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Sample records for modelling applying advanced

  1. Recent Turbulence Model Advances Applied to Multielement Airfoil Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    2000-01-01

    A one-equation linear turbulence model and a two-equation nonlinear explicit algebraic stress model (EASM) are applied to the flow over a multielement airfoil. The effect of the K-epsilon and K-omega forms of the two-equation model are explored, and the K-epsilon form is shown to be deficient in the wall-bounded regions of adverse pressure gradient flows. A new K-omega form of EASM is introduced. Nonlinear terms present in EASM are shown to improve predictions of turbulent shear stress behind the trailing edge of the main element and near midflap. Curvature corrections are applied to both the one- and two-equation turbulence models and yield only relatively small local differences in the flap region, where the flow field undergoes the greatest curvature. Predictions of maximum lift are essentially unaffected by the turbulence model variations studied.

  2. Advances in CBL Budgetting and Inverse Modelling by Applying an Off-the-shelf Mesoscale Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Molen, M. K.; Dolman, H.; Ronda, R. J.

    2005-12-01

    Eddy flux towers measure carbon sinks/sources at a local scale (~0.1 km), with the CBL budget method fluxes may be determined at a landscape scale (~1 km), and inverse models may determine the source/sink distribution at a global/continental scale (~1000-10000 km). Although currently efforts are made to increase the resolution of inverse models to the regional scale (~100 km), the meso-scale (100-1000 km) is rather badly represented in this spectrum of approaches. Boundary layer profiles contain signatures of mesoscale processes, such as the effect of wind divergence, topography and forest breezes on the boundary layer height and the subsidence velocity. 3-D advection of resulting concentration gradients is one of the main reasons of failure of the CBL budget approach and the representation error in inverse models and may be addressed in mesoscale atmospheric models. This study shows that considerable improvement may be obtained in the interpretation of boundary layer profiles by running an off-the-shelf mesoscale model without detailed prior knowlegde of the surface flux distribution. The simulations were carried out in the region around Zotino, Central Siberia to aid the interpretation of profile observations collected as part of TCOS-Siberia.

  3. Extending the Surrogacy Analogy: Applying the Advance Directive Model to Biobanks

    PubMed Central

    Mongoven, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Biobank donors and biobank governance face a conceptual challenge akin to clinical patients and their designated surrogate decision-makers: the necessity of making decisions and policies now that must be implemented under future unknown circumstances. We propose that biobanks take advantage of this parallel to learn lessons from the historical trajectory of advance directives and develop models analogous to current “best practice” advance directives such as values histories and the Five Wishes. We suggest how such models could improve biobanks’ engagement both with communities and with individual donors by being more honest about the limits of current disclosure and eliciting information to ensure protection of donor interests more robustly through time than current “informed consent” processes in biobanking. PMID:25074323

  4. Modeling of Broadband Liners Applied to the Advanced Noise Control Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nark, Douglas M.; Jones, Michael G.; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    The broadband component of fan noise has grown in relevance with an increase in bypass ratio and incorporation of advanced fan designs. Therefore, while the attenuation of fan tones remains a major factor in engine nacelle acoustic liner design, the simultaneous reduction of broadband fan noise levels has received increased interest. As such, a previous investigation focused on improvements to an established broadband acoustic liner optimization process using the Advanced Noise Control Fan (ANCF) rig as a demonstrator. Constant-depth, double-degree of freedom and variable-depth, multi-degree of freedom liner designs were carried through design, fabrication, and testing. This paper addresses a number of areas for further research identified in the initial assessment of the ANCF study. Specifically, incident source specification and uncertainty in some aspects of the predicted liner impedances are addressed. This information is incorporated in updated predictions of the liner performance and comparisons with measurement are greatly improved. Results illustrate the value of the design process in concurrently evaluating the relative costs/benefits of various liner designs. This study also provides further confidence in the integrated use of duct acoustic propagation/radiation and liner modeling tools in the design and evaluation of novel broadband liner concepts for complex engine configurations.

  5. Advancing the Interdisciplinary Collaborative Health Team Model: Applying Democratic Professionalism, Implementation Science, and Therapeutic Alliance to Enact Social Justice Practice.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    This essay reframes the interdisciplinary collaborative health team model by proposing the application of 3 foundational pillars-democratic professionalism, implementation science, and therapeutic alliance to advance this practice. The aim was to address challenges to the model, enhance their functional capacity, and explicate and enact social justice practices to affect individual health outcomes while simultaneously addressing health inequities. The pillars are described and examples from the author's dissertation research illustrate how the pillars were used to bring about action. Related theories, models, and frameworks that have negotiation, capacity building, collaboration, and knowledge/task/power sharing as central concepts are presented under each of the pillars. PMID:26244478

  6. Improving governance action by an advanced water modelling system applied to the Po river basin in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessandrini, Cinzia; Del Longo, Mauro; Pecora, Silvano; Puma, Francesco; Vezzani, Claudia

    2013-04-01

    In spite of the historical abundance of water due to rains and to huge storage capacity provided by alpine lakes, Po river basin, the most important Italian water district experienced in the past ten years five drought/water scarcity events respectively in 2003, 2006, 2007 and 2012 summers and in the 2011-2012 winter season. The basic approach to these crises was the observation and the post-event evaluation; from 2007 an advanced numerical modelling system, called Drought Early Warning System for the Po River (DEWS-Po) was developed, providing advanced tools to simulate the hydrological and anthropic processes that affect river flows and allowing to follow events with real-time evaluations. In early 2012 the same system enabled also forecasts. Dews-Po system gives a real-time representation of water distribution across the basin, characterized by high anthropogenic pressure, optimizing with specific tools water allocation in competing situations. The system represents an innovative approach in drought forecast and in water resource management in the Po basin, giving deterministic and probabilistic meteorological forecasts as input to a chain for numerical distributed modelling of hydrological and hydraulic simulations. The system architecture is designed to receive in input hydro-meteorological actually observed and forecasted variables: deterministic meteorological forecasts with a fifteen days lead time, withdrawals data for different uses, natural an artificial reservoirs storage and release data. The model details are very sharp, simulating also the interaction between Adriatic sea and Po river in the delta area in terms of salt intrusion forecasting. Calculation of return period through run-method and of drought stochastic-indicators are enabled to assess the characteristics of the on-going and forecasted event. An Inter-institutional Technical Board is constituted within the Po River Basin Authority since 2008 and meets regularly during water crises to act

  7. Applied model validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, A. D.

    1985-07-01

    The NBS Center for Fire Research (CFR) conducts scientific research bearing on the fire safety of buildings, vehicles, tunnels and other inhabited structures. Data from controlled fire experiments are collected, analyzed and reduced to the analytical formulas that appear to underly the observed phenomena. These results and more general physical principles are then combined into models to predict the development of environments that may be hostile to humans. This is a progress report of an applied model validation case study. The subject model is Transport of Fire, Smoke and Gases (FAST). Products from a fire in a burn room exit through a connected corridor to outdoors. Cooler counterflow air in a lower layer feeds the fire. The model predicts corridor layer temperatures and thicknesses vs. time, given enclosure, fire and ambient specifications. Data have been collected from 38 tests using several fire sizes, but have not been reduced. Corresponding model results, and model and test documentation are yet to come. Considerable modeling and calculation is needed to convert instrument readings to test results comparable with model outputs so that residual differences may be determined.

  8. Hierarchical Multiscale Framework for Materials Modeling: Advances in Scale-Bridging Applied to a Taylor Anvil Impact Test of RDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Brian; Leiter, Kenneth; Becker, Richard; Knap, Jaroslaw; Brennan, John

    As part of a multiscale modeling effort, we present progress on a challenge in continuum-scale modeling: the direct incorporation of complex molecular-level processes in the constitutive evaluation. In this initial phase of the research we use a concurrent scale-bridging approach, with a hierarchical multiscale framework running in parallel to couple a particle-based model (the ''lower scale'') computing the equation of state (EOS) to the constitutive response in a finite-element multi-physics simulation (the ''upper scale''). The lower scale simulations of 1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) use a force-matched coarse-grain model and dissipative particle dynamics methods, and the upper scale simulation is of a Taylor anvil impact experiment. Results emphasize use of adaptive sampling (via dynamic kriging) that accelerates time to solution, and its comparison to fully ''on the fly'' runs. Work towards inclusion of a fully reactive EOS is also discussed.

  9. Novel imazethapyr detoxification applying advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Stathis, Ioannis; Hela, Dimitra G; Scrano, Laura; Lelario, Filomena; Emanuele, Lucia; Bufo, Sabino A

    2011-01-01

    Different degradation methods have been applied to assess the suitability of advanced oxidation process (AOPs) to promote mineralization of imazethapyr [(RS)-5-ethyl-2-(4-isopropyl-4-methyl-5-oxo-2-imidazolin-2-yl)nicotinic acid], a widely used imidazolinone class herbicide, the persistence of which has been demonstrated in surface and ground waters destined to human uses. Independent of the oxidation process assessed, the decomposition of imazethapyr always followed a pseudo-first order kinetic. The direct UV-irradiation (UV) of the herbicide as well as its oxidation with ozone (O₃), and hydrogen peroxide tied to UV-irradiation (H₂O₂/UV) were sufficiently slow to permit the identification of intermediate products, the formation pathway of which has been proposed. Ozonation joined to UV-irradiation (O₃/UV), ozonation joined to titanium dioxide photo-catalysis (TiO₂/UV+O₃), sole photo-catalysis (TiO₂/UV), and photo-catalysis reinforced with hydrogen peroxide-oxidation (TiO₂/UV+H₂O₂) were characterized by a faster degradation and rapid formation of a lot of small molecules, which were quickly degraded to complete mineralization. The most effective oxidation methods were those using titanium dioxide photo-catalysis enhanced either by ozonation or hydrogen peroxide. Most of all, these last processes were useful to avoid the development of dangerous by-products. PMID:21726140

  10. Heuristics Applied in the Development of Advanced Space Mission Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nilsen, Erik N.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced mission studies are the first step in determining the feasibility of a given space exploration concept. A space scientist develops a science goal in the exploration of space. This may be a new observation method, a new instrument or a mission concept to explore a solar system body. In order to determine the feasibility of a deep space mission, a concept study is convened to determine the technology needs and estimated cost of performing that mission. Heuristics are one method of defining viable mission and systems architectures that can be assessed for technology readiness and cost. Developing a viable architecture depends to a large extent upon extending the existing body of knowledge, and applying it in new and novel ways. These heuristics have evolved over time to include methods for estimating technical complexity, technology development, cost modeling and mission risk in the unique context of deep space missions. This paper examines the processes involved in performing these advanced concepts studies, and analyzes the application of heuristics in the development of an advanced in-situ planetary mission. The Venus Surface Sample Return mission study provides a context for the examination of the heuristics applied in the development of the mission and systems architecture. This study is illustrative of the effort involved in the initial assessment of an advance mission concept, and the knowledge and tools that are applied.

  11. UPDATING APPLIED DIFFUSION MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most diffusion models currently used in air quality applications are substantially out of date with understanding of turbulence and diffusion in the planetary boundary layer. Under a Cooperative Agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency, the American Meteorological Socie...

  12. Recent Advances in Nanotechnology Applied to Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xueqing; Guo, Qin; Cui, Daxiang

    2009-01-01

    In recent years there has been great progress the application of nanomaterials in biosensors. The importance of these to the fundamental development of biosensors has been recognized. In particular, nanomaterials such as gold nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, magnetic nanoparticles and quantum dots have been being actively investigated for their applications in biosensors, which have become a new interdisciplinary frontier between biological detection and material science. Here we review some of the main advances in this field over the past few years, explore the application prospects, and discuss the issues, approaches, and challenges, with the aim of stimulating a broader interest in developing nanomaterial-based biosensors and improving their applications in disease diagnosis and food safety examination. PMID:22399954

  13. Advanced Concept Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaput, Armand; Johns, Zachary; Hodges, Todd; Selfridge, Justin; Bevirt, Joeben; Ahuja, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Concepts Modeling software validation, analysis, and design. This was a National Institute of Aerospace contract with a lot of pieces. Efforts ranged from software development and validation for structures and aerodynamics, through flight control development, and aeropropulsive analysis, to UAV piloting services.

  14. ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    William Goddard III; Lawrence Cathles III; Mario Blanco; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

    2004-05-01

    The advanced Chemistry Basin Model project has been operative for 48 months. During this period, about half the project tasks are on projected schedule. On average the project is somewhat behind schedule (90%). Unanticipated issues are causing model integration to take longer then scheduled, delaying final debugging and manual development. It is anticipated that a short extension will be required to fulfill all contract obligations.

  15. Airline return-on-investment model for technology evaluation. [computer program to measure economic value of advanced technology applied to passenger aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    This report presents the derivation, description, and operating instructions for a computer program (TEKVAL) which measures the economic value of advanced technology features applied to long range commercial passenger aircraft. The program consists of three modules; and airplane sizing routine, a direct operating cost routine, and an airline return-on-investment routine. These modules are linked such that they may be operated sequentially or individually, with one routine generating the input for the next or with the option of externally specifying the input for either of the economic routines. A very simple airplane sizing technique was previously developed, based on the Brequet range equation. For this program, that sizing technique has been greatly expanded and combined with the formerly separate DOC and ROI programs to produce TEKVAL.

  16. Advanced resistivity model for arbitrary magnetization orientation applied to a series of compressive- to tensile-strained (Ga,Mn)As layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limmer, W.; Daeubler, J.; Dreher, L.; Glunk, M.; Schoch, W.; Schwaiger, S.; Sauer, R.

    2008-05-01

    The longitudinal and transverse resistivities of differently strained (Ga,Mn)As layers are theoretically and experimentally studied as a function of the magnetization orientation. The strain in the series of (Ga,Mn)As layers is gradually varied from compressive to tensile using (In,Ga)As templates with different In concentrations. Analytical expressions for the resistivities are derived from a series expansion of the resistivity tensor with respect to the direction cosines of the magnetization. In order to quantitatively model the experimental data, terms up to the fourth order have to be included. The expressions derived are generally valid for any single-crystalline cubic and tetragonal ferromagnet and apply to arbitrary surface orientations and current directions. The model phenomenologically incorporates the longitudinal and transverse anisotropic magnetoresistance as well as the anomalous Hall effect. The resistivity parameters obtained from a comparison between experiment and theory are found to systematically vary with the strain in the layer.

  17. Modeling Applied to Problem Solving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawl, Andrew; Barrantes, Analia; Pritchard, David E.

    2009-11-01

    We describe a modeling approach to help students learn expert problem solving. Models are used to present and hierarchically organize the syllabus content and apply it to problem solving, but students do not develop and validate their own Models through guided discovery. Instead, students classify problems under the appropriate instructor-generated Model by selecting a system to consider and describing the interactions that are relevant to that system. We believe that this explicit System, Interactions and Model (S.I.M.) problem modeling strategy represents a key simplification and clarification of the widely disseminated modeling approach originated by Hestenes and collaborators. Our narrower focus allows modeling physics to be integrated into (as opposed to replacing) a typical introductory college mechanics course, while preserving the emphasis on understanding systems and interactions that is the essence of modeling. We have employed the approach in a three-week review course for MIT freshmen who received a D in the fall mechanics course with very encouraging results.

  18. Applied Developmental Science: An Advanced Textbook. The SAGE Program on Applied Developmental Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Richard M., Ed.; Jacobs, Fraincine, Ed.; Wertlieb, Donald, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This course textbook has been adapted from the four-volume "Handbook of Applied Developmental Science" (SAGE 2003), a work that offers a detailed roadmap for action and research in ensuring positive child, youth, and family development. In 20 chapters, "Applied Developmental Science: An Advanced Textbook" brings together theory and application…

  19. Advanced Production Planning Models

    SciTech Connect

    JONES,DEAN A.; LAWTON,CRAIG R.; KJELDGAARD,EDWIN A.; WRIGHT,STEPHEN TROY; TURNQUIST,MARK A.; NOZICK,LINDA K.; LIST,GEORGE F.

    2000-12-01

    >This report describes the innovative modeling approach developed as a result of a 3-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development project. The overall goal of this project was to provide an effective suite of solvers for advanced production planning at facilities in the nuclear weapons complex (NWC). We focused our development activities on problems related to operations at the DOE's Pantex Plant. These types of scheduling problems appear in many contexts other than Pantex--both within the NWC (e.g., Neutron Generators) and in other commercial manufacturing settings. We successfully developed an innovative and effective solution strategy for these types of problems. We have tested this approach on actual data from Pantex, and from Org. 14000 (Neutron Generator production). This report focuses on the mathematical representation of the modeling approach and presents three representative studies using Pantex data. Results associated with the Neutron Generator facility will be published in a subsequent SAND report. The approach to task-based scheduling described here represents a significant addition to the literature for large-scale, realistic scheduling problems in a variety of production settings.

  20. Advanced Chemistry Basins Model

    SciTech Connect

    William Goddard; Mario Blanco; Lawrence Cathles; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

    2002-11-10

    The DOE-funded Advanced Chemistry Basin model project is intended to develop a public domain, user-friendly basin modeling software under PC or low end workstation environment that predicts hydrocarbon generation, expulsion, migration and chemistry. The main features of the software are that it will: (1) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter kinetic parameters for different maturity indicators; (2) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter compositional kinetic parameters to predict hydrocarbon composition (e.g., gas/oil ratio (GOR), wax content, API gravity, etc.) at different kerogen maturities; (3) calculate the chemistry, fluxes and physical properties of all hydrocarbon phases (gas, liquid and solid) along the primary and secondary migration pathways of the basin and predict the location and intensity of phase fractionation, mixing, gas washing, etc.; and (4) predict the location and intensity of de-asphaltene processes. The project has be operative for 36 months, and is on schedule for a successful completion at the end of FY 2003.

  1. Advanced Modeling of Micromirror Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalicek, M. Adrian; Sene, Darren E.; Bright, Victor M.

    1995-01-01

    The flexure-beam micromirror device (FBMD) is a phase only piston style spatial light modulator demonstrating properties which can be used for phase adaptive corrective optics. This paper presents a complete study of a square FBMD, from advanced model development through final device testing and model verification. The model relates the electrical and mechanical properties of the device by equating the electrostatic force of a parallel-plate capacitor with the counter-acting spring force of the device's support flexures. The capacitor solution is derived via the Schwartz-Christoffel transformation such that the final solution accounts for non-ideal electric fields. The complete model describes the behavior of any piston-style device, given its design geometry and material properties. It includes operational parameters such as drive frequency and temperature, as well as fringing effects, mirror surface deformations, and cross-talk from neighboring devices. The steps taken to develop this model can be applied to other micromirrors, such as the cantilever and torsion-beam designs, to produce an advanced model for any given device. The micromirror devices studied in this paper were commercially fabricated in a surface micromachining process. A microscope-based laser interferometer is used to test the device in which a beam reflected from the device modulates a fixed reference beam. The mirror displacement is determined from the relative phase which generates a continuous set of data for each selected position on the mirror surface. Plots of this data describe the localized deflection as a function of drive voltage.

  2. ADVANCED MIXING MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Dimenna, R; Tamburello, D

    2011-02-14

    The process of recovering and processing High Level Waste (HLW) the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank with one to four mixers (pumps) located within the tank. The typical criteria to establish a mixed condition in a tank are based on the number of pumps in operation and the time duration of operation. To ensure that a mixed condition is achieved, operating times are typically set conservatively long. This approach results in high operational costs because of the long mixing times and high maintenance and repair costs for the same reason. A significant reduction in both of these costs might be realized by reducing the required mixing time based on calculating a reliable indicator of mixing with a suitably validated computer code. The focus of the present work is to establish mixing criteria applicable to miscible fluids, with an ultimate goal of addressing waste processing in HLW tanks at SRS and quantifying the mixing time required to suspend sludge particles with the submersible jet pump. A single-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach was taken for the analysis of jet flow patterns with an emphasis on the velocity decay and the turbulent flow evolution for the farfield region from the pump. Literature results for a turbulent jet flow are reviewed, since the decay of the axial jet velocity and the evolution of the jet flow patterns are important phenomena affecting sludge suspension and mixing operations. The work described in this report suggests a basis for further development of the theory leading to the identified mixing indicators, with benchmark analyses demonstrating their consistency with widely accepted correlations. Although the indicators are somewhat generic in nature, they are applied to Savannah River Site (SRS) waste tanks to provide a better, physically based estimate of the required mixing time. Waste storage tanks at SRS contain settled sludge which varies in

  3. Fracture Toughness of Advanced Structural Ceramics: Applying ASTM C1421

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Swab, Jeffrey J.; Tice, Jason; Wereszczak, Andrew A.; Kraft, Reuben H.

    2014-11-03

    The three methods of determining the quasi-static Mode I fracture toughness (KIc) (surface crack in flexure – SC, single-edge precracked beam – PB, and chevron notched beam – VB) found in ASTM C1421 were applied to a variety of advanced ceramic materials. All three methods produced valid and comparable KIc values for the Al2O3, SiC, Si3N4 and SiAlON ceramics examined. However, not all methods could successfully be applied to B4C, ZrO2 and WC ceramics due to a variety of material factors. The coarse-grained microstructure of one B4C hindered the ability to observe and measure the precracks generated in the SCmore » and PB methods while the transformation toughening in the ZrO2 prevented the formation of the SC and PB precracks and thus made it impossible to use either method on this ceramic. The high strength and elastic modulus of the WC made it impossible to achieve stable crack growth using the VB method because the specimen stored a tremendous amount of energy prior to fracture. Even though these methods have passed the rigors of the standardization process there are still some issues to be resolved when the methods are applied to certain classes of ceramics. We recommend that at least two of these methods be employed to determine the KIc, especially when a new or unfamiliar ceramic is being evaluated.« less

  4. Applied and Workforce Baccalaureate Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, Deborah L.; Falconetti, Angela M. Garcia; Felsher, Rivka A.

    2012-01-01

    Community colleges have a storied history of successfully providing pathways and access to credentials and degrees through various models of delivery and in diverse programs of study. Until recently, the highest degree offered by community colleges was the associate degree. During the past decade, major changes have occurred in the landscape of…

  5. Recent advances in click chemistry applied to dendrimer synthesis.

    PubMed

    Arseneault, Mathieu; Wafer, Caroline; Morin, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Dendrimers are monodisperse polymers grown in a fractal manner from a central point. They are poised to become the cornerstone of nanoscale devices in several fields, ranging from biomedicine to light-harvesting. Technical difficulties in obtaining these molecules has slowed their transfer from academia to industry. In 2001, the arrival of the "click chemistry" concept gave the field a major boost. The flagship reaction, a modified Hüisgen cycloaddition, allowed researchers greater freedom in designing and building dendrimers. In the last five years, advances in click chemistry saw a wider use of other click reactions and a notable increase in the complexity of the reported structures. This review covers key developments in the click chemistry field applied to dendrimer synthesis from 2010 to 2015. Even though this is an expert review, basic notions and references have been included to help newcomers to the field. PMID:26007183

  6. Advanced Chemistry Basins Model

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco, Mario; Cathles, Lawrence; Manhardt, Paul; Meulbroek, Peter; Tang, Yongchun

    2003-02-13

    The objective of this project is to: (1) Develop a database of additional and better maturity indicators for paleo-heat flow calibration; (2) Develop maturation models capable of predicting the chemical composition of hydrocarbons produced by a specific kerogen as a function of maturity, heating rate, etc.; assemble a compositional kinetic database of representative kerogens; (3) Develop a 4 phase equation of state-flash model that can define the physical properties (viscosity, density, etc.) of the products of kerogen maturation, and phase transitions that occur along secondary migration pathways; (4) Build a conventional basin model and incorporate new maturity indicators and data bases in a user-friendly way; (5) Develop an algorithm which combines the volume change and viscosities of the compositional maturation model to predict the chemistry of the hydrocarbons that will be expelled from the kerogen to the secondary migration pathways; (6) Develop an algorithm that predicts the flow of hydrocarbons along secondary migration pathways, accounts for mixing of miscible hydrocarbon components along the pathway, and calculates the phase fractionation that will occur as the hydrocarbons move upward down the geothermal and fluid pressure gradients in the basin; and (7) Integrate the above components into a functional model implemented on a PC or low cost workstation.

  7. Advanced Turbulence Modeling Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing

    2005-01-01

    The ZCET program developed at NASA Glenn Research Center is to study hydrogen/air injection concepts for aircraft gas turbine engines that meet conventional gas turbine performance levels and provide low levels of harmful NOx emissions. A CFD study for ZCET program has been successfully carried out. It uses the most recently enhanced National combustion code (NCC) to perform CFD simulations for two configurations of hydrogen fuel injectors (GRC- and Sandia-injector). The results can be used to assist experimental studies to provide quick mixing, low emission and high performance fuel injector designs. The work started with the configuration of the single-hole injector. The computational models were taken from the experimental designs. For example, the GRC single-hole injector consists of one air tube (0.78 inches long and 0.265 inches in diameter) and two hydrogen tubes (0.3 inches long and 0.0226 inches in diameter opposed at 180 degree). The hydrogen tubes are located 0.3 inches upstream from the exit of the air element (the inlet location for the combustor). To do the simulation, the single-hole injector is connected to a combustor model (8.16 inches long and 0.5 inches in diameter). The inlet conditions for air and hydrogen elements are defined according to actual experimental designs. Two crossing jets of hydrogen/air are simulated in detail in the injector. The cold flow, reacting flow, flame temperature, combustor pressure and possible flashback phenomena are studied. Two grid resolutions of the numerical model have been adopted. The first computational grid contains 0.52 million elements, the second one contains over 1.3 million elements. The CFD results have shown only about 5% difference between the two grid resolutions. Therefore, the CFD result obtained from the model of 1.3-million grid resolution can be considered as a grid independent numerical solution. Turbulence models built in NCC are consolidated and well tested. They can handle both coarse and

  8. Fracture Toughness of Advanced Structural Ceramics: Applying ASTM C1421

    SciTech Connect

    Swab, Jeffrey J.; Tice, Jason; Wereszczak, Andrew A.; Kraft, Reuben H.

    2014-11-03

    The three methods of determining the quasi-static Mode I fracture toughness (KIc) (surface crack in flexure – SC, single-edge precracked beam – PB, and chevron notched beam – VB) found in ASTM C1421 were applied to a variety of advanced ceramic materials. All three methods produced valid and comparable KIc values for the Al2O3, SiC, Si3N4 and SiAlON ceramics examined. However, not all methods could successfully be applied to B4C, ZrO2 and WC ceramics due to a variety of material factors. The coarse-grained microstructure of one B4C hindered the ability to observe and measure the precracks generated in the SC and PB methods while the transformation toughening in the ZrO2 prevented the formation of the SC and PB precracks and thus made it impossible to use either method on this ceramic. The high strength and elastic modulus of the WC made it impossible to achieve stable crack growth using the VB method because the specimen stored a tremendous amount of energy prior to fracture. Even though these methods have passed the rigors of the standardization process there are still some issues to be resolved when the methods are applied to certain classes of ceramics. We recommend that at least two of these methods be employed to determine the KIc, especially when a new or unfamiliar ceramic is being evaluated.

  9. Applied Creativity: The Creative Marketing Breakthrough Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titus, Philip A.

    2007-01-01

    Despite the increasing importance of personal creativity in today's business environment, few conceptual creativity frameworks have been presented in the marketing education literature. The purpose of this article is to advance the integration of creativity instruction into marketing classrooms by presenting an applied creative marketing…

  10. Advancing MODFLOW Applying the Derived Vector Space Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, G. S.; Herrera, I.; Lemus-García, M.; Hernandez-Garcia, G. D.

    2015-12-01

    The most effective domain decomposition methods (DDM) are non-overlapping DDMs. Recently a new approach, the DVS-framework, based on an innovative discretization method that uses a non-overlapping system of nodes (the derived-nodes), was introduced and developed by I. Herrera et al. [1, 2]. Using the DVS-approach a group of four algorithms, referred to as the 'DVS-algorithms', which fulfill the DDM-paradigm (i.e. the solution of global problems is obtained by resolution of local problems exclusively) has been derived. Such procedures are applicable to any boundary-value problem, or system of such equations, for which a standard discretization method is available and then software with a high degree of parallelization can be constructed. In a parallel talk, in this AGU Fall Meeting, Ismael Herrera will introduce the general DVS methodology. The application of the DVS-algorithms has been demonstrated in the solution of several boundary values problems of interest in Geophysics. Numerical examples for a single-equation, for the cases of symmetric, non-symmetric and indefinite problems were demonstrated before [1,2]. For these problems DVS-algorithms exhibited significantly improved numerical performance with respect to standard versions of DDM algorithms. In view of these results our research group is in the process of applying the DVS method to a widely used simulator for the first time, here we present the advances of the application of this method for the parallelization of MODFLOW. Efficiency results for a group of tests will be presented. References [1] I. Herrera, L.M. de la Cruz and A. Rosas-Medina. Non overlapping discretization methods for partial differential equations, Numer Meth Part D E, (2013). [2] Herrera, I., & Contreras Iván "An Innovative Tool for Effectively Applying Highly Parallelized Software To Problems of Elasticity". Geofísica Internacional, 2015 (In press)

  11. Advanced Background Subtraction Applied to Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahr, Christopher J.; Horne, William C.

    2015-01-01

    An advanced form of background subtraction is presented and applied to aeroacoustic wind tunnel data. A variant of this method has seen use in other fields such as climatology and medical imaging. The technique, based on an eigenvalue decomposition of the background noise cross-spectral matrix, is robust against situations where isolated background auto-spectral levels are measured to be higher than levels of combined source and background signals. It also provides an alternate estimate of the cross-spectrum, which previously might have poor definition for low signal-to-noise ratio measurements. Simulated results indicate similar performance to conventional background subtraction when the subtracted spectra are weaker than the true contaminating background levels. Superior performance is observed when the subtracted spectra are stronger than the true contaminating background levels. Experimental results show limited success in recovering signal behavior for data where conventional background subtraction fails. They also demonstrate the new subtraction technique's ability to maintain a proper coherence relationship in the modified cross-spectral matrix. Beam-forming and de-convolution results indicate the method can successfully separate sources. Results also show a reduced need for the use of diagonal removal in phased array processing, at least for the limited data sets considered.

  12. Advanced solar irradiances applied to satellite and ionospheric operational systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent; Schunk, Robert; Eccles, Vince; Bouwer, Dave

    Satellite and ionospheric operational systems require solar irradiances in a variety of time scales and spectral formats. We describe the development of a system using operational grade solar irradiances that are applied to empirical thermospheric density models and physics-based ionospheric models used by operational systems that require a space weather characterization. The SOLAR2000 (S2K) and SOLARFLARE (SFLR) models developed by Space Environment Technologies (SET) provide solar irradiances from the soft X-rays (XUV) through the Far Ultraviolet (FUV) spectrum. The irradiances are provided as integrated indices for the JB2006 empirical atmosphere density models and as line/band spectral irradiances for the physics-based Ionosphere Forecast Model (IFM) developed by the Space Environment Corporation (SEC). We describe the integration of these irradiances in historical, current epoch, and forecast modes through the Communication Alert and Prediction System (CAPS). CAPS provides real-time and forecast HF radio availability for global and regional users and global total electron content (TEC) conditions.

  13. ADVANCED MIXING MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R; David Tamburello, D

    2008-11-13

    The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank with one to four dual-nozzle jet mixers located within the tank. The typical criteria to establish a mixed condition in a tank are based on the number of pumps in operation and the time duration of operation. To ensure that a mixed condition is achieved, operating times are set conservatively long. This approach results in high operational costs because of the long mixing times and high maintenance and repair costs for the same reason. A significant reduction in both of these costs might be realized by reducing the required mixing time based on calculating a reliable indicator of mixing with a suitably validated computer code. The work described in this report establishes the basis for further development of the theory leading to the identified mixing indicators, the benchmark analyses demonstrating their consistency with widely accepted correlations, and the application of those indicators to SRS waste tanks to provide a better, physically based estimate of the required mixing time. Waste storage tanks at SRS contain settled sludge which varies in height from zero to 10 ft. The sludge has been characterized and modeled as micron-sized solids, typically 1 to 5 microns, at weight fractions as high as 20 to 30 wt%, specific gravities to 1.4, and viscosities up to 64 cp during motion. The sludge is suspended and mixed through the use of submersible slurry jet pumps. To suspend settled sludge, water is added to the tank as a slurry medium and stirred with the jet pump. Although there is considerable technical literature on mixing and solid suspension in agitated tanks, very little literature has been published on jet mixing in a large-scale tank. If shorter mixing times can be shown to support Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) or other feed requirements, longer pump lifetimes can be achieved with associated operational cost and

  14. Applying Technology Ranking and Systems Engineering in Advanced Life Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry; Luna, Bernadette (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    According to the Advanced Life Support (ALS) Program Plan, the Systems Modeling and Analysis Project (SMAP) has two important tasks: 1) prioritizing investments in ALS Research and Technology Development (R&TD), and 2) guiding the evolution of ALS systems. Investments could be prioritized simply by independently ranking different technologies, but we should also consider a technology's impact on system design. Guiding future ALS systems will require SMAP to consider many aspects of systems engineering. R&TD investments can be prioritized using familiar methods for ranking technology. The first step is gathering data on technology performance, safety, readiness level, and cost. Then the technologies are ranked using metrics or by decision analysis using net present economic value. The R&TD portfolio can be optimized to provide the maximum expected payoff in the face of uncertain future events. But more is needed. The optimum ALS system can not be designed simply by selecting the best technology for each predefined subsystem. Incorporating a new technology, such as food plants, can change the specifications of other subsystems, such as air regeneration. Systems must be designed top-down starting from system objectives, not bottom-up from selected technologies. The familiar top-down systems engineering process includes defining mission objectives, mission design, system specification, technology analysis, preliminary design, and detail design. Technology selection is only one part of systems analysis and engineering, and it is strongly related to the subsystem definitions. ALS systems should be designed using top-down systems engineering. R&TD technology selection should consider how the technology affects ALS system design. Technology ranking is useful but it is only a small part of systems engineering.

  15. Barriers to applying advanced high-temperature materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premkumar, M. K.

    1993-01-01

    During the past 25 years, aerospace engineers and material scientists have made significant technical progress toward developing next-generation aircraft. However, while advanced high-temperature materials continue to be developed, the outlook for their future application is uncertain and will depend on the ability of these materials to satisfy a more diverse market.

  16. Thermochemical modelling of advanced CANDU reactor fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcoran, Emily Catherine

    2009-04-01

    With an aging fleet of nuclear generating facilities, the imperative to limit the use of non-renewal fossil fuels and the inevitable need for additional electricity to power Canada's economy, a renaissance in the use of nuclear technology in Canada is at hand. The experience and knowledge of over 40 years of CANDU research, development and operation in Ontario and elsewhere has been applied to a new generation of CANDU, the Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR). Improved fuel design allows for an extended burnup, which is a significant improvement, enhancing the safety and the economies of the ACR. The use of a Burnable Neutron Absorber (BNA) material and Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel has created a need to understand better these novel materials and fuel types. This thesis documents a work to advance the scientific and technological knowledge of the ACR fuel design with respect to thermodynamic phase stability and fuel oxidation modelling. For the BNA material, a new (BNA) model is created based on the fundamental first principles of Gibbs energy minimization applied to material phase stability. For LEU fuel, the methodology used for the BNA model is applied to the oxidation of irradiated fuel. The pertinent knowledge base for uranium, oxygen and the major fission products is reviewed, updated and integrated to create a model that is applicable to current and future CANDU fuel designs. As part of this thesis, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Coulombic Titration (CT) experiments are compared to the BNA and LEU models, respectively. From the analysis of the CT results, a number of improvements are proposed to enhance the LEU model and provide confidence in its application to ACR fuel. A number of applications for the potential use of these models are proposed and discussed. Keywords: CANDU Fuel, Gibbs Energy Mimimization, Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Fuel, Burnable Neutron Absorber (BNA) Material, Coulometric Titration, X-Ray Diffraction

  17. Advanced Mirror & Modelling Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Effinger, Michael; Stahl, H. Philip; Abplanalp, Laura; Maffett, Steven; Egerman, Robert; Eng, Ron; Arnold, William; Mosier, Gary; Blaurock, Carl

    2014-01-01

    The 2020 Decadal technology survey is starting in 2018. Technology on the shelf at that time will help guide selection to future low risk and low cost missions. The Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) team has identified development priorities based on science goals and engineering requirements for Ultraviolet Optical near-Infrared (UVOIR) missions in order to contribute to the selection process. One key development identified was lightweight mirror fabrication and testing. A monolithic, stacked, deep core mirror was fused and replicated twice to achieve the desired radius of curvature. It was subsequently successfully polished and tested. A recently awarded second phase to the AMTD project will develop larger mirrors to demonstrate the lateral scaling of the deep core mirror technology. Another key development was rapid modeling for the mirror. One model focused on generating optical and structural model results in minutes instead of months. Many variables could be accounted for regarding the core, face plate and back structure details. A portion of a spacecraft model was also developed. The spacecraft model incorporated direct integration to transform optical path difference to Point Spread Function (PSF) and between PSF to modulation transfer function. The second phase to the project will take the results of the rapid mirror modeler and integrate them into the rapid spacecraft modeler.

  18. Advanced Signal Processing Methods Applied to Digital Mammography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauduhar, Richard P.

    1997-01-01

    without further support. Task 5: Better modeling does indeed make an improvement in the detection output. After the proposal ended, we came up with some new theoretical explanations that helps in understanding when the D4 filter should be better. This work is currently in the review process. Task 6: N/A. This no longer applies in view of Tasks 4-5. Task 7: Comprehensive plans for further work have been completed. These plans are the subject of two proposals, one to NASA and one to HHS. These proposals represent plans for a complete evaluation of the methods for identifying normal mammograms, augmented with significant further theoretical work.

  19. Modeling Tool Advances Rotorcraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Continuum Dynamics Inc. (CDI), founded in 1979, specializes in advanced engineering services, including fluid dynamic modeling and analysis for aeronautics research. The company has completed a number of SBIR research projects with NASA, including early rotorcraft work done through Langley Research Center, but more recently, out of Ames Research Center. NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants on helicopter wake modeling resulted in the Comprehensive Hierarchical Aeromechanics Rotorcraft Model (CHARM), a tool for studying helicopter and tiltrotor unsteady free wake modeling, including distributed and integrated loads, and performance prediction. Application of the software code in a blade redesign program for Carson Helicopters, of Perkasie, Pennsylvania, increased the payload and cruise speeds of its S-61 helicopter. Follow-on development resulted in a $24 million revenue increase for Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation, of Stratford, Connecticut, as part of the company's rotor design efforts. Now under continuous development for more than 25 years, CHARM models the complete aerodynamics and dynamics of rotorcraft in general flight conditions. CHARM has been used to model a broad spectrum of rotorcraft attributes, including performance, blade loading, blade-vortex interaction noise, air flow fields, and hub loads. The highly accurate software is currently in use by all major rotorcraft manufacturers, NASA, the U.S. Army, and the U.S. Navy.

  20. Economic impact of applying advanced technologies to transport airplanes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carline, A. J. K.

    1972-01-01

    Various technologies have been studied which could have application to the design of future transport airplanes. These technologies include the use of supercritical aerodynamics, composite materials, and active control systems, together with advanced engine designs that provide lower noise and pollutant levels. The economic impact of each technology is shown for a typical fleet of 195-passenger, transcontinental commercial transports cruising at both 0.9M and 0.98M. Comparisons are made with conventional transports cruising at 0.82M. Effects of combining the technologies are discussed. An R & D program aimed at bringing the technologies to fruition is outlined.

  1. Linear mixing model applied to coarse resolution satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, Brent N.; Shimabukuro, Yosio E.

    1992-01-01

    A linear mixing model typically applied to high resolution data such as Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer, Thematic Mapper, and Multispectral Scanner System is applied to the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer coarse resolution satellite data. The reflective portion extracted from the middle IR channel 3 (3.55 - 3.93 microns) is used with channels 1 (0.58 - 0.68 microns) and 2 (0.725 - 1.1 microns) to run the Constrained Least Squares model to generate fraction images for an area in the west central region of Brazil. The derived fraction images are compared with an unsupervised classification and the fraction images derived from Landsat TM data acquired in the same day. In addition, the relationship betweeen these fraction images and the well known NDVI images are presented. The results show the great potential of the unmixing techniques for applying to coarse resolution data for global studies.

  2. Applying business management models in health care.

    PubMed

    Trisolini, Michael G

    2002-01-01

    Most health care management training programmes and textbooks focus on only one or two models or conceptual frameworks, but the increasing complexity of health care organizations and their environments worldwide means that a broader perspective is needed. This paper reviews five management models developed for business organizations and analyses issues related to their application in health care. Three older, more 'traditional' models are first presented. These include the functional areas model, the tasks model and the roles model. Each is shown to provide a valuable perspective, but to have limitations if used in isolation. Two newer, more 'innovative' models are next discussed. These include total quality management (TQM) and reengineering. They have shown potential for enabling dramatic improvements in quality and cost, but have also been found to be more difficult to implement. A series of 'lessons learned' are presented to illustrate key success factors for applying them in health care organizations. In sum, each of the five models is shown to provide a useful perspective for health care management. Health care managers should gain experience and training with a broader set of business management models. PMID:12476639

  3. Advances in parameter estimation techniques applied to flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maben, Egbert; Zimmerman, David C.

    1994-01-01

    In this work, various parameter estimation techniques are investigated in the context of structural system identification utilizing distributed parameter models and 'measured' time-domain data. Distributed parameter models are formulated using the PDEMOD software developed by Taylor. Enhancements made to PDEMOD for this work include the following: (1) a Wittrick-Williams based root solving algorithm; (2) a time simulation capability; and (3) various parameter estimation algorithms. The parameter estimations schemes will be contrasted using the NASA Mini-Mast as the focus structure.

  4. AN ADVANCED TOOL FOR APPLIED INTEGRATED SAFETY MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Potts, T. Todd; Hylko, James M.; Douglas, Terence A.

    2003-02-27

    WESKEM, LLC's Environmental, Safety and Health (ES&H) Department had previously assessed that a lack of consistency, poor communication and using antiquated communication tools could result in varying operating practices, as well as a failure to capture and disseminate appropriate Integrated Safety Management (ISM) information. To address these issues, the ES&H Department established an Activity Hazard Review (AHR)/Activity Hazard Analysis (AHA) process for systematically identifying, assessing, and controlling hazards associated with project work activities during work planning and execution. Depending on the scope of a project, information from field walkdowns and table-top meetings are collected on an AHR form. The AHA then documents the potential failure and consequence scenarios for a particular hazard. Also, the AHA recommends whether the type of mitigation appears appropriate or whether additional controls should be implemented. Since the application is web based, the information is captured into a single system and organized according to the >200 work activities already recorded in the database. Using the streamlined AHA method improved cycle time from over four hours to an average of one hour, allowing more time to analyze unique hazards and develop appropriate controls. Also, the enhanced configuration control created a readily available AHA library to research and utilize along with standardizing hazard analysis and control selection across four separate work sites located in Kentucky and Tennessee. The AHR/AHA system provides an applied example of how the ISM concept evolved into a standardized field-deployed tool yielding considerable efficiency gains in project planning and resource utilization. Employee safety is preserved through detailed planning that now requires only a portion of the time previously necessary. The available resources can then be applied to implementing appropriate engineering, administrative and personal protective equipment

  5. Advanced imaging systems for diagnostic investigations applied to Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peccenini, E.; Albertin, F.; Bettuzzi, M.; Brancaccio, R.; Casali, F.; Morigi, M. P.; Petrucci, F.

    2014-12-01

    The diagnostic investigations are an important resource in the studies on Cultural Heritage to enhance the knowledge on execution techniques, materials and conservation status of a work of art. In this field, due to the great historical and artistic value of the objects, preservation is the main concern; for this reason, new technological equipment has been designed and developed in the Physics Departments of the Universities of Ferrara and Bologna to enhance the non-invasive approach to the study of pictorial artworks and other objects of cultural interest. Infrared (IR) reflectography, X-ray radiography and computed tomography (CT), applied to works of art, are joined by the same goal: to get hidden information on execution techniques and inner structure pursuing the non-invasiveness of the methods, although using different setup and physical principles. In this work transportable imaging systems to investigate large objects in museums and galleries are presented. In particular, 2D scanning devices for IR reflectography and X-ray radiography, CT systems and some applications to the Cultural Heritage are described.

  6. Probabilistic Analysis Techniques Applied to Complex Spacecraft Power System Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hojnicki, Jeffrey S.; Rusick, Jeffrey J.

    2005-01-01

    Electric power system performance predictions are critical to spacecraft, such as the International Space Station (ISS), to ensure that sufficient power is available to support all the spacecraft s power needs. In the case of the ISS power system, analyses to date have been deterministic, meaning that each analysis produces a single-valued result for power capability because of the complexity and large size of the model. As a result, the deterministic ISS analyses did not account for the sensitivity of the power capability to uncertainties in model input variables. Over the last 10 years, the NASA Glenn Research Center has developed advanced, computationally fast, probabilistic analysis techniques and successfully applied them to large (thousands of nodes) complex structural analysis models. These same techniques were recently applied to large, complex ISS power system models. This new application enables probabilistic power analyses that account for input uncertainties and produce results that include variations caused by these uncertainties. Specifically, N&R Engineering, under contract to NASA, integrated these advanced probabilistic techniques with Glenn s internationally recognized ISS power system model, System Power Analysis for Capability Evaluation (SPACE).

  7. Recent advances in applying decision science to managing national forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marcot, Bruce G.; Thompson, Matthew P.; Runge, Michael C.; Thompson, Frank R.; McNulty, Steven; Cleaves, David; Tomosy, Monica; Fisher, Larry A.; Andrew, Bliss

    2012-01-01

    Management of federal public forests to meet sustainability goals and multiple use regulations is an immense challenge. To succeed, we suggest use of formal decision science procedures and tools in the context of structured decision making (SDM). SDM entails four stages: problem structuring (framing the problem and defining objectives and evaluation criteria), problem analysis (defining alternatives, evaluating likely consequences, identifying key uncertainties, and analyzing tradeoffs), decision point (identifying the preferred alternative), and implementation and monitoring the preferred alternative with adaptive management feedbacks. We list a wide array of models, techniques, and tools available for each stage, and provide three case studies of their selected use in National Forest land management and project plans. Successful use of SDM involves participation by decision-makers, analysts, scientists, and stakeholders. We suggest specific areas for training and instituting SDM to foster transparency, rigor, clarity, and inclusiveness in formal decision processes regarding management of national forests.

  8. Micromechanical modeling of advanced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, S.A.; Taylor, P.A.; Wise, J.L.; Furnish, M.D.

    1994-04-01

    Funded as a laboratory-directed research and development (LDRD) project, the work reported here focuses on the development of a computational methodology to determine the dynamic response of heterogeneous solids on the basis of their composition and microstructural morphology. Using the solid dynamics wavecode CTH, material response is simulated on a scale sufficiently fine to explicitly represent the material`s microstructure. Conducting {open_quotes}numerical experiments{close_quotes} on this scale, the authors explore the influence that the microstructure exerts on the material`s overall response. These results are used in the development of constitutive models that take into account the effects of microstructure without explicit representation of its features. Applying this methodology to a glass-reinforced plastic (GRP) composite, the authors examined the influence of various aspects of the composite`s microstructure on its response in a loading regime typical of impact and penetration. As a prerequisite to the microscale modeling effort, they conducted extensive materials testing on the constituents, S-2 glass and epoxy resin (UF-3283), obtaining the first Hugoniot and spall data for these materials. The results of this work are used in the development of constitutive models for GRP materials in transient-dynamics computer wavecodes.

  9. Applying target shadow models for SAR ATR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papson, Scott; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2007-04-01

    Recent work has suggested that target shadows in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images can be used effectively to aid in target classification. The method outlined in this paper has four steps - segmentation, representation, modeling, and selection. Segmentation is the process by which a smooth, background-free representation of the target's shadow is extracted from an image chip. A chain code technique is then used to represent the shadow boundary. Hidden Markov modeling is applied to sets of chain codes for multiple targets to create a suitable bank of target representations. Finally, an ensemble framework is proposed for classification. The proposed model selection process searches for an optimal ensemble of models based on various target model configurations. A five target subset of the MSTAR database is used for testing. Since the shadow is a back-projection of the target profile, some aspect angles will contain more discriminatory information then others. Therefore, performance is investigated as a function of aspect angle. Additionally, the case of multiple target looks is considered. The capability of the shadow-only classifier to enhance more traditional classification techniques is examined.

  10. Improved Broadband Liner Optimization Applied to the Advanced Noise Control Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nark, Douglas M.; Jones, Michael G.; Sutliff, Daniel L.; Ayle, Earl; Ichihashi, Fumitaka

    2014-01-01

    The broadband component of fan noise has grown in relevance with the utilization of increased bypass ratio and advanced fan designs. Thus, while the attenuation of fan tones remains paramount, the ability to simultaneously reduce broadband fan noise levels has become more desirable. This paper describes improvements to a previously established broadband acoustic liner optimization process using the Advanced Noise Control Fan rig as a demonstrator. Specifically, in-duct attenuation predictions with a statistical source model are used to obtain optimum impedance spectra over the conditions of interest. The predicted optimum impedance information is then used with acoustic liner modeling tools to design liners aimed at producing impedance spectra that most closely match the predicted optimum values. Design selection is based on an acceptance criterion that provides the ability to apply increased weighting to specific frequencies and/or operating conditions. Constant-depth, double-degree of freedom and variable-depth, multi-degree of freedom designs are carried through design, fabrication, and testing to validate the efficacy of the design process. Results illustrate the value of the design process in concurrently evaluating the relative costs/benefits of these liner designs. This study also provides an application for demonstrating the integrated use of duct acoustic propagation/radiation and liner modeling tools in the design and evaluation of novel broadband liner concepts for complex engine configurations.

  11. Integrated Modeling Program, Applied Chemical Theory (IMPACT)

    PubMed Central

    BANKS, JAY L.; BEARD, HEGE S.; CAO, YIXIANG; CHO, ART E.; DAMM, WOLFGANG; FARID, RAMY; FELTS, ANTHONY K.; HALGREN, THOMAS A.; MAINZ, DANIEL T.; MAPLE, JON R.; MURPHY, ROBERT; PHILIPP, DEAN M.; REPASKY, MATTHEW P.; ZHANG, LINDA Y.; BERNE, BRUCE J.; FRIESNER, RICHARD A.; GALLICCHIO, EMILIO; LEVY, RONALD M.

    2009-01-01

    We provide an overview of the IMPACT molecular mechanics program with an emphasis on recent developments and a description of its current functionality. With respect to core molecular mechanics technologies we include a status report for the fixed charge and polarizable force fields that can be used with the program and illustrate how the force fields, when used together with new atom typing and parameter assignment modules, have greatly expanded the coverage of organic compounds and medicinally relevant ligands. As we discuss in this review, explicit solvent simulations have been used to guide our design of implicit solvent models based on the generalized Born framework and a novel nonpolar estimator that have recently been incorporated into the program. With IMPACT it is possible to use several different advanced conformational sampling algorithms based on combining features of molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. The program includes two specialized molecular mechanics modules: Glide, a high-throughput docking program, and QSite, a mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics module. These modules employ the IMPACT infrastructure as a starting point for the construction of the protein model and assignment of molecular mechanics parameters, but have then been developed to meet specialized objectives with respect to sampling and the energy function. PMID:16211539

  12. Advances in Watershed Models and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, G. T.; Zhang, F.

    2015-12-01

    The development of watershed models and their applications to real-world problems has evolved significantly since 1960's. Watershed models can be classified based on what media are included, what processes are dealt with, and what approaches are taken. In term of media, a watershed may include segregated overland regime, river-canal-open channel networks, ponds-reservoirs-small lakes, and subsurface media. It may also include integrated media of all these or a partial set of these as well as man-made control structures. In term of processes, a watershed model may deal with coupled or decoupled hydrological and biogeochemical cycles. These processes include fluid flow, thermal transport, salinity transport, sediment transport, reactive transport, and biota and microbe kinetics. In terms of approaches, either parametric or physics-based approach can be taken. This talk discusses the evolution of watershed models in the past sixty years. The advances of watershed models center around their increasing design capability to foster these segregated or integrated media and coupled or decoupled processes. Widely used models developed by academia, research institutes, government agencies, and private industries will be reviewed in terms of the media and processes included as well as approaches taken. Many types of potential benchmark problems in general can be proposed and will be discussed. This presentation will focus on three benchmark problems of biogeochemical cycles. These three problems, dealing with water quality transport, will be formulated in terms of reactive transport. Simulation results will be illustrated using WASH123D, a watershed model developed and continuously updated by the author and his PhD graduates. Keywords: Hydrological Cycles, Biogeochemical Cycles, Biota Kinetics, Parametric Approach, Physics-based Approach, Reactive Transport.

  13. The Influence of Applied STEM Coursetaking on Advanced Mathematics and Science Coursetaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottfried, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced mathematics and science course taking is critical in building the foundation for students to advance through the STEM pathway-from high school to college to career. To invigorate students' persistence in STEM fields, high schools have been introducing applied STEM courses into the curriculum as a way to reinforce concepts learned in…

  14. Advances in Sun-Earth Connection Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, S. B.; Gavrishchaka, V. V.

    2003-06-01

    Space weather forecasting is a focus of a multidisciplinary research effort motivated by a sensitive dependence of many modern technologies on geospace conditions. Adequate understanding of the physics of the Sun-Earth connection and associated multi-scale magnetospheric and ionospheric processes is an essential part of this effort. Modern physical simulation models such as multimoment multifluid models with effective coupling from small-scale kinetic processes can provide valuable insight into the role of various physical mechanisms operating during geomagnetic storm/substorm activity. However, due to necessary simplifying assumptions, physical models are still not well suited for accurate real-time forecasting. Complimentary approach includes data-driven models capable of efficient processing of multi-scale spatio-temporal data. However, the majority of advanced nonlinear algorithms, including neural networks (NN), can encounter a set of problems called dimensionality curse when applied to high-dimensional data. Forecasting of rare/extreme events such as large geomagnetic storms/substorms is of the most practical importance but is also very challenging for many existing models. A very promising algorithm that combines the power of the best nonlinear techniques and tolerance to high-dimensional and incomplete data is support vector machine (SVM). We have summarized advantages of the SVM and described a hybrid model based on SVM and extreme value theory (EVT) for rare event forecasting. Results of the SVM application to substorm forecasting and future directions are discussed.

  15. Linear mixing model applied to AVHRR LAC data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, Brent N.; Shimabukuro, Yosio E.

    1993-01-01

    A linear mixing model was applied to coarse spatial resolution data from the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer. The reflective component of the 3.55 - 3.93 microns channel was extracted and used with the two reflective channels 0.58 - 0.68 microns and 0.725 - 1.1 microns to run a Constraine Least Squares model to generate vegetation, soil, and shade fraction images for an area in the Western region of Brazil. The Landsat Thematic Mapper data covering the Emas National park region was used for estimating the spectral response of the mixture components and for evaluating the mixing model results. The fraction images were compared with an unsupervised classification derived from Landsat TM data acquired on the same day. The relationship between the fraction images and normalized difference vegetation index images show the potential of the unmixing techniques when using coarse resolution data for global studies.

  16. Advanced panel-type influence coefficient methods applied to subsonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, F. T.; Rubbert, P. E.

    1975-01-01

    An advanced technique for solving the linear integral equations of three-dimensional subsonic potential flows (steady, inviscid, irrotational and incompressible) about arbitrary configurations is presented. It involves assembling select, logically consistent networks whose construction comprises four tasks, which are described in detail: surface geometry definition; singularity strength definition; control point and boundary condition specification; and calculation of induced potential or velocity. The technique is applied to seven wing examples approached by four network types: source/analysis, doublet/analysis, source/design, and doublet/design. The results demonstrate the forgiveness of the model to irregular paneling and the practicality of combined analysis/design boundary conditions. The appearance of doublet strength mismatch is a valuable indicator of locally inadequate paneling.

  17. Advances in Applying Treatment Integrity Research for Dissemination and Implementation Science: Introduction to Special Issue

    PubMed Central

    Southam-Gerow, Michael A.; McLeod, Bryce D.

    2013-01-01

    This special series focuses upon the ways in which research on treatment integrity, a multidimensional construct including assessment of the content and quality of a psychosocial treatment delivered to a client as well as relational elements, can inform dissemination and implementation science. The five articles for this special series illustrate how treatment integrity concepts and methods can be applied across different levels of the mental health service system to advance dissemination and implementation science. In this introductory article, we provide an overview of treatment integrity research and describe three broad conceptual models that are relevant to the articles in the series. We conclude with a brief description of each of the five articles in the series. PMID:23970819

  18. Advanced modeling of high intensity accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R.D.; Habib, S.; Wangler, T.P.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goals of this project were three-fold: (1) to develop a new capability, based on high performance (parallel) computers, to perform large scale simulations of high intensity accelerators; (2) to apply this capability to modeling high intensity accelerators under design at LANL; and (3) to use this new capability to improve the understanding of the physics of intense charge particle beams, especially in regard to the issue of beam halo formation. All of these goals were met. In particular, the authors introduced split-operator methods as a powerful and efficient means to simulate intense beams in the presence of rapidly varying accelerating and focusing fields. They then applied these methods to develop scaleable, parallel beam dynamics codes for modeling intense beams in linacs, and in the process they implemented a new three-dimensional space charge algorithm. They also used the codes to study a number of beam dynamics issues related to the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project, and in the process performed the largest simulations to date for any accelerator design project. Finally, they used the new modeling capability to provide direction and validation to beam physics studies, helping to identify beam mismatch as a major source of halo formation in high intensity accelerators. This LDRD project ultimately benefited not only LANL but also the US accelerator community since, by promoting expertise in high performance computing and advancing the state-of-the-art in accelerator simulation, its accomplishments helped lead to approval of a new DOE Grand Challenge in Computational Accelerator Physics.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF THE ADVANCED UTILITY SIMULATION MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the development of the Advanced Utility Simulation Model (AUSM), developed for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP), to forecast air emissions of pollutants from electric utilities. USM integrates generating unit engineering detail with d...

