Science.gov

Sample records for modeling exercise evaluation

  1. Evaluation Training: Simulation Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Carl B.; Farr, Roger

    The preparation of this simulation material package is guided by the concept of an evaluator as a decision-maker, based on the definition of evaluation as a continuous assessment concerned with answering decision-making questions. The continuous concept of evaluation is based on the model created by Egon Guba and Daniel Stufflebeam, named by its…

  2. What are the Starting Points? Evaluating Base-Year Assumptions in the Asian Modeling Exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Waldhoff, Stephanie; Clarke, Leon E.; Fujimori, Shinichiro

    2012-12-01

    A common feature of model inter-comparison efforts is that the base year numbers for important parameters such as population and GDP can differ substantially across models. This paper explores the sources and implications of this variation in Asian countries across the models participating in the Asian Modeling Exercise (AME). Because the models do not all have a common base year, each team was required to provide data for 2005 for comparison purposes. This paper compares the year 2005 information for different models, noting the degree of variation in important parameters, including population, GDP, primary energy, electricity, and CO2 emissions. It then explores the difference in these key parameters across different sources of base-year information. The analysis confirms that the sources provide different values for many key parameters. This variation across data sources and additional reasons why models might provide different base-year numbers, including differences in regional definitions, differences in model base year, and differences in GDP transformation methodologies, are then discussed in the context of the AME scenarios. Finally, the paper explores the implications of base-year variation on long-term model results.

  3. Automatic evaluations and exercise setting preference in frequent exercisers.

    PubMed

    Antoniewicz, Franziska; Brand, Ralf

    2014-12-01

    The goals of this study were to test whether exercise-related stimuli can elicit automatic evaluative responses and whether automatic evaluations reflect exercise setting preference in highly active exercisers. An adapted version of the Affect Misattribution Procedure was employed. Seventy-two highly active exercisers (26 years ± 9.03; 43% female) were subliminally primed (7 ms) with pictures depicting typical fitness center scenarios or gray rectangles (control primes). After each prime, participants consciously evaluated the "pleasantness" of a Chinese symbol. Controlled evaluations were measured with a questionnaire and were more positive in participants who regularly visited fitness centers than in those who reported avoiding this exercise setting. Only center exercisers gave automatic positive evaluations of the fitness center setting (partial eta squared = .08). It is proposed that a subliminal Affect Misattribution Procedure paradigm can elicit automatic evaluations to exercising and that, in highly active exercisers, these evaluations play a role in decisions about the exercise setting rather than the amounts of physical exercise. Findings are interpreted in terms of a dual systems theory of social information processing and behavior. PMID:25602145

  4. EVALUATION OF INTERNAL MEDICINE RESIDENTS AS EXERCISE ROLE MODELS AND ASSOCIATIONS WITH SELF-REPORTED COUNSELING BEHAVIOR, CONFIDENCE, AND PERCEIVED SUCCESS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Patients perceive physicians who practice healthy personal behaviors as more credible and better able to motivate patients to make healthy lifestyle choices. Purposes: To evaluate internal medicine resident physicians as role models for promoting exercise by an assessment of physician ph...

  5. A Modeling Exercise for the Organic Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitlock, Christine R.

    2010-01-01

    An in-class molecular modeling exercise is described. Groups of students are given molecular models to investigate and questions about the models to answer. This exercise is a quick and effective way to review nomenclature, stereochemistry, and conformational analysis.

  6. Emergency Exercise Participation and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julie; Black, Lynette; Williams, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Extension is uniquely positioned to participate in emergency exercises, formally or informally, with the goal of engaging community members in emergency and disaster preparedness. With their knowledge of community needs, Extension personnel are valuable resources and can assist emergency managers in the process of identifying local risks and…

  7. A Comparative Study Evaluating the Impact of Physical Exercise on Disease Progression in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Maliszewska-Cyna, Ewelina; Xhima, Kristiana; Aubert, Isabelle

    2016-05-01

    Evidence suggests that physical exercise can serve as a preventive strategy against Alzheimer's disease (AD). In contrast, much less is known about the impact of exercise when it is introduced after cognitive deficits are established. Using the TgCRND8 mouse model of amyloidosis, we compared the effects of exercise as an intervention strategy aimed at altering disease progression. Voluntary running for 1 month or 2 months was introduced in 3-month-old TgCRND8 mice, which exhibit amyloid-beta (Aβ) plaque pathology and cognitive deficits at this age. Specifically, we examined Aβ plaque load, spatial memory, and neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus. After 1 month of running, TgCRND8 mice spent more time in the novel arm of the Y-maze compared to the familiar arms, indicating improved memory. The levels of doublecortin (a marker of immature neurons) were increased in TgCRND8 mice running for 1 month, but with no significant difference in the number of new mature neurons or plaque burden. As the disease progressed, running prevented further deficits in the Y-maze performance and hippocampal neurogenesis and it reduced plaque load pathology in TgCRND8 mice running for 2 months, compared to non-running transgenics. Therefore, the impact of running on memory, neurogenesis, and amyloid pathology was of greater significance when sustained through later stages of the disease. PMID:27163797

  8. Positive effect of combined exercise training in a model of metabolic syndrome and menopause: autonomic, inflammatory, and oxidative stress evaluations.

    PubMed

    Conti, Filipe Fernandes; Brito, Janaina de Oliveira; Bernardes, Nathalia; Dias, Danielle da Silva; Malfitano, Christiane; Morris, Mariana; Llesuy, Susana Francisca; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia; De Angelis, Kátia

    2015-12-15

    It is now well established that after menopause cardiometabolic disorders become more common. Recently, resistance exercise has been recommended as a complement to aerobic (combined training, CT) for the treatment of cardiometabolic diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of CT in hypertensive ovariectomized rats undergoing fructose overload in blood pressure variability (BPV), inflammation, and oxidative stress parameters. Female rats were divided into the following groups (n = 8/group): sedentary normotensive Wistar rats (C), and sedentary (FHO) or trained (FHOT) ovariectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats undergoing and fructose overload. CT was performed on a treadmill and ladder adapted to rats in alternate days (8 wk; 40-60% maximal capacity). Arterial pressure (AP) was directly measured. Oxidative stress and inflammation were measured on cardiac and renal tissues. The association of risk factors (hypertension + ovariectomy + fructose) promoted increase in insulin resistance, mean AP (FHO: 174 ± 4 vs. C: 108 ± 1 mmHg), heart rate (FHO: 403 ± 12 vs. C: 352 ± 11 beats/min), BPV, cardiac inflammation (tumor necrosis factor-α-FHO: 65.8 ± 9.9 vs. C: 23.3 ± 4.3 pg/mg protein), and oxidative stress cardiac and renal tissues. However, CT was able to reduce mean AP (FHOT: 158 ± 4 mmHg), heart rate (FHOT: 303 ± 5 beats/min), insulin resistance, and sympathetic modulation. Moreover, the trained rats presented increased nitric oxide bioavailability, reduced tumor necrosis factor-α (FHOT: 33.1 ± 4.9 pg/mg protein), increased IL-10 in cardiac tissue and reduced lipoperoxidation, and increased antioxidant defenses in cardiac and renal tissues. In conclusion, the association of risk factors promoted an additional impairment in metabolic, cardiovascular, autonomic, inflammatory, and oxidative stress parameters and combined exercise training was able to attenuate these dysfunctions. PMID:26423710

  9. Exer-Genie(Registered Trademark) Exercise Device Hardware Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffner, Grant; Sharp,Carwyn; Stroud, Leah

    2008-01-01

    An engineering evaluation was performed on the ExerGenie(r) exercise device to quantify its capabilities and limitations to address questions from the Constellation Program. Three subjects performed rowing and circuit training sessions to assess the suitability of the device for aerobic exercise. Three subjects performed a resistive exercise session to assess the suitability of the device for resistive exercise. Since 1 subject performed both aerobic and resistive exercise sessions, a total of 5 subjects participated.

  10. Weight Loss and the Prevention of Weight Regain: Evaluation of a Treatment Model of Exercise Self-Regulation Generalizing to Controlled Eating

    PubMed Central

    Annesi, James J; Johnson, Ping H; Tennant, Gisèle A; Porter, Kandice J; McEwen, Kristin L

    2016-01-01

    Context: For decades, behavioral weight-loss treatments have been unsuccessful beyond the short term. Development and testing of innovative, theoretically based methods that depart from current failed practices is a priority for behavioral medicine. Objective: To evaluate a new, theory-based protocol in which exercise support methods are employed to facilitate improvements in psychosocial predictors of controlled eating and sustained weight loss. Methods: Women with obesity were randomized into either a comparison treatment that incorporated a print manual plus telephone follow-ups (n = 55) or an experimental treatment of The Coach Approach exercise-support protocol followed after 2 months by group nutrition sessions focused on generalizing self-regulatory skills from an exercise support to a controlled eating context (n = 55). Repeated-measures analysis of variance contrasted group changes in weight, physical activity, fruit and vegetable intake, mood, and exercise- and eating-related self-regulation and self-efficacy over 24 months. Regression analyses determined salient interrelations of change scores over both the weight-loss phase (baseline-month 6) and weight-loss maintenance phase (month 6-month 24). Results: Improvements in all psychological measures, physical activity, and fruit and vegetable intake were significantly greater in the experimental group where a mean weight loss of 5.7 kg (6.1% of initial body weight) occurred at month 6, and was largely maintained at a loss of 5.1 kg (5.4%) through the full 24 months of the study. After establishing temporal intervals for changes in self-regulation, self-efficacy, and mood that best predicted improvements in physical activity and eating, a consolidated multiple mediation model suggested that change in self-regulation best predicted weight loss, whereas change in self-efficacy best predicted maintenance of lost weight. Conclusions: Because for most participants loss of weight remained greater than that

  11. Exercise-Related Sudden Death: Cardiovascular Evaluation of Exercisers (Part 2 of 2).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Camp, Steven P.

    1988-01-01

    A primary goal of the cardiovascular evaluation of exercisers is to identify conditions that carry the risk of exercise-related sudden death. These conditions, which are found in a careful evaluation of the patient, are identifed and described in detail. (Author/JL)

  12. Fun and fit: evaluation of a pediatric exercise program.

    PubMed

    Gruenfeld, Elizabeth A; Zagarins, Sofija E; Walker, Allison P; Skinner, Sandra S

    2013-01-01

    While the components of effective pediatric exercise interventions have been identified in structured research settings, recent reviews have highlighted the need for translating these interventions into accessible programs. In this paper we evaluate a behavioral intervention-based exercise program designed to serve community children and teens at risk for adult obesity. Measures of weight, strength, cardiovascular fitness, and exercise intensity improved significantly over the course of this program, and qualitative assessments indicated that attitudes towards exercise also improved. Our experiences suggest that structured, protocol-driven exercise interventions can be successfully translated into effective programs accessible to children of different ages and socioeconomic levels. PMID:23531461

  13. SUSTAINABLE REMEDIATION SOFTWARE TOOL EXERCISE AND EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, J.; Nichols, R.; Looney, B.

    2011-05-12

    The goal of this study was to examine two different software tools designed to account for the environmental impacts of remediation projects. Three case studies from the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC were used to exercise SiteWise (SW) and Sustainable Remediation Tool (SRT) by including both traditional and novel remediation techniques, contaminants, and contaminated media. This study combined retrospective analysis of implemented projects with prospective analysis of options that were not implemented. Input data were derived from engineering plans, project reports, and planning documents with a few factors supplied from calculations based on Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). Conclusions drawn from software output were generally consistent within a tool; both tools identified the same remediation options as the 'best' for a given site. Magnitudes of impacts varied between the two tools, and it was not always possible to identify the source of the disagreement. The tools differed in their quantitative approaches: SRT based impacts on specific contaminants, media, and site geometry and modeled contaminant removal. SW based impacts on processes and equipment instead of chemical modeling. While SW was able to handle greater variety in remediation scenarios, it did not include a measure of the effectiveness of the scenario.

  14. Exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy in evaluating aortocoronary bypass surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Haaz, W.; Segal, B.L.; Kane, S.A.

    1981-07-01

    Thirty patients with recurrent symptoms after aortocoronary bypass graft surgery underwent angiography as well as exercise thallium 201 imaging. Exercise imaging has been shown to be highly specific (100 percent in our study) in evaluating patients after bypass surgery. Patients with complete revascularization have normal thallium 201 images. Similarly, exercise-induced defects are seen only in the presence of incomplete revascularization. There are patients, however, with incomplete revascularization with normal exercise images, but these generally limited to the right coronary artery or the diagonal vessels or their grafts.

  15. Laboratory Exercise to Evaluate Hay Preservatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGraw, R. L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a laboratory exercise designed to demonstrate the effects of moisture on hay preservation products in a manner that does not require large amounts of equipment or instructor time. Materials, procedures, and probable results are discussed. (CW)

  16. Exercise exerts neuroprotective effects on Parkinson's disease model of rats.

    PubMed

    Tajiri, Naoki; Yasuhara, Takao; Shingo, Tetsuro; Kondo, Akihiko; Yuan, Wenji; Kadota, Tomohito; Wang, Feifei; Baba, Tanefumi; Tayra, Judith Thomas; Morimoto, Takamasa; Jing, Meng; Kikuchi, Yoichiro; Kuramoto, Satoshi; Agari, Takashi; Miyoshi, Yasuyuki; Fujino, Hidemi; Obata, Futoshi; Takeda, Isao; Furuta, Tomohisa; Date, Isao

    2010-01-15

    Recent studies demonstrate that rehabilitation ameliorates physical and cognitive impairments of patients with stroke, spinal cord injury, and other neurological diseases and that rehabilitation also has potencies to modulate brain plasticity. Here we examined the effects of compulsive exercise on Parkinson's disease model of rats. Before 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, 20 microg) lesion into the right striatum of female SD rats, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was injected to label the proliferating cells. Subsequently, at 24 h after the lesion, the rats were forced to run on the treadmill (5 days/week, 30 min/day, 11 m/min). As behavioral evaluations, cylinder test was performed at 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks and amphetamine-induced rotational test was performed at 2 and 4 weeks with consequent euthanasia for immunohistochemical investigations. The exercise group showed better behavioral recovery in cylinder test and significant decrease in the number of amphetamine-induced rotations, compared to the non-exercise group. Correspondingly, significant preservation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive fibers in the striatum and TH-positive neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) was demonstrated, compared to the non-exercise group. Additionally, the number of migrated BrdU- and Doublecortin-positive cells toward the lesioned striatum was increased in the exercise group. Furthermore, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor increased in the striatum by exercise. The results suggest that exercise exerts neuroprotective effects or enhances the neuronal differentiation in Parkinson's disease model of rats with subsequent improvement in deteriorated motor function. PMID:19900418

  17. Integrated Assessment Model Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. J.; Clarke, L.; Edmonds, J. A.; Weyant, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Integrated assessment models of climate change (IAMs) are widely used to provide insights into the dynamics of the coupled human and socio-economic system, including emission mitigation analysis and the generation of future emission scenarios. Similar to the climate modeling community, the integrated assessment community has a two decade history of model inter-comparison, which has served as one of the primary venues for model evaluation and confirmation. While analysis of historical trends in the socio-economic system has long played a key role in diagnostics of future scenarios from IAMs, formal hindcast experiments are just now being contemplated as evaluation exercises. Some initial thoughts on setting up such IAM evaluation experiments are discussed. Socio-economic systems do not follow strict physical laws, which means that evaluation needs to take place in a context, unlike that of physical system models, in which there are few fixed, unchanging relationships. Of course strict validation of even earth system models is not possible (Oreskes etal 2004), a fact borne out by the inability of models to constrain the climate sensitivity. Energy-system models have also been grappling with some of the same questions over the last quarter century. For example, one of "the many questions in the energy field that are waiting for answers in the next 20 years" identified by Hans Landsberg in 1985 was "Will the price of oil resume its upward movement?" Of course we are still asking this question today. While, arguably, even fewer constraints apply to socio-economic systems, numerous historical trends and patterns have been identified, although often only in broad terms, that are used to guide the development of model components, parameter ranges, and scenario assumptions. IAM evaluation exercises are expected to provide useful information for interpreting model results and improving model behavior. A key step is the recognition of model boundaries, that is, what is inside

  18. Computational Models of Exercise on the Advanced Resistance Exercise Device (ARED)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newby, Nate; Caldwell, Erin; Scott-Pandorf, Melissa; Peters,Brian; Fincke, Renita; DeWitt, John; Poutz-Snyder, Lori

    2011-01-01

    Muscle and bone loss remain a concern for crew returning from space flight. The advanced resistance exercise device (ARED) is used for on-orbit resistance exercise to help mitigate these losses. However, characterization of how the ARED loads the body in microgravity has yet to be determined. Computational models allow us to analyze ARED exercise in both 1G and 0G environments. To this end, biomechanical models of the squat, single-leg squat, and deadlift exercise on the ARED have been developed to further investigate bone and muscle forces resulting from the exercises.

  19. Clinical applications of exercise stress echocardiography in the treadmill with upright evaluation during and after exercise

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Exercise stress echocardiography is the most frequently used stress test in our laboratory. Exercise echocardiography is used mainly in the study of patients with coronary artery disease. However, the technique is increasingly being used to study other diseases. In our centre, we use an original methodology, published by us in 2000, in which we evaluate heart function during exercise in the treadmill. After the exercise, patients are maintained in orthostatic position when appropriate or lying down in left lateral decubitus for further evaluation. Since this method seems to increase the quality and the quantity of information obtained in so many clinical arenas, we now present a detailed review of this methodology and its applications. PMID:23875614

  20. A Placer-Gold Evaluation Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunley, A. Tom

    1984-01-01

    A laboratory exercise allowing students to use drillhole data to simulate the process of locating a placer gold paystreak is presented. As part of the activity students arithmetically compute the value of their gold, mining costs, and personal profits or losses, and decide on development plans for the claim. (BC)

  1. Global off-line evaluation of the ISBA-TRIP continental hydrological system used in the CNRM-CM6 climate model for the next CMIP6 exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decharme, Bertrand; Vergnes, Jean-Pierre; Minvielle, Marie; Colin, Jeanne; Delire, Christine

    2016-04-01

    The land surface hydrology represents an active component of the climate system. It is likely to influence the water and energy exchanges at the land surface, the ocean salinity and temperature at the mouth of the largest rivers, and the climate at least at the regional scale. In climate models, the continental hydrology is simulated via Land Surface Models (LSM), which compute water and energy budgets at the surface, coupled to River Routing Model (RRM), which convert the runoff simulated by the LSMs into river discharge in order to transfer the continental fresh water into the oceans and then to close the global hydrological cycle. Validating these Continental Hydrological Systems (CHS) at the global scale is therefore a crucial task, which requires off-line simulations driven by realistic atmospheric fluxes to avoid the systematic biases commonly found in the atmospheric models. In the CNRM-CM6 climate model of Météo-France, that will be used for the next Coupled Climate Intercomparison Project phase 6 (CMIP6) exercise, the land surface hydrology is simulated using the ISBA-TRIP CHS coupled via the OASIS-MCT coupler. The ISBA LSM solves explicitly the one dimensional Fourier law for soil temperature and the mixed form of the Richards equation for soil moisture using a 14-layers discretization over 12m depths. For the snowpack, a discretization using 12 layers allows the explicit representation of some snow key processes as its viscosity, its compaction due to wind, its age and its albedo on the visible and near infrared spectra. The TRIP RRM uses a global river channel network at 0.5° resolution. It is based on a three prognostic equations for the surface stream water, the seasonal floodplains, and the groundwater. The streamflow velocity is computed using the Maning's formula. The floodplain reservoir fills when the river height exceeds the river bankfull height and vice-versa. The flood interacts with the ISBA soil hydrology through infiltration and with

  2. Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) COPD: Lifestyle Management Exercises Exercises Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... riding a stationary bike. Medication to Help You Exercise People with COPD often use a metered-dose ...

  3. A stage-matched intervention for exercise behavior change based on the transtheoretical model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngho

    2008-06-01

    The effectiveness of a stage-matched intervention for enhancing exercise behavior was investigated with related Transtheoretical Model constructs among young Korean adults. 265 university students (147 men, 118 women; M age=24.1 yr., SD=3.5) enrolled in Seoul National University of Technology voluntarily participated in an 8-wk. intervention study. In order to measure exercise behavior and its related psychological constructs, the Stages of Readiness for Exercise Behavior Scale, Decision Balance Scale for Exercise, Exercise Self-efficacy Scale, Processes of Change Scale, and Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire were used. Results indicated that the participants' exercise readiness was significantly changed in a positive way after the 8-wk. intervention. There was a significant main effect of testing time and an interaction between testing time and exercise readiness stage at baseline. There were significant interactions between testing times and groups for all Transtheoretical Model measures, implying that the stage-matched intervention can be an effective tool for increasing exercise readiness and related psychological variables. The present study provides a starting point for stage-matched interventions aimed at increasing exercise levels, and a baseline level from which to evaluate interventions. PMID:18763468

  4. Methodological and statistical considerations for exercise-related hormone evaluations.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, M S; Chu, S Y; Mureika, R

    1995-08-01

    Improvements in laboratory techniques have allowed research related to exercise endocrinology to flourish. The emerging literature, however, is often inconsistent and contradictory. The discrepancies in research findings are possibly the result of poor control of confounding variables and/or inappropriate methodologies or analyses. Environmental and pretesting behavioural conditions must be standardised to minimise the influence of variables not directly related to the investigation. Environmental temperature and relative humidity, alcohol, caffeine and nicotine intake, prandial state, sleep deprivation and previous exercise can each alter hormonal responses to exercise. Both prescription and over-the-counter medications can also modify normal hormonal secretions thereby confusing exercise-induced findings. Specimen collection and analysis procedures must be controlled carefully. Changes in plasma volume related to postural changes or tourniquet-induced stasis can confound attempts to isolate exercise-related endocrine responses. The established circadian and rhythmical variations characteristic of many hormones need to be controlled. The specimen selection (plasma, serum, urine, etc), collection, storage and analysis procedures should be carefully planned and evaluated. The magnitude of haemolysis, analytical and biological variation must also be monitored. Isolating the hormonal perturbations resulting from a particular exercise variable can be very difficult. Exercise intensity, duration, mode, frequency and volume may each have specific effects on the endocrine changes seen with exercise and training. Furthermore, hormonal responses to exercise are dependent upon initial training status and fitness level. The statistical procedures and data presentation options selected to convey experimental findings can bias experimental results. The descriptive and inferential statistics to be used for data analysis should be preplanned and consistent with the underlying

  5. Hardware Evaluation of the Horizontal Exercise Fixture with Weight Stack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newby, Nate; Leach, Mark; Fincke, Renita; Sharp, Carwyn

    2009-01-01

    HEF with weight stack seems to be a very sturdy and reliable exercise device that should function well in a bed rest training setting. A few improvements should be made to both the hardware and software to improve usage efficiency, but largely, this evaluation has demonstrated HEF's robustness. The hardware offers loading to muscles, bones, and joints, potentially sufficient to mitigate the loss of muscle mass and bone mineral density during long-duration bed rest campaigns. With some minor modifications, the HEF with weight stack equipment provides the best currently available means of performing squat, heel raise, prone row, bench press, and hip flexion/extension exercise in a supine orientation.

  6. An Exercise in Modelling Using the US Standard Atmosphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoPresto, Michael C.; Jacobs, Diane A.

    2007-01-01

    In this exercise the US Standard Atmosphere is used as "data" that a student is asked to model by deriving equations to reproduce it with the help of spreadsheet and graphing software. The exercise can be used as a laboratory or an independent study for a student of introductory physics to provide an introduction to scientific research methods…

  7. A Practical Exercise to Demonstrate the Variable Source Area Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burt, Tim

    1988-01-01

    Describes a field exercise exemplifying aspects of the variable source area model. States that objectives of the exercise are to ensure that students understand why there is a variation in discharge in different parts of a basin, learn a dilution gauging method, and perform necessary calculations. Appendices describe the Gulp Injection method and…

  8. Jogging in place. Evaluation of a simplified exercise test

    SciTech Connect

    Papazoglou, N.; Kolokouri-Dervou, E.; Fanourakis, I.; Natsis, P.; Koutsiouba, P. )

    1989-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate jogging in place as an electrocardiographic exercise test. Jogging in place continuously recorded via an ordinary single-channel electrocardiograph was compared with the Bruce treadmill protocol with a three-channel monitor and recorder in 141 cases with a wide spectrum of chest complaints. Agreement for the presence or absence of electrocardiographic ischemia (ST-segment displacement greater than or equal to 1 mm at 80 ms from the J point, or U-wave inversion) for the two tests was observed in 91 percent of the cases (95 percent confidence intervals: 86 percent to 95.5 percent). One hundred of the previous cases with paired electrocardiographic exercise tests were compared with the presence of reversible defects on exercise myocardial thallium-201 scintigraphy. The electrocardiographic ischemia had a similar correct classification rate in both methods (83 percent with jogging in place and 85 percent with Bruce treadmill protocol; not significant) against the finding of scintigraphic ischemia. This was also true for 52 cases having selective coronary arteriography. The correct classification rate was 54 percent (28/52) with jogging in place and 48 percent (25/52) with Bruce treadmill protocol (not significant). Given the safety and the easy applicability, even in older persons, this simplified test can be recommended as a valid alternative to the established multistage exercise tests.

  9. Exerciser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lem, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    The Mark I exerciser which was added for the second and third Skylab missions, was used for a number of arm and leg exercises. This unit is a modified version of a commercial device. This is an iso-kinetic, or constant velocity, exerciser which retards the speed at which the user is allowed to move. The user applies a maximum effort and the device automatically varies the opposing resistance to maintain speed of translation at a constant preselected value.

  10. Cardiovascular response to dynamic aerobic exercise: a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Magosso, E; Ursino, M

    2002-11-01

    An original mathematical model of the cardiovascular response to dynamic exercise is presented. It includes the pulsating heart, the pulmonary and systemic circulation, a separate description of the vascular bed in active tissues, the local metabolic vasodilation in these tissues and the mechanical effects of muscular contractions on venous return. Moreover, the model provides a description of the ventilatory response to exercise and various neural regulatory mechanisms working on cardiovascular parameters. These mechanisms embrace the so-called central command, the arterial baroreflex and the lung inflation reflex. All parameters in the model have been given in accordance with physiological data from the literature. In this work, the model has been used to simulate the steady-state value of the main cardiorespiratory quantities at different levels of aerobic exercise and the temporal pattern in the transient phase from rest to moderate exercise. Results suggest that, with suitable parameter values the model is able accurately to simulate the cardiorespiratory response in the overall range of aerobic exercise. This response is characterised by a moderate hypertension (10-30%) and by a conspicuous increase in systemic conductance (80-130%), heart rate (64-150%) and cardiac output (100-200%). The transient pattern exhibits three distinct phases (lasting approximately 5s, 15s and 2 min), that reflect the temporal heterogeneity of the mechanisms involved. The model may be useful to improve understanding of exercise physiology and as an educational tool to analyse the complexity of cardiovascular and respiratory regulation. PMID:12507317

  11. Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... article Exercise / physical activity with MS Judy Boone, physical therapist Lynn Williams, Dan Melfi and Dave Altman discuss ... adjusted as changes occur in MS symptoms. A physical therapist experienced with MS can be helpful in designing, ...

  12. Integrating stage and continuum models to explain processing of exercise messages and exercise initiation among sedentary college students.

    PubMed

    Rosen, C S

    2000-03-01

    Concepts from the transtheoretical model (J.O. Prochaska, C.C. DiClemente, & J.C. Norcross, 1992), theory of planned behavior (I. Ajzen, 1985), and the elaboration likelihood model (R.E. Petty & J.T. Cacioppo, 1986b) were used to examine how exercise readiness impacted processing of exercise messages and exercise initiation. Sedentary college students (n = 147) were assessed for exercise attitude, intent, behavior, and stage of change. Students also listed their thoughts after reading messages with either strong or weak arguments for exercise. Attitude predicted depth of message processing, but stage of change did not. Stage of change and intent at baseline predicted exercise adoption at 1- to 3-month follow-up (n = 134), with baseline activity moderating the effect of intent. Tailoring messages to recipients' depth of processing and interactive effects of intent and behavior on exercise adoption should be considered in future research. PMID:10762101

  13. A Model-Based Prioritisation Exercise for the European Water Framework Directive

    PubMed Central

    Daginnus, Klaus; Gottardo, Stefania; Payá-Pérez, Ana; Whitehouse, Paul; Wilkinson, Helen; Zaldívar, José-Manuel

    2011-01-01

    A model-based prioritisation exercise has been carried out for the Water Framework Directive (WFD) implementation. The approach considers two aspects: the hazard of a certain chemical and its exposure levels, and focuses on aquatic ecosystems, but also takes into account hazards due to secondary poisoning, bioaccumulation through the food chain and potential human health effects. A list provided by EU Member States, Stakeholders and Non-Governmental Organizations comprising 2,034 substances was evaluated according to hazard and exposure criteria. Then 78 substances classified as “of high concern” where analysed and ranked in terms of risk ratio (Predicted Environmental Concentration/Predicted No-Effect Concentration). This exercise has been complemented by a monitoring-based prioritization exercise using data provided by Member States. The proposed approach constitutes the first step in setting the basis for an open modular screening tool that could be used for the next prioritization exercises foreseen by the WFD. PMID:21556195

  14. The Singing Wineglass: An Exercise in Mathematical Modelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voges, E. L.; Joubert, S. V.

    2008-01-01

    Lecturers in mathematical modelling courses are always on the lookout for new examples to illustrate the modelling process. A physical phenomenon, documented as early as the nineteenth century, was recalled: when a wineglass "sings", waves are visible on the surface of the wine. These surface waves are used as an exercise in mathematical…

  15. An Active Learning Exercise for Introducing Agent-Based Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinder, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in agent-based modeling as a method of systems analysis and optimization indicate that students in business analytics need an introduction to the terminology, concepts, and framework of agent-based modeling. This article presents an active learning exercise for MBA students in business analytics that demonstrates agent-based…

  16. Effects of exercise on brain functions in diabetic animal models

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Sun Shin

    2015-01-01

    Human life span has dramatically increased over several decades, and the quality of life has been considered to be equally important. However, diabetes mellitus (DM) characterized by problems related to insulin secretion and recognition has become a serious health problem in recent years that threatens human health by causing decline in brain functions and finally leading to neurodegenerative diseases. Exercise is recognized as an effective therapy for DM without medication administration. Exercise studies using experimental animals are a suitable option to overcome this drawback, and animal studies have improved continuously according to the needs of the experimenters. Since brain health is the most significant factor in human life, it is very important to assess brain functions according to the different exercise conditions using experimental animal models. Generally, there are two types of DM; insulin-dependent type 1 DM and an insulin-independent type 2 DM (T2DM); however, the author will mostly discuss brain functions in T2DM animal models in this review. Additionally, many physiopathologic alterations are caused in the brain by DM such as increased adiposity, inflammation, hormonal dysregulation, uncontrolled hyperphagia, insulin and leptin resistance, and dysregulation of neurotransmitters and declined neurogenesis in the hippocampus and we describe how exercise corrects these alterations in animal models. The results of changes in the brain environment differ according to voluntary, involuntary running exercises and resistance exercise, and gender in the animal studies. These factors have been mentioned in this review, and this review will be a good reference for studying how exercise can be used with therapy for treating DM. PMID:25987956

  17. A Cooperative Molecular Modeling Exercise--The Hypersurface as Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, Christopher J.; Kormos, Bethany L.; Winget, Paul; Audette, Vanessa M.; Beebe, Jeremy M.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Burdick, W. Russ; Cochran, Eric W.; Eklov, Brian L.; Giese, Timothy J.; Jun, Yongseok; Kesavan, Lakshmi S. D.; Kinsinger, Christopher R.; Minyaev, Mickail E.; Rajamani, Ramkumar; Salsbury, Jonathon S.; Stubbs, John M.; Surek, Jack T.; Thompson, Jason D.; Voelz, Vincent A.; Wick, Collin D.; Zhang, Ling

    2001-09-01

    A molecular modeling exercise and an associated exam that have both competitive and cooperative learning aspects are described. Collaborative efforts are facilitated by Web-based information management. The exercise/exam is appropriate for use in undergraduate or graduate quantum chemistry or molecular modeling courses that have access to modest computational resources. Students develop a molecular potential energy surface, identify multiple minima and transition-state structures, repeat the process at two or more levels of theory, and then analyze the data looking for interesting chemical or computational phenomena.

  18. Exercise Challenge for Exercise-Induced Bronchospasm. Confirming Presence, Evaluating Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Ted A.

    1995-01-01

    Exercise-induced bronchospasm commonly strikes young people, keeping many away from activity. The exercise challenge test (a powerful tool in diagnosing the condition, fine-tuning treatment, and improving patient compliance) can help get patients back in action. Knowing how to interpret and use test results helps physicians expedite effective…

  19. Computer model of cardiovascular control system responses to exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croston, R. C.; Rummel, J. A.; Kay, F. J.

    1973-01-01

    Approaches of systems analysis and mathematical modeling together with computer simulation techniques are applied to the cardiovascular system in order to simulate dynamic responses of the system to a range of exercise work loads. A block diagram of the circulatory model is presented, taking into account arterial segments, venous segments, arterio-venous circulation branches, and the heart. A cardiovascular control system model is also discussed together with model test results.

  20. Evaluating an Introductory Geoscience Classroom Exercise using Pre- and Post-Exercise Assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipp, S.; Henning, A. T.; Sawyer, D. S.

    2003-12-01

    Discovering Plate Boundaries is a data-rich classroom exercise that has been used successfully in middle school, high school, and college-level science classes. It is an active learning exercise that encourages students to discover the theory of plate tectonics based on their observations of maps containing earthquake, volcano, topography, and seafloor age data. Students and educators have responded with enthusiasm to this exercise, especially the jigsaw component that promotes random group interaction. We now focus our attention on assessing the impact of the exercise on student learning in order to determine whether it conveys sufficient content knowledge. We designed a pre-exercise assessment consisting of questions relating to introductory geoscience concepts, with particular emphasis on plate tectonics. These questions were based on student learning goals for introductory geoscience courses that utilize the Discovering Plate Boundaries exercise. The questions have evolved with repeated use in order to more effectively gauge student knowledge. The pre-exercise assessments have been completed by middle school, high school, and college students, and have identified some common student misconceptions about geoscience. For example, many students believe that earthquakes are a key component of mountain-building, while volcanoes are not. This type of information should be used by the instructor to stress certain concepts during the course in order to address these preconceived notions. A post-exercise assessment consisting of the same questions was administered at the end of the courses and we found that some of the initial misconceptions remained. We conclude that more pre-exercise assessments should be administered in order to establish a database of student misconceptions so that educators can focus instruction in these areas.

  1. Fischer and Schrock Carbene Complexes: A Molecular Modeling Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Craig D.

    2015-01-01

    An exercise in molecular modeling that demonstrates the distinctive features of Fischer and Schrock carbene complexes is presented. Semi-empirical calculations (PM3) demonstrate the singlet ground electronic state, restricted rotation about the C-Y bond, the positive charge on the carbon atom, and hence, the electrophilic nature of the Fischer…

  2. Evaluation of the Virtual Physiology of Exercise Laboratory Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobson, John L.

    2009-01-01

    The Virtual Physiology of Exercise Laboratory (VPEL) program was created to simulate the test design, data collection, and analysis phases of selected exercise physiology laboratories. The VPEL program consists of four modules: (1) cardiovascular, (2) maximal O[subscript 2] consumption [Vo[subscript 2max], (3) lactate and ventilatory thresholds,…

  3. Bayesian structural equation modeling in sport and exercise psychology.

    PubMed

    Stenling, Andreas; Ivarsson, Andreas; Johnson, Urban; Lindwall, Magnus

    2015-08-01

    Bayesian statistics is on the rise in mainstream psychology, but applications in sport and exercise psychology research are scarce. In this article, the foundations of Bayesian analysis are introduced, and we will illustrate how to apply Bayesian structural equation modeling in a sport and exercise psychology setting. More specifically, we contrasted a confirmatory factor analysis on the Sport Motivation Scale II estimated with the most commonly used estimator, maximum likelihood, and a Bayesian approach with weakly informative priors for cross-loadings and correlated residuals. The results indicated that the model with Bayesian estimation and weakly informative priors provided a good fit to the data, whereas the model estimated with a maximum likelihood estimator did not produce a well-fitting model. The reasons for this discrepancy between maximum likelihood and Bayesian estimation are discussed as well as potential advantages and caveats with the Bayesian approach. PMID:26442771

  4. Individualized Exercises for Self-Assessment of Programming Knowledge: An Evaluation of QuizPACK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brusilovsky, Peter; Sosnovsky, Sergey

    2005-01-01

    Individualized exercises are a promising feature in promoting modern e-learning. The focus of this article is on the QuizPACK system, which is able to generate parameterized exercises for the C language and automatically evaluate the correctness of student answers. We introduce QuizPACK and present the results of its comprehensive classroom…

  5. Behavior Modification for Obesity: The Evaluation of Exercise, Contingency Management, and Program Adherence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Stalonas, Peter M., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Investigated behavioral programs for obesity. Exercise and self-managed contingency components were compared using obese subjects who were evaluated after treatment and follow-up. Significant weight loss was observed at termination. The influence of exercise at follow-up was noticeable. Subjects engaged in behaviors, yet behaviors were not related…

  6. Noninvasive diagnostic test choices for the evaluation of coronary artery disease in women: a multivariate comparison of cardiac fluoroscopy, exercise electrocardiography and exercise thallium myocardial perfusion scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, J.; Chaitman, B.R.; Lam, J.; Lesperance, J.; Dupras, G.; Fines, P.; Bourassa, M.G.

    1984-07-01

    Several diagnostic noninvasive tests to detect coronary and multivessel coronary disease are available for women. However, all are imperfect and it is not yet clear whether one particular test provides substantially more information than others. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical findings, exercise electrocardiography, exercise thallium myocardial scintigraphy and cardiac fluoroscopy in 92 symptomatic women without previous infarction and determine which tests were most useful in determining the presence of coronary disease and its severity. Univariate analysis revealed two clinical, eight exercise electrocardiographic, seven myocardial scintigraphic and seven fluoroscopic variables predictive of coronary or multivessel disease with 70% or greater stenosis. The multivariate discriminant function analysis selected a reversible thallium defect, coronary calcification and character of chest pain syndrome as the variables most predictive of presence or absence of coronary disease. The ranked order of variables most predictive of multivessel disease were cardiac fluoroscopy score, thallium score and extent of ST segment depression in 14 electrocardiographic leads. Each provided statistically significant information to the model. The estimate of predictive accuracy was 89% for coronary disease and 97% for multivessel coronary disease. The results suggest that cardiac fluoroscopy or thallium scintigraphy provide significantly more diagnostic information than exercise electrocardiography in women over a wide range of clinical patient subsets.

  7. Aerobic Exercise Training in Post-Polio Syndrome: Process Evaluation of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Voorn, Eric L.; Koopman, Fieke S.; Brehm, Merel A.; Beelen, Anita; de Haan, Arnold; Gerrits, Karin H. L.; Nollet, Frans

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore reasons for the lack of efficacy of a high intensity aerobic exercise program in post-polio syndrome (PPS) on cardiorespiratory fitness by evaluating adherence to the training program and effects on muscle function. Design A process evaluation using data from an RCT. Patients Forty-four severely fatigued individuals with PPS were randomized to exercise therapy (n = 22) or usual care (n = 22). Methods Participants in the exercise group were instructed to exercise 3 times weekly for 4 months on a bicycle ergometer (60–70% heart rate reserve). Results The attendance rate was high (median 89%). None of the participants trained within the target heart rate range during >75% of the designated time. Instead, participants exercised at lower intensities, though still around the anaerobic threshold (AT) most of the time. Muscle function did not improve in the exercise group. Conclusion Our results suggest that severely fatigued individuals with PPS cannot adhere to a high intensity aerobic exercise program on a cycle ergometer. Despite exercise intensities around the AT, lower extremity muscle function nor cardiorespiratory fitness improved. Improving the aerobic capacity in PPS is difficult through exercise primarily focusing on the lower extremities, and may require a more individualized approach, including the use of other large muscle groups instead. Trial Registration Netherlands National Trial Register NTR1371 PMID:27419388

  8. Intramuscular water movement during and after isometric muscle contraction: evaluation at different exercise intensities.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Osamu; Kurihara, Toshiyuki

    2016-09-01

    We aimed at evaluating the effect of isometric muscle contraction on intramuscular water movement at different exercise intensities. Seven men performed 1-min isometric ankle dorsiflexion (20% and 50% maximal voluntary contractions [MVCs]) with a non-magnetic custom-made dynamometer, inside a magnetic resonance (MR) device. Axial diffusion-weighted images were obtained before, during and at 1-20 min (1-min interval) after the exercise to calculate the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the tibialis anterior. Under the same exercise condition, the concentration change of total haemoglobin (Hb) and myoglobin (Mb) (total Hb/Mb) within the tibialis anterior was assessed by performing near-infrared spectroscopy before, during and after the exercise outside the MR device. The 20% MVC exercise significantly increased the ADC only at 1 min postexercise (P<0·01), whereas the ADC significantly increased during and at 2-20 min after the 50% MVC exercise (P<0·01). The 20% MVC exercise decreased the total Hb/Mb during exercise (P<0·01), but the value significantly increased at 1 min postexercise (P<0·01). The total Hb/Mb significantly decreased during the 50% MVC exercise, but significantly increased at 1-5 min postexercise (P<0·01). One-minute moderate-intensity isometric exercise activates intramuscular water movement during and after the exercise. This activation was found even after a low-intensity exercise, but the effect was small and did not last long. The effect of intramuscular hyperaemia on the postexercise ADC elevation may be limited to the very early period after low- to moderate-intensity exercises. PMID:26147530

  9. Computer Aided Modeling to Determine the Effectiveness of Resistive Exercises as Countermeasures for Bone Mineral Density Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Benjamin M.

    1999-01-01

    Due to the loss of gravitational loading, astronauts have a tendency to lose bone mineral density in their lumbar spine and lower extremities on orbit. NASA requires astronauts to perform exercises during space flight to help reduce the amount of demineralization. To test these exercises on earth, 17 week bed rest studies are conducted that consist of specific diet and exercise regimes. Developing a finite element model of these exercises will help to quantify the stress distribution imposed by of each of these exercises. To help develop this model, MRI images are acquired from individuals participating in the bed rest studies. The MRIs can be used to create a subject specific model of each individual for testing. The MRIs are processed in the Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data Transfer System program to develop a three-dimensional finite element model of the femur for evaluation. Modifications were made to the MRIDTS that simplified the model creation process. These modifications made it possible to construct two separate models of different portions of a bone simultaneously and then later connect them manually. This helped alleviate the warping problem associated with the drastic changes in geometry found in some body parts, such as the joints. The code was also modified to incorporate material properties of various bone components into the model. Interior meshing was also incorporated into the program to allow for both the cortical shell and the entire bone to be modeled. A prototype model of the right femur of an adult female is being constructed and tested to determine the feasibility of finite element analysis as a tool for evaluating exercise effectiveness. The model is being run through the ANSYS finite element program on the Alabama Super Computer Network. After the model is validated, models of bedrest subjects can be generated to investigate exercise countermeasures.

  10. Third Radiation Transfer Model Intercomparison (RAMI) exercise: Documenting progress in canopy reflectance models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widlowski, J.-L.; Taberner, M.; Pinty, B.; Bruniquel-Pinel, V.; Disney, M.; Fernandes, R.; Gastellu-Etchegorry, J.-P.; Gobron, N.; Kuusk, A.; Lavergne, T.; Leblanc, S.; Lewis, P. E.; Martin, E.; Mõttus, M.; North, P. R. J.; Qin, W.; Robustelli, M.; Rochdi, N.; Ruiloba, R.; Soler, C.; Thompson, R.; Verhoef, W.; Verstraete, M. M.; Xie, D.

    2007-05-01

    The Radiation Transfer Model Intercomparison (RAMI) initiative benchmarks canopy reflectance models under well-controlled experimental conditions. Launched for the first time in 1999, this triennial community exercise encourages the systematic evaluation of canopy reflectance models on a voluntary basis. The first phase of RAMI focused on documenting the spread among radiative transfer (RT) simulations over a small set of primarily 1-D canopies. The second phase expanded the scope to include structurally complex 3-D plant architectures with and without background topography. Here sometimes significant discrepancies were noted which effectively prevented the definition of a reliable "surrogate truth," over heterogeneous vegetation canopies, against which other RT models could then be compared. The present paper documents the outcome of the third phase of RAMI, highlighting both the significant progress that has been made in terms of model agreement since RAMI-2 and the capability of/need for RT models to accurately reproduce local estimates of radiative quantities under conditions that are reminiscent of in situ measurements. Our assessment of the self-consistency and the relative and absolute performance of 3-D Monte Carlo models in RAMI-3 supports their usage in the generation of a "surrogate truth" for all RAMI test cases. This development then leads (1) to the presentation of the "RAMI Online Model Checker" (ROMC), an open-access web-based interface to evaluate RT models automatically, and (2) to a reassessment of the role, scope, and opportunities of the RAMI project in the future.

  11. The Global Energy Budget -- A Student Exercise in Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, Gregory

    2004-05-01

    What in the world does an Energy Czar have to worry about? In this session, we will explore an exercise where students are appointed "Energy Czar" of the planet. This modeling project shows past energy consumption patterns and allows students to manipulate the world's energy usage into the future. Students are asked to use their knowledge of current and future energy sources, as well as other variables important to the world's energy budget, to build the energy future of their dreams.

  12. An Evaluation of Levalbuterol HFA in the Prevention of Exercise-Induced Bronchospasm

    PubMed Central

    Pearlman, D.S.; Rees, William; Schaefer, Kendyl; Huang, Holly; Andrews, William T.

    2007-01-01

    Background Exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB) affects up to 90% of all patients with asthma. Objective This study evaluated the ability of levalbuterol hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) 90 μg (two actuations of 45 μg) administered via metered dose inhaler (MDI) to protect against EIB in mild-to-moderate asthmatics. Methods This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, two-way cross-over study. Patients with asthma (n = 15) were ≥18 years, had a ≥6-month history of EIB, ≥70% baseline predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and a 20% to 50% decrease in FEV1 after treadmill exercise challenge using single-blind placebo MDI. Levalbuterol or placebo was self-administered 30 minutes before exercise. Treatment sequences were separated by a 3-to 7-day washout period. Spirometry was performed predose, 20 minutes postdose/pre-exercise, and 5, 10, 15, 30, and 60 minutes post-exercise. The primary endpoint was the maximum percent decrease in FEV1 from baseline (postdose/pre-exercise). The percentage of protected (≤20% decrease in post-exercise FEV1) patients was also assessed. Results Levalbuterol had significantly smaller maximum percent post-exercise decrease in FEV1 compared with placebo (LS mean ± SE; −4.8% ± 2.8% versus −22.5% ± 2.8%, respectively). For levalbuterol, 14/15 (93.3%) patients had <20% decrease in post-exercise FEV1 compared with 8/15 (53.3%) for placebo (p = 0.0143). Treatment was well tolerated. Conclusion Levalbuterol HFA MDI (90 μg) administered 30 minutes before exercise was significantly more effective than placebo in protecting against EIB after a single exercise challenge and was well tolerated. Clinical Implications Levalbuterol HFA MDI when administered before exercise was effective in protecting adults with asthma from EIB. PMID:17994402

  13. Evaluation of Dogs with Border Collie Collapse, Including Response to Two Standardized Strenuous Exercise Protocols.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Susan; Shmon, Cindy; Su, Lillian; Epp, Tasha; Minor, Katie; Mickelson, James; Patterson, Edward; Shelton, G Diane

    2016-01-01

    Clinical and metabolic variables were evaluated in 13 dogs with border collie collapse (BCC) before, during, and following completion of standardized strenuous exercise protocols. Six dogs participated in a ball-retrieving protocol, and seven dogs participated in a sheep-herding protocol. Findings were compared with 16 normal border collies participating in the same exercise protocols (11 retrieving, five herding). Twelve dogs with BCC developed abnormal mentation and/or an abnormal gait during evaluation. All dogs had post-exercise elevations in rectal temperature, pulse rate, arterial blood pH, PaO2, and lactate, and decreased PaCO2 and bicarbonate, as expected with strenuous exercise, but there were no significant differences between BCC dogs and normal dogs. Electrocardiography demonstrated sinus tachycardia in all dogs following exercise. Needle electromyography was normal, and evaluation of muscle biopsy cryosections using a standard panel of histochemical stains and reactions did not reveal a reason for collapse in 10 dogs with BCC in which these tests were performed. Genetic testing excluded the dynamin-1 related exercise-induced collapse mutation and the V547A malignant hyperthermia mutation as the cause of BCC. Common reasons for exercise intolerance were eliminated. Although a genetic basis is suspected, the cause of collapse in BCC was not determined. PMID:27487345

  14. Modelling Mass Casualty Decontamination Systems Informed by Field Exercise Data

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Joseph R.; Amlôt, Richard

    2012-01-01

    In the event of a large-scale chemical release in the UK decontamination of ambulant casualties would be undertaken by the Fire and Rescue Service (FRS). The aim of this study was to track the movement of volunteer casualties at two mass decontamination field exercises using passive Radio Frequency Identification tags and detection mats that were placed at pre-defined locations. The exercise data were then used to inform a computer model of the FRS component of the mass decontamination process. Having removed all clothing and having showered, the re-dressing (termed re-robing) of casualties was found to be a bottleneck in the mass decontamination process during both exercises. Computer simulations showed that increasing the capacity of each lane of the re-robe section to accommodate 10 rather than five casualties would be optimal in general, but that a capacity of 15 might be required to accommodate vulnerable individuals. If the duration of the shower was decreased from three minutes to one minute then a per lane re-robe capacity of 20 might be necessary to maximise the throughput of casualties. In conclusion, one practical enhancement to the FRS response may be to provide at least one additional re-robe section per mass decontamination unit. PMID:23202768

  15. Evaluation of noninvasive cardiac output methods during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Alan D.; Barrows, Linda H.; Rashid, Michael; Siconolfi, Steven F.

    1992-01-01

    Noninvasive techniques to estimate cardiac output (Qc) will be used during future space flight. This retrospective literature survey compared the Qc techniques of carbon dioxide rebreathing (CO2-R), CO2 single breath (CO2-S), Doppler (DOP), impedance (IM), and inert gas (IG: acetylene or nitrous oxide) to direct (DIR) assessments measured at rest and during exercise.

  16. Using a formative simulated patient exercise for curriculum evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, David J; Laird-Fick, Heather S; Keefe, Carole W; Thompson, Margaret E; Noel, Mary Margaret

    2004-01-01

    Background It is not clear that teaching specific history taking, physical examination and patient teaching techniques to medical students results in durable behavioural changes. We used a quasi-experimental design that approximated a randomized double blinded trial to examine whether a Participatory Decision-Making (PDM) educational module taught in a clerkship improves performance on a Simulated Patient Exercise (SPE) in another clerkship, and how this is influenced by the time between training and assessment. Methods Third year medical students in an internal medicine clerkship were assessed on their use of PDM skills in an SPE conducted in the second week of the clerkship. The rotational structure of the third year clerkships formed a pseudo-randomized design where students had 1) completed the family practice clerkship containing a training module on PDM skills approximately four weeks prior to the SPE, 2) completed the family medicine clerkship and the training module approximately 12 weeks prior to the SPE or 3) had not completed the family medicine clerkship and the PDM training module at the time they were assessed via the SPE. Results Based on limited pilot data there were statistically significant differences between students who received PDM training approximately four weeks prior to the SPE and students who received training approximately 12 weeks prior to the SPE. Students who received training 12 weeks prior to the SPE performed better than those who received training four weeks prior to the SPE. In a second comparison students who received training four weeks prior to the SPE performed better than those who did not receive training but the differences narrowly missed statistical significance (P < 0.05). Conclusion This pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of a methodology for conducting rigorous curricular evaluations using natural experiments based on the structure of clinical rotations. In addition, it provided preliminary data suggesting

  17. Application of the Transtheoretical Model to Exercise Behavior among Nontraditional College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Lorraine Silver; Buckworth, Janet

    2001-01-01

    Examined the applicability of the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) to understanding exercise among nontraditional college students. Over half were in the precontemplation, contemplation, or preparation stages (sedentary or irregular exercisers), and 17 percent were in the action stage (regular exercisers). All TTM constructs differed significantly…

  18. Design and Evaluation of an Interactive Exercise Coaching System for Older Adults: Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Ofli, Ferda; Kurillo, Gregorij; Obdržálek, Štěpán; Bajcsy, Ruzena; Jimison, Holly Brugge; Pavel, Misha

    2016-01-01

    Although the positive effects of exercise on the well-being and quality of independent living for older adults are well accepted, many elderly individuals lack access to exercise facilities, or the skills and motivation to perform exercise at home. To provide a more engaging environment that promotes physical activity, various fitness applications have been proposed. Many of the available products, however, are geared toward a younger population and are not appropriate or engaging for an older population. To address these issues, we developed an automated interactive exercise coaching system using the Microsoft Kinect. The coaching system guides users through a series of video exercises, tracks and measures their movements, provides real-time feedback, and records their performance over time. Our system consists of exercises to improve balance, flexibility, strength, and endurance, with the aim of reducing fall risk and improving performance of daily activities. In this paper, we report on the development of the exercise system, discuss the results of our recent field pilot study with six independently living elderly individuals, and highlight the lessons learned relating to the in-home system setup, user tracking, feedback, and exercise performance evaluation. PMID:25594988

  19. The EMEFS model evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Barchet, W.R. ); Dennis, R.L. ); Seilkop, S.K. ); Banic, C.M.; Davies, D.; Hoff, R.M.; Macdonald, A.M.; Mickle, R.E.; Padro, J.; Puckett, K. ); Byun, D.; McHenry, J.N.

    1991-12-01

    The binational Eulerian Model Evaluation Field Study (EMEFS) consisted of several coordinated data gathering and model evaluation activities. In the EMEFS, data were collected by five air and precipitation monitoring networks between June 1988 and June 1990. Model evaluation is continuing. This interim report summarizes the progress made in the evaluation of the Regional Acid Deposition Model (RADM) and the Acid Deposition and Oxidant Model (ADOM) through the December 1990 completion of a State of Science and Technology report on model evaluation for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). Because various assessment applications of RADM had to be evaluated for NAPAP, the report emphasizes the RADM component of the evaluation. A protocol for the evaluation was developed by the model evaluation team and defined the observed and predicted values to be used and the methods by which the observed and predicted values were to be compared. Scatter plots and time series of predicted and observed values were used to present the comparisons graphically. Difference statistics and correlations were used to quantify model performance. 64 refs., 34 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. ATMOSPHERIC MODEL EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of the Models-3/CMAQ is conducted in this task. The focus is on evaluation of ozone, other photochemical oxidants, and fine particles using data from both routine monitoring networks and special, intensive field programs. Two types of evaluations are performed here: pe...

  1. A randomised controlled trial evaluating family mediated exercise (FAME) therapy following stroke

    PubMed Central

    Galvin, Rose; Cusack, Tara; Stokes, Emma

    2008-01-01

    Background Stroke is a leading cause of disability among adults worldwide. Evidence suggests that increased duration of exercise therapy following stroke has a positive impact on functional outcome following stroke. The main objective of this randomised controlled trial is to evaluate the impact of additional family assisted exercise therapy in people with acute stroke. Methods/Design A prospective multi-centre single blind randomised controlled trial will be conducted. Forty patients with acute stroke will be randomised into either an experimental or control group. The experimental group will receive routine therapy and additional lower limb exercise therapy in the form of family assisted exercises. The control group will receive routine therapy with no additional formal input from their family members. Participants will be assessed at baseline, post intervention and followed up at three months using a series of standardised outcome measures. A secondary aim of the project is to evaluate the impact of the family mediated exercise programme on the person with stroke and the individual(s) assisting in the delivery of exercises using a qualitative methodology. The study has gained ethical approval from the Research Ethics Committees of each of the clinical sites involved in the study. Discussion This study will evaluate a structured programme of exercises that can be delivered to people with stroke by their 'family members/friends'. Given that the progressive increase in the population of older people is likely to lead to an increased prevalence of stroke in the future, it is important to reduce the burden of this illness on the individual, the family and society. Family mediated exercises can maximise the carry over outside formal physiotherapy sessions, giving patients the opportunity for informal practice. Trial Registration The protocol for this study is registered with the US NIH Clinical trials registry (NCT00666744) PMID:18570643

  2. Planning, Executing, and Evaluating Handcrafts Exercise in English for Foreign Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senda, Shinkoh; Yamamoto, Koji; Tachibana, Kazushi; Shiraki, Naoyasu; Nakakimura, Masafumi; Umehara, Noritsugu

    Nagoya University has more than one thousand foreign students. Some of them cannot understand Japanese well. In order to promote well understanding engineering, and to increase interaction among foreign students, technical staffs in Engineering School organized handcrafts exercise in English for foreign students based on suggestions by teachers at Creation Plaza. The subject in the exercise is to assemble models of a Stirling Engine. Technical staffs prepared all the parts of test equipments and gave English instructions to the registered students. All the participants appreciated the handcrafts exercised. Their comments are as follows : it was very fruitful ; good experience ; good opportunity to increase mutual interaction ; and so on.

  3. Mass medication modeling in response to public health emergencies: outcomes of a drive-thru exercise.

    PubMed

    Zerwekh, Tyler; McKnight, Jason; Hupert, Nathaniel; Wattson, Daniel; Hendrickson, Lisa; Lane, David

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the outcomes of a full-scale training exercise utilizing a drive-thru clinic model for dispensing of Strategic National Stockpile medication. The Hawaii Department of Health developed a clinic design for vehicles based on previous exercises and research on sample throughput rates. The streamlined model selected includes a triage area near the entrance and consecutive stations for the public to register, have an evaluation for drug contradictions, and receive the medication. During the 2-hour exercise held in April 2005, a total of 622 patients were processed in their vehicles for an overall rate of 5.2 persons per minute. Although patient services were reduced in comparison to current walk-in clinic models, the public was able to receive prophylactic medication in a timely manner with a high rate of accuracy and minimal human-to-human contact. These results demonstrate that local health departments, particularly in rural areas, can provide essential medications, vaccinations, or rations through a drive-thru clinic, thus limiting morbidity and mortality during a public health emergency. PMID:17149094

  4. Introduction, development, and evaluation of the miniclinical evaluation exercise in postgraduate education of chiropractors

    PubMed Central

    Paravicini, Inga; Peterson, Cynthia K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if the clinical evaluation exercise (CEX) format is reliable, applicable and useful for evaluating clinical competency in the postgraduate chiropractic program as formative feedback. Methods Twelve mini-CEX clinical encounters were evaluated by 2 assessors per clinical encounter (7 assessors per session) in 23 chiropractic residents over a 12-month period. Two different rating scales (9 point and 5 point) were used, and the 2 assessors completed the forms independently. Individual competencies assessed consisted of history taking, physical examination, organization/efficiency, clinical judgment, professionalism/communication, counseling, and overall clinical performance. Interassessor reliability was calculated using κ and intraclass correlation coefficient statistics. Cronbach α assessed internal consistency of the mini-CEX. Spearman correlation coefficient evaluated correlation between the various competencies. The Mann-Whitney U test evaluated differences between the assessors' median numerical scores. Results The κ value for the 9-point rating scale was 0.31 (fair) and for the 5-point scale was 0.42 (moderate) with statistically significant intraclass correlation values (p < .05) for 4 of the 6 competencies. High correlation coefficients (p = .0001) were found when comparing the various competencies at each clinical encounter. There were no significant differences between the 2 assessors per clinical encounter for the scores awarded to the residents. Conclusions The mini-CEX is a reliable and useful tool to provide valuable formative feedback to postgraduate chiropractic residents. The 5-point grading scale was more user-friendly with better reliability. PMID:25408995

  5. Radiation Transfer Model Intercomparison (RAMI) exercise: Results from the second phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinty, B.; Widlowski, J.-L.; Taberner, M.; Gobron, N.; Verstraete, M. M.; Disney, M.; Gascon, F.; Gastellu, J.-P.; Jiang, L.; Kuusk, A.; Lewis, P.; Li, X.; Ni-Meister, W.; Nilson, T.; North, P.; Qin, W.; Su, L.; Tang, S.; Thompson, R.; Verhoef, W.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Yan, G.; Zang, H.

    2004-03-01

    The Radiation Transfer Model Intercomparison (RAMI) initiative is a community-driven exercise to benchmark the models of radiation transfer (RT) used to represent the reflectance of terrestrial surfaces. Systematic model intercomparisons started in 1999 as a self-organized, open-access, voluntary activity of the RT modeling community. The results of the first phase were published by [2001]. The present paper describes the benchmarking protocol and the results achieved during the second phase, which took place during 2002. This second phase included two major components: The first one included a rerun of all direct-mode tests proposed during the first phase, to accommodate the evaluation of models that have been upgraded since, and the participation of new models into the entire exercise. The second component was designed to probe the performance of three-dimensional models in complex heterogeneous environments, which closely mimic the observations of actual space instruments operating at various spatial resolutions over forest canopy systems. Phases 1 and 2 of RAMI both confirm not only that a majority of the radiation transfer models participating in RAMI are in good agreement between themselves for relatively simple radiation transfer problems but also that these models exhibit significant discrepancies when considering more complex but nevertheless realistic geophysical scenarios. Specific recommendations are provided to guide the future of this benchmarking program (Phase 3 and beyond).

  6. Maximal intermittent handgrip strategy: design and evaluation of an exercise protocol and a grip tool.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Danielle Christine; Thomas, Scott Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Handgrip (HG) exercise has been prescribed as a lifestyle intervention to successfully reduce resting blood pressure (BP) among heterogeneous groups of participants. Current HG protocols have limited accessibility due to complicated exercise prescriptions and sophisticated required equipment. Therefore, this research describes the design and evaluation of the maximal intermittent (MINT) HG exercise strategy, consisting of both a novel exercise protocol (32×5 seconds maximal grip squeezes separated by 5 seconds of rest between sets) and an original grip tool. This research was a multistep progressive design that included 51 postmenopausal women as participants in three separate research studies. Part 1 of this research focuses on the MINT exercise protocol. A literature-informed rationale for the design of the protocol is described. This includes exercise intensity, work-to-rest ratio, and total exercise duration with reference to the unique physiology (mechanoreflex and metaboreflex) of postmenopausal women. Subsequent experimental analyses of acute responses to the MINT protocol revealed that women produced 50% of their maximum grip force with moderate cardiovascular responses (increases of systolic BP: 41.6 mmHg, diastolic BP: 20.1 mmHg, heart rate: 35.1 bpm) that remained far below the thresholds of concern identified by the American College of Sports Medicine. Part 2 of this research describes the creation of a novel grip tool, beginning with a mixed-methods assessment of participant opinions regarding two distinct in-laboratory grip tools, leading to the creation of four prototype MINT tools. Structured focus groups revealed a strong preference for MINT prototype 1 for all tool design features, including color, shape, size, and foam grip. Collectively, the result of this multistep research is a novel HG exercise strategy with enhanced accessibility by being easy to understand and simple to execute. The long-term training effectiveness of MINT as an exercise

  7. Maximal intermittent handgrip strategy: design and evaluation of an exercise protocol and a grip tool

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, Danielle Christine; Thomas, Scott Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Handgrip (HG) exercise has been prescribed as a lifestyle intervention to successfully reduce resting blood pressure (BP) among heterogeneous groups of participants. Current HG protocols have limited accessibility due to complicated exercise prescriptions and sophisticated required equipment. Therefore, this research describes the design and evaluation of the maximal intermittent (MINT) HG exercise strategy, consisting of both a novel exercise protocol (32×5 seconds maximal grip squeezes separated by 5 seconds of rest between sets) and an original grip tool. This research was a multistep progressive design that included 51 postmenopausal women as participants in three separate research studies. Part 1 of this research focuses on the MINT exercise protocol. A literature-informed rationale for the design of the protocol is described. This includes exercise intensity, work-to-rest ratio, and total exercise duration with reference to the unique physiology (mechanoreflex and metaboreflex) of postmenopausal women. Subsequent experimental analyses of acute responses to the MINT protocol revealed that women produced 50% of their maximum grip force with moderate cardiovascular responses (increases of systolic BP: 41.6 mmHg, diastolic BP: 20.1 mmHg, heart rate: 35.1 bpm) that remained far below the thresholds of concern identified by the American College of Sports Medicine. Part 2 of this research describes the creation of a novel grip tool, beginning with a mixed-methods assessment of participant opinions regarding two distinct in-laboratory grip tools, leading to the creation of four prototype MINT tools. Structured focus groups revealed a strong preference for MINT prototype 1 for all tool design features, including color, shape, size, and foam grip. Collectively, the result of this multistep research is a novel HG exercise strategy with enhanced accessibility by being easy to understand and simple to execute. The long-term training effectiveness of MINT as an exercise

  8. Muscle recruitment variations during wrist flexion exercise: MR evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleckenstein, J. L.; Watumull, D.; Bertocci, L. A.; Nurenberg, P.; Peshock, R. M.; Payne, J. A.; Haller, R. G.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Many exercise protocols used in physiological studies assume homogeneous and diffuse muscle recruitment. To test this assumption during a "standard" wrist flexion protocol, variations in muscle recruitment were assessed using MRI in eight healthy subjects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Variations were assessed by comparing the right to the left forearms and the effect of slight (15 degrees) pronation or supination at the wrist. RESULTS: Postexercise imaging showed focal regions of increased signal intensity (SI), indicating relatively strong recruitment, most often in entire muscles, although occasionally only in subvolumes of muscles. In 15 of 26 studies, flexor carpi radialis (FCR) showed more SI than flexor carpi ulnaris, while in 11 studies SI in these muscles increased equivalently. Relatively greater FCR recruitment was seen during pronation and/or use of the nondominant side. Palmaris longus, a wrist flexor, did not appear recruited in 4 of 11 forearms in which it was present. A portion of the superficial finger flexor became hyperintense in 89% of studies, while recruitment of the deep finger flexor was seen only in 43%. CONCLUSION: Inter- and intraindividual variations in forearm muscle recruitment should be anticipated in physiological studies of standard wrist flexion exercise protocols.

