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Sample records for model organism database

  1. Curation accuracy of model organism databases.

    PubMed

    Keseler, Ingrid M; Skrzypek, Marek; Weerasinghe, Deepika; Chen, Albert Y; Fulcher, Carol; Li, Gene-Wei; Lemmer, Kimberly C; Mladinich, Katherine M; Chow, Edmond D; Sherlock, Gavin; Karp, Peter D

    2014-01-01

    Manual extraction of information from the biomedical literature-or biocuration-is the central methodology used to construct many biological databases. For example, the UniProt protein database, the EcoCyc Escherichia coli database and the Candida Genome Database (CGD) are all based on biocuration. Biological databases are used extensively by life science researchers, as online encyclopedias, as aids in the interpretation of new experimental data and as golden standards for the development of new bioinformatics algorithms. Although manual curation has been assumed to be highly accurate, we are aware of only one previous study of biocuration accuracy. We assessed the accuracy of EcoCyc and CGD by manually selecting curated assertions within randomly chosen EcoCyc and CGD gene pages and by then validating that the data found in the referenced publications supported those assertions. A database assertion is considered to be in error if that assertion could not be found in the publication cited for that assertion. We identified 10 errors in the 633 facts that we validated across the two databases, for an overall error rate of 1.58%, and individual error rates of 1.82% for CGD and 1.40% for EcoCyc. These data suggest that manual curation of the experimental literature by Ph.D-level scientists is highly accurate. Database URL: http://ecocyc.org/, http://www.candidagenome.org// PMID:24923819

  2. BeetleBase: the model organism database for Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liangjiang; Wang, Suzhi; Li, Yonghua; Paradesi, Martin S R; Brown, Susan J

    2007-01-01

    BeetleBase (http://www.bioinformatics.ksu.edu/BeetleBase/) is an integrated resource for the Tribolium research community. The red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum) is an important model organism for genetics, developmental biology, toxicology and comparative genomics, the genome of which has recently been sequenced. BeetleBase is constructed to integrate the genomic sequence data with information about genes, mutants, genetic markers, expressed sequence tags and publications. BeetleBase uses the Chado data model and software components developed by the Generic Model Organism Database (GMOD) project. This strategy not only reduces the time required to develop the database query tools but also makes the data structure of BeetleBase compatible with that of other model organism databases. BeetleBase will be useful to the Tribolium research community for genome annotation as well as comparative genomics. PMID:17090595

  3. Xenbase: expansion and updates of the Xenopus model organism database

    PubMed Central

    James-Zorn, Christina; Ponferrada, Virgilio G.; Jarabek, Chris J.; Burns, Kevin A.; Segerdell, Erik J.; Lee, Jacqueline; Snyder, Kevin; Bhattacharyya, Bishnu; Karpinka, J. Brad; Fortriede, Joshua; Bowes, Jeff B.; Zorn, Aaron M.; Vize, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    Xenbase (http://www.xenbase.org) is a model organism database that provides genomic, molecular, cellular and developmental biology content to biomedical researchers working with the frog, Xenopus and Xenopus data to workers using other model organisms. As an amphibian Xenopus serves as a useful evolutionary bridge between invertebrates and more complex vertebrates such as birds and mammals. Xenbase content is collated from a variety of external sources using automated and semi-automated pipelines then processed via a combination of automated and manual annotation. A link-matching system allows for the wide variety of synonyms used to describe biological data on unique features, such as a gene or an anatomical entity, to be used by the database in an equivalent manner. Recent updates to the database include the Xenopus laevis genome, a new Xenopus tropicalis genome build, epigenomic data, collections of RNA and protein sequences associated with genes, more powerful gene expression searches, a community and curated wiki, an extensive set of manually annotated gene expression patterns and a new database module that contains data on over 700 antibodies that are useful for exploring Xenopus cell and developmental biology. PMID:23125366

  4. ZFIN: enhancements and updates to the zebrafish model organism database

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Yvonne; Conlin, Tom; Dunn, Nathan; Fashena, David; Frazer, Ken; Howe, Douglas G.; Knight, Jonathan; Mani, Prita; Martin, Ryan; Moxon, Sierra A. T.; Paddock, Holly; Pich, Christian; Ramachandran, Sridhar; Ruef, Barbara J.; Ruzicka, Leyla; Bauer Schaper, Holle; Schaper, Kevin; Shao, Xiang; Singer, Amy; Sprague, Judy; Sprunger, Brock; Van Slyke, Ceri; Westerfield, Monte

    2011-01-01

    ZFIN, the Zebrafish Model Organism Database, http://zfin.org, serves as the central repository and web-based resource for zebrafish genetic, genomic, phenotypic and developmental data. ZFIN manually curates comprehensive data for zebrafish genes, phenotypes, genotypes, gene expression, antibodies, anatomical structures and publications. A wide-ranging collection of web-based search forms and tools facilitates access to integrated views of these data promoting analysis and scientific discovery. Data represented in ZFIN are derived from three primary sources: curation of zebrafish publications, individual research laboratories and collaborations with bioinformatics organizations. Data formats include text, images and graphical representations. ZFIN is a dynamic resource with data added daily as part of our ongoing curation process. Software updates are frequent. Here, we describe recent additions to ZFIN including (i) enhanced access to images, (ii) genomic features, (iii) genome browser, (iv) transcripts, (v) antibodies and (vi) a community wiki for protocols and antibodies. PMID:21036866

  5. ZFIN, the Zebrafish Model Organism Database: updates and new directions

    PubMed Central

    Ruzicka, Leyla; Bradford, Yvonne M.; Frazer, Ken; Howe, Douglas G.; Paddock, Holly; Ramachandran, Sridhar; Singer, Amy; Toro, Sabrina; Van Slyke, Ceri E.; Eagle, Anne E.; Fashena, David; Kalita, Patrick; Knight, Jonathan; Mani, Prita; Martin, Ryan; Moxon, Sierra A. T.; Pich, Christian; Schaper, Kevin; Shao, Xiang; Westerfield, Monte

    2015-01-01

    The Zebrafish Model Organism Database (ZFIN; http://zfin.org) is the central resource for genetic and genomic data from zebrafish (Danio rerio) research. ZFIN staff curate detailed information about genes, mutants, genotypes, reporter lines, sequences, constructs, antibodies, knockdown reagents, expression patterns, phenotypes, gene product function, and orthology from publications. Researchers can submit mutant, transgenic, expression, and phenotype data directly to ZFIN and use the ZFIN Community Wiki to share antibody and protocol information. Data can be accessed through topic-specific searches, a new site-wide search, and the data-mining resource ZebrafishMine (http://zebrafishmine.org). Data download and web service options are also available. ZFIN collaborates with major bioinformatics organizations to verify and integrate genomic sequence data, provide nomenclature support, establish reciprocal links and participate in the development of standardized structured vocabularies (ontologies) used for data annotation and searching. ZFIN-curated gene, function, expression, and phenotype data are available for comparative exploration at several multi-species resources. The use of zebrafish as a model for human disease is increasing. ZFIN is supporting this growing area with three major projects: adding easy access to computed orthology data from gene pages, curating details of the gene expression pattern changes in mutant fish, and curating zebrafish models of human diseases. PMID:26097180

  6. ZFIN, The zebrafish model organism database: Updates and new directions.

    PubMed

    Ruzicka, Leyla; Bradford, Yvonne M; Frazer, Ken; Howe, Douglas G; Paddock, Holly; Ramachandran, Sridhar; Singer, Amy; Toro, Sabrina; Van Slyke, Ceri E; Eagle, Anne E; Fashena, David; Kalita, Patrick; Knight, Jonathan; Mani, Prita; Martin, Ryan; Moxon, Sierra A T; Pich, Christian; Schaper, Kevin; Shao, Xiang; Westerfield, Monte

    2015-08-01

    The Zebrafish Model Organism Database (ZFIN; http://zfin.org) is the central resource for genetic and genomic data from zebrafish (Danio rerio) research. ZFIN staff curate detailed information about genes, mutants, genotypes, reporter lines, sequences, constructs, antibodies, knockdown reagents, expression patterns, phenotypes, gene product function, and orthology from publications. Researchers can submit mutant, transgenic, expression, and phenotype data directly to ZFIN and use the ZFIN Community Wiki to share antibody and protocol information. Data can be accessed through topic-specific searches, a new site-wide search, and the data-mining resource ZebrafishMine (http://zebrafishmine.org). Data download and web service options are also available. ZFIN collaborates with major bioinformatics organizations to verify and integrate genomic sequence data, provide nomenclature support, establish reciprocal links, and participate in the development of standardized structured vocabularies (ontologies) used for data annotation and searching. ZFIN-curated gene, function, expression, and phenotype data are available for comparative exploration at several multi-species resources. The use of zebrafish as a model for human disease is increasing. ZFIN is supporting this growing area with three major projects: adding easy access to computed orthology data from gene pages, curating details of the gene expression pattern changes in mutant fish, and curating zebrafish models of human diseases. PMID:26097180

  7. Choosing a Genome Browser for a Model Organism Database (MOD): Surveying the Maize Community

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As the maize genome sequencing is nearing its completion, the Maize Genetics and Genomics Database (MaizeGDB), the Model Organism Database for maize, integrated a genome browser to its already existing Web interface and database. The addition of the MaizeGDB Genome Browser to MaizeGDB will allow it ...

  8. Model organism databases: essential resources that need the support of both funders and users.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Stephen G; Lock, Antonia; Harris, Midori A; Nurse, Paul; Wood, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Modern biomedical research depends critically on access to databases that house and disseminate genetic, genomic, molecular, and cell biological knowledge. Even as the explosion of available genome sequences and associated genome-scale data continues apace, the sustainability of professionally maintained biological databases is under threat due to policy changes by major funding agencies. Here, we focus on model organism databases to demonstrate the myriad ways in which biological databases not only act as repositories but actively facilitate advances in research. We present data that show that reducing financial support to model organism databases could prove to be not just scientifically, but also economically, unsound. PMID:27334346

  9. MaizeGDB update: New tools, data, and interface for the maize model organism database

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MaizeGDB is a highly curated, community-oriented database and informatics service to researchers focused on the crop plant and model organism Zea mays ssp. mays. Although some form of the maize community database has existed over the last 25 years, there have only been two major releases. In 1991, ...

  10. MaizeGDB, the maize model organism database

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MaizeGDB is the maize research community's database for maize genetic and genomic information. In this seminar I will outline our current endeavors including a full website redesign, the status of maize genome assembly and annotation projects, and work toward genome functional annotation. Mechanis...

  11. Using semantic data modeling techniques to organize an object-oriented database for extending the mass storage model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, William J.; Short, Nicholas M., Jr.; Roelofs, Larry H.; Dorfman, Erik

    1991-01-01

    A methodology for optimizing organization of data obtained by NASA earth and space missions is discussed. The methodology uses a concept based on semantic data modeling techniques implemented in a hierarchical storage model. The modeling is used to organize objects in mass storage devices, relational database systems, and object-oriented databases. The semantic data modeling at the metadata record level is examined, including the simulation of a knowledge base and semantic metadata storage issues. The semantic data model hierarchy and its application for efficient data storage is addressed, as is the mapping of the application structure to the mass storage.

  12. The Generic Genome Browser: A Building Block for a Model Organism System Database

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Lincoln D.; Mungall, Christopher; Shu, ShengQiang; Caudy, Michael; Mangone, Marco; Day, Allen; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Stajich, Jason E.; Harris, Todd W.; Arva, Adrian; Lewis, Suzanna

    2002-01-01

    The Generic Model Organism System Database Project (GMOD) seeks to develop reusable software components for model organism system databases. In this paper we describe the Generic Genome Browser (GBrowse), a Web-based application for displaying genomic annotations and other features. For the end user, features of the browser include the ability to scroll and zoom through arbitrary regions of a genome, to enter a region of the genome by searching for a landmark or performing a full text search of all features, and the ability to enable and disable tracks and change their relative order and appearance. The user can upload private annotations to view them in the context of the public ones, and publish those annotations to the community. For the data provider, features of the browser software include reliance on readily available open source components, simple installation, flexible configuration, and easy integration with other components of a model organism system Web site. GBrowse is freely available under an open source license. The software, its documentation, and support are available at http://www.gmod.org. PMID:12368253

  13. MaizeGDB update: new tools, data and interface for the maize model organism database

    PubMed Central

    Andorf, Carson M.; Cannon, Ethalinda K.; Portwood, John L.; Gardiner, Jack M.; Harper, Lisa C.; Schaeffer, Mary L.; Braun, Bremen L.; Campbell, Darwin A.; Vinnakota, Abhinav G.; Sribalusu, Venktanaga V.; Huerta, Miranda; Cho, Kyoung Tak; Wimalanathan, Kokulapalan; Richter, Jacqueline D.; Mauch, Emily D.; Rao, Bhavani S.; Birkett, Scott M.; Sen, Taner Z.; Lawrence-Dill, Carolyn J.

    2016-01-01

    MaizeGDB is a highly curated, community-oriented database and informatics service to researchers focused on the crop plant and model organism Zea mays ssp. mays. Although some form of the maize community database has existed over the last 25 years, there have only been two major releases. In 1991, the original maize genetics database MaizeDB was created. In 2003, the combined contents of MaizeDB and the sequence data from ZmDB were made accessible as a single resource named MaizeGDB. Over the next decade, MaizeGDB became more sequence driven while still maintaining traditional maize genetics datasets. This enabled the project to meet the continued growing and evolving needs of the maize research community, yet the interface and underlying infrastructure remained unchanged. In 2015, the MaizeGDB team completed a multi-year effort to update the MaizeGDB resource by reorganizing existing data, upgrading hardware and infrastructure, creating new tools, incorporating new data types (including diversity data, expression data, gene models, and metabolic pathways), and developing and deploying a modern interface. In addition to coordinating a data resource, the MaizeGDB team coordinates activities and provides technical support to the maize research community. MaizeGDB is accessible online at http://www.maizegdb.org. PMID:26432828

  14. MaizeGDB update: new tools, data and interface for the maize model organism database.

    PubMed

    Andorf, Carson M; Cannon, Ethalinda K; Portwood, John L; Gardiner, Jack M; Harper, Lisa C; Schaeffer, Mary L; Braun, Bremen L; Campbell, Darwin A; Vinnakota, Abhinav G; Sribalusu, Venktanaga V; Huerta, Miranda; Cho, Kyoung Tak; Wimalanathan, Kokulapalan; Richter, Jacqueline D; Mauch, Emily D; Rao, Bhavani S; Birkett, Scott M; Sen, Taner Z; Lawrence-Dill, Carolyn J

    2016-01-01

    MaizeGDB is a highly curated, community-oriented database and informatics service to researchers focused on the crop plant and model organism Zea mays ssp. mays. Although some form of the maize community database has existed over the last 25 years, there have only been two major releases. In 1991, the original maize genetics database MaizeDB was created. In 2003, the combined contents of MaizeDB and the sequence data from ZmDB were made accessible as a single resource named MaizeGDB. Over the next decade, MaizeGDB became more sequence driven while still maintaining traditional maize genetics datasets. This enabled the project to meet the continued growing and evolving needs of the maize research community, yet the interface and underlying infrastructure remained unchanged. In 2015, the MaizeGDB team completed a multi-year effort to update the MaizeGDB resource by reorganizing existing data, upgrading hardware and infrastructure, creating new tools, incorporating new data types (including diversity data, expression data, gene models, and metabolic pathways), and developing and deploying a modern interface. In addition to coordinating a data resource, the MaizeGDB team coordinates activities and provides technical support to the maize research community. MaizeGDB is accessible online at http://www.maizegdb.org. PMID:26432828

  15. Protein Model Database

    SciTech Connect

    Fidelis, K; Adzhubej, A; Kryshtafovych, A; Daniluk, P

    2005-02-23

    The phenomenal success of the genome sequencing projects reveals the power of completeness in revolutionizing biological science. Currently it is possible to sequence entire organisms at a time, allowing for a systemic rather than fractional view of their organization and the various genome-encoded functions. There is an international plan to move towards a similar goal in the area of protein structure. This will not be achieved by experiment alone, but rather by a combination of efforts in crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and computational modeling. Only a small fraction of structures are expected to be identified experimentally, the remainder to be modeled. Presently there is no organized infrastructure to critically evaluate and present these data to the biological community. The goal of the Protein Model Database project is to create such infrastructure, including (1) public database of theoretically derived protein structures; (2) reliable annotation of protein model quality, (3) novel structure analysis tools, and (4) access to the highest quality modeling techniques available.

  16. MyMpn: a database for the systems biology model organism Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Wodke, Judith A H; Alibés, Andreu; Cozzuto, Luca; Hermoso, Antonio; Yus, Eva; Lluch-Senar, Maria; Serrano, Luis; Roma, Guglielmo

    2015-01-01

    MyMpn (http://mympn.crg.eu) is an online resource devoted to studying the human pathogen Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a minimal bacterium causing lower respiratory tract infections. Due to its small size, its ability to grow in vitro, and the amount of data produced over the past decades, M. pneumoniae is an interesting model organisms for the development of systems biology approaches for unicellular organisms. Our database hosts a wealth of omics-scale datasets generated by hundreds of experimental and computational analyses. These include data obtained from gene expression profiling experiments, gene essentiality studies, protein abundance profiling, protein complex analysis, metabolic reactions and network modeling, cell growth experiments, comparative genomics and 3D tomography. In addition, the intuitive web interface provides access to several visualization and analysis tools as well as to different data search options. The availability and--even more relevant--the accessibility of properly structured and organized data are of up-most importance when aiming to understand the biology of an organism on a global scale. Therefore, MyMpn constitutes a unique and valuable new resource for the large systems biology and microbiology community. PMID:25378328

  17. SubtiWiki 2.0--an integrated database for the model organism Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Michna, Raphael H; Zhu, Bingyao; Mäder, Ulrike; Stülke, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    To understand living cells, we need knowledge of each of their parts as well as about the interactions of these parts. To gain rapid and comprehensive access to this information, annotation databases are required. Here, we present SubtiWiki 2.0, the integrated database for the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis (http://subtiwiki.uni-goettingen.de/). SubtiWiki provides text-based access to published information about the genes and proteins of B. subtilis as well as presentations of metabolic and regulatory pathways. Moreover, manually curated protein-protein interactions diagrams are linked to the protein pages. Finally, expression data are shown with respect to gene expression under 104 different conditions as well as absolute protein quantification for cytoplasmic proteins. To facilitate the mobile use of SubtiWiki, we have now expanded it by Apps that are available for iOS and Android devices. Importantly, the App allows to link private notes and pictures to the gene/protein pages. Today, SubtiWiki has become one of the most complete collections of knowledge on a living organism in one single resource. PMID:26433225

  18. ZFIN, the Zebrafish Model Organism Database: increased support for mutants and transgenics.

    PubMed

    Howe, Douglas G; Bradford, Yvonne M; Conlin, Tom; Eagle, Anne E; Fashena, David; Frazer, Ken; Knight, Jonathan; Mani, Prita; Martin, Ryan; Moxon, Sierra A Taylor; Paddock, Holly; Pich, Christian; Ramachandran, Sridhar; Ruef, Barbara J; Ruzicka, Leyla; Schaper, Kevin; Shao, Xiang; Singer, Amy; Sprunger, Brock; Van Slyke, Ceri E; Westerfield, Monte

    2013-01-01

    ZFIN, the Zebrafish Model Organism Database (http://zfin.org), is the central resource for zebrafish genetic, genomic, phenotypic and developmental data. ZFIN curators manually curate and integrate comprehensive data involving zebrafish genes, mutants, transgenics, phenotypes, genotypes, gene expressions, morpholinos, antibodies, anatomical structures and publications. Integrated views of these data, as well as data gathered through collaborations and data exchanges, are provided through a wide selection of web-based search forms. Among the vertebrate model organisms, zebrafish are uniquely well suited for rapid and targeted generation of mutant lines. The recent rapid production of mutants and transgenic zebrafish is making management of data associated with these resources particularly important to the research community. Here, we describe recent enhancements to ZFIN aimed at improving our support for mutant and transgenic lines, including (i) enhanced mutant/transgenic search functionality; (ii) more expressive phenotype curation methods; (iii) new downloads files and archival data access; (iv) incorporation of new data loads from laboratories undertaking large-scale generation of mutant or transgenic lines and (v) new GBrowse tracks for transgenic insertions, genes with antibodies and morpholinos. PMID:23074187

  19. Xenbase, the Xenopus model organism database; new virtualized system, data types and genomes

    PubMed Central

    Karpinka, J. Brad; Fortriede, Joshua D.; Burns, Kevin A.; James-Zorn, Christina; Ponferrada, Virgilio G.; Lee, Jacqueline; Karimi, Kamran; Zorn, Aaron M.; Vize, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Xenbase (http://www.xenbase.org), the Xenopus frog model organism database, integrates a wide variety of data from this biomedical model genus. Two closely related species are represented: the allotetraploid Xenopus laevis that is widely used for microinjection and tissue explant-based protocols, and the diploid Xenopus tropicalis which is used for genetics and gene targeting. The two species are extremely similar and protocols, reagents and results from each species are often interchangeable. Xenbase imports, indexes, curates and manages data from both species; all of which are mapped via unique IDs and can be queried in either a species-specific or species agnostic manner. All our services have now migrated to a private cloud to achieve better performance and reliability. We have added new content, including providing full support for morpholino reagents, used to inhibit mRNA translation or splicing and binding to regulatory microRNAs. New genomes assembled by the JGI for both species and are displayed in Gbrowse and are also available for searches using BLAST. Researchers can easily navigate from genome content to gene page reports, literature, experimental reagents and many other features using hyperlinks. Xenbase has also greatly expanded image content for figures published in papers describing Xenopus research via PubMedCentral. PMID:25313157

  20. Developing a biocuration workflow for AgBase, a non-model organism database

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Lakshmi; Chouvarine, Philippe; Tudor, Catalina O.; Schmidt, Carl J.; Vijay-Shanker, K.; McCarthy, Fiona M.

    2012-01-01

    AgBase provides annotation for agricultural gene products using the Gene Ontology (GO) and Plant Ontology, as appropriate. Unlike model organism species, agricultural species have a body of literature that does not just focus on gene function; to improve efficiency, we use text mining to identify literature for curation. The first component of our annotation interface is the gene prioritization interface that ranks gene products for annotation. Biocurators select the top-ranked gene and mark annotation for these genes as ‘in progress’ or ‘completed’; links enable biocurators to move directly to our biocuration interface (BI). Our BI includes all current GO annotation for gene products and is the main interface to add/modify AgBase curation data. The BI also displays Extracting Genic Information from Text (eGIFT) results for each gene product. eGIFT is a web-based, text-mining tool that associates ranked, informative terms (iTerms) and the articles and sentences containing them, with genes. Moreover, iTerms are linked to GO terms, where they match either a GO term name or a synonym. This enables AgBase biocurators to rapidly identify literature for further curation based on possible GO terms. Because most agricultural species do not have standardized literature, eGIFT searches all gene names and synonyms to associate articles with genes. As many of the gene names can be ambiguous, eGIFT applies a disambiguation step to remove matches that do not correspond to this gene, and filtering is applied to remove abstracts that mention a gene in passing. The BI is linked to our Journal Database (JDB) where corresponding journal citations are stored. Just as importantly, biocurators also add to the JDB citations that have no GO annotation. The AgBase BI also supports bulk annotation upload to facilitate our Inferred from electronic annotation of agricultural gene products. All annotations must pass standard GO Consortium quality checking before release in Ag

  1. Unlocking the potential of survival data for model organisms through a new database and online analysis platform: SurvCurv

    PubMed Central

    Ziehm, Matthias; Thornton, Janet M

    2013-01-01

    Lifespan measurements, also called survival records, are a key phenotype in research on aging. If external hazards are excluded, aging alone determines the mortality in a population of model organisms. Understanding the biology of aging is highly desirable because of the benefits for the wide range of aging-related diseases. However, it is also extremely challenging because of the underlying complexity. Here, we describe SurvCurv, a new database and online resource focused on model organisms collating survival data for storage and analysis. All data in SurvCurv are manually curated and annotated. The database, available at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/thornton-srv/databases/SurvCurv/, offers various functions including plotting, Cox proportional hazards analysis, mathematical mortality models and statistical tests. It facilitates reanalysis and allows users to analyse their own data and compare it with the largest repository of model-organism data from published experiments, thus unlocking the potential of survival data and demographics in model organisms. PMID:23826631

  2. Combining next-generation sequencing and online databases for microsatellite development in non-model organisms.

    PubMed

    Rico, Ciro; Normandeau, Eric; Dion-Côté, Anne-Marie; Rico, María Inés; Côté, Guillaume; Bernatchez, Louis

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is revolutionising marker development and the rapidly increasing amount of transcriptomes published across a wide variety of taxa is providing valuable sequence databases for the identification of genetic markers without the need to generate new sequences. Microsatellites are still the most important source of polymorphic markers in ecology and evolution. Motivated by our long-term interest in the adaptive radiation of a non-model species complex of whitefishes (Coregonus spp.), in this study, we focus on microsatellite characterisation and multiplex optimisation using transcriptome sequences generated by Illumina® and Roche-454, as well as online databases of Expressed Sequence Tags (EST) for the study of whitefish evolution and demographic history. We identified and optimised 40 polymorphic loci in multiplex PCR reactions and validated the robustness of our analyses by testing several population genetics and phylogeographic predictions using 494 fish from five lakes and 2 distinct ecotypes. PMID:24296905

  3. Combining next-generation sequencing and online databases for microsatellite development in non-model organisms

    PubMed Central

    Rico, Ciro; Normandeau, Eric; Dion-Côté, Anne-Marie; Rico, María Inés; Côté, Guillaume; Bernatchez, Louis

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is revolutionising marker development and the rapidly increasing amount of transcriptomes published across a wide variety of taxa is providing valuable sequence databases for the identification of genetic markers without the need to generate new sequences. Microsatellites are still the most important source of polymorphic markers in ecology and evolution. Motivated by our long-term interest in the adaptive radiation of a non-model species complex of whitefishes (Coregonus spp.), in this study, we focus on microsatellite characterisation and multiplex optimisation using transcriptome sequences generated by Illumina® and Roche-454, as well as online databases of Expressed Sequence Tags (EST) for the study of whitefish evolution and demographic history. We identified and optimised 40 polymorphic loci in multiplex PCR reactions and validated the robustness of our analyses by testing several population genetics and phylogeographic predictions using 494 fish from five lakes and 2 distinct ecotypes. PMID:24296905

  4. Immediate Dissemination of Student Discoveries to a Model Organism Database Enhances Classroom-Based Research Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, Emily A.; Stover, Nicholas A.

    2014-01-01

    Use of inquiry-based research modules in the classroom has soared over recent years, largely in response to national calls for teaching that provides experience with scientific processes and methodologies. To increase the visibility of in-class studies among interested researchers and to strengthen their impact on student learning, we have extended the typical model of inquiry-based labs to include a means for targeted dissemination of student-generated discoveries. This initiative required: 1) creating a set of research-based lab activities with the potential to yield results that a particular scientific community would find useful and 2) developing a means for immediate sharing of student-generated results. Working toward these goals, we designed guides for course-based research aimed to fulfill the need for functional annotation of the Tetrahymena thermophila genome, and developed an interactive Web database that links directly to the official Tetrahymena Genome Database for immediate, targeted dissemination of student discoveries. This combination of research via the course modules and the opportunity for students to immediately “publish” their novel results on a Web database actively used by outside scientists culminated in a motivational tool that enhanced students’ efforts to engage the scientific process and pursue additional research opportunities beyond the course. PMID:24591511

  5. SubtiWiki-a database for the model organism Bacillus subtilis that links pathway, interaction and expression information.

    PubMed

    Michna, Raphael H; Commichau, Fabian M; Tödter, Dominik; Zschiedrich, Christopher P; Stülke, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Genome annotation and access to information from large-scale experimental approaches at the genome level are essential to improve our understanding of living cells and organisms. This is even more the case for model organisms that are the basis to study pathogens and technologically important species. We have generated SubtiWiki, a database for the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis (http://subtiwiki.uni-goettingen.de/). In addition to the established companion modules of SubtiWiki, SubtiPathways and SubtInteract, we have now created SubtiExpress, a third module, to visualize genome scale transcription data that are of unprecedented quality and density. Today, SubtiWiki is one of the most complete collections of knowledge on a living organism in one single resource. PMID:24178028

  6. SubtiWiki–a database for the model organism Bacillus subtilis that links pathway, interaction and expression information

    PubMed Central

    Michna, Raphael H.; Commichau, Fabian M.; Tödter, Dominik; Zschiedrich, Christopher P.; Stülke, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Genome annotation and access to information from large-scale experimental approaches at the genome level are essential to improve our understanding of living cells and organisms. This is even more the case for model organisms that are the basis to study pathogens and technologically important species. We have generated SubtiWiki, a database for the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis (http://subtiwiki.uni-goettingen.de/). In addition to the established companion modules of SubtiWiki, SubtiPathways and SubtInteract, we have now created SubtiExpress, a third module, to visualize genome scale transcription data that are of unprecedented quality and density. Today, SubtiWiki is one of the most complete collections of knowledge on a living organism in one single resource. PMID:24178028

  7. MaizeGDB: The Maize Model Organism Database for Basic, Translational, and Applied Research

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Carolyn J.; Harper, Lisa C.; Schaeffer, Mary L.; Sen, Taner Z.; Seigfried, Trent E.; Campbell, Darwin A.

