligand forms hexacoordinated complexes having octahedral geometry for Mn(II) and tetragonal geometry for Cu(II) complexes. The thermal studies suggested that the complexes are more stable as compared to ligand. In molecular modelling the geometries of Schiff's base and metal complexes were fully optimized with respect to the energy using the 6-31g(d,p) basis set. The mycological studies of the compounds were examined against the plant pathogenic fungi i.e. Rhizoctonia bataticola, Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium odum.

  11. Reactive Transport Modeling of Microbe-mediated Fe (II) Oxidation for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surasani, V.; Li, L.

    2011-12-01

    Microbially Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) aims to improve the recovery of entrapped heavy oil in depleted reservoirs using microbe-based technology. Reservoir ecosystems often contain diverse microbial communities those can interact with subsurface fluids and minerals through a network of nutrients and energy fluxes. Microbe-mediated reactions products include gases, biosurfactants, biopolymers those can alter the properties of oil and interfacial interactions between oil, brine, and rocks. In addition, the produced biomass and mineral precipitates can change the reservoir permeability profile and increase sweeping efficiency. Under subsurface conditions, the injection of nitrate and Fe (II) as the electron acceptor and donor allows bacteria to grow. The reaction products include minerals such as Fe(OH)3 and nitrogen containing gases. These reaction products can have large impact on oil and reservoir properties and can enhance the recovery of trapped oil. This work aims to understand the Fe(II) oxidation by nitrate under conditions relevant to MEOR. Reactive transport modeling is used to simulate the fluid flow, transport, and reactions involved in this process. Here we developed a complex reactive network for microbial mediated nitrate-dependent Fe (II) oxidation that involves both thermodynamic controlled aqueous reactions and kinetic controlled Fe (II) mineral reaction. Reactive transport modeling is used to understand and quantify the coupling between flow, transport, and reaction processes. Our results identify key parameter controls those are important for the alteration of permeability profile under field conditions.

  12. Comparison of MRI signatures in pattern I and II multiple sclerosis models.

    PubMed

    Serres, Sébastien; Anthony, Daniel C; Jiang, Yanyan; Campbell, Sandra J; Broom, Kerry A; Khrapitchev, Alexandre; Sibson, Nicola R

    2009-12-01

    The majority of individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) exhibit T-cell- and macrophage-dominated lesions (patterns I and II; as opposed to III and IV). These lesions, in turn, may be distinguished on the basis of whether or not there are immunoglobulin and complement depositions at the sites of active myelin destruction; such depositions are found exclusively in pattern II lesions. The main aim of this study was to determine whether pattern I and pattern II MS lesions exhibit distinct MRI signatures. We have used a recently described focal MOG-induced EAE model of the rat brain, which recapitulates many of the hallmarks of pattern II MS; we compared this with our previous work in a delayed type hypersensitivity model of a pattern I type lesion in the rat brain. Demyelinating lesions with extensive inflammation were generated, in which the T2-weighted signal was increased. Magnetisation transfer ratio (MTR) maps revealed loss and subsequent incomplete recovery of the structure of the corpus callosum, together with changes in tissue water diffusion and an associated increase in ventricle size. Notably, the MTR changes preceeded histological demyelination and may report on the processes leading to demyelination, rather than demyelination per se. Immunohistochemically, these MRI-detectable signal changes correlated with both inflammatory cell infiltration and later loss of myelin. Breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and an increase in the regional cerebral blood volume were also evident in and around the lesion site at the early stage of the disease. Interestingly, however, the MRI signal changes in this pattern II type MS lesion were remarkably consistent with those previously observed in a pattern I lesion. These findings suggest that the observed signal changes reflect the convergent histopathology of the two models rather than the underlying mechanisms of the disease. PMID:19489017

  13. Chronic resveratrol reverses a mild angiotensin II-induced pressor effect in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Gordish, Kevin L; Beierwaltes, William H

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is reported to reduce blood pressure in animal models of hypertension, but the mechanisms are unknown. We have shown that resveratrol infusion increases sodium excretion. We hypothesized that chronic ingestion of resveratrol would reduce angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced increases in blood pressure by decreasing oxidative stress and by also decreasing sodium reabsorption through a nitric oxide-dependent mechanism. We infused rats with vehicle or 80 μg Ang II/d over 4 weeks. Vehicle or Ang II-infused rats were individually housed, pair fed, and placed on a diet of normal chow or normal chow plus 146 mg resveratrol/d. Groups included 1) control, 2) resveratrol-fed, 3) Ang II-treated, and 4) Ang II plus resveratrol. Systolic blood pressure was measured by tail cuff. During the 4th week, rats were placed in metabolic caging for urine collection. NO2/NO3 and 8-isoprostane excretion were measured. Ang II increased systolic blood pressure in the 1st week by +14±5 mmHg (P<0.05) in Group 3 and +10±3 mmHg (P<0.05) in Group 4, respectively. Blood pressure was unchanged in Groups 1 and 2. After 4 weeks, blood pressure remained elevated in Group 3 rats with Ang II (+9±3 mmHg, P<0.05), but in Group 4, blood pressure was no longer elevated (+2±2 mmHg). We found no significant differences between the groups in sodium excretion or cumulative sodium balance (18.49±0.12, 17.75±0.16, 17.97±0.17, 18.46±0.18 μEq Na+/7 d in Groups 1-4, respectively). Urinary excretion of NO2/NO3 in the four groups was 1) 1631±207 μmol/24 h, 2) 1045±236 μmol/24 h, 3) 1490±161 μmol/24 h, and 4) 609±17 μmol/24 h. 8-Isoprostane excretion was 1) 63.85±19.39 nmol/24 h, 2) 73.57±22.02 nmol/24 h, 3) 100.69±37.62 nmol/24 h, and 4) 103.00±38.88 nmol/24 h. We conclude that chronic resveratrol supplementation does not blunt Ang II-increased blood pressure, and while resveratrol has mild depressor effects, these do not seem to be due to natriuresis or enhanced renal nitric oxide

  14. Chronic resveratrol reverses a mild angiotensin II-induced pressor effect in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Gordish, Kevin L; Beierwaltes, William H

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is reported to reduce blood pressure in animal models of hypertension, but the mechanisms are unknown. We have shown that resveratrol infusion increases sodium excretion. We hypothesized that chronic ingestion of resveratrol would reduce angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced increases in blood pressure by decreasing oxidative stress and by also decreasing sodium reabsorption through a nitric oxide-dependent mechanism. We infused rats with vehicle or 80 μg Ang II/d over 4 weeks. Vehicle or Ang II-infused rats were individually housed, pair fed, and placed on a diet of normal chow or normal chow plus 146 mg resveratrol/d. Groups included 1) control, 2) resveratrol-fed, 3) Ang II-treated, and 4) Ang II plus resveratrol. Systolic blood pressure was measured by tail cuff. During the 4th week, rats were placed in metabolic caging for urine collection. NO2/NO3 and 8-isoprostane excretion were measured. Ang II increased systolic blood pressure in the 1st week by +14±5 mmHg (P<0.05) in Group 3 and +10±3 mmHg (P<0.05) in Group 4, respectively. Blood pressure was unchanged in Groups 1 and 2. After 4 weeks, blood pressure remained elevated in Group 3 rats with Ang II (+9±3 mmHg, P<0.05), but in Group 4, blood pressure was no longer elevated (+2±2 mmHg). We found no significant differences between the groups in sodium excretion or cumulative sodium balance (18.49±0.12, 17.75±0.16, 17.97±0.17, 18.46±0.18 μEq Na+/7 d in Groups 1–4, respectively). Urinary excretion of NO2/NO3 in the four groups was 1) 1631±207 μmol/24 h, 2) 1045±236 μmol/24 h, 3) 1490±161 μmol/24 h, and 4) 609±17 μmol/24 h. 8-Isoprostane excretion was 1) 63.85±19.39 nmol/24 h, 2) 73.57±22.02 nmol/24 h, 3) 100.69±37.62 nmol/24 h, and 4) 103.00±38.88 nmol/24 h. We conclude that chronic resveratrol supplementation does not blunt Ang II-increased blood pressure, and while resveratrol has mild depressor effects, these do not seem to be due to natriuresis or enhanced renal nitric oxide

  15. Seizure modeling of Pb(II) and Cd(II) from aqueous solution by chemically modified sugarcane bagasse fly ash: isotherms, kinetics, and column study.

    PubMed

    Shah, Bhavna; Mistry, Chirag; Shah, Ajay

    2013-04-01

    Heavy metal pollution is a common environmental problem all over the world. The purpose of the research is to examine the applicability of bagasse fly ash (BFA)-an agricultural waste of sugar industry used for the synthesis of zeolitic material. The zeolitic material are used for the uptake of Pb(II) and Cd(II) heavy metal. Bagasse fly ash is used as a native material for the synthesis of zeolitic materials by conventional hydrothermal treatment without (conventional zeolitic bagasse fly ash (CZBFA)) and with electrolyte (conventional zeolitic bagasse fly ash in electrolyte media (ECZBFA)) media. Heavy metal ions Pb(II) and Cd(II) were successfully seized from aqueous media using these synthesized zeolitic materials. In this study, the zeolitic materials were well characterized by different instrumental methods such as Brunauer-Emmett-Teller, XRF, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopic microphotographs. The presence of analcime, phillipsite, and zeolite P in adsorbents confirms successful conversion of native BFA into zeolitic materials. Seizure modeling of Pb(II) and Cd(II) was achieved by batch sorption experiments, isotherms, and kinetic studies. These data were used to compare and evaluate the zeolitic materials as potential sorbents for the uptake of heavy metal ions from an aqueous media. The Langmuir isotherm correlation coefficient parameters best fit the equilibrium data which indicate the physical sorption. Pseudo-second-order and intra-particle diffusion model matches best which indicates that the rate of sorption was controlled by film diffusion. The column studies were performed for the practical function of sorbents, and breakthrough curves were obtained, which revealed higher sorption capacity as compared to batch method. Synthesized zeolitic material (CZBFA and ECZBFA), a low-cost sorbent, was proven as potential sorbent for the uptake of Pb(II) and Cd(II) heavy metal ions. PMID:22739768

  16. Constructing kinetic models to elucidate structural dynamics of a complete RNA polymerase II elongation cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jin; Da, Lin-Tai; Huang, Xuhui

    2015-02-01

    The RNA polymerase II elongation is central in eukaryotic transcription. Although multiple intermediates of the elongation complex have been identified, the dynamical mechanisms remain elusive or controversial. Here we build a structure-based kinetic model of a full elongation cycle of polymerase II, taking into account transition rates and conformational changes characterized from both single molecule experimental studies and computational simulations at atomistic scale. Our model suggests a force-dependent slow transition detected in the single molecule experiments corresponds to an essential conformational change of a trigger loop (TL) opening prior to the polymerase translocation. The analyses on mutant study of E1103G and on potential sequence effects of the translocation substantiate this proposal. Our model also investigates another slow transition detected in the transcription elongation cycle which is independent of mechanical force. If this force-independent slow transition happens as the TL gradually closes upon NTP binding, the analyses indicate that the binding affinity of NTP to the polymerase has to be sufficiently high. Otherwise, one infers that the slow transition happens pre-catalytically but after the TL closing. Accordingly, accurate determination of intrinsic properties of NTP binding is demanded for an improved characterization of the polymerase elongation. Overall, the study provides a working model of the polymerase II elongation under a generic Brownian ratchet mechanism, with most essential structural transition and functional kinetics elucidated.

  17. Structural Model of RNA Polymerase II Elongation Complex with Complete Transcription Bubble Reveals NTP Entry Routes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Pardo-Avila, Fátima; Wang, Dong; Huang, Xuhui

    2015-01-01

    The RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is a eukaryotic enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of the messenger RNA using a DNA template. Despite numerous biochemical and biophysical studies, it remains elusive whether the “secondary channel” is the only route for NTP to reach the active site of the enzyme or if the “main channel” could be an alternative. On this regard, crystallographic structures of Pol II have been extremely useful to understand the structural basis of transcription, however, the conformation of the unpaired non-template DNA part of the full transcription bubble (TB) is still unknown. Since diffusion routes of the nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) substrate through the main channel might overlap with the TB region, gaining structural information of the full TB is critical for a complete understanding of Pol II transcription process. In this study, we have built a structural model of Pol II with a complete transcription bubble based on multiple sources of existing structural data and used Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations together with structural analysis to shed light on NTP entry pathways. Interestingly, we found that although both channels have enough space to allow NTP loading, the percentage of MD conformations containing enough space for NTP loading through the secondary channel is twice higher than that of the main channel. Further energetic study based on MD simulations with NTP loaded in the channels has revealed that the diffusion of the NTP through the main channel is greatly disfavored by electrostatic repulsion between the NTP and the highly negatively charged backbones of nucleotides in the non-template DNA strand. Taken together, our results suggest that the secondary channel is the major route for NTP entry during Pol II transcription. PMID:26134169

  18. SAGE II aerosol data validation based on retrieved aerosol model size distribution from SAGE II aerosol measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pi-Huan; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Chu, W. P.; Swissler, T. J.; Osborn, M. T.; Russell, P. B.; Oberbeck, V. R.; Livingston, J.; Rosen, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to aerosol correlative measurements experiments for the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II, conducted between November 1984 and July 1986. The correlative measurements were taken with an impactor/laser probe, a dustsonde, and an airborne 36-cm lidar system. The primary aerosol quantities measured by the ground-based instruments are compared with those calculated from the aerosol size distributions from SAGE II aerosol extinction measurements. Good agreement is found between the two sets of measurements.

