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Sample records for modeling animal movement

  1. Modeling interdependent animal movement in continuous time.

    PubMed

    Niu, Mu; Blackwell, Paul G; Skarin, Anna

    2016-06-01

    This article presents a new approach to modeling group animal movement in continuous time. The movement of a group of animals is modeled as a multivariate Ornstein Uhlenbeck diffusion process in a high-dimensional space. Each individual of the group is attracted to a leading point which is generally unobserved, and the movement of the leading point is also an Ornstein Uhlenbeck process attracted to an unknown attractor. The Ornstein Uhlenbeck bridge is applied to reconstruct the location of the leading point. All movement parameters are estimated using Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling, specifically a Metropolis Hastings algorithm. We apply the method to a small group of simultaneously tracked reindeer, Rangifer tarandus tarandus, showing that the method detects dependency in movement between individuals. PMID:26812666

  2. Continuous-time discrete-space models for animal movement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanks, Ephraim M.; Hooten, Mevin B.; Alldredge, Mat W.

    2015-01-01

    The processes influencing animal movement and resource selection are complex and varied. Past efforts to model behavioral changes over time used Bayesian statistical models with variable parameter space, such as reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo approaches, which are computationally demanding and inaccessible to many practitioners. We present a continuous-time discrete-space (CTDS) model of animal movement that can be fit using standard generalized linear modeling (GLM) methods. This CTDS approach allows for the joint modeling of location-based as well as directional drivers of movement. Changing behavior over time is modeled using a varying-coefficient framework which maintains the computational simplicity of a GLM approach, and variable selection is accomplished using a group lasso penalty. We apply our approach to a study of two mountain lions (Puma concolor) in Colorado, USA.

  3. On modeling animal movements using Brownian motion with measurement error.

    PubMed

    Pozdnyakov, Vladimir; Meyer, Thomas; Wang, Yu-Bo; Yan, Jun

    2014-02-01

    Modeling animal movements with Brownian motion (or more generally by a Gaussian process) has a long tradition in ecological studies. The recent Brownian bridge movement model (BBMM), which incorporates measurement errors, has been quickly adopted by ecologists because of its simplicity and tractability. We discuss some nontrivial properties of the discrete-time stochastic process that results from observing a Brownian motion with added normal noise at discrete times. In particular, we demonstrate that the observed sequence of random variables is not Markov. Consequently the expected occupation time between two successively observed locations does not depend on just those two observations; the whole path must be taken into account. Nonetheless, the exact likelihood function of the observed time series remains tractable; it requires only sparse matrix computations. The likelihood-based estimation procedure is described in detail and compared to the BBMM estimation. PMID:24669719

  4. Mapping behavioral landscapes for animal movement: a finite mixture modeling approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tracey, Jeff A.; Zhu, Jun; Boydston, Erin E.; Lyren, Lisa M.; Fisher, Robert N.; Crooks, Kevin R.

    2013-01-01

    Because of its role in many ecological processes, movement of animals in response to landscape features is an important subject in ecology and conservation biology. In this paper, we develop models of animal movement in relation to objects or fields in a landscape. We take a finite mixture modeling approach in which the component densities are conceptually related to different choices for movement in response to a landscape feature, and the mixing proportions are related to the probability of selecting each response as a function of one or more covariates. We combine particle swarm optimization and an Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm to obtain maximum likelihood estimates of the model parameters. We use this approach to analyze data for movement of three bobcats in relation to urban areas in southern California, USA. A behavioral interpretation of the models revealed similarities and differences in bobcat movement response to urbanization. All three bobcats avoided urbanization by moving either parallel to urban boundaries or toward less urban areas as the proportion of urban land cover in the surrounding area increased. However, one bobcat, a male with a dispersal-like large-scale movement pattern, avoided urbanization at lower densities and responded strictly by moving parallel to the urban edge. The other two bobcats, which were both residents and occupied similar geographic areas, avoided urban areas using a combination of movements parallel to the urban edge and movement toward areas of less urbanization. However, the resident female appeared to exhibit greater repulsion at lower levels of urbanization than the resident male, consistent with empirical observations of bobcats in southern California. Using the parameterized finite mixture models, we mapped behavioral states to geographic space, creating a representation of a behavioral landscape. This approach can provide guidance for conservation planning based on analysis of animal movement data using

  5. a Geo-Visual Analytics Approach to Biological Shepherding: Modelling Animal Movements and Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benke, K. K.; Sheth, F.; Betteridge, K.; Pettit, C. J.; Aurambout, J.-P.

    2012-07-01

    The lamb industry in Victoria is a significant component of the state economy with annual exports in the vicinity of 1 billion. GPS and visualisation tools can be used to monitor grazing animal movements at the farm scale and observe interactions with the environment. Modelling the spatial-temporal movements of grazing animals in response to environmental conditions provides input for the design of paddocks with the aim of improving management procedures, animal performance and animal welfare. The term "biological shepherding" is associated with the re-design of environmental conditions and the analysis of responses from grazing animals. The combination of biological shepherding with geo-visual analytics (geo-spatial data analysis with visualisation) provides a framework for improving landscape design and supports research in grazing behaviour in variable landscapes, heat stress avoidance behaviour during summer months, and modelling excreta distributions (with respect to nitrogen emissions and nitrogen return for fertilising the paddock). Nitrogen losses due to excreta are mainly in the form of gaseous emissions to the atmosphere and leaching into the groundwater. In this study, background and context are provided in the case of biological shepherding and tracking animal movements. Examples are provided of recent applications in regional Australia and New Zealand. Based on experimental data and computer simulation, and using data visualisation and feature extraction, it was demonstrated that livestock excreta are not always randomly located, but concentrated around localised gathering points, sometimes separated by the nature of the excretion. Farmers require information on the nitrogen losses in order to reduce emissions to meet local and international nitrogen leaching and greenhouse gas targets and to improve the efficiency of nutrient management.

  6. Uniting Statistical and Individual-Based Approaches for Animal Movement Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Latombe, Guillaume; Parrott, Lael; Basille, Mathieu; Fortin, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic nature of their internal states and the environment directly shape animals' spatial behaviours and give rise to emergent properties at broader scales in natural systems. However, integrating these dynamic features into habitat selection studies remains challenging, due to practically impossible field work to access internal states and the inability of current statistical models to produce dynamic outputs. To address these issues, we developed a robust method, which combines statistical and individual-based modelling. Using a statistical technique for forward modelling of the IBM has the advantage of being faster for parameterization than a pure inverse modelling technique and allows for robust selection of parameters. Using GPS locations from caribou monitored in Québec, caribou movements were modelled based on generative mechanisms accounting for dynamic variables at a low level of emergence. These variables were accessed by replicating real individuals' movements in parallel sub-models, and movement parameters were then empirically parameterized using Step Selection Functions. The final IBM model was validated using both k-fold cross-validation and emergent patterns validation and was tested for two different scenarios, with varying hardwood encroachment. Our results highlighted a functional response in habitat selection, which suggests that our method was able to capture the complexity of the natural system, and adequately provided projections on future possible states of the system in response to different management plans. This is especially relevant for testing the long-term impact of scenarios corresponding to environmental configurations that have yet to be observed in real systems. PMID:24979047

  7. Effects of Temporal Resolution on an Inferential Model of Animal Movement

    PubMed Central

    Postlethwaite, Claire M.; Dennis, Todd E.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, there has been much interest in describing the behaviour of animals by fitting various movement models to tracking data. Despite this interest, little is known about how the temporal ‘grain’ of movement trajectories affects the outputs of such models, and how behaviours classified at one timescale may differ from those classified at other scales. Here, we present a study in which random-walk state-space models were fit both to nightly geospatial lifelines of common brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) and synthetic trajectories parameterised from empirical observations. Observed trajectories recorded by GPS collars at 5-min intervals were sub-sampled at periods varying between 10 and 60 min, to approximate the effect of collecting data at lower sampling frequencies. Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo fitting techniques, using information about movement rates and turning angles between sequential fixes, were employed using a Bayesian framework to assign distinct behavioural states to individual location estimates. We found that in trajectories with higher temporal granularities behaviours could be clearly differentiated into ‘slow-area-restricted’ and ‘fast-transiting’ states, but for trajectories with longer inter-fix intervals this distinction was markedly less obvious. Specifically, turning-angle distributions varied from being highly peaked around either or at fine temporal scales, to being uniform across all angles at low sampling intervals. Our results highlight the difficulty of comparing model results amongst tracking-data sets that vary substantially in temporal grain, and demonstrate the importance of matching the observed temporal resolution of tracking devices to the timescales of behaviours of interest, otherwise inter-individual comparisons of inferred behaviours may be invalid, or important biological information may be obscured. PMID:23671558

  8. Effects of temporal resolution on an inferential model of animal movement.

    PubMed

    Postlethwaite, Claire M; Dennis, Todd E

    2013-01-01

    Recently, there has been much interest in describing the behaviour of animals by fitting various movement models to tracking data. Despite this interest, little is known about how the temporal 'grain' of movement trajectories affects the outputs of such models, and how behaviours classified at one timescale may differ from those classified at other scales. Here, we present a study in which random-walk state-space models were fit both to nightly geospatial lifelines of common brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) and synthetic trajectories parameterised from empirical observations. Observed trajectories recorded by GPS collars at 5-min intervals were sub-sampled at periods varying between 10 and 60 min, to approximate the effect of collecting data at lower sampling frequencies. Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo fitting techniques, using information about movement rates and turning angles between sequential fixes, were employed using a Bayesian framework to assign distinct behavioural states to individual location estimates. We found that in trajectories with higher temporal granularities behaviours could be clearly differentiated into 'slow-area-restricted' and 'fast-transiting' states, but for trajectories with longer inter-fix intervals this distinction was markedly less obvious. Specifically, turning-angle distributions varied from being highly peaked around either 0° or 180° at fine temporal scales, to being uniform across all angles at low sampling intervals. Our results highlight the difficulty of comparing model results amongst tracking-data sets that vary substantially in temporal grain, and demonstrate the importance of matching the observed temporal resolution of tracking devices to the timescales of behaviours of interest, otherwise inter-individual comparisons of inferred behaviours may be invalid, or important biological information may be obscured. PMID:23671558

  9. Integrative modelling of animal movement: incorporating in situ habitat and behavioural information for a migratory marine predator.

    PubMed

    Bestley, Sophie; Jonsen, Ian D; Hindell, Mark A; Guinet, Christophe; Charrassin, Jean-Benoît

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental goal in animal ecology is to quantify how environmental (and other) factors influence individual movement, as this is key to understanding responsiveness of populations to future change. However, quantitative interpretation of individual-based telemetry data is hampered by the complexity of, and error within, these multi-dimensional data. Here, we present an integrative hierarchical Bayesian state-space modelling approach where, for the first time, the mechanistic process model for the movement state of animals directly incorporates both environmental and other behavioural information, and observation and process model parameters are estimated within a single model. When applied to a migratory marine predator, the southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina), we find the switch from directed to resident movement state was associated with colder water temperatures, relatively short dive bottom time and rapid descent rates. The approach presented here can have widespread utility for quantifying movement-behaviour (diving or other)-environment relationships across species and systems. PMID:23135676

  10. Multielectrode nerve cuff stimulation of the median nerve produces selective movements in a raccoon animal model.

    PubMed

    Walter, J S; Griffith, P; Sweeney, J; Scarpine, V; Bidnar, M; McLane, J; Robinson, C

    1997-04-01

    In this study, an electrode system consisting of twelve small platinum dot electrodes imbedded in a spiral silicone rubber insulating cuff was used to investigate the feasibility of selective (regional) stimulation of the median nerves of the raccoon. Acute experiments in four raccoons consisted of functional responses observations, isometric force recordings from tendon attachments and postmortem fascicular mapping. Functional responses (elbow, wrist and/or digit flexion, pronation and/or thumb abduction) to selective stimulation were noted as dependent upon cuff electrode configuration (longitudinal tripole with and without field steering, as well as a transverse bipolar arrangement) and current level (threshold, 1/2 maximal, maximal). Muscle force recruitment curves (force as a function of stimulus amplitude) were plotted for flexor digitorum superficialis, flexor digitorum profundus, flexor carpi radialis, palmaris longus and pronator teres of three raccoons. Fascicular maps at the level of the nerve cuff were created indicating the approximate position of innervation to each of the aforementioned muscles, as well as other innervation such as paw fascicles, sensory fascicles, and elbow innervation (such as coracobrachialis). The greatest selectivity was observed at or near threshold current levels. In all four raccoons studied, a threshold electrode choice and stimulation strategy could be identified enabling selective production of either digit flexion, wrist flexion and/or digit and wrist flexion. It was possible to elicit a selective pronation response at threshold in three of the four animals. Selective elbow flexion at threshold could be produced in all four experiments. With stronger currents, additional movements were usually induced. The raccoon therefore appears to be a suitable, if challenging, animal model for further development of not only nerve cuff electrode approaches but perhaps other stimulation electrode technologies prior to human

  11. Balancing direct and indirect sources of navigational information in a leaderless model of collective animal movement.

    PubMed

    Codling, Edward A; Bode, Nikolai W F

    2016-04-01

    Navigation is an important movement process that enables individuals and groups of animals to find targets in space at different spatio-temporal scales. Earlier studies have shown how being in a group can confer navigational advantages to individuals, either through following more experienced leaders or through the pooling of many inaccurate compasses, a process known as the 'many wrongs principle'. However, the exact mechanisms for how information is transferred and used within the group in order to improve both individual- and group-level navigational performance are not fully understood. Here we explore the relative weighting that should be given to different sources of navigational information by an individual within a navigating group at each step of the movement process. Specifically, we consider a direct goal-oriented source of navigational information such as the individual׳s own imperfect knowledge of the target (a 'noisy compass') alongside two indirect sources of navigational information: the previous movement directions of neighbours in the group (social information) and, for the first time in this context, the previous movement direction of the individual (persistence). We assume that all individuals are equal in their abilities and that direct navigational information is prone to higher errors than indirect information. Using computer simulations, we show that in such situations giving a high weighting to either type of indirect navigational information can serve to significantly improve the navigation success of groups. Crucially, we also show that if the quality of social information is reduced, e.g. by an individual׳s limited cognitive abilities, the best navigational strategy for groups assigns a considerable weighting to persistence, a behaviour that is neither social, nor directly aimed at navigating. PMID:26801875

  12. Combining High-Speed Cameras and Stop-Motion Animation Software to Support Students' Modeling of Human Body Movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Victor R.

    2015-04-01

    Biomechanics, and specifically the biomechanics associated with human movement, is a potentially rich backdrop against which educators can design innovative science teaching and learning activities. Moreover, the use of technologies associated with biomechanics research, such as high-speed cameras that can produce high-quality slow-motion video, can be deployed in such a way to support students' participation in practices of scientific modeling. As participants in classroom design experiment, fifteen fifth-grade students worked with high-speed cameras and stop-motion animation software (SAM Animation) over several days to produce dynamic models of motion and body movement. The designed series of learning activities involved iterative cycles of animation creation and critique and use of various depictive materials. Subsequent analysis of flipbooks of human jumping movements created by the students at the beginning and end of the unit revealed a significant improvement in both the epistemic fidelity of students' representations. Excerpts from classroom observations highlight the role that the teacher plays in supporting students' thoughtful reflection of and attention to slow-motion video. In total, this design and research intervention demonstrates that the combination of technologies, activities, and teacher support can lead to improvements in some of the foundations associated with students' modeling.

  13. Maximum-entropy description of animal movement.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Chris H; Subaşı, Yiğit; Calabrese, Justin M

    2015-03-01

    We introduce a class of maximum-entropy states that naturally includes within it all of the major continuous-time stochastic processes that have been applied to animal movement, including Brownian motion, Ornstein-Uhlenbeck motion, integrated Ornstein-Uhlenbeck motion, a recently discovered hybrid of the previous models, and a new model that describes central-place foraging. We are also able to predict a further hierarchy of new models that will emerge as data quality improves to better resolve the underlying continuity of animal movement. Finally, we also show that Langevin equations must obey a fluctuation-dissipation theorem to generate processes that fall from this class of maximum-entropy distributions when the constraints are purely kinematic. PMID:25871054

  14. Maximum-entropy description of animal movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Chris H.; Subaşı, Yiǧit; Calabrese, Justin M.

    2015-03-01

    We introduce a class of maximum-entropy states that naturally includes within it all of the major continuous-time stochastic processes that have been applied to animal movement, including Brownian motion, Ornstein-Uhlenbeck motion, integrated Ornstein-Uhlenbeck motion, a recently discovered hybrid of the previous models, and a new model that describes central-place foraging. We are also able to predict a further hierarchy of new models that will emerge as data quality improves to better resolve the underlying continuity of animal movement. Finally, we also show that Langevin equations must obey a fluctuation-dissipation theorem to generate processes that fall from this class of maximum-entropy distributions when the constraints are purely kinematic.

  15. Fast fitting of non-Gaussian state-space models to animal movement data via Template Model Builder.

    PubMed

    Albertsen, Christoffer Moesgaard; Whoriskey, Kim; Yurkowski, David; Nielsen, Anders; Mills, Joanna

    2015-10-01

    State-space models (SSM) are often used for analyzing complex ecological processes that are not observed directly, such as marine animal movement. When outliers are present in the measurements, special care is needed in the analysis to obtain reliable location and process estimates. Here we recommend using the Laplace approximation combined with automatic differentiation (as implemented in the novel R package Template Model Builder; TMB) for the fast fitting of continuous-time multivariate non-Gaussian SSMs. Through Argos satellite tracking data, we demonstrate that the use of continuous-time t-distributed measurement errors for error-prone data is more robust to outliers and improves the location estimation compared to using discretized-time t-distributed errors (implemented with a Gibbs sampler) or using continuous-time Gaussian errors (as with the Kalman filter). Using TMB, we are able to estimate additional parameters compared to previous methods, all without requiring a substantial increase in computational time. The model implementation is made available through the R package argosTrack. PMID:26649381

  16. Can physical exercise have a protective effect in an animal model of sleep-related movement disorder?

    PubMed

    Esteves, Andrea M; Lopes, Cleide; Frank, Miriam K; Arida, Ricardo M; Frussa-Filho, Roberto; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Túlio

    2016-05-15

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether physical exercise (PE) has a protective effect in an experimental animal model of sleep-related movement disorder (A11 dopaminergic nuclei lesions with 6-OHDA). Rats were divided into four groups (Control PE-CTRL/PE, SHAM/PE, A11 lesion/NPE, A11 lesion/PE). Two experiments were performed: (1) the rats underwent PE before (2 weeks) and after (4 weeks) the A11 lesion; and (2) the rats underwent PE only after (4 weeks) the A11 lesion. Electrode insertion surgery was performed and sleep analyses were conducted over a period of 24h (baseline and after PE) and analyzed in 6 blocks of 4h. The results demonstrated that the A11 lesion produced an increased percentage of wakefulness in the final block of the dark period (3-7am) and a significant enhancement of the number of limb movements (LM) throughout the day. Four weeks of PE was important for reducing the number of LMs in the A11 lesion group in the rats that performed PE before and after the A11 lesion. However, in the analysis of the protective effect of PE on LM, the results showed that the number of LMs was lower at baseline in the group that had performed 2 weeks of PE prior to the A11 lesion than in the group that had not previously performed PE. In conclusion, these findings consistently demonstrate that non-pharmacological manipulations had a beneficial effect on the symptoms of sleep-related movement disorder. PMID:26923163

  17. Movement of regulatory RNA between animal cells

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Antony M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recent studies suggest that RNA can move from one cell to another and regulate genes through specific base-pairing. Mechanisms that modify or select RNA for secretion from a cell are unclear. Secreted RNA can be stable enough to be detected in the extracellular environment and can enter the cytosol of distant cells to regulate genes. Mechanisms that import RNA into the cytosol of an animal cell can enable uptake of RNA from many sources including other organisms. This role of RNA is akin to that of steroid hormones, which cross cell membranes to regulate genes. The potential diagnostic use of RNA in human extracellular fluids has ignited interest in understanding mechanisms that enable the movement of RNA between animal cells. Genetic model systems will be essential to gain more confidence in proposed mechanisms of RNA transport and to connect an extracellular RNA with a specific biological function. Studies in the worm C. elegans and in other animals have begun to reveal parts of this novel mechanism of cell-to-cell communication. Here, I summarize the current state of this nascent field, highlight the many unknowns, and suggest future directions. PMID:26138457

  18. Building the bridge between animal movement and population dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Juan M.; Moorcroft, Paul R.; Matthiopoulos, Jason; Frair, Jacqueline L.; Kie, John G.; Powell, Roger A.; Merrill, Evelyn H.; Haydon, Daniel T.

    2010-01-01

    While the mechanistic links between animal movement and population dynamics are ecologically obvious, it is much less clear when knowledge of animal movement is a prerequisite for understanding and predicting population dynamics. GPS and other technologies enable detailed tracking of animal location concurrently with acquisition of landscape data and information on individual physiology. These tools can be used to refine our understanding of the mechanistic links between behaviour and individual condition through ‘spatially informed’ movement models where time allocation to different behaviours affects individual survival and reproduction. For some species, socially informed models that address the movements and average fitness of differently sized groups and how they are affected by fission–fusion processes at relevant temporal scales are required. Furthermore, as most animals revisit some places and avoid others based on their previous experiences, we foresee the incorporation of long-term memory and intention in movement models. The way animals move has important consequences for the degree of mixing that we expect to find both within a population and between individuals of different species. The mixing rate dictates the level of detail required by models to capture the influence of heterogeneity and the dynamics of intra- and interspecific interaction. PMID:20566505

  19. Comparative study between two animal models of extrapyramidal movement disorders: prevention and reversion by pecan nut shell aqueous extract.

    PubMed

    Trevizol, Fabiola; Benvegnú, Dalila M; Barcelos, Raquel C S; Pase, Camila S; Segat, Hecson J; Dias, Verônica Tironi; Dolci, Geisa S; Boufleur, Nardeli; Reckziegel, Patrícia; Bürger, Marilise E

    2011-08-01

    Acute reserpine and subchronic haloperidol are animal models of extrapyramidal disorders often used to study parkinsonism, akinesia and tardive dyskinesia. In humans, these usually irreversible and disabling extrapyramidal disorders are developed by typical antipsychotic treatment, whose pathophysiology has been related to oxidative damages development. So far, there is no treatment to prevent these problems of the psychiatric clinic, and therefore further studies are needed. Here we used the animal models of extrapyramidal disorders cited above, which were performed in two distinct experiments: orofacial dyskinesia (OD)/catalepsy induced by acute reserpine and subchronic haloperidol after (experiment 1) and before (experiment 2) oral treatment with pecan shell aqueous extract (AE), a natural and promissory antioxidant. When administered previously (exp.1), the AE prevented OD and catalepsy induced by both reserpine and haloperidol. When reserpine and haloperidol were administered before the extract (exp.2), the animals developed OD and catalepsy all the same. However, the orofacial parameter (but not catalepsy) in both animal models was reversed after 7 and 14 days of AE treatment. These results indicate that, acute reserpine and subchronic haloperidol administrations induced similar motor disorders, although through different mechanisms, and therefore are important animal models to study the physiopathology of extrapyramidal disorders. Comparatively, the pecan shell AE was able to both prevent and reverse OD but only to prevent catalepsy. These results reinforce the role of oxidative stress and validate the two animal models used here. Our findings also favor the idea of prevention of extrapyramidal disorders, rather than their reversal. PMID:21356248

  20. Understanding the dynamical control of animal movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Donald

    2008-03-01

    Over the last 50 years, neurophysiologists have described many neural circuits that transform sensory input into motor commands, while biomechanicians and behavioral biologists have described many patterns of animal movement that occur in response to sensory input. Attempts to link these two have been frustrated by our technical inability to record from the necessary neurons in a freely behaving animal. As a result, we don't know how these neural circuits function in the closed loop context of free behavior, where the sensory and motor context changes on a millisecond time-scale. To address this problem, we have developed a software package, AnimatLab (www.AnimatLab.com), that enables users to reconstruct an animal's body and its relevant neural circuits, to link them at the sensory and motor ends, and through simulation, to test their ability to reproduce appropriate patterns of the animal's movements in a simulated Newtonian world. A Windows-based program, AnimatLab consists of a neural editor, a body editor, a world editor, stimulus and recording facilities, neural and physics engines, and an interactive 3-D graphical display. We have used AnimatLab to study three patterns of behavior: the grasshopper jump, crayfish escape, and crayfish leg movements used in postural control, walking, reaching and grasping. In each instance, the simulation helped identify constraints on both nervous function and biomechanical performance that have provided the basis for new experiments. Colleagues elsewhere have begun to use AnimatLab to study control of paw movements in cats and postural control in humans. We have also used AnimatLab simulations to guide the development of an autonomous hexapod robot in which the neural control circuitry is downloaded to the robot from the test computer.

  1. What is the animal doing? Tools for exploring behavioural structure in animal movements.

    PubMed

    Gurarie, Eliezer; Bracis, Chloe; Delgado, Maria; Meckley, Trevor D; Kojola, Ilpo; Wagner, C Michael

    2016-01-01

    Movement data provide a window - often our only window - into the cognitive, social and biological processes that underlie the behavioural ecology of animals in the wild. Robust methods for identifying and interpreting distinct modes of movement behaviour are of great importance, but complicated by the fact that movement data are complex, multivariate and dependent. Many different approaches to exploratory analysis of movement have been developed to answer similar questions, and practitioners are often at a loss for how to choose an appropriate tool for a specific question. We apply and compare four methodological approaches: first passage time (FPT), Bayesian partitioning of Markov models (BPMM), behavioural change point analysis (BCPA) and a fitted multistate random walk (MRW) to three simulated tracks and two animal trajectories - a sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) tracked for 12 h and a wolf (Canis lupus) tracked for 1 year. The simulations - in which, respectively, velocity, tortuosity and spatial bias change - highlight the sensitivity of all methods to model misspecification. Methods that do not account for autocorrelation in the movement variables lead to spurious change points, while methods that do not account for spatial bias completely miss changes in orientation. When applied to the animal data, the methods broadly agree on the structure of the movement behaviours. Important discrepancies, however, reflect differences in the assumptions and nature of the outputs. Important trade-offs are between the strength of the a priori assumptions (low in BCPA, high in MRW), complexity of output (high in the BCPA, low in the BPMM and MRW) and explanatory potential (highest in the MRW). The animal track analysis suggests some general principles for the exploratory analysis of movement data, including ways to exploit the strengths of the various methods. We argue for close and detailed exploratory analysis of movement before fitting complex movement models. PMID

  2. Combining High-Speed Cameras and Stop-Motion Animation Software to Support Students' Modeling of Human Body Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Victor R.

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanics, and specifically the biomechanics associated with human movement, is a potentially rich backdrop against which educators can design innovative science teaching and learning activities. Moreover, the use of technologies associated with biomechanics research, such as high-speed cameras that can produce high-quality slow-motion video,…

  3. Memory Effects on Movement Behavior in Animal Foraging

    PubMed Central

    Bracis, Chloe; Gurarie, Eliezer; Van Moorter, Bram; Goodwin, R. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    An individual’s choices are shaped by its experience, a fundamental property of behavior important to understanding complex processes. Learning and memory are observed across many taxa and can drive behaviors, including foraging behavior. To explore the conditions under which memory provides an advantage, we present a continuous-space, continuous-time model of animal movement that incorporates learning and memory. Using simulation models, we evaluate the benefit memory provides across several types of landscapes with variable-quality resources and compare the memory model within a nested hierarchy of simpler models (behavioral switching and random walk). We find that memory almost always leads to improved foraging success, but that this effect is most marked in landscapes containing sparse, contiguous patches of high-value resources that regenerate relatively fast and are located in an otherwise devoid landscape. In these cases, there is a large payoff for finding a resource patch, due to size, value, or locational difficulty. While memory-informed search is difficult to differentiate from other factors using solely movement data, our results suggest that disproportionate spatial use of higher value areas, higher consumption rates, and consumption variability all point to memory influencing the movement direction of animals in certain ecosystems. PMID:26288228

  4. When to be discrete: The importance of time formulation in understanding animal movement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McClintock, Brett T.; Johnson, Devin S.; Hooten, Mevin B.; Ver Hoef, Jay M.; Morales, Juan M.

    2014-01-01

    Animal movement is essential to our understanding of population dynamics, animal behavior, and the impacts of global change. Coupled with high-resolution biotelemetry data, exciting new inferences about animal movement have been facilitated by various specifications of contemporary models. These approaches differ, but most share common themes. One key distinction is whether the underlying movement process is conceptualized in discrete or continuous time. This is perhaps the greatest source of confusion among practitioners, both in terms of implementation and biological interpretation. In general, animal movement occurs in continuous time but we observe it at fixed discrete-time intervals. Thus, continuous time is conceptually and theoretically appealing, but in practice it is perhaps more intuitive to interpret movement in discrete intervals. With an emphasis on state-space models, we explore the differences and similarities between continuous and discrete versions of mechanistic movement models, establish some common terminology, and indicate under which circumstances one form might be preferred over another. Counter to the overly simplistic view that discrete- and continuous-time conceptualizations are merely different means to the same end, we present novel mathematical results revealing hitherto unappreciated consequences of model formulation on inferences about animal movement. Notably, the speed and direction of movement are intrinsically linked in current continuous-time random walk formulations, and this can have important implications when interpreting animal behavior. We illustrate these concepts in the context of state-space models with multiple movement behavior states using northern fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus) biotelemetry data.

  5. When to be discrete: the importance of time formulation in understanding animal movement.

    PubMed

    McClintock, Brett T; Johnson, Devin S; Hooten, Mevin B; Ver Hoef, Jay M; Morales, Juan M

    2014-01-01

    Animal movement is essential to our understanding of population dynamics, animal behavior, and the impacts of global change. Coupled with high-resolution biotelemetry data, exciting new inferences about animal movement have been facilitated by various specifications of contemporary models. These approaches differ, but most share common themes. One key distinction is whether the underlying movement process is conceptualized in discrete or continuous time. This is perhaps the greatest source of confusion among practitioners, both in terms of implementation and biological interpretation. In general, animal movement occurs in continuous time but we observe it at fixed discrete-time intervals. Thus, continuous time is conceptually and theoretically appealing, but in practice it is perhaps more intuitive to interpret movement in discrete intervals. With an emphasis on state-space models, we explore the differences and similarities between continuous and discrete versions of mechanistic movement models, establish some common terminology, and indicate under which circumstances one form might be preferred over another. Counter to the overly simplistic view that discrete- and continuous-time conceptualizations are merely different means to the same end, we present novel mathematical results revealing hitherto unappreciated consequences of model formulation on inferences about animal movement. Notably, the speed and direction of movement are intrinsically linked in current continuous-time random walk formulations, and this can have important implications when interpreting animal behavior. We illustrate these concepts in the context of state-space models with multiple movement behavior states using northern fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus) biotelemetry data. PMID:25709830

  6. Predicting the Movement Speeds of Animals in Natural Environments.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robbie S; Husak, Jerry F; Halsey, Lewis G; Clemente, Christofer J

    2015-12-01

    An animal's movement speed affects all behaviors and underlies the intensity of an activity, the time it takes to complete it, and the probability of successfully completing it, but which factors determine how fast or slow an animal chooses to move? Despite the critical importance of an animal's choice of speed (hereafter designated as "speed-choice"), we still lack a framework for understanding and predicting how fast animals should move in nature. In this article, we develop a framework for predicting speed that is applicable to any animal-including humans-performing any behavior where choice of speed occurs. To inspire new research in this area, we (1) detail the main factors likely to affect speed-choice, including organismal constraints (i.e., energetic, physiological, and biomechanical) and environmental constraints (i.e., predation intensity and abiotic factors); (2) discuss the value of optimal foraging theory in developing models of speed-choice; and (3) describe how optimality models might be integrated with the range of potential organismal and environmental constraints to predict speed. We show that by utilizing optimality theory it is possible to provide quantitative predictions of optimal speeds across different ecological contexts. However, the usefulness of any predictive models is still entirely dependent on being able to provide relevant mathematical functions to insert into such models. We still lack basic knowledge about how an animal's speed affects its motor control, maneuverability, observational skills, and vulnerability to predators. Studies exploring these gaps in knowledge will help facilitate the field of optimal performance and allow us to adequately parameterize models predicting the speed-choice of animals, which represents one of the most basic of all behavioral decisions. PMID:26493609

  7. Art In Movement: New Directions in Animation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halas, John; Manvell, Roger

    Thanks to film, graphic artists can now create over time as well as in space. An essay discusses the influence of cinema on still paintings (e.g., Duchamp's "Nude Descending a Staircase" and the increasing combination of animation and live action in films. New techniques that are available in animation and in special visual effects are explained,…

  8. Analysis and visualization of animal movement

    PubMed Central

    Shamoun-Baranes, Judy; van Loon, E. Emiel; Purves, Ross S.; Speckmann, Bettina; Weiskopf, Daniel; Camphuysen, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    The interdisciplinary workshop ‘Analysis and Visualization of Moving Objects’ was held at the Lorentz Centre in Leiden, The Netherlands, from 27 June to 1 July 2011. It brought together international specialists from ecology, computer science and geographical information science actively involved in the exploration, visualization and analysis of moving objects, such as marine reptiles, mammals, birds, storms, ships, cars and pedestrians. The aim was to share expertise, methodologies, data and common questions between different fields, and to work towards making significant advances in movement research. A data challenge based on GPS tracking of lesser black-backed gulls (Larus fuscus) was used to stimulate initial discussions, cross-fertilization between research groups and to serve as an initial focus for activities during the workshop. PMID:21865243

  9. Crossing regimes of temperature dependence in animal movement.

    PubMed

    Gibert, Jean P; Chelini, Marie-Claire; Rosenthal, Malcolm F; DeLong, John P

    2016-05-01

    A pressing challenge in ecology is to understand the effects of changing global temperatures on food web structure and dynamics. The stability of these complex ecological networks largely depends on how predator-prey interactions may respond to temperature changes. Because predators and prey rely on their velocities to catch food or avoid being eaten, understanding how temperatures may affect animal movement is central to this quest. Despite our efforts, we still lack a mechanistic understanding of how the effect of temperature on metabolic processes scales up to animal movement and beyond. Here, we merge a biomechanical approach, the Metabolic Theory of Ecology and empirical data to show that animal movement displays multiple regimes of temperature dependence. We also show that crossing these regimes has important consequences for population dynamics and stability, which depend on the parameters controlling predator-prey interactions. We argue that this dependence upon interaction parameters may help explain why experimental work on the temperature dependence of interaction strengths has so far yielded conflicting results. More importantly, these changes in the temperature dependence of animal movement can have consequences that go well beyond ecological interactions and affect, for example, animal communication, mating, sensory detection, and any behavioral modality dependent on the movement of limbs. Finally, by not taking into account the changes in temperature dependence reported here we might not be able to properly forecast the impact of global warming on ecological processes and propose appropriate mitigation action when needed. PMID:26854767

  10. Toward a mechanistic understanding of animal migration: incorporating physiological measurements in the study of animal movement

    PubMed Central

    Jachowski, David S.; Singh, Navinder J.

    2015-01-01

    Movements are a consequence of an individual's motion and navigational capacity, internal state variables and the influence of external environmental conditions. Although substantial advancements have been made in methods of measuring and quantifying variation in motion capacity, navigational capacity and external environmental parameters in recent decades, the role of internal state in animal migration (and in movement in general) is comparatively little studied. Recent studies of animal movement in the wild illustrate how direct physiological measurements can improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying movement decisions. In this review, we synthesize and provide examples of how recent technical advances in the physiology-related fields of energetics, nutrition, endocrinology, immunology and ecotoxicology provide opportunities for direct measurements of physiological state in the study of animal movement. We then propose a framework for practitioners to enable better integration of studies of physiological state into animal movement ecology by assessing the mechanistic role played by physiology as both a driver and a modulator of movement. Finally, we highlight the current limitations and research priorities for better integration of direct measurements of animal physiological state into the study of animal movement. PMID:27293720

  11. A passive integrated transponder system for tracking animal movements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boarman, W.I.; Beigel, M.L.; Goodlett, G.C.; Sazaki, M.

    1999-01-01

    We describe an automated system that uses passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags to track movements of animals past specific locations. The system was designed to operate maintenance free for several months, be secure from vandalism and environmental damage, and record the identity, date, and time of passage of animals past a 2.4-m wide area. We used the system to monitor effectively the movements of 172 desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) through 2 storm drain culverts that pass beneath a state highway in the Mojave Desert, California. Four tortoises entered or passed through the culverts on 60 occasions. The system can be easily adapted to other species.

  12. Animal Model of Dermatophytosis

    PubMed Central

    Shimamura, Tsuyoshi; Kubota, Nobuo; Shibuya, Kazutoshi

    2012-01-01

    Dermatophytosis is superficial fungal infection caused by dermatophytes that invade the keratinized tissue of humans and animals. Lesions from dermatophytosis exhibit an inflammatory reaction induced to eliminate the invading fungi by using the host's normal immune function. Many scientists have attempted to establish an experimental animal model to elucidate the pathogenesis of human dermatophytosis and evaluate drug efficacy. However, current animal models have several issues. In the present paper, we surveyed reports about the methodology of the dermatophytosis animal model for tinea corporis, tinea pedis, and tinea unguium and discussed future prospects. PMID:22619489

  13. Discovering loose group movement patterns from animal trajectories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Yuwei; Luo, Ze; Xiong, Yan; Prosser, Diann J.; Newman, Scott H.; Takekawa, John Y.; Yan, Baoping

    2015-01-01

    The technical advances of positioning technologies enable us to track animal movements at finer spatial and temporal scales, and further help to discover a variety of complex interactive relationships. In this paper, considering the loose gathering characteristics of the real-life groups' members during the movements, we propose two kinds of loose group movement patterns and corresponding discovery algorithms. Firstly, we propose the weakly consistent group movement pattern which allows the gathering of a part of the members and individual temporary leave from the whole during the movements. To tolerate the high dispersion of the group at some moments (i.e. to adapt the discontinuity of the group's gatherings), we further scheme the weakly consistent and continuous group movement pattern. The extensive experimental analysis and comparison with the real and synthetic data shows that the group pattern discovery algorithms proposed in this paper are similar to the the real-life frequent divergences of the members during the movements, can discover more complete memberships, and have considerable performance.

  14. Animal models of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kapourchali, Fatemeh Ramezani; Surendiran, Gangadaran; Chen, Li; Uitz, Elisabeth; Bahadori, Babak; Moghadasian, Mohammed H

    2014-01-01

    In this mini-review several commonly used animal models of atherosclerosis have been discussed. Among them, emphasis has been made on mice, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates. Although these animal models have played a significant role in our understanding of induction of atherosclerotic lesions, we still lack a reliable animal model for regression of the disease. Researchers have reported several genetically modified and transgenic animal models that replicate human atherosclerosis, however each of current animal models have some limitations. Among these animal models, the apolipoprotein (apo) E-knockout (KO) mice have been used extensively because they develop spontaneous atherosclerosis. Furthermore, atherosclerotic lesions developed in this model depending on experimental design may resemble humans’ stable and unstable atherosclerotic lesions. This mouse model of hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis has been also used to investigate the impact of oxidative stress and inflammation on atherogenesis. Low density lipoprotein (LDL)-r-KO mice are a model of human familial hypercholesterolemia. However, unlike apo E-KO mice, the LDL-r-KO mice do not develop spontaneous atherosclerosis. Both apo E-KO and LDL-r-KO mice have been employed to generate other relevant mouse models of cardiovascular disease through breeding strategies. In addition to mice, rabbits have been used extensively particularly to understand the mechanisms of cholesterol-induced atherosclerosis. The present review paper details the characteristics of animal models that are used in atherosclerosis research. PMID:24868511

  15. From birds to butterflies: animal movement patterns and stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, Dustin R; Hobson, Keith A

    2004-05-01

    Establishing patterns of movement of wild animals is crucial for our understanding of their ecology, life history and behavior, and is a prerequisite for their effective conservation. Advances in the use of stable isotope markers make it possible to track a diversity of animal species in a variety of habitats. This approach is revolutionizing the way in which we make connections between phases of the annual cycle of migratory animals. However, researchers must exercise care in their application of isotopic methods. Here, we review stable isotope patterns in nature and discuss recent tracking applications in a range of taxa. To aid in the interpretation and design of effective and insightful isotope movement studies, we discuss a series of key issues and assumptions. This exciting field will advance rapidly if researchers consider these aspects of study design and interpretation carefully. PMID:16701265

  16. 9 CFR 71.16 - Inspection and certification of poultry or other animals for interstate movement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... poultry or other animals for interstate movement. 71.16 Section 71.16 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 71.16 Inspection and certification of poultry or other animals for interstate movement. (a) Assistance and facilities. When poultry or other animals...

  17. 9 CFR 71.16 - Inspection and certification of poultry or other animals for interstate movement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... poultry or other animals for interstate movement. 71.16 Section 71.16 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 71.16 Inspection and certification of poultry or other animals for interstate movement. (a) Assistance and facilities. When poultry or other animals...

  18. 9 CFR 71.16 - Inspection and certification of poultry or other animals for interstate movement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... poultry or other animals for interstate movement. 71.16 Section 71.16 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 71.16 Inspection and certification of poultry or other animals for interstate movement. (a) Assistance and facilities. When poultry or other animals...

  19. 9 CFR 71.16 - Inspection and certification of poultry or other animals for interstate movement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... poultry or other animals for interstate movement. 71.16 Section 71.16 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 71.16 Inspection and certification of poultry or other animals for interstate movement. (a) Assistance and facilities. When poultry or other animals...

  20. 9 CFR 71.16 - Inspection and certification of poultry or other animals for interstate movement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... poultry or other animals for interstate movement. 71.16 Section 71.16 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 71.16 Inspection and certification of poultry or other animals for interstate movement. (a) Assistance and facilities. When poultry or other animals...

  1. Modelling Farm Animal Welfare

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Lisa M.; Part, Chérie E.

    2013-01-01

    Simple Summary In this review paper we discuss the different modeling techniques that have been used in animal welfare research to date. We look at what questions they have been used to answer, the advantages and pitfalls of the methods, and how future research can best use these approaches to answer some of the most important upcoming questions in farm animal welfare. Abstract The use of models in the life sciences has greatly expanded in scope and advanced in technique in recent decades. However, the range, type and complexity of models used in farm animal welfare is comparatively poor, despite the great scope for use of modeling in this field of research. In this paper, we review the different modeling approaches used in farm animal welfare science to date, discussing the types of questions they have been used to answer, the merits and problems associated with the method, and possible future applications of each technique. We find that the most frequently published types of model used in farm animal welfare are conceptual and assessment models; two types of model that are frequently (though not exclusively) based on expert opinion. Simulation, optimization, scenario, and systems modeling approaches are rarer in animal welfare, despite being commonly used in other related fields. Finally, common issues such as a lack of quantitative data to parameterize models, and model selection and validation are discussed throughout the review, with possible solutions and alternative approaches suggested. PMID:26487411

  2. Animal Density and Track Counts: Understanding the Nature of Observations Based on Animal Movements

    PubMed Central

    Keeping, Derek; Pelletier, Rick

    2014-01-01

    Counting animals to estimate their population sizes is often essential for their management and conservation. Since practitioners frequently rely on indirect observations of animals, it is important to better understand the relationship between such indirect indices and animal abundance. The Formozov-Malyshev-Pereleshin (FMP) formula provides a theoretical foundation for understanding the relationship between animal track counts and the true density of species. Although this analytical method potentially has universal applicability wherever animals are readily detectable by their tracks, it has long been unique to Russia and remains widely underappreciated. In this paper, we provide a test of the FMP formula by isolating the influence of animal travel path tortuosity (i.e., convolutedness) on track counts. We employed simulations using virtual and empirical data, in addition to a field test comparing FMP estimates with independent estimates from line transect distance sampling. We verify that track counts (total intersections between animals and transects) are determined entirely by density and daily movement distances. Hence, the FMP estimator is theoretically robust against potential biases from specific shapes or patterns of animal movement paths if transects are randomly situated with respect to those movements (i.e., the transects do not influence animals’ movements). However, detectability (the detection probability of individual animals) is not determined simply by daily travel distance but also by tortuosity, so ensuring that all intersections with transects are counted regardless of the number of individual animals that made them becomes critical for an accurate density estimate. Additionally, although tortuosity has no bearing on mean track encounter rates, it does affect encounter rate variance and therefore estimate precision. We discuss how these fundamental principles made explicit by the FMP formula have widespread implications for methods of

  3. Dissemination of parasites by animal movements in small ruminant farms.

    PubMed

    Vasileiou, N G C; Fthenakis, G C; Papadopoulos, E

    2015-09-30

    The present paper discusses the spread of parasites by animal movements in small ruminant farms; it focuses in dissemination of parasitic forms that would lead to subsequent infection of sheep or goats. Systems of small ruminant production involve a component of animal movement (e.g., grazing) as part of routine husbandry, which favors spread of parasitic forms; that refers mainly to parasites of the digestive system (nematodes, trematodes, cestodes, protozoa), as well as helminthes of the respiratory system, although dissemination of the various parasitic forms in the environment would not always result to subsequent infection; external parasites may also be disseminated during movements, e.g., to inhabit wooden poles used in fencing. New livestock into a farm constitutes a biosecurity hazard and the most common means to introducing new parasitic pathogens into a farm; in contemporary small ruminant health management, this contributes in dissemination of anthelmintic resistant parasitic strains; other parasitic disease agents (e.g., mange mites, ticks) may also be spread into a farm that way. Often, especially in small scale farming, visits of rams or bucks take place from one farm to another during the mating season; in such cases, ectoparasites (e.g., mange mites) can be disseminated through direct contact of animals, as well other pathogens (e.g., Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum) via the semen. During transportation of sheep/goats, parasitic forms can also spread, as well as during movement of sheep or goats to slaughterhouses, in which case dogs present in these places would contribute to their dissemination. Spread of life forms of various parasites can also occur from animal species present in the environment of sheep or goats; these include animals present within a farm, stray dogs roaming around a farm (e.g., for spread of Multiceps multiceps, Echinococcus granulosus, Taenia hydatigena, N. caninum), cats commanding the environment of a farm (e.g., for

  4. A new method for discovering behavior patterns among animal movements

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuwei; Luo, Ze; Takekawa, John; Prosser, Diann; Xiong, Yan; Newman, Scott; Xiao, Xiangming; Batbayar, Nyambayar; Spragens, Kyle; Balachandran, Sivananinthaperumal; Yan, Baoping

    2016-01-01

    Advanced satellite tracking technologies enable biologists to track animal movements at fine spatial and temporal scales. The resultant data present opportunities and challenges for understanding animal behavioral mechanisms. In this paper, we develop a new method to elucidate animal movement patterns from tracking data. Here, we propose the notion of continuous behavior patterns as a concise representation of popular migration routes and underlying sequential behaviors during migration. Each stage in the pattern is characterized in terms of space (i.e., the places traversed during movements) and time (i.e. the time spent in those places); that is, the behavioral state corresponding to a stage is inferred according to the spatiotemporal and sequential context. Hence, the pattern may be interpreted predictably. We develop a candidate generation and refinement framework to derive all continuous behavior patterns from raw trajectories. In the framework, we first define the representative spots to denote the underlying potential behavioral states that are extracted from individual trajectories according to the similarity of relaxed continuous locations in certain distinct time intervals. We determine the common behaviors of multiple individuals according to the spatiotemporal proximity of representative spots and apply a projection-based extension approach to generate candidate sequential behavior sequences as candidate patterns. Finally, the candidate generation procedure is combined with a refinement procedure to derive continuous behavior patterns. We apply an ordered processing strategy to accelerate candidate refinement. The proposed patterns and discovery framework are evaluated through conceptual experiments on both real GPS-tracking and large synthetic datasets. PMID:27217810

  5. A new method for discovering behavior patterns among animal movements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Y.; Luo, Ze; Takekawa, J.; Prosser, Diann J.; Xiong, Y.; Newman, S.; Xiao, X.; Batbayar, N.; Spragens, Kyle A; Balachandran, S.; Yan, B.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced satellite tracking technologies enable biologists to track animal movements at fine spatial and temporal scales. The resultant data present opportunities and challenges for understanding animal behavioral mechanisms. In this paper, we develop a new method to elucidate animal movement patterns from tracking data. Here, we propose the notion of continuous behavior patterns as a concise representation of popular migration routes and underlying sequential behaviors during migration. Each stage in the pattern is characterized in terms of space (i.e., the places traversed during movements) and time (i.e. the time spent in those places); that is, the behavioral state corresponding to a stage is inferred according to the spatiotemporal and sequential context. Hence, the pattern may be interpreted predictably. We develop a candidate generation and refinement framework to derive all continuous behavior patterns from raw trajectories. In the framework, we first define the representative spots to denote the underlying potential behavioral states that are extracted from individual trajectories according to the similarity of relaxed continuous locations in certain distinct time intervals. We determine the common behaviors of multiple individuals according to the spatiotemporal proximity of representative spots and apply a projection-based extension approach to generate candidate sequential behavior sequences as candidate patterns. Finally, the candidate generation procedure is combined with a refinement procedure to derive continuous behavior patterns. We apply an ordered processing strategy to accelerate candidate refinement. The proposed patterns and discovery framework are evaluated through conceptual experiments on both real GPS-tracking and large synthetic datasets.

  6. Animal models for osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Turner, R T; Maran, A; Lotinun, S; Hefferan, T; Evans, G L; Zhang, M; Sibonga, J D

    2001-01-01

    Animal models will continue to be important tools in the quest to understand the contribution of specific genes to establishment of peak bone mass and optimal bone architecture, as well as the genetic basis for a predisposition toward accelerated bone loss in the presence of co-morbidity factors such as estrogen deficiency. Existing animal models will continue to be useful for modeling changes in bone metabolism and architecture induced by well-defined local and systemic factors. However, there is a critical unfulfilled need to develop and validate better animal models to allow fruitful investigation of the interaction of the multitude of factors which precipitate senile osteoporosis. Well characterized and validated animal models that can be recommended for investigation of the etiology, prevention and treatment of several forms of osteoporosis have been listed in Table 1. Also listed are models which are provisionally recommended. These latter models have potential but are inadequately characterized, deviate significantly from the human response, require careful choice of strain or age, or are not practical for most investigators to adopt. It cannot be stressed strongly enough that the enormous potential of laboratory animals as models for osteoporosis can only be realized if great care is taken in the choice of an appropriate species, age, experimental design, and measurements. Poor choices will results in misinterpretation of results which ultimately can bring harm to patients who suffer from osteoporosis by delaying advancement of knowledge. PMID:11704974

  7. Animal models for osteoporosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. T.; Maran, A.; Lotinun, S.; Hefferan, T.; Evans, G. L.; Zhang, M.; Sibonga, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Animal models will continue to be important tools in the quest to understand the contribution of specific genes to establishment of peak bone mass and optimal bone architecture, as well as the genetic basis for a predisposition toward accelerated bone loss in the presence of co-morbidity factors such as estrogen deficiency. Existing animal models will continue to be useful for modeling changes in bone metabolism and architecture induced by well-defined local and systemic factors. However, there is a critical unfulfilled need to develop and validate better animal models to allow fruitful investigation of the interaction of the multitude of factors which precipitate senile osteoporosis. Well characterized and validated animal models that can be recommended for investigation of the etiology, prevention and treatment of several forms of osteoporosis have been listed in Table 1. Also listed are models which are provisionally recommended. These latter models have potential but are inadequately characterized, deviate significantly from the human response, require careful choice of strain or age, or are not practical for most investigators to adopt. It cannot be stressed strongly enough that the enormous potential of laboratory animals as models for osteoporosis can only be realized if great care is taken in the choice of an appropriate species, age, experimental design, and measurements. Poor choices will results in misinterpretation of results which ultimately can bring harm to patients who suffer from osteoporosis by delaying advancement of knowledge.

  8. Animal movement constraints improve resource selection inference in the presence of telemetry error.

    PubMed

    Brost, Brian M; Hooten, Mevin B; Hanks, Ephraim M; Small, Robert J

    2015-10-01

    Multiple factors complicate the analysis of animal telemetry location data. Recent advancements address issues such as temporal autocorrelation and telemetry measurement error, but additional challenges remain. Difficulties introduced by complicated error structures or barriers to animal movement can weaken inference. We propose an approach for obtaining resource selection inference from animal location data that accounts for complicated error structures, movement constraints, and temporally autocorrelated observations. We specify a model for telemetry data observed with error conditional on unobserved true locations that reflects prior knowledge about constraints in the animal movement process. The observed telemetry data are modeled using a flexible distribution that accommodates extreme errors and complicated error structures. Although constraints to movement are often viewed as a nuisance, we use constraints to simultaneously estimate and account for telemetry error. We apply the model to simulated data, showing that it outperforms common ad hoc approaches used when confronted with measurement error and movement constraints. We then apply our framework to an Argos satellite telemetry data set on harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) in the Gulf of Alaska, a species that is constrained to move within the marine environment and adjacent coastlines. PMID:26649380

  9. Animal movement constraints improve resource selection inference in the presence of telemetry error

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brost, Brian M.; Hooten, Mevin B.; Hanks, Ephraim M.; Small, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple factors complicate the analysis of animal telemetry location data. Recent advancements address issues such as temporal autocorrelation and telemetry measurement error, but additional challenges remain. Difficulties introduced by complicated error structures or barriers to animal movement can weaken inference. We propose an approach for obtaining resource selection inference from animal location data that accounts for complicated error structures, movement constraints, and temporally autocorrelated observations. We specify a model for telemetry data observed with error conditional on unobserved true locations that reflects prior knowledge about constraints in the animal movement process. The observed telemetry data are modeled using a flexible distribution that accommodates extreme errors and complicated error structures. Although constraints to movement are often viewed as a nuisance, we use constraints to simultaneously estimate and account for telemetry error. We apply the model to simulated data, showing that it outperforms common ad hoc approaches used when confronted with measurement error and movement constraints. We then apply our framework to an Argos satellite telemetry data set on harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) in the Gulf of Alaska, a species that is constrained to move within the marine environment and adjacent coastlines.

  10. Animal models of tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Brozoski, Thomas J; Bauer, Carol A

    2016-08-01

    Presented is a thematic review of animal tinnitus models from a functional perspective. Chronic tinnitus is a persistent subjective sound sensation, emergent typically after hearing loss. Although the sensation is experientially simple, it appears to have central a nervous system substrate of unexpected complexity that includes areas outside of those classically defined as auditory. Over the past 27 years animal models have significantly contributed to understanding tinnitus' complex neurophysiology. In that time, a diversity of models have been developed, each with its own strengths and limitations. None has clearly become a standard. Animal models trace their origin to the 1988 experiments of Jastreboff and colleagues. All subsequent models derive some of their features from those experiments. Common features include behavior-dependent psychophysical determination, acoustic conditions that contrast objective sound and silence, and inclusion of at least one normal-hearing control group. In the present review, animal models have been categorized as either interrogative or reflexive. Interrogative models use emitted behavior under voluntary control to indicate hearing. An example would be pressing a lever to obtain food in the presence of a particular sound. In this type of model animals are interrogated about their auditory sensations, analogous to asking a patient, "What do you hear?" These models require at least some training and motivation management, and reflect the perception of tinnitus. Reflexive models, in contrast, employ acoustic modulation of an auditory reflex, such as the acoustic startle response. An unexpected loud sound will elicit a reflexive motor response from many species, including humans. Although involuntary, acoustic startle can be modified by a lower-level preceding event, including a silent sound gap. Sound-gap modulation of acoustic startle appears to discriminate tinnitus in animals as well as humans, and requires no training or

  11. Joint estimation over multiple individuals improves behavioural state inference from animal movement data

    PubMed Central

    Jonsen, Ian

    2016-01-01

    State-space models provide a powerful way to scale up inference of movement behaviours from individuals to populations when the inference is made across multiple individuals. Here, I show how a joint estimation approach that assumes individuals share identical movement parameters can lead to improved inference of behavioural states associated with different movement processes. I use simulated movement paths with known behavioural states to compare estimation error between nonhierarchical and joint estimation formulations of an otherwise identical state-space model. Behavioural state estimation error was strongly affected by the degree of similarity between movement patterns characterising the behavioural states, with less error when movements were strongly dissimilar between states. The joint estimation model improved behavioural state estimation relative to the nonhierarchical model for simulated data with heavy-tailed Argos location errors. When applied to Argos telemetry datasets from 10 Weddell seals, the nonhierarchical model estimated highly uncertain behavioural state switching probabilities for most individuals whereas the joint estimation model yielded substantially less uncertainty. The joint estimation model better resolved the behavioural state sequences across all seals. Hierarchical or joint estimation models should be the preferred choice for estimating behavioural states from animal movement data, especially when location data are error-prone. PMID:26853261

  12. Animal models of ADHD.

    PubMed

    Bari, A; Robbins, T W

    2011-01-01

    Studies employing animal models of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) present clear inherent advantages over human studies. Animal models are invaluable tools for the study of underlying neurochemical, neuropathological and genetic alterations that cause ADHD, because they allow relatively fast, rigorous hypothesis testing and invasive manipulations as well as selective breeding. Moreover, especially for ADHD, animal models with good predictive validity would allow the assessment of potential new therapeutics. In this chapter, we describe and comment on the most frequently used animal models of ADHD that have been created by genetic, neurochemical and physical alterations in rodents. We then discuss that an emerging and promising direction of the field is the analysis of individual behavioural differences among a normal population of animals. Subjects presenting extreme characteristics related to ADHD can be studied, thereby avoiding some of the problems that are found in other models, such as functional recovery and unnecessary assumptions about aetiology. This approach is justified by the theoretical need to consider human ADHD as the extreme part of a spectrum of characteristics that are distributed normally in the general population, as opposed to the predominant view of ADHD as a separate pathological category. PMID:21287324

  13. Animal models of fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Animal models of disease states are valuable tools for developing new treatments and investigating underlying mechanisms. They should mimic the symptoms and pathology of the disease and importantly be predictive of effective treatments. Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic widespread pain with associated co-morbid symptoms that include fatigue, depression, anxiety and sleep dysfunction. In this review, we present different animal models that mimic the signs and symptoms of fibromyalgia. These models are induced by a wide variety of methods that include repeated muscle insults, depletion of biogenic amines, and stress. All potential models produce widespread and long-lasting hyperalgesia without overt peripheral tissue damage and thus mimic the clinical presentation of fibromyalgia. We describe the methods for induction of the model, pathophysiological mechanisms for each model, and treatment profiles. PMID:24314231

  14. Animal models of scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Bobyn, Justin D; Little, David G; Gray, Randolph; Schindeler, Aaron

    2015-04-01

    Multiple techniques designed to induce scoliotic deformity have been applied across many animal species. We have undertaken a review of the literature regarding experimental models of scoliosis in animals to discuss their utility in comprehending disease aetiology and treatment. Models of scoliosis in animals can be broadly divided into quadrupedal and bipedal experiments. Quadrupedal models, in the absence of axial gravitation force, depend upon development of a mechanical asymmetry along the spine to initiate a scoliotic deformity. Bipedal models more accurately mimic human posture and consequently are subject to similar forces due to gravity, which have been long appreciated to be a contributing factor to the development of scoliosis. Many effective models of scoliosis in smaller animals have not been successfully translated to primates and humans. Though these models may not clarify the aetiology of human scoliosis, by providing a reliable and reproducible deformity in the spine they are a useful means with which to test interventions designed to correct and prevent deformity. PMID:25492698

  15. Animal Models of Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    A. Bouhenni, Rachida; Dunmire, Jeffrey; Sewell, Abby; Edward, Deepak P.

    2012-01-01

    Glaucoma is a heterogeneous group of disorders that progressively lead to blindness due to loss of retinal ganglion cells and damage to the optic nerve. It is a leading cause of blindness and visual impairment worldwide. Although research in the field of glaucoma is substantial, the pathophysiologic mechanisms causing the disease are not completely understood. A wide variety of animal models have been used to study glaucoma. These include monkeys, dogs, cats, rodents, and several other species. Although these models have provided valuable information about the disease, there is still no ideal model for studying glaucoma due to its complexity. In this paper we present a summary of most of the animal models that have been developed and used for the study of the different types of glaucoma, the strengths and limitations associated with each species use, and some potential criteria to develop a suitable model. PMID:22665989

  16. 9 CFR 94.15 - Animal products and materials; movement and handling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Animal products and materials; movement and handling. 94.15 Section 94.15 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND...

  17. 9 CFR 94.15 - Animal products and materials; movement and handling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Animal products and materials; movement and handling. 94.15 Section 94.15 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND...

  18. Agent Based Model of Livestock Movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miron, D. J.; Emelyanova, I. V.; Donald, G. E.; Garner, G. M.

    The modelling of livestock movements within Australia is of national importance for the purposes of the management and control of exotic disease spread, infrastructure development and the economic forecasting of livestock markets. In this paper an agent based model for the forecasting of livestock movements is presented. This models livestock movements from farm to farm through a saleyard. The decision of farmers to sell or buy cattle is often complex and involves many factors such as climate forecast, commodity prices, the type of farm enterprise, the number of animals available and associated off-shore effects. In this model the farm agent's intelligence is implemented using a fuzzy decision tree that utilises two of these factors. These two factors are the livestock price fetched at the last sale and the number of stock on the farm. On each iteration of the model farms choose either to buy, sell or abstain from the market thus creating an artificial supply and demand. The buyers and sellers then congregate at the saleyard where livestock are auctioned using a second price sealed bid. The price time series output by the model exhibits properties similar to those found in real livestock markets.

  19. Animal Models of Hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Sabatino, Denise E.; Nichols, Timothy C.; Merricks, Elizabeth; Bellinger, Dwight A.; Herzog, Roland W.; Monahan, Paul E.