  20. An Ecological and Conservation Perspective on Advances in the Applied Virology of Zoonoses

    PubMed Central

    Vandegrift, Kurt J.; Wale, Nina; Epstein, Jonathan H.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this manuscript is to describe how modern advances in our knowledge of viruses and viral evolution can be applied to the fields of disease ecology and conservation. We review recent progress in virology and provide examples of how it is informing both empirical research in field ecology and applied conservation. We include a discussion of needed breakthroughs and ways to bridge communication gaps between the field and the lab. In an effort to foster this interdisciplinary effort, we have also included a table that lists the definitions of key terms. The importance of understanding the dynamics of zoonotic pathogens in their reservoir hosts is emphasized as a tool to both assess risk factors for spillover and to test hypotheses related to treatment and/or intervention strategies. In conclusion, we highlight the need for smart surveillance, viral discovery efforts and predictive modeling. A shift towards a predictive approach is necessary in today’s globalized society because, as the 2009 H1N1 pandemic demonstrated, identification post-emergence is often too late to prevent global spread. Integrating molecular virology and ecological techniques will allow for earlier recognition of potentially dangerous pathogens, ideally before they jump from wildlife reservoirs into human or livestock populations and cause serious public health or conservation issues. PMID:21994738

  1. Mathematical biodynamic feedthrough model applied to rotorcraft.

    PubMed

    Venrooij, Joost; Mulder, Mark; Abbink, David A; van Paassen, Marinus M; Mulder, Max; van der Helm, Frans C T; Bulthoff, Heinrich H

    2014-07-01

    Biodynamic feedthrough (BDFT) occurs when vehicle accelerations feed through the human body and cause involuntary control inputs. This paper proposes a model to quantitatively predict this effect in rotorcraft. This mathematical BDFT model aims to fill the gap between the currently existing black box BDFT models and physical BDFT models. The model structure was systematically constructed using asymptote modeling, a procedure described in detail in this paper. The resulting model can easily be implemented in many typical rotorcraft BDFT studies, using the provided model parameters. The model's performance was validated in both the frequency and time domain. Furthermore, it was compared with several recent BDFT models. The results show that the proposed mathematical model performs better than typical black box models and is easier to parameterize and implement than a recent physical model. PMID:24013832

  2. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

    2009-01-20

    Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

  3. Advancements in engineering turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T.-H.

    1991-01-01

    Some new developments in two-equation models and second order closure models are presented. Two-equation models (k-epsilon models) have been widely used in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for engineering problems. Most of low-Reynolds number two-equation models contain some wall-distance damping functions to account for the effect of wall on turbulence. However, this often causes the confusion and difficulties in computing flows with complex geometry and also needs an ad hoc treatment near the separation and reattachment points. A set of modified two-equation models is proposed to remove the aforementioned shortcomings. The calculations using various two-equation models are compared with direct numerical simulations of channel flow and flat boundary layers. Development of a second order closure model is also discussed with emphasis on the modeling of pressure related correlation terms and dissipation rates in the second moment equations. All the existing models poorly predict the normal stresses near the wall and fail to predict the 3-D effect of mean flow on the turbulence (e.g. decrease in the shear stress caused by the cross flow in the boundary layer). The newly developed second order near-wall turbulence model is described and is capable of capturing the near-wall behavior of turbulence as well as the effect of 3-D mean flow on the turbulence.

  4. Applying various algorithms for species distribution modelling.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinhai; Wang, Yuan

    2013-06-01

    Species distribution models have been used extensively in many fields, including climate change biology, landscape ecology and conservation biology. In the past 3 decades, a number of new models have been proposed, yet researchers still find it difficult to select appropriate models for data and objectives. In this review, we aim to provide insight into the prevailing species distribution models for newcomers in the field of modelling. We compared 11 popular models, including regression models (the generalized linear model, the generalized additive model, the multivariate adaptive regression splines model and hierarchical modelling), classification models (mixture discriminant analysis, the generalized boosting model, and classification and regression tree analysis) and complex models (artificial neural network, random forest, genetic algorithm for rule set production and maximum entropy approaches). Our objectives are: (i) to compare the strengths and weaknesses of the models, their characteristics and identify suitable situations for their use (in terms of data type and species-environment relationships) and (ii) to provide guidelines for model application, including 3 steps: model selection, model formulation and parameter estimation. PMID:23731809

  5. Modeling of Spacecraft Advanced Chemical Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benfield, Michael P. J.; Belcher, Jeremy A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper outlines the development of the Advanced Chemical Propulsion System (ACPS) model for Earth and Space Storable propellants. This model was developed by the System Technology Operation of SAIC-Huntsville for the NASA MSFC In-Space Propulsion Project Office. Each subsystem of the model is described. Selected model results will also be shown to demonstrate the model's ability to evaluate technology changes in chemical propulsion systems.

  6. PHOTOCHEMICAL MODELING APPLIED TO NATURAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study examines the application of modeling photochemical processes in natural water systems. For many photochemical reactions occurring in natural waters, a simple photochemical model describing reaction rate as a function of intensity, radiation attenuation, reactant absorpt...

  7. Applying Modeling Tools to Ground System Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Di Pasquale, Peter

    2012-01-01

    As part of a long-term effort to revitalize the Ground Systems (GS) Engineering Section practices, Systems Modeling Language (SysML) and Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN) have been used to model existing GS products and the procedures GS engineers use to produce them.

  8. Model Standards Advance the Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Staff Development, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Leadership by teachers is essential to serving the needs of students, schools, and the teaching profession. To that end, the Teacher Leadership Exploratory Consortium has developed Teacher Leader Model Standards to codify, promote, and support teacher leadership as a vehicle to transform schools for the needs of the 21st century. The Teacher…

  9. Applying the take-grant protection model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Matt

    1990-01-01

    The Take-Grant Protection Model has in the past been used to model multilevel security hierarchies and simple protection systems. The models are extended to include theft of rights and sharing information, and additional security policies are examined. The analysis suggests that in some cases the basic rules of the Take-Grant Protection Model should be augmented to represent the policy properly; when appropriate, such modifications are made and their efforts with respect to the policy and its Take-Grant representation are discussed.

  10. A soil-plant model applied to phytoremediation of metals.

    PubMed

    Lugli, Francesco; Mahler, Claudio Fernando

    2016-01-01

    This study reports a phytoremediation pot experiment using an open-source program. Unsaturated water flow was described by the Richards' equation and solute transport by the advection-dispersion equation. Sink terms in the governing flow and transport equations accounted for root water and solute uptake, respectively. Experimental data were related to application of Vetiver grass to soil contaminated by metal ions. Sensitivity analysis revealed that due to the specific experimental set-up (bottom flux not allowed), hydraulic model parameters did not influence root water (and contaminant) uptake. In contrast, the results were highly correlated with plant solar radiation interception efficiency (leaf area index). The amounts of metals accumulated in the plant tissue were compared to numerical values of cumulative uptake. Pb(2+) and Zn(2+) uptake was satisfactorily described using a passive model. However, for Ni(2+) and Cd(2+), a specific calibration of the active uptake model was necessary. Calibrated MM parameters for Ni(2+), Cd(2+), and Pb(2+) were compared to values in the literature, generally suggesting lower rates and saturation advance. A parameter (saturation ratio) was introduced to assess the efficiency of contaminant uptake. Numerical analysis, applying actual field conditions, showed the limitation of the active model for being independent of the transpiration rate. PMID:26457927

  11. Advanced Space Shuttle simulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatom, F. B.; Smith, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    A non-recursive model (based on von Karman spectra) for atmospheric turbulence along the flight path of the shuttle orbiter was developed. It provides for simulation of instantaneous vertical and horizontal gusts at the vehicle center-of-gravity, and also for simulation of instantaneous gusts gradients. Based on this model the time series for both gusts and gust gradients were generated and stored on a series of magnetic tapes, entitled Shuttle Simulation Turbulence Tapes (SSTT). The time series are designed to represent atmospheric turbulence from ground level to an altitude of 120,000 meters. A description of the turbulence generation procedure is provided. The results of validating the simulated turbulence are described. Conclusions and recommendations are presented. One-dimensional von Karman spectra are tabulated, while a discussion of the minimum frequency simulated is provided. The results of spectral and statistical analyses of the SSTT are presented.

  12. Modeling Advance Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Marvin; Sager, John; Loader, Coleen; Drysdale, Alan

    1996-01-01

    Activities this summer consisted of two projects that involved computer simulation of bioregenerative life support systems for space habitats. Students in the Space Life Science Training Program (SLSTP) used the simulation, space station, to learn about relationships between humans, fish, plants, and microorganisms in a closed environment. One student complete a six week project to modify the simulation by converting the microbes from anaerobic to aerobic, and then balancing the simulation's life support system. A detailed computer simulation of a closed lunar station using bioregenerative life support was attempted, but there was not enough known about system restraints and constants in plant growth, bioreactor design for space habitats and food preparation to develop an integrated model with any confidence. Instead of a completed detailed model with broad assumptions concerning the unknown system parameters, a framework for an integrated model was outlined and work begun on plant and bioreactor simulations. The NASA sponsors and the summer Fell were satisfied with the progress made during the 10 weeks, and we have planned future cooperative work.

  13. Applying the Sport Education Model to Tennis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayvazo, Shiri

    2009-01-01

    The physical education field abounds with theoretically sound curricular approaches such as fitness education, skill theme approach, tactical approach, and sport education. In an era that emphasizes authentic sport experiences, the Sport Education Model includes unique features that sets it apart from other curricular models and can be a valuable…

  14. TURBULENCE MODELING APPLIED TO BUOYANT PLUMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A viable computer model was developed that is based on second-order closure of the turbulent correlation equations for predicting the fate of nonchemically reacting contaminants released in the atmospheric boundary layer. The invariant turbulence model discussed in previous repor...

  15. Applied uses of level density models

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, E.D.; Guenther, P.T.; Smith, A.B.; Smith, D.L.; Argonne National Lab., IL )

    1989-01-01

    This paper addresses issues associated with the use of nuclear level density models in calculations made for data applications. The two most commonly used models, the Gilbert Cameron and the Back-Shifted Fermi Gas, are briefly summarized and examples are provided of recent efforts to improve their parameterization. Calculated particle emission spectra are compared with recent experimental data in order to assess performance and sensitivity to these models. Extrapolation of nuclear level densities for calculations involving nuclei away from stability poses special problems and examples of recent efforts to improve such extrapolations are cited. The sensitivity of current schemes in the modeling of fission transition state densities are explored through calculated (n,f) cross sections. Two newer phenomenological models, those of Ignatyuk and Schmidt, provide a more physically realistic description of level densities. Calculations concerning {sup 207}Pb(n,xn) cross sections compare results using the Ignatyuk formalism with the Gilbert Cameron results. 31 refs., 10 figs.

  16. Accurate mask model for advanced nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zine El Abidine, Nacer; Sundermann, Frank; Yesilada, Emek; Ndiaye, El Hadji Omar; Mishra, Kushlendra; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Bork, Ingo; Buck, Peter; Toublan, Olivier; Schanen, Isabelle

    2014-07-01

    Standard OPC models consist of a physical optical model and an empirical resist model. The resist model compensates the optical model imprecision on top of modeling resist development. The optical model imprecision may result from mask topography effects and real mask information including mask ebeam writing and mask process contributions. For advanced technology nodes, significant progress has been made to model mask topography to improve optical model accuracy. However, mask information is difficult to decorrelate from standard OPC model. Our goal is to establish an accurate mask model through a dedicated calibration exercise. In this paper, we present a flow to calibrate an accurate mask enabling its implementation. The study covers the different effects that should be embedded in the mask model as well as the experiment required to model them.

  17. Building an advanced climate model: Program plan for the CHAMMP (Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics, and Model Physics) Climate Modeling Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    The issue of global warming and related climatic changes from increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has received prominent attention during the past few years. The Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics, and Model Physics (CHAMMP) Climate Modeling Program is designed to contribute directly to this rapid improvement. The goal of the CHAMMP Climate Modeling Program is to develop, verify, and apply a new generation of climate models within a coordinated framework that incorporates the best available scientific and numerical approaches to represent physical, biogeochemical, and ecological processes, that fully utilizes the hardware and software capabilities of new computer architectures, that probes the limits of climate predictability, and finally that can be used to address the challenging problem of understanding the greenhouse climate issue through the ability of the models to simulate time-dependent climatic changes over extended times and with regional resolution.

  18. Analysis of Petroleum Technology Advances Through Applied Research by Independent Oil Producers

    SciTech Connect

    Brashear, Jerry P.; North, Walter B.; Thomas Charles P.; Becker, Alan B.; Faulder, David D.

    2000-01-12

    Petroleum Technology Advances Through Applied Research by Independent Oil Producers is a program of the National Oil Research Program, U.S. Department of Energy. Between 1995 and 1998, the program competitively selected and cost-shared twenty-two projects with small producers. The purpose was to involve small independent producers in testing technologies of interest to them that would advance (directly or indirectly) one or more of four national program objectives: (1) Extend the productive life of reservoirs; (2) Increase production and/or reserves; (3) Improve environmental performance; and (4) Broaden the exchange of technology information.

  19. Divorce and Child Behavior Problems: Applying Latent Change Score Models to Life Event Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Patrick S.; Lansford, Jennifer E.; Castellino, Domini R.; Berlin, Lisa J.; Dodge, Kenneth A.; Bates, John E.; Pettit, Gregory S.

    2004-01-01

    Effects of parents' divorce on children's adjustment have been studied extensively. This article applies new advances in trajectory modeling to the problem of disentangling the effects of divorce on children's adjustment from related factors such as the child's age at the time of divorce and the child's gender. Latent change score models were used…

  20. Applying Machine Trust Models to Forensic Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, Marika; Venter, Hein; Eloff, Jan; Olivier, Martin

    Digital forensics involves the identification, preservation, analysis and presentation of electronic evidence for use in legal proceedings. In the presence of contradictory evidence, forensic investigators need a means to determine which evidence can be trusted. This is particularly true in a trust model environment where computerised agents may make trust-based decisions that influence interactions within the system. This paper focuses on the analysis of evidence in trust-based environments and the determination of the degree to which evidence can be trusted. The trust model proposed in this work may be implemented in a tool for conducting trust-based forensic investigations. The model takes into account the trust environment and parameters that influence interactions in a computer network being investigated. Also, it allows for crimes to be reenacted to create more substantial evidentiary proof.

  1. Polarization model applied to Uranian radio emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, C. B.; Neal, K. L.; Warwick, J. W.

    1991-04-01

    The total power and the degree of circular polarization as measured by the Planetary Radio Astronomy experiments on the Voyager spacecraft are modeled. For a source near the electron cyclotron frequency, the degree of circular polarization is determined by the angle between the wave vector and the field. It is shown that the observed strong circular polarization of Uranian smooth low-frequency (SLF) can be modeled as emission that is beamed along the direction of the magnetic field in a filled cone. The main observational constraints of SLF emission from Uranus are met by conjugate sources at about 21 deg from the magnetic equator.

  2. Applying waste logistics modeling to regional planning

    SciTech Connect

    Holter, G.M.; Khawaja, A.; Shaver, S.R.; Peterson, K.L.

    1995-05-01

    Waste logistics modeling is a powerful analytical technique that can be used for effective planning of future solid waste storage, treatment, and disposal activities. Proper waste management is essential for preventing unacceptable environmental degradation from ongoing operations, and is also a critical part of any environmental remediation activity. Logistics modeling allows for analysis of alternate scenarios for future waste flowrates and routings, facility schedules, and processing or handling capacities. Such analyses provide an increased understanding of the critical needs for waste storage, treatment, transport, and disposal while there is still adequate lead time to plan accordingly. They also provide a basis for determining the sensitivity of these critical needs to the various system parameters. This paper discusses the application of waste logistics modeling concepts to regional planning. In addition to ongoing efforts to aid in planning for a large industrial complex, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is currently involved in implementing waste logistics modeling as part of the planning process for material recovery and recycling within a multi-city region in the western US.

  3. Recent advances in modeling stellar interiors (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, Joyce Ann

    2010-01-01

    Advances in stellar interior modeling are being driven by new data from large-scale surveys and high-precision photometric and spectroscopic observations. Here we focus on single stars in normal evolutionary phases; we will not discuss the many advances in modeling star formation, interacting binaries, supernovae, or neutron stars. We review briefly: (1) updates to input physics of stellar models; (2) progress in two and three-dimensional evolution and hydrodynamic models; (3) insights from oscillation data used to infer stellar interior structure and validate model predictions (asteroseismology). We close by highlighting a few outstanding problems, e.g., the driving mechanisms for hybrid {gamma} Dor/{delta} Sct star pulsations, the cause of giant eruptions seen in luminous blue variables such as {eta} Car and P Cyg, and the solar abundance problem.

  4. Advances in deep-space telecommunications technology at the Applied Physics Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokulic, R. S.; Reinhart, M. J.; Willey, C. E.; Stilwell, R. K.; Penn, J. E.; Norton, J. R.; Cheng, S.; DeCicco, D. J.; Schulze, R. C.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in RF telecommunications technology at the Applied Physics Laboratory. These advances, which address the miniaturization and high data rate needs of NASA, fall into three major areas: (1) transceiver-based systems, (2) antennas, and (3) solid-state power amplifiers. In the transceiver area, a deep-space transceiver system being developed for the Comet Nucleus Tour (CONTOUR) spacecraft is described. In addition, the development progress of a low-power S/X-band digital receiver and an advanced ultrastable oscillator quartz resonator are described. In the antenna area, an X-band phased array system being developed for the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft is described, along with the concept for a K a-band hybrid inflatable antenna. In the solid-state power amplifier area, the development of X- and K a-band amplifiers suitable for phased array applications is described.

  5. Advances in scientific balloon thermal modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohaboj, T.; Cathey, H.

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Balloon Program Office has long acknowledged that the accurate modeling of balloon performance and flight prediction is dependant on how well the balloon is thermally modeled. This ongoing effort is focused on developing accurate balloon thermal models that can be used to quickly predict balloon temperatures and balloon performance. The ability to model parametric changes is also a driver for this effort. This paper will present the most recent advances made in this area. This research effort continues to utilize the ``Thermal Desktop'' addition to AUTO CAD for the modeling. Recent advances have been made by using this analytical tool. A number of analyses have been completed to test the applicability of this tool to the problem with very positive results. Progressively detailed models have been developed to explore the capabilities of the tool as well as to provide guidance in model formulation. A number of parametric studies have been completed. These studies have varied the shape of the structure, material properties, environmental inputs, and model geometry. These studies have concentrated on spherical ``proxy models'' for the initial development stages and then to transition to the natural shaped zero pressure and super pressure balloons. An assessment of required model resolution has also been determined. Model solutions have been cross checked with known solutions via hand calculations. The comparison of these cases will also be presented. One goal is to develop analysis guidelines and an approach for modeling balloons for both simple first order estimates and detailed full models. This paper presents the step by step advances made as part of this effort, capabilities, limitations, and the lessons learned. Also presented are the plans for further thermal modeling work.

  6. Advances in Scientific Balloon Thermal Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohaboj, T.; Cathey, H. M., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Balloon Program office has long acknowledged that the accurate modeling of balloon performance and flight prediction is dependant on how well the balloon is thermally modeled. This ongoing effort is focused on developing accurate balloon thermal models that can be used to quickly predict balloon temperatures and balloon performance. The ability to model parametric changes is also a driver for this effort. This paper will present the most recent advances made in this area. This research effort continues to utilize the "Thrmal Desktop" addition to AUTO CAD for the modeling. Recent advances have been made by using this analytical tool. A number of analyses have been completed to test the applicability of this tool to the problem with very positive results. Progressively detailed models have been developed to explore the capabilities of the tool as well as to provide guidance in model formulation. A number of parametric studies have been completed. These studies have varied the shape of the structure, material properties, environmental inputs, and model geometry. These studies have concentrated on spherical "proxy models" for the initial development stages and then to transition to the natural shaped zero pressure and super pressure balloons. An assessment of required model resolution has also been determined. Model solutions have been cross checked with known solutions via hand calculations. The comparison of these cases will also be presented. One goal is to develop analysis guidelines and an approach for modeling balloons for both simple first order estimates and detailed full models. This papa presents the step by step advances made as part of this effort, capabilities, limitations, and the lessons learned. Also presented are the plans for further thermal modeling work.

  7. Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation Intern

    SciTech Connect

    Gertman, Vanessa

    2010-01-01

    Some interns just copy papers and seal envelopes. Not at INL! Check out how Vanessa Gertman, an INL intern working at the Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation, spent her summer working with some intense visualization software. Lots more content like this is available at INL's facebook page http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  8. Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation Intern

    ScienceCinema

    Gertman, Vanessa

    2013-05-28

    Some interns just copy papers and seal envelopes. Not at INL! Check out how Vanessa Gertman, an INL intern working at the Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation, spent her summer working with some intense visualization software. Lots more content like this is available at INL's facebook page http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  9. Holographic interferometry applied to real-time dynamic modal analysis of an advanced exotic metal alloy airfoil structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fein, Howard

    1999-07-01

    Holographic Interferometry has been successfully employed to characterize the materials and behavior of diverse types of structures under stress. Specialized variations of this technology have also been applied to define dynamic and vibration related structural behavior. Such applications of holographic technique offer some of the most effective methods of modal and dynamic analysis available. Real-time dynamic testing of the structural behavior of aerodynamic control and airfoil structures for advanced aircraft and missile systems has traditionally required advanced instrumentation for data collection in either actual flight test or wind-tunnel simulations. Advanced optical holography techniques are alternate methods which result in full-field behavioral data on the ground in a nondestructive hardware- in-the-loop environment. These methods offer significant insight in both the development and subsequent operational test and modeling of advanced control and airfoil structures and their integration with total vehicle system dynamics. Aerodynamic control structures and components can be analyzed in place with very low amplitude excitation and the resultant data can be used to adjust the accuracy of mathematically derived structural and behavioral models as well actual performance.

  10. Mathematical Modelling: A New Approach to Teaching Applied Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burghes, D. N.; Borrie, M. S.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the advantages of mathematical modeling approach in teaching applied mathematics and gives many suggestions for suitable material which illustrates the links between real problems and mathematics. (GA)

  11. Applied Research Consultants (ARC): A Vertical Practicum Model of Training Applied Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadler, Joel T.; Cundiff, Nicole L.

    2009-01-01

    The demand for highly trained evaluation consultants is increasing. Furthermore, the gap between job seekers' evaluation competencies and job recruiters' expectations suggests a need for providing practical training experiences. A model using a vertical practicum (advanced students assisting in the training of newer students) is suggested as an…

  12. Combustion modeling in advanced gas turbine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Smoot, L.D.; Hedman, P.O.; Fletcher, T.H.; Brewster, B.S.; Kramer, S.K.

    1995-12-31

    Goal of DOE`s Advanced Turbine Systems program is to develop and commercialize ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, cost competitive gas turbine systems for base-load applications in utility, independent power producer, and industrial markets. Primary objective of the program here is to develop a comprehensive combustion model for advanced gas turbine combustion systems using natural gas (coal gasification or biomass fuels). The efforts included code evaluation (PCGC-3), coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, laser Doppler anemometry, and laser-induced fluorescence.

  13. Advanced dynamic modelling for friction draft gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qing; Spiryagin, Maksym; Cole, Colin

    2015-04-01

    A white-box friction draft gear model has been developed with all components of the draft gear and their geometries considered. The conventional two-stage (loading and unloading) working process of the friction draft gear was detailed as a four-stage process. A preliminary work called the 'base model' was improved with regard to force-displacement characteristics, friction modelling and transitional characteristics. A set of impact test data were analysed; five types of draft gear behaviour were identified and modelled: hysteresis, stiffening, change of stage, locked unloading and softening. Simulated comparisons of three draft gear models were presented: a look-up table model, the base model and the advanced model.

  14. Maturity Model for Advancing Smart Grid Interoperability

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Mark; Widergren, Steven E.; Mater, J.; Montgomery, Austin

    2013-10-28

    Abstract—Interoperability is about the properties of devices and systems to connect and work properly. Advancing interoperability eases integration and maintenance of the resulting interconnection. This leads to faster integration, lower labor and component costs, predictability of projects and the resulting performance, and evolutionary paths for upgrade. When specifications are shared and standardized, competition and novel solutions can bring new value streams to the community of stakeholders involved. Advancing interoperability involves reaching agreement for how things join at their interfaces. The quality of the agreements and the alignment of parties involved in the agreement present challenges that are best met with process improvement techniques. The GridWise® Architecture Council (GWAC) sponsored by the United States Department of Energy is supporting an effort to use concepts from capability maturity models used in the software industry to advance interoperability of smart grid technology. An interoperability maturity model has been drafted and experience is being gained through trials on various types of projects and community efforts. This paper describes the value and objectives of maturity models, the nature of the interoperability maturity model and how it compares with other maturity models, and experiences gained with its use.

  15. Advanced Behavioral Applications in Schools: A Review of R. Douglas Greer's "Designing Teaching Strategies: An Applied Behavior Analysis Systems Approach"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moxley, Roy A.

    2004-01-01

    R. Douglas Greer's "Designing Teaching Strategies" is an important book directed to advanced students in applied behavior analysis for classrooms. This review presents some of the striking features of the Comprehensive Applied Behavior Analysis to Schooling (CABAS[R]) program and the individualized instruction that the book advances. These include…

  16. Advances in Computationally Modeling Human Oral Bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junmei; Hou, Tingjun

    2015-01-01

    Although significant progress has been made in experimental high throughput screening (HTS) of ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion) and pharmacokinetic properties, the ADME and Toxicity (ADME-Tox) in silico modeling is still indispensable in drug discovery as it can guide us to wisely select drug candidates prior to expensive ADME screenings and clinical trials. Compared to other ADME-Tox properties, human oral bioavailability (HOBA) is particularly important but extremely difficult to predict. In this paper, the advances in human oral bioavailability modeling will be reviewed. Moreover, our deep insight on how to construct more accurate and reliable HOBA QSAR and classification models will also discussed. PMID:25582307

  17. Advances in computationally modeling human oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junmei; Hou, Tingjun

    2015-06-23

    Although significant progress has been made in experimental high throughput screening (HTS) of ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion) and pharmacokinetic properties, the ADME and Toxicity (ADME-Tox) in silico modeling is still indispensable in drug discovery as it can guide us to wisely select drug candidates prior to expensive ADME screenings and clinical trials. Compared to other ADME-Tox properties, human oral bioavailability (HOBA) is particularly important but extremely difficult to predict. In this paper, the advances in human oral bioavailability modeling will be reviewed. Moreover, our deep insight on how to construct more accurate and reliable HOBA QSAR and classification models will also discussed. PMID:25582307

  18. Learning to Apply Models of Materials While Explaining Their Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karpin, Tiia; Juuti, Kalle; Lavonen, Jari

    2014-01-01

    Background: Applying structural models is important to chemistry education at the upper secondary level, but it is considered one of the most difficult topics to learn. Purpose: This study analyses to what extent in designed lessons students learned to apply structural models in explaining the properties and behaviours of various materials.…

  19. Advanced Technology System Scheduling Governance Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, Jim; Carnes, Brian; Hoang, Thuc; Vigil, Manuel

    2015-06-11

    In the fall of 2005, the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program appointed a team to formulate a governance model for allocating resources and scheduling the stockpile stewardship workload on ASC capability systems. This update to the original document takes into account the new technical challenges and roles for advanced technology (AT) systems and the new ASC Program workload categories that must be supported. The goal of this updated model is to effectively allocate and schedule AT computing resources among all three National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) laboratories for weapons deliverables that merit priority on this class of resource. The process outlined below describes how proposed work can be evaluated and approved for resource allocations while preserving high effective utilization of the systems. This approach will provide the broadest possible benefit to the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP).

  20. Combustion modeling in advanced gas turbine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Smoot, L.D.; Hedman, P.O.; Fletcher, T.H.

    1995-10-01

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program is to help develop and commercialize ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base-load applications in the utility, independent power producer, and industrial markets. Combustion modeling, including emission characteristics, has been identified as a needed, high-priority technology by key professionals in the gas turbine industry.

  1. A nonlinear interface model applied to masonry structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebon, Frédéric; Raffa, Maria Letizia; Rizzoni, Raffaella

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a new imperfect interface model is presented. The model includes finite strains, micro-cracks and smooth roughness. The model is consistently derived by coupling a homogenization approach for micro-cracked media and arguments of asymptotic analysis. The model is applied to brick/mortar interfaces. Numerical results are presented.

  2. Some Recent Advances of Ultrasonic Diagnostic Methods Applied to Materials and Structures (Including Biological Ones)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Lucio; Nobile, Stefano

    This paper gives an overview of some recent advances of ultrasonic methods applied to materials and structures (including biological ones), exploring typical applications of these emerging inspection technologies to civil engineering and medicine. In confirmation of this trend, some results of an experimental research carried out involving both destructive and non-destructive testing methods for the evaluation of structural performance of existing reinforced concrete (RC) structures are discussed in terms of reliability. As a result, Ultrasonic testing can usefully supplement coring thus permitting less expensive and more representative evaluation of the concrete strength throughout the whole structure under examination.

  3. Defining Requirements and Applying Information Modeling for Protecting Enterprise Assets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortier, Stephen C.; Volk, Jennifer H.

    The advent of terrorist threats has heightened local, regional, and national governments' interest in emergency response and disaster preparedness. The threat of natural disasters also challenges emergency responders to act swiftly and in a coordinated fashion. When a disaster occurs, an ad hoc coalition of pre-planned groups usually forms to respond to the incident. History has shown that these “system of systems” do not interoperate very well. Communications between fire, police and rescue components either do not work or are inefficient. Government agencies, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and private industry use a wide array of software platforms for managing data about emergency conditions, resources and response activities. Most of these are stand-alone systems with very limited capability for data sharing with other agencies or other levels of government. Information technology advances have facilitated the movement towards an integrated and coordinated approach to emergency management. Other communication mechanisms, such as video teleconferencing, digital television and radio broadcasting, are being utilized to combat the challenges of emergency information exchange. Recent disasters, such as Hurricane Katrina and the tsunami in Indonesia, have illuminated the weaknesses in emergency response. This paper will discuss the need for defining requirements for components of ad hoc coalitions which are formed to respond to disasters. A goal of our effort was to develop a proof of concept that applying information modeling to the business processes used to protect and mitigate potential loss of an enterprise was feasible. These activities would be modeled both pre- and post-incident.

  4. Accelerating advances in continental domain hydrologic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archfield, Stacey A.; Clark, Martyn; Arheimer, Berit; Hay, Lauren E.; McMillan, Hilary; Kiang, Julie E.; Seibert, Jan; Hakala, Kirsti; Bock, Andrew; Wagener, Thorsten; Farmer, William H.; Andréassian, Vazken; Attinger, Sabine; Viglione, Alberto; Knight, Rodney; Markstrom, Steven; Over, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    In the past, hydrologic modeling of surface water resources has mainly focused on simulating the hydrologic cycle at local to regional catchment modeling domains. There now exists a level of maturity among the catchment, global water security, and land surface modeling communities such that these communities are converging toward continental domain hydrologic models. This commentary, written from a catchment hydrology community perspective, provides a review of progress in each community toward this achievement, identifies common challenges the communities face, and details immediate and specific areas in which these communities can mutually benefit one another from the convergence of their research perspectives. Those include: (1) creating new incentives and infrastructure to report and share model inputs, outputs, and parameters in data services and open access, machine-independent formats for model replication or reanalysis; (2) ensuring that hydrologic models have: sufficient complexity to represent the dominant physical processes and adequate representation of anthropogenic impacts on the terrestrial water cycle, a process-based approach to model parameter estimation, and appropriate parameterizations to represent large-scale fluxes and scaling behavior; (3) maintaining a balance between model complexity and data availability as well as uncertainties; and (4) quantifying and communicating significant advancements toward these modeling goals.

  5. Advancements in predictive plasma formation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purvis, Michael A.; Schafgans, Alexander; Brown, Daniel J. W.; Fomenkov, Igor; Rafac, Rob; Brown, Josh; Tao, Yezheng; Rokitski, Slava; Abraham, Mathew; Vargas, Mike; Rich, Spencer; Taylor, Ted; Brandt, David; Pirati, Alberto; Fisher, Aaron; Scott, Howard; Koniges, Alice; Eder, David; Wilks, Scott; Link, Anthony; Langer, Steven

    2016-03-01

    We present highlights from plasma simulations performed in collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Labs. This modeling is performed to advance the rate of learning about optimal EUV generation for laser produced plasmas and to provide insights where experimental results are not currently available. The goal is to identify key physical processes necessary for an accurate and predictive model capable of simulating a wide range of conditions. This modeling will help to drive source performance scaling in support of the EUV Lithography roadmap. The model simulates pre-pulse laser interaction with the tin droplet and follows the droplet expansion into the main pulse target zone. Next, the interaction of the expanded droplet with the main laser pulse is simulated. We demonstrate the predictive nature of the code and provide comparison with experimental results.

  6. Advanced Small Modular Reactor Economics Model Development

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Thomas J.

    2014-10-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) research and development activities focus on four key areas: Developing assessment methods for evaluating advanced SMR technologies and characteristics; and Developing and testing of materials, fuels and fabrication techniques; and Resolving key regulatory issues identified by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and industry; and Developing advanced instrumentation and controls and human-machine interfaces. This report focuses on development of assessment methods to evaluate advanced SMR technologies and characteristics. Specifically, this report describes the expansion and application of the economic modeling effort at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Analysis of the current modeling methods shows that one of the primary concerns for the modeling effort is the handling of uncertainty in cost estimates. Monte Carlo–based methods are commonly used to handle uncertainty, especially when implemented by a stand-alone script within a program such as Python or MATLAB. However, a script-based model requires each potential user to have access to a compiler and an executable capable of handling the script. Making the model accessible to multiple independent analysts is best accomplished by implementing the model in a common computing tool such as Microsoft Excel. Excel is readily available and accessible to most system analysts, but it is not designed for straightforward implementation of a Monte Carlo–based method. Using a Monte Carlo algorithm requires in-spreadsheet scripting and statistical analyses or the use of add-ons such as Crystal Ball. An alternative method uses propagation of error calculations in the existing Excel-based system to estimate system cost uncertainty. This method has the advantage of using Microsoft Excel as is, but it requires the use of simplifying assumptions. These assumptions do not necessarily bring into question the analytical results. In fact, the

  7. Selecting Research Collections for Digitization: Applying the Harvard Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brancolini, Kristine R.

    2000-01-01

    Librarians at Harvard University have written the most comprehensive guide to selecting research collections for digitization. This article applies the Harvard Model to a digitization project at Indiana University in order to evaluate the appropriateness of the model for use at another institution and to adapt the model to local needs. (Contains 7…

  8. Charmonium sum rules applied to a holographic model

    SciTech Connect

    Hohler, Paul M.

    2011-01-15

    The heavy-quark QCD sum rules are applied to a model of charmonium based upon the gauge/gravity duality. We find that there is strong agreement between the moments of the polarization function calculated from the holographic model and the experimental data suggesting that the model is consistent with the heavy-quark QCD sum rules at zero temperature.

  9. Applying modeling Results in designing a global tropospheric experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A set of field experiments and advanced modeling studies which provide a strategy for a program of global tropospheric experiments was identified. An expanded effort to develop space applications for trospheric air quality monitoring and studies was recommended. The tropospheric ozone, carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur cycles are addressed. Stratospheric-tropospheric exchange is discussed. Fast photochemical processes in the free troposphere are considered.

  10. 76 FR 68011 - Medicare Program; Advanced Payment Model

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ... Medicare Program; Advanced Payment Model; Notice #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 212 / Wednesday... Services Medicare Program; Advanced Payment Model AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces the testing of the Advance Payment Model...

  11. Advanced statistical process control of a chemical vapor tungsten deposition process on an Applied Materials Centura reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefani, Jerry A.; Poarch, Scott; Saxena, Sharad; Mozumder, P. K.

    1994-09-01

    An advanced multivariable off-line process control system, which combines traditional Statistical Process Control (SPC) with feedback control, has been applied to the CVD tungsten process on an Applied Materials Centura reactor. The goal of the model-based controller is to compensate for shifts in the process and maintain the wafer state responses on target. In the present application the controller employs measurements made on test wafers by off-line metrology tools to track the process behavior. This is accomplished by using model- bases SPC, which compares the measurements with predictions obtained from empirically-derived process models. For CVD tungsten, a physically-based modeling approach was employed based on the kinetically-limited H2 reduction of WF6. On detecting a statistically significant shift in the process, the controller calculates adjustments to the settings to bring the process responses back on target. To achieve this a few additional test wafers are processed at slightly different settings than the nominal. This local experiment allows the models to be updated to reflect the current process performance. The model updates are expressed as multiplicative or additive changes in the process inputs and a change in the model constant. This approach for model updating not only tracks the present process/equipment state, but it also provides some diagnostic capability regarding the cause of the process shift. The updated models are used by an optimizer to compute new settings to bring the responses back to target. The optimizer is capable of incrementally entering controllables into the strategy, reflecting the degree to which the engineer desires to manipulates each setting. The capability of the controller to compensate for shifts in the CVD tungsten process has been demonstrated. Targets for film bulk resistivity and deposition rate were maintained while satisfying constraints on film stress and WF6 conversion efficiency.

  12. 48 CFR 32.405 - Applying Pub. L. 85-804 to advance payments under sealed bid contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applying Pub. L. 85-804 to advance payments under sealed bid contracts. 32.405 Section 32.405 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Advance Payments for Non-Commercial Items 32.405...

  13. An applied mathematics perspective on stochastic modelling for climate.

    PubMed

    Majda, Andrew J; Franzke, Christian; Khouider, Boualem

    2008-07-28

    Systematic strategies from applied mathematics for stochastic modelling in climate are reviewed here. One of the topics discussed is the stochastic modelling of mid-latitude low-frequency variability through a few teleconnection patterns, including the central role and physical mechanisms responsible for multiplicative noise. A new low-dimensional stochastic model is developed here, which mimics key features of atmospheric general circulation models, to test the fidelity of stochastic mode reduction procedures. The second topic discussed here is the systematic design of stochastic lattice models to capture irregular and highly intermittent features that are not resolved by a deterministic parametrization. A recent applied mathematics design principle for stochastic column modelling with intermittency is illustrated in an idealized setting for deep tropical convection; the practical effect of this stochastic model in both slowing down convectively coupled waves and increasing their fluctuations is presented here. PMID:18445572

  14. Prospects for Advanced RF Theory and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, D.B.

    1999-04-12

    This paper represents an attempt to express in print the contents of a rather philosophical review talk. The charge for the talk was not to summarize the present status of the field and what we can do, but to assess what we will need to do in the future and where the gaps are in fulfilling these needs. The objective was to be complete, covering all aspects of theory and modeling in all frequency regimes, although in the end the talk mainly focussed on the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF). In choosing which areas to develop, it is important to keep in mind who the customers for RF modeling are likely to be and what sorts of tasks they will need for RF to do. This occupies the first part of the paper. Then we examine each of the elements of a complete RF theory and try to identify the kinds of advances needed.

  15. Micromechanical Modeling Efforts for Advanced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Over the past two decades, NASA Lewis Research Center's in-house efforts in analytical modeling for advanced composites have yielded several computational predictive tools. These are, in general, based on simplified micromechanics equations. During the last 3 years, our efforts have been directed primarily toward developing prediction tools for high temperature ceramic matrix composite (CMC's) materials. These materials are being considered for High Speed Research program applications, specifically for combustor liners. In comparison to conventional materials, CMC's offer several advantages: high specific stiffness and strength, and higher toughness and nonbrittle failure in comparison to monolithic ceramics, as well as environmental stability and wear resistance for both roomtemperature and elevated-temperature applications. Under the sponsorship of the High Temperature Engine Materials Program (HITEMP), CMC analytical modeling has resulted in the computational tool Ceramic Matrix Composites Analyzer (CEMCAN).

  16. The HPT Model Applied to a Kayak Company's Registration Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Florence; Hall, Herman A., IV; Blakely, Amanda; Gayford, Matthew C.; Gunter, Erin

    2009-01-01

    This case study describes the step-by-step application of the traditional human performance technology (HPT) model at a premier kayak company located on the coast of North Carolina. The HPT model was applied to address lost revenues related to three specific business issues: misinformed customers, dissatisfied customers, and guides not showing up…

  17. A layered neural network model applied to the auditory system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travis, Bryan J.

    1986-08-01

    The structure of the auditory system is described with emphasis on the cerebral cortex. A layered neural network model incorporating much of the known structure of the cortex is applied to word discrimination. The concepts of iterated maps and atrractive fixed points are used to enable the model to recognize words despite variations in pitch, intensity and duration.

  18. Modeling Protein Folding and Applying It to a Relevant Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Allan; Goetze, Jim

    2004-01-01

    The different levels of protein structure that can be easily understood by creating a model that simulates protein folding, which can then be evaluated by applying it to a relevant activity, is presented. The materials required and the procedure for constructing a protein folding model are mentioned.

  19. Applying the ARCS Motivation Model in Technological and Vocational Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, Hung-Chang; Wang, Ya-huei

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the incorporation of Keller's ARCS (Attention, Relevance, Confidence, and Satisfaction) motivation model into traditional classroom instruction-learning process. Viewing that technological and vocational students have low confidence and motivation in learning, the authors applied the ARCS motivation model not only in the…

  20. Advancing an Information Model for Environmental Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsburgh, J. S.; Aufdenkampe, A. K.; Hooper, R. P.; Lehnert, K. A.; Schreuders, K.; Tarboton, D. G.; Valentine, D. W.; Zaslavsky, I.

    2011-12-01

    have been modified to support data management for the Critical Zone Observatories (CZOs). This paper will present limitations of the existing information model used by the CUAHSI HIS that have been uncovered through its deployment and use, as well as new advances to the information model, including: better representation of both in situ observations from field sensors and observations derived from environmental samples, extensibility in attributes used to describe observations, and observation provenance. These advances have been developed by the HIS team and the broader scientific community and will enable the information model to accommodate and better describe wider classes of environmental observations and to better meet the needs of the hydrologic science and CZO communities.

  1. LEARNING SEMANTICS-ENHANCED LANGUAGE MODELS APPLIED TO UNSUEPRVISED WSD

    SciTech Connect

    VERSPOOR, KARIN; LIN, SHOU-DE

    2007-01-29

    An N-gram language model aims at capturing statistical syntactic word order information from corpora. Although the concept of language models has been applied extensively to handle a variety of NLP problems with reasonable success, the standard model does not incorporate semantic information, and consequently limits its applicability to semantic problems such as word sense disambiguation. We propose a framework that integrates semantic information into the language model schema, allowing a system to exploit both syntactic and semantic information to address NLP problems. Furthermore, acknowledging the limited availability of semantically annotated data, we discuss how the proposed model can be learned without annotated training examples. Finally, we report on a case study showing how the semantics-enhanced language model can be applied to unsupervised word sense disambiguation with promising results.

  2. Advances in a distributed approach for ocean model data interoperability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Signell, Richard P.; Snowden, Derrick P.

    2014-01-01

    An infrastructure for earth science data is emerging across the globe based on common data models and web services. As we evolve from custom file formats and web sites to standards-based web services and tools, data is becoming easier to distribute, find and retrieve, leaving more time for science. We describe recent advances that make it easier for ocean model providers to share their data, and for users to search, access, analyze and visualize ocean data using MATLAB® and Python®. These include a technique for modelers to create aggregated, Climate and Forecast (CF) metadata convention datasets from collections of non-standard Network Common Data Form (NetCDF) output files, the capability to remotely access data from CF-1.6-compliant NetCDF files using the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Sensor Observation Service (SOS), a metadata standard for unstructured grid model output (UGRID), and tools that utilize both CF and UGRID standards to allow interoperable data search, browse and access. We use examples from the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS®) Coastal and Ocean Modeling Testbed, a project in which modelers using both structured and unstructured grid model output needed to share their results, to compare their results with other models, and to compare models with observed data. The same techniques used here for ocean modeling output can be applied to atmospheric and climate model output, remote sensing data, digital terrain and bathymetric data.

  3. Advances in electromagnetic models for three-dimensional nondestructive evaluation of advanced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, Harold A.; Murphy, R. Kim; Sabbagh, Elias H.

    2016-02-01

    In past work we have developed a rigorous electromagnetic model and an inversion algorithm for the three-dimensional NDE of advanced composite materials. This approach extends Victor Technologies' work in eddy-current NDE of conventional metals, and allows one to determine in localized regions the fiber-resin ratio in graphite-epoxy, and to determine those anomalies, e.g., delaminations, broken fibers, moisture content, etc., that can be reconstructed by our inversion method. In developing the model, we applied rigorous electromagnetic theory to determine a Green's function for a slab of anisotropic composite material, and then determine the integral relations for the forward and inverse problems using the Green's function. In addition, we have given examples of the solution of forward and inverse problems using these algorithms.

  4. Advances in Modeling Exploding Bridgewire Initiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hrousis, C A; Christensen, J S

    2010-03-10

    There is great interest in applying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation techniques to the designs of electrical high explosive (HE) initiators, for the purpose of better understanding a design's sensitivities, optimizing its performance, and/or predicting its useful lifetime. Two MHD-capable LLNL codes, CALE and ALE3D, are being used to simulate the process of ohmic heating, vaporization, and plasma formation in exploding bridgewires (EBW). Initiation of the HE is simulated using Ignition & Growth reactive flow models. 1-D, 2-D and 3-D models have been constructed and studied. The models provide some intuitive explanation of the initiation process and are useful for evaluating the potential impact of identified aging mechanisms (such as the growth of intermetallic compounds or powder sintering). The end product of this work is a simulation capability for evaluating margin in proposed, modified or aged initiation system designs.

  5. Learning to apply models of materials while explaining their properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpin, Tiia; Juuti, Kalle; Lavonen, Jari

    2014-09-01

    Background:Applying structural models is important to chemistry education at the upper secondary level, but it is considered one of the most difficult topics to learn. Purpose:This study analyses to what extent in designed lessons students learned to apply structural models in explaining the properties and behaviours of various materials. Sample:An experimental group is 27 Finnish upper secondary school students and control group included 18 students from the same school. Design and methods:In quasi-experimental setting, students were guided through predict, observe, explain activities in four practical work situations. It was intended that the structural models would encourage students to learn how to identify and apply appropriate models when predicting and explaining situations. The lessons, organised over a one-week period, began with a teacher's demonstration and continued with student experiments in which they described the properties and behaviours of six household products representing three different materials. Results:Most students in the experimental group learned to apply the models correctly, as demonstrated by post-test scores that were significantly higher than pre-test scores. The control group showed no significant difference between pre- and post-test scores. Conclusions:The findings indicate that the intervention where students engage in predict, observe, explain activities while several materials and models are confronted at the same time, had a positive effect on learning outcomes.

  6. Methods for model selection in applied science and engineering.

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Richard V., Jr.

    2004-10-01

    Mathematical models are developed and used to study the properties of complex systems and/or modify these systems to satisfy some performance requirements in just about every area of applied science and engineering. A particular reason for developing a model, e.g., performance assessment or design, is referred to as the model use. Our objective is the development of a methodology for selecting a model that is sufficiently accurate for an intended use. Information on the system being modeled is, in general, incomplete, so that there may be two or more models consistent with the available information. The collection of these models is called the class of candidate models. Methods are developed for selecting the optimal member from a class of candidate models for the system. The optimal model depends on the available information, the selected class of candidate models, and the model use. Classical methods for model selection, including the method of maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods, as well as a method employing a decision-theoretic approach, are formulated to select the optimal model for numerous applications. There is no requirement that the candidate models be random. Classical methods for model selection ignore model use and require data to be available. Examples are used to show that these methods can be unreliable when data is limited. The decision-theoretic approach to model selection does not have these limitations, and model use is included through an appropriate utility function. This is especially important when modeling high risk systems, where the consequences of using an inappropriate model for the system can be disastrous. The decision-theoretic method for model selection is developed and applied for a series of complex and diverse applications. These include the selection of the: (1) optimal order of the polynomial chaos approximation for non-Gaussian random variables and stationary stochastic processes, (2) optimal pressure load model to be

  7. An advanced shape-fitting algorithm applied to quadrupedal mammals: improving volumetric mass estimates

    PubMed Central

    Brassey, Charlotte A.; Gardiner, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Body mass is a fundamental physical property of an individual and has enormous bearing upon ecology and physiology. Generating reliable estimates for body mass is therefore a necessary step in many palaeontological studies. Whilst early reconstructions of mass in extinct species relied upon isolated skeletal elements, volumetric techniques are increasingly applied to fossils when skeletal completeness allows. We apply a new ‘alpha shapes’ (α-shapes) algorithm to volumetric mass estimation in quadrupedal mammals. α-shapes are defined by: (i) the underlying skeletal structure to which they are fitted; and (ii) the value α, determining the refinement of fit. For a given skeleton, a range of α-shapes may be fitted around the individual, spanning from very coarse to very fine. We fit α-shapes to three-dimensional models of extant mammals and calculate volumes, which are regressed against mass to generate predictive equations. Our optimal model is characterized by a high correlation coefficient and mean square error (r2=0.975, m.s.e.=0.025). When applied to the woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) and giant ground sloth (Megatherium americanum), we reconstruct masses of 3635 and 3706 kg, respectively. We consider α-shapes an improvement upon previous techniques as resulting volumes are less sensitive to uncertainties in skeletal reconstructions, and do not require manual separation of body segments from skeletons. PMID:26361559

  8. Initial Assessment of Open Rotor Propulsion Applied to an Advanced Single-Aisle Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, Mark D.; Berton, Jeffrey J.; Hendricks, Eric S.; Tong, Michael T.; Haller, William J.; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    Application of high speed, advanced turboprops, or propfans, to subsonic transport aircraft received significant attention and research in the 1970s and 1980s when fuel efficiency was the driving focus of aeronautical research. Recent volatility in fuel prices and concern for aviation s environmental impact have renewed interest in unducted, open rotor propulsion, and revived research by NASA and a number of engine manufacturers. Unfortunately, in the two decades that have passed since open rotor concepts were thoroughly investigated, NASA has lost experience and expertise in this technology area. This paper describes initial efforts to re-establish NASA s capability to assess aircraft designs with open rotor propulsion. Specifically, methodologies for aircraft-level sizing, performance analysis, and system-level noise analysis are described. Propulsion modeling techniques have been described in a previous paper. Initial results from application of these methods to an advanced single-aisle aircraft using open rotor engines based on historical blade designs are presented. These results indicate open rotor engines have the potential to provide large reductions in fuel consumption and emissions. Initial noise analysis indicates that current noise regulations can be met with old blade designs and modern, noiseoptimized blade designs are expected to result in even lower noise levels. Although an initial capability has been established and initial results obtained, additional development work is necessary to make NASA s open rotor system analysis capability on par with existing turbofan analysis capabilities.

  9. Advanced Numerical Model for Irradiated Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Giorla, Alain B.

    2015-03-01

    In this report, we establish a numerical model for concrete exposed to irradiation to address these three critical points. The model accounts for creep in the cement paste and its coupling with damage, temperature and relative humidity. The shift in failure mode with the loading rate is also properly represented. The numerical model for creep has been validated and calibrated against different experiments in the literature [Wittmann, 1970, Le Roy, 1995]. Results from a simplified model are shown to showcase the ability of numerical homogenization to simulate irradiation effects in concrete. In future works, the complete model will be applied to the analysis of the irradiation experiments of Elleuch et al. [1972] and Kelly et al. [1969]. This requires a careful examination of the experimental environmental conditions as in both cases certain critical information are missing, including the relative humidity history. A sensitivity analysis will be conducted to provide lower and upper bounds of the concrete expansion under irradiation, and check if the scatter in the simulated results matches the one found in experiments. The numerical and experimental results will be compared in terms of expansion and loss of mechanical stiffness and strength. Both effects should be captured accordingly by the model to validate it. Once the model has been validated on these two experiments, it can be applied to simulate concrete from nuclear power plants. To do so, the materials used in these concrete must be as well characterized as possible. The main parameters required are the mechanical properties of each constituent in the concrete (aggregates, cement paste), namely the elastic modulus, the creep properties, the tensile and compressive strength, the thermal expansion coefficient, and the drying shrinkage. These can be either measured experimentally, estimated from the initial composition in the case of cement paste, or back-calculated from mechanical tests on concrete. If some

  10. AFDM: An Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model

    SciTech Connect

    Bohl, W.R.; Parker, F.R. ); Wilhelm, D. . Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik); Berthier, J. ); Goutagny, L. . Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire); Ninokata,

    1990-09-01

    AFDM, or the Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model, is a computer code that investigates new approaches simulating the multiphase-flow fluid-dynamics aspects of severe accidents in fast reactors. The AFDM formalism starts with differential equations similar to those in the SIMMER-II code. These equations are modified to treat three velocity fields and supplemented with a variety of new models. The AFDM code has 12 topologies describing what material contacts are possible depending on the presence or absence of a given material in a computational cell, on the dominant liquid, and on the continuous phase. Single-phase, bubbly, churn-turbulent, cellular, and dispersed flow regimes are permitted for the pool situations modeled. Virtual mass terms are included for vapor in liquid-continuous flow. Interfacial areas between the continuous and discontinuous phases are convected to allow some tracking of phenomenological histories. Interfacial areas are also modified by models of nucleation, dynamic forces, turbulence, flashing, coalescence, and mass transfer. Heat transfer is generally treated using engineering correlations. Liquid-vapor phase transitions are handled with the nonequilibrium, heat-transfer-limited model, whereas melting and freezing processes are based on equilibrium considerations. Convection is treated using a fractional-step method of time integration, including a semi-implicit pressure iteration. A higher-order differencing option is provided to control numerical diffusion. The Los Alamos SESAME equation-of-state has been implemented using densities and temperatures as the independent variables. AFDM programming has vectorized all computational loops consistent with the objective of producing an exportable code. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Nonlinear Dynamic Models in Advanced Life Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry

    2002-01-01

    To facilitate analysis, ALS systems are often assumed to be linear and time invariant, but they usually have important nonlinear and dynamic aspects. Nonlinear dynamic behavior can be caused by time varying inputs, changes in system parameters, nonlinear system functions, closed loop feedback delays, and limits on buffer storage or processing rates. Dynamic models are usually cataloged according to the number of state variables. The simplest dynamic models are linear, using only integration, multiplication, addition, and subtraction of the state variables. A general linear model with only two state variables can produce all the possible dynamic behavior of linear systems with many state variables, including stability, oscillation, or exponential growth and decay. Linear systems can be described using mathematical analysis. Nonlinear dynamics can be fully explored only by computer simulations of models. Unexpected behavior is produced by simple models having only two or three state variables with simple mathematical relations between them. Closed loop feedback delays are a major source of system instability. Exceeding limits on buffer storage or processing rates forces systems to change operating mode. Different equilibrium points may be reached from different initial conditions. Instead of one stable equilibrium point, the system may have several equilibrium points, oscillate at different frequencies, or even behave chaotically, depending on the system inputs and initial conditions. The frequency spectrum of an output oscillation may contain harmonics and the sums and differences of input frequencies, but it may also contain a stable limit cycle oscillation not related to input frequencies. We must investigate the nonlinear dynamic aspects of advanced life support systems to understand and counter undesirable behavior.

  12. Modeling of advanced fossil fuel power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabihian, Farshid

    The first part of this thesis deals with greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from fossil fuel-fired power stations. The GHG emission estimation from fossil fuel power generation industry signifies that emissions from this industry can be significantly reduced by fuel switching and adaption of advanced power generation technologies. In the second part of the thesis, steady-state models of some of the advanced fossil fuel power generation technologies are presented. The impacts of various parameters on the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) overpotentials and outputs are investigated. The detail analyses of operation of the hybrid SOFC-gas turbine (GT) cycle when fuelled with methane and syngas demonstrate that the efficiencies of the cycles with and without anode exhaust recirculation are close, but the specific power of the former is much higher. The parametric analysis of the performance of the hybrid SOFC-GT cycle indicates that increasing the system operating pressure and SOFC operating temperature and fuel utilization factor improves cycle efficiency, but the effects of the increasing SOFC current density and turbine inlet temperature are not favourable. The analysis of the operation of the system when fuelled with a wide range of fuel types demonstrates that the hybrid SOFC-GT cycle efficiency can be between 59% and 75%, depending on the inlet fuel type. Then, the system performance is investigated when methane as a reference fuel is replaced with various species that can be found in the fuel, i.e., H2, CO2, CO, and N 2. The results point out that influence of various species can be significant and different for each case. The experimental and numerical analyses of a biodiesel fuelled micro gas turbine indicate that fuel switching from petrodiesel to biodiesel can influence operational parameters of the system. The modeling results of gas turbine-based power plants signify that relatively simple models can predict plant performance with acceptable accuracy. The unique

  13. Recent advances and applications of probabilistic topic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Ian

    2014-12-01

    I present here an overview of recent advances in probabilistic topic modelling and related Bayesian graphical models as well as some of their more atypical applications outside of their home: text analysis. These techniques allow the modelling of high dimensional count vectors with strong correlations. With such data, simply calculating a correlation matrix is infeasible. Probabilistic topic models address this using mixtures of multinomials estimated via Bayesian inference with Dirichlet priors. The use of conjugate priors allows for efficient inference, and these techniques scale well to data sets with many millions of vectors. The first of these techniques to attract significant attention was Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) [1, 2]. Numerous extensions and adaptations of LDA have been proposed: non-parametric models; assorted models incorporating authors, sentiment and other features; models regularised through the use of extra metadata or extra priors on topic structure, and many more [3]. They have become widely used in the text analysis and population genetics communities, with a number of compelling applications. These techniques are not restricted to text analysis, however, and can be applied to other types of data which can be sensibly discretised and represented as counts of labels/properties/etc. LDA and it's variants have been used to find patterns in data from diverse areas of inquiry, including genetics, plant physiology, image analysis, social network analysis, remote sensing and astrophysics. Nonetheless, it is relatively recently that probabilistic topic models have found applications outside of text analysis, and to date few such applications have been considered. I suggest that there is substantial untapped potential for topic models and models inspired by or incorporating topic models to be fruitfully applied, and outline the characteristics of systems and data for which this may be the case.

