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Sample records for modeling orifice pulse

  1. Modeling Orifice Pulse Tube Coolers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, Kittel P.; Roach, P. R.; Lee, J. M.; Kashani, A.; McCreight, Craig R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a calculational model that treats all the components of an orifice pulse tube cooler. We base our analysis on 1-dimensional thermodynamic equations for the regenerator and we assume that all mass flows, pressure oscillations and temperature oscillations are small and sinusoidal. Non-linear pressure drop effects are included in the regenerator to account for finite pressure amplitude effects. The resulting mass flows and pressures are matched at the boundaries with the other components of the cooler: compressor, aftercooler, cold heat exchanger, pulse tube, hot heat exchanger, orifice and reservoir. The results of the calculation are oscillating pressures, mass flows and enthalpy flows in the main components of the cooler. By comparing with the calculations of other available models, we show that our model is very similar to REGEN 3 from NIST and DeltaE from Los Alamos National Lab. Our model is much easier to use than other available models because of its simple graphical interface and the fact that no guesses are required for the operating pressures or mass flows. In addition, the model only requires a few minutes of running time allowing many parameters to be optimized in a reasonable time. A version of the model is available for use over the World Wide Web at http://irtek.arc.nasa.gov. Future enhancements include adding a bypass orifice and including second order terms in steady mass streaming and steady heat transfer. A two-dimensional anelastic approximation of the fluid equations will be used as the basis for the latter analysis. Preliminary results are given in dimensionless numbers appropriate for oscillating compressible flows. The model shows how transverse heat transfer reduces enthalpy flow, particularly for small pulse tubes. The model also clearly shows mass recirculation in the open tube on the order of the tube length. They result from the higher order Reynolds stresses. An interesting result of the linearized approach is that the

  2. Development and experimental test of an analytical model of the orifice pulse tube refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storch, Peter J.; Radebaugh, Ray

    1988-01-01

    An analytical model for the orifice pulse tube is developed, in which the system is described in terms of average enthalpy flow with such simplifying assumptions as an ideal gas and sinusoidal pressure variation. Phasor analysis is used to represent temperature, pressure, and mass-flow rate waves in vector form. The model predictions, namely, that the refrigeration power of a pulse-tube refrigerator is proportional to the average pressure, the pulse frequency, the mass-flow ratio, and the square of the dynamic pressure ratio, were verified by experimental measurements. It was found that, as a result of the simplifying assumptions, the magnitudes of the refrigeration power predicted by the model were between three and five times greater than experimental values.

  3. Ideal orifice pulse tube refrigerator performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittel, P.

    1992-01-01

    The recent development of orifice pulse tube refrigerators has raised questions as to what limits their ultimate performance. Using an analogy to the Stirling cycle refrigerator, the efficiency (cooling power per unit input power) of an ideal orifice pulse tube refrigerator is shown to be T1/T0, the ratio of the cold temperature to the hot temperature.

  4. A small, single stage orifice pulse tube cryocooler demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, John B.

    1990-01-01

    This final report summarizes and presents the analytical and experimental progress in the present effort. The principal objective of this effort was the demonstration of a 0.25 Watt, 80 Kelvin orifice pulse tube refrigerator. The experimental apparatus is described. The design of a partially optimized pulse tube refrigerator is included. The refrigerator demonstrates an ultimate temperature of 77 K, has a projected cooling power of 0.18 Watts at 80 K, and has a measured cooling power of 1 Watt at 97 K, with an electrical efficiency of 250 Watts/Watt, much better than previous pulse tube refrigerators. A model of the pulse tube refrigerator that provides estimates of pressure ratio and mass flow within the pulse tube refrigerator, based on component physical characteristics is included. A model of a pulse tube operation based on generalized analysis which is adequate to support local optimization of existing designs is included. A model of regenerator performance based on an analogy to counterflow heat exchangers is included.

  5. Fluid mechanical model of the acoustic impedance of small orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.; Rogers, T.

    1975-01-01

    A fluid mechanical model of the acoustic behavior of small orifices is presented which predicts orifice impedance as a function of incident sound pressure level, frequency, and orifice geometry. Agreement between predicted and measured values (in both water and air) of orifice impedance is excellent. The model shows that (1) the acoustic flow in the immediate neighborhood of the orifice can be modelled as a locally spherical flow, (2) within this near field, the flow is, to a first approximation, unsteady and incompressible, and (3) at very low sound pressure levels, the orifice viscous resistance is directly related to the effect of boundary-layer displacement along the walls containing the orifice, and the orifice reactance is directly related to the inertia of the oscillating flow in the orifice neighborhood.-

  6. Fluid mechanical model of the acoustic impedance of small orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.; Rogers, T.

    1976-01-01

    A fluid mechanical model of the acoustic behavior of small orifices is presented which predicts orifice resistance and reactance as a function of incident sound pressure level, frequency, and orifice geometry. Agreement between predicted and measured values is excellent. The model shows the following: (1) The acoustic flow in immediate neighborhood of the orifice can be modeled as a locally spherical flow. Within this near field, the flow is, to a first approximation, unsteady and incompressible. (2) At very low sound pressure levels, the orifice viscous resistance is directly related to the effect of boundary-layer displacement along the walls containing the orifice, and the orifice reactance is directly related to the inertia of the oscillating flow in the neighborhood of the orifice. (3) For large values of the incident acoustic pressure, the impedance is dominated by nonlinear jet-like effects. (4) For low values of the pressure, the resistance and reactance are roughly equal.

  7. Numerical modeling of flow through orifice meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikholesiami, M. Z.; Patel, B. R.

    1988-03-01

    Numerical modeling is performed for turbulent flow through orifice meters using Creare's computer program FLUENT. FLUENT solves the time averaged Navier-Stokes equations in 2-D and 3-D Cartesian or cylindrical coordinates. Turbulence is simulated using a two equation k-epsilon or algebraic stress turbulence model. It is shown that an 80 x 60 grid distribution is sufficient to resolve the flow field around the orifice. The variations in discharge coefficient are studied as a result of variation in beta ratio, Reynolds number, upstream and downstream boundary conditions, pipe surface roughness, and upstream swirl. The effects of beta ratio and Reynolds number on the discharge coefficient are shown to be similar to the experimental data. It is also shown that the surface roughness can increase the discharge coefficient by about 0.7 percent for the range of roughness heights encountered in practice. The numerical modeling approach would be most effective if it is combined with a systematic experimental program that can supply the necessary boundary conditions. It is recommended that numerical modeling be used for the study of other flow meters.

  8. Method and apparatus for fine tuning an orifice pulse tube refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Wollan, John J.

    2003-12-23

    An orifice pulse tube refrigerator uses flow resistance, compliance, and inertance components connected to a pulse tube for establishing a phase relationship between oscillating pressure and oscillating velocity in the pulse tube. A temperature regulating system heats or cools a working gas in at least one of the flow resistance and inertance components. A temperature control system is connected to the temperature regulating system for controlling the temperature of the working gas in the at least one of the flow resistance and inertance components and maintains a control temperature that is indicative of a desired temporal phase relationship.

  9. The influence of gas velocity on surface heat pumping for the orifice pulse tube refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. M.; Dill, H. R.

    1990-01-01

    The basic pulse tube refrigerator produces cooling by a mechanism known as surface heat pumping. Cyclical compression and expansion of a gas within an enclosed tube produces large temperature gradients. The purpose of the tube is to act as 'nodal regenerator'. Heat is stored at node positions along the tube wall and is transported between nodes by moving gas parcels. This process gives rise to refrigeration, with hot temperatures at the closed end and cold temperatures at the open end. Unfortunately, much of the available refrigeration is not realized because the closed end of the basic pulse tube restricts gas movement - gas at the extreme temperatures does not come in contact with the heat exchangers. The orifice pulse tube overcomes this limitation by using a valve and surge volume assembly at the warm, closed end. This allows for a residual gas velocity to remain present during the heat transfer process, thereby permitting more gas to exchange heat at the heat exchangers. This paper describes the pulse tube as a nodal regenerator and the effect residual gas velocity has on the heat transfer mechanism of the orifice pulse tube.

  10. Frequency-domain methods for modeling a nonlinear acoustic orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egolf, David P.; Murphy, William J.; Franks, John R.; Kirlin, R. Lynn

    2002-11-01

    This presentation describes frequency-domain methods for simulating transmission loss across a single orifice mounted in an acoustic waveguide. The work was a preamble to research involving earplugs containing one or more orifices. Simulation methods included direct Fourier transformation, linearization about an operating point, and Volterra series. They were applied to an electric-circuit analog of the acoustic system containing the orifice. The orifice itself was characterized by an empirical expression for nonlinear impedance obtained by fitting curves to experimental resistance and reactance data reported by other authors. Their data-collection procedures required the impedance expression presented herein to be properly labeled as a describing function, a quantity well known in the nonlinear control systems literature. Results of the computer simulations were compared to experimental transmission-loss data. For a single-tone input sound pressure, the computer code accurately predicted the output fundamental (i.e., without harmonics). For a broadband input, the simulated output was less accurate, but acceptable. Levels of the sound-pressure input ranged from 60 to 160 dB. [Work supported by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH, through a research associateship granted the first author by the National Research Council.] a)Currently on leave at National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH.

  11. Visualization of Orifice Flow with Measurement-integrated Simulation Using a Turbulent Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, Mitsuhiro; Kawashima, Kenji; Kagawa, Toshiharu

    Measurement-integrated (MI) simulation is a numerical simulation in which experimental results are fed back to the simulation. The calculated values become closer to the experimental values. In this paper, MI simulation using a standard k-ε model is proposed and applied it to steady airflows passing an orifice plate in a pipeline. The upstream corner tap pressure in simulation is compensated by using proportional controller or proportional-integral controller. The signal is fed back to the axial velocity control volume in vena contract. The effectiveness of the method was evaluated compared with the experimental results at downstream of orifice. The calculation time of proposed MI simulation is significantly reduced compared with ordinary simulation analysis.

  12. Localisation and direction of mitral regurgitant flow in mitral orifice studied with combined use of ultrasonic pulsed Doppler technique and two dimensional echocardiography.

    PubMed Central

    Miyatake, K; Nimura, Y; Sakakibara, H; Kinoshita, N; Okamoto, M; Nagata, S; Kawazoe, K; Fujita, T

    1982-01-01

    Regurgitant flow was analysed in 40 cases of mitral regurgitation, using combined ultrasonic pulsed Doppler technique and two dimensional echocardiography. Abnormal Doppler signals indicative of mitral regurgitant flow were detected in reference to the two dimensional image of the long axis view of the heart and the short axis view at the level of the mitral orifice. The overall direction of regurgitant flow into the left atrium was clearly seen in 28 of 40 cases, and the localisation of regurgitant flow in the mitral orifice in 38 cases. In cases with mitral valve prolapse of the anterior leaflet or posterior leaflet the regurgitant flow was directed posteriorly or anteriorly, respectively. The prolapse occurred at the anterolateral commissure or posteromedial commissure and resulted in regurgitant flow located near the anterolateral commissure or posteromedial commissure of the mitral orifice, respectively. In cases with rheumatic mitral regurgitation the regurgitant flow is usually towards the central portion of the left atrium and is sited in the mid-part of the orifice. The Doppler findings were consistent with left ventriculography and surgical findings. The ultrasonic pulsed Doppler technique combined with two dimensional echocardiography is useful for non-invasive analysis and preoperative assessment of mitral regurgitation. Images PMID:7138708

  13. Numerical modeling of flow through orifice meters. Topical report, July 1986-August 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Sheikholeslami, M.Z.; Patel, B.R.

    1988-03-01

    Numerical modeling is performed for turbulent flow through orifice meters using Creare's computer program FLUENT. FLUENT solves the time averaged Navier-Stokes equations in 2D/3D Cartesian or cylindrical coordinates. Turbulence is simulated using a two-equation k-epsilon or algebraic stress-turbulence model. It is shown that an 80x60 grid distribution is sufficient to resolve the flow field around the orifice. The variations in discharge coefficient are studied as a result of variation in beta ratio, Reynolds number, upstream and downstream boundary conditions, pipe surface roughness, and upstream swirl. The effects of beta ratio and Reynolds number on the discharge coefficient are shown to be similar to the experimental data. It is also shown that the surface roughness can increase the discharge coefficient by about 0.7% for the range of roughness heights encountered in practice. The numerical-modeling approach would be most effective if it is combined with a systematic experimental program that can supply the necessary boundary conditions. It is recommended that numerical modeling be used for the study of other flow meters.

  14. Cavitation in an orifice flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabiri, S.; Sirignano, W. A.; Joseph, D. D.

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the potential locations for cavitation induced by total stress on the flow of a liquid through an orifice of an atomizer. A numerical simulation of two-phase incompressible flow is conducted in an axisymmetric geometry of the orifice for Reynolds numbers between 100 and 2000. The orifice has a rounded upstream corner and a sharp downstream corner with length-to-diameter ratio between 0.1 and 5. The total stress including viscous stress and pressure has been calculated in the flow field and, from there, the maximum principal stress is found. The total-stress criterion for cavitation is applied to find the regions where cavitation is likely to occur and compared with those of the traditional pressure criterion. Results show that the viscous stress has significant effects on cavitation. The effect of geometry and occurrence of hydraulic flip in the orifice on the total stress are studied. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically using a finite-volume method and a boundary-fitted orthogonal grid that comes from the streamlines and potential lines of an axisymmetric equipotential flow in the same geometry. A level-set formulation is used to track the interface and model the surface tension.

  15. Pulsed Plasma Accelerator Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, M.; Kazeminezhad, F.; Owens, T.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents the main results of the modeling task of the PPA project. The objective of this task is to make major progress towards developing a new computational tool with new capabilities for simulating cylindrically symmetric 2.5 dimensional (2.5 D) PPA's. This tool may be used for designing, optimizing, and understanding the operation of PPA s and other pulsed power devices. The foundation for this task is the 2-D, cylindrically symmetric, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code PCAPPS (Princeton Code for Advanced Plasma Propulsion Simulation). PCAPPS was originally developed by Sankaran (2001, 2005) to model Lithium Lorentz Force Accelerators (LLFA's), which are electrode based devices, and are typically operated in continuous magnetic field to the model, and implementing a first principles, self-consistent algorithm to couple the plasma and power circuit that drives the plasma dynamics.

  16. Systemic Inflammatory Response After Natural Orifice Translumenal Surgery: Transvaginal Cholecystectomy in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Joe K. M.; Tong, Daniel K. H.; HO, David W. Y.; Luk, John; Law, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Objective: We analyzed circulating TNF-α and IL-6 to determine systemic inflammatory responses associated with transvaginal cholecystectomy in a porcine model. Methods: Six female pigs were used for a survival study after transvaginal cholecystectomy (NOTES group) using endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) instruments and a single-channel endoscope. Blood was drawn preoperatively and 24 hours and 48 hours postoperatively. Four pigs were used as controls. In addition, laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed in 2 pigs for laparoscopic control. Results: In all 6 pigs in the NOTES group, no major intraoperative complications occurred. No significant differences were found between control, laparoscopic, and NOTES groups in terms of preoperative IL-6 level (P=0.897) and at 24 hours (P=0.790), and 48 hours postoperatively (P=0.945). Similarly, there was no significant difference in mean preoperative (P=0.349) and mean day 2 postoperative TNF-α levels (P=0.11). But a significant increase in day 1 postoperative TNF-α levels in the laparoscopic group compared with that in the control and NOTES groups was observed (P=0.049). One limitation of our study is that the sample size was relatively small. Conclusion: NOTES is safe in animal models in terms of anatomical and cellular level changes with minimal systemic inflammatory host responses elicited. Further study needs to be carried out in humans before NOTES can be recommended for routine use. PMID:19366533

  17. Effect of grazing flow on the acoustic impedance of Helmholtz resonators consisting of single and clustered orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.; Walker, B.; Bucka, M.

    1978-01-01

    A semiempirical fluid mechanical model is presented which predicts impedance of a Helmholtz resonator consisting of a single cavity-backed orifice as a function of grazing flow speed, boundary-layer thickness, incident sound amplitude and frequency, and resonator geometry. The incident and cavity sound fields are connected in terms of an orifice discharge coefficient. The effect of multiple orifices was studied experimentally. Interaction between orifices is important only for orifices aligned parallel to the grazing flow. Resistance was virtually independent of both orifice relative spacing and number. Reactance was found to be quite dependent upon orifice spacing but insensitive to the number of orifices.

  18. Pulse Detonation Engine Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    2001-01-01

    Pulse Detonation Engine Technology is currently being investigated at Glenn for both airbreathing and rocket propulsion applications. The potential for both mechanical simplicity and high efficiency due to the inherent near-constant-volume combustion process, may make Pulse Detonation Engines (PDE's) well suited for a number of mission profiles. Assessment of PDE cycles requires a simulation capability that is both fast and accurate. It should capture the essential physics of the system, yet run at speeds that allow parametric analysis. A quasi-one-dimensional, computational-fluid-dynamics-based simulation has been developed that may meet these requirements. The Euler equations of mass, momentum, and energy have been used along with a single reactive species transport equation, and submodels to account for dominant loss mechanisms (e.g., viscous losses, heat transfer, and valving) to successfully simulate PDE cycles. A high-resolution numerical integration scheme was chosen to capture the discontinuities associated with detonation, and robust boundary condition procedures were incorporated to accommodate flow reversals that may arise during a given cycle. The accompanying graphs compare experimentally measured and computed performance over a range of operating conditions for a particular PDE. Experimental data were supplied by Fred Schauer and Jeff Stutrud from the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson AFB and by Royce Bradley from Innovative Scientific Solutions, Inc. The left graph shows thrust and specific impulse, Isp, as functions of equivalence ratio for a PDE cycle in which the tube is completely filled with a detonable hydrogen/air mixture. The right graph shows thrust and specific impulse as functions of the fraction of the tube that is filled with a stoichiometric mixture of hydrogen and air. For both figures, the operating frequency was 16 Hz. The agreement between measured and computed values is quite good, both in terms of trend and

  19. High Pressure Water Stripping Using Multi-Orifice Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, David

    1999-01-01

    The use of multi-orifice rotary nozzles greatly increases the speed and stripping effectiveness of high pressure water blasting systems, but also greatly increases the complexity of selecting and optimizing the operating parameters. The rotational speed of the nozzle must be coupled with its transverse velocity as it passes across the surface of the substrate being stripped. The radial and angular positions of each orifice must be included in the analysis of the nozzle configuration. Orifices at the outer edge of the nozzle head move at a faster rate than the orifices located near the center. The energy transmitted to the surface from the impact force of the water stream from an outer orifice is therefore spread over a larger area than energy from an inner orifice. Utilizing a larger diameter orifice in the outer radial positions increases the total energy transmitted from the outer orifice to compensate for the wider distribution of energy. The total flow rate from the combination of all orifices must be monitored and should be kept below the pump capacity while choosing orifice to insert in each position. The energy distribution from the orifice pattern is further complicated since the rotary path of all the orifices in the nozzle head pass through the center section. All orifices contribute to the stripping in the center of the path while only the outer most orifice contributes to the stripping at the edge of the nozzle. Additional orifices contribute to the stripping from the outer edge toward the center section. With all these parameters to configure and each parameter change affecting the others, a computer model was developed to track and coordinate these parameters. The computer simulation graphically indicates the cumulative affect from each parameter selected. The result from the proper choices in parameters is a well designed, highly efficient stripping system. A poorly chosen set of parameters will cause the nozzle to strip aggressively in some areas

  20. Active Control of Liner Impedance by Varying Perforate Orifice Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuji, K. K.; Gaeta, R. J., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The present work explored the feasibility of controlling the acoustic impedance of a resonant type acoustic liner. This was accomplished by translating one perforate over another of the same porosity creating a totally new perforate that had an intermediate porosity. This type of adjustable perforate created a variable orifice perforate whose orifices were non-circular. The key objective of the present study was to quantify, the degree of attenuation control that can be achieved by applying such a concept to the buried septum in a two-degree-of-freedom (2DOF) acoustic liner. An additional objective was to examine the adequacy of the existing impedance models to explain the behavior of the unique orifice shapes that result from the proposed silding perforate concept. Different orifice shapes with equivalent area were also examined to determine if highly non-circular orifices had a significant impact on the impedance.

  1. Balanced Orifice Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor); Buskirk, Paul D. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An orifice plate for use in a conduit through which fluid flows is defined by a central circular region having a radius R, and a ring-shaped region surrounding the central circular region. The ring-shaped region has holes formed therethrough with those holes centered at each radius R thereof satisfying a relationship A(sub R)=al(X(sub R)V(sub R)(sup b)) where A(sub R) is a sum of areas of those holes having centers at radius R, X(sub R) is a flow coefficient at radius R, V(sub R) is a velocity of the fluid that is to flow through the conduit at radius R, b is a constant selected to make at least one process variable (associated with the fluid that is to flow through the conduit) approximately equal at each radius R, and a is a constant that is equal to (X(sub R)A(sub R)V(sub R)(sup b)) at each radius R.

  2. High Pressure Water Stripping Using Multi-Orifice Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, David T.

    1998-01-01

    The use of multi-orifice rotary nozzles not only increases the speed and stripping effectiveness of high pressure water blasting systems, but also greatly increases the complexity of selecting and optimizing the operating parameters. The rotational speed of the nozzle must be coupled with the transverse velocity of the nozzle as it passes across the surface of the substrate being stripped. The radial and angular positions of each orifice must be included in the analysis of the nozzle configuration. Since orifices at the outer edge of the nozzle head move at a faster rate than the orifice located near the center, the energy impact force of the water stream from the outer orifice is spread over a larger area than the water streams from the inner orifice. Utilizing a larger diameter orifice in the outer radial positions increases the energy impact to compensate for its wider force distribution. The total flow rate from the combination of orifices must be monitored and kept below the pump capacity while choosing an orifice to insert in each position. The energy distribution from the orifice pattern is further complicated since the rotary path of all orifices in the nozzle head pass through the center section, contributing to the stripping in this area while only the outer most orifice contributes to the stripping in the shell area at the extreme outside edge of the nozzle. From t he outer most shell to the center section, more orifices contribute to the stripping in each progressively reduced diameter shell. With all these parameters to configure and each parameter change affecting the others, a computer model was developed to track and coordinate these parameters. The computer simulation responds by graphically indicating the cumulative affect from each parameter selected. The results from the proper choices in parameters is a well designed, highly efficient stripping system. A poorly chosen set of parameters will cause the nozzle to strip aggressively in some areas

  3. Pulse height model for deuterated scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haitang; Enqvist, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    An analytical model of light pulse height distribution for finite deuterated scintillation detectors is created using the impulse approximation. Particularly, the energy distribution of a scattered neutron is calculated based on an existing collision probability scheme for general cylindrical shaped detectors considering double differential cross-sections. The light pulse height distribution is analytically and numerically calculated by convoluting collision sequences with the light output function for an EJ-315 detector from our measurements completed at Ohio University. The model provides a good description of collision histories capturing transferred neutron energy in deuterium-based scintillation materials. The resulting light pulse height distribution details pulse compositions and their corresponding contributions. It shows that probabilities of neutron collision with carbon and deuterium nuclei are comparable, however the light pulse amplitude due to collisions with carbon nuclei is small and mainly located at the lower region of the light pulse distribution axis. The model can explore those neutron interaction events that generate pulses near or below a threshold that would be imposed in measurements. A comparison is made between the light pulse height distributions given by the analytical model and measurements. It reveals a significant probability of a neutron generating a small light pulse due to collisions with carbon nuclei when compared to larger light pulse generated by collisions involving deuterium nuclei. This model is beneficial to understand responses of scintillation materials and pulse compositions, as well as nuclei information extraction from recorded pulses.

  4. Successful balloon dilatation of both orifices in a case of double-orifice mitral valve with severe rheumatic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Nath, Ranjit Kumar; Soni, Dheeraj Kumar

    2016-08-01

    A 24-year-old female patient presented to us with progressive dyspnea on exertion for last three year. She was not a known case of rheumatic heart disease. Her physical examination showed regular pulse and her blood pressure was 100/76 mm Hg. Cardiac palpation showed grade 3 parasternal heave and auscultation revelled an accentuated first heart sound, loud P2 and mid-diastolic long rumbling murmur at apex and pansystolic murmur of tricuspid regurgitation at lower left sterna border. Chest X-ray showed evidence of grade 3 pulmonary venous congestion. Transthoracic and transesophageal two-dimensional echocardiography revealed a double-orifice mitral valve of complete bridge type at the leaflet level. Both orifice sizes were unequal, with the anterolateral orifice being smaller than its counterpart. There was moderate subvalvular fusion and both commisures were fused. Color doppler examination showed two separate mitral diastolic flows with mean gradients of 22 mm and 20 mm of Hg, respectively. There was no mitral regurgitation and no left atrial or appendage clot was seen by transesophageal echocardiography. Transseptal puncture was done by the modified fluoroscopic method. Posteromedial orifice was crossed with a 24 mm Inoue balloon and dilated using the stepwise dilation technique. Anterolateral orifice was not crossed by Inuoe balloon after multiple attempts. A TYSHAK (NuMAD Canada Inc.) balloon (16 × 40mm) was taken over the wire and inflated successfully across the anterolateral orifice with the help of transthoracic echocardiography guidance. Mean gradient become 9 and 8 mm across the medial and lateral orifice. Patient was discharged in stable condition after two day. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26389694

  5. Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic wedge hepatic resection with a water-jet hybrid knife in a non-survival porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hong; Jiang, Sheng-Jun; Li, Bin; Fu, Deng-Ke; Xin, Pei; Wang, Yong-Guang

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To explore the feasibility of a water-jet hybrid knife to facilitate wedge hepatic resection using a natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) approach in a non-survival porcine model. METHODS: The Erbe Jet2 water-jet system allows a needleless, tissue-selective hydro-dissection with a pre-selected pressure. Using this system, wedge hepatic resection was performed through three natural routes (trans-anal, trans-vaginal and trans-umbilical) in three female pigs weighing 35 kg under general anesthesia. Entry into the peritoneal cavity was via a 15-mm incision using a hook knife. The targeted liver segment was marked by an APC probe, followed by wedge hepatic resection performed using a water-jet hybrid knife with the aid of a 4-mm transparent distance soft cap mounted onto the tip of the endoscope for holding up the desired plane. The exposed vascular and ductal structures were clipped with Endoclips. Hemostasis was applied to the bleeding cut edges of the liver parenchyma by electrocautery. After the procedure, the incision site was left open, and the animal was euthanized followed by necropsy. RESULTS: Using the Erbe Jet2 water-jet system, trans-anal and trans-vaginal wedge hepatic resection was successfully performed in two pigs without laparoscopic assistance. Trans-umbilical attempt failed due to an unstable operating platform. The incision for peritoneal entry took 1 min, and about 2 h was spent on excision of the liver tissue. The intra-operative blood loss ranged from 100 to 250 mL. Microscopically, the hydro-dissections were relatively precise and gentle, preserving most vessels. CONCLUSION: The Erbe Jet2 water-jet system can safely accomplish non-anatomic wedge hepatic resection in NOTES, which deserves further studies to shorten the dissection time. PMID:21412502

  6. Influence of Geometry and Flow Variation on Jet Mixing and NO Formation in a Model Staged Combustor Mixer with Eight Orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samuelsen, G. S.; Sowa, W. A.; Hatch, M. S.

    1996-01-01

    A series of non-reacting parametric experiments was conducted to investigate the effect of geometric and flow variations on mixing of cold jets in an axis-symmetric, heated cross flow. The confined, cylindrical geometries tested represent the quick mix region of a Rich-Burn/Quick-Mix/Lean-Burn (RQL) combustor. The experiments show that orifice geometry and jet to mainstream momentum-flux ratio significantly impact the mixing characteristic of jets in a cylindrical cross stream. A computational code was used to extrapolate the results of the non-reacting experiments to reacting conditions in order to examine the nitric oxide (NO) formation potential of the configurations examined. The results show that the rate of NO formation is highest immediately downstream of the injection plane. For a given momentum-flux ratio, the orifice geometry that mixes effectively in both the immediate vicinity of the injection plane, and in the wall regions at downstream locations, has the potential to produce the lowest NO emissions. The results suggest that further study may not necessarily lead to a universal guideline for designing a low NO mixer. Instead, an assessment of each application may be required to determine the optimum combination of momentum-flux ratio and orifice geometry to minimize NO formation. Experiments at reacting conditions are needed to verify the present results.

  7. Modeling pulse characteristics in Xenon with NEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mock, J.; Barry, N.; Kazkaz, K.; Stolp, D.; Szydagis, M.; Tripathi, M.; Uvarov, S.; Woods, M.; Walsh, N.

    2014-04-01

    A comprehensive model for describing the characteristics of pulsed signals, generated by particle interactions in xenon detectors, is presented. An emphasis is laid on two-phase time projection chambers, but the models presented are also applicable to single phase detectors. In order to simulate the pulse shape due to primary scintillation light, the effects of the ratio of singlet and triplet dimer state populations, as well as their corresponding decay times, and the recombination time are incorporated into the model. In a two phase time projection chamber, when simulating the pulse caused by electroluminescence light, the ionization electron mean free path in gas, the drift velocity, singlet and triplet decay times, diffusion constants, and the electron trapping time, have been implemented. This modeling has been incorporated into a complete software package, which realistically simulates the expected pulse shapes for these types of detectors.

  8. A model for pulse jet fabric filters.

    PubMed

    Ju, J; Chiu, M S; Tien, C

    2000-04-01

    A new model for pulse jet fabric filtration is proposed. In contrast to the earlier model of Ravin and Humphries, which was formulated on the steady state assumption, the present study is aimed at developing a predictive capability for both transient and steady state operations, taking into account the compression effect of filter cakes. The model's relative simplicity allows frequent updating of the model parameter values, thus improving the accuracy of predictions. As a result, the model is particularly useful in developing control algorithms and designing controllers of pulse jet fabric filtration systems. PMID:10786012

  9. Hollow Cathode With Multiple Radial Orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Improved hollow cathode serving as source of electrons has multiple radial orifices instead of single axial orifice. Distributes ion current more smoothly, over larger area. Prototype of high-current cathodes for ion engines in spacecraft. On Earth, cathodes used in large-diameter ion sources for industrial processing of materials. Radial orientation of orifices in new design causes current to be dispersed radially in vicinity of cathode. Advantageous where desireable to produce plasma more nearly uniform over wider region around cathode.