    2008-01-01

    In 2001 maize became the number one production crop in the world with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations reporting over 614 million tonnes produced. Its success is due to the high productivity per acre in tandem with a wide variety of commercial uses. Not only is maize an excellent source of food, feed, and fuel, but also its by-products are used in the production of various commercial products. Maize's unparalleled success in agriculture stems from basic research, the outcomes of which drive breeding and product development. In order for basic, translational, and applied researchers to benefit from others' investigations, newly generated data must be made freely and easily accessible. MaizeGDB is the maize research community's central repository for genetics and genomics information. The overall goals of MaizeGDB are to facilitate access to the outcomes of maize research by integrating new maize data into the database and to support the maize research community by coordinating group activities. PMID:18769488

  8. Database for propagation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil V.

    1991-01-01

    A propagation researcher or a systems engineer who intends to use the results of a propagation experiment is generally faced with various database tasks such as the selection of the computer software, the hardware, and the writing of the programs to pass the data through the models of interest. This task is repeated every time a new experiment is conducted or the same experiment is carried out at a different location generating different data. Thus the users of this data have to spend a considerable portion of their time learning how to implement the computer hardware and the software towards the desired end. This situation may be facilitated considerably if an easily accessible propagation database is created that has all the accepted (standardized) propagation phenomena models approved by the propagation research community. Also, the handling of data will become easier for the user. Such a database construction can only stimulate the growth of the propagation research it if is available to all the researchers, so that the results of the experiment conducted by one researcher can be examined independently by another, without different hardware and software being used. The database may be made flexible so that the researchers need not be confined only to the contents of the database. Another way in which the database may help the researchers is by the fact that they will not have to document the software and hardware tools used in their research since the propagation research community will know the database already. The following sections show a possible database construction, as well as properties of the database for the propagation research.

  9. Use of model organism and disease databases to support matchmaking for human disease gene discovery.

    PubMed

    Mungall, Christopher J; Washington, Nicole L; Nguyen-Xuan, Jeremy; Condit, Christopher; Smedley, Damian; Köhler, Sebastian; Groza, Tudor; Shefchek, Kent; Hochheiser, Harry; Robinson, Peter N; Lewis, Suzanna E; Haendel, Melissa A

    2015-10-01

    The Matchmaker Exchange application programming interface (API) allows searching a patient's genotypic or phenotypic profiles across clinical sites, for the purposes of cohort discovery and variant disease causal validation. This API can be used not only to search for matching patients, but also to match against public disease and model organism data. This public disease data enable matching known diseases and variant-phenotype associations using phenotype semantic similarity algorithms developed by the Monarch Initiative. The model data can provide additional evidence to aid diagnosis, suggest relevant models for disease mechanism and treatment exploration, and identify collaborators across the translational divide. The Monarch Initiative provides an implementation of this API for searching multiple integrated sources of data that contextualize the knowledge about any given patient or patient family into the greater biomedical knowledge landscape. While this corpus of data can aid diagnosis, it is also the beginning of research to improve understanding of rare human diseases. PMID:26269093

  10. SubtiWiki 2.0—an integrated database for the model organism Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Michna, Raphael H.; Zhu, Bingyao; Mäder, Ulrike; Stülke, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    To understand living cells, we need knowledge of each of their parts as well as about the interactions of these parts. To gain rapid and comprehensive access to this information, annotation databases are required. Here, we present SubtiWiki 2.0, the integrated database for the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis (http://subtiwiki.uni-goettingen.de/). SubtiWiki provides text-based access to published information about the genes and proteins of B. subtilis as well as presentations of metabolic and regulatory pathways. Moreover, manually curated protein-protein interactions diagrams are linked to the protein pages. Finally, expression data are shown with respect to gene expression under 104 different conditions as well as absolute protein quantification for cytoplasmic proteins. To facilitate the mobile use of SubtiWiki, we have now expanded it by Apps that are available for iOS and Android devices. Importantly, the App allows to link private notes and pictures to the gene/protein pages. Today, SubtiWiki has become one of the most complete collections of knowledge on a living organism in one single resource. PMID:26433225

  11. A Database for Propagation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil V.; Rucker, James

    1997-01-01

    The Propagation Models Database is designed to allow the scientists and experimenters in the propagation field to process their data through many known and accepted propagation models. The database is an Excel 5.0 based software that houses user-callable propagation models of propagation phenomena. It does not contain a database of propagation data generated out of the experiments. The database not only provides a powerful software tool to process the data generated by the experiments, but is also a time- and energy-saving tool for plotting results, generating tables and producing impressive and crisp hard copy for presentation and filing.

  12. Integration of an Evidence Base into a Probabilistic Risk Assessment Model. The Integrated Medical Model Database: An Organized Evidence Base for Assessing In-Flight Crew Health Risk and System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saile, Lynn; Lopez, Vilma; Bickham, Grandin; FreiredeCarvalho, Mary; Kerstman, Eric; Byrne, Vicky; Butler, Douglas; Myers, Jerry; Walton, Marlei

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Integrated Medical Model (IMM) database, which is an organized evidence base for assessing in-flight crew health risk. The database is a relational database accessible to many people. The database quantifies the model inputs by a ranking based on the highest value of the data as Level of Evidence (LOE) and the quality of evidence (QOE) score that provides an assessment of the evidence base for each medical condition. The IMM evidence base has already been able to provide invaluable information for designers, and for other uses.

  13. Building a Database for a Quantitative Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, C. Joseph; Kleinhammer, Roger

    2014-01-01

    A database can greatly benefit a quantitative analysis. The defining characteristic of a quantitative risk, or reliability, model is the use of failure estimate data. Models can easily contain a thousand Basic Events, relying on hundreds of individual data sources. Obviously, entering so much data by hand will eventually lead to errors. Not so obviously entering data this way does not aid linking the Basic Events to the data sources. The best way to organize large amounts of data on a computer is with a database. But a model does not require a large, enterprise-level database with dedicated developers and administrators. A database built in Excel can be quite sufficient. A simple spreadsheet database can link every Basic Event to the individual data source selected for them. This database can also contain the manipulations appropriate for how the data is used in the model. These manipulations include stressing factors based on use and maintenance cycles, dormancy, unique failure modes, the modeling of multiple items as a single "Super component" Basic Event, and Bayesian Updating based on flight and testing experience. A simple, unique metadata field in both the model and database provides a link from any Basic Event in the model to its data source and all relevant calculations. The credibility for the entire model often rests on the credibility and traceability of the data.

  14. A database for propagation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil V.; Suwitra, Krisjani S.

    1992-01-01

    In June 1991, a paper at the fifteenth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 15) was presented outlining the development of a database for propagation models. The database is designed to allow the scientists and experimenters in the propagation field to process their data through any known and accepted propagation model. The architecture of the database also incorporates the possibility of changing the standard models in the database to fit the scientist's or the experimenter's needs. The database not only provides powerful software to process the data generated by the experiments, but is also a time- and energy-saving tool for plotting results, generating tables, and producing impressive and crisp hard copy for presentation and filing.

  15. Organizing a breast cancer database: data management.

    PubMed

    Yi, Min; Hunt, Kelly K

    2016-06-01

    Developing and organizing a breast cancer database can provide data and serve as valuable research tools for those interested in the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer. Depending on the research setting, the quality of the data can be a major issue. Assuring that the data collection process does not contribute inaccuracies can help to assure the overall quality of subsequent analyses. Data management is work that involves the planning, development, implementation, and administration of systems for the acquisition, storage, and retrieval of data while protecting it by implementing high security levels. A properly designed database provides you with access to up-to-date, accurate information. Database design is an important component of application design. If you take the time to design your databases properly, you'll be rewarded with a solid application foundation on which you can build the rest of your application. PMID:27197511

  16. The Organization of Free Text Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paijmans, H.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the design and implementation of database management systems for low-organized and natural language text on small computers. Emphasis is on the efficient storage and access of primary (text) and secondary (dictionary) files. Possible expansions to the system to increase its use in linguistic research are considered. (six references)…

  17. A database for propagation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil V.; Suwitra, Krisjani; Le, Chuong

    1995-01-01

    A database of various propagation phenomena models that can be used by telecommunications systems engineers to obtain parameter values for systems design is presented. This is an easy-to-use tool and is currently available for either a PC using Excel software under Windows environment or a Macintosh using Excel software for Macintosh. All the steps necessary to use the software are easy and many times self explanatory.

  18. Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) database organization and user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, Maria; Heller, Gerard; Steinberg, Sandra; Spiegel, Douglas

    1989-01-01

    The organization of the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) database is presented. Included are definitions and detailed descriptions of the database tables and views, the SEL data, and system support data. The mapping from the SEL and system support data to the base tables is described. In addition, techniques for accessing the database, through the Database Access Manager for the SEL (DAMSEL) system and via the ORACLE structured query language (SQL), are discussed.

  19. Community Organizing for Database Trial Buy-In by Patrons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pionke, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Database trials do not often garner a lot of feedback. Using community-organizing techniques can not only potentially increase the amount of feedback received but also deepen the relationship between the librarian and his or her constituent group. This is a case study of the use of community-organizing techniques in a series of database trials for…

  20. DEPOT: A Database of Environmental Parameters, Organizations and Tools

    SciTech Connect

    CARSON,SUSAN D.; HUNTER,REGINA LEE; MALCZYNSKI,LEONARD A.; POHL,PHILLIP I.; QUINTANA,ENRICO; SOUZA,CAROLINE A.; HIGLEY,KATHRYN; MURPHIE,WILLIAM

    2000-12-19

    The Database of Environmental Parameters, Organizations, and Tools (DEPOT) has been developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) as a central warehouse for access to data essential for environmental risk assessment analyses. Initial efforts have concentrated on groundwater and vadose zone transport data and bioaccumulation factors. DEPOT seeks to provide a source of referenced data that, wherever possible, includes the level of uncertainty associated with these parameters. Based on the amount of data available for a particular parameter, uncertainty is expressed as a standard deviation or a distribution function. DEPOT also provides DOE site-specific performance assessment data, pathway-specific transport data, and links to environmental regulations, disposal site waste acceptance criteria, other environmental parameter databases, and environmental risk assessment models.

  1. Conceptual and logical level of database modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunka, Frantisek; Matula, Jiri

    2016-06-01

    Conceptual and logical levels form the top most levels of database modeling. Usually, ORM (Object Role Modeling) and ER diagrams are utilized to capture the corresponding schema. The final aim of business process modeling is to store its results in the form of database solution. For this reason, value oriented business process modeling which utilizes ER diagram to express the modeling entities and relationships between them are used. However, ER diagrams form the logical level of database schema. To extend possibilities of different business process modeling methodologies, the conceptual level of database modeling is needed. The paper deals with the REA value modeling approach to business process modeling using ER-diagrams, and derives conceptual model utilizing ORM modeling approach. Conceptual model extends possibilities for value modeling to other business modeling approaches.

  2. Organ system heterogeneity DB: a database for the visualization of phenotypes at the organ system level.

    PubMed

    Mannil, Deepthi; Vogt, Ingo; Prinz, Jeanette; Campillos, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Perturbations of mammalian organisms including diseases, drug treatments and gene perturbations in mice affect organ systems differently. Some perturbations impair relatively few organ systems while others lead to highly heterogeneous or systemic effects. Organ System Heterogeneity DB (http://mips.helmholtz-muenchen.de/Organ_System_Heterogeneity/) provides information on the phenotypic effects of 4865 human diseases, 1667 drugs and 5361 genetically modified mouse models on 26 different organ systems. Disease symptoms, drug side effects and mouse phenotypes are mapped to the System Organ Class (SOC) level of the Medical Dictionary of Regulatory Activities (MedDRA). Then, the organ system heterogeneity value, a measurement of the systemic impact of a perturbation, is calculated from the relative frequency of phenotypic features across all SOCs. For perturbations of interest, the database displays the distribution of phenotypic effects across organ systems along with the heterogeneity value and the distance between organ system distributions. In this way, it allows, in an easy and comprehensible fashion, the comparison of the phenotypic organ system distributions of diseases, drugs and their corresponding genetically modified mouse models of associated disease genes and drug targets. The Organ System Heterogeneity DB is thus a platform for the visualization and comparison of organ system level phenotypic effects of drugs, diseases and genes. PMID:25313158

  3. Organ system heterogeneity DB: a database for the visualization of phenotypes at the organ system level

    PubMed Central

    Mannil, Deepthi; Vogt, Ingo; Prinz, Jeanette; Campillos, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Perturbations of mammalian organisms including diseases, drug treatments and gene perturbations in mice affect organ systems differently. Some perturbations impair relatively few organ systems while others lead to highly heterogeneous or systemic effects. Organ System Heterogeneity DB (http://mips.helmholtz-muenchen.de/Organ_System_Heterogeneity/) provides information on the phenotypic effects of 4865 human diseases, 1667 drugs and 5361 genetically modified mouse models on 26 different organ systems. Disease symptoms, drug side effects and mouse phenotypes are mapped to the System Organ Class (SOC) level of the Medical Dictionary of Regulatory Activities (MedDRA). Then, the organ system heterogeneity value, a measurement of the systemic impact of a perturbation, is calculated from the relative frequency of phenotypic features across all SOCs. For perturbations of interest, the database displays the distribution of phenotypic effects across organ systems along with the heterogeneity value and the distance between organ system distributions. In this way, it allows, in an easy and comprehensible fashion, the comparison of the phenotypic organ system distributions of diseases, drugs and their corresponding genetically modified mouse models of associated disease genes and drug targets. The Organ System Heterogeneity DB is thus a platform for the visualization and comparison of organ system level phenotypic effects of drugs, diseases and genes. PMID:25313158

  4. Models And Results Database System.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-03-27

    Version 00 MAR-D 4.16 is a program that is used primarily for Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) data loading. This program defines a common relational database structure that is used by other PRA programs. This structure allows all of the software to access and manipulate data created by other software in the system without performing a lengthy conversion. The MAR-D program also provides the facilities for loading and unloading of PRA data from the relational databasemore » structure used to store the data to an ASCII format for interchange with other PRA software. The primary function of MAR-D is to create a data repository for NUREG-1150 and other permanent data by providing input, conversion, and output capabilities for data used by IRRAS, SARA, SETS and FRANTIC.« less

  5. Web resources for model organism studies.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bixia; Wang, Yanqing; Zhu, Junwei; Zhao, Wenming

    2015-02-01

    An ever-growing number of resources on model organisms have emerged with the continued development of sequencing technologies. In this paper, we review 13 databases of model organisms, most of which are reported by the National Institutes of Health of the United States (NIH; http://www.nih.gov/science/models/). We provide a brief description for each database, as well as detail its data source and types, functions, tools, and availability of access. In addition, we also provide a quality assessment about these databases. Significantly, the organism databases instituted in the early 1990s--such as the Mouse Genome Database (MGD), Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD), and FlyBase--have developed into what are now comprehensive, core authority resources. Furthermore, all of the databases mentioned here update continually according to user feedback and with advancing technologies. PMID:25707592

  6. Databases for Computational Thermodynamics and Diffusion Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattner, U. R.; Boettinger, W. J.; Morral, J. E.

    2002-11-01

    Databases for computational thermodynamics and diffusion modeling can be applied to predict phase diagrams for alloy design and alloy behavior during processing and service. Databases that are currently available to scientists, engineers and students need to be expanded and improved. The approach of the workshop was to first identify the database and information delivery tool needs of industry and education. The workshop format was a series of invited talks given to the group as a whole followed by general discussions of needs and benefits to provide a roadmap of future activities.

  7. Data dictionary model for relational databases

    SciTech Connect

    Seesing, P.R.

    1983-10-01

    Data Dictionary is an important tool in information engineering, especially when the data is maintained in relational structures. Using the formal concepts from which relational DBMS technology is derived, it is possible to construct a meta-informational dictionary to model relational database. This general model can be used to evaluate the design of existing and planned databases, as well as modeling business or scientific data. Such a dictionary model is described and its potential uses and benefits are explored with emphasis on integrity constraints. Issues related to the balancing of such formal conceptualization against real-world operations are presented.

  8. Development and Mining of a Volatile Organic Compound Database

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Azian Azamimi; Altaf-Ul-Amin, Md.; Ono, Naoaki; Sato, Tetsuo; Sugiura, Tadao; Morita, Aki Hirai; Katsuragi, Tetsuo; Muto, Ai; Nishioka, Takaaki; Kanaya, Shigehiko

    2015-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are small molecules that exhibit high vapor pressure under ambient conditions and have low boiling points. Although VOCs contribute only a small proportion of the total metabolites produced by living organisms, they play an important role in chemical ecology specifically in the biological interactions between organisms and ecosystems. VOCs are also important in the health care field as they are presently used as a biomarker to detect various human diseases. Information on VOCs is scattered in the literature until now; however, there is still no available database describing VOCs and their biological activities. To attain this purpose, we have developed KNApSAcK Metabolite Ecology Database, which contains the information on the relationships between VOCs and their emitting organisms. The KNApSAcK Metabolite Ecology is also linked with the KNApSAcK Core and KNApSAcK Metabolite Activity Database to provide further information on the metabolites and their biological activities. The VOC database can be accessed online. PMID:26495281

  9. The Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR): a model organism database providing a centralized, curated gateway to Arabidopsis biology, research materials and community.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Seung Yon; Beavis, William; Berardini, Tanya Z; Chen, Guanghong; Dixon, David; Doyle, Aisling; Garcia-Hernandez, Margarita; Huala, Eva; Lander, Gabriel; Montoya, Mary; Miller, Neil; Mueller, Lukas A; Mundodi, Suparna; Reiser, Leonore; Tacklind, Julie; Weems, Dan C; Wu, Yihe; Xu, Iris; Yoo, Daniel; Yoon, Jungwon; Zhang, Peifen

    2003-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is the most widely-studied plant today. The concerted efforts of over 11 000 researchers and 4000 organizations around the world are generating a rich diversity and quantity of information and materials. This information is made available through a comprehensive on-line resource called the Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR) (http://arabidopsis.org), which is accessible via commonly used web browsers and can be searched and downloaded in a number of ways. In the last two years, efforts have been focused on increasing data content and diversity, functionally annotating genes and gene products with controlled vocabularies, and improving data retrieval, analysis and visualization tools. New information include sequence polymorphisms including alleles, germplasms and phenotypes, Gene Ontology annotations, gene families, protein information, metabolic pathways, gene expression data from microarray experiments and seed and DNA stocks. New data visualization and analysis tools include SeqViewer, which interactively displays the genome from the whole chromosome down to 10 kb of nucleotide sequence and AraCyc, a metabolic pathway database and map tool that allows overlaying expression data onto the pathway diagrams. Finally, we have recently incorporated seed and DNA stock information from the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center (ABRC) and implemented a shopping-cart style on-line ordering system. PMID:12519987

  10. An information model based weld schedule database

    SciTech Connect

    Kleban, S.D.; Knorovsky, G.A.; Hicken, G.K.; Gershanok, G.A.

    1997-08-01

    As part of a computerized system (SmartWeld) developed at Sandia National Laboratories to facilitate agile manufacturing of welded assemblies, a weld schedule database (WSDB) was also developed. SmartWeld`s overall goals are to shorten the design-to-product time frame and to promote right-the-first-time weldment design and manufacture by providing welding process selection guidance to component designers. The associated WSDB evolved into a substantial subproject by itself. At first, it was thought that the database would store perhaps 50 parameters about a weld schedule. This was a woeful underestimate: the current WSDB has over 500 parameters defined in 73 tables. This includes data bout the weld, the piece parts involved, the piece part geometry, and great detail about the schedule and intervals involved in performing the weld. This complex database was built using information modeling techniques. Information modeling is a process that creates a model of objects and their roles for a given domain (i.e. welding). The Natural-Language Information Analysis methodology (NIAM) technique was used, which is characterized by: (1) elementary facts being stated in natural language by the welding expert, (2) determinism (the resulting model is provably repeatable, i.e. it gives the same answer every time), and (3) extensibility (the model can be added to without changing existing structure). The information model produced a highly normalized relational schema that was translated to Oracle{trademark} Relational Database Management Systems for implementation.

  11. The Database for Reaching Experiments and Models

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Ben; Kording, Konrad

    2013-01-01

    Reaching is one of the central experimental paradigms in the field of motor control, and many computational models of reaching have been published. While most of these models try to explain subject data (such as movement kinematics, reaching performance, forces, etc.) from only a single experiment, distinct experiments often share experimental conditions and record similar kinematics. This suggests that reaching models could be applied to (and falsified by) multiple experiments. However, using multiple datasets is difficult because experimental data formats vary widely. Standardizing data formats promises to enable scientists to test model predictions against many experiments and to compare experimental results across labs. Here we report on the development of a new resource available to scientists: a database of reaching called the Database for Reaching Experiments And Models (DREAM). DREAM collects both experimental datasets and models and facilitates their comparison by standardizing formats. The DREAM project promises to be useful for experimentalists who want to understand how their data relates to models, for modelers who want to test their theories, and for educators who want to help students better understand reaching experiments, models, and data analysis. PMID:24244351

  12. Hydroacoustic forcing function modeling using DNS database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zawadzki, I.; Gershfield, J. L.; Na, Y.; Wang, M.

    1996-01-01

    A wall pressure frequency spectrum model (Blake 1971 ) has been evaluated using databases from Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of a turbulent boundary layer (Na & Moin 1996). Good agreement is found for moderate to strong adverse pressure gradient flows in the absence of separation. In the separated flow region, the model underpredicts the directly calculated spectra by an order of magnitude. The discrepancy is attributed to the violation of the model assumptions in that part of the flow domain. DNS computed coherence length scales and the normalized wall pressure cross-spectra are compared with experimental data. The DNS results are consistent with experimental observations.

  13. Combining Soil Databases for Topsoil Organic Carbon Mapping in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Ece

    2016-01-01

    Accuracy in assessing the distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) is an important issue because of playing key roles in the functions of both natural ecosystems and agricultural systems. There are several studies in the literature with the aim of finding the best method to assess and map the distribution of SOC content for Europe. Therefore this study aims searching for another aspect of this issue by looking to the performances of using aggregated soil samples coming from different studies and land-uses. The total number of the soil samples in this study was 23,835 and they’re collected from the “Land Use/Cover Area frame Statistical Survey” (LUCAS) Project (samples from agricultural soil), BioSoil Project (samples from forest soil), and “Soil Transformations in European Catchments” (SoilTrEC) Project (samples from local soil data coming from six different critical zone observatories (CZOs) in Europe). Moreover, 15 spatial indicators (slope, aspect, elevation, compound topographic index (CTI), CORINE land-cover classification, parent material, texture, world reference base (WRB) soil classification, geological formations, annual average temperature, min-max temperature, total precipitation and average precipitation (for years 1960–1990 and 2000–2010)) were used as auxiliary variables in this prediction. One of the most popular geostatistical techniques, Regression-Kriging (RK), was applied to build the model and assess the distribution of SOC. This study showed that, even though RK method was appropriate for successful SOC mapping, using combined databases was not helpful to increase the statistical significance of the method results for assessing the SOC distribution. According to our results; SOC variation was mainly affected by elevation, slope, CTI, average temperature, average and total precipitation, texture, WRB and CORINE variables for Europe scale in our model. Moreover, the highest average SOC contents were found in the wetland areas

  14. Combining Soil Databases for Topsoil Organic Carbon Mapping in Europe.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Ece; Yigini, Yusuf; Montanarella, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Accuracy in assessing the distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) is an important issue because of playing key roles in the functions of both natural ecosystems and agricultural systems. There are several studies in the literature with the aim of finding the best method to assess and map the distribution of SOC content for Europe. Therefore this study aims searching for another aspect of this issue by looking to the performances of using aggregated soil samples coming from different studies and land-uses. The total number of the soil samples in this study was 23,835 and they're collected from the "Land Use/Cover Area frame Statistical Survey" (LUCAS) Project (samples from agricultural soil), BioSoil Project (samples from forest soil), and "Soil Transformations in European Catchments" (SoilTrEC) Project (samples from local soil data coming from six different critical zone observatories (CZOs) in Europe). Moreover, 15 spatial indicators (slope, aspect, elevation, compound topographic index (CTI), CORINE land-cover classification, parent material, texture, world reference base (WRB) soil classification, geological formations, annual average temperature, min-max temperature, total precipitation and average precipitation (for years 1960-1990 and 2000-2010)) were used as auxiliary variables in this prediction. One of the most popular geostatistical techniques, Regression-Kriging (RK), was applied to build the model and assess the distribution of SOC. This study showed that, even though RK method was appropriate for successful SOC mapping, using combined databases was not helpful to increase the statistical significance of the method results for assessing the SOC distribution. According to our results; SOC variation was mainly affected by elevation, slope, CTI, average temperature, average and total precipitation, texture, WRB and CORINE variables for Europe scale in our model. Moreover, the highest average SOC contents were found in the wetland areas; agricultural

  15. Assessment of the SFC database for analysis and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centeno, Martha A.

    1994-01-01

    SFC is one of the four clusters that make up the Integrated Work Control System (IWCS), which will integrate the shuttle processing databases at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The IWCS framework will enable communication among the four clusters and add new data collection protocols. The Shop Floor Control (SFC) module has been operational for two and a half years; however, at this stage, automatic links to the other 3 modules have not been implemented yet, except for a partial link to IOS (CASPR). SFC revolves around a DB/2 database with PFORMS acting as the database management system (DBMS). PFORMS is an off-the-shelf DB/2 application that provides a set of data entry screens and query forms. The main dynamic entity in the SFC and IOS database is a task; thus, the physical storage location and update privileges are driven by the status of the WAD. As we explored the SFC values, we realized that there was much to do before actually engaging in continuous analysis of the SFC data. Half way into this effort, it was realized that full scale analysis would have to be a future third phase of this effort. So, we concentrated on getting to know the contents of the database, and in establishing an initial set of tools to start the continuous analysis process. Specifically, we set out to: (1) provide specific procedures for statistical models, so as to enhance the TP-OAO office analysis and modeling capabilities; (2) design a data exchange interface; (3) prototype the interface to provide inputs to SCRAM; and (4) design a modeling database. These objectives were set with the expectation that, if met, they would provide former TP-OAO engineers with tools that would help them demonstrate the importance of process-based analyses. The latter, in return, will help them obtain the cooperation of various organizations in charting out their individual processes.

  16. Spatial Database Modeling for Indoor Navigation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotlib, Dariusz; Gnat, Miłosz

    2013-12-01

    For many years, cartographers are involved in designing GIS and navigation systems. Most GIS applications use the outdoor data. Increasingly, similar applications are used inside buildings. Therefore it is important to find the proper model of indoor spatial database. The development of indoor navigation systems should utilize advanced teleinformation, geoinformatics, geodetic and cartographical knowledge. The authors present the fundamental requirements for the indoor data model for navigation purposes. Presenting some of the solutions adopted in the world they emphasize that navigation applications require specific data to present the navigation routes in the right way. There is presented original solution for indoor data model created by authors on the basis of BISDM model. Its purpose is to expand the opportunities for use in indoor navigation.

  17. Asteroid models from the Lowell photometric database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ďurech, J.; Hanuš, J.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Vančo, R.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Information about shapes and spin states of individual asteroids is important for the study of the whole asteroid population. For asteroids from the main belt, most of the shape models available now have been reconstructed from disk-integrated photometry by the lightcurve inversion method. Aims: We want to significantly enlarge the current sample (~350) of available asteroid models. Methods: We use the lightcurve inversion method to derive new shape models and spin states of asteroids from the sparse-in-time photometry compiled in the Lowell Photometric Database. To speed up the time-consuming process of scanning the period parameter space through the use of convex shape models, we use the distributed computing project Asteroids@home, running on the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) platform. This way, the period-search interval is divided into hundreds of smaller intervals. These intervals are scanned separately by different volunteers and then joined together. We also use an alternative, faster, approach when searching the best-fit period by using a model of triaxial ellipsoid. By this, we can independently confirm periods found with convex models and also find rotation periods for some of those asteroids for which the convex-model approach gives too many solutions. Results: From the analysis of Lowell photometric data of the first 100 000 numbered asteroids, we derived 328 new models. This almost doubles the number of available models. We tested the reliability of our results by comparing models that were derived from purely Lowell data with those based on dense lightcurves, and we found that the rate of false-positive solutions is very low. We also present updated plots of the distribution of spin obliquities and pole ecliptic longitudes that confirm previous findings about a non-uniform distribution of spin axes. However, the models reconstructed from noisy sparse data are heavily biased towards more elongated bodies with high

  18. A Model Based Mars Climate Database for the Mission Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on a model based climate database is shown. The topics include: 1) Why a model based climate database?; 2) Mars Climate Database v3.1 Who uses it ? (approx. 60 users!); 3) The new Mars Climate database MCD v4.0; 4) MCD v4.0: what's new ? 5) Simulation of Water ice clouds; 6) Simulation of Water ice cycle; 7) A new tool for surface pressure prediction; 8) Acces to the database MCD 4.0; 9) How to access the database; and 10) New web access

  19. Physiological Parameters Database for PBPK Modeling (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA released for public comment a physiological parameters database (created using Microsoft ACCESS) intended to be used in PBPK modeling. The database contains physiological parameter values for humans from early childhood through senescence. It also contains similar data for an...

  20. A computational framework for a database of terrestrial biosphere models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzler, Holger; Müller, Markus; Ceballos-Núñez, Verónika; Sierra, Carlos A.

    2016-04-01

    Most terrestrial biosphere models consist of a set of coupled ordinary first order differential equations. Each equation represents a pool containing carbon with a certain turnover rate. Although such models share some basic mathematical structures, they can have very different properties such as number of pools, cycling rates, and internal fluxes. We present a computational framework that helps analyze the structure and behavior of terrestrial biosphere models using as an example the process of soil organic matter decomposition. The same framework can also be used for other sub-processes such as carbon fixation or allocation. First, the models have to be fed into a database consisting of simple text files with a common structure. Then they are read in using Python and transformed into an internal 'Model Class' that can be used to automatically create an overview stating the model's structure, state variables, internal and external fluxes. SymPy, a Python library for symbolic mathematics, helps to also calculate the Jacobian matrix at possibly given steady states and the eigenvalues of this matrix. If complete parameter sets are available, the model can also be run using R to simulate its behavior under certain conditions and to support a deeper stability analysis. In this case, the framework is also able to provide phase-plane plots if appropriate. Furthermore, an overview of all the models in the database can be given to help identify their similarities and differences.

