Science.gov

Sample records for modelling interior salt

  1. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2006-05-26

    The principal research effort for Phase 1 (Concept Development) of the project has been data compilation; determination of the tectonic, depositional, burial, and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin; basin modeling (geohistory, thermal maturation, hydrocarbon expulsion); petroleum system identification; comparative basin evaluation; and resource assessment. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, and regional cross sections have been prepared. Structure, isopach and formation lithology maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history, and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and burial history, thermal maturation history, and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs include Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies; shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies; and carbonate shoal, shelf and reef facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary. Hydrocarbon

  2. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-02-05

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and the determination of the tectonic and depositional histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin. In the first three (3) to six (6) months of Year 1, the research focus is on data compilation and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the tectonic and depositional histories of the basin. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule. The principal objectives of the project are to develop through basin analysis and modeling the concept that petroleum systems acting in a basin can be identified through basin modeling and to demonstrate that the information and analysis resulting from characterizing and modeling of these petroleum systems in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin can be used in providing a more reliable and advanced approach for targeting stratigraphic traps and specific reservoir facies within a geologic system and in providing a refined assessment of undiscovered and underdeveloped reservoirs and associated oil and gas resources.

  3. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2006-02-28

    The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project is basin modeling and petroleum system identification, comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. In the first six (6) months of Year 3, the research focus is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule. The principal objectives of the project are to develop through basin analysis and modeling the concept that petroleum systems acting in a basin can be identified through basin modeling and to demonstrate that the information and analysis resulting from characterizing and modeling of these petroleum systems in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin can be used in providing a more reliable and advanced approach for targeting stratigraphic traps and specific reservoir facies within a geologic system and in providing a refined assessment of undiscovered and underdeveloped reservoirs and associated oil and gas resources.

  4. Interior cavern conditions and salt fall potential

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, D.E.; Molecke, M.A.; Myers, R.E.

    1998-03-01

    A relatively large number of salt caverns are used for fluid hydrocarbon storage, including an extensive set of facilities in the Gulf Coast salt domes for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Program. Attention is focused on the SPR caverns because of available histories that detail events involving loss and damage of the hanging string casing. The total number of events is limited, making the database statistically sparse. The occurrence of the events is not evenly distributed, with some facilities, and some caverns, more susceptible than others. While not all of these events could be attributed to impacts from salt falls, many did show the evidence of such impacts. As a result, a study has been completed to analyze the potential for salt falls in the SPR storage caverns. In this process, it was also possible to deduce some of the cavern interior conditions. Storage caverns are very large systems in which many factors could possibly play a part in casing damage. In this study, all of the potentially important factors such as salt dome geology, operational details, and material characteristics were considered, with all being logically evaluated and most being determined as secondary in nature. As a result of the study, it appears that a principal factor in determining a propensity for casing damage from salt falls is the creep and fracture characteristics of salt in individual caverns. In addition the fracture depends strongly upon the concentration of impurity particles in the salt. Although direct observation of cavern conditions is not possible, the average impurity concentration and the accumulation of salt fall material can be determined. When this is done, there is a reasonable correlation between the propensity for a cavern to show casing damage events and accumulation of salt fall material. The accumulation volumes of salt fall material can be extremely large, indicating that only a few of the salt falls are large enough to cause impact damage.

  5. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, Ernest A.

    2003-02-06

    The project objectives are improving access to information for the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin by inventorying data files and records of the major information repositories in the region, making these inventories easily accessible in electronic format, increasing the amount of information available on domestic sedimentary basins through a comprehensive analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, and enhancing the understanding of the petroleum systems operating in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  6. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard; Ronald K. Zimmerman

    2005-05-10

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been data compilation and the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin and basin modeling and petroleum system identification. In the first nine (9) months of Year 2, the research focus was on the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories, and during the remainder of the year the emphasis has basin modeling and petroleum system identification. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, regional cross sections have been prepared, structure and isopach maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and related profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs are mainly Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies and Lower Cretaceous and Upper Cretaceous shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary

  7. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2005-03-31

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project is the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories and basin modeling and petroleum system identification of the North Louisiana Salt Basin. In the first six (6) to nine (9) months of Year 2, the research focus is on the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  8. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-11-05

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project is the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories and basin modeling and petroleum system identification of the North Louisiana Salt Basin. In the first six (6) to nine (9) months of Year 2, the research focus is on the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  9. Dry Creek salt dome, Mississippi Interior Salt basin

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, S.L.; Ericksen, R.L.

    1997-03-01

    Recent drilling of salt dome flanks in the Mississippi Salt basin has resulted in important new discoveries and the opening of a frontier play. This play is focused on gas/condensate reserves in several Cretaceous formations, most notably the Upper Cretaceous Eutaw and lower Tuscaloosa intervals and Lower Cretaceous Paluxy and Hosston formations. As many as eight domes have been drilled thus far; sandstones in the upper Hosston Formation comprise the primary target. Production has been as high as 3-5 Mcf and 500-1200 bbl of condensate per day, with estimated ultimate reserves in the range of 0.2 to 1.5 MBOE (million barrels oil equivalent) per well. As typified by discovery at Dry Creek salt dome, traps are related to faulting, unconformities, and updip loss of permeability. Previous drilling at Dry Creek, and in the basin generally, avoided the flank areas of most domes, due to geologic models that predicted latestage (Tertiary) piercement and breached accumulations. Recent data from Dry Creek and other productive domes suggest that growth was episodic and that piercement of Tertiary strata did not affect deeper reservoirs charged with hydrocarbons in the Late Cretaceous.

  10. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-11-11

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and the determination of the tectonic and depositional histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin. In the first three (3) to six (6) months of Year 1, the research focus is on data compilation and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the tectonic and depositional histories of the basin. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  11. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-09-11

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and the determination of the tectonic and depositional histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin. In the first three (3) to six (6) months of Year 1, the research focus is on data compilation and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the tectonic and depositional histories of the basin. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  12. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

    2005-08-01

    The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project is basin modeling and petroleum system identification, comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. In the first six (6) months of Year 3, the research focus is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  13. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2007-06-30

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of Phase 2 (Concept Demonstration) of the project is Mesozoic (Bossier) petroleum system characterization and modeling and refined resource assessment. The necessary software applications have been acquired to accomplish this work. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  14. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modelling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-09-30

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of Phase 2 (Concept Demonstration) of the project is Smackover petroleum system characterization and modeling. The necessary software applications have been acquired to accomplish this work. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  15. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-07-31

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of Phase 2 (Concept Demonstration) of the project is Smackover petroleum system characterization and modeling. The necessary software applications are in the process of being acquired to accomplish this work. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  16. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-12-31

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of Phase 2 (Concept Demonstration) of the project is Smackover petroleum system characterization and modeling. The necessary software applications have been acquired to accomplish this work. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  17. Basin Analysis of Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest Mancini

    2001-03-01

    Part 3 (Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation) objectives are to provide an analysis of the Smackover petroleum system in Years 4 and 5 of the project and to transfer effectively the research results to producers through workshops and topical reports. Work Accomplished (Year 5): Task 1 - Basin Flow - Basin flow modeling has been completed and the topical report has been submitted to the U.S. DOE for review. Task 2 - Petroleum Source Rocks - Work on the characterization of Smackover petroleum source rocks has been integrated into the basin flow model. The information on the source rocks is being prepared for inclusion in the final report. Task 3 - Petroleum Reservoirs - Work on the characterization of Smackover petroleum reservoirs continues. The cores to be described have been identified and many of the cores for the eastern and western parts of the basin have been described. Task 4 - Reservoir Diagenesis - Work on reservoir diagenesis continues. Samples from the cores selected for the reservoir characterization are being used for this task. Task 5 - Underdeveloped Reservoirs - Two underdeveloped Smackover reservoirs have been identified. They are the microbial reef and shoal reservoirs. Work Planned (Year 5): Task 1 - Basin Flow - This task has been completed and the topical report has been submitted to the U.S. DOE. Task 2 - Petroleum Source Rocks - Petroleum source rock information will continue to be prepared for the final report. Task 3 - Petroleum Reservoirs - Characterization of petroleum reservoirs will continue through core studies. Task 4 - Reservoir Diagenesis - Characterization of reservoir diagenesis will continue through petrographic analysis. Task 5 - Underdeveloped Reservoirs - Study of Smackover underdeveloped reservoirs will continue with focus on the microbial reef and shoal reservoirs.

  18. Maximum potential erosion and inundation of seven interior salt domes

    SciTech Connect

    Aronow, S.

    1982-08-01

    Seven interior salt domes have been evaluated in regard to erosion or inundation due to natural events. The most likely possibility of either event occurring would be associated with continental glaciation. The domes were evaluated based on maximum previous sea level changes due to glaciation and effects caused by melting of existing ice sheets. Results are listed for each of the seven domes. Past history indicates a likelihood of returning to a glacial period. The subsequent fall of sea level may cause regrading of streams in the area. A conservative evaluation of this phenomenon was performed and the results are reported.

  19. Propeller aircraft interior noise model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, L. D.; Wilby, E. G.; Wilby, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical model was developed to predict the interior noise of propeller-driven aircraft. The fuselage model is that of a cylinder with a structurally-integral floor. The cabin sidewall is stiffened by stringers and ring frames, and the floor by longitudinal beams. The cabin interior is covered with a sidewall treatments consisting of layers of porous material and an impervious trim septum. Representation of the propeller pressure field is utilized as input data in the form of the propeller noise signature at a series of locations on a grid over the fuselage structure. Results obtained from the analytical model are compared with test data measured by NASA in a scale model cylindrical fuselage excited by a model propeller.

  20. Crushed Salt Constitutive Model

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, G.D.

    1999-02-01

    The constitutive model used to describe the deformation of crushed salt is presented in this report. Two mechanisms -- dislocation creep and grain boundary diffusional pressure solution -- are combined to form the basis for the constitutive model governing the deformation of crushed salt. The constitutive model is generalized to represent three-dimensional states of stress. Upon complete consolidation, the crushed-salt model reproduces the Multimechanism Deformation (M-D) model typically used for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) host geological formation salt. New shear consolidation tests are combined with an existing database that includes hydrostatic consolidation and shear consolidation tests conducted on WIPP and southeastern New Mexico salt. Nonlinear least-squares model fitting to the database produced two sets of material parameter values for the model -- one for the shear consolidation tests and one for a combination of the shear and hydrostatic consolidation tests. Using the parameter values determined from the fitted database, the constitutive model is validated against constant strain-rate tests. Shaft seal problems are analyzed to demonstrate model-predicted consolidation of the shaft seal crushed-salt component. Based on the fitting statistics, the ability of the model to predict the test data, and the ability of the model to predict load paths and test data outside of the fitted database, the model appears to capture the creep consolidation behavior of crushed salt reasonably well.

  1. Bibliography, geophysical data locations, and well core listings for the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    To date, comprehensive basin analysis and petroleum system modeling studies have not been performed on any of the basins in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Of these basins, the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin has been selected for study because it is the most petroliferous basin in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, small- and medium-size companies are drilling the majority of the exploration wells. These companies do not have the resources to perform basin analysis or petroleum system modeling research studies nor do they have the resources to undertake elaborate information searches through the volumes of publicly available data at the universities, geological surveys, and regulatory agencies in the region. The Advanced Geologic Basin Analysis Program of the US Department of Energy provides an avenue for studying and evaluating sedimentary basins. This program is designed to improve the efficiency of the discovery of the nation`s remaining undiscovered oil resources by providing improved access to information available in the public domain and by increasing the amount of public information on domestic basins. This report provides the information obtained from Year 1 of this study of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin. The work during Year 1 focused on inventorying the data files and records of the major information repositories in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico and making these inventories easily accessible in an electronic format.

  2. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain, Final Report and Topical Reports 5-8 on Smackover Petroleum system and Underdevelopment Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, Ernest A.; Puckett, T. Markham; Parcell, William C.; Llinas, Juan Carlos; Kopaska-Merkel, David C.; Townsend, Roger N.

    2002-03-05

    The Smackover Formation, a major hydrocarbon-producing horizon in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin (MISB), conformably overlies the Norphlet Formation and is conformably overlain by the Buckner Anhydrite Member of the Haynesville Formation. The Norphlet-Smackover contact can be either gradational or abrupt. The thickness and lithofacies distribution of the Smackover Formation were controlled by the configuration of incipient paleotopography. The Smackover Formation has been subdivided into three informal members, referred to as the lower, middle and upper members.

  3. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest Mancini

    2000-12-31

    Part 3 (Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation) objectives are to provide an analysis of the Smackover petroleum system in Years 4 and 5 of the project and to transfer effectively the research results to producers through workshops and topical reports. Work Accomplished (Year 5): Task 1 - Basin Flow - Basin flow modeling has been completed and the modeling results are being interpreted for report writing (Table 1). Task 2 - Petroleum Source Rocks - Work on the characterization of Smackover petroleum source rocks has been integrated into the basin flow model. Task 3 - Petroleum Reservoirs - Work on the characterization of Smackover petroleum reservoirs continues. The cores to be described have been identified and many of the cores for the eastern part of the basin have been described. Task 4 - Reservoir Diagenesis - Work on reservoir diagenesis has been initiated. Samples from the cores selected for the reservoir characterization are being used for this task. Work Planned (Year 5): Task 1 - Basin Flow - The report on basin flow will be completed. Task 2 - Petroleum Source Rocks - Petroleum source rock data will be reviewed in light of the basin flow model results. Task 3 - Petroleum Reservoirs - Characterization of petroleum reservoirs will continue through core studies. Task 4 - Reservoir Diagenesis - Characterization of reservoir diagenesis will continue through petrographic analysis.

  4. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2005-10-28

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been petroleum system characterization and modeling. Understanding the burial, thermal maturation, and hydrocarbon expulsion histories of the strata in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas is important in hydrocarbon resource assessment. The underburden and overburden rocks in these basins and subbasins are a product of their rift-related geohistory. Petroleum source rock analysis and initial thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling indicated that an effective regional petroleum source rock in the onshore interior salt basins and subbasins, the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin, was Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. The initial modeling also indicated that hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and that hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Refined thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling and additional petroleum source rock analysis have confirmed that the major source rock in the onshore interior salt basins and subbasins is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Early to Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary.

  5. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

    2005-04-15

    The principal research effort for the first six months of Year 2 of the project has been petroleum system characterization. Understanding the burial and thermal maturation histories of the strata in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas is important in petroleum system characterization. The underburden and overburden rocks in these basins and subbasins are a product of their rift-related geohistory. Petroleum source rock analysis and thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling indicate that an effective regional petroleum source rock in the onshore interior salt basins, the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin, was the Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. The Upper Cretaceous Tuscaloosa shale was an effective local petroleum source rock in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and a possible local source bed in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion was initiated in the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion was initiated in the Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Reservoir rocks include Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary siliciclastic and carbonate strata. Seal rocks include Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary anhydrite and shale beds. Petroleum traps include structural and combination traps.

  6. Enceladus' Interior: A Liquid Circulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, Dennis L.; Johnson, Torrence; Lunine, Jonathan; Castillo-Rogez, Julie

    We are studying a model for Enceladus' interior in which the water, gas, dust and heat are supplied to the plumes by a relatively deeply circulating brine solution. Data indicates such a source for the erupting material. On the basis of ammonia in the plume gas Waite et al. [1] suggested that the jets might originate from a liquid water region under Enceladus' icy surface. Postberg et al. [2] noted that the presence of ". . . grains that are rich in sodium salts (0.5-2 percent by mass). . . can arise only if the plumes originate from liquid water." Waite et al. [1] also regard the some of the plume chemicals as evidence for interactions with an ice layer presumably overlying the liquid water reservoir. They suggest that this could be in the form of dissociation of clathrate hydrates [3]. Additionally, there is a large heat flow of more than 15 GW [4, 5] coming out of Enceladus' south polar region. We consider a model that brings heat and chemical species up to the surface from a reservoir or "ocean" located below the ice crust that may be many tens of kilometers thick. Water transits to the surface via vertical conduits. The Cassini INMS data suggest that the water has a relatively large gas content of order a few percent. As the water travels upward and the pressure is released, exolving gases form bubbles. Since the bubbly liquid is less dense than the ice, it moves upward. (This part of the model is a variant of the "Perrier Ocean" Europa model of Crawford and Stevenson [6]. A similar model was studied for Ganymede by Murchie and Head [7].) Postberg et al. [2] model the plume eruptions that result from the water, gases, salts, and other chemicals that our circulation model provides. In the near-surface reservoir feeding the plumes, bubbles reaching the surface of the water pop and throw a very fine spray. Some of these very small droplets of brine exit with the plume gas and provide the observed salt-rich dust particles [2]. Much of the water-borne heat is

  7. Sensor-based interior modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert, M.; Hoffman, R.; Johnson, A.; Osborn, J.

    1995-02-01

    Robots and remote systems will play crucial roles in future decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities. Many of these facilities, such as uranium enrichment plants, weapons assembly plants, research and production reactors, and fuel recycling facilities, are dormant; there is also an increasing number of commercial reactors whose useful lifetime is nearly over. To reduce worker exposure to radiation, occupational and other hazards associated with D&D tasks, robots will execute much of the work agenda. Traditional teleoperated systems rely on human understanding (based on information gathered by remote viewing cameras) of the work environment to safely control the remote equipment. However, removing the operator from the work site substantially reduces his efficiency and effectiveness. To approach the productivity of a human worker, tasks will be performed telerobotically, in which many aspects of task execution are delegated to robot controllers and other software. This paper describes a system that semi-automatically builds a virtual world for remote D&D operations by constructing 3-D models of a robot`s work environment. Planar and quadric surface representations of objects typically found in nuclear facilities are generated from laser rangefinder data with a minimum of human interaction. The surface representations are then incorporated into a task space model that can be viewed and analyzed by the operator, accessed by motion planning and robot safeguarding algorithms, and ultimately used by the operator to instruct the robot at a level much higher than teleoperation.

  8. Recent advances in modeling stellar interiors (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, Joyce Ann

    2010-01-01

    Advances in stellar interior modeling are being driven by new data from large-scale surveys and high-precision photometric and spectroscopic observations. Here we focus on single stars in normal evolutionary phases; we will not discuss the many advances in modeling star formation, interacting binaries, supernovae, or neutron stars. We review briefly: (1) updates to input physics of stellar models; (2) progress in two and three-dimensional evolution and hydrodynamic models; (3) insights from oscillation data used to infer stellar interior structure and validate model predictions (asteroseismology). We close by highlighting a few outstanding problems, e.g., the driving mechanisms for hybrid {gamma} Dor/{delta} Sct star pulsations, the cause of giant eruptions seen in luminous blue variables such as {eta} Car and P Cyg, and the solar abundance problem.

  9. INTERIOR MODELS OF URANUS AND NEPTUNE

    SciTech Connect

    Helled, Ravit; Schubert, Gerald; Anderson, John D.; Podolak, Morris E-mail: schubert@ucla.edu E-mail: morris@tau.ac.il

    2011-01-01

    'Empirical' models (pressure versus density) of Uranus and Neptune interiors constrained by the gravitational coefficients J{sub 2}, J{sub 4}, the planetary radii and masses, and Voyager solid-body rotation periods are presented. The empirical pressure-density profiles are then interpreted in terms of physical equations of state of hydrogen, helium, ice (H{sub 2}O), and rock (SiO{sub 2}) to test the physical plausibility of the models. The compositions of Uranus and Neptune are found to be similar with somewhat different distributions of the high-Z material. The big difference between the two planets is that Neptune requires a non-solar envelope, while Uranus is best matched with a solar composition envelope. Our analysis suggests that the heavier elements in both Uranus' and Neptune's interior might increase gradually toward the planetary centers. Indeed it is possible to fit the gravitational moments without sharp compositional transitions.

  10. Mars interior structure models from tidal measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivoldini, A.; Verhoeven, O.; van Hoolst, T.; Mocquet, A.; Dehant, V.

    2005-12-01

    Besides the mean planetary density, obtained from the planet's mass and size, the polar moment of inertia (MOI) gives important constraints on the interior structure of a planet. Nevertheless, these constraints are not sufficient for precisely determining the state and size of the planet's core, nor do they provide strong constraints on mantle composition and temperature. On the other hand, the additional use of the latest estimates of mean crustal density and thickness and an assumed bulk Fe/Si ratio for Mars (e.g. chondritic with Fe/Si=1.7) can strongly reduce the set of interior models, which are parameterized in terms of core composition and size, and of mantle composition and temperature. Unfortunately, the origin of Mars and the value of the Martian Fe/Si bulk ratio are not well known. We therefore propose to complement the MOI and the mean density with the latest estimate of the tidal Love number k2 in order to better constrain the interior structure and composition. We consider spherically symmetric models of Mars, consisting of a crust parameterized by mean density and thickness, a mantle with different mineralogical compositions and temperature profiles, and a core parameterized by size, composition (Fe, Ni and FeS), and state (liquid, solid or both). For the presently known values, with their associated uncertainties, of the mean density, the MOI and the Love umber k2, we calculate sets of possible interior models in terms of the above arameterization and compute the bulk Fe/Si ratios.

  11. A Polytropic Model of the Solar Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo-Mozo, B.; Buitrago Casas, J. C.; Martinez Oliveros, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we considered different processes in the solar interior that can be described using polytropes. This assumption implies a radially variable continuous polytropic exponent, that is, our model is a multi-polytropic model of the Sun. We derived the equations for this type of multi-polytropic structure and solved them using numerical integration methods. Both, the exponent and proportionality factor in the polytropic model equation of state were taken as input functions, for each spherical layer in the solar interior. Using the spatial distribution of the density and pressure terms from a solar standard model (SSM) we obtained the variable with depth polytropic exponents. We found that the radial distribution of these exponents show four different zones. These can be interpreted as a first region where the energy transport is controlled by radiation. The second region is defined by a sudden change in the polytropic index, which can be associated to the tachocline, followed by a region with a nearly constant polytropic index which suits well a convective zone. Finally, the exponent decreases radially at the photosphere.

  12. Mobile Modelling for Crowdsourcing Building Interior Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosser, J.; Morley, J.; Jackson, M.

    2012-06-01

    Indoor spatial data forms an important foundation to many ubiquitous computing applications. It gives context to users operating location-based applications, provides an important source of documentation of buildings and can be of value to computer systems where an understanding of environment is required. Unlike external geographic spaces, no centralised body or agency is charged with collecting or maintaining such information. Widespread deployment of mobile devices provides a potential tool that would allow rapid model capture and update by a building's users. Here we introduce some of the issues involved in volunteering building interior data and outline a simple mobile tool for capture of indoor models. The nature of indoor data is inherently private; however in-depth analysis of this issue and legal considerations are not discussed in detail here.

  13. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

    2004-10-28

    The objectives of the study are: to perform resource assessment of the in-place deep (>15,000 ft) natural gas resource of the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling and to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the in-place deep gas resource that is potentially recoverable and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and petroleum system identification. The research focus for the first nine (9) months of Year 1 is on data compilation and for the remainder of the year the emphasis is on petroleum system identification.

  14. Interior Models for Saturn's Moon Titan Consistent with Cassini Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo-Rogez, Julie

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrate that a model of Titan's interior with a core dominated by hydrated silicates can explain three major geophysical constraints available for this body: the mean moment of inertia (revised values currently in the literature or being published), tidal Love number k2, both of which were inferred from Cassini radio science observations, as well as indirect estimate of the dissipation factor inferred from Titan's orbital properties. Other models in which ice has remained partially mixed with silicates as a consequence of limited early heating fail to explain the dissipation factor. A core hydrated in silicate is difficult to maintain over the long term and may be in the process of dehydrating, which may involve significant transfer of water enriched in salts from the core to the ocean and destabilize the high-pressure ice layer. We will present possible observations that could help test this model with future observations to be obtained by the Cassini Orbiter. Acknowledgements: This work has been carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  15. Effects of lowering interior canal stages on salt-water intrusion into the shallow aquifer in Southeast Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Land, Larry F.

    1975-01-01

    Land in southeast Palm Beach County is undergoing a large-scale change in use, from agricultural to residential. To accommodate residential use, a proposal has been made by developers to the Board of the Lake Worth Drainage District to lower the canal stages in the interior part of the area undergoing change. This report documents one of the possible effects of such lowering. Of particular interest to the Board was whether the lower canal stages would cause an increase in salt-water intrusion into the shallow aquifer along the coast. The two main tools used in the investigation were a digital model for aquifer evaluation and an analytical technique for predicting the movement of the salt-water front in response to a change of ground-water flow into the ocean. The method of investigation consisted of developing a digital ground-water flow model for three east-west test strips. They pass through the northern half of municipal well fields in Lake Worth, Delray Beach, and Boca Raton. The strips were first modeled with no change in interior canal stages. Then they were modeled with a change in canal stages of 2 to 4 feet (0.6 to 1.6 metres). Also, two land development schemes were tested. One was for a continuation of the present level of land development, simulated by continuing the present pumpage rates. The second scheme was for land development to continue until the maximum allowable densities were reached, simulated by increasing the pumping rates. The results of the test runs for an east-west strip through Lake Worth show that lowering part of the interior canal water levels 3 feet (1.0 metre), as done in 1961, does not affect the aquifer head or salt-water intrusion along the coastal area of Lake Worth. As a result, no effect in the coastal area would be expected as a result of canal stage lowering in other, interior parts of the study area. Results from the other test runs show that lowering interior canal water levels by as much as 4 feet (1.2 metres) would

  16. A universal salt model based on under-ground precipitation of solid salts due to supercritical water `out-salting'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueslåtten, H.; Hovland, M. T.

    2010-12-01

    shallow magma-chamber causes a sufficiently high heat-flow to drive a convection cell of seawater. The model shows that salt precipitates along the flow lines within the supercritical region (Hovland et al., 2006). During the various stages of planet Mars’ development, it must be inferred that zones with very high heat-flow also existed there. This meant that water (brine) confined in the crust of Mars was mobilized in a convective manner and would pass into the supercritical water zone during the down-going leg (the recharge leg) of the convective cell. The zones with supercritical out-salting would require accommodation space for large masses of solid salt, as modeled in the Red Sea analogy. However, as the accommodation space for the solid salt fills up, it will pile up and force its way upwards to form large, perhaps layered anticlines, as seen in the Hebes Mensa area of Mars and at numerous locations on Earth, including the Red Sea. Thus, we offer a universal ‘hydrothermal salt model’, which would be viable on all planets with free water in their interiors or on their surfaces, including Mars and Earth. Hovland, et al., 2006. Salt formation by supercritical seawater and submerged boiling. Marine and Petrol. Geol. 23, 855-69

  17. 48. MISSISSIPPI BASIN MODEL AT CLINTON SUBSTATION. INTERIOR OF CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. MISSISSIPPI BASIN MODEL AT CLINTON SUBSTATION. INTERIOR OF CONTROL BUILDING, SHOWING TWO ROWS OF STEVENS STAGE RECORDERS AND INFLOW PROGRAMMERS. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  18. 21. INTERIOR, DOUBLE STAIRWAY LEADING TO MODEL HALL, DETAIL OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. INTERIOR, DOUBLE STAIRWAY LEADING TO MODEL HALL, DETAIL OF ONE FLIGHT (5 x 7 negative; 8 x 10 print) - Patent Office Building, Bounded by Seventh, Ninth, F & G Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  19. Evaluation of constitutive models for crushed salt

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, G.D.; Loken, M.C. [RE Hurtado, L.D.; Hansen, F.D.

    1996-05-01

    Three constitutive models are recommended as candidates for describing the deformation of crushed salt. These models are generalized to three-dimensional states of stress to include the effects of mean and deviatoric stress and modified to include effects of temperature, grain size, and moisture content. A database including hydrostatic consolidation and shear consolidation tests conducted on Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and southeastern New Mexico salt is used to determine material parameters for the models. To evaluate the capability of the models, parameter values obtained from fitting the complete database are used to predict the individual tests. Finite element calculations of a WIPP shaft with emplaced crushed salt demonstrate the model predictions.

  20. A numerical model for ETC gun interior ballistics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, C.-C.; Phillips, G. T.; Su, F. Y.

    1993-01-01

    A multidimensional, transient, fluid dynamic model, BISON, has been developed to study the interior ballistic processes in an electrothermal chemical (ETC) gun. The model solves the full Navier-Stokes equations and uses a high-order numerical scheme to integrate the governing equations. Most of the important physical processes pertinent to ETC gun interior ballistics, including multiphase flow, chemical reactions, and plasma dynamics, are incorporated. Examples of applications to the study of ETC gun phenomena, such as plasma jet penetration and real gun design component analyses, are discussed. The modeling results not only compare well with experimental data, but also provide a better understanding of interior ballistics physics. The multidimensional BISON model is useful for ETC simulations.

  1. An improved source model for aircraft interior noise studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahan, J. R.; Fuller, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    There is concern that advanced turboprop engines currently being developed may produce excessive aircraft cabin noise levels. This concern has stimulated renewed interest in developing aircraft interior noise reduction methods that do not significantly increase take off weight. An existing analytical model for noise transmission into aircraft cabins was utilized to investigate the behavior of an improved propeller source model for use in aircraft interior noise studies. The new source model, a virtually rotating dipole, is shown to adequately match measured fuselage sound pressure distributions, including the correct phase relationships, for published data. The virtually rotating dipole is used to study the sensitivity of synchrophasing effectiveness to the fuselage sound pressure trace velocity distribution. Results of calculations are presented which reveal the importance of correctly modeling the surface pressure phase relations in synchrophasing and other aircraft interior noise studies.

  2. Interior models of Mercury with equatorial ellipticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumberry, M.

    2012-09-01

    The combination of planetary rotation observations and gravity field measurements by the MESSENGER spacecraft can be used to constrain the internal structure of Mercury. A recently published model suggests a mean mantle density of ρm = 3650 ± 225 kg m-3, substantially larger than that expected of a silicate mantle (3300 kg m-3) and possibly hinting at the presence of an FeS-rich layer at the base of the mantle. Here, we show that a large ρm is only required if the core-mantle boundary (CMB) of the planet is assumed axially-symmetric. An equatorial ellipticity of CMB of the order of 2 · 10-5 allows to satisfy gravity and rotation constraints with a mean mantle density typical of silicate material. Possible origin of such topography include past mantle convection, aspherical planetary shrinking, remnant tidal deformation, or a combination thereof.

  3. RESOURCE ASSESSMENT OF THE IN-PLACE AND POTENTIALLY RECOVERABLE DEEP NATURAL GAS RESOURCE OF THE ONSHORE INTERIOR SALT BASINS, NORTH CENTRAL AND NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-04-16

    The University of Alabama and Louisiana State University have undertaken a cooperative 3-year, advanced subsurface methodology resource assessment project, involving petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling, to facilitate exploration for a potential major source of natural gas that is deeply buried (below 15,000 feet) in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas. The project is designed to assist in the formulation of advanced exploration strategies for funding and maximizing the recovery from deep natural gas domestic resources at reduced costs and risks and with minimum impact. The results of the project should serve to enhance exploration efforts by domestic companies in their search for new petroleum resources, especially those deeply buried (below 15,000 feet) natural gas resources, and should support the domestic industry's endeavor to provide an increase in reliable and affordable supplies of fossil fuels. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and petroleum system identification. The research focus for the first nine (9) months of Year 1 is on data compilation and for the remainder of the year the emphasis is on petroleum system identification. The objectives of the study are: to perform resource assessment of the in-place deep (>15,000 ft) natural gas resource of the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling and to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the in-place deep gas resource that is potentially recoverable and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource. The project objectives will be achieved through a 3-year effort. First, emphasis is on petroleum system identification and characterization in the North

  4. CIDGA - Coupling of Interior Dynamic models with Global Atmosphere models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, Lena; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Breuer, Doris

    2010-05-01

    Atmosphere temperatures and in particular the surface temperatures mostly depend on the solar heat flux and the atmospheric composition. The latter can be influenced by interior processes of the planet, i.e. volcanism that releases greenhouse gases such as H2O, CO2 and methane into the atmosphere and plate tectonics through which atmospheric CO2 is recycled via carbonates into the mantle. An increasing concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere results in an increase of the surface temperature. Changes in the surface temperature on the other hand may influence the cooling behaviour of the planet and hence influence its volcanic activity [Phillips et al., 2001]. This feedback relation between mantle convection and atmosphere is not very well understood, since until now mostly either the interior dynamic of a planet or its atmosphere was investigated separately. 2D or 3D mantle convection models to the authors' knowledge haven't been coupled to the atmosphere so far. We have used the 3D spherical simulation code GAIA [Hüttig et al., 2008] including partial melt production and coupled it with the atmosphere module CIDGA using a gray greenhouse model for varying H2O concentrations. This way, not only the influence of mantle dynamics on the atmosphere can be investigated, but also the recoupling effect, that the surface temperature has on the mantle dynamics. So far, we consider one-plate planets without crustal and thus volatile recycling. Phillips et al. [2001] already investigated the coupling effect of the surface temperature on mantle dynamics by using simple parameterized convection models for Venus. In their model a positive feedback mechanism has been observed, i.e., an increase of the surface temperature leads to an increase of partial melt and hence an increase of atmosphere density and surface temperature. Applying our model to Venus, we show that an increase of surface temperature leads not only to an increase of partial melt in the mantle; it also

  5. Aptian ‘Shale Gas’ Prospectivity in the Downdip Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Gulf Coast, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackley, Paul C.; Valentine, Brett J.; Enomoto, Catherine B.; Lohr, Celeste D.; Scott, Krystina R.; Dulong, Frank T.; Bove, Alana M.