  10. Effect of mitral orifice shape on intra-ventricular filling fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okafor, Ikechukwu; Angirish, Yagna; Yoganathan, Ajit; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind

    2013-11-01

    The natural geometry of the mitral orifice is D-shaped. However, most current designs of prosthetic valves employ O-shaped orifice geometry. The goal of this study was to compare the effect of geometrical modification between the D and O orifice on the intra-ventricular fluid dynamics during diastolic filling. The different mitral orifice geometries were incorporated into an in vitro left heart simulator consisting of a flexible-walled anatomical left ventricle (LV) physical model enclosed in an acrylic housing. Physiological flow rates and pressures were obtained via tuning systemic resistance and compliance elements in the flow loop. A programmable piston pump was used to generate the LV model wall motion. 2D Particle image velocimetry measurements were conducted along multiple longitudinal planes perpendicular to the annulus plane. During peak diastole, the incoming jet width at the LV central plane was smaller for the D-orifice than that of the O-orifice. Further, the core of the vortex ring in the D-orifice was reduced in size compared to that of the O-orifice. The spatiotemporal spreading of the inflow jet as well as the propagation of the vortex ring will be discussed. This study was funded by a grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (RO1HL70262).

  11. Modeling Pulse Tube Cryocoolers with CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flake, Barrett; Razani, Arsalan

    2004-06-01

    A commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package is used to model the oscillating flow inside a pulse tube cryocooler. Capabilities for modeling pulse tubes are demonstrated with preliminary case studies and the results presented. The 2D axi-symmetric simulations demonstrate the time varying temperature and velocity fields in the tube along with computation of the heat fluxes at the hot and cold heat exchangers. The only externally imposed boundary conditions are a cyclically moving piston wall at one end of the tube and constant temperature or heat flux boundaries at the external walls of the hot and cold heat exchangers.

  12. Generic Sensor Modeling Using Pulse Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helder, Dennis L.; Choi, Taeyoung

    2005-01-01

    Recent development of high spatial resolution satellites such as IKONOS, Quickbird and Orbview enable observation of the Earth's surface with sub-meter resolution. Compared to the 30 meter resolution of Landsat 5 TM, the amount of information in the output image was dramatically increased. In this era of high spatial resolution, the estimation of spatial quality of images is gaining attention. Historically, the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) concept has been used to estimate an imaging system's spatial quality. Sometimes classified by target shapes, various methods were developed in laboratory environment utilizing sinusoidal inputs, periodic bar patterns and narrow slits. On-orbit sensor MTF estimation was performed on 30-meter GSD Landsat4 Thematic Mapper (TM) data from the bridge pulse target as a pulse input . Because of a high resolution sensor s small Ground Sampling Distance (GSD), reasonably sized man-made edge, pulse, and impulse targets can be deployed on a uniform grassy area with accurate control of ground targets using tarps and convex mirrors. All the previous work cited calculated MTF without testing the MTF estimator's performance. In previous report, a numerical generic sensor model had been developed to simulate and improve the performance of on-orbit MTF estimating techniques. Results from the previous sensor modeling report that have been incorporated into standard MTF estimation work include Fermi edge detection and the newly developed 4th order modified Savitzky-Golay (MSG) interpolation technique. Noise sensitivity had been studied by performing simulations on known noise sources and a sensor model. Extensive investigation was done to characterize multi-resolution ground noise. Finally, angle simulation was tested by using synthetic pulse targets with angles from 2 to 15 degrees, several brightness levels, and different noise levels from both ground targets and imaging system. As a continuing research activity using the developed sensor

  13. [Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery: current situation].

    PubMed

    Delgado, Salvadora; Ibarzábal, Ainitze; Fernández-Esparrach, Glòria

    2008-10-01

    Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) is the paradigm of the evolution of minimally invasive surgery. The laparoscopic has introduced new ideas in general surgery, one of them being that modern surgery is the work of multidisciplinary teams. A clear example of this is provided by NOTES. The aim of this type of surgery is to perform conventional laparoscopic procedures without incision, using flexible endoscopic technology usually employed in the diagnosis and treatment of intraluminal lesions and reaching the inside of the abdominal cavity through natural orifices (mouth, anus, vagina and even urethra). This type of access opens a highly interesting field for certain types of patients, such as those with high surgical risk, the morbidly obese, and those with multiple prior abdominal interventions or surgical wound infections. Animal models have shown that a wide variety of interventions (cholecystectomy, appendicectomy, splenectomy, hysterectomy, tubal ligations, gastroenteroanastomosis, peritoneoscopy, liver biopsy and herniorrhaphy, among others) can be performed. However, before use in humans, this new technique must be shown to be safe and to provide real advantages for patients. To do this, a series of issues, including safe methods for closure of the gastric incision and the avoidance of infections, among others, must be solved. Another critical element for the development of this new type of surgery is the creation of appropriate instrumentation, requiring input not only from medical professionals but also from engineers and industry. The present article describes the major advances made in NOTES since this technique was first described and analyzes the risks and potential benefits associated with this novel procedure. PMID:18928752

  14. Modelling the pulse transformer in SPICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godlewska, Malgorzata; Górecki, Krzysztof; Górski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    The paper is devoted to modelling pulse transformers in SPICE. It shows the character of the selected models of this element, points out their advantages and disadvantages, and presents the results of experimental verification of the considered models. These models are characterized by varying degrees of complexity - from linearly coupled linear coils to nonlinear electrothermal models. The study was conducted for transformer with ring cores made of a variety of ferromagnetic materials, while exciting the sinusoidal signal of a frequency 100 kHz and different values of load resistance. The transformers operating conditions under which the considered models ensure the acceptable accuracy of calculations are indicated.

  15. Gas Generator Feedline Orifice Sizing Methodology: Effects of Unsteadiness and Non-Axisymmetric Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; West, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    Engine LH2 and LO2 gas generator feed assemblies were modeled with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods at 100% rated power level, using on-center square- and round-edge orifices. The purpose of the orifices is to regulate the flow of fuel and oxidizer to the gas generator, enabling optimal power supply to the turbine and pump assemblies. The unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations were solved on unstructured grids at second-order spatial and temporal accuracy. The LO2 model was validated against published experimental data and semi-empirical relationships for thin-plate orifices over a range of Reynolds numbers. Predictions for the LO2 square- and round-edge orifices precisely match experiment and semi-empirical formulas, despite complex feedline geometry whereby a portion of the flow from the engine main feedlines travels at a right-angle through a smaller-diameter pipe containing the orifice. Predictions for LH2 square- and round-edge orifice designs match experiment and semi-empirical formulas to varying degrees depending on the semi-empirical formula being evaluated. LO2 mass flow rate through the square-edge orifice is predicted to be 25 percent less than the flow rate budgeted in the original engine balance, which was subsequently modified. LH2 mass flow rate through the square-edge orifice is predicted to be 5 percent greater than the flow rate budgeted in the engine balance. Since CFD predictions for LO2 and LH2 square-edge orifice pressure loss coefficients, K, both agree with published data, the equation for K has been used to define a procedure for orifice sizing.

  16. Preparation of spherical particles by vibrating orifice technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Shuichi; Tomizawa, Atsushi; Yoshikawa, Hidemi; Yano, Tetsuji; Yamane, Masayuki

    2000-05-01

    Preparation of micrometer-sized spherical particles containing Rhodamine 6G (R6G) has been investigated for the spherical cavity micro-laser. Using phenyl triethoxy silane (PTES) as a starting material, R6G-doped monodisperse spherical particles were prepared by the vibrating orifice technique. Processing consists of two major processes: (1) Hydrolysis and polymerization of PTES and (2) Droplet formation from PTES oligomers by vibrating orifice technique. A cylindrical liquid jet passing through the orifice of 10 and 20 micrometers in diameter breaks up into equal- sized droplets by mechanical vibration. Alcohol solvent of these droplets was evaporated during flying with carrier gas and subsequently solidified in ammonium water trap. For making smooth surface and god shaped particles, control of molecular weight of PTES oligomer was essential. R6G-doped hybrid spherical particles of 4 to 10 micrometers size of cavity structure were successfully obtained. The spherical particles were pumped by a second harmonic pulse of Q- switched Nd:YAG laser and laser emission peaks were observed at wavelengths which correspond to the resonance modes.

  17. Orifice Blocks Heat Pipe in Reverse Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alario, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    High forward-mode conductance is combined with rapid reverse-mode shutoff in a heat pipe originally developed to cool spacecraft payloads. A narrow orifice within the pipe "chokes off" the evaporator if heat sink becomes warmer than source. During normal operation, with source warmer than sink, orifice has little effect. Design is simpler and more compact than other thermal-diode heat pipes and requires no special materials, forgings, or unusual construction techniques.

  18. Improved Orifice Plate for Spray Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, W.

    1986-01-01

    Erratic spray pattern of commercial spray gun changed to repeatable one by simple redesign of two parts. In modified spray gun orifice plate and polytetrafluoroethylene bushing redesigned to assure centering and alignment with nozzle. Such improvement useful in many industrial applications requiring repeatable spray patterns. Might include spraying of foam insulation, paint, other protective coatings, detergents, abrasives, adhesives, process chemicals, or fuels. Unmodified spray gun produces erratic spray because lateral misalignment between orifice plate and nozzle.

  19. Transanal natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery total mesorectal excision in animal models: endoscopic inferior mesenteric artery dissection made easier by a retroperitoneal approach

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun Jin; Chang, Tae Young; Jung, Yunho; Kim, Hyung Jin; Kim, Young Ill; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We report the performance of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) low anterior resection in animals using transanal total mesorectal excision (TME) with laparoscopic assistance and endoscopic inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) dissection. Methods Four pigs weighing 45 kg each, and one dog weighing 25 kg, underwent surgery via a transanal approach. The rectum was occluded transanally using a purse-string suture, approximately 3-4 cm from the anal verge. The rectal mucosa was incised circumferentially just distal to the purse-string. A SILS or GelPOINT port was inserted transanally. Transanal TME was assisted by laparoscopy and proceeded up to the peritoneal reflection. More proximal dissection, including IMA dissection, was performed along the retroperitoneal avascular plane by endoscopy alone and facilitated by CO2 insufflation. The IMA was clipped and divided endoscopically. The mobilized rectosigmoid were exteriorized transanally and transected. A colorectal anastomosis was performed using a circular stapler with a single stapling technique. Results Endoscopic dissection of the IMA was successful in all five animals. The mean operation time was 125 minutes (range, 90-170 minutes). There were no intraoperative complications or hemodynamic instability. The mean length of the resected specimen was 14.4 cm (range, 12-16 cm). Conclusion A NOTES retroperitoneal approach to the IMA with CO2 insufflation and intact peritoneal covering overcame the difficulties of retraction and exposure of endoscopic dissection in animals. PMID:25025019

  20. Slotted orifice flowmeter. Final report, July 1993-August 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, G.L.

    1995-09-01

    The report shows that a slotted orifice has superior performance characteristics compared to a standard orifice by being significantly less dependent upon upstream flow conditioning than a standard orifice plate. The effectiveness of the slotted orifice as a flow condition is shown.

  1. TWO-PHASE FLOW OF TWO HFC REFRIGERANT MIXTURES THROUGH SHORT-TUBE ORIFICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an experimental investigation to develop an acceptable flow model for short tube orifice expansion devices used in heat pumps. The refrigerants investigated were two hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) mixtures considered hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC)-22 replacem...

  2. Modeling of pulsed lasers for remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Brian M.; Barnes, Norman P.; Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Jirong; Singh, Upendra N.

    2005-01-01

    Pulsed lasers are useful for remote sensing of wind and greenhouse gases to better understand the atmosphere and its impact on weather patterns and the environment. It is not always practical to develop and optimize new laser systems empirically due to the time and expense associated with such endeavors. A practical option is to use a laser model to predict various performance parameters and compare these with the needs required for a particular remote sensing application. This approach can be very useful in determining the efficacy of potential laser systems, saving both time and money before proceeding with the actual construction of a laser device. As a pedagogical example, the modeling of diode pumped Tm:Ho:YLF and Tm:Ho:LuLF lasers are examined. Tm:Ho lasers operating around 2.0 μm have been used for wind measurements such as clear air turbulence and wake vortices. The model predictions for the laser systems examined here are compared to the actual laser performance, validating the usefulness of the modeling approach. While Tm:Ho fluoride lasers are used as a pedagogical example, the model is applicable to any lanthanide series pulsed laser system. This provides a useful tool for investigating potential laser systems that meet the requirements desired for a variety of remote sensing applications.

  3. Comparison of turbulent flow through hexagram and hexagon orifices in circular pipes using large-eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Nicolleau, Franck C. G. A.; Qin, Ning

    2016-04-01

    Characteristics of turbulent flow through a circular, a hexagon and a hexagram orifice with the same flow area in circular pipes are investigated using wall-modelled large-eddy simulation. Good agreements to available experimental data were obtained in both the mean velocity and turbulent kinetic energy. The hexagram orifice with alternating convex and concave corners introduces outwards radial velocity around the concave corners downstream of the orifice plate stronger than the hexagon orifice. The stronger outwards radial velocity transfers high momentum from the pipe centre towards the pipe wall to energize the orifice-forced vortex sheet rolling-up and leads to a delayed vortex break-down. Correspondingly, the hexagram has a more gradual flow recovery to a pipe flow and a reduced pressure drop than the hexagon orifice. Both the hexagon and hexagram orifices show an axis-switching phenomenon, which is observed from both the streamwise velocity and turbulent kinetic energy contours. To the best knowledge of the authors, this is the first comparison of orifice-forced turbulence development, mixing and flow dynamics between a regular and a fractal-based polygonal orifice.

  4. Anesthetic management of transoral natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery: two cases report

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chan Jong; Lee, Seung Cheo; Shin, Ho Jin

    2014-01-01

    Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) is an evolving field of minimally invasive surgery. NOTES reaches the target organ by inserting the endoscope through a natural orifice (e.g. mouth, anus, urethra, vagina) and offers advantages of less postoperative pain and lower complication rate. Since its first description in 2004, NOTES has progressed from use on animal models to humans. We experienced anesthetic care of two patients who underwent transoral NOTES under general anesthesia. PMID:25237454

  5. Bubble Formation at a Submerged Orifice in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buyevich, Yu A.; Webbon, Bruce W.

    1994-01-01

    The dynamic regime of gas injection through a circular plate orifice into an ideally wetting liquid is considered, when successively detached bubbles may be regarded as separate identities. In normal gravity and at relatively low gas flow rates, a growing bubble is modeled as a spherical segment touching the orifice perimeter during the whole time of its evolution. If the flow rate exceeds a certain threshold value, another stage of the detachment process takes place in which an almost spherical gas envelope is connected with the orifice by a nearly cylindrical stem that lengthens as the bubble rises above the plate. The bubble shape resembles then that of a mushroom and the upper envelope continues to grow until the gas supply through the stem is completely cut off. Such a stage is always present under conditions of sufficiently low gravity, irrespective of the flow rate. Two major reasons make for bubble detachment: the buoyancy force and the force due to the momentum inflow into the bubble with the injected gas. The former force dominates the process at normal gravity whereas the second one plays a key role under negligible gravity conditions. It is precisely this fundamental factor that conditions the drastic influence on bubble growth and detachment that changes in gravity are able to cause. The frequency of bubble formation is proportional to and the volume of detached bubbles is independent of the gas flow rate in sufficiently low gravity, while at normal and moderately reduced gravity conditions the first variable slightly decreases and the second one almost linearly increases as the flow rate grows. Effects of other parameters, such as the orifice radius, gas and liquid densities, and surface tension are discussed.

  6. Modeling and analysis of pulse electrochemical machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Bin

    Pulse Electrochemical Machining (PECM) is a potentially cost effective technology meeting the increasing needs of precision manufacturing of superalloys, like titanium alloys, into complex shapes such as turbine airfoils. This dissertation reports: (1) an assessment of the worldwide state-of-the-art PECM research and industrial practice; (2) PECM process model development; (3) PECM of a superalloy (Ti-6Al-4V); and (4) key issues in future PECM research. The assessment focuses on identifying dimensional control problems with continuous ECM and how PECM can offer a solution. Previous research on PECM system design, process mechanisms, and dimensional control is analysed, leading to a clearer understanding of key issues in PECM development such as process characterization and modeling. New interelectrode gap dynamic models describing the gap evolution with time are developed for different PECM processes with an emphasis on the frontal gaps and a typical two-dimensional case. A 'PECM cosine principle' and several tool design formulae are also derived. PECM processes are characterized using concepts such as quasi-equilibrium gap and dissolution localization. Process simulation is performed to evaluate the effects of process inputs on dimensional accuracy control. Analysis is made on three types (single-phase, homogeneous, and inhomogeneous) of models concerning the physical processes (such as the electrolyte flow, Joule heating, and bubble generation) in the interelectrode gap. A physical model is introduced for the PECM with short pulses, which addresses the effect of electrolyte conductivity change on anodic dissolution. PECM of the titanium alloy is studied from a new perspective on the pulsating currents influence on surface quality and dimension control. An experimental methodology is developed to acquire instantaneous currents and to accurately measure the coefficient of machinability. The influence of pulse parameters on the surface passivation is explained based

  7. Effects of Ultrasmall Orifices on the Electro-generation of Femtoliter-Volume Aqueous Droplets

    PubMed Central

    He, Mingyan; Kuo, Jason S.; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to generate individual picoliter- and femtoliter-volume aqueous droplets on-demand is useful for encapsulating and chemically manipulating discrete chemical and biological samples. This paper characterizes the effects of orifice dimensions and material choices on generating such droplets in an immiscible oil phase using single high-voltage pulses with various amplitudes and durations. We have examined microfluidic orifices as small as 1.7 μm in equivalent radii, and found that the electrohydrodynamic jet lengths and the subsequent formation of droplets are affected by the axial aspect ratios of the orifices (length of an orifice divided by its equivalent radius). As higher voltages were used to compensate for the increased capillary pressure and hydrodynamic resistance in ultrasmall orifices, we observed secondary jet protrusions and droplet formations that were not of classical electrohydrodynamic origin. The droplets generated from secondary jets traveled at relatively lower velocities as compared to those of electrohydrodynamic origin, and these slow individual droplets are potentially more useful for applications in microscale chemical reactions. PMID:16800707

  8. Variable orifice using an iris shutter

    DOEpatents

    Beeman, Raymond; Brajkovich, Steven J.

    1978-01-01

    A variable orifice forming mechanism utilizing an iris shutter arrangement adapted to control gas flow, conductance in vacuum systems, as a heat shield for furnace windows, as a beam shutter in sputtering operations, and in any other application requiring periodic or continuously-variable control of material, gas, or fluid flow.

  9. Contoured Orifice for Silicon-Ribbon Die

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackintosh, B. H.

    1985-01-01

    Die configuration encourages purity and stable growth. Contour of die orifice changes near ribbon edges. As result, silicon ribbon has nearly constant width and little carbon contamination. Die part of furnace being developed to produce high-quality, low-cost material for solar cells.

  10. Investigation of drop motion through circular orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordoloi, Ankur; Longmire, Ellen; Kong, Xiangzhao; Saar, Martin

    2011-11-01

    The motion of drops though porous media occurs in numerous science and engineering fields including multiphase fluid flow in the subsurface during groundwater flow, geothermal energy recovery, and geologic carbon dioxide sequestration. Here, we simplify the porous medium to a thin plate with an orifice to study the interactions between the drop and the solid medium. Drops of water/glycerin with diameter, D, are released in a tank of silicone oil with matched refractive index and allowed to fall downward by gravity. After reaching terminal speed, the drops encounter a thin plate with orifice diameter, d, placed horizontally within the surrounding tank. Drop deformation, contact with the orifice, and breakage are investigated using high-speed imaging, and velocity fields are determined by particle image velocimetry (PIV). Effects of diameter ratio d/D, drop Reynolds number, and drop offset with respect to the orifice center are examined. The experimental results are compared to results from numerical simulations using an immiscible, two-color BGK lattice-Boltzmann method performed under similar test conditions. Supported by DOE (DOE EERE-PMC-10EE0002764).

  11. Update on Natural Orifice Translumenal Endoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bingener, Juliane; Gostout, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) has moved from the realm of laboratory experiments to the realm of human clinical trials. This paper reviews the spectrum of NOTES procedures currently available in the United States and worldwide. It also discusses the limitations and avenues for further development of these procedures, particularly those involving the transgastric approach. PMID:22933874

  12. Pressure drop control using multiple orifice system in compressible pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Heuydong; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Matsuo, Shigeru; Raghunathan, S. R.

    2001-10-01

    In order to investigate the effectiveness of an orifice system in producing pressure drops and the effect of compressibility on the pressure drop, computations using the mass-averaged implicit Navier-Stokes equations were applied to the axisymmetric pipe flows with the operating pressure ratio from 1.5 to 20.0. The standard k- ɛ turbulence model was employed to close the governing equations. Numerical calculations were carried out for some combinations of the multiple orifice configurations. The present CFD data showed that the orifice systems, which have been applied to incompressible flow regime to date, could not be used for the high operating pressure ratio flows. The orifice interval did not strongly affect the total pressure drop, but the orifice area ratio more than 2.5 led to relatively high pressure drops. The total pressure drop rapidly increased in the range of the operating pressure ratio from 1.5 to 4.0, but it nearly did not increase when the operating pressure ratio was over 4.0. In the compressible pipe flows through double and triple orifice systems, the total pressure drop was largely due to shock losses.

  13. Measurements and computational fluid dynamics predictions of the acoustic impedance of orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, J.; Rupp, J.; Garmory, A.; Carrotte, J. F.

    2015-09-01

    The response of orifices to incident acoustic waves, which is important for many engineering applications, is investigated with an approach combining both experimental measurements and numerical simulations. This paper presents experimental data on acoustic impedance of orifices, which is subsequently used for validation of a numerical technique developed for the purpose of predicting the acoustic response of a range of geometries with moderate computational cost. Measurements are conducted for orifices with length to diameter ratios, L/D, of 0.5, 5 and 10. The experimental data is obtained for a range of frequencies using a configuration in which a mean (or bias) flow passes from a duct through the test orifices before issuing into a plenum. Acoustic waves are provided by a sound generator on the upstream side of the orifices. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations of the same configuration have also been performed. These have been undertaken using an unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) approach with a pressure based compressible formulation with appropriate characteristic based boundary conditions to simulate the correct acoustic behaviour at the boundaries. The CFD predictions are in very good agreement with the experimental data, predicting the correct trend with both frequency and orifice L/D in a way not seen with analytical models. The CFD was also able to successfully predict a negative resistance, and hence a reflection coefficient greater than unity for the L / D = 0.5 case.

  14. Future Modeling Needs in Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, Brian; Talley, Doug; Mueller, Donn; Tew, Dave; Guidos, Mike; Seymour, Dave

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a performance model rocket engine design that takes advantage of pulse detonation to generate thrust. The contents include: 1) Introduction to the Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine (PDRE); 2) PDRE modeling issues and options; 3) Discussion of the PDRE Performance Workshop held at Marshall Space Flight Center; and 4) Identify needs involving an open performance model for Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  15. Modelling of noise-like pulses generated in fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Sergey; Kobtsev, Sergey

    2016-03-01

    The present paper for the first time proposes and studies a relatively simple model of noise-like pulses that matches the experimental data well and suggests that there is a correlation between phases of adjacent spectral components of noiselike pulses. Comparison of a relatively basic model of `random' pulses with the results of noise-like pulse modelling in mode-locked fibre lasers based on coupled non-linear Schrödinger equations demonstrates that it adequately reproduces temporal and spectral properties of noise-like pulses as well as correlation between adjacent modes so that it's possible to use the proposed model for highly efficient simulations of promising applications of noise-like pulses, such as material processing, non-linear frequency conversion, microscopy, and others.

  16. The underground electromagnetic pulse: Four representative models

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, L.F.

    1989-06-01

    I describe four phenomenological models by which an underground nuclear explosion may generate electromagnetic pulses: Compton current asymmetry (or ''Compton dipole''); Uphole conductor currents (or ''casing currents''); Diamagnetic cavity plasma (or ''magnetic bubble''); and Large-scale ground motion (or ''magneto-acoustic wave''). I outline the corresponding analytic exercises and summarize the principal results of the computations. I used a 10-kt contained explosion as the fiducial case. Each analytic sequence developed an equivalent source dipole and calculated signal waveforms at representative ground-surface locations. As a comparative summary, the Compton dipole generates a peak source current moment of about 12,000 A/center dot/m in the submicrosecond time domain. The casing-current source model obtains an equivalent peak moment of about 2 /times/ 10/sup 5/ A/center dot/m in the 10- to 30-/mu/s domain. The magnetic bubble produces a magnetic dipole moment of about 7 /times/ 10/sup 6/ A/center dot/m/sup 2/, characterized by a 30-ms time structure. Finally, the magneto-acoustic wave corresponds to a magnetic dipole moment of about 600 A/center dot/m/sup 2/, with a waveform showing 0.5-s periodicities. 8 refs., 35 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Erik P.; Andrews, Paul E.; Lingeman, James E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this publication is to document the evolution of a new surgical procedure for the treatment of carefully selected patients with organ confined localized prostate cancer. Natural orifice surgery represents a paradigm shift in the surgical approach to disease, although its adoption into clinical practice has been limited to date. This manuscript describes the development of natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgical radical prostatectomy (NOTES RP). The laboratory, animal, preclinical and early clinical experiences are described and detailed. While the early experiences with this approach are promising and encouraging, more information is required. Despite the early successes with the procedure, long-term oncological and functional outcomes are essential and more work needs to be done to facilitate the teaching and ease of the NOTES RP. PMID:22295043

  18. Hydraulic design and performance of a GCFR core assembly orifice

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, I.M.

    1980-02-01

    The design and performance of a core assembly orifice for gas-cooled fast-breeder reactors (GCFRs) are studied in this report. Successful reactor operation relies on adequate cooling, among other things, and orificing is important to cooling. A simple, yet effective, graphical design method for estimating the loss coefficient of an orifice and its associated opening area is presented. A numerical example is also provided for demonstration of the method. The effect of the orifice configuration on orifice hydraulic performance is discussed. The design method stated above provides a first estimate toward an orifice design. Hydraulic experiments are required for verification of the design adequacy.

  19. [Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery: historical and future perspectives].

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Kazuhiro; Shiroshita, Hidefumi; Inomata, Masafumi; Kitano, Seigo

    2013-11-01

    Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) has gained much attention worldwide since the first report of transgastric peritoneoscopy in a porcine model in 2004. In this review, we summarize and highlight the current status and future directions of NOTES. Thousands of human NOTES procedures have been performed. The most common procedures are cholecystectomy and appendectomy, mainly performed through transvaginal access in a hybrid fashion with laparoscopic assistance, and the general complication rate is acceptable. Although much work is still needed to refine the techniques for NOTES, the development of NOTES has the potential to create a paradigm shift in minimally invasive surgery. PMID:24358724

  20. Acoustic Absorption Characteristics of an Orifice With a Mean Bias Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Gaeta, R. J., Jr.; DAgostino, M.; Jones, Mike (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the study reported here was to acquire acoustic and flow data for numerical validation of impedance models that simulate bias flow through perforates. The impedance model is being developed by researchers at High Technology Corporation. This report documents normal incidence impedance measurements a singular circular orifice with mean flow passing through it. All measurements are made within a 1.12 inch (28.5 mm) diameter impedance tube. The mean flow is introduced upstream of the orifice (with the flow and incident sound wave travelling in the same direction) with an anechoic termination downstream of the orifice. Velocity profiles are obtained upstream of the orifice to characterize the inflow boundary conditions. Velocity in the center of the orifice is also obtained. All velocity measurements are made with a hot wire anemometer and subsequent checked with mass flow measurements made concurrently. All impedance measurements are made using the Two-Microphone Method. Although we have left the analysis of the data to the developers of the impedance models that simulate bias flow through perforate, our initial examination indicates that our results follow the trends consistent with published theory on impedance of perforates with a steady bias flow.

  1. Modeling propagation of coherent optical pulses through molecular vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.; Eberly, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    Results of modeling the mutual coupling of coherent molecular response and coherent optical pulses during propagation are described. The propagation is treated numerically, with particular emphasis on both continuum and discrete behavior associated with the quasicontinuum model.

  2. Effect of grazing flow on the acoustic impedance of Helmholtz resonators consisting of single and clustered orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersch, A. S.; Walker, B.

    1979-01-01

    A semiempirical fluid mechanical model is derived for the acoustic behavior of thin-walled single orifice Helmholtz resonators in a grazing flow environment. The incident and cavity sound fields are connected in terms of an orifice discharge coefficient whose values are determined experimentally using the two-microphone method. Measurements show that at high grazing flow speeds, acoustical resistance is almost linearly proportional to the grazing flow speed and almost independent of incident sound pressure. The corresponding values of reactance are much smaller and tend towards zero. For thicker-walled orifice plates, resistance and reactance were observed to be less sensitive to grazing flow as the ratio of plate thickness to orifice diameter increased. Loud tones were observed to radiate from a single orifice Helmholtz resonator due to interaction between the grazing flow shear layer and the resonator cavity. Measurements showed that the tones radiated at a Strouhal number equal to 0.26. The effects of grazing flow on the impedance of Helmholtz resonators consisting of clusters of orifices was also studied. In general, both resistance and reaction were found to be virtually independent of orifice relative spacing and number. These findings are valid with and without grazing flow.