  1. Integrated Space Asset Management Database and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry; Percy, Thomas; Mason, Shane

    2015-01-01

    Effective Space Asset Management is one key to addressing the ever-growing issue of space congestion. It is imperative that agencies around the world have access to data regarding the numerous active assets and pieces of space junk currently tracked in orbit around the Earth. At the center of this issues is the effective management of data of many types related to orbiting objects. As the population of tracked objects grows, so too should the data management structure used to catalog technical specifications, orbital information, and metadata related to those populations. Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Asset Management Database (SAM-D) was implemented in order to effectively catalog a broad set of data related to known objects in space by ingesting information from a variety of database and processing that data into useful technical information. Using the universal NORAD number as a unique identifier, the SAM-D processes two-line element data into orbital characteristics and cross-references this technical data with metadata related to functional status, country of ownership, and application category. The SAM-D began as an Excel spreadsheet and was later upgraded to an Access database. While SAM-D performs its task very well, it is limited by its current platform and is not available outside of the local user base. Further, while modeling and simulation can be powerful tools to exploit the information contained in SAM-D, the current system does not allow proper integration options for combining the data with both legacy and new M&S tools. This paper provides a summary of SAM-D development efforts to date and outlines a proposed data management infrastructure that extends SAM-D to support the larger data sets to be generated. A service-oriented architecture model using an information sharing platform named SIMON will allow it to easily expand to incorporate new capabilities, including advanced analytics, M&S tools, fusion techniques and user interface for

  2. Synthesized Population Databases: A US Geospatial Database for Agent-Based Models

    PubMed Central

    Wheaton, William D.; Cajka, James C.; Chasteen, Bernadette M.; Wagener, Diane K.; Cooley, Philip C.; Ganapathi, Laxminarayana; Roberts, Douglas J.; Allpress, Justine L.

    2010-01-01

    Agent-based models simulate large-scale social systems. They assign behaviors and activities to “agents” (individuals) within the population being modeled and then allow the agents to interact with the environment and each other in complex simulations. Agent-based models are frequently used to simulate infectious disease outbreaks, among other uses. RTI used and extended an iterative proportional fitting method to generate a synthesized, geospatially explicit, human agent database that represents the US population in the 50 states and the District of Columbia in the year 2000. Each agent is assigned to a household; other agents make up the household occupants. For this database, RTI developed the methods for generating synthesized households and personsassigning agents to schools and workplaces so that complex interactions among agents as they go about their daily activities can be taken into accountgenerating synthesized human agents who occupy group quarters (military bases, college dormitories, prisons, nursing homes).In this report, we describe both the methods used to generate the synthesized population database and the final data structure and data content of the database. This information will provide researchers with the information they need to use the database in developing agent-based models. Portions of the synthesized agent database are available to any user upon request. RTI will extract a portion (a county, region, or state) of the database for users who wish to use this database in their own agent-based models. PMID:20505787

  3. Techniques to Access Databases and Integrate Data for Hydrologic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, Gene; Tenney, Nathan D.; Pelton, Mitchell A.; Coleman, Andre M.; Ward, Duane L.; Droppo, James G.; Meyer, Philip D.; Dorow, Kevin E.; Taira, Randal Y.

    2009-06-17

    This document addresses techniques to access and integrate data for defining site-specific conditions and behaviors associated with ground-water and surface-water radionuclide transport applicable to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission reviews. Environmental models typically require input data from multiple internal and external sources that may include, but are not limited to, stream and rainfall gage data, meteorological data, hydrogeological data, habitat data, and biological data. These data may be retrieved from a variety of organizations (e.g., federal, state, and regional) and source types (e.g., HTTP, FTP, and databases). Available data sources relevant to hydrologic analyses for reactor licensing are identified and reviewed. The data sources described can be useful to define model inputs and parameters, including site features (e.g., watershed boundaries, stream locations, reservoirs, site topography), site properties (e.g., surface conditions, subsurface hydraulic properties, water quality), and site boundary conditions, input forcings, and extreme events (e.g., stream discharge, lake levels, precipitation, recharge, flood and drought characteristics). Available software tools for accessing established databases, retrieving the data, and integrating it with models were identified and reviewed. The emphasis in this review was on existing software products with minimal required modifications to enable their use with the FRAMES modeling framework. The ability of four of these tools to access and retrieve the identified data sources was reviewed. These four software tools were the Hydrologic Data Acquisition and Processing System (HDAPS), Integrated Water Resources Modeling System (IWRMS) External Data Harvester, Data for Environmental Modeling Environmental Data Download Tool (D4EM EDDT), and the FRAMES Internet Database Tools. The IWRMS External Data Harvester and the D4EM EDDT were identified as the most promising tools based on their ability to access and

  4. Fish Karyome version 2.1: a chromosome database of fishes and other aquatic organisms

    PubMed Central

    Nagpure, Naresh Sahebrao; Pathak, Ajey Kumar; Pati, Rameshwar; Rashid, Iliyas; Sharma, Jyoti; Singh, Shri Prakash; Singh, Mahender; Sarkar, Uttam Kumar; Kushwaha, Basdeo; Kumar, Ravindra; Murali, S.

    2016-01-01

    A voluminous information is available on karyological studies of fishes; however, limited efforts were made for compilation and curation of the available karyological data in a digital form. ‘Fish Karyome’ database was the preliminary attempt to compile and digitize the available karyological information on finfishes belonging to the Indian subcontinent. But the database had limitations since it covered data only on Indian finfishes with limited search options. Perceiving the feedbacks from the users and its utility in fish cytogenetic studies, the Fish Karyome database was upgraded by applying Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP (pre hypertext processor) (LAMP) technologies. In the present version, the scope of the system was increased by compiling and curating the available chromosomal information over the globe on fishes and other aquatic organisms, such as echinoderms, molluscs and arthropods, especially of aquaculture importance. Thus, Fish Karyome version 2.1 presently covers 866 chromosomal records for 726 species supported with 253 published articles and the information is being updated regularly. The database provides information on chromosome number and morphology, sex chromosomes, chromosome banding, molecular cytogenetic markers, etc. supported by fish and karyotype images through interactive tools. It also enables the users to browse and view chromosomal information based on habitat, family, conservation status and chromosome number. The system also displays chromosome number in model organisms, protocol for chromosome preparation and allied techniques and glossary of cytogenetic terms. A data submission facility has also been provided through data submission panel. The database can serve as a unique and useful resource for cytogenetic characterization, sex determination, chromosomal mapping, cytotaxonomy, karyo-evolution and systematics of fishes. Database URL: http://mail.nbfgr.res.in/Fish_Karyome PMID:26980518

  5. Fish Karyome version 2.1: a chromosome database of fishes and other aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Nagpure, Naresh Sahebrao; Pathak, Ajey Kumar; Pati, Rameshwar; Rashid, Iliyas; Sharma, Jyoti; Singh, Shri Prakash; Singh, Mahender; Sarkar, Uttam Kumar; Kushwaha, Basdeo; Kumar, Ravindra; Murali, S

    2016-01-01

    A voluminous information is available on karyological studies of fishes; however, limited efforts were made for compilation and curation of the available karyological data in a digital form. 'Fish Karyome' database was the preliminary attempt to compile and digitize the available karyological information on finfishes belonging to the Indian subcontinent. But the database had limitations since it covered data only on Indian finfishes with limited search options. Perceiving the feedbacks from the users and its utility in fish cytogenetic studies, the Fish Karyome database was upgraded by applying Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP (pre hypertext processor) (LAMP) technologies. In the present version, the scope of the system was increased by compiling and curating the available chromosomal information over the globe on fishes and other aquatic organisms, such as echinoderms, molluscs and arthropods, especially of aquaculture importance. Thus, Fish Karyome version 2.1 presently covers 866 chromosomal records for 726 species supported with 253 published articles and the information is being updated regularly. The database provides information on chromosome number and morphology, sex chromosomes, chromosome banding, molecular cytogenetic markers, etc. supported by fish and karyotype images through interactive tools. It also enables the users to browse and view chromosomal information based on habitat, family, conservation status and chromosome number. The system also displays chromosome number in model organisms, protocol for chromosome preparation and allied techniques and glossary of cytogenetic terms. A data submission facility has also been provided through data submission panel. The database can serve as a unique and useful resource for cytogenetic characterization, sex determination, chromosomal mapping, cytotaxonomy, karyo-evolution and systematics of fishes. Database URL: http://mail.nbfgr.res.in/Fish_Karyome. PMID:26980518

  6. Organ growth functions in maturing male Sprague-Dawley rats based on a collective database.

    PubMed

    Mirfazaelian, Ahmad; Fisher, Jeffrey W

    2007-06-01

    Ten different organ weights (liver, spleen, kidneys, heart, lungs, brain, adrenals, testes, epididymes, and seminal vesicles) of male Sprague-Dawley (S-D) rats of different ages (1-280 d) were extracted based on a thorough literature survey database. A generalized Michaelis-Menten (GMM) model, used to fit organ weights versus age in a previous study (Schoeffner et al., 1999) based on a limited data, was used to find the best fit model for the present expanded data compilation. The GMM model has the functional form: Wt = (Wt(o).K(gamma) + Wt(max).Age(gamma))/(K(gamma) + Age(gamma)) where Wt is organ/tissue weight at a specified age, Wt(o) and Wt(max) are weight at birth and maximal growth, respectively, and K and gamma are constants. Organ weights were significantly correlated with their respective ages for all organs and tissues. GMM-derived organ growth and percent body weight (%BW) fractions of different tissues were plotted against animal age and compared with experimental values as well as previously published models. The GMM-based organ growth and %BW fraction profiles were in general agreement with our empirical data as well as with previous studies. The present model was compared with the GMM model developed previously for six organs--liver, spleen, kidneys, heart, lungs, and brain--based on a limited data, and no significant difference was noticed between the two sets of predictions. It was concluded that the GMM models presented herein for different male S-D rats organs (liver, spleen, kidneys, heart, lungs, brain, adrenals, testes, epididymes, and seminal vesicles) are capable of predicting organ weights and %BW ratios accurately at different ages. PMID:17497417

  7. Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) database organization and user's guide, revision 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morusiewicz, Linda; Bristow, John

    1992-01-01

    The organization of the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) database is presented. Included are definitions and detailed descriptions of the database tables and views, the SEL data, and system support data. The mapping from the SEL and system support data to the base table is described. In addition, techniques for accessing the database through the Database Access Manager for the SEL (DAMSEL) system and via the ORACLE structured query language (SQL) are discussed.

  8. Sequence modelling and an extensible data model for genomic database

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Peter Wei-Der Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1992-01-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) plans to sequence the human genome by the beginning of the next century. It will generate DNA sequences of more than 10 billion bases and complex marker sequences (maps) of more than 100 million markers. All of these information will be stored in database management systems (DBMSs). However, existing data models do not have the abstraction mechanism for modelling sequences and existing DBMS's do not have operations for complex sequences. This work addresses the problem of sequence modelling in the context of the HGP and the more general problem of an extensible object data model that can incorporate the sequence model as well as existing and future data constructs and operators. First, we proposed a general sequence model that is application and implementation independent. This model is used to capture the sequence information found in the HGP at the conceptual level. In addition, abstract and biological sequence operators are defined for manipulating the modelled sequences. Second, we combined many features of semantic and object oriented data models into an extensible framework, which we called the Extensible Object Model'', to address the need of a modelling framework for incorporating the sequence data model with other types of data constructs and operators. This framework is based on the conceptual separation between constructors and constraints. We then used this modelling framework to integrate the constructs for the conceptual sequence model. The Extensible Object Model is also defined with a graphical representation, which is useful as a tool for database designers. Finally, we defined a query language to support this model and implement the query processor to demonstrate the feasibility of the extensible framework and the usefulness of the conceptual sequence model.

  9. Sequence modelling and an extensible data model for genomic database

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Peter Wei-Der |

    1992-01-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) plans to sequence the human genome by the beginning of the next century. It will generate DNA sequences of more than 10 billion bases and complex marker sequences (maps) of more than 100 million markers. All of these information will be stored in database management systems (DBMSs). However, existing data models do not have the abstraction mechanism for modelling sequences and existing DBMS`s do not have operations for complex sequences. This work addresses the problem of sequence modelling in the context of the HGP and the more general problem of an extensible object data model that can incorporate the sequence model as well as existing and future data constructs and operators. First, we proposed a general sequence model that is application and implementation independent. This model is used to capture the sequence information found in the HGP at the conceptual level. In addition, abstract and biological sequence operators are defined for manipulating the modelled sequences. Second, we combined many features of semantic and object oriented data models into an extensible framework, which we called the ``Extensible Object Model``, to address the need of a modelling framework for incorporating the sequence data model with other types of data constructs and operators. This framework is based on the conceptual separation between constructors and constraints. We then used this modelling framework to integrate the constructs for the conceptual sequence model. The Extensible Object Model is also defined with a graphical representation, which is useful as a tool for database designers. Finally, we defined a query language to support this model and implement the query processor to demonstrate the feasibility of the extensible framework and the usefulness of the conceptual sequence model.

  10. Database Information for Small Organizations: Extension Bridges the Utilization Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePaulo, Peter J.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a demonstration program in which information needed to respond to questions is based on secondary data that comes from databases of agencies such as the Census Bureau and Dun and Bradstreet. (JOW)

  11. EPA's Drinking Water Treatability Database and Treatment Cost Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    USEPA Drinking Water Treatability Database and Drinking Water Treatment Cost Models are valuable tools for determining the effectiveness and cost of treatment for contaminants of emerging concern. The models will be introduced, explained, and demonstrated.

  12. Object-Oriented Geographical Database Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, M. L.; Bryant, N.; Sapounas, D.

    1996-01-01

    Terbase is an Object-Oriented database system under development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Terbase is designed for flexibility, reusability, maintenace ease, multi-user collaboration and independence, and efficiency. This paper details the design and development of Terbase as a geographic data server...

  13. Integrated Space Asset Management Database and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliano, L.; MacLeod, T.; Mason, S.; Percy, T.; Prescott, J.

    The Space Asset Management Database (SAM-D) was implemented in order to effectively track known objects in space by ingesting information from a variety of databases and performing calculations to determine the expected position of the object at a specified time. While SAM-D performs this task very well, it is limited by technology and is not available outside of the local user base. Modeling and simulation can be powerful tools to exploit the information contained in SAM-D. However, the current system does not allow proper integration options for combining the data with both legacy and new M&S tools. A more capable data management infrastructure would extend SAM-D to support the larger data sets to be generated by the COI. A service-oriented architecture model will allow it to easily expand to incorporate new capabilities, including advanced analytics, M&S tools, fusion techniques and user interface for visualizations. Based on a web-centric approach, the entire COI will be able to access the data and related analytics. In addition, tight control of information sharing policy will increase confidence in the system, which would encourage industry partners to provide commercial data. SIMON is a Government off the Shelf information sharing platform in use throughout DoD and DHS information sharing and situation awareness communities. SIMON providing fine grained control to data owners allowing them to determine exactly how and when their data is shared. SIMON supports a micro-service approach to system development, meaning M&S and analytic services can be easily built or adapted. It is uniquely positioned to fill this need as an information-sharing platform with a proven track record of successful situational awareness system deployments. Combined with the integration of new and legacy M&S tools, a SIMON-based architecture will provide a robust SA environment for the NASA SA COI that can be extended and expanded indefinitely. First Results of Coherent Uplink from a

  14. Integrated Space Asset Management Database and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliano, L.; MacLeod, T.; Mason, S.; Percy, T.; Prescott, J.

    The Space Asset Management Database (SAM-D) was implemented in order to effectively track known objects in space by ingesting information from a variety of databases and performing calculations to determine the expected position of the object at a specified time. While SAM-D performs this task very well, it is limited by technology and is not available outside of the local user base. Modeling and simulation can be powerful tools to exploit the information contained in SAM-D. However, the current system does not allow proper integration options for combining the data with both legacy and new M&S tools. A more capable data management infrastructure would extend SAM-D to support the larger data sets to be generated by the COI. A service-oriented architecture model will allow it to easily expand to incorporate new capabilities, including advanced analytics, M&S tools, fusion techniques and user interface for visualizations. Based on a web-centric approach, the entire COI will be able to access the data and related analytics. In addition, tight control of information sharing policy will increase confidence in the system, which would encourage industry partners to provide commercial data. SIMON is a Government off the Shelf information sharing platform in use throughout DoD and DHS information sharing and situation awareness communities. SIMON providing fine grained control to data owners allowing them to determine exactly how and when their data is shared. SIMON supports a micro-service approach to system development, meaning M&S and analytic services can be easily built or adapted. It is uniquely positioned to fill this need as an information-sharing platform with a proven track record of successful situational awareness system deployments. Combined with the integration of new and legacy M&S tools, a SIMON-based architecture will provide a robust SA environment for the NASA SA COI that can be extended and expanded indefinitely. First Results of Coherent Uplink from a

  15. A Robust Damage Assessment Model for Corrupted Database Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Ge; Zhu, Hong; Li, Yingjiu

    An intrusion tolerant database uses damage assessment techniques to detect damage propagation scales in a corrupted database system. Traditional damage assessment approaches in a intrusion tolerant database system can only locate damages which are caused by reading corrupted data. In fact, there are many other damage spreading patterns that have not been considered in traditional damage assessment model. In this paper, we systematically analyze inter-transaction dependency relationships that have been neglected in the previous research and propose four different dependency relationships between transactions which may cause damage propagation. We extend existing damage assessment model based on the four novel dependency relationships. The essential properties of our model is also discussed.

  16. A Web Database To Manage and Organize ANSI Standards Collections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matylonek, John C.; Peasley, Maren

    2001-01-01

    Discusses collections of standards by ANSI (American National Standards Institute) and the problems they create for technical libraries. Describes a custom-designed Web database at Oregon State University that is linked to online catalog records, thus enhancing access to the standards collection. (LRW)

  17. PHYTOTOX: DATABASE DEALING WITH THE EFFECT OF ORGANIC CHEMICALS ON TERRESTRIAL VASCULAR PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new database, PHYTOTOX, dealing with the direct effects of exogenously supplied organic chemicals on terrestrial vascular plants is described. The database consists of two files, a Reference File and Effects File. The Reference File is a bibliographic file of published research...

  18. Impact of Prior Knowledge of Informational Content and Organization on Learning Search Principles in a Database.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linde, Lena; Bergstrom, Monica

    1988-01-01

    The importance of prior knowledge of informational content and organization for search performance on a database was evaluated for 17 undergraduates. Pretraining related to content, and information did facilitate learning logical search principles in a relational database; contest pretraining was more efficient. (SLD)

  19. UTAB: A COMPUTER DATABASE ON RESIDUES OF XENOBIOTIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS AND HEAVY METALS IN PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    UTAB can be used to estimate the accumulation of chemicals in vegetation and their subsequent movement through the food chain. he UTAB Database contains information concerned with the uptake/accumulation, translocation, adhesion, and biotransformation of both xenobiotic organic c...

  20. Effects of distributed database modeling on evaluation of transaction rollbacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, Ravi

    1991-01-01

    Data distribution, degree of data replication, and transaction access patterns are key factors in determining the performance of distributed database systems. In order to simplify the evaluation of performance measures, database designers and researchers tend to make simplistic assumptions about the system. The effect is studied of modeling assumptions on the evaluation of one such measure, the number of transaction rollbacks, in a partitioned distributed database system. Six probabilistic models and expressions are developed for the numbers of rollbacks under each of these models. Essentially, the models differ in terms of the available system information. The analytical results so obtained are compared to results from simulation. From here, it is concluded that most of the probabilistic models yield overly conservative estimates of the number of rollbacks. The effect of transaction commutativity on system throughout is also grossly undermined when such models are employed.

  1. Effects of distributed database modeling on evaluation of transaction rollbacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, Ravi

    1991-01-01

    Data distribution, degree of data replication, and transaction access patterns are key factors in determining the performance of distributed database systems. In order to simplify the evaluation of performance measures, database designers and researchers tend to make simplistic assumptions about the system. Here, researchers investigate the effect of modeling assumptions on the evaluation of one such measure, the number of transaction rollbacks in a partitioned distributed database system. The researchers developed six probabilistic models and expressions for the number of rollbacks under each of these models. Essentially, the models differ in terms of the available system information. The analytical results obtained are compared to results from simulation. It was concluded that most of the probabilistic models yield overly conservative estimates of the number of rollbacks. The effect of transaction commutativity on system throughput is also grossly undermined when such models are employed.

  2. Outline of a Model for Lexical Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ide, Nancy; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Reports on a project showing that relational data models, including unnormalized models that allow the nesting of relations, cannot fully capture the structural properties of lexical information. A feature-based model that allows for a full representation of some nesting and defines a factoring mechanism is described and demonstrated. (38…

  3. GIS-based Conceptual Database Model for Planetary Geoscientific Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gasselt, Stephan; Nass, Andrea; Neukum, Gerhard

    2010-05-01

    concerning, e.g., map products (product and cartograpic representation), sensor-data products, stratigraphy definitions for each planet (facies, formation, ...), and mapping units. Domains and subtypes as well as a set of two dozens relationships define their interaction and allow a high level of constraints that aid to limit errors by domain- and topologic boundary conditions without limiting the abilitiy of the mapper to perform his/her task. The geodatabase model is part of a data model currently under development and design in the context of providing tools and definitions for mapping, cartographic representations and data exploitation. The database model as an integral part is designed for portability with respect to geoscientific mapping tasks in general and can be applied to every GIS project dealing with terrestrial planetary objects. It will be accompanied by definitions and representations on the cartographic level as well as tools and utilities for providing easy accessible workflows focussing on query, organization, maintainance, integration of planetary data and meta information. The data model's layout is modularized with individual components dealing with symbol representations (geology and geomorphology), metadata accessibility and modification, definition of stratigraphic entitites and their relationships as well as attribute domains, extensions for planetary mapping and analysis tasks as well as integration of data information on the level of vector representations for easy accessible querying, data processing in connection with ISIS/GDAL and data integration.

  4. Human Thermal Model Evaluation Using the JSC Human Thermal Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant; Makinen, Janice; Cognata, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Human thermal modeling has considerable long term utility to human space flight. Such models provide a tool to predict crew survivability in support of vehicle design and to evaluate crew response in untested space environments. It is to the benefit of any such model not only to collect relevant experimental data to correlate it against, but also to maintain an experimental standard or benchmark for future development in a readily and rapidly searchable and software accessible format. The Human thermal database project is intended to do just so; to collect relevant data from literature and experimentation and to store the data in a database structure for immediate and future use as a benchmark to judge human thermal models against, in identifying model strengths and weakness, to support model development and improve correlation, and to statistically quantify a model s predictive quality. The human thermal database developed at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) is intended to evaluate a set of widely used human thermal models. This set includes the Wissler human thermal model, a model that has been widely used to predict the human thermoregulatory response to a variety of cold and hot environments. These models are statistically compared to the current database, which contains experiments of human subjects primarily in air from a literature survey ranging between 1953 and 2004 and from a suited experiment recently performed by the authors, for a quantitative study of relative strength and predictive quality of the models.

  5. Imprecision and Uncertainty in the UFO Database Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Gyseghem, Nancy; De Caluwe, Rita

    1998-01-01

    Discusses how imprecision and uncertainty are dealt with in the UFO (Uncertainty and Fuzziness in an Object-oriented) database model. Such information is expressed by means of possibility distributions, and modeled by means of the proposed concept of "role objects." The role objects model uncertain, tentative information about objects, and thus…

  6. SIFT vehicle recognition with semi-synthetic model database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Rebecca L.; Rovito, Todd V.

    2012-06-01

    Object recognition is an important problem that has many applications that are of interest to the United States Air Force (USAF). Recently the USAF released its update to Technology Horizons, a report that is designed to guide the science and technology direction of the Air Force. Technology Horizons specifically calls out for the need to use autonomous systems in essentially all aspects of Air Force operations [1]. Object recognition is a key enabler to autonomous exploitation of intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) data which might make the automatic searching of millions of hours of video practical. In particular this paper focuses on vehicle recognition with Lowe's Scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) using a model database that was generated with semi-synthetic data. To create the model database we used a desktop laser scanner to create a high resolution 3D facet model. Then the 3D facet model was imported into LuxRender, a physics accurate ray tracing tool, and several views were rendered to create a model database. SIFT was selected because the algorithm is invariant to scale, noise, and illumination making it possible to create a model database of only a hundred original viewing locations which keeps the size of the model database reasonable.

  7. Performance modeling for large database systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaar, Stephen; Hum, Frank; Romano, Joe

    1997-02-01

    One of the unique approaches Science Applications International Corporation took to meet performance requirements was to start the modeling effort during the proposal phase of the Interstate Identification Index/Federal Bureau of Investigations (III/FBI) project. The III/FBI Performance Model uses analytical modeling techniques to represent the III/FBI system. Inputs to the model include workloads for each transaction type, record size for each record type, number of records for each file, hardware envelope characteristics, engineering margins and estimates for software instructions, memory, and I/O for each transaction type. The model uses queuing theory to calculate the average transaction queue length. The model calculates a response time and the resources needed for each transaction type. Outputs of the model include the total resources needed for the system, a hardware configuration, and projected inherent and operational availability. The III/FBI Performance Model is used to evaluate what-if scenarios and allows a rapid response to engineering change proposals and technical enhancements.

  8. Examining the Factors That Contribute to Successful Database Application Implementation Using the Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nworji, Alexander O.

    2013-01-01

    Most organizations spend millions of dollars due to the impact of improperly implemented database application systems as evidenced by poor data quality problems. The purpose of this quantitative study was to use, and extend, the technology acceptance model (TAM) to assess the impact of information quality and technical quality factors on database…

  9. BioProject and BioSample databases at NCBI: facilitating capture and organization of metadata.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Tanya; Clark, Karen; Gevorgyan, Robert; Gorelenkov, Vyacheslav; Gribov, Eugene; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Kimelman, Michael; Pruitt, Kim D; Resenchuk, Sergei; Tatusova, Tatiana; Yaschenko, Eugene; Ostell, James

    2012-01-01

    As the volume and complexity of data sets archived at NCBI grow rapidly, so does the need to gather and organize the associated metadata. Although metadata has been collected for some archival databases, previously, there was no centralized approach at NCBI for collecting this information and using it across databases. The BioProject database was recently established to facilitate organization and classification of project data submitted to NCBI, EBI and DDBJ databases. It captures descriptive information about research projects that result in high volume submissions to archival databases, ties together related data across multiple archives and serves as a central portal by which to inform users of data availability. Concomitantly, the BioSample database is being developed to capture descriptive information about the biological samples investigated in projects. BioProject and BioSample records link to corresponding data stored in archival repositories. Submissions are supported by a web-based Submission Portal that guides users through a series of forms for input of rich metadata describing their projects and samples. Together, these databases offer improved ways for users to query, locate, integrate and interpret the masses of data held in NCBI's archival repositories. The BioProject and BioSample databases are available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject and http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/biosample, respectively. PMID:22139929

  10. Human Thermal Model Evaluation Using the JSC Human Thermal Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cognata, T.; Bue, G.; Makinen, J.

    2011-01-01

    The human thermal database developed at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) is used to evaluate a set of widely used human thermal models. This database will facilitate a more accurate evaluation of human thermoregulatory response using in a variety of situations, including those situations that might otherwise prove too dangerous for actual testing--such as extreme hot or cold splashdown conditions. This set includes the Wissler human thermal model, a model that has been widely used to predict the human thermoregulatory response to a variety of cold and hot environments. These models are statistically compared to the current database, which contains experiments of human subjects primarily in air from a literature survey ranging between 1953 and 2004 and from a suited experiment recently performed by the authors, for a quantitative study of relative strength and predictive quality of the models. Human thermal modeling has considerable long term utility to human space flight. Such models provide a tool to predict crew survivability in support of vehicle design and to evaluate crew response in untested environments. It is to the benefit of any such model not only to collect relevant experimental data to correlate it against, but also to maintain an experimental standard or benchmark for future development in a readily and rapidly searchable and software accessible format. The Human thermal database project is intended to do just so; to collect relevant data from literature and experimentation and to store the data in a database structure for immediate and future use as a benchmark to judge human thermal models against, in identifying model strengths and weakness, to support model development and improve correlation, and to statistically quantify a model s predictive quality.

  11. Content-Based Search on a Database of Geometric Models: Identifying Objects of Similar Shape

    SciTech Connect

    XAVIER, PATRICK G.; HENRY, TYSON R.; LAFARGE, ROBERT A.; MEIRANS, LILITA; RAY, LAWRENCE P.

    2001-11-01

    The Geometric Search Engine is a software system for storing and searching a database of geometric models. The database maybe searched for modeled objects similar in shape to a target model supplied by the user. The database models are generally from CAD models while the target model may be either a CAD model or a model generated from range data collected from a physical object. This document describes key generation, database layout, and search of the database.

  12. Analysis of a virtual memory model for maintaining database views

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinsley, Kathryn C.; Hughes, Charles E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical model for predicting the performance of a new support strategy for database views. This strategy, called the virtual method, is compared with traditional methods for supporting views. The analytical model's predictions of improved performance by the virtual method are then validated by comparing these results with those achieved in an experimental implementation.