  19. Relaxin Treatment in an Ang-II-Based Transgenic Preeclamptic-Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Nadine; Golic, Michaela; Herse, Florian; Rugor, Julianna; Linz, Dominik; Solano, Maria Emilia; Müller, Dominik N.; Dechend, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Relaxin is a peptide related to pregnancy that induces nitric oxide-related and gelatinase-related effects, allowing vasodilation and pregnancy-related adjustments permitting parturition to occur. Relaxin controls the hemodynamic and renovascular adaptive changes that occur during pregnancy. Interest has evolved regarding relaxin and a therapeutic principle in preeclampsia and heart failure. Preeclampsia is a pregnancy disorder, featuring hypertension, proteinuria and placental anomalies. We investigated relaxin in an established transgenic rat model of preeclampsia, where the phenotype is induced by angiotensin (Ang)-II production in mid pregnancy. We gave recombinant relaxin to preeclamtic rats at day 9 of gestation. Hypertension and proteinuria was not ameliorated after relaxin administration. Intrauterine growth retardation of the fetus was unaltered by relaxin. Heart-rate responses and relaxin levels documented drug effects. In this Ang-II-based model of preeclampsia, we could not show a salubrious effect on preeclampsia. PMID:26963382

  20. Relaxin Treatment in an Ang-II-Based Transgenic Preeclamptic-Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Haase, Nadine; Golic, Michaela; Herse, Florian; Rugor, Julianna; Linz, Dominik; Solano, Maria Emilia; Müller, Dominik N; Dechend, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Relaxin is a peptide related to pregnancy that induces nitric oxide-related and gelatinase-related effects, allowing vasodilation and pregnancy-related adjustments permitting parturition to occur. Relaxin controls the hemodynamic and renovascular adaptive changes that occur during pregnancy. Interest has evolved regarding relaxin and a therapeutic principle in preeclampsia and heart failure. Preeclampsia is a pregnancy disorder, featuring hypertension, proteinuria and placental anomalies. We investigated relaxin in an established transgenic rat model of preeclampsia, where the phenotype is induced by angiotensin (Ang)-II production in mid pregnancy. We gave recombinant relaxin to preeclamtic rats at day 9 of gestation. Hypertension and proteinuria was not ameliorated after relaxin administration. Intrauterine growth retardation of the fetus was unaltered by relaxin. Heart-rate responses and relaxin levels documented drug effects. In this Ang-II-based model of preeclampsia, we could not show a salubrious effect on preeclampsia. PMID:26963382

  1. Angiotensin II induces skin fibrosis: a novel mouse model of dermal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    inflammation and fibrosis in the skin via MCP1 upregulation and accumulation of activated fibroblasts. Additionally, our data suggest that populations of these fibroblasts originate from circulating blood cells. Ang II infusion via osmotic minipumps could serve as a useful mouse model of skin fibrosis to gain new insights into pathogenic mechanisms and to test new antifibrotic therapies. PMID:22913887

  2. Detailed p- and s-wave velocity models along the LARSE II transect, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, J.M.; Fuis, G.S.; Ryberg, T.; Lutter, W.J.; Catchings, R.D.; Goldman, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    Structural details of the crust determined from P-wave velocity models can be improved with S-wave velocity models, and S-wave velocities are needed for model-based predictions of strong ground motion in southern California. We picked P- and S-wave travel times for refracted phases from explosive-source shots of the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment, Phase II (LARSE II); we developed refraction velocity models from these picks using two different inversion algorithms. For each inversion technique, we calculated ratios of P- to S-wave velocities (VP/VS) where there is coincident P- and S-wave ray coverage.We compare the two VP inverse velocity models to each other and to results from forward modeling, and we compare the VS inverse models. The VS and VP/VS models differ in structural details from the VP models. In particular, dipping, tabular zones of low VS, or high VP/VS, appear to define two fault zones in the central Transverse Ranges that could be parts of a positive flower structure to the San Andreas fault. These two zones are marginally resolved, but their presence in two independent models lends them some credibility. A plot of VS versus VP differs from recently published plots that are based on direct laboratory or down-hole sonic measurements. The difference in plots is most prominent in the range of VP = 3 to 5 km=s (or VS ~ 1:25 to 2:9 km/s), where our refraction VS is lower by a few tenths of a kilometer per second from VS based on direct measurements. Our new VS - VP curve may be useful for modeling the lower limit of VS from a VP model in calculating strong motions from scenario earthquakes.

  3. The XAS model of dissolved Cu(II) and its significance to biological electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Patrick; Benfatto, Maurizio; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.

    2009-11-01

    The standard model for dissolved Cu(II) portrays the complex ion as an axially elongated, equatorially planar octahedron. Using EXAFS and MXAN analyses of copper K-edge XAS spectra, new structural models for dissolved [Cu(aq)]2+ and [Cu(amm)]2+ have been determined. These structures uniformly depart from the octahedral model in favour of an axially elongated square pyramidal core. MXAN results also indicate that the equatorial ligands need not be coplanar with copper. Further structural elements include a -z axially localized scatterer at ~3 Å. Even more distant scatterers imply second shell solvent organization, which can vary with the medium. Preliminary results from new extended, k = 18 Å-1, higher resolution copper K-edge XAS data sets are reported. The low symmetry of dissolved Cu(II) ion contradicts the central thesis of the rack-induced bonding hypothesis of copper electron transfer proteins. The asymmetry of biological copper is not a frozen vibronic excited state enforced by a rigid protein scaffold, but is entirely in harmony with the structural ground state of the dissolved aqueous Cu(II) complex ion.

  4. System modelling to support accelerated fuel transfer rate at EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Imel, G.R.; Houshyar, A.; Planchon, H.P.; Cutforth, D.C.

    1995-06-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) ia a 62.5 MW(th) liquid metal reactor operated by Argonne National Laboratory for The United States Department of Energy. The reactor is located near Idaho Falls, Idaho at the Argonne-West site (ANL-W). Full power operation was achieved in 1964,- the reactor operated continuously since that time until October 1994 in a variety of configurations depending on the programmatic mission. A three year program was initiated in October, 1993 to replace the 330 depleted uranium blanket subassemblies (S/As) with stainless steel reflectors. It was intended to operate the reactor during the three year blanket unloading program, followed by about a half year of driver fuel unloading. However, in the summer of 1994, Congress dictacted that EBR-II be shut down October 1, and complete defueling without operation. To assist in the planning for resources needed for this defueling campaign, a mathematical model of the fuel handling sequence was developed utilizing the appropriate reliability factors and inherent mm constraints of each stage of the process. The model allows predictions of transfer rates under different scenarios. Additionally, it has facilitated planning of maintenance activities, as well as optimization of resources regarding manpower and modification effort. The model and its application is described in this paper.

  5. Neutrinoless double beta decay in type I+II seesaw models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borah, Debasish; Dasgupta, Arnab

    2015-11-01

    We study neutrinoless double beta decay in left-right symmetric extension of the standard model with type I and type II seesaw origin of neutrino masses. Due to the enhanced gauge symmetry as well as extended scalar sector, there are several new physics sources of neutrinoless double beta decay in this model. Ignoring the left-right gauge boson mixing and heavy-light neutrino mixing, we first compute the contributions to neutrinoless double beta decay for type I and type II dominant seesaw separately and compare with the standard light neutrino contributions. We then repeat the exercise by considering the presence of both type I and type II seesaw, having non-negligible contributions to light neutrino masses and show the difference in results from individual seesaw cases. Assuming the new gauge bosons and scalars to be around a TeV, we constrain different parameters of the model including both heavy and light neutrino masses from the requirement of keeping the new physics contribution to neutrinoless double beta decay amplitude below the upper limit set by the GERDA experiment and also satisfying bounds from lepton flavor violation, cosmology and colliders.

  6. Modeling of G333.6-0.2 as a spherical H II region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, R. H.; Hollenbach, D. J.; Erickson, E. F.

    1983-01-01

    The radio and IR observations of the H II region G333.6-0.2 are matched with a detailed spherical model with a density distribution which has a uniform-density core of radius 0.05 pc, a power-law intermediate zone, and a uniform-density halo. A stellar radiation field is required that is somewhat different from those predicted by available model atmospheres. Of the stellar models of Kurucz, the Teff = 34,000 K and log g = 3.5 model best fits the observed ratio of helium to hydrogen recombination lines. A good fit to all the observations in obtained with an S(2+) ionizing flux which is a factor of 20 times less than predicted by the Kurucz atmosphere. Current model atmospheres may not be appropriate because a single stable star with Teff = 34,000 K fails by at least an order of magnitude to produce the ionizing luminosity. The small radius of the constant-density core implies a short dynamical lifetime of approximately 5000 years for this spherical model; this may indicate that a nonspherical blister geometry is more appropriate for this H II region.

  7. Transient PVT measurements and model predictions for vessel heat transfer. Part II.

    SciTech Connect

    Felver, Todd G.; Paradiso, Nicholas Joseph; Winters, William S., Jr.; Evans, Gregory Herbert; Rice, Steven F.

    2010-07-01

    Part I of this report focused on the acquisition and presentation of transient PVT data sets that can be used to validate gas transfer models. Here in Part II we focus primarily on describing models and validating these models using the data sets. Our models are intended to describe the high speed transport of compressible gases in arbitrary arrangements of vessels, tubing, valving and flow branches. Our models fall into three categories: (1) network flow models in which flow paths are modeled as one-dimensional flow and vessels are modeled as single control volumes, (2) CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) models in which flow in and between vessels is modeled in three dimensions and (3) coupled network/CFD models in which vessels are modeled using CFD and flows between vessels are modeled using a network flow code. In our work we utilized NETFLOW as our network flow code and FUEGO for our CFD code. Since network flow models lack three-dimensional resolution, correlations for heat transfer and tube frictional pressure drop are required to resolve important physics not being captured by the model. Here we describe how vessel heat transfer correlations were improved using the data and present direct model-data comparisons for all tests documented in Part I. Our results show that our network flow models have been substantially improved. The CFD modeling presented here describes the complex nature of vessel heat transfer and for the first time demonstrates that flow and heat transfer in vessels can be modeled directly without the need for correlations.

  8. Synthesis, characterization, biological activity, molecular modeling and docking studies of complexes 4-(4-hydroxy)-3-(2-pyrazine-2-carbonyl)hydrazonomethylphenyl-diazen-yl-benzenesulfonamide with manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), zinc(II) and cadmium(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaghaz, Abdel-Nasser M. A.; Zayed, Mohamed E.; Alharbi, Suliman A.; Ammar, Reda A. A.; Elhenawy, Ahmed

    2015-03-01

    A new series of complexes of 4-(4-hydroxy)-3-(2-pyrazine-2-carbonyl)hydrazonomethylphenyl-diazen-yl-benzenesulfonamide (HL) with Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) have been prepared and characterized by different physical techniques. The IR spectra of the prepared complexes were suggested that the ligand behaves as a tri-dentate ligand through the carbonyl oxygen, azomethine nitrogen and phenolic oxygen atoms (ONO). Electronic spectra and magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal octahedral geometry for all complexes. The elemental analyses and mass spectral data have justified the ML2 composition of complexes. The EPR spectra of Mn(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) complexes support the mononuclear structure. The crystal field splitting, Racah repulsion and nephelauxetic parameters and determined from the electronic spectra of the complexes. Thermal properties and decomposition kinetics of all complexes are investigated. The geometry of the metal complexes has been optimized with the help of molecular modeling. The biological activity of these compounds against various fungi has been investigated.