    2016-01-01

    (41 aqueous measurements from calcite cements in one argillaceous James Limestone sample) indicates homogenization temperatures (Th) of 120-135°C, consistent with present-day bottom-hole conditions and measured bitumen Ro values towards the western end of the MSB. Downdip in the central MSB, microthermometry (26 aqueous measurements from quartz dust rims in one Paluxy sandstone sample) and measured bitumen Ro values indicate maximum temperatures may have been significantly higher (~25°C) than present-day conditions. High inclusion salinities (15-25 wt.% salt) at both locations suggest interaction of pore fluids with evaporites. Mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) analyses (n=3) indicate porosity ranges 1.3-2.1% and permeability 0.006-0.02 µD for Pine Island and Rodessa shales. Overall, results from this work indicate generally poor ‘shale gas’ prospectivity compared to other shale reservoirs based primarily on depth, low organic content, low porosity, and high clay content. However, thickness and thermal maturity are appropriate, moderate reservoir pressures are present, and petroleum systems modelling by others has indicated high undiscovered gas potential for the basin as a whole.

  6. Precipitates/Salts Model Sensitivity Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    P. Mariner

    2001-12-20

    The objective and scope of this calculation is to assist Performance Assessment Operations and the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Department in modeling the geochemical effects of evaporation on potential seepage waters within a potential repository drift. This work is developed and documented using procedure AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'', in support of ''Technical Work Plan For Engineered Barrier System Department Modeling and Testing FY 02 Work Activities'' (BSC 2001a). The specific objective of this calculation is to examine the sensitivity and uncertainties of the Precipitates/Salts model. The Precipitates/Salts model is documented in an Analysis/Model Report (AMR), ''In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Analysis'' (BSC 2001b). The calculation in the current document examines the effects of starting water composition, mineral suppressions, and the fugacity of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) on the chemical evolution of water in the drift.

  7. Crushed-salt constitutive model update

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, G.D.; Loken, M.C.; Mellegard, K.D.

    1998-01-01

    Modifications to the constitutive model used to describe the deformation of crushed salt are presented in this report. Two mechanisms--dislocation creep and grain boundary diffusional pressure solutioning--defined previously but used separately are combined to form the basis for the constitutive model governing the deformation of crushed salt. The constitutive model is generalized to represent three-dimensional states of stress. New creep consolidation tests are combined with an existing database that includes hydrostatic consolidation and shear consolidation tests conducted on Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and southeastern New Mexico salt to determine material parameters for the constitutive model. Nonlinear least-squares model fitting to data from the shear consolidation tests and a combination of the shear and hydrostatic consolidation tests produced two sets of material parameter values for the model. The change in material parameter values from test group to test group indicates the empirical nature of the model but demonstrates improvement over earlier work with the previous models. Key improvements are the ability to capture lateral strain reversal and better resolve parameter values. To demonstrate the predictive capability of the model, each parameter value set was used to predict each of the tests in the database. Based on the fitting statistics and the ability of the model to predict the test data, the model appears to capture the creep consolidation behavior of crushed salt quite well.

  8. Mesoscale modeling of polyelectrolyte brushes with salt.

    PubMed

    Ibergay, Cyrille; Malfreyt, Patrice; Tildesley, Dominic J

    2010-06-01

    We report dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations of a polyelectrolyte brush under athermal solvent conditions. The electrostatic interactions are calculated using the particle-particle particle-mesh (PPPM) method with charges distributed over the particles. The polymer beads, counterions, co-ions, and solvent particles are modeled explicitly. The DPD simulations show a dependence of the brush height on the grafting density and the charge fraction that is typical of the nonlinear osmotic brush regime. We report the effect of the addition of salt on the structural properties of the brush. In the case of a polyelectrolyte brush with a high surface coverage, the simulations reproduce the transition between the nonlinear osmotic brush regime where the thickness of the brush is independent of the salt concentration and the salted regime where the brush height decreases weakly with the salt concentration. PMID:20455593

  9. Geological evaluation of Gulf Coast salt domes: overall assessment of the Gulf Interior Region

    SciTech Connect

    1981-10-01

    The three major phases in site characterization and selection are regional studies, area studies, and location studies. This report characterizes regional geologic aspects of the Gulf Coast salt dome basins. It includes general information from published sources on the regional geology; the tectonic, domal, and hydrologic stability; and a brief description the salt domes to be investigated. After a screening exercise, eight domes were chosen for further characterization: Keechi, Oakwood, and Palestine Domes in Texas; Vacherie and Rayburn's domes in North Louisiana; and Cypress Creek and Richton domes in Mississippi. A general description of each, maps of the location, property ownership, and surface geology, and a geologic cross section were presented for each dome.

  10. Chapter 5. Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources-Lower Cretaceous Travis Peak and Hosston formations, Jurassic Smackover interior salt basins total petroleum system, in the East Texas basin and Louisiana-Mississippi salt basins provinces.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyman, T.S.; Condon, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    The petroleum assessment of the Travis Peak and Hosston Formations was conducted by using a total petroleum system model. A total petroleum system includes all of the important elements of a hydrocarbon fluid system needed to develop oil and gas accumulations, including source and reservoir rocks, hydrocarbon generation, migration, traps and seals, and undiscovered accumulations. A total petroleum system is mappable and may include one or more assessment units. For each assessment unit, reservoir rocks contain similar geology, exploration characteristics, and risk. The Jurassic Smackover Interior Salt Basins Total Petroleum System is defined for this assessment to include (1) Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates and calcareous shales and organic-rich shales of the Upper Jurassic Bossier Shale of the Cotton Valley Group and (2) Lower Cretaceous Travis Peak and Hosston Formations. The Jurassic Smackover Interior Salt Basins Total Petroleum System includes three conventional Travis Peak-Hosston assessment units: Travis Peak-Hosston Gas and Oil (AU 50490205), Travis Peak-Hosston Updip Oil (AU 50490206), and Travis Peak-Hosston Hypothetical Updip Oil (AU 50490207). A fourth assessment unit, the Hosston Hypothetical Slope-Basin Gas Assessment Unit, was named and numbered (AU 50490208) but not geologically defined or quantitatively assessed owing to a lack of data. Together, assessment units 50490205 to 50490207 are estimated to contain a mean undiscovered conventional resource of 29 million barrels of oil, 1,136 billion cubic feet of gas, and 22 million barrels of natural gas liquids.

  11. Incorporation of Helium Demixing in Interior Structure Models of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Bob; Stanley, Sabine; Valencia, Diana

    2015-04-01

    Experiments and ab initio calculations of hydrogen-helium mixtures predict a phase separation at pressure-temperature conditions relevant to Saturn's interior. At depths where this occurs, droplets of helium form out of the mixture and sink towards the deep interiors where it re-mixes again, thereby depleting the helium above the layer over time while enriching the concentration below the layer. In dynamo modelling, the axisymmetric nature of Saturn's magnetic field is so far best explained by the inclusion of a stably stratified layer just below the depth at which hydrogen metallizes (approximately 0.65RS). Stable stratification at that depth could occur if the compositional gradients produced by the helium rain process described above is great enough to suppress convection in the de-mixing layers. Thus, we first developed a range of interior structure models consistent with available constraints of the gravity field and atmospheric composition. The hydrogen-helium de-mixing curve was then incorporated in calculations of some of these models to assess its feasibility in compositionally stratifying the top of the dynamo source region. We found that when helium rain is taken into account, a stably stratified layer approximately 0.1 - 0.15RS in thickness can exist atop the dynamo source region, consistent with thicknesses needed in dynamo models to axisymmetrize the observable magnetic field. Furthermore, inertial gravity waves could be excited in such thick stably stratified regions. These may be detectable by asteroseismology techniques, or by analysis of wave modes' gravitational interaction with Saturn's ring particles. Thus, profiles of sound speed and Brunt-Vaisala frequencies were also calculated for all of the interior structures models studied to be used for comparison with possible seismic studies in the future.

  12. Final report on decommissioning boreholes and wellsite restoration, Gulf Coast Interior Salt Domes of Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    In 1978, eight salt domes in Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi were identified for study as potential locations for a nuclear waste repository as part of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program. Three domes were selected in Mississippi for ``area characterization`` phase study as follows: Lampton Dome near Columbia, Cypress Creek Dome near New Augusta, and Richton Dome near Richton. The purpose of the studies was to acquire geologic and geohydrologic information from shallow and deep drilling investigations to enable selection of sites suitable for more intensive study. Eleven deep well sites were selected for multiple-well installations to acquire information on the lithologic and hydraulic properties of regional aquifers. In 1986, the Gulf Coast salt domes were eliminated from further consideration for repository development by the selection of three candidate sites in other regions of the country. In 1987, well plugging and restoration of these deferred sites became a closeout activity. The primary objectives of this activity are to plug and abandon all wells and boreholes in accordance with state regulations, restore all drilling sites to as near original condition as feasible, and convey to landowners any wells on their property that they choose to maintain. This report describes the activities undertaken to accomplish these objectives, as outlines in Activity Plan 1--2, ``Activity Plan for Well Plugging and Site Restoration of Test Hole Sites in Mississippi.``

  13. Propeller aircraft interior noise model: User's manual for computer program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilby, E. G.; Pope, L. D.

    1985-01-01

    A computer program entitled PAIN (Propeller Aircraft Interior Noise) has been developed to permit calculation of the sound levels in the cabin of a propeller-driven airplane. The fuselage is modeled as a cylinder with a structurally integral floor, the cabin sidewall and floor being stiffened by ring frames, stringers and floor beams of arbitrary configurations. The cabin interior is covered with acoustic treatment and trim. The propeller noise consists of a series of tones at harmonics of the blade passage frequency. Input data required by the program include the mechanical and acoustical properties of the fuselage structure and sidewall trim. Also, the precise propeller noise signature must be defined on a grid that lies in the fuselage skin. The propeller data are generated with a propeller noise prediction program such as the NASA Langley ANOPP program. The program PAIN permits the calculation of the space-average interior sound levels for the first ten harmonics of a propeller rotating alongside the fuselage. User instructions for PAIN are given in the report. Development of the analytical model is presented in NASA CR 3813.

  14. Propeller aircraft interior noise model utilization study and validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, L. D.

    1984-01-01

    Utilization and validation of a computer program designed for aircraft interior noise prediction is considered. The program, entitled PAIN (an acronym for Propeller Aircraft Interior Noise), permits (in theory) predictions of sound levels inside propeller driven aircraft arising from sidewall transmission. The objective of the work reported was to determine the practicality of making predictions for various airplanes and the extent of the program's capabilities. The ultimate purpose was to discern the quality of predictions for tonal levels inside an aircraft occurring at the propeller blade passage frequency and its harmonics. The effort involved three tasks: (1) program validation through comparisons of predictions with scale-model test results; (2) development of utilization schemes for large (full scale) fuselages; and (3) validation through comparisons of predictions with measurements taken in flight tests on a turboprop aircraft. Findings should enable future users of the program to efficiently undertake and correctly interpret predictions.

  15. Propeller aircraft interior noise model utilization study and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, L. D.

    1984-09-01

    Utilization and validation of a computer program designed for aircraft interior noise prediction is considered. The program, entitled PAIN (an acronym for Propeller Aircraft Interior Noise), permits (in theory) predictions of sound levels inside propeller driven aircraft arising from sidewall transmission. The objective of the work reported was to determine the practicality of making predictions for various airplanes and the extent of the program's capabilities. The ultimate purpose was to discern the quality of predictions for tonal levels inside an aircraft occurring at the propeller blade passage frequency and its harmonics. The effort involved three tasks: (1) program validation through comparisons of predictions with scale-model test results; (2) development of utilization schemes for large (full scale) fuselages; and (3) validation through comparisons of predictions with measurements taken in flight tests on a turboprop aircraft. Findings should enable future users of the program to efficiently undertake and correctly interpret predictions.

  16. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-09-30

    The objectives of the study were: (1) to perform resource assessment of the thermogenic gas resources in deeply buried (>15,000 ft) natural gas reservoirs of the onshore interior salt basins of the north central and northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling; and (2) to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the deep thermogenic gas resource that is available for potential recovery and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential for this thermogenic gas resource. Petroleum source rock analysis and petroleum system characterization and modeling, including thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling, have shown that the Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation served as the regional petroleum source rock in the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Thus, the estimates of the total hydrocarbons, oil, and gas generated and expelled are based on the assumption that the Smackover Formation is the main petroleum source rock in these basins and subbasins. The estimate of the total hydrocarbons generated for the North Louisiana Salt Basin in this study using a petroleum system approach compares favorably with the total volume of hydrocarbons generated published by Zimmermann (1999). In this study, the estimate is 2,870 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated using the method of Schmoker (1994), and the estimate is 2,640 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated using the Platte River software application. The estimate of Zimmermann (1999) is 2,000 to 2,500 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated. The estimate of gas generated for this basin is 6,400 TCF using the Platte River software application, and 12,800 TCF using the method of Schmoker (1994). Barnaby (2006) estimated that the total gas volume generated for this basin ranges from 4,000 to 8,000 TCF. Seventy

  17. Combined Grammar for the Modeling of Building Interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, S.; Peter, M.; Fritsch, D.; Philipp, D.; Baier, P.; Dibak, C.

    2013-11-01

    As spatial grammars have proven successful and efficient to deliver LOD3 models, the next challenge is their extension to indoor applications, leading to LOD4 models. Therefore, a combined indoor grammar for the automatic generation of indoor models from erroneous and incomplete observation data is presented. In building interiors where inaccurate observation data is available, the grammar can be used to make the reconstruction process robust, and verify the reconstructed geometries. In unobserved building interiors, the grammar can generate hypotheses about possible indoor geometries matching the style of the rest of the building. The grammar combines concepts from L-systems and split grammars. It is designed in such way that it can be derived from observation data fully automatically. Thus, manual predefinitions of the grammar rules usually required to tune the grammar to a specific building style, become obsolete. The potential benefit of using our grammar as support for indoor modeling is evaluated based on an example where the grammar has been applied to automatically generate an indoor model from erroneous and incomplete traces gathered by foot-mounted MEMS/IMU positioning systems.

  18. Computation of Jupiter interior models from gravitational inversion theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, W. B.; Horedt, G. P.

    1983-01-01

    Spacecraft measurements of Jupiter have provided the mass, standard pressure level radius, rotation law, internal mass distribution multipole moments, and internal composition and temperature distribution constraints, for the present implementation of a method for deriving planetary interior models that exactly satisfy a set of N gravitational constraints by means of appropriate iteration. The models are not forced to fit the more indirectly derived constraints, which are instead used as conistency checks. In the case of an He mass fraction in the envelope Y of 0.2, the inferred pressure at a mass density of about 0.2 g/cu cm is about a factor of 2 higher than would be indicated by experimental H compression data in the relevant pressure range of 100,000 to one million bar. The inferred pressure distribution is in better agreement with the shock data for a nominal Y value of 0.3 + or - 0.05.

  19. Numerical modeling of convection in the interiors of giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evonuk, Martha

    Thermal convection in the deep interiors of giant planets is simulated to help explain observations of surface winds and predict interior behavior. Using two- and three-dimensional hydro-codes, approximations and assumptions commonly made while simulating giant planets are examined. Two-dimensional simulations show that fluid behavior in giant planets cannot be studied properly unless the vast change in density with depth experienced in a giant planet is taken into consideration. Including a density stratification results in asymmetric scales of motion (smaller scales in the less dense regions), a preferential weighting of the mean properties of the fluid (such as entropy) to that of the denser regions, and for rotating fluids, a very important source of vorticity generation which fuels the formation of zonal flow structures at the surface and at depth. Currently the majority of codes used in the planetary modeling community employ the Boussinesq approximation, which assumes a constant density background profile, a poor approximation for a giant planet. Core size and rotation rate also play important roles in the interior fluid patterns, as rotation acts to suppress convection and to drive shear flow while larger cores acts to impede flow. At low rotation rates, simulations of planets that include small solid cores for numerical reasons may be poor approximations for planets without solid inner cores. Two-dimensional simulations provide valuable insights, yet there are many aspects of giant planets that need to be explore in three dimensions. Three-dimensional finite-volume simulations of a Jupiter- like planet with no core generate surface zonal flow patterns similar to previous spectral simulations that include large cores. This result emphasizes that it is increased resolution and Rayleigh number in conjunction with the density stratification that allows the formation of multiple high latitude jets in a planetary body, not the inclusion of a large non

  20. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2006-04-26

    The principal research effort for the first half of Year 3 of the project has been resource assessment. Emphasis has been on estimating the total volume of hydrocarbons generated and the potential amount of this resource that is classified as deep (>15,000 ft) gas in the North Louisiana Salt Basin, the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, the Manila Subbasin and the Conecuh Subbasin. The amount of this resource that has been expelled, migrated and entrapped is also the focus of the first half of Year 3 of this study.

  1. Phytotoxicity of salt and plant salt uptake: Modeling ecohydrological feedback mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Rasmussen, Nikolaj F.; Feificova, Dagmar; Trapp, Stefan

    2008-04-01

    A new model of phytotoxicity of salt and plant salt uptake is presented and is coupled to an existing three-dimensional groundwater simulation model. The implementation of phytotoxicity and salt uptake relationships is based on experimental findings from willow trees grown in hydroponic solution. The data confirm an s-shaped phytotoxicity relationship as found in previous studies. Uptake data were explained assuming steady state salt concentration in plant roots, passive salt transport into the roots, and active enzymatic removal of salt from plant roots. On the one hand, transpiration strongly depends on groundwater salinity (phytotoxicity); on the other hand, transpiration significantly changes the groundwater salinity (uptake). This feedback loop generates interesting dynamic phenomena in hydrological systems that are dominated by transpiration and are influenced by significant salinity gradients. Generic simulations are performed for the Okavango island system and are shown to reproduce essential phenomena observed in nature.

  2. INVESTIGATING SUPERCONDUCTIVITY IN NEUTRON STAR INTERIORS WITH GLITCH MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Haskell, B.; Pizzochero, P. M.; Seveso, S.

    2013-02-20

    The high-density interior of a neutron star is expected to contain superconducting protons and superfluid neutrons. Theoretical estimates suggest that the protons will form a type II superconductor in which the stellar magnetic field is carried by flux tubes. The strong interaction between the flux tubes and the neutron rotational vortices could lead to strong ''pinning'', i.e., vortex motion could be impeded. This has important implications especially for pulsar glitch models as it would lead to a large part of the vorticity of the star being decoupled from the ''normal'' component to which the electromagnetic emission is locked. In this Letter, we explore the consequences of strong pinning in the core on the ''snowplow'' model for pulsar glitches, making use of realistic equations of state and relativistic background models for the neutron star. We find that, in general, a large fraction of the pinned vorticity in the core is not compatible with observations of giant glitches in the Vela pulsar. Thus, the conclusion is that either most of the core is in a type I superconducting state or the interaction between vortices and flux tubes is weaker than previously assumed.

  3. Interior Models and Gravity Field of Jupiter's Moon Amalthea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinwurm, G.; Weber, R.

    2003-12-01

    Before its final plunge into Jupiter in September 2003, GALILEO made a last visit to Jupiters moon Amalthea. This final flyby of the spacecrafts successful mission occurred on November 5, 2002. In order to analyse the spacecraft data with respect to Amaltheas gravity field, interior models of the moon had to be provided. The method used for this approach is based on the numerical integration of infinitesimal volume elements, which are calculated by the scale factors of a three-axial ellipsoid (elliptic coordinates). To derive the gravity field coefficients of the body, the second method of Neumann was applied. Based on the spacecraft trajectory data provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, GALILEOs velocity perturbations at closest approach could be calculated. We have derived the harmonic coefficients of Amaltheas gravity field up to degree and order six, for both homogeneous and reasonable heterogeneous cases. Based on these numbers we calculated the impact on the trajectory of GALILEO and compared it to existing Doppler data. Although no two-way Doppler-data was available during the flyby and the harmonic coefficients of the gravity field are buried in the one-way Doppler-noise, the calculated gravity field models of Amalthea can be a basis for further exploration of the Jupiter system. Furthermore, the model approach can be used for any planetary body.

  4. Models of a partially hydrated Titan interior with clathrate crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunine, J. I.; Castillo-Rogez, J.

    2012-04-01

    We present an updated model of the interior evolution of Titan over time, assuming the silicate core was hydrated early in Titan's history and is dehydrating over time. The original model presented in Castillo-Rogez and Lunine (2010) was motivated by a Cassini-derived moment of inertia (Iess et al., 2010) for Titan too large to be accommodated by classical fully differentiated models in which an anhydrous silicate core was overlain by a water ice (with possible perched ocean) mantle. Our model consisted of a silicate core still in the process of dehydrating today, a situation made possible by the leaching of radiogenic potassium from the silicates into the liquid water ocean. The crust of Titan was assumed to be pure water ice I. The model was consistent with the moment of inertia of Titan, but neglected the presence of large amounts of methane in the upper crust invoked to explain methane's persistence at present and through geologic time (Tobie et al. 2006). We have updated our model with such a feature. We have also improved our modeling with a better physical model for the dehydration of antigorite and other hydrated minerals. In particular our modeling now simulates heat advection resulting from water circulation (e.g., Seipold and Schilling 2003), rather than the purely conductive heat transfer regime assumed in the first version of our model. The modeling proceeds as in Castillo-Rogez and Lunine (2010), with the thermal conductivity of the methane clathrate crust rather than that of ice I. The former is several times lower than that of the latter, and the two have rather different temperature dependences (English and Tse, 2009). The crust turns out to have essentially no bearing on the temperature of the silicate core and hence the timing of dehydration, but it profoundly affects the thickness of the high-pressure ice layer beneath the ocean. Indeed, with the insulating methane clathrate crust, there must be a liquid water ocean beneath the methane clathrate

  5. Next step in Earth interior modeling for nutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehant, V.; Folgueira, M.; Puica, M.; Koot, L.; Van Hoolst, T.; Trinh, A.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate reference systems are important for many geophysical applications and satellite observations. It is therefore necessary to know the Earth rotation and orientation with high precision. Interactions between the solid Earth and its fluid layers (liquid core, atmosphere, ocean) induce variations in the Earth's speed of rotation. In addition, because the Earth is not a perfect sphere, but rather an ellipsoid flattened at its poles, the combined gravitational forces acting upon it produce changes in the orientation of its spin axis. Precession describes the long-term trend in the orientation of the Earth, while nutation refers to shorter-term periodic variations. The nutations of the Earth are the prime focus of the present paper. Models are used to predict the real-time Earth rotation and orientation, based on past observations and theoretical considerations of geophysical processes. In particular, the coupling mechanisms at the internal boundaries have been shown to be important for rotation. We here address the coupling mechanisms at the core boundaries such as the topographic, electromagnetic and viscous couplings, and discuss improvements in their computation and observation. The study uses and compares numerical and semi-analytical approaches, with the objective of both improving the nutation model and the rotation, and better understanding the interior of the Earth.

  6. Salt glacier and composite sediment-salt glacier models for the emplacement and early burial of allochthonous salt sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, R.C.; Hudec, M.R.; Watson, I.A.

    1996-12-31

    Allochthonous salt sheets in the northern Gulf of Mexico were emplaced as extrusive {open_quotes}salt glaciers{close_quotes} at the sediment-water interface. Massive dissolution was suppressed by a thin carapace of pelagic sediments. During emplacement, several hundred meters of bathymetric relief restricted rapid sedimentation to outside the glacial margins. The glaciers acted as sediment dams, influencing the transport and deposition of sediment from an upslope source. Because of contemporaneous sedimentation, the base of the glaciers climbed upward in all directions away from their feeder stocks, and successive sedimentary horizons were truncated against it. The local slope at the base of the sheets is equal to the local rate of sedimentation divided by the local rate of salt advance. Alternating episodes of slow and rapid sedimentation gave rise to a basal salt surface of alternating flats and ramps, which are preserved. Many salt sheets have nearly circular map patterns but are strongly asymmetric. Feeder stocks occur near upslope edges, and base-of-salt slopes are greater updip of the feeder. The asymmetry is due to more rapid sedimentation at the upslope edge and to slower advance induced by the smaller hydraulic head between the salt fountain and the upslope edge compared to the downslope edge. Rapid emplacement of the Mickey salt sheet (Mitchell dome) from a preexisting salt stock took {approximately}4 m.y, as {approximately}1 km of sediment was deposited. A three-dimensional geomechanical model for the rapid salt emplacement yields the following relationship for the diapir`s downdip radius versus time: R(t) {approx} Mt{sup q} {approx} B[({rho} - {rho}{sub w})gK{sup 3} / {eta}]{sup 1/8}t{sup q}, where M, q, b, and K are constants related to salt supply into the sheet, {rho} and {rho}{sub w} are the densities of salt water, g is the acceleration of gravity, {eta} is salt viscosity, and t is a model time extrapolated back to zero sheet volume at t = 0.

  7. Two planets: Earth and Mars - One salt model: The Hydrothermal SCRIW-Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovland, M. T.; Rueslaatten, H.; Johnsen, H. K.; Indreiten, T.

    2011-12-01

    Red Sea indicates that a shallow magma-chamber causes a sufficiently high heat-flow to drive a convection cell of seawater. The model shows that salt precipitates along the flow lines within the SCRIW-region (Hovland et al., 2006). During the various stages of planet Mars' development, it must be inferred that zones with very high heat-flow also existed there. This meant that water (brine) confined in the crust of Mars was mobilized in a convective manner and would pass into the SCRIW-zone during the down-going leg (the recharge leg) of the convective cell. The zones with SCRIW out-salting would require accommodation space for large masses of solid salt, as modeled in the Red Sea analogy. However, as the accommodation space for the solid salt fills up, it will pile up and force its way upwards to form large, perhaps layered anticlines, as seen in the Hebes Mensa area of Mars and at numerous locations on Earth, including the Red Sea. Thus, we offer a universal 'hydrothermal salt model', which would be viable on all planets with free water in their interiors or on their surfaces, including Mars and Earth.

  8. In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Model

    SciTech Connect

    P. Mariner

    2003-10-21

    As directed by ''Technical Work Plan For: Engineered Barrier System Department Modeling and Testing FY03 Work Activities'' (BSC 2003 [165601]), the In-Drift Precipitates/Salts (IDPS) model is developed and refined to predict the aqueous geochemical effects of evaporation in the proposed repository. The purpose of this work is to provide a model for describing and predicting the postclosure effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the chemical composition of water within the proposed Engineered Barrier System (EBS). Application of this model is to be documented elsewhere for the Total System Performance Assessment License Application (TSPA-LA). The principal application of this model is to be documented in REV 02 of ''Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model'' (BSC 2003 [165601]). The scope of this document is to develop, describe, and validate the IDPS model. This model is a quasi-equilibrium model. All reactions proceed to equilibrium except for several suppressed minerals in the thermodynamic database not expected to form under the proposed repository conditions within the modeling timeframe. In this revision, upgrades to the EQ3/6 code (Version 8.0) and Pitzer thermodynamic database improve the applicable range of the model. These new additions allow equilibrium and reaction-path modeling of evaporation to highly concentrated brines for potential water compositions of the system Na-K-H-Mg-Ca-Al-Cl-F-NO{sub 3}-SO{sub 4}-Br-CO{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O at temperatures in the range of 0 C to 125 C, pressures in the atmospheric range, and relative humidity in the range of 0 to 100 percent. This system applies to oxidizing conditions only, and therefore limits the model to applications involving oxidizing conditions. A number of thermodynamic parameters in the Pitzer database have values that have not been determined or verified for the entire temperature range. In these cases, the known values are used to approximate

  9. Study of materials performance model for aircraft interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leary, K.; Skratt, J.

    1980-01-01

    A demonstration version of an aircraft interior materials computer data library was developed and contains information on selected materials applicable to aircraft seats and wall panels, including materials for the following: panel face sheets, bond plies, honeycomb, foam, decorative film systems, seat cushions, adhesives, cushion reinforcements, fire blocking layers, slipcovers, decorative fabrics and thermoplastic parts. The information obtained for each material pertains to the material's performance in a fire scenario, selected material properties and several measures of processability.

  10. Salt matters: How salt affects the rheological and physical properties of gelatine for analogue modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brizzi, S.; Funiciello, F.; Corbi, F.; Di Giuseppe, E.; Mojoli, G.

    2016-06-01

    Gelatine is extensively used as analogue material for the easiness to tune its physical and rheological properties. The addition of salt to gelatine is generally adopted to increase the density of the material, improving the scaling of the models. However, the way the addition of salt changes the rheological properties of gelatine is generally underestimated. Here, we investigate both rheological and physical properties (i.e., density and transparency) of type A pig-skin 2.5 wt.% gelatine at T = 10 °C as a function of salt concentration, cNaCl, and ageing time. We established a standard preparation recipe and measuring protocol, yielding to uniform samples with reproducible behaviour. Rheometric measurements show that the presence of salt weakens the gelatine structure, with a decrease of both material rigidity and viscosity as cNaCl increases. Salted gelatine behaviour moves from viscoelastic to dominantly elastic as the ageing time increases. Density and cloudiness also increase with cNaCl. Finally, we present results from subduction interplate seismicity models performed with pure and salted gelatines, showing that the modified material may improve the modelling performance and open new perspectives in experimental tectonics.

  11. How to Observe (Rather Than Model) The Interiors of Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsworth, Yvonne

    2012-05-01

    Seismology - the study of the propagation of sound waves - allows us to make real observations of the interior of stars and provides a vital counterpoint to the inferences of theory. Helioseismology pioneered this activity and an autonomous small network (BiSON) run from the University of Birmingham (UK) has been making seismic observations of the Sun for more than three solar cycles. Its continuing observations have included the just past rather strange minimum. I will use some of the recent data to illustrate the curious behaviour of our home star. For other stars there have been several recent breakthrough missions. Foremost in these is the NASA Kepler mission which has opened up to view a very large number of stars. The prime aim of the Kepler mission is the hunt for earth-like planets and the role of the seismic analysis is to inform about the host stars. However, the observations of the stars are very important in their own right. My particular interest is in the solar-like main sequence stars and red giants. I will discuss some of the recent exciting results. Given that we can now observe the interior of stars like the Sun and also stars like the Sun will - in time - become, there is every hope that we will see major in our knowledge of stellar populations, structure and evolution.

  12. In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Model

    SciTech Connect

    P. Mariner

    2004-11-09

    This report documents the development and validation of the in-drift precipitates/salts (IDPS) model. The IDPS model is a geochemical model designed to predict the postclosure effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the chemical composition of water within the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). Application of the model in support of TSPA-LA is documented in ''Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169860]). Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156]) is the technical work plan (TWP) for this report. It called for a revision of the previous version of the report (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167734]) to achieve greater transparency, readability, data traceability, and report integration. The intended use of the IDPS model is to estimate and tabulate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the effects of evaporation, deliquescence, and potential environmental conditions on the pH, ionic strength, and chemical compositions of water and minerals on the drip shield or other location within the drift during the postclosure period. Specifically, the intended use is as follows: (1) To estimate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the presence and composition of water occurring within the repository during the postclosure period (i.e., effects on pH, ionic strength, deliquescence relative humidity, total concentrations of dissolved components in the system Na-K-H-Mg-Ca-Al-Cl-F-NO{sub 3}-SO{sub 4}-Br-CO{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O, and concentrations of the following aqueous species that potentially affect acid neutralizing capacity: HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, OH{sup -}, H{sup +}, HSO{sub 4}{sup -}, Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, CaHCO{sub 3}{sup +}, MgHCO{sub 3}{sup +}, HSiO{sub 3

  13. Final report on decommissioning of wells, boreholes, and tiltmeter sites, Gulf Coast Interior Salt Domes of Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    In the late 1970s, test holes were drilled in northern Louisiana in the vicinity of Vacherie and Rayburn`s Salt Domes as part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) (rename the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM)) program. The purpose of the program was to evaluate the suitability of salt domes for long term storage or disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The Institute for Environmental Studies at Louisiana State University (IES/LSU) and Law Engineering Testing Company (LETCo) of Marietta, Georgia performed the initial field studies. In 1982, DOE awarded a contract to the Earth Technology Corporation (TETC) of Long Beach, California to continue the Gulf Coast Salt Dome studies. In 1986, DOE deferred salt domes from further consideration as repository sites. This report describes test well plugging and site abandonment activities performed by SWEC in accordance with Activity Plan (AP) 1--3, Well Plugging and Site Restoration of Work Sites in Louisiana. The objective of the work outlined in this AP was to return test sites to as near original condition as possible by plugging boreholes, removing equipment, regrading, and seeding. Appendices to this report contain forms required by State of Louisiana, used by SWEC to document decommissioning activities, and pertinent documentation related to lease/access agreements.

  14. HORSMIC. Horizontal Salt Solution Mining Model

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    The code HORSMIC was written to solve the problem of calculating the shape of hydrocarbon (gas or liquid) storage caverns formed by solution mining in bedded salt formations. In the past many storage caverns have been formed by vertically drilling into salt dome formations and solution mining large-aspect-ratio, vertically axisymmetric caverns. This approach is generally not satisfactory for shallow salt beds because it would result in geomechanically-unstable, pancake-shaped caverns. In order to produce a high aspect ratio cavern in the horizontal direction a more complicated strategy must be employed. This code was developed to implement such a strategy, and can be used to estimate the shape of the cavern produced by a prescribed leaching schedule. Multiple trials can then be used to investigate the effects of various pipe hole configurations in order to optimize over the cavern shape.