    2013-01-01

    The X-linked bleeding disorder hemophilia is caused by mutations in coagulation factor VIII (hemophilia A) or factor IX (hemophilia B). Unless prophylactic treatment is provided, patients with severe disease (less than 1% clotting activity) typically experience frequent spontaneous bleeds. Current treatment is largely based on intravenous infusion of recombinant or plasma-derived coagulation factor concentrate. More effective factor products are being developed. Moreover, gene therapies for sustained correction of hemophilia are showing much promise in pre-clinical studies and in clinical trials. These advances in molecular medicine heavily depend on availability of well-characterized small and large animal models of hemophilia, primarily hemophilia mice and dogs. Experiments in these animals represent important early and intermediate steps of translational research aimed at development of better and safer treatments for hemophilia, such a protein and gene therapies or immune tolerance protocols. While murine models are excellent for studies of large groups of animals using genetically defined strains, canine models are important for testing scale-up and for longer-term follow-up as well as for studies that require larger blood volumes. PMID:22137432

  20. Animal models of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Jones, CA; Watson, DJG; Fone, KCF

    2011-01-01

    Developing reliable, predictive animal models for complex psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, is essential to increase our understanding of the neurobiological basis of the disorder and for the development of novel drugs with improved therapeutic efficacy. All available animal models of schizophrenia fit into four different induction categories: developmental, drug-induced, lesion or genetic manipulation, and the best characterized examples of each type are reviewed herein. Most rodent models have behavioural phenotype changes that resemble ‘positive-like’ symptoms of schizophrenia, probably reflecting altered mesolimbic dopamine function, but fewer models also show altered social interaction, and learning and memory impairment, analogous to negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia respectively. The negative and cognitive impairments in schizophrenia are resistant to treatment with current antipsychotics, even after remission of the psychosis, which limits their therapeutic efficacy. The MATRICS initiative developed a consensus on the core cognitive deficits of schizophrenic patients, and recommended a standardized test battery to evaluate them. More recently, work has begun to identify specific rodent behavioural tasks with translational relevance to specific cognitive domains affected in schizophrenia, and where available this review focuses on reporting the effect of current and potential antipsychotics on these tasks. The review also highlights the need to develop more comprehensive animal models that more adequately replicate deficits in negative and cognitive symptoms. Increasing information on the neurochemical and structural CNS changes accompanying each model will also help assess treatments that prevent the development of schizophrenia rather than treating the symptoms, another pivotal change required to enable new more effective therapeutic strategies to be developed. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on

  1. Can orchards help connect Mediterranean ecosystems? Animal movement data alter conservation priorities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nogeire, Theresa M.; Davis, Frank W.; Crooks, Kevin R.; McRae, Brad H.; Lyren, Lisa M.; Boydston, Erin E.

    2015-01-01

    As natural habitats become fragmented by human activities, animals must increasingly move through human-dominated systems, particularly agricultural landscapes. Mapping areas important for animal movement has therefore become a key part of conservation planning. Models of landscape connectivity are often parameterized using expert opinion and seldom distinguish between the risks and barriers presented by different crop types. Recent research, however, suggests different crop types, such as row crops and orchards, differ in the degree to which they facilitate or impede species movements. Like many mammalian carnivores, bobcats (Lynx rufus) are sensitive to fragmentation and loss of connectivity between habitat patches. We investigated how distinguishing between different agricultural land covers might change conclusions about the relative conservation importance of different land uses in a Mediterranean ecosystem. Bobcats moved relatively quickly in row crops but relatively slowly in orchards, at rates similar to those in natural habitats of woodlands and scrub. We found that parameterizing a connectivity model using empirical data on bobcat movements in agricultural lands and other land covers, instead of parameterizing the model using habitat suitability indices based on expert opinion, altered locations of predicted animal movement routes. These results emphasize that differentiating between types of agriculture can alter conservation planning outcomes.

  2. 9 CFR 71.3 - Interstate movement of diseased animals and poultry generally prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interstate movement of diseased animals and poultry generally prohibited. 71.3 Section 71.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND...

  3. 9 CFR 71.3 - Interstate movement of diseased animals and poultry generally prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and on... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interstate movement of diseased animals and poultry generally prohibited. 71.3 Section 71.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND...

  4. Modeling animal landscapes.

    PubMed

    Porter, W P; Ostrowski, S; Williams, J B

    2010-01-01

    There is an increasing need to assess the effects of climate and land-use change on habitat quality, ideally from a mechanistic basis. The symposium "Molecules to Migration: Pressures of Life" at the Fourth International Conference in Africa for Comparative Physiology and Biochemistry, Maasai Mara National Reserve, Kenya, 2008, illustrated how the principles of biophysical ecology can capture the mechanistic links between organisms, climate, and other habitat features. These principles provide spatially explicit assessments of habitat quality from a physiological perspective (i.e., "animal landscapes") that can be validated independently of the data used to derive and parameterize them. The contents of this symposium showcased how the modeling of animal landscapes can be used to assess key issues in applied and theoretical ecology. The presentations included applications to amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. The rare Arabian oryx on the Arabian Peninsula is used as an example for energetic calculations and their implications for behavior on the landscape. PMID:20670170

  5. Animal Models of Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lichao; Brown, Ritchie E.; McKenna, James T.; McCarley, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a debilitating sleep disorder with excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy as its two major symptoms. Although this disease was first described about one century ago, an animal model was not available until the 1970s. With the establishment of the Stanford canine narcolepsy colony, researchers were able to conduct multiple neurochemical studies to explore the pathophysiology of this disease. It was concluded that there was an imbalance between monoaminergic and cholinergic systems in canine narcolepsy. In 1999, two independent studies revealed that orexin neurotransmission deficiency was pivotal to the development of narcolepsy with cataplexy. This scientific leap fueled the generation of several genetically engineered mouse and rat models of narcolepsy. To facilitate further research, it is imperative that researchers reach a consensus concerning the evaluation of narcoleptic behavioral and EEG phenomenology in these models. PMID:19689311

  6. Development of automatic movement analysis system for a small laboratory animal using image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatomo, Satoshi; Kawasue, Kikuhito; Koshimoto, Chihiro

    2013-03-01

    Activity analysis in a small laboratory animal is an effective procedure for various bioscience fields. The simplest way to obtain animal activity data is just observation and recording manually, even though this is labor intensive and rather subjective. In order to analyze animal movement automatically and objectivity, expensive equipment is usually needed. In the present study, we develop animal activity analysis system by means of a template matching method with video recorded movements in laboratory animal at a low cost.

  7. Introduction to the Symposium: Towards a General Framework for Predicting Animal Movement Speeds in Nature.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robbie S; Husak, Jerry F

    2015-12-01

    Speed of movement is fundamental to animal behavior-defining the intensity of a task, the time needed to complete it, and the likelihood of success-but how does an animal decide how fast to move? Most studies of animal performance measure maximum capabilities, but animals rarely move at their maximum in the wild. It was the goal of our symposium to develop a conceptual framework to explore the choices of speed in nature. A major difference between our approach and previous work is our move toward understanding optimal rather than maximal speeds. In the following series of papers, we provide a starting point for future work on animal movement speeds, including a conceptual framework, a simple optimality model, an evolutionary context, and an exploration of the various biomechanical and energetic constraints on speed. By applying a cross-disciplinary approach to the study of the choice of speed-as we have done here-we can reveal much about the way animals use habitats, interact with conspecifics, avoid predators, obtain food, and negotiate human-modified landscapes. PMID:26493610

  8. The effect of animal movement on line transect estimates of abundance.

    PubMed

    Glennie, Richard; Buckland, Stephen T; Thomas, Len

    2015-01-01

    Line transect sampling is a distance sampling method for estimating the abundance of wild animal populations. One key assumption of this method is that all animals are detected at their initial location. Animal movement independent of the transect and observer can thus cause substantial bias. We present an analytic expression for this bias when detection within the transect is certain (strip transect sampling) and use simulation to quantify bias when detection falls off with distance from the line (line transect sampling). We also explore the non-linear relationship between bias, detection, and animal movement by varying detectability and movement type. We consider animals that move in randomly orientated straight lines, which provides an upper bound on bias, and animals that are constrained to a home range of random radius. We find that bias is reduced when animal movement is constrained, and bias is considerably smaller in line transect sampling than strip transect sampling provided that mean animal speed is less than observer speed. By contrast, when mean animal speed exceeds observer speed the bias in line transect sampling becomes comparable with, and may exceed, that of strip transect sampling. Bias from independent animal movement is reduced by the observer searching further perpendicular to the transect, searching a shorter distance ahead and by ignoring animals that may overtake the observer from behind. However, when animals move in response to the observer, the standard practice of searching further ahead should continue as the bias from responsive movement is often greater than that from independent movement. PMID:25799206

  9. 9 CFR 78.2 - Handling of certificates, permits, and “S” brand permits for interstate movement of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... âSâ brand permits for interstate movement of animals. 78.2 Section 78.2 Animals and Animal Products... certificates, permits, and “S” brand permits for interstate movement of animals. (a) Any certificate, permit, or “S” brand permit required by this part for the interstate movement of animals shall be...

  10. 9 CFR 78.2 - Handling of certificates, permits, and “S” brand permits for interstate movement of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... âSâ brand permits for interstate movement of animals. 78.2 Section 78.2 Animals and Animal Products... certificates, permits, and “S” brand permits for interstate movement of animals. (a) Any certificate, permit, or “S” brand permit required by this part for the interstate movement of animals shall be...

  11. 9 CFR 78.2 - Handling of certificates, permits, and “S” brand permits for interstate movement of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... âSâ brand permits for interstate movement of animals. 78.2 Section 78.2 Animals and Animal Products... certificates, permits, and “S” brand permits for interstate movement of animals. (a) Any certificate, permit, or “S” brand permit required by this part for the interstate movement of animals shall be...

  12. 9 CFR 80.3 - Movement of domestic animals that are positive to an official Johne's disease test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... positive to an official Johne's disease test. 80.3 Section 80.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS JOHNE'S DISEASE IN DOMESTIC ANIMALS § 80.3 Movement of domestic animals that are positive to an official Johne's disease test. (a) Movement of domestic animals...

  13. 9 CFR 80.3 - Movement of domestic animals that are positive to an official Johne's disease test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... positive to an official Johne's disease test. 80.3 Section 80.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS JOHNE'S DISEASE IN DOMESTIC ANIMALS § 80.3 Movement of domestic animals that are positive to an official Johne's disease test. (a) Movement of domestic animals...

  14. 9 CFR 80.4 - Segregation of animals positive to an official Johne's disease test during interstate movement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... official Johne's disease test during interstate movement. 80.4 Section 80.4 Animals and Animal Products... ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS JOHNE'S DISEASE IN DOMESTIC ANIMALS § 80.4 Segregation of animals positive to an official Johne's disease test during interstate movement. Animals that are...

  15. 9 CFR 80.3 - Movement of domestic animals that are positive to an official Johne's disease test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... positive to an official Johne's disease test. 80.3 Section 80.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS JOHNE'S DISEASE IN DOMESTIC ANIMALS § 80.3 Movement of domestic animals that are positive to an official Johne's disease test. (a) Movement of domestic animals...

  16. 9 CFR 80.4 - Segregation of animals positive to an official Johne's disease test during interstate movement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... official Johne's disease test during interstate movement. 80.4 Section 80.4 Animals and Animal Products... ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS JOHNE'S DISEASE IN DOMESTIC ANIMALS § 80.4 Segregation of animals positive to an official Johne's disease test during interstate movement. Animals that are...

  17. 9 CFR 80.3 - Movement of domestic animals that are positive to an official Johne's disease test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... positive to an official Johne's disease test. 80.3 Section 80.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS JOHNE'S DISEASE IN DOMESTIC ANIMALS § 80.3 Movement of domestic animals that are positive to an official Johne's disease test. (a) Movement of domestic animals...

  18. 9 CFR 80.4 - Segregation of animals positive to an official Johne's disease test during interstate movement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... official Johne's disease test during interstate movement. 80.4 Section 80.4 Animals and Animal Products... ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS JOHNE'S DISEASE IN DOMESTIC ANIMALS § 80.4 Segregation of animals positive to an official Johne's disease test during interstate movement. Animals that are...

  19. 9 CFR 80.3 - Movement of domestic animals that are positive to an official Johne's disease test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... positive to an official Johne's disease test. 80.3 Section 80.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS JOHNE'S DISEASE IN DOMESTIC ANIMALS § 80.3 Movement of domestic animals that are positive to an official Johne's disease test. (a) Movement of domestic animals...

  20. 9 CFR 80.4 - Segregation of animals positive to an official Johne's disease test during interstate movement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... official Johne's disease test during interstate movement. 80.4 Section 80.4 Animals and Animal Products... ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS JOHNE'S DISEASE IN DOMESTIC ANIMALS § 80.4 Segregation of animals positive to an official Johne's disease test during interstate movement. Animals that are...

  1. 9 CFR 80.4 - Segregation of animals positive to an official Johne's disease test during interstate movement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... official Johne's disease test during interstate movement. 80.4 Section 80.4 Animals and Animal Products... ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS JOHNE'S DISEASE IN DOMESTIC ANIMALS § 80.4 Segregation of animals positive to an official Johne's disease test during interstate movement. Animals that are...

  2. Apparent power-law distributions in animal movements can arise from intraspecific interactions

    PubMed Central

    Breed, Greg A.; Severns, Paul M.; Edwards, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Lévy flights have gained prominence for analysis of animal movement. In a Lévy flight, step-lengths are drawn from a heavy-tailed distribution such as a power law (PL), and a large number of empirical demonstrations have been published. Others, however, have suggested that animal movement is ill fit by PL distributions or contend a state-switching process better explains apparent Lévy flight movement patterns. We used a mix of direct behavioural observations and GPS tracking to understand step-length patterns in females of two related butterflies. We initially found movement in one species (Euphydryas editha taylori) was best fit by a bounded PL, evidence of a Lévy flight, while the other (Euphydryas phaeton) was best fit by an exponential distribution. Subsequent analyses introduced additional candidate models and used behavioural observations to sort steps based on intraspecific interactions (interactions were rare in E. phaeton but common in E. e. taylori). These analyses showed a mixed-exponential is favoured over the bounded PL for E. e. taylori and that when step-lengths were sorted into states based on the influence of harassing conspecific males, both states were best fit by simple exponential distributions. The direct behavioural observations allowed us to infer the underlying behavioural mechanism is a state-switching process driven by intraspecific interactions rather than a Lévy flight. PMID:25519992

  3. A new multi-scale measure for analysing animal movement data.

    PubMed

    Postlethwaite, Claire M; Brown, Pieta; Dennis, Todd E

    2013-01-21

    We present a new measure for analysing animal movement data, which we term a 'Multi-Scale Straightness Index' (MSSI). The measure is a generalisation of the 'Straightness Index', the ratio of the beeline distance between the start and end of a track to the total distance travelled. In our new measure, the Straightness Index is computed repeatedly for track segments at all possible temporal scales. The MSSI offers advantages over the standard Straightness Index, and other simple measures of track tortuosity (such as Sinuosity and Fractal Dimension), because it provides multiple characterisations of straightness, rather than just a single summary measure. Thus, comparisons can be made among different segments of trajectories and changes in behaviour can be inferred, both over time and at different temporal granularities. The measure also has an important advantage over several recent and increasingly popular methods for detecting behavioural changes in time-series locational data (e.g., state-space models and positional entropy methods), in that it is extremely simple to compute. Here, we demonstrate use of the MSSI on both synthetic and real animal-movement trajectories. We show how behavioural changes can be inferred within individual tracks and how behaviour varies across spatio-temporal scales. Our aim is to present a useful tool for researchers requiring a computationally simple but effective means of analysing the movement patterns of animals. PMID:23079283

  4. Animated Randomness, Avatars, Movement, and Personalization in Risk Graphics

    PubMed Central

    Fuhrel-Forbis, Andrea; Wijeysundera, Harindra C; Exe, Nicole; Dickson, Mark; Holtzman, Lisa; Kahn, Valerie C; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    Background Risk communication involves conveying two inherently difficult concepts about the nature of risk: the underlying random distribution of outcomes and how a population-based proportion applies to an individual. Objective The objective of this study was to test whether 4 design factors in icon arrays—animated random dispersal of risk events, avatars to represent an individual, personalization (operationalized as choosing the avatar’s color), and a moving avatar—might help convey randomness and how a given risk applies to an individual, thereby better aligning risk perceptions with risk estimates. Methods A diverse sample of 3630 adults with no previous heart disease or stroke completed an online nested factorial experiment in which they entered personal health data into a risk calculator that estimated 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease based on a robust and validated model. We randomly assigned them to view their results in 1 of 10 risk graphics that used different combinations of the 4 design factors. We measured participants’ risk perceptions as our primary outcome, as well as behavioral intentions and recall of the risk estimate. We also assessed subjective numeracy, whether or not participants knew anyone who had died of cardiovascular causes, and whether or not they knew their blood pressure and cholesterol as potential moderators. Results Animated randomness was associated with better alignment between risk estimates and risk perceptions (F 1,3576=6.12, P=.01); however, it also led to lower scores on healthy lifestyle intentions (F 1,3572=11.1, P<.001). Using an avatar increased risk perceptions overall (F 1,3576=4.61, P=.03) and most significantly increased risk perceptions among those who did not know a particular person who had experienced the grave outcomes of cardiovascular disease (F 1,3576=5.88, P=.02). Using an avatar also better aligned actual risk estimates with intentions to see a doctor (F 1,3556=6.38, P=.01). No design

  5. ANIMAL MODELS FOR IMMUNOTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Greater susceptibility to infection is a hallmark of compromised immune function in humans and animals, and is often considered the benchmark against which the predictive value of immune function tests are compared. This focus of this paper is resistance to infection with the pa...

  6. Model of Emotional Expressions in Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozaliev, Vladimir L.; Orlova, Yulia A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to automated identification of human emotions based on analysis of body movements, a recognition of gestures and poses. Methodology, models and automated system for emotion identification are considered. To characterize the person emotions in the model, body movements are described with linguistic variables and a…

  7. Animal Models of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Robert L.; Fleet, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease that afflicts a large number of people in the United States. The use of animal models has the potential to increase our understanding of carcinogenesis, tumor biology, and the impact of specific molecular events on colon biology. In addition, animal models with features of specific human colorectal cancers can be used to test strategies for cancer prevention and treatment. In this review we provide an overview of the mechanisms driving human cancer, we discuss the approaches one can take to model colon cancer in animals, and we describe a number of specific animal models that have been developed for the study of colon cancer. We believe that there are many valuable animal models to study various aspects of human colorectal cancer. However, opportunities for improving upon these models exist. PMID:23076650

  8. Spatial scaling: Its analysis and effects on animal movements in semiarid landscape mosaics

    SciTech Connect

    Wiens, J.A.

    1992-09-01

    The research conducted under this agreement focused in general on the effects of envirorunental heterogeneity on movements of animals and materials in semiarid grassland landscapes, on the form of scale-dependency of ecological patterns and processes, and on approaches to extrapolating among spatial scales. The findings are summarized in a series of published and unpublished papers that are included as the main body of this report. We demonstrated the value of experimental model systems'' employing observations and experiments conducted in small-scale microlandscapes to test concepts relating to flows of individuals and materials through complex, heterogeneous mosaics. We used fractal analysis extensively in this research, and showed how fractal measures can produce insights and lead,to questions that do not emerge from more traditional scale-dependent measures. We developed new concepts and theory to deal with scale-dependency in ecological systems and with integrating individual movement patterns into considerations of population and ecosystem dynamics.

  9. How animals move along? Exactly solvable model of superdiffusive spread resulting from animal's decision making.

    PubMed

    Tilles, Paulo F C; Petrovskii, Sergei V

    2016-07-01

    Patterns of individual animal movement have been a focus of considerable attention recently. Of particular interest is a question how different macroscopic properties of animal dispersal result from the stochastic processes occurring on the microscale of the individual behavior. In this paper, we perform a comprehensive analytical study of a model where the animal changes the movement velocity as a result of its behavioral response to environmental stochasticity. The stochasticity is assumed to manifest itself through certain signals, and the animal modifies its velocity as a response to the signals. We consider two different cases, i.e. where the change in the velocity is or is not correlated to its current value. We show that in both cases the early, transient stage of the animal movement is super-diffusive, i.e. ballistic. The large-time asymptotic behavior appears to be diffusive in the uncorrelated case but super-ballistic in the correlated case. We also calculate analytically the dispersal kernel of the movement and show that, whilst it converge to a normal distribution in the large-time limit, it possesses a fatter tail during the transient stage, i.e. at early and intermediate time. Since the transients are known to be highly relevant in ecology, our findings may indicate that the fat tails and superdiffusive spread that are sometimes observed in the movement data may be a feature of the transitional dynamics rather than an inherent property of the animal movement. PMID:26650504

  10. Taking animal tracking to new depths: synthesizing horizontal--vertical movement relationships for four marine predators.

    PubMed

    Bestley, Sophie; Jonsen, Ian D; Hindell, Mark A; Harcourt, Robert G; Gales, Nicholas J

    2015-02-01

    In animal ecology, a question of key interest for aquatic species is how changes in movement behavior are related in the horizontal and vertical dimensions when individuals forage. Alternative theoretical models and inconsistent empirical findings mean that this question remains unresolved. Here we tested expectations by incorporating the vertical dimension (dive information) when predicting switching between movement states ("resident" or "directed") within a state-space model. We integrated telemetry-based tracking and diving data available for four seal species (southern elephant, Weddell, antarctic fur, and crabeater) in East Antarctica. Where possible, we included dive variables derived from the relationships between (1) dive duration and depth (as a measure of effort), and (2) dive duration and the postdive surface interval (as a physiological measure of cost). Our results varied within and across species, but there was a general tendency for the probability of switching into "resident" state to be positively associated with shorter dive durations (for a given depth) and longer postdive surface intervals (for a given dive duration). Our results add to a growing body of literature suggesting that simplistic interpretations of optimal foraging theory based only on horizontal movements do not directly translate into the vertical dimension in dynamic marine environments. Analyses that incorporate at least two dimensions can test more sophisticated models of foraging behavior. PMID:26240863

  11. The modelling cycle for collective animal behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Sumpter, David J. T.; Mann, Richard P.; Perna, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Collective animal behaviour is the study of how interactions between individuals produce group level patterns, and why these interactions have evolved. This study has proved itself uniquely interdisciplinary, involving physicists, mathematicians, engineers as well as biologists. Almost all experimental work in this area is related directly or indirectly to mathematical models, with regular movement back and forth between models, experimental data and statistical fitting. In this paper, we describe how the modelling cycle works in the study of collective animal behaviour. We classify studies as addressing questions at different levels or linking different levels, i.e. as local, local to global, global to local or global. We also describe three distinct approaches—theory-driven, data-driven and model selection—to these questions. We show, with reference to our own research on species across different taxa, how we move between these different levels of description and how these various approaches can be applied to link levels together. PMID:23173077

  12. 9 CFR 71.2 - Secretary to issue rule governing quarantine and interstate movement of diseased animals...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... quarantine and interstate movement of diseased animals, including poultry. 71.2 Section 71.2 Animals and... TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 71.2 Secretary to issue rule governing quarantine and interstate movement of diseased animals, including poultry. When...

  13. 9 CFR 71.2 - Secretary to issue rule governing quarantine and interstate movement of diseased animals...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... quarantine and interstate movement of diseased animals, including poultry. 71.2 Section 71.2 Animals and... TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 71.2 Secretary to issue rule governing quarantine and interstate movement of diseased animals, including poultry. When...

  14. 9 CFR 71.2 - Secretary to issue rule governing quarantine and interstate movement of diseased animals...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... quarantine and interstate movement of diseased animals, including poultry. 71.2 Section 71.2 Animals and... TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 71.2 Secretary to issue rule governing quarantine and interstate movement of diseased animals, including poultry. When...

  15. 9 CFR 71.2 - Secretary to issue rule governing quarantine and interstate movement of diseased animals...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... quarantine and interstate movement of diseased animals, including poultry. 71.2 Section 71.2 Animals and... TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 71.2 Secretary to issue rule governing quarantine and interstate movement of diseased animals, including poultry. When...

  16. 9 CFR 71.2 - Secretary to issue rule governing quarantine and interstate movement of diseased animals...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... quarantine and interstate movement of diseased animals, including poultry. 71.2 Section 71.2 Animals and... TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 71.2 Secretary to issue rule governing quarantine and interstate movement of diseased animals, including poultry. When...

  17. Animal models in peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Nikitidou, Olga; Peppa, Vasiliki I.; Leivaditis, Konstantinos; Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Zarogiannis, Sotirios G.; Liakopoulos, Vassilios

    2015-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) has been extensively used over the past years as a method of kidney replacement therapy for patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD). In an attempt to better understand the properties of the peritoneal membrane and the mechanisms involved in major complications associated with PD, such as inflammation, peritonitis and peritoneal injury, both in vivo and ex vivo animal models have been used. The aim of the present review is to briefly describe the animal models that have been used, and comment on the main problems encountered while working with these models. Moreover, the differences characterizing these animal models, as well as, the differences with humans are highlighted. Finally, it is suggested that the use of standardized protocols is a necessity in order to take full advantage of animal models, extrapolate their results in humans, overcome the problems related to PD and help promote its use. PMID:26388781

  18. Animal Models for Therapeutic Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, Patricia L.; An, Yuehuei H.

    2003-04-15

    Embolization techniques have been performed in different animals to accumulate basic data before a clinical trial.Choosing the right embolization model for a specific project is critical. However, there are several variables when defining the best model for embolization research such as the size of the animal to be used, the target organs, the route of introducing the embolization agent, and the feasible methods of evaluation. Commonly used research animals for endovascular embolization include rabbits, dogs, and rats. Frequently used target organs are the kidney and the liver. Most models use a transcatheter for introducing the embolus and occasionally open surgery and direct arterial injection are used. Basic methods of evaluation are straightforward, and commonly include macro observation of the embolized organs, angiogram, and histology. This article concisely reviews the available animal models and their evaluation for embolization research to help researchers to choose the appropriate model.

  19. Animal models of cerebral ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodanovich, M. Yu.; Kisel, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    Cerebral ischemia remains one of the most frequent causes of death and disability worldwide. Animal models are necessary to understand complex molecular mechanisms of brain damage as well as for the development of new therapies for stroke. This review considers a certain range of animal models of cerebral ischemia, including several types of focal and global ischemia. Since animal models vary in specificity for the human disease which they reproduce, the complexity of surgery, infarct size, reliability of reproduction for statistical analysis, and adequate models need to be chosen according to the aim of a study. The reproduction of a particular animal model needs to be evaluated using appropriate tools, including the behavioral assessment of injury and non-invasive and post-mortem control of brain damage. These problems also have been summarized in the review.

  20. Animal models in burn research.

    PubMed

    Abdullahi, A; Amini-Nik, S; Jeschke, M G

    2014-09-01

    Burn injury is a severe form of trauma affecting more than 2 million people in North America each year. Burn trauma is not a single pathophysiological event but a devastating injury that causes structural and functional deficits in numerous organ systems. Due to its complexity and the involvement of multiple organs, in vitro experiments cannot capture this complexity nor address the pathophysiology. In the past two decades, a number of burn animal models have been developed to replicate the various aspects of burn injury, to elucidate the pathophysiology, and to explore potential treatment interventions. Understanding the advantages and limitations of these animal models is essential for the design and development of treatments that are clinically relevant to humans. This review aims to highlight the common animal models of burn injury in order to provide investigators with a better understanding of the benefits and limitations of these models for translational applications. While many animal models of burn exist, we limit our discussion to the skin healing of mouse, rat, and pig. Additionally, we briefly explain hypermetabolic characteristics of burn injury and the animal model utilized to study this phenomena. Finally, we discuss the economic costs associated with each of these models in order to guide decisions of choosing the appropriate animal model for burn research. PMID:24714880

  1. Animal Models in Burn Research

    PubMed Central

    Abdullahi, A.; Amini-Nik, S.; Jeschke, M.G

    2014-01-01

    Burn injury is a severe form of trauma affecting more than two million people in North America each year. Burn trauma is not a single pathophysiological event but a devastating injury that causes structural and functional deficits in numerous organ systems. Due to its complexity and the involvement of multiple organs, in vitro experiments cannot capture this complexity nor address the pathophysiology. In the past two decades, a number of burn animal models have been developed to replicate the various aspects of burn injury; to elucidate the pathophysiology and explore potential treatment interventions. Understanding the advantages and limitations of these animal models is essential for the design and development of treatments that are clinically relevant to humans. This review paper aims to highlight the common animal models of burn injury in order to provide investigators with a better understanding of the benefits and limitations of these models for translational applications. While many animal models of burn exist, we limit our discussion to the skin healing of mouse, rat, and pig. Additionally, we briefly explain hypermetabolic characteristics of burn injury and the animal model utilized to study this phenomena. Finally, we discuss the economic costs associated with each of these models in order to guide decisions of choosing the appropriate animal model for burn research. PMID:24714880

  2. Dystonia and Paroxysmal Dyskinesias: Under-Recognized Movement Disorders in Domestic Animals? A Comparison with Human Dystonia/Paroxysmal Dyskinesias

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Angelika; Hamann, Melanie; Wissel, Jörg; Volk, Holger A.

    2015-01-01

    Dystonia is defined as a neurological syndrome characterized by involuntary sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing twisting, often repetitive movements, and postures. Paroxysmal dyskinesias are episodic movement disorders encompassing dystonia, chorea, athetosis, and ballism in conscious individuals. Several decades of research have enhanced the understanding of the etiology of human dystonia and dyskinesias that are associated with dystonia, but the pathophysiology remains largely unknown. The spontaneous occurrence of hereditary dystonia and paroxysmal dyskinesia is well documented in rodents used as animal models in basic dystonia research. Several hyperkinetic movement disorders, described in dogs, horses and cattle, show similarities to these human movement disorders. Although dystonia is regarded as the third most common movement disorder in humans, it is often misdiagnosed because of the heterogeneity of etiology and clinical presentation. Since these conditions are poorly known in veterinary practice, their prevalence may be underestimated in veterinary medicine. In order to attract attention to these movement disorders, i.e., dystonia and paroxysmal dyskinesias associated with dystonia, and to enhance interest in translational research, this review gives a brief overview of the current literature regarding dystonia/paroxysmal dyskinesia in humans and summarizes similar hereditary movement disorders reported in domestic animals. PMID:26664992

  3. Animal Models of Bacterial Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Marquart, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial keratitis is a disease of the cornea characterized by pain, redness, inflammation, and opacity. Common causes of this disease are Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Animal models of keratitis have been used to elucidate both the bacterial factors and the host inflammatory response involved in the disease. Reviewed herein are animal models of bacterial keratitis and some of the key findings in the last several decades. PMID:21274270

  4. Animal models for human diseases.

    PubMed

    Rust, J H

    1982-01-01

    The use of animal models for the study of human disease is, for the most part, a recent development. This discussion of the use of animal models for human diseases directs attention to the sterile period, early advances, some personal experiences, the human as the model, biological oddities among common laboratory animals, malignancies in laboratory animals, problems created by federal regulations, cancer tests with animals, and what the future holds in terms of the use of animal models as an aid to understanding human disease. In terms of early use of animal models, there was a school of rabbis, some of whom were also physicians, in Babylon who studied and wrote extensively on ritual slaughter and the suitability of birds and beasts for food. Considerable detailed information on animal pathology, physiology, anatomy, and medicine in general can be found in the Soncino Babylonian Talmudic Translations. The 1906 edition of the "Jewish Encyclopedia," has been a rich resource. Although it has not been possible to establish what diseases of animals were studied and their relationship to the diseases of humans, there are fascinating clues to pursue, despite the fact that these were sterile years for research in medicine. The quotation from the Talmud is of interest: "The medical knowledge of the Talmudist was based upon tradition, the dissection of human bodies, observation of disease and experiments upon animals." A bright light in the lackluster years of medical research was provided by Galen, considered the originator of research in physiology and anatomy. His dissection of animals and work on apes and other lower animals were models for human anatomy and physiology and the bases for many treatises. Yet, Galen never seemed to suggest that animals could serve as models for human diseases. Most early physicians who can be considered to have been students of disease developed their medical knowledge by observing the sick under their care. 1 early medical investigator

  5. Animal models in myopia research.

    PubMed

    Schaeffel, Frank; Feldkaemper, Marita

    2015-11-01

    Our current understanding of the development of refractive errors, in particular myopia, would be substantially limited had Wiesel and Raviola not discovered by accident that monkeys develop axial myopia as a result of deprivation of form vision. Similarly, if Josh Wallman and colleagues had not found that simple plastic goggles attached to the chicken eye generate large amounts of myopia, the chicken model would perhaps not have become such an important animal model. Contrary to previous assumptions about the mechanisms of myopia, these animal models suggested that eye growth is visually controlled locally by the retina, that an afferent connection to the brain is not essential and that emmetropisation uses more sophisticated cues than just the magnitude of retinal blur. While animal models have shown that the retina can determine the sign of defocus, the underlying mechanism is still not entirely clear. Animal models have also provided knowledge about the biochemical nature of the signal cascade converting the output of retinal image processing to changes in choroidal thickness and scleral growth; however, a critical question was, and still is, can the results from animal models be applied to myopia in children? While the basic findings from chickens appear applicable to monkeys, some fundamental questions remain. If eye growth is guided by visual feedback, why is myopic development not self-limiting? Why does undercorrection not arrest myopic progression even though positive lenses induce myopic defocus, which leads to the development of hyperopia in emmetropic animals? Why do some spectacle or contact lens designs reduce myopic progression and others not? It appears that some major differences exist between animals reared with imposed defocus and children treated with various optical corrections, although without the basic knowledge obtained from animal models, we would be lost in an abundance of untestable hypotheses concerning human myopia. PMID:26769177

  6. Modelling larval movement data from individual bioassays.

    PubMed

    McLellan, Chris R; Worton, Bruce J; Deasy, William; Birch, A Nicholas E

    2015-05-01

    We consider modelling the movements of larvae using individual bioassays in which data are collected at a high-frequency rate of five observations per second. The aim is to characterize the behaviour of the larvae when exposed to attractant and repellent compounds. Mixtures of diffusion processes, as well as Hidden Markov models, are proposed as models of larval movement. These models account for directed and localized movements, and successfully distinguish between the behaviour of larvae exposed to attractant and repellent compounds. A simulation study illustrates the advantage of using a Hidden Markov model rather than a simpler mixture model. Practical aspects of model estimation and inference are considered on extensive data collected in a study of novel approaches for the management of cabbage root fly. PMID:25764283

  7. Animal Models of Bone Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Simmons, J K; Hildreth, B E; Supsavhad, W; Elshafae, S M; Hassan, B B; Dirksen, W P; Toribio, R E; Rosol, T J

    2015-09-01

    Bone is one of the most common sites of cancer metastasis in humans and is a significant source of morbidity and mortality. Bone metastases are considered incurable and result in pain, pathologic fracture, and decreased quality of life. Animal models of skeletal metastases are essential to improve the understanding of the molecular pathways of cancer metastasis and growth in bone and to develop new therapies to inhibit and prevent bone metastases. The ideal animal model should be clinically relevant, reproducible, and representative of human disease. Currently, an ideal model does not exist; however, understanding the strengths and weaknesses of the available models will lead to proper study design and successful cancer research. This review provides an overview of the current in vivo animal models used in the study of skeletal metastases or local tumor invasion into bone and focuses on mammary and prostate cancer, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and miscellaneous tumors that metastasize to bone. PMID:26021553

  8. Animal Models of Bone Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, J. K.; Hildreth, B. E.; Supsavhad, W.; Elshafae, S. M.; Hassan, B. B.; Dirksen, W. P.; Toribio, R. E.; Rosol, T. J.

    2015-01-01

    Bone is one of the most common sites of cancer metastasis in humans and is a significant source of morbidity and mortality. Bone metastases are considered incurable and result in pain, pathologic fracture, and decreased quality of life. Animal models of skeletal metastases are essential to improve the understanding of the molecular pathways of cancer metastasis and growth in bone and to develop new therapies to inhibit and prevent bone metastases. The ideal animal model should be clinically relevant, reproducible, and representative of human disease. Currently, an ideal model does not exist; however, understanding the strengths and weaknesses of the available models will lead to proper study design and successful cancer research. This review provides an overview of the current in vivo animal models used in the study of skeletal metastases or local tumor invasion into bone and focuses on mammary and prostate cancer, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and miscellaneous tumors that metastasize to bone. PMID:26021553

  9. A dynamical model for mirror movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daffertshofer, A.; van den Berg, C.; Beek, P. J.

    1999-07-01

    In an experiment involving the unimanual performance of rhythmic movements about the elbow joint, mirror movements (MM) (i.e., unintended, associated movements) were observed in the arm not instructed to move. The amplitude of these movements was small relative to that of the intended movements (in the order of 0.5 to 5%). Complex patterns of relative phasing were observed between the intended movements and the MM that were characterized by the presence of higher harmonics in the oscillating units. The patterns in question depended on the frequency of the intended movements, which was varied from 0.5 to 3 Hz. At low frequencies, cases of both in- and anti-phase coordination were observed amidst various other instances of phase locking. MM were smaller in the anti-phase than in the in-phase coordination. At higher frequencies, the occurrence of in-phase coordination was most common while instances of anti-phase coordination were absent. To account for these properties, a dynamical model for the coordination between large-amplitude intended movements and small-amplitude MM was derived in the form of a model of nonlinearly coupled nonlinear oscillators with unequal amplitudes. The derived model was shown to correspond well with many quantitative and qualitative features of the observed dynamics of MM, including frequency locking, stable in-phase and anti-phase coordination, coordination-dependency of mirror movement amplitudes, and the presence of higher harmonics. The implications of the obtained experimental and analytical results and numerical parameter optimizations for the study of MM were discussed.

  10. An information maximization model of eye movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renninger, Laura Walker; Coughlan, James; Verghese, Preeti; Malik, Jitendra

    2005-01-01

    We propose a sequential information maximization model as a general strategy for programming eye movements. The model reconstructs high-resolution visual information from a sequence of fixations, taking into account the fall-off in resolution from the fovea to the periphery. From this framework we get a simple rule for predicting fixation sequences: after each fixation, fixate next at the location that minimizes uncertainty (maximizes information) about the stimulus. By comparing our model performance to human eye movement data and to predictions from a saliency and random model, we demonstrate that our model is best at predicting fixation locations. Modeling additional biological constraints will improve the prediction of fixation sequences. Our results suggest that information maximization is a useful principle for programming eye movements.

  11. Animal Models of Head Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Cernak, Ibolja

    2005-01-01

    Summary: Animal models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) are used to elucidate primary and secondary sequelae underlying human head injury in an effort to identify potential neuroprotective therapies for developing and adult brains. The choice of experimental model depends upon both the research goal and underlying objectives. The intrinsic ability to study injury-induced changes in behavior, physiology, metabolism, the blood/tissue interface, the blood brain barrier, and/or inflammatory- and immune-mediated responses, makes in vivo TBI models essential for neurotrauma research. Whereas human TBI is a highly complex multifactorial disorder, animal trauma models tend to replicate only single factors involved in the pathobiology of head injury using genetically well-defined inbred animals of a single sex. Although such an experimental approach is helpful to delineate key injury mechanisms, the simplicity and hence inability of animal models to reflect the complexity of clinical head injury may underlie the discrepancy between preclinical and clinical trials of neuroprotective therapeutics. Thus, a search continues for new animal models, which would more closely mimic the highly heterogeneous nature of human TBI, and address key factors in treatment optimization. PMID:16389305

  12. Terrestrial movement energetics: current knowledge and its application to the optimising animal.

    PubMed

    Halsey, Lewis G

    2016-05-15

    The energetic cost of locomotion can be a substantial proportion of an animal's daily energy budget and thus key to its ecology. Studies on myriad species have added to our knowledge about the general cost of animal movement, including the effects of variations in the environment such as terrain angle. However, further such studies might provide diminishing returns on the development of a deeper understanding of how animals trade-off the cost of movement with other energy costs, and other ecological currencies such as time. Here, I propose the 'individual energy landscape' as an approach to conceptualising the choices facing the optimising animal. In this Commentary, first I outline previous broad findings about animal walking and running locomotion, focusing in particular on the use of net cost of transport as a metric of comparison between species, and then considering the effects of environmental perturbations and other extrinsic factors on movement costs. I then introduce and explore the idea that these factors combine with the behaviour of the animal in seeking short-term optimality to create that animal's individual energy landscape - the result of the geographical landscape and environmental factors combined with the animal's selected trade-offs. Considering an animal's locomotion energy expenditure within this context enables hard-won empirical data on transport costs to be applied to questions about how an animal can and does move through its environment to maximise its fitness, and the relative importance, or otherwise, of locomotion energy economy. PMID:27207950

  13. Animal Models of Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Rainer; Banks, Glen B.; Hall, John K.; Muir, Lindsey A.; Ramos, Julian N.; Wicki, Jacqueline; Odom, Guy L.; Konieczny, Patryk; Seto, Jane; Chamberlain, Joel R.; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies (MDs) represent a diverse collection of inherited human disorders, which affect to varying degrees skeletal, cardiac, and sometimes smooth muscle (Emery, 20021). To date, more than 50 different genes have been implicated as causing one or more types of MD (Bansal et al., 20032). In many cases, invaluable insights into disease mechanisms, structure and function of gene products, and approaches for therapeutic interventions have benefited from the study of animal models of the different MDs (Arnett et al., 20093). The large number of genes that are associated with MD and the tremendous number of animal models that have been developed preclude a complete discussion of each in the context of this review. However, we summarize here a number of the more commonly used models together with a mixture of different types of gene and MD, which serves to give a general overview of the value of animal models of MD for research and therapeutic development. PMID:22137430

  14. Symptomatic animal models for dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Bethany K.; Hess, Ellen J.

    2013-01-01

    Symptomatic animal models have clinical features consistent with human disorders and are often used to identify the anatomical and physiological processes involved in the expression of symptoms and to experimentally demonstrate causality where it would be infeasible in the patient population. Rodent and primate models of dystonia have identified basal ganglia abnormalities, including alterations in striatal GABAergic and dopaminergic transmission. Symptomatic animal models have also established the critical role of the cerebellum in dystonia, particularly abnormal glutamate signaling and aberrant Purkinje cell activity. Further, experiments suggest that the basal ganglia and cerebellum are nodes in an integrated network that is dysfunctional in dystonia. The knowledge gained from experiments in symptomatic animal models may serve as the foundation for the development of novel therapeutic interventions to treat dystonia. PMID:23893454

  15. Animal models of pituitary neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lines, K.E.; Stevenson, M.; Thakker, R.V.

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary neoplasias can occur as part of a complex inherited disorder, or more commonly as sporadic (non-familial) disease. Studies of the molecular and genetic mechanisms causing such pituitary tumours have identified dysregulation of >35 genes, with many revealed by studies in mice, rats and zebrafish. Strategies used to generate these animal models have included gene knockout, gene knockin and transgenic over-expression, as well as chemical mutagenesis and drug induction. These animal models provide an important resource for investigation of tissue-specific tumourigenic mechanisms, and evaluations of novel therapies, illustrated by studies into multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), a hereditary syndrome in which ∼30% of patients develop pituitary adenomas. This review describes animal models of pituitary neoplasia that have been generated, together with some recent advances in gene editing technologies, and an illustration of the use of the Men1 mouse as a pre clinical model for evaluating novel therapies. PMID:26320859

  16. ANIMAL MODELS FOR FOOD ALLERGY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal models have been used to provide insight into the complex immunological and pathophysioligical mechanisms of human Type 1 allergic diseases. Research efforts that include mechanistic studies in search of new therapies and screening models for hazard identification of potential allergens in a...

  17. Animal models of cardiac cachexia.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Francesca; Malara, Natalia; Mollace, Vincenzo; Rosano, Giuseppe; Ferraro, Elisabetta

    2016-09-15

    Cachexia is the loss of body weight associated with several chronic diseases including chronic heart failure (CHF). The cachectic condition is mainly due to loss of skeletal muscle mass and adipose tissue depletion. The majority of experimental in vivo studies on cachexia rely on animal models of cancer cachexia while a reliable and appropriate model for cardiac cachexia has not yet been established. A critical issue in generating a cardiac cachexia model is that genetic modifications or pharmacological treatments impairing the heart functionality and used to obtain the heart failure model might likely impair the skeletal muscle, this also being a striated muscle and sharing with the myocardium several molecular and physiological mechanisms. On the other hand, often, the induction of heart damage in the several existing models of heart failure does not necessarily lead to skeletal muscle loss and cachexia. Here we describe the main features of cardiac cachexia and illustrate some animal models proposed for cardiac cachexia studies; they include the genetic calsequestrin and Dahl salt-sensitive models, the monocrotaline model and the surgical models obtained by left anterior descending (LAD) ligation, transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and ascending aortic banding. The availability of a specific animal model for cardiac cachexia is a crucial issue since, besides the common aspects of cachexia in the different syndromes, each disease has some peculiarities in its etiology and pathophysiology leading to cachexia. Such peculiarities need to be unraveled in order to find new targets for effective therapies. PMID:27317993

  18. Predicting the continuum between corridors and barriers to animal movements using Step Selection Functions and Randomized Shortest Paths.

    PubMed

    Panzacchi, Manuela; Van Moorter, Bram; Strand, Olav; Saerens, Marco; Kivimäki, Ilkka; St Clair, Colleen C; Herfindal, Ivar; Boitani, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    The loss, fragmentation and degradation of habitat everywhere on Earth prompts increasing attention to identifying landscape features that support animal movement (corridors) or impedes it (barriers). Most algorithms used to predict corridors assume that animals move through preferred habitat either optimally (e.g. least cost path) or as random walkers (e.g. current models), but neither extreme is realistic. We propose that corridors and barriers are two sides of the same coin and that animals experience landscapes as spatiotemporally dynamic corridor-barrier continua connecting (separating) functional areas where individuals fulfil specific ecological processes. Based on this conceptual framework, we propose a novel methodological approach that uses high-resolution individual-based movement data to predict corridor-barrier continua with increased realism. Our approach consists of two innovations. First, we use step selection functions (SSF) to predict friction maps quantifying corridor-barrier continua for tactical steps between consecutive locations. Secondly, we introduce to movement ecology the randomized shortest path algorithm (RSP) which operates on friction maps to predict the corridor-barrier continuum for strategic movements between functional areas. By modulating the parameter Ѳ, which controls the trade-off between exploration and optimal exploitation of the environment, RSP bridges the gap between algorithms assuming optimal movements (when Ѳ approaches infinity, RSP is equivalent to LCP) or random walk (when Ѳ → 0, RSP → current models). Using this approach, we identify migration corridors for GPS-monitored wild reindeer (Rangifer t. tarandus) in Norway. We demonstrate that reindeer movement is best predicted by an intermediate value of Ѳ, indicative of a movement trade-off between optimization and exploration. Model calibration allows identification of a corridor-barrier continuum that closely fits empirical data and demonstrates that RSP

  19. Construction of energy landscapes can clarify the movement and distribution of foraging animals

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Rory P.; Quintana, Flavio; Hobson, Victoria J.

    2012-01-01

    Variation in the physical characteristics of the environment should impact the movement energetics of animals. Although cognizance of this may help interpret movement ecology, determination of the landscape-dependent energy expenditure of wild animals is problematic. We used accelerometers in animal-attached tags to derive energy expenditure in 54 free-living imperial cormorants Phalacrocorax atriceps and construct an energy landscape of the area around a breeding colony. Examination of the space use of a further 74 birds over 4 years showed that foraging areas selected varied considerably in distance from the colony and water depth, but were characterized by minimal power requirements compared with other areas in the available landscape. This accords with classic optimal foraging concepts, which state that animals should maximize net energy gain by minimizing costs where possible and show how deriving energy landscapes can help understand how and why animals distribute themselves in space. PMID:21900327

  20. Animal Models of Ricin Toxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kejing; Sivasubramani, Satheesh K.; Gardner, Donald J.; Pincus, Seth H.

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of ricin toxicosis are necessary for testing the efficacy of therapeutic measures, as well studying the mechanisms by which ricin exerts its toxicity in intact animals. Because ricin can serve as a particularly well-characterized model of tissue damage, and the host response to that damage, studies of the mechanisms of ricin toxicity may have more general applicability. For example, our studies of the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of ricin-induced hypoglycemia may help elucidate the relationship of type II diabetes, insulin resistance, and inflammation. Studies in non-human primates are most relevant for testing and developing agents having clinical utility. But these animals are expensive and limited in quantity, and so rodents are used for most mechanistic studies. PMID:21956160

  1. Animal models of drug craving.

    PubMed

    Markou, A; Weiss, F; Gold, L H; Caine, S B; Schulteis, G; Koob, G F

    1993-01-01

    Drug craving, the desire to experience the effect(s) of a previously experienced psychoactive substance, has been hypothesized to contribute significantly to continued drug use and relapse after a period of abstinence in humans. In more theoretical terms, drug craving can be conceptualized within the framework of incentive motivational theories of behavior and be defined as the incentive motivation to self-administer a psychoactive substance. The incentive-motivational value of drugs is hypothesized to be determined by a continuous interaction between the hedonic rewarding properties of drugs (incentive) and the motivational state of the organism (organismic state). In drug-dependent individuals, the incentive-motivational value of drugs (i.e., drug craving) is greater compared to non-drug-dependent individuals due to the motivational state (i.e., withdrawal) developed with repeated drug administration. In this conceptual framework, animal models of drug craving would reflect two aspects of the incentive motivation to self-administer a psychoactive substance. One aspect would be the unconditioned incentive (reinforcing) value of the drug itself. The other aspect would be relatively independent of the direct (unconditioned) incentive value of the drug itself and could be reflected in the ability of previously neutral stimuli to acquire conditioned incentive properties that could elicit drug-seeking and drug-taking behavior. Animal models of drug craving that permit the investigation of the behavioral and neurobiological components of these two aspects of drug craving are reviewed and evaluated. The models reviewed are the progressive ratio, choice, extinction, conditioned reinforcement and second-order schedule paradigms. These animal models are evaluated according to two criteria that are established herein as necessary and sufficient criteria for the evaluation of animal models of human psychopathology: reliability and predictive validity. The development of

  2. The Effect of Map Boundary on Estimates of Landscape Resistance to Animal Movement

    PubMed Central

    Koen, Erin L.; Garroway, Colin J.; Wilson, Paul J.; Bowman, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Background Artificial boundaries on a map occur when the map extent does not cover the entire area of study; edges on the map do not exist on the ground. These artificial boundaries might bias the results of animal dispersal models by creating artificial barriers to movement for model organisms where there are no barriers for real organisms. Here, we characterize the effects of artificial boundaries on calculations of landscape resistance to movement using circuit theory. We then propose and test a solution to artificially inflated resistance values whereby we place a buffer around the artificial boundary as a substitute for the true, but unknown, habitat. Methodology/Principal Findings We randomly assigned landscape resistance values to map cells in the buffer in proportion to their occurrence in the known map area. We used circuit theory to estimate landscape resistance to organism movement and gene flow, and compared the output across several scenarios: a habitat-quality map with artificial boundaries and no buffer, a map with a buffer composed of randomized habitat quality data, and a map with a buffer composed of the true habitat quality data. We tested the sensitivity of the randomized buffer to the possibility that the composition of the real but unknown buffer is biased toward high or low quality. We found that artificial boundaries result in an overestimate of landscape resistance. Conclusions/Significance Artificial map boundaries overestimate resistance values. We recommend the use of a buffer composed of randomized habitat data as a solution to this problem. We found that resistance estimated using the randomized buffer did not differ from estimates using the real data, even when the composition of the real data was varied. Our results may be relevant to those interested in employing Circuitscape software in landscape connectivity and landscape genetics studies. PMID:20668690

  3. Animal models of CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    McGonigle, Paul

    2014-01-01

    There is intense interest in the development and application of animal models of CNS disorders to explore pathology and molecular mechanisms, identify potential biomarkers, and to assess the therapeutic utility, estimate safety margins and establish pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic parameters of new chemical entities (NCEs). This is a daunting undertaking, due to the complex and heterogeneous nature of these disorders, the subjective and sometimes contradictory nature of the clinical endpoints and the paucity of information regarding underlying molecular mechanisms. Historically, these models have been invaluable in the discovery of therapeutics for a range of disorders including anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, and Parkinson's disease. Recently, however, they have been increasingly criticized in the wake of numerous clinical trial failures of NCEs with promising preclinical profiles. These failures have resulted from a number of factors including inherent limitations of the models, over-interpretation of preclinical results and the complex nature of clinical trials for CNS disorders. This review discusses the rationale, strengths, weaknesses and predictive validity of the most commonly used models for psychiatric, neurodegenerative and neurological disorders as well as critical factors that affect the variability and reproducibility of these models. It also addresses how progress in molecular genetics and the development of transgenic animals has fundamentally changed the approach to neurodegenerative disorder research. To date, transgenic animal models\\have not been the panacea for drug discovery that many had hoped for. However continual refinement of these models is leading to steady progress with the promise of eventual therapeutic breakthroughs. PMID:23811310

  4. Animal models of polymicrobial pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Hraiech, Sami; Papazian, Laurent; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Bregeon, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is one of the leading causes of severe and occasionally life-threatening infections. The physiopathology of pneumonia has been extensively studied, providing information for the development of new treatments for this condition. In addition to in vitro research, animal models have been largely used in the field of pneumonia. Several models have been described and have provided a better understanding of pneumonia under different settings and with various pathogens. However, the concept of one pathogen leading to one infection has been challenged, and recent flu epidemics suggest that some pathogens exhibit highly virulent potential. Although “two hits” animal models have been used to study infectious diseases, few of these models have been described in pneumonia. Therefore the aims of this review were to provide an overview of the available literature in this field, to describe well-studied and uncommon pathogen associations, and to summarize the major insights obtained from this information. PMID:26170617

  5. All at sea with animal tracks; methodological and analytical solutions for the resolution of movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Rory P.; Liebsch, Nikolai; Davies, Ian M.; Quintana, Flavio; Weimerskirch, Henri; Storch, Sandra; Lucke, Klaus; Siebert, Ursula; Zankl, Solvin; Müller, Gabriele; Zimmer, Ilka; Scolaro, Alejandro; Campagna, Claudio; Plötz, Jochen; Bornemann, Horst; Teilmann, Jonas; McMahon, Clive R.

    2007-02-01

    Determining the movement of marine animals is logistically difficult and is currently primarily based on VHF and satellite-tracking telemetry, GPS, acoustic telemetry, and geolocation, all of which have substantial limitations in accurately locating the fine-scale movements of these animals. A recent development—that of dead-reckoning—is being increasingly used to examine the fine-scale movement of animals underwater. The advantages and drawbacks of this approach are quite different to those incurred by the other methods. This paper considers the advances that dead-reckoning can bring to the study of the often cryptic movement and behaviour of marine animals at sea. Methods used in determining position via dead-reckoning are presented and consideration is given to results derived from the use of dead-reckoning on cetaceans, pinnipeds, penguins and sea turtles; these are complemented by data on cormorants and albatrosses acquired using GPS systems. Suggestions are made as to how movement data derived from these devices can be analysed using indices that allow interpretation over a large variety of temporal and spatial scales.

  6. Animal Models of Subjective Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Tinnitus is one of the major audiological diseases, affecting a significant portion of the ageing society. Despite its huge personal and presumed economic impact there are only limited therapeutic options available. The reason for this deficiency lies in the very nature of the disease as it is deeply connected to elementary plasticity of auditory processing in the central nervous system. Understanding these mechanisms is essential for developing a therapy that reverses the plastic changes underlying the pathogenesis of tinnitus. This requires experiments that address individual neurons and small networks, something usually not feasible in human patients. However, in animals such invasive experiments on the level of single neurons with high spatial and temporal resolution are possible. Therefore, animal models are a very critical element in the combined efforts for engineering new therapies. This review provides an overview over the most important features of animal models of tinnitus: which laboratory species are suitable, how to induce tinnitus, and how to characterize the perceived tinnitus by behavioral means. In particular, these aspects of tinnitus animal models are discussed in the light of transferability to the human patients. PMID:24829805

  7. Extrapyramidal system neurotoxicity: animal models.

    PubMed

    Dorman, David

    2015-01-01

    The central nervous system's extrapyramidal system provides involuntary motor control to the muscles of the head, neck, and limbs. Toxicants that affect the extrapyramidal system are generally clinically characterized by impaired motor control, which is usually the result of basal ganglionic dysfunction. A variety of extrapyramidal syndromes are recognized in humans and include Parkinson's disease, secondary parkinsonism, other degenerative diseases of the basal ganglia, and clinical syndromes that result in dystonia, dyskinesia, essential tremor, and other forms of tremor and chorea. This chapter briefly reviews the anatomy of the extrapyramidal system and discusses several naturally occurring and experimental models that target the mammalian (nonhuman) extrapyramidal system. Topics discussed include extrapyramidal syndromes associated with antipsychotic drugs, carbon monoxide, reserpine, cyanide, rotenone, paraquat, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), and manganese. In most cases, animals are used as experimental models to improve our understanding of the toxicity and pathogenesis of these agents. Another agent discussed in this chapter, yellowstar thistle poisoning in horses, however, represents an important spontaneous cause of parkinsonism that naturally occurs in animals. The central focus of the chapter is on animal models, especially the concordance between clinical signs, neurochemical changes, and neuropathology between animals and people. PMID:26563791

  8. Animal Models of Sleep Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Linda A; Bhargava, Pavan

    2013-01-01

    Problems with sleep affect a large part of the general population, with more than half of all people in the United States reporting difficulties with sleep or insufficient sleep at various times and about 40 million affected chronically. Sleep is a complex physiologic process that is influenced by many internal and environmental factors, and problems with sleep are often related to specific personal circumstances or are based on subjective reports from the affected person. Although human subjects are used widely in the study of sleep and sleep disorders, the study of animals has been invaluable in developing our understanding about the physiology of sleep and the underlying mechanisms of sleep disorders. Historically, the use of animals for the study of sleep disorders has arguably been most fruitful for the condition of narcolepsy, in which studies of dogs and mice revealed previously unsuspected mechanisms for this condition. The current overview considers animal models that have been used to study 4 of the most common human sleep disorders—insomnia, narcolepsy, restless legs syndrome, and sleep apnea—and summarizes considerations relevant to the use of animals for the study of sleep and sleep disorders. Animal-based research has been vital to the elucidation of mechanisms that underlie sleep, its regulation, and its disorders and undoubtedly will remain crucial for discovering and validating sleep mechanisms and testing interventions for sleep disorders. PMID:23582416

  9. Biliary atresia: the animal models.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Claus

    2012-08-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a progressive fibrosing process of the neonatal biliary tree and liver, of unknown origin, and an as-yet unexplained pathologic mechanism. The crucial point is to elucidate the origin of this rare disease to change palliative surgery to etiology-related procedures. Patient-based research can only begin at the time of the Kasai procedure and does not allow retracing of the pathology back to its origin. Basic research has focused on similar diseases in the veterinary literature and started to simulate BA in animal models. Unfortunately, even after 50 years of research, no knowledge has been gained from such models, which has led to a single clinical application. This article reviews BA in the context of the animal models available and discusses whether future studies are promising or futile. PMID:22800971

  10. Animal models of source memory.

    PubMed

    Crystal, Jonathon D

    2016-01-01

    Source memory is the aspect of episodic memory that encodes the origin (i.e., source) of information acquired in the past. Episodic memory (i.e., our memories for unique personal past events) typically involves source memory because those memories focus on the origin of previous events. Source memory is at work when, for example, someone tells a favorite joke to a person while avoiding retelling the joke to the friend who originally shared the joke. Importantly, source memory permits differentiation of one episodic memory from another because source memory includes features that were present when the different memories were formed. This article reviews recent efforts to develop an animal model of source memory using rats. Experiments are reviewed which suggest that source memory is dissociated from other forms of memory. The review highlights strengths and weaknesses of a number of animal models of episodic memory. Animal models of source memory may be used to probe the biological bases of memory. Moreover, these models can be combined with genetic models of Alzheimer's disease to evaluate pharmacotherapies that ultimately have the potential to improve memory. PMID:26609644

  11. An accurate and portable eye movement detector for studying sleep in small animals.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-López, Álvaro; Escudero, Miguel

    2015-08-01

    Although eye movements are a highly valuable variable in attempts to precisely identify different periods of the sleep-wake cycle, their indirect measurement by electrooculography is not good enough. The present article describes an accurate and portable scleral search coil that allows the detection of tonic and phasic characteristics of eye movements in free-moving animals. Six adult Wistar rats were prepared for chronic recording of electroencephalography, electromyography and eye movements using the scleral search coil technique. We developed a miniature magnetic field generator made with two coils, consisting of 35 turns and 15 mm diameter of insulated 0.2 mm cooper wire, mounted in a frame of carbon fibre. This portable scleral search coil was fixed on the head of the animal, with each magnetic coil parallel to the eye coil and at 5 mm from each eye. Eye movements detected by the portable scleral search coil were compared with those measured by a commercial scleral search coil requiring immobilizing the head of the animal. No qualitative differences were found between the two scleral search coil systems in their capabilities to detect eye movements. This innovative portable scleral search coil system is an essential tool to detect slow changes in eye position and miniature rapid eye movements during sleep. The portable scleral search coil is much more suitable for detecting eye movements than any previously available system because of its precision and simplicity, and because it does not require immobilization of the animal's head. PMID:25590417

  12. A model for learning human reaching movements.

    PubMed

    Karniel, A; Inbar, G F

    1997-09-01

    Reaching movement is a fast movement towards a given target. The main characteristics of such a movement are straight path and a bell-shaped speed profile. In this work a mathematical model for the control of the human arm during ballistic reaching movements is presented. The model of the arm contains a 2 degrees of freedom planar manipulator, and a Hill-type, non-linear mechanical model of six muscles. The arm model is taken from the literature with minor changes. The nervous system is modeled as an adjustable pattern generator that creates the control signals to the muscles. The control signals in this model are rectangular pulses activated at various amplitudes and timings, that are determined according to the given target. These amplitudes and timings are the parameters that should be related to each target and initial conditions in the work-space. The model of the nervous system consists of an artificial neural net that maps any given target to the parameter space of the pattern generator. In order to train this net, the nervous system model includes a sensitivity model that transforms the error from the arm end-point coordinates to the parameter coordinates. The error is assessed only at the termination of the movement from knowledge of the results. The role of the non-linearity in the muscle model and the performance of the learning scheme are analysed, illustrated in simulations and discussed. The results of the present study demonstrate the central nervous system's (CNS) ability to generate typical reaching movements with a simple feedforward controller that controls only the timing and amplitude of rectangular excitation pulses to the muscles and adjusts these parameters based on knowledge of the results. In this scheme, which is based on the adjustment of only a few parameters instead of the whole trajectory, the dimension of the control problem is reduced significantly. It is shown that the non-linear properties of the muscles are essential to achieve

  13. Animal models for human sexuality.

    PubMed

    Beach, F A

    The value of animal models in biomedical research is firmly established, and many basic principles of human psychology have been explicated as the result of comparative studies. There is pressing need for non-human models in the behavioural sciences as represented by psychiatry, psychology and ethology; and such models should be constructed, provided their validity can be assured. Valid models cannot be based exclusively on similarity in the formal properties of behaviour. Commonality of descriptive terms as applied to different species does not guarantee identity of the concepts to which the terms apply. Model builders must evaluate interspecific similarities and differences in the causes, mediating mechanisms and functional outcomes of behaviour. The validity of interspecific generalization can never exceed the reliability of intraspecific analysis; and the latter is an indispensable antecedent of the former. Existing and potential models for homosexuality and other psychosexual characteristics of human beings are evaluated within the perspective provided by the foregoing generalizations. PMID:256826

  14. Animal models for microbicide studies

    PubMed Central

    Veazey, Ronald S.; Shattock, Robin J; Klasse, Per Johan; Moore, John P.

