Science.gov

Sample records for modeling support contract

  1. Physics modeling support contract: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-30

    This document is the final report for the Physics Modeling Support contract between TRW, Inc. and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for fiscal year 1987. It consists of following projects: TIBER physics modeling and systems code development; advanced blanket modeling task; time dependent modeling; and free electron maser for TIBER II.

  2. Past and ongoing shifts in Joshua tree distribution support future modeled range contraction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, Kenneth L.; Ironside, Kirsten; Eischeid, Jon K.; Garfin, Gregg; Duffy, Phil; Toney, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The future distribution of the Joshua tree (Yucca brevifolia) is projected by combining a geostatistical analysis of 20th-century climates over its current range, future modeled climates, and paleoecological data showing its response to a past similar climate change. As climate rapidly warmed ;11 700 years ago, the range of Joshua tree contracted, leaving only the populations near what had been its northernmost limit. Its ability to spread northward into new suitable habitats after this time may have been inhibited by the somewhat earlier extinction of megafaunal dispersers, especially the Shasta ground sloth. We applied a model of climate suitability for Joshua tree, developed from its 20th-century range and climates, to future climates modeled through a set of six individual general circulation models (GCM) and one suite of 22 models for the late 21st century. All distribution data, observed climate data, and future GCM results were scaled to spatial grids of ;1 km and ;4 km in order to facilitate application within this topographically complex region. All of the models project the future elimination of Joshua tree throughout most of the southern portions of its current range. Although estimates of future monthly precipitation differ between the models, these changes are outweighed by large increases in temperature common to all the models. Only a few populations within the current range are predicted to be sustainable. Several models project significant potential future expansion into new areas beyond the current range, but the species' Historical and current rates of dispersal would seem to prevent natural expansion into these new areas. Several areas are predicted to be potential sites for relocation/ assisted migration. This project demonstrates how information from paleoecology and modern ecology can be integrated in order to understand ongoing processes and future distributions.

  3. 10 CFR 950.13 - Standby Support Contract: General provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Standby Support Contract: General provisions. 950.13 Section 950.13 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY STANDBY SUPPORT FOR CERTAIN NUCLEAR PLANT DELAYS Standby Support Contract Process § 950.13 Standby Support Contract: General provisions. (a) Purpose. Each Standby Support Contract shall include a...

  4. 76 FR 81807 - Operational Contract Support

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ... of a formally designated group, joint, or Military Department deployment center. (13) Support the... groups. (15) Integrate OCS into mission rehearsals and training exercises. (16) When contracts are being... Workforce Mix.'' Sec. 158.4 Policy. It is DoD policy that: (a) OCS actions (e.g., planning,...

  5. Uterine Contraction Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Miao; Belfore, Lee A.; Shen, Yuzhong; Scerbo, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    Building a training system for medical personnel to properly interpret fetal heart rate tracing requires developing accurate models that can relate various signal patterns to certain pathologies. In addition to modeling the fetal heart rate signal itself, the change of uterine pressure that bears strong relation to fetal heart rate and provides indications of maternal and fetal status should also be considered. In this work, we have developed a group of parametric models to simulate uterine contractions during labor and delivery. Through analysis of real patient records, we propose to model uterine contraction signals by three major components: regular contractions, impulsive noise caused by fetal movements, and low amplitude noise invoked by maternal breathing and measuring apparatus. The regular contractions are modeled by an asymmetric generalized Gaussian function and least squares estimation is used to compute the parameter values of the asymmetric generalized Gaussian function based on uterine contractions of real patients. Regular contractions are detected based on thresholding and derivative analysis of uterine contractions. Impulsive noise caused by fetal movements and low amplitude noise by maternal breathing and measuring apparatus are modeled by rational polynomial functions and Perlin noise, respectively. Experiment results show the synthesized uterine contractions can mimic the real uterine contractions realistically, demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  6. Contract Negotiations Supported Through Risk Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Sérgio A.; Vaz, Marco A.; Souza, Jano M.

    Many clients often view software as a commodity; then, it is critical that IT sellers know how to create value into their offering to differentiate their service from all the others. Clients sometimes refuse to contract software development due to lack of technical understanding or simply because they are afraid of IT contractual commitments. The IT negotiators who recognize the importance of this issue and the reason why it is a problem will be able to work to reach the commercial terms they want. Therefore, this chapter aims to stimulate IT professionals to improve their negotiation skills and presents a computational tool to support managers to get the best out of software negotiations through the identification of contract risks.

  7. Sustaining Financial Support through Workforce Development Grants and Contracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brumbach, Mary A.

    2005-01-01

    Workforce development grants and contracts are important methods for sustaining financial support for community colleges. This chapter details decision factors, college issues, possible pitfalls, and methods for procuring and handling government contracts and grants for workforce training.

  8. Dual Support in Contract Workers' Triangular Employment Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buch, Robert; Kuvaas, Bard; Dysvik, Anders

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the interplay between perceived investment in contract worker development by the "client" organization and contract workers' perceived organizational support from their temporary employment "agency." A study among 2021 contract workers from three temporary employment agencies in Norway showed that the relationships between…

  9. PHYSICAL MODELING OF CONTRACTED FLOW.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Jonathan K.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments on steady flow over uniform grass roughness through centered single-opening contractions were conducted in the Flood Plain Simulation Facility at the U. S. Geological Survey's Gulf Coast Hydroscience Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. The experimental series was designed to provide data for calibrating and verifying two-dimensional, vertically averaged surface-water flow models used to simulate flow through openings in highway embankments across inundated flood plains. Water-surface elevations, point velocities, and vertical velocity profiles were obtained at selected locations for design discharges ranging from 50 to 210 cfs. Examples of observed water-surface elevations and velocity magnitudes at basin cross-sections are presented.

  10. 10 CFR 950.12 - Standby Support Contract Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... construction, testing and full power operation of the advanced nuclear facility. (9) Provided to the Program... Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY STANDBY SUPPORT FOR CERTAIN NUCLEAR PLANT DELAYS Standby Support Contract... construction of the advanced nuclear facility; (5) Documented coverage of insurance required for the project...

  11. 10 CFR 950.12 - Standby Support Contract Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... construction, testing and full power operation of the advanced nuclear facility. (9) Provided to the Program... Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY STANDBY SUPPORT FOR CERTAIN NUCLEAR PLANT DELAYS Standby Support Contract... construction of the advanced nuclear facility; (5) Documented coverage of insurance required for the project...

  12. 10 CFR 950.12 - Standby Support Contract Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... construction, testing and full power operation of the advanced nuclear facility. (9) Provided to the Program... Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY STANDBY SUPPORT FOR CERTAIN NUCLEAR PLANT DELAYS Standby Support Contract... construction of the advanced nuclear facility; (5) Documented coverage of insurance required for the project...

  13. 10 CFR 950.12 - Standby Support Contract Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... construction, testing and full power operation of the advanced nuclear facility. (9) Provided to the Program... Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY STANDBY SUPPORT FOR CERTAIN NUCLEAR PLANT DELAYS Standby Support Contract... construction of the advanced nuclear facility; (5) Documented coverage of insurance required for the project...

  14. NASA Extends Chandra Science and Operations Support Contract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-01-01

    NASA has extended a contract with the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Mass., to provide science and operational support for the Chandra X-ray Observatory, a powerful tool used to better understand the structure and evolution of the universe. The contract extension with the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory provides continued science and operations support to Chandra. This approximately 172 million modification brings the total value of the contract to approximately 545 million for the base effort. The base effort period of performance will continue through Sept. 30, 2013, except for the work associated with the administration of scientific research grants, which will extend through Feb. 28, 2016. The contract type is cost reimbursement with no fee. In addition to the base effort, the contract includes two options for three years each to extend the period of performance for an additional six years. Option 1 is priced at approximately 177 million and Option 2 at approximately 191 million, for a total possible contract value of about $913 million. The contract covers mission operations and data analysis, which includes observatory operations, science data processing and astronomer support. The operations tasks include monitoring the health and status of the observatory and developing and uplinking the observation sequences during Chandra's communication coverage periods. The science data processing tasks include the competitive selection, planning and coordination of science observations and processing and delivery of the resulting scientific data. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala, manages the Chandra program for the agency's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls Chandra's science and flight operations. For more information about the Chandra X-ray Observatory visit: http://chandra.nasa.gov

  15. A Motivation Contract Model of Employee Appraisal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Robert B.

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a process model for identification and assessment of employee job performance, through motivation contracting. The model integrated various components of expectancy theories of motivation and performance contracting and is based on humanistic assumptions about the nature of people. More specifically, the…

  16. A mathematical model of collagen lattice contraction

    PubMed Central

    Dallon, J. C.; Evans, E. J.; Ehrlich, H. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Two mathematical models for fibroblast–collagen interaction are proposed which reproduce qualitative features of fibroblast-populated collagen lattice contraction. Both models are force based and model the cells as individual entities with discrete attachment sites; however, the collagen lattice is modelled differently in each model. In the collagen lattice model, the lattice is more interconnected and formed by triangulating nodes to form the fibrous structure. In the collagen fibre model, the nodes are not triangulated, are less interconnected, and the collagen fibres are modelled as a string of nodes. Both models suggest that the overall increase in stress of the lattice as it contracts is not the cause of the reduced rate of contraction, but that the reduced rate of contraction is due to inactivation of the fibroblasts. PMID:25142520

  17. Sample Language of Modified Contract Elements from Existing CBAs, MOUs, or EWAs to Support Turnaround

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mass Insight Education (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    Organized by the key conditions areas for turnaround, "People, Program, Time and Money," this tool offers sample language for each contract element to serve as a model for modifications from a traditional CBA that may support a district's turnaround efforts. Sample language is offered from existing provisions in district-wide collective bargaining…

  18. Contracts

    Science.gov Websites

    05, 2016 Contracts For Feb. 04, 2016 Contracts For Feb. 03, 2016 Contracts For Feb. 02, 2016 Contracts For Feb. 01, 2016 Search Contracts Search Recent Oldest Title Title - ...

  19. Contracts

    Science.gov Websites

    2016 Contracts For March 04, 2016 Contracts For March 03, 2016 Contracts For March 02, 2016 Contracts For March 01, 2016 Search Contracts Search Recent Oldest Title Title - ...

  20. An Exposition of Fischer's Model of Overlapping Contracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, T. Windsor; Hart, William R.

    1992-01-01

    Suggests how the classic model of overlapping contracts can be incorporated into the contract wage model of aggregate supply. Illustrates dynamics of macroeconomic adjustment following a shock to aggregate demand. Concludes that overlapping contracts do not prolong the adjustment process; rather, the longest remaining contract determines the time…

  1. Models of muscle contraction and energetics

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Nicola; Gladden, L. Bruce; Carlier, Pierre G.; Cabrera, Marco E.

    2013-01-01

    How does skeletal muscle manage to regulate the pathways of ATP synthesis during large-scale changes in work rate while maintaining metabolic homeostasis remains unknown. The classic model of metabolic regulation during muscle contraction states that accelerating ATP utilization leads to increasing concentrations of ADP and Pi, which serve as substrates for oxidative phosphorylation and thus accelerate ATP synthesis. An alternative model states that both the ATP demand and ATP supply pathways are simultaneously activated. Here, we review experimental and computational models of muscle contraction and energetics at various organizational levels and compare them with respect to their pros and cons in facilitating understanding of the regulation of energy metabolism during exercise in the intact organism. PMID:24421861

  2. 7 CFR 1718.104 - Availability of model loan contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Availability of model loan contract. 1718.104 Section 1718.104 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE... Borrowers § 1718.104 Availability of model loan contract. Single copies of the model loan contract...

  3. 7 CFR 1718.104 - Availability of model loan contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Availability of model loan contract. 1718.104 Section 1718.104 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE... Borrowers § 1718.104 Availability of model loan contract. Single copies of the model loan contract...

  4. 7 CFR 1718.104 - Availability of model loan contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Availability of model loan contract. 1718.104 Section 1718.104 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE... Borrowers § 1718.104 Availability of model loan contract. Single copies of the model loan contract...

  5. 7 CFR 1718.104 - Availability of model loan contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Availability of model loan contract. 1718.104 Section 1718.104 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE... Borrowers § 1718.104 Availability of model loan contract. Single copies of the model loan contract...

  6. Office of Inspector General report on audit of controls over the ADP support services contract

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-15

    In March 1995, the Department awarded a cost-plus-award-fee contract to DynCorp valued at approximately $246 million over 5 years for ADP support services at Headquarters. The performance period for the contract was a 3-year base period with two 1-year options. The contract statement of work identified 24 information management functional areas that required technical support services, including Automated Office Systems Support and Local Area Network support. The purpose of the audit was to evaluate the cost-plus-award-fee contract for ADP support services at Headquarters. The objective was to determine whether the Department`s program offices at Headquarters were managing their ADP support services contract costs.

  7. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 89

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    Summaries are presented for the DOE contracts related to supported research for thermal recovery of petroleum, geoscience technology, and field demonstrations in high-priority reservoir classes. Data included for each project are: title, contract number, principal investigator, research organization, beginning date, expected completion date, amount of award, objectives of the research, and summary of technical progress.

  8. Integration of massive states as contractions of nonlinear {sigma} models

    SciTech Connect

    Andrianopoli, L.; Ferrara, S.; Lledo, M.A.; Macia, O.

    2005-07-01

    We consider the contraction of some nonlinear {sigma} models which appear in effective supergravity theories. In particular we consider the contractions of maximally symmetric spaces corresponding to N=1 and N=2 theories, as they appear in certain low energy effective supergravity actions with mass deformations. The contraction procedure is shown to describe the integrating out of massive modes in the presence of interactions, as it happens in many supergravity models after spontaneous supersymmetry breaking.

  9. A Mathematical Model of the Mouse Ventricular Myocyte Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Mullins, Paula D.; Bondarenko, Vladimir E.

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical models of cardiac function at the cellular level include three major components, such as electrical activity, Ca2+ dynamics, and cellular shortening. We developed a model for mouse ventricular myocyte contraction which is based on our previously published comprehensive models of action potential and Ca2+ handling mechanisms. The model was verified with extensive experimental data on mouse myocyte contraction at room temperature. In the model, we implemented variable sarcomere length and indirect modulation of the tropomyosin transition rates by Ca2+ and troponin. The resulting model described well steady-state force-calcium relationships, dependence of the contraction force on the sarcomere length, time course of the contraction force and myocyte shortening, frequency dependence of the contraction force and cellular contraction, and experimentally measured derivatives of the myocyte length variation. We emphasized the importance of the inclusion of variable sarcomere length into a model for ventricular myocyte contraction. Differences in contraction force and cell shortening for epicardial and endocardial ventricular myocytes were investigated. Model applicability for the experimental studies and model limitations were discussed. PMID:23671664

  10. Contractions

    MedlinePlus

    ... feel tightening of your uterus muscles at irregular intervals or a squeezing sensation in your lower abdomen ... beginning of childbirth. These contractions come at regular intervals, usually move from the back to the lower ...

  11. 7 CFR 1718.104 - Availability of model loan contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Availability of model loan contract. 1718.104 Section 1718.104 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOAN SECURITY DOCUMENTS FOR ELECTRIC BORROWERS Loan Contracts With Distribution Borrowers § 1718.104 Availability...

  12. 78 FR 40158 - Supportive Housing for the Elderly Senior Preservation Rental Assistance Contracts: 60-Day Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... was made available for SPRAC funding. On January 8, 2013, at 78 FR 1224, HUD published a proposed... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Supportive Housing for the Elderly Senior Preservation Rental Assistance Contracts: 60... Section 202 Supportive Housing for the Elderly Act of 2010 (Pub. L. 111-372, 124 Stat. 4077,...

  13. The Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph Scientific Support Contract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In 1988, Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC) was selected as the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) Scientific Support Contractor (SSC). This was to have been a few months before the launch of NASA's first Great Observatory, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). As one of five scientific instruments on HST, the GHRS was designed to obtain spectra in the 1050-3300 A ultraviolet wavelength region with a resolving power, lambda/Delta(lambda) , of up to 100,000 and relative photometric accuracy to 1%. It was built by Ball AeroSpace Systems Group under the guidance of the GHRS Investigation Definition Team (IDT), comprised of 16 scientists from the US and Canada. After launch, the IDT was to perform the initial instrument calibration and execute a broad scientific program during a five-year Guaranteed Time Observation (GTO) period. After a year's delay, the launch of HST occurred in April 1990, and CSC participated in the in-orbit calibration and first four years of GTO observations with the IDT. The HST primary mirror suffered from spherical aberration, which reduced the spatial and spectral resolution of Large Science Aperture (LSA) observations and decreased the throughput of the Small Science Aperture (SSA) by a factor of two. Periodic problems with the Side 1 carrousel electronics and anomalies with the low-voltage power supply finally resulted in a suspension of the use of Side 1 less than two years after launch. At the outset, the GHRS SSC task involved work in four areas: 1) to manage and operate the GHRS Data Analysis Facility (DAF); 2) to support the second Servicing Mission Observatory Verification (SMOV) program, as well as perform system engineering analysis of the GHRS as nesessary; 3) to assist the GHRS IDT with their scientific research programs, particularly the GSFC members of the team, and 4) to provide administrative and logistic support for GHRS public information and educational activities.

  14. Models of Excitation–Contraction Coupling in Cardiac Ventricular Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jafri, M. Saleet

    2012-01-01

    Excitation–contraction coupling describes the processes relating to electrical excitation through force generation and contraction in the heart. It occurs at multiple levels from the whole heart, to single myocytes and down to the sarcomere. A central process that links electrical excitation to contraction is calcium mobilization. Computational models that are well grounded in experimental data have been an effective tool to understand the complex dynamics of the processes involved in excitation–contraction coupling. Presented here is a summary of some computational models that have added to the understanding of the cellular and subcellular mechanisms that control ventricular myocyte calcium dynamics. Models of cardiac ventricular myocytes that have given insight into termination of calcium release and interval–force relations are discussed in this manuscript. Computational modeling of calcium sparks, the elementary events in cardiac excitation–contraction coupling, has given insight into mechanism governing their dynamics and termination as well as their role in excitation–contraction coupling and is described herein. PMID:22821602

  15. Beyond altruistic and commercial contract motherhood: the professional model.

    PubMed

    Van Zyl, Liezl; Walker, Ruth

    2013-09-01

    It has become common to distinguish between altruistic and commercial contract motherhood (or 'surrogacy'). Altruistic arrangements are based on the 'gift relationship': a woman is motivated by altruism to have a baby for an infertile couple, who are free to reciprocate as they see fit. By contrast, in commercial arrangements both parties are motivated by personal gain to enter a legally enforceable agreement, which stipulates that the contract mother or 'surrogate' is to bear a child for the intending parents in exchange for a fee. She is required to undergo medical examinations and to refrain from behaviour that could harm the foetus. The intending parents are the child's legal parents from the outset. The parties to the contract can, but are not expected to, maintain contact after the transaction is completed. We argue that contract motherhood should not be organized according to the norms of the gift relationship, and that contract mothers should be compensated for their labour. However, we accept that there are good reasons for rejecting the commercial model as a suitable framework for contract pregnancy, and argue, instead, in favour of viewing it as a profession. PMID:22500585

  16. Student Mental Models Related to Expansion and Contraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurnaz, Mehmet Altan; Emen, Ayse Yagmur

    2014-01-01

    Following up on the effects of learning environments is essential to learning. The aim of this study was to examine students' mental models related to the concepts of expansion and contraction of materials. The population of the case study consisted of 155 students in a city center in Turkey. The data was gathered using open-ended questions that…

  17. Two-wave model of the muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Molski, Marcin

    2009-05-01

    The Matsuno model of the muscle contraction is considered in the framework of the two-wave Corben's theory of composite objects built up of both time- and space-like components. It has been proved that during muscle contraction the locally coherent aggregates distributed along the actin filament interact by means of space-like fields, which are solutions of the relativistic Feinberg equation. The existence of such interactions and lack of decoherence are conditions sine qua non for appearance of the quantum entanglement between actin monomers in an ATP-activated filament. A possible role of a quantum potential in the muscle contraction is discussed and the mass of the carrier of space-like interactions is estimated m0' = 7.3 x 10(-32) g (46 eV). PMID:19428979

  18. Contraction limits of the proton-neutron symplectic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganev, H. G.

    2016-01-01

    The algebraic approach to nuclear structure physics allows a certain microscopic collective motion algebra to be also interpreted on macroscopic level which is achieved in the limit of large representation quantum numbers. Such limits are referred to as macroscopic or hydrodynamic limits and show how a given microscopic discrete system starts to behave like a continuous fluid. In the present paper, two contraction limits of the recently introduced fully microscopic proton-neutron symplectic model (PNSM) with the Sp(12; R) dynamical symmetry algebra are considered. As a result, two simplified macroscopic models of nuclear collective motion are obtained in simple geometrical terms. The first one is the U(6)-phonon model with the semi-direct product structure [HW(21)]U(6), which is shown to be actually an alternative formulation of the original proton-neutron symplectic model in the familiar IBM-terms. The second model which appears in double contraction limit is the two-rotor model with the ROTp(3) ⊗ ROTn(3) ⊃ ROT(3) algebraic structure. The latter, in contrast to the original two-rotor model, is not restricted to the case of two coupled axial rotors. In this way, the second contraction limit of the PNSM, provides the phenomenological two-rotor model with a simple microscopic foundation.

  19. Rhode Island Model Evaluation & Support System: Support Professional. Edition II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Rhode Island educators believe that implementing a fair, accurate, and meaningful evaluation and support system for support professionals will help improve student outcomes. The primary purpose of the Rhode Island Model Support Professional Evaluation and Support System (Rhode Island Model) is to help all support professionals do their best work…

  20. On the application of copula in modeling maintenance contract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskandar, B. P.; Husniah, H.

    2016-02-01

    This paper deals with the application of copula in maintenance contracts for a nonrepayable item. Failures of the item are modeled using a two dimensional approach where age and usage of the item and this requires a bi-variate distribution to modelling failures. When the item fails then corrective maintenance (CM) is minimally repaired. CM can be outsourced to an external agent or done in house. The decision problem for the owner is to find the maximum total profit whilst for the agent is to determine the optimal price of the contract. We obtain the mathematical models of the decision problems for the owner as well as the agent using a Nash game theory formulation.

  1. A model of tissue contraction during thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang Sub; Hall, Sheldon K; Liu, Cong; Payne, Stephen J

    2016-09-01

    A model of a globular protein is used to describe the contraction of tissue exposed to elevated temperatures. This will be useful in predicting the contraction of tissue that is observed during thermal ablation of tumours, which is a problem when trying to determine the ablation zone in post-operative images. The transitions between the states of the protein can be related to a change in the length of the molecule, which can be directly observed as a change in the length of the tissue. A three state model of a globular protein is used to describe the contraction of tissue exposed to elevated temperatures. A nonlinear fitting algorithm is considered here to fit available experimental data and thus to obtain the values of the model parameters. A sensitivity analysis of the proposed mathematical model is performed to determine the most important parameters in the model. The model parameters were obtained from experimental data of isothermal free shrinkage experiments. The predictions of the complete model show similar agreement with the data, well within the experimental error of 10%. The overall activation energy and frequency factor were found to be 201 kJ mol(-1) and [Formula: see text] s(-1) respectively. The results show that the experimental data were well described by the three state model considered here. Furthermore, it was possible to determine the most sensitive parameters in the model. The model presented here will allow predictions of thermal ablation to be corrected for tissue shrinkage, thus improving mathematical simulations for treatment planning, although clinical translation will require adapting the model from experimentally obtained tendon data to soft tissue data. PMID:27510949

  2. 25 CFR 170.608 - Can a tribe pay contract support costs from Department of the Interior or BIA appropriations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the Interior or BIA appropriations? 170.608 Section 170.608 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS... the Interior or BIA appropriations? No. Contract support costs for IRR construction projects cannot be paid out of Department of the Interior or BIA appropriations. Contracts and Agreements Under ISDEAA...

  3. Improved Cell Culture Method for Growing Contracting Skeletal Muscle Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marquette, Michele L.; Sognier, Marguerite A.

    2013-01-01

    An improved method for culturing immature muscle cells (myoblasts) into a mature skeletal muscle overcomes some of the notable limitations of prior culture methods. The development of the method is a major advance in tissue engineering in that, for the first time, a cell-based model spontaneously fuses and differentiates into masses of highly aligned, contracting myotubes. This method enables (1) the construction of improved two-dimensional (monolayer) skeletal muscle test beds; (2) development of contracting three-dimensional tissue models; and (3) improved transplantable tissues for biomedical and regenerative medicine applications. With adaptation, this method also offers potential application for production of other tissue types (i.e., bone and cardiac) from corresponding precursor cells.