  9. SAGE II aerosol data validation based on retrieved aerosol model size distribution from SAGE II aerosol measurements.

    PubMed

    Wang, P H; McCormick, M P; McMaster, L R; Chu, W P; Swissler, T J; Osborn, M T; Russell, P B; Oberbeck, V R; Livingston, J; Rosen, J M; Hofmann, D J; Grams, G W; Fuller, W H; Yue, G K

    1989-06-20

    This paper describes an investigation of the comprehensive aerosol correlative measurement experiments conducted between November 1984 and July 1986 for satellite measurement program of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II). The correlative sensors involved in the experiments consist of the NASA Ames Research Center impactor/laser probe, the University of Wyoming dustsonde, and the NASA Langley Research Center airborne 14-inch (36 cm) lidar system. The approach of the analysis is to compare the primary aerosol quantities measured by the ground-based instruments with the calculated ones based on the aerosol size distributions retrieved from the SAGE II aerosol extinction measurements. The analysis shows that the aerosol size distributions derived from the SAGE II observations agree qualitatively with the in situ measurements made by the impactor/laser probe. The SAGE II-derived vertical distributions of the ratio N0.15/N0.25 (where Nr is the cumulative aerosol concentration for particle radii greater than r, in micrometers) and the aerosol backscatter profiles at 0.532- and 0.6943-micrometer lidar wavelengths are shown to agree with the dustsonde and the 14-inch (36-cm) lidar observations, with the differences being within the respective uncertainties of the SAGE II and the other instruments. PMID:11539801

  10. Comparative modeling of the three-dimensional structure of type II antifreeze protein.

    PubMed Central

    Sönnichsen, F. D.; Sykes, B. D.; Davies, P. L.

    1995-01-01

    Type II antifreeze proteins (AFP), which inhibit the growth of seed ice crystals in the blood of certain fishes (sea raven, herring, and smelt), are the largest known fish AFPs and the only class for which detailed structural information is not yet available. However, a sequence homology has been recognized between these proteins and the carbohydrate recognition domain of C-type lectins. The structure of this domain from rat mannose-binding protein (MBP-A) has been solved by X-ray crystallography (Weis WI, Drickamer K, Hendrickson WA, 1992, Nature 360:127-134) and provided the coordinates for constructing the three-dimensional model of the 129-amino acid Type II AFP from sea raven, to which it shows 19% sequence identity. Multiple sequence alignments between Type II AFPs, pancreatic stone protein, MBP-A, and as many as 50 carbohydrate-recognition domain sequences from various lectins were performed to determine reliably aligned sequence regions. Successive molecular dynamics and energy minimization calculations were used to relax bond lengths and angles and to identify flexible regions. The derived structure contains two alpha-helices, two beta-sheets, and a high proportion of amino acids in loops and turns. The model is in good agreement with preliminary NMR spectroscopic analyses. It explains the observed differences in calcium binding between sea raven Type II AFP and MBP-A. Furthermore, the model proposes the formation of five disulfide bridges between Cys 7 and Cys 18, Cys 35 and Cys 125, Cys 69 and Cys 100, Cys 89 and Cys 111, and Cys 101 and Cys 117.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7540906

  11. Compartmental models: theory and practice using the SAAM II software system.

    PubMed

    Cobelli, C; Foster, D M

    1998-01-01

    Understanding in vivo the functioning of metabolic systems at the whole-body or regional level requires one to make some assumptions on how the system works and to describe them mathematically, that is, to postulate a model of the system. Models of systems can have different characteristics depending on the properties of the system and the database available for their study; they can be deterministic or stochastic, dynamic or static, with lumped or distributed parameters. Metabolic systems are dynamic systems and we focus here on the most widely used class of dynamic (differential equation) models: compartmental models. This is a class of models for which the governing law is conservation of mass. It is a very attractive class to users because it formalizes physical intuition in a simple and reasonable way. Compartmental models are lumped parameter models, in that the events in the system are described by a finite number of changing variables, and are thus described by ordinary differential equations. While stochastic compartment models can also be defined, we discuss here the deterministic versions--those that can work with exact relationships between model variables. These are the models most widely used in discussions of endocrinology and metabolism. In this chapter, we will discuss the theory of compartmental models, and then discuss how the SAAM II software system, a system designed specifically to aid in the development and testing of multicompartmental models, can be used. PMID:9781383

  12. Saturation magnetization of Ni(II) in metalloproteins and model compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sendova, M.; Day, E.P.; Kiick, K.; Johnson, M.; Ma, L.; Scott, B.; Hausinger, R.; Todd, M.; Peterson, J. Univ. of Georgia, Athens Michigan State Univ., East Lansing Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa )

    1992-01-01

    The Ni(II) sites of urease (from Klebsiella aerogenes and jack bean), coenzyme F[sub 430] (from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum), and several model compounds having octahedral symmetry have been studied using the saturation megnetization technique. Data were collected at four fixed fields over the temperature range from 2 - 200K. Theoretical curves calculated from the spin Hamiltonian were used to fit the experimentally obtained magnetization curves. The following parameters were determined: the spine state (S), the amount of the sample in this spin state ([S]), the gyromagnetic ratio (g), and the zero field splitting parameters (D, E/D). The amount of S=1 paramagnetism of the Ni(II) sites was found to depend on the pH of the buffer and on the concentration of the protein in D[sub 2]O (for coenzyme F[sub 430]). The relationship of the strength of the ligand field to the zero field splitting parameter was studied for the model compounds. There was no evidence for exchange coupling between the two Ni(II) ions at the active sites of either plant or bacterial urease.

  13. Modeling and Simulation of Longitudinal Dynamics for LER-HER PEP II Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Rivetta, Claudio; Mastorides, T.; Fox, J.D.; Teytelman, D.; Van Winkle, D.; /SLAC

    2007-03-06

    A time domain modeling and simulation tool for beam-cavity interactions in LER and HER rings at PEP II are presented. The motivation for this tool is to explore the stability margins and performance limits of PEP II RF systems at higher currents and upgraded RF configurations. It also serves as test bed for new control algorithms and can define the ultimate limits of the architecture. The time domain program captures the dynamical behavior of the beam-cavity interaction based on a reduced model. The ring current is represented by macro-bunches. Multiple RF station in the ring are represented via one or two macro-cavities. Each macro-cavity captures the overall behavior of all the 2 or 4 cavity RF station. Station models include nonlinear elements in the klystron and signal processing. This allows modeling the principal longitudinal impedance control loops interacting with the longitudinal beam model. Validation of simulation tool is in progress by comparing the measured growth rates for both LER and HER rings with simulation results. The simulated behavior of both machines at high currents are presented comparing different control strategies and the effect of non-linear klystrons in the growth rates.

  14. Development of nonfibrotic left ventricular hypertrophy in an ANG II-induced chronic ovine hypertension model.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Niklas; Scherschel, Katharina; Schad, Claudia; Lau, Denise; Reitmeier, Aline; Kuklik, Pawel; Muellerleile, Kai; Yamamura, Jin; Zeller, Tanja; Steven, Daniel; Baldus, Stephan; Schäffer, Benjamin; Jungen, Christiane; Eickholt, Christian; Wassilew, Katharina; Schwedhelm, Edzard; Willems, Stephan; Meyer, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for many cardiovascular diseases and leads to subsequent concomitant pathologies such as left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Translational approaches using large animals get more important as they allow the use of standard clinical procedures in an experimental setting. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish a minimally invasive ovine hypertension model using chronic angiotensin II (ANG II) treatment and to characterize its effects on cardiac remodeling after 8 weeks. Sheep were implanted with osmotic minipumps filled with either vehicle control (n = 7) or ANG II (n = 9) for 8 weeks. Mean arterial blood pressure in the ANG II-treated group increased from 87.4 ± 5.3 to 111.8 ± 6.9 mmHg (P = 0.00013). Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging showed an increase in left ventricular mass from 112 ± 12.6 g to 131 ± 18.7 g after 7 weeks (P = 0.0017). This was confirmed by postmortem measurement of left ventricular wall thickness which was higher in ANG II-treated animals compared to the control group (18 ± 4 mm vs. 13 ± 2 mm, respectively, P = 0.002). However, ANG II-treated sheep did not reveal any signs of fibrosis or inflammatory infiltrates as defined by picrosirius red and H&E staining on myocardial full thickness paraffin sections of both atria and ventricles. Measurements of plasma high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and urinary 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α were inconspicuous in all animals. Furthermore, multielectrode surface mapping of the heart did not show any differences in epicardial conduction velocity and heterogeneity. These data demonstrate that chronic ANG II treatment using osmotic minipumps presents a reliable, minimally invasive approach to establish hypertension and nonfibrotic LVH in sheep. PMID:27613823

  15. Large-scale Validation of AMIP II Land-surface Simulations: Preliminary Results for Ten Models

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, T J; Henderson-Sellers, A; Irannejad, P; McGuffie, K; Zhang, H

    2005-12-01

    This report summarizes initial findings of a large-scale validation of the land-surface simulations of ten atmospheric general circulation models that are entries in phase II of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP II). This validation is conducted by AMIP Diagnostic Subproject 12 on Land-surface Processes and Parameterizations, which is focusing on putative relationships between the continental climate simulations and the associated models' land-surface schemes. The selected models typify the diversity of representations of land-surface climate that are currently implemented by the global modeling community. The current dearth of global-scale terrestrial observations makes exacting validation of AMIP II continental simulations impractical. Thus, selected land-surface processes of the models are compared with several alternative validation data sets, which include merged in-situ/satellite products, climate reanalyses, and off-line simulations of land-surface schemes that are driven by observed forcings. The aggregated spatio-temporal differences between each simulated process and a chosen reference data set then are quantified by means of root-mean-square error statistics; the differences among alternative validation data sets are similarly quantified as an estimate of the current observational uncertainty in the selected land-surface process. Examples of these metrics are displayed for land-surface air temperature, precipitation, and the latent and sensible heat fluxes. It is found that the simulations of surface air temperature, when aggregated over all land and seasons, agree most closely with the chosen reference data, while the simulations of precipitation agree least. In the latter case, there also is considerable inter-model scatter in the error statistics, with the reanalyses estimates of precipitation resembling the AMIP II simulations more than to the chosen reference data. In aggregate, the simulations of land-surface latent and sensible

  16. Modeling of optical spectra of the light-harvesting CP29 antenna complex of photosystem II--part II.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ximao; Kell, Adam; Pieper, Jörg; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2013-06-01

    Until recently, it was believed that the CP29 protein from higher plant photosystem II (PSII) contains 8 chlorophylls (Chl's) per complex (Ahn et al. Science 2008, 320, 794-797; Bassi et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 1999, 96, 10056-10061) in contrast to the 13 Chl's revealed by the recent X-ray structure (Pan et al. Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 2011, 18, 309-315). This disagreement presents a constraint on the interpretation of the underlying electronic structure of this complex. To shed more light on the interpretation of various experimental optical spectra discussed in the accompanying paper (part I, DOI 10.1021/jp4004328 ), we report here calculated low-temperature (5 K) absorption, fluorescence, hole-burned (HB), and 300 K circular dichroism (CD) spectra for CP29 complexes with a different number of pigments. We focus on excitonic structure and the nature of the low-energy state using modeling based on the X-ray structure of CP29 and Redfield theory. We show that the lowest energy state is mostly contributed to by a612, a611, and a615 Chl's. We suggest that in the previously studied CP29 complexes from spinach (Pieper et al. Photochem. Photobiol.2000, 71, 574-589) two Chl's could have been lost during the preparation/purification procedure, but it is unlikely that the spinach CP29 protein contains only eight Chl's, as suggested by the sequence homology-based study (Bassi et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.1999, 96, 10056-10061). The likely Chl's missing in wild-type (WT) CP29 complexes studied previously (Pieper et al. Photochem. Photobiol. 2000, 71, 574-589) include a615 and b607. This is why the nonresonant HB spectra shown in that reference were ~1 nm blue-shifted with the low-energy state mostly localized on about one Chl a (i.e., a612) molecule. Pigment composition of CP29 is discussed in the context of light-harvesting and excitation energy transfer. PMID:23662835

  17. Progresses in tritium accident modelling in the frame of IAEA EMRAS II

    SciTech Connect

    Galeriu, D.; Melintescu, A.

    2015-03-15

    The assessment of the environmental impact of tritium release from nuclear facilities is a topic of interest in many countries. In the IAEA's Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety (EMRAS I) programme, progresses for routine releases were done and in the EMRAS II programme a dedicated working group (WG 7 - Tritium Accidents) focused on the potential accidental releases (liquid and atmospheric pathways). The progresses achieved in WG 7 were included in a complex report - a technical document of IAEA covering both liquid and atmospheric accidental release consequences. A brief description of the progresses achieved in the frame of EMRAS II WG 7 is presented. Important results have been obtained concerning washout rate, the deposition on the soil of HTO and HT, the HTO uptake by leaves and the subsequent conversion to OBT (organically bound tritium) during daylight. Further needs of the processes understanding and the experimental efforts are emphasised.