  14. Mathematical models applied in inductive non-destructive testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wac-Wlodarczyk, A.; Goleman, R.; Czerwinski, D.; Gizewski, T.

    Non-destructive testing are the wide group of investigative methods of non-homogenous material. Methods of computer tomography, ultrasonic, magnetic and inductive methods still developed are widely applied in industry. In apparatus used for non-destructive tests, the analysis of signals is made on the basis of complex system answers. The answer is linearized due to the model of research system. In this paper, the authors will discuss the applications of the mathematical models applied in investigations of inductive magnetic materials. The statistical models and other gathered in similarity classes will be taken into consideration. Investigation of mathematical models allows to choose the correct method, which in consequence leads to precise representation of the inner structure of examined object. Inductive research of conductive media, especially those with ferromagnetic properties, are run with high frequency magnetic field (eddy-currents method), which considerably decrease penetration depth.

  15. The Path to Sustainable Nuclear Energy. Basic and Applied Research Opportunities for Advanced Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Finck, P.; Edelstein, N.; Allen, T.; Burns, C.; Chadwick, M.; Corradini, M.; Dixon, D.; Goff, M.; Laidler, J.; McCarthy, K.; Moyer, B.; Nash, K.; Navrotsky, A.; Oblozinsky, P.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.; Peterson, P.; Sackett, J.; Sickafus, K. E.; Tulenko, J.; Weber, W.; Morss, L.; Henry, G.

    2005-09-01

    fuel cycle Development of advanced tools for designing reactors with reduced margins and lower costs ? Long-term nuclear reactor development requires basic science breakthroughs: Understanding of materials behavior under extreme environmental conditions Creation of new, efficient, environmentally benign chemical separations methods Modeling and simulation to improve nuclear reaction cross-section data, design new materials and separation system, and propagate uncertainties within the fuel cycle Improvement of proliferation resistance by strengthening safeguards technologies and decreasing the attractiveness of nuclear materials A series of translational tools is proposed to advance the AFCI objectives and to bring the basic science concepts and processes promptly into the technological sphere. These tools have the potential to revolutionize the approach to nuclear engineering R&D by replacing lengthy experimental campaigns with a rigorous approach based on modeling, key fundamental experiments, and advanced simulations.

  16. Applying computer simulation models as learning tools in fishery management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, B.L.

    1995-01-01

    Computer models can be powerful tools for addressing many problems in fishery management, but uncertainty about how to apply models and how they should perform can lead to a cautious approach to modeling. Within this approach, we expect models to make quantitative predictions but only after all model inputs have been estimated from empirical data and after the model has been tested for agreement with an independent data set. I review the limitations to this approach and show how models can be more useful as tools for organizing data and concepts, learning about the system to be managed, and exploring management options. Fishery management requires deciding what actions to pursue to meet management objectives. Models do not make decisions for us but can provide valuable input to the decision-making process. When empirical data are lacking, preliminary modeling with parameters derived from other sources can help determine priorities for data collection. When evaluating models for management applications, we should attempt to define the conditions under which the model is a useful, analytical tool (its domain of applicability) and should focus on the decisions made using modeling results, rather than on quantitative model predictions. I describe an example of modeling used as a learning tool for the yellow perch Perca flavescens fishery in Green Bay, Lake Michigan.

  17. Applying knowledge compilation techniques to model-based reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M.

    1991-01-01

    Researchers in the area of knowledge compilation are developing general purpose techniques for improving the efficiency of knowledge-based systems. In this article, an attempt is made to define knowledge compilation, to characterize several classes of knowledge compilation techniques, and to illustrate how some of these techniques can be applied to improve the performance of model-based reasoning systems.

  18. Guidelines for applying the Composite Specification Model (CSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agresti, William

    1987-01-01

    The Composite Specification Model (CSM) is an approach to representing software requirements. Guidelines are provided for applying CSM and developing each of the three descriptive views of the software: the contextual view, using entities and relationships; the dynamic view, using states and transitions; and the function view, using data flows and processes. Using CSM results in a software specification document, which is outlined.

  19. Advances in NLTE modeling for integrated simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, H. A.; Hansen, S. B.

    2010-01-01

    The last few years have seen significant progress in constructing the atomic models required for non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) simulations. Along with this has come an increased understanding of the requirements for accurately modeling the ionization balance, energy content and radiative properties of different atomic species for a wide range of densities and temperatures. Much of this progress is the result of a series of workshops dedicated to comparing the results from different codes and computational approaches applied to a series of test problems. The results of these workshops emphasized the importance of atomic model completeness, especially in doubly-excited states and autoionization transitions, to calculating ionization balance, and the importance of accurate, detailed atomic data to producing reliable spectra. We describe a simple screened-hydrogenic model that calculates NLTE ionization balance with sufficient accuracy, at a low enough computational cost for routine use in radiation-hydrodynamics codes. The model incorporates term splitting, Δ n = 0 transitions, and approximate UTA widths for spectral calculations, with results comparable to those of much more detailed codes. Simulations done with this model have been increasingly successful at matching experimental data for laser-driven systems and hohlraums. Accurate and efficient atomic models are just one requirement for integrated NLTE simulations. Coupling the atomic kinetics to hydrodynamics and radiation transport constrains both discretizations and algorithms to retain energy conservation, accuracy and stability. In particular, the strong coupling between radiation and populations can require either very short time steps or significantly modified radiation transport algorithms to account for NLTE material response. Considerations such as these continue to provide challenges for NLTE simulations.

  20. Advance finite element modeling of rotor blade aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, F. K.; Sangha, K. B.; Panda, B.

    1994-01-01

    An advanced beam finite element has been developed for modeling rotor blade dynamics and aeroelasticity. This element is part of the Element Library of the Second Generation Comprehensive Helicopter Analysis System (2GCHAS). The element allows modeling of arbitrary rotor systems, including bearingless rotors. It accounts for moderately large elastic deflections, anisotropic properties, large frame motion for maneuver simulation, and allows for variable order shape functions. The effects of gravity, mechanically applied and aerodynamic loads are included. All kinematic quantities required to compute airloads are provided. In this paper, the fundamental assumptions and derivation of the element matrices are presented. Numerical results are shown to verify the formulation and illustrate several features of the element.

  1. Advanced Modeling, Simulation and Analysis (AMSA) Capability Roadmap Progress Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonsson, Erik; Gombosi, Tamas

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: NASA capability roadmap activity. Advanced modeling, simulation, and analysis overview. Scientific modeling and simulation. Operations modeling. Multi-special sensing (UV-gamma). System integration. M and S Environments and Infrastructure.

  2. Advances in Modelling of Valley Glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Surendra

    For glaciological conditions typical of valley glaciers, the central idea of this research lies in understanding the effects of high-order mechanics and parameterizing these for simpler dynamical and statistical methods in glaciology. As an effective tool for this, I formulate a new brand of dynamical models that describes distinct physical processes of deformational flow. Through numerical simulations of idealized glacier domains, I calculate empirical correction factors to capture the effects of longitudinal stress gradients and lateral drag for simplified dynamical models in the plane-strain regime. To get some insights into real glacier dynamics, I simulate Haig Glacier in the Canadian Rocky Mountains. As geometric effects overshadow dynamical effects in glacier retreat scenarios, it appears that high-order physics are not very important for Haig Glacier, particularly for evaluating its fate. Indeed, high-order and reduced models all predict that Haig Glacier ceases to exist by about AD2080 under ongoing climate warming. This finding regarding the minimal role of high-order physics may not be broadly valid, as it is not true in advance scenarios at Haig Glacier and it may not be representative of other glaciological settings. Through a 'bulk' parameterization of high-order physics, geometric and climatic settings, sliding conditions, and transient effects, I also provide new insights into the volume-area relation, a widely used statistical method for estimating glacier volume. I find a steady-state power-law exponent of 1:46, which declines systematically to 1:38 after 100 years of sustained retreat, in good accord with the observations. I recommend more accurate scaling relations through characterization of individual glacier morphology and degree of climatic disequilibrium. This motivates a revision of global glacier volume estimates, of some urgency in sea level rise assessments.

  3. Computer-aided modeling applied to microengineered pressure sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgaras, C.; Samaan, Noel D.

    1998-04-01

    The development of miniaturized diaphragm structures is highly significant to the successful realization of many microengineered devices. Most industrial designs of physical sensors are now based upon detailed finite element modeling of the mechanical microstructures using software currently available for conventional mechanics. This paper investigates the effects of miniaturization on corrugated diaphragm structures through the use of advanced computer modeling and simulation techniques. By developing detailed models of the diaphragm structures using commercial finite element analysis software it is possible to investigate the effects on diaphragm performance when diaphragms are scaled from a macro level (eg. 10 mm diameter) down to a micro level (< 1 mm diameter). Case studies are presented and comparisons are made with research work published by other workers. With subsequent sensitivity analysis it is possible to explore the critical design parameters of the microengineered diaphragms, and parameterize the diaphragm such that its performance will be compensated to some degree from limitations imposed by processing parameters.

  4. Applying Mathematical Optimization Methods to an ACT-R Instance-Based Learning Model

    PubMed Central

    Said, Nadia; Engelhart, Michael; Kirches, Christian; Körkel, Stefan; Holt, Daniel V.

    2016-01-01

    Computational models of cognition provide an interface to connect advanced mathematical tools and methods to empirically supported theories of behavior in psychology, cognitive science, and neuroscience. In this article, we consider a computational model of instance-based learning, implemented in the ACT-R cognitive architecture. We propose an approach for obtaining mathematical reformulations of such cognitive models that improve their computational tractability. For the well-established Sugar Factory dynamic decision making task, we conduct a simulation study to analyze central model parameters. We show how mathematical optimization techniques can be applied to efficiently identify optimal parameter values with respect to different optimization goals. Beyond these methodological contributions, our analysis reveals the sensitivity of this particular task with respect to initial settings and yields new insights into how average human performance deviates from potential optimal performance. We conclude by discussing possible extensions of our approach as well as future steps towards applying more powerful derivative-based optimization methods. PMID:27387139

  5. Models for Curricular Materials Development: Combining Applied Development Processes with Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleton, James; Lawrenz, Frances; Craft, Elaine; Cudmore, Wynn; Hall, Jim; Waintraub, Jack

    2007-12-01

    Developing curricular materials for technical and vocational education is particularly challenging because of the comprehensive requirements for technical education and the rapidity with which technical positions are evolving. Well-educated employees are expected to have general communication, reasoning, problem-solving, and behavioral skills in addition to occupation-specific technical knowledge. Furthermore, technical and vocational education materials must meet the needs of various contexts each with its own unique array of factors which must be accommodated. To assist in the process of materials development, this paper presents a comprehensive and contextualized model as a guide for curricular developers. This model was formed through the synthesis of two theoretical and four applied models, with the outline of the applied models occurring as part of a national evaluation of the National Science Foundation's Advanced Technological Education Program. Examples illuminating the elements of the template are provided.

  6. Applying Model Based Systems Engineering to NASA's Space Communications Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul; Barnes, Patrick; Reinert, Jessica; Golden, Bert

    2013-01-01

    System engineering practices for complex systems and networks now require that requirement, architecture, and concept of operations product development teams, simultaneously harmonize their activities to provide timely, useful and cost-effective products. When dealing with complex systems of systems, traditional systems engineering methodology quickly falls short of achieving project objectives. This approach is encumbered by the use of a number of disparate hardware and software tools, spreadsheets and documents to grasp the concept of the network design and operation. In case of NASA's space communication networks, since the networks are geographically distributed, and so are its subject matter experts, the team is challenged to create a common language and tools to produce its products. Using Model Based Systems Engineering methods and tools allows for a unified representation of the system in a model that enables a highly related level of detail. To date, Program System Engineering (PSE) team has been able to model each network from their top-level operational activities and system functions down to the atomic level through relational modeling decomposition. These models allow for a better understanding of the relationships between NASA's stakeholders, internal organizations, and impacts to all related entities due to integration and sustainment of existing systems. Understanding the existing systems is essential to accurate and detailed study of integration options being considered. In this paper, we identify the challenges the PSE team faced in its quest to unify complex legacy space communications networks and their operational processes. We describe the initial approaches undertaken and the evolution toward model based system engineering applied to produce Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) PSE products. We will demonstrate the practice of Model Based System Engineering applied to integrating space communication networks and the summary of its

  7. A general diagnostic model applied to language testing data.

    PubMed

    von Davier, Matthias

    2008-11-01

    Probabilistic models with one or more latent variables are designed to report on a corresponding number of skills or cognitive attributes. Multidimensional skill profiles offer additional information beyond what a single test score can provide, if the reported skills can be identified and distinguished reliably. Many recent approaches to skill profile models are limited to dichotomous data and have made use of computationally intensive estimation methods such as Markov chain Monte Carlo, since standard maximum likelihood (ML) estimation techniques were deemed infeasible. This paper presents a general diagnostic model (GDM) that can be estimated with standard ML techniques and applies to polytomous response variables as well as to skills with two or more proficiency levels. The paper uses one member of a larger class of diagnostic models, a compensatory diagnostic model for dichotomous and partial credit data. Many well-known models, such as univariate and multivariate versions of the Rasch model and the two-parameter logistic item response theory model, the generalized partial credit model, as well as a variety of skill profile models, are special cases of this GDM. In addition to an introduction to this model, the paper presents a parameter recovery study using simulated data and an application to real data from the field test for TOEFL Internet-based testing. PMID:17535481

  8. Agrochemical fate models applied in agricultural areas from Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Santos, Glenda; Yang, Jing; Andreoli, Romano; Binder, Claudia

    2010-05-01

    The misuse application of pesticides in mainly agricultural catchments can lead to severe problems for humans and environment. Especially in developing countries where there is often found overuse of agrochemicals and incipient or lack of water quality monitoring at local and regional levels, models are needed for decision making and hot spots identification. However, the complexity of the water cycle contrasts strongly with the scarce data availability, limiting the number of analysis, techniques, and models available to researchers. Therefore there is a strong need for model simplification able to appropriate model complexity and still represent the processes. We have developed a new model so-called Westpa-Pest to improve water quality management of an agricultural catchment located in the highlands of Colombia. Westpa-Pest is based on the fully distributed hydrologic model Wetspa and a fate pesticide module. We have applied a multi-criteria analysis for model selection under the conditions and data availability found in the region and compared with the new developed Westpa-Pest model. Furthermore, both models were empirically calibrated and validated. The following questions were addressed i) what are the strengths and weaknesses of the models?, ii) which are the most sensitive parameters of each model?, iii) what happens with uncertainties in soil parameters?, and iv) how sensitive are the transfer coefficients?

  9. Fractal projection pursuit classification model applied to geochemical survey data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Fan; Chen, Jianguo

    2012-08-01

    A new hybrid exploratory data analysis method, fractal projection pursuit classification (FPPC) model, is developed on the basis of the projection pursuit (PP) and fractal models. In this model, objective classification results are obtained by applying the projection index on the basis of the number-size fractal model. The real-coded acceleration genetic algorithm (RAGA) is used to optimize the projection index to establish the optimum projection direction in the model. Stream sedimentary geochemical data, Gejiu Mining District, Yunnan Province, China, were chosen in a case study to demonstrate the processing data analysis using FPPC. The results show that the anomalies are associated with known mineral deposits in the eastern part of the Gejiu District, and correlated with faults and granite in the western part of the study area. It is demonstrated that FPPC can be a powerful tool for multi-factor classification analysis and provide an effective approach to identify anomalies for mineral exploration.

  10. The Ising Model Applied on Chronification of Pain

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This is a hypothesis-article suggesting an entirely new framework for understanding and treating longstanding pain. Most medical and psychological models are described with boxes and arrows. Such models are of little clinical and explanatory use when describing the phenomenon of chronification of pain due to unknown causes. To date no models that have been provided - and tested in a scientific satisfactory way - lays out a plan for specific assessment due to a specific causal explanation, and in the end serves the clinicians, patients and researcher with tools on how to address the specific pain condition to every individual pain patient's condition. By applying the Ising model (from physics) on the phenomenon of chronification of pain, one is able to detangle all these factors, and thus have a model that both suggests an explanation of the condition and outlines how one might target the treatment of chronic pain patients with the use of network science. PMID:26398917

  11. Time reversed elastic nonlinearity diagnostic applied to mock osseointegration monitoring applying two experimental models.

    PubMed

    Rivière, Jacques; Haupert, Sylvain; Laugier, Pascal; Ulrich, T J; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Johnson, Paul A

    2012-03-01

    This study broadens vibration-like techniques developed for osseointegration monitoring to the nonlinear field. The time reversed elastic nonlinearity diagnostic is applied to two mock models. The first one consists of tightening a dental implant at different torques in a mock cortical bone; the second one allows one to follow glue curing at the interface between a dental implant and a mock jaw. Energy is focused near the implant interface using the time reversal technique. Two nonlinear procedures termed pulse inversion and the scaling subtraction method, already used successfully in other fields such as contrast agents and material characterization, are employed. These two procedures are compared for both models. The results suggest that nonlinear elasticity can provide new information regarding the interface, complementary to the linear wave velocity and attenuation. The curing experiment exhibits an overall low nonlinear level due to the fact that the glue significantly damps elastic nonlinearity at the interface. In contrast, the torque experiment shows strong nonlinearities at the focus time. Consequently, a parallel analysis of these models, both only partially reflecting a real case, enables one to envisage future in vivo experiments. PMID:22423689

  12. Applying Benner's model to school nursing of multiple handicapped children.

    PubMed

    Pesata, V L

    1994-09-01

    The role of the school health nurse has become more complex in recent years due to public policy changes. The focus of this article is on changes in school health nursing since enactment of Public Law 94-142, the Education for All Handicapped Children Act, which places medically complex and multiply handicapped children in the public school system. The changing character of school health nursing increases the need for the advanced practice nurse (APN) to use nursing theories to guide nursing decisions. In this article, Benner's Model of Expert Practice is used by the APN in the challenging setting of school health nursing. A case study is included to describe how an APN can use this model to promote optimal functioning in a child with multiple handicaps while helping the child and family transition through developmental stages. PMID:7882256

  13. Fractional Calculus Model of Electrical Impedance Applied to Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Vosika, Zoran B.; Lazovic, Goran M.; Misevic, Gradimir N.; Simic-Krstic, Jovana B.

    2013-01-01

    Fractional calculus is a mathematical approach dealing with derivatives and integrals of arbitrary and complex orders. Therefore, it adds a new dimension to understand and describe basic nature and behavior of complex systems in an improved way. Here we use the fractional calculus for modeling electrical properties of biological systems. We derived a new class of generalized models for electrical impedance and applied them to human skin by experimental data fitting. The primary model introduces new generalizations of: 1) Weyl fractional derivative operator, 2) Cole equation, and 3) Constant Phase Element (CPE). These generalizations were described by the novel equation which presented parameter related to remnant memory and corrected four essential parameters We further generalized single generalized element by introducing specific partial sum of Maclaurin series determined by parameters We defined individual primary model elements and their serial combination models by the appropriate equations and electrical schemes. Cole equation is a special case of our generalized class of models for Previous bioimpedance data analyses of living systems using basic Cole and serial Cole models show significant imprecisions. Our new class of models considerably improves the quality of fitting, evaluated by mean square errors, for bioimpedance data obtained from human skin. Our models with new parameters presented in specific partial sum of Maclaurin series also extend representation, understanding and description of complex systems electrical properties in terms of remnant memory effects. PMID:23577065

  14. Fractional calculus model of electrical impedance applied to human skin.

    PubMed

    Vosika, Zoran B; Lazovic, Goran M; Misevic, Gradimir N; Simic-Krstic, Jovana B

    2013-01-01

    Fractional calculus is a mathematical approach dealing with derivatives and integrals of arbitrary and complex orders. Therefore, it adds a new dimension to understand and describe basic nature and behavior of complex systems in an improved way. Here we use the fractional calculus for modeling electrical properties of biological systems. We derived a new class of generalized models for electrical impedance and applied them to human skin by experimental data fitting. The primary model introduces new generalizations of: 1) Weyl fractional derivative operator, 2) Cole equation, and 3) Constant Phase Element (CPE). These generalizations were described by the novel equation which presented parameter [Formula: see text] related to remnant memory and corrected four essential parameters [Formula: see text] We further generalized single generalized element by introducing specific partial sum of Maclaurin series determined by parameters [Formula: see text] We defined individual primary model elements and their serial combination models by the appropriate equations and electrical schemes. Cole equation is a special case of our generalized class of models for[Formula: see text] Previous bioimpedance data analyses of living systems using basic Cole and serial Cole models show significant imprecisions. Our new class of models considerably improves the quality of fitting, evaluated by mean square errors, for bioimpedance data obtained from human skin. Our models with new parameters presented in specific partial sum of Maclaurin series also extend representation, understanding and description of complex systems electrical properties in terms of remnant memory effects. PMID:23577065

  15. Image reconstruction techniques applied to nuclear mass models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Irving O.; Isacker, P. Van; Velazquez, V.; Barea, J.; Mendoza-Temis, J.; Vieyra, J. C. López; Hirsch, J. G.; Frank, A.

    2010-02-01

    A new procedure is presented that combines well-known nuclear models with image reconstruction techniques. A color-coded image is built by taking the differences between measured masses and the predictions given by the different theoretical models. This image is viewed as part of a larger array in the (N,Z) plane, where unknown nuclear masses are hidden, covered by a “mask.” We apply a suitably adapted deconvolution algorithm, used in astronomical observations, to “open the window” and see the rest of the pattern. We show that it is possible to improve significantly mass predictions in regions not too far from measured nuclear masses.

  16. Computational inspection applied to a mask inspection system with advanced aerial imaging capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Linyong; Peng, Danping; He, Lin; Chen, Dongxue; Dam, Thuc; Tolani, Vikram; Tam, Aviram; Staud, Wolf

    2010-03-01

    At the most advanced technology nodes, such as 32nm and 22nm, aggressive OPC and Sub-Resolution Assist Features (SRAFs) are required. However, their use results in significantly increased mask complexity, challenging mask defect dispositioning more than ever. To address these challenges in mask inspection and defect dispositioning, new mask inspection technologies have been developed that not only provide high resolution masks imaged at the same wavelength as the scanner, but that also provide aerial images by using both: software simulation and hardware emulation. The original mask patterns stored by the optics of mask inspection systems can be recovered using a patented algorithm based on the Level Set Method. More accurate lithography simulation models can be used to further evaluate defects on simulated resist patterns using the recovered mask pattern in high resolution and aerial mode. An automated defect classification based on lithography significance and local CD changes is also developed to disposition tens of thousands of potential defects in minutes, so that inspection throughput is not impacted.

  17. Expansion of Perturbation Theory Applied to Shim Rotation Automation of the Advanced Test Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Joshua Loren

    In 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) declared the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This declaration expanded the focus of the ATR to include diversified classes of academic and industrial experiments. An essential part of the new suite of more accurate and flexible codes being deployed to support the NSUF is their ability to predict reactor behavior at startup, particularly the position of the outer shim control cylinders (OSCC). The current method used for calculating the OSCC positions during a cycle startup utilizes a heuristic trial and error approach that is impractical with the computationally intensive reactor physics tools, such as NEWT. It is therefore desirable that shim rotation prediction for startup be automated. Shim rotation prediction with perturbation theory was chosen to be investigated as one method for use with startup calculation automation. A modified form of first order perturbation theory, called phase space interpolated perturbation theory, was developed to more accurately model shim rotation prediction. Shim rotation prediction is just one application for this new modified form of perturbation theory. Phase space interpolated perturbation theory can be used on any application where the range of change to the system is known a priori, but the magnitude of change is not known. A cubic regression method was also developed to automate shim rotation prediction by using only forward solutions to the transport equation.

  18. GENERIC MODEL FOR MAGNETIC EXPLOSIONS APPLIED TO SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Melrose, D. B.

    2012-04-10

    An accepted model for magnetospheric substorms is proposed as the basis for a generic model for magnetic explosions and is applied to solar flares. The model involves widely separated energy-release and particle-acceleration regions, with energy transported Alfvenically between them. On a global scale, these regions are coupled by a large-scale current that is set up during the explosion by redirection of pre-existing current associated with the stored magnetic energy. The explosion-related current is driven by an electromotive force (EMF) due to the changing magnetic flux enclosed by this current. The current path and the EMF are identified for an idealized quadrupolar model for a flare.

  19. Applying New Laser Interaction Models to the ORION Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, Claude; Sinko, John

    2010-10-08

    Previously, Phipps, et al. developed a model that permitted laser ablation impulse predictions within a factor of two over an extremely broad range of pulse durations and wavelengths in the plasma regime. This model lacked the ability to predict the intensity for optimum impulse generation. For the lower-intensity vapor regime, below the plasma transition, Sinko developed a useful, fluence-dependent model which predicts impulse delivered for pulsed lasers on polymers at a specific wavelength. Phipps subsequently developed an alternate model which treats elemental solids in the vapor regime, that only requires knowledge of basic material parameters and vapor pressure vs. temperature data. These data, except for optical absorptivity, are wavelength-independent. A simple technique combines either vapor model with the plasma model to form a complete model that moves smoothly through the vapor to plasma transition. In this paper, we apply these models to show the optimum momentum coupling fluence on target, at the transition from the vapor to the plasma regimes, for aluminum (a typical debris material) and polyoxymethylene (representing polymeric debris). The application of this work is the ORION laser space debris mitigation concept. This is an improvement over previous work, in which this optimum was only estimated from the plasma ignition threshold. We present calculations showing how impulse delivered to debris targets in the ORION concept varies with pulse duration, at an optimum fluence determined by nonlinear optical effects in the Earth's atmosphere.

  20. Advanced model for fast assessment of piezoelectric micro energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardito, Raffaele; Corigliano, Alberto; Gafforelli, Giacomo; Valzasina, Carlo; Procopio, Francesco; Zafalon, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to present recent advances in modelling and design of piezoelectric energy harvesters, in the framework of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS). More specifically, the case of inertial energy harvesting is considered, in the sense that the kinetic energy due to environmental vibration is transformed into electrical energy by means of piezoelectric transduction. The execution of numerical analyses is greatly important in order to predict the actual behaviour of MEMS devices and to carry out the optimization process. In the common practice, the results are obtained by means of burdensome 3D Finite Element Analyses (FEA). The case of beams could be treated by applying 1D models, which can enormously reduce the computational burden with obvious benefits in the case of repeated analyses. Unfortunately, the presence of piezoelectric coupling may entail some serious issues in view of its intrinsically three-dimensional behaviour. In this paper, a refined, yet simple, model is proposed with the objective of retaining the Euler-Bernoulli beam model, with the inclusion of effects connected to the actual three-dimensional shape of the device. The proposed model is adopted to evaluate the performances of realistic harvesters, both in the case of harmonic excitation and for impulsive loads.

  1. Advanced structures technology applied to a supersonic cruise arrow-wing configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, I. F.; Davis, G. W.

    1976-01-01

    The application of advanced technology to a promising aerodynamic configuration was explored to investigate the improved payload range characteristics over the configuration postulated during the National SST Program. The results of an analytical study performed to determine the best structural approach for design of a Mach number 2.7 arrow-wing supersonic cruise aircraft are highlighted. The data conducted under the auspices of the Structures Directorate of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Langley Research Center, established firm technical bases from which further trend studies were conducted to quantitatively assess the benefits and feasibility of using advanced structures technology to arrive at a viable advanced supersonic cruise aircraft.

  2. Simple predictive electron transport models applied to sawtoothing plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.; Merle, A.; Sauter, O.; Goodman, T. P.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we introduce two simple transport models to evaluate the time evolution of electron temperature and density profiles during sawtooth cycles (i.e. over a sawtooth period time-scale). Since the aim of these simulations is to estimate reliable profiles within a short calculation time, two simplified ad-hoc models have been developed. The goal for these models is to rely on a few easy-to-check free parameters, such as the confinement time scaling factor and the profiles’ averaged scale-lengths. Due to the simplicity and short calculation time of the models, it is expected that these models can also be applied to real-time transport simulations. We show that it works well for Ohmic and EC heated L- and H-mode plasmas. The differences between these models are discussed and we show that their predictive capabilities are similar. Thus only one model is used to reproduce with simulations the results of sawtooth control experiments on the TCV tokamak. For the sawtooth pacing, the calculated time delays between the EC power off and sawtooth crash time agree well with the experimental results. The map of possible locking range is also well reproduced by the simulation.

  3. Applying FSL to the FIAC Data: Model-Based and Model-Free Analysis of Voice and Sentence Repetition Priming

    PubMed Central

    Beckmann, Christian F.; Jenkinson, Mark; Woolrich, Mark W.; Behrens, Timothy E.J.; Flitney, David E.; Devlin, Joseph T.; Smith, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents results obtained from applying various tools from FSL (FMRIB Software Library) to data from the repetition priming experiment used for the HBM’05 Functional Image Analysis Contest. We present analyses from the model-based General Linear Model (GLM) tool (FEAT) and from the model-free independent component analysis tool (MELODIC). We also discuss the application of tools for the correction of image distortions prior to the statistical analysis and the utility of recent advances in functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) time series modeling and inference such as the use of optimal constrained HRF basis function modeling and mixture modeling inference. The combination of hemodynamic response function (HRF) and mixture modeling, in particular, revealed that both sentence content and speaker voice priming effects occurred bilaterally along the length of the superior temporal sulcus (STS). These results suggest that both are processed in a single underlying system without any significant asymmetries for content vs. voice processing. PMID:16565953

  4. Remote sensing applied to numerical modelling. [water resources pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengupta, S.; Lee, S. S.; Veziroglu, T. N.; Bland, R.

    1975-01-01

    Progress and remaining difficulties in the construction of predictive mathematical models of large bodies of water as ecosystems are reviewed. Surface temperature is at present the only variable than can be measured accurately and reliably by remote sensing techniques, but satellite infrared data are of sufficient resolution for macro-scale modeling of oceans and large lakes, and airborne radiometers are useful in meso-scale analysis (of lakes, bays, and thermal plumes). Finite-element and finite-difference techniques applied to the solution of relevant coupled time-dependent nonlinear partial differential equations are compared, and the specific problem of the Biscayne Bay and environs ecosystem is tackled in a finite-differences treatment using the rigid-lid model and a rigid-line grid system.

  5. Advancing swine models for human health and diseases.

    PubMed

    Walters, Eric M; Prather, Randall S

    2013-01-01

    Swine models are relatively new kids on the block for modeling human health and diseases when compared to rodents and dogs. Because of the similarity to humans in size, physiology, and genetics, the pig has made significant strides in advancing the understanding of the human condition, and is thus an excellent choice for an animal model. Recent technological advances to genetic engineering of the swine genome enhance the utility of swine as models of human genetic diseases. PMID:23829105

  6. Local structural excitations in model glass systems under applied load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swayamjyoti, S.; Löffler, J. F.; Derlet, P. M.

    2016-04-01

    The potential-energy landscape of a model binary Lennard-Jones structural glass is investigated as a function of applied external strain, in terms of how local structural excitations (LSEs) respond to the load. Using the activation relaxation technique and nudged elastic band methods, the evolving structure and barrier energy of such LSEs are studied in detail. For the case of a tensile/compressive strain, the LSE barrier energies generally decrease/increase, whereas under pure shear, it may either increase or decrease resulting in a broadening of the barrier energy distribution. It is found that how a particular LSE responds to an applied strain is strongly controlled by the LSE's far-field internal stress signature prior to loading.

  7. A Log Logistic Survival Model Applied to Hypobaric Decompression Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, Johnny

    2001-01-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) is a complex, multivariable problem. A mathematical description or model of the likelihood of DCS requires a large amount of quality research data, ideas on how to define a decompression dose using physical and physiological variables, and an appropriate analytical approach. It also requires a high-performance computer with specialized software. I have used published DCS data to develop my decompression doses, which are variants of equilibrium expressions for evolved gas plus other explanatory variables. My analytical approach is survival analysis, where the time of DCS occurrence is modeled. My conclusions can be applied to simple hypobaric decompressions - ascents lasting from 5 to 30 minutes - and, after minutes to hours, to denitrogenation (prebreathing). They are also applicable to long or short exposures, and can be used whether the sufferer of DCS is at rest or exercising at altitude. Ultimately I would like my models to be applied to astronauts to reduce the risk of DCS during spacewalks, as well as to future spaceflight crews on the Moon and Mars.

  8. Applied mechanics modeling of granulated ceramic powder compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, F.M.; Readey, M.J.

    1995-08-01

    In ceramic manufacturing processes such as dry-pressing, correlations between applied compacting pressure and resultant powder compact density are essential for defining reliable process conditions for ceramic components. Pressure-density diagrams have been developed as a tool for both process control and for understanding the compaction behavior of different powders. These types of diagrams, however, pertain only to the averag@ properties of a powder compact and do not address a significant issue in powder compaction processes: the formation of density gradients within the compact. Continuum-based mechanics models of varying complexity have addressed the influence of frictional forces acting at the powder-die wall interface which dissipate the applied pressure throughout the compact. Resulting pressure distribution models are then typically coupled with empirical functions relating pressure and density to obtain a green density distribution in the compact. All of these models predict similar trends; however, none predict the distribution with sufficient accuracy to be considered as a design tool for industrial applications.

  9. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. ); Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. )

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this proposed study are to establish the mechanisms and rates of basic steps in coal conversion processes, to integrate and incorporate this information into comprehensive computer models for coal conversion processes, to evaluate these models and to apply them to gasification, mild gasification and combustion in heat engines. This report describes progress during twenty second quarter of the program. Specifically, the paper discusses progress in three task areas: (1) Submodel development and evaluation: coal to char chemistry submodel; fundamental high-pressure reaction rate data; secondary reaction of pyrolysis product and burnout submodels; ash physics and chemistry submodel; large particle submodels; large char particle oxidation at high pressures; and SO[sub x]-NO[sub x] submodel development and evaluation; (2) Comprehensive model development and evaluation: integration of advanced submodels into entrained-flow code, with evaluation and documentation; comprehensive fixed-bed modeling review, development evaluation and implementation; and generalized fuels feedstock submodel; and (3) Application of integrated codes: application of generalized pulverized coal comprehensive code and application of fixed-bed code.

  10. A GIS modeling method applied to predicting forest songbird habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dettmers, Randy; Bart, Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    We have developed an approach for using a??presencea?? data to construct habitat models. Presence data are those that indicate locations where the target organism is observed to occur, but that cannot be used to define locations where the organism does not occur. Surveys of highly mobile vertebrates often yield these kinds of data. Models developed through our approach yield predictions of the amount and the spatial distribution of good-quality habitat for the target species. This approach was developed primarily for use in a GIS context; thus, the models are spatially explicit and have the potential to be applied over large areas. Our method consists of two primary steps. In the first step, we identify an optimal range of values for each habitat variable to be used as a predictor in the model. To find these ranges, we employ the concept of maximizing the difference between cumulative distribution functions of (1) the values of a habitat variable at the observed presence locations of the target organism, and (2) the values of that habitat variable for all locations across a study area. In the second step, multivariate models of good habitat are constructed by combining these ranges of values, using the Boolean operators a??anda?? and a??or.a?? We use an approach similar to forward stepwise regression to select the best overall model. We demonstrate the use of this method by developing species-specific habitat models for nine forest-breeding songbirds (e.g., Cerulean Warbler, Scarlet Tanager, Wood Thrush) studied in southern Ohio. These models are based on speciesa?? microhabitat preferences for moisture and vegetation characteristics that can be predicted primarily through the use of abiotic variables. We use slope, land surface morphology, land surface curvature, water flow accumulation downhill, and an integrated moisture index, in conjunction with a land-cover classification that identifies forest/nonforest, to develop these models. The performance of these

  11. The Advancement Value Chain: An Exploratory Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Edward F., III

    2005-01-01

    Since the introduction of the value chain concept in 1985, several varying, yet virtually similar, value chains have been developed for the business enterprise. Shifting to higher education, can a value chain be found that links together the various activities of advancement so that an institution's leaders can actually look at the philanthropic…

  12. Predicting Career Advancement with Structural Equation Modelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heimler, Ronald; Rosenberg, Stuart; Morote, Elsa-Sofia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to use the authors' prior findings concerning basic employability skills in order to determine which skills best predict career advancement potential. Design/methodology/approach: Utilizing survey responses of human resource managers, the employability skills showing the largest relationships to career…

  13. Advanced Placement: Model Policy Components. Policy Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinth, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Advanced Placement (AP), launched in 1955 by the College Board as a program to offer gifted high school students the opportunity to complete entry-level college coursework, has since expanded to encourage a broader array of students to tackle challenging content. This Education Commission of the State's Policy Analysis identifies key components of…

  14. A comparison of atmospheric loading models applied to SLR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Rolf; Dill, Robert; Raimondo, Jean-Claude; Vei, Margarita

    2016-04-01

    We compute displacements of global SLR station coordinates by atmospheric loading based on surface pressure data from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ERA-interim data. Inhouse we generate two branches: firstly straightforward following Farrel's theory but using updated load Love numbers, secondly from utilizing localized Green's functions instead of global ones. Externally provided displacements are available f.i. from the International Mass Loading Service (IMLS) based on different input data and modeling. We compare these displacements and apply them to Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) data processing of a recent six years period of the LAGEOS, LARES, AJISAI, STARLETTE and STELLA geodetic missions. We assess the impact of the loading models on precise orbit determination and Earth parameters of interest.

  15. Transtheoretical Model of Health Behavior Change Applied to Voice Therapy

    PubMed Central

    van Leer, Eva; Hapner, Edie R.; Connor, Nadine P.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Studies of patient adherence to health behavior programs, such as physical exercise, smoking cessation, and diet, have resulted in the formulation and validation of the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) of behavior change. Although widely accepted as a guide for the development of health behavior interventions, this model has not been applied to vocal rehabilitation. Because resolution of vocal difficulties frequently depends on a patient’s ability to make changes in vocal and health behaviors, the TTM may be a useful way to conceptualize voice behavior change processes, including the patient’s readiness for change. The purpose of this paper is to apply the TTM to the voice therapy process to: (1) provide an organizing framework for understanding of behavior change in voice therapy, (2) explain how treatment adherence problems can arise, and (3) provide broad strategies to improve treatment adherence. Given the significant role of treatment adherence in treatment outcome, considering readiness for behavior change should be taken into account when planning treatment. Principles of health behavior change can aid speech pathologists in such understanding and estimating readiness for voice therapy. PMID:18082367

  16. Applying the luminosity function statistics in the fireshell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangel Lemos, L. J.; Bianco, C. L.; Ruffini, R.

    2015-12-01

    The luminosity function (LF) statistics applied to the data of BATSE, GBM/Fermi and BAT/Swift is the theme approached in this work. The LF is a strong statistical tool to extract useful information from astrophysical samples, and the key point of this statistical analysis is in the detector sensitivity, where we have performed careful analysis. We applied the tool of the LF statistics to three GRB classes predicted by the Fireshell model. We produced, by LF statistics, predicted distributions of: peak ux N(Fph pk), redshift N(z) and peak luminosity N(Lpk) for the three GRB classes predicted by Fireshell model; we also used three GRB rates. We looked for differences among the distributions, and in fact we found. We performed a comparison between the distributions predicted and observed (with and without redshifts), where we had to build a list with 217 GRBs with known redshifts. Our goal is transform the GRBs in a standard candle, where a alternative is find a correlation between the isotropic luminosity and the Band peak spectral energy (Liso - Epk).

  17. Multiresolution active contour model applied on lung and colon images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehmeshki, Jamshid; Siddique, Musib; Wong, Wing; Chis Ster, Irina

    2004-05-01

    This paper deploys a wavelet based scale-space approach to extract the boundary of the object of interest in medical CT images. The classical approach of the active contour models consists of starting with an initial contour, to deform it under the action of some forces attracting the contour towards the edges by means of a set of forces. The mathematical model involves in the minimisation of an objective function called energy functional, which depends on the geometry of the contour as well as of the image characteristics. Various strategies could be used for the formulation of the energy functional and its optimisation. In this study, a wavelet based scale-space approach has been adopted. The coarsest scale is able to enlarge the capture region surrounding an object and avoids the trapping of contour into weak edges. The finer scales are used to refine the contour as close as possible to the boundary of the object. An adaptive scale coefficient for the balloon energy has been introduced. Four levels of resolution have been applied in order to get reproducibility of the contour despite poor different initialisations. The scheme has been applied to segment the regions of interest in CT lung and colon images. The result has been shown to be accurate and reproducible for the cases containing fat, holes and other small high intensity objects inside lung nodules as well as colon polyps.

  18. The lag RST turbulence model applied to vortical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchfield, Matthew John

    The subject of this work is the application of Olsen and Coakley's Reynolds stress relaxation turbulence model, which they call the lag Reynold stress transport (RST) model, to wingtip vortex flows. The lag RST model is meant for general non-equilibrium turbulent flows, and has not been applied to vortical flows before this work. Such a model relaxes the Reynolds stresses toward their equilibrium value, determined by the Boussinesq approximation, at a rate depending on a model constant, alpha0, multiplied by the specific dissipation rate of the turbulence, o. The alpha 0 constant can be adjusted to vary the rate at which the Reynolds stress tensor relaxes toward its equilibrium value. It performs this relaxation by solving for the equilibrium Reynolds stresses using Wilcox's k-o model, but then uses a relaxation equation to solve for the actual Reynolds stress tensor. The lag RST turbulence model allows the principal axes of the Reynolds stress tensor to be misaligned with those of the mean strain rate tensor, something linear eddy viscosity models cannot do, but something that occurs in actual vortical flows. The lag RST model is used with the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations to compute a one-dimensional, time-varying, line vortex with axial flow, called the q-vortex. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) data is available for comparison. Also, a modified version of the OVERFLOW code is used to solve the RANS and lag RST model equations in a three-dimensional wingtip vortex flow, for which there is experimental data. This work shows that computations performed with the lag RST model have a mean flow in much better agreement with the DNS or experimental data than those performed with the k-o model, the lag RST model's base. In fact, the lag RST model performs equally or better in this these flows than the well performing Spalart-Allmaras model with a correction for streamline curvature and rotation. As the lag parameter alpha0 is decreased, the amount

  19. A bidirectional coupling procedure applied to multiscale respiratory modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuprat, A. P.; Kabilan, S.; Carson, J. P.; Corley, R. A.; Einstein, D. R.

    2013-07-01

    pressure applied to the multiple sets of ODEs. In both the simplified geometry and in the imaging-based geometry, the performance of the method was comparable to that of monolithic schemes, in most cases requiring only a single CFD evaluation per time step. Thus, this new accelerator allows us to begin combining pulmonary CFD models with lower-dimensional models of pulmonary mechanics with little computational overhead. Moreover, because the CFD and lower-dimensional models are totally separate, this framework affords great flexibility in terms of the type and breadth of the adopted lower-dimensional model, allowing the biomedical researcher to appropriately focus on model design. Research funded by the National Heart and Blood Institute Award 1RO1HL073598.

  20. A Bidirectional Coupling Procedure Applied to Multiscale Respiratory Modeling.

    PubMed

    Kuprat, A P; Kabilan, S; Carson, J P; Corley, R A; Einstein, D R

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we present a novel multiscale computational framework for efficiently linking multiple lower-dimensional models describing the distal lung mechanics to imaging-based 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the upper pulmonary airways in order to incorporate physiologically appropriate outlet boundary conditions. The framework is an extension of the Modified Newton's Method with nonlinear Krylov accelerator developed by Carlson and Miller [1, 2, 3]. Our extensions include the retention of subspace information over multiple timesteps, and a special correction at the end of a timestep that allows for corrections to be accepted with verified low residual with as little as a single residual evaluation per timestep on average. In the case of a single residual evaluation per timestep, the method has zero additional computational cost compared to uncoupled or unidirectionally coupled simulations. We expect these enhancements to be generally applicable to other multiscale coupling applications where timestepping occurs. In addition we have developed a "pressure-drop" residual which allows for stable coupling of flows between a 3D incompressible CFD application and another (lower-dimensional) fluid system. We expect this residual to also be useful for coupling non-respiratory incompressible fluid applications, such as multiscale simulations involving blood flow. The lower-dimensional models that are considered in this study are sets of simple ordinary differential equations (ODEs) representing the compliant mechanics of symmetric human pulmonary airway trees. To validate the method, we compare the predictions of hybrid CFD-ODE models against an ODE-only model of pulmonary airflow in an idealized geometry. Subsequently, we couple multiple sets of ODEs describing the distal lung to an imaging-based human lung geometry. Boundary conditions in these models consist of atmospheric pressure at the mouth and intrapleural pressure applied to the multiple sets

  1. A Bidirectional Coupling Procedure Applied to Multiscale Respiratory Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kuprat, Andrew P.; Kabilan, Senthil; Carson, James P.; Corley, Richard A.; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we present a novel multiscale computational framework for efficiently linking multiple lower-dimensional models describing the distal lung mechanics to imaging-based 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the upper pulmonary airways in order to incorporate physiologically appropriate outlet boundary conditions. The framework is an extension of the Modified Newton’s Method with nonlinear Krylov accelerator developed by Carlson and Miller [1, 2, 3]. Our extensions include the retention of subspace information over multiple timesteps, and a special correction at the end of a timestep that allows for corrections to be accepted with verified low residual with as little as a single residual evaluation per timestep on average. In the case of a single residual evaluation per timestep, the method has zero additional computational cost compared to uncoupled or unidirectionally coupled simulations. We expect these enhancements to be generally applicable to other multiscale coupling applications where timestepping occurs. In addition we have developed a “pressure-drop” residual which allows for stable coupling of flows between a 3D incompressible CFD application and another (lower-dimensional) fluid system. We expect this residual to also be useful for coupling non-respiratory incompressible fluid applications, such as multiscale simulations involving blood flow. The lower-dimensional models that are considered in this study are sets of simple ordinary differential equations (ODEs) representing the compliant mechanics of symmetric human pulmonary airway trees. To validate the method, we compare the predictions of hybrid CFD-ODE models against an ODE-only model of pulmonary airflow in an idealized geometry. Subsequently, we couple multiple sets of ODEs describing the distal lung to an imaging-based human lung geometry. Boundary conditions in these models consist of atmospheric pressure at the mouth and intrapleural pressure applied to the multiple

  2. A bidirectional coupling procedure applied to multiscale respiratory modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kuprat, A.P.; Kabilan, S.; Carson, J.P.; Corley, R.A.; Einstein, D.R.

    2013-07-01

    pressure applied to the multiple sets of ODEs. In both the simplified geometry and in the imaging-based geometry, the performance of the method was comparable to that of monolithic schemes, in most cases requiring only a single CFD evaluation per time step. Thus, this new accelerator allows us to begin combining pulmonary CFD models with lower-dimensional models of pulmonary mechanics with little computational overhead. Moreover, because the CFD and lower-dimensional models are totally separate, this framework affords great flexibility in terms of the type and breadth of the adopted lower-dimensional model, allowing the biomedical researcher to appropriately focus on model design. Research funded by the National Heart and Blood Institute Award 1RO1HL073598.

  3. A phenomenological performance model for applied-field MPD thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albertoni, R.; Paganucci, F.; Andrenucci, M.

    2015-02-01

    A theoretical model for the performance prediction of applied-field magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters (MPDTs) is presented. MPD thrusters have been long regarded as leading candidates for near-term, thrust-demanding missions due to their substantial thrust density and specific impulse even at moderate power levels (50-200 kW). However, the complicated physics behind the acceleration mechanism as well as the challenging on-ground testing have delayed their development and optimization leading to a slow but constant decline of interest in such a technology. Despite several theoretical efforts in the last few decades, no complete and definitive understanding of the scaling relations governing their performance is yet available. In this work, a simple phenomenological model for both the thrust and the terminal voltage is presented and discussed. The validity of the model is then assessed through a systematic comparison with the experimental data available in the literature. It was found that the suggested model can actually capture most of the characteristic features of this class of thrusters within a 20% error for a wide range of operational conditions.

  4. APPLYING A SPATIOTEMPORAL MODEL FOR LONGITUDINAL CARDIAC IMAGING DATA

    PubMed Central

    George, Brandon; Denney, Thomas; Gupta, Himanshu; Dell’Italia, Louis; Aban, Inmaculada

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinal imaging studies have both spatial and temporal correlation among the multiple outcome measurements from a subject. Statistical methods of analysis must properly account for this autocorrelation. In this work we discuss how a linear model with a separable parametric correlation structure could be used to analyze data from such a study. The goal of this paper is to provide an easily understood description of how such a model works and discuss how it can be applied to real data. Model assumptions are discussed and the process of selecting a working correlation structure is thoroughly discussed. The steps necessitating collaboration between statistical and scientific investigators have been highlighted, as have considerations for missing data or uneven follow-up. The results from a completed longitudinal cardiac imaging study were considered for illustration purposes. The data comes from a clinical trial for medical therapy for patients with mitral regurgitation, with repeated measurements taken at sixteen locations from the left ventricle to measure disease progression. The spatiotemporal correlation model was compared to previously used summary measures to demonstrate improved power as well as increased flexibility in the use of time- and space-varying predictors. PMID:27087884

  5. Geomorphological Approach to Glacial and Snow Modeling applied to Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gsell, P.; Le Moine, N.; Ribstein, P.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrological modeling of mountainous watershed has specific problems due to the effect of ice and snow cover in a certain range of altitude. The representation of the snow and ice storage dyanmics is a main issue for the understanding of mountainous hydrosystems mechanisms for future and past climate. That's also an operational concern for watersheds equipped with hydroelectric dams, whose dimensioning and electric capacity evaluation rely on a good understanding of ice-snow dynamics, in particular for a lapse of several years. The objective of the study is to get ahead, at a theoretical view, in a way in between classical representation used in hydrological models (infinity of ice stock) and 3D ice tongues modeling describing explicitly viscous glacier evolution at a river basin scale. Geomorphology will be used in this approach. Noticing that glaciers, at a catchment scale, take the drainage system as a geometrical framework, an axe of our study lies on the coupling of the probabilistic description of the river network with determinist glacier models using concepts that already have been used in hydrology modeling like Geomorphological Instantaneous Unitary Hydrogram. By analogy, a simplified glacier model (Shallow Ice Approximation or Minimal Glacier Models) will be put together as a transfer function to simulate large scale ablation and ice front dynamics. In our study, we analyze the distribution of upstream area for a dataset of 78 river basins in the Southern Rocky Mountains. In a certain range of scale and under a few assumptions, we use a statistic model for river networks description that we adapt by considering relief by linking hypsometry and morphology. The model developed P(A>a,z) allow us to identify any site of the river network from a DEM analysis via elevation z and upstream area a fields with the help of 2 parameters. The 3D consideration may be relevant for hydrologic implications as production function usually increases with relief. This model

  6. PARTNERING WITH DOE TO APPLY ADVANCED BIOLOGICAL, ENVIRONMENTAL, AND COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE TO ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    On February 18, 2004, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Department of Energy signed a Memorandum of Understanding to expand the research collaboration of both agencies to advance biological, environmental, and computational sciences for protecting human health and the ...

  7. Adaptive Modeling, Engineering Analysis and Design of Advanced Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Hsu, Su-Yuen; Mason, Brian H.; Hicks, Mike D.; Jones, William T.; Sleight, David W.; Chun, Julio; Spangler, Jan L.; Kamhawi, Hilmi; Dahl, Jorgen L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes initial progress towards the development and enhancement of a set of software tools for rapid adaptive modeling, and conceptual design of advanced aerospace vehicle concepts. With demanding structural and aerodynamic performance requirements, these high fidelity geometry based modeling tools are essential for rapid and accurate engineering analysis at the early concept development stage. This adaptive modeling tool was used for generating vehicle parametric geometry, outer mold line and detailed internal structural layout of wing, fuselage, skin, spars, ribs, control surfaces, frames, bulkheads, floors, etc., that facilitated rapid finite element analysis, sizing study and weight optimization. The high quality outer mold line enabled rapid aerodynamic analysis in order to provide reliable design data at critical flight conditions. Example application for structural design of a conventional aircraft and a high altitude long endurance vehicle configuration are presented. This work was performed under the Conceptual Design Shop sub-project within the Efficient Aerodynamic Shape and Integration project, under the former Vehicle Systems Program. The project objective was to design and assess unconventional atmospheric vehicle concepts efficiently and confidently. The implementation may also dramatically facilitate physics-based systems analysis for the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Mission. In addition to providing technology for design and development of unconventional aircraft, the techniques for generation of accurate geometry and internal sub-structure and the automated interface with the high fidelity analysis codes could also be applied towards the design of vehicles for the NASA Exploration and Space Science Mission projects.

  8. Radiative Transfer Theory Applied to Ocean Bottom Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quijano, Jorge Eduardo

    Research on the propagation of acoustic waves in ocean bottom sediment is of interest for active sonar applications such as target detection and remote sensing. Currently, all seabed scattering models available in the literature are based on the full solution of the wave equation, which sometimes leads to mathematically intractable problems. In the electromagnetics community, an alternative formulation that overcomes some of this complexity is radiative transfer theory, which has established itself as an important technique for remote sensing. In this work, radiative transfer (RT) theory is proposed for the first time as a tool for the study of seabed acoustic scattering. The focus of this work is the development of a complete model for the interaction of acoustic energy with water-saturated sediments. The general geometry considered in this study consists of multiple elastic layers containing random distributions of inhomogeneities. The accuracy of the proposed model is assessed by rigorous experimental work, with data collected from random media in which acoustic properties such as the concentration and size of scatterers, background material, and the presence of elastic boundaries are controlled parameters. First, the ultrasound RT model is implemented for layers of finite thickness. The range of applicability of the proposed model is then illustrated using scaled experiments conducted at the Northwest Electromagnetics and Acoustics Research Laboratory (NEAR-Lab). Next, the model is applied to field data collected in a region with gassy sediments and compared to the formulation originally used to explain these data. Finally, insight into the emerging area of study of the time-dependent RT formulation is presented, and its role in the representation of finite broadband pulses is discussed.

  9. Applying modern measurements of Pleistocene loads to model lithospheric rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, E. P.; Hoggan, J. R.; Lowry, A. R.

    2011-12-01

    The remnant shorelines of Pleistocene Lake Bonneville provide a unique opportunity for building a dataset from which to infer rheological properties of the lower crust and upper mantle. Multiple lakeshores developed over a period of around 30 kyr which record the lithosphere's isostatic response to a well-constrained load history. Bills et al. (1994) utilized a shoreline elevation dataset compiled by Currey (1982) in an attempt to model linear (Maxwell) viscosity as a function of depth beneath the basin. They estimated an effective elastic thickness (Te) for the basin of 20-25 km which differs significantly from the 5-15 km estimates derived from models of loading on geologic timescales (e.g., Lowry and Pérez-Gussinyé, 2011). We propose that the discrepancy in Te modeled by these two approaches may be resolved with dynamical modeling of a common rheology, using a more complete shoreline elevation dataset applied to a spherical Earth model. Where Currey's (1982) dataset was compiled largely from observations of depositional shoreline features, we are developing an algorithm for estimating elevation variations in erosional shorelines based on cross-correlation and stacking techniques similar to those used to automate picking of seismic phase arrival times. Application of this method to digital elevation models (DEMs) will increase the size and accuracy of the shoreline elevation dataset, enabling more robust modeling of the rheological properties driving isostatic response to unloading of Lake Bonneville. Our plan is to model these data and invert for a relatively small number of parameters describing depth- and temperature-dependent power-law rheology of the lower crust and upper mantle. These same parameters also will be used to model topographic and Moho response to estimates of regional mass variation on the longer loading timescales to test for inconsistencies. Bills, B.G., D.R. Currey, and G.A. Marshall, 1994, Viscosity estimates for the crust and upper

  10. Advancing complementary and alternative medicine through social network analysis and agent-based modeling.

    PubMed

    Frantz, Terrill L

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces the contemporary perspectives and techniques of social network analysis (SNA) and agent-based modeling (ABM) and advocates applying them to advance various aspects of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). SNA and ABM are invaluable methods for representing, analyzing and projecting complex, relational, social phenomena; they provide both an insightful vantage point and a set of analytic tools that can be useful in a wide range of contexts. Applying these methods in the CAM context can aid the ongoing advances in the CAM field, in both its scientific aspects and in developing broader acceptance in associated stakeholder communities. PMID:22327550

  11. Enabling Advanced Modeling and Simulations for Fuel-Flexible Combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Pitsch, Heinz

    2010-05-31

    The overall goal of the present project is to enable advanced modeling and simulations for the design and optimization of fuel-flexible turbine combustors. For this purpose we use a high fidelity, extensively-tested large-eddy simulation (LES) code and state-of-the-art models for premixed/partially-premixed turbulent combustion developed in the PI's group. In the frame of the present project, these techniques are applied, assessed, and improved for hydrogen enriched premixed and partially premixed gas-turbine combustion. Our innovative approaches include a completely consistent description of flame propagation; a coupled progress variable/level set method to resolve the detailed flame structure, and incorporation of thermal-diffusion (non-unity Lewis number) effects. In addition, we have developed a general flamelet-type transformation holding in the limits of both non-premixed and premixed burning. As a result, a model for partially premixed combustion has been derived. The coupled progress variable/level method and the general flamelet transformation were validated by LES of a lean-premixed low-swirl burner that has been studied experimentally at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The model is extended to include the non-unity Lewis number effects, which play a critical role in fuel-flexible combustor with high hydrogen content fuel. More specifically, a two-scalar model for lean hydrogen and hydrogen-enriched combustion is developed and validated against experimental and direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Results are presented to emphasize the importance of non-unity Lewis number effects in the lean-premixed low-swirl burner of interest in this project. The proposed model gives improved results, which shows that the inclusion of the non-unity Lewis number effects is essential for accurate prediction of the lean-premixed low-swirl flame.