  15. The Receptacle Model of Salting-In by Tetramethylammonium Ions

    PubMed Central

    Hribar–Lee, Barbara; Dill, Ken A.; Vlachy, Vojko

    2010-01-01

    Water is a poor solvent for nonpolar solutes. Water containing ions is an even poorer solvent. According to standard terminology, the tendency of salts to precipitate oils from water is called salting-out. However, interestingly, some salt ions, such as tetramethylammonium (TMA), cause instead the salting-in of hydrophobic solutes. Even more puzzling, there is a systematic dependence on solute size. TMA causes the salting-out of small hydrophobes and the salting-in of larger nonpolar solutes. We study these effects using NPT Monte Carlo simulations of the MB + dipole model of water, which was previously shown to account for hydrophobic effects and ion solubilities in water. The present model gives a structural interpretation for the thermodynamics of salting-in. The TMA structure allows deep penetration by a first shell of waters, the dipoles of which interact electrostatically with the ion. This first water shell sets up a second water shell that is shaped to act as a receptacle that binds the nonpolar solute. In this way, a nonpolar solute can actually bind more tightly to the TMA ion than to another hydrophobe, leading to the increased solubility and salting-in. Such structuring may also explain why molecular ions do not follow the same charge density series’ as atomic ions do. PMID:21028768

  16. Receptacle model of salting-in by tetramethylammonium ions.

    PubMed

    Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Dill, Ken A; Vlachy, Vojko

    2010-11-25

    Water is a poor solvent for nonpolar solutes. Water containing ions is an even poorer solvent. According to standard terminology, the tendency of salts to precipitate oils from water is called salting-out. However, interestingly, some salt ions, such as tetramethylammonium (TMA), cause instead the salting-in of hydrophobic solutes. Even more puzzling, there is a systematic dependence on solute size. TMA causes the salting-out of small hydrophobes and the salting-in of larger nonpolar solutes. We study these effects using NPT Monte Carlo simulations of the Mercedes-Benz (MB) + dipole model of water, which was previously shown to account for hydrophobic effects and ion solubilities in water. The present model gives a structural interpretation for the thermodynamics of salting-in. The TMA structure allows deep penetration by a first shell of waters, the dipoles of which interact electrostatically with the ion. This first water shell sets up a second water shell that is shaped to act as a receptacle that binds the nonpolar solute. In this way, a nonpolar solute can actually bind more tightly to the TMA ion than to another hydrophobe, leading to the increased solubility and salting-in. Such structuring may also explain why molecular ions do not follow the same charge density series as atomic ions do. PMID:21028768

  17. Modeling and Simulation of Interior Ballistics Based on Actual Combustion Characteristics of Propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Xin; Zhao, Jun; Xu, Bin; Wang, Ze-Shan

    2015-07-01

    A novel interior ballistic model was established by revising actual combustion characteristics describing the relationship between burned propellants (ψ) and pressure impulse (It). The discrepancy between theory and experiment for gas releasing of porous propellant was investigated. Furthermore, the model was tested for multiperforated propellants, with relative errors less than 1 and 3% for the maximum pressure and velocity, respectively, indicating that this is a good model to estimate the interior ballistics performance for multiperforated propellants.

  18. Modeling of Shales in Salt-Hydrocarbon Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolinakou, Maria A.; Flemings, Peter B.; Hudec, Michael R.

    2016-02-01

    We model the stress-strain response of shale wall rocks to large deformations associated with the emplacement of salt bodies. We further identify the implications of these stress changes for hydrocarbon exploration. We model the mudrocks as porous elastoplastic materials. We employ both static and evolutionary approach for the modeling of salt systems and show that while the static one can model actual geologic geometries, only the evolutionary approach can provide a detailed description of the stress changes associated with the emplacement of salt. Hence, the evolutionary approach can register the overall stress history of the shale wall rocks, which is essential for predicting the present-day state of stress, porosity, and pore pressure. More generally, the evolutionary approach can provide useful insights for understanding Earth processes related to salt-hydrocarbon systems.

  19. Health Gain by Salt Reduction in Europe: A Modelling Study

    PubMed Central

    Hendriksen, Marieke A. H.; van Raaij, Joop M. A.; Geleijnse, Johanna M.; Breda, Joao; Boshuizen, Hendriek C.

    2015-01-01

    Excessive salt intake is associated with hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Salt intake exceeds the World Health Organization population nutrition goal of 5 grams per day in the European region. We assessed the health impact of salt reduction in nine European countries (Finland, France, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Sweden and United Kingdom). Through literature research we obtained current salt intake and systolic blood pressure levels of the nine countries. The population health modeling tool DYNAMO-HIA including country-specific disease data was used to predict the changes in prevalence of ischemic heart disease and stroke for each country estimating the effect of salt reduction through its effect on blood pressure levels. A 30% salt reduction would reduce the prevalence of stroke by 6.4% in Finland to 13.5% in Poland. Ischemic heart disease would be decreased by 4.1% in Finland to 8.9% in Poland. When salt intake is reduced to the WHO population nutrient goal, it would reduce the prevalence of stroke from 10.1% in Finland to 23.1% in Poland. Ischemic heart disease would decrease by 6.6% in Finland to 15.5% in Poland. The number of postponed deaths would be 102,100 (0.9%) in France, and 191,300 (2.3%) in Poland. A reduction of salt intake to 5 grams per day is expected to substantially reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease and mortality in several European countries. PMID:25826317

  20. Salt tectonics and shallow subseafloor fluid convection: models of coupled fluid-heat-salt transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, A.; Ruppel, C.

    2007-01-01

    Thermohaline convection associated with salt domes has the potential to drive significant fluid flow and mass and heat transport in continental margins, but previous studies of fluid flow associated with salt structures have focused on continental settings or deep flow systems of importance to petroleum exploration. Motivated by recent geophysical and geochemical observations that suggest a convective pattern to near-seafloor pore fluid flow in the northern Gulf of Mexico (GoMex), we devise numerical models that fully couple thermal and chemical processes to quantify the effects of salt geometry and seafloor relief on fluid flow beneath the seafloor. Steady-state models that ignore halite dissolution demonstrate that seafloor relief plays an important role in the evolution of shallow geothermal convection cells and that salt at depth can contribute a thermal component to this convection. The inclusion of faults causes significant, but highly localized, increases in flow rates at seafloor discharge zones. Transient models that include halite dissolution show the evolution of flow during brine formation from early salt-driven convection to later geothermal convection, characteristics of which are controlled by the interplay of seafloor relief and salt geometry. Predicted flow rates are on the order of a few millimeters per year or less for homogeneous sediments with a permeability of 10−15 m2, comparable to compaction-driven flow rates. Sediment permeabilities likely fall below 10−15 m2 at depth in the GoMex basin, but such thermohaline convection can drive pervasive mass transport across the seafloor, affecting sediment diagenesis in shallow sediments. In more permeable settings, such flow could affect methane hydrate stability, seafloor chemosynthetic communities, and the longevity of fluid seeps.

  1. Examining Interior Grid Nudging Techniques Using Two-Way Nesting in the WRF Model for Regional Climate Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluates interior nudging techniques using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model for regional climate modeling over the conterminous United States (CONUS) using a two-way nested configuration. NCEP–Department of Energy Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Pro...

  2. INTERACTION OF INORGANIC MERCURY SALTS WITH MODEL AND RED CELL MEMBRANES: IMPORTANCE OF LIPID BINDING SALTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect induced by two mercury salts, HgCl2 and Hg(NO3)2, on the thermotropic properties of PS model membranes (multilamellar vesicles) and rat red cell membranes was investigated employing 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) fluorescence polarization. ercury(II) interacts wit...

  3. Mechanical stratification of autochthonous salt: Implications from basin-scale numerical models of rifted margin salt tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ings, Steven; Albertz, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Deformation of salt and sediments owing to the flow of weak evaporites is a common phenomenon in sedimentary basins worldwide, and the resulting structures and thermal regimes have a significant impact on hydrocarbon exploration. Evaporite sequences ('salt') of significant thickness (e.g., >1km) are typically deposited in many cycles of seawater inundation and evaporation in restricted basins resulting in layered autochthonous evaporite packages. However, analogue and numerical models of salt tectonics typically treat salt as a homogeneous viscous material, often with properties of halite, the weakest evaporite. In this study, we present results of two-dimensional plane-strain numerical experiments designed to illustrate the effects of variable evaporite viscosity and embedded frictional-plastic ('brittle') sediment layers on the style of salt flow and associated deformation of the sedimentary overburden. Evaporite viscosity is a first-order control on salt flow rate and the style of overburden deformation. Near-complete evacuation of low-viscosity salt occurs beneath expulsion basins, whereas significant salt is trapped when viscosity is high. Embedded frictional-plastic sediment layers (with finite yield strength) partition salt flow and develop transient contractional structures (folds, thrust faults, and folded faults) in a seaward salt-squeeze flow regime. Multiple internal sediment layers reduce the overall seaward salt flow during sediment aggradation, leaving more salt behind to be re-mobilized during subsequent progradation. This produces more seaward extensive allochthonous salt sheets. If there is a density difference between the embedded layers and the surrounding salt, then the embedded layers 'fractionate' during deformation and either float to the surface or sink to the bottom (depending on density), creating a thick zone of pure halite. Such a process of 'buoyancy fractionation' may partially explain the apparent paradox of layered salt in

  4. Modeling salt precipitation from brines on Mars: Evaporation versus freezing origin for soil salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, Jonathan D.; Catling, David C.; Light, Bonnie

    2015-04-01

    Perchlorates, in mixture with sulfates, chlorides, and carbonates, have been found in relatively high concentrations in martian soils. To determine probable soil salt assemblages from aqueous chemical data, equilibrium models have been developed to predict salt precipitation sequences during either freezing or evaporation of brines. However, these models have not been validated for multicomponent systems and some model predictions are clearly in error. In this study, we built a Pitzer model in the Na-K-Ca-Mg-Cl-SO4-ClO4-H2O system at 298.15 K using compilations of solubility data in ternary and quaternary perchlorate systems. The model is a significant improvement over FREZCHEM, particularly for Na-Mg-Cl-ClO4, Ca-Cl-ClO4, and Na-SO4-ClO4 mixtures. We applied our model to the evaporation of a nominal Phoenix Lander Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) solution at 298.15 K and compare our results to FREZCHEM. Both models predict the early precipitation of KClO4, hydromagnesite (3MgCO3·Mg(OH)2·3H2O), gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O), and epsomite (MgSO4·7H2O), followed by dehydration of epsomite and gypsum to kieserite (MgSO4·H2O) and anhydrite (CaSO4) respectively. At low residual water contents, our model predicts the precipitation of halite (NaCl), NaClO4·H2O, and Mg(ClO4)2·6H2O, whereas halite and NaClO4·H2O never precipitate in FREZCHEM. Our model predicts that calcite does not precipitate from evaporating WCL solutions at 298.15 K, which conflicts with other evidence for calcite in Phoenix soils. Previous studies that modeled freezing of WCL solutions found that calcite does form. Furthermore, our model predicts that ∼0.3 wt.% H2O is held in hydrated salts after the WCL solution has completely evaporated at 298.15 K, whereas previous studies have found that ∼1.3 wt.% H2O is held in hydrated salts if WCL solutions freeze. Given minimum water contents in Mars soils of 1.5-2 wt.% H2O measured from orbital spectra and in situ measurements, our modeling results suggest that

  5. A hybrid SEA/modal technique for modeling structural-acoustic interior noise in rotorcraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayachandran, V.; Bonilha, M. W.

    2003-03-01

    This paper describes a hybrid technique that combines Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) predictions for structural vibration with acoustic modal summation techniques to predict interior noise levels in rotorcraft. The method was applied for predicting the sound field inside a mock-up of the interior panel system of the Sikorsky S-92 helicopter. The vibration amplitudes of the frame and panel systems were predicted using a detailed SEA model and these were used as inputs to the model of the interior acoustic space. The spatial distribution of the vibration field on individual panels, and their coupling to the acoustic space were modeled using stochastic techniques. Leakage and nonresonant transmission components were accounted for using space-averaged values obtained from a SEA model of the complete structural-acoustic system. Since the cabin geometry was quite simple, the modeling of the interior acoustic space was performed using a standard modal summation technique. Sound pressure levels predicted by this approach at specific microphone locations were compared with measured data. Agreement within 3 dB in one-third octave bands above 40 Hz was observed. A large discrepancy in the one-third octave band in which the first acoustic mode is resonant (31.5 Hz) was observed. Reasons for such a discrepancy are discussed in the paper. The developed technique provides a method for modeling helicopter cabin interior noise in the frequency mid-range where neither FEA nor SEA is individually effective or accurate.

  6. Micro-Macro Analysis and Phenomenological Modelling of Salt Viscous Damage and Application to Salt Caverns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Cheng; Pouya, Ahmad; Arson, Chloé

    2015-11-01

    This paper aims to gain fundamental understanding of the microscopic mechanisms that control the transition between secondary and tertiary creep around salt caverns in typical geological storage conditions. We use a self-consistent inclusion-matrix model to homogenize the viscoplastic deformation of halite polycrystals and predict the number of broken grains in a Representative Elementary Volume of salt. We use this micro-macro modeling framework to simulate creep tests under various axial stresses, which gives us the critical viscoplastic strain at which grain breakage (i.e., tertiary creep) is expected to occur. The comparison of simulation results for short-term and long-term creep indicates that the initiation of tertiary creep depends on the stress and the viscoplastic strain. We use the critical viscoplastic deformation as a yield criterion to control the transition between secondary and tertiary creep in a phenomenological viscoplastic model, which we implement into the Finite Element Method program POROFIS. We model a 850-m-deep salt cavern of irregular shape, in axis-symmetric conditions. Simulations of cavern depressurization indicate that a strain-dependent damage evolution law is more suitable than a stress-dependent damage evolution law, because it avoids high damage concentrations and allows capturing the formation of a damaged zone around the cavity. The modeling framework explained in this paper is expected to provide new insights to link grain breakage to phenomenological damage variables used in Continuum Damage Mechanics.

  7. Apply 3D model on the customized product color combination for the interior decoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheih-Ying

    2013-03-01

    The customized product color interface for the interior decoration is designed to simulate the display of various color combination sofas in the interior of the room. There are 144 color combinations of the spatial image resulted from four the interior rooms and 36 popular color sofas. The image compositing technique is adopted to appear the 144 color combinations of the spatial image on computer screen. This study tests the experience of using the interface by the questionnaire for User Interface Satisfaction (QUIS). The results show that the high grade of evaluation items including wonderful, easy, satisfying, stimulating and flexible for the experience of users. Therefore, the entrepreneur who wants to display the color primarily commodity could using the customized color combination interface with 3D models for consumers to take opportunity to find the appropriate products to meet with the interior room, so as to shorten communication time between entrepreneurs and consumers.

  8. Mechanical modeling of the growth of salt structures

    SciTech Connect

    Alfaro, R.A.M.

    1993-05-01

    A 2D numerical model for studying the morphology and history of salt structures by way of computer simulations is presented. The model is based on conservation laws for physical systems, a fluid marker equation to keep track of the salt/sediments interface, and two constitutive laws for rocksalt. When buoyancy alone is considered, the fluid-assisted diffusion model predicts evolution of salt structures 2.5 times faster than the power-law creep model. Both rheological laws predict strain rates of the order of 4.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}15}s{sup {minus}1} for similar structural maturity level of salt structures. Equivalent stresses and viscosities predicted by the fluid-assisted diffusion law are 10{sup 2} times smaller than those predicted by the power-law creep rheology. Use of East Texas Basin sedimentation rates and power-law creep rheology indicate that differential loading is an effective mechanism to induce perturbations that amplify and evolve to mature salt structures, similar to those observed under natural geological conditions.

  9. Chapter 2. Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources--Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Cotton Valley group, Jurassic Smackover interior salt basins total petroleum system, in the East Texas basin and Louisiana-Mississippi salt basins provinces.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyman, T.S.; Condon, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    The Jurassic Smackover Interior Salt Basins Total Petroleum System is defined for this assessment to include (1) Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation carbonates and calcareous shales and (2) Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous Cotton Valley Group organic-rich shales. The Jurassic Smackover Interior Salt Basins Total Petroleum System includes four conventional Cotton Valley assessment units: Cotton Valley Blanket Sandstone Gas (AU 50490201), Cotton Valley Massive Sandstone Gas (AU 50490202), Cotton Valley Updip Oil and Gas (AU 50490203), and Cotton Valley Hypothetical Updip Oil (AU 50490204). Together, these four assessment units are estimated to contain a mean undiscovered conventional resource of 29.81 million barrels of oil, 605.03 billion cubic feet of gas, and 19.00 million barrels of natural gas liquids. The Cotton Valley Group represents the first major influx of clastic sediment into the ancestral Gulf of Mexico. Major depocenters were located in south-central Mississippi, along the Louisiana-Mississippi border, and in northeast Texas. Reservoir properties and production characteristics were used to identify two Cotton Valley Group sandstone trends across northern Louisiana and east Texas: a high-permeability blanket-sandstone trend and a downdip, low-permeability massive-sandstone trend. Pressure gradients throughout most of both trends are normal, which is characteristic of conventional rather than continuous basin-center gas accumulations. Indications that accumulations in this trend are conventional rather than continuous include (1) gas-water contacts in at least seven fields across the blanket-sandstone trend, (2) relatively high reservoir permeabilities, and (3) high gas-production rates without fracture stimulation. Permeability is sufficiently low in the massive-sandstone trend that gas-water transition zones are vertically extensive and gas-water contacts are poorly defined. The interpreted presence of gas-water contacts within the Cotton Valley

  10. Interior Structure Models and Tidal Love Numbers of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohl, F.; Hussmann, H.; Schwentker, B.; Spohn, T.; Lorenz, R. D.

    Two decades of research mean that we now have a climatology of surface ocean pCO2 in the North Atlantic, but we know little about how the sink for atmospheric CO2 in this region may vary from year to year. Detailed knowledge of how the sink varies seasonally, with space and from year to year would be of great practical value. For example, it could be used to constrain atmoshperic inverse models and provide infor- mation on the changes in the terrestrial sink for CO2 in Eurasia and North America, knowledge important to the verification of the Kyoto Protocol. An EU-funded project, CArbon VAriability Studies by Ships of Opportunity (CAVASSOO) will provide this information by the instrumentation of four ship-of-opportunity routes across the North Atlantic. Near-continuous information on how pCO2 changes across the region will be used in conjunction with atmoshperic and ocean models to provide high resolu- tion, season-by-season estimates of the sink for CO2 in the North Atlantic. The main data-gathering phase of the project has now begun, and it is hoped to show first results.

  11. Salting our landscape: an integrated catchment model using readily accessible data to assess emerging road salt contamination to streams.

    PubMed

    Jin, Li; Whitehead, Paul; Siegel, Donald I; Findlay, Stuart

    2011-05-01

    A new integrated catchment model for salinity has been developed to assess the transport of road salt from upland areas in watersheds to streams using readily accessible landscape, hydrologic, and meteorological data together with reported salt applications. We used Fishkill Creek (NY) as a representative watershed to test the model. Results showed good agreement between modeled and measured stream water chloride concentrations. These results suggest that a dominant mode of catchment simulation that does not entail complex deterministic modeling is an appropriate method to model salinization and to assess effects of future applications of road salt to streams. We heuristically increased and decreased salt applications by 100% and results showed that stream chloride concentrations increased by 13% and decreased by 7%, respectively. The model suggests that future management of salt application can reduce environmental concentrations, albeit over some time. PMID:21316826

  12. Rhea gravity field and interior modeling from Cassini data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortora, Paolo; Zannoni, Marco; Hemingway, Doug; Nimmo, Francis; Jacobson, Robert A.; Iess, Luciano; Parisi, Marzia

    2016-01-01

    During its tour of the Saturn system, Cassini performed two close flybys of Rhea dedicated to gravity investigations, the first in November 2005 and the second in March 2013. This paper presents an estimation of Rhea's fully unconstrained quadrupole gravity field obtained from a joint multi-arc analysis of the two Cassini flybys. Our best estimates of the main gravity quadrupole unnormalized coefficients are J2 × 106 = 946.0 ± 13.9, C22 × 106 = 242.1 ± 4.0 (uncertainties are 1-σ). Their resulting ratio is J2/C22 = 3.91 ± 0.10, statistically not compatible (at a 5-σ level) with the theoretical value of 10/3, predicted for a hydrostatic satellite in slow, synchronous rotation around a planet. Therefore, it is not possible to infer the moment of inertia factor directly using the Radau-Darwin approximation. The observed excess J2 (gravity oblateness) was investigated using a combined analysis of gravity and topography, under different plausible geophysical assumptions. The observed gravity is consistent with that generated by the observed shape for an undifferentiated (uniform density) body. However, because the surface is more likely to be water ice, a two-layer model may be a better approximation. In this case, and assuming a mantle density of 920 kg/m3, some 1-3 km of excess core oblateness is consistent with the observed gravity. A wide range of moments of inertia is allowed, but models with low moments of inertia (i.e., more differentiation) require greater magnitudes of excess core topography to satisfy the observations.

  13. Evaluation of potential crushed-salt constitutive models

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, G.D.; Loken, M.C.; Sambeek, L.L. Van; Chen, R.; Pfeifle, T.W.; Nieland, J.D.

    1995-12-01

    Constitutive models describing the deformation of crushed salt are presented in this report. Ten constitutive models with potential to describe the phenomenological and micromechanical processes for crushed salt were selected from a literature search. Three of these ten constitutive models, termed Sjaardema-Krieg, Zeuch, and Spiers models, were adopted as candidate constitutive models. The candidate constitutive models were generalized in a consistent manner to three-dimensional states of stress and modified to include the effects of temperature, grain size, and moisture content. A database including hydrostatic consolidation and shear consolidation tests conducted on Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and southeastern New Mexico salt was used to determine material parameters for the candidate constitutive models. Nonlinear least-squares model fitting to data from the hydrostatic consolidation tests, the shear consolidation tests, and a combination of the shear and hydrostatic tests produces three sets of material parameter values for the candidate models. The change in material parameter values from test group to test group indicates the empirical nature of the models. To evaluate the predictive capability of the candidate models, each parameter value set was used to predict each of the tests in the database. Based on the fitting statistics and the ability of the models to predict the test data, the Spiers model appeared to perform slightly better than the other two candidate models. The work reported here is a first-of-its kind evaluation of constitutive models for reconsolidation of crushed salt. Questions remain to be answered. Deficiencies in models and databases are identified and recommendations for future work are made. 85 refs.

  14. Analogue modelling of salt diapirism induced by differential loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warsitzka, Michael; Kley, Jonas; Kukowski, Nina; Jähne, Fabian

    2010-05-01

    In salt tectonics, two general concepts exist to explain salt diapirism. First, the theory of active piercement by Trusheim (1960) states that salt rises up and pierces its overburden autonomously by buoyancy forces. Second, the theory of reactive piercement by Vendeville and Jackson (1992) considers a tectonic stress field responsible for initiation of salt uplift and has been tested in many analogue experiments. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis in which salt diapir formation is activated by sedimentary processes alone, i.e. without a tectonic trigger. Our models consisted of a viscous silicone layer simulating rock salt overlain by layers of sand that mimic brittle behaviour in natural overburden sediments. The experiments were monitored with a high-resolution strain analysis tool based on digital image correlation (particle image velocimetry, PIV). Deformation in the silicone was initiated by a lateral variation in the thickness or density of the overburden, which established a differential loading on the silicone layer. Subsequent sedimentation in certain time intervals forced the silicone to rise up and break through the initial sand layer by buoyancy forces. The model results support the hypothesis of active piercement of diapirs. Uplift of the silicone and creation of a pillow structure with a significant elevation can be achieved if the overburden does not exceed a critical thickness and if the load gradient in the overburden reaches a minimum value. Then, ongoing sedimentation in adjacent areas increases the lateral load gradient until the buoyancy force in the silicone is high enough to overcome the shear strength of the sand. Synkinematic sedimentation produces some typical strata geometries in the sand layer that can also be observed in nature, e.g. drag folds bordering the diapirs and layer thickening in the peripherical rim synclines. The creation of one diapir and its peripherical sinks induces a lateral migration of the deformation to

  15. Citronelle Dome: A giant opportunity for multizone carbon storage and enhanced oil recovery in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin of Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Esposito, R.A.; Pashin, J.C.; Walsh, P.M.

    2008-01-01

    The Citronelle Dome is a giant, salt-cored anticline in the eastern Mississippi Interior Salt Basin of southern Alabama that is located near several large-scale, stationary, carbon-emitting sources in the greater Mobile area. The dome forms an elliptical, four-way structural closure containing opportunities for CO2-enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR) and large-capacity saline reservoir CO2 sequestration. The Citronelle oil field, located on the crest of the dome, has produced more than 169 million bbl of 42-46?? API gravity oil from sandstone bodies in the Lower Cretaceous Rodessa Formation. The top seal for the oil accumulation is a thick succession of shale and anhydrite, and the reservoir is underfilled such that oil-water contacts are typically elevated 30-60 m (100-200 ft) above the structural spill point. Approximately 31-34% of the original oil in place has been recovered by primary and secondary methods, and CO2-EOR has the potential to increase reserves by up to 20%. Structural contour maps of the dome demonstrate that the area of structural closure increases upward in section. Sandstone units providing prospective carbon sinks include the Massive and Pilot sands of the lower Tuscaloosa Group, as well as several sandstone units in the upper Tuscaloosa Group and the Eutaw Formation. Many of these sandstone units are characterized by high porosity and permeability with low heterogeneity. The Tuscaloosa-Eutaw interval is capped by up to 610 m (2000 ft) of chalk and marine shale that are proven reservoir seals in nearby oil fields. Therefore, the Citronelle Dome can be considered a major geologic sink where CO2 can be safely stored while realizing the economic benefits associated with CO2-EOR. Copyright ?? 2008. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

  16. Conceptual Model for Selenium Cycling in the Great Salt Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, W. P.; Conover, M. R.; Wurtsbaugh, W. A.; Adams, J.

    2006-12-01

    The conceptual model for Selenium cycling in the Great Salt Lake was developed to guide investigations in support of determining an open water selenium standard for the Great Salt Lake. The motivation to determine this particular selenium standard derives from public concern for a plan to allow disposal of reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate in the GSL, which would contain elevated concentrations of major and trace elements, including selenium. The development of an open water standard for selenium requires a working knowledge of the biological significance of existing selenium concentrations in the Great Salt Lake, as well as a working understanding of the likely changes of these concentrations over time given existing and proposed loads to the system. This working knowledge" is being represented in a conceptual model that accounts for selenium in various stocks" in the system (e.g. water, sediment, biota) and the flow" of selenium between stocks (e.g., precipitation and settling, volatilization, bioconcentration). It illustrates the critical pathway of selenium in the Great Salt Lake from water, to microorganisms, to brine shrimp and brine flies, to birds, and to their eggs. It also addresses the complexity of the GSL system: a) Spatially diverse, being comprised by four distinct bays and two layers, with major differences in salinity among their waters. b) Temporally dynamic, due to seasonal and inter-annual variations in runoff. The conceptual model is presently descriptive, but will serve as the basis for a semi-quantitative model that will be fed by data accumulated during subsequent investigations.

  17. Salt movements and faulting of the overburden - can numerical modeling predict the fault patterns above salt structures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, O. R.; Egholm, D. L.; Wesenberg, R.

    2012-04-01

    Salt deformation has been the topic of numerous studies through the 20th century and up until present because of the close relation between commercial hydrocarbons and salt structure provinces of the world (Hudec & Jackson, 2007). The fault distribution in sediments above salt structures influences among other things the productivity due to the segmentation of the reservoir (Stewart 2006). 3D seismic data above salt structures can map such fault patterns in great detail and studies have shown that a variety of fault patterns exists. Yet, most patterns fall between two end members: concentric and radiating fault patterns. Here we use a modified version of the numerical spring-slider model introduced by Malthe-Sørenssen et al.(1998a) for simulating the emergence of small scale faults and fractures above a rising salt structure. The three-dimensional spring-slider model enables us to control the rheology of the deforming overburden, the mechanical coupling between the overburden and the underlying salt, as well as the kinematics of the moving salt structure. In this presentation, we demonstrate how the horizontal component on the salt motion influences the fracture patterns within the overburden. The modeling shows that purely vertical movement of the salt introduces a mesh of concentric normal faults in the overburden, and that the frequency of radiating faults increases with the amount of lateral movements across the salt-overburden interface. The two end-member fault patterns (concentric vs. radiating) can thus be linked to two different styles of salt movement: i) the vertical rising of a salt indenter and ii) the inflation of a 'salt-balloon' beneath the deformed strata. The results are in accordance with published analogue and theoretical models, as well as natural systems, and the model may - when used appropriately - provide new insight into how the internal dynamics of the salt in a structure controls the generation of fault patterns above the structure. The

  18. MIXING MODELING ANALYSIS FOR SRS SALT WASTE DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    2011-01-18

    Nuclear waste at Savannah River Site (SRS) waste tanks consists of three different types of waste forms. They are the lighter salt solutions referred to as supernate, the precipitated salts as salt cake, and heavier fine solids as sludge. The sludge is settled on the tank floor. About half of the residual waste radioactivity is contained in the sludge, which is only about 8 percentage of the total waste volume. Mixing study to be evaluated here for the Salt Disposition Integration (SDI) project focuses on supernate preparations in waste tanks prior to transfer to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) feed tank. The methods to mix and blend the contents of the SRS blend tanks were evalutaed to ensure that the contents are properly blended before they are transferred from the blend tank such as Tank 50H to the SWPF feed tank. The work consists of two principal objectives to investigate two different pumps. One objective is to identify a suitable pumping arrangement that will adequately blend/mix two miscible liquids to obtain a uniform composition in the tank with a minimum level of sludge solid particulate in suspension. The other is to estimate the elevation in the tank at which the transfer pump inlet should be located where the solid concentration of the entrained fluid remains below the acceptance criterion (0.09 wt% or 1200 mg/liter) during transfer operation to the SWPF. Tank 50H is a Waste Tank that will be used to prepare batches of salt feed for SWPF. The salt feed must be a homogeneous solution satisfying the acceptance criterion of the solids entrainment during transfer operation. The work described here consists of two modeling areas. They are the mixing modeling analysis during miscible liquid blending operation, and the flow pattern analysis during transfer operation of the blended liquid. The modeling results will provide quantitative design and operation information during the mixing/blending process and the transfer operation of the blended

  19. The role of interior watershed processes in improving parameter estimation and performance of watershed models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Watershed models typically are evaluated solely through comparison of in-stream water and nutrient fluxes with measured data using established performance criteria, whereas processes and responses within the interior of the watershed that govern these global fluxes often are neglected. Due to the l...

  20. Modeling the Dynamical Coupling of Solar Convection with the Radiative Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Allan Sacha; Miesch, Mark S.; Toomre, Juri

    2011-12-01

    The global dynamics of a rotating star like the Sun involves the coupling of a highly turbulent convective envelope overlying a seemingly benign radiative interior. We use the anelastic spherical harmonic code to develop a new class of three-dimensional models that nonlinearly couple the convective envelope to a deep stable radiative interior. The numerical simulation assumes a realistic solar stratification from r = 0.07 up to 0.97R (with R the solar radius), thus encompassing part of the nuclear core up through most of the convection zone. We find that a tachocline naturally establishes itself between the differentially rotating convective envelope and the solid body rotation of the interior, with a slow spreading that is here diffusively controlled. The rapid angular momentum redistribution in the convective envelope leads to a fast equator and slow poles, with a conical differential rotation achieved at mid-latitudes, much as has been deduced by helioseismology. The convective motions are able to overshoot downward about 0.04R into the radiative interior. However, the convective meridional circulation there is confined to a smaller penetration depth and is directed mostly equatorward at the base of the convection zone. Thermal wind balance is established in the lower convection zone and tachocline but departures are evident in the upper convection zone. Internal gravity waves are excited by the convective overshooting, yielding a complex wave field throughout the radiative interior.

  1. MODELING THE DYNAMICAL COUPLING OF SOLAR CONVECTION WITH THE RADIATIVE INTERIOR

    SciTech Connect

    Brun, Allan Sacha; Toomre, Juri

    2011-12-01

    The global dynamics of a rotating star like the Sun involves the coupling of a highly turbulent convective envelope overlying a seemingly benign radiative interior. We use the anelastic spherical harmonic code to develop a new class of three-dimensional models that nonlinearly couple the convective envelope to a deep stable radiative interior. The numerical simulation assumes a realistic solar stratification from r = 0.07 up to 0.97R (with R the solar radius), thus encompassing part of the nuclear core up through most of the convection zone. We find that a tachocline naturally establishes itself between the differentially rotating convective envelope and the solid body rotation of the interior, with a slow spreading that is here diffusively controlled. The rapid angular momentum redistribution in the convective envelope leads to a fast equator and slow poles, with a conical differential rotation achieved at mid-latitudes, much as has been deduced by helioseismology. The convective motions are able to overshoot downward about 0.04R into the radiative interior. However, the convective meridional circulation there is confined to a smaller penetration depth and is directed mostly equatorward at the base of the convection zone. Thermal wind balance is established in the lower convection zone and tachocline but departures are evident in the upper convection zone. Internal gravity waves are excited by the convective overshooting, yielding a complex wave field throughout the radiative interior.

  2. Levermore-Pomraning Model Results for an Interior Source Binary Stochastic Medium Benchmark Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Brantley, P S; Palmer, T S

    2009-02-24

    The accuracy of the Levermore-Pomraning model for particle transport through a binary stochastic medium is investigated using an interior source benchmark problem. As in previous comparisons of the model for incident angular flux benchmark problems, the model accurately computes the leakage and the scalar flux distributions for optically thin slabs. The model is less accurate for more optically thick slabs but has a maximum relative error in the leakage of approximately 10% for the problems examined. The maximum root-mean-squared relative errors for the total and material scalar flux distributions approach 65% for the more optically thick slabs. Consistent with previous benchmark comparisons, the results of these interior source benchmark comparisons demonstrate that the Levermore-Pomraning model produces qualitatively correct and semi-quantitatively correct results for both leakage values and scalar flux distributions.