    2013-01-01

    There have been encouraging recent successes in the development of safe and effective topical microbicides to prevent vaginal or rectal HIV-1 transmission, based on the use of anti-retroviral drugs. However, much work remains to be accomplished before a microbicide becomes a standard element of prevention science strategies. Animal models should continue to play an important role in pre-clinical testing, with emphasis on safety, pharmacokinetic and efficacy testing. PMID:22264049

  15. Animal movement and establishment of vaccinia virus Cantagalo strain in Amazon biome, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Quixabeira-Santos, Jociane Cristina; Medaglia, Maria Luiza G; Pescador, Caroline A; Damaso, Clarissa R

    2011-04-01

    To understand the emergence of vaccinia virus Cantagalo strain in the Amazon biome of Brazil, during 2008-2010 we conducted a molecular and epidemiologic survey of poxvirus outbreaks. Data indicate that animal movement was the major cause of virus dissemination within Rondonia State, leading to the establishment and spread of this pathogen. PMID:21470472

  16. Urban landscape features influencing rodent control and animal movement in two urban areas of California

    EPA Science Inventory

    “Pest” control of both native (e.g., gophers) and exotic (e.g., black rats, house mice) species may impact populations of non-target species inadvertently. We evaluated relationships among animal movement, rodent control, and landscape features in two urban locations in Californ...

  17. Landscape features influencing residential rodent control and animal movement in two urban areas of California

    EPA Science Inventory

    Residential “pest” control of both native (e.g., gophers, rabbits) and exotic (e.g., black and Norway rats, house mice) species may impact populations of non-target species inadvertently. We evaluated relationships among animal movement, rodent control, and landscape features in...

  18. Springs, steroids, and slingshots: the roles of enhancers and constraints in animal movement.

    PubMed

    Higham, Timothy E; Irschick, Duncan J

    2013-07-01

    Whole-body movement is an essential part of life for many animal species, and is used to evade predators, capture prey, and perform many other behaviors. In many cases, the ability to perform rapid movements may be crucial to fitness as doing so may allow animals to do things like effectively capture an elusive prey or to elude a chasing predator. A significant body of research has been devoted toward the musculoskeletal and neurobiological basis of animal movement, with large reviews and volumes written on locomotion and feeding. Biologists have also defined how movement can be quantified and compared among different species. Arnold (Am Zool 23:347-361, 1983) first clearly explained that the ability to perform an ecologically important task could be labeled and quantified as maximum performance abilities, a point that is elaborated upon later (Garland and Losos, Ecological morphology: integrative organismal biology. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1994; Irschick et al., Evol Ecol Res 10:177-196, 2008). Some commonly examined performance traits include maximum sprint speed, maximum acceleration or deceleration, maneuverability, maximum aerobic capacity (VO2max), bite force, and rapidity of tongue projection, among other examples. Although the ability to perform such movements can be limited by muscle physiology, there are several situations in which the limits of muscle physiology are circumvented with a range of specializations. Here, we synthesize the literature dealing with movement (primarily ballistic) enhancers. Our goal is both to encapsulate the current state of knowledge of enhancers, and also to provide a broader evolutionary framework that might explain in which ecological contexts they have evolved, and how they can be studied in the future. Some common mechanisms for enhancing movement include elastic energy storage (e.g., tendons and other materials) in vertebrates and invertebrates, or hormonal changes (e.g., increased testosterone levels

  19. Modeling the biomechanics of fetal movements.

    PubMed

    Verbruggen, Stefaan W; Loo, Jessica H W; Hayat, Tayyib T A; Hajnal, Joseph V; Rutherford, Mary A; Phillips, Andrew T M; Nowlan, Niamh C

    2016-08-01

    Fetal movements in the uterus are a natural part of development and are known to play an important role in normal musculoskeletal development. However, very little is known about the biomechanical stimuli that arise during movements in utero, despite these stimuli being crucial to normal bone and joint formation. Therefore, the objective of this study was to create a series of computational steps by which the forces generated during a kick in utero could be predicted from clinically observed fetal movements using novel cine-MRI data of three fetuses, aged 20-22 weeks. A custom tracking software was designed to characterize the movements of joints in utero, and average uterus deflection of [Formula: see text] mm due to kicking was calculated. These observed displacements provided boundary conditions for a finite element model of the uterine environment, predicting an average reaction force of [Formula: see text] N generated by a kick against the uterine wall. Finally, these data were applied as inputs for a musculoskeletal model of a fetal kick, resulting in predicted maximum forces in the muscles surrounding the hip joint of approximately 8 N, while higher maximum forces of approximately 21 N were predicted for the muscles surrounding the knee joint. This study provides a novel insight into the closed mechanical environment of the uterus, with an innovative method allowing elucidation of the biomechanical interaction of the developing fetus with its surroundings. PMID:26534772

  20. Animal models of serotonergic psychedelics.

    PubMed

    Hanks, James B; González-Maeso, Javier

    2013-01-16

    The serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor is the major target of psychedelic drugs such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), mescaline, and psilocybin. Serotonergic psychedelics induce profound effects on cognition, emotion, and sensory processing that often seem uniquely human. This raises questions about the validity of animal models of psychedelic drug action. Nonetheless, recent findings suggest behavioral abnormalities elicited by psychedelics in rodents that predict such effects in humans. Here we review the behavioral effects induced by psychedelic drugs in rodent models, discuss the translational potential of these findings, and define areas where further research is needed to better understand the molecular mechanisms and neuronal circuits underlying their neuropsychological effects. PMID:23336043

  1. Software Validation via Model Animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutle, Aaron M.; Munoz, Cesar A.; Narkawicz, Anthony J.; Butler, Ricky W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores a new approach to validating software implementations that have been produced from formally-verified algorithms. Although visual inspection gives some confidence that the implementations faithfully reflect the formal models, it does not provide complete assurance that the software is correct. The proposed approach, which is based on animation of formal specifications, compares the outputs computed by the software implementations on a given suite of input values to the outputs computed by the formal models on the same inputs, and determines if they are equal up to a given tolerance. The approach is illustrated on a prototype air traffic management system that computes simple kinematic trajectories for aircraft. Proofs for the mathematical models of the system's algorithms are carried out in the Prototype Verification System (PVS). The animation tool PVSio is used to evaluate the formal models on a set of randomly generated test cases. Output values computed by PVSio are compared against output values computed by the actual software. This comparison improves the assurance that the translation from formal models to code is faithful and that, for example, floating point errors do not greatly affect correctness and safety properties.

  2. ANIMAL CONTROL - WHAT CONSTITUTES A RELIABLE CUE TO STOP ANIMAL MOVEMENT?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Controlling free-range livestock requires low-stress cues to alter animal behaviour. Recently modulated sound and electric shock were demonstrated to be effective in controlling free-ranging cattle. In this study the behaviour of 60, 300 kg Belmont Red heifers were observed for behavioural changes ...

  3. Animal movements in the Kenya Rift and evidence for the earliest ambush hunting by hominins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kübler, Simon; Owenga, Peter; Reynolds, Sally C.; Rucina, Stephen M.; King, Geoffrey C. P.

    2015-09-01

    Animal movements in the Kenya Rift Valley today are influenced by a combination of topography and trace nutrient distribution. These patterns would have been the same in the past when hominins inhabited the area. We use this approach to create a landscape reconstruction of Olorgesailie, a key site in the East African Rift with abundant evidence of large-mammal butchery between ~1.2 and ~0.5 Ma BP. The site location in relation to limited animal routes through the area show that hominins were aware of animal movements and used the location for ambush hunting during the Lower to Middle Pleistocene. These features explain the importance of Olorgesailie as a preferred location of repeated hominin activity through multiple changes in climate and local environmental conditions, and provide insights into the cognitive and hunting abilities of Homo erectus while indicating that their activities at the site were aimed at hunting, rather than scavenging.

  4. Animal movements in the Kenya Rift and evidence for the earliest ambush hunting by hominins.

    PubMed

    Kübler, Simon; Owenga, Peter; Reynolds, Sally C; Rucina, Stephen M; King, Geoffrey C P

    2015-01-01

    Animal movements in the Kenya Rift Valley today are influenced by a combination of topography and trace nutrient distribution. These patterns would have been the same in the past when hominins inhabited the area. We use this approach to create a landscape reconstruction of Olorgesailie, a key site in the East African Rift with abundant evidence of large-mammal butchery between ~1.2 and ~0.5 Ma BP. The site location in relation to limited animal routes through the area show that hominins were aware of animal movements and used the location for ambush hunting during the Lower to Middle Pleistocene. These features explain the importance of Olorgesailie as a preferred location of repeated hominin activity through multiple changes in climate and local environmental conditions, and provide insights into the cognitive and hunting abilities of Homo erectus while indicating that their activities at the site were aimed at hunting, rather than scavenging. PMID:26369499

  5. Animal movements in the Kenya Rift and evidence for the earliest ambush hunting by hominins

    PubMed Central

    Kübler, Simon; Owenga, Peter; Reynolds, Sally C.; Rucina, Stephen M.; King, Geoffrey C. P.

    2015-01-01

    Animal movements in the Kenya Rift Valley today are influenced by a combination of topography and trace nutrient distribution. These patterns would have been the same in the past when hominins inhabited the area. We use this approach to create a landscape reconstruction of Olorgesailie, a key site in the East African Rift with abundant evidence of large-mammal butchery between ~1.2 and ~0.5 Ma BP. The site location in relation to limited animal routes through the area show that hominins were aware of animal movements and used the location for ambush hunting during the Lower to Middle Pleistocene. These features explain the importance of Olorgesailie as a preferred location of repeated hominin activity through multiple changes in climate and local environmental conditions, and provide insights into the cognitive and hunting abilities of Homo erectus while indicating that their activities at the site were aimed at hunting, rather than scavenging. PMID:26369499

  6. Animal models of erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gajbhiye, Snehlata V.; Jadhav, Kshitij S.; Marathe, Padmaja A.; Pawar, Dattatray B.

    2015-01-01

    Animal models have contributed to a great extent to understanding and advancement in the field of sexual medicine. Many current medical and surgical therapies in sexual medicine have been tried based on these animal models. Extensive literature search revealed that the compiled information is limited. In this review, we describe various experimental models of erectile dysfunction (ED) encompassing their procedures, variables of assessment, advantages and disadvantages. The search strategy consisted of review of PubMed based articles. We included original research work and certain review articles available in PubMed database. The search terms used were “ED and experimental models,” “ED and nervous stimulation,” “ED and cavernous nerve stimulation,” “ED and central stimulation,” “ED and diabetes mellitus,” “ED and ageing,” “ED and hypercholesteremia,” “ED and Peyronie's disease,” “radiation induced ED,” “telemetric recording,” “ED and mating test” and “ED and non-contact erection test.” PMID:25624570

  7. A movement pattern generator model using artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, S; Gander, R E; Wood, H C

    1992-07-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANN's) allow a new approach to biological modeling. The main applications of ANN's have been geared towards the modeling of the association and learning mechanisms of the brain; only a few researchers have explored them for motor control. The fact that ANN's are based on biological systems indicates their potential application for a biological act such as locomotion. Towards this goal, we have developed a "movement pattern generator," using an ANN for generating periodic movement trajectories. This model is based on the concept of "central pattern generators." Jordan's sequential network, which is capable of learning sequences of patterns, was modified and used to generate several bipedal trajectories (or gaits), coded in task space, at different frequencies. The network model successfully learned all of the trajectories presented to it. The model has many attractive properties such as limit cycle behavior, generalization of trajectories and frequencies, phase maintenance, and fault tolerance. The movement pattern generator model is potentially applicable for improved understanding of animal locomotion and for use in legged robots and rehabilitation medicine. PMID:1516938

  8. Animal models of adrenocortical tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Beuschlein, Felix; Galac, Sara; Wilson, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, research on human adrenocortical neoplasia has been dominated by gene expression profiling of tumor specimens and by analysis of genetic disorders associated with a predisposition to these tumors. Although these studies have identified key genes and associated signaling pathways that are dysregulated in adrenocortical neoplasms, the molecular events accounting for the frequent occurrence of benign tumors and low rate of malignant transformation remain unknown. Moreover, the prognosis for patients with adrenocortical carcinoma remains poor, so new medical treatments are needed. Naturally occurring and genetically engineered animal models afford a means to investigate adrenocortical tumorigenesis and to develop novel therapeutics. This comparative review highlights adrenocortical tumor models useful for either mechanistic studies or preclinical testing. Three model species – mouse, ferret, and dog – are reviewed, and their relevance to adrenocortical tumors in humans is discussed. PMID:22100615

  9. Effects of Number of Animals Monitored on Representations of Cattle Group Movement Characteristics and Spatial Occupancy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tong; Green, Angela R.; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Ramirez, Brett C.; Shike, Daniel W.

    2015-01-01

    The number of animals required to represent the collective characteristics of a group remains a concern in animal movement monitoring with GPS. Monitoring a subset of animals from a group instead of all animals can reduce costs and labor; however, incomplete data may cause information losses and inaccuracy in subsequent data analyses. In cattle studies, little work has been conducted to determine the number of cattle within a group needed to be instrumented considering subsequent analyses. Two different groups of cattle (a mixed group of 24 beef cows and heifers, and another group of 8 beef cows) were monitored with GPS collars at 4 min intervals on intensively managed pastures and corn residue fields in 2011. The effects of subset group size on cattle movement characterization and spatial occupancy analysis were evaluated by comparing the results between subset groups and the entire group for a variety of summarization parameters. As expected, more animals yield better results for all parameters. Results show the average group travel speed and daily travel distances are overestimated as subset group size decreases, while the average group radius is underestimated. Accuracy of group centroid locations and group radii are improved linearly as subset group size increases. A kernel density estimation was performed to quantify the spatial occupancy by cattle via GPS location data. Results show animals among the group had high similarity of spatial occupancy. Decisions regarding choosing an appropriate subset group size for monitoring depend on the specific use of data for subsequent analysis: a small subset group may be adequate for identifying areas visited by cattle; larger subset group size (e.g. subset group containing more than 75% of animals) is recommended to achieve better accuracy of group movement characteristics and spatial occupancy for the use of correlating cattle locations with other environmental factors. PMID:25647571

  10. Path segmentation for beginners: an overview of current methods for detecting changes in animal movement patterns.

    PubMed

    Edelhoff, Hendrik; Signer, Johannes; Balkenhol, Niko

    2016-01-01

    Increased availability of high-resolution movement data has led to the development of numerous methods for studying changes in animal movement behavior. Path segmentation methods provide basics for detecting movement changes and the behavioral mechanisms driving them. However, available path segmentation methods differ vastly with respect to underlying statistical assumptions and output produced. Consequently, it is currently difficult for researchers new to path segmentation to gain an overview of the different methods, and choose one that is appropriate for their data and research questions. Here, we provide an overview of different methods for segmenting movement paths according to potential changes in underlying behavior. To structure our overview, we outline three broad types of research questions that are commonly addressed through path segmentation: 1) the quantitative description of movement patterns, 2) the detection of significant change-points, and 3) the identification of underlying processes or 'hidden states'. We discuss advantages and limitations of different approaches for addressing these research questions using path-level movement data, and present general guidelines for choosing methods based on data characteristics and questions. Our overview illustrates the large diversity of available path segmentation approaches, highlights the need for studies that compare the utility of different methods, and identifies opportunities for future developments in path-level data analysis. PMID:27595001

  11. An animal model of fetishism.

    PubMed

    Köksal, Falih; Domjan, Michael; Kurt, Adnan; Sertel, Ozlem; Orüng, Sabiha; Bowers, Rob; Kumru, Gulsen

    2004-12-01

    An animal model of sexual fetishism was developed with male Japanese quail based on persistence of conditioned sexual responding during extinction to an inanimate object made of terrycloth (Experiments 1 and 3). This persistent responding occurred only in subjects that came to copulate with the terrycloth object, suggesting that the copulatory behavior served to maintain the fetishistic behavior. Sexual conditioning was carried out by pairing a conditioned stimulus (CS) with the opportunity to copulate with a female (the unconditioned stimulus or US). Copulation with the CS object and persistent responding did not develop if the CS was a light (Experiment 1) or if conditioning was carried out with a food US (Experiment 2). In addition, subjects that showed persistence in responding to the terrycloth CS did not persist in their responding to a light CS (Experiment 3). The results are consistent with the hypothesis that conditioned copulatory behavior creates a form of self-maintenance that leads to persistent responding to an inanimate object. The development of an animal model of such fetishistic behavior should facilitate experimental analysis of the phenomenon. PMID:15500813

  12. Animal models of cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    Cook, J. L.; Hung, C. T.; Kuroki, K.; Stoker, A. M.; Cook, C. R.; Pfeiffer, F. M.; Sherman, S. L.; Stannard, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage repair in terms of replacement, or regeneration of damaged or diseased articular cartilage with functional tissue, is the ‘holy grail’ of joint surgery. A wide spectrum of strategies for cartilage repair currently exists and several of these techniques have been reported to be associated with successful clinical outcomes for appropriately selected indications. However, based on respective advantages, disadvantages, and limitations, no single strategy, or even combination of strategies, provides surgeons with viable options for attaining successful long-term outcomes in the majority of patients. As such, development of novel techniques and optimisation of current techniques need to be, and are, the focus of a great deal of research from the basic science level to clinical trials. Translational research that bridges scientific discoveries to clinical application involves the use of animal models in order to assess safety and efficacy for regulatory approval for human use. This review article provides an overview of animal models for cartilage repair. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;4:89–94. PMID:24695750

  13. Opportunities for the application of advanced remotely-sensed data in ecological studies of terrestrial animal movement.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Wiebke; Martinuzzi, Sebastian; Estes, Anna B; Pidgeon, Anna M; Dettki, Holger; Ericsson, Göran; Radeloff, Volker C

    2015-01-01

    Animal movement patterns in space and time are a central aspect of animal ecology. Remotely-sensed environmental indices can play a key role in understanding movement patterns by providing contiguous, relatively fine-scale data that link animal movements to their environment. Still, implementation of newly available remotely-sensed data is often delayed in studies of animal movement, calling for a better flow of information to researchers less familiar with remotely-sensed data applications. Here, we reviewed the application of remotely-sensed environmental indices to infer movement patterns of animals in terrestrial systems in studies published between 2002 and 2013. Next, we introduced newly available remotely-sensed products, and discussed their opportunities for animal movement studies. Studies of coarse-scale movement mostly relied on satellite data representing plant phenology or climate and weather. Studies of small-scale movement frequently used land cover data based on Landsat imagery or aerial photographs. Greater documentation of the type and resolution of remotely-sensed products in ecological movement studies would enhance their usefulness. Recent advancements in remote sensing technology improve assessments of temporal dynamics of landscapes and the three-dimensional structures of habitats, enabling near real-time environmental assessment. Online movement databases that now integrate remotely-sensed data facilitate access to remotely-sensed products for movement ecologists. We recommend that animal movement studies incorporate remotely-sensed products that provide time series of environmental response variables. This would facilitate wildlife management and conservation efforts, as well as the predictive ability of movement analyses. Closer collaboration between ecologists and remote sensing experts could considerably alleviate the implementation gap. Ecologists should not expect that indices derived from remotely-sensed data will be directly

  14. Animal Models of Autoimmune Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Soliven, Betty

    2014-01-01

    The peripheral nervous system (PNS) comprises the cranial nerves, the spinal nerves with their roots and rami, dorsal root ganglia neurons, the peripheral nerves, and peripheral components of the autonomic nervous system. Cell-mediated or antibody-mediated immune attack on the PNS results in distinct clinical syndromes, which are classified based on the tempo of illness, PNS component(s) involved, and the culprit antigen(s) identified. Insights into the pathogenesis of autoimmune neuropathy have been provided by ex vivo immunologic studies, biopsy materials, electrophysiologic studies, and experimental models. This review article summarizes earlier seminal observations and highlights the recent progress in our understanding of immunopathogenesis of autoimmune neuropathies based on data from animal models. PMID:24615441

  15. Animal models and conserved processes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The concept of conserved processes presents unique opportunities for using nonhuman animal models in biomedical research. However, the concept must be examined in the context that humans and nonhuman animals are evolved, complex, adaptive systems. Given that nonhuman animals are examples of living systems that are differently complex from humans, what does the existence of a conserved gene or process imply for inter-species extrapolation? Methods We surveyed the literature including philosophy of science, biological complexity, conserved processes, evolutionary biology, comparative medicine, anti-neoplastic agents, inhalational anesthetics, and drug development journals in order to determine the value of nonhuman animal models when studying conserved processes. Results Evolution through natural selection has employed components and processes both to produce the same outcomes among species but also to generate different functions and traits. Many genes and processes are conserved, but new combinations of these processes or different regulation of the genes involved in these processes have resulted in unique organisms. Further, there is a hierarchy of organization in complex living systems. At some levels, the components are simple systems that can be analyzed by mathematics or the physical sciences, while at other levels the system cannot be fully analyzed by reducing it to a physical system. The study of complex living systems must alternate between focusing on the parts and examining the intact whole organism while taking into account the connections between the two. Systems biology aims for this holism. We examined the actions of inhalational anesthetic agents and anti-neoplastic agents in order to address what the characteristics of complex living systems imply for inter-species extrapolation of traits and responses related to conserved processes. Conclusion We conclude that even the presence of conserved processes is insufficient for inter

  16. Animal models of recurrent or bipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Kato, T; Kasahara, T; Kubota-Sakashita, M; Kato, T M; Nakajima, K

    2016-05-01

    Animal models of mental disorders should ideally have construct, face, and predictive validity, but current animal models do not always satisfy these validity criteria. Additionally, animal models of depression rely mainly on stress-induced behavioral changes. These stress-induced models have limited validity, because stress is not a risk factor specific to depression, and the models do not recapitulate the recurrent and spontaneous nature of depressive episodes. Although animal models exhibiting recurrent depressive episodes or bipolar depression have not yet been established, several researchers are trying to generate such animals by modeling clinical risk factors as well as by manipulating a specific neural circuit using emerging techniques. PMID:26265551

  17. Parathyroid diseases and animal models.

    PubMed

    Imanishi, Yasuo; Nagata, Yuki; Inaba, Masaaki

    2012-01-01

    CIRCULATING CALCIUM AND PHOSPHATE ARE TIGHTLY REGULATED BY THREE HORMONES: the active form of vitamin D (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D), fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-23, and parathyroid hormone (PTH). PTH acts to stimulate a rapid increment in serum calcium and has a crucial role in calcium homeostasis. Major target organs of PTH are kidney and bone. The oversecretion of the hormone results in hypercalcemia, caused by increased intestinal calcium absorption, reduced renal calcium clearance, and mobilization of calcium from bone in primary hyperparathyroidism. In chronic kidney disease, secondary hyperparathyroidism of uremia is observed in its early stages, and this finally develops into the autonomous secretion of PTH during maintenance hemodialysis. Receptors in parathyroid cells, such as the calcium-sensing receptor, vitamin D receptor, and FGF receptor (FGFR)-Klotho complex have crucial roles in the regulation of PTH secretion. Genes such as Cyclin D1, RET, MEN1, HRPT2, and CDKN1B have been identified in parathyroid diseases. Genetically engineered animals with these receptors and the associated genes have provided us with valuable information on the patho-physiology of parathyroid diseases. The application of these animal models is significant for the development of new therapies. PMID:22754549

  18. Disease Spread through Animal Movements: A Static and Temporal Network Analysis of Pig Trade in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Lentz, Hartmut H. K.; Koher, Andreas; Hövel, Philipp; Gethmann, Jörn; Sauter-Louis, Carola; Selhorst, Thomas; Conraths, Franz J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Animal trade plays an important role for the spread of infectious diseases in livestock populations. The central question of this work is how infectious diseases can potentially spread via trade in such a livestock population. We address this question by analyzing the underlying network of animal movements. In particular, we consider pig trade in Germany, where trade actors (agricultural premises) form a complex network. Methodology The considered pig trade dataset spans several years and is analyzed with respect to its potential to spread infectious diseases. Focusing on measurements of network-topological properties, we avoid the usage of external parameters, since these properties are independent of specific pathogens. They are on the contrary of great importance for understanding any general spreading process on this particular network. We analyze the system using different network models, which include varying amounts of information: (i) static network, (ii) network as a time series of uncorrelated snapshots, (iii) temporal network, where causality is explicitly taken into account. Findings We find that a static network view captures many relevant aspects of the trade system, and premises can be classified into two clearly defined risk classes. Moreover, our results allow for an efficient allocation strategy for intervention measures using centrality measures. Data on trade volume do barely alter the results and is therefore of secondary importance. Although a static network description yields useful results, the temporal resolution of data plays an outstanding role for an in-depth understanding of spreading processes. This applies in particular for an accurate calculation of the maximum outbreak size. PMID:27152712

  19. Optimal orientation in flows: providing a benchmark for animal movement strategies.

    PubMed

    McLaren, James D; Shamoun-Baranes, Judy; Dokter, Adriaan M; Klaassen, Raymond H G; Bouten, Willem

    2014-10-01

    Animal movements in air and water can be strongly affected by experienced flow. While various flow-orientation strategies have been proposed and observed, their performance in variable flow conditions remains unclear. We apply control theory to establish a benchmark for time-minimizing (optimal) orientation. We then define optimal orientation for movement in steady flow patterns and, using dynamic wind data, for short-distance mass movements of thrushes (Turdus sp.) and 6000 km non-stop migratory flights by great snipes, Gallinago media. Relative to the optimal benchmark, we assess the efficiency (travel speed) and reliability (success rate) of three generic orientation strategies: full compensation for lateral drift, vector orientation (single-heading movement) and goal orientation (continually heading towards the goal). Optimal orientation is characterized by detours to regions of high flow support, especially when flow speeds approach and exceed the animal's self-propelled speed. In strong predictable flow (short distance thrush flights), vector orientation adjusted to flow on departure is nearly optimal, whereas for unpredictable flow (inter-continental snipe flights), only goal orientation was near-optimally reliable and efficient. Optimal orientation provides a benchmark for assessing efficiency of responses to complex flow conditions, thereby offering insight into adaptive flow-orientation across taxa in the light of flow strength, predictability and navigation capacity. PMID:25056213

  20. Optimal orientation in flows: providing a benchmark for animal movement strategies

    PubMed Central

    McLaren, James D.; Shamoun-Baranes, Judy; Dokter, Adriaan M.; Klaassen, Raymond H. G.; Bouten, Willem

    2014-01-01

    Animal movements in air and water can be strongly affected by experienced flow. While various flow-orientation strategies have been proposed and observed, their performance in variable flow conditions remains unclear. We apply control theory to establish a benchmark for time-minimizing (optimal) orientation. We then define optimal orientation for movement in steady flow patterns and, using dynamic wind data, for short-distance mass movements of thrushes (Turdus sp.) and 6000 km non-stop migratory flights by great snipes, Gallinago media. Relative to the optimal benchmark, we assess the efficiency (travel speed) and reliability (success rate) of three generic orientation strategies: full compensation for lateral drift, vector orientation (single-heading movement) and goal orientation (continually heading towards the goal). Optimal orientation is characterized by detours to regions of high flow support, especially when flow speeds approach and exceed the animal's self-propelled speed. In strong predictable flow (short distance thrush flights), vector orientation adjusted to flow on departure is nearly optimal, whereas for unpredictable flow (inter-continental snipe flights), only goal orientation was near-optimally reliable and efficient. Optimal orientation provides a benchmark for assessing efficiency of responses to complex flow conditions, thereby offering insight into adaptive flow-orientation across taxa in the light of flow strength, predictability and navigation capacity. PMID:25056213

  1. Animal Models of Williams Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    OSBORNE, LUCY R.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, researchers have generated a variety of mouse models in an attempt to dissect the contribution of individual genes to the complex phenotype associated with Williams syndrome (WS). The mouse genome is easily manipulated to produce animals that are copies of humans with genetic conditions, be it with null mutations, hypomorphic mutations, point mutations, or even large deletions encompassing many genes. The existing mouse models certainly seem to implicate hemizygosity for ELN, BAZ1B, CLIP2, and GTF2IRD1 in WS, and new mice with large deletions of the WS region are helping us to understand both the additive and potential combinatorial effects of hemizygosity for specific genes. However, not all genes that are haploinsufficient in humans prove to be so in mice and the effect of genetic background can also have a significant effect on the penetrance of many phenotypes. Thus although mouse models are powerful tools, the information garnered from their study must be carefully interpreted. Nevertheless, mouse models look set to provide a wealth of information about the neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and molecular pathways that underlie WS and in the future will act as essential tools for the development and testing of therapeutics. PMID:20425782

  2. Energy efficiency and allometry of movement of swimming and flying animals.

    PubMed

    Bale, Rahul; Hao, Max; Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Patankar, Neelesh A

    2014-05-27

    Which animals use their energy better during movement? One metric to answer this question is the energy cost per unit distance per unit weight. Prior data show that this metric decreases with mass, which is considered to imply that massive animals are more efficient. Although useful, this metric also implies that two dynamically equivalent animals of different sizes will not be considered equally efficient. We resolve this longstanding issue by first determining the scaling of energy cost per unit distance traveled. The scale is found to be M(2/3) or M(1/2), where M is the animal mass. Second, we introduce an energy-consumption coefficient (CE) defined as energy per unit distance traveled divided by this scale. CE is a measure of efficiency of swimming and flying, analogous to how drag coefficient quantifies aerodynamic drag on vehicles. Derivation of the energy-cost scale reveals that the assumption that undulatory swimmers spend energy to overcome drag in the direction of swimming is inappropriate. We derive allometric scalings that capture trends in data of swimming and flying animals over 10-20 orders of magnitude by mass. The energy-consumption coefficient reveals that swimmers beyond a critical mass, and most fliers are almost equally efficient as if they are dynamically equivalent; increasingly massive animals are not more efficient according to the proposed metric. Distinct allometric scalings are discovered for large and small swimmers. Flying animals are found to require relatively more energy compared with swimmers. PMID:24821764

  3. Energy efficiency and allometry of movement of swimming and flying animals

    PubMed Central

    Bale, Rahul; Hao, Max; Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2014-01-01

    Which animals use their energy better during movement? One metric to answer this question is the energy cost per unit distance per unit weight. Prior data show that this metric decreases with mass, which is considered to imply that massive animals are more efficient. Although useful, this metric also implies that two dynamically equivalent animals of different sizes will not be considered equally efficient. We resolve this longstanding issue by first determining the scaling of energy cost per unit distance traveled. The scale is found to be M2/3 or M1/2, where M is the animal mass. Second, we introduce an energy-consumption coefficient (CE) defined as energy per unit distance traveled divided by this scale. CE is a measure of efficiency of swimming and flying, analogous to how drag coefficient quantifies aerodynamic drag on vehicles. Derivation of the energy-cost scale reveals that the assumption that undulatory swimmers spend energy to overcome drag in the direction of swimming is inappropriate. We derive allometric scalings that capture trends in data of swimming and flying animals over 10–20 orders of magnitude by mass. The energy-consumption coefficient reveals that swimmers beyond a critical mass, and most fliers are almost equally efficient as if they are dynamically equivalent; increasingly massive animals are not more efficient according to the proposed metric. Distinct allometric scalings are discovered for large and small swimmers. Flying animals are found to require relatively more energy compared with swimmers. PMID:24821764

  4. Serotonergic pharmacology in animal models: from behavioral disorders to dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin-Gobert, Maude; Sgambato-Faure, Véronique

    2014-06-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) dysfunction has been involved in both movement and behavioral disorders. Serotonin pharmacology improves dyskinetic movements as well as depressive, anxious, aggressive and anorexic symptoms. Animal models have been useful to investigate more precisely to what extent 5-HT is involved and whether drugs targeting the 5-HT system can counteract the symptoms exhibited. We review existing rodent and non-human primate (NHP) animal models in which selective 5-HT or dual 5-HT-norepinephrine (NE) transporter inhibitors, as well as specific 5-HT receptors agonists and antagonists, monoamine oxidase A inhibitors (IMAO-A) and MDMA (Ecstasy) have been used. We review overlaps between the various drug classes involved. We confront behavioral paradigms and treatment regimen. Some but not all animal models and associated pharmacological treatments have been extensively studied in the litterature. In particular, the impact of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) has been extensively investigated using a variety of pharmacological or genetic rodent models of depression, anxiety, aggressiveness. But the validity of these rodent models is questioned. On the contrary, few studies did address the potential impact of targeting the 5-HT system on NHP models of behavioral disorders, despite the fact that those models may match more closely to human pathologies. Further investigations with carefull behavioral analysis will improve our understanding of neural bases underlying the pathophysiology of movement and behavioral disorders. PMID:24486710

  5. Animal Models of Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hai-Hong

    2011-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is a common health problem significantly affecting the quality of life of women worldwide. Animal models that simulate SUI enable the assessment of the mechanism of risk factors for SUI in a controlled fashion, including childbirth injuries, and enable preclinical testing of new treatments and therapies for SUI. Animal models that simulate childbirth are presently being utilized to determine the mechanisms of the maternal injuries of childbirth that lead to SUI with the goal of developing prophylactic treatments. Methods of assessing SUI in animals that mimic diagnostic methods used clinically have been developed to evaluate the animal models. Use of these animal models to test innovative treatment strategies has the potential to improve clinical management of SUI. This chapter provides a review of the available animal models of SUI, as well as a review of the methods of assessing SUI in animal models, and potential treatments that have been tested on these models. PMID:21290221

  6. Animal models to evaluate bacterial biofilm development.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Kim; Trøstrup, Hannah; Moser, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Medical biofilms have attracted substantial attention especially in the past decade. Animal models are contributing significantly to understand the pathogenesis of medical biofilms. In addition, animal models are an essential tool in testing the hypothesis generated from clinical observations in patients and preclinical testing of agents showing in vitro antibiofilm effect. Here, we describe three animal models - two non-foreign body Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm models and a foreign body Staphylococcus aureus model. PMID:24664830

  7. Potency of Animal Models in KANSEI Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Shigeru; Hisano, Setsuji; Iwamoto, Yoshiki

    Various species of animals have been used as animal models for neuroscience and provided critical information about the brain functions. Although it seems difficult to elucidate a highly advanced function of the human brain, animal models have potency to clarify the fundamental mechanisms of emotion, decision-making and social behavior. In this review, we will pick up common animal models and point to both the merits and demerits caused by the characteristics. We will also mention that wide-ranging approaches from animal models are advantageous to understand KANSEI as well as mind in humans.

  8. Minimally Invasive Techniques to Accelerate the Orthodontic Tooth Movement: A Systematic Review of Animal Studies

    PubMed Central

    Qamruddin, Irfan; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Khamis, Mohd Fadhli; Husein, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate various noninvasive and minimally invasive procedures for the enhancement of orthodontic tooth movement in animals. Materials and Methods. Literature was searched using NCBI (PubMed, PubMed Central, and PubMed Health), MedPilot (Medline, Catalogue ZB MED, Catalogue Medicine Health, and Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE)), and Google Scholar from January 2009 till 31 December 2014. We included original articles related to noninvasive and minimally invasive procedures to enhance orthodontic tooth movement in animals. Extraction of data and quality assessments were carried out by two observers independently. Results. The total number of hits was 9195 out of which just 11 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Nine articles were good and 5 articles were moderate in quality. Low level laser therapy (LLLT) was among the most common noninvasive techniques whereas flapless corticision using various instruments was among the commonest minimally invasive procedures to enhance velocity of tooth movement. Conclusions. LLLT, low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS), mechanical vibration, and flapless corticision are emerging noninvasive and minimally invasive techniques which need further researches to establish protocols to use them clinically with conviction. PMID:26881201

  9. Laboratory Animal Models for Brucellosis Research

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Teane M. A.; Costa, Erica A.; Paixão, Tatiane A.; Tsolis, Renée M.; Santos, Renato L.

    2011-01-01

    Brucellosis is a chronic infectious disease caused by Brucella spp., a Gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen that affects humans and animals, leading to significant impact on public health and animal industry. Human brucellosis is considered the most prevalent bacterial zoonosis in the world and is characterized by fever, weight loss, depression, hepato/splenomegaly, osteoarticular, and genital infections. Relevant aspects of Brucella pathogenesis have been intensively investigated in culture cells and animal models. The mouse is the animal model more commonly used to study chronic infection caused by Brucella. This model is most frequently used to investigate specific pathogenic factors of Brucella spp., to characterize the host immune response, and to evaluate therapeutics and vaccines. Other animal species have been used as models for brucellosis including rats, guinea pigs, and monkeys. This paper discusses the murine and other laboratory animal models for human and animal brucellosis. PMID:21403904

  10. The mathematics of movement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Review of: Quantitative Analysis of Movement: Measuring and Modeling Population Redistribution in Animals and Plants. Peter Turchin. 1998. Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, MA. 306 pages. $38.95 (paper).

  11. Animal Models and Integrated Nested Laplace Approximations

    PubMed Central

    Holand, Anna Marie; Steinsland, Ingelin; Martino, Sara; Jensen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Animal models are generalized linear mixed models used in evolutionary biology and animal breeding to identify the genetic part of traits. Integrated Nested Laplace Approximation (INLA) is a methodology for making fast, nonsampling-based Bayesian inference for hierarchical Gaussian Markov models. In this article, we demonstrate that the INLA methodology can be used for many versions of Bayesian animal models. We analyze animal models for both synthetic case studies and house sparrow (Passer domesticus) population case studies with Gaussian, binomial, and Poisson likelihoods using INLA. Inference results are compared with results using Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. For model choice we use difference in deviance information criteria (DIC). We suggest and show how to evaluate differences in DIC by comparing them with sampling results from simulation studies. We also introduce an R package, AnimalINLA, for easy and fast inference for Bayesian Animal models using INLA. PMID:23708299

  12. Computer Model Predicts the Movement of Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A new computer model of the atmosphere can now actually pinpoint where global dust events come from, and can project where they're going. The model may help scientists better evaluate the impact of dust on human health, climate, ocean carbon cycles, ecosystems, and atmospheric chemistry. Also, by seeing where dust originates and where it blows people with respiratory problems can get advanced warning of approaching dust clouds. 'The model is physically more realistic than previous ones,' said Mian Chin, a co-author of the study and an Earth and atmospheric scientist at Georgia Tech and the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Md. 'It is able to reproduce the short term day-to-day variations and long term inter-annual variations of dust concentrations and distributions that are measured from field experiments and observed from satellites.' The above images show both aerosols measured from space (left) and the movement of aerosols predicted by computer model for the same date (right). For more information, read New Computer Model Tracks and Predicts Paths Of Earth's Dust Images courtesy Paul Giroux, Georgia Tech/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

  13. Relevance of animal models to human tardive dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Pierre J; Parent, Marie-Thérèse; Rompré, Pierre H; Lévesque, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Tardive dyskinesia remains an elusive and significant clinical entity that can possibly be understood via experimentation with animal models. We conducted a literature review on tardive dyskinesia modeling. Subchronic antipsychotic drug exposure is a standard approach to model tardive dyskinesia in rodents. Vacuous chewing movements constitute the most common pattern of expression of purposeless oral movements and represent an impermanent response, with individual and strain susceptibility differences. Transgenic mice are also used to address the contribution of adaptive and maladaptive signals induced during antipsychotic drug exposure. An emphasis on non-human primate modeling is proposed, and past experimental observations reviewed in various monkey species. Rodent and primate models are complementary, but the non-human primate model appears more convincingly similar to the human condition and better suited to address therapeutic issues against tardive dyskinesia. PMID:22404856

  14. Impact of Bisphosphonate on Orthodontic tooth movement and osteoclastic count: An Animal Study

    PubMed Central

    Venkataramana, V; Chidambaram, S; Reddy, B Vishnuvardhan; Goud, E V Soma Shekara; Arafath, Mohammed; Krishnan, Santhana

    2014-01-01

    Background : The aim of the current study is to examine the effect of systemically administered BP-Pamidronate, on Orthodontic Tooth Movement (OTM) along with osteoclastic quantification in New Zealand white rabbits. Materials & Methods : Twenty rabbits used in the study, were equally divided into 2 groups ; Group-1 as Control & Group-2 as Experimental. A sentalloy NITI closed coil spring (GAC International, USA) of 100 gram force, ligated between the lower first molar and the anterior most incisors of the rabbit has served as orthodontic force element. The BP- Pamidronate was administered at the dosage of 1.5 mg/kg body intra-peritonially, on the 1st, 7th and 14th day of the experiment. On the 21st day both group of animals were sacrificed, mandibles were dissected. The formed diastema between the 1st and 2nd molar was measured on the dissected mandibles using standard metric scale, which is considered as the OTM in the mesial direction. Next, the alveolar bone regions along with intact mesial surfaces were processed for histological investigation (osteoclastic count). Results : The student ‘t’ test has been done to compare the mean values of molar tooth movement and osteoclastic count. Parameter :1 molar tooth movement has shown a significant difference between the control (3.750 ± 0.548 mm) and the experimental group (3.050 ± 0.556 mm) with calculated ‘p’ value (p-value <0.05) is significant at 0.0110 level. Parameter : 2 osteoclastic count has shown a significant difference between the control (13.335000 ± 0.735856 per square mm.) and the experimental group (11.426900 ± 1.49369 per square mm) calculated ‘p’ value (p-value <0.05) is significant at 0.003 level. Conclusion : The molar tooth movement and the osteoclastic count were significantly reduced in BP – Pamidronate administered animals than non-drug recipients. How to cite the article: Venkataramana V, Chidambaram S, Reddy BV, Goud EV, Arafath M, Krishnan S. Impact of Bisphosphonate on

  15. Measurement error causes scale-dependent threshold erosion of biological signals in animal movement data.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Corey J A; Sims, David W; Hays, Graeme C

    2007-03-01

    Recent advances in telemetry technology have created a wealth of tracking data available for many animal species moving over spatial scales from tens of meters to tens of thousands of kilometers. Increasingly, such data sets are being used for quantitative movement analyses aimed at extracting fundamental biological signals such as optimal searching behavior and scale-dependent foraging decisions. We show here that the location error inherent in various tracking technologies reduces the ability to detect patterns of behavior within movements. Our analyses endeavored to set out a series of initial ground rules for ecologists to help ensure that sampling noise is not misinterpreted as a real biological signal. We simulated animal movement tracks using specialized random walks known as Lévy flights at three spatial scales of investigation: 100-km, 10-km, and 1-km maximum daily step lengths. The locations generated in the simulations were then blurred using known error distributions associated with commonly applied tracking methods: the Global Positioning System (GPS), Argos polar-orbiting satellites, and light-level geolocation. Deviations from the idealized Lévy flight pattern were assessed for each track after incrementing levels of location error were applied at each spatial scale, with additional assessments of the effect of error on scale-dependent movement patterns measured using fractal mean dimension and first-passage time (FPT) analyses. The accuracy of parameter estimation (Lévy mu, fractal mean D, and variance in FPT) declined precipitously at threshold errors relative to each spatial scale. At 100-km maximum daily step lengths, error standard deviations of > or = 10 km seriously eroded the biological patterns evident in the simulated tracks, with analogous thresholds at the 10-km and 1-km scales (error SD > or = 1.3 km and 0.07 km, respectively). Temporal subsampling of the simulated tracks maintained some elements of the biological signals depending on

  16. MOAB: a spatially explicit, individual-based expert system for creating animal foraging models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, J.; Finn, John T.

    1999-01-01

    We describe the development, structure, and corroboration process of a simulation model of animal behavior (MOAB). MOAB can create spatially explicit, individual-based animal foraging models. Users can create or replicate heterogeneous landscape patterns, and place resources and individual animals of a goven species on that landscape to simultaneously simulate the foraging behavior of multiple species. The heuristic rules for animal behavior are maintained in a user-modifiable expert system. MOAB can be used to explore hypotheses concerning the influence of landscape patttern on animal movement and foraging behavior. A red fox (Vulpes vulpes L.) foraging and nest predation model was created to test MOAB's capabilities. Foxes were simulated for 30-day periods using both expert system and random movement rules. Home range size, territory formation and other available simulation studies. A striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis L.) model also was developed. The expert system model proved superior to stochastic in respect to territory formation, general movement patterns and home range size.

  17. Animal models of tuberculosis for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Gupta, U D; Katoch, V M

    2009-01-01

    Animal models for testing different vaccine candidates have been developed since a long time for studying tuberculosis. Mice, guinea pigs and rabbits are animals most frequently used. Each model has its own merits for studying human tuberculosis, and none completely mimics the human disease. Different animal models are being used depending upon the availability of the space, trained manpower as well as other resources. Efforts should continue to develop a vaccine which can replace/outperform the presently available vaccine BCG. PMID:19287053

  18. Space-use behaviour of woodland caribou based on a cognitive movement model.

    PubMed

    Avgar, Tal; Baker, James A; Brown, Glen S; Hagens, Jevon S; Kittle, Andrew M; Mallon, Erin E; McGreer, Madeleine T; Mosser, Anna; Newmaster, Steven G; Patterson, Brent R; Reid, Douglas E B; Rodgers, Art R; Shuter, Jennifer; Street, Garrett M; Thompson, Ian; Turetsky, Merritt J; Wiebe, Philip A; Fryxell, John M

    2015-07-01

    Movement patterns offer a rich source of information on animal behaviour and the ecological significance of landscape attributes. This is especially useful for species occupying remote landscapes where direct behavioural observations are limited. In this study, we fit a mechanistic model of animal cognition and movement to GPS positional data of woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou; Gmelin 1788) collected over a wide range of ecological conditions. The model explicitly tracks individual animal informational state over space and time, with resulting parameter estimates that have direct cognitive and ecological meaning. Three biotic landscape attributes were hypothesized to motivate caribou movement: forage abundance (dietary digestible biomass), wolf (Canis lupus; Linnaeus, 1758) density and moose (Alces alces; Linnaeus, 1758) habitat. Wolves are the main predator of caribou in this system and moose are their primary prey. Resulting parameter estimates clearly indicated that forage abundance is an important driver of caribou movement patterns, with predator and moose avoidance often having a strong effect, but not for all individuals. From the cognitive perspective, our results support the notion that caribou rely on limited sensory inputs from their surroundings, as well as on long-term spatial memory, to make informed movement decisions. Our study demonstrates how sensory, memory and motion capacities may interact with ecological fitness covariates to influence movement decisions by free-ranging animals. PMID:25714592

  19. Pain assessment in animal models of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Piel, Margaret J; Kroin, Jeffrey S; van Wijnen, Andre J; Kc, Ranjan; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2014-03-10

    Assessment of pain in animal models of osteoarthritis is integral to interpretation of a model's utility in representing the clinical condition, and enabling accurate translational medicine. Here we describe behavioral pain assessments available for small and large experimental osteoarthritic pain animal models. PMID:24333346

  20. PARTICLE TRACKING ANALYSIS & ANIMATIONS DEPICTING MOVEMENT OF THE CARBON TETRACHLORIDE PLUME REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    MCMAHON, W.J.; ROHAY, V.J.

    2006-11-02

    The purpose of the hydraulic particle tracking animation files is to show where carbon tetrachloride that reached groundwater from the known discharge facilities would have been likely to travel fin the groundwater, and from where carbon tetrachloride presently observed in the aquifer likely would have started. These analyses support the 200-PW-1 Operable Unit activity to identify sources of carbon tetrachloride currently observed in groundwater or locations where carbon tetrachloride may have entered the groundwater. The animation files show travel paths (both forward and backward in time) for hypothetical particles of carbon tetrachloride carried in the groundwater. The travel paths represent the movement of the carbon tetrachloride at the average groundwater velocity. The particles only represent an estimation of where the carbon tetrachloride would be expected to be (or have come from) and do not indicate or imply what the concentration in the groundwater would be.

  1. Homogenization of Large-Scale Movement Models in Ecology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garlick, M.J.; Powell, J.A.; Hooten, M.B.; McFarlane, L.R.

    2011-01-01

    A difficulty in using diffusion models to predict large scale animal population dispersal is that individuals move differently based on local information (as opposed to gradients) in differing habitat types. This can be accommodated by using ecological diffusion. However, real environments are often spatially complex, limiting application of a direct approach. Homogenization for partial differential equations has long been applied to Fickian diffusion (in which average individual movement is organized along gradients of habitat and population density). We derive a homogenization procedure for ecological diffusion and apply it to a simple model for chronic wasting disease in mule deer. Homogenization allows us to determine the impact of small scale (10-100 m) habitat variability on large scale (10-100 km) movement. The procedure generates asymptotic equations for solutions on the large scale with parameters defined by small-scale variation. The simplicity of this homogenization procedure is striking when compared to the multi-dimensional homogenization procedure for Fickian diffusion,and the method will be equally straightforward for more complex models. ?? 2010 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  2. Ethical issues: impact of the animal rights movement on surgical research.

    PubMed

    Sonnino, R E; Banks, R E

    1996-08-01

    The aggressive militancy of many animal rights or "antivivisectionist" groups is causing great consternation but little action on the part of medical and surgical researchers. Pediatric surgeons are particularly affected, since issues of tissue healing, growth and development, and organ or total-body responses to surgical insults must be established in the live organism, usually in animal models that cannot be replaced by other methods. Investigators have been threatened physically; laboratories have been vandalized and valuable data destroyed. Biomedical researchers have been called "animal-Nazis." The proliferation of animal rights groups such as the Animal Liberation Front (ALF) and People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) have prompted the birth of pro-research organizations such as "Putting People First" and the "incurably ill For Animal Research" (iiFAR). The result of this pro and con activity is an extraordinary amount of time and expense devoted to cover the cost of new regulations and laboratory security (approximately $ 1.5 billion in the U. S. alone) at the expense of research budgets, adding to the increasing shortage of research funding. This situation has created dilemmas for the surgeon involved in basic animal research: is it worth taking personal risks to develop new techniques? Is it ethical to allow these fears to hinder progress in surgery? Should we do away with animal research entirely and test new techniques directly on children? Would that be ethical? These questions are difficult to answer, but must be addressed if we expect medicine to progress. PMID:24057778

  3. DynAOI: a tool for matching eye-movement data with dynamic areas of interest in animations and movies.

    PubMed

    Papenmeier, Frank; Huff, Markus

    2010-02-01

    Analyzing gaze behavior with dynamic stimulus material is of growing importance in experimental psychology; however, there is still a lack of efficient analysis tools that are able to handle dynamically changing areas of interest. In this article, we present DynAOI, an open-source tool that allows for the definition of dynamic areas of interest. It works automatically with animations that are based on virtual three-dimensional models. When one is working with videos of real-world scenes, a three-dimensional model of the relevant content needs to be created first. The recorded eye-movement data are matched with the static and dynamic objects in the model underlying the video content, thus creating static and dynamic areas of interest. A validation study asking participants to track particular objects demonstrated that DynAOI is an efficient tool for handling dynamic areas of interest. PMID:20160298

  4. 9 CFR 71.17 - Interstate movement of dead poultry or other animals prohibited in same car with live poultry or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interstate movement of dead poultry or other animals prohibited in same car with live poultry or other animals. 71.17 Section 71.17 Animals and... TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 71.17 Interstate...

  5. 9 CFR 71.17 - Interstate movement of dead poultry or other animals prohibited in same car with live poultry or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Interstate movement of dead poultry or other animals prohibited in same car with live poultry or other animals. 71.17 Section 71.17 Animals and... TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 71.17 Interstate...

  6. 9 CFR 71.17 - Interstate movement of dead poultry or other animals prohibited in same car with live poultry or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Interstate movement of dead poultry or other animals prohibited in same car with live poultry or other animals. 71.17 Section 71.17 Animals and... TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 71.17 Interstate...

  7. 9 CFR 71.17 - Interstate movement of dead poultry or other animals prohibited in same car with live poultry or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interstate movement of dead poultry or other animals prohibited in same car with live poultry or other animals. 71.17 Section 71.17 Animals and... TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 71.17 Interstate...

  8. 9 CFR 71.17 - Interstate movement of dead poultry or other animals prohibited in same car with live poultry or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interstate movement of dead poultry or other animals prohibited in same car with live poultry or other animals. 71.17 Section 71.17 Animals and... TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 71.17 Interstate...

  9. A method to quantify movement activity of groups of animals using automated image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianyu; Yu, Haizhen; Liu, Ying

    2009-07-01

    Most physiological and environmental changes are capable of inducing variations in animal behavior. The behavioral parameters have the possibility to be measured continuously in-situ by a non-invasive and non-contact approach, and have the potential to be used in the actual productions to predict stress conditions. Most vertebrates tend to live in groups, herds, flocks, shoals, bands, packs of conspecific individuals. Under culture conditions, the livestock or fish are in groups and interact on each other, so the aggregate behavior of the group should be studied rather than that of individuals. This paper presents a method to calculate the movement speed of a group of animal in a enclosure or a tank denoted by body length speed that correspond to group activity using computer vision technique. Frame sequences captured at special time interval were subtracted in pairs after image segmentation and identification. By labeling components caused by object movement in difference frame, the projected area caused by the movement of every object in the capture interval was calculated; this projected area was divided by the projected area of every object in the later frame to get body length moving distance of each object, and further could obtain the relative body length speed. The average speed of all object can well respond to the activity of the group. The group activity of a tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) school to high (2.65 mg/L) levels of unionized ammonia (UIA) concentration were quantified based on these methods. High UIA level condition elicited a marked increase in school activity at the first hour (P<0.05) exhibiting an avoidance reaction (trying to flee from high UIA condition), and then decreased gradually.

  10. Relative contributions of neighbourhood and animal movements to Coxiella burnetii infection in dairy cattle herds.

    PubMed

    Nusinovici, Simon; Hoch, Thierry; Widgren, Stefan; Joly, Alain; Lindberg, Ann; Beaudeau, François

    2014-05-01

    Q fever in dairy cattle herds occurs mainly after inhalation of contaminated aerosols generated from excreta by shedder animals. Propagation of Coxiella burnetii, the cause of the disease between ruminant herds could result from transmission between neighbouring herds and/or the introduction of infected shedder animals in healthy herds. The objective of this study were (i) to describe the spatial distribution C. burnetii-infected dairy cattle herds in two different regions: the Finistère District in France (2,829 herds) and the island of Gotland in Sweden (119 herds) and (ii) to quantify and compare the relative contributions of C. burnetii transmission related to neighbourhood and to animal movements on the risk for a herd to be infected. An enzyme--linked immunosorbent assay was used for testing bulk tank milk in May 2012 and June 2011, respectively. Only one geographical cluster of positive herds was identified in north-western Finistère. Logistic regression was used to assess the association of risk for a herd to test positively with local cattle density (the total number of cattle located in a 5 km radius circle) and the in-degree (ID) parameter, a measure of the number of herds from which each herd had received animals directly within the last 2 years. The risk for a herd to test positively was higher for herds with a higher local cattle density [odds ratio (OR) = 2.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.6-3.2, for herds with a local density between 100 and 120 compared to herds with a local density 60]. The risk was also higher for herds with higher IDs (OR = 2.3, 95% CI = 1.6-3.2, for herds with ID 3 compared to herds that did not introduce animals). The proportion of cases attributable to infections in the neighbourhood in high-density areas was twice the proportion attributable to animal movements, suggesting that wind plays a main role in the transmission. PMID:24893024

  11. Evaluation of spinal cord injury animal models

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Fang, Marong; Chen, Haohao; Gou, Fangming; Ding, Mingxing

    2014-01-01

    Because there is no curative treatment for spinal cord injury, establishing an ideal animal model is important to identify injury mechanisms and develop therapies for individuals suffering from spinal cord injuries. In this article, we systematically review and analyze various kinds of animal models of spinal cord injury and assess their advantages and disadvantages for further studies. PMID:25598784

  12. An integrated model of fixational eye movements and microsaccades.

    PubMed

    Engbert, Ralf; Mergenthaler, Konstantin; Sinn, Petra; Pikovsky, Arkady

    2011-09-27

    When we fixate a stationary target, our eyes generate miniature (or fixational) eye movements involuntarily. These fixational eye movements are classified as slow components (physiological drift, tremor) and microsaccades, which represent rapid, small-amplitude movements. Here we propose an integrated mathematical model for the generation of slow fixational eye movements and microsaccades. The model is based on the concept of self-avoiding random walks in a potential, a process driven by a self-generated activation field. The self-avoiding walk generates persistent movements on a short timescale, whereas, on a longer timescale, the potential produces antipersistent motions that keep the eye close to an intended fixation position. We introduce microsaccades as fast movements triggered by critical activation values. As a consequence, both slow movements and microsaccades follow the same law of motion; i.e., movements are driven by the self-generated activation field. Thus, the model contributes a unified explanation of why it has been a long-standing problem to separate slow movements and microsaccades with respect to their motion-generating principles. We conclude that the concept of a self-avoiding random walk captures fundamental properties of fixational eye movements and provides a coherent theoretical framework for two physiologically distinct movement types. PMID:21873243

  13. Experimental Animal Models in Periodontology: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Struillou, Xavier; Boutigny, Hervé; Soueidan, Assem; Layrolle, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    In periodontal research, animal studies are complementary to in vitro experiments prior to testing new treatments. Animal models should make possible the validation of hypotheses and prove the safety and efficacy of new regenerating approaches using biomaterials, growth factors or stem cells. A review of the literature was carried out by using electronic databases (PubMed, ISI Web of Science). Numerous animal models in different species such as rats, hamsters, rabbits, ferrets, canines and primates have been used for modeling human periodontal diseases and treatments. However, both the anatomy and physiopathology of animals are different from those of humans, making difficult the evaluation of new therapies. Experimental models have been developed in order to reproduce major periodontal diseases (gingivitis, periodontitis), their pathogenesis and to investigate new surgical techniques. The aim of this review is to define the most pertinent animal models for periodontal research depending on the hypothesis and expected results. PMID:20556202

  14. Animal models for the study of tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Warden, S J

    2007-01-01

    Tendinopathy is a common and significant clinical problem characterised by activity‐related pain, focal tendon tenderness and intratendinous imaging changes. Recent histopathological studies have indicated the underlying pathology to be one of tendinosis (degeneration) as opposed to tendinitis (inflammation). Relatively little is known about tendinosis and its pathogenesis. Contributing to this is an absence of validated animal models of the pathology. Animal models of tendinosis represent potential efficient and effective means of furthering our understanding of human tendinopathy and its underlying pathology. By selecting an appropriate species and introducing known risk factors for tendinopathy in humans, it is possible to develop tendon changes in animal models that are consistent with the human condition. This paper overviews the role of animal models in tendinopathy research by discussing the benefits and development of animal models of tendinosis, highlighting potential outcome measures that may be used in animal tendon research, and reviewing current animal models of tendinosis. It is hoped that with further development of animal models of tendinosis, new strategies for the prevention and treatment of tendinopathy in humans will be generated. PMID:17127722

  15. Animal Models in Studying Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ming; Xu, Hongzhi; Qin, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an important cause of hemorrhagic stroke. The etiology is largely unknown and the therapeutics are controversial. A review of AVM-associated animal models may be helpful in order to understand the up-to-date knowledge and promote further research about the disease. We searched PubMed till December 31, 2014, with the term “arteriovenous malformation,” limiting results to animals and English language. Publications that described creations of AVM animal models or investigated AVM-related mechanisms and treatments using these models were reviewed. More than 100 articles fulfilling our inclusion criteria were identified, and from them eight different types of the original models were summarized. The backgrounds and procedures of these models, their applications, and research findings were demonstrated. Animal models are useful in studying the pathogenesis of AVM formation, growth, and rupture, as well as in developing and testing new treatments. Creations of preferable models are expected. PMID:26649296

  16. Engineering large animal models of human disease.

    PubMed

    Whitelaw, C Bruce A; Sheets, Timothy P; Lillico, Simon G; Telugu, Bhanu P

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of gene editing tools and methodology for use in livestock enables the production of new animal disease models. These tools facilitate site-specific mutation of the genome, allowing animals carrying known human disease mutations to be produced. In this review, we describe the various gene editing tools and how they can be used for a range of large animal models of diseases. This genomic technology is in its infancy but the expectation is that through the use of gene editing tools we will see a dramatic increase in animal model resources available for both the study of human disease and the translation of this knowledge into the clinic. Comparative pathology will be central to the productive use of these animal models and the successful translation of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26414877

  17. Animal models of external traumatic wound infections

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Tianhong; Kharkwal, Gitika B; Tanaka, Masamitsu; Huang, Ying-Ying; Bil de Arce, Vida J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite advances in traumatic wound care and management, infections remain a leading cause of mortality, morbidity and economic disruption in millions of wound patients around the world. Animal models have become standard tools for studying a wide array of external traumatic wound infections and testing new antimicrobial strategies. Results: Animal models of external traumatic wound infections reported by different investigators vary in animal species used, microorganism strains, the number of microorganisms applied, the size of the wounds and for burn infections, the length of time the heated object or liquid is in contact with the skin. Methods: This review covers experimental infections in animal models of surgical wounds, skin abrasions, burns, lacerations, excisional wounds and open fractures. Conclusions: As antibiotic resistance continues to increase, more new antimicrobial approaches are urgently needed. These should be tested using standard protocols for infections in external traumatic wounds in animal models. PMID:21701256

  18. Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on movement: movable art, relocating families, human rights, and trains and cars. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books, additional resources and activities (PEN)

  19. Classifying movement behaviour in relation to environmental conditions using hidden Markov models.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Toby A; Basson, Marinelle; Bravington, Mark V; Gunn, John S

    2009-11-01

    1. Linking the movement and behaviour of animals to their environment is a central problem in ecology. Through the use of electronic tagging and tracking (ETT), collection of in situ data from free-roaming animals is now commonplace, yet statistical approaches enabling direct relation of movement observations to environmental conditions are still in development. 2. In this study, we examine the hidden Markov model (HMM) for behavioural analysis of tracking data. HMMs allow for prediction of latent behavioural states while directly accounting for the serial dependence prevalent in ETT data. Updating the probability of behavioural switches with tag or remote-sensing data provides a statistical method that links environmental data to behaviour in a direct and integrated manner. 3. It is important to assess the reliability of state categorization over the range of time-series lengths typically collected from field instruments and when movement behaviours are similar between movement states. Simulation with varying lengths of times series data and contrast between average movements within each state was used to test the HMMs ability to estimate movement parameters. 4. To demonstrate the methods in a realistic setting, the HMMs were used to categorize resident and migratory phases and the relationship between movement behaviour and ocean temperature using electronic tagging data from southern bluefin tuna (Thunnus maccoyii). Diagnostic tools to evaluate the suitability of different models and inferential methods for investigating differences in behaviour between individuals are also demonstrated. PMID:19563470

  20. Natural movement generation using hidden Markov models and principal components.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Junghyun; Park, Frank C

    2008-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that the perception of natural movements-in the sense of being "humanlike"-depends on both joint and task space characteristics of the movement. This paper proposes a movement generation framework that merges two established techniques from gesture recognition and motion generation-hidden Markov models (HMMs) and principal components-into an efficient and reliable means of generating natural movements, which uniformly considers joint and task space characteristics. Given human motion data that are classified into several movement categories, for each category, the principal components extracted from the joint trajectories are used as basis elements. An HMM is, in turn, designed and trained for each movement class using the human task space motion data. Natural movements are generated as the optimal linear combination of principal components, which yields the highest probability for the trained HMM. Experimental case studies with a prototype humanoid robot demonstrate the various advantages of our proposed framework. PMID:18784005

  1. Modelling Fine Scale Movement Corridors for the Tricarinate Hill Turtle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, I.; Kumar, R. S.; Habib, B.; Talukdar, G.