  9. The Characterization of Obese Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Rat Model Suitable for Exercise Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Shuwei; Jiang, Zhongli

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop a new polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) rat model suitable for exercise intervention. Method Thirty six rats were randomly divided into three experimental groups: PCOS rats with high-fat diet (PF, n = 24), PCOS rats with ordinary diet (PO, n = 6), and control rats with ordinary diet (CO, n = 6). Two kinds of PCOS rat model were made by adjustment diet structure and testosterone injection for 28 days. After a successful animal model, PF model rats were randomly assigned to three groups: exercise with a continuation of high-fat diet (PF-EF, n = 6), sedentary with a continuation of high-fat diet (PF-SF, n = 6), exercise with an ordinary diet (PF-EO, n = 6). Fasting blood glucose (FBG) and insulin (FINS), estrogen (E2), progesterone (P), and testosterone (T) in serum were determined by RIA, and ovarian morphology was evaluated by Image-Pro plus 6.0. Results Body weight, Lee index, FINS increased significantly in PF rat model. Serum levels of E2 and T were significantly higher in PF and PO than in CO. Ovary organ index and ovarian areas were significant lower in PF than in CO. After intervention for 2 weeks, the levels of 1 h postprandial blood glucose (PBG1), 2 h postprandial blood glucose (PBG2), FINS and the serum levels of T decreased significantly in PF-EF rats and PF-EO rats. The ratio of FBG/FINS was significant higher in PF-EO rats than in PF-SF rats. Ovarian morphology showed that the numbers of preantral follicles and atretic follicles decreased significantly, and the numbers of antral follicles and corpora lutea increased significantly in the rats of PF-EF and PF-EO. Conclusion By combination of high-fat diet and testosterone injection, the obese PCOS rat model is conformable with the lifestyle habits of fatty foods and insufficient exercise, and has metabolic and reproductive characteristics of human PCOS. This model can be applied to study exercise intervention. PMID:24905232

  10. Utility of a Non-Exercise VO2max Prediction Model for Designing Ramp Test Protocols.

    PubMed

    Cunha, F A; Midgley, A; Montenegro, R; Vasconcellos, F; Farinatti, P

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the validity of determining the final work rates of cycling and walking ramp-incremented maximal cardiopulmonary exercise tests (CPETs) using a non-exercise model to predict maximal oxygen uptake VO2max and the American College of Sports Medicine ACSM's metabolic equations. The validity of using this methodology to elicit the recommended test duration of between 8 and 12 min was then evaluated. First, 83 subjects visited the laboratory once to perform a cycling (n=49) or walking (n=34) CPET to investigate the validity of the methodology. Second, 25 subjects (cycling group: n=13; walking group: n=12) performed a CPET on 2 separate days to test the reliability of CPET outcomes. Observed VO2max was 1.0 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) lower than predicted in the cycling CPET (P=0.001) and 1.4 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) lower in the walking CPET (P=0.001). Only one of the 133 conducted CPETs was outside the test duration range of 8-12 min. Test-retest reliability was high for all CPET outcomes, with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.90 to 0.99. In conclusion, the non-exercise model is a valid and reliable method for establishing the final work rate of cycling and walking CPETs for eliciting test durations of between 8 and 12 min. PMID:26038880

  11. Evaluator/controller practicum for US Department of Energy emergency exercises

    SciTech Connect

    Lacher, L.; Converse, R.; Gasper, W.; Mitrani, J.

    1996-12-31

    Argonne National Laboratory has designed a practicum to help ensure that exercises at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities provide results that will be useful in maintaining or improving emergency preparedness while ensuring the safety of the public and the exercise participants. Participants in the first two offerings of the practicum came from DOE facilities nationwide. The practicum augments the usual forms of controller and evaluator training with actual practice in carrying out controller and evaluator roles. Feedback from participants indicated substantial benefit from the training. Many of the participants expressed a desire to present such training to others at their home facilities.

  12. Evaluation of exercise-respiratory system modifications and integration schemes for physiological systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    Exercise subroutine modifications are implemented in an exercise-respiratory system model yielding improvement of system response to exercise forcings. A more physiologically desirable respiratory ventilation rate in addition to an improved regulation of arterial gas tensions and cerebral blood flow is observed. A respiratory frequency expression is proposed which would be appropriate as an interfacing element of the respiratory-pulsatile cardiovascular system. Presentation of a circulatory-respiratory system integration scheme along with its computer program listing is given. The integrated system responds to exercise stimulation for both nonstressed and stressed physiological states. Other integration possibilities are discussed with respect to the respiratory, pulsatile cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, and the long-term circulatory systems.

  13. Evaluating the Training Effects of Two Swallowing Rehabilitation Therapies Using Surface Electromyography-Chin Tuck Against Resistance (CTAR) Exercise and the Shaker Exercise.

    PubMed

    Sze, Wei Ping; Yoon, Wai Lam; Escoffier, Nicolas; Rickard Liow, Susan J

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the efficacy of two dysphagia interventions, the Chin Tuck against Resistance (CTAR) and Shaker exercises, were evaluated based on two principles in exercise science-muscle-specificity and training intensity. Both exercises were developed to strengthen the suprahyoid muscles, whose contractions facilitate the opening of the upper esophageal sphincter, thereby improving bolus transfer. Thirty-nine healthy adults performed two trials of both exercises in counter-balanced order. Surface electromyography (sEMG) recordings were simultaneously collected from suprahyoid muscle group and sternocleidomastoid muscle during the exercises. Converging results using sEMG amplitude analyses suggested that the CTAR was more specific in targeting the suprahyoid muscles than the Shaker exercise. Fatigue analyses on sEMG signals further indicated that the suprahyoid muscle group were equally or significantly fatigued (depending on metric), when participants carried out CTAR compared to the Shaker exercise. Importantly, unlike during Shaker exercise, the sternocleidomastoid muscles were significantly less activated and fatigued during CTAR. Lowering the chin against resistance is therefore sufficiently specific and intense to fatigue the suprahyoid muscles. PMID:26837612

  14. Rehabilitative exercise in a rat model of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Hydock, David S; Lien, Chia-Ying; Jensen, Brock T; Parry, Traci L; Schneider, Carole M; Hayward, Reid

    2012-12-01

    The use of exercise to minimize doxorubicin (DOX)-induced cardiotoxicity is gaining attention. However, very few clinically relevant reports exist investigating the effects of exercise performed during and following DOX treatments. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to examine the effects of voluntary wheel running during and following DOX treatment using two models of late-onset DOX cardiotoxicity in the rat. Female Sprague-Dawley rats received either DOX or saline injections using one of two separate treatment regimens. These regimens involved either daily or weekly DOX injections with cumulative doses for both protocols totaling 15 mg/kg. Daily DOX injections were 1 mg/kg and lasted for 15 consecutive days while weekly DOX injections were 2.5 mg/kg and lasted for six consecutive weeks with control animals receiving matched saline injection regimens. Immediately following the initial DOX/saline injection, animals were randomly housed in cages with voluntary running wheels or standard rat cages throughout DOX/saline treatments and continued until reaching 10 weeks. Cardiac function was then assessed using echocardiography and an isolated working heart model, and myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform distribution was assessed using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. When compared wth controls, daily DOX treatment resulted in reduced running wheel distances at weeks 2-10 (P < 0.05), and weekly DOX treatment resulted in reduced running wheel distances at weeks 2, 6 and 10 (P < 0.05). Nonetheless, wheel running during and following daily and weekly DOX dosing protected against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity by preserving maximal mitral and aortic blood flow velocities, left ventricular developed pressure and MHC isoform expression. In conclusion, the overall reduced volume of activity during and following daily and weekly DOX treatments attenuated DOX-induced cardiac dysfunction suggesting that low-volume endurance training may be an effective

  15. Cross-Cultural Comparison of American and Finnish College Students' Exercise Behavior Using Transtheoretical Model Constructs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardinal, Bradley J.; Tuominen, Kaisa J.; Rintala, Pauli

    2004-01-01

    Although the benefits of exercise are well documented, an international problem of physical inactivity exists. More research, especially theory based, has been recommended. One promising approach for studying exercise behavior is that proposed in the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) of behavior change. This model, however; has received minimal…

  16. Effects of exercise in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (an animal model of multiple sclerosis)

    PubMed Central

    Klaren, Rachel E.; Motl, Robert W.; Woods, Jeffrey A.; Miller, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Exercise training has improved many outcomes in “clinical” research involving persons with multiple sclerosis (MS), but there is limited understanding of the underlying “basic” pathophysiological mechanisms. The animal model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), seems ideal for examining the effects of exercise training on MS-disease pathophysiology. EAE is an autoimmune T-helper cell-mediated disease characterized by T-cell and monocyte infiltration and inflammation in the CNS. To that end, this paper briefly describes common models of EAE, reviews existing research on exercise and EAE, and then identifies future research directions for understanding the consequences of exercise training using EAE. PMID:24999244

  17. Effects of exercise in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (an animal model of multiple sclerosis).

    PubMed

    Klaren, Rachel E; Motl, Robert W; Woods, Jeffrey A; Miller, Stephen D

    2014-09-15

    Exercise training has improved many outcomes in "clinical" research involving persons with multiple sclerosis (MS), but there is limited understanding of the underlying "basic" pathophysiological mechanisms. The animal model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), seems ideal for examining the effects of exercise training on MS-disease pathophysiology. EAE is an autoimmune T-helper cell-mediated disease characterized by T-cell and monocyte infiltration and inflammation in the CNS. To that end, this paper briefly describes common models of EAE, reviews existing research on exercise and EAE, and then identifies future research directions for understanding the consequences of exercise training using EAE. PMID:24999244

  18. Modeling arson - An exercise in qualitative model building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heineke, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    A detailed example is given of the role of von Neumann and Morgenstern's 1944 'expected utility theorem' (in the theory of games and economic behavior) in qualitative model building. Specifically, an arsonist's decision as to the amount of time to allocate to arson and related activities is modeled, and the responsiveness of this time allocation to changes in various policy parameters is examined. Both the activity modeled and the method of presentation are intended to provide an introduction to the scope and power of the expected utility theorem in modeling situations of 'choice under uncertainty'. The robustness of such a model is shown to vary inversely with the number of preference restrictions used in the analysis. The fewer the restrictions, the wider is the class of agents to which the model is applicable, and accordingly more confidence is put in the derived results. A methodological discussion on modeling human behavior is included.

  19. Dropping Out or Keeping Up? Early-Dropouts, Late-Dropouts, and Maintainers Differ in Their Automatic Evaluations of Exercise Already before a 14-Week Exercise Course

    PubMed Central

    Antoniewicz, Franziska; Brand, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine how automatic evaluations of exercising (AEE) varied according to adherence to an exercise program. Eighty-eight participants (24.98 years ± 6.88; 51.1% female) completed a Brief-Implicit Association Task assessing their AEE, positive and negative associations to exercising at the beginning of a 3-month exercise program. Attendance data were collected for all participants and used in a cluster analysis of adherence patterns. Three different adherence patterns (52 maintainers, 16 early dropouts, 20 late dropouts; 40.91% overall dropouts) were detected using cluster analyses. Participants from these three clusters differed significantly with regard to their positive and negative associations to exercising before the first course meeting (ηp2 = 0.07). Discriminant function analyses revealed that positive associations to exercising was a particularly good discriminating factor. This is the first study to provide evidence of the differential impact of positive and negative associations on exercise behavior over the medium term. The findings contribute to theoretical understanding of evaluative processes from a dual-process perspective and may provide a basis for targeted interventions. PMID:27313559

  20. A rat model of saliva secretory immunoglobulin: a suppression caused by intense exercise.

    PubMed

    Kimura, F; Aizawa, K; Tanabe, K; Shimizu, K; Kon, M; Lee, H; Akimoto, T; Akama, T; Kono, I

    2008-06-01

    We aimed to develop a valid model of immunosuppression induced by intense exercise in rats. Rats were divided into three groups. In the rest (Rest) group, saliva was collected from resting rats on 4 consecutive days. In the exercise (Ex) group, rats ran on a treadmill until exhaustion (exercise time: 60.0 +/- 3.7 min), and their saliva was collected before and after exercise; the salivary glands were removed after exercise. In the control (Con) group, saliva collection and gland removal were also performed, but the rats did not exercise. Secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) concentrations in saliva and polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) mRNA expression in the glands were measured. There was no significant change in SIgA concentration in the Rest group over 4 days. In the Ex group, SIgA concentration decreased significantly after exercise compared with before, whereas there was no significant change in the Con group. The expression of pIgR mRNA was significantly lower in the Ex group post-exercise than in the Con group. Our procedure for saliva collection appeared suitable, and the exercise-induced SIgA suppression was probably caused by a decline in pIgR mRNA expression. We propose to use this reproducible and reliable rat model of exercise-induced SIgA suppression in future studies. PMID:17555544

  1. Verification, Validation and Credibility Assessment of a Computational Model of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, C. R.; Humphreys, B. T.; Mulugeta, L.

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) is the resistive exercise device used by astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS) to mitigate bone loss and muscle atrophy due to extended exposure to microgravity (micro g). The Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) has developed a multi-body dynamics model of biomechanics models for use in spaceflight exercise physiology research and operations. In an effort to advance model maturity and credibility of the ARED model, the DAP performed verification, validation and credibility (VV and C) assessment of the analyses of the model in accordance to NASA-STD-7009 'Standards for Models and Simulations'.

  2. Integrated Modeling, Mapping, and Simulation (IMMS) Framework for Exercise and Response Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mapar, Jalal; Hoette, Trisha; Mahrous, Karim; Pancerella, Carmen M.; Plantenga, Todd; Yang, Christine; Yang, Lynn; Hopmeier, Michael

    2011-01-01

    EmergenCy management personnel at federal, stale, and local levels can benefit from the increased situational awareness and operational efficiency afforded by simulation and modeling for emergency preparedness, including planning, training and exercises. To support this goal, the Department of Homeland Security's Science & Technology Directorate is funding the Integrated Modeling, Mapping, and Simulation (IMMS) program to create an integrating framework that brings together diverse models for use by the emergency response community. SUMMIT, one piece of the IMMS program, is the initial software framework that connects users such as emergency planners and exercise developers with modeling resources, bridging the gap in expertise and technical skills between these two communities. SUMMIT was recently deployed to support exercise planning for National Level Exercise 2010. Threat, casualty. infrastructure, and medical surge models were combined within SUMMIT to estimate health care resource requirements for the exercise ground truth.

  3. Integrative model for predicting thermal balance in exercising horses.

    PubMed

    Mostert, H J; Lund, R J; Guthrie, A J; Cilliers, P J

    1996-07-01

    A theoretical integrative model was developed to determine the heat balance of horses working in a given environment. This model included the following parameters: metabolic heat gain, solar heat gain, evaporative heat loss due to sweating, respiratory tract heat loss, radiation from the body and heat gain or loss due to convection and conduction. The model developed in this study includes an unique approach for estimating heat loss via evaporation of sweat from the animal's skin surface. Previous studies modelling evaporative heat dissipation were based on the volume of sweat loss. While it is known that the ambient conditions affect evaporation rate, these effects have not been adequately described. The present model assumes the horse's skin surface is adequately represented by a body of water and it describes the interaction of that water body with the atmosphere. It is assumed that sweat has thermodynamic characteristics equivalent to distilled water. Sweat, however, has high electrolyte and protein concentrations and anecdotal evidence has shown that the thermodynamic characteristics may be significantly affected. Further research is, therefore, required to confirm these characteristics for equine sweat. The model describes all factors known to affect the thermal balance of the horse working in a given environment. The relative significance of the various variables on the whole integrative model has been illustrated. The effect of ambient temperature and humidity on the evaporative heat loss, the most significant and critical avenue of heat dissipation, is defined and quantified. The model illustrates clearly how increasing relative humidity limits evaporative heat loss, which can be further compromised when horses exercise on treadmills with no air movement. PMID:8894545

  4. Evaluation of a Tabletop Emergency Preparedness Exercise for Pharmacy Students.

    PubMed

    Pate, Adam; Bratberg, Jeffrey P; Robertson, Courtney; Smith, Gregory

    2016-04-25

    Objective. To describe the implementation and effect of an emergency preparedness laboratory activity on student knowledge, willingness to participate in emergency preparedness training, current level of preparedness, and the importance of a pharmacist's role in disaster response. Design. Second-year pharmacy students in the infectious disease module participated in a laboratory activity based on a basic disaster response tabletop exercise format. Three case-based scenarios involving infectious diseases were created by participating faculty members. Assessment. Surveys before and after the laboratory were used to assess the activity's effect on student knowledge, willingness to participate in emergency preparedness training, current level of preparedness, and the importance of a pharmacist's role in disaster response. In addition, the postsurvey assessed student perceptions of the activity's success at accomplishing faculty-specified outcomes from Appendix B of the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education's (ACPE) Standards. Conclusion. Implementation of an emergency response laboratory activity may improve overall students' knowledge of, confidence in, and understanding of their role as pharmacists in an emergency response, while incorporating a variety of skills and knowledge outcomes. PMID:27170821

  5. Evaluation of a Tabletop Emergency Preparedness Exercise for Pharmacy Students

    PubMed Central

    Bratberg, Jeffrey P.; Robertson, Courtney; Smith, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To describe the implementation and effect of an emergency preparedness laboratory activity on student knowledge, willingness to participate in emergency preparedness training, current level of preparedness, and the importance of a pharmacist’s role in disaster response. Design. Second-year pharmacy students in the infectious disease module participated in a laboratory activity based on a basic disaster response tabletop exercise format. Three case-based scenarios involving infectious diseases were created by participating faculty members. Assessment. Surveys before and after the laboratory were used to assess the activity’s effect on student knowledge, willingness to participate in emergency preparedness training, current level of preparedness, and the importance of a pharmacist’s role in disaster response. In addition, the postsurvey assessed student perceptions of the activity’s success at accomplishing faculty-specified outcomes from Appendix B of the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education’s (ACPE) Standards. Conclusion. Implementation of an emergency response laboratory activity may improve overall students’ knowledge of, confidence in, and understanding of their role as pharmacists in an emergency response, while incorporating a variety of skills and knowledge outcomes. PMID:27170821

  6. Near-Infrared Monitoring of Model Chronic Compartment Syndrome In Exercising Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, Alan R.; Breit, G. A.; Gross, J. H.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Chance, B.

    1995-01-01

    Chronic compartment syndrome (CCS) is characterized by muscle ischemia, usually in the anterior oompartment of the leg, caused by high intramuscular pressure during exercise. Dual-wave near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy is an optical technique that allows noninvasive tracking of variations in muscle tissue oxygenation (Chance et al., 1988). We hypothesized that with a model CCS, muscle tissue oxygenation will show a greater decline during exercise and a slower recovery post-exercise than under normal conditions.

  7. Clinical Problem Solving Exercises for Pre-Clinical Medical Education: A Design, Implementation and Preliminary Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordage, Georges

    Clinical problem solving exercises for preclinical medical education that were developed at Michigan State University School of Osteopathic Medicine are described. Two types of outcomes were set as priorities in the design and implementation of the problem solving sessions: small group peer interactions as instructional and evaluative resources;…

  8. Evaluating a Pre-Session Homework Exercise in a Standalone Information Literacy Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Joseph E.; Barber, Catherine R.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, researchers evaluate a homework exercise assigned before a standalone information literacy session. Students in a Master of Education program completed a worksheet using the ERIC database thesaurus. The researchers conducted pre- and posttests within a single library session to assess student learning, using a control group for…

  9. An Evaluation of the Local Exercise Action Pilots and Impact on Moderate Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pringle, Andy; Gilson, Nick; McKenna, Jim; Cooke, Carlton

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Identifying community physical activity interventions that facilitate increases in moderate physical activity (MPA) is important in meeting targets set in government health policy. This study evaluated community interventions that aimed to increase levels of MPA. Intervention themes included exercise referral, classes and groups, peer…

  10. Emerging concept: 'central benefit model' of exercise in falls prevention.

    PubMed

    Liu-Ambrose, Teresa; Nagamatsu, Lindsay S; Hsu, Chun Liang; Bolandzadeh, Niousha

    2013-01-01

    Falls are a common geriatric syndrome and are the third leading cause of chonic disability worldwide. Falls are not random events and occur, at least in part, due to impaired physiological function, such as impaired balance, and cognitive impairment. The clinical syndrome of falls is important for Sports and Exercise Medicine Clinicians as there is Level 1 evidence that targeted exercise prescription is an effective intervention strategy. The widely accepted dogma is that improved physical function, balance and muscle strength, underlies the effectiveness of the exercise in reducing falls. However, findings from randomised controlled trials suggest that exercise reduce falls via mechanisms other than improved physiological function. The authors propose that improved cognitive function - specifically, executive functions - and associated functional plasticity may be an important yet underappreciated mechanism by which the exercise reduces falls in older adults. PMID:22522589

  11. Effectiveness of circumoral muscle exercises in the developing dentofacial morphology in adenotonsillectomized children: an ultrasonographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Das, U M; Beena, J P

    2009-01-01

    Alterations in the functions of the facial muscle can establish changes in facial skeleton and in the development of occlusion. The effect of mouth breathing on the facial morphology is probably greatest during the growth period. Removal of nasal obstruction, adenoids, and tonsils have not given beneficial results in the reversion of the habit unless intercepted with various muscle exercises. Hence, this study was conducted to ultrasonographically evaluate the effectiveness of circumoral muscle exercises in the developing dentofacial morphology in adenotonsillectomized children. PMID:19736502

  12. BP Neural Network Model-based Physical Exercises and Dietary Habits Relationships Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xingwei; Zhang, Xuesheng; Sun, Yi

    2015-01-01

    With the continuous progress of society, increment of social pressure, people have paid little and little attentions to physical exercises and dietary necessity. Take Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, Shenzhen, Shijiazhuang and Baotou university students as research objects, targeted at physical exercises time and dietary habits, it starts investigation. Make principal component analysis of investigation results, results indicates that cereal intake is principal component in dietary habits; strenuous exercise time and general physical exercise time are the principal components in physical exercise. Utilize BP neural network model, analyze these seven cities’ physical exercises and dietary habits conditions, the result indicates that except for Shenzhen, all the other six cities haven’t reached the standard. PMID:26981164

  13. Grit, conscientiousness, and the transtheoretical model of change for exercise behavior.

    PubMed

    Reed, Justy; Pritschet, Brian L; Cutton, David M

    2013-05-01

    Grit and the Big Five Inventory (BFI) Conscientiousness dimension were examined with respect to the transtheoretical model (TTM) stages of change for exercise behavior. Participants (N = 1171) completed an online survey containing exercise-related TTM staging questions, the Short Grit Scale and BFI Conscientiousness. Ordinal regression analyses showed that grit significantly predicted high intensity and moderate intensity exercise TTM stage while BFI Conscientiousness did not. The results suggest that grit is a potentially important differentiator of TTM stage for moderate and high intensity exercise. PMID:22904153

  14. Evaluating Daily Load Stimulus Formulas in Relating Bone Response to Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennline, James A.; Mulugeta, Lealem

    2014-01-01

    Six formulas representing what is commonly referred to as "daily load stimulus" are identified, compared and tested in their ability to relate skeletal mechanical loading to bone maintenance and osteogenic response. Particular emphasis is placed on exercise- induced skeletal loading and whether or not the formulas can adequately capture the known experimental observations of saturation of continuous cyclic loading, rest insertion between repetitions (cycles), recovery of osteogenic potential following saturation, and multiple shorter bouts versus a single long bout of exercise. To evaluate the ability of the formulas to capture these characteristics, a set of exercise scenarios with type of exercise bout, specific duration, number of repetitions, and rest insertion between repetitions is defined. The daily load values obtained from the formulas for the loading conditions of the set of scenarios is illustrated. Not all of the formulas form estimates of daily load in units of stress or in terms of strain at a skeletal site due to the loading force from a specific exercise prescription. The comparative results show that none of the formulas are able to capture all of the experimentally observed characteristics of cyclic loading. However, the enhanced formula presented by Genc et al. does capture several characteristics of cyclic loading that the others do not, namely recovery of osteogenic potential and saturation. This could be a basis for further development of mathematical formulas that more adequately approximates the amount of daily stress at a skeletal site that contributes to bone adaptation.

  15. Use of exercise testing in the evaluation of interventional efficacy: an official ERS statement.

    PubMed

    Puente-Maestu, Luis; Palange, Paolo; Casaburi, Richard; Laveneziana, Pierantonio; Maltais, François; Neder, J Alberto; O'Donnell, Denis E; Onorati, Paolo; Porszasz, Janos; Rabinovich, Roberto; Rossiter, Harry B; Singh, Sally; Troosters, Thierry; Ward, Susan

    2016-02-01

    This document reviews 1) the measurement properties of commonly used exercise tests in patients with chronic respiratory diseases and 2) published studies on their utilty and/or evaluation obtained from MEDLINE and Cochrane Library searches between 1990 and March 2015.Exercise tests are reliable and consistently responsive to rehabilitative and pharmacological interventions. Thresholds for clinically important changes in performance are available for several tests. In pulmonary arterial hypertension, the 6-min walk test (6MWT), peak oxygen uptake and ventilation/carbon dioxide output indices appear to be the variables most responsive to vasodilators. While bronchodilators do not always show clinically relevant effects in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, high-intensity constant work-rate (endurance) tests (CWRET) are considerably more responsive than incremental exercise tests and 6MWTs. High-intensity CWRETs need to be standardised to reduce interindividual variability. Additional physiological information and responsiveness can be obtained from isotime measurements, particularly of inspiratory capacity and dyspnoea. Less evidence is available for the endurance shuttle walk test. Although the incremental shuttle walk test and 6MWT are reliable and less expensive than cardiopulmonary exercise testing, two repetitions are needed at baseline. All exercise tests are safe when recommended precautions are followed, with evidence suggesting that no test is safer than others. PMID:26797036

  16. An explanatory model of functional exercise capacity in patients with systemic sclerosis: considerations for rehabilitation programs

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Agnaldo José; Ferreira, Arthur de Sá; Lima, Tatiana Rafaela Lemos; Menezes, Sara Lucia Silveira; Guimarães, Fernando Silva

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to evaluate the impact of lung function and peripheral muscle function on the six-minute walking distance (6MWD) in systemic sclerosis (SS) patients and, thereby, to develop an explanatory model of functional exercise capacity for these individuals. [Methods] In a cross-sectional study, 31 SS patients underwent pulmonary function testing (including spirometry, diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide [DLCO], and respiratory muscle strength), isometric dynamometry with surface electromyography, and the 6MWD. [Results] There was a significant correlation between the 6MWD (% predicted, 6MWD%) and the following parameters: height (r = 0.427) and DLCO (r = 0.404). In contrast, no other independent variable showed a significant correlation with the 6MWD% (r ≤ 0.257). The final prediction model for 6MWD% (adjusted R2 = 0.456, SE of bias=12%) was 6MWD% Gibbons = −131.3 + 1.16 × heightcm + 0.33 × DLCO% predicted. [Conclusion] In SS patients, body height and pulmonary diffusion are the main determinants of the 6MWD. Our results justify further investigation of the performance of SS patients during exercise, which may increase the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the disease. The impact of these findings in SS patients may be useful for evaluating the effects of rehabilitation programs. PMID:27065545

  17. An explanatory model of functional exercise capacity in patients with systemic sclerosis: considerations for rehabilitation programs.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Agnaldo José; Ferreira, Arthur de Sá; Lima, Tatiana Rafaela Lemos; Menezes, Sara Lucia Silveira; Guimarães, Fernando Silva

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to evaluate the impact of lung function and peripheral muscle function on the six-minute walking distance (6MWD) in systemic sclerosis (SS) patients and, thereby, to develop an explanatory model of functional exercise capacity for these individuals. [Methods] In a cross-sectional study, 31 SS patients underwent pulmonary function testing (including spirometry, diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide [DLCO], and respiratory muscle strength), isometric dynamometry with surface electromyography, and the 6MWD. [Results] There was a significant correlation between the 6MWD (% predicted, 6MWD%) and the following parameters: height (r = 0.427) and DLCO (r = 0.404). In contrast, no other independent variable showed a significant correlation with the 6MWD% (r ≤ 0.257). The final prediction model for 6MWD% (adjusted R(2) = 0.456, SE of bias=12%) was 6MWD% Gibbons = -131.3 + 1.16 × heightcm + 0.33 × DLCO% predicted. [Conclusion] In SS patients, body height and pulmonary diffusion are the main determinants of the 6MWD. Our results justify further investigation of the performance of SS patients during exercise, which may increase the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the disease. The impact of these findings in SS patients may be useful for evaluating the effects of rehabilitation programs. PMID:27065545

  18. Automated evaluation of physical therapy exercises using multi-template dynamic time warping on wearable sensor signals.

    PubMed

    Yurtman, Aras; Barshan, Billur

    2014-11-01

    We develop an autonomous system to detect and evaluate physical therapy exercises using wearable motion sensors. We propose the multi-template multi-match dynamic time warping (MTMM-DTW) algorithm as a natural extension of DTW to detect multiple occurrences of more than one exercise type in the recording of a physical therapy session. While allowing some distortion (warping) in time, the algorithm provides a quantitative measure of similarity between an exercise execution and previously recorded templates, based on DTW distance. It can detect and classify the exercise types, and count and evaluate the exercises as correctly/incorrectly performed, identifying the error type, if any. To evaluate the algorithm's performance, we record a data set consisting of one reference template and 10 test executions of three execution types of eight exercises performed by five subjects. We thus record a total of 120 and 1200 exercise executions in the reference and test sets, respectively. The test sequences also contain idle time intervals. The accuracy of the proposed algorithm is 93.46% for exercise classification only and 88.65% for simultaneous exercise and execution type classification. The algorithm misses 8.58% of the exercise executions and demonstrates a false alarm rate of 4.91%, caused by some idle time intervals being incorrectly recognized as exercise executions. To test the robustness of the system to unknown exercises, we employ leave-one-exercise-out cross validation. This results in a false alarm rate lower than 1%, demonstrating the robustness of the system to unknown movements. The proposed system can be used for assessing the effectiveness of a physical therapy session and for providing feedback to the patient. PMID:25168775

  19. It Takes One to Know One: A Class Exercise in Mental Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Theresa

    2014-01-01

    An active learning class exercise is presented that gives students the personal experience of the decision-making limitations of mental models. This innovative exercise was shown to increase student learning through greater understanding of the concept and higher retention of knowledge. The results suggest that student critical thinking skills…

  20. [pi] Backbonding in Carbonyl Complexes and Carbon-Oxygen Stretching Frequencies: A Molecular Modeling Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Craig D.

    2007-01-01

    An exercise is described that has illustrated the effect of various factors on [pi] backbonding to carbonyl ligands, where the students can view the molecular orbitals corresponding to the M-CO [pi] interaction as well as the competing interaction between the metal and co-ligands. The visual and hands-on nature of the modeling exercise has helped…

  1. An Exercise in Evaluating the Contamination Potential of Surface Impoundments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinker, John R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Outlines a laboratory procedure which enables students to evaluate the contamination potential of surface impoundments and apply basic principles of hydrogeology to the land disposal of waste material. Includes a list of materials needed and directions for the instructor. (Author/DC)

  2. VPPA weld model evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccutcheon, Kimble D.; Gordon, Stephen S.; Thompson, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    NASA uses the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding (VPPAW) process extensively for fabrication of Space Shuttle External Tanks. This welding process has been in use at NASA since the late 1970's but the physics of the process have never been satisfactorily modeled and understood. In an attempt to advance the level of understanding of VPPAW, Dr. Arthur C. Nunes, Jr., (NASA) has developed a mathematical model of the process. The work described in this report evaluated and used two versions (level-0 and level-1) of Dr. Nunes' model, and a model derived by the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH) from Dr. Nunes' level-1 model. Two series of VPPAW experiments were done, using over 400 different combinations of welding parameters. Observations were made of VPPAW process behavior as a function of specific welding parameter changes. Data from these weld experiments was used to evaluate and suggest improvements to Dr. Nunes' model. Experimental data and correlations with the model were used to develop a multi-variable control algorithm for use with a future VPPAW controller. This algorithm is designed to control weld widths (both on the crown and root of the weld) based upon the weld parameters, base metal properties, and real-time observation of the crown width. The algorithm exhibited accuracy comparable to that of the weld width measurements for both aluminum and mild steel welds.

  3. Therapeutic Effects of Melatonin On Liver And Kidney Damages In Intensive Exercise Model of Rats.

    PubMed

    Gedikli, Semin; Gelen, Volkan; Sengul, Emin; Ozkanlar, Seckin; Gur, Cihan; Agırbas, Ozturk; Cakmak, Fatih; Kara, Adem

    2015-01-01

    Extensive exercise induces inflammatory reactions together with high production of free radicals and subsequent liver and kidney tissues damage. This study was designed to investigate for effects of melatonin on liver and kidney tissues in the extensive exercise exposed rats and non-exercised rats. In this research, 24-male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups. For exercise rat model, the rats were exposed to slow pace running with the velocity of 10 m/min for 5 minutes for five days just before the study. And for last ten days after adaptation period, the exercise was improved as 15 min with the speed of 20 m/min and intra-peritoneal melatonin injection has been performed to the melatonin treated groups with the dose of 10 mg/kg. Biochemical results revealed a decrease in the parameters of kidney and liver enzymes in exercise-group and an increase in the parameters of serum, liver and kidney enzymes in the group that melatonin-exercise-group. As for histological analysis, while it is observed that there are cellular degenerations in the liver and kidney tissues with exercise application, a decrease has been observed in these degenerations in the group that melatonin was applied. At the end of the research, it has been determined that exercise application causes some damages on liver and kidney, and these damages were ameliorated with melatonin treatment. PMID:26310355

  4. Evaluating Service Organization Models

    PubMed Central

    TOUATI, NASSERA; PINEAULT, RAYNALD; CHAMPAGNE, FRANÇOIS; DENIS, JEAN-LOUIS; BROUSSELLE, ASTRID; CONTANDRIOPOULOS, ANDRÉ-PIERRE; GENEAU, ROBERT

    2016-01-01

    Based on the example of the evaluation of service organization models, this article shows how a configurational approach overcomes the limits of traditional methods which for the most part have studied the individual components of various models considered independently of one another. These traditional methods have led to results (observed effects) that are difficult to interpret. The configurational approach, in contrast, is based on the hypothesis that effects are associated with a set of internally coherent model features that form various configurations. These configurations, like their effects, are context-dependent. We explore the theoretical basis of the configuration approach in order to emphasize its relevance, and discuss the methodological challenges inherent in the application of this approach through an in-depth analysis of the scientific literature. We also propose methodological solutions to these challenges. We illustrate from an example how a configurational approach has been used to evaluate primary care models. Finally, we begin a discussion on the implications of this new evaluation approach for the scientific and decision-making communities.

  5. Modeling the effects of exercise during 100% oxygen prebreathe on the risk of hypobaric decompression sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftin, K. C.; Conkin, J.; Powell, M. R.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several previous studies indicated that exercise during prebreathe with 100% O2 decreased the incidence of hypobaric decompression sickness (DCS). We report a meta-analysis of these investigations combined with a new study in our laboratory to develop a statistical model as a predictive tool for DCS. HYPOTHESIS: Exercise during prebreathe increases N2 elimination in a theoretical 360-min half-time compartment decreasing the incidence of DCS. METHODS: A dose-response probability tissue ratio (TR) model with 95% confidence limits was created for two groups, prebreathe with exercise (n = 113) and resting prebreathe (n = 113), using nonlinear regression analysis with maximum likelihood optimization. RESULTS: The model predicted that prebreathe exercise would reduce the residual N2 in a 360-min half-time compartment to a level analogous to that in a 180-min compartment. This finding supported the hypothesis. The incidence of DCS for the exercise prebreathe group was significantly decreased (Chi-Square = 17.1, p < 0.0001) from the resting prebreathe group. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggested that exercise during prebreathe increases tissue perfusion and N2 elimination approximately 2-fold and markedly lowers the risk of DCS. Based on the model, the prebreathe duration may be reduced from 240 min to a predicted 91 min for the protocol in our study, but this remains to be verified. The model provides a useful planning tool to develop and test appropriate prebreathe exercise protocols and to predict DCS risks for astronauts.

  6. A Probability Model of Decompression Sickness at 4.3 Psia after Exercise Prebreathe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, Johnny; Gernhardt, Michael L.; Powell, Michael R.; Pollock, Neal

    2004-01-01

    Exercise PB can reduce the risk of decompression sickness on ascent to 4.3 psia when performed at the proper intensity and duration. Data are from seven tests. PB times ranged from 90 to 150 min. High intensity, short duration dual-cycle ergometry was done during the PB. This was done alone, or combined with intermittent low intensity exercise or periods of rest for the remaining PB. Nonambulating men and women performed light exercise from a semi-recumbent position at 4.3 psia for four hrs. The Research Model with age tested the probability that DCS increases with advancing age. The NASA Model with gender hypothesized that the probability of DCS increases if gender is female. Accounting for exercise and rest during PB with a variable half-time compartment for computed tissue N2 pressure advances our probability modeling of hypobaric DCS. Both models show that a small increase in exercise intensity during PB reduces the risk of DCS, and a larger increase in exercise intensity dramatically reduces risk. These models support the hypothesis that aerobic fitness is an important consideration for the risk of hypobaric DCS when exercise is performed during the PB.

  7. An Evaluation of Antecedent Exercise on Behavior Maintained by Automatic Reinforcement Using a Three-Component Multiple Schedule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Heather; Roscoe, Eileen M.; Atwell, Amy

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated antecedent exercise for treating the automatically reinforced problem behavior of 4 individuals with autism. We conducted preference assessments to identify leisure and exercise items that were associated with high levels of engagement and low levels of problem behavior. Next, we conducted three 3-component multiple-schedule…

  8. Composite Load Model Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ning; Qiao, Hong

    2007-09-30

    The WECC load modeling task force has dedicated its effort in the past few years to develop a composite load model that can represent behaviors of different end-user components. The modeling structure of the composite load model is recommended by the WECC load modeling task force. GE Energy has implemented this composite load model with a new function CMPLDW in its power system simulation software package, PSLF. For the last several years, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has taken the lead and collaborated with GE Energy to develop the new composite load model. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and BPA joint force and conducted the evaluation of the CMPLDW and test its parameter settings to make sure that: • the model initializes properly, • all the parameter settings are functioning, and • the simulation results are as expected. The PNNL effort focused on testing the CMPLDW in a 4-bus system. An exhaustive testing on each parameter setting has been performed to guarantee each setting works. This report is a summary of the PNNL testing results and conclusions.

  9. Outcome of exercise electrocardiography in familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy patients, Portuguese type, under evaluation for liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Juneblad, Kristina; Näslund, Anna; Olofsson, Bert-Ove; Suhr, Ole B

    2004-09-01

    Familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP) is a dominantly inherited systemic amyloidosis caused by mutated transthyretin (TTR). Liver transplantation is currently the only available treatment that halts the progress of the disease. Cardiovascular complications are common in FAP, and cardiac arrhythmias are typical complications in FAP Val30Met. For patients with late onset FAP, as the Swedish patients, coronary heart disease has been found in several patients, and a QS complex is not an uncommon finding in FAP-patients ECG raising the suspicion of coronary heart disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate exercise ECG in FAP patients before transplantation with regard to mortality and morbidity. Thirty-eight FAP patients who underwent examination by exercise ECG, as part of the evaluation for liver transplantation were included in the study. Of these, 30 patients were transplanted, and the surviving patients were followed for at least 2 years. Exercise ECG was performed on bicycles with standard 12 leads. Non-parametric statistical analyses were used in all calculations. Six patients died 0-5.5 years after transplantation. They were older than the survivors (p < 0.01), but their duration of disease did not deviate from that of survivors (p = 0.8). They were also less able to increase their heart rates during exercise than the survivors (p < 0.05). For all transplanted patients, a significant relationship was found between patients' increase of heart rate, blood pressure and maximal workload, and the duration of disease and also for the PND-score, signifying that the outcome of exercise ECG predominantly was related to the patients autonomic and motor function, and not to their heart function. PMID:15523924

  10. Pragmatic geometric model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamer, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Quantification of subsurface model reliability is mathematically and technically demanding as there are many different sources of uncertainty and some of the factors can be assessed merely in a subjective way. For many practical applications in industry or risk assessment (e. g. geothermal drilling) a quantitative estimation of possible geometric variations in depth unit is preferred over relative numbers because of cost calculations for different scenarios. The talk gives an overview of several factors that affect the geometry of structural subsurface models that are based upon typical geological survey organization (GSO) data like geological maps, borehole data and conceptually driven construction of subsurface elements (e. g. fault network). Within the context of the trans-European project "GeoMol" uncertainty analysis has to be very pragmatic also because of different data rights, data policies and modelling software between the project partners. In a case study a two-step evaluation methodology for geometric subsurface model uncertainty is being developed. In a first step several models of the same volume of interest have been calculated by omitting successively more and more input data types (seismic constraints, fault network, outcrop data). The positions of the various horizon surfaces are then compared. The procedure is equivalent to comparing data of various levels of detail and therefore structural complexity. This gives a measure of the structural significance of each data set in space and as a consequence areas of geometric complexity are identified. These areas are usually very data sensitive hence geometric variability in between individual data points in these areas is higher than in areas of low structural complexity. Instead of calculating a multitude of different models by varying some input data or parameters as it is done by Monte-Carlo-simulations, the aim of the second step of the evaluation procedure (which is part of the ongoing work) is to

  11. Aerobic Exercise for Reducing Migraine Burden: Mechanisms, Markers, and Models of Change Processes

    PubMed Central

    Irby, Megan B.; Bond, Dale S.; Lipton, Richard B.; Nicklas, Barbara; Houle, Timothy T.; Penzien, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Engagement in regular exercise routinely is recommended as an intervention for managing and preventing migraine, and yet empirical support is far from definitive. We possess at best a weak understanding of how aerobic exercise and resulting change in aerobic capacity influence migraine, let alone the optimal parameters for exercise regimens as migraine therapy (eg, who will benefit, when to prescribe, optimal types, and doses/intensities of exercise, level of anticipated benefit). These fundamental knowledge gaps critically limit our capacity to deploy exercise as an intervention for migraine. Overview Clear articulation of the markers and mechanisms through which aerobic exercise confers benefits for migraine would prove invaluable and could yield insights on migraine pathophysiology. Neurovascular and neuroinflammatory pathways, including an effect on obesity or adiposity, are obvious candidates for study given their role both in migraine as well as the changes known to accrue with regular exercise. In addition to these biological pathways, improvements in aerobic fitness and migraine alike also are mediated by changes in psychological and sociocognitive factors. Indeed a number of specific mechanisms and pathways likely are operational in the relationship between exercise and migraine improvement, and it remains to be established whether these pathways operate in parallel or synergistically. As heuristics that might conceptually benefit our research programs here forward, we: (1) provide an extensive listing of potential mechanisms and markers that could account for the effects of aerobic exercise on migraine and are worthy of empirical exploration and (2) present two exemplar conceptual models depicting pathways through which exercise may serve to reduce the burden of migraine. Conclusion Should the promise of aerobic exercise as a feasible and effective migraine therapy be realized, this line of endeavor stands to benefit migraineurs (including the

  12. Cardiovascular adjustments induced by training evaluated during semisupine isotonic exercise and recovery period: an echocardiographic study.

    PubMed

    Di Bello, V; Santoro, G; Cini, G; Pentimone, F; Ginanni, A; Romano, M F; Giusti, C

    1987-12-01

    Two groups of subjects were examined: trained athletes (group A) and a sedentary control group (group B). The subjects performed submaximal bicycle exercise in the semisupine position to evaluate the differences between the two groups with regard to cardiovascular response during exercise and recovery and to point out all the changes due to training. During the first part of exercise, cardiac output increased contemporary with heart rate and myocardial contractility as shown by the trend of the ejection fraction, higher in group A, under the same level of total vascular peripheral resistances. Later there was an increase of cardiac output for a further increase of heart rate and cardiac inotropism due to the homeometric mechanism. During recovery the heart rate and peripheral vascular resistance reduction led to an increase of venous return which set up the Frank-Starling mechanism via an increase of left ventricular dimensions. These adjustments were more efficient in group A. During exercise and recovery the heart rate-pressure product was constantly lower in group A with a significant difference to group B. Therefore, trained athletes' myocardium is more efficient than that of the sedentary group because it performs an external work load with a lower oxygen consumption. PMID:3429087

  13. Basic neuron model electrical equivalent circuit: an undergraduate laboratory exercise.

    PubMed

    Dabrowski, Katie M; Castaño, Diego J; Tartar, Jaime L

    2013-01-01

    We developed a hands-on laboratory exercise for undergraduate students in which they can build and manipulate a neuron equivalent circuit. This exercise uses electrical circuit components that resemble neuron components and are easy to construct. We describe the methods for creating the equivalent circuit and how to observe different neuron properties through altering the structure of the equivalent circuit. We explain how this hands-on laboratory activity allows for the better understanding of this fundamental neuroscience concept. At the conclusion of this laboratory exercise, undergraduate students will be able to apply the principles of Ohm's law, cable theory with regards to neurons, and understand the functions of resistance and capacitance in a neuron. PMID:24319391

  14. Evaluation of an exercise-based treatment for children with reading difficulties.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, David; Nicolson, Roderick I; Hambly, Helen

    2003-02-01

    An evaluation is reported of an exercise-based approach to remediation of dyslexia-related disorders. Pupils in three years of a Warwickshire junior school were screened for risk of literacy difficulty using the Dyslexia Screening Test (DST). The 35 children scoring 0.4 or over on the DST were divided randomly into two groups matched for age and DST score. One quarter of the participants had an existing diagnosis of dyslexia, dyspraxia or ADHD. Both groups received the same treatment at school but the intervention group used the DDAT exercise programme daily at home. Performance on the DST and specialist cerebellar/vestibular and eye movement tests were assessed initially and after six months. Cerebellar/vestibular signs were substantially alleviated following the exercise treatment whereas there were no significant changes for the control group. Even after allowing for the passage of time, there were significant improvements for the intervention group in postural stability, dexterity, phonological skill, and (one-tailed) for naming fluency and semantic fluency. Reading fluency showed a highly significant improvement for the intervention group, and nonsense passage reading was also improved significantly. Significantly greater improvements for the intervention group than the control group occurred for dexterity, reading, verbal fluency and semantic fluency. Substantial and significant improvements (compared with those in the previous year) also occurred for the exercise group on national standardized tests of reading, writing and comprehension. It is concluded that, in addition to its direct effects on balance, dexterity and eye movement control, the benefits of the DDAT exercise treatment transferred significantly to cognitive skills underlying literacy, to the reading process, and to standardized national literacy attainment tests. PMID:12625376

  15. Incremental and independent value of cardiopulmonary exercise test measures and the Seattle Heart Failure Model for prediction of risk in patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Dardas, Todd; Li, Yanhong; Reed, Shelby D.; O’Connor, Christopher M.; Whellan, David J.; Ellis, Stephen J.; Schulman, Kevin A.; Kraus, William E.; Forman, Daniel E.; Levy, Wayne C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Multivariable risk scores and exercise measures are well-validated risk prediction methods. Combining information from a functional evaluation and a risk model may improve accuracy of risk predictions. We analyzed whether adding exercise measures to the Seattle Heart Failure Model (SHFM) improves risk prediction accuracy in systolic heart failure. Methods and Results We used a sample of patients from the Heart Failure and A Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of Exercise TraiNing (HF-ACTION) study to examine the addition of peak VO2, VE/VCO2 slope, 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) or exercise duration (CPXDUR) to the SHFM. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to test the association between the combined endpoint (death, LVAD or cardiac transplantation) and the addition of exercise variables to the SHFM. 2152 patients were included in the sample. The SHFM and all exercise measures were associated with events (all p-values<0.0001) in proportional hazards models. There was statistically significant improvement in risk estimation when exercise measures were added to the SHFM. However, the improvement in c-index for addition of peak VO2 (+0.01), VE/VCO2 (+0.02), 6MWD (−0.001) and CPXDUR (+0.001) to the SHFM was small or slightly worse than the SHFM alone. Changes in risk assignment with the addition of exercise variables were minimal for patients above or below a15% 1-year mortality. Conclusions Exercise performance measures and the SHFM are independently useful for predicting risk in systolic heart failure. Adding CPET measures and 6MWD to the SHFM offers only minimal improvement in risk reassignment at clinically meaningful cutpoints. PMID:25940075

  16. Evaluation of Muscle Activities in Human Forearms under Exercises by Diffuse Optical Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanikawa, Yukari; Gao, Feng; Miyakawa, Michio; Kiryu, Toru; Kizuka, Tomohiro; Endo, Yasuomi; Okawa, Shinpei; Yamada, Yukio

    During the forearm exercise, it is generally understood that the inner muscles work for the task, and the outer muscles work to fix the joints for the efficient work of the inner muscles. For evaluation of the exercise, quantitative measurement of inner muscle activities is necessary. Electromyograph (EMG) and oxygen monitoring using continuous-wave near-infrared spectroscopy (CW-NIRS) have been used for the evaluation because both of them are the modalities of safe, portable and noninvasive measurements of muscle activities. However, these modalities can show the qualitative changes in the muscle activities in the vicinity of the skin surface. Time-resolved diffuse optical tomography (TR-DOT) can quantitatively provide tomographic images of the changes in the oxygenation state of the whole muscles. In vivo experiments of TR-DOT were performed for human forearms under handgrip exercises, and DOT images of the changes in the oxygenation state of the forearms were reconstructed using the algorithm based on the modified generalized pulsed spectrum technique. The DOT images are compared with the MR-images, and it is shown that the activities of the inner muscles of the forearms were active during the handgrip excises.

  17. A new methodology to assess the performance and uncertainty of source apportionment models in intercomparison exercises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belis, C. A.; Pernigotti, D.; Karagulian, F.; Pirovano, G.; Larsen, B. R.; Gerboles, M.; Hopke, P. K.

    2015-10-01

    A new methodology to assess source apportionment model performance in intercomparison exercises, encompassing the preparation of real-world and synthetic datasets and the evaluation of the source apportionment results reported by participants, is described. The evaluation consists of three types of tests: complementary tests, preliminary tests, and performance tests. The complementary tests provide summary information about the source apportionment results as a whole. The preliminary tests check whether source/factors belong to a given source category. Three types of indicators: Pearson correlation (Pearson), standardized identity distance (SID), and weighted difference (WD) are used to test factor/source chemical profiles, while factor/source time series and contribution-to-species values are tested only using the Pearson. The performance tests, based on international standards for proficiency testing, are targeted at evaluating whether the reported biases in the quantification of the factor/source contribution estimates (SCEs) and uncertainties are consistent with previously established quality standards in a fitness-for-purpose approach. Moreover, the consistency of the SCE time series is evaluated using a variant of the RMSE normalised by the reference standard uncertainty. The described methodology facilitates a thorough evaluation of the source apportionment output. The new indicator to compare source or factor profiles presented in this study (SID) is more robust and provides additional information compared to the existing ones.

  18. Landscape - Soilscape Modelling: Proposed framework for a model comparison benchmarking exercise, who wants to join?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoorl, Jeroen M.; Jetten, Victor G.; Coulthard, Thomas J.; Hancock, Greg R.; Renschler, Chris S.; Irvine, Brian J.; Cerdan, Olivier; Kirkby, Mike J.; (A) Veldkamp, Tom

    2014-05-01

    Current landscape - soilscape modelling frameworks are developed under a wide range of spatial and temporal resolutions and extents, from the so called event-based models, soil erosion models to the landscape evolution models. In addition, these models are based on different assumptions, include variable and different processes descriptions and produce different outcomes. Consequently, the models often need specific input data and their development and calibration is best linked to a specific area and local conditions. Model validation is often limited and restricted to the shorter time scales and single events. A first workshop on catchment based modelling (6 event based models were challenged then) was organised in the late 90's and the results lead to some excellent discussions on predictive modelling, equifinality and a special issue in Catena. It is time for a similar exercise: new models have been made, older models have been updated, and judging from literature there is a lot more experience in calibration/validation and reflections on processes observed in the field and how these should be simulated. In addition there are new data sources, such as high resolution remote sensing (including DEMs), new pattern analysis, comparison techniques and continuous developments and results in dating sediment archives and erosion rates. The main goal of this renewed exercise will be to come up with a benchmarking methodology for comparing and judging model behaviour including the issues of upscaling and downscaling of results. Model comparison may lead to the development of new research questions and lead to a firmer understanding of different models performance under different circumstances.

  19. Kinematic Evaluation of the Step-up Exercise in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kozánek, Michal; Hosseini, Ali; Van de Velde, Samuel K.; Moussa, Mohamed E.; Gill, Thomas J.; Li, Guoan

    2011-01-01

    Background Step-up exercise is one of the most commonly utilized exercises during rehabilitation of patients after both ACL injury and reconstruction. Currently, insurance providers increasingly required a trial of intensified rehabilitation before surgical reconstruction is attempted. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether this “safe” rehabilitation exercise in the setting of ACL deficiency can cause altered knee kinematics. Methods Thirty patients with unilateral ACL rupture were recruited for this study. The mean time from injury was 3.3 months. Tibiofemoral kinematics were determined during a step-up exercise using a combination of MRI, dual fluoroscopy and advanced computer modeling. Findings The ACL-injured knee displayed an average 5° greater external tibial rotation than the uninjured knee (p<0.05), during the last 30% of step-up. The ACL-injured knee also demonstrated on average 2.5 mm greater anterior tibial shift during the last 40% of stance phase (p<0.01). In addition, during the last 30% of stance the tibia of the ACL-deficient knee tended to shift more medially (~1 mm) as the knee approached full extension (p<0.01). Interpertation The data confirmed the initial hypothesis as it was found that ACL deficient knees demonstrated significantly increased anterior tibial translation, medial tibial translation and external tibial rotation towards the end of the step-up as the knee approached full extension. Intensive rehabilitation utilizing the step-up exercise in the setting of ACL deficiency can potentially introduce repetitive microtrauma by way of altered kinematics. PMID:21652128

  20. BioVapor Model Evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    General background on modeling and specifics of modeling vapor intrusion are given. Three classical model applications are described and related to the problem of petroleum vapor intrusion. These indicate the need for model calibration and uncertainty analysis. Evaluation of Bi...

  1. Modeling heat exchange characteristics of long term space operations: Role of skin wettedness and exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Richard R.

    1994-01-01

    The problems of heat exchange during rest and exercise during long term space operations are covered in this report. Particular attention is given to the modeling and description of the consequences of requirement to exercise in a zero-g atmosphere during Space Shuttle flights, especially long term ones. In space environments, there exists no free convection therefore only forced convection occurring by movement, such as pedalling on a cycle ergometer, augments required heat dissipation necessary to regulate body temperature. The requirement to exercise at discrete periods of the day is good practice in order to resist the deleterious consequences of zero-gravity problems and improve distribution of body fluids. However, during exercise (ca. 180 to 250W), in zero-g environments, the mass of eccrine sweating rests as sheets on the skin surface and the sweat cannot evaporate readily. The use of exercise suits with fabrics that have hydrophobic or outwicking properties somewhat distributes the mass of sweat to a larger surface from which to evaporate. However, with no free convection, increased skin wettedness throughout the body surface induces increasing thermal discomfort, particularly during continuous exercise. This report presents several alternatives to aid in this problem: use of intermittent exercise, methods to quantify local skin wettedness, and introduction of a new effective temperature that integrates thermal stress and heat exchange avenues in a zero-g atmosphere.

  2. Exercise and Nutritional Benefits in PD: Rodent Models and Clinical Settings.

    PubMed

    Archer, Trevor; Kostrzewa, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise offers a highly effective health-endowering activity as has been evidence using rodent models of Parkinson's disease (PD). It is a particularly useful intervention in individuals employed in sedentary occupations or afflicted by a neurodegenerative disorder, such as PD. The several links between exercise and quality-of-life, disorder progression and staging, risk factors and symptoms-biomarkers in PD all endower a promise for improved prognosis. Nutrition provides a strong determinant for disorder vulnerability and prognosis with fish oils and vegetables with a mediterranean diet offering both protection and resistance. Three factors determining the effects of exercise on disorder severity of patients may be presented: (i) Exercise effects upon motor impairment, gait, posture and balance, (ii) Exercise reduction of oxidative stress, stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and up-regulation of autophagy, and (iii) Exercise stimulation of dopamine (DA) neurochemistry and trophic factors. Running-wheel performance, as measured by distance run by individual mice from different treatment groups, was related to DA-integrity, indexed by striatal DA levels. Finally, both nutrition and exercise may facilitate positive epigenetic outcomes, such as lowering the dosage of L-Dopa required for a therapeutic effect. PMID:26728168

  3. The Effects of Voluntary Exercise on Oocyte Quality in a Diet-Induced Obese Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Boudoures, Anna L.; Chi, Maggie; Thompson, Alysha; Zhang, Wendy; Moley, Kelle H.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity negatively affects many aspects of the human body, including reproductive function. In females, the root of the decline in fertility is linked to problems in the oocyte. Problems seen in oocytes that positively correlate with increasing BMI include changes to the metabolism, lipid accumulation, meiosis, and metaphase II (MII) spindle structure. Studies in mice indicate dietary interventions fail to reverse these problems [4]. How exercise affects the oocytes has not been addressed. Therefore, we hypothesized an exercise intervention would improve oocyte quality. Here we show in a mouse model of an exercise intervention can improve lipid metabolism in germinal vesicle (GV) stage oocytes. Oocytes significantly increased activity and transcription of the β-oxidation enzyme Hadha (Hydroxyacyl-CoA-dehydrogenase) in response to exercise training only if the mice had been fed a high fat diet (HFD). An exercise intervention also reversed the lipid accumulation seen in GV stage oocytes of HFD females. However, delays in meiosis and disorganized MII spindles remained present. Therefore, exercise is able to improve, but not reverse, damage imparted on oocytes as a result of a high fat diet and obesity. By utilizing an exercise intervention on a HFD, we determined only lipid content and lipid metabolism is changed in GV oocytes. Moving forward, interventions to improve oocyte quality may need to be more targeted to the oocyte specifically. Because of the HFD induced deficiency in β-oxidation, dietary supplementation with substrates to improve lipid utilization may be more beneficial. PMID:26700938

  4. COMPARING MODEL RESULTS TO NATIONAL CLIMATE POLICY GOALS: RESULTS FROM THE ASIA MODELING EXERCISE

    SciTech Connect

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Fawcett, Allen A.; Jiang, Kejun

    2012-12-01

    While the world has yet to adopt a single unified policy to limit climate change, many countries and regions have adopted energy and climate policies that have implications for global emissions. In this paper, we discuss a few key policies and how they are included in a set of 24 energy and integrated assessment models that participated in the Asia Modeling Exercise. We also compare results from these models for a small set of stylized scenarios to the pledges made as part of the Copenhagen Accord and the goals stated by the Major Economies Forum. We find that the targets outlined by the United States, the European Union, Japan, and Korea require significant policy action in most of the models analyzed. For most of the models in the study, however, the goals outlined by India are met without any climate policy. The stringency of climate policy required to meet China’s Copenhagen pledges varies across models and accounting methodologies.

  5. Social Program Evaluation: Six Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Directions for Program Evaluation, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Representative models of program evaluation are described by their approach to values, and categorized by empirical style: positivism versus humanism. The models are: social process audit; experimental/quasi-experimental research design; goal-free evaluation; systems evaluation; cost-benefit analysis; and accountability program evaluation. (CP)

  6. Evaluation Theory, Models, and Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stufflebeam, Daniel L.; Shinkfield, Anthony J.

    2007-01-01

    "Evaluation Theory, Models, and Applications" is designed for evaluators and students who need to develop a commanding knowledge of the evaluation field: its history, theory and standards, models and approaches, procedures, and inclusion of personnel as well as program evaluation. This important book shows how to choose from a growing array of…

  7. Effects of exercise in a relapsing-remitting model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Klaren, Rachel E; Stasula, Ulana; Steelman, Andrew J; Hernandez, Jessica; Pence, Brandt D; Woods, Jeffrey A; Motl, Robert W

    2016-10-01

    Previous research has examined the effects of exercise in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model of multiple sclerosis. However, all previous studies have utilized a chronic model of EAE, with exercise delivered prior to or immediately after induction of EAE. To our knowledge, no study has examined the effects of exercise delivered during a remission period after initial disease onset in a relapsing-remitting model of EAE (RR-EAE). The current study examines the effects of both voluntary wheel running and forced treadmill exercise on clinical disability and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in SJL mice with RR-EAE. The results demonstrate no significant effects of exercise delivered during remission after initial disease onset on clinical disability scores or levels of hippocampal BDNF in mice with RR-EAE. Furthermore, our results demonstrate no significant increase in citrate synthase activity in the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles of mice in the running wheel or treadmill conditions compared with the sedentary condition. These results suggest that the exercise stimuli might have been insufficient to elicit differences in clinical disability or hippocampal BDNF among treatment conditions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27312674

  8. Prognostic value of exercise thallium-201 imaging in patients presenting for evaluation of chest pain

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.A.; Boucher, C.A.; Okada, R.D.; Guiney, T.E.; Newell, J.B.; Strauss, H.W.; Pohost, G.M.

    1983-04-01

    Accurate prognostic information is important in determining optimal management of patients presenting for evaluation of chest pain. In this study, the ability of exercise thallium-201 myocardial imaging to predict future cardiac events (cardiovascular death or nonfatal myocardial infarction) was correlated with clinical, coronary and left ventricular angiographic and exercise electrocardiographic data in 139 consecutive, nonsurgically managed patients followed-up over a 3 to 5 year period (mean follow-up, 3.7 +/- 0.9), using a logistic regression analysis. Among patients without prior myocardial infarction (100 of 139), the number of myocardial segments with transient thallium-201 defects was the only statistically significant predictor of future cardiac events when all patient variables were evaluated. Among patients with myocardial infarction before evaluation (39 of 139), angiographic ejection fraction was the only significant predictor of future cardiac events when all variables were considered. This study suggests an approach to evaluate the risk of future cardiac events in patients with possible ischemic heart disease.

  9. Exercise during early, but not late abstinence, attenuates subsequent relapse vulnerability in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Beiter, R M; Peterson, A B; Abel, J; Lynch, W J

    2016-01-01

    Exercise has shown promise as a nonpharmacological intervention for addiction, with evidence suggesting a potential utility for relapse prevention. In humans, exercise as an intervention is typically introduced well after the initiation of abstinence, yet neurobiological data from preclinical studies suggest that it may be more effective if initiated during early abstinence. Here, using rat models, we determined whether the beneficial effects of exercise on relapse vulnerability depends on when exercise is first initiated, during early versus late abstinence. Once rats (n=47) acquired cocaine self-administration, they were given 24-h access to cocaine (1.5 mg/kg per infusion) under a discrete trial procedure (four infusions per hour) for 10 days. The rats then began a 14-day abstinence period in which they had access (2 h per day) to a locked wheel throughout abstinence (sedentary) or an unlocked wheel during early (days 1-7), late (days 8-14) or throughout (days 1-14) abstinence (n=10-14 per group). Cocaine seeking, as assessed under an extinction/cued-induced reinstatement procedure, was examined on day 15 of abstinence. Exercise beginning during early abstinence robustly attenuated subsequent cocaine seeking, and this effect persisted even when exercise ended on the seventh day of abstinence. In contrast, exercise during late abstinence was not effective and these animals displayed high levels of cocaine seeking similar to those observed in sedentary animals. These results indicate that the timing of exercise availability differentially impacts cocaine seeking with results suggesting that exercise during early, but not late, abstinence may provide long-term protection against cocaine relapse. PMID:27115123

  10. Exercise during early, but not late abstinence, attenuates subsequent relapse vulnerability in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Beiter, R M; Peterson, A B; Abel, J; Lynch, W J

    2016-01-01

    Exercise has shown promise as a nonpharmacological intervention for addiction, with evidence suggesting a potential utility for relapse prevention. In humans, exercise as an intervention is typically introduced well after the initiation of abstinence, yet neurobiological data from preclinical studies suggest that it may be more effective if initiated during early abstinence. Here, using rat models, we determined whether the beneficial effects of exercise on relapse vulnerability depends on when exercise is first initiated, during early versus late abstinence. Once rats (n=47) acquired cocaine self-administration, they were given 24-h access to cocaine (1.5 mg/kg per infusion) under a discrete trial procedure (four infusions per hour) for 10 days. The rats then began a 14-day abstinence period in which they had access (2 h per day) to a locked wheel throughout abstinence (sedentary) or an unlocked wheel during early (days 1–7), late (days 8–14) or throughout (days 1–14) abstinence (n=10–14 per group). Cocaine seeking, as assessed under an extinction/cued-induced reinstatement procedure, was examined on day 15 of abstinence. Exercise beginning during early abstinence robustly attenuated subsequent cocaine seeking, and this effect persisted even when exercise ended on the seventh day of abstinence. In contrast, exercise during late abstinence was not effective and these animals displayed high levels of cocaine seeking similar to those observed in sedentary animals. These results indicate that the timing of exercise availability differentially impacts cocaine seeking with results suggesting that exercise during early, but not late, abstinence may provide long-term protection against cocaine relapse. PMID:27115123

  11. Models and techniques for evaluating the effectiveness of aircraft computing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    Progress in the development of system models and techniques for the formulation and evaluation of aircraft computer system effectiveness is reported. Topics covered include: analysis of functional dependence: a prototype software package, METAPHOR, developed to aid the evaluation of performability; and a comprehensive performability modeling and evaluation exercise involving the SIFT computer.