  13. Spatial-temporal database model based on geodatabase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hongmei; Luo, Yu

    2009-10-01

    Entities in the real world have non-spatial attributes, as well as spatial and temporal features. A spatial-temporal data model aims at describing appropriately these intrinsic characteristics within the entities and model them on a conceptual level so that the model can present both static information and dynamic information that occurs over time. In this paper, we devise a novel spatial-temporal data model which is based on Geodatabase. The model employs object-oriented analysis method, combining object concept with event. The entity is defined as a feature class encapsulating attributes and operations. The operations detect change and store the changes automatically in a historic database in Geodatabase. Furthermore, the model takes advantage of the existing strengths of the relational database at the bottom level of Geodatabase, such as trigger and constraint, to monitor events on the attributes or locations and respond to the events correctly. A case of geographic database for Kunming municipal sewerage geographic information system is implemented by the model. The database reveals excellent performance on managing data and tracking the details of change. It provides a perfect data platform for querying, recurring history and predicting the trend of future. The instance demonstrates the spatial-temporal data model is efficient and practicable.

  14. A Database Model for Medical Consultation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anvari, Morteza

    1991-01-01

    Describes a relational data model that can be used for knowledge representation and manipulation in rule-based medical consultation systems. Fuzzy queries or attribute values and fuzzy set theory are discussed, functional dependencies are described, and an example is presented of a system for diagnosing causes of eye inflammation. (15 references)…

  15. Visual Analysis of Residuals from Data-Based Models in Complex Industrial Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordoñez, Daniel G.; Cuadrado, Abel A.; Díaz, Ignacio; García, Francisco J.; Díez, Alberto B.; Fuertes, Juan J.

    2012-10-01

    The use of data-based models for visualization purposes in an industrial background is discussed. Results using Self-Organizing Maps (SOM) show how through a good design of the model and a proper visualization of the residuals generated by the model itself, the behavior of essential parameters of the process can be easily tracked in a visual way. Real data from a cold rolling facility have been used to prove the advantages of these techniques.

  16. 3MdB: the Mexican Million Models database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisset, C.; Delgado-Inglada, G.

    2014-10-01

    The 3MdB is an original effort to construct a large multipurpose database of photoionization models. This is a more modern version of a previous attempt based on Cloudy3D and IDL tools. It is accessed by MySQL requests. The models are obtained using the well known and widely used Cloudy photoionization code (Ferland et al, 2013). The database is aimed to host grids of models with different references to identify each project and to facilitate the extraction of the desired data. We present here a description of the way the database is managed and some of the projects that use 3MdB. Anybody can ask for a grid to be run and stored in 3MdB, to increase the visibility of the grid and the potential side applications of it.

  17. Evaluating Service Organization Models

    PubMed Central

    TOUATI, NASSERA; PINEAULT, RAYNALD; CHAMPAGNE, FRANÇOIS; DENIS, JEAN-LOUIS; BROUSSELLE, ASTRID; CONTANDRIOPOULOS, ANDRÉ-PIERRE; GENEAU, ROBERT

    2016-01-01

    Based on the example of the evaluation of service organization models, this article shows how a configurational approach overcomes the limits of traditional methods which for the most part have studied the individual components of various models considered independently of one another. These traditional methods have led to results (observed effects) that are difficult to interpret. The configurational approach, in contrast, is based on the hypothesis that effects are associated with a set of internally coherent model features that form various configurations. These configurations, like their effects, are context-dependent. We explore the theoretical basis of the configuration approach in order to emphasize its relevance, and discuss the methodological challenges inherent in the application of this approach through an in-depth analysis of the scientific literature. We also propose methodological solutions to these challenges. We illustrate from an example how a configurational approach has been used to evaluate primary care models. Finally, we begin a discussion on the implications of this new evaluation approach for the scientific and decision-making communities.

  18. Materials Database Development for Ballistic Impact Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael

    2007-01-01

    A set of experimental data is being generated under the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Supersonics project to help create and validate accurate computational impact models of jet engine impact events. The data generated will include material property data generated at a range of different strain rates, from 1x10(exp -4)/sec to 5x10(exp 4)/sec, over a range of temperatures. In addition, carefully instrumented ballistic impact tests will be conducted on flat plates and curved structures to provide material and structural response information to help validate the computational models. The material property data and the ballistic impact data will be generated using materials from the same lot, as far as possible. It was found in preliminary testing that the surface finish of test specimens has an effect on measured high strain rate tension response of AL2024. Both the maximum stress and maximum elongation are greater on specimens with a smoother finish. This report gives an overview of the testing that is being conducted and presents results of preliminary testing of the surface finish study.

  19. Overarching framework for data-based modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelter, Björn; Mader, Malenka; Mader, Wolfgang; Sommerlade, Linda; Platt, Bettina; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso; Thiel, Marco

    2014-02-01

    One of the main modelling paradigms for complex physical systems are networks. When estimating the network structure from measured signals, typically several assumptions such as stationarity are made in the estimation process. Violating these assumptions renders standard analysis techniques fruitless. We here propose a framework to estimate the network structure from measurements of arbitrary non-linear, non-stationary, stochastic processes. To this end, we propose a rigorous mathematical theory that underlies this framework. Based on this theory, we present a highly efficient algorithm and the corresponding statistics that are immediately sensibly applicable to measured signals. We demonstrate its performance in a simulation study. In experiments of transitions between vigilance stages in rodents, we infer small network structures with complex, time-dependent interactions; this suggests biomarkers for such transitions, the key to understand and diagnose numerous diseases such as dementia. We argue that the suggested framework combines features that other approaches followed so far lack.

  20. SPECTRAFACTORY.NET: A DATABASE OF MOLECULAR MODEL SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Cami, J.; Van Malderen, R.; Markwick, A. J. E-mail: Andrew.Markwick@manchester.ac.uk

    2010-04-01

    We present a homogeneous database of synthetic molecular absorption and emission spectra from the optical to mm wavelengths for a large range of temperatures and column densities relevant for various astrophysical purposes, but in particular for the analysis, identification, and first-order analysis of molecular bands in spectroscopic observations. All spectra are calculated in the LTE limit from several molecular line lists, and are presented at various spectral resolving powers corresponding to several specific instrument simulations. The database is available online at http://www.spectrafactory.net, where users can freely browse, search, display, and download the spectra. We describe how additional model spectra can be requested for (automatic) calculation and inclusion. The database already contains over half a million model spectra for 39 molecules (96 different isotopologues) over the wavelength range 350 nm-3 mm ({approx}3-30000 cm{sup -1})

  1. Conventionally altered organisms: Database on survival, dispersal, fate, and pathogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Kuklinski, D.M.; King, K.H.; Addison, J.T.; Travis, C.C.

    1990-03-29

    Although increases in development and sales of biotechnology are projected, research on the risks associated with deliberate releases of biotechnology products lags behind. Thus, there is an urgent need to provide investigators and regulators with guidelines for classifying and evaluating risks associated with the release of genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs). If the release of GEMs into the environmental poses risks similar to that of releasing conventionally altered organisms (CAOs), then a study evaluating the hazards associated with environmentally released CAOs would be most useful. This paper provides a survey of the available data on survival, dispersal, pathogenicity, and other characteristics which affect the fate of microbes after release. Although the present study is not exhaustive, it does provide an indication of the type and amount of data available on CAOs. 350 refs.

  2. Database integration in a multimedia-modeling environment

    SciTech Connect

    Dorow, Kevin E.

    2002-09-02

    Integration of data from disparate remote sources has direct applicability to modeling, which can support Brownfield assessments. To accomplish this task, a data integration framework needs to be established. A key element in this framework is the metadata that creates the relationship between the pieces of information that are important in the multimedia modeling environment and the information that is stored in the remote data source. The design philosophy is to allow modelers and database owners to collaborate by defining this metadata in such a way that allows interaction between their components. The main parts of this framework include tools to facilitate metadata definition, database extraction plan creation, automated extraction plan execution / data retrieval, and a central clearing house for metadata and modeling / database resources. Cross-platform compatibility (using Java) and standard communications protocols (http / https) allow these parts to run in a wide variety of computing environments (Local Area Networks, Internet, etc.), and, therefore, this framework provides many benefits. Because of the specific data relationships described in the metadata, the amount of data that have to be transferred is kept to a minimum (only the data that fulfill a specific request are provided as opposed to transferring the complete contents of a data source). This allows for real-time data extraction from the actual source. Also, the framework sets up collaborative responsibilities such that the different types of participants have control over the areas in which they have domain knowledge-the modelers are responsible for defining the data relevant to their models, while the database owners are responsible for mapping the contents of the database using the metadata definitions. Finally, the data extraction mechanism allows for the ability to control access to the data and what data are made available.

  3. Technical Work Plan for: Thermodynamic Database for Chemical Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    C.F. Jovecolon

    2006-09-07

    The objective of the work scope covered by this Technical Work Plan (TWP) is to correct and improve the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) thermodynamic databases, to update their documentation, and to ensure reasonable consistency among them. In addition, the work scope will continue to generate database revisions, which are organized and named so as to be transparent to internal and external users and reviewers. Regarding consistency among databases, it is noted that aqueous speciation and mineral solubility data for a given system may differ according to how solubility was determined, and the method used for subsequent retrieval of thermodynamic parameter values from measured data. Of particular concern are the details of the determination of ''infinite dilution'' constants, which involve the use of specific methods for activity coefficient corrections. That is, equilibrium constants developed for a given system for one set of conditions may not be consistent with constants developed for other conditions, depending on the species considered in the chemical reactions and the methods used in the reported studies. Hence, there will be some differences (for example in log K values) between the Pitzer and ''B-dot'' database parameters for the same reactions or species.

  4. NGNP Risk Management Database: A Model for Managing Risk

    SciTech Connect

    John Collins

    2009-09-01

    To facilitate the implementation of the Risk Management Plan, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project has developed and employed an analytical software tool called the NGNP Risk Management System (RMS). A relational database developed in Microsoft® Access, the RMS provides conventional database utility including data maintenance, archiving, configuration control, and query ability. Additionally, the tool’s design provides a number of unique capabilities specifically designed to facilitate the development and execution of activities outlined in the Risk Management Plan. Specifically, the RMS provides the capability to establish the risk baseline, document and analyze the risk reduction plan, track the current risk reduction status, organize risks by reference configuration system, subsystem, and component (SSC) and Area, and increase the level of NGNP decision making.

  5. Modeling past, current, and future time in medical databases.

    PubMed Central

    Kouramajian, V.; Fowler, J.

    1994-01-01

    Recent research has focused on increasing the power of medical information systems by incorporating time into the database system. A problem with much of this research is that it fails to differentiate between historical time and future time. The concept of bitemporal lifespan presented in this paper overcomes this deficiency. Bitemporal lifespan supports the concepts of valid time and transaction time and allows the integration of past, current, and future information in a unified model. The concept of bitemporal lifespan is presented within the framework of the Extended Entity-Relationship model. This model permits the characterization of temporal properties of entities, relationships, and attributes. Bitemporal constraints are defined that must hold between entities forming "isa" hierarchies and between entities and relationships. Finally, bitemporal extensions are presented for database query languages in order to provide natural high-level operators for bitemporal query expressions. PMID:7949941

  6. SAPling: a Scan-Add-Print barcoding database system to label and track asexual organisms

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Michael A.; Schötz, Eva-Maria

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY We have developed a ‘Scan-Add-Print’ database system, SAPling, to track and monitor asexually reproducing organisms. Using barcodes to uniquely identify each animal, we can record information on the life of the individual in a computerized database containing its entire family tree. SAPling has enabled us to carry out large-scale population dynamics experiments with thousands of planarians and keep track of each individual. The database stores information such as family connections, birth date, division date and generation. We show that SAPling can be easily adapted to other asexually reproducing organisms and has a strong potential for use in large-scale and/or long-term population and senescence studies as well as studies of clonal diversity. The software is platform-independent, designed for reliability and ease of use, and provided open source from our webpage to allow project-specific customization. PMID:21993779

  7. Artificial intelligence techniques for modeling database user behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, Steve; Graves, Sara J.

    1990-01-01

    The design and development of the adaptive modeling system is described. This system models how a user accesses a relational database management system in order to improve its performance by discovering use access patterns. In the current system, these patterns are used to improve the user interface and may be used to speed data retrieval, support query optimization and support a more flexible data representation. The system models both syntactic and semantic information about the user's access and employs both procedural and rule-based logic to manipulate the model.

  8. Comparing global soil models to soil carbon profile databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koven, C. D.; Harden, J. W.; He, Y.; Lawrence, D. M.; Nave, L. E.; O'Donnell, J. A.; Treat, C.; Sulman, B. N.; Kane, E. S.

    2015-12-01

    As global soil models begin to consider the dynamics of carbon below the surface layers, it is crucial to assess the realism of these models. We focus on the vertical profiles of soil C predicted across multiple biomes form the Community Land Model (CLM4.5), using different values for a parameter that controls the rate of decomposition at depth versus at the surface, and compare these to observationally-derived diagnostics derived from the International Soil Carbon Database (ISCN) to assess the realism of model predictions of carbon depthattenuation, and the ability of observations to provide a constraint on rates of decomposition at depth.

  9. INTERCOMPARISON OF ALTERNATIVE VEGETATION DATABASES FOR REGIONAL AIR QUALITY MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vegetation cover data are used to characterize several regional air quality modeling processes, including the calculation of heat, moisture, and momentum fluxes with the Mesoscale Meteorological Model (MM5) and the estimate of biogenic volatile organic compound and nitric oxide...

  10. CyanOmics: an integrated database of omics for the model cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yaohua; Feng, Jie; Li, Tao; Ge, Feng; Zhao, Jindong

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are an important group of organisms that carry out oxygenic photosynthesis and play vital roles in both the carbon and nitrogen cycles of the Earth. The annotated genome of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, as an ideal model cyanobacterium, is available. A series of transcriptomic and proteomic studies of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 cells grown under different conditions have been reported. However, no database of such integrated omics studies has been constructed. Here we present CyanOmics, a database based on the results of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 omics studies. CyanOmics comprises one genomic dataset, 29 transcriptomic datasets and one proteomic dataset and should prove useful for systematic and comprehensive analysis of all those data. Powerful browsing and searching tools are integrated to help users directly access information of interest with enhanced visualization of the analytical results. Furthermore, Blast is included for sequence-based similarity searching and Cluster 3.0, as well as the R hclust function is provided for cluster analyses, to increase CyanOmics’s usefulness. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first integrated omics analysis database for cyanobacteria. This database should further understanding of the transcriptional patterns, and proteomic profiling of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 and other cyanobacteria. Additionally, the entire database framework is applicable to any sequenced prokaryotic genome and could be applied to other integrated omics analysis projects. Database URL: http://lag.ihb.ac.cn/cyanomics PMID:25632108

  11. Using the Cambridge Structural Database to Teach Molecular Geometry Concepts in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wackerly, Jay Wm.; Janowicz, Philip A.; Ritchey, Joshua A.; Caruso, Mary M.; Elliott, Erin L.; Moore, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    This article reports a set of two homework assignments that can be used in a second-year undergraduate organic chemistry class. These assignments were designed to help reinforce concepts of molecular geometry and to give students the opportunity to use a technological database and data mining to analyze experimentally determined chemical…

  12. Fitting the Balding-Nichols model to forensic databases.

    PubMed

    Rohlfs, Rori V; Aguiar, Vitor R C; Lohmueller, Kirk E; Castro, Amanda M; Ferreira, Alessandro C S; Almeida, Vanessa C O; Louro, Iuri D; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2015-11-01

    Large forensic databases provide an opportunity to compare observed empirical rates of genotype matching with those expected under forensic genetic models. A number of researchers have taken advantage of this opportunity to validate some forensic genetic approaches, particularly to ensure that estimated rates of genotype matching between unrelated individuals are indeed slight overestimates of those observed. However, these studies have also revealed systematic error trends in genotype probability estimates. In this analysis, we investigate these error trends and show how they result from inappropriate implementation of the Balding-Nichols model in the context of database-wide matching. Specifically, we show that in addition to accounting for increased allelic matching between individuals with recent shared ancestry, studies must account for relatively decreased allelic matching between individuals with more ancient shared ancestry. PMID:26186694

  13. ASGARD: an open-access database of annotated transcriptomes for emerging model arthropod species.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Victor; Extavour, Cassandra G

    2012-01-01

    The increased throughput and decreased cost of next-generation sequencing (NGS) have shifted the bottleneck genomic research from sequencing to annotation, analysis and accessibility. This is particularly challenging for research communities working on organisms that lack the basic infrastructure of a sequenced genome, or an efficient way to utilize whatever sequence data may be available. Here we present a new database, the Assembled Searchable Giant Arthropod Read Database (ASGARD). This database is a repository and search engine for transcriptomic data from arthropods that are of high interest to multiple research communities but currently lack sequenced genomes. We demonstrate the functionality and utility of ASGARD using de novo assembled transcriptomes from the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus, the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus and the amphipod crustacean Parhyale hawaiensis. We have annotated these transcriptomes to assign putative orthology, coding region determination, protein domain identification and Gene Ontology (GO) term annotation to all possible assembly products. ASGARD allows users to search all assemblies by orthology annotation, GO term annotation or Basic Local Alignment Search Tool. User-friendly features of ASGARD include search term auto-completion suggestions based on database content, the ability to download assembly product sequences in FASTA format, direct links to NCBI data for predicted orthologs and graphical representation of the location of protein domains and matches to similar sequences from the NCBI non-redundant database. ASGARD will be a useful repository for transcriptome data from future NGS studies on these and other emerging model arthropods, regardless of sequencing platform, assembly or annotation status. This database thus provides easy, one-stop access to multi-species annotated transcriptome information. We anticipate that this database will be useful for members of multiple research communities, including developmental

  14. Organizing the Extremely Large LSST Database forReal-Time Astronomical Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Becla, Jacek; Lim, Kian-Tat; Monkewitz, Serge; Nieto-Santisteban, Maria; Thakar, Ani; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2007-11-07

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will catalog billions of astronomical objects and trillions of sources, all of which will be stored and managed by a database management system. One of the main challenges is real-time alert generation. To generate alerts, up to 100K new difference detections have to be cross-correlated with the huge historical catalogs, and then further processed to prune false alerts. This paper explains the challenges, the implementation of the LSST Association Pipeline and the database organization strategies we are planning to use to meet the real-time requirements, including data partitioning, parallelization, and pre-loading.

  15. Teaching biology with model organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeley, Dolores A.

    The purpose of this study is to identify and use model organisms that represent each of the kingdoms biologists use to classify organisms, while experiencing the process of science through guided inquiry. The model organisms will be the basis for studying the four high school life science core ideas as identified by the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS): LS1-From molecules to organisms, LS2-Ecosystems, LS3- Heredity, and LS4- Biological Evolution. NGSS also have identified four categories of science and engineering practices which include developing and using models and planning and carrying out investigations. The living organisms will be utilized to increase student interest and knowledge within the discipline of Biology. Pre-test and posttest analysis utilizing student t-test analysis supported the hypothesis. This study shows increased student learning as a result of using living organisms as models for classification and working in an inquiry-based learning environment.

  16. Mouse Genome Database: from sequence to phenotypes and disease models

    PubMed Central

    Eppig, Janan T.; Richardson, Joel E.; Kadin, James A.; Smith, Cynthia L.; Blake, Judith A.; Bult, Carol J.

    2015-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, www.informatics.jax.org) is the international scientific database for genetic, genomic, and biological data on the laboratory mouse to support the research requirements of the biomedical community. To accomplish this goal, MGD provides broad data coverage, serves as the authoritative standard for mouse nomenclature for genes, mutants, and strains, and curates and integrates many types of data from literature and electronic sources. Among the key data sets MGD supports are: the complete catalog of mouse genes and genome features, comparative homology data for mouse and vertebrate genes, the authoritative set of Gene Ontology (GO) annotations for mouse gene functions, a comprehensive catalog of mouse mutations and their phenotypes, and a curated compendium of mouse models of human diseases. Here we describe the data acquisition process, specifics about MGD’s key data areas, methods to access and query MGD data, and outreach and user help facilities. PMID:26150326

  17. Mouse Genome Database: From sequence to phenotypes and disease models.

    PubMed

    Eppig, Janan T; Richardson, Joel E; Kadin, James A; Smith, Cynthia L; Blake, Judith A; Bult, Carol J

    2015-08-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, www.informatics.jax.org) is the international scientific database for genetic, genomic, and biological data on the laboratory mouse to support the research requirements of the biomedical community. To accomplish this goal, MGD provides broad data coverage, serves as the authoritative standard for mouse nomenclature for genes, mutants, and strains, and curates and integrates many types of data from literature and electronic sources. Among the key data sets MGD supports are: the complete catalog of mouse genes and genome features, comparative homology data for mouse and vertebrate genes, the authoritative set of Gene Ontology (GO) annotations for mouse gene functions, a comprehensive catalog of mouse mutations and their phenotypes, and a curated compendium of mouse models of human diseases. Here, we describe the data acquisition process, specifics about MGD's key data areas, methods to access and query MGD data, and outreach and user help facilities. PMID:26150326

  18. NGNP Risk Management Database: A Model for Managing Risk

    SciTech Connect

    John Collins; John M. Beck

    2011-11-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Risk Management System (RMS) is a database used to maintain the project risk register. The RMS also maps risk reduction activities to specific identified risks. Further functionality of the RMS includes mapping reactor suppliers Design Data Needs (DDNs) to risk reduction tasks and mapping Phenomena Identification Ranking Table (PIRTs) to associated risks. This document outlines the basic instructions on how to use the RMS. This document constitutes Revision 1 of the NGNP Risk Management Database: A Model for Managing Risk. It incorporates the latest enhancements to the RMS. The enhancements include six new custom views of risk data - Impact/Consequence, Tasks by Project Phase, Tasks by Status, Tasks by Project Phase/Status, Tasks by Impact/WBS, and Tasks by Phase/Impact/WBS.

  19. Organization's Orderly Interest Exploration: Inception, Development and Insights of AIAA's Topics Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Jospeh R.; Morris, Allan T.

    2007-01-01

    Since 2003, AIAA's Computer Systems and Software Systems Technical Committees (TCs) have developed a database that aids technical committee management to map technical topics to their members. This Topics/Interest (T/I) database grew out of a collection of charts and spreadsheets maintained by the TCs. Since its inception, the tool has evolved into a multi-dimensional database whose dimensions include the importance, interest and expertise of TC members and whether or not a member and/or a TC is actively involved with the topic. In 2005, the database was expanded to include the TCs in AIAA s Information Systems Group and then expanded further to include all AIAA TCs. It was field tested at an AIAA Technical Activities Committee (TAC) Workshop in early 2006 through live access by over 80 users. Through the use of the topics database, TC and program committee (PC) members can accomplish relevant tasks such as: to identify topic experts (for Aerospace America articles or external contacts), to determine the interest of its members, to identify overlapping topics between diverse TCs and PCs, to guide new member drives and to reveal emerging topics. This paper will describe the origins, inception, initial development, field test and current version of the tool as well as elucidate the benefits and insights gained by using the database to aid the management of various TC functions. Suggestions will be provided to guide future development of the database for the purpose of providing dynamics and system level benefits to AIAA that currently do not exist in any technical organization.

  20. Lagrangian modelling tool for IAGOS database added-value products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, Alain; Auby, Antoine; Petetin, Hervé; Sauvage, Bastien; Thouret, Valérie; Boulanger, Damien

    2015-04-01

    Since 1994, the IAGOS (In-Service Aircraft for a Global Observing System, http://www.iagos.fr) project has produced in-situ measurements of chemical as ozone, carbon monoxide or nitrogen oxides species through more than 40000 commercial aircraft flights. In order to help analysing these observations a tool which links the observed pollutants to their sources was developped based on the Stohl et al. (2003) methodology. Build on the lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART coupled with ECMWF meteorological fields, this tool simulates contributions of anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions from the ECCAD database, to the measured carbon monoxide mixing ratio along each IAGOS flight. Thanks to automated processes, 20-days backward simulation are run from the observation, separating individual contributions from the different source regions. The main goal is to supply added-value product to the IAGOS database showing pollutants geographical origin and emission type and link trends in the atmospheric composition to changes in the transport pathways and to the evolution of emissions. This tool may also be used for statistical validation for intercomparisons of emission inventories, where they can be compared to the in-situ observations from the IAGOS database.

  1. Feasibility and utility of applications of the common data model to multiple, disparate observational health databases

    PubMed Central

    Makadia, Rupa; Matcho, Amy; Ma, Qianli; Knoll, Chris; Schuemie, Martijn; DeFalco, Frank J; Londhe, Ajit; Zhu, Vivienne; Ryan, Patrick B

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the utility of applying the Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership (OMOP) Common Data Model (CDM) across multiple observational databases within an organization and to apply standardized analytics tools for conducting observational research. Materials and methods Six deidentified patient-level datasets were transformed to the OMOP CDM. We evaluated the extent of information loss that occurred through the standardization process. We developed a standardized analytic tool to replicate the cohort construction process from a published epidemiology protocol and applied the analysis to all 6 databases to assess time-to-execution and comparability of results. Results Transformation to the CDM resulted in minimal information loss across all 6 databases. Patients and observations excluded were due to identified data quality issues in the source system, 96% to 99% of condition records and 90% to 99% of drug records were successfully mapped into the CDM using the standard vocabulary. The full cohort replication and descriptive baseline summary was executed for 2 cohorts in 6 databases in less than 1 hour. Discussion The standardization process improved data quality, increased efficiency, and facilitated cross-database comparisons to support a more systematic approach to observational research. Comparisons across data sources showed consistency in the impact of inclusion criteria, using the protocol and identified differences in patient characteristics and coding practices across databases. Conclusion Standardizing data structure (through a CDM), content (through a standard vocabulary with source code mappings), and analytics can enable an institution to apply a network-based approach to observational research across multiple, disparate observational health databases. PMID:25670757

  2. Using chemical organization theory for model checking

    PubMed Central

    Kaleta, Christoph; Richter, Stephan; Dittrich, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: The increasing number and complexity of biomodels makes automatic procedures for checking the models' properties and quality necessary. Approaches like elementary mode analysis, flux balance analysis, deficiency analysis and chemical organization theory (OT) require only the stoichiometric structure of the reaction network for derivation of valuable information. In formalisms like Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML), however, information about the stoichiometric coefficients required for an analysis of chemical organizations can be hidden in kinetic laws. Results: First, we introduce an algorithm that uncovers stoichiometric information that might be hidden in the kinetic laws of a reaction network. This allows us to apply OT to SBML models using modifiers. Second, using the new algorithm, we performed a large-scale analysis of the 185 models contained in the manually curated BioModels Database. We found that for 41 models (22%) the set of organizations changes when modifiers are considered correctly. We discuss one of these models in detail (BIOMD149, a combined model of the ERK- and Wnt-signaling pathways), whose set of organizations drastically changes when modifiers are considered. Third, we found inconsistencies in 5 models (3%) and identified their characteristics. Compared with flux-based methods, OT is able to identify those species and reactions more accurately [in 26 cases (14%)] that can be present in a long-term simulation of the model. We conclude that our approach is a valuable tool that helps to improve the consistency of biomodels and their repositories. Availability: All data and a JAVA applet to check SBML-models is available from http://www.minet.uni-jena.de/csb/prj/ot/tools Contact: dittrich@minet.uni-jena.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19468053

  3. An atmospheric tritium release database for model comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Wortham, G.R.

    1991-12-19

    A database of vegetation, soil, and air tritium concentrations at gridded coordinate locations following nine accidental atmospheric releases is described. While none of the releases caused a significant dose to the public, the data collected is valuable for comparison with the results of tritium transport models used for risk assessment. The largest, potential, individual off-site dose from any of the releases was calculated to be 1.6 mrem. The population dose from this same release was 46 person-rem which represents 0.04% of the natural background radiation dose to the population in the path of the release.

  4. An atmospheric tritium release database for model comparisons. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Wortham, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    A database of vegetation, soil, and air tritium concentrations at gridded coordinate locations following nine accidental atmospheric releases is described. While none of the releases caused a significant dose to the public, the data collected are valuable for comparison with the results of tritium transport models used for risk assessment. The largest, potential, individual off-site dose from any of the releases was calculated to be 1.6 mrem. The population dose from this same release was 46 person-rem which represents 0.04% of the natural background radiation dose to the population in the path of the release.

  5. Developing High-resolution Soil Database for Regional Crop Modeling in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, E.; Ines, A. V. M.

    2014-12-01

    The most readily available soil data for regional crop modeling in Africa is the World Inventory of Soil Emission potentials (WISE) dataset, which has 1125 soil profiles for the world, but does not extensively cover countries Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania in East Africa. Another dataset available is the HC27 (Harvest Choice by IFPRI) in a gridded format (10km) but composed of generic soil profiles based on only three criteria (texture, rooting depth, and organic carbon content). In this paper, we present a development and application of a high-resolution (1km), gridded soil database for regional crop modeling in East Africa. Basic soil information is extracted from Africa Soil Information Service (AfSIS), which provides essential soil properties (bulk density, soil organic carbon, soil PH and percentages of sand, silt and clay) for 6 different standardized soil layers (5, 15, 30, 60, 100 and 200 cm) in 1km resolution. Soil hydraulic properties (e.g., field capacity and wilting point) are derived from the AfSIS soil dataset using well-proven pedo-transfer functions and are customized for DSSAT-CSM soil data requirements. The crop model is used to evaluate crop yield forecasts using the new high resolution soil database and compared with WISE and HC27. In this paper we will present also the results of DSSAT loosely coupled with a hydrologic model (VIC) to assimilate root-zone soil moisture. Creating a grid-based soil database, which provides a consistent soil input for two different models (DSSAT and VIC) is a critical part of this work. The created soil database is expected to contribute to future applications of DSSAT crop simulation in East Africa where food security is highly vulnerable.

  6. Database and Interim Glass Property Models for Hanford HLW Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Vienna, John D.; Cooley, Scott K.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Russell, Renee L.