  12. Enabling Advanced Modeling and Simulations for Fuel-Flexible Combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Heinz Pitsch

    2010-05-31

    The overall goal of the present project is to enable advanced modeling and simulations for the design and optimization of fuel-flexible turbine combustors. For this purpose we use a high-fidelity, extensively-tested large-eddy simulation (LES) code and state-of-the-art models for premixed/partially-premixed turbulent combustion developed in the PI's group. In the frame of the present project, these techniques are applied, assessed, and improved for hydrogen enriched premixed and partially premixed gas-turbine combustion. Our innovative approaches include a completely consistent description of flame propagation, a coupled progress variable/level set method to resolve the detailed flame structure, and incorporation of thermal-diffusion (non-unity Lewis number) effects. In addition, we have developed a general flamelet-type transformation holding in the limits of both non-premixed and premixed burning. As a result, a model for partially premixed combustion has been derived. The coupled progress variable/level method and the general flamelet tranformation were validated by LES of a lean-premixed low-swirl burner that has been studied experimentally at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The model is extended to include the non-unity Lewis number effects, which play a critical role in fuel-flexible combustor with high hydrogen content fuel. More specifically, a two-scalar model for lean hydrogen and hydrogen-enriched combustion is developed and validated against experimental and direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Results are presented to emphasize the importance of non-unity Lewis number effects in the lean-premixed low-swirl burner of interest in this project. The proposed model gives improved results, which shows that the inclusion of the non-unity Lewis number effects is essential for accurate prediction of the lean-premixed low-swirl flame.

  13. Fiber-optic technologies for advanced thermo-therapy applied ex vivo to liver tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, D.; Perrone, G.; Vallan, A.; Braglia, A.; Liu, Y.; Macchi, E. G.; Braschi, G.; Gallati, M.; Cigada, A.; Poeggel, S.; Duraibabu, D. B.; Leen, G.; Lewis, E.

    2015-07-01

    Thermal ablation, using radiofrequency, microwave, and laser sources, is a common treatment for hepatic tumors. Sensors allow monitoring, at the point of treatment, the evolution of thermal ablation procedures. We present optical fiber sensors that allow advanced capabilities for recording the biophysical phenomena occurring in the tissue in real time. Distributed or quasi-distributed thermal sensors allow recording temperature with spatial resolution ranging from 0.1 mm to 5 mm. In addition, a thermally insensitive pressure sensor allows recording pressure rise, supporting advanced treatment of encapsulated tumors. Our investigation is focused on two case studies: (1) radiofrequency ablation of hepatic tissue, performed on a phantom with a stem-shaped applicator; (2) laser ablation of a liver phantom, performed with a fiber laser. The main measurement results are discussed, comparing the technologies used for the investigation, and drawing the potential for using optical fiber sensors for "smart"-ablation.

  14. Advancing Software Architecture Modeling for Large Scale Heterogeneous Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gorton, Ian; Liu, Yan

    2010-11-07

    In this paper we describe how incorporating technology-specific modeling at the architecture level can help reduce risks and produce better designs for large, heterogeneous software applications. We draw an analogy with established modeling approaches in scientific domains, using groundwater modeling as an example, to help illustrate gaps in current software architecture modeling approaches. We then describe the advances in modeling, analysis and tooling that are required to bring sophisticated modeling and development methods within reach of software architects.

  15. Thermal Model Predictions of Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen J.; Fabanich, William Anthony; Schmitz, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation describes the capabilities of three-dimensional thermal power model of advanced stirling radioisotope generator (ASRG). The performance of the ASRG is presented for different scenario, such as Venus flyby with or without the auxiliary cooling system.

  16. A value analysis model applied to the management of amblyopia.

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, G R; Bane, M C; Stager, D R; Berry, P M; Wright, W W

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the value of amblyopia-related services by utilizing a health value model (HVM). Cost and quality criteria are evaluated in accordance with the interests of patients, physicians, and purchasers. METHODS: We applied an HVM to a hypothetical statistical ("median") child with amblyopia whose visual acuity is 20/80 and to a group of children with amblyopia who are managed by our practice. We applied the model to calculate the value of these services by evaluating the responses of patients and physicians and relating these responses to clinical outcomes. RESULTS: The consensus value of care for the hypothetical median child was calculated to be 0.406 (of 1.000). For those children managed in our practice, the calculated value is 0.682. Clinically, 79% achieved 20/40 or better visual acuity, and the mean final visual acuity was 0.2 logMAR (20/32). Value appraisals revealed significant concerns about the financial aspects of amblyopia-related services, particularly among physicians. Patients rated services more positively than did physicians. CONCLUSIONS: Amblyopia care is difficult, sustained, and important work that requires substantial sensitivity to and support of children and families. Compliance and early detection are essential to success. The value of amblyopia services is rated significantly higher by patients than by physicians. Relative to the measured value, amblyopia care is undercompensated. The HVM is useful to appraise clinical service delivery and its variation. The costs of failure and the benefits of success are high; high-value amblyopia care yields substantial dividends and should be commensurately compensated in the marketplace. PMID:10703133

  17. Advances in modelling of condensation phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.S.; Zaltsgendler, E.; Hanna, B.

    1997-07-01

    The physical parameters in the modelling of condensation phenomena in the CANDU reactor system codes are discussed. The experimental programs used for thermal-hydraulic code validation in the Canadian nuclear industry are briefly described. The modelling of vapour generation and in particular condensation plays a key role in modelling of postulated reactor transients. The condensation models adopted in the current state-of-the-art two-fluid CANDU reactor thermal-hydraulic system codes (CATHENA and TUF) are described. As examples of the modelling challenges faced, the simulation of a cold water injection experiment by CATHENA and the simulation of a condensation induced water hammer experiment by TUF are described.

  18. Advanced in turbulence physics and modeling by direct numerical simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, W. C.

    1987-01-01

    The advent of direct numerical simulations of turbulence has opened avenues for research on turbulence physics and turbulence modeling. Direct numerical simulation provides values for anything that the scientist or modeler would like to know about the flow. An overview of some recent advances in the physical understanding of turbulence and in turbulence modeling obtained through such simulations is presented.

  19. Applying Public Health Frameworks to Advance the Promotion of Mental Health Among Asian American Children

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Keng-Yen; Calzada, Esther; Kamboukos, Dimitra; Rhule, Dana; Sharma, Kirsten Cullen; Cheng, Sabrina; Brotman, Laurie Miller

    2014-01-01

    Asian American (ASA) children experience high rates of mental health problems. Although there is a pressing need to utilize population approaches, emerging frameworks from the fields of public and population health have not been applied to ASA children. This paper addresses this gap by first discussing applications of the National Prevention Strategy (NPS), a population strategy developed from the Social Determinants of Health perspective, to guide ASA prevention work. Next, we provide a practical example to illustrate how the NPS can be applied to prevention program design (using ParentCorps as an example) and dissemination and implementation processes to broadly address ASA children's mental health needs. Finally, we present preliminary data on the feasibility of applying this population strategy to ASA families and a framework for researchers who are considering disseminating and implementing evidence-based programs to ASA or ethnic minority pediatric populations. PMID:25505500

  20. Separations of Short DNA in Agarose Gels: What Model Applies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beheshti, Afshin

    2000-03-01

    Gel Electrophoresis is used ubiquitously for separating proteins and DNA fragments from mixtures into individual components. Molecules separate because their mobilities, μ = v / E, depend on their effective charge and effective friction imposed by the gel. Models describing the dependence of μ on molecular parameters are inadequate. For example, the reptation theory as applied in other studies suggests μ proportional to (1/L). We asked whether the relationship (1/μ) proportional to AL + B, where A and B are independent parameters, would better describe electrophoretic separations of DNA fragments over a wide range of fragment lengths. A series of DNA ladders were electrophoresed in Seakem and in Metaphor agarose and mobilities studied as a function of their DNA length. In the Metaphor agarose a range of 10 bp to 1500 bp DNA fragments were observed. While in the Seakem agarose the study was done with DNA fragments ranging from 100 bp to 10 kbp. Results of the fits for μ vs. L indicate the dependence is more complex than these simple models suggest. Supported by NSF BES 9521381 and NSF Research Training Grant Fellowship 130362022.

  1. Cohesive model applied to fracture propagation in Indiana Limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewers, T. A.; Rinehart, A. J.; Bishop, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    We apply a cohesive fracture (CF) model to results of short-rod (SR), notched 3-point-bend (N3PB) tests, and Brazil tests in Indiana Limestone. Calibration and validation of the model are performed within a commercial finite element modeling platform. By using a linear traction-displacement softening response for a defined fracture-opening displacement (w1) following peak tensile stress (σcrit), the CF model numerically lumps different spatially distributed inelastic processes occurring at and around fracture tips into a thin zone within an elastic domain. Both the SR and the N3PB test specimen geometries use a notch partway through the sample to control the location of fracture propagation. We develop a mesh for both the SR and N3PB geometries with a narrow cohesive zone in the center of notches. From the Brazil tests, we find a tensile splitting stress (σsplit) of 5.9 MPa. We use a σsplit as the peak tensile stress (σcrit) for all simulations. The Young's modulus (E) and the critical crack opening distance (w1) of the CF model are calibrated against the SR data. The model successfully captures the elastic, yield, peak, and initial and late failure behavior and compares favorably against the N3PB tests. Differences in force-displacement and crack propagation are primarily caused by: more mixed-mode (shear and opening) crack propagation in N3PB than in SR tests, causing a higher peak; and transition from compression (high E) to tension (low E) in a larger volume of the N3PB sample than in the SR geometry. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-SC0001114. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy

  2. Advances on genetic rat models of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Serikawa, Tadao; Mashimo, Tomoji; Kuramoto, Takashi; Voigt, Birger; Ohno, Yukihiro; Sasa, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Considering the suitability of laboratory rats in epilepsy research, we and other groups have been developing genetic models of epilepsy in this species. After epileptic rats or seizure-susceptible rats were sporadically found in outbred stocks, the epileptic traits were usually genetically-fixed by selective breeding. So far, the absence seizure models GAERS and WAG/Rij, audiogenic seizure models GEPR-3 and GEPR-9, generalized tonic-clonic seizure models IER, NER and WER, and Canavan-disease related epileptic models TRM and SER have been established. Dissection of the genetic bases including causative genes in these epileptic rat models would be a significant step toward understanding epileptogenesis. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis provides a systematic approach which allowed us to develop two novel epileptic rat models: heat-induced seizure susceptible (Hiss) rats with an Scn1a missense mutation and autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) model rats with an Lgi1 missense mutation. In addition, we have established episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) model rats with a Kcna1 missense mutation derived from the ENU-induced rat mutant stock, and identified a Cacna1a missense mutation in a N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mutant rat strain GRY, resulting in the discovery of episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) model rats. Thus, epileptic rat models have been established on the two paths: ‘phenotype to gene’ and ‘gene to phenotype’. In the near future, development of novel epileptic rat models will be extensively promoted by the use of sophisticated genome editing technologies. PMID:25312505

  3. Advances on genetic rat models of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Serikawa, Tadao; Mashimo, Tomoji; Kuramoro, Takashi; Voigt, Birger; Ohno, Yukihiro; Sasa, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Considering the suitability of laboratory rats in epilepsy research, we and other groups have been developing genetic models of epilepsy in this species. After epileptic rats or seizure-susceptible rats were sporadically found in outbred stocks, the epileptic traits were usually genetically-fixed by selective breeding. So far, the absence seizure models GAERS and WAG/Rij, audiogenic seizure models GEPR-3 and GEPR-9, generalized tonic-clonic seizure models IER, NER and WER, and Canavan-disease related epileptic models TRM and SER have been established. Dissection of the genetic bases including causative genes in these epileptic rat models would be a significant step toward understanding epileptogenesis. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis provides a systematic approach which allowed us to develop two novel epileptic rat models: heat-induced seizure susceptible (Hiss) rats with an Scn1a missense mutation and autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) model rats with an Lgi1 missense mutation. In addition, we have established episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) model rats with a Kcna1 missense mutation derived from the ENU-induced rat mutant stock, and identified a Cacna1a missense mutation in a N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mutant rat strain GRY, resulting in the discovery of episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) model rats. Thus, epileptic rat models have been established on the two paths: 'phenotype to gene' and 'gene to phenotype'. In the near future, development of novel epileptic rat models will be extensively promoted by the use of sophisticated genome editing technologies. PMID:25312505

  4. Recent Advances in the LEWICE Icing Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, William B.; Addy, Gene; Struk, Peter; Bartkus, Tadas

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe two recent modifications to the Glenn ICE software. First, a capability for modeling ice crystals and mixed phase icing has been modified based on recent experimental data. Modifications have been made to the ice particle bouncing and erosion model. This capability has been added as part of a larger effort to model ice crystal ingestion in aircraft engines. Comparisons have been made to ice crystal ice accretions performed in the NRC Research Altitude Test Facility (RATFac). Second, modifications were made to the run back model based on data and observations from thermal scaling tests performed in the NRC Altitude Icing Tunnel.

  5. Recent Advances in Modeling Hugoniots with Cheetah

    SciTech Connect

    Glaesemann, K R; Fried, L E

    2005-07-26

    We describe improvements to the Cheetah thermochemical-kinetics code's equilibrium solver to enable it to find a wider range of thermodynamic states. Cheetah supports a wide range of elements, condensed detonation products, and gas phase reactions. Therefore, Cheetah can be applied to a wide range of shock problems involving both energetic and non-energetic materials. An improve equation of state is also introduced. New experimental validations of Cheetah's equation of state methodology have been performed, including both reacted and unreacted Hugoniots.

  6. Recent Advances in Modeling Hugoniots with Cheetah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaesemann, K. R.; Fried, L. E.

    2006-07-01

    We describe improvements to the Cheetah thermochemical-kinetics code's equilibrium solver to enable it to find a wider range of thermodynamic states. Cheetah supports a wide range of elements, condensed detonation products, and gas phase reactions. Therefore, Cheetah can be applied to a wide range of shock problems involving both energetic and non-energetic materials. An improve equation of state is also introduced. New experimental validations of Cheetah's equation of state methodology have been performed, including both reacted and unreacted Hugoniots.

  7. STARPAHC - Operational findings. [Space Technology Applied to Rural Papago Advanced Health Care

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belasco, N.; Pool, S. L.

    1976-01-01

    Delivery of quality health care to passengers of extended-mission spacecraft and to remote populations on earth (a major national problem) requires extending the knowledge and skills of the physician many kilometers distant from his physical location. The STARPAHC telemedicine system accomplishes this by using physician's assistants complemented with space technology in communications, data handling, and systems engineering. It is presently in operation and undergoing a 2-year evaluation on the Papago Indian Reservation, Arizona. Results have established its feasibility as a solution for remote area health care on earth, while providing information useful to the planners of advanced manned spacecraft missions.

  8. Advanced terahertz imaging system performance model for concealed weapon identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murrill, Steven R.; Redman, Brian; Espinola, Richard L.; Franck, Charmaine C.; Petkie, Douglas T.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Jacobs, Eddie L.; Griffin, Steven T.; Halford, Carl E.; Reynolds, Joe

    2007-04-01

    The U.S. Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) and the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) have developed a terahertz-band imaging system performance model for detection and identification of concealed weaponry. The details of this MATLAB-based model which accounts for the effects of all critical sensor and display components, and for the effects of atmospheric attenuation, concealment material attenuation, and active illumination, were reported on at the 2005 SPIE Europe Security and Defence Symposium. The focus of this paper is to report on recent advances to the base model which have been designed to more realistically account for the dramatic impact that target and background orientation can have on target observability as related to specular and Lambertian reflections captured by an active-illumination-based imaging system. The advanced terahertz-band imaging system performance model now also accounts for target and background thermal emission, and has been recast into a user-friendly, Windows-executable tool. This advanced THz model has been developed in support of the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency's (DARPA) Terahertz Imaging Focal-Plane Technology (TIFT) program. This paper will describe the advanced THz model and its new radiometric sub-model in detail, and provide modeling and experimental results on target observability as a function of target and background orientation.

  9. Essays on Applied Resource Economics Using Bioeconomic Optimization Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affuso, Ermanno

    With rising demographic growth, there is increasing interest in analytical studies that assess alternative policies to provide an optimal allocation of scarce natural resources while ensuring environmental sustainability. This dissertation consists of three essays in applied resource economics that are interconnected methodologically within the agricultural production sector of Economics. The first chapter examines the sustainability of biofuels by simulating and evaluating an agricultural voluntary program that aims to increase the land use efficiency in the production of biofuels of first generation in the state of Alabama. The results show that participatory decisions may increase the net energy value of biofuels by 208% and reduce emissions by 26%; significantly contributing to the state energy goals. The second chapter tests the hypothesis of overuse of fertilizers and pesticides in U.S. peanut farming with respect to other inputs and address genetic research to reduce the use of the most overused chemical input. The findings suggest that peanut producers overuse fungicide with respect to any other input and that fungi resistant genetically engineered peanuts may increase the producer welfare up to 36.2%. The third chapter implements a bioeconomic model, which consists of a biophysical model and a stochastic dynamic recursive model that is used to measure potential economic and environmental welfare of cotton farmers derived from a rotation scheme that uses peanut as a complementary crop. The results show that the rotation scenario would lower farming costs by 14% due to nitrogen credits from prior peanut land use and reduce non-point source pollution from nitrogen runoff by 6.13% compared to continuous cotton farming.

  10. An Advanced Sea-Floor Spreading Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutch, Steven I.

    1986-01-01

    Describes models which (1) illustrate spreading that varies in rate from place to place; (2) clearly show transform faults as arcs of small circles; and (3) illustrate what happens near a pole of rotation. The models are easy to construct and have been well received by students. (JN)

  11. Advances in Swine biomedical Model Genomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This manuscript is a short update on the diversity of swine biomedical models and the importance of genomics in their continued development. The swine has been used as a major mammalian model for human studies because of the similarity in size and physiology, and in organ development and disease pro...

  12. Carbon export algorithm advancements in models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çağlar Yumruktepe, Veli; Salihoğlu, Barış

    2015-04-01

    The rate at which anthropogenic CO2 is absorbed by the oceans remains a critical question under investigation by climate researchers. Construction of a complete carbon budget, requires better understanding of air-sea exchanges and the processes controlling the vertical and horizontal transport of carbon in the ocean, particularly the biological carbon pump. Improved parameterization of carbon sequestration within ecosystem models is vital to better understand and predict changes in the global carbon cycle. Due to the complexity of processes controlling particle aggregation, sinking and decomposition, existing ecosystem models necessarily parameterize carbon sequestration using simple algorithms. Development of improved algorithms describing carbon export and sequestration, suitable for inclusion in numerical models is an ongoing work. Existing unique algorithms used in the state-of-the art ecosystem models and new experimental results obtained from mesocosm experiments and open ocean observations have been inserted into a common 1D pelagic ecosystem model for testing purposes. The model was implemented to the timeseries stations in the North Atlantic (BATS, PAP and ESTOC) and were evaluated with datasets of carbon export. Targetted topics of algorithms were PFT functional types, grazing and vertical movement of zooplankton, and remineralization, aggregation and ballasting dynamics of organic matter. Ultimately it is intended to feed improved algorithms to the 3D modelling community, for inclusion in coupled numerical models.

  13. Recent modelling advances for ultrasonic TOFD inspections

    SciTech Connect

    Darmon, Michel; Ferrand, Adrien; Dorval, Vincent; Chatillon, Sylvain; Lonné, Sébastien

    2015-03-31

    The ultrasonic TOFD (Time of Flight Diffraction) Technique is commonly used to detect and characterize disoriented cracks using their edge diffraction echoes. An overview of the models integrated in the CIVA software platform and devoted to TOFD simulation is presented. CIVA allows to predict diffraction echoes from complex 3D flaws using a PTD (Physical Theory of Diffraction) based model. Other dedicated developments have been added to simulate lateral waves in 3D on planar entry surfaces and in 2D on irregular surfaces by a ray approach. Calibration echoes from Side Drilled Holes (SDHs), specimen echoes and shadowing effects from flaws can also been modelled. Some examples of theoretical validation of the models are presented. In addition, experimental validations have been performed both on planar blocks containing calibration holes and various notches and also on a specimen with an irregular entry surface and allow to draw conclusions on the validity of all the developed models.

  14. An advanced terrain modeler for an autonomous planetary rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, E. L.

    1980-01-01

    A roving vehicle capable of autonomously exploring the surface of an alien world is under development and an advanced terrain modeler to characterize the possible paths of the rover as hazardous or safe is presented. This advanced terrain modeler has several improvements over the Troiani modeler that include: a crosspath analysis, better determination of hazards on slopes, and methods for dealing with missing returns at the extremities of the sensor field. The results from a package of programs to simulate the roving vehicle are then examined and compared to results from the Troiani modeler.

  15. Advanced robotics technology applied to mixed waste characterization, sorting and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmsen, K.; Hurd, R.; Grasz, E.

    1994-04-01

    There are over one million cubic meters of radioactively contaminated hazardous waste, known as mixed waste, stored at Department of Energy facilities. Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are developing methods to safely and efficiently treat this type of waste. LLNL has automated and demonstrated a means of segregating items in a mixed waste stream. This capability incorporates robotics and automation with advanced multi-sensor information for autonomous and teleoperational handling of mixed waste items with previously unknown characteristics. The first phase of remote waste stream handling was item singulation; the ability to remove individual items of heterogeneous waste directly from a drum, box, bin, or pile. Once objects were singulated, additional multi-sensory information was used for object classification and segregation. In addition, autonomous and teleoperational surface cleaning and decontamination of homogeneous metals has been demonstrated in processing mixed waste streams. The LLNL waste stream demonstration includes advanced technology such as object classification algorithms, identification of various metal types using active and passive gamma scans and RF signatures, and improved teleoperational and autonomous grasping of waste objects. The workcell control program used an off-line programming system as a server to perform both simulation control as well as actual hardware control of the workcell. This paper will discuss the motivation for remote mixed waste stream handling, the overall workcell layout, sensor specifications, workcell supervisory control, 3D vision based automated grasp planning and object classification algorithms.

  16. Advances and applications of occupancy models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, Larissa; MacKenzie, Darry I.; Nichols, James D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: The past decade has seen an explosion in the development and application of models aimed at estimating species occurrence and occupancy dynamics while accounting for possible non-detection or species misidentification. We discuss some recent occupancy estimation methods and the biological systems that motivated their development. Collectively, these models offer tremendous flexibility, but simultaneously place added demands on the investigator. Unlike many mark–recapture scenarios, investigators utilizing occupancy models have the ability, and responsibility, to define their sample units (i.e. sites), replicate sampling occasions, time period over which species occurrence is assumed to be static and even the criteria that constitute ‘detection’ of a target species. Subsequent biological inference and interpretation of model parameters depend on these definitions and the ability to meet model assumptions. We demonstrate the relevance of these definitions by highlighting applications from a single biological system (an amphibian–pathogen system) and discuss situations where the use of occupancy models has been criticized. Finally, we use these applications to suggest future research and model development.

  17. ADVANCED UTILITY SIMULATION MODEL DESCRIPTION OF MODIFICATIONS TO THE STATE LEVEL MODEL (VERSION 3.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents modifications to the state level model portion of the Advanced Utility Simulation Model (AUSM), one of four stationary source emission and control cost forecasting models developed for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). The AUSM model...

  18. Cellular Automata Models Applied to the Study of Landslide Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liucci, Luisa; Melelli, Laura; Suteanu, Cristian

    2015-04-01

    Landslides are caused by complex processes controlled by the interaction of numerous factors. Increasing efforts are being made to understand the spatial and temporal evolution of this phenomenon, and the use of remote sensing data is making significant contributions in improving forecast. This paper studies landslides seen as complex dynamic systems, in order to investigate their potential Self Organized Critical (SOC) behavior, and in particular, scale-invariant aspects of processes governing the spatial development of landslides and their temporal evolution, as well as the mechanisms involved in driving the system and keeping it in a critical state. For this purpose, we build Cellular Automata Models, which have been shown to be capable of reproducing the complexity of real world features using a small number of variables and simple rules, thus allowing for the reduction of the number of input parameters commonly used in the study of processes governing landslide evolution, such as those linked to the geomechanical properties of soils. This type of models has already been successfully applied in studying the dynamics of other natural hazards, such as earthquakes and forest fires. The basic structure of the model is composed of three modules: (i) An initialization module, which defines the topographic surface at time zero as a grid of square cells, each described by an altitude value; the surface is acquired from real Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). (ii) A transition function, which defines the rules used by the model to update the state of the system at each iteration. The rules use a stability criterion based on the slope angle and introduce a variable describing the weakening of the material over time, caused for example by rainfall. The weakening brings some sites of the system out of equilibrium thus causing the triggering of landslides, which propagate within the system through local interactions between neighboring cells. By using different rates of

  19. Digraph reliability model processing advances and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iverson, D. L.; Patterson-Hine, F. A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a new algorithm, called SourceDoubls, which efficiently solves for singletons and doubletons of a digraph reliability model. Compared with previous methods, the SourceDoubls algorithm provides up to a two order of magnitude reduction in the amount of time required to solve large digraph models. This significant increase in model solution speed allows complex digraphs containing thousands of nodes to be used as knowledge bases for real time automated monitoring and diagnosis applications. Currently, an application to provide monitoring and diagnosis of the Space Station Freedom Data Management System is under development at NASA/Ames Research Center and NASA/Johnson Space Center. This paper contains an overview of this system and provides details of how it will use digraph models processed by the SourceDoubls algorithm to accomplish its task.

  20. Advanced Concepts for Underwater Acoustic Channel Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etter, P. C.; Haas, C. H.; Ramani, D. V.

    2014-12-01

    This paper examines nearshore underwater-acoustic channel modeling concepts and compares channel-state information requirements against existing modeling capabilities. This process defines a subset of candidate acoustic models suitable for simulating signal propagation in underwater communications. Underwater-acoustic communications find many practical applications in coastal oceanography, and networking is the enabling technology for these applications. Such networks can be formed by establishing two-way acoustic links between autonomous underwater vehicles and moored oceanographic sensors. These networks can be connected to a surface unit for further data transfer to ships, satellites, or shore stations via a radio-frequency link. This configuration establishes an interactive environment in which researchers can extract real-time data from multiple, but distant, underwater instruments. After evaluating the obtained data, control messages can be sent back to individual instruments to adapt the networks to changing situations. Underwater networks can also be used to increase the operating ranges of autonomous underwater vehicles by hopping the control and data messages through networks that cover large areas. A model of the ocean medium between acoustic sources and receivers is called a channel model. In an oceanic channel, characteristics of the acoustic signals change as they travel from transmitters to receivers. These characteristics depend upon the acoustic frequency, the distances between sources and receivers, the paths followed by the signals, and the prevailing ocean environment in the vicinity of the paths. Properties of the received signals can be derived from those of the transmitted signals using these channel models. This study concludes that ray-theory models are best suited to the simulation of acoustic signal propagation in oceanic channels and identifies 33 such models that are eligible candidates.

  1. Advanced modeling techniques for micromagnetic systems.

    PubMed

    Jalil, M B A; Tan, S G; Cheng, X Z

    2007-01-01

    We present a review of micromagnetic and magnetotransport modeling methods which go beyond the standard model. We first give a brief overview of the standard micromagnetic model, which for (i) the steady-state (equilibrium) solution is based on the minimization of the free energy functional, and for (ii) the dynamical solution, relies on the numerical solution of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation. We present three complements to the standard model, i.e., (i) magnetotransport calculations based on ohmic conduction in the presence of the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effect, (ii) magnetotransport calculations based on spin-dependent tunneling in the presence of single charge tunneling (Coulomb blockade) effect, and (iii) stochastic micromagnetics, which incorporates the effects of thermal fluctuations via a white-noise thermal field in the LLG equation. All three complements are of practical importance: (i) magnetotransport model either in the ohmic or tunneling transport regimes, enables the conversion of the micromagnetic results to the measurable quantity of magnetoresistance ratio, while (ii) stochastic modeling is essential as the dimensions of the micromagnetic system reduces to the deep submicron regime and approaches the superparamagnetic limit. PMID:17455475

  2. Recent advances in modeling Hugoniots with Cheetah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaesemann, Kurt

    2005-07-01

    The detonation of an energetic material is the result of a complex interaction between kinetic chemical reactions and thermodynamic chemical equilibrium. Unfortunately, little is known concerning the detailed chemical kinetics of reacting energetic materials. Cheetah uses rate laws to treat species with the slowest chemical reactions, while assuming other chemical species are in equilibrium. Cheetah supports a wide range of elements and condensed detonation products and can also be applied to gas phase reactions. Improvements have been made to Cheetah's equilibrium solver, that allow it to find a wider range of thermodynamic states. Many of the difficulties experienced by users in earlier versions of Cheetah have been fixed. New capabilities have also been added. The ultimate result is a code that can be applied to a wide range of shock problems involving both energetic and non-energetic materials. New experimental validations of Cheetah's equation of state methodology have been performed, including both reacted and unreacted Hugoniots. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  3. Applying the Advancing Excellence in America's Nursing Homes Circle of Success to improving and sustaining quality.

    PubMed

    Bakerjian, Debra; Zisberg, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Looking forward to the Quality Assurance Performance Improvement (QAPI) program to be implemented and required in 2014, and as nursing home staff provide care for residents with increasingly complex health issues, knowledge of how to implement quality improvement (QI) is imperative. The nursing home administrator and director of nursing (DON) provide overall leadership, but it is the primary responsibility of the DON and other registered nurse staff to implement and manage the day to day QI process. This article describes potential roles of nursing leaders and key components of a QI project using a pressure ulcer case study exemplar to illustrate a quality improvement process. The authors suggest specific methods that RN leaders can employ using the Advancing Excellence Campaign Circle of Success as an organizing framework along with evidence-based resources. Nursing home leaders could use this article as a guideline for implementing any clinical quality improvement process. PMID:23870372

  4. Advanced Monitoring of Trace Metals Applied to Contamination Reduction of Silicon Device Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillot, P.; Martin, C.; Planchais, A.

    2011-11-01

    The detrimental effects of metallic on certain key electrical parameters of silicon devices mandates the use of state-of-the-art characterization and metrology tools as well as appropriate control plans. Historically, this has been commonly achieved in-line on monitor wafers through a combination of Total Reflectance X-Ray Fluorescence (TXRF) and post anneal Surface Photo Voltage (SPV). On the other hand, VPD (Vapor Phase Decomposition) combined with ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Mass Spectrometry) or TXRF is known to provide both identification and quantification of surface trace metals at lower detection limits. Based on these considerations the description of an advanced monitoring scheme using SPV, TXRF and automated VPD ICP-MS is described.

  5. Atomistic Method Applied to Computational Modeling of Surface Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Abel, Phillip B.

    2000-01-01

    The formation of surface alloys is a growing research field that, in terms of the surface structure of multicomponent systems, defines the frontier both for experimental and theoretical techniques. Because of the impact that the formation of surface alloys has on surface properties, researchers need reliable methods to predict new surface alloys and to help interpret unknown structures. The structure of surface alloys and when, and even if, they form are largely unpredictable from the known properties of the participating elements. No unified theory or model to date can infer surface alloy structures from the constituents properties or their bulk alloy characteristics. In spite of these severe limitations, a growing catalogue of such systems has been developed during the last decade, and only recently are global theories being advanced to fully understand the phenomenon. None of the methods used in other areas of surface science can properly model even the already known cases. Aware of these limitations, the Computational Materials Group at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field has developed a useful, computationally economical, and physically sound methodology to enable the systematic study of surface alloy formation in metals. This tool has been tested successfully on several known systems for which hard experimental evidence exists and has been used to predict ternary surface alloy formation (results to be published: Garces, J.E.; Bozzolo, G.; and Mosca, H.: Atomistic Modeling of Pd/Cu(100) Surface Alloy Formation. Surf. Sci., 2000 (in press); Mosca, H.; Garces J.E.; and Bozzolo, G.: Surface Ternary Alloys of (Cu,Au)/Ni(110). (Accepted for publication in Surf. Sci., 2000.); and Garces, J.E.; Bozzolo, G.; Mosca, H.; and Abel, P.: A New Approach for Atomistic Modeling of Pd/Cu(110) Surface Alloy Formation. (Submitted to Appl. Surf. Sci.)). Ternary alloy formation is a field yet to be fully explored experimentally. The computational tool, which is based on

  6. Applying Quality Function Deployment Model in Burn Unit Service Improvement.

    PubMed

    Keshtkaran, Ali; Hashemi, Neda; Kharazmi, Erfan; Abbasi, Mehdi

    2014-10-13

    Quality function deployment (QFD) is one of the most effective quality design tools. This study applies QFD technique to improve the quality of the burn unit services in Ghotbedin Hospital in Shiraz, Iran. First, the patients' expectations of burn unit services and their priorities were determined through Delphi method. Thereafter, burn unit service specifications were determined through Delphi method. Further, the relationships between the patients' expectations and service specifications and also the relationships between service specifications were determined through an expert group's opinion. Last, the final importance scores of service specifications were calculated through simple additive weighting method. The findings show that burn unit patients have 40 expectations in six different areas. These expectations are in 16 priority levels. Burn units also have 45 service specifications in six different areas. There are four-level relationships between the patients' expectations and service specifications and four-level relationships between service specifications. The most important burn unit service specifications have been identified in this study. The QFD model developed in the study can be a general guideline for QFD planners and executives. PMID:23884047

  7. Advanced Space Propulsion System Flowfield Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Sheldon

    1998-01-01

    Solar thermal upper stage propulsion systems currently under development utilize small low chamber pressure/high area ratio nozzles. Consequently, the resulting flow in the nozzle is highly viscous, with the boundary layer flow comprising a significant fraction of the total nozzle flow area. Conventional uncoupled flow methods which treat the nozzle boundary layer and inviscid flowfield separately by combining the two calculations via the influence of the boundary layer displacement thickness on the inviscid flowfield are not accurate enough to adequately treat highly viscous nozzles. Navier Stokes models such as VNAP2 can treat these flowfields but cannot perform a vacuum plume expansion for applications where the exhaust plume produces induced environments on adjacent structures. This study is built upon recently developed artificial intelligence methods and user interface methodologies to couple the VNAP2 model for treating viscous nozzle flowfields with a vacuum plume flowfield model (RAMP2) that is currently a part of the Plume Environment Prediction (PEP) Model. This study integrated the VNAP2 code into the PEP model to produce an accurate, practical and user friendly tool for calculating highly viscous nozzle and exhaust plume flowfields.

  8. Phenomenological Modeling of Infrared Sources: Recent Advances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Chun Ming; Kwok, Sun (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Infrared observations from planned space facilities (e.g., ISO (Infrared Space Observatory), SIRTF (Space Infrared Telescope Facility)) will yield a large and uniform sample of high-quality data from both photometric and spectroscopic measurements. To maximize the scientific returns of these space missions, complementary theoretical studies must be undertaken to interpret these observations. A crucial step in such studies is the construction of phenomenological models in which we parameterize the observed radiation characteristics in terms of the physical source properties. In the last decade, models with increasing degree of physical realism (in terms of grain properties, physical processes, and source geometry) have been constructed for infrared sources. Here we review current capabilities available in the phenomenological modeling of infrared sources and discuss briefly directions for future research in this area.

  9. Linear mixing model applied to coarse spatial resolution data from multispectral satellite sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, Brent N.; Shimabukuro, Yosio E.

    1993-01-01

    A linear mixing model was applied to coarse spatial resolution data from the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer. The reflective component of the 3.55-3.95 micron channel was used with the two reflective channels 0.58-0.68 micron and 0.725-1.1 micron to run a constrained least squares model to generate fraction images for an area in the west central region of Brazil. The fraction images were compared with an unsupervised classification derived from Landsat TM data acquired on the same day. The relationship between the fraction images and normalized difference vegetation index images show the potential of the unmixing techniques when using coarse spatial resolution data for global studies.

  10. Model advanced for hydrocarbon microseepage, related alterations

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.K. ); Saunders, D.F.; Burson, K.R. )

    1994-11-14

    Future significant petroleum fields will be found in subtle stratigraphic traps in addition to structural traps. Both may be detectable by measuring surface hydrocarbon microseepage and related alterations. Reasons these methods have not been commonly used include: (1) early over-selling by some contractors with consequent bad client experiences, and (2) lack of generally accepted scientific models to relate anomalies to subsurface hydrocarbon accumulations. This article is restricted primarily to the authors' specific experience, studies, and conclusions over some 38 years with particular emphasis on the last 15 years. The authors believe these findings have resulted in improved wildcat success rates and realistic scientific models.

  11. Modeling Innovations Advance Wind Energy Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    In 1981, Glenn Research Center scientist Dr. Larry Viterna developed a model that predicted certain elements of wind turbine performance with far greater accuracy than previous methods. The model was met with derision from others in the wind energy industry, but years later, Viterna discovered it had become the most widely used method of its kind, enabling significant wind energy technologies-like the fixed pitch turbines produced by manufacturers like Aerostar Inc. of Westport, Massachusetts-that are providing sustainable, climate friendly energy sources today.

  12. A National Strategy for Advancing Climate Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlea, Edward; Elfring, Chris

    2012-12-04

    Climate models are the foundation for understanding and projecting climate and climate-related changes and are thus critical tools for supporting climate-related decision making. This study developed a holistic strategy for improving the nation's capability to accurately simulate climate and related Earth system changes on decadal to centennial timescales. The committee's report is a high level analysis, providing a strategic framework to guide progress in the nation's climate modeling enterprise over the next 10-20 years. This study was supported by DOE, NSF, NASA, NOAA, and the intelligence community.

  13. Advances in Swine Biomedical Model Genomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The swine has been a major biomedical model species, for transplantation, heart disease, allergies and asthma, as well as normal neonatal development and reproductive physiology. Swine have been used extensively for studies of infectious disease processes and analyses of preventative strategies, inc...

  14. Smart Engines Via Advanced Model Based Controls

    SciTech Connect

    Allain, Marc

    2000-08-20

    A ''new'' process for developing control systems - Less engine testing - More robust control system - Shorter development cycle time - ''Smarter'' approach to engine control - On-board models describe engine behavior - Shorter, systematic calibration process - Customer and legislative requirements designed-in.

  15. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT )

    1991-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This program will merge significant advances made in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior. Comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors.

  16. Benefits associated with advanced technologies applied to a high-speed civil transport concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozoroski, L. P.; Shields, E. W.; Fenbert, J. W.; Mcelroy, M. O.

    1993-01-01

    Results of a first-order assessment of the mission performance benefits associated with the technology improvements and goals of the Phase II High-Speed Research (HSR) Program are presented. A breakdown of the four major disciplines resulted in the following estimated TOGW savings from the 1990 vehicle: propulsion at 14.3 percent, structures at 11.7 percent, flight-deck systems at 4.0 percent, and aerodynamics at 15.0 percent. Based on 100 percent success of the HSR Phase II proposed technology advancements, the overall combined impact is estimated to result in a 45 percent reduction in TOGW from a 1990 entry-into-service (EIS) date, which could result in a viable 2005 EIS vehicle with an acceptable TOGW that meets Stage III community noise restrictions. Through supersonic laminar flow control and the possible reduction in reserve fuel requirements resulting from synthetic vision capability, the potential exists for an additional 9.6 percent reduction in TOGW.

  17. Advanced air revitalization system modeling and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dall-Baumann, Liese; Jeng, Frank; Christian, Steve; Edeer, Marybeth; Lin, Chin

    1990-01-01

    To support manned lunar and Martian exploration, an extensive evaluation of air revitalization subsystems (ARS) is being conducted. The major operations under study include carbon dioxide removal and reduction; oxygen and nitrogen production, storage, and distribution; humidity and temperature control; and trace contaminant control. A comprehensive analysis program based on a generalized block flow model was developed to facilitate the evaluation of various processes and their interaction. ASPEN PLUS was used in modelling carbon dioxide removal and reduction. Several life support test stands were developed to test new and existing technologies for their potential applicability in space. The goal was to identify processes which use compact, lightweight equipment and maximize the recovery of oxygen and water. The carbon dioxide removal test stands include solid amine/vacuum desorption (SAVD), regenerative silver oxide chemisorption, and electrochemical carbon dioxide concentration (EDC). Membrane-based carbon dioxide removal and humidity control, catalytic reduction of carbon dioxide, and catalytic oxidation of trace contaminants were also investigated.

  18. Advanced Numerical Modeling of Turbulent Atmospheric Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnlein, Christian; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Gerz, Thomas

    The present chapter introduces the method of computational simulation to predict and study turbulent atmospheric flows. This includes a description of the fundamental approach to computational simulation and the practical implementation using the technique of large-eddy simulation. In addition, selected contributions from IPA scientists to computational model development and various examples for applications are given. These examples include homogeneous turbulence, convective boundary layers, heated forest canopy, buoyant thermals, and large-scale flows with baroclinic wave instability.

  19. Integrated modeling of advanced optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.; Needels, Laura; Levine, B. Martin

    1993-02-01

    This poster session paper describes an integrated modeling and analysis capability being developed at JPL under funding provided by the JPL Director's Discretionary Fund and the JPL Control/Structure Interaction Program (CSI). The posters briefly summarize the program capabilities and illustrate them with an example problem. The computer programs developed under this effort will provide an unprecedented capability for integrated modeling and design of high performance optical spacecraft. The engineering disciplines supported include structural dynamics, controls, optics and thermodynamics. Such tools are needed in order to evaluate the end-to-end system performance of spacecraft such as OSI, POINTS, and SMMM. This paper illustrates the proof-of-concept tools that have been developed to establish the technology requirements and demonstrate the new features of integrated modeling and design. The current program also includes implementation of a prototype tool based upon the CAESY environment being developed under the NASA Guidance and Control Research and Technology Computational Controls Program. This prototype will be available late in FY-92. The development plan proposes a major software production effort to fabricate, deliver, support and maintain a national-class tool from FY-93 through FY-95.

  20. Applying knowledge-anchored hypothesis discovery methods to advance clinical and translational research: the OAMiner project

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Rebecca D; Best, Thomas M; Borlawsky, Tara B; Lai, Albert M; James, Stephen; Gurcan, Metin N

    2012-01-01

    The conduct of clinical and translational research regularly involves the use of a variety of heterogeneous and large-scale data resources. Scalable methods for the integrative analysis of such resources, particularly when attempting to leverage computable domain knowledge in order to generate actionable hypotheses in a high-throughput manner, remain an open area of research. In this report, we describe both a generalizable design pattern for such integrative knowledge-anchored hypothesis discovery operations and our experience in applying that design pattern in the experimental context of a set of driving research questions related to the publicly available Osteoarthritis Initiative data repository. We believe that this ‘test bed’ project and the lessons learned during its execution are both generalizable and representative of common clinical and translational research paradigms. PMID:22647689

  1. Use of Advanced Meteorological Model Output for Coastal Ocean Modeling in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Wang, Taiping

    2011-06-01

    It is a great challenge to specify meteorological forcing in estuarine and coastal circulation modeling using observed data because of the lack of complete datasets. As a result of this limitation, water temperature is often not simulated in estuarine and coastal modeling, with the assumption that density-induced currents are generally dominated by salinity gradients. However, in many situations, temperature gradients could be sufficiently large to influence the baroclinic motion. In this paper, we present an approach to simulate water temperature using outputs from advanced meteorological models. This modeling approach was applied to simulate annual variations of water temperatures of Puget Sound, a fjordal estuary in the Pacific Northwest of USA. Meteorological parameters from North American Region Re-analysis (NARR) model outputs were evaluated with comparisons to observed data at real-time meteorological stations. Model results demonstrated that NARR outputs can be used to drive coastal ocean models for realistic simulations of long-term water-temperature distributions in Puget Sound. Model results indicated that the net flux from NARR can be further improved with the additional information from real-time observations.

  2. Modeling and analysis of advanced binary cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Gawlik, K.

    1997-12-31

    A computer model (Cycle Analysis Simulation Tool, CAST) and a methodology have been developed to perform value analysis for small, low- to moderate-temperature binary geothermal power plants. The value analysis method allows for incremental changes in the levelized electricity cost (LEC) to be determined between a baseline plant and a modified plant. Thermodynamic cycle analyses and component sizing are carried out in the model followed by economic analysis which provides LEC results. The emphasis of the present work is on evaluating the effect of mixed working fluids instead of pure fluids on the LEC of a geothermal binary plant that uses a simple Organic Rankine Cycle. Four resources were studied spanning the range of 265{degrees}F to 375{degrees}F. A variety of isobutane and propane based mixtures, in addition to pure fluids, were used as working fluids. This study shows that the use of propane mixtures at a 265{degrees}F resource can reduce the LEC by 24% when compared to a base case value that utilizes commercial isobutane as its working fluid. The cost savings drop to 6% for a 375{degrees}F resource, where an isobutane mixture is favored. Supercritical cycles were found to have the lowest cost at all resources.

  3. Recent advances in modeling of well hydraulics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Hund-Der; Chang, Ya-Chi

    2013-01-01

    Well hydraulics is a discipline to understand the process of flow to the well in an aquifer which is regarded as a source of groundwater. A variety of analytical and numerical models have been developed over the last few decades to provide a framework for understanding and quantifying the flow behavior in aquifer systems. In this review, we first briefly introduce the background of the theory of well hydraulics and the concepts, methodologies, and applications of analytical, semi-analytical, numerical and approximate methods in solving the well-hydraulic problems. We then address the subjects of current interests such as the incorporation of effects of finite well radius, wellbore storage, well partial penetration, and the presence of skin into various practical problems of groundwater flow. Furthermore, we also summarize recent developments of flow modeling such as the flow in aquifers with horizontal wells or collector wells, the capture zone delineation, and the non-Darcian flow in porous media and fractured formations. Finally, we present a comprehensive review on the numerical calculations for five well functions frequently appearing in well-hydraulic literature and suggest some topics in groundwater flow for future research.

  4. An Advanced Time Averaging Modelling Technique for Power Electronic Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankuloski, Goce

    For stable and efficient performance of power converters, a good mathematical model is needed. This thesis presents a new modelling technique for DC/DC and DC/AC Pulse Width Modulated (PWM) converters. The new model is more accurate than the existing modelling techniques such as State Space Averaging (SSA) and Discrete Time Modelling. Unlike the SSA model, the new modelling technique, the Advanced Time Averaging Model (ATAM) includes the averaging dynamics of the converter's output. In addition to offering enhanced model accuracy, application of linearization techniques to the ATAM enables the use of conventional linear control design tools. A controller design application demonstrates that a controller designed based on the ATAM outperforms one designed using the ubiquitous SSA model. Unlike the SSA model, ATAM for DC/AC augments the system's dynamics with the dynamics needed for subcycle fundamental contribution (SFC) calculation. This allows for controller design that is based on an exact model.

  5. Modeling of advanced ECLSS/ARS with ASPEN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolodney, M.; Lange, K. E.; Edeen, M. A.

    1991-01-01

    System-level ASPEN models were developed for the CO2 partial reduction subsystem and a bioregenerative life support subsystem (BRLSS). The individual component and subsystem models were integrated into three different system-level atmospheric revitalization subsystem (ARS) models: baseline physico-chemical, BRLSS, and partial reduction of Martian CO2. The Aspen models were based on FORTRAN interfaces necessary for integration with another program, G189A, to perform quasi-transient modeling. Detailed reactor models were prepared for the two CO2 reduction reactors (Bosch and Advanced Carbon Formation), and the low-temperature trace contaminant oxidation reactor.

  6. Advances in using MRI probes and sensors for in vivo cell tracking as applied to regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Amit K.; Kadayakkara, Deepak K.; Bar-Shir, Amnon; Gilad, Assaf A.; McMahon, Michael T.; Bulte, Jeff W. M.

    2015-01-01

    The field of molecular and cellular imaging allows molecules and cells to be visualized in vivo non-invasively. It has uses not only as a research tool but in clinical settings as well, for example in monitoring cell-based regenerative therapies, in which cells are transplanted to replace degenerating or damaged tissues, or to restore a physiological function. The success of such cell-based therapies depends on several critical issues, including the route and accuracy of cell transplantation, the fate of cells after transplantation, and the interaction of engrafted cells with the host microenvironment. To assess these issues, it is necessary to monitor transplanted cells non-invasively in real-time. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a tool uniquely suited to this task, given its ability to image deep inside tissue with high temporal resolution and sensitivity. Extraordinary efforts have recently been made to improve cellular MRI as applied to regenerative medicine, by developing more advanced contrast agents for use as probes and sensors. These advances enable the non-invasive monitoring of cell fate and, more recently, that of the different cellular functions of living cells, such as their enzymatic activity and gene expression, as well as their time point of cell death. We present here a review of recent advancements in the development of these probes and sensors, and of their functioning, applications and limitations. PMID:26035841

  7. Advances in using MRI probes and sensors for in vivo cell tracking as applied to regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Amit K; Kadayakkara, Deepak K; Bar-Shir, Amnon; Gilad, Assaf A; McMahon, Michael T; Bulte, Jeff W M

    2015-04-01

    The field of molecular and cellular imaging allows molecules and cells to be visualized in vivo non-invasively. It has uses not only as a research tool but in clinical settings as well, for example in monitoring cell-based regenerative therapies, in which cells are transplanted to replace degenerating or damaged tissues, or to restore a physiological function. The success of such cell-based therapies depends on several critical issues, including the route and accuracy of cell transplantation, the fate of cells after transplantation, and the interaction of engrafted cells with the host microenvironment. To assess these issues, it is necessary to monitor transplanted cells non-invasively in real-time. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a tool uniquely suited to this task, given its ability to image deep inside tissue with high temporal resolution and sensitivity. Extraordinary efforts have recently been made to improve cellular MRI as applied to regenerative medicine, by developing more advanced contrast agents for use as probes and sensors. These advances enable the non-invasive monitoring of cell fate and, more recently, that of the different cellular functions of living cells, such as their enzymatic activity and gene expression, as well as their time point of cell death. We present here a review of recent advancements in the development of these probes and sensors, and of their functioning, applications and limitations. PMID:26035841

  8. Advanced modeling and simulation to design and manufacture high performance and reliable advanced microelectronics and microsystems.

    SciTech Connect

    Nettleship, Ian (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Hinklin, Thomas; Holcomb, David Joseph; Tandon, Rajan; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Dempsey, James Franklin; Ewsuk, Kevin Gregory; Neilsen, Michael K.; Lanagan, Michael (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA)

    2007-07-01

    An interdisciplinary team of scientists and engineers having broad expertise in materials processing and properties, materials characterization, and computational mechanics was assembled to develop science-based modeling/simulation technology to design and reproducibly manufacture high performance and reliable, complex microelectronics and microsystems. The team's efforts focused on defining and developing a science-based infrastructure to enable predictive compaction, sintering, stress, and thermomechanical modeling in ''real systems'', including: (1) developing techniques to and determining materials properties and constitutive behavior required for modeling; (2) developing new, improved/updated models and modeling capabilities, (3) ensuring that models are representative of the physical phenomena being simulated; and (4) assessing existing modeling capabilities to identify advances necessary to facilitate the practical application of Sandia's predictive modeling technology.

  9. The Lag Model Applied to High Speed Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Michael E.; Coakley, Thomas J.; Lillard, Randolph P.

    2005-01-01

    The Lag model has shown great promise in prediction of low speed and transonic separations. The predictions of the model, along with other models (Spalart-Allmaras and Menter SST) are assessed for various high speed flowfields. In addition to skin friction and separation predictions, the prediction of heat transfer are compared among these models, and some fundamental building block flowfields, are investigated.

  10. Existing Soil Carbon Models Do Not Apply to Forested Wetlands.

    SciTech Connect

    Trettin, C C; Song, B; Jurgensen, M F; Li, C

    2001-09-14

    Evaluation of 12 widely used soil carbon models to determine applicability to wetland ecosystems. For any land area that includes wetlands, none of the individual models would produce reasonable simulations based on soil processes. Study presents a wetland soil carbon model framework based on desired attributes, the DNDC model and components of the CENTURY and WMEM models. Proposed synthesis would be appropriate when considering soil carbon dynamics at multiple spatial scales and where the land area considered includes both wetland and upland ecosystems.

  11. Novel Multiscale Modeling Tool Applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, Matthew B.; Papin, Jason A.

    2013-01-01

    Multiscale modeling is used to represent biological systems with increasing frequency and success. Multiscale models are often hybrids of different modeling frameworks and programming languages. We present the MATLAB-NetLogo extension (MatNet) as a novel tool for multiscale modeling. We demonstrate the utility of the tool with a multiscale model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation that incorporates both an agent-based model (ABM) and constraint-based metabolic modeling. The hybrid model correctly recapitulates oxygen-limited biofilm metabolic activity and predicts increased growth rate via anaerobic respiration with the addition of nitrate to the growth media. In addition, a genome-wide survey of metabolic mutants and biofilm formation exemplifies the powerful analyses that are enabled by this computational modeling tool. PMID:24147108

  12. Robust Decision-making Applied to Model Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Hemez, Francois M.

    2012-08-06

    The scientific and engineering communities are relying more and more on numerical models to simulate ever-increasingly complex phenomena. Selecting a model, from among a family of models that meets the simulation requirements, presents a challenge to modern-day analysts. To address this concern, a framework is adopted anchored in info-gap decision theory. The framework proposes to select models by examining the trade-offs between prediction accuracy and sensitivity to epistemic uncertainty. The framework is demonstrated on two structural engineering applications by asking the following question: Which model, of several numerical models, approximates the behavior of a structure when parameters that define each of those models are unknown? One observation is that models that are nominally more accurate are not necessarily more robust, and their accuracy can deteriorate greatly depending upon the assumptions made. It is posited that, as reliance on numerical models increases, establishing robustness will become as important as demonstrating accuracy.

  13. Constructing an advanced software tool for planetary atmospheric modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M.; Sims, Michael; Podolak, Ester; Mckay, Christopher

    1990-01-01

    Scientific model building can be an intensive and painstaking process, often involving the development of large and complex computer programs. Despite the effort involved, scientific models cannot be easily distributed and shared with other scientists. In general, implemented scientific models are complex, idiosyncratic, and difficult for anyone but the original scientist/programmer to understand. We believe that advanced software techniques can facilitate both the model building and model sharing process. In this paper, we describe a prototype for a scientific modeling software tool that serves as an aid to the scientist in developing and using models. This tool includes an interactive intelligent graphical interface, a high level domain specific modeling language, a library of physics equations and experimental datasets, and a suite of data display facilities. Our prototype has been developed in the domain of planetary atmospheric modeling, and is being used to construct models of Titan's atmosphere.

  14. The monocular visual imaging technology model applied in the airport surface surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhe; Wang, Jian; Huang, Chao

    2013-08-01

    At present, the civil aviation airports use the surface surveillance radar monitoring and positioning systems to monitor the aircrafts, vehicles and the other moving objects. Surface surveillance radars can cover most of the airport scenes, but because of the terminals, covered bridges and other buildings geometry, surface surveillance radar systems inevitably have some small segment blind spots. This paper presents a monocular vision imaging technology model for airport surface surveillance, achieving the perception of scenes of moving objects such as aircrafts, vehicles and personnel location. This new model provides an important complement for airport surface surveillance, which is different from the traditional surface surveillance radar techniques. Such technique not only provides clear objects activities screen for the ATC, but also provides image recognition and positioning of moving targets in this area. Thereby it can improve the work efficiency of the airport operations and avoid the conflict between the aircrafts and vehicles. This paper first introduces the monocular visual imaging technology model applied in the airport surface surveillance and then the monocular vision measurement accuracy analysis of the model. The monocular visual imaging technology model is simple, low cost, and highly efficient. It is an advanced monitoring technique which can make up blind spot area of the surface surveillance radar monitoring and positioning systems.

  15. A Model Driven Engineering Approach Applied to Master Data Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menet, Ludovic; Lamolle, Myriam

    The federation of data sources and the definition of pivot models are strongly interrelated topics. This paper explores a mediation solution based on XML architecture and the concept of Master Data Management. In this solution, pivot models use the standard XML Schema allowing the definition of complex data structures. The introduction of a MDE approach is a means to make modeling easier. We use UML as an abstract modeling layer. UML is a modeling object language, which is more and more used and recognized as a standard in the software engineering field, which makes it an ideal candidate for the modeling of XML Schema models. In this purpose we introduce features of the UML formalism, through profiles, to facilitate the definition and the exchange of models.