  3. Dynamic model of target charging by short laser pulse interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poyé, A.; Dubois, J.-L.; Lubrano-Lavaderci, F.; D'Humières, E.; Bardon, M.; Hulin, S.; Bailly-Grandvaux, M.; Ribolzi, J.; Raffestin, D.; Santos, J. J.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2015-10-01

    A model providing an accurate estimate of the charge accumulation on the surface of a metallic target irradiated by a high-intensity laser pulse of fs-ps duration is proposed. The model is confirmed by detailed comparisons with specially designed experiments. Such a model is useful for understanding the electromagnetic pulse emission and the quasistatic magnetic field generation in laser-plasma interaction experiments.

  4. Dynamic model of target charging by short laser pulse interactions.

    PubMed

    Poyé, A; Dubois, J-L; Lubrano-Lavaderci, F; D'Humières, E; Bardon, M; Hulin, S; Bailly-Grandvaux, M; Ribolzi, J; Raffestin, D; Santos, J J; Nicolaï, Ph; Tikhonchuk, V

    2015-10-01

    A model providing an accurate estimate of the charge accumulation on the surface of a metallic target irradiated by a high-intensity laser pulse of fs-ps duration is proposed. The model is confirmed by detailed comparisons with specially designed experiments. Such a model is useful for understanding the electromagnetic pulse emission and the quasistatic magnetic field generation in laser-plasma interaction experiments. PMID:26565356

  5. Pulse

    MedlinePlus

    Heart rate; Heart beat ... The pulse can be measured at areas where an artery passes close to the skin. These areas include the: ... side of the foot Wrist To measure the pulse at the wrist, place the index and middle ...

  6. Natural orifice transluminal endoscopy surgery: A review

    PubMed Central

    Moreira-Pinto, João; Lima, Estevão; Correia-Pinto, Jorge; Rolanda, Carla

    2011-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery started spreading worldwide in 1987, when the first laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed. Meanwhile, improvement of endoscopic equipment and instruments allowed gastroenterologists to attempt more aggressive endoluminal interventions, even beyond the wall barrier. The first transgastric peritoneoscopy, in 2004, brought to light the concept of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES). The idea of incisionless surgery is attractive and has become a new goal for both surgeons and other people interested in this field of investigation. The authors present a review of all developments concerning NOTES, including animal studies and human experience. PMID:21987621

  7. Natural orifice translumenal surgery: Flexible platform review

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Sohail N; Thompson, Christopher C

    2010-01-01

    Natural orifice translumenal surgery (NOTES) has garnished significant attention from surgeons and gastroenterologists, due to the fusion of flexible endoscopy and operative technique. Preliminary efforts suggest that NOTES holds potential for a less invasive approach with certain surgical conditions. Many of the hurdles encountered during the shift from open to laparoscopic surgery are now being revisited in the development of NOTES. Physician directed efforts, coupled with industry support, have brought about several NOTES specific devices and platforms to help address limitations with current instrumentation. This review addresses current flexible platforms and their attributes, advantages, disadvantages and limitations. PMID:21160877

  8. Study of orifice fabrication technologies for the liquid droplet radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, David B.; Hayes, Donald J.; Bush, J. Michael

    1991-01-01

    Eleven orifice fabrication technologies potentially applicable for a liquid droplet radiator are discussed. The evaluation is focused on technologies capable of yielding 25-150 microns diameter orifices with trajectory accuracies below 5 milliradians, ultimately in arrays of up to 4000 orifices. An initial analytical screening considering factors such as trajectory accuracy, manufacturability, and hydrodynamics of orifice flow is presented. Based on this screening, four technologies were selected for experimental evaluation. A jet straightness system used to test 50-orifice arrays made by electro-discharge machining (EDM), Fotoceram, and mechanical drilling is discussed. Measurements on orifice diameter control and jet trajectory accuracy are presented and discussed. Trajectory standard deviations are in the 4.6-10.0 milliradian range. Electroforming and EDM appear to have the greatest potential for Liquid Droplet Radiator applications. The direction of a future development effort is discussed.

  9. Pulsed Ejector Thrust Amplification Tested and Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jack

    2004-01-01

    There is currently much interest in pulsed detonation engines for aeronautical propulsion. This, in turn, has sparked renewed interest in pulsed ejectors to increase the thrust of such engines, since previous, though limited, research had indicated that pulsed ejectors could double the thrust in a short device. An experiment has been run at the NASA Glenn Research Center, using a shrouded Hartmann-Sprenger tube as a source of pulsed flow, to measure the thrust augmentation of a statistically designed set of ejectors. A Hartmann- Sprenger tube directs the flow from a supersonic nozzle (Mach 2 in the present experiment) into a closed tube. Under appropriate conditions, an oscillation is set up in which the jet flow alternately fills the tube and then spills around flow emerging from the tube. The tube length determines the frequency of oscillation. By shrouding the tube, the flow was directed out of the shroud as an axial stream. The set of ejectors comprised three different ejector lengths, three ejector diameters, and three nose radii. The thrust of the jet alone, and then of the jet plus ejector, was measured using a thrust plate. The arrangement is shown in this photograph. Thrust augmentation is defined as the thrust of the jet with an ejector divided by the thrust of the jet alone. The experiments exhibited an optimum ejector diameter and length for maximizing the thrust augmentation, but little dependence on nose radius. Different frequencies were produced by changing the length of the Hartmann-Sprenger tube, and the experiment was run at a total of four frequencies. Additional measurements showed that the major feature of the pulsed jet was a starting vortex ring. The size of the vortex ring depended on the frequency, as did the optimum ejector diameter.

  10. Bubble Formation at a Submerged Orifice for Aluminum Foams Produced by Gas Injection Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xueliu; Chen, Xiang; Liu, Xingnan; Zhang, Huiming; Li, Yanxiang

    2013-02-01

    The bubble formation at a submerged orifice in the process of aluminum foams produced by gas injection method is investigated. The experimental results show that the increase of the gas flow rate and the orifice diameter can lead to increasing of the bubble size. The large orifice can make the frequency of bubble formation decrease by slowing down the increase of the gas chamber pressure when the gas flow rate increases. The effect of the gas chamber volume on the bubble size can be ignored in the experiment when it expands from 1 to 125 cm3. A theoretical model of bubble formation, expansion, and detachment under constant flow conditions is established to predict the bubble size. The theoretical predictions for air-aluminum melt systems are consistent with the experimental results.

  11. Finite element modeling of pulsed eddy current NDT phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.; Ida, N.; Lord, W.

    1985-05-15

    Transient fields for nondestructive testing (pulsed eddy current methods) have been used experimentally for such applications as coating thickness measurements and the inspection of reactor fuel tubing. The lack of suitable models to facilitate understanding of the interaction of the pulsed field with the test specimen has hindered a wider acceptance of the method as a tool in NDT. Two models, based on the finite element technique are described. The first model, used for repetitive pulse train sources makes use of the Fourier series of the source current to solve a steady state problem for each significant harmonic. The harmonic solutions are then summed to produce the total EMF in the pickup coil. The second model is used for single pulse application. The response is calculated using an iterative time stepping solution. In both cases axisymmetric geometries are studied using a magnetic vector potential formulation. Solutions are compared with experimental results. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Quasi-One-Dimensional Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Christopher I.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the engine cycle of a pulse detonation rocket engine (PDRE), models for optimizing the performance of a PDRE, and the performance of PDREs in comparison to Solid State Rocket Engines (SSREs).

  13. Gaseous Nitrogen Orifice Mass Flow Calculator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritrivi, Charles

    2013-01-01

    The Gaseous Nitrogen (GN2) Orifice Mass Flow Calculator was used to determine Space Shuttle Orbiter Water Spray Boiler (WSB) GN2 high-pressure tank source depletion rates for various leak scenarios, and the ability of the GN2 consumables to support cooling of Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) lubrication during entry. The data was used to support flight rationale concerning loss of an orbiter APU/hydraulic system and mission work-arounds. The GN2 mass flow-rate calculator standardizes a method for rapid assessment of GN2 mass flow through various orifice sizes for various discharge coefficients, delta pressures, and temperatures. The calculator utilizes a 0.9-lb (0.4 kg) GN2 source regulated to 40 psia (.276 kPa). These parameters correspond to the Space Shuttle WSB GN2 Source and Water Tank Bellows, but can be changed in the spreadsheet to accommodate any system parameters. The calculator can be used to analyze a leak source, leak rate, gas consumables depletion time, and puncture diameter that simulates the measured GN2 system pressure drop.

  14. Force-displacement model for analysis of pulsed-GMAW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, Nabeel; Lee, Jae Hak; Yoo, Choong Don

    2009-02-01

    A force-displacement model (FDM) is introduced in this work to analyse pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW). The drop detaching criterion is established based on the displacement of the pendant drop instead of the previous force balance criterion. The displacement of the drop is calculated by integrating the acceleration of the drop, and the force exerted on the drop is predicted using the modified force balance model coupled with wire melting. When the peak current, base current and time of pulsed-GMAW are given, the peak time for the one-drop one-pulse condition is determined using the FDM. While the peak current has the most significant effect on drop detachment, the initial drop mass prior to the peak time also influences the drop transfer. The FDM is applied to the dc as well as pulsed-GMAW, and the calculated results show good agreement with the experimental data.

  15. Increasing pulse wave velocity in a realistic cardiovascular model does not increase pulse pressure with age

    PubMed Central

    Mohiuddin, Mohammad W.; Rihani, Ryan J.; Laine, Glen A.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of the well-documented increase in aortic pulse pressure (PP) with age is disputed. Investigators assuming a classical windkessel model believe that increases in PP arise from decreases in total arterial compliance (Ctot) and increases in total peripheral resistance (Rtot) with age. Investigators assuming a more sophisticated pulse transmission model believe PP rises because increases in pulse wave velocity (cph) make the reflected pressure wave arrive earlier, augmenting systolic pressure. It has recently been shown, however, that increases in cph do not have a commensurate effect on the timing of the reflected wave. We therefore used a validated, large-scale, human arterial system model that includes realistic pulse wave transmission to determine whether increases in cph cause increased PP with age. First, we made the realistic arterial system model age dependent by altering cardiac output (CO), Rtot, Ctot, and cph to mimic the reported changes in these parameters from age 30 to 70. Then, cph was theoretically maintained constant, while Ctot, Rtot, and CO were altered. The predicted increase in PP with age was similar to the observed increase in PP. In a complementary approach, Ctot, Rtot, and CO were theoretically maintained constant, and cph was increased. The predicted increase in PP was negligible. We found that increases in cph have a limited effect on the timing of the reflected wave but cause the system to degenerate into a windkessel. Changes in PP can therefore be attributed to a decrease in Ctot. PMID:22561301

  16. A simple expression for pressure drops of water and other low molecular liquids in the flow through micro-orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Tomiichi; Ushida, Akiomi; Narumi, Takatsune

    2015-12-01

    Flows are generally divided into two types: shear flows and shear-free elongational (extensional) flows. Both are necessary for a thorough understanding of the flow properties of a fluid. Shear flows are easy to achieve in practice, for example, through Poiseuille or Couette flows. Shear-free elongational flows are experimentally hard to achieve, resulting in an incomplete understanding of the flow properties of fluids in micro-devices. Nevertheless, flows through micro-orifices are useful for probing the properties of elongational flows at high elongational rates; although these flows exhibit shear and elongation, the elongation is dominant and the shear is negligible in the central region of the flows. We previously reported an anomalous reduction in pressure drops in the flows of water, a 50/50 mixture of glycerol and water, and silicone oils through micro-orifices. In the present paper, we rearrange the data presented in the previous paper and reveal a simple relationship where the pressure drop is proportional to the velocity through the micro-orifices, independent of the orifice diameter and the viscosity of the liquids tested. We explain our observations by introducing a "fluid element" model, in which fluid elements are formed on entering the orifice. The model is based on the idea that low molecular liquids, including water, generate strong elongational stress, similar to a polymer solution, in the flow through micro-orifices.

  17. Double-orifice mitral valve associated with atrioventricular canal defects

    PubMed Central

    Rhissassi, Jaafar; El Malki, Hicham; Benmessaoud, Fatima Azzahra; El Kandoussi, Tahar; Laaroussi, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    A 4 year-old male presented with effort dyspnea, and was diagnosed as atrioventricular canal defects. This finding was confirmed by open heart surgery, and a congenital double orifice mitral valve was discovered. The septal defect was closed but the double orifice mitral valve was respected because of the absence of hemodynamic disturbance. We report this case with review of literature. PMID:27347288

  18. Multiple-orifice liquid injection into hypersonic air streams.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    Review of oblique water and fluorocarbon injection test results obtained in experimental studies of the effects of multiple-orifice liquid injection into hypersonic air streams. The results include the finding that maximum lateral penetration from such injections increases linearly with the square root of the jet-to-freestream dynamic-pressure ratio and is proportional to an equivalent orifice diameter.

  19. A Simple Model of Pulsed Ejector Thrust Augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jack; Deloof, Richard L. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A simple model of thrust augmentation from a pulsed source is described. In the model it is assumed that the flow into the ejector is quasi-steady, and can be calculated using potential flow techniques. The velocity of the flow is related to the speed of the starting vortex ring formed by the jet. The vortex ring properties are obtained from the slug model, knowing the jet diameter, speed and slug length. The model, when combined with experimental results, predicts an optimum ejector radius for thrust augmentation. Data on pulsed ejector performance for comparison with the model was obtained using a shrouded Hartmann-Sprenger tube as the pulsed jet source. A statistical experiment, in which ejector length, diameter, and nose radius were independent parameters, was performed at four different frequencies. These frequencies corresponded to four different slug length to diameter ratios, two below cut-off, and two above. Comparison of the model with the experimental data showed reasonable agreement. Maximum pulsed thrust augmentation is shown to occur for a pulsed source with slug length to diameter ratio equal to the cut-off value.

  20. Wind tunnel investigation of an all flush orifice air data system for a large subsonic aircraft. [conducted in a Langley 8 foot transonic pressure tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, T. J.; Flechner, S. G.; Siemers, P. M., III

    1980-01-01

    The results of a wind tunnel investigation on an all flush orifice air data system for use on a KC-135A aircraft are presented. The investigation was performed to determine the applicability of fixed all flush orifice air data systems that use only aircraft surfaces for orifices on the nose of the model (in a configuration similar to that of the shuttle entry air data system) provided the measurements required for the determination of stagnation pressure, angle of attack, and angle of sideslip. For the measurement of static pressure, additional flush orifices in positions on the sides of the fuselage corresponding to those in a standard pitot-static system were required. An acceptable but less accurate system, consisting of orifices only on the nose of the model, is defined and discussed.

  1. A numerical and experimental investigation of the flow acceleration region proximal to an orifice.

    PubMed

    Anayiotos, A S; Perry, G J; Myers, J G; Green, D W; Fan, P H; Nanda, N C

    1995-01-01

    Attempts to quantify valvular regurgitation have recently been focused on the proximal orifice flow field. A complete description of the proximal orifice flow field is provided in this investigation. A steady state in vitro model accessible by both color Doppler ultrasound (CDU) and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) was utilized. Velocities for varying flow rates and orifices were calculated by finite element modeling (FEM), by LDV and by CDU. The steady flow model was composed of circular orifices of 3, 5 and 10 mm diameters at flow rates from 0.7 to 10 L/min. Regurgitant flow rates were calculated from the proximal CDU data by two separate methods. The first approach utilized angle corrected velocities while the second approach utilized only velocities which did not require angle correction (centerline velocities). Both methods correlated well with known flow rates (y = 0.97x -0.09, r = 0.98, SEE = 0.45, p < 0.0001; and y = 1.0x + 0.07, r = 0.99, SEE = 0.27, p < 0.0001, respectively) and were superior to results obtained by assuming a hemispherical geometry as is done in the aliasing technique. The methodology provides a complete analysis of the proximal flow field and involves fewer geometric assumptions than the aliasing approach. This may prove to be an advantage when analyzing in vivo flow fields with complex, uncertain geometry. PMID:7571143

  2. Flows through sequential orifices with heated spacer reservoirs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Stetz, T. T.

    1982-01-01

    Flow rates and pressure thermal profiles for two phase choked flows of fluid nitrogen were studied theoretically and experimentally in a four sequential orifice configuration. Both theory and experimental evidence demonstrate that heat addition in the first spacer-reservoir adjacent to the inlet orifice is most effective in reducing the flow rate and that heat addition in the last spacer-reservoir is least effective. The flows are choked at the exit orifice for large spacings and at the inlet orifice for small spacings. The moderate addition of heat available for this experiment did not materially alter this result for large spacings; however, significant heat addition for the small spacings tended to shift the choke point to the exit orifice. Nitrogen is used as the working fluid over a range of states from liquid to gas with a reduced inlet stagnation pressure range to P sub r, o = 2.

  3. Micro-Facet Scattering Model for Pulse Polarization Ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stryjewski, J.; Roggemann, M.; Tyler, D.; Hand, D.

    Determining the shape, material and orientation of nano-sats (satellites too small to image from the ground) requires new sensing approaches. Pulse Polarization Ranging (PPR) is one such approach that uses the polarization and shape characteristics of laser pulses reflected from satellites to determine satellite shape, orientation and material. We use an innovative approach to relate PPR measurements to actual satellite characteristics (shape, material and orientation), requiring that we have an accurate physical and dynamical model of the satellite. In particular, to determine the polarization characteristics (depolarization, birefringence, diattenuation) of the reflected pulses we need an accurate model of light scattering from real (complex) surfaces. To do this, we have extended the micro-facet model of Ashikhmin et al. to include retro-reflection and multiple scattering effects. In this presentation, we describe the scattering model and its efficient implementation using graphical processing units (GPUs).

  4. How to prevent venous cannula orifice obstruction during extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Sayed, S; Favre, J; von Segesser, L K

    2015-04-01

    Venous cannula orifice obstruction is an underestimated problem during augmented cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), which can potentially be reduced with redesigned, virtually wall-less cannula designs versus traditional percutaneous control venous cannulas. A bench model, allowing for simulation of the vena cava with various affluent orifices, venous collapse and a worst case scenario with regard to cannula position, was developed. Flow (Q) was measured sequentially for right atrial+hepatic+renal+iliac drainage scenarios, using a centrifugal pump and an experimental bench set-up (afterload 60 mmHg). At 1500, 2000 and 2500 RPM and atrial position, the Q values were 3.4, 6.03 and 8.01 versus 0.77*, 0.43* and 0.58* l/min: p<0.05* for wall-less and the Biomedicus® cannula, respectively. The corresponding pressure values were -15.18, -31.62 and -74.53 versus -46.0*, -119.94* and -228.13* mmHg. At the hepatic position, the Q values were 3.34, 6.67 and 9.26 versus 2.3*, 0.42* and 0.18* l/min; and the pressure values were -10.32, -20.25 and -42.83 versus -23.35*, -119.09* and -239.38* mmHg. At the renal position, the Q values were 3.43, 6.56 and 8.64 versus 2.48*, 0.41* and 0.22* l/min and the pressure values were -9.64, -20.98 and -63.41 versus -20.87 -127.68* and -239* mmHg, respectively. At the iliac position, the Q values were 3.43, 6.01 and 9.25 versus 1.62*, 0.55* and 0.58* l/min; the pressure values were -9.36, -33.57 and -44.18 versus -30.6*, -120.27* and -228* mmHg, respectivly. Our experimental evaluation demonstrates that the redesigned, virtually wall-less cannulas, allowing for direct venous drainage at practically all intra-venous orifices, outperform the commercially available control cannula, with superior flow at reduced suction levels for all scenarios tested. PMID:25416743

  5. Use of nose cap and fuselage pressure orifices for determination of air data for space shuttle orbiter below supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, T. J.; Siemers, P. M., III

    1980-01-01

    Wind tunnel pressure measurements were acquired from orifices on a 0.1 scale forebody model of the space shuttle orbiter that were arranged in a preliminary configuration of the shuttle entry air data system (SEADS). Pressures from those and auxiliary orifices were evaluated for their ability to provide air data at subsonic and transonic speeds. The orifices were on the vehicle's nose cap and on the sides of the forebody forward of the cabin. The investigation covered a Mach number range of 0.25 to 1.40 and an angle of attack range from 4 deg. to 18 deg. An air data system consisting of nose cap and forebody fuselage orifices constitutes a complete and accurate air data system at subsonic and transonic speeds. For Mach numbers less than 0.80 orifices confined to the nose cap can be used as a complete and accurate air data system. Air data systems that use only flush pressure orifices can be used to determine basic air data on other aircraft at subsonic and transonic speeds.

  6. Modeling of ultrashort pulse generation in mode-locked VECSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilen, I.; Koch, S. W.; Hader, J.; Moloney, J. V.

    2016-03-01

    We present a study of various models for the mode-locked pulse dynamics in a vertical external-cavity surface emitting laser with a saturable absorber. The semiconductor Bloch equations are used to model microscopically the light-matter interaction and the carrier dynamics. Maxwell's equations describe the pulse propagation. Scattering contributions due to higher order correlation effects are approximated using effective rates that are found from a comparison to solving the microscopic scattering equations on the second Born-Markov level. It is shown that the simulations result in the same mode-locked final state whether the system is initialized with a test pulse close to the final mode-locked pulse or the full field build-up from statistical noise is considered. The influence of the cavity design is studied. The longest pulses are found for a standard V-cavity while a linear cavity and a V-cavity with an high reflectivity mirror in the middle are shown to produce similar, much shorter pulses.

  7. Pulse

    MedlinePlus

    ... resting for at least 10 minutes. Take the exercise heart rate while you are exercising. ... pulse rate can help determine if the patient's heart is pumping. ... rate gives information about your fitness level and health.

  8. Modeling Escherichia coli removal in constructed wetlands under pulse loading.

    PubMed

    Hamaamin, Yaseen A; Adhikari, Umesh; Nejadhashemi, A Pouyan; Harrigan, Timothy; Reinhold, Dawn M

    2014-03-01

    Manure-borne pathogens are a threat to water quality and have resulted in disease outbreaks globally. Land application of livestock manure to croplands may result in pathogen transport through surface runoff and tile drains, eventually entering water bodies such as rivers and wetlands. The goal of this study was to develop a robust model for estimating the pathogen removal in surface flow wetlands under pulse loading conditions. A new modeling approach was used to describe Escherichia coli removal in pulse-loaded constructed wetlands using adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS). Several ANFIS models were developed and validated using experimental data under pulse loading over two seasons (winter and summer). In addition to ANFIS, a mechanistic fecal coliform removal model was validated using the same sets of experimental data. The results showed that the ANFIS model significantly improved the ability to describe the dynamics of E. coli removal under pulse loading. The mechanistic model performed poorly as demonstrated by lower coefficient of determination and higher root mean squared error compared to the ANFIS models. The E. coli concentrations corresponding to the inflection points on the tracer study were keys to improving the predictability of the E. coli removal model. PMID:24231031

  9. Model of Layered Weld Formation Under Narrow Gap Pulse Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krampit, A. G.

    2016-04-01

    The model parameters of narrow gap pulse welding can be divided into input, internal and output ones. The breadth of gap, that is, clearance breadth between upright edges is one of key parameters securing high quality of a weld joint. The paper presents theoretical outcomes for the model of layered weld formation under narrow gap pulse welding. Based on these studies is developed model of processes, which occur in the weld pool under pulse grove welding. It comprises the scheme of liquid metal motion in the weld pool, scheme of fusion with the side edge and in the bottom part, and the scheme of welding current impulse effect on the structure of a weld joint.

  10. Thor: Modeling of a Megabar Class Pulsed Power Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haill, T. A.; Reisman, D. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Austin, K. N.; Stygar, W. A.; Brown, J. L.; Davis, J.-P.; Waisman, E. M.

    2015-06-01

    Thor is a compact, economical machine to drive megabar-class shockless compression material physics experiments and multi-mega-ampere HEDP experiments for the physics community. It is capable of driving peak currents up to 7 MA with rise times of 200-500 ns, resulting in material pressures between 1 to 5 Mbar depending upon the load design, and incorporates a pulse tailoring capability required to maintain shockless loading of many materials. Thor is modular in nature with 200 capacitive bricks triggered in groups by independent, de-coupled switches. The current pulse at the load is a simple linear combination of the 200 time-shifted basis pulses. This enables a variety of experiments including shockless compression experiments using smooth ramped pulses, shock-ramp compression experiments using tailored pulses, and strength measurement experiments using flat top pulses. This paper overviews the Thor design and describes an equivalent circuit model of the machine that drives MHD simulations of the load region. 3D ALEGRA MHD simulations explore topics such as the uniformity of the magnetic field along the stripline load and the design modifications to improve uniformity. Optimized current drives and simulations of the aforementioned applications are also presented. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. DOE's NNSA under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. A numerical study on the effects of cavitation on orifice flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabiri, S.; Sirignano, W. A.; Joseph, D. D.

    2010-04-01

    Previous experimental studies have shown better atomization of sprays generated by high-pressure liquid injectors when cavitation occurs inside the nozzle. It has been proposed that the collapse of traveling cavitation bubbles increases the disturbances inside the liquid flow. These disturbances will later trigger the instabilities in the emerged jet and cause a shorter breakup distance. In this paper, effects of cavitation on increasing the disturbances in the flow through the orifice of an atomizer are studied. In previous cavitation models, spherical cavitation bubbles are considered. Here, the cavitation bubbles are allowed to deform as they travel through the orifice. Dynamics of the cavitation bubble, traveling in the separated shear layer in the orifice, is analyzed through a one-way coupling between the orifice flow and bubble dynamics. Effects of shear strain, normal strain, and pressure variation are examined. Three mechanisms are suggested that could be responsible for the increase in disturbances in the flow due to cavitation. These mechanisms are monopole, quadrupole, and vorticities generated during growth and collapse of cavitation bubbles. The effects of these mechanisms are estimated by postprocessing of the solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations to identify monopole and quadrupole behaviors.

  12. Orifice-induced pressure error studies in Langley 7- by 10-foot high-speed tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plentovich, E. B.; Gloss, B. B.

    1986-01-01

    For some time it has been known that the presence of a static pressure measuring hole will disturb the local flow field in such a way that the sensed static pressure will be in error. The results of previous studies aimed at studying the error induced by the pressure orifice were for relatively low Reynolds number flows. Because of the advent of high Reynolds number transonic wind tunnels, a study was undertaken to assess the magnitude of this error at high Reynolds numbers than previously published and to study a possible method of eliminating this pressure error. This study was conducted in the Langley 7- by 10-Foot High-Speed Tunnel on a flat plate. The model was tested at Mach numbers from 0.40 to 0.72 and at Reynolds numbers from 7.7 x 1,000,000 to 11 x 1,000,000 per meter (2.3 x 1,000,000 to 3.4 x 1,000,000 per foot), respectively. The results indicated that as orifice size increased, the pressure error also increased but that a porous metal (sintered metal) plug inserted in an orifice could greatly reduce the pressure error induced by the orifice.

  13. Increasing pulse wave velocity in a realistic cardiovascular model does not increase pulse pressure with age.

    PubMed

    Mohiuddin, Mohammad W; Rihani, Ryan J; Laine, Glen A; Quick, Christopher M

    2012-07-01

    The mechanism of the well-documented increase in aortic pulse pressure (PP) with age is disputed. Investigators assuming a classical windkessel model believe that increases in PP arise from decreases in total arterial compliance (C(tot)) and increases in total peripheral resistance (R(tot)) with age. Investigators assuming a more sophisticated pulse transmission model believe PP rises because increases in pulse wave velocity (c(ph)) make the reflected pressure wave arrive earlier, augmenting systolic pressure. It has recently been shown, however, that increases in c(ph) do not have a commensurate effect on the timing of the reflected wave. We therefore used a validated, large-scale, human arterial system model that includes realistic pulse wave transmission to determine whether increases in c(ph) cause increased PP with age. First, we made the realistic arterial system model age dependent by altering cardiac output (CO), R(tot), C(tot), and c(ph) to mimic the reported changes in these parameters from age 30 to 70. Then, c(ph) was theoretically maintained constant, while C(tot), R(tot), and CO were altered. The predicted increase in PP with age was similar to the observed increase in PP. In a complementary approach, C(tot), R(tot), and CO were theoretically maintained constant, and c(ph) was increased. The predicted increase in PP was negligible. We found that increases in c(ph) have a limited effect on the timing of the reflected wave but cause the system to degenerate into a windkessel. Changes in PP can therefore be attributed to a decrease in C(tot). PMID:22561301

  14. Pressure atomizer having multiple orifices and turbulent generation feature

    DOEpatents

    VanBrocklin, Paul G.; Geiger, Gail E.; Moran, Donald James; Fournier, Stephane

    2002-01-01

    A pressure atomizer includes a silicon plate having a top surface and a bottom surface. A portion of the top surface defines a turbulent chamber. The turbulent chamber is peripherally bounded by the top surface of the plate. The turbulent chamber is recessed a predetermined depth relative to the top surface. The silicon plate further defines at least one flow orifice. Each flow orifice extends from the bottom surface of the silicon plate to intersect with and open into the turbulent chamber. Each flow orifice is in fluid communication with the turbulent chamber.

  15. Double-orifice mitral valve treated by percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Thomas George; Revankar, Vinod Raghunath; Papanna, Monica; Srinivasan, Harshini

    2016-07-01

    Double-orifice mitral valve is an rare anomaly characterized by a mitral valve with a single fibrous annulus and 2 orifices that open into the left ventricle. It is often associated with other congenital anomalies, most commonly atrioventricular canal defects, and rarely associated with a stenotic or regurgitant mitral valve. A patient who was diagnosed with congenital double-orifice mitral valve with severe mitral stenosis was treated successfully by percutaneous balloon mitral valvotomy rather than the conventional open surgical approach, demonstrating the utility of percutaneous correction of this anomaly. PMID:26045488

  16. Modeling and simulation of ultra-short pulse amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflaum, Christoph; Hartmann, Rainer; Rahimi, Zhabiz

    2016-03-01

    Ultra-short pulses with high average power are required for a variety of technical and medical applications. Single, multi-pass, and regenerative amplifiers are used, in order to increase the power of ultra-short lasers. Typical laser crystals for such amplifiers include Ti:Sapphire or Yb:YAG laser crystals. Difficulties in the amplification of ultra-short pulses include gain narrowing effects and dispersion effects in the laser crystal. In particular, these complications arise, when a pulse stretcher is needed before amplification of the laser beam. We present a technique to model and simulate the amplification of ultra-short pulses. This technique allows to model both gain narrowing effects and decrease of beam quality caused by amplification of the laser beam. This requires a detailed 3-dimensional simulation of population inversion. Gain narrowing effects are taken into account by analyzing the gain of the spectrum of the laser beam. It is important to distinguish amplifiers with one or only two passes and a regenerative amplifier. These two different kind of amplifiers are modeled by different approaches. A regenerative amplifier is modeled by a set of time dependent rate equations. However, a single pass amplifier is modeled by a set of spatial dependent rate equations. In both cases, a system of rate equations arises from spectral discretization of the laser beam. Detailed simulation results are presented.