    2001-07-24

    The purpose of this report is to provide a methodology for an increase in the efficiency and a decrease in the cost of vitrifying high-level waste (HLW) by optimizing HLW glass formulation. This methodology consists in collecting and generating a database of glass properties that determine HLW glass processability and acceptability and relating these properties to glass composition. The report explains how the property-composition models are developed, fitted to data, used for glass formulation optimization, and continuously updated in response to changes in HLW composition estimates and changes in glass processing technology. Further, the report reviews the glass property-composition literature data and presents their preliminary critical evaluation and screening. Finally the report provides interim property-composition models for melt viscosity, for liquidus temperature (with spinel and zircon primary crystalline phases), and for the product consistency test normalized releases of B, Na, and Li. Models were fitted to a subset of the screened database deemed most relevant for the current HLW composition region.

  7. Modeling, Measurements, and Fundamental Database Development for Nonequilibrium Hypersonic Aerothermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    The design of entry vehicles requires predictions of aerothermal environment during the hypersonic phase of their flight trajectories. These predictions are made using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes that often rely on physics and chemistry models of nonequilibrium processes. The primary processes of interest are gas phase chemistry, internal energy relaxation, electronic excitation, nonequilibrium emission and absorption of radiation, and gas-surface interaction leading to surface recession and catalytic recombination. NASAs Hypersonics Project is advancing the state-of-the-art in modeling of nonequilibrium phenomena by making detailed spectroscopic measurements in shock tube and arcjets, using ab-initio quantum mechanical techniques develop fundamental chemistry and spectroscopic databases, making fundamental measurements of finite-rate gas surface interactions, implementing of detailed mechanisms in the state-of-the-art CFD codes, The development of new models is based on validation with relevant experiments. We will present the latest developments and a roadmap for the technical areas mentioned above

  8. A future of the model organism model

    PubMed Central

    Rine, Jasper

    2014-01-01

    Changes in technology are fundamentally reframing our concept of what constitutes a model organism. Nevertheless, research advances in the more traditional model organisms have enabled fresh and exciting opportunities for young scientists to establish new careers and offer the hope of comprehensive understanding of fundamental processes in life. New advances in translational research can be expected to heighten the importance of basic research in model organisms and expand opportunities. However, researchers must take special care and implement new resources to enable the newest members of the community to engage fully with the remarkable legacy of information in these fields. PMID:24577733

  9. MOSAIC: An organic geochemical and sedimentological database for marine surface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavagna, Maria Luisa; Usman, Muhammed; De Avelar, Silvania; Eglinton, Timothy

    2015-04-01

    Modern ocean sediments serve as the interface between the biosphere and the geosphere, play a key role in biogeochemical cycles and provide a window on how contemporary processes are written into the sedimentary record. Research over past decades has resulted in a wealth of information on the content and composition of organic matter in marine sediments, with ever-more sophisticated techniques continuing to yield information of greater detail and as an accelerating pace. However, there has been no attempt to synthesize this wealth of information. We are establishing a new database that incorporates information relevant to local, regional and global-scale assessment of the content, source and fate of organic materials accumulating in contemporary marine sediments. In the MOSAIC (Modern Ocean Sediment Archive and Inventory of Carbon) database, particular emphasis is placed on molecular and isotopic information, coupled with relevant contextual information (e.g., sedimentological properties) relevant to elucidating factors that influence the efficiency and nature of organic matter burial. The main features of MOSAIC include: (i) Emphasis on continental margin sediments as major loci of carbon burial, and as the interface between terrestrial and oceanic realms; (ii) Bulk to molecular-level organic geochemical properties and parameters, including concentration and isotopic compositions; (iii) Inclusion of extensive contextual data regarding the depositional setting, in particular with respect to sedimentological and redox characteristics. The ultimate goal is to create an open-access instrument, available on the web, to be utilized for research and education by the international community who can both contribute to, and interrogate the database. The submission will be accomplished by means of a pre-configured table available on the MOSAIC webpage. The information on the filled tables will be checked and eventually imported, via the Structural Query Language (SQL), into

  10. Solid waste projection model: Database version 1. 0 technical reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, F.; Bowman, A.

    1990-11-01

    The Solid Waste Projection Model (SWPM) system is an analytical tool developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The SWPM system provides a modeling and analysis environment that supports decisions in the process of evaluating various solid waste management alternatives. This document, one of a series describing the SWPM system, contains detailed information regarding the software and data structures utilized in developing the SWPM Version 1.0 Database. This document is intended for use by experienced database specialists and supports database maintenance, utility development, and database enhancement. Those interested in using the SWPM database should refer to the SWPM Database User's Guide. 14 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Data-based Non-Markovian Model Inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghil, Michael

    2015-04-01

    This talk concentrates on obtaining stable and efficient data-based models for simulation and prediction in the geosciences and life sciences. The proposed model derivation relies on using a multivariate time series of partial observations from a large-dimensional system, and the resulting low-order models are compared with the optimal closures predicted by the non-Markovian Mori-Zwanzig formalism of statistical physics. Multilayer stochastic models (MSMs) are introduced as both a very broad generalization and a time-continuous limit of existing multilevel, regression-based approaches to data-based closure, in particular of empirical model reduction (EMR). We show that the multilayer structure of MSMs can provide a natural Markov approximation to the generalized Langevin equation (GLE) of the Mori-Zwanzig formalism. A simple correlation-based stopping criterion for an EMR-MSM model is derived to assess how well it approximates the GLE solution. Sufficient conditions are given for the nonlinear cross-interactions between the constitutive layers of a given MSM to guarantee the existence of a global random attractor. This existence ensures that no blow-up can occur for a very broad class of MSM applications. The EMR-MSM methodology is first applied to a conceptual, nonlinear, stochastic climate model of coupled slow and fast variables, in which only slow variables are observed. The resulting reduced model with energy-conserving nonlinearities captures the main statistical features of the slow variables, even when there is no formal scale separation and the fast variables are quite energetic. Second, an MSM is shown to successfully reproduce the statistics of a partially observed, generalized Lokta-Volterra model of population dynamics in its chaotic regime. The positivity constraint on the solutions' components replaces here the quadratic-energy-preserving constraint of fluid-flow problems and it successfully prevents blow-up. This work is based on a close

  12. Global search tool for the Advanced Photon Source Integrated Relational Model of Installed Systems (IRMIS) database.

    SciTech Connect

    Quock, D. E. R.; Cianciarulo, M. B.; APS Engineering Support Division; Purdue Univ.

    2007-01-01

    The Integrated Relational Model of Installed Systems (IRMIS) is a relational database tool that has been implemented at the Advanced Photon Source to maintain an updated account of approximately 600 control system software applications, 400,000 process variables, and 30,000 control system hardware components. To effectively display this large amount of control system information to operators and engineers, IRMIS was initially built with nine Web-based viewers: Applications Organizing Index, IOC, PLC, Component Type, Installed Components, Network, Controls Spares, Process Variables, and Cables. However, since each viewer is designed to provide details from only one major category of the control system, the necessity for a one-stop global search tool for the entire database became apparent. The user requirements for extremely fast database search time and ease of navigation through search results led to the choice of Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX) technology in the implementation of the IRMIS global search tool. Unique features of the global search tool include a two-tier level of displayed search results, and a database data integrity validation and reporting mechanism.

  13. LANL High-Level Model (HLM) database development letter report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    Traditional methods of evaluating munitions have been able to successfully compare like munition`s capabilities. On the modern battlefield, however, many different types of munitions compete for the same set of targets. Assessing the overall stockpile capability and proper mix of these weapons is not a simple task, as their use depends upon the specific geographic region of the world, the threat capabilities, the tactics and operational strategy used by both the US and Threat commanders, and of course the type and quantity of munitions available to the CINC. To sort out these types of issues, a hierarchical set of dynamic, two-sided combat simulations are generally used. The DoD has numerous suitable models for this purpose, but rarely are the models focused on munitions expenditures. Rather, they are designed to perform overall platform assessments and force mix evaluations. However, in some cases, the models could be easily adapted to provide this information, since it is resident in the model`s database. Unfortunately, these simulations` complexity (their greatest strength) precludes quick turnaround assessments of the type and scope required by senior decision-makers.

  14. BioModels Database: a repository of mathematical models of biological processes.

    PubMed

    Chelliah, Vijayalakshmi; Laibe, Camille; Le Novère, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    BioModels Database is a public online resource that allows storing and sharing of published, peer-reviewed quantitative, dynamic models of biological processes. The model components and behaviour are thoroughly checked to correspond the original publication and manually curated to ensure reliability. Furthermore, the model elements are annotated with terms from controlled vocabularies as well as linked to relevant external data resources. This greatly helps in model interpretation and reuse. Models are stored in SBML format, accepted in SBML and CellML formats, and are available for download in various other common formats such as BioPAX, Octave, SciLab, VCML, XPP and PDF, in addition to SBML. The reaction network diagram of the models is also available in several formats. BioModels Database features a search engine, which provides simple and more advanced searches. Features such as online simulation and creation of smaller models (submodels) from the selected model elements of a larger one are provided. BioModels Database can be accessed both via a web interface and programmatically via web services. New models are available in BioModels Database at regular releases, about every 4 months. PMID:23715986

  15. An atmospheric tritium release database for model comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Wortham, G.R.

    1997-10-13

    A database of vegetation, soil, and air tritium concentrations at gridded coordinate locations following nine accidental atmospheric releases is described. The concentration data is supported by climatological data taken during and immediately after the releases. In six cases, the release data is supplemented with meteorological data taken at seven towers scattered throughout the immediate area of the releases and data from a single television tower instrumented at eight heights. While none of the releases caused a significant dose to the public, the data collected is valuable for comparison with the results of tritium transport models used for risk assessment. The largest, potential off-site dose from any of the releases was calculated to be 1.6 mrem. The population dose from this same release was 46 person-rem which represents 0.04 percent of the natural background dose to the population in the path of the release.

  16. BioModels Database: An enhanced, curated and annotated resource for published quantitative kinetic models

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Quantitative models of biochemical and cellular systems are used to answer a variety of questions in the biological sciences. The number of published quantitative models is growing steadily thanks to increasing interest in the use of models as well as the development of improved software systems and the availability of better, cheaper computer hardware. To maximise the benefits of this growing body of models, the field needs centralised model repositories that will encourage, facilitate and promote model dissemination and reuse. Ideally, the models stored in these repositories should be extensively tested and encoded in community-supported and standardised formats. In addition, the models and their components should be cross-referenced with other resources in order to allow their unambiguous identification. Description BioModels Database http://www.ebi.ac.uk/biomodels/ is aimed at addressing exactly these needs. It is a freely-accessible online resource for storing, viewing, retrieving, and analysing published, peer-reviewed quantitative models of biochemical and cellular systems. The structure and behaviour of each simulation model distributed by BioModels Database are thoroughly checked; in addition, model elements are annotated with terms from controlled vocabularies as well as linked to relevant data resources. Models can be examined online or downloaded in various formats. Reaction network diagrams generated from the models are also available in several formats. BioModels Database also provides features such as online simulation and the extraction of components from large scale models into smaller submodels. Finally, the system provides a range of web services that external software systems can use to access up-to-date data from the database. Conclusions BioModels Database has become a recognised reference resource for systems biology. It is being used by the community in a variety of ways; for example, it is used to benchmark different simulation

  17. A Conceptual Model of the Information Requirements of Nursing Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Emmy

    1989-01-01

    Three related issues play a role in the identification of the information requirements of nursing organizations. These issues are the current state of computer systems in health care organizations, the lack of a well-defined data set for nursing, and the absence of models representing data and information relevant to clinical and administrative nursing practice. This paper will examine current methods of data collection, processing, and storage in clinical and administrative nursing practice for the purpose of identifying the information requirements of nursing organizations. To satisfy these information requirements, database technology can be used; however, a model for database design is needed that reflects the conceptual framework of nursing and the professional concerns of nurses. A conceptual model of the types of data necessary to produce the desired information will be presented and the relationships among data will be delineated.

  18. Virtual Organizations: Trends and Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nami, Mohammad Reza; Malekpour, Abbaas

    The Use of ICT in business has changed views about traditional business. With VO, organizations with out physical, geographical, or structural constraint can collaborate with together in order to fulfill customer requests in a networked environment. This idea improves resource utilization, reduces development process and costs, and saves time. Virtual Organization (VO) is always a form of partnership and managing partners and handling partnerships are crucial. Virtual organizations are defined as a temporary collection of enterprises that cooperate and share resources, knowledge, and competencies to better respond to business opportunities. This paper presents an overview of virtual organizations and main issues in collaboration such as security and management. It also presents a number of different model approaches according to their purpose and applications.

  19. Global and Regional Ecosystem Modeling: Databases of Model Drivers and Validation Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R.J.

    2002-03-19

    }-grid cells for which inventory, modeling, or remote-sensing tools were used to scale up the point measurements. Documentation of the content and organization of the EMDI databases are provided.

  20. Data model and relational database design for the New England Water-Use Data System (NEWUDS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tessler, Steven

    2001-01-01

    The New England Water-Use Data System (NEWUDS) is a database for the storage and retrieval of water-use data. NEWUDS can handle data covering many facets of water use, including (1) tracking various types of water-use activities (withdrawals, returns, transfers, distributions, consumptive-use, wastewater collection, and treatment); (2) the description, classification and location of places and organizations involved in water-use activities; (3) details about measured or estimated volumes of water associated with water-use activities; and (4) information about data sources and water resources associated with water use. In NEWUDS, each water transaction occurs unidirectionally between two site objects, and the sites and conveyances form a water network. The core entities in the NEWUDS model are site, conveyance, transaction/rate, location, and owner. Other important entities include water resources (used for withdrawals and returns), data sources, and aliases. Multiple water-exchange estimates can be stored for individual transactions based on different methods or data sources. Storage of user-defined details is accommodated for several of the main entities. Numerous tables containing classification terms facilitate detailed descriptions of data items and can be used for routine or custom data summarization. NEWUDS handles single-user and aggregate-user water-use data, can be used for large or small water-network projects, and is available as a stand-alone Microsoft? Access database structure. Users can customize and extend the database, link it to other databases, or implement the design in other relational database applications.

  1. Discovery of Possible Gene Relationships through the Application of Self-Organizing Maps to DNA Microarray Databases

    PubMed Central

    Chavez-Alvarez, Rocio; Chavoya, Arturo; Mendez-Vazquez, Andres

    2014-01-01

    DNA microarrays and cell cycle synchronization experiments have made possible the study of the mechanisms of cell cycle regulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by simultaneously monitoring the expression levels of thousands of genes at specific time points. On the other hand, pattern recognition techniques can contribute to the analysis of such massive measurements, providing a model of gene expression level evolution through the cell cycle process. In this paper, we propose the use of one of such techniques –an unsupervised artificial neural network called a Self-Organizing Map (SOM)–which has been successfully applied to processes involving very noisy signals, classifying and organizing them, and assisting in the discovery of behavior patterns without requiring prior knowledge about the process under analysis. As a test bed for the use of SOMs in finding possible relationships among genes and their possible contribution in some biological processes, we selected 282 S. cerevisiae genes that have been shown through biological experiments to have an activity during the cell cycle. The expression level of these genes was analyzed in five of the most cited time series DNA microarray databases used in the study of the cell cycle of this organism. With the use of SOM, it was possible to find clusters of genes with similar behavior in the five databases along two cell cycles. This result suggested that some of these genes might be biologically related or might have a regulatory relationship, as was corroborated by comparing some of the clusters obtained with SOMs against a previously reported regulatory network that was generated using biological knowledge, such as protein-protein interactions, gene expression levels, metabolism dynamics, promoter binding, and modification, regulation and transport of proteins. The methodology described in this paper could be applied to the study of gene relationships of other biological processes in different organisms. PMID:24699245

  2. Modeling of heavy organic deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, F.T.H.

    1992-01-01

    Organic deposition is often a major problem in petroleum production and processing. This problem is manifested by current activities in gas flooding and heavy oil production. The need for understanding the nature of asphaltenes and asphaltics and developing solutions to the deposition problem is well recognized. Prediction technique is crucial to solution development. In the past 5 years, some progress in modeling organic deposition has been made. A state-of-the-art review of methods for modeling organic deposition is presented in this report. Two new models were developed in this work; one based on a thermodynamic equilibrium principle and the other on the colloidal stability theory. These two models are more general and realistic than others previously reported. Because experimental results on the characteristics of asphaltene are inconclusive, it is still not well known whether the asphaltenes is crude oil exist as a true solution or as a colloidal suspension. Further laboratory work which is designed to study the solubility properties of asphaltenes and to provide additional information for model development is proposed. Some experimental tests have been conducted to study the mechanisms of CO{sub 2}-induced asphaltene precipitation. Coreflooding experiments show that asphaltene precipitation occurs after gas breakthrough. The mechanism of CO{sub 2}-induced asphaltene precipitation is believed to occur by hydrocarbon extraction which causes change in oil composition. Oil swelling due to CO{sub 2} solubilization does not induce asphaltene precipitation.

  3. Filling a missing link between biogeochemical, climate and ecosystem studies: a global database of atmospheric water-soluble organic nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornell, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    It is time to collate a global community database of atmospheric water-soluble organic nitrogen deposition. Organic nitrogen (ON) has long been known to be globally ubiquitous in atmospheric aerosol and precipitation, with implications for air and water quality, climate, biogeochemical cycles, ecosystems and human health. The number of studies of atmospheric ON deposition has increased steadily in recent years, but to date there is no accessible global dataset, for either bulk ON or its major components. Improved qualitative and quantitative understanding of the organic nitrogen component is needed to complement the well-established knowledge base pertaining to other components of atmospheric deposition (cf. Vet et al 2014). Without this basic information, we are increasingly constrained in addressing the current dynamics and potential interactions of atmospheric chemistry, climate and ecosystem change. To see the full picture we need global data synthesis, more targeted data gathering, and models that let us explore questions about the natural and anthropogenic dynamics of atmospheric ON. Collectively, our research community already has a substantial amount of atmospheric ON data. Published reports extend back over a century and now have near-global coverage. However, datasets available from the literature are very piecemeal and too often lack crucially important information that would enable aggregation or re-use. I am initiating an open collaborative process to construct a community database, so we can begin to systematically synthesize these datasets (generally from individual studies at a local and temporally limited scale) to increase their scientific usability and statistical power for studies of global change and anthropogenic perturbation. In drawing together our disparate knowledge, we must address various challenges and concerns, not least about the comparability of analysis and sampling methodologies, and the known complexity of composition of ON. We

  4. GIS-based hydrogeological databases and groundwater modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogu, Radu Constantin; Carabin, Guy; Hallet, Vincent; Peters, Valerie; Dassargues, Alain

    2001-12-01

    Reliability and validity of groundwater analysis strongly depend on the availability of large volumes of high-quality data. Putting all data into a coherent and logical structure supported by a computing environment helps ensure validity and availability and provides a powerful tool for hydrogeological studies. A hydrogeological geographic information system (GIS) database that offers facilities for groundwater-vulnerability analysis and hydrogeological modelling has been designed in Belgium for the Walloon region. Data from five river basins, chosen for their contrasting hydrogeological characteristics, have been included in the database, and a set of applications that have been developed now allow further advances. Interest is growing in the potential for integrating GIS technology and groundwater simulation models. A "loose-coupling" tool was created between the spatial-database scheme and the groundwater numerical model interface GMS (Groundwater Modelling System). Following time and spatial queries, the hydrogeological data stored in the database can be easily used within different groundwater numerical models. Résumé. La validité et la reproductibilité de l'analyse d'un aquifère dépend étroitement de la disponibilité de grandes quantités de données de très bonne qualité. Le fait de mettre toutes les données dans une structure cohérente et logique soutenue par les logiciels nécessaires aide à assurer la validité et la disponibilité et fournit un outil puissant pour les études hydrogéologiques. Une base de données pour un système d'information géographique (SIG) hydrogéologique qui offre toutes les facilités pour l'analyse de la vulnérabilité des eaux souterraines et la modélisation hydrogéologique a été établi en Belgique pour la région Wallonne. Les données de cinq bassins de rivières, choisis pour leurs caractéristiques hydrogéologiques différentes, ont été introduites dans la base de données, et un ensemble d

  5. A database for estimating organ dose for coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT scans for arbitrary spectra and angular tube current modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rupcich, Franco; Badal, Andreu; Kyprianou, Iacovos; Schmidt, Taly Gilat

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a database for estimating organ dose in a voxelized patient model for coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT acquisitions with any spectra and angular tube current modulation setting. The database enables organ dose estimation for existing and novel acquisition techniques without requiring Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: The study simulated transport of monoenergetic photons between 5 and 150 keV for 1000 projections over 360 Degree-Sign through anthropomorphic voxelized female chest and head (0 Degree-Sign and 30 Degree-Sign tilt) phantoms and standard head and body CTDI dosimetry cylinders. The simulations resulted in tables of normalized dose deposition for several radiosensitive organs quantifying the organ dose per emitted photon for each incident photon energy and projection angle for coronary angiography and brain perfusion acquisitions. The values in a table can be multiplied by an incident spectrum and number of photons at each projection angle and then summed across all energies and angles to estimate total organ dose. Scanner-specific organ dose may be approximated by normalizing the database-estimated organ dose by the database-estimated CTDI{sub vol} and multiplying by a physical CTDI{sub vol} measurement. Two examples are provided demonstrating how to use the tables to estimate relative organ dose. In the first, the change in breast and lung dose during coronary angiography CT scans is calculated for reduced kVp, angular tube current modulation, and partial angle scanning protocols relative to a reference protocol. In the second example, the change in dose to the eye lens is calculated for a brain perfusion CT acquisition in which the gantry is tilted 30 Degree-Sign relative to a nontilted scan. Results: Our database provides tables of normalized dose deposition for several radiosensitive organs irradiated during coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT scans. Validation results indicate

  6. Technique to model and design physical database systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, T.E.

    1983-12-01

    Database management systems (DBMSs) allow users to define and manipulate records at a logical level of abstraction. A logical record is not stored as users see it but is mapped into a collection of physical records. Physical records are stored in file structures managed by a DBMS. Likewise, DBMS commands which appear to be directed toward one or more logical records actually correspond to a series of operations on the file structures. The structures and operations of a DBMS (i.e., its physical architecture) are not visible to users at the logical level. Traditionally, logical records and DBMS commands are mapped to physical records and operations in one step. In this report, logical records are mapped to physical records in a series of steps over several levels of abstraction. Each level of abstraction is composed of one or more intermediate record types. A hierarchy of record types results that covers the gap between logical and physical records. The first step of our technique identifies the record types and levels of abstraction that describe a DBMS. The second step maps DBMS commands to physical operations in terms of these records and levels of abstraction. The third step encapsulates each record type and its operations into a programming construct called a module. The applications of our technique include modeling existing DBMSs and designing the physical architectures of new DBMSs. To illustrate one application, we describe in detail the architecture of the commercial DBMS INQUIRE.

  7. MOAtox: A comprehensive mode of action and acute aquatic toxicity database for predictive model development.

    PubMed

    Barron, M G; Lilavois, C R; Martin, T M

    2015-04-01

    The mode of toxic action (MOA) has been recognized as a key determinant of chemical toxicity and as an alternative to chemical class-based predictive toxicity modeling. However, the development of quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) and other models has been limited by the availability of comprehensive high quality MOA and toxicity databases. The current study developed a dataset of MOA assignments for 1213 chemicals that included a diversity of metals, pesticides, and other organic compounds that encompassed six broad and 31 specific MOAs. MOA assignments were made using a combination of high confidence approaches that included international consensus classifications, QSAR predictions, and weight of evidence professional judgment based on an assessment of structure and literature information. A toxicity database of 674 acute values linked to chemical MOA was developed for fish and invertebrates. Additionally, species-specific measured or high confidence estimated acute values were developed for the four aquatic species with the most reported toxicity values: rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), and the cladoceran (Daphnia magna). Measured acute toxicity values met strict standardization and quality assurance requirements. Toxicity values for chemicals with missing species-specific data were estimated using established interspecies correlation models and procedures (Web-ICE; http://epa.gov/ceampubl/fchain/webice/), with the highest confidence values selected. The resulting dataset of MOA assignments and paired toxicity values are provided in spreadsheet format as a comprehensive standardized dataset available for predictive aquatic toxicology model development. PMID:25700118

  8. Java Web Simulation (JWS); a web based database of kinetic models.

    PubMed

    Snoep, J L; Olivier, B G

    2002-01-01

    Software to make a database of kinetic models accessible via the internet has been developed and a core database has been set up at http://jjj.biochem.sun.ac.za/. This repository of models, available to everyone with internet access, opens a whole new way in which we can make our models public. Via the database, a user can change enzyme parameters and run time simulations or steady state analyses. The interface is user friendly and no additional software is necessary. The database currently contains 10 models, but since the generation of the program code to include new models has largely been automated the addition of new models is straightforward and people are invited to submit their models to be included in the database. PMID:12241068

  9. Avibase – a database system for managing and organizing taxonomic concepts

    PubMed Central

    Lepage, Denis; Vaidya, Gaurav; Guralnick, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Scientific names of biological entities offer an imperfect resolution of the concepts that they are intended to represent. Often they are labels applied to entities ranging from entire populations to individual specimens representing those populations, even though such names only unambiguously identify the type specimen to which they were originally attached. Thus the real-life referents of names are constantly changing as biological circumscriptions are redefined and thereby alter the sets of individuals bearing those names. This problem is compounded by other characteristics of names that make them ambiguous identifiers of biological concepts, including emendations, homonymy and synonymy. Taxonomic concepts have been proposed as a way to address issues related to scientific names, but they have yet to receive broad recognition or implementation. Some efforts have been made towards building systems that address these issues by cataloguing and organizing taxonomic concepts, but most are still in conceptual or proof-of-concept stage. We present the on-line database Avibase as one possible approach to organizing taxonomic concepts. Avibase has been successfully used to describe and organize 844,000 species-level and 705,000 subspecies-level taxonomic concepts across every major bird taxonomic checklist of the last 125 years. The use of taxonomic concepts in place of scientific names, coupled with efficient resolution services, is a major step toward addressing some of the main deficiencies in the current practices of scientific name dissemination and use. PMID:25061375

  10. Demonstration of SLUMIS: a clinical database and management information system for a multi organ transplant program.

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, M.; Bennett, T.; Garvin, P.; Manuel, F.; Williams, M.; Langreder, S.

    1991-01-01

    Because of the rapid evolution of the heart, heart/lung, liver, kidney and kidney/pancreas transplant programs at our institution, and because of a lack of an existing comprehensive database, we were required to develop a computerized management information system capable of supporting both clinical and research requirements of a multifaceted transplant program. SLUMIS (ST. LOUIS UNIVERSITY MULTI-ORGAN INFORMATION SYSTEM) was developed for the following reasons: 1) to comply with the reporting requirements of various transplant registries, 2) for reporting to an increasing number of government agencies and insurance carriers, 3) to obtain updates of our operative experience at regular intervals, 4) to integrate the Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics Laboratory (HLA) for online test result reporting, and 5) to facilitate clinical investigation. PMID:1807741

  11. Database Administrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Pam

    2010-01-01

    The Internet and electronic commerce (e-commerce) generate lots of data. Data must be stored, organized, and managed. Database administrators, or DBAs, work with database software to find ways to do this. They identify user needs, set up computer databases, and test systems. They ensure that systems perform as they should and add people to the…

  12. Models for financial sustainability of biological databases and resources.

    PubMed

    Chandras, Christina; Weaver, Thomas; Zouberakis, Michael; Smedley, Damian; Schughart, Klaus; Rosenthal, Nadia; Hancock, John M; Kollias, George; Schofield, Paul N; Aidinis, Vassilis

    2009-01-01

    Following the technological advances that have enabled genome-wide analysis in most model organisms over the last decade, there has been unprecedented growth in genomic and post-genomic science with concomitant generation of an exponentially increasing volume of data and material resources. As a result, numerous repositories have been created to store and archive data, organisms and material, which are of substantial value to the whole community. Sustained access, facilitating re-use of these resources, is essential, not only for validation, but for re-analysis, testing of new hypotheses and developing new technologies/platforms. A common challenge for most data resources and biological repositories today is finding financial support for maintenance and development to best serve the scientific community. In this study we examine the problems that currently confront the data and resource infrastructure underlying the biomedical sciences. We discuss the financial sustainability issues and potential business models that could be adopted by biological resources and consider long term preservation issues within the context of mouse functional genomics efforts in Europe. PMID:20157490

  13. Organic Model of Interstellar Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabushita, S.; Inagaki, T.; Kawabe, T.; Wada, K.

    1987-04-01

    Extinction efficiency of grains is calculated from the Mie formula on the premise that the grains are of organic composition. The optical constants adopted for the calculations are those of E. coli, polystyrene and bovine albumin. The grain radius a is assumed to obey a distribution of the form N(a) ∝ a-α and the value of α is chosen so as to make the calculated extinction curve match the observed interstellar extinction curve. Although the calculated curve gives a reasonably good fit to the observed extinction curve for wavelengths less than 2100 Å, at longer wavelength regions, agreement is poor. It is concluded that another component is required for the organic model to be viable.

  14. FOAM (Functional Ontology Assignments for Metagenomes): a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) database with environmental focus.