  16. Technological Diffusion within Educational Institutions: Applying the Technology Acceptance Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolski, Stacy; Jackson, Sally

    Expectancy models of behavior such as the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) and the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) offer guidelines that aid efforts to facilitate use of new technology. These models remind us that both acceptance of and resistance to technology use are grounded in beliefs and norms regarding the technology. Although TAM is widely…

  17. Asian Library Partnerships: Applying the Knowledge Model for Library Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, G. E.; Cullen, Rowena

    The standard approach adopted in library networking or partnership models is neither developmental nor evolutionary, yet development and evolution are keys to robust, contextually responsive partnerships. Using a set of knowledge models first proposed by Owen and Wiercx, this paper argues for a new approach to the modeling of networks in which…

  18. Applying the Job Characteristics Model to the College Education Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kass, Steven J.; Vodanovich, Stephen J.; Khosravi, Jasmine Y.

    2011-01-01

    Boredom is one of the most common complaints among university students, with studies suggesting its link to poor grades, drop out, and behavioral problems. Principles borrowed from industrial-organizational psychology may help prevent boredom and enrich the classroom experience. In the current study, we applied the core dimensions of the job…

  19. Ontological Relations and the Capability Maturity Model Applied in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Oliveira, Jerônimo Moreira; Campoy, Laura Gómez; Vilarino, Lilian

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a new approach to the discovery, identification and connection of ontological elements within the domain of characterization in learning organizations. In particular, the study can be applied to contexts where organizations require planning, logic, balance, and cognition in knowledge creation scenarios, which is the case for the…

  20. A Novel Bioluminescence Orthotopic Mouse Model for Advanced Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Torossian, Artour; Li, Wenyan; Schleicher, Stephen; Niu, Kathy; Giacalone, Nicholas J.; Kim, Sung June; Chen, Heidi; Gonzalez, Adriana; Moretti, Luigi; Lu, Bo

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States despite recent advances in our understanding of this challenging disease. An animal model for high-throughput screening of therapeutic agents for advanced lung cancer could help promote the development of more successful treatment interventions. To develop our orthotopic lung cancer model, luciferase-expressing A549 cancer cells were injected into the mediastinum of athymic nude mice. To determine whether the model would allow easy monitoring of response to therapeutic interventions, tumors were treated with 30 mg/kg Paclitaxel or were irradiated with 5 fractions of 2 Gy, and tumor burden was monitored using bioluminescence imaging. Evidence of radiation-induced lung injury was assessed using immunohistochemical staining for phospho-Smad2/3 and cleaved caspase-3. We found that tumor implantation recapitulated advanced human lung cancer as evidenced by tumor establishment and proliferation within the mediastinum. The tumor responded to Paclitaxel or radiation as shown by decreased tumor bioluminescence and improved overall survival. Immunohistochemistry revealed increased phospho-Smad2/3 and cleaved caspase-3 in irradiated lungs, consistent with radiation-induced lung injury. This orthotopic lung cancer model may help provide a method to assess therapeutic interventions in a preclinical setting that recapitulates locally advanced lung cancer. PMID:21663394

  1. Advances in Games Technology: Software, Models, and Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prakash, Edmond; Brindle, Geoff; Jones, Kevin; Zhou, Suiping; Chaudhari, Narendra S.; Wong, Kok-Wai

    2009-01-01

    Games technology has undergone tremendous development. In this article, the authors report the rapid advancement that has been observed in the way games software is being developed, as well as in the development of games content using game engines. One area that has gained special attention is modeling the game environment such as terrain and…

  2. QUEST FOR AN ADVANCED REGIONAL AIR QUALITY MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organizations interested in advancing the science and technology of regional air quality modeling on the "grand challenge" scale have joined to form CAMRAQ. hey plan to leverage their research finds by collaborating on the development and evaluation of CMSs so ambitious in scope ...

  3. Applying Advanced and Existing Sensors in Dealing with Potential Natural Disasters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habib, Shahid

    2006-01-01

    As an integrated observing strategy, the concept of sensorweb for Earth observations is appealing in many aspects. For instance, by increasing the spatial and temporal coverage of observations from space and other vantage points, one can eventually aid in increasing the accuracy of the atmospheric models which are precursor to hurricane track prediction, volcanic eruption forecast, and trajectory path of transcontinental transport of dust, harmful nuclear and chemical plumes. In reality, there is little analysis available in terms of benefits, costs and optimized set of sensors needed to make these necessary observations. This is a complex problem that must be carefully studied and balanced over many boundaries such as science, defense, early warning, security, and surveillance. Simplistically, the sensorweb concept from the technological point of view alone has a great appeal in the defense, early warning and security applications. In fact, it can be relatively less expensive in per unit cost as opposed to building and deploying it for the scientific use. However, overall observing approach should not be singled out and aligned somewhat orthogonally to serve a particular need. On the other hand, the sensorweb should be designed and deployed to serve multiple subject areas and customers simultaneously; and can behave as directed measuring systems for both science and operational entities. Sensorweb can be designed to act as expert systems, and/or also provide a dedicated integrated surveillance network. Today, there is no system in the world that is fully integrated in terms of reporting timely multiple hazards warnings, computing the loss of life and property damage estimates, and is also designed to cater to everyone s needs. It is not an easier problem to undertake and more so is not practically solvable. At this time due to some recent events in the world, the scientific community, social scientists, and operational agencies are more cognizant and getting

  4. Advancing Space Weather Modeling Capabilities at the CCMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, M. Leila; Kuznetsova, Maria; Boblitt, Justin; Chulaki, Anna; MacNeice, Peter; Mendoza, Michelle; Mullinix, Richard; Pembroke, Asher; Pulkkinen, Antti; Rastaetter, Lutz; Shim, Ja Soon; Taktakishvili, Aleksandre; Wiegand, Chiu; Zheng, Yihua

    2016-04-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC, http://ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov) serves as a community access point to an expanding collection of state-of-the-art space environment models and as a hub for collaborative development on next generation of space weather forecasting systems. In partnership with model developers and the international research and operational communities, the CCMC integrates new data streams and models from diverse sources into end-to-end space weather predictive systems, identifies weak links in data-model & model-model coupling and leads community efforts to fill those gaps. The presentation will focus on the latest model installations at the CCMC and advances in CCMC-led community-wide model validation projects.

  5. Specification of advanced safety modeling requirements (Rev. 0).

    SciTech Connect

    Fanning, T. H.; Tautges, T. J.

    2008-06-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Global Nuclear Energy Partnership has lead to renewed interest in liquid-metal-cooled fast reactors for the purpose of closing the nuclear fuel cycle and making more efficient use of future repository capacity. However, the U.S. has not designed or constructed a fast reactor in nearly 30 years. Accurate, high-fidelity, whole-plant dynamics safety simulations will play a crucial role by providing confidence that component and system designs will satisfy established design limits and safety margins under a wide variety of operational, design basis, and beyond design basis transient conditions. Current modeling capabilities for fast reactor safety analyses have resulted from several hundred person-years of code development effort supported by experimental validation. The broad spectrum of mechanistic and phenomenological models that have been developed represent an enormous amount of institutional knowledge that needs to be maintained. Complicating this, the existing code architectures for safety modeling evolved from programming practices of the 1970s. This has lead to monolithic applications with interdependent data models which require significant knowledge of the complexities of the entire code in order for each component to be maintained. In order to develop an advanced fast reactor safety modeling capability, the limitations of the existing code architecture must be overcome while preserving the capabilities that already exist. To accomplish this, a set of advanced safety modeling requirements is defined, based on modern programming practices, that focuses on modular development within a flexible coupling framework. An approach for integrating the existing capabilities of the SAS4A/SASSYS-1 fast reactor safety analysis code into the SHARP framework is provided in order to preserve existing capabilities while providing a smooth transition to advanced modeling capabilities. In doing this, the advanced fast reactor safety models will

  6. Computer modeling for advanced life support system analysis.

    PubMed

    Drysdale, A

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses the equivalent mass approach to advanced life support system analysis, describes a computer model developed to use this approach, and presents early results from modeling the NASA JSC BioPlex. The model is built using an object oriented approach and G2, a commercially available modeling package Cost factor equivalencies are given for the Volosin scenarios. Plant data from NASA KSC and Utah State University (USU) are used, together with configuration data from the BioPlex design effort. Initial results focus on the importance of obtaining high plant productivity with a flight-like configuration. PMID:11540448

  7. Test model designs for advanced refractory ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy Kim

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of space vehicles will be subjected to severe aerothermal loads and will require an improved thermal protection system (TPS) and other advanced vehicle components. In order to ensure the satisfactory performance system (TPS) and other advanced vehicle materials and components, testing is to be performed in environments similar to space flight. The design and fabrication of the test models should be fairly simple but still accomplish test objectives. In the Advanced Refractory Ceramic Materials test series, the models and model holders will need to withstand the required heat fluxes of 340 to 817 W/sq cm or surface temperatures in the range of 2700 K to 3000 K. The model holders should provide one dimensional (1-D) heat transfer to the samples and the appropriate flow field without compromising the primary test objectives. The optical properties such as the effective emissivity, catalytic efficiency coefficients, thermal properties, and mass loss measurements are also taken into consideration in the design process. Therefore, it is the intent of this paper to demonstrate the design schemes for different models and model holders that would accommodate these test requirements and ensure the safe operation in a typical arc jet facility.

  8. Sensor Management for Applied Research Technologies (SMART)-On Demand Modeling (ODM) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, M.; Blakeslee, R.; Hood, R.; Jedlovec, G.; Botts, M.; Li, X.

    2006-01-01

    NASA requires timely on-demand data and analysis capabilities to enable practical benefits of Earth science observations. However, a significant challenge exists in accessing and integrating data from multiple sensors or platforms to address Earth science problems because of the large data volumes, varying sensor scan characteristics, unique orbital coverage, and the steep learning curve associated with each sensor and data type. The development of sensor web capabilities to autonomously process these data streams (whether real-time or archived) provides an opportunity to overcome these obstacles and facilitate the integration and synthesis of Earth science data and weather model output. A three year project, entitled Sensor Management for Applied Research Technologies (SMART) - On Demand Modeling (ODM), will develop and demonstrate the readiness of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) capabilities that integrate both Earth observations and forecast model output into new data acquisition and assimilation strategies. The advancement of SWE-enabled systems (i.e., use of SensorML, sensor planning services - SPS, sensor observation services - SOS, sensor alert services - SAS and common observation model protocols) will have practical and efficient uses in the Earth science community for enhanced data set generation, real-time data assimilation with operational applications, and for autonomous sensor tasking for unique data collection.

  9. Model-free adaptive control of advanced power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, George Shu-Xing; Mulkey, Steven L.; Wang, Qiang

    2015-08-18

    A novel 3-Input-3-Output (3.times.3) Model-Free Adaptive (MFA) controller with a set of artificial neural networks as part of the controller is introduced. A 3.times.3 MFA control system using the inventive 3.times.3 MFA controller is described to control key process variables including Power, Steam Throttle Pressure, and Steam Temperature of boiler-turbine-generator (BTG) units in conventional and advanced power plants. Those advanced power plants may comprise Once-Through Supercritical (OTSC) Boilers, Circulating Fluidized-Bed (CFB) Boilers, and Once-Through Supercritical Circulating Fluidized-Bed (OTSC CFB) Boilers.

  10. UNAMAP: user's network for applied modeling of air pollution, Version 6. Model

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.B.; Busse, A.D.

    1986-08-01

    UNAMAP (Version 6) represents the 1986 update to the users network for applied modeling of air pollution. UNAMAP consists of an ASCII magnetic tape containing FORTRAN codes an test data for 25 air-quality simulation models (AQSM) as well as associated documentation. AQSM's and supporting programs and data are arranged in six sections: (1) Guideline (appendix A) models..(files 2 through 9); (2) Other models or processors (new models). .(files 10 through 19 and 33); (3) Other models and processors (revised)..(files 20 through 27 and 32); (4) Additional models for regulatory use (files 28 through 31); (5) Data files..(files 34 through 39); and (6) Output print files..(files 40 through 68). There are 68 files on this tape..Software Description: The system is written in FORTRAN for implementation on a UNIVAC 1100/82 using the 39R2 operating system.

  11. Applying the S.O.I. Model to Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Marilyn A.

    The article discusses the use of the Structure of Intellect (SOI) model as a basis for developing thinking abilities in a variety of curriculum areas: (1) the integration of subject matter areas and SOI operations; (2) thematic lessons that sequence specific cells of the SOI model; (3) directed teaching lessons to develop student awareness of…

  12. Applying reliability models to the maintenance of Space Shuttle software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneidewind, Norman F.

    1992-01-01

    Software reliability models provide the software manager with a powerful tool for predicting, controlling, and assessing the reliability of software during maintenance. We show how a reliability model can be effectively employed for reliability prediction and the development of maintenance strategies using the Space Shuttle Primary Avionics Software Subsystem as an example.

  13. Hydrologic and water quality teminology as applied to modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A survey of literature and examination in particular of terminology use in a previous special collection of modeling calibration and validation papers has been conducted to arrive at a list of consistent terminology recommended for writing about hydrologic and water quality model calibration and val...

  14. Modeling Educational Choices. A Binomial Logit Model Applied to the Demand for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimenez, Juan de Dios; Salas-Velasco, Manual

    2000-01-01

    Presents a microeconomic analysis of the choice of university degree course (3 year or 4 year course) Spanish students make on finishing their secondary studies and applies the developed binomial logit model to survey data from 388 high school graduates. Findings show the importance of various factors in determining the likelihood of choosing the…

  15. Evaluation of reliability modeling tools for advanced fault tolerant systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Robert; Scheper, Charlotte

    1986-01-01

    The Computer Aided Reliability Estimation (CARE III) and Automated Reliability Interactice Estimation System (ARIES 82) reliability tools for application to advanced fault tolerance aerospace systems were evaluated. To determine reliability modeling requirements, the evaluation focused on the Draper Laboratories' Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) architecture as an example architecture for fault tolerance aerospace systems. Advantages and limitations were identified for each reliability evaluation tool. The CARE III program was designed primarily for analyzing ultrareliable flight control systems. The ARIES 82 program's primary use was to support university research and teaching. Both CARE III and ARIES 82 were not suited for determining the reliability of complex nodal networks of the type used to interconnect processing sites in the AIPS architecture. It was concluded that ARIES was not suitable for modeling advanced fault tolerant systems. It was further concluded that subject to some limitations (the difficulty in modeling systems with unpowered spare modules, systems where equipment maintenance must be considered, systems where failure depends on the sequence in which faults occurred, and systems where multiple faults greater than a double near coincident faults must be considered), CARE III is best suited for evaluating the reliability of advanced tolerant systems for air transport.

  16. Alexandrium minutum growth controlled by phosphorus . An applied model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapelle, A.; Labry, C.; Sourisseau, M.; Lebreton, C.; Youenou, A.; Crassous, M. P.

    2010-11-01

    Toxic algae are a worldwide problem threatening aquaculture, public health and tourism. Alexandrium, a toxic dinoflagellate proliferates in Northwest France estuaries (i.e. the Penzé estuary) causing Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning events. Vegetative growth, and in particular the role of nutrient uptake and growth rate, are crucial parameters to understand toxic blooms. With the goal of modelling in situ Alexandrium blooms related to environmental parameters, we first try to calibrate a zero-dimensional box model of Alexandrium growth. This work focuses on phosphorus nutrition. Our objective is to calibrate Alexandrium minutum as well as Heterocapsa triquetra (a non-toxic dinoflagellate) growth under different rates of phosphorus supply, other factors being optimal and constant. Laboratory experiments are used to calibrate two growth models and three uptake models for each species. Models are then used to simulate monospecific batch and semi-continuous experiments as well as competition between the two algae (mixed cultures). Results show that the Droop growth model together with linear uptake versus quota can represent most of our observations, although a power law uptake function can more accurately simulate our phosphorus uptake data. We note that such models have limitations in non steady-state situations and cell quotas can depend on a variety of factors, so care must be taken in extrapolating these results beyond the specific conditions studied.

  17. Blue sky catastrophe as applied to modeling of cardiac rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyzin, S. D.; Kolesov, A. Yu.; Rozov, N. Kh.

    2015-07-01

    A new mathematical model for the electrical activity of the heart is proposed. The model represents a special singularly perturbed three-dimensional system of ordinary differential equations with one fast and two slow variables. A characteristic feature of the system is that its solution performs nonclassical relaxation oscillations and simultaneously undergoes a blue sky catastrophe bifurcation. Both these factors make it possible to achieve a phenomenological proximity between the time dependence of the fast component in the model and an ECG of the human heart.

  18. Gasification CFD Modeling for Advanced Power Plant Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zitney, S.E.; Guenther, C.P.

    2005-09-01

    In this paper we have described recent progress on developing CFD models for two commercial-scale gasifiers, including a two-stage, coal slurry-fed, oxygen-blown, pressurized, entrained-flow gasifier and a scaled-up design of the PSDF transport gasifier. Also highlighted was NETL’s Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator for coupling high-fidelity equipment models with process simulation for the design, analysis, and optimization of advanced power plants. Using APECS, we have coupled the entrained-flow gasifier CFD model into a coal-fired, gasification-based FutureGen power and hydrogen production plant. The results for the FutureGen co-simulation illustrate how the APECS technology can help engineers better understand and optimize gasifier fluid dynamics and related phenomena that impact overall power plant performance.

  19. The development of a model curriculum for applied health informatics.

    PubMed Central

    MacNeill, J. E.; Covvey, H. D.

    2000-01-01

    Applied Health Informaticians (AHIs) are professionals that deploy information technologies in support of health system processes. AHIs require both a well-developed knowledge base that encompasses the health system, computer science, and health information systems-related topics (what is known as the "Body of Knowledge"), as well as a set of intellectual and procedural skills (what we call the "Body of Skills") and preparatory experiences. The availability of skilled and knowledgeable AHIs has become a critical issue in today's health system. PMID:11079939

  20. Joint regression analysis and AMMI model applied to oat improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A.; Oliveira, T. A.; Mejza, S.

    2012-09-01

    In our work we present an application of some biometrical methods useful in genotype stability evaluation, namely AMMI model, Joint Regression Analysis (JRA) and multiple comparison tests. A genotype stability analysis of oat (Avena Sativa L.) grain yield was carried out using data of the Portuguese Plant Breeding Board, sample of the 22 different genotypes during the years 2002, 2003 and 2004 in six locations. In Ferreira et al. (2006) the authors state the relevance of the regression models and of the Additive Main Effects and Multiplicative Interactions (AMMI) model, to study and to estimate phenotypic stability effects. As computational techniques we use the Zigzag algorithm to estimate the regression coefficients and the agricolae-package available in R software for AMMI model analysis.

  1. Applying simulation and logistics modeling to tansportation issues

    SciTech Connect

    Funkhouser, B.R.; Ballweg, E.L.; Mackoy, R.D.

    1995-08-15

    This paper describes an application where transportation logistics and simulation tools are integrated to create a modeling environment for transportation planning. The Transportation Planning Model (TPM) is a tool developed for the Department of Energy (DOE) to aid in the long-term planning of their transportation resources. The focus of the tool is to aid DOE and Sandia National Laboratory analysts in the planning of future fleet sizes, driver and support personnel sizes, base site locations, and resource balancing among the base sites. The design approach is to develop a rapid modeling environment which integrates graphical user interfaces, logistics optimizing tools, and simulation modeling. Using the TPM an analyst can easily set up a shipment scenario and perform multiple ``What If`` evaluations. The TPM has been developed on personal computers using commercial off-the-shelf software tools under the WINDOW{reg_sign} operating environment.

  2. Two-Point Turbulence Closure Applied to Variable Resolution Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, Sharath S.; Rubinstein, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Variable resolution methods have become frontline CFD tools, but in order to take full advantage of this promising new technology, more formal theoretical development is desirable. Two general classes of variable resolution methods can be identified: hybrid or zonal methods in which RANS and LES models are solved in different flow regions, and bridging or seamless models which interpolate smoothly between RANS and LES. This paper considers the formulation of bridging methods using methods of two-point closure theory. The fundamental problem is to derive a subgrid two-equation model. We compare and reconcile two different approaches to this goal: the Partially Integrated Transport Model, and the Partially Averaged Navier-Stokes method.

  3. Pressure Sensitive Paint Applied to Flexible Models Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schairer, Edward T.; Kushner, Laura Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    One gap in current pressure-measurement technology is a high-spatial-resolution method for accurately measuring pressures on spatially and temporally varying wind-tunnel models such as Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators (IADs), parachutes, and sails. Conventional pressure taps only provide sparse measurements at discrete points and are difficult to integrate with the model structure without altering structural properties. Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) provides pressure measurements with high spatial resolution, but its use has been limited to rigid or semi-rigid models. Extending the use of PSP from rigid surfaces to flexible surfaces would allow direct, high-spatial-resolution measurements of the unsteady surface pressure distribution. Once developed, this new capability will be combined with existing stereo photogrammetry methods to simultaneously measure the shape of a dynamically deforming model in a wind tunnel. Presented here are the results and methodology for using PSP on flexible surfaces.

  4. Applied topology optimization of vibro-acoustic hearing instrument models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Søndergaard, Morten Birkmose; Pedersen, Claus B. W.

    2014-02-01

    Designing hearing instruments remains an acoustic challenge as users request small designs for comfortable wear and cosmetic appeal and at the same time require sufficient amplification from the device. First, to ensure proper amplification in the device, a critical design challenge in the hearing instrument is to minimize the feedback between the outputs (generated sound and vibrations) from the receiver looping back into the microphones. Secondly, the feedback signal is minimized using time consuming trial-and-error design procedures for physical prototypes and virtual models using finite element analysis. In the present work it is demonstrated that structural topology optimization of vibro-acoustic finite element models can be used to both sufficiently minimize the feedback signal and to reduce the time consuming trial-and-error design approach. The structural topology optimization of a vibro-acoustic finite element model is shown for an industrial full scale model hearing instrument.

  5. Tensegrity applied to modelling the motion of viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simona-Mariana, Cretu; Gabriela-Catalina, Brinzan

    2011-02-01

    A considerable number of viruses' structures have been discovered and more are expected to be identified. Different viruses' symmetries can be observed at the nanoscale level. The mechanical models of some viruses realised by scientists are described in this paper, none of which has taken into consideration the internal deformation of subsystems. The authors' models for some viruses' elements are introduced, with rigid and flexible links, which reproduce the movements of viruses including internal deformations of the subunits.

  6. The J3 SCR model applied to resonant converter simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avant, R. L.; Lee, F. C. Y.

    1985-01-01

    The J3 SCR model is a continuous topology computer model for the SCR. Its circuit analog and parameter estimation procedure are uniformly applicable to popular computer-aided design and analysis programs such as SPICE2 and SCEPTRE. The circuit analog is based on the intrinsic three pn junction structure of the SCR. The parameter estimation procedure requires only manufacturer's specification sheet quantities as a data base.

  7. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. ); Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. )

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this study are to establish the mechanisms and rates of basic steps in coal conversion processes, to integrate and incorporate this information into comprehensive computer models for coal conversion processes, to evaluate these models and to apply them to gasification, mild gasification and combustion in heat engines.

  8. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. ); Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. )

    1991-09-25

    The objectives of this study are to establish the mechanisms and rates of basic steps in coal conversion processes, to integrate and incorporate this information into comprehensive computer models for coal conversion processes, to evaluate these models and to apply them to gasification, mild gasification and combustion in heat engines. (VC)

  9. Applying different spatial distribution and modelling concepts in three nested mesoscale catchments of Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongartz, K.

    Distributed, physically based river basin models are receiving increasing importance in integrated water resources management (IWRM) in Germany and in Europe, especially after the release of the new European Water Framework Directive (WFD). Applications in mesoscale catchments require an appropriate approach to represent the spatial distribution of related catchment properties such as land use, soil physics and topography by utilizing techniques of remote sensing and GIS analyses. The challenge is to delineate scale independent homogeneous modelling entities which, on the one hand may represent the dynamics of the dominant hydrological processes and, on the other hand can be derived from spatially distributed physiographical catchment properties. This scaling problem is tackled in this regional modelling study by applying the concept of hydrological response units (HRUs). In a nested catchment approach three different modelling conceptualisations are used to describe the runoff processes: (i) the topographic stream-segment-based HRU delineation proposed by Leavesley et al. [Precipitation-Runoff-Modelling-System, User’s Manual, Water Resource Investigations Report 83-4238, US Geological Survey, 1983]; (ii) the process based physiographic HRU-concept introduced by Flügel [Hydrol. Process. 9 (1995) 423] and (iii) an advanced HRU-concept adapted from (ii), which included the topographic topology of HRU-areas and the river network developed by Staudenraush [Eco Regio 8 (2000) 121]. The influence of different boundary conditions associated with changing the landuse classes, the temporal data resolution and the landuse scenarios were investigated. The mesoscale catchment of the river Ilm ( A∼895 km 2) in Thuringia, Germany, and the Precipitation-Runoff-Modelling-System (PRMS) were selected for this study. Simulations show that the physiographic based concept is a reliable method for modelling basin dynamics in catchments up to 200 km 2 whereas in larger catchments

  10. Applying artificial vision models to human scene understanding

    PubMed Central

    Aminoff, Elissa M.; Toneva, Mariya; Shrivastava, Abhinav; Chen, Xinlei; Misra, Ishan; Gupta, Abhinav; Tarr, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    How do we understand the complex patterns of neural responses that underlie scene understanding? Studies of the network of brain regions held to be scene-selective—the parahippocampal/lingual region (PPA), the retrosplenial complex (RSC), and the occipital place area (TOS)—have typically focused on single visual dimensions (e.g., size), rather than the high-dimensional feature space in which scenes are likely to be neurally represented. Here we leverage well-specified artificial vision systems to explicate a more complex understanding of how scenes are encoded in this functional network. We correlated similarity matrices within three different scene-spaces arising from: (1) BOLD activity in scene-selective brain regions; (2) behavioral measured judgments of visually-perceived scene similarity; and (3) several different computer vision models. These correlations revealed: (1) models that relied on mid- and high-level scene attributes showed the highest correlations with the patterns of neural activity within the scene-selective network; (2) NEIL and SUN—the models that best accounted for the patterns obtained from PPA and TOS—were different from the GIST model that best accounted for the pattern obtained from RSC; (3) The best performing models outperformed behaviorally-measured judgments of scene similarity in accounting for neural data. One computer vision method—NEIL (“Never-Ending-Image-Learner”), which incorporates visual features learned as statistical regularities across web-scale numbers of scenes—showed significant correlations with neural activity in all three scene-selective regions and was one of the two models best able to account for variance in the PPA and TOS. We suggest that these results are a promising first step in explicating more fine-grained models of neural scene understanding, including developing a clearer picture of the division of labor among the components of the functional scene-selective brain network. PMID:25698964

  11. Applying artificial vision models to human scene understanding.

    PubMed

    Aminoff, Elissa M; Toneva, Mariya; Shrivastava, Abhinav; Chen, Xinlei; Misra, Ishan; Gupta, Abhinav; Tarr, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    How do we understand the complex patterns of neural responses that underlie scene understanding? Studies of the network of brain regions held to be scene-selective-the parahippocampal/lingual region (PPA), the retrosplenial complex (RSC), and the occipital place area (TOS)-have typically focused on single visual dimensions (e.g., size), rather than the high-dimensional feature space in which scenes are likely to be neurally represented. Here we leverage well-specified artificial vision systems to explicate a more complex understanding of how scenes are encoded in this functional network. We correlated similarity matrices within three different scene-spaces arising from: (1) BOLD activity in scene-selective brain regions; (2) behavioral measured judgments of visually-perceived scene similarity; and (3) several different computer vision models. These correlations revealed: (1) models that relied on mid- and high-level scene attributes showed the highest correlations with the patterns of neural activity within the scene-selective network; (2) NEIL and SUN-the models that best accounted for the patterns obtained from PPA and TOS-were different from the GIST model that best accounted for the pattern obtained from RSC; (3) The best performing models outperformed behaviorally-measured judgments of scene similarity in accounting for neural data. One computer vision method-NEIL ("Never-Ending-Image-Learner"), which incorporates visual features learned as statistical regularities across web-scale numbers of scenes-showed significant correlations with neural activity in all three scene-selective regions and was one of the two models best able to account for variance in the PPA and TOS. We suggest that these results are a promising first step in explicating more fine-grained models of neural scene understanding, including developing a clearer picture of the division of labor among the components of the functional scene-selective brain network. PMID:25698964

  12. GIS-Based Population Model Applied to Nevada Transportation Routes

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, G.S.; Neuhauser, K.S.

    1999-03-04

    Recently, a model based on geographic information system (GIS) processing of US Census Block data has made high-resolution population analysis for transportation risk analysis technically and economically feasible. Population density bordering each kilometer of a route may be tabulated with specific route sections falling into each of three categories (Rural, Suburban or Urban) identified for separate risk analysis. In addition to the improvement in resolution of Urban areas along a route, the model provides a statistically-based correction to population densities in Rural and Suburban areas where Census Block dimensions may greatly exceed the 800-meter scale of interest. A semi-automated application of the GIS model to a subset of routes in Nevada (related to the Yucca Mountain project) are presented, and the results compared to previous models including a model based on published Census and other data. These comparisons demonstrate that meaningful improvement in accuracy and specificity of transportation risk analyses is dependent on correspondingly accurate and geographically-specific population density data.

  13. A Model-Based Prognostics Approach Applied to Pneumatic Valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Matthew J.; Goebel, Kai

    2011-01-01

    Within the area of systems health management, the task of prognostics centers on predicting when components will fail. Model-based prognostics exploits domain knowledge of the system, its components, and how they fail by casting the underlying physical phenomena in a physics-based model that is derived from first principles. Uncertainty cannot be avoided in prediction, therefore, algorithms are employed that help in managing these uncertainties. The particle filtering algorithm has become a popular choice for model-based prognostics due to its wide applicability, ease of implementation, and support for uncertainty management. We develop a general model-based prognostics methodology within a robust probabilistic framework using particle filters. As a case study, we consider a pneumatic valve from the Space Shuttle cryogenic refueling system. We develop a detailed physics-based model of the pneumatic valve, and perform comprehensive simulation experiments to illustrate our prognostics approach and evaluate its effectiveness and robustness. The approach is demonstrated using historical pneumatic valve data from the refueling system.

  14. Nutrient-controlled growth of Skeletonema costatum: an applied model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ke; Qiu, Zhongfeng; He, Yijun; Yin, Baoshu

    2014-05-01

    To model Skeletonema costatum blooms and their relationship with environmental parameters in situ, a S. costatum-specific zero-dimensional box model based on the mechanistic model Eco3M was established using physiological features. The parameters were calibrated using experimental counterparts, and simulations were compared with published laboratory findings. The resulting normalized objective function (NOF) values are less than 1.0 (and in most cases less than 0.58) and the values for the slope γ (between 0.656 7-1.127 4) and R 2 (between 0.806 8-0.971) are close to 1.0 for most of the sub-figures. This indicates good agreement between simulated and measured data and suggests that the model reproduces the general characteristics of S. costatum growth and use of nutrients under different N- or P-limiting conditions. The model is appropriate for further applications and can be used to test more scenarios using other nutrients.

  15. A new inverse regression model applied to radiation biodosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Higueras, Manuel; Puig, Pedro; Ainsbury, Elizabeth A.; Rothkamm, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Biological dosimetry based on chromosome aberration scoring in peripheral blood lymphocytes enables timely assessment of the ionizing radiation dose absorbed by an individual. Here, new Bayesian-type count data inverse regression methods are introduced for situations where responses are Poisson or two-parameter compound Poisson distributed. Our Poisson models are calculated in a closed form, by means of Hermite and negative binomial (NB) distributions. For compound Poisson responses, complete and simplified models are provided. The simplified models are also expressible in a closed form and involve the use of compound Hermite and compound NB distributions. Three examples of applications are given that demonstrate the usefulness of these methodologies in cytogenetic radiation biodosimetry and in radiotherapy. We provide R and SAS codes which reproduce these examples. PMID:25663804

  16. Radiative transfer theory applied to ocean bottom modeling.

    PubMed

    Quijano, Jorge E; Zurk, Lisa M

    2009-10-01

    Research on the propagation of acoustic waves in the ocean bottom sediment is of interest for active sonar applications such as target detection and remote sensing. The interaction of acoustic energy with the sea floor sublayers is usually modeled with techniques based on the full solution of the wave equation, which sometimes leads to mathematically intractable problems. An alternative way to model wave propagation in layered media containing random scatterers is the radiative transfer (RT) formulation, which is a well established technique in the electromagnetics community and is based on the principle of conservation of energy. In this paper, the RT equation is used to model the backscattering of acoustic energy from a layered elastic bottom sediment containing distributions of independent scatterers due to a constant single frequency excitation in the water column. It is shown that the RT formulation provides insight into the physical phenomena of scattering and conversion of energy between waves of different polarizations. PMID:19813787

  17. Differential Evolution algorithm applied to FSW model calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idagawa, H. S.; Santos, T. F. A.; Ramirez, A. J.

    2014-03-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process that can be modelled using a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approach. These models use adjustable parameters to control the heat transfer and the heat input to the weld. These parameters are used to calibrate the model and they are generally determined using the conventional trial and error approach. Since this method is not very efficient, we used the Differential Evolution (DE) algorithm to successfully determine these parameters. In order to improve the success rate and to reduce the computational cost of the method, this work studied different characteristics of the DE algorithm, such as the evolution strategy, the objective function, the mutation scaling factor and the crossover rate. The DE algorithm was tested using a friction stir weld performed on a UNS S32205 Duplex Stainless Steel.

  18. Advances in modeling and simulation of vacuum electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Mondelli, A.A.; Levush, B.; Verboncoeur, J.P.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1999-05-01

    Recent advances in the modeling and simulation of vacuum electronic devices are reviewed. Design of these devices makes use of a variety of physical models and numerical code types. Progress in the development of these models and codes is outlined and illustrated with specific examples. The state of the art in device simulation is evolving to the point such that devices can be designed on the computer, thereby eliminating many trial and error fabrication and test steps. The role of numerical simulation in the design process can be expected to grow further in the future.

  19. A kinematically driven anisotropic viscoelastic constitutive model applied to tires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Arthur R.; Tanner, John A.; Mason, Angela J.

    1995-08-01

    Aircraft tires are composite structures manufactured with viscoelastic materials such as carbon black filled rubber and nylon cords. When loaded they experience large deflections and moderately large strains. Detailed structural models of tires require the use of either nonlinear shell or nonlinear three dimensional solid finite elements. Computational predictions of the dynamic response of tires must consider the composite viscoelastic material behavior in a realistic fashion. We describe a modification to a nonlinear anisotropic shell finite element so it can be used to model viscoelastic stresses during general deformations. The model is developed by introducing internal variables of the type used to model elastic strain energy. The internal variables are strains, curvatures, and transverse shear angles which are in a one-to-one correspondence with the generalized coordinates used to model the elastic strain energy for nonlinear response. A difference-relaxation equation is used to relate changes in the observable strain field to changes in the internal strain field. The internal stress state is introduced into the equilibrium equations by converting it to nodal loads associated with the element's displacement degrees of freedom. In this form the tangent matrix in the Newton-Raphson solution algorithm is not modified from its form for the nonlinear statics problem. Only the gradient vector is modified and the modification is not computationally costly. The existing finite element model for the Space Shuttle nose gear tire is used to provide examples of the algorithm. In the first example, the tire's rim is displaced at a constant rate up to a fixed value. In the second example, the tire's rim is enforced to follow a saw tooth load and unload curve to generate hysteresis loops.

  20. A kinematically driven anisotropic viscoelastic constitutive model applied to tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Arthur R.; Tanner, John A.; Mason, Angela J.

    1995-01-01

    Aircraft tires are composite structures manufactured with viscoelastic materials such as carbon black filled rubber and nylon cords. When loaded they experience large deflections and moderately large strains. Detailed structural models of tires require the use of either nonlinear shell or nonlinear three dimensional solid finite elements. Computational predictions of the dynamic response of tires must consider the composite viscoelastic material behavior in a realistic fashion. We describe a modification to a nonlinear anisotropic shell finite element so it can be used to model viscoelastic stresses during general deformations. The model is developed by introducing internal variables of the type used to model elastic strain energy. The internal variables are strains, curvatures, and transverse shear angles which are in a one-to-one correspondence with the generalized coordinates used to model the elastic strain energy for nonlinear response. A difference-relaxation equation is used to relate changes in the observable strain field to changes in the internal strain field. The internal stress state is introduced into the equilibrium equations by converting it to nodal loads associated with the element's displacement degrees of freedom. In this form the tangent matrix in the Newton-Raphson solution algorithm is not modified from its form for the nonlinear statics problem. Only the gradient vector is modified and the modification is not computationally costly. The existing finite element model for the Space Shuttle nose gear tire is used to provide examples of the algorithm. In the first example, the tire's rim is displaced at a constant rate up to a fixed value. In the second example, the tire's rim is enforced to follow a saw tooth load and unload curve to generate hysteresis loops.

  1. Advanced Representation Technologies Applied to the Temple of Neptune, the Sphinx and the Metope in the Archaeological Park of Paestum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardinale, T.; Valva, R.; Lucarelli, M.

    2013-02-01

    The Summer School of Surveying and 3D modelling in Paestum was an opportunity to explore the use of innovative tools and advanced techniques in the design, implementation and management of surveys of historic and artistic complexes. In general such methods are used specifically for the development and management of vulnerability maps of existing heritage and so for the preventive conservation and valorisation of the built environment. The accurate detection of risk situations and the systematic promotion of highly selected and minimally invasive maintenance practices means that restoration and the efficiency of cycles of intervention can be optimized, with clear benefits from economic and cultural points of view. The group worked on the survey and 3D modelling of the Temple of Neptune, the Sphinx and the Metope of the Archaeological Park in Paestum.

  2. The applied model of imagery use: Examination of moderation and mediation effects.

    PubMed

    Koehn, S; Stavrou, N A M; Young, J A; Morris, T

    2016-08-01

    The applied model of mental imagery use proposed an interaction effect between imagery type and imagery ability. This study had two aims: (a) the examination of imagery ability as a moderating variable between imagery type and dispositional flow, and (b) the testing of alternative mediation models. The sample consisted of 367 athletes from Scotland and Australia, who completed the Sport Imagery Questionnaire, Sport Imagery Ability Questionnaire, and Dispositional Flow Scale-2. Hierarchical regression analysis showed direct effects of imagery use and imagery ability on flow, but no significant interaction. Mediation analysis revealed a significant indirect path, indicating a partially mediated relationship (P = 0.002) between imagery use, imagery ability, and flow. Partial mediation was confirmed when the effect of cognitive imagery use and cognitive imagery ability was tested, and a full mediation model was found between motivational imagery use, motivational imagery ability, and flow. The results are discussed in conjunction with potential future research directions on advancing theory and applications. PMID:26247483

  3. Similitude requirements and scaling relationships as applied to model testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolowicz, C. H.; Brown, J. S., Jr.; Gilbert, W. P.

    1979-01-01

    The similitude requirements for the most general test conditions are presented. These similitude requirements are considered in relation to the scaling relationships, test technique, test conditions (including supersonic flow), and test objectives. Particular emphasis is placed on satisfying the various similitude requirements for incompressible and compressible flow conditions. For free flying models tests, the test velocities for incompressible flow are scaled from Froude number similitude requirements and those for compressible flow are scaled from Mach number similitude requirements. The limitations of various test techniques are indicated, with emphasis on the free flying model.

  4. Combustion and flow modelling applied to the OMV VTE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosiliere, Louis M.; Jeng, San-Mou

    1990-01-01

    A predictive tool for hypergolic bipropellant spray combustion and flow evolution in the OMV VTE (orbital maneuvering vehicle variable thrust engine) is described. It encompasses a computational technique for the gas phase governing equations, a discrete particle method for liquid bipropellant sprays, and constitutive models for combustion chemistry, interphase exchanges, and unlike impinging liquid hypergolic stream interactions. Emphasis is placed on the phenomenological modelling of the hypergolic liquid bipropellant gasification processes. An application to the OMV VTE combustion chamber is given in order to show some of the capabilities and inadequacies of this tool.

  5. Air modeling: Air dispersion models; regulatory applications and technological advances

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.; Liles, R.

    1995-09-01

    Air dispersion models are a useful and practical tool for both industry and regulatory agencies. They serve as tools for engineering, permitting, and regulations development. Their cost effectiveness and ease of implementation compared to ambient monitoring is perhaps their most-appealing trait. Based on the current momentum within the U.S. EPA to develop better models and contain regulatory burdens on industry, it is likely that air dispersion modeling will be a major player in future air regulatory initiatives.

  6. Applying the Teacher Scholar Model in the School of Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, John C.; McGowan, Carl B., Jr.; Moeller, Susan E.

    2010-01-01

    The teacher-scholar model was proposed in Boyer (1990) and defines four dimensions of scholarship: 1) discovery, 2) integration, 3) application, and 4) teaching. In this paper, we describe the characteristics of scholarship, the theory of the scholarship of teaching, the excellent teacher, and undergraduate research and scholarship. We then show…

  7. Applying Buddhist Practices to Advocacy: The Advocacy-Serving Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Jane; Klepper, Konja K.; Lambert, Serena; Nunez, Johnna; Williams, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Creating and retaining empathic connections with the most disenfranchised among us can take a toll on the wellness of counselor advocates. The Advocacy-Serving Model is introduced as a creative approach to strengthening the ability of advocates to serve through enhancing awareness, focusing actions, and connecting to community. The model…

  8. Applying an Employee-Motivation Model to Prevent Student Plagiarism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malouff, John M.; Sims, Randi L.

    1996-01-01

    A model based on Vroom's expectancy theory of employee motivation posits that instructors can prevent plagiarism by ensuring that students understand the rules of ethical writing, expect assignments to be manageable and have personal benefits, and expect plagiarism to be difficult and have important personal costs. (SK)

  9. Probabilistic climate change predictions applying Bayesian model averaging.

    PubMed

    Min, Seung-Ki; Simonis, Daniel; Hense, Andreas

    2007-08-15

    This study explores the sensitivity of probabilistic predictions of the twenty-first century surface air temperature (SAT) changes to different multi-model averaging methods using available simulations from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change fourth assessment report. A way of observationally constrained prediction is provided by training multi-model simulations for the second half of the twentieth century with respect to long-term components. The Bayesian model averaging (BMA) produces weighted probability density functions (PDFs) and we compare two methods of estimating weighting factors: Bayes factor and expectation-maximization algorithm. It is shown that Bayesian-weighted PDFs for the global mean SAT changes are characterized by multi-modal structures from the middle of the twenty-first century onward, which are not clearly seen in arithmetic ensemble mean (AEM). This occurs because BMA tends to select a few high-skilled models and down-weight the others. Additionally, Bayesian results exhibit larger means and broader PDFs in the global mean predictions than the unweighted AEM. Multi-modality is more pronounced in the continental analysis using 30-year mean (2070-2099) SATs while there is only a little effect of Bayesian weighting on the 5-95% range. These results indicate that this approach to observationally constrained probabilistic predictions can be highly sensitive to the method of training, particularly for the later half of the twenty-first century, and that a more comprehensive approach combining different regions and/or variables is required. PMID:17569647

  10. A vortex entrainment model applied to slender delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, P. L., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A mathematical model of the vortex flow over a slender sharp-edged delta wing is proposed, and is shown to provide good agreement with the experiment. Although the technique requires experimental data in the form of the vortex core locations, it does account for the previously ignored mass entrainment of the vortex core.

  11. A sewer ventilation model applying conservation of momentum.

    PubMed

    Ward, M; Hamer, G; McDonald, A; Witherspoon, J; Loh, E; Parker, W

    2011-01-01

    The work presented herein was completed in an effort to characterize the forces influencing ventilation in gravity sewers and to develop a mathematical model, based on conservation of momentum, capable of accounting for friction at the headspace/pipe interface, drag at the air/water interface, and buoyancy caused by air density differences between a sewer headspace and ambient. Experiments were completed on two full scale sewer reaches in Australia. A carbon monoxide-based tracer technique was used to measure the ventilation rate within the sewer headspaces. Additionally, measurements of pressure, relative humidity, and temperature were measured in the ambient air and sewer headspace. The first location was a five kilometre long sewer outfall beginning at a wastewater treatment plant and terminating at the ocean. The second location was a large gravity sewer reach fitted with ventilation fans. At the first location the headspace was entirely sealed except for openings that were controlled during the experiments. In this situation forces acting on the headspace air manifested mostly as a pressure distribution within the reach, effectively eliminating friction at the pipe wall. At the second location, air was forced to move near the same velocity as the wastewater, effectively eliminating drag at the air/water interface. These experiments allowed individual terms of the momentum equation to be evaluated. Experimental results were compared to the proposed mathematical model. Conclusions regarding model accuracy are provided along with model application guidance and assumptions. PMID:22214094

  12. Applying Transtheoretical Model to Promote Physical Activities Among Women

    PubMed Central

    Pirzadeh, Asiyeh; Mostafavi, Firoozeh; Ghofranipour, Fazllolah; Feizi, Awat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Physical activity is one of the most important indicators of health in communities but different studies conducted in the provinces of Iran showed that inactivity is prevalent, especially among women. Objectives: Inadequate regular physical activities among women, the importance of education in promoting the physical activities, and lack of studies on the women using transtheoretical model, persuaded us to conduct this study with the aim of determining the application of transtheoretical model in promoting the physical activities among women of Isfahan. Materials and Methods: This research was a quasi-experimental study which was conducted on 141 women residing in Isfahan, Iran. They were randomly divided into case and control groups. In addition to the demographic information, their physical activities and the constructs of the transtheoretical model (stages of change, processes of change, decisional balance, and self-efficacy) were measured at 3 time points; preintervention, 3 months, and 6 months after intervention. Finally, the obtained data were analyzed through t test and repeated measures ANOVA test using SPSS version 16. Results: The results showed that education based on the transtheoretical model significantly increased physical activities in 2 aspects of intensive physical activities and walking, in the case group over the time. Also, a high percentage of people have shown progress during the stages of change, the mean of the constructs of processes of change, as well as pros and cons. On the whole, a significant difference was observed over the time in the case group (P < 0.01). Conclusions: This study showed that interventions based on the transtheoretical model can promote the physical activity behavior among women. PMID:26834796

  13. Validating and Applying Numerical Models for Current Energy Capture Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirlinger, C. Y.; James, S. C.; Cardenas, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    With the growing focus on renewable energy, there is increased interest in modeling and optimizing current energy capture (CEC) devices. The interaction of multiple wakes from CEC devices can affect optimal placement strategy, and issues of environmental impacts on sediment transport and large-scale flow should be examined. Numerical models of four flume-scale experiments were built using Sandia National Laboratories' Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (SNL-EFDC.) Model predictions were calibrated against measured velocities to estimate flow and turbine parameters. The velocity deficit was most sensitive to αmd, the dimensionless Smagorinsky constant related to horizontal momentum diffusion, and to CPB, the dimensionless partial blockage coefficient accounting for the physical displacement of fluid due to turbine blockage. Calibration to four data sets showed αmd ranged from 0.3 to 1.0 while CPB ranged from 40 to 300. Furthermore, results of parameter estimation indicated centerline velocity data were insufficient to uniquely identify the turbulence, flow, and device parameters; cross-channel velocity measurements at multiple locations downstream yielded important calibration information and it is likely that vertical velocity profiles would also be useful to the calibration effort. In addition to flume scale models, a full-scale implementation of a CEC device at Roza Canal in Yakima, WA was developed. The model was analyzed to find an appropriate grid size and to understand the sensitivity of downstream velocity profiles to horizontal momentum diffusion and partial blockage coefficients. Preliminary results generally showed that as CPB increased the wake was enhanced vertically.

  14. Processors, Pipelines, and Protocols for Advanced Modeling Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coughlan, Joseph; Komar, George (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Predictive capabilities arise from our understanding of natural processes and our ability to construct models that accurately reproduce these processes. Although our modeling state-of-the-art is primarily limited by existing computational capabilities, other technical areas will soon present obstacles to the development and deployment of future predictive capabilities. Advancement of our modeling capabilities will require not only faster processors, but new processing algorithms, high-speed data pipelines, and a common software engineering framework that allows networking of diverse models that represent the many components of Earth's climate and weather system. Development and integration of these new capabilities will pose serious challenges to the Information Systems (IS) technology community. Designers of future IS infrastructures must deal with issues that include performance, reliability, interoperability, portability of data and software, and ultimately, the full integration of various ES model systems into a unified ES modeling network.

  15. ADVANCED ELECTRIC AND MAGNETIC MATERIAL MODELS FOR FDTD ELECTROMAGNETIC CODES

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, B R; Nelson, S D; Langdon, S

    2005-05-05

    The modeling of dielectric and magnetic materials in the time domain is required for pulse power applications, pulsed induction accelerators, and advanced transmission lines. For example, most induction accelerator modules require the use of magnetic materials to provide adequate Volt-sec during the acceleration pulse. These models require hysteresis and saturation to simulate the saturation wavefront in a multipulse environment. In high voltage transmission line applications such as shock or soliton lines the dielectric is operating in a highly nonlinear regime, which require nonlinear models. Simple 1-D models are developed for fast parameterization of transmission line structures. In the case of nonlinear dielectrics, a simple analytic model describing the permittivity in terms of electric field is used in a 3-D finite difference time domain code (FDTD). In the case of magnetic materials, both rate independent and rate dependent Hodgdon magnetic material models have been implemented into 3-D FDTD codes and 1-D codes.

  16. Testing and Implementation of Advanced Reynolds Stress Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.

    1997-01-01

    A research program was proposed for the testing and implementation of advanced turbulence models for non-equilibrium turbulent flows of aerodynamic importance that are of interest to NASA. Turbulence models that are being developed in connection with the Office of Naval Research ARI in Non-equilibrium are provided for implementation and testing in aerodynamic flows at NASA Langley Research Center. Close interactions were established with researchers at Nasa Langley RC and refinements to the models were made based on the results of these tests. The models that have been considered include two-equation models with an anisotropic eddy viscosity as well as full second-order closures. Three types of non-equilibrium corrections to the models have been considered in connection with the ARI on Nonequilibrium Turbulence: conducted for ONR.

  17. Applying a fully nonlinear particle filter on a coupled ocean-atmosphere climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, Philip; van Leeuwen, Peter Jan; Wilson, Simon

    2014-05-01

    It is a widely held assumption that particle filters are not applicable in high-dimensional systems due to filter degeneracy, commonly called the curse of dimensionality. This is only true of naive particle filters, and indeed it has been shown much more advanced methods perform particularly well on systems of dimension up to 216 ≡ 6.5 × 104. In this talk we will present results from using the equivalent weights particle filter in twin experiments with the global climate model HadCM3. These experiments have a number of notable features. Firstly the sheer size of model in use is substantially larger than has been previously achieved. The model has state dimension approximately 4 × 106 and approximately 4 × 104 observations per analysis step. This is 2 orders of magnitude more than has been achieved with a particle filter in the geosciences. Secondly, the use of a fully nonlinear data assimilation technique to initialise a climate model gives us the possibility to find non-Gaussian estimates for the current state of the climate. In doing so we may find that the same model may demonstrate multiple likely scenarios for forecasts on a multi-annular/decadal timescale. The experiments consider to assimilating artificial sea surface temperatures daily for several years. We will discuss how an ensemble based method for assimilation in a coupled system avoids issues faced by variational methods. Practical details of how the experiments were carried out, specifically the use of the EMPIRE data assimilation framework, will be discussed. The results from applying the nonlinear data assimilation method can always be improved through having a better representation of the model error covariance matrix. We will discuss the representation which we have used for this matrix, and in particular, how it was generated from the coupled system.

  18. Modelling the progression of bird migration with conditional autoregressive models applied to ringing data.

    PubMed

    Ambrosini, Roberto; Borgoni, Riccardo; Rubolini, Diego; Sicurella, Beatrice; Fiedler, Wolfgang; Bairlein, Franz; Baillie, Stephen R; Robinson, Robert A; Clark, Jacquie A; Spina, Fernando; Saino, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Migration is a fundamental stage in the life history of several taxa, including birds, and is under strong selective pressure. At present, the only data that may allow for both an assessment of patterns of bird migration and for retrospective analyses of changes in migration timing are the databases of ring recoveries. We used ring recoveries of the Barn Swallow Hirundo rustica collected from 1908-2008 in Europe to model the calendar date at which a given proportion of birds is expected to have reached a given geographical area ('progression of migration') and to investigate the change in timing of migration over the same areas between three time periods (1908-1969, 1970-1990, 1991-2008). The analyses were conducted using binomial conditional autoregressive (CAR) mixed models. We first concentrated on data from the British Isles and then expanded the models to western Europe and north Africa. We produced maps of the progression of migration that disclosed local patterns of migration consistent with those obtained from the analyses of the movements of ringed individuals. Timing of migration estimated from our model is consistent with data on migration phenology of the Barn Swallow available in the literature, but in some cases it is later than that estimated by data collected at ringing stations, which, however, may not be representative of migration phenology over large geographical areas. The comparison of median migration date estimated over the same geographical area among time periods showed no significant advancement of spring migration over the whole of Europe, but a significant advancement of autumn migration in southern Europe. Our modelling approach can be generalized to any records of ringing date and locality of individuals including those which have not been recovered subsequently, as well as to geo-referenced databases of sightings of migratory individuals. PMID:25047331

  19. Modelling the Progression of Bird Migration with Conditional Autoregressive Models Applied to Ringing Data

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosini, Roberto; Borgoni, Riccardo; Rubolini, Diego; Sicurella, Beatrice; Fiedler, Wolfgang; Bairlein, Franz; Baillie, Stephen R.; Robinson, Robert A.; Clark, Jacquie A.; Spina, Fernando; Saino, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Migration is a fundamental stage in the life history of several taxa, including birds, and is under strong selective pressure. At present, the only data that may allow for both an assessment of patterns of bird migration and for retrospective analyses of changes in migration timing are the databases of ring recoveries. We used ring recoveries of the Barn Swallow Hirundo rustica collected from 1908–2008 in Europe to model the calendar date at which a given proportion of birds is expected to have reached a given geographical area (‘progression of migration’) and to investigate the change in timing of migration over the same areas between three time periods (1908–1969, 1970–1990, 1991–2008). The analyses were conducted using binomial conditional autoregressive (CAR) mixed models. We first concentrated on data from the British Isles and then expanded the models to western Europe and north Africa. We produced maps of the progression of migration that disclosed local patterns of migration consistent with those obtained from the analyses of the movements of ringed individuals. Timing of migration estimated from our model is consistent with data on migration phenology of the Barn Swallow available in the literature, but in some cases it is later than that estimated by data collected at ringing stations, which, however, may not be representative of migration phenology over large geographical areas. The comparison of median migration date estimated over the same geographical area among time periods showed no significant advancement of spring migration over the whole of Europe, but a significant advancement of autumn migration in southern Europe. Our modelling approach can be generalized to any records of ringing date and locality of individuals including those which have not been recovered subsequently, as well as to geo-referenced databases of sightings of migratory individuals. PMID:25047331

  20. Advanced computer modeling techniques expand belt conveyor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Alspaugh, M.

    1998-07-01

    Increased mining production is continuing to challenge engineers and manufacturers to keep up. The pressure to produce larger and more versatile equipment is increasing. This paper will show some recent major projects in the belt conveyor industry that have pushed the limits of design and engineering technology. Also, it will discuss the systems engineering discipline and advanced computer modeling tools that have helped make these achievements possible. Several examples of technologically advanced designs will be reviewed. However, new technology can sometimes produce increased problems with equipment availability and reliability if not carefully developed. Computer modeling techniques that help one design larger equipment can also compound operational headaches if engineering processes and algorithms are not carefully analyzed every step of the way.

  1. Applying learning theories and instructional design models for effective instruction.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Mohammed K; Elkhider, Ihsan A

    2016-06-01

    Faculty members in higher education are involved in many instructional design activities without formal training in learning theories and the science of instruction. Learning theories provide the foundation for the selection of instructional strategies and allow for reliable prediction of their effectiveness. To achieve effective learning outcomes, the science of instruction and instructional design models are used to guide the development of instructional design strategies that elicit appropriate cognitive processes. Here, the major learning theories are discussed and selected examples of instructional design models are explained. The main objective of this article is to present the science of learning and instruction as theoretical evidence for the design and delivery of instructional materials. In addition, this article provides a practical framework for implementing those theories in the classroom and laboratory. PMID:27068989

  2. Applying the Extended Parallel Process Model to workplace safety messages.

    PubMed

    Basil, Michael; Basil, Debra; Deshpande, Sameer; Lavack, Anne M

    2013-01-01

    The extended parallel process model (EPPM) proposes fear appeals are most effective when they combine threat and efficacy. Three studies conducted in the workplace safety context examine the use of various EPPM factors and their effects, especially multiplicative effects. Study 1 was a content analysis examining the use of EPPM factors in actual workplace safety messages. Study 2 experimentally tested these messages with 212 construction trainees. Study 3 replicated this experiment with 1,802 men across four English-speaking countries-Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The results of these three studies (1) demonstrate the inconsistent use of EPPM components in real-world work safety communications, (2) support the necessity of self-efficacy for the effective use of threat, (3) show a multiplicative effect where communication effectiveness is maximized when all model components are present (severity, susceptibility, and efficacy), and (4) validate these findings with gory appeals across four English-speaking countries. PMID:23330856

  3. Modulated photothermal radiometry applied to semitransparent samples: Models and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, S.; Rémy, B.; Maillet, D.; Degiovanni, A.; Serra, J.-J.

    2004-09-01

    Mathematical modeling is presented of the combined conductive and radiative heat transfer occurring in a semitransparent material (STM) subjected to a periodic heat flux. The models rely on the quadrupole method, which is a very powerful tool to obtain analytical solutions in the Fourier or Laplace domain. Photoacoustic or photothermal radiometry techniques are reviewed. Two groups of methods are discussed depending on whether the sample has natural or opaque interfaces to simulate radiative exchanges with the surroundings. The metrological problem of measuring the phonic thermal diffusivity of semitransparent materials is investigated. Theoretical simulations are given. They explain some typical features of the phase-lag signal of temperature responses. Experimental measurements on pure silica validate the results and prove that these methods are efficient for the thermal characterization of STM.