  17. Periodic cavitation shedding in a cylindrical orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, C.; Barber, T.; Milton, B.; Rosengarten, G.

    2011-11-01

    Cavitation structures in a large-scale ( D = 8.25 mm), plain orifice style nozzle within a unique experimental rig are investigated using high-speed visualisation and digital image processing techniques. Refractive index matching with an acrylic nozzle is achieved using aqueous sodium iodide for the test fluid. Cavitation collapse length, unsteady shedding frequency and spray angles are measured for cavitation conditions from incipient to supercavitation for a range of Reynolds numbers, for a fixed L/ D ratio of 4.85. Periodic cavitation shedding was shown to occur with frequencies between 500 and 2,000 Hz for conditions in which cavitation occupied less than 30% of the nozzle length. A discontinuity in collapse length was shown to occur once the cavitation exceeded this length, coinciding with a loss of periodic shedding. A mechanism for this behaviour is discussed. Peak spray angles of approximately θ ≈ 14° were recorded for supercavitation conditions indicating the positive influence of cavitation bubble collapse on the jet atomisation process.

  18. Quasi-One-Dimensional Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Christopher I.

    2003-01-01

    Pulse detonation rocket engines (PDREs) offer potential performance improvements over conventional designs, but represent a challenging modeling task. A quasi 1-D, finite-rate chemistry CFD model for a PDRE & described and implemented. A parametric study of the effect of blowdown pressure ratio on the performance of an optimized, fixed PDRE nozzle configuration is reported. The results are compared to a steady-state rocket system using similar modeling assumptions.

  19. State dependent model predictive control for orbital rendezvous using pulse-width pulse-frequency modulated thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Zhu, Zheng H.; Meguid, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper studies the pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation based trajectory planning for orbital rendezvous and proximity maneuvering near a non-cooperative spacecraft in an elliptical orbit. The problem is formulated by converting the continuous control input, output from the state dependent model predictive control, into a sequence of pulses of constant magnitude by controlling firing frequency and duration of constant-magnitude thrusters. The state dependent model predictive control is derived by minimizing the control error of states and control roughness of control input for a safe, smooth and fuel efficient approaching trajectory. The resulting nonlinear programming problem is converted into a series of quadratic programming problem and solved by numerical iteration using the receding horizon strategy. The numerical results show that the proposed state dependent model predictive control with the pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation is able to effectively generate optimized trajectories using equivalent control pulses for the proximity maneuvering with less energy consumption.

  20. Model for nonequilibrium segregation during pulsed laser annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R.F.

    1980-08-01

    Highly nonequilibrium thermodynamic processes occur during the ultrarapid recrystallization characteristic of pulsed laser annealing. Values of interface segregation coefficients are observed to differ from equilibrium values by as much as three orders of magnitude and equilibrium solubility limits may be exceeded by similar magnitudes. In this letter, a model is developed which accounts quantitatively for these effects.

  1. Acute inflammatory response to transgastric natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery peritoneoscopy: An experimental study in swine

    PubMed Central

    Rezende, Marcelo; Montero, Edna Frasson de Souza; Salomão, Reinaldo; Brunialti, Milena; Rodrigues, Rodrigo; Gomes, Gustavo; Libera, Alice Della; Ferrari, Angelo; Libera, Ermelindo Della

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of transgastric peritoneal access on plasma biomarkers of acute inflammatory response in comparison to laparoscopy. METHODS: This was a prospective and comparative study in a porcine model. Transgastric peritoneal access performed by natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery was compared with laparoscopy. Laparotomy and sham groups were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. Thirty-four pigs were assigned to receive transgastric natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (n = 12), laparoscopy (n = 8), laparotomy (n = 8) or a sham procedure involving only anesthesia (n = 6). In the natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery group, peritoneoscopy was performed with a gastroscope via transgastric access. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 1, 3, 6, 9 and 24 h after the surgical procedure for measurement of interleukins 1β, 6 and 10 and tumor necrosis factor-α. A complete blood count was performed, and C-reactive protein levels were measured at baseline and at 24 h. RESULTS: All surgical and endoscopic procedures were performed without major complications. Peritoneal cavity inventory showed no signs of peritonitis in any animal. Interleukin 1β, interleukin 10 and tumor necrosis factor-α levels were below the threshold of detection. The mean level of interleukin 6 was statistically significantly higher in the laparotomy group than in the other groups (p<0.05), with no significant differences among the sham, laparoscopy and natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery groups (p>0.05). C-reactive protein analysis indicated significant increases in all groups, with no differences among the groups. Complete blood count analysis showed no differences among the groups. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the observed interleukin 6 patterns, the systemic inflammatory response resulting from transgastric peritoneal access by natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery is similar in

  2. Numerical Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine Gasdynamics and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, C. I.

    2003-01-01

    Pulse detonation engines (PDB) have generated considerable research interest in recent years as a chemical propulsion system potentially offering improved performance and reduced complexity compared to conventional gas turbines and rocket engines. The detonative mode of combustion employed by these devices offers a theoretical thermodynamic advantage over the constant-pressure deflagrative combustion mode used in conventional engines. However, the unsteady blowdown process intrinsic to all pulse detonation devices has made realistic estimates of the actual propulsive performance of PDES problematic. The recent review article by Kailasanath highlights some of the progress that has been made in comparing the available experimental measurements with analytical and numerical models.

  3. 49 CFR 230.71 - Orifice testing of compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Compressor size Single strokes per minute Diameter of orifice(in inches) Air pressure maintained(in pounds... feet the speed of compressor may be increased 5 single strokes per minute for each 1,000 feet...

  4. 49 CFR 230.71 - Orifice testing of compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Compressor size Single strokes per minute Diameter of orifice(in inches) Air pressure maintained(in pounds... feet the speed of compressor may be increased 5 single strokes per minute for each 1,000 feet...

  5. ETF Facility evaporator skid orifice sizing design analysis

    SciTech Connect

    ELLINGSON, S.D.

    1999-08-31

    This document releases and records the design analysis for sizing the Orifice plate being installed on the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) evaporator skid per Engineering Change Notice (ECN) 651583.

  6. Stalled Pulsing Inertial Oscillation Model for a Tornadic Cyclone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costen, Robert C.

    2005-01-01

    A supercell storm is a tall, rotating thunderstorm that can generate hail and tornadoes. Two models exist for the development of the storm's rotation or mesocyclone - the conventional splitting-storm model, and the more recent pulsing inertial oscillation (PIO) model, in which a nonlinear pulse represents the supercell. Although data support both models and both could operate in the same supercell, neither model has satisfactorily explained the tornadic cyclone. A tornadic cyclone is an elevated vorticity concentration of Rossby number approximately 1000 that develops within the contracting mesocyclone shortly before a major tornado appears at the surface. We now show that if the internal temperature excess due to latent energy release is limited to the realistic range of -12 K to +12 K, the PIO model can stall part way through the pulse in a state of contraction and spin-up. Should this happen, the stalled-PIO model can evolve into a tornadic cyclone with a central pressure deficit that exceeds 40 mb, which is greater than the largest measured value. This simulation uses data from a major tornadic supercell that occurred over Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA, on May 3, 1999. The stalled-PIO mechanism also provides a strategy for human intervention to retard or reverse the development of a tornadic cyclone and its pendant tornado.

  7. Block-Based Neural Networks with Pulsed Neuron Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguchi, Syota; Koakutsu, Seiichi; Okamoto, Takashi; Hirata, Hironori

    In recent years, the study of hardware implementation of Neural Networks (NN) has been getting more important. In particular, Block-Based Neural Networks (BBNN) which are one of NN have been attracted attention. However, the conventional BBNN are analogue NN (ANN). The digital hardware implementation of ANN is very difficult, because the input and output signals are represented as analogue values. Pulsed Neural Networks (PNN) which adopt a pulsed neuron (PN) model instead of the AN model have been proposed in order to solve this problem. The input and output signals of PNN are represented as a series of pulses, and thus the digital hardware implementation of PNN becomes easy. In this paper, we propose Block-Based Pulsed Neural Networks (BBPNN) introducing the PN model into BBNN in order to faciliate the implementation of NN on digital hardware. We use particle swarm optimization (PSO) for optimization of weights of BBPNN, because PSO can produce a globally optimum solution of nonlinear continuous optimization problems in practicable calculation time by high accuracy. To evaluate the proposed BBPNN, we apply them to XOR problem and autonomous mobile robot control problems. Computational experiments indicate that the proposed BBPNN and the conventional BBNN can produce about the same results.

  8. Computational Modeling of Ultrafast Pulse Propagation in Nonlinear Optical Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorjian, Peter M.; Agrawal, Govind P.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    There is an emerging technology of photonic (or optoelectronic) integrated circuits (PICs or OEICs). In PICs, optical and electronic components are grown together on the same chip. rib build such devices and subsystems, one needs to model the entire chip. Accurate computer modeling of electromagnetic wave propagation in semiconductors is necessary for the successful development of PICs. More specifically, these computer codes would enable the modeling of such devices, including their subsystems, such as semiconductor lasers and semiconductor amplifiers in which there is femtosecond pulse propagation. Here, the computer simulations are made by solving the full vector, nonlinear, Maxwell's equations, coupled with the semiconductor Bloch equations, without any approximations. The carrier is retained in the description of the optical pulse, (i.e. the envelope approximation is not made in the Maxwell's equations), and the rotating wave approximation is not made in the Bloch equations. These coupled equations are solved to simulate the propagation of femtosecond optical pulses in semiconductor materials. The simulations describe the dynamics of the optical pulses, as well as the interband and intraband.

  9. Fabrication of small-orifice fuel injectors for diesel engines.

    SciTech Connect

    Woodford, J. B.; Fenske, G. R.

    2005-04-08

    Diesel fuel injector nozzles with spray hole diameters of 50-75 {micro}m have been fabricated via electroless nickel plating of conventionally made nozzles. Thick layers of nickel are deposited onto the orifice interior surfaces, reducing the diameter from {approx}200 {micro}m to the target diameter. The nickel plate is hard, smooth, and adherent, and covers the orifice interior surfaces uniformly.

  10. Computational modeling of ultra-short-pulse ablation of enamel

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.A.; Bailey, D.S.; Young, D.A.

    1996-02-29

    A computational model for the ablation of tooth enamel by ultra-short laser pulses is presented. The role of simulations using this model in designing and understanding laser drilling systems is discussed. Pulses of duration 300 sec and intensity greater than 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} are considered. Laser absorption proceeds via multi-photon initiated plasma mechanism. The hydrodynamic response is calculated with a finite difference method, using an equation of state constructed from thermodynamic functions including electronic, ion motion, and chemical binding terms. Results for the ablation efficiency are presented. An analytic model describing the ablation threshold and ablation depth is presented. Thermal coupling to the remaining tissue and long-time thermal conduction are calculated. Simulation results are compared to experimental measurements of the ablation efficiency. Desired improvements in the model are presented.

  11. Broadband spatiotemporal Gaussian Schell-model pulse trains.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Rahul; Korhonen, Minna; Friberg, Ari T; Genty, Göery; Turunen, Jari

    2014-03-01

    A new class of partially coherent model sources is introduced on the basis of the second-order coherence theory of nonstationary optical fields. These model sources are spatially fully coherent at each frequency but can have broadband spectra and variable spectral coherence properties, which lead to reduced spatiotemporal coherence in the time domain. The source model is motivated by the spectral coherence properties of supercontinuum pulse trains generated in single-spatial-mode optical fibers. We demonstrate that such broadband light is highly (but not completely) spatially coherent, even though the spectral and temporal coherence properties may vary over a wide range. The model sources introduced here are convenient in assessing the spatiotemporal coherence of broadband pulses in optical systems. PMID:24690663

  12. Advanced modeling techniques in application to plasma pulse treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashchenko, A. F.; Pashchenko, F. F.

    2016-06-01

    Different approaches considered for simulation of plasma pulse treatment process. The assumption of a significant non-linearity of processes in the treatment of oil wells has been confirmed. Method of functional transformations and fuzzy logic methods suggested for construction of a mathematical model. It is shown, that models, based on fuzzy logic are able to provide a satisfactory accuracy of simulation and prediction of non-linear processes observed.

  13. Apparatus for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice

    DOEpatents

    Flynn, P.L.; Giammarise, A.W.

    1995-02-21

    The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance to erosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice`s interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas. 2 figs.

  14. Modelling Multi-Pulse Population Dynamics from Ultrafast Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    van Wilderen, Luuk J. G. W.; Lincoln, Craig N.; van Thor, Jasper J.

    2011-01-01

    Current advanced laser, optics and electronics technology allows sensitive recording of molecular dynamics, from single resonance to multi-colour and multi-pulse experiments. Extracting the occurring (bio-) physical relevant pathways via global analysis of experimental data requires a systematic investigation of connectivity schemes. Here we present a Matlab-based toolbox for this purpose. The toolbox has a graphical user interface which facilitates the application of different reaction models to the data to generate the coupled differential equations. Any time-dependent dataset can be analysed to extract time-independent correlations of the observables by using gradient or direct search methods. Specific capabilities (i.e. chirp and instrument response function) for the analysis of ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopic data are included. The inclusion of an extra pulse that interacts with a transient phase can help to disentangle complex interdependent pathways. The modelling of pathways is therefore extended by new theory (which is included in the toolbox) that describes the finite bleach (orientation) effect of single and multiple intense polarised femtosecond pulses on an ensemble of randomly oriented particles in the presence of population decay. For instance, the generally assumed flat-top multimode beam profile is adapted to a more realistic Gaussian shape, exposing the need for several corrections for accurate anisotropy measurements. In addition, the (selective) excitation (photoselection) and anisotropy of populations that interact with single or multiple intense polarised laser pulses is demonstrated as function of power density and beam profile. Using example values of real world experiments it is calculated to what extent this effectively orients the ensemble of particles. Finally, the implementation includes the interaction with multiple pulses in addition to depth averaging in optically dense samples. In summary, we show that mathematical modelling is

  15. Pulsed pumping process optimization using a potential flow model.

    PubMed

    Tenney, C M; Lastoskie, C M

    2007-08-15

    A computational model is applied to the optimization of pulsed pumping systems for efficient in situ remediation of groundwater contaminants. In the pulsed pumping mode of operation, periodic rather than continuous pumping is used. During the pump-off or trapping phase, natural gradient flow transports contaminated groundwater into a treatment zone surrounding a line of injection and extraction wells that transect the contaminant plume. Prior to breakthrough of the contaminated water from the treatment zone, the wells are activated and the pump-on or treatment phase ensues, wherein extracted water is augmented to stimulate pollutant degradation and recirculated for a sufficient period of time to achieve mandated levels of contaminant removal. An important design consideration in pulsed pumping groundwater remediation systems is the pumping schedule adopted to best minimize operational costs for the well grid while still satisfying treatment requirements. Using an analytic two-dimensional potential flow model, optimal pumping frequencies and pumping event durations have been investigated for a set of model aquifer-well systems with different well spacings and well-line lengths, and varying aquifer physical properties. The results for homogeneous systems with greater than five wells and moderate to high pumping rates are reduced to a single, dimensionless correlation. Results for heterogeneous systems are presented graphically in terms of dimensionless parameters to serve as an efficient tool for initial design and selection of the pumping regimen best suited for pulsed pumping operation for a particular well configuration and extraction rate. In the absence of significant retardation or degradation during the pump-off phase, average pumping rates for pulsed operation were found to be greater than the continuous pumping rate required to prevent contaminant breakthrough. PMID:17350717

  16. Computer modeling of pulsed CO2 lasers for lidar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.

    1993-01-01

    The object of this effort is to develop code to enable the accurate prediction of the performance of pulsed transversely excited (TE) CO2 lasers prior to their construction. This is of particular benefit to the NASA Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) project. A benefit of the completed code is that although developed specifically for the pulsed CO2 laser much of the code can be modified to model other laser systems of interest to the lidar community. A Boltzmann equation solver has been developed which enables the electron excitation rates for the vibrational levels of CO2 and N2, together with the electron ionization and attachment coefficients to be determined for any CO2 laser gas mixture consisting of a combination of CO2, N2, CO, He and CO. The validity of the model has been verified by comparison with published material. The results from the Boltzmann equation solver have been used as input to the laser kinetics code which is currently under development. A numerical code to model the laser induced medium perturbation (LIMP) arising from the relaxation of the lower laser level has been developed and used to determine the effect of LIMP on the frequency spectrum of the LAWS laser output pulse. The enclosed figures show representative results for a laser operating at 0.5 atm. with a discharge cross-section of 4.5 cm to produce a 20 J pulse with aFWHM of 3.1 microns. The first four plots show the temporal evolution of the laser pulse power, energy evolution, LIMP frequency chirp and electric field magnitude. The electric field magnitude is taken by beating the calculated complex electric field and beating it with a local oscillator signal. The remaining two figures show the power spectrum and energy distribution in the pulse as a function of the varying pulse frequency. The LIMP theory has been compared with experimental data from the NOAA Windvan Lidar and has been found to be in good agreement.

  17. Creating Small Gas Bubbles in Flowing Mercury Using Turbulence at an Orifice

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Abdou, Ashraf A; Paquit, Vincent C; Felde, David K; Riemer, Bernie

    2010-01-01

    Pressure waves created in liquid mercury pulsed spallation targets have been shown to create cavitation damage to the target container. One way to mitigate such damage would be to absorb the pressure pulse energy into a dispersed population of small bubbles, however, creating such a population in mercury is difficult due to the high surface tension and particularly the non-wetting behavior of mercury on gas-injection hardware. If the larger injected gas bubbles can be broken down into small bubbles after they are introduced to the flow, then the material interface problem is avoided. Research at the Oak Ridge National Labarotory is underway to develop a technique that has shown potential to provide an adequate population of small-enough bubbles to a flowing spallation target. This technique involves gas injection at an orifice of a geometry that is optimized to the turbulence intensity and pressure distribution of the flow, while avoiding coalescence of gas at injection sites. The most successful geometry thus far can be described as a square-toothed orifice having a 2.5 bar pressure drop in the nominal flow of 12 L/s for one of the target inlet legs. High-speed video and high-resolution photography have been used to quantify the bubble population on the surface of the mercury downstream of the gas injection sight. Also, computational fluid dynamics has been used to optimize the dimensions of the toothed orifice based on a RANS computed mean flow including turbulent energies such that the turbulent dissipation and pressure field are best suited for turbulent break-up of the gas bubbles.

  18. Practitioner's guide to laser pulse propagation models and simulation. Numerical implementation and practical usage of modern pulse propagation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couairon, A.; Brambilla, E.; Corti, T.; Majus, D.; de J. Ramírez-Góngora, O.; Kolesik, M.

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide practical introduction into numerical modeling of ultrashort optical pulses in extreme nonlinear regimes. The theoretic background section covers derivation of modern pulse propagation models starting from Maxwell's equations, and includes both envelope-based models and carrier-resolving propagation equations. We then continue with a detailed description of implementation in software of Nonlinear Envelope Equations as an example of a mixed approach which combines finite-difference and spectral techniques. Fully spectral numerical solution methods for the Unidirectional Pulse Propagation Equation are discussed next. The modeling part of this guide concludes with a brief introduction into efficient implementations of nonlinear medium responses. Finally, we include several worked-out simulation examples. These are mini-projects designed to highlight numerical and modeling issues, and to teach numerical-experiment practices. They are also meant to illustrate, first and foremost for a non-specialist, how tools discussed in this guide can be applied in practical numerical modeling.

  19. Numerical Modelling of Pulse Combustor Tail Pipe Heat Transfer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyageswaran, Sridhar

    1994-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics analysis was used to perform multi-dimensional simulations of flow in a pulse combustor tail pipe. The tail pipe flow is complicated by periodic reversals amid large rates of turbulent heat transfer. The primary objectives were to understand the mechanisms causing heat transfer enhancement under pulsing flow conditions, and to develop a flow-based model capable of predicting heat transfer rates over a broad range of operating conditions. The experiments of Dec et al. (Combustion and Flame, 77, 80 and 83), in a square cross-section tail pipe, were used as the reference. The research focussed on modelling the near-wall turbulence transport, by treating the tail pipe as a two-dimensional channel. An experimental baseline pulsing case was simulated using the wall-function model, and an alternative near -wall turbulence model known as the Boundary Layer Wall Model. The latter uses an algebraically prescribed wall layer turbulence length scale, and allows much greater phase resolution between the near-wall and the bulk flow. Heat transfer predictions from these quasi-steady models compare poorly with the time-resolved measurements, and fail to match the observed increase in the instantaneous heat transfer during times of flow reversal. An unsteady wall layer model, with a robust prescription for the length scale damping factor, A^ {+}, was developed. Allowing A ^{+} to vary with the wall layer parameter, u^{+}p ^{+}, helps to model the effects of adverse and favourable pressure gradients on the wall layer turbulence during a pulsation cycle. A sequence of lag equations is also used, to incorporate the delayed response of the wall layer turbulence to the time-varying pressure gradient. Simulations of many operating conditions, spanning a range of pulsation frequencies, amplitudes and mean flow Reynolds numbers, indicate that the improved model is capable of capturing the essential trends observed by Dec et al.

  20. Computer modeling of pulsed CO2 lasers for lidar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.; Smithers, Martin E.; Murty, Rom

    1991-01-01

    The experimental results will enable a comparison of the numerical code output with experimental data. This will ensure verification of the validity of the code. The measurements were made on a modified commercial CO2 laser. Results are listed as following. (1) The pulse shape and energy dependence on gas pressure were measured. (2) The intrapulse frequency chirp due to plasma and laser induced medium perturbation effects were determined. A simple numerical model showed quantitative agreement with these measurements. The pulse to pulse frequency stability was also determined. (3) The dependence was measured of the laser transverse mode stability on cavity length. A simple analysis of this dependence in terms of changes to the equivalent fresnel number and the cavity magnification was performed. (4) An analysis was made of the discharge pulse shape which enabled the low efficiency of the laser to be explained in terms of poor coupling of the electrical energy into the vibrational levels. And (5) the existing laser resonator code was changed to allow it to run on the Cray XMP under the new operating system.

  1. Modeling of Multi-Tube Pulse Detonation Engine Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebrahimi, Houshang B.; Mohanraj, Rajendran; Merkle, Charles L.

    2001-01-01

    The present paper explores some preliminary issues concerning the operational characteristics of multiple-tube pulsed detonation engines (PDEs). The study is based on a two-dimensional analysis of the first-pulse operation of two detonation tubes exhausting through a common nozzle. Computations are first performed to assess isolated tube behavior followed by results for multi-tube flow phenomena. The computations are based on an eight-species, finite-rate transient flow-field model. The results serve as an important precursor to understanding appropriate propellant fill procedures and shock wave propagation in multi-tube, multi-dimensional simulations. Differences in behavior between single and multi-tube PDE models are discussed, The influence of multi-tube geometry and the preferred times for injecting the fresh propellant mixture during multi-tube PDE operation are studied.

  2. Transient analysis of single stage GM type double inlet pulse tube cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gujarati, P. B.; Desai, K. P.; Naik, H. B.; Atrey, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Transient analysis of single stage GM type double inlet pulse tube cryocooler is carried out using a one dimensional numerical model based on real gas properties of helium. The model solves continuity, momentum and energy equation for gas and solid to analyse the physical process occurring inside of the pulse tube cryocooler. Finite volume method is applied to discretize the governing equations with realistic initial and boundary conditions. Input data required for solving the model are the design data and operating parameters viz. pressure waveform from the compressor, regenerator matrix data, and system geometry including pulse tube, regenerator size and operating frequency for pulse tube cryocooler. The model investigates the effect of orifice opening, double inlet opening, pressure ratio, system geometry on no load temperature and refrigeration power at various temperatures for different charging pressure. The results are compared with experimental data and reasonable agreement is observed. The model can further be extended for designing two stage pulse tube cryocooler.

  3. Modeling of Pulses in Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Celestin, Sebastien; Pasko, Victor

    2015-04-01

    Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) are high-energy photon bursts originating from the Earth's atmosphere that are associated with lightning activities. After their discovery in 1994 by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) detector aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory [Fishman et al., Science, 264, 1313, 1994], this phenomenon has been further observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) [Smith et al., Science, 307, 1085, 2005], the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope [Briggs et al., JGR, 115, A07323, 2010] and the Astrorivelatore Gamma a Immagini Leggero (AGILE) satellite [Marisaldi et al., JGR, 115, A00E13, 2010]. Photon spectra corresponding to the mechanism of relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREAs) usually provide a very good agreement with satellite observations [Dwyer and Smith, GRL, 32, L22804, 2005]. On the other hand, Celestin and Pasko [JGR, 116, A03315, 2011] have shown theoretically that the large flux of thermal runaway electrons generated by streamers during the negative corona flash stage of stepping lightning leaders in intracloud lightning flashes could be responsible for TGFs. Recently, based on analysis of the temporal profiles of 278 TGF events observed by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor, Foley et al. [JGR, 119, 5931, 2014] have suggested that 67% of TGF pulses detected are asymmetric and these asymmetric pulses are consistent with the production mechanism of TGFs by relativistic feedback discharges. In the present work, we employ a Monte Carlo model to study the temporal distribution of photons at low-orbit satellite altitudes during TGF events. Using the pulse fitting method described in [Foley et al., 2014], we further investigate the characteristics of TGF pulses. We mainly focus on the effects of Compton scattering on the symmetry properties and the rise and fall times of TGF pulses.

  4. Process for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice

    DOEpatents

    Flynn, P.L.; Giammarise, A.W.

    1991-10-29

    The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance to erosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice's interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas. 2 figures.

  5. Apparatus for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice

    DOEpatents

    Flynn, Paul L.; Giammarise, Anthony W.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance to erosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice's interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas.

  6. Process for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice

    DOEpatents

    Flynn, Paul L.; Giammarise, Anthony W.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance toerosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice's interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas.

  7. The effect of mitral orifice eccentricity on the left ventricular hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Trung; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the left ventricular hemodynamics using high resolution Direct Numerical Simulation. The LV geometry is reconstructed from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data of a healthy volunteer. The diastolic kinematics of the LV wall is modelled using a cell-based electrical activation methodology, which yields global left-heart motion parameters well within the physiologic range of an adult. By prescribing the kinematics and the physiologic mitral valve waveform, numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the intraventricular flow patterns during the diastolic filling. The results show that the intraventricular flow is dominated by the formation and breakdown of a vortex ring originating from the mitral orifice. The eccentricity of the mitral orifice is found to be the determining factor controlling the dynamics of vortex formation and rotational flow patterns at the end of diastole. This work was supported by NIH Grant RO1-HL-07262 and the Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  8. Study of subcritical flow through multiple-orifice valves

    SciTech Connect

    Surbey, D.W.; Kelkar, B.G.; Brill, J.P.

    1988-02-01

    Increased oil and gas production from offshore areas and hostile environments has led to a greater use of multiple-orifice-valve (MOV) wellhead chokes. Unlike conventional wellhead chokes, MOV's can be adjusted to any given choke area while under pressure, allowing wells in remote locations to be controlled from a central site. Data on the behavior of multiphase flow through MOV chokes have not been available in the past. This study investigated high-pressure (400 to 800 psia (2.8 to 5.5 MPa)), two-phase air/water flow through a 2-in. (5.1-cm) MOV choke. Single-phase air and water data were obtained to determine the valve-sizing coefficient, C/sub v/. A correlating parameter was determined with two-phase data to predict the subcritical two-phase pressure drop. This parameter was found to be a function of the gas/liquid ratio, upstream pressure, and choke opening. A mathematical model based on experimental observations was developed to predict the subcritical pressure drop across the choke for single-phase liquid flow.

  9. An analysis of Freedman's "image pulse" model in air.

    PubMed

    Tsakiris, J; McKerrow, P

    2000-10-01

    The "image pulse" model developed by Freedman calculates the echoes generated from convex objects in an underwater environment after insonification with a narrow-band transient signal. The model uses the source radiation and the solid angle subtended at the transducer by the scattering body to determine the echo structure. Work has been completed in adapting this model for use in an air environment using noncoincident transmitters and receivers. Experiments were conducted to measure the amplitudes of the echoes off a range of convex objects, at distances up to 1.4 m, after insonification with a Polaroid transducer. These measured amplitudes were compared to those predicted by the model, with the results for cones highlighting the limitations of the model. Spheres, however, performed significantly better, with an average error of under 5%, indicating that the model should be reasonably accurate at calculating the echoes off convex objects with a smoothly varying surface. PMID:11051488

  10. Impact of the QPO models on the pulse profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varniere, P.; Vincent, F. H.

    2015-12-01

    Quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) are an important probe of the timing properties of black-hole binaries. Many models are proposed in order to account for these features and it is difficult to differentiate them with current data. Here we aim to look at the actual pulse profile from each model in order to see how they could be differentiated and what kind of sources are the best targets for such a test. We consider three classes of simple models: elongated hot spots, tori and spirals. We perturb the equilibrium temperature of a thin disk to create these structures. The perturbed disk is supposed to emit blackbody radiation at the local temperature. Radiation is ray-traced in the Schwarzschild metric to a distant observer. We study the dependency with the source inclination of the pulse profile for different frequencies for these three models. The departure from a pure sinusoid of certain models at high inclination will be visible in the power density spectra by a higher presence of harmonics. In particular, hot spots and spirals lead to a (complete or partial) harmonic series which is lacking for a radially oscillating tori. We conclude that analyzing the first harmonics of the dominant power density spectrum peak for high-inclination sources is an interesting probe and it might make it possible to differentiate between axisymmetric (tori) and non-axisymmetric (hotspots and spirals) models.