    PubMed

    Prestat, Emmanuel; David, Maude M; Hultman, Jenni; Taş, Neslihan; Lamendella, Regina; Dvornik, Jill; Mackelprang, Rachel; Myrold, David D; Jumpponen, Ari; Tringe, Susannah G; Holman, Elizabeth; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Jansson, Janet K

    2014-10-29

    A new functional gene database, FOAM (Functional Ontology Assignments for Metagenomes), was developed to screen environmental metagenomic sequence datasets. FOAM provides a new functional ontology dedicated to classify gene functions relevant to environmental microorganisms based on Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). Sets of aligned protein sequences (i.e. 'profiles') were tailored to a large group of target KEGG Orthologs (KOs) from which HMMs were trained. The alignments were checked and curated to make them specific to the targeted KO. Within this process, sequence profiles were enriched with the most abundant sequences available to maximize the yield of accurate classifier models. An associated functional ontology was built to describe the functional groups and hierarchy. FOAM allows the user to select the target search space before HMM-based comparison steps and to easily organize the results into different functional categories and subcategories. FOAM is publicly available at http://portal.nersc.gov/project/m1317/FOAM/. PMID:25260589

  15. FOAM (Functional Ontology Assignments for Metagenomes): A Hidden Markov Model (HMM) database with environmental focus

    SciTech Connect

    Prestat, Emmanuel; David, Maude M.; Hultman, Jenni; Ta , Neslihan; Lamendella, Regina; Dvornik, Jill; Mackelprang, Rachel; Myrold, David D.; Jumpponen, Ari; Tringe, Susannah G.; Holman, Elizabeth; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Jansson, Janet K.

    2014-09-26

    A new functional gene database, FOAM (Functional Ontology Assignments for Metagenomes), was developed to screen environmental metagenomic sequence datasets. FOAM provides a new functional ontology dedicated to classify gene functions relevant to environmental microorganisms based on Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). Sets of aligned protein sequences (i.e. ‘profiles’) were tailored to a large group of target KEGG Orthologs (KOs) from which HMMs were trained. The alignments were checked and curated to make them specific to the targeted KO. Within this process, sequence profiles were enriched with the most abundant sequences available to maximize the yield of accurate classifier models. An associated functional ontology was built to describe the functional groups and hierarchy. FOAM allows the user to select the target search space before HMM-based comparison steps and to easily organize the results into different functional categories and subcategories. FOAM is publicly available at http://portal.nersc.gov/project/m1317/FOAM/.

  16. Historical Land Use Change Estimates for Climate Modelers: Results from The HYDE Database.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein Goldewijk, K.

    2003-04-01

    It is beyond doubt that human activities always have modified the natural environment, but it has become clear that during the last centuries the intensity and scale of these modifications has increased dramatically. Land cover changes affect climate by their impact on surface energy and moisture budgets, and thus should be included in global climate models. Therefore, a growing need is developed for better knowledge of historical land cover. A database with historical data of the global environment (HYDE) was created, which can be used in global climate models. HYDE covers not only land use (changes), but also general topics such as population, livestock, gross domestic product, and value added of industry and/or services as well. These driving forces occur at several spatial and temporal scales and dimensions, and differ often among regions. This requires a geographically explicit modeling approach. Where possible, data have been organized at the country level, and for the period 1700 to 1990. Some data are also available with geographic detail (Klein Goldewijk, 2001; Klein Goldewijk and Battjes, 1997). Examples of a global reconstruction of 300 years historical land use are presented, using gridded historical population estimates as a proxy for allocation of agricultural land. References: Klein Goldewijk, K., 2001. Estimating Global Land Use over the past 300 years: The HYDE 2.0 database. Global Biogeochemical Cycles 15(2): 417--433. Klein Goldewijk, C.G.M. and J.J. Battjes, 1997. A Hundred Year (1890 1990) Database for Integrated Environmental Assessments (HYDE, version 1.1). RIVM Report no. 422514002. National Institute of Public Health and Environmental Protection (RIVM). 196 pp. Internet: http://www.rivm.nl/env/int/hyde/

  17. Database specification for the Worldwide Port System (WPS) Regional Integrated Cargo Database (ICDB)

    SciTech Connect

    Faby, E.Z.; Fluker, J.; Hancock, B.R.; Grubb, J.W.; Russell, D.L.; Loftis, J.P.; Shipe, P.C.; Truett, L.F.

    1994-03-01

    This Database Specification for the Worldwide Port System (WPS) Regional Integrated Cargo Database (ICDB) describes the database organization and storage allocation, provides the detailed data model of the logical and physical designs, and provides information for the construction of parts of the database such as tables, data elements, and associated dictionaries and diagrams.

  18. Solid Waste Projection Model: Database (Version 1.4). Technical reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, C.; Cillan, T.

    1993-09-01

    The Solid Waste Projection Model (SWPM) system is an analytical tool developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The SWPM system provides a modeling and analysis environment that supports decisions in the process of evaluating various solid waste management alternatives. This document, one of a series describing the SWPM system, contains detailed information regarding the software and data structures utilized in developing the SWPM Version 1.4 Database. This document is intended for use by experienced database specialists and supports database maintenance, utility development, and database enhancement. Those interested in using the SWPM database should refer to the SWPM Database User`s Guide. This document is available from the PNL Task M Project Manager (D. L. Stiles, 509-372-4358), the PNL Task L Project Manager (L. L. Armacost, 509-372-4304), the WHC Restoration Projects Section Manager (509-372-1443), or the WHC Waste Characterization Manager (509-372-1193).

  19. Functional Analysis and Discovery of Microbial Genes Transforming Metallic and Organic Pollutants: Database and Experimental Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence P. Wackett; Lynda B.M. Ellis

    2004-12-09

    Microbial functional genomics is faced with a burgeoning list of genes which are denoted as unknown or hypothetical for lack of any knowledge about their function. The majority of microbial genes encode enzymes. Enzymes are the catalysts of metabolism; catabolism, anabolism, stress responses, and many other cell functions. A major problem facing microbial functional genomics is proposed here to derive from the breadth of microbial metabolism, much of which remains undiscovered. The breadth of microbial metabolism has been surveyed by the PIs and represented according to reaction types on the University of Minnesota Biocatalysis/Biodegradation Database (UM-BBD): http://umbbd.ahc.umn.edu/search/FuncGrps.html The database depicts metabolism of 49 chemical functional groups, representing most of current knowledge. Twice that number of chemical groups are proposed here to be metabolized by microbes. Thus, at least 50% of the unique biochemical reactions catalyzed by microbes remain undiscovered. This further suggests that many unknown and hypothetical genes encode functions yet undiscovered. This gap will be partly filled by the current proposal. The UM-BBD will be greatly expanded as a resource for microbial functional genomics. Computational methods will be developed to predict microbial metabolism which is not yet discovered. Moreover, a concentrated effort to discover new microbial metabolism will be conducted. The research will focus on metabolism of direct interest to DOE, dealing with the transformation of metals, metalloids, organometallics and toxic organics. This is precisely the type of metabolism which has been characterized most poorly to date. Moreover, these studies will directly impact functional genomic analysis of DOE-relevant genomes.

  20. Bayesian statistical modeling of disinfection byproduct (DBP) bromine incorporation in the ICR database.

    PubMed

    Francis, Royce A; Vanbriesen, Jeanne M; Small, Mitchell J

    2010-02-15

    Statistical models are developed for bromine incorporation in the trihalomethane (THM), trihaloacetic acids (THAA), dihaloacetic acid (DHAA), and dihaloacetonitrile (DHAN) subclasses of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) using distribution system samples from plants applying only free chlorine as a primary or residual disinfectant in the Information Collection Rule (ICR) database. The objective of this study is to characterize the effect of water quality conditions before, during, and post-treatment on distribution system bromine incorporation into DBP mixtures. Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods are used to model individual DBP concentrations and estimate the coefficients of the linear models used to predict the bromine incorporation fraction for distribution system DBP mixtures in each of the four priority DBP classes. The bromine incorporation models achieve good agreement with the data. The most important predictors of bromine incorporation fraction across DBP classes are alkalinity, specific UV absorption (SUVA), and the bromide to total organic carbon ratio (Br:TOC) at the first point of chlorine addition. Free chlorine residual in the distribution system, distribution system residence time, distribution system pH, turbidity, and temperature only slightly influence bromine incorporation. The bromide to applied chlorine (Br:Cl) ratio is not a significant predictor of the bromine incorporation fraction (BIF) in any of the four classes studied. These results indicate that removal of natural organic matter and the location of chlorine addition are important treatment decisions that have substantial implications for bromine incorporation into disinfection byproduct in drinking waters. PMID:20095529

  1. Modeling BVOC isoprene emissions based on a GIS and remote sensing database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Man Sing; Sarker, Md. Latifur Rahman; Nichol, Janet; Lee, Shun-cheng; Chen, Hongwei; Wan, Yiliang; Chan, P. W.

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a geographic information systems (GIS) model to relate biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) isoprene emissions to ecosystem type, as well as environmental drivers such as light intensity, temperature, landscape factor and foliar density. Data and techniques have recently become available which can permit new improved estimates of isoprene emissions over Hong Kong. The techniques are based on Guenther et al.'s (1993, 1999) model. The spatially detailed mapping of isoprene emissions over Hong Kong at a resolution of 100 m and a database has been constructed for retrieval of the isoprene maps from February 2007 to January 2008. This approach assigns emission rates directly to ecosystem types not to individual species, since unlike in temperate regions where one or two single species may dominate over large regions, Hong Kong's vegetation is extremely diverse with up to 300 different species in 1 ha. Field measurements of emissions by canister sampling obtained a range of ambient emissions according to different climatic conditions for Hong Kong's main ecosystem types in both urban and rural areas, and these were used for model validation. Results show the model-derived isoprene flux to have high to moderate correlations with field observations (i.e. r2 = 0.77, r2 = 0.63, r2 = 0.37 for all 24 field measurements, subset for summer, and winter data, respectively) which indicate the robustness of the approach when applied to tropical forests at detailed level, as well as the promising role of remote sensing in isoprene mapping. The GIS model and raster database provide a simple and low cost estimation of the BVOC isoprene in Hong Kong at detailed level. City planners and environmental authorities may use the derived models for estimating isoprene transportation, and its interaction with anthropogenic pollutants in urban areas.

  2. DSSTOX WEBSITE LAUNCH: IMPROVING PUBLIC ACCESS TO DATABASES FOR BUILDING STRUCTURE-TOXICITY PREDICTION MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    DSSTox Website Launch: Improving Public Access to Databases for Building Structure-Toxicity Prediction Models
    Ann M. Richard
    US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA

    Distributed: Decentralized set of standardized, field-delimited databases,...

  3. Integrated Functional and Executional Modelling of Software Using Web-Based Databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Deepak; Marietta, Roberta

    1998-01-01

    NASA's software subsystems undergo extensive modification and updates over the operational lifetimes. It is imperative that modified software should satisfy safety goals. This report discusses the difficulties encountered in doing so and discusses a solution based on integrated modelling of software, use of automatic information extraction tools, web technology and databases. To appear in an article of Journal of Database Management.

  4. A Database for Propagation Models and Conversion to C++ Programming Language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil V.; Angkasa, Krisjani; Rucker, James

    1996-01-01

    In the past few years, a computer program was produced to contain propagation models and the necessary prediction methods of most propagation phenomena. The propagation model database described here creates a user friendly environment that makes using the database easy for experienced users and novices alike. The database is designed to pass data through the desired models easily and generate relevant results quickly. The database already contains many of the propagation phenomena models accepted by the propagation community and every year new models are added. The major sources of models included are the NASA Propagation Effects Handbook or the International Radio Consultive Committee (CCIR) or publications such as the Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE).

  5. Organ Impairment—Drug–Drug Interaction Database: A Tool for Evaluating the Impact of Renal or Hepatic Impairment and Pharmacologic Inhibition on the Systemic Exposure of Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, CK; Yoshida, K; Kusama, M; Zhang, H; Ragueneau-Majlessi, I; Argon, S; Li, L; Chang, P; Le, CD; Zhao, P; Zhang, L; Sugiyama, Y; Huang, S-M

    2015-01-01

    The organ impairment and drug–drug interaction (OI-DDI) database is the first rigorously assembled database of pharmacokinetic drug exposure data from publicly available renal and hepatic impairment studies presented together with the maximum change in drug exposure from drug interaction inhibition studies. The database was used to conduct a systematic comparison of the effect of renal/hepatic impairment and pharmacologic inhibition on drug exposure. Additional applications are feasible with the public availability of this database. PMID:26380158

  6. 2D face database diversification based on 3D face modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qun; Li, Jiang; Asari, Vijayan K.; Karim, Mohammad A.

    2011-05-01

    Pose and illumination are identified as major problems in 2D face recognition (FR). It has been theoretically proven that the more diversified instances in the training phase, the more accurate and adaptable the FR system appears to be. Based on this common awareness, researchers have developed a large number of photographic face databases to meet the demand for data training purposes. In this paper, we propose a novel scheme for 2D face database diversification based on 3D face modeling and computer graphics techniques, which supplies augmented variances of pose and illumination. Based on the existing samples from identical individuals of the database, a synthesized 3D face model is employed to create composited 2D scenarios with extra light and pose variations. The new model is based on a 3D Morphable Model (3DMM) and genetic type of optimization algorithm. The experimental results show that the complemented instances obviously increase diversification of the existing database.

  7. Publication Trends in Model Organism Research

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Michael R.; Ankeny, Rachel A.; Chen, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    In 1990, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) gave some organisms special status as designated model organisms. This article documents publication trends for these NIH-designated model organisms over the past 40 years. We find that being designated a model organism by the NIH does not guarantee an increasing publication trend. An analysis of model and nonmodel organisms included in GENETICS since 1960 does reveal a sharp decline in the number of publications using nonmodel organisms yet no decline in the overall species diversity. We suggest that organisms with successful publication records tend to share critical characteristics, such as being well developed as standardized, experimental systems and being used by well-organized communities with good networks of exchange and methods of communication. PMID:25381363

  8. Estimating spatial distribution of soil organic carbon for the Midwestern United States using historical database.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep

    2015-05-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the most important parameter influencing soil health, global climate change, crop productivity, and various ecosystem services. Therefore, estimating SOC at larger scales is important. The present study was conducted to estimate the SOC pool at regional scale using the historical database gathered by the National Soil Survey Staff. Specific objectives of the study were to upscale the SOC density (kg C m(-2)) and total SOC pool (PgC) across the Midwestern United States using the geographically weighted regression kriging (GWRK), and compare the results with those obtained from the geographically weighted regression (GWR) using the data for 3485 georeferenced profiles. Results from this study support the conclusion that the GWRK produced satisfactory predictions with lower root mean square error (5.60 kg m(-2)), mean estimation error (0.01 kg m(-2)) and mean absolute estimation error (4.30 kg m(-2)), and higher R(2) (0.58) and goodness-of-prediction statistic (G=0.59) values. The superiority of this approach is evident through a substantial increase in R(2) (0.45) compared to that for the global regression (R(2)=0.28). Croplands of the region store 16.8 Pg SOC followed by shrubs (5.85 Pg) and forests (4.45 Pg). Total SOC pool for the Midwestern region ranges from 31.5 to 31.6 Pg. This study illustrates that the GWRK approach explicitly addresses the spatial dependency and spatial non-stationarity issues for interpolating SOC density across the regional scale. PMID:25655697

  9. SOLID WASTE PROJECTION MODEL: DATABASE USER'S GUIDE (Version 1.0)

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, F.; Stiles, D.

    1991-01-01

    The Solid Waste Projection Model (SWPM) system is an analytical tool developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) specifically to address Hanford solid waste management issues. This document is one of a set of documents supporting the SWPM system and providing instructions in the use and maintenance of SWPM components. This manual contains instructions for preparing to use Version 1 of the SWPM database, for entering and maintaining data, and for performing routine database functions. This document supports only those operations which are specific to SWPM database menus and functions, and does not provide instructions in the use of Paradox, the database management system in which the SWPM database is established.

  10. Solid Waste Projection Model: Database User`s Guide. Version 1.4

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, C.L.

    1993-10-01

    The Solid Waste Projection Model (SWPM) system is an analytical tool developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) specifically to address Hanford solid waste management issues. This document is one of a set of documents supporting the SWPM system and providing instructions in the use and maintenance of SWPM components. This manual contains instructions for using Version 1.4 of the SWPM database: system requirements and preparation, entering and maintaining data, and performing routine database functions. This document supports only those operations which are specific to SWPM database menus and functions and does not Provide instruction in the use of Paradox, the database management system in which the SWPM database is established.

  11. Relational-database model for improving quality assurance and process control in a composite manufacturing environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentry, Jeffery D.

    2000-05-01

    A relational database is a powerful tool for collecting and analyzing the vast amounts of inner-related data associated with the manufacture of composite materials. A relational database contains many individual database tables that store data that are related in some fashion. Manufacturing process variables as well as quality assurance measurements can be collected and stored in database tables indexed according to lot numbers, part type or individual serial numbers. Relationships between manufacturing process and product quality can then be correlated over a wide range of product types and process variations. This paper presents details on how relational databases are used to collect, store, and analyze process variables and quality assurance data associated with the manufacture of advanced composite materials. Important considerations are covered including how the various types of data are organized and how relationships between the data are defined. Employing relational database techniques to establish correlative relationships between process variables and quality assurance measurements is then explored. Finally, the benefits of database techniques such as data warehousing, data mining and web based client/server architectures are discussed in the context of composite material manufacturing.

  12. Neuronal database integration: the Senselab EAV data model.

    PubMed Central

    Marenco, L.; Nadkarni, P.; Skoufos, E.; Shepherd, G.; Miller, P.

    1999-01-01

    We discuss an approach towards integrating heterogeneous nervous system data using an augmented Entity-Attribute-Value (EAV) schema design. This approach, widely used in implementing electronic patient record systems (EPRSs), allows the physical schema of the database to be relatively immune to changes in domain knowledge. This is because new kinds of facts are added as data (or as metadata) rather than hard-coded as the names of newly created tables or columns. Because the domain knowledge is stored as metadata, a framework developed in one scientific domain can be ported to another with only modest revision. We describe our progress in creating a code framework that handles browsing and hyperlinking of the different kinds of data. PMID:10566329

  13. Modeling and Measuring Organization Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkeson, Andrew; Kehoe, Patrick J.

    2005-01-01

    Manufacturing plants have a clear life cycle: they are born small, grow substantially with age, and eventually die. Economists have long thought that this life cycle is driven by organization capital, the accumulation of plant-specific knowledge. The location of plants in the life cycle determines the size of the payments, or organization rents,…

  14. Organization Development: Strategies and Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckhard, Richard

    This book, written for managers, specialists, and students of management, is based largely on the author's experience in helping organization leaders with planned-change efforts, and on related experience of colleagues in the field. Chapter 1 presents the background and causes for the increased concern with organization development and planned…

  15. An Online Database for Informing Ecological Network Models: http://kelpforest.ucsc.edu

    PubMed Central

    Beas-Luna, Rodrigo; Novak, Mark; Carr, Mark H.; Tinker, Martin T.; Black, August; Caselle, Jennifer E.; Hoban, Michael; Malone, Dan; Iles, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Ecological network models and analyses are recognized as valuable tools for understanding the dynamics and resiliency of ecosystems, and for informing ecosystem-based approaches to management. However, few databases exist that can provide the life history, demographic and species interaction information necessary to parameterize ecological network models. Faced with the difficulty of synthesizing the information required to construct models for kelp forest ecosystems along the West Coast of North America, we developed an online database (http://kelpforest.ucsc.edu/) to facilitate the collation and dissemination of such information. Many of the database's attributes are novel yet the structure is applicable and adaptable to other ecosystem modeling efforts. Information for each taxonomic unit includes stage-specific life history, demography, and body-size allometries. Species interactions include trophic, competitive, facilitative, and parasitic forms. Each data entry is temporally and spatially explicit. The online data entry interface allows researchers anywhere to contribute and access information. Quality control is facilitated by attributing each entry to unique contributor identities and source citations. The database has proven useful as an archive of species and ecosystem-specific information in the development of several ecological network models, for informing management actions, and for education purposes (e.g., undergraduate and graduate training). To facilitate adaptation of the database by other researches for other ecosystems, the code and technical details on how to customize this database and apply it to other ecosystems are freely available and located at the following link (https://github.com/kelpforest-cameo/databaseui). PMID:25343723

  16. An online database for informing ecological network models: http://kelpforest.ucsc.edu

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beas-Luna, Rodrigo; Tinker, M. Tim; Novak, Mark; Carr, Mark H.; Black, August; Caselle, Jennifer E.; Hoban, Michael; Malone, Dan; Iles, Alison C.

    2014-01-01

    Ecological network models and analyses are recognized as valuable tools for understanding the dynamics and resiliency of ecosystems, and for informing ecosystem-based approaches to management. However, few databases exist that can provide the life history, demographic and species interaction information necessary to parameterize ecological network models. Faced with the difficulty of synthesizing the information required to construct models for kelp forest ecosystems along the West Coast of North America, we developed an online database (http://kelpforest.ucsc.edu/) to facilitate the collation and dissemination of such information. Many of the database's attributes are novel yet the structure is applicable and adaptable to other ecosystem modeling efforts. Information for each taxonomic unit includes stage-specific life history, demography, and body-size allometries. Species interactions include trophic, competitive, facilitative, and parasitic forms. Each data entry is temporally and spatially explicit. The online data entry interface allows researchers anywhere to contribute and access information. Quality control is facilitated by attributing each entry to unique contributor identities and source citations. The database has proven useful as an archive of species and ecosystem-specific information in the development of several ecological network models, for informing management actions, and for education purposes (e.g., undergraduate and graduate training). To facilitate adaptation of the database by other researches for other ecosystems, the code and technical details on how to customize this database and apply it to other ecosystems are freely available and located at the following link (https://github.com/kelpforest-cameo/data​baseui).

  17. Approach for ontological modeling of database schema for the generation of semantic knowledge on the web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozeva, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Currently there is large quantity of content on web pages that is generated from relational databases. Conceptual domain models provide for the integration of heterogeneous content on semantic level. The use of ontology as conceptual model of a relational data sources makes them available to web agents and services and provides for the employment of ontological techniques for data access, navigation and reasoning. The achievement of interoperability between relational databases and ontologies enriches the web with semantic knowledge. The establishment of semantic database conceptual model based on ontology facilitates the development of data integration systems that use ontology as unified global view. Approach for generation of ontologically based conceptual model is presented. The ontology representing the database schema is obtained by matching schema elements to ontology concepts. Algorithm of the matching process is designed. Infrastructure for the inclusion of mediation between database and ontology for bridging legacy data with formal semantic meaning is presented. Implementation of the knowledge modeling approach on sample database is performed.

  18. Database Manager

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    It is normal practice today for organizations to store large quantities of records of related information as computer-based files or databases. Purposeful information is retrieved by performing queries on the data sets. The purpose of DATABASE MANAGER is to communicate to students the method by which the computer performs these queries. This…

  19. Tree-Structured Digital Organisms Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Teruhiko; Nobesawa, Shiho; Tahara, Ikuo

    Tierra and Avida are well-known models of digital organisms. They describe a life process as a sequence of computation codes. A linear sequence model may not be the only way to describe a digital organism, though it is very simple for a computer-based model. Thus we propose a new digital organism model based on a tree structure, which is rather similar to the generic programming. With our model, a life process is a combination of various functions, as if life in the real world is. This implies that our model can easily describe the hierarchical structure of life, and it can simulate evolutionary computation through mutual interaction of functions. We verified our model by simulations that our model can be regarded as a digital organism model according to its definitions. Our model even succeeded in creating species such as viruses and parasites.

  20. QSAR Modeling Using Large-Scale Databases: Case Study for HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tarasova, Olga A; Urusova, Aleksandra F; Filimonov, Dmitry A; Nicklaus, Marc C; Zakharov, Alexey V; Poroikov, Vladimir V

    2015-07-27

    Large-scale databases are important sources of training sets for various QSAR modeling approaches. Generally, these databases contain information extracted from different sources. This variety of sources can produce inconsistency in the data, defined as sometimes widely diverging activity results for the same compound against the same target. Because such inconsistency can reduce the accuracy of predictive models built from these data, we are addressing the question of how best to use data from publicly and commercially accessible databases to create accurate and predictive QSAR models. We investigate the suitability of commercially and publicly available databases to QSAR modeling of antiviral activity (HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibition). We present several methods for the creation of modeling (i.e., training and test) sets from two, either commercially or freely available, databases: Thomson Reuters Integrity and ChEMBL. We found that the typical predictivities of QSAR models obtained using these different modeling set compilation methods differ significantly from each other. The best results were obtained using training sets compiled for compounds tested using only one method and material (i.e., a specific type of biological assay). Compound sets aggregated by target only typically yielded poorly predictive models. We discuss the possibility of "mix-and-matching" assay data across aggregating databases such as ChEMBL and Integrity and their current severe limitations for this purpose. One of them is the general lack of complete and semantic/computer-parsable descriptions of assay methodology carried by these databases that would allow one to determine mix-and-matchability of result sets at the assay level. PMID:26046311

  1. Guide on Data Models in the Selection and Use of Database Management Systems. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Leonard J.; Draper, Jesse M.

    A tutorial introduction to data models in general is provided, with particular emphasis on the relational and network models defined by the two proposed ANSI (American National Standards Institute) database language standards. Examples based on the network and relational models include specific syntax and semantics, while examples from the other…

  2. Automatic generation of conceptual database design tools from data model specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Shuguang.

    1989-01-01

    The problems faced in the design and implementation of database software systems based on object-oriented data models are similar to that of other software design, i.e., difficult, complex, yet redundant effort. Automatic generation of database software system has been proposed as a solution to the problems. In order to generate database software system for a variety of object-oriented data models, two critical issues: data model specification and software generation, must be addressed. SeaWeed is a software system that automatically generates conceptual database design tools from data model specifications. A meta model has been defined for the specification of a class of object-oriented data models. This meta model provides a set of primitive modeling constructs that can be used to express the semantics, or unique characteristics, of specific data models. Software reusability has been adopted for the software generation. The technique of design reuse is utilized to derive the requirement specification of the software to be generated from data model specifications. The mechanism of code reuse is used to produce the necessary reusable software components. This dissertation presents the research results of SeaWeed including the meta model, data model specification, a formal representation of design reuse and code reuse, and the software generation paradigm.

  3. Combining computational models, semantic annotations and simulation experiments in a graph database

    PubMed Central

    Henkel, Ron; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Waltemath, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    Model repositories such as the BioModels Database, the CellML Model Repository or JWS Online are frequently accessed to retrieve computational models of biological systems. However, their storage concepts support only restricted types of queries and not all data inside the repositories can be retrieved. In this article we present a storage concept that meets this challenge. It grounds on a graph database, reflects the models’ structure, incorporates semantic annotations and simulation descriptions and ultimately connects different types of model-related data. The connections between heterogeneous model-related data and bio-ontologies enable efficient search via biological facts and grant access to new model features. The introduced concept notably improves the access of computational models and associated simulations in a model repository. This has positive effects on tasks such as model search, retrieval, ranking, matching and filtering. Furthermore, our work for the first time enables CellML- and Systems Biology Markup Language-encoded models to be effectively maintained in one database. We show how these models can be linked via annotations and queried. Database URL: https://sems.uni-rostock.de/projects/masymos/ PMID:25754863

  4. Analysis of the Properties of Working Substances for the Organic Rankine Cycle based Database "REFPROP"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galashov, Nikolay; Tsibulskiy, Svyatoslav; Serova, Tatiana

    2016-02-01

    The object of the study are substances that are used as a working fluid in systems operating on the basis of an organic Rankine cycle. The purpose of research is to find substances with the best thermodynamic, thermal and environmental properties. Research conducted on the basis of the analysis of thermodynamic and thermal properties of substances from the base "REFPROP" and with the help of numerical simulation of combined-cycle plant utilization triple cycle, where the lower cycle is an organic Rankine cycle. Base "REFPROP" describes and allows to calculate the thermodynamic and thermophysical parameters of most of the main substances used in production processes. On the basis of scientific publications on the use of working fluids in an organic Rankine cycle analysis were selected ozone-friendly low-boiling substances: ammonia, butane, pentane and Freon: R134a, R152a, R236fa and R245fa. For these substances have been identified and tabulated molecular weight, temperature of the triple point, boiling point, at atmospheric pressure, the parameters of the critical point, the value of the derivative of the temperature on the entropy of the saturated vapor line and the potential ozone depletion and global warming. It was also identified and tabulated thermodynamic and thermophysical parameters of the steam and liquid substances in a state of saturation at a temperature of 15 °C. This temperature is adopted as the minimum temperature of heat removal in the Rankine cycle when working on the water. Studies have shown that the best thermodynamic, thermal and environmental properties of the considered substances are pentane, butane and R245fa. For a more thorough analysis based on a gas turbine plant NK-36ST it has developed a mathematical model of combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) triple cycle, where the lower cycle is an organic Rankine cycle, and is used as the air cooler condenser. Air condenser allows stating material at a temperature below 0 °C. Calculation of the

  5. RECEIVING WATER QUALITY DATABASE FOR TESTING OF MATHEMATICAL MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many mathematical models exist for simulation of quantity and quality parameters of receiving waters. Such models are frequently used in the evaluation of effects on receiving waters of pollution control alternatives such as advanced waste treatment and nonpoint source runoff aba...