  4. Applying ecological modeling to parenting for Australian refugee families.

    PubMed

    Grant, Julian; Guerin, Pauline B

    2014-10-01

    Children in families with parents from refugee backgrounds are often viewed as a vulnerable group with increased risks of developing physical or psychological problems. However, there is very little research regarding the strategies that parents might use to parent their children in a new country while they also manage the interrelated challenges of poverty, social isolation, maternal stress, and mental ill health that often go along with resettlement. We explore the application of ecological modeling, specifically at individual, institutional, and policy levels, within an Australian context to critique the factors that shape the development of parenting capacity within refugee families settling in a new Western country. Ecological modeling enables examination of how public policy at local state and national levels influences the individual and family directly and through the organizations that are given the task of implementing many of the policy recommendations. Recommendations for health practice and research are made. PMID:24583875

  5. Probabilistic graphic models applied to identification of diseases.

    PubMed

    Sato, Renato Cesar; Sato, Graziela Tiemy Kajita

    2015-01-01

    Decision-making is fundamental when making diagnosis or choosing treatment. The broad dissemination of computed systems and databases allows systematization of part of decisions through artificial intelligence. In this text, we present basic use of probabilistic graphic models as tools to analyze causality in health conditions. This method has been used to make diagnosis of Alzheimer´s disease, sleep apnea and heart diseases. PMID:26154555

  6. Applying CIPP Model for Learning-Object Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgado, Erla M. Morales; Peñalvo, Francisco J. García; Martín, Carlos Muñoz; Gonzalez, Miguel Ángel Conde

    Although knowledge management process needs to receive some evaluation in order to determine their suitable functionality. There is not a clear definition about the stages where LOs need to be evaluated and the specific metrics to continuously promote their quality. This paper presents a proposal for LOs evaluation during their management for e-learning systems. To achieve this, we suggest specific steps for LOs design, implementation and evaluation into the four stages proposed by CIPP model (Context, Input, Process, Product).

  7. Probabilistic graphic models applied to identification of diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Renato Cesar; Sato, Graziela Tiemy Kajita

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Decision-making is fundamental when making diagnosis or choosing treatment. The broad dissemination of computed systems and databases allows systematization of part of decisions through artificial intelligence. In this text, we present basic use of probabilistic graphic models as tools to analyze causality in health conditions. This method has been used to make diagnosis of Alzheimer´s disease, sleep apnea and heart diseases. PMID:26154555

  8. Modeling a Thermoelectric Generator Applied to Diesel Automotive Heat Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa, N.; Lazard, M.; Aixala, L.; Scherrer, H.

    2010-09-01

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are outstanding devices for automotive waste heat recovery. Their packaging, lack of moving parts, and direct heat to electrical conversion are the main benefits. Usually, TEGs are modeled with a constant hot-source temperature. However, energy in exhaust gases is limited, thus leading to a temperature decrease as heat is recovered. Therefore thermoelectric properties change along the TEG, affecting performance. A thermoelectric generator composed of Mg2Si/Zn4Sb3 for high temperatures followed by Bi2Te3 for low temperatures has been modeled using engineering equation solver (EES) software. The model uses the finite-difference method with a strip-fins convective heat transfer coefficient. It has been validated on a commercial module with well-known properties. The thermoelectric connection and the number of thermoelements have been addressed as well as the optimum proportion of high-temperature material for a given thermoelectric heat exchanger. TEG output power has been estimated for a typical commercial vehicle at 90°C coolant temperature.

  9. Mathematical model of gas plasma applied to chronic wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. G.; Liu, X. Y.; Liu, D. W.; Lu, X. P.; Zhang, Y. T.

    2013-11-15

    Chronic wounds are a major burden for worldwide health care systems, and patients suffer pain and discomfort from this type of wound. Recently gas plasmas have been shown to safely speed chronic wounds healing. In this paper, we develop a deterministic mathematical model formulated by eight-species reaction-diffusion equations, and use it to analyze the plasma treatment process. The model follows spatial and temporal concentration within the wound of oxygen, chemoattractants, capillary sprouts, blood vessels, fibroblasts, extracellular matrix material, nitric oxide (NO), and inflammatory cell. Two effects of plasma, increasing NO concentration and reducing bacteria load, are considered in this model. The plasma treatment decreases the complete healing time from 25 days (normal wound healing) to 17 days, and the contributions of increasing NO concentration and reducing bacteria load are about 1/4 and 3/4, respectively. Increasing plasma treatment frequency from twice to three times per day accelerates healing process. Finally, the response of chronic wounds of different etiologies to treatment with gas plasmas is analyzed.

  10. Experiences & Tools from Modeling Instruction Applied to Earth Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervenec, J.; Landis, C. E.

    2012-12-01

    The Framework for K-12 Science Education calls for stronger curricular connections within the sciences, greater depth in understanding, and tasks higher on Bloom's Taxonomy. Understanding atmospheric sciences draws on core knowledge traditionally taught in physics, chemistry, and in some cases, biology. If this core knowledge is not conceptually sound, well retained, and transferable to new settings, understanding the causes and consequences of climate changes become a task in memorizing seemingly disparate facts to a student. Fortunately, experiences and conceptual tools have been developed and refined in the nationwide network of Physics Modeling and Chemistry Modeling teachers to build necessary understanding of conservation of mass, conservation of energy, particulate nature of matter, kinetic molecular theory, and particle model of light. Context-rich experiences are first introduced for students to construct an understanding of these principles and then conceptual tools are deployed for students to resolve misconceptions and deepen their understanding. Using these experiences and conceptual tools takes an investment of instructional time, teacher training, and in some cases, re-envisioning the format of a science classroom. There are few financial barriers to implementation and students gain a greater understanding of the nature of science by going through successive cycles of investigation and refinement of their thinking. This presentation shows how these experiences and tools could be used in an Earth Science course to support students developing conceptually rich understanding of the atmosphere and connections happening within.

  11. Mathematical model of gas plasma applied to chronic wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. G.; Liu, X. Y.; Liu, D. W.; Lu, X. P.; Zhang, Y. T.

    2013-11-01

    Chronic wounds are a major burden for worldwide health care systems, and patients suffer pain and discomfort from this type of wound. Recently gas plasmas have been shown to safely speed chronic wounds healing. In this paper, we develop a deterministic mathematical model formulated by eight-species reaction-diffusion equations, and use it to analyze the plasma treatment process. The model follows spatial and temporal concentration within the wound of oxygen, chemoattractants, capillary sprouts, blood vessels, fibroblasts, extracellular matrix material, nitric oxide (NO), and inflammatory cell. Two effects of plasma, increasing NO concentration and reducing bacteria load, are considered in this model. The plasma treatment decreases the complete healing time from 25 days (normal wound healing) to 17 days, and the contributions of increasing NO concentration and reducing bacteria load are about 1/4 and 3/4, respectively. Increasing plasma treatment frequency from twice to three times per day accelerates healing process. Finally, the response of chronic wounds of different etiologies to treatment with gas plasmas is analyzed.

  12. Advanced geothermal hydraulics model -- Phase 1 final report, Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    W. Zheng; J. Fu; W. C. Maurer

    1999-07-01

    An advanced geothermal well hydraulics model (GEODRIL) is being developed to accurately calculate bottom-hole conditions in these hot wells. In Phase 1, real-time monitoring and other improvements were added to GEODRIL. In Phase 2, GEODRIL will be integrated into Marconi's Intelligent Drilling Monitor (IDM) that will use artificial intelligence to detect lost circulation, fluid influxes and other circulation problems in geothermal wells. This software platform has potential for significantly reducing geothermal drilling costs.

  13. Evaluation of ADAM/1 model for advanced coal extraction concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, G. K.; Gangal, M. D.

    1982-01-01

    Several existing computer programs for estimating life cycle cost of mining systems were evaluated. A commercially available program, ADAM/1 was found to be satisfactory in relation to the needs of the advanced coal extraction project. Two test cases were run to confirm the ability of the program to handle nonconventional mining equipment and procedures. The results were satisfactory. The model, therefore, is recommended to the project team for evaluation of their conceptual designs.

  14. ADVISOR: a systems analysis tool for advanced vehicle modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markel, T.; Brooker, A.; Hendricks, T.; Johnson, V.; Kelly, K.; Kramer, B.; O'Keefe, M.; Sprik, S.; Wipke, K.

    This paper provides an overview of Advanced Vehicle Simulator (ADVISOR)—the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) ADVISOR written in the MATLAB/Simulink environment and developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. ADVISOR provides the vehicle engineering community with an easy-to-use, flexible, yet robust and supported analysis package for advanced vehicle modeling. It is primarily used to quantify the fuel economy, the performance, and the emissions of vehicles that use alternative technologies including fuel cells, batteries, electric motors, and internal combustion engines in hybrid (i.e. multiple power sources) configurations. It excels at quantifying the relative change that can be expected due to the implementation of technology compared to a baseline scenario. ADVISOR's capabilities and limitations are presented and the power source models that are included in ADVISOR are discussed. Finally, several applications of the tool are presented to highlight ADVISOR's functionality. The content of this paper is based on a presentation made at the 'Development of Advanced Battery Engineering Models' workshop held in Crystal City, Virginia in August 2001.

  15. Virtual building environments (VBE) - Applying information modeling to buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Bazjanac, Vladimir

    2004-06-21

    A Virtual Building Environment (VBE) is a ''place'' where building industry project staffs can get help in creating Building Information Models (BIM) and in the use of virtual buildings. It consists of a group of industry software that is operated by industry experts who are also experts in the use of that software. The purpose of a VBE is to facilitate expert use of appropriate software applications in conjunction with each other to efficiently support multidisciplinary work. This paper defines BIM and virtual buildings, and describes VBE objectives, set-up and characteristics of operation. It informs about the VBE Initiative and the benefits from a couple of early VBE projects.

  16. Biomorphodynamic modelling of inner bank advance in migrating meander bends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zen, Simone; Zolezzi, Guido; Toffolon, Marco; Gurnell, Angela M.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a bio-morphodynamic model at bend cross-sectional scale for the lateral migration of river meander bends, where the two banks can migrate separately as a result of the mutual interaction between river flow, sediments and riparian vegetation, particularly at the interface between the permanently wet channel and the advancing floodplain. The model combines a non-linear analytical model for the morphodynamic evolution of the channel bed, a quasi-1D model to account for flow unsteadiness, and an ecological model describing riparian vegetation dynamics. Simplified closures are included to estimate the feedbacks among vegetation, hydrodynamics and sediment transport, which affect the morphology of the river-floodplain system. Model tests reveal the fundamental role of riparian plants in generating bio-morphological patterns at the advancing floodplain margin. Importantly, they provide insight into the biophysical controls of the 'bar push' mechanism and into its role in the lateral migration of meander bends and in the temporal variations of the active channel width.

  17. Photosensitizer nanocarriers modeling for photodynamic therapy applied to dermatological diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas-García, I.; Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Ortega-Quijano, N.; López-Escobar, M.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2011-02-01

    Photodynamic Therapy involves the therapeutic use of photosensitizers in combination with visible light. The subsequent photochemical reactions generate reactive oxygen species which are considered the principal cytotoxic agents to induce cell death. This technique has become widely used in medicine to treat tumors and other nonmalignant diseases. However, there are several factors related to illumination or the photosensitizer that limit an optimal treatment outcome. The use of nanoparticles (NP) for PDT has been proposed as a solution to current shortcomings. In this way, there are NPs that act as carriers for photosensitizers, NPs that absorb the light and transfer the energy to the photosensitizer and NPs that are themselves photodynamically active. In dermatology, the use of topical photosensitizers produces a time dependent inhomogeneous distribution within the tumor, where the stratum corneum is the main barrier to the diffusion of the photosensitizer to the deeper layers of skin. This produces an insufficient photosensitizer accumulation in tumor tissues and therefore, a low therapeutic efficiency in the case of deep lesions. This work focuses in the use of NPs as photosensitizer carriers to improve the actual topical drug distribution in malignant skin tissues. We present a mathematical model of PS distribution in tumor tissue using NPs that takes into account parameters related to nanoparticles binding. Once the concentration profile of NPs into tissue is obtained, we use a photochemical model which allows us to calculate the temporal evolution of reactive oxygen species according to PS distribution calculated previously from NPs profile.

  18. Applying the Health Belief Model to college students' health behavior

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hak-Seon; Ahn, Joo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate how university students' nutrition beliefs influence their health behavioral intention. This study used an online survey engine (Qulatrics.com) to collect data from college students. Out of 253 questionnaires collected, 251 questionnaires (99.2%) were used for the statistical analysis. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) revealed that six dimensions, "Nutrition Confidence," "Susceptibility," "Severity," "Barrier," "Benefit," "Behavioral Intention to Eat Healthy Food," and "Behavioral Intention to do Physical Activity," had construct validity; Cronbach's alpha coefficient and composite reliabilities were tested for item reliability. The results validate that objective nutrition knowledge was a good predictor of college students' nutrition confidence. The results also clearly showed that two direct measures were significant predictors of behavioral intentions as hypothesized. Perceived benefit of eating healthy food and perceived barrier for eat healthy food to had significant effects on Behavioral Intentions and was a valid measurement to use to determine Behavioral Intentions. These findings can enhance the extant literature on the universal applicability of the model and serve as useful references for further investigations of the validity of the model within other health care or foodservice settings and for other health behavioral categories. PMID:23346306

  19. Mathematical Modeling Applied to Prediction of Landslides in Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Lúcia; Araújo, João; Braga, Beatriz; Fernandes, Nelson

    2013-04-01

    Mass movements are natural phenomena that occur on the slopes and are important agents working in landscape development. These movements have caused serious damage to infrastructure and properties. In addition to the mass movements occurring in natural slopes, there is also a large number of accidents induced by human action in the landscape. The change of use and land cover for the introduction of agriculture is a good example that have affected the stability of slopes. Land use and/or land cover changes have direct and indirect effects on slope stability and frequently represent a major factor controlling the occurrence of man-induced mass movements. In Brazil, especially in the southern and southeastern regions, areas of original natural rain forest have been continuously replaced by agriculture during the last decades, leading to important modifications in soil mechanical properties and to major changes in hillslope hydrology. In these regions, such effects are amplified due to the steep hilly topography, intense summer rainfall events and dense urbanization. In November 2008, a major landslide event took place in a rural area with intensive agriculture in the state of Santa Catarina (Morro do Baú) where many catastrophic landslides were triggered after a long rainy period. In this area, the natural forest has been replaced by huge banana and pine plantations. The state of Santa Catarina in recent decades has been the scene of several incidents of mass movements such as this catastrophic event. In this study, based on field mapping and modeling, we characterize the role played by geomorphological and geological factors in controlling the spatial distribution of landslides in the Morro do Baú area. In order to attain such objective, a digital elevation model of the basin was generated with a 10m grid in which the topographic parameters were obtained. The spatial distribution of the scars from this major event was mapped from another image, obtained immediately

  20. Electrostatic Model Applied to ISS Charged Water Droplet Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Daan; Schaub, Hanspeter; Pettit, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    The electrostatic force can be used to create novel relative motion between charged bodies if it can be isolated from the stronger gravitational and dissipative forces. Recently, Coulomb orbital motion was demonstrated on the International Space Station by releasing charged water droplets in the vicinity of a charged knitting needle. In this investigation, the Multi-Sphere Method, an electrostatic model developed to study active spacecraft position control by Coulomb charging, is used to simulate the complex orbital motion of the droplets. When atmospheric drag is introduced, the simulated motion closely mimics that seen in the video footage of the experiment. The electrostatic force's inverse dependency on separation distance near the center of the needle lends itself to analytic predictions of the radial motion.

  1. Integrated Modeling Applied to the Terrestrial Planet Finder Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kissil, Andrew; Kwack, Eug; Ho, Timothy; Dumont, Philip; Irish, Sandra; Weng, Ichung

    2006-01-01

    Toolsets work well, and are getting better (looking forward to significant capability increase shortly)Lessons-learned: problems encountered & solved (or temporarily worked-around). Currently, all computed WFE's & RB motions for thermal disturbance are within error budget. We need to account for CTE variation in PM:Taking CTE variation into account generally results in higher WFE's than assuming uniform CTE of 10 ppb/C (especially for higher Zernikes). Focus & Astigmatism are biggest contributors to WFE due to changes in PM front-to-back delta-temps. Design feasibility looks good: no major road-blocks. Keeping in mind the many idealizations made at this point in time: more detail modeling to follow.

  2. Applying Contamination Modelling to Spacecraft Propulsion Systems Designs and Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Philip T.; Thomson, Shaun; Woronowicz, Michael S.

    2000-01-01

    Molecular and particulate contaminants generated from the operations of a propulsion system may impinge on spacecraft critical surfaces. Plume depositions or clouds may hinder the spacecraft and instruments from performing normal operations. Firing thrusters will generate both molecular and particulate contaminants. How to minimize the contamination impact from the plume becomes very critical for a successful mission. The resulting effect from either molecular or particulate contamination of the thruster firing is very distinct. This paper will discuss the interconnection between the functions of spacecraft contamination modeling and propulsion system implementation. The paper will address an innovative contamination engineering approach implemented from the spacecraft concept design, manufacturing, integration and test (I&T), launch, to on- orbit operations. This paper will also summarize the implementation on several successful missions. Despite other contamination sources, only molecular contamination will be considered here.

  3. Noise levels from a model turbofan engine with simulated noise control measures applied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David G.; Woodward, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    A study of estimated full-scale noise levels based on measured levels from the Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) sub-scale model is presented. Testing of this model was performed in the NASA Lewis Low Speed Anechoic Wind Tunnel at a simulated takeoff condition of Mach 0.2. Effective Perceived Noise Level (EPNL) estimates for the baseline configuration are documented, and also used as the control case in a study of the potential benefits of two categories of noise control. The effect of active noise control is evaluated by artificially removing various rotor-stator interaction tones. Passive noise control is simulated by applying a notch filter to the wind tunnel data. Cases with both techniques are included to evaluate hybrid active-passive noise control. The results for EPNL values are approximate because the original source data was limited in bandwidth and in sideline angular coverage. The main emphasis is on comparisons between the baseline and configurations with simulated noise control measures.

  4. Applying dispersive changes to Lagrangian particles in groundwater transport models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, Leonard F.

    2010-01-01

    Method-of-characteristics groundwater transport models require that changes in concentrations computed within an Eulerian framework to account for dispersion be transferred to moving particles used to simulate advective transport. A new algorithm was developed to accomplish this transfer between nodal values and advecting particles more precisely and realistically compared to currently used methods. The new method scales the changes and adjustments of particle concentrations relative to limiting bounds of concentration values determined from the population of adjacent nodal values. The method precludes unrealistic undershoot or overshoot for concentrations of individual particles. In the new method, if dispersion causes cell concentrations to decrease during a time step, those particles in the cell having the highest concentration will decrease the most, and those with the lowest concentration will decrease the least. The converse is true if dispersion is causing concentrations to increase. Furthermore, if the initial concentration on a particle is outside the range of the adjacent nodal values, it will automatically be adjusted in the direction of the acceptable range of values. The new method is inherently mass conservative.

  5. Applying Dispersive Changes to Lagrangian Particles in Groundwater Transport Models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, L.F.

    2010-01-01

    Method-of-characteristics groundwater transport models require that changes in concentrations computed within an Eulerian framework to account for dispersion be transferred to moving particles used to simulate advective transport. A new algorithm was developed to accomplish this transfer between nodal values and advecting particles more precisely and realistically compared to currently used methods. The new method scales the changes and adjustments of particle concentrations relative to limiting bounds of concentration values determined from the population of adjacent nodal values. The method precludes unrealistic undershoot or overshoot for concentrations of individual particles. In the new method, if dispersion causes cell concentrations to decrease during a time step, those particles in the cell having the highest concentration will decrease the most, and those with the lowest concentration will decrease the least. The converse is true if dispersion is causing concentrations to increase. Furthermore, if the initial concentration on a particle is outside the range of the adjacent nodal values, it will automatically be adjusted in the direction of the acceptable range of values. The new method is inherently mass conservative. ?? US Government 2010.

  6. A model of smoldering combustion applied to flexible polyurethane foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlemiller, T. J.; Rogers, F.; Bellan, J.

    1979-01-01

    Smoldering combustion, particularly in upholstery and bedding materials, has been proven a serious life hazard. The simplest representation of this hazard situation is one-dimensional downward propagation of a smolder wave against a buoyant upflow (cocurrent smolder); the configuration treated here is identical in all respects to this except for the presence of a forced flow replacing the buoyant one. The complex degradation chemistry of the polyurethanes is here reduced to the two major overall reactions of char formation and char oxidation. The model solutions, which are in reasonable agreement with experimental results, show the smolder process to be oxygen-limited, which leads to some very simple trends. More subtle behavior aspects determine actual propagation velocity, fraction of fuel consumed, and apparent equivalence ratio (all of which are variable). The self-insulating character of the smolder wave makes it viable in a wide-ranging set of conditions if the igniting stimulus is sufficiently long. These results have significant implications regarding the problem of smolder prevention or hindrance.

  7. A variable polytrope index applied to planet and material models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weppner, S. P.; McKelvey, J. P.; Thielen, K. D.; Zielinski, A. K.

    2015-09-01

    We introduce a new approach to a century-old assumption which enhances not only planetary interior calculations but also high-pressure material physics. We show that the polytropic index is the derivative of the bulk modulus with respect to pressure. We then augment the traditional polytrope theory by including a variable polytrope index within the confines of the Lane-Emden differential equation. To investigate the possibilities of this method, we create a high-quality universal equation of state, transforming the traditional polytrope method to a tool with the potential for excellent predictive power. The theoretical foundation of our equation of state is the same elastic observable which we found equivalent to the polytrope index, the derivative of the bulk modulus with respect to pressure. We calculate the density-pressure of six common materials up to 1018 Pa, mass-radius relationships for the same materials, and produce plausible density-radius models for the rocky planets of our Solar system. We argue that the bulk modulus and its derivatives have been underutilized in previous planet formation methods. We constrain the material surface observables for the inner core, outer core, and mantle of planet Earth in a systematic way including pressure, bulk modulus, and the polytrope index in the analysis. We believe that this variable polytrope method has the necessary apparatus to be extended further to gas giants and stars. As supplemental material we provide computer code to calculate multi-layered planets.

  8. A variable polytrope index applied to planet and material models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thielen, Kevin; Weppner, Stephen; Zielinski, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new approach to a century-old assumption which enhances not only planetary interior calculations but also high-pressure material physics. We show that the polytropic index is the derivative of the bulk modulus with respect to pressure. We then augment the traditional polytrope theory by including a variable polytrope index within the confines of the Lane-Emden differential equation. To investigate the possibilities of this method, we create a high-quality universal equation of state, transforming the traditional polytrope method to a tool with the potential for excellent predictive power. The theoretical foundation of our equation of state is the same elastic observable which we found equivalent to the polytrope index, the derivative of the bulk modulus with respect to pressure. We calculate the density-pressure of six common materials up to 1018 Pa, mass-radius relationships for the same materials, and produce plausible density-radius models for the rocky planets of our Solar system. We argue that the bulk modulus and its derivatives have been underutilized in previous planet formation methods. We constrain the material surface observables for the inner core, outer core, and mantle of planet Earth in a systematic way including pressure, bulk modulus, and the polytrope index in the analysis. We believe that this variable polytrope method has the necessary apparatus to be extended further to gas giants and stars. As supplemental material we provide computer code to calculate multi-layered planets.

  9. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. ); Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. )

    1990-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This technology is important to reduce the technical and economic risks inherent in utilizing coal, a feedstock whose variable and often unexpected behavior presents a significant challenge. This program will merge significant advances made at Advanced Fuel Research, Inc. (AFR) in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior, with technology being developed at Brigham Young University (BYU) in comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors. The foundation to describe coal-specified conversion behavior is ARF's Functional Group (FG) and Devolatilization, Vaporization, and Crosslinking (DVC) models, developed under previous and on-going METC sponsored programs. These models have demonstrated the capability to describe the time dependent evolution of individual gas species, and the amount and characteristics of tar and char. The combined FG-DVC model will be integrated with BYU's comprehensive two-dimensional reactor model, PCGC-2, which is currently the most widely used reactor simulation for combustion or gasification. The program includes: (1) validation of the submodels by comparison with laboratory data obtained in this program, (2) extensive validation of the modified comprehensive code by comparison of predicted results with data from bench-scale and process scale investigations of gasification, mild gasification and combustion of coal or coal-derived products in heat engines, and (3) development of well documented user friendly software applicable to a workstation'' environment.

  10. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. ); Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. )

    1990-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This technology is important to reduce the technical and economic risks inherent in utilizing coal, a feedstock whose variable and often unexpected behavior presents a significant challenge. This program will merge significant advances made at Advanced Fuel Research, Inc. (AFR) in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior, with technology being developed at Brigham Young University (BYU) in comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors. The foundation to describe coal-specific conversion behavior is AFR's Functional Group (FG) and Devolatilization, Vaporization, and Crosslinking (DVC) models, developed under previous and on-going METC sponsored programs. These models have demonstrated the capability to describe the time dependent evolution of individual gas species, and the amount and characteristics of tar and char. The combined FG-DVC model will be integrated with BYU's comprehensive two-dimensional reactor model, PCGC-2, which is currently the most widely used reactor simulation for combustion or gasification. Success in this program will be a major step in improving in predictive capabilities for coal conversion processes including: demonstrated accuracy and reliability and a generalized first principles'' treatment of coals based on readily obtained composition data. The progress during the fifteenth quarterly of the program is presented. 56 refs., 41 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Archaeal Diversity in Biofilm Technologies Applied to Treat Urban and Industrial Wastewater: Recent Advances and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Calderón, Kadiya; González-Martínez, Alejandro; Gómez-Silván, Cinta; Osorio, Francisco; Rodelas, Belén; González-López, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Biological wastewater treatment (WWT) frequently relies on biofilms for the removal of anthropogenic contaminants. The use of inert carrier materials to support biofilm development is often required, although under certain operating conditions microorganisms yield structures called granules, dense aggregates of self-immobilized cells with the characteristics of biofilms maintained in suspension. Molecular techniques have been successfully applied in recent years to identify the prokaryotic communities inhabiting biofilms in WWT plants. Although methanogenic Archaea are widely acknowledged as key players for the degradation of organic matter in anaerobic bioreactors, other biotechnological functions fulfilled by Archaea are less explored, and research on their significance and potential for WWT is largely needed. In addition, the occurrence of biofilms in WWT plants can sometimes be a source of operational problems. This is the case for membrane bioreactors (MBR), an advanced technology that combines conventional biological treatment with membrane filtration, which is strongly limited by biofouling, defined as the undesirable accumulation of microbial biofilms and other materials on membrane surfaces. The prevalence and spatial distribution of archaeal communities in biofilm-based WWT as well as their role in biofouling are reviewed here, in order to illustrate the significance of this prokaryotic cellular lineage in engineered environments devoted to WWT. PMID:24022691

  12. Current themes and recent advances in modelling species occurrences

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Recent years have seen a huge expansion in the range of methods and approaches that are being used to predict species occurrences. This expansion has been accompanied by many improvements in statistical methods, including more accurate ways of comparing models, better null models, methods to cope with autocorrelation, and greater awareness of the importance of scale and prevalence. However, the field still suffers from problems with incorporating temporal variation, overfitted models and poor out-of-sample prediction, confusion between explanation and prediction, simplistic assumptions, and a focus on pattern over process. The greatest advances in recent years have come from integrative studies that have linked species occurrence models with other themes and topics in ecology, such as island biogeography, climate change, disease geography, and invasive species. PMID:20948597

  13. Advancing microbial sciences by individual-based modelling.

    PubMed

    Hellweger, Ferdi L; Clegg, Robert J; Clark, James R; Plugge, Caroline M; Kreft, Jan-Ulrich

    2016-07-01

    Remarkable technological advances have revealed ever more properties and behaviours of individual microorganisms, but the novel data generated by these techniques have not yet been fully exploited. In this Opinion article, we explain how individual-based models (IBMs) can be constructed based on the findings of such techniques and how they help to explore competitive and cooperative microbial interactions. Furthermore, we describe how IBMs have provided insights into self-organized spatial patterns from biofilms to the oceans of the world, phage-CRISPR dynamics and other emergent phenomena. Finally, we discuss how combining individual-based observations with IBMs can advance our understanding at both the individual and population levels, leading to the new approach of microbial individual-based ecology (μIBE). PMID:27265769

  14. Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a final report for the period of 12/1/03 through 11/30/04 for NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC3-776, entitled "Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials." During this final period, major efforts were focused on both the determination of mechanical properties of advanced ceramic materials and the development of mechanical test methodologies under several different programs of the NASA-Glenn. The important research activities made during this period are: 1. Mechanical properties evaluation of two gas-turbine grade silicon nitrides. 2) Mechanical testing for fuel-cell seal materials. 3) Mechanical properties evaluation of thermal barrier coatings and CFCCs and 4) Foreign object damage (FOD) testing.

  15. Thermal Model Predictions of Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen J.; Fabanich, William Anthony; Schmitz, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents recent thermal model results of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG). The three-dimensional (3D) ASRG thermal power model was built using the Thermal Desktop(trademark) thermal analyzer. The model was correlated with ASRG engineering unit test data and ASRG flight unit predictions from Lockheed Martin's (LM's) I-deas(trademark) TMG thermal model. The auxiliary cooling system (ACS) of the ASRG is also included in the ASRG thermal model. The ACS is designed to remove waste heat from the ASRG so that it can be used to heat spacecraft components. The performance of the ACS is reported under nominal conditions and during a Venus flyby scenario. The results for the nominal case are validated with data from Lockheed Martin. Transient thermal analysis results of ASRG for a Venus flyby with a representative trajectory are also presented. In addition, model results of an ASRG mounted on a Cassini-like spacecraft with a sunshade are presented to show a way to mitigate the high temperatures of a Venus flyby. It was predicted that the sunshade can lower the temperature of the ASRG alternator by 20 C for the representative Venus flyby trajectory. The 3D model also was modified to predict generator performance after a single Advanced Stirling Convertor failure. The geometry of the Microtherm HT insulation block on the outboard side was modified to match deformation and shrinkage observed during testing of a prototypic ASRG test fixture by LM. Test conditions and test data were used to correlate the model by adjusting the thermal conductivity of the deformed insulation to match the post-heat-dump steady state temperatures. Results for these conditions showed that the performance of the still-functioning inboard ACS was unaffected.

  16. Developing a Model of Advanced Training to Promote Career Advancement for Certified Genetic Counselors: An Investigation of Expanded Skills, Advanced Training Paths, and Professional Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Baty, Bonnie J; Trepanier, Angela; Bennett, Robin L; Davis, Claire; Erby, Lori; Hippman, Catriona; Lerner, Barbara; Matthews, Anne; Myers, Melanie F; Robbins, Carol B; Singletary, Claire N

    2016-08-01

    There are currently multiple paths through which genetic counselors can acquire advanced knowledge and skills. However, outside of continuing education opportunities, there are few formal training programs designed specifically for the advanced training of genetic counselors. In the genetic counseling profession, there is currently considerable debate about the paths that should be available to attain advanced skills, as well as the skills that might be needed for practice in the future. The Association of Genetic Counseling Program Directors (AGCPD) convened a national committee, the Committee on Advanced Training for Certified Genetic Counselors (CATCGC), to investigate varied paths to post-master's training and career development. The committee began its work by developing three related grids that view career advancement from the viewpoints of the skills needed to advance (skills), ways to obtain these skills (paths), and existing genetic counselor positions that offer career change or advancement (positions). Here we describe previous work related to genetic counselor career advancement, the charge of the CATCGC, our preliminary work in developing a model through which to view genetic counselor advanced training and career advancement opportunities, and our next steps in further developing and disseminating the model. PMID:26739839

  17. Surrogate Model Development for Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, Krishnasamy; Ra, youngchul; Reitz, Rolf; Bunting, Bruce G

    2011-01-01

    The fuels used in internal-combustion engines are complex mixtures of a multitude of different types of hydrocarbon species. Attempting numerical simulations of combustion of real fuels with all of the hydrocarbon species included is highly unrealistic. Thus, a surrogate model approach is generally adopted, which involves choosing a few representative hydrocarbon species whose overall behavior mimics the characteristics of the target fuel. The present study proposes surrogate models for the nine fuels for advanced combustion engines (FACE) that have been developed for studying low-emission, high-efficiency advanced diesel engine concepts. The surrogate compositions for the fuels are arrived at by simulating their distillation profiles to within a maximum absolute error of 4% using a discrete multi-component (DMC) fuel model that has been incorporated in the multi-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, KIVA-ERC-CHEMKIN. The simulated surrogate compositions cover the range and measured concentrations of the various hydrocarbon classes present in the fuels. The fidelity of the surrogate fuel models is judged on the basis of matching their specific gravity, lower heating value, hydrogen/carbon (H/C) ratio, cetane number, and cetane index with the measured data for all nine FACE fuels.

  18. The Propulsion Model of Creative Contributions Applied to the Arts and Letters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternberg, Robert J.; Kaufman, James C.; Pretz, Jean E.

    2001-01-01

    This article applies a propulsion model of creative contributions to the arts and letters. It opens with a general discussion of creative contributions and reviews existing models before describing the propulsion model and suggesting eight types of contributions that follow from this model. Examples illustrate use of the model in understanding…

  19. Advancing Cyberinfrastructure to support high resolution water resources modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarboton, D. G.; Ogden, F. L.; Jones, N.; Horsburgh, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    Addressing the problem of how the availability and quality of water resources at large scales are sensitive to climate variability, watershed alterations and management activities requires computational resources that combine data from multiple sources and support integrated modeling. Related cyberinfrastructure challenges include: 1) how can we best structure data and computer models to address this scientific problem through the use of high-performance and data-intensive computing, and 2) how can we do this in a way that discipline scientists without extensive computational and algorithmic knowledge and experience can take advantage of advances in cyberinfrastructure? This presentation will describe a new system called CI-WATER that is being developed to address these challenges and advance high resolution water resources modeling in the Western U.S. We are building on existing tools that enable collaboration to develop model and data interfaces that link integrated system models running within an HPC environment to multiple data sources. Our goal is to enhance the use of computational simulation and data-intensive modeling to better understand water resources. Addressing water resource problems in the Western U.S. requires simulation of natural and engineered systems, as well as representation of legal (water rights) and institutional constraints alongside the representation of physical processes. We are establishing data services to represent the engineered infrastructure and legal and institutional systems in a way that they can be used with high resolution multi-physics watershed modeling at high spatial resolution. These services will enable incorporation of location-specific information on water management infrastructure and systems into the assessment of regional water availability in the face of growing demands, uncertain future meteorological forcings, and existing prior-appropriations water rights. This presentation will discuss the informatics

  20. Incorporating a Full-Physics Meteorological Model into an Applied Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling System

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Larry K.; Allwine, K Jerry; Rutz, Frederick C.

    2004-08-23

    A new modeling system has been developed to provide a non-meteorologist with tools to predict air pollution transport in regions of complex terrain. This system couples the Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model 5 (MM5) with Earth Tech’s CALMET-CALPUFF system using a unique Graphical User Interface (GUI) developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This system is most useful in data-sparse regions, where there are limited observations to initialize the CALMET model. The user is able to define the domain of interest, provide details about the source term, and enter a surface weather observation through the GUI. The system then generates initial conditions and time constant boundary conditions for use by MM5. MM5 is run and the results are piped to CALPUFF for the dispersion calculations. Contour plots of pollutant concentration are prepared for the user. The primary advantages of the system are the streamlined application of MM5 and CALMET, limited data requirements, and the ability to run the coupled system on a desktop or laptop computer. In comparison with data collected as part of a field campaign, the new modeling system shows promise that a full-physics mesoscale model can be used in an applied modeling system to effectively simulate locally thermally-driven winds with minimal observations as input. An unexpected outcome of this research was how well CALMET represented the locally thermally-driven flows.

  1. Fish Passage Assessment of an Advanced Hydropower Turbine and Conventional Turbine Using Blade-strike Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Ploskey, Gene R.

    2011-01-04

    In the Columbia and Snake River basins, several species of Pacific salmon were listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 due to significant declines of fish population. Dam operators and design engineers are thus faced with the task of making those hydroelectric facilities more ecologically friendly through changes in hydro-turbine design and operation. Public Utility District No. 2 of Grant County, Washington, applied for re-licensing from the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to replace the 10 turbines at Wanapum Dam with advanced hydropower turbines that were designed to increase power generation and improve fish passage conditions. We applied both deterministic and stochastic blade-strike models to the newly installed turbine and an existing turbine. Modeled probabilities were compared to the results of a large-scale live fish survival study and a sensor fish study under the same operational parameters. Overall, injury rates predicted by the deterministic model were higher than experimental rates of injury while those predicted by the stochastic model were in close agreement with experiment results. Fish orientation at the time of entry into the plane of the leading edges of the turbine runner blades was an important factor contributing to uncertainty in modeled results. The advanced design turbine had slightly higher modeled injury rates than the existing turbine design; however, there was no statistical evidence that suggested significant differences in blade-strike injuries between the two turbines and the hypothesis that direct fish survival rate through the advanced hydropower turbine is equal or better than that through the conventional turbine could not be rejected.

  2. Business Model Evaluation for an Advanced Multimedia Service Portfolio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisciella, Paolo; Zoric, Josip; Gaivoronski, Alexei A.

    In this paper we analyze quantitatively a business model for the collaborative provision of an advanced mobile data service portfolio composed of three multimedia services: Video on Demand, Internet Protocol Television and User Generated Content. We provide a description of the provision system considering the relation occurring between tecnical aspects and business aspects for each agent providing the basic multimedia service. Such a techno-business analysis is then projected into a mathematical model dealing with the problem of the definition of incentives between the different agents involved in a collaborative service provision. Through the implementation of this model we aim at shaping the behaviour of each of the contributing agents modifying the level of profitability that the Service Portfolio yields to each of them.

  3. Acoustic test and analyses of three advanced turboprop models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, B. M.; Metzger, F. B.

    1980-01-01

    Results of acoustic tests of three 62.2 cm (24.5 inch) diameter models of the prop-fan (a small diameter, highly loaded. Multi-bladed variable pitch advanced turboprop) are presented. Results show that there is little difference in the noise produced by unswept and slightly swept designs. However, the model designed for noise reduction produces substantially less noise at test conditions simulating 0.8 Mach number cruise speed or at conditions simulating takeoff and landing. In the near field at cruise conditions the acoustically designed. In the far field at takeoff and landing conditions the acoustically designed model is 5 db quieter than unswept or slightly swept designs. Correlation between noise measurement and theoretical predictions as well as comparisons between measured and predicted acoustic pressure pulses generated by the prop-fan blades are discussed. The general characteristics of the pulses are predicted. Shadowgraph measurements were obtained which showed the location of bow and trailing waves.

  4. Consistent low-field mobility modeling for advanced MOS devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanojević, Zlatan; Baumgartner, Oskar; Filipović, Lidija; Kosina, Hans; Karner, Markus; Kernstock, Christian; Prause, Philipp

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we develop several extensions to semi-classical modeling of low-field mobility, which are necessary to treat planar and non-planar channel geometries on equal footing. We advance the state-of-the-art by generalizing the Prange-Nee model for surface roughness scattering to non-planar geometries, providing a fully numerical treatment of Coulomb scattering, and formulating the Kubo-Greenwood mobility model in a consistent, dimension-independent manner. These extensions allow meaningful comparison of planar and non-planar structures alike, and open the door to evaluating emerging device concepts, such as the FinFET or the junction-less transistor, on physical grounds.

  5. Development of a system model for advanced small modular reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a system model that can be used to analyze three advance small modular reactor (SMR) designs through their lifetime. Neutronics of these reactor designs were evaluated using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX/6). The system models were developed in Matlab and Simulink. A major thrust of this research was the initial scoping analysis of Sandia's concept of a long-life fast reactor (LLFR). The inherent characteristic of this conceptual design is to minimize the change in reactivity over the lifetime of the reactor. This allows the reactor to operate substantially longer at full power than traditional light water reactors (LWRs) or other SMR designs (e.g. high temperature gas reactor (HTGR)). The system model has subroutines for lifetime reactor feedback and operation calculations, thermal hydraulic effects, load demand changes and a simplified SCO2 Brayton cycle for power conversion.

  6. Advanced optical position sensors for magnetically suspended wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafleur, S.

    1985-01-01

    A major concern to aerodynamicists has been the corruption of wind tunnel test data by model support structures, such as stings or struts. A technique for magnetically suspending wind tunnel models was considered by Tournier and Laurenceau (1957) in order to overcome this problem. This technique is now implemented with the aid of a Large Magnetic Suspension and Balance System (LMSBS) and advanced position sensors for measuring model attitude and position within the test section. Two different optical position sensors are discussed, taking into account a device based on the use of linear CCD arrays, and a device utilizing area CID cameras. Current techniques in image processing have been employed to develop target tracking algorithms capable of subpixel resolution for the sensors. The algorithms are discussed in detail, and some preliminary test results are reported.

  7. Advancing Models and Evaluation of Cumulus, Climate and Aerosol Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gettelman, Andrew

    2015-10-27

    This project was successfully able to meet its’ goals, but faced some serious challenges due to personnel issues. Nonetheless, it was largely successful. The Project Objectives were as follows: 1. Develop a unified representation of stratifom and cumulus cloud microphysics for NCAR/DOE global community models. 2. Examine the effects of aerosols on clouds and their impact on precipitation in stratiform and cumulus clouds. We will also explore the effects of clouds and precipitation on aerosols. 3. Test these new formulations using advanced evaluation techniques and observations and release

  8. Advances in Electromagnetic Modelling through High Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, K.; Folwell, N.; Ge, L.; Guetz, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Prudencio, E.; Schussman, G.; Uplenchwar, R.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2006-03-29

    Under the DOE SciDAC project on Accelerator Science and Technology, a suite of electromagnetic codes has been under development at SLAC that are based on unstructured grids for higher accuracy, and use parallel processing to enable large-scale simulation. The new modeling capability is supported by SciDAC collaborations on meshing, solvers, refinement, optimization and visualization. These advances in computational science are described and the application of the parallel eigensolver Omega3P to the cavity design for the International Linear Collider is discussed.

  9. Advances in DOE modeling and optical performance for SMO applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carriere, James; Stack, Jared; Childers, John; Welch, Kevin; Himel, Marc D.

    2010-04-01

    The introduction of source mask optimization (SMO) to the design process addresses an urgent need for the 32nm node and beyond as alternative lithography approaches continue to push out. To take full advantage of SMO routines, an understanding of the characteristic properties of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) is required. Greater flexibility in the DOE output is needed to optimize lithographic process windows. In addition, new and tighter constraints on the DOEs used for off-axis illumination (OAI) are being introduced to precisely predict, control and reduce the effects of pole imbalance and stray light on the CD budget. We present recent advancements in the modeling and optical performance of these DOEs.

  10. Advanced Models for Aeroelastic Analysis of Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Mahajan, Aparajit

    1996-01-01

    This report describes an integrated, multidisciplinary simulation capability for aeroelastic analysis and optimization of advanced propulsion systems. This research is intended to improve engine development, acquisition, and maintenance costs. One of the proposed simulations is aeroelasticity of blades, cowls, and struts in an ultra-high bypass fan. These ducted fans are expected to have significant performance, fuel, and noise improvements over existing engines. An interface program was written to use modal information from COBSTAN and NASTRAN blade models in aeroelastic analysis with a single rotation ducted fan aerodynamic code.

  11. Demasking the integrated value of discharge - Advanced sensitivity analysis on the components of hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guse, Björn; Pfannerstill, Matthias; Gafurov, Abror; Fohrer, Nicola; Gupta, Hoshin

    2016-04-01

    The hydrologic response variable most often used in sensitivity analysis is discharge which provides an integrated value of all catchment processes. The typical sensitivity analysis evaluates how changes in the model parameters affect the model output. However, due to discharge being the aggregated effect of all hydrological processes, the sensitivity signal of a certain model parameter can be strongly masked. A more advanced form of sensitivity analysis would be achieved if we could investigate how the sensitivity of a certain modelled process variable relates to the changes in a parameter. Based on this, the controlling parameters for different hydrological components could be detected. Towards this end, we apply the approach of temporal dynamics of parameter sensitivity (TEDPAS) to calculate the daily sensitivities for different model outputs with the FAST method. The temporal variations in parameter dominance are then analysed for both the modelled hydrological components themselves, and also for the rates of change (derivatives) in the modelled hydrological components. The daily parameter sensitivities are then compared with the modelled hydrological components using regime curves. Application of this approach shows that when the corresponding modelled process is investigated instead of discharge, we obtain both an increased indication of parameter sensitivity, and also a clear pattern showing how the seasonal patterns of parameter dominance change over time for each hydrological process. By relating these results with the model structure, we can see that the sensitivity of model parameters is influenced by the function of the parameter. While capacity parameters show more sensitivity to the modelled hydrological component, flux parameters tend to have a higher sensitivity to rates of change in the modelled hydrological component. By better disentangling the information hidden in the discharge values, we can use sensitivity analyses to obtain a clearer signal

  12. Multiscale and Multiphysics Modeling of Additive Manufacturing of Advanced Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Frank; Newkirk, Joseph; Fan, Zhiqiang; Sparks, Todd; Chen, Xueyang; Fletcher, Kenneth; Zhang, Jingwei; Zhang, Yunlu; Kumar, Kannan Suresh; Karnati, Sreekar

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this proposed project is to research and develop a prediction tool for advanced additive manufacturing (AAM) processes for advanced materials and develop experimental methods to provide fundamental properties and establish validation data. Aircraft structures and engines demand materials that are stronger, useable at much higher temperatures, provide less acoustic transmission, and enable more aeroelastic tailoring than those currently used. Significant improvements in properties can only be achieved by processing the materials under nonequilibrium conditions, such as AAM processes. AAM processes encompass a class of processes that use a focused heat source to create a melt pool on a substrate. Examples include Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication and Direct Metal Deposition. These types of additive processes enable fabrication of parts directly from CAD drawings. To achieve the desired material properties and geometries of the final structure, assessing the impact of process parameters and predicting optimized conditions with numerical modeling as an effective prediction tool is necessary. The targets for the processing are multiple and at different spatial scales, and the physical phenomena associated occur in multiphysics and multiscale. In this project, the research work has been developed to model AAM processes in a multiscale and multiphysics approach. A macroscale model was developed to investigate the residual stresses and distortion in AAM processes. A sequentially coupled, thermomechanical, finite element model was developed and validated experimentally. The results showed the temperature distribution, residual stress, and deformation within the formed deposits and substrates. A mesoscale model was developed to include heat transfer, phase change with mushy zone, incompressible free surface flow, solute redistribution, and surface tension. Because of excessive computing time needed, a parallel computing approach was also tested. In addition

  13. Advancing reservoir operation description in physically based hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghileri, Daniela; Giudici, Federico; Castelletti, Andrea; Burlando, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Last decades have seen significant advances in our capacity of characterizing and reproducing hydrological processes within physically based models. Yet, when the human component is considered (e.g. reservoirs, water distribution systems), the associated decisions are generally modeled with very simplistic rules, which might underperform in reproducing the actual operators' behaviour on a daily or sub-daily basis. For example, reservoir operations are usually described by a target-level rule curve, which represents the level that the reservoir should track during normal operating conditions. The associated release decision is determined by the current state of the reservoir relative to the rule curve. This modeling approach can reasonably reproduce the seasonal water volume shift due to reservoir operation. Still, it cannot capture more complex decision making processes in response, e.g., to the fluctuations of energy prices and demands, the temporal unavailability of power plants or varying amount of snow accumulated in the basin. In this work, we link a physically explicit hydrological model with detailed hydropower behavioural models describing the decision making process by the dam operator. In particular, we consider two categories of behavioural models: explicit or rule-based behavioural models, where reservoir operating rules are empirically inferred from observational data, and implicit or optimization based behavioural models, where, following a normative economic approach, the decision maker is represented as a rational agent maximising a utility function. We compare these two alternate modelling approaches on the real-world water system of Lake Como catchment in the Italian Alps. The water system is characterized by the presence of 18 artificial hydropower reservoirs generating almost 13% of the Italian hydropower production. Results show to which extent the hydrological regime in the catchment is affected by different behavioural models and reservoir

  14. Applying Catastrophe Theory to an Information-Processing Model of Problem Solving in Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stamovlasis, Dimitrios; Tsaparlis, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we test an information-processing model (IPM) of problem solving in science education, namely the working memory overload model, by applying catastrophe theory. Changes in students' achievement were modeled as discontinuities within a cusp catastrophe model, where working memory capacity was implemented as asymmetry and the degree…

  15. Accuracy of Binary Black Hole Waveform Models for Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Prayush; Fong, Heather; Barkett, Kevin; Bhagwat, Swetha; Afshari, Nousha; Chu, Tony; Brown, Duncan; Lovelace, Geoffrey; Pfeiffer, Harald; Scheel, Mark; Szilagyi, Bela; Simulating Extreme Spacetimes (SXS) Team

    2016-03-01

    Coalescing binaries of compact objects, such as black holes and neutron stars, are the primary targets for gravitational-wave (GW) detection with Advanced LIGO. Accurate modeling of the emitted GWs is required to extract information about the binary source. The most accurate solution to the general relativistic two-body problem is available in numerical relativity (NR), which is however limited in application due to computational cost. Current searches use semi-analytic models that are based in post-Newtonian (PN) theory and calibrated to NR. In this talk, I will present comparisons between contemporary models and high-accuracy numerical simulations performed using the Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC), focusing at the questions: (i) How well do models capture binary's late-inspiral where they lack a-priori accurate information from PN or NR, and (ii) How accurately do they model binaries with parameters outside their range of calibration. These results guide the choice of templates for future GW searches, and motivate future modeling efforts.

  16. Computational ocean acoustics: Advances in 3D ocean acoustic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Henrik; Jensen, Finn B.

    2012-11-01

    The numerical model of ocean acoustic propagation developed in the 1980's are still in widespread use today, and the field of computational ocean acoustics is often considered a mature field. However, the explosive increase in computational power available to the community has created opportunities for modeling phenomena that earlier were beyond reach. Most notably, three-dimensional propagation and scattering problems have been prohibitive computationally, but are now addressed routinely using brute force numerical approaches such as the Finite Element Method, in particular for target scattering problems, where they are being combined with the traditional wave theory propagation models in hybrid modeling frameworks. Also, recent years has seen the development of hybrid approaches coupling oceanographic circulation models with acoustic propagation models, enabling the forecasting of sonar performance uncertainty in dynamic ocean environments. These and other advances made over the last couple of decades support the notion that the field of computational ocean acoustics is far from being mature. [Work supported by the Office of Naval Research, Code 321OA].

  17. Advanced parallel programming models research and development opportunities.

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Zhaofang.; Brightwell, Ronald Brian

    2004-07-01

    There is currently a large research and development effort within the high-performance computing community on advanced parallel programming models. This research can potentially have an impact on parallel applications, system software, and computing architectures in the next several years. Given Sandia's expertise and unique perspective in these areas, particularly on very large-scale systems, there are many areas in which Sandia can contribute to this effort. This technical report provides a survey of past and present parallel programming model research projects and provides a detailed description of the Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) programming model. The PGAS model may offer several improvements over the traditional distributed memory message passing model, which is the dominant model currently being used at Sandia. This technical report discusses these potential benefits and outlines specific areas where Sandia's expertise could contribute to current research activities. In particular, we describe several projects in the areas of high-performance networking, operating systems and parallel runtime systems, compilers, application development, and performance evaluation.

  18. Crashworthiness analysis using advanced material models in DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, R.W.; Burger, M.J.; McMichael, L.D.; Parkinson, R.D.

    1993-10-22

    As part of an electric vehicle consortium, LLNL and Kaiser Aluminum are conducting experimental and numerical studies on crashworthy aluminum spaceframe designs. They have jointly explored the effect of heat treat on crush behavior and duplicated the experimental behavior with finite-element simulations. The major technical contributions to the state of the art in numerical simulation arise from the development and use of advanced material model descriptions for LLNL`s DYNA3D code. Constitutive model enhancements in both flow and failure have been employed for conventional materials such as low-carbon steels, and also for lighter weight materials such as aluminum and fiber composites being considered for future vehicles. The constitutive model enhancements are developed as extensions from LLNL`s work in anisotropic flow and multiaxial failure modeling. Analysis quality as a function of level of simplification of material behavior and mesh is explored, as well as the penalty in computation cost that must be paid for using more complex models and meshes. The lightweight material modeling technology is being used at the vehicle component level to explore the safety implications of small neighborhood electric vehicles manufactured almost exclusively from these materials.

  19. Modelling Vegetation Response to Climate Change in the Upper Danube Subcatchment applying a Biophysical Landsurface Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hank, T.; Mauser, W.

    2009-04-01

    The manifold exchange processes that occur between landsurface and atmosphere are largely determined through the living vegetation cover that dynamically responds to atmospheric conditions such as humidity, temperature or the concentration of carbon dioxide respectively. When dealing with the mapping of biospheric feedbacks on changing climatic conditions, the numerical description of the involved processes represents a helpful tool and reliable instrument for the investigation of the dynamics that are part of these landsurface exchange cycles. A considerable number of current studies concentrates on the modelling of global dynamic reactions of the vegetation cover on changing atmospheric parameters. Nonetheless, questions concerning the regional effects of climate change are getting more and more important for stakeholders and decision makers worldwide. Within the scope of the GLOWA-Danube cooperative project, which is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMB+F), the physically-based hydrological model PROMET (process of radiation mass and energy transfer) is applied to investigate the consequences of climate change on the regional scale. PROMET largely represents the landsurface component of the DANUBIA decision support system, which has been recently enhanced by an explicit model of photosynthesis. The assimilation model was combined with a model of stomatal conductance and the respective physiological submodels to enable a spatial modelling of active vegetation growth, taking the sensitivity of the photosynthetic apparatus with respect to changing atmospheric conditions into account. The combined model approach was applied to a set of climate scenarios, all tracing the characteristics of the moderate IPCC A1B scenario, but featuring different realizations of this storyline. The meteorology for the scenario runs was generated, using a stochastic method that is based on a statistical analysis and rearrangement of measured

  20. Composite Structure Modeling and Analysis of Advanced Aircraft Fuselage Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Sorokach, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project and the Boeing Company are collabrating to advance the unitized damage arresting composite airframe technology with application to the Hybrid-Wing-Body (HWB) aircraft. The testing of a HWB fuselage section with Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) construction is presently being conducted at NASA Langley. Based on lessons learned from previous HWB structural design studies, improved finite-element models (FEM) of the HWB multi-bay and bulkhead assembly are developed to evaluate the performance of the PRSEUS construction. In order to assess the comparative weight reduction benefits of the PRSEUS technology, conventional cylindrical skin-stringer-frame models of a cylindrical and a double-bubble section fuselage concepts are developed. Stress analysis with design cabin-pressure load and scenario based case studies are conducted for design improvement in each case. Alternate analysis with stitched composite hat-stringers and C-frames are also presented, in addition to the foam-core sandwich frame and pultruded rod-stringer construction. The FEM structural stress, strain and weights are computed and compared for relative weight/strength benefit assessment. The structural analysis and specific weight comparison of these stitched composite advanced aircraft fuselage concepts demonstrated that the pressurized HWB fuselage section assembly can be structurally as efficient as the conventional cylindrical fuselage section with composite stringer-frame and PRSEUS construction, and significantly better than the conventional aluminum construction and the double-bubble section concept.

  1. Zebrafish Models of Human Leukemia: Technological Advances and Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Nicholas R.; Laroche, Fabrice J.F.; Gutierrez, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Insights concerning leukemic pathophysiology have been acquired in various animal models and further efforts to understand the mechanisms underlying leukemic treatment resistance and disease relapse promise to improve therapeutic strategies. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a vertebrate organism with a conserved hematopoietic program and unique experimental strengths suiting it for the investigation of human leukemia. Recent technological advances in zebrafish research including efficient transgenesis, precise genome editing, and straightforward transplantation techniques have led to the generation of a number of leukemia models. The transparency of the zebrafish when coupled with improved lineage-tracing and imaging techniques has revealed exquisite details of leukemic initiation, progression, and regression. With these advantages, the zebrafish represents a unique experimental system for leukemic research and additionally, advances in zebrafish-based high-throughput drug screening promise to hasten the discovery of novel leukemia therapeutics. To date, investigators have accumulated knowledge of the genetic underpinnings critical to leukemic transformation and treatment resistance and without doubt, zebrafish are rapidly expanding our understanding of disease mechanisms and helping to shape therapeutic strategies for improved outcomes in leukemic patients. PMID:27165361

  2. Joint modeling of progression-free survival and death in advanced cancer clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Dejardin, David; Lesaffre, Emmanuel; Verbeke, Geert

    2010-07-20

    Progression-related endpoints (such as time to progression or progression-free survival) and time to death are common endpoints in cancer clinical trials. It is of interest to study the link between progression-related endpoints and time to death (e.g. to evaluate the degree of surrogacy). However, current methods ignore some aspects of the definitions of progression-related endpoints. We review those definitions and investigate their impact on modeling the joint distribution. Further, we propose a multi-state model in which the association between the endpoints is modeled through a frailty term. We also argue that interval-censoring needs to be taken into account to more closely match the latent disease evolution. The joint distribution and an expression for Kendall's tau are derived. The model is applied to data from a clinical trial in advanced metastatic ovarian cancer. PMID:20572123

  3. Modeling Creep Effects in Advanced SiC/SiC Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Jerry; DiCarlo, James

    2006-01-01

    Because advanced SiC/SiC composites are projected to be used for aerospace components with large thermal gradients at high temperatures, efforts are on-going at NASA Glenn to develop approaches for modeling the anticipated creep behavior of these materials and its subsequent effects on such key composite properties as internal residual stress, proportional limit stress, ultimate tensile strength, and rupture life. Based primarily on in-plane creep data for 2D panels, this presentation describes initial modeling progress at applied composite stresses below matrix cracking for some high performance SiC/SiC composite systems recently developed at NASA. Studies are described to develop creep and rupture models using empirical, mechanical analog, and mechanistic approaches, and to implement them into finite element codes for improved component design and life modeling

  4. Online model-based diagnosis to support autonomous operation of an advanced life support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Gautam; Manders, Eric-Jan; Ramirez, John; Mahadevan, Nagabhusan; Abdelwahed, Sherif

    2004-01-01

    This article describes methods for online model-based diagnosis of subsystems of the advanced life support system (ALS). The diagnosis methodology is tailored to detect, isolate, and identify faults in components of the system quickly so that fault-adaptive control techniques can be applied to maintain system operation without interruption. We describe the components of our hybrid modeling scheme and the diagnosis methodology, and then demonstrate the effectiveness of this methodology by building a detailed model of the reverse osmosis (RO) system of the water recovery system (WRS) of the ALS. This model is validated with real data collected from an experimental testbed at NASA JSC. A number of diagnosis experiments run on simulated faulty data are presented and the results are discussed.