  11. Modeling of High-Energy Pulsed Laser Interactions with Coupons

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C D; Rubenchik, A M

    2003-02-06

    We describe a computational model of laser-materials interactions in the regime accessed by the solid state heat capacity lasers (SSHCLs) built at LLNL. We show that its predictions compare quite favorably with coupon experiments by the 10 kW SSHCL at LLNL. The body of this paper describes the following topics, listed by section number: (2) model in quiescent air, (3) comparison with experiments in quiescent air, (4) effects of air flow, (5) comparison with experiments involving air flow, (6) importance of material properties, (7) advantage of pulsed lasers over CW lasers, and (8) conclusions and recommendations.

  12. Model of pulse extraction from a copper laser amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C.D.; Warner, B.E.

    1997-03-01

    A computational model of pulse propagation through a copper laser amplifier has been developed. The model contains a system of 1-D (in the axial direction), time-dependent equations for the laser intensity and amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), coupled to rate equations for the atomic levels. Detailed calculations are presented for a high-power amplifier at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The extracted power agrees with experiment near saturation. At lower input power the calculation overestimates experiment, probably because of increased ASE effects. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Numerical study of liquid-hydrogen droplet generation from a vibrating orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Celik, D.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2005-08-01

    Atomic hydrogen propellant feed systems for far-future spacecraft may utilize solid-hydrogen particle carriers for atomic species that undergo recombination to create hot rocket exhaust. Such technology will require the development of particle generation techniques. One such technique could involve the production of hydrogen droplets from a vibrating orifice that would then freeze in cryogenic helium vapor. Among other quantities, the shape and size of the droplet are of particular interest. The present paper addresses this problem within the framework of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for multiphase flows, in order to unravel the basic mechanisms of droplet formation with a view to control them. Surface tension, one of the most important mechanisms to determine droplet shape, is modeled as the source term in the momentum equation. Droplet shape is tracked using a volume-of-fluid approach. A dynamic meshing technique is employed to accommodate the vibration of the generator orifice. Numerically predicted droplet shapes show satisfactory agreement with photographs of droplets generated in experiments. A parametric study is carried out to understand the influence of injection velocity, nozzle vibrational frequency, and amplitude on the droplet shape and size. The computational model provides a definitive qualitative picture of the evolution of droplet shape as a function of the operating parameters. It is observed that, primarily, the orifice vibrational frequency affects the shape, the vibrational amplitude affects the time until droplet detachment from the orifice, and the injection velocity affects the size. However, it does not mean that, for example, there is no secondary effect of amplitude on shape or size.

  14. Theoretical transport modeling of Ohmic cold pulse experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsey, J. E.; Waltz, R. E.; St. John, H. E.

    1998-11-01

    The response of several theory-based transport models in Ohmically heated tokamak discharges to rapid edge cooling due to trace impurity injection is studied. Results are presented for the Institute for Fusion Studies—Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (IFS/PPPL), gyro-Landau-fluid (GLF23), Multi-mode (MM), and the Itoh-Itoh-Fukuyama (IIF) transport models with an emphasis on results from the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT) [K. W. Gentle, Nucl. Technol./Fusion 1, 479 (1981)]. It is found that critical gradient models containing a strong ion and electron temperature ratio dependence can exhibit behavior that is qualitatively consistent with experimental observation while depending solely on local parameters. The IFS/PPPL model yields the strongest response and demonstrates both rapid radial pulse propagation and a noticeable increase in the central electron temperature following a cold edge temperature pulse (amplitude reversal). Furthermore, the amplitude reversal effect is predicted to diminish with increasing electron density and auxiliary heating in agreement with experimental data. An Ohmic pulse heating effect due to rearrangement of the current profile is shown to contribute to the rise in the core electron temperature in TEXT, but not in the Joint European Tokamak (JET) [A. Tanga and the JET Team, in Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1986 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1987), Vol. 1, p. 65] and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [R. J. Hawryluk, V. Arunsalam, M. G. Bell et al., in Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1986 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1987), Vol. 1, p. 51]. While this phenomenon is not necessarily a unique signature of a critical gradient, there is sufficient evidence suggesting that the apparent plasma response to edge cooling may not require any underlying nonlocal mechanism and may be explained within the context of the intrinsic properties of electrostatic drift

  15. Static pressure orifice system testing method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culotta, R. F.; Posey, D. L. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus are presented for pressure testing the static pressure orifices and associated connections used in wind tunnels. A cylindrical module, having in one end an open hemispherical calibration pressure chamber separated from and surrounded by an annular vacuum chamber is placed over the orifice of the system to be tested. O-rings ensure seating and a vacuum seal between the chambered end of the module and the surface around the orifice: one O-ring separates the outer chamber from the outside environment. Ports lead from each of the chambers out the other end of the module to tubes connected to a control box consisting of calibration pressure and vacuum supply lines, bleeder valves, and gauges.

  16. Effect of nonsymmetrical flow resistance upon orifice impedance resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posey, J. W.; Compton, K. J.

    1974-01-01

    A nonreactive orifice in an infinite baffle is analyzed. The pressure difference delta across the orifice varies sinusoidally with amplitude 1.0 and average value -P. The orifice resistance, delta p is discontinuous at zero velocity and exhibits the constant values R sub + and R sub - for u 0 and u 0, respectively. The resultant velocity has power in all harmonics of the excitation frequency. A quasi-linear resistance is defined and found to be relatively insensitive to the presence or absence of a resonant backing cavity; however, it does vary from 1.33 R sub + to 0.67 R sub + for a resistance ratio R sub +/R sub - between 0.5 and 2.0.

  17. Discharging Through an Orifice Determines Steam-Water Enthalpy

    SciTech Connect

    James, Russell

    1987-01-20

    A wide range of steam-water mixtures was discharged to the atmosphere through a 10.7 mm diameter orifice which was sharp-edged with a minuscule throat pressure tapping. The ratio of throat pressure to up-stream pressure was found sensitive to dryness fraction over the whole range studied from 0.03 to 1.0. The technique (employing large orifices) has the potential of identifying the unknown enthalpy of geothermal wells discharging large flows. Contrariwise, a nozzle (rounded entry orifice) was found remarkably _insensitive_ over most of the dryness range and hence is useless for such determinations; however, it can be used to measure the flow-rate when enthalpy is known. 2 figs., 7 refs.

  18. Extension of an exponential light-curve gamma-ray burst pulse model across energy bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemiroff, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    A simple mathematical model of gamma-ray burst(GRB) pulses in time, suggested by Norris et al., is extended across energy. For a class of isolated pulses, two fit parameters appear to be effectively independent of energy. Specifically, statistical fits indicate that pulse amplitude A and pulse width τ are energy dependent, while pulse start time and pulse shape are effectively energy independent. These results bolster the pulse start and pulse scale conjectures of Nemiroff and add a new pulse shape conjecture which states that a class of pulses all have the same shape. The simple resulting pulse counts model is P(t, E) =A(E) exp[ -t/τ(E) -τ(E)/t], where t is the time since the start of the pulse. This pulse model is found to be an acceptable statistical fit to many of the fluent separable Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) pulses listed by Norris et al. Even without theoretical interpretation, this cross-energy extension may be immediately useful for fitting prompt emission from GRB pulses across energy channels with a minimal number of free parameters.

  19. Traveling Pulses for a Two-Species Chemotaxis Model.

    PubMed

    Emako, Casimir; Gayrard, Charlène; Buguin, Axel; Neves de Almeida, Luís; Vauchelet, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Mathematical models have been widely used to describe the collective movement of bacteria by chemotaxis. In particular, bacterial concentration waves traveling in a narrow channel have been experimentally observed and can be precisely described thanks to a mathematical model at the macroscopic scale. Such model was derived in [1] using a kinetic model based on an accurate description of the mesoscopic run-and-tumble process. We extend this approach to study the behavior of the interaction between two populations of E. Coli. Separately, each population travels with its own speed in the channel. When put together, a synchronization of the speed of the traveling pulses can be observed. We show that this synchronization depends on the fraction of the fast population. Our approach is based on mathematical analysis of a macroscopic model of partial differential equations. Numerical simulations in comparison with experimental observations show qualitative agreement. PMID:27071058

  20. Traveling Pulses for a Two-Species Chemotaxis Model

    PubMed Central

    Emako, Casimir; Gayrard, Charlène; Buguin, Axel; Neves de Almeida, Luís; Vauchelet, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical models have been widely used to describe the collective movement of bacteria by chemotaxis. In particular, bacterial concentration waves traveling in a narrow channel have been experimentally observed and can be precisely described thanks to a mathematical model at the macroscopic scale. Such model was derived in [1] using a kinetic model based on an accurate description of the mesoscopic run-and-tumble process. We extend this approach to study the behavior of the interaction between two populations of E. Coli. Separately, each population travels with its own speed in the channel. When put together, a synchronization of the speed of the traveling pulses can be observed. We show that this synchronization depends on the fraction of the fast population. Our approach is based on mathematical analysis of a macroscopic model of partial differential equations. Numerical simulations in comparison with experimental observations show qualitative agreement. PMID:27071058

  1. Acoustic response of a rectangular levitator with orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Raheb, Michael; Wagner, Paul

    1990-01-01

    The acoustic response of a rectangular cavity to speaker-generated excitation through waveguides terminating at orifices in the cavity walls is analyzed. To find the effects of orifices, acoustic pressure is expressed by eigenfunctions satisfying Neumann boundary conditions as well as by those satisfying Dirichlet ones. Some of the excess unknowns can be eliminated by point constraints set over the boundary, by appeal to Lagrange undetermined multipliers. The resulting transfer matrix must be further reduced by partial condensation to the order of a matrix describing unmixed boundary conditions. If the cavity is subjected to an axial temperature dependence, the transfer matrix is determined numerically.

  2. Phenomenological Model of Current Sheet Canting in Pulsed Electromagnetic Accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markusic, Thomas; Choueiri, E. Y.

    2003-01-01

    The phenomenon of current sheet canting in pulsed electromagnetic accelerators is the departure of the plasma sheet (that carries the current) from a plane that is perpendicular to the electrodes to one that is skewed, or tipped. Review of pulsed electromagnetic accelerator literature reveals that current sheet canting is a ubiquitous phenomenon - occurring in all of the standard accelerator geometries. Developing an understanding of current sheet canting is important because it can detract from the propellant sweeping capabilities of current sheets and, hence, negatively impact the overall efficiency of pulsed electromagnetic accelerators. In the present study, it is postulated that depletion of plasma near the anode, which results from axial density gradient induced diamagnetic drift, occurs during the early stages of the discharge, creating a density gradient normal to the anode, with a characteristic length on the order of the ion skin depth. Rapid penetration of the magnetic field through this region ensues, due to the Hall effect, leading to a canted current front ahead of the initial current conduction channel. In this model, once the current sheet reaches appreciable speeds, entrainment of stationary propellant replenishes plasma in the anode region, inhibiting further Hall-convective transport of the magnetic field; however, the previously established tilted current sheet remains at a fairly constant canting angle for the remainder of the discharge cycle, exerting a transverse J x B force which drives plasma toward the cathode and accumulates it there. This proposed sequence of events has been incorporated into a phenomenological model. The model predicts that canting can be reduced by using low atomic mass propellants with high propellant loading number density; the model results are shown to give qualitative agreement with experimentally measured canting angle mass dependence trends.

  3. A neuron model of stochastic resonance using rectangular pulse trains.

    PubMed

    Danziger, Zachary; Grill, Warren M

    2015-02-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is the enhanced representation of a weak input signal by the addition of an optimal level of broadband noise to a nonlinear (threshold) system. Since its discovery in the 1980s the domain of input signals shown to be applicable to SR has greatly expanded, from strictly periodic inputs to now nearly any aperiodic forcing function. The perturbations (noise) used to generate SR have also expanded, from white noise to now colored noise or vibrational forcing. This study demonstrates that a new class of perturbations can achieve SR, namely, series of stochastically generated biphasic pulse trains. Using these pulse trains as 'noise' we show that a Hodgkin Huxley model neuron exhibits SR behavior when detecting weak input signals. This result is of particular interest to neuroscience because nearly all artificial neural stimulation is implemented with square current or voltage pulses rather than broadband noise, and this new method may facilitate the translation of the performance gains achievable through SR to neural prosthetics. PMID:25186655

  4. Numerically Modeling Pulsed-Current, Kinked Wire Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filbey, Gordon; Kingman, Pat

    1999-06-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has embarked on a program to provide far-term land fighting vehicles with electromagnetic armor protection. Part of this work seeks to establish robust simulations of magneto-solid-mechanics phenomena. Whether describing violent rupture of a fuse link resulting from a large current pulse or the complete disruption of a copper shaped-charge jet subjected to high current densities, the simulations must include effects of intense Lorentz body forces and rapid Ohmic heating. Material models are required that describe plasticity, flow and fracture, conductivity, and equation of state (EOS) parameters for media in solid, liquid, and vapor phases. An extended version of the Eulerian wave code CTH has been used to predict the apex motion of a V-shaped (``kinked'') copper wire 3mm in diameter during a 400 kilo-amp pulse. These predictions, utilizing available material, EOS, and conductivity data for copper and the known characteristics of an existing capacitor-bank pulsed power supply, were then used to configure an experiment. The experiments were in excellent agreement with the prior simulations. Both computational and experimental results (including electrical data and flash X-rays) will be presented.

  5. A Neuron Model of Stochastic Resonance Using Rectangular Pulse Trains

    PubMed Central

    Danziger, Zachary; Grill, Warren M

    2014-01-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is the enhanced representation of a weak input signal by the addition of an optimal level of broadband noise to a nonlinear (threshold) system. Since its discovery in the 1980s the domain of input signals shown to be applicable to SR has greatly expanded, from strictly periodic inputs to now nearly any aperiodic forcing function. The perturbations (noise) used to generate SR have also expanded, from white noise to now colored noise or vibrational forcing. This study demonstrates that a new class of perturbations can achieve SR, namely, series of stochastically generated biphasic pulse trains. Using these pulse trains as ‘noise’ we show that a Hodgkin Huxley model neuron exhibits SR behavior when detecting weak input signals. This result is of particular interest to neuroscience because nearly all artificial neural stimulation is implemented with square current or voltage pulses rather than broadband noise, and this new method may facilitate the translation of the performance gains achievable through SR to neural prosthetics. PMID:25186655

  6. Effect of nozzle orifice geometry on spray, combustion, and emission characteristics under diesel engine conditions.

    SciTech Connect

    Som, S.; Longman, D. E; Ramirez, A. I.; Aggarwal, S. K.

    2011-03-01

    Diesel engine performance and emissions are strongly coupled with fuel atomization and spray processes, which in turn are strongly influenced by injector flow dynamics. Modern engines employ micro-orifices with different orifice designs. It is critical to characterize the effects of various designs on engine performance and emissions. In this study, a recently developed primary breakup model (KH-ACT), which accounts for the effects of cavitation and turbulence generated inside the injector nozzle is incorporated into a CFD software CONVERGE for comprehensive engine simulations. The effects of orifice geometry on inner nozzle flow, spray, and combustion processes are examined by coupling the injector flow and spray simulations. Results indicate that conicity and hydrogrinding reduce cavitation and turbulence inside the nozzle orifice, which slows down primary breakup, increasing spray penetration, and reducing dispersion. Consequently, with conical and hydroground nozzles, the vaporization rate and fuel air mixing are reduced, and ignition occurs further downstream. The flame lift-off lengths are the highest and lowest for the hydroground and conical nozzles, respectively. This can be related to the rate of fuel injection, which is higher for the hydroground nozzle, leading to richer mixtures and lower flame base speeds. A modified flame index is employed to resolve the flame structure, which indicates a dual combustion mode. For the conical nozzle, the relative role of rich premixed combustion is enhanced and that of diffusion combustion reduced compared to the other two nozzles. In contrast, for the hydroground nozzle, the role of rich premixed combustion is reduced and that of non-premixed combustion is enhanced. Consequently, the amount of soot produced is the highest for the conical nozzle, while the amount of NOx produced is the highest for the hydroground nozzle, indicating the classical tradeoff between them.

  7. 2-D Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of A Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Cassibry, J. T.; Wu, S. T.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Experiments are being performed on the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) MK-1 pulsed plasma thruster. Data produced from the experiments provide an opportunity to further understand the plasma dynamics in these thrusters via detailed computational modeling. The detailed and accurate understanding of the plasma dynamics in these devices holds the key towards extending their capabilities in a number of applications, including their applications as high power (greater than 1 MW) thrusters, and their use for producing high-velocity, uniform plasma jets for experimental purposes. For this study, the 2-D MHD modeling code, MACH2, is used to provide detailed interpretation of the experimental data. At the same time, a 0-D physics model of the plasma initial phase is developed to guide our 2-D modeling studies.

  8. 49 CFR 230.71 - Orifice testing of compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Orifice testing of compressors. 230.71 Section 230.71 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS...

  9. 49 CFR 230.71 - Orifice testing of compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Orifice testing of compressors. 230.71 Section 230.71 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS...

  10. 49 CFR 230.71 - Orifice testing of compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Orifice testing of compressors. 230.71 Section 230.71 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS...

  11. Sound generation by steady flow through glottis-shaped orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoyan; Mongeau, Luc; Frankel, Steven H.; Thomson, Scott; Park, Jong Beom

    2004-09-01

    Although the signature of human voice is mostly tonal, it also includes a significant broadband component. Quadrupolelike sources due to turbulence in the region downstream of the glottis, and dipolelike sources due to the force applied by the vocal folds onto the surrounding fluid are the two primary broadband sound generating mechanisms. In this study, experiments were conducted to characterize the broadband sound emissions of confined stationary jets through rubber orifices formed to imitate the approximate shape of the human glottis at different stages during one cycle of vocal fold vibrations. The radiated sound pressure spectra downstream of the orifices were measured for varying flow rates, orifice shapes, and gas mixtures. The nondimensional sound pressure spectra were decomposed into the product of three functions: a source function F, a radiation efficiency function M, and an acoustic response function G. The results show that, as for circular jets, the quadrupole source contributions dominated for straight and convergent orifices. For divergent jets, whistling tonal sounds were emitted at low flow rates. At high flow rates for the same geometry, dipole contributions dominated the sound radiated by free jets. However, possible source-load acoustic feedback may have hampered accurate source identification in confined flows.

  12. Sound generation by steady flow through glottis-shaped orifices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaoyan; Mongeau, Luc; Frankel, Steven H; Thomson, Scott; Park, Jong Beom

    2004-09-01

    Although the signature of human voice is mostly tonal, it also includes a significant broadband component. Quadrupolelike sources due to turbulence in the region downstream of the glottis, and dipolelike sources due to the force applied by the vocal folds onto the surrounding fluid are the two primary broadband sound generating mechanisms. In this study, experiments were conducted to characterize the broadband sound emissions of confined stationary jets through rubber orifices formed to imitate the approximate shape of the human glottis at different stages during one cycle of vocal fold vibrations. The radiated sound pressure spectra downstream of the orifices were measured for varying flow rates, orifice shapes, and gas mixtures. The nondimensional sound pressure spectra were decomposed into the product of three functions: a source function F, a radiation efficiency function M, and an acoustic response function G. The results show that, as for circular jets, the quadrupole source contributions dominated for straight and convergent orifices. For divergent jets, whistling tonal sounds were emitted at low flow rates. At high flow rates for the same geometry, dipole contributions dominated the sound radiated by free jets. However, possible source-load acoustic feedback may have hampered accurate source identification in confined flows. PMID:15478439

  13. Experimental Investigation of Cavitation Induced Feedline Instability from an Orifice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hitt, Matthew A.; Lineberry, David M.; Ahuja, Vineet; Frederick, Robert A,

    2012-01-01

    This paper details the results of an experimental investigation into the cavitation instabilities created by a circular orifice conducted at the University of Alabama in Huntsville Propulsion Research Center. This experiment was conducted in concert with a computational simulation to serve as a reference point for the simulation. Testing was conducted using liquid nitrogen as a cryogenic propellant simulant. A 1.06 cm diameter thin orifice with a rounded inlet was tested in an approximately 1.25 kg/s flow with inlet pressures ranging from 504.1 kPa to 829.3 kPa. Pressure fluctuations generated by the orifice were measured using a high frequency pressure sensor located 0.64 tube diameters downstream of the orifice. Fast Fourier Transforms were performed on the high frequency data to determine the instability frequency. Shedding resulted in a primary frequency with a cavitation related subharmonic frequency. For this experiment, the cavitation instability ranged from 153 Hz to 275 Hz. Additionally, the strength of the cavitation occur red as a function of cavitation number. At lower cavitation numbers, the strength of the cavitation instability ranged from 2.4 % to 7 % of the inlet pressure. However, at higher cavitation numbers, the strength of the cavitation instability ranged from 0.6 % to 1 % of the inlet pressure.

  14. Axisymmetric Numerical Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Christopher I.

    2005-01-01

    Pulse detonation rocket engines (PDREs) have generated research interest in recent years as a chemical propulsion system potentially offering improved performance and reduced complexity compared to conventional rocket engines. The detonative mode of combustion employed by these devices offers a thermodynamic advantage over the constant-pressure deflagrative combustion mode used in conventional rocket engines and gas turbines. However, while this theoretical advantage has spurred considerable interest in building PDRE devices, the unsteady blowdown process intrinsic to the PDRE has made realistic estimates of the actual propulsive performance problematic. The recent review article by Kailasanath highlights some of the progress that has been made in comparing the available experimental measurements with analytical and numerical models. In recent work by the author, a quasi-one-dimensional, finite rate chemistry CFD model was utilized to study the gasdynamics and performance characteristics of PDREs over a range of blowdown pressure ratios from 1-1000. Models of this type are computationally inexpensive, and enable first-order parametric studies of the effect of several nozzle and extension geometries on PDRE performance over a wide range of conditions. However, the quasi-one-dimensional approach is limited in that it cannot properly capture the multidimensional blast wave and flow expansion downstream of the PDRE, nor can it resolve nozzle flow separation if present. Moreover, the previous work was limited to single-pulse calculations. In this paper, an axisymmetric finite rate chemistry model is described and utilized to study these issues in greater detail. Example Mach number contour plots showing the multidimensional blast wave and nozzle exhaust plume are shown. The performance results are compared with the quasi-one-dimensional results from the previous paper. Both Euler and Navier-Stokes solutions are calculated in order to determine the effect of viscous

  15. In-flight investigation of shuttle tile pressure orifice installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moes, Timothy R.; Meyer, Robert R., Jr.

    1990-09-01

    To determine shuttle orbiter wing loads during ascent, wing load instrumentation was added to Columbia (OV-102). This instrumentation included strain gages and pressure orifices on the wing. The loads derived from wing pressure measurements taken during STS 61-C did not agree with those derived from strain gage measurements or with the loads predicted from the aerodynamic database. Anomalies in the surface immediately surrounding the pressure orifices in the thermal protection system (TPS) tiles were one possible cause of errors in the loads derived from wing pressure measurements. These surface anomalies were caused by a ceramic filler material which was installed around the pressure tubing. The filler material allowed slight movement of the TPS tile and pressure tube as the airframe flexed and bent under aerodynamic loads during ascent and descent. Postflight inspection revealed that this filler material had protruded from or receeded beneath the surface, causing the orifice to lose its flushness. Flight tests were conducted at NASA Ames Research Center Dryden Flight Research Facility to determine the effects of any anomaly in surface flushness of the orifice installation on the measured pressures at Mach numbers between 0.6 and 1.4. An F-104 aircraft with a flight test fixture mounted beneath the fuselage was used for these flights. Surface flushness anomalies typical of those on the orbiter after flight (STA 61-C) were tested. Also, cases with excessive protrusion and recession of the filler material were tested. This report shows that the anomalies in STS 61-C orifice installations adversely affected the pressure measurements. But the magnitude of the affect was not great enough to account for the discrepancies with the strain gage measurements and the aerodynamic predictions.

  16. In-flight investigation of shuttle tile pressure orifice installations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moes, Timothy R.; Meyer, Robert R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    To determine shuttle orbiter wing loads during ascent, wing load instrumentation was added to Columbia (OV-102). This instrumentation included strain gages and pressure orifices on the wing. The loads derived from wing pressure measurements taken during STS 61-C did not agree with those derived from strain gage measurements or with the loads predicted from the aerodynamic database. Anomalies in the surface immediately surrounding the pressure orifices in the thermal protection system (TPS) tiles were one possible cause of errors in the loads derived from wing pressure measurements. These surface anomalies were caused by a ceramic filler material which was installed around the pressure tubing. The filler material allowed slight movement of the TPS tile and pressure tube as the airframe flexed and bent under aerodynamic loads during ascent and descent. Postflight inspection revealed that this filler material had protruded from or receeded beneath the surface, causing the orifice to lose its flushness. Flight tests were conducted at NASA Ames Research Center Dryden Flight Research Facility to determine the effects of any anomaly in surface flushness of the orifice installation on the measured pressures at Mach numbers between 0.6 and 1.4. An F-104 aircraft with a flight test fixture mounted beneath the fuselage was used for these flights. Surface flushness anomalies typical of those on the orbiter after flight (STA 61-C) were tested. Also, cases with excessive protrusion and recession of the filler material were tested. This report shows that the anomalies in STS 61-C orifice installations adversely affected the pressure measurements. But the magnitude of the affect was not great enough to account for the discrepancies with the strain gage measurements and the aerodynamic predictions.

  17. Numerical Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine Gasdynamics and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on the numerical modeling of pulse detonation rocket engines (PDRE), with an emphasis on the Gasdynamics and performance analysis of these engines. The topics include: 1) Performance Analysis of PDREs; 2) Simplified PDRE Cycle; 3) Comparison of PDRE and Steady-State Rocket Engines (SSRE) Performance; 4) Numerical Modeling of Quasi 1-D Rocket Flows; 5) Specific PDRE Geometries Studied; 6) Time-Accurate Thrust Calculations; 7) PDRE Performance (Geometries A B C and D); 8) PDRE Blowdown Gasdynamics (Geom. A B C and D); 9) PDRE Geometry Performance Comparison; 10) PDRE Blowdown Time (Geom. A B C and D); 11) Specific SSRE Geometry Studied; 12) Effect of F-R Chemistry on SSRE Performance; 13) PDRE/SSRE Performance Comparison; 14) PDRE Performance Study; 15) Grid Resolution Study; and 16) Effect of F-R Chemistry on SSRE Exit Species Mole Fractions.

  18. Modelling hot electron generation in short pulse target heating experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircombe, N. J.; Hughes, S. J.

    2013-11-01

    Target heating experiments planned for the Orion laser facility, and electron beam driven fast ignition schemes, rely on the interaction of a short pulse high intensity laser with dense material to generate a flux of energetic electrons. It is essential that the characteristics of this electron source are well known in order to inform transport models in radiation hydrodynamics codes and allow effective evaluation of experimental results and forward modelling of future campaigns. We present results obtained with the particle in cell (PIC) code EPOCH for realistic target and laser parameters, including first and second harmonic light. The hot electron distributions are characterised and their implications for onward transport and target heating are considered with the aid of the Monte-Carlo transport code THOR.

  19. A stochastic model for DNA electrotransfer with finite pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Miao; Lin, Hao

    2011-11-01

    Gene electrotransfer is a non-viral method to introduce foreign DNA into cells using electric fields. The fundamental mechanism for DNA transfer is unknown and under debate. While previous research investigated the role of DNA-membrane interaction and endocytosis, we here explore electrophoresis as a possible mechanism to assist translocation. In this model, DNA strands are treated as long-chain polymers driven through pores on the cell membrane by applied electric fields. A stochastic model is constructed, and solved numerically to parametrically study the time process of DNA translocation. Numerical results indicate that there exists an optimal pulse length beyond which DNA delivery probability no longer increases. The optimal length correlates inversely with applied field strength, and increases nonlinearly with DNA length. The results show good agreement with data from both solid-state nano-pore and electroporation experiments, and suggest that electrophoresis may play a key role in electroporation-mediated gene delivery.

  20. Modelling of pulsed and steady-state DEMO scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giruzzi, G.; Artaud, J. F.; Baruzzo, M.; Bolzonella, T.; Fable, E.; Garzotti, L.; Ivanova-Stanik, I.; Kemp, R.; King, D. B.; Schneider, M.; Stankiewicz, R.; Stępniewski, W.; Vincenzi, P.; Ward, D.; Zagórski, R.

    2015-07-01

    Scenario modelling for the demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) has been carried out using a variety of simulation codes. Two DEMO concepts have been analysed: a pulsed tokamak, characterized by rather conventional physics and technology assumptions (DEMO1) and a steady-state tokamak, with moderately advanced physics and technology assumptions (DEMO2). Sensitivity to impurity concentrations, radiation, and heat transport models has been investigated. For DEMO2, the impact of current driven non-inductively by neutral beams has been studied by full Monte Carlo simulations of the fast ion distribution. The results obtained are a part of a more extensive research and development (R&D) effort carried out in the EU in order to develop a viable option for a DEMO reactor, to be adopted after ITER for fusion energy research.