  6. The CORE Model to Student Organization Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conyne, Robert K.

    Student organization development (SOD) is an emerging technology for conducting intentional student development through positive alteration of student organizations. One model (CORE) for conceptualizing SOD is in use at the Student Development Center of the University of Cincinnati. The CORE model to SOD is comprised of three concentric rings, the…

  7. FOAM (Functional Ontology Assignments for Metagenomes): A Hidden Markov Model (HMM) database with environmental focus

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Prestat, Emmanuel; David, Maude M.; Hultman, Jenni; Ta , Neslihan; Lamendella, Regina; Dvornik, Jill; Mackelprang, Rachel; Myrold, David D.; Jumpponen, Ari; Tringe, Susannah G.; et al

    2014-09-26

    A new functional gene database, FOAM (Functional Ontology Assignments for Metagenomes), was developed to screen environmental metagenomic sequence datasets. FOAM provides a new functional ontology dedicated to classify gene functions relevant to environmental microorganisms based on Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). Sets of aligned protein sequences (i.e. ‘profiles’) were tailored to a large group of target KEGG Orthologs (KOs) from which HMMs were trained. The alignments were checked and curated to make them specific to the targeted KO. Within this process, sequence profiles were enriched with the most abundant sequences available to maximize the yield of accurate classifier models. An associatedmore » functional ontology was built to describe the functional groups and hierarchy. FOAM allows the user to select the target search space before HMM-based comparison steps and to easily organize the results into different functional categories and subcategories. FOAM is publicly available at http://portal.nersc.gov/project/m1317/FOAM/.« less

  8. Guidelines for the Effective Use of Entity-Attribute-Value Modeling for Biomedical Databases

    PubMed Central

    Dinu, Valentin; Nadkarni, Prakash

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To introduce the goals of EAV database modeling, to describe the situations where Entity-Attribute-Value (EAV) modeling is a useful alternative to conventional relational methods of database modeling, and to describe the fine points of implementation in production systems. Methods We analyze the following circumstances: 1) data are sparse and have a large number of applicable attributes, but only a small fraction will apply to a given entity; 2) numerous classes of data need to be represented, each class has a limited number of attributes, but the number of instances of each class is very small. We also consider situations calling for a mixed approach where both conventional and EAV design are used for appropriate data classes. Results and Conclusions In robust production systems, EAV-modeled databases trade a modest data sub-schema for a complex metadata sub-schema. The need to design the metadata effectively makes EAV design potentially more challenging than conventional design. PMID:17098467

  9. Partial automation of database processing of simulation outputs from L-systems models of plant morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi- Ping Phoebe; Hanan, Jim

    2002-01-01

    Models of plant architecture allow us to explore how genotype environment interactions effect the development of plant phenotypes. Such models generate masses of data organised in complex hierarchies. This paper presents a generic system for creating and automatically populating a relational database from data generated by the widely used L-system approach to modelling plant morphogenesis. Techniques from compiler technology are applied to generate attributes (new fields) in the database, to simplify query development for the recursively-structured branching relationship. Use of biological terminology in an interactive query builder contributes towards making the system biologist-friendly. PMID:12069728

  10. WholeCellSimDB: a hybrid relational/HDF database for whole-cell model predictions

    PubMed Central

    Karr, Jonathan R.; Phillips, Nolan C.; Covert, Markus W.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanistic ‘whole-cell’ models are needed to develop a complete understanding of cell physiology. However, extracting biological insights from whole-cell models requires running and analyzing large numbers of simulations. We developed WholeCellSimDB, a database for organizing whole-cell simulations. WholeCellSimDB was designed to enable researchers to search simulation metadata to identify simulations for further analysis, and quickly slice and aggregate simulation results data. In addition, WholeCellSimDB enables users to share simulations with the broader research community. The database uses a hybrid relational/hierarchical data format architecture to efficiently store and retrieve both simulation setup metadata and results data. WholeCellSimDB provides a graphical Web-based interface to search, browse, plot and export simulations; a JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) Web service to retrieve data for Web-based visualizations; a command-line interface to deposit simulations; and a Python API to retrieve data for advanced analysis. Overall, we believe WholeCellSimDB will help researchers use whole-cell models to advance basic biological science and bioengineering. Database URL: http://www.wholecellsimdb.org Source code repository URL: http://github.com/CovertLab/WholeCellSimDB PMID:25231498

  11. Database Design Learning: A Project-Based Approach Organized through a Course Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominguez, Cesar; Jaime, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an active method for database design learning through practical tasks development by student teams in a face-to-face course. This method integrates project-based learning, and project management techniques and tools. Some scaffolding is provided at the beginning that forms a skeleton that adapts to a great variety of…

  12. Pricing Models for Electronic Databases on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machovec, George S., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    Outlines prevalent electronic information pricing models along with their strengths and weaknesses. Highlights include full-time equivalent (FTE) student counts; pure head counts; print plus fee; concurrent users; IP (information provider) classes; by transaction, connect time or retrieval; other factors, e.g., total budget and materials budget;…

  13. Modeling Powered Aerodynamics for the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle Aerodynamic Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, David T.; Walker, Eric L.; Robinson, Philip E.; Wilson, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Modeling the aerodynamics of the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV) has presented many technical challenges to the developers of the Orion aerodynamic database. During a launch abort event, the aerodynamic environment around the LAV is very complex as multiple solid rocket plumes interact with each other and the vehicle. It is further complicated by vehicle separation events such as between the LAV and the launch vehicle stack or between the launch abort tower and the crew module. The aerodynamic database for the LAV was developed mainly from wind tunnel tests involving powered jet simulations of the rocket exhaust plumes, supported by computational fluid dynamic simulations. However, limitations in both methods have made it difficult to properly capture the aerodynamics of the LAV in experimental and numerical simulations. These limitations have also influenced decisions regarding the modeling and structure of the aerodynamic database for the LAV and led to compromises and creative solutions. Two database modeling approaches are presented in this paper (incremental aerodynamics and total aerodynamics), with examples showing strengths and weaknesses of each approach. In addition, the unique problems presented to the database developers by the large data space required for modeling a launch abort event illustrate the complexities of working with multi-dimensional data.

  14. An Object-Relational Ifc Storage Model Based on Oracle Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hang; Liu, Hua; Liu, Yong; Wang, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    With the building models are getting increasingly complicated, the levels of collaboration across professionals attract more attention in the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry. In order to adapt the change, buildingSMART developed Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) to facilitate the interoperability between software platforms. However, IFC data are currently shared in the form of text file, which is defective. In this paper, considering the object-based inheritance hierarchy of IFC and the storage features of different database management systems (DBMS), we propose a novel object-relational storage model that uses Oracle database to store IFC data. Firstly, establish the mapping rules between data types in IFC specification and Oracle database. Secondly, design the IFC database according to the relationships among IFC entities. Thirdly, parse the IFC file and extract IFC data. And lastly, store IFC data into corresponding tables in IFC database. In experiment, three different building models are selected to demonstrate the effectiveness of our storage model. The comparison of experimental statistics proves that IFC data are lossless during data exchange.

  15. Primate models in organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Douglas J; Kirk, Allan D

    2013-09-01

    Large animal models have long served as the proving grounds for advances in transplantation, bridging the gap between inbred mouse experimentation and human clinical trials. Although a variety of species have been and continue to be used, the emergence of highly targeted biologic- and antibody-based therapies has required models to have a high degree of homology with humans. Thus, the nonhuman primate has become the model of choice in many settings. This article will provide an overview of nonhuman primate models of transplantation. Issues of primate genetics and care will be introduced, and a brief overview of technical aspects for various transplant models will be discussed. Finally, several prominent immunosuppressive and tolerance strategies used in primates will be reviewed. PMID:24003248

  16. Circulation Control Model Experimental Database for CFD Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paschal, Keith B.; Neuhart, Danny H.; Beeler, George B.; Allan, Brian G.

    2012-01-01

    A 2D circulation control wing was tested in the Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center. A traditional circulation control wing employs tangential blowing along the span over a trailing-edge Coanda surface for the purpose of lift augmentation. This model has been tested extensively at the Georgia Tech Research Institute for the purpose of performance documentation at various blowing rates. The current study seeks to expand on the previous work by documenting additional flow-field data needed for validation of computational fluid dynamics. Two jet momentum coefficients were tested during this entry: 0.047 and 0.114. Boundary-layer transition was investigated and turbulent boundary layers were established on both the upper and lower surfaces of the model. Chordwise and spanwise pressure measurements were made, and tunnel sidewall pressure footprints were documented. Laser Doppler Velocimetry measurements were made on both the upper and lower surface of the model at two chordwise locations (x/c = 0.8 and 0.9) to document the state of the boundary layers near the spanwise blowing slot.

  17. Extracting protein alignment models from the sequence database.

    PubMed Central

    Neuwald, A F; Liu, J S; Lipman, D J; Lawrence, C E

    1997-01-01

    Biologists often gain structural and functional insights into a protein sequence by constructing a multiple alignment model of the family. Here a program called Probe fully automates this process of model construction starting from a single sequence. Central to this program is a powerful new method to locate and align only those, often subtly, conserved patterns essential to the family as a whole. When applied to randomly chosen proteins, Probe found on average about four times as many relationships as a pairwise search and yielded many new discoveries. These include: an obscure subfamily of globins in the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans ; two new superfamilies of metallohydrolases; a lipoyl/biotin swinging arm domain in bacterial membrane fusion proteins; and a DH domain in the yeast Bud3 and Fus2 proteins. By identifying distant relationships and merging families into superfamilies in this way, this analysis further confirms the notion that proteins evolved from relatively few ancient sequences. Moreover, this method automatically generates models of these ancient conserved regions for rapid and sensitive screening of sequences. PMID:9108146

  18. The Cambridge MRI database for animal models of Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Sawiak, Stephen J; Morton, A Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    We describe the Cambridge animal brain magnetic resonance imaging repository comprising 400 datasets to date from mouse models of Huntington disease. The data include raw images as well as segmented grey and white matter images with maps of cortical thickness. All images and phenotypic data for each subject are freely-available without restriction from (http://www.dspace.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/243361/). Software and anatomical population templates optimised for animal brain analysis with MRI are also available from this site. PMID:25941090

  19. Chromism of Model Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincon, Angela; Guzman, Marcelo; Hoffmann, Michael; Colussi, Agustin

    2008-03-01

    The optical properties of the atmospheric aerosol play a fundamental role in the Earth's radiative balance. Since more than half of the aerosol mass consists of complex organic matter that absorbs in the ultraviolet and visible regions of the spectrum, it is important to establish the identity of the organic chromophores. Here we report studies on the chromism vs. chemical composition of photolyzed (lambda longer than 305 nm) solutions of pyruvic acid, a widespread aerosol component, under a variety of experimental conditions that include substrate concentration, temperature and the presence of relevant spectator solutes, such ammonium sulfate. We use high resolution mass- and 13C NMR-spectrometries to track chemical speciation in photolyzed solutions as they undergo thermochromic and photobleaching cycles. Since the chemical identity of the components of these mixtures does not change in these cycles, in which photobleached solutions gradually recover their yellow color in the dark with non-conventional kinetics typical of aggregation processes, we infer that visible absorptions likely involve the intermolecular coupling of carbonyl chromophores in supramolecular assemblies made possible by the polyfunctional nature of the products of pyruvic acid photolysis.

  20. Data model and relational database design for the New Jersey Water-Transfer Data System (NJWaTr)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tessler, Steven

    2003-01-01

    The New Jersey Water-Transfer Data System (NJWaTr) is a database design for the storage and retrieval of water-use data. NJWaTr can manage data encompassing many facets of water use, including (1) the tracking of various types of water-use activities (withdrawals, returns, transfers, distributions, consumptive-use, wastewater collection, and treatment); (2) the storage of descriptions, classifications and locations of places and organizations involved in water-use activities; (3) the storage of details about measured or estimated volumes of water associated with water-use activities; and (4) the storage of information about data sources and water resources associated with water use. In NJWaTr, each water transfer occurs unidirectionally between two site objects, and the sites and conveyances form a water network. The core entities in the NJWaTr model are site, conveyance, transfer/volume, location, and owner. Other important entities include water resource (used for withdrawals and returns), data source, permit, and alias. Multiple water-exchange estimates based on different methods or data sources can be stored for individual transfers. Storage of user-defined details is accommodated for several of the main entities. Many tables contain classification terms to facilitate the detailed description of data items and can be used for routine or custom data summarization. NJWaTr accommodates single-user and aggregate-user water-use data, can be used for large or small water-network projects, and is available as a stand-alone Microsoft? Access database. Data stored in the NJWaTr structure can be retrieved in user-defined combinations to serve visualization and analytical applications. Users can customize and extend the database, link it to other databases, or implement the design in other relational database applications.

  1. Query Monitoring and Analysis for Database Privacy - A Security Automata Model Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anand; Ligatti, Jay; Tu, Yi-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Privacy and usage restriction issues are important when valuable data are exchanged or acquired by different organizations. Standard access control mechanisms either restrict or completely grant access to valuable data. On the other hand, data obfuscation limits the overall usability and may result in loss of total value. There are no standard policy enforcement mechanisms for data acquired through mutual and copyright agreements. In practice, many different types of policies can be enforced in protecting data privacy. Hence there is the need for an unified framework that encapsulates multiple suites of policies to protect the data. We present our vision of an architecture named security automata model (SAM) to enforce privacy-preserving policies and usage restrictions. SAM analyzes the input queries and their outputs to enforce various policies, liberating data owners from the burden of monitoring data access. SAM allows administrators to specify various policies and enforces them to monitor queries and control the data access. Our goal is to address the problems of data usage control and protection through privacy policies that can be defined, enforced, and integrated with the existing access control mechanisms using SAM. In this paper, we lay out the theoretical foundation of SAM, which is based on an automata named Mandatory Result Automata. We also discuss the major challenges of implementing SAM in a real-world database environment as well as ideas to meet such challenges. PMID:26997936

  2. The Genomic Threading Database: a comprehensive resource for structural annotations of the genomes from key organisms.

    PubMed

    McGuffin, Liam J; Street, Stefano A; Bryson, Kevin; Sørensen, Søren-Aksel; Jones, David T

    2004-01-01

    Currently, the Genomic Threading Database (GTD) contains structural assignments for the proteins encoded within the genomes of nine eukaryotes and 101 prokaryotes. Structural annotations are carried out using a modified version of GenTHREADER, a reliable fold recognition method. The Gen THREADER annotation jobs are distributed across multiple clusters of processors using grid technology and the predictions are deposited in a relational database accessible via a web interface at http://bioinf.cs.ucl.ac.uk/GTD. Using this system, up to 84% of proteins encoded within a genome can be confidently assigned to known folds with 72% of the residues aligned. On average in the GTD, 64% of proteins encoded within a genome are confidently assigned to known folds and 58% of the residues are aligned to structures. PMID:14681393

  3. Transport and Environment Database System (TRENDS): Maritime air pollutant emission modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakaki, Aliki; Coffey, Robert A.; Lock, Graham; Sorenson, Spencer C.

    This paper reports the development of the maritime module within the framework of the Transport and Environment Database System (TRENDS) project. A detailed database has been constructed for the calculation of energy consumption and air pollutant emissions. Based on an in-house database of commercial vessels kept at the Technical University of Denmark, relationships between the fuel consumption and size of different vessels have been developed, taking into account the fleet's age and service speed. The technical assumptions and factors incorporated in the database are presented, including changes from findings reported in Methodologies for Estimating air pollutant Emissions from Transport (MEET). The database operates on statistical data provided by Eurostat, which describe vessel and freight movements from and towards EU 15 major ports. Data are at port to Maritime Coastal Area (MCA) level, so a bottom-up approach is used. A port to MCA distance database has also been constructed for the purpose of the study. This was the first attempt to use Eurostat maritime statistics for emission modelling; and the problems encountered, since the statistical data collection was not undertaken with a view to this purpose, are mentioned. Examples of the results obtained by the database are presented. These include detailed air pollutant emission calculations for bulk carriers entering the port of Helsinki, as an example of the database operation, and aggregate results for different types of movements for France. Overall estimates of SO x and NO x emission caused by shipping traffic between the EU 15 countries are in the area of 1 and 1.5 million tonnes, respectively.

  4. Estimating soil water-holding capacities by linking the Food and Agriculture Organization Soil map of the world with global pedon databases and continuous pedotransfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, C. A.; Jackson, T. J.; Rawls, W. J.

    2000-12-01

    Spatial soil water-holding capacities were estimated for the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) digital Soil Map of the World (SMW) by employing continuous pedotransfer functions (PTF) within global pedon databases and linking these results to the SMW. The procedure first estimated representative soil properties for the FAO soil units by statistical analyses and taxotransfer depth algorithms [Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), 1996]. The representative soil properties estimated for two layers of depths (0-30 and 30-100 cm) included particle-size distribution, dominant soil texture, organic carbon content, coarse fragments, bulk density, and porosity. After representative soil properties for the FAO soil units were estimated, these values were substituted into three different pedotransfer functions (PTF) models by Rawls et al. [1982], Saxton et al. [1986], and Batjes [1996a]. The Saxton PTF model was finally selected to calculate available water content because it only required particle-size distribution data and results closely agreed with the Rawls and Batjes PTF models that used both particle-size distribution and organic matter data. Soil water-holding capacities were then estimated by multiplying the available water content by the soil layer thickness and integrating over an effective crop root depth of 1 m or less (i.e., encountered shallow impermeable layers) and another soil depth data layer of 2.5 m or less.

  5. Photochemistry of Model Organic Aerosol Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mang, S. A.; Bateman, A. P.; Dailo, M.; Do, T.; Nizkorodov, S. A.; Pan, X.; Underwood, J. S.; Walser, M. L.

    2007-05-01

    Up to 90 percent of urban aerosol particles have been shown to contain organic molecules. Reactions of these particles with atmospheric oxidants and/or sunlight result in large changes in their composition, toxicity, and ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei. For this reason, chemistry of model organic aerosol particles initiated by oxidation and direct photolysis is of great interest to atmospheric, climate, and health scientists. Most studies in this area have focused on identifying the products of oxidation of the organic aerosols, while the products of direct photolysis of the resulting molecules remaining in the aerosol particle have been left mostly unexplored. We have explored direct photolytic processes occurring in selected organic aerosol systems using infrared cavity ringdown spectroscopy to identify small gas phase products of photolysis, and mass-spectrometric and photometric techniques to study the condensed phase products. The first model system was secondary organic aerosol formed from the oxidation of several monoterpenes by ozone in the presence and absence of NOx, under different humidities. The second system modeled after oxidatively aged primary organic aerosol particles was a thin film of either alkanes or saturated fatty acids oxidized in several different ways, with the oxidation initiated by ozone, chlorine atom, or OH. In every case, the general conclusion was that the photochemical processing of model organic aerosols is significant. Such direct photolysis processes are believed to age organic aerosol particles on time scales that are short compared to the particles' atmospheric lifetimes.

  6. Statistical databases

    SciTech Connect

    Kogalovskii, M.R.

    1995-03-01

    This paper presents a review of problems related to statistical database systems, which are wide-spread in various fields of activity. Statistical databases (SDB) are referred to as databases that consist of data and are used for statistical analysis. Topics under consideration are: SDB peculiarities, properties of data models adequate for SDB requirements, metadata functions, null-value problems, SDB compromise protection problems, stored data compression techniques, and statistical data representation means. Also examined is whether the present Database Management Systems (DBMS) satisfy the SDB requirements. Some actual research directions in SDB systems are considered.

  7. Gas Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry Measurements and Protocols for Database and Library Development Relating to Organic Species in Support of the Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, P.; Garcia, R.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2010-04-01

    An organic contaminant database and library has been developed for use with the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrumentation utilizing laboratory-based Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry measurements of pyrolyzed and baked material samples.

  8. TogoTable: cross-database annotation system using the Resource Description Framework (RDF) data model

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Shin; Watanabe, Tsutomu; Mizuguchi, Sohei; Araki, Norie; Katayama, Toshiaki; Yamaguchi, Atsuko

    2014-01-01

    TogoTable (http://togotable.dbcls.jp/) is a web tool that adds user-specified annotations to a table that a user uploads. Annotations are drawn from several biological databases that use the Resource Description Framework (RDF) data model. TogoTable uses database identifiers (IDs) in the table as a query key for searching. RDF data, which form a network called Linked Open Data (LOD), can be searched from SPARQL endpoints using a SPARQL query language. Because TogoTable uses RDF, it can integrate annotations from not only the reference database to which the IDs originally belong, but also externally linked databases via the LOD network. For example, annotations in the Protein Data Bank can be retrieved using GeneID through links provided by the UniProt RDF. Because RDF has been standardized by the World Wide Web Consortium, any database with annotations based on the RDF data model can be easily incorporated into this tool. We believe that TogoTable is a valuable Web tool, particularly for experimental biologists who need to process huge amounts of data such as high-throughput experimental output. PMID:24829452

  9. Modeling personnel turnover in the parametric organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Edwin B.

    1991-01-01

    A model is developed for simulating the dynamics of a newly formed organization, credible during all phases of organizational development. The model development process is broken down into the activities of determining the tasks required for parametric cost analysis (PCA), determining the skills required for each PCA task, determining the skills available in the applicant marketplace, determining the structure of the model, implementing the model, and testing it. The model, parameterized by the likelihood of job function transition, has demonstrated by the capability to represent the transition of personnel across functional boundaries within a parametric organization using a linear dynamical system, and the ability to predict required staffing profiles to meet functional needs at the desired time. The model can be extended by revisions of the state and transition structure to provide refinements in functional definition for the parametric and extended organization.

  10. Modeling Virtual Organization Architecture with the Virtual Organization Breeding Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paszkiewicz, Zbigniew; Picard, Willy

    While Enterprise Architecture Modeling (EAM) methodologies become more and more popular, an EAM methodology tailored to the needs of virtual organizations (VO) is still to be developed. Among the most popular EAM methodologies, TOGAF has been chosen as the basis for a new EAM methodology taking into account characteristics of VOs presented in this paper. In this new methodology, referred as Virtual Organization Breeding Methodology (VOBM), concepts developed within the ECOLEAD project, e.g. the concept of Virtual Breeding Environment (VBE) or the VO creation schema, serve as fundamental elements for development of VOBM. VOBM is a generic methodology that should be adapted to a given VBE. VOBM defines the structure of VBE and VO architectures in a service-oriented environment, as well as an architecture development method for virtual organizations (ADM4VO). Finally, a preliminary set of tools and methods for VOBM is given in this paper.

  11. A genome-scale metabolic flux model of Escherichia coli K–12 derived from the EcoCyc database

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    advantages can be derived from the combination of model organism databases and flux balance modeling represented by MetaFlux. Interpretation of the EcoCyc database as a flux balance model results in a highly accurate metabolic model and provides a rigorous consistency check for information stored in the database. PMID:24974895

  12. Modeling the High Speed Research Cycle 2B Longitudinal Aerodynamic Database Using Multivariate Orthogonal Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, E. A.; Proffitt, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    The data for longitudinal non-dimensional, aerodynamic coefficients in the High Speed Research Cycle 2B aerodynamic database were modeled using polynomial expressions identified with an orthogonal function modeling technique. The discrepancy between the tabular aerodynamic data and the polynomial models was tested and shown to be less than 15 percent for drag, lift, and pitching moment coefficients over the entire flight envelope. Most of this discrepancy was traced to smoothing local measurement noise and to the omission of mass case 5 data in the modeling process. A simulation check case showed that the polynomial models provided a compact and accurate representation of the nonlinear aerodynamic dependencies contained in the HSR Cycle 2B tabular aerodynamic database.

  13. A virtual observatory for photoionized nebulae: the Mexican Million Models database (3MdB).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisset, C.; Delgado-Inglada, G.; Flores-Fajardo, N.

    2015-04-01

    Photoionization models obtained with numerical codes are widely used to study the physics of the interstellar medium (planetary nebulae, HII regions, etc). Grids of models are performed to understand the effects of the different parameters used to describe the regions on the observables (mainly emission line intensities). Most of the time, only a small part of the computed results of such grids are published, and they are sometimes hard to obtain in a user-friendly format. We present here the Mexican Million Models dataBase (3MdB), an effort to resolve both of these issues in the form of a database of photoionization models, easily accessible through the MySQL protocol, and containing a lot of useful outputs from the models, such as the intensities of 178 emission lines, the ionic fractions of all the ions, etc. Some examples of the use of the 3MdB are also presented.

  14. Genome databases

    SciTech Connect

    Courteau, J.

    1991-10-11

    Since the Genome Project began several years ago, a plethora of databases have been developed or are in the works. They range from the massive Genome Data Base at Johns Hopkins University, the central repository of all gene mapping information, to small databases focusing on single chromosomes or organisms. Some are publicly available, others are essentially private electronic lab notebooks. Still others limit access to a consortium of researchers working on, say, a single human chromosome. An increasing number incorporate sophisticated search and analytical software, while others operate as little more than data lists. In consultation with numerous experts in the field, a list has been compiled of some key genome-related databases. The list was not limited to map and sequence databases but also included the tools investigators use to interpret and elucidate genetic data, such as protein sequence and protein structure databases. Because a major goal of the Genome Project is to map and sequence the genomes of several experimental animals, including E. coli, yeast, fruit fly, nematode, and mouse, the available databases for those organisms are listed as well. The author also includes several databases that are still under development - including some ambitious efforts that go beyond data compilation to create what are being called electronic research communities, enabling many users, rather than just one or a few curators, to add or edit the data and tag it as raw or confirmed.

  15. The Subject-Object Relationship Interface Model in Database Management Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yannakoudakis, Emmanuel J.; Attar-Bashi, Hussain A.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a model that displays structures necessary to map between the conceptual and external levels in database management systems, using an algorithm that maps the syntactic representations of tuples onto semantic representations. A technique for translating tuples into natural language sentences is introduced, and a system implemented in…

  16. A Multiscale Database of Soil Properties for Regional Environmental Quality Modeling in the Western United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA-NRCS STATSGO regional soil database can provide generalized soil information for regional-scale modeling, planning and management of soil and water conservation, and assessment of environmental quality. However, the data available in STATSGO can not be readily extracted nor parameterized to...

  17. Integrated Functional and Executional Modelling of Software Using Web-Based Databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Deepak; Marietta, Roberta

    1998-01-01

    NASA's software subsystems undergo extensive modification and updates over the operational lifetimes. It is imperative that modified software should satisfy safety goals. This report discusses the difficulties encountered in doing so and discusses a solution based on integrated modelling of software, use of automatic information extraction tools, web technology and databases.

  18. Database on Pathogen and Indicator Organism Survival in Soils and other Environmental Media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data on survival of pathogen and indicator organism in soils, sediments, organic waste, and waters represent the key information for evaluating management practices and predicting fate and transport of the microorganisms. Such data are, in general, available, but are spread across thousands of publi...

  19. AERMOD: A Dispersion Model for Industrial Source Applications. Part II: Model Performance against 17 Field Study Databases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Steven G.; Cimorelli, Alan J.; Paine, Robert J.; Brode, Roger W.; Weil, Jeffrey C.; Venkatram, Akula; Wilson, Robert B.; Lee, Russell F.; Peters, Warren D.

    2005-05-01

    The performance of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regulatory Model (AERMOD) Improvement Committee's applied air dispersion model against 17 field study databases is described. AERMOD is a steady-state plume model with significant improvements over commonly applied regulatory models. The databases are characterized, and the performance measures are described. Emphasis is placed on statistics that demonstrate the model's abilities to reproduce the upper end of the concentration distribution. This is most important for applied regulatory modeling. The field measurements are characterized by flat and complex terrain, urban and rural conditions, and elevated and surface releases with and without building wake effects. As is indicated by comparisons of modeled and observed concentration distributions, with few exceptions AERMOD's performance is superior to that of the other applied models tested. This is the second of two articles, with the first describing the model formulations.

  20. The Transporter Classification Database

    PubMed Central

    Saier, Milton H.; Reddy, Vamsee S.; Tamang, Dorjee G.; Västermark, Åke

    2014-01-01

    The Transporter Classification Database (TCDB; http://www.tcdb.org) serves as a common reference point for transport protein research. The database contains more than 10 000 non-redundant proteins that represent all currently recognized families of transmembrane molecular transport systems. Proteins in TCDB are organized in a five level hierarchical system, where the first two levels are the class and subclass, the second two are the family and subfamily, and the last one is the transport system. Superfamilies that contain multiple families are included as hyperlinks to the five tier TC hierarchy. TCDB includes proteins from all types of living organisms and is the only transporter classification system that is both universal and recognized by the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. It has been expanded by manual curation, contains extensive text descriptions providing structural, functional, mechanistic and evolutionary information, is supported by unique software and is interconnected to many other relevant databases. TCDB is of increasing usefulness to the international scientific community and can serve as a model for the expansion of database technologies. This manuscript describes an update of the database descriptions previously featured in NAR database issues. PMID:24225317

  1. Mouse genome database 2016.

    PubMed

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600

  2. Mouse genome database 2016

    PubMed Central

    Bult, Carol J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Blake, Judith A.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600

  3. Examination of the U.S. EPA’s vapor intrusion database based on models

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yijun; Shen, Rui; Pennell, Kelly G.; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    In the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA)’s vapor intrusion (VI) database, there appears to be a trend showing an inverse relationship between the indoor air concentration attenuation factor and the subsurface source vapor concentration. This is inconsistent with the physical understanding in current vapor intrusion models. This paper explores possible reasons for this apparent discrepancy. Soil vapor transport processes occur independently of the actual building entry process, and are consistent with the trends in the database results. A recent EPA technical report provided a list of factors affecting vapor intrusion, and the influence of some of these are explored in the context of the database results. PMID:23293835

  4. Development of a database of organ doses for paediatric and young adult CT scans in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Kim, K. P.; Berrington de González, A.; Pearce, M. S.; Salotti, J. A.; Parker, L.; McHugh, K.; Craft, A. W.; Lee, C.