  3. Precipitates/Salts Model Calculations for Various Drift Temperature Environments

    SciTech Connect

    P. Marnier

    2001-12-20

    The objective and scope of this calculation is to assist Performance Assessment Operations and the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Department in modeling the geochemical effects of evaporation within a repository drift. This work is developed and documented using procedure AP-3.12Q, Calculations, in support of ''Technical Work Plan For Engineered Barrier System Department Modeling and Testing FY 02 Work Activities'' (BSC 2001a). The primary objective of this calculation is to predict the effects of evaporation on the abstracted water compositions established in ''EBS Incoming Water and Gas Composition Abstraction Calculations for Different Drift Temperature Environments'' (BSC 2001c). A secondary objective is to predict evaporation effects on observed Yucca Mountain waters for subsequent cement interaction calculations (BSC 2001d). The Precipitates/Salts model is documented in an Analysis/Model Report (AMR), ''In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Analysis'' (BSC 2001b).

  4. Roughness modelling based on human auditory perception for sound quality evaluation of vehicle interior noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. S.; Shen, G. Q.; Guo, H.; Tang, X. L.; Hamade, T.

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, a roughness model, which is based on human auditory perception (HAP) and known as HAP-RM, is developed for the sound quality evaluation (SQE) of vehicle noise. First, the interior noise signals are measured for a sample vehicle and prepared for roughness modelling. The HAP-RM model is based on the process of sound transfer and perception in the human auditory system by combining the structural filtering function and nonlinear perception characteristics of the ear. The HAP-RM model is applied to the measured vehicle interior noise signals by considering the factors that affect hearing, such as the modulation and carrier frequencies, the time and frequency maskings and the correlations of the critical bands. The HAP-RM model is validated by jury tests. An anchor-scaled scoring method (ASM) is used for subjective evaluations in the jury tests. The verification results show that the novel developed model can accurately calculate vehicle noise roughness below 0.6 asper. Further investigation shows that the total roughness of the vehicle interior noise can mainly be attributed to frequency components below 12 Bark. The time masking effects of the modelling procedure enable the application of the HAP-RM model to stationary and nonstationary vehicle noise signals and the SQE of other sound-related signals in engineering problems.

  5. Analytical model of the structureborne interior noise induced by a propeller wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junger, M. C.; Garrelick, J. M.; Martinez, R.; Cole, J. E., III

    1984-05-01

    The structure-borne contribution to the interior noise that is induced by the propeller wake acting on the wing was studied. Analytical models were developed to describe each aspect of this path including the excitation loads, the wing and fuselage structures, and the interior acoustic space. The emphasis is on examining a variety of parameters, and as a result different models were developed to examine specific parameters. The excitation loading on the wing by the propeller wake is modeled by a distribution of rotating potential vortices whose strength is related to the thrust per blade. The response of the wing to this loading is examined using beam models. A model of a beam structurally connected to a cylindrical shell with an internal acoustic fluid was developed to examine the coupling of energy from the wing to the interior space. The model of the acoustic space allows for arbitrary end conditions (e.g., rigid or vibrating end caps). Calculations are presented using these models to compare with a laboratory test configuration as well as for parameters of a prop-fan aircraft.

  6. Analytical model of the structureborne interior noise induced by a propeller wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junger, M. C.; Garrelick, J. M.; Martinez, R.; Cole, J. E., III

    1984-01-01

    The structure-borne contribution to the interior noise that is induced by the propeller wake acting on the wing was studied. Analytical models were developed to describe each aspect of this path including the excitation loads, the wing and fuselage structures, and the interior acoustic space. The emphasis is on examining a variety of parameters, and as a result different models were developed to examine specific parameters. The excitation loading on the wing by the propeller wake is modeled by a distribution of rotating potential vortices whose strength is related to the thrust per blade. The response of the wing to this loading is examined using beam models. A model of a beam structurally connected to a cylindrical shell with an internal acoustic fluid was developed to examine the coupling of energy from the wing to the interior space. The model of the acoustic space allows for arbitrary end conditions (e.g., rigid or vibrating end caps). Calculations are presented using these models to compare with a laboratory test configuration as well as for parameters of a prop-fan aircraft.

  7. A coarse-grained model with implicit salt for RNAs: Predicting 3D structure, stability and salt effect

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Ya-Zhou; Wang, Feng-Hua; Wu, Yuan-Yan; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2014-09-14

    To bridge the gap between the sequences and 3-dimensional (3D) structures of RNAs, some computational models have been proposed for predicting RNA 3D structures. However, the existed models seldom consider the conditions departing from the room/body temperature and high salt (1M NaCl), and thus generally hardly predict the thermodynamics and salt effect. In this study, we propose a coarse-grained model with implicit salt for RNAs to predict 3D structures, stability, and salt effect. Combined with Monte Carlo simulated annealing algorithm and a coarse-grained force field, the model folds 46 tested RNAs (≤45 nt) including pseudoknots into their native-like structures from their sequences, with an overall mean RMSD of 3.5 Å and an overall minimum RMSD of 1.9 Å from the experimental structures. For 30 RNA hairpins, the present model also gives the reliable predictions for the stability and salt effect with the mean deviation ∼ 1.0 °C of melting temperatures, as compared with the extensive experimental data. In addition, the model could provide the ensemble of possible 3D structures for a short RNA at a given temperature/salt condition.

  8. Road salt emissions: A comparison of measurements and modelling using the NORTRIP road dust emission model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denby, B. R.; Ketzel, M.; Ellermann, T.; Stojiljkovic, A.; Kupiainen, K.; Niemi, J. V.; Norman, M.; Johansson, C.; Gustafsson, M.; Blomqvist, G.; Janhäll, S.; Sundvor, I.

    2016-09-01

    De-icing of road surfaces is necessary in many countries during winter to improve vehicle traction. Large amounts of salt, most often sodium chloride, are applied every year. Most of this salt is removed through drainage or traffic spray processes but a certain amount may be suspended, after drying of the road surface, into the air and will contribute to the concentration of particulate matter. Though some measurements of salt concentrations are available near roads, the link between road maintenance salting activities and observed concentrations of salt in ambient air is yet to be quantified. In this study the NORTRIP road dust emission model, which estimates the emissions of both dust and salt from the road surface, is applied at five sites in four Nordic countries for ten separate winter periods where daily mean ambient air measurements of salt concentrations are available. The model is capable of reproducing many of the salt emission episodes, both in time and intensity, but also fails on other occasions. The observed mean concentration of salt in PM10, over all ten datasets, is 4.2 μg/m3 and the modelled mean is 2.8 μg/m3, giving a fractional bias of -0.38. The RMSE of the mean concentrations, over all 10 datasets, is 2.9 μg/m3 with an average R2 of 0.28. The mean concentration of salt is similar to the mean exhaust contribution during the winter periods of 2.6 μg/m3. The contribution of salt to the kerbside winter mean PM10 concentration is estimated to increase by 4.1 ± 3.4 μg/m3 for every kg/m2 of salt applied on the road surface during the winter season. Additional sensitivity studies showed that the accurate logging of salt applications is a prerequisite for predicting salt emissions, as well as good quality data on precipitation. It also highlights the need for more simultaneous measurements of salt loading together with ambient air concentrations to help improve model parameterisations of salt and moisture removal processes.

  9. Salt-Pond Box Model (SPOOM) and Its Application to the Napa-Sonoma Salt Ponds, San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lionberger, Megan L.; Schoellhamer, David H.; Buchanan, Paul A.; Meyer, Scott

    2004-01-01

    A box model to simulate water volume and salinity of a salt pond has been developed by the U.S. Geological Survey to obtain water and salinity budgets. The model, SPOOM, uses the principle of conservation of mass to calculate daily pond volume and salinity and includes a salt crystallization and dissolution algorithm. Model inputs include precipitation, evaporation, infiltration, and water transfers. Salinity and water-surface-elevation data were collected monthly in the Napa-Sonoma Salt-Pond Complex from February 1999 through September 2001 and were used to calibrate and validate the model. The months when water transfers occurred were known but the magnitudes were unknown, so the magnitudes of water transfers were adjusted in the model to calibrate simulated pond volumes to measured pond volumes for three ponds. Modeled salinity was then compared with measured salinity, which remained a free parameter, in order to validate the model. Comparison showed good correlation between modeled and measured salinity. Deviations can be attributed to lack of water-transfer information. Water and salinity budgets obtained through modeling will be used to help interpret ecological data from the ponds. This model has been formulated to be applicable to the Napa-Sonoma salt ponds, but can be applied to other salt ponds.

  10. Measuring Jupiter's water abundance by Juno: the link between interior and formation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helled, Ravit; Lunine, Jonathan

    2014-07-01

    The Juno mission to Jupiter is planned to measure the water abundance in Jupiter's atmosphere below the cloud layer. This measurement is important because it can be used to reveal valuable information on Jupiter's origin and its composition. In this paper, we discuss the importance of this measurement, the challenges in its interpretation, and address how it can be connected to interior and formation models of Jupiter.

  11. A trade-off analysis design tool. Aircraft interior noise-motion/passenger satisfaction model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, I. D.

    1977-01-01

    A design tool was developed to enhance aircraft passenger satisfaction. The effect of aircraft interior motion and noise on passenger comfort and satisfaction was modelled. Effects of individual aircraft noise sources were accounted for, and the impact of noise on passenger activities and noise levels to safeguard passenger hearing were investigated. The motion noise effect models provide a means for tradeoff analyses between noise and motion variables, and also provide a framework for optimizing noise reduction among noise sources. Data for the models were collected onboard commercial aircraft flights and specially scheduled tests.

  12. Validation of an interior noise prediction model for a composite cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyer, Todd B.; Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    1987-01-01

    An acoustic modal analysis has been performed in the cavity of a composite cylinder model of an aircraft fuselage. The filament wound, composite shell is 12 feet long and 5.5 feet in diameter. A one-half-in. thick plywood floor is attached to the shell 69 deg from the vertical centerline through the bottom of the shell. The acoustic modal frequencies were obtained from a sound pressure level and phase survey conducted throughout the interior volume bounded by the floor, endcaps and stiffened shell, while being excited by white noise from a loudspeaker source. The measured acoustic resonance frequencies and mode shapes compare well with analytical predictions from the Propeller Aircraft Interior Noise (PAIN) model. Details of the theory and derivation of the acoustic characteristics have been included. Reverberation time measurements, using the integrated impulse technique, have been performed to determine acoustic loss factors. These measured loss factors have been input to the PAIN program in order to more accurately predict the space-averaged interior noise of the composite cylinder.

  13. Controls on interior West Antarctic Ice Sheet Elevations: inferences from geologic constraints and ice sheet modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackert, Robert P.; Putnam, Aaron E.; Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy; Pollard, David; DeConto, Robert M.; Kurz, Mark D.; Borns, Harold W.

    2013-04-01

    Knowledge of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) response to past sea level and climate forcing is necessary to predict its response to warmer temperatures in the future. The timing and extent of past interior WAIS elevation changes provides insight to WAIS behavior and constraints for ice sheet models. Constraints prior to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) however, are rare. Surface exposure ages of glacial erratics near the WAIS divide at Mt. Waesche in Marie Byrd Land, and at the Ohio Range in the Transantarctic Mountains, range from ∼10 ka to >500 ka without a dependence on elevation. The probability distribution functions (PDF) of the exposure ages at both locations, are remarkably similar. During the last glaciation, maximum interior ice elevations as recorded by moraines and erratics were reached between 10 ka and 12 ka. However, most exposure ages are older than the LGM and cluster around ∼40 ka and ∼80 ka. The peak in the exposure age distributions at ∼40 ka includes ages of alpine moraine boulders at Mercer Ridge in the Ohio Range. Comparison of the PDF of exposures ages from the Ohio Range and Mt. Waesche with the temperature record from the Fuji Dome ice core indicates that the youngest peak in the exposure age distributions corresponds to the abrupt warming during the Last Glacial termination. A prominent peak in the Ohio Range PDF corresponds to the penultimate termination (stage 5e). During the intervening glacial period, there is not a consistent relationship between the peaks in the PDF at each location and temperature. A combined ice sheet/ice shelf model with forcing scaled to marine δ18O predicts that interior WAIS elevations near the ice divide have varied ∼300 m over the Last Glacial cycle. Peaks in the PDF correspond to model highstands over the last 200 ka. In the simulated elevation history, maximum ice elevations at Ohio Range (+100 m) and Mt. Waesche (+60 m) occur at ∼10 ka, in agreement with observations from these sites

  14. A new nonlinear magnetic circuit model for dynamic analysis of interior permanent magnet synchronous motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kenji; Saito, Kenichi; Watanabe, Tadaaki; Ichinokura, Osamu

    2005-04-01

    Interior permanent magnet synchronous motors (IPMSMs) have high efficiency and torque, since the motors can utilize reluctance torque in addition to magnet torque. The IPMSMs are widely used for electric household appliances and electric bicycles and vehicles. A quantitative analysis method of dynamic characteristics of the IPMSMs, however, has not been clarified fully. For optimum design, investigation of dynamic characteristics considering magnetic nonlinearity is needed. This paper presents a new nonlinear magnetic circuit model of an IPMSM, and suggests a dynamic analysis method using the proposed magnetic circuit model.

  15. Development of a Mantle Convection Physical Model to Assist with Teaching about Earth's Interior Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glesener, G. B.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    The Modeling and Educational Demonstrations Laboratory (MEDL) at UCLA is developing a mantle convection physical model to assist educators with the pedagogy of Earth’s interior processes. Our design goal consists of two components to help the learner gain conceptual understanding by means of visual interactions without the burden of distracters, which may promote alternative conceptions. Distracters may be any feature of the conceptual model that causes the learner to use inadequate mental artifact to help him or her understand what the conceptual model is intended to convey. The first component, and most important, is a psychological component that links properties of “everyday things” (Norman, 1988) to the natural phenomenon, mantle convection. Some examples of everyday things may be heat rising out from a freshly popped bag of popcorn, or cold humid air falling from an open freezer. The second component is the scientific accuracy of the conceptual model. We would like to simplify the concepts for the learner without sacrificing key information that is linked to other natural phenomena the learner will come across in future science lessons. By taking into account the learner’s mental artifacts in combination with a simplified, but accurate, representation of what scientists know of the Earth’s interior, we expect the learner to have the ability to create an adequate qualitative mental simulation of mantle convection. We will be presenting some of our prototypes of this mantle convection physical model at this year’s poster session and invite constructive input from our colleagues.

  16. Two-oscillator Kantowski-Sachs model of the Schwarzschild black hole interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djordjevic, Goran S.; Nesic, Ljubisa; Radovancevic, Darko

    2016-08-01

    In this paper the interior of the Schwarzschild black hole, which is presented as a vacuum, homogeneous and anisotropic Kantowski-Sachs minisuperspace cosmological model, is considered. Lagrangian of the model is reduced by a suitable coordinate transformation to Lagrangian of two decoupled oscillators with the same frequencies and with zero energy in total (an oscillator-ghost-oscillator system). The model is presented in a classical, a p-adic and a noncommutative case. Then, within the standard quantum approach Wheeler-DeWitt equation and its general solutions, i.e. a wave function of the model is written, and then an adelic wave function is constructed. Finally, thermodynamics of the model is studied by using the Feynman-Hibbs procedure.

  17. Recording and Modelling of MONUMENTS' Interior Space Using Range and Optical Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiadis, Charalampos; Patias, Petros; Tsioukas, Vasilios

    2016-06-01

    Three dimensional modelling of artefacts and building interiors is a highly active research field in our days. Several techniques are being utilized to perform such a task, spanning from traditional surveying techniques and photogrammetry to structured light scanners, laser scanners and so on. New technological advancements in both hardware and software create new recording techniques, tools and approaches. In this paper we present a new recording and modelling approach based on the SwissRanger SR4000 range camera coupled with a Canon 400D dSLR camera. The hardware component of our approach consists of a fixed base, which encloses the range and SLR cameras. The two sensors are fully calibrated and registered to each other thus we were able to produce colorized point clouds acquired from the range camera. In this paper we present the initial design and calibration of the system along with experimental data regarding the accuracy of the proposed approach. We are also providing results regarding the modelling of interior spaces and artefacts accompanied with accuracy tests from other modelling approaches based on photogrammetry and laser scanning.

  18. Evaluation of landscape models for wolverines in the interior Northwest, United States of America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowland, M.M.; Wisdom, M.J.; Johnson, D.H.; Wales, B.C.; Copeland, J.P.; Edelmann, F.B.

    2003-01-01

    The wolverine (Gulo gulo) is an uncommon, wide-ranging carnivore of conservation concern. We evaluated performance of landscape models for wolverines within their historical range at 2 scales in the interior Northwest based on recent observations (n = 421) from Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana. At the subbasin scale, simple overlays of habitat and road-density classes were effective in predicting observations of wolverines. At the watershed scale, we used a Bayesian belief network model to provide spatially explicit estimates of relative habitat capability. The model has 3 inputs: amount of habitat, human population density, and road density. At both scales, the best models revealed strong correspondence between means of predicted counts of wolverines and means of observed counts (P < 0.001). Our results can be used to guide regional conservation planning for this elusive animal.

  19. Evaluation of landscape models for wolverines in the interior northwest, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowland, M.M.; Wisdom, M.J.; Johnson, D.H.; Wales, B.C.; Copeland, J.P.; Edelmann, F.B.

    2003-01-01

    The wolverine (Gulo gulo) is an uncommon, wide-ranging carnivore of conservation concern. We evaluated performance of landscape models for wolverines within their historical range at 2 scales in the interior Northwest based on recent observations (n = 421) from Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana. At the subbasin scale, simple overlays of habitat and road-density classes were effective in predicting observations of wolverines. At the watershed scale, we used a Bayesian belief network model to provide spatially explicit estimates of relative habitat capability. The model has 3 inputs: amount of habitat, human population density, and road density. At both scales, the best models revealed strong correspondence between means of predicted counts of wolverines and means of observed counts (P < 0.001). Our results can be used to guide regional conservation planning for this elusive animal.

  20. An Induced Venusian Magnetosphere Model for Investigating Venus’s Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Peter J.; Russell, Christopher T.; Villarreal, Michaela N.; Luhmann, Janet G.; Zhang, T. L.

    2015-11-01

    The deep layers of Venus are usually considered to be similar to those of the Earth, but the parameters of these layers, including the size of the Venusian core, remain unknown. If Venus has a metallic core, the magnetic field that enters the planet cannot diffuse into the core within the time scales when the external magnetic field can remain steady. The bending of magnetic field lines by the core could be measured at low altitudes, providing information to infer the core size. This method of magnetic sounding has successfully estimated the size of the lunar core, helped by the fact that the Earth’s magnetotail can provide a uniform background magnetic field for the Moon. At Venus, the magnetic field is much more complicated, as the solar wind interaction with the planet develops an induced magnetosphere. Estimating the magnetic induction by the core in this non-uniform, non-axisymmetric magnetic field environment also requires numerical computation.This study develops an induced Venusian magnetosphere model that is suitable for understanding Venus’s interior. Different from the global plasma models, this model includes the planetary interior in the model domain. A tradeoff is the use of magnetostatic equations, which enables faster computation in return. This approach is similar to that adopted by popular empirical models for the terrestrial magnetosphere. Improved from our previous 2-D model, the new 3-D model consists of a conducting core, the Venus counterpart of the Chapman-Ferraro current, and the tail current sheet. In a separate scenario, a global dipole moment is also considered. The finite element method is used to compute the magnetic field vectors within the induced Venusian magnetopause. We will present model results as well as their comparisons with the magnetic field measurements by PVO and by the more recent VEX mission.

  1. Modeling Coupled THM Processes and Brine Migration in Salt at High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Blanco-Martin, Laura; Molins, Sergi; Trebotich, David; Birkholzer, Jens

    2015-09-01

    In this report, we present FY2015 progress by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) related to modeling of coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in salt and their effect on brine migration at high temperatures. This is a combined milestone report related to milestone Salt R&D Milestone “Modeling Coupled THM Processes and Brine Migration in Salt at High Temperatures” (M3FT-15LB0818012) and the Salt Field Testing Milestone (M3FT-15LB0819022) to support the overall objectives of the salt field test planning.

  2. Modeling the effects of fire severity on soil organic horizons and forest composition in Interior Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genet, H.; Barrett, K. M.; Johnstone, J. F.; McGuire, A. D.; Yuan, F.; Euskirchen, E. S.; Kasischke, E. S.; Rupp, S. T.; Turetsky, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    The fire regime in the boreal region of interior Alaska has been intensifying in terms of both area burned and severity over the last three decades. Based on projections of climate change, this trend is expected to continue throughout the 21st century. Fire causes abrupt changes in energy, nutrient and water balances influencing habitat and vegetation composition. An important factor influencing these changes is the reduction of the soil organic horizon because of differential regeneration capabilities of conifer and evergreen shrubs vs. deciduous and herbaceous vegetation on organic vs. mineral soils. The goal of this study is to develop a prognostic model to simulate the effects of fire severity on soil organic horizons and to evaluate its long-term consequences on forest composition in interior Alaska. Existing field observations were analyzed to build a predictive model of the depth of burning of soil organic horizon after a fire. The model is driven by data sets of fire occurrence, climate, and topography. Post-fire vegetation succession was simulated as a function of post-fire organic horizon depth. The fire severity and post-fire vegetation succession models were then implemented within a biogeochemistry model, the process-based Terrestrial Ecosystem Model. Simulations for 21st century climate scenarios at a 1 by 1km resolution for the Alaska Yukon River Basin were conducted to evaluate the effects of considering vs. ignoring post-fire vegetation succession on carbon dynamics. The results of these simulations indicate that it is important for ecosystem models to represent the influence of fire severity on post-fire vegetation succession in order to fully understand the consequences of changes in climate and disturbance regimes on boreal ecosystems.

  3. Heat flow and gravity responses over salt bodies: A comparative model analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Corrigan, J.; Sweat, M.

    1995-07-01

    Two-dimensional numerical modeling of sea-floor heat flow and water-bottom gravity responses to systematic variations in simple subsurface salt body geometries provides insight on the relative usefulness of these two data types for extracting salt geometry information. For a given salt body geometry, diffusion of heat through overlying sediments results in a dramatic decrease in the amplitude of heat flow anomalies as the depth to the top of the salt body increases. For top-of-salt depths greater than about 1 km, the heat flow response is insensitive to the length of salt feeder stocks and to the thickness of salt tongues/sheets. This shallow depth-to-top-of-salt sensitivity range, in addition to a number of environmental factors that can adversely affect interpretation of heat flow anomalies in terms of heat refraction towards and through salt bodies, severely limits the usefulness of sea-floor heat flow data for constraining aspects of salt body geometry. For gravity data, the critical factor for addressing salt body geometry is the distribution of salt relative to the sediment-salt density crossover depth (above and below which salt is more and less dense, respectively, than the surrounding sediment). Except when ht relevant geometry information being sought (presence and/or length of feeder stock, thickness of salt tongue or sheet) is near the density crossover depth, the geometry-related information content of the gravity field is greater than that of the heat flow field. Based on these model results, measurement uncertainty considerations, and data limitations, the authors conclude that gravity data generally offer an order of magnitude greater resolution capability than sea-floor heat flow data for addressing salt body geometry issues of exploration interest.

  4. Volatile-rich Crater Interior Deposits on Mars: An Energy Balance Model of Modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Patrick S.; Head, James W.; Hecht, Michael H.

    2003-01-01

    Several craters on Mars are partially filled by material emplaced by post-impact processes. Populations of such craters include those in the circumsouth polar cap region, in Arabia Terra, associated with the Medusae Fossae Formation, and in the northern lowlands proximal to the north polar cap. In this study, crater fill material refers to an interior mound, generally separated from the interior walls of the crater by a trough that may be continuous along the crater s circumference (i.e. a ring-shaped trough), or may only partially contact the crater walls (i.e. a crescent-shaped trough). The fill deposit is frequently off-center from the crater center and may be asymmetric, (i.e. not circular) in plan view shape. Here we test the hypothesis that asymmetries in volatile fill shape, profile, and center-location within a crater result from asymmetries in local energy balance within the crater due mainly to variation of solar insolation and radiative effects of the crater walls over the crater interior. We first focus on Korolev crater in the northern lowlands. We can then apply this model to other craters in different regions. If asymmetry in morphology and location of crater fill are consistent with radiative-dominated asymmetries in energy budget within the crater, then 1) the volatile-rich composition of the fill is supported (this process should not be effective at shaping volcanic or sedimentary deposits), and 2) the dominant factor determining the observed shape of volatile-rich crater fill is the local radiative energy budget within the crater (and erosive processes such as eolian deflation are not necessary).

  5. The salting behavior of glyoxal in model aerosols containing sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waxman, Eleanor; Kampf, Christopher; Slowik, Jay; Dommen, Josef; Pfaffenberger, Lisa; Praplan, Arnaud; Prevot, Andre; Baltensperger, Urs; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Volkamer, Rainer

    2013-04-01

    Glyoxal, the smallest alpha-dicarbonyl, is a ubiquitous component of biogenic environments and urban, arctic, and marine atmospheres. An increasing body of evidence finds small water soluble and polar oxygenated hydrocarbons (OVOC) like glyoxal in the condensed phase despite their high vapor pressures. It is generally believed that multiphase chemical reactions in cloud or aerosol water form soluble products with lower vapor pressures, and that this lowering of the vapor pressure is the primary cause for the enhanced partitioning. However, our data shows that this could be due to electrostatic forces instead. We have performed a series of simulation chamber experiments to quantify for the first time the time-resolved evolution of glyoxal partitioning to aqueous model aerosols containing sulfate. These measurements show an exponential increase in Henry's law constants with seed particle salt concentrations. This exponential increase is found to be independent of the presence or absence of organics in the seed particles, and can be explained by means of a single parameter, the salting constant K_S, to predict the partitioning of glyoxal over a wide range of environmental conditions (cloud water and concentrated salt solutions of aerosol water). The formalism that we find best explains our data builds on the theory developed by Setschenow in the late 19th century. It is known to the limnology community, but to our knowledge has not previously been used to describe aqueous systems in the atmosphere (aerosols or cloud droplets). The rapid and high monomer partitioning suggests that electrostatic forces triggered by the high dipole moment of glyoxal, rather than vapor pressure, are at the core of the mechanism that causes the high partitioning. This high abundance of glyoxal monomers is compared with oligomeric reservoirs and irreversible reaction pathways (NH4 or OH radical reactions), and representations for use in atmospheric models are discussed that can explain most

  6. Hydrodynamic modeling for river delta salt marshes using lidar topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, Ben R.

    2014-05-01

    Topographic data from lidar and multi-beam sonar create new challenges for hydrodynamic models of estuaries, tidelands, and river deltas. We now can readily obtain detailed elevation data on 1 m scales and finer, but solving hydrodynamics with model grid cells at these small scales remains computationally prohibitive (primarily because of the small time step required for small grid cells). Practical estuarine models for the next decade or so will likely have grid scales in the range of 5 to 15 m. So how should we handle known subgrid-scale features? Simply throwing out known data does not seem like a good idea, but there is no consensus on how best to incorporate knowledge of subgrid topography into either hydrodynamic or turbulence models. This presentation discusses both the theoretical foundations for modeling subgrid-scale features and the challenges in applying these ideas in the salt marshes of a river delta. The subgrid problem highlights some important areas for field and laboratory research to provide calibration parameters for new models that upscale the effects of known subgrid features.

  7. The role of interior watershed processes in improving parameter estimation and performance of watershed models.

    PubMed

    Yen, Haw; Bailey, Ryan T; Arabi, Mazdak; Ahmadi, Mehdi; White, Michael J; Arnold, Jeffrey G

    2014-09-01

    Watershed models typically are evaluated solely through comparison of in-stream water and nutrient fluxes with measured data using established performance criteria, whereas processes and responses within the interior of the watershed that govern these global fluxes often are neglected. Due to the large number of parameters at the disposal of these models, circumstances may arise in which excellent global results are achieved using inaccurate magnitudes of these "intra-watershed" responses. When used for scenario analysis, a given model hence may inaccurately predict the global, in-stream effect of implementing land-use practices at the interior of the watershed. In this study, data regarding internal watershed behavior are used to constrain parameter estimation to maintain realistic intra-watershed responses while also matching available in-stream monitoring data. The methodology is demonstrated for the Eagle Creek Watershed in central Indiana. Streamflow and nitrate (NO) loading are used as global in-stream comparisons, with two process responses, the annual mass of denitrification and the ratio of NO losses from subsurface and surface flow, used to constrain parameter estimation. Results show that imposing these constraints not only yields realistic internal watershed behavior but also provides good in-stream comparisons. Results further demonstrate that in the absence of incorporating intra-watershed constraints, evaluation of nutrient abatement strategies could be misleading, even though typical performance criteria are satisfied. Incorporating intra-watershed responses yields a watershed model that more accurately represents the observed behavior of the system and hence a tool that can be used with confidence in scenario evaluation. PMID:25603246

  8. Model for transient creep of southeastern New Mexico rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, W; Wawersik, W R; Lauson, H S

    1980-11-01

    In a previous analysis, existing experimental data pertaining to creep tests on rock salt from the Salado formation of S.E. New Mexico were fitted to an exponential transient creep law. While very early time portions of creep strain histories were not fitted very well for tests at low temperatures and stresses, initial creep rates in particular generally being underestimated, the exponential creep law has the property that the transient creep strain approaches a finite limit with time, and is therefore desirable from a creep modelling point of view. In this report, an analysis of transient creep is made. It is found that exponential transient creep can be related to steady-state creep through a universal creep curve. The resultant description is convenient for creep analyses where very early time behavior is not important.

  9. INTERIOR MODELS OF SATURN: INCLUDING THE UNCERTAINTIES IN SHAPE AND ROTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Helled, Ravit; Guillot, Tristan

    2013-04-20

    The accurate determination of Saturn's gravitational coefficients by Cassini could provide tighter constraints on Saturn's internal structure. Also, occultation measurements provide important information on the planetary shape which is often not considered in structure models. In this paper we explore how wind velocities and internal rotation affect the planetary shape and the constraints on Saturn's interior. We show that within the geodetic approach the derived physical shape is insensitive to the assumed deep rotation. Saturn's re-derived equatorial and polar radii at 100 mbar are found to be 54,445 {+-} 10 km and 60,365 {+-} 10 km, respectively. To determine Saturn's interior, we use one-dimensional three-layer hydrostatic structure models and present two approaches to include the constraints on the shape. These approaches, however, result in only small differences in Saturn's derived composition. The uncertainty in Saturn's rotation period is more significant: with Voyager's 10{sup h}39{sup m} period, the derived mass of heavy elements in the envelope is 0-7 M{sub Circled-Plus }. With a rotation period of 10{sup h}32{sup m}, this value becomes <4 M{sub Circled-Plus }, below the minimum mass inferred from spectroscopic measurements. Saturn's core mass is found to depend strongly on the pressure at which helium phase separation occurs, and is estimated to be 5-20 M{sub Circled-Plus }. Lower core masses are possible if the separation occurs deeper than 4 Mbar. We suggest that the analysis of Cassini's radio occultation measurements is crucial to test shape models and could lead to constraints on Saturn's rotation profile and departures from hydrostatic equilibrium.

  10. Experimental investigation of opacity models for stellar interiors, inertial fusion, and high energy density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, James

    2008-11-01

    Theoretical opacities are required for calculating energy transport in plasmas. In particular, understanding stellar interiors, inertial fusion, and Z-pinches depends on the opacities of mid-atomic-number elements in the 150-300 eV temperature range. These models are complex and experimental validation is crucial. For example, solar models presently disagree with helioseismology and one possible explanation is inadequate opacities. Testing these opacities requires a uniform plasma at temperatures high enough to produce the ion charge states that exist in the sun. Typical opacity experiments heat a sample using x-rays and measure the spectrally resolved transmission with a backlight. The difficulty grows as the temperature increases because the heating x-ray source must supply more energy and the backlighter source must be bright enough to overwhelm the plasma self emission. These problems were overcome using the dynamic hohlraum x-ray source at Sandia's Z facility to measure the transmission of a mixed Mg-Fe plasma heated above 150 eV. This capability will also advance opacity science for other high energy density plasmas. This tutorial describes opacity experiment challenges including accurate transmission measurements, plasma diagnostics, and quantitative model comparisons. The solar interior serves as a focal problem and Z facility experiments are used to illustrate the techniques. **In collaboration with C. Iglesias (LLNL), R. Mancini (U. Nevada), J.MacFarlane, I. Golovkin and P. Wang (Prism), C. Blancard, Ph. Cosse, G. Faussurier, F. Gilleron, and J.C. Pain (CEA), J. Abdallah Jr. (LANL), and G.A. Rochau and P.W. Lake (Sandia). ++Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Applications of Panoramic Images: from 720° Panorama to Interior 3d Models of Augmented Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, I.-C.; Tsai, F.