  4. A model of a radially expanding and contracting lymphangion.

    PubMed

    Rahbar, Elaheh; Moore, James E

    2011-04-01

    The lymphatic system is an extensive vascular network featuring valves and contractile walls that pump interstitial fluid and plasma proteins back to the main circulation. Immune function also relies on the lymphatic system's ability to transport white blood cells. Failure to drain and pump this excess fluid results in edema characterized by fluid retention and swelling of limbs. It is, therefore, important to understand the mechanisms of fluid transport and pumping of lymphatic vessels. Unfortunately, there are very few studies in this area, most of which assume Poiseuille flow conditions. In vivo observations reveal that these vessels contract strongly, with diameter changes of the order of magnitude of the diameter itself over a cycle that lasts typically 2-3s. The radial velocity of the contracting vessel is on the order of the axial fluid velocity, suggesting that modeling flow in these vessels with a Poiseuille model is inappropriate. In this paper, we describe a model of a radially expanding and contracting lymphatic vessel and investigate the validity of assuming Poiseuille flow to estimate wall shear stress, which is presumably important for lymphatic endothelial cell mechanotransduction. Three different wall motions, periodic sinusoidal, skewed sinusoidal and physiologic wall motions, were investigated with steady and unsteady parabolic inlet velocities. Despite high radial velocities resulting from the wall motion, wall shear stress values were within 4% of quasi-static Poiseuille values. Therefore, Poiseuille flow is valid for the estimation of wall shear stress for the majority of the lymphangion contractile cycle. PMID:21377158

  5. Effective Team Support: From Modeling to Software Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, Roger W. (Technical Monitor); John, Bonnie; Sycara, Katia

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research contract was to perform multidisciplinary research between CMU psychologists, computer scientists and engineers and NASA researchers to design a next generation collaborative system to support a team of human experts and intelligent agents. To achieve robust performance enhancement of such a system, we had proposed to perform task and cognitive modeling to thoroughly understand the impact technology makes on the organization and on key individual personnel. Guided by cognitively-inspired requirements, we would then develop software agents that support the human team in decision making, information filtering, information distribution and integration to enhance team situational awareness. During the period covered by this final report, we made substantial progress in modeling infrastructure and task infrastructure. Work is continuing under a different contract to complete empirical data collection, cognitive modeling, and the building of software agents to support the teams task.

  6. Contraction pre-conditioner in finite-difference electromagnetic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavich, Nikolay; Zhdanov, Michael S.

    2016-09-01

    This paper introduces a novel approach to constructing an effective pre-conditioner for finite-difference (FD) electromagnetic modelling in geophysical applications. This approach is based on introducing an FD contraction operator, similar to one developed for integral equation formulation of Maxwell's equation. The properties of the FD contraction operator were established using an FD analogue of the energy equality for the anomalous electromagnetic field. A new pre-conditioner uses a discrete Green's function of a 1-D layered background conductivity. We also developed the formulae for an estimation of the condition number of the system of FD equations pre-conditioned with the introduced FD contraction operator. Based on this estimation, we have established that the condition number is bounded by the maximum conductivity contrast between the background conductivity and actual conductivity. When there are both resistive and conductive anomalies relative to the background, the new pre-conditioner is advantageous over using the 1-D discrete Green's function directly. In our numerical experiments with both resistive and conductive anomalies, for a land geoelectrical model with 1:10 contrast, the method accelerates convergence of an iterative method (BiCGStab) by factors of 2-2.5, and in a marine example with 1:50 contrast, by a factor of 4.6, compared to direct use of the discrete 1-D Green's function as a pre-conditioner.

  7. Modeling Advance Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Marvin; Sager, John; Loader, Coleen; Drysdale, Alan

    1996-01-01

    Activities this summer consisted of two projects that involved computer simulation of bioregenerative life support systems for space habitats. Students in the Space Life Science Training Program (SLSTP) used the simulation, space station, to learn about relationships between humans, fish, plants, and microorganisms in a closed environment. One student complete a six week project to modify the simulation by converting the microbes from anaerobic to aerobic, and then balancing the simulation's life support system. A detailed computer simulation of a closed lunar station using bioregenerative life support was attempted, but there was not enough known about system restraints and constants in plant growth, bioreactor design for space habitats and food preparation to develop an integrated model with any confidence. Instead of a completed detailed model with broad assumptions concerning the unknown system parameters, a framework for an integrated model was outlined and work begun on plant and bioreactor simulations. The NASA sponsors and the summer Fell were satisfied with the progress made during the 10 weeks, and we have planned future cooperative work.

  8. Volume of Fluid Model of Open Channel Contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, I.; Debnath, K.

    2014-07-01

    In the present paper, the effect of channel contraction has been studied using FLUENT. Contracted channels having three different contraction ratios (0.77, 0.61, and 0.44) have been investigated. The effect of channel contraction on the vertical profiles of longitudinal mean velocity, turbulence intensity, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and turbulent dissipation rate in comparison to the open channel case is explored. The velocity profile of the contracted channel with contraction ratio 0.44 is compared with experimental data obtained from laboratory flume experiment. The mean longitudinal velocity, turbulence intensity, TKE and turbulent dissipation rate increases with the decrease in contraction ratio and vice versa.

  9. Theory and Modeling in Support of Tether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. L.; Bergeron, G.; Drobot, A. D.; Papadopoulos, K.; Riyopoulos, S.; Szuszczewicz, E.

    1999-01-01

    This final report summarizes the work performed by SAIC's Applied Physics Operation on the modeling and support of Tethered Satellite System missions (TSS-1 and TSS-1R). The SAIC team, known to be Theory and Modeling in Support of Tether (TMST) investigation, was one of the original twelve teams selected in July, 1985 for the first TSS mission. The accomplishments described in this report cover the period December 19, 1985 to September 31, 1999 and are the result of a continuous effort aimed at supporting the TSS missions in the following major areas. During the contract period, the SAIC's TMST investigation acted to: Participate in the planning and the execution on both of the TSS missions; Provide scientific understanding on the issues involved in the electrodynamic tether system operation prior to the TSS missions; Predict ionospheric conditions encountered during the re-flight mission (TSS-lR) based on realtime global ionosounde data; Perform post mission analyses to enhance our understanding on the TSS results. Specifically, we have 1) constructed and improved current collection models and enhanced our understanding on the current-voltage data; 2) investigated the effects of neutral gas in the current collection processes; 3) conducted laboratory experiments to study the discharge phenomena during and after tether-break; and 4) perform numerical simulations to understand data collected by plasma instruments SPES onboard the TSS satellite; Design and produce multi-media CD that highlights TSS mission achievements and convey the knowledge of the tether technology to the general public. Along with discussions of this work, a list of publications and presentations derived from the TMST investigation spanning the reporting period is compiled.

  10. A Unitary Transformation in the Contracted Symplectic Model Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaños, Octavio; López-Moreno, Enrique

    1997-04-01

    In the last years a contracted version of the Symplectic Shell Model scheme has been used to describe the energy spectra and electromagnetic transitions to describe light and heavy rotational nuclei. In these works a model hamiltonian that takes into account the shell structure, couplings to major shells through a quadrupole-quadrupole interaction, and a residual rotor term were used. In the present contribution a unitary transformation is introduced, which gives rise to a simpler hamiltonian and the matrix elements of its different component terms with respect to the Ub × U_s(3) basis states are easily calculated. Also the quadrupole electromagnetic transitions can be easily determined. At the same time this unitary transformation in the boson approximation limit yields new insights to the shell model interpretation of the quantum rotor hamiltonian.

  11. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review number 86, quarter ending March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    Summaries are presented for 37 enhanced oil recovery contracts being supported by the Department of Energy. The projects are grouped into gas displacement methods, thermal recovery methods, geoscience technology, reservoir characterization, and field demonstrations in high-priority reservoir classes. Each summary includes the objectives of the project and a summary of the technical progress, as well as information on contract dates, size of award, principal investigator, and company or facility doing the research.

  12. 14 CFR 302.719 - Explanation and data supporting the contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Mail Rate Proceedings and Mail Contracts Processing Contracts for the Carriage of Mail in Foreign Air... nature of such mail (letter mail, parcel post, third class, etc.), together with a statement as to...

  13. 48 CFR 5152.245-9000 - Government property for installation support services (fixed-price contracts).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Contracting Officer withdraws it from use under this contract in accordance with FAR 52.245-2(b). The... performance of the required services under this contract regardless of the length of time which the property provided hereunder remains operational. Property provided by or obtained by the Contractor under...

  14. 48 CFR 5152.245-9000 - Government property for installation support services (fixed-price contracts).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Contracting Officer withdraws it from use under this contract in accordance with FAR 52.245-2(b). The... performance of the required services under this contract regardless of the length of time which the property provided hereunder remains operational. Property provided by or obtained by the Contractor under...

  15. A contracting island model of electron acceleration during magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, J. F.; Che, H.; Swisdak, M.; Shay, M. A.

    2006-10-01

    A Fermi-like model for energetic electron production during magnetic reconnection is described that explains key observations in the magnetosphere and solar corona [1]. Magnetic reconnection with a guide field leads to the growth and dynamics of multiple magnetic islands rather than a single large x-line [2]. Above a critical energy electron acceleration is dominated by the Fermi-like reflection of electrons within the resulting magnetic islands rather than by the parallel electric fields associated with the x-line. Particles trapped within islands gain energy as they reflect from ends of contracting magnetic islands. The pressure from energetic electrons rises rapidly until the rate of electron energy gain balances the rate of magnetic energy release. A Fokker-Planck equation for the distribution of energetic particles, including their feedback on island contraction, is obtained by averaging over the particle interaction with many islands. The steady state solutions in reconnection geometry result from convective losses balancing the Fermi drive. At high energy the electron distribution functions take the form of powerlaws whose spectral index depends on the initial electron β, lower (higher) β producing harder (softer) spectra.1. Drake et al., Nature, in press.2. Drake et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 33, L13105, 2006.

  16. Contracts and Management Services FY 1996 Site Support Program Plan: WBS 6.10.14. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, J.M. Jr.

    1995-09-01

    This is the Contracts and Management Services site support program plan for the US DOE Hanford site. The topics addressed in the program plan include a mission statement, program objectives, planning assumptions, program constraints, work breakdown structure, milestone list, milestone description sheets, and activity detail including cost accounting narrative summary, approved funding budget, and activity detailed description.

  17. Injectable Polyurethane Composite Scaffolds Delay Wound Contraction and Support Cellular Infiltration and Remodeling in Rat Excisional Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Adolph, Elizabeth J.; Hafeman, Andrea E.; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Nanney, Lillian B.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    Injectable scaffolds present compelling opportunities for wound repair and regeneration due to their ability to fill irregularly shaped defects and deliver biologics such as growth factors. In this study, we investigated the properties of injectable polyurethane biocomposite scaffolds and their application in cutaneous wound repair using a rat excisional model. The scaffolds have a minimal reaction exotherm and clinically relevant working and setting times. Moreover, the biocomposites have mechanical and thermal properties consistent with rubbery elastomers. In the rat excisional wound model, injection of settable biocomposite scaffolds stented the wounds at early time points, resulting in a regenerative rather than a scarring phenotype at later time points. Measurements of wound width and thickness revealed that the treated wounds were less contracted at day 7 compared to blank wounds. Analysis of cell proliferation and apoptosis showed that the scaffolds were biocompatible and supported tissue ingrowth. Myofibroblast formation and collagen fiber organization provided evidence that the scaffolds have a positive effect on extracellular matrix remodeling by disrupting the formation of an aligned matrix under elevated tension. In summary, we have developed an injectable biodegradable polyurethane biocomposite scaffold that enhances cutaneous wound healing in a rat model. PMID:22105887

  18. Commercial Contract Training, Marine Corps Area VOTEC Support Center (AVSC) Guidelines. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, D. R.; And Others

    The report provides a description of the Phase II findings of a two-phase study to determine if certain Marine Corps skill training requirements could be satisfied through contract with qualified commercial sources. It demonstrates the utility of the commercial contract training concept and contains information useful to Area VOTEC…

  19. Sequenced Contractions and Abbreviations for Model 2 Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronnell, Bruce

    The nature and use of contractions and abbreviations in beginning reading is discussed and applied to the Southwest Regional Laboratory (SWRL) Mod 2 Reading Program, a four-year program (K-3) for teaching reading skills to primary-grade children. The contractions and abbreviations are listed and sequenced for the reading program. The results of…

  20. 48 CFR 5152.245-9001 - Government property for installation support services (cost-reimbursement contracts).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... or lose its identity as personal property by being attached to any real property. The Contractor... the provisions of FAR subpart 45.5 in effect on the date of this contract. (g) Maintenance. (1)...

  1. 48 CFR 5152.245-9001 - Government property for installation support services (cost-reimbursement contracts).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... or lose its identity as personal property by being attached to any real property. The Contractor... the provisions of FAR subpart 45.5 in effect on the date of this contract. (g) Maintenance. (1)...

  2. 48 CFR 5152.245-9001 - Government property for installation support services (cost-reimbursement contracts).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... or lose its identity as personal property by being attached to any real property. The Contractor... the provisions of FAR subpart 45.5 in effect on the date of this contract. (g) Maintenance. (1)...

  3. 48 CFR 5152.245-9001 - Government property for installation support services (cost-reimbursement contracts).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... or lose its identity as personal property by being attached to any real property. The Contractor... the provisions of FAR subpart 45.5 in effect on the date of this contract. (g) Maintenance. (1)...

  4. 48 CFR 5152.245-9001 - Government property for installation support services (cost-reimbursement contracts).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... or lose its identity as personal property by being attached to any real property. The Contractor... the provisions of FAR subpart 45.5 in effect on the date of this contract. (g) Maintenance. (1)...

  5. Mathematical Model Development and Simulation Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, Ronald C.; Tobbe, Patrick A.

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed in support of the Contact Dynamics 6DOF Facility and the Flight Robotics Lab at NASA/ MSFC in the areas of Mathematical Model Development and Simulation Support.

  6. Contracts and management services site support program plan WBS 6.10.14

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, J.M. Jr.

    1994-09-01

    Contracts and Management Services is recognized as the central focal point for programs having company or sitewide application in pursuit of the Hanford Missions`s financial and operational objectives. Contracts and Management Services actively pursues cost savings and operational efficiencies through: Management Standards by ensuring all employees have an accessible, integrated system of clear, complete, accurate, timely, and useful management control policies and procedures; Contract Reform by restructuring the contract, organization, and cost accounting systems to refocus Hanford contract activities on output products; Systems and Operations Evaluation by directing the Cost Reduction program, Great Ideas, and Span of Management activities; Program Administration by enforcing conditions of Accountability (whether DEAR-based or FAR-based) for WHC, BCSR, ICF KH, and BHI; Contract Performance activities; chairing the WHC Cost Reduction Review Board; and analyzing companywide Performance Measures; Data Standards and Administration by establishing and directing the company data management program; giving direction to the major RL programs and mission areas for implementation of cost-effective and efficient data management practices; directing all operations, application, and interfaces contained within the Hanford PeopleCore System; directing accomplishment and delivery of TPA data management milestones; and directing the sitewide data management processes for Data Standards and the Data Directory.

  7. Hemodynamic effects of pressure-volume relation in the atrial contraction model on the total artificial heart using centrifugal blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Shiga, Takuya; Kuroda, Takehito; Tsuboko, Yusuke; Miura, Hidekazu; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Yambe, Tomoyuki

    2013-01-01

    Hemodynamic effects of atrial contraction with centrifugal pump type total artificial heart is unknown. In this study, we simulated an atrial contraction in a mock model. By the driving condition with higher pressure in the mock atrial model, the load during atrial contraction increased. Based on these findings, we examined atrial contraction in the animal using adult goats. Prior to the measurement, we installed a centrifugal-type ventricular assist device (VADs), and then clamped both ventricles. We measured the hemodynamic data without ventricular contractile functions in order to obtain the effect of atrial contraction on hemodynamics under the condition of the total artificial heart (TAH) circulatory support model. We could estimate the heart rate by revolution number and voltage of pumps. There might be a possibility that we could regulate autonomic nervous response with the control of cardiac output. PMID:24110062

  8. A multi-agent cell-based model for wound contraction.

    PubMed

    Boon, W M; Koppenol, D C; Vermolen, F J

    2016-05-24

    A mathematical model for wound contraction is presented. The model is based on a cell-based formalism where fibroblasts, myofibroblasts and the immune reaction are taken into account. The model is used to simulate contraction of a wound using point forces on the cell boundary and it also determines the orientation of collagen after restoration of the damage. The paper presents the mathematical model in terms of the equations and assumptions, as well as some implications of the modelling. The present model predicts that the amount of final contraction is larger if the migration velocity of the leukocytes is larger and hence it is important that the immune system functions well to prevent contractures. Further, the present model is the first cell-based model that combines the immune system to final contractions. PMID:26805459

  9. Versatile Support For Electromagnetic-Test Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Ford, Eddie D.

    1994-01-01

    Supporting apparatus holds model for measurements of electromagnetic properties. Includes rigid swept strut, on end of which model oriented over range of angles. Designed to interfere minimally with electromagnetic measurements.

  10. Alternative Education/Alternative Revenue. A. Contract Training: Public and Private Sector Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lestina, Raymond; Curry, Beverly A.

    1989-01-01

    Highlights two models of contract education, using Triton College's (IL) programs as examples. Describes Triton's Employee Development Institute, which contracts to provide specific training to local businesses, and Triton's Continuing Education Center for Health Professionals (CECHP), which co-sponsors programs for the continuing education of…

  11. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review number 87

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    Approximately 30 research projects are summarized in this report. Title of the project, contract number, company or university, award amount, principal investigators, objectives, and summary of technical progress are given for each project. Enhanced oil recovery projects include chemical flooding, gas displacement, and thermal recovery. Most of the research projects though are related to geoscience technology and reservoir characterization.

  12. 76 FR 16349 - Notice of Policy Regarding Civil Aircraft Operators Providing Contract Support to Government...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ... operator with a written declaration (from the contracting officer or higher- level official) of public... statute; and The declaration is made in advance of the proposed public aircraft flight. To implement this... is a declaration of public aircraft status, all operations must be conducted in accordance with...

  13. Mathematical Modeling Of Life-Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshan, Panchalam K.; Ganapathi, Balasubramanian; Jan, Darrell L.; Ferrall, Joseph F.; Rohatgi, Naresh K.

    1994-01-01

    Generic hierarchical model of life-support system developed to facilitate comparisons of options in design of system. Model represents combinations of interdependent subsystems supporting microbes, plants, fish, and land animals (including humans). Generic model enables rapid configuration of variety of specific life support component models for tradeoff studies culminating in single system design. Enables rapid evaluation of effects of substituting alternate technologies and even entire groups of technologies and subsystems. Used to synthesize and analyze life-support systems ranging from relatively simple, nonregenerative units like aquariums to complex closed-loop systems aboard submarines or spacecraft. Model, called Generic Modular Flow Schematic (GMFS), coded in such chemical-process-simulation languages as Aspen Plus and expressed as three-dimensional spreadsheet.

  14. The Entrepreneurial Model of Supported Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markve, Robert; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Existing models of supported employment (individual placement, mobile crew, enclave, and benchwork models) have limited utility in rural areas. The Black Hills Special Services Cooperative (Sturgis, South Dakota) developed an entrepreneurial model that addresses the lack of rural employers and transportation problems by creating new businesses…

  15. Filial Piety by Contract? The Emergence, Implementation, and Implications of the "Family Support Agreement" in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Rita Jing-Ann

    2011-01-01

    China has the largest aging population in the world today. Despite the Chinese tradition of filial piety, economic, social, cultural, and familial changes have made it increasingly difficult for older Chinese to receive support from adult children. To ensure parental support, the Family Support Agreement (FSA) emerged from a local community in the…

  16. Mechanisms test bed math model modification and simulation support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilchrist, Andrea C.; Tobbe, Patrick A.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed under contract NAS8-38771 in support of the Marshall Space Flight Center Six Degree of Freedom Motion Facility and Flight Robotics Laboratory. The contract activities included the development of the two flexible body and Remote Manipulator System simulations, Dynamic Overhead Target Simulator control system and operating software, Global Positioning System simulation, and Manipulator Coupled Spacecraft Controls Testbed. Technical support was also provided for the Lightning Imaging Sensor and Solar X-Ray Imaging programs. The cover sheets and introductory sections for the documentation written under this contract are provided as an appendix.

  17. Characterization of an acute muscle contraction model using cultured C2C12 myotubes.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Yasuko; Miyatake, Shouta; Takagi, Mayumi; Nakamura, Mio; Okeda, Ai; Nakano, Taemi; Hirshman, Michael F; Goodyear, Laurie J; Fujii, Nobuharu L

    2012-01-01

    A cultured C2C12 myotube contraction system was examined for application as a model for acute contraction-induced phenotypes of skeletal muscle. C2C12 myotubes seeded into 4-well rectangular plates were placed in a contraction system equipped with a carbon electrode at each end. The myotubes were stimulated with electric pulses of 50 V at 1 Hz for 3 ms at 997-ms intervals. Approximately 80% of the myotubes were observed to contract microscopically, and the contractions lasted for at least 3 h with electrical stimulation. Calcium ion (Ca²⁺) transient evoked by the electric pulses was detected fluorescently with Fluo-8. Phosphorylation of protein kinase B/Akt (Akt), 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38), and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK)1/2, which are intracellular signaling proteins typically activated in exercised/contracted skeletal muscle, was observed in the electrically stimulated C2C12 myotubes. The contractions induced by the electric pulses increased glucose uptake and depleted glycogen in the C2C12 myotubes. C2C12 myotubes that differentiated after exogenous gene transfection by a lipofection or an electroporation method retained their normal contractile ability by electrical stimulation. These findings show that our C2C12 cell contraction system reproduces the muscle phenotypes that arise invivo (exercise), in situ (hindlimb muscles in an anesthetized animal), and invitro (dissected muscle tissues in incubation buffer) by acute muscle contraction, demonstrating that the system is applicable for the analysis of intracellular events evoked by acute muscle contraction. PMID:23300713

  18. Support of NASA quality requirements by defense contract administration services regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrar, Hiram D.

    1966-01-01

    Defense Contract Administration Services Regions (DCASR) quality assurance personnel performing under NASA Letters of Delegation must work closely with the assigned technical representative of the NASA centers. It is realized that technical personnel from the NASA Centers cannot make on-site visits as frequently as they would like to. However, DCASR quality assurance personnel would know the assigned NASA technical representative and should contact him when problems arise. The technical representative is the expert on the hardware and should be consulted on any problem area. It is important that the DCASR quality assurance personnel recommend to the delegating NASA Center any new or improved methods of which they may be aware which would assist in achieving the desired quality and reliability in NASA hardware. NASA expects assignment of competent personnel in the Quality Assurance functional area and is not only buying the individual's technical skill, but also his experience. Suggestions by field personnel can many times up-grade the quality or the hardware.

  19. Mitochondrial fusion is frequent in skeletal muscle and supports excitation–contraction coupling

    PubMed Central

    Eisner, Verónica; Lenaers, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Genetic targeting experiments indicate a fundamental role for mitochondrial fusion proteins in mammalian physiology. However, owing to the multiple functions of fusion proteins, their related phenotypes are not necessarily caused by altered mitochondrial fusion. Perhaps the biggest mystery is presented by skeletal muscle, where mostly globular-shaped mitochondria are densely packed into the narrow intermyofilamental space, limiting the interorganellar interactions. We show here that mitochondria form local networks and regularly undergo fusion events to share matrix content in skeletal muscle fibers. However, fusion events are less frequent and more stable in the fibers than in nondifferentiated myoblasts. Complementation among muscle mitochondria was suppressed by both in vivo genetic perturbations and chronic alcohol consumption that cause myopathy. An Mfn1-dependent pathway is revealed whereby fusion inhibition weakens the metabolic reserve of mitochondria to cause dysregulation of calcium oscillations during prolonged stimulation. Thus, fusion dynamically connects skeletal muscle mitochondria and its prolonged loss jeopardizes bioenergetics and excitation–contraction coupling, providing a potential pathomechanism contributing to myopathies. PMID:24751540

  20. A POROELASTIC MODEL FOR CELL CRAWLING INCLUDING MECHANICAL COUPLING BETWEEN CYTOSKELETAL CONTRACTION AND ACTIN POLYMERIZATION.