  12. Development and evaluation of a treadmill-based exercise tolerance test in cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Jenny; Cheng, Dunlei; Barton, Stephanie; Bigej-Cerqua, Janet; Mims, Lisa; Molden, Jennifer; Anderson, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation exercise prescriptions should be based on exercise stress tests; however, limitations in performing stress tests in this setting typically force reliance on subjective measures like the Duke Activity Status Index (DASI). We developed and evaluated a treadmill-based exercise tolerance test (ETT) to provide objective physiologic measures without requiring additional equipment or insurance charges. The ETT is stopped when the patient's Borg scale rating of perceived exertion (RPE) reaches 15 or when any sign/symptom indicates risk of an adverse event. Outcomes of the study included reasons for stopping; maximum heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and rate pressure product; and adverse events. We tested equivalence to the DASI as requiring the 95% confidence interval for the mean difference between DASI and ETT metabolic equivalents (METs) to fall within the range (–1, 1). Among 502 consecutive cardiac rehabilitation patients, one suffered a panic attack; no other adverse events occurred. Most (80%) stopped because they reached an RPE of 15; the remaining 20% were stopped on indications that continuing risked an adverse event. Mean maximum systolic blood pressure, heart rate, and rate pressure product were significantly (P < 0.001) below thresholds of the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation. Two patients’ heart rates exceeded 150 beats per minute, but their rate pressure products remained below 36,000. The mean difference between DASI and ETT METs was −0.8 (−0.98, −0.65), indicating equivalence at our threshold. In conclusion, the ETT can be performed within cardiac rehabilitation, providing a functional capacity assessment equivalent to the DASI and objective physiologic measures for developing exercise prescriptions and measuring progress. PMID:23814381

  13. Development and evaluation of a treadmill-based exercise tolerance test in cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Dunagan, Julie; Adams, Jenny; Cheng, Dunlei; Barton, Stephanie; Bigej-Cerqua, Janet; Mims, Lisa; Molden, Jennifer; Anderson, Valerie

    2013-07-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation exercise prescriptions should be based on exercise stress tests; however, limitations in performing stress tests in this setting typically force reliance on subjective measures like the Duke Activity Status Index (DASI). We developed and evaluated a treadmill-based exercise tolerance test (ETT) to provide objective physiologic measures without requiring additional equipment or insurance charges. The ETT is stopped when the patient's Borg scale rating of perceived exertion (RPE) reaches 15 or when any sign/symptom indicates risk of an adverse event. Outcomes of the study included reasons for stopping; maximum heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and rate pressure product; and adverse events. We tested equivalence to the DASI as requiring the 95% confidence interval for the mean difference between DASI and ETT metabolic equivalents (METs) to fall within the range (-1, 1). Among 502 consecutive cardiac rehabilitation patients, one suffered a panic attack; no other adverse events occurred. Most (80%) stopped because they reached an RPE of 15; the remaining 20% were stopped on indications that continuing risked an adverse event. Mean maximum systolic blood pressure, heart rate, and rate pressure product were significantly (P < 0.001) below thresholds of the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation. Two patients' heart rates exceeded 150 beats per minute, but their rate pressure products remained below 36,000. The mean difference between DASI and ETT METs was -0.8 (-0.98, -0.65), indicating equivalence at our threshold. In conclusion, the ETT can be performed within cardiac rehabilitation, providing a functional capacity assessment equivalent to the DASI and objective physiologic measures for developing exercise prescriptions and measuring progress. PMID:23814381

  14. Computational Modeling Using OpenSim to Simulate a Squat Exercise Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, C. A.; Thompson, W. K.; Lewandowski, B. E.; Humphreys, B. T.; Funk, J. H.; Funk, N. H.; Weaver, A. S.; Perusek, G. P.; Sheehan, C. C.; Mulugeta, L.

    2015-01-01

    Long duration space travel to destinations such as Mars or an asteroid will expose astronauts to extended periods of reduced gravity. Astronauts will use an exercise regime for the duration of the space flight to minimize the loss of bone density, muscle mass and aerobic capacity that occurs during exposure to a reduced gravity environment. Since the area available in the spacecraft for an exercise device is limited and gravity is not present to aid loading, compact resistance exercise device prototypes are being developed. Since it is difficult to rigorously test these proposed devices in space flight, computational modeling provides an estimation of the muscle forces, joint torques and joint loads during exercise to gain insight on the efficacy to protect the musculoskeletal health of astronauts.

  15. Analysis of Regional Budgets of Sulfur Species Modeled for the COSAM Exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Roelofs, G.-J.; Kasibhatla, P.; Barrie, Leonard A.; Bergmann, D.; Bridgeman, C.; Chin, M.; Christensen, J.; Easter, Richard C.; Feichter, J.; Jeuken, A.; Kjellstrom, E.; Koch, D.; Land, C.; Lohmann, U.; Rasch, P.

    2001-11-01

    The COSAM intercomparison exercise (comparison of large-scale sulfur models) was organized to compare and evaluate the performance of global sulfur cycle models. Eleven models participated, and from these models the simulated surface concentrations, vertical profiles and budget terms were submitted. This study focuses on simulated budget terms for the sources and sinks of SO2 and sulfate in three polluted regions in the Northern Hemisphere, i.e., eastern North America, Europe, and Southeast Asia. Qualitatively, features of the sulfur cycle are modeled quite consistently between models, such as the relative importance of dry deposition as a removal mechanism for SO2, the important of aqueous phase oxidation over gas phase oxidation for SO2, and the importance of wet over dry deposition for removal of sulfate aerosol. Quantitatively, however, models may show large differences, especially for cloud-related processes, i.e., aqueous phase oxidation of SO2 and sulfate wet deposition. In some cases a specific behavior can be related to the treatment of oxidants for aqueous phase SO2 oxidation, or the vertical resolution applied in models. Generally, however, the differences between models appear to be related to simulated cloud (micro-)physics and distributions, whereas differences in vertical transport efficiencies related to convection play an additional role. The estimated sulfur column burdens, lifetimes and export budgets vary between models by about a factor of 2 or 3. It can be expected that uncertainties in related effects which are derived from global sulfur model calculations, such as direct and indirect climate forcing estimates by sulfate aerosol, are at least of similar magnitude.

  16. Exercise modulation of the host-tumor interaction in an orthotopic model of murine prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lee W; Antonelli, Jodi; Masko, Elizabeth M; Broadwater, Gloria; Lascola, Christopher D; Fels, Diane; Dewhirst, Mark W; Dyck, Jason R B; Nagendran, Jeevan; Flores, Catherine T; Betof, Allison S; Nelson, Erik R; Pollak, Michael; Dash, Rajesh C; Young, Martin E; Freedland, Stephen J

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of exercise on cancer progression, metastasis, and underlying mechanisms in an orthotopic model of murine prostate cancer. C57BL/6 male mice (6-8 wk of age) were orthotopically injected with transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate C-1 cells (5 × 10(5)) and randomly assigned to exercise (n = 28) or a non-intervention control (n = 31) groups. The exercise group was given voluntary access to a wheel 24 h/day for the duration of the study. Four mice per group were serially killed on days 14, 31, and 36; the remaining 38 mice (exercise, n = 18; control, n = 20) were killed on day 53. Before death, MRI was performed to assess tumor blood perfusion. Primary tumor growth rate was comparable between groups, but expression of prometastatic genes was significantly modulated in exercising animals with a shift toward reduced metastasis. Exercise was associated with increased activity of protein kinases within the MEK/MAPK and PI3K/mTOR signaling cascades with subsequent increased intratumoral protein levels of HIF-1α and VEGF. This was associated with improved tumor vascularization. Multiplex ELISAs revealed distinct reductions in plasma concentrations of several angiogenic cytokines in the exercise group, which was associated with increased expression of angiogenic and metabolic genes in the skeletal muscle. Exercise-induced stabilization of HIF-1α and subsequent upregulation of VEGF was associated with "productive" tumor vascularization with a shift toward suppressed metastasis in an orthotopic model of prostate cancer. PMID:22604887

  17. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... show that people with arthritis, heart disease, or diabetes benefit from regular exercise. Exercise also helps people ... or difficulty walking. To learn about exercise and diabetes, see "Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes" from Go4Life®, ...

  18. The Education and Evaluation of Vitamin Consumption Effects on Stress Markers Oxidative after Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sam, Cemil Tugrulhan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to evaluate the effect of 4-week vitamin C and E supplementation on the markers of oxidative stress after exercise session in students. 30 non-athlete persons (25.21 ± 1.5 years, 173.42 ± 5.62 cm, 75.6±5.75 kg, VO[subscript 2] max of 42.26 ± 1.11 ml/kg/min, and waist-hip ratio of 0.91 ±0.02 cm) volunteered for the…

  19. Triggering endogenous neuroprotective processes through exercise in models of dopamine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Zigmond, Michael J; Cameron, Judy L; Leak, Rehana K; Mirnics, Karoly; Russell, Vivienne A; Smeyne, Richard J; Smith, Amanda D

    2009-12-01

    We are testing the hypothesis that exercise is neuroprotective in animal models of the dopamine (DA) deficiency in Parkinson's disease. Our studies include mice or rats provided access to a running wheel and subsequently treated with MPTP (mice) or 6-hydroxydopamine (rats) and monkeys provided access to a treadmill and subsequently treated with MPTP. Typically, the exercise occurs for 3 months prior to the toxin treatment and often for 1-2 months thereafter. Our findings indicate that exercise reduces the behavioral impairments elicited by the dopaminergic neurotoxins as well as the loss of DA neurons as assessed by PET imaging and biochemical or histochemical assessment of tissue samples. Our studies are focused on one of several possible explanations for the beneficial effects of exercise: an exercise-induced increase in the expression of neurotrophic factors, particularly GDNF. Our observations indicate that GDNF can reduce the vulnerability of DA neurons, in part due to the activation of key intracellular cascades. We also find that mild cellular stress itself can provide protection against more intensive stress, a form of preconditioning. We conclude that dopamine neurons have the capacity to respond to intracellular and extracellular signals by triggering endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms. This raises the possibility that some individuals with Parkinson's disease suffer from a reduction of these neuroprotective mechanisms, and that treatments that boost these mechanisms - including exercise - may provide therapeutic benefit. PMID:20083005

  20. User's instructions for the high speed version of the cardiovascular exercise model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croston, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    A mathematical model and digital computer simulation of the human cardiovascular system and its controls were developed to simulate transient responses to bicycle ergometer exercise. The purpose of the model was to provide a method to analyze cardiovascular control hypotheses which cannot be easily tested in an animal or human or in a spaceflight environment.

  1. Anatomical Knowledge Gain through a Clay-Modeling Exercise Compared to Live and Video Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kooloos, Jan G. M.; Schepens-Franke, Annelieke N.; Bergman, Esther M.; Donders, Rogier A. R. T.; Vorstenbosch, Marc A. T. M.

    2014-01-01

    Clay modeling is increasingly used as a teaching method other than dissection. The haptic experience during clay modeling is supposed to correspond to the learning effect of manipulations during exercises in the dissection room involving tissues and organs. We questioned this assumption in two pretest-post-test experiments. In these experiments,…

  2. Exploring Solid-State Structure and Physical Properties: A Molecular and Crystal Model Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bindel, Thomas H.

    2008-01-01

    A crystal model laboratory exercise is presented that allows students to examine relations among the microscopic-macroscopic-symbolic levels, using crystalline mineral samples and corresponding crystal models. Students explore the relationship between solid-state structure and crystal form. Other structure-property relationships are explored. The…

  3. Using Visual Models as Pre-Reading Exercises in Teaching Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeker, Michael W.

    Adapting strategies of invention from the new process-oriented rhetoric, the literature teacher can help students understand what they read through prereading exercises. Presenting students with an abstract model of a text's metaphoric structure, the teacher can spark students' immediate and imaginative response to the model, involving them…

  4. Modeling of breath methane concentration profiles during exercise on an ergometer*

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, Anna; Unterkofler, Karl; Mochalski, Pawel; Jandacka, Martin; Ruzsanyi, Vera; Szabó, Gábor; Mohácsi, Árpád; Teschl, Susanne; Teschl, Gerald; King, Julian

    2016-01-01

    We develop a simple three compartment model based on mass balance equations which quantitatively describes the dynamics of breath methane concentration profiles during exercise on an ergometer. With the help of this model it is possible to estimate the endogenous production rate of methane in the large intestine by measuring breath gas concentrations of methane. PMID:26828421

  5. Modeling Biological Membranes with Circuit Boards and Measuring Electrical Signals in Axons: Student Laboratory Exercises

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Martha M.; Martin, Jonathan M.; Atwood, Harold L.; Cooper, Robin L.

    2011-01-01

    This is a demonstration of how electrical models can be used to characterize biological membranes. This exercise also introduces biophysical terminology used in electrophysiology. The same equipment is used in the membrane model as on live preparations. Some properties of an isolated nerve cord are investigated: nerve action potentials, recruitment of neurons, and responsiveness of the nerve cord to environmental factors. PMID:21304461

  6. Cardiorespiratory endurance evaluation using heart rate analysis during ski simulator exercise and the Harvard step test in elementary school students.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo Taek; Roh, Hyo Lyun; Kim, Yoon Sang

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Efficient management using exercise programs with various benefits should be provided by educational institutions for children in their growth phase. We analyzed the heart rates of children during ski simulator exercise and the Harvard step test to evaluate the cardiopulmonary endurance by calculating their post-exercise recovery rate. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects (n = 77) were categorized into a normal weight and an overweight/obesity group by body mass index. They performed each exercise for 3 minutes. The cardiorespiratory endurance was calculated using the Physical Efficiency Index formula. [Results] The ski simulator and Harvard step test showed that there was a significant difference in the heart rates of the 2 body mass index-based groups at each minute. The normal weight and the ski-simulator group had higher Physical Efficiency Index levels. [Conclusion] This study showed that a simulator exercise can produce a cumulative load even when performed at low intensity, and can be effectively utilized as exercise equipment since it resulted in higher Physical Efficiency Index levels than the Harvard step test. If schools can increase sport durability by stimulating students' interests, the ski simulator exercise can be used in programs designed to improve and strengthen students' physical fitness. PMID:27065556

  7. Cardiorespiratory endurance evaluation using heart rate analysis during ski simulator exercise and the Harvard step test in elementary school students

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo Taek; Roh, Hyo Lyun; Kim, Yoon Sang

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Efficient management using exercise programs with various benefits should be provided by educational institutions for children in their growth phase. We analyzed the heart rates of children during ski simulator exercise and the Harvard step test to evaluate the cardiopulmonary endurance by calculating their post-exercise recovery rate. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects (n = 77) were categorized into a normal weight and an overweight/obesity group by body mass index. They performed each exercise for 3 minutes. The cardiorespiratory endurance was calculated using the Physical Efficiency Index formula. [Results] The ski simulator and Harvard step test showed that there was a significant difference in the heart rates of the 2 body mass index-based groups at each minute. The normal weight and the ski-simulator group had higher Physical Efficiency Index levels. [Conclusion] This study showed that a simulator exercise can produce a cumulative load even when performed at low intensity, and can be effectively utilized as exercise equipment since it resulted in higher Physical Efficiency Index levels than the Harvard step test. If schools can increase sport durability by stimulating students’ interests, the ski simulator exercise can be used in programs designed to improve and strengthen students’ physical fitness. PMID:27065556

  8. Radionuclide angiographic evaluation of left ventricular performance at rest and during exercise in patients with aortic regurgitation

    SciTech Connect

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Heo, J.

    1986-06-01

    Radionuclide angiographic evaluation of LV performance at rest and during exercise in patients with AR have shown that an abnormal EF response to exercise may be observed in asymptomatic patients with normal resting LV function. The EF response to exercise has been correlated with a number of clinical and exercise measurements; important among these are the slope of the systolic pressure-to-end-systolic volume, end-systolic volume, cardiac index, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, and wall stress. The changes in the regurgitant fraction, EF, and LV volume have shown considerable individual variability; they have also allowed a better understanding of the circulatory responses during exercise. Radionuclide angiography provides a reliable and reproducible method of measuring the rest LVEF that is important in the timing and the outcome of valve replacement. The value of the EF response to exercise in patient management is not yet clear; it is possible that other radionuclide-derived measurements at rest or during exercise, such as the systolic pressure-to-end-systolic volume relationship, and the end-systolic volume may provide complementary information to that provided by the EF.

  9. Joint protection and hand exercises for hand osteoarthritis: an economic evaluation comparing methods for the analysis of factorial trials

    PubMed Central

    Oppong, Raymond; Nicholls, Elaine; Whitehurst, David G. T.; Hill, Susan; Hammond, Alison; Hay, Elaine M.; Dziedzic, Krysia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Evidence regarding the cost-effectiveness of joint protection and hand exercises for the management of hand OA is not well established. The primary aim of this study is to assess the cost-effectiveness (cost-utility) of these management options. In addition, given the absence of consensus regarding the conduct of economic evaluation alongside factorial trials, we compare different analytical methodologies. Methods. A trial-based economic evaluation to assess the cost-utility of joint protection only, hand exercises only and joint protection plus hand exercises compared with leaflet and advice was undertaken over a 12 month period from a UK National Health Service perspective. Patient-level mean costs and mean quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were calculated for each trial arm. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were estimated and cost-effectiveness acceptability curves were constructed. The base case analysis used a within-the-table analysis methodology. Two further methods were explored: the at-the-margins approach and a regression-based approach with or without an interaction term. Results. Mean costs (QALYs) were £58.46 (s.d. 0.662) for leaflet and advice, £92.12 (s.d. 0.659) for joint protection, £64.51 (s.d. 0.681) for hand exercises and £112.38 (s.d. 0.658) for joint protection plus hand exercises. In the base case, hand exercises were the cost-effective option, with an ICER of £318 per QALY gained. Hand exercises remained the most cost-effective management strategy when adopting alternative methodological approaches. Conclusion. This is the first trial evaluating the cost-effectiveness of occupational therapy-supported approaches to self-management for hand OA. Our findings showed that hand exercises were the most cost-effective option. PMID:25339642

  10. A Model of the Cardiorespiratory Response to Aerobic Exercise in Healthy and Heart Failure Conditions.

    PubMed

    Fresiello, Libera; Meyns, Bart; Di Molfetta, Arianna; Ferrari, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    The physiological response to physical exercise is now recognized as an important tool which can aid the diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. This is due to the fact that several mechanisms are needed to accommodate a higher cardiac output and a higher oxygen delivery to tissues. The aim of the present work is to provide a fully closed loop cardiorespiratory simulator reproducing the main physiological mechanisms which arise during aerobic exercise. The simulator also provides a representation of the impairments of these mechanisms in heart failure condition and their effect on limiting exercise capacity. The simulator consists of a cardiovascular model including the left and right heart, pulmonary and systemic circulations. This latter is split into exercising and non-exercising regions and is controlled by the baroreflex and metabolic mechanisms. In addition, the simulator includes a respiratory model reproducing the gas exchange in lungs and tissues, the ventilation control and the effects of its mechanics on the cardiovascular system. The simulator was tested and compared to the data in the literature at three different workloads whilst cycling (25, 49 and 73 watts). The results show that the simulator is able to reproduce the response to exercise in terms of: heart rate (from 67 to 134 bpm), cardiac output (from 5.3 to 10.2 l/min), leg blood flow (from 0.7 to 3.0 l/min), peripheral resistance (from 0.9 to 0.5 mmHg/(cm(3)/s)), central arteriovenous oxygen difference (from 4.5 to 10.8 ml/dl) and ventilation (6.1-25.5 l/min). The simulator was further adapted to reproduce the main impairments observed in heart failure condition, such as reduced sensitivity of baroreflex and metabolic controls, lower perfusion to the exercising regions (from 0.6 to 1.4 l/min) and hyperventilation (from 9.2 to 40.2 l/min). The simulator we developed is a useful tool for the description of the basic physiological mechanisms operating during exercise. It can reproduce

  11. A Model of the Cardiorespiratory Response to Aerobic Exercise in Healthy and Heart Failure Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Fresiello, Libera; Meyns, Bart; Di Molfetta, Arianna; Ferrari, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    The physiological response to physical exercise is now recognized as an important tool which can aid the diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. This is due to the fact that several mechanisms are needed to accommodate a higher cardiac output and a higher oxygen delivery to tissues. The aim of the present work is to provide a fully closed loop cardiorespiratory simulator reproducing the main physiological mechanisms which arise during aerobic exercise. The simulator also provides a representation of the impairments of these mechanisms in heart failure condition and their effect on limiting exercise capacity. The simulator consists of a cardiovascular model including the left and right heart, pulmonary and systemic circulations. This latter is split into exercising and non-exercising regions and is controlled by the baroreflex and metabolic mechanisms. In addition, the simulator includes a respiratory model reproducing the gas exchange in lungs and tissues, the ventilation control and the effects of its mechanics on the cardiovascular system. The simulator was tested and compared to the data in the literature at three different workloads whilst cycling (25, 49 and 73 watts). The results show that the simulator is able to reproduce the response to exercise in terms of: heart rate (from 67 to 134 bpm), cardiac output (from 5.3 to 10.2 l/min), leg blood flow (from 0.7 to 3.0 l/min), peripheral resistance (from 0.9 to 0.5 mmHg/(cm3/s)), central arteriovenous oxygen difference (from 4.5 to 10.8 ml/dl) and ventilation (6.1–25.5 l/min). The simulator was further adapted to reproduce the main impairments observed in heart failure condition, such as reduced sensitivity of baroreflex and metabolic controls, lower perfusion to the exercising regions (from 0.6 to 1.4 l/min) and hyperventilation (from 9.2 to 40.2 l/min). The simulator we developed is a useful tool for the description of the basic physiological mechanisms operating during exercise. It can reproduce

  12. Strong exercise stress exacerbates dermatitis in atopic model mice, NC/Nga mice, while proper exercise reduces it.

    PubMed

    Orita, Kumi; Hiramoto, Keiichi; Inoue, Risa; Sato, Eisuke F; Kobayashi, Hiromi; Ishii, Masamitsu; Inoue, Masayasu

    2010-12-01

    Atopic dermatitis is well known to exacerbate by stress. How the influence of exercise stress on the skin symptoms in patients with atopic dermatitis has not been clarified. The purpose of our research is to investigate how different strength of exercise stress acts on atopic dermatitis. Specific pathogen-free (SPF) and conventional NC/Nga male mice were used for the experiments. Conventional mice but not SPF group spontaneously develop dermal symptom similar to that of patients with atopic dermatitis at their age of 7 weeks. They were given two types of stress, mild (20 m/min for 60 min) or strong exercise (25 m/min for 90 min), using a treadmill four times per day. The dermal symptom of the conventional group was strongly exacerbated by strong exercise but ameliorated by mild exercise. Under the standard experimental conditions, plasma concentrations of α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and substance P in conventional mice increased markedly with concomitant exacerbation of the symptom. The plasma concentrations of these proteins elevated after strong exercise but decreased after mild exercise. Under the conventional conditions, plasma levels of β-endorphin increased with time by some mechanisms enhanced by the mild exercise. These observations suggested that exercise-induced stress significantly affect the symptom of atopic dermatitis in a pivotal manner depending on the plasma levels of TGF-β, α-MSH, substance P and β-endorphin. PMID:21087324

  13. Exercises in Hot and Humid Environment Caused Liver Injury in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bang; Liu, YuZheng; Zeng, ZhiYu; Lu, LingLing; Zheng, ZhiYong; Li, Bing; Zheng, ZongFu

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate injury pattern during intense exercises in hot and humid environment particularly on liver in a rat exertional heat stroke model. Methods We randomly divided 30 rats into a control group (CG), a normal temperature (25±2°C, 60%±5% humidity) exercise group (NTEG) and a high temperature and high humidity (35±2°C, 80%±10% humidity) exercising group (HTEG), each comprising 10 animals. The NTEG and HTEG rats were forced to run in a treadmill for 1 hour maximum at 20 rpm. We analyzed liver cells of all three groups with JC-1 dye and flow cytometry for apoptosis rates in addition to liver tissue 8 - hydroxy deoxyguanosine (8 - OhdG) and blood serum IL–6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), alanine aminotransferase ALT, aspartate amino transferase (AST), serum creatinine (CREA), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine phosphate kinase (CK) concentrations. Result Compared with NTEG rats, beside reduced exercise tolerance (60±5 vs. 15±3 minutes) (p = 0.002) the 8-OhdG liver tissue concentrations were significantly higher (p = 0.040) in the HTEG rats. The HTEG developed more organ tissue damage and cellular fragmentations of liver cells. In both exercise groups TNF-α and IL-6 serum concentrations were enhanced significantly (p<0.001) being highest in the HTEG animals. Serum ALT, AST, LDH, CREA, BUN and CK concentrations were significantly enhance in both exercise groups. Conclusion In our exertional heat stroke rat model, we found tissue damage particularly in livers during exercises in hot and humid environment that was related to inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis. PMID:25548911

  14. Mechanical and physiological evaluation of exercise performance in elite national rowers.

    PubMed

    Mahler, D A; Nelson, W N; Hagerman, F C

    1984-07-27

    We describe the scientific basis for evaluating the biomechanics and associated physiological requirements of exercise performance in elite national rowers. Computer-assisted analysis of high-speed cinematography has demonstrated that efficiency in rowing is related to the relative proximity between peak force and the perpendicular position of the oar. Physiological testing has indicated that near maximal levels of oxygen consumption are required during "all out" rowing, involving both aerobic and anaerobic metabolism. Serial testing has been performed on elite oarsmen throughout the year in order to evaluate the individual benefits of a training program and to establish guidelines for future training. Successful application of the scientific analysis of rowing performance requires that the athlete, coach, and investigator work closely together in an effort to increase the average velocity of the boat. PMID:6737640

  15. Exercise intervention increases spontaneous locomotion but fails to attenuate dopaminergic system loss in a progressive MPTP model in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Hood, Rebecca L; Liguore, William A; Moore, Cynthia; Pflibsen, Lacey; Meshul, Charles K

    2016-09-01

    While exercise is commonly recommended for PD patients to improve motor function, little is known about the disease-altering potential of exercise. Although others have demonstrated neuroprotective or neurorestorative effects of exercise in animal models of PD, the majority of these studies utilize young animals. In order to assess the effects of exercise intervention in a more clinically relevant model, we have subjected aged mice to progressive 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) lesioning and daily treadmill exercise, initiated early in the course of the disease. The MPTP model elicited a 55% reduction in striatal TH as measured by immunohistochemistry compared to sedentary controls, and exercise did not attenuate this loss in exercised MPTP animals. Furthermore, striatal TH and DAT loss, as assessed by western blotting, were not significantly impacted by treadmill exercise in MPTP-lesioned mice. We did find an increase in spontaneous locomotion in exercised mice that was not decreased by MPTP lesioning. This finding may be due, in part, to an increase in TH expression in the motor cortex in exercised MPTP mice. PMID:27350080

  16. Bridging animal and human models of exercise-induced brain plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Michelle W.; Vivar, Carmen; Kramer, Arthur F.; van Praag, Henriette

    2015-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in understanding the neurobiological mechanisms through which exercise protects and restores the brain. In this feature review, we integrate animal and human research, examining physical activity effects across multiple levels of description (neurons up to inter-regional pathways). We evaluate the influence of exercise on hippocampal structure and function, addressing common themes such as spatial memory and pattern separation, brain structure and plasticity, neurotrophic factors, and vasculature. Areas of research focused more within species, such as hippocampal neurogenesis in rodents, also provide crucial insight into the protective role of physical activity. Overall, converging evidence suggests exercise benefits brain function and cognition across the mammalian lifespan, which may translate into reduced risk for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in humans. PMID:24029446

  17. Evaluation of Work Place Group and Internet Based Physical Activity Interventions on Psychological Variables Associated with Exercise Behavior Change

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Kimberley A.; Tracey, Jill; Berry, Tanya

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to compare group-based and internet-based physical activity interventions in terms of desirability, participant characteristics, exercise self-efficacy, and barrier self-efficacy. Pretest questionnaires were completed prior to voluntary enrollment into either of the ten-week physical activity interventions. Both interventions were based on Social Cognitive Theory and the Transtheoretical Model. Interventions were followed with posttest questionnaires. Results demonstrated that the internet intervention attracted more participants, but only the group-based participants showed significant increases in exercise and barrier self-efficacy. At pretest, participants who selected the internet intervention were significantly lower in life and job satisfaction than those who selected the group intervention. Results suggest that traditional group-based exercise interventions are helpful for improving cognitions associated with exercise behavior change (e.g., exercise self-efficacy) and that the internet intervention may help employees who fall into an “unhappy employee ”typology. Key pointsGroup-based physical activity interventions are capable of improving exercise self-efficacy and barrier self-efficacy.At pretest, participants who selected the internet physical activity intervention were significantly lower in job and life satisfaction than those who selected the group-intervention.While the internet intervention attracted more participants, the group-based physical activity intervention was more successful at changing cognitions associated with successful exercise behavior change. PMID:24149963

  18. Effect of exercise-induced neurogenesis on cognitive function deficit in a rat model of vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    CHOI, DONG-HEE; LEE, KYOUNG-HEE; LEE, JONGMIN

    2016-01-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) is strongly correlated with progressive cognitive decline in neurological diseases, such as vascular dementia (VaD) and Alzheimer's disease. Exercise can enhance learning and memory, and delay age-related cognitive decline. However, exercise-induced hippocampal neurogenesis in experimental animals submitted to CCH has not been investigated. The present study aimed to investigate whether hippocampal neurogenesis induced by exercise can improve cognitive deficit in a rat model of VaD. Male Wistar rats (age, 8 weeks; weight, 292±3.05 g; n=12–13/group) were subjected to bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (2VO) or sham-surgery and each group was then subdivided randomly into no exercise and treadmill exercise groups. Exercise groups performed treadmill exercise daily at 15 m/min for 30 min for 4 weeks from the third to the seventh week after 2VO. It was demonstrated that the number of neural progenitor cells and mature neurons in the subgranular zone of 2VO rats was increased by exercise, and cognitive impairment in 2VO rats was attenuated by treadmill exercise. In addition, mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in the hippocampus were increased in the exercise groups. Thus the present study suggests that exercise delays cognitive decline by the enhancing neurogenesis and increasing BDNF expression in the context of VaD. PMID:26934837

  19. Comparison of Nigella sativa- and exercise-induced models of cardiac hypertrophy: structural and electrophysiological features.

    PubMed

    Al-Asoom, Lubna Ibrahim; Al-Shaikh, Basil Abdulrahman; Bamosa, Abdullah Omar; El-Bahai, Mohammad Nabil

    2014-09-01

    Exercise training is employed as supplementary therapeutic intervention for heart failure, due to its ability to induce physiological cardiac hypertrophy. In parallel, supplementation with Nigella sativa (N. sativa) was found to enhance myocardial function and induce cardiac hypertrophy. In this study, we aim to compare the morphological and electrophysiological changes associated with these patterns of cardiac hypertrophy and the possible changes upon administration of N. sativa to exercise-trained animals. Fifty-six adult Wistar rats were divided into: control, Nigella-treated (N), exercise-trained (E), and Nigella-treated-exercise-trained (NE) rats. Daily 800 mg/kg N. sativa was administered orally to N and NE. E and NE ran on treadmill, 2 h/day. At the end of 8 weeks ECG, body weight (BW), heart weight (HW), and left ventricular weight (LVW) were recorded. Hematoxylin and Eosin and periodic acid-Schiff sections were prepared to study the histology of left ventricles and to measure diameter of cardiomyocytes (Cdia). HW/BW, LVW/BW, and mean Cdia were significantly higher in all experimental animals compared to the controls. Histology showed normal cardiomyocytes with no fibrosis. ECG showed significantly lower heart rates, higher QRS amplitude, and ventricular specific potential in NE group compared to control group. Supplementation of N. sativa demonstrated a synergistic effect with exercise training as Nigella-exercise-induced cardiac hypertrophy had lower heart rate and well-matched electrical activity of the heart to its mass. Therefore, this model of cardiac hypertrophy might be introduced as a new therapeutic strategy for treatment for heart failure with superior advantages to exercise training. PMID:24448711

  20. Modeling Stretching Modes of Common Organic Molecules with the Quantum Mechanical Harmonic Oscillator: An Undergraduate Vibrational Spectroscopy Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parnis, J. Mark; Thompson, Matthew G. K.

    2004-01-01

    An introductory undergraduate physical organic chemistry exercise that introduces the harmonic oscillator's use in vibrational spectroscopy is developed. The analysis and modeling exercise begins with the students calculating the stretching modes of common organic molecules with the help of the quantum mechanical harmonic oscillator (QMHO) model.

  1. [Myocardial involvement in diabetic patients evaluated by exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy and cardiac catheterization].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, S; Genda, A; Nakayama, A; Igarashi, Y; Takeda, R

    1985-06-01

    To evaluate myocardial involvement in diabetes mellitus, we studied 39 patients with negative double-Master's test and without hypertension by exercise thallium-201 (T1-201) myocardial scintigraphy using a bicycle ergometer. Among the 39 patients, 12 (30.8%) showed filling defects in the scintigrams (positive cases), including eight with stress-induced defects and four with fixed defects. The positive cases had higher scores of diabetic complications (3.6 +/- 2.4 vs 2.1 +/- 1.8; p less than 0.05) and longer durations of diabetes as compared with those of the negative cases. The frequency of insulin therapy was also greater in the positive cases. Eleven patients (5 positive and 6 negative cases) who underwent cardiac catheterization had no significant stenotic lesions of their coronary arteries. However, all of the positive cases showed abnormal wall motion, mainly hypokinesis, by left ventriculography (LVG). The abnormalities of the LVG corresponded to the findings of the scintigrams (i.e. filling defects and decrease in washout ratios by circumferential profile analysis). These results suggest that in some diabetics myocardial involvement exists in the early stage without overt cardiac disease and exercise T1-201 scintigraphy is useful in detecting pre-clinical cardiomyopathy. Cardiomyopathy in diabetics seems to be due to disturbances of the myocardial microcirculation. PMID:4093624

  2. Evaluating the Spatial Distributions of Ethnic Populations: A Quantitative Exercise for Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivizzigno, Victoria L.

    This exercise teaches undergraduate geography students to use the Lorenz Curve and the Index of Dissimilarity to assess the spatial distributions of the White, Black, and American Indian populations of the United States in 1980. Specific procedures for implementing the exercise are provided; solutions to the exercise are also included. Students…

  3. Patients' mental models and adherence to outpatient physical therapy home exercise programs.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Jon

    2015-05-01

    Within physical therapy, patient adherence usually relates to attending appointments, following advice, and/or undertaking prescribed exercise. Similar to findings for general medical adherence, patient adherence to physical therapy home exercise programs (HEP) is estimated between 35 and 72%. Adherence to HEPs is a multifactorial and poorly understood phenomenon, with no consensus regarding a common theoretical framework that best guides empirical or clinical efforts. Mental models, a construct used to explain behavior and decision-making in the social sciences, may serve as this framework. Mental models comprise an individual's tacit thoughts about how the world works. They include assumptions about new experiences and expectations for the future based on implicit comparisons between current and past experiences. Mental models play an important role in decision-making and guiding actions. This professional theoretical article discusses empirical research demonstrating relationships among mental models, prior experience, and adherence decisions in medical and physical therapy contexts. Specific issues related to mental models and physical therapy patient adherence are discussed, including the importance of articulation of patients' mental models, assessment of patients' mental models that relate to exercise program adherence, discrepancy between patient and provider mental models, and revision of patients' mental models in ways that enhance adherence. The article concludes with practical implications for physical therapists and recommendations for further research to better understand the role of mental models in physical therapy patient adherence behavior. PMID:25585516

  4. Model Program Evaluations. Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Safe Schools Initiative Division, 2002

    2002-01-01

    There are probably thousands of programs and courses intended to prevent or reduce violence in this nation's schools. Evaluating these many programs has become a problem or goal in itself. There are now many evaluation programs, with many levels of designations, such as model, promising, best practice, exemplary and noteworthy. "Model program" is…

  5. Evaluating Causal Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, James H., Jr.

    Pointing out that linear causal models can organize the interrelationships of a large number of variables, this paper contends that such models are particularly useful to mass communication research, which must by necessity deal with complex systems of variables. The paper first outlines briefly the philosophical requirements for establishing a…

  6. A Laboratory Exercise Using a Physical Model for Demonstrating Countercurrent Heat Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loudon, Catherine; Davis-Berg, Elizabeth C.; Botz, Jason T.

    2012-01-01

    A physical model was used in a laboratory exercise to teach students about countercurrent exchange mechanisms. Countercurrent exchange is the transport of heat or chemicals between fluids moving in opposite directions separated by a permeable barrier (such as blood within adjacent blood vessels flowing in opposite directions). Greater exchange of…

  7. An EFQM Model Self-Assessment Exercise at a Spanish University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tari, Juan Jose

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to study the EFQM model self-assessment in a Spanish university. Design/methodology/approach: A case study methodology is used based on five services provided by a public university in Spain. Findings: The findings show the steps that one university can follow in order to apply this exercise in a successful…

  8. Coupling Molecular Modeling to the Traditional "IR-ID" Exercise in the Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes-Huby, Heather; Vitale, Dale E.

    2007-01-01

    This exercise integrates the infrared unknown identification ("IR-ID") experiment common to most organic laboratory syllabi with computer molecular modeling. In this modification students are still required to identify unknown compounds from their IR spectra, but must additionally match some of the absorptions with computed frequencies they…

  9. A Learner-Centered Molecular Modeling Exercise for Allied Health Majors in a Biochemistry Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Terace M.; Ershler, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Learner-centered molecular modeling exercises in college science courses can be especially challenging for nonchemistry majors as students typically have a higher degree of anxiety and may not appreciate the relevance of the work. This article describes a learner-centered project given to allied health majors in a Biochemistry course. The project…

  10. Voluntary exercise enhances activity rhythms and ameliorates anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in the sand rat model of circadian rhythm-related mood changes.

    PubMed

    Tal-Krivisky, Katy; Kronfeld-Schor, Noga; Einat, Haim

    2015-11-01

    Physical exercise is a non-pharmacological treatment for affective disorders. The mechanisms of its effects are unknown although some suggest a relationship to synchronization of circadian rhythms. One way to explore mechanisms is to utilize animal models. We previously demonstrated that the diurnal fat sand rat is an advantageous model for studying the interactions between photoperiods and mood. The current study was designed to evaluate the effects of voluntary exercise on activity rhythms and anxiety and depression-like behaviors in sand rats as a step towards better understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Male sand rats were housed in short photoperiod (SP; 5h light/19 h dark) or neutral light (NP; 12h light/12h dark) regimens for 3 weeks and divided into subgroups with or without running wheels. Activity was monitored for 3 additional weeks and then animals were tested in the elevated plus-maze, the forced swim test and the social interaction test. Activity rhythms were enhanced by the running wheels. As hypothesized, voluntary exercise had significant effects on SP animals' anxiety- and depression-like behaviors but not on NP animals. Results are discussed in the context of interactions between physical exercise, circadian rhythms and mood. We suggest that the sand rat model can be used to explore the underlying mechanism of the effects of physical exercise for mood disorders. PMID:26253214

  11. Evaluation of the effects of exercise and a mild hypocaloric diet on cardiovascular risk factors in obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Himeno, E; Nishino, K; Nanri, H; Okazaki, T; Komatsu, T; Ikeda, M

    2001-03-01

    A weight reduction program to improve cardiovascular risk factors was implemented in obese subjects. The program consisted of exercise training corresponding to the anaerobic threshold (AT) and a mild hypocaloric diet for 12 weeks. In this program, we evaluated the effects of a combination of exercise training and a diet on cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity, dyslipidemia, and poor exercise performance in obese subjects. In addition, we also evaluated the independent effects of exercise training and dietary modification. For this purpose, we adopted a relative training time and a diet score. A relative training time was calculated as the number of times that the subject performed exercises divided by all of the training sessions scheduled, and the diet score was calculated from information which each subject provided on a self-assessment questionnaire. Twenty three obese subjects (Age: 24-54 years old, 19 men and 4 women, body mass index (BMI) > 26 kg/m2) participated in this study. After the 12-week intervention, the mean reductions in body weight, body mass index and body fat were 4.7 kg, 1.7 kg/m2 and 2.9%, respectively (P < 0.0001). The % change in body weight was significantly associated with the diet score and with the relative training time. The mean reductions in total cholesterol, triglyceride and low density lipoprotein cholesterol were 21 mg/dl (P < 0.002), 34 mg/dl (P < 0.01) and 15.9 mg/dl (P < 0.01), respectively, and the % change in triglyceride was significantly associated with the diet score (P = 0.0056) and tended to correlate with the relative training time (P = 0.0596). Oxygen uptake at AT and at peak exercise were increased from 14.1 +/- 1.6 to 16.0 +/- 3.1 ml/min/kg (P < 0.005) and from 26.3 +/- 4.8 to 28.4 +/- 4.9 ml/min/kg (P < 0.002), respectively. A combination of aerobic exercise and a mild hypocaloric diet significantly contributed not only to weight loss but also to the improvement of dyslipidemia and exercise performance, but

  12. Exercise countermeasures for spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Convertino, V A; Sandler, H

    1995-01-01

    The authors present a physiological basis for the use of exercise as a weightlessness countermeasure, outline special considerations for the development of exercise countermeasures, review and evaluate exercise used during space flight, and provide new approaches and concepts for the implementation of novel exercise countermeasures for future space flight. The discussion of the physiological basis for countermeasures examines maximal oxygen uptake, blood volume, metabolic responses to work, muscle function, bone loss, and orthostatic instability. The discussion of considerations for exercise prescriptions during space flight includes operational considerations, type of exercise, fitness considerations, age and gender, and psychological considerations. The discussion of exercise currently used in space flight examines cycle ergometry, the treadmill, strength training devices, electrical stimulation, and the Penguin suit worn by Russian crews. New approaches to exercise countermeasures include twin bicycles, dynamic resistance exercisers, maximal exercise effects, grasim (gravity simulators), and the relationship between exercise and LBNP. PMID:11541470

  13. Exercise response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, J. A.; Sawin, C. F.; Michel, E. L.

    1975-01-01

    The bicycle ergometer and a graded stress protocol were used to conduct exercise stress tests for the Apollo project. The graded exercise tests permitted a progressive evaluation of physiological control system response and provided a better understanding of safe stress limits; heart rate was used for determining stress levels. During each test, workload, heart rate, blood pressure, and respiratory gas exchange (oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, and minute volume) measurements were made. The results are presented and discussed.

  14. Biological dosimetry intercomparison exercise: an evaluation of triage and routine mode results by robust methods.

    PubMed

    Di Giorgio, M; Barquinero, J F; Vallerga, M B; Radl, A; Taja, M R; Seoane, A; De Luca, J; Oliveira, M Stuck; Valdivia, P; Lima, O García; Lamadrid, A; Mesa, J González; Aguilera, I Romero; Cardoso, T Mandina; Carvajal, Y C Guerrero; Maldonado, C Arceo; Espinoza, M E; Martínez-López, W; Méndez-Acuña, L; Di Tomaso, M V; Roy, L; Lindholm, C; Romm, H; Güçlü, I; Lloyd, D C

    2011-05-01

    Well-defined protocols and quality management standards are indispensable for biological dosimetry laboratories. Participation in periodic proficiency testing by interlaboratory comparisons is also required. This harmonization is essential if a cooperative network is used to respond to a mass casualty event. Here we present an international intercomparison based on dicentric chromosome analysis for dose assessment performed in the framework of the IAEA Regional Latin American RLA/9/054 Project. The exercise involved 14 laboratories, 8 from Latin America and 6 from Europe. The performance of each laboratory and the reproducibility of the exercise were evaluated using robust methods described in ISO standards. The study was based on the analysis of slides from samples irradiated with 0.75 (DI) and 2.5 Gy (DII). Laboratories were required to score the frequency of dicentrics and convert them to estimated doses, using their own dose-effect curves, after the analysis of 50 or 100 cells (triage mode) and after conventional scoring of 500 cells or 100 dicentrics. In the conntional scoring, at both doses, all reported frequencies were considered as satisfactory, and two reported doses were considered as questionable. The analysis of the data dispersion among the dicentric frequencies and among doses indicated a better reproducibility for estimated doses (15.6% for DI and 8.8% for DII) than for frequencies (24.4% for DI and 11.4% for DII), expressed by the coefficient of variation. In the two triage modes, although robust analysis classified some reported frequencies or doses as unsatisfactory or questionable, all estimated doses were in agreement with the accepted error of ±0.5 Gy. However, at the DI dose and for 50 scored cells, 5 out of the 14 reported confidence intervals that included zero dose and could be interpreted as false negatives. This improved with 100 cells, where only one confidence interval included zero dose. At the DII dose, all estimations fell within

  15. Ants, Tunnels, and Calculus: An Exercise in Mathematical Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian J.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses an activity which models the building of a tunnel by ants using the definitions of derivative and indefinite integral from calculus. Includes a discussion of reasonableness and interpretation of the problem. (MKR)

  16. Evaluating a Nationwide Recreational Football Intervention: Recruitment, Attendance, Adherence, Exercise Intensity, and Health Effects.

    PubMed

    Fløtum, Liljan Av; Ottesen, Laila S; Krustrup, Peter; Mohr, Magni

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated a nationwide exercise intervention with Football Fitness in a small-scale society. In all, 741 adult participants (20-72 yrs) were successfully recruited for Football Fitness training in local football clubs, corresponding to 2.1% of the adult population. A preintervention test battery including resting heart rate (RHR), blood pressure, and body mass measurements along with performance tests (Yo-Yo Intermittent Endurance level 1 (Yo-Yo IE1), the Arrowhead Agility Test, and the Flamingo Balance Test) were performed (n = 502). Training attendance (n = 310) was 1.6 ± 0.2 sessions per week (range: 0.6-2.9), corresponding to 28.8 ± 1.0 sessions during the 18 wk intervention period. After 18 wks mean arterial pressure (MAP) was -2.7 ± 0.7 mmHg lower (P < 0.05; n = 151) with even greater (P < 0.05) reductions for those with baseline MAP values >99 mmHg (-5.6 ± 1.5 mmHg; n = 50). RHR was lowered (P < 0.05) by 6 bpm after intervention (77 ± 1 to 71 ± 1 bpm). Yo-Yo IE1 performance increased by 41% (540 ± 27 to 752 ± 45 m), while agility and postural balance were improved (P < 0.05) by ~6 and ~45%, respectively. In conclusion, Football Fitness was shown to be a successful health-promoting nationwide training intervention for adult participants with an extraordinary recruitment, a high attendance rate, moderate adherence, high exercise intensity, and marked benefits in cardiovascular health profile and fitness. PMID:27437401

  17. Evaluating a Nationwide Recreational Football Intervention: Recruitment, Attendance, Adherence, Exercise Intensity, and Health Effects

    PubMed Central

    Fløtum, Liljan av; Ottesen, Laila S.; Krustrup, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated a nationwide exercise intervention with Football Fitness in a small-scale society. In all, 741 adult participants (20–72 yrs) were successfully recruited for Football Fitness training in local football clubs, corresponding to 2.1% of the adult population. A preintervention test battery including resting heart rate (RHR), blood pressure, and body mass measurements along with performance tests (Yo-Yo Intermittent Endurance level 1 (Yo-Yo IE1), the Arrowhead Agility Test, and the Flamingo Balance Test) were performed (n = 502). Training attendance (n = 310) was 1.6 ± 0.2 sessions per week (range: 0.6–2.9), corresponding to 28.8 ± 1.0 sessions during the 18 wk intervention period. After 18 wks mean arterial pressure (MAP) was −2.7 ± 0.7 mmHg lower (P < 0.05; n = 151) with even greater (P < 0.05) reductions for those with baseline MAP values >99 mmHg (−5.6 ± 1.5 mmHg; n = 50). RHR was lowered (P < 0.05) by 6 bpm after intervention (77 ± 1 to 71 ± 1 bpm). Yo-Yo IE1 performance increased by 41% (540 ± 27 to 752 ± 45 m), while agility and postural balance were improved (P < 0.05) by ~6 and ~45%, respectively. In conclusion, Football Fitness was shown to be a successful health-promoting nationwide training intervention for adult participants with an extraordinary recruitment, a high attendance rate, moderate adherence, high exercise intensity, and marked benefits in cardiovascular health profile and fitness. PMID:27437401

  18. Exercise electrocardiography and myocardial scintigraphy in the serial evaluation of the results of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Schall, J.M.; Chaitman, B.R.; David, P.R.; Dupras, G.; Brevers, G; Val, P.G.; Crepeau, J.; Lesperance, J.; Bourassa, M.G.

    1982-08-01

    The diagnostic value of exercise electrocardiography using 14 leads and thallium-201 scintigraphy were evaluated in 54 of 70 patients who underwent percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), both in the initial assessment and serial follow-up of patients after PTCA. Of the 45 patients who had successful PTCA, 36 had complete noninvasive studies performed before and 1 month after PTCA. The use of clinical symptoms in conjunction with the physiologic data, ECG and myocardial scintigram acquired during exercise provide important short-term data on the angiographic evolution of PTCA results. The noninvasive tests may be useful in determining guidelines for repeat angiography in patients who have had PTCA. (JMT)

  19. The planning, execution, and evaluation of a mass prophylaxis full-scale exercise in cook county, IL.

    PubMed

    Kilianski, Andy; O'Rourke, Amy T; Carlson, Crystal L; Parikh, Shannon M; Shipman-Amuwo, Frankie

    2014-01-01

    Increasing threats of bioterrorism and the emergence of novel disease agents, including the recent international outbreaks of H7N9 influenza and MERS-CoV, have stressed the importance and highlighted the need for public health preparedness at local, regional, and national levels. To test plans that were developed for mass prophylaxis scenarios, in April 2013 the Cook Country Department of Public Health (CCDPH) and the Triple Community (TripCom) Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) executed a full-scale mass prophylaxis exercise in response to a simulated anthrax bioterrorism attack. The exercise took place over 2 days and included the TripCom Point-of-Dispensing (POD) Management Team, volunteers from the TripCom MRC, and neighboring public health departments and MRCs. Individuals from the community volunteered as actors during the exercise, while local municipal, police, and fire personnel coordinated their responses to create the most realistic simulation possible. The exercise was designed to test the capacity of TripCom and CCDPH to implement plans for organizing municipal staff and volunteers to efficiently distribute prophylaxis to the community. Based on results from POD clinic flow, accuracy of prophylaxis distribution, and observations from evaluators, the exercise was successful in demonstrating areas that were operationally efficient as well as identifying areas that can be improved on. These include improvements to the just-in-time training for POD staff, the health screening and consent forms handed out to patients, the physical setup of the POD, and the command structure and communication for the management of POD operations. This article demonstrates the need for full-scale exercises and identifies gaps in POD planning that can be integrated into future plans, exercises, and emergency response. PMID:24697783

  20. Gender Differences in Exercise Dependence and Eating Disorders in Young Adults: A Path Analysis of a Conceptual Model

    PubMed Central

    Meulemans, Shelli; Pribis, Peter; Grajales, Tevni; Krivak, Gretchen

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to study the prevalence of exercise dependence (EXD) among college students and to investigate the role of EXD and gender on exercise behavior and eating disorders. Excessive exercise can become an addiction known as exercise dependence. In our population of 517 college students, 3.3% were at risk for EXD and 8% were at risk for an eating disorder. We used Path analysis the simplest case of Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) to investigate the role of EXD and exercise behavior on eating disorders. We observed a small direct effect from gender to eating disorders. In females we observed significant direct effect between exercise behavior (r = −0.17, p = 0.009) and EXD (r = 0.34, p < 0.001) on eating pathology. We also observed an indirect effect of exercise behavior on eating pathology (r = 0.16) through EXD (r = 0.48, r2 = 0.23, p < 0.001). In females the total variance of eating pathology explained by the SEM model was 9%. In males we observed a direct effect between EXD (r = 0.23, p < 0.001) on eating pathology. We also observed indirect effect of exercise behavior on eating pathology (r = 0.11) through EXD (r = 0.49, r2 = 0.24, p < 0.001). In males the total variance of eating pathology explained by the SEM model was 5%. PMID:25379689

  1. Gender differences in exercise dependence and eating disorders in young adults: a path analysis of a conceptual model.

    PubMed

    Meulemans, Shelli; Pribis, Peter; Grajales, Tevni; Krivak, Gretchen

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of our study was to study the prevalence of exercise dependence (EXD) among college students and to investigate the role of EXD and gender on exercise behavior and eating disorders. Excessive exercise can become an addiction known as exercise dependence. In our population of 517 college students, 3.3% were at risk for EXD and 8% were at risk for an eating disorder. We used Path analysis the simplest case of Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) to investigate the role of EXD and exercise behavior on eating disorders. We observed a small direct effect from gender to eating disorders. In females we observed significant direct effect between exercise behavior (r = -0.17, p = 0.009) and EXD (r = 0.34, p < 0.001) on eating pathology. We also observed an indirect effect of exercise behavior on eating pathology (r = 0.16) through EXD (r = 0.48, r2 = 0.23, p < 0.001). In females the total variance of eating pathology explained by the SEM model was 9%. In males we observed a direct effect between EXD (r = 0.23, p < 0.001) on eating pathology. We also observed indirect effect of exercise behavior on eating pathology (r = 0.11) through EXD (r = 0.49, r2 = 0.24, p < 0.001). In males the total variance of eating pathology explained by the SEM model was 5%. PMID:25379689

  2. Proposed Design of the Third Marine Ice Sheet Model Intercomparison Exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornford, S. L.; Gudmundsson, G. H.; Pattyn, F.; Durand, G.; Martin, D. F.; Payne, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    The MISMIP and MISMIP3D marine ice sheet model intercomparison exercises have become popular benchmarks, and several modeling groups have used them to show how their models compare to both analytical results and other models. Both sets of experiments studied grounding line migration in response to changes to (in effect) properties of the grounded ice, either perturbations to the basal traction coefficient (C), or to ice softness (A). In particular, both exercises concluded that careful treatment of the grounding line was required in numerical models, either through fine resolution (typically better than 1 km), or higher order methods, or modifications to the discretization scheme. Given the success of these experiments, we propose a sequel. Like MISMIP3D, the experiments take place in a idealized, three-dimensional setting and compare full 3D (Stokes) and reduced, hydrostatic flow models. Unlike the earlier exercises, the primary focus will be the response of models to changes in ice shelf conditions, especially sub-shelf melting. The chosen configuration features an ice shelf that experiences substantial lateral shear and buttresses the upstream ice, and so is well suited to melting experiments. We also aim to design an experiment in which differences between the steady states of each model are minor compared to the response to melt-rate perturbations, a choice that reflects typical real-world applications where parameters are chosen so that the initial states of all models tend to match observations (and hence each other). We will present the MISMIP+ experiments, and show how results computed with the BISICLES ice sheet model are affected by mesh resolution, choice of flow model, and choice of melt-rate.

  3. Development and validation of a predictive model of acute glucose response to exercise in individuals with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Our purpose was to develop and test a predictive model of the acute glucose response to exercise in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Design and methods Data from three previous exercise studies (56 subjects, 488 exercise sessions) were combined and used as a development dataset. A mixed-effects Least Absolute Shrinkage Selection Operator (LASSO) was used to select predictors among 12 potential predictors. Tests of the relative importance of each predictor were conducted using the Lindemann Merenda and Gold (LMG) algorithm. Model structure was tested using likelihood ratio tests. Model accuracy in the development dataset was assessed by leave-one-out cross-validation. Prospectively captured data (47 individuals, 436 sessions) was used as a test dataset. Model accuracy was calculated as the percentage of predictions within measurement error. Overall model utility was assessed as the number of subjects with ≤1 model error after the third exercise session. Model accuracy across individuals was assessed graphically. In a post-hoc analysis, a mixed-effects logistic regression tested the association of individuals’ attributes with model error. Results Minutes since eating, a non-linear transformation of minutes since eating, post-prandial state, hemoglobin A1c, sulfonylurea status, age, and exercise session number were identified as novel predictors. Minutes since eating, its transformations, and hemoglobin A1c combined to account for 19.6% of the variance in glucose response. Sulfonylurea status, age, and exercise session each accounted for <1.0% of the variance. In the development dataset, a model with random slopes for pre-exercise glucose improved fit over a model with random intercepts only (likelihood ratio 34.5, p < 0.001). Cross-validated model accuracy was 83.3%. In the test dataset, overall accuracy was 80.2%. The model was more accurate in pre-prandial than postprandial exercise (83.6% vs. 74.5% accuracy respectively). 31/47 subjects had

  4. Commitment to Sport and Exercise: Re-examining the Literature for a Practical and Parsimonious Model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A commitment to physical activity is necessary for personal health, and is a primary goal of physical activity practitioners. Effective practitioners rely on theory and research as a guide to best practices. Thus, sound theory, which is both practical and parsimonious, is a key to effective practice. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature in search of such a theory - one that applies to and explains commitment to physical activity in the form of sport and exercise for youths and adults. The Sport Commitment Model has been commonly used to study commitment to sport and has more recently been applied to the exercise context. In this paper, research using the Sport Commitment Model is reviewed relative to its utility in both the sport and exercise contexts. Through this process, the relevance of the Investment Model for study of physical activity commitment emerged, and a more parsimonious framework for studying of commitment to physical activity is suggested. Lastly, links between the models of commitment and individuals' participation motives in physical activity are suggested and practical implications forwarded. PMID:23412904

  5. Differential Effects of Acute (Extenuating) and Chronic (Training) Exercise on Inflammation and Oxidative Stress Status in an Animal Model of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira de Lemos, Edite; Pinto, Rui; Oliveira, Jorge; Garrido, Patrícia; Sereno, José; Mascarenhas-Melo, Filipa; Páscoa-Pinheiro, João; Teixeira, Frederico; Reis, Flávio

    2011-01-01

    This study compares the effects of a single bout of exercise (acute extenuating) with those promoted by an exercise training program (chronic), focusing on low-grade chronic inflammation profile and on oxidative stress status, using the obese ZDF rats as a model of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Animals were sacrificed after 12 weeks of a swimming training program and after a single bout of acute extenuating exercise. Glycaemic, insulinemic, and lipidic profile (triglycerides, total-cholesterol) were evaluated, as well as inflammatory (serum CRPhs, TNF-α, adiponectin) and oxidative (lipidic peroxidation and uric acid) status. When compared to obese diabetic sedentary rats, the animals submitted to acute exercise presented significantly lower values of glycaemia and insulinaemia, with inflammatory profile and oxidative stress significantly aggravated. The trained animals showed amelioration of glycaemic and lipidic dysmetabolism, accompanied by remarkable reduction of inflammatory and oxidative markers. In conclusion, the results presented herein suggessted that exercise pathogenesis-oriented interventions should not exacerbate underlying inflammatory stress associated with T2DM. PMID:22174491

  6. State Space Modelling and Data Analysis Exercises in LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nofrarias, M.; Antonucci, F.; Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Benedetti, M.; Binetruy, P.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Congedo, G.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; De Marchi, F.; Diaz-Aguilo, M.; Diepholz, I.; Dixon, G.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Fauste, J.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fichter, W.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Grimani, C.; Grynagier, A.; Guzmán, F.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hoyland, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Llamas, X.; Lloro, I.; Lobo, A.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Martin, V.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P.; Mendes, J.; Mitchell, E.; Nicolodi, D.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Russano, G.; Schleicher, A.; Shaul, D.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T. J.; Taylor, A.; Texier, D.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H. B.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Wealthy, D.; Wen, S.; Weber, W.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2013-01-01

    LISA Pathfinder is a mission planned by the European Space Agency (ESA) to test the key technologies that will allow the detection of gravitational waves in space. The instrument on-board, the LISA Technology package, will undergo an exhaustive campaign of calibrations and noise characterisation campaigns in order to fully describe the noise model. Data analysis plays an important role in the mission and for that reason the data analysis team has been developing a toolbox which contains all the functionality required during operations. In this contribution we give an overview of recent activities, focusing on the improvements in the modelling of the instrument and in the data analysis campaigns performed both with real and simulated data.

  7. Cardiometabolic and reproductive benefits of early dietary energy restriction and voluntary exercise in an obese PCOS-prone rodent model.

    PubMed

    Diane, Abdoulaye; Kupreeva, Maria; Borthwick, Faye; Proctor, Spencer D; Pierce, W David; Vine, Donna F

    2015-09-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine-metabolic disorders in women of reproductive age characterized by ovulatory dysfunction, hyperandrogenism and cardiometabolic risk. The overweight-obese PCOS phenotype appears to have exacerbated reproductive dysfunction and cardiometabolic risk. In overweight-obese adult women with PCOS, exercise and energy restricted diets have shown limited and inconsistent effects on both cardiometabolic indices and reproductive outcomes. We hypothesized that an early lifestyle intervention involving exercise and dietary energy restriction to prevent or reduce the propensity for adiposity would modulate reproductive indices and cardiometabolic risk in an obese PCOS-prone rodent model. Weanling obese PCOS-prone and Lean-Control JCR:LA-cp rodents were given a chow diet ad libitum or an energy-restricted diet combined with or without voluntary exercise (4  h/day) for 8 weeks. Dietary energy restriction and exercise lowered total body weight gain and body fat mass by 30% compared to free-fed sedentary or exercising obese PCOS-prone animals (P<0.01). Energy restriction induced an increase in exercise intensity compared to free-feeding plus exercise conditions. Energy restriction and exercise decreased fasting plasma triglycerides and apoB48 concentrations in obese PCOS-prone animals compared to free-fed and exercise or sedentary groups. The energy restriction and exercise combination in obese PCOS-prone animals significantly increased plasma sex-hormone binding globulin, hypothalamic cocaine-and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) and Kisspeptin mRNA expression to levels of the Lean-Control group, and this was further associated with improvements in estrous cyclicity. The combination of exercise and dietary energy restriction when initiated in early life exerts beneficial effects on cardiometabolic and reproductive indices in an obese PCOS-prone rodent model, and this may be associated with normalization of

  8. Anti-fatigue effect of Myelophil in a chronic forced exercise mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Seok; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Han, Jong-Min; Kim, Young-Ae; Son, Chang-Gue

    2015-10-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the anti-fatigue effects of Myelophil. ICR male mice (10 weeks old) were forced to run for 1 hour, 5 days/week for 4 weeks. Each running session was followed by administration of distilled water, Myelophil (50 or 100 mg/kg), or ascorbic acid (100 mg/kg) 1h later. Equal proportions of Astragali Radix and Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix were extracted using 30% ethanol, and formulated into Myelophil. To evaluate the anti-fatigue effects of Myelophil, exercise tolerance and forced swimming tests were conducted. Underlying mechanisms, including oxidant-antioxidant balance, inflammatory response, and energy metabolism, were investigated by analyzing skeletal muscle tissues and/or sera. Myelophil significantly increased exercise ability and latency times, and decreased the number of electric shocks and immobility time on exercise tolerance and forced swimming tests compared with control group. Myelophil also significantly ameliorated fatigue-induced alterations in oxidative stress biomarkers, antioxidant enzymes and antioxidant capacity, as measured by multiple assays, including enzyme activity assays and western blotting, as well as alterations in pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, Myelophil normalized alterations in energy metabolic markers in sera. These findings suggest that Myelophil reduces the effects of chronic fatigue, likely by attenuating oxidative and inflammatory responses and normalizing energy metabolism. Consequently, this study provides evidence for the clinical relevance of Myelophil. PMID:26142828

  9. Psychometric Evaluation of the Exercise Identity Scale among Greek Adults and Cross-Cultural Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlachopoulos, Symeon P.; Kaperoni, Maria; Moustaka, Frederiki C.; Anderson, Dean F.