  18. The impact of a human IGF-II analog ([Leu27]IGF-II) on fetal growth in a mouse model of fetal growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Charnock, Jayne C; Dilworth, Mark R; Aplin, John D; Sibley, Colin P; Westwood, Melissa; Crocker, Ian P

    2016-01-01

    Enhancing placental insulin-like growth factor (IGF) availability appears to be an attractive strategy for improving outcomes in fetal growth restriction (FGR). Our approach was the novel use of [Leu(27)]IGF-II, a human IGF-II analog that binds the IGF-II clearance receptor IGF-IIR in fetal growth-restricted (FGR) mice. We hypothesized that the impact of [Leu(27)]IGF-II infusion in C57BL/6J (wild-type) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase knockout (eNOS(-/-); FGR) mice would be to enhance fetal growth and investigated this from mid- to late gestation; 1 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) [Leu(27)]IGF-II was delivered via a subcutaneous miniosmotic pump from E12.5 to E18.5. Fetal and placental weights recorded at E18.5 were used to generate frequency distribution curves; fetuses <5th centile were deemed growth restricted. Placentas were harvested for immunohistochemical analysis of the IGF system, and maternal serum was collected for measurement of exogenously administered IGF-II. In WT pregnancies, [Leu(27)]IGF-II treatment halved the number of FGR fetuses, reduced fetal(P = 0.028) and placental weight variations (P = 0.0032), and increased the numbers of pups close to the mean fetal weight (131 vs. 112 pups within 1 SD). Mixed-model analysis confirmed litter size to be negatively correlated with fetal and placental weight and showed that [Leu(27)]IGF-II preferentially improved fetal weight in the largest litters, as defined by number. Unidirectional (14C)MeAIB transfer per gram placenta (System A amino acid transporter activity) was inversely correlated with fetal weight in [Leu(27)]IGF-II-treated WT animals (P < 0.01). In eNOS(-/-) mice, [Leu(27)]IGF-II reduced the number of FGR fetuses(1 vs. 5 in the untreated group). The observed reduction in FGR pup numbers in both C57 and eNOS(-/-) litters suggests the use of this analog as a means of standardizing and rescuing fetal growth, preferentially in the smallest offspring. PMID:26530156

  19. The impact of a human IGF-II analog ([Leu27]IGF-II) on fetal growth in a mouse model of fetal growth restriction

    PubMed Central

    Charnock, Jayne C.; Dilworth, Mark R.; Aplin, John D.; Sibley, Colin P.; Westwood, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing placental insulin-like growth factor (IGF) availability appears to be an attractive strategy for improving outcomes in fetal growth restriction (FGR). Our approach was the novel use of [Leu27]IGF-II, a human IGF-II analog that binds the IGF-II clearance receptor IGF-IIR in fetal growth-restricted (FGR) mice. We hypothesized that the impact of [Leu27]IGF-II infusion in C57BL/6J (wild-type) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase knockout (eNOS−/−; FGR) mice would be to enhance fetal growth and investigated this from mid- to late gestation; 1 mg·kg−1·day−1 [Leu27]IGF-II was delivered via a subcutaneous miniosmotic pump from E12.5 to E18.5. Fetal and placental weights recorded at E18.5 were used to generate frequency distribution curves; fetuses <5th centile were deemed growth restricted. Placentas were harvested for immunohistochemical analysis of the IGF system, and maternal serum was collected for measurement of exogenously administered IGF-II. In WT pregnancies, [Leu27]IGF-II treatment halved the number of FGR fetuses, reduced fetal(P = 0.028) and placental weight variations (P = 0.0032), and increased the numbers of pups close to the mean fetal weight (131 vs. 112 pups within 1 SD). Mixed-model analysis confirmed litter size to be negatively correlated with fetal and placental weight and showed that [Leu27]IGF-II preferentially improved fetal weight in the largest litters, as defined by number. Unidirectional 14CMeAIB transfer per gram placenta (System A amino acid transporter activity) was inversely correlated with fetal weight in [Leu27]IGF-II-treated WT animals (P < 0.01). In eNOS−/− mice, [Leu27]IGF-II reduced the number of FGR fetuses(1 vs. 5 in the untreated group). The observed reduction in FGR pup numbers in both C57 and eNOS−/− litters suggests the use of this analog as a means of standardizing and rescuing fetal growth, preferentially in the smallest offspring. PMID:26530156

  20. Development and Verification of a TOPAZ-II Electromagnetic Pump Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Paramonov, Dmitry V.

    1994-07-01

    An integrated model of the TOPAZ-II electromagnetic (EM) pump is developed and incorporated into the Thermionic Transient Analysis Model (TITAM). The magnetic field strength of the induction coil depends not only on the current supplied by the pump TFEs, but also on the temperature of the coil. All electric and thermal properties of the coolant, wall material of pump ducts, and the electric leads are taken to be temperature dependent. The pump model is benchmarked with experimental data at different coolant temperatures. Results show the pump model to be in good agreement with experimental data. The maximum deviation in the mass flow predictions obtained at different coolant temperatures and pump currents is less than 0.1 kg/s.

  1. Models of H II regions - Heavy element opacity, variation of temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed set of H II region models that use the same physics and self-consistent input have been computed and are used to examine where in parameter space the effects of heavy element opacity is important. The models are briefly described, and tabular data for the input parameters and resulting properties of the models are presented. It is found that the opacities of C, Ne, O, and to a lesser extent N play a vital role over a large region of parameter space, while S and Ar opacities are negligible. The variation of the average electron temperature T(e) of the models with metal abundance, density, and T(eff) is investigated. It is concluded that by far the most important determinator of T(e) is metal abundance; an almost 7000 K difference is expected over the factor of 10 change from up to down abundances.

  2. Modelling the Pan-Spectral Energy Distribution of Starburst Galaxies: II. Control of the H II Region Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Dopita, M A; Fischera, J; Sutherland, R S; Kewley, L J; Tuffs, R J; Popescu, C C; van Breugel, W; Groves, B A; Leitherer, C

    2006-03-01

    We examine from a theoretical viewpoint how the physical parameters of H II regions are controlled both in normal galaxies and in starburst environments. These parameters are the H II region luminosity function, the time-dependent size, the covering fraction of molecular clouds, the pressure in the ionized gas and the ionization parameter. The factors which control them are the initial mass function of the exciting stars, the cluster mass function, the metallicity and the mean pressure in the surrounding interstellar medium. We investigate the sensitivity of the H{alpha} luminosity to the IMF, and find that this can translate to about 30% variation in derived star formation rates. The molecular cloud dissipation timescale is estimated from a case study of M17 to be {approx} 1 Myr. Based upon H II luminosity function fitting for nearby galaxies, we propose that the cluster mass function has a log-normal form peaking at {approx} 185M{sub {circle_dot}}. This suggests that the cluster mass function is the continuation of the stellar IMF to higher mass. The pressure in the H II regions is controlled by the mechanical luminosity flux from the central cluster. Since this is closely related to the ionizing photon flux, we show that the ionization parameter is not a free variable, and that the diffuse ionized medium may be composed of many large, faint and old H II regions. Finally, we derive theoretical probability distributions for the ionization parameter as a function of metallicity and compare these to those derived for SDSS galaxies.

  3. A Global Model of The Light Curves and Expansion Velocities of Type II-plateau Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejcha, Ondřej; Prieto, Jose L.

    2015-02-01

    We present a new self-consistent and versatile method that derives photospheric radius and temperature variations of Type II-Plateau supernovae based on their expansion velocities and photometric measurements. We apply the method to a sample of 26 well-observed, nearby supernovae with published light curves and velocities. We simultaneously fit ~230 velocity and ~6800 mag measurements distributed over 21 photometric passbands spanning wavelengths from 0.19 to 2.2 μm. The light-curve differences among the Type II-Plateau supernovae are well modeled by assuming different rates of photospheric radius expansion, which we explain as different density profiles of the ejecta, and we argue that steeper density profiles result in flatter plateaus, if everything else remains unchanged. The steep luminosity decline of Type II-Linear supernovae is due to fast evolution of the photospheric temperature, which we verify with a successful fit of SN 1980K. Eliminating the need for theoretical supernova atmosphere models, we obtain self-consistent relative distances, reddenings, and nickel masses fully accounting for all internal model uncertainties and covariances. We use our global fit to estimate the time evolution of any missing band tailored specifically for each supernova, and we construct spectral energy distributions and bolometric light curves. We produce bolometric corrections for all filter combinations in our sample. We compare our model to the theoretical dilution factors and find good agreement for the B and V filters. Our results differ from the theory when the I, J, H, or K bands are included. We investigate the reddening law toward our supernovae and find reasonable agreement with standard \\mathscr{R}_V˜ 3.1 reddening law in UBVRI bands. Results for other bands are inconclusive. We make our fitting code publicly available.

  4. Prognostic and Predictive Model for Stage II Colon Cancer Patients With Nonemergent Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chun-Dong; Wang, Ji-Nan; Sui, Bai-Qiang; Zeng, Yong-Ji; Chen, Jun-Qing; Dai, Dong-Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract No ideal prognostic model has been applied to clearly identify which suitable high-risk stage II colon cancer patients with negative margins undergoing nonemergent surgery should receive adjuvant chemotherapy routinely. Clinicopathologic and prognostic data of 333 stage II colon cancer patients who underwent D2 or D3 lymphadenectomy during nonemergent surgery were retrospectively analyzed. Four pathologically determined factors, including adjacent organ involvement (RR 2.831, P = 0.001), histologic differentiation (RR 2.151, P = 0.009), lymphovascular invasion (RR 4.043, P < 0.001), and number of lymph nodes retrieved (RR 2.161, P = 0.011), were identified as independent prognostic factors on multivariate analysis. Importantly, a simple cumulative scoring system clearly categorizing prognostic risk groups was generated: risk score = ∑ coefficient’ × status (AOI + histological differentiated + lymphovascular invasion + LNs retrieved). Our new prognostic model may provide valuable information on the impact of lymphovascular invasion, as well as powerfully and reliably predicting prognosis and recurrence for this particular cohort of patients. This model may identify suitable patients with an R0 resection who should receive routine postoperative adjuvant therapy and may help clinicians to facilitate individualized treatment. In this study, we aim to provide an ideal and quantifiable method for clinical decision making in the nonemergent surgical treatment of stage II colon cancer. Our prognostic and predictive model should be applied in multicenter, prospective studies with large sample sizes, in order to obtain a more reliable clinical recommendation. PMID:26735527

  5. A GLOBAL MODEL OF THE LIGHT CURVES AND EXPANSION VELOCITIES OF TYPE II-PLATEAU SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Pejcha, Ondřej; Prieto, Jose L.

    2015-02-01

    We present a new self-consistent and versatile method that derives photospheric radius and temperature variations of Type II-Plateau supernovae based on their expansion velocities and photometric measurements. We apply the method to a sample of 26 well-observed, nearby supernovae with published light curves and velocities. We simultaneously fit ∼230 velocity and ∼6800 mag measurements distributed over 21 photometric passbands spanning wavelengths from 0.19 to 2.2 μm. The light-curve differences among the Type II-Plateau supernovae are well modeled by assuming different rates of photospheric radius expansion, which we explain as different density profiles of the ejecta, and we argue that steeper density profiles result in flatter plateaus, if everything else remains unchanged. The steep luminosity decline of Type II-Linear supernovae is due to fast evolution of the photospheric temperature, which we verify with a successful fit of SN 1980K. Eliminating the need for theoretical supernova atmosphere models, we obtain self-consistent relative distances, reddenings, and nickel masses fully accounting for all internal model uncertainties and covariances. We use our global fit to estimate the time evolution of any missing band tailored specifically for each supernova, and we construct spectral energy distributions and bolometric light curves. We produce bolometric corrections for all filter combinations in our sample. We compare our model to the theoretical dilution factors and find good agreement for the B and V filters. Our results differ from the theory when the I, J, H, or K bands are included. We investigate the reddening law toward our supernovae and find reasonable agreement with standard R{sub V}∼3.1 reddening law in UBVRI bands. Results for other bands are inconclusive. We make our fitting code publicly available.

  6. Visual imagery and the user model applied to fuel handling at EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.

    1995-06-01

    The material presented in this paper is based on two studies involving visual display designs and the user`s perspective model of a system. The studies involved a methodology known as Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP), and its use in expanding design choices which included the ``comfort parameters`` and ``perspective reality`` of the user`s model of the world. In developing visual displays for the EBR-II fuel handling system, the focus would be to incorporate the comfort parameters that overlap from each of the representation systems: visual, auditory and kinesthetic then incorporate the comfort parameters of the most prominent group of the population, and last, blend in the other two representational system comfort parameters. The focus of this informal study was to use the techniques of meta-modeling and synesthesia to develop a virtual environment that closely resembled the operator`s perspective of the fuel handling system of Argonne`s Experimental Breeder Reactor - II. An informal study was conducted using NLP as the behavioral model in a v reality (VR) setting.