    PubMed

    Taber, L A; Shi, Y; Yang, L; Bayly, P V

    2011-01-01

    Much is known about the biophysical mechanisms involved in cell crawling, but how these processes are coordinated to produce directed motion is not well understood. Here, we propose a new hypothesis whereby local cytoskeletal contraction generates fluid flow through the lamellipodium, with the pressure at the front of the cell facilitating actin polymerization which pushes the leading edge forward. The contraction, in turn, is regulated by stress in the cytoskeleton. To test this hypothesis, finite element models for a crawling cell are presented. These models are based on nonlinear poroelasticity theory, modified to include the effects of active contraction and growth, which are regulated by mechanical feedback laws. Results from the models agree reasonably well with published experimental data for cell speed, actin flow, and cytoskeletal deformation in migrating fish epidermal keratocytes. The models also suggest that oscillations can occur for certain ranges of parameter values. PMID:21765817

  1. Technologies, Products, and Models Supporting Knowledge Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luan, Jing; Serban, Andreea M.

    2002-01-01

    Based on a taxonomy of knowledge management processes, provides a synopsis of technologies and vendors that support knowledge management. Proposes a model for classifying the various types of technologies related to knowledge management that are most often used in institutional research. (EV)

  2. Supporting the Serial in the SERIOL Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Carol

    2008-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that orthographical lexical access in visual word recognition takes place in parallel, with all letters activated at the same time. In contrast, in the SERIOL model of letter-position encoding, letters fire sequentially (Whitney, 2001). I present further support for such seriality on several fronts. (1) The reasons that led…

  3. Natural limits of electroweak model as contraction of its gauge group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromov, N. A.

    2015-06-01

    The low and higher energy limits of the electroweak model are obtained from the first principles of gauge theory. Both limits are given by the same contraction of the gauge group, but for the different consistent rescalings of the field space. Mathematical contraction parameter in both cases is interpreted as energy. Very weak neutrino-matter interactions are explained by zero tending contraction parameter, which depends on neutrino energy. The second consistent rescaling corresponds to the higher energy limit of the electroweak model. At the infinite energy all particles lose mass, electroweak interactions become long-range and are mediated by neutral currents. The limit model represents the development of the early Universe from the big bang up to the end of the first second.

  4. Non-invasive muscle contraction assay to study rodent models of sarcopenia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Age-related sarcopenia is a disease state of loss of muscle mass and strength that affects physical function and mobility leading to falls, fractures, and disability. The need for therapies to treat age-related sarcopenia has attracted intensive preclinical research. To facilitate the discovery of these therapies, we have developed a non-invasive rat muscle functional assay system to efficiently measure muscle force and evaluate the efficacy of drug candidates. Methods The lower leg muscles of anesthetized rats are artificially stimulated with surface electrodes on the knee holders and the heel support, causing the lower leg muscles to push isometric pedals that are attached to force transducers. We developed a stimulation protocol to perform a fatigability test that reveals functional muscle parameters like maximal force, the rate of fatigue, fatigue-resistant force, as well as a fatigable muscle force index. The system is evaluated in a rat aging model and a rat glucocorticoid-induced muscle loss model Results The aged rats were generally weaker than adult rats and showed a greater reduction in their fatigable force when compared to their fatigue-resistant force. Glucocorticoid treated rats mostly lost fatigable force and fatigued at a higher rate, indicating reduced force from glycolytic fibers with reduced energy reserves. Conclusions The involuntary contraction assay is a reliable system to assess muscle function in rodents and can be applied in preclinical research, including age-related sarcopenia and other myopathy. PMID:22035016

  5. Mathematical model of excitation-contraction in a uterine smooth muscle cell.

    PubMed

    Bursztyn, Limor; Eytan, Osnat; Jaffa, Ariel J; Elad, David

    2007-05-01

    Uterine contractility is generated by contractions of myometrial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) that compose most of the myometrial layer of the uterine wall. Calcium ion (Ca(2+)) entry into the cell can be initiated by depolarization of the cell membrane. The increase in the free Ca(2+) concentration within the cell initiates a chain of reactions, which lead to formation of cross bridges between actin and myosin filaments, and thereby the cell contracts. During contraction the SMC shortens while it exerts forces on neighboring cells. A mathematical model of myometrial SMC contraction has been developed to study this process of excitation and contraction. The model can be used to describe the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and stress produced by the cell in response to depolarization of the cell membrane. The model accounts for the operation of three Ca(2+) control mechanisms: voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels, Ca(2+) pumps, and Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers. The processes of myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation and stress production are accounted for using the cross-bridge model of Hai and Murphy (Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 254: C99-C106, 1988) and are coupled to the Ca(2+) concentration through the rate constant of myosin phosphorylation. Measurements of Ca(2+), MLC phosphorylation, and force in contracting cells were used to set the model parameters and test its ability to predict the cell response to stimulation. The model has been used to reproduce results of voltage-clamp experiments performed in myometrial cells of pregnant rats as well as the results of simultaneous measurements of MLC phosphorylation and force production in human nonpregnant myometrial cells. PMID:17267547

  6. The psychological contract: is the UK National Health Service a model employer?

    PubMed

    Fielden, Sandra; Whiting, Fiona

    2007-05-01

    The UK National Health Service (NHS) is facing recruitment challenges that mean it will need to become an 'employer of choice' if it is to continue to attract high-quality employees. This paper reports the findings from a study focusing on allied health professional staff (n = 67), aimed at establishing the expectations of the NHS inherent in their current psychological contract and to consider whether the government's drive to make the NHS a model employer meets those expectations. The findings show that the most important aspects of the psychological contract were relational and based on the investment made in the employment relationship by both parties. The employment relationship was one of high involvement but also one where transactional contract items, such as pay, were still of some importance. Although the degree of employee satisfaction with the relational content of the psychological contract was relatively positive, there was, nevertheless, a mismatch between levels of importance placed on such aspects of the contract and levels of satisfaction, with employees increasingly placing greater emphasis on those items the NHS is having the greatest difficulty providing. Despite this apparent disparity between employee expectation and the fulfilment of those expectations, the overall health of the psychological contract was still high. PMID:17524221

  7. Simulating uterine contraction by using an electro-chemo-mechanical model.

    PubMed

    Sharifimajd, Babak; Thore, Carl-Johan; Stålhand, Jonas

    2016-06-01

    Contractions of uterine smooth muscle cells consist of a chain of physiological processes. These contractions provide the required force to expel the fetus from the uterus. The inclusion of these physiological processes is, therefore, imperative when studying uterine contractions. In this study, an electro-chemo-mechanical model to replicate the excitation, activation, and contraction of uterine smooth muscle cells is developed. The presented modeling strategy enables efficient integration of knowledge about physiological processes at the cellular level to the organ level. The model is implemented in a three-dimensional finite element setting to simulate uterus contraction during labor in response to electrical discharges generated by pacemaker cells and propagated within the myometrium via gap junctions. Important clinical factors, such as uterine electrical activity and intrauterine pressure, are predicted using this simulation. The predictions are in agreement with clinically measured data reported in the literature. A parameter study is also carried out to investigate the impact of physiologically related parameters on the uterine contractility. PMID:26162461

  8. Evaluation of an in vitro muscle contraction model in mouse primary cultured myotubes.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Yasuko; Ogino, Shinya; Ito, Miyuki; Furuichi, Yasuro; Takagi, Mayumi; Yamada, Mio; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Ono, Yusuke; Fujii, Nobuharu L

    2016-03-15

    To construct an in vitro contraction model with the primary cultured myotubes, we isolated satellite cells from the mouse extensor digitorum longus. Differentiated myotubes possessed a greater number of sarcomere assemblies and higher expression levels of myosin heavy chain, cytochrome c oxidase IV, and myoglobin than in C2C12 myotubes. In agreement with these results regarding the sarcomere assemblies and protein expressions, the primary myotubes showed higher contractile activity stimulated by the electric pulses than that in the C2C12 myotubes. These data suggest that mouse primary myotubes will be a valuable research tool as an in vitro muscle contraction model. PMID:26548957

  9. Modeling Magnetomyograms of Uterine Contractions during Pregnancy Using a Multiscale Forward Electromagnetic Approach

    PubMed Central

    La Rosa, Patricio S.; Wilson, James D.; Eswaran, Hari; Nehorai, Arye

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of uterine contractions during pregnancy is especially important in predicting the onset of labor and thus in forecasting preterm deliveries. Preterm birth can cause serious health problems in newborns, as well as large financial burdens to society. Various techniques such as electromyography (EMG) and magnetomyography (MMG) have been developed to quantify uterine contractions. However, no widely accepted method to predict labor based on electromagnetic measurement is available. Therefore, developing a biophysical model of EMG and MMG could help better understand uterine contractions, interpret real measurements, and detect labor. In this work, we propose a multiscale realistic model of uterine contractions during pregnancy. At the cellular level, building on bifurcation theory, we apply generalized FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) equations that produces both plateau-type and bursting-type action potentials. At the tissue level, we introduce a random fiber orientation model applicable to an arbitrary uterine shape. We also develop an analytical expression for the propagation speed of transmembrane potential. At the organ level, a realistic volume conductor geometry model is provided based on magnetic resonance images of a pregnant woman. To simulate the measurements from the SQUID Array for Reproductive Assessment (SARA) device, we propose a sensor array model. Our model is able to reproduce the characteristics of action potentials. Additionally, we investigate the sensitivity of MMG to model configuration aspects such as volume geometry, fiber orientation, and pacemaker location. Our numerical results show that fiber orientation and pacemaker location are the key aspects that greatly affect the MMG as measured by the SARA device. We conclude that sphere is appropriate as an approximation of the volume geometry. The initial step towards validating the model against real MMG measurement is also presented. Our results show that the model is

  10. Modeling Magnetomyograms of Uterine Contractions during Pregnancy Using a Multiscale Forward Electromagnetic Approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengxue; Tidwell, Vanessa; La Rosa, Patricio S; Wilson, James D; Eswaran, Hari; Nehorai, Arye

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of uterine contractions during pregnancy is especially important in predicting the onset of labor and thus in forecasting preterm deliveries. Preterm birth can cause serious health problems in newborns, as well as large financial burdens to society. Various techniques such as electromyography (EMG) and magnetomyography (MMG) have been developed to quantify uterine contractions. However, no widely accepted method to predict labor based on electromagnetic measurement is available. Therefore, developing a biophysical model of EMG and MMG could help better understand uterine contractions, interpret real measurements, and detect labor. In this work, we propose a multiscale realistic model of uterine contractions during pregnancy. At the cellular level, building on bifurcation theory, we apply generalized FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) equations that produces both plateau-type and bursting-type action potentials. At the tissue level, we introduce a random fiber orientation model applicable to an arbitrary uterine shape. We also develop an analytical expression for the propagation speed of transmembrane potential. At the organ level, a realistic volume conductor geometry model is provided based on magnetic resonance images of a pregnant woman. To simulate the measurements from the SQUID Array for Reproductive Assessment (SARA) device, we propose a sensor array model. Our model is able to reproduce the characteristics of action potentials. Additionally, we investigate the sensitivity of MMG to model configuration aspects such as volume geometry, fiber orientation, and pacemaker location. Our numerical results show that fiber orientation and pacemaker location are the key aspects that greatly affect the MMG as measured by the SARA device. We conclude that sphere is appropriate as an approximation of the volume geometry. The initial step towards validating the model against real MMG measurement is also presented. Our results show that the model is

  11. Support Vector Training of Protein Alignment Models

    PubMed Central

    Joachims, Thorsten; Elber, Ron; Pillardy, Jaroslaw

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Sequence to structure alignment is an important step in homology modeling of protein structures. Incorporation of features such as secondary structure, solvent accessibility, or evolutionary information improve sequence to structure alignment accuracy, but conventional generative estimation techniques for alignment models impose independence assumptions that make these features difficult to include in a principled way. In this paper, we overcome this problem using a Support Vector Machine (SVM) method that provides a well-founded way of estimating complex alignment models with hundred of thousands of parameters. Furthermore, we show that the method can be trained using a variety of loss functions. In a rigorous empirical evaluation, the SVM algorithm outperforms the generative alignment method SSALN, a highly accurate generative alignment model that incorporates structural information. The alignment model learned by the SVM aligns 50% of the residues correctly and aligns over 70% of the residues within a shift of four positions. PMID:18707536

  12. Quantitative model for predicting lymph formation and muscle compressibility in skeletal muscle during contraction and stretch

    PubMed Central

    Causey, Laura; Cowin, Stephen C.; Weinbaum, Sheldon

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is widely perceived as nearly incompressible despite the fact that blood and lymphatic vessels within the endomysial and perimysial spaces undergo significant changes in diameter and length during stretch and contraction. These fluid shifts between fascicle and interstitial compartments have proved extremely difficult to measure. In this paper, we propose a theoretical framework based on a space-filling hexagonal fascicle array to provide predictions of the displacement of blood and lymph into and out of the muscle’s endomysium and perimysium during stretch and contraction. We also use this model to quantify the distribution of blood and initial lymphatic (IL) vessels within a fascicle and its perimysial space using data for the rat spinotrapezius muscle. On average, there are 11 muscle fibers, 0.4 arteriole/venule pairs, and 0.2 IL vessels per fascicle. The model predicts that the blood volume in the endomysial space increases 24% and decreases 22% for a 20% contraction and stretch, respectively. However, these significant changes in blood volume in the endomysium produce a change of only ∼2% in fascicle cross-sectional area. In contrast, the entire muscle deviates from isovolumetry by 7% and 6% for a 20% contraction and stretch, respectively, largely attributable to the significantly larger blood volume changes that occur in the perimysial space. This suggests that arcade blood vessels in the perimysial space provide the primary pumping action required for the filling and emptying of ILs during muscular contraction and stretch. PMID:22615376

  13. Classroom Crisis Intervention through Contracting: A Moral Development Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smaby, Marlowe H.; Tamminen, Armas W.

    1981-01-01

    A counselor can arbitrate problem situations using a systematic approach to classroom intervention which includes meetings with the teacher and students. This crisis intervention model based on moral development can be more effective than reliance on guidance activities disconnected from the actual classroom settings where the problems arise.…

  14. The Generalized Hill Model: A Kinematic Approach Towards Active Muscle Contraction.

    PubMed

    Göktepe, Serdar; Menzel, Andreas; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-12-01

    Excitation-contraction coupling is the physiological process of converting an electrical stimulus into a mechanical response. In muscle, the electrical stimulus is an action potential and the mechanical response is active contraction. The classical Hill model characterizes muscle contraction though one contractile element, activated by electrical excitation, and two non-linear springs, one in series and one in parallel. This rheology translates into an additive decomposition of the total stress into a passive and an active part. Here we supplement this additive decomposition of the stress by a multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into a passive and an active part. We generalize the one-dimensional Hill model to the three-dimensional setting and constitutively define the passive stress as a function of the total deformation gradient and the active stress as a function of both the total deformation gradient and its active part. We show that this novel approach combines the features of both the classical stress-based Hill model and the recent active-strain models. While the notion of active stress is rather phenomenological in nature, active strain is micro-structurally motivated, physically measurable, and straightforward to calibrate. We demonstrate that our model is capable of simulating excitation-contraction coupling in cardiac muscle with its characteristic features of wall thickening, apical lift, and ventricular torsion. PMID:25221354

  15. The Generalized Hill Model: A Kinematic Approach Towards Active Muscle Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Menzel, Andreas; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Excitation-contraction coupling is the physiological process of converting an electrical stimulus into a mechanical response. In muscle, the electrical stimulus is an action potential and the mechanical response is active contraction. The classical Hill model characterizes muscle contraction though one contractile element, activated by electrical excitation, and two non-linear springs, one in series and one in parallel. This rheology translates into an additive decomposition of the total stress into a passive and an active part. Here we supplement this additive decomposition of the stress by a multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into a passive and an active part. We generalize the one-dimensional Hill model to the three-dimensional setting and constitutively define the passive stress as a function of the total deformation gradient and the active stress as a function of both the total deformation gradient and its active part. We show that this novel approach combines the features of both the classical stress-based Hill model and the recent active-strain models. While the notion of active stress is rather phenomenological in nature, active strain is micro-structurally motivated, physically measurable, and straightforward to calibrate. We demonstrate that our model is capable of simulating excitation-contraction coupling in cardiac muscle with its characteristic features of wall thickening, apical lift, and ventricular torsion. PMID:25221354

  16. The generalized Hill model: A kinematic approach towards active muscle contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göktepe, Serdar; Menzel, Andreas; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-12-01

    Excitation-contraction coupling is the physiological process of converting an electrical stimulus into a mechanical response. In muscle, the electrical stimulus is an action potential and the mechanical response is active contraction. The classical Hill model characterizes muscle contraction though one contractile element, activated by electrical excitation, and two non-linear springs, one in series and one in parallel. This rheology translates into an additive decomposition of the total stress into a passive and an active part. Here we supplement this additive decomposition of the stress by a multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into a passive and an active part. We generalize the one-dimensional Hill model to the three-dimensional setting and constitutively define the passive stress as a function of the total deformation gradient and the active stress as a function of both the total deformation gradient and its active part. We show that this novel approach combines the features of both the classical stress-based Hill model and the recent active-strain models. While the notion of active stress is rather phenomenological in nature, active strain is micro-structurally motivated, physically measurable, and straightforward to calibrate. We demonstrate that our model is capable of simulating excitation-contraction coupling in cardiac muscle with its characteristic features of wall thickening, apical lift, and ventricular torsion.

  17. Analysis of Commercial Contract Training for the Navy (Phase II) [And] Commercial Contract Training Navy Area VOTEC Support Center (AVSC) Guidelines. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, D. Robert; And Others

    The two-part report describing the Phase 2 findings of a two-phase study demonstrates the utility of the commercial contract training concept for satisfying certain Navy skill training requirements. Part 1 concerns source evaluation, skill analysis and selection, contractual considerations, and comparative training capability evaluation. It…

  18. Analysis of Commercial Contract Training for the Marine Corps (Phase II) [And] Commercial Contract Training Marine Corps Area VOTEC Support Center (AVSC) Guidelines. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, D. Robert; And Others

    The two-part report describing the Phase 2 findings of a two-phase study demonstrates the utility of the commercial contract training concept for satisfying certain Marine Corps skill training requirements. Part 1 concerns source evaluation, skill analysis and selection, contractual considerations, and comparative training capability evaluation.…

  19. Clinical ethics support services: an evolving model.

    PubMed

    Schlairet, Maura C; Kiser, Ken; Norris, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Ethical issues arising in clinical practice are complex and clinicians must be able to manage the needs of ethically vulnerable patients and families. This paper describes a model for providing Clinical Ethics Support Services as a broad spectrum of care for management of conflict and ethically difficult situations in health care and describes how an ethics consultation process was transformed to a Holistic Care Continuum for managing the needs of ethically vulnerable patients. During a 4-year journey at a regional medical center, a Family Support Team played a central role in identification of ethically vulnerable patients/family, interdisciplinary connectivity, and iterative engagement in the clinical milieu. Concepts of professional advocacy and interdisciplinary perspectives resulted in a model for ethically sound patient care promoting communication among patients/family, staff, and professionals; clarification of interdisciplinary roles and responsibilities; establishment of mutually derived goals and shared solutions; and implementation of interventions maximizing institutional resources. PMID:22357314

  20. Another Look at Helmholtz's Model for the Gravitational Contraction of the Sun

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tort, A. C.; Nogarol, F.

    2011-01-01

    We take another look at the Helmholtz model for the gravitational contraction of the Sun. We show that there are two other pedagogically useful ways of rederiving Helmholtz's main results that make use of Gauss's law, the concept of gravitational field energy and the work-kinetic energy theorem. An account of the energy balance involved in the…

  1. Promises from Afar: A Model of International Student Psychological Contract in Business Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordia, Sarbari; Bordia, Prashant; Restubog, Simon Lloyd D.

    2015-01-01

    Despite their significant presence in western business schools, the needs and experiences of international students have not been adequately reflected in the business education literature. We draw upon psychological contract theory--used to understand employer-employee relationships--to develop a novel theoretical model on the international…

  2. Uniform Contractivity in Wasserstein Metric for the Original 1D Kac's Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauray, Maxime

    2016-03-01

    We study here a very popular 1D jump model introduced by Kac: it consists of N velocities encountering random binary collisions at which they randomly exchange energy. We show the uniform (in N) exponential contractivity of the dynamics in a non-standard Monge-Kantorovich-Wasserstein: precisely the MKW metric of order 2 on the energy. The result is optimal in the sense that for each N, the contractivity constant is equal to the L^2 spectral gap of the generator associated to Kac's dynamic. As a corollary, we get an uniform but non optimal contractivity in the MKW metric of order 4. We use a simple coupling that works better that the parallel one. The estimates are simple and new (to the best of our knowledge).

  3. Maintenance service contract model for heavy equipment in mining industry using principal agent theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakpahan, Eka K. A.; Iskandar, Bermawi P.

    2015-12-01

    Mining industry is characterized by a high operational revenue, and hence high availability of heavy equipment used in mining industry is a critical factor to ensure the revenue target. To maintain high avaliability of the heavy equipment, the equipment's owner hires an agent to perform maintenance action. Contract is then used to control the relationship between the two parties involved. The traditional contracts such as fixed price, cost plus or penalty based contract studied is unable to push agent's performance to exceed target, and this in turn would lead to a sub-optimal result (revenue). This research deals with designing maintenance contract compensation schemes. The scheme should induce agent to select the highest possible maintenance effort level, thereby pushing agent's performance and achieve maximum utility for both parties involved. Principal agent theory is used as a modeling approach due to its ability to simultaneously modeled owner and agent decision making process. Compensation schemes considered in this research includes fixed price, cost sharing and revenue sharing. The optimal decision is obtained using a numerical method. The results show that if both parties are risk neutral, then there are infinite combination of fixed price, cost sharing and revenue sharing produced the same optimal solution. The combination of fixed price and cost sharing contract results in the optimal solution when the agent is risk averse, while the optimal combination of fixed price and revenue sharing contract is obtained when agent is risk averse. When both parties are risk averse, the optimal compensation scheme is a combination of fixed price, cost sharing and revenue sharing.

  4. The Optimal Licensing Contract in a Differentiated Stackelberg Model

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Xianpei; Yang, Lijun; Zhang, Huaige; Zhao, Dan

    2014-01-01

    This paper extends the work of Wang (2002) by considering a differentiated Stackelberg model, when the leader firm is an inside innovator and licenses its new technology by three options, that is, fixed-fee licensing, royalty licensing, and two-part tariff licensing. The main contributions and conclusions of this paper are threefold. First of all, this paper derives a very different result from Wang (2002). We show that, with a nondrastic innovation, royalty licensing is always better than fixed-fee licensing for the innovator; with a drastic innovation, royalty licensing is superior to fixed-fee licensing for small values of substitution coefficient d; however when d becomes closer to 1, neither fee nor royalty licensing will occur. Secondly, this paper shows that the innovator is always better off in case of two-part tariff licensing than fixed-fee licensing no matter what the innovation size is. Thirdly, the innovator always prefers to license its nondrastic innovation by means of a two-part tariff instead of licensing by means of a royalty; however, with a drastic innovation, the optimal licensing strategy can be either a two-part tariff or a royalty, depending upon the differentiation of the goods. PMID:24683342

  5. Combined model for diabetes lifestyle support.

    PubMed

    Gyuk, Peter; Szabo, Istvan; Vassanyi, Istvan; Kosa, Istvan; Kovacs, Levente

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of diabetes mellitus is a public health related problem of modern healthcare. Surveys show that current methods to estimate the required amount of insulin are quite inefficient in practice as they are based on experience. This paper offers a new approach to predict the glucose level of people with diabetes. It combines two efficient models of the literature: one for nutrient absorption and one for glucose control. The combination of them tracks the blood sugar level considering nutrition composition, applied insulin and initial glucose level. Compared to already existing mixed meal models, the current version takes into account a more detailed nutrition composition (protein, lipid, monosaccharide, fiber and starch) supported by our expert dietary systems. Although the model gives satisfactory results even with parameter sets taken from literature, parameter training by genetic algorithms yields a better tracking of the patients. PMID:24743081

  6. Flood Impact Modelling to support decision making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Gareth; Quinn, Paul; O'Donnell, Greg

    2015-04-01

    Much of what is known about the impacts of landuse change and Natural Flood Management (NFM) is at the local/plot scale. Evidence of the downstream impacts at the larger catchment scale is limited. However, the strategic and financial decisions of land managers, stakeholders and policy makers are made at the larger scale. There are a number of techniques that have the potential to scale local impacts to the catchment scale. This poster will show findings for the 30km2 Leven catchment, North Yorkshire, England. A NFM approach has been adopted by the Environment Agency to reduce flood risk within the catchment. A dense network of stream level gauges were installed in the catchment at the commencement of this project to gain a detailed understanding of the catchment behaviour during storm events. A novel Flood Impact Modelling (FIM) approach has been adopted which uses the network of gauges to disaggregate the outlet hydrograph in terms of source locations. Using a combination of expert opinion and local evidence, the model can be used to assess the impacts of distributed changes in land use management and NFM on flood events. A number of potential future landuse and NFM scenarios have been modelled to investigate their impact on flood peaks. These modelled outcomes are mapped to a simple Decision Support Matrix (DSM). The DSM encourages end users (e.g. land managers and policy makers) to develop an NFM scheme by studying the degree to which local runoff can be attenuated and how that flow will propagate through the network to the point of impact. The DSM relates the impact on flood peaks in terms of alterations to soil management practices and landscape flow connectivity (e.g. soil underdrainage), which can be easily understood by farmers and land managers. The DSM and the FIM together provide a simple to use and transparent modelling tool, making best use of expert knowledge, to support decision making.