  1. Using Cox cluster processes to model latent pulse location patterns in hormone concentration data.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Nichole E; Grunwald, Gary K; Johnson, Timothy D

    2016-04-01

    Many hormones, including stress hormones, are intermittently secreted as pulses. The pulsatile location process, describing times when pulses occur, is a regulator of the entire stress system. Characterizing the pulse location process is particularly difficult because the pulse locations are latent; only hormone concentration at sampled times is observed. In addition, for stress hormones the process may change both over the day and relative to common external stimuli. This potentially results in clustering in pulse locations across subjects. Current approaches to characterizing the pulse location process do not capture subject-to-subject clustering in locations. Here we show how a Bayesian Cox cluster process may be adapted as a model of the pulse location process. We show that this novel model of pulse locations is capable of detecting circadian rhythms in pulse locations, clustering of pulse locations between subjects, and identifying exogenous controllers of pulse events. We integrate our pulse location process into a model of hormone concentration, the observed data. A spatial birth-and-death Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm is used for estimation. We exhibit the strengths of this model on simulated data and adrenocorticotropic and cortisol data collected to study the stress axis in depressed and non-depressed women. PMID:26553914

  2. ARTICLES: Thermohydrodynamic models of the interaction of pulse-periodic radiation with matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutyunyan, R. V.; Baranov, V. Yu; Bol'shov, Leonid A.; Malyuta, D. D.; Mezhevov, V. S.; Pis'mennyĭ, V. D.

    1987-02-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations were made of the processes of drilling and deep melting of metals by pulsed and pulse-periodic laser radiation. Direct photography of the surface revealed molten metal splashing due to interaction with single CO2 laser pulses. A proposed thermohydrodynamic model was used to account for the experimental results and to calculate the optimal parameters of pulse-periodic radiation needed for deep melting. The melt splashing processes were simulated numerically.

  3. Laboratory modeling of pulsed regimes of electron cyclotron instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubev, S. V.; Mansfeld, D. A.; Viktorov, M. E.; Izotov, I. V.; Vodopyanov, A. V.; Demekhov, A. G.; Shalashov, A. G.

    2012-04-01

    propagating in the rarefied plasma across the external magnetic field. We have been able to explain the generation mechanism of the sequences of pulsed precipitations at the nonlinear instability growth phase in terms of a cyclotron maser model in which the instability threshold is exceeded through a reduction in electromagnetic energy losses characteristic of the plasma decay. The conditions in the decaying plasma resemble those in auroral plasma cavities and similar systems, and in this case electromagnetic waves with quasi-perpendicular propagation direction are excited.

  4. Order of Orifices: Sequence of Condom Use and Ejaculation by Orifice during Anal Intercourse among Women, Implications for HIV Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Gorbach, Pamina M.; Pines, Heather; Javanbakht, Marjan; Weiss, Robert E.; Jeffries, Robin; Cranston, Ross D.; Fuchs, Edward J; Hezerah, Marjan; Brown, Stephen; Voskanian, Alen; Anton, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background For women the order of penile insertion, condom use, and ejaculation by orifice during sexual events affects the probability of HIV transmission and design of HIV prevention methods. Methods From October 2006-June 2009, 431 women in Los Angeles and Baltimore in a rectal health study reported the sequence of penile insertion, condom use, and ejaculation by orifice location by computer assisted self-interview. Multinomial logistic regression identified predictors of condom use by orifice among women who reported vaginal intercourse (VI) during their last anal intercourse (AI) event. Results Of the 192 reporting on a last AI event, 96.3% (180/187) reported VI. Of these, 83.1% had VI before AI; 66.1% reported ejaculation during VI and 45.2% during AI. Only one third used a condom for both VI and AI, less than 10% for VI only or AI only; and half used no condoms. After adjusting for race, partner type, and substance use, compared to women who used condoms for both VI and AI at last AI, being older (units=5 years) (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=0.76, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.60, 0.96), with serodiscordant partners (AOR=0.22, 95% CI: 0.08, 0.61) and HIV-positive with seroconcordant partners (AOR = 0.15; 95% CI: 0.04, 0.54) were inversely associated with non-condom use. Conclusions For most of the women in our study VI accompanied AI, with AI usually occurring after VI. This evidence for use of multiple orifices during the same sexual encounter and low use of condoms across orifices supports the need for a multi-compartment HIV prevention strategy. PMID:25356778

  5. Modeling pulsed-laser melting of embedded semiconductor nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, C.A.; Guzman, J.; Boswell-Koller, C.N.; Sherburne, M.P.; Mastandrea, J.P.; Bustillo, K.C.; Ager III, J.W.; Haller, E.E.; Chrzan, D.C.

    2011-05-18

    Pulsed-laser melting (PLM) is commonly used to achieve a fast quench rate in both thin films and nanoparticles. A model for the size evolution during PLM of nanoparticles confined in a transparent matrix, such as those created by ion-beam synthesis, is presented. A self-consistent mean-field rate equations approach that has been used successfully to model ion beam synthesis of germanium nanoparticles in silica is extended to include the PLM process. The PLM model includes classical optical absorption, multiscale heat transport by both analytical and finite difference methods, and melting kinetics for confined nanoparticles. The treatment of nucleation and coarsening behavior developed for the ion beam synthesis model is modified to allow for a non-uniform temperature gradient and for interacting liquid and solid particles with different properties. The model allows prediction of the particle size distribution after PLM under various laser fluences, starting from any particle size distribution including as-implanted or annealed simulated samples. A route for narrowing the size distribution of embedded nanoparticles is suggested, with simulated distribution widths as low as 15% of the average size.

  6. Hydrodynamical modeling of laser drilling with short and ultrashort pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruf, Andreas; Breitling, Detlef; Berger, Peter; Dausinger, Friedrich; Huegel, Helmut

    2003-11-01

    This contribution examines the basic concepts and results of two laser ablation models based on commercially available hydrodynamical codes. In both cases the different material phases are described continuously by a single numerical algorithm. The first approach uses a finite-element model for the simultaneous description of solid and melt. It is thereby particularly suited for the description of melt formation and ejection. The results indicate a slow acceleration of the melt during the laser pulse up to velocities of some 10m/s followed by a rather steady-going ejection which is finally cut off by the resolidification. Although it was possible to examine this expulsion process, the model showed considerable numerical stability problems for higher intensities and the ultrasonic vapor expansion cannot be included. To overcome these shortages another model is proposed which is based on an equation of state for the target material in combination with a special pressure-based solver. Besides the continuous description of the material states, it also includes a continuous treatment of the beam propagation and energy coupling by solving Maxwell's equations. Although the work on this model is still going on, some of its basic prospects and limitations can already be discussed.

  7. Vortex structures in turbulent channel flow behind an orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Soichiro; Iwamoto, Kaoru; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2006-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation of a channel flow with an orifice has been performed for Reτ0=10 - 600, where uτ0 is the friction velocity calculated from the mean pressure gradient, δ the channel half width and ν the kinematic viscosity. In the wake region, the mean flow becomes asymmetric by the Coanda effect. The degree of asymmetry increases with increasing the Reynolds number for the laminar flow at Reτ0< 50. The degree decreases abruptly at Reτ0=50, where the transition from the laminar to the turbulent flow take places. Large-scale spanwise vortices generated at the orifice edges. They become deformed and break up into disordered small-scale structures in shear layer. The small-scale vortices are convected towards the channel center. The large-scale vortices have an important effect upon the reattachment locations and streamwise vortices near the wall in the wake region.

  8. Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES): implications for anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) has recently evolved as a novel approach for abdominal surgery with great potential to further improve the advantages of laparoscopy over laparotomy. The first patients undergoing NOTES cholecystectomy or appendectomy reported no or only minimal pain, required no narcotic analgesics, and were discharged early from the hospital and immediately resumed daily activities. If this is confirmed by randomized controlled clinical trials, what are the potential implications for anesthesia? PMID:20948698

  9. Inspection of Ureteral Orifices: The Pearl of Flexible Cystoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Charmaine; Bushra, Hamid; Das, Sanjay; Pettersson, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cystoscopy is most common diagnostic investigation. The examination technique and the findings, both normal and pathological, were well described described a hundred years ago. With technological advances, there has been over-emphasis on imaging modalities for diagnostic purposes. A basic maneuver of examining the ureteral orifices is sometimes rushed through when in fact careful examination can clinch the diagnosis. The importance is exemplified by two cases, one of which is a rare case of Xanthoma of the ureter.

  10. Standards for discharge measurement with standardized nozzles and orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1940-01-01

    The following standards give the standardized forms for two throttling devices, standard nozzles and standard orifices, and enable them to be used in circular pipes without calibration. The definition of the standards are applicable in principle to the calibration and use of nonstandardized throttling devices, such as the venturi tube. The standards are valid, likewise, as a basis for discharge measurements in the German acceptance standards.

  11. Experimental Visualization of Bubble Formation from an Orifice In Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, C.; Iacona, E.; Foldes, I. B.; Suner, G.; Milburn, C.

    2002-01-01

    The formation of air bubbles injected into a stagnant, isothermal liquid in microgravity through an orifice was studied. The bubbles grew very large in microgravity. They attained a nearly spherical shape and showed pronounced affinity towards coalescence in the absence of electric fields and other perturbations. Under the influence of electric fields, periodic detachment was observed, with bubble sizes larger than in terrestrial conditions. The bubble shape was elongated. After detachment, the bubbles moved away from the electrode at which they formed without coalescing with other bubbles. Experimental data on bubble shape and size at detachment showed good agreement with models.

  12. Sonic injection through diamond orifices into a hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Huaiguo

    The objective for the present study was to experimentally characterize the performance of diamond shaped injectors for hypersonic flow applications. First, an extensive literature review was performed. Second, a small scale Mach 5.0 wind tunnel facility was installed. Third, a detailed experimental parametric investigation of sonic injection through a diamond orifice (five incidence angles and three momentum ratios) and a circular injector (three momentum ratios) into the Mach 5.0 freestream was performed. Also, the use of downstream plume vorticity control ramps was investigated. Fourth, a detailed analysis of the experimental data to characterize and model the flow for the present range of conditions was achieved. The experimental techniques include surface oil flow visualization, Mie-Scattering flow visualization, particle image velocimetry (PIV), shadowgraph photograph, and a five-hole mean flow probe. The results show that the diamond injectors have the potential to produce attached shock depending on the incidence angle and jet momentum ratio. For example, the incidence angles less than or equal to 45° at J = 0.43 generated attached interaction shocks. The attached shock produced reduced total pressure loss (drag for scramjet) and eliminated potential hot spots, associated with the upstream flow separation. The jet interaction shock angle increased with jet incidence angle and momentum ratio due to increased penetration and flow disturbances. The plume penetration and cross-sectional area increased with incidence angle and momentum ratio. The increased jet interaction shock angle and strength produced increased total pressure loss, jet interaction force and total normal force. The characteristic kidney bean shaped plume was not discernable from the diamond injectors indicating increased effectiveness for film cooling applications. A vorticity generation ramp increased the penetration of the plume and the plume shape was indicative of higher levels of

  13. Numerical Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine Gasdynamics And Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Christopher I.

    2004-01-01

    Pulse detonation rocket engines (PDREs) offer potential performance improvements over conventional designs, but represent a challenging modeling task. A quasi-1-D, finite-rate chemistry computational fluid dynamics model for PDREs is described and implemented. Four different PDRE geometries are evaluated in this work: a baseline detonation tube, a detonation tube with a straight extension, and a detonation tube with two types of converging-diverging (C-D) nozzles. The effect of extension length and C-D nozzle area ratio on the single-shot gasdynamics and performance of a PDRE is studied over a wide range of blowdown pressure ratios (1-1000). The results indicate that a C-D nozzle is generally more effective than a straight extension in improving PDRE performance, particularly at higher pressure ratios. Additionally, the results show that the blowdown process of the C-D nozzle systems could be beneficially cut off well before the pressure at the end-wall reaches the ambient value. The performance results are also compared to a steady-state rocket system using similar modeling assumptions.

  14. High energy pulsed inductive thruster modeling operating with ammonia propellant

    SciTech Connect

    Mikellides, Pavlos G.; Villarreal, James K.

    2007-11-15

    Numerical modeling of the pulsed inductive thruster operating with ammonia propellant at high energy levels, utilized a time-dependent, two-dimensional, and axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamics code to provide bilateral validation of experiment and theory and offer performance insights for improved designs. The power circuit model was augmented by a plasma voltage algorithm that accounts for the propellant's time-dependent resistance and inductance to properly account for plasma dynamics and was verified using available analytic solutions of two idealized plasma problems. Comparisons of the predicted current waveforms to experimental data exhibited excellent agreement for the initial half-period, essentially capturing the dominant acceleration phase. Further validation proceeded by comparisons of the impulse for three different energy levels, 2592, 4050, and 4608 J and a wide range of propellant mass values. Predicted impulse captured both trends and magnitudes measured experimentally for nominal operation. Interpretation of the modeling results in conjunction to experimental observations further confirm the critical mass phenomenon beyond which efficiency degrades due to elevated internal energy mode deposition and anomalous operation.

  15. Maximizing the rigidity of a large planar orifice air bearing.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Michael; Broadhurst, John

    2014-08-01

    A rotating support for a large astronomical mirror has been implemented using an opposed surface planar orifice air bearing. This bearing needs to provide rotation as free as possible of static and dynamic friction, as well as maximizing the resistance to sudden angular deviations produced by wind gusts. Information on the design of traditional bearings, namely, a cavity supplied with air under pressure through an orifice or diffuser flow restriction and closed by the moving member, has been published in detail. These traditional bearings are not suitable for the application described, due to their slow speed of response to transient changes in forces, a considerable volume of air being needed to change the pressure in the cavity. The air bearing used in this application has no cavity but consists of two flat surfaces in close proximity with air under pressure introduced at the center of one of the surfaces. The volume of air in the bearing is therefore minimized, improving the response to load change transients. The load capacity of this type bearing is reduced as the air between the bearing surfaces is not at constant pressure, but is expanding from the center point of injection to its escape at the edges. This paper indicates a quantitative method of determining the size of the air supply orifices to achieve the maximum rigidity orthogonal to the direction of motion. The approach described can also be applied to optimizing the geometry of other non-cavity air bearings. PMID:25173317

  16. Observational Study On Thermal Flow And Condensation Of Injecting Steam From Various Submerged Orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamei, Shuya; Hirata, Masaru

    1983-03-01

    It has been recognized that the steam accumulator plays an important role as one of thermal energy storage system and was used at hospitals, hotels and food factories in recent years. Experiments have been carried out to investigate direct contact condensation of saturated steam into a quiescent subcooled water environment. They were performed for subcooling from 20 - 70°C, for atmospheric pressure, and for various type of orifice ( single-orifice, multi-orifice and porous-disc-orifice ). The phenomena were observed by means of high speed shadowgraphy using a rotating prism camera. The phenomena were also visualized by techniques of liquid crystal using a still camera. The effect of bulk temperature in a water tank and the difference among a single-orifice, a multi-orifice and porous-disc-orifice were discussed and good predictive results for the visualization of thermal flow in a quiescent subcooled water environment were obtained.

  17. Stimulated LIF studied using pulsed digital holography and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amer, Eynas; Stenvall, Jonas; Gren, Per; Sjödahl, Mikael

    2013-04-01

    A frequency tripled Q-switched Nd-YAG laser (wavelength 355 nm, pulse duration 12 ns) has been used to pump Coumarin 153 dye solved in ethanol. The laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrum has been recorded using a spectrometer at different dye concentrations. The frequency doubled 532 nm beam from the same laser is used as a probe beam to pass through the excited volume of the dye. Because of stimulated emission an increase of the probe (532 nm) beam energy is recorded and a reduction of the spontaneous fluorescence spectrum intensity is observed. A model was developed that approaches the trend of the gain as a function of the probe beam energy at low dye concentrations (less than 0.08 g/L). The stimulated LIF is further recorded using digital holography. Digital holograms were recorded for different dye concentrations using collimated laser light (532 nm) passed through the dye volume. Two holograms without and with the UV laser beam were recorded. Intensity maps were calculated from the recorded digital holograms and are used to calculate the gain of the green laser beam due to the stimulated fluorescence emission which is coupled to the dye concentration. The gain of the coherent 532 nm beam is seen in the intensity maps and its value is about 40% for a dye concentration of 0.32 g/L and decreases with the decrease of the dye concentration. The results show that pulsed digital holography can be coupled to the stimulated LIF effect for imaging fluorescent species.

  18. Magnetized plasma flow through a small orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, J. P.

    2001-03-01

    Deuterium plasma flow through a circular hole in a flat conducting plate is simulated by the two-dimensional object-oriented particle-in-cell code (XOOPIC) [J. P. Verboncoeur, A. B. Langdon, and N. T. Gladd, Comp. Phys. Comm. 87, 199 (1995)]. A constant magnetic field is oriented perpendicular to the plate surface, and parallel to the cylindrical axis of the hole. Charge neutralization on the interior surface of the hole leads to attenuation of the ion current throughput. The attenuation is stronger than would be expected from a finite Larmor radius model, due to acceleration of ions by the self-consistent radial electric field. The current attenuation has been measured by comparing two Langmuir probes that were operated simultaneously under a wide range of plasma conditions in Tore Supra [Equipe Tore Supra, IAEA-CN-64/02-2, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, p. I-41 (1996)]. One probe was exposed directly to the plasma and the other was hidden behind a graphite shield pierced with either 3 or 4 mm diameter holes. Both the ion current attenuation and the floating potential drop are in reasonable agreement with the simulation results.

  19. Computational modeling of laser-plasma interactions: pulse self-modulation and energy transfer between intersecting laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Kupfer, Rotem; Barmashenko, Boris; Bar, Ilana

    2013-07-01

    The nonlinear interaction of intense femtosecond laser pulses with a self-induced plasma channel in air and the energy transfer between two intersecting laser pulses were simulated using the finite-difference time-domain particle-in-cell method. Implementation of a simple numerical code enabled modeling of various phenomena, including pulse self-modulation in the spatiotemporal and spectral domains, conical emission, and energy transfer between two intersecting laser beams. The mechanism for energy transfer was found to be related to a plasma waveguide array induced by Moiré patterns of the interfering electric fields. The simulation results provide a persuasive replication and explanation of previous experimental results, when carried out under comparable physical conditions, and lead to prediction of others. This approach allows us to further examine the effect of the laser and plasma parameters on the simulation results and to investigate the underlying physics. PMID:23944583

  20. Computational modeling of laser-plasma interactions: Pulse self-modulation and energy transfer between intersecting laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupfer, Rotem; Barmashenko, Boris; Bar, Ilana

    2013-07-01

    The nonlinear interaction of intense femtosecond laser pulses with a self-induced plasma channel in air and the energy transfer between two intersecting laser pulses were simulated using the finite-difference time-domain particle-in-cell method. Implementation of a simple numerical code enabled modeling of various phenomena, including pulse self-modulation in the spatiotemporal and spectral domains, conical emission, and energy transfer between two intersecting laser beams. The mechanism for energy transfer was found to be related to a plasma waveguide array induced by Moiré patterns of the interfering electric fields. The simulation results provide a persuasive replication and explanation of previous experimental results, when carried out under comparable physical conditions, and lead to prediction of others. This approach allows us to further examine the effect of the laser and plasma parameters on the simulation results and to investigate the underlying physics.

  1. Comparison of model fitting and gated integration for pulse shape discrimination and spectral estimation of digitized lanthanum halide scintillator pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFee, J. E.; Mosquera, C. M.; Faust, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    An analysis of digitized pulse waveforms from experiments with LaBr3(Ce) and LaCl3(Ce) detectors is presented. Pulse waveforms from both scintillator types were captured in the presence of 22Na and 60Co sources and also background alone. Two methods to extract pulse shape discrimination (PSD) parameters and estimate energy spectra were compared. The first involved least squares fitting of the pulse waveforms to a physics-based model of one or two exponentially modified Gaussian functions. The second was the conventional gated integration method. The model fitting method produced better PSD than gated integration for LaCl3(Ce) and higher resolution energy spectra for both scintillator types. A disadvantage to the model fitting approach is that it is more computationally complex and about 5 times slower. LaBr3(Ce) waveforms had a single decay component and showed no ability for alpha/electron PSD. LaCl3(Ce) was observed to have short and long decay components and alpha/electron discrimination was observed.

  2. Modeling of High Efficiency Solar Cells Under Laser Pulse for Power Beaming Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    Solar cells may be used as receivers for laser power beaming. To understand the behavior of solar cells when illuminated by a pulsed laser, the time response of gallium arsenide and silicon solar cells to pulsed monochromatic input has been modeled using a finite element solar cell model.

  3. High Amplitude Acoustic Behavior of a Slit-Orifice Backed by a Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Gaeta, R. J., Jr.; DAgostino, M.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to acquire detailed acoustic data and limited flow visualization data for numerical validation of a new model of sound absorption by a very narrow rectangular slit backed by a cavity. The sound absorption model is that being developed by Dr. C. K. W. Tam of Florida State University. This report documents normal incidence impedance measurements of a singular rectangular slit orifice with no mean flow. All impedance measurements are made within a 1.12 inch (28.5 mm) diameter impedance tube using the two-microphone method for several frequencies in the range 1000 - 6000Hz and incident sound pressure levels in the range 130 - 150 dB. In the interest of leaving the analysis of the data to the developers of more advanced Analytical and computational models of sound absorption by narrow slits, we authors have refrained from giving our own explanations of the observed results, although many of the observed results can be explained using the classical understanding of sound absorption by orifices.

  4. High Amplitude Acoustic Behavior of a Slit-Orifice Backed by a Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Gaeta, R. J., Jr.; DAgostino, M.; Jones, Mike (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the study reported here was to acquire detailed acoustic data and limited and flow visualization data for numerical validation a new model of sound absorption by a very narrow rectangular slit backed by a cavity. The sound absorption model is being developed by Dr. C. K. W. Tam of Florida State University. This report documents normal incidence impedance measurements of a singular rectangular slit orifice with no mean flow. All impedance measurements are made within a 1.12 inch (28.5 mm) diameter impedance tube using the two-microphone method for several frequencies in the range 1000-6000Hz and incident sound pressure levels in the range 130 - 150 dB. In the interest of leaving the analysis of the data to the developers of more advanced analytical and computational models of sound absorption by narrow slits, we have refrained from giving our own explanations of the observed results, although many of the observed results can be explained using the classical explanations of sound absorption by orifices.

  5. Modeling and laser-based sensing of pulsed detonation engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Ethan A.

    This work is concerned with two major aspects of pulse detonation engines (PDE) research: modeling and laser-based sensing. The modeling addresses both ideal and real considerations relevant to PDE design. First, an ideal nozzle model is developed which provides a tool for choosing area ratios for fixed-geometry converging, diverging, or converging-diverging nozzles. Next, losses associated with finite-rate chemistry are investigated. It was found that PDEs can experience up to 10% reduction in specific impulse from this effect if 02 is used as the oxidizer, whereas the losses are negligible for air-breathing applications. Next, heat transfer and friction losses were investigated and found to be greater than the losses from simple straight-tube PDEs. These losses are most pronounced (˜15%) when converging nozzles are used. The second portion of this work focuses on laser-based absorption sensing for PDEs. The mid-infrared was chosen as the best way to address the challenges of signal-to-noise ratio, sensitivity, robustness, and sensor bandwidth. A water vapor sensor was developed and applied to the PDE at the Naval Postgraduate School. This sensor provided improvements in temperature accuracy, and it revealed that water (generated by the vitiator) inhibited performance of the engine. Next, a JP-10 absorption sensor was developed and applied to the same engine. This sensor provided thermometry data at a higher temporal resolution than the water sensor. The sensor also provided crucial information on equivalence ratio and fuel arrival time which enabled the engine to be successfully operated on JP-10 and air for the first time.

  6. Individualization of the parameters of the three-elements Windkessel model using carotid pulse signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żyliński, Marek; Niewiadomski, Wiktor; Strasz, Anna; GÄ siorowska, Anna; Berka, Martin; Młyńczak, Marcel; Cybulski, Gerard

    2015-09-01

    The haemodynamics of the arterial system can be described by the three-elements Windkessel model. As it is a lumped model, it does not account for pulse wave propagation phenomena: pulse wave velocity, reflection, and pulse pressure profile changes during propagation. The Modelflowmethod uses this model to calculate stroke volume and total peripheral resistance (TPR) from pulse pressure obtained from finger; the reliability of this method is questioned. The model parameters are: aortic input impedance (Zo), TPR, and arterial compliance (Cw). They were obtained from studies of human aorta preparation. Individual adjustment is performed based on the subject's age and gender. As Cw is also affected by diseases, this may lead to inaccuracies. Moreover, the Modelflowmethod transforms the pulse pressure recording from the finger (Finapres©) into a remarkably different pulse pressure in the aorta using a predetermined transfer function — another source of error. In the present study, we indicate a way to include in the Windkessel model information obtained by adding carotid pulse recording to the finger pressure measurement. This information allows individualization of the values of Cw and Zo. It also seems reasonable to utilize carotid pulse, which better reflects aortic pressure, to individualize the transfer function. Despite its simplicity, the Windkessel model describes essential phenomena in the arterial system remarkably well; therefore, it seems worthwhile to check whether individualization of its parameters would increase the reliability of results obtained with this model.

  7. Photon kinetic modeling of laser pulse propagation in underdense plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Reitsma, A. J. W.; Trines, R. M. G. M.; Bingham, R.; Cairns, R. A.; Mendonca, J. T.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2006-11-15

    This paper discusses photon kinetic theory, which is a description of the electromagnetic field in terms of classical particles in coordinate and wave number phase space. Photon kinetic theory is applied to the interaction of laser pulses with underdense plasma and the transfer of energy and momentum between the laser pulse and the plasma is described in photon kinetic terms. A comparison is made between a one-dimensional full wave and a photon kinetic code for the same laser and plasma parameters. This shows that the photon kinetic simulations accurately reproduce the pulse envelope evolution for photon frequencies down to the plasma frequency.

  8. Lattice Boltzmann investigation of acoustic damping mechanism and performance of an in-duct circular orifice.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chenzhen; Zhao, Dan

    2014-06-01

    In this work, three-dimensional numerical simulations of acoustically excited flow through a millimeter-size circular orifice are conducted to assess its noise damping performance, with particular emphasis on applying the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) as an alternative computational aeroacoustics tool. The model is intended to solve the discrete lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) by using the pseudo-particle based technique. The LBE controls the particles associated with collision and propagation over a discrete lattice mesh. Flow variables such as pressure, density, momentum, and internal energy are determined by performing a local integration of the particle distribution at each time step. This is different from the conventional numerical investigation attempting to solve Navier-Stokes (NS) equations by using high order finite-difference or finite-volume methods. Compared with the conventional NS solvers, one of the main advantages of LBM may be a reduced computational cost. Unlike frequency domain simulations, the present investigation is conducted in time domain, and the orifice damping behavior is quantified over a broad frequency range at a time by forcing an oscillating flow with multiple tones. Comparing the numerical results with those obtained from the theoretical models, large eddy simulation, and experimental measurements, good agreement is observed. PMID:24907789

  9. Performance evaluation of a developed orifice type heater for thermal compensation control at J-PARC cryogenic hydrogen system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumoto, H.; Aso, T.; Ohtsu, K.; Kawakami, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Supercritical hydrogen with a temperature of less than 20 K and a pressure of 1.5 MPa is used as moderator material at J-PARC. Total nuclear heating of 3.75 kW is generated by three moderators for a 1-MW proton beam operation. We have developed an orifice-type high-power heater for thermal compensation to mitigate hydrogen pressure fluctuation caused by the abrupt huge heat load and to reduce the fluctuation in the temperature of the supply hydrogen to less than 0.25 K. Through a performance test, we confirmed that the developed orifice-type heater could be heated uniformly and showed fast response, as expected. Furthermore, a simulation model that can describe heater behaviors has been established on the basis of the experimental data. The heater control approach was studied using the aforementioned heater simulation model and a dynamic simulation code developed by the authors.

  10. A physics-based model of the electric field pulses occurring during the lightning initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspar, Petr; Santolik, Ondrej; Kolmasova, Ivana

    2016-04-01

    We investigate properties of the electric field pulses observed during the lightning initiation using a generalization of electrostatic and transmission-line models. In the model, the initial leader has a finite conductivity, the current in the channel is inducted owing to an ambient field generated by charge structure inside a thundercloud, and the electric field is computed by a formula derived from exact solution of the Maxwell's equations for a given inducted current. We show how the shape of electric field waveform of individual pulses depends on various parameters of the model with an emphasis on the thundercloud charge structure. We generalize the model to include sequences of several electric field pulses. We show how the peak current pulse is related to the preliminary breakdown electric field peak pulse and we compare this estimation with observations.

  11. Characterization of surface position in a liquid dispensing orifice

    SciTech Connect

    Farahi, R H; Passian, Ali; Thundat, Thomas George; Lereu, Aude L; Tetard, Laurene; Jones, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    Precision microdispencing technology delivers picoliter amounts of fluid for printing, electronic, optical, chemical and biomedical applications. In particular, microjetting is capable of accurate, flexible, and non-contact coating with polymers, thus allowing the functionalization of delicate microsensors such as microcantilevers. Information on various phases of droplet formation are important to control volume, uniformity, velocity and rate. One such aspect is the ringing of the meniscus after droplet breakoff which can affect subsequent drop formation. We present analysis of an optical characterization technique and experimental results on the behaviour of menisus oscillations in an orifice of a piezoelectric microjet.

  12. Atresia of the right atrioventricular orifice with atrioventricular concordance.

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, D F; Wilkinson, J L; Smith, A; Anderson, R H

    1979-01-01

    Three hearts are described in which a fibrous membrane was interposed between the right atrium and a formed but hypoplastic right ventricle, which possessed recognisable inlet, trabecular, and infundibular components. In these hearts the distribution of the conducting tissue was as expected for concordant atrioventricular connections, and contrasts with that seen in the classical type of 'tricuspid atresia'. The distinctive morphological and histological features of these specimens lend further support to our view that the majority of cases of atresia of the right atrioventricular orifice should be regarded as coming within the designation of 'the univentricular heart'. Images PMID:475940

  13. Modeling of an actively stabilized regenerative amplifier for OMEGA pulse-shaping applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skeldon, Mark D.; Babushkin, Andrei; Zuegel, Jonathan D.; Keck, Robert L.; Okishev, Andrey V.; Seka, Wolf D.