  7. Analysis of five forest harvesting simulation models. II. Paths, pitfalls, and other considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Goulet, D.V.; Iff, R.H.; Sirois, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    This is the second of two papers describing the conclusions from a study to determine the state of the art in timber harvesting computer simulation modeling. Five models were evaluated -- Forest Harvesting Simulation Model (FHSM), Full Tree Field Chipping (FTFC), Harvesting System Simulator (HSS), Simulation Applied to Logging Systems (SAPLOS), and Timber Harvesting and Transport Simulator (THATS) -- for their potential use in southern forest harvesting operations. In Part I, modeling characteristics and overall model philosophy were identified and illustrated. This included a detailed discussion of the wood flow process in each model, accounting strategies for productive/nonproductive times, performance variables used, and the different harvesting systems modelable. In Part II user implementation problems are discussed. Those dealt with in detail are the following: What questions can be asked of the model. What are the modeling tradeoffs, and how do they impact on the analysis. What are the computer skills necessary to work effectively with the model. What computer support is needed. Are the models operational. The results provide a good picture of the state of the art in timber harvesting computer simulation. Much learning has occurred in the generation of these models, and many modeling and implementation problems have been uncovered, some of which remain unsolved. Hence, the user needs to examine closely the model and the intended application so that results will represent useable, valid data. It is recommended that the development of timber harvesting computer simulation modeling continue so that existing and proposed timber harvesting strategies can be adequately evaluated. Design criteria are proposed. (Refs. 22).

  8. Arms race modeling: systematic analysis and synthesis. (Volumes I and II)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderton, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years there has been a significant proliferation of arms race models in journals and books across many disciplines. Numerous factors have been put forth as relevant by arms race modelers and diverse analytical and explanatory approaches have been employed. This indicates that arms race modeling can be advanced by a systematic analysis (review) and synthesis. This is the purpose of this thesis). Part I discusses the perspective, purposes, and organization of this thesis, definitions of arms race, and mathematical modeling as a tool of arms race research. Parts II-VI review in detail over 125 arms race models and numerous other defense determination models. Part VII synthesizes arms race modeling factors and approaches from the perspective of economics. Each side in an arms race is viewed as facing an economic choice problem of how to allocate scarce resources between defense and nondefense goods. Part VIII undertakes policy analysis using the models developed in Part VII. The three issues investigated are (1) nuclear-conventional substitutability in the European theater, (2) the Strategic Defense Initiative, and (3) the impact of arms races on outputs and factor rewards. Part IX discusses future research avenues related to arms race modeling.

  9. Time-dependent toroidal compactification proposals and the Bianchi type II model: Classical and quantum solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socorro, J.; Toledo Sesma, L.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we construct an effective four-dimensional model by compactifying a ten-dimensional theory of gravity coupled with a real scalar dilaton field on a time-dependent torus without the contributions of fluxes as first approximation. This approach is applied to anisotropic cosmological Bianchi type II model for which we study the classical coupling of the anisotropic scale factors with the two real scalar moduli produced by the compactification process. Also, we present some solutions to the corresponding Wheeler-DeWitt (WDW) equation in the context of Standard Quantum Cosmology and we claim that these quantum solution are generic in the moduli scalar field for all Bianchi Class A models. Also we give the relation to these solutions for asymptotic behavior to large argument in the corresponding quantum solution in the gravitational variables and compare with Bohm's solutions, finding that this corresponds to the lowest-order WKB approximation.

  10. Introduction of LL-IV Distributed Hydrological Model and Applications in DMIP-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Zhang, H.; Yang, M.; Nicholson, A.

    2011-12-01

    Watershed hydrological models are an important tool for understanding hydrological processes on the earth, and they have been developed from empirical models to stochastic models, to lumped conceptual models, and finally to distributed conceptual models. Among them, the distributed hydrological model with physical bases is a great milestone in the development of hydrological models. The Hydrology Laboratory of the US National Weather Service paid high attention to the applications of distributed hydrological models. This department has proposed the Distributed Model Intercomparison Projects (DMIP-I and DMIP-II) since 2001, which made a major contribution to the development of distributed hydrological models. This paper introduces the development of the LL (Lan Li) distributed hydrological model, which produced satisfactory results in both DMIP-I and DIMP-II. LL-IV is the latest version of the LL distributed hydrological model and its basic equations and structures are detailed in this paper. LL-IV, for the first time, derives convection-diffusion equations for the interflow (in both saturated and unsaturated conditions) and underground flow. In addition, this model describes soil humidity, evaporation from soil, infiltration, overland flow, stream flow etc. by convection-diffusion equations. The advantages of using convection-diffusion equations in LL-IV to represent water cycle process for either the vertical change in a single grid or water interchange between grids are as follows: (1) Convection-diffusion equations require fewer variables compared with St. Venant equations. Whole and continuous data of the velocity and water stage, for example, are not usually available for most watersheds, which limits the application of distributed hydrological model. For LL-IV, however, these data are not always necessary when simulating. (2) LL-IV improves computational efficiency and requires less memory space by using convection-diffusion equations which focus mainly on

  11. Sorption modelling on illite. Part II: Actinide sorption and linear free energy relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradbury, M. H.; Baeyens, B.

    2009-02-01

    Sorption edge data for Ni(II), Co(II), Eu(III) and Sn(IV) [Bradbury M. H. and Baeyens B. (2009) Sorption modelling on illite. Part I: titration measurements and sorption of Ni(II), Co(II), Eu(III) and Sn(IV), Part I] on purified Na-Illite du Puy are available from some previous work, and some new measurements for Am(III), Th(IV), Pa(V) and U(VI) are presented here. All of these sorption edge measurements have been modelled with a 2 site protolysis non-electrostatic surface complexation and cation exchange (2SPNE SC/CE) sorption model for which the site types, site capacities and protolysis constants were fixed [Bradbury M. H. and Baeyens B. (2009), Part I]. In addition, two further data sets for the sorption of Am(III) and Np(V) on Illite du Puy, obtained from the literature, were also modelled in this work. Thus, surface complexation constants for the strong sites in the 2SPNE SC/CE sorption model for nine metals with valence states from II to VI have been obtained. A linear relationship between the logarithm of strong site metal binding constants, SK x-1, and the logarithm of the corresponding aqueous hydrolysis stability constant, OHK x, extending over nearly 35 orders of magnitude is established here for illite for these nine metals. Such correlations are often termed linear free energy relationships (LFER), and although they are quite common in aqueous phase chemistry, they are much less so in surface chemistry, especially over this large range. The LFER for illite could be described by the equation: logSK=7.9±0.4+(0.83±0.02)logOHKx where, " x" is an integer. A similar relationship has been previously obtained for montmorillonite, thus LFERs relating to the sorption on two of the most important clay minerals present in natural systems have been established. Such an LFER approach is an extremely useful tool for estimating surface complexation constants for metals in a chemically consistent manner. It provides a means of obtaining sorption values for

  12. Modelling the Pan-Spectral Energy Distribution of Starburst Galaxies: III. Emission Line Diagnostics of Ensembles of H II Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Dopita, M A; Fischera, J; Sutherland, R S; Kewley, L J; Leitherer, C; Tuffs, R J; Popescu, C C; van Breugel, W; Groves, B A

    2006-05-10

    We have built, as far as possible, fully self-consistent models of H II regions around aging clusters of stars. These produce strong emission line diagnostics applicable to either individual H II regions in galaxies, or to the integrated emission line spectra of disk or starburst galaxies. The models assume that the expansion and internal pressure of individual H II regions is driven by the net input of mechanical energy from the central cluster, be it through winds or supernova events. This eliminates the ionization parameter as a free variable, replacing it with a parameter which depends on the ratio of the cluster mass to the pressure in the surrounding interstellar medium. These models explain why H II regions with low abundances have high excitation, and demonstrate that at least part of the warm ionized medium is the result of overlapping faint, old, large, and low pressure H II regions. We present a number of line ratios (at both optical and IR wavelengths) that provide reliable abundance diagnostics for either single H II regions or for integrated galaxy spectra, and others that are sensitive to the age of the cluster stars exciting individual H II regions.

  13. Type II Supernova Energetics and Comparison of Light Curves to Shock-cooling Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Adam; Gal-Yam, Avishay; De Cia, Annalisa; Horesh, Assaf; Khazov, Danny; Ofek, Eran O.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Arcavi, Iair; Manulis, Ilan; Yaron, Ofer; Vreeswijk, Paul; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Perley, Daniel A.; Cao, Yi; Cenko, S. Bradley; Rebbapragada, Umaa D.; Woźniak, P. R.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Clubb, K. I.; Nugent, Peter E.; Pan, Y.-C.; Badenes, C.; Howell, D. Andrew; Valenti, Stefano; Sand, David; Sollerman, J.; Johansson, Joel; Leonard, Douglas C.; Horst, J. Chuck; Armen, Stephen F.; Fedrow, Joseph M.; Quimby, Robert M.; Mazzali, Paulo; Pian, Elena; Sternberg, Assaf; Matheson, Thomas; Sullivan, M.; Maguire, K.; Lazarevic, Sanja

    2016-03-01

    During the first few days after explosion, Type II supernovae (SNe) are dominated by relatively simple physics. Theoretical predictions regarding early-time SN light curves in the ultraviolet (UV) and optical bands are thus quite robust. We present, for the first time, a sample of 57 R-band SN II light curves that are well-monitored during their rise, with \\gt 5 detections during the first 10 days after discovery, and a well-constrained time of explosion to within 1-3 days. We show that the energy per unit mass (E/M) can be deduced to roughly a factor of five by comparing early-time optical data to the 2011 model of Rabinak & Waxman, while the progenitor radius cannot be determined based on R-band data alone. We find that SN II explosion energies span a range of E/M = (0.2-20) × 1051 erg/(10 {M}⊙ ), and have a mean energy per unit mass of < E/M> =0.85× {10}51 erg/(10 {M}⊙ ), corrected for Malmquist bias. Assuming a small spread in progenitor masses, this indicates a large intrinsic diversity in explosion energy. Moreover, E/M is positively correlated with the amount of 56Ni produced in the explosion, as predicted by some recent models of core-collapse SNe. We further present several empirical correlations. The peak magnitude is correlated with the decline rate ({{Δ }}{m}15), the decline rate is weakly correlated with the rise time, and the rise time is not significantly correlated with the peak magnitude. Faster declining SNe are more luminous and have longer rise times. This limits the possible power sources for such events.

  14. Multi-dimensional modelling of gas turbine combustion using a flame sheet model in KIVA II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, W. K.; Lai, M.-C.; Chue, T.-H.

    1991-01-01

    A flame sheet model for heat release is incorporated into a multi-dimensional fluid mechanical simulation for gas turbine application. The model assumes that the chemical reaction takes place in thin sheets compared to the length scale of mixing, which is valid for the primary combustion zone in a gas turbine combustor. In this paper, the details of the model are described and computational results are discussed.

  15. A multimedia fate and chemical transport modeling system for pesticides: II. Model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rong; Scholtz, M. Trevor; Yang, Fuquan; Sloan, James J.

    2011-07-01

    Pesticides have adverse health effects and can be transported over long distances to contaminate sensitive ecosystems. To address problems caused by environmental pesticides we developed a multimedia multi-pollutant modeling system, and here we present an evaluation of the model by comparing modeled results against measurements. The modeled toxaphene air concentrations for two sites, in Louisiana (LA) and Michigan (MI), are in good agreement with measurements (average concentrations agree to within a factor of 2). Because the residue inventory showed no soil residues at these two sites, resulting in no emissions, the concentrations must be caused by transport; the good agreement between the modeled and measured concentrations suggests that the model simulates atmospheric transport accurately. Compared to the LA and MI sites, the measured air concentrations at two other sites having toxaphene soil residues leading to emissions, in Indiana and Arkansas, showed more pronounced seasonal variability (higher in warmer months); this pattern was also captured by the model. The model-predicted toxaphene concentration fraction on particles (0.5-5%) agrees well with measurement-based estimates (3% or 6%). There is also good agreement between modeled and measured dry (1:1) and wet (within a factor of less than 2) depositions in Lake Ontario. Additionally this study identified erroneous soil residue data around a site in Texas in a published US toxaphene residue inventory, which led to very low modeled air concentrations at this site. Except for the erroneous soil residue data around this site, the good agreement between the modeled and observed results implies that both the US and Mexican toxaphene soil residue inventories are reasonably good. This agreement also suggests that the modeling system is capable of simulating the important physical and chemical processes in the multimedia compartments.

  16. Analysis of TOPAZ II and SPACE-R space nuclear power plants using a modified thermionic model

    SciTech Connect

    Habedank, O.D.