    2016-06-01

    Habitat loss and the destruction of habitat connectivity can lead to species extinction by isolation of population. Identifying important habitat corridors to enhance habitat connectivity is imperative for species conservation by preserving dispersal pattern to maintain genetic diversity. Circuit theory is a novel tool to model habitat connectivity as it considers habitat as an electronic circuit board and species movement as a certain amount of current moving around through different resistors in the circuit. Most studies involving circuit theory have been carried out at small scales on large ranging animals like wolves or pumas, and more recently on tigers. This calls for a study that tests circuit theory at a large scale to model micro-scale habitat connectivity. The present study on a small South-Asian geoemydid, the Tricarinate Hill-turtle (Melanochelys tricarinata), focuses on habitat connectivity at a very fine scale. The Tricarinate has a small body size (carapace length: 127-175 mm) and home range (8000-15000 m2), with very specific habitat requirements and movement patterns. We used very high resolution Worldview satellite data and extensive field observations to derive a model of landscape permeability at 1 : 2,000 scale to suit the target species. Circuit theory was applied to model potential corridors between core habitat patches for the Tricarinate Hill-turtle. The modelled corridors were validated by extensive ground tracking data collected using thread spool technique and found to be functional. Therefore, circuit theory is a promising tool for accurately identifying corridors, to aid in habitat studies of small species.

  2. Animal Models of Human Granulocyte Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Klein, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    In vivo animal models have proven very useful to understand basic biological pathways of the immune system, a prerequisite for the development of innovate therapies. This manuscript addresses currently available models for defined human monogenetic defects of neutrophil granulocytes, including murine, zebrafish and larger mammalian species. Strengths and weaknesses of each system are summarized, and clinical investigators may thus be inspired to develop further lines of research to improve diagnosis and therapy by use of the appropriate animal model system. PMID:23351993

  3. Assessing the Permeability of Landscape Features to Animal Movement: Using Genetic Structure to Infer Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Sara J.; Kierepka, Elizabeth M.; Swihart, Robert K.; Latch, Emily K.; Rhodes, Olin E.

    2015-01-01

    Human-altered environments often challenge native species with a complex spatial distribution of resources. Hostile landscape features can inhibit animal movement (i.e., genetic exchange), while other landscape attributes facilitate gene flow. The genetic attributes of organisms inhabiting such complex environments can reveal the legacy of their movements through the landscape. Thus, by evaluating landscape attributes within the context of genetic connectivity of organisms within the landscape, we can elucidate how a species has coped with the enhanced complexity of human altered environments. In this research, we utilized genetic data from eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus) in conjunction with spatially explicit habitat attribute data to evaluate the realized permeability of various landscape elements in a fragmented agricultural ecosystem. To accomplish this we 1) used logistic regression to evaluate whether land cover attributes were most often associated with the matrix between or habitat within genetically identified populations across the landscape, and 2) utilized spatially explicit habitat attribute data to predict genetically-derived Bayesian probabilities of population membership of individual chipmunks in an agricultural ecosystem. Consistency between the results of the two approaches with regard to facilitators and inhibitors of gene flow in the landscape indicate that this is a promising new way to utilize both landscape and genetic data to gain a deeper understanding of human-altered ecosystems. PMID:25719366

  4. Assessing the permeability of landscape features to animal movement: using genetic structure to infer functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sara J; Kierepka, Elizabeth M; Swihart, Robert K; Latch, Emily K; Rhodes, Olin E

    2015-01-01

    Human-altered environments often challenge native species with a complex spatial distribution of resources. Hostile landscape features can inhibit animal movement (i.e., genetic exchange), while other landscape attributes facilitate gene flow. The genetic attributes of organisms inhabiting such complex environments can reveal the legacy of their movements through the landscape. Thus, by evaluating landscape attributes within the context of genetic connectivity of organisms within the landscape, we can elucidate how a species has coped with the enhanced complexity of human altered environments. In this research, we utilized genetic data from eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus) in conjunction with spatially explicit habitat attribute data to evaluate the realized permeability of various landscape elements in a fragmented agricultural ecosystem. To accomplish this we 1) used logistic regression to evaluate whether land cover attributes were most often associated with the matrix between or habitat within genetically identified populations across the landscape, and 2) utilized spatially explicit habitat attribute data to predict genetically-derived Bayesian probabilities of population membership of individual chipmunks in an agricultural ecosystem. Consistency between the results of the two approaches with regard to facilitators and inhibitors of gene flow in the landscape indicate that this is a promising new way to utilize both landscape and genetic data to gain a deeper understanding of human-altered ecosystems. PMID:25719366

  5. Hidden semi-Markov models reveal multiphasic movement of the endangered Florida panther.

    PubMed

    van de Kerk, Madelon; Onorato, David P; Criffield, Marc A; Bolker, Benjamin M; Augustine, Ben C; McKinley, Scott A; Oli, Madan K

    2015-03-01

    Animals must move to find food and mates, and to avoid predators; movement thus influences survival and reproduction, and ultimately determines fitness. Precise description of movement and understanding of spatial and temporal patterns as well as relationships with intrinsic and extrinsic factors is important both for theoretical and applied reasons. We applied hidden semi-Markov models (HSMM) to hourly geographic positioning system (GPS) location data to understand movement patterns of the endangered Florida panther (Puma concolor coryi) and to discern factors influencing these patterns. Three distinct movement modes were identified: (1) Resting mode, characterized by short step lengths and turning angles around 180(o); (2) Moderately active (or intermediate) mode characterized by intermediate step lengths and variable turning angles, and (3) Traveling mode, characterized by long step lengths and turning angles around 0(o). Males and females, and females with and without kittens, exhibited distinctly different movement patterns. Using the Viterbi algorithm, we show that differences in movement patterns of male and female Florida panthers were a consequence of sex-specific differences in diurnal patterns of state occupancy and sex-specific differences in state-specific movement parameters, whereas the differences between females with and without dependent kittens were caused solely by variation in state occupancy. Our study demonstrates the use of HSMM methodology to precisely describe movement and to dissect differences in movement patterns according to sex, and reproductive status. PMID:25251870

  6. Using mass scaling of movement cost and resource encounter rate to predict animal body size-population density relationships.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Erlend B; Finstad, Anders G; Næsje, Tor F; Sverdrup-Thygeson, Anne

    2013-06-01

    The negative relationship between body mass and population abundance was documented decades ago and forms one of the most fundamental scaling-laws in ecology. However, current theory fails to capture observed variations and the subject continues to raise controversy. Here we unify empirically observed size-abundance relationships with theory, by incorporating allometries in resource encounter rate and metabolic costs of movements. Fractal geometry is used to quantify the underlying resources distributions. Our model predicts that in environments packed with resources, body mass to population abundance relationships is less negative than the commonly assumed -3/4 power law. When resources are more patchily distributed, we predict a more negative exponent. These predictions are consistent with empirical observations. The current research provides an important step towards synthesizing metabolism, resource distribution and the global scaling of animal abundance, explaining why size-abundance relationships vary among feeding guilds and ecosystems. PMID:23548840

  7. Coarse-grained dynamics of alignment in animal group models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Sung Joon; Levin, Simon; Kevrekidis, Yannis

    2006-03-01

    Coordinated motion in animal groups, such as bird flocks and fish schools, and their models gives rise to remarkable coherent structures. Using equation-free computational tools we explore the coarse-grained dynamics of a model for the orientational movement decision in animal groups, consisting of a small number of informed "leaders" and a large number of uninformed, nonidentical ``followers.'' The direction in which each group member is headed is characterized by a phase angle of a limit-cycle oscillator, whose dynamics are nonlinearly coupled with those of all the other group members. We identify a small number of proper coarse-grained variables (using uncertainty quantification methods) that describe the collective dynamics, and perform coarse projective integration and equation-free bifurcation analysis of the coarse-grained model behavior in these variables.

  8. Dynamic modeling of the neck muscles during horizontal head movement.

    PubMed

    Haapala, Stephenie A; Enderle, John D

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents modeling and simulation of superficial neck muscle movement in the horizontal plane (yaw). The parametric muscle model was constructed using Pro/Engineer 2000i Student Edition, Parametric Technologies Corp, and simulated using Pro/Mechanica. Pennation angles, force-tension, force-generation and rate of muscle activation data were obtained from anatomic and physiological studies. Saccadic eye movement models developed by G. Alexander Korentis and John Enderle also provided the basis for this model. PMID:12085608

  9. Animal models for SARS and MERS coronaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Gretebeck, Lisa M; Subbarao, Kanta

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), two strains of animal coronaviruses that crossed the species barrier to infect and cause severe respiratory infections in humans within the last 12 years, have taught us that coronaviruses represent a global threat that does not recognize international borders. We can expect to see other novel coronaviruses emerge in the future. An ideal animal model should reflect the clinical signs, viral replication and pathology seen in humans. In this review, we present factors to consider in establishing an animal model for the study of novel coronaviruses and compare the different animal models that have been employed to study SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. PMID:26184451

  10. Progress With Nonhuman Animal Models of Addiction.

    PubMed

    Crabbe, John C

    2016-09-01

    Nonhuman animals have been major contributors to the science of the genetics of addiction. Given the explosion of interest in genetics, it is fair to ask, are we making reasonable progress toward our goals with animal models? I will argue that our goals are changing and that overall progress has been steady and seems likely to continue apace. Genetics tools have developed almost incredibly rapidly, enabling both more reductionist and more synthetic or integrative approaches. I believe that these approaches to making progress have been unbalanced in biomedical science, favoring reductionism, particularly in animal genetics. I argue that substantial, novel progress is also likely to come in the other direction, toward synthesis and abstraction. Another area in which future progress with genetic animal models seems poised to contribute more is the reconciliation of human and animal phenotypes, or consilience. The inherent power of the genetic animal models could be more profitably exploited. In the end, animal research has continued to provide novel insights about how genes influence individual differences in addiction risk and consequences. The rules of the genetics game are changing so fast that it is hard to remember how comparatively little we knew even a generation ago. Rather than worry about whether we have been wasting time and resources asking the questions we have been, we should look to the future and see if we can come up with some new ones. The valuable findings from the past will endure, and the sidetracks will be forgotten. PMID:27588527

  11. Genetic animal models of dystonia: common features and diversities.

    PubMed

    Richter, Franziska; Richter, Angelika

    2014-10-01

    Animal models are pivotal for studies of pathogenesis and treatment of disorders of the central nervous system which in its complexity cannot yet be modeled in vitro or using computer simulations. The choice of a specific model to test novel therapeutic strategies for a human disease should be based on validity of the model for the approach: does the model reflect symptoms, pathogenesis and treatment response present in human patients? In the movement disorder dystonia, prior to the availability of genetically engineered mice, spontaneous mutants were chosen based on expression of dystonic features, including abnormal muscle contraction, movements and postures. Recent discovery of a number of genes and gene products involved in dystonia initiated research on pathogenesis of the disorder, and the creation of novel models based on gene mutations. Here we present a review of current models of dystonia, with a focus on genetic rodent models, which will likely be first choice in the future either for pathophysiological or for preclinical drug testing or both. In order to help selection of a model depending on expression of a specific feature of dystonia, this review is organized by symptoms and current knowledge of pathogenesis of dystonia. We conclude that albeit there is increasing need for research on pathogenesis of the disease and development of improved models, current models do replicate features of dystonia and are useful tools to develop urgently demanded treatment for this debilitating disorder. PMID:25034123

  12. Animal models in motion sickness research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daunton, Nancy G.

    1990-01-01

    Practical information on candidate animal models for motion sickness research and on methods used to elicit and detect motion sickness in these models is provided. Four good potential models for use in motion sickness experiments include the dog, cat, squirrel monkey, and rat. It is concluded that the appropriate use of the animal models, combined with exploitation of state-of-the-art biomedical techniques, should generate a great step forward in the understanding of motion sickness mechanisms and in the development of efficient and effective approaches to its prevention and treatment in humans.

  13. Animal models of monogenic migraine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Pin; Tolner, Else A; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina

    2016-06-01

    Migraine is a highly prevalent and disabling neurological disorder with a strong genetic component. Rare monogenic forms of migraine, or syndromes in which migraine frequently occurs, help scientists to unravel pathogenetic mechanisms of migraine and its comorbidities. Transgenic mouse models for rare monogenic mutations causing familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM), cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), and familial advanced sleep-phase syndrome (FASPS), have been created. Here, we review the current state of research using these mutant mice. We also discuss how currently available experimental approaches, including epigenetic studies, biomolecular analysis and optogenetic technologies, can be used for characterization of migraine genes to further unravel the functional and molecular pathways involved in migraine. PMID:27154999

  14. Animal models of acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Matute-Bello, Gustavo; Frevert, Charles W.; Martin, Thomas R.

    2008-01-01

    Acute lung injury in humans is characterized histopathologically by neutrophilic alveolitis, injury of the alveolar epithelium and endothelium, hyaline membrane formation, and microvascular thrombi. Different animal models of experimental lung injury have been used to investigate mechanisms of lung injury. Most are based on reproducing in animals known risk factors for ARDS, such as sepsis, lipid embolism secondary to bone fracture, acid aspiration, ischemia-reperfusion of pulmonary or distal vascular beds, and other clinical risks. However, none of these models fully reproduces the features of human lung injury. The goal of this review is to summarize the strengths and weaknesses of existing models of lung injury. We review the specific features of human ARDS that should be modeled in experimental lung injury and then discuss specific characteristics of animal species that may affect the pulmonary host response to noxious stimuli. We emphasize those models of lung injury that are based on reproducing risk factors for human ARDS in animals and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each model and the extent to which each model reproduces human ARDS. The present review will help guide investigators in the design and interpretation of animal studies of acute lung injury. PMID:18621912

  15. Low relative error in consumer-grade GPS units make them ideal for measuring small-scale animal movement patterns.

    PubMed

    Breed, Greg A; Severns, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    Consumer-grade GPS units are a staple of modern field ecology, but the relatively large error radii reported by manufacturers (up to 10 m) ostensibly precludes their utility in measuring fine-scale movement of small animals such as insects. Here we demonstrate that for data collected at fine spatio-temporal scales, these devices can produce exceptionally accurate data on step-length and movement patterns of small animals. With an understanding of the properties of GPS error and how it arises, it is possible, using a simple field protocol, to use consumer grade GPS units to collect step-length data for the movement of small animals that introduces a median error as small as 11 cm. These small error rates were measured in controlled observations of real butterfly movement. Similar conclusions were reached using a ground-truth test track prepared with a field tape and compass and subsequently measured 20 times using the same methodology as the butterfly tracking. Median error in the ground-truth track was slightly higher than the field data, mostly between 20 and 30 cm, but even for the smallest ground-truth step (70 cm), this is still a signal-to-noise ratio of 3:1, and for steps of 3 m or more, the ratio is greater than 10:1. Such small errors relative to the movements being measured make these inexpensive units useful for measuring insect and other small animal movements on small to intermediate scales with budgets orders of magnitude lower than survey-grade units used in past studies. As an additional advantage, these units are simpler to operate, and insect or other small animal trackways can be collected more quickly than either survey-grade units or more traditional ruler/gird approaches. PMID:26312190

  16. Low relative error in consumer-grade GPS units make them ideal for measuring small-scale animal movement patterns

    PubMed Central

    Severns, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Consumer-grade GPS units are a staple of modern field ecology, but the relatively large error radii reported by manufacturers (up to 10 m) ostensibly precludes their utility in measuring fine-scale movement of small animals such as insects. Here we demonstrate that for data collected at fine spatio-temporal scales, these devices can produce exceptionally accurate data on step-length and movement patterns of small animals. With an understanding of the properties of GPS error and how it arises, it is possible, using a simple field protocol, to use consumer grade GPS units to collect step-length data for the movement of small animals that introduces a median error as small as 11 cm. These small error rates were measured in controlled observations of real butterfly movement. Similar conclusions were reached using a ground-truth test track prepared with a field tape and compass and subsequently measured 20 times using the same methodology as the butterfly tracking. Median error in the ground-truth track was slightly higher than the field data, mostly between 20 and 30 cm, but even for the smallest ground-truth step (70 cm), this is still a signal-to-noise ratio of 3:1, and for steps of 3 m or more, the ratio is greater than 10:1. Such small errors relative to the movements being measured make these inexpensive units useful for measuring insect and other small animal movements on small to intermediate scales with budgets orders of magnitude lower than survey-grade units used in past studies. As an additional advantage, these units are simpler to operate, and insect or other small animal trackways can be collected more quickly than either survey-grade units or more traditional ruler/gird approaches. PMID:26312190

  17. Animal Eye Models for Uveal Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jinfeng; Jager, Martine J.

    2015-01-01

    Animal models play an important role in understanding tumor growth and may be used to develop novel therapies against human malignancies. The significance of the results from animal experiments depends on the selection of the proper model. Many attempts have been made to create appropriate animal models for uveal melanoma and its characteristic metastatic behavior. One approach is to use transgenic animal models or to implant tumor cells. A variety of tumor types have been used for this purpose: tumor cells, such as Greene melanoma, murine B16 melanoma, and human uveal melanoma cells, may be implanted in the eyes of hamsters, rats, rabbits, and mice, among others. Various inoculation routes, including into the anterior chamber and posterior compartment, and retro-orbitally, have been applied to obtain tumor growth mimicking ocular uveal melanoma. However, when we choose animal models, we must be conscious of many disadvantages, such as variable tumor growth, or the need for immunosuppression in xenogeneic grafts. In this paper, we will discuss the various eye models. PMID:27172424

  18. Animal Eye Models for Uveal Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jinfeng; Jager, Martine J

    2015-04-01

    Animal models play an important role in understanding tumor growth and may be used to develop novel therapies against human malignancies. The significance of the results from animal experiments depends on the selection of the proper model. Many attempts have been made to create appropriate animal models for uveal melanoma and its characteristic metastatic behavior. One approach is to use transgenic animal models or to implant tumor cells. A variety of tumor types have been used for this purpose: tumor cells, such as Greene melanoma, murine B16 melanoma, and human uveal melanoma cells, may be implanted in the eyes of hamsters, rats, rabbits, and mice, among others. Various inoculation routes, including into the anterior chamber and posterior compartment, and retro-orbitally, have been applied to obtain tumor growth mimicking ocular uveal melanoma. However, when we choose animal models, we must be conscious of many disadvantages, such as variable tumor growth, or the need for immunosuppression in xenogeneic grafts. In this paper, we will discuss the various eye models. PMID:27172424

  19. Animal models of human response to dioxins.

    PubMed Central

    Grassman, J A; Masten, S A; Walker, N J; Lucier, G W

    1998-01-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is the most potent member of a class of chlorinated hydrocarbons that interact with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). TCDD and dioxinlike compounds are environmentally and biologically stable and as a result, human exposure is chronic and widespread. Studies of highly exposed human populations show that dioxins produce developmental effects, chloracne, and an increase in all cancers and suggest that they may also alter immune and endocrine function. In contrast, the health effects of low-level environmental exposure have not been established. Experimental animal models can enhance the understanding of the effects of low-level dioxin exposure, particularly when there is evidence that humans respond similarly to the animal models. Although there are species differences in pharmacokinetics, experimental animal models demonstrate AhR-dependent health effects that are similar to those found in exposed human populations. Comparisons of biochemical changes show that humans and animal models have similar degrees of sensitivity to dioxin-induced effects. The information gained from animal models is important for developing mechanistic models of dioxin toxicity and critical for assessing the risks to human populations under different circumstances of exposure. PMID:9599728

  20. Animal Models for Adipose Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Uthamanthil, Rajesh; Beahm, Elisabeth; Frye, Cindy

    2008-01-01

    Abstract There is a critical need for adequate reconstruction of soft tissue defects resulting from tumor resection, trauma, and congenital abnormalities. To be sure, adipose tissue engineering strategies offer promising solutions. However, before clinical translation can occur, efficacy must be proven in animal studies. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of animal models currently employed for adipose tissue engineering. PMID:18544014

  1. Current status: Animal models of nausea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    The advantages, and possible benefits of a valid, reliable animal model for nausea are discussed, and difficulties inherent to the development of a model are considered. A principle problem for developing models arises because nausea is a subjective sensation that can be identified only in humans. Several putative measures of nausea in animals are considered, with more detailed consideration directed to variation in cardiac rate, levels of vasopressin, and conditioned taste aversion. Demonstration that putative measures are associated with reported nausea in humans is proposed as a requirement for validating measures to be used in animal models. The necessity for a 'real-time' measure of nausea is proposed as an important factor for future research; and the need for improved understanding of the neuroanatomy underlying the emetic syndrome is discussed.

  2. Retinal Cell Degeneration in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Niwa, Masayuki; Aoki, Hitomi; Hirata, Akihiro; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Green, Paul G.; Hara, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide an overview of various retinal cell degeneration models in animal induced by chemicals (N-methyl-d-aspartate- and CoCl2-induced), autoimmune (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis), mechanical stress (optic nerve crush-induced, light-induced) and ischemia (transient retinal ischemia-induced). The target regions, pathology and proposed mechanism of each model are described in a comparative fashion. Animal models of retinal cell degeneration provide insight into the underlying mechanisms of the disease, and will facilitate the development of novel effective therapeutic drugs to treat retinal cell damage. PMID:26784179

  3. Optogenetics in animal model of alcohol addiction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalberczak, Maria; Radwanska, Kasia

    2014-11-01

    Our understanding of the neuronal and molecular basis of alcohol addiction is still not satisfactory. As a consequence we still miss successful therapy of alcoholism. One of the reasons for such state is the lack of appropriate animal models which would allow in-depth analysis of biological basis of addiction. Here we will present our efforts to create the animal model of alcohol addiction in the automated learning device, the IntelliCage setup. Applying this model to optogenetically modified mice with remotely controlled regulation of selected neuronal populations by light may lead to very precise identification of neuronal circuits involved in coding addiction-related behaviors.

  4. Animal models of human granulocyte diseases.

    PubMed

    Schäffer, Alejandro A; Klein, Christoph

    2013-02-01

    In vivo animal models have proven very useful to the understanding of basic biologic pathways of the immune system, a prerequisite for the development of innovate therapies. This article addresses currently available models for defined human monogenetic defects of neutrophil granulocytes, including murine, zebrafish, and larger mammalian species. Strengths and weaknesses of each system are summarized, and clinical investigators may thus be inspired to develop further lines of research to improve diagnosis and therapy by use of the appropriate animal model system. PMID:23351993

  5. Pharmacokinetic modeling in aquatic animals. 1. Models and concepts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barron, M.G.; Stehly, Guy R.; Hayton, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    While clinical and toxicological applications of pharmacokinetics have continued to evolve both conceptually and experimentally, pharmacokinetics modeling in aquatic animals has not progressed accordingly. In this paper we present methods and concepts of pharmacokinetic modeling in aquatic animals using multicompartmental, clearance-based, non-compartmental and physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models. These models should be considered as alternatives to traditional approaches, which assume that the animal acts as a single homogeneous compartment based on apparent monoexponential elimination.

  6. Animal models of gastrointestinal inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, L; Chan, Ruby L Y; Luo, X M; Wu, William K K; Shin, Vivian Y; Cho, C H

    2014-07-11

    Inflammation and cancer are the two major disorders in the gastrointestinal tract. They are causally related in their pathogenesis. It is important to study animal models' causal relationship and, in particular, to discover new therapeutic agents for such diseases. There are several criteria for these models in order to make them useful in better understanding the etiology and treatment of the said diseases in humans. In this regard, animal models should be similar as possible to human diseases and also be easy to produce and reproducible and also economic to allow a continuous replication in different laboratories. In this review, we summarize the various animal models for inflammatory and cancerous disorders in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. Experimental approaches are as simple as by giving a single oral dose of alcohol or other noxious agents or by injections of multiple dosages of ulcer inducing agents or by parenteral administration or in drinking water of carcinogens or by modifying the genetic makeups of animals to produce relatively long-term pathological changes in particular organs. With these methods they could induce consistent inflammatory responses or tumorigenesis in the gastrointestinal mucosa. These animal models are widely used in laboratories in understanding the pathogenesis as well as the mechanisms of action for therapeutic agents in the treatment of gastrointestinal inflammation and cancer. PMID:24825611

  7. Social network models predict movement and connectivity in ecological landscapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fletcher, R.J., Jr.; Acevedo, M.A.; Reichert, Brian E.; Pias, Kyle E.; Kitchens, W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Network analysis is on the rise across scientific disciplines because of its ability to reveal complex, and often emergent, patterns and dynamics. Nonetheless, a growing concern in network analysis is the use of limited data for constructing networks. This concern is strikingly relevant to ecology and conservation biology, where network analysis is used to infer connectivity across landscapes. In this context, movement among patches is the crucial parameter for interpreting connectivity but because of the difficulty of collecting reliable movement data, most network analysis proceeds with only indirect information on movement across landscapes rather than using observed movement to construct networks. Statistical models developed for social networks provide promising alternatives for landscape network construction because they can leverage limited movement information to predict linkages. Using two mark-recapture datasets on individual movement and connectivity across landscapes, we test whether commonly used network constructions for interpreting connectivity can predict actual linkages and network structure, and we contrast these approaches to social network models. We find that currently applied network constructions for assessing connectivity consistently, and substantially, overpredict actual connectivity, resulting in considerable overestimation of metapopulation lifetime. Furthermore, social network models provide accurate predictions of network structure, and can do so with remarkably limited data on movement. Social network models offer a flexible and powerful way for not only understanding the factors influencing connectivity but also for providing more reliable estimates of connectivity and metapopulation persistence in the face of limited data.

  8. Animal Models for HIV Cure Research

    PubMed Central

    Policicchio, Benjamin B.; Pandrea, Ivona; Apetrei, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    The HIV-1/AIDS pandemic continues to spread unabated worldwide, and no vaccine exists within our grasp. Effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been developed, but ART cannot clear the virus from the infected patient. A cure for HIV-1 is badly needed to stop both the spread of the virus in human populations and disease progression in infected individuals. A safe and effective cure strategy for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection will require multiple tools, and appropriate animal models are tools that are central to cure research. An ideal animal model should recapitulate the essential aspects of HIV pathogenesis and associated immune responses, while permitting invasive studies, thus allowing a thorough evaluation of strategies aimed at reducing the size of the reservoir (functional cure) or eliminating the reservoir altogether (sterilizing cure). Since there is no perfect animal model for cure research, multiple models have been tailored and tested to address specific quintessential questions of virus persistence and eradication. The development of new non-human primate and mouse models, along with a certain interest in the feline model, has the potential to fuel cure research. In this review, we highlight the major animal models currently utilized for cure research and the contributions of each model to this goal. PMID:26858716

  9. Lessons from Animal Models of Arterial Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Gertz, S. David; Mintz, Yoav; Beeri, Ronen; Rubinstein, Chen; Gilon, Dan; Gavish, Leah; Berlatzky, Yacov; Appelbaum, Liat; Gavish, Lilach

    2013-01-01

    We review the results from the most common animal models of arterial aneurysm, including recent findings from our novel, laparoscopy-based pig model of abdominal aortic aneurysm, that contribute important insights into early pathogenesis. We emphasize the relevance of these findings for evaluation of treatment protocols and novel device prototypes for mechanism-based prevention of progression and rupture. PMID:26798701

  10. Animal Models for HIV Cure Research.

    PubMed

    Policicchio, Benjamin B; Pandrea, Ivona; Apetrei, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    The HIV-1/AIDS pandemic continues to spread unabated worldwide, and no vaccine exists within our grasp. Effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been developed, but ART cannot clear the virus from the infected patient. A cure for HIV-1 is badly needed to stop both the spread of the virus in human populations and disease progression in infected individuals. A safe and effective cure strategy for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection will require multiple tools, and appropriate animal models are tools that are central to cure research. An ideal animal model should recapitulate the essential aspects of HIV pathogenesis and associated immune responses, while permitting invasive studies, thus allowing a thorough evaluation of strategies aimed at reducing the size of the reservoir (functional cure) or eliminating the reservoir altogether (sterilizing cure). Since there is no perfect animal model for cure research, multiple models have been tailored and tested to address specific quintessential questions of virus persistence and eradication. The development of new non-human primate and mouse models, along with a certain interest in the feline model, has the potential to fuel cure research. In this review, we highlight the major animal models currently utilized for cure research and the contributions of each model to this goal. PMID:26858716

  11. Simplification of the kinematic model of human movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusza, Jacek J.; Wawrzyniak, Zbigniew M.; del Prado Martinez, David

    2013-10-01

    The paper presents a methods of simplification of the human gait model. The experimental data were obtained in the laboratory of the group SATI in the Electronics Engineering Department of the University of Valencia. As a result of the Mean Double Step (MDS) procedure, the human motion were described by a matrix containing the Cartesian coordinates of 26 markers placed on the human body recorded in the 100 time points. With these data it has been possible to develop an software application which performs a wide diversity of tasks like array simplification, mask calculation for the simplification, error calculation as well as tools for signals comparison and movement animation of the markers. Simplifications were made by the spectral analysis of signals and calculating the standard deviation of the differences between the signal and its approximation. Using this method the signals of displacement could be written as the time series limited to a small number of harmonic signals. This approach allows us for a high degree of data compression. The model presented in this work can be applied into the context of medical diagnostics or rehabilitation because for a given approximation error and a large number of harmonics may demonstrate some abnormalities (of orthopaedic symptoms) in the gait cycle analysis.

  12. Large animal models for stem cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The field of regenerative medicine is approaching translation to clinical practice, and significant safety concerns and knowledge gaps have become clear as clinical practitioners are considering the potential risks and benefits of cell-based therapy. It is necessary to understand the full spectrum of stem cell actions and preclinical evidence for safety and therapeutic efficacy. The role of animal models for gaining this information has increased substantially. There is an urgent need for novel animal models to expand the range of current studies, most of which have been conducted in rodents. Extant models are providing important information but have limitations for a variety of disease categories and can have different size and physiology relative to humans. These differences can preclude the ability to reproduce the results of animal-based preclinical studies in human trials. Larger animal species, such as rabbits, dogs, pigs, sheep, goats, and non-human primates, are better predictors of responses in humans than are rodents, but in each case it will be necessary to choose the best model for a specific application. There is a wide spectrum of potential stem cell-based products that can be used for regenerative medicine, including embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, somatic stem cells, and differentiated cellular progeny. The state of knowledge and availability of these cells from large animals vary among species. In most cases, significant effort is required for establishing and characterizing cell lines, comparing behavior to human analogs, and testing potential applications. Stem cell-based therapies present significant safety challenges, which cannot be addressed by traditional procedures and require the development of new protocols and test systems, for which the rigorous use of larger animal species more closely resembling human behavior will be required. In this article, we discuss the current status and challenges of and several major directions

  13. Measuring Animal Movements in a Natural Ecosystem: A Mark-Recapture Investigation Using Stream-Dwelling Snails

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Timothy W.

    2007-01-01

    In this investigation, students measure and describe movements of animals in a natural ecosystem. Students mark stream-dwelling snails with nail polish, then search for these snails 1-7 days later. Distances and directions moved by recaptured snails are recorded. Simple statistical techniques are used to answer specific research questions and…

  14. Modeling white sturgeon movement in a reservoir: The effect of water quality and sturgeon density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, A.B.; Jager, H.I.; Myers, R.

    2003-01-01

    We developed a movement model to examine the distribution and survival of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) in a reservoir subject to large spatial and temporal variation in dissolved oxygen and temperature. Temperature and dissolved oxygen were simulated by a CE-QUAL-W2 model of Brownlee Reservoir, Idaho for a typical wet, normal, and dry hydrologic year. We compared current water quality conditions to scenarios with reduced nutrient inputs to the reservoir. White sturgeon habitat quality was modeled as a function of temperature, dissolved oxygen and, in some cases, suitability for foraging and depth. We assigned a quality index to each cell along the bottom of the reservoir. The model simulated two aspects of daily movement. Advective movement simulated the tendency for animals to move toward areas with high habitat quality, and diffusion simulated density dependent movement away from areas with high sturgeon density in areas with non-lethal habitat conditions. Mortality resulted when sturgeon were unable to leave areas with lethal temperature or dissolved oxygen conditions. Water quality was highest in winter and early spring and lowest in mid to late summer. Limiting nutrient inputs reduced the area of Brownlee Reservoir with lethal conditions for sturgeon and raised the average habitat suitability throughout the reservoir. Without movement, simulated white sturgeon survival ranged between 45 and 89%. Allowing movement raised the predicted survival of sturgeon under all conditions to above 90% as sturgeon avoided areas with low habitat quality. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Animal models for motor neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Green, S L; Tolwani, R J

    1999-10-01

    Motor neuron disease is a general term applied to a broad class of neurodegenerative diseases that are characterized by fatally progressive muscular weakness, atrophy, and paralysis attributable to loss of motor neurons. At present, there is no cure for most motor neuron diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the most common human motor neuron disease--the cause of which remains largely unknown. Animal models of motor neuron disease (MND) have significantly contributed to the remarkable recent progress in understanding the cause, genetic factors, and pathologic mechanisms proposed for this class of human neurodegenerative disorders. Largely driven by ALS research, animal models of MND have proven their usefulness in elucidating potential causes and specific pathogenic mechanisms, and have helped to advance promising new treatments from "benchside to bedside." This review summarizes important features of selected established animal models of MND: genetically engineered mice and inherited or spontaneously occurring MND in the murine, canine, and equine species. PMID:10551448

  16. Differential Paradigms in Animal Models of Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Kingsley, S Manoj Kumar; Bhat, B Vishnu

    2016-09-01

    Sepsis is a serious clinical problem involving complex mechanisms which requires better understanding and insight. Animal models of sepsis have played a major role in providing insight into the complex pathophysiology of sepsis. There have been various animal models of sepsis with different paradigms. Endotoxin, bacterial infusion, cecal ligation and puncture, and colon ascendens stent peritonitis models are the commonly practiced methods at present. Each of these models has their own advantages and also confounding factors. We have discussed the underlying mechanisms regulating each of these models along with possible reasons why each model failed to translate into the clinic. In animal models, the timing of development of the hemodynamic phases and the varied cytokine patterns could not accurately resemble the progression of clinical sepsis. More often, the exuberant and transient pro-inflammatory cytokine response is only focused in most models. Immunosuppression and apoptosis in the later phase of sepsis have been found to cause more damage than the initial acute phase of sepsis. Likewise, better understanding of the existing models of sepsis could help us create a more relevant model which could provide solution to the currently failed clinical trials in sepsis. PMID:27432263

  17. Animal and cellular models of Friedreich ataxia.

    PubMed

    Perdomini, Morgane; Hick, Aurore; Puccio, Hélène; Pook, Mark A

    2013-08-01

    The development and use of animal and cellular models of Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) are essential requirements for the understanding of FRDA disease mechanisms and the investigation of potential FRDA therapeutic strategies. Although animal and cellular models of lower organisms have provided valuable information on certain aspects of FRDA disease and therapy, it is intuitive that the most useful models are those of mammals and mammalian cells, which are the closest in physiological terms to FRDA patients. To date, there have been considerable efforts put into the development of several different FRDA mouse models and relevant FRDA mouse and human cell line systems. We summarize the principal mammalian FRDA models, discuss the pros and cons of each system, and describe the ways in which such models have been used to address two of the fundamental, as yet unanswered, questions regarding FRDA. Namely, what is the exact pathophysiology of FRDA and what is the detailed genetic and epigenetic basis of FRDA? PMID:23859342

  18. Hierarchical models of animal abundance and occurrence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew; Dorazio, R.M.

    2006-01-01

    Much of animal ecology is devoted to studies of abundance and occurrence of species, based on surveys of spatially referenced sample units. These surveys frequently yield sparse counts that are contaminated by imperfect detection, making direct inference about abundance or occurrence based on observational data infeasible. This article describes a flexible hierarchical modeling framework for estimation and inference about animal abundance and occurrence from survey data that are subject to imperfect detection. Within this framework, we specify models of abundance and detectability of animals at the level of the local populations defined by the sample units. Information at the level of the local population is aggregated by specifying models that describe variation in abundance and detection among sites. We describe likelihood-based and Bayesian methods for estimation and inference under the resulting hierarchical model. We provide two examples of the application of hierarchical models to animal survey data, the first based on removal counts of stream fish and the second based on avian quadrat counts. For both examples, we provide a Bayesian analysis of the models using the software WinBUGS.

  19. Animal models of cavitation in pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Helke, Kris L; Mankowski, Joseph L; Manabe, Yukari C

    2006-09-01

    Transmission of tuberculosis occurs with the highest frequency from patients with extensive, cavitary, pulmonary disease and positive sputum smear microscopy. In animal models of tuberculosis, the development of caseous necrosis is an important prerequisite for the formation of cavities although the immunological triggers for liquefaction are unknown. We review the relative merits and the information gleaned from the available animal models of pulmonary cavitation. Understanding the host-pathogen interaction important to the formation of cavities may lead to new strategies to prevent cavitation and thereby, block transmission. PMID:16359922

  20. Overturning conclusions of Lévy flight movement patterns by fishing boats and foraging animals.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Andrew M

    2011-06-01

    A surprisingly diverse variety of foragers have previously been concluded to exhibit movement patterns known as Lévy flights, a special type of random walk. These foragers range in size from microzooplankton in experiments to fishermen in the Pacific Ocean and the North Sea. The Lévy flight conclusion implies that all the foragers have similar scale-free movement patterns that can be described by a single dimensionless parameter, the exponent micro of a power-law (Pareto) distribution. However, the previous conclusions have been made using methods that have since been shown to be problematic: inaccurate techniques were used to estimate micro, and the power-law distribution was usually assumed to hold without testing any alternative hypotheses. Therefore, I address the open question of whether the previous data still support the Lévy flight hypothesis, and thus determine whether Lévy flights really are so ubiquitous in ecology. I present a comprehensive reanalysis of 17 data sets from seven previous studies for which Lévy flight behavior had been concluded, covering marine, terrestrial, and experimental systems from four continents. I use the modern likelihood and Akaike weights approach to test whether simple alternative models are more supported by the data than Lévy flights. The previously estimated values of the power-law exponent micro do not match those calculated here using the accurate likelihood approach, and almost all of them lie outside of the likelihood-based 95% confidence intervals. Furthermore, the original power-law Lévy flight model is overwhelmingly rejected for 16 out of the 17 data sets when tested against three other simple models. For one data set, the data are consistent with coming from a bounded power-law distribution (a truncated Lévy flight). For three other data sets, an exponential distribution corresponding to a simple Poisson process is suitable. Thus, Lévy flight movement patterns are not the common phenomena that was once

  1. Animal models of gene-nutrient interactions.

    PubMed

    Reed, Danielle R

    2008-12-01

    Food intake of humans is governed by the food's nutritional value and pleasing taste, but also by other factors such as food cost and availability, cultural imperatives, and social status. The biological determinants of human food intake are not easily parsed from these other factors, making them hard to study against the whirligig aspects of human life in a modern age. The study of animals provides a useful alternative. Humans have a history of studying animal food intake, for agricultural reasons (e.g., pigs and cows), and for personal reasons (e.g., dogs and cats), and these practical concerns have been joined with the appreciation that other models can teach us the principles of behavior, genetics, and nutrition. Thus there is a steady use of the traditional animal models in this type of research, as well as growth in the use of other systems such as worms and flies. Rats and mice occupy a special niche as animal models for two reasons; first, they share with humans a love of the same types of food, and second, they are the target of a number of well-developed genetic tools. The available genetic tools that make mice a popular model include a well-annotated genome (Mouse Build 37), profiles of RNA expression from many tissues, a diverse panel of inbred strains, and the ability to manipulate genes in the whole animal, including removing a gene only in specific tissues (e.g., Cre-lox system). Mice have been harnessed to find genotypes that contribute to sweet-liking, and other studies are underway to understand how genetic variation might at least partially explain other puzzles of human appetites. Animal models provide a way to study the genetic determinants of food selection with experimental rigor and therefore complement human genetics studies. PMID:19037208

  2. Animal models of neurological deficits: how relevant is the rat?

    PubMed

    Cenci, M Angela; Whishaw, Ian Q; Schallert, Timothy

    2002-07-01

    Animal models of neurological deficits are essential for the assessment of new therapeutic options. It has been suggested that rats are not as appropriate as primates for the symptomatic modelling of disease, but a large body of data argues against this view. Comparative analyses of movements in rats and primates show homology of many motor patterns across species. Advances have been made in identifying rat equivalents of akinesia, tremor, postural deficits and dyskinesia, which are relevant to Parkinson's disease. Rat models of hemiplegia, neglect and tactile extinction are useful in assessing the outcome of ischaemic or traumatic brain injury, and in monitoring the effects of therapeutic interventions. Studies in rodents that emphasize careful behavioural analysis should continue to be developed as effective and inexpensive models that complement studies in primates. PMID:12094213

  3. Are animal models predictive for humans?

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    It is one of the central aims of the philosophy of science to elucidate the meanings of scientific terms and also to think critically about their application. The focus of this essay is the scientific term predict and whether there is credible evidence that animal models, especially in toxicology and pathophysiology, can be used to predict human outcomes. Whether animals can be used to predict human response to drugs and other chemicals is apparently a contentious issue. However, when one empirically analyzes animal models using scientific tools they fall far short of being able to predict human responses. This is not surprising considering what we have learned from fields such evolutionary and developmental biology, gene regulation and expression, epigenetics, complexity theory, and comparative genomics. PMID:19146696

  4. [Diabetes mellitus and its animal models].

    PubMed

    Duhault, J; Koenig-Berard, E

    1997-01-01

    This review presents the major animal models usually used for the study of the pathological processes related to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and to the main diabetic complications. These models can be observed spontaneously or can be obtained by selective cross-breeding or toxic exposure (chemical or viral), as well as genetically induced. They reproduce some aspects of the human pathology without combining them all in a single model. Consequently, a pertinent pharmacological approach may compare the results obtained with several models. The examination of the recent results obtained with transgenesis does not allow these animal models to replace more classical ones but they may constitute a future challenge for gene therapy despite the multifactorial aspect of diabetic disease. PMID:9501560

  5. State-Space Modelling of the Drivers of Movement Behaviour in Sympatric Species

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Barbería, F. J.; Small, M.; Hooper, R. J.; Aldezabal, A.; Soriguer-Escofet, R.; Bakken, G. S.; Gordon, I. J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding animal movement behaviour is key to furthering our knowledge on intra- and inter-specific competition, group cohesion, energy expenditure, habitat use, the spread of zoonotic diseases or species management. We used a radial basis function surface approximation subject to minimum description length constraint to uncover the state-space dynamical systems from time series data. This approximation allowed us to infer structure from a mathematical model of the movement behaviour of sheep and red deer, and the effect of density, thermal stress and vegetation type. Animal movement was recorded using GPS collars deployed in sheep and deer grazing a large experimental plot in winter and summer. Information on the thermal stress to which animals were exposed was estimated using the power consumption of mechanical heated models and meteorological records of a network of stations in the plot. Thermal stress was higher in deer than in sheep, with less differences between species in summer. Deer travelled more distance than sheep, and both species travelled more in summer than in winter; deer travel distance showed less seasonal differences than sheep. Animal movement was better predicted in deer than in sheep and in winter than in summer; both species showed a swarming behaviour in group cohesion, stronger in deer. At shorter separation distances swarming repulsion was stronger between species than within species. At longer separation distances inter-specific attraction was weaker than intra-specific; there was a positive density-dependent effect on swarming, and stronger in deer than in sheep. There was not clear evidence which species attracted or repelled the other; attraction between deer at long separation distances was stronger when the model accounted for thermal stress, but in general the dynamic movement behaviour was hardly affected by the thermal stress. Vegetation type affected intra-species interactions but had little effect on inter

  6. State-Space Modelling of the Drivers of Movement Behaviour in Sympatric Species.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Barbería, F J; Small, M; Hooper, R J; Aldezabal, A; Soriguer-Escofet, R; Bakken, G S; Gordon, I J

    2015-01-01

    Understanding animal movement behaviour is key to furthering our knowledge on intra- and inter-specific competition, group cohesion, energy expenditure, habitat use, the spread of zoonotic diseases or species management. We used a radial basis function surface approximation subject to minimum description length constraint to uncover the state-space dynamical systems from time series data. This approximation allowed us to infer structure from a mathematical model of the movement behaviour of sheep and red deer, and the effect of density, thermal stress and vegetation type. Animal movement was recorded using GPS collars deployed in sheep and deer grazing a large experimental plot in winter and summer. Information on the thermal stress to which animals were exposed was estimated using the power consumption of mechanical heated models and meteorological records of a network of stations in the plot. Thermal stress was higher in deer than in sheep, with less differences between species in summer. Deer travelled more distance than sheep, and both species travelled more in summer than in winter; deer travel distance showed less seasonal differences than sheep. Animal movement was better predicted in deer than in sheep and in winter than in summer; both species showed a swarming behaviour in group cohesion, stronger in deer. At shorter separation distances swarming repulsion was stronger between species than within species. At longer separation distances inter-specific attraction was weaker than intra-specific; there was a positive density-dependent effect on swarming, and stronger in deer than in sheep. There was not clear evidence which species attracted or repelled the other; attraction between deer at long separation distances was stronger when the model accounted for thermal stress, but in general the dynamic movement behaviour was hardly affected by the thermal stress. Vegetation type affected intra-species interactions but had little effect on inter

  7. Modeling of human movement monitoring using Bluetooth Low Energy technology.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari, G; Zhang, Q; Karunanithi, M

    2015-01-01

    Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) is a wireless communication technology which can be used to monitor human movements. In this monitoring system, a BLE signal scanner scans signal strength of BLE tags carried by people, to thus infer human movement patterns within its monitoring zone. However to the extent of our knowledge one main aspect of this monitoring system which has not yet been thoroughly investigated in literature is how to build a sound theoretical model, based on tunable BLE communication parameters such as scanning time interval and advertising time interval, to enable the study and design of effective and efficient movement monitoring systems. In this paper, we proposed and developed a statistical model based on Monte-Carlo simulation, which can be utilized to assess impacts of BLE technology parameters in terms of latency and efficiency, on a movement monitoring system, and can thus benefit a more efficient system design. PMID:26737430

  8. Animal models for photodynamic therapy (PDT)

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Zenildo Santos; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) employs non-toxic dyes called photosensitizers (PSs), which absorb visible light to give the excited singlet state, followed by the long-lived triplet state that can undergo photochemistry. In the presence of ambient oxygen, reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radicals are formed that are able to kill cancer cells, inactivate microbial pathogens and destroy unwanted tissue. Although there are already several clinically approved PSs for various disease indications, many studies around the world are using animal models to investigate the further utility of PDT. The present review will cover the main groups of animal models that have been described in the literature. Cancer comprises the single biggest group of models including syngeneic mouse/rat tumours that can either be subcutaneous or orthotopic and allow the study of anti-tumour immune response; human tumours that need to be implanted in immunosuppressed hosts; carcinogen-induced tumours; and mice that have been genetically engineered to develop cancer (often by pathways similar to those in patients). Infections are the second biggest class of animal models and the anatomical sites include wounds, burns, oral cavity, ears, eyes, nose etc. Responsible pathogens can include Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, fungi, viruses and parasites. A smaller and diverse group of miscellaneous animal models have been reported that allow PDT to be tested in ophthalmology, atherosclerosis, atrial fibrillation, dermatology and wound healing. Successful studies using animal models of PDT are blazing the trail for tomorrow's clinical approvals. PMID:26415497

  9. An animated model of reticulorumen motility.

    PubMed

    Gookin, Jody L; Foster, Derek M; Harvey, Alice M; McWhorter, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Understanding reticulorumen motility is important to the assessment of ruminant health and optimal production, and in the recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. Accordingly, the teaching of reticulorumen motility is a staple of all veterinary curricula. This teaching has historically been based on written descriptions, line drawings, or pressure tracings obtained during contraction sequences. We developed an animated model of reticulorumen motility and hypothesized that veterinary students would prefer use of the model over traditional instructional methods. First-year veterinary students were randomly allocated to one of two online learning exercises: with the animated model (Group A) or with text and line drawings (Group B) depicting reticulorumen motility. Learning was assessed with a multiple-choice quiz and feedback on the learning alternatives was obtained by survey. Seventy-four students participated in the study, including 38/42 in Group A and 36/36 in Group B. Sixty-four out of 72 students (89%) responded that they would prefer use of the animated model if only one of the two learning methods was available. A majority of students agreed or strongly agreed that the animated model was easy to understand and improved their knowledge and appreciation of the importance of reticulorumen motility, and would recommend the model to other veterinary students. Interestingly, students in Group B achieved higher scores on examination than students in Group A. This could be speculatively attributed to the inclusion of an itemized list of contraction sequences in the text provided to Group B and failure of Group A students to read the text associated with the animations. PMID:20054084

  10. Automated Tracking of Animal Posture and Movement during Exploration and Sensory Orientation Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Marin, Alex; Partoune, Nicolas; Stephens, Greg J.; Louis, Matthieu

    2012-01-01

    Background The nervous functions of an organism are primarily reflected in the behavior it is capable of. Measuring behavior quantitatively, at high-resolution and in an automated fashion provides valuable information about the underlying neural circuit computation. Accordingly, computer-vision applications for animal tracking are becoming a key complementary toolkit to genetic, molecular and electrophysiological characterization in systems neuroscience. Methodology/Principal Findings We present Sensory Orientation Software (SOS) to measure behavior and infer sensory experience correlates. SOS is a simple and versatile system to track body posture and motion of single animals in two-dimensional environments. In the presence of a sensory landscape, tracking the trajectory of the animal's sensors and its postural evolution provides a quantitative framework to study sensorimotor integration. To illustrate the utility of SOS, we examine the orientation behavior of fruit fly larvae in response to odor, temperature and light gradients. We show that SOS is suitable to carry out high-resolution behavioral tracking for a wide range of organisms including flatworms, fishes and mice. Conclusions/Significance Our work contributes to the growing repertoire of behavioral analysis tools for collecting rich and fine-grained data to draw and test hypothesis about the functioning of the nervous system. By providing open-access to our code and documenting the software design, we aim to encourage the adaptation of SOS by a wide community of non-specialists to their particular model organism and questions of interest. PMID:22912674

  11. Animation of finite element models and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipman, Robert R.

    1992-01-01

    This is not intended as a complete review of computer hardware and software that can be used for animation of finite element models and results, but is instead a demonstration of the benefits of visualization using selected hardware and software. The role of raw computational power, graphics speed, and the use of videotape are discussed.

  12. Henipavirus infections: lessons from animal models.

    PubMed

    Dhondt, Kévin P; Horvat, Branka

    2013-01-01

    The Henipavirus genus contains two highly lethal viruses, the Hendra and Nipah viruses and one, recently discovered, apparently nonpathogenic member; Cedar virus. These three, negative-sense single-stranded RNA viruses, are hosted by fruit bats and use EphrinB2 receptors for entry into cells. The Hendra and Nipah viruses are zoonotic pathogens that emerged in the middle of 90s and have caused severe, and often fatal, neurologic and/or respiratory diseases in both humans and different animals; including spillover into equine and porcine species. Development of relevant models is critical for a better understanding of viral pathogenesis, generating new diagnostic tools, and assessing anti-viral therapeutics and vaccines. This review summarizes available data on several animal models where natural and/or experimental infection has been demonstrated; including pteroid bats, horses, pigs, cats, hamsters, guinea pigs, ferrets, and nonhuman primates. It recapitulates the principal features of viral pathogenesis in these animals and current knowledge on anti-viral immune responses. Lastly it describes the recently characterized murine animal model, which provides the possibility to use numerous and powerful tools available for mice to further decipher henipaviruses immunopathogenesis, prophylaxis, and treatment. The utility of different models to analyze important aspects of henipaviruses-induced disease in humans, potential routes of transmission, and therapeutic approaches are equally discussed. PMID:25437037

  13. Animal models for genetic neuromuscular diseases.

    PubMed

    Vainzof, Mariz; Ayub-Guerrieri, Danielle; Onofre, Paula C G; Martins, Poliana C M; Lopes, Vanessa F; Zilberztajn, Dinorah; Maia, Lucas S; Sell, Karen; Yamamoto, Lydia U

    2008-03-01

    The neuromuscular disorders are a heterogeneous group of genetic diseases, caused by mutations in genes coding sarcolemmal, sarcomeric, and citosolic muscle proteins. Deficiencies or loss of function of these proteins leads to variable degree of progressive loss of motor ability. Several animal models, manifesting phenotypes observed in neuromuscular diseases, have been identified in nature or generated in laboratory. These models generally present physiological alterations observed in human patients and can be used as important tools for genetic, clinic, and histopathological studies. The mdx mouse is the most widely used animal model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Although it is a good genetic and biochemical model, presenting total deficiency of the protein dystrophin in the muscle, this mouse is not useful for clinical trials because of its very mild phenotype. The canine golden retriever MD model represents a more clinically similar model of DMD due to its larger size and significant muscle weakness. Autosomal recessive limb-girdle MD forms models include the SJL/J mice, which develop a spontaneous myopathy resulting from a mutation in the Dysferlin gene, being a model for LGMD2B. For the human sarcoglycanopahties (SG), the BIO14.6 hamster is the spontaneous animal model for delta-SG deficiency, whereas some canine models with deficiency of SG proteins have also been identified. More recently, using the homologous recombination technique in embryonic stem cell, several mouse models have been developed with null mutations in each one of the four SG genes. All sarcoglycan-null animals display a progressive muscular dystrophy of variable severity and share the property of a significant secondary reduction in the expression of the other members of the sarcoglycan subcomplex and other components of the Dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. Mouse models for congenital MD include the dy/dy (dystrophia-muscularis) mouse and the allelic mutant dy(2J)/dy(2J) mouse

  14. Animal models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rial, Sandra; Girón-Martínez, Álvaro; Peces-Barba, Germán

    2015-03-01

    Animal models of disease have always been welcomed by the scientific community because they provide an approach to the investigation of certain aspects of the disease in question. Animal models of COPD cannot reproduce the heterogeneity of the disease and usually only manage to represent the disease in its milder stages. Moreover, airflow obstruction, the variable that determines patient diagnosis, not always taken into account in the models. For this reason, models have focused on the development of emphysema, easily detectable by lung morphometry, and have disregarded other components of the disease, such as airway injury or associated vascular changes. Continuous, long-term exposure to cigarette smoke is considered the main risk factor for this disease, justifying the fact that the cigarette smoke exposure model is the most widely used. Some variations on this basic model, related to exposure time, the association of other inducers or inhibitors, exacerbations or the use of transgenic animals to facilitate the identification of pathogenic pathways have been developed. Some variations or heterogeneity of this disease, then, can be reproduced and models can be designed for resolving researchers' questions on disease identification or treatment responses. PMID:25201221

  15. Traumatic Brain Injury Models in Animals.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death in young adults in industrialized nations and in the developing world the WHO considers TBI a silent epidemic caused by an increasing number of traffic accidents. Despite the major improvement of TBI outcome in the acute setting in the past 20 years, the assessment, therapeutic interventions, and prevention of long-term complications remain a challenge. In order to get a deeper insight into the pathology of TBI and advancement of medical understanding and clinical progress experimental animal models are an essential requirement. This chapter provides an overview of most commonly used experimental animal TBI models and the pathobiological findings based on current data. In addition, limitations and advantages of each TBI model are mentioned. This will hopefully give an insight into the possibilities of each model and be of value in choosing one when designing a study. PMID:27604712

  16. Animal models for meniscus repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Deponti, Daniela; Di Giancamillo, Alessia; Scotti, Celeste; Peretti, Giuseppe M; Martin, Ivan

    2015-05-01

    The meniscus plays an important role in knee function and mechanics. Meniscal lesions, however, are common phenomena and this tissue is not able to achieve spontaneous successful repair, particularly in the inner avascular zone. Several animal models have been studied and proposed for testing different reparative approaches, as well as for studying regenerative methods aiming to restore the original shape and function of this structure. This review summarizes the gross anatomy, function, ultrastructure and biochemical composition of the knee meniscus in several animal models in comparison with the human meniscus. The relevance of the models is discussed from the point of view of basic research as well as of clinical translation for meniscal repair, substitution and regeneration. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages of each model for various research directions are critically discussed. PMID:23712959

  17. Whisker Movements Reveal Spatial Attention: A Unified Computational Model of Active Sensing Control in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Mitchinson, Ben; Prescott, Tony J.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial attention is most often investigated in the visual modality through measurement of eye movements, with primates, including humans, a widely-studied model. Its study in laboratory rodents, such as mice and rats, requires different techniques, owing to the lack of a visual fovea and the particular ethological relevance of orienting movements of the snout and the whiskers in these animals. In recent years, several reliable relationships have been observed between environmental and behavioural variables and movements of the whiskers, but the function of these responses, as well as how they integrate, remains unclear. Here, we propose a unifying abstract model of whisker movement control that has as its key variable the region of space that is the animal's current focus of attention, and demonstrate, using computer-simulated behavioral experiments, that the model is consistent with a broad range of experimental observations. A core hypothesis is that the rat explicitly decodes the location in space of whisker contacts and that this representation is used to regulate whisker drive signals. This proposition stands in contrast to earlier proposals that the modulation of whisker movement during exploration is mediated primarily by reflex loops. We go on to argue that the superior colliculus is a candidate neural substrate for the siting of a head-centred map guiding whisker movement, in analogy to current models of visual attention. The proposed model has the potential to offer a more complete understanding of whisker control as well as to highlight the potential of the rodent and its whiskers as a tool for the study of mammalian attention. PMID:24086120

  18. Modeling the postural disturbances caused by upper extremity movements.

    PubMed

    Triolo, R J; Werner, K N; Kirsch, R F

    2001-06-01

    This paper describes the design, validation, and application of a dynamic, three-dimensional (3-D) model of the upper extremity for the purpose of estimating postural disturbances generated by movements of the arms. The model consists of two links representing the upper and lower arms, with the shoulder and elbow modeled as gimbal joints to allow three rotational degrees of freedom. With individualized segment inertial parameters based on anthropometric measurements, the model performs inverse dynamic analysis of recorded arm movements to calculate reaction forces and moments acting on the body at the shoulder in three dimensions. The method was validated by comparing the output of the model to estimates obtained from ground reaction loads during stereotypical and free form unilateral movements at various velocities and with different loads carried by human subjects while seated on biomechanical force platforms. The correlation between predicted and measured reaction forces and moments was very good under all conditions and across all subjects, with average rms errors less than 8% of measured peak-to-peak values. The model was then applied to bimanual activities representative of functional movements that would typically be performed while standing at a counter. The resulting estimates were consistent and adequate for the purpose of evaluating postural disturbances caused by upper extremity movements. PMID:11474966

  19. Modelling gait transition in two-legged animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Carla M. A.; Santos, Alexandra P.

    2011-12-01

    The study of locomotor patterns has been a major research goal in the last decades. Understanding how intralimb and interlimb coordination works out so well in animals' locomotion is a hard and challenging task. Many models have been proposed to model animal's rhythms. These models have also been applied to the control of rhythmic movements of adaptive legged robots, namely biped, quadruped and other designs. In this paper we study gait transition in a central pattern generator (CPG) model for bipeds, the 4-cells model. This model is proposed by Golubitsky, Stewart, Buono and Collins and is studied further by Pinto and Golubitsky. We briefly resume the work done by Pinto and Golubitsky. We compute numerically gait transition in the 4-cells CPG model for bipeds. We use Morris-Lecar equations and Wilson-Cowan equations as the internal dynamics for each cell. We also consider two types of coupling between the cells: diffusive and synaptic. We obtain secondary gaits by bifurcation of primary gaits, by varying the coupling strengths. Nevertheless, some bifurcating branches could not be obtained, emphasizing the fact that despite analytically those bifurcations exist, finding them is a hard task and requires variation of other parameters of the equations. We note that the type of coupling did not influence the results.

  20. Evaluation of Surrogate Animal Models of Melioidosis

    PubMed Central

    Warawa, Jonathan Mark

    2010-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the Gram-negative bacterial pathogen responsible for the disease melioidosis. B. pseudomallei establishes disease in susceptible individuals through multiple routes of infection, all of which may proceed to a septicemic disease associated with a high mortality rate. B. pseudomallei opportunistically infects humans and a wide range of animals directly from the environment, and modeling of experimental melioidosis has been conducted in numerous biologically relevant models including mammalian and invertebrate hosts. This review seeks to summarize published findings related to established animal models of melioidosis, with an aim to compare and contrast the virulence of B. pseudomallei in these models. The effect of the route of delivery on disease is also discussed for intravenous, intraperitoneal, subcutaneous, intranasal, aerosol, oral, and intratracheal infection methodologies, with a particular focus on how they relate to modeling clinical melioidosis. The importance of the translational validity of the animal models used in B. pseudomallei research is highlighted as these studies have become increasingly therapeutic in nature. PMID:21772830

  1. Nonmurine animal models of food allergy.

    PubMed Central

    Helm, Ricki M; Ermel, Richard W; Frick, Oscar L

    2003-01-01

    Food allergy can present as immediate hypersensitivity [manifestations mediated by immunoglobulin (Ig)E], delayed-type hypersensitivity (reactions associated with specific T lymphocytes), and inflammatory reactions caused by immune complexes. For reasons of ethics and efficacy, investigations in humans to determine sensitization and allergic responses of IgE production to innocuous food proteins are not feasible. Therefore, animal models are used a) to bypass the innate tendency to develop tolerance to food proteins and induce specific IgE antibody of sufficient avidity/affinity to cause sensitization and upon reexposure to induce an allergic response, b) to predict allergenicity of novel proteins using characteristics of known food allergens, and c) to treat food allergy by using immunotherapeutic strategies to alleviate life-threatening reactions. The predominant hypothesis for IgE-mediated food allergy is that there is an adverse reaction to exogenous food proteins or food protein fragments, which escape lumen hydrolysis, and in a polarized helper T cell subset 2 (Th2) environment, immunoglobulin class switching to allergen-specific IgE is generated in the immune system of the gastrointestinal-associated lymphoid tissues. Traditionally, the immunologic characterization and toxicologic studies of small laboratory animals have provided the basis for development of animal models of food allergy; however, the natural allergic response in large animals, which closely mimic allergic diseases in humans, can also be useful as models for investigations involving food allergy. PMID:12573913

  2. A Model of Loggerhead Sea Turtle (Caretta caretta) Habitat and Movement in the Oceanic North Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Abecassis, Melanie; Senina, Inna; Lehodey, Patrick; Gaspar, Philippe; Parker, Denise; Balazs, George; Polovina, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Habitat preferences for juvenile loggerhead turtles in the North Pacific were investigated with data from two several-year long tagging programs, using 224 satellite transmitters deployed on wild and captive-reared turtles. Animals ranged between 23 and 81 cm in straight carapace length. Tracks were used to investigate changes in temperature preferences and speed of the animals with size. Average sea surface temperatures along the tracks ranged from 18 to 23 °C. Bigger turtles generally experienced larger temperature ranges and were encountered in warmer surface waters. Seasonal differences between small and big turtles suggest that the larger ones dive deeper than the mixed layer and subsequently target warmer surface waters to rewarm. Average swimming speeds were under 1 km/h and increased with size for turtles bigger than 30 cm. However, when expressed in body lengths per second (bl s−1), smaller turtles showed much higher swimming speeds (>1 bl s−1) than bigger ones (0.5 bl s−1). Temperature and speed values at size estimated from the tracks were used to parameterize a habitat-based Eulerian model to predict areas of highest probability of presence in the North Pacific. The model-generated habitat index generally matched the tracks closely, capturing the north-south movements of tracked animals, but the model failed to replicate observed east-west movements, suggesting temperature and foraging preferences are not the only factors driving large-scale loggerhead movements. Model outputs could inform potential bycatch reduction strategies. PMID:24039901

  3. A model of loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) habitat and movement in the oceanic North Pacific.