    1997-12-01

    We have modeled the output of a feedback stabilized regenerative amplifier (regen). We solve the rate equations including upper- and lower-laser-level lifetimes explicitly. The complete regen dynamics including the losses due to the feedback stabilizer are modeled. We provide a prescription for determining the injection-pulse shape required to produce a given output-pulse shape from this region. The model shows excellent agreement to measured regen output. This model of the regen along with our code RAINBOW, completely describes the temporal dynamics of the OMEGA laser system allowing OMEGA users to specify on-target pulse shapes in advance.

  14. Flow of granular matter in a silo with multiple exit orifices: jamming to mixing.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Sandesh; Kunte, Amit; Doshi, Pankaj; Orpe, Ashish V

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the mixing characteristics of dry granular material while draining down a silo with multiple exit orifices. The mixing in the silo, which otherwise consists of noninteracting stagnant and flowing regions, is observed to improve significantly when the flow through specific orifices is stopped intermittently. This momentary stoppage of flow through the orifice is either controlled manually or is chosen by the system itself when the orifice width is small enough to cause spontaneous jamming and unjamming. We observe that the overall mixing behavior shows a systematic dependence on the frequency of closing and opening of specific orifices. In particular, the silo configuration employing random jamming and unjamming of any of the orifices shows early evidence of chaotic mixing. When operated in a multipass mode, the system exhibits a practical and efficient way of mixing particles. PMID:25615084

  15. Fabrication and characterization of micro-orifices for diesel fuel injectors.

    SciTech Connect

    Fenske, G.; Woodford, J.; Wang, J.; El-Hannouny, E.; Schaefer, R.; Hamady, F.; National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions Lab.

    2007-04-01

    Stringent emission standards are driving the development of diesel-fuel injection concepts to mitigate in-cylinder formation of particulates. While research has demonstrated significant reduction in particulate formation using micro-orifice technology, implementation requires development of industrial processes to fabricate micro-orifices with diameters as low as 50 gmm and with large length-to-diameter ratios. This paper reviews the different processes being pursued to fabricate micro-orifices and the advanced techniques applied to characterize the performance of micro-orifices. The latter include the use of phase-contrast x-ray imaging of electroless nickel-plated, micro-orifices and laser imaging of fuel sprays at elevated pressures. The experimental results demonstrate an industrially viable process to create small uniform orifices that improve spray formation for fuel injection.

  16. Model for electron detachment from negative ions by ultrashort half-cycle electric-field pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grozdanov, T. P.; Jaćimović, J.

    2009-01-01

    We study a model for electron detachment from negative ions by ultrashort unipolar electric pulses. The electron-atom interaction is described by the zero-range potential and the temporal dependence of the electric field is approximated by the Dirac δ functions. The case of a single pulse can be treated semianalytically and explicit expressions are obtained for momentum and energy distributions of detached electrons as well as for the total detachment probability. The determination of angular distribution involves numerical evaluation of a one-dimensional integral. The case of two alternating electric pulses requires numerical evaluation of more complicated integrals but leads to interesting effects caused by the quantum interference of the electronic wave packets produced during the interactions with the first and the second pulses. The differential and integral detachment probabilities are calculated and discussed for a variety of pulse strengths and time delays between the pulses.

  17. Quasi-One-Dimensional Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Christopher I.

    2002-01-01

    Pulsed detonation rocket engines (PDREs) have generated considerable research interest in recent years as a chemical propulsion system potentially offering improved performance and reduced complexity compared to conventional rocket engines. The detonative mode of combustion employed by these devices offers a thermodynamic advantage over the constant-pressure deflagrative combustion mode used in conventional rocket engines and gas turbines. However, while this theoretical advantage has spurred a great deal of interest in building PDRE devices, the unsteady blowdown process intrinsic to the PDRE has made realistic estimates of the actual propulsive performance problematic. The recent review article by Kailasanath highlights some of the difficulties in comparing the available experimental measurements with numerical models. In a previous paper by the author, parametric studies of the performance of a single, straight-tube PDRE were reported. A 1-D, unsteady method of characteristics code, employing a constant-gamma assumption behind the detonation front, was developed for that study. Models of this type are computationally inexpensive, and are particularly useful for parametric performance comparisons. For example, a plot showing the specific impulse of various PDRE and steady-state rocket engine (SSRE) configurations as a function of blowdown pressure ratio. The performance curves clearly indicate that a straight-tube PDRE is superior in specific impulse to a SSRE with a sonic nozzle over the entire range of pressure ratios. Note, however, that a straight-tube PDRE in general does not compare favorably to a SSRE fitted with an optimized de Laval supersonic nozzle, particularly at the high pressure ratios typical for boost or in-space rocket applications. However, the calculations also show that if a dynamically optimized, supersonic de Laval nozzle could be could be fitted to a PDRE, then the specific impulse of the device would exceed that of a comparable SSRE

  18. LANL Efforts on Neutron Coincidence Modeling of INL Pulsed Neutron Data

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Scott; Thron, Jonathan L.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Geist, William H.; Charlton, William S.

    2012-06-25

    Overview of this presentation is: (1) pulsed histogram analysis, (2) creation of SPNS, (3) use of SPNS for modeling pulsed neutron data, (4) creation of MUDI, (5) calculated accidentals correction using GUAM + MUDI, (6) background subtraction analysis, and (7) current/figure work with MCNP.

  19. The Effect of Suppression of Vortex Generator Jets with Asymmetric Orifices on Flow Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Naoki

    In vortex generator jets (VGJs), the beneficial effect of separation control is obtained only if the jets are pitched to the lower wall and skewed with respect to the freestream direction. In particular, in the case of VGJs with circular orifices, the jets are pitched at an angle of 45 deg or less to the wall to achieve effective suppression, due to the generation of strong dominant vortices. On the other hand, it was confirmed that the vortices for the VGJs with the rectangular orifices are stronger and appear to provide more effective momentum transfer across the wall boundary layer, in contrast to the vortices for the VGJs with circular orifices in the previous study. In the present study, the suppression effect is investigated for VGJs with T-shaped orifices combined into two rectangular orifices in the case of a large pitch angle (60 deg). The VGJs with T-shaped orifices were practically applied to the flow separation control of a two-dimensional diffuser, and the suppression effect for the T-shaped orifices was compared to that for the circular orifices. The behavior and the decay of longitudinal vortices in the downstream direction are also described. The T-shaped orifices produce a counter-rotating vortex pair that has different strengths between positive and negative vortices, and longitudinal vortices exist near the lower wall. Therefore, the VGJs with T-shaped orifices provide more effective momentum transfer to the boundary layer and make the separation control effective, in contrast to the VGJs with circular orifices. The formation and behavior of the counter-rotating vortex pair produced by the interaction of the jets and the freestream in the downstream direction were strongly affected by the jet orifice shape.

  20. Adjustable steam producing flexible orifice independent of fluid pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Andrew D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A self-adjusting choke for a fluids nozzle includes a membrane constructed of a single piece of flexible or elastic material. This flexible material is shaped to fit into the outlet of a nozzle. The body of the membrane has at least two flow channels, from one face to the other, which directs two streams of water to cross at the opening of the nozzle or at some point beyond. The elasticity and thickness of the membrane is selected to match the range of expected pressures and fluid velocities. The choke may have more than two flow channels, as long as they are aligned adjacent to one another and directed towards each other at the exit face. In a three orifice embodiment, one is directed upward, one is directed downward, and the one in the middle is directed forward. In this embodiment all three fluid streams intersect at some point past the nozzle opening. Under increased pressure the membrane will deform causing the orifices to realign in a more forward direction, causing the streams to intersect at a smaller angle. This reduces the force with which the separate streams impact each other, still allowing the separate streams to unify into a single stable spiralling stream in spite of the increased pressure.

  1. Laparoscopic natural orifice specimen extraction-colectomy: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Wolthuis, Albert M; de Buck van Overstraeten, Anthony; D’Hoore, André

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, laparoscopic colorectal surgery has shown equal efficacy for benign and malignant colorectal diseases when compared to open surgery. However, a laparoscopic approach reduces postoperative morbidity and shortens hospital stay. In the quest to optimize outcomes after laparoscopic colorectal surgery, reduction of access trauma could be a way to improve recovery. To date, one method to reduce access trauma is natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE). NOSE aims to reduce access trauma in laparoscopic colorectal surgery. The specimen is delivered via a natural orifice and the anastomosis is created intracorporeally. Different methods are used to extract the specimen and to create a bowel anastomosis. Currently, specimens are delivered transcolonically, transrectally, transanally, or transvaginally. Each of these NOSE-procedures raises specific issues with regard to operative technique and application. The presumed benefits of NOSE-procedures are less pain, lower analgesia requirements, faster recovery, shorter hospital stay, better cosmetic results, and lower incisional hernia rates. Avoidance of extraction site laparotomy is the most important characteristic of NOSE. Concerns associated with the NOSE-technique include bacterial contamination of the peritoneal cavity, inflammatory response, and postoperative outcomes, including postoperative pain and the functional and oncologic outcomes. These issues need to be studied in prospective randomized controlled trials. The aim of this systematic review is to describe the role of NOSE in minimally invasive colorectal surgery. PMID:25278692

  2. On the performance and flow characteristics of jet pumps with multiple orifices.

    PubMed

    Oosterhuis, Joris P; Timmer, Michael A G; Bühler, Simon; van der Meer, Theo H; Wilcox, Douglas

    2016-05-01

    The design of compact thermoacoustic devices requires compact jet pump geometries, which can be realized by employing jet pumps with multiple orifices. The oscillatory flow through the orifice(s) of a jet pump generates asymmetric hydrodynamic end effects, which result in a time-averaged pressure drop that can counteract Gedeon streaming in traveling wave thermoacoustic devices. In this study, the performance of jet pumps having 1-16 orifices is characterized experimentally in terms of the time-averaged pressure drop and acoustic power dissipation. Upon increasing the number of orifices, a significant decay in the jet pump performance is observed. Further analysis shows a relation between this performance decay and the diameter of the individual holes. Possible causes of this phenomenon are discussed. Flow visualization is used to study the differences in vortex ring interaction from adjacent jet pump orifices. The mutual orifice spacing is varied and the corresponding jet pump performance is measured. The orifice spacing is shown to have less effect on the jet pump performance compared to increasing the number of orifices. PMID:27250166

  3. Flow through a cylindrical pipe with a periodic array of fractal orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Melick, P. A. J.; Geurts, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    We apply direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations to predict flow through a cylindrical pipe in which a periodic array of orifice plates with a fractal perimeter is mounted. The flow is simulated using a volume penalization immersed boundary method with which the geometric complexity of the orifice plate is represented. Adding a periodic array of orifice plates to a cylindrical pipe is shown to increase the mixing efficiency of the flow in the laminar regime. The average stretching rate is shown to increase by a factor of up to 5, comparing pipe flow without orifice plates to flow passing through an orifice plate derived from the Koch snowflake fractal. The dispersion rate is shown to increase by a factor of up to 4. In laminar flow, the viscous forces are most important close to the walls, causing orifice geometries with the largest perimeter to exhibit the largest axial velocities near the centerline of the pipe and the largest pressure drop to maintain the prescribed volumetric flow rate. The immersed boundary method is also applied to turbulent flow through a ‘fractal-orifices pipe’ at Re = 4300. It is shown that the pressure drop that is required to maintain the specified volumetric flow rate decreases by about 15% on comparing orifice plates with a circular opening to orifice plates with more complex shapes that contain several corners such as triangles, squares, stars and the Koch snowflake.

  4. Finite Element Modeling of Pulsed Eddy Current Signals from Aluminum Plates Having Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babbar, V. K.; Harlley, D.; Krause, T. W.

    2010-02-01

    The pulsed eddy current technique is being developed for detection of flaws located at depth within conducting structures. The present work investigates the pulsed eddy current response from flat-plate conductors having defects by using finite element modeling. Modeling revealed the optimum probe position with respect to a multilayer defect geometry. Models were also produced to investigate the effect of changing some probe parameters on pickup signal and penetration depth.

  5. Dynamics model of the IBR-2M pulsed reactor for analysis of fast transition processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepelyshev, Yu. N.; Popov, A. K.; Sumkhuu, D.; Sangaa, D.

    2015-05-01

    A nonlinear model of the IBR-2M pulsed reactor dynamics relating values of variables at discreet instants of time (when power pulses appear) is developed on the basis of the MATLAB program system. The tests of the model by simulating calculated processes in the IBR-2M reactor proved the correctness of the model. A tentative estimate of the transfer coefficient for the linear part of the automatic regulator is obtained.

  6. Modeling the Pulse Signal by Wave-Shape Function and Analyzing by Synchrosqueezing Transform.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hau-Tieng; Wu, Han-Kuei; Wang, Chun-Li; Yang, Yueh-Lung; Wu, Wen-Hsiang; Tsai, Tung-Hu; Chang, Hen-Hong

    2016-01-01

    We apply the recently developed adaptive non-harmonic model based on the wave-shape function, as well as the time-frequency analysis tool called synchrosqueezing transform (SST) to model and analyze oscillatory physiological signals. To demonstrate how the model and algorithm work, we apply them to study the pulse wave signal. By extracting features called the spectral pulse signature, and based on functional regression, we characterize the hemodynamics from the radial pulse wave signals recorded by the sphygmomanometer. Analysis results suggest the potential of the proposed signal processing approach to extract health-related hemodynamics features. PMID:27304979

  7. Modeling the Pulse Signal by Wave-Shape Function and Analyzing by Synchrosqueezing Transform

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun-Li; Yang, Yueh-Lung; Wu, Wen-Hsiang; Tsai, Tung-Hu; Chang, Hen-Hong

    2016-01-01

    We apply the recently developed adaptive non-harmonic model based on the wave-shape function, as well as the time-frequency analysis tool called synchrosqueezing transform (SST) to model and analyze oscillatory physiological signals. To demonstrate how the model and algorithm work, we apply them to study the pulse wave signal. By extracting features called the spectral pulse signature, and based on functional regression, we characterize the hemodynamics from the radial pulse wave signals recorded by the sphygmomanometer. Analysis results suggest the potential of the proposed signal processing approach to extract health-related hemodynamics features. PMID:27304979

  8. Understanding variation in ecosystem pulse responses to wetting: Benefits of data-model coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenerette, D.

    2011-12-01

    Metabolic pulses of activity are a common ecological response to intermittently available resources and in water-limited ecosystems these pulses often occur in response to wetting. Net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) in response to episodic wetting events is hypothesized to have a complex trajectory reflecting the distinct responses, or "pulses", of respiration and photosynthesis. To help direct research activities a physiological-based model of whole ecosystem metabolic activity up- and down-regulation was developed to investigate ecosystem energy balance and gas exchange pulse responses following precipitation events. This model was to investigate pulse dynamics from a local network of sites in southern Arizona, a global network of eddy-covariance ecosystem monitoring sites, laboratory incubation studies, and field manipulations. Pulse responses were found to be ubiquitous across ecosystem types. These pulses had a highly variable influence on NEE following wetting, ranging from large net sinks to sources of CO2 to the atmosphere. Much of the variability in pulse responses of NEE could be described through a coupled up- and down-regulation pulse response model. Respiration pulses were hypothesized to occur through a reduction in whole ecosystem activation energy; this model was both useful and corroborated through laboratory incubation studies of soil respiration. Using the Fluxnet eddy-covariance measurement database event specific responses were combined with the pulse model into an event specific twenty-five day net flux calculation. Across all events observed a general net accumulation of CO2 following a precipitation event, with the largest net uptake within deciduous broadleaf forests and smallest within grasslands. NEE pulses favored greater uptake when pre-event ecosystem respiration rates and total precipitation were higher. While the latter was expected, the former adds to previous theory by suggesting a larger net uptake of CO2 when pre-event metabolic

  9. Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery: new minimally invasive surgery come of age.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chen; Huang, Ren-Xiang; Qiu, Zheng-Jun

    2011-10-21

    Although in the past two decades, laparoscopic surgery, considered as a great revolution in the minimally invasive surgery field, has undergone major development worldwide, another dramatic surgical revolution has quietly appeared in recent years. Ever since Kalloo's first report on transgastric peritoneoscopy in a porcine model in 2004, interest in a new surgical procedure named natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) has blossomed worldwide. Considering that a NOTES procedure could theoretically avoid any abdominal incision, operation-related pain and scarring, many surgeons and endoscopists have been enthusiastic in their study of this new technique. In recent years, several NOTES studies have been carried out on porcine models and even on humans, including transvaginal cholecystectomy, transgastric appendectomy, transvaginal appendectomy, and transvesical peritoneoscopy. So what is the current situation of NOTES and how many challenges do we still face? This review discusses the current research progress in NOTES. PMID:22110263

  10. Quarter-wave pulse tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, G. W.; Gardner, D. L.; Backhaus, S. N.

    2011-10-01

    In high-power pulse-tube refrigerators, the pulse tube itself can be very long without too much dissipation of acoustic power on its walls. The pressure amplitude, the volume-flow-rate amplitude, and the time phase between them evolve significantly along a pulse tube that is about a quarter-wavelength long. Proper choice of length and area makes the oscillations at the ambient end of the long pulse tube optimal for driving a second, smaller pulse-tube refrigerator, thereby utilizing the acoustic power that would typically have been dissipated in the first pulse-tube refrigerator's orifice. Experiments show that little heat is carried from the ambient heat exchanger to the cold heat exchanger in such a long pulse tube, even though the oscillations are turbulent and even when the tube is compactly coiled.

  11. Effects of Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields on Osteoporosis Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaowei, Yang; Liming, Wang; Guan, Z. C.; Yaou, Zhang; Xiangpeng, Wang

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate the preventive effects and long term effects of extremely low frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs), generated by circular coils and pulsed electromagnetic fields stimulators, on osteoporosis in bilaterally ovariectomized rats. In preventive experiment, thirty three-month old female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three different groups: sham (SHAM), ovariectomy (OVX), PEMFs stimulation (PEMFs). All rats were subjected to bilaterally ovariectomy except those in SHAM group. The PEMFs group was exposed to pulsed electromagnetic fields with frequency 15 Hz, peak magnetic induction density 2.2mT and exposure time 2 hours per day. The bone mineral density (BMD) of vertebra and left femur were measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry at eighth week, twelfth week and sixteenth week after surgery. In long term effects experiment, forty four rats were randomly divided into sham (14 rats, SHAM), ovariectomy group (10 rats, OVX), 15Hz PEMFs group(10 rats, 15Hz) and 30Hz PEMFs group(10 rats, 30Hz) at twenty-sixth week after surgery. Rats in PEMFs groups were stimulated sixteen weeks. In preventive experiment, the Corrected BMD of vertebra and femur was significantly higher than that of OVX group after 16 weeks (P<0.001, P<0.001 respectively). In long term effects experiment, the vertebral BMD of 15Hz PEMFs group and 30Hz PEMFs group was significantly higher than that of OVX groups (P<0.01, P<0.05 respectively). The experimental results demonstrated that extremely low intensity, low frequency, single pulsed electromagnetic fields significantly slowed down the loss of corrected vertebral and femoral BMD in bilaterally ovariectomized rats and suggest that PEMFs may be beneficial in the treatment of osteoporosis.

  12. Emergency transvaginal hybrid natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Noguera, J F; Cuadrado, A; Sánchez-Margallo, F M; Dolz, C; Asencio, J M; Olea, J M; Morales, R; Lozano, L; Vicens, J C

    2011-05-01

    In a clinical series, 10 consecutive female patients with intra-abdominal infections were successfully treated with natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) performed transvaginally. The surgery, which consisted of a hybrid NOTES procedure using a transvaginal approach, was performed on an emergency basis by the surgical team on call. The indications for surgery were acute cholecystitis (n = 6), acute appendicitis (n = 2), and pelvic peritonitis (n = 2) with intra-abdominal infection. The procedure was successfully performed in all patients using a dual-channel endoscope and mini-laparoscopy assistance. This is the first clinical series in which NOTES has been performed on an emergency basis to treat intra-abdominal infections. Transvaginal surgery for intra-abdominal infection is a feasible procedure for groups experienced in the elective NOTES approach. PMID:21165824

  13. An Acoustic Demonstration Model for CW and Pulsed Spectrosocopy Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starck, Torben; Mäder, Heinrich; Trueman, Trevor; Jäger, Wolfgang

    2009-06-01

    High school and undergraduate students have often difficulties if new concepts are introduced in their physics or chemistry lectures. Lecture demonstrations and references to more familiar analogues can be of great help to the students in such situations. We have developed an experimental setup to demonstrate the principles of cw absorption and pulsed excitation - emission spectroscopies, using acoustical analogues. Our radiation source is a speaker and the detector is a microphone, both controlled by a computer sound card. The acoustical setup is housed in a plexiglas box, which serves as a resonator. It turns out that beer glasses are suitable samples; this also helps to keep the students interested! The instrument is controlled by a LabView program. In a cw experiment, the sound frequency is swept through a certain frequency range and the microphone response is recorded simultaneously as function of frequency. A background signal without sample is recorded, and background subtraction yields the beer glass spectrum. In a pulsed experiment, a short sound pulse is generated and the microphone is used to record the resulting emission signal of the beer glass. A Fourier transformation of the time domain signal gives then the spectrum. We will discuss the experimental setup and show videos of the experiments.

  14. Normal position of the ureteral orifice in infancy and childhood: a quantitative study.

    PubMed

    Cussen, L J

    1979-05-01

    Normal values for the distance between the vesicoureteral orifice and the internal urethral orifice are given for different ages, heights, weights, crown-to-rump lengths and surface areas of infants and children. A simple estimate of approximate mean values for these measurements also is included. PMID:571481

  15. Identification of whistling ability of a single hole orifice from an incompressible flow simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lacombe, Romain; Moussou, Pierre

    2012-07-01

    Pure tone noise from orifices in pipe result from vortex shedding with lock-in. Acoustic amplification at the orifice is coupled to resonant condition to create self-sustained oscillations. One key feature of this phenomenon is hence the ability of an orifice to amplify acoustic waves in a given range of frequencies. Here a numerical investigation of the linear response of an orifice is undertaken, with the support of experimental data for validation. The study deals with a sharp edge orifice. Its diameter equals to 0.015 m and its thickness to 0.005 m. The pipe diameter is 0.030 m. An air flow with a Mach number 0.026 and a Reynolds number 18000 in the main pipe is present. At such a low Mach number; the fluid behavior can reasonably be described as locally incompressible. The incompressible Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations are solved with the help of a finite volume fluid mechanics software. The orifice is submitted to an average flow velocity, with superimposed small harmonic perturbations. The harmonic response of the orifice is the difference between the upstream and downstream pressures, and a straightforward calculation brings out the acoustic impedance of the orifice. Comparison with experiments shows that the main physical features of the whistling phenomenon are reasonably reproduced. (authors)

  16. Modeling of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators driven by repetitive nanosecond pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Likhanskii, Alexandre V.; Shneider, Mikhail N.; Macheret, Sergey O.; Miles, Richard B.

    2007-07-15

    A detailed physical model for an asymmetric dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in air driven by repetitive nanosecond voltage pulses is developed. In particular, modeling of DBD with high voltage repetitive negative and positive nanosecond pulses combined with positive dc bias is carried out. Operation at high voltage is compared with operation at low voltage, highlighting the advantage of high voltages, however the effect of backward-directed breakdown in the case of negative pulses results in a decrease of the integral momentum transferred to the gas. The use of positive repetitive pulses with dc bias is demonstrated to be promising for DBD performance improvement. The effects of the voltage waveform not only on force magnitude, but also on the spatial profile of the force, are shown. The crucial role of background photoionization in numerical modeling of ionization waves (streamers) in DBD plasmas is demonstrated.

  17. Pulse timing during irreversible electroporation achieves enhanced destruction in a hindlimb model of cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chunlan; Shao, Qi; Bischof, John

    2015-04-01

    The use of irreversible electroporation (IRE) for cancer treatment has increased during the past decade due to many advantages over other focal therapies. However, despite early success in pre-clinical and clinical IRE trials, in vivo studies have shown that IRE suffers from an inability to destroy large volumes of cancer tissue without repeating treatment and/or increasing the applied electrical dose to dangerous levels. The present work demonstrates a simple method whereby treatment volumes can be enhanced by changing pulse timing (delivering pulsing in three trains, 30 s apart), without changing the electrical dose (51 pulses at pulse strengths of 600 V, durations of 50 µs, and repetition rates of 10 Hz), during IRE in a 3D hindlimb tumor model. Results show that 3 weeks of tumor growth delay was achieved with pulse timing compared to 1 week in baseline IRE (200% increase). Furthermore, the pulse timing approach does not introduce any foreign molecules into the body and can easily be integrated into existing treatment or enhancement protocols of IRE. The enhanced injury may correlate to longer pore exposures, or time during which pores exist on the membrane during pulse timing. This in turn increases the likelihood of membrane failure, and/or death from secondary injury such as loss of critical ions, proteins and other cellular components. In summary this work demonstrates a simple translational approach to increase 3D IRE treatment volumes in vivo by using pulse timing. PMID:25269611

  18. Modelling the effects of pulse exposure of several PSII inhibitors on two algae.

    PubMed

    Copin, Pierre-Jean; Chèvre, Nathalie

    2015-10-01

    Subsequent to crop application and during precipitation events, herbicides can reach surface waters in pulses of high concentrations. These pulses can exceed the Annual Average Environmental Quality Standards (AA-EQS), defined in the EU Water Framework Directive, which aims to protect the aquatic environment. A model was developed in a previous study to evaluate the effects of pulse exposure for the herbicide isoproturon on the alga Scenedesmus vacuolatus. In this study, the model was extended to other substances acting as photosystem II inhibitors and to other algae. The measured and predicted effects were equivalent when pulse exposure of atrazine and diuron were tested on S. vacuolatus. The results were consistent for isoproturon on the alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. The model is thus suitable for the effect prediction of phenylureas and triazines and for the algae used: S. vacuolatus and P. subcapitata. The toxicity classification obtained from the dose-response curves (diuron>atrazine>isoproturon) was conserved for the pulse exposure scenarios modelled for S. vacuolatus. Toxicity was identical for isoproturon on the two algae when the dose-response curves were compared and also for the pulse exposure scenarios. Modelling the effects of any pulse scenario of photosystem II inhibitors on algae is therefore feasible and only requires the determination of the dose-response curves of the substance and growth rate of unexposed algae. It is crucial to detect the longest pulses when measurements of herbicide concentrations are performed in streams because the model showed that they principally affect the cell density inhibition of algae. PMID:26011414

  19. Effects of brief pulse and ultrabrief pulse electroconvulsive stimulation on rodent brain and behaviour in the corticosterone model of depression.

    PubMed

    O'Donovan, Sinead; Dalton, Victoria; Harkin, Andrew; McLoughlin, Declan M

    2014-09-01

    Brief pulse electroconvulsive therapy (BP ECT; pulse width 0.5-1.5 ms) is the most effective treatment available for severe depression. However, its use is associated with side-effects. The stimulus in ultrabrief pulse ECT (UBP ECT; pulse width 0.25-0.3 ms) is more physiological and has been reported to be associated with less cognitive side-effects, but its antidepressant effectiveness is not yet well established. Using electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS), the animal model of ECT, we previously reported UBP ECS to be significantly less effective than well-established BP ECS in eliciting behavioural, molecular and cellular antidepressant-related effects in naïve rats. We have now compared the effects of BP and UBP ECS in an animal model of depression related to exogenous supplementation with the stress-induced glucocorticoid hormone, corticosterone. Corticosterone administration resulted in an increase in immobility time in the forced swim test (FST) (p < 0.01) and decreases in the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) (p < 0.05) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (p < 0.001) in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. There was no significant difference in the duration or type of seizure induced by BP (0.5 ms) or UBP (0.3 ms) ECS. UBP ECS proved to be as effective as BP ECS at inducing a behavioural antidepressant response in the FST with a significant decrease (p < 0.001) in immobility seen following administration of ECS. Both forms of ECS also induced significant increases in BDNF protein (p < 0.01) expression in the hippocampus. BP ECS (p < 0.05) but not UBP ECS induced a significant increase in GFAP levels in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Overall, UBP ECS effectively induced antidepressant-related behavioural and molecular responses in the corticosterone supplementation model, providing the first preclinical data on the potential role of this form of ECS to treat a depression phenotype related to elevated corticosterone. PMID

  20. Study of the diameter and number of the pulmonary veins orifices.

    PubMed

    Niculescu, M C; Niculescu, V; Sişu, Alina Maria; Ciobanu, Iulia Camelia; Dăescu, Ecaterina; Petrescu, Codruţa Ileana; Jianu, Adelina; Rusu, M C

    2006-01-01

    The present study was made in the anatomy laboratory on 100 heart specimens. It was studied the morphological parameters about diameter and number of the atrial orifices of the pulmonary veins. The number of the orifices and their diameter depends on the lungs weight. Generally (70% of the cases) the orifices number is four and rarely three or five. An increased number of orifices are more frequently in the right side and a decreased number especially in the left side. The orifices diameter is much larger at the male's veins than the female's ones, and much larger in the right than the left side and also much larger at the superiors than the inferior veins. PMID:17106520

  1. Computation of Transverse Injection Into Supersonic Crossflow With Various Injector Orifice Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Lancert; Engblom, William A.

    2003-01-01

    Computational results are presented for the performance and flow behavior of various injector geometries employed in transverse injection into a non-reacting Mach 1.2 flow. 3-D Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) results are obtained for the various injector geometries using the Wind code with the Mentor s Shear Stress Transport turbulence model in both single and multi-species modes. Computed results for the injector mixing, penetration, and induced wall forces are presented. In the case of rectangular injectors, those longer in the direction of the freestream flow are predicted to generate the most mixing and penetration of the injector flow into the primary stream. These injectors are also predicted to provide the largest discharge coefficients and induced wall forces. Minor performance differences are indicated among diamond, circle, and square orifices. Grid sensitivity study results are presented which indicate consistent qualitative trends in the injector performance comparisons with increasing grid fineness.