  7. National Transonic Facility model and model support vibration problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Clarence P., Jr.; Popernack, Thomas G., Jr.; Gloss, Blair B.

    1990-01-01

    Vibrations of models and model support system were encountered during testing in the National Transonic Facility. Model support system yaw plane vibrations have resulted in model strain gage balance design load limits being reached. These high levels of vibrations resulted in limited aerodynamic testing for several wind tunnel models. The yaw vibration problem was the subject of an intensive experimental and analytical investigation which identified the primary source of the yaw excitation and resulted in attenuation of the yaw oscillations to acceptable levels. This paper presents the principal results of analyses and experimental investigation of the yaw plane vibration problems. Also, an overview of plans for development and installation of a permanent model system dynamic and aeroelastic response measurement and monitoring system for the National Transonic Facility is presented.

  8. New contractivity condition in a population model with piecewise constant arguments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muroya, Yoshiaki

    2008-10-01

    In this paper, we improve contractivity conditions of solutions for the positive equilibrium of the following differential equation with piecewise constant arguments: where r(t) is a nonnegative continuous function on [0,+[infinity]), r(t)[not identical with]0, , bi[greater-or-equal, slanted]0, i=0,1,2,...,m, and . In particular, for the case a=0 and m[greater-or-equal, slanted]1, we really improve the known three type conditions of the contractivity for solutions of this model (see for example, [Y. Muroya, A sufficient condition on global stability in a logistic equation with piecewise constant arguments, Hokkaido Math. J. 32 (2003) 75-83]). For the other case a[not equal to]0 and m[greater-or-equal, slanted]1, under the condition , the obtained result partially improves the known results on the contractivity of solutions for the positive equilibrium of this model given by the author [Y. Muroya, Persistence, contractivity and global stability in logistic equations with piecewise constant delays, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 270 (2002) 602-635] and others.

  9. Automatic and quantitative measurement of collagen gel contraction using model-guided segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsin-Chen; Yang, Tai-Hua; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Zhao, Chunfeng; Amadio, Peter C.; Sun, Yung-Nien; Su, Fong-Chin; An, Kai-Nan

    2013-08-01

    Quantitative measurement of collagen gel contraction plays a critical role in the field of tissue engineering because it provides spatial-temporal assessment (e.g., changes of gel area and diameter during the contraction process) reflecting the cell behavior and tissue material properties. So far the assessment of collagen gels relies on manual segmentation, which is time-consuming and suffers from serious intra- and inter-observer variability. In this study, we propose an automatic method combining various image processing techniques to resolve these problems. The proposed method first detects the maximal feasible contraction range of circular references (e.g., culture dish) and avoids the interference of irrelevant objects in the given image. Then, a three-step color conversion strategy is applied to normalize and enhance the contrast between the gel and background. We subsequently introduce a deformable circular model which utilizes regional intensity contrast and circular shape constraint to locate the gel boundary. An adaptive weighting scheme was employed to coordinate the model behavior, so that the proposed system can overcome variations of gel boundary appearances at different contraction stages. Two measurements of collagen gels (i.e., area and diameter) can readily be obtained based on the segmentation results. Experimental results, including 120 gel images for accuracy validation, showed high agreement between the proposed method and manual segmentation with an average dice similarity coefficient larger than 0.95. The results also demonstrated obvious improvement in gel contours obtained by the proposed method over two popular, generic segmentation methods.

  10. Examination of Ventricular Contraction Function Using Electrical Lumped Circuit Model of Circulation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Mitsuyo; Koya, Yoshiharu; Mizoshiri, Isao

    Presently, many of the already proposed blood circulation models are mainly partial models although they are precise models. A complete model that is a combination of these partial models are difficult to analyze because it is complicated to consider both the viscosity of blood and circulatory details at the same time. So, it is difficult to control the model parameters in order to adapt to various cases of circulatory diseases. This paper proposes a complete circulation model as a lumped electrical circuit, which is comparatively simple. In the circuit model, total blood is modeled as seven lumped capacitors, representing the functions of atriums, ventricles, arteries, veins and lungs. We regard the variation of the ventricle capacitance as the driving force of the complete circulation model. In our model, we considered only the variation of pressure between each part and the blood capacity of each part. In particular, the contraction function of the left ventricle is examined under the consideration of whole blood circulation.

  11. A mathematical model of the coupled mechanisms of cell adhesion, contraction and spreading.

    PubMed

    Vernerey, Franck J; Farsad, Mehdi

    2014-03-01

    Recent research has shown that cell spreading is highly dependent on the contractility of its cytoskeleton and the mechanical properties of the environment it is located in. The dynamics of such process is critical for the development of tissue engineering strategy but is also a key player in wound contraction, tissue maintenance and angiogenesis. To better understand the underlying physics of such phenomena, the paper describes a mathematical formulation of cell spreading and contraction that couples the processes of stress fiber formation, protrusion growth through actin polymerization at the cell edge and dynamics of cross-membrane protein (integrins) enabling cell-substrate attachment. The evolving cell's cytoskeleton is modeled as a mixture of fluid, proteins and filaments that can exchange mass and generate contraction. In particular, besides self-assembling into stress fibers, actin monomers able to polymerize into an actin meshwork at the cell's boundary in order to push the membrane forward and generate protrusion. These processes are possible via the development of cell-substrate attachment complexes that arise from the mechano-sensitive equilibrium of membrane proteins, known as integrins. After deriving the governing equation driving the dynamics of cell evolution and spreading, we introduce a numerical solution based on the extended finite element method, combined with a level set formulation. Numerical simulations show that the proposed model is able to capture the dependency of cell spreading and contraction on substrate stiffness and chemistry. The very good agreement between model predictions and experimental observations suggests that mechanics plays a strong role into the coupled mechanisms of contraction, adhesion and spreading of adherent cells. PMID:23463540

  12. A mathematical model of the coupled mechanisms of cell adhesion, contraction and spreading

    PubMed Central

    Vernerey, Franck J.; Farsad, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has shown that cell spreading is highly dependent on the contractililty of its cytoskeleton and the mechanical properties of the environment it is located in. The dynamics of such process is critical for the development of tissue engineering strategy but is also a key player in wound contraction, tissue maintenance and angiogenesis. To better understand the underlying physics of such phenomena, the paper describes a mathematical formulation of cell spreading and contraction that couples the processes of stress fiber formation, protrusion growth through actin polymerization at the cell edge and dynamics of cross-membrane protein (integrins) enabling cell-substrate attachment. The evolving cell’s cytoskeleton is modeled as a mixture of fluid, proteins and filaments that can exchange mass and generate contraction. In particular, besides self-assembling into stress fibers, actin monomers able to polymerize into an actin meshwork at the cell’s boundary in order to push the membrane forward and generate protrusion. These processes are possible via the development of cell-substrate attachment complexes that arise from the mechano-sensitive equilibrium of membrane proteins, known as integrins. After deriving the governing equation driving the dynamics of cell evolution and spreading, we introduce a numerical solution based on the extended finite element method, combined with a level set formulation. Numerical simulations show that the proposed model is able to capture the dependency of cell spreading and contraction on substrate stiffness and chemistry. The very good agreement between model predictions and experimental observations suggests that mechanics plays a strong role into the coupled mechanisms of contraction, adhesion and spreading of adherent cells. PMID:23463540

  13. Graph based model to support nurses' work.

    PubMed

    Benedik, Peter; Rajkovič, Uroš; Sušteršič, Olga; Prijatelj, Vesna; Rajkovič, Vladislav

    2014-01-01

    Health care is a knowledge-based community that critically depends on knowledge management activities in order to ensure quality. Nurses are primary stakeholders and need to ensure that their information and knowledge needs are being met in such ways that enable them, to improve the quality and efficiency of health care service delivery for all subjects of health care. This paper describes a system to help nurses to create nursing care plan. It supports focusing nurse's attention on those resources/solutions that are likely to be most relevant to their particular situation/problem in nursing domain. System is based on multi-relational property graph representing a flexible modeling construct. Graph allows modeling a nursing domain (ontology) and the indices that partition domain into an efficient, searchable space where the solution to a problem is seen as abstractly defined traversals through its vertices and edges. PMID:24943559

  14. Nonlinear Dynamic Models in Advanced Life Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry

    2002-01-01

    To facilitate analysis, ALS systems are often assumed to be linear and time invariant, but they usually have important nonlinear and dynamic aspects. Nonlinear dynamic behavior can be caused by time varying inputs, changes in system parameters, nonlinear system functions, closed loop feedback delays, and limits on buffer storage or processing rates. Dynamic models are usually cataloged according to the number of state variables. The simplest dynamic models are linear, using only integration, multiplication, addition, and subtraction of the state variables. A general linear model with only two state variables can produce all the possible dynamic behavior of linear systems with many state variables, including stability, oscillation, or exponential growth and decay. Linear systems can be described using mathematical analysis. Nonlinear dynamics can be fully explored only by computer simulations of models. Unexpected behavior is produced by simple models having only two or three state variables with simple mathematical relations between them. Closed loop feedback delays are a major source of system instability. Exceeding limits on buffer storage or processing rates forces systems to change operating mode. Different equilibrium points may be reached from different initial conditions. Instead of one stable equilibrium point, the system may have several equilibrium points, oscillate at different frequencies, or even behave chaotically, depending on the system inputs and initial conditions. The frequency spectrum of an output oscillation may contain harmonics and the sums and differences of input frequencies, but it may also contain a stable limit cycle oscillation not related to input frequencies. We must investigate the nonlinear dynamic aspects of advanced life support systems to understand and counter undesirable behavior.

  15. Global Urbanization Modeling Supported by Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Smith, S.; Zhao, K.; Imhoff, M. L.; Thomson, A. M.; Bond-Lamberty, B. P.; Elvidge, C.

    2014-12-01

    Urbanization, one of the major human induced land cover and land use change, has profound impacts on the Earth system, and plays important roles in a variety of processes such as biodiversity loss, water and carbon cycle, and climate change. Accurate information on urban areas and their spatial distribution at the regional and global scales is important in both scientific and policy-making communities. The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) nighttime stable light data (NTL) provide a potential way to map urban area and its dynamics economically and timely. In this study, we developed a cluster-based method to estimate the optimal thresholds and map urban extents from the DMSP/OLS NTL data. The sensitivity analysis demonstrates the robustness of the derived optimal thresholds and the reliability of the cluster-based method. Compared to existing threshold techniques, our method reduces the over- and under-estimation issue, when mapping urban extent over a large area. Using this cluster-based method, we built new global maps of 1-km urban extent from the NTL data (Figure 1) and evaluated its temporal dynamics from 1992 to 2013. Supported by the derived global urban maps and socio-economic drivers, we developed an integrated modeling framework by integrating a top-down macro-scale statistical model with a bottom-up urban growth model and projected future urban expansion.

  16. Modelling and Decision Support of Clinical Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Roland; Lux, Thomas

    The German health care market is under a rapid rate of change, forcing especially hospitals to provide high-quality services at low costs. Appropriate measures for more effective and efficient service provision are process orientation and decision support by information technology of clinical pathway of a patient. The essential requirements are adequate modelling of clinical pathways as well as usage of adequate systems, which are capable of assisting the complete path of a patient within a hospital, and preferably also outside of it, in a digital way. To fulfil these specifications the authors present a suitable concept, which meets the challenges of well-structured clinical pathways as well as rather poorly structured diagnostic and therapeutic decisions, by interplay of process-oriented and knowledge-based hospital information systems.

  17. Direct Modeling of X-Ray Diffraction Pattern from Contracting Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Koubassova, Natalia A.; Bershitsky, Sergey Y.; Ferenczi, Michael A.; Tsaturyan, Andrey K.

    2008-01-01

    A direct modeling approach was used to quantitatively interpret the two-dimensional x-ray diffraction patterns obtained from contracting mammalian skeletal muscle. The dependence of the calculated layer line intensities on the number of myosin heads bound to the thin filaments, on the conformation of these heads and on their mode of attachment to actin, was studied systematically. Results of modeling are compared to experimental data collected from permeabilized fibers from rabbit skeletal muscle contracting at 5°C and 30°C and developing low and high isometric tension, respectively. The results of the modeling show that: i), the intensity of the first actin layer line is independent of the tilt of the light chain domains of myosin heads and can be used as a measure of the fraction of myosin heads stereospecifically attached to actin; ii), during isometric contraction at near physiological temperature, the fraction of these heads is ∼40% and the light chain domains of the majority of them are more perpendicular to the filament axis than in rigor; and iii), at low temperature, when isometric tension is low, a majority of the attached myosin heads are bound to actin nonstereospecifically whereas at high temperature and tension they are bound stereospecifically. PMID:18539638

  18. Life cycle cost-based risk model for energy performance contracting retrofits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berghorn, George H.

    Buildings account for 41% of the primary energy consumption in the United States, nearly half of which is accounted for by commercial buildings. Among the greatest energy users are those in the municipalities, universities, schools, and hospitals (MUSH) market. Correctional facilities are in the upper half of all commercial building types for energy intensity. Public agencies have experienced reduced capital budgets to fund retrofits; this has led to the increased use of energy performance contracts (EPC), which are implemented by energy services companies (ESCOs). These companies guarantee a minimum amount of energy savings resulting from the retrofit activities, which in essence transfers performance risk from the owner to the contractor. Building retrofits in the MUSH market, especially correctional facilities, are well-suited to EPC, yet despite this potential and their high energy intensities, efficiency improvements lag behind that of other public building types. Complexities in project execution, lack of support for data requests and sub-metering, and conflicting project objectives have been cited as reasons for this lag effect. As a result, project-level risks must be understood in order to support wider adoption of retrofits in the public market, in particular the correctional facility sub-market. The goal of this research is to understand risks related to the execution of energy efficiency retrofits delivered via EPC in the MUSH market. To achieve this goal, in-depth analysis and improved understanding was sought with regard to ESCO risks that are unique to EPC in this market. The proposed work contributes to this understanding by developing a life cycle cost-based risk model to improve project decision making with regard to risk control and reduction. The specific objectives of the research are: (1) to perform an exploratory analysis of the EPC retrofit process and identify key areas of performance risk requiring in-depth analysis; (2) to construct a

  19. Modeling and control design of a wind tunnel model support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, David A.

    1990-01-01

    The 12-Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel at Ames Research Center is being restored. A major part of the restoration is the complete redesign of the aircraft model supports and their associated control systems. An accurate trajectory control servo system capable of positioning a model (with no measurable overshoot) is needed. Extremely small errors in scaled-model pitch angle can increase airline fuel costs for the final aircraft configuration by millions of dollars. In order to make a mechanism sufficiently accurate in pitch, a detailed structural and control-system model must be created and then simulated on a digital computer. The model must contain linear representations of the mechanical system, including masses, springs, and damping in order to determine system modes. Electrical components, both analog and digital, linear and nonlinear must also be simulated. The model of the entire closed-loop system must then be tuned to control the modes of the flexible model-support structure. The development of a system model, the control modal analysis, and the control-system design are discussed.

  20. β-adrenergic effects on cardiac myofilaments and contraction in an integrated rabbit ventricular myocyte model.

    PubMed

    Negroni, Jorge A; Morotti, Stefano; Lascano, Elena C; Gomes, Aldrin V; Grandi, Eleonora; Puglisi, José L; Bers, Donald M

    2015-04-01

    A five-state model of myofilament contraction was integrated into a well-established rabbit ventricular myocyte model of ion channels, Ca(2+) transporters and kinase signaling to analyze the relative contribution of different phosphorylation targets to the overall mechanical response driven by β-adrenergic stimulation (β-AS). β-AS effect on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) handling, Ca(2+), K(+) and Cl(-) currents, and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase properties was included based on experimental data. The inotropic effect on the myofilaments was represented as reduced myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity (XBCa) and titin stiffness, and increased cross-bridge (XB) cycling rate (XBcy). Assuming independent roles of XBCa and XBcy, the model reproduced experimental β-AS responses on action potentials and Ca(2+) transient amplitude and kinetics. It also replicated the behavior of force-Ca(2+), release-restretch, length-step, stiffness-frequency and force-velocity relationships, and increased force and shortening in isometric and isotonic twitch contractions. The β-AS effect was then switched off from individual targets to analyze their relative impact on contractility. Preventing β-AS effects on L-type Ca(2+) channels or phospholamban limited Ca(2+) transients and contractile responses in parallel, while blocking phospholemman and K(+) channel (IKs) effects enhanced Ca(2+) and inotropy. Removal of β-AS effects from XBCa enhanced contractile force while decreasing peak Ca(2+) (due to greater Ca(2+) buffering), but had less effect on shortening. Conversely, preventing β-AS effects on XBcy preserved Ca(2+) transient effects, but blunted inotropy (both isometric force and especially shortening). Removal of titin effects had little impact on contraction. Finally, exclusion of β-AS from XBCa and XBcy while preserving effects on other targets resulted in preserved peak isometric force response (with slower kinetics) but nearly abolished enhanced shortening. β-AS effects on XBCa and XBcy

  1. β-adrenergic effects on cardiac myofilaments and contraction in an integrated rabbit ventricular myocyte model

    PubMed Central

    Negroni, Jorge A.; Morotti, Stefano; Lascano, Elena C.; Gomes, Aldrin V.; Grandi, Eleonora; Puglisi, José L; Bers, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    A five-state model of myofilament contraction was integrated into a well-established rabbit ventricular myocyte model of ion channels, Ca2+ transporters and kinase signaling to analyze the relative contribution of different phosphorylation targets to the overall mechanical response driven by β-adrenergic stimulation (β-AS). β-AS effect on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ handling, Ca2+, K+ and Cl− currents, and Na+/K+-ATPase properties were included based on experimental data. The inotropic effect on the myofilaments was represented as reduced myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity (XBCa) and titin stiffness, and increased cross-bridge (XB) cycling rate (XBcy). Assuming independent roles of XBCa and XBcy, the model reproduced experimental β-AS responses on action potentials and Ca2+ transient amplitude and kinetics. It also replicated the behavior of force-Ca2+, release-restretch, length-step, stiffness-frequency and force-velocity relationships, and increased force and shortening in isometric and isotonic twitch contractions. The β-AS effect was then switched off from individual targets to analyze their relative impact on contractility. Preventing β-AS effects on L-type Ca2+ channels or phospholamban limited Ca2+ transients and contractile responses in parallel, while blocking phospholemman and K+ channel (IKs) effects enhanced Ca2+ and inotropy. Removal of β-AS effects from XBCa enhanced contractile force while decreasing peak Ca2+ (due to greater Ca2+ buffering), but had less effect on shortening. Conversely, preventing β-AS effects on XBcy preserved Ca2+ transient effects, but blunted inotropy (both isometric force and especially shortening). Removal of titin effects had little impact on contraction. Finally, exclusion of β-AS from XBCa and XBcy while preserving effects on other targets resulted in preserved peak isometric force response (with slower kinetics) but nearly abolished enhanced shortening. β-AS effects on XBCa vs. XBcy have greater impact on isometric

  2. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 78, quarter ending March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This report presents descriptions of various research projects and field projects concerned with the enhanced recovery of petroleum. Contract numbers, principal investigators, company names, and project management information is included.

  3. Smooth muscle modeling and experimental identification: application to bladder isometric contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laforêt, Jérémy; Guiraud, David; Andreu, David; Taillades, Hubert; Azevedo Coste, Christine

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents an original smooth muscle model based on the Huxley microscopic approach. This model is the main part of a comprehensive lower urinary track model. The latter is used for simulation studies and is assessed through experiments on rabbits, for which a subset of parameters is estimated, using intravesical pressure measurements in isometric conditions. Bladder contraction is induced by electrical stimulation that determines the onset and thus synchronizes simulation and experimental data. Model sensitivity versus parameter accuracy is discussed and allows the definition of a subset of four parameters that must be accurately identified in order to obtain good fitting between experimental and acquired data. Preliminary experimental data are presented as well as model identification results. They show that the model is able to follow the pressure changes induced by an artificial stimulus in isometric contractions. Moreover, the model gives an insight into the internal changes in calcium concentration and the ratio of the different chemical species present in the muscle cells, in particular the bounded and unbounded actin and myosin and the normalized concentration of intracellular calcium.

  4. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review number 83, quarter ending June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    Summaries of 41 research projects on enhanced recovery are presented under the following sections: (1) chemical flooding; (2) gas displacement; (3) thermal recovery; (4) geoscience technology; (5) resource assessment technology; and (6) reservoir classes. Each presentation gives the title of the project, contract number, research facility, contract date, expected completion data, amount of the award, principal investigator, and DOE program manager, and describes the objectives of the project and a summary of the technical progress.

  5. IHY Modeling Support at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chulaki, A.; Hesse, Michael; Kuznetsova, Masha; MacNeice, P.; Rastaetter, L.

    2005-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a US inter-agency activity aiming at research in support of the generation of advanced space weather models. As one of its main functions, the CCMC provides to researchers the use of space science models, even if they are not model owners themselves. In particular, the CCMC provides to the research community the execution of "runs-onrequest" for specific events of interest to space science researchers. Through this activity and the concurrent development of advanced visualization tools, CCMC provides, to the general science community, unprecedented access to a large number of state-of-the-art research models. CCMC houses models that cover the entire domain from the Sun to the Earth. In this presentation, we will provide an overview of CCMC modeling services that are available to support activities during the International Heliospheric Year. In order to tailor CCMC activities to IHY needs, we will also invite community input into our IHY planning activities.

  6. Normality Index of Ventricular Contraction Based on a Statistical Model from FADS

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Ángeles, Luis; Valdés-Cristerna, Raquel; Vallejo, Enrique; Bialostozky, David; Medina-Bañuelos, Verónica

    2013-01-01

    Radionuclide-based imaging is an alternative to evaluate ventricular function and synchrony and may be used as a tool for the identification of patients that could benefit from cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). In a previous work, we used Factor Analysis of Dynamic Structures (FADS) to analyze the contribution and spatial distribution of the 3 most significant factors (3-MSF) present in a dynamic series of equilibrium radionuclide angiography images. In this work, a probability density function model of the 3-MSF extracted from FADS for a control group is presented; also an index, based on the likelihood between the control group's contraction model and a sample of normal subjects is proposed. This normality index was compared with those computed for two cardiopathic populations, satisfying the clinical criteria to be considered as candidates for a CRT. The proposed normality index provides a measure, consistent with the phase analysis currently used in clinical environment, sensitive enough to show contraction differences between normal and abnormal groups, which suggests that it can be related to the degree of severity in the ventricular contraction dyssynchrony, and therefore shows promise as a follow-up procedure for patients under CRT. PMID:23634177

  7. Automatic and Quantitative Measurement of Collagen Gel Contraction Using Model-Guided Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Chen; Yang, Tai-Hua; Thoreson, Andrew R; Zhao, Chunfeng; Amadio, Peter C; Sun, Yung-Nien; Su, Fong-Chin; An, Kai-Nan

    2013-08-01

    Quantitative measurement of collagen gel contraction plays a critical role in the field of tissue engineering because it provides spatial-temporal assessment (e.g., changes of gel area and diameter during the contraction process) reflecting the cell behaviors and tissue material properties. So far the assessment of collagen gels relies on manual segmentation, which is time-consuming and suffers from serious intra- and inter-observer variability. In this study, we propose an automatic method combining various image processing techniques to resolve these problems. The proposed method first detects the maximal feasible contraction range of circular references (e.g., culture dish) and avoids the interference of irrelevant objects in the given image. Then, a three-step color conversion strategy is applied to normalize and enhance the contrast between the gel and background. We subsequently introduce a deformable circular model (DCM) which utilizes regional intensity contrast and circular shape constraint to locate the gel boundary. An adaptive weighting scheme was employed to coordinate the model behavior, so that the proposed system can overcome variations of gel boundary appearances at different contraction stages. Two measurements of collagen gels (i.e., area and diameter) can readily be obtained based on the segmentation results. Experimental results, including 120 gel images for accuracy validation, showed high agreement between the proposed method and manual segmentation with an average dice similarity coefficient larger than 0.95. The results also demonstrated obvious improvement in gel contours obtained by the proposed method over two popular, generic segmentation methods. PMID:24092954

  8. Mutual Support: A Model of Participatory Support by and for People with Learning Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keyes, Sarah E.; Brandon, Toby

    2012-01-01

    Mutual Support, a model of peer support by and for people with learning difficulties, was constructed through a participatory research process. The research focussed on individual narratives from people with learning difficulties. These narratives were then brought together to form a collective model of support. This paper outlines the detailed…

  9. 48 CFR 39.107 - Contract clause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING ACQUISITION OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY General 39.107 Contract clause. The contracting officer..., in solicitations and contracts for information technology which require security of information... information technology services or support services....