  5. Online model-based diagnosis to support autonomous operation of an advanced life support system.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Gautam; Manders, Eric-Jan; Ramirez, John; Mahadevan, Nagabhusan; Abdelwahed, Sherif

    2004-01-01

    This article describes methods for online model-based diagnosis of subsystems of the advanced life support system (ALS). The diagnosis methodology is tailored to detect, isolate, and identify faults in components of the system quickly so that fault-adaptive control techniques can be applied to maintain system operation without interruption. We describe the components of our hybrid modeling scheme and the diagnosis methodology, and then demonstrate the effectiveness of this methodology by building a detailed model of the reverse osmosis (RO) system of the water recovery system (WRS) of the ALS. This model is validated with real data collected from an experimental testbed at NASA JSC. A number of diagnosis experiments run on simulated faulty data are presented and the results are discussed. PMID:15880907

  6. Current advancements and challenges in soil-root interactions modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Huber, Katrin; Abesha, Betiglu; Meunier, Felicien; Leitner, Daniel; Roose, Tiina; Javaux, Mathieu; Vanderborght, Jan; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Roots change their surrounding soil chemically, physically and biologically. This includes changes in soil moisture and solute concentration, the exudation of organic substances into the rhizosphere, increased growth of soil microorganisms, or changes in soil structure. The fate of water and solutes in the root zone is highly determined by these root-soil interactions. Mathematical models of soil-root systems in combination with non-invasive techniques able to characterize root systems are a promising tool to understand and predict the behaviour of water and solutes in the root zone. With respect to different fields of applications, predictive mathematical models can contribute to the solution of optimal control problems in plant recourse efficiency. This may result in significant gains in productivity, efficiency and environmental sustainability in various land use activities. Major challenges include the coupling of model parameters of the relevant processes with the surrounding environment such as temperature, nutrient concentration or soil water content. A further challenge is the mathematical description of the different spatial and temporal scales involved. This includes in particular the branched structures formed by root systems or the external mycelium of mycorrhizal fungi. Here, reducing complexity as well as bridging between spatial scales is required. Furthermore, the combination of experimental and mathematical techniques may advance the field enormously. Here, the use of root system, soil and rhizosphere models is presented through a number of modelling case studies, including image based modelling of phosphate uptake by a root with hairs, model-based optimization of root architecture for phosphate uptake from soil, upscaling of rhizosphere models, modelling root growth in structured soil, and the effect of root hydraulic architecture on plant water uptake efficiency and drought resistance.

  7. Current Advancements and Challenges in Soil-Root Interactions Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, A.; Huber, K.; Abesha, B.; Meunier, F.; Leitner, D.; Roose, T.; Javaux, M.; Vanderborght, J.; Vereecken, H.

    2014-12-01

    Roots change their surrounding soil chemically, physically and biologically. This includes changes in soil moisture and solute concentration, the exudation of organic substances into the rhizosphere, increased growth of soil microorganisms, or changes in soil structure. The fate of water and solutes in the root zone is highly determined by these root-soil interactions. Mathematical models of soil-root systems in combination with non-invasive techniques able to characterize root systems are a promising tool to understand and predict the behaviour of water and solutes in the root zone. With respect to different fields of applications, predictive mathematical models can contribute to the solution of optimal control problems in plant recourse efficiency. This may result in significant gains in productivity, efficiency and environmental sustainability in various land use activities. Major challenges include the coupling of model parameters of the relevant processes with the surrounding environment such as temperature, nutrient concentration or soil water content. A further challenge is the mathematical description of the different spatial and temporal scales involved. This includes in particular the branched structures formed by root systems or the external mycelium of mycorrhizal fungi. Here, reducing complexity as well as bridging between spatial scales is required. Furthermore, the combination of experimental and mathematical techniques may advance the field enormously. Here, the use of root system, soil and rhizosphere models is presented through a number of modelling case studies, including image based modelling of phosphate uptake by a root with hairs, model-based optimization of root architecture for phosphate uptake from soil, upscaling of rhizosphere models, modelling root growth in structured soil, and the effect of root hydraulic architecture on plant water uptake efficiency and drought resistance.

  8. Practical Findings from Applying the PSD Model for Evaluating Software Design Specifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räisänen, Teppo; Lehto, Tuomas; Oinas-Kukkonen, Harri

    This paper presents practical findings from applying the PSD model to evaluating the support for persuasive features in software design specifications for a mobile Internet device. On the one hand, our experiences suggest that the PSD model fits relatively well for evaluating design specifications. On the other hand, the model would benefit from more specific heuristics for evaluating each technique to avoid unnecessary subjectivity. Better distinction between the design principles in the social support category would also make the model easier to use. Practitioners who have no theoretical background can apply the PSD model to increase the persuasiveness of the systems they design. The greatest benefit of the PSD model for researchers designing new systems may be achieved when it is applied together with a sound theory, such as the Elaboration Likelihood Model. Using the ELM together with the PSD model, one may increase the chances for attitude change.

  9. Numerical modeling of spray combustion with an advanced VOF method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yen-Sen; Shang, Huan-Min; Shih, Ming-Hsin; Liaw, Paul

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes the technical development and validation of a multiphase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical method using the volume-of-fluid (VOF) model and a Lagrangian tracking model which can be employed to analyze general multiphase flow problems with free surface mechanism. The gas-liquid interface mass, momentum and energy conservation relationships are modeled by continuum surface mechanisms. A new solution method is developed such that the present VOF model can be applied for all-speed flow regimes. The objectives of the present study are to develop and verify the fractional volume-of-fluid cell partitioning approach into a predictor-corrector algorithm and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the present approach by simulating benchmark problems including laminar impinging jets, shear coaxial jet atomization and shear coaxial spray combustion flows.

  10. Colleges and Institutes: Advanced Skills and Applied Research. Submission to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance Pre-Budget Consultations 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Canadian Community Colleges, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Integrated with the industrial and technical drivers of the economy, Canada's colleges, institutes, polytechnics and cegeps offer the advanced skills of faculty and staff to support the private sector's need for applied research, product and process innovation, commercialization and technology transfer. Federal investments in research over the…

  11. Steady-state Analysis Model for Advanced Fuelcycle Schemes

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-05-12

    The model was developed as a part of the study, "Advanced Fuel Cycles and Waste Management", which was performed during 2003—2005 by an ad-hoc expert group under the Nuclear Development Committee in the OECD/NEA. The model was designed for an efficient conduct of nuclear fuel cycle scheme cost analyses. It is simple, transparent and offers users the capability to track down the cost analysis results. All the fuel cycle schemes considered in the model aremore » represented in a graphic format and all values related to a fuel cycle step are shown in the graphic interface, i.e., there are no hidden values embedded in the calculations. All data on the fuel cycle schemes considered in the study including mass flows, waste generation, cost data, and other data such as activities, decay heat and neutron sources of spent fuel and high—level waste along time are included in the model and can be displayed. The user can modify easily the values of mass flows and/or cost parameters and see the corresponding changes in the results. The model calculates: front—end fuel cycle mass flows such as requirements of enrichment and conversion services and natural uranium; mass of waste based on the waste generation parameters and the mass flow; and all costs. It performs Monte Carlo simulations with changing the values of all unit costs within their respective ranges (from lower to upper bounds).« less

  12. NASA Trapezoidal Wing Computations Including Transition and Advanced Turbulence Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, C. L.; Lee-Rausch, E. M.

    2012-01-01

    Flow about the NASA Trapezoidal Wing is computed with several turbulence models by using grids from the first High Lift Prediction Workshop in an effort to advance understanding of computational fluid dynamics modeling for this type of flowfield. Transition is accounted for in many of the computations. In particular, a recently-developed 4-equation transition model is utilized and works well overall. Accounting for transition tends to increase lift and decrease moment, which improves the agreement with experiment. Upper surface flap separation is reduced, and agreement with experimental surface pressures and velocity profiles is improved. The predicted shape of wakes from upstream elements is strongly influenced by grid resolution in regions above the main and flap elements. Turbulence model enhancements to account for rotation and curvature have the general effect of increasing lift and improving the resolution of the wing tip vortex as it convects downstream. However, none of the models improve the prediction of surface pressures near the wing tip, where more grid resolution is needed.

  13. Operational advances in ring current modeling using RAM-SCB

    SciTech Connect

    Welling, Daniel T; Jordanova, Vania K; Zaharia, Sorin G; Morley, Steven K

    2010-12-03

    The Ring current Atmosphere interaction Model with Self-Consistently calculated 3D Magnetic field (RAM-SCB) combines a kinetic model of the ring current with a force-balanced model of the magnetospheric magnetic field to create an inner magnetospheric model that is magnetically self consistent. RAM-SCB produces a wealth of outputs that are valuable to space weather applications. For example, the anisotropic particle distribution of the KeV-energy population calculated by the code is key for predicting surface charging on spacecraft. Furthermore, radiation belt codes stand to benefit substantially from RAM-SCB calculated magnetic field values and plasma wave growth rates - both important for determining the evolution of relativistic electron populations. RAM-SCB is undergoing development to bring these benefits to the space weather community. Data-model validation efforts are underway to assess the performance of the system. 'Virtual Satellite' capability has been added to yield satellite-specific particle distribution and magnetic field output. The code's outer boundary is being expanded to 10 Earth Radii to encompass previously neglected geosynchronous orbits and allow the code to be driven completely by either empirical or first-principles based inputs. These advances are culminating towards a new, real-time version of the code, rtRAM-SCB, that can monitor the inner magnetosphere conditions on both a global and spacecraft-specific level. This paper summarizes these new features as well as the benefits they provide the space weather community.

  14. A comparison of economic evaluation models as applied to geothermal energy technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziman, G. M.; Rosenberg, L. S.

    1983-01-01

    Several cost estimation and financial cash flow models have been applied to a series of geothermal case studies. In order to draw conclusions about relative performance and applicability of these models to geothermal projects, the consistency of results was assessed. The model outputs of principal interest in this study were net present value, internal rate of return, or levelized breakeven price. The models used were VENVAL, a venture analysis model; the Geothermal Probabilistic Cost Model (GPC Model); the Alternative Power Systems Economic Analysis Model (APSEAM); the Geothermal Loan Guarantee Cash Flow Model (GCFM); and the GEOCOST and GEOCITY geothermal models. The case studies to which the models were applied include a geothermal reservoir at Heber, CA; a geothermal eletric power plant to be located at the Heber site; an alcohol fuels production facility to be built at Raft River, ID; and a direct-use, district heating system in Susanville, CA.

  15. Advancing brain-machine interfaces: moving beyond linear state space models.

    PubMed

    Rouse, Adam G; Schieber, Marc H

    2015-01-01

    Advances in recent years have dramatically improved output control by Brain-Machine Interfaces (BMIs). Such devices nevertheless remain robotic and limited in their movements compared to normal human motor performance. Most current BMIs rely on transforming recorded neural activity to a linear state space composed of a set number of fixed degrees of freedom. Here we consider a variety of ways in which BMI design might be advanced further by applying non-linear dynamics observed in normal motor behavior. We consider (i) the dynamic range and precision of natural movements, (ii) differences between cortical activity and actual body movement, (iii) kinematic and muscular synergies, and (iv) the implications of large neuronal populations. We advance the hypothesis that a given population of recorded neurons may transmit more useful information than can be captured by a single, linear model across all movement phases and contexts. We argue that incorporating these various non-linear characteristics will be an important next step in advancing BMIs to more closely match natural motor performance. PMID:26283932

  16. Advancing brain-machine interfaces: moving beyond linear state space models

    PubMed Central

    Rouse, Adam G.; Schieber, Marc H.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in recent years have dramatically improved output control by Brain-Machine Interfaces (BMIs). Such devices nevertheless remain robotic and limited in their movements compared to normal human motor performance. Most current BMIs rely on transforming recorded neural activity to a linear state space composed of a set number of fixed degrees of freedom. Here we consider a variety of ways in which BMI design might be advanced further by applying non-linear dynamics observed in normal motor behavior. We consider (i) the dynamic range and precision of natural movements, (ii) differences between cortical activity and actual body movement, (iii) kinematic and muscular synergies, and (iv) the implications of large neuronal populations. We advance the hypothesis that a given population of recorded neurons may transmit more useful information than can be captured by a single, linear model across all movement phases and contexts. We argue that incorporating these various non-linear characteristics will be an important next step in advancing BMIs to more closely match natural motor performance. PMID:26283932

  17. Boron neutron capture therapy applied to advanced breast cancers: Engineering simulation and feasibility study of the radiation treatment protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sztejnberg Goncalves-Carralves, Manuel Leonardo

    This dissertation describes a novel Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) application for the treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 positive (HER2+) breast cancers. The original contribution of the dissertation is the development of the engineering simulation and the feasibility study of the radiation treatment protocol for this novel combination of BNCT and HER2+ breast cancer treatment. This new concept of BNCT, representing a radiation binary targeted treatment, consists of the combination of two approaches never used in a synergism before. This combination may offer realistic hope for relapsed and/or metastasized breast cancers. This treatment assumes that the boronated anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies (MABs) are administrated to the patient and accumulate preferentially in the tumor. Then the tumor is destroyed when is exposed to neutron irradiation. Since the use of anti-HER2 MABs yields good and promising results, the proposed concept is expected to amplify the known effect and be considered as a possible additional treatment approach to the most severe breast cancers for patients with metastasized cancer for which the current protocol is not successful and for patients refusing to have the standard treatment protocol. This dissertation makes an original contribution with an integral numerical approach and proves feasible the combination of the aforementioned therapy and disease. With these goals, the dissertation describes the theoretical analysis of the proposed concept providing an integral engineering simulation study of the treatment protocol. An extensive analysis of the potential limitations, capabilities and optimization factors are well studied using simplified models, models based on real CT patients' images, cellular models, and Monte Carlo (MCNP5/X) transport codes. One of the outcomes of the integral dosimetry assessment originally developed for the proposed treatment of advanced breast cancers is the implementation of BNCT

  18. Overview of the development of the advanced power system by the applied superconductivity technologies programme in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Kang-Sik; Jo, Young-Sik; Park, Minwon

    2006-03-01

    At the end of July 2004, DAPAS (development of the advanced power system by applied superconductivity technologies), which is a 10 year long programme, finished the first of three phases. As a result of the first phase, a process for a metre long coated conductor and the core technologies of the distribution line voltage class high temperature superconductor (HTS) power systems including cables, transformers, fault current limiters (FCLs), and motors have been developed. The ultimate goal of the HTS cable project is to develop 1 GVA class HTS transmission cables. During the first phase, a three-phase 50 MVA/22.9 kV class HTS cable of 30 m length has been developed and tested successfully; it has been installed by LS Cable Ltd. In the second phase, grid-connected HTS cables will be developed and established in the real utility line. In case of FCLs, there were two types of FCL developed during the first phase: a reactive type and a resistive type. Both types had the same project targets with the specification of 6.6 kV/200 A for three-phase, and entered the second phase with the target of a 22.9 kV class. In the case of the HTS transformer project, a 1 MVA/22.9 kV class was developed, and after the second phase this project will be considered for practical application. Technically, the optimal design and the manufacturing technologies of HTS transformers as well as the analysis tools of electromagnetic field in the transformer were developed. Furthermore, a 100 hp class motor has been developed so that the key technologies for the utilization of superconducting motors could be obtained. The developed motor consists of Bi-2223 field coils of 100 A operating current at 30 K and a closed-loop cooling system, the results of which will lead us to develop 1 and 5 MVA motors in the second and third phase, respectively. In the case of the coated conductors (CCs) programme, a batch-type co-evaporation process and a reel-to-reel pulsed laser deposition process gave us 10 m

  19. Steady-State Analysis Model for Advanced Fuel Cycle Schemes.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-03-17

    Version 00 SMAFS was developed as a part of the study, "Advanced Fuel Cycles and Waste Management", which was performed during 2003-2005 by an ad-hoc expert group under the Nuclear Development Committee in the OECD/NEA. The model was designed for an efficient conduct of nuclear fuel cycle scheme cost analyses. It is simple, transparent and offers users the capability to track down cost analysis results. All the fuel cycle schemes considered in the model aremore » represented in a graphic format and all values related to a fuel cycle step are shown in the graphic interface, i.e., there are no hidden values embedded in the calculations. All data on the fuel cycle schemes considered in the study including mass flows, waste generation, cost data, and other data such as activities, decay heat and neutron sources of spent fuel and high-level waste along time are included in the model and can be displayed. The user can easily modify values of mass flows and/or cost parameters and see corresponding changes in the results. The model calculates: front-end fuel cycle mass flows such as requirements of enrichment and conversion services and natural uranium; mass of waste based on the waste generation parameters and the mass flow; and all costs.« less

  20. Modelling the marine advance of the last Cordilleran ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguinot, Julien; Rogozhina, Irina

    2014-05-01

    Marine advance of the last Cordilleran ice sheet onto the north-eastern Pacific continental shelf may have caused rapid fluctuations of sea level and potentially impacted upon human migration into North America. However the position of the former ice front was critically controlled by a process that remains poorly understood: glacier calving. Geomorphological reconstructions show that part of the presently oceanic areas were ice-covered, allowing for downstream formation of the well-studied Puget and Juan de Fuca lobes. Here we use a numerical glacier model (PISM) to reconstruct the former marine front of the Cordilleran ice sheet and its impact on upstream ice dynamics. Our simulations show that the use of a thickness-based calving law leads to a strong deficit of marine ice cover in the areas where existing reconstructions suggest its advance. In contrast, a physically-based parametrization of glacier calving using the main components of the strain rate tensor (eigencalving; A. Levermann, T. Albrecht, R. Winkelmann, M. A. Martin, M. Haseloff, and I. Joughin, The Cryosphere, 6, 273-286, 2012) reproduces the geomorphologically inferred ice extent.

  1. Kenya and distance education: a model to advance graduate nursing.

    PubMed

    Mutea, Naomi; Cullen, Deborah

    2012-08-01

    Africa is faced with a myriad of challenges, such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, and a variety of political and historical complications that have affected the educational system for advanced nursing practice. In Kenya, the current situation in the higher education sector does not give nurses an opportunity to pursue graduate education after they have acquired the basic diploma in nursing due to limited government support and the type of education system existing in the country today. Although distance education has been available in Kenya for professionals such as teachers, in public universities, this kind of opportunity is unreachable for nurses who are working and need to further their education. Nurses desire to have access to advanced practice education to equip them with the relevant knowledge to cope and address the complex health issues arising in the management and care of patients. A collaborative model is presented as a potential solution for this need. Four major constituents are identified including hospitals and agencies, communities of interest, Kenyan universities and international education partners. Each has a part to play including contributions to information, communication of opinion and expertise, money and support, infrastructure and in-kind resources. Distance education is cost-effective and will help in building capacity at various levels of nursing including leadership in clinical practice, teaching, administration and research. PMID:22845642

  2. Advanced modelling, monitoring, and process control of bioconversion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Elliott C.

    Production of fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass is an increasingly important area of research and industrialization throughout the world. In order to be competitive with fossil-based fuels and chemicals, maintaining cost-effectiveness is critical. Advanced process control (APC) and optimization methods could significantly reduce operating costs in the biorefining industry. Two reasons APC has previously proven challenging to implement for bioprocesses include: lack of suitable online sensor technology of key system components, and strongly nonlinear first principal models required to predict bioconversion behavior. To overcome these challenges batch fermentations with the acetogen Moorella thermoacetica were monitored with Raman spectroscopy for the conversion of real lignocellulosic hydrolysates and a kinetic model for the conversion of synthetic sugars was developed. Raman spectroscopy was shown to be effective in monitoring the fermentation of sugarcane bagasse and sugarcane straw hydrolysate, where univariate models predicted acetate concentrations with a root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 1.9 and 1.0 g L-1 for bagasse and straw, respectively. Multivariate partial least squares (PLS) models were employed to predict acetate, xylose, glucose, and total sugar concentrations for both hydrolysate fermentations. The PLS models were more robust than univariate models, and yielded a percent error of approximately 5% for both sugarcane bagasse and sugarcane straw. In addition, a screening technique was discussed for improving Raman spectra of hydrolysate samples prior to collecting fermentation data. Furthermore, a mechanistic model was developed to predict batch fermentation of synthetic glucose, xylose, and a mixture of the two sugars to acetate. The models accurately described the bioconversion process with an RMSEP of approximately 1 g L-1 for each model and provided insights into how kinetic parameters changed during dual substrate

  3. Dynamical properties of the Penna aging model applied to the population of wolves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowiec, Danuta

    1997-02-01

    The parameters of th Penna bit-string model of aging of biological systems are systematically tested to better understand the model itself as well as the results arising from applying this model to studies of the development of the stationary population of Alaska wolves.

  4. Applying Model Analysis to a Resource-Based Analysis of the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Trevor I.; Wittmann, Michael C.; Carter, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we analyzed the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation in terms of a resources-based model that allows for clustering of questions so as to provide useful information on how students correctly or incorrectly reason about physics. In this paper, we apply model analysis to show that the associated model plots provide more information…

  5. "Analyze, Acquire, Apply, and Write" as a New Learning Model in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choe, Jeong V.

    2015-01-01

    I have developed a new teaching and learning model called AAAW, which stand for Analyze, Acquire, Apply and Write. This model grows from action research and unique experience in teaching a biochemistry course to high school students who are talented in math and science. In this model, students first "Analyze" lab data to generate…

  6. An eddy-current model for three-dimensional nondestructive evaluation of advanced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, Harold A.; Murphy, R. Kim; Sabbagh, Elias H.

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a rigorous electromagnetic model and an inversion algorithm for the three-dimensional NDE of advanced composite materials. This approach extends Victor Technologies' work in eddy-current NDE of conventional metals, and allows one to determine in localized regions the fiber-resin ratio in graphite-epoxy, and to determine those anomalies, e.g., delaminations, broken fibers, moisture content, etc., that can be reconstructed by our inversion method. In developing the model, we apply rigorous electromagnetic theory to determine a Green's function for a slab of anisotropic composite material, and then determine the integral relations for the forward and inverse problems using the Green's function. We will give examples of the solution of forward problems using this model.

  7. Applied genomics in ruminants-new discoveries and model for predictive medicine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An overview of the progress for Dr. Sonstegard’s work in applied genomics in dairy cattle will be presented. The overview will include how applied research in livestock offers unique investigative models to discover gene function as a result of genetic load or inbreeding and also how genome selectio...

  8. UTILITY OF MECHANISTIC MODELS FOR DIRECTING ADVANCED SEPARATIONS RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES: Electrochemically Modulated Separation Example

    SciTech Connect

    Schwantes, Jon M.

    2009-06-01

    The objective for this work was to demonstrate the utility of mechanistic computer models designed to simulate actinide behavior for use in efficiently and effectively directing advanced laboratory R&D activities associated with developing advanced separations methods.

  9. User's manual for ADAM (Advanced Dynamic Airfoil Model)

    SciTech Connect

    Oler, J.W.; Strickland, J.H.; Im, B.J.

    1987-06-01

    The computer code for an advanced dynamic airfoil model (ADAM) is described. The code is capable of calculating steady or unsteady flow over two-dimensional airfoils with allowances for boundary layer separation. Specific types of airfoil motions currently installed are steady rectilinear motion, impulsively started rectilinear motion, constant rate pitching, sinusoidal pitch oscillations, sinusoidal lateral plunging, and simulated Darrieus turbine motion. Other types of airfoil motion may be analyzed through simple modifications of a single subroutine. The code has a built-in capability to generate the geometric parameters for a cylinder, the NACA four-digit series of airfoils, and a NASA NLF-0416 laminar airfoil. Other types of airfoils are easily incorporated. The code ADAM is currently in a state of development. It is theoretically consistent and complete. However, further work is needed on the numerical implementation of the method.

  10. Advances and Limitations of Disease Biogeography Using Ecological Niche Modeling.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Luis E; Craft, Meggan E

    2016-01-01

    Mapping disease transmission risk is crucial in public and animal health for evidence based decision-making. Ecology and epidemiology are highly related disciplines that may contribute to improvements in mapping disease, which can be used to answer health related questions. Ecological niche modeling is increasingly used for understanding the biogeography of diseases in plants, animals, and humans. However, epidemiological applications of niche modeling approaches for disease mapping can fail to generate robust study designs, producing incomplete or incorrect inferences. This manuscript is an overview of the history and conceptual bases behind ecological niche modeling, specifically as applied to epidemiology and public health; it does not pretend to be an exhaustive and detailed description of ecological niche modeling literature and methods. Instead, this review includes selected state-of-the-science approaches and tools, providing a short guide to designing studies incorporating information on the type and quality of the input data (i.e., occurrences and environmental variables), identification and justification of the extent of the study area, and encourages users to explore and test diverse algorithms for more informed conclusions. We provide a friendly introduction to the field of disease biogeography presenting an updated guide for researchers looking to use ecological niche modeling for disease mapping. We anticipate that ecological niche modeling will soon be a critical tool for epidemiologists aiming to map disease transmission risk, forecast disease distribution under climate change scenarios, and identify landscape factors triggering outbreaks. PMID:27547199

  11. Advances and Limitations of Disease Biogeography Using Ecological Niche Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Luis E.; Craft, Meggan E.

    2016-01-01

    Mapping disease transmission risk is crucial in public and animal health for evidence based decision-making. Ecology and epidemiology are highly related disciplines that may contribute to improvements in mapping disease, which can be used to answer health related questions. Ecological niche modeling is increasingly used for understanding the biogeography of diseases in plants, animals, and humans. However, epidemiological applications of niche modeling approaches for disease mapping can fail to generate robust study designs, producing incomplete or incorrect inferences. This manuscript is an overview of the history and conceptual bases behind ecological niche modeling, specifically as applied to epidemiology and public health; it does not pretend to be an exhaustive and detailed description of ecological niche modeling literature and methods. Instead, this review includes selected state-of-the-science approaches and tools, providing a short guide to designing studies incorporating information on the type and quality of the input data (i.e., occurrences and environmental variables), identification and justification of the extent of the study area, and encourages users to explore and test diverse algorithms for more informed conclusions. We provide a friendly introduction to the field of disease biogeography presenting an updated guide for researchers looking to use ecological niche modeling for disease mapping. We anticipate that ecological niche modeling will soon be a critical tool for epidemiologists aiming to map disease transmission risk, forecast disease distribution under climate change scenarios, and identify landscape factors triggering outbreaks. PMID:27547199

  12. Advanced microwave forward model for the land surface data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chang-Hwan; Pause, Marion; Gayler, Sebastian; Wollschlaeger, Ute; Jackson, Thomas J.; LeDrew, Ellsworth; Behrendt, Andreas; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2015-04-01

    , a significant improvement by new approach would be expected in monitoring surface runoff and infiltration, managing and improving irrigation system, and mapping and predicting flood events. Finally, the novel dielectric-mixing model is able to successfully integrate the land surface model and the dielectric constant of microwave. Radiative transfer is calculated for the bare soil and the vegetated components of the grid box using a two-stream radiative transfer model. These model characteristics provide all relevant information needed for a simulation of the microwave emission from the land surface with unprecedented realism. Noah-MP is coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model system. Also, the novel dielectric-mixing model physically links the Noah-MP land surface properties and the microwave effective dielectric constant. Finally, with the existing radiative transfer model the advanced forward model can assimilate microwave brightness temperature into a consistent land-surface-atmosphere system. A case study will be provided to investigate how well the simulation of the forward model matches to the real world. L-band microwave remote-sensing measurements over the Schäfertal region in Germany have been used for this case study.

  13. Advanced modelling of the Planck-LFI radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, P.; Franceschet, C.; Zonca, A.; Bersanelli, M.; Butler, R. C.; D'Arcangelo, O.; Davis, R. J.; Galeotta, S.; Guzzi, P.; Hoyland, R.; Hughes, N.; Jukkala, P.; Kettle, D.; Laaninen, M.; Leonardi, R.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Meinhold, P.; Mennella, A.; Platania, P.; Terenzi, L.; Tuovinen, J.; Varis, J.; Villa, F.; Wilkinson, A.

    2009-12-01

    The Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) is a radiometer array covering the 30-70 GHz spectral range on-board the ESA Planck satellite, launched on May 14th, 2009 to observe the cosmic microwave background (CMB) with unprecedented precision. In this paper we describe the development and validation of a software model of the LFI pseudo-correlation receivers which enables to reproduce and predict all the main system parameters of interest as measured at each of the 44 LFI detectors. These include system total gain, noise temperature, band-pass response, non-linear response. The LFI Advanced RF Model (LARFM) has been constructed by using commercial software tools and data of each radiometer component as measured at single unit level. The LARFM has been successfully used to reproduce the LFI behavior observed during the LFI ground-test campaign. The model is an essential element in the database of LFI data processing center and will be available for any detailed study of radiometer behaviour during the survey.

  14. Modelling and Simulation of the Advanced Plasma Source

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Benjamin; Peter, Ralf; Harhausen, Jens; Ohl, Andreas

    2011-08-15

    Plasma ion assisted-deposition (PIAD) is a combination of conventional thermal evaporation deposition and plasma-beam surface modification; it serves as a well-established technology for the creation of high quality coatings on mirrors, lenses, and other optical devices. It is closely related to ion-assisted deposition to the extent that electrons preserve quasineutrality of the ion beam. This paper investigates the Advanced Plasma Source (APS), a plasma beam source employed for PIAD. A field enhanced glow discharge generates a radially expanding plasma flow with an ion energy of about 80-120 eV. Charge exchange collisions with the neutral background gas (pressure 0.1 Pa and below) produce a cold secondary plasma, which expands as well. A model is developed which describes the primary ions by a simplified Boltzmann equation, the secondary ions by the equations of continuity and momentum balance, and the electrons by the condition of Boltzmann equilibrium. Additionally, quasineutrality is assumed. The model can be reduced to a single nonlinear differential equation for the velocity of the secondary ions, which has several removable singularities and one essential singularity, identified as the Bohm singularity. Solving the model yields macroscopic plasma features, such as fluxes, densities, and the electrical field. An add-on Monte-Carlo simulation is employed to calculate the ion energy distribution function at the substrate. All results compare well to experiments conducted at a commercial APS system.

  15. Cruise noise measurements of a scale model advanced ducted propulsor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, James H.; Hughes, Christopher E.; Bock, Lawrence A.; Hall, David G.

    1993-01-01

    A scale model Advanced Ducted Propulsor (ADP) was tested in NASA Lewis Research Center's 8- by 6-Foot Wind Tunnel to obtain acoustic data at cruise conditions. The model, designed and manufactured by Pratt & Whitney Division of United Technologies, was tested with three inlet lengths. The model has 16 rotor blades and 22 stator vanes, which results in a cut-on condition with respect to rotor-stator interaction noise. Comparisons of the noise directivity of the ADP with that of a previously tested high-speed, unducted propeller showed that the ADP peak blade passing tone was about 30 dB below that of the propeller, and therefore, should not present a cabin or enroute noise problem. The maximum blade passing tone first increased with increasing helical tip Mach number, peaked, and then decreased at a higher Mach number. The ADP tests with the shortest inlet showed more noise in the inlet arc than did tests with either of the other two inlet lengths.

  16. Advances in Analytical and Numerical Dispersion Modeling of Pollutants Releasing from an Area-source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmatoori, Praneeth

    The air quality near agricultural activities such as tilling, plowing, harvesting, and manure application is of main concern because they release fine particulate matter into the atmosphere. These releases are modeled as area-sources in the air quality modeling research. None of the currently available dispersion models relate and incorporate physical characteristics and meteorological conditions for modeling the dispersion and deposition of particulates emitting from such area-sources. This knowledge gap was addressed by developing the advanced analytical and numerical methods for modeling the dispersion of particulate matter. The development, application, and evaluation of new dispersion modeling methods are discussed in detail in this dissertation. In the analytical modeling, a ground-level area source analytical dispersion model known as particulate matter deposition -- PMD was developed for predicting the concentrations of different particle sizes. Both the particle dynamics (particle physical characteristics) and meteorological conditions which have significant effect on the dispersion of particulates were related and incorporated in the PMD model using the formulations of particle gravitational settling and dry deposition velocities. The modeled particle size concentrations of the PMD model were evaluated statistically after applying it to particulates released from a biosolid applied agricultural field. The evaluation of the PMD model using the statistical criteria concluded effective and successful inclusion of dry deposition theory for modeling particulate matter concentrations. A comprehensive review of analytical area-source dispersion models, which do not account for dry deposition and treat pollutants as gases, was conducted and determined three models -- the Shear, the Parker, and the Smith. A statistical evaluation of these dispersion models was conducted after applying them to two different field data sets and the statistical results concluded that

  17. Interim Service ISDN Satellite (ISIS) network model for advanced satellite designs and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, Gerard R.; Hager, E. Paul

    1991-01-01

    The Interim Service Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) Satellite (ISIS) Network Model for Advanced Satellite Designs and Experiments describes a model suitable for discrete event simulations. A top-down model design uses the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) as its basis. The ISDN modeling abstractions are added to permit the determination and performance for the NASA Satellite Communications Research (SCAR) Program.

  18. Applying Statistical Models and Parametric Distance Measures for Music Similarity Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukashevich, Hanna; Dittmar, Christian; Bastuck, Christoph

    Automatic deriving of similarity relations between music pieces is an inherent field of music information retrieval research. Due to the nearly unrestricted amount of musical data, the real-world similarity search algorithms have to be highly efficient and scalable. The possible solution is to represent each music excerpt with a statistical model (ex. Gaussian mixture model) and thus to reduce the computational costs by applying the parametric distance measures between the models. In this paper we discuss the combinations of applying different parametric modelling techniques and distance measures and weigh the benefits of each one against the others.

  19. Identifying Successful Advancement Approaches in Four Catholic Universities: The Effectiveness of the Four Advancement Models of Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonglia, Jean-Pierre K.

    2010-01-01

    The current longitudinal study of the most successful Catholic universities in the United States identifies the prevalence of four advancement models of communication that have contributed to make those institutions successful in their philanthropic efforts. While research by Grunig and Kelly maintained that the two-way symmetrical model of…

  20. Advanced Issues of Wind Turbine Modelling and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simani, Silvio

    2015-11-01

    The motivation for this paper comes from a real need to have an overview about the challenges of modelling and control for very demanding systems, such as wind turbine systems, which require reliability, availability, maintainability, and safety over power conversion efficiency. These issues have begun to stimulate research and development in the wide control community particularly for these installations that need a high degree of “sustainability”. Note that this topic represents a key point mainly for offshore wind turbines with very large rotors, since they are characterised by challenging modelling and control problems, as well as expensive and safety critical maintenance works. In this case, a clear conflict exists between ensuring a high degree of availability and reducing maintenance times, which affect the final energy cost. On the other hand, wind turbines have highly nonlinear dynamics, with a stochastic and uncontrollable driving force as input in the form of wind speed, thus representing an interesting challenge also from the modelling point of view. Suitable control methods can provide a sustainable optimisation of the energy conversion efficiency over wider than normally expected working conditions. Moreover, a proper mathematical description of the wind turbine system should be able to capture the complete behaviour of the process under monitoring, thus providing an important impact on the control design itself. In this way, the control scheme could guarantee prescribed performance, whilst also giving a degree of “tolerance” to possible deviation of characteristic properties or system parameters from standard conditions, if properly included in the wind turbine model itself. The most important developments in advanced controllers for wind turbines are addressed, and open problems in the areas of modelling of wind turbines are also outlined.

  1. Computational physics and applied mathematics capability review June 8-10, 2010 (Advance materials to committee members)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Stephen R

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory will review its Computational Physics and Applied Mathematics (CPAM) capabilities in 2010. The goals of capability reviews are to assess the quality of science, technology, and engineering (STE) performed by the capability, evaluate the integration of this capability across the Laboratory and within the scientific community, examine the relevance of this capability to the Laboratory's programs, and provide advice on the current and future directions of this capability. This is the first such review for CPAM, which has a long and unique history at the laboratory, starting from the inception of the Laboratory in 1943. The CPAM capability covers an extremely broad technical area at Los Alamos, encompassing a wide array of disciplines, research topics, and organizations. A vast array of technical disciplines and activities are included in this capability, from general numerical modeling, to coupled mUlti-physics simulations, to detailed domain science activities in mathematics, methods, and algorithms. The CPAM capability involves over 12 different technical divisions and a majority of our programmatic and scientific activities. To make this large scope tractable, the CPAM capability is broken into the following six technical 'themes.' These themes represent technical slices through the CP AM capability and collect critical core competencies of the Laboratory, each of which contributes to the capability (and each of which is divided into multiple additional elements in the detailed descriptions of the themes in subsequent sections): (1) Computational Fluid Dynamics - This theme speaks to the vast array of scientific capabilities for the simulation of fluids under shocks, low-speed flow, and turbulent conditions - which are key, historical, and fundamental strengths of the laboratory; (2) Partial Differential Equations - The technical scope of this theme is the applied mathematics and numerical solution of partial differential equations

  2. Sensitivity analysis of infectious disease models: methods, advances and their application.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianyong; Dhingra, Radhika; Gambhir, Manoj; Remais, Justin V

    2013-09-01

    Sensitivity analysis (SA) can aid in identifying influential model parameters and optimizing model structure, yet infectious disease modelling has yet to adopt advanced SA techniques that are capable of providing considerable insights over traditional methods. We investigate five global SA methods-scatter plots, the Morris and Sobol' methods, Latin hypercube sampling-partial rank correlation coefficient and the sensitivity heat map method-and detail their relative merits and pitfalls when applied to a microparasite (cholera) and macroparasite (schistosomaisis) transmission model. The methods investigated yielded similar results with respect to identifying influential parameters, but offered specific insights that vary by method. The classical methods differed in their ability to provide information on the quantitative relationship between parameters and model output, particularly over time. The heat map approach provides information about the group sensitivity of all model state variables, and the parameter sensitivity spectrum obtained using this method reveals the sensitivity of all state variables to each parameter over the course of the simulation period, especially valuable for expressing the dynamic sensitivity of a microparasite epidemic model to its parameters. A summary comparison is presented to aid infectious disease modellers in selecting appropriate methods, with the goal of improving model performance and design. PMID:23864497

  3. Sensitivity analysis of infectious disease models: methods, advances and their application

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianyong; Dhingra, Radhika; Gambhir, Manoj; Remais, Justin V.

    2013-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis (SA) can aid in identifying influential model parameters and optimizing model structure, yet infectious disease modelling has yet to adopt advanced SA techniques that are capable of providing considerable insights over traditional methods. We investigate five global SA methods—scatter plots, the Morris and Sobol’ methods, Latin hypercube sampling-partial rank correlation coefficient and the sensitivity heat map method—and detail their relative merits and pitfalls when applied to a microparasite (cholera) and macroparasite (schistosomaisis) transmission model. The methods investigated yielded similar results with respect to identifying influential parameters, but offered specific insights that vary by method. The classical methods differed in their ability to provide information on the quantitative relationship between parameters and model output, particularly over time. The heat map approach provides information about the group sensitivity of all model state variables, and the parameter sensitivity spectrum obtained using this method reveals the sensitivity of all state variables to each parameter over the course of the simulation period, especially valuable for expressing the dynamic sensitivity of a microparasite epidemic model to its parameters. A summary comparison is presented to aid infectious disease modellers in selecting appropriate methods, with the goal of improving model performance and design. PMID:23864497

  4. Advanced AEM by Comprehensive Analysis and Modeling of System Drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, Arnulf; Klune, Klaus; Schattauer, Ingrid

    2010-05-01

    The quality of the assessment of risks outgoing from environmental hazards strongly depends on the spatial and temporal distribution of the data collected in a survey area. Natural hazards generally emerge from wide areas as it is in the case of volcanoes or land slides. Conventional surface measurements are restricted to few lines or locations and often can't be conducted in difficult terrain. So they only give a spatial and temporary limited data set and therefore limit the reliability of risk analysis. Aero-geophysical measurements potentially provide a valuable tool for completing the data set as they can be performed over a wide area, even above difficult terrain within a short time. A most desirable opportunity in course of such measurements is the ascertainment of the dynamics of such potentially hazardous environmental processes. This necessitates repeated and reproducible measurements. Current HEM systems can't accomplish this adequately due to their system immanent drift and - in some cases - bad signal to noise ratio. So, to develop comprising concepts for advancing state of the art HEM-systems to a valuable tool for data acquisition in risk assessment or hydrological problems, different studies have been undertaken which form the contents of the presented work conducted in course of the project HIRISK (Helicopter Based Electromagnetic System for Advanced Environmental Risk Assessment - FWF L-354 N10, supported by the Austrian Science Fund). The methodology is based upon two paths: A - Comprehensive experimental testing on an existing HEM system serving as an experimental platform. B - The setup of a numerical model which is continuously refined according to the results of the experimental data. The model then serves to simulate the experimental as well as alternative configurations and to analyze them subject to their drift behavior. Finally, concepts for minimizing the drift are derived and tested. Different test series - stationary on ground as well

  5. Comparative studies of Coulomb barrier heights for nuclear models applied to sub-barrier fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, W. W.; Zhang, G. L.; Zhang, H. Q.; Wolski, R.

    2014-12-01

    Coulomb barrier heights provided by different nuclear interaction models including the Bass model, the proximity potential model, and the double folding model have been applied for experimental data of fusion in terms of a recently proposed energy scaling approach. The results show that the proximity potential description of the barrier heights seems to be closest to the values required by the systematics. It is suggested that the proximity potential model is the most suitable model to calculate the barrier height. However, the double folding model gives the lowest barrier heights.

  6. Automated estimation of the truncation of room impulse response by applying a nonlinear decay model.

    PubMed

    Janković, Marko; Ćirić, Dejan G; Pantić, Aleksandar

    2016-03-01

    Noise represents one of the most significant disturbances in measured room impulse responses (RIRs), and it has a potentially large impact on evaluation of the decay parameters. In order to reduce noise effects, various methods have been applied, including truncation of an RIR. In this paper, a procedure for the response truncation based on a model of RIR (nonlinear decay model) is presented. The model is represented by an exponential decay plus stationary noise. Unknown parameters of the model are calculated by an optimization that minimizes the difference between the curve generated by the model and the target one of the response to be truncated. Different curves can be applied in the optimization-absolute value of the RIR, logarithmic decay curve, and Schroeder curve obtained by the backward integration of the RIR. The proposed procedure is tested on various synthesized and measured impulse responses. It is compared with the procedure taken from the literature, often applied in practice. PMID:27036242

  7. Comparative Study of Advanced Turbulence Models for Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadid, Ali H.; Sindir, Munir M.

    1996-01-01

    A computational study has been undertaken to study the performance of advanced phenomenological turbulence models coded in a modular form to describe incompressible turbulent flow behavior in two dimensional/axisymmetric and three dimensional complex geometry. The models include a variety of two equation models (single and multi-scale k-epsilon models with different near wall treatments) and second moment algebraic and full Reynolds stress closure models. These models were systematically assessed to evaluate their performance in complex flows with rotation, curvature and separation. The models are coded as self contained modules that can be interfaced with a number of flow solvers. These modules are stand alone satellite programs that come with their own formulation, finite-volume discretization scheme, solver and boundary condition implementation. They will take as input (from any generic Navier-Stokes solver) the velocity field, grid (structured H-type grid) and computational domain specification (boundary conditions), and will deliver, depending on the model used, turbulent viscosity, or the components of the Reynolds stress tensor. There are separate 2D/axisymmetric and/or 3D decks for each module considered. The modules are tested using Rocketdyn's proprietary code REACT. The code utilizes an efficient solution procedure to solve Navier-Stokes equations in a non-orthogonal body-fitted coordinate system. The differential equations are discretized over a finite-volume grid using a non-staggered variable arrangement and an efficient solution procedure based on the SIMPLE algorithm for the velocity-pressure coupling is used. The modules developed have been interfaced and tested using finite-volume, pressure-correction CFD solvers which are widely used in the CFD community. Other solvers can also be used to test these modules since they are independently structured with their own discretization scheme and solver methodology. Many of these modules have been

  8. Advanced Model for Extreme Lift and Improved Aeroacoustics (AMELIA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtwardt, Jonathan; Paciano, Eric; Jameson, Tina; Fong, Robert; Marshall, David

    2012-01-01

    With the very recent advent of NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project (ERA), which is dedicated to designing aircraft that will reduce the impact of aviation on the environment, there is a need for research and development of methodologies to minimize fuel burn, emissions, and reduce community noise produced by regional airliners. ERA tackles airframe technology, propulsion technology, and vehicle systems integration to meet performance objectives in the time frame for the aircraft to be at a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of 4-6 by the year of 2020 (deemed N+2). The proceeding project that investigated similar goals to ERA was NASA's Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW). SFW focused on conducting research to improve prediction methods and technologies that will produce lower noise, lower emissions, and higher performing subsonic aircraft for the Next Generation Air Transportation System. The work provided in this investigation was a NASA Research Announcement (NRA) contract #NNL07AA55C funded by Subsonic Fixed Wing. The project started in 2007 with a specific goal of conducting a large-scale wind tunnel test along with the development of new and improved predictive codes for the advanced powered-lift concepts. Many of the predictive codes were incorporated to refine the wind tunnel model outer mold line design. The large scale wind tunnel test goal was to investigate powered lift technologies and provide an experimental database to validate current and future modeling techniques. Powered-lift concepts investigated were Circulation Control (CC) wing in conjunction with over-the-wing mounted engines to entrain the exhaust to further increase the lift generated by CC technologies alone. The NRA was a five-year effort; during the first year the objective was to select and refine CESTOL concepts and then to complete a preliminary design of a large-scale wind tunnel model for the large scale test. During the second, third, and fourth years the large-scale wind

  9. Applying MDA to SDR for Space to Model Real-time Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaser, Tammy M.

    2007-01-01

    NASA space communications systems have the challenge of designing SDRs with highly-constrained Size, Weight and Power (SWaP) resources. A study is being conducted to assess the effectiveness of applying the MDA Platform-Independent Model (PIM) and one or more Platform-Specific Models (PSM) specifically to address NASA space domain real-time issues. This paper will summarize our experiences with applying MDA to SDR for Space to model real-time issues. Real-time issues to be examined, measured, and analyzed are: meeting waveform timing requirements and efficiently applying Real-time Operating System (RTOS) scheduling algorithms, applying safety control measures, and SWaP verification. Real-time waveform algorithms benchmarked with the worst case environment conditions under the heaviest workload will drive the SDR for Space real-time PSM design.

  10. Advanced Ground Systems Maintenance Physics Models For Diagnostics Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    The project will use high-fidelity physics models and simulations to simulate real-time operations of cryogenic and systems and calculate the status/health of the systems. The project enables the delivery of system health advisories to ground system operators. The capability will also be used to conduct planning and analysis of cryogenic system operations. This project will develop and implement high-fidelity physics-based modeling techniques tosimulate the real-time operation of cryogenics and other fluids systems and, when compared to thereal-time operation of the actual systems, provide assessment of their state. Physics-modelcalculated measurements (called “pseudo-sensors”) will be compared to the system real-timedata. Comparison results will be utilized to provide systems operators with enhanced monitoring ofsystems' health and status, identify off-nominal trends and diagnose system/component failures.This capability can also be used to conduct planning and analysis of cryogenics and other fluidsystems designs. This capability will be interfaced with the ground operations command andcontrol system as a part of the Advanced Ground Systems Maintenance (AGSM) project to helpassure system availability and mission success. The initial capability will be developed for theLiquid Oxygen (LO2) ground loading systems.

  11. Advanced REACH Tool: a Bayesian model for occupational exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    McNally, Kevin; Warren, Nicholas; Fransman, Wouter; Entink, Rinke Klein; Schinkel, Jody; van Tongeren, Martie; Cherrie, John W; Kromhout, Hans; Schneider, Thomas; Tielemans, Erik

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes a Bayesian model for the assessment of inhalation exposures in an occupational setting; the methodology underpins a freely available web-based application for exposure assessment, the Advanced REACH Tool (ART). The ART is a higher tier exposure tool that combines disparate sources of information within a Bayesian statistical framework. The information is obtained from expert knowledge expressed in a calibrated mechanistic model of exposure assessment, data on inter- and intra-individual variability in exposures from the literature, and context-specific exposure measurements. The ART provides central estimates and credible intervals for different percentiles of the exposure distribution, for full-shift and long-term average exposures. The ART can produce exposure estimates in the absence of measurements, but the precision of the estimates improves as more data become available. The methodology presented in this paper is able to utilize partially analogous data, a novel approach designed to make efficient use of a sparsely populated measurement database although some additional research is still required before practical implementation. The methodology is demonstrated using two worked examples: an exposure to copper pyrithione in the spraying of antifouling paints and an exposure to ethyl acetate in shoe repair. PMID:24665110

  12. Advanced REACH Tool: A Bayesian Model for Occupational Exposure Assessment

    PubMed Central

    McNally, Kevin; Warren, Nicholas; Fransman, Wouter; Entink, Rinke Klein; Schinkel, Jody; van Tongeren, Martie; Cherrie, John W.; Kromhout, Hans; Schneider, Thomas; Tielemans, Erik

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a Bayesian model for the assessment of inhalation exposures in an occupational setting; the methodology underpins a freely available web-based application for exposure assessment, the Advanced REACH Tool (ART). The ART is a higher tier exposure tool that combines disparate sources of information within a Bayesian statistical framework. The information is obtained from expert knowledge expressed in a calibrated mechanistic model of exposure assessment, data on inter- and intra-individual variability in exposures from the literature, and context-specific exposure measurements. The ART provides central estimates and credible intervals for different percentiles of the exposure distribution, for full-shift and long-term average exposures. The ART can produce exposure estimates in the absence of measurements, but the precision of the estimates improves as more data become available. The methodology presented in this paper is able to utilize partially analogous data, a novel approach designed to make efficient use of a sparsely populated measurement database although some additional research is still required before practical implementation. The methodology is demonstrated using two worked examples: an exposure to copper pyrithione in the spraying of antifouling paints and an exposure to ethyl acetate in shoe repair. PMID:24665110

  13. Applying Silvia's Model of Interest to Academic Text: Is There a Third Appraisal?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connelly, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent research, treating interest as an emotion, indicates the cognitive appraisals of novelty-complexity and coping potential predict interest. This appraisal-based model of interest has not yet been applied to educational research. The present study evaluated the significance of the model regarding the activity of reading expository,…

  14. How High Is the Tramping Track? Mathematising and Applying in a Calculus Model-Eliciting Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoon, Caroline; Dreyfus, Tommy; Thomas, Michael O. J.

    2010-01-01

    Two complementary processes involved in mathematical modelling are mathematising a realistic situation and applying a mathematical technique to a given realistic situation. We present and analyse work from two undergraduate students and two secondary school teachers who engaged in both processes during a mathematical modelling task that required…

  15. Opinions of Mathematics Teacher Candidates towards Applying 7E Instructional Model on Computer Aided Instruction Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yenilmez, Kursat; Ersoy, Mehmet

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine opinions of mathematics teacher candidates towards applying 7E instructional model on computer aided instruction environments. The descriptive case study model was used in this study. The sample of the study consists of 52 mathematics teacher candidates which were selected randomly from Eskisehir…

  16. Reply to Comment on Shadow model for sub-barrier fusion applied to light systems' ''

    SciTech Connect

    Scalia, A. )

    1994-05-01

    This is a reply to the Comment on Shadow model for sub-barrier fusion applied to light systems.' '' We confirm the results of our paper. The claimed demonstration of the disagreement between the cross section derived from the shadow'' model and the low energy laboratory data is meaningless because it is based on a comparison which is incorrect.

  17. Modeling rainfall-induced release of manure constituents from surface-applied liquid dairy manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Release kinetics of manure constituents (MC) is an important mechanism affecting overland and subsurface transport of manure-borne contaminants. Present release models adequately describe the rainfall-induced release of MC from surface-applied solid manure, but these models are not applicable for li...

  18. DESCRIPTION OF UNAMAP (USER'S NETWORK FOR APPLIED MODELING OF AIR POLLUTION) (VERSION 6)

    EPA Science Inventory

    UNAMAP (VERSION 6) represents the 1986 update to the User's Network for Applied Modeling of Air Pollution. UNAMAP consists of an ASCII magnetic tape containing FORTRAN codes and test data for 25 air quality simulation models as well as associated documentation. The tape and docum...

  19. A Dyadic Approach: Applying a Developmental-Conceptual Model to Couples Coping with Chronic Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Checton, Maria G.; Magsamen-Conrad, Kate; Venetis, Maria K.; Greene, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to apply Berg and Upchurch's developmental-conceptual model toward a better understanding of how couples cope with chronic illness. Specifically, a model was hypothesized in which proximal factors (relational quality), dyadic appraisal (illness interference), and dyadic coping (partner support) influence…

  20. Applying the Rasch Model To Explore Rater Influences on the Assessed Quality of Students' Writing Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gyagenda, Ismail S.; Engelhard, George, Jr.

    The purpose of this study was to describe the Rasch model for measurement and apply the model to examine the relationship between raters, domains of written compositions, and student writing ability. Twenty raters were randomly selected from a group of 87 operational raters contracted to rate essays as part of the 1993 field test of the Georgia…

  1. Causal Modeling--Path Analysis a New Trend in Research in Applied Linguistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rastegar, Mina

    2006-01-01

    This article aims at discussing a new statistical trend in research in applied linguistics. This rather new statistical procedure is causal modeling--path analysis. The article demonstrates that causal modeling--path analysis is the best statistical option to use when the effects of a multitude of L2 learners' variables on language achievement are…

  2. A MODEL FOR PHOSPHORUS TRANSFORMATION AND RUNOFF LOSS FOR SURFACE-APPLIED MANURES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural P transport in runoff is an environmental concern. An important source of P runoff is surface-applied, unincorporated manures, but computer models used to assess P transport do not adequately simulate P release and transport from surface manures. We developed a model to address this lim...

  3. Dengue human infection models to advance dengue vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Christian P; Whitehead, Stephen S; Durbin, Anna P

    2015-12-10

    Dengue viruses (DENV) currently infect approximately 400 million people each year causing millions to seek care and overwhelming the health care infrastructure in endemic areas. Vaccines to prevent dengue and therapeutics to treat dengue are not currently available. The efficacy of the most advanced candidate vaccine against symptomatic dengue in general and DENV-2 in particular was much lower than expected, despite the ability of the vaccine to induce neutralizing antibody against all four DENV serotypes. Because seroconversion to the DENV serotypes following vaccination was thought to be indicative of induced protection, these results have made it more difficult to assess which candidate vaccines should or should not be evaluated in large studies in endemic areas. A dengue human infection model (DHIM) could be extremely valuable to down-select candidate vaccines or therapeutics prior to engaging in efficacy trials in endemic areas. Two DHIM have been developed to assess the efficacy of live attenuated tetravalent (LATV) dengue vaccines. The first model, developed by the Laboratory of Infectious Diseases at the U. S. National Institutes of Health, utilizes a modified DENV-2 strain DEN2Δ30. This virus was derived from the DENV-2 Tonga/74 that caused only very mild clinical infection during the outbreak from which it was recovered. DEN2Δ30 induced viremia in 100%, rash in 80%, and neutropenia in 27% of the 30 subjects to whom it was given. The Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) is developing a DHIM the goal of which is to identify DENV that cause symptomatic dengue fever. WRAIR has evaluated seven viruses and has identified two that meet dengue fever criteria. Both of these models may be very useful in the evaluation and down-selection of candidate dengue vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:26424605

  4. Chance-constrained model predictive control applied to inventory management in hospitalary pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Maestre, Jose Maria; Ocampo-Martinez, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This extended abstract addresses the preliminary results of applying uncertainty handling strategies and advanced control techniques to the inventary management of hospitality pharmacy. Inventory management is one of the main tasks that a pharmacy department has to carry out in a hospital. It is a complex problem because it requires to establish a tradeoff between contradictory optimization criteria. The final goal of the proposed research is to update the inventory management system of hospitals such that it is possible to reduce the average inventory while maintaining preestablished clinical guarantees. PMID:25488247

  5. ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR RESERVOIR SIMULATION AND MODELING OF NONCONVENTIONAL WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Louis J. Durlofsky; Khalid Aziz

    2004-08-20

    Nonconventional wells, which include horizontal, deviated, multilateral and ''smart'' wells, offer great potential for the efficient management of oil and gas reservoirs. These wells are able to contact larger regions of the reservoir than conventional wells and can also be used to target isolated hydrocarbon accumulations. The use of nonconventional wells instrumented with downhole inflow control devices allows for even greater flexibility in production. Because nonconventional wells can be very expensive to drill, complete and instrument, it is important to be able to optimize their deployment, which requires the accurate prediction of their performance. However, predictions of nonconventional well performance are often inaccurate. This is likely due to inadequacies in some of the reservoir engineering and reservoir simulation tools used to model and optimize nonconventional well performance. A number of new issues arise in the modeling and optimization of nonconventional wells. For example, the optimal use of downhole inflow control devices has not been addressed for practical problems. In addition, the impact of geological and engineering uncertainty (e.g., valve reliability) has not been previously considered. In order to model and optimize nonconventional wells in different settings, it is essential that the tools be implemented into a general reservoir simulator. This simulator must be sufficiently general and robust and must in addition be linked to a sophisticated well model. Our research under this five year project addressed all of the key areas indicated above. The overall project was divided into three main categories: (1) advanced reservoir simulation techniques for modeling nonconventional wells; (2) improved techniques for computing well productivity (for use in reservoir engineering calculations) and for coupling the well to the simulator (which includes the accurate calculation of well index and the modeling of multiphase flow in the wellbore

  6. Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Transitions: Optimization, Modeling Choices, and Disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsen, Robert W.