    2015-05-01

    A series of panoramic images are usually used to generate a 720° panorama image. Although panoramic images are typically used for establishing tour guiding systems, in this research, we demonstrate the potential of using panoramic images acquired from multiple sites to create not only 720° panorama, but also three-dimensional (3D) point clouds and 3D indoor models. Since 3D modeling is one of the goals of this research, the location of the panoramic sites needed to be carefully planned in order to maintain a robust result for close-range photogrammetry. After the images are acquired, panoramic images are processed into 720° panoramas, and these panoramas which can be used directly as panorama guiding systems or other applications. In addition to these straightforward applications, interior orientation parameters can also be estimated while generating 720° panorama. These parameters are focal length, principle point, and lens radial distortion. The panoramic images can then be processed with closerange photogrammetry procedures to extract the exterior orientation parameters and generate 3D point clouds. In this research, VisaulSFM, a structure from motion software is used to estimate the exterior orientation, and CMVS toolkit is used to generate 3D point clouds. Next, the 3D point clouds are used as references to create building interior models. In this research, Trimble Sketchup was used to build the model, and the 3D point cloud was added to the determining of locations of building objects using plane finding procedure. In the texturing process, the panorama images are used as the data source for creating model textures. This 3D indoor model was used as an Augmented Reality model replacing a guide map or a floor plan commonly used in an on-line touring guide system. The 3D indoor model generating procedure has been utilized in two research projects: a cultural heritage site at Kinmen, and Taipei Main Station pedestrian zone guidance and navigation system. The

  12. Using Interior Point Method Optimization Techniques to Improve 2- and 3-Dimensional Models of Earth Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, A.; Gutierrez, A. E.; Velasco, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    2- and 3-Dimensional models obtained from the inversion of geophysical data are widely used to represent the structural composition of the Earth and to constrain independent models obtained from other geological data (e.g. core samples, seismic surveys, etc.). However, inverse modeling of gravity data presents a very unstable and ill-posed mathematical problem, given that solutions are non-unique and small changes in parameters (position and density contrast of an anomalous body) can highly impact the resulting model. Through the implementation of an interior-point method constrained optimization technique, we improve the 2-D and 3-D models of Earth structures representing known density contrasts mapping anomalous bodies in uniform regions and boundaries between layers in layered environments. The proposed techniques are applied to synthetic data and gravitational data obtained from the Rio Grande Rift and the Cooper Flat Mine region located in Sierra County, New Mexico. Specifically, we improve the 2- and 3-D Earth models by getting rid of unacceptable solutions (those that do not satisfy the required constraints or are geologically unfeasible) given the reduction of the solution space.

  13. Martian Craters with Interior Deposits: A Global Survey and Wind Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, K. A.; Schmeeckle, M. W.

    2012-12-01

    Sediment mounds occur within impact craters across the surface of Mars, but their origin and evolution remain poorly understood. Interior deposits are found in craters of all sizes, are not always centered in their host crater, and can rise higher than the surrounding crater walls (Malin and Edgett 2000). Gale Crater, the landing site for the Mars Science Laboratory, is one prominent example of a crater containing a central mound. The prevalent hypothesis for their formation presents the mounds as eroded remnants of deposits that once filled the crater (Malin and Edgett 2000). Subaerial, subaqueous, volcanic, and impact processes have all been proposed as methods of deposition and/or erosion (e.g. Malin and Edgett 2000, Scott and Tanaka 1982, Cabrol et al. 1999). Previous surveys of these interior deposits have either been restricted to a limited area (Thompson et al. 2011) or generalized to all sedimentary deposits on Mars (Malin and Edgett 2000). This study examines the global population of craters with interior deposits independently from other sedimentary units. We catalog the location and radius for each mound and its parent crater. Preliminary results suggest certain areas on Mars that have concentrations of craters containing interior deposits show local biases as to where the deposit is located within the crater. For example, the deposits in western Arabia Terra are preferentially located on the western side of their host craters. We investigate the hypothesis that this bias developed from wind blowing in a preferred direction and causing sediment to either deposit or erode preferentially on one side. We have developed an aeolian morphodynamics model to test this hypothesis. In each time iteration the model first calculates the 3-dimensional steady-state wind field by solving the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. Currently we employ the Spalart-Allmaras RANS closure equations with a rough wall approximation. Then the sediment flux field is

  14. Sediment and vegetation spatial dynamics facing sea-level rise in microtidal salt marshes: Insights from an ecogeomorphic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belliard, J.-P.; Di Marco, N.; Carniello, L.; Toffolon, M.

    2016-07-01

    Modeling efforts have considerably improved our understanding on the chief processes that govern the evolution of salt marshes under climate change. Yet the spatial dynamic response of salt marshes to sea-level rise that results from the interactions between the tidal landforms of interest and the presence of bio-geomorphic features has not been addressed explicitly. Accordingly, we use a modeling framework that integrates the co-evolution of the marsh platform and the embedded tidal networks to study sea-level rise effects on spatial sediment and vegetation dynamics in microtidal salt marshes considering different ecological scenarios. The analysis unveils mechanisms that drive spatial variations in sedimentation rates in ways that increase marsh resilience to rising sea-levels. In particular, marsh survival is related to the effectiveness of transport of sediments toward the interior marshland. This study hints at additional dynamics related to the modulation of channel cross-sections affecting sediment advection in the channels and subsequent delivery in the inner marsh, which should be definitely considered in the study of marsh adaptability to sea-level rise and posterior management.

  15. Revised predictive equations for salt intrusion modelling in estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisen, J. I. A.; Savenije, H. H. G.; Nijzink, R. C.

    2015-01-01

    For one-dimensional salt intrusion models to be predictive, we need predictive equations to link model parameters to observable hydraulic and geometric variables. The one-dimensional model of Savenije (1993b) made use of predictive equation for the Van der Burgh coefficient K and the dispersion at the seaward boundary D0. Here we have improved these equations by using an expanded database, including new previously un-surveyed estuaries. Furthermore, we derived a revised predictive equation for the dispersion at tidal average (TA) condition and with the boundary situated at the well identifiable inflection point where the estuary changes from wave-dominated to tide-dominated geometry. We used 89 salinity profiles in 30 estuaries (including 7 recently studied estuaries in Malaysia), and empirically derived a range of equations using various combinations of dimensionless parameters. We split our data in two separated datasets: (1) with more reliable data for calibration, and (2) with less reliable data for validation. The dimensionless parameters that gave the best performance depended on the geometry, tidal strength, friction and the Richardson Number. The limitation of the equations is that the friction is generally unknown. In order to overcome this problem, a coupling has been made with the analytical hydraulic model of Cai et al. (2012), which makes use of observed tidal damping and by which the friction can be determined.

  16. Revised predictive equations for salt intrusion modelling in estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisen, J. I. A.; Savenije, H. H. G.; Nijzink, R. C.

    2015-06-01

    For one-dimensional salt intrusion models to be predictive, we need predictive equations to link model parameters to observable hydraulic and geometric variables. The one-dimensional model of Savenije (1993b) made use of predictive equations for the Van der Burgh coefficient K and the dispersion at the seaward boundary D0. Here we have improved these equations by using an expanded database, including new previously un-surveyed estuaries. Furthermore, we derived a revised predictive equation for the dispersion at tidal average condition and with the boundary situated at the well identifiable inflection point where the estuary changes from wave-dominated to tide-dominated geometry. We used 89 salinity profiles in 30 estuaries (including seven recently studied estuaries in Malaysia), and empirically derived a range of equations using various combinations of dimensionless parameters. We split our data in two separated data sets: (1) with more reliable data for calibration, and (2) with less reliable data for validation. The dimensionless parameters that gave the best performance depended on the geometry, tidal strength, friction and the Richardson number. The limitation of the equations is that the friction is generally unknown. In order to overcome this problem, a coupling has been made with the analytical hydraulic model of Cai et al. (2012), which makes use of observed tidal damping and by which the friction can be determined.

  17. The response of Dahl salt-sensitive and salt-resistant female rats to a space flight model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thierry-Palmer, Myrtle; Cephas, Stacy; Cleek, Tammy; Sayavongsa, Phouyong; Arnaud, Sara B.

    2003-01-01

    Vitamin D metabolism in the Dahl salt-sensitive (S) rat, a model of salt-induced hypertension, differs from that in the Dahl salt-resistant (R) rat. We have tested the hypothesis that differences in vitamin D metabolism would render the Dahl S rat more susceptible than the Dahl R rat to the effects of a space flight model. Dahl female rats were tail suspended (hind limb unloaded) for 28 days, while fed a low salt (3 g/kg sodium chloride) diet. Plasma 25-OHD concentrations of S rats were significantly lower than that of R rats. Plasma 1,25-(OH)2D concentration was 50% lower in unloaded than in loaded S rats, but was unaffected in unloaded R rats. The left soleus muscle weight and breaking strength of the left femur (torsion test) were 50% and 25% lower in unloaded than in loaded S and R rats. The mineral content of the left femur, however, was significantly lower (by 11%) only in unloaded S rats. We conclude that female S rats are more vulnerable than female R rats to decreases in plasma 1,25-(OH)2D concentration and femur mineral content during hind limb unloading, but equally vulnerable to muscle atrophy and reduced breaking strength of the femur.

  18. Modelling Salt Intrusion and Nitrate Concentrations in the Ythan Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillibrand, P. A.; Balls, P. W.

    1998-12-01

    A one-dimensional salt intrusion model is used to investigate the hydrography of the Ythan estuary, a small shallow macrotidal estuary in the north-east of Scotland. The model simulates the longitudinal distributions of water level, salinity and total oxidized nitrogen (TON) in the estuary. The model employs upstream differencing and the Smolarkiewicz anti-diffusion scheme to avoid the numerical difficulties typically encountered when modelling strong tidal flows using centred differences. The physical mechanisms driving the simulations are the tide at the entrance to the estuary and freshwater discharge at the head. The model was calibrated against measurements of water level made at three locations in the estuary, salinity observations made at a central platform and axial salinity distributions. At both spring and neap tides, the full range of salinity observed at the central platform was simulated. However, at the midway stage between springs and neaps, the simulated peak salinity was less than that observed. This was probably due to the sensitivity of the model to the digitisation of the estuarine bathymetry. The model successfully simulated salinity distributions for periods of high and low river flow, and was used to illustrate how TON concentrations fluctuated in response to variations in river flow. The potential implications of variations in the bathymetry of the estuary on salinity and nutrient distributions were predicted to be slight. However, the four fold increase in riverine TON concentrations that has occurred over the past 30 years was shown to increase TON distributions along the entire length of the estuary. The calculated estuary flushing time was strongly dependent on river flow and varied between 11-60 h.

  19. Modeling and numerical simulation of interior ballistic processes in a 120mm mortar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Ragini

    Numerical Simulation of interior ballistic processes in gun and mortar systems is a very difficult and interesting problem. The mathematical model for the physical processes in the mortar systems consists of a system of non-linear coupled partial differential equations, which also contain non-homogeneity in form of the source terms. This work includes the development of a three-dimensional mortar interior ballistic (3D-MIB) code for a 120mm mortar system and its stage-wise validation with multiple sets of experimental data. The 120mm mortar system consists of a flash tube contained within an ignition cartridge, tail-boom, fin region, charge increments containing granular propellants, and a projectile payload. The ignition cartridge discharges hot gas-phase products and unburned granular propellants into the mortar tube through vent-holes on its surface. In view of the complexity of interior ballistic processes in the mortar propulsion system, the overall problem was solved in a modular fashion, i.e., simulating each physical component of the mortar propulsion system separately. These modules were coupled together with appropriate initial and boundary conditions. The ignition cartridge and mortar tube contain nitrocellulose-based ball propellants. Therefore, the gas dynamical processes in the 120mm mortar system are two-phase, which were simulated by considering both phases as an interpenetrating continuum. Mass and energy fluxes from the flash tube into the granular bed of ignition cartridge were determined from a semi-empirical technique. For the tail-boom section, a transient one-dimensional two-phase compressible flow solver based on method of characteristics was developed. The mathematical model for the interior ballistic processes in the mortar tube posed an initial value problem with discontinuous initial conditions with the characteristics of the Riemann problem due to the discontinuity of the initial conditions. Therefore, the mortar tube model was solved

  20. Modelling artificial sea salt emission in large eddy simulations.

    PubMed

    Maalick, Z; Korhonen, H; Kokkola, H; Kühn, T; Romakkaniemi, S

    2014-12-28

    We study the dispersion of sea salt particles from artificially injected sea spray at a cloud-resolving scale. Understanding of how different aerosol processes affect particle dispersion is crucial when designing emission sources for marine cloud brightening. Compared with previous studies, we include for the first time an explicit treatment of aerosol water, which takes into account condensation, evaporation and their effect on ambient temperature. This enables us to capture the negative buoyancy caused by water evaporation from aerosols. Additionally, we use a higher model resolution to capture aerosol loss through coagulation near the source point. We find that, with a seawater flux of 15 kg s(-1), the cooling due to evaporation can be as much as 1.4 K, causing a delay in particle dispersion of 10-20 min. This delay enhances particle scavenging by a factor of 1.14 compared with simulations without aerosol water. We further show that both cooling and particle dispersion depend on the model resolution, with a maximum particle scavenging efficiency of 20% within 5 h after emission at maximum resolution of 50 m. Based on these results, we suggest further regional high-resolution studies which model several injection periods over several weeks. PMID:25404679

  1. Modelling artificial sea salt emission in large eddy simulations

    PubMed Central

    Maalick, Z.; Korhonen, H.; Kokkola, H.; Kühn, T.; Romakkaniemi, S.

    2014-01-01

    We study the dispersion of sea salt particles from artificially injected sea spray at a cloud-resolving scale. Understanding of how different aerosol processes affect particle dispersion is crucial when designing emission sources for marine cloud brightening. Compared with previous studies, we include for the first time an explicit treatment of aerosol water, which takes into account condensation, evaporation and their effect on ambient temperature. This enables us to capture the negative buoyancy caused by water evaporation from aerosols. Additionally, we use a higher model resolution to capture aerosol loss through coagulation near the source point. We find that, with a seawater flux of 15 kg s−1, the cooling due to evaporation can be as much as 1.4 K, causing a delay in particle dispersion of 10–20 min. This delay enhances particle scavenging by a factor of 1.14 compared with simulations without aerosol water. We further show that both cooling and particle dispersion depend on the model resolution, with a maximum particle scavenging efficiency of 20% within 5 h after emission at maximum resolution of 50 m. Based on these results, we suggest further regional high-resolution studies which model several injection periods over several weeks. PMID:25404679

  2. Making and Measuring a Model of a Salt Marsh

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogleman, Tara; Curran, Mary Carla

    2007-01-01

    Students are often confused by the difference between the terms "accuracy" and "precision." In the following activities, students explore the definitions of accuracy and precision while learning about salt march ecology and the methods used by scientists to assess salt marsh health. The activities also address the concept that the ocean supports a…

  3. Assessing Wildlife Habitat Value of New England Salt Marshes: II. Model Testing and Validation

    EPA Science Inventory

    We test a previously described model to assess the wildlife habitat value of New England salt marshes by comparing modeled habitat values and scores with bird abundance and species richness at sixteen salt marshes in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island USA. Assessment scores ranged f...

  4. Assessing the Wildlife Habitat Value of New England Salt Marshes: I. Model and Application

    EPA Science Inventory

    We developed an assessment model to quantify the wildlife habitat value of New England salt marshes based on marsh characteristics and the presence of habitat types that influence habitat use by terrestrial wildlife. Applying the model to12 salt marshes located in Narragansett B...

  5. Fire frequency in the Interior Columbia River Basin: Building regional models from fire history data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, D.; Peterson, D.L.; Agee, James K.

    2000-01-01

    Fire frequency affects vegetation composition and successional pathways; thus it is essential to understand fire regimes in order to manage natural resources at broad spatial scales. Fire history data are lacking for many regions for which fire management decisions are being made, so models are needed to estimate past fire frequency where local data are not yet available. We developed multiple regression models and tree-based (classification and regression tree, or CART) models to predict fire return intervals across the interior Columbia River basin at 1-km resolution, using georeferenced fire history, potential vegetation, cover type, and precipitation databases. The models combined semiqualitative methods and rigorous statistics. The fire history data are of uneven quality; some estimates are based on only one tree, and many are not cross-dated. Therefore, we weighted the models based on data quality and performed a sensitivity analysis of the effects on the models of estimation errors that are due to lack of cross-dating. The regression models predict fire return intervals from 1 to 375 yr for forested areas, whereas the tree-based models predict a range of 8 to 150 yr. Both types of models predict latitudinal and elevational gradients of increasing fire return intervals. Examination of regional-scale output suggests that, although the tree-based models explain more of the variation in the original data, the regression models are less likely to produce extrapolation errors. Thus, the models serve complementary purposes in elucidating the relationships among fire frequency, the predictor variables, and spatial scale. The models can provide local managers with quantitative information and provide data to initialize coarse-scale fire-effects models, although predictions for individual sites should be treated with caution because of the varying quality and uneven spatial coverage of the fire history database. The models also demonstrate the integration of

  6. Models of a partially hydrated Titan interior with a clathrate crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunine, J. I.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Choukroun, M.; Sotin, C.

    2012-04-01

    We present a model of the interior evolution of Titan over time, assuming the silicate core was hydrated early in Titan’s history and is dehydrating over time. The original model presented in Castillo-Rogez and Lunine (2010) was motivated by a Cassini-derived moment of inertia (Iess et al., 2010) for Titan too large to be accommodated by classical fully differentiated models in which an anhydrous silicate core was overlain by a water ice (with possible perched ocean) mantle. Our model consists of a silicate core still in the process of dehydrating today, a situation made possible by the leaching of radiogenic potassium from the silicates into the perched liquid water ocean. The most recent version of our model accounts for the likely presence of large amounts of methane in the upper crust invoked to explain methane’s persistence at present and through geologic time (Tobie et al. 2006). The methane-rich crust turns out to have essentially no bearing on the temperature of the silicate core and hence the timing of dehydration, but it profoundly affects the thickness of the high-pressure ice layer beneath the ocean. Indeed, the insulating effect of the methane clathrate crust could have delayed the formation of the high-pressure layer, resulting in the interaction of liquid water with the silicate core for extended periods of time. Although a high-pressure ice layer is likely in place today, it is thin enough that plumes of hot water from the dehydrating core probably breach that layer. The implications of such a deep hydrothermal system for the later stages of the evolution of Titan’s interior and surface will be discussed. Part of this work has been performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. Government sponsorship acknowledged. References: Castillo-Rogez, J., Lunine, J.: “Evolution of Titan’s rocky core constrained by Cassini observations”. GRL, Vol. 37, L20205, 2010. Iess, L., et al.:

  7. Scaling the Earth: A Sensitivity Analysis of Terrestrial Exoplanetary Interior Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unterborn, C. T.; Dismukes, E. E.; Panero, W. R.

    2016-03-01

    An exoplanet’s structure and composition are first-order controls of the planet’s habitability. We explore which aspects of bulk terrestrial planet composition and interior structure affect the chief observables of an exoplanet: its mass and radius. We apply these perturbations to the Earth, the planet we know best. Using the mineral physics toolkit BurnMan to self-consistently calculate mass-radius models, we find that the core radius, the presence of light elements in the core, and an upper mantle consisting of low-pressure silicates have the largest effects on the final calculated mass at a given radius, none of which are included in current mass-radius models. We expand these results to provide a self-consistent grid of compositionally as well as structurally constrained terrestrial mass-radius models for quantifying the likelihood of exoplanets being “Earth-like.” We further apply this grid to Kepler-36b, finding that it is only ˜20% likely to be structurally similar to the Earth with Si/Fe = 0.9 compared with the Earth’s Si/Fe = 1 and the Sun’s Si/Fe = 1.19.

  8. Interior Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This document contains teacher's materials for an eight-unit secondary education vocational home economics course on interior design. The units cover period styles of interiors, furniture and accessories, surface treatments and lighting, appliances and equipment, design and space planning in home and business settings, occupant needs, acquisition…

  9. 3D modelling of salt tectonics with a brittle overburden in an extensional regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichheimer, Philipp; Reuber, Georg; Kaus, Boris

    2016-04-01

    Most previous numerical models of salt tectonics only considered 2D cases or did not taken a brittle sedimentary overburden into account, both of which are likely to be important in nature. To get insights into the dynamics of diapiric rise of salt we here present time-dependent high resolution 3D models of salt tectonics in the presence of a brittle overburden and sedimentation. We focus on the internal deformation of an embedded anhydrite layer within a nonlinear viscous salt layer. As salt in nature tends to rise upwards to the surface along fault zones, the salt layer is overlain by a brittle overburden to simulate faulting. The resulting complex folding of the anhydrite layer obtained in our models is consistent with natural observations, e.g. Gorleben [1]. Regarding field examples we vary the shape of the anhydrite layer to understand different modes of deformation [2]. We test the effect of overburden rheology, extension and sedimentation rates on the 3D salt dome patterns and on its internal deformation. [1] O. Bornemann. Zur Geologie des Salzstocks Gorleben nach den Bohrergebnissen. Bundesamt für Strahlenschutz (1991). [2] Z. Chemia, H. Koyi, and H. Schmeling. Numerical modelling of rise and fall of a dense layer in salt diapirs. Geophysical Journal International 172.2 (2008): 798-816.

  10. A sound quality model for objective synthesis evaluation of vehicle interior noise based on artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. S.; Shen, G. Q.; Xing, Y. F.

    2014-03-01

    Based on the artificial neural network (ANN) technique, an objective sound quality evaluation (SQE) model for synthesis annoyance of vehicle interior noises is presented in this paper. According to the standard named GB/T18697, firstly, the interior noises under different working conditions of a sample vehicle are measured and saved in a noise database. Some mathematical models for loudness, sharpness and roughness of the measured vehicle noises are established and performed by Matlab programming. Sound qualities of the vehicle interior noises are also estimated by jury tests following the anchored semantic differential (ASD) procedure. Using the objective and subjective evaluation results, furthermore, an ANN-based model for synthetical annoyance evaluation of vehicle noises, so-called ANN-SAE, is developed. Finally, the ANN-SAE model is proved by some verification tests with the leave-one-out algorithm. The results suggest that the proposed ANN-SAE model is accurate and effective and can be directly used to estimate sound quality of the vehicle interior noises, which is very helpful for vehicle acoustical designs and improvements. The ANN-SAE approach may be extended to deal with other sound-related fields for product quality evaluations in SQE engineering.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF FIELD-BASED EMPIRICAL MODELS OF SUITABLE TEMPERATURE REGIMES FOR INTERIOR SALMONIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interior salmonids are species of growing interest and concern in the Pacific Northwest. Evidence of population declines associated with habitat loss and fragmentation have culminate in every species being listed, or proposed or petitioned for listing under he Endangered Species...

  12. Modeling soil thermal and carbon dynamics of a fire chronosequence in interior Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhuang, Q.; McGuire, A.D.; O'Neill, K. P.; Harden, J.W.; Romanovsky, V.E.; Yarie, J.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the dynamics of soil thermal, hydrologic, and ecosystem processes were coupled to project how the carbon budgets of boreal forests will respond to changes in atmospheric CO2, climate, and fire disturbance. The ability of the model to simulate gross primary production and ecosystem respiration was verified for a mature black spruce ecosystem in Canada, the age-dependent pattern of the simulated vegetation carbon was verified with inventory data on aboveground growth of Alaskan black spruce forests, and the model was applied to a postfire chronosequence in interior Alaska. The comparison between the simulated soil temperature and field-based estimates during the growing season (May to September) of 1997 revealed that the model was able to accurately simulate monthly temperatures at 10 cm (R > 0.93) for control and burned stands of the fire chronosequence. Similarly, the simulated and field-based estimates of soil respiration for control and burned stands were correlated (R = 0.84 and 0.74 for control and burned stands, respectively). The simulated and observed decadal to century-scale dynamics of soil temperature and carbon dynamics, which are represented by mean monthly values of these variables during the growing season, were correlated among stands (R = 0.93 and 0.71 for soil temperature at 20- and 10-cm depths, R = 0.95 and 0.91 for soil respiration and soil carbon, respectively). Sensitivity analyses indicate that along with differences in fire and climate history a number of other factors influence the response of carbon dynamics to fire disturbance. These factors include nitrogen fixation, the growth of moss, changes in the depth of the organic layer, soil drainage, and fire severity.

  13. Numerical and measured data from the 3D salt canopy physical modeling project

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, C.; House, L.; Fehler, M.; Pearson, J.; TenCate, J.; Wiley, R.

    1997-11-01

    The evolution of salt structures in the Gulf of Mexico have been shown to provide a mechanism for the trapping of significant hydrocarbon reserves. Most of these structures have complex geometries relative to the surrounding sedimentary layers. This aspect in addition to high velocities within the salt tend to scatter and defocus seismic energy and make imaging of subsalt lithology extremely difficult. An ongoing program the SEG/EAEG modeling project (Aminzadeh et al. 1994a: Aminzadeh et al. 1994b: Aminzadeh et al. 1995), and a follow-up project funded as part of the Advanced Computational Technology Initiative (ACTI) (House et al. 1996) have sought to investigate problems with imaging beneath complex salt structures using numerical modeling and more recently, construction of a physical model patterned after the numerical subsalt model (Wiley and McKnight. 1996). To date, no direct comparison of the numerical and physical aspects of these models has been attempted. We present the results of forward modeling a numerical realization of the 3D salt canopy physical model with the French Petroleum Institute (IFP) acoustic finite difference algorithm used in the numerical subsalt tests. We compare the results from the physical salt canopy model, the acoustic modeling of the physical/numerical model and the original numerical SEG/EAEG Salt Model. We will be testing the sensitivity of migration to the presence of converted shear waves and acquisition geometry.

  14. Numerical models of salt marsh evolution: ecological, geomorphic, and climatic factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fagherazzi, Sergio; Kirwan, Matthew L.; Mudd, Simon M.; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Temmerman, Stijn; D'Alpaos, Andrea; van de Koppel, Johan; Rybczyk, John; Reyes, Enrique; Craft, Chris; Clough, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Salt marshes are delicate landforms at the boundary between the sea and land. These ecosystems support a diverse biota that modifies the erosive characteristics of the substrate and mediates sediment transport processes. Here we present a broad overview of recent numerical models that quantify the formation and evolution of salt marshes under different physical and ecological drivers. In particular, we focus on the coupling between geomorphological and ecological processes and on how these feedbacks are included in predictive models of landform evolution. We describe in detail models that simulate fluxes of water, organic matter, and sediments in salt marshes. The interplay between biological and morphological processes often produces a distinct scarp between salt marshes and tidal flats. Numerical models can capture the dynamics of this boundary and the progradation or regression of the marsh in time. Tidal channels are also key features of the marsh landscape, flooding and draining the marsh platform and providing a source of sediments and nutrients to the marsh ecosystem. In recent years, several numerical models have been developed to describe the morphogenesis and long-term dynamics of salt marsh channels. Finally, salt marshes are highly sensitive to the effects of long-term climatic change. We therefore discuss in detail how numerical models have been used to determine salt marsh survival under different scenarios of sea level rise.

  15. Numerical models of salt marsh evolution: Ecological, geomorphic, and climatic factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fagherazzi, S.; Kirwan, M.L.; Mudd, S.M.; Guntenspergen, G.R.; Temmerman, S.; D'Alpaos, A.; Van De Koppel, J.; Rybczyk, J.M.; Reyes, E.; Craft, C.; Clough, J.

    2012-01-01

    Salt marshes are delicate landforms at the boundary between the sea and land. These ecosystems support a diverse biota that modifies the erosive characteristics of the substrate and mediates sediment transport processes. Here we present a broad overview of recent numerical models that quantify the formation and evolution of salt marshes under different physical and ecological drivers. In particular, we focus on the coupling between geomorphological and ecological processes and on how these feedbacks are included in predictive models of landform evolution. We describe in detail models that simulate fluxes of water, organic matter, and sediments in salt marshes. The interplay between biological and morphological processes often produces a distinct scarp between salt marshes and tidal flats. Numerical models can capture the dynamics of this boundary and the progradation or regression of the marsh in time. Tidal channels are also key features of the marsh landscape, flooding and draining the marsh platform and providing a source of sediments and nutrients to the marsh ecosystem. In recent years, several numerical models have been developed to describe the morphogenesis and long-term dynamics of salt marsh channels. Finally, salt marshes are highly sensitive to the effects of long-term climatic change. We therefore discuss in detail how numerical models have been used to determine salt marsh survival under different scenarios of sea level rise. Copyright 2012 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Building a Probabilistic Denitrification Model for an Oregon Salt Marsh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, J. B.; Stecher, H. A.; DeWitt, T.; Nahlik, A.; Regutti, R.; Michael, L.; Fennessy, M. S.; Brown, L.; Mckane, R.; Naithani, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    Despite abundant work starting in the 1950s on the drivers of denitrification (DeN), mechanistic complexity and methodological challenges of direct DeN measurements have resulted in a lack of reliable rate estimates across landscapes, and a lack of operationally valid, robust models. Measuring and modeling DeN are particularly challenging in tidal systems, which play a vital role in buffering adjacent coastal waters from nitrogen inputs. These systems are hydrologically and biogeochemically complex, varying on fine temporal and spatial scales. We assessed the spatial and temporal variability of soil nitrate (NO3-) levels and O2 availability, two primary drivers of DeN, in surface soils of Winant salt marsh located in Yaquina estuary, OR during the summers of 2013 and 2014. We found low temporal variability in soil NO3- concentrations across years, tide series, and tide cycles, but high spatial variability linked to elevation gradients (i.e., habitat types); spatial variability within the high marsh habitat (0 - 68 μg N g-1 dry soil) was correlated with distance to major tide creek channels and connectivity to upslope N-fixing red alder. Soil O2 measurements collected at 5 cm below ground across three locations on two spring tide series showed that O2 drawdown rates were also spatially variable. Depending on the marsh location, O2 draw down ranged from sub-optimal for DeN (> 80 % O2 saturation) across an entire tide series (i.e., across days) to optimum (i.e., ~ 0 % O2 saturation) within one overtopping tide event (i.e., within hours). We are using these results, along with empirical relationships created between DeN and soil NO3- concentrations for Winant to improve on a pre-existing tidal DeN model. We will develop the first version of a fully probabilistic hierarchical Bayesian tidal DeN model to quantify parameter and prediction uncertainties, which are as important as determining mean predictions in order to distinguish measurable differences across the marsh.

  17. Modeling the hot-dense plasma of the solar interior in and out of thermal equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsiao-Hsuan

    The developments in helioseismology ensure a wealth of studies in solar physics. In particular, with the high precision of the observations of helioseismology, a high-quality solar model is mandated, since even the tiny deviations between a model and the real Sun can be detected. One crucial ingredient of any solar model is the thermodynamics of hot-dense plasmas, in particular the equation of state. This has motivated efforts to develop sophisticated theoretical equations of state (EOS). It is important to realize that for the conditions of solar-interior plasmas, there are no terrestrial laboratory experiments; the only observational constraints come from helioseismology. Among the most successful EOS is so called OPAL EOS, which is part of the Opacity Project at Livermore. It is based on an activity expansion of the quantum plasma, and realized in the so-called "physical picture". One of its main competitor is the so called MHD EOS, which is part of the international Opacity Project (OP), a non-classified multi-country consortium. The approach of MHD is via the so-called "chemical picture". Since OPAL is the most accurate equation of state so far, there has been a call for a public-domain version of it. However, the OPAL code remains proprietary, and its "emulation" makes sense. An additional reason for such a project is that the results form OPAL can only be accessed via tables generated by the OPAL team. Their users do not have the flexibility to change the chemical composition from their end. The earlier MHD-based OPAL emulator worked well with its modifications of the MHD equation of state, which is the Planck-Larkin partition function and its corresponding scattering terms. With this modification, MHD can serve as a OPAL emulator with all the flexibility and accessibility. However, to build a really user-friendly OPAL emulator one should consider CEFF-based OPAL emulator. CEFF itself is already widely used practical EOS which can be easily implemented

  18. Interior Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mixson, John S.; Wilby, John F.

    1991-01-01

    The generation and control of flight vehicle interior noise is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms of transmission through airborne and structure-borne paths and the control of cabin noise by path modification. Techniques for identifying the relative contributions of the various source-path combinations are also discussed along with methods for the prediction of aircraft interior noise such as those based on the general modal theory and statistical energy analysis.

  19. Permafrost distribution mapping and temperature modeling along the Alaska Highway corridor, Interior Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Santosh K.

    An up-to-date permafrost distribution map is critical for making engineering decisions during the planning and design of any engineering project in Interior Alaska. I used a combination of empirical-statistical and remote sensing techniques to generate a high-resolution spatially continuous near-surface (< 1.6 m) permafrost map by exploiting the correlative relationships between permafrost and biophysical terrain parameters. A Binary Logistic Regression (BLR) model was used to establish the relationship between vegetation type, aspect-slope and permafrost presence. The logistic coefficients for each variable class obtained from the BLR model were supplied to respective variable classes mapped from remotely sensed data to estimate permafrost probability for every pixel. The BLR model predicts permafrost presence/absence at an accuracy of 88%. Near-surface permafrost occupies 37% of the total study area. A permafrost map based on the interpretation of airborne electromagnetic (EM) resistivity data shows 22.5 -- 43.5% of the total study area as underlain by permafrost. Permafrost distribution statistics from both the maps suggest near-surface permafrost distribution in the study area is sporadic (10 -- 50 % of the area underlain by permafrost). Changes in air temperature and/or winter snow depth are important factors responsible for permafrost aggradation or degradation. I evaluated the effects of past and recent (1941-2008) climate changes on permafrost and active-layer dynamics at selected locations using the Geophysical Institute Permafrost Laboratory model. Results revealed that active-layer thickness reached 0.58 and 1.0 m, and mean annual permafrost temperature increased by 1.6 and 1.7 °C during 1966-1994 at two sites in response to increased mean annual air temperature, mean summer air temperature and winter snow depth. The study found that active-layer thickness is not only a function of summer air temperature but also of mean annual air temperature and

  20. Modeling Ice Giant Interiors Using Constraints on the H2-H2O Critical Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, E.; Stevenson, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    We present a range of models of Uranus and Neptune, taking into account recent experimental data (Bali, 2013) implying the location of the critical curve of the H2-H2O system at pressures up to 2.6 GPa. The models presented satisfy the observed total mass of each planet and the radius at the observed 1-bar pressure level. We assume the existence of three regions at different depths: an outer adiabatic envelope composed predominately of H2 and He, with a helium mass fraction 0.26, a water-rich layer including varied amounts of rock and hydrogen, and a chemically homogeneous rock core. Using measured rotation rates of Uranus and Neptune, and a density profile obtained for each model using constituent equations of state and the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium, we calculate the gravitational harmonics J2 and J4 for comparison with observed values as an additional constraint. The H2-H2O critical curve provides information about the nature of the boundary between the outer, hydrogen-rich envelope and underlying water-rich layer. The extrapolated critical curve for hydrogen-water mixtures crosses the adiabat of the outer atmospheric shell in these models at two depths, implying a shallow outer region of limited miscibility, an intermediate region between ~90 and 98 percent of the total planet radius within which hydrogen and water can mix in all proportions, and another, deeper region of limited miscibility at less than ~90 percent of the total planet radius. The pressure and temperature of the gaseous adiabatic shell at the depth of the shallowest extent of the water-rich layer determines whether a gradual compositional transition or an ocean surface boundary may exist at depth in these planets. To satisfy the observed J2, the outer extent of the water-rich layer in these models must be located between approximately 80 and 85 percent of the total planet radius, within the deep region of limited H2-H2O miscibility, implying an ocean surface is possible within the

  1. Molten Salt Power Tower Cost Model for the System Advisor Model (SAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, C. S.; Heath, G. A.