  2. Optimization of orifice geometry for cross-flow mixing in a cylindrical duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sowa, W. A.; Kroll, J. T.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    Mixing of gaseous jets in a cross-flow has significant applications in engineering, one example of which is the dilution zone of a gas turbine combustor. Despite years of study, the design of jet injection in combustors is largely based on practical experience. A series of experiments was undertaken to delineate the optimal mixer orifice geometry. A cross-flow to core-flow momentum-flux ratio of 40 and a mass flow ratio of 2.5 were selected as representative of an advanced design. An experimental test matrix was designed around three variables: the number of orifices, the orifice aspect ratio (long-to-short dimension), and the orifice angle. A regression analysis was performed on the data to arrive at an interpolating equation that predicted the mixing performance of orifice geometry combinations within the range of the test matrix parameters. Results indicate that mixture uniformity is a non-linear function of the number of orifices, the orifice aspect ratio, and the orifice angle. Optimum mixing occurs when the asymptotic mean jet trajectories are in the range of 0.35 less than r/R less than 0.5 (where r = 0 is at the mixer wall) at z/R = 1.0. At the optimum number of orifices, the difference between shallow-angled slots with large aspect ratios and round holes is minimal and either approach will lead to good mixing performance. At the optimum number of orifices, it appears possible to have two local optimums where one corresponds to an aspect ratio of 1.0 and the other to a high aspect ratio.

  3. Collection efficiency and interstage loss of nanoparticles in micro-orifice-based cascade impactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun-Nan; Awasthi, Amit; Hung, Yi-Hung; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn

    2013-04-01

    In this study, two micro-orifice-based cascade impactors, including the micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI, MSP Model 110) and the NCTU micro-orifice cascade impactor (NMCI), were tested for the collection efficiency and interstage loss of nanoparticles. In the NMCI, new nozzle plates with smooth nozzle shape made by the LIGA (Lithography, Electroplating, and Molding) process were used to replace the 7th-10th stages in one of the MOUDI. Test results show that after adjusting proper S/W ratios (S: jet to plate distance, W: nozzle diameter) to 2.52, 3.01, 13.44, and 24.75 for the 7th, 8th, 9th and 10th stage of the NMCI, respectively, and 5.56, 11.18, 9.3, and 10.9 for the 7th, 8th, 9th and 10th stage of the MOUDI, respectively, the cutoff aerodynamic diameters (dpa50) are close to the nominal values given in Marple et al. (1991). Different S/W ratios are needed due to differences in the nozzle shape and nozzle diameter between two cascade impactors. Total interstage loss of nanoparticles from the inlet to the 6th-10th stage of the MOUDI exists due to the convection-diffusion mechanism, which increases with decreasing dpa. For the MOUDI, total loss is 2.9-15.3 % (dpa: 105.8 to 15.4 nm) for the inlet to the 6th stage and it increases to 20.1-26.1 % (dpa: 23 to 15.4 nm) for the inlet to the 10th stage, respectively. Similar but slightly lower loss also exists in the NMCI. Field comparison tests in the ambient air show that mass size distributions measured by the MOUDI agree well with those of the NMCI. Finally, nozzle clogging tests using high concentration incense smokes indicate that the NMCI has a much less tendency for particles to clog in the nozzles than the MODUI.

  4. Pulse Tube Refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Yoichi

    The pulse tube refrigerator is one of the regenerative cycle refrigerators such as Stirling cycle or Gifford-McMahon cycle which gives the cooling temperature below 150 K down to liquid helium temperature. In 1963, W. E. Gifford invented a simple refrigeration cycle which is composed of compressor, regenerator and simple tube named as pulse tube which gives a similar function of the expander in Stirling or Gifford-McMahon cycle. The thermodynamically performance of this pulse tube refrigerator is inferior to that of other regenerative cycles. In 1984, however, Mikulin and coworkers made a significant advance in pulse tube configuration called as orifice pulse tube. After this, several modifications of the pulse tube hot end configuration have been developed. With those modifications, the thermodynamic performance of the pulse tube refrigerator became the same order to that of Stirling and Gifford-McMahon refrigerator. This article reviews the brief history of the pulse tube refrigerator development in the view point of its thermodynamically efficiency. Simplified theories of the energy flow in the pulse tube have also been described.

  5. Modeling of coherent beam combining from multimillijoule chirped pulse tapered fiber amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianov, A. V.; Kim, A. V.; Anashkina, E. A.; Meyerov, I. B.; Lebedev, S. A.; Sergeev, A. M.; Koenig, K.; Mourou, G.

    2015-10-01

    The amplification of high energy chirped pulses in Large Mode Area tapered fiber amplifiers and their coherent combining have been investigated numerically. We have developed a three-dimensional model of strongly chirped nanosecond pulse amplification and compression back to femtosecond duration fully taking into account transverse and longitudinal variations of refractive index profile and distribution of active ions in the fiber, wavelength dependence of emission and absorption cross sections, gain saturation and Kerr nonlinearity. Modeling of Yb-doped fiber amplifier shows that up to 3 mJ of output energy can be extracted in 1 ns pulse with single-mode beam quality. Finally, we have investigated numerically the capabilities of compression and coherent combining of up to 36 perturbed amplifying channels in which high-order modes were excited and have obtained more than 70% combining efficiency and 380 fs compressed pulse duration.

  6. Finite Element Modeling of Pulsed Eddy Current Signals from Conducting Cylinders and Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babbar, V. K.; Kooten, P. V.; Cadeau, T. J.; Krause, T. W.

    2009-03-01

    Pulsed eddy current technique is being developed for detection of flaws located at depth within conducting structures. The present work investigates the pulsed eddy current response from cylindrical and flat-plate conductors by using finite element modeling employing COMSOL Multiphysics commercial package. The benchmark case of a driver/pick-up coil configuration encircling a solid conducting cylinder is used to model the transient electromagnetic response of cylinders of different diameters and lengths. A good comparison with experimental results validates the model. The work was extended to model a planar coil response to flat-plate aluminum structures.

  7. A review of pulse tube refrigeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radebaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of the three types of pulse tube refrigerators: basic, resonant, and orifice types. The principles of operation are given. It is shown that the pulse tube refrigerator is a variation of the Stirling-cycle refrigerator, where the moving displacer is substituted by a heat transfer mechanism or by an orifice to bring about the proper phase shifts between pressure and mass flow rate. A harmonic analysis with phasors is described which gives reasonable results for the refrigeration power, yet is simple enough to make clear the processes which give rise to the refrigeration. The efficiency and refrigeration power are compared with those of other refrigeration cycles. A brief review is given of the research being done at various laboratories on both one- and two-stage pulse tubes. A preliminary assessment of the role of pulse tube refrigerators is discussed.

  8. An integrated model describing the toxic responses of Daphnia magna to pulsed exposures of three metals.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Tham C; Tomasso, Joseph R; Klaine, Stephen J

    2007-01-01

    Some toxicology research in which toxicant exposures are continual (pulsed) rather than continuous have been reported. A number of toxicity models have been developed for pulsed and continuous exposures. Most of these models were developed based on one- or two-compartment, first-order toxicokinetics and were calibrated with organic compounds. In the present study, the relationship between mortality (after 21 d) of Daphnia magna in response to pulsed and continuous exposures to Cu, Zn, and Se was used to develop a model that integrated the effects of single and multiple pulsed metal exposures based on first-order uptake and depuration kinetics. Mortality was a function of exposure concentration, duration, and recovery time between exposures. The model was successfully validated using an independent data set. It is applicable to risk assessment and, potentially, may be incorporated with other models (e.g., the biotic ligand model) to predict the toxicity of pulsed metal exposures under a range of environmental conditions. PMID:17269470

  9. Semi-empirical analysis of liquid fuel distribution downstream of a plain orifice injector under cross-stream air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, J. S.; Jiang, H. K.; Cao, M. H.

    1981-07-01

    A simple, flat-fan spray model is proposed, which can with two empirical parameters predict both the value and the position of liquid fuel distribution curve maximums downstream of a plain orifice injector under high-velocity cross flow. It was found that the model is useful in the preliminary design of the fan air flow portion of a turbofan afterburner, due to its ability to predict the influence on liquid fuel distribution of (1) such flow parameters as air velocity and viscosity, pressure and temperature; (2) injector parameters such as diameter and injection velocity; and (3) liquid properties including viscosity, density, and surface tension.

  10. Choked-Flow Inlet Orifice Bubbler for Creating Small Bubbles in Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Abdou, Ashraf A; Riemer, Bernie

    2013-01-01

    Pressure waves created in liquid mercury pulsed spallation targets like the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, induce cavitation damage on the target container. The cavitation damage is thought to limit the lifetime of the target for power levels at and above 1 MW. One way to mitigate the damage would be to absorb the pressure pulse energy into a dispersed population of small bubbles, however, creating a bubble size distribution that is sufficiently large and disperse in mercury is challenging due to the high surface tension. Also, measuring the population is complicated by the opacity and the high level of turbulent mixing. Recent advances in bubble diagnostics by batch sampling the mercury made it possible to compare bubble populations for different techniques in a SNS-1/20th scale test loop. More than 10 bubblers were tested and the most productive bubblers were taken for in-beam testing at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) WNR user facility. One bubbler design, referred to as the inlet-orifice bubbler, that showed moderate success in creating populations also has an added advantage that it could easily be included in the existing SNS full-scale mercury target configuration. Improvements to the bubbler were planned including a reduction of the nozzle size to choke the gas injection, thus steadying the injected mass flow and allowing multiple nozzles to work off of a common plenum. For the first time, reliable bubble population data are available in the prototypical target geometry and can be compared with populations that mitigated cavitation damage. This paper presents those experimental results.

  11. AxBAxB… pulsed atomic layer deposition: Numerical growth model and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muneshwar, Triratna; Cadien, Ken

    2016-02-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is widely used for the fabrication of advanced semiconductor devices and related nanoscale structures. During ALD, large precursor doses (>1000 L per pulse) are often required to achieve surface saturation, of which only a small fraction is utilized in film growth while the rest is pumped from the system. Since the metal precursor constitutes a significant cost of ALD, strategies to enhance precursor utilization are essential for the scaling of ALD processes. In the precursor reaction step, precursor physisorption is restricted by steric hindrance (mA1) from ligands on the precursor molecules. On reaction, some of these ligands are removed as by-products resulting in chemisorbed species with reduced steric hindrance (mA1 → mA2, where mA2 < mA1) and some of the initially hindered surface reaction sites becoming accessible for further precursor physisorption. To utilize these additional reaction sites, we propose a generalized AxBAxB… pulsed deposition where the total precursor dose (ΦA) is introduced as multiple x (x > 1, x ∈ I) short-pulses rather than a single pulse. A numerical first-order surface reaction kinetics growth model is presented and applied to study the effect of AxBAxB… pulsed ALD on the growth per cycle (GPC). The model calculations predict higher GPC for AxBAxB… pulsing than with ABAB… deposition. In agreement with the model predictions, with AxBAxB… pulsed deposition, the GPC was found to increase by ˜46% for ZrN plasma enhanced ALD (PEALD), ˜49% for HfO2 PEALD, and ˜8% for thermal Al2O3 ALD with respect to conventional ABAB… pulsed growth.

  12. Evaluation of pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound exposures on metastasis in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Hilary; Dreher, Matthew R; Crawford, Nigel; Pollock, Claire B; Shih, Jennifer; Wood, Bradford J; Hunter, Kent; Frenkel, Victor

    2009-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) may be employed in two ways: continuous exposures for thermal ablation of tissue (> 60 degrees C), and pulsed-exposures for non-ablative effects, including low temperature hyperthermia (37-45 degrees C), and non thermal effects (e.g. acoustic cavitation and radiation forces). Pulsed-HIFU effects may enhance the tissue's permeability for improved delivery of drugs and genes, for example, by opening up gaps between cells in the vasculature and parenchyma. Inducing these effects may improve local targeting of therapeutic agents, however; concerns exist that pulsed exposures could theoretically also facilitate dissemination of tumor cells and exacerbate metastases. In the present study, the influence of pulsed-HIFU exposures on increasing metastatic burden was evaluated in a murine model with metastatic breast cancer. A preliminary study was carried out to validate the model and determine optimal timing for treatment and growth of lung metastases. Next, the effect of pulsed-HIFU on the metastatic burden was evaluated using quantitative image processing of whole-lung histological sections. Compared to untreated controls (2/15), a greater number of mice treated with pulsed-HIFU were found to have lungs "overgrown" with metastases (7/15), where individual metastases grew together such that they could not accurately be counted. Furthermore, area fraction of lung metastases (area of metastases/area of lungs) was approximately 30% greater in mice treated with pulsed-HIFU; however, these differences were not statistically significant. The present study details the development of an animal model for investigating the influence of interventional techniques or exposures (such as pulsed HIFU) on metastatic burden. PMID:19517258

  13. Model calibration for pressure drop in a pulse-jet cleaned fabric filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, John L.; David, Leith

    A model based on Darcy's law allows prediction of pressure drop in a pulse-jet cleaned fabric filter. The model considers the effects of filtration velocity, dust areal density added during one filtration cycle, and pulse pressure. Data used to calibrate the model were collected in experiments with three fabric surface treatments and three dusts conducted at three filtration velocities, for a total of 27 different experimental conditions. The fabric used was polyester felt with untreated, singed, or PTFE-laminated surface. The dusts used were granite, limestone and fly ash. Filtration velocities were 50,75 and 100 mm s -1. Dust areal density added during one filtration cycle was constant, as was pulse pressure. Under these conditions, fabric surface treatment alone largely determined the values for two of the three constants in the model; the third constant depends on pressure drop characteristics of the venturi at the top of each filter bag.

  14. Determination of modeling parameters for power IGBTs under pulsed power conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Gregory E; Van Gordon, Jim A; Kovaleski, Scott D

    2010-01-01

    While the power insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGRT) is used in many applications, it is not well characterized under pulsed power conditions. This makes the IGBT difficult to model for solid state pulsed power applications. The Oziemkiewicz implementation of the Hefner model is utilized to simulate IGBTs in some circuit simulation software packages. However, the seventeen parameters necessary for the Oziemkiewicz implementation must be known for the conditions under which the device will be operating. Using both experimental and simulated data with a least squares curve fitting technique, the parameters necessary to model a given IGBT can be determined. This paper presents two sets of these seventeen parameters that correspond to two different models of power IGBTs. Specifically, these parameters correspond to voltages up to 3.5 kV, currents up to 750 A, and pulse widths up to 10 {micro}s. Additionally, comparisons of the experimental and simulated data will be presented.

  15. Three-dimensional laser anemometer study of compressible flow through orifice plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.

    1988-09-01

    Two experimental facilities were constructed, one for the measurement of the pressure distributions on the pipe wall upstream and downstream of the orifice plate and on the orifice plate surface and the other for use with a laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) system to measure the complex flow field inside the orifice run. Pressure measurements for Beta = 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75 were performed for a range of Reynolds numbers from 17,700 to 120,000. A five hole Pitot probe and a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) were used to measure profiles of the axial and radial velocities downstream of the orifice plate. Both devices showed a large recirculation zone extending approximately 2.5 pipe diameters downstream. The 3-D LDA measurements clearly showed the vena contracta and a secondary recirculation zone near the downstream base of the orifice plate. The 3-D LDA also measured the entire Reynolds stress tensor distribution downstream of a Beta = 0.05 orifice for a Reynolds number of 17,700. Creare, Inc.'s Fluent program was used to predict the flow field inside a Beta = 0.50 orifice flow meter. Using assumed inlet conditions, the agreement between experimental and computed results was good.

  16. Synthetic Jets in Cross-flow. Part 2; Jets From Orifices of Different Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milanovic, Ivana M.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2003-01-01

    The flow fields of synthetic jets in a cross-flow from orifices of different geometry are investigated. The geometries include a straight, a tapered, a pitched and a cluster of nine orifices, all having the same cross-sectional area through which the perturbation is discharged into the cross-flow. The strength of the jet from the tapered orifice in comparison to that from the straight one is found to be only slightly enhanced. The flow field from the cluster of orifices, when viewed a few equivalent diameters downstream, is similar to that from the single orifice. However, the penetration is somewhat lower in the former case due to the increased mixing of the distributed jets with the cross-flow. The penetration for the pitched configuration is the lowest, as expected. The jet trajectories for the straight and pitched orifices are well represented by correlation equations available for steady jets-in-cross-flow. Distributions of streamwise velocity, vorticity as well as turbulence intensity are documented for various cases. In addition, distributions of phase-averaged velocity and vorticity for the cylindrical and the clustered orifices are presented providing an insight into the flow dynamics.

  17. Computational modeling of on-demand solder delivery for fluxless MCM packaging applications

    SciTech Connect

    Essien, M.; Sackinger, P.A.; Peebles, H.C.

    1996-10-01

    The development of smaller circuit volumes in microelectronic applications, particularly Multichip Module (MCM) technology, entails deposition of minute quantities of solder, with volumes on the order of nanoliters. We propose a system for fluxless solder deposition which uses on-demand solder jetting for deposition of 200 micrometer diameter solder droplets onto aluminum pads. This work details the computational modeling performed to provide design parameters for a magneto-hydrodynamic solder jetter (MHD). A dimensionless analysis was used to relate the fluid properties, the orifice length and width, and the droplet size to the amplitude and duration of the pressure pulse. These results were used as the initial inputs for the fluid dynamics model, and subsequent iterations were performed to determine the operational parameters that lead to the formation of stable, single droplets. Results show that a maximum pulse amplitude on the order of 0.5 Mdynes/cm[sup 2] is necessary to dispense molten solder from a 200 micrometer diameter orifice. The size of the droplet was found to vary linearly with the applied pressure pulse. The duration of the pulse ranged from approximately 0.6 to 0.9 milliseconds. A theoretical description of the relationship between the orifice diameter, surface tension, and `Pinch-off` time is given, and is in agreement with the results of the computational model.

  18. Modeling crater formation in femtosecond-pulse laser damage from basic principles.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Robert A; Schumacher, Douglass W; Chowdhury, Enam A

    2015-05-15

    We present the first fundamental simulation method for the determination of crater morphology due to femtosecond-pulse laser damage. To this end we have adapted the particle-in-cell (PIC) method commonly used in plasma physics for use in the study of laser damage and developed the first implementation of a pair potential for PIC codes. We find that the PIC method is a complementary approach to modeling laser damage, bridging the gap between fully ab-initio molecular dynamics approaches and empirical models. We demonstrate our method by modeling a femtosecond-pulse laser incident on a flat copper slab for a range of intensities. PMID:26393696

  19. A quantitative model for heat pulse propagation across large helical device plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H.; Dendy, R. O.; Chapman, S. C.; Inagaki, S.

    2015-06-01

    It is known that rapid edge cooling of magnetically confined plasmas can trigger heat pulses that propagate rapidly inward. These can result in large excursion, either positive or negative, in the electron temperature at the core. A set of particularly detailed measurements was obtained in Large Helical Device (LHD) plasmas [S. Inagaki et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 52, 075002 (2010)], which are considered here. By applying a travelling wave transformation, we extend the model of Dendy et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 55, 115009 (2013), which successfully describes the local time-evolution of heat pulses in these plasmas, to include also spatial dependence. The new extended model comprises two coupled nonlinear first order differential equations for the (x, t) evolution of the deviation from steady state of two independent variables: the excess electron temperature gradient and the excess heat flux, both of which are measured in the LHD experiments. The mathematical structure of the model equations implies a formula for the pulse velocity, defined in terms of plasma quantities, which aligns with empirical expectations and is within a factor of two of the measured values. We thus model spatio-temporal pulse evolution, from first principles, in a way which yields as output the spatiotemporal evolution of the electron temperature, which is also measured in detail in the experiments. We compare the model results against LHD datasets using appropriate initial and boundary conditions. Sensitivity of this nonlinear model with respect to plasma parameters, initial conditions, and boundary conditions is also investigated. We conclude that this model is able to match experimental data for the spatio-temporal evolution of the temperature profiles of these pulses, and their propagation velocities, across a broad radial range from r /a ≃0.5 to the plasma core. The model further implies that the heat pulse may be related mathematically to soliton solutions of the

  20. Modeling ultrashort-pulse laser ablation of dielectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, B. H.; Balling, P.

    2009-04-15

    An approach to modeling ablation thresholds and depths in dielectric materials is proposed. The model is based on the multiple-rate-equation description suggested by Rethfeld [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 187401 (2004)]. This model has been extended to include a description of the propagation of the light into the dielectric sample. The generic model is based on only a few experimental quantities that characterize the native material. A Drude model describing the evolution of the dielectric constant owing to an excitation of the electrons in the material is applied. The model is compared to experimental ablation data for different dielectric materials from the literature.

  1. Effect of grazing flow on the acoustic impedance of interacting cavity-backed orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.; Walker, B.

    1977-01-01

    The two-microphone method was used to investigate the impedance of interacting cavity-backed orifices in the presence of a grazing flow; the investigation has relevance for the control of turbomachinery noise generated within jet engines. The number (varied from one to 16), the diameter, and the spacing of the orifices were the chief parameters studied in the experimental program. It was found that interactions between adjacent orifices, while increasing reactance, do not significantly alter resistance. In addition, the grazing flow appears to reduce the rate of increase of the reactance.

  2. Velocity field near the jet orifice of a round jet in a crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fearn, R. L.; Benson, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    Experimentally determined velocities at selected locations near the jet orifice are presented and analyzed for a round jet in crossflow. Jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios of four and eight were studied experimentally for a round subsonic jet of air exhausting perpendicularly through a flat plate into a subsonic crosswind of the same temperature. Velocity measurements were made in cross sections to the jet plume located from one to four jet diameters from the orifice. Jet centerline and vortex properties are presented and utilized to extend the results of a previous study into the region close to the jet orifice.

  3. An improved three-dimensional two-temperature model for multi-pulse femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinping; Chen, Yuping Hu, Mengning; Chen, Xianfeng

    2015-02-14

    In this paper, an improved three-dimensional two-temperature model for multi-pulse femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum was proposed and proved in our experiment. Aiming to achieve hole-drilling with a high ratio of depth/entrance diameter in vacuum, this model can predict the depth and radius of the drilled holes precisely when employing different laser parameters. Additionally, for multi-pulse laser ablation, we found that the laser fluence and number of pulses are the dominant parameters and the multi-pulse ablation threshold is much lower than the single-pulse one, which will help to obtain high-quality holes.

  4. Modeling for V—O2 reactive sputtering process using a pulsed power supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Yu, He; Dong, Xiang; Jiang, Ya-Dong; Chen, Chao; Wu, Ro-Land

    2014-08-01

    In this article, we present a time-dependent model that enables us to describe the dynamic behavior of pulsed DC reactive sputtering and predict the film compositions of VOx prepared by this process. In this modeling, the average current J is replaced by a new parameter of Jeff. Meanwhile, the four species states of V, V2O3, VO2, and V2O5 in the vanadium oxide films are taken into consideration. Based on this work, the influences of the oxygen gas supply and the pulsed power parameters including the duty cycle and frequency on film compositions are discussed. The model suggests that the time to reach process equilibrium may vary substantially depending on these parameters. It is also indicated that the compositions of VOx films are quite sensitive to both the reactive gas supply and the duty cycle when the power supply works in pulse mode. The ‘steady-state’ balance values obtained by these simulations show excellent agreement with the experimental data, which indicates that the experimentally obtained dynamic behavior of the film composition can be explained by this time-dependent modeling for pulsed DC reactive sputtering process. Moreover, the computer simulation results indicate that the curves will essentially yield oscillations around the average value of the film compositions with lower pulse frequency.

  5. A residue-based toxicokinetic model for pulse-exposure toxicity in aquatic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hickie, B.E.; McCarty, L.S.; Dixon, D.G.

    1995-12-01

    This pulse-exposure model (PULSETOX) is based on the simple one-compartment first-order kinetics (1CFOK) equation. It tracks the accumulation of waterborne organic chemicals by fish and predicts acute toxicity by means of previously established relationships between whole-body residues and lethality. The predictive capabilities of the model were tested with a data set of 27 acute pulse-exposure lethality tests with larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to pentachlorophenol (PCP). Tests included eight single exposures (2 to 96 h) and 19 multiple exposures, which varied in the number (2 to 15) and duration (2 to 24 h) of pulses, and time interval between pulses (6 to 24 h). Experimental work included determination of 1CFOK kinetics parameters from [{sup 14}C]PCP uptake and clearance, and from time-toxicity curves. Lethality was expected in any exposure regime where the fish reaches or exceeds the critical body residue (CBR) of 0.30 mmol PCP/kg fish (SD, {+-} 0.02; n = 11). Using the CBR endpoint, the model accounted for between 90 and 93% of variability in the observed lethality data, depending on the toxicokinetic parameters employed. Predictive power of the model was optimized by using kinetics parameters derived from the toxicity curve for pulse-toxicity tests as shown by the regression: predicted LC50 = 1.04 {center_dot} (observed LC50) + 0.01 (p < 0.001, r{sup 2} = 0.94, n = 27).

  6. [Transvaginal hybrid natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery appendectomy].

    PubMed

    Wada, Norihito; Tanabe, Minoru; Kataoka, Fumio; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2013-11-01

    Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) is considered the ultimate minimally invasive intervention for visceral disease. The transvaginal route is now the only one that can be used for NOTES procedures in daily clinical practice. We performed hybrid NOTES appendectomy that was preevaluated and approved by the Japan NOTES and Institutional Review Board. A 5-mm trocar was inserted transumbilically and used for laparoscope access. An additional transumbilical 2.3-mm port was placed, through which the surgeon inserted a grasper. We created a transvaginal port with a long 12-mm trocar. Laparoscopic instruments such as a vessel sealing system, surgical staplers, and a retrieval bag were introduced, and the surgical technique consequently became safer, although the access route was limited. The appendix was removed transvaginally. The patient did not need epidural anesthesia or any pain medication. The cosmetic results were better than that of conventional single-port surgery. Triangulation is achieved in this procedure, which makes the surgery easier. To generalize NOTES to many types of surgery and enable it to be performed in men, the transgastric approach is essential. The development of flexible instruments designed for NOTES is also necessary. PMID:24358726

  7. Hybrid natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery for ileocecal resection

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Satoru; Hara, Masayasu; Sato, Mikinori; Takeyama, Hiromitsu

    2012-01-01

    Although laparoscopic colectomy is commonly performed around the world, an operative wound formed during the surgery is large but not sufficient enough to convert for the majority of open surgery. Thus, a certain sized skin incision is required to remove the resected colon. Here we report the case of a pure laparoscopic ileocecal resection which involves transanal specimen extraction. We present a case characterized by a laterally spreading type of tumor of the cecum. We performed a pure laparoscopic ileocecal resection and the resected specimen was removed transanally using colonoscopy. Intracorporeal functional anastomosis was then performed using a flexible linear stapling device under supporting barbed suture traction. The patient was discharged without complications on postoperative day 4. Laparoscopic colectomy performed with minimal incision could essentially increase the usage of this surgical technique. Although our method is restricted to flat or small lesions, we think it is a feasible and realistic solution for minimization of operative invasion because it involves specimen extraction through a natural orifice. PMID:22408718

  8. The Effect of Ionospheric Models on Electromagnetic Pulse Locations

    SciTech Connect

    Fenimore, Edward E.; Triplett, Laurie A.

    2014-07-01

    Locations of electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) determined by time-of-arrival (TOA) often have outliers with significantly larger errors than expected. In the past, these errors were thought to arise from high order terms in the Appleton-Hartree equation. We simulated 1000 events randomly spread around the Earth into a constellation of 22 GPS satellites. We used four different ionospheres: “simple” where the time delay goes as the inverse of the frequency-squared, “full Appleton-Hartree”, the “BobRD integrals” and a full raytracing code. The simple and full Appleton-Hartree ionospheres do not show outliers whereas the BobRD and raytracing do. This strongly suggests that the cause of the outliers is not additional terms in the Appleton-Hartree equation, but rather is due to the additional path length due to refraction. A method to fix the outliers is suggested based on fitting a time to the delays calculated at the 5 GPS frequencies with BobRD and simple ionospheres. The difference in time is used as a correction to the TOAs.

  9. Three-dimensional electromagnetic model of the pulsed-power Z-pinch accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.; Madrid, E. A.; Miller, C. L.; Clark, R. E.; Stygar, W. A.; Savage, M. E.; Rochau, G. A.; Bailey, J. E.; Nash, T. J.; Sceiford, M. E.; Struve, K. W.; Corcoran, P. A.; Whitney, B. A.

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional, fully electromagnetic model of the principal pulsed-power components of the 26-MA ZR accelerator [D. H. McDaniel , in Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Dense Z-Pinches (AIP, New York, 2002), p. 23] has been developed. This large-scale simulation model tracks the evolution of electromagnetic waves through the accelerator’s intermediate-storage capacitors, laser-triggered gas switches, pulse-forming lines, water switches, triplate transmission lines, and water convolute to the vacuum insulator stack. The insulator-stack electrodes are coupled to a transmission-line circuit model of the four-level magnetically insulated vacuum-transmission-line section and double-post-hole convolute. The vacuum-section circuit model is terminated by a one-dimensional self-consistent dynamic model of an imploding z-pinch load. The simulation results are compared with electrical measurements made throughout the ZR accelerator, and are in good agreement with the data, especially for times until peak load power. This modeling effort demonstrates that 3D electromagnetic models of large-scale, multiple-module, pulsed-power accelerators are now computationally tractable. This, in turn, presents new opportunities for simulating the operation of existing pulsed-power systems used in a variety of high-energy-density-physics and radiographic applications, as well as even higher-power next-generation accelerators before they are constructed.

  10. Electrochemical machining with ultrashort voltage pulses: modelling of charging dynamics and feature profile evolution.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Jason A; Hwang, Gyeong S

    2005-07-01

    A two-dimensional computational model is developed to describe electrochemical nanostructuring of conducting materials with ultrashort voltage pulses. The model consists of (1) a transient charging simulation to describe the evolution of the overpotentials at the tool and workpiece surfaces and the resulting dissolution currents and (2) a feature profile evolution tool which uses the level set method to describe either vertical or lateral etching of the workpiece. Results presented include transient currents at different separations between tool and workpiece, evolution of overpotentials and dissolution currents as a function of position along the workpiece, and etch profiles as a function of pulse duration. PMID:21727446