    Many nuclear fuel cycle simulators have evolved over time to help understan the nuclear industry/ecosystem at a macroscopic level. Cyclus is one of th first fuel cycle simulators to accommodate larger-scale analysis with it liberal open-source licensing and first-class Linux support. Cyclus also ha features that uniquely enable investigating the effects of modeling choices o fuel cycle simulators and scenarios. This work is divided into thre experiments focusing on optimization, effects of modeling choices, and fue cycle uncertainty. Effective optimization techniques are developed for automatically determinin desirable facility deployment schedules with Cyclus. A novel method fo mapping optimization variables to deployment schedules is developed. Thi allows relationships between reactor types and scenario constraints to b represented implicitly in the variable definitions enabling the usage o optimizers lacking constraint support. It also prevents wasting computationa resources evaluating infeasible deployment schedules. Deployed power capacit over time and deployment of non-reactor facilities are also included a optimization variables There are many fuel cycle simulators built with different combinations o modeling choices. Comparing results between them is often difficult. Cyclus flexibility allows comparing effects of many such modeling choices. Reacto refueling cycle synchronization and inter-facility competition among othe effects are compared in four cases each using combinations of fleet of individually modeled reactors with 1-month or 3-month time steps. There are noticeable differences in results for the different cases. The larges differences occur during periods of constrained reactor fuel availability This and similar work can help improve the quality of fuel cycle analysi generally There is significant uncertainty associated deploying new nuclear technologie such as time-frames for technology availability and the cost of buildin advanced reactors

  7. Film grain noise modeling in advanced video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Byung Tae; Kuo, C.-C. Jay; Sun, Shijun; Lei, Shawmin

    2007-01-01

    A new technique for film grain noise extraction, modeling and synthesis is proposed and applied to the coding of high definition video in this work. The film grain noise is viewed as a part of artistic presentation by people in the movie industry. On one hand, since the film grain noise can boost the natural appearance of pictures in high definition video, it should be preserved in high-fidelity video processing systems. On the other hand, video coding with film grain noise is expensive. It is desirable to extract film grain noise from the input video as a pre-processing step at the encoder and re-synthesize the film grain noise and add it back to the decoded video as a post-processing step at the decoder. Under this framework, the coding gain of the denoised video is higher while the quality of the final reconstructed video can still be well preserved. Following this idea, we present a method to remove film grain noise from image/video without distorting its original content. Besides, we describe a parametric model containing a small set of parameters to represent the extracted film grain noise. The proposed model generates the film grain noise that is close to the real one in terms of power spectral density and cross-channel spectral correlation. Experimental results are shown to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed scheme.

  8. Experimental Classical Flutter Reesults of a Composite Advanced Turboprop Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehmed, O.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental results are presented that show the effects of blade pitch angle and number of blades on classical flutter of a composite advanced turboprop (propfan) model. An increase in the number of blades on the rotor or the blade pitch angle is destablizing which shows an aerodynamic coupling or cascade effect between blades. The flutter came in suddenly and all blades vibrated at the same frequency but at different amplitudes and with a common predominant phase angle between consecutive blades. This further indicates aerodynamic coupling between blades. The flutter frequency was between the first two blade normal modes, signifying an aerodynamic coupling between the normal modes. Flutter was observed at all blade pitch angles from small to large angles-of-attack of the blades. A strong blade response occurred, for four blades at the two-per-revolution (2P) frequency, when the rotor speed was near the crossing of the flutter mode frequency and the 2P order line. This is because the damping is low near the flutter condition and the interblade phase angle of the flutter mode and the 2P response are the same.

  9. Advanced rheological characterization of soft colloidal model systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Kundu, S. K.; Stellbrink, J.; Willner, L.; Allgaier, J.; Richter, D.

    2012-11-01

    The complex flow behavior of polymer-based soft colloidal model systems was investigated using steady and oscillatory shear to prove new concepts for advanced rheological characterization. In the very dilute regime we investigated high molecular weight polybutadiene star polymers to quantify the internal relaxation time arising from the polymeric nature of these ultra-soft colloids. The observed shear-induced brush deformation is interpreted in terms of the internal Zimm time τz. The observed dependence of τz on matrix viscosity can be explained by shrinkage of the star polymer due to an increasing incompatibility with increasing matrix molecular weight. The influence of the polymeric nature on the characteristic structural relaxation time in the concentrated regime was investigated using non-linear rheology following Wyss et al (SRFS) (2007 Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 238303). Here we used star-like block copolymer micelles to systematically tune the ‘softness’ of the colloids by variation of the block ratio. A master curve with proper scaling parameters could be generated independent of the degree of colloidal ‘softness’. However, the obtained strain-rate independent structural relaxation time τ0 was not observed in the linear regime. In addition, a high frequency discrepancy was clearly found in all our experimental data. Both reflect the shortcomings of the SRFS approach.

  10. Investigations and advanced concepts on gyrotron interaction modeling and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Avramidis, K. A.

    2015-12-15

    In gyrotron theory, the interaction between the electron beam and the high frequency electromagnetic field is commonly modeled using the slow variables approach. The slow variables are quantities that vary slowly in time in comparison to the electron cyclotron frequency. They represent the electron momentum and the high frequency field of the resonant TE modes in the gyrotron cavity. For their definition, some reference frequencies need to be introduced. These include the so-called averaging frequency, used to define the slow variable corresponding to the electron momentum, and the carrier frequencies, used to define the slow variables corresponding to the field envelopes of the modes. From the mathematical point of view, the choice of the reference frequencies is, to some extent, arbitrary. However, from the numerical point of view, there are arguments that point toward specific choices, in the sense that these choices are advantageous in terms of simulation speed and accuracy. In this paper, the typical monochromatic gyrotron operation is considered, and the numerical integration of the interaction equations is performed by the trajectory approach, since it is the fastest, and therefore it is the one that is most commonly used. The influence of the choice of the reference frequencies on the interaction simulations is studied using theoretical arguments, as well as numerical simulations. From these investigations, appropriate choices for the values of the reference frequencies are identified. In addition, novel, advanced concepts for the definitions of these frequencies are addressed, and their benefits are demonstrated numerically.

  11. Sharpening advanced land imager multispectral data using a sensor model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lemeshewsky, G.P.

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) instrument on NASA's Earth Observing One (EO-1) satellite provides for nine spectral bands at 30m ground sample distance (GSD) and a 10m GSD panchromatic band. This report describes an image sharpening technique where the higher spatial resolution information of the panchromatic band is used to increase the spatial resolution of ALI multispectral (MS) data. To preserve the spectral characteristics, this technique combines reported deconvolution deblurring methods for the MS data with highpass filter-based fusion methods for the Pan data. The deblurring process uses the point spread function (PSF) model of the ALI sensor. Information includes calculation of the PSF from pre-launch calibration data. Performance was evaluated using simulated ALI MS data generated by degrading the spatial resolution of high resolution IKONOS satellite MS data. A quantitative measure of performance was the error between sharpened MS data and high resolution reference. This report also compares performance with that of a reported method that includes PSF information. Preliminary results indicate improved sharpening with the method reported here.

  12. Investigations and advanced concepts on gyrotron interaction modeling and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramidis, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    In gyrotron theory, the interaction between the electron beam and the high frequency electromagnetic field is commonly modeled using the slow variables approach. The slow variables are quantities that vary slowly in time in comparison to the electron cyclotron frequency. They represent the electron momentum and the high frequency field of the resonant TE modes in the gyrotron cavity. For their definition, some reference frequencies need to be introduced. These include the so-called averaging frequency, used to define the slow variable corresponding to the electron momentum, and the carrier frequencies, used to define the slow variables corresponding to the field envelopes of the modes. From the mathematical point of view, the choice of the reference frequencies is, to some extent, arbitrary. However, from the numerical point of view, there are arguments that point toward specific choices, in the sense that these choices are advantageous in terms of simulation speed and accuracy. In this paper, the typical monochromatic gyrotron operation is considered, and the numerical integration of the interaction equations is performed by the trajectory approach, since it is the fastest, and therefore it is the one that is most commonly used. The influence of the choice of the reference frequencies on the interaction simulations is studied using theoretical arguments, as well as numerical simulations. From these investigations, appropriate choices for the values of the reference frequencies are identified. In addition, novel, advanced concepts for the definitions of these frequencies are addressed, and their benefits are demonstrated numerically.

  13. Diagnostic imaging advances in murine models of colitis

    PubMed Central

    Brückner, Markus; Lenz, Philipp; Mücke, Marcus M; Gohar, Faekah; Willeke, Peter; Domagk, Dirk; Bettenworth, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic-remittent inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract still evoking challenging clinical diagnostic and therapeutic situations. Murine models of experimental colitis are a vital component of research into human IBD concerning questions of its complex pathogenesis or the evaluation of potential new drugs. To monitor the course of colitis, to the present day, classical parameters like histological tissue alterations or analysis of mucosal cytokine/chemokine expression often require euthanasia of animals. Recent advances mean revolutionary non-invasive imaging techniques for in vivo murine colitis diagnostics are increasingly available. These novel and emerging imaging techniques not only allow direct visualization of intestinal inflammation, but also enable molecular imaging and targeting of specific alterations of the inflamed murine mucosa. For the first time, in vivo imaging techniques allow for longitudinal examinations and evaluation of intra-individual therapeutic response. This review discusses the latest developments in the different fields of ultrasound, molecularly targeted contrast agent ultrasound, fluorescence endoscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy as well as tomographic imaging with magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and fluorescence-mediated tomography, discussing their individual limitations and potential future diagnostic applications in the management of human patients with IBD. PMID:26811642

  14. Advancement of Global-scale River Hydrodynamics Modelling and Its Potential Applications to Earth System Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, D.

    2015-12-01

    Global river routine models have been developed for representing freshwater discharge from land to ocean in Earth System Models. At the beginning, global river models had simulated river discharge along a prescribed river network map by using a linear-reservoir assumption. Recently, in parallel with advancement of remote sensing and computational powers, many advanced global river models have started to represent floodplain inundation assuming sub-grid floodplain topography. Some of them further pursue physically-appropriate representation of river and floodplain dynamics, and succeeded to utilize "hydrodynamic flow equations" to realistically simulate channel/floodplain and upstream/downstream interactions. State-of-the-art global river hydrodynamic models can well reproduce flood stage (e.g. inundated areas and water levels) in addition to river discharge. Flood stage simulation by global river models can be potentially coupled with land surface processes in Earth System Models. For example, evaporation from inundated water area is not negligible for land-atmosphere interactions in arid areas (such as the Niger River). Surface water level and ground water level are correlated each other in flat topography, and this interaction could dominate wetting and drying of many small lakes in flatland and could also affect biogeochemical processes in these lakes. These land/surface water interactions had not been implemented in Earth System Models but they have potential impact on the global climate and carbon cycle. In the AGU presentation, recent advancements of global river hydrodynamic modelling, including super-high resolution river topography datasets, will be introduces. The potential applications of river and surface water modules within Earth System Models will be also discussed.

  15. Microplume model of spatial-yield spectra. [applying to electron gas degradation in molecular nitrogen gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, A. E. S.; Singhal, R. P.

    1979-01-01

    An analytic representation for the spatial (radial and longitudinal) yield spectra is developed in terms of a model containing three simple 'microplumes'. The model is applied to electron energy degradation in molecular nitrogen gas for 0.1 to 5 keV incident electrons. From the nature of the cross section input to this model it is expected that the scaled spatial yield spectra for other gases will be quite similar. The model indicates that each excitation, ionization, etc. plume should have its individual spatial and energy dependence. Extensions and aeronomical and radiological applications of the model are discussed.

  16. Biases in simulation of the rice phenology models when applied in warmer climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Li, T.; Yang, X.; Simelton, E.

    2015-12-01

    The current model inter-comparison studies highlight the difference in projections between crop models when they are applied to warmer climates, but these studies do not provide results on how the accuracy of the models would change in these projections because the adequate observations under largely diverse growing season temperature (GST) are often unavailable. Here, we investigate the potential changes in the accuracy of rice phenology models when these models were applied to a significantly warmer climate. We collected phenology data from 775 trials with 19 cultivars in 5 Asian countries (China, India, Philippines, Bangladesh and Thailand). Each cultivar encompasses the phenology observations under diverse GST regimes. For a given rice cultivar in different trials, the GST difference reaches 2.2 to 8.2°C, which allows us to calibrate the models under lower GST and validate under higher GST (i.e., warmer climates). Four common phenology models representing major algorithms on simulations of rice phenology, and three model calibration experiments were conducted. The results suggest that the bilinear and beta models resulted in gradually increasing phenology bias (Figure) and double yield bias per percent increase in phenology bias, whereas the growing-degree-day (GDD) and exponential models maintained a comparatively constant bias when applied in warmer climates (Figure). Moreover, the bias of phenology estimated by the bilinear and beta models did not reduce with increase in GST when all data were used to calibrate models. These suggest that variations in phenology bias are primarily attributed to intrinsic properties of the respective phenology model rather than on the calibration dataset. Therefore we conclude that using the GDD and exponential models has more chances of predicting rice phenology correctly and thus, production under warmer climates, and result in effective agricultural strategic adaptation to and mitigation of climate change.

  17. Advances in assessing geomorphic plausibility in statistical susceptibility modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steger, Stefan; Brenning, Alexander; Bell, Rainer; Petschko, Helene; Glade, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The quality, reliability and applicability of landslide susceptibility maps is regularly deduced directly by interpreting quantitative model performance measures. These quantitative estimates are usually calculated for an independent test sample of a landslide inventory. Numerous studies demonstrate that totally unbiased landslide inventories are rarely available. We assume that such biases are also inherent in the test sample used to quantitatively validate the models. Therefore we suppose that the explanatory power of statistical performance measures is limited by the quality of the inventory used to calculate these statistics. To investigate this assumption, we generated and validated 16 statistical susceptibility models by using two landslide inventories of differing qualities for the Rhenodanubian Flysch zone of Lower Austria (1,354 km²). The ALS-based (Airborne Laser Scan) Inventory (n=6,218) was mapped purposely for susceptibility modelling from a high resolution hillshade and exhibits a high positional accuracy. The less accurate building ground register (BGR; n=681) provided by the Geological Survey of Lower Austria represents reported damaging events and shows a substantially lower completeness. Both inventories exhibit differing systematic biases regarding the land cover. For instance, due to human impact on the visibility of geomorphic structures (e.g. planation), few ALS landslides could be mapped on settlements and pastures (ALS-mapping bias). In contrast, damaging events were frequently reported for settlements and pastures (BGR-report bias). Susceptibility maps were calculated by applying four multivariate classification methods, namely generalized linear model, generalized additive model, random forest and support vector machine separately for both inventories and two sets of explanatory variables (with and without land cover). Quantitative validation was performed by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUROC

  18. Cross-Cultural Dimensions of Applied, Critical, and Transformational Leadership: Women Principals Advancing Social Justice and Educational Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santamaría, Lorri J.; Jean-Marie, Gaëtane

    2014-01-01

    This study, based on the qualitatively rendered experiences and perceptions of educational leaders from historically underserved backgrounds in the US, argues that identity impacts leadership practice. To make this point, researchers build upon an emergent theoretical framework for applied critical leadership from the theories and traditions of…

  19. Developing an International Combined Applied Surgical Science and Wet Lab Simulation Course as an Undergraduate Teaching Model

    PubMed Central

    Sideris, Michail; Papalois, Apostolos; Tsoulfas, Georgios; Majumder, Sanjib; Toutouzas, Konstantinos; Koletsis, Efstratios; Dedeilias, Panagiotis; Lymperopoulos, Nikolaos; Papagrigoriadis, Savvas; Papalois, Vassilios; Zografos, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Background. Essential Skills in the Management of Surgical Cases (ESMSC) is an international, animal model-based course. It combines interactive lectures with basic ex vivo stations and more advanced wet lab modules, that is, in vivo dissections and Heart Transplant Surgery on a swine model. Materials and Methods. Forty-nine medical students (male, N = 27, female N = 22, and mean age = 23.7 years) from King's College London (KCL) and Greek Medical Schools attended the course. Participants were assessed with Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (DOPS), as well as Multiple Choice Questions (MCQs). Paired t-test associations were used to evaluate whether there was statistically significant improvement in their performance. Aim. To evaluate the effectiveness of a combined applied surgical science and wet lab simulation course as a teaching model for surgical skills at the undergraduate level. Results. The mean MCQ score was improved by 2.33/32 (P < 0.005). Surgical skills competences, as defined by DOPS scores, were improved in a statically significant manner (P < 0.005 for all paired t-test correlations). Conclusions. ESMSC seems to be an effective teaching model, which improves the understanding of the surgical approach and the basic surgical skills. In vivo models could be used potentially as a step further in the Undergraduate Surgical Education. PMID:26613083

  20. Different approaches in Partial Least Squares and Artificial Neural Network models applied for the analysis of a ternary mixture of Amlodipine, Valsartan and Hydrochlorothiazide.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Hany W; Hassan, Said A; Salem, Maissa Y; El-Zeany, Badr A

    2014-03-25

    Different chemometric models were applied for the quantitative analysis of Amlodipine (AML), Valsartan (VAL) and Hydrochlorothiazide (HCT) in ternary mixture, namely, Partial Least Squares (PLS) as traditional chemometric model and Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) as advanced model. PLS and ANN were applied with and without variable selection procedure (Genetic Algorithm GA) and data compression procedure (Principal Component Analysis PCA). The chemometric methods applied are PLS-1, GA-PLS, ANN, GA-ANN and PCA-ANN. The methods were used for the quantitative analysis of the drugs in raw materials and pharmaceutical dosage form via handling the UV spectral data. A 3-factor 5-level experimental design was established resulting in 25 mixtures containing different ratios of the drugs. Fifteen mixtures were used as a calibration set and the other ten mixtures were used as validation set to validate the prediction ability of the suggested methods. The validity of the proposed methods was assessed using the standard addition technique. PMID:24378624

  1. Different approaches in Partial Least Squares and Artificial Neural Network models applied for the analysis of a ternary mixture of Amlodipine, Valsartan and Hydrochlorothiazide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwish, Hany W.; Hassan, Said A.; Salem, Maissa Y.; El-Zeany, Badr A.

    2014-03-01

    Different chemometric models were applied for the quantitative analysis of Amlodipine (AML), Valsartan (VAL) and Hydrochlorothiazide (HCT) in ternary mixture, namely, Partial Least Squares (PLS) as traditional chemometric model and Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) as advanced model. PLS and ANN were applied with and without variable selection procedure (Genetic Algorithm GA) and data compression procedure (Principal Component Analysis PCA). The chemometric methods applied are PLS-1, GA-PLS, ANN, GA-ANN and PCA-ANN. The methods were used for the quantitative analysis of the drugs in raw materials and pharmaceutical dosage form via handling the UV spectral data. A 3-factor 5-level experimental design was established resulting in 25 mixtures containing different ratios of the drugs. Fifteen mixtures were used as a calibration set and the other ten mixtures were used as validation set to validate the prediction ability of the suggested methods. The validity of the proposed methods was assessed using the standard addition technique.

  2. Advances in design and modeling of porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayral, André; Calas-Etienne, Sylvie; Coasne, Benoit; Deratani, André; Evstratov, Alexis; Galarneau, Anne; Grande, Daniel; Hureau, Matthieu; Jobic, Hervé; Morlay, Catherine; Parmentier, Julien; Prelot, Bénédicte; Rossignol, Sylvie; Simon-Masseron, Angélique; Thibault-Starzyk, Frédéric

    2015-07-01

    This special issue of the European Physical Journal Special Topics is dedicated to selected papers from the symposium "High surface area porous and granular materials" organized in the frame of the conference "Matériaux 2014", held on November 24-28, 2014 in Montpellier, France. Porous materials and granular materials gather a wide variety of heterogeneous, isotropic or anisotropic media made of inorganic, organic or hybrid solid skeletons, with open or closed porosity, and pore sizes ranging from the centimeter scale to the sub-nanometer scale. Their technological and industrial applications cover numerous areas from building and civil engineering to microelectronics, including also metallurgy, chemistry, health, waste water and gas effluent treatment. Many emerging processes related to environmental protection and sustainable development also rely on this class of materials. Their functional properties are related to specific transfer mechanisms (matter, heat, radiation, electrical charge), to pore surface chemistry (exchange, adsorption, heterogeneous catalysis) and to retention inside confined volumes (storage, separation, exchange, controlled release). The development of innovative synthesis, shaping, characterization and modeling approaches enables the design of advanced materials with enhanced functional performance. The papers collected in this special issue offer a good overview of the state-of-the-art and science of these complex media. We would like to thank all the speakers and participants for their contribution to the success of the symposium. We also express our gratitude to the organization committee of "Matériaux 2014". We finally thank the reviewers and the staff of the European Physical Journal Special Topics who made the publication of this special issue possible.

  3. Finite element modeling and analysis of piezo-integrated composite structures under large applied electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M. N.; Tarun, S.; Schmidt, R.; Schröder, K.-U.

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we focus on static finite element (FE) simulation of piezoelectric laminated composite plates and shells, considering the nonlinear constitutive behavior of piezoelectric materials under large applied electric fields. Under the assumptions of small strains and large electric fields, the second-order nonlinear constitutive equations are used in the variational principle approach, to develop a nonlinear FE model. Numerical simulations are performed to study the effect of material nonlinearity for piezoelectric bimorph and laminated composite plates as well as cylindrical shells. In comparison to the experimental investigations existing in the literature, the results predicted by the present model agree very well. The importance of the present nonlinear model is highlighted especially in large applied electric fields, and it is shown that the difference between the results simulated by linear and nonlinear constitutive FE models cannot be omitted.

  4. Liminality in cultural transition: applying ID-EA to advance a concept into theory-based practice.

    PubMed

    Baird, Martha B; Reed, Pamela G

    2015-01-01

    As global migration increases worldwide, nursing interventions are needed to address the effects of migration on health. The concept of liminality emerged as a pivotal concept in the situation-specific theory of well-being in refugee women experiencing cultural transition. As a relatively new concept in the discipline of nursing, liminality is explored using a method, called ID-EA, which we developed to advance a theoretical concept for application to nursing practice. Liminality in the context of cultural transition is further developed using the five steps of inquiry of the ID-EA method. The five steps are as follows: (1) inductive inquiry: qualitative research, (2) deductive inquiry: literature review, (3) synthesis of inductive and deductive inquiry, (4) evaluation inquiry, and (5) application-to-practice inquiry. The overall goal of this particular work was to develop situation-specific, theory-based interventions that facilitate cultural transitions for immigrants and refugees. PMID:25799694

  5. Advanced digital subtraction angiography and MR fusion imaging protocol applied to accurate placement of flow diverter device.

    PubMed

    Faragò, Giuseppe; Caldiera, Valentina; Tempra, Giovanni; Ciceri, Elisa

    2016-02-01

    In recent years there has been a progressive increase in interventional neuroradiology procedures, partially due to improvements in devices, but also to the simultaneous development of technologies and radiological images. Cone beam CT (Dyna-CT; Siemens) is a method recently used to obtain pseudo CT images from digital subtraction angiography (DSA) with a flat panel detector. Using dedicated software, it is then possible to merge Dyna-CT images with images from a different source. We report here the usefulness of advanced DSA techniques (Syngo-Dyna CT, three-dimensional DSA iPilot) for the treatment of an intracranial aneurysm with a flow diverter device. Merging MR and Dyna-CT images at the end of the procedure proved to be a simple and rapid additional method of verifying the success of the intervention. PMID:25589548

  6. The KL Mix Model Applied to Directly Driven Capsules on the Omega Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton, R E; Mikaelian, K O; Park, H; Dimonte, G; Rygg, J R; Li, C K

    2005-10-10

    The coefficients of the KL mix model were set by Dimonte to match RT and RM instabilities as measured on the Linear Electric Motor (LEM). The KL mix model has been applied to directly-driven capsule implosions with a variety of laser energies, ablator materials, ablator thicknesses and convergence ratios. The KL calculations nearly match the observed Y{sub DD}, Y{sub DT}, Y{sub P}, T{sub ion} and implosion times for many (but not all) capsules.

  7. Applying high frame-rate digital radiography and dual-energy distributed-sources for advanced tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travish, Gil; Rangel, Felix J.; Evans, Mark A.; Schmiedehausen, Kristin

    2013-09-01

    Conventional radiography uses a single point x-ray source with a fan or cone beam to visualize various areas of the human body. An imager records the transmitted photons—historically film and now increasingly digital radiography (DR) flat panel detectors—followed by optional image post-processing. Some post-processing techniques of particular interest are tomosynthesis, and dual energy subtraction. Tomosynthesis adds the ability to recreate quasi-3D images from a series of 2D projections. These exposures are typically taken along an arc or other path; and, tomosynthesis reconstruction is used to form a three-dimensional representation of the area of interest. Dual-energy radiography adds the ability to enhance or "eliminate" structures based on their different attenuation of well-separated end-point energies in two exposures. These advanced capabilities come at a high cost in terms of complexity, imaging time, capital equipment, space, and potentially reduced image quality due to motion blur if acquired sequentially. Recently, the prospect of creating x-ray sources, which are composed of arrays of micro-emitters, has been put forward. These arrays offer a flat-panel geometry and may afford advantages in fabrication methodology, size and cost. They also facilitate the use of the dual energy technology. Here we examine the possibility of using such an array of x-ray sources combined with high frame-rate (~kHz) DR detectors to produce advanced medical images without the need for moving gantries or other complex motion systems. Combining the advantages of dual energy imaging with the ability to determine the relative depth location of anatomical structures or pathological findings from imaging procedures should prove to be a powerful diagnostic tool. We also present use cases that would benefit from the capabilities of this modality.

  8. Hydration kinetics modeling of Portland cement considering the effects of curing temperature and applied pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Feng Meyer, Christian

    2009-04-15

    A hydration kinetics model for Portland cement is formulated based on thermodynamics of multiphase porous media. The mechanism of cement hydration is discussed based on literature review. The model is then developed considering the effects of chemical composition and fineness of cement, water-cement ratio, curing temperature and applied pressure. The ultimate degree of hydration of Portland cement is also analyzed and a corresponding formula is established. The model is calibrated against the experimental data for eight different Portland cements. Simple relations between the model parameters and cement composition are obtained and used to predict hydration kinetics. The model is used to reproduce experimental results on hydration kinetics, adiabatic temperature rise, and chemical shrinkage of different cement pastes. The comparisons between the model reproductions and the different experimental results demonstrate the applicability of the proposed model, especially for cement hydration at elevated temperature and high pressure.

  9. AN EMPIRICAL MODEL FOR DISSOLVED PHOSPHORUS IN RUNOFF FROM SURFACE-APPLIED FERTILIZERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dissolved phosphorus (P) in runoff from surface-applied fertilizers can be relatively great, but commonly used field or watershed-scale computer models often do not simulate direct transfer of fertilizer P to runoff. Using data from our own simulated rainfall experiments and published runoff studies...

  10. Applying a Weighted Maximum Likelihood Latent Trait Estimator to the Generalized Partial Credit Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penfield, Randall D.; Bergeron, Jennifer M.

    2005-01-01

    This article applies a weighted maximum likelihood (WML) latent trait estimator to the generalized partial credit model (GPCM). The relevant equations required to obtain the WML estimator using the Newton-Raphson algorithm are presented, and a simulation study is described that compared the properties of the WML estimator to those of the maximum…

  11. Flipped Classroom Adapted to the ARCS Model of Motivation and Applied to a Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asiksoy, Gülsüm; Özdamli, Fezile

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine the effect on the achievement, motivation and self-sufficiency of students of the flipped classroom approach adapted to Keller's ARCS (Attention, Relevance, Confidence and Satisfaction) motivation model and applied to a physics course. The study involved 66 students divided into two classes of a physics course. The…

  12. From Add-On to Mainstream: Applying Distance Learning Models for ALL Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zai, Robert, III.; Wesley, Threasa L.

    2013-01-01

    The use of distance learning technology has allowed Northern Kentucky University's W. Frank Steely Library to remove traditional boundaries between both distance and on-campus students. An emerging model that applies these distance learning methodologies to all students has proven effective for enhancing reference and instructional services.…

  13. Applying the Transtheoretical Model to Reality Television: The Biggest Loser Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Adam E.; Piazza-Gardner, Anna K.

    2012-01-01

    This teaching idea presents a heuristic example using reality television as a tool for applying health behavior theory. It utilizes The Biggest Loser (TBL) to provide "real world" cases depicting how individuals progress through/experience the Transtheoretical Model (TTM). Observing TBL contestants provides students practice grounding…

  14. Lovaas Model of Applied Behavior Analysis. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The "Lovaas Model of Applied Behavior Analysis" is a type of behavioral therapy that initially focuses on discrete trials: brief periods of one-on-one instruction, during which a teacher cues a behavior, prompts the appropriate response, and provides reinforcement to the child. Children in the program receive an average of 35 to 40 hours of…

  15. Crystal Field Theory and the Angular Overlap Model Applied to Hydrides of Main Group Elements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, E. A.

    1990-01-01

    Described is how crystal field theory and the angular overlap model can be applied to very simple molecules which can then be used to introduce such concepts as bonding orbitals, MO diagrams, and Walsh diagrams. The main-group compounds are used as examples and a switch to the transition metal complexes. (KR)

  16. Mathematical Modeling of Food Supply for Long Term Space Missions Using Advanced Life Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruthirds, John E.

    2003-01-01

    A habitat for long duration missions which utilizes Advanced Life Support (ALS), the Bioregenerative Planetary Life Support Systems Test Complex (BIO-Plex), is currently being built at JSC. In this system all consumables will be recycled and reused. In support of this effort, a menu is being planned utilizing ALS crops that will meet nutritional and psychological requirements. The need exists in the food system to identify specific physical quantities that define life support systems from an analysis and modeling perspective. Once these quantities are defined, they need to be fed into a mathematical model that takes into consideration other systems in the BIO-Plex. This model, if successful, will be used to understand the impacts of changes in the food system on the other systems and vice versa. The Equivalent System Mass (ESM) metric has been used to describe systems and subsystems, including the food system options, in terms of the single parameter, mass. There is concern that this approach might not adequately address the important issues of food quality and psychological impact on crew morale of a supply of fiesh food items. In fact, the mass of food can also depend on the quality of the food. This summer faculty fellow project will involve creating an appropriate mathematical model for the food plan developed by the Food Processing System for BIO-Plex. The desired outcome of this work will be a quantitative model that can be applied to the various options of supplying food on long-term space missions.

  17. Radiance and Jacobian Intercomparison of Radiative Transfer Models Applied to HIRS and AMSU Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garand, L.; Turner, D. S.; Larocque, M.; Bates, J.; Boukabara, S.; Brunel, P.; Chevallier, F.; Deblonde, G.; Engelen, R.; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The goals of this study are the evaluation of current fast radiative transfer models (RTMs) and line-by-line (LBL) models. The intercomparison focuses on the modeling of 11 representative sounding channels routinely used at numerical weather prediction centers: seven HIRS (High-resolution Infrared Sounder) and four AMSU (Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit) channels. Interest in this topic was evidenced by the participation of 24 scientists from 16 institutions. An ensemble of 42 diverse atmospheres was used and results compiled for 19 infrared models and 10 microwave models, including several LBL RTMs. For the first time, not only radiances, but also Jacobians (of temperature, water vapor, and ozone) were compared to various LBL models for many channels. In the infrared, LBL models typically agree to within 0.05-0.15 K (standard deviation) in terms of top-of-the-atmosphere brightness temperature (BT). Individual differences up to 0.5 K still exist, systematic in some channels, and linked to the type of atmosphere in others. The best fast models emulate LBL BTs to within 0.25 K, but no model achieves this desirable level of success for all channels. The ozone modeling is particularly challenging. In the microwave, fast models generally do quite well against the LBL model to which they were tuned. However significant differences were noted among LBL models. Extending the intercomparison to the Jacobians proved very useful in detecting subtle and more obvious modeling errors. In addition, total and single gas optical depths were calculated, which provided additional insight on the nature of differences. Recommendations for future intercomparisons are suggested.

  18. Good modelling practice in applying computational fluid dynamics for WWTP modelling.

    PubMed

    Wicklein, Edward; Batstone, Damien J; Ducoste, Joel; Laurent, Julien; Griborio, Alonso; Wicks, Jim; Saunders, Stephen; Samstag, Randal; Potier, Olivier; Nopens, Ingmar

    2016-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling in the wastewater treatment (WWT) field is continuing to grow and be used to solve increasingly complex problems. However, the future of CFD models and their value to the wastewater field are a function of their proper application and knowledge of their limits. As has been established for other types of wastewater modelling (i.e. biokinetic models), it is timely to define a good modelling practice (GMP) for wastewater CFD applications. An International Water Association (IWA) working group has been formed to investigate a variety of issues and challenges related to CFD modelling in water and WWT. This paper summarizes the recommendations for GMP of the IWA working group on CFD. The paper provides an overview of GMP and, though it is written for the wastewater application, is based on general CFD procedures. A forthcoming companion paper to provide specific details on modelling of individual wastewater components forms the next step of the working group. PMID:26942517

  19. ADVANCED UTILITY SIMULATION MODEL, REPORT OF SENSITIVITY TESTING, CALIBRATION, AND MODEL OUTPUT COMPARISONS (VERSION 3.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of activities relating to the Advanced Utility Simulation Model (AUSM): sensitivity testing. comparison with a mature electric utility model, and calibration to historical emissions. The activities were aimed at demonstrating AUSM's validity over input va...

  20. Dynamic modeling and optimal joint torque coordination of advanced robotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hee-Jun

    The development is documented of an efficient dynamic modeling algorithm and the subsequent optimal joint input load coordination of advanced robotic systems for industrial application. A closed-form dynamic modeling algorithm for the general closed-chain robotic linkage systems is presented. The algorithm is based on the transfer of system dependence from a set of open chain Lagrangian coordinates to any desired system generalized coordinate set of the closed-chain. Three different techniques for evaluation of the kinematic closed chain constraints allow the representation of the dynamic modeling parameters in terms of system generalized coordinates and have no restriction with regard to kinematic redundancy. The total computational requirement of the closed-chain system model is largely dependent on the computation required for the dynamic model of an open kinematic chain. In order to improve computational efficiency, modification of an existing open-chain KIC based dynamic formulation is made by the introduction of the generalized augmented body concept. This algorithm allows a 44 pct. computational saving over the current optimized one (O(N4), 5995 when N = 6). As means of resolving redundancies in advanced robotic systems, local joint torque optimization is applied for effectively using actuator power while avoiding joint torque limits. The stability problem in local joint torque optimization schemes is eliminated by using fictitious dissipating forces which act in the necessary null space. The performance index representing the global torque norm is shown to be satisfactory. In addition, the resulting joint motion trajectory becomes conservative, after a transient stage, for repetitive cyclic end-effector trajectories. The effectiveness of the null space damping method is shown. The modular robot, which is built of well defined structural modules from a finite-size inventory and is controlled by one general computer system, is another class of evolving

  1. Diesel engine emissions and combustion predictions using advanced mixing models applicable to fuel sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abani, Neerav; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2010-09-01

    An advanced mixing model was applied to study engine emissions and combustion with different injection strategies ranging from multiple injections, early injection and grouped-hole nozzle injection in light and heavy duty diesel engines. The model was implemented in the KIVA-CHEMKIN engine combustion code and simulations were conducted at different mesh resolutions. The model was compared with the standard KIVA spray model that uses the Lagrangian-Drop and Eulerian-Fluid (LDEF) approach, and a Gas Jet spray model that improves predictions of liquid sprays. A Vapor Particle Method (VPM) is introduced that accounts for sub-grid scale mixing of fuel vapor and more accurately and predicts the mixing of fuel-vapor over a range of mesh resolutions. The fuel vapor is transported as particles until a certain distance from nozzle is reached where the local jet half-width is adequately resolved by the local mesh scale. Within this distance the vapor particle is transported while releasing fuel vapor locally, as determined by a weighting factor. The VPM model more accurately predicts fuel-vapor penetrations for early cycle injections and flame lift-off lengths for late cycle injections. Engine combustion computations show that as compared to the standard KIVA and Gas Jet spray models, the VPM spray model improves predictions of in-cylinder pressure, heat released rate and engine emissions of NOx, CO and soot with coarse mesh resolutions. The VPM spray model is thus a good tool for efficiently investigating diesel engine combustion with practical mesh resolutions, thereby saving computer time.

  2. Probabilistic models of genetic variation in structured populations applied to global human studies

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Wei; Song, Minsun; Storey, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Modern population genetics studies typically involve genome-wide genotyping of individuals from a diverse network of ancestries. An important problem is how to formulate and estimate probabilistic models of observed genotypes that account for complex population structure. The most prominent work on this problem has focused on estimating a model of admixture proportions of ancestral populations for each individual. Here, we instead focus on modeling variation of the genotypes without requiring a higher-level admixture interpretation. Results: We formulate two general probabilistic models, and we propose computationally efficient algorithms to estimate them. First, we show how principal component analysis can be utilized to estimate a general model that includes the well-known Pritchard–Stephens–Donnelly admixture model as a special case. Noting some drawbacks of this approach, we introduce a new ‘logistic factor analysis’ framework that seeks to directly model the logit transformation of probabilities underlying observed genotypes in terms of latent variables that capture population structure. We demonstrate these advances on data from the Human Genome Diversity Panel and 1000 Genomes Project, where we are able to identify SNPs that are highly differentiated with respect to structure while making minimal modeling assumptions. Availability and Implementation: A Bioconductor R package called lfa is available at http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/lfa.html. Contact: jstorey@princeton.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26545820

  3. Applying an integrated neuro-expert system model in a real-time alarm processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosla, Rajiv; Dillon, Tharam S.

    1993-03-01

    In this paper we propose an integrated model which is derived from the combination of a generic neuro-expert system model, an object model, and unix operating system process (UOSP) model. This integrated model reflects the strengths of both artificial neural nets (ANNs) and expert systems (ESs). A formalism of ES object, ANN object, UOSP object, and problem domain object is used for developing a set of generic data structures and methods. These generic data structures and methods help us to build heterogeneous ES-ANN objects with uniform communication interface. The integrated model is applied in a real-time alarm processing system for a non-trivial terminal power station. It is shown how features like hierarchical/distributed ES/ANN objects, inter process communication, and fast concurrent execution help to cope with real-time system constraints like, continuity, data variability, and fast response time.

  4. Bird communities, roads and development: Prospects and constraints of applying empirical models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gutzwiller, K.J.; Barrow, W.C., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Our objectives were to explain the prospects and constraints of applying empirical models that relate bird community metrics to broad-scale characteristics of roads and development. We explored the practical value of regression models that were derived for a large protected area in the Chihuahuan Desert. These models related bird species richness, relative abundance, or probability of occurrence to total length of roads within each of two spatial extents (1- and 2-km radii), distance to the nearest road, distance to the nearest development, or the two-way interactions of these variables. Empirical models can be used to inform conservation decisions, to parameterise simulation models for conservation planning, to identify threshold levels of road and development variables, and to determine the focus of management experiments for confirmatory hypothesis testing and improvement of model realism.

  5. Natural Language Processing and Machine Learning (NLP/ML): Applying Advances in Biomedicine to the Earth Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerr, R.; Myers, S.; Palmer, M.; Jenkins, C. J.; Thessen, A.; Martin, J.

    2015-12-01

    Semantics underlie many of the tools and services available from and on the web. From improving search results to enabling data mashups and other forms of interoperability, semantic technologies have proven themselves. But creating semantic resources, especially re-usable semantic resources, is extremely time consuming and labor intensive. Why? Because it is not just a matter of technology but also of obtaining rough consensus if not full agreement amongst community members on the meaning and order of things. One way to develop these resources in a more automated way would be to use NLP/ML techniques to extract the required resources from large corpora of subject-specific text such as peer-reviewed papers where presumably a rough consensus has been achieved at least about the basics of the particular discipline involved. While not generally applied to Earth Sciences, considerable resources have been spent in other fields such as medicine on these types of techniques with some success. The NSF-funded ClearEarth project is applying the techniques developed for biomedicine to the cryosphere, geology, and biology in order to spur faster development of the semantic resources needed in these fields. The first area being addressed by the project is the cryosphere, specifically sea ice nomenclature where an existing set of sea ice ontologies are being used as the "Gold Standard" against which to test and validate the NLP/ML techniques. The processes being used, lessons learned and early results will be described.

  6. Generalized pricing formulas for stochastic volatility jump diffusion models applied to the exponential Vasicek model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, L. Z. J.; Lemmens, D.; Tempere, J.

    2010-06-01

    Path integral techniques for the pricing of financial options are mostly based on models that can be recast in terms of a Fokker-Planck differential equation and that, consequently, neglect jumps and only describe drift and diffusion. We present a method to adapt formulas for both the path-integral propagators and the option prices themselves, so that jump processes are taken into account in conjunction with the usual drift and diffusion terms. In particular, we focus on stochastic volatility models, such as the exponential Vasicek model, and extend the pricing formulas and propagator of this model to incorporate jump diffusion with a given jump size distribution. This model is of importance to include non-Gaussian fluctuations beyond the Black-Scholes model, and moreover yields a lognormal distribution of the volatilities, in agreement with results from superstatistical analysis. The results obtained in the present formalism are checked with Monte Carlo simulations.

  7. Evaluation of Turbulence-Model Performance as Applied to Jet-Noise Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, S. L.; Seiner, J. M.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Erlebacher, G.

    1998-01-01

    The accurate prediction of jet noise is possible only if the jet flow field can be predicted accurately. Predictions for the mean velocity and turbulence quantities in the jet flowfield are typically the product of a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver coupled with a turbulence model. To evaluate the effectiveness of solvers and turbulence models in predicting those quantities most important to jet noise prediction, two CFD codes and several turbulence models were applied to a jet configuration over a range of jet temperatures for which experimental data is available.

  8. Bayesian model selection applied to artificial neural networks used for water resources modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingston, Greer B.; Maier, Holger R.; Lambert, Martin F.

    2008-04-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have proven to be extremely valuable tools in the field of water resources engineering. However, one of the most difficult tasks in developing an ANN is determining the optimum level of complexity required to model a given problem, as there is no formal systematic model selection method. This paper presents a Bayesian model selection (BMS) method for ANNs that provides an objective approach for comparing models of varying complexity in order to select the most appropriate ANN structure. The approach uses Markov Chain Monte Carlo posterior simulations to estimate the evidence in favor of competing models and, in this study, three known methods for doing this are compared in terms of their suitability for being incorporated into the proposed BMS framework for ANNs. However, it is acknowledged that it can be particularly difficult to accurately estimate the evidence of ANN models. Therefore, the proposed BMS approach for ANNs incorporates a further check of the evidence results by inspecting the marginal posterior distributions of the hidden-to-output layer weights, which unambiguously indicate any redundancies in the hidden layer nodes. The fact that this check is available is one of the greatest advantages of the proposed approach over conventional model selection methods, which do not provide such a test and instead rely on the modeler's subjective choice of selection criterion. The advantages of a total Bayesian approach to ANN development, including training and model selection, are demonstrated on two synthetic and one real world water resources case study.

  9. Advanced deposition model for thermal activated chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Dang

    Thermal Activated Chemical Vapor Deposition (TACVD) is defined as the formation of a stable solid product on a heated substrate surface from chemical reactions and/or dissociation of gaseous reactants in an activated environment. It has become an essential process for producing solid film, bulk material, coating, fibers, powders and monolithic components. Global market of CVD products has reached multi billions dollars for each year. In the recent years CVD process has been extensively used to manufacture semiconductors and other electronic components such as polysilicon, AlN and GaN. Extensive research effort has been directed to improve deposition quality and throughput. To obtain fast and high quality deposition, operational conditions such as temperature, pressure, fluid velocity and species concentration and geometry conditions such as source-substrate distance need to be well controlled in a CVD system. This thesis will focus on design of CVD processes through understanding the transport and reaction phenomena in the growth reactor. Since the in situ monitor is almost impossible for CVD reactor, many industrial resources have been expended to determine the optimum design by semi-empirical methods and trial-and-error procedures. This approach has allowed the achievement of improvements in the deposition sequence, but begins to show its limitations, as this method cannot always fulfill the more and more stringent specifications of the industry. To resolve this problem, numerical simulation is widely used in studying the growth techniques. The difficulty of numerical simulation of TACVD crystal growth process lies in the simulation of gas phase and surface reactions, especially the latter one, due to the fact that very limited kinetic information is available in the open literature. In this thesis, an advanced deposition model was developed to study the multi-component fluid flow, homogeneous gas phase reactions inside the reactor chamber, heterogeneous surface

  10. Colored polydimethylsiloxane micropillar arrays for high throughput measurements of forces applied by genetic model organisms.

    PubMed

    Khare, Siddharth M; Awasthi, Anjali; Venkataraman, V; Koushika, Sandhya P

    2015-01-01

    Measuring forces applied by multi-cellular organisms is valuable in investigating biomechanics of their locomotion. Several technologies have been developed to measure such forces, for example, strain gauges, micro-machined sensors, and calibrated cantilevers. We introduce an innovative combination of techniques as a high throughput screening tool to assess forces applied by multiple genetic model organisms. First, we fabricated colored Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micropillars where the color enhances contrast making it easier to detect and track pillar displacement driven by the organism. Second, we developed a semi-automated graphical user interface to analyze the images for pillar displacement, thus reducing the analysis time for each animal to minutes. The addition of color reduced the Young's modulus of PDMS. Therefore, the dye-PDMS composite was characterized using Yeoh's hyperelastic model and the pillars were calibrated using a silicon based force sensor. We used our device to measure forces exerted by wild type and mutant Caenorhabditis elegans moving on an agarose surface. Wild type C. elegans exert an average force of ∼1 μN on an individual pillar and a total average force of ∼7.68 μN. We show that the middle of C. elegans exerts more force than its extremities. We find that C. elegans mutants with defective body wall muscles apply significantly lower force on individual pillars, while mutants defective in sensing externally applied mechanical forces still apply the same average force per pillar compared to wild type animals. Average forces applied per pillar are independent of the length, diameter, or cuticle stiffness of the animal. We also used the device to measure, for the first time, forces applied by Drosophila melanogaster larvae. Peristaltic waves occurred at 0.4 Hz applying an average force of ∼1.58 μN on a single pillar. Our colored microfluidic device along with its displacement tracking software allows us to measure forces

  11. Colored polydimethylsiloxane micropillar arrays for high throughput measurements of forces applied by genetic model organisms

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Siddharth M.; Awasthi, Anjali; Venkataraman, V.; Koushika, Sandhya P.

    2015-01-01

    Measuring forces applied by multi-cellular organisms is valuable in investigating biomechanics of their locomotion. Several technologies have been developed to measure such forces, for example, strain gauges, micro-machined sensors, and calibrated cantilevers. We introduce an innovative combination of techniques as a high throughput screening tool to assess forces applied by multiple genetic model organisms. First, we fabricated colored Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micropillars where the color enhances contrast making it easier to detect and track pillar displacement driven by the organism. Second, we developed a semi-automated graphical user interface to analyze the images for pillar displacement, thus reducing the analysis time for each animal to minutes. The addition of color reduced the Young's modulus of PDMS. Therefore, the dye-PDMS composite was characterized using Yeoh's hyperelastic model and the pillars were calibrated using a silicon based force sensor. We used our device to measure forces exerted by wild type and mutant Caenorhabditis elegans moving on an agarose surface. Wild type C. elegans exert an average force of ∼1 μN on an individual pillar and a total average force of ∼7.68 μN. We show that the middle of C. elegans exerts more force than its extremities. We find that C. elegans mutants with defective body wall muscles apply significantly lower force on individual pillars, while mutants defective in sensing externally applied mechanical forces still apply the same average force per pillar compared to wild type animals. Average forces applied per pillar are independent of the length, diameter, or cuticle stiffness of the animal. We also used the device to measure, for the first time, forces applied by Drosophila melanogaster larvae. Peristaltic waves occurred at 0.4 Hz applying an average force of ∼1.58 μN on a single pillar. Our colored microfluidic device along with its displacement tracking software allows us to measure forces

  12. Musculoskeletal modelling of muscle activation and applied external forces for the correction of scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study uses biomechanical modelling and computational optimization to investigate muscle activation in combination with applied external forces as a treatment for scoliosis. Bracing, which incorporates applied external forces, is the most popular non surgical treatment for scoliosis. Non surgical treatments which make use of muscle activation include electrical stimulation, postural control, and therapeutic exercises. Electrical stimulation has been largely dismissed as a viable treatment for scoliosis, although previous studies have suggested that it can potentially deliver similarly effective corrective forces to the spine as bracing. Methods The potential of muscle activation for scoliosis correction was investigated over different curvatures both with and without the addition of externally applied forces. The five King’s classifications of scoliosis were investigated over a range of Cobb angles. A biomechanical model of the spine was used to represent various scoliotic curvatures. Optimization was applied to the model to reduce the curves using combinations of both deep and superficial muscle activation and applied external forces. Results Simulating applied external forces in combination with muscle activation at low Cobb angles (< 20 degrees) over the 5 King’s classifications, it was possible to reduce the magnitude of the curve by up to 85% for classification 4, 75% for classifications 3 and 5, 65% for classification 2, and 60% for classification 1. The reduction in curvature was less at larger Cobb angles. For King’s classifications 1 and 2, the serratus, latissimus dorsi, and trapezius muscles were consistently recruited by the optimization algorithm for activation across all Cobb angles. When muscle activation and external forces were applied in combination, lower levels of muscle activation or less external force was required to reduce the curvature of the spine, when compared with either muscle activation or external force applied

  13. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Advanced Seismic Soil Structure Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Bolisetti, Chandrakanth; Coleman, Justin Leigh

    2015-06-01

    of interest. The specific nonlinear soil behavior included in the NLSSI calculation presented in this report is gapping and sliding. Other NLSSI effects are not included in the calculation. The results presented in this report document initial model runs in the linear and nonlinear analysis process. Final comparisons between traditional and advanced SPRA will be presented in the September 30th deliverable.

  14. Calculations on the Back of an Envelope Model: Applying Seasonal Fecundity Models to Species’ Range Limits

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most predictions of the effect of climate change on species’ ranges are based on correlations between climate and current species’ distributions. These so-called envelope models may be a good first approximation, but we need demographically mechanistic models to incorporate the ...

  15. A new glacier model resolving ice dynamics applied to the Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maussion, Fabien; Marzeion, Ben

    2016-04-01

    Most regional and global glacier models rely on empirical scaling laws to account for glacier area and volume change with time. These scaling methods are computationally cheap and are statistically robust when applied to many glaciers, but their accuracy considerably lowers at the glacier or catchment scale. The nearest alternative in terms of complexity - glacier flowline modelling - requires significantly more information about the glacier geometry. Here we present a new open source glacier model applicable at regional to global scale implementing i) the determination of glacier centerlines, ii) the inversion of glacier bed topography, and iii) a multi-branch flowline model handling glacier tributaries. Using the HISTALP dataset as climatological input we apply the model in the Alps for 1800 to present and present new estimations of present-day and past glacier volume. The relatively large number of independent data available for validation in this region allow a critical discussion of the added value of our new approach. In particular, we will focus our discussion on two contradictory aspects inherent to any geoscientific model development: while our model clearly opens wide-ranging possibilities to better resolve the glacier processes, this new playground is associated with an increase in complexity, the number of calibration parameters, and…uncertainty?

  16. Comparing SEBAL and METRIC: Evapotranspiration Models Applied to Paramount Farms Almond Orchards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furey, B. J.; Kefauver, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    Two evapotranspiration models were applied to almond and pistachio orchards in California. The SEBAL model, developed by W.G.M. Bastiaanssen, was programmed in MatLab for direct comparison to the METRIC model, developed by R.G. Allen and the IDWR. Remote sensing data from the NASA SARP 2011 Airborne Research Program was used in the application of these models. An evaluation of the models showed that they both followed the same pattern in evapotranspiration (ET) rates for different types of ground cover. The models exhibited a slightly different range of values and appeared to be related (non-linearly). The models both underestimated the actual ET at the CIMIS weather station. However, SEBAL overestimated the ET of the almond orchards by 0.16 mm/hr when applying its crop coefficient to the reference ET. This is compared to METRIC, which underestimated the ET of the almond orchards by only 0.10 mm/hr. Other types of ground cover were similarly compared. Temporal variability in ET rates between the morning and afternoon were also observed.

  17. Applied regional monitoring of the vernal advancement and retrogradation (Green wave effect) of natural vegetation in the Great Plains corridor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, J. W., Jr. (Principal Investigator); Deering, D. W.; Haas, R. H.; Welch, R. I.; Harlan, J. C.; Whitney, P. R.

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. LANDSAT 2 has shown that digital data products can be effectively employed on a regional basis to monitor changes in vegetation conditions. The TV16 was successfully applied to an extended test site and the Great Plains Corridor in tests of the ability to assess green forage biomass on rangelands as an index to vegetation condition. A strategy for using TV16 on a regional basis was developed and tested. These studies have shown that: (1) for rangelands with good vegetative cover, such as most of the Great Plains, and which are not heavily infested with brush or undesirable weed species, the LANDSAT digital data can provide a good estimate (within 250 kg/ha) of the quantity of green forage biomass, and (2) at least five levels of pasture and range feed conditions can be adequately mapped for extended regions.

  18. Performance evaluation of different solar advanced oxidation processes applied to the treatment of a real textile dyeing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Manenti, Diego R; Soares, Petrick A; Silva, Tânia F C V; Módenes, Aparecido N; Espinoza-Quiñones, Fernando R; Bergamasco, Rosângela; Boaventura, Rui A R; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2015-01-01

    The performance of different solar-driven advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), such as TiO2/UV, TiO2/H2O2/UV, and Fe(2+)/H2O2/UV-visible in the treatment of a real textile effluent using a pilot plant with compound parabolic collectors (CPCs), was investigated. The influence of the main photo-Fenton reaction variables such as iron concentration (20-100 mg Fe(2+) L(-1)), pH (2.4-4.5), temperature (10-50 °C), and irradiance (22-68 WUV m(-2)) was evaluated in a lab-scale prototype using artificial solar radiation. The real textile wastewater presented a beige color, with a maximum absorbance peak at 641 nm, alkaline pH (8.1), moderate organic content (dissolved organic carbon (DOC) = 129 mg C L(-1) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) = 496 mg O2 L(-1)), and high conductivity mainly associated to the high concentration of chloride (1.1 g Cl(-) L(-1)), sulfate (0.4 g SO 4 (2 -) L(- 1)), and sodium (1.2 g Na(+) L(-1)) ions. Although all the processes tested contributed to complete decolorization and effective mineralization, the most efficient process was the solar photo-Fenton with an optimum catalyst concentration of 60 mg Fe(2+) L(-1), leading to 70 % mineralization (DOCfinal = 41 mg C L(-1); CODfinal < 150 mg O2 L(-1)) at pH 3.6, requiring a UV energy dose of 3.5 kJUV L(-1) (t 30 W = 22.4 min; [Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]) and consuming 18.5 mM of H2O2. PMID:24737016

  19. Applying Forecast Models from the Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehmeyr, M.; Baker, D. N.; Millward, G.; Odstrcil, D.

    2007-12-01

    The Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling (CISM) has developed three forecast models (FMs) for the Sun-Earth chain. They have been matured by various degrees toward the operational stage. The Sun-Earth FM suite comprises empirical and physical models: the Planetary Equivalent Amplitude (AP-FM), the Solar Wind (SW- FM), and the Geospace (GS-FM) models. We give a brief overview of these forecast models and touch briefly on the associated validation studies. We demonstrate the utility of the models: AP-FM supporting the operations of the AIM (Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere) mission soon after launch; SW-FM providing assistance with the interpretation of the STEREO beacon data; and GS-FM combining model and observed data to characterize the aurora borealis. We will then discuss space weather tools in a more general sense, point out where the current capabilities and shortcomings are, and conclude with a look forward to what areas need improvement to facilitate better real-time forecasts.

  20. Advanced Computing Tools and Models for Accelerator Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, Robert; Ryne, Robert D.

    2008-06-11

    This paper is based on a transcript of my EPAC'08 presentation on advanced computing tools for accelerator physics. Following an introduction I present several examples, provide a history of the development of beam dynamics capabilities, and conclude with thoughts on the future of large scale computing in accelerator physics.