    2013-02-01

    This report describes a component-based cost model developed for molten-salt power tower solar power plants. The cost model was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), using data from several prior studies, including a contracted analysis from WorleyParsons Group, which is included herein as an Appendix. The WorleyParsons' analysis also estimated material composition and mass for the plant to facilitate a life cycle analysis of the molten salt power tower technology. Details of the life cycle assessment have been published elsewhere. The cost model provides a reference plant that interfaces with NREL's System Advisor Model or SAM. The reference plant assumes a nominal 100-MWe (net) power tower running with a nitrate salt heat transfer fluid (HTF). Thermal energy storage is provided by direct storage of the HTF in a two-tank system. The design assumes dry-cooling. The model includes a spreadsheet that interfaces with SAM via the Excel Exchange option in SAM. The spreadsheet allows users to estimate the costs of different-size plants and to take into account changes in commodity prices. This report and the accompanying Excel spreadsheet can be downloaded at https://sam.nrel.gov/cost.

  2. Long Term Dynamics of Interior Least Tern Sandbar Habitat: Landsat's Contribution to a Metapopulation Ecological Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulliner, E. A.; Jacobson, R. B.; Elliott, C. M.; Lott, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Sandbars in sand-bedded rivers of the central U.S have ecological importance to many species. Many of these sandbars provide the primary historical breeding habitat for the endangered Interior Least Tern (Sterna antillarum), or ILT. Sandbars within these systems are highly variable both temporally and spatially due to morphodynamic and vegetative processes, as well as varying hydrology. Differences in available habitat type and quality occur not only among rivers but among individual reaches of a single river. Complete characterization of temporal and spatial shifts in sandbar habitat therefore requires long-term datasets spanning the entire range used by the species with sufficient temporal resolution to capture hydrologically-driven system dynamics. The Landsat series of satellites with their long-term, wide-scale, consistent data records provide a rich and unique source of information on this habitat. We developed methods to automate characterization of sandbar habitat within 13 rivers of the central U.S. plains using Thematic Mapper (TM) imagery. The rivers were divided into segments with relatively uniform flow regimes (between major tributaries). Approximately 25,000 combinations of river segments with daily streamflow records and unobscured TM images exist for the breeding range of the ILT. Within each of these combinations of flow segments and TM images, we have automated the identification of river, vegetation, and bare sand within the active river channel boundaries for image-specific streamflow using a combination of geoprocessing scripts and unsupervised ISODATA classification. The primary goal of this effort is to create physically-informed empirical models of sandbar habitat dynamics, including morphodynamic and vegetative influences on sandbar creation and degradation. The models will be used to parameterize sandbar habitat in an individual-based metapopulation model of the ILT. The geospatial data we have extracted from TM images allows

  3. Projected Impact of Salt Restriction on Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in China: A Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Coxson, Pamela G.; Penko, Joanne; Goldman, Lee; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Zhao, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the effects of achieving China’s national goals for dietary salt (NaCl) reduction or implementing culturally-tailored dietary salt restriction strategies on cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention. Methods The CVD Policy Model was used to project blood pressure lowering and subsequent downstream prevented CVD that could be achieved by population-wide salt restriction in China. Outcomes were annual CVD events prevented, relative reductions in rates of CVD incidence and mortality, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained, and CVD treatment costs saved. Results Reducing mean dietary salt intake to 9.0 g/day gradually over 10 years could prevent approximately 197 000 incident annual CVD events [95% uncertainty interval (UI): 173 000–219 000], reduce annual CVD mortality by approximately 2.5% (2.2–2.8%), gain 303 000 annual QALYs (278 000–329 000), and save approximately 1.4 billion international dollars (Int$) in annual CVD costs (Int$; 1.2–1.6 billion). Reducing mean salt intake to 6.0 g/day could approximately double these benefits. Implementing cooking salt-restriction spoons could prevent 183 000 fewer incident CVD cases (153 000–215 000) and avoid Int$1.4 billion in CVD treatment costs annually (1.2–1.7 billion). Implementing a cooking salt substitute strategy could lead to approximately three times the health benefits of the salt-restriction spoon program. More than three-quarters of benefits from any dietary salt reduction strategy would be realized in hypertensive adults. Conclusion China could derive substantial health gains from implementation of population-wide dietary salt reduction policies. Most health benefits from any dietary salt reduction program would be realized in adults with hypertension. PMID:26840409

  4. The universal response of fluid interiors to end-member models of mechanical forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grannan, A. M.; Favier, B.; Ribeiro, A.; Le Bars, M.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Turbulence generated in electrically conductive liquid interiors of planetary bodies may be due, in part, to mechanical forcing through geophysically relevant mechanisms of precession/nutation, librations, tidal forcing, and collisions. Using experimental particle image velocimetry techniques accompanied by selected high-resolution numerical simulations, we show, for the first time, the generation of bulk-filling turbulence driven by high frequency tidal forcing. The transition to sustained turbulence is characterized by a succession of resonances first between the tidally forced ellipsoidal base flow with two primary inertial modes and subsequently between secondary inertial modes and the primary inertial modes. Furthermore, deviations in the amplitude of the time-averaged retrograde zonal flow suggest an as yet unseen secondary flow transition that may promote additional turbulence. The turbulence generated by high frequency, low amplitude tidal forcing is similar to the libration-driven turbulent flows studied by Grannan et al. [2014] and Favier et al. [2015]. These works reveal the universal fluid response to elliptical instability driven by separate models that correspond, in geophysical terms, to two end member types of mechanical forcing. In the first, non-synchronous satellites possess elastically deformable boundaries such that shape of the distortion has a non-zero mean motion. In the second, the core-mantle boundary of a body possesses an inherently rigid or tidally frozen-in ellipsoidal shape in a synchronous orbit such that the mean motion of the elliptically deformed boundary is zero. Although the strength of the mechanical forcing is much weaker at planetary settings, the corresponding viscous dissipation is also weaker and thus may still permit the generation of the same turbulent flow found in both experiments and numerical simulations. The efficacy of such turbulent flows in magnetic field generation and dissipation is currently being pursued

  5. Partial replacement of bile salts causes marked changes of cholesterol crystallization in supersaturated model bile systems.

    PubMed Central

    Nishioka, T; Tazuma, S; Yamashita, G; Kajiyama, G

    1999-01-01

    Cholesterol crystallization is a key step in gallstone formation and is influenced by numerous factors. Human bile contains various bile salts having different hydrophobicity and micelle-forming capacities, but the importance of lipid composition to bile metastability remains unclear. This study investigated the effect of bile salts on cholesterol crystallization in model bile (MB) systems. Supersaturated MB systems were prepared with an identical composition on a molar basis (taurocholate/phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol, 152 mM:38 mM: 24 mM), except for partial replacement of taurocholate (10, 20, and 30%) with various taurine-conjugated bile salts. Cholesterol crystallization was quantitatively estimated by spectrophotometrically measuring crystal-related turbidity and morphologically scanned by video-enhanced microscopy. After partial replacement of taurocholate with hydrophobic bile salts, cholesterol crystallization increased dose-dependently without changing the size of vesicles or crystal morphology and the rank order of crystallization was deoxycholate>chenodeoxycholate>cholate (control MB). All of the hydrophilic bile salts (ursodeoxycholate, ursocholate and beta-muricholate) inhibited cholesterol precipitation by forming a stable liquid-crystal phase, and there were no significant differences among the hydrophilic bile-salt species. Cholesterol crystallization was markedly altered by partial replacement of bile salts with a different hydrophobicity. Thus minimal changes in bile-salt composition may dramatically alter bile lipid metastability. PMID:10333488

  6. High Salt Intake Promotes Urinary Loss of Vitamin D Metabolites by Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rats in a Space Flight Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thierry-Palmer, M.; Cephas, S.; Sayavongsa, P.; Clark, T.; Arnaud, S. B.

    2004-01-01

    Vitamin D metabolism in the Dahl salt-sensitive (S) rat, a model of salt-induced hypertension, differs from that in the Dahl salt-resistant (R) rat. We have demonstrated that female S rats are more vulnerable than female R rats to decreases in plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25-(OH)2D) concentrations during hind limb unloading (a space flight model). We report here on the response of the vitamin D endocrine system of S and R rats to hind limb unloading during high salt intake. Dahl female rats (9.7-week-old) were tail-suspended (hind limb unloaded) for 28 days, while fed a diet containing twice the salt in standard rat chow (2 % sodium chloride). Control rats were fed the same diet, but were not hind limb unloaded. Vitamin D metabolites were analyzed by HPLC and radioimmunoassay kits from Diasorin.

  7. Particle creation and annihilation at interior boundaries: one-dimensional models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppeler, Stefan; Sieber, Martin

    2016-03-01

    We describe creation and annihilation of particles at external sources in one spatial dimension in terms of interior-boundary conditions (IBCs). We derive explicit solutions for spectra, (generalised) eigenfunctions, as well as Green functions, spectral determinants, and integrated spectral densities. Moreover, we introduce a quantum graph version of IBC-Hamiltonians.

  8. Internationalizing an Interior Design Course: A Model for Global FCS Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlson, Julie; Vouchilas, Gus

    2010-01-01

    Accreditation for Family and Consumer Sciences and for Interior Design programs includes standards to globalize education of undergraduate students. An integrative approach to planning curriculum relates the concept of global interdependence to the development of critical thinking skills for student decision-making. This was addressed in modifying…

  9. Piecewise-Constant-Model-Based Interior Tomography Applied to Dentin Tubules

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Biao; Wang, Steve; Stock, Stuart R.; Yu, Hengyong

    2013-01-01

    Dentin is a hierarchically structured biomineralized composite material, and dentin's tubules are difficult to study in situ. Nano-CT provides the requisite resolution, but the field of view typically contains only a few tubules. Using a plate-like specimen allows reconstruction of a volume containing specific tubules from a number of truncated projections typically collected over an angular range of about 140°, which is practically accessible. Classical computed tomography (CT) theory cannot exactly reconstruct an object only from truncated projections, needless to say a limited angular range. Recently, interior tomography was developed to reconstruct a region-of-interest (ROI) from truncated data in a theoretically exact fashion via the total variation (TV) minimization under the condition that the ROI is piecewise constant. In this paper, we employ a TV minimization interior tomography algorithm to reconstruct interior microstructures in dentin from truncated projections over a limited angular range. Compared to the filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction, our reconstruction method reduces noise and suppresses artifacts. Volume rendering confirms the merits of our method in terms of preserving the interior microstructure of the dentin specimen. PMID:23509603

  10. Piecewise-constant-model-based interior tomography applied to dentin tubules.

    PubMed

    He, Peng; Wei, Biao; Wang, Steve; Stock, Stuart R; Yu, Hengyong; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    Dentin is a hierarchically structured biomineralized composite material, and dentin's tubules are difficult to study in situ. Nano-CT provides the requisite resolution, but the field of view typically contains only a few tubules. Using a plate-like specimen allows reconstruction of a volume containing specific tubules from a number of truncated projections typically collected over an angular range of about 140°, which is practically accessible. Classical computed tomography (CT) theory cannot exactly reconstruct an object only from truncated projections, needless to say a limited angular range. Recently, interior tomography was developed to reconstruct a region-of-interest (ROI) from truncated data in a theoretically exact fashion via the total variation (TV) minimization under the condition that the ROI is piecewise constant. In this paper, we employ a TV minimization interior tomography algorithm to reconstruct interior microstructures in dentin from truncated projections over a limited angular range. Compared to the filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction, our reconstruction method reduces noise and suppresses artifacts. Volume rendering confirms the merits of our method in terms of preserving the interior microstructure of the dentin specimen. PMID:23509603

  11. Piecewise-Constant-Model-Based Interior Tomography Applied to Dentin Tubules

    DOE PAGESBeta

    He, Peng; Wei, Biao; Wang, Steve; Stock, Stuart R.; Yu, Hengyong; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    Dentin is a hierarchically structured biomineralized composite material, and dentin’s tubules are difficult to study in situ. Nano-CT provides the requisite resolution, but the field of view typically contains only a few tubules. Using a plate-like specimen allows reconstruction of a volume containing specific tubules from a number of truncated projections typically collected over an angular range of about 140°, which is practically accessible. Classical computed tomography (CT) theory cannot exactly reconstruct an object only from truncated projections, needless to say a limited angular range. Recently, interior tomography was developed to reconstruct a region-of-interest (ROI) from truncated data in amore » theoretically exact fashion via the total variation (TV) minimization under the condition that the ROI is piecewise constant. In this paper, we employ a TV minimization interior tomography algorithm to reconstruct interior microstructures in dentin from truncated projections over a limited angular range. Compared to the filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction, our reconstruction method reduces noise and suppresses artifacts. Volume rendering confirms the merits of our method in terms of preserving the interior microstructure of the dentin specimen.« less

  12. Bone Density and High Salt Diets in a Space Flight Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, S. B.; Navidi, M.; Liang, M. T. C.; Wolinsky, I.

    1999-01-01

    High salt diets accelerate bone loss with aging in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis except when calcium supplementation is provided. We have observed that the decrease in mineral content of growing femurs in juvenile rats, exposed to a space flight model which unloads the hind limbs , is substantially less in animals fed excess salt. To determine whether excess dietary salt has the same effect on the skeleton of the mature animal whose response to unloading is increased resorption and bone loss rather than impaired growth, we carried out a metabolic study in mature rats with hindlimbs unloaded by tailsuspension.

  13. Understanding the Interiors of Saturn and Mercury through Magnetic Field Observation and Dynamo Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hao

    Understanding the interior structure and dynamics of a planet is a key step towards understanding the formation and evolution of a planet. In this thesis, I combine field observation and dynamo modeling to understand planetary interiors. Focus has been put on planets Saturn and Mercury. The Cassini spacecraft has been taking continuous measurements in the Saturnian system since the Saturn orbital insertion in June 2004. Since the Mercury orbital insertion in March 2011, the MESSENGER spacecraft has been examining planet Mercury. After analyzing the close-in portion of the in-situ Cassini magnetometer measurements around Saturn, I find that Saturn's magnetic field features several surprising characteristics. First, Saturn's magnetic field is extremely axisymmetric. We cannot find any consistent departure from axisymmetry, and have put an extremely tight upper bound on the dipole tilt of Saturn: the dipole tilt of Saturn has to be smaller than 0.06 degrees. Second, we find that Saturn's magnetic field is extremely stable with time. Third, we estimated the magnetic moments of Saturn up to degree 5. This is the first magnetic field model for Saturn which goes beyond degree 3. We find that not only Saturn's intrinsic magnetic field is dominated by the axial moments; among these axial moments the odd degree ones dominate. In addition, the first three odd degree axial moments all take the same sign. This sign pattern of Saturn's magnetic moments is in contrast to that of the Earth's magnetic moments which takes alternative signs for the past century. The contrast between the geometries of Saturn's magnetic field and the Earth's magnetic field lead us to propose a dynamo hypothesis which speculates that such differences are caused by structural and dynamical differences inside these two planets. Our dynamo hypothesis for Saturn has two essential ingredients. The first concerns about the existence and size of a central core inside Saturn and its influence on Saturn's dynamo

  14. 3D modelling in salt tectonic context: the Crocodile minibasin in Sivas (Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collon, Pauline; Pichat, Alexandre; Kergaravat, Charlie; Botella, Arnaud; Caumon, Guillaume; Favreau, Océane; Fuss, Gaétan; Godefroy, Gabriel; Lerat, Marine; Mazuyer, Antoine; Parquer, Marion; Charreau, Julien; Callot, Jean-Paul; Ringenbach, Jean-Claude

    2015-04-01

    Impermeable, with a low density and acting as a viscous fluid at the geological time scale, salt plays a unique tectonic role favouring hydrocarbon trap formations. Halokinetic structures are various and difficult to image with classic seismic techniques. Thus, outcrop analogues are precious and sought after. Since the re-interpretation in September 2011 of its evaporite deposits, the Oligo-Miocene basin of Sivas (Turkey) is a new choice analogue for the study of salt tectonic with outstanding outcrops reflecting the variety of salt related structures: minibasins, diapirs, welds... While studying these structures requires an important field work, building 3D models becomes an interesting way to better help understanding the three-dimensional organisation and to further perform numerical simulations (e.g., restoration, potential field measurement campaign simulation). The complex geometries observed in salt tectonic context make these 3D geological models particularly challenging to build, especially when only outcrops data are available. We focus on the Crocodile minibasin (Sivas) and present a modelling strategy using a subtle combination of recently developed techniques. Available data are: a Digital Elevation Model, satellite images and associated interpreted bedding traces on topography, orientation measurements of the strata and a conceptual interpretation. Located on an ancient salt extrusion, this minibasin is filled with lacustrine and sabkha sediments. It is interpreted with a closed synclinal structure on North. On its southern part, a central diapir has risen up, separating two tightened synclinals. The salt surface is modelled first as a triangulated surface using a classical explicit surface patch construction method and a manual post-process mesh improvement. Then, the minibasin sediments are modelled with an implicit approach that considers interfaces as equipotentials of a 3D scalar field. This requires to build a volumetric mesh conformable to the

  15. CHIC - Coupling Habitability, Interior and Crust: A new Code for Modeling the Thermal Evolution of Planets and Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, Lena; Rivoldini, Attilio; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2015-04-01

    We present a new numerical code (CHIC) for the simulation of the thermal evolution of terrestrial planets. The code consists of both a 1d parameterised model to evaluate the temperature profile in the planet's interior and a 2d/3d convection model for the silicate mantle - the latter uses either a Cartesian box, a 2d cylindrical sphere or a 2d spherical annulus. The code is modular and can be easily extended (for example to include an atmosphere module). In the convection model next to the energy equation the conservation equations of mass and momentum are solved, as well. We apply either a Boussinesq approximation or an extended Boussinesq approximation for mantle convection; compressible treatment is planned for the future. The code provides information on the temperature field in the mantle, convective velocities and convective stresses. Simulations can be run under steady-state or thermal evolution conditions. The CHIC code handles surface volcanism, crustal development, and different regimes of surface mobilization like plate tectonics. It is therefore well suited for studying scenarios related to the habitability of terrestrial planets. The code provides a user updatable library of thermodynamic properties of iron and common mantle silicates as well as associated equations of state that allow to compute material properties at high pressure and temperature. Furthermore, the interior structure of a planet for given composition and mass can be determined, yielding the core and planet radius that can then be automatically used for the thermal evolution simulation. CHIC does also accommodate a module for computing a simple parameterised thermal evolution model of a planet's core that includes the formation of an inner core. This module can be combined with either the 1d parameterised thermal evolution model or the 2d/3d mantle convection model. The code has been benchmarked with different convection codes, and compared to published interior-structure models and 1d

  16. How do salt withdrawal minibasins form? Insights from forward modelling, and implications for hydrocarbon migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peel, Frank J.

    2014-09-01

    Existing models for the initiation of salt withdrawal minibasins focus on the role of triggers that exist within the minibasin, either stratigraphic (e.g. differential deposition) or tectonic (extension, translation or contraction). Existing studies tend to focus on complex settings, such as continental margins, which contain many different potential triggering mechanisms. It can be difficult in these settings to identify which process is responsible for minibasin initiation, or the influence of individual factors on their subsequent development. Salt withdrawal minibasins also exist in simpler settings, without any obvious intrinsic trigger; the region of the North German Basin used by Trusheim (1960) in the classic definition of salt withdrawal geometries was of this nature. There is no overall basal or surface slope, no major lateral movement, and there is no depositional heterogeneity. Previously recognized trigger processes for minibasin initiation do not apply in this benign setting, suggesting that other, potentially more fundamental, influences may be at work. A simple forward-modelling approach shows how, in the absence of any other mechanism, a new minibasin can develop as the consequence of salt movement driven by its neighbour, and families of withdrawal minibasins can propagate across a region from a single seed point. This new mechanism may explain how some minibasins appear to initiate before the sediment density has exceeded that of the underlying salt. The forward modelling also indicates that some minibasins begin to invert to form turtle anticlines before the underlying salt has been evacuated, so that the timing of turtle formation may not be diagnostic of weld formation. This mechanism may also give rise to salt-cored turtles that have a lens of salt trapped beneath their cores. These new findings have implications for hydrocarbon migration and trapping.

  17. Artificial neural network modeling using clinical and knowledge independent variables predicts salt intake reduction behavior

    PubMed Central

    Isma’eel, Hussain A.; Sakr, George E.; Almedawar, Mohamad M.; Fathallah, Jihan; Garabedian, Torkom; Eddine, Savo Bou Zein

    2015-01-01

    Background High dietary salt intake is directly linked to hypertension and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Predicting behaviors regarding salt intake habits is vital to guide interventions and increase their effectiveness. We aim to compare the accuracy of an artificial neural network (ANN) based tool that predicts behavior from key knowledge questions along with clinical data in a high cardiovascular risk cohort relative to the least square models (LSM) method. Methods We collected knowledge, attitude and behavior data on 115 patients. A behavior score was calculated to classify patients’ behavior towards reducing salt intake. Accuracy comparison between ANN and regression analysis was calculated using the bootstrap technique with 200 iterations. Results Starting from a 69-item questionnaire, a reduced model was developed and included eight knowledge items found to result in the highest accuracy of 62% CI (58-67%). The best prediction accuracy in the full and reduced models was attained by ANN at 66% and 62%, respectively, compared to full and reduced LSM at 40% and 34%, respectively. The average relative increase in accuracy over all in the full and reduced models is 82% and 102%, respectively. Conclusions Using ANN modeling, we can predict salt reduction behaviors with 66% accuracy. The statistical model has been implemented in an online calculator and can be used in clinics to estimate the patient’s behavior. This will help implementation in future research to further prove clinical utility of this tool to guide therapeutic salt reduction interventions in high cardiovascular risk individuals. PMID:26090333

  18. Pattern formation of down-built salt structures: insights from 3D numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Naiara; Kaus, Boris

    2015-04-01

    Many salt diapirs are thought to have formed as a result of down-building, which implies that the top of the diapir remained close to the surface during sediment deposition. This process is largely three-dimensional and in order to better understand what controls the patterns that form as a result of this down-building process, we here perform three-dimensional numerical models and compare the results with analytical models. In our models, we vary several parameters such as initial salt thickness, sedimentation rate, salt viscosity, salt-sediment viscosity contrast as well as the density of sediments. Down-building of three-dimensional diapirs only occurs for a certain range of parameters and is favored by lower sediment/salt viscosity contrasts and sedimentation rates in agreement with analytical predictions and findings from previous 2D models. However, the models show that the sedimentation rate has an additional effect on the formation and evolution of three-dimensional diapir patterns. At low sedimentation rates, salt ridges that form during early model stages remain preserved at later stages as well. For higher sedimentation rates, the initial salt ridges break up and form finger-like diapirs at the junction of salt ridges, which results in different salt exposure patterns at the surface. Once the initial pattern of diapirs is formed, higher sedimentation rate can also result in covered diapirs if the diapir extrusion velocity is insufficiently large. We quantify the effect of sedimentation rate on the number of diapirs exposed at the surface as well as on their spacing. In some cases, this final pattern is distinctly different from the initial polygonal pattern. We also study the extrusion of salt through time in the simulations, and show that it can be related to the geometries of the sedimentary layers surrounding the diapirs. Acknowledgements. Funding was provided by the European Research Council under the European Community's Seventh Framework Program

  19. Heat Transfer Salts for Nuclear Reactor Systems - Chemistry Control, Corrosion Mitigation, and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Mark; Sridharan, Kumar; Morgan, Dane; Peterson, Per; Calderoni, Pattrick; Scheele, Randall; Casekka, Andrew; McNamara, Bruce

    2015-01-22

    The concept of a molten salt reactor has existed for nearly sixty years. Previously all work was done during a large collaborative effort at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, culminating in a research reactor which operated for 15,000 hours without major error. This technical success has garnished interest in modern, high temperature, reactor schemes. Research using molten fluoride salts for nuclear applications requires a steady supply of high grade molten salts. There is no bulk supplier of research grade fluoride salts in the world, so a facility which could provide all the salt needed for testing at the University of Wisconsin had to be produced. Two salt purification devices were made for this purpose, a large scale purifier, and a small scale purifier, each designed to clean the salts from impurities and reduce their corrosion potential. As of now, the small scale has performed with flibe salt, hydrogen, and hydrogen fluoride, yielding clean salt. This salt is currently being used in corrosion testing facilities at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of Wisconsin. Working with the beryllium based salts requires extensive safety measures and health monitoring to prevent the development of acute or chronic beryllium disease, two pulmonary diseases created by an allergic reaction to beryllium in the lungs. Extensive health monitoring, engineering controls, and environment monitoring had to be set up with the University of Wisconsin department of Environment, Health and Safety. The hydrogen fluoride required for purification was also an extreme health hazard requiring thoughtful planning and execution. These dangers have made research a slow and tedious process. Simple processes, such as chemical handling and clean-up, can take large amounts of ingenuity and time. Other work has complemented the experimental research at Wisconsin to advance high temperature reactor goals. Modeling work has been performed in house to re

  20. Modeling a Possible Volcanic Origin for Interior Layered Deposits on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, M. G.; Kneissl, T.

    2011-12-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the valid range of temperatures required for sub-ice volcanic origin of interior layered deposits (ILDs) in Valles Marineris. To this end, using GIS the volume estimates of Ophir Chasma and its 4 ILDs were mapped and measured. The GIS volumes in this study are based on high-res HRSC topography overlain on MOLA. We determined the void space of Ophir Chasma sans ILDs to be 92,319 km3. Volumes for each ILD mound were determined to be 6,185 km3, 4,833 km3, 2,628 km3, and 0.2 km3 (negligible); totaling 13,642 km3. A sub-ice volcano requires eruption beneath an existing ice sheet or ponded ice. If during the formation of a sub-ice volcano the associated unstable englacial meltwater lake is drained by jökulhlaups or if the volcano rises above the meltwater, effused subaerial lava will cap the tuff cone forming resistant sheet lavas. Hence, the lava cap horizon can be used to estimate the minimum height of ice. Three resistant ILD caprock locales (found only on the 2 largest ILDs) were mapped and the hypothetical ice volumes measured beneath their elevations are 77,391 km3, 79,899 km3, and 51,695 km3. Following the equation from Chapman et al. (2003), if the known ILDs in Ophir are assumed to be basaltic subice volcanoes, calorimetry can be used to estimate the volumes of meltwater generated by their eruption [Allen, 1980; Björnsson, 1988; Gudmundsson and Björnsson, 1991; Gudmundsson et al., 1997; Höskuldsson and Sparks, 1997]. These estimates are based on (1) the volume and likely mound density, (2) the heat content of basaltic magmas, and (3) the specific heat capacity and the latent heat of fusion for ice. The ice that can be melted by a mass of magma as it solidifies and cools can be calculated by equating the heat content of the magma with the heat used for melting. Two possible end member cases were used. In the first case it is assumed that the chasma contained ice at its melting point of 273 K and in the other case the

  1. Modeling of Dense Water Production and Salt Transport from Alaskan Coastal Polynyas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signorini, Sergio R.; Cavalieri, Donald J.

    2000-01-01

    The main significance of this paper is that a realistic, three-dimensional, high-resolution primitive equation model has been developed to study the effects of dense water formation in Arctic coastal polynyas. The model includes realistic ambient stratification, realistic bottom topography, and is forced by time-variant surface heat flux, surface salt flux, and time-dependent coastal flow. The salt and heat fluxes, and the surface ice drift, are derived from satellite observations (SSM/I and NSCAT sensors). The model is used to study the stratification, salt transport, and circulation in the vicinity of Barrow Canyon during the 1996/97 winter season. The coastal flow (Alaska coastal current), which is an extension of the Bering Sea throughflow, is formulated in the model using the wind-transport regression. The results show that for the 1996/97 winter the northeastward coastal current exports 13% to 26% of the salt produced by coastal polynyas upstream of Barrow Canyon in 20 to 30 days. The salt export occurs more rapidly during less persistent polynyas. The inclusion of ice-water stress in the model makes the coastal current slightly weaker and much wider due to the combined effects of surface drag and offshore Ekman transport.

  2. 25 CFR Appendix A to Part 1000 - Model Compact of Self-Governance Between the Tribe and the Department of the Interior

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Model Compact of Self-Governance Between the Tribe and the Department of the Interior A Appendix A to Part 1000 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ANNUAL FUNDING AGREEMENTS UNDER THE TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNMENT ACT AMENDMENTS TO THE INDIAN...

  3. Modeling Solute Thermokinetics in LiCI-KCI Molten Salt for Nuclear Waste Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Dane; Eapen, Jacob

    2013-10-01

    Recovery of actinides is an integral part of a closed nuclear fuel cycle. Pyrometallurgical nuclear fuel recycling processes have been developed in the past for recovering actinides from spent metallic and nitride fuels. The process is essentially to dissolve the spent fuel in a molten salt and then extract just the actinides for reuse in a reactor. Extraction is typically done through electrorefining, which involves electrochemical reduction of the dissolved actinides and plating onto a cathode. Knowledge of a number of basic thermokinetic properties of salts and salt-fuel mixtures is necessary for optimizing present and developing new approaches for pyrometallurgical waste processing. The properties of salt-fuel mixtures are presently being studied, but there are so many solutes and varying concentrations that direct experimental investigation is prohibitively time consuming and expensive (particularly for radioactive elements like Pu). Therefore, there is a need to reduce the number of required experiments through modeling of salt and salt-fuel mixture properties. This project will develop first-principles-based molecular modeling and simulation approaches to predict fundamental thermokinetic properties of dissolved actinides and fission products in molten salts. The focus of the proposed work is on property changes with higher concentrations (up to 5 mol%) of dissolved fuel components, where there is still very limited experimental data. The properties predicted with the modeling will be density, which is used to assess the amount of dissolved material in the salt; diffusion coefficients, which can control rates of material transport during separation; and solute activity, which determines total solubility and reduction potentials used during electrorefining. The work will focus on La, Sr, and U, which are chosen to include the important distinct categories of lanthanides, alkali earths, and actinides, respectively. Studies will be performed using LiCl-KCl salt

  4. Heat and salt redistribution within the Mediterranean Sea in the Med-CORDEX model ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llasses, J.; Jordà, G.; Gomis, D.; Adloff, F.; Macías, D.; Harzallah, A.; Arsouze, T.; Akthar, N.; Li, L.; Elizalde, A.; Sannino, G.

    2016-06-01

    Characterizing and understanding the basic functioning of the Mediterranean Sea in terms of heat and salt redistribution within the basin is a crucial issue to predict its evolution. Here we quantify and analyze the heat and salt transfers using a simple box model consisting of four layers in the vertical for each of the two (western and eastern) basins. Namely, we box-average 14 regional simulations of the Med-CORDEX ensemble plus a regional and a global reanalysis, computing for each of them the heat and salt exchanges between layers. First, we analyze in detail the mechanisms behind heat and salt redistribution at different time scales from the outputs of a single simulation (NEMOMED8). We show that in the western basin the transfer between layer 1 (0-150 m) and layer 2 (150-600 m) is upwards for most models both for heat and salt, while in the eastern basin both transfers are downwards. A feature common to both basins is that the transports are smaller in summer than in winter due to the enhanced stratification, which dampen the mixing between layers. From the comparison of the 16 simulations we observe that the spread between models is much larger than the ensemble average for the salt transfer and for the heat transfer between layer 1 and layer 2. At lower layers (below 600 m) there is a set of models showing a good agreement between them, while others are not correlated with any other. The mechanisms behind the ensemble spread are not straightforward. First, to have a coarse resolution prevents the model to correctly represent the heat and salt redistribution in the basin. Second, those models with a very different initial stratification also show a very different redistribution, especially at intermediate and deep layers. Finally, the assimilation of data seems to perturb the heat and salt redistribution. Besides this, the differences among regional models that share similar spatial resolution and initial conditions are induced by more subtle mechanisms

  5. Reverse modeling of 2D and 3D diapiric salt structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, N.; Kaus, B.

    2013-12-01

    Mechanical forward modeling of salt diapirs formed by two different processes (differential loading and buoyancy driven) has been widely performed with numerical codes in many studies, whereas works focusing on the dynamic retro-deformation of such structures remain scarce. Buoyancy driven diapirs, in which the density difference between salt and overburden induces upward motion of salt, have been successfully retro-deformed in two and three dimensions using simple rheologies for the salt and overburden (e.g., Kaus & Podladchikov 2001). However, retro-deformation of down-building diapirs (syndepositional process in which salt structures grow while sediments are being deposited) using mechanical codes has only been done in two dimensions (e.g., Ismael-Zadeh et al. 2001), even though the importance of three-dimensionality in salt diapirism is accepted. We have used the two-dimensional visco-elasto-plastic finite element code MILAMIN_VEP to perform both forward and backward simulations and to check the validity of a reversed time step method (Kaus & Podladchikov 2001 and Ismael-Zadeh et al. 2001) for a wide range of parameters, variable sedimentation rates, and for non-linear rheologies. Forward simulations are run until the salt layer is exhausted and then a reverse time step is applied in order to retro-deform the model. Down-building process was mimicked using a fast-erosion condition at the surface, which keeps it flat and redistributes material at every time step. Initially, we have tested our method by retro-deforming salt structures that develop from an interface that is sinusoidally perturbed. More realistic simulations were performed by starting with randomly perturbed salt interface and using different rheological parameters for the salt and the overburden as well as variable sedimentation rates. Once the method has been proved successful for different parameters in two dimensions, the finite differences parallel code LaMEM has also been used to dynamically

  6. Thermo-mechanical modelling of cyclic gas storage applications in salt caverns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, Norbert; Watanabe, Norihiro; Görke, Uwe-Jens; Kolditz, Olaf; Nagel, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Due to the growing importance of renewable energy sources it becomes more and more necessary to investigate energy storage potentials. One major way to store energy is the power-to-gas concept. Excessive electrical energy can be used either to produce hydrogen or methane by electrolysis or methanation or to compress air, respectively. Those produced gases can then be stored in artificial salt caverns, which are constructed in large salt formations by solution mining. In combination with renewable energy sources, the power-to-gas concept is subjected to fluctuations. Compression and expansion of the storage gases lead to temperature differences within the salt rock. The variations can advance several metres into the host rock, influencing its material behaviour, inducing thermal stresses and altering the creep response. To investigate the temperature influence on the cavern capacity, we have developed a numerical model to simulate the thermo-mechanical behaviour of salt caverns during cyclic gas storage. The model considers the thermodynamic behaviour of the stored gases as well as the heat transport and the temperature dependent material properties of the host rock. Therefore, we utilized well-known constitutive thermo-visco-plastic material models, implemented into the open source-scientific software OpenGeoSys. Both thermal and mechanical processes are solved using a finite element approach, connected via a staggered coupling scheme. The model allows the assessment of the structural safety as well as the convergence of the salt caverns.