    PubMed

    Abecassis, Melanie; Senina, Inna; Lehodey, Patrick; Gaspar, Philippe; Parker, Denise; Balazs, George; Polovina, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Habitat preferences for juvenile loggerhead turtles in the North Pacific were investigated with data from two several-year long tagging programs, using 224 satellite transmitters deployed on wild and captive-reared turtles. Animals ranged between 23 and 81 cm in straight carapace length. Tracks were used to investigate changes in temperature preferences and speed of the animals with size. Average sea surface temperatures along the tracks ranged from 18 to 23 °C. Bigger turtles generally experienced larger temperature ranges and were encountered in warmer surface waters. Seasonal differences between small and big turtles suggest that the larger ones dive deeper than the mixed layer and subsequently target warmer surface waters to rewarm. Average swimming speeds were under 1 km/h and increased with size for turtles bigger than 30 cm. However, when expressed in body lengths per second (bl s(-1)), smaller turtles showed much higher swimming speeds (>1 bl s (-1) ) than bigger ones (0.5 bl s(-1)). Temperature and speed values at size estimated from the tracks were used to parameterize a habitat-based Eulerian model to predict areas of highest probability of presence in the North Pacific. The model-generated habitat index generally matched the tracks closely, capturing the north-south movements of tracked animals, but the model failed to replicate observed east-west movements, suggesting temperature and foraging preferences are not the only factors driving large-scale loggerhead movements. Model outputs could inform potential bycatch reduction strategies. PMID:24039901

  4. Modelling the Constraints of Spatial Environment in Fauna Movement Simulations: Comparison of a Boundaries Accurate Function and a Cost Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, L.; Cohen, M.; Ruas, A.

    2015-08-01

    Landscape influences fauna movement at different levels, from habitat selection to choices of movements' direction. Our goal is to provide a development frame in order to test simulation functions for animal's movement. We describe our approach for such simulations and we compare two types of functions to calculate trajectories. To do so, we first modelled the role of landscape elements to differentiate between elements that facilitate movements and the ones being hindrances. Different influences are identified depending on landscape elements and on animal species. Knowledge were gathered from ecologists, literature and observation datasets. Second, we analysed the description of animal movement recorded with GPS at fine scale, corresponding to high temporal frequency and good location accuracy. Analysing this type of data provides information on the relation between landscape features and movements. We implemented an agent-based simulation approach to calculate potential trajectories constrained by the spatial environment and individual's behaviour. We tested two functions that consider space differently: one function takes into account the geometry and the types of landscape elements and one cost function sums up the spatial surroundings of an individual. Results highlight the fact that the cost function exaggerates the distances travelled by an individual and simplifies movement patterns. The geometry accurate function represents a good bottom-up approach for discovering interesting areas or obstacles for movements.

  5. System identification of perilymphatic fistula in an animal model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, C. 3rd; Casselbrant, M. L.

    1992-01-01

    An acute animal model has been developed in the chinchilla for the study of perilymphatic fistulas. Micropunctures were made in three sites to simulate bony, round window, and oval window fistulas. The eye movements in response to pressure applied to the external auditory canal were recorded after micropuncture induction and in preoperative controls. The main pressure stimulus was a pseudorandom binary sequence (PRBS) that rapidly changed between plus and minus 200 mm of water. The PRBS stimulus, with its wide frequency bandwidth, produced responses clearly above the preoperative baseline in 78 percent of the runs. The response was better between 0.5 and 3.3 Hz than it was below 0.5 Hz. The direction of horizontal eye movement was toward the side of the fistula with positive pressure applied in 92 percent of the runs. Vertical eye movements were also observed. The ratio of vertical eye displacement to horizontal eye displacement depended upon the site of the micropuncture induction. Thus, such a ratio measurement may be clinically useful in the noninvasive localization of perilymphatic fistulas in humans.

  6. Fantastic animals as an experimental model to teach animal adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Guidetti, Roberto; Baraldi, Laura; Calzolai, Caterina; Pini, Lorenza; Veronesi, Paola; Pederzoli, Aurora

    2007-01-01

    Background Science curricula and teachers should emphasize evolution in a manner commensurate with its importance as a unifying concept in science. The concept of adaptation represents a first step to understand the results of natural selection. We settled an experimental project of alternative didactic to improve knowledge of organism adaptation. Students were involved and stimulated in learning processes by creative activities. To set adaptation in a historic frame, fossil records as evidence of past life and evolution were considered. Results The experimental project is schematized in nine phases: review of previous knowledge; lesson on fossils; lesson on fantastic animals; planning an imaginary world; creation of an imaginary animal; revision of the imaginary animals; adaptations of real animals; adaptations of fossil animals; and public exposition. A rubric to evaluate the student's performances is reported. The project involved professors and students of the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia and of the "G. Marconi" Secondary School of First Degree (Modena, Italy). Conclusion The educational objectives of the project are in line with the National Indications of the Italian Ministry of Public Instruction: knowledge of the characteristics of living beings, the meanings of the term "adaptation", the meaning of fossils, the definition of ecosystem, and the particularity of the different biomes. At the end of the project, students will be able to grasp particular adaptations of real organisms and to deduce information about the environment in which the organism evolved. This project allows students to review previous knowledge and to form their personalities. PMID:17767729

  7. An Early Childhood Movement Laboratory Model: Kindergym

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marston, Rip

    2004-01-01

    Early childhood motor activity programs at institutions of higher learning can operate within the tripartite mission of the university while serving a vital function in providing leadership and guidance to educators. This article describes the University of Northern Iowa's Kindergym model. Within this model, curricular areas of games/sports,…

  8. Animal models of HIV peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Burdo, Tricia H; Miller, Andrew D

    2014-01-01

    The use of animal models in the study of HIV and AIDS has advanced our understanding of the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms of infection. Of the multitude of HIV disease manifestations, peripheral neuropathy remains one of the most common long-term side effects. Several of the most important causes of peripheral neuropathy in AIDS patients include direct association with HIV infection with or without antiretroviral medication and infection with opportunistic agents. Because the pathogeneses of these diseases are difficult to study in human patients, animal models have allowed for significant advancement in the understanding of the role of viral infection and the immune system in disease genesis. This review focuses on rodent, rabbit, feline and rhesus models used to study HIV-associated peripheral neuropathies, focusing specifically on sensory neuropathy and antiretroviral-associated neuropathies. PMID:25214880

  9. Pathogenesis of Epilepsy: Challenges in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Hui Yin, Yow; Ahmad, Nurulumi; Makmor-Bakry, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic disorders affecting individuals of all ages. A greater understanding of pathogenesis in epilepsy will likely provide the basis fundamental for development of new antiepileptic therapies that aim to prevent the epileptogenesis process or modify the progression of epilepsy in addition to treatment of epilepsy symptomatically. Therefore, several investigations have embarked on advancing knowledge of the mechanism underlying epileptogenesis, understanding in mechanism of pharmacoresistance and discovering antiepileptogenic or disease-modifying therapy. Animal models play a crucial and significant role in providing additional insight into mechanism of epileptogenesis. With the help of these models, epileptogenesis process has been demonstrated to be involved in various molecular and biological pathways or processes. Hence, this article will discuss the known and postulated mechanisms of epileptogenesis and challenges in using the animal models. PMID:24494063

  10. Animal models of antimuscle specific kinase myasthenia

    PubMed Central

    Richman, David P.; Nishi, Kayoko; Ferns, Michael J.; Schnier, Joachim; Pytel, Peter; Maselli, Ricardo A.; Agius, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Antimuscle specific kinase (anti-MuSK) myasthenia (AMM) differs from antiacetylcholine receptor myasthenia gravis in exhibiting more focal muscle involvement (neck, shoulder, facial, and bulbar muscles) with wasting of the involved, primarily axial, muscles. AMM is not associated with thymic hyperplasia and responds poorly to anticholinesterase treatment. Animal models of AMM have been induced in rabbits, mice, and rats by immunization with purified xenogeneic MuSK ectodomain, and by passive transfer of large quantities of purified serum IgG from AMM patients into mice. The models have confirmed the pathogenic role of the MuSK antibodies in AMM and have demonstrated the involvement of both the presynaptic and postsynaptic components of the neuromuscular junction. The observations in this human disease and its animal models demonstrate the role of MuSK not only in the formation of this synapse but also in its maintenance. PMID:23252909

  11. Towards an animal model of food addiction.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Johannes W; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J; Adan, Roger A H

    2012-01-01

    The dramatically increasing prevalence of obesity, associated with potentially life-threatening health problems, including cardiovascular diseases and type II diabetes, poses an enormous public health problem. It has been proposed that the obesity epidemic can be explained by the concept of 'food addiction'. In this review we focus on possible similarities between binge eating disorder (BED), which is highly prevalent in the obese population, and drug addiction. Indeed, both behavioral and neural similarities between addiction and BED have been demonstrated. Behavioral similarities are reflected in the overlap in DSM-IV criteria for drug addiction with the (suggested) criteria for BED and by food addiction-like behavior in animals after prolonged intermittent access to palatable food. Neural similarities include the overlap in brain regions involved in food and drug craving. Decreased dopamine D2 receptor availability in the striatum has been found in animal models of binge eating, after cocaine self-administration in animals as well as in drug addiction and obesity in humans. To further explore the neurobiological basis of food addiction, it is essential to have an animal model to test the addictive potential of palatable food. A recently developed animal model for drug addiction involves three behavioral characteristics that are based on the DSM-IV criteria: i) extremely high motivation to obtain the drug, ii) difficulty in limiting drug seeking even in periods of explicit non-availability, iii) continuation of drug-seeking despite negative consequences. Indeed, it has been shown that a subgroup of rats, after prolonged cocaine self-administration, scores positive on these three criteria. If food possesses addictive properties, then food-addicted rats should also meet these criteria while searching for and consuming food. In this review we discuss evidence from literature regarding food addiction-like behavior. We also suggest future experiments that could

  12. Animal Models of Depression: Molecular Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Vaishnav; Nestler, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Much of the current understanding about the pathogenesis of altered mood, impaired concentration and neurovegetative symptoms in major depression has come from animal models. However, because of the unique and complex features of human depression, the generation of valid and insightful depression models has been less straightforward than modeling other disabling diseases like cancer or autoimmune conditions. Today’s popular depression models creatively merge ethologically valid behavioral assays with the latest technological advances in molecular biology and automated video-tracking. This chapter reviews depression assays involving acute stress (e.g., forced swim test), models consisting of prolonged physical or social stress (e.g., social defeat), models of secondary depression, genetic models, and experiments designed to elucidate the mechanisms of antidepressant action. These paradigms are critically evaluated in relation to their ease, validity and replicability, the molecular insights that they have provided, and their capacity to offer the next generation of therapeutics for depression. PMID:21225412

  13. Animal models of epilepsy: use and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Kandratavicius, Ludmyla; Balista, Priscila Alves; Lopes-Aguiar, Cleiton; Ruggiero, Rafael Naime; Umeoka, Eduardo Henrique; Garcia-Cairasco, Norberto; Bueno-Junior, Lezio Soares; Leite, Joao Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic neurological condition characterized by recurrent seizures that affects millions of people worldwide. Comprehension of the complex mechanisms underlying epileptogenesis and seizure generation in temporal lobe epilepsy and other forms of epilepsy cannot be fully acquired in clinical studies with humans. As a result, the use of appropriate animal models is essential. Some of these models replicate the natural history of symptomatic focal epilepsy with an initial epileptogenic insult, which is followed by an apparent latent period and by a subsequent period of chronic spontaneous seizures. Seizures are a combination of electrical and behavioral events that are able to induce chemical, molecular, and anatomic alterations. In this review, we summarize the most frequently used models of chronic epilepsy and models of acute seizures induced by chemoconvulsants, traumatic brain injury, and electrical or sound stimuli. Genetic models of absence seizures and models of seizures and status epilepticus in the immature brain were also examined. Major uses and limitations were highlighted, and neuropathological, behavioral, and neurophysiological similarities and differences between the model and the human equivalent were considered. The quest for seizure mechanisms can provide insights into overall brain functions and consciousness, and animal models of epilepsy will continue to promote the progress of both epilepsy and neurophysiology research. PMID:25228809

  14. [Vector systems and rhythms in movements and orientation of elk (Alces alces L.) and other wild animals (Mammalia)].

    PubMed

    Zaĭtsev, V A

    2002-01-01

    The orientation of elk and other mammals studied in fields with visual and instrumental tracing has obviously hierarchical organization. Animals usually choose general direction headed for distant markers and then select short-distance landmarks. Movements of animals to distant and close landmarks is characterized by almost constant or regularly changing angles between main direction and movement vector. Fragments of trajectories represent left-side or right-side spirals with decreasing or increasing curvature according to the main direction. Three types of spirals differed by average values of initial angles are considered. Orientation to distant landmarks or along direction of movement possesses discrete reaction on the given landmarks and has some characters of iteration process. Special rhythms of activity (rhythms of orientation changing) participate in regulation of changing of movement directions and orientation reactions. They take part in formation of sinusoid, spiral and other trajectories. Rhythmic regulation involves great statistical variability of parameters (lengths, angles, time periods between consecutive orientations) that can be adaptive meaning. Lengths of orientation vectors and trajectory fragments are similar to some linear elements of landscape. Angular parameters of orientation are more variable. The main ones are similar to the angular parameters of Earth rotation. It looks, that orientation parameters evolved under the influence of Sun-Earth compass in inertial field of Earth rotation. PMID:12298181

  15. Pediatric Epileptic Encephalopathies: Pathophysiology and Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Shao, Li-Rong; Stafstrom, Carl E

    2016-05-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are syndromes in which seizures or interictal epileptiform activity contribute to or exacerbate brain function, beyond that caused by the underlying pathology. These severe epilepsies begin early in life, are associated with poor lifelong outcome, and are resistant to most treatments. Therefore, they represent an immense challenge for families and the medical care system. Furthermore, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the epileptic encephalopathies are poorly understood, hampering attempts to devise novel treatments. This article reviews animal models of the three classic epileptic encephalopathies-West syndrome (infantile spasms), Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, and continuous spike waves during sleep or Landau-Kleffner syndrome-with discussion of how animal models are revealing underlying pathophysiological mechanisms that might be amenable to targeted therapy. PMID:27544466

  16. Standardised animal models of host microbial mutualism

    PubMed Central

    Macpherson, A J; McCoy, K D

    2015-01-01

    An appreciation of the importance of interactions between microbes and multicellular organisms is currently driving research in biology and biomedicine. Many human diseases involve interactions between the host and the microbiota, so investigating the mechanisms involved is important for human health. Although microbial ecology measurements capture considerable diversity of the communities between individuals, this diversity is highly problematic for reproducible experimental animal models that seek to establish the mechanistic basis for interactions within the overall host-microbial superorganism. Conflicting experimental results may be explained away through unknown differences in the microbiota composition between vivaria or between the microenvironment of different isolated cages. In this position paper, we propose standardised criteria for stabilised and defined experimental animal microbiotas to generate reproducible models of human disease that are suitable for systematic experimentation and are reproducible across different institutions. PMID:25492472

  17. Experimental Diabetes Mellitus in Different Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Al-Awar, Amin; Kupai, Krisztina; Veszelka, Médea; Szűcs, Gergő; Attieh, Zouhair; Murlasits, Zsolt; Török, Szilvia; Pósa, Anikó; Varga, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    Animal models have historically played a critical role in the exploration and characterization of disease pathophysiology and target identification and in the evaluation of novel therapeutic agents and treatments in vivo. Diabetes mellitus disease, commonly known as diabetes, is a group of metabolic disorders characterized by high blood glucose levels for a prolonged time. To avoid late complications of diabetes and related costs, primary prevention and early treatment are therefore necessary. Due to its chronic symptoms, new treatment strategies need to be developed, because of the limited effectiveness of the current therapies. We overviewed the pathophysiological features of diabetes in relation to its complications in type 1 and type 2 mice along with rat models, including Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats, BB rats, LEW 1AR1/-iddm rats, Goto-Kakizaki rats, chemically induced diabetic models, and Nonobese Diabetic mouse, and Akita mice model. The advantages and disadvantages that these models comprise were also addressed in this review. This paper briefly reviews the wide pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms associated with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, particularly focusing on the challenges associated with the evaluation and predictive validation of these models as ideal animal models for preclinical assessments and discovering new drugs and therapeutic agents for translational application in humans. PMID:27595114

  18. Animal models of age related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pennesi, Mark E.; Neuringer, Martha; Courtney, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss of those over the age of 65 in the industrialized world. The prevalence and need to develop effective treatments for AMD has lead to the development of multiple animal models. AMD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that involves the interaction of both genetic and environmental factors with the unique anatomy of the human macula. Models in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates have recreated many of the histological features of AMD and provided much insight into the underlying pathological mechanisms of this disease. In spite of the large number of models developed, no one model yet recapitulates all of the features of human AMD. However, these models have helped reveal the roles of chronic oxidative damage, inflammation and immune dysregulation, and lipid metabolism in the development of AMD. Models for induced choroidal neovascularization have served as the backbone for testing new therapies. This article will review the diversity of animal models that exist for AMD as well as their strengths and limitations. PMID:22705444

  19. Experimental Diabetes Mellitus in Different Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Al-awar, Amin; Veszelka, Médea; Szűcs, Gergő; Attieh, Zouhair; Murlasits, Zsolt; Török, Szilvia; Pósa, Anikó; Varga, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    Animal models have historically played a critical role in the exploration and characterization of disease pathophysiology and target identification and in the evaluation of novel therapeutic agents and treatments in vivo. Diabetes mellitus disease, commonly known as diabetes, is a group of metabolic disorders characterized by high blood glucose levels for a prolonged time. To avoid late complications of diabetes and related costs, primary prevention and early treatment are therefore necessary. Due to its chronic symptoms, new treatment strategies need to be developed, because of the limited effectiveness of the current therapies. We overviewed the pathophysiological features of diabetes in relation to its complications in type 1 and type 2 mice along with rat models, including Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats, BB rats, LEW 1AR1/-iddm rats, Goto-Kakizaki rats, chemically induced diabetic models, and Nonobese Diabetic mouse, and Akita mice model. The advantages and disadvantages that these models comprise were also addressed in this review. This paper briefly reviews the wide pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms associated with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, particularly focusing on the challenges associated with the evaluation and predictive validation of these models as ideal animal models for preclinical assessments and discovering new drugs and therapeutic agents for translational application in humans. PMID:27595114

  20. Diabetic Retinopathy: Animal Models, Therapies, and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xue; McGinnis, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the major complications of diabetes. Although great efforts have been made to uncover the mechanisms underlying the pathology of DR, the exact causes of DR remain largely unknown. Because of multifactor involvement in DR etiology, currently no effective therapeutic treatments for DR are available. In this paper, we review the pathology of DR, commonly used animal models, and novel therapeutic approaches. Perspectives and future directions for DR treatment are discussed. PMID:26881246

  1. Animal models of smoke inhalation induced injuries.

    PubMed

    David, Poon; Dunsford, Denny; Lu, Jia; Moochhala, Shabbir

    2009-01-01

    Smoke inhalation injury is the leading cause of mortality from structural fires, as a result of complications such as systemic inflammatory response syndrome and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which can be caused by a localized or systemic response. In this review, the pathophysiology of smoke inhalation injury, along with the characteristics found in clinical settings, common animal models, current treatment methods and future potential therapeutics are discussed. PMID:19273376

  2. Animal models of tic disorders: A translational perspective

    PubMed Central

    Godar, Sean C.; Mosher, Laura J.; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Bortolato, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Tics are repetitive, sudden movements and/or vocalizations, typically enacted as maladaptive responses to intrusive premonitory urges. The most severe tic disorder, Tourette syndrome (TS), is a childhood-onset condition featuring multiple motor and at least one phonic tic for a duration longer than 1 year. The pharmacological treatment of TS is mainly based on antipsychotic agents; while these drugs are often effective in reducing tic severity and frequency, their therapeutic compliance is limited by serious motor and cognitive side effects. The identification of novel therapeutic targets and development of better treatments for tic disorders is conditional on the development of animal models with high translational validity. In addition, these experimental tools can prove extremely useful to test hypotheses on the etiology and neurobiological bases of TS and related conditions. In recent years, the translational value of these animal models has been enhanced, thanks to a significant re-organization of our conceptual framework of neuropsychiatric disorders, with a greater focus on endophenotypes and quantitative indices, rather than qualitative descriptors. Given the complex and multifactorial nature of TS and other tic disorders, the selection of animal models that can appropriately capture specific symptomatic aspects of these conditions can pose significant theoretical and methodological challenges. In this article, we will review the state of the art on the available animal models of tic disorders, based on genetic mutations, environmental interventions as well as pharmacological manipulations. Furthermore, we will outline emerging lines of translational research showing how some of these experimental preparations have led to significant progress in the identification of novel therapeutic targets for tic disorders. PMID:25244952

  3. Animal models of human microsporidial infections.

    PubMed

    Snowden, K F; Didier, E S; Orenstein, J M; Shadduck, J A

    1998-12-01

    Two new models have been described for Enterocytozoon bieneusi, non-human primates and immuno-suppressed gnotobiotic pigs, but there still is no successful cell culture system. The intestinal xenograft system holds promise as an animal model for Encephalitozoon intestinalis. Encephalitozoon hellem is easily propagated in mice, and also may be an important cause of spontaneous disease of psittacine birds. Encephalitozoon cuniculi occurs spontaneously in a wide variety of animals and can be induced experimentally in athymic mice. This is a useful experimental system and animal model, but the infection is relatively rare in man. Mammalian microsporidioses first were recognized as spontaneous diseases of animals that later confounded studies intended to elucidate the nature of diseases of humans. Much was learned about both experimental and spontaneous animal microsporidial infections that subsequently has been applied to the human diseases. In addition, new diseases have appeared, in both animals and humans, for which models are being developed. Since there are now animal models for almost all the known human microsporidioses, information on pathogenesis, host defenses, and effective treatments may become available soon. The microsporidioses provide a good example of the value of comparative pathology. Dr. Payne: Joe Payne. How much accidental infection has occurred with adjacent laboratory animals? Dr. Shadduck: A hard question. The organisms are thought to spread horizontally, and there is some pretty good evidence for that in rabbits. One assumes that this also is the explanation for the occurrence in infected kennels. Horizontal transmission probably occurs via contaminated urine, at least in the case of rabbits and dogs. Experimentally, horizontal transmission has been difficult to demonstrate in mice. Relative to the danger in people, I don't know how to answer that. I have always treated this as one of those things where you should be careful, but you shouldn

  4. Animal model for anaerobic lung abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Kannangara, D W; Thadepalli, H; Bach, V T; Webb, D

    1981-01-01

    There are no satisfactory animal models for the study of anaerobic lung abscess. Aspiration of food, gastric mucin, or hydrochloric acid, or any combination of these, along with oropharyngeal bacteria, is commonly believed to cause aspiration pneumonia and lung abscess. In the animal model described, none of the adjuvants was effective in producing anaerobic lung abscesses. Anaerobic bacteria derived from dental scrapings of a healthy adult (Peptococcus morbillorum, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Eubacterium lentum, and Bacteroides fragilis), when inoculated transtracheally without any adjuvants into New Zealand male white rabbits, consistently produced lung abscesses. Neither B fragilis by itself nor a mixture of P. morbillorum, F. nucleatum, and E. lentum without the addition of B. fragilis produced lung abscesses. The bacterial isolates used in this study were stored in prereduced chopped-meat-glucose medium and subcultured several times and were found effective in reproducing anaerobic lung abscesses repeatedly. This animal model is suitable for the study of pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of B. fragilis-associated anaerobic lung abscess. Images PMID:7216463

  5. Neurologic autoimmunity: mechanisms revealed by animal models.

    PubMed

    Bradl, Monika; Lassmann, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, neurologic autoimmunity has become a major consideration in the diagnosis and management of patients with many neurologic presentations. The nature of the associated antibodies and their targets has led to appreciation of the importance of the accessibility of the target antigen to antibodies, and a partial understanding of the different mechanisms that can follow antibody binding. This chapter will first describe the basic principles of autoimmune inflammation and tissue damage in the central and peripheral nervous system, and will then demonstrate what has been learnt about neurologic autoimmunity from circumstantial clinical evidence and from passive, active, and occasionally spontaneous or genetic animal models. It will cover neurologic autoimmune diseases ranging from disorders of neuromuscular transmission, peripheral and ganglionic neuropathy, to diseases of the central nervous system, where autoantibodies are either pathogenic and cause destruction or changes in function of their targets, where they are harmless bystanders of T-cell-mediated tissue damage, or are not involved at all. Finally, this chapter will summarize the relevance of current animal models for studying the different neurologic autoimmune diseases, and it will identify aspects where future animal models need to be improved to better reflect the disease reality experienced by affected patients, e.g., the chronicity or the relapsing/remitting nature of their disease. PMID:27112675

  6. Colon Preneoplastic Lesions in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Suzui, Masumi; Morioka, Takamitsu; Yoshimi, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    The animal model is a powerful and fundamental tool in the field of biochemical research including toxicology, carcinogenesis, cancer therapeutics and prevention. In the carcinogenesis animal model system, numerous examples of preneoplastic lesions have been isolated and investigated from various perspectives. This may indicate that several options of endpoints to evaluate carcinogenesis effect or therapeutic outcome are presently available; however, classification of preneoplastic lesions has become complicated. For instance, these lesions include aberrant crypt foci (ACF), dysplastic ACF, flat ACF, β-catenin accumulated crypts, and mucin-depleted foci. These lesions have been induced by commonly used chemical carcinogens such as azoxymethane (AOM), 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH), methylnitrosourea (MUN), or 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP). Investigators can choose any procedures or methods to examine colonic preneoplastic lesions according to their interests and the objectives of their experiments. Based on topographical, histopathological, and biological features of colon cancer preneoplastic lesions in the animal model, we summarize and discuss the character and implications of these lesions. PMID:24526805

  7. Animal Models of Compulsive Eating Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Di Segni, Matteo; Patrono, Enrico; Patella, Loris; Puglisi-Allegra, Stefano; Ventura, Rossella

    2014-01-01

    Eating disorders are multifactorial conditions that can involve a combination of genetic, metabolic, environmental, and behavioral factors. Studies in humans and laboratory animals show that eating can also be regulated by factors unrelated to metabolic control. Several studies suggest a link between stress, access to highly palatable food, and eating disorders. Eating “comfort foods” in response to a negative emotional state, for example, suggests that some individuals overeat to self-medicate. Clinical data suggest that some individuals may develop addiction-like behaviors from consuming palatable foods. Based on this observation, “food addiction” has emerged as an area of intense scientific research. A growing body of evidence suggests that some aspects of food addiction, such as compulsive eating behavior, can be modeled in animals. Moreover, several areas of the brain, including various neurotransmitter systems, are involved in the reinforcement effects of both food and drugs, suggesting that natural and pharmacological stimuli activate similar neural systems. In addition, several recent studies have identified a putative connection between neural circuits activated in the seeking and intake of both palatable food and drugs. The development of well-characterized animal models will increase our understanding of the etiological factors of food addiction and will help identify the neural substrates involved in eating disorders such as compulsive overeating. Such models will facilitate the development and validation of targeted pharmacological therapies. PMID:25340369

  8. Neuroteratology and Animal Modeling of Brain Disorders.

    PubMed

    Archer, Trevor; Kostrzewa, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 60 years, a large number of selective neurotoxins were discovered and developed, making it possible to animal-model a broad range of human neuropsychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders. In this paper, we highlight those neurotoxins that are most commonly used as neuroteratologic agents, to either produce lifelong destruction of neurons of a particular phenotype, or a group of neurons linked by a specific class of transporter proteins (i.e., dopamine transporter) or body of receptors for a specific neurotransmitter (i.e., NMDA class of glutamate receptors). Actions of a range of neurotoxins are described: 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), 6-hydroxydopa, DSP-4, MPTP, methamphetamine, IgG-saporin, domoate, NMDA receptor antagonists, and valproate. Their neuroteratologic features are outlined, as well as those of nerve growth factor, epidermal growth factor, and that of stress. The value of each of these neurotoxins in animal modeling of human neurologic, neurodegenerative, and neuropsychiatric disorders is discussed in terms of the respective value as well as limitations of the derived animal model. Neuroteratologic agents have proven to be of immense importance for understanding how associated neural systems in human neural disorders may be better targeted by new therapeutic agents. PMID:26857462

  9. Animal models of compulsive eating behavior.

    PubMed

    Di Segni, Matteo; Patrono, Enrico; Patella, Loris; Puglisi-Allegra, Stefano; Ventura, Rossella

    2014-10-01

    Eating disorders are multifactorial conditions that can involve a combination of genetic, metabolic, environmental, and behavioral factors. Studies in humans and laboratory animals show that eating can also be regulated by factors unrelated to metabolic control. Several studies suggest a link between stress, access to highly palatable food, and eating disorders. Eating "comfort foods" in response to a negative emotional state, for example, suggests that some individuals overeat to self-medicate. Clinical data suggest that some individuals may develop addiction-like behaviors from consuming palatable foods. Based on this observation, "food addiction" has emerged as an area of intense scientific research. A growing body of evidence suggests that some aspects of food addiction, such as compulsive eating behavior, can be modeled in animals. Moreover, several areas of the brain, including various neurotransmitter systems, are involved in the reinforcement effects of both food and drugs, suggesting that natural and pharmacological stimuli activate similar neural systems. In addition, several recent studies have identified a putative connection between neural circuits activated in the seeking and intake of both palatable food and drugs. The development of well-characterized animal models will increase our understanding of the etiological factors of food addiction and will help identify the neural substrates involved in eating disorders such as compulsive overeating. Such models will facilitate the development and validation of targeted pharmacological therapies. PMID:25340369

  10. Biomedical Research and the Animal Rights Movement: A Contrast in Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Adrian R.

    1993-01-01

    This article explains how animals are used in research in an effort to counteract animal rights literature. Reveals how medical professionals and others trained in scholarship have misquoted the scientific literature to bolster their claims against the utility of animal research. (PR)

  11. Animal Models in Pressure Ulcer Research

    PubMed Central

    Salcido, Richard; Popescu, Adrian; Ahn, Chulhyun

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objective: Research targeting the pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of pressure ulcers (PrUs) continue to be a significant priority for clinical and basic science research. Spinal cord injury patients particularly benefit from PrU research, because the prevalence of chronic wounds in this category is increasing despite standardized medical care. Because of practical, ethical, and safety considerations, PrUs in the human environment are limited to studies involving patients with pre-existing ulcers. Therefore, we are limited in our basic knowledge pertaining to the development, progression, and healing environment in this devastating disease. Methods: This review provides a synopsis of literature and a discussion of techniques used to induce PrUs in animal models. The question of what animal model best mimics the human PrU environment has been a subject of debate by investigators, peer review panels, and editors. The similarities in wound development and healing in mammalian tissue make murine models a relevant model for understanding the causal factors as well as the wound healing elements. Although we are beginning to understand some of the mechanisms of PrU development, a key dilemma of what makes an apparently healthy tissue develop a PrU waits to be solved. Results and Conclusions: No single method of induction and exploring PrUs in animals can address all the aspects of the pathology of chronic wounds. Each model has its particular strengths and weaknesses. Certain types of models can selectively identify specific aspects of wound development, quantify the extent of lesions, and assess outcomes from interventions. The appropriate interpretation of these methods is significant for proper study design, an understanding of the results, and extrapolation to clinical relevance. PMID:17591222

  12. Proliferative retinopathies: animal models and therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Villacampa, Pilar; Haurigot, Virginia; Bosch, Fatima

    2015-01-01

    Proliferative retinopathies are the leading causes of blindness in Western societies. The development of new, more efficacious treatments that take advantage of recent advances in the fields of gene and cell therapy requires further investigations on the mechanisms underlying disease onset and progression, and adequate animal models that recapitulate the pathogenesis of human proliferative retinopathy and allow evaluation of the long-term therapeutic benefits that these therapies can offer. Unfortunately, most models of retinal neovascularization have short-term evolution and diabetic rodents show a very mild retinal phenotype, limited to non-proliferative changes, and do not develop proliferative retinopathy at all. Transgenic mice overexpressing Insulin-like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I) in the retina (TgIGF-I) constitute the only rodent model currently available that develops most of the retinal alterations observed in diabetic eyes, with a temporal evolution that resembles that of the human disease. TgIGF-I have retinal vascular alterations that progress as animals age from non-proliferative to proliferative disease, making these mice an excellent model of proliferative retinopathy that, due to its slow progression, allows long-term evaluation of novel antiangiogenic therapies. At the molecular level, transgenic retinas recapitulate a variety of changes that are also observed in diabetic retinas, which reinforces the validity of this model. In addition to vascular and glial alterations, Tg-IGF-I mice show progressive neurodegeneration that leads to blindness in old animals. Thus, TgIGF-I are a useful model for testing the long-term efficacy and safety of innovative antiangiogenic, glial-modulating and neuroprotective therapies for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy and other retinal proliferative disorders. PMID:25760215

  13. Small animals models for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Martin, James G; Novali, Mauro

    2011-10-01

    There has been an explosion of studies of animal models of asthma in the past 20 years. The elucidation of fundamental immunological mechanisms underlying the development of allergy and the complex cytokine and chemokines networks underlying the responses have been substantially unraveled. Translation of findings to human asthma have been slow and hindered by the varied phenotypes that human asthma represents. New areas for expansion of modeling include virally mediated airway inflammation, oxidant stress, and the interactions of stimuli triggering innate immune and adaptive immune responses. PMID:21601000

  14. Realistic avatar eye and head animation using a neurobiological model of visual attention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itti, Laurent; Dhavale, Nitin; Pighin, Frederic

    2004-01-01

    We describe a neurobiological model of visual attention and eye/head movements in primates, and its application to the automatic animation of a realistic virtual human head watching an unconstrained variety of visual inputs. The bottom-up (image-based) attention model is based on the known neurophysiology of visual processing along the occipito-parietal pathway of the primate brain, while the eye/head movement model is derived from recordings in freely behaving Rhesus monkeys. The system is successful at autonomously saccading towards and tracking salient targets in a variety of video clips, including synthetic stimuli, real outdoors scenes and gaming console outputs. The resulting virtual human eye/head animation yields realistic rendering of the simulation results, both suggesting applicability of this approach to avatar animation and reinforcing the plausibility of the neural model.

  15. Clinical relevance of animal models of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Koch, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Animal models and endophenotypes of mental disorders are regarded as preclinical heuristic approaches aiming at understanding the etiopathogenesis of these diseases, and at developing drug treatment strategies. A frequently used translational model of sensorimotor gating and its deficits in some neuropsychiatric disorders is prepulse inhibition (PPI) of startle. PPI is reduced in schizophrenia patients, but the exact relationship between symptoms and reduced PPI is still unclear. Recent findings suggest that the levels of PPI in humans and animals may be predictive of certain cognitive functions. Hence, this simple measure of reflex suppression may be of use for clinical research. PPI is the reduction of the acoustic startle response that occurs when a weak prestimulus is presented shortly prior to a startling noise pulse. It is considered a measure of sensorimotor gating and is regulated by a cortico-limbic striato-pallidal circuit. However, PPI does not only occur in the domain of startle. PPI of alpha, gamma, and theta oscillations at frontal and central locations has been found, suggesting a relationship between PPI and cognitive processes. In fact, levels of PPI in healthy subjects and in animals predict their performance in cognitive tasks mainly mediated by the frontal cortex. Taken together, PPI might reflect a more general filtering performance leading to gating of intrusive sensory, motor, and cognitive input, thereby improving cognitive function. Hence, PPI might be used in clinical settings to predict the impact of drugs or psychotherapy on cognitive performance in neuropsychiatric patients. PMID:24053035

  16. Animal models of addiction: fat and sugar.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Drake; Sizemore, Glen M

    2011-01-01

    The concept of "food addiction" is gaining acceptance among the scientific community, and much is known about the influence of various components of food (e.g. high-fat, sugar, carbohydrate, salt) on behavior and physiology. Most of the studies to date have studied these consequences following relatively long-term diet manipulations and/or relatively free access to the food of interest. It is suggested that these types of studies are primarily tapping into the energy regulation and homeostatic processes that govern food intake and consumption. More recently, the overlap between the neurobiology of "reward-related" or hedonic effects of food ingestion and other reinforcers such as drugs of abuse has been highlighted, contributing to the notion that "food addiction" exists and that various components of food may be the substance of abuse. Based on preclinical animal models of drug addiction, a new direction for this field is using self-administration procedures and identifying an addiction-like behavioral phenotype in animals following various environmental, genetic, pharmacological, and neurobiological manipulations. Here we provide examples from this research area, with a focus on fat and sugar self-administration, and how the sophisticated animal models of drug addiction can be used to study the determinants and consequences of food addiction. PMID:21492084

  17. Animal models of chronic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Meyer, Christoph; Xu, Chengfu; Weng, Honglei; Hellerbrand, Claus; ten Dijke, Peter; Dooley, Steven

    2013-03-01

    Chronic liver diseases are frequent and potentially life threatening for humans. The underlying etiologies are diverse, ranging from viral infections, autoimmune disorders, and intoxications (including alcohol abuse) to imbalanced diets. Although at early stages of disease the liver regenerates in the absence of the insult, advanced stages cannot be healed and may require organ transplantation. A better understanding of underlying mechanisms is mandatory for the design of new drugs to be used in clinic. Therefore, rodent models are being developed to mimic human liver disease. However, no model to date can completely recapitulate the "corresponding" human disorder. Limiting factors are the time frame required in humans to establish a certain liver disease and the fact that rodents possess a distinct immune system compared with humans and have different metabolic rates affecting liver homeostasis. These features account for the difficulties in developing adequate rodent models for studying disease progression and for testing new pharmaceuticals to be translated into the clinic. Nevertheless, traditional and new promising animal models that mimic certain attributes of chronic liver diseases are established and being used to deepen our understanding in the underlying mechanisms of distinct liver diseases. This review aims at providing a comprehensive overview of recent advances in animal models recapitulating different features and etiologies of human liver diseases. PMID:23275613

  18. Animal models of depression: are there any?

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Michael F; Moore, Nicholas A

    2003-06-01

    Simple tests for antidepressant-like activity, such as 5-HTP-induced syndrome or reserpine-induced hypomotility, are often mechanism-based tests, pharmacologically specific for certain known classes of therapeutically successful antidepressant agents. Many of these behavioural assays have been superseded by neurochemical techniques such as in vivo microdialysis. In contrast to these mechanistic-based models, investigators have also endeavoured to reproduce in the laboratory, factors that are believed to precipitate depression in people. It is a strong assumption in this approach that depression is a response to stress. This strategy profiles the consequences of chronic stress particularly psychosocial stress or early life events, in order to reproduce in animals the behavioural signs and pathologies associated with depression. The advances in the social psychological, clinical pathological and new areas such as neuroimaging research offer the possibility of establishing more sophisticated models for depression in animals with a broader range of biomarkers from the immunological and endocrinological to neurochemical and behavioural. Combining these novel insights with more traditional tests of depression may not only increase our understanding of the neurobiology of depression but also afford more precise and predictive preclinical models of depression. The responsiveness of different strains or genetically modified animals to stress is likely to be a key area of study. Furthermore we must look to individual differences in subjects, even within the same strain, to more fully understand why some individuals show pathological responses to stress whereas others appear unaffected. Conversely in validating our models using currently available treatments we must include the concept of non-responders so as not to disregard models that may extend therapeutic possibilities in these patients. PMID:12766928

  19. Barrett’s esophagus and animal models

    PubMed Central

    Macke, Ryan A.; Nason, Katie S.; Mukaisho, Ken-ichi; Hattori, Takanori; Fujimura, Takashi; Sasaki, Shozo; Oyama, Katsunobu; Miyashita, Tomoharu; Ohta, Tetsuo; Miwa, Koichi; Zaidi, Ali; Malhotra, Usha; Atasoy, Ajlan; Foxwell, Tyler; Jobe, Blair

    2014-01-01

    Concise summaries Significant progress has been made in the last few decades using animal models to recreate the esophagitis–metaplasia–carcinoma sequence similar to that seen in human Barrett’s esophagus (BE) and EAC. More recent works focus on molecular pathways associated with intestinal metaplasia and carcinogenesis, as well as similarities between genetic mutations occurring in humans and animal models, mouse, rat, pig, rabbit, guinea pig, dog, cat, ferret, and possum. Despite the lack of a perfect model, there is still significant potential in using these models to clarify the contribution of different types of reflux (gastric, biliary, and pancreatic) to esophageal adenocarcinoma and to determine how the different types of refluxate interact. Refluxed duodenal contents cause gastric and esophageal carcinoma in rats without exposure to carcinogens, and several rat duodenal contents reflux models have been developed. BE in the animal models has well-developed goblet cells positive forMUC2, gastric pyloric-type mucins positive for MUC6, and sometimes intermingled with gastric foveolar-type mucins positive for MUC5AC. A gut regenerative cell lineage, characterized by pyloric–foveolar metaplasia followed by the appearance of goblet cells, occurs in the regenerative process in response to chronic inflammation. High animal-fat dietary intake causes severe obesity, resulting in the development of increased abdominal pressure and increased refluxate, particularly of the duodenal contents. The N-nitroso bile acid conjugates, which have mutagenecity, play an important role in Barrett’s carcinogenesis, and are stabilized by gastric acid. Experiments have been made in a rodent duodeno-esophageal reflux model using thioproline or cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor to prevent the inflammation–metaplasia– adenocarcinoma sequence. Thioproline is one of the nitrite scavengers, which reduce the production of carcinogenic nitroso-compounds. Celecoxib could postpone the

  20. The Impact of Movements and Animal Density on Continental Scale Cattle Disease Outbreaks in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Buhnerkempe, Michael G.; Tildesley, Michael J.; Lindström, Tom; Grear, Daniel A.; Portacci, Katie; Miller, Ryan S.; Lombard, Jason E.; Werkman, Marleen; Keeling, Matt J.; Wennergren, Uno; Webb, Colleen T.

    2014-01-01

    Globalization has increased the potential for the introduction and spread of novel pathogens over large spatial scales necessitating continental-scale disease models to guide emergency preparedness. Livestock disease spread models, such as those for the 2001 foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) epidemic in the United Kingdom, represent some of the best case studies of large-scale disease spread. However, generalization of these models to explore disease outcomes in other systems, such as the United States’s cattle industry, has been hampered by differences in system size and complexity and the absence of suitable livestock movement data. Here, a unique database of US cattle shipments allows estimation of synthetic movement networks that inform a near-continental scale disease model of a potential FMD-like (i.e., rapidly spreading) epidemic in US cattle. The largest epidemics may affect over one-third of the US and 120,000 cattle premises, but cattle movement restrictions from infected counties, as opposed to national movement moratoriums, are found to effectively contain outbreaks. Slow detection or weak compliance may necessitate more severe state-level bans for similar control. Such results highlight the role of large-scale disease models in emergency preparedness, particularly for systems lacking comprehensive movement and outbreak data, and the need to rapidly implement multi-scale contingency plans during a potential US outbreak. PMID:24670977

  1. Movement Activity Based Classification of Animal Behaviour with an Application to Data from Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus)

    PubMed Central

    Grünewälder, Steffen; Broekhuis, Femke; Macdonald, David Whyte; Wilson, Alan Martin; McNutt, John Weldon; Shawe-Taylor, John; Hailes, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    We propose a new method, based on machine learning techniques, for the analysis of a combination of continuous data from dataloggers and a sampling of contemporaneous behaviour observations. This data combination provides an opportunity for biologists to study behaviour at a previously unknown level of detail and accuracy; however, continuously recorded data are of little use unless the resulting large volumes of raw data can be reliably translated into actual behaviour. We address this problem by applying a Support Vector Machine and a Hidden-Markov Model that allows us to classify an animal's behaviour using a small set of field observations to calibrate continuously recorded activity data. Such classified data can be applied quantitatively to the behaviour of animals over extended periods and at times during which observation is difficult or impossible. We demonstrate the usefulness of the method by applying it to data from six cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. Cumulative activity data scores were recorded every five minutes by accelerometers embedded in GPS radio-collars for around one year on average. Direct behaviour sampling of each of the six cheetah were collected in the field for comparatively short periods. Using this approach we are able to classify each five minute activity score into a set of three key behaviour (feeding, mobile and stationary), creating a continuous behavioural sequence for the entire period for which the collars were deployed. Evaluation of our classifier with cross-validation shows the accuracy to be , but that the accuracy for individual classes is reduced with decreasing sample size of direct observations. We demonstrate how these processed data can be used to study behaviour identifying seasonal and gender differences in daily activity and feeding times. Results given here are unlike any that could be obtained using traditional approaches in both accuracy and detail. PMID:23185301

  2. Movement activity based classification of animal behaviour with an application to data from cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus).

    PubMed

    Grünewälder, Steffen; Broekhuis, Femke; Macdonald, David Whyte; Wilson, Alan Martin; McNutt, John Weldon; Shawe-Taylor, John; Hailes, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    We propose a new method, based on machine learning techniques, for the analysis of a combination of continuous data from dataloggers and a sampling of contemporaneous behaviour observations. This data combination provides an opportunity for biologists to study behaviour at a previously unknown level of detail and accuracy; however, continuously recorded data are of little use unless the resulting large volumes of raw data can be reliably translated into actual behaviour. We address this problem by applying a Support Vector Machine and a Hidden-Markov Model that allows us to classify an animal's behaviour using a small set of field observations to calibrate continuously recorded activity data. Such classified data can be applied quantitatively to the behaviour of animals over extended periods and at times during which observation is difficult or impossible. We demonstrate the usefulness of the method by applying it to data from six cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. Cumulative activity data scores were recorded every five minutes by accelerometers embedded in GPS radio-collars for around one year on average. Direct behaviour sampling of each of the six cheetah were collected in the field for comparatively short periods. Using this approach we are able to classify each five minute activity score into a set of three key behaviour (feeding, mobile and stationary), creating a continuous behavioural sequence for the entire period for which the collars were deployed. Evaluation of our classifier with cross-validation shows the accuracy to be 83%-94%, but that the accuracy for individual classes is reduced with decreasing sample size of direct observations. We demonstrate how these processed data can be used to study behaviour identifying seasonal and gender differences in daily activity and feeding times. Results given here are unlike any that could be obtained using traditional approaches in both accuracy and detail. PMID:23185301

  3. Using Computational and Mechanical Models to Study Animal Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Laura A.; Goldman, Daniel I.; Hedrick, Tyson L.; Tytell, Eric D.; Wang, Z. Jane; Yen, Jeannette; Alben, Silas

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in computational methods have made realistic large-scale simulations of animal locomotion possible. This has resulted in numerous mathematical and computational studies of animal movement through fluids and over substrates with the purpose of better understanding organisms’ performance and improving the design of vehicles moving through air and water and on land. This work has also motivated the development of improved numerical methods and modeling techniques for animal locomotion that is characterized by the interactions of fluids, substrates, and structures. Despite the large body of recent work in this area, the application of mathematical and numerical methods to improve our understanding of organisms in the context of their environment and physiology has remained relatively unexplored. Nature has evolved a wide variety of fascinating mechanisms of locomotion that exploit the properties of complex materials and fluids, but only recently are the mathematical, computational, and robotic tools available to rigorously compare the relative advantages and disadvantages of different methods of locomotion in variable environments. Similarly, advances in computational physiology have only recently allowed investigators to explore how changes at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels might lead to changes in performance at the organismal level. In this article, we highlight recent examples of how computational, mathematical, and experimental tools can be combined to ultimately answer the questions posed in one of the grand challenges in organismal biology: “Integrating living and physical systems.” PMID:22988026

  4. Spatial scaling: Its analysis and effects on animal movements in semiarid landscape mosaics. Final report, 1 September 1988--31 May 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wiens, J.A.

    1992-09-01

    The research conducted under this agreement focused in general on the effects of envirorunental heterogeneity on movements of animals and materials in semiarid grassland landscapes, on the form of scale-dependency of ecological patterns and processes, and on approaches to extrapolating among spatial scales. The findings are summarized in a series of published and unpublished papers that are included as the main body of this report. We demonstrated the value of ``experimental model systems`` employing observations and experiments conducted in small-scale microlandscapes to test concepts relating to flows of individuals and materials through complex, heterogeneous mosaics. We used fractal analysis extensively in this research, and showed how fractal measures can produce insights and lead,to questions that do not emerge from more traditional scale-dependent measures. We developed new concepts and theory to deal with scale-dependency in ecological systems and with integrating individual movement patterns into considerations of population and ecosystem dynamics.

  5. Animal models of craving for ethanol.

    PubMed

    Koob, G F

    2000-08-01

    Craving has various meanings but can be defined generally in terms of a desire for the previously experienced effects of ethanol. Animal models provide a means by which to study the underlying mechanisms associated with craving and are most useful when they fulfill the requirements for predictive validity and reliability. Craving is a key part of the process of addiction that can lead to relapse and is conceptualized as having at least three components: preoccupation/anticipation, binge/intoxication and withdrawal/negative affect. Animal models of craving are hypothesized at this time to involve three domains of motivation to take drugs: excessive drinking, negative affective states and conditioned reinforcement. Excessive drinking includes the alcohol deprivation effect, drinking during withdrawal and drinking after a history of dependence. Models of the negative affective state include increases in brain reward thresholds, and conditioned reinforcement models include cue-induced resistance to extinction or cue-induced reinstatement. Experimental psychology is a rich resource of sensitive behavioral techniques by which to measure hypothetical constructs associated with the motivation to drink ethanol. Rigorous tests of predictive validity and reliability will be necessary to make them useful for understanding the neurobiology of craving and for the development of new medications for treating craving. PMID:11002904

  6. Animal models for HIV/AIDS research

    PubMed Central

    Hatziioannou, Theodora; Evans, David T.

    2015-01-01

    The AIDS pandemic continues to present us with unique scientific and public health challenges. Although the development of effective antiretroviral therapy has been a major triumph, the emergence of drug resistance requires active management of treatment regimens and the continued development of new antiretroviral drugs. Moreover, despite nearly 30 years of intensive investigation, we still lack the basic scientific knowledge necessary to produce a safe and effective vaccine against HIV-1. Animal models offer obvious advantages in the study of HIV/AIDS, allowing for a more invasive investigation of the disease and for preclinical testing of drugs and vaccines. Advances in humanized mouse models, non-human primate immunogenetics and recombinant challenge viruses have greatly increased the number and sophistication of available mouse and simian models. Understanding the advantages and limitations of each of these models is essential for the design of animal studies to guide the development of vaccines and antiretroviral therapies for the prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:23154262

  7. Large animal models of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Tsang, H G; Rashdan, N A; Whitelaw, C B A; Corcoran, B M; Summers, K M; MacRae, V E

    2016-04-01

    The human cardiovascular system is a complex arrangement of specialized structures with distinct functions. The molecular landscape, including the genome, transcriptome and proteome, is pivotal to the biological complexity of both normal and abnormal mammalian processes. Despite our advancing knowledge and understanding of cardiovascular disease (CVD) through the principal use of rodent models, this continues to be an increasing issue in today's world. For instance, as the ageing population increases, so does the incidence of heart valve dysfunction. This may be because of changes in molecular composition and structure of the extracellular matrix, or from the pathological process of vascular calcification in which bone-formation related factors cause ectopic mineralization. However, significant differences between mice and men exist in terms of cardiovascular anatomy, physiology and pathology. In contrast, large animal models can show considerably greater similarity to humans. Furthermore, precise and efficient genome editing techniques enable the generation of tailored models for translational research. These novel systems provide a huge potential for large animal models to investigate the regulatory factors and molecular pathways that contribute to CVD in vivo. In turn, this will help bridge the gap between basic science and clinical applications by facilitating the refinement of therapies for cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26914991

  8. Assessing the impact of a cattle risk-based trading scheme on the movement of bovine tuberculosis infected animals in England and Wales.

    PubMed

    Adkin, A; Brouwer, A; Downs, S H; Kelly, L

    2016-01-01

    The adoption of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) risk-based trading (RBT) schemes has the potential to reduce the risk of bTB spread. However, any scheme will have cost implications that need to be balanced against its likely success in reducing bTB. This paper describes the first stochastic quantitative model assessing the impact of the implementation of a cattle risk-based trading scheme to inform policy makers and contribute to cost-benefit analyses. A risk assessment for England and Wales was developed to estimate the number of infected cattle traded using historic movement data recorded between July 2010 and June 2011. Three scenarios were implemented: cattle traded with no RBT scheme in place, voluntary provision of the score and a compulsory, statutory scheme applying a bTB risk score to each farm. For each scenario, changes in trade were estimated due to provision of the risk score to potential purchasers. An estimated mean of 3981 bTB infected animals were sold to purchasers with no RBT scheme in place in one year, with 90% confidence the true value was between 2775 and 5288. This result is dependent on the estimated between herd prevalence used in the risk assessment which is uncertain. With the voluntary provision of the risk score by farmers, on average, 17% of movements was affected (purchaser did not wish to buy once the risk score was available), with a reduction of 23% in infected animals being purchased initially. The compulsory provision of the risk score in a statutory scheme resulted in an estimated mean change to 26% of movements, with a reduction of 37% in infected animals being purchased initially, increasing to a 53% reduction in infected movements from higher risk sellers (score 4 and 5). The estimated mean reduction in infected animals being purchased could be improved to 45% given a 10% reduction in risky purchase behaviour by farmers which may be achieved through education programmes, or to an estimated mean of 49% if a rule was implemented

  9. Domestic animals as models for biomedical research

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Leif

    2016-01-01

    Domestic animals are unique models for biomedical research due to their long history (thousands of years) of strong phenotypic selection. This process has enriched for novel mutations that have contributed to phenotype evolution in domestic animals. The characterization of such mutations provides insights in gene function and biological mechanisms. This review summarizes genetic dissection of about 50 genetic variants affecting pigmentation, behaviour, metabolic regulation, and the pattern of locomotion. The variants are controlled by mutations in about 30 different genes, and for 10 of these our group was the first to report an association between the gene and a phenotype. Almost half of the reported mutations occur in non-coding sequences, suggesting that this is the most common type of polymorphism underlying phenotypic variation since this is a biased list where the proportion of coding mutations are inflated as they are easier to find. The review documents that structural changes (duplications, deletions, and inversions) have contributed significantly to the evolution of phenotypic diversity in domestic animals. Finally, we describe five examples of evolution of alleles, which means that alleles have evolved by the accumulation of several consecutive mutations affecting the function of the same gene. PMID:26479863

  10. Multi-quadric collocation model of horizontal crustal movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.; Zeng, A. M.; Ming, F.; Jing, Y. F.

    2015-11-01

    To establish the horizontal crustal movement velocity field of the Chinese mainland, a Hardy multi-quadric fitting model and collocation are usually used, but the kernel function, nodes, and smoothing factor are difficult to determine in the Hardy function interpolation, and in the collocation model the covariance function of the stochastic signal must be carefully constructed. In this paper, a new combined estimation method for establishing the velocity field, based on collocation and multi-quadric equation interpolation, is presented. The crustal movement estimation simultaneously takes into consideration an Euler vector as the crustal movement trend and the local distortions as the stochastic signals, and a kernel function of the multi-quadric fitting model substitutes for the covariance function of collocation. The velocities of a set of 1070 reference stations were obtained from the Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONOC), and the corresponding velocity field established using the new combined estimation method. A total of 85 reference stations were used as check points, and the precision in the north and east directions was 1.25 and 0.80 mm yr-1, respectively. The result obtained by the new method corresponds with the collocation method and multi-quadric interpolation without requiring the covariance equation for the signals.

  11. Integrating population- and individual-level information in a movement model of Yellowstone bison.

    PubMed

    Geremia, C; White, P J; Hoeting, J A; Wallen, R L; Watson, F G R; Blanton, D; Hobbs, N T

    2014-03-01

    Throughout the world, fragmentation of landscapes by human activities has constrained the opportunity for large herbivores to migrate. Conflict between people and wildlife results when migrating animals transmit disease to livestock, damage property, and threaten human safety. Mitigating this conflict requires understanding the forces that shape migration patterns. Bison Bos bison migrating from Yellowstone National Park into the state of Montana during winter and spring concern ranchers on lands surrounding the park because bison can transmit brucellosis (Brucella abortus) to cattle. Migrations have been constrained, with bison being lethally removed or moved back into the park. We developed a state-space model to support decisions on bison management aimed at mitigating conflict with landowners outside the park. The model integrated recent GPS observations with 22 years (1990-2012) of aerial counts to forecast monthly distributions and identify factors driving migration. Wintering areas were located along decreasing elevation gradients, and bison accumulated in wintering areas prior to moving to areas progressively lower in elevation. Bison movements were affected by time since the onset of snowpack, snowpack magnitude, standing crop, and herd size. Migration pathways were increasingly used over time, suggesting that experience or learning influenced movements. To support adaptive management of Yellowstone bison, we forecast future movements to evaluate alternatives. Our approach of developing models capable of making explicit probabilistic forecasts of large herbivore movements and seasonal distributions is applicable to managing the migratory movements of large herbivores worldwide. These forecasts allow managers to develop and refine strategies in advance, and promote sound decision-making that reduces conflict as migratory animals come into contact with people. PMID:24689146

  12. Lattice animal model of chromosome organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Balaji V. S.; Arya, Gaurav

    2012-07-01

    Polymer models tied together by constraints of looping and confinement have been used to explain many of the observed organizational characteristics of interphase chromosomes. Here we introduce a simple lattice animal representation of interphase chromosomes that combines the features of looping and confinement constraints into a single framework. We show through Monte Carlo simulations that this model qualitatively captures both the leveling off in the spatial distance between genomic markers observed in fluorescent in situ hybridization experiments and the inverse decay in the looping probability as a function of genomic separation observed in chromosome conformation capture experiments. The model also suggests that the collapsed state of chromosomes and their segregation into territories with distinct looping activities might be a natural consequence of confinement.

  13. Models for extracting vertical crustal movements from leveling data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdahl, S. H.

    1978-01-01

    Various adjustment strategies are being used in North America to obtain vertical crustal movements from repeated leveling. The more successful models utilize polynomials or multiquadric analysis to describe elevation change with a velocity surface. Other features permit determination of nonlinear motions, motions associated with earthquakes or episodes, and vertical motions of blocks where boundaries are prespecified. The preferred models for estimating crustal motions permit the use of detached segments of releveling to govern the shape of a velocity surface and allow for input from nonleveling sources such as tide gages and paired lake gages. Some models for extracting vertical crustal movements from releveling data are also excellent for adjusting leveling networks, and permit mixing old and new data in areas exhibiting vertical motion. The new adjustment techniques are more general than older static models and will undoubtedly be used routinely in the future as the constitution of level networks becomes mainly relevelings.

  14. Macrophages and Uveitis in Experimental Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Mérida, Salvador; Palacios, Elena; Bosch-Morell, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Resident and infiltrated macrophages play relevant roles in uveitis as effectors of innate immunity and inductors of acquired immunity. They are major effectors of tissue damage in uveitis and are also considered to be potent antigen-presenting cells. In the last few years, experimental animal models of uveitis have enabled us to enhance our understanding of the leading role of macrophages in eye inflammation processes, including macrophage polarization in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis and the major role of Toll-like receptor 4 in endotoxin-induced uveitis. This improved knowledge should guide advantageous iterative research to establish mechanisms and possible therapeutic targets for human uveitis resolution. PMID:26078494

  15. Respiratory, circulatory, and neurological responses to hanging: a review of animal models.

    PubMed

    Boghossian, Elie; Clément, Renaud; Redpath, Margaret; Sauvageau, Anny

    2010-09-01

    The pathophysiology of hanging is still poorly understood. This article presents a review of eight animal models: four models of isolated occlusion of the vessels of the neck (group 1), one model of combined tracheal and vessel occlusion (group 2), and three models of true animal hanging (group 3). Occlusion of the airway passages in group 2 did not accelerate respiratory arrest compared to group 1. Cessation of cerebral blood flow, rather than airway obstruction, seems to be the main cause of respiratory decline. In general, muscular movements ceased after 1-3.5 min and early generalized tonic-clonic convulsions were described. Complete circulatory collapse seems to occur between 4 and 8.5 min. These observations from animal models of hanging are compared with the data collected from filmed human hangings. Avenues to improve animal models are discussed. PMID:20487163

  16. Integrating batch marks and radio tags to estimate the size of a closed population with a movement model.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Carl James; Cope, Scott; Fratton, Glenda

    2013-12-01

    Movement models require individually identifiable marks to estimate the movement rates among strata. But they are relatively expensive to apply and monitor. Batch marks can be readily applied, but individual animal movements cannot be identified. We describe a method to estimate population size in a stratified population when movement takes place among strata and animals are marked with a combination of batch and individually identifiable tags. A hierarchical model with Bayesian inference is developed that pools information across segments on the detection efficiency based on radio-tagged fish and also uses the movement of the radio-tagged fish to impute the movement of the batch-marked fish to provide estimates of the population size on a segment and river level. The batch marks provide important information to help estimate the movement rates, but contribute little to the overall estimate of the population size. In this case, the approximate equal catchability among strata in either sample obviates the need for stratification. PMID:24455133

  17. Animal model of neuropathic tachycardia syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, R. P.; Appalsamy, M.; Diedrich, A.; Davis, T. L.; Robertson, D.