  10. Isotonic contraction as a result of cooperation of sarcomeres--a model and simulation outcome.

    PubMed

    Wünsch, Z

    1996-01-01

    The molecular level of the functional structure of the contractile apparatus of cross-striated muscle has been mapped out almost minutely. Most authors accept the basic principles of the theory of sliding filaments and the theory of operation of molecular generators of force which, of course, are progressively updated by integrating new knowledge. The idea of the model delineated below does not contradict these theories, for it refers to another level of the system's hierarchy. The definition of the system, hereafter referred to Ideal Sarcomere (IS), takes into account the fact that, during isotonic contraction, a large number of not wholly independently working sarcomeres and molecular generators of force is active in a synergistic way. The shortening velocity of isotonically contracting IS is determined by the relation between quantities conveying different tasks of active generators of force and the influence of the system parameters. Although IS is derived from simple axiomatic predicates, it has properties which were not premediated in defining the system and which, in spite of this, correspond to some properties of the biological original. The equations of the system allow us to calculate the shortening velocity of 'isotonic contraction' and other variables and parameters and show, inter alia, an alternative way to derive and interpret the relations stated in Hill's force-velocity equation. The simulation results indicate that the macroscopic manifestations of isotonic contraction may be also contingent on the properties of the cooperating system of the multitude of sarcomeres, which also constitutes one part of the functional structure of muscle. PMID:8924648

  11. Understanding Hadley Cell Expansion vs. Contraction: Insights from Simplified Models and Implications for Recent Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandon, N. F.; Gerber, E. P.; Sobel, A. H.; Polvani, L. M.

    2012-12-01

    This study seeks a deeper understanding of the causes of Hadley Cell (HC) expansion, as projected under global warming, and HC contraction, as observed under El Nino. The authors present a series of experiments in which they apply thermal forcings to an idealized general circulation model. These experiments show that tropical thermal forcings with narrow meridional extent produce "El Nino-like" HC contraction, while wider forcings produce "global warming-like" HC expansion. These circulation responses are largely insensitive to the vertical structure of the thermal forcing and are much more sensitive to its meridional structure. If the thermal forcing is confined to the midlatitudes, the amount of HC expansion is more than three times that of a forcing of comparable amplitude that is spread over the tropics. This finding may be relevant to recent trends of tropical widening, which comprehensive models typically underpredict. The shift of the HC edge can be understood in a very simple way in terms of changes in the transformed Eulerian mean (TEM) circulation. In this context, the HC edge is defined as the maximum in residual vertical velocity in the upper troposphere; this corresponds well with the conventional Eulerian definition of the HC edge. Then, a toy model is constructed in which the circulation simply diffuses the thermal forcing meridionally. This diffusion produces anomalous diabatic cooling, and hence anomalous TEM descent, on the poleward flank of the thermal forcing. This descending anomaly results in a shift of the climatological maximum of residual vertical velocity, and thus a shift of the HC edge. So the meridional extent of the thermal forcing determines the location of anomalous TEM descent, which in turn determines whether the HC expands or contracts.

  12. Characteristics of Hydraulic Shock Waves in an Inclined Chute Contraction by Using Three Dimensional Numerical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Kai-Wen; Hsu, Yu-Chao; Jan, Chyan-Deng; Su, Yu-Wen

    2016-04-01

    The inclined rectangular chute construction is a common structure used in hydraulic engineering for typical reasons such as the increase of bottom slope, the transition from side channel intakes to tunnel spillways, the drainage construction, and the reduction of chute width due to bridges, flood diversion structures or irrigation systems. The converging vertical sidewalls of a chute contraction deflect the supercritical flow to form hydraulic shock waves. Hydraulic shock waves have narrow and locally extreme wavy surfaces, which commonly results in the requirement of higher height of sidewalls. Therefore, predicting the possible height and position of maximum hydraulic shock wave are necessary to design the required height of sidewalls to prevent flow overtopping. In this study, we used a three-dimensional computation fluid dynamics model (i.e., FLOW-3D) to simulate the characteristics of hydraulic shock waves in an inclined chute contraction. For this purpose, the parameters of simulated hydraulic shock wave, such as the shock angle, maximum shock wave height and maximum shock wave position in various conditions are compared with those calculated by the empirical relations obtained from literatures. We showed that the simulated results are extremely close to the experimental results. The numerical results validated the applicability of these empirical relations and extend their applicability to higher approach Froude numbers from 3.51 to 7.27. Furthermore, we also applied the Yuan-Shan-Tsu flood diversion channel under 200-year peak flow condition to FLOW-3D model to simulate the hydraulic shock waves and validate the effect of the installation of a diversion pier in the channel on promoting the stability of flow fluid. The results revealed that a diversion pier installed in the Yuan-Shan-Tsu flood diversion channel is helpful for improving the stability of flow field. In summary, this study demonstrates that FLOW-3D model can be used to simulate the

  13. Teaching Contracts with Contracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misner, Robert L.

    1977-01-01

    The teaching of contracts law is an area that lends itself easily to introducing students to realistic factual situations. An exercise is described in which students were assigned to separate "firms" with volunteers from the later law school classes as clients. Each firm was responsible for submitting a signed contract and an accompanying paper.…

  14. On Using Model Populations to Determine Mechanical Properties of Skeletal Muscle. Application to Concentric Contraction Simulation.

    PubMed

    Sierra, M; Miana-Mena, F J; Calvo, B; Muñoz, M J; Rodríguez, J F; Grasa, J

    2015-10-01

    In the field of computational biomechanics, the experimental evaluation of the material properties is crucial for the development of computational models that closely reproduce real organ systems. When simulations of muscle tissue are concerned, stress/strain relations for both passive and active behavior are required. These experimental relations usually exhibit certain variability. In this study, a set of material parameters involved in a 3D skeletal muscle model are determined by using a system biology approach in which the parameters are randomly varied leading to a population of models. Using a set of experimental results from an animal model, a subset of the entire population of models was selected. This reduced population predicted the mechanical response within the window of experimental observations. Hence, a range of model parameters, instead of a single set of them, was determined. Rat Tibialis Anterior muscle was selected for this study. Muscles ([Formula: see text]) were activated through the sciatic nerve and during contraction the tissue pulled a weight fixed to the distal tendon (concentric contraction). Three different weights 1, 2 and 3 N were used and the time course of muscle stretch was analyzed obtaining values of (mean [Formula: see text] standard deviation): [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] respectively. A paired two-sided sign rank test showed significant differences between the muscle response for the three weights ([Formula: see text]). This study shows that the Monte Carlo method could be used for determine muscle characteristic parameters considering the variability of the experimental population. PMID:25691399

  15. Supporting Students' Knowledge Transfer in Modeling Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piksööt, Jaanika; Sarapuu, Tago

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates ways to enhance secondary school students' knowledge transfer in complex science domains by implementing question prompts. Two samples of students applied two web-based models to study molecular genetics--the model of genetic code (n = 258) and translation (n = 245). For each model, the samples were randomly divided into…

  16. Geomechanical modeling of stress and strain evolution during contractional fault-related folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, Kevin J.; Ferrill, David A.; Morris, Alan P.; McGinnis, Ronald N.

    2012-11-01

    Understanding stress states and rock mass deformation deep underground is critical to a range of endeavors including oil and gas exploration and production, geothermal reservoir characterization and management, and subsurface disposal of CO2. Geomechanical modeling can predict the onset of failure and the type and abundance of deformation features along with the orientations and magnitudes of stresses. This approach enables development of forward models that incorporate realistic mechanical stratigraphy (e.g., including competence contrasts, bed thicknesses, and bedding planes), include faults and bedding-slip surfaces as frictional sliding interfaces, reproduce the overall geometry of the fold structures of interest, and allow tracking of stress and strain through the deformation history. Use of inelastic constitutive relationships (e.g., elastic-plastic behavior) allows permanent strains to develop in response to the applied loads. This ability to capture permanent deformation is superior to linear elastic models, which are often used for numerical convenience, but are incapable of modeling permanent deformation or predicting permanent deformation processes such as faulting, fracturing, and pore collapse. Finite element modeling results compared with field examples of a natural contractional fault-related fold show that well-designed geomechanical modeling can match overall fold geometries and be applied to stress, fracture, and subseismic fault prediction in geologic structures. Geomechanical modeling of this type allows stress and strain histories to be obtained throughout the model domain.

  17. Modeling uncertainty in requirements engineering decision support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, Martin S.; Maynard-Zhang, Pedrito; Kiper, James D.

    2005-01-01

    One inherent characteristic of requrements engineering is a lack of certainty during this early phase of a project. Nevertheless, decisions about requirements must be made in spite of this uncertainty. Here we describe the context in which we are exploring this, and some initial work to support elicitation of uncertain requirements, and to deal with the combination of such information from multiple stakeholders.

  18. EPA-SUPPORTED (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY-SUPPORTED) WASTELOAD ALLOCATION MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling is increasingly becoming part of the Wasteload Allocation Process. The U.S. EPA provides guidance, technical training and computer software in support of this program. This paper reviews the support available to modelers through the Wasteload Allocation Section of EPA's ...

  19. The preferential contraction ratios of transversus abdominis on the variations of knee angles during abdominal drawing-in maneuver in wall support standing

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Young-In; Kim, Jwa-Jun; Park, Du-Jin

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine appropriate knee angles for the abdominal drawing-in maneuver (ADIM) through evaluation of changes in contraction ratios of the abdominal muscles and activity of quadriceps muscle in relation to changes in knee angles occurring while the ADIM is performed in the wall support standing (WSS). 20 subjects performed the ADIM at different knee angles (0°, 20°, 40°, 60°) in random order, standing at a point 6 inches away from the wall with the spine maintained in the neutral position. The WSS with knee flexion at 20° showed significantly higher preferential contraction ratio (PCR) of transversus abdominis (TrA) compared to other positions (0°, 40°, 60°). Therefore, performing the ADIM in the WSS with knee flexion at 20° appears to be the most appropriate position for TrA PCR. PMID:24877045

  20. Rhode Island Model Evaluation & Support System: Teacher. Edition III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Rhode Island educators believe that implementing a fair, accurate, and meaningful educator evaluation and support system will help improve teaching and learning. The primary purpose of the Rhode Island Model Teacher Evaluation and Support System (Rhode Island Model) is to help all teachers improve. Through the Model, the goal is to help create a…

  1. Teaching Contracts--Present Criticism and a Model Proposal for Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strasser, Kurt A.

    1981-01-01

    Contract teaching, it is suggested, should focus on building foundations in common law methodology and contract doctrine; the law and practice of modern commercial dispute and resolution should be a secondary goal. Criticisms of contract law and teaching of Professors Gilmore, Hurst, Friedman, Macaulay, Macneil and Reitz are reviewed. (MLW)

  2. Paleoclimatic modeling and phylogeography of least killifish, Heterandria formosa: insights into Pleistocene expansion-contraction dynamics and evolutionary history of North American Coastal Plain freshwater biota

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Climatic and sea-level fluctuations throughout the last Pleistocene glacial cycle (~130-0 ka) profoundly influenced present-day distributions and genetic diversity of Northern Hemisphere biotas by forcing range contractions in many species during the glacial advance and allowing expansion following glacial retreat ('expansion-contraction’ model). Evidence for such range dynamics and refugia in the unglaciated Gulf-Atlantic Coastal Plain stems largely from terrestrial species, and aquatic species Pleistocene responses remain relatively uninvestigated. Heterandria formosa, a wide-ranging regional endemic, presents an ideal system to test the expansion-contraction model within this biota. By integrating ecological niche modeling and phylogeography, we infer the Pleistocene history of this livebearing fish (Poeciliidae) and test for several predicted distributional and genetic effects of the last glaciation. Results Paleoclimatic models predicted range contraction to a single southwest Florida peninsula refugium during the Last Glacial Maximum, followed by northward expansion. We inferred spatial-population subdivision into four groups that reflect genetic barriers outside this refuge. Several other features of the genetic data were consistent with predictions derived from an expansion-contraction model: limited intraspecific divergence (e.g. mean mtDNA p-distance = 0.66%); a pattern of mtDNA diversity (mean Hd = 0.934; mean π = 0.007) consistent with rapid, recent population expansion; a lack of mtDNA isolation-by-distance; and clinal variation in allozyme diversity with higher diversity at lower latitudes near the predicted refugium. Statistical tests of mismatch distributions and coalescent simulations of the gene tree lent greater support to a scenario of post-glacial expansion and diversification from a single refugium than to any other model examined (e.g. multiple-refugia scenarios). Conclusions Congruent results from diverse data

  3. Crop Simulation Models and Decision Support Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The first computer simulation models for agricultural systems were developed in the 1970s. These early models simulated potential production for major crops as a function of weather conditions, especially temperature and solar radiation. At a later stage, the water component was added to be able to ...

  4. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review quarter ending September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: chemical flooding--supporting research; gas displacement--supporting research; thermal recovery--supporting research; geoscience technology; resource assessment technology; and field demonstrations in high-priority reservoir classes. A list of available publications is also included.

  5. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery: Progress review No. 74, Quarter ending March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    Accomplishments for the past quarter are presented for the following tasks: chemical flooding--supporting research; gas displacement--supporting research; thermal recovery--supporting research; geoscience technology; resource assessment technology; microbial technology; field demonstrations in high-priority reservoir classes; and novel technology. A list of available publication is also provided.

  6. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 71, quarter ending June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: chemical flooding--supporting research; gas displacement--supporting research; thermal recovery--supporting research; geoscience technology; resource assessment technology; microbial technology; and novel technology. A list of available publication is also provided.

  7. A mechanochemical 3D continuum model for smooth muscle contraction under finite strains.

    PubMed

    Stålhand, J; Klarbring, A; Holzapfel, G A

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a modelling framework in which the mechanochemical properties of smooth muscle cells may be studied. The activation of smooth muscles is considered in a three-dimensional continuum model which is key to realistically capture the function of hollow organs such as blood vessels. On the basis of a general thermodynamical framework the mechanical and chemical phases are specialized in order to quantify the coupled mechanochemical process. A free-energy function is proposed as the sum of a mechanical energy stored in the passive tissue, a coupling between the mechanical and chemical kinetics and an energy related purely to the chemical kinetics and the calcium ion concentration. For the chemical phase it is shown that the cross-bridge model of Hai and Murphy [1988. Am. J. Physiol. Cell Physiol. 254, C99-C106] is included in the developed evolution law as a special case. In order to show the specific features and the potential of the proposed continuum model a uniaxial extension test of a tissue strip is analysed in detail and the related kinematics and stress-stretch relations are derived. Parameter studies point to coupling phenomena; in particular the tissue response is analysed in terms of the calcium ion level. The model for smooth muscle contraction may significantly contribute to current modelling efforts of smooth muscle tissue responses. PMID:20946904

  8. Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drysdale, Alan; Thomas, Mark; Fresa, Mark; Wheeler, Ray

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to CELSS, a critical technology for the Space Exploration Initiative. OCAM (object-oriented CELSS analysis and modeling) models carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen recycling. Multiple crops and plant types can be simulated. Resource recovery options from inedible biomass include leaching, enzyme treatment, aerobic digestion, and mushroom and fish growth. The benefit of using many small crops overlapping in time, instead of a single large crop, is demonstrated. Unanticipated results include startup transients which reduce the benefit of multiple small crops. The relative contributions of mass, energy, and manpower to system cost are analyzed in order to determine appropriate research directions.

  9. Iterated non-linear model predictive control based on tubes and contractive constraints.

    PubMed

    Murillo, M; Sánchez, G; Giovanini, L

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a predictive control algorithm for non-linear systems based on successive linearizations of the non-linear dynamic around a given trajectory. A linear time varying model is obtained and the non-convex constrained optimization problem is transformed into a sequence of locally convex ones. The robustness of the proposed algorithm is addressed adding a convex contractive constraint. To account for linearization errors and to obtain more accurate results an inner iteration loop is added to the algorithm. A simple methodology to obtain an outer bounding-tube for state trajectories is also presented. The convergence of the iterative process and the stability of the closed-loop system are analyzed. The simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in controlling a quadcopter type unmanned aerial vehicle. PMID:26850752

  10. Simulation of dilute polymeric fluids in a three-dimensional contraction using a multiscale FENE model

    SciTech Connect

    Griebel, M. E-mail: ruettgers@ins.uni-bonn.de; Rüttgers, A. E-mail: ruettgers@ins.uni-bonn.de

    2014-05-15

    The multiscale FENE model is applied to a 3D square-square contraction flow problem. For this purpose, the stochastic Brownian configuration field method (BCF) has been coupled with our fully parallelized three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver NaSt3DGPF. The robustness of the BCF method enables the numerical simulation of high Deborah number flows for which most macroscopic methods suffer from stability issues. The results of our simulations are compared with that of experimental measurements from literature and show a very good agreement. In particular, flow phenomena such as a strong vortex enhancement, streamline divergence and a flow inversion for highly elastic flows are reproduced. Due to their computational complexity, our simulations require massively parallel computations. Using a domain decomposition approach with MPI, the implementation achieves excellent scale-up results for up to 128 processors.

  11. A human ventricular myocyte model with a refined representation of excitation-contraction coupling.

    PubMed

    Himeno, Yukiko; Asakura, Keiichi; Cha, Chae Young; Memida, Hiraku; Powell, Trevor; Amano, Akira; Noma, Akinori

    2015-07-21

    Cardiac Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR) occurs by a regenerative activation of ryanodine receptors (RyRs) within each Ca(2+)-releasing unit, triggered by the activation of L-type Ca(2+) channels (LCCs). CICR is then terminated, most probably by depletion of Ca(2+) in the junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Hinch et al. previously developed a tightly coupled LCC-RyR mathematical model, known as the Hinch model, that enables simulations to deal with a variety of functional states of whole-cell populations of a Ca(2+)-releasing unit using a personal computer. In this study, we developed a membrane excitation-contraction model of the human ventricular myocyte, which we call the human ventricular cell (HuVEC) model. This model is a hybrid of the most recent HuVEC models and the Hinch model. We modified the Hinch model to reproduce the regenerative activation and termination of CICR. In particular, we removed the inactivated RyR state and separated the single step of RyR activation by LCCs into triggering and regenerative steps. More importantly, we included the experimental measurement of a transient rise in Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)], 10-15 μM) during CICR in the vicinity of Ca(2+)-releasing sites, and thereby calculated the effects of the local Ca(2+) gradient on CICR as well as membrane excitation. This HuVEC model successfully reconstructed both membrane excitation and key properties of CICR. The time course of CICR evoked by an action potential was accounted for by autonomous changes in an instantaneous equilibrium open probability of couplons. This autonomous time course was driven by a core feedback loop including the pivotal local [Ca(2+)], influenced by a time-dependent decay in the SR Ca(2+) content during CICR. PMID:26200878

  12. Using Covariation Reasoning to Support Mathematical Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Erik

    2014-01-01

    For many students, making connections between mathematical ideas and the real world is one of the most intriguing and rewarding aspects of the study of mathematics. In the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSI 2010), mathematical modeling is highlighted as a mathematical practice standard for all grades. To engage in mathematical…

  13. Strategies to Support Students' Mathematical Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Hyunyi

    2015-01-01

    An important question for mathematics teachers is this: "How can we help students learn mathematics to solve everyday problems, rather than teaching them only to memorize rules and practice mathematical procedures?" Teaching students using modeling activities can help them learn mathematics in real-world problem-solving situations that…

  14. Key Elements of the Tutorial Support Management Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Grace; Paasuke, Philip

    2011-01-01

    In response to an exponential growth in enrolments the "Tutorial Support Management" (TSM) model has been adopted by Open Universities Australia (OUA) after a two-year project on the provision of online tutor support in first year, online undergraduate units. The essential focus of the TSM model was the development of a systemic approach to the…

  15. Rhode Island Model Evaluation & Support System: Building Administrator. Edition III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Rhode Island educators believe that implementing a fair, accurate, and meaningful educator evaluation and support system will help improve teaching, learning, and school leadership. The primary purpose of the Rhode Island Model Building Administrator Evaluation and Support System (Rhode Island Model) is to help all building administrators improve.…

  16. Atmospheric analysis modeling in support of Seasat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langland, R. A.; Stephens, P. L.

    1978-01-01

    Atmospheric objective analysis models were developed and tested in preparation for assessing the utility of Seasat data. Of the several discretionary procedures in such computer programs, the effects of three were examined and documented: (1) the effect of varying the weights in the pattern conserving techniques; (2) the effect of varying the data influence region; (3) the effect of including wind information in analysis of mass-structure variables. The problem of inserting bogus reports is also examined.

  17. A model of the release of myosin heads from actin in rapidly contracting muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, R; White, H; Pate, E

    1994-01-01

    We describe a model that relates the maximum shortening velocity of a muscle fiber, Vm, to the kinetics of the dissociation of a myosin head from actin. At Vm, the positive work exerted by cross-bridges attached in the powerstroke must be balanced by cross-bridges that have been carried by movement of the filaments into a region where they exert a negative force. This balance allows one to relate Vm and the rate of cross-bridge detachment. Studies of actomyosin kinetics suggest that at high substrate, detachment should be limited by a slow protein isomerization (approximately 50 s-1) that precedes ADP release. This rate is too slow to be easily accommodated in existing models. However, a slow rate for cross-bridge dissociation, similar to that of the isomerization, is predicted if previous models are modified to include rapid detachment of cross-bridges that have been carried so far into the negative force region that their free energy exceeds that of the detached state. The model also explains another aspect of muscle contraction: at high shortening velocities, the observed rate of ATP hydrolysis is low, because a cross-bridge can interact with multiple actin binding sites before releasing the hydrolysis products and binding another ATP. PMID:8011910

  18. Premature Contractions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tools & Resources Stroke More Premature Contractions - PACs and PVCs Updated:Apr 6,2016 Premature contraction = early beat ... chambers of the heart (atria). Premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) start in the lower chambers of the heart ( ...

  19. Wavelet modelling in support of IRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Michael

    The slant total electron content (STEC) of the ionosphere is defined as the integral of the electron density along the ray-path of the signal between the transmitter and the receiver. So-called geometry free GPS measurements provide information on the electron density, which is basically a four-dimensional function depending on spatial position and time. Since ground-based measurements are not very sensitive to the vertical structure within the atmosphere, the ionosphere is often represented by a spherical layer, where all electrons are concentrated. Then the STEC is transformed into the vertical total electron content (VTEC), which is a three-dimensional function depending on longitude, latitude and time. In our approach, we decompose an ionospheric function, i.e. the electron density or the VTEC, into a reference part computed from a given model like the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) and an unknown correction term expanded in a multi-dimensional series in terms of localizing base functions. The corresponding series coefficients are calculable from GPS measurements applying parameter estimation procedures. Since the GPS receivers are located rather unbalanced, finer structures are modelable just in regions with a sufficient number of observation sites. Due to the localizing feature of B-spline functions we apply a tensor product spline expansion to model the correction term regionally. Furthermore, the multi-resolution representation derived from wavelet analysis allows monitoring the ionosphere at different resolutions levels. We demonstrate the advantages of this procedure by representing a simulated VTEC data set over South America.

  20. Georeferenced model simulations efficiently support targeted monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlekamp, Jürgen; Klasmeier, Jörg

    2010-05-01

    The European Water Framework Directive (WFD) demands the good ecological and chemical status of surface waters. To meet the definition of good chemical status of the WFD surface water concentrations of priority pollutants must not exceed established environmental quality standards (EQS). Surveillance of the concentrations of numerous chemical pollutants in whole river basins by monitoring is laborious and time-consuming. Moreover, measured data do often not allow for immediate source apportionment which is a prerequisite for defining promising reduction strategies to be implemented within the programme of measures. In this context, spatially explicit model approaches are highly advantageous because they provide a direct link between local point emissions (e.g. treated wastewater) or diffuse non-point emissions (e.g. agricultural runoff) and resulting surface water concentrations. Scenario analyses with such models allow for a priori investigation of potential positive effects of reduction measures such as optimization of wastewater treatment. The geo-referenced model GREAT-ER (Geography-referenced Regional Exposure Assessment Tool for European Rivers) has been designed to calculate spatially resolved averaged concentrations for different flow conditions (e.g. mean or low flow) based on emission estimations for local point source emissions such as treated effluents from wastewater treatment plants. The methodology was applied to selected pharmaceuticals (diclofenac, sotalol, metoprolol, carbamazepin) in the Main river basin in Germany (approx. 27,290 km²). Average concentrations of the compounds were calculated for each river reach in the whole catchment. Simulation results were evaluated by comparison with available data from orienting monitoring and used to develop an optimal monitoring strategy for the assessment of water quality regarding micropollutants at the catchment scale.