    2008-01-01

    The present study reported on translating the Exercise Identity Scale (EIS: Anderson & Cychosz, 1994) into Greek and examining its psychometric properties and cross-cultural validity based on U.S. individuals' EIS responses. Using four samples comprising 33, 103, and 647 Greek individuals, including exercisers and nonexercisers, and a similar…

  10. Human subject evaluation of the controlled resistance exercise device (C-red) for spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Paulus, David C; DeWitt, John

    2015-01-01

    Resistance exercise is an effective countermeasure to the muscle and bone atrophy associated with the unloading experienced during spaceflight. Long duration spaceflight will require compact exercise devices that are capable of delivering sufficient loading to prevent physiological losses while meeting strict mass and volume requirements. Accordingly, a controlled resistance exercise device (C-RED), developed as an advanced exercise concept for NASA, uses an electric motor for resistance and is programmed to simulate inertial loading based on barbell acceleration and desired resistance mass. The barbell acts as a movable pulley increasing efficiency by doubling the created load. Human subject testing of the functionality of the device was conducted in a laboratory at NASA’s Johnson Space Center. Subjects performed ten resistance exercises typically used by astronauts at three freely chosen load levels. The results indicate that subjects were able to perform all exercises with resistance loads that were typical to those used in the gymnasium with loads ranges of 4-1600 N, and bilateral symmetry of ground reaction force was quantified for the deadlift. A survey also was given to each subject to allow the users to express their opinions regarding the device. The subject questionnaire showed that the dumbbell attachment exercises were preferred to the barbell exercises. The positive preliminary results indicate promise for the device. PMID:25996698

  11. Strongwomen® Program Evaluation: Effect of Strength Training Exercises on Physical Fitness of Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaudhary, Anil Kumar; Van Horn, Beth; Corbin, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    The Strongwomen® Program (SWP) is a nationally disseminated group strength-training exercise and nutrition education program delivered by Extension. The study reported here examined the effect of strength training exercises in SWP on improvement in physical fitness of program participants. Senior Fitness Test was used to collect data. Upon…

  12. Exercise Activates p53 and Negatively Regulates IGF-1 Pathway in Epidermis within a Skin Cancer Model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Miao; King, Brenee; Ewert, Emily; Su, Xiaoyu; Mardiyati, Nur; Zhao, Zhihui; Wang, Weiqun

    2016-01-01

    Exercise has been previously reported to lower cancer risk through reducing circulating IGF-1 and IGF-1-dependent signaling in a mouse skin cancer model. This study aims to investigate the underlying mechanisms by which exercise may down-regulate the IGF-1 pathway via p53 and p53-related regulators in the skin epidermis. Female SENCAR mice were pair-fed an AIN-93 diet with or without 10-week treadmill exercise at 20 m/min, 60 min/day and 5 days/week. Animals were topically treated with TPA 2 hours before sacrifice and the target proteins in the epidermis were analyzed by both immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Under TPA or vehicle treatment, MDM2 expression was significantly reduced in exercised mice when compared with sedentary control. Meanwhile, p53 was significantly elevated. In addition, p53-transcriptioned proteins, i.e., p21, IGFBP-3, and PTEN, increased in response to exercise. There was a synergy effect between exercise and TPA on the decreased MDM2 and increased p53, but not p53-transcripted proteins. Taken together, exercise appeared to activate p53, resulting in enhanced expression of p21, IGFBP-3, and PTEN that might induce a negative regulation of IGF-1 pathway and thus contribute to the observed cancer prevention by exercise in this skin cancer model. PMID:27509024

  13. Exercise Activates p53 and Negatively Regulates IGF-1 Pathway in Epidermis within a Skin Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Miao; King, Brenee; Ewert, Emily; Su, Xiaoyu; Mardiyati, Nur; Zhao, Zhihui; Wang, Weiqun

    2016-01-01

    Exercise has been previously reported to lower cancer risk through reducing circulating IGF-1 and IGF-1-dependent signaling in a mouse skin cancer model. This study aims to investigate the underlying mechanisms by which exercise may down-regulate the IGF-1 pathway via p53 and p53-related regulators in the skin epidermis. Female SENCAR mice were pair-fed an AIN-93 diet with or without 10-week treadmill exercise at 20 m/min, 60 min/day and 5 days/week. Animals were topically treated with TPA 2 hours before sacrifice and the target proteins in the epidermis were analyzed by both immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Under TPA or vehicle treatment, MDM2 expression was significantly reduced in exercised mice when compared with sedentary control. Meanwhile, p53 was significantly elevated. In addition, p53-transcriptioned proteins, i.e., p21, IGFBP-3, and PTEN, increased in response to exercise. There was a synergy effect between exercise and TPA on the decreased MDM2 and increased p53, but not p53-transcripted proteins. Taken together, exercise appeared to activate p53, resulting in enhanced expression of p21, IGFBP-3, and PTEN that might induce a negative regulation of IGF-1 pathway and thus contribute to the observed cancer prevention by exercise in this skin cancer model. PMID:27509024

  14. The Effects of Exercise on Cognitive Recovery after Acquired Brain Injury in Animal Models: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wogensen, Elise; Malá, Hana; Mogensen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present paper is to review the current status of exercise as a tool to promote cognitive rehabilitation after acquired brain injury (ABI) in animal model-based research. Searches were conducted on the PubMed, Scopus, and psycINFO databases in February 2014. Search strings used were: exercise (and) animal model (or) rodent (or) rat (and) traumatic brain injury (or) cerebral ischemia (or) brain irradiation. Studies were selected if they were (1) in English, (2) used adult animals subjected to acquired brain injury, (3) used exercise as an intervention tool after inflicted injury, (4) used exercise paradigms demanding movement of all extremities, (5) had exercise intervention effects that could be distinguished from other potential intervention effects, and (6) contained at least one measure of cognitive and/or emotional function. Out of 2308 hits, 22 publications fulfilled the criteria. The studies were examined relative to cognitive effects associated with three themes: exercise type (forced or voluntary), timing of exercise (early or late), and dose-related factors (intensity, duration, etc.). The studies indicate that exercise in many cases can promote cognitive recovery after brain injury. However, the optimal parameters to ensure cognitive rehabilitation efficacy still elude us, due to considerable methodological variations between studies. PMID:26509085

  15. Exercise-induced oxidatively damaged DNA in humans: evaluation in plasma or urine?

    PubMed

    Karpouzi, Christina; Nikolaidis, Stefanos; Kabasakalis, Athanasios; Tsalis, George; Mougios, Vassilis

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise can induce oxidative damage in humans. 8-Hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is a widely known biomarker of DNA oxidation, which can be determined in blood and urine. The aim of the present study was to compare these two biological fluids in terms of which is more suitable for the estimation of the oxidative damage of DNA by measuring the concentration of 8-OHdG one hour after maximal exercise by enzyme immunoassay. The concentration of 8-OHdG increased with exercise only in plasma (p < 0.001), and values differed between exercise tests in both plasma and urine (p < 0.05). In conclusion, plasma appears to be more sensitive to exercise-induced 8-OHdG changes than urine and, hence, a more appropriate medium for assessing oxidative damage of DNA, although the poor repeatability of the measurement needs to be addressed in future studies. PMID:26849281

  16. The medical evaluation of patients with diabetes mellitus in exercise therapy.

    PubMed

    Yamada, J; Tanaka, S; Sato, T; Suzuki, R; Fujii, S

    1991-12-01

    To investigate myocardial ischemia during exercise, submaximal exercise testing with electrocardiogram and thallium 201-myocardial scintigraphy was performed in non-insulin-dependent diabetics. The relationship between plasma atrial natriuretic polypeptide (ANP) levels in response to exercise and cardiac function assessed by echocardiography was also examined. The following results were obtained: 1) Twelve of the 66 diabetics (18.2%) had ischemic ST-segment changes in exercise ECGs, compared with 4 of 75 control subjects (5.3%)(p less than 0.05). Of the 12 diabetics with positive exercise ECGs, 10 were asymptomatic. 2) The washout rate in thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy was significantly less in diabetics with positive exercise ECGs (36.5 +/- 4.1%) than in controls (51.9 +/- 2.8%)(p less than 0.05). 3) Although no difference in heart rate were observed between diabetics and controls, diabetic patients had significantly higher systolic blood pressure than controls during all stages of exercise and at maximal exertion. Rate pressure products in stages 1 and 2 were significantly higher in diabetics than in controls. 4) The increase of plasma ANP concentration during moderate exercise (VO2 max 60%) was significantly greater in diabetics than in controls (32.3 +/- 11.9 pg/ml vs. 15.0 +/- 1.7 pg/ml)(p less than 0.02). 5) There was a significant correlation between the increase in plasma ANP during exercise and the levels of left ventricular diastolic function (A/R:r = 0.504, p less than 0.05, IRT:r = 0.587, p less than 0.02), assessed by echocardiography, in diabetics. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the frequency of asymptomatic myocardial ischemia during exercise was higher in diabetics than in controls.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1840303

  17. A pragmatic randomised controlled trial of the Welsh National Exercise Referral Scheme: protocol for trial and integrated economic and process evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    trial recruitment, a comprehensive process evaluation examining intervention delivery and an integrated economic evaluation. This will allow a unique insight into the feasibility, effectiveness and cost effectiveness of a national exercise referral scheme for participants with CHD risk factors or mild to moderate anxiety, depression, or stress and provides a potential model for future policy evaluations. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN47680448 PMID:20565846

  18. Neuroprotective Effects of Voluntary Exercise in an Inherited Retinal Degeneration Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Hanif, Adam M.; Lawson, Eric C.; Prunty, Megan; Gogniat, Marissa; Aung, Moe H.; Chakraborty, Ranjay; Boatright, Jeffrey H.; Pardue, Machelle T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Our previous investigations showed that involuntary treadmill exercise is neuroprotective in a light-induced retinal degeneration mouse model, and it may act through activation of tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptors. This study investigated whether voluntary running wheel exercise can be neuroprotective in an inheritable model of the retinal degenerative disease retinitis pigmentosa (RP), rd10 mice. Methods Breeding pairs of rd10 and C57BL/6J mice were given free-spinning (active) or locked (inactive) running wheels. Pups were weaned into separate cages with their parents' respective wheel types, and visual function was tested with ERG and a virtual optokinetic system at 4, 5, and 6 weeks of age. Offspring were killed at 6 weeks of age and retinal cross-sections were prepared for photoreceptor nuclei counting. Additionally, separate cohorts of active and inactive rd10 pups were injected daily for 14 days after eye opening with a selective TrkB receptor antagonist (ANA-12) or vehicle solution and assessed as described above. Results Mice in the rd10 active group exhibited significant preservation of visual acuity, cone nuclei, and total photoreceptor nuclei number. Injection with ANA-12 precluded the preservation of visual acuity and photoreceptor nuclei number in rd10 mice. Conclusions Voluntary running partially protected against the retinal degeneration and vision loss that otherwise occurs in the rd10 mouse model of RP. This protection was prevented by injection of ANA-12, suggesting that TrkB activation mediates exercise's preservation of the retina. Exercise may serve as an effective, clinically translational intervention against retinal degeneration. PMID:26567796

  19. Advocacy Evaluation: A Model for Internal Evaluation Offices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonnichsen, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    As evaluations are more often implemented by internal staff, internal evaluators must begin to assume decision-making and advocacy tasks. This advocacy evaluation concept is described using the Federal Bureau of Investigation evaluation staff as a model. (TJH)

  20. UAV Deployment Exercise for Mapping Purposes: Evaluation of Emergency Response Applications.

    PubMed

    Boccardo, Piero; Chiabrando, Filiberto; Dutto, Furio; Tonolo, Fabio Giulio; Lingua, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Exploiting the decrease of costs related to UAV technology, the humanitarian community started piloting the use of similar systems in humanitarian crises several years ago in different application fields, i.e., disaster mapping and information gathering, community capacity building, logistics and even transportation of goods. Part of the author's group, composed of researchers in the field of applied geomatics, has been piloting the use of UAVs since 2006, with a specific focus on disaster management application. In the framework of such activities, a UAV deployment exercise was jointly organized with the Regional Civil Protection authority, mainly aimed at assessing the operational procedures to deploy UAVs for mapping purposes and the usability of the acquired data in an emergency response context. In the paper the technical features of the UAV platforms will be described, comparing the main advantages/disadvantages of fixed-wing versus rotor platforms. The main phases of the adopted operational procedure will be discussed and assessed especially in terms of time required to carry out each step, highlighting potential bottlenecks and in view of the national regulation framework, which is rapidly evolving. Different methodologies for the processing of the acquired data will be described and discussed, evaluating the fitness for emergency response applications. PMID:26147728

  1. UAV Deployment Exercise for Mapping Purposes: Evaluation of Emergency Response Applications

    PubMed Central

    Boccardo, Piero; Chiabrando, Filiberto; Dutto, Furio; Giulio Tonolo, Fabio; Lingua, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Exploiting the decrease of costs related to UAV technology, the humanitarian community started piloting the use of similar systems in humanitarian crises several years ago in different application fields, i.e., disaster mapping and information gathering, community capacity building, logistics and even transportation of goods. Part of the author’s group, composed of researchers in the field of applied geomatics, has been piloting the use of UAVs since 2006, with a specific focus on disaster management application. In the framework of such activities, a UAV deployment exercise was jointly organized with the Regional Civil Protection authority, mainly aimed at assessing the operational procedures to deploy UAVs for mapping purposes and the usability of the acquired data in an emergency response context. In the paper the technical features of the UAV platforms will be described, comparing the main advantages/disadvantages of fixed-wing versus rotor platforms. The main phases of the adopted operational procedure will be discussed and assessed especially in terms of time required to carry out each step, highlighting potential bottlenecks and in view of the national regulation framework, which is rapidly evolving. Different methodologies for the processing of the acquired data will be described and discussed, evaluating the fitness for emergency response applications. PMID:26147728

  2. Evaluation of fatigue of respiratory and lower limb muscles during prolonged aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    Nadiv, Yaara; Vachbroit, Ricki; Gefen, Amit; Elad, David; Zaretsky, Uri; Moran, Dani; Halpern, Pinchas; Ratnovsky, Anat

    2012-05-01

    The respiratory muscles may fatigue during prolonged exercises and thereby become a factor that limits extreme physical activity. The aim of the current study was to determine whether respiratory muscle fatigue imposes a limitation on extreme physical activity of well-trained young men. Electromyography (EMG) signals of respiratory (external intercostal and sternomastoid) and calf muscles (gastrocnemius) were measured (N = 8) during 1 hr of treadmill marching at a speed of 8 km/hr with and without a 15 kg backpack. The root mean square (RMS) and the mean power frequency of the EMG signals were evaluated for calculating fatigue indices. The EMG RMS revealed that the respiratory and calf muscles did not fatigue during the marching without a backpack load. The study did show, however, a significant rise in the EMG values when a backpack was carried with respect to the no-load condition (p < .05), which suggests that respiratory muscles should be trained in military recruits who are required to carry loaded backpacks while marching. PMID:22723112

  3. Exercise training and rehabilitation in pulmonary arterial hypertension: rationale and current data evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zafrir, Barak

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by reduced functional capacity and health-related quality of life. Despite the progress made in recent years in disease-targeted therapies with improvement in prognosis, PAH patients often experience progressive exercise intolerance. Exercise rehabilitation is beneficial and has become a standard of care in patients with systolic heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, although PAH patients present with similar exertional limitation and often share common hemodynamic, ventilatory, and skeletal muscle derangements, exercise rehabilitation was discouraged in PAH patients because of concerns of clinical deterioration and adverse outcomes. In recent years, several small-scale studies have demonstrated that closely supervised and monitored exercise training programs may have potential benefits in the management of stable PAH patients, improving exercise capacity and quality of life, with an acceptable low risk of adverse events in the studied populations. This review describes the emerging clinical data supporting the efficacy and safety of exercise training in PAH patients. The review provides a perspective on the pathophysiological impairments contributing to exercise intolerance in these patients and critically project from the proven evidence-based benefits of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation in chronic heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on the PAH population. PMID:23962982

  4. Evaluation and management of pediatric hand injuries resulting from exercise machines.

    PubMed

    Vouis, Jon; Hadeed, Josef

    2009-07-01

    Traumatic injury to the hand in the pediatric population unfortunately remains common in the spectrum of accidental injuries sustained in this population. This is particularly true regarding stationary exercise equipment. The popularity of home exercise equipment continues to rise in the United States, particularly stationary bicycles and treadmills. Additional safety mechanisms are required to prevent the anticipated increase in the number of hand injuries to children as a result of these machines. The aim of this paper was to review the incidence and management of pediatric hand injuries sustained as a result of stationary exercise equipment in the home, in addition to increasing awareness of these types of injuries. PMID:19553858

  5. ENDURANCE EXERCISE PROMOTES CARDIORESPIRATORY REHABILITATION WITHOUT NEURORESTORATION IN THE CHRONIC MOUSE MODEL OF PARKINSONISM WITH SEVERE NEURODEGENERATION

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jarrah, Muhammed; Pothakos, Konstantinos; Novikova, Lesya; Smirnova, Irina V.; Kurz, Max J.; Stehno-Bittel, Lisa; Lau, Yuen-Sum

    2007-01-01

    Physical rehabilitation with endurance exercise for patients with Parkinson's disease has not been well established, although some clinical and laboratory reports suggest that exercise may produce neuroprotective effect and restore dopaminergic and motor functions. In this study, we used a chronic mouse model of Parkinsonism, which was induced by injecting male C57BL/6 mice with 10 doses of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (25 mg/kg) and probenecid (250 mg/kg) over five weeks. This chronic Parkinsonian model displays a severe and persistent loss of nigrostriatal neurons resulting in robust dopamine depletion and locomotor impairment in mice. Following the induction of Parkinsonism, these mice were capable to sustain an exercise training program on a motorized rodent treadmill at a speed of 18 m/min, 0° of inclination, 40 min/day, 5 days/week for 4 weeks. At the end of exercise training, we examined and compared their cardiorespiratory capacity, behavior, and neurochemical changes with that of the probenecid-treated control and sedentary Parkinsonian mice. We found that the resting heart rate after 4 weeks of exercise in the chronic Parkinsonian mice was significantly lower than the rate before exercise, whereas the resting heart rate at the beginning and 4 weeks afterwards in the control or sedentary Parkinsonian mice were unchanged. Exercised Parkinsonian mice also recovered from elevated electrocardiogram R-wave amplitude that was detected in the Parkinsonian mice without exercise for 4 weeks. The values of oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, and body heat generation in the exercised Parkinsonian mice before and during the Bruce maximal exercise challenge test were all significantly lower than their sedentary counterparts. Furthermore, the exercised Parkinsonian mice revealed a greater mass in the left ventricle of the heart and an increased level of citrate synthase activity in the skeletal muscles. The amphetamine-induced, dopamine

  6. Digital Astronaut Project Biomechanical Models: Biomechanical Modeling of Squat, Single-Leg Squat and Heel Raise Exercises on the Hybrid Ultimate Lifting Kit (HULK)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, William K.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Crentsil, Lawton; Lewandowski, Beth E.; Humphreys, Brad T.; DeWitt, John K.; Fincke, Renita S.; Mulugeta, Lealem

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) implements well-vetted computational models to predict and assess spaceflight health and performance risks, and to enhance countermeasure development. The DAP Musculoskeletal Modeling effort is developing computational models to inform exercise countermeasure development and to predict physical performance capabilities after a length of time in space. For example, integrated exercise device-biomechanical models can determine localized loading, which will be used as input to muscle and bone adaptation models to estimate the effectiveness of the exercise countermeasure. In addition, simulations of mission tasks can be used to estimate the astronaut's ability to perform the task after exposure to microgravity and after using various exercise countermeasures. The software package OpenSim (Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA) (Ref. 1) is being used to create the DAP biomechanical models and its built-in muscle model is the starting point for the DAP muscle model. During Exploration missions, such as those to asteroids and Mars, astronauts will be exposed to reduced gravity for extended periods. Therefore, the crew must have access to exercise countermeasures that can maintain their musculoskeletal and aerobic health. Exploration vehicles may have very limited volume and power available to accommodate such capabilities, even more so than the International Space Station (ISS). The exercise devices flown on Exploration missions must be designed to provide sufficient load during the performance of various resistance and aerobic/anaerobic exercises while meeting potential additional requirements of limited mass, volume and power. Given that it is not practical to manufacture and test (ground, analog and/or flight) all candidate devices, nor is it always possible to obtain data such as localized muscle and bone loading empirically, computational modeling can estimate the localized loading during various exercise modalities performed on

  7. Design of the Resistance and Endurance exercise After ChemoTherapy (REACT) study: A randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of exercise interventions after chemotherapy on physical fitness and fatigue

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Preliminary studies suggest that physical exercise interventions can improve physical fitness, fatigue and quality of life in cancer patients after completion of chemotherapy. Additional research is needed to rigorously test the effects of exercise programmes among cancer patients and to determine optimal training intensity accordingly. The present paper presents the design of a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a high intensity exercise programme compared to a low-to-moderate intensity exercise programme and a waiting list control group on physical fitness and fatigue as primary outcomes. Methods After baseline measurements, cancer patients who completed chemotherapy are randomly assigned to either a 12-week high intensity exercise programme or a low-to-moderate intensity exercise programme. Next, patients from both groups are randomly assigned to immediate training or a waiting list (i.e. waiting list control group). After 12 weeks, patients of the waiting list control group start with the exercise programme they have been allocated to. Both interventions consist of equal bouts of resistance and endurance interval exercises with the same frequency and duration, but differ in training intensity. Additionally, patients of both exercise programmes are counselled to improve compliance and achieve and maintain an active lifestyle, tailored to their individual preferences and capabilities. Measurements will be performed at baseline (t = 0), 12 weeks after randomization (t = 1), and 64 weeks after randomization (t = 2). The primary outcome measures are cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle strength assessed by means of objective performance indicators, and self-reported fatigue. Secondary outcome measures include health-related quality of life, self-reported physical activity, daily functioning, body composition, mood and sleep disturbances, and return to work. In addition, compliance and satisfaction with the

  8. A Model for Curriculum Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crane, Peter; Abt, Clark C.

    1969-01-01

    Describes in some detail the Curriculum Evaluation Model, "a technique for calculating the cost-effectiveness of alternative curriculum materials by a detailed breakdown and analysis of their components, quality, and cost. Coverage, appropriateness, motivational effectiveness, and cost are the four major categories in terms of which the…

  9. Stochastic optimization for modeling physiological time series: application to the heart rate response to exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakynthinaki, M. S.; Stirling, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    Stochastic optimization is applied to the problem of optimizing the fit of a model to the time series of raw physiological (heart rate) data. The physiological response to exercise has been recently modeled as a dynamical system. Fitting the model to a set of raw physiological time series data is, however, not a trivial task. For this reason and in order to calculate the optimal values of the parameters of the model, the present study implements the powerful stochastic optimization method ALOPEX IV, an algorithm that has been proven to be fast, effective and easy to implement. The optimal parameters of the model, calculated by the optimization method for the particular athlete, are very important as they characterize the athlete's current condition. The present study applies the ALOPEX IV stochastic optimization to the modeling of a set of heart rate time series data corresponding to different exercises of constant intensity. An analysis of the optimization algorithm, together with an analytic proof of its convergence (in the absence of noise), is also presented.

  10. Parents' subjective evaluation of a self-help education-exercise program for asthmatic children and their parents.

    PubMed

    Selner, J C; Staudenmayer, H

    1979-10-01

    A self-help education-exercise program for asthmatic children and their parents was evaluated in Denver, Colorado. The objective of the program was to instill better self-care practices in the child which are expected to reduce utilization and cost of medical services and reduce the amount of interference in the child's normal activities. The program was designed to educate the family about the nature of asthma and its treatment, the importance of self-responsibility for the child, and the psychosocial aspects which may affect both the child and the parents in a family with an asthmatic child. The program also included specific lessons pertaining to self-care practices including general health exercises on land and in water, relaxation training, and diaphragmatic breathing. The results of subjective evaluations of the parents indicated that the program was successful in achieving its goals to: Reduce the number of severe attacks, reduce medication usage, improve compliance, reduce days of school missed, increase exercise activity, and control wheezing by the steps taught in the course. While the results are suggestive, a further, controlled evaluation of the program is recommended. PMID:262455

  11. Exercise prevents raphe nucleus mitochondrial overactivity in a rat depression model.

    PubMed

    Wen, Li; Jin, Yahong; Li, Lei; Sun, Shuangyu; Cheng, Shixiang; Zhang, Sai; Zhang, Yong; Svenningsson, Per

    2014-06-10

    Monoamine deficit and mitochondrial dysfunction may underlie depression. Serotoninergic neurons from raphe nuclei project widely and may be involved in depression. This study used chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) in rats as a model of depression to assess the effects of CUS, exercise and fluoxetine on mitochondrial function and serotonin levels in the raphe nuclei. Rats were divided into 4 groups (6 per group): control (C); depression (D), CUS for 28days; depression+exercise (DE), treadmill exercises from days 11-28 of CUS; depression+fluoxetine (DF), fluoxetine (5mg/kg/d i.g.) from days 11 to 28 of CUS. Behavioral changes were assessed using body weight, sucrose consumption tests (anhedonia) and open field tests (locomotor/exploratory behavior). Raphe nucleus mitochondrial function was determined using the respiratory control ratio, ATP synthesis rate, and activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase. Serotonin levels were measured in the raphe nuclei and hippocampus. On day 28 of CUS, body weight was higher in group C than in groups D, DE and DF (P<0.001), and higher in group DE than in group D or DF (P<0.05). Sucrose consumption was higher in group C than in groups D, DE and DF (P<0.001), higher in group DE than in groups D (P<0.001) or DF (P<0.05), and higher in group DF than in group D (P<0.05). All measures of mitochondrial function were increased in group D compared with the other groups (P<0.01). Hippocampal serotonin was lower in group D than in the other groups (P<0.01); levels in the raphe nuclei were elevated in group DE compared with the remaining groups (P<0.001). CUS in rats may cause overactivation of the mitochondria in the raphe nuclei, and exercise training may suppress these changes. PMID:24813829

  12. Simple exponential regression model to describe the relation between minute ventilation and oxygen uptake during incremental exercise.

    PubMed

    Baba, Reizo; Mori, Emiko; Tauchi, Nobuo; Nagashima, Masami

    2002-11-01

    The physiological significance of an exponential regression model between minute ventilation (VE) and oxygen uptake (VO2) during incremental exercise was examined. Thirty-eight subjects, including 12 patients with chronic heart failure, participated in cardiopulmonary exercise testing on a bicycle ergometer. The equation VE = a e(bVO2), where a and b are parameters, was used to describe the relation between VE and VO2 during incremental exercise. Arterialized blood gas analysis was measured before and during exercise. The correlation coefficient of the regression model was high (r = 0.97 +/- 0.02). Parameter a negatively correlated with the arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide during exercise (r = -0.44, p < 0.01), and positively correlated with peak VO2 (r = 0.47, p < 0.01). Parameter b negatively correlated with peak VO2 (r = -0.86, p < 0.01) and positively correlated with the dead space to tidal volume ratio (r = 0.68, p < 0.01). The regression model, as well as parameters a and b, is physiologically useful in expressing metabolic response to exercise. This model, a specific solution to the differential equation dVE/dVO2 = bVE, implies that the more a subject breathes, the greater is the increment in ventilation needed to meet a further increment of metabolic demand. PMID:12580535

  13. Jumping into the deep-end: results from a pilot impact evaluation of a community-based aquatic exercise program.

    PubMed

    Barker, Anna L; Talevski, Jason; Morello, Renata T; Nolan, Genevieve A; De Silva, Renee D; Briggs, Andrew M

    2016-06-01

    This multi-center quasi-experimental pilot study aimed to evaluate changes in pain, joint stiffness, physical function, and quality of life over 12 weeks in adults with musculoskeletal conditions attending 'Waves' aquatic exercise classes. A total of 109 adults (mean age, 65.2 years; range, 24-93 years) with musculoskeletal conditions were recruited across 18 Australian community aquatic centers. The intervention is a peer-led, 45 min, weekly aquatic exercise class including aerobic, strength, flexibility, and balance exercises (n = 67). The study also included a control group of people not participating in Waves or other formal exercise (n = 42). Outcomes were measured using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and EuroQoL five dimensions survey (EQ-5D) at baseline and 12 weeks. Satisfaction with Waves classes was also measured at 12 weeks. Eighty two participants (43 Waves and 39 control) completed the study protocol and were included in the analysis. High levels of satisfaction with classes were reported by Waves participants. Over 90 % of participants reported Waves classes were enjoyable and would recommend classes to others. Waves participants demonstrated improvements in WOMAC and EQ-5D scores however between-group differences did not reach statistical significance. Peer-led aquatic exercise classes appear to improve pain, joint stiffness, physical function and quality of life for people with musculoskeletal conditions. The diverse study sample is likely to have limited the power to detect significant changes in outcomes. Larger studies with an adequate follow-up period are needed to confirm effects. PMID:26511965

  14. Enhancing Patient Understanding of Medical Procedures: Evaluation of an Interactive Multimedia Program with In-line Exercises

    PubMed Central

    Tait, Alan R.; Voepel-Lewis, Terri; Chetcuti, Stanley J.; Brennan-Martinez, Colleen; Levine, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Standard print and verbal information provided to patients undergoing treatments is often difficult to understand and may impair their ability to be truly informed. This study examined the effect of an interactive multimedia informational program with in-line exercises and corrected feedback on patients’ real-time understanding of their cardiac catheterization procedure. Methods 151 adult patients scheduled for diagnostic cardiac catheterization were randomized to receive information about their procedure using either the standard institutional verbal and written information (SI) or an interactive iPad-based informational program (IPI). Subject understanding was evaluated using semi-structured interviews at baseline, immediately following catheterization, and 2 weeks after the procedure. In addition, for those randomized to the IPI, the ability to respond correctly to several in-line exercises was recorded. Subjects’ perceptions of, and preferences for the information delivery were also elicited. Results Subjects randomized to the IPI program had significantly better understanding following the intervention compared with those randomized to the SI group (8.3 ± 2.4 vs 7.4 ± 2.5, respectively, 0–12 scale where 12 = complete understanding, P<0.05). First-time correct responses to the in-line exercises ranged from 24.3% – 100%. Subjects reported that the in-line exercises were very helpful (9.1 ± 1.7, 0–10 scale, where 10 = extremely helpful) and the iPad program very easy to use (9.0 ± 1.6, 0–10 scale, where 10 = extremely easy) suggesting good clinical utility. Discussion Results demonstrated the ability of an interactive multimedia program to enhance patients’ understanding of their medical procedure. Importantly, the incorporation of in-line exercises permitted identification of knowledge deficits, provided corrected feedback, and confirmed the patients’ understanding of treatment information in real-time when consent was sought

  15. The Strength Model of Self-Control in Sport and Exercise Psychology

    PubMed Central

    Englert, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The strength model of self-control assumes that all acts of self-control (e.g., emotion regulation, persistence) are empowered by a single global metaphorical strength that has limited capacity. This strength can become temporarily depleted after a primary self-control act, which, in turn, can impair performance in subsequent acts of self-control. Recently, the assumptions of the strength model of self-control also have been adopted and tested in the field of sport and exercise psychology. The present review paper aims to give an overview of recent developments in self-control research based on the strength model of self-control. Furthermore, recent research on interventions on how to improve and revitalize self-control strength will be presented. Finally, the strength model of self-control has been criticized lately, as well as expanded in scope, so the present paper will also discuss alternative explanations of why previous acts of self-control can lead to impaired performance in sport and exercise. PMID:26973590

  16. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-20

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and I/O through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample I/O drivers. This is a library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modeling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, such as time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Has applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed for anomalies.

  17. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    SciTech Connect

    2014-02-14

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and 1/0 through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample 1/0 drivers. This is a Framework library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modelling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, such as time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Ha) applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed

  18. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-02-14

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and 1/0 through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample 1/0 drivers. This is a Framework library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modelling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, suchmore » as time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Ha) applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed« less

  19. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-10-20

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and I/O through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample I/O drivers. This is a library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modeling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, such asmore » time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Has applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed for anomalies.« less

  20. Evaluation of Exercise Tolerance in Dialysis Patients Performing Tai Chi Training: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Bulińska, Katarzyna; Kusztal, Mariusz; Kowalska, Joanna; Rogowski, Łukasz; Zembroń-Łacny, Agnieszka; Gołębiowski, Tomasz; Ochmann, Bartosz; Pawlaczyk, Weronika; Woźniewski, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have poor physical performance and exercise capacity due to frequent dialysis treatments. Tai Chi exercises can be very useful in the area of rehabilitation of people with ESRD. Objectives. The aim of the study was to assess exercise capacity in ESRD patients participating in 6-month Tai Chi training. Patients and Methods. Twenty dialysis patients from Wroclaw took part in the training; at the end of the project, 14 patients remained (age 69.2 ± 8.6 years). A 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and spiroergometry were performed at the beginning and after 6 months of training. Results. After 6 months of Tai Chi, significant improvements were recorded in mean distance in the 6MWT (387.89 versus 436.36 m), rate of perceived exertion (7.4 versus 4.7), and spiroergometry (8.71 versus 10.08 min). Conclusions. In the ESRD patients taking part in Tai Chi training, a definite improvement in exercise tolerance was recorded after the 6-month training. Tai Chi exercises conducted on days without dialysis can be an effective and interesting form of rehabilitation for patients, offering them a chance for a better quality of life and fewer falls and hospitalisations that are the result of it. PMID:27547228

  1. Using Network Science to Evaluate Exercise-Associated Brain Changes in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Burdette, Jonathan H.; Laurienti, Paul J.; Espeland, Mark A.; Morgan, Ashley; Telesford, Qawi; Vechlekar, Crystal D.; Hayasaka, Satoru; Jennings, Janine M.; Katula, Jeffrey A.; Kraft, Robert A.; Rejeski, W. Jack

    2010-01-01

    Literature has shown that exercise is beneficial for cognitive function in older adults and that aerobic fitness is associated with increased hippocampal tissue and blood volumes. The current study used novel network science methods to shed light on the neurophysiological implications of exercise-induced changes in the hippocampus of older adults. Participants represented a volunteer subgroup of older adults that were part of either the exercise training (ET) or healthy aging educational control (HAC) treatment arms from the Seniors Health and Activity Research Program Pilot (SHARP-P) trial. Following the 4-month interventions, MRI measures of resting brain blood flow and connectivity were performed. The ET group's hippocampal cerebral blood flow (CBF) exhibited statistically significant increases compared to the HAC group. Novel whole-brain network connectivity analyses showed greater connectivity in the hippocampi of the ET participants compared to HAC. Furthermore, the hippocampus was consistently shown to be within the same network neighborhood (module) as the anterior cingulate cortex only within the ET group. Thus, within the ET group, the hippocampus and anterior cingulate were highly interconnected and localized to the same network neighborhood. This project shows the power of network science to investigate potential mechanisms for exercise-induced benefits to the brain in older adults. We show a link between neurological network features and CBF, and it is possible that this alteration of functional brain networks may lead to the known improvement in cognitive function among older adults following exercise. PMID:20589103

  2. An evaluation of exercise pen use by circus tigers (Pathera tigris tigris).

    PubMed

    Nevill, Christian H; Friend, Ted H; Windom, Amy G

    2010-01-01

    This study quantified the behavior of 11 tigers during periodic access to an exercise pen throughout the day and night. The study determined the amount of time spent in the pen and the percentage of time spent performing stereotypic pacing, normal locomotor behavior, and lying down while in the pen. Average access to the exercise pen was 10 hr 49 min overnight and 5 hr 30 min during the day. At night, the tigers spent 29.1% of their time in the exercise pen, during which they paced 19.6% and performed normal locomotor behavior for 23.1% of that time. By day, they spent 40.4% of their time in the exercise pen, during which they paced 10.0% and performed normal locomotor behavior 35.7% of that time. The tigers spent the rest of the time in the pen lying down. Overall, tigers will utilize an exercise pen, spending a greater percentage of time in the pen during the day than at night and also performing less stereotyped pacing than at night. PMID:20349381

  3. Exercise and disease progression in multiple sclerosis: can exercise slow down the progression of multiple sclerosis?

    PubMed Central

    Stenager, Egon

    2012-01-01

    It has been suggested that exercise (or physical activity) might have the potential to have an impact on multiple sclerosis (MS) pathology and thereby slow down the disease process in MS patients. The objective of this literature review was to identify the literature linking physical exercise (or activity) and MS disease progression. A systematic literature search was conducted in the following databases: PubMed, SweMed+, Embase, Cochrane Library, PEDro, SPORTDiscus and ISI Web of Science. Different methodological approaches to the problem have been applied including (1) longitudinal exercise studies evaluating the effects on clinical outcome measures, (2) cross-sectional studies evaluating the relationship between fitness status and MRI findings, (3) cross-sectional and longitudinal studies evaluating the relationship between exercise/physical activity and disability/relapse rate and, finally, (4) longitudinal exercise studies applying the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) animal model of MS. Data from intervention studies evaluating disease progression by clinical measures (1) do not support a disease-modifying effect of exercise; however, MRI data (2), patient-reported data (3) and data from the EAE model (4) indicate a possible disease-modifying effect of exercise, but the strength of the evidence limits definite conclusions. It was concluded that some evidence supports the possibility of a disease-modifying potential of exercise (or physical activity) in MS patients, but future studies using better methodologies are needed to confirm this. PMID:22435073

  4. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a model for the study of aging and exercise: physical ability and trainability decrease with age.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Matthew J H; Zerulla, Tanja C; Tierney, Keith B

    2014-02-01

    A rapidly aging global population has motivated the development and use of models for human aging. Studies on aging have shown parallels between zebrafish and humans at the internal organization level; however, few parallels have been studied at the whole-organism level. Furthermore, the effectiveness of exercise as a method to mitigate the effects of aging has not been studied in zebrafish. We investigated the effects of aging and intermittent exercise on swimming performance, kinematics and behavior. Young, middle-aged and old zebrafish (20-29, 36-48 and 60-71% of average lifespan, respectively) were exercised to exhaustion in endurance and sprint swimming tests once a week for four weeks. Both endurance and sprint performance decreased with increased age. Swimming performance improved with exercise training in young and middle-aged zebrafish, but not in old zebrafish. Tail-beat amplitude, which is akin to stride length in humans, increased for all age groups with training. Zebrafish turning frequency, which is an indicator of routine activity, decreased with age but showed no change with exercise. In sum, our results show that zebrafish exhibit a decline in whole-organism performance and trainability with age. These findings closely resemble the senescence-related declines in physical ability experienced by humans and mammalian aging models and therefore support the use of zebrafish as a model for human exercise and aging. PMID:24316042

  5. Infrasound Sensor Models and Evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    KROMER,RICHARD P.; MCDONALD,TIMOTHY S.

    2000-07-31

    Sandia National Laboratories has continued to evaluate the performance of infrasound sensors that are candidates for use by the International Monitoring System (IMS) for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization. The performance criteria against which these sensors are assessed are specified in ``Operational Manual for Infra-sound Monitoring and the International Exchange of Infrasound Data''. This presentation includes the results of efforts concerning two of these sensors: (1) Chaparral Physics Model 5; and (2) CEA MB2000. Sandia is working with Chaparral Physics in order to improve the capability of the Model 5 (a prototype sensor) to be calibrated and evaluated. With the assistance of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Sandia is also conducting tests to evaluate the performance of the CEA MB2000. Sensor models based on theoretical transfer functions and manufacturer specifications for these two devices have been developed. This presentation will feature the results of coherence-based data analysis of signals from a huddle test, utilizing several sensors of both types, in order to verify the sensor performance.

  6. Praecordial surface mapping after exercise in evaluation of propranolol for angina pectoris.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, K; Selwyn, A; Oakley, D; Jonathan, A; Shillingford, J

    1980-01-01

    The effect of propranolol on ST depression in the praecordial 16 lead electrocardiogram was observed in 52 patients before and after treatment, both at rest and after exercise. In a further 20 patients exercise tests repeated on separate days two months apart showed that the technique gave reproducible results. A variable relation between symptomatic relief and praecordial exercise-induced ST segment depression was noted. Use of a single fixed-position chest lead (V5) was shown to be less accurate. The relief of symptoms alone is probably an inadequate guide to the success of medical treatment, which should control not only angina but also the manifestations of ischaemia on the praecordial electrocardiogram. PMID:7397038

  7. Evaluation of immune response after moderate and overtraining exercise in wistar rat

    PubMed Central

    Gholamnezhad, Zahra; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Hosseini, Mahmoud; Sankian, Mojtaba; Khajavi Rad, Abolfazl

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): The effect of prolonged overtraining on cytokine kinetics was compared with moderate exercise in the present study. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into control sedentary (C), moderate trained (MT), (V=20 m/min, 30 min/day for 6 days a week, 8 weeks), overtrained (OT) (V=25 m/min, 60min/day for 6 days a week, 11 weeks) and recovered overtrained (OR) (OT plus 2 weeks recovery) groups, (n=6 for each group). Immediately, 24 hr and 2 weeks (in OR) after last bout of exercise blood samples were obtained. The plasma concentrations of TNFα, IL-6, IL-10, IL-4 and IFN were measured by ELISA method. Results: Immediately after last bout of exercise the following findings were observed; IL-6, IL-10 and TNFα concentrations increased in OT and OR groups compared with control (P<0.05–P<0.001). Serum level of IL-4 decreased (P<0.01) but IFN increased (P<0.05) in MT group vs. control. In addition, circulatory levels of TNFα, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-4 were higher but the IFN concentrations were lower in OT and OR groups than MT group (P<0.05-P<0.01). The IFN-γ/IL4 ratio was significantly increased in MT (P<0.01) while it decreased in OT group. There were not statistical differences in TNFα, IL-6, and IFN levels between different time intervals after exercise in MT, OT and OR groups. Conclusion: These data confirm a positive effect of moderate exercise on immune function and a decrease in susceptibility to viral infection by inducing Th1 cytokine profile shift. However, prolonged and overtraining exercise causes numerous changes in immunity that possibly reflects physiological stress and immune suppression. PMID:24592300

  8. Exercise motives and positive body image in physically active college women and men: Exploring an expanded acceptance model of intuitive eating.

    PubMed

    Tylka, Tracy L; Homan, Kristin J

    2015-09-01

    The acceptance model of intuitive eating posits that body acceptance by others facilitates body appreciation and internal body orientation, which contribute to intuitive eating. Two domains of exercise motives (functional and appearance) may also be linked to these variables, and thus were integrated into the model. The model fit the data well for 406 physically active U.S. college students, although some pathways were stronger for women. Body acceptance by others directly contributed to higher functional exercise motives and indirectly contributed to lower appearance exercise motives through higher internal body orientation. Functional exercise motives positively, and appearance exercise motives inversely, contributed to body appreciation. Whereas body appreciation positively, and appearance exercise motives inversely, contributed to intuitive eating for women, only the latter association was evident for men. To benefit positive body image and intuitive eating, efforts should encourage body acceptance by others and emphasize functional and de-emphasize appearance exercise motives. PMID:26281958

  9. Psychometric evaluations of the efficacy expectations and Outcome Expectations for Exercise Scales in African American women.

    PubMed

    Murrock, Carolyn J; Gary, Faye

    2014-01-01

    This secondary analysis tested the reliability and validity of the Self-Efficacy for Exercise (SEE) and the Outcome Expectations for Exercise (OEE) scales in 126 community dwelling, middle aged African American women. Social Cognitive Theory postulates self-efficacy is behavior age, gender and culture specific. Therefore, it is important to determine ifself-efficacy scales developed and tested in older Caucasian female adults are reliable and valid in middle aged, minority women. Cronbach's alpha and construct validity using hypothesis testing and confirmatory factor analysis supported the reliability and validity of the SEE and OEE scales in community dwelling, middle aged African American women. PMID:25612395

  10. Verification of a canine model of transient exercise induced myocardial dysfunction: antianginal effects of flestolol, an ultra short acting beta adrenoceptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Fischer, G; Grohs, J G; Raberger, G

    1990-02-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE - The aim of the study was to verify the reproducibility of a canine model of treadmill exercise induced regional myocardial dysfunction designed to mimic exertional angina pectoris in man. DESIGN - Dogs trained to run on a treadmill were chronically instrumented with a microtip manometer in the left ventricle, a hydraulic occluder around the circumflex branch of the left coronary artery, two pairs of crystals for sonomicrometry, and arterial and venous catheters. Experiments were started 10 d after surgery, when the animals were submitted to seven treadmill exercise cycles, each of 3 min, with a 7 min recovery period. Ischaemia was adjusted so as not to impair regional function at rest but to produce progressive dysfunction with increasing work load. Flestolol (1 microgram.kg-1.min-1) was infused intravenously during the third and fourth exercise cycle. SUBJECTS - Six mongrel dogs, 13.5-29.5 kg, were used. MEASUREMENTS and RESULTS - Flestolol caused a marked reduction in the exercise induced increase in left ventricular positive dP/dtmax, and minor reductions in heart rate and systolic blood pressure, resulting in a decrease in myocardial oxygen demand and an improvement in regional function in the circumflex area of the left coronary artery. The functional improvement was transient and disappeared entirely after termination of flestolol infusion. CONCLUSIONS - The results show that flestolol is beneficial in conditions of limited coronary reserve and exercise induced myocardial dysfunction. The fact that the extent of regional myocardial dysfunction was comparable before and after flestolol infusion confirms the stability and usefulness of this experimental model in the evaluation of antianginal drugs. PMID:1970278

  11. Operationalizing Pain Treatment in the Biopsychosocial Model: Take a Daily "SWEM"--Socialize, Work, Exercise, Meditate.

    PubMed

    Collen, Mark

    2015-09-01

    In the United States, chronic pain is often poorly treated at an exceedingly high cost. The use of the biomedical model to manage pain is frequently ineffective, and evidence suggests that the biopsychosocial (BPS) model is a better choice. A problem with the BPS model is that it has not been operationalized in terms of patient behavior. This commentary addresses that issue by suggesting that people with chronic pain and illness participate daily in four self-management health behaviors: socialize, work, exercise, and meditation, and discusses evidence that supports these recommendations. These self-management behaviors may decrease pain and thus reduce the need for pain medications and other medical interventions. Additional topics include patient adherence and health coaching. PMID:26367791

  12. Effects of exercise training on systo-diastolic ventricular dysfunction in patients with hypertension: an echocardiographic study with tissue velocity and strain imaging evaluation.

    PubMed

    Leggio, Massimo; Mazza, Andrea; Cruciani, Giancarlo; Sgorbini, Luca; Pugliese, Marco; Bendini, Maria Grazia; Severi, Paolo; Jesi, Anna Patrizia

    2014-07-01

    There is a lack of detailed data regarding the effect of exercise training in pharmacologically treated hypertensive patients. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of exercise training on left and right ventricular morphologic and functional parameters by means of conventional echocardiography and sensitive new echocardiographic techniques including tissue Doppler velocity and strain imaging, that were performed in pharmacologically treated hypertensive patients at baseline and at the end of a specific exercise training protocol for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. We selected 116 pharmacologically treated hypertensive patients who completed the exercise training protocol. All patients underwent a clinical history and examination; transthoracic echocardiography and exercise testing were performed at baseline and at the end of the exercise training protocol. Conventional echocardiography revealed a mild degree of diastolic dysfunction without significant differences or variations from baseline to the end of the exercise training protocol. In contrast, tissue Doppler velocity and strain imaging measurements demonstrated and highlighted the positive influence of exercise training: for both left and right ventricle myocardial early peak diastolic velocities (Em), the ratio of myocardial early-late peak diastolic velocity (Em/Am), myocardial peak systolic velocities (Sm) and peak strain and strain rate values significantly increased at the end of the exercise training protocol, suggesting a relationship between exercise capacity and both left and right ventricular systo-diastolic function. Our study, by means of newer more sensitive echocardiographic techniques, clearly demonstrated the positive impact of exercise training on both left and right ventricular systo-diastolic function, in terms of adjunctive subclinical improvement, in pharmacologically treated hypertensive patients. PMID:24694644

  13. An Evaluation of a Worksite Exercise Intervention Using the Social Cognitive Theory: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amaya, Megan; Petosa, R. L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To increase exercise adherence among insufficiently active adult employees. Design: A quasi-experimental separate samples pre-test-post-test group design was used to compare treatment and comparison group. Setting: The worksite. Subjects: Employees (n = 127) who did not meet current American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)…

  14. Critically Evaluating Competing Theories: An Exercise Based on the Kitty Genovese Murder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagarin, Brad J.; Lawler-Sagarin, Kimberly A.

    2005-01-01

    We describe an exercise based on the 1964 murder of Catherine Genovese--a murder observed by 38 witnesses, none of whom called the police. Students read a summary of the murder and worked in small groups to design an experiment to test the competing theories for the inaction of the witnesses (Americans' selfishness and insensitivity vs. diffusion…

  15. Evaluation of exercise-respiratory system modifications and preliminary respiratory-circulatory system integration scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    The respiratory control system, functioning as an independent system, is presented with modifications of the exercise subroutine. These modifications illustrate an improved control of ventilation rates and arterial and compartmental gas tensions. A very elementary approach to describing the interactions of the respiratory and circulatory system is presented.

  16. The Spiral-Interactive Program Evaluation Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khaleel, Ibrahim Adamu

    1988-01-01

    Describes the spiral interactive program evaluation model, which is designed to evaluate vocational-technical education programs in secondary schools in Nigeria. Program evaluation is defined; utility oriented and process oriented models for evaluation are described; and internal and external evaluative factors and variables that define each…

  17. An exercise in hydrological modeling: does expert knowledge improve model results?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellebrand, H.; Müller, C.; Matgen, P.; Fenicia, F.; Savenije, H.

    2009-04-01

    basins where conventional soil data (i.e soil maps) are lacking and furthermore, the maps could be used for the evaluation of model concepts.

  18. An activity recognition model using inertial sensor nodes in a wireless sensor network for frozen shoulder rehabilitation exercises.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsueh-Chun; Chiang, Shu-Yin; Lee, Kai; Kan, Yao-Chiang

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a model for recognizing motions performed during rehabilitation exercises for frozen shoulder conditions. The model consists of wearable wireless sensor network (WSN) inertial sensor nodes, which were developed for this study, and enables the ubiquitous measurement of bodily motions. The model employs the back propagation neural network (BPNN) algorithm to compute motion data that are formed in the WSN packets; herein, six types of rehabilitation exercises were recognized. The packets sent by each node are converted into six components of acceleration and angular velocity according to three axes. Motor features such as basic acceleration, angular velocity, and derivative tilt angle were input into the training procedure of the BPNN algorithm. In measurements of thirteen volunteers, the accelerations and included angles of nodes were adopted from possible features to demonstrate the procedure. Five exercises involving simple swinging and stretching movements were recognized with an accuracy of 85%-95%; however, the accuracy with which exercises entailing spiral rotations were recognized approximately 60%. Thus, a characteristic space and enveloped spectrum improving derivative features were suggested to enable identifying customized parameters. Finally, a real-time monitoring interface was developed for practical implementation. The proposed model can be applied in ubiquitous healthcare self-management to recognize rehabilitation exercises. PMID:25608218

  19. An Activity Recognition Model Using Inertial Sensor Nodes in a Wireless Sensor Network for Frozen Shoulder Rehabilitation Exercises

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hsueh-Chun; Chiang, Shu-Yin; Lee, Kai; Kan, Yao-Chiang

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a model for recognizing motions performed during rehabilitation exercises for frozen shoulder conditions. The model consists of wearable wireless sensor network (WSN) inertial sensor nodes, which were developed for this study, and enables the ubiquitous measurement of bodily motions. The model employs the back propagation neural network (BPNN) algorithm to compute motion data that are formed in the WSN packets; herein, six types of rehabilitation exercises were recognized. The packets sent by each node are converted into six components of acceleration and angular velocity according to three axes. Motor features such as basic acceleration, angular velocity, and derivative tilt angle were input into the training procedure of the BPNN algorithm. In measurements of thirteen volunteers, the accelerations and included angles of nodes were adopted from possible features to demonstrate the procedure. Five exercises involving simple swinging and stretching movements were recognized with an accuracy of 85%–95%; however, the accuracy with which exercises entailing spiral rotations were recognized approximately 60%. Thus, a characteristic space and enveloped spectrum improving derivative features were suggested to enable identifying customized parameters. Finally, a real-time monitoring interface was developed for practical implementation. The proposed model can be applied in ubiquitous healthcare self-management to recognize rehabilitation exercises. PMID:25608218

  20. Beneficial Effects of Antecedent Exercise Training on Limb Motor Function and Calpain Expression in a Rat Model of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Myoung; Kim, Eunjung

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] In the present study, we investigated the effects of antecedent exercise on functional recovery and calpain protein expression following focal cerebral ischemia injury. [Subjects and Methods] The rat middle cerebral artery occlusion model was employed. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 groups. Group I comprised untreated normal rats (n=10); Group II comprised untreated rats with focal cerebral ischemia (n=10); Group III comprised rats that performed treadmill exercise (20 m/min) training after focal cerebral ischemia (n=10); and Group IV comprised rats that performed antecedent treadmill exercise (20 m/min) training before focal cerebral ischemia (n=10). At different time points (1, 7, 14, and 21 days), limb placement test score and the levels of calpain protein in the hippocampus were examined. [Results] In the antecedent exercise group, improvements in the motor behavior index (limb placement test) were observed and hippocampal calpain protein levels were decreased. [Conclusion] These results indicated that antecedent treadmill exercise prior to focal cerebral ischemia exerted neuroprotective effects against ischemic brain injury by improving motor performance and decreasing the levels of calpain expression. Furthermore, these results suggest that antecedent treadmill exercise of an appropriate intensity is critical for post-stroke rehabilitation. PMID:24259890

  1. Writing Exercises from "Exercise Exchange." Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, Charles R., Ed.

    Reflecting current practices in the teaching of writing, the exercises in this compilation were drawn from the journal "Exercise Exchange." The articles are arranged into six sections: sources for writing; prewriting; modes for writing; writing and reading; language, mechanics, and style; and revising, responding, and evaluating. Among the topics…

  2. CSAR Benchmark Exercise 2011–2012: Evaluation of Results from Docking and Relative Ranking of Blinded Congeneric Series

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Community Structure–Activity Resource (CSAR) recently held its first blinded exercise based on data provided by Abbott, Vertex, and colleagues at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. A total of 20 research groups submitted results for the benchmark exercise where the goal was to compare different improvements for pose prediction, enrichment, and relative ranking of congeneric series of compounds. The exercise was built around blinded high-quality experimental data from four protein targets: LpxC, Urokinase, Chk1, and Erk2. Pose prediction proved to be the most straightforward task, and most methods were able to successfully reproduce binding poses when the crystal structure employed was co-crystallized with a ligand from the same chemical series. Multiple evaluation metrics were examined, and we found that RMSD and native contact metrics together provide a robust evaluation of the predicted poses. It was notable that most scoring functions underpredicted contacts between the hetero atoms (i.e., N, O, S, etc.) of the protein and ligand. Relative ranking was found to be the most difficult area for the methods, but many of the scoring functions were able to properly identify Urokinase actives from the inactives in the series. Lastly, we found that minimizing the protein and correcting histidine tautomeric states positively trended with low RMSD for pose prediction but minimizing the ligand negatively trended. Pregenerated ligand conformations performed better than those that were generated on the fly. Optimizing docking parameters and pretraining with the native ligand had a positive effect on the docking performance as did using restraints, substructure fitting, and shape fitting. Lastly, for both sampling and ranking scoring functions, the use of the empirical scoring function appeared to trend positively with the RMSD. Here, by combining the results of many methods, we hope to provide a statistically relevant evaluation and elucidate specific shortcomings

  3. Effect of Exercise on µ-Opioid Receptor Expression in the Rostral Ventromedial Medulla in Neuropathic Pain Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Jin; Byun, Jeong-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of aerobic exercise on neuropathic pain and verify whether regular treadmill exercise alters opioid receptor expression in the rostral ventral medulla (RVM) in a neuropathic pain rat model. Methods Thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in the study. All rats were divided into 3 groups, i.e., group A, sham group (n=10); group B, chronic constriction injury (CCI) group (n=11); and group C, CCI+exercise group (n=11). Regular treadmill exercise was performed for 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week, for 4 weeks at the speed of 8 m/min for 5 minutes, 11 m/min for 5 minutes, and 22 m/min for 20 minutes. Withdrawal threshold and withdrawal latency were measured before and after the regular exercise program. Immunohistochemistry and Western blots analyses were performed using antibodies against µ-opioid receptor (MOR). Results Body weight of group C was the lowest among all groups. Withdrawal thresholds and withdrawal latencies were increased with time in groups B and C. There were significant differences of withdrawal thresholds between group B and group C at 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th weeks after exercise. There were significant differences of withdrawal latencies between group B and group C at 3rd and 4th weeks after exercise. MOR expression of group C was significantly decreased, as compared to that of group B in the RVM and spinal cord. Conclusion In neuropathic pain, exercise induced analgesia could be mediated by desensitization of central MOR by endogenous opioids, leading to the shift of RVM circuitry balance to pain inhibition. PMID:26161338

  4. Effects of a Community-Based, Post-Rehabilitation Exercise Program in COPD: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial With Embedded Process Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Desveaux, Laura; Beauchamp, Marla K; Lee, Annemarie; Ivers, Noah; Goldstein, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of death across the world and will become increasingly common with an aging population. Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is an evidence-based, nonpharmacological intervention for individuals with COPD, targeting the secondary impairments of the disease. Although the benefits of participation in PR are well established, improvements in exercise tolerance and health status typically deteriorate following discharge. Challenges with long-term adherence to recommended exercise regimens are thought to explain much of this decline. Therefore, we developed a community-based exercise maintenance program for patients with COPD following discharge from PR. Objectives This manuscript (1) outlines the intervention, (2) describes how its effectiveness is being evaluated in a pragmatic randomized controlled trial, and (3) summarizes the embedded process evaluation aiming to understand key barriers and facilitators for implementation in new environments. Methods Participating centers refer eligible individuals with COPD following discharge from their local PR program. Consenting patients are assigned to a year-long community exercise program or usual care using block randomization and stratifying for supplemental oxygen use. Patients in the intervention arm are asked to attend an exercise session at least twice per week at their local community facility where their progress is supervised by a case manager. Each exercise session includes a component of aerobic exercise, and activities designed to optimize balance, flexibility, and strength. All study participants will have access to routine follow-up appointments with their respiratory physician, and additional health care providers as part of their usual care. Assessments will be completed at baseline (post-PR), 6, and 12 months, and include measures of functional exercise capacity, quality of life, self-efficacy, and health care usage. Intervention

  5. Simple technique to evaluate on the ground the energetic expenditure of physical exercise carried out in weightlessness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scano, Aristide

    A simple method is described to evaluate the energetic expenditure of graded muscular exercises carried out on the ground in such a way as to approximate the state of space microgravity. Consumption of O 2 measured at different rates of execution is shown as well as a tentative computation of the mechanical work on the basis of the accelerations impressed alternately on the mass of the trunk and upper limbs. The practicability of the method proposed under space conditions is pointed out; it does not require any ergometer, in fact, but only the fixing of the subject's feet to the floor of the vehicle.

  6. Longitudinal examination of the exercise and self-esteem model in middle-aged women.

    PubMed

    Elavsky, Steriani

    2010-12-01

    This 2-year prospective study examined the exercise and self-esteem model in middle-aged women (N = 143) previously enrolled in a randomized controlled exercise trial. Across the 2-year period, increases in physical activity (PA) and self-efficacy and reductions in body mass index (BMI) were associated with improved subdomain self-perceptions relative to physical condition, and reductions in BMI were associated with improved subdomain self-perceptions relative to physical condition and body attractiveness. The effects of PA, self-efficacy, and BMI on changes in physical self-worth and global self-esteem were mediated by changes in self-perceptions relative to physical condition and body attractiveness. The results of this longitudinal analysis support the hierarchical and multidimensional structure of self-esteem and indicate that middle-aged women can enhance how they perceive their condition and body attractiveness by continued participation in physical activity, increasing their self-efficacy, and maintaining healthy BMI levels. PMID:21282842

  7. Densitography - A new method for evaluation of cardiac performance of rest and during exercise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chirife, R.; Spodick, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    The validity of the densitographic curves obtained from the pinna of the ear for measuring the systolic intervals has been investigated in 28 subjects. This technique is found to permit the performance of noninvasive physiologic studies during physical activities, exercise tests, flight conditions, and probably long-term monitoring of critically ill patients. Densitographic curves constitute an excellent substitute by which to measure time-base intervals of the cardiac cycle when the carotid pulse tracing is not available.

  8. Evaluating the User Experience of Exercising Reaching Motions With a Robot That Predicts Desired Movement Difficulty.

    PubMed

    Shirzad, Navid; Van der Loos, H F Machiel

    2016-01-01

    The notion of an optimal difficulty during practice has been articulated in many areas of cognitive psychology: flow theory, the challenge point framework, and desirable difficulties. Delivering exercises at a participant's desired difficulty has the potential to improve both motor learning and users' engagement in therapy. Motivation and engagement are among the contributing factors to the success of exercise programs. The authors previously demonstrated that error amplification can be used to introduce levels of challenge into a robotic reaching task, and that machine-learning algorithms can dynamically adjust difficulty to the desired level with 85% accuracy. Building on these findings, we present the results of a proof-of-concept study investigating the impacts of practicing under desirable difficulty conditions. A control condition with a predefined random order for difficulty levels was deemed more suitable for this study (compared to constant or continuously increasing difficulty). By practicing the task at their desirable difficulties, participants in the experimental group perceived their performance at a significantly higher level and reported lower required effort to complete the task, in comparison to a control group. Moreover, based on self-reports, participants in the experimental group were willing, on average, to continue the training session for 4.6 more training blocks (∼45 min) compared to the control group's average. This study demonstrates the efficiency of delivering the exercises at the user's desired difficulty level to improve the user's engagement in exercise tasks. Future work will focus on clinical feasibility of this approach in increasing stroke survivors' engagement in their therapy programs. PMID:25945816

  9. Effects of treadmill exercise on hippocampal neurogenesis in an MPTP /probenecid-induced Parkinson’s disease mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Yun-Hee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of treadmill exercise on non-motor function, specifically long-term memory, in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid-induced Parkinson’s disease mouse model. [Methods] A mouse model of Parkinson’s disease was developed by injecting 20 mg/kg of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine and 250 mg/kg of probenecid (P). We divided in into four groups: probenecid group, probenecid-exercise group, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid group, and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid-exercise group. Mice in the exercise groups ran on treadmill for 30 min/day, five times per week for 4 weeks. [Results] Latency in the passive avoidance test increased in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid-exercise group compared with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid group. In addition, the number of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine/NeuN-positive cells and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine/doublecortin-positive cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus was higher in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid-exercise group than that in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid group. These changes were associated with the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the hippocampus. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that treadmill exercise may improve long-term memory in Parkinson’s disease mice by facilitating neurogenesis via increased expression of neurotrophic factors. PMID:26644675

  10. Dual AAV therapy ameliorates exercise-induced muscle injury and functional ischemia in murine models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yadong; Yue, Yongping; Li, Liang; Hakim, Chady H.; Zhang, Keqing; Thomas, Gail D.; Duan, Dongsheng

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) membrane delocalization contributes to the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by promoting functional muscle ischemia and exacerbating muscle injury during exercise. We have previously shown that supra-physiological expression of nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin restores normal blood flow regulation and prevents functional ischemia in transgenic mdx mice, a DMD model. A critical next issue is whether systemic dual adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy can restore nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin expression and mitigate muscle activity-related functional ischemia and injury. Here, we performed systemic gene transfer in mdx and mdx4cv mice using a pair of dual AAV vectors that expressed a 6 kb nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin gene. Vectors were packaged in tyrosine mutant AAV-9 and co-injected (5 × 1012 viral genome particles/vector/mouse) via the tail vein to 1-month-old dystrophin-null mice. Four months later, we observed 30–50% mini-dystrophin positive myofibers in limb muscles. Treatment ameliorated histopathology, increased muscle force and protected against eccentric contraction-induced injury. Importantly, dual AAV therapy successfully prevented chronic exercise-induced muscle force drop. Doppler hemodynamic assay further showed that therapy attenuated adrenergic vasoconstriction in contracting muscle. Our results suggest that partial transduction can still ameliorate nNOS delocalization-associated functional deficiency. Further evaluation of nNOS binding mini-dystrophin dual AAV vectors is warranted in dystrophic dogs and eventually in human patients. PMID:23681067

  11. The Biomechanics of Exercise Countermeasures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavanagh, Peter R.; Arnold, Steven; Derr, Janice; Sharkey, Neil; Wu, Ge

    1999-01-01

    The Penn State Zero-gravity Simulator (PSZS) is a device developed by the Center for Locomotion Studies (CELOS) to enable ground studies of exercise countermeasures for the bone loss that has been shown to occur during long-term exposure to zero gravity (0G). The PSZS simulates 0G exercise by providing a suspension system that holds an individual in a horizontal (supine) position above the floor in order to enable exercise on a wall-mounted treadmill. Due to this orientation, exercise performed in the PSZS is free of the force of -ravity in the direction that would normally contribute to ground reaction forces. In order for movements to be more similar to those in 0G, a constant force suspension of each segment (equal to the segment weight) is provided regardless of limb position. During the preliminary development of the PSZS, CELOS researchers also designed an optional gravity-replacement simulation feature for the PSZS. This feature was a prototype tethering system that consisted of a spring tension system to pull an exercising individual toward the treadmill. The immediate application of the tethering system was to be the provision of gravity-replacement loading so that exercise in 0G- and 1G-loading conditions could be compared, and the PSZS could then be used to evaluate exercise countermeasures for bone loss during space flight. This tethering system would also be a model for the further refinement of gravity-replacement systems provided for astronaut usage while performing prescribed exercise countermeasures for bone loss during long-term space flights.

  12. Abnormal expression of key genes and proteins in the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway of articular cartilage in a rat model of exercise-induced osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    LIU, SHEN-SHEN; ZHOU, PU; ZHANG, YANQIU

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the molecular pathogenesis of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway in exercise-induced osteoarthritis (OA), 30 male healthy Sprague Dawley rats were divided into three groups (control, normal exercise-induced OA and injured exercise-induced OA groups) in order to establish the exercise-induced OA rat model. The mRNA and protein expression levels of Runx-2, BMP-2, Ctnnb1, Sox-9, collagen II, Mmp-13, Wnt-3a and β-catenin in chon-drocytes were detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting and immunohistochemical staining. The mRNA levels of Runx-2, BMP-2 and Ctnnb1 were upregulated in the normal exercise-induced OA and injured exercise-induced OA groups; while Runx-2 and BMP-2 were upregulated in the injured exercise-induced OA group when compared with the normal exercise-induced OA group. The protein levels of Mmp-13, Wnt-3a and β-catenin were increased and collagen II was reduced in the normal exercise-induced OA and injured exercise-induced OA groups. Ctnnb1, Wnt-3a and β-catenin, which are key genes and proteins in the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway, were abnormally expressed in chondrocytes of the exercise-induced OA rat model. Ctnnb1, β-catenin and Wnt-3a were suggested to participate in the pathogenesis of exercise-induced OA by abnormally activating the Wnt/β-catenin pathway during physical exercise due to excessive pressure. The results of the present study may provide an improved understanding of the pathogenesis of exercise-induced OA. PMID:26794964

  13. Exercise improves physical and psychological quality of life in people with depression: A meta-analysis including the evaluation of control group response.