  7. Hydrologic modeling as a predictive basis for ecological restoration of salt marshes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roman, C.T.; Garvine, R.W.; Portnoy, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    Roads, bridges, causeways, impoundments, and dikes in the coastal zone often restrict tidal flow to salt marsh ecosystems. A dike with tide control structures, located at the mouth of the Herring River salt marsh estuarine system (Wellfleet, Massachusetts) since 1908, has effectively restricted tidal exchange, causing changes in marsh vegetation composition, degraded water quality, and reduced abundance of fish and macroinvertebrate communities. Restoration of this estuary by reintroduction of tidal exchange is a feasible management alternative. However, restoration efforts must proceed with caution as residential dwellings and a golf course are located immediately adjacent to and in places within the tidal wetland. A numerical model was developed to predict tide height levels for numerous alternative openings through the Herring River dike. Given these model predictions and knowledge of elevations of flood-prone areas, it becomes possible to make responsible decisions regarding restoration. Moreover, tidal flooding elevations relative to the wetland surface must be known to predict optimum conditions for ecological recovery. The tide height model has a universal role, as demonstrated by successful application at a nearby salt marsh restoration site in Provincetown, Massachusetts. Salt marsh restoration is a valuable management tool toward maintaining and enhancing coastal zone habitat diversity. The tide height model presented in this paper will enable both scientists and resource professionals to assign a degree of predictability when designing salt marsh restoration programs.

  8. Simple model for the growth behaviour of mixed lecithin-bile salt micelles.

    PubMed

    Madenci, Dilek; Salonen, Anniina; Schurtenberger, Peter; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Egelhaaf, Stefan U

    2011-02-28

    Mixed lecithin-bile salt micelles are known to have a cylindrical or worm-like structure. We investigated their shape, length, flexibility and cross-sectional structure using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). A broad range of sample compositions was studied varying both the total amphiphile concentration and the molar ratio of bile salt (sodium taurochenodeoxycholate, NaTCDC) to lecithin (egg yolk phosphatidylcholine, EYL). The length of the micelles was quantitatively linked to the micellar composition by introducing a simple model. The model takes into account the partitioning of lecithin and bile salt between the bulk, cylindrical parts and the end caps of the micelles. The model also sheds light on the organization of the micelles, both in their cylindrical regions and end caps. PMID:21135948

  9. Modeling Coupled THMC Processes and Brine Migration in Salt at High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Blanco Martin, Laura; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2014-08-14

    In this report, we present FY2014 progress by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) related to modeling of coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in salt and their effect on brine migration at high temperatures. LBNL’s work on the modeling of coupled THMC processes in salt was initiated in FY2012, focusing on exploring and demonstrating the capabilities of an existing LBNL modeling tool (TOUGH-FLAC) for simulating temperature-driven coupled flow and geomechanical processes in salt. This work includes development related to, and implementation of, essential capabilities, as well as testing the model against relevant information and published experimental data related to the fate and transport of water. we provide more details on the FY2014 work, first presenting updated tools and improvements made to the TOUGH-FLAC simulator, and the use of this updated tool in a new model simulation of long-term THM behavior within a generic repository in a salt formation. This is followed by the description of current benchmarking and validations efforts, including the TSDE experiment. We then present the current status in the development of constitutive relationships and the dual-continuum model for brine migration. We conclude with an outlook for FY2015, which will be much focused on model validation against field experiments and on the use of the model for the design studies related to a proposed heater experiment.

  10. Forward and reverse modelling of salt diapirs formed by down-building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Naiara; Kaus, Boris J. P.

    2013-04-01

    Two end member processes are usually described to explain how salt diapirs form: (1) buoyancy instability (i.e. Rayleigh-Taylor instability) in which the density difference between salt and overburden induces upward motion of salt and (2) a down-building or syndepositional process in which salt structures grow while sediments are being deposited. Both processes have been extensively studied using forward numerical models, but few numerical models focus on the mechanical retrodeformation (reverse modelling) of salt diapirs, regardless their origin. Kaus and Podladchikov (2001) successfully performed mechanical retrodeformation of diapirs that developed as a result of buoyancy instability. Here, we focus on a time-reversal approach to retrodeform diapirs that are formed by down-building. We have used the two-dimensional visco-elasto-plastic finite element code MILAMIN_VEP to perform both forward and synthetic backward simulations. Down-building process was mimicked using a fast-erosion condition at the surface, which keeps it flat and redistributes material at every time step. Initially, the interface between the salt and the overburden is perturbed using a sinusoidal geometry: a thin layer of sediments is present over a sinusoidal shaped salt layer so that the salt is closest to the surface at the domain centre. Several forward simulations are performed, using different initial parameters (rheological parameters, sedimentation rate and the geometry of the initial perturbation). Simulations are run until the salt layer is exhausted, which results in realistic salt dome structures. Using the reversed time step method we have shown that the modelled salt structures formed by down-building can be retrodeformed to a geometry close to the initial one if the correct rheological parameters and sedimentation history through time are used. Once the method has been tested for a wider range of initial geometries and parameters, it will be used to retrodeform geometric

  11. Modeling of Interior Ballistic Gas-Solid Flow Using a Coupled Computational Fluid Dynamics-Discrete Element Method.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2013-05-01

    In conventional models for two-phase reactive flow of interior ballistic, the dynamic collision phenomenon of particles is neglected or empirically simplified. However, the particle collision between particles may play an important role in dilute two-phase flow because the distribution of particles is extremely nonuniform. The collision force may be one of the key factors to influence the particle movement. This paper presents the CFD-DEM approach for simulation of interior ballistic two-phase flow considering the dynamic collision process. The gas phase is treated as a Eulerian continuum and described by a computational fluid dynamic method (CFD). The solid phase is modeled by discrete element method (DEM) using a soft sphere approach for the particle collision dynamic. The model takes into account grain combustion, particle-particle collisions, particle-wall collisions, interphase drag and heat transfer between gas and solid phases. The continuous gas phase equations are discretized in finite volume form and solved by the AUSM+-up scheme with the higher order accurate reconstruction method. Translational and rotational motions of discrete particles are solved by explicit time integrations. The direct mapping contact detection algorithm is used. The multigrid method is applied in the void fraction calculation, the contact detection procedure, and CFD solving procedure. Several verification tests demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of this approach. The simulation of an experimental igniter device in open air shows good agreement between the model and experimental measurements. This paper has implications for improving the ability to capture the complex physics phenomena of two-phase flow during the interior ballistic cycle and to predict dynamic collision phenomena at the individual particle scale. PMID:24891728

  12. Non-Radiological Air Quality Modeling for the High-Level Waste Salt Disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, C.H.

    1999-11-29

    Dispersion modeling of non-radiological airborne emissions associated with the construction and operation of three alternatives for high-level waste salt disposition at the Savannah River Site has been completed. The results will be used by Department of Energy-Savannah River in the preparation of the salt disposition supplemental environmental impact statement. Estimated maximum ground-level concentrations of applicable regulated air pollutants of the site boundary and at the distance to a hypothetical, co-located onsite worker are summarized in tables. In all cases, model estimated ambient concentrations are less than regulatory standards.

  13. 2-D Modeling of the Variability of the Solar Interior for Climate Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofia, S.; Li, L. H.; Spada, F.; Ventura, P.

    2012-07-01

    To establish the possible influence of solar variability on climate, it is necessary to understand the luminosity changes induced by a variable dynamo magnetic field. To accomplish this, we have developed a 2D code of the structure and evolution of the solar interior (based on the 1D YREC code), that includes rotation, magnetic fields of arbitrary configuration, and turbulence, that can be run on very short time scales (down to 1 year), and that represents all global parameters (R, L, Teff) with a relative accuracy of 1 part per million, or better. This paper discusses the motivation for this work, the structure and the physical components of the code, and its application to interpret the results of the SODISM experiment on the PICARD satellite, and of the balloon-borne Solar Disk Sextant (SDS) experiment.

  14. Computational modeling of latent-heat-storage in PCM modified interior plaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fořt, Jan; Maděra, Jiří; Trník, Anton; Pavlíková, Milena; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2016-06-01

    The latent heat storage systems represent a promising way for decrease of buildings energy consumption with respect to the sustainable development principles of building industry. The presented paper is focused on the evaluation of the effect of PCM incorporation on thermal performance of cement-lime plasters. For basic characterization of the developed materials, matrix density, bulk density, and total open porosity are measured. Thermal conductivity is accessed by transient impulse method. DSC analysis is used for the identification of phase change temperature during the heating and cooling process. Using DSC data, the temperature dependent specific heat capacity is calculated. On the basis of the experiments performed, the supposed improvement of the energy efficiency of characteristic building envelope system where the designed plasters are likely to be used is evaluated by a computational analysis. Obtained experimental and computational results show a potential of PCM modified plasters for improvement of thermal stability of buildings and moderation of interior climate.

  15. Numerical models of thermal convection in Venus interior: implications for its atmospheric composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotin, C.; Choblet, G.; Smrekar, S. E.

    2012-12-01

    The composition of Venus atmosphere is the result of several processes including the accretion of volatiles during the formation of the planet and then the outgassing of volatiles that are trapped into the mantle rocks, during volcanic events. Spacecraft can more easily study the atmosphere of a planet than its interior. Observations of the atmosphere can therefore provide important information on the interior dynamics and the thermal evolution of a planet such as Venus. This study describes the results of numerical simulations of thermal convection in Venus mantle. These simulations investigate the effects of spherical geometry, internal heating rate, and complex viscosity on the characteristics of mantle plumes. In particular, they provide key information on the velocities and temperature of the upwelling plumes. Temperature and vertical velocities control the occurrence and amount of partial melt that can eventually migrate to the surface and release the gas compounds that were incorporated into the melt. Numerical simulations are carried out in the stagnant lid regime since Venus does not show any evidence of mobile lid or plate tectonics. In that regime, the thickness of the lid is very large and the temperature exceeds the melting temperature of mantle rocks only if water is present in the rocks. The recent volcanic activity suggests that melt is produced at depth. The results of these numerical simulations imply that Venus' mantle is wet. The information on the radial velocity of the plumes and the number of plumes allows us to investigate the amount of water that can be extracted from the mantle. The values are compared with the abundance of water in the low atmosphere, which has been estimated by the analysis of infrared spectra obtained by the VIRTIS instrument onboard the VenusExpress spacecraft. Similarly, we have investigated the amount of 40Ar that can be released during the partial melting of upwelling mantle plumes. This work has been performed at

  16. Properties of alkali-halide salt solutions about polarizable nanoparticle solutes for different ion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynveen, Aaron; Bresme, Fernando

    2010-10-01

    We investigate the distributions of various salts about large hydrophobic polarizable solutes in aqueous electrolyte solutions. The solutes are modeled as nanometer-sized cylindrical objects, a scale relevant to biomolecules and nanomaterials, and particularly high aspect ratio nanoparticles. Interactions, including image charge forces arising from the finite polarizability of the solute, between explicit solvent/ions and the solute are computed explicitly using a molecular dynamics simulation methodology we have recently introduced. Comparisons are made between several salt species and different models of the force fields for each ionic component of the salt. We find evidence that both small cations, Li+, and large anions, I-, adsorb at hydrophobic interfaces. Our results indicate that the ion structure about the solute is strongly dependent on the force field investigated, suggesting that ion selectivity is quite sensitive to the respective parameters defining the ion's size and binding energy as well as to the polarizability of the solute.

  17. Planetary Interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerdt, W. Bruce; Abercrombie, Rachel; Keddie, Susan; Mizutani, Hitoshi; Nagihara, Seiichi; Nakamura, Yosio; Pike, W. Thomas

    1996-01-01

    This report identifies two main themes to guide planetary science in the next two decades: understanding planetary origins, and understanding the constitution and fundamental processes of the planets themselves. Within the latter theme, four specific goals related to interior measurements addressing the theme. These are: (1) Understanding the internal structure and dynamics of at least one solid body, other than the Earth or Moon, that is actively convecting, (2) Determine the characteristics of the magnetic fields of Mercury and the outer planets to provide insight into the generation of planetary magnetic fields, (3) Specify the nature and sources of stress that are responsible for the global tectonics of Mars, Venus, and several icy satellites of the outer planets, and (4) Advance significantly our understanding of crust-mantle structure for all the solid planets. These goals can be addressed almost exclusively by measurements made on the surfaces of planetary bodies.

  18. Developing a coupled analytical model for analyzing salt intrusion in alluvial estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenije, H.; CAI, H.; Gisen, J.

    2013-12-01

    A predictive assessment technique to estimate the salt intrusion length and longitudinal salinity distribution in estuaries is important for policy makers and managers to maintain a healthy estuarine environment. In this study, the salt intrusion model of Savenije (2005, 2012) is applied and coupled to an explicit solution for tidal dynamics developed by Cai and Savenije (2013). The objective of the coupling is to reduce the number of calibration parameters, which subsequently strengthens the reliability of the salt intrusion model. Moreover, the fully analytical treatment allows assessing the effect of model forcing (i.e., tide and river discharge) and geometry adjustments (e.g., by dredging) on system performance. The coupled model has been applied to a wide range of estuaries, and the result shows that the correspondence between analytical estimations and observations is very good. As a result, the coupled model is a useful tool for decision makers to obtain first order estimates of salt intrusion in estuaries based on a minimum of information required. References Savenije, H.H.G. (2005), Salinity and Tides in Alluvial Estuaries, Elsevier. Savenije, H.H.G. (2012), Salinity and Tides in Alluvial Estuaries, completely revised 2nd edition, www.salinityandtides.com. Cai, H., and H. H. G. Savenije (2013), Asymptotic behavior of tidal damping in alluvial estuaries, Journal of Geophysical Research, submitted.

  19. Dietary Salt Reduction and Cardiovascular Disease Rates in India: A Mathematical Model

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sanjay; Stuckler, David; Vellakkal, Sukumar; Ebrahim, Shah

    2012-01-01

    Background Reducing salt intake has been proposed to prevent cardiovascular disease in India. We sought to determine whether salt reductions would be beneficial or feasible, given the worry that unrealistically large reductions would be required, worsening iodine deficiency and benefiting only urban subpopulations. Methods and Results Future myocardial infarctions (MI) and strokes in India were predicted with a Markov model simulating men and women aged 40 to 69 in both urban and rural locations, incorporating the risk reduction from lower salt intake. If salt intake does not change, we expect ∼8.3 million MIs (95% CI: 6.9–9.6 million), 830,000 strokes (690,000–960,000) and 2.0 million associated deaths (1.5–2.4 million) per year among Indian adults aged 40 to 69 over the next three decades. Reducing intake by 3 g/day over 30 years (−0.1 g/year, 25% reduction) would reduce annual MIs by 350,000 (a 4.6% reduction; 95% CI: 320,000–380,000), strokes by 48,000 (−6.5%; 13,000–83,000) and deaths by 81,000 (−4.9%; 59,000–100,000) among this group. The largest decline in MIs would be among younger urban men, but the greatest number of averted strokes would be among rural men, and nearly one-third of averted strokes and one-fifth of averted MIs would be among rural women. Only under a highly pessimistic scenario would iodine deficiency increase (by <0.0001%, ∼1600 persons), since inadequate iodized salt access—not low intake of iodized salt—is the major cause of deficiency and would be unaffected by dietary salt reduction. Conclusions Modest reductions in salt intake could substantially reduce cardiovascular disease throughout India. PMID:22970159

  20. Sensitivity to deliberate sea salt seeding of marine clouds - observations and model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alterskjær, K.; Kristjánsson, J. E.; Seland, Ø.

    2012-03-01

    Sea salt seeding of marine clouds to increase their albedo is a proposed technique to counteract or slow global warming. In this study, we first investigate the susceptibility of marine clouds to sea salt injections, using observational data of cloud droplet number concentration, cloud optical depth, and liquid cloud fraction from the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instruments on board the Aqua and Terra satellites. We then compare the derived susceptibility function to a corresponding estimate from the Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM). Results compare well between simulations and observations, showing that stratocumulus regions off the west coast of the major continents along with large regions over the Pacific and the Indian Oceans are susceptible. At low and mid latitudes the signal is dominated by the cloud fraction. We then carry out geo-engineering experiments with a uniform increase over ocean of 10-9 kg m-2 s-1 in emissions of sea salt particles with a dry modal radius of 0.13 μm, an emission strength and areal coverage much greater than proposed in earlier studies. The increased sea salt concentrations and the resulting change in marine cloud properties lead to a globally averaged forcing of -4.8 W m-2 at the top of the atmosphere, more than cancelling the forcing associated with a doubling of CO2 concentrations. The forcing is large in areas found to be sensitive by using the susceptibility function, confirming its usefulness as an indicator of where to inject sea salt for maximum effect. Results also show that the effectiveness of sea salt seeding is reduced because the injected sea salt provides a large surface area for water vapor and gaseous sulphuric acid to condense on, thereby lowering the maximum supersaturation and suppressing the formation and lifetime of sulphate particles. In some areas, our simulations show an overall reduction in the CCN concentration and the number of activated cloud droplets decreases

  1. Sensitivity to deliberate sea salt seeding of marine clouds - observations and model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alterskjær, K.; Kristjánsson, J. E.; Seland, Ø.

    2011-10-01

    Sea salt seeding of marine clouds to increase their albedo is a proposed technique to counteract or slow global warming. In this study, we first investigate the susceptibility of marine clouds to sea salt injections, using observational data of cloud droplet number concentration, cloud optical depth, and liquid cloud fraction from the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instruments on board the Aqua and Terra satellites. We then compare the derived susceptibility function to a corresponding estimate from the Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM). Results compare well between simulations and observations, showing that stratocumulus regions off the west coast of the major continents along with large regions in the Pacific and the Indian Oceans are susceptible. We then carry out geo-engineering experiments with a uniform increase of 10-9 kg m-2 s-1 in emissions of sea salt particles with a modal radius of 0.13 μm. The increased sea salt concentrations and the resulting change in marine cloud properties lead to a globally averaged forcing of -4.8 W m-2 at the top of the atmosphere, more than cancelling a doubling of CO2 concentrations. The forcing is large in areas found to be sensitive by using the susceptibility function, confirming its usefulness as an indicator of where to inject sea salt for maximum effect. Results also show that the effectiveness of sea salt seeding is reduced because the injected sea salt provide a large surface area for water vapor and gaseous sulphuric acid to condense on, thereby lowering the maximum supersaturation and suppressing the formation and lifetime of sulphate particles. In some areas, our simulations show an overall reduction in the CCN concentration and the number of activated cloud droplets decreases, resulting in a positive globally averaged forcing.

  2. Convection without eddy viscosity: An attempt to model the interiors of giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingersoll, A. P.

    1986-01-01

    In the theory of hydrostatic quasi-geostrophic flow in the Earth's atmosphere the principal results do not depend on the eddy viscosity. This contrasts with published theories of convection in deep rotating fluid spheres, where the wavelength of the fastest growing disturbance varies as E sup 1/3, where E, the Ekman number, is proportional to the eddy viscosity. A new theory of quasi-columnar motions in stably stratified fluid spheres attempts to capture the luck of the meteorologists. The theory allows one to investigate the stability of barotropic and baroclinic zonal flows that extend into the planetary interior. It is hypothesized that the internal heat Jupiter and Saturn comes out not radially but on sloping surfaces defined by the internal entropy distribution. To test the hypothesis one searches for basic states in which the wavelength of the fastest-growing disturbance remains finite as E tends to zero, and is which the heat flux vector is radially outward and poleward.

  3. Automatic Construction of 3D Basic-Semantic Models of Inhabited Interiors Using Laser Scanners and RFID Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Valero, Enrique; Adan, Antonio; Cerrada, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    This paper is focused on the automatic construction of 3D basic-semantic models of inhabited interiors using laser scanners with the help of RFID technologies. This is an innovative approach, in whose field scarce publications exist. The general strategy consists of carrying out a selective and sequential segmentation from the cloud of points by means of different algorithms which depend on the information that the RFID tags provide. The identification of basic elements of the scene, such as walls, floor, ceiling, windows, doors, tables, chairs and cabinets, and the positioning of their corresponding models can then be calculated. The fusion of both technologies thus allows a simplified 3D semantic indoor model to be obtained. This method has been tested in real scenes under difficult clutter and occlusion conditions, and has yielded promising results. PMID:22778609

  4. AQUIFEM-SALT; a finite-element model for aquifers containing a seawater interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voss, C.I.

    1984-01-01

    Described are modifications to AQUIFEM, a finite element areal ground-water flow model for aquifer evaluation. The modified model, AQUIFEM-SALT, simulates an aquifer containing a freshwater body that freely floats on seawater. Parts of the freshwater lens may be confined above and below by less permeable units. Theory, code modifications, and model verification are discussed. A modified input data list is included. This report is intended as a companion to the original AQUIFEM documentation. (USGS)

  5. Salt transport properties of model reverse osmosis membranes using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Kathleen; Chan, Edwin; Stafford, Gery; Stafford, Christopher

    With the increasing shortage of clean water, efficient purification technologies including membrane separations are becoming critical. The main requirement of reverse osmosis in particular is to maximize water permeability while minimizing salt permeability. Such performance optimization has typically taken place through trial and error approaches. In this work, key salt transport metrics are instead measured in model reverse osmosis membranes using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). As shown previously, EIS can provide both the membrane resistance Rm and membrane capacitance Cm, with Rm directly related to salt permeability. The membranes are fabricated in a molecular layer by layer approach, which allows for control over such parameters as thickness, surface and bulk chemistry, and network geometry/connectivity. Rm, and therefore salt permeability, follows the expected trends with thickness and membrane area but shows unusual behavior when the network geometry is systematically varied. By connecting intrinsic material properties such as the salt permeability with macroscopic performance measures we can begin to establish design rules for improving membrane efficiency and facilitate the creation of next-generation separation membranes.

  6. Models of coupled salt and water transport across leaky epithelia.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, A M; Stephenson, J L

    1981-05-15

    A general formulation is presented for the verification of isotonic transport and for the assignment of a degree of osmotic coupling in any epithelial model. In particular, it is shown that the concentration of the transported fluid in the presence of exactly equal bathing media is, in general, not a sufficient calculation by which to decide the issue of isotonicity of transport. Within this framework, two epithelial models are considered: (1) A nonelectrolyte compartment model of the lateral intercellular space is presented along with its linearization about the condition of zero flux. This latter approximate model is shown to be useful in the estimation of deviation from isotonicity, intraepithelial solute polarization effects, and the capacity to transport water against a gradient. In the case of uphill water transport, some limitations of a model of fixed geometry are indicated and the advantage of modeling a compliant interspace is suggested. (2) A comprehensive model of cell and channel is described which includes the major electrolytes and the possible presence of intraepithelial gradients. The general approach to verification of isotonicity is illustrated for this numerical model. In addition, the insights about parameter dependence gained from the linear compartment model are shown to be applicable to understanding this large simulation. PMID:6264088

  7. A comparison of sea salt emission parameterizations in northwestern Europe using a chemistry transport model setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Daniel; Matthias, Volker; Bieser, Johannes; Aulinger, Armin; Quante, Markus

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric sea salt particles affect chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere. These particles provide surface area for condensation and reaction of nitrogen, sulfur, and organic species and are a vehicle for the transport of these species. Additionally, HCl is released from sea salt. Hence, sea salt has a relevant impact on air quality, particularly in coastal regions with high anthropogenic emissions, such as the North Sea region. Therefore, the integration of sea salt emissions in modeling studies in these regions is necessary. However, it was found that sea salt concentrations are not represented with the necessary accuracy in some situations.In this study, three sea salt emission parameterizations depending on different combinations of wind speed, salinity, sea surface temperature, and wave data were implemented and compared: GO03 (Gong, 2003), SP13 (Spada et al., 2013), and OV14 (Ovadnevaite et al., 2014). The aim was to identify the parameterization that most accurately predicts the sea salt mass concentrations at different distances to the source regions. For this purpose, modeled particle sodium concentrations, sodium wet deposition, and aerosol optical depth were evaluated against measurements of these parameters. Each 2-month period in winter and summer 2008 were considered for this purpose. The shortness of these periods limits generalizability of the conclusions on other years.While the GO03 emissions yielded overestimations in the PM10 concentrations at coastal stations and underestimations of those at inland stations, OV14 emissions conversely led to underestimations at coastal stations and overestimations at inland stations. Because of the differently shaped particle size distributions of the GO03 and OV14 emission cases, the deposition velocity of the coarse particles differed between both cases which yielded this distinct behavior at inland and coastal stations. The PM10 concentrations produced by the SP13 emissions generally

  8. Models for coupling of salt and water transport; Proximal tubular reabsorption in Necturus kidney.

    PubMed

    Sackin, H; Boulpaep, E L

    1975-12-01

    Models for coupling of salt and water transport are developed with two important assumptions appropriate for leaky epithelia. (a) The tight junction is permeable to both sale and water. (b) Active Na transport into the lateral speces is assumed to occur uniformly along the length of the channel. The proposed models deal specifically with the intraepithelial mechanism of proximal tubular resbsorption in the Necturus kidney although they have implications for epithelial transport in the gallbladder and small intestine as well. The first model (continuous version) is similar to the standing gradient model devised by Diamond and Bossert but used different boundary conditions. In contrast to Diamond and Bossert's model, the predicted concentration profiles are relatively flat with no sizable gradients along the interspace. The second model (compartment version) expands Curran's model of epithelial salt and water transport by including additional compartments and considering both electrical and chemical driving forces for individual Na and Cl ions as well as hydraulic and osmotic driving forces for water. In both models, ion and water fluxes are investigated as a function of the transport parameters. The behavior of the models is consistent with previously suggested mechanisms for the control of net transport, particularly during saline diuresis. Under all conditions the predicted ratio of net solute to solvent flux, or emergent concentration, deviates from exact isotonicity (except when the basement membrane has an appreciable salt reflection coefficient). However, the degree of hypertonicity may be small enough to be experimentally indistinguishable from isotonic transport. PMID:1104761

  9. Determining salt concentrations for equivalent water activity in reduced-sodium cheese by use of a model system.

    PubMed

    Grummer, J; Schoenfuss, T C

    2011-09-01

    The range of sodium chloride (salt)-to-moisture ratio is critical in producing high-quality cheese products. The salt-to-moisture ratio has numerous effects on cheese quality, including controlling water activity (a(w)). Therefore, when attempting to decrease the sodium content of natural cheese it is important to calculate the amount of replacement salts necessary to create the same a(w) as the full-sodium target (when using the same cheese making procedure). Most attempts to decrease sodium using replacement salts have used concentrations too low to create the equivalent a(w) due to the differences in the molecular weight of the replacers compared with salt. This could be because of the desire to minimize off-flavors inherent in the replacement salts, but it complicates the ability to conclude that the replacement salts are the cause of off-flavors such as bitter. The objective of this study was to develop a model system that could be used to measure a(w) directly, without manufacturing cheese, to allow cheese makers to determine the salt and salt replacer concentrations needed to achieve the equivalent a(w) for their existing full-sodium control formulas. All-purpose flour, salt, and salt replacers (potassium chloride, modified potassium chloride, magnesium chloride, and calcium chloride) were blended with butter and water at concentrations that approximated the solids, fat, and moisture contents of typical Cheddar cheese. Salt and salt replacers were applied to the model systems at concentrations predicted by Raoult's law. The a(w) of the model samples was measured on a water activity meter, and concentrations were adjusted using Raoult's law if they differed from those of the full-sodium model. Based on the results determined using the model system, stirred-curd pilot-scale batches of reduced- and full-sodium Cheddar cheese were manufactured in duplicate. Water activity, pH, and gross composition were measured and evaluated statistically by linear mixed model

  10. Application of Physiologically Based Absorption Modeling for Amphetamine Salts Drug Products in Generic Drug Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Babiskin, Andrew H; Zhang, Xinyuan

    2015-09-01

    Amphetamine (AMP) salts-based extended-release (ER) drug products are widely used for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. We developed physiologically based absorption models for mixed AMP salts ER capsules and dextroamphetamine sulfate ER capsules to address specific questions raised during generic drug postmarketing surveillance and bioequivalence (BE) guidance development. The models were verified against several data sets. Virtual BE simulations were conducted to assess BE in various populations other than normal healthy subjects where BE studies are generally conducted for approval. The models were also used to predict pharmacokinetics (PK) for hypothetical formulations having dissolution profiles falling within specification after the development of in vitro-in vivo relation. Finally, we demonstrated how to use the models to test sensitivity of PK metrics to the changes in formulation variables. PMID:25973928

  11. MULTISCALE MODELING OF AIR FLOW IN SALT LAKE CITY AND THE SURROUNDING REGION

    SciTech Connect

    M. BROWN; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    A general overview is given of a modeling effort to simulate the fate and transport of a tracer within the downtown core of Salt Lake City and beyond into the Salt Lake Basin. The problem crosses three significant scales where different physics are predominant: atmospheric mesoscale, city scale, and building scale. Three different computational fluid dynamics models were used, each with strengths at particular spatial and temporal scales. We show preliminary results and discuss what we believe to be the relevant phenomenon one must model as one crosses from atmospheric scale to engineering scale flow problems. We also describe our model validation efforts, including wind-tunnel and tow-tank experiments and a recently completed urban field experiment.

  12. A fluid-structure interaction model with interior damping and delay in the structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, Gilbert

    2016-03-01

    A coupled system of partial differential equations modeling the interaction of a fluid and a structure with delay in the feedback is studied. The model describes the dynamics of an elastic body immersed in a fluid that is contained in a vessel, whose boundary is made of a solid wall. The fluid component is modeled by the linearized Navier-Stokes equation, while the solid component is given by the wave equation neglecting transverse elastic force. Spectral properties and exponential or strong stability of the interaction model under appropriate conditions on the damping factor, delay factor and the delay parameter are established using a generalized Lax-Milgram method.

  13. Modeling Fecal Indicator Bacteria Like Salt in Newport Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciglar, A. M.; Rippy, M.; Grant, S. B.

    2015-12-01

    Newport Bay is a harbor and estuary located in Orange County, CA that provides many water sports and recreational activities for millions of southern California residents and tourists. The aim of this study is to quickly assess exceedances of FIB in the Newport Bay which pose a health risk to recreational users. The ability to quickly assess water quality is made possible with an advection-diffusion mass transport model that uses easily measurable parameters such as volumetric flow rate from tributaries. Current FIB assessment methods for Newport Bay take a minimum of 24 hours to evaluate health risk by either culturing for FIB or running a more complex fluid dynamics model. By this time the FIB may have already reached the ocean outlet thus no longer posing a risk in the bay or recreationists may have already come in close contact with contaminated waters. The advection-diffusion model can process and disseminate health risk information within a few hours of flow rate measurements, minimizing time between an FIB exceedance and public awareness about the event. Data used to calibrate and validate the model was collected from January 2006 through February 2007. Salinity data was used for calibration and FIB data was used for validation. Both steady-state and transient conditions were assessed to determine if dry weather patterns can be simplified to the steady-state condition.

  14. An electrochemical model for hot-salt stress-corrosion of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garfinkle, M.

    1972-01-01

    An electrochemical model of hot-salt stress-corrosion cracking of titanium alloys is proposed based on an oxygen-concentration cell. Hydrogen embrittlement is proposed as the direct cause of cracking, the hydrogen being generated as the results of the hydrolysis of complex halides formed at the shielded anode of the electrochemical cell. The model found to be consistent with the diverse observations made both in this study and by many investigators in this field.

  15. Cosmological Parameter Uncertainties from SALT-II Type Ia Supernova Light Curve Models

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.; Guy, J.; Kessler, R.; Astier, P.; Marriner, J.; Betoule, M.; Sako, M.; El-Hage, P.; Biswas, R.; Pain, R.; Kuhlmann, S.; Regnault, N.; Frieman, J. A.; Schneider, D. P.