  1. Supportive Accountability: A Model for Providing Human Support to Enhance Adherence to eHealth Interventions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of and adherence to eHealth interventions is enhanced by human support. However, human support has largely not been manualized and has usually not been guided by clear models. The objective of this paper is to develop a clear theoretical model, based on relevant empirical literature, that can guide research into human support components of eHealth interventions. A review of the literature revealed little relevant information from clinical sciences. Applicable literature was drawn primarily from organizational psychology, motivation theory, and computer-mediated communication (CMC) research. We have developed a model, referred to as “Supportive Accountability.” We argue that human support increases adherence through accountability to a coach who is seen as trustworthy, benevolent, and having expertise. Accountability should involve clear, process-oriented expectations that the patient is involved in determining. Reciprocity in the relationship, through which the patient derives clear benefits, should be explicit. The effect of accountability may be moderated by patient motivation. The more intrinsically motivated patients are, the less support they likely require. The process of support is also mediated by the communications medium (eg, telephone, instant messaging, email). Different communications media each have their own potential benefits and disadvantages. We discuss the specific components of accountability, motivation, and CMC medium in detail. The proposed model is a first step toward understanding how human support enhances adherence to eHealth interventions. Each component of the proposed model is a testable hypothesis. As we develop viable human support models, these should be manualized to facilitate dissemination. PMID:21393123

  2. Supportive accountability: a model for providing human support to enhance adherence to eHealth interventions.

    PubMed

    Mohr, David C; Cuijpers, Pim; Lehman, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of and adherence to eHealth interventions is enhanced by human support. However, human support has largely not been manualized and has usually not been guided by clear models. The objective of this paper is to develop a clear theoretical model, based on relevant empirical literature, that can guide research into human support components of eHealth interventions. A review of the literature revealed little relevant information from clinical sciences. Applicable literature was drawn primarily from organizational psychology, motivation theory, and computer-mediated communication (CMC) research. We have developed a model, referred to as "Supportive Accountability." We argue that human support increases adherence through accountability to a coach who is seen as trustworthy, benevolent, and having expertise. Accountability should involve clear, process-oriented expectations that the patient is involved in determining. Reciprocity in the relationship, through which the patient derives clear benefits, should be explicit. The effect of accountability may be moderated by patient motivation. The more intrinsically motivated patients are, the less support they likely require. The process of support is also mediated by the communications medium (eg, telephone, instant messaging, email). Different communications media each have their own potential benefits and disadvantages. We discuss the specific components of accountability, motivation, and CMC medium in detail. The proposed model is a first step toward understanding how human support enhances adherence to eHealth interventions. Each component of the proposed model is a testable hypothesis. As we develop viable human support models, these should be manualized to facilitate dissemination. PMID:21393123

  3. Psychological contracts of hospice nurses.

    PubMed

    Jones, Audrey Elizabeth; Sambrook, Sally

    2010-12-01

    Psychological contracts have been described as individuals' beliefs regarding the obligations, expectations, and contributions that exist between them and their employer. They can be influenced by the organization's culture and philosophy, through human resources policies, and through the employee's personality and characteristics. Owing to the recent economic crisis, hospices in the UK are currently in a transitional phase and are being expected to demonstrate efficiencies that might be more in line with a business model than a health-care environment. This may conflict with the philosophical views of hospice nurses. To support nurses through this transition, it might be helpful to understand the antecedents of hospice nurses' behaviour and how they construct their psychological contracts. Failure to offer adequate support might lead to negative outcomes such as a desire to leave the organisation, poorer quality work, or disruptive behaviour. This study used a modified grounded theory approach involving in-depth interviews to explore the context and content of the psychological contracts of hospice nurses in the UK. Four main themes emerged: the types of psychological contracts formed, how the contracts are formed, their contents, and the breaches and potential violations the nurses perceive. PMID:21240104

  4. A model for effective planning of SME support services.

    PubMed

    Rakićević, Zoran; Omerbegović-Bijelović, Jasmina; Lečić-Cvetković, Danica

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a model for effective planning of support services for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The idea is to scrutinize and measure the suitability of support services in order to give recommendations for the improvement of a support planning process. We examined the applied support services and matched them with the problems and needs of SMEs, based on the survey conducted in 2013 on a sample of 336 SMEs in Serbia. We defined and analysed the five research questions that refer to support services, their consistency with the SMEs' problems and needs, and the relation between the given support and SMEs' success. The survey results have shown a statistically significant connection between them. Based on this result, we proposed an eight-phase model as a method for the improvement of support service planning for SMEs. This model helps SMEs to plan better their requirements in terms of support; government and administration bodies at all levels and organizations that provide support services to understand better SMEs' problems and needs for support. PMID:26479837

  5. Modeling Flare Hard X-ray Emission from Electrons in Contracting Magnetic Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidoni, Silvina E.; Allred, Joel C.; Alaoui, Meriem; Holman, Gordon D.; DeVore, C. Richard; Karpen, Judith T.

    2016-05-01

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed impulsive hard X-ray emission in solar flares is not well understood. It is generally accepted that this emission is produced by a non-thermal beam of electrons that collides with the ambient ions as the beam propagates from the top of a flare loop to its footpoints. Most current models that investigate this transport assume an injected beam with an initial energy spectrum inferred from observed hard X-ray spectra, usually a power law with a low-energy cutoff. In our previous work (Guidoni et al. 2016), we proposed an analytical method to estimate particle energy gain in contracting, large-scale, 2.5-dimensional magnetic islands, based on a kinetic model by Drake et al. (2010). We applied this method to sunward-moving islands formed high in the corona during fast reconnection in a simulated eruptive flare. The overarching purpose of the present work is to test this proposed acceleration model by estimating the hard X-ray flux resulting from its predicted accelerated-particle distribution functions. To do so, we have coupled our model to a unified computational framework that simulates the propagation of an injected beam as it deposits energy and momentum along its way (Allred et al. 2015). This framework includes the effects of radiative transfer and return currents, necessary to estimate flare emission that can be compared directly to observations. We will present preliminary results of the coupling between these models.

  6. Nested and Dynamic Contract Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, T. Stephen; Felleisen, Matthias

    Previous work on software contracts assumes fixed and statically known boundaries between the parties to a contract. Implementations of contract monitoring systems rely on this assumption to explain the nature of contract violations and to assign blame to violators. In this paper, we explain how to implement arbitrary, nested, and dynamic contract boundaries with two examples. First, we add nestable contract regions to a static, first-order module system. Second, we show that even a dynamic, higher-order, and hierarchical module system can be equipped with software contracts that support precise blame assignment.

  7. 7 CFR Appendix A to Subpart C of... - Model Form of Loan Contract for Electric Distribution Borrowers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 1987, and 49 CFR part 24, referenced by 7 CFR part 21, to the extent the Uniform Act is applicable to... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Model Form of Loan Contract for Electric Distribution... (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOAN SECURITY DOCUMENTS FOR ELECTRIC...

  8. 7 CFR Appendix A to Subpart C of... - Model Form of Loan Contract for Electric Distribution Borrowers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 1987, and 49 CFR part 24, referenced by 7 CFR part 21, to the extent the Uniform Act is applicable to... 7 Agriculture 11 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Model Form of Loan Contract for Electric Distribution... (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOAN SECURITY DOCUMENTS FOR ELECTRIC...

  9. 7 CFR Appendix A to Subpart C of... - Model Form of Loan Contract for Electric Distribution Borrowers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 1987, and 49 CFR part 24, referenced by 7 CFR part 21, to the extent the Uniform Act is applicable to... 7 Agriculture 11 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Model Form of Loan Contract for Electric Distribution... (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOAN SECURITY DOCUMENTS FOR ELECTRIC...

  10. 7 CFR Appendix A to Subpart C of... - Model Form of Loan Contract for Electric Distribution Borrowers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 1987, and 49 CFR part 24, referenced by 7 CFR part 21, to the extent the Uniform Act is applicable to... 7 Agriculture 11 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Model Form of Loan Contract for Electric Distribution... (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOAN SECURITY DOCUMENTS FOR ELECTRIC...

  11. Huxley's Model for Muscle Contraction Revisited: The Importance of Microscopic Reversibility.

    PubMed

    Astumian, R Dean

    2015-01-01

    Andrew Huxley's model for muscle contraction is the first mechanistic description of how an energy-providing chemical reaction, ATP hydrolysis, can be coupled by a molecule (myosin) to do work in the environment in a cyclic process. The model was originally used to fit experimentally obtained force vs velocity curves, and has served as a paradigm for understanding mechanochemical coupling ever since. Despite the remarkable success in fitting kinetic data, Huxley's model is thermodynamically inconsistent in several regards, most notably in its failure to include thermal noise in the description of the mechanical transitions by which motion occurs. This inconsistency has led subsequent workers to incorrect conclusions regarding the importance of mechanical transitions for determining the direction of motion, the efficiency of energy conversion, the ratio of forward to backward steps, and the applied force necessary to stop the motion of chemically driven molecular motors. In this chapter an extension of Huxley's model is described where the principle of microscopic reversibility provides a framework for developing a thermodynamically consistent description of a molecular machine. The results show clearly that mechanical strain and the so-called "power stroke" are irrelevant for determining the directionality and thermodynamic properties of any chemically driven molecular motor. Instead these properties are controlled entirely by the chemical specificity that describes how the relative rates of the ATP hydrolysis reaction depend, by allosteric interactions, on the mechanical state of the molecule. This mechanism has been termed an "information ratchet" in the literature. In contrast to the results for chemical driving, a power stroke can be a key component for the operation of an optically driven motor, the transitions of which do not obey microscopic reversibility. PMID:26122749

  12. Integration/coordination contractor support to Environmental Restoration Program and Program Support Office. Contract status report, September 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This status report updates activities on the following tasks: Environmental restoration task planning; Waste management task planning; Waste management project support; CPP stakeholder involvement; EM site specific advisory board - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; and, Hypermedia document. A summary status assessment and forecast of all tasks is provided and A cost management report is included.

  13. Lunar Polar Illumination Modeling to Support Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazarico, E.; Nicholas, J. B.; McClanahan, T. P.; Neumann, G. A.

    2014-10-01

    We show that illumination modeling at the lunar poles can be useful to support calibration and analysis of lunar datasets such as the neutron data, in particular when studying time­variable effects and correlation with time of day.

  14. Implementation of Contraction to Electrophysiological Ventricular Myocyte Models, and Their Quantitative Characterization via Post-Extrasystolic Potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yanyan Claire; Gray, Richard A.; Fenton, Flavio H.

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) affects over 5 million Americans and is characterized by impairment of cellular cardiac contractile function resulting in reduced ejection fraction in patients. Electrical stimulation such as cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) and cardiac contractility modulation (CCM) have shown some success in treating patients with HF. Computer simulations have the potential to help improve such therapy (e.g. suggest optimal lead placement) as well as provide insight into the underlying mechanisms which could be beneficial. However, these myocyte models require a quantitatively accurate excitation-contraction coupling such that the electrical and contraction predictions are correct. While currently there are close to a hundred models describing the detailed electrophysiology of cardiac cells, the majority of cell models do not include the equations to reproduce contractile force or they have been added ad hoc. Here we present a systematic methodology to couple first generation contraction models into electrophysiological models via intracellular calcium and then compare the resulting model predictions to experimental data. This is done by using a post-extrasystolic pacing protocol, which captures essential dynamics of contractile forces. We found that modeling the dynamic intracellular calcium buffers is necessary in order to reproduce the experimental data. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in models the mechanism of the post-extrasystolic potentiation is highly dependent on the calcium released from the Sarcoplasmic Reticulum. Overall this study provides new insights into both specific and general determinants of cellular contractile force and provides a framework for incorporating contraction into electrophysiological models, both of which will be necessary to develop reliable simulations to optimize electrical therapies for HF. PMID:26317204

  15. A Framework and Model for Evaluating Clinical Decision Support Architectures

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a four-phase model for evaluating architectures for clinical decision support that focuses on: defining a set of desirable features for a decision support architecture; building a proof-of-concept prototype; demonstrating that the architecture is useful by showing that it can be integrated with existing decision support systems and comparing its coverage to that of other architectures. We apply this framework to several well-known decision support architectures, including Arden Syntax, GLIF, SEBASTIAN and SAGE PMID:18462999

  16. Influence of Joint Angle on EMG-Torque Model During Constant-Posture, Torque-Varying Contractions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pu; Liu, Lukai; Clancy, Edward A

    2015-11-01

    Relating the electromyogram (EMG) to joint torque is useful in various application areas, including prosthesis control, ergonomics and clinical biomechanics. Limited study has related EMG to torque across varied joint angles, particularly when subjects performed force-varying contractions or when optimized modeling methods were utilized. We related the biceps-triceps surface EMG of 22 subjects to elbow torque at six joint angles (spanning 60° to 135°) during constant-posture, torque-varying contractions. Three nonlinear EMG σ -torque models, advanced EMG amplitude (EMG σ ) estimation processors (i.e., whitened, multiple-channel) and the duration of data used to train models were investigated. When EMG-torque models were formed separately for each of the six distinct joint angles, a minimum "gold standard" error of 4.01±1.2% MVC(F90) resulted (i.e., error relative to maximum voluntary contraction at 90° flexion). This model structure, however, did not directly facilitate interpolation across angles. The best model which did so achieved a statistically equivalent error of 4.06±1.2% MVC(F90). Results demonstrated that advanced EMG σ processors lead to improved joint torque estimation as do longer model training durations. PMID:25706722

  17. A Model for the Electronic Support of Practice-Based Research Networks

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Kevin A.; Delaney, Brendan C.; Arvanitis, Theodoros N.; Taweel, Adel; Sandberg, Elisabeth A.; Speedie, Stuart; Richard Hobbs, F. D.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The principal goal of the electronic Primary Care Research Network (ePCRN) is to enable the development of an electronic infrastructure to support clinical research activities in primary care practice-based research networks (PBRNs). We describe the model that the ePCRN developed to enhance the growth and to expand the reach of PBRN research. METHODS Use cases and activity diagrams were developed from interviews with key informants from 11 PBRNs from the United States and United Kingdom. Discrete functions were identified and aggregated into logical components. Interaction diagrams were created, and an overall composite diagram was constructed describing the proposed software behavior. Software for each component was written and aggregated, and the resulting prototype application was pilot tested for feasibility. A practical model was then created by separating application activities into distinct software packages based on existing PBRN business rules, hardware requirements, network requirements, and security concerns. RESULTS We present an information architecture that provides for essential interactions, activities, data flows, and structural elements necessary for providing support for PBRN translational research activities. The model describes research information exchange between investigators and clusters of independent data sites supported by a contracted research director. The model was designed to support recruitment for clinical trials, collection of aggregated anonymous data, and retrieval of identifiable data from previously consented patients across hundreds of practices. CONCLUSIONS The proposed model advances our understanding of the fundamental roles and activities of PBRNs and defines the information exchange commonly used by PBRNs to successfully engage community health care clinicians in translational research activities. By describing the network architecture in a language familiar to that used by software developers, the model provides

  18. Support System Effects on the NASA Common Research Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, S. Melissa B.; Hunter, Craig A.

    2012-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the NASA Common Research Model was conducted in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility and NASA Ames 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel Facility for use in the Drag Prediction Workshop. As data from the experimental investigations was collected, a large difference in moment values was seen between the experimental and the computational data from the 4th Drag Prediction Workshop. This difference led to the present work. In this study, a computational assessment has been undertaken to investigate model support system interference effects on the Common Research Model. The configurations computed during this investigation were the wing/body/tail=0deg without the support system and the wing/body/tail=0deg with the support system. The results from this investigation confirm that the addition of the support system to the computational cases does shift the pitching moment in the direction of the experimental results.

  19. Consequences of intravascular lymphatic valve properties: a study of contraction timing in a multi-lymphangion model.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Christopher D; Macaskill, Charlie; Davis, Michael J; Moore, James E

    2016-04-01

    The observed properties of valves in collecting lymphatic vessels include transmural pressure-dependent bias to the open state and hysteresis. The bias may reduce resistance to flow when the vessel is functioning as a conduit. However, lymphatic pumping implies a streamwise increase in mean pressure across each valve, suggesting that the bias is then potentially unhelpful. Lymph pumping by a model of several collecting lymphatic vessel segments (lymphangions) in series, which incorporated these properties, was investigated under conditions of adverse pressure difference while varying the refractory period between active muscular contractions and the inter-lymphangion contraction delay. It was found that many combinations of the timing parameters and the adverse pressure difference led to one or more intermediate valves remaining open instead of switching between open and closed states during repetitive contraction cycles. Cyclic valve switching was reliably indicated if the mean pressure in a lymphangion over a cycle was higher than that in the lymphangion upstream, but either lack of or very brief valve closure could cause mean pressure to be lower downstream. Widely separated combinations of refractory period and delay time were found to produce the greatest flow-rate for a given pressure difference. The efficiency of pumping was always maximized by a long refractory period and lymphangion contraction starting when the contraction of the lymphangion immediately upstream was peaking. By means of an ex vivo experiment, it was verified that intermediate valves in a chain of pumping lymphangions can remain open, while the lymphangions on either side of the open valve continue to execute contractions. PMID:26747501

  20. A Generic Modeling Process to Support Functional Fault Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maul, William A.; Hemminger, Joseph A.; Oostdyk, Rebecca; Bis, Rachael A.

    2016-01-01

    Functional fault models (FFMs) are qualitative representations of a system's failure space that are used to provide a diagnostic of the modeled system. An FFM simulates the failure effect propagation paths within a system between failure modes and observation points. These models contain a significant amount of information about the system including the design, operation and off nominal behavior. The development and verification of the models can be costly in both time and resources. In addition, models depicting similar components can be distinct, both in appearance and function, when created individually, because there are numerous ways of representing the failure space within each component. Generic application of FFMs has the advantages of software code reuse: reduction of time and resources in both development and verification, and a standard set of component models from which future system models can be generated with common appearance and diagnostic performance. This paper outlines the motivation to develop a generic modeling process for FFMs at the component level and the effort to implement that process through modeling conventions and a software tool. The implementation of this generic modeling process within a fault isolation demonstration for NASA's Advanced Ground System Maintenance (AGSM) Integrated Health Management (IHM) project is presented and the impact discussed.

  1. Exposure to Radiofrequency Radiation Emitted from Common Mobile Phone Jammers Alters the Pattern of Muscle Contractions: an Animal Model Study

    PubMed Central

    Rafati, A.; Rahimi, S.; Talebi, A.; Soleimani, A.; Haghani, M.; Mortazavi, S. M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The rapid growth of wireless communication technologies has caused public concerns regarding the biological effects of electromagnetic radiations on human health. Some early reports indicated a wide variety of non-thermal effects of electromagnetic radiation on amphibians such as the alterations of the pattern of muscle extractions. This study is aimed at investigating the effects of exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation emitted from mobile phone jammers on the pulse height of contractions, the time interval between two subsequent contractions and the latency period of frog’s isolated gastrocnemius muscle after stimulation with single square pulses of 1V (1 Hz). Materials and Methods Frogs were kept in plastic containers in a room. Animals in the jammer group were exposed to radiofrequency (RF) radiation emitted from a common Jammer at a distance of 1m from the jammer’s antenna for 2 hours while the control frogs were only sham exposed. Then animals were sacrificed and isolated gastrocnemius muscles were exposed to on/off jammer radiation for 3 subsequent 10 minute intervals. Isolated gastrocnemius muscles were attached to the force transducer with a string. Using a PowerLab device (26-T), the pattern of muscular contractions was monitored after applying single square pulses of 1V (1 Hz) as stimuli. Results The findings of this study showed that the pulse height of muscle contractions could not be affected by the exposure to electromagnetic fields. However, the latency period was effectively altered in RF-exposed samples. However, none of the experiments could show an alteration in the time interval between two subsequent contractions after exposure to electromagnetic fields. Conclusion These findings support early reports which indicated a wide variety of non-thermal effects of electromagnetic radiation on amphibians including the effects on the pattern of muscle extractions. PMID:26396969

  2. Prioritization of engineering support requests and advanced technology projects using decision support and industrial engineering models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavana, Madjid

    1995-01-01

    The evaluation and prioritization of Engineering Support Requests (ESR's) is a particularly difficult task at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) -- Shuttle Project Engineering Office. This difficulty is due to the complexities inherent in the evaluation process and the lack of structured information. The evaluation process must consider a multitude of relevant pieces of information concerning Safety, Supportability, O&M Cost Savings, Process Enhancement, Reliability, and Implementation. Various analytical and normative models developed over the past have helped decision makers at KSC utilize large volumes of information in the evaluation of ESR's. The purpose of this project is to build on the existing methodologies and develop a multiple criteria decision support system that captures the decision maker's beliefs through a series of sequential, rational, and analytical processes. The model utilizes the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), subjective probabilities, the entropy concept, and Maximize Agreement Heuristic (MAH) to enhance the decision maker's intuition in evaluating a set of ESR's.

  3. 48 CFR 242.202 - Assignment of contract administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... may perform supporting administration of these contracts at missile activation sites during the... Defense Energy Support Center, Defense Logistics Agency. (ii) Contract administration functions for...

  4. 48 CFR 242.202 - Assignment of contract administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... may perform supporting administration of these contracts at missile activation sites during the... Defense Energy Support Center, Defense Logistics Agency. (ii) Contract administration functions for...

  5. 48 CFR 242.202 - Assignment of contract administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... may perform supporting administration of these contracts at missile activation sites during the... Defense Energy Support Center, Defense Logistics Agency. (ii) Contract administration functions for...

  6. 48 CFR 242.202 - Assignment of contract administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... may perform supporting administration of these contracts at missile activation sites during the... Defense Energy Support Center, Defense Logistics Agency. (ii) Contract administration functions for...

  7. 48 CFR 242.202 - Assignment of contract administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... may perform supporting administration of these contracts at missile activation sites during the... Defense Energy Support Center, Defense Logistics Agency. (ii) Contract administration functions for...

  8. Operations and support cost modeling of conceptual space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebeling, Charles

    1994-01-01

    The University of Dayton is pleased to submit this annual report to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center which documents the development of an operations and support (O&S) cost model as part of a larger life cycle cost (LCC) structure. It is intended for use during the conceptual design of new launch vehicles and spacecraft. This research is being conducted under NASA Research Grant NAG-1-1327. This research effort changes the focus from that of the first two years in which a reliability and maintainability model was developed to the initial development of an operations and support life cycle cost model. Cost categories were initially patterned after NASA's three axis work breakdown structure consisting of a configuration axis (vehicle), a function axis, and a cost axis. A revised cost element structure (CES), which is currently under study by NASA, was used to established the basic cost elements used in the model. While the focus of the effort was on operations and maintenance costs and other recurring costs, the computerized model allowed for other cost categories such as RDT&E and production costs to be addressed. Secondary tasks performed concurrent with the development of the costing model included support and upgrades to the reliability and maintainability (R&M) model. The primary result of the current research has been a methodology and a computer implementation of the methodology to provide for timely operations and support cost analysis during the conceptual design activities.

  9. Evaluation of transtension and transpression within contractional fault steps: Comparing kinematic and mechanical models to field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevitt, Johanna M.; Pollard, David D.; Warren, Jessica M.

    2014-03-01

    Rock deformation often is investigated using kinematic and/or mechanical models. Here we provide a direct comparison of these modeling techniques in the context of a deformed dike within a meter-scale contractional fault step. The kinematic models consider two possible shear plane orientations and various modes of deformation (simple shear, transtension, transpression), while the mechanical model uses the finite element method and assumes elastoplastic constitutive behavior. The results for the kinematic and mechanical models are directly compared using the modeled maximum and minimum principal stretches. The kinematic analysis indicates that the contractional step may be classified as either transtensional or transpressional depending on the modeled shear plane orientation, suggesting that these terms may be inappropriate descriptors of step-related deformation. While the kinematic models do an acceptable job of depicting the change in dike shape and orientation, they are restricted to a prescribed homogeneous deformation. In contrast, the mechanical model allows for heterogeneous deformation within the step to accurately represent the deformation. The ability to characterize heterogeneous deformation and include fault slip - not as a prescription, but as a solution to the governing equations of motion - represents a significant advantage of the mechanical model over the kinematic models.