    2001-01-01

    Clinically relevant autonomic dysfunction can result from either complete or partial loss of sympathetic outflow to effector organs. Reported animal models of autonomic neuropathy have aimed to achieve complete lesions of sympathetic nerves, but incomplete lesions might be more relevant to certain clinical entities. We hypothesized that loss of sympathetic innervation would result in a predicted decrease in arterial pressure and a compensatory increase in heart rate. Increased heart rate due to loss of sympathetic innervation is seemingly paradoxical, but it provides a mechanistic explanation for clinical autonomic syndromes such as neuropathic postural tachycardia syndrome. Partially dysautonomic animals were generated by selectively lesioning postganglionic sympathetic neurons with 150 mg/kg 6-hydroxydopamine hydrobromide in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored using radiotelemetry. Systolic blood pressure decreased within hours postlesion (Delta>20 mm Hg). Within 4 days postlesion, heart rate rose and remained elevated above control levels. The severity of the lesion was determined functionally and pharmacologically by spectral analysis and responsiveness to tyramine. Low-frequency spectral power of systolic blood pressure was reduced postlesion and correlated with the diminished tyramine responsiveness (r=0.9572, P=0.0053). The tachycardia was abolished by treatment with the beta-antagonist propranolol, demonstrating that it was mediated by catecholamines acting on cardiac beta-receptors. Partial lesions of the autonomic nervous system have been hypothesized to underlie many disorders, including neuropathic postural tachycardia syndrome. This animal model may help us better understand the pathophysiology of autonomic dysfunction and lead to development of therapeutic interventions.

  18. Animal models for protein respiratory sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Ward, Marsha D W; Selgrade, Maryjane K

    2007-01-01

    Protein induced respiratory hypersensitivity, particularly atopic disease in general, and allergic asthma in particular, has increased dramatically over the last several decades in the US and other industrialized nations as a result of ill-defined changes in living conditions in modern western society. In addition, work-related asthma has become the most frequently diagnosed occupational respiratory illness. Animal models have demonstrated great utility in developing an understanding of the etiology and mechanisms of many diseases. A few models been developed as predictive models to identify a protein as an allergen or to characterize its potency. Here we describe animal models that have been used to investigate and identify protein respiratory sensitizers. In addition to prototypical experimental design, methods for exposure route, sample collection, and endpoint assessment are described. Some of the most relevant endpoints in assessing the potential for a given protein to induce atopic or allergic asthma respiratory hypersensitivity are the development of cytotropic antibodies (IgE, IgG1), eosinophil influx into the lung, and airway hyperresponsiveness to the sensitizing protein and/or to non-antigenic stimuli (Mch). The utility of technologies such as PCR and multiplexing assay systems is also described. These models and methods have been used to elucidate the potential for protein sources to induce allergy, identify environmental conditions (pollutants) to impact allergy responsiveness, and establish safe exposure limits. As an example, data are presented from an experiment designed to compare the allergenicity of a fungal biopesticide Metarhizium anisopliae (MACA) crude extract with the one of its components, conidia (CON) extract. PMID:17161304

  19. An Intermediate Animal Model of Spinal Cord Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Guiho, Thomas; Coste, Christine Azevedo; Delleci, Claire; Chenu, Jean-Patrick; Vignes, Jean-Rodolphe; Bauchet, Luc; Guiraud, David

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCI) result in the loss of movement and sensory feedback as well as organs dysfunctions. For example, nearly all SCI subjects loose their bladder control and are prone to kidney failure if they do not proceed to intermittent (self-) catheterization. Electrical stimulation of the sacral spinal roots with an implantable neuroprosthesis is a promising approach, with commercialized products, to restore continence and control micturition. However, many persons do not ask for this intervention since a surgical deafferentation is needed and the loss of sensory functions and reflexes become serious side effects of this procedure. Recent results renewed interest in spinal cord stimulation. Stimulation of existing pre-cabled neural networks involved in physiological processes regulation is suspected to enable synergic recruitment of spinal fibers. The development of direct spinal stimulation strategies aiming at bladder and bowel functions restoration would therefore appear as a credible alternative to existent solutions. However, a lack of suitable large animal model complicates these kinds of studies. In this article, we propose a new animal model of spinal stimulation -pig- and will briefly introduce results from one first acute experimental validation session. PMID:27478570

  20. Immune-mediated animal models of Tourette syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hornig, Mady; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2014-01-01

    An autoimmune diathesis has been proposed in Tourette syndrome (TS) and related neuropsychiatric disorders such as obsessive-compulsive disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism and anorexia nervosa. Environmental triggers including infection and xenobiotics are hypothesized to lead to the production of brain-directed autoantibodies in a subset of genetically susceptible individuals. Although much work has focused on Group A Streptococcus (GAS), the role of this common childhood infection remains controversial. Animal model studies based on immune and autoantibody findings in TS have demonstrated immunoglobulin (Ig) deposits and stereotypic movements and related behavioral disturbances reminiscent of TS following exposure to GAS and other activators of host anti-microbial responses, soluble immune mediators and anti-GAS or anti-neuronal antibodies. Demonstration of the ability to recreate these abnormalities through passive transfer of serum IgG from GAS-immunized mice into naïve mice and abrogation of this activity through depletion of IgG has provided compelling evidence in support of the autoimmune hypothesis. Immunologically-based animal models of TS are a potent tool for dissecting the pathogenesis of this serious neuropsychiatric syndrome. PMID:23313649

  1. Marijuana withdrawal syndrome in the animal model.

    PubMed

    Lichtman, Aron H; Martin, Billy R

    2002-11-01

    Although the proposition that repeated marijuana use can lead to marijuana dependence has long been accepted, only recently has evidence emerged suggesting that abstinence leads to clinically significant withdrawal symptoms. Converging evidence from human and animal studies has increased our understanding of cannabinoid dependence. One of the most powerful tools to advance this area of research is the CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR 141716A, which reliably precipitates withdrawal syndromes in mice, rats, and dogs that have been treated repeatedly with cannabinoids. In addition, the use of CB1 receptor knockout mice has revealed that not only cannabinoid dependence is mediated through a CB1 receptor mechanism of action, but CB1 receptors also modulate opioid dependence. Moreover, the results of other genetically altered mouse models suggest the existence of a reciprocal relationship between cannabinoid and opioid systems in drug dependence. Undoubtedly, these animal models will play pivotal roles in further characterizing cannabinoid dependence and elucidating the mechanisms of action, as well as developing potential pharmacotherapies for cannabinoid dependence. PMID:12412832

  2. Animal Models of Colitis-Associated Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kanneganti, Manasa; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Mizoguchi, Emiko

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a group of chronic inflammatory disorders that affect individuals throughout life. Although the etiology and pathogenesis of IBD are largely unknown, studies with animal models of colitis indicate that dysregulation of host/microbial interactions are requisite for the development of IBD. Patients with long-standing IBD have an increased risk for developing colitis-associated cancer (CAC), especially 10 years after the initial diagnosis of colitis, although the absolute number of CAC cases is relatively small. The cancer risk seems to be not directly related to disease activity, but is related to disease duration/extent, complication of primary sclerosing cholangitis, and family history of colon cancer. In particular, high levels and continuous production of inflammatory mediators, including cytokines and chemokines, by colonic epithelial cells (CECs) and immune cells in lamina propria may be strongly associated with the pathogenesis of CAC. In this article, we have summarized animal models of CAC and have reviewed the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlining the development of carcinogenic changes in CECs secondary to the chronic inflammatory conditions in the intestine. It may provide us some clues in developing a new class of therapeutic agents for the treatment of IBD and CAC in the near future. PMID:21274454

  3. Using animal models in osteoarthritis biomarker research.

    PubMed

    Garner, Bridget C; Stoker, Aaron M; Kuroki, Keiichi; Evans, Richard; Cook, Cristi Reeves; Cook, James L

    2011-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disease that commonly affects human and veterinary patients. Animal models are routinely used for OA research, and the dog is a nearly ideal species for translational investigation of human OA biomarkers. The cytokine, chemokine, and matrix metalloprotease (MMP) profiles of synovial fluid, serum, and urine from dogs with surgically induced and naturally occurring OA were compared with dogs without OA using xMAP technology (Qiagen Inc., Valencia, CA). Markers that exhibited significant differences between groups were identified (monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 [MCP1], interleukin 8 [IL8], keratinocyte-derived chemoattractant [KC], and MMP2 and MMP3), and their sensitivities and specificities were calculated to determine their diagnostic usefulness in a future biomarker panel. Synovial fluid IL8 was the most sensitive, but MCP1 was also highly sensitive and specific. The alterations in KC suggested that it may differentiate between cruciate disease and other types of OA, and the MMPs were most sensitive and specific in the serum. This study provided additional insight to the participation of cytokines, chemokines, and MMPs in OA, and potential diagnostic biomarker candidates were identified. A brief literature review of other biomarker candidates previously examined using animal models is discussed. PMID:22303754

  4. Emerging and Evolving Ovarian Cancer Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Bobbs, Alexander S; Cole, Jennifer M; Cowden Dahl, Karen D

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the leading cause of death from a gynecological malignancy in the United States. By the time a woman is diagnosed with OC, the tumor has usually metastasized. Mouse models that are used to recapitulate different aspects of human OC have been evolving for nearly 40 years. Xenograft studies in immunocompromised and immunocompetent mice have enhanced our knowledge of metastasis and immune cell involvement in cancer. Patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) can accurately reflect metastasis, response to therapy, and diverse genetics found in patients. Additionally, multiple genetically engineered mouse models have increased our understanding of possible tissues of origin for OC and what role individual mutations play in establishing ovarian tumors. Many of these models are used to test novel therapeutics. As no single model perfectly copies the human disease, we can use a variety of OC animal models in hypothesis testing that will lead to novel treatment options. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the utility of different mouse models in the study of OC and their suitability for cancer research. PMID:26380555

  5. Animal Models of Parkinson's Disease: Vertebrate Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yunjong; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a complex genetic disorder that is associated with environmental risk factors and aging. Vertebrate genetic models, especially mice, have aided the study of autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive PD. Mice are capable of showing a broad range of phenotypes and, coupled with their conserved genetic and anatomical structures, provide unparalleled molecular and pathological tools to model human disease. These models used in combination with aging and PD-associated toxins have expanded our understanding of PD pathogenesis. Attempts to refine PD animal models using conditional approaches have yielded in vivo nigrostriatal degeneration that is instructive in ordering pathogenic signaling and in developing therapeutic strategies to cure or halt the disease. Here, we provide an overview of the generation and characterization of transgenic and knockout mice used to study PD followed by a review of the molecular insights that have been gleaned from current PD mouse models. Finally, potential approaches to refine and improve current models are discussed. PMID:22960626

  6. A Simulation Model for Intra-Urban Movements

    PubMed Central

    Serok, Nimrod; Blumenfeld-Lieberthal, Efrat

    2015-01-01

    Human mobility patterns (HMP) have become of interest to a variety of disciplines. The increasing availability of empirical data enables researchers to analyze patterns of people’s movements. Recent work suggested that HMP follow a Levy-flight distribution and present regularity. Here, we present an innovative agent-based model that simulates HMP for various purposes. It is based on the combination of regular movements with spatial considerations, represented by an expanded gravitation model. The agents in this model have different attributes that affect their choice of destination and the duration they stay in each location. Thus, their movement mimics real-life situations. This is a stochastic, bottom-up model, yet it yields HMP that qualitatively fit HMP empirical data in terms of individuals, as well as the entire population. Our results also correspond to real-life phenomena in terms of urban spatial dynamics, that is, the emergence of popular locations in the city due to bottom-up behavior of people. Our model is novel in being based on the assumption that HMP are space-dependent as well as follow high regularity. To our knowledge, we are the first to succeed in simulating HMP not only at the inter-city scale but also at the intra-urban one. PMID:26161640

  7. A Simulation Model for Intra-Urban Movements.

    PubMed

    Serok, Nimrod; Blumenfeld-Lieberthal, Efrat

    2015-01-01

    Human mobility patterns (HMP) have become of interest to a variety of disciplines. The increasing availability of empirical data enables researchers to analyze patterns of people's movements. Recent work suggested that HMP follow a Levy-flight distribution and present regularity. Here, we present an innovative agent-based model that simulates HMP for various purposes. It is based on the combination of regular movements with spatial considerations, represented by an expanded gravitation model. The agents in this model have different attributes that affect their choice of destination and the duration they stay in each location. Thus, their movement mimics real-life situations. This is a stochastic, bottom-up model, yet it yields HMP that qualitatively fit HMP empirical data in terms of individuals, as well as the entire population. Our results also correspond to real-life phenomena in terms of urban spatial dynamics, that is, the emergence of popular locations in the city due to bottom-up behavior of people. Our model is novel in being based on the assumption that HMP are space-dependent as well as follow high regularity. To our knowledge, we are the first to succeed in simulating HMP not only at the inter-city scale but also at the intra-urban one. PMID:26161640

  8. 9 CFR 72.1 - Interstate movement of infested or exposed animals prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... No animals infested with ticks [Boophilus annulatus or Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus, Margaropus annulatus, Boophilus microplus or Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, or Babesiasis (Babesiosis) species vectors of Margaropus, Rhipicephalus, Amblyomma, Demacentor, or Ixodes] or exposed to...

  9. Elucidating the significance of spatial memory on movement decisions by African savannah elephants using state-space models.

    PubMed

    Polansky, Leo; Kilian, Werner; Wittemyer, George

    2015-04-22

    Spatial memory facilitates resource acquisition where resources are patchy, but how it influences movement behaviour of wide-ranging species remains to be resolved. We examined African elephant spatial memory reflected in movement decisions regarding access to perennial waterholes. State-space models of movement data revealed a rapid, highly directional movement behaviour almost exclusively associated with visiting perennial water. Behavioural change point (BCP) analyses demonstrated that these goal-oriented movements were initiated on average 4.59 km, and up to 49.97 km, from the visited waterhole, with the closest waterhole accessed 90% of the time. Distances of decision points increased when switching to different waterholes, during the dry season, or for female groups relative to males, while selection of the closest waterhole decreased when switching. Overall, our analyses indicated detailed spatial knowledge over large scales, enabling elephants to minimize travel distance through highly directional movement when accessing water. We discuss the likely cognitive and socioecological mechanisms driving these spatially precise movements that are most consistent with our findings. By applying modern analytic techniques to high-resolution movement data, this study illustrates emerging approaches for studying how cognition structures animal movement behaviour in different ecological and social contexts. PMID:25808888

  10. Elucidating the significance of spatial memory on movement decisions by African savannah elephants using state–space models

    PubMed Central

    Polansky, Leo; Kilian, Werner; Wittemyer, George

    2015-01-01

    Spatial memory facilitates resource acquisition where resources are patchy, but how it influences movement behaviour of wide-ranging species remains to be resolved. We examined African elephant spatial memory reflected in movement decisions regarding access to perennial waterholes. State–space models of movement data revealed a rapid, highly directional movement behaviour almost exclusively associated with visiting perennial water. Behavioural change point (BCP) analyses demonstrated that these goal-oriented movements were initiated on average 4.59 km, and up to 49.97 km, from the visited waterhole, with the closest waterhole accessed 90% of the time. Distances of decision points increased when switching to different waterholes, during the dry season, or for female groups relative to males, while selection of the closest waterhole decreased when switching. Overall, our analyses indicated detailed spatial knowledge over large scales, enabling elephants to minimize travel distance through highly directional movement when accessing water. We discuss the likely cognitive and socioecological mechanisms driving these spatially precise movements that are most consistent with our findings. By applying modern analytic techniques to high-resolution movement data, this study illustrates emerging approaches for studying how cognition structures animal movement behaviour in different ecological and social contexts. PMID:25808888

  11. Modeling basal ganglia for understanding Parkinsonian reaching movements.

    PubMed

    Magdoom, K N; Subramanian, D; Chakravarthy, V S; Ravindran, B; Amari, Shun-Ichi; Meenakshisundaram, N

    2011-02-01

    We present a computational model that highlights the role of basal ganglia (BG) in generating simple reaching movements. The model is cast within the reinforcement learning (RL) framework with correspondence between RL components and neuroanatomy as follows: dopamine signal of substantia nigra pars compacta as the temporal difference error, striatum as the substrate for the critic, and the motor cortex as the actor. A key feature of this neurobiological interpretation is our hypothesis that the indirect pathway is the explorer. Chaotic activity, originating from the indirect pathway part of the model, drives the wandering, exploratory movements of the arm. Thus, the direct pathway subserves exploitation, while the indirect pathway subserves exploration. The motor cortex becomes more and more independent of the corrective influence of BG as training progresses. Reaching trajectories show diminishing variability with training. Reaching movements associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) are simulated by reducing dopamine and degrading the complexity of indirect pathway dynamics by switching it from chaotic to periodic behavior. Under the simulated PD conditions, the arm exhibits PD motor symptoms like tremor, bradykinesia and undershooting. The model echoes the notion that PD is a dynamical disease. PMID:21105828

  12. Animal models for investigating chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a continuous or recurrent inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by progressive and irreversible morphological changes. It typically causes pain and permanent impairment of pancreatic function. In chronic pancreatitis areas of focal necrosis are followed by perilobular and intralobular fibrosis of the parenchyma, by stone formation in the pancreatic duct, calcifications in the parenchyma as well as the formation of pseudocysts. Late in the course of the disease a progressive loss of endocrine and exocrine function occurs. Despite advances in understanding the pathogenesis no causal treatment for chronic pancreatitis is presently available. Thus, there is a need for well characterized animal models for further investigations that allow translation to the human situation. This review summarizes existing experimental models and distinguishes them according to the type of pathological stimulus used for induction of pancreatitis. There is a special focus on pancreatic duct ligation, repetitive overstimulation with caerulein and chronic alcohol feeding. Secondly, attention is drawn to genetic models that have recently been generated and which mimic features of chronic pancreatitis in man. Each technique will be supplemented with data on the pathophysiological background of the model and their limitations will be discussed. PMID:22133269

  13. Animal models for investigating chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Aghdassi, Alexander A; Mayerle, Julia; Christochowitz, Sandra; Weiss, Frank U; Sendler, Matthias; Lerch, Markus M

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a continuous or recurrent inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by progressive and irreversible morphological changes. It typically causes pain and permanent impairment of pancreatic function. In chronic pancreatitis areas of focal necrosis are followed by perilobular and intralobular fibrosis of the parenchyma, by stone formation in the pancreatic duct, calcifications in the parenchyma as well as the formation of pseudocysts. Late in the course of the disease a progressive loss of endocrine and exocrine function occurs. Despite advances in understanding the pathogenesis no causal treatment for chronic pancreatitis is presently available. Thus, there is a need for well characterized animal models for further investigations that allow translation to the human situation. This review summarizes existing experimental models and distinguishes them according to the type of pathological stimulus used for induction of pancreatitis. There is a special focus on pancreatic duct ligation, repetitive overstimulation with caerulein and chronic alcohol feeding. Secondly, attention is drawn to genetic models that have recently been generated and which mimic features of chronic pancreatitis in man. Each technique will be supplemented with data on the pathophysiological background of the model and their limitations will be discussed. PMID:22133269

  14. Inverse Modelling to Obtain Head Movement Controller Signal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, W. S.; Lee, S. H.; Hannaford, B.; Stark, L.

    1984-01-01

    Experimentally obtained dynamics of time-optimal, horizontal head rotations have previously been simulated by a sixth order, nonlinear model driven by rectangular control signals. Electromyography (EMG) recordings have spects which differ in detail from the theoretical rectangular pulsed control signal. Control signals for time-optimal as well as sub-optimal horizontal head rotations were obtained by means of an inverse modelling procedures. With experimentally measured dynamical data serving as the input, this procedure inverts the model to produce the neurological control signals driving muscles and plant. The relationships between these controller signals, and EMG records should contribute to the understanding of the neurological control of movements.

  15. An animal model of human cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Gao, L; Qian, S; Zeng, L; Wang, R; Wei, G; Fan, J; Zheng, S

    2007-12-01

    To develop a rat model that allowed in vivo progressive human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection, allogeneic liver transplantation was performed across a rat combination of Dark Agouti (DA) to Brown Norway (BN). AD169, a well-characterized laboratory strain of HCMV, was used to establish a rat model of HCMV infection by injection of 0.4 mL (30.0 logTCID50) supernate into the rat peritoneum. Histological and blood specimens were obtained from animals sacrificed at predetermined timepoints. We performed immunohistochemical staining in liver, heart, kidney, spleen, and lung for HCMV immediate-early antigen (IE), lower matrix protein (pp65) detection in peripheral blood leukocytes, and HCMV early antigen (EA) and late antigen (LA). We compared survival rates. Our results showed positive HCMV IE and pp65 antigenemia detected in peripheral blood leukocytes in transplanted recipients from day 1 to day 30. Positive HCMV EA and LA staining cells were only detected in sections 10 days after liver transplantation, namely, in hepatocytes, mononuclear cells, bile duct epithelial cells, and endothelial cells. Successful HCMV replication was due to the combination of liver transplantation and cyclosporine (CsA) immunosuppression. Survival analysis showed no significant differences between the HCMV-infected group and HCMV-uninfected group. This new rat model of HCMV infection may be helpful to understand immune system modulation of HCMV infection. PMID:18089401

  16. Peroxisome deficient invertebrate and vertebrate animal models

    PubMed Central

    Van Veldhoven, Paul P.; Baes, Myriam

    2013-01-01

    Although peroxisomes are ubiquitous organelles in all animal species, their importance for the functioning of tissues and organs remains largely unresolved. Because peroxins are essential for the biogenesis of peroxisomes, an obvious approach to investigate their physiological role is to inactivate a Pex gene or to suppress its translation. This has been performed in mice but also in more primitive organisms including D. melanogaster, C. elegans, and D. rerio, and the major findings and abnormalities in these models will be highlighted. Although peroxisomes are generally not essential for embryonic development and organogenesis, a generalized inactivity of peroxisomes affects lifespan and posthatching/postnatal growth, proving that peroxisomal metabolism is necessary for the normal maturation of these organisms. Strikingly, despite the wide variety of model organisms, corresponding tissues are affected including the central nervous system and the testis. By inactivating peroxisomes in a cell type selective way in the brain of mice, it was also demonstrated that peroxisomes are necessary to prevent neurodegeneration. As these peroxisome deficient model organisms recapitulate pathologies of patients affected with peroxisomal diseases, their further analysis will contribute to the elucidation of still elusive pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:24319432

  17. Biology Notes: How the Skeleton Functions in the Movement of Animals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worsley, C. J.

    1972-01-01

    Argues that the term skeleton is not a word denoting a structure but a word denoting a function--that of allowing animals the freedom of self-motivated purposive local motion. Indeed a skeleton is a necessary prerequisite for there to be locomotion at all.'' (Author/AL)

  18. The role of animal movement, including off-farm rearing of heifers, in the interherd transmission of multidrug-resistant Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, B; Besser, T E; Gay, J M; Fox, L K; Davis, M A; Cobbold, R N; Berge, A C B; Hancock, D D

    2009-09-01

    Fifty-nine commercial dairy farms were sampled 7 times over 15 to 21 mo to determine the role of animal movement, including off-farm rearing of heifers, in the interherd transmission of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella spp. Farm management data were collected by on-site inspections and questionnaires on herd management practices before and after the study. Forty-four percent (26/59) of herds did not acquire any new MDR Salmonella strains. The number of newly introduced MDR Salmonella strains acquired by the remaining 56% (33/59) of herds ranged from 1 to 8. Logistic regression models indicated that off-farm heifer raising, including contract heifer raising where heifers commingle with cattle from other farms [commingled heifers, odds ratio (OR) = 8.9, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.4, 32.80], and herd size per 100-animal increment (herd size, OR = 1.04, 95% CI, 1.01, 1.05) were significantly associated with the introduction of new MDR Salmonella strains. The negative binomial regression similarly revealed that commingled heifers [relative risk (RR) = 2.3, 95% CI: 1.1, 4.7], herd size per 100 animals (RR = 1.02, 95% CI, 1.01, 1.03), and a history of clinical salmonellosis diagnosed before the study (RR = 2.5, 95% CI, 1.3, 5.0) were significantly associated with the number of new MDR Salmonella strains that were introduced. Factors not associated with the introduction of new MDR Salmonella strains were housing of heifers and cows in the same close-up pen, a common hospital-maternity pen, and the number of purchased cattle. This study highlights the role of animal movement in the interherd transmission of MDR Salmonella spp. PMID:19700684

  19. Animal models of tumorigenic herpesviruses--an update.

    PubMed

    Dittmer, Dirk P; Damania, Blossom; Sin, Sang-Hoon

    2015-10-01

    Any one model system, be it culture or animal, only recapitulates one aspect of the viral life cycle in the human host. By providing recent examples of animal models for Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, we would argue that multiple animal models are needed to gain a comprehensive understanding of the pathogenesis associated with human oncogenic herpesviruses. Transgenic mice, homologous animal herpesviruses, and tumorgraft and humanized mouse models all complement each other in the study of viral pathogenesis. The use of animal model systems facilitates the exploration of novel anti-viral and anti-cancer treatment modalities for diseases associated with oncogenic herpesviruses. PMID:26476352

  20. Model-based estimation of muscle forces exerted during movements.

    PubMed

    Erdemir, Ahmet; McLean, Scott; Herzog, Walter; van den Bogert, Antonie J

    2007-02-01

    Estimation of individual muscle forces during human movement can provide insight into neural control and tissue loading and can thus contribute to improved diagnosis and management of both neurological and orthopaedic conditions. Direct measurement of muscle forces is generally not feasible in a clinical setting, and non-invasive methods based on musculoskeletal modeling should therefore be considered. The current state of the art in clinical movement analysis is that resultant joint torques can be reliably estimated from motion data and external forces (inverse dynamic analysis). Static optimization methods to transform joint torques into estimates of individual muscle forces using musculoskeletal models, have been known for several decades. To date however, none of these methods have been successfully translated into clinical practice. The main obstacles are the lack of studies reporting successful validation of muscle force estimates, and the lack of user-friendly and efficient computer software. Recent advances in forward dynamics methods have opened up new opportunities. Forward dynamic optimization can be performed such that solutions are less dependent on measured kinematics and ground reaction forces, and are consistent with additional knowledge, such as the force-length-velocity-activation relationships of the muscles, and with observed electromyography signals during movement. We conclude that clinical applications of current research should be encouraged, supported by further development of computational tools and research into new algorithms for muscle force estimation and their validation. PMID:17070969

  1. Animal Model of Acute Deep Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Sumit; Laerum, Frode; Brosstad, Frank; Kvernebo, Knut; Sakariassen, Kjell S.

    1998-07-15

    Purpose: To develop an animal model of acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Methods: In part I of the study nine juvenile domestic pigs were used. Each external iliac vein was transluminally occluded with a balloon catheter. Thrombin was infused through a microcatheter in one leg according to one of the following protocols: (1) intraarterial (IA): 1250 U at 25 U/min in the common femoral artery (n= 3); (2) intravenous (IV): 5000 U in the popliteal vein at 500 U/min (n= 3), or at 100 U/min (n= 3). Saline was administered in the opposite leg. After the animals were killed, the mass of thrombus in the iliofemoral veins was measured. The pudendoepiploic (PEV), profunda femoris (PF), and popliteal veins (PV) were examined. Thrombosis in the tributaries of the superficial femoral vein (SFVt) was graded according to a three-point scale (0, +, ++). In part II of the study IV administration was further investigated in nine pigs using the following three regimens with 1000 U at 25 U/min serving as the control: (1) 1000 U at 100 U/min, (2) 250 U at 25 U/min, (3) 250 U at 6.25 U/min. Results: All animals survived. In part I median thrombus mass in the test limbs was 1.40 g as compared with 0.25 g in the controls (p= 0.01). PEV, PFV and PV were thrombosed in all limbs infused with thrombin. IV infusion was more effective in inducing thrombosis in both the parent veins (mass 1.32-1.78 g) and SVFt (++ in 4 of 6 legs), as compared with IA infusion (mass 0.0-1.16 g; SFVt ++ in 1 of 3 legs). In part II thrombus mass in axial veins ranged from 1.23 to 2.86 g, and showed no relationship with the dose of thrombin or the rate of infusion. Tributary thrombosis was less extensive with 250 U at 25 U/min than with the other regimens. Conclusion: Slow distal intravenous thrombin infusion in the hind legs of pigs combined with proximal venous occlusion induces thrombosis in the leg veins that closely resembles clinical DVT in distribution.

  2. What future for Lévy walks in animal movement research?. Comment on "Liberating Lévy walk research from the shackles of optimal foraging", by A.M. Reynolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, Denis

    2015-09-01

    Due to the apparent erratic nature of animal trajectories, the standard random walk, including variants like the correlated random walk (CRW), represents a natural framework for modeling animal movement [1]. The complexity of movement decisions is reduced to a stochastic noise for the sake of simplicity. This approach can be further simplified thanks to the Markov hypothesis, which is very popular. Namely, if one also assumes that successive displacements are independent, or if memory decays sufficiently fast over time like in the CRW, the theory of random walks becomes relatively friendly and easy to apply. Not less relevant to animal mobility are non-Markovian processes, though, in particular self-repulsing and self-attracting random walks, which commonly model ants and bacteria movements [2]. These stochastic processes, arguably more realistic in many situations and with rich emerging properties, have not found their place (yet?) in the dominant animal movement paradigm. More because of their formidable mathematical complexity than their lack of relevance, probably.

  3. RASopathies: unraveling mechanisms with animal models

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Granton A.; Goyal, Yogesh; Burdine, Rebecca D.; Rauen, Katherine A.; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT RASopathies are developmental disorders caused by germline mutations in the Ras-MAPK pathway, and are characterized by a broad spectrum of functional and morphological abnormalities. The high incidence of these disorders (∼1/1000 births) motivates the development of systematic approaches for their efficient diagnosis and potential treatment. Recent advances in genome sequencing have greatly facilitated the genotyping and discovery of mutations in affected individuals, but establishing the causal relationships between molecules and disease phenotypes is non-trivial and presents both technical and conceptual challenges. Here, we discuss how these challenges could be addressed using genetically modified model organisms that have been instrumental in delineating the Ras-MAPK pathway and its roles during development. Focusing on studies in mice, zebrafish and Drosophila, we provide an up-to-date review of animal models of RASopathies at the molecular and functional level. We also discuss how increasingly sophisticated techniques of genetic engineering can be used to rigorously connect changes in specific components of the Ras-MAPK pathway with observed functional and morphological phenotypes. Establishing these connections is essential for advancing our understanding of RASopathies and for devising rational strategies for their management and treatment. PMID:26203125

  4. Animal Models of Q Fever (Coxiella burnetii)

    PubMed Central

    Bewley, Kevin R

    2013-01-01

    Q fever, caused by the pathogen Coxiella burnetii, is an acute disease that can progress to become a serious chronic illness. The organism leads an obligate, intracellular lifecycle, during which it multiplies in the phagolytic compartments of the phagocytic cells of the immune system of its hosts. This characteristic makes study of the organism particularly difficult and is perhaps one of the reasons why, more than 70 y after its discovery, much remains unknown about the organism and its pathogenesis. A variety of animal species have been used to study both the acute and chronic forms of the disease. Although none of the models perfectly mimics the disease process in humans, each opens a window onto an important aspect of the pathology of the disease. We have learned that immunosuppression, overexpression of IL10, or physical damage to the heart muscle in mice and guinea pigs can induce disease that is similar to the chronic disease seen in humans, suggesting that this aspect of disease may eventually be fully understood. Models using species from mice to nonhuman primates have been used to evaluate and characterize vaccines to protect against the disease and may ultimately yield safer, less expensive vaccines. PMID:24326221

  5. RASopathies: unraveling mechanisms with animal models.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Granton A; Goyal, Yogesh; Burdine, Rebecca D; Rauen, Katherine A; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y

    2015-08-01

    RASopathies are developmental disorders caused by germline mutations in the Ras-MAPK pathway, and are characterized by a broad spectrum of functional and morphological abnormalities. The high incidence of these disorders (∼1/1000 births) motivates the development of systematic approaches for their efficient diagnosis and potential treatment. Recent advances in genome sequencing have greatly facilitated the genotyping and discovery of mutations in affected individuals, but establishing the causal relationships between molecules and disease phenotypes is non-trivial and presents both technical and conceptual challenges. Here, we discuss how these challenges could be addressed using genetically modified model organisms that have been instrumental in delineating the Ras-MAPK pathway and its roles during development. Focusing on studies in mice, zebrafish and Drosophila, we provide an up-to-date review of animal models of RASopathies at the molecular and functional level. We also discuss how increasingly sophisticated techniques of genetic engineering can be used to rigorously connect changes in specific components of the Ras-MAPK pathway with observed functional and morphological phenotypes. Establishing these connections is essential for advancing our understanding of RASopathies and for devising rational strategies for their management and treatment. PMID:26203125

  6. Development and Validation of an Animal Susceptibility Model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An individual animal’s stress level is the summation of stresses from three areas: the environment, animal, and management. A model was developed to predict the susceptibility of an individual animal to heat stress. The model utilizes a hierarchal knowledge-based fuzzy inference system with 11 anim...

  7. Modeling rapid mass movements using the shallow water equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hergarten, S.; Robl, J.

    2014-11-01

    We propose a new method to model rapid mass movements on complex topography using the shallow water equations in Cartesian coordinates. These equations are the widely used standard approximation for the flow of water in rivers and shallow lakes, but the main prerequisite for their application - an almost horizontal fluid table - is in general not satisfied for avalanches and debris flows in steep terrain. Therefore, we have developed appropriate correction terms for large topographic gradients. In this study we present the mathematical formulation of these correction terms and their implementation in the open source flow solver GERRIS. This novel approach is evaluated by simulating avalanches on synthetic and finally natural topographies and the widely used Voellmy flow resistance law. The results are tested against analytical solutions and the commercial avalanche model RAMMS. The overall results are in excellent agreement with the reference system RAMMS, and the deviations between the different models are far below the uncertainties in the determination of the relevant fluid parameters and involved avalanche volumes in reality. As this code is freely available and open source, it can be easily extended by additional fluid models or source areas, making this model suitable for simulating several types of rapid mass movements. It therefore provides a valuable tool assisting regional scale natural hazard studies.

  8. Modeling loggerhead turtle movement in the Mediterranean: importance of body size and oceanography.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Scott A; Moore, Jeffrey E; Dunn, Daniel C; van Buiten, Ricardo Sagarminaga; Eckert, Karen L; Halpin, Patrick N

    2008-03-01

    Adapting state-space models (SSMs) to telemetry data has been helpful for dealing with location error and for modeling animal movements. We used a combination of two hierarchical Bayesian SSMs to estimate movement pathways from Argos satellite-tag data for 15 juvenile loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta) in the western Mediterranean Sea, and to probabilistically assign locations to one of two behavioral movement types and relate those behaviors to environmental features. A Monte Carlo procedure helped propagate location uncertainty from the first SSM into the estimation of behavioral states and environment--behavior relationships in the second SSM. Turtles using oceanic habitats of the Balearic Sea (n = 9 turtles) within the western Mediterranean were more likely to exhibit "intensive search" behavior as might occur during foraging, but only larger turtles responded to variations in sea-surface height. This suggests that they were better able than smaller turtles to cue on environmental features that concentrate prey resources or were more dependent on high-quality feeding areas. These findings stress the importance of individual heterogeneity in the analysis of movement behavior and, taken in concert with descriptive studies of Pacific loggerheads, suggest that directed movements toward patchy ephemeral resources may be a general property of larger juvenile loggerheads in different populations. We discovered size-based variation in loggerhead distribution and documented use of the western Mediterranean Sea by turtles larger than previously thought to occur there. With one exception, only individuals > 57 cm curved carapace length used the most westerly basin in the Mediterranean (western Alborán Sea). These observations shed new light on loggerhead migration phenology. PMID:18488597

  9. Animal model of Mycoplasma fermentans respiratory infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma fermentans has been associated with respiratory, genitourinary tract infections and rheumatoid diseases but its role as pathogen is controversial. The purpose of this study was to probe that Mycoplasma fermentans is able to produce respiratory tract infection and migrate to several organs on an experimental infection model in hamsters. One hundred and twenty six hamsters were divided in six groups (A-F) of 21 hamsters each. Animals of groups A, B, C were intratracheally injected with one of the mycoplasma strains: Mycoplasma fermentans P 140 (wild strain), Mycoplasma fermentans PG 18 (type strain) or Mycoplasma pneumoniae Eaton strain. Groups D, E, F were the negative, media, and sham controls. Fragments of trachea, lungs, kidney, heart, brain and spleen were cultured and used for the histopathological study. U frequency test was used to compare recovery of mycoplasmas from organs. Results Mycoplasmas were detected by culture and PCR. The three mycoplasma strains induced an interstitial pneumonia; they also migrated to several organs and persisted there for at least 50 days. Mycoplasma fermentans P 140 induced a more severe damage in lungs than Mycoplasma fermentans PG 18. Mycoplasma pneumoniae produced severe damage in lungs and renal damage. Conclusions Mycoplasma fermentans induced a respiratory tract infection and persisted in different organs for several weeks in hamsters. This finding may help to explain the ability of Mycoplasma fermentans to induce pneumonia and chronic infectious diseases in humans. PMID:23298636

  10. The maternal deprivation animal model revisited.

    PubMed

    Marco, Eva M; Llorente, Ricardo; López-Gallardo, Meritxell; Mela, Virginia; Llorente-Berzal, Álvaro; Prada, Carmen; Viveros, María-Paz

    2015-04-01

    Early life stress, in the form of MD (24h at pnd 9), interferes with brain developmental trajectories modifying both behavioral and neurobiochemical parameters. MD has been reported to enhance neuroendocrine responses to stress, to affect emotional behavior and to impair cognitive function. More recently, changes in body weight gain, metabolic parameters and immunological responding have also been described. Present data give support to the fact that neuronal degeneration and/or astrocyte proliferation are present in specific brain regions, mainly hippocampus, prefrontal cortex and hypothalamus, which are particularly vulnerable to the effects of neonatal stress. The MD animal model arises as a valuable tool for the investigation of the brain processes occurring at the narrow time window comprised between pnd 9 and 10 that are critical for the establishment of brain circuitries critical for the regulation of behavior, metabolism and energy homeostasis. In the present review we will discuss three possible mechanisms that might be crucial for the effects of MD, namely, the rapid increase in glucocorticoids, the lack of the neonatal leptin surge, and the enhanced endocannabinoid signaling during the specific critical period of MD. A better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the detrimental consequences of MD is a concern for public health and may provide new insights into mental health prevention strategies and into novel therapeutic approaches in neuropsychiatry. PMID:25616179

  11. A Bayesian Approach for Modeling Cattle Movements in the United States: Scaling up a Partially Observed Network

    PubMed Central

    Lindström, Tom; Grear, Daniel A.; Buhnerkempe, Michael; Webb, Colleen T.; Miller, Ryan S.; Portacci, Katie; Wennergren, Uno

    2013-01-01

    Networks are rarely completely observed and prediction of unobserved edges is an important problem, especially in disease spread modeling where networks are used to represent the pattern of contacts. We focus on a partially observed cattle movement network in the U.S. and present a method for scaling up to a full network based on Bayesian inference, with the aim of informing epidemic disease spread models in the United States. The observed network is a 10% state stratified sample of Interstate Certificates of Veterinary Inspection that are required for interstate movement; describing approximately 20,000 movements from 47 of the contiguous states, with origins and destinations aggregated at the county level. We address how to scale up the 10% sample and predict unobserved intrastate movements based on observed movement distances. Edge prediction based on a distance kernel is not straightforward because the probability of movement does not always decline monotonically with distance due to underlying industry infrastructure. Hence, we propose a spatially explicit model where the probability of movement depends on distance, number of premises per county and historical imports of animals. Our model performs well in recapturing overall metrics of the observed network at the node level (U.S. counties), including degree centrality and betweenness; and performs better compared to randomized networks. Kernel generated movement networks also recapture observed global network metrics, including network size, transitivity, reciprocity, and assortativity better than randomized networks. In addition, predicted movements are similar to observed when aggregated at the state level (a broader geographic level relevant for policy) and are concentrated around states where key infrastructures, such as feedlots, are common. We conclude that the method generally performs well in predicting both coarse geographical patterns and network structure and is a promising method to generate full

  12. Early synaptic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease: Insights from animal models.

    PubMed

    Schirinzi, Tommaso; Madeo, Graziella; Martella, Giuseppina; Maltese, Marta; Picconi, Barbara; Calabresi, Paolo; Pisani, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    The appearance of motor manifestations in Parkinson's disease (PD) is invariably linked to degeneration of nigral dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta. Traditional views on PD neuropathology have been grounded in the assumption that the prime event of neurodegeneration involves neuronal cell bodies with the accumulation of metabolic products. However, this view has recently been challenged by both clinical and experimental evidence. Neuropathological studies in human brain samples and both in vivo and in vitro models support the hypothesis that nigrostriatal synapses may indeed be affected at the earliest stages of the neurodegenerative process. The mechanisms leading to either structural or functional synaptic dysfunction are starting to be elucidated and include dysregulation of axonal transport, impairment of the exocytosis and endocytosis machinery, altered intracellular trafficking, and loss of corticostriatal synaptic plasticity. The aim of this review is to try to integrate different lines of evidence from both pathogenic and genetic animal models that, to different extents, suggest that early synaptic impairment may represent the key event in PD pathogenesis. Understanding the molecular and cellular events underlying such synaptopathy is a fundamental step toward developing specific biomarkers of early dopaminergic dysfunction and, more importantly, designing novel therapies targeting the synaptic apparatus of selective, vulnerable synapses. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:27193205

  13. Zebrafish: A complete animal model to enumerate the nanoparticle toxicity.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Sharma, Ashish Ranjan; Sharma, Garima; Lee, Sang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Presently, nanotechnology is a multi-trillion dollar business sector that covers a wide range of industries, such as medicine, electronics and chemistry. In the current era, the commercial transition of nanotechnology from research level to industrial level is stimulating the world's total economic growth. However, commercialization of nanoparticles might offer possible risks once they are liberated in the environment. In recent years, the use of zebrafish (Danio rerio) as an established animal model system for nanoparticle toxicity assay is growing exponentially. In the current in-depth review, we discuss the recent research approaches employing adult zebrafish and their embryos for nanoparticle toxicity assessment. Different types of parameters are being discussed here which are used to evaluate nanoparticle toxicity such as hatching achievement rate, developmental malformation of organs, damage in gill and skin, abnormal behavior (movement impairment), immunotoxicity, genotoxicity or gene expression, neurotoxicity, endocrine system disruption, reproduction toxicity and finally mortality. Furthermore, we have also highlighted the toxic effect of different nanoparticles such as silver nanoparticle, gold nanoparticle, and metal oxide nanoparticles (TiO2, Al2O3, CuO, NiO and ZnO). At the end, future directions of zebrafish model and relevant assays to study nanoparticle toxicity have also been argued. PMID:27544212

  14. Clinical Forms and Animal Models of Hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    Salles, Jean Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is due to mutations of the tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) gene expressed in the liver, kidney, and bone. TNAP substrates include inorganic pyrophosphate cleaved into inorganic phosphate (Pi) in bone, pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP), the circulating form of vitamin B6, and phosphoethanolamine (PEA). As an autosomal recessive or dominant disease, HPP results in a range of clinical forms. Its hallmarks are low alkaline phosphatase (AP) and elevated PLP and PEA levels. Perinatal HPP may cause early death with respiratory insufficiency and hypomineralization resulting in deformed limbs and sometimes near-absence of bones and skull. Infantile HPP is diagnosed before 6 months of life. Respiratory failure, rib fractures and seizures due to vitamin B6 deficiency in the brain indicate poor prognosis. Craniosynostosis is frequent. Unlike in other forms of rickets, calcium and phosphorus are not decreased, resulting in hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis. Hypercalcemic crisis may occur. Failure to thrive and growth retardation are concerns. In infantile and adult forms of HPP, non-traumatic fractures may be the prominent manifestation, with otherwise unexplained chronic pain. Progressive myopathy has been described. Dental manifestations with early loss of teeth are usual in HPP and in a specific form, odontohypophosphatasia. HPP has been studied in knock-out mice models which mimic its severe form. Animal models have made a major contribution to the development of an original enzyme therapy for human infantile HPP, which is however essentially targeted at mineralized tissues. Better knowledge of its extraskeletal manifestations, including pain and neurological symptoms, is therefore required. PMID:26219704

  15. How interactions between animal movement and landscape processes modify range dynamics and extinction risk

    EPA Science Inventory

    Range dynamics models now incorporate many of the mechanisms and interactions that drive species distributions. However, connectivity continues to be studied using overly simple distance-based dispersal models with little consideration of how the individual behavior of dispersin...

  16. Animal models of rheumatoid arthritis: How informative are they?

    PubMed

    McNamee, Kay; Williams, Richard; Seed, Michael

    2015-07-15

    Animal models of arthritis are widely used to de-convolute disease pathways and to identify novel drug targets and therapeutic approaches. However, the high attrition rates of drugs in Phase II/III rates means that a relatively small number of drugs reach the market, despite showing efficacy in pre-clinical models. There is also increasing awareness of the ethical issues surrounding the use of animal models of disease and it is timely, therefore, to review the relevance and translatability of animal models of arthritis. In this paper we review the most commonly used animal models in terms of their pathological similarities to human rheumatoid arthritis as well as their response to drug therapy. In general, the ability of animal models to predict efficacy of biologics in man has been good. However, the predictive power of animal models for small molecules has been variable, probably because of differences in the levels of target knockdown achievable in vivo. PMID:25824900

  17. Animal models in virus research: their utility and limitations.

    PubMed

    Louz, Derrick; Bergmans, Hans E; Loos, Birgit P; Hoeben, Rob C

    2013-11-01

    Viral diseases are important threats to public health worldwide. With the number of emerging viral diseases increasing the last decades, there is a growing need for appropriate animal models for virus studies. The relevance of animal models can be limited in terms of mimicking human pathophysiology. In this review, we discuss the utility of animal models for studies of influenza A viruses, HIV and SARS-CoV in light of viral emergence, assessment of infection and transmission risks, and regulatory decision making. We address their relevance and limitations. The susceptibility, immune responses, pathogenesis, and pharmacokinetics may differ between the various animal models. These complexities may thwart translating results from animal experiments to the humans. Within these constraints, animal models are very informative for studying virus immunopathology and transmission modes and for translation of virus research into clinical benefit. Insight in the limitations of the various models may facilitate further improvements of the models. PMID:22978742

  18. Systematic Review of Traumatic Brain Injury Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Phipps, Helen W

    2016-01-01

    The goals of this chapter are to provide an introduction into the variety of animal models available for studying traumatic brain injury (TBI) and to provide a concise systematic review of the general materials and methods involved in each model. Materials and methods were obtained from a literature search of relevant peer-reviewed articles. Strengths and weaknesses of each animal choice were presented to include relative cost, anatomical and physiological features, and mechanism of injury desired. Further, a variety of homologous, isomorphic/induced, and predictive animal models were defined, described, and compared with respect to their relative ease of use, characteristics, range, adjustability (e.g., amplitude, duration, mass/size, velocity, and pressure), and rough order of magnitude cost. Just as the primary mechanism of action of TBI is limitless, so are the animal models available to study TBI. With such a wide variety of available animals, types of injury models, along with the research needs, there exists no single "gold standard" model of TBI rendering cross-comparison of data extremely difficult. Therefore, this chapter reflects a representative sampling of the TBI animal models available and is not an exhaustive comparison of every possible model and associated parameters. Throughout this chapter, special considerations for animal choice and TBI animal model classification are discussed. Criteria central to choosing appropriate animal models of TBI include ethics, funding, complexity (ease of use, safety, and controlled access requirements), type of model, model characteristics, and range of control (scope). PMID:27604713

  19. A model for evaluating friction during orthodontic tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Loftus, B P; Artum, J

    2001-06-01

    Orthodontic forces for sliding tooth movement during space closure are applied at a distance from the centre of resistance of the teeth. For this reason, the teeth will tip until contacts are established between the archwire and diagonally opposite corners of the bracket wings. They will also rotate until the wire contacts opposite corners of the ligature tie or the buccal shield with self-ligating brackets, and the base of the slot. Frictional forces measured with models that do not enable such movements may therefore not be representative of the clinical condition. To test this hypothesis, a dentoalveolar model that allowed accurate reproduction of the width of a material of similar elastic properties as the periodontal ligament (PDL) was fabricated. In addition, a device was designed that allowed accurate adjustment of the bracket slot in all three planes of space during mounting of the model in an Instron machine. Frictional forces during sliding of ceramic brackets with 0.022 x 0.028-inch bracket slots along 0.019 x 0.025-inch stainless steel wires were tested using models with simulated PDL widths of 0.00, 0.33, 0.67, and 1.00 mm. ANOVA detected a significant effect of PDL width on mean frictional force (P < 0.001). Pairwise comparisons at 0.05 significance level indicated no differences between the models without PDL and those with a width of 0.33 mm, and between models with PDL widths of 0.67 and 1.00 mm. However, the two models with smaller widths produced significantly lower frictional forces. PMID:11471268

  20. Animal models of human amino acid responses.

    PubMed

    Baker, David H

    2004-06-01

    The principal differences between experimental animals and humans with regard to amino acid responses are 1) growing animals partition most of their amino acid intake to protein accretion, whereas growing children partition most of their intake to maintenance; 2) invasive assessment procedures are common in animals but very limited in humans; and 3) humans can describe how they feel in response to amino acid levels or balances, whereas animals cannot. New (pharmacologic) uses of amino acids have been and are being discovered (e.g., cysteine, arginine, leucine, glutamine), and this makes it imperative that tolerance limits be established. Work with pigs suggests that excessive intake of methionine and tryptophan present the biggest problems, whereas excessive intake of threonine, glutamate, and the branched-chain amino acids seems to be well tolerated. PMID:15173445

  1. Animation of natural scene by virtual eye-movements evokes high precision and low noise in V1 neurons

    PubMed Central

    Baudot, Pierre; Levy, Manuel; Marre, Olivier; Monier, Cyril; Pananceau, Marc; Frégnac, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic noise is thought to be a limiting factor for computational efficiency in the brain. In visual cortex (V1), ongoing activity is present in vivo, and spiking responses to simple stimuli are highly unreliable across trials. Stimulus statistics used to plot receptive fields, however, are quite different from those experienced during natural visuomotor exploration. We recorded V1 neurons intracellularly in the anaesthetized and paralyzed cat and compared their spiking and synaptic responses to full field natural images animated by simulated eye-movements to those evoked by simpler (grating) or higher dimensionality statistics (dense noise). In most cells, natural scene animation was the only condition where high temporal precision (in the 10–20 ms range) was maintained during sparse and reliable activity. At the subthreshold level, irregular but highly reproducible membrane potential dynamics were observed, even during long (several 100 ms) “spike-less” periods. We showed that both the spatial structure of natural scenes and the temporal dynamics of eye-movements increase the signal-to-noise ratio by a non-linear amplification of the signal combined with a reduction of the subthreshold contextual noise. These data support the view that the sparsening and the time precision of the neural code in V1 may depend primarily on three factors: (1) broadband input spectrum: the bandwidth must be rich enough for recruiting optimally the diversity of spatial and time constants during recurrent processing; (2) tight temporal interplay of excitation and inhibition: conductance measurements demonstrate that natural scene statistics narrow selectively the duration of the spiking opportunity window during which the balance between excitation and inhibition changes transiently and reversibly; (3) signal energy in the lower frequency band: a minimal level of power is needed below 10 Hz to reach consistently the spiking threshold, a situation rarely reached with visual

  2. Animation of natural scene by virtual eye-movements evokes high precision and low noise in V1 neurons.

    PubMed

    Baudot, Pierre; Levy, Manuel; Marre, Olivier; Monier, Cyril; Pananceau, Marc; Frégnac, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic noise is thought to be a limiting factor for computational efficiency in the brain. In visual cortex (V1), ongoing activity is present in vivo, and spiking responses to simple stimuli are highly unreliable across trials. Stimulus statistics used to plot receptive fields, however, are quite different from those experienced during natural visuomotor exploration. We recorded V1 neurons intracellularly in the anaesthetized and paralyzed cat and compared their spiking and synaptic responses to full field natural images animated by simulated eye-movements to those evoked by simpler (grating) or higher dimensionality statistics (dense noise). In most cells, natural scene animation was the only condition where high temporal precision (in the 10-20 ms range) was maintained during sparse and reliable activity. At the subthreshold level, irregular but highly reproducible membrane potential dynamics were observed, even during long (several 100 ms) "spike-less" periods. We showed that both the spatial structure of natural scenes and the temporal dynamics of eye-movements increase the signal-to-noise ratio by a non-linear amplification of the signal combined with a reduction of the subthreshold contextual noise. These data support the view that the sparsening and the time precision of the neural code in V1 may depend primarily on three factors: (1) broadband input spectrum: the bandwidth must be rich enough for recruiting optimally the diversity of spatial and time constants during recurrent processing; (2) tight temporal interplay of excitation and inhibition: conductance measurements demonstrate that natural scene statistics narrow selectively the duration of the spiking opportunity window during which the balance between excitation and inhibition changes transiently and reversibly; (3) signal energy in the lower frequency band: a minimal level of power is needed below 10 Hz to reach consistently the spiking threshold, a situation rarely reached with visual dense

  3. Animal models to evaluate anti-atherosclerotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Priyadharsini, Raman P

    2015-08-01

    Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial condition characterized by endothelial injury, fatty streak deposition, and stiffening of the blood vessels. The pathogenesis is complex and mediated by adhesion molecules, inflammatory cells, and smooth muscle cells. Statins have been the major drugs in treating hypercholesterolemia for the past two decades despite little efficacy. There is an urgent need for new drugs that can replace statins or combined with statins. The preclinical studies evaluating atherosclerosis require an ideal animal model which resembles the disease condition, but there is no single animal model which mimics the disease. The animal models used are rabbits, rats, mice, hamsters, mini pigs, etc. Each animal model has its own advantages and disadvantages. The method of induction of atherosclerosis includes diet, chemical induction, mechanically induced injuries, and genetically manipulated animal models. This review mainly focuses on the various animal models, method of induction, the advantages, disadvantages, and the current perspectives with regard to preclinical studies on atherosclerosis. PMID:26095240

  4. Imaging of Small-Animal Models of Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jelicks, Linda A.; Lisanti, Michael P.; Machado, Fabiana S.; Weiss, Louis M.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Desruisseaux, Mahalia S.

    2014-01-01

    Infectious diseases are the second leading cause of death worldwide. Noninvasive small-animal imaging has become an important research tool for preclinical studies of infectious diseases. Imaging studies permit enhanced information through longitudinal studies of the same animal during the infection. Herein, we briefly review recent studies of animal models of infectious disease that have used imaging modalities. PMID:23201133

  5. An animal model for chorioamnionitis at term

    PubMed Central

    Dell'Ovo, Valeria; Rosenzweig, Jason; Burd, Irina; Merabova, Nana; Darbinian, Nune; Goetzl, Laura

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to develop an animal model for intrapartum inflammation at term to investigate the interactions between maternal and fetal inflammatory responses and adverse neurologic outcome. STUDY DESIGN Lipopolysaccharide (160, 320, or 640 μg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally to day 20 term-pregnant Sprague Dawley rat dams 2, 4, and 6 hours before sample collection. Maternal outcomes included dam core temperature and plasma interleukin 6 (IL-6). Fetal outcomes included plasma IL-6, brain IL-6 messenger RNA expression, and brain IL-6 protein expression. Primary cortical cell cultures were prepared to examine neuronal morphologic condition. Neurite counts were obtained with the use of automated Sholl analysis. RESULTS Maternal plasma IL-6 levels peaked 2 hours after lipopolysaccharide stimulus and rapidly resolved, except for an observed low level persistence at 6 hours with 640 μg/kg. Fetal plasma and placental IL-6 expression also peaked rapidly but only persisted in placental samples. Fetal brain IL-6 RNA and protein expression was significantly higher than control litters at 6 hours after the exposure to both 320 μg/kg (P ≤ .05) and 640 μg/kg (P ≤ .01). Cortical cells from fetuses that were exposed for 6 hours to maternal systemic inflammation showed reduced neurite number and neurite length (P < .001) with increasing lipopolysaccharide dose. CONCLUSION Our results demonstrate that fetal brain injury follows isolated systemic maternal inflammation and that fetal brain inflammation lags after maternal stimulus, which creates a potential 4-hour clinical window for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25979619

  6. Top-down guided eye movements: peripheral model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyak, Dimitri A.; Stark, Lawrence W.

    2001-06-01

    Eye movements are an important aspect of human visual behavior. The temporal and space-variant nature of sampling a visual scenes requires frequent attentional gaze shifts, saccades, to fixate onto different parts of an image. Fixations are often directed towards the most informative regions in the visual scene. We introduce a model and its simulation that can select such regions based on prior knowledge of similar scenes. Having representations of scene categories as probabilistic combination of hypothetical objects, i.e., prototypical regions with certain properties, it is possible to assess the likely contribution of each image region to the successive recognition process. The regions are obtained by segmenting low-resolution images using the normalized cut algorithm. Based on low-level features, such as average color, size, position, regions are clustered into a small set of hypothetical objects. Using conditions probabilities for each object given the scene category, the model can then predict the informative value of the corresponding region and initiate a sequential spatial information-gathering algorithm analogous to an eye movement saccade to a new fixation. The article demonstrates how the initial hypothesis determines the next region of interest to visit and how these scene hypotheses are affected by sequentially visiting each new image region.

  7. Modelling and monitoring of passive control structures in human movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemami, Hooshang; Hemami, Mahmoud

    2014-09-01

    Passive tissues, ligaments and cartilage are vital to human movement. Their contribution to stability, joint function and joint integrity is essential. The articulation of their functions and quantitative assessment of what they do in a healthy or injured state are important in athletics, orthopaedics, medicine and health. In this paper, the role of cartilage and ligaments in stability of natural contacts, connections and joints is articulated by including them in two very simple skeletal systems: one- and three-link rigid body systems. Based on the Newton-Euler equations, a state space presentation of the dynamics is discussed that allows inclusion of ligament and cartilage structures in the model, and allows for Lyapunov stability studies for the original and reduced systems. The connection constraints may be holonomic and non-holonomic depending on the structure of the passive elements. The development is pertinent to the eventual design of a computational framework for the study of human movement that involves computer models of all the relevant skeletal, neural and physiological elements of the central nervous system (CNS). Such a structure also permits testing of different hypotheses about the functional neuroanatomy of the CNS, and the study of the effects and dynamics of disease, deterioration, aging and injuries. The formulation here is applied to one- and three-link systems. Digital computer simulations of a two rigid body system are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the approach and the methods.

  8. Extending the E-Z Reader Model of Eye Movement Control to Chinese Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayner, Keith; Li, Xingshan; Pollatsek, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Chinese readers' eye movements were simulated in the context of the E-Z Reader model, which was developed to account for the eye movements of readers of English. Despite obvious differences between English and Chinese, the model did a fairly good job of simulating the eye movements of Chinese readers. The successful simulation suggests that the…

  9. COLLECTIVE VORTEX BEHAVIORS: DIVERSITY, PROXIMATE, AND ULTIMATE CAUSES OF CIRCULAR ANIMAL GROUP MOVEMENTS.

    PubMed

    Delcourt, Johann; Bode, Nikolai W F; Denoël, Mathieu

    2016-03-01

    Ant mill, caterpillar circle, bat doughnut, amphibian vortex, duck swirl, and fish torus are different names for rotating circular animal formations, where individuals turn around a common center. These "collective vortex behaviors" occur at different group sizes from pairs to several million individuals and have been reported in a large number of organisms, from bacteria to vertebrates, including humans. However, to date, no comprehensive review and synthesis of the literature on vortex behaviors has been conducted. Here, we review the state of the art of the proximate and ultimate causes of vortex behaviors. The ubiquity of this behavioral phenomenon could suggest common causes or fundamental underlying principles across contexts. However, we find that a variety of proximate mechanisms give rise to vortex behaviors. We highlight the potential benefits of collective vortex behaviors to individuals involved in them. For example, in some species, vortices increase feeding efficiency and could give protection against predators. It has also been argued that vortices could improve collective decision-making and information transfer. We highlight gaps in our understanding of these ubiquitous behavioral phenomena and discuss future directions for research in vortex studies. PMID:27192777

  10. Is that really my movement?—Students' experiences of a video-supported interactive learning model for movement awareness

    PubMed Central

    Backåberg, Sofia; Gummesson, Christina; Brunt, David; Rask, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare staff and students have a great risk of developing musculoskeletal symptoms. One cause of this is heavy load related work activities such as manual handling, in which the quality of individual work technique may play a major role. Preventive interventions and well-defined educational strategies to support movement awareness and long-lasting movement changes need to be developed. The aim of the present study was to explore nursing students’ experiences of a newly developed interactive learning model for movement awareness. The learning model, which is based on a life-world perspective with focus on interpersonal interaction, has been used with 11 undergraduate students from the second and final year. Each student participated in three individual video sessions with a facilitator. Two individual interviews were carried out with each student during the learning process and one interview 12–18 months after the last session. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim, and a phenomenological hermeneutic method inspired by Paul Ricoeur and described by Lindseth and Norberg was used to interpret the interviews and diary notes. The interpretation resulted in three key themes and nine subthemes. The key themes were; “Obtaining better preconditions for bodily awareness,” “Experiencing changes in one's own movement,” and “Experiencing challenges in the learning process.” The interactive learning model entails a powerful and challenging experience that develops movement awareness. The experience of meaningfulness and usefulness emerges increasingly and alternates with a feeling of discomfort. The learning model may contribute to the body of knowledge of well-defined educational strategies in movement awareness and learning in, for example, preventive interventions and ergonomic education. It may also be valuable in other practical learning situations where movement awareness is required. PMID:26274385

  11. An extensible simulation environment and movement metrics for testing walking behavior in agent-based models

    SciTech Connect

    Paul M. Torrens; Atsushi Nara; Xun Li; Haojie Zhu; William A. Griffin; Scott B. Brown

    2012-01-01

    Human movement is a significant ingredient of many social, environmental, and technical systems, yet the importance of movement is often discounted in considering systems complexity. Movement is commonly abstracted in agent-based modeling (which is perhaps the methodological vehicle for modeling complex systems), despite the influence of movement upon information exchange and adaptation in a system. In particular, agent-based models of urban pedestrians often treat movement in proxy form at the expense of faithfully treating movement behavior with realistic agency. There exists little consensus about which method is appropriate for representing movement in agent-based schemes. In this paper, we examine popularly-used methods to drive movement in agent-based models, first by introducing a methodology that can flexibly handle many representations of movement at many different scales and second, introducing a suite of tools to benchmark agent movement between models and against real-world trajectory data. We find that most popular movement schemes do a relatively poor job of representing movement, but that some schemes may well be 'good enough' for some applications. We also discuss potential avenues for improving the representation of movement in agent-based frameworks.