    PubMed

    Schuch, Felipe B; Vancampfort, Davy; Rosenbaum, Simon; Richards, Justin; Ward, Philip B; Stubbs, Brendon

    2016-07-30

    Exercise has established efficacy as an antidepressant in people with depression. However, few meta-analyses have assessed the effects of exercise across different domains of Quality of Life (QoL) in people with depression. Furthermore, there has been no previous meta-analysis of control group response in relation to QoL in exercise trials for depression. Randomized Clinical Trials(RCTs) were initially identified from a Cochrane review, and those including QoL assessments were included in the analysis. Search of major electronic databases were conducted to identify RCTs that compared the exercise effects on QoL versus control condition in people with depression. A random effects meta-analysis was employed to evaluate the Standardized Mean Difference (SMD). Six RCTs were included. Exercise significantly improved physical and psychological domains and overall QoL. Effects on social relationship and environment domains were not significant. No significant control group response was found for any domain or overall QoL. Exercise can be considered as a therapeutic strategy to improve physical and psychological domains and overall QoL of people with depression, with no effect evident across the social and environmental domains. The lack of improvement among control groups reinforces the role of exercise as a treatment for depression with benefits to QoL. PMID:27155287

  14. Effects of exercise training on tumor hypoxia and vascular function in the rodent preclinical orthotopic prostate cancer model.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Danielle J; Nguyen, Linda M-D; Siemann, Dietmar W; Behnke, Bradley J

    2013-12-01

    Regular physical exercise is considered to be an integral component of cancer care strategies. However, the effect of exercise training on tumor microvascular oxygenation, hypoxia, and vascular function, all of which can affect the tumor microenvironment, remains unknown. Using an orthotopic preclinical model of prostate cancer, we tested the hypotheses that, after exercise training, in the tumor, there would be an enhanced microvascular Po2, increased number of patent vessels, and reduced hypoxia. We also investigated tumor resistance artery contractile properties. Dunning R-3327 AT-1 tumor cells (10(4)) were injected into the ventral prostate of 4-5-mo-old male Copenhagen or Nude rats, which were randomly assigned to tumor-bearing exercise trained (TB-Ex trained; n = 15; treadmill exercise for 5-7 wk) or sedentary groups (TB-Sedentary; n = 12). Phosphorescence quenching was used to measure tumor microvascular Po2, and Hoechst-33342 and EF-5 were used to measure patent vessels and tumor hypoxia, respectively. Tumor resistance artery function was assessed in vitro using the isolated microvessel technique. Compared with sedentary counterparts, tumor microvascular Po2 increased ∼100% after exercise training (TB-Sedentary, 6.0 ± 0.3 vs. TB-Ex Trained, 12.2 ± 1.0 mmHg, P < 0.05). Exercise training did not affect the number of patent vessels but did significantly reduce tumor hypoxia in the conscious, resting condition from 39 ± 12% of the tumor area in TB-Sedentary to 4 ± 1% in TB-Ex Trained. Exercise training did not affect vessel contractile function. These results demonstrate that after exercise training, there is a large increase in the driving force of O2 from the tumor microcirculation, which likely contributes to the considerable reduction in tumor hypoxia. These results suggest that exercise training can modulate the microenvironment of the tumor, such that a sustained reduction in tumor hypoxia occurs, which may lead to a less aggressive phenotype and

  15. Questionable Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liemohn, Wendell; Haydu, Traci; Phillips, Dawn

    1999-01-01

    This publication presents general guidelines for exercise prescription that have an anatomical basis but also consider the exerciser's ability to do the exercise correctly. It reviews various common questionable exercises, explaining how some exercises, especially those designed for flexibility and muscle fitness, can cause harm. Safer…

  16. Decisionmaking Context Model for Enhancing Evaluation Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Robert D.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This paper discusses two models that hold promise for helping evaluators understand and cope with different decision contexts: (1) the conflict Model (Janis and Mann, 1977) and the Social Process Model (Vroom and Yago, 1974). Implications and guidelines for using decisionmaking models in evaluation settings are presented. (BS)

  17. A forced running wheel system with a microcontroller that provides high-intensity exercise training in an animal ischemic stroke model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C.C.; Chang, M.W.; Chang, C.P.; Chan, S.C.; Chang, W.Y.; Yang, C.L.; Lin, M.T.

    2014-01-01

    We developed a forced non-electric-shock running wheel (FNESRW) system that provides rats with high-intensity exercise training using automatic exercise training patterns that are controlled by a microcontroller. The proposed system successfully makes a breakthrough in the traditional motorized running wheel to allow rats to perform high-intensity training and to enable comparisons with the treadmill at the same exercise intensity without any electric shock. A polyvinyl chloride runway with a rough rubber surface was coated on the periphery of the wheel so as to permit automatic acceleration training, and which allowed the rats to run consistently at high speeds (30 m/min for 1 h). An animal ischemic stroke model was used to validate the proposed system. FNESRW, treadmill, control, and sham groups were studied. The FNESRW and treadmill groups underwent 3 weeks of endurance running training. After 3 weeks, the experiments of middle cerebral artery occlusion, the modified neurological severity score (mNSS), an inclined plane test, and triphenyltetrazolium chloride were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed platform. The proposed platform showed that enhancement of motor function, mNSS, and infarct volumes was significantly stronger in the FNESRW group than the control group (P<0.05) and similar to the treadmill group. The experimental data demonstrated that the proposed platform can be applied to test the benefit of exercise-preconditioning-induced neuroprotection using the animal stroke model. Additional advantages of the FNESRW system include stand-alone capability, independence of subjective human adjustment, and ease of use. PMID:25140816

  18. Governance of Higher Education in Britain: The Significance of the Research Assessment Exercises for the Funding Council Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapper, Ted; Salter, Brian

    2004-01-01

    This article uses the political struggles that have enveloped the research assessment exercises (RAEs) to interpret the UK's current funding council model of governance. Ironically, the apparently widespread improvement in the research performance of British universities, as demonstrated by RAE 2001, has made it more difficult to distribute…

  19. An Introductory Classroom Exercise on Protein Molecular Model Visualization and Detailed Analysis of Protein-Ligand Binding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poeylaut-Palena, Andres, A.; de los Angeles Laborde, Maria

    2013-01-01

    A learning module for molecular level analysis of protein structure and ligand/drug interaction through the visualization of X-ray diffraction is presented. Using DeepView as molecular model visualization software, students learn about the general concepts of protein structure. This Biochemistry classroom exercise is designed to be carried out by…

  20. How Does an Activity Theory Model Help to Know Better about Teaching with Electronic-Exercise-Bases?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abboud-Blanchard, Maha; Cazes, Claire

    2012-01-01

    The research presented in this paper relies on Activity Theory and particularly on Engestrom's model, to better understand the use of Electronic-Exercise-Bases (EEB) by mathematics teachers. This theory provides a holistic approach to illustrate the complexity of the EEB integration. The results highlight reasons and ways of using EEB and show…

  1. Evaluation of Firefighter Exposure to Wood Smoke during Training Exercises at Burn Houses.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Sujan; Shaw, Lorraine; Shaw, Don; Gallea, Michael; VandenEnden, Lori; House, Ron; Verma, Dave K; Britz-McKibbin, Philip; McCarry, Brian E

    2016-02-01

    Smoke from wood-fueled fires is one of the most common hazards encountered by firefighters worldwide. Wood smoke is complex in nature and contains numerous compounds, including methoxyphenols (MPs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), some of which are carcinogenic. Chronic exposure to wood smoke can lead to adverse health outcomes, including respiratory infections, impaired lung function, cardiac infarctions, and cancers. At training exercises held in burn houses at four fire departments across Ontario, air samples, skin wipes, and urine specimens from a cohort of firefighters (n = 28) were collected prior to and after exposure. Wood was the primary fuel used in these training exercises. Air samples showed that MP concentrations were on average 5-fold greater than those of PAHs. Skin wipe samples acquired from multiple body sites of firefighters indicated whole-body smoke exposure. A suite of MPs (methyl-, ethyl-, and propylsyringol) and deconjugated PAH metabolites (hydroxynaphthalene, hydroxyfluorene, hydroxyphenanthrene, and their isomers) were found to be sensitive markers of smoke exposure in urine. Creatinine-normalized levels of these markers were significantly elevated (p < 0.05) in 24 h postexposure urine despite large between-subject variations that were dependent on the specific operational roles of firefighters while using personal protective equipment. This work offers deeper insight into potential health risk from smoke exposure that is needed for translation of better mitigation policies, including improved equipment to reduce direct skin absorption and standardized hygiene practices implemented at different regional fire services. PMID:26726952

  2. Eye Exercises and Reading Efficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Earl J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Evaluated with a total of 60 primary-grade children was the effectiveness in improving ocular motor control of three training programs: the Bender proprioceptive facilitative feedback exercises, the Marsden ball program, and perceptual exercises. (DB)

  3. [DGRW-update: exercise therapy in medical rehabilitation--effects, quality, perspectives].

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, K; Sudeck, G; Brüggemann, S; Huber, G

    2010-08-01

    Exercise therapy constitutes the better part of rehabilitative treatment. However, in rehabilitation research the scientific analysis of exercise therapy only plays a minor role. Taking the theoretical model of rehabilitation and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) into account, we propose a heuristic model of aims and effects of exercise therapy and define a system of methodological target setting. This system offers a background for an expanded scientific discussion about biopsychosocial determinants and effects of exercise therapy as well as quality development and the evaluation of exercise treatment concepts within and across indications in the context of multimodal medical rehabilitation. PMID:20677118

  4. Beyond Evaluation: A Model for Cooperative Evaluation of Internet Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood, Hal P., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Presents a status report on Web site evaluation efforts, listing dead, merged, new review, Yahoo! wannabes, subject-specific review, former librarian-managed, and librarian-managed review sites; discusses how sites are evaluated; describes and demonstrates (reviewing company directories) the Marr/Kirkwood evaluation model; and provides an…

  5. Developing Useful Evaluation Capability: Lessons From the Model Evaluation Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, John D.; And Others

    The assessment of 12 model evaluation systems provides insight and guidance into their development for government managers and evaluators. The eight individual completed grants are documented in a series of case studies, while the synthesis of all the project experiences and results are summarized. There are things that evaluation systems can do…

  6. Design of the Physical exercise during Adjuvant Chemotherapy Effectiveness Study (PACES):A randomized controlled trial to evaluate effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of physical exercise in improving physical fitness and reducing fatigue

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cancer chemotherapy is frequently associated with a decline in general physical condition, exercise tolerance, and muscle strength and with an increase in fatigue. While accumulating evidence suggests that physical activity and exercise interventions during chemotherapy treatment may contribute to maintaining cardiorespiratory fitness and strength, the results of studies conducted to date have not been consistent. Additional research is needed to determine the optimal intensity of exercise training programs in general and in particular the relative effectiveness of supervised, outpatient (hospital- or physical therapy practice-based) versus home-based programs. Methods This multicenter, prospective, randomized trial will evaluate the effectiveness of a low to moderate intensity, home-based, self-management physical activity program, and a high intensity, structured, supervised exercise program, in maintaining or enhancing physical fitness (cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle strength), in minimizing fatigue and in enhancing the health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy for breast or colon cancer (n = 360) are being recruited from twelve hospitals in the Netherlands, and randomly allocated to one of the two treatment groups or to a 'usual care' control group. Performance-based and self-reported outcomes are assessed at baseline, at the end of chemotherapy and at six month follow-up. Discussion This large, multicenter, randomized clinical trial will provide additional empirical evidence regarding the effectiveness of physical exercise during adjuvant chemotherapy in enhancing physical fitness, minimizing fatigue, and maintaining or enhancing patients' quality of life. If demonstrated to be effective, exercise intervention programs will be a welcome addition to the standard program of care offered to patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy. Trial registration This study is registered at the Netherlands Trial

  7. CSAR Benchmark Exercise 2013: Evaluation of Results from a Combined Computational Protein Design, Docking, and Scoring/Ranking Challenge.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard D; Damm-Ganamet, Kelly L; Dunbar, James B; Ahmed, Aqeel; Chinnaswamy, Krishnapriya; Delproposto, James E; Kubish, Ginger M; Tinberg, Christine E; Khare, Sagar D; Dou, Jiayi; Doyle, Lindsey; Stuckey, Jeanne A; Baker, David; Carlson, Heather A

    2016-06-27

    Community Structure-Activity Resource (CSAR) conducted a benchmark exercise to evaluate the current computational methods for protein design, ligand docking, and scoring/ranking. The exercise consisted of three phases. The first phase required the participants to identify and rank order which designed sequences were able to bind the small molecule digoxigenin. The second phase challenged the community to select a near-native pose of digoxigenin from a set of decoy poses for two of the designed proteins. The third phase investigated the ability of current methods to rank/score the binding affinity of 10 related steroids to one of the designed proteins (pKd = 4.1 to 6.7). We found that 11 of 13 groups were able to correctly select the sequence that bound digoxigenin, with most groups providing the correct three-dimensional structure for the backbone of the protein as well as all atoms of the active-site residues. Eleven of the 14 groups were able to select the appropriate pose from a set of plausible decoy poses. The ability to predict absolute binding affinities is still a difficult task, as 8 of 14 groups were able to correlate scores to affinity (Pearson-r > 0.7) of the designed protein for congeneric steroids and only 5 of 14 groups were able to correlate the ranks of the 10 related ligands (Spearman-ρ > 0.7). PMID:26419257

  8. Flow for Exercise Adherence: Testing an Intrinsic Model of Health Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petosa, R. Lingyak; Holtz, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Background: Health behavior theory generally does not include intrinsic motivation as a determinate of health practices. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test the flow theory of exercise adherence. Flow theory posits that exercise can be intrinsically rewarding if the experiences of self/time transcendence and control/mastery are achieved…

  9. Health Professionals' Perspectives on Exercise Referral and Physical Activity Promotion in Primary Care: Findings from a Process Evaluation of the National Exercise Referral Scheme in Wales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Din, Nafees U.; Moore, Graham F.; Murphy, Simon; Wilkinson, Clare; Williams, Nefyn H.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives: Referring clinicians' experiences of exercise referral schemes (ERS) can provide valuable insights into their uptake. However, most qualitative studies focus on patient views only. This paper explores health professionals' perceptions of their role in promoting physical activity and experiences of a National Exercise…

  10. The Northeast U.S. continental shelf Energy Modeling and Analysis exercise (EMAX): Ecological network model development and basic ecosystem metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, Jason; Overholtz, William; O'Reilly, John; Green, Jack; Dow, David; Palka, Debra; Legault, Chris; Vitaliano, Joseph; Guida, Vincent; Fogarty, Michael; Brodziak, Jon; Methratta, Lisa; Stockhausen, William; Griswold, Laurel and Carolyn, Col

    2008-11-01

    During the past half-century notable changes have occurred in the Northeast U.S. (NEUS) Continental Shelf Large Marine Ecosystem (LME). To understand how the system functions as a whole, to evaluate the potential responses of this ecosystem to numerous human-induced perturbations, and to elucidate the relative magnitude of key biota and processes, the Northeast Fisheries Science Center instituted the Energy Modeling and Analysis eXercise (EMAX). The primary goal of EMAX was to establish an ecological network model (i.e., a more nuanced energy budget) of the entire Northeast U.S. food web. The EMAX work focused on the interdisciplinary development of a network model which reflected contemporary conditions (1996-2000) in four major regions of the ecosystem:, Gulf of Maine, Georges Bank, Southern New England and Middle Atlantic Bight. The model had 36 network "nodes" or biomass state variables across a broad range of the biological hierarchy within each trophic level and incorporated a wide range of key rate processes. Because this ecosystem has been relatively well studied many of the biomass estimates were based on field measurements and biomass estimates from the scientific literature were required only for a relatively small number of nodes. The emphasis of EMAX was to explore the particular role of small pelagic fishes in the ecosystem. Our results show that small pelagic fishes are indeed keystone species in the ecosystem. We examined a suite of novel ecosystem metrics as we compared the four regions and provided a general, system-level description of the NEUS ecosystem. The general patterns of the network properties in the four regions were similar; however the network indices and metrics did reveal some noteworthy differences among regions reflecting their different oceanographic and faunal characteristics. The process of compiling and evaluating available data required by an ecosystem network model identified important gaps in our understanding which should

  11. Evaluation of the Best-designed Graded Exercise Test to Assess Peak Treadmill Speed.

    PubMed

    Peserico, C S; Zagatto, A M; Machado, F A

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the influence of different speed increments during treadmill exercise tests on peak treadmill speed (Vpeak) and its relationship with a 1-h treadmill running performance. 18 male recreational and amateur runners (10-km running pace: 10-15 km·h(-1)) performed, in an alternate order, 3 continuous incremental exercise tests with different speed increments (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 km·h(-1)) on a motorized treadmill to determine Vpeak. Thereafter they undertook a 1-h time trial on a treadmill. Vpeak was determined as either (a) the highest speed that could be maintained for a complete minute (Vpeak-60 s), (b) the speed of the last complete stage (Vpeak-C), or (c) the speed of the last complete stage added to the product of the speed increment and the completed fraction of the incomplete stage (Vpeak-P). The Vpeak values were highly influenced by the different speed-incremented rates and the Vpeak-P determined during the protocol comprising speed increments of 1 km·h(-1) presented the highest correlation with 1-h time trial performance (r=0.89). The results suggest that a protocol with speed increments comprising 1 km·h(-1) and with a 3-min stage duration should be used as standard for the determination of Vpeak to assess aerobic fitness and predict endurance performance in recreational runners. Furthermore, the Vpeak-P should be used for the determination of Vpeak. PMID:25875318

  12. Exercise therapy normalizes BDNF upregulation and glial hyperactivity in a mouse model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Cayo; DeMaman, Aline; Kusuda, Ricardo; Cadetti, Flaviane; Ravanelli, Maria Ida; Queiroz, André L; Sousa, Thais A; Zanon, Sonia; Silveira, Leonardo R; Lucas, Guilherme

    2015-03-01

    Treatment of neuropathic pain is a clinical challenge likely because of the time-dependent changes in many neurotransmitter systems, growth factors, ionic channels, membrane receptors, transcription factors, and recruitment of different cell types. Conversely, an increasing number of reports have shown the ability of extended and regular physical exercise in alleviating neuropathic pain throughout a wide range of mechanisms. In this study, we investigate the effect of swim exercise on molecules associated with initiation and maintenance of nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain. BALB/c mice were submitted to partial ligation of the sciatic nerve followed by a 5-week aerobic exercise program. Physical training reversed mechanical hypersensitivity, which lasted for an additional 4 weeks after exercise interruption. Swim exercise normalized nerve injury-induced nerve growth factor, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhanced expression in the dorsal root ganglion, but had no effect on the glial-derived neurotrophic factor. However, only BDNF remained at low levels after exercise interruption. In addition, exercise training significantly reduced the phosphorylation status of PLCγ-1, but not CREB, in the spinal cord dorsal horn in response to nerve injury. Finally, prolonged swim exercise reversed astrocyte and microglia hyperactivity in the dorsal horn after nerve lesion, which remained normalized after training cessation. Together, these results demonstrate that exercise therapy induces long-lasting analgesia through various mechanisms associated with the onset and advanced stages of neuropathy. Moreover, the data support further studies to clarify whether appropriate exercise intensity, volume, and duration can also cause long-lasting pain relief in patients with neuropathic pain. PMID:25687543

  13. Endurance exercise ameliorates low birthweight developed catch-up growth related metabolic dysfunctions in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ju, Liping; Tong, Wenxin; Qiu, Miaoyan; Shen, Weili; Sun, Jichao; Chen, Ying; Li, Zhen; Wang, Weiqing; Tian, Jingyan

    2016-03-31

    Low birthweight is known to predict high risk of metabolic diseases in adulthood, while regular endurance exercises are believed sufficient to improve metabolic dysfunction. In this study, we established a mouse model to determine whether long-term exercise training could ameliorate catch-up growth, and we explored the possible underlying mechanisms. By restricting maternal food intake during the last week of gestation, we successfully produced low birthweight pups. Further, normal birthweight mice and low birthweight mice were randomly distributed into one of three groups receiving either a normal fat diet, high fat diet, or high fat diet with exercise training. The growth/metabolism, mitochondrial content and functions were assessed at 6 months of age. Through group comparisons and correlation analyses, the 4th week was demonstrated to be the period of crucial growth and chosen to be the precise point of intervention, as the growth rate at this point is significantly correlated with body weight, intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT), Lee's index and fat mass in adulthood. In addition, regular endurance exercises when started from 4 weeks remarkably ameliorated low birthweight outcomes and induced catch-up growth and glucose intolerance in the 25th week. Furthermore, real-time PCR and western blot results indicated that the effect of long-term exercise on mitochondrial functions alleviated catch-up related metabolic dysfunction. To conclude, long-term exercise training from the 4th week is sufficient to ameliorate catch-up growth and related metabolic disturbances in adulthood by promoting mitochondrial functions in skeletal muscle. PMID:26842396

  14. Exercise training normalizes mitochondrial respiratory capacity within the striatum of the R6/1 model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Herbst, E A F; Holloway, G P

    2015-09-10

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive cell loss in the striatum and cerebral cortex, leading to a decline in motor control and eventually death. The mechanisms promoting motor dysfunction are not known, however loss of mitochondrial function and content has been observed, suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction may contribute to HD phenotype. Recent work has demonstrated that voluntary wheel running reduces hindlimb clasping in the R6/1 mouse model of HD, which we hypothesized may be due to preservation of mitochondrial content with exercise. Therefore, we investigated the role of chronic exercise training on preventing symptom progression and the loss of mitochondrial content in HD. Exercising R6/1 mice began training at 7 wks of age and continued for 10 or 20 wks. At 17 wks of age, R6/1 mice displayed a clasping phenotype without showing changes in mitochondrial respiration or protein content in either the cortex or striatum, suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction is not necessary for the progression of symptoms. At 27 wks of age, R6/1 mice demonstrated no additional changes in mitochondrial content or respiration within the cortex, but displayed loss of protein in complexes I and III of the striatum, which was not present in exercise-trained R6/1 mice. Mitochondrial respiration was also elevated in the striatum of R6/1 mice at 27 wks, which was prevented with exercise training. Together, the present study provides evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction is not necessary for the progression of hindlimb clasping in R6/1 mice, and that exercise partially prevents changes in mitochondrial content and function that occur late in HD. PMID:26186895

  15. Predicting VO2peak from Submaximal- and Peak Exercise Models: The HUNT 3 Fitness Study, Norway

    PubMed Central

    Loe, Henrik; Nes, Bjarne M.; Wisløff, Ulrik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) is seldom assessed in health care settings although being inversely linked to cardiovascular risk and all-cause mortality. The aim of this study was to develop VO2peak prediction models for men and women based on directly measured VO2peak from a large healthy population Methods VO2peak prediction models based on submaximal- and peak performance treadmill work were derived from multiple regression analysis. 4637 healthy men and women aged 20–90 years were included. Data splitting was used to generate validation and cross-validation samples. Results The accuracy for the peak performance models were 10.5% (SEE = 4.63 mL⋅kg-1⋅min-1) and 11.5% (SEE = 4.11 mL⋅kg-1⋅min-1) for men and women, respectively, with 75% and 72% of the variance explained. For the submaximal performance models accuracy were 14.1% (SEE = 6.24 mL⋅kg-1⋅min-1) and 14.4% (SEE = 5.17 mL⋅kg-1⋅min-1) for men and women, respectively, with 55% and 56% of the variance explained. The validation and cross-validation samples displayed SEE and variance explained in agreement with the total sample. Cross-classification between measured and predicted VO2peak accurately classified 91% of the participants within the correct or nearest quintile of measured VO2peak. Conclusion Judicious use of the exercise prediction models presented in this study offers valuable information in providing a fairly accurate assessment of VO2peak, which may be beneficial for risk stratification in health care settings. PMID:26794677

  16. Modelling the lactate response to short-term all out exercise

    PubMed Central

    Beneke, Ralph; Jumah, Masen D; Leithäuser, Renate M

    2007-01-01

    Background The maximum post exercise blood lactate concentration (BLCmax) has been positively correlated with maximal short-term exercise (MSE) performance. However, the moment when BLCmax occurs (TBLCmax) is rather unpredictable and interpretation of BLC response to MSE is therefore difficult. Methods We compared a 3- and a 4-parameter model for the analysis of the dynamics of BLC response to MSEs lasting 10 (MSE10) and 30 s (MSE30) in eleven males (24.6 ± 2.3 yrs; 182.4 ± 6.8 cm; 75.1 ± 9.4 kg). The 3-parameter model uses BLC at MSE-start, extra-vascular increase (A) and rate constants of BLC appearance (k1) and disappearance (k2). The 4-parameter model includes BLC at MSE termination and amplitudes and rate constants of increase (A1, y1) and decrease (A2, y2) of post MSE-BLC. Results Both models consistently explained 93.69 % or more of the variance of individual BLC responses. Reduction of the number of parameters decreased (p < 0.05) the goodness of the fit in every MSE10 and in 3 MSE30. A (9.1 ± 2.1 vs. 15.3 ± 2.1 mmol l-1) and A1 (7.1 ± 1.6 vs. 10.9 ± 2.0 mmol l-1) were lower (p < 0.05) in MSE10 than in MSE30. k1 (0.610 ± 0.119 vs. 0.505 ± 0.107 min-1), k2 (4.21 10-2 ± 1.06 10-2 vs. 2.45 10-2 ± 1.04 10-2 min-1), and A2 (-563.8 ± 370.8 vs. -1412.6 ± 868.8 mmol l-1), and y1 (0.579 ± 0.137 vs. 0.489 ± 0.076 min-1) were higher (p < 0.05) in MSE10 than in MSE30. No corresponding difference in y2 (0.41 10-2 ± 0.82 10-2 vs. 0.15 10-2 ± 0.42 10-2 min-1) was found. Conclusion The 3-parameter model estimates of lactate appearance and disappearance were sensitive to differences in test duration and support an interrelation between BLC level and halftime of lactate elimination previously found. The 4-parameter model results support the 3-parameter model findings about lactate appearance; however, parameter estimates for lactate disappearance were unrealistic in the 4-parameter model. The 3-parameter model provides useful information about the dynamics

  17. Complex network models reveal correlations among network metrics, exercise intensity and role of body changes in the fatigue process

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Vanessa Helena; Gama, Maria Carolina Traina; Sousa, Filipe Antônio Barros; Lewis, Theodore Gyle; Gobatto, Claudio Alexandre; Manchado - Gobatto, Fúlvia Barros

    2015-01-01

    The aims of the present study were analyze the fatigue process at distinct intensity efforts and to investigate its occurrence as interactions at distinct body changes during exercise, using complex network models. For this, participants were submitted to four different running intensities until exhaustion, accomplished in a non-motorized treadmill using a tethered system. The intensities were selected according to critical power model. Mechanical (force, peak power, mean power, velocity and work) and physiological related parameters (heart rate, blood lactate, time until peak blood lactate concentration (lactate time), lean mass, anaerobic and aerobic capacities) and IPAQ score were obtained during exercises and it was used to construction of four complex network models. Such models have both, theoretical and mathematical value, and enables us to perceive new insights that go beyond conventional analysis. From these, we ranked the influences of each node at the fatigue process. Our results shows that nodes, links and network metrics are sensibility according to increase of efforts intensities, been the velocity a key factor to exercise maintenance at models/intensities 1 and 2 (higher time efforts) and force and power at models 3 and 4, highlighting mechanical variables in the exhaustion occurrence and even training prescription applications. PMID:25994386

  18. Complex network models reveal correlations among network metrics, exercise intensity and role of body changes in the fatigue process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Vanessa Helena; Gama, Maria Carolina Traina; Sousa, Filipe Antônio Barros; Lewis, Theodore Gyle; Gobatto, Claudio Alexandre; Manchado-Gobatto, Fúlvia Barros

    2015-05-01

    The aims of the present study were analyze the fatigue process at distinct intensity efforts and to investigate its occurrence as interactions at distinct body changes during exercise, using complex network models. For this, participants were submitted to four different running intensities until exhaustion, accomplished in a non-motorized treadmill using a tethered system. The intensities were selected according to critical power model. Mechanical (force, peak power, mean power, velocity and work) and physiological related parameters (heart rate, blood lactate, time until peak blood lactate concentration (lactate time), lean mass, anaerobic and aerobic capacities) and IPAQ score were obtained during exercises and it was used to construction of four complex network models. Such models have both, theoretical and mathematical value, and enables us to perceive new insights that go beyond conventional analysis. From these, we ranked the influences of each node at the fatigue process. Our results shows that nodes, links and network metrics are sensibility according to increase of efforts intensities, been the velocity a key factor to exercise maintenance at models/intensities 1 and 2 (higher time efforts) and force and power at models 3 and 4, highlighting mechanical variables in the exhaustion occurrence and even training prescription applications.

  19. Complex network models reveal correlations among network metrics, exercise intensity and role of body changes in the fatigue process.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Vanessa Helena; Gama, Maria Carolina Traina; Sousa, Filipe Antônio Barros; Lewis, Theodore Gyle; Gobatto, Claudio Alexandre; Manchado-Gobatto, Fúlvia Barros

    2015-01-01

    The aims of the present study were analyze the fatigue process at distinct intensity efforts and to investigate its occurrence as interactions at distinct body changes during exercise, using complex network models. For this, participants were submitted to four different running intensities until exhaustion, accomplished in a non-motorized treadmill using a tethered system. The intensities were selected according to critical power model. Mechanical (force, peak power, mean power, velocity and work) and physiological related parameters (heart rate, blood lactate, time until peak blood lactate concentration (lactate time), lean mass, anaerobic and aerobic capacities) and IPAQ score were obtained during exercises and it was used to construction of four complex network models. Such models have both, theoretical and mathematical value, and enables us to perceive new insights that go beyond conventional analysis. From these, we ranked the influences of each node at the fatigue process. Our results shows that nodes, links and network metrics are sensibility according to increase of efforts intensities, been the velocity a key factor to exercise maintenance at models/intensities 1 and 2 (higher time efforts) and force and power at models 3 and 4, highlighting mechanical variables in the exhaustion occurrence and even training prescription applications. PMID:25994386

  20. Updating ACSM's Recommendations for Exercise Preparticipation Health Screening.

    PubMed

    Riebe, Deborah; Franklin, Barry A; Thompson, Paul D; Garber, Carol Ewing; Whitfield, Geoffrey P; Magal, Meir; Pescatello, Linda S

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of the American College of Sports Medicine's (ACSM) exercise preparticipation health screening process is to identify individuals who may be at elevated risk for exercise-related sudden cardiac death and/or acute myocardial infarction. Recent studies have suggested that using the current ACSM exercise preparticipation health screening guidelines can result in excessive physician referrals, possibly creating a barrier to exercise participation. In addition, there is considerable evidence that exercise is safe for most people and has many associated health and fitness benefits; exercise-related cardiovascular events are often preceded by warning signs/symptoms; and the cardiovascular risks associated with exercise lessen as individuals become more physically active/fit. Consequently, a scientific roundtable was convened by the ACSM in June 2014 to evaluate the current exercise preparticipation health screening recommendations. The roundtable proposed a new evidence-informed model for exercise preparticipation health screening on the basis of three factors: 1) the individual's current level of physical activity, 2) presence of signs or symptoms and/or known cardiovascular, metabolic, or renal disease, and 3) desired exercise intensity, as these variables have been identified as risk modulators of exercise-related cardiovascular events. Identifying cardiovascular disease risk factors remains an important objective of overall disease prevention and management, but risk factor profiling is no longer included in the exercise preparticipation health screening process. The new ACSM exercise preparticipation health screening recommendations reduce possible unnecessary barriers to adopting and maintaining a regular exercise program, a lifestyle of habitual physical activity, or both, and thereby emphasize the important public health message that regular physical activity is important for all individuals. PMID:26473759

  1. Exercise Prescription.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribisl, Paul M.

    If exercise programs are to become effective in producing the desired results, then the correct exercise prescription must be applied. Four variables should be controlled in the prescription of exercise: (a) type of activity, (b) intensity, (c) duration, and (d) frequency. The long-term prescription of exercise involves the use of a (a) starter…

  2. Evaluation of COSMO-ART in the Framework of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Lea; Brunner, Dominik; Im, Ulas; Galmarini, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    The Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) coordinated by the EC-JRC and US-EPA, promotes since 2008 research on regional air quality model evaluation across the atmospheric modelling communities of Europe and North America. AQMEII has now reached its Phase 2 that is dedicated to the evaluation of on-line coupled chemistry-meteorology models as opposed to Phase 1 where only off-line models were considered. At European level, AQMEII collaborates with the COST Action "European framework for on-line integrated air quality and meteorology modelling" (EuMetChem). All European groups participating in AQMEII performed simulations over the same spatial domain (Europe at a resolution of about 20 km) and using the same simulation strategy (e.g. no nudging allowed) and the same input data as much as possible. The initial and boundary conditions (IC/BC) were shared between all groups. Emissions were provided by the TNO-MACC database for anthropogenic emissions and the FMI database for biomass burning emissions. Chemical IC/BC data were taken from IFS-MOZART output, and meteorological IC/BC from the ECWMF global model. Evaluation data sets were collected by the Joint Research Center (JRC) and include measurements from surface in situ networks (AirBase and EMEP), vertical profiles from ozone sondes and aircraft (MOZAIC), and remote sensing (AERONET, satellites). Since Phase 2 focuses on on-line coupled models, a special effort is devoted to the detailed speciation of particulate matter components, with the goal of studying feedback processes. For the AQMEII exercise, COSMO-ART has been run with 40 levels of vertical resolution, and a chemical scheme that includes the SCAV module of Knote and Brunner (ACP 2013) for wet-phase chemistry and the SOA treatment according to VBS (volatility basis set) approach (Athanasopoulou et al., ACP 2013). The COSMO-ART evaluation shows that, next to a good performance in the meteorology, the gas phase chemistry is well

  3. Modeling the benefits of an artificial gravity countermeasure coupled with exercise and vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Rahul; Kaderka, Justin; Newman, Dava

    2012-01-01

    The current, system-specific countermeasures to space deconditioning have limited success with the musculoskeletal system in long duration missions. Artificial gravity (AG) that is produced by short radius centrifugation has been hypothesized as an effective countermeasure because it reintroduces an acceleration field in space; however, AG alone might not be enough stimuli to preserve the musculoskeletal system. A novel combination of AG coupled with one-legged squats on a vibrating platform may preserve muscle and bone in the lower limbs to a greater extent than the current exercise paradigm. The benefits of the proposed countermeasure have been analyzed through the development of a simulation platform. Ground reaction force data and motion data were collected using a motion capture system while performing one-legged and two-legged squats in 1-G. The motion was modeled in OpenSim, an open-source software, and inverse dynamics were applied in order to determine the muscle and reaction forces of lower limb joints. Vibration stimulus was modeled by adding a 20 Hz sinusoidal force of 0.5 body weight to the force plate data. From the numerical model in a 1-G acceleration field, muscle forces for quadriceps femoris, plantar flexors and glutei increased substantially for one-legged squats with vibration compared to one- or two-legged squats without vibration. Additionally, joint reaction forces for one-legged squats with vibration also increased significantly compared to two-legged squats with or without vibration. Higher muscle forces and joint reaction forces might help to stimulate muscle activation and bone modeling and thus might reduce musculoskeletal deconditioning. These results indicate that the proposed countermeasure might surpass the performance of the current space countermeasures and should be further studied as a method of mitigating musculoskeletal deconditioning.

  4. The EMEFS model evaluation. An interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Barchet, W.R.; Dennis, R.L.; Seilkop, S.K.; Banic, C.M.; Davies, D.; Hoff, R.M.; Macdonald, A.M.; Mickle, R.E.; Padro, J.; Puckett, K.; Byun, D.; McHenry, J.N.; Karamchandani, P.; Venkatram, A.; Fung, C.; Misra, P.K.; Hansen, D.A.; Chang, J.S.

    1991-12-01

    The binational Eulerian Model Evaluation Field Study (EMEFS) consisted of several coordinated data gathering and model evaluation activities. In the EMEFS, data were collected by five air and precipitation monitoring networks between June 1988 and June 1990. Model evaluation is continuing. This interim report summarizes the progress made in the evaluation of the Regional Acid Deposition Model (RADM) and the Acid Deposition and Oxidant Model (ADOM) through the December 1990 completion of a State of Science and Technology report on model evaluation for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). Because various assessment applications of RADM had to be evaluated for NAPAP, the report emphasizes the RADM component of the evaluation. A protocol for the evaluation was developed by the model evaluation team and defined the observed and predicted values to be used and the methods by which the observed and predicted values were to be compared. Scatter plots and time series of predicted and observed values were used to present the comparisons graphically. Difference statistics and correlations were used to quantify model performance. 64 refs., 34 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. The small-molecule fast skeletal troponin activator, CK-2127107, improves exercise tolerance in a rat model of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hwee, Darren T; Kennedy, Adam R; Hartman, James J; Ryans, Julie; Durham, Nickie; Malik, Fady I; Jasper, Jeffrey R

    2015-04-01

    Heart failure-mediated skeletal myopathy, which is characterized by muscle atrophy and muscle metabolism dysfunction, often manifests as dyspnea and limb muscle fatigue. We have previously demonstrated that increasing Ca(2+) sensitivity of the sarcomere by a small-molecule fast skeletal troponin activator improves skeletal muscle force and exercise performance in healthy rats and models of neuromuscular disease. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a novel fast skeletal troponin activator, CK-2127107 (2-aminoalkyl-5-N-heteroarylpyrimidine), on skeletal muscle function and exercise performance in rats exhibiting heart failure-mediated skeletal myopathy. Rats underwent a left anterior descending coronary artery ligation, resulting in myocardial infarction and a progressive decline in cardiac function [left anterior descending coronary artery heart failure (LAD-HF)]. Compared with sham-operated control rats, LAD-HF rat hindlimb and diaphragm muscles exhibited significant muscle atrophy. Fatigability was increased during repeated in situ isokinetic plantar flexor muscle contractions. CK-2127107 produced a leftward shift in the force-Ca(2+) relationship of skinned, single diaphragm, and extensor digitorum longus fibers. Exercise performance, which was assessed by rotarod running, was lower in vehicle-treated LAD-HF rats than in sham controls (116 ± 22 versus 193 ± 31 seconds, respectively; mean ± S.E.M.; P = 0.04). In the LAD-HF rats, a single oral dose of CK-2127107 (10 mg/kg p.o.) increased running time compared with vehicle treatment (283 ± 47 versus 116 ± 22 seconds; P = 0.0004). In summary, CK-2127107 substantially increases exercise performance in this heart failure model, suggesting that modulation of skeletal muscle function by a fast skeletal troponin activator may be a useful therapeutic in heart failure-associated exercise intolerance. PMID:25678535

  6. Ensemble evaluation of hydrological model hypotheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Tobias; Freer, Jim; Quinton, John N.; MacLeod, Christopher J. A.; Bilotta, Gary S.; Brazier, Richard E.; Butler, Patricia; Haygarth, Philip M.

    2010-07-01

    It is demonstrated for the first time how model parameter, structural and data uncertainties can be accounted for explicitly and simultaneously within the Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) methodology. As an example application, 72 variants of a single soil moisture accounting store are tested as simplified hypotheses of runoff generation at six experimental grassland field-scale lysimeters through model rejection and a novel diagnostic scheme. The fields, designed as replicates, exhibit different hydrological behaviors which yield different model performances. For fields with low initial discharge levels at the beginning of events, the conceptual stores considered reach their limit of applicability. Conversely, one of the fields yielding more discharge than the others, but having larger data gaps, allows for greater flexibility in the choice of model structures. As a model learning exercise, the study points to a "leaking" of the fields not evident from previous field experiments. It is discussed how understanding observational uncertainties and incorporating these into model diagnostics can help appreciate the scale of model structural error.

  7. Evaluating modeling tools for the EDOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoble, Gordon; Mccaleb, Frederick; Aslam, Tanweer; Nester, Paul

    1994-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Operations System (EDOS) Project is developing a functional, system performance model to support the system implementation phase of the EDOS which is being designed and built by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The EDOS Project will use modeling to meet two key objectives: (1) manage system design impacts introduced by unplanned changed in mission requirements; and (2) evaluate evolutionary technology insertions throughout the development of the EDOS. To select a suitable modeling tool, the EDOS modeling team developed an approach for evaluating modeling tools and languages by deriving evaluation criteria from both the EDOS modeling requirements and the development plan. Essential and optional features for an appropriate modeling tool were identified and compared with known capabilities of several modeling tools. Vendors were also provided the opportunity to model a representative EDOS processing function to demonstrate the applicability of their modeling tool to the EDOS modeling requirements. This paper emphasizes the importance of using a well defined approach for evaluating tools to model complex systems like the EDOS. The results of this evaluation study do not in any way signify the superiority of any one modeling tool since the results will vary with the specific modeling requirements of each project.

  8. Exercise Effects on Early Vocal Ultrasonic Communication Dysfunction in a PINK1 Knockout Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kelm-Nelson, Cynthia A.; Yang, Katie M.; Ciucci, Michelle R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a complex neurodegenerative disease with vocal communication deficits that manifest early, progress, and are largely resistant to medical interventions; however, they do respond to exercise-based speech and voice therapies. Objective and Methods To study how exercise-based vocal treatment can affect the progression of communication deficits related to PD, we studied ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) in rats with homozygous knockout (−/−) of PINK1, a gene mutation known to cause PD, under the manipulation of a behavioral vocal exercise paradigm that allows us to precisely control dose and timing of exercise in the prodromal (prior to diagnosis) stages. Results We show that intensive vocal-training rescues frequency range and intensity deficits as well as leads to an increase in call complexity and duration of calls compared to sham-training; however, over time this training regime loses significant effect as the disease progresses. We also show effects of frequent handling and conspecific (male-female) interaction in the sham-training group as they demonstrated significantly higher call rate, intensity, frequency range, and call complexity compared to rats without any form of training and consequently less handling/interaction. Further, we confirm that this model exhibits progressive gross motor deficits that indicate neurodegeneration. Discussion This study suggests that the evolving nature of vocal communication deficits requires an adjustment of therapy targets and more intensive training over the course of this progressive disease and demonstrates the importance of frequent social experiences. PMID:26577653

  9. A Model for Administrative Evaluation by Subordinates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budig, Jeanne E.

    Under the administrator evaluation program adopted at Vincennes University, all faculty and professional staff are invited to evaluate each administrator above them in the chain of command. Originally based on the Purdue University "cafeteria" system, this evaluation model has been used biannually for 10 years. In an effort to simplify the system,…

  10. Growth of Microbial Populations. Mathematical Modeling, Laboratory Exercises, and Model-Based Data Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juska, Alfonsas; Gedminiene, Genovaite; Ivanec, Ruta

    2006-01-01

    This paper has arisen as a result of teaching Models in Biology to undergraduates of Bioengineering at the Gediminas Technical University of Vilnius. The aim is to teach the students to use a fresh approach to the problems they are familiar with, to come up with an articulate verbal model after a mental effort, to express it in rigorous…

  11. Exercise testing and thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in the clinical evaluation of patients with Wolff Parkinson White syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Poyatos, M.E.; Suarez, L.; Lerman, J.; Guibourg, H.; Camps, J.; Perosio, A.

    1986-10-01

    In 58 patients with Wolff Parkinson White syndrome (WPW), we performed exercise stress testing in order to investigate the incidence of normalization of the auriculo-ventricular conduction and the ST-segment changes. For a more accurate evaluation of the latter, exercise and redistribution radionuclide images with Thallium-201 were obtained in 18 cases. Forty-nine had type A and nine had type B of WPW. Forty-eight had permanent, four had alternant and six had no pre-excitation (PE) when they started the test. Mean maximal functional capacity, mean maximal heart rate and mean maximal double product were not different when compared to an age-matched control group. Of the 48 patients who began the test with PE, in 23 (48%) it disappeared while PE persisted in 25 (52%). In 16 cases the disappearance of the PE was sudden and in seven it was progressive. Pre-excitation persisted in 39.5% of patients with type A and in 88.8% with type B (p less than 0.01). ST-segment depression was observed in 76.6% of patients with PE and in 28.6% of cases without PE (p less than 0.01). ST-segment depression occurred in 44.8% of patients with type A and in 100% of cases with type B (p less than 0.05). Transient abnormal Thallium-201 scans were observed in 62.5% of patients without PE and in 20% with PE. No patients showed exertional arrhythmias. This study suggests the possibility of measuring the duration of the refractory period of the accessory pathway in those patients n which the PE disappears suddenly, at a given heart rate.

  12. COPD: benefits of exercise training.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    In patients with stable, moderate or severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), general exercise training, including limb exercises, provides sustained improvement in various quality of life domains, compared with care without pulmonary rehabilitation. After a COPD exacerbation, exercise training appears to reduce the risk of hospitalisation in the following months by at least half. Few studies have evaluated the adverse effects of exercise training in COPD, but based on the data available in 2015, its harm-benefit balance appears favourable. PMID:27152405

  13. An Evaluation of the Efficacy of a Laboratory Exercise on Cellular Respiration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholer, Anne-Marie; Hatton, Mary

    2008-01-01

    This study is an analysis of the effectiveness of a faculty-designed laboratory experience about a difficult topic, cellular respiration. The activity involves a hands-on model of the cellular-respiration process, making use of wooden ball-and-stick chemistry models and small toy trucks on a table top model of the mitochondrion. Students…

  14. Reducing Societal Obesity: Establishing a Separate Exercise Model through Studies of Group Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Puterbaugh, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    The past 50 years has brought attention to high and increasing levels of human obesity in most of the industrialized world. The medical profession has noticed, has evaluated, and has developed models for studying, preventing, and reversing obesity. The current model prescribes activity in specific quantities such as days, minutes, heart rates, and footfalls. Although decreased levels of activity have come from changes revolving around built environments and social networks, the existing medical model to lower body weights by increasing activity remains individually prescriptive. It is not working. The study of societal obesity precludes the individual and must involve group behavioral studies. Such studies necessitate acquiring separate tools and, therefore, require a significant change in the evaluation and treatment of obesity. Finding groups with common activities and lower levels of obesity would allow the development of new models of land use and encourage active lifestyles through shared interests. PMID:27429800

  15. The impact of voluntary exercise on relative telomere length in a rat model of developmental stress

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Exposure to early adverse events can result in the development of later psychopathology, and is often associated with cognitive impairment. This may be due to accelerated cell aging, which can be catalogued by attritioned telomeres. Exercise enhances neurogenesis and has been proposed to buffer the effect of psychological stress on telomere length. This study aimed to investigate the impact of early developmental stress and voluntary exercise on telomere length in the ventral hippocampus (VH) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) of the rat. Forty-five male Sprague–Dawley rats were categorised into four groups: maternally separated runners (MSR), maternally separated non-runners (MSnR), non-maternally separated runners (nMSR) and non-maternally separated non-runners (nMSnR). Behavioural analyses were conducted to assess anxiety-like behaviour and memory performance in the rats, after which relative telomere length was measured using qPCR. Results Maternally separated (MS) rats exhibited no significant differences in either anxiety levels or memory performance on the elevated-plus maze and the open field compared to non-maternally separated rats at 49 days of age. Exercised rats displayed increased levels of anxiety on the day that they were removed from the cages with attached running wheels, as well as improved spatial learning and temporal recognition memory compared to non-exercised rats. Exploratory post-hoc analyses revealed that maternally separated non-exercised rats exhibited significantly longer telomere length in the VH compared to those who were not maternally separated; however, exercise appeared to cancel this effect since there was no difference in VH telomere length between maternally separated and non-maternally separated runners. Conclusions The increased telomere length in the VH of maternally separated non-exercised rats may be indicative of reduced cellular proliferation, which could, in turn, indicate hippocampal dysfunction. This effect on

  16. Exercise in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rajarajeswaran, P.; Vishnupriya, R.

    2009-01-01

    Physical exercise has attracted increased interest in rehabilitation of oncological patients. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature and summarize the evidence of physical exercise in preventing cancer, its ability in attenuating the effect of cancer and its treatments and to provide guidelines for exercise prescription Review of recent literature by electronic search of MEDline (Pub Med), Cancer lit, Cochrane libraries, CINAHL were done using Keywords and the variables were identified and systematically evaluated. There is strong evidence for reduced risk of colorectal and breast cancer with possible association for prostate, endometrial and lung cancer with increasing physical activity. Exercise helps cancer survivors cope with and recover from treatment; exercise may improve the health of long term cancer survivors and extend survival. Physical exercise will benefit throughout the spectrum of cancer. However, an understanding of the amount, type and intensity of exercise needed has not been fully elucidated. There is sufficient evidence to promote exercise in cancer survivors following careful assessment and tailoring on exercise prescription. PMID:20596305

  17. A computational model of skeletal muscle metabolism linking cellular adaptations induced by altered loading states to metabolic responses during exercise

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Ranjan K; DiBella, John A; Cabrera, Marco E

    2007-01-01

    Background The alterations in skeletal muscle structure and function after prolonged periods of unloading are initiated by the chronic lack of mechanical stimulus of sufficient intensity, which is the result of a series of biochemical and metabolic interactions spanning from cellular to tissue/organ level. Reduced activation of skeletal muscle alters the gene expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms to meet the functional demands of reduced mechanical load, which results in muscle atrophy and reduced capacity to process fatty acids. In contrast, chronic loading results in the opposite pattern of adaptations. Methods To quantify interactions among cellular and skeletal muscle metabolic adaptations, and to predict metabolic responses to exercise after periods of altered loading states, we develop a computational model of skeletal muscle metabolism. The governing model equations – with parameters characterizing chronic loading/unloading states- were solved numerically to simulate metabolic responses to moderate intensity exercise (WR ≤ 40% VO2 max). Results Model simulations showed that carbohydrate oxidation was 8.5% greater in chronically unloaded muscle compared with the loaded muscle (0.69 vs. 0.63 mmol/min), while fat oxidation was 7% higher in chronically loaded muscle (0.14 vs. 0.13 mmol/min), during exercise. Muscle oxygen uptake (VO2) and blood flow (Q) response times were 29% and 44% shorter in chronically loaded muscle (0.4 vs. 0.56 min for VO2 and 0.25 vs. 0.45 min for Q). Conclusion The present model can be applied to test complex hypotheses during exercise involving the integration and control of metabolic processes at various organizational levels (cellular to tissue) in individuals who have undergone periods of chronic loading or unloading. PMID:17448235

  18. Evaluation of Progressive Failure Analysis and Modeling of Impact Damage in Composite Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) is leading an evaluation effort in advanced destructive and nondestructive testing of composite pressure vessels and structures. WSTF is using progressive finite element analysis methods for test design and for confirmation of composite pressure vessel performance. Using composite finite element analysis models and failure theories tested in the World-Wide Failure Exercise, WSTF is able to estimate the static strength of composite pressure vessels. Additionally, test and evaluation on composites that have been impact damaged is in progress so that models can be developed to estimate damage tolerance and the degradation in static strength.

  19. Exercise as a pro-cognitive, pro-neurogenic and anti-inflammatory intervention in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Sinéad M; Kelly, Áine M

    2016-05-01

    It is now well established, at least in animal models, that exercise elicits potent pro-cognitive and pro-neurogenic effects. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the leading causes of dementia and represents one of the greatest burdens on healthcare systems worldwide, with no effective treatment for the disease to date. Exercise presents a promising non-pharmacological option to potentially delay the onset of or slow down the progression of AD. Exercise interventions in mouse models of AD have been explored and have been found to reduce amyloid pathology and improve cognitive function. More recent studies have expanded the research question by investigating potential pro-neurogenic and anti-inflammatory effects of exercise. In this review we summarise studies that have examined exercise-mediated effects on AD pathology, cognitive function, hippocampal neurogenesis and neuroinflammation in transgenic mouse models of AD. Furthermore, we attempt to identify the optimum exercise conditions required to elicit the greatest benefits, taking into account age and pathology of the model, as well as type and duration of exercise. PMID:27039886

  20. Professionalism Mini-Evaluation Exercise in Finland: A preliminary investigation introducing the Finnish version of the P-MEX instrument

    PubMed Central

    KARUKIVI, MAX; KORTEKANGAS-SAVOLAINEN, OUTI; SAXÉN, ULLA; HAAPASALO-PESU, KIRSI-MARIA

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Teaching medical professionalism is increasingly acknowledged as an important aspect of medical education. The Professionalism Mini-Evaluation Exercise (P-MEX) is an assessment tool for evaluating medical professionalism, but no studies using it as a self-assessment instrument have been reported. This paper reports on a preliminary investigation of the Finnish version of the P-MEX instrument as an assessment and self-assessment measure. Methods The sample in the present cross-sectional study comprised all 23 medical students and recent graduates (15 females and 8 males) participating in a summer school of psychiatry program in 2014. The two-month program combines clinical work with multifaceted teaching and intensive tutoring. At the end of the program, the participants’ medical professionalism was assessed by the tutors and other members of the work community as well as the students themselves using the Finnish version of the P-MEX instrument. The P-MEX scores were compared, using the Friedman test. Results The mean values and SD for the P-MEX assessments were as follows: tutor assessment 3.26±0.21, work community assessment 3.32±0.26 and self-assessment 3.01±0.07. No significant gender differences were observed. The tutor and work community assessments were significantly correlated (r=0.573, p=0.040), but the self-assessment scores did not correlate with either of the other assessments. Overall, the students evaluated their skills significantly poorer in comparison to the other assessments. Conclusion Although the small sample size limits the generalization of these preliminary results, the Finnish version of the P-MEX instrument appears to be a feasible measure of medical professionalism. The instrument can also be used as a self-assessment instrument, but subjective evaluations should be complemented with external assessments or feedback in order to take individual and cultural aspects into account. PMID:26457311

  1. Model Performance Evaluation and Scenario Analysis (MPESA) Tutorial

    EPA Science Inventory

    This tool consists of two parts: model performance evaluation and scenario analysis (MPESA). The model performance evaluation consists of two components: model performance evaluation metrics and model diagnostics. These metrics provides modelers with statistical goodness-of-fit m...

  2. THE ATMOSPHERIC MODEL EVALUATION (AMET): METEOROLOGY MODULE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An Atmospheric Model Evaluation Tool (AMET), composed of meteorological and air quality components, is being developed to examine the error and uncertainty in the model simulations. AMET matches observations with the corresponding model-estimated values in space and time, and the...

  3. Black Model Appearance and Product Evaluations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerin, Roger A.

    1979-01-01

    Examines a study of how human models affect the impression conveyed by an advertisement, particularly the effect of a Black model's physical characteristics on product evaluations among Black and White females.Results show that the physical appearance of the model influenced impressions of product quality and suitability for personal use. (JMF)

  4. An integrated exercise response and muscle fatigue model for performance decrement estimates of workloads in oxygen-limiting environments.

    PubMed

    Ng, Laurel J; Sih, Bryant L; Stuhmiller, James H

    2012-04-01

    The performance dynamic physiology model (DPM-PE) integrates a modified muscle fatigue model with an exercise physiology model that calculates the transport and delivery of oxygen to working muscles during exposures of oxygen-limiting environments. This mathematical model implements a number of physiologic processes (respiration, circulation, tissue metabolism, diffusion-limited gas transfer at the blood/gas lung interface, and ventilatory control with afferent feedback, central command and humoral chemoreceptor feedback) to replicate the three phases of ventilatory response to a variety of exertion patterns, predict the delivery and transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide from the lungs to tissues, and calculate the amount of aerobic and anaerobic work performed. The ventilatory patterns from passive leg movement, unloaded work, and stepped and ramping loaded work compare well against data. The model also compares well against steady-state ventilation, cardiac output, blood oxygen levels, oxygen consumption, and carbon dioxide generation against a range of exertion levels at sea level and at altitude, thus demonstrating the range of applicability of the exercise model. With the ability to understand and predict gas transport and delivery of oxygen to working muscle tissue for different workloads and environments, the correlation between blood oxygen measures and the recovery factor of the muscle fatigue model was explored. Endurance data sets in normoxia and hypoxia were best replicated using arterial oxygen saturation as the correlate with the recovery factor. This model provides a physiologically based method for predicting physical performance decrement due to oxygen-limiting environments. PMID:21769737

  5. Comprehensive system models: Strategies for evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Field, Christopher; Kutzbach, John E.; Ramanathan, V.; Maccracken, Michael C.

    1992-01-01

    The task of evaluating comprehensive earth system models is vast involving validations of every model component at every scale of organization, as well as tests of all the individual linkages. Even the most detailed evaluation of each of the component processes and the individual links among them should not, however, engender confidence in the performance of the whole. The integrated earth system is so rich with complex feedback loops, often involving components of the atmosphere, oceans, biosphere, and cryosphere, that it is certain to exhibit emergent properties very difficult to predict from the perspective of a narrow focus on any individual component of the system. Therefore, a substantial share of the task of evaluating comprehensive earth system models must reside at the level of whole system evaluations. Since complete, integrated atmosphere/ ocean/ biosphere/ hydrology models are not yet operational, questions of evaluation must be addressed at the level of the kinds of earth system processes that the models should be competent to simulate, rather than at the level of specific performance criteria. Here, we have tried to identify examples of earth system processes that are difficult to simulate with existing models and that involve a rich enough suite of feedbacks that they are unlikely to be satisfactorily described by highly simplified or toy models. Our purpose is not to specify a checklist of evaluation criteria but to introduce characteristics of the earth system that may present useful opportunities for model testing and, of course, improvement.

  6. Blood flow and oxygen uptake during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. W.; Stolwijk, J. A. J.; Nadel, E. R.

    1973-01-01

    A model is developed for predicting oxygen uptake, muscle blood flow, and blood chemistry changes under exercise conditions. In this model, the working muscle mass system is analyzed. The conservation of matter principle is applied to the oxygen in a unit mass of working muscle under transient exercise conditions. This principle is used to relate the inflow of oxygen carried with the blood to the outflow carried with blood, the rate of change of oxygen stored in the muscle myoglobin, and the uptake by the muscle. Standard blood chemistry relations are incorporated to evaluate venous levels of oxygen, pH, and carbon dioxide.

  7. Evaluation of the meteorological forcing used for the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) air quality simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vautard, Robert; Moran, Michael D.; Solazzo, Efisio; Gilliam, Robert C.; Matthias, Volker; Bianconi, Roberto; Chemel, Charles; Ferreira, Joana; Geyer, Beate; Hansen, Ayoe B.; Jericevic, Amela; Prank, Marje; Segers, Arjo; Silver, Jeremy D.; Werhahn, Johannes; Wolke, Ralf; Rao, S. T.; Galmarini, Stefano

    2012-06-01

    Accurate regional air pollution simulation relies strongly on the accuracy of the mesoscale meteorological simulation used to drive the air quality model. The framework of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII), which involved a large international community of modeling groups in Europe and North America, offered a unique opportunity to evaluate the skill of mesoscale meteorological models for two continents for the same period. More than 20 groups worldwide participated in AQMEII, using several meteorological and chemical transport models with different configurations. The evaluation has been performed over a full year (2006) for both continents. The focus for this particular evaluation was meteorological parameters relevant to air quality processes such as transport and mixing, chemistry, and surface fluxes. The unprecedented scale of the exercise (one year, two continents) allowed us to examine the general characteristics of meteorological models' skill and uncertainty. In particular, we found that there was a large variability between models or even model versions in predicting key parameters such as surface shortwave radiation. We also found several systematic model biases such as wind speed overestimations, particularly during stable conditions. We conclude that major challenges still remain in the simulation of meteorology, such as nighttime meteorology and cloud/radiation processes, for air quality simulation.

  8. Compulsive Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... of power to help them cope with low self-esteem. Although compulsive exercising doesn't have to accompany ... a downward spiral of negative thinking and low self-esteem. continue Why Is Exercising Too Much a Bad ...

  9. Exercise & Sleep

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. Feature: Back to School, the Healthy Way Exercise & Sleep Past Issues / Fall 2012 Table of Contents ... helps kids. Photo: iStock 6 "Bests" About Kids' Exercise At least one hour of physical activity a ...

  10. Costs and benefits of hospital-wide PACS networks: an overview of a comprehensive evaluation exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Stirling; Weatherburn, Gwyneth C.; Watkins, Jessamy; Keen, Justin; Muris, Nicole; Buxton, Martin J.

    1998-07-01

    The experimental site for the evaluation reported was the Hammersmith Hospital, London. The study adopted an economic perspective in that the focus was on the change in various elements of cost and the change in various parameters of benefit following the implementation of a hospital-wide PACS. Comparison was made of hospital operation in a film-based situation with operation in a PACS-based situation. Some of the research activities focused on the radiology service itself at Hammersmith, others focused on other areas of the hospital where radiological information was seen as an important component in clinical decision-making, and others looked outside the hospital. In terms of operational, clinical and patient benefits, the evaluation found no significant indicators of disadvantages of PACS and many examples of significant actual measurable benefits or perceived advantages by users. However, as one might expect, these advantages come at a significant net cost.

  11. Voluntary exercise induces adult hippocampal neurogenesis and BDNF expression in a rodent model of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Fanny; Gil-Mohapel, Joana; Cox, Adrian; Patten, Anna; Giles, Erica; Brocardo, Patricia S; Christie, Brian R

    2011-05-01

    Alcohol consumption during pregnancy can result in a myriad of health problems in the affected offspring ranging from growth deficiencies to central nervous system impairments that result in cognitive deficits. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is thought to play a role in cognition (i.e. learning and memory) and can be modulated by extrinsic factors such as alcohol consumption and physical exercise. We examined the impact of voluntary physical exercise on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in a rat model of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Intragastric intubation was used to deliver ethanol to rats in a highly controlled fashion through all three trimester equivalents (i.e. throughout gestation and during the first 10 days of postnatal life). Ethanol-exposed animals and their pair-fed and ad libitum controls were left undisturbed until they reached a young adult stage at which point they had free access to a running wheel for 12 days. Prenatal and early postnatal ethanol exposure altered cell proliferation in young adult female rats and increased early neuronal maturation without affecting cell survival in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus. Voluntary wheel running increased cell proliferation, neuronal maturation and cell survival as well as levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the DG of both ethanol-exposed female rats and their pair-fed and ad libitum controls. These results indicate that the capacity of the brain to respond to exercise is not impaired in this model of FASD, highlighting the potential therapeutic value of physical exercise for this developmental disorder. PMID:21535455

  12. Evaluation of the effectiveness of an aerobic exercise program and the personality characteristics of patients with fibromyalgia syndrome: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Vural, Meltem; Berkol, Tonguc Demir; Erdogdu, Zeynep; Pekedis, Keramettin; Kuçukserat, Batuhan; Aksoy, Cihan

    2014-10-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a 6-week aerobic exercise program on pain, physical function, and psychological status, and to evaluate the personality characteristics of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fourteen women with FMS were enrolled. They were trained for a 6-week home-based aerobic exercise program. The Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, the Beck Depression Inventory, the visual analog scale of pain and sleep quality were measured at baseline and at the end of week 6. The personality profiles were evaluated using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). [Results] After the exercise program, significant improvements were determined in pain, sleep quality, physical function, depression and FMS symptoms compared to baseline. In addition, the hysteria item (71.21±8.84) of the MMPI was significantly higher in FMS. [Conclusion] Our findings indicate that home-based aerobic exercise may be a useful treatment in the management of FMS. Personality characteristics should be considered during the planning process of the treatment of FMS. Personality is a filter between life events and psychological responses. It is defined to be the integration of effective and behavioral patterns. Long-term studies involving larger clinical samples are needed to define the role of personality characteristics in FMS. PMID:25364113

  13. Morning Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Natalie Crohn

    2006-01-01

    In this article, Natalie Schmitt recalls her teaching experiences with morning exercise programs, beginning with her first teaching job as assistant Morning Exercise teacher at the Francis W. Parker School in Chicago. In the Morning Exercises, students were encouraged to employ all means of expression: speaking, drawing, dancing, singing, acting.…

  14. Exercise and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zisser, H; Gong, P; Kelley, C M; Seidman, J S; Riddell, M C

    2011-02-01

    Diet and exercise form the foundation of a healthy lifestyle. These are especially important for people living with diabetes mellitus, as they are the most practical non-pharmacological means by which patients may significantly improve their blood glucose levels. Exercise increases insulin sensitivity (both short and long term), lowers blood sugar levels, reduces body fat and improves cardiovascular (CV) function. Because of this, exercise offers enormous benefit to patients with diabetes. Blood glucose levels can significantly drop during and after physical activities, due to the increased utilisation of glucose as a fuel during exercise and the up-regulation of glucose transport into working muscles. Therefore, patients (especially those with type 1 diabetes) must account for the effects of exercise and adjust their medications and nutrition accordingly. Improvements in real-time continuous glucose monitoring and optimisation of basal insulin dosing may offer significant benefit to preventing hypoglycaemia in patients with type 1 diabetes who regularly exercise. Diverse exercise programmes and devices can also assist patients in monitoring their activities as well as motivating them to achieve their exercise goals. For patients with type 1 diabetes, questions such as how much, how long, how strenuous and what kind of exercise must be addressed in order for healthcare professionals to offer maximum benefit to their patients. Additionally, since patients with type 2 diabetes often have other significant co-morbidities such as obesity and CV disease, care providers must evaluate each patient's risk factors before designing an exercise programme. Several publications in the last year have addressed these issues and may serve as a valuable resource to provide safe and effective recommendations to patients and their healthcare providers. To be included in the Exercise and Diabetes chapter for the 2010 YEARBOOK, we reviewed leading peer-reviewed manuscripts that were

  15. Evaluation of Galactic Cosmic Ray Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Heiblim, Samuel; Malott, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Models of the galactic cosmic ray spectra have been tested by comparing their predictions to an evaluated database containing more than 380 measured cosmic ray spectra extending from 1960 to the present.