  10. Health, Supportive Environments, and the Reasonable Person Model

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Stephen; Kaplan, Rachel

    2003-01-01

    The Reasonable Person Model is a conceptual framework that links environmental factors with human behavior. People are more reasonable, cooperative, helpful, and satisfied when the environment supports their basic informational needs. The same environmental supports are important factors in enhancing human health. We use this framework to identify the informational requirements common to various health-promoting factors that are realizable through welldesigned physical environments. Environmental attractors, support of way-finding, and facilitation of social interaction all contribute to the health-relevant themes of community, crime, and mode of transportation. In addition, the nearby natural environment, although often neglected, can serve as a remarkably effective resource. PMID:12948967

  11. Design Approaches to Support Preservice Teachers in Scientific Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenyon, Lisa; Davis, Elizabeth A.; Hug, Barbara

    2011-02-01

    Engaging children in scientific practices is hard for beginning teachers. One such scientific practice with which beginning teachers may have limited experience is scientific modeling. We have iteratively designed preservice teacher learning experiences and materials intended to help teachers achieve learning goals associated with scientific modeling. Our work has taken place across multiple years at three university sites, with preservice teachers focused on early childhood, elementary, and middle school teaching. Based on results from our empirical studies supporting these design decisions, we discuss design features of our modeling instruction in each iteration. Our results suggest some successes in supporting preservice teachers in engaging students in modeling practice. We propose design principles that can guide science teacher educators in incorporating modeling in teacher education.

  12. A model to support nursing students with dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Salkeld, John

    2016-07-20

    Dyslexia is one of the most commonly declared disabilities in higher educational institutions in the UK. This article explores the effects of specific learning difficulties, in particular dyslexia, on pre-registration nursing students on practice placements in clinical environments. The author proposes use of the OPEL model, which provides a simple, structured framework for supporting nursing students with specific learning difficulties in practice placements. This model could be applied to clinical situations where constructive support is necessary to enable the student to achieve the standards and requirements set by the Nursing and Midwifery Council. PMID:27440364

  13. Computer modeling for advanced life support system analysis.

    PubMed

    Drysdale, A

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses the equivalent mass approach to advanced life support system analysis, describes a computer model developed to use this approach, and presents early results from modeling the NASA JSC BioPlex. The model is built using an object oriented approach and G2, a commercially available modeling package Cost factor equivalencies are given for the Volosin scenarios. Plant data from NASA KSC and Utah State University (USU) are used, together with configuration data from the BioPlex design effort. Initial results focus on the importance of obtaining high plant productivity with a flight-like configuration. PMID:11540448

  14. Model-Driven Engineering Support for Building C# Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derezińska, Anna; Ołtarzewski, Przemysław

    Realization of Model-Driven Engineering (MDE) vision of software development requires a comprehensive and user-friendly tool support. This paper presents a UML-based approach for building trustful C# applications. UML models are refined using profiles for assigning class model elements to C# concepts and to elements of implementation project. Stereotyped elements are verified on life and during model to code transformation in order to prevent creation of an incorrect code. The Transform OCL Fragments into C# system (T.O.F.I.C.) was created as a feature of the Eclipse environment. The system extends the IBM Rational Software Architect tool.

  15. A numerical cloud model for the support of laboratory experimentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagen, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical cloud model is presented which can describe the evolution of a cloud starting from moist aerosol-laden air through the diffusional growth regime. The model is designed for the direct support of cloud chamber laboratory experimentation, i.e., experiment preparation, real-time control and data analysis. In the model the thermodynamics is uncoupled from the droplet growth processes. Analytic solutions for the cloud droplet growth equations are developed which can be applied in most laboratory situations. The model is applied to a variety of representative experiments.

  16. A Simple, Inexpensive Model to Demonstrate How Contraction of GI Longitudinal Smooth Muscle Promotes Propulsion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lujan, Heidi L.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    Peristalis is a propulsive activity that involves both circular and longitudinal muscle layers of the esophagus, distal stomach, and small and large intestines. During peristalsis, the circular smooth muscle contracts behind (on the orad side) the bolus and relaxes in front (on the aborad side) of the bolus. At the same time, the longitudinal…

  17. State Assessment Program Item Banks: Model Language for Request for Proposals (RFP) and Contracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Leonard C.

    2010-01-01

    This document provides recommendations for request for proposal (RFP) and contract language that state education agencies can use to specify their requirements for access to test item banks. An item bank is a repository for test items and data about those items. Item banks are used by state agency staff to view items and associated data; to…

  18. Ostwald ripening of charged supported metal nanoparticles: Schottky model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2015-07-01

    Due to high surface area, supported metal nanoparticles are thermodynamically prone to sintering. The experimental studies of this process exhibit sometimes transient bimodal particle size distributions. Such observations may result from the support heterogeneity. Looking retrospectively, one can also find the prediction that in the case of Ostwald ripening this feature can be related to charge of metal nanoparticles. In real systems, this charge is often associated with the metal-support interaction and can be interpreted in the framework of the Schottky model. Using this model, the author shows that the charge redistribution cannot be behind bimodal particle size distributions. Moreover, the corresponding contribution to the driving force for Ostwald ripening is typically much smaller than the conventional one.

  19. A Learner Support Model Based on Peer Tutor Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Rosmalen, P.; Sloep, P.; Kester, L.; Brouns, F.; de Croock, M.; Pannekeet, K.; Koper, R.

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of elearning often leads to an increase in the time staff spends on tutoring. To alleviate the workload of staff tutors, we developed a model for organizing and supporting learner-related interactions in elearning systems. It makes use of the knowledge and experience of peers and builds on the assumption that (lifelong) learners,…

  20. Modeling Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports for Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Doris Adams; Flores, Margaret M.

    2014-01-01

    The authors modeled programwide positive behavior interventions and supports (PBIS) principles to 26 preservice teachers during consolidated yearly extended school year (ESY) services delivered to elementary students from four school districts. While PBIS were in place for preservice teachers to implement with students, a similar system was…

  1. Educating All Learners: Refocusing the Comprehensive Support Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obiakor, Festus E., Ed.; Grant, Patrick A., Ed.; Dooley, Elizabeth A., Ed.

    This collection of papers addresses the importance of maximizing the fullest potential of all students and leaving no child behind. The 14 papers are: (1) "The Comprehensive Support Model for All Learners: Conceptualization and Meaning" (Festus E. Obiakor, Pauline Harris-Obiakor, and Ramel L. Smith); (2) "The Power of the `Self' in Education"…

  2. Designing Electronic Performance Support Systems: Models and Instructional Strategies Employed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nekvinda, Christopher D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to determine whether instructional designers and performance technologists utilize instructional design models when designing and developing electronic performance support systems (EPSS). The study also explored if these same designers were utilizing instructional strategies within their EPSS to support…

  3. OASIS: A GRAPHICAL DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM FOR GROUNDWATER CONTAMINANT MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three new software technologies were applied to develop an efficient and easy to use decision support system far ground-water contaminant modeling. raphical interfaces create a more intuitive and effective form of communication with the computer compared to text-based interfaces....

  4. Rectangular Array Model Supporting Students' Spatial Structuring in Learning Multiplication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanty, Nenden Octavarulia; Wijaya, Surya

    2012-01-01

    We examine how rectangular array model can support students' spatial structuring in learning multiplication. To begin, we define what we mean by spatial structuring as the mental operation of constructing an organization or form for an object or set of objects. For that reason, the eggs problem was chosen as the starting point in which the…

  5. Training of Existing Workers: Issues, Incentives and Models. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawer, Giselle; Jackson, Elaine

    2005-01-01

    This document was produced by the authors based on their research for the report, "Training of Existing Workers: Issues, Incentives and Models," (ED495138) and is an added resource for further information. This support document is divided into the following sections: (1) The Retail Industry--A Snapshot; (2) Case Studies--Hardware, Retail Industry…

  6. MSW Time to Tumor Model and Supporting Documentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The multistage Weibull (MSW) time-to-tumor model and related documentation were developed principally (but not exclusively) for conducting time-to-tumor analyses to support risk assessments under the IRIS program. These programs and related docum...

  7. Supporting Teachers, Strengthening Families: A Model Child Abuse Prevention Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Maril

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about a model child abuse prevention approach called, "Supporting Teachers, Strengthening Families." It is NAEYC's professional development initiative to help early childhood educators play leading roles in preventing child abuse and neglect through family strengthening efforts. It focuses on six strategies that high-quality…

  8. Modeling actions and operations to support mission preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Ryan, D. P.; Schreckenghost, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes two linked technology development projects to support Space Shuttle ground operations personnel, both during mission preparation analysis and related analyses in missions. The Space Propulsion Robust Analysis Tool (SPRAT) will provide intelligent support and automation for mission analysis setup, interpretation, reporting and documentation. SPRAT models the actions taken by flight support personnel during mission preparation and uses this model to generate an action plan. CONFIG will provide intelligent automation for procedure analyses and failure impact analyses, by simulating the interactions between operations and systems with embedded failures. CONFIG models the actions taken by crew during space vehicle malfunctions and simulates how the planned action sequences in procedures affect a device model. Jointly the SPRAT and CONFIG projects provide an opportunity to investigate how the nature of a task affects the representation of actions, and to determine a more general action representation supporting a broad range of tasks. This paper describes the problems in representing actions for mission preparation and their relation to planning and scheduling.

  9. Online model-based diagnosis to support autonomous operation of an advanced life support system.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Gautam; Manders, Eric-Jan; Ramirez, John; Mahadevan, Nagabhusan; Abdelwahed, Sherif

    2004-01-01

    This article describes methods for online model-based diagnosis of subsystems of the advanced life support system (ALS). The diagnosis methodology is tailored to detect, isolate, and identify faults in components of the system quickly so that fault-adaptive control techniques can be applied to maintain system operation without interruption. We describe the components of our hybrid modeling scheme and the diagnosis methodology, and then demonstrate the effectiveness of this methodology by building a detailed model of the reverse osmosis (RO) system of the water recovery system (WRS) of the ALS. This model is validated with real data collected from an experimental testbed at NASA JSC. A number of diagnosis experiments run on simulated faulty data are presented and the results are discussed. PMID:15880907

  10. Online model-based diagnosis to support autonomous operation of an advanced life support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Gautam; Manders, Eric-Jan; Ramirez, John; Mahadevan, Nagabhusan; Abdelwahed, Sherif

    2004-01-01

    This article describes methods for online model-based diagnosis of subsystems of the advanced life support system (ALS). The diagnosis methodology is tailored to detect, isolate, and identify faults in components of the system quickly so that fault-adaptive control techniques can be applied to maintain system operation without interruption. We describe the components of our hybrid modeling scheme and the diagnosis methodology, and then demonstrate the effectiveness of this methodology by building a detailed model of the reverse osmosis (RO) system of the water recovery system (WRS) of the ALS. This model is validated with real data collected from an experimental testbed at NASA JSC. A number of diagnosis experiments run on simulated faulty data are presented and the results are discussed.

  11. Supporting Universal Prevention Programs: A Two-Phased Coaching Model

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Kimberly D.; Darney, Dana; Domitrovich, Celene; Keperling, Jennifer Pitchford; Ialongo, Nicholas S.

    2013-01-01

    Schools are adopting evidence-based programs designed to enhance students’ emotional and behavioral competencies at increasing rates (Hemmeter, Snyder, & Artman, 2011). At the same time, teachers express the need for increased support surrounding implementation of these evidence-based programs (Carter & Van Norman, 2010). Ongoing professional development in the form of coaching may enhance teacher skills and implementation (Noell et al., 2005; Stormont, Reinke, Newcomer, Darney, & Lewis, 2012). There exists a need for a coaching model that can be applied to a variety of teacher skill levels and one that guides coach decision-making about how best to support teachers. This article provides a detailed account of a two-phased coaching model with empirical support developed and tested with coaches and teachers in urban schools (Becker, Bradshaw, Domitrovich, & Ialongo, 2013). In the initial universal coaching phase, all teachers receive the same coaching elements regardless of their skill level. Then, in the tailored coaching phase, coaching varies according to the strengths and needs of each teacher. Specifically, more intensive coaching strategies are used only with teachers who need additional coaching supports whereas other teachers receive just enough support to consolidate and maintain their strong implementation. Examples of how coaches used the two-phased coaching model when working with teachers who were implementing two universal prevention programs (i.e., the PATHS® curriculum and PAX Good Behavior Game [PAX GBG]) provide illustrations of the application of this model. The potential reach of this coaching model extends to other school-based programs as well as other settings in which coaches partner with interventionists to implement evidence-based programs. PMID:23660973

  12. An Experimental Model Using Cultured Cardiac Myocytes for a Study of the Generation of Premature Ventricular Contractions Under Ultrasound Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Nobuki; Yamamoto, Masaya

    2011-09-01

    It is known that use of a contrast agents in echocardiography increases the probability of generation of premature ventricular contractions (PVCs). As a basic study to elucidate the mechanisms and to reduce adverse effects, the generation of PVCs was investigated using cultured cardiac myocytes instead of the intact heart in vivo. Cardiac myocytes were isolated from neonatal rats and cultured on a cover slip. The myocyte sample was exposed to pulsed ultrasound with microbubbles adjacent to the myocytes, and generation of PVCs was examined with ultrasound exposure at various delay times after onset of myocyte contraction. The experimental results showed that generation of PVCs had a stable threshold delay time and that PVCs were generated only when myocytes were exposed to ultrasound with delay times longer than the threshold. The results indicate that the model used in this study is useful for revealing the mechanisms by which PVCs are induced by ultrasound exposure.

  13. Educational Support for Low-Performing Students in Mathematics: The Three-Tier Support Model in Finnish Lower Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekstam, Ulrika; Linnanmäki, Karin; Aunio, Pirjo

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, there was a legislative reform regarding educational support in Finland, with a focus on early identification, differentiation and flexible arrangement of support using a multi-professional approach, the three-tier support model. The main aim of this study was to investigate what educational support practices are used with low-performing…

  14. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 80. Quarterly report, July--September, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This report contains information on petroleum enhanced recovery projects. In addition to project descriptions, contract numbers, principal investigators and project management information is included.

  15. Effective Team Support: From Task and Cognitive Modeling to Software Agents for Time-Critical Complex Work Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, Roger W. (Technical Monitor); John, Bonnie E.; Sycara, Katia

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research contract was to perform multidisciplinary research between CMU psychologists, computer scientists and NASA researchers to design a next generation collaborative system to support a team of human experts and intelligent agents. To achieve robust performance enhancement of such a system, we had proposed to perform task and cognitive modeling to thoroughly understand the impact technology makes on the organization and on key individual personnel. Guided by cognitively-inspired requirements, we would then develop software agents that support the human team in decision making, information filtering, information distribution and integration to enhance team situational awareness. During the period covered by this final report, we made substantial progress in completing a system for empirical data collection, cognitive modeling, and the building of software agents to support a team's tasks, and in running experiments for the collection of baseline data.

  16. Behavior Change Support Systems: A Research Model and Agenda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oinas-Kukkonen, Harri

    This article introduces the concept of a behavior change support system and suggests it as a key construct for research on persuasive systems design, technologies, and applications. Key concepts for behavior change support systems are defined and a research agenda for them is outlined. The article suggests that a change in complying, a behavior change, and an attitude change (C-, B- or A-Change) constitute the archetypes of a behavioral change. Change in itself is either of a forming, altering or reinforcing outcome (F-, A- or R-Outcome). This research model will become helpful in researching and designing persuasive technology.

  17. The effect of alkylating agents on model supported metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Erdem-Senatalar, A.; Blackmond, D.G.; Wender, I. . Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering); Oukaci, R. )

    1988-01-01

    Interactions between model supported metal clusters and alkylating agents were studied in an effort to understand a novel chemical trapping technique developed for identifying species adsorbed on catalyst surfaces. It was found that these interactions are more complex than had previously been suggested. Studies were completed using deuterium-labeled dimethyl sulfate (DMS), (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, as a trapping agent to interact with the supported metal cluster ethylidyne tricobalt enneacarbonyl. Results showed that oxygenated products formed during the trapping reaction contained {minus}OCD{sub 3} groups from the DMS, indicating that the interaction was not a simple alkylation. 18 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  18. Tectonic model explaining divergent contraction directions along the Cascadia subduction margin, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCrory, P.A.

    1996-01-01

    Differential motion across the central Cascadia subduction boundary in Washington results in a complex pattern of folds and faults within the shelf and onshore parts of the accretionary margin. Faults and folds above a coastal, north-northwest-trending thrust system provide evidence of ongoing subduction-related contraction. South of this coastal thrust system many fold axes and thrust faults trend east-northeast, in the direction of convergence. These structures are not consistent with a simple subduction system undergoing northeastward convergence. This deformation, adjacent to the boundary between the subduction complex and the Siletz terrane, may be driven by relative convergence between the northward-translating Siletz terrane and the subduction complex. The regional pattern of modern uplift rates is consistent with ongoing north-south contraction across this boundary and the north-south compressional stress field in the area.

  19. Activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force, reporting period March--August 1991; Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, reporting period October--December 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    Activities of DOE's Oil Implementation Task Force for the period March--August 1991 are reviewed. Contracts for fields projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery are discussed, with a list of related publications given. Enhanced recovery processes covered include chemical flooding, gas displacement, thermal recovery, and microbial recovery.

  20. Support for an expanded tripartite influence model with gay men.

    PubMed

    Tylka, Tracy L; Andorka, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether an expanded tripartite influence model would represent gay men's experiences. This model was extended by adding partners and gay community involvement as sources of social influence and considering dual body image pathways (muscularity and body fat dissatisfaction) to muscularity enhancement and disordered eating behaviors. Latent variable structural equation modeling analyses upheld this model for 346 gay men. Dual body image pathways to body change behaviors were supported, although three unanticipated interrelationships emerged, suggesting that muscularity and body fat concerns and behaviors may be more integrated for gay men. Internalization of the mesomorphic ideal, appearance comparison, muscularity dissatisfaction, and body fat dissatisfaction were key mediators in the model. Of the sources of social influence, friend and media pressure to be lean, gay community involvement, and partner, friend, media, and family pressures to be muscular made incremental contributions. Unexpectedly, certain sources were directly connected to body change behaviors. PMID:22036192

  1. Data and Models Needed to Support Civil Aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onsager, Terrance; Biesecker, D. A.; Berger, Thomas; Rutledge, Robert

    2016-07-01

    The effective utilization of existing data and models is an important element in advancing the goals of the COSPAR/ILWS space weather roadmap. This is recommended to be done through innovative approaches to data utilization, including data driving, data assimilation, and ensemble modeling. This presentation will focus on observations and models needed to support space weather services for civil aviation and commercial space transportation. The service needs for aviation will be discussed, and an overview will be given of some of the existing data and models that can provide these services. Efforts underway to define the requirements for real-time data and to assess current modeling capabilities will be described. Recommendations will be offered for internationally coordinated activities that could identify priorities and further the roadmap goals.

  2. Final Report DOE Supported Activities through the Utility/DOE Matching Grant Program Contract Number DE FG02-95NE38111 For the Period 30 September 1995 through 30 September 2002 Extended until 30 March 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbins, James F.

    2003-08-15

    This report covers activities in the Univesity of Illinois Department of Nulcear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering Matching Grant Program for the period form 30 September 1995 to 30 March 2003. The funds for this program include industrial partner funds which were matched, or nearly matched by DOE-NE. The industrial partner was Commonwealth Edison, which changed its corporate structure and name to Exelon during the course of the contract. The funds from the contract were used to support nuclear engineering educational needs, including undergraduate and graduate students support, purchase of laboratory equipment, support for seminar speakers and conferences, and support for new faculty members. The funds were instrumental in maintaining a first quality nuclear engineering educational program at the University of Illinois.

  3. Collagen gel contraction as a measure of fibroblast function in an animal model of subsynovial connective tissue fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tai-Hua; Thoreson, Andrew R; Gingery, Anne; Larson, Dirk R; Passe, Sandra M; An, Kai-Nan; Zhao, Chunfeng; Amadio, Peter C

    2015-05-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a peripheral neuropathy characterized by non-inflammatory fibrosis of the subsynovial connective tissues (SSCT). A rabbit model of CTS was developed to test the hypothesis that SSCT fibrosis causes the neuropathy. We used a cell-seeded collagen-gel contraction model to characterize the fibrosis in this model in terms of cellular mechanics, specifically to compare the ability of SSCT cells from the rabbit model and normal rabbits to contract the gel, and to assess the effect of transforming growth factor-β1,which is upregulated in CTS, on these cells. SSCT fibrosis was induced in six retired breeder female rabbits which were sacrificed at 6 weeks (N = 3) and 12 weeks (n = 3). An additional two rabbits served as controls. SSCT was harvested according to a standard protocol. Gels seeded with SSCT cells from rabbits sacrificed at 6 weeks had significantly higher tensile strength (p < 0.001) and Young's modulus (p < 0.001) than gels seeded with cells from rabbits sacrificed at 12 weeks or control animals. TGF-β1 significantly increased the decay time constant (p < 0.001), tensile strength (p < 0.001), and Young's modulus (p < 0.001) regardless of the cell source. This model may be useful in screening therapeutic agents that may block SSCT fibrosis, identifying possible candidates for CTS treatment. PMID:25626430

  4. Model-supported exploitation of synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chellappa, Rama; Kuttikkad, Shyam; Meth, Reuven; Burlina, Philippe; Shekhar, Chandra S.

    1996-02-01

    We address the application of model-supported exploitation techniques to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery. The emphasis is on monitoring SAR imagery using wide area 2D and/or 3D site models along with contextual information. We consider here the following tasks useful in monitoring: (a) site model construction using segmentation and labeling techniques, (b) target detection, (c) target classification and indexing, and (d) SAR image-site model registration. The 2-D wide area site models used here for SAR image exploitation differ from typical site models developed for RADIUS applications, in that they do not model specific facilities, but constitute wide area site models of cultural features such as urban clutter areas, roads, clearings, fields, etc. These models may be derived directly from existing site models, possibly constructed from electro-optical (EO) observations. When such models are not available, a set of segmentation and labeling techniques described here can be used for the construction of 2D site models. The use of models can potentially yield critical information which can disambiguate target signatures in SAR images. We address registration of SAR and EO images to a common site model. Specific derivations are given for the case of registration within the RCDE platform. We suggest a constant false alarm rate (CFAR) detection scheme and a topographic primal sketch (TPS) based classification scheme for monitoring target occurrences in SAR images. The TPS of an observed target is matched against candidate targets TPSs synthesized for the preferred target orientation, inferred from context (e.g. road or parking lot targets). Experimental results on real and synthetic SAR images are provided.