  12. How interactions between animal movement and landscape processes modify local range dynamics and extinction risk.

    PubMed

    Fordham, Damien A; Shoemaker, Kevin T; Schumaker, Nathan H; Akçakaya, H Reşit; Clisby, Nathan; Brook, Barry W

    2014-05-01

    Forecasts of range dynamics now incorporate many of the mechanisms and interactions that drive species distributions. However, connectivity continues to be simulated using overly simple distance-based dispersal models with little consideration of how the individual behaviour of dispersing organisms interacts with landscape structure (functional connectivity). Here, we link an individual-based model to a niche-population model to test the implications of this omission. We apply this novel approach to a turtle species inhabiting wetlands which are patchily distributed across a tropical savannah, and whose persistence is threatened by two important synergistic drivers of global change: predation by invasive species and overexploitation. We show that projections of local range dynamics in this study system change substantially when functional connectivity is modelled explicitly. Accounting for functional connectivity in model simulations causes the estimate of extinction risk to increase, and predictions of range contraction to slow. We conclude that models of range dynamics that simulate functional connectivity can reduce an important source of bias in predictions of shifts in species distributions and abundances, especially for organisms whose dispersal behaviours are strongly affected by landscape structure. PMID:24806426

  13. How interactions between animal movement and landscape processes modify local range dynamics and extinction risk

    PubMed Central

    Fordham, Damien A.; Shoemaker, Kevin T.; Schumaker, Nathan H.; Akçakaya, H. Reşit; Clisby, Nathan; Brook, Barry W.

    2014-01-01

    Forecasts of range dynamics now incorporate many of the mechanisms and interactions that drive species distributions. However, connectivity continues to be simulated using overly simple distance-based dispersal models with little consideration of how the individual behaviour of dispersing organisms interacts with landscape structure (functional connectivity). Here, we link an individual-based model to a niche-population model to test the implications of this omission. We apply this novel approach to a turtle species inhabiting wetlands which are patchily distributed across a tropical savannah, and whose persistence is threatened by two important synergistic drivers of global change: predation by invasive species and overexploitation. We show that projections of local range dynamics in this study system change substantially when functional connectivity is modelled explicitly. Accounting for functional connectivity in model simulations causes the estimate of extinction risk to increase, and predictions of range contraction to slow. We conclude that models of range dynamics that simulate functional connectivity can reduce an important source of bias in predictions of shifts in species distributions and abundances, especially for organisms whose dispersal behaviours are strongly affected by landscape structure. PMID:24806426

  14. Edaphics, active tectonics and animal movements in the Kenyan Rift - implications for early human evolution and dispersal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kübler, Simon; Owenga, Peter; Rucina, Stephen; King, Geoffrey C. P.

    2014-05-01

    The quality of soils (edaphics) and the associated vegetation strongly controls the health of grazing animals. Until now, this has hardly been appreciated by paleo-anthropologists who only take into account the availability of water and vegetation in landscape reconstruction attempts. A lack of understanding the importance of the edaphics of a region greatly limits interpretations of the relation between our ancestors and animals over the last few million years. If a region lacks vital trace elements then wild grazing and browsing animals will avoid it and go to considerable length and take major risks to seek out better pasture. As a consequence animals must move around the landscape at different times of the year. In complex landscapes, such as tectonically active rifts, hominins can use advanced group behaviour to gain strategic advantage for hunting. Our study in the southern Kenya rift in the Lake Magadi region shows that the edaphics and active rift structures play a key role in present day animal movements as well as the for the location of an early hominin site at Mt. Olorgesailie. We carried out field analysis based on studying the relationship between the geology and soil development as well as the tectonic geomorphology to identify 'good' and 'bad' regions both in terms of edaphics and accessibility for grazing animals. We further sampled different soils that developed on the volcanic bedrock and sediment sources of the region and interviewed the local Maasai shepherds to learn about present-day good and bad grazing sites. At the Olorgesailie site the rift valley floor is covered with flood trachytes; basalts only occur at Mt. Olorgesailie and farther east up the rift flank. The hominin site is located in lacustrine sediments at the southern edge of a playa that extends north and northwest of Mt. Olorgesailie. The lakebeds are now tilted and eroded by motion on two north-south striking faults. The lake was trapped by basalt flows from Mt. Olorgesailie

  15. Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Considerations for Animal Models of Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Brabb, Thea; Carbone, Larry; Snyder, Jessica; Phillips, Nona

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy and neuropathic pain are debilitating, life-altering conditions that affect a significant proportion of the human population. Animal models, used to study basic disease mechanisms and treatment modalities, are diverse and provide many challenges for institutional animal care and use committee (IACUC) review and postapproval monitoring. Items to consider include regulatory and ethical imperatives in animal models that may be designed to study pain, the basic mechanism of neurodegeneration, and different disease processes for which neuropathic pain is a side effect. Neuropathic pain can be difficult to detect or quantify in many models, and pain management is often unsuccessful in both humans and animals, inspiring the need for more research. Design of humane endpoints requires clear communication of potential adverse outcomes and solutions. Communication with the IACUC, researchers, and veterinary staff is also key for successful postapproval monitoring of these challenging models. PMID:24615447

  16. ANIMAL MODELS OF CHRONIC PESTICIDE NEUROTOXICITY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a wealth of literature on neurotoxicological outcomes of acute and short-term exposure to pesticides in laboratory animals, but there are relatively few studies of- long-term exposure. Many reports in the literature describing ;chronic' exposures to pesticides are, in fa...

  17. ANIMAL MODELS OF CHRONIC PESTICIDE NEUROTOXICITY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a wealth of literature on neurotoxicological outcomes of acute and short-term exposure to pesticides in laboratory animals, but there are relatively few reports of long-term exposure. Reports in the literature describing "chronic" exposures to pesticides are, in fact, a...

  18. Reaction time in ankle movements: a diffusion model analysis

    PubMed Central

    Michmizos, Konstantinos P.; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2015-01-01

    Reaction time (RT) is one of the most commonly used measures of neurological function and dysfunction. Despite the extensive studies on it, no study has ever examined the RT in the ankle. Twenty-two subjects were recruited to perform simple, 2- and 4-choice RT tasks by visually guiding a cursor inside a rectangular target with their ankle. RT did not change with spatial accuracy constraints imposed by different target widths in the direction of the movement. RT increased as a linear function of potential target stimuli, as would be predicted by Hick–Hyman law. Although the slopes of the regressions were similar, the intercept in dorsal–plantar (DP) direction was significantly smaller than the intercept in inversion–eversion (IE) direction. To explain this difference, we used a hierarchical Bayesian estimation of the Ratcliff's (Psychol Rev 85:59, 1978) diffusion model parameters and divided processing time into cognitive components. The model gave a good account of RTs, their distribution and accuracy values, and hence provided a testimony that the non-decision processing time (overlap of posterior distributions between DP and IE < 0.045), the boundary separation (overlap of the posterior distributions < 0.1) and the evidence accumulation rate (overlap of the posterior distributions < 0.01) components of the RT accounted for the intercept difference between DP and IE. The model also proposed that there was no systematic change in non-decision processing time or drift rate when spatial accuracy constraints were altered. The results were in agreement with the memory drum hypothesis and could be further justified neurophysiologically by the larger innervation of the muscles controlling DP movements. This study might contribute to assessing deficits in sensorimotor control of the ankle and enlighten a possible target for correction in the framework of our on-going effort to develop robotic therapeutic interventions to the ankle of children with cerebral palsy

  19. The Various Roles of Animal Models in Understanding Human Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottlieb, Gilbert; Lickliter, Robert

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors take a very conservative view of the contribution of animal models to an understanding of human development. We do not think that homologies can be readily documented with even our most closely related relatives' behavior and psychological functioning. The major contribution of animal models is their provision of food…

  20. Overview of Vertebrate Animal Models of Fungal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hohl, Tobias M.

    2014-01-01

    Fungi represent emerging infectious threats to human populations worldwide. Mice and other laboratory animals have proved invaluable in modeling clinical syndromes associated with superficial and life-threatening invasive mycoses. This review outlines salient features of common vertebrate animal model systems to study fungal pathogenesis, host antifungal immune responses, and antifungal compounds. PMID:24709390

  1. Animal Models of Cardiac Disease and Stem Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Lailiang; Li, Wenzhong; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Yue; Jie, Shen; Kong, Deling; Steinhoff, Gustav; Ma, Nan

    2010-01-01

    Animal models that mimic cardiovascular diseases are indispensable tools for understanding the mechanisms underlying the diseases at the cellular and molecular level. This review focuses on various methods in preclinical research to create small animal models of cardiac diseases, such as myocardial infarction, dilated cardiomyopathy, heart failure, myocarditis and cardiac hypertrophy, and the related stem cell treatment for these diseases. PMID:21258568

  2. Are animal models as good as we think?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Models have been a tool of science at least since the 18th century and serve a variety of purposes from focusing abstract thoughts to representing scaled down version of things for study. Generally, animal models are needed when it is impractical or unethical to study the target animal. Biologists...

  3. Animal models of human respiratory syncytial virus disease

    PubMed Central

    Domachowske, Joseph B.; Rosenberg, Helene F.

    2011-01-01

    Infection with the human pneumovirus pathogen, respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV), causes a wide spectrum of respiratory disease, notably among infants and the elderly. Laboratory animal studies permit detailed experimental modeling of hRSV disease and are therefore indispensable in the search for novel therapies and preventative strategies. Present animal models include several target species for hRSV, including chimpanzees, cattle, sheep, cotton rats, and mice, as well as alternative animal pneumovirus models, such as bovine RSV and pneumonia virus of mice. These diverse animal models reproduce different features of hRSV disease, and their utilization should therefore be based on the scientific hypothesis under investigation. The purpose of this review is to summarize the strengths and limitations of each of these animal models. Our intent is to provide a resource for investigators and an impetus for future research. PMID:21571908

  4. Ethological concepts enhance the translational value of animal models.

    PubMed

    Peters, Suzanne M; Pothuizen, Helen H J; Spruijt, Berry M

    2015-07-15

    The translational value of animal models is an issue of ongoing discussion. We argue that 'Refinement' of animal experiments is needed and this can be achieved by exploiting an ethological approach when setting up and conducting experiments. Ethology aims to assess the functional meaning of behavioral changes, due to experimental manipulation or treatment, in animal models. Although the use of ethological concepts is particularly important for studies involving the measurement of animal behavior (as is the case for most studies on neuro-psychiatric conditions), it will also substantially benefit other disciplines, such as those investigating the immune system or inflammatory response. Using an ethological approach also involves using more optimal testing conditions are employed that have a biological relevance to the animal. Moreover, using a more biological relevant analysis of the data will help to clarify the functional meaning of the modeled readout (e.g. whether it is psychopathological or adaptive in nature). We advocate for instance that more behavioral studies should use animals in group-housed conditions, including the recording of their ultrasonic vocalizations, because (1) social behavior is an essential feature of animal models for human 'social' psychopathologies, such as autism and schizophrenia, and (2) social conditions are indispensable conditions for appropriate behavioral studies in social species, such as the rat. Only when taking these elements into account, the validity of animal experiments and, thus, the translation value of animal models can be enhanced. PMID:25823814

  5. Modeling Caribou Movements: Seasonal Ranges and Migration Routes of the Central Arctic Herd

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Kerry L.; Arthur, Stephen M.; Horne, Jon S.; Garton, Edward O.; Del Vecchio, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Migration is an important component of the life history of many animals, but persistence of large-scale terrestrial migrations is being challenged by environmental changes that fragment habitats and create obstacles to animal movements. In northern Alaska, the Central Arctic herd (CAH) of barren-ground caribou (Rangifer tarandus granti) is known to migrate over large distances, but the herd’s seasonal distributions and migratory movements are not well documented. From 2003–2007, we used GPS radio-collars to determine seasonal ranges and migration routes of 54 female caribou from the CAH. We calculated Brownian bridges to model fall and spring migrations for each year and used the mean of these over all 4 years to identify areas that were used repeatedly. Annual estimates of sizes of seasonal ranges determined by 90% fixed kernel utilization distributions were similar between summer and winter (X̅ = 27,929 SE = 1,064 and X̅ = 26,585 SE = 4912 km2, respectively). Overlap between consecutive summer and winter ranges varied from 3.3–18.3%. Percent overlap between summer ranges used during consecutive years (X̅ = 62.4% SE = 3.7%) was higher than for winter ranges (X̅ = 42.8% SE = 5.9%). Caribou used multiple migration routes each year, but some areas were used by caribou during all years, suggesting that these areas should be managed to allow for continued utilization by caribou. Restoring migration routes after they have been disturbed or fragmented is challenging. However, prior knowledge of movements and threats may facilitate maintenance of migratory paths and seasonal ranges necessary for long-term persistence of migratory species. PMID:27045587

  6. Modeling Caribou Movements: Seasonal Ranges and Migration Routes of the Central Arctic Herd.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Kerry L; Arthur, Stephen M; Horne, Jon S; Garton, Edward O; Del Vecchio, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Migration is an important component of the life history of many animals, but persistence of large-scale terrestrial migrations is being challenged by environmental changes that fragment habitats and create obstacles to animal movements. In northern Alaska, the Central Arctic herd (CAH) of barren-ground caribou (Rangifer tarandus granti) is known to migrate over large distances, but the herd's seasonal distributions and migratory movements are not well documented. From 2003-2007, we used GPS radio-collars to determine seasonal ranges and migration routes of 54 female caribou from the CAH. We calculated Brownian bridges to model fall and spring migrations for each year and used the mean of these over all 4 years to identify areas that were used repeatedly. Annual estimates of sizes of seasonal ranges determined by 90% fixed kernel utilization distributions were similar between summer and winter (X̅ = 27,929 SE = 1,064 and X̅ = 26,585 SE = 4912 km2, respectively). Overlap between consecutive summer and winter ranges varied from 3.3-18.3%. Percent overlap between summer ranges used during consecutive years (X̅ = 62.4% SE = 3.7%) was higher than for winter ranges (X̅ = 42.8% SE = 5.9%). Caribou used multiple migration routes each year, but some areas were used by caribou during all years, suggesting that these areas should be managed to allow for continued utilization by caribou. Restoring migration routes after they have been disturbed or fragmented is challenging. However, prior knowledge of movements and threats may facilitate maintenance of migratory paths and seasonal ranges necessary for long-term persistence of migratory species. PMID:27045587

  7. A Guide to Neurotoxic Animal Models of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tieu, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurological movement disorder primarily resulting from damage to the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. To elucidate the pathogenesis, mechanisms of cell death, and to evaluate therapeutic strategies for PD, numerous animal models have been developed. Understanding the strengths and limitations of these models can significantly impact the choice of model, experimental design, and data interpretation. The primary objectives of this article are twofold: First, to assist new investigators who are contemplating embarking on PD research to navigate through the available animal models. Emphasis will be placed on common neurotoxic murine models in which toxic molecules are used to lesion the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system. And second, to provide an overview of basic technical requirements for assessing the pathology, structure, and function of the nigrostriatal pathway. PMID:22229125

  8. The use of animal as models: ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Levy, Neil

    2012-07-01

    The use of animals in scientific research is highly controversial. Older justifications, which referred to an immense gulf between human beings and other animals, can no longer be sustained in the face of a large body of scientific evidence concerning the similarities between human beings and other animals. The probability is very high that they are like us in many important ways, including in having a capacity to suffer. Because animals may suffer during research, their use must be justified. An appropriate justification will require that researchers can demonstrate that the expected benefits of the research, in terms of pure knowledge and medical applications, outweigh the suffering imposed. However, while the infliction of suffering on animal models must meet stringent conditions, research which involves the (painless) death of animals is often easier to justify, since few animals other than human beings possess the psychological capacities required to care about their future. PMID:22712743

  9. Animal Models of Tourette Syndrome-From Proliferation to Standardization.

    PubMed

    Yael, Dorin; Israelashvili, Michal; Bar-Gad, Izhar

    2016-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a childhood onset disorder characterized by motor and vocal tics and associated with multiple comorbid symptoms. Over the last decade, the accumulation of findings from TS patients and the emergence of new technologies have led to the development of novel animal models with high construct validity. In addition, animal models which were previously associated with other disorders were recently attributed to TS. The proliferation of TS animal models has accelerated TS research and provided a better understanding of the mechanism underlying the disorder. This newfound success generates novel challenges, since the conclusions that can be drawn from TS animal model studies are constrained by the considerable variation across models. Typically, each animal model examines a specific subset of deficits and centers on one field of research (physiology/genetics/pharmacology/etc.). Moreover, different studies do not use a standard lexicon to characterize different properties of the model. These factors hinder the evaluation of individual model validity as well as the comparison across models, leading to a formation of a fuzzy, segregated landscape of TS pathophysiology. Here, we call for a standardization process in the study of TS animal models as the next logical step. We believe that a generation of standard examination criteria will improve the utility of these models and enable their consolidation into a general framework. This should lead to a better understanding of these models and their relationship to TS, thereby improving the research of the mechanism underlying this disorder and aiding the development of new treatments. PMID:27065791

  10. Animal Models of Tourette Syndrome—From Proliferation to Standardization

    PubMed Central

    Yael, Dorin; Israelashvili, Michal; Bar-Gad, Izhar

    2016-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a childhood onset disorder characterized by motor and vocal tics and associated with multiple comorbid symptoms. Over the last decade, the accumulation of findings from TS patients and the emergence of new technologies have led to the development of novel animal models with high construct validity. In addition, animal models which were previously associated with other disorders were recently attributed to TS. The proliferation of TS animal models has accelerated TS research and provided a better understanding of the mechanism underlying the disorder. This newfound success generates novel challenges, since the conclusions that can be drawn from TS animal model studies are constrained by the considerable variation across models. Typically, each animal model examines a specific subset of deficits and centers on one field of research (physiology/genetics/pharmacology/etc.). Moreover, different studies do not use a standard lexicon to characterize different properties of the model. These factors hinder the evaluation of individual model validity as well as the comparison across models, leading to a formation of a fuzzy, segregated landscape of TS pathophysiology. Here, we call for a standardization process in the study of TS animal models as the next logical step. We believe that a generation of standard examination criteria will improve the utility of these models and enable their consolidation into a general framework. This should lead to a better understanding of these models and their relationship to TS, thereby improving the research of the mechanism underlying this disorder and aiding the development of new treatments. PMID:27065791

  11. Systematic Reviews of Animal Models: Methodology versus Epistemology

    PubMed Central

    Greek, Ray; Menache, Andre

    2013-01-01

    Systematic reviews are currently favored methods of evaluating research in order to reach conclusions regarding medical practice. The need for such reviews is necessitated by the fact that no research is perfect and experts are prone to bias. By combining many studies that fulfill specific criteria, one hopes that the strengths can be multiplied and thus reliable conclusions attained. Potential flaws in this process include the assumptions that underlie the research under examination. If the assumptions, or axioms, upon which the research studies are based, are untenable either scientifically or logically, then the results must be highly suspect regardless of the otherwise high quality of the studies or the systematic reviews. We outline recent criticisms of animal-based research, namely that animal models are failing to predict human responses. It is this failure that is purportedly being corrected via systematic reviews. We then examine the assumption that animal models can predict human outcomes to perturbations such as disease or drugs, even under the best of circumstances. We examine the use of animal models in light of empirical evidence comparing human outcomes to those from animal models, complexity theory, and evolutionary biology. We conclude that even if legitimate criticisms of animal models were addressed, through standardization of protocols and systematic reviews, the animal model would still fail as a predictive modality for human response to drugs and disease. Therefore, systematic reviews and meta-analyses of animal-based research are poor tools for attempting to reach conclusions regarding human interventions. PMID:23372426

  12. A Review of Translational Animal Models for Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Martin H.; Capito, Nicholas; Kuroki, Keiichi; Stoker, Aaron M.; Cook, James L.; Sherman, Seth L.

    2012-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis remains a tremendous public health concern, both in terms of health-related quality of life and financial burden of disease. Translational research is a critical step towards understanding and mitigating the long-term effects of this disease process. Animal models provide practical and clinically relevant ways to study both the natural history and response to treatment of knee osteoarthritis. Many factors including size, cost, and method of inducing osteoarthritis are important considerations for choosing an appropriate animal model. Smaller animals are useful because of their ease of use and cost, while larger animals are advantageous because of their anatomical similarity to humans. This evidence-based review will compare and contrast several different animal models for knee osteoarthritis. Our goal is to inform the clinician about current research models, in order to facilitate the transfer of knowledge from the “bench” to the “bedside.” PMID:23326663

  13. Dynamical movement primitives: learning attractor models for motor behaviors.

    PubMed

    Ijspeert, Auke Jan; Nakanishi, Jun; Hoffmann, Heiko; Pastor, Peter; Schaal, Stefan

    2013-02-01

    Nonlinear dynamical systems have been used in many disciplines to model complex behaviors, including biological motor control, robotics, perception, economics, traffic prediction, and neuroscience. While often the unexpected emergent behavior of nonlinear systems is the focus of investigations, it is of equal importance to create goal-directed behavior (e.g., stable locomotion from a system of coupled oscillators under perceptual guidance). Modeling goal-directed behavior with nonlinear systems is, however, rather difficult due to the parameter sensitivity of these systems, their complex phase transitions in response to subtle parameter changes, and the difficulty of analyzing and predicting their long-term behavior; intuition and time-consuming parameter tuning play a major role. This letter presents and reviews dynamical movement primitives, a line of research for modeling attractor behaviors of autonomous nonlinear dynamical systems with the help of statistical learning techniques. The essence of our approach is to start with a simple dynamical system, such as a set of linear differential equations, and transform those into a weakly nonlinear system with prescribed attractor dynamics by means of a learnable autonomous forcing term. Both point attractors and limit cycle attractors of almost arbitrary complexity can be generated. We explain the design principle of our approach and evaluate its properties in several example applications in motor control and robotics. PMID:23148415

  14. A new CDF model for data movement based on SRM

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Manoj Kumar; Compostella, Gabriele; Lucchesi, Donatella; Griso, Simone P.; Benjamin, Doug; /Duke U.

    2010-01-01

    Being a large international collaboration established well before the full development of the Grid as the main computing tool for High Energy Physics, CDF has recently changed and improved its computing model, decentralizing some parts of it in order to be able to exploit the rising number of distributed resources available nowadays. Despite those efforts, while the large majority of CDF Monte Carlo production has moved to the Grid, data processing is still mainly performed in dedicated farms hosted at FNAL, requiring a centralized management of data and Monte Carlo samples needed for physics analysis. This rises the question on how to manage the transfer of produced Monte Carlo samples from remote Grid sites to FNAL in an efficient way; up to now CDF has relied on a non scalable centralized solution based on dedicated data servers accessed through rcp protocol, which has proven to be unsatisfactory. A new data transfer model has been designed that uses SRMs as local caches for remote Monte Carlo production sites, interfaces them with SAM, the experiment data catalog, and finally realizes the file movement exploiting the features provided by the data catalog transfer layer. We describe here the model and its integration within the current CDF computing architecture.

  15. Recording Lifetime Behavior and Movement in an Invertebrate Model

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Sige; Liedo, Pablo; Altamirano-Robles, Leopoldo; Cruz-Enriquez, Janeth; Morice, Amy; Ingram, Donald K.; Kaub, Kevin; Papadopoulos, Nikos; Carey, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Characterization of lifetime behavioral changes is essential for understanding aging and aging-related diseases. However, such studies are scarce partly due to the lack of efficient tools. Here we describe and provide proof of concept for a stereo vision system that classifies and sequentially records at an extremely fine scale six different behaviors (resting, micro-movement, walking, flying, feeding and drinking) and the within-cage (3D) location of individual tephritid fruit flies by time-of-day throughout their lives. Using flies fed on two different diets, full sugar-yeast and sugar-only diets, we report for the first time their behavioral changes throughout their lives at a high resolution. We have found that the daily activity peaks at the age of 15–20 days and then gradually declines with age for flies on both diets. However, the overall daily activity is higher for flies on sugar-only diet than those on the full diet. Flies on sugar-only diet show a stronger diurnal localization pattern with higher preference to staying on the top of the cage during the period of light-off when compared to flies on the full diet. Clustering analyses of age-specific behavior patterns reveal three distinct young, middle-aged and old clusters for flies on each of the two diets. The middle-aged groups for flies on sugar-only diet consist of much younger age groups when compared to flies on full diet. This technology provides research opportunities for using a behavioral informatics approach for understanding different ways in which behavior, movement, and aging in model organisms are mutually affecting. PMID:21559058

  16. Improving the predictive value of interventional animal models data.

    PubMed

    Zeiss, Caroline J

    2015-04-01

    For many chronic diseases, translational success using the animal model paradigm has reached an impasse. Using Alzheimer's disease as an example, this review employs a networks-based method to assess repeatability of outcomes across species, by intervention and mechanism. Over 75% of animal studies reported an improved outcome. Strain background was a significant potential confounder. Five percent of interventions had been tested across animals and humans, or examined across three or more animal models. Positive outcomes across species emerged for donepezil, memantine and exercise. Repeatable positive outcomes in animals were identified for the amyloid hypothesis and three additional mechanisms. This approach supports in silico reduction of positive outcomes bias in animal studies. PMID:25448761

  17. Animator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tech Directions, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Art and animation work is the most significant part of electronic game development, but is also found in television commercials, computer programs, the Internet, comic books, and in just about every visual media imaginable. It is the part of the project that makes an abstract design idea concrete and visible. Animators create the motion of life in…

  18. A Computational Model for Rhythmic and Discrete Movements in Uni- and Bimanual Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Ronsse, Renaud; Sternad, Dagmar; Lefèvre, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Current research on discrete and rhythmic movements differs in both experimental procedures and theory, despite the ubiquitous overlap between discrete and rhythmic components in everyday behaviors. Models of rhythmic movements usually use oscillatory systems mimicking central pattern generators (CPGs). In contrast, models of discrete movements often employ optimization principles, thereby reflecting the higher-level cortical resources involved in the generation of such movements. This letter proposes a unified model for the generation of both rhythmic and discrete movements. We show that a physiologically motivated model of a CPG can not only generate simple rhythmic movements with only a small set of parameters, but can also produce discrete movements if the CPG is fed with an exponentially decaying phasic input. We further show that a particular coupling between two of these units can reproduce main findings on in-phase and antiphase stability. Finally, we propose an integrated model of combined rhythmic and discrete movements for the two hands. These movement classes are sequentially addressed in this letter with increasing model complexity. The model variations are discussed in relation to the degree of recruitment of the higher-level cortical resources, necessary for such movements. PMID:19018700

  19. ANIMAL MODELS OF COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT IN NEUROTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The thesis of this chapter has been that spatial delayed alternation versus position discrimination learning can serve as a valuable rodent model of cognitive development in neurotoxicology. his model captures dual process conceptualizations of memory in human neuropsychology and...

  20. Animal models of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The preterm baboon models

    PubMed Central

    Coalson, Jacqueline J.

    2014-01-01

    Much of the progress in improved neonatal care, particularly management of underdeveloped preterm lungs, has been aided by investigations of multiple animal models, including the neonatal baboon (Papio species). In this article we highlight how the preterm baboon model at both 140 and 125 days gestation (term equivalent 185 days) has advanced our understanding and management of the immature human infant with neonatal lung disease. Not only is the 125-day baboon model extremely relevant to the condition of bronchopulmonary dysplasia but there are also critical neurodevelopmental and other end-organ pathological features associated with this model not fully discussed in this limited forum. We also describe efforts to incorporate perinatal infection into these preterm models, both fetal and neonatal, and particularly associated with Ureaplasma/Mycoplasma organisms. Efforts to rekindle the preterm primate model for future evaluations of therapies such as stem cell replacement, early lung recruitment interventions coupled with noninvasive surfactant and high-frequency nasal ventilation, and surfactant therapy coupled with antioxidant or anti-inflammatory medications, to name a few, should be undertaken. PMID:25281639

  1. Animal models of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The preterm baboon models.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Bradley A; Coalson, Jacqueline J

    2014-12-15

    Much of the progress in improved neonatal care, particularly management of underdeveloped preterm lungs, has been aided by investigations of multiple animal models, including the neonatal baboon (Papio species). In this article we highlight how the preterm baboon model at both 140 and 125 days gestation (term equivalent 185 days) has advanced our understanding and management of the immature human infant with neonatal lung disease. Not only is the 125-day baboon model extremely relevant to the condition of bronchopulmonary dysplasia but there are also critical neurodevelopmental and other end-organ pathological features associated with this model not fully discussed in this limited forum. We also describe efforts to incorporate perinatal infection into these preterm models, both fetal and neonatal, and particularly associated with Ureaplasma/Mycoplasma organisms. Efforts to rekindle the preterm primate model for future evaluations of therapies such as stem cell replacement, early lung recruitment interventions coupled with noninvasive surfactant and high-frequency nasal ventilation, and surfactant therapy coupled with antioxidant or anti-inflammatory medications, to name a few, should be undertaken. PMID:25281639

  2. Large animal models for vaccine development and testing.

    PubMed

    Gerdts, Volker; Wilson, Heather L; Meurens, Francois; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia; Wilson, Don; Walker, Stewart; Wheler, Colette; Townsend, Hugh; Potter, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    The development of human vaccines continues to rely on the use of animals for research. Regulatory authorities require novel vaccine candidates to undergo preclinical assessment in animal models before being permitted to enter the clinical phase in human subjects. Substantial progress has been made in recent years in reducing and replacing the number of animals used for preclinical vaccine research through the use of bioinformatics and computational biology to design new vaccine candidates. However, the ultimate goal of a new vaccine is to instruct the immune system to elicit an effective immune response against the pathogen of interest, and no alternatives to live animal use currently exist for evaluation of this response. Studies identifying the mechanisms of immune protection; determining the optimal route and formulation of vaccines; establishing the duration and onset of immunity, as well as the safety and efficacy of new vaccines, must be performed in a living system. Importantly, no single animal model provides all the information required for advancing a new vaccine through the preclinical stage, and research over the last two decades has highlighted that large animals more accurately predict vaccine outcome in humans than do other models. Here we review the advantages and disadvantages of large animal models for human vaccine development and demonstrate that much of the success in bringing a new vaccine to market depends on choosing the most appropriate animal model for preclinical testing. PMID:25991698

  3. Animal Models of Diabetic Neuropathy: Progress Since 1960s

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Shahidul

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic or peripheral diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is one of the major complications among some other diabetic complications such as diabetic nephropathy, diabetic retinopathy, and diabetic cardiomyopathy. The use of animal models in the research of diabetes and diabetic complications is very common when rats and mice are most commonly used for many reasons. A numbers of animal models of diabetic and PDN have been developed in the last several decades such as streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat models, conventional or genetically modified or high-fat diet-fed C57BL/Ks (db/db) mice models, streptozotocin-induced C57BL6/J and ddY mice models, Chinese hamster neuropathic model, rhesus monkey PDN model, spontaneously diabetic WBN/Kob rat model, L-fucose-induced neropathic rat model, partial sciatic nerve ligated rat model, nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice model, spontaneously induced Ins2 Akita mice model, leptin-deficient (ob/ob) mice model, Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rat model, surgically-induced neuropathic model, and genetically modified Spontaneously Diabetic Torii (SDT) rat model, none of which are without limitations. An animal model of diabetic or PDN should mimic the all major pathogeneses of human diabetic neuropathy. Hence, this review comparatively evaluates the animal models of diabetic and PDN which are developed since 1960s with their advantages and disadvantages to help diabetic research groups in order to more accurately choose an appropriate model to meet their specific research objectives. PMID:23984428

  4. Animal models of henipavirus infection: a review.

    PubMed

    Weingartl, Hana M; Berhane, Yohannes; Czub, Markus

    2009-09-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) form a separate genus Henipavirus within the family Paramyxoviridae, and are classified as biosafety level four pathogens due to their high case fatality rate following human infection and because of the lack of effective vaccines or therapy. Both viruses emerged from their natural reservoir during the last decade of the 20th century, causing severe disease in humans, horses and swine, and infecting a number of other mammalian species. The current review summarises current published data relating to experimental infection of small and large animals, including the natural reservoir species, the Pteropus bat, with HeV or NiV. Susceptibility to infection and virus distribution in the individual species is discussed, along with the pathogenesis, pathological changes, and potential routes of transmission. PMID:19084436

  5. Large Animal Model for Development of Functional Restoration Paradigms Using Epidural and Intraspinal Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Hachmann, Jan T.; Jeong, Ju Ho; Grahn, Peter J.; Mallory, Grant W.; Evertz, Loribeth Q.; Bieber, Allan J.; Lobel, Darlene A.; Bennet, Kevin E.; Lee, Kendall H.; Lujan, J. Luis

    2013-01-01

    Restoration of movement following spinal cord injury (SCI) has been achieved using electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves and skeletal muscles. However, practical limitations such as the rapid onset of muscle fatigue hinder clinical application of these technologies. Recently, direct stimulation of alpha motor neurons has shown promise for evoking graded, controlled, and sustained muscle contractions in rodent and feline animal models while overcoming some of these limitations. However, small animal models are not optimal for the development of clinical spinal stimulation techniques for functional restoration of movement. Furthermore, variance in surgical procedure, targeting, and electrode implantation techniques can compromise therapeutic outcomes and impede comparison of results across studies. Herein, we present a protocol and large animal model that allow standardized development, testing, and optimization of novel clinical strategies for restoring motor function following spinal cord injury. We tested this protocol using both epidural and intraspinal stimulation in a porcine model of spinal cord injury, but the protocol is suitable for the development of other novel therapeutic strategies. This protocol will help characterize spinal circuits vital for selective activation of motor neuron pools. In turn, this will expedite the development and validation of high-precision therapeutic targeting strategies and stimulation technologies for optimal restoration of motor function in humans. PMID:24339929

  6. Large animal model for development of functional restoration paradigms using epidural and intraspinal stimulation.

    PubMed

    Hachmann, Jan T; Jeong, Ju Ho; Grahn, Peter J; Mallory, Grant W; Evertz, Loribeth Q; Bieber, Allan J; Lobel, Darlene A; Bennet, Kevin E; Lee, Kendall H; Lujan, J Luis

    2013-01-01

    Restoration of movement following spinal cord injury (SCI) has been achieved using electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves and skeletal muscles. However, practical limitations such as the rapid onset of muscle fatigue hinder clinical application of these technologies. Recently, direct stimulation of alpha motor neurons has shown promise for evoking graded, controlled, and sustained muscle contractions in rodent and feline animal models while overcoming some of these limitations. However, small animal models are not optimal for the development of clinical spinal stimulation techniques for functional restoration of movement. Furthermore, variance in surgical procedure, targeting, and electrode implantation techniques can compromise therapeutic outcomes and impede comparison of results across studies. Herein, we present a protocol and large animal model that allow standardized development, testing, and optimization of novel clinical strategies for restoring motor function following spinal cord injury. We tested this protocol using both epidural and intraspinal stimulation in a porcine model of spinal cord injury, but the protocol is suitable for the development of other novel therapeutic strategies. This protocol will help characterize spinal circuits vital for selective activation of motor neuron pools. In turn, this will expedite the development and validation of high-precision therapeutic targeting strategies and stimulation technologies for optimal restoration of motor function in humans. PMID:24339929

  7. An updated overview of animal models in neuropsychiatry.

    PubMed

    Razafsha, M; Behforuzi, H; Harati, H; Wafai, R Al; Khaku, A; Mondello, S; Gold, M S; Kobeissy, F H

    2013-06-14

    Animal models are vital tools to study the genetic, molecular, cellular, and environmental parameters involved in several neuropsychiatric disorders. Over the years, these models have expanded our understanding of the pathogenesis of many neuropsychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Although animal models have been widely used in psychiatry, and despite several years of extensive research with these models, their validity is still being investigated and presents a challenge to both investigators and clinicians as well. In this concise review, we will describe the most common animal models utilized in neuropsychiatry, including animal models of depression, anxiety, and psychosis. In addition, we will also discuss the validity and reliability of these models and current challenges in this domain. Furthermore, this work will discuss the role of gene-environment interaction as an additional contributing factor that modulates neuropsychological outcome and its implication on animal models. This overview will give a succinct summary of animal models in psychiatry which will be useful both to the seasoned researcher, as well as novices in the field. PMID:23473749

  8. Animal models of gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Animal models of cystic fibrosis: gastrointestinal, pancreatic, and hepatobiliary disease and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Alicia K.; Gibson-Corley, Katherine N.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple organ systems, including the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, and hepatobiliary systems, are affected by cystic fibrosis (CF). Many of these changes begin early in life and are difficult to study in young CF patients. Recent development of novel CF animal models has expanded opportunities in the field to better understand CF pathogenesis and evaluate traditional and innovative therapeutics. In this review, we discuss manifestations of CF disease in gastrointestinal, pancreatic, and hepatobiliary systems of humans and animal models. We also compare the similarities and limitations of animal models and discuss future directions for modeling CF. PMID:25591863

  9. Animal models of gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Animal models of cystic fibrosis: gastrointestinal, pancreatic, and hepatobiliary disease and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Alicia K; Gibson-Corley, Katherine N; Meyerholz, David K

    2015-03-15

    Multiple organ systems, including the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, and hepatobiliary systems, are affected by cystic fibrosis (CF). Many of these changes begin early in life and are difficult to study in young CF patients. Recent development of novel CF animal models has expanded opportunities in the field to better understand CF pathogenesis and evaluate traditional and innovative therapeutics. In this review, we discuss manifestations of CF disease in gastrointestinal, pancreatic, and hepatobiliary systems of humans and animal models. We also compare the similarities and limitations of animal models and discuss future directions for modeling CF. PMID:25591863

  10. Developing better and more valid animal models of brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Adam Michael; Kalueff, Allan V

    2015-01-01

    Valid sensitive animal models are crucial for understanding the pathobiology of complex human disorders, such as anxiety, autism, depression and schizophrenia, which all have the 'spectrum' nature. Discussing new important strategic directions of research in this field, here we focus i) on cross-species validation of animal models, ii) ensuring their population (external) validity, and iii) the need to target the interplay between multiple disordered domains. We note that optimal animal models of brain disorders should target evolutionary conserved 'core' traits/domains and specifically mimic the clinically relevant inter-relationships between these domains. PMID:24384129

  11. The FAO/NACA Asia Regional Technical Guidelines on Health Management for the Responsible Movement of Live Aquatic Animals: lessons learned from their development and implementation.

    PubMed

    Subasinghe, R P; Bondad-Reantaso, M G

    2008-04-01

    Aquaculture is the fastest growing food producing sector in the world and it is expected to produce significant quantities of fish in the coming years to meet the growing global demand for aquatic animal products. The expansion and diversification of the sector, along with globalisation and trade liberalisation have resulted in aquatic animals and animal products moving around the world rapidly, causing serious disease outbreaks stemming from incursions of pathogens through unregulated transboundary movements. It has become necessary to develop appropriate guidelines for establishing national regulatory frameworks to improve responsibility in transboundary movement of live aquatic animals. In 2000, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), in collaboration with the Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia-Pacific (NACA) and in partnership with 21 Asian countries, developed the Asia Regional Technical Guidelines on Health Management for the Responsible Movement of Live Aquatic Animals. The present article outlines the development process of the guidelines, the lessons learned from their implementation at national level and the way forward. PMID:18666478

  12. A systematic review of animal models for Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Reizner, W.; Hunter, J.G.; O’Malley, N.T.; Southgate, R.D.; Schwarz, E.M.; Kates, S.L.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) osteomyelitis is a significant complication for orthopaedic patients undergoing surgery, particularly with fracture fixation and arthroplasty. Given the difficulty in studying S. aureus infections in human subjects, animal models serve an integral role in exploring the pathogenesis of osteomyelitis, and aid in determining the efficacy of prophylactic and therapeutic treatments. Animal models should mimic the clinical scenarios seen in patients as closely as possible to permit the experimental results to be translated to the corresponding clinical care. To help understand existing animal models of S. aureus, we conducted a systematic search of PubMed & Ovid MEDLINE to identify in vivo animal experiments that have investigated the management of S. aureus osteomyelitis in the context of fractures and metallic implants. In this review, experimental studies are categorized by animal species and are further classified by the setting of the infection. Study methods are summarized and the relevant advantages and disadvantages of each species and model are discussed. While no ideal animal model exists, the understanding of a model’s strengths and limitations should assist clinicians and researchers to appropriately select an animal model to translate the conclusions to the clinical setting. PMID:24668594

  13. Animal Models of Psychosis: Current State and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Alexandra D.; Coto, Carlos A.; Siegel, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Psychosis is an abnormal mental state characterized by disorganization, delusions and hallucinations. Animal models have become an increasingly important research tool in the effort to understand both the underlying pathophysiology and treatment of psychosis. There are multiple animal models for psychosis, with each formed by the coupling of a manipulation and a measurement. In this manuscript we do not address the diseases of which psychosis is a prominent comorbidity. Instead, we summarize the current state of affairs and future directions for animal models of psychosis. To accomplish this, our manuscript will first discuss relevant behavioral and electrophysiological measurements. We then provide an overview of the different manipulations that are combined with these measurements to produce animal models. The strengths and limitations of each model will be addressed in order to evaluate its cross-species comparability. PMID:25215267

  14. Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis: Insights from Large Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Vilahur, Gemma; Padro, Teresa; Badimon, Lina

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerosis and its thrombotic complications are responsible for remarkably high numbers of deaths. The combination of in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo experimental approaches has largely contributed to a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the atherothrombotic process. Indeed, different animal models have been implemented in atherosclerosis and thrombosis research in order to provide new insights into the mechanisms that have already been outlined in isolated cells and protein studies. Yet, although no model completely mimics the human pathology, large animal models have demonstrated better suitability for translation to humans. Indeed, direct translation from mice to humans should be taken with caution because of the well-reported species-related differences. This paper provides an overview of the available atherothrombotic-like animal models, with a particular focus on large animal models of thrombosis and atherosclerosis, and examines their applicability for translational research purposes as well as highlights species-related differences with humans. PMID:21274431

  15. Tracking boundary movement and exterior shape modelling in lung EIT imaging.

    PubMed

    Biguri, A; Grychtol, B; Adler, A; Soleimani, M

    2015-06-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) has shown significant promise for lung imaging. One key challenge for EIT in this application is the movement of electrodes during breathing, which introduces artefacts in reconstructed images. Various approaches have been proposed to compensate for electrode movement, but no comparison of these approaches is available. This paper analyses boundary model mismatch and electrode movement in lung EIT. The aim is to evaluate the extent to which various algorithms tolerate movement, and to determine if a patient specific model is required for EIT lung imaging. Movement data are simulated from a CT-based model, and image analysis is performed using quantitative figures of merit. The electrode movement is modelled based on expected values of chest movement and an extended Jacobian method is proposed to make use of exterior boundary tracking. Results show that a dynamical boundary tracking is the most robust method against any movement, but is computationally more expensive. Simultaneous electrode movement and conductivity reconstruction algorithms show increased robustness compared to only conductivity reconstruction. The results of this comparative study can help develop a better understanding of the impact of shape model mismatch and electrode movement in lung EIT. PMID:26007150

  16. Exploring the Validity of Valproic Acid Animal Model of Autism

    PubMed Central

    Mabunga, Darine Froy N.; Gonzales, Edson Luck T.; Kim, Ji-woon; Kim, Ki Chan

    2015-01-01

    The valproic acid (VPA) animal model of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is one of the most widely used animal model in the field. Like any other disease models, it can't model the totality of the features seen in autism. Then, is it valid to model autism? This model demonstrates many of the structural and behavioral features that can be observed in individuals with autism. These similarities enable the model to define relevant pathways of developmental dysregulation resulting from environmental manipulation. The uncovering of these complex pathways resulted to the growing pool of potential therapeutic candidates addressing the core symptoms of ASD. Here, we summarize the validity points of VPA that may or may not qualify it as a valid animal model of ASD. PMID:26713077

  17. Exploring the Validity of Valproic Acid Animal Model of Autism.

    PubMed

    Mabunga, Darine Froy N; Gonzales, Edson Luck T; Kim, Ji-Woon; Kim, Ki Chan; Shin, Chan Young

    2015-12-01

    The valproic acid (VPA) animal model of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is one of the most widely used animal model in the field. Like any other disease models, it can't model the totality of the features seen in autism. Then, is it valid to model autism? This model demonstrates many of the structural and behavioral features that can be observed in individuals with autism. These similarities enable the model to define relevant pathways of developmental dysregulation resulting from environmental manipulation. The uncovering of these complex pathways resulted to the growing pool of potential therapeutic candidates addressing the core symptoms of ASD. Here, we summarize the validity points of VPA that may or may not qualify it as a valid animal model of ASD. PMID:26713077

  18. Animal Models of Substance Abuse and Addiction: Implications for Science, Animal Welfare, and Society

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Wendy J; Nicholson, Katherine L; Dance, Mario E; Morgan, Richard W; Foley, Patricia L

    2010-01-01

    Substance abuse and addiction are well recognized public health concerns, with 2 NIH institutes (the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism) specifically targeting this societal problem. As such, this is an important area of research for which animal experiments play a critical role. This overview presents the importance of substance abuse and addiction in society; reviews the development and refinement of animal models that address crucial areas of biology, pathophysiology, clinical treatments, and drug screening for abuse liability; and discusses some of the unique veterinary, husbandry, and IACUC challenges associated with these models. PMID:20579432

  19. Why test animals to treat humans? On the validity of animal models.

    PubMed

    Shelley, Cameron

    2010-09-01

    Critics of animal modeling have advanced a variety of arguments against the validity of the practice. The point of one such form of argument is to establish that animal modeling is pointless and therefore immoral. In this article, critical arguments of this form are divided into three types, the pseudoscience argument, the disanalogy argument, and the predictive validity argument. I contend that none of these criticisms currently succeed, nor are they likely to. However, the connection between validity and morality is important, suggesting that critical efforts would be instructive if they addressed it in a more nuanced way. PMID:20934650

  20. Sex differences in animal models of psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Kokras, N; Dalla, C

    2014-10-01

    Psychiatric disorders are characterized by sex differences in their prevalence, symptomatology and treatment response. Animal models have been widely employed for the investigation of the neurobiology of such disorders and the discovery of new treatments. However, mostly male animals have been used in preclinical pharmacological studies. In this review, we highlight the need for the inclusion of both male and female animals in experimental studies aiming at gender-oriented prevention, diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric disorders. We present behavioural findings on sex differences from animal models of depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, substance-related disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and autism. Moreover, when available, we include studies conducted across different stages of the oestrous cycle. By inspection of the relevant literature, it is obvious that robust sex differences exist in models of all psychiatric disorders. However, many times results are conflicting, and no clear conclusion regarding the direction of sex differences and the effect of the oestrous cycle is drawn. Moreover, there is a lack of considerable amount of studies using psychiatric drugs in both male and female animals, in order to evaluate the differential response between the two sexes. Notably, while in most cases animal models successfully mimic drug response in both sexes, test parameters and treatment-sensitive behavioural indices are not always the same for male and female rodents. Thus, there is an increasing need to validate animal models for both sexes and use standard procedures across different laboratories. PMID:24697577

  1. Emerging preclinical animal models for FSHD

    PubMed Central

    Lek, Angela; Rahimov, Fedik; Jones, Peter L.; Kunkel, Louis M.

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is a unique and complex genetic disease that is not entirely solved. Recent advances in the field have led to a consensus genetic premise for the disorder, enabling researchers to now pursue the design of preclinical models. In this review, we explore all available FSHD models (DUX4-dependent and -independent) for their utility in therapeutic discovery and potential to yield novel disease insights. Due to the complex nature of FSHD, there is currently no single model that accurately recapitulates the genetic and pathophysiological spectrum of the disorder. Existing models are limited to emphasize only specific aspects of the disease, thus highlighting the need for more collaborative research and novel paradigms to advance the translational research space of FSHD. PMID:25801126

  2. Emerging preclinical animal models for FSHD.

    PubMed

    Lek, Angela; Rahimov, Fedik; Jones, Peter L; Kunkel, Louis M

    2015-05-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is a unique and complex genetic disease that is not entirely solved. Recent advances in the field have led to a consensus genetic premise for the disorder, enabling researchers to now pursue the design of preclinical models. In this review we explore all available FSHD models (DUX4-dependent and -independent) for their utility in therapeutic discovery and potential to yield novel disease insights. Owing to the complex nature of FSHD, there is currently no single model that accurately recapitulates the genetic and pathophysiological spectrum of the disorder. Existing models emphasize only specific aspects of the disease, highlighting the need for more collaborative research and novel paradigms to advance the translational research space of FSHD. PMID:25801126

  3. Animal Models of Posttraumatic Seizures and Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Glushakov, Alexander V; Glushakova, Olena Y; Doré, Sylvain; Carney, Paul R; Hayes, Ronald L

    2016-01-01

    Posttraumatic epilepsy (PTE) is one of the most common and devastating complications of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Currently, the etiopathology and mechanisms of PTE are poorly understood and as a result, there is no effective treatment or means to prevent it. Antiepileptic drugs remain common preventive strategies in the management of TBI to control acute posttraumatic seizures and to prevent the development of PTE, although their efficacy in the latter case is disputed. Different strategies of PTE prophylaxis have been showing promise in preclinical models, but their translation to the clinic still remains elusive due in part to the variability of these models and the fact they do not recapitulate all complex pathologies associated with human TBI. TBI is a multifaceted disorder reflected in several potentially epileptogenic alterations in the brain, including mechanical neuronal and vascular damage, parenchymal and subarachnoid hemorrhage, subsequent toxicity caused by iron-rich hemoglobin breakdown products, and energy disruption resulting in secondary injuries, including excitotoxicity, gliosis, and neuroinflammation, often coexisting to a different degree. Several in vivo models have been developed to reproduce the acute TBI cascade of events, to reflect its anatomical pathologies, and to replicate neurological deficits. Although acute and chronic recurrent posttraumatic seizures are well-recognized phenomena in these models, there is only a limited number of studies focused on PTE. The most used mechanical TBI models with documented electroencephalographic and behavioral seizures with remote epileptogenesis include fluid percussion, controlled cortical impact, and weight-drop. This chapter describes the most popular models of PTE-induced TBI models, focusing on the controlled cortical impact and the fluid percussion injury models, the methods of behavioral and electroencephalogram seizure assessments, and other approaches to detect epileptogenic properties

  4. Animal models for screening anxiolytic-like drugs: a perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bourin, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary biological psychiatry uses experimental animal models to increase our understanding of affective disorder pathogenesis. Modern anxiolytic drug discovery mainly targets specific pathways and molecular determinants within a single phenotypic domain. However, greater understanding of the mechanisms of action is possible through animal models. Primarily developed with rats, animal models in anxiety have been adapted with mixed success for mice, easy-to-use mammals with better genetic possibilities than rats. In this review, we focus on the three most common animal models of anxiety in mice used in the screening of anxiolytics. Both conditioned and unconditioned models are described, in order to represent all types of animal models of anxiety. Behavioral studies require careful attention to variable parameters linked to environment, handling, or paradigms; this is also discussed. Finally, we focus on the consequences of re-exposure to the apparatus. Test-retest procedures can provide new answers, but should be intensively studied in order to revalidate the entire paradigm as an animal model of anxiety. PMID:26487810

  5. Animal Models in Cardiovascular Research: Hypertension and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Chun-Yi; Jaarin, Kamsiah

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension and atherosclerosis are among the most common causes of mortality in both developed and developing countries. Experimental animal models of hypertension and atherosclerosis have become a valuable tool for providing information on etiology, pathophysiology, and complications of the disease and on the efficacy and mechanism of action of various drugs and compounds used in treatment. An animal model has been developed to study hypertension and atherosclerosis for several reasons. Compared to human models, an animal model is easily manageable, as compounding effects of dietary and environmental factors can be controlled. Blood vessels and cardiac tissue samples can be taken for detailed experimental and biomolecular examination. Choice of animal model is often determined by the research aim, as well as financial and technical factors. A thorough understanding of the animal models used and complete analysis must be validated so that the data can be extrapolated to humans. In conclusion, animal models for hypertension and atherosclerosis are invaluable in improving our understanding of cardiovascular disease and developing new pharmacological therapies. PMID:26064920

  6. Leading compounds for the validation of animal models of psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Micale, Vincenzo; Kucerova, Jana; Sulcova, Alexandra

    2013-10-01

    Modelling of complex psychiatric disorders, e.g., depression and schizophrenia, in animals is a major challenge, since they are characterized by certain disturbances in functions that are absolutely unique to humans. Furthermore, we still have not identified the genetic and neurobiological mechanisms, nor do we know precisely the circuits in the brain that function abnormally in mood and psychotic disorders. Consequently, the pharmacological treatments used are mostly variations on a theme that was started more than 50 years ago. Thus, progress in novel drug development with improved therapeutic efficacy would benefit greatly from improved animal models. Here, we review the available animal models of depression and schizophrenia and focus on the way that they respond to various types of potential candidate molecules, such as novel antidepressant or antipsychotic drugs, as an index of predictive validity. We conclude that the generation of convincing and useful animal models of mental illnesses could be a bridge to success in drug discovery. PMID:23942897

  7. GHRH treatment: studies in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Shakutsui, S; Abe, H; Chihara, K

    1989-01-01

    This study examined the effects of chronic deletion of circulating growth hormone-releasing (GHRH) and/or somatostatin (SRIF) on normal growing male rats, as well as the effects of exogenous GHRH (1-29)NH2 and/or SMS 201-995 administration on the growth of rats with hypothalamic ablation. Passive immunization with anti-rat GHRH goat gamma-globulin (GHRH-Ab) for 3 weeks caused a marked decrease in the levels of pituitary GH mRNA and severe growth failure. Treatment with anti-SRIF goat gamma-globulin (SRIF-Ab) for 3 weeks produced a more modest decrease in GH mRNA levels in the pituitary and a slight but significant inhibition of normal somatic growth. Hypothalamic ablation produced a marked decrease in the level of mRNA in the pituitary. Chronic continuous administration of GHRH (1-29)NH2 stimulated pituitary GH synthesis, elevated serum levels of insulin-like growth factor I and increased body weight gain in rats with hypothalamic ablation treated with replacement doses of cortisone, testosterone and L-thyroxine. Combined treatment with GHRH (1-29)NH2 and SMS 201-995 appeared to promote the effect of GHRH on pituitary GH release and somatic growth in these animals. The results suggest that continuous administration of GHRH will be useful in the treatment of children with growth retardation resulting from hypothalamic disorders. In children with combined GHRH and somatostatin deficiencies, the addition of somatostatin to a GHRH treatment regimen may produce better results. PMID:2568726

  8. Animal Models of Uveal Melanoma: Methods, Applicability, and Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Stei, Marta M.; Loeffler, Karin U.; Holz, Frank G.; Herwig, Martina C.

    2016-01-01

    Animal models serve as powerful tools for investigating the pathobiology of cancer, identifying relevant pathways, and developing novel therapeutic agents. They have facilitated rapid scientific progress in many tumor entities. However, for establishing a powerful animal model of uveal melanoma fundamental challenges remain. To date, no animal model offers specific genetic attributes as well as histologic, immunologic, and metastatic features of uveal melanoma. Syngeneic models with intraocular injection of cutaneous melanoma cells may suit best for investigating immunologic/tumor biology aspects. However, differences between cutaneous and uveal melanoma regarding genetics and metastasis remain problematic. Human xenograft models are widely used for evaluating novel therapeutics but require immunosuppression to allow tumor growth. New approaches aim to establish transgenic mouse models of spontaneous uveal melanoma which recently provided preliminary promising results. Each model provides certain benefits and may render them suitable for answering a respective scientific question. However, all existing models also exhibit relevant limitations which may have led to delayed research progress. Despite refined therapeutic options for the primary ocular tumor, patients' prognosis has not improved since the 1970s. Basic research needs to further focus on a refinement of a potent animal model which mimics uveal melanoma specific mechanisms of progression and metastasis. This review will summarise and interpret existing animal models of uveal melanoma including recent advances in the field. PMID:27366747

  9. Animal models of tumour-associated epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kirschstein, Timo; Köhling, Rüdiger

    2016-02-15

    Brain tumours cause a sizeable proportion of epilepsies in adulthood, and actually can be etiologically responsible also for childhood epilepsies. Conversely, seizures are often first clinical signs of a brain tumour. Nevertheless, several issues of brain-tumour associated seizures and epilepsies are far from understood, or clarified regarding clinical consensus. These include both the specific mechanisms of epileptogenesis related to different tumour types, the possible relationship between malignancy and seizure emergence, the interaction between tumour mass and surrounding neuronal networks, and - not least - the best treatment options depending on different tumour types. To investigate these issues, experimental models of tumour-induced epilepsies are necessary. This review concentrates on the description of currently used models, focusing on methodological aspects. It highlights advantages and shortcomings of these models, and identifies future experimental challenges. PMID:26092434

  10. Animal models of tuberculosis: Guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Clark, Simon; Hall, Yper; Williams, Ann

    2015-05-01

    The progression of the disease that follows infection of guinea pigs with Mycobacterium tuberculosis displays many features of human tuberculosis (TB), and the guinea pig model of TB has been used for more than 100 years as a research tool to understand and describe disease mechanisms. Changes in the bacterial burden and pathology following infection can be readily monitored and used to evaluate the impact of TB interventions. Demonstration of the protective efficacy of vaccines in the low-dose aerosol guinea pig model is an important component of the preclinical data package for novel vaccines in development, and there is a continual need to improve the model to facilitate progression of vaccines to the clinic. Development of better tools with which to dissect the immune responses of guinea pigs is a focus of current research. PMID:25524720

  11. ASSESSMENT OF VENOUS THROMBOSIS IN ANIMAL MODELS

    PubMed Central

    SP, Grover; CE, Evans; AS, Patel; B, Modarai; P, Saha; A, Smith

    2016-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis and common complications, including pulmonary embolism and post thrombotic syndrome, represent a major source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Experimental models of venous thrombosis have provided considerable insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate thrombus formation and subsequent resolution. Here we critically appraise the ex vivo and in vivo techniques used to assess venous thrombosis in these models. Particular attention is paid to imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance imaging, micro computed tomography and high frequency ultrasound that facilitate longitudinal assessment of thrombus size and composition. PMID:26681755

  12. Retinal degeneration in animal models with a defective visual cycle.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Akiko; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Continuous generation of visual chromophore through the visual (retinoid) cycle is essential to maintain eyesight and retinal heath. Impairments in this cycle and related pathways adversely affect vision. In this review, we summarize the chemical reactions of vitamin A metabolites involved in the retinoid cycle and describe animal models of associated human diseases. Development of potential therapies for retinal disorders in these animal models is also introduced. PMID:25210527

  13. Retinal degeneration in animal models with a defective visual cycle

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Akiko; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Continuous generation of visual chromophore through the visual (retinoid) cycle is essential to maintain eyesight and retinal heath. Impairments in this cycle and related pathways adversely affect vision. In this review, we summarize the chemical reactions of vitamin A metabolites involved in the retinoid cycle and describe animal models of associated human diseases. Development of potential therapies for retinal disorders in these animal models is also introduced. PMID:25210527

  14. Mathematical modelling of animate and intentional motion.

    PubMed Central

    Rittscher, Jens; Blake, Andrew; Hoogs, Anthony; Stein, Gees

    2003-01-01

    Our aim is to enable a machine to observe and interpret the behaviour of others. Mathematical models are employed to describe certain biological motions. The main challenge is to design models that are both tractable and meaningful. In the first part we will describe how computer vision techniques, in particular visual tracking, can be applied to recognize a small vocabulary of human actions in a constrained scenario. Mainly the problems of viewpoint and scale invariance need to be overcome to formalize a general framework. Hence the second part of the article is devoted to the question whether a particular human action should be captured in a single complex model or whether it is more promising to make extensive use of semantic knowledge and a collection of low-level models that encode certain motion primitives. Scene context plays a crucial role if we intend to give a higher-level interpretation rather than a low-level physical description of the observed motion. A semantic knowledge base is used to establish the scene context. This approach consists of three main components: visual analysis, the mapping from vision to language and the search of the semantic database. A small number of robust visual detectors is used to generate a higher-level description of the scene. The approach together with a number of results is presented in the third part of this article. PMID:12689374

  15. Animal models for information processing during sleep.

    PubMed

    Coenen, A M L; Drinkenburg, W H I M

    2002-12-01

    Information provided by external stimuli does reach the brain during sleep, although the amount of information is reduced during sleep compared to wakefulness. The process controlling this reduction is called 'sensory' gating and evidence exists that the underlying neurophysiological processes take place in the thalamus. Furthermore, it is clear that stimuli given during sleep can alter the functional state of the brain. Two factors have been shown to play a crucial role in causing changes in the sleeping brain: the intensity and the relevance of the stimulus. Intensive stimuli arouse the brain, as well as stimuli having a high informational impact on the sleeping person. The arousal threshold for important stimuli is quite low compared to neutral stimuli. A central question in sleep research is whether associative learning, or in other words the formation of new associations between stimuli, can take place in a sleeping brain. It has been shown that simple forms of learning are still possible during sleep. In sleeping rats, it is proven that habituation, an active, simple form of learning not to respond to irrelevant stimuli, can occur. Moreover, there is evidence for the view that more complex associations can be modulated and newly formed during sleep. This is shown by two experimental approaches: an extinction paradigm and a latent inhibition (pre-exposure) paradigm. The presentation of non-reinforced stimuli during sleep causes slower extinction compared to the same presentation of these stimuli during wakefulness. Consistently, the suppressive capacity of a stimulus in the latent inhibition paradigm is less when previously pre-exposed during sleep, as compared to pre-exposure during wakefulness. Thus, while associative learning is not completely blocked during sleep, aspects of association formation are clearly altered. However, animal studies also clearly indicate that complex forms of learning are not possible during sleep. It is hypothesised that this

  16. Modeling crawling cell movement on soft engineered substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronson, Igor

    2014-03-01

    Self-propelled motion, emerging spontaneously or in response to external cues, is a hallmark of living organisms. Systems of self-propelled synthetic particles are also relevant for multiple applications, from targeted drug delivery to the design of self-healing materials. Self-propulsion relies on the force transfer to the surrounding. While self-propelled swimming in the bulk of liquids is fairly well characterized, many open questions remain in our understanding of self-propelled motion along substrates, such as in the case of crawling cells or related biomimetic objects. How is the force transfer organized and how does it interplay with the deformability of the moving object and the substrate? How do the spatially dependent traction distribution and adhesion dynamics give rise to complex cell behavior? How can we engineer a specific cell response on synthetic compliant substrates? Here we present a phase-field model for a crawling cell by incorporating locally resolved traction forces and substrate deformations. The model captures the generic structure of the traction force distribution and faithfully reproduces experimental observations, like the response of a cell on a gradient in substrate elasticity (durotaxis). It also exhibits complex modes of cell movement such as ``bipedal'' motion. Our work may guide experiments on cell traction force microscopy and substrate-based cell sorting and can be helpful for the design of biomimetic ``crawlers'' and active and reconfigurable self-healing materials. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, under Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  17. Contaminant plume configuration and movement: an experimental model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alencoao, A.; Reis, A.; Pereira, M. G.; Liberato, M. L. R.; Caramelo, L.; Amraoui, M.; Amorim, V.