  16. Outcomes Evaluation: A Model for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasi, John F.; Davis, Barbara S.

    1986-01-01

    Examines issues and problems related to the measurement of community college outcomes in relation to mission and goals. Presents a model for outcomes evaluation at the community college which derives from the mission statement and provides evaluative comment and comparison with institutional and national norms. (DMM)

  17. Evaluation Model for Career Programs. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byerly, Richard L.; And Others

    A study was conducted to provide and test an evaluative model that could be utilized in providing curricular evaluation of the various career programs. Two career fields, dental assistant and auto mechanic, were chosen for study. A questionnaire based upon the actual job performance was completed by six groups connected with the auto mechanics and…

  18. Exercise effects on polyp burden and immune markers in the ApcMin/+ mouse model of intestinal tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    McClellan, Jamie L; Steiner, Jennifer L; Day, Stani D; Enos, Reilly T; Davis, Mark J; Singh, Udai P; Murphy, E Angela

    2014-08-01

    Many observational epidemiologic studies suggest an association between exercise and colon cancer risk. The mechanisms contributing to a preventative effect of exercise on colon cancer are complex and multifaceted. Altered immune system function is one possible mechanism that has been largely unexplored. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of exercise on markers associated with macrophages and select T cell populations in a mouse model of intestinal tumorigenesis and to relate this to polyp characteristics. Male Apc(Min/+) mice were randomly assigned to either sedentary (Sed) or exercise (Ex) treatment (n=6-9/group). The exercise treatment consisted of treadmill running for 1 h/day and 6 days a week at 15 m/min from 4 until 16 weeks of age. Intestinal polyps were counted and categorized by size. Mucosal tissue was analyzed for mRNA expression of overall macrophages (F4/80), for genes associated with M1 (IL-12, IL-23 and Nos2) and M2 (CD206, IL-10, IL-4, CCL17, CCL22 and Arg-1) macrophages and the macrophage chemoattractants MCP-1, fetuin A and CXCL14. Markers for cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) and regulatory T cells were also examined by measuring mRNA expression of CD8 and Foxp3, respectively. While there was no significant difference in overall polyp number between the groups (Sed, 23.3±4.3; and Ex, 16.5±4.3), Ex did have a reduction in the number of large polyps (Sed, 6.1±1.1; and Ex, 3.0±0.6) (P<0.05). This was consistent with a decrease in spleen weight (P<0.05). Similarly, Ex reduced mRNA expression of overall macrophages (F4/80) as well as markers associated with both M1 (IL-12) and M2 (CD206, CCL22 and Arg-1) subtypes (P<0.05) but there was no significant decrease in macrophage chemoattractants. CD8 expression was increased while Foxp3 expression was decreased with Ex (P<0.05). Overall the data provide important new information on immune regulation as a possible mechanism for the documented benefits of exercise training on reducing

  19. Health professionals’ perspectives on exercise referral and physical activity promotion in primary care: Findings from a process evaluation of the National Exercise Referral Scheme in Wales

    PubMed Central

    Din, Nafees U; Moore, Graham F; Murphy, Simon; Wilkinson, Clare; Williams, Nefyn H

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives: Referring clinicians’ experiences of exercise referral schemes (ERS) can provide valuable insights into their uptake. However, most qualitative studies focus on patient views only. This paper explores health professionals’ perceptions of their role in promoting physical activity and experiences of a National Exercise Referral Scheme (NERS) in Wales. Design: Qualitative semi-structured group interviews. Setting: General practice premises. Methods: Nine semi-structured group interviews involving 46 health professionals were conducted on general practice premises in six local health board areas. Purposive sampling taking into account area deprivation, practice size and referral rates was employed. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using the Framework method of thematic analysis. Results: Health professionals described physical activity promotion as important, although many thought it was outside of their expertise and remit, and less important than other health promotion activities such as smoking cessation. Professionals linked decisions on whether to advise physical activity to patients to their own physical activity levels and to subjective judgements of patient motivation. While some described ERS as a holistic alternative to medication, with potential social benefits, others expressed concerns regarding their limited reach and potential to exacerbate inequalities. Barriers to referral included geographic isolation and uncertainties about patient selection criteria, medico-legal responsibilities and a lack of feedback about patient progress. Conclusion: Clinicians’ concerns about expertise, priority setting and time constraints should be addressed to enhance physical activity promotion in primary care. Further research is needed to fully understand decision making relating to provision of physical activity advice and use of ERS. PMID:26527835

  20. Effects of high-intensity interval versus continuous moderate-intensity aerobic exercise on apoptosis, oxidative stress and metabolism of the infarcted myocardium in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kai; Wang, Li; Wang, Changying; Yang, Yuan; Hu, Dayi; Ding, Rongjing

    2015-08-01

    The optimal aerobic exercise training (AET) protocol for patients following myocardial infarction (MI) has remained under debate. The present study therefore aimed to compare the effects of continuous moderate-intensity training (CMT) and high-intensity interval training (HIT) on cardiac functional recovery, and to investigate the potential associated mechanisms in a post-MI rat model. Female Sprague Dawley rats (8-10 weeks old) undergoing MI or sham surgery were subsequently submitted to CMT or HIT, or kept sedentary for eight weeks. Prior to and following AET, echocardiographic parameters and exercise capacity of the rats were measured. Western blotting was used to evaluate the levels of apoptosis and associated signaling pathway protein expression. The concentrations of biomarkers of oxidative stress were also determined by ELISA assay. Messenger (m)RNA levels and activity of the key enzymes for glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation, as well as the rate of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis, were also measured. Compared with the MI group, exercise capacity and cardiac function were significantly improved following AET, particularly following HIT. Left ventricular ejection fraction and fraction shortening were further improved in the MI-HIT group in comparison to that of the MI-CMT group. The two forms of AET almost equally attenuated apoptosis of the post-infarction myocardium. CMT and HIT also alleviated oxidative stress by decreasing the concentration of malondialdehyde and increasing the concentration of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). In particular, HIT induced a greater increase in the concentration of GPx than that of CMT. AET, and HIT in particular, significantly increased the levels of mRNA and the maximal activity of phosphofructokinase-1 and carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1, as well as the maximal ratio of ATP synthesis. In addition, compared with the MI group, the expression of signaling proteins PI3K, Akt, p38mapk and AMPK

  1. Subjective perceptions and ergonomics evaluation of a liquid cooled garment worn under protective ensemble during an intermittent treadmill exercise.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Coca, Aitor; Williams, W Jon; Roberge, Raymond J

    2011-07-01

    While a personal protective equipment (PPE) ensemble effectively provides workers with protection from occupational hazards, working in a vapour-resistant ensemble increases the risk of heat illness/injuries and physiological burdens. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of body cooling via a liquid-cooled garment (LCG) underneath a PPE ensemble on perceived thermal strain, physiological responses and ergonomics during an intermittent treadmill exercise in warm environmental conditions. The results of the present study indicated that the concomitant wearing of LCG underneath the PPE ensemble significantly reduced subjective perception of heat and alleviated overall increase in body temperature and heart rate while no impact of wearing LCG on ergonomic features was found. The extension of the present findings to practical applications in occupational settings requires further research on a LCG system design and performance evaluations while the LCG is incorporated within the PPE ensemble. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Implementation of a LCG underneath PPE for body cooling was investigated, focusing on its impact on individuals' perceived thermal strain, physiological responses and ergonomics. The findings of the present study indicated that body cooling via a wearable LCG underneath PPE significantly alleviated both perceived thermal and physiological strain in uncompensable heat stress condition. PMID:21770750

  2. Constructing and evaluating a validity argument for the final-year ward simulation exercise.

    PubMed

    Till, Hettie; Ker, Jean; Myford, Carol; Stirling, Kevin; Mires, Gary

    2015-12-01

    The authors report final-year ward simulation data from the University of Dundee Medical School. Faculty who designed this assessment intend for the final score to represent an individual senior medical student's level of clinical performance. The results are included in each student's portfolio as one source of evidence of the student's capability as a practitioner, professional, and scholar. Our purpose in conducting this study was to illustrate how assessment designers who are creating assessments to evaluate clinical performance might develop propositions and then collect and examine various sources of evidence to construct and evaluate a validity argument. The data were from all 154 medical students who were in their final year of study at the University of Dundee Medical School in the 2010-2011 academic year. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on an analysis of senior medical students' clinical performance while they were taking responsibility for the management of a simulated ward. Using multi-facet Rasch measurement and a generalizability theory approach, we examined various sources of validity evidence that the medical school faculty have gathered for a set of six propositions needed to support their use of scores as measures of students' clinical ability. Based on our analysis of the evidence, we would conclude that, by and large, the propositions appear to be sound, and the evidence seems to support their proposed score interpretation. Given the body of evidence collected thus far, their intended interpretation seems defensible. PMID:25808311

  3. Nociceptive and Neuronal Evaluation of the Sciatic Nerve of Wistar Rats Subjected to Compression Injury and Treated with Resistive Exercise.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Juliana Sobral; Lovison, Keli; Karvat, Jhenifer; Peretti, Ana Luiza; Vieira, Lizyana; Higuchi, Guilherme Hideaki; Brancalhão, Rose Meire Costa; Ribeiro, Lucinéia de Fátima Chasko; Bertolini, Gladson Ricardo Flor

    2016-01-01

    Background. To investigate the climb stairs resistance exercise on nociception and axonal regeneration in the sciatic nerve of rats. Methods. 24 Wistar rats were divided: control group (CG-no injury), exercise group (EG-no injury with physical exercise), lesion group (LG-injury, but without exercise), and treated group (LEG-injury and physical exercise). LG and LEG were subjected to sciatic nerve compression with hemostat. From the 3rd day after injury began treatment with exercise, and after 22 days occurs the removal of a nerve fragment for morphological analysis. Results. Regarding allodynia, CG obtained values less than EG (p = 0.012) and larger than LG and LEG (p < 0.001). Histological results showed that CG and EG had normal appearance, as LG and LEG showed up with large amounts of inflammatory infiltration, degeneration and disruption of nerve fibers, and reduction of the myelin sheath; however LEG presented some regenerated fibers. From the morphometric data there were significant differences, for nerve fiber diameter, comparing CG with LG and LEG and comparing axon diameter and the thickness of the myelin of the CG to others. Conclusion. Climb stairs resistance exercise was not effective to speed up the regenerative process of axons. PMID:27594795

  4. Nociceptive and Neuronal Evaluation of the Sciatic Nerve of Wistar Rats Subjected to Compression Injury and Treated with Resistive Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Juliana Sobral; Lovison, Keli; Karvat, Jhenifer; Peretti, Ana Luiza; Vieira, Lizyana; Higuchi, Guilherme Hideaki; Ribeiro, Lucinéia de Fátima Chasko

    2016-01-01

    Background. To investigate the climb stairs resistance exercise on nociception and axonal regeneration in the sciatic nerve of rats. Methods. 24 Wistar rats were divided: control group (CG—no injury), exercise group (EG—no injury with physical exercise), lesion group (LG—injury, but without exercise), and treated group (LEG—injury and physical exercise). LG and LEG were subjected to sciatic nerve compression with hemostat. From the 3rd day after injury began treatment with exercise, and after 22 days occurs the removal of a nerve fragment for morphological analysis. Results. Regarding allodynia, CG obtained values less than EG (p = 0.012) and larger than LG and LEG (p < 0.001). Histological results showed that CG and EG had normal appearance, as LG and LEG showed up with large amounts of inflammatory infiltration, degeneration and disruption of nerve fibers, and reduction of the myelin sheath; however LEG presented some regenerated fibers. From the morphometric data there were significant differences, for nerve fiber diameter, comparing CG with LG and LEG and comparing axon diameter and the thickness of the myelin of the CG to others. Conclusion. Climb stairs resistance exercise was not effective to speed up the regenerative process of axons. PMID:27594795

  5. Left ventricular performance during exercise in patients with left bundle branch block: evaluation by gated radionuclide ventriculography

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, D.W.; De Puey, E.G.; Sonnemaker, R.E.; Hall, R.J.; Burdine, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    To investigate changes in left ventricular (LV) function during exercise in patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB), 22 patients without a history or physical findings of previous myocardial infarction or LV dysfunction were studied by gated radionuclide ventriculography (GRNV) at rest and during bicycle exercise. Coronary arteriography demonstrated greater than 75% diameter narrowing of at least one coronary artery in nine patients. Of the remaining 13 patients, GRNV demonstrated wall motion abnormalities in seven patients either at rest or with exercise. During exercise, mean ejection fraction (EF) did not increase in patients without coronary artery disease (CAD). Patients with CAD had a 12-point fall in mean EF with exercise. Researchers conclude that LV reserve, as demonstrated by ability to increase EF with exercise, is impaired in patients with LBBB even in the absence of CAD or other underlying cardiac disease and that standard GRNV criteria to exclude the presence of CAD (a greater than five-point increase in EF with exercise and normal wall motion) are not strictly applicable in screening patients with LBBB.

  6. Prognostic evaluation by clinical exercise test scores in patients treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention or fibrinolysis for acute myocardial infarction (a Danish Trial in Acute Myocardial Infarction-2 Sub-Study).

    PubMed

    Valeur, Nana; Clemmensen, Peter; Grande, Peer; Saunamäki, Kari

    2007-10-01

    The prognostic accuracy of exercise testing after myocardial infarction is low, and different models have been proposed to enhance the predictive value for subsequent mortality. This study tested a simple score against 3 established scores. Patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarctions were randomized in the Danish Trial in Acute Myocardial Infarction-2 (DANAMI-2) to either primary percutaneous coronary intervention or fibrinolysis with predischarge exercise testing. Clinical and exercise test data were collected prospectively and were available for 1,115 patients. A simple score was derived, awarding 1 point for history or new signs of heart failure, 1 point for a left ventricular ejection fraction <40%, 1 point for age >65 years in men and age >70 years in women, and 1 point for exercise capacity <5 METs in men and exercise capacity <4 METs in women. This DANAMI score was compared with the Veterans Affairs Medical Center score, the Duke treadmill score, and the Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio Della Sopravvivenza nell'Infarto Miocardico-2 (GISSI-2) score in multivariate Cox models and receiver-operating characteristic plots. All scoring systems were predictive of adverse outcomes. The DANAMI score performed better, with greater chi-square values (142 vs 53 to 88 for the prediction of death). Areas under the receiver-operating characteristic curves were compared and were larger for the DANAMI score (C-statistic 0.79 vs 0.71 to 0.74 for the other tests regarding mortality). The DANAMI score stratified patients into a small high-risk group (8% of the population with 43% mortality in 6 years), an intermediate-risk group (13% with 16% mortality in 6 years), and a low-risk group (79% with 4% mortality in 6 years). In conclusion, a simple exercise test score composed of age, METs, heart failure, and a left ventricular ejection fraction <40% seems to outperform the Duke treadmill score, Veterans Affairs Medical Center score, and GISSI-2 score in risk stratifying

  7. SAPHIRE models and software for ASP evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Sattison, M.B.; Schroeder, J.A.; Russell, K.D.

    1995-04-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) over the past year has created 75 plant-specific Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) models using the SAPHIRE suite of PRA codes. Along with the new models, the INEL has also developed a new module for SAPHIRE which is tailored specifically to the unique needs of conditional core damage probability (CCDP) evaluations. These models and software will be the next generation of risk tools for the evaluation of accident precursors by both NRR and AEOD. This paper presents an overview of the models and software. Key characteristics include: (1) classification of the plant models according to plant response with a unique set of event trees for each plant class, (2) plant-specific fault trees using supercomponents, (3) generation and retention of all system and sequence cutsets, (4) full flexibility in modifying logic, regenerating cutsets, and requantifying results, and (5) user interface for streamlined evaluation of ASP events.

  8. Rock mechanics models evaluation report. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    This report documents the evaluation of the thermal and thermomechanical models and codes for repository subsurface design and for design constraint analysis. The evaluation was based on a survey of the thermal and thermomechanical codes and models that are applicable to subsurface design, followed by a Kepner-Tregoe (KT) structured decision analysis of the codes and models. The primary recommendations of the analysis are that the DOT code be used for two-dimensional thermal analysis and that the STEALTH and HEATING 5/6 codes be used for three-dimensional and complicated two-dimensional thermal analysis. STEALTH and SPECTROM 32 are recommended for thermomechanical analyses. The other evaluated codes should be considered for use in certain applications. A separate review of salt creep models indicate that the commonly used exponential time law model is appropriate for use in repository design studies. 38 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  9. Advanced GIS Exercise: Performing Error Analysis in ArcGIS ModelBuilder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Steven T.; Post, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of Geographic Information Systems is quickly becoming an integral part of the natural resource professionals' skill set. With the growing need of professionals with these skills, we created an advanced geographic information systems (GIS) exercise for students at Clemson University to introduce them to the concept of error analysis,…

  10. Using "Fremyella Diplosiphon" as a Model Organism for Genetics-Based Laboratory Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Beronda L.

    2011-01-01

    In this pilot study, a genetics-based laboratory exercise using the cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon was developed and trialled with thirteen Natural Sciences undergraduates. Despite most students only having limited prior exposure to molecular genetics laboratory methods, this cohort confirmed that they were able to follow the protocol and…

  11. Modeling oxygenation in venous blood and skeletal muscle in response to exercise using near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Nicola; Zhou, Haiying; Saidel, Gerald M.; Wolf, Martin; McCully, Kevin; Gladden, L. Bruce; Cabrera, Marco E.

    2009-01-01

    Noninvasive, continuous measurements in vivo are commonly used to make inferences about mechanisms controlling internal and external respiration during exercise. In particular, the dynamic response of muscle oxygenation (\\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{Sm}}_{{\\mathrm{O}}_{2}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}) measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is assumed to be correlated to that of venous oxygen saturation (SvO2) measured invasively. However, there are situations where the dynamics of \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{Sm}}_{{\\mathrm{O}}_{2}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} and SvO2 do not follow the same pattern. A quantitative analysis of venous and muscle oxygenation dynamics during exercise is necessary to explain the links between different patterns observed experimentally. For this purpose, a mathematical model of oxygen transport and utilization that accounts for the relative contribution of hemoglobin (Hb) and myoglobin (Mb) to the NIRS signal was developed. This model includes changes in microvascular composition within skeletal muscle during exercise and integrates experimental data in a consistent and mechanistic manner. Three subjects (age 25.6 ± 0.6 yr) performed square-wave moderate exercise on a cycle ergometer under normoxic and hypoxic conditions while muscle oxygenation (Coxy) and deoxygenation (Cdeoxy) were measured by NIRS. Under normoxia, the oxygenated Hb/Mb concentration (Coxy) drops rapidly at the onset of

  12. Evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease during exercise: the relation between extent of disease and perfusion deficit

    SciTech Connect

    Hakki, A.H.; DePace, N.; Iskandrian, A.S.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relation between the extent of coronary artery disease (CAD) and size of exercise-induced myocardial hypoperfusion in 79 patients with angiographically documented CAD. None of the patients had Q-wave myocardial infarction. Fifty patients had one-vessel disease, ten had two-vessel disease, and 19 patients had three-vessel or left main disease. From a scintigraphic functional standpoint, patients were classified into two groups: 28 patients (35%) had large perfusion defects and 51 patients (65%) had small defects. The size of the thallium-201 perfusion defect during exercise was assessed as the perimeter of the defect in each projection expressed as a percentage abnormality of the total left ventricular perimeter in that projection. The average abnormality from the three projections was used in the final analysis. Eleven patients with large defects (39%) had one-vessel disease and 12 patients with small defects (24%) had multivessel disease. Stepwise multivariate discriminate analysis identified the number of diseased vessels (F . 13.9), the change in systolic blood pressure from rest to exercise (F . 10.8), the exercise heart rate (F . 9.1), and exercise electrocardiographic response (F . 7.8) as significant associates of the size of the perfusion defect (predictive accuracy . 70%). We conclude that the size of hypoperfused myocardium during exercise is variable in patients with CAD. Discriminate analysis identified the extent of CAD, exercise heart rate, change in systolic pressure from rest to exercise, and exercise electrocardiographic response as significant associates of the size of the defect.

  13. EURADOS intercomparison exercise on MC modelling for the in-vivo monitoring of AM-241 in skull phantoms (Part II and III).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrba, Tomas; Broggio, David; Caldeira, Margarida; Capello, Kevin; Fantínová, Karin; Franck, Didier; Gómez-Ros, Jose Maria; Hunt, John; Kinase, Sakae; Leone, Debora; Lombardo, Pasquale Alessandro; Manohari, Murugan; Marzocchi, Olaf; Moraleda, Montserrat; Nogueira, Pedro; Ośko, Jakub; Arron, Shutt; Suhl, Soheigh; Takahashi, Masa; Teles, Pedro; Tremblay, Marilyn; Tymińska, Katarzyna; Lopez, Maria Antonia; Tanner, Rick

    2015-08-01

    An intercomparison on in-vivo monitoring for determination of Am-241 in three skull phantoms was launched by EURADOS in 2011. The project focused on measurement and estimation of the activity of Am-241 in the human skull. Three human skull phantoms of different complexity were used. A Monte Carlo (MC) intercomparison exercise with the voxel representations of the physical phantom was launched additionally in September of 2012. The main goals of the action were (1) to investigate the different methodologies for developing MC calibrations that might arise from a complex radiological assessment and (2) to compare individual approaches of the participating laboratories in order to determine international guidance for best practice. The MC exercise consisted of three tasks with increasing difficulty, in order to test the extent of skills needed by the participating laboratory. The first task was to simulate a given detector and a well-defined semi-skull phantom. The second and third tasks presented in this paper-introduced more complex simulations with individual geometry and real detector modelling. The paper provides an overview of the participant's results, analyses of the observed issues concerning tasks two and three, and a general evaluation of the whole project.

  14. Validity and Reproducibility of an Incremental Sit-To-Stand Exercise Test for Evaluating Anaerobic Threshold in Young, Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Ohira, Masayoshi; Yokokawa, Yoshiharu; Nagasawa, Yuya

    2015-01-01

    Sit-to-stand exercise (STS) is a common activity of daily living. The objectives of the present study were: 1) to assess the validity of aerobic fitness measurements based on anaerobic thresholds (ATs), during incremental sit-to-stand exercise (ISTS) with and without arm support compared with an incremental cycle-ergometer (CE) test; and 2) to examine the reproducibility of the AT measured during the ISTSs. Twenty-six healthy individuals randomly performed the ISTS and CE test. Oxygen uptakes at the AT (AT-VO2) and heart rate at the AT (AT-HR) were determined during the ISTSs and CE test, and repeated-measures analyses of variance and Tukey’s post-hoc test were used to evaluate the differences between these variables. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to assess the strength of the relationship between AT-VO2 and AT-HR during the ISTSs and CE test. Data analysis yielded the following correlations: AT-VO2 during the ISTS with arm support and the CE test, r = 0.77 (p < 0.05); AT-VO2 during the ISTS without arm support and the CE test, r = 0.70 (p < 0.05); AT-HR during the ISTS with arm support and the CE test, r = 0.80 (p < 0.05); and AT-HR during the ISTS without arm support and the CE test, r = 0.66 (p < 0.05). The AT-VO2 values during the ISTS with arm support (18.5 ± 1.9 mL·min-1·kg-1) and the CE test (18.4 ± 1.8 mL·min-1·kg-1) were significantly higher than those during the ISTS without arm support (16.6 ± 1.8 mL·min-1·kg-1; p < 0.05). The AT-HR values during the ISTS with arm support (126 ± 10 bpm) and the CE test (126 ± 13 bpm) were significantly higher than those during the ISTS without arm support (119 ± 9 bpm; p < 0.05). The ISTS with arm support may provide a cardiopulmonary function load equivalent to the CE test; therefore, it is a potentially valid test for evaluating AT-VO2 and AT-HR in healthy, young adults. Key points The ISTS is a simple test that varies only according to the frequency of standing up, and requires only a small

  15. Benchmarking Exercises To Validate The Updated ELLWF GoldSim Slit Trench Model

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G. A.; Hiergesell, R. A.

    2013-11-12

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) results of the 2008 Performance Assessment (PA) (WSRC, 2008) sensitivity/uncertainty analyses conducted for the trenches located in the EArea LowLevel Waste Facility (ELLWF) were subject to review by the United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) (LFRG, 2008). LFRG comments were generally approving of the use of probabilistic modeling in GoldSim to support the quantitative sensitivity analysis. A recommendation was made, however, that the probabilistic models be revised and updated to bolster their defensibility. SRS committed to addressing those comments and, in response, contracted with Neptune and Company to rewrite the three GoldSim models. The initial portion of this work, development of Slit Trench (ST), Engineered Trench (ET) and Components-in-Grout (CIG) trench GoldSim models, has been completed. The work described in this report utilizes these revised models to test and evaluate the results against the 2008 PORFLOW model results. This was accomplished by first performing a rigorous code-to-code comparison of the PORFLOW and GoldSim codes and then performing a deterministic comparison of the two-dimensional (2D) unsaturated zone and three-dimensional (3D) saturated zone PORFLOW Slit Trench models against results from the one-dimensional (1D) GoldSim Slit Trench model. The results of the code-to-code comparison indicate that when the mechanisms of radioactive decay, partitioning of contaminants between solid and fluid, implementation of specific boundary conditions and the imposition of solubility controls were all tested using identical flow fields, that GoldSim and PORFLOW produce nearly identical results. It is also noted that GoldSim has an advantage over PORFLOW in that it simulates all radionuclides simultaneously - thus avoiding a potential problem as demonstrated in the Case Study (see Section 2.6). Hence, it was concluded that the follow

  16. EPA EXPOSURE MODELS LIBRARY AND INTEGRATED MODEL EVALUATION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The third edition of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys (EPA) EML/IMES (Exposure Models Library and Integrated Model Evaluation System) on CD-ROM is now available. The purpose of the disc is to provide a compact and efficient means to distribute exposure models, documentat...

  17. Evaluation of constitutive models for crushed salt

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, G.D.; Loken, M.C. [RE Hurtado, L.D.; Hansen, F.D.

    1996-05-01

    Three constitutive models are recommended as candidates for describing the deformation of crushed salt. These models are generalized to three-dimensional states of stress to include the effects of mean and deviatoric stress and modified to include effects of temperature, grain size, and moisture content. A database including hydrostatic consolidation and shear consolidation tests conducted on Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and southeastern New Mexico salt is used to determine material parameters for the models. To evaluate the capability of the models, parameter values obtained from fitting the complete database are used to predict the individual tests. Finite element calculations of a WIPP shaft with emplaced crushed salt demonstrate the model predictions.

  18. Adherence of older women with strength training and aerobic exercise

    PubMed Central

    Picorelli, Alexandra Miranda Assumpção; Pereira, Daniele Sirineu; Felício, Diogo Carvalho; Dos Anjos, Daniela Maria; Pereira, Danielle Aparecida Gomes; Dias, Rosângela Corrêa; Assis, Marcella Guimarães; Pereira, Leani Souza Máximo

    2014-01-01

    Background Participation of older people in a program of regular exercise is an effective strategy to minimize the physical decline associated with age. The purpose of this study was to assess adherence rates in older women enrolled in two different exercise programs (one aerobic exercise and one strength training) and identify any associated clinical or functional factors. Methods This was an exploratory observational study in a sample of 231 elderly women of mean age 70.5 years. We used a structured questionnaire with standardized tests to evaluate the relevant clinical and functional measures. A specific adherence questionnaire was developed by the researchers to determine motivators and barriers to exercise adherence. Results The adherence rate was 49.70% in the aerobic exercise group and 56.20% in the strength training group. Multiple logistic regression models for motivation were significant (P=0.003) for the muscle strengthening group (R2=0.310) and also significant (P=0.008) for the aerobic exercise group (R2=0.154). A third regression model for barriers to exercise was significant (P=0.003) only for the muscle strengthening group (R2=0.236). The present study shows no direct relationship between worsening health status and poor adherence. Conclusion Factors related to adherence with exercise in the elderly are multifactorial. PMID:24600212

  19. Application of near-infrared spectroscopy to the evaluation of exercise performance and limitations in patients with heart failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, Donna

    1997-01-01

    Exercise performance in patients with heart failure is limited primarily due to a reduction in cardiac output. This results in skeletal muscle hypo-perfusion. Near infrared spectroscopy provides a simple noninvasive method for assessing skeletal muscle oxygenation during exercise. In this paper we review the application of this technique to patients with heart failure and describe excessive limb and respiratory muscle oxygenation as compared to normal subjects. The potential of this technology for monitoring clinical improvement and therapeutic efficacy also is discussed.

  20. Evaluation of Treadmill Exercise in a Lower Body Negative Pressure Chamber as a Countermeasure for Weightlessness-Induced Bone Loss: a Bed Rest Study with Identical Twins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Davis-Street, Janis E.; Fesperman, J. Vernell; Calkins, D. S.; Bawa, Maneesh; Macias, Brandon R.; Meyer, R. Scott; Hargens, Alan R.

    2003-01-01

    Counteracting bone loss is required for future space exploration. We evaluated the ability of treadmill exercise in a LBNP chamber to counteract bone loss in a 30-day bed rest study. Eight pairs of identical twins were randomly assigned to sedentary control or exercise groups. Exercise within LBNP decreased the bone resorption caused by bed rest and may provide a countermeasure for spaceflight. INTRODUCTION: Bone loss is one of the greatest physiological challenges for extended-duration space missions. The ability of exercise to counteract weightlessness-induced bone loss has been studied extensively, but to date, it has proven ineffective. We evaluated the effectiveness of a combination of two countermeasures-treadmill exercise while inside a lower body negative pressure (LBNP) chamber-on bone loss during a 30-day bed rest study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eight pairs of identical twins were randomized into sedentary (SED) or exercise/LBNP (EX/LBNP) groups. Blood and urine samples were collected before, several times during, and after the 30-day bed rest period. These samples were analyzed for markers of bone and calcium metabolism. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to determine statistical significance. Because identical twins were used, both time and group were treated as repeated variables. RESULTS: Markers of bone resorption were increased during bed rest in samples from sedentary subjects, including the collagen cross-links and serum and urinary calcium concentrations. For N-telopeptide and deoxypyridinoline, there were significant (p < 0.05) interactions between group (SED versus EX/LBNP) and phase of the study (sample collection point). Pyridinium cross-links were increased above pre-bed rest levels in both groups, but the EX/LBNP group had a smaller increase than the SED group. Markers of bone formation were unchanged by bed rest in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that this weight-bearing exercise combined with LBNP ameliorates some of the negative

  1. Thermal comfort modelling of body temperature and psychological variations of a human exercising in an outdoor environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanos, Jennifer K.; Warland, Jon S.; Gillespie, Terry J.; Kenny, Natasha A.

    2012-01-01

    Human thermal comfort assessments pertaining to exercise while in outdoor environments can improve urban and recreational planning. The current study applied a simple four-segment skin temperature approach to the COMFA (COMfort FormulA) outdoor energy balance model. Comparative results of measured mean skin temperature ( {{bar{T}}}nolimits_{{Msk}} ) with predicted {{bar{T}}}nolimits_{{sk}} indicate that the model accurately predicted {{bar{T}}}nolimits_{{sk}} , showing significantly strong agreement ( r = 0.859, P < 0.01) during outdoor exercise (cycling and running). The combined 5-min mean variation of the {{bar{T}}}nolimits_{{sk}} RMSE was 1.5°C, with separate cycling and running giving RMSE of 1.4°C and 1.6°C, respectively, and no significant difference in residuals. Subjects' actual thermal sensation (ATS) votes displayed significant strong rank correlation with budget scores calculated using both measured and predicted {{bar{T}}}nolimits_{{sk}} ( r s = 0.507 and 0.517, respectively, P < 0.01). These results show improved predictive strength of ATS of subjects as compared to the original and updated COMFA models. This psychological improvement, plus {{bar{T}}}nolimits_{{sk}} and T c validations, enables better application to a variety of outdoor spaces. This model can be used in future research studying linkages between thermal discomfort, subsequent decreases in physical activity, and negative health trends.

  2. Moderate treadmill exercise rescues anxiety and depression-like behavior as well as memory impairment in a rat model of posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Patki, Gaurav; Li, Lumeng; Allam, Farida; Solanki, Naimesh; Dao, An T; Alkadhi, Karim; Salim, Samina

    2014-05-10

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a condition which can develop from exposure to a severe traumatic event such as those occurring during wars or natural disasters. Benzodiazepines and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are considered the gold standard for PTSD treatment, but their side effects pose a serious problem. While regular physical exercise is regarded as a mood elevator and known to enhance cognitive function, its direct role in rescuing core symptoms of PTSD including anxiety and depression-like behaviors and cognitive impairment is unclear. In the present study using the single-prolonged stress (SPS) rat model of PTSD (2h restrain, 20 min forced swimming, 15 min rest, and 1-2 min diethyl ether exposure), we examined the beneficial effect of moderate treadmill exercise on SPS-induced behavioral deficits including anxiety and depression-like behaviors and memory impairment. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into four groups: control (sedentary), exercised, SPS (no exercise), or SPS-exercised. Rats were exercised on a rodent treadmill for 14 consecutive days. Rats in all groups were tested for anxiety-like behaviors using open field (OF), light-dark and elevated-plus maze tests. All rats were tested for short-term and long-term memory in the radial arm water maze test. Rats were then sacrificed, blood was collected (for corticosterone levels), and individual organs (spleen, adrenals, and thymus) harvested. Results suggest that moderate physical exercise ameliorates SPS-induced behavioral deficits in rats. PMID:24657739

  3. Evaluation of a lake whitefish bioenergetics model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; O'Connor, Daniel V.; Pothoven, Steven A.; Schneeberger, Philip J.; Rediske, Richard R.; O'Keefe, James P.; Bergstedt, Roger A.; Argyle, Ray L.; Brandt, Stephen B.

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the Wisconsin bioenergetics model for lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis in the laboratory and in the field. For the laboratory evaluation, lake whitefish were fed rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax in four laboratory tanks during a 133-d experiment. Based on a comparison of bioenergetics model predictions of lake whitefish food consumption and growth with observed consumption and growth, we concluded that the bioenergetics model furnished significantly biased estimates of both food consumption and growth. On average, the model overestimated consumption by 61% and underestimated growth by 16%. The source of the bias was probably an overestimation of the respiration rate. We therefore adjusted the respiration component of the bioenergetics model to obtain a good fit of the model to the observed consumption and growth in our laboratory tanks. Based on the adjusted model, predictions of food consumption over the 133-d period fell within 5% of observed consumption in three of the four tanks and within 9% of observed consumption in the remaining tank. We used polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) as a tracer to evaluate model performance in the field. Based on our laboratory experiment, the efficiency with which lake whitefish retained PCBs from their food (I?) was estimated at 0.45. We applied the bioenergetics model to Lake Michigan lake whitefish and then used PCB determinations of both lake whitefish and their prey from Lake Michigan to estimate p in the field. Application of the original model to Lake Michigan lake whitefish yielded a field estimate of 0.28, implying that the original formulation of the model overestimated consumption in Lake Michigan by 61%. Application of the bioenergetics model with the adjusted respiration component resulted in a field I? estimate of 0.56, implying that this revised model underestimated consumption by 20%.

  4. The Discrepancy Evaluation Model. I. Basic Tenets of the Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinmetz, Andres

    1976-01-01

    The basic principles of the discrepancy evaluation model (DEM), developed by Malcolm Provus, are presented. The three concepts which are essential to DEM are defined: (1) the standard is a description of how something should be; (2) performance measures are used to find out the actual characteristics of the object being evaluated; and (3) the…

  5. Circadian rhythms and depression: effects of exercise in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Solberg, L C; Horton, T H; Turek, F W

    1999-01-01

    There is a clear link between altered circadian rhythms and depressive disorders, although the nature of this relationship is unknown. In addition, exercise affects both mood and alters clock function. To investigate the relationship between circadian rhythms, depression, and exercise, 3-wk-old mice housed on a 12:12-h light-dark cycle were exposed to chronic stress (CS) for 6 wk before being placed into constant darkness (DD). One-half of both the control and stressed mice were given access to a running wheel. Stressed mice consumed significantly less of a 2% sucrose solution during CS and exhibited a significant increase in immobility in the forced swim test 3 wk after the termination of stress relative to control mice. These effects were more pronounced in mice without running wheels. Stressed mice also exhibited altered percent distribution of total activity and increased fragmentation of daily activity rhythms during CS relative to control mice. Alterations in percent distribution were more pronounced in animals without running wheels. No activity rhythm changes were seen in DD, and there were no differences in light-induced phase shifts between stressed and control mice. These results suggest that CS causes long-term depressive-like symptoms but does not have long-lasting effects on activity rhythms. These changes were more pronounced in mice without running wheels, suggesting that exercise may protect against the harmful effects of stress. PMID:9887189

  6. Saphire models and software for ASP evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Sattison, M.B.

    1997-02-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) over the three years has created 75 plant-specific Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) models using the SAPHIRE suite of PRA codes. Along with the new models, the INEL has also developed a new module for SAPHIRE which is tailored specifically to the unique needs of ASP evaluations. These models and software will be the next generation of risk tools for the evaluation of accident precursors by both the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR) and the Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD). This paper presents an overview of the models and software. Key characteristics include: (1) classification of the plant models according to plant response with a unique set of event trees for each plant class, (2) plant-specific fault trees using supercomponents, (3) generation and retention of all system and sequence cutsets, (4) full flexibility in modifying logic, regenerating cutsets, and requantifying results, and (5) user interface for streamlined evaluation of ASP events. Future plans for the ASP models is also presented.

  7. Multi-criteria evaluation of hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakovec, Oldrich; Clark, Martyn; Weerts, Albrecht; Hill, Mary; Teuling, Ryan; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2013-04-01

    Over the last years, there is a tendency in the hydrological community to move from the simple conceptual models towards more complex, physically/process-based hydrological models. This is because conceptual models often fail to simulate the dynamics of the observations. However, there is little agreement on how much complexity needs to be considered within the complex process-based models. One way to proceed to is to improve understanding of what is important and unimportant in the models considered. The aim of this ongoing study is to evaluate structural model adequacy using alternative conceptual and process-based models of hydrological systems, with an emphasis on understanding how model complexity relates to observed hydrological processes. Some of the models require considerable execution time and the computationally frugal sensitivity analysis, model calibration and uncertainty quantification methods are well-suited to providing important insights for models with lengthy execution times. The current experiment evaluates two version of the Framework for Understanding Structural Errors (FUSE), which both enable running model inter-comparison experiments. One supports computationally efficient conceptual models, and the second supports more-process-based models that tend to have longer execution times. The conceptual FUSE combines components of 4 existing conceptual hydrological models. The process-based framework consists of different forms of Richard's equations, numerical solutions, groundwater parameterizations and hydraulic conductivity distribution. The hydrological analysis of the model processes has evolved from focusing only on simulated runoff (final model output), to also including other criteria such as soil moisture and groundwater levels. Parameter importance and associated structural importance are evaluated using different types of sensitivity analyses techniques, making use of both robust global methods (e.g. Sobol') as well as several

  8. Evaluating the uncertainty of input quantities in measurement models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Possolo, Antonio; Elster, Clemens

    2014-06-01

    The Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) gives guidance about how values and uncertainties should be assigned to the input quantities that appear in measurement models. This contribution offers a concrete proposal for how that guidance may be updated in light of the advances in the evaluation and expression of measurement uncertainty that were made in the course of the twenty years that have elapsed since the publication of the GUM, and also considering situations that the GUM does not yet contemplate. Our motivation is the ongoing conversation about a new edition of the GUM. While generally we favour a Bayesian approach to uncertainty evaluation, we also recognize the value that other approaches may bring to the problems considered here, and focus on methods for uncertainty evaluation and propagation that are widely applicable, including to cases that the GUM has not yet addressed. In addition to Bayesian methods, we discuss maximum-likelihood estimation, robust statistical methods, and measurement models where values of nominal properties play the same role that input quantities play in traditional models. We illustrate these general-purpose techniques in concrete examples, employing data sets that are realistic but that also are of conveniently small sizes. The supplementary material available online lists the R computer code that we have used to produce these examples (stacks.iop.org/Met/51/3/339/mmedia). Although we strive to stay close to clause 4 of the GUM, which addresses the evaluation of uncertainty for input quantities, we depart from it as we review the classes of measurement models that we believe are generally useful in contemporary measurement science. We also considerably expand and update the treatment that the GUM gives to Type B evaluations of uncertainty: reviewing the state-of-the-art, disciplined approach to the elicitation of expert knowledge, and its encapsulation in probability distributions that are usable in

  9. A factorial randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effect of micronutrients supplementation and regular aerobic exercise on maternal endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and oxidative stress of the newborn

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many studies have suggested a relationship between metabolic abnormalities and impaired fetal growth with the development of non-transmissible chronic diseases in the adulthood. Moreover, it has been proposed that maternal factors such as endothelial function and oxidative stress are key mechanisms of both fetal metabolic alterations and subsequent development of non-transmissible chronic diseases. The objective of this project is to evaluate the effect of micronutrient supplementation and regular aerobic exercise on endothelium-dependent vasodilation maternal and stress oxidative of the newborn. Methods and design 320 pregnant women attending to usual prenatal care in Cali, Colombia will be included in a factorial randomized controlled trial. Women will be assigned to the following intervention groups: 1. Control group: usual prenatal care (PC) and placebo (maltodextrine). 2. Exercise group: PC, placebo and aerobic physical exercise. 3. Micronutrients group: PC and a micronutrients capsule consisting of zinc (30 mg), selenium (70 μg), vitamin A (400 μg), alphatocopherol (30 mg), vitamin C (200 mg), and niacin (100 mg). 4. Combined interventions Group: PC, supplementation of micronutrients, and aerobic physical exercise. Anthropometric measures will be taken at the start and at the end of the interventions. Discussion Since in previous studies has been showed that the maternal endothelial function and oxidative stress are related to oxidative stress of the newborn, this study proposes that complementation with micronutrients during pregnancy and/or regular physical exercise can be an early and innovative alternative to strengthen the prevention of chronic diseases in the population. Trial registration NCT00872365. PMID:21356082

  10. Evaluation of trends in wheat yield models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    Trend terms in models for wheat yield in the U.S. Great Plains for the years 1932 to 1976 are evaluated. The subset of meteorological variables yielding the largest adjusted R(2) is selected using the method of leaps and bounds. Latent root regression is used to eliminate multicollinearities, and generalized ridge regression is used to introduce bias to provide stability in the data matrix. The regression model used provides for two trends in each of two models: a dependent model in which the trend line is piece-wise continuous, and an independent model in which the trend line is discontinuous at the year of the slope change. It was found that the trend lines best describing the wheat yields consisted of combinations of increasing, decreasing, and constant trend: four combinations for the dependent model and seven for the independent model.

  11. Journal ratings as predictors of articles quality in Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences: an analysis based on the Italian Research Evaluation Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Bonaccorsi, Andrea; Cicero, Tindaro; Ferrara, Antonio; Malgarini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to understand whether the probability of receiving positive peer reviews is influenced by having published in an independently assessed, high-ranking journal: we eventually interpret a positive relationship among peer evaluation and journal ranking as evidence that journal ratings are good predictors of article quality. The analysis is based on a large dataset of over 11,500 research articles published in Italy in the period 2004-2010 in the areas of architecture, arts and humanities, history and philosophy, law, sociology and political sciences. These articles received a score by a large number of externally appointed referees in the context of the Italian research assessment exercise (VQR); similarly, journal scores were assigned in a panel-based independent assessment, which involved all academic journals in which Italian scholars have published, carried out under a different procedure. The score of an article is compared with that of the journal it is published in: more specifically, we first estimate an ordered probit model, assessing the probability for a paper of receiving a higher score, the higher the score of the journal; in a second step, we concentrate on the top papers, evaluating the probability of a paper receiving an excellent score having been published in a top-rated journal. In doing so, we control for a number of characteristics of the paper and its author, including the language of publication, the scientific field and its size, the age of the author and the academic status. We add to the literature on journal classification by providing for the first time a large scale test of the robustness of expert-based classification. PMID:26309731

  12. Dynamic Multicriteria Evaluation of Conceptual Hydrological Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vos, N. J.; Rientjes, T. H.; Fenicia, F.; Gupta, H. V.

    2007-12-01

    Accurate and precise forecasts of river streamflows are crucial for successful management of water resources and under the threat of hydrological extremes such as floods and droughts. Conceptual rainfall-runoff models are the most popular approach in flood forecasting. However, the calibration and evaluation of such models is often oversimplified by the use of performance statistics that largely ignore the dynamic character of a watershed system. This research aims to find novel ways of model evaluation by identifying periods of hydrologic similarity and customizing evaluation within each period using multiple criteria. A dynamic approach to hydrologic model identification, calibration and testing can be realized by applying clustering algorithms (e.g., Self-Organizing Map, Fuzzy C-means algorithm) to hydrological data. These algorithms are able to identify clusters in the data that represent periods of hydrological similarity. In this way, dynamic catchment system behavior can be simplified within the clusters that are identified. Although clustering requires a number of subjective choices, new insights into the hydrological functioning of a catchment can be obtained. Finally, separate model multi-criteria calibration and evaluation is performed for each of the clusters. Such a model evaluation procedure shows to be reliable and gives much-needed feedback on exactly where certain model structures fail. Several clustering algorithms were tested on two data sets of meso-scale and large-scale catchments. The results show that the clustering algorithms define categories that reflect hydrological process understanding: dry/wet seasons, rising/falling hydrograph limbs, precipitation-driven/ non-driven periods, etc. The results of various clustering algorithms are compared and validated using expert knowledge. Calibration results on a conceptual hydrological model show that the common practice of single-criteria calibration over the complete time series fails to perform

  13. Evaluating network models: A likelihood analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-Qiang; Zhang, Qian-Ming; Zhou, Tao

    2012-04-01

    Many models are put forward to mimic the evolution of real networked systems. A well-accepted way to judge the validity is to compare the modeling results with real networks subject to several structural features. Even for a specific real network, we cannot fairly evaluate the goodness of different models since there are too many structural features while there is no criterion to select and assign weights on them. Motivated by the studies on link prediction algorithms, we propose a unified method to evaluate the network models via the comparison of the likelihoods of the currently observed network driven by different models, with an assumption that the higher the likelihood is, the more accurate the model is. We test our method on the real Internet at the Autonomous System (AS) level, and the results suggest that the Generalized Linear Preferential (GLP) model outperforms the Tel Aviv Network Generator (Tang), while both two models are better than the Barabási-Albert (BA) and Erdös-Rényi (ER) models. Our method can be further applied in determining the optimal values of parameters that correspond to the maximal likelihood. The experiment indicates that the parameters obtained by our method can better capture the characters of newly added nodes and links in the AS-level Internet than the original methods in the literature.

  14. Melatonin combined with exercise cannot alleviate cerebral injury in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seunghoon; Shin, Jinhee; Lee, Minkyung; Hong, Yunkyung; Lee, Sang-Kil; Lee, Youngjeon; Lkhagvasuren, Tserentogtokh; Kim, Dong-Wook; Yang, Young-Ae; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Hong, Yonggeun

    2012-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that melatonin combined with exercise can alleviate secondary damage after spinal cord injury in rats. Therefore, it is hypothesized that melatonin combined with exercise can also alleviate ischemic brain damage. In this study, adult rats were subjected to right middle cerebral artery occlusion after receiving 10 mg/kg melatonin or vehicle subcutaneously twice daily for 14 days. Forced exercise using an animal treadmill was performed at 20 m/min for 30 minutes per day for 6 days prior to middle cerebral artery occlusion. After middle cerebral artery occlusion, each rat received melatonin combined with exercise, melatonin or exercise alone equally for 7 days until sacrifice. Interestingly, rats receiving melatonin combined with exercise exhibited more severe neurological deficits than those receiving melatonin or exercise alone. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α mRNA in the brain tissue was upregulated in rats receiving melatonin combined with exercise. Similarly, microtubule associated protein-2 mRNA expression was significantly upregulated in rats receiving melatonin alone. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (NG2) mRNA expression was significantly decreased in rats receiving melatonin combined with exercise as well as in rats receiving exercise alone. Furthermore, neural cell loss in the primary motor cortex was significantly reduced in rats receiving melatonin or exercise alone, but the change was not observed in rats receiving melatonin combined with exercise. These findings suggest that excessive intervention with melatonin, exercise or their combination may lead to negative effects on ischemia/reperfusion-induced brain damage. PMID:25722687

  15. PREFACE SPECIAL ISSUE ON MODEL EVALUATION: EVALUATION OF URBAN AND REGIONAL EULERIAN AIR QUALITY MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The "Preface to the Special Edition on Model Evaluation: Evaluation of Urban and Regional Eulerian Air Quality Models" is a brief introduction to the papers included in a special issue of Atmospheric Environment. The Preface provides a background for the papers, which have thei...

  16. Can exercise prevent cognitive decline?

    PubMed

    Behrman, Sophie; Ebmeier, Klaus P

    2014-01-01

    As the tolerability of pharmacological agents decreases with age, exercise may be particularly helpful as a possible treatment or stabiliser of mood and cognitive function in older age. Exercise has been most commonly evaluated for the treatment of depression. Exercise interventions designed primarily for treatment of physical conditions in the elderly do appear to confer psychological benefits as well, with reduction in depressive symptoms over the course of treatment. The effects of exercise on reducing depressive symptoms are not dissimilar to the effects of antidepressant drugs and cognitive behaviour therapy. Exercise may be a useful low-tech intervention for people with mild to moderate depression. In particular, exercise may be helpful in the elderly and in patients who have had insufficient response to, or are intolerant of, pharmacotherapy. Mastery of a new skill and positive feedback from others may increase feelings of self-esteem and improve mood. Exercise may distract participants from persistent negative thoughts. Exercise has been shown to improve executive function acutely in adults of all ages. It is possible that dance routines or other exercise regimens requiring some cognitive input may confer additional benefit to cognitive function. Exercise has a moderate effect on the ability of people with dementia to perform activities of daily living and may improve cognitive function. Midlife exercise may also have an impact on later cognitive function. PMID:24617099

  17. Evaluation of a habitat suitability index model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farmer, A.H.; Cade, B.S.; Stauffer, D.F.

    2002-01-01

    We assisted with development of a model for maternity habitat of the Indiana bat (Myotis soda/is), for use in conducting assessments of projects potentially impacting this endangered species. We started with an existing model, modified that model in a workshop, and evaluated the revised model, using data previously collected by others. Our analyses showed that higher indices of habitat suitability were associated with sites where Indiana bats were present and, thus, the model may be useful for identifying suitable habitat. Utility of the model, however, was based on a single component-density of suitable roost trees. Percentage of landscape in forest did not allow differentiation between sites occupied and not occupied by Indiana bats. Moreover, in spite of a general opinion by participants in the workshop that bodies of water were highly productive feeding areas and that a diversity of feeding habitats was optimal, we found no evidence to support either hypothesis.

  18. Performance Evaluation of Dense Gas Dispersion Models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touma, Jawad S.; Cox, William M.; Thistle, Harold; Zapert, James G.

    1995-03-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a study to evaluate the performance of seven dense gas dispersion models using data from three field experiments. Two models (DEGADIS and SLAB) are in the public domain and the other five (AIRTOX, CHARM, FOCUS, SAFEMODE, and TRACE) are proprietary. The field data used are the Desert Tortoise pressurized ammonia releases, Burro liquefied natural gas spill tests, and the Goldfish anhydrous hydrofluoric acid spill experiments. Desert Tortoise and Goldfish releases were simulated as horizontal jet releases, and Burro as a liquid pool. Performance statistics were used to compare maximum observed concentrations and plume half-width to those predicted by each model. Model performance varied and no model exhibited consistently good performance across all three databases. However, when combined across the three databases, all models performed within a factor of 2. Problems encountered are discussed in order to help future investigators.

  19. Influence of Exercise on Bone Remodeling-Related Hormones and Cytokines in Ovariectomized Rats: A Model of Postmenopausal Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lihui; Chen, Xi; Lv, Shuang; Dong, Miaomiao; Zhang, Li; Tu, Jiaheng; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Lingli; Song, Yinan; Xu, Leiting; Zou, Jun

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to explore the effects of exercise on postmenopausal osteoporosis and the mechanisms by which exercise affects bone remodeling. Sixty-three Wistar female rats were randomly divided into five groups: (1) control group, (2) sham-operated group, (3) OVX (Ovariectomy) group, (4) DES-OVX (Diethylstilbestrol-OVX) group, and (5) Ex-OVX (Exercise-OVX) group. The rat osteoporosis model was established through ovariectomy. The Ex-OVX rats were made to run 251.2 meters every day, 6 d/wk for 3 months in a running wheel. Trabecular bone volume (TBV%), total resorption surface (TRS%), trabecular formation surface (TFS%), mineralization rate (MAR), bone cortex mineralization rate (mAR), and osteoid seam width (OSW) were determined by bone histomorphometry. The mRNA and protein levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β2), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) were determined by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Serum levels of estrogen estradiol (E2), calcitonin (CT), osteocalcin (BGP), and parathyroid hormone (PTH) were determined by ELISA assays. The investigation revealed that compared to the control and the sham-operated groups, the OVX group showed significantly lower levels of TBV%, E2, and CT, but much higher levels of TRS%, TFS%, MAR, OSW, BGP, and PTH. The Ex-OVX group showed increased TBV% and serum levels of E2 and CT compared to the OVX group. Ovariectomy also led to a significant increase in IL-1β mRNA and protein levels in the bone marrow and IL-6 and Cox-2 protein levels in tibias. In addition, the Ex-OVX group showed lower levels of IL-1 mRNA and protein, IL-6 mRNA, and Cox-2 mRNA and protein than those in the OVX group. The upshot of the study suggests that exercise can significantly increase bone mass in postmenopausal osteoporosis rat models by inhibiting bone resorption and increasing bone formation, especially in trabecular bones. PMID:25393283

  20. Optical Storage Performance Modeling and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behera, Bailochan; Singh, Harpreet

    1990-01-01

    Evaluates different types of storage media for long-term archival storage of large amounts of data. Existing storage media are reviewed, including optical disks, optical tape, magnetic storage, and microfilm; three models are proposed based on document storage requirements; performance analysis is considered; and cost effectiveness is discussed.…

  1. Evaluation of Usability Utilizing Markov Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penedo, Janaina Rodrigues; Diniz, Morganna; Ferreira, Simone Bacellar Leal; Silveira, Denis S.; Capra, Eliane

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyze the usability of a remote learning system in its initial development phase, using a quantitative usability evaluation method through Markov models. Design/methodology/approach: The paper opted for an exploratory study. The data of interest of the research correspond to the possible accesses of users…

  2. Evaluation of help model replacement codes

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteside, Tad; Hang, Thong; Flach, Gregory

    2009-07-01

    This work evaluates the computer codes that are proposed to be used to predict percolation of water through the closure-cap and into the waste containment zone at the Department of Energy closure sites. This work compares the currently used water-balance code (HELP) with newly developed computer codes that use unsaturated flow (Richards’ equation). It provides a literature review of the HELP model and the proposed codes, which result in two recommended codes for further evaluation: HYDRUS-2D3D and VADOSE/W. This further evaluation involved performing actual simulations on a simple model and comparing the results of those simulations to those obtained with the HELP code and the field data. From the results of this work, we conclude that the new codes perform nearly the same, although moving forward, we recommend HYDRUS-2D3D.

  3. Evaluation of a Mysis bioenergetics model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chipps, S.R.; Bennett, D.H.

    2002-01-01

    Direct approaches for estimating the feeding rate of the opossum shrimp Mysis relicta can be hampered by variable gut residence time (evacuation rate models) and non-linear functional responses (clearance rate models). Bioenergetics modeling provides an alternative method, but the reliability of this approach needs to be evaluated using independent measures of growth and food consumption. In this study, we measured growth and food consumption for M. relicta and compared experimental results with those predicted from a Mysis bioenergetics model. For Mysis reared at 10??C, model predictions were not significantly different from observed values. Moreover, decomposition of mean square error indicated that 70% of the variation between model predictions and observed values was attributable to random error. On average, model predictions were within 12% of observed values. A sensitivity analysis revealed that Mysis respiration and prey energy density were the most sensitive parameters affecting model output. By accounting for uncertainty (95% CLs) in Mysis respiration, we observed a significant improvement in the accuracy of model output (within 5% of observed values), illustrating the importance of sensitive input parameters for model performance. These findings help corroborate the Mysis bioenergetics model and demonstrate the usefulness of this approach for estimating Mysis feeding rate.

  4. Exercise effects on lipids in persons with varying dietary patterns - Does diet matter if they exercise? Responses in STRRIDE I

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, Kim M.; Hawk, Victoria H.; Henes, Sarah T.; Ocampo, Christine I.; Orenduff, Melissa C.; Slentz, Cris A.; Johnson, Johanna L.; Houmard, Joseph A.; Samsa, Gregory P.; Kraus, William E.; Bales, Connie W.

    2012-01-01

    Background The standard clinical approach for reducing cardiovascular disease risk due to dyslipidemia is to prescribe changes in diet and physical activity. The purpose of the current study was to determine if, across a range of dietary patterns, there were variable lipoprotein responses to an aerobic exercise training intervention. Methods Subjects were participants in the Studies of a Targeted Risk Reduction Intervention through Defined Exercise (STRRIDE I), a supervised exercise program in sedentary, overweight subjects randomized to 6 months of inactivity or one of 3 aerobic exercise programs. To characterize diet patterns observed during the study, we calculated a modified z-score that included intakes of total fat, saturated fat, trans fatty acids, cholesterol, omega-3 fatty acids and fiber as compared to the 2006 AHA diet recommendations. Linear models were used to evaluate relationships between diet patterns and exercise effects on lipoproteins/lipids. Results Independent of diet, exercise had beneficial effects on LDL-cholesterol particle number, LDL-cholesterol size, HDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol size, and triglycerides (P<0.05 for all). However, having a diet pattern that closely adhered to AHA recommendations was not related to changes in these or any other serum lipids or lipoproteins in any of the exercise groups. Conclusions We found that even in sedentary individuals whose habitual diets vary in the extent of adherence to AHA dietary recommendations, a rigorous, supervised exercise intervention can achieve significant beneficial lipid effects. PMID:22795291

  5. Development and validation of a health belief model based instrument for measuring factors influencing exercise behaviors to prevent osteoporosis in pre-menopausal women (HOPE)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The health belief model (HBM) is the most commonly used conceptual framework for evaluating osteoporosis health belief and behaviors. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate the psychometric properties of a health belief model based questionnaire for exercise behavior for preventing osteoporosis among women aged 30 years and over. Methods This was a cross sectional study of a convenience sample of women aged 30 years and over in Tehran, Iran using a theory-based instrument (HOPE). The instrument contained 39 items covering issues relate to osteoporosis prevention behavior. In this methodological study, exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used for psychometric evaluation. The Cronbach’s alpha coefficient and Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate the reliability of the scale. Results In all 240 women participated in the study. The mean age of participant was 39.2 ± 7.8 years. The initial analysis extracted nine factors for the questionnaire that jointly accounted for 66.5% of variance observed. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the data obtained was fit with Health Belief Model (HBM) and self-regulation construct (X2 = 1132.80, df = 629, P < 0.0001, CFI = 0.94, GFI = 0.91, RMSEA = 0.05 and SRMR = 0.06). The Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for the subscales ranged from 0.72 to 0.90 and Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) ranged from 0.71 to 0.98; well above acceptable thresholds. Conclusions The HOPE was found to be appropriate instrument for measuring health belief and self-regulation for prevention of osteoporosis. PMID:24581300

  6. Evaluation (not validation) of quantitative models.

    PubMed Central

    Oreskes, N

    1998-01-01

    The present regulatory climate has led to increasing demands for scientists to attest to the predictive reliability of numerical simulation models used to help set public policy, a process frequently referred to as model validation. But while model validation may reveal useful information, this paper argues that it is not possible to demonstrate the predictive reliability of any model of a complex natural system in advance of its actual use. All models embed uncertainties, and these uncertainties can and frequently do undermine predictive reliability. In the case of lead in the environment, we may categorize model uncertainties as theoretical, empirical, parametrical, and temporal. Theoretical uncertainties are aspects of the system that are not fully understood, such as the biokinetic pathways of lead metabolism. Empirical uncertainties are aspects of the system that are difficult (or impossible) to measure, such as actual lead ingestion by an individual child. Parametrical uncertainties arise when complexities in the system are simplified to provide manageable model input, such as representing longitudinal lead exposure by cross-sectional measurements. Temporal uncertainties arise from the assumption that systems are stable in time. A model may also be conceptually flawed. The Ptolemaic system of astronomy is a historical example of a model that was empirically adequate but based on a wrong conceptualization. Yet had it been computerized--and had the word then existed--its users would have had every right to call it validated. Thus, rather than talking about strategies for validation, we should be talking about means of evaluation. That is not to say that language alone will solve our problems or that the problems of model evaluation are primarily linguistic. The uncertainties inherent in large, complex models will not go away simply because we change the way we talk about them. But this is precisely the point: calling a model validated does not make it valid

  7. Evaluation (not validation) of quantitative models.

    PubMed

    Oreskes, N

    1998-12-01

    The present regulatory climate has led to increasing demands for scientists to attest to the predictive reliability of numerical simulation models used to help set public policy, a process frequently referred to as model validation. But while model validation may reveal useful information, this paper argues that it is not possible to demonstrate the predictive reliability of any model of a complex natural system in advance of its actual use. All models embed uncertainties, and these uncertainties can and frequently do undermine predictive reliability. In the case of lead in the environment, we may categorize model uncertainties as theoretical, empirical, parametrical, and temporal. Theoretical uncertainties are aspects of the system that are not fully understood, such as the biokinetic pathways of lead metabolism. Empirical uncertainties are aspects of the system that are difficult (or impossible) to measure, such as actual lead ingestion by an individual child. Parametrical uncertainties arise when complexities in the system are simplified to provide manageable model input, such as representing longitudinal lead exposure by cross-sectional measurements. Temporal uncertainties arise from the assumption that systems are stable in time. A model may also be conceptually flawed. The Ptolemaic system of astronomy is a historical example of a model that was empirically adequate but based on a wrong conceptualization. Yet had it been computerized--and had the word then existed--its users would have had every right to call it validated. Thus, rather than talking about strategies for validation, we should be talking about means of evaluation. That is not to say that language alone will solve our problems or that the problems of model evaluation are primarily linguistic. The uncertainties inherent in large, complex models will not go away simply because we change the way we talk about them. But this is precisely the point: calling a model validated does not make it valid

  8. Predictive Ability of Pender's Health Promotion Model for Physical Activity and Exercise in People with Spinal Cord Injuries: A Hierarchical Regression Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keegan, John P.; Chan, Fong; Ditchman, Nicole; Chiu, Chung-Yi

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to validate Pender's Health Promotion Model (HPM) as a motivational model for exercise/physical activity self-management for people with spinal cord injuries (SCIs). Quantitative descriptive research design using hierarchical regression analysis (HRA) was used. A total of 126 individuals with SCI were recruited…

  9. Exercise attenuates neuropathology and has greater benefit on cognitive than motor deficits in the R6/1 Huntington's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Harrison, David J; Busse, Monica; Openshaw, Rebecca; Rosser, Anne E; Dunnett, Stephen B; Brooks, Simon P

    2013-10-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by a mutation within the huntingtin gene that induces degeneration within the striatal nuclei, progressing to widespread brain atrophy and death. The neurodegeneration produces symptoms that reflect a corticostriatal disconnection syndrome involving motor, cognitive and psychiatric disturbance. Environmental enrichment has been demonstrated to be beneficial to patients with neurological disorders, with exercise being central to this effect. Rodent studies have confirmed exercise-induced neurogenesis and increased growth factor levels in the brain and improved behavioural function. The present study sought to determine whether an extended regime of exercise could retard disease progression in the R6/1 mouse model of HD. The study was designed specifically with a translational focus, selecting behavioural assessments with high clinical predictive validity. We found that exercise improved gait function in both control and HD mice and selectively improved performance in the R6/1 mice on a motor coordination aspect of the balance beam task. Exercise also retarded the progression of cognitive dysfunction on water T-maze procedural and reversal learning probes presented serially to probe cognitive flexibility. In addition, exercise reduced striatal neuron loss in the R6/1 mice but increased striatal neuronal intra-nuclear inclusion size and number relative to non-exercised R6/1 mice which demonstrated increased numbers of extra-neuronal inclusions, suggesting that the functional effects were striatally mediated. These results confirm and extend those from previous studies that demonstrate that HD may be amenable to exercise-mediated therapeutics, but suggest that the impact of such interventions may be primarily cognitive. PMID:23911978

  10. A model evaluation checklist for process-based environmental models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson-Blake, Leah

    2015-04-01

    Mechanistic catchment-scale phosphorus models appear to perform poorly where diffuse sources dominate. The reasons for this were investigated for one commonly-applied model, the INtegrated model of CAtchment Phosphorus (INCA-P). Model output was compared to 18 months of daily water quality monitoring data in a small agricultural catchment in Scotland, and model structure, key model processes and internal model responses were examined. Although the model broadly reproduced dissolved phosphorus dynamics, it struggled with particulates. The reasons for poor performance were explored, together with ways in which improvements could be made. The process of critiquing and assessing model performance was then generalised to provide a broadly-applicable model evaluation checklist, incorporating: (1) Calibration challenges, relating to difficulties in thoroughly searching a high-dimensional parameter space and in selecting appropriate means of evaluating model performance. In this study, for example, model simplification was identified as a necessary improvement to reduce the number of parameters requiring calibration, whilst the traditionally-used Nash Sutcliffe model performance statistic was not able to discriminate between realistic and unrealistic model simulations, and alternative statistics were needed. (2) Data limitations, relating to a lack of (or uncertainty in) input data, data to constrain model parameters, data for model calibration and testing, and data to test internal model processes. In this study, model reliability could be improved by addressing all four kinds of data limitation. For example, there was insufficient surface water monitoring data for model testing against an independent dataset to that used in calibration, whilst additional monitoring of groundwater and effluent phosphorus inputs would help distinguish between alternative plausible model parameterisations. (3) Model structural inadequacies, whereby model structure may inadequately represent

  11. A Mixed Method Evaluation of an Undergraduate Physical Education and Exercise Science Program as It Relates to Professional Preparedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolciato, Ronald P.

    2010-01-01

    Colleges and universities are being held more and more accountable for outcomes. Therefore, it is important that a college knows how its curriculum truly prepares individual students for their desired field of employment. This study was completed to determine the extent to which graduates of a physical education and exercise science program…

  12. The development and evaluation of a program for leg-strengthening exercises and balance assessment using Kinect

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin-Seung; Kang, Dong-Won; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Dae-Hyeok; Yang, Seung-Tae; Tack, Gye-Rae

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] In this study, a program was developed for leg-strengthening exercises and balance assessment using Microsoft Kinect. [Subjects and Methods] The program consists of three leg-strengthening exercises (knee flexion, hip flexion, and hip extension) and the one-leg standing test (OLST). The program recognizes the correct exercise posture by comparison with the range of motion of the hip and knee joints and provides a number of correct action examples to improve training. The program measures the duration of the OLST and presents this as the balance-age. The accuracy of the program was analyzed using the data of five male adults. [Results] In terms of the motion recognition accuracy, the sensitivity and specificity were 95.3% and 100%, respectively. For the balance assessment, the time measured using the existing method with a stopwatch had an absolute error of 0.37 sec. [Conclusion] The developed program can be used to enable users to conduct leg-strengthening exercises and balance assessments at home. PMID:26957724

  13. Promoting Exercise as Part of a Physiotherapy-Led Falls Pathway Service for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: A Service Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crockett, Jennifer; Finlayson, Janet; Skelton, Dawn A.; Miller, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disabilities experience high rates of falls. Balance and gait problems are common in people with intellectual disabilities, increasing the likelihood of falls; thus, tailored exercise interventions to improve gait and balance are recommended. The present authors set up a physiotherapy-led falls pathway service…

  14. Evaluating model accuracy for model-based reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Roden, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    Described here is an approach to automatically assessing the accuracy of various components of a model. In this approach, actual data from the operation of a target system is used to drive statistical measures to evaluate the prediction accuracy of various portions of the model. We describe how these statistical measures of model accuracy can be used in model-based reasoning for monitoring and design. We then describe the application of these techniques to the monitoring and design of the water recovery system of the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) of Space Station Freedom.