  5. Model-based decision support in diabetes care.

    PubMed

    Salzsieder, E; Vogt, L; Kohnert, K-D; Heinke, P; Augstein, P

    2011-05-01

    The model-based Karlsburg Diabetes Management System (KADIS®) has been developed as a patient-focused decision-support tool to provide evidence-based advice for physicians in their daily efforts to optimize metabolic control in diabetes care of their patients on an individualized basis. For this purpose, KADIS® was established in terms of a personalized, interactive in silico simulation procedure, implemented into a problem-related diabetes health care network and evaluated under different conditions by conducting open-label mono- and polycentric trials, and a case-control study, and last but not least, by application in routine diabetes outpatient care. The trial outcomes clearly show that the recommendations provided to the physicians by KADIS® lead to significant improvement of metabolic control. This model-based decision-support system provides an excellent tool to effectively guide physicians in personalized decision-making to achieve optimal metabolic control for their patients. PMID:20621384

  6. Automated rodent in situ muscle contraction assay and myofiber organization analysis in sarcopenia animal models.

    PubMed

    Weber, H; Rauch, A; Adamski, S; Chakravarthy, K; Kulkarni, A; Dogdas, B; Bendtsen, C; Kath, G; Alves, S E; Wilkinson, H A; Chiu, C-S

    2012-06-01

    Age-related sarcopenia results in frailty and decreased mobility, which are associated with increased falls and long-term disability in the elderly. Given the global increase in lifespan, sarcopenia is a growing, unmet medical need. This report aims to systematically characterize muscle aging in preclinical models, which may facilitate the development of sarcopenia therapies. Naïve rats and mice were subjected to noninvasive micro X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) imaging, terminal in situ muscle function characterizations, and ATPase-based myofiber analysis. We developed a Definiens (Parsippany, NJ)-based algorithm to automate micro-CT image analysis, which facilitates longitudinal in vivo muscle mass analysis. We report development and characterization of translational in situ skeletal muscle performance assay systems in rat and mouse. The systems incorporate a custom-designed animal assay stage, resulting in enhanced force measurement precision, and LabVIEW (National Instruments, Austin, TX)-based algorithms to support automated data acquisition and data analysis. We used ATPase-staining techniques for myofibers to characterize fiber subtypes and distribution. Major parameters contributing to muscle performance were identified using data mining and integration, enabled by Labmatrix (BioFortis, Columbia, MD). These technologies enabled the systemic and accurate monitoring of muscle aging from a large number of animals. The data indicated that longitudinal muscle cross-sectional area measurement effectively monitors change of muscle mass and function during aging. Furthermore, the data showed that muscle performance during aging is also modulated by myofiber remodeling factors, such as changes in myofiber distribution patterns and changes in fiber shape, which affect myofiber interaction. This in vivo muscle assay platform has been applied to support identification and validation of novel targets for the treatment of sarcopenia. PMID:22461442

  7. Neighborhood Supported Model Level Fuzzy Aggregation for Moving Object Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Chiranjeevi, Pojala; Sengupta, Somnath

    2014-02-01

    We propose a new algorithm for moving object detection in the presence of challenging dynamic background conditions. We use a set of fuzzy aggregated multifeature similarity measures applied on multiple models corresponding to multimodal backgrounds. The algorithm is enriched with a neighborhood-supported model initialization strategy for faster convergence. A model level fuzzy aggregation measure driven background model maintenance ensures more robustness. Similarity functions are evaluated between the corresponding elements of the current feature vector and the model feature vectors. Concepts from Sugeno and Choquet integrals are incorporated in our algorithm to compute fuzzy similarities from the ordered similarity function values for each model. Model updating and the foreground/background classification decision is based on the set of fuzzy integrals. Our proposed algorithm is shown to outperform other multi-model background subtraction algorithms. The proposed approach completely avoids explicit offline training to initialize background model and can be initialized with moving objects also. The feature space uses a combination of intensity and statistical texture features for better object localization and robustness. Our qualitative and quantitative studies illustrate the mitigation of varieties of challenging situations by our approach. PMID:24235250

  8. Information Model Translation to Support a Wider Science Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, John S.; Crichton, Daniel; Ritschel, Bernd; Hardman, Sean; Joyner, Ronald

    2014-05-01

    The Planetary Data System (PDS), NASA's long-term archive for solar system exploration data, has just released PDS4, a modernization of the PDS architecture, data standards, and technical infrastructure. This next generation system positions the PDS to meet the demands of the coming decade, including big data, international cooperation, distributed nodes, and multiple ways of analysing and interpreting data. It also addresses three fundamental project goals: providing more efficient data delivery by data providers to the PDS, enabling a stable, long-term usable planetary science data archive, and enabling services for the data consumer to find, access, and use the data they require in contemporary data formats. The PDS4 information architecture is used to describe all PDS data using a common model. Captured in an ontology modeling tool it supports a hierarchy of data dictionaries built to the ISO/IEC 11179 standard and is designed to increase flexibility, enable complex searches at the product level, and to promote interoperability that facilitates data sharing both nationally and internationally. A PDS4 information architecture design requirement stipulates that the content of the information model must be translatable to external data definition languages such as XML Schema, XMI/XML, and RDF/XML. To support the semantic Web standards we are now in the process of mapping the contents into RDF/XML to support SPARQL capable databases. We are also building a terminological ontology to support virtually unified data retrieval and access. This paper will provide an overview of the PDS4 information architecture focusing on its domain information model and how the translation and mapping are being accomplished.

  9. Toward a transtheoretical model of interprofessional education: stages, processes and forces supporting institutional change.

    PubMed

    Clark, Phillip G

    2013-01-01

    The history of interprofessional education (IPE) in the USA is a checkered one, characterized by boom and bust cycles of advancement and retrenchment, expansion and contraction. The successful development, implementation and continuation of IPE in health and social care in US higher education institutions all depend on a number of factors related to how individuals and organizations do or do not support it in the academic setting. Deliberate and planned change to advance IPE requires a comprehensive theoretical framework to guide it and insure its success. A transtheoretical model (TTM) of institutional change is proposed as a comprehensive framework of the stages, processes and forces that can facilitate and maintain change in support of IPE. The TTM framework recognizes the complexity of change, and captures and organizes important elements from different organizational theories. It also provides a structure for conceptualizing the multiple dimensions needed for change, offering intervention strategies and leverage points to be used by leaders in promoting and maintaining it. Finally, the TTM model suggests that the stabilization of IPE programs over the long term is dependent on a real and significant shift in institutional values in response to forces from both within and without the organization. PMID:23078592

  10. Model-It: A Case Study of Learner-Centered Software Design for Supporting Model Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Shari L.; Stratford, Steven J.; Krajcik, Joseph S.; Soloway, Elliot

    Learner-centered software design (LCSD) guides the design of tasks, tools, and interfaces in order to support the unique needs of learners: growth, diversity and motivation. This paper presents a framework for LCSD and describes a case study of its application to the ScienceWare Model-It, a learner-centered tool to support scientific modeling and…

  11. Student Contracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldridge, Hal

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of the nature of student-teacher contracts pertaining to academic work to be performed by the student and evaluated by the teacher covers a wide range of related issues in this article. The nature of contracts, evaluation procedures, instructional materials, community attitudes, and the individualization of instruction are commented on…

  12. Architect's Contract.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Board of Education, Columbus.

    An actual contract form used for architectural services is presented. Fees, duties, and services are included. Services are listed in the following phases--(1) schematic design, (2) design development, (3) contract document, and (4) construction. Extra services are listed, and owner's responsibility with regard to cost estimates is given.…

  13. Managing Contraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, William

    The major thesis of this paper on declining resources and enrollment is that the management of decline, or, as the author calls it, "contraction," is not simply an economic and technical problem; it is basically a conceptual and political one. The author first considers the effects of contraction on schools, buildings, and courses, touching on the…

  14. Performance Contracting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Tom

    The management team at Minooka (Illinois) School District 201 is actively pursuing school improvement measures by establishing Performance Contracts to increase productivity. The format of the Performance Contract highlights yearly short-term and long-term goals, which are presented in the form of Job Improvement Targets stating the goal itself, a…

  15. Contracts. Warranties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mertz, Gayle

    1988-01-01

    Presents two lesson plans for grades 5-9 which are meant to increase student's legal literacy. The first lesson covers contracts and includes a comic strip which illustrates contract law. The second deals with warranties and why they are important. Included are examples of product warranties. (GEA)

  16. PORFLOW Modeling Supporting The H-Tank Farm Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, J. M.; Flach, G. P.; Westbrook, M. L.

    2012-08-31

    Numerical simulations of groundwater flow and contaminant transport in the vadose and saturated zones have been conducted using the PORFLOW code in support of an overall Performance Assessment (PA) of the H-Tank Farm. This report provides technical detail on selected aspects of PORFLOW model development and describes the structure of the associated electronic files. The PORFLOW models for the H-Tank Farm PA, Rev. 1 were updated with grout, solubility, and inventory changes. The aquifer model was refined. In addition, a set of flow sensitivity runs were performed to allow flow to be varied in the related probabilistic GoldSim models. The final PORFLOW concentration values are used as input into a GoldSim dose calculator.

  17. Experimental-based modeling of a support structure as part of a full system model

    SciTech Connect

    CARNE,THOMAS G.; DOHRMANN,CLARK R.

    2000-02-29

    Structural dynamic systems are often attached to a support structure to simulate proper boundary conditions during testing. In some cases the support structure is fairly simple and can be modeled by discrete springs and dampers. In other cases the desired test conditions necessitate the use of a support structural that introduces dynamics of its own. For such cases a more complex structural dynamic model is required to simulate the response of the full combined system. In this paper experimental frequency response functions, admittance function modeling concepts, and least squares reductions are used to develop a support structure model including both translational and rotational degrees of freedom at an attachment location. Subsequently, the modes of the support structure are estimated, and a NASTRAN model is created for attachment to the tested system.

  18. CSMOS GROUNDWATER MODELING SOFTWARE (CENTER FOR SUBSURFACE MODELING SUPPORT, SUBSURFACE PROTECTION AND REMEDIATION DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Center for Subsurface Modeling Support (CSMoS), which is part of NRMRL's Subsurface Protection and Remediation Division, distributes various public domain groundwater and vadose zone models. A short decription of each model is available. You can obtain both models and manuals...

  19. Mimetic butterflies support Wallace's model of sexual dimorphism.

    PubMed

    Kunte, Krushnamegh

    2008-07-22

    Theoretical and empirical observations generally support Darwin's view that sexual dimorphism evolves due to sexual selection on, and deviation in, exaggerated male traits. Wallace presented a radical alternative, which is largely untested, that sexual dimorphism results from naturally selected deviation in protective female coloration. This leads to the prediction that deviation in female rather than male phenotype causes sexual dimorphism. Here I test Wallace's model of sexual dimorphism by tracing the evolutionary history of Batesian mimicry-an example of naturally selected protective coloration-on a molecular phylogeny of Papilio butterflies. I show that sexual dimorphism in Papilio is significantly correlated with both female-limited Batesian mimicry, where females are mimetic and males are non-mimetic, and with the deviation of female wing colour patterns from the ancestral patterns conserved in males. Thus, Wallace's model largely explains sexual dimorphism in Papilio. This finding, along with indirect support from recent studies on birds and lizards, suggests that Wallace's model may be more widely useful in explaining sexual dimorphism. These results also highlight the contribution of naturally selected female traits in driving phenotypic divergence between species, instead of merely facilitating the divergence in male sexual traits as described by Darwin's model. PMID:18426753

  20. Heart and lung support interaction--modeling and simulation.

    PubMed

    Darowski, M

    2000-01-01

    Mechanical support of the lungs used to preserve life or during any kind of surgery may have an adverse effect on the cardiovascular system. Usually, positive pressure in alveoli diminishes lung perfusion, venous return and cardiac output. Positive pressure during the respiratory cycle is transfered into the thoracic space. The aim of this study was to assess how synchronization of the respirator with spontaneous breathing influences the distribution of pressure and ventilation in nonhomogeneous lungs and how it should influence hemodynamics. For this purpose a multicompartmental model of respiratory system mechanics was used in the electrical analog of a respirator-lung circuit, which enabled us to simultaneously simulate ventilatory support and spontaneous breathing. Mechanical properties of the respiratory system were modeled by lumped parameters: resistances and capacitances of constant values, independent of lung volume or inspiratory flow changes. A multicompartmental model of the respiratory system enabled us to simulate lung pathology characterized by non-homogeneity of the mechanical properties of the different parts of the lungs. The results of simulations presented in the paper enable us to conclude that lung volume increase, independent of the respirator-patient breathing synchronization, may be modeled as the increase in pulmonary vascular resistance and alveolar pressure increase, dependent on respirator-patient breathing synchronization, may be averaged by esophageous balloon measurements which show intrathoracic pressure changes. PMID:11014677

  1. Operations and support cost modeling using Markov chains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Resit

    1989-01-01

    Systems for future missions will be selected with life cycle costs (LCC) as a primary evaluation criterion. This reflects the current realization that only systems which are considered affordable will be built in the future due to the national budget constaints. Such an environment calls for innovative cost modeling techniques which address all of the phases a space system goes through during its life cycle, namely: design and development, fabrication, operations and support; and retirement. A significant portion of the LCC for reusable systems are generated during the operations and support phase (OS). Typically, OS costs can account for 60 to 80 percent of the total LCC. Clearly, OS costs are wholly determined or at least strongly influenced by decisions made during the design and development phases of the project. As a result OS costs need to be considered and estimated early in the conceptual phase. To be effective, an OS cost estimating model needs to account for actual instead of ideal processes by associating cost elements with probabilities. One approach that may be suitable for OS cost modeling is the use of the Markov Chain Process. Markov chains are an important method of probabilistic analysis for operations research analysts but they are rarely used for life cycle cost analysis. This research effort evaluates the use of Markov Chains in LCC analysis by developing OS cost model for a hypothetical reusable space transportation vehicle (HSTV) and suggests further uses of the Markov Chain process as a design-aid tool.

  2. Job Demands-Control-Support model and employee safety performance.

    PubMed

    Turner, Nick; Stride, Chris B; Carter, Angela J; McCaughey, Deirdre; Carroll, Anthony E

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore whether work characteristics (job demands, job control, social support) comprising Karasek and Theorell's (1990) Job Demands-Control-Support framework predict employee safety performance (safety compliance and safety participation; Neal and Griffin, 2006). We used cross-sectional data of self-reported work characteristics and employee safety performance from 280 healthcare staff (doctors, nurses, and administrative staff) from Emergency Departments of seven hospitals in the United Kingdom. We analyzed these data using a structural equation model that simultaneously regressed safety compliance and safety participation on the main effects of each of the aforementioned work characteristics, their two-way interactions, and the three-way interaction among them, while controlling for demographic, occupational, and organizational characteristics. Social support was positively related to safety compliance, and both job control and the two-way interaction between job control and social support were positively related to safety participation. How work design is related to employee safety performance remains an important area for research and provides insight into how organizations can improve workplace safety. The current findings emphasize the importance of the co-worker in promoting both safety compliance and safety participation. PMID:22269573

  3. Intrinsic bioremediation modeling to support Superfund site closure

    SciTech Connect

    Bedard, A.H.; Day, M.J.; Johnson, R.H.; Ritter, K.J.; Stancel, S.G.; Thomson, J.A.M.

    1997-09-01

    Closure of the groundwater component of a major Superfund site has been accomplished by a combination of source control, engineered in-situ bioremediation, and subsequent long-term intrinsic bioremediation. Engineered bioremediation outside the source control area resulted in very significant contaminant mass removal. This allowed intrinsic bioremediation to be considered as a passive remedial management method of achieving cleanup objectives after active remediation needed. Modeling demonstrated that intrinsic bioremediation would achieve cleanup objectives (for this site, Federal drinking water standards) within ten years of shutdown of the active bioremediation system. Modeling showed that residual electron acceptors and nutrients distributed in the aquifer during engineered bioremediation greatly enhance the intrinsic bioremediation process. The results of the modeling effort led to the active system being shut down a year ahead of schedule, allowing the project to move into a low-maintenance intrinsic bioremediation and long-term monitoring phase. The modeling demonstration coupled Visual MODFLOW{copyright} and BioTrans{copyright} to simulate groundwater flow, solute transport, and oxygen-limited, multi-species biodegradation. Regional flow evaluation, detailed model sensitivity analyses, and subarea modeling were employed to provide support to model predictions. Predictions will be tested by subsequent progress and compliance monitoring. Site closure began in early 1996.

  4. Bridging groundwater models and decision support with a Bayesian network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fienen, Michael N.; Masterson, John P.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Gutierrez, Benjamin T.; Thieler, E. Robert

    2013-01-01

    Resource managers need to make decisions to plan for future environmental conditions, particularly sea level rise, in the face of substantial uncertainty. Many interacting processes factor in to the decisions they face. Advances in process models and the quantification of uncertainty have made models a valuable tool for this purpose. Long-simulation runtimes and, often, numerical instability make linking process models impractical in many cases. A method for emulating the important connections between model input and forecasts, while propagating uncertainty, has the potential to provide a bridge between complicated numerical process models and the efficiency and stability needed for decision making. We explore this using a Bayesian network (BN) to emulate a groundwater flow model. We expand on previous approaches to validating a BN by calculating forecasting skill using cross validation of a groundwater model of Assateague Island in Virginia and Maryland, USA. This BN emulation was shown to capture the important groundwater-flow characteristics and uncertainty of the groundwater system because of its connection to island morphology and sea level. Forecast power metrics associated with the validation of multiple alternative BN designs guided the selection of an optimal level of BN complexity. Assateague island is an ideal test case for exploring a forecasting tool based on current conditions because the unique hydrogeomorphological variability of the island includes a range of settings indicative of past, current, and future conditions. The resulting BN is a valuable tool for exploring the response of groundwater conditions to sea level rise in decision support.

  5. The European ALMA Regional Centre: a model of user support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreani, P.; Stoehr, F.; Zwaan, M.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Biggs, A.; Diaz-Trigo, M.; Humphreys, E.; Petry, D.; Randall, S.; Stanke, T.; van Kampen, E.; Bárta, M.; Brand, J.; Gueth, F.; Hogerheijde, M.; Bertoldi, F.; Muxlow, T.; Richards, A.; Vlemmings, W.

    2014-08-01

    The ALMA Regional Centres (ARCs) form the interface between the ALMA observatory and the user community from the proposal preparation stage to the delivery of data and their subsequent analysis. The ARCs provide critical services to both the ALMA operations in Chile and to the user community. These services were split by the ALMA project into core and additional services. The core services are financed by the ALMA operations budget and are critical to the successful operation of ALMA. They are contractual obligations and must be delivered to the ALMA project. The additional services are not funded by the ALMA project and are not contractual obligations, but are critical to achieve ALMA full scientific potential. A distributed network of ARC nodes (with ESO being the central ARC) has been set up throughout Europe at the following seven locations: Bologna, Bonn-Cologne, Grenoble, Leiden, Manchester, Ondrejov, Onsala. These ARC nodes are working together with the central node at ESO and provide both core and additional services to the ALMA user community. This paper presents the European ARC, and how it operates in Europe to support the ALMA community. This model, although complex in nature, is turning into a very successful one, providing a service to the scientific community that has been so far highly appreciated. The ARC could become a reference support model in an age where very large collaborations are required to build large facilities, and support is needed for geographically and culturally diverse communities.

  6. Local Control Model of Excitation–Contraction Coupling in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Michael D.; Pizarro, Gonzalo; Ríos, Eduardo

    1997-01-01

    This is a quantitative model of control of Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in skeletal muscle, based on dual control of release channels (ryanodine receptors), primarily by voltage, secondarily by Ca2+ (Ríos, E., and G. Pizarro. 1988. NIPS. 3:223–227). Channels are positioned in a double row array of between 10 and 60 channels, where exactly half face voltage sensors (dihydropyridine receptors) in the transverse (t) tubule membrane (Block, B.A., T. Imagawa, K.P. Campbell, and C. Franzini-Armstrong. 1988. J. Cell Biol. 107:2587–2600). We calculate the flux of Ca2+ release upon different patterns of pulsed t-tubule depolarization by explicit stochastic simulation of the states of all channels in the array. Channels are initially opened by voltage sensors, according to an allosteric prescription (Ríos, E., M. Karhanek, J. Ma, A. González. 1993. J. Gen. Physiol. 102:449–482). Ca2+ permeating the open channels, diffusing in the junctional gap space, and interacting with fixed and mobile buffers produces defined and changing distributions of Ca2+ concentration. These concentrations interact with activating and inactivating channel sites to determine the propagation of activation and inactivation within the array. The model satisfactorily simulates several whole-cell observations, including kinetics and voltage dependence of release flux, the “paradox of control,” whereby Ca2+-activated release remains under voltage control, and, most surprisingly, the “quantal” aspects of activation and inactivation (Pizarro, G., N. Shirokova, A. Tsugorka, and E. Ríos. 1997. J. Physiol. 501:289–303). Additionally, the model produces discrete events of activation that resemble Ca2+ sparks (Cheng, H., M.B. Cannell, and W.J. Lederer. 1993. Science (Wash. DC). 262:740–744). All these properties result from the intersection of stochastic channel properties, control by local Ca2+, and, most importantly, the one dimensional geometry of the array and its

  7. Quantitative study of the effect of tissue microstructure on contraction in a computational model of rat left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Carapella, Valentina; Bordas, Rafel; Pathmanathan, Pras; Lohezic, Maelene; Schneider, Jurgen E; Kohl, Peter; Burrage, Kevin; Grau, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Tissue microstructure, in particular the alignment of myocytes (fibre direction) and their lateral organisation into sheets, is fundamental to cardiac function. We studied the effect of microstructure on contraction in a computational model of rat left ventricular electromechanics. Different fibre models, globally rule-based or locally optimised to DT-MRI data, were compared, in order to understand whether a subject-specific fibre model would enhance the predictive power of our model with respect to the global ones. We also studied the impact of sheets on ventricular deformation by comparing: (a) a transversely isotropic versus an orthotropic material law and (b) a linear model with a bimodal model of sheet transmural variation. We estimated ejection fraction, wall thickening and base-to-apex shortening and compared them with measures from cine-MRI. We also evaluated Lagrangian strains as local metrics of cardiac deformation. Our results show that the subject-specific fibre model provides little improvement in the metric predictions with respect to global fibre models while material orthotropy allows closer agreement with measures than transverse isotropy. Nonetheless, the impact of sheets in our model is smaller than that of fibres. We conclude that further investigation of the modelling of sheet dynamics is necessary to fully understand the impact of tissue structure on cardiac deformation. PMID:24695115

  8. Quantitative Study of the Effect of Tissue Microstructure on Contraction in a Computational Model of Rat Left Ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Carapella, Valentina; Bordas, Rafel; Pathmanathan, Pras; Lohezic, Maelene; Schneider, Jurgen E.; Kohl, Peter; Burrage, Kevin; Grau, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Tissue microstructure, in particular the alignment of myocytes (fibre direction) and their lateral organisation into sheets, is fundamental to cardiac function. We studied the effect of microstructure on contraction in a computational model of rat left ventricular electromechanics. Different fibre models, globally rule-based or locally optimised to DT-MRI data, were compared, in order to understand whether a subject-specific fibre model would enhance the predictive power of our model with respect to the global ones. We also studied the impact of sheets on ventricular deformation by comparing: (a) a transversely isotropic versus an orthotropic material law and (b) a linear model with a bimodal model of sheet transmural variation. We estimated ejection fraction, wall thickening and base-to-apex shortening and compared them with measures from cine-MRI. We also evaluated Lagrangian strains as local metrics of cardiac deformation. Our results show that the subject-specific fibre model provides little improvement in the metric predictions with respect to global fibre models while material orthotropy allows closer agreement with measures than transverse isotropy. Nonetheless, the impact of sheets in our model is smaller than that of fibres. We conclude that further investigation of the modelling of sheet dynamics is necessary to fully understand the impact of tissue structure on cardiac deformation. PMID:24695115

  9. Land Surface Emission Modeling to Support Physical Precipitation Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters-Lidard, Christina D.; Harrison, Kenneth; Kumar, Sujay; Ferraro, Ralph; Skofronick-Jackson, Gail

    2010-01-01

    Land surface modeling and data assimilation can provide dynamic land surface state variables necessary to support physical precipitation retrieval algorithms over land. It is well-known that surface emission, particularly over the range of frequencies to be included in the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission (GPM), is sensitive to land surface states, including soil properties, vegetation type and greenness, soil moisture, surface temperature, and snow cover, density, and grain size. In order to investigate the robustness of both the land surface model states and the microwave emissivity and forward radiative transfer models, we have undertaken a multi-site investigation as part of the NASA Precipitation Measurement Missions (PMM) Land Surface Characterization. Working Group.

  10. Muscle contraction increases interstitial nitric oxide as predicted by a new model of local blood flow regulation.

    PubMed

    Golub, Aleksander S; Song, Bjorn K; Pittman, Roland N

    2014-03-15

    The prevailing metabolic theory of local blood flow regulation suggests the dilatation of arterioles in response to tissue hypoxia via the emission of multiple metabolic vasodilators by parenchymal cells. We have proposed a mechanism of regulation, built from well-known components, which assumes that arterioles are normally dilated in metabolically active tissues, due to the emission of NO by the endothelium of microvessels. Regulation of local blood flow aims at preventing an excessive supply of oxygen (O2) and glucose to the tissue and thus provides an adequate supply, in contrast to the metabolic regulation theory which requires permanent hypoxia to generate the metabolic vasodilators. The mediator of the restrictive signal is superoxide anion (O2(-)) released by membrane NAD(P)H oxidases into the interstitial space, where it neutralizes NO at a diffusion-limited rate. This model predicts that the onset of muscle contraction will lead to the cessation of O2(-) production, which will cause an elevation of interstitial NO concentration and an increase in fluorescence of the NO probe DAF-FM after its conversion to DAF-T. The time course of DAF-T fluorescence in contracting muscle is predicted by also considering the washout from the muscle of the interstitially loaded NO indicator. Experiments using pulse fluorimetry confirmed an increase in the interstitial concentration of NO available for reaction with DAF-FM during bouts of muscle contraction. The sharp increase in interstitial [NO] is consistent with the hypothesis that the termination of the neutralizing superoxide flow into the interstitium is associated with the activation of mitochondria and a reduction of the interstitial oxygen tension. The advantage of the new model is its ability to explain the interaction of metabolic activity and local blood flow through the adequate delivery of glucose and oxygen. PMID:24445318