    2009-04-01

    The relevance of Science and Technology in our daily routines makes it compulsory to educate citizens who have both scientific literacy and scientific knowledge. These will allow them to be intervening citizens in a constantly changing society. Thus, physical and natural sciences are included in school curricula, both in primary and secondary education, with the fundamental aim of developing in the students the skills, attitudes and knowledge needed for the understanding of the planet Earth and its real problems. On the other hand, teaching in Geosciences is more and more based on practical methodologies which use didactic material, sustaining teachers' pedagogical practices and facilitating students' learning tasks suggested on the syllabus defined for each school level. Themes related to exploring the different components of the Hydrological Cycle and themes related to natural environment protection and preservation, namely water resources and soil contamination by industrial and urban sewage are examples of subject matters included on the Portuguese syllabus. These topics motivated the conception and construction of experimental models for the study of the propagation of pollutants on a porous medium. The experimental models allow inducing a horizontal flux of water though different kinds of permeable substances (e.g. sand, silt), with contamination spots on its surface. These experimental activities facilitate the student to understand the flow path of contaminating substances on the saturated zone and to observe the contaminant plume configuration and movement. The activities are explored in a teaching and learning process perspective where the student builds its own knowledge through real question- problem based learning which relate Science, Technology and Society. These activities have been developed in the framework of project ‘Water in the Environment' (CV/PVI/0854) of the POCTI Program (Programa Operacional "Ciência, Tecnologia, Inovação") financed

  18. Animal models and their results in gastrointestinal alcohol research.

    PubMed

    Siegmund, Soren V; Haas, Stephan; Singer, Manfred V

    2005-01-01

    Alcohol-induced diseases of the gastrointestinal tract play an important role in clinical gastroenterology. However, the precise pathophysiological mechanisms are still largely unknown. Alcohol research depends essentially on animal models due to the fact that controlled experimental studies of ethanol-induced diseases in humans are unethical. Animal models have already been successfully applied to disclose and analyze molecular mechanisms in alcohol-induced diseases, partially by using knockout technology. Because of a lack of transferability of some animal models to the human condition, results have to be interpreted cautiously. For some alcohol-related diseases like chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, the ideal animal model does not yet exist. Here we provide an overview of the most commonly used animal models in gastrointestinal alcohol research. We will also briefly discuss the findings based on animal models as well as the current concepts of pathophysiological mechanisms involved in acute and chronic alcoholic damage of the esophagus, stomach, small and large intestine, pancreas and liver. PMID:16508282

  19. Animal Models of Interferon Signature Positive Lupus.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Haoyang; Szeto, Christopher; Han, Shuhong; Yang, Lijun; Reeves, Westley H

    2015-01-01

    Human lupus is strongly associated with a gene expression signature characterized by over-expression of Type I interferon-regulated genes. A strong interferon signature generally is not seen in the standard mouse models of lupus, despite considerable evidence for the involvement of toll-like receptor-driven interferon production. In contrast, pristane-induced lupus exhibits a prominent TLR7-dependent interferon signature. Importantly, genetic disorders with dysregulated interferon production in both human beings and mice cause severe autoinflammatory diseases but not the typical manifestations of lupus, suggesting that interferon over-production is insufficient to cause systemic lupus erythematosus itself. Single-gene models in mice suggest that lupus-like disease may result from abnormalities in B-cell activation and the clearance of dead cells. Pristane may mimic human systemic lupus erythematosus by causing synergistic abnormalities in interferon production along with defective clearance of apoptotic cells and over-active B-cell signaling. PMID:26097482

  20. Animal Models of Interferon Signature Positive Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Haoyang; Szeto, Christopher; Han, Shuhong; Yang, Lijun; Reeves, Westley H.

    2015-01-01

    Human lupus is strongly associated with a gene expression signature characterized by over-expression of Type I interferon-regulated genes. A strong interferon signature generally is not seen in the standard mouse models of lupus, despite considerable evidence for the involvement of toll-like receptor-driven interferon production. In contrast, pristane-induced lupus exhibits a prominent TLR7-dependent interferon signature. Importantly, genetic disorders with dysregulated interferon production in both human beings and mice cause severe autoinflammatory diseases but not the typical manifestations of lupus, suggesting that interferon over-production is insufficient to cause systemic lupus erythematosus itself. Single-gene models in mice suggest that lupus-like disease may result from abnormalities in B-cell activation and the clearance of dead cells. Pristane may mimic human systemic lupus erythematosus by causing synergistic abnormalities in interferon production along with defective clearance of apoptotic cells and over-active B-cell signaling. PMID:26097482

  1. [Use of animal models of clinical pain].

    PubMed

    Guilbaud, G

    1990-11-01

    For a better understanding of clinical pain, several groups involved in the study of basic pain mechanisms have proposed the use of various experimental models close to clinical situations. They are based either on neurogenic or inflammatory processes. Data obtained with three of these models will be developed in the paper: rats rendered arthritic by Freund's adjuvant injection into the tail, rats with an intraplantar injection of carrageenin in one hind-paw, rats with a moderate ligature of one common sciatic nerve. The various pharmacological approaches revealed dramatic changes of the analgesic effects of morphine and other opioid substances, and a spectacular modification of the endogenous opioid reactivity. A further enhancement of the initial hyperalgesia was observed with high doses (1-3 mg/kg iv) of naloxone (known as an antagonist of morphine), contrasting with the paradoxical analgesia induced with the low dose (peaking up for 3 micrograms/kg iv). Electrophysiological studies emphasized dramatic changes of neuronal responsiveness in structures involved in the transmission of the nociceptive messages. In each of these models, electrophysiological data provide new insights on the physiopathological mechanisms of the related clinical pain. PMID:2092200

  2. The Use of Animal Models for Stroke Research: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Casals, Juliana B; Pieri, Naira CG; Feitosa, Matheus LT; Ercolin, Anna CM; Roballo, Kelly CS; Barreto, Rodrigo SN; Bressan, Fabiana F; Martins, Daniele S; Miglino, Maria A; Ambrósio, Carlos E

    2011-01-01

    Stroke has been identified as the second leading cause of death worldwide. Stroke is a focal neurologic deficit caused by a change in cerebral circulation. The use of animal models in recent years has improved our understanding of the physiopathology of this disease. Rats and mice are the most commonly used stroke models, but the demand for larger models, such as rabbits and even nonhuman primates, is increasing so as to better understand the disease and its treatment. Although the basic mechanisms of stroke are nearly identical among mammals, we here discuss the differences between the human encephalon and various animals. In addition, we compare common surgical techniques used to induce animal models of stroke. A more complete anatomic knowledge of the cerebral vessels of various model species is needed to develop more reliable models for objective results that improve knowledge of the pathology of stroke in both human and veterinary medicine. PMID:22330245

  3. Effect of supplementary zinc on orthodontic tooth movement in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Sadegh, Ahmad Akhoundi Mohammad; Rezvaneh, Ghazanfari; Shahroo, Etemad-Moghadam; Mojgan, Alaeddini; Azam, Khorshidian; Shahram, Rabbani; Reza, Shamshiri Ahmad; Nafiseh, Momeni

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Osteoclasts and osteoblasts are responsible for regulating bone homeostasis during which the trace element zinc has been shown to exert a cumulative effect on bone mass by stimulating osteoblastic bone formation and inhibiting osteoclastic bone resorption. Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of zinc (Zn) on orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) in a rat model. Material and Methods: A total of 44 male Wistar rats were divided into four groups of 11 animals each and received 0, 1.5, 20 and 50 ppm Zn in distilled water for 60 days. In the last 21 days of the study, nickel-titanium closed coil springs were ligated between maxillary right incisors and first molars of all rats, and tooth movement was measured at the end of this period. Histological analysis of hematoxylin/eosin slides was performed to assess root resorption lacunae, osteoclast number and periodontal ligament (PDL) width. Results: Mean OTM was calculated as 51.8, 49.1, 35.5 and 45 µm in the 0, 1.5, 20 and 50 ppm zinc-receiving groups, respectively. There were no significant differences in neither OTM nor histological parameters among the study groups (p > 0.05). Conclusion: According to the results obtained in the current investigation, increase in supplementary zinc up to 50 ppm does not affect the rate of OTM neither bone and root resorption in rats. PMID:27275614

  4. Bioethics Symposium: The ethical food movement: What does it mean for the role of science and scientists in current debates about animal agriculture?

    PubMed

    Croney, C C; Apley, M; Capper, J L; Mench, J A; Priest, S

    2012-05-01

    Contemporary animal agriculture is increasingly criticized on ethical grounds. Consequently, current policy and legislative discussions have become highly controversial as decision makers attempt to reconcile concerns about the impacts of animal production on animal welfare, the environment, and on the efficacy of antibiotics required to ensure human health with demands for abundant, affordable, safe food. Clearly, the broad implications for US animal agriculture of what appears to be a burgeoning movement relative to ethical food production must be understood by animal agriculture stakeholders. The potential effects of such developments on animal agricultural practices, corporate marketing strategies, and public perceptions of the ethics of animal production must also be clarified. To that end, it is essential to acknowledge that people's beliefs about which food production practices are appropriate are tied to diverse, latent value systems. Thus, relying solely on scientific information as a means to resolve current debates about animal agriculture is unlikely to be effective. The problem is compounded when scientific information is used inappropriately or strategically to advance a political agenda. Examples of the interface between science and ethics in regards to addressing currently contentious aspects of food animal production (animal welfare, antimicrobial use, and impacts of animal production practices on the environment) are reviewed. The roles of scientists and science in public debates about animal agricultural practices are also examined. It is suggested that scientists have a duty to contribute to the development of sound policy by providing clear and objectively presented information, by clarifying misinterpretations of science, and by recognizing the differences between presenting data vs. promoting their own value judgments in regard to how and which data should be used to establish policy. Finally, the role of the media in shaping public opinions

  5. Animal Models of Cystic Fibrosis Pathology: Phenotypic Parallels and Divergences.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Gillian M; White, Michelle M; Browne, Niall; McElvaney, Noel G; Reeves, Emer P

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The resultant characteristic ion transport defect results in decreased mucociliary clearance, bacterial colonisation, and chronic neutrophil-dominated inflammation. Much knowledge surrounding the pathophysiology of the disease has been gained through the generation of animal models, despite inherent limitations in each. The failure of certain mouse models to recapitulate the phenotypic manifestations of human disease has initiated the generation of larger animals in which to study CF, including the pig and the ferret. This review will summarise the basic phenotypes of three animal models and describe the contributions of such animal studies to our current understanding of CF. PMID:27340661

  6. Animal Models of Cystic Fibrosis Pathology: Phenotypic Parallels and Divergences

    PubMed Central

    McElvaney, Noel G.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The resultant characteristic ion transport defect results in decreased mucociliary clearance, bacterial colonisation, and chronic neutrophil-dominated inflammation. Much knowledge surrounding the pathophysiology of the disease has been gained through the generation of animal models, despite inherent limitations in each. The failure of certain mouse models to recapitulate the phenotypic manifestations of human disease has initiated the generation of larger animals in which to study CF, including the pig and the ferret. This review will summarise the basic phenotypes of three animal models and describe the contributions of such animal studies to our current understanding of CF. PMID:27340661

  7. The Fuzzy Model for Diagnosis of Animal Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianhua, Xiao; Luyi, Shi; Yu, Zhang; Li, Gao; Honggang, Fan; Haikun, Ma; Hongbin, Wang

    The knowledge of animal disease diagnosis was fuzzy; the fuzzy model can imitate the character of clinical diagnosis for veterinary. The fuzzy model of disease, the methods for class the disease group of differential diagnosis and the fuzzy diagnosis model were discussed in this paper.

  8. Learning to See: Guiding Students' Attention via a Model's Eye Movements Fosters Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarodzka, Halszka; van Gog, Tamara; Dorr, Michael; Scheiter, Katharina; Gerjets, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated how to teach perceptual tasks, that is, classifying fish locomotion, through eye movement modeling examples (EMME). EMME consisted of a replay of eye movements of a didactically behaving domain expert (model), which had been recorded while he executed the task, superimposed onto the video stimulus. Seventy-five students…

  9. Sex differences in animal models of psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kokras, N; Dalla, C

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders are characterized by sex differences in their prevalence, symptomatology and treatment response. Animal models have been widely employed for the investigation of the neurobiology of such disorders and the discovery of new treatments. However, mostly male animals have been used in preclinical pharmacological studies. In this review, we highlight the need for the inclusion of both male and female animals in experimental studies aiming at gender-oriented prevention, diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric disorders. We present behavioural findings on sex differences from animal models of depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, substance-related disorders, obsessive–compulsive disorder, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and autism. Moreover, when available, we include studies conducted across different stages of the oestrous cycle. By inspection of the relevant literature, it is obvious that robust sex differences exist in models of all psychiatric disorders. However, many times results are conflicting, and no clear conclusion regarding the direction of sex differences and the effect of the oestrous cycle is drawn. Moreover, there is a lack of considerable amount of studies using psychiatric drugs in both male and female animals, in order to evaluate the differential response between the two sexes. Notably, while in most cases animal models successfully mimic drug response in both sexes, test parameters and treatment-sensitive behavioural indices are not always the same for male and female rodents. Thus, there is an increasing need to validate animal models for both sexes and use standard procedures across different laboratories. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Animal Models in Psychiatry Research. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-20 PMID:24697577

  10. Simple animal model of Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Werawatganon, Duangporn

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has become accepted as a human pathogen for the development of gastritis and gastroduodenal ulcer. To develop a simple rat model of chronic H. pylori infection, male Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with streptomycin suspended in tap water (5 mg/mL) for 3 d. The rats were inoculated by gavage at 1 mL/rat with H. pylori suspension (5 × 108-5 × 1010 CFU/mL) twice daily at an interval of 4 h for three consecutive days. Two weeks after inoculation, rats were sacrificed and the stomachs were removed. Antral biopsies were performed for urease test and the stomachs were taken for histopathology. Successful H. pylori inoculation was defined as a positive urease test and histopathology. We reported a 69.8%-83.0% success rate for H. pylori infection using the urease test, and hematoxylin and eosin staining confirmed the results. Histopathological analysis detected bacteria along the mucous lining of the surface epithelium and crypt lumen and demonstrated mild to moderate gastric inflammation in successfully inoculated rats. We developed a simple rat model of chronic H. pylori infection for research into gastric microcirculatory changes and therapy with plant products. PMID:24914363

  11. Animal models for prion-like diseases.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Eraña, Hasier; Venegas, Vanesa; Elezgarai, Saioa R; Harrathi, Chafik; Castilla, Joaquín

    2015-09-01

    Prion diseases or Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs) are a group of fatal neurodegenerative disorders affecting several mammalian species being Creutzfeldt-Jacob Disease (CJD) the most representative in human beings, scrapie in ovine, Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) in bovine and Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in cervids. As stated by the "protein-only hypothesis", the causal agent of TSEs is a self-propagating aberrant form of the prion protein (PrP) that through a misfolding event acquires a β-sheet rich conformation known as PrP(Sc) (from scrapie). This isoform is neurotoxic, aggregation prone and induces misfolding of native cellular PrP. Compelling evidence indicates that disease-specific protein misfolding in amyloid deposits could be shared by other disorders showing aberrant protein aggregates such as Alzheimer's Disease (AD), Parkinson's Disease (PD), Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and systemic Amyloid A amyloidosis (AA amyloidosis). Evidences of shared mechanisms of the proteins related to each disease with prions will be reviewed through the available in vivo models. Taking prion research as reference, typical prion-like features such as seeding and propagation ability, neurotoxic species causing disease, infectivity, transmission barrier and strain evidences will be analyzed for other protein-related diseases. Thus, prion-like features of amyloid β peptide and tau present in AD, α-synuclein in PD, SOD-1, TDP-43 and others in ALS and serum α-amyloid (SAA) in systemic AA amyloidosis will be reviewed through models available for each disease. PMID:25907990

  12. Impairments of Synaptic Plasticity in Aged Animals and in Animal Models of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Balietti, Marta; Tamagnini, Francesco; Fattoretti, Patrizia; Burattini, Costanza; Casoli, Tiziana; Platano, Daniela; Lattanzio, Fabrizia

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aging is associated with a gradual decline in cognitive functions, and more dramatic cognitive impairments occur in patients affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD). Electrophysiological and molecular studies performed in aged animals and in animal models of AD have shown that cognitive decline is associated with significant modifications in synaptic plasticity (i.e., activity-dependent changes in synaptic strength) and have elucidated some of the cellular mechanisms underlying this process. Morphological studies have revealed a correlation between the quality of memory performance and the extent of structural changes of synaptic contacts occurring during memory consolidation. We briefly review recent experimental evidence here. PMID:22533439

  13. Neuroimaging in Animal Seizure Models with 18FDG-PET

    PubMed Central

    Mirrione, Martine M.; Tsirka, Stella E.

    2011-01-01

    Small animal neuroimaging has become increasingly available to researchers, expanding the breadth of questions studied with these methods. Applying these noninvasive techniques to the open questions underlying epileptogenesis is no exception. A major advantage of small animal neuroimaging is its translational appeal. Studies can be well controlled and manipulated, examining the living brain in the animal before, during, and after the disease onset or disease treatment. The results can also be compared to data collected on human patients. Over the past decade, we and others have explored metabolic patterns in animal models of epilepsy to gain insight into the circuitry underlying development of the disease. In this paper, we provide technical details on how metabolic imaging that uses 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (18FDG) and positron emission tomography (PET) is performed and explain the strengths and limitations of these studies. We will also highlight recent advances toward understanding epileptogenesis through small animal imaging. PMID:22937232

  14. Animal models of obsessive-compulsive disorder: utility and limitations.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Pino; López-Solà, Clara; Real, Eva; Segalàs, Cinto; Menchón, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a disabling and common neuropsychiatric condition of poorly known etiology. Many attempts have been made in the last few years to develop animal models of OCD with the aim of clarifying the genetic, neurochemical, and neuroanatomical basis of the disorder, as well as of developing novel pharmacological and neurosurgical treatments that may help to improve the prognosis of the illness. The latter goal is particularly important given that around 40% of patients with OCD do not respond to currently available therapies. This article summarizes strengths and limitations of the leading animal models of OCD including genetic, pharmacologically induced, behavioral manipulation-based, and neurodevelopmental models according to their face, construct, and predictive validity. On the basis of this evaluation, we discuss that currently labeled "animal models of OCD" should be regarded not as models of OCD but, rather, as animal models of different psychopathological processes, such as compulsivity, stereotypy, or perseverance, that are present not only in OCD but also in other psychiatric or neurological disorders. Animal models might constitute a challenging approach to study the neural and genetic mechanism of these phenomena from a trans-diagnostic perspective. Animal models are also of particular interest as tools for developing new therapeutic options for OCD, with the greatest convergence focusing on the glutamatergic system, the role of ovarian and related hormones, and the exploration of new potential targets for deep brain stimulation. Finally, future research on neurocognitive deficits associated with OCD through the use of analogous animal tasks could also provide a genuine opportunity to disentangle the complex etiology of the disorder. PMID:26346234

  15. Animal models of obsessive–compulsive disorder: utility and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Pino; López-Solà, Clara; Real, Eva; Segalàs, Cinto; Menchón, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) is a disabling and common neuropsychiatric condition of poorly known etiology. Many attempts have been made in the last few years to develop animal models of OCD with the aim of clarifying the genetic, neurochemical, and neuroanatomical basis of the disorder, as well as of developing novel pharmacological and neurosurgical treatments that may help to improve the prognosis of the illness. The latter goal is particularly important given that around 40% of patients with OCD do not respond to currently available therapies. This article summarizes strengths and limitations of the leading animal models of OCD including genetic, pharmacologically induced, behavioral manipulation-based, and neurodevelopmental models according to their face, construct, and predictive validity. On the basis of this evaluation, we discuss that currently labeled “animal models of OCD” should be regarded not as models of OCD but, rather, as animal models of different psychopathological processes, such as compulsivity, stereotypy, or perseverance, that are present not only in OCD but also in other psychiatric or neurological disorders. Animal models might constitute a challenging approach to study the neural and genetic mechanism of these phenomena from a trans-diagnostic perspective. Animal models are also of particular interest as tools for developing new therapeutic options for OCD, with the greatest convergence focusing on the glutamatergic system, the role of ovarian and related hormones, and the exploration of new potential targets for deep brain stimulation. Finally, future research on neurocognitive deficits associated with OCD through the use of analogous animal tasks could also provide a genuine opportunity to disentangle the complex etiology of the disorder. PMID:26346234

  16. [Efficient and rapid liquid reduction animal model].

    PubMed

    Han, Bing; Kou, Shu-ming; Chen, Biao; Peng, Yao-zong; Wang, Yue; Han, Yu-long; Ye, Xiao-li; Li, Xue-gang

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the practicability of establishing zebrafish lipid-lowering drug screening model and the effect of berberine (BBR) on hyperlipidemic zebrafish. Three-month-old zebrafishes were fed with 4% cholesterol for 0, 2, 4, 8, 14, 20, 25, 30 days, and the level of total cholesterol in serum was measured. Zebrafish were randomly divided into four groups: the control group, the high cholesterol diet group, the 0.01% simvastatin-treated group, the 0.1% berberine-treated group and the 0.2% berberine-treated group. The levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TC), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) in serum were measured; the expression of hepatic HMGCR, LDLR and CYP7A1a mRNA expressions were detected by real time PCR. Oil red O staining was performed to observe the changes in fat content in the liver. According to the result, the level of serum TC in the 4% cholesterol diet group significantly was higher than that of the normal control group in a time-dependent manner and reached a stable level at the 20th day. The BBR group showed significant decreases in the levels of TC, TG and LDL-c, HMGCR mRNA expression and fat content and increases in LDLR and CYP7A1a mRNA. The hyperlipidemia zebrafish model was successfully established by feeding with 4% cholesterol for 20 days. The findings lay a foundation for further screenings on lipid-lowering drugs. PMID:27097422

  17. Animal models for inherited peripheral neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    MARTINI, RUDOLF

    1997-01-01

    Recent progress in human genetics and neurobiology has led to the identification of various mutations in particular myelin genes as the cause for many of the known inherited demyelinating peripheral neuropathies. Mutations in 3 distinct myelin genes, PMP22, P0, and connexin 32 cause the 3 major demyelinating subtypes of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, CMT1A, CMT1B and CMTX, respectively. In addition, a reduction in the gene dosage of PMP22 causes hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), while particular point mutations in PMP22 and P0 cause the severe Dejerine-Sottas (DS) neuropathy. A series of spontaneous and genetically engineered rodent mutants for genes for the above-mentioned myelin constituents are now available and their suitability to serve as models for these still untreatable diseases is an issue of particular interest. The spontaneous mutants Trembler-J and Trembler, with point mutations in PMP22, reflect some of the pathological alterations seen in CMT1A and DS patients, respectively. Furthermore, engineered mutants that either over or underexpress particular myelin genes are suitable models for patients who are similarly compromised in the gene dosage of the corresponding genes. In addition, engineered mutants heterozygously or homozygously deficient in the myelin component P0 show the pathology of distinct CMT1B and DS patients, respectively, while Cx32 deficient mice develop pathological abnormalities similar to those of CMTX patients. Mutants that mimic human peripheral neuropathies might allow the development of strategies to alleviate the symptoms of the diseases, and help to define environmental risk factors for aggravation of the disease. In addition, such mutants might be instrumental in the development of strategies to cure the diseases by gene therapy. PMID:9418989

  18. Animal models for inherited peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Martini, R

    1997-10-01

    Recent progress in human genetics and neurobiology has led to the identification of various mutations in particular myelin genes as the cause for many of the known inherited demyelinating peripheral neuropathies. Mutations in 3 distinct myelin genes, PMP22, P0, and connexin 32 cause the 3 major demyelinating subtypes of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, CMT1A, CMT1B and CMTX, respectively. In addition, a reduction in the gene dosage of PMP22 causes hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), while particular point mutations in PMP22 and P0 cause the severe Dejerine-Sottas (DS) neuropathy. A series of spontaneous and genetically engineered rodent mutants for genes for the above-mentioned myelin constituents are now available and their suitability to serve as models for these still untreatable diseases is an issue of particular interest. The spontaneous mutants Trembler-J and Trembler, with point mutations in PMP22, reflect some of the pathological alterations seen in CMT1A and DS patients, respectively. Furthermore, engineered mutants that either over or underexpress particular myelin genes are suitable models for patients who are similarly compromised in the gene dosage of the corresponding genes. In addition, engineered mutants heterozygously or homozygously deficient in the myelin component P0 show the pathology of distinct CMT1B and DS patients, respectively, while Cx32 deficient mice develop pathological abnormalities similar to those of CMTX patients. Mutants that mimic human peripheral neuropathies might allow the development of strategies to alleviate the symptoms of the diseases, and help to define environmental risk factors for aggravation of the disease. In addition, such mutants might be instrumental in the development of strategies to cure the diseases by gene therapy. PMID:9418989

  19. A search theory model of patch-to-patch forager movement with application to pollinator-mediated gene flow.

    PubMed

    Hoyle, Martin; Cresswell, James E

    2007-09-01

    We present a spatially implicit analytical model of forager movement, designed to address a simple scenario common in nature. We assume minimal depression of patch resources, and discrete foraging bouts, during which foragers fill to capacity. The model is particularly suitable for foragers that search systematically, foragers that deplete resources in a patch only incrementally, and for sit-and-wait foragers, where harvesting does not affect the rate of arrival of forage. Drawing on the theory of job search from microeconomics, we estimate the expected number of patches visited as a function of just two variables: the coefficient of variation of the rate of energy gain among patches, and the ratio of the expected time exploiting a randomly chosen patch and the expected time travelling between patches. We then consider the forager as a pollinator and apply our model to estimate gene flow. Under model assumptions, an upper bound for animal-mediated gene flow between natural plant populations is approximately proportional to the probability that the animal rejects a plant population. In addition, an upper bound for animal-mediated gene flow in any animal-pollinated agricultural crop from a genetically modified (GM) to a non-GM field is approximately proportional to the proportion of fields that are GM and the probability that the animal rejects a field. PMID:17544452

  20. Life sciences research in space: The requirement for animal models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. A.; Philips, R. W.; Ballard, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    Use of animals in NASA space programs is reviewed. Animals are needed because life science experimentation frequently requires long-term controlled exposure to environments, statistical validation, invasive instrumentation or biological tissue sampling, tissue destruction, exposure to dangerous or unknown agents, or sacrifice of the subject. The availability and use of human subjects inflight is complicated by the multiple needs and demands upon crew time. Because only living organisms can sense, integrate and respond to the environment around them, the sole use of tissue culture and computer models is insufficient for understanding the influence of the space environment on intact organisms. Equipment for spaceborne experiments with animals is described.

  1. Current animal models of bladder cancer: Awareness of translatability (Review)

    PubMed Central

    DING, JIE; XU, DING; PAN, CHUNWU; YE, MIN; KANG, JIAN; BAI, QIANG; QI, JUN

    2014-01-01

    Experimental animal models are crucial in the study of biological behavior and pathological development of cancer, and evaluation of the efficacy of novel therapeutic or preventive agents. A variety of animal models that recapitulate human urothelial cell carcinoma have thus far been established and described, while models generated by novel techniques are emerging. At present a number of reviews on animal models of bladder cancer comprise the introduction of one type of method, as opposed to commenting on and comparing all classifications, with the merits of a certain method being explicit but the shortcomings not fully clarified. Thus the aim of the present study was to provide a summary of the currently available animal models of bladder cancer including transplantable (which could be divided into xenogeneic or syngeneic, heterotopic or orthotopic), carcinogen-induced and genetically engineered models in order to introduce their materials and methods and compare their merits as well as focus on the weaknesses, difficulties in operation, associated problems and translational potential of the respective models. Findings of these models would provide information for authors and clinicians to select an appropriate model or to judge relevant preclinical study findings. Pertinent detection methods are therefore briefly introduced and compared. PMID:25120584

  2. Use of Animal Models to Develop Antiaddiction Medications

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Eliot L.

    2008-01-01

    Although addiction is a uniquely human phenomenon, some of its pathognomonic features can be modeled at the animal level. Such features include the euphoric “high” produced by acute administration of addictive drugs; the dysphoric “crash” produced by acute withdrawal, drug-seeking, and drug-taking behaviors; and relapse to drug-seeking behavior after achieving successful abstinence. Animal models exist for each of these features. In this review, I focus on various animal models of addiction and how they can be used to search for clinically effective antiaddiction medications. I conclude by noting some of the new and novel medications that have been developed preclinically using such models and the hope for further developments along such lines. PMID:18803910

  3. Animal models of post-traumatic stress disorder: face validity

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Sonal; Rodríguez-Sierra, Olga; Cascardi, Michele; Paré, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a debilitating condition that develops in a proportion of individuals following a traumatic event. Despite recent advances, ethical limitations associated with human research impede progress in understanding PTSD. Fortunately, much effort has focused on developing animal models to help study the pathophysiology of PTSD. Here, we provide an overview of animal PTSD models where a variety of stressors (physical, psychosocial, or psychogenic) are used to examine the long-term effects of severe trauma. We emphasize models involving predator threat because they reproduce human individual differences in susceptibility to, and in the long-term consequences of, psychological trauma. PMID:23754973

  4. Animal models of post-traumatic stress disorder: face validity.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Sonal; Rodríguez-Sierra, Olga; Cascardi, Michele; Paré, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a debilitating condition that develops in a proportion of individuals following a traumatic event. Despite recent advances, ethical limitations associated with human research impede progress in understanding PTSD. Fortunately, much effort has focused on developing animal models to help study the pathophysiology of PTSD. Here, we provide an overview of animal PTSD models where a variety of stressors (physical, psychosocial, or psychogenic) are used to examine the long-term effects of severe trauma. We emphasize models involving predator threat because they reproduce human individual differences in susceptibility to, and in the long-term consequences of, psychological trauma. PMID:23754973

  5. Recent developments in experimental animal models of Henipavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Rockx, Barry

    2014-07-01

    Hendra (HeV) and Nipah (NiV) viruses (genus Henipavirus (HNV; family Paramyxoviridae) are emerging zoonotic agents that can cause severe respiratory distress and acute encephalitis in humans. Given the lack of effective therapeutics and vaccines for human use, these viruses are considered as public health concerns. Several experimental animal models of HNV infection have been developed in recent years. Here, we review the current status of four of the most promising experimental animal models (mice, hamsters, ferrets, and African green monkeys) and their suitability for modeling the clinical disease, transmission, pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment for HNV infection in humans. PMID:24488776

  6. Behavioral Models of Tinnitus and Hyperacusis in Animals

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Sarah H.; Radziwon, Kelly E.; Stolzberg, Daniel J.; Salvi, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    The phantom perception of tinnitus and reduced sound-level tolerance associated with hyperacusis have a high comorbidity and can be debilitating conditions for which there are no widely accepted treatments. One factor limiting the development of treatments for tinnitus and hyperacusis is the lack of reliable animal behavioral models of these disorders. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to highlight the current animal models of tinnitus and hyperacusis, and to detail the advantages and disadvantages of each paradigm. To date, this is the first review to include models of both tinnitus and hyperacusis. PMID:25278931

  7. Piperidine, pyridine alkaloid inhibition of fetal movement in a day 40 pregnant goat model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The inhibition of fetal movement is one mechanism behind the development of multiple congenital contracture-type defects and cleft palate in developing fetuses of humans and animals. In this study, we tested the alkaloids anabasine, lobeline, and myosmine for agonist actions, and sensitivity to alp...

  8. Animal models of GM2 gangliosidosis: utility and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Cheryl A; Martin, Douglas R

    2016-01-01

    GM2 gangliosidosis, a subset of lysosomal storage disorders, is caused by a deficiency of the glycohydrolase, β-N-acetylhexosaminidase, and includes the closely related Tay–Sachs and Sandhoff diseases. The enzyme deficiency prevents the normal, stepwise degradation of ganglioside, which accumulates unchecked within the cellular lysosome, particularly in neurons. As a result, individuals with GM2 gangliosidosis experience progressive neurological diseases including motor deficits, progressive weakness and hypotonia, decreased responsiveness, vision deterioration, and seizures. Mice and cats are well-established animal models for Sandhoff disease, whereas Jacob sheep are the only known laboratory animal model of Tay–Sachs disease to exhibit clinical symptoms. Since the human diseases are relatively rare, animal models are indispensable tools for further study of pathogenesis and for development of potential treatments. Though no effective treatments for gangliosidoses currently exist, animal models have been used to test promising experimental therapies. Herein, the utility and limitations of gangliosidosis animal models and how they have contributed to the development of potential new treatments are described. PMID:27499644

  9. Animal models of GM2 gangliosidosis: utility and limitations.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Cheryl A; Martin, Douglas R

    2016-01-01

    GM2 gangliosidosis, a subset of lysosomal storage disorders, is caused by a deficiency of the glycohydrolase, β-N-acetylhexosaminidase, and includes the closely related Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases. The enzyme deficiency prevents the normal, stepwise degradation of ganglioside, which accumulates unchecked within the cellular lysosome, particularly in neurons. As a result, individuals with GM2 gangliosidosis experience progressive neurological diseases including motor deficits, progressive weakness and hypotonia, decreased responsiveness, vision deterioration, and seizures. Mice and cats are well-established animal models for Sandhoff disease, whereas Jacob sheep are the only known laboratory animal model of Tay-Sachs disease to exhibit clinical symptoms. Since the human diseases are relatively rare, animal models are indispensable tools for further study of pathogenesis and for development of potential treatments. Though no effective treatments for gangliosidoses currently exist, animal models have been used to test promising experimental therapies. Herein, the utility and limitations of gangliosidosis animal models and how they have contributed to the development of potential new treatments are described. PMID:27499644

  10. How Animal Models Inform Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Hanna E.; Vaccarino, Flora M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Every available approach should be utilized to advance the field of child and adolescent psychiatry. Biological systems are important for the behavioral problems of children. Close examination of non-human animals and the biology and behavior they share with humans is an approach that must be used to advance the clinical work of child psychiatry. Method We review here how model systems are used to contribute to significant insights into childhood psychiatric disorders. Model systems have not only demonstrated causality of risk factors for psychiatric pathophysiology but have also allowed child psychiatrists to think in different ways about risks for psychiatric disorders and multiple levels that might be the basis of recovery and prevention. Results We present examples of how animal systems are utilized to benefit child psychiatry, including through environmental, genetic, and acute biological manipulations. Animal model work has been essential in our current thinking about childhood disorders, including the importance of dose and timing of risk factors, specific features of risk factors that are significant, neurochemistry involved in brain functioning, molecular components of brain development, and the importance of cellular processes previously neglected in psychiatric theories. Conclusion Animal models have clear advantages and disadvantages that must both be considered for these systems to be useful. Coupled with increasingly sophisticated methods for investigating human behavior and biology, animal model systems will continue to make essential contributions to our field. PMID:25901771

  11. ANIMAL MODEL OF NIPPOSTRONGYLUS BRASILIENSIS AND HELIGMOSOMOIDES POLYGYRUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal models of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and Heligmosomoides polygyrus infection are powerful tools for the investigation of the basic biology of immune responses and protective immunity. In particular they model the induction and maintenance of Th2 type immune responses and exhibiting all the ...

  12. Distribution of cow-calf producers' beliefs regarding gathering and holding their cattle and observing animal movement restrictions during an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Amy H; Norby, Bo; Scott, H Morgan; Dean, Wesley; McIntosh, W Alex; Bush, Eric

    2014-12-01

    The voluntary cooperation of producers with disease control measures such as movement restrictions and gathering cattle for testing, vaccination, or depopulation is critical to the success of many disease control programs. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Texas in order to determine the distribution of key beliefs about obeying movement restrictions and gathering and holding cattle for disease control purposes. Two questionnaires were developed and distributed to separate representative samples of Texas cow-calf producers, respectively. The context for each behavior was provided through the use of scenarios in the questionnaire. Belief strength was measured using a 7-point Likert-like scale. Producers surveyed were unsure about the possible negative consequences of gathering and holding their cattle when requested by authorities, suggesting a key need for communication in this area during an outbreak. Respondents identified a lack of manpower and/or financial resources to gather and hold cattle as barriers to their cooperation with orders to gather and hold cattle. Producers also expressed uncertainty about the efficacy of movement restrictions to prevent the spread of foot-and-mouth disease and concern about possible feed shortages or animal suffering. However, there are emotional benefits to complying with movement restrictions and strong social expectations of cooperation with any movement bans put in place. PMID:25315760

  13. Animal Models in HIV-1 Protection and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hessell, Ann J.; Haigwood, Nancy L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the review The purpose of this review is to highlight major advances in the development and use of animal models for HIV-1 research during the last year. Recent findings Animal model research during the last year has focused on the: (i) development and refinement of models; (ii) use of these models to explore key questions about HIV entry, immune control, and persistence; and (iii) key discoveries with these models testing therapeutic and vaccine concepts. Some of the greatest breakthroughs have been in understanding early events surrounding transmission, the effectiveness of broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies as passive prophylaxis, and some new ideas in the area of eliminating the viral reservoir in established infection. Summary Despite the lack of a flawless HIV-1 infection and pathogenesis model, the field has several models that have already made important contributions to our understanding of early events, immune control, and the potential for novel therapies. PMID:25730345

  14. The pain of pain: challenges of animal behavior models.

    PubMed

    Barrett, James E

    2015-04-15

    Berend Olivier has had a long-standing interest in the utility of animal models for a wide variety of therapeutic indications. His work has spanned multiple types of models, blending ethological, or species typical and naturalistic behaviors, along with methodologies based on learned behavior. He has consistently done so, from an analytical as well as predictive perspective, and has made multiple contributions while working in both the pharmaceutical industry and within an academic institution. Although focused primarily on psychiatric disorders, Berend has conducted research in the area of pain in humans and in animals, demonstrating an expansive appreciation for the breadth, scope and significance of the science and applications of the discipline of pharmacology to these diverse areas. This review focuses on the use of animal models in pain research from the perspective of the long-standing deficiencies in the development of therapeutics in this area and from a preclinical perspective where the translational weaknesses have been quite problematic. The challenges confronting animal models of pain, however, are not unique to this area of research, as they cut across several therapeutic areas. Despite the deficiencies, failures and concerns, existing animal models of pain continue to be of widespread use and are essential to progress in pain research as well as in other areas. Although not focusing on specific animal models of pain, this paper seeks to examine general issues facing the use of these models. It does so by exploring alternative approaches which capture recent developments, which build upon principles and concepts we have learned from Berend's contributions, and which provide the prospect of helping to address the absence of novel therapeutics in this area. PMID:25583180

  15. Use of social network analysis to characterize the pattern of animal movements in the initial phases of the 2001 foot and mouth disease (FMD) epidemic in the UK.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Pelaez, A; Pfeiffer, D U; Soares-Magalhães, R J; Guitian, F J

    2006-09-15

    Aggregated movement data do not take into account the relative position of the units within a higher-level structure. Social network analysis (SNA) and graph theory provide a tool to organise and analyse relational data overcoming the limitations of standard methods where the position of individuals/observations does not affect the result of the analysis. Some recorded movements of cattle and sheep during the initial phase of the 2001 foot and mouth disease (FMD) outbreak in the UK, before the ban on animal movements was imposed, are analysed descriptively using SNA. With the data available, a directed dichotomized network with 653 nodes and 797 arches was analysed. Most of the 10 nodes with the highest betweenness (3 farms, 4 markets and 3 dealers) were identified as key players in the initial spread of the infection. Three groups of nodes with distinctive proportion of k < or = 2 neighbours would result in three different theoretical outbreak dimensions assuming that the infection is only disseminated by the movements included in the network: no spread, spread up to 7% and around 25%. There are three hierarchical clusters with 308, 215 and 130 nodes, respectively. Farms in cluster 1 appear to be more similar in their movement patterns to non-farm holdings than to farms in clusters 2 and 3. Relative betweenness, k-neighbours and structural equivalence using hierarchical clustering were able to identify key actors in the evolution of the initial phases of the FMD outbreak such as markets, dealers and farms with atypical movement patterns. Holdings with high betweenness, large number of k < or = 2 neighbours and with movement pattern as in cluster 1 should be targeted in disease control activities once primary actors like markets, dealers and slaughter houses have been contained. PMID:16769142

  16. Computer simulation models are implementable as replacements for animal experiments.

    PubMed

    Badyal, Dinesh K; Modgill, Vikas; Kaur, Jasleen

    2009-04-01

    It has become increasingly difficult to perform animal experiments, because of issues related to the procurement of animals, and strict regulations and ethical issues related to their use. As a result, it is felt that the teaching of pharmacology should be more clinically oriented and that unnecessary animal experimentation should be avoided. Although a number of computer simulation models (CSMs) are available, they are not being widely used. Interactive demonstrations were conducted to encourage the departmental faculty to use CSMs. Four different animal experiments were selected, that dealt with actions of autonomic drugs. The students observed demonstrations of animal experiments involving conventional methods and the use of CSMs. This was followed by hands-on experience of the same experiment, but using CSMs in small groups, instead of hands-on experience with the animal procedures. Test scores and feedback showed that there was better understanding of the mechanisms of action of the drugs, gained in a shorter time. The majority of the students found the teaching programme used to be good to excellent. CSMs can be used repeatedly and independently by students, and this avoids unnecessary experimentation and also causing pain and trauma to animals. The CSM programme can be implemented in existing teaching schedules for pharmacology undergraduate teaching with basic infrastructure support, and is readily adaptable for use by other institutes. PMID:19453215

  17. Pain assessment in animal models: do we need further studies?

    PubMed Central

    Gigliuto, Carmelo; De Gregori, Manuela; Malafoglia, Valentina; Raffaeli, William; Compagnone, Christian; Visai, Livia; Petrini, Paola; Avanzini, Maria Antonietta; Muscoli, Carolina; Viganò, Jacopo; Calabrese, Francesco; Dominioni, Tommaso; Allegri, Massimo; Cobianchi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    In the last two decades, animal models have become important tools in understanding and treating pain, and in predicting analgesic efficacy. Although rodent models retain a dominant role in the study of pain mechanisms, large animal models may predict human biology and pharmacology in certain pain conditions more accurately. Taking into consideration the anatomical and physiological characteristics common to man and pigs (median body size, digestive apparatus, number, size, distribution and communication of vessels in dermal skin, epidermal–dermal junctions, the immunoreactivity of peptide nerve fibers, distribution of nociceptive and non-nociceptive fiber classes, and changes in axonal excitability), swines seem to provide the most suitable animal model for pain assessment. Locomotor function, clinical signs, and measurements (respiratory rate, heart rate, blood pressure, temperature, electromyography), behavior (bright/quiet, alert, responsive, depressed, unresponsive), plasma concentration of substance P and cortisol, vocalization, lameness, and axon reflex vasodilatation by laser Doppler imaging have been used to assess pain, but none of these evaluations have proved entirely satisfactory. It is necessary to identify new methods for evaluating pain in large animals (particularly pigs), because of their similarities to humans. This could lead to improved assessment of pain and improved analgesic treatment for both humans and laboratory animals. PMID:24855386

  18. Pain assessment in animal models: do we need further studies?

    PubMed

    Gigliuto, Carmelo; De Gregori, Manuela; Malafoglia, Valentina; Raffaeli, William; Compagnone, Christian; Visai, Livia; Petrini, Paola; Avanzini, Maria Antonietta; Muscoli, Carolina; Viganò, Jacopo; Calabrese, Francesco; Dominioni, Tommaso; Allegri, Massimo; Cobianchi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    In the last two decades, animal models have become important tools in understanding and treating pain, and in predicting analgesic efficacy. Although rodent models retain a dominant role in the study of pain mechanisms, large animal models may predict human biology and pharmacology in certain pain conditions more accurately. Taking into consideration the anatomical and physiological characteristics common to man and pigs (median body size, digestive apparatus, number, size, distribution and communication of vessels in dermal skin, epidermal-dermal junctions, the immunoreactivity of peptide nerve fibers, distribution of nociceptive and non-nociceptive fiber classes, and changes in axonal excitability), swines seem to provide the most suitable animal model for pain assessment. Locomotor function, clinical signs, and measurements (respiratory rate, heart rate, blood pressure, temperature, electromyography), behavior (bright/quiet, alert, responsive, depressed, unresponsive), plasma concentration of substance P and cortisol, vocalization, lameness, and axon reflex vasodilatation by laser Doppler imaging have been used to assess pain, but none of these evaluations have proved entirely satisfactory. It is necessary to identify new methods for evaluating pain in large animals (particularly pigs), because of their similarities to humans. This could lead to improved assessment of pain and improved analgesic treatment for both humans and laboratory animals. PMID:24855386

  19. Diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy: insights from animal models.

    PubMed

    Stables, Catherine L; Glasser, Rebecca L; Feldman, Eva L

    2013-10-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a relatively common and often devastating complication of diabetes. The major clinical signs are tachycardia, exercise intolerance, and orthostatic hypotension, but the most severe aspects of this complication are high rates of cardiac events and mortality. One of the earliest manifestations of CAN is reduced heart rate variability, and detection of this, along with abnormal results in postural blood pressure testing and/or the Valsalva maneuver, are central to diagnosis of the disease. The treatment options for CAN, beyond glycemic control, are extremely limited and lack evidence of efficacy. The underlying molecular mechanisms are also poorly understood. Thus, CAN is associated with a poor prognosis and there is a compelling need for research to understand, prevent, and reverse CAN. In this review of the literature we examine the use and usefulness of animal models of CAN in diabetes. Compared to other diabetic complications, the number of animal studies of CAN is very low. The published studies range across a variety of species, methods of inducing diabetes, and timescales examined, leading to high variability in study outcomes. The lack of well-characterized animal models makes it difficult to judge the relevance of these models to the human disease. One major advantage of animal studies is the ability to probe underlying molecular mechanisms, and the limited numbers of mechanistic studies conducted to date are outlined. Thus, while animal models of CAN in diabetes are crucial to better understanding and development of therapies, they are currently under-used. PMID:23562143

  20. Animal Models of Tick-Borne Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Zivcec, Marko; Safronetz, David; Feldmann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Tick-borne hemorrhagic fever viruses (TBHFV) are detected throughout the African and Eurasian continents and are an emerging or re-emerging threat to many nations. Due to the largely sporadic incidences of these severe diseases, information on human cases and research activities in general have been limited. In the past decade, however, novel TBHFVs have emerged and areas of endemicity have expanded. Therefore, the development of countermeasures is of utmost importance in combating TBHFV as elimination of vectors and interrupting enzootic cycles is all but impossible and ecologically questionable. As in vivo models are the only way to test efficacy and safety of countermeasures, understanding of the available animal models and the development and refinement of animal models is critical in negating the detrimental impact of TBHFVs on public and animal health. PMID:25437041

  1. Engineering Large Animal Species to Model Human Diseases.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    Animal models are an important resource for studying human diseases. Genetically engineered mice are the most commonly used species and have made significant contributions to our understanding of basic biology, disease mechanisms, and drug development. However, they often fail to recreate important aspects of human diseases and thus can have limited utility as translational research tools. Developing disease models in species more similar to humans may provide a better setting in which to study disease pathogenesis and test new treatments. This unit provides an overview of the history of genetically engineered large animals and the techniques that have made their development possible. Factors to consider when planning a large animal model, including choice of species, type of modification and methodology, characterization, production methods, and regulatory compliance, are also covered. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27367161

  2. What Constitutes a Relevant Animal Model of the Ketogenic Diet?

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Gregory L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Animal models of human disease have been enormously important in improving our understanding of the pathophysiological basis and the development of novel therapies. In epilepsy, modeling using both in vivo and in vitro preparations has provided insight into fundamental neuronal mechanisms. Indeed, much of our understanding of seizure mechanisms comes from animal studies. The conceptual advances in understanding basic mechanisms of epilepsies have been largely validated in humans, attesting to the validity of the rationale and providing a basis for bridging the gaps between experimental and human data. While the ketogenic diet is clearly efficacious in a wide variety of seizure types and syndromes, the mechanism of action of the diet has not been established. Animal models will continue to be enormously important in furthering our understanding of how dietary therapy can help individuals with epilepsy. PMID:19049589

  3. Differential optical imaging in animal models using infrared transillumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Sanhita; Le, Theresamai; Amin, Khalid; Faris, Gregory W.

    2007-02-01

    We demonstrate the use of diffuse optical imaging via transillumination to detect cancerous tissue in a rat animal model. In this imaging modality infrared radiation is transmitted through whole animal tissue. The radiation is nonionizing and uses endogenous contrast: namely deoxyhemoglobin (Hb) and oxyhemoglobin (HbO). Differential image analysis is performed to visualize the presence of cancerous tissue. Varying levels of inspired air and carbogen gases ensure a differential response in absorption by blood due to changing levels of Hb and HbO. We believe that this response may be sufficient to provide contrast in differential image analysis. The present method also sheds light on physiological challenges in whole animal imaging especially with respect to significant optical signals from healthy tissue. Specifically, we have seen strong signals from abdominal regions in normal rats indicative of diet related anomalous transmission. We have also been able to track the changes in optical signal during animal death.

  4. Imaging Techniques for Small Animal Models of Pulmonary Disease: MR Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Driehuys, Bastiaan; Hedlund, Laurence W.

    2009-01-01

    In vivo magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) of the small animal lung has become a valuable research tool, especially for preclinical studies. MRM offers a noninvasive and nondestructive tool for imaging small animals longitudinally and at high spatial resolution. We summarize some of the technical and biologic problems and solutions associated with imaging the small animal lung and describe several important pulmonary disease applications. A major advantage of MR is direct imaging of the gas spaces of the lung using breathable gases such as helium and xenon. When polarized, these gases become rich MR signal sources. In animals breathing hyperpolarized helium, the dynamics of gas distribution can be followed and airway constrictions and obstructions can be detected. Diffusion coefficients of helium can be calculated from diffusion-sensitive images, which can reveal micro-structural changes in the lungs associated with pathologies such as emphysema and fibrosis. Unlike helium, xenon in the lung is absorbed by blood and exhibits different frequencies in gas, tissue, or erythrocytes. Thus, with MR imaging, the movement of xenon gas can be tracked through pulmonary compartments to detect defects of gas transfer. MRM has become a valuable tool for studying morphologic and functional changes in small animal models of lung diseases. PMID:17325972

  5. Minireview: Epigenetic programming of diabetes and obesity: animal models.

    PubMed

    Seki, Yoshinori; Williams, Lyda; Vuguin, Patricia M; Charron, Maureen J

    2012-03-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that the intrauterine (IU) environment has a significant and lasting effect on the long-term health of the growing fetus and the development of metabolic disease in later life as put forth in the fetal origins of disease hypothesis. Metabolic diseases have been associated with alterations in the epigenome that occur without changes in the DNA sequence, such as cytosine methylation of DNA, histone posttranslational modifications, and micro-RNA. Animal models of epigenetic modifications secondary to an altered IU milieu are an invaluable tool to study the mechanisms that determine the development of metabolic diseases, such as diabetes and obesity. Rodent and nonlitter bearing animals are good models for the study of disease, because they have similar embryology, anatomy, and physiology to humans. Thus, it is feasible to monitor and modify the IU environment of animal models in order to gain insight into the molecular basis of human metabolic disease pathogenesis. In this review, the database of PubMed was searched for articles published between 1999 and 2011. Key words included epigenetic modifications, IU growth retardation, small for gestational age, animal models, metabolic disease, and obesity. The inclusion criteria used to select studies included animal models of epigenetic modifications during fetal and neonatal development associated with adult metabolic syndrome. Experimental manipulations included: changes in the nutritional status of the pregnant female (calorie-restricted, high-fat, or low-protein diets during pregnancy), as well as the father; interference with placenta function, or uterine blood flow, environmental toxin exposure during pregnancy, as well as dietary modifications during the neonatal (lactation) as well as pubertal period. This review article is focused solely on studies in animal models that demonstrate epigenetic changes that are correlated with manifestation of metabolic disease, including diabetes

  6. Animal models of skin disease for drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Avci, Pinar; Sadasivam, Magesh; Gupta, Asheesh; De Melo, Wanessa CMA; Huang, Ying-Ying; Yin, Rui; Rakkiyappan, Chandran; Kumar, Raj; Otufowora, Ayodeji; Nyame, Theodore; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Discovery of novel drugs, treatments, and testing of consumer products in the field of dermatology is a multi-billion dollar business. Due to the distressing nature of many dermatological diseases, and the enormous consumer demand for products to reverse the effects of skin photodamage, aging, and hair loss, this is a very active field. Areas covered In this paper, we will cover the use of animal models that have been reported to recapitulate to a greater or lesser extent the features of human dermatological disease. There has been a remarkable increase in the number and variety of transgenic mouse models in recent years, and the basic strategy for constructing them is outlined. Expert opinion Inflammatory and autoimmune skin diseases are all represented by a range of mouse models both transgenic and normal. Skin cancer is mainly studied in mice and fish. Wound healing is studied in a wider range of animal species, and skin infections such as acne and leprosy also have been studied in animal models. Moving to the more consumer-oriented area of dermatology, there are models for studying the harmful effect of sunlight on the skin, and testing of sunscreens, and several different animal models of hair loss or alopecia. PMID:23293893

  7. The role of animal models in tendon research

    PubMed Central

    Hast, M. W.; Zuskov, A.; Soslowsky, L. J.

    2014-01-01

    Tendinopathy is a debilitating musculoskeletal condition which can cause significant pain and lead to complete rupture of the tendon, which often requires surgical repair. Due in part to the large spectrum of tendon pathologies, these disorders continue to be a clinical challenge. Animal models are often used in this field of research as they offer an attractive framework to examine the cascade of processes that occur throughout both tendon pathology and repair. This review discusses the structural, mechanical, and biological changes that occur throughout tendon pathology in animal models, as well as strategies for the improvement of tendon healing. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:193–202. PMID:24958818

  8. HCV animal models: a journey of more than 30 years.

    PubMed

    Meuleman, Philip; Leroux-Roels, Geert

    2009-09-01

    In the 1970s and 1980s it became increasingly clear that blood transfusions could induce a form of chronic hepatitis that could not be ascribed to any of the viruses known to cause liver inflammation. In 1989, the hepatitis C virus (HCV) was discovered and found to be the major causative agent of these infections. Because of its narrow tropism, the in vivo study of this virus was, especially in the early days, limited to the chimpanzee. In the past decade, several alternative animal models have been created. In this review we review these novel animal models and their contribution to our current understanding of the biology of HCV. PMID:21994547

  9. Translational value of animal models of kidney failure.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Alberto; Sanchez-Niño, Maria D; Izquierdo, Maria C; Martin-Cleary, Catalina; Garcia-Bermejo, Laura; Moreno, Juan A; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Draibe, Juliana; Cruzado, Josep M; Garcia-Gonzalez, Miguel A; Lopez-Novoa, Jose M; Soler, Maria J; Sanz, Ana B

    2015-07-15

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are associated with decreased renal function and increased mortality risk, while the therapeutic armamentarium is unsatisfactory. The availability of adequate animal models may speed up the discovery of biomarkers for disease staging and therapy individualization as well as design and testing of novel therapeutic strategies. Some longstanding animal models have failed to result in therapeutic advances in the clinical setting, such as kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury and diabetic nephropathy models. In this regard, most models for diabetic nephropathy are unsatisfactory in that they do not evolve to renal failure. Satisfactory models for additional nephropathies are needed. These include anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, IgA nephropathy, anti-phospholipase-A2-receptor (PLA2R) membranous nephropathy and Fabry nephropathy. However, recent novel models hold promise for clinical translation. Thus, the AKI to CKD translation has been modeled, in some cases with toxins of interest for human CKD such as aristolochic acid. Genetically modified mice provide models for Alport syndrome evolving to renal failure that have resulted in clinical recommendations, polycystic kidney disease models that have provided clues for the development of tolvaptan, that was recently approved for the human disease in Japan; and animal models also contributed to target C5 with eculizumab in hemolytic uremic syndrome. Some ongoing trials explore novel concepts derived from models, such TWEAK targeting as tissue protection for lupus nephritis. We now review animal models reproducing diverse, genetic and acquired, causes of AKI and CKD evolving to kidney failure and discuss the contribution to clinical translation and prospects for the future. PMID:25814248

  10. Animal models and brain circuits in drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Kalivas, Peter W; Peters, Jamie; Knackstedt, Lori

    2006-12-01

    Animal models in the field of addiction are considered to be among the best available models of neuropsychiatric disease. These models have undergone a number of refinements that allow deeper understanding of the circuitry involved in initiating drug seeking and relapse. Notably, the demonstrable involvement of classic corticostriatal habit circuitry and the engagement of prefrontal cortical circuits in extinction training may have relevance to the therapeutic modulation of habit circuitry and drug addiction in humans. PMID:17200461

  11. [Using spectra and visual modeling to study animal coloration].

    PubMed

    Yang, Can-Chao; Liang, Wei

    2013-12-01

    Animal coloration has many adaptive functions and plays an important role in signal communication both among intra- and interspecies. For example, it has been widely used in mate choice, intrasexual competition, and as aposematic or cryptic coloration in predator avoidance. Many colors and pigments also function in microbial resistance, structural support, photoprotection, and thermoregulation. Differing from human vision, based on RGB system, many other animals have tetrachromatic vision system, which includes the ultraviolet (UV) range that is undetectable by human eyes. Previous studies showed that ultraviolet is important in some species' social signaling and communication. Moreover, cone inner segments of most classes of vertebrate contain an oil droplet, which acts as a cut-off filter absorbing wavelengths below a critical value, and transmitting longer wavelengths. Animal and human vision is significantly different in that the classification of color by human standards may be a misleading for measuring animal coloration. Here, we illuminate how to use fiber spectrophotometer to quantify animal coloration, and analyze it by spectra analysis and visual modeling. As an example, we obtained plumage reflectance spectra from male and female scarlet minivets (Pericrocotus flammeus). This bird species is sexually dimorphic that the males have plumage color in black and red, while the females have grey and yellow accordingly. These plumage colors are typically generated from melanin and carotenoid pigments, which have an effect on antioxidant activity. Analysis of spectra segments provides hue, chroma, brightness and relative brightness of each wave range. Visual modeling maps color patches on tetrahedral color space and Robinson projection, meanwhile, calculates color span and color space volume which describe the color contrast and color diversity, respectively. In visual modeling, ambient light irradiance and spectral sensitivity of animal retinas are included

  12. Cardiovascular imaging: what have we learned from animal models?

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Arnoldo; Fernández-Friera, Leticia; Villalba, María; López-Melgar, Beatriz; España, Samuel; Mateo, Jesús; Mota, Ruben A.; Jiménez-Borreguero, Jesús; Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular imaging has become an indispensable tool for patient diagnosis and follow up. Probably the wide clinical applications of imaging are due to the possibility of a detailed and high quality description and quantification of cardiovascular system structure and function. Also phenomena that involve complex physiological mechanisms and biochemical pathways, such as inflammation and ischemia, can be visualized in a non-destructive way. The widespread use and evolution of imaging would not have been possible without animal studies. Animal models have allowed for instance, (i) the technical development of different imaging tools, (ii) to test hypothesis generated from human studies and finally, (iii) to evaluate the translational relevance assessment of in vitro and ex-vivo results. In this review, we will critically describe the contribution of animal models to the use of biomedical imaging in cardiovascular medicine. We will discuss the characteristics of the most frequent models used in/for imaging studies. We will cover the major findings of animal studies focused in the cardiovascular use of the repeatedly used imaging techniques in clinical practice and experimental studies. We will also describe the physiological findings and/or learning processes for imaging applications coming from models of the most common cardiovascular diseases. In these diseases, imaging research using animals has allowed the study of aspects such as: ventricular size, shape, global function, and wall thickening, local myocardial function, myocardial perfusion, metabolism and energetic assessment, infarct quantification, vascular lesion characterization, myocardial fiber structure, and myocardial calcium uptake. Finally we will discuss the limitations and future of imaging research with animal models. PMID:26539113

  13. Contemporary Animal Models For Human Gene Therapy Applications.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Chitra; Nathar, Trupti Job; Ghosh, Arkasubhra; Hickstein, Dennis Durand; Remington Nelson, Everette Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Over the past three decades, gene therapy has been making considerable progress as an alternative strategy in the treatment of many diseases. Since 2009, several studies have been reported in humans on the successful treatment of various diseases. Animal models mimicking human disease conditions are very essential at the preclinical stage before embarking on a clinical trial. In gene therapy, for instance, they are useful in the assessment of variables related to the use of viral vectors such as safety, efficacy, dosage and localization of transgene expression. However, choosing a suitable disease-specific model is of paramount importance for successful clinical translation. This review focuses on the animal models that are most commonly used in gene therapy studies, such as murine, canine, non-human primates, rabbits, porcine, and a more recently developed humanized mice. Though small and large animals both have their own pros and cons as disease-specific models, the choice is made largely based on the type and length of study performed. While small animals with a shorter life span could be well-suited for degenerative/aging studies, large animals with longer life span could suit longitudinal studies and also help with dosage adjustments to maximize therapeutic benefit. Recently, humanized mice or mouse-human chimaeras have gained interest in the study of human tissues or cells, thereby providing a more reliable understanding of therapeutic interventions. Thus, animal models are of great importance with regard to testing new vector technologies in vivo for assessing safety and efficacy prior to a gene therapy clinical trial. PMID:26415576

  14. Experimental animal models for studies on the mechanisms of blast-induced neurotrauma.

    PubMed

    Risling, Mårten; Davidsson, Johan

    2012-01-01

    A blast injury is a complex type of physical trauma resulting from the detonation of explosive compounds and has become an important issue due to the use of improvised explosive devices (IED) in current military conflicts. Blast-induced neurotrauma (BINT) is a major concern in contemporary military medicine and includes a variety of injuries that range from mild to lethal. Extreme forces and their complex propagation characterize BINT. Modern body protection and the development of armored military vehicles can be assumed to have changed the outcome of BINT. Primary blast injuries are caused by overpressure waves whereas secondary, tertiary, and quaternary blast injuries can have more varied origins such as the impact of fragments, abnormal movements, or heat. The characteristics of the blast wave can be assumed to be significantly different in open field detonations compared to explosions in a confined space, such an armored vehicle. Important parameters include peak pressure, duration, and shape of the pulse. Reflections from walls and armor can make the prediction of effects in individual cases very complex. Epidemiological data do not contain information of the comparative importance of the different blast mechanisms. It is therefore important to generate data in carefully designed animal models. Such models can be selective reproductions of a primary blast, penetrating injuries from fragments, acceleration movements, or combinations of such mechanisms. It is of crucial importance that the physical parameters of the employed models are well characterized so that the experiments can be reproduced in different laboratory settings. Ideally, pressure recordings should be calibrated by using the same equipment in several laboratories. With carefully designed models and thoroughly evaluated animal data it should be possible to achieve a translation of data between animal and clinical data. Imaging and computer simulation represent a possible link between experiments

  15. Experimental Animal Models for Studies on the Mechanisms of Blast-Induced Neurotrauma

    PubMed Central

    Risling, Mårten; Davidsson, Johan

    2012-01-01

    A blast injury is a complex type of physical trauma resulting from the detonation of explosive compounds and has become an important issue due to the use of improvised explosive devices (IED) in current military conflicts. Blast-induced neurotrauma (BINT) is a major concern in contemporary military medicine and includes a variety of injuries that range from mild to lethal. Extreme forces and their complex propagation characterize BINT.