  15. AERMOD: Model formulation and evaluation results

    SciTech Connect

    Paine, R.J.; Lee, R.; Brode, R.; Wilson, R.; Cimorelli, A.; Perry, S.G.; Weil, J.; Venkatram, A.; Peters, W.

    1999-07-01

    AERMOD is an advanced plume model that incorporates updated treatments of the boundary layer theory, understanding of turbulence and dispersion, and includes handling of terrain interactions. This paper presents an overview of AERMOD's features relative to ISCST3. AERMOD has been evaluated on 10 databases, which include flat and hilly terrain areas, urban and rural sites, and a mixture of tracer experiments as well as routine monitoring networks with a limited number of fixed monitoring sites. This paper presents a summary of the evaluation results of AERMOD with these diverse databases.

  16. AERMOD: Model formulation and evaluation results

    SciTech Connect

    Paine, R.; Lee, R.; Brode, R.; Wilson, R.; Cimorelli, A.

    1999-07-01

    AERMOD is an advanced plume model that incorporates update treatment of the boundary treatments of the boundary layer theory, understanding of turbulence and dispersion, and includes handling of terrain interactions. This paper presents an overview of AERMOD`s features relatives of ISCST3. AERMOD has been evaluated on 10 databases, which include flat and hilly terrain areas, urban and rural sites, and a mixture of tracer experiments as well as routine monitoring networks with a limited number of fixed monitoring sites. This paper presents a summary of the evaluation results of AERMOD with these diverse databases.

  17. Ultra-Short-Term Heart Rate Variability Indexes at Rest and Post-Exercise in Athletes: Evaluating the Agreement with Accepted Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Esco, Michael R.; Flatt, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the agreement of the vagal-related heart rate variability index, log-transformed root mean square of successive R-R intervals (lnRMSSD), measured under ultra-short-term conditions (< 60 seconds) with conventional longer term recordings of 5 minutes in collegiate athletes under resting and post-exercise conditions. Electrocardiographic readings were collected from twenty-three athletes within 5-minute segments at rest and at 25-30 minutes of supine recovery following a maximal exercise test. From each 5-minute segment, lnRMSSD was recorded as the criterion measure. Within each 5-minute segment, lnRMSSD was also determined from randomly selected ultra-short-term segments of 10-, 30-, and 60-seconds in length, which were compared to the criterion. When compared to the criterion measures, the significant intraclass correlation (from 0.98 to 0.81, p < 0.05) and typical error (from 0.11 to 0.34) increased as ultra-short-term measurement duration decreased (i.e., from 60 seconds to 10 seconds). In addition, the limits of agreement (Bias ± 1.98 SD) increased as ultra-short-term lnRMSSD duration decreased as follows: 0.00 ± 0.22 ms, -0.07 ± 0.41 ms, -0.20 ± 0.94 ms for the 60-, 30-, and 10-second pre-exercise segments, respectively, and -0.15 ± 0.39 ms, -0.14 ± 0.53 ms, -0.12 ± 0.76 ms for the 60-, 30-, and 10-second post-exercise segments, respectively. This study demonstrated that as ultra-short-term measurement duration decreased from 60 seconds to 10 seconds, the agreement to the criterion decreased. Therefore, 60 seconds appears to be an acceptable recording time for lnRMSSD data collection in collegiate athletes. Key Points The log-transformed root mean square of successive R-R intervals (lnRMSSD) is a vagal-related heart rate variability index that has become a promising method for monitoring individual adaptation to training when measured during resting or post-exercise conditions. This study demonstrated that ln

  18. High Intensity Aerobic Exercise Training Improves Deficits of Cardiovascular Autonomic Function in a Rat Model of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus with Moderate Hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Grisé, Kenneth N; Olver, T Dylan; McDonald, Matthew W; Dey, Adwitia; Jiang, Mao; Lacefield, James C; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Noble, Earl G; Melling, C W James

    2016-01-01

    Indices of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in experimental models of Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) are often contrary to clinical data. Here, we investigated whether a relatable insulin-treated model of T1DM would induce deficits in cardiovascular (CV) autonomic function more reflective of clinical results and if exercise training could prevent those deficits. Sixty-four rats were divided into four groups: sedentary control (C), sedentary T1DM (D), control exercise (CX), or T1DM exercise (DX). Diabetes was induced via multiple low-dose injections of streptozotocin and blood glucose was maintained at moderate hyperglycemia (9-17 mM) through insulin supplementation. Exercise training consisted of daily treadmill running for 10 weeks. Compared to C, D had blunted baroreflex sensitivity, increased vascular sympathetic tone, increased serum neuropeptide Y (NPY), and decreased intrinsic heart rate. In contrast, DX differed from D in all measures of CAN (except NPY), including heart rate variability. These findings demonstrate that this T1DM model elicits deficits and exercise-mediated improvements to CV autonomic function which are reflective of clinical T1DM. PMID:26885531

  19. High Intensity Aerobic Exercise Training Improves Deficits of Cardiovascular Autonomic Function in a Rat Model of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus with Moderate Hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Grisé, Kenneth N.; Olver, T. Dylan; McDonald, Matthew W.; Dey, Adwitia; Jiang, Mao; Lacefield, James C.; Shoemaker, J. Kevin; Noble, Earl G.; Melling, C. W. James

    2016-01-01

    Indices of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in experimental models of Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) are often contrary to clinical data. Here, we investigated whether a relatable insulin-treated model of T1DM would induce deficits in cardiovascular (CV) autonomic function more reflective of clinical results and if exercise training could prevent those deficits. Sixty-four rats were divided into four groups: sedentary control (C), sedentary T1DM (D), control exercise (CX), or T1DM exercise (DX). Diabetes was induced via multiple low-dose injections of streptozotocin and blood glucose was maintained at moderate hyperglycemia (9–17 mM) through insulin supplementation. Exercise training consisted of daily treadmill running for 10 weeks. Compared to C, D had blunted baroreflex sensitivity, increased vascular sympathetic tone, increased serum neuropeptide Y (NPY), and decreased intrinsic heart rate. In contrast, DX differed from D in all measures of CAN (except NPY), including heart rate variability. These findings demonstrate that this T1DM model elicits deficits and exercise-mediated improvements to CV autonomic function which are reflective of clinical T1DM. PMID:26885531

  20. Modifications to an interactive model of the human body during exercise: With special emphasis on thermoregulation. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherb, Megan Kay

    1993-01-01

    Since 1988 an interactive computer model of the human body during exercise has been under development by a number of undergraduate students in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Iowa State University. The program, written under the direction of Dr. Richard C. Seagrave, uses physical characteristics of the user, environmental conditions and activity information to predict the onset of hypothermia, hyperthermia, dehydration, or exhaustion for various levels and durations of a specified exercise. The program however, was severely limited in predicting the onset of dehydration due to the lack of sophistication with which the program predicts sweat rate and its relationship to sensible water loss, degree of acclimatization, and level of physical training. Additionally, it was not known whether sweat rate also depended on age and gender. For these reasons, the goal of this creative component was to modify the program in the above mentioned areas by applying known information and empirical relationships from literature. Furthermore, a secondary goal was to improve the consistency with which the program was written by modifying user input statements and improving the efficiency and logic of the program calculations.

  1. Evaluation of NDE Round-Robin Exercises Using the NRC Steam Generator Mockup at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Muscara, Joseph; Kupperman, David S.; Bakhtiari, Sasab; Park, Jang-Yul; Shack, William J.

    2002-07-01

    This paper discusses round-robin exercises using the NRC steam generator (SG) mock-up at Argonne National Laboratory to assess inspection reliability. The purpose of the round robins was to assess the current reliability of SG tubing inservice inspection, determine the probability of detection (POD) as function of flaw size or severity, and assess the capability for sizing of flaws. For the round robin and subsequent evaluation completed in 2001, eleven teams participated. Bobbin and rotating coil mock-up data collected by qualified industry personnel were evaluated. The mock-up contains hundreds of cracks and simulations of artifacts such as corrosion deposits and tube support plates that make detection and characterization of cracks more difficult in operating steam generators than in most laboratory situations. An expert Task Group from industry, Argonne National Laboratory, and the NRC have reviewed the signals from the laboratory-grown cracks used in the mock-up to ensure that they provide reasonable simulations of those obtained in the field. The mock-up contains 400 tube openings. Each tube contains nine 22.2-mm (7/8-in.) diameter, 30.5-cm (1-ft) long, Alloy 600 test sections. The flaws are located in the tube sheet near the roll transition zone (RTZ), in the tube support plate (TSP), and in the free-span. The flaws are primarily intergranular stress corrosion cracks (axial and circumferential, ID and OD) though intergranular attack (IGA) wear and fatigue cracks are also present, as well as cracks in dents. In addition to the simulated tube sheet and TSP the mock-up has simulated sludge and magnetite deposits. A multiparameter eddy current algorithm, validated for mock-up flaws, provided a detailed isometric plot for every flaw and was used to establish the reference state of defects in the mock-up. The detection results for the 11 teams were used to develop POD curves as a function of maximum depth, voltage and the parameter m p, for the various types of

  2. Rationale and design of a randomised controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of an exercise program to improve the quality of life of patients with heart failure in primary care: The EFICAR study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Quality of life (QoL) decreases as heart failure worsens, which is one of the greatest worries of these patients. Physical exercise has been shown to be safe for people with heart failure. Previous studies have tested heterogeneous exercise programs using different QoL instruments and reported inconsistent effects on QoL. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a new exercise program for people with heart failure (EFICAR), additional to the recommended optimal treatment in primary care, to improve QoL, functional capacity and control of cardiovascular risk factors. Methods/Design Multicenter clinical trial in which 600 patients with heart failure in NYHA class II-IV will be randomized to two parallel groups: EFICAR and control. After being recruited, through the reference cardiology services, in six health centres from the Spanish Primary Care Prevention and Health Promotion Research Network (redIAPP), patients are followed for 1 year after the beginning of the intervention. Both groups receive the optimized treatment according to the European Society of Cardiology guidelines. In addition, the EFICAR group performs a 3 month supervised progressive exercise program with an aerobic (high-intensity intervals) and a strength component; and the programme continues linked with community resources for 9 months. The main outcome measure is the change in health-related QoL measured by the SF-36 and the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaires at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months. Secondary outcomes considered are changes in functional capacity measured by the 6-Minute Walking Test, cardiac structure (B-type natriuretic peptides), muscle strength and body composition. Both groups will be compared on an intention to treat basis, using multi-level longitudinal mixed models. Sex, age, social class, co-morbidity and cardiovascular risk factors will be considered as potential confounding and predictor variables. Discussion A key challenges of

  3. Evaluating spatial patterns in hydrological modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Julian; Stisen, Simon; Høgh Jensen, Karsten

    2014-05-01

    Recent advances in hydrological modeling towards fully distributed grid based model codes, increased availability of spatially distributed data (remote sensing and intensive field studies) and more computational power allow a shift towards a spatial model evaluation away from the traditional aggregated evaluation. The consideration of spatially aggregated observations, in form of river discharge, in the evaluation process does not ensure a correct simulation of catchment-inherent distributed variables. The integration of spatial data and hydrological models is limited due to a lack of suitable metrics to evaluate similarity of spatial patterns. This study is engaged with the development of a novel set of performance metrics that capture spatial patterns and go beyond global statistics. The metrics are required to be easy, flexible and especially targeted to compare observed and simulated spatial patterns of hydrological variables. Four quantitative methodologies for comparing spatial patterns are brought forward: (1) A fuzzy set approach that incorporates both fuzziness of location and fuzziness of category. (2) Kappa statistic that expresses the similarity between two maps based on a contingency table (error matrix). (3) An extended version of (2) by considering both fuzziness in location and fuzziness in category. (4) Increasing the information content of a single cell by aggregating neighborhood cells at different window sizes; then computing mean and standard deviation. The identified metrics are tested on observed and simulated land surface temperature maps in a groundwater dominated catchment in western Denmark. The observed data originates from the MODIS satellite and MIKE SHE, a coupled and fully distributed hydrological model, serves as the modelling tool. Synthetic land surface temperature maps are generated to further address strengths and weaknesses of the metrics. The metrics are tested in different parameter optimizing frameworks, where they are

  4. Automated Expert Modeling and Student Evaluation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-09-12

    AEMASE searches a database of recorded events for combinations of events that are of interest. It compares matching combinations to a statistical model to determine similarity to previous events of interest and alerts the user as new matching examples are found. AEMASE is currently used by weapons tactics instructors to find situations of interest in recorded tactical training scenarios. AEMASE builds on a sub-component, the Relational Blackboard (RBB), which is being released as open-source software.more » AEMASE builds on RBB adding interactive expert model construction (automated knowledge capture) and re-evaluation of scenario data.« less

  5. Automated Expert Modeling and Student Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    2012-09-12

    AEMASE searches a database of recorded events for combinations of events that are of interest. It compares matching combinations to a statistical model to determine similarity to previous events of interest and alerts the user as new matching examples are found. AEMASE is currently used by weapons tactics instructors to find situations of interest in recorded tactical training scenarios. AEMASE builds on a sub-component, the Relational Blackboard (RBB), which is being released as open-source software. AEMASE builds on RBB adding interactive expert model construction (automated knowledge capture) and re-evaluation of scenario data.

  6. CTBT integrated verification system evaluation model supplement

    SciTech Connect

    EDENBURN,MICHAEL W.; BUNTING,MARCUS; PAYNE JR.,ARTHUR C.; TROST,LAWRENCE C.

    2000-03-02

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a computer based model called IVSEM (Integrated Verification System Evaluation Model) to estimate the performance of a nuclear detonation monitoring system. The IVSEM project was initiated in June 1994, by Sandia's Monitoring Systems and Technology Center and has been funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Nonproliferation and National Security (DOE/NN). IVSEM is a simple, ''top-level,'' modeling tool which estimates the performance of a Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) monitoring system and can help explore the impact of various sensor system concepts and technology advancements on CTBT monitoring. One of IVSEM's unique features is that it integrates results from the various CTBT sensor technologies (seismic, in sound, radionuclide, and hydroacoustic) and allows the user to investigate synergy among the technologies. Specifically, IVSEM estimates the detection effectiveness (probability of detection), location accuracy, and identification capability of the integrated system and of each technology subsystem individually. The model attempts to accurately estimate the monitoring system's performance at medium interfaces (air-land, air-water) and for some evasive testing methods such as seismic decoupling. The original IVSEM report, CTBT Integrated Verification System Evaluation Model, SAND97-25 18, described version 1.2 of IVSEM. This report describes the changes made to IVSEM version 1.2 and the addition of identification capability estimates that have been incorporated into IVSEM version 2.0.

  7. In vitro modeling of human tibial strains during exercise in micro-gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterman, M. M.; Hamel, A. J.; Cavanagh, P. R.; Piazza, S. J.; Sharkey, N. A.

    2001-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to micro-gravity causes substantial bone loss (Leblanc et al., Journal of Bone Mineral Research 11 (1996) S323) and treadmill exercise under gravity replacement loads (GRLs) has been advocated as a countermeasure. To date, the magnitudes of GRLs employed for locomotion in space have been substantially less than the loads imposed in the earthbound 1G environment, which may account for the poor performance of locomotion as an intervention. The success of future treadmill interventions will likely require GRLs of greater magnitude. It is widely held that mechanical tissue strain is an important intermediary signal in the transduction pathway linking the external loading environment to bone maintenance and functional adaptation; yet, to our knowledge, no data exist linking alterations in external skeletal loading to alterations in bone strain. In this preliminary study, we used unique cadaver simulations of micro-gravity locomotion to determine relationships between localized tibial bone strains and external loading as a means to better predict the efficacy of future exercise interventions proposed for bone maintenance on orbit. Bone strain magnitudes in the distal tibia were found to be linearly related to ground reaction force magnitude (R(2)>0.7). Strain distributions indicated that the primary mode of tibial loading was in bending, with little variation in the neutral axis over the stance phase of gait. The greatest strains, as well as the greatest strain sensitivity to altered external loading, occurred within the anterior crest and posterior aspect of the tibia, the sites furthest removed from the neutral axis of bending. We established a technique for estimating local strain magnitudes from external loads, and equations for predicting strain during simulated micro-gravity walking are presented.

  8. In vitro modeling of human tibial strains during exercise in micro-gravity.

    PubMed

    Peterman, M M; Hamel, A J; Cavanagh, P R; Piazza, S J; Sharkey, N A

    2001-05-01

    Prolonged exposure to micro-gravity causes substantial bone loss (Leblanc et al., Journal of Bone Mineral Research 11 (1996) S323) and treadmill exercise under gravity replacement loads (GRLs) has been advocated as a countermeasure. To date, the magnitudes of GRLs employed for locomotion in space have been substantially less than the loads imposed in the earthbound 1G environment, which may account for the poor performance of locomotion as an intervention. The success of future treadmill interventions will likely require GRLs of greater magnitude. It is widely held that mechanical tissue strain is an important intermediary signal in the transduction pathway linking the external loading environment to bone maintenance and functional adaptation; yet, to our knowledge, no data exist linking alterations in external skeletal loading to alterations in bone strain. In this preliminary study, we used unique cadaver simulations of micro-gravity locomotion to determine relationships between localized tibial bone strains and external loading as a means to better predict the efficacy of future exercise interventions proposed for bone maintenance on orbit. Bone strain magnitudes in the distal tibia were found to be linearly related to ground reaction force magnitude (R(2)>0.7). Strain distributions indicated that the primary mode of tibial loading was in bending, with little variation in the neutral axis over the stance phase of gait. The greatest strains, as well as the greatest strain sensitivity to altered external loading, occurred within the anterior crest and posterior aspect of the tibia, the sites furthest removed from the neutral axis of bending. We established a technique for estimating local strain magnitudes from external loads, and equations for predicting strain during simulated micro-gravity walking are presented. PMID:11311711

  9. Programs Help Create And Evaluate Markov Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Boerschlein, David P.

    1993-01-01

    Pade Approximation With Scaling (PAWS) and Scaled Taylor Exponential Matrix (STEM) computer programs provide flexible, user-friendly, language-based interface for creation and evaluation of Markov models describing behaviors of fault-tolerant reconfigurable computer systems. Produce exact solution for probabilities of system failures and provide conservative estimates of numbers of significant digits in solutions. Also offer as part of bundled package with SURE and ASSIST, two other reliable analysis programs developed by Systems Validation Methods group at Langley Research Center.

  10. GHEP-ISFG collaborative exercise on mixture profiles of autosomal STRs (GHEP-MIX01, GHEP-MIX02 and GHEP-MIX03): results and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Crespillo, M; Barrio, P A; Luque, J A; Alves, C; Aler, M; Alessandrini, F; Andrade, L; Barretto, R M; Bofarull, A; Costa, S; García, M A; García, O; Gaviria, A; Gladys, A; Gorostiza, A; Hernández, A; Herrera, M; Hombreiro, L; Ibarra, A A; Jiménez, M J; Luque, G M; Madero, P; Martínez-Jarreta, B; Masciovecchio, M V; Modesti, N M; Moreno, F; Pagano, S; Pedrosa, S; Plaza, G; Prat, E; Puente, J; Rendo, F; Ribeiro, T; Sala, A; Santamaría, E; Saragoni, V G; Whittle, M R

    2014-05-01

    One of the main objectives of the Spanish and Portuguese-Speaking Group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (GHEP-ISFG) is to promote and contribute to the development and dissemination of scientific knowledge in the area of forensic genetics. Due to this fact, GHEP-ISFG holds different working commissions that are set up to develop activities in scientific aspects of general interest. One of them, the Mixture Commission of GHEP-ISFG, has organized annually, since 2009, a collaborative exercise on analysis and interpretation of autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) mixture profiles. Until now, three exercises have been organized (GHEP-MIX01, GHEP-MIX02 and GHEP-MIX03), with 32, 24 and 17 participant laboratories respectively. The exercise aims to give a general vision by addressing, through the proposal of mock cases, aspects related to the edition of mixture profiles and the statistical treatment. The main conclusions obtained from these exercises may be summarized as follows. Firstly, the data show an increased tendency of the laboratories toward validation of DNA mixture profiles analysis following international recommendations (ISO/IEC 17025:2005). Secondly, the majority of discrepancies are mainly encountered in stutters positions (53.4%, 96.0% and 74.9%, respectively for the three editions). On the other hand, the results submitted reveal the importance of performing duplicate analysis by using different kits in order to reduce errors as much as possible. Regarding the statistical aspect (GHEP-MIX02 and 03), all participants employed the likelihood ratio (LR) parameter to evaluate the statistical compatibility and the formulas employed were quite similar. When the hypotheses to evaluate the LR value were locked by the coordinators (GHEP-MIX02) the results revealed a minor number of discrepancies that were mainly due to clerical reasons. However, the GHEP-MIX03 exercise allowed the participants to freely come up with their own hypotheses to

  11. An Elementary Organic Review Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beach, Darrell H.

    1980-01-01

    An elementary organic review exercise is described which can be given to a secondary school student who has completed an elementary unit on the chemistry of carbon. This is recommended as an exercise, not a test, but can be utilized for evaluative purposes. The format includes both multiple-choice and essay questions. (DS)

  12. Effects and potential mechanisms of exercise training on cancer progression: a translational perspective.

    PubMed

    Betof, Allison S; Dewhirst, Mark W; Jones, Lee W

    2013-03-01

    Over the past decade there has been increasing research and clinical interest in the role of exercise therapy/rehabilitation as an adjunct therapy to improve symptom control and management following a cancer diagnosis. More recently, the field of 'exercise - oncology' has broadened in scope to investigate whether the benefits extend beyond symptom control to modulate cancer-specific outcomes (i.e., cancer progression and metastasis). Here we review the extant epidemiological evidence examining the association between exercise behavior, functional capacity/exercise capacity, and cancer-specific recurrence and mortality as well as all-cause mortality individuals following a cancer diagnosis. We also evaluate evidence from clinical studies investigating the effects of structured exercise on blood-based biomarkers associated with cancer progression/metastasis as well findings from preclinical investigations examining the effects and molecular mechanisms of exercise in mouse models of cancer. Current gaps in knowledge are also discussed. PMID:22610066

  13. Radiation model for row crops: II. Model evaluation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Relatively few radiation transfer studies have considered the impact of varying vegetation cover that typifies row crops, and meth¬ods to account for partial row crop cover have not been well investigated. Our objective was to evaluate a widely used radiation model that was modified for row crops ha...

  14. A mathematical model of coronary blood flow control: simulation of patient-specific three-dimensional hemodynamics during exercise

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Kevin D.; Asrress, Kaleab N.; Redwood, Simon R.; Figueroa, C. Alberto

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a mathematical model of the metabolic feedback and adrenergic feedforward control of coronary blood flow that occur during variations in the cardiac workload. It is based on the physiological observations that coronary blood flow closely follows myocardial oxygen demand, that myocardial oxygen debts are repaid, and that control oscillations occur when the system is perturbed and so are phenomenological in nature. Using clinical data, we demonstrate that the model can provide patient-specific estimates of coronary blood flow changes between rest and exercise, requiring only the patient's heart rate and peak aortic pressure as input. The model can be used in zero-dimensional lumped parameter network studies or as a boundary condition for three-dimensional multidomain Navier-Stokes blood flow simulations. For the first time, this model provides feedback control of the coronary vascular resistance, which can be used to enhance the physiological accuracy of any hemodynamic simulation, which includes both a heart model and coronary arteries. This has particular relevance to patient-specific simulation for which heart rate and aortic pressure recordings are available. In addition to providing a simulation tool, under our assumptions, the derivation of our model shows that β-feedforward control of the coronary microvascular resistance is a mathematical necessity and that the metabolic feedback control must be dependent on two error signals: the historical myocardial oxygen debt, and the instantaneous myocardial oxygen deficit. PMID:26945076

  15. Using Critical Incidents To Model Effective Evaluation Practice in the Teaching of Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preskill, Hallie

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the importance of modeling effective evaluation practice as teachers teach about evaluation. Using the critical incidents evaluation tool and process students in graduate evaluation courses were asked to reflect on their learning of modeling formative evaluation throughout the course as a way to teach about evaluation practice. (SLD)

  16. Use of a Time-of-Flight Camera With an Omek Beckon™ Framework to Analyze, Evaluate and Correct in Real Time the Verticality of Multiple Sclerosis Patients during Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Eguíluz, Gonzalo; García, María Begoña

    2013-01-01

    Any person with Multiple Sclerosis (MS), regardless of the severity of their disability, needs regular physical activity. Poorly performed exercises could aggravate muscle imbalances and worsen the patient’s health. In this paper, we propose a human body verticality detection system using a time-of-flight camera as a tool to detect incorrect postures and improve them in real time. The prototype uses Omek’s Beckon™ Framework to analyze and evaluate the position of patients during exercise. Preliminary results, based on objective questionnaires, indicate an improvement in patients’ evolution through better positions and performance of the exercises. PMID:24192790

  17. The RAMI On-line Model Checker (ROMC): A tool for the automated evaluation of canopy reflectance models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widlowski, J.-L.; Robustelli, M.; Taberner, M.; Pinty, B.; Rami Participants, All

    The Radiative transfer Model Intercomparison RAMI exercise was first launched in 1999 and then again in 2002 and 2005 RAMI aims at evaluating the performance of canopy reflectance models in absence of any absolute reference truth It does so by intercomparing models over a large ensemble of test cases under a variety of spectral and illumination conditions A series of criteria can be applied to select an ensemble of mutually agreeing 3-D Monte Carlo models to provide a surrogate truth against which all other models can then be compared We will present an overview of the RAMI activities and show how the results of the latest phase have lead to the development of the RAMI Online model checker ROMC This tool allows both model developers and users to evaluate the performance of their canopy reflectance models a against previous RAMI test cases whose results have already been published in the literature and b against test cases that are similar to the RAMI cases but for which no results will be known a priori As such the ROMC allows models to be debugged and or validated autonomously on a limited number of test cases RAMI-certified graphics that document a model s performance can be downloaded for future use in scientific presentations and or publications

  18. The Use of Thermal Imaging in the Evaluation of the Symmetry of Muscle Activity in Various Types of Exercises (Symmetrical and Asymmetrical)

    PubMed Central

    Chudecka, Monika; Lubkowska, Anna; Leźnicka, Katarzyna; Krupecki, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    In order to achieve higher efficiency of training and thus better athletic performance, new research and diagnostic methods are constantly being developed, particularly those that are non-invasive. One such a method is thermography, suitable for quantitative and therefore objective evaluation of variables, such as changes in the temperature of the skin covering working muscles. The aim of this study was to use a thermal imaging infrared camera to evaluate temperature changes of symmetric body surfaces over symmetrically working muscles of male scullers after exercising on a two-oared rowing ergometer and compare these to asymmetrically working muscles of handball players after an endurance training session containing elements of an actual game. In the scullers, the mean temperature of body surfaces was always lower post than pre exercise, with no significant differences in an average temperature drop between the opposite sides, indicating that the work of the muscles involved in the physical exertion on the rowing ergometer was symmetrical. In contrast, in the handball players, skin temperatures in symmetric areas over the asymmetrically working muscles showed statistically significant differences between sides, which was associated with the functional asymmetry of training. This study indicates that thermal imaging may be useful for coaches in the evaluation of technical preparations in sports in which equal involvement of symmetric muscles is a condition of success, e.g. in scullers. PMID:26839614

  19. The Use of Thermal Imaging in the Evaluation of the Symmetry of Muscle Activity in Various Types of Exercises (Symmetrical and Asymmetrical).

    PubMed

    Chudecka, Monika; Lubkowska, Anna; Leźnicka, Katarzyna; Krupecki, Krzysztof

    2015-12-22

    In order to achieve higher efficiency of training and thus better athletic performance, new research and diagnostic methods are constantly being developed, particularly those that are non-invasive. One such a method is thermography, suitable for quantitative and therefore objective evaluation of variables, such as changes in the temperature of the skin covering working muscles. The aim of this study was to use a thermal imaging infrared camera to evaluate temperature changes of symmetric body surfaces over symmetrically working muscles of male scullers after exercising on a two-oared rowing ergometer and compare these to asymmetrically working muscles of handball players after an endurance training session containing elements of an actual game. In the scullers, the mean temperature of body surfaces was always lower post than pre exercise, with no significant differences in an average temperature drop between the opposite sides, indicating that the work of the muscles involved in the physical exertion on the rowing ergometer was symmetrical. In contrast, in the handball players, skin temperatures in symmetric areas over the asymmetrically working muscles showed statistically significant differences between sides, which was associated with the functional asymmetry of training. This study indicates that thermal imaging may be useful for coaches in the evaluation of technical preparations in sports in which equal involvement of symmetric muscles is a condition of success, e.g. in scullers. PMID:26839614

  20. Healthy Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Oberman, Albert

    1984-01-01

    Persons at any age can substantially improve their fitness for work and play through appropriate exercise training. Considerable evidence indicates that physical activity is valuable for weight control, modifying lipids and improving carbohydrate tolerance. Less rigorous scientific data are available for associated long-term blood pressure and psychological changes with habitual exercise. Strenuous physical activity most likely reduces the incidence of coronary heart disease and the detrimental impact of certain chronic diseases on health. Adverse effects may result from a training program, but the major concern is the susceptibility to cardiovascular events during and immediately after exertion. To achieve optimal benefits with minimal risk, exercise must be carefully prescribed within the context of overall health and training objectives. Taken altogether, a distinct rationale exists for regular vigorous exercise as an integral part of a personal health maintenance program. PMID:6395501

  1. Exercise Habit

    MedlinePlus

    ... lungs. Examples of aerobic exercise include walking, hiking, running, aerobic dance, biking, rowing, swimming, and cross-country ... Brisk walking can burn as many calories as running, but it is less likely to cause injuries ...

  2. Compulsive Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... diseases. Many teens who play sports have higher self-esteem than their less active pals, and exercise can ... may have a distorted body image and low self-esteem. They may see themselves as overweight or out ...

  3. User's appraisal of yield model evaluation criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, F. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    The five major potential USDA users of AgRISTAR crop yield forecast models rated the Yield Model Development (YMD) project Test and Evaluation Criteria by the importance placed on them. These users were agreed that the "TIMELINES" and "RELIABILITY" of the forecast yields would be of major importance in determining if a proposed yield model was worthy of adoption. Although there was considerable difference of opinion as to the relative importance of the other criteria, "COST", "OBJECTIVITY", "ADEQUACY", AND "MEASURES OF ACCURACY" generally were felt to be more important that "SIMPLICITY" and "CONSISTENCY WITH SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE". However, some of the comments which accompanied the ratings did indicate that several of the definitions and descriptions of the criteria were confusing.

  4. Evaluation of a mallard productivity model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, D.H.; Cowardin, L.M.; Sparling, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    A stochastic model of mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) productivity has been developed over a 10-year period and successfully applied to several management questions. Here we review the model and describe some recent uses and improvements that increase its realism and applicability, including naturally occurring changes in wetland habitat, catastrophic weather events, and the migrational homing of mallards. The amount of wetland habitat influenced productivity primarily by affecting the renesting rate. Late snowstorms severely reduced productivity, whereas the loss of nests due to flooding was largely compensated for by increased renesting, often in habitats where hatching rates were better. Migrational homing was shown to be an important phenomenon in population modeling and should be considered when evaluating management plans.

  5. Effect of Turbulence on the Temporal Variation of Hemodynamic Stresses in Aneurysm Model under Resting and Exercise Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanafer, Khalil

    2005-11-01

    A numerical model is developed to analyze pulsatile turbulent flow in axisymmetric abdominal aortic aneurysm models (AAM) using realistic physiological resting and exercise waveforms. The transport equations are solved using the finite element formulation based on the Galerkin method of weighted residuals. The κ-ɛ model is used in this work to simulate turbulence characteristics of the convective flow by incorporating Boussinesq eddy-viscosity model. A number of interesting features of the flow field resulting from using realistic physiological waveforms are obtained for various pertinent parameters. Such parameters include Reynolds number, size of aneurysm, flexibility of aneurysm's wall, and the propagation of pressure and flow waves through AAM. The effect of non-Newtonian behavior of blood on hemodynamic stresses and compared with Newtonian behavior through AAM is investigated in the present study. The results of the present work illustrate that maximum turbulent shear stress occurs at the distal end of the AAA model. Furthermore, turbulence is found to have a significant effect on the pressure distribution along AAA wall for both physiological waveforms. This work paves the road for researchers in the area of AAA risk rupture to improve their understanding on the mechanics of aneurysm rupture enhanced by increased flow turbulence.

  6. Evaluation of muscle metaboreflex function through graded reduction in forearm blood flow during rhythmic handgrip exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Masashi; Delliaux, Stephane; Watanabe, Kazuhito; Fujii, Naoto; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2011-08-01

    Hypoperfusion of active skeletal muscle elicits a reflex pressor response termed the muscle metaboreflex. Our aim was to determine the muscle metaboreflex threshold and gain in humans by creating an open-loop relationship between active muscle blood flow and hemodynamic responses during a rhythmic handgrip exercise. Eleven healthy subjects performed the exercise at 5 or 15% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) in random order. During the exercise, forearm blood flow (FBF), which was continuously measured using Doppler ultrasound, was reduced in five steps by manipulating the inner pressure of an occlusion cuff on the upper arm. The FBF at each level was maintained for 3 min. The initial reductions in FBF elicited no hemodynamic changes, but once FBF fell below a threshold, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) increased and total vascular conductance (TVC) decreased in a linear manner. The threshold FBF during the 15% MVC trial was significantly higher than during the 5% MVC trial. The gain was then estimated as the slope of the relationship between the hemodynamic responses and FBFs below the threshold. The gains for the MAP and TVC responses did not differ between workloads, but the gain for the HR response was greater in the 15% MVC trial. Our findings thus indicate that increasing the workload shifts the threshold for the muscle metaboreflex to higher blood flows without changing the gain of the reflex for the MAP and TVC responses, whereas it enhances the gain for the HR response. PMID:21602474

  7. PULMONARY CIRCULATION AT EXERCISE

    PubMed Central

    NAEIJE, R; CHESLER, N

    2012-01-01

    The pulmonary circulation is a high flow and low pressure circuit, with an average resistance of 1 mmHg.min.L−1 in young adults, increasing to 2.5 mmHg.min.L−1 over 4–6 decades of life. Pulmonary vascular mechanics at exercise are best described by distensible models. Exercise does not appear to affect the time constant of the pulmonary circulation or the longitudinal distribution of resistances. Very high flows are associated with high capillary pressures, up to a 20–25 mmHg threshold associated with interstitial lung edema and altered ventilation/perfusion relationships. Pulmonary artery pressures of 40–50 mmHg, which can be achieved at maximal exercise, may correspond to the extreme of tolerable right ventricular afterload. Distension of capillaries that decrease resistance may be of adaptative value during exercise, but this is limited by hypoxemia from altered diffusion/perfusion relationships. Exercise in hypoxia is associated with higher pulmonary vascular pressures and lower maximal cardiac output, with increased likelihood of right ventricular function limitation and altered gas exchange by interstitial lung edema. Pharmacological interventions aimed at the reduction of pulmonary vascular tone have little effect on pulmonary vascular pressure-flow relationships in normoxia, but may decrease resistance in hypoxia, unloading the right ventricle and thereby improving exercise capacity. Exercise in patients with pulmonary hypertension is associated with sharp increases in pulmonary artery pressure and a right ventricular limitation of aerobic capacity. Exercise stress testing to determine multipoint pulmonary vascular pressures-flow relationships may uncover early stage pulmonary vascular disease. PMID:23105961

  8. The rat adequately reflects human responses to exercise in blood biochemical profile: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Goutianos, Georgios; Tzioura, Aikaterini; Kyparos, Antonios; Paschalis, Vassilis; Margaritelis, Nikos V; Veskoukis, Aristidis S; Zafeiridis, Andreas; Dipla, Konstantina; Nikolaidis, Michalis G; Vrabas, Ioannis S

    2015-02-01

    Animal models are widely used in biology and the findings of animal research are traditionally projected to humans. However, recent publications have raised concerns with regard to what extent animals and humans respond similar to physiological stimuli. Original data on direct in vivo comparison between animals and humans are scarce and no study has addressed this issue after exercise. We aimed to compare side by side in the same experimental setup rat and human responses to an acute exercise bout of matched intensity and duration. Rats and humans ran on a treadmill at 86% of maximal velocity until exhaustion. Pre and post exercise we measured 30 blood chemistry parameters, which evaluate iron status, lipid profile, glucose regulation, protein metabolism, liver, and renal function. ANOVA indicated that almost all biochemical parameters followed a similar alteration pattern post exercise in rats and humans. In fact, there were only 2/30 significant species × exercise interactions (in testosterone and globulins), indicating different responses to exercise between rats and humans. On the contrary, the main effect of exercise was significant in 15/30 parameters and marginally nonsignificant in other two parameters (copper, P = 0.060 and apolipoprotein B, P = 0.058). Our major finding is that the rat adequately mimics human responses to exercise in those basic blood biochemical parameters reported here. The physiological resemblance of rat and human blood responses after exercise to exhaustion on a treadmill indicates that the use of blood chemistry in rats for exercise physiology research is justified. PMID:25677548

  9. The effects of exercise program on burnout and metabolic syndrome components in banking and insurance workers.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Han Hui; Yeh, Ching Ying; Su, Chien Tien; Chen, Chiou Jong; Peng, Shu Mei; Chen, Ruey Yu

    2013-01-01

    To explore the effectiveness of exercise program for banking and insurance workers and clarify the association between exercise, burnout, and metabolic syndrome components. In the process of the study, a practicable worksite exercise program was developed for bank and insurance enterprises. A three-month (12-wk) exercise course was conducted, and its benefits evaluated. Levels of burnout and metabolic syndrome components were analyzed after exercise intervention. After intervention, the indicators of burnout and metabolic syndrome components were significantly improved in both low and high intensity groups, and the improvement were expressed in reduction of waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, person burnout and work-related burnout. A dose-response of burnouts and metabolic syndrome components with exercise intensity are shown (p<0.05). Metabolic syndrome components were independently associated with burnout and exercise intensity in the crude model. After adjustment for potential confounders, waist circumference and systolic blood pressure differences showed significant associations with exercise intensity (p<0.05). This study demonstrated an effective approach to worksite exercise intervention and exercise intensity played an important role to alleviate damage between burnouts and metabolic syndrome components. PMID:23518604

  10. Exercise training prevents increased intraocular pressure and sympathetic vascular modulation in an experimental model of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Castro, E.F.S.; Mostarda, C.T.; Rodrigues, B.; Moraes-Silva, I.C.; Feriani, D.J.; De Angelis, K.; Irigoyen, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to study the effects of exercise training (ET) performed by rats on a 10-week high-fructose diet on metabolic, hemodynamic, and autonomic changes, as well as intraocular pressure (IOP). Male Wistar rats receiving fructose overload in drinking water (100 g/L) were concomitantly trained on a treadmill for 10 weeks (FT group) or kept sedentary (F group), and a control group (C) was kept in normal laboratory conditions. The metabolic evaluation comprised the Lee index, glycemia, and insulin tolerance test (KITT). Arterial pressure (AP) was measured directly, and systolic AP variability was performed to determine peripheral autonomic modulation. ET attenuated impaired metabolic parameters, AP, IOP, and ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) induced by fructose overload (FT vs F). The increase in peripheral sympathetic modulation in F rats, demonstrated by systolic AP variance and low frequency (LF) band (F: 37±2, 6.6±0.3 vs C: 26±3, 3.6±0.5 mmHg2), was prevented by ET (FT: 29±3, 3.4±0.7 mmHg2). Positive correlations were found between the LF band and right IOP (r=0.57, P=0.01) and left IOP (r=0.64, P=0.003). Negative correlations were noted between KITT values and right IOP (r=-0.55, P=0.01) and left IOP (r=-0.62, P=0.005). ET in rats effectively prevented metabolic abnormalities and AP and IOP increases promoted by a high-fructose diet. In addition, ocular benefits triggered by exercise training were associated with peripheral autonomic improvement. PMID:25714884

  11. Exercise training prevents increased intraocular pressure and sympathetic vascular modulation in an experimental model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Castro, E F S; Mostarda, C T; Rodrigues, B; Moraes-Silva, I C; Feriani, D J; De Angelis, K; Irigoyen, M C

    2015-04-01

    The present study aimed to study the effects of exercise training (ET) performed by rats on a 10-week high-fructose diet on metabolic, hemodynamic, and autonomic changes, as well as intraocular pressure (IOP). Male Wistar rats receiving fructose overload in drinking water (100 g/L) were concomitantly trained on a treadmill for 10 weeks (FT group) or kept sedentary (F group), and a control group (C) was kept in normal laboratory conditions. The metabolic evaluation comprised the Lee index, glycemia, and insulin tolerance test (KITT). Arterial pressure (AP) was measured directly, and systolic AP variability was performed to determine peripheral autonomic modulation. ET attenuated impaired metabolic parameters, AP, IOP, and ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) induced by fructose overload (FT vs F). The increase in peripheral sympathetic modulation in F rats, demonstrated by systolic AP variance and low frequency (LF) band (F: 37±2, 6.6±0.3 vs C: 26±3, 3.6±0.5 mmHg2), was prevented by ET (FT: 29±3, 3.4±0.7 mmHg2). Positive correlations were found between the LF band and right IOP (r=0.57, P=0.01) and left IOP (r=0.64, P=0.003). Negative correlations were noted between KITT values and right IOP (r=-0.55, P=0.01) and left IOP (r=-0.62, P=0.005). ET in rats effectively prevented metabolic abnormalities and AP and IOP increases promoted by a high-fructose diet. In addition, ocular benefits triggered by exercise training were associated with peripheral autonomic improvement. PMID:25714884

  12. A Formulation of the Interactive Evaluation Model

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Peter J.; Awad-Edwards, Roger; Engelhardt, K. G.; Perkash, Inder

    1985-01-01

    The development of highly technical devices for specialized users requires continual feedback from potential users to the project team designing the device to assure that a useful product will result. This necessity for user input is the basis for the Interactive Evaluation Model which has been applied to complex computer assisted robotic aids for individuals with disabilities and has wide application to the development of a variety of technical devices. We present a preliminary mathematical formulation of the Interactive Evaluation Model which maximizes the rate of growth toward success, at a constant cost rate, of the efforts of a team having the diverse expertises needed to produce a complex technical product. Close interaction is simulated by a growth rate which is a multiplicative product involving the number of participants within a given class of necessary expertise and evaluation is included by demanding that users form one of the necessary classes. In the multipliers, the number of class participants is raised to a power termed the class weight exponent. In the simplest case, the optimum participant number varies as the ratio of the class weight exponent to the average class cost. An illustrative example, based on our experience with medical care assistive aids, shows the dramatic cost reduction possible with users on the team.

  13. Hazardous gas model evaluation with field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, S. R.; Chang, J. C.; Strimaitis, D. G.

    Fifteen hazardous gas models were evaluated using data from eight field experiments. The models include seven publicly available models (AFTOX, DEGADIS, HEGADAS, HGSYSTEM, INPUFF, OB/DG and SLAB), six proprietary models (AIRTOX, CHARM, FOCUS, GASTAR, PHAST and TRACE), and two "benchmark" analytical models (the Gaussian Plume Model and the analytical approximations to the Britter and McQuaid Workbook nomograms). The field data were divided into three groups—continuous dense gas releases (Burro LNG, Coyote LNG, Desert Tortoise NH 3-gas and aerosols, Goldfish HF-gas and aerosols, and Maplin Sands LNG), continuous passive gas releases (Prairie Grass and Hanford), and instantaneous dense gas releases (Thorney Island freon). The dense gas models that produced the most consistent predictions of plume centerline concentrations across the dense gas data sets are the Britter and McQuaid, CHARM, GASTAR, HEGADAS, HGSYSTEM, PHAST, SLAB and TRACE models, with relative mean biases of about ±30% or less and magnitudes of relative scatter that are about equal to the mean. The dense gas models tended to overpredict the plume widths and underpredict the plume depths by about a factor of two. All models except GASTAR, TRACE, and the area source version of DEGADIS perform fairly well with the continuous passive gas data sets. Some sensitivity studies were also carried out. It was found that three of the more widely used publicly-available dense gas models (DEGADIS, HGSYSTEM and SLAB) predicted increases in concentration of about 70% as roughness length decreased by an order of magnitude for the Desert Tortoise and Goldfish field studies. It was also found that none of the dense gas models that were considered came close to simulating the observed factor of two increase in peak concentrations as averaging time decreased from several minutes to 1 s. Because of their assumption that a concentrated dense gas core existed that was unaffected by variations in averaging time, the dense gas

  14. Physical Exercise as a Counseling Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Y. Barry; Baird, M. Kathleen

    1999-01-01

    Provides an integrative review of the literature on the relationship between physical exercise and three psychological variables (depression, anxiety, and self-esteem). Proposes guidelines for using exercise as a counseling intervention, and makes suggestions for evaluating exercise interventions. (Author/GCP)

  15. The natural emissions model (NEMO): Description, application and model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liora, Natalia; Markakis, Konstantinos; Poupkou, Anastasia; Giannaros, Theodore M.; Melas, Dimitrios

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is the application and evaluation of a new computer model used for the quantification of emissions coming from natural sources. The Natural Emissions Model (NEMO) is driven by the meteorological data of the mesoscale numerical Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and it estimates particulate matter (PM) emissions from windblown dust, sea salt aerosols (SSA) and primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs). It also includes emissions from Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOCs) from vegetation; however, this study focuses only on particle emissions. An application and evaluation of NEMO at European scale are presented. NEMO and the modelling system consisted of WRF model and the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions (CAMx) were applied in a 30 km European domain for the year 2009. The computed domain-wide annual PM10 emissions from windblown dust, sea salt and PBAPs were 0.57 Tg, 20 Tg and 0.12 Tg, respectively. PM2.5 represented 6% and 33% of emitted windblown dust and sea salt, respectively. Natural emissions are characterized by high geographical and seasonal variations; windblown dust emissions were the highest during summer in the southern Europe and SSA production was the highest in Atlantic Ocean during the cold season while in Mediterranean Sea the highest SSA emissions were found over the Aegean Sea during summer. Modelled concentrations were compared with surface station measurements and showed that the model captured fairly well the contribution of the natural sources to PM levels over Europe. Dust concentrations correlated better when dust transport events from Sahara desert were absent while the simulation of sea salt episodes led to an improvement of model performance during the cold season.

  16. Evaluating face trustworthiness: a model based approach

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Sean G.; Oosterhof, Nikolaas N.

    2008-01-01

    Judgments of trustworthiness from faces determine basic approach/avoidance responses and approximate the valence evaluation of faces that runs across multiple person judgments. Here, based on trustworthiness judgments and using a computer model for face representation, we built a model for representing face trustworthiness (study 1). Using this model, we generated novel faces with an increased range of trustworthiness and used these faces as stimuli in a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging study (study 2). Although participants did not engage in explicit evaluation of the faces, the amygdala response changed as a function of face trustworthiness. An area in the right amygdala showed a negative linear response—as the untrustworthiness of faces increased so did the amygdala response. Areas in the left and right putamen, the latter area extended into the anterior insula, showed a similar negative linear response. The response in the left amygdala was quadratic—strongest for faces on both extremes of the trustworthiness dimension. The medial prefrontal cortex and precuneus also showed a quadratic response, but their response was strongest to faces in the middle range of the trustworthiness dimension. PMID:19015102

  17. Evaluating conflation methods using uncertainty modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doucette, Peter; Dolloff, John; Canavosio-Zuzelski, Roberto; Lenihan, Michael; Motsko, Dennis

    2013-05-01

    The classic problem of computer-assisted conflation involves the matching of individual features (e.g., point, polyline, or polygon vectors) as stored in a geographic information system (GIS), between two different sets (layers) of features. The classical goal of conflation is the transfer of feature metadata (attributes) from one layer to another. The age of free public and open source geospatial feature data has significantly increased the opportunity to conflate such data to create enhanced products. There are currently several spatial conflation tools in the marketplace with varying degrees of automation. An ability to evaluate conflation tool performance quantitatively is of operational value, although manual truthing of matched features is laborious and costly. In this paper, we present a novel methodology that uses spatial uncertainty modeling to simulate realistic feature layers to streamline evaluation of feature matching performance for conflation methods. Performance results are compiled for DCGIS street centerline features.

  18. Genetic damage in multiple organs of acutely exercised rats.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Renan; Rosa, Jose C; Eguchi, Ricardo; Oller do Nascimento, Claudia M; Oyama, Lila M; Aguiar, Odair; Chaves, Marcelo D; Ribeiro, Daniel A

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of acute exercise on genomic damage in an animal model. Male adult Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: control and acute exercised (experimental). For this purpose, 15 animals were accustomed to running on a rodent treadmill for 15 min per day for 5 days (10-20 m min(-1); 08 grade). After 4 days at rest, active animals ran on the treadmill (22 m min(-1), 58 grade) till exhaustion. Cells from peripheral blood, liver, heart, and brain were collected after 0, 2, and 6 h after exercise. The results showed that acute exercise was able to induce genetic damage in peripheral blood cells after 2 and 6 h of exercise, whereas liver pointed out genetic damage for all periods evaluated. No genetic damage was induced either in brain or in heart cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that acute exercise could contribute to the genetic damage in peripheral blood and liver cells. It seems that liver is a sensitive organ to the genotoxic insult after acute exercise. PMID:20979236

  19. Treadmill exercise induces hippocampal astroglial alterations in rats.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Caren; Tramontina, Ana Carolina; Nardin, Patrícia; Biasibetti, Regina; Costa, Ana Paula; Vizueti, Adriana Fernanda; Batassini, Cristiane; Tortorelli, Lucas Silva; Wartchow, Krista Minéia; Dutra, Márcio Ferreira; Bobermin, Larissa; Sesterheim, Patrícia; Quincozes-Santos, André; de Souza, Jaqueline; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Physical exercise effects on brain health and cognitive performance have been described. Synaptic remodeling in hippocampus induced by physical exercise has been described in animal models, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Changes in astrocytes, the glial cells involved in synaptic remodeling, need more characterization. We investigated the effect of moderate treadmill exercise (20 min/day) for 4 weeks on some parameters of astrocytic activity in rat hippocampal slices, namely, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), glutamate uptake and glutamine synthetase (GS) activities, glutathione content, and S100B protein content and secretion, as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels and glucose uptake activity in this tissue. Results show that moderate treadmill exercise was able to induce a decrease in GFAP content (evaluated by ELISA and immunohistochemistry) and an increase in GS activity. These changes could be mediated by corticosterone, whose levels were elevated in serum. BDNF, another putative mediator, was not altered in hippocampal tissue. Moreover, treadmill exercise caused a decrease in NO content. Our data indicate specific changes in astrocyte markers induced by physical exercise, the importance of studying astrocytes for understanding brain plasticity, as well as reinforce the relevance of physical exercise as a neuroprotective strategy. PMID:23401802

  20. Treadmill Exercise Induces Hippocampal Astroglial Alterations in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Caren; Tramontina, Ana Carolina; Nardin, Patrícia; Biasibetti, Regina; Costa, Ana Paula; Vizueti, Adriana Fernanda; Batassini, Cristiane; Tortorelli, Lucas Silva; Wartchow, Krista Minéia; Dutra, Márcio Ferreira; Bobermin, Larissa; Sesterheim, Patrícia; Quincozes-Santos, André; de Souza, Jaqueline; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Physical exercise effects on brain health and cognitive performance have been described. Synaptic remodeling in hippocampus induced by physical exercise has been described in animal models, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Changes in astrocytes, the glial cells involved in synaptic remodeling, need more characterization. We investigated the effect of moderate treadmill exercise (20 min/day) for 4 weeks on some parameters of astrocytic activity in rat hippocampal slices, namely, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), glutamate uptake and glutamine synthetase (GS) activities, glutathione content, and S100B protein content and secretion, as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels and glucose uptake activity in this tissue. Results show that moderate treadmill exercise was able to induce a decrease in GFAP content (evaluated by ELISA and immunohistochemistry) and an increase in GS activity. These changes could be mediated by corticosterone, whose levels were elevated in serum. BDNF, another putative mediator, was not altered in hippocampal tissue. Moreover, treadmill exercise caused a decrease in NO content. Our data indicate specific changes in astrocyte markers induced by physical exercise, the importance of studying astrocytes for understanding brain plasticity, as well as reinforce the relevance of physical exercise as a neuroprotective strategy. PMID:23401802

  1. An Outcome-Based Action Study on Changes in Fitness, Blood Lipids, and Exercise Adherence, Using the Disconnected Values (Intervention) Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anshel, Mark H.; Kang, Minsoo

    2007-01-01

    The authors' purpose in this action study was to examine the effect of a 10-week intervention, using the Disconnected Values Model (DVM), on changes in selected measures of fitness, blood lipids, and exercise adherence among 51 university faculty (10 men and 41 women) from a school in the southeastern United States. The DVM is an intervention…

  2. Exercise preconditioning of the myocardium.

    PubMed

    Kavazis, Andreas N

    2009-01-01

    Diseases of the heart (e.g. myocardial ischaemia reperfusion injury) remain the major cause of death in the industrialized world. Therefore, developing a pragmatic countermeasure to reduce myocardial ischaemia reperfusion injury is vital. In this regard, a plethora of evidence indicates that regular exercise can protect the heart during an ischaemia reperfusion insult (i.e. cardioprotection). This review summarizes studies indicating that both short-term (i.e. 1-5 days) and long-term (i.e. weeks to months) endurance exercise provides cardioprotection. Data are presented showing that exercise duration and exercise intensity are both important factors in achieving a cardioprotective phenotype. Importantly, it appears that the exercise duration of a single exercise session should last for 60 minutes and should be performed at about 75% maximum oxygen consumption in order to achieve exercise-induced cardioprotection. Furthermore, data are presented showing that exercise-induced cardioprotection against myocardial stunning can persist for at least 9 days after the cessation of exercise training, but is lost 18 days after exercise. This review also summarizes the exercise-induced adaptations that occur to the myocardium. In particular, extrinsic changes observed in human and animal models include neural, hormonal, humoral, vascular and reduced body fat. Other anatomical and biochemical/molecular changes that have been studied as putative mechanisms in exercise-induced cardioprotection include alterations in anatomic coronary arteries, induction of myocardial heat shock proteins, increased myocardial cyclooxygenase-2 activity, elevated endoplasmic reticulum stress proteins, nitric oxide production, improved function of sarcolemmal and/or mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium channels and increased myocardial antioxidant capacity. However, the most compelling evidence for exercise-induced cardioprotection is the fact that exercise training

  3. A prognostic scoring system for arm exercise stress testing

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yan; Xian, Hong; Chandiramani, Pooja; Bainter, Emily; Wan, Leping; Martin, Wade H

    2016-01-01

    Objective Arm exercise stress testing may be an equivalent or better predictor of mortality outcome than pharmacological stress imaging for the ≥50% for patients unable to perform leg exercise. Thus, our objective was to develop an arm exercise ECG stress test scoring system, analogous to the Duke Treadmill Score, for predicting outcome in these individuals. Methods In this retrospective observational cohort study, arm exercise ECG stress tests were performed in 443 consecutive veterans aged 64.1 (11.1) years. (mean (SD)) between 1997 and 2002. From multivariate Cox models, arm exercise scores were developed for prediction of 5-year and 12-year all-cause and cardiovascular mortality and 5-year cardiovascular mortality or myocardial infarction (MI). Results Arm exercise capacity in resting metabolic equivalents (METs), 1 min heart rate recovery (HRR) and ST segment depression ≥1 mm were the stress test variables independently associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality by step-wise Cox analysis (all p<0.01). A score based on the relation HRR (bpm)+7.3×METs−10.5×ST depression (0=no; 1=yes) prognosticated 5-year cardiovascular mortality with a C-statistic of 0.81 before and 0.88 after adjustment for significant demographic and clinical covariates. Arm exercise scores for the other outcome end points yielded C-statistic values of 0.77–0.79 before and 0.82–0.86 after adjustment for significant covariates versus 0.64–0.72 for best fit pharmacological myocardial perfusion imaging models in a cohort of 1730 veterans who were evaluated over the same time period. Conclusions Arm exercise scores, analogous to the Duke Treadmill Score, have good power for prediction of mortality or MI in patients who cannot perform leg exercise. PMID:26835142

  4. Data assimilation and model evaluation experiment datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Chung-Cheng A.; Qian, Wen; Glenn, Scott M.

    1994-01-01

    The Institute for Naval Oceanography, in cooperation with Naval Research Laboratories and universities, executed the Data Assimilation and Model Evaluation Experiment (DAMEE) for the Gulf Stream region during fiscal years 1991-1993. Enormous effort has gone into the preparation of several high-quality and consistent datasets for model initialization and verification. This paper describes the preparation process, the temporal and spatial scopes, the contents, the structure, etc., of these datasets. The goal of DAMEE and the need of data for the four phases of experiment are briefly stated. The preparation of DAMEE datasets consisted of a series of processes: (1) collection of observational data; (2) analysis and interpretation; (3) interpolation using the Optimum Thermal Interpolation System package; (4) quality control and re-analysis; and (5) data archiving and software documentation. The data products from these processes included a time series of 3D fields of temperature and salinity, 2D fields of surface dynamic height and mixed-layer depth, analysis of the Gulf Stream and rings system, and bathythermograph profiles. To date, these are the most detailed and high-quality data for mesoscale ocean modeling, data assimilation, and forecasting research. Feedback from ocean modeling groups who tested this data was incorporated into its refinement. Suggestions for DAMEE data usages include (1) ocean modeling and data assimilation studies, (2) diagnosis and theoretical studies, and (3) comparisons with locally detailed observations.

  5. Evaluation of Inelastic Constitutive Models for Nonlinear Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of inelastic material models on computed stress-strain states, and therefore predicted lives, was studied for thermomechanically loaded structures. Nonlinear structural analyses were performed on a fatigue specimen which was subjected to thermal cycling in fluidized beds and on a mechanically load cycled benchmark notch specimen. Four incremental plasticity creep models (isotropic, kinematic, combined isotropic-kinematic, combined plus transient creep) were exercised. Of the plasticity models, kinematic hardening gave results most consistent with experimental observations. Life predictions using the computed strain histories at the critical location with a Strainrange Partitioning approach considerably overpredicted the crack initiation life of the thermal fatigue specimen.

  6. A new methodology to assess the performance and uncertainty of source apportionment models II: The results of two European intercomparison exercises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belis, C. A.; Karagulian, F.; Amato, F.; Almeida, M.; Artaxo, P.; Beddows, D. C. S.; Bernardoni, V.; Bove, M. C.; Carbone, S.; Cesari, D.; Contini, D.; Cuccia, E.; Diapouli, E.; Eleftheriadis, K.; Favez, O.; El Haddad, I.; Harrison, R. M.; Hellebust, S.; Hovorka, J.; Jang, E.; Jorquera, H.; Kammermeier, T.; Karl, M.; Lucarelli, F.; Mooibroek, D.; Nava, S.; Nøjgaard, J. K.; Paatero, P.; Pandolfi, M.; Perrone, M. G.; Petit, J. E.; Pietrodangelo, A.; Pokorná, P.; Prati, P.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Quass, U.; Querol, X.; Saraga, D.; Sciare, J.; Sfetsos, A.; Valli, G.; Vecchi, R.; Vestenius, M.; Yubero, E.; Hopke, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    The performance and the uncertainty of receptor models (RMs) were assessed in intercomparison exercises employing real-world and synthetic input datasets. To that end, the results obtained by different practitioners using ten different RMs were compared with a reference. In order to explain the differences in the performances and uncertainties of the different approaches, the apportioned mass, the number of sources, the chemical profiles, the contribution-to-species and the time trends of the sources were all evaluated using the methodology described in Belis et al. (2015). In this study, 87% of the 344 source contribution estimates (SCEs) reported by participants in 47 different source apportionment model results met the 50% standard uncertainty quality objective established for the performance test. In addition, 68% of the SCE uncertainties reported in the results were coherent with the analytical uncertainties in the input data. The most used models, EPA-PMF v.3, PMF2 and EPA-CMB 8.2, presented quite satisfactory performances in the estimation of SCEs while unconstrained models, that do not account for the uncertainty in the input data (e.g. APCS and FA-MLRA), showed below average performance. Sources with well-defined chemical profiles and seasonal time trends, that make appreciable contributions (>10%), were those better quantified by the models while those with contributions to the PM mass close to 1% represented a challenge. The results of the assessment indicate that RMs are capable of estimating the contribution of the major pollution source categories over a given time window with a level of accuracy that is in line with the needs of air quality management.

  7. Adherence to an Exercise Intervention Among Older Women Post Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Resnick, Barbara; D’Adamo, Christopher; Shardell, Michelle; Orwig, Denise; Hawkes, William; Hebel, J. Richard; Golden, Justine; Magaziner, Jay; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Yu-Yahiro, Janet

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate adherence to home-based exercise interventions among older women post hip fracture that were randomized to one of three exercise intervention groups or a routine care group. A total of 157 female hip fracture patients provided data for the intervention analysis. Factors evaluated baseline, 2, 6, and 12 months post hip fracture included demographic variables, adherence to treatment visits, self-efficacy, outcome expectations, stage of change for exercise, social support for exercise, mood, health status, pain, and fear of falling. The hypothesized model tested the direct and indirect impact of all study variables on adherence to exercise intervention sessions. Different factors appeared to influence adherence to visits across the recovery trajectory. PMID:20428489

  8. [Exercise test and respiratory muscle function test].

    PubMed

    Akashiba, Tsuneto

    2011-10-01

    Dyspnea on exertion is a chief complaint of patients with COPD, and it has a major effect on the quality of their lives. Dyspnea is, by definition, subjective, but objective approaches are needed for a comprehensive understanding of these patients' conditions. Thus, measuring changes in cardiopulmonary variables during exercise can be very helpful when evaluating patients with COPD. The main purpose of exercise testing is to evaluate exercise tolerance and to identify the factors limiting exercise. Although incremental exercise testing is ideal for these purposes, simple walking tests such as 6-minute walking test, are also useful. PMID:22073578

  9. Analysis of UK and European NOx and VOC emission scenarios in the Defra model intercomparison exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derwent, Richard; Beevers, Sean; Chemel, Charles; Cooke, Sally; Francis, Xavier; Fraser, Andrea; Heal, Mathew R.; Kitwiroon, Nutthida; Lingard, Justin; Redington, Alison; Sokhi, Ranjeet; Vieno, Massimo

    2014-09-01

    Simple emission scenarios have been implemented in eight United Kingdom air quality models with the aim of assessing how these models compared when addressing whether photochemical ozone formation in southern England was NOx- or VOC-sensitive and whether ozone precursor sources in the UK or in the Rest of Europe (RoE) were the most important during July 2006. The suite of models included three Eulerian-grid models (three implementations of one of these models), a Lagrangian atmospheric dispersion model and two moving box air parcel models. The assignments as to NOx- or VOC-sensitive and to UK- versus RoE-dominant, turned out to be highly variable and often contradictory between the individual models. However, when the assignments were filtered by model performance on each day, many of the contradictions could be eliminated. Nevertheless, no one model was found to be the 'best' model on all days, indicating that no single air quality model could currently be relied upon to inform policymakers robustly in terms of NOx- versus VOC-sensitivity and UK- versus RoE-dominance on each day. It is important to maintain a diversity in model approaches.

  10. Prediction of Muscle Performance During Dynamic Repetitive Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byerly, D. L.; Byerly, K. A.; Sognier, M. A.; Squires, W. G.

    2002-01-01

    A method for predicting human muscle performance was developed. Eight test subjects performed a repetitive dynamic exercise to failure using a Lordex spinal machine. Electromyography (EMG) data was collected from the erector spinae. Evaluation of the EMG data using a 5th order Autoregressive (AR) model and statistical regression analysis revealed that an AR parameter, the mean average magnitude of AR poles, can predict performance to failure as early as the second repetition of the exercise. Potential applications to the space program include evaluating on-orbit countermeasure effectiveness, maximizing post-flight recovery, and future real-time monitoring capability during Extravehicular Activity.

  11. Modelling approaches for evaluating multiscale tendon mechanics.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fei; Lake, Spencer P

    2016-02-01

    Tendon exhibits anisotropic, inhomogeneous and viscoelastic mechanical properties that are determined by its complicated hierarchical structure and varying amounts/organization of different tissue constituents. Although extensive research has been conducted to use modelling approaches to interpret tendon structure-function relationships in combination with experimental data, many issues remain unclear (i.e. the role of minor components such as decorin, aggrecan and elastin), and the integration of mechanical analysis across different length scales has not been well applied to explore stress or strain transfer from macro- to microscale. This review outlines mathematical and computational models that have been used to understand tendon mechanics at different scales of the hierarchical organization. Model representations at the molecular, fibril and tissue levels are discussed, including formulations that follow phenomenological and microstructural approaches (which include evaluations of crimp, helical structure and the interaction between collagen fibrils and proteoglycans). Multiscale modelling approaches incorporating tendon features are suggested to be an advantageous methodology to understand further the physiological mechanical response of tendon and corresponding adaptation of properties owing to unique in vivo loading environments. PMID:26855747

  12. CTBT Integrated Verification System Evaluation Model

    SciTech Connect

    Edenburn, M.W.; Bunting, M.L.; Payne, A.C. Jr.