    1993-03-01

    Models based on the TDS thermionic diode model were developed for the TOPAZ II and SPACE-R nuclear power systems. Due to computer code limitations inherent in the TDS model, only the TOPAZ II system model ran successfully. Several parameter studies were conducted on the TOPAZ II model. These studies determined system performance and efficiency while varying the following: (1) the coolant flow inlet temperatures; (2) the rate of coolant temperature change; (3) the power profile of the core; and (4) the cesium reservoir temperature. Analysis of the results indicate that the model accurately represented the TOPAZ II system, underestimating published data by 10%. Coolant flow parameter studies indicate that raising coolant flow temperatures up to 100 K higher increases system power by put to 5%. Additional increases in temperature result in gradual performance degradation. Varying the axial power profile of the core from the actual peaked profile to a flat profile results in a negligible 0.3% change in total system performance. The peaked profile used in TOPAZ II produces the highest system efficiency of all the profiles modeled. The cesium pressure study indicates that the system is operating above optimum cesium pressure and that system performance is strongly dependent on cesium pressure. Increasing cesium reservoir temperature above design temperature by 30 K decreases system efficiency by 30%.

  17. Hemodynamic characterization of the diabetic Psammomys obesus--an animal model of type II diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hilzenrat, N; Sikuler, E; Yaari, A; Maislos, M

    1996-11-01

    The hemodynamic changes occurring early in the course of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (Type II, NIDDM) are not well understood. We applied the radioactive microspheres technique at an early stage of diabetes in Psammomys abesus (sand rat), an established animal model of spontaneous NIDDM. Ten diabetic and 7 control male animals were studied. Plasma glucose and insulin levels in the diabetic group were significantly higher than in the control group (21.3 +/- 2.1 vs. 6.2 +/- 1.1 mmol/l, and 2,650 +/- 480 vs. 770 +/- 120 pmol/l, respectively). Mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, splanchnic blood flow, muscular blood flow, and total peripheral resistance were not statistically different between the two groups. Renal blood flow was significantly lower in the diabetic group (7.45 +/- 0.32 vs. 10.48 +/- 0.99 ml/min) and renal arterial resistance was higher (11.65 +/- 0.93 vs. 8.33 +/- 0.76 mm Hg.min/ml) compared with the control group. These results suggest that increased renal resistance and decreased renal blood flow may be the initial hemodynamic alterations in NIDDM. The combination of this animal model with the radioactive microspheres technique provides a new tool for studying the physiopathology, the natural history of hemodynamic changes, and possible therapeutic interventions of Type II diabetes. PMID:8960075

  18. Blooms' separation of the final exam of Engineering Mathematics II: Item reliability using Rasch measurement model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuaad, Norain Farhana Ahmad; Nopiah, Zulkifli Mohd; Tawil, Norgainy Mohd; Othman, Haliza; Asshaari, Izamarlina; Osman, Mohd Hanif; Ismail, Nur Arzilah

    2014-06-01

    In engineering studies and researches, Mathematics is one of the main elements which express physical, chemical and engineering laws. Therefore, it is essential for engineering students to have a strong knowledge in the fundamental of mathematics in order to apply the knowledge to real life issues. However, based on the previous results of Mathematics Pre-Test, it shows that the engineering students lack the fundamental knowledge in certain topics in mathematics. Due to this, apart from making improvements in the methods of teaching and learning, studies on the construction of questions (items) should also be emphasized. The purpose of this study is to assist lecturers in the process of item development and to monitor the separation of items based on Blooms' Taxonomy and to measure the reliability of the items itself usingRasch Measurement Model as a tool. By using Rasch Measurement Model, the final exam questions of Engineering Mathematics II (Linear Algebra) for semester 2 sessions 2012/2013 were analysed and the results will provide the details onthe extent to which the content of the item providesuseful information about students' ability. This study reveals that the items used in Engineering Mathematics II (Linear Algebra) final exam are well constructed but the separation of the items raises concern as it is argued that it needs further attention, as there is abig gap between items at several levels of Blooms' cognitive skill.

  19. A wheat grazing model for simulating grain and beef production: Part II - model validation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Model evaluation is a prerequisite to its adoption and successful application. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the ability of a newly developed wheat grazing model to predict fall-winter forage and grain yields of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) as well as daily weight gains per steer...

  20. Mathematics in Marine Botany: Examples of the Modelling Process. Part II: Continuous Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyman, Melvin A.; Brown, Murray T.

    1996-01-01

    Describes some continuous models for growth of the seaweed Macrocystis pyrifera. Uses observed growth rates over several months to derive first-order differential equations as models for growth rates of individual fronds. The nature of the solutions is analyzed and comparison between these theoretical results and documented characteristics of…

  1. Correspondence between dark solitons and the type II excitations of the Lieb-Liniger model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpiuk, Tomasz; Sowiński, Tomasz; Gajda, Mariusz; Rzążewski, Kazimierz; Brewczyk, Mirosław

    2015-01-01

    A one-dimensional model of bosons with repulsive short-range interactions, solved analytically by Lieb and Liniger many years ago, predicts the existence of two branches of elementary excitations. One of them represents Bogoliubov phonons; the other, as suggested by some authors, might be related to dark solitons. On the other hand, it has been already demonstrated within the framework of the classical field approximation that a quasi-one-dimensional interacting Bose gas at equilibrium exhibits excitations which are phonons and dark solitons. By showing that for lower temperatures statistical distributions of dark solitons obtained within the classical field approximation are well represented by the distributions of quasiparticles of the second kind derived from fully quantum description, we demonstrate that type II excitations in the Lieb-Liniger model are, indeed, quantum solitons.

  2. A mediational model of PTSD in World War II veterans exposed to mustard gas.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, M Kay; Schnurr, Paula P; Adams, Gary A; Green, Bonnie L; Ford, Julian D; Friedman, Matthew J

    2004-08-01

    Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to examine associations among trauma-related contextual factors, initial psychological reactions, social support, and subsequent disclosure on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in a sample of World War II (WWII) veterans exposed to mustard gas (N = 305). A structural model suggested that initial psychological reaction mediated the relationship between variables related to the context of mustard gas exposure and severity of PTSD symptoms 50 years later. Unexpectedly, social support appeared to be positively related to PTSD symptoms, and not related to the contextual variables or initial psychological reactions. These findings contribute to our understanding of PTSD in older veterans, and have relevance for early intervention services to prevent PTSD among those at risk for exposure to toxic agents. PMID:15462537

  3. A cometary hydrogen model - Comparison with OGO-5 measurements of Comet Bennett /1970 II/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, H. U.; Thomas, G. E.

    1975-01-01

    A model is constructed for the hydrogen cloud of Comet Bennett (1970 II) based on highly sensitive observations of its Lyman alpha emission by a photometer on board OGO-5 and taking into account the cometary motion, field gradients, solar L-alpha profile, and finite lifetime of the H atoms along their trajectories. The solar L-alpha flux is determined independently of instrumental calibration using the strong curvature of the hydrogen cloud in the orbital plane of the comet, and the cometary production rate of hydrogen atoms is calculated. The combination of two equally weighted Maxwellian velocity distributions with mean velocities of 7 and 21 km/sec is found to match the photometer scans across the comet better than any single Maxwellian distribution. A complete L-alpha isophote map is presented for the model hydrogen cloud on Mar. 20, 1970.

  4. Scientific uncertainties in atmospheric mercury models III: Boundary and initial conditions, model grid resolution, and Hg(II) reduction mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Che-Jen; Pongprueksa, Pruek; Lindberg, Steven Eric; Jang, Carey; Braverman, Thomas; Bullock, Russell O; Ho, Thomas; Chu, Hsing-Wei

    2008-03-01

    In this study, the model response in terms of simulated mercury concentration and deposition to boundary condition (BC), initial condition (IC), model grid resolution (12 km versus 36 km), and two alternative Hg(II) reduction mechanisms, was investigated. The model response to the change of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) concentration from 0 to 2 ngm3 in IC/BC is found to be very linear (r240.99) based on the results of sensitivity simulations in July 2001. An increase of 1 ngm3 of GEM in BC resulted in an increase of 0.81 ngm3 in the monthly average of total mercury concentration, and 1270 ngm2 in the monthly total deposition. IC has similar but weaker effects compared to those of BC. An increase of 1 ngm3 of GEM in IC resulted in an increase of 0.14 ngm3 in the monthly average of total mercury concentration, and 250 ngm2 in the monthly total deposition. Varying reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) or particulate mercury (PHg) in BC/IC has much less significant impact. Simulation results at different grid resolutions show good agreement (slope 0.950 1.026, r 0.816 0.973) in mercury concentration, dry deposition, and total deposition. The agreement in wet deposition is somewhat weaker (slope 0.770 0.794, r 0.685 0.892) due to the difference in emission dilution and simulated precipitation that subsequently change reaction rates in the aqueous phase. Replacing the aqueous Hg(II)-HO2 reduction by either RGM reduction by CO (51018cm3 molecule1 s1) or photoreduction of RGM (1105 s1) gives significantly better model agreement with the wet deposition measured by Mercury Deposition Network (MDN). Possible ranges of the reduction rates are estimated based on model sensitivity results. The kinetic estimate requires further verification by laboratory studies.

  5. Comparative Study of Personality Traits in Patients with Bipolar I and II Disorder from the Five-Factor Model Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byungsu; Lim, Jong-Han; Kim, Seong Yoon

    2012-01-01

    Objective The distinguishing features of Bipolar I Disorder (BD I) from Bipolar II Disorder (BD II) may reflect a separation in enduring trait dimension between the two subtypes. We therefore assessed the similarities and differences in personality traits in patients with BD I and BD II from the perspective of the Five-Factor Model (FFM). Methods The revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R) was administered to 85 BD I (47 females, 38 males) and 43 BD II (23 females, 20 males) patients. All included patients were in remission from their most recent episode and in a euthymic state for at least 8 weeks prior to study entry. Results BDII patients scored higher than BD I patients on the Neuroticism dimension and its four corresponding facets (Anxiety, Depression, Self-consciousness, and Vulnerability). In contrast, BD II patients scored lower than BD I patients on the Extraversion dimension and its facet, Positive emotion. Competence and Achievement-striving facets within the Conscientiousness dimension were significantly lower for BD II than for BD I patients. There were no significant between-group differences in the Openness and Agreeableness dimensions. Conclusion Disparities in personality traits were observed between BD I and BD II patients from the FFM perspective. BD II patients had higher Neuroticism and lower Extraversion than BD I patients, which are differentiating natures between the two subtypes based on the FFM. PMID:23251198

  6. A scattering model for perfectly conducting random surfaces. I - Model development. II - Range of validity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, A. K.; Pan, G. W.

    1987-01-01

    The surface current on a perfectly conducting randomly rough surface is estimated by solving iteratively a standard integral equation, and the estimate is then used to compute the far-zone scattered fields and the backscattering coefficients for vertical, horizontal and cross polarizations. The model developed here yields a simple backscattering coefficient expression in terms of the surface parameters. The expression reduces analytically to the Kirchhoff and the first-order small-perturbation model in the high- and low-frequency regions, respectively. The range of validity of the model is determined.

  7. The Jena Diversity Model: Towards a Richer Representation of the Terrestrial Biosphere for Earth System Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlick, R.; Reu, B.; Bohn, K.; Dyke, J.; Kleidon, A.

    2010-12-01

    The terrestrial biosphere is a complex, self-organizing system which is continually both adapting to and altering its global environment. It also exhibits a vast diversity of vegetation forms and functioning. However, the terrestrial biosphere components within current state-of-the-art Earth System Models abstract this diversity in to a handful of relatively static plant functional types. These coarse and static representations of functional diversity might contribute to overly pessimistic projections regarding terrestrial ecosystem responses to scenarios of global change (e.g. Amazonian and boreal forest diebacks). In the Jena Diversity (JeDi) model, we introduce a new approach to vegetation modelling with a richer representation of functional diversity, based not on plant functional types, but on unavoidable plant ecophysiological trade-offs, which we hypothesize should be more stable in time. The JeDi model tests a large number of plant growth strategies. Each growth strategy is simulated using a set of randomly generated parameter values, which characterize its functioning in terms of carbon allocation, ecophysiology, and phenology, which are then linked to the growing conditions at the land surface. The model is constructed in such a way that these parameters inherently lead to ecophysiological trade-offs, which determine whether a growth strategy is able to survive and reproduce under the prevalent climatic conditions. Kleidon and Mooney (2000) demonstrated that this approach is capable of reproducing the geographic distribution of species richness. More recently, we have shown the JeDi model can explain other biogeographical phenomena including the present-day global pattern of biomes (Reu et al., accepted), ecosystem evenness (Kleidon et al. 2009), and possible mechanisms for biome shifts and biodiversity changes under scenarios of global warming (Reu et al., submitted). We have also evaluated the simulated biogeochemical fluxes from JeDi against a variety

  8. GYMNOS Modeling of Electron Beam Dynamics for the Injector and Final Focus Regions of the ETA-II Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueny, C. S.; Wang, L.-F.; Chen, Y.-J.; Hewett, D. W.