    2012-01-01

    Despite great potential benefits, there are concerns about the possible harm from medical imaging including the risk of radiation-related cancer. There are particular concerns about computed tomography (CT) scans in children because both radiation dose and sensitivity to radiation for children are typically higher than for adults undergoing equivalent procedures. As direct empirical data on the cancer risks from CT scans are lacking, the authors are conducting a retrospective cohort study of over 240 000 children in the UK who underwent CT scans. The main objective of the study is to quantify the magnitude of the cancer risk in relation to the radiation dose from CT scans. In this paper, the methods used to estimate typical organ-specific doses delivered by CT scans to children are described. An organ dose database from Monte Carlo radiation transport-based computer simulations using a series of computational human phantoms from newborn to adults for both male and female was established. Organ doses vary with patient size and sex, examination types and CT technical settings. Therefore, information on patient age, sex and examination type from electronic radiology information systems and technical settings obtained from two national surveys in the UK were used to estimate radiation dose. Absorbed doses to the brain, thyroid, breast and red bone marrow were calculated for reference male and female individuals with the ages of newborns, 1, 5, 10, 15 and 20 y for a total of 17 different scan types in the pre- and post-2001 time periods. In general, estimated organ doses were slightly higher for females than males which might be attributed to the smaller body size of the females. The younger children received higher doses in pre-2001 period when adult CT settings were typically used for children. Paediatric-specific adjustments were assumed to be used more frequently after 2001, since then radiation doses to children have often been smaller than those to adults. The

  5. Modeling Personnel Turnover in the Parametric Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Edwin B.

    1991-01-01

    A primary issue in organizing a new parametric cost analysis function is to determine the skill mix and number of personnel required. The skill mix can be obtained by a functional decomposition of the tasks required within the organization and a matrixed correlation with educational or experience backgrounds. The number of personnel is a function of the skills required to cover all tasks, personnel skill background and cross training, the intensity of the workload for each task, migration through various tasks by personnel along a career path, personnel hiring limitations imposed by management and the applicant marketplace, personnel training limitations imposed by management and personnel capability, and the rate at which personnel leave the organization for whatever reason. Faced with the task of relating all of these organizational facets in order to grow a parametric cost analysis (PCA) organization from scratch, it was decided that a dynamic model was required in order to account for the obvious dynamics of the forming organization. The challenge was to create such a simple model which would be credible during all phases of organizational development. The model development process was broken down into the activities of determining the tasks required for PCA, determining the skills required for each PCA task, determining the skills available in the applicant marketplace, determining the structure of the dynamic model, implementing the dynamic model, and testing the dynamic model.

  6. D Digital Model Database Applied to Conservation and Research of Wooden Construction in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.

    2013-07-01

    Protected by the Tai-Hang Mountains, Shanxi Province, located in north central China, is a highly prosperous, densely populated valley and considered to be one of the cradles of Chinese civilization. Its continuous habitation and rich culture have given rise to a large number of temple complexes and pavilions. Among these structures, 153 can be dated as early as from the Tang dynasty (618- 907C.E.) to the end of the Yuan dynasty (1279-1368C.E.) in Southern Shanxi area. The buildings are the best-preserved examples of wooden Chinese architecture in existence, exemplifying historic building technology and displaying highly intricate architectural decoration and detailing. They have survived war, earthquakes, and, in the last hundred years, neglect. In 2005, a decade-long conservation project was initiated by the State Administration of Cultural Heritage of China (SACH) to conserve and document these important buildings. The conservation process requires stabilization, conservation of important features, and, where necessary, partial dismantlement in order to replace unsound structural elements. Project team of CHCC have developed a practical recording system that created a record of all building components prior to and during the conservation process. After that we are trying to establish a comprehensive database which include all of the 153 earlier buildings, through which we can easily entering, browse, indexing information of the wooden construction, even deep into component details. The Database can help us to carry out comparative studies of these wooden structures, and, provide important support for the continued conservation of these heritage buildings. For some of the most important wooden structure, we have established three-dimensional models. Connected the Database with 3D Digital Model based on ArcGIS, we have developed 3D Digital Model Database for these cherish buildings. The 3D Digital Model Database helps us set up an integrate information inventory

  7. Modelling nitrous oxide emissions from organic soils in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppelt, Thomas; Dechow, Rene; Gebbert, Sören; Freibauer, Annette

    2013-04-01

    The greenhouse gas emission potential of peatland ecosystems are mandatory for a complete annual emission budget in Europe. The GHG-Europe project aims to improve the modelling capabilities for greenhouse gases, e.g., nitrous oxide. The heterogeneous and event driven fluxes of nitrous oxide are challenging to model on European scale, especially regarding the upscaling purpose and certain parameter estimations. Due to these challenges adequate techniques are needed to create a robust empirical model. Therefore a literature study of nitrous oxide fluxes from organic soils has been carried out. This database contains flux data from boreal and temperate climate zones and covers the different land use categories: cropland, grassland, forest, natural and peat extraction sites. Especially managed crop- and grassland sites feature high emission potential. Generally nitrous oxide emissions increases significantly with deep drainage and intensive application of nitrogen fertilisation. Whereas natural peatland sites with a near surface groundwater table can act as nitrous oxide sink. An empirical fuzzy logic model has been applied to predict annual nitrous oxide emissions from organic soils. The calibration results in two separate models with best model performances for bogs and fens, respectively. The derived parameter combinations of these models contain mean groundwater table, nitrogen fertilisation, annual precipitation, air temperature, carbon content and pH value. Influences of the calibrated parameters on nitrous oxide fluxes are verified by several studies in literature. The extrapolation potential has been tested by an implemented cross validation. Furthermore the parameter ranges of the calibrated models are compared to occurring values on European scale. This avoid unknown systematic errors for the regionalisation purpose. Additionally a sensitivity analysis specify the model behaviour for each alternating parameter. The upscaling process for European peatland

  8. Significant speedup of database searches with HMMs by search space reduction with PSSM family models

    PubMed Central

    Beckstette, Michael; Homann, Robert; Giegerich, Robert; Kurtz, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Profile hidden Markov models (pHMMs) are currently the most popular modeling concept for protein families. They provide sensitive family descriptors, and sequence database searching with pHMMs has become a standard task in today's genome annotation pipelines. On the downside, searching with pHMMs is computationally expensive. Results: We propose a new method for efficient protein family classification and for speeding up database searches with pHMMs as is necessary for large-scale analysis scenarios. We employ simpler models of protein families called position-specific scoring matrices family models (PSSM-FMs). For fast database search, we combine full-text indexing, efficient exact p-value computation of PSSM match scores and fast fragment chaining. The resulting method is well suited to prefilter the set of sequences to be searched for subsequent database searches with pHMMs. We achieved a classification performance only marginally inferior to hmmsearch, yet, results could be obtained in a fraction of runtime with a speedup of >64-fold. In experiments addressing the method's ability to prefilter the sequence space for subsequent database searches with pHMMs, our method reduces the number of sequences to be searched with hmmsearch to only 0.80% of all sequences. The filter is very fast and leads to a total speedup of factor 43 over the unfiltered search, while retaining >99.5% of the original results. In a lossless filter setup for hmmsearch on UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot, we observed a speedup of factor 92. Availability: The presented algorithms are implemented in the program PoSSuMsearch2, available for download at http://bibiserv.techfak.uni-bielefeld.de/possumsearch2/. Contact: beckstette@zbh.uni-hamburg.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19828575

  9. Using the Reactome Database

    PubMed Central

    Haw, Robin

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the bioinformatics community in creating pathway databases. The Reactome project (a collaboration between the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, New York University Medical Center and the European Bioinformatics Institute) is one such pathway database and collects structured information on all the biological pathways and processes in the human. It is an expert-authored and peer-reviewed, curated collection of well-documented molecular reactions that span the gamut from simple intermediate metabolism to signaling pathways and complex cellular events. This information is supplemented with likely orthologous molecular reactions in mouse, rat, zebrafish, worm and other model organisms. This unit describes how to use the Reactome database to learn the steps of a biological pathway; navigate and browse through the Reactome database; identify the pathways in which a molecule of interest is involved; use the Pathway and Expression analysis tools to search the database for and visualize possible connections within user-supplied experimental data set and Reactome pathways; and the Species Comparison tool to compare human and model organism pathways. PMID:22700314

  10. Object-oriented urban 3D spatial data model organization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing-wen; Li, Wen-qing; Lv, Nan; Su, Tao

    2015-12-01

    This paper combined the 3d data model with object-oriented organization method, put forward the model of 3d data based on object-oriented method, implemented the city 3d model to quickly build logical semantic expression and model, solved the city 3d spatial information representation problem of the same location with multiple property and the same property with multiple locations, designed the space object structure of point, line, polygon, body for city of 3d spatial database, and provided a new thought and method for the city 3d GIS model and organization management.

  11. Animal model integration to AutDB, a genetic database for autism

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In the post-genomic era, multi-faceted research on complex disorders such as autism has generated diverse types of molecular information related to its pathogenesis. The rapid accumulation of putative candidate genes/loci for Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and ASD-related animal models poses a major challenge for systematic analysis of their content. We previously created the Autism Database (AutDB) to provide a publicly available web portal for ongoing collection, manual annotation, and visualization of genes linked to ASD. Here, we describe the design, development, and integration of a new module within AutDB for ongoing collection and comprehensive cataloguing of ASD-related animal models. Description As with the original AutDB, all data is extracted from published, peer-reviewed scientific literature. Animal models are annotated with a new standardized vocabulary of phenotypic terms developed by our researchers which is designed to reflect the diverse clinical manifestations of ASD. The new Animal Model module is seamlessly integrated to AutDB for dissemination of diverse information related to ASD. Animal model entries within the new module are linked to corresponding candidate genes in the original "Human Gene" module of the resource, thereby allowing for cross-modal navigation between gene models and human gene studies. Although the current release of the Animal Model module is restricted to mouse models, it was designed with an expandable framework which can easily incorporate additional species and non-genetic etiological models of autism in the future. Conclusions Importantly, this modular ASD database provides a platform from which data mining, bioinformatics, and/or computational biology strategies may be adopted to develop predictive disease models that may offer further insights into the molecular underpinnings of this disorder. It also serves as a general model for disease-driven databases curating phenotypic characteristics of

  12. Measuring the effects of distributed database models on transaction availability measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, Ravi

    1991-01-01

    Data distribution, data replication, and system reliability are key factors in determining the availability measures for transactions in distributed database systems. In order to simplify the evaluation of these measures, database designers and researchers tend to make unrealistic assumptions about these factors. Here, the effect of such assumptions on the computational complexity and accuracy of such evaluations is investigated. A database system is represented with five parameters related to the above factors. Probabilistic analysis is employed to evaluate the availability of read-one and read-write transactions. Both the read-one/write-all and the majority-read/majority-write replication control policies are considered. It is concluded that transaction availability is more sensitive to variations in degrees of replication, less sensitive to data distribution, and insensitive to reliability variations in a heterogeneous system. The computational complexity of the evaluations is found to be mainly determined by the chosen distributed database model, while the accuracy of the results are not so much dependent on the models.

  13. Acquisition of Seco Creek GIS database and it's use in water quality models

    SciTech Connect

    Steers, C.A.; Steiner, M.; Taylor, B. )

    1993-02-01

    The Seco Creek Water Quality Demonstration Project covers 1,700,670 acres in parts of Bandera, Frio, Medina and Uvalde Counties in south central Texas. The Seco Creek Database was constructed as part of the Soil Conservation Service's National Water Quality Program to develop hydrologic tools that measure the effects of agricultural nonpoint source pollution and to demonstrate the usefulness of GIS in natural resources management. This project will be part of a GRASS-Water Quality Model Interface which will incorporate watershed models with water quality planning and implementation by January of 1994. The Seco Creek Demonstration Area is the sole water supply for 1.3 million in the San Antonio Area. The database constructed for the project will help maintain the excellent water quality that flows directly into the Edwards Aquifer. The database consists of several vector and raster layers including: SSURGO quality soils, elevation, roads, streams and detailed data on field ownership, cropping and grazing practices and other landuses. This paper will consist of the development and planned uses of the Seco Creek Database.

  14. The feature-based modeling of standard tooth in a dental prosthetic database.

    PubMed

    Song, Ya-Li; Li, Jia; Huang, Tian; Gao, Ping

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a feature-based approach that creates standard teeth models in database to provide the topological construction of the model for dental CAD. The approach arises from the basic idea that every tooth has its individual features and can be implemented in three steps. In the first step, the features on teeth are defined according to the oral anatomy. In the second step, Nurbs surfaces are applied so that the forms of standard teeth can be represented via establishing the topological relationship of features. Here, these feature-based surfaces have the capability of being local controlled that guarantees the accuracy of dental design. In the last step, feature curves are presented to describe the topological construction of dental ridges and grooves. Through these curves, the occlusal surface can be changed globally, simplifying dental design. It is finished with the establishment of standard database composed of 28 standard models constructed by feature-based surfaces and feature curves. PMID:17281869

  15. The origin and evolution of model organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedges, S. Blair

    2002-01-01

    The phylogeny and timescale of life are becoming better understood as the analysis of genomic data from model organisms continues to grow. As a result, discoveries are being made about the early history of life and the origin and development of complex multicellular life. This emerging comparative framework and the emphasis on historical patterns is helping to bridge barriers among organism-based research communities.

  16. A scalable database model for multiparametric time series: a volcano observatory case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalto, Placido; Aliotta, Marco; Cassisi, Carmelo; Prestifilippo, Michele; Cannata, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    The variables collected by a sensor network constitute a heterogeneous data source that needs to be properly organized in order to be used in research and geophysical monitoring. With the time series term we refer to a set of observations of a given phenomenon acquired sequentially in time. When the time intervals are equally spaced one speaks of period or sampling frequency. Our work describes in detail a possible methodology for storage and management of time series using a specific data structure. We designed a framework, hereinafter called TSDSystem (Time Series Database System), in order to acquire time series from different data sources and standardize them within a relational database. The operation of standardization provides the ability to perform operations, such as query and visualization, of many measures synchronizing them using a common time scale. The proposed architecture follows a multiple layer paradigm (Loaders layer, Database layer and Business Logic layer). Each layer is specialized in performing particular operations for the reorganization and archiving of data from different sources such as ASCII, Excel, ODBC (Open DataBase Connectivity), file accessible from the Internet (web pages, XML). In particular, the loader layer performs a security check of the working status of each running software through an heartbeat system, in order to automate the discovery of acquisition issues and other warning conditions. Although our system has to manage huge amounts of data, performance is guaranteed by using a smart partitioning table strategy, that keeps balanced the percentage of data stored in each database table. TSDSystem also contains modules for the visualization of acquired data, that provide the possibility to query different time series on a specified time range, or follow the realtime signal acquisition, according to a data access policy from the users.

  17. The Chinchilla Research Resource Database: resource for an otolaryngology disease model.

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, Mary; Smith, Jennifer R; De Pons, Jeff; Tutaj, Marek; Khampang, Pawjai; Hong, Wenzhou; Erbe, Christy B; Ehrlich, Garth D; Bakaletz, Lauren O; Kerschner, Joseph E

    2016-01-01

    The long-tailed chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) is an established animal model for diseases of the inner and middle ear, among others. In particular, chinchilla is commonly used to study diseases involving viral and bacterial pathogens and polymicrobial infections of the upper respiratory tract and the ear, such as otitis media. The value of the chinchilla as a model for human diseases prompted the sequencing of its genome in 2012 and the more recent development of the Chinchilla Research Resource Database (http://crrd.mcw.edu) to provide investigators with easy access to relevant datasets and software tools to enhance their research. The Chinchilla Research Resource Database contains a complete catalog of genes for chinchilla and, for comparative purposes, human. Chinchilla genes can be viewed in the context of their genomic scaffold positions using the JBrowse genome browser. In contrast to the corresponding records at NCBI, individual gene reports at CRRD include functional annotations for Disease, Gene Ontology (GO) Biological Process, GO Molecular Function, GO Cellular Component and Pathway assigned to chinchilla genes based on annotations from the corresponding human orthologs. Data can be retrieved via keyword and gene-specific searches. Lists of genes with similar functional attributes can be assembled by leveraging the hierarchical structure of the Disease, GO and Pathway vocabularies through the Ontology Search and Browser tool. Such lists can then be further analyzed for commonalities using the Gene Annotator (GA) Tool. All data in the Chinchilla Research Resource Database is freely accessible and downloadable via the CRRD FTP site or using the download functions available in the search and analysis tools. The Chinchilla Research Resource Database is a rich resource for researchers using, or considering the use of, chinchilla as a model for human disease.Database URL: http://crrd.mcw.edu. PMID:27173523

  18. The Chinchilla Research Resource Database: resource for an otolaryngology disease model

    PubMed Central

    Shimoyama, Mary; Smith, Jennifer R.; De Pons, Jeff; Tutaj, Marek; Khampang, Pawjai; Hong, Wenzhou; Erbe, Christy B.; Ehrlich, Garth D.; Bakaletz, Lauren O.; Kerschner, Joseph E.

    2016-01-01

    The long-tailed chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) is an established animal model for diseases of the inner and middle ear, among others. In particular, chinchilla is commonly used to study diseases involving viral and bacterial pathogens and polymicrobial infections of the upper respiratory tract and the ear, such as otitis media. The value of the chinchilla as a model for human diseases prompted the sequencing of its genome in 2012 and the more recent development of the Chinchilla Research Resource Database (http://crrd.mcw.edu) to provide investigators with easy access to relevant datasets and software tools to enhance their research. The Chinchilla Research Resource Database contains a complete catalog of genes for chinchilla and, for comparative purposes, human. Chinchilla genes can be viewed in the context of their genomic scaffold positions using the JBrowse genome browser. In contrast to the corresponding records at NCBI, individual gene reports at CRRD include functional annotations for Disease, Gene Ontology (GO) Biological Process, GO Molecular Function, GO Cellular Component and Pathway assigned to chinchilla genes based on annotations from the corresponding human orthologs. Data can be retrieved via keyword and gene-specific searches. Lists of genes with similar functional attributes can be assembled by leveraging the hierarchical structure of the Disease, GO and Pathway vocabularies through the Ontology Search and Browser tool. Such lists can then be further analyzed for commonalities using the Gene Annotator (GA) Tool. All data in the Chinchilla Research Resource Database is freely accessible and downloadable via the CRRD FTP site or using the download functions available in the search and analysis tools. The Chinchilla Research Resource Database is a rich resource for researchers using, or considering the use of, chinchilla as a model for human disease. Database URL: http://crrd.mcw.edu PMID:27173523

  19. Database of the United States Coal Pellet Collection of the U.S. Geological Survey Organic Petrology Laboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deems, Nikolaus J.; Hackley, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    The Organic Petrology Laboratory (OPL) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Eastern Energy Resources Science Center in Reston, Virginia, contains several thousand processed coal sample materials that were loosely organized in laboratory drawers for the past several decades. The majority of these were prepared as 1-inch-diameter particulate coal pellets (more than 6,000 pellets; one sample usually was prepared as two pellets, although some samples were prepared in as many as four pellets), which were polished and used in reflected light petrographic studies. These samples represent the work of many scientists from the 1970s to the present, most notably Ron Stanton, who managed the OPL until 2001 (see Warwick and Ruppert, 2005, for a comprehensive bibliography of Ron Stanton's work). The purpose of the project described herein was to organize and catalog the U.S. part of the petrographic sample collection into a comprehensive database (available with this report as a Microsoft Excel file) and to compile and list published studies associated with the various sample sets. Through this work, the extent of the collection is publicly documented as a resource and sample library available to other scientists and researchers working in U.S. coal basins previously studied by organic petrologists affiliated with the USGS. Other researchers may obtain samples in the OPL collection on loan at the discretion of the USGS authors listed in this report and its associated Web page.

  20. Putting "Organizations" into an Organization Theory Course: A Hybrid CAO Model for Teaching Organization Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannah, David R.; Venkatachary, Ranga

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a retrospective analysis of an instructor's multiyear redesign of a course on organization theory into what is called a hybrid Classroom-as-Organization model. It is suggested that this new course design served to apprentice students to function in quasi-real organizational structures. The authors further argue…

  1. Research proceedings on amphibian model organisms

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Lu-Sha; ZHAO, Lan-Ying; WANG, Shou-Hong; JIANG, Jian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Model organisms have long been important in biology and medicine due to their specific characteristics. Amphibians, especially Xenopus, play key roles in answering fundamental questions on developmental biology, regeneration, genetics, and toxicology due to their large and abundant eggs, as well as their versatile embryos, which can be readily manipulated and developed in vivo. Furthermore, amphibians have also proven to be of considerable benefit in human disease research due to their conserved cellular developmental and genomic organization. This review gives a brief introduction on the progress and limitations of these animal models in biology and human disease research, and discusses the potential and challenge of Microhyla fissipes as a new model organism. PMID:27469255

  2. Research proceedings on amphibian model organisms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu-Sha; Zhao, Lan-Ying; Wang, Shou-Hong; Jiang, Jian-Ping

    2016-07-18

    Model organisms have long been important in biology and medicine due to their specific characteristics. Amphibians, especially Xenopus, play key roles in answering fundamental questions on developmental biology, regeneration, genetics, and toxicology due to their large and abundant eggs, as well as their versatile embryos, which can be readily manipulated and developed in vivo. Furthermore, amphibians have also proven to be of considerable benefit in human disease research due to their conserved cellular developmental and genomic organization. This review gives a brief introduction on the progress and limitations of these animal models in biology and human disease research, and discusses the potential and challenge of Microhyla fissipes as a new model organism. PMID:27469255

  3. Toxicity of halogenated organic compounds. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning health and environmental effects of halogenated organic compounds. Topics include laboratory and field investigations regarding bioaccumulation and concentration, metabolic aspects, and specific site studies in industrial and commercial operations. Pesticides, solvents, and a variety of industrial compounds are discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. Leaf respiration (GlobResp) - global trait database supports Earth System Models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wullschleger, Stan D.; Warren, Jeffrey; Thornton, Peter E.

    2015-03-20

    Here we detail how Atkin and his colleagues compiled a global database (GlobResp) that details rates of leaf dark respiration and associated traits from sites that span Arctic tundra to tropical forests. This compilation builds upon earlier research (Reich et al., 1998; Wright et al., 2006) and was supplemented by recent field campaigns and unpublished data.In keeping with other trait databases, GlobResp provides insights on how physiological traits, especially rates of dark respiration, vary as a function of environment and how that variation can be used to inform terrestrial biosphere models and land surface components of Earth System Models. Althoughmore » an important component of plant and ecosystem carbon (C) budgets (Wythers et al., 2013), respiration has only limited representation in models. Seen through the eyes of a plant scientist, Atkin et al. (2015) give readers a unique perspective on the climatic controls on respiration, thermal acclimation and evolutionary adaptation of dark respiration, and insights into the covariation of respiration with other leaf traits. We find there is ample evidence that once large databases are compiled, like GlobResp, they can reveal new knowledge of plant function and provide a valuable resource for hypothesis testing and model development.« less

  5. Leaf respiration (GlobResp) - global trait database supports Earth System Models

    SciTech Connect

    Wullschleger, Stan D.; Warren, Jeffrey; Thornton, Peter E.

    2015-03-20

    Here we detail how Atkin and his colleagues compiled a global database (GlobResp) that details rates of leaf dark respiration and associated traits from sites that span Arctic tundra to tropical forests. This compilation builds upon earlier research (Reich et al., 1998; Wright et al., 2006) and was supplemented by recent field campaigns and unpublished data.In keeping with other trait databases, GlobResp provides insights on how physiological traits, especially rates of dark respiration, vary as a function of environment and how that variation can be used to inform terrestrial biosphere models and land surface components of Earth System Models. Although an important component of plant and ecosystem carbon (C) budgets (Wythers et al., 2013), respiration has only limited representation in models. Seen through the eyes of a plant scientist, Atkin et al. (2015) give readers a unique perspective on the climatic controls on respiration, thermal acclimation and evolutionary adaptation of dark respiration, and insights into the covariation of respiration with other leaf traits. We find there is ample evidence that once large databases are compiled, like GlobResp, they can reveal new knowledge of plant function and provide a valuable resource for hypothesis testing and model development.

  6. Data extraction tool and colocation database for satellite and model product evaluation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, S.; Zhang, H.; Privette, J. L.; Del Greco, S.; Urzen, M.; Pan, Y.; Cook, R. B.; Wilson, B. E.; Wei, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The Satellite Product Evaluation Center (SPEC) is an ongoing project to integrate operational monitoring of data products from satellite and model analysis, with support for quantitative calibration, validation and algorithm improvement. The system uniquely allows scientists and others to rapidly access, subset, visualize, statistically compare and download multi-temporal data from multiple in situ, satellite, weather radar and model sources without reference to native data and metadata formats, packaging or physical location. Although still in initial development, the SPEC database and services will contain a wealth of integrated data for evaluation, validation, and discovery science activities across many different disciplines. The SPEC data extraction architecture departs from traditional dataset and research driven approaches through the use of standards and relational database technology. The NetCDF for Java API is used as a framework for data decoding and abstraction. The data are treated as generic feature types (such as Grid or Swath) as defined by the NetCDF Climate and Forecast (CF) metadata conventions. Colocation data for various field measurement networks, such as the Climate Reference Network (CRN) and Ameriflux network, are extracted offline, from local disk or distributed sources. The resulting data subsets are loaded into a relational database for fast access. URL-based (Representational State Transfer (REST)) web services are provided for simple database access to application programmers and scientists. SPEC supports broad NOAA, U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) and World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) initiatives including the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) and NOAA’s Climate Data Record (CDR) programs. SPEC is a collaboration between NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) and DOE’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In this presentation we will describe the data extraction

  7. S-World: A high resolution global soil database for simulation modelling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoorvogel, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    There is an increasing call for high resolution soil information at the global level. A good example for such a call is the Global Gridded Crop Model Intercomparison carried out within AgMIP. While local studies can make use of surveying techniques to collect additional techniques this is practically impossible at the global level. It is therefore important to rely on legacy data like the Harmonized World Soil Database. Several efforts do exist that aim at the development of global gridded soil property databases. These estimates of the variation of soil properties can be used to assess e.g., global soil carbon stocks. However, they do not allow for simulation runs with e.g., crop growth simulation models as these models require a description of the entire pedon rather than a few soil properties. This study provides the required quantitative description of pedons at a 1 km resolution for simulation modelling. It uses the Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD) for the spatial distribution of soil types, the ISRIC-WISE soil profile database to derive information on soil properties per soil type, and a range of co-variables on topography, climate, and land cover to further disaggregate the available data. The methodology aims to take stock of these available data. The soil database is developed in five main steps. Step 1: All 148 soil types are ordered on the basis of their expected topographic position using e.g., drainage, salinization, and pedogenesis. Using the topographic ordering and combining the HWSD with a digital elevation model allows for the spatial disaggregation of the composite soil units. This results in a new soil map with homogeneous soil units. Step 2: The ranges of major soil properties for the topsoil and subsoil of each of the 148 soil types are derived from the ISRIC-WISE soil profile database. Step 3: A model of soil formation is developed that focuses on the basic conceptual question where we are within the range of a particular soil property

  8. Thermodynamic modeling for organic solid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, T.H.

    1992-12-01

    A generalized predictive model which is based on thermodynamic principle for solid-liquid phase equilibrium has been developed for organic solid precipitation. The model takes into account the effects of temperature, composition, and activity coefficient on the solubility of wax and asphaltenes in organic solutions. The solid-liquid equilibrium K-value is expressed as a function of the heat of melting, melting point temperature, solubility parameter, and the molar volume of each component in the solution. All these parameters have been correlated with molecular weight. Thus, the model can be applied to crude oil systems. The model has been tested with experimental data for wax formation and asphaltene precipitation. The predicted wax appearance temperature is very close to the measured temperature. The model not only can match the measured asphaltene solubility data but also can be used to predict the solubility of asphaltene in organic solvents or crude oils. The model assumes that asphaltenes are dissolved in oil in a true liquid state, not in colloidal suspension, and the precipitation-dissolution process is reversible by changing thermodynamic conditions. The model is thermodynamically consistent and has no ambiguous assumptions.

  9. Global database of InSAR earthquake source models: A tool for independently assessing seismic catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, A. M.; Weston, J. M.; Funning, G. J.

    2011-12-01

    Earthquake source models are routinely determined using seismic data and are reported in many seismic catalogues, such as the Global Centroid Moment Tensor (GCMT) catalogue. Recent advances in space geodesy, such as InSAR, have enabled the estimation of earthquake source parameters from the measurement of deformation of the Earth's surface, independently of seismic information. The absence of an earthquake catalogue based on geodetic data prompted the compilation of a large InSAR database of CMT parameters from the literature (Weston et al., 2011, hereafter referred to as the ICMT database). Information provided in published InSAR studies of earthquakes is used to obtain earthquake source parameters, and equivalent CMT parameters. Multiple studies of the same earthquake are included in the database, as they are valuable to assess uncertainties in source models. Here, source parameters for 70 earthquakes in an updated version of the ICMT database are compared with those reported in global and regional seismic catalogues. There is overall good agreement between parameters, particularly in fault strike, dip and rake. However, InSAR centroid depths are systematically shallower (5-10 km) than those in the EHB catalogue, but this is reduced for depths from inversions of InSAR data that use a layered half-space. Estimates of the seismic moment generally agree well between the two datasets, but for thrust earthquakes there is a slight tendency for the InSAR-determined seismic moment to be larger. Centroid locations from the ICMT database are in good agreement with those from regional seismic catalogues with a median distance of ~6 km between them, which is smaller than for comparisons with global catalogues (17.0 km and 9.2 km for the GCMT and ISC catalogues, respectively). Systematic tests of GCMT-like inversions have shown that similar mislocations occur for several different degree 20 Earth models (Ferreira et al., 2011), suggesting that higher resolution Earth models

  10. Methodology for creating three-dimensional terrain databases for use in IR signature modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Bryan L.; Pickard, J. W., Jr.

    1996-06-01

    This paper describes a methodology which has been successfully used to create high fidelity three-dimensional infrared (IR) signature models of terrain backgrounds for use in digital simulations by the U.S. Army Missile Command. Topics discussed include (1) derivation of database fidelity and resolution requirements based upon system parameters, (2) use of existing digital elevation maps (DEMs) (3) generation of digital elevation maps from stereo aerial and satellite imagery, and (4) classification of ground cover materials.