    1997-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a computer based model called IVSEM (Integrated Verification System Evaluation Model) to estimate the performance of a nuclear detonation monitoring system. The IVSEM project was initiated in June 1994, by Sandia`s Monitoring Systems and Technology Center and has been funded by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Nonproliferation and National Security (DOE/NN). IVSEM is a simple, top-level, modeling tool which estimates the performance of a Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) monitoring system and can help explore the impact of various sensor system concepts and technology advancements on CTBT monitoring. One of IVSEM`s unique features is that it integrates results from the various CTBT sensor technologies (seismic, infrasound, radionuclide, and hydroacoustic) and allows the user to investigate synergy among the technologies. Specifically, IVSEM estimates the detection effectiveness (probability of detection) and location accuracy of the integrated system and of each technology subsystem individually. The model attempts to accurately estimate the monitoring system`s performance at medium interfaces (air-land, air-water) and for some evasive testing methods such as seismic decoupling. This report describes version 1.2 of IVSEM.

  13. An evaluation framework for participatory modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, T.; Inman, A.; Chilvers, J.

    2012-04-01

    Strong arguments for participatory modelling in hydrology can be made on substantive, instrumental and normative grounds. These arguments have led to increasingly diverse groups of stakeholders (here anyone affecting or affected by an issue) getting involved in hydrological research and the management of water resources. In fact, participation has become a requirement of many research grants, programs, plans and policies. However, evidence of beneficial outcomes of participation as suggested by the arguments is difficult to generate and therefore rare. This is because outcomes are diverse, distributed, often tacit, and take time to emerge. In this paper we develop an evaluation framework for participatory modelling focussed on learning outcomes. Learning encompasses many of the potential benefits of participation, such as better models through diversity of knowledge and scrutiny, stakeholder empowerment, greater trust in models and ownership of subsequent decisions, individual moral development, reflexivity, relationships, social capital, institutional change, resilience and sustainability. Based on the theories of experiential, transformative and social learning, complemented by practitioner experience our framework examines if, when and how learning has occurred. Special emphasis is placed on the role of models as learning catalysts. We map the distribution of learning between stakeholders, scientists (as a subgroup of stakeholders) and models. And we analyse what type of learning has occurred: instrumental learning (broadly cognitive enhancement) and/or communicative learning (change in interpreting meanings, intentions and values associated with actions and activities; group dynamics). We demonstrate how our framework can be translated into a questionnaire-based survey conducted with stakeholders and scientists at key stages of the participatory process, and show preliminary insights from applying the framework within a rural pollution management situation in

  14. Exercise and Quality of Life: Strengthening the Connections

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Eileen

    2010-01-01

    Exercise improves quality of life (QOL) in people with cancer. Most oncology healthcare providers recognize the statement to be true because the research literature provides strong support for the physical and psychological benefits of exercise. Because the terms exercise, QOL, and people with cancer have different meanings, the contextual connections in which they are used are important to understanding the relationship between exercise and QOL in people with cancer. This article explores the links between exercise and QOL in people with cancer and examines issues that impact the development, implementation, and evaluation of exercise programs for people with cancer. Issues related to exercise goal development, exercise prescription, exercise testing, exercise adherence, and methods to evaluate the efficacy of exercise in relation to QOL are discussed. PMID:19193547

  15. Use of micro-computed tomography to evaluate the effects of exercise on preventing the degeneration of articular cartilage in tail-suspended rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Hui-Qin; Sun, Lian-Wen; Huang, Yun-Fei; Wu, Xin-tong; Niu, Haijun; Liu, Hong; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2015-07-01

    Space flight has been shown to induce bone loss and muscle atrophy, which could initiate the degeneration of articular cartilage. Countermeasures to prevent bone loss and muscle atrophy have been explored, but few spaceflight or ground-based studies have focused on the effects on cartilage degeneration. In this study, we investigated the effects of exercise on articular cartilage deterioration in tail-suspended rats. Thirty-two female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups (n = 8 in each): tail suspension (TS), tail suspension plus passive motion (TSP), tail suspension plus active exercise (TSA), and control (CON) groups. In the TS, TSP, and TSA groups, the rat hindlimbs were unloaded for 21 days by tail suspension. Next, the cartilage thickness and volume, and the attenuation coefficient of the distal femur were evaluated by micro-computed tomography (μCT). Histological analysis was used to assess the surface integrity of the cartilage, cartilage thickness, and chondrocytes. The results showed that: (1) the cartilage thickness on the distal femur was significantly lower in the TS and TSP groups compared with the CON and TSA groups; (2) the cartilage volume in the TS group was significantly lower compared with the CON, TSA, and TSP groups; and (3) histomorphology showed that the chondrocytes formed clusters where the degree of matrix staining was lower in the TS and TSP groups. There were no significant differences between any of these parameters in the CON and TSA groups. The cartilage thickness measurements obtained by μCT and histomorphology correlated well. In general, tail suspension could induce articular cartilage degeneration, but active exercise was effective in preventing this degeneration in tail-suspended rats.

  16. An Economic Evaluation of Resistance Training and Aerobic Training versus Balance and Toning Exercises in Older Adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Jennifer C.; Bryan, Stirling; Marra, Carlo A.; Sharma, Devika; Chan, Alison; Beattie, B. Lynn; Graf, Peter; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Background Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) represents a critical window to intervene against dementia. Exercise training is a promising intervention strategy, but the efficiency (i.e., relationship of costs and consequences) of such types of training remains unknown. Thus, we estimated the incremental cost-effectiveness of resistance training or aerobic training compared with balance and tone exercises in terms of changes in executive cognitive function among senior women with probable MCI. Methods Economic evaluation conducted concurrently with a six-month three arm randomized controlled trial including eighty-six community dwelling women aged 70 to 80 years living in Vancouver, Canada. Participants received twice-weekly resistance training (n = 28), twice weekly aerobic training (n = 30) or twice-weekly balance and tone (control group) classes (n = 28) for 6 months. The primary outcome measure of the Exercise for Cognition and Everyday Living (EXCEL) study assessed executive cognitive function, a test of selective attention and conflict resolution (i.e., Stroop Test). We collected healthcare resource utilization costs over six months. Results Based on the bootstrapped estimates from our base case analysis, we found that both the aerobic training and resistance training interventions were less costly than twice weekly balance and tone classes. Compared with the balance and tone group, the resistance-training group had significantly improved performance on the Stroop Test (p = 0.04). Conclusions Resistance training and aerobic training result in health care cost saving and are more effective than balance and tone classes after only 6 months of intervention. Resistance training is a promising strategy to alter the trajectory of cognitive decline in seniors with MCI. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00958867. PMID:23690976

  17. Silent ischemia after coronary angioplasty: Evaluation of restenosis and extent of ischemia in asymptomatic patients by tomographic thallium-201 exercise imaging and comparison with symptomatic patients

    SciTech Connect

    Hecht, H.S.; Shaw, R.E.; Chin, H.L.; Ryan, C.; Stertzer, S.H.; Myler, R.K. )

    1991-03-01

    One hundred sixteen patients were evaluated to determine the ability of single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) thallium-201 exercise and redistribution imaging to detect silent ischemia secondary to restenosis in asymptomatic patients after single and multiple vessel percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and the findings were compared with SPECT imaging detection of restenosis in symptomatic patients. The value of exercise electrocardiography (ECG) and the amount of ischemic myocardium in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients were determined. Forty-one patients were asymptomatic after angioplasty; 77% of these had chest pain before angioplasty. Seventy-five patients had chest pain after angioplasty; 99% of these had chest pain before angioplasty. Restenosis occurred in 61% of asymptomatic and 59% of symptomatic patients and in 46% of the vessels in both asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detection of restenosis by SPECT in individual patients were 96%, 75% and 88% versus 91%, 77% and 85%, respectively, in the asymptomatic versus symptomatic groups (p = NS). Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for restenosis detection in individual vessels were 90%, 89% and 89% versus 84%, 77% and 84%, respectively, in the asymptomatic and symptomatic groups (p = NS), with similar results for the three major arteries. Sensitivity and accuracy of exercise ECG were significantly less than those of SPECT imaging for the patients with silent (40% and 44%) and symptomatic (59% and 64%) ischemia (p less than 0.001). Restenosis of vessels in the patients with silent and symptomatic ischemia was associated with an equal amount and degree of severity of ischemic myocardium in the two groups.

  18. Use of micro-computed tomography to evaluate the effects of exercise on preventing the degeneration of articular cartilage in tail-suspended rats.

    PubMed

    Luan, Hui-Qin; Sun, Lian-Wen; Huang, Yun-Fei; Wu, Xin-tong; Niu, Haijun; Liu, Hong; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2015-07-01

    Space flight has been shown to induce bone loss and muscle atrophy, which could initiate the degeneration of articular cartilage. Countermeasures to prevent bone loss and muscle atrophy have been explored, but few spaceflight or ground-based studies have focused on the effects on cartilage degeneration. In this study, we investigated the effects of exercise on articular cartilage deterioration in tail-suspended rats. Thirty-two female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups (n=8 in each): tail suspension (TS), tail suspension plus passive motion (TSP), tail suspension plus active exercise (TSA), and control (CON) groups. In the TS, TSP, and TSA groups, the rat hindlimbs were unloaded for 21 days by tail suspension. Next, the cartilage thickness and volume, and the attenuation coefficient of the distal femur were evaluated by micro-computed tomography (μCT). Histological analysis was used to assess the surface integrity of the cartilage, cartilage thickness, and chondrocytes. The results showed that: (1) the cartilage thickness on the distal femur was significantly lower in the TS and TSP groups compared with the CON and TSA groups; (2) the cartilage volume in the TS group was significantly lower compared with the CON, TSA, and TSP groups; and (3) histomorphology showed that the chondrocytes formed clusters where the degree of matrix staining was lower in the TS and TSP groups. There were no significant differences between any of these parameters in the CON and TSA groups. The cartilage thickness measurements obtained by μCT and histomorphology correlated well. In general, tail suspension could induce articular cartilage degeneration, but active exercise was effective in preventing this degeneration in tail-suspended rats. PMID:26256623

  19. Performance Evaluation Modeling of Network Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clare, Loren P.; Jennings, Esther H.; Gao, Jay L.

    2003-01-01

    Substantial benefits are promised by operating many spatially separated sensors collectively. Such systems are envisioned to consist of sensor nodes that are connected by a communications network. A simulation tool is being developed to evaluate the performance of networked sensor systems, incorporating such metrics as target detection probabilities, false alarms rates, and classification confusion probabilities. The tool will be used to determine configuration impacts associated with such aspects as spatial laydown, and mixture of different types of sensors (acoustic, seismic, imaging, magnetic, RF, etc.), and fusion architecture. The QualNet discrete-event simulation environment serves as the underlying basis for model development and execution. This platform is recognized for its capabilities in efficiently simulating networking among mobile entities that communicate via wireless media. We are extending QualNet's communications modeling constructs to capture the sensing aspects of multi-target sensing (analogous to multiple access communications), unimodal multi-sensing (broadcast), and multi-modal sensing (multiple channels and correlated transmissions). Methods are also being developed for modeling the sensor signal sources (transmitters), signal propagation through the media, and sensors (receivers) that are consistent with the discrete event paradigm needed for performance determination of sensor network systems. This work is supported under the Microsensors Technical Area of the Army Research Laboratory (ARL) Advanced Sensors Collaborative Technology Alliance.

  20. Evaluating Domestic Hot Water Distribution System Options with Validated Analysis Models

    SciTech Connect

    Weitzel, E.; Hoeschele, E.

    2014-09-01

    A developing body of work is forming that collects data on domestic hot water consumption, water use behaviors, and energy efficiency of various distribution systems. Transient System Simulation Tool (TRNSYS) is a full distribution system developed that has been validated using field monitoring data and then exercised in a number of climates to understand climate impact on performance. In this study, the Building America team built upon previous analysis modeling work to evaluate differing distribution systems and the sensitivities of water heating energy and water use efficiency to variations of climate, load, distribution type, insulation and compact plumbing practices. Overall, 124 different TRNSYS models were simulated. The results of this work are useful in informing future development of water heating best practices guides as well as more accurate (and simulation time efficient) distribution models for annual whole house simulation programs.

  1. Daily exercise routines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Patrick L.; Amoroso, Michael T.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on daily exercise routines are presented. Topics covered include: daily exercise and periodic stress testings; exercise equipment; physiological monitors; exercise protocols; physiological levels; equipment control; control systems; and fuzzy logic control.

  2. Exercise and age

    MedlinePlus

    Age and exercise ... It is never too late to start exercising. Exercise has benefits at any age. Don't worry ... as you age. The right kind of regular exercise can also reduce your risk of heart disease, ...

  3. Exercise and Posture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Info For Teens Message Boards & Forums Donate Shop Exercise & Posture About Spondylitis / Exercise & Posture Overview For The ... Diet Blood Work and Spondylitis Spondylitis Awareness Month Exercise Exercise is an integral part of any spondylitis ...

  4. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions & Treatments ▸ Conditions Dictionary ▸ Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Share | Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB) « Back to A to Z Listing Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction, (EIB), often known as exercise-induced ...

  5. Diabetes and exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000083.htm Diabetes and exercise To use the sharing features on this page, ... not exercising at all. Your Blood Sugar and Exercise Check your blood sugar before you exercise. Also, ...

  6. Exercise at Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Divisions Home Health Insights Exercise Exercise at Home Exercise at Home Make an Appointment Ask a Question ... with the movement and contact your provider. Posture Exercises Better posture means better breathing and movement. Axial ...

  7. Exercise-induced asthma

    MedlinePlus

    Wheezing - exercise-induced; Reactive airway disease - exercise ... Having asthma symptoms when you exercise does not mean you cannot or should not exercise. But be aware of your EIA triggers. Cold or dry air may ...

  8. The Prescription or Proscription of Exercise in Endometrial Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaochen; Haggerty, Ashley F.; Brown, Justin C.; Giuntoli, Robert; Lin, Lilie; Simpkins, Fiona; Dean, Lorraine T.; Ko, Emily; Morgan, Mark; Schmitz, Kathryn H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the proportion of endometrial cancer patients who can be safely prescribed community/home based unsupervised exercise. A better understanding of the physical dysfunction secondary to comorbidities among endometrial cancer patients would assist clinicians in delineating which patients to send to medically-based supervised rehabilitation versus a community/home based unsupervised exercise program. Methods A literature review identified health issues which could impede patients from successfully completing an unsupervised exercise program after a cancer diagnosis. The charts of 479 endometrial cancer patients treated between 2006 and 2010 were reviewed to determine the health status at the time of diagnosis and the type and percentage of health-issues that could preclude an unsupervised exercise program in this population. Univariable and multivariable modeling were used to evaluate the association of demographic, cancer-related characteristics and clinical variables with ability to participate in unsupervised exercise. Results We determined that 14.2% of endometrial cancer patients were able to exercise without supervision based on their health status at the time of diagnosis. After excluding common comorbidities (hypertension, diabetes and morbid obesity) from the identified health-issues, the proportion increased to 20.5%. Older at diagnosis (P=0.007) and higher BMI (P<0.001) are more likely to exclude patients from community/home based unsupervised exercise program. Conclusions Only 14.2% to 20.5% of endometrial cancer patients were deemed able to exercise without supervision based on their health status at diagnosis. Our data suggest that approximately 80% of endometrial cancer patients would benefit from a referral to a medically-based supervised exercise program. PMID:26307400

  9. Autonomic neural control of heart rate during dynamic exercise: revisited

    PubMed Central

    White, Daniel W; Raven, Peter B

    2014-01-01

    The accepted model of autonomic control of heart rate (HR) during dynamic exercise indicates that the initial increase is entirely attributable to the withdrawal of parasympathetic nervous system (PSNS) activity and that subsequent increases in HR are entirely attributable to increases in cardiac sympathetic activity. In the present review, we sought to re-evaluate the model of autonomic neural control of HR in humans during progressive increases in dynamic exercise workload. We analysed data from both new and previously published studies involving baroreflex stimulation and pharmacological blockade of the autonomic nervous system. Results indicate that the PSNS remains functionally active throughout exercise and that increases in HR from rest to maximal exercise result from an increasing workload-related transition from a 4 : 1 vagal–sympathetic balance to a 4 : 1 sympatho–vagal balance. Furthermore, the beat-to-beat autonomic reflex control of HR was found to be dependent on the ability of the PSNS to modulate the HR as it was progressively restrained by increasing workload-related sympathetic nerve activity. In conclusion: (i) increases in exercise workload-related HR are not caused by a total withdrawal of the PSNS followed by an increase in sympathetic tone; (ii) reciprocal antagonism is key to the transition from vagal to sympathetic dominance, and (iii) resetting of the arterial baroreflex causes immediate exercise-onset reflexive increases in HR, which are parasympathetically mediated, followed by slower increases in sympathetic tone as workloads are increased. PMID:24756637

  10. Using an Agenda Setting Model to Help Students Develop & Exercise Participatory Skills and Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Anthony D.; Wilkenfeld, Britt S.

    2006-01-01

    The Agenda Setting Model is a program component that can be used in courses to contribute to students' development as responsible, effective, and informed citizens. This model involves students in finding a unified voice to assert an agenda of issues that they find especially pressing. This is often the only time students experience such a…

  11. How Long is my Toilet Roll?--A Simple Exercise in Mathematical Modelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    The simple question of how much paper is left on my toilet roll is studied from a mathematical modelling perspective. As is typical with applied mathematics, models of increasing complexity are introduced and solved. Solutions produced at each step are compared with the solution from the previous step. This process exposes students to the typical…

  12. Hands-On Exercise in Environmental Structural Geology Using a Fracture Block Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Alexander E.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of a scale analog model of an actual fractured rock reservoir to replace paper copies of fracture maps in the structural geology curriculum. Discusses the merits of the model in enabling students to gain experience performing standard structural analyses. (DDR)

  13. Fish under exercise.

    PubMed

    Palstra, Arjan P; Planas, Josep V

    2011-06-01

    Improved knowledge on the swimming physiology of fish and its application to fisheries science and aquaculture (i.e., farming a fitter fish) is currently needed in the face of global environmental changes, high fishing pressures, increased aquaculture production as well as increased concern on fish well-being. Here, we review existing data on teleost fish that indicate that sustained exercise at optimal speeds enhances muscle growth and has consequences for flesh quality. Potential added benefits of sustained exercise may be delay of ovarian development and stimulation of immune status. Exercise could represent a natural, noninvasive, and economical approach to improve growth, flesh quality as well as welfare of aquacultured fish: a FitFish for a healthy consumer. All these issues are important for setting directions for policy decisions and future studies in this area. For this purpose, the FitFish workshop on the Swimming Physiology of Fish ( http://www.ub.edu/fitfish2010 ) was organized to bring together a multidisciplinary group of scientists using exercise models, industrial partners, and policy makers. Sixteen international experts from Europe, North America, and Japan were invited to present their work and view on migration of fishes in their natural environment, beneficial effects of exercise, and applications for sustainable aquaculture. Eighty-eight participants from 19 different countries contributed through a poster session and round table discussion. Eight papers from invited speakers at the workshop have been contributed to this special issue on The Swimming Physiology of Fish. PMID:21611721

  14. Mitohormesis in exercise training.

    PubMed

    Merry, Troy L; Ristow, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Hormesis is a process whereby exposure to a low dose of a potentially harmful stressor promotes adaptive changes to the cell that enables it to better tolerate subsequent stress. In recent years this concept has been applied specifically to the mitochondria (mitohormesis), suggesting that in response to a perturbation the mitochondria can initiate and transduce a signal to the nucleus that coordinates a transcriptional response resulting in both mitochondrial and non-mitochondrial adaptations that return and maintain cellular homeostasis. In this review we summarize the evidence that mitohormesis is a significant adaptive-response signaling pathway, and suggest that it plays a role in mediating exercise-induced adaptations. We discuss potential mitochondrial emitters of retrograde signals that may activate known exercise-sensitive transcription factors to modulate transcription responses to exercise, and draw on evidence from mitochondrial dysfunction animal models to support a role for mitohormesis in mitochondrial biogenesis. Studies directly linking mitohormesis to the exercise training response are lacking, however mounting evidence suggests numerous signals are emitted from the mitochondria during exercise and have the potential to induce a nuclear transcription response, with reactive oxygen species (ROS) being the primary candidate. PMID:26654757

  15. Exercise Promotion in Geriatric Oncology.

    PubMed

    Burhenn, Peggy S; Bryant, Ashley Leak; Mustian, Karen M

    2016-09-01

    Evidence of the benefits of exercise for people with cancer from diagnosis through survivorship is growing. However, most cancers occur in older adults and little exercise advice is available for making specific recommendations for older adults with cancer. Individualized exercise prescriptions are safe, feasible, and beneficial for the geriatric oncology population. Oncology providers must be equipped to discuss the short- and long-term benefits of exercise and assist older patients in obtaining appropriate exercise prescriptions. This review provides detailed information about professionals and their roles as it relates to functional assessment, intervention, and evaluation of the geriatric oncology population. This review addresses the importance of functional status assessment and appropriate referrals to other oncology professionals. PMID:27484061

  16. Telerehabilitation for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: feasibility of a simple, real time model of supervised exercise training.

    PubMed

    Holland, Anne E; Hill, Catherine J; Rochford, Peter; Fiore, Julio; Berlowitz, David J; McDonald, Christine F

    2013-06-01

    We evaluated the safety and feasibility of home telerehabilitation for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Eight patients with mean age of 66 years and moderately impaired lung function took part. The telerehabilitation equipment in the participant's home included an exercise bicycle, a tablet computer with webcam for low bandwidth videoconferencing, and a pulse oximeter positioned so that the display was visible while videoconferencing. Participants undertook supervised aerobic training twice a week for eight weeks, with two participants and a physiotherapist attending each class via videoconferencing from separate locations. Primary outcomes were adverse events, sessions attended and system usability. Secondary outcomes were the 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) and Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire (CRQ). No significant adverse events occurred during the study. Participants attended 76% of possible sessions. System usability ratings were excellent when sessions were delivered via the university network (mean 94 out of 100) but lower when using the hospital network (mean 59 out of 100), with 67% of technical problems related to data network capability. Five participants completed the programme, with clinically significant improvements in 6MWD (mean 27 m, SD 40) and CRQ dyspnoea (4 units, SD 4). Simple home-based telerehabilitation using readily available equipment is safe and feasible for people with COPD. Effective delivery of telerehabilitation requires an adequate data network. PMID:23666438

  17. Myocardial function and perfusion in the CREST syndrome variant of progressive systemic sclerosis. Exercise radionuclide evaluation and comparison with diffuse scleroderma

    SciTech Connect

    Follansbee, W.P.; Curtiss, E.I.; Medsger, T.A. Jr.; Owens, G.R.; Steen, V.D.; Rodnan, G.P.

    1984-09-01

    Myocardial function and perfusion were evaluated in 22 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis with the CREST syndrome using exercise and radionuclide techniques, pulmonary function testing, and chest roentgenography. The results were compared with a similar study of 26 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis with diffuse scleroderma. The prevalence of thallium perfusion abnormalities was similar in the groups with CREST syndrome and diffuse scleroderma, (64 percent versus 77 percent), but the defects were significantly smaller in the CREST syndrome (p less than 0.01). Reperfusion thallium defects in the absence of extramural coronary artery disease were seen in 38 percent of patients with diffuse scleroderma. This finding was not seen in any of the patients with the CREST syndrome. In diffuse scleroderma, abnormalities of both right and left ventricular function were related to larger thallium perfusion defects. In the CREST syndrome, abnormalities of left ventricular function were minor, were seen only during exercise, and were unrelated to thallium perfusion defects. Abnormal resting right ventricular function was seen in 36 percent of the patients with the CREST syndrome and was associated with an isolated decrease in diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide. It is concluded that the cardiac manifestations of the CREST syndrome are distinct from those found in diffuse scleroderma. Unlike diffuse scleroderma, abnormalities of left ventricular function in the CREST syndrome are minor and are unrelated to abnormalities of coronary perfusion. Right ventricular dysfunction in the CREST syndrome appears to be primarily related to pulmonary vascular disease.

  18. An Integrated Model of Training Evaluation and Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Kaye; Salas, Eduardo; Garofano, Christina M.

    2004-01-01

    A decade of training evaluation and training effectiveness research was reviewed to construct an integrated model of training evaluation and effectiveness. This model integrates four prior evaluation models and results of 10 years of training effectiveness research. It is the first to be constructed using a set of strict criteria and to…

  19. 10 CFR Appendix K to Part 50 - ECCS Evaluation Models

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false ECCS Evaluation Models K Appendix K to Part 50 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Pt. 50, App. K Appendix K to Part 50—ECCS Evaluation Models I. Required and Acceptable Features of Evaluation Models. II. Required Documentation. I. Required...

  20. Effects of structured written feedback by cards on medical students’ performance at Mini Clinical Evaluation Exercise (Mini-CEX) in an outpatient clinic

    PubMed Central

    HAGHANI, FARIBA; HATEF KHORAMI, MOHAMMAD; FAKHARI, MOHAMMAD

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Feedback cards are recommended as a feasible tool for structured written feedback delivery in clinical education while effectiveness of this tool on the medical students’ performance is still questionable.  The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of structured written feedback by cards as well as verbal feedback versus verbal feedback alone on the clinical performance of medical students at the Mini Clinical Evaluation Exercise (Mini-CEX) test in an outpatient clinic. Methods This is a quasi-experimental study with pre- and post-test comprising four groups in two terms of medical students’ externship. The students’ performance was assessed through the Mini-Clinical Evaluation Exercise (Mini-CEX) as a clinical performance evaluation tool. Structured written feedbacks were given to two experimental groups by designed feedback cards as well as verbal feedback, while in the two control groups feedback was delivered verbally as a routine approach in clinical education. Results By consecutive sampling method, 62 externship students were enrolled in this study and seven students were excluded from the final analysis due to their absence for three days. According to the ANOVA analysis and Post Hoc Tukey test,  no statistically significant difference was observed among the four groups at the pre-test, whereas a statistically significant difference was observed between the experimental and control groups at the post-test  (F = 4.023, p =0.012). The effect size of the structured written feedbacks on clinical performance was 0.19. Conclusion Structured written feedback by cards could improve the performance of medical students in a statistical sense. Further studies must be conducted in other clinical courses with longer durations. PMID:27382581

  1. Anisn-Dort Neutron-Gamma Flux Intercomparison Exercise for a Simple Testing Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehmer, B.; Konheiser, J.; Borodkin, G.; Brodkin, E.; Egorov, A.; Kozhevnikov, A.; Zaritsky, S.; Manturov, G.; Voloschenko, A.

    2003-06-01

    The ability of transport codes ANISN, DORT, ROZ-6, MCNP and TRAMO, as well as nuclear data libraries BUGLE-96, ABBN-93, VITAMIN-B6 and ENDF/B-6 to deliver consistent gamma and neutron flux results was tested in the calculation of a one-dimensional cylindrical model consisting of a homogeneous core and an outer zone with a single material. Model variants with H2O, Fe, Cr and Ni in the outer zones were investigated. The results are compared with MCNP-ENDF/B-6 results. Discrepancies are discussed. The specified test model is proposed as a computational benchmark for testing calculation codes and data libraries.

  2. Exercise apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffner, Grant (Inventor); Bentley, Jason R. (Inventor); Loehr, James A. (Inventor); Gundo, Daniel P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An apparatus and method for exercising whereby the user is supported by various mechanisms in such as way that the user's shoulder area is free to translate and rotate; the user's pelvic area is free to translate and rotate; or in any combination.

  3. Budget Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clowes, Darrel A.

    Following a discussion of the factors to be considered in constructing feasible college budgets, an exercise in budget development is presented involving a hypothetical community college with 2,500 full-time equivalent (FTE) students, 500 in developmental education, 750 each in transfer and technical programs, and 500 undecided. Exercise…

  4. Cardiovascular model for the simulation of exercise, lower body negative pressure, and tilt experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croston, R. C.; Fitzjerrell, D. G.

    1974-01-01

    A mathematical model and digital computer simulation of the human cardiovascular system and its controls have been developed to simulate pulsatile dynamic responses to the cardiovascular experiments of the Skylab missions and to selected physiological stresses of manned space flight. Specific model simulations of the bicycle ergometry, lower body negative pressure, and tilt experiments have been developed and verified for 1-g response by comparison with available experimental data. The zero-g simulations of two Skylab experiments are discussed.

  5. Evaluation of Mesoscale Model Phenomenological Verification Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Winifred

    2006-01-01

    Forecasters at the Spaceflight Meteorology Group, 45th Weather Squadron, and National Weather Service in Melbourne, FL use mesoscale numerical weather prediction model output in creating their operational forecasts. These models aid in forecasting weather phenomena that could compromise the safety of launch, landing, and daily ground operations and must produce reasonable weather forecasts in order for their output to be useful in operations. Considering the importance of model forecasts to operations, their accuracy in forecasting critical weather phenomena must be verified to determine their usefulness. The currently-used traditional verification techniques involve an objective point-by-point comparison of model output and observations valid at the same time and location. The resulting statistics can unfairly penalize high-resolution models that make realistic forecasts of a certain phenomena, but are offset from the observations in small time and/or space increments. Manual subjective verification can provide a more valid representation of model performance, but is time-consuming and prone to personal biases. An objective technique that verifies specific meteorological phenomena, much in the way a human would in a subjective evaluation, would likely produce a more realistic assessment of model performance. Such techniques are being developed in the research community. The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) was tasked to conduct a literature search to identify phenomenological verification techniques being developed, determine if any are ready to use operationally, and outline the steps needed to implement any operationally-ready techniques into the Advanced Weather Information Processing System (AWIPS). The AMU conducted a search of all literature on the topic of phenomenological-based mesoscale model verification techniques and found 10 different techniques in various stages of development. Six of the techniques were developed to verify precipitation forecasts, one

  6. A comparison of lactate indices during ramp exercise using modelling techniques and conventional methods.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Vincent; Costes, Frédéric; Chatagnon, Michel; Pouilly, Jean-Pierre; Busso, Thierry

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the lactate indices provided by single- and double-breakpoint models with lactate thresholds obtained with conventional methods. Arterial samples for the determination of lactate concentrations were drawn from eight participants at rest and every minute during a ramp test (15 W x min(-1)) on a cycle ergometer. Lactate thresholds were determined from a blood lactate concentration equal to 4 mM (LT(4)), from an increase of 1 mM above the resting level (Delta1 mM), and from indirect methods using ventilatory parameters. Other indices were computed from the modelling of the lactate curve using an exponential function (LSI), a polynomial function (Dmax), a semi-log model (SLog), a parabola plus delay model (Mod P), and a two-breakpoint model (Mod M). Mod P and Mod M showed poor agreement with the other methods. LT(4), Dmax, LSI, and respiratory exchange ratio equal to 1 were correlated with each other (0.81 models to detect lactate thresholds, knowing that LT(4), LSI, Dmax, and respiratory exchange ratio equal to 1 provide indices that occur at similar power outputs. PMID:18923955

  7. Treatment modalities and evaluation models for periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Mohammad; Iqbal, Zeenat; Ali, Javed; Baboota, Sanjula; Talegaonkar, Sushama; Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Sahni, Jasjeet K

    2012-01-01

    Periodontitis is the most common localized dental inflammatory disease related with several pathological conditions like inflammation of gums (gingivitis), degeneration of periodontal ligament, dental cementum and alveolar bone loss. In this perspective, the various preventive and treatment modalities, including oral hygiene, gingival irrigations, mechanical instrumentation, full mouth disinfection, host modulation and antimicrobial therapy, which are used either as adjunctive treatments or as stand-alone therapies in the non-surgical management of periodontal infections, have been discussed. Intra-pocket, sustained release systems have emerged as a novel paradigm for the future research. In this article, special consideration is given to different locally delivered anti-microbial and anti inflammatory medications which are either commercially available or are currently under consideration for Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval. The various in vitro dissolution models and microbiological strain investigated to impersonate the infected and inflamed periodontal cavity and to predict the in vivo performance of treatment modalities have also been thrashed out. Animal models that have been employed to explore the pathology at the different stages of periodontitis and to evaluate its treatment modalities are enlightened in this proposed review. PMID:23373002

  8. Impact of emergency preparedness exercise on performance.

    PubMed

    Agboola, Foluso; McCarthy, Tara; Biddinger, Paul D

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether prior participation in preparedness exercises was predictive of better performance on objective measures of response. We conducted a statewide tabletop exercise that focused on a hazardous materials (HAZMAT) scenario and assessed performance using our developed evaluation tool. The evaluative score was analyzed in relation to the number of HAZMAT exercises in the past 3 years, participation in prior CHEMPACK-specific exercise, hospital size, teaching status of the hospital, preparedness training experience, and participants years of experience in preparedness activities. Hospitals that had participated in more exercises in the past 3 years performed significantly better than hospitals that had participated in fewer exercises. No significant differences were found between the performance of hospitals in relation to size, teaching status, preparedness training experience, and participants' years of experience in preparedness activities. Our results suggest that more frequent participation in exercises may result in improved overall response. PMID:23903400

  9. Exercise hypertension: an adverse prognosis?

    PubMed

    Smith, Ryan G; Rubin, Stanley A; Ellestad, Myrvin H

    2009-01-01

    We sought to clarify the prognostic importance of an "exaggerated" or "hypertensive" systolic blood pressure response to exercise during an exercise test. Studies evaluating the prognosis for cardiovascular events and cardiovascular mortality in those with hypertension during exercise testing were systematically reviewed. Fourteen studies were identified. Six studies were of healthy volunteers or hypertensives. Eight studies were in subjects with known or suspected heart disease. Without established heart disease, exercise hypertension predicted cardiovascular events and cardiovascular death. However, two of the six studies included a multivariate analysis; both demonstrated no independent association. Studies in subjects with known or suspected heart disease demonstrated that exercise hypertension predicted fewer cardiac events and lesser mortality or, after multivariate adjustment, no associated risk. In a healthy population, a higher exercise blood pressure may indicate hypertension or prehypertension, instead of normal vascular function, and an associated long-term adverse prognosis. In a population with a high burden of heart disease, the highest risk subjects with the most extensive cardiac disease may not be capable of generating pressure or workload to allow the manifestation of exercise systolic hypertension. By comparison, therefore, those with exercise hypertension have a better prognosis. PMID:20409979

  10. A Multidisciplinary Model of Evaluation Capacity Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preskill, Hallie; Boyle, Shanelle

    2008-01-01

    Evaluation capacity building (ECB) has become a hot topic of conversation, activity, and study within the evaluation field. Seeking to enhance stakeholders' understanding of evaluation concepts and practices, and in an effort to create evaluation cultures, organizations have been implementing a variety of strategies to help their members learn…

  11. An international model validation exercise on radionuclide transfer and doses to freshwater biota.

    SciTech Connect

    Yankovich, T. L.; Vives i Batlle, J.; Vives-Lynch, S.; Beresford, N. A.; Barnett, C. L.; Beaugelin-Seiller, K.; Brown, J. E.; Cheng, J.-J.; Copplestone, D.; Heling, R.; Hosseini, A.; Howard, B. J.; Kamboj, S.; Kryshev, A. I.; Nedveckaite, T.; Smith, J. T.; Wood, M. D.; Environmental Science Division; AREVA Resources; Environmental Science, Westlakes Scientific Consulting Ltd.; Centre for Ecology and Hydrology; IRSN; Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority; The Environment Agency; Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group; Univ. of Liverpool; School of Earth and Environmental Sciences; Inst. of Physics, Lithuania; State Enterprise Scientific Production Association

    2010-06-09

    Under the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)'s EMRAS (Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety) program, activity concentrations of {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 3}H in Perch Lake at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's Chalk River Laboratories site were predicted, in freshwater primary producers, invertebrates, fishes, herpetofauna and mammals using eleven modelling approaches. Comparison of predicted radionuclide concentrations in the different species types with measured values highlighted a number of areas where additional work and understanding is required to improve the predictions of radionuclide transfer. For some species, the differences could be explained by ecological factors such as trophic level or the influence of stable analogues. Model predictions were relatively poor for mammalian species and herpetofauna compared with measured values, partly due to a lack of relevant data. In addition, concentration ratios are sometimes under-predicted when derived from experiments performed under controlled laboratory conditions representative of conditions in other water bodies.

  12. An international model validation exercise on radionuclide transfer and doses to freshwater biota.

    PubMed

    Yankovich, T L; Vives i Batlle, J; Vives-Lynch, S; Beresford, N A; Barnett, C L; Beaugelin-Seiller, K; Brown, J E; Cheng, J-J; Copplestone, D; Heling, R; Hosseini, A; Howard, B J; Kamboj, S; Kryshev, A I; Nedveckaite, T; Smith, J T; Wood, M D

    2010-06-01

    Under the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)'s EMRAS (Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety) programme, activity concentrations of (60)Co, (90)Sr, (137)Cs and (3)H in Perch Lake at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's Chalk River Laboratories site were predicted, in freshwater primary producers, invertebrates, fishes, herpetofauna and mammals using eleven modelling approaches. Comparison of predicted radionuclide concentrations in the different species types with measured values highlighted a number of areas where additional work and understanding is required to improve the predictions of radionuclide transfer. For some species, the differences could be explained by ecological factors such as trophic level or the influence of stable analogues. Model predictions were relatively poor for mammalian species and herpetofauna compared with measured values, partly due to a lack of relevant data. In addition, concentration ratios are sometimes under-predicted when derived from experiments performed under controlled laboratory conditions representative of conditions in other water bodies. PMID:20530860

  13. Two-dimensional finite difference model to study temperature distribution in SST regions of human limbs immediately after physical exercise in cold climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Babita; Adlakha, Neeru

    2015-02-01

    Thermoregulation is a complex mechanism regulating heat production within the body (chemical thermoregulation) and heat exchange between the body and the environment (physical thermoregulation) in such a way that the heat exchange is balanced and deep body temperatures are relatively stable. The external heat transfer mechanisms are radiation, conduction, convection and evaporation. The physical activity causes thermal stress and poses challenges for this thermoregulation. In this paper, a model has been developed to study temperature distribution in SST regions of human limbs immediately after physical exercise under cold climate. It is assumed that the subject is doing exercise initially and comes to rest at time t = 0. The human limb is assumed to be of cylindrical shape. The peripheral region of limb is divided into three natural components namely epidermis, dermis and subdermal tissues (SST). Appropriate boundary conditions have been framed based on the physical conditions of the problem. Finite difference has been employed for time, radial and angular variables. The numerical results have been used to obtain temperature profiles in the SST region immediately after continuous exercise for a two-dimensional unsteady state case. The results have been used to analyze the thermal stress in relation to light, moderate and vigorous intensity exercise.

  14. A conceptual model for worksite intelligent physical exercise training - IPET - intervention for decreasing life style health risk indicators among employees: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Health promotion at the work site in terms of physical activity has proven positive effects but optimization of relevant exercise training protocols and implementation for high adherence are still scanty. Methods/Design The aim of this paper is to present a study protocol with a conceptual model for planning the optimal individually tailored physical exercise training for each worker based on individual health check, existing guidelines and state of the art sports science training recommendations in the broad categories of cardiorespiratory fitness, muscle strength in specific body parts, and functional training including balance training. The hypotheses of this research are that individually tailored worksite-based intelligent physical exercise training, IPET, among workers with inactive job categories will: 1) Improve cardiorespiratory fitness and/or individual health risk indicators, 2) Improve muscle strength and decrease musculoskeletal disorders, 3) Succeed in regular adherence to worksite and leisure physical activity training, and 3) Reduce sickness absence and productivity losses (presenteeism) in office workers. The present RCT study enrolled almost 400 employees with sedentary jobs in the private as well as public sectors. The training interventions last 2 years with measures at baseline as well as one and two years follow-up. Discussion If proven effective, the intelligent physical exercise training scheduled as well as the information for its practical implementation can provide meaningful scientifically based information for public health policy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov, number: NCT01366950. PMID:24964869

  15. Vibration exercise decreases insulin resistance and modulates the insulin signaling pathway in a type 2 diabetic rat model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Liu, Chang; Lu, Mei-Li; Tang, Fu-Tian; Hou, Xu-Wei; Yang, Jing; Liu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Vibration exercise (VE) is a new type of physical training, but little is known about its effects on insulin resistance at the molecular level. A Sprague-Dawley rat model of type 2 diabetes with insulin resistance was induced with a high-fat diet and low-dose streptozotocin. Animals were then subjected to 8 wk of VE consisting of placing the rats on a vibration stand bracket (8 cm × 8 cm × 20 cm) with a maximum vertical vibration displacement of 52 mm for 15 min twice a day, 6 d each week. Various metabolic markers and the phosphorylation and expression of proteins within the PI3K/AKT insulin signaling pathway were assessed. The high-fat diet and low-dose streptozotocin increased food intake, body weight, and levels of blood glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, and free fatty acids, while Kitt rate, 2-deoxyglucose uptake, and glycogen levels were decreased. These effects were ameliorated in animals receiving VE. VE treatment activated the PI3K/AKT insulin-signaling pathway, and also increased the expression of GLUT4. In conclusion, VE improved the metabolic issues associated with the diabetic state by suppressing the reduction of IRS1, AKT2, and GLUT4 in the diabetic condition, indicating that VE could be used as a therapeutic intervention for insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. PMID:26550236

  16. Modeling the effects of hypoxia on ATP turnover in exercising muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arthur, P. G.; Hogan, M. C.; Bebout, D. E.; Wagner, P. D.; Hochachka, P. W.

    1992-01-01

    Most models of metabolic control concentrate on the regulation of ATP production and largely ignore the regulation of ATP demand. We describe a model, based on the results of Hogan et al. (J. Appl. Physiol. 73: 728-736, 1992), that incorporates the effects of ATP demand. The model is developed from the premise that a unique set of intracellular conditions can be measured at each level of ATP turnover and that this relationship is best described by energetic state. Current concepts suggest that cells are capable of maintaining oxygen consumption in the face of declines in the concentration of oxygen through compensatory changes in cellular metabolites. We show that these compensatory changes can cause significant declines in ATP demand and result in a decline in oxygen consumption and ATP turnover. Furthermore we find that hypoxia does not directly affect the rate of anaerobic ATP synthesis and associated lactate production. Rather, lactate production appears to be related to energetic state, whatever the PO2. The model is used to describe the interaction between ATP demand and ATP supply in determining final ATP turnover.

  17. A Bayesian network for modelling blood glucose concentration and exercise in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ewings, Sean M; Sahu, Sujit K; Valletta, John J; Byrne, Christopher D; Chipperfield, Andrew J

    2015-06-01

    This article presents a new statistical approach to analysing the effects of everyday physical activity on blood glucose concentration in people with type 1 diabetes. A physiologically based model of blood glucose dynamics is developed to cope with frequently sampled data on food, insulin and habitual physical activity; the model is then converted to a Bayesian network to account for measurement error and variability in the physiological processes. A simulation study is conducted to determine the feasibility of using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods for simultaneous estimation of all model parameters and prediction of blood glucose concentration. Although there are problems with parameter identification in a minority of cases, most parameters can be estimated without bias. Predictive performance is unaffected by parameter misspecification and is insensitive to misleading prior distributions. This article highlights important practical and theoretical issues not previously addressed in the quest for an artificial pancreas as treatment for type 1 diabetes. The proposed methods represent a new paradigm for analysis of deterministic mathematical models of blood glucose concentration. PMID:24492795

  18. BUILDING AN ENVIRONMENTAL TRAINING MODEL, MAPCORE - A TRAINING EXERCISE FOR AIR POLLUTION CONTROL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SIEGEL, GILBERT B.; SULLIVAN, DONALD M.

    NEW AIR POLLUTION CONTROL PROGRAMS HAVE RESULTED FROM THE "CLEAN AIR ACT" PASSED BY CONGRESS IN DECEMBER 1963. THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA DEVELOPED A TRAINING MODEL, CALLED "MAPCORE," WHICH PROVIDES A SEMISTRUCTURED ENVIRONMENT, IS PRACTICAL AND REALISTIC IN APPROACH, PROVIDES OPPORTUNITY FOR HIGH CREATIVITY, PROVIDES AN…

  19. An Evidence-Based Approach To Exercise Prescriptions on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2009-01-01

    This presentation describes current exercise countermeasures and exercise equipment for astronauts onboard the ISS. Additionally, a strategy for evaluating evidence supporting spaceflight exercise is described and a new exercise prescription is proposed. The current exercise regimen is not fully effective as the ISS exercise hardware does not allow for sufficient exercise intensity, the exercise prescription is adequate and crew members are noncompliant with the prescription. New ISS hardware is proposed, Advanced Resistance Exercise Device (ARED), which allows additional exercises, is instrumented for data acquisition and offers improved loading. The new T2 hardware offers a better harness and subject loading system, is instrumented to allow ground reaction force data, and offers improved speed. A strategy for developing a spaceflight exercise prescription is described and involves identifying exercise training programs that have been shown to maximize adaptive benefits of people exercising in both 0 and 1 g environments. Exercise intensity emerged as an important factor in maintaining physiologic adaptations in the spaceflight environment and interval training is suggested. New ISS exercise hardware should allow for exercise at intensities high enough to elicit adaptive responses. Additionally, new exercise prescriptions should incorporate higher intensity exercises and seek to optimize intensity, duration and frequency for greater efficiency.

  20. Toward Exercise as Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Michael D.; Church, Timothy S.

    2013-01-01

    The early 21st century has witnessed a steady push by scientists, industry leaders, and government officials to make medicine more personalized. To date, the concept of personalized medicine has referred largely to the field of pharmacogenomics. In contrast, relatively few data exist regarding the application of preventive strategies such as physical exercise in the context of personalized medicine. Within this review, we highlight the extant literature and propose five strategies for scientists that may propel the exercise and sports science fields toward this global goal. Notably, these approaches are in addition to methods to maintain adherence to training – a well-known factor in determining exercise responsiveness. Briefly, these strategies include (1) evaluating participant responses to training at the individual as well as group level; (2) identifying sources of variability in responsiveness to training; (3) optimizing exercise dosing strategies to maximize benefits while minimizing barriers to participation; (4) evaluating the efficacy of multimodal interventions for relevant population subgroups; and (5) increasing the clinical relevance of study populations and outcomes in exercise trials. We look forward to seeing these strategies considered in trials of preventive health interventions such as exercise. Extensive future research in this area is needed for the vision of exercise as a personalized form of medicine to become a reality. PMID:23382011

  1. The design and implementation of an operational model evaluation system

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K.T.

    1995-06-01

    An evaluation of an atmospheric transport and diffusion model`s operational performance typically involves the comparison of the model`s calculations with measurements of an atmospheric pollutant`s temporal and spatial distribution. These evaluations however often use data from a small number of experiments and may be limited to producing some of the commonly quoted statistics based on the differences between model calculations and the measurements. This paper presents efforts to develop a model evaluation system geared for both the objective statistical analysis and the more subjective visualization of the inter-relationships between a model`s calculations and the appropriate field measurement data.

  2. Predicting objectively assessed physical activity from the content and regulation of exercise goals: evidence for a mediational model.

    PubMed

    Sebire, Simon J; Standage, Martyn; Vansteenkiste, Maarten

    2011-04-01

    Grounded in self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 2000), the purpose of this work was to examine effects of the content and motivation of adults' exercise goals on objectively assessed moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). After reporting the content and motivation of their exercise goals, 101 adult participants (Mage = 38.79 years; SD = 11.5) wore an ActiGraph (GT1M) accelerometer for seven days. Accelerometer data were analyzed to provide estimates of engagement in MVPA and bouts of physical activity. Goal content did not directly predict behavioral engagement; however, mediation analysis revealed that goal content predicted behavior via autonomous exercise motivation. Specifically, intrinsic versus extrinsic goals for exercise had a positive indirect effect on average daily MVPA, average daily MVPA accumulated in 10-min bouts and the number of days on which participants performed 30 or more minutes of MVPA through autonomous motivation. These results support a motivational sequence in which intrinsic versus extrinsic exercise goals influence physical activity behavior because such goals are associated with more autonomous forms of exercise motivation. PMID:21558579

  3. Endurance exercise training programs intestinal lipid metabolism in a rat model of obesity and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Yu‐Han; Linden, Melissa A.; Gordon, Alicia; Scott Rector, R.; Buhman, Kimberly K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Endurance exercise has been shown to improve metabolic outcomes in obesity and type 2 diabetes; however, the physiological and molecular mechanisms for these benefits are not completely understood. Although endurance exercise has been shown to decrease lipogenesis, promote fatty acid oxidation (FAO), and increase mitochondrial biosynthesis in adipose tissue, muscle, and liver, its effects on intestinal lipid metabolism remain unknown. The absorptive cells of the small intestine, enterocytes, mediate the highly efficient absorption and processing of nutrients, including dietary fat for delivery throughout the body. We investigated how endurance exercise altered intestinal lipid metabolism in obesity and type 2 diabetes using Otsuka Long‐Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. We assessed mRNA levels of genes associated with intestinal lipid metabolism in nonhyperphagic, sedentary Long‐Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats (L‐Sed), hyperphagic, sedentary OLETF rats (O‐Sed), and endurance exercised OLETF rats (O‐EndEx). O‐Sed rats developed hyperphagia‐induced obesity (HIO) and type 2 diabetes compared with L‐Sed rats. O‐EndEx rats gained significantly less weight and fat pad mass, and had improved serum metabolic parameters without change in food consumption compared to O‐Sed rats. Endurance exercise resulted in dramatic up‐regulation of a number of genes in intestinal lipid metabolism and mitochondrial content compared with sedentary rats. Overall, this study provides evidence that endurance exercise programs intestinal lipid metabolism, likely contributing to its role in improving metabolic outcomes in obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:25602012

  4. The roles of exercise-induced immune system disturbances in the pathology of heat stroke : the dual pathway model of heat stroke.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chin Leong; Mackinnon, Laurel T

    2006-01-01

    Heat stroke is a life-threatening condition that can be fatal if not appropriately managed. Although heat stroke has been recognised as a medical condition for centuries, a universally accepted definition of heat stroke is lacking and the pathology of heat stroke is not fully understood. Information derived from autopsy reports and the clinical presentation of patients with heat stroke indicates that hyperthermia, septicaemia, central nervous system impairment and cardiovascular failure play important roles in the pathology of heat stroke. The current models of heat stroke advocate that heat stroke is triggered by hyperthermia but is driven by endotoxaemia. Endotoxaemia triggers the systemic inflammatory response, which can lead to systemic coagulation and haemorrhage, necrosis, cell death and multi-organ failure. However, the current heat stroke models cannot fully explain the discrepancies in high core temperature (Tc) as a trigger of heat stroke within and between individuals. Research on the concept of critical Tc as a limitation to endurance exercise implies that a high Tc may function as a signal to trigger the protective mechanisms against heat stroke. Athletes undergoing a period of intense training are subjected to a variety of immune and gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances. The immune disturbances include the suppression of immune cells and their functions, suppression of cell-mediated immunity, translocation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), suppression of anti-LPS antibodies, increased macrophage activity due to muscle tissue damage, and increased concentration of circulating inflammatory and pyrogenic cytokines. Common symptoms of exercise-induced GI disturbances include diarrhoea, vomiting, gastrointestinal bleeding, and cramps, which may increase gut-related LPS translocation. This article discusses the current evidence that supports the argument that these exercise-induced immune and GI disturbances may contribute to the development of endotoxaemia and

  5. A Hybrid Evaluation Model for Evaluating Online Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahs-Vaughn, Debbie; Zygouris-Coe, Vicky; Fiedler, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    Online professional development is multidimensional. It encompasses: a) an online, web-based format; b) professional development; and most likely c) specific objectives tailored to and created for the respective online professional development course. Evaluating online professional development is therefore also multidimensional and as such both…

  6. Modelling and evaluating against the violent insider

    SciTech Connect

    Fortney, D.S.; Al-Ayat, R.A.; Saleh, R.A.

    1991-07-01

    The violent insider threat poses a special challenge to facilities protecting special nuclear material from theft or diversion. These insiders could potentially behave as nonviolent insiders to deceitfully defeat certain safeguards elements and use violence to forcefully defeat hardware or personnel. While several vulnerability assessment tools are available to deal with the nonviolent insider, very limited effort has been directed to developing analysis tools for the violent threat. In this paper, we present an approach using the results of a vulnerability assessment for nonviolent insiders to evaluate certain violent insider scenarios. Since existing tools do not explicitly consider violent insiders, the approach is intended for experienced safeguards analysts and relies on the analyst to brainstorm possible violent actions, to assign detection probabilities, and to ensure consistency. We then discuss our efforts in developing an automated tool for assessing the vulnerability against those violent insiders who are willing to use force against barriers, but who are unwilling to kill or be killed. Specifically, we discuss our efforts in developing databases for violent insiders penetrating barriers, algorithms for considering the entry of contraband, and modelling issues in considering the use of violence.

  7. Modelling and evaluating against the violent insider

    SciTech Connect

    Fortney, D.S.; Al-Ayat, R.A.; Saleh, R.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The violent insider threat poses a special challenge to facilities protecting special nuclear material from theft or diversion. These insiders could potentially behave as nonviolent insiders to deceitfully defeat certain safeguards elements and use violence to forcefully defeat hardware or personnel. While several vulnerability assessment tools are available to deal with the nonviolent insider, very limited effort has been directed to developing analysis tools for the violent threat. In this paper, the authors present an approach using the results of a vulnerability assessment for nonviolent insiders to evaluate certain violent insider scenarios. Since existing tools do not explicitly consider violent insiders, the approach is intended for experienced safeguards analysts and relies on the analyst to brainstorm possible violent actions, to assign detection probabilities, and to ensure consistency. The authors then discuss our efforts in developing an automated tool for assessing the vulnerability against those violent insiders who are willing to use force against barriers, but who are unwilling to kill or be killed. Specifically, the authors discuss our efforts in developing databases for violent insiders penetrating barriers, algorithms for considering the entry of contraband, and modelling issues in considering the use of violence.

  8. Evaluation of video quality models for multimedia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunnström, Kjell; Hands, David; Speranza, Filippo; Webster, Arthur

    2008-02-01

    The Video Quality Experts Group (VQEG) is a group of experts from industry, academia, government and standards organizations working in the field of video quality assessment. Over the last 10 years, VQEG has focused its efforts on the evaluation of objective video quality metrics for digital video. Objective video metrics are mathematical models that predict the picture quality as perceived by an average observer. VQEG has completed validation tests for full reference objective metrics for the Standard Definition Television (SDTV) format. From this testing, two ITU Recommendations were produced. This standardization effort is of great relevance to the video industries because objective metrics can be used for quality control of the video at various stages of the delivery chain. Currently, VQEG is undertaking several projects in parallel. The most mature project is concerned with objective measurement of multimedia content. This project is probably the largest coordinated set of video quality testing ever embarked upon. The project will involve the collection of a very large database of subjective quality data. About 40 subjective assessment experiments and more than 160,000 opinion scores will be collected. These will be used to validate the proposed objective metrics. This paper describes the test plan for the project, its current status, and one of the multimedia subjective tests.

  9. Symmetry analysis of a model for the exercise of a barrier option

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara, J. G.; Sophocleous, C.; Leach, P. G. L.

    2013-09-01

    A barrier option takes into account the possibility of an unacceptable change in the price of the underlying stock. Such a change could carry considerable financial loss. We examine one model based upon the Black-Scholes-Merton Equation and determine the functional forms of the barrier function and rebate function which are consistent with a solution of the underlying evolution partial differential equation using the Lie Theory of Extended Groups. The solution is consistent with the possibility of no rebate and the barrier function is very similar to one adopted on an heuristic basis.

  10. An Evaluation Model for Innovative Individualized Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Margaret B.

    1977-01-01

    Program evaluation is a tri-level process: evaluation of the learners, of the program against its own objectives, and as compared against a criterion program. Evaluation of innovative programs is primarily an issue of definition, and they should be judged in terms of the needs they were designed to satisfy. (Author/CTM)

  11. Dissociating the therapeutic effects of environmental enrichment and exercise in a mouse model of anxiety with cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, J; Vo, U; Buret, LS; Pang, TY; Meiklejohn, H; Zeleznikow-Johnston, A; Churilov, L; van den Buuse, M; Hannan, AJ; Renoir, T

    2016-01-01

    Clinical evidence indicates that serotonin-1A receptor (5-HT1AR) gene polymorphisms are associated with anxiety disorders and deficits in cognition. In animal models, exercise (Ex) and environmental enrichment (EE) can change emotionality-related behaviours, as well as enhance some aspects of cognition and hippocampal neurogenesis. We investigated the effects of Ex and EE (which does not include running wheels) on cognition and anxiety-like behaviours in wild-type (WT) and 5-HT1AR knock-out (KO) mice. Using an algorithm-based classification of search strategies in the Morris water maze, we report for we believe the first time that Ex increased the odds for mice to select more hippocampal-dependent strategies. In the retention probe test, Ex (but not EE) corrected long-term spatial memory deficits displayed by KO mice. In agreement with these findings, only Ex increased hippocampal cell survival and BDNF protein levels. However, only EE (but not Ex) modified anxiety-like behaviours, demonstrating dissociation between improvements in cognition and innate anxiety. EE enhanced hippocampal cell proliferation in WT mice only, suggesting a crucial role for intact serotonergic signalling in mediating this effect. Together, these results demonstrate differential effects of Ex vs EE in a mouse model of anxiety with cognitive impairment. Overall, the 5-HT1AR does not seem to be critical for those behavioural effects to occur. These findings will have implications for our understanding of how Ex and EE enhance experience-dependent plasticity, as well as their differential impacts on anxiety and cognition. PMID:27115125

  12. Dissociating the therapeutic effects of environmental enrichment and exercise in a mouse model of anxiety with cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Rogers, J; Vo, U; Buret, L S; Pang, T Y; Meiklejohn, H; Zeleznikow-Johnston, A; Churilov, L; van den Buuse, M; Hannan, A J; Renoir, T

    2016-01-01

    Clinical evidence indicates that serotonin-1A receptor (5-HT1AR) gene polymorphisms are associated with anxiety disorders and deficits in cognition. In animal models, exercise (Ex) and environmental enrichment (EE) can change emotionality-related behaviours, as well as enhance some aspects of cognition and hippocampal neurogenesis. We investigated the effects of Ex and EE (which does not include running wheels) on cognition and anxiety-like behaviours in wild-type (WT) and 5-HT1AR knock-out (KO) mice. Using an algorithm-based classification of search strategies in the Morris water maze, we report for we believe the first time that Ex increased the odds for mice to select more hippocampal-dependent strategies. In the retention probe test, Ex (but not EE) corrected long-term spatial memory deficits displayed by KO mice. In agreement with these findings, only Ex increased hippocampal cell survival and BDNF protein levels. However, only EE (but not Ex) modified anxiety-like behaviours, demonstrating dissociation between improvements in cognition and innate anxiety. EE enhanced hippocampal cell proliferation in WT mice only, suggesting a crucial role for intact serotonergic signalling in mediating this effect. Together, these results demonstrate differential effects of Ex vs EE in a mouse model of anxiety with cognitive impairment. Overall, the 5-HT1AR does not seem to be critical for those behavioural effects to occur. These findings will have implications for our understanding of how Ex and EE enhance experience-dependent plasticity, as well as their differential impacts on anxiety and cognition. PMID:27115125

  13. Hydrodynamics of a shallow coastal lagoon with submarine groundwater discharge: a numerical modeling exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casares, R.; Marino-Tapia, I.

    2013-05-01

    Coastal lagoons are subjected to physical forces that make them vulnerable to climate change and human intervention. The karstic geology along the coastal zone of Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, forces groundwater to discharge in the sea and coastal lagoons through underground conduits that can form small but numerous and scattered underwater springs. These freshwater inputs, along with other physical forces like ocean tides and meteorological events, can have a significant effect on the circulation and residence times in coastal lagoons. Climate change consequences such as sea level rise and changing rain patterns, as well as the increasing human impact, can cause or aggravate certain environmental effects. Since coastal lagoons provide important environmental services there is a need to understand and have predictive capability to simulate the transport processes and the forces acting on them. The present study was carried out in the coastal lagoon of Celestun, located at NW Yucatan Peninsula, a region of karstic geology. The aim of this research is to understand the barotropic hydrodynamic functioning of this shallow system, taking into account the oceanographical, meteorological and hydrological forcing. Emphasis is made on the residence times in different parts of the lagoon, and the effects of freshwater inputs. For the detailed understanding of the processes the hydrodynamic numerical model DELFT3D was implemented. The model was validated with data gathered on the field during two intensive oceanographic campaigns, which included installation of CTDs and acoustic current meters at strategic sites distributed in the system, and detailed bathymetric measurements using an echosounder coupled with a differential GPS on board of a motorboat. In order to improve model performance a sensitivity analysis to the main variables involved in the model was carried out, among them: the size of the grid cells, grid depth, time step, friction coefficients, boundary conditions

  14. THE ATMOSPHERIC MODEL EVALUATION TOOL (AMET); AIR QUALITY MODULE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation reviews the development of the Atmospheric Model Evaluation Tool (AMET) air quality module. The AMET tool is being developed to aid in the model evaluation. This presentation focuses on the air quality evaluation portion of AMET. Presented are examples of the...

  15. Formative Evaluation: A Revised Descriptive Theory and a Prescriptive Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braden, Roberts A.

    The premise is advanced that a major weakness of the everyday generic instructional systems design model stems from a too modest traditional conception of the purpose and potential of formative evaluation. In the typical ISD (instructional systems design) model formative evaluation is shown not at all or as a single, product evaluation step. Yet…

  16. Evaluating a Training Using the "Four Levels Model"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steensma, Herman; Groeneveld, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study are: to present a training evaluation based on the "four levels model"; to demonstrate the value of experimental designs in evaluation studies; and to take a first step in the development of an evidence-based training program. Design/methodology/approach: The Kirkpatrick four levels model was used to evaluate the…

  17. Evaluation of tympanic temperature and thermal sensation responses during exercise to verify the positive effects of wearing germanium-coated functional clothing.

    PubMed

    Cho, Su Youn; Roh, Youn Sun; Roh, Hee Tae

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated the effects of wearing germanium-coated functional clothing on tympanic temperature, thermal sensation, heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), and lactate during endurance exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Nine healthy and untrained male subjects were enrolled. Subjects ran for 60 min on a treadmill (75% heart rate reserve) in the following 2 tests: 1) control test (wearing conventional clothing) and 2) experimental test (wearing germanium-coated functional clothing). During each test, the tympanic temperature and thermal sensation were measured, and blood samples were collected immediately before exercise and immediately after exercise. Thermal sensation was measured using a DISC score. [Results] The tympanic temperature immediately after exercise was significantly increased compared to the temperature immediately before exercise in the control test, while no significant change was observed in the experimental test. In both tests, the DISC score and Hsp70 and lactate levels immediately after exercise were significantly increased compared to those immediately before exercise. In addition, the DISC score immediately after exercise was significantly higher in the control test than in the experimental test. [Conclusion] Wearing germanium-coated functional clothing during endurance exercise may have the positive effect of alleviating thermal stress that accumulates in the body during exercise. PMID:27390434

  18. Evaluation of tympanic temperature and thermal sensation responses during exercise to verify the positive effects of wearing germanium-coated functional clothing

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Su Youn; Roh, Youn Sun; Roh, Hee Tae

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated the effects of wearing germanium-coated functional clothing on tympanic temperature, thermal sensation, heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), and lactate during endurance exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Nine healthy and untrained male subjects were enrolled. Subjects ran for 60 min on a treadmill (75% heart rate reserve) in the following 2 tests: 1) control test (wearing conventional clothing) and 2) experimental test (wearing germanium-coated functional clothing). During each test, the tympanic temperature and thermal sensation were measured, and blood samples were collected immediately before exercise and immediately after exercise. Thermal sensation was measured using a DISC score. [Results] The tympanic temperature immediately after exercise was significantly increased compared to the temperature immediately before exercise in the control test, while no significant change was observed in the experimental test. In both tests, the DISC score and Hsp70 and lactate levels immediately after exercise were significantly increased compared to those immediately before exercise. In addition, the DISC score immediately after exercise was significantly higher in the control test than in the experimental test. [Conclusion] Wearing germanium-coated functional clothing during endurance exercise may have the positive effect of alleviating thermal stress that accumulates in the body during exercise. PMID:27390434

  19. Computer analysis of the exercise electrocardiogram and control of radionuclide ventriculography: an optimal statistical decision model for diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, P.W.E.

    1987-01-01

    A new automated technique for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) by stress electrocardiography and radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) has been developed. The method employs digital signal processing of the electrocardiogram (ECG) for recognition of ischemic and arrhythmic events. On-line detection of abnormal beats is used for control image acquisition by the gamma camera resulting in improved image quality since only identical beats are included in the composite images of the cardiac cycle. A combined stress ECG analysis which measures ST changes indicative of ischemia, and radionuclide results, which reveal corresponding ejection fraction abnormalities yields greater sensitivity and specificity than either test alone. Digitized data from the electrocardiogram are analyzed in a beat-by-beat mode and a contextual diagnosis of underlying rhythm is given. Template generation, R wave detection, QRS window size, baseline correction, and continuous updating of heart rate are completely automated. A statistical model base on computerized ST segment measurements combined with radionuclide ventriculography data has been developed by using a logistic model with stepwise regression fitting. A previously acquired database of similar measurements was used for designing the model. The most significant parameters were found to be (1) ejection fraction of exercise RNV; (2) difference of ST level between exercise and resting test (stdif); and (3) ejection fraction difference between exercise and resting test. The new parameter stdif, not previously used in ECG interpretation, was found to be of great diagnostic significance.

  20. The Role of Asia in Mitigating Climate Change: Results from the Asia Modeling Exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Krey, Volker; Blanford, Geoffrey J.; Jiang, Kejun; Kainuma, M.; Kriegler, Elmar; Luderer, Gunnar; Shukla, Priyadarshi R.

    2012-12-01

    In 2010, Asia accounted for 60% of global population, 39% of Gross World Product, 44% of global energy consumption and nearly half of the world’s energy system CO2 emissions. Thus, Asia is an important region to consider in any discussion of climate change or climate change mitigation. This paper explores the role of Asia in mitigating climate change, by comparing the results of 23 energy-economy and integrated assessment models. We focus our analysis on seven key areas: base year data, future energy use and emissions absent climate policy, the effect of urban and rural development on future energy use and emissions, the role of technology in emissions mitigation, regional emissions mitigation, and national climate policies