    1999-11-01

    The 2-D axisymmetric PIC code GYMNOS has been used to model electron beam dynamics in the ETA-II accelerator at LLNL. Experiments on ETA-II seek to produce a high-brightness, low-emittance electron beam and deliver it to an X-ray converter target. These experiments are relevant to the DARHT II (Dual Axis Radiography Hydrodynamic Test) and AHF (Advanced Hydrotest Facility) projects, which will provide X-ray radiography diagnostics as part of the US Science-Based Stockpile Stewardship Program. We present simulations of both the ETA-II injector which produces the initial beam, and of the target region where X-ray generation occurs. GYMNOS employs the Embedded Curved Boundary (ECB) model to provide accurate beam modeling near the injector cathode and the target surfaces, and was recently upgraded with a non-uniform mesh to efficiently model the beam over a range of spatial scales. Modeling of the ETA-II injector has provided guidance on experimental parameters necessary for producing a high-quality beam for transport through the accelerator. Simulations of the target region have modeled the effects of backstreaming ions and backscattered electrons on beam dynamics, and investigated possible measures to minimize degradation in beam quality and final spot size.

  9. HIERARCHICAL METHODOLOGY FOR MODELING HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS PART II: DETAILED MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, B; Donald L. Anton, D

    2008-12-22

    There is significant interest in hydrogen storage systems that employ a media which either adsorbs, absorbs or reacts with hydrogen in a nearly reversible manner. In any media based storage system the rate of hydrogen uptake and the system capacity is governed by a number of complex, coupled physical processes. To design and evaluate such storage systems, a comprehensive methodology was developed, consisting of a hierarchical sequence of models that range from scoping calculations to numerical models that couple reaction kinetics with heat and mass transfer for both the hydrogen charging and discharging phases. The scoping models were presented in Part I [1] of this two part series of papers. This paper describes a detailed numerical model that integrates the phenomena occurring when hydrogen is charged and discharged. A specific application of the methodology is made to a system using NaAlH{sub 4} as the storage media.

  10. Modeling FAMA ion beam diagnostics based on the Ptolemy II model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balvanović, R.; Beličev, P.; Radjenović, B.

    2012-10-01

    The previously developed model of ion beam transport control of the FAMA facility is further enhanced by equipping it with the model of ion beam diagnostics. The model of control, executing once, is adjusted so that it executes in iterative mode, where each iteration samples the input beam normally distributed over initial phase space and calculates a single trajectory through the facility beam lines. The model takes into account only the particles that manage to pass through all the beam line apertures, emulating in this way a Faraday cup and a beam profile meter. Generated are also beam phase space distributions and horizontal and vertical beam profiles at the end of the beam transport lines the FAMA facility consists of. By adding the model of ion beam diagnostics to the model of ion beam transport control, the process of determining optimal ion beam control parameters is eased and speeded up, and the understanding of influence of control parameters on the ion beam characteristics is improved.

  11. An improved model of H II bubbles during the epoch of reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Aseem; Choudhury, T. Roy

    2014-08-01

    The size distribution of ionized regions during the epoch of reionization - a key ingredient in understanding the H I power spectrum observable by 21 cm experiments - can be modelled analytically using the excursion set formalism of random walks in the smoothed initial density field. To date, such calculations have been based on simplifying assumptions carried forward from the earliest excursion set models of two decades ago. In particular, these models assume that the random walks have uncorrelated steps and that haloes can form at arbitrary locations in the initial density field. We extend these calculations by incorporating recent technical developments that allow us to (a) include the effect of correlations in the steps of the walks induced by a realistic smoothing filter and (b) more importantly, account for the fact that dark matter haloes preferentially form near peaks in the initial density. A comparison with previous calculations shows that including these features, particularly the peaks constraint on halo locations, has large effects on the size distribution of the H II bubbles surrounding these haloes. For example, when comparing models at the same value of the globally averaged ionized volume fraction, the typical bubble sizes predicted by our model are more than a factor of 2 larger than earlier calculations. Our results can potentially have a significant impact on estimates of the observable H I power spectrum.

  12. Fuel Modelling at Extended Burnup: IAEA Coordinated Research Project FUMEX-II

    SciTech Connect

    Killeen, J.C.; Turnbull, J.A.; Sartori, E.

    2007-07-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency sponsored a Coordinated Research Project on Fuel Modelling at Extended Burnup (FUMEX-II). Eighteen fuel modelling groups participated with the intention of improving their capabilities to understand and predict the behaviour of water reactor fuel at high burnups. The exercise was carried out in coordination with the OECD/NEA. The participants used a mixture of data derived from actual irradiation histories of high burnup experimental fuel and commercial irradiations where post-irradiation examination measurements are available, combined with idealised power histories intended to represent possible future extended dwell commercial irradiations and test code capabilities at high burnup. All participants have been asked to model nine priority cases out of some 27 cases made available to them for the exercise from the IAEA/OECD International Fuel Performance Experimental Database. Calculations carried out by the participants, particularly for the idealised cases, have shown how varying modelling assumptions affect the high burnup predictions, and have led to an understanding of the requirements of future high burnup experimental data to help discriminate between modelling assumptions. This understanding is important in trying to model transient and fault behaviour at high burnup. It is important to recognise that the code predictions presented here should not be taken to indicate that some codes do not perform well. The codes have been designed for different applications and have differing assumptions and validation ranges; for example codes intended to predict Candu fuel operation with thin wall collapsible cladding do not need the clad creep and gap conductivity modelling found in PWR codes. Therefore, when a case is based on Candu technology or PWR technology, it is to be expected that the codes may not agree. However, it is the very differences in such behaviour that is useful in helping to understand the effects of such

  13. Multiscale modeling, simulations, and experiments of coating growth on nanofibers. Part II. Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Buldum, A.; Clemons, C.B.; Dill, L.H.; Kreider, K.L.; Young, G.W.; Zheng, X.; Evans, E.A.; Zhang, G.; Hariharan, S.I.

    2005-08-15

    This work is Part II of an integrated experimental/modeling investigation of a procedure to coat nanofibers and core-clad nanostructures with thin-film materials using plasma-enhanced physical vapor deposition. In the experimental effort, electrospun polymer nanofibers are coated with aluminum materials under different operating conditions to observe changes in the coating morphology. This procedure begins with the sputtering of the coating material from a target. Part I [J. Appl. Phys. 98, 044303 (2005)] focused on the sputtering aspect and transport of the sputtered material through the reactor. That reactor level model determines the concentration field of the coating material. This field serves as input into the present species transport and deposition model for the region surrounding an individual nanofiber. The interrelationships among processing factors for the transport and deposition are investigated here from a detailed modeling approach that includes the salient physical and chemical phenomena. Solution strategies that couple continuum and atomistic models are used. At the continuum scale, transport dynamics near the nanofiber are described. At the atomic level, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to study the deposition and sputtering mechanisms at the coating surface. Ion kinetic energies and fluxes are passed from the continuum sheath model to the MD simulations. These simulations calculate sputtering and sticking probabilities that in turn are used to calculate parameters for the continuum transport model. The continuum transport model leads to the definition of an evolution equation for the coating-free surface. This equation is solved using boundary perturbation and level set methods to determine the coating morphology as a function of operating conditions.

  14. MODELING THE NUCLEAR INFRARED SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF TYPE II ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Lira, Paulina; Videla, Liza; Wu, Yanling; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Alexander, David M.; Ward, Martin

    2013-02-20

    We present results from model fitting to the spectral energy distribution (SED) of a homogeneous sample of Seyfert II galaxies drawn from the 12 {mu}m Galaxy Sample. Imaging and nuclear flux measurements are presented in an accompanying paper. Here we add Spitzer/IRS observations to further constrain the SEDs after careful subtraction of a starburst component. We use the library of CLUMPY torus models from Nenkova et al. and also test the two-phase models recently produced by Stalevski et al. We find that photometric and spectroscopic observations in the mid-IR ({lambda} {approx}> 5 {mu}m) are crucial to properly constrain the best-fit torus models. About half of our sources show clear near-IR excess of their SEDs above the best-fit models. This problem can be less severe when using the Stalevski et al. models. The nature of this emission is not clear since best-fitted blackbody temperatures are very high ({approx}1700-2500 K) and the Type II classification of our sources would correspond to a small probability to peer directly into the hottest regions of the torus. Crucially, the derived torus parameters are quite robust when using CLUMPY models, independently of whether or not the sources require an additional blackbody component. Our findings suggest that tori are characterized by N{sub 0}{approx}>5, {sigma} {approx}> 40, {tau} {approx}< 25, Angle i {approx}> 40 Degree-Sign , Y {approx}< 50, and A {sup los} {sub v} {approx} 100-300, where N{sub 0} is the number of clouds in the equatorial plane of the torus, {sigma} is the characteristic opening angle of the cloud distribution, {tau} is the opacity of a single cloud, Angle i is the line-of-sight orientation of the torus, Y is the ratio of the inner to the outer radii, and A {sup los} {sub v} is the total opacity along the line of sight. From these, we can determine typical torus sizes and masses of 0.1-5.0 pc and 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} M {sub Sun }, respectively. We find tentative evidence that those nuclei with

  15. Blind prediction of Cu(II) sorption onto goethite: Current capabilities of diffuse double layer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Anke; Brendler, Vinzenz; Nebelung, Cordula

    2005-06-01

    The paper presents examples illustrating the current blind predictive capabilities of the diffuse double layer model (DDLM) as the model requiring the smallest set of parameters and thus being most suitable for substituting even more empiric sorption approaches such as distribution coefficients K D. The general strategy for the selection of numerical data are discussed. Based on the information about the minerals compiled in the sorption database RES 3T (Rossendorf Expert System for Surface and Sorption Thermodynamics), first a set of relevant surface species is generated. Then relevant surface complexation parameters are taken from RES 3T: the binding site density for the minerals, the surface protolysis constants, and the stability constants for all relevant surface complexes. To be able to compare and average thermodynamic constants originating from different sources, a normalization concept is applied. Our demonstration is based on a blind prediction exercise, i.e., the goal was not to provide optimal fits. The system considered is Cu(II) sorption onto goethite. The predictions are compared with raw data from three independent experimental investigations. The calculations were performed with the FITEQL 3.2 code. In most cases the model predictions represented the experimental sorption values for the sorbed amount of Cu(II), expressed as conventional distribution coefficients, within one order of magnitude or better. We conclude that the application of DDLM can indeed be used for estimating distribution coefficients for contaminants in well defined mineral systems. A stepwise strategy of species selection, data collection, normalization, and averaging is outlined. The SCM database so far assembled within the RES 3T project is able to provide the parameter sets.

  16. Continuous infusion of angiotensin II modulates hypertrophic differentiation and apoptosis of chondrocytes in cartilage formation in a fracture model mouse.

    PubMed

    Kawahata, Hirohisa; Sotobayashi, Daisuke; Aoki, Motokuni; Shimizu, Hideo; Nakagami, Hironori; Ogihara, Toshio; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2015-06-01

    Although components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are reported to be expressed in cultured chondrocytes and cartilage, little is known about the precise function of Angiotensin II (Ang II) in chondrocytes. In this study, we employed a rib fracture model mouse to investigate the effect of Ang II on chondrocytes. Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) was expressed in chondrocytes in the growth plate of mouse tibia. Continuous infusion of Ang II to rib-fractured mice resulted in a significant increase in the volume of cartilage, suggesting Ang II-induced hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes. It was also confirmed by a significant increase in the mRNA expression of Sox9 and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), which are genes related to chondrocyte differentiation, and type X collagen, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 and Indian hedgehog (Ihh), which are hypertrophic chondrocyte-specific molecular markers. Chondrocyte hypertrophy with upregulation of these genes was attenuated by administration of olmesartan, an AT1R blocker, but not by hydralazine. Moreover, Ang II infusion significantly suppressed apoptosis of chondrocytes, accompanied by significant induction of mRNA expression of bcl-2 and bcl-xL. Olmesartan, but not hydralazine, significantly attenuated the reduction of apoptotic cells and the increase in anti-apoptotic genes induced by Ang II infusion. Overall, the present study demonstrated that Ang II promoted hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes and reduced apoptosis of hypertrophic chondrocytes independently of high blood pressure. The present data indicate the role of Ang II in cartilage, and might provide a new concept for treatment of cartilage diseases. PMID:25693858

  17. Final Report for Dynamic Models for Causal Analysis of Panel Data. Models for Change in Quantitative Variables, Part II Scholastic Models. Part II, Chapter 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannan, Michael T.

    This document is part of a series of chapters described in SO 011 759. Stochastic models for the sociological analysis of change and the change process in quantitative variables are presented. The author lays groundwork for the statistical treatment of simple stochastic differential equations (SDEs) and discusses some of the continuities of…

  18. Establishment of type II 5alpha-reductase over-expressing cell line as an inhibitor screening model.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sunhyae; Lee, Young; Hwang, Seong-Lok; Lee, Min-Ho; Park, Su Jin; Lee, In Ho; Kang, Sangjin; Roh, Seok-Seon; Seo, Young-Joon; Park, Jang-Kyu; Lee, Jeung-Hoon; Kim, Chang Deok

    2007-01-01

    Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) is the most potent male hormone that causes androgenetic alopecia. The type II 5alpha-reductase is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of testosterone (T) to DHT, therefore it can be expected that specific inhibitors for type II 5alpha-reductase may improve the pathophysiologic status of androgenetic alopecia. In this study, we attempted to establish the reliable and convenient screening model for type II 5alpha-reductase inhibitors. After transfection of human cDNA for type II 5alpha-reductase into HEK293 cells, the type II 5alpha-reductase over-expressing stable cells were selected by G418 treatment. RT-PCR and Western blot analyses confirmed that type II 5alpha-reductase gene was expressed in the stable cells. In in vitro enzymatic assay, 10 microg of stable cell extract completely converted 1 microCi (approximately 0.015 nmol) of T into DHT. The type II 5alpha-reductase activity was inhibited by finasteride in a dose-dependent manner, confirming the reliability of screening system. In cell culture condition, 2 x 10(5) of stable cells completely converted all the input T (approximately 0.03 nmol) into DHT by 4h incubation, demonstrating that the stable cell line can be used as a cell-based assay system. Using this system, we selected the extracts of Curcumae longae rhizoma and Mori ramulus as the potential inhibitors for type II 5alpha-reductase. These results demonstrate that the type II 5alpha-reductase over-expressing stable cell line is a convenient and reliable model for screening and evaluation of inhibitors. PMID:17646096

  19. Predictions of B{sub c} meson decay emitting pseudoscalar and heavy scalar mesons using ISGW II model

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Neelesh; Verma, R. C.

    2010-11-01

    Two-body hadronic weak decays of B{sub c} meson emitting pseudoscalar and heavy scalar mesons are investigated using the Spectator Quark Model. Decay amplitudes are obtained using the factorization scheme; consequently, branching ratios are predicted in the Isgur-Scora-Grinstein-Wise (ISGW II) model.

  20. Bäcklund flux quantization in a model of electrodiffusion based on Painlevé II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, A. J.; Bass, L.; Rogers, C.

    2012-03-01

    A previously established model of steady one-dimensional two-ion electrodiffusion across a liquid junction is reconsidered. It involves three coupled first-order nonlinear ordinary differential equations and has the second-order Painlevé II equation at its core. Solutions are now grouped by Bäcklund transformations into infinite sequences, partially labelled by two Bäcklund invariants. Each sequence is characterized by evenly-spaced quantized fluxes of the two ionic species, and hence evenly-spaced quantization of the electric current density. Finite subsequences of exact solutions are identified, with positive ionic concentrations and quantized fluxes, starting from a solution with zero electric field found by Planck, and suggesting an interpretation as a ground state plus excited states of the system. Positivity of ionic concentrations is established whenever Planck’s charge-neutral boundary conditions apply. Exact solutions are obtained for the electric field and ionic concentrations in well-stirred reservoirs outside each face of the junction, enabling the formulation of more realistic boundary conditions. In an approximate form, these lead to radiation boundary conditions for Painlevé II. Illustrative numerical solutions are presented, and the problem of establishing compatibility of boundary conditions with the structure of flux-quantizing sequences is discussed.

  1. Unified Model of Type I and Type II Turbulence in the Equitorial E-Layer Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, W., Jr.; Hassan, E.; Smolyakov, A.; Litt, S.; Hatch, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    A new unified two-fluid model for the E-layer for the Type I and Type II plasma instabilities is developed and simulated for the nonlinear dynamics of the electron density, the electric fields, and ion fluid acceleration. Profiles and parameters are taken from the IRI data for the equitorial region ionosphere. Large, spectral simulations for the turbulence and the coherent structures are carried out. The fields are recorded for each sub-second time step in both physical space and wavenubmer space. The growth rate has two peaks in horizontal wavenumber and the nonlinear cascades go both to small scales [~10cm] and large scales [~10-50m]. Horizontal and vertical wavenumber spectra are shown as well as the isotropized energy spectrum of k-n. The S4 scintillation index computed from the density fluctuations and the PDFs for intermittency from the density fluctuations are computed. The PDFs and the net electron density fluxes are computed. Examples are run where the upward density gradient (Type II) is the dominant instability mechanism.

  2. Emergency Response Equipment and Related Training: Airborne Radiological Computer System (Model II)

    SciTech Connect

    David P. Colton

    2007-02-28

    The materials included in the Airborne Radiological Computer System, Model-II (ARCS-II) were assembled with several considerations in mind. First, the system was designed to measure and record the airborne gamma radiation levels and the corresponding latitude and longitude coordinates, and to provide a first overview look of the extent and severity of an accident's impact. Second, the portable system had to be light enough and durable enough that it could be mounted in an aircraft, ground vehicle, or watercraft. Third, the system must control the collection and storage of the data, as well as provide a real-time display of the data collection results to the operator. The notebook computer and color graphics printer components of the system would only be used for analyzing and plotting the data. In essence, the provided equipment is composed of an acquisition system and an analysis system. The data can be transferred from the acquisition system to the analysis system at the end of the data collection or at some other agreeable time.

  3. Neutrino masses and leptogenesis in type I and type II seesaw models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borah, Debasish; Das, Mrinal Kumar

    2014-07-01

    The baryon to photon ratio in the present Universe is very accurately measured to be (6.065±0.090)×10-10. We study the possible origin of this baryon asymmetry in the neutrino sector through the generic mechanism of baryogenesis through leptogenesis. We consider both the type I and type II seesaw origin of neutrino masses within the framework of left-right symmetric models (LRSM). Using the latest best-fit global neutrino oscillation data of mass squared differences, mixing angles and Dirac CP phase, we compute the predictions for baryon to photon ratio keeping the Majorana CP phases as free parameters for two different choices of lightest neutrino mass eigenvalue for both normal and inverted hierarchical patterns of neutrino masses. We do our calculation with and without lepton flavor effects being taken into account. We choose different diagonal Dirac neutrino mass matrix for different flavor effects in such a way that the lightest right-handed neutrino mass is in the appropriate range. We also study the predictions for baryon asymmetry when the neutrino masses arise from a combination of both type I and type II seesaw (with dominating type I term) and discriminate between several combinations of Dirac and Majorana CP phases by demanding successful predictions for baryon asymmetry.

  4. Dynamic spatially-explicit mass-balance modeling for targeted watershed phosphorus management II: Model Application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cost-effective nonpoint source phosphorus (P) control should target the land areas at greatest risk for P loss. We combined mass-balance modeling and geographic analysis to identify and map high-risk areas for P export by integrating long-term P input/output accounting with spatially variable physi...

  5. Experimental verification of a tank to tank He II transfer model with trade study results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1990-01-01

    A computer program has been developed to study the thermodynamics of tank to tank superfluid helium transfer. The model includes a supply and a receiver tank connected by a transfer line. The convey of He II from one tank to the other is controlled by a fountain effect pump (FEP). Phase separators are present in both the supply and receiver tank to regulate the bath temperature. Description of this model has been published elsewhere. In the present paper, data from a transfer experiment are used to verify the accuracy of this model. The experiment consisted of an FEP made of a 2-micron sintered stainless steel porous plug. Superfluid has been transferred from a liquid helium bath into a glass beaker. Bath temperatures, flowrate and heater power records are available. These results are compared to the predictions of the computer program and good agreement is found between the two. This model is very useful for the study and design of superfluid transfer systems, e.g., the Superfluid Helium Tanker (SFHT) and the Particle Astrophysics Magnet Facility (ASTROMAG).

  6. Dislocation mechanism based model for stage II fatigue crack propagation rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumdar, P. K.

    1986-01-01

    Repeated plastic deformation, which of course depends on dislocation mechanism, at or near the crack tip leads to the fatigue crack propagation. By involving the theory of thermally activated flow and the cumulative plastic strain criterion, an effort is made here to model the stage II fatigue crack propagation rate in terms of the dislocation mechanism. The model, therefore, provides capability to ascertain: (1) the dislocation mechanism (and hence the near crack tip microstructures) assisting the crack growth, (2) the relative resistance of dislocation mechanisms to the crack growth, and (3) the fracture surface characteristics and its interpretation in terms of the dislocation mechanism. The local microstructure predicted for the room temperature crack growth in copper by this model is in good agreement with the experimental results taken from the literature. With regard to the relative stability of such dislocation mechanisms as the cross-slip and the dislocation intersection, the model suggests an enhancement of crack growth rate with an ease of cross-slip which in general promotes dislocation cell formation and is common in material which has high stacking fault energy (produces wavy slips). Cross-slip apparently enhances crack growth rate by promoting slip irreversibility and fracture surface brittleness to a greater degree.

  7. Survey of non-linear hydrodynamic models of type-II Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolec, R.

    2016-03-01

    We present a grid of non-linear convective type-II Cepheid models. The dense model grids are computed for 0.6 M⊙ and a range of metallicities ([Fe/H] = -2.0, -1.5, -1.0), and for 0.8 M⊙ ([Fe/H] = -1.5). Two sets of convective parameters are considered. The models cover the full temperature extent of the classical instability strip, but are limited in luminosity; for the most luminous models, violent pulsation leads to the decoupling of the outermost model shell. Hence, our survey reaches only the shortest period RV Tau domain. In the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, we detect two domains in which period-doubled pulsation is possible. The first extends through the BL Her domain and low-luminosity W Vir domain (pulsation periods ˜2-6.5 d). The second domain extends at higher luminosities (W Vir domain; periods >9.5 d). Some models within these domains display period-4 pulsation. We also detect very narrow domains (˜10 K wide) in which modulation of pulsation is possible. Another interesting phenomenon we detect is double-mode pulsation in the fundamental mode and in the fourth radial overtone. Fourth overtone is a surface mode, trapped in the outer model layers. Single-mode pulsation in the fourth overtone is also possible on the hot side of the classical instability strip. The origin of the above phenomena is discussed. In particular, the role of resonances in driving different pulsation dynamics as well as in shaping the morphology of the radius variation curves is analysed.

  8. Chemometric investigation of complex equilibria in solution phase II: Sensitivity of chemical models for the interaction of AADH and FAH with Ni(II) in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Babu, A R; Krishna, D M; Rao, R S

    1993-12-01

    A detailed study of the species formed in the complex equilibria involving adipic acid dihydrazide (AADH)/2-furoic acid hydrazide (FAH) with Ni(II) using pH titration with glass electrode is performed. The results of modeling studies and effect of errors on the equilibrium constants of AADH/FAH with Ni(II) refined by the non-linear least squares program MINIQUAD75 are reported. Based on the expert system approach developed in our laboratory for the species formed from secondary formation data (n and n (H)), several preliminary chemical models were tested. For the four species identified (MLH, ML, ML(2)H, ML(2)), an exhaustive search of a different combination of models (15) was performed. Then other suspected minor species (ML(2)H(2), ML(3) and ML(3)H) were tested. The final best fit chemical model was found to contain ML(3)H to an extent of 3% along with the other four major species. In order to ascertain the accuracy of the stability constants and consequently distribution of the species, a detailed error analysis is attempted. As the existing least squares procedures cannot suppress the systematic errors, three-dimensional plots of the simultaneous effects of pH and TLO:TMO (1.5:1 to 5:1) on the percentage of species are drawn which are of immense use in arriving at optimum conditions for the preparation of a complex of definite stoichiometry. PMID:18965865

  9. Dynamics of stochastic predator-prey models with Holling II functional response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qun; Zu, Li; Jiang, Daqing

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we consider the dynamics of stochastic predator-prey models with Holling II functional response. For the stochastic systems, we firstly establish sufficient conditions for the existence of the globally positive solutions. Then we investigate the asymptotic moment estimations of the positive solutions and study the ultimately bounded in the mean of them. Thirdly, by constructing some suitable Lyapunov functions, we verify that there are unique stationary distributions and they are ergodic. The obtained results show that the systems still retain some stability in the sense of weak stability provided that the intensity of the white noise is relatively small. Finally, some numerical simulations are introduced to illustrate our main results.

  10. Phase II monitoring of auto-correlated linear profiles using linear mixed model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narvand, A.; Soleimani, P.; Raissi, Sadigh

    2013-05-01

    In many circumstances, the quality of a process or product is best characterized by a given mathematical function between a response variable and one or more explanatory variables that is typically referred to as profile. There are some investigations to monitor auto-correlated linear and nonlinear profiles in recent years. In the present paper, we use the linear mixed models to account autocorrelation within observations which is gathered on phase II of the monitoring process. We undertake that the structure of correlated linear profiles simultaneously has both random and fixed effects. The work enhanced a Hotelling's T 2 statistic, a multivariate exponential weighted moving average (MEWMA), and a multivariate cumulative sum (MCUSUM) control charts to monitor process. We also compared their performances, in terms of average run length criterion, and designated that the proposed control charts schemes could effectively act in detecting shifts in process parameters. Finally, the results are applied on a real case study in an agricultural field.