    2014-08-29

    We use simulated type Ia supernova (SN Ia) samples, including both photometry and spectra, to perform the first direct validation of cosmology analysis using the SALT-II light curve model. This validation includes residuals from the light curve training process, systematic biases in SN Ia distance measurements, and a bias on the dark energy equation of state parameter w. Using the SN-analysis package SNANA, we simulate and analyze realistic samples corresponding to the data samples used in the SNLS3 analysis: ~120 low-redshift (z < 0.1) SNe Ia, ~255 Sloan Digital Sky Survey SNe Ia (z < 0.4), and ~290 SNLS SNe Ia (z ≤ 1). To probe systematic uncertainties in detail, we vary the input spectral model, the model of intrinsic scatter, and the smoothing (i.e., regularization) parameters used during the SALT-II model training. Using realistic intrinsic scatter models results in a slight bias in the ultraviolet portion of the trained SALT-II model, and w biases (w (input) – w (recovered)) ranging from –0.005 ± 0.012 to –0.024 ± 0.010. These biases are indistinguishable from each other within the uncertainty, the average bias on w is –0.014 ± 0.007.

  16. Cosmological parameter uncertainties from SALT-II type Ia supernova light curve models

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.; Sako, M.; Guy, J.; Astier, P.; Betoule, M.; El-Hage, P.; Pain, R.; Regnault, N.; Marriner, J.; Biswas, R.; Kuhlmann, S.; Schneider, D. P.

    2014-09-20

    We use simulated type Ia supernova (SN Ia) samples, including both photometry and spectra, to perform the first direct validation of cosmology analysis using the SALT-II light curve model. This validation includes residuals from the light curve training process, systematic biases in SN Ia distance measurements, and a bias on the dark energy equation of state parameter w. Using the SN-analysis package SNANA, we simulate and analyze realistic samples corresponding to the data samples used in the SNLS3 analysis: ∼120 low-redshift (z < 0.1) SNe Ia, ∼255 Sloan Digital Sky Survey SNe Ia (z < 0.4), and ∼290 SNLS SNe Ia (z ≤ 1). To probe systematic uncertainties in detail, we vary the input spectral model, the model of intrinsic scatter, and the smoothing (i.e., regularization) parameters used during the SALT-II model training. Using realistic intrinsic scatter models results in a slight bias in the ultraviolet portion of the trained SALT-II model, and w biases (w {sub input} – w {sub recovered}) ranging from –0.005 ± 0.012 to –0.024 ± 0.010. These biases are indistinguishable from each other within the uncertainty; the average bias on w is –0.014 ± 0.007.

  17. Conceptual model for regional radionuclide transport from a salt dome repository: a technical memorandum

    SciTech Connect

    Kier, R.S.; Showalter, P.A.; Dettinger, M.D.

    1980-05-30

    Disposal of high-level radioactive wastes is a major environmental problem influencing further development of nuclear energy in this country. Salt domes in the Gulf Coast Basin are being investigated as repository sites. A major concern is geologic and hydrologic stability of candidate domes and potential transport of radionuclides by groundwater to the biosphere prior to their degradation to harmless levels of activity. This report conceptualizes a regional geohydrologic model for transport of radionuclides from a salt dome repository. The model considers transport pathways and the physical and chemical changes that would occur through time prior to the radionuclides reaching the biosphere. Necessary, but unknown inputs to the regional model involve entry and movement of fluids through the repository dome and across the dome-country rock interface and the effect on the dome and surrounding strata of heat generated by the radioactive wastes.

  18. Modeling and analysis of a molten salt electrowinning system with liquid cadmium cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.R.; Ahn, D.H.; Paek, S.; Kwon, S.W.; Kim, S.H.; Shim, J.B.; Chung, H.; Kim, E.H.

    2007-07-01

    In the present work, an electrowinning process in the LiCl-KCl/Cd system is considered to model and analyze the equilibrium behavior and electro-transport of the actinide and rare-earth elements. Equilibrium distributions of the actinide and rare-earth elements in a molten salt and liquid cadmium system have been estimated for an infinite potentiostatic electrolysis from the thermodynamic data and material balance. A simple dynamic modeling of this process was performed by taking into account the material balances and diffusion-controlled electrochemical reactions in a diffusion layer at an electrode interface between the molten salt and liquid cadmium cathode. This model demonstrated a prediction of the concentration behaviors, a faradic current of each element and an electrochemical potential as function of the time up to the corresponding electro-transport satisfying a given applied current based on a galvano-static electrolysis. (authors)

  19. Sedimentary characteristics and depositional model of a Paleocene-Eocene salt lake in the Jiangling Depression, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaocan; Wang, Chunlian; Liu, Chenglin; Zhang, Zhaochong; Xu, Haiming; Huang, Hua; Xie, Tengxiao; Li, Haonan; Liu, Jinlei

    2015-11-01

    We studied the sedimentary characteristics of a Paleocene-Eocene salt lake in the Jiangling Depression through field core observation, thin section identification, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis. On the basis of sedimentary characteristics we have summarized the petrological and mineralogical characteristics of the salt lake and proposed 9 types of grade IV salt rhythms. The deposition shows a desalting to salting order of halite-argillaceous-mudstone-mud dolostonemud anhydrock-glauberite-halite. The relationship among grade IV rhythms, water salinity and climate fluctuations was analyzed. Based on the analysis of the relationship between boron content and mudstone color and by combining the mineralogy and sedimentary environment characteristics, we propose that the early and late Paleocene Shashi Formation in the Jiangling Depression was a paleolacustrine depositional environment with a high salt content, which is a representation of the shallow water salt lake depositional model. The middle Paleocene Shashi Formation and the early Eocene Xingouzui Formation were salt and brackish sedimentary environments with low salt content in a deep paleolake, which represents a deep salt lake depositional model.

  20. An approach to computerized preliminary design procedure of mid-size superyachts from hull modeling to interior space arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Jong-Ho; Kim, Dong-Ham; Lee, Ho Jin

    2010-06-01

    A concept of preliminary design for mid-size superyachts is explored. First, the profile of a superyacht is interactively designed with the help of freeform curve functionality and graphical user interface (GUI) based interaction. The hull form is then constructed using major characteristic curves such as design waterline, deck sideline, and sections in addition to the predefined profile curve. After exterior hull modeling is done, the arrangement of significant interior spaces of all decks is carried out. A genetic algorithm is exploited to find a space arrangement by considering space fitness values, space proximity, and stairs connectivity of relevant spaces. A goal of the paper is to offer a step-by-step procedure for superyacht design from scratch or when initial information is not sufficient for complete design. For this purpose, a GUI based superyacht design system is developed. This design approach is expected to help users interactively design mid-size superyachts.

  1. Sea salt aerosol from blowing snow on sea ice - modeling vs observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xin; Frey, Markus; Norris, Sarah; Brooks, Ian; Anderson, Philip; Jones, Anna; wolff, Eric; Legrand, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Blowing snow over sea ice, through a subsequent sublimation process of salt-containing blown snow particles, has been hypothesized as a significant sea salt aerosol (SSA) source in high latitudes. This mechanism has been strongly supported by a winter cruise in the Weddell Sea (during June-August 2013). The newly collected data, including both physical and chemical components, provide a unique way to test and validate the parameterisation used for describing the SSA production from blowing snow events. With updates to some key parameters such as snow salinity in a global Chemistry-transport model pTOMCAT, simulated SSA concentrations can be well compared with measured SSA data. In this presentation, I will report modeled SSA number density against collected data on board of Polarstern ship during the Weddell Sea cruise, as well as modeled SSA massive concentrations against those measured at both coastal sites such as Alert in the North and Dumont d'Urville (DDU) in the South and central Antarctic sites such as Concordia and Kohnen stations. Model experiments indicated that open ocean-sourced SSA could not explain the observed winter SSA peaks seen in most polar sites, while with sea ice-sourced SSA in the model, the winter peaks can be well improved indicating the importance of sea ice-sourced SSA as a significant contributor to the salts (Na+, Cl-) recorded in the ice core.

  2. Introducing improved structural properties and salt dependence into a coarse-grained model of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Snodin, Benedict E. K. Mosayebi, Majid; Schreck, John S.; Romano, Flavio; Doye, Jonathan P. K.; Randisi, Ferdinando; Šulc, Petr; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Tsukanov, Roman; Nir, Eyal; Louis, Ard A.

    2015-06-21

    We introduce an extended version of oxDNA, a coarse-grained model of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) designed to capture the thermodynamic, structural, and mechanical properties of single- and double-stranded DNA. By including explicit major and minor grooves and by slightly modifying the coaxial stacking and backbone-backbone interactions, we improve the ability of the model to treat large (kilobase-pair) structures, such as DNA origami, which are sensitive to these geometric features. Further, we extend the model, which was previously parameterised to just one salt concentration ([Na{sup +}] = 0.5M), so that it can be used for a range of salt concentrations including those corresponding to physiological conditions. Finally, we use new experimental data to parameterise the oxDNA potential so that consecutive adenine bases stack with a different strength to consecutive thymine bases, a feature which allows a more accurate treatment of systems where the flexibility of single-stranded regions is important. We illustrate the new possibilities opened up by the updated model, oxDNA2, by presenting results from simulations of the structure of large DNA objects and by using the model to investigate some salt-dependent properties of DNA.

  3. Box Model of a Series of Salt Ponds, as Applied to the Alviso Salt Pond Complex, South San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lionberger, Megan A.; Schoellhamer, David H.; Shellenbarger, Gregory; Orlando, James L.; Ganju, Neil K.

    2007-01-01

    This report documents the development and application of a box model to simulate water level, salinity, and temperature of the Alviso Salt Pond Complex in South San Francisco Bay. These ponds were purchased for restoration in 2003 and currently are managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to maintain existing wildlife habitat and prevent a build up of salt during the development of a long-term restoration plan. The model was developed for the purpose of aiding pond managers during the current interim management period to achieve these goals. A previously developed box model of a salt pond, SPOOM, which calculates daily pond volume and salinity, was reconfigured to simulate multiple connected ponds and a temperature subroutine was added. The updated model simulates rainfall, evaporation, water flowing between the ponds and the adjacent tidal slough network, and water flowing from one pond to the next by gravity and pumps. Theoretical and measured relations between discharge and corresponding differences in water level are used to simulate most flows between ponds and between ponds and sloughs. The principle of conservation of mass is used to calculate daily pond volume and salinity. The model configuration includes management actions specified in the Interim Stewardship Plan for the ponds. The temperature subroutine calculates hourly net heat transfer to or from a pond resulting in a rise or drop in pond temperature and daily average, minimum, and maximum pond temperatures are recorded. Simulated temperature was compared with hourly measured data from pond 3 of the Napa?Sonoma Salt Pond Complex and monthly measured data from pond A14 of the Alviso Salt-Pond Complex. Comparison showed good agreement of measured and simulated pond temperature on the daily and monthly time scales.

  4. Thermo-mechanical modelling of salt caverns due to fluctuating loading conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, N.

    2015-12-01

    This work summarizes the development and application of a numerical model for the thermo-mechanical behaviour of salt caverns during cyclic gas storage. Artificial salt caverns are used for short term energy storage, such as power-to-gas or compressed air energy storage. Those applications are characterized by highly fluctuating operation pressures due to the unsteady power levels of power plants based on renewable energy. Compression and expansion of the storage gases during loading and unloading stages lead to rapidly changing temperatures in the host rock of the caverns. This affects the material behaviour of the host rock within a zone that extends several meters into the rock mass adjacent to the cavern wall, and induces thermo-mechanical stresses and alters the creep response.The proposed model features the thermodynamic behaviour of the storage medium, conductive heat transport in the host rock, as well as temperature dependent material properties of rock salt using different thermo-viscoplastic material models. The utilized constitutive models are well known and state-of-the-art in various salt mechanics applications. The model has been implemented into the open-source software platform OpenGeoSys. Thermal and mechanical processes are solved using a finite element approach, coupled via a staggered coupling scheme. The simulation results allow the conclusion, that the cavern convergence rate (and thus the efficiency of the cavern) is highly influenced by the loading cycle frequency and the resulting gas temperatures. The model therefore allows to analyse the influence of operation modes on the cavern host rock or on neighbouring facilities.

  5. Modelling the Interior Structure of Enceladus Based on the 2014's Cassini Gravity Data.

    PubMed

    Taubner, R-S; Leitner, J J; Firneis, M G; Hitzenberger, R

    2016-06-01

    We present a model for the internal structure of Saturn's moon Enceladus. This model allows us to estimate the physical conditions at the bottom of the satellite's potential subsurface water reservoir and to determine the radial distribution of pressure and gravity. This leads to a better understanding of the physical and chemical conditions at the water/rock boundary. This boundary is the most promising area on icy moons for astrobiological studies as it could serve as a potential habitat for extraterrestrial life similar to terrestrial microbes that inhabit rocky mounds on Earth's sea floors. PMID:26559966

  6. Modelling the Interior Structure of Enceladus Based on the 2014's Cassini Gravity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubner, R.-S.; Leitner, J. J.; Firneis, M. G.; Hitzenberger, R.

    2016-06-01

    We present a model for the internal structure of Saturn's moon Enceladus. This model allows us to estimate the physical conditions at the bottom of the satellite's potential subsurface water reservoir and to determine the radial distribution of pressure and gravity. This leads to a better understanding of the physical and chemical conditions at the water/rock boundary. This boundary is the most promising area on icy moons for astrobiological studies as it could serve as a potential habitat for extraterrestrial life similar to terrestrial microbes that inhabit rocky mounds on Earth's sea floors.

  7. 3D Modeling of Lacus Mortis Pit Crater with Presumed Interior Tube Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Ik-Seon; Yi, Yu; Yu, Jaehyung; Haruyama, Junichi

    2015-06-01

    When humans explore the Moon, lunar caves will be an ideal base to provide a shelter from the hazards of radiation, meteorite impact, and extreme diurnal temperature differences. In order to ascertain the existence of caves on the Moon, it is best to visit the Moon in person. The Google Lunar X Prize(GLXP) competition started recently to attempt lunar exploration missions. Ones of those groups competing, plan to land on a pit of Lacus Mortis and determine the existence of a cave inside this pit. In this pit, there is a ramp from the entrance down to the inside of the pit, which enables a rover to approach the inner region of the pit. In this study, under the assumption of the existence of a cave in this pit, a 3D model was developed based on the optical image data. Since this model simulates the actual terrain, the rendering of the model agrees well with the image data. Furthermore, the 3D printing of this model will enable more rigorous investigations and also could be used to publicize lunar exploration missions with ease.

  8. Interior structure of Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, W.B.

    1984-10-01

    Key measurements are discussed which are diagnostic of Uranus interior structure and evolutionary history, and reviews their present status. Typical interior models have chondritic cores, but have the bulk of their mass in an envelope consisting of ice component, principally H2O. The total amount of free H2 in the planet cannot exceed approximately 1 to 2 earth masses. Measurements of the gravitational moments of Uranus are beginning to be accurate enough to constrain models, but are limited in utility by uncertainty in the rotation period. Discussed is evidence that the outermost planetary layers have a gravitationally significant quantity of denser material (ice component) in addition to H2 and He. The He/H ratio and the deuterium abundance in the atmosphere may be diagnostic of the planet's previous evolutionary history. It is argued that the planet's interior is likely to now be at a temperature approximately 10(3) deg K. Uranus interior with Neptune's in a number of ways, considering heat flow, degree of internal differentiation, and possible magnetic field.

  9. Modeling the surface and interior structure of comet nuclei using a multidisciplinary approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odell, C. R.; Dakoulas, Panos C.; Pharr, George M.

    1991-01-01

    The goal was to investigate the structural properties of the surface of comet nucleus and how the surface should change with time under effect of solar radiation. The basic model that was adopted was that the nucleus is an aggregate of frosty particles loosely bound together, so that it is essentially a soil. The nucleus must mostly be composed of dust particles. The observed mass ratios of dust to gas in the coma is never much greater than unity, but this ratio is probably a much lower limit than that of the nucleus because it is vastly easier to remove the gaseous component by sublimation than by carrying off the dust. Therefore the described models assumed that the particles in the soil were frost covered grains of submicron basic size, closely resembling the interstellar grains. The surface properties of such a nucleus under the effects of heating and cooling as the nucleus approaches and recedes from the Sun generally characterized.

  10. Infrared near-Earth-object survey modeling for observatories interior to the Earth's orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buie, M.

    2014-07-01

    The search for and dynamical characterization of the near-Earth population of objects (NEOs) has been a busy topic for surveys for many years. Most of the work thus far has been from ground-based optical surveys such as the Catalina Sky Survey and LINEAR. These surveys have essentially reached a complete inventory of objects down to 1 km diameter and have shown that the known objects do not pose any significant impact threat. Smaller objects are correspondingly smaller threats but there are more of them and fewer of them have so far been discovered. The next generation of surveys is looking to extend their reach down to much smaller sizes. From an impact risk perspective, those objects as small as 30--40 m are still of interest (similar in size to the Tunguska bolide). Smaller objects than this are largely of interest from a space resource or in-situ analysis efforts. A recent mission concept promoted by the B612 Foundation and Ball Aerospace calls for an infrared survey telescope in a Venus-like orbit, known as the Sentinel Mission. This wide-field facility has been designed to complete the inventory down to a 140 m diameter while also providing substantial constraints on the NEO population down to a Tunguska-sized object. I have been working to develop a suite of tools to provide survey modeling for this class of survey telescope. The purpose of the tool is to uncover hidden complexities that govern mission design and operation while also working to quantitatively understand the orbit quality provided on its catalog of objects without additional followup assets. The baseline mission design calls for a 6.5 year survey lifetime. This survey model is a statistically based tool for establishing completeness as a function of object size and survey duration. Effects modeled include the ability to adjust the field-of-regard (includes all pointing restrictions), field-of-view, focal plane array fill factor, and the observatory orbit. Consequences tracked include time

  11. Interior design for passive solar homes

    SciTech Connect

    Breen, J. C.

    1981-07-01

    The increasing emphasis on refinement of passive solar systems has brought recognition to interior design as an integral part of passive solar architecture. Interior design can be used as a finetuning tool minimizing many of the problems associated with passive solar energy use in residential buildings. In addition, treatment of interior space in solar model homes may be a prime factor in determining sales success. A new style of interior design is evolving in response to changes in building form incorporating passive solar design features. The psychology behind passive solar architecture is reflected in interiors, and selection of interior components increasingly depends on the functional suitability of various interior elements.

  12. High-fidelity gravity modeling applied to spacecraft trajectories and lunar interior analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chappaz, Loic P. R.

    As the complexity and boldness of emerging mission proposals increase, and with the rapid evolution of the available computational capabilities, high-accuracy and high-resolution gravity models and the tools to exploit such models are increasingly attractive within the context of spaceflight mechanics, mission design and analysis, and planetary science in general. First, in trajectory design applications, a gravity representation for the bodies of interest is, in general, assumed and exploited to determine the motion of a spacecraft in any given system. The focus is the exploration of trajectories in the vicinity of a system comprised of two small irregular bodies. Within this context, the primary bodies are initially modeled as massive ellipsoids and tools to construct third-body trajectories are developed. However, these dynamical models are idealized representations of the actual dynamical regime and do not account for any perturbing effects. Thus, a robust strategy to maintain a spacecraft near reference third-body trajectories is constructed. Further, it is important to assess the perturbing effect that dominates the dynamics of the spacecraft in such a region as a function of the baseline orbit. Alternatively, the motion of the spacecraft around a given body may be known to extreme precision enabling the derivation of a very high-accuracy gravity field for that body. Such knowledge can subsequently be exploited to gain insight into specific properties of the body. The success of the NASA's GRAIL mission ensures that the highest resolution and most accurate gravity data for the Moon is now available. In the GRAIL investigation, the focus is on the specific task of detecting the presence and extent of subsurface features, such as empty lava tubes beneath the mare surface. In addition to their importance for understanding the emplacement of the mare flood basalts, open lava tubes are of interest as possible habitation sites safe from cosmic radiation and

  13. Salt-Induced Changes in Cardiac Phosphoproteome in a Rat Model of Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhengxiu; Zhu, Hongguo; Zhang, Menghuan; Wang, Liangliang; He, Hanchang; Jiang, Shaoling; Hou, Fan Fan; Li, Aiqing

    2014-01-01

    Heart damage is widely present in patients with chronic kidney disease. Salt diet is the most important environmental factor affecting development of chronic renal failure and cardiovascular diseases. The proteins involved in chronic kidney disease -induced heart damage, especially their posttranslational modifications, remain largely unknown to date. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 5/6 nephrectomy (chronic renal failure model) or sham operation were treated for 2 weeks with a normal-(0.4% NaCl), or high-salt (4% NaCl) diet. We employed TiO2 enrichment, iTRAQ labeling and liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry strategy for phosphoproteomic profiling of left ventricular free walls in these animals. A total of 1724 unique phosphopeptides representing 2551 non-redundant phosphorylation sites corresponding to 763 phosphoproteins were identified. During normal salt feeding, 89 (54%) phosphopeptides upregulated and 76 (46%) phosphopeptides downregulated in chronic renal failure rats relative to sham rats. In chronic renal failure rats, high salt intake induced upregulation of 84 (49%) phosphopeptides and downregulation of 88 (51%) phosphopeptides. Database searches revealed that most of the identified phospholproteins were important signaling molecules such as protein kinases, receptors and phosphatases. These phospholproteins were involved in energy metabolism, cell communication, cell differentiation, cell death and other biological processes. The Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes analysis revealed functional links among 15 significantly regulated phosphoproteins in chronic renal failure rats compared to sham group, and 23 altered phosphoproteins induced by high salt intake. The altered phosphorylation levels of two proteins involved in heart damage, lamin A and phospholamban were validated. Expression of the downstream genes of these two proteins, desmin and SERCA2a, were also analyzed. PMID:24945867

  14. Salt effects on functional traits in model and in economically important Lotus species.

    PubMed

    Uchiya, P; Escaray, F J; Bilenca, D; Pieckenstain, F; Ruiz, O A; Menéndez, A B

    2016-07-01

    A common stress on plants is NaCl-derived soil salinity. Genus Lotus comprises model and economically important species, which have been studied regarding physiological responses to salinity. Leaf area ratio (LAR), root length ratio (RLR) and their components, specific leaf area (SLA) and leaf mass fraction (LMF) and specific root length (SRL) and root mass fraction (RMF) might be affected by high soil salinity. We characterised L. tenuis, L. corniculatus, L. filicaulis, L. creticus, L. burtii and L. japonicus grown under different salt concentrations (0, 50, 100 and 150 mm NaCl) on the basis of SLA, LMF, SRL and RMF using PCA. We also assessed effects of different salt concentrations on LAR and RLR in each species, and explored whether changes in these traits provide fitness benefit. Salinity (150 mm NaCl) increased LAR in L. burtii and L. corniculatus, but not in the remaining species. The highest salt concentration caused a decrease of RLR in L. japonicus Gifu, but not in the remaining species. Changes in LAR and RLR would not be adaptive, according to adaptiveness analysis, with the exception of SLA changes in L. corniculatus. PCA revealed that under favourable conditions plants optimise surfaces for light and nutrient acquisition (SLA and SRL), whereas at higher salt concentrations they favour carbon allocation to leaves and roots (LMF and RMF) in detriment to their surfaces. PCA also showed that L. creticus subjected to saline treatment was distinguished from the remaining Lotus species. We suggest that augmented carbon partitioning to leaves and roots could constitute a salt-alleviating mechanism through toxic ion dilution. PMID:27007305

  15. Numerical modelling of the evolution of the salt diapiric internal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamuszek, Marta; Dabrowski, Marcin

    2014-05-01

    Evaporate series are composed of a range of interbedded rock types such as carbonates (calcite, dolomite), sulphates (anhydrite, gypsum), and chlorides (rock salt, potassium and magnesium salt). The presence of evaporates particularly with thick salt layers within sedimentary basins significantly influences their tectonic evolution. This is due to unique properties of salt, which cause that salt buried under sediments becomes buoyant and migrates towards the surface promoting development of diapiric structures. The intensive complex deformation that operates on the layered evaporates sequence leads to the development of a complicated diapir internal architecture. Varying material properties such as viscosity and density of different rock types in the evaporate series contribute to the complexity of the formed structures. We numerically investigate the initiation and evolution of tectonic structures within the salt diapirs comprising mechanically stratified evaporate series. We analyse the role of parameters such as mechanical properties of the layered evaporate series and the overburden rocks, the initial spatial arrangement of different rock types, the rate of sedimentation of the overburden rocks, and various deformation regimes. In the study, we focus on the relationship between the structures such as folds and boudinage structures that develop on a small-scale (corresponding to the outcrop scale in the salt mine galleries) and a large-scale (corresponding to the whole diapir scale). Additionally, the influence of the internal structure development on the evolution of the overall diapir shape is examined. In the numerical model, we use non-linear viscous rheology for the evaporate series and the overburden. We solve an incompressible Stokes equation in the presence of the gravity using the finite element method solver MILAMIN [1]. The diapir evolution is simulated in two dimensions. The development of complex structures is analysed using the resolved interface

  16. Ranking contributing areas of salt and selenium in the Lower Gunnison River Basin, Colorado, using multiple linear regression models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Linard, Joshua I.

    2013-01-01

    Mitigating the effects of salt and selenium on water quality in the Grand Valley and lower Gunnison River Basin in western Colorado is a major concern for land managers. Previous modeling indicated means to improve the models by including more detailed geospatial data and a more rigorous method for developing the models. After evaluating all possible combinations of geospatial variables, four multiple linear regression models resulted that could estimate irrigation-season salt yield, nonirrigation-season salt yield, irrigation-season selenium yield, and nonirrigation-season selenium yield. The adjusted r-squared and the residual standard error (in units of log-transformed yield) of the models were, respectively, 0.87 and 2.03 for the irrigation-season salt model, 0.90 and 1.25 for the nonirrigation-season salt model, 0.85 and 2.94 for the irrigation-season selenium model, and 0.93 and 1.75 for the nonirrigation-season selenium model. The four models were used to estimate yields and loads from contributing areas corresponding to 12-digit hydrologic unit codes in the lower Gunnison River Basin study area. Each of the 175 contributing areas was ranked according to its estimated mean seasonal yield of salt and selenium.

  17. Groundwater Flow and Salt Transport at a Sand Tailings Dam: Field Observations and Modelling Results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, A. C.; Mendoza, C. A.

    2004-05-01

    Large volumes of sand tailings are produced during the extraction of bitumen from the oil sands of Northeastern Alberta. The long-term groundwater response and subsequent movement of water and solutes within the large permeable sand tailings storage areas is uncertain. At the Southwest Sand Storage (SWSS) Facility, located at Syncrude's Mildred Lake operations near Ft. McMurray, there is concern that salts from the tailings water may discharge to newly placed reclamation material that covers the sand tailings. This saline discharge water could destroy the reclamation soil structure and negatively impact vegetation. The steady-state groundwater flow and transient movement of salts at the local (bench and slope) and intermediate (pile) scales in the SWSS are investigated. Water levels, seepage and groundwater quality (including TDS) have been measured for over a year along two transects of piezometers installed in the SWSS. The field data have been used to complete traditional hydrogeological interpretations of the site, and to develop a conceptual model of flow and transport. The local and intermediate flow systems and salt transport in the dam are being evaluated with numerical models. The models will allow possible future hydrogeological behaviour of the structure to be tested. Preliminary results show differences in flow systems and salinity distribution that depend on the deposition of the SWSS. This research will facilitate better long-term environmental management of this and similar sites.

  18. Experimental study of planetary gases with applications to planetary interior models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Peter M.; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    1988-01-01

    High-pressure experimental data on planetary materials are critical in developing planetary models and in addressing otherwise insoluble problems of the internal structure of the major planets. Progress in the last five years has been particularly marked. Maximum static pressure of 550 GPa was achieved. For the first time, X-ray diffraction of solidified gases (Ne, Xe) and ices (H2O) were obtained at pressures above one megabar, single-crystal diffraction of ultralight elements (H2, He) were detected up to 25 GPa, pressures over 200 GPa at 77 K were reached in solid hydrogen, including the discovery of a phase transformation in the molecular solid. Advances in instrumentation and new measurements performed during 1983 to 1988 are summarized.

  19. Salt Repository Project: Waste Package Program (WPP) modeling activiteis: FY 1984 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, W.L.; Simonson, S.A.; Pulsipher, B.A.

    1987-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is supporting the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Salt Repository Project (SRP) through its Waste Package Program (WPP). During FY 1984, the WPP continued its program of waste package component development and interactions testing and application of the resulting data base to develop predictive models describing waste package degradation and radionuclide release. Within the WPP, the Modeling Task (Task 04 during FY 1984) was conducted to interpret the tests in such a way that scientifically defensible models can be developed for use in qualification of the waste package.

  20. Modeling the structure of magnetic fields in Neutron Stars: from the interior to the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucciantini, Niccolò; Pili, Antonio G.; Del Zanna, Luca

    2016-05-01

    The phenomenology of the emission of pulsars and magnetars depends dramatically on the structure and properties of their magnetic field. In particular it is believed that the outbursting and flaring activity observed in AXPs and SRGs is strongly related to their internal magnetic field. Recent observations have moreover shown that charges are present in their magnetospheres supporting the idea that their magnetic field is tightly twisted in the vicinity of the star. In principle these objects offer a unique opportunity to investigate physics in a regime beyond what can be obtained in the laboratory. We will discuss the properties of equilibrium models of magnetized neutron stars, and we will show how internal and external currents can be related. These magnetic field configurations will be discussed considering also their stability, relevant for their origin and possibly connected to events like SNe and GRBs. We will also show what kind of deformations they induce in the star, that could lead to emission of gravitational waves. In the case of a twisted magnetosphere we will show how the amount of twist regulates their general topology. A general formalism based on the simultaneous numerical solution of the general relativistic Grad-Shafranov equation and Einstein equations will be presented.

  1. Modeling soluble salt assemblages on Mars: past aqueous history and present-day habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, J. D.; Catling, D. C.; Light, B.

    2014-12-01

    Soluble salt assemblages formed through aqueous processes are widespread on Mars. These minerals are important for understanding the past aqueous history of Mars and indicate critical habitability parameters such as pH, temperature, water activity, and salinity. Equilibrium models have been used to determine solution chemistry and salt precipitation sequences from aqueous chemical data; however, current models are limited by a lack of experimental data for low-temperature perchlorates, and some model predictions are clearly anomalous. To address the need for accurate equilibrium models, we have developed a comprehensive model for low-temperature perchlorate-rich brines using (1) previously neglected literature data, (2) experimental solubilities determined in low-temperature perchlorate solutions, and (3) solubility and heat capacity results determined using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Our resulting model is a significant improvement over existing models, such as FREZCHEM, particularly for perchlorate mixtures. We have applied our model to evaporation and freezing of a nominal Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) solution measured at the Phoenix site. For a freezing WCL solution, our model indicates that ice, KClO4, hydromagnesite (3MgCO3·Mg(OH)2·3H2O), calcite (CaCO3), meridianiite (MgSO4·11H2O), MgCl2·12H2O, NaClO4·2H2O, and Mg(ClO4)2·6H2O form at the eutectic (209 K); whereas, KClO4, hydromagnesite, kieserite (MgSO4·H2O), anhydrite (CaSO4), halite (NaCl), NaClO4·H2O, and Mg(ClO4)2·6H2O form upon complete evaporation at 298 K. In general, evaporation yields more dehydrated mineral assemblages than salts produced by freezing. Hydrated phases that form during evaporation contain 0.3 wt. % water, which compares with 1.2 wt. % during freezing. Given independent evidence for the presence of calcite and minimum water contents in Martian soils of ~1.5 wt. %, salts at the Phoenix site, and possibly elsewhere, appear more likely to have formed during

  2. Magnesium degradation influenced by buffering salts in concentrations typical of in vitro and in vivo models.

    PubMed

    Agha, Nezha Ahmad; Feyerabend, Frank; Mihailova, Boriana; Heidrich, Stefanie; Bismayer, Ulrich; Willumeit-Römer, Regine

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium and its alloys have considerable potential for orthopedic applications. During the degradation process the interface between material and tissue is continuously changing. Moreover, too fast or uncontrolled degradation is detrimental for the outcome in vivo. Therefore in vitro setups utilizing physiological conditions are promising for the material/degradation analysis prior to animal experiments. The aim of this study is to elucidate the influence of inorganic salts contributing to the blood buffering capacity on degradation. Extruded pure magnesium samples were immersed under cell culture conditions for 3 and 10 days. Hank's balanced salt solution without calcium and magnesium (HBSS) plus 10% of fetal bovine serum (FBS) was used as the basic immersion medium. Additionally, different inorganic salts were added with respect to concentration in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM, in vitro model) and human plasma (in vivo model) to form 12 different immersion media. Influences on the surrounding environment were observed by measuring pH and osmolality. The degradation interface was analyzed by electron-induced X-ray emission (EIXE) spectroscopy, including chemical-element mappings and electron microprobe analysis, as well as Fourier transform infrared reflection micro-spectroscopy (FTIR). PMID:26478376

  3. Meridional transport of salt in the global ocean from an eddy-resolving model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treguier, A. M.; Deshayes, J.; Le Sommer, J.; Lique, C.; Madec, G.; Penduff, T.; Molines, J.-M.; Barnier, B.; Bourdalle-Badie, R.; Talandier, C.

    2014-04-01

    The meridional transport of salt is computed in a global eddy-resolving numerical model (1/12° resolution) in order to improve our understanding of the ocean salinity budget. A methodology is proposed that allows a global analysis of the salinity balance in relation to surface water fluxes, without defining a "freshwater anomaly" based on an arbitrary reference salinity. The method consists of a decomposition of the meridional transport into (i) the transport by the time-longitude-depth mean velocity, (ii) time-mean velocity recirculations and (iii) transient eddy perturbations. Water is added (rainfall and rivers) or removed (evaporation) at the ocean surface at different latitudes, which creates convergences and divergences of mass transport with maximum and minimum values close to ±1 Sv. The resulting meridional velocity effects a net transport of salt at each latitude (±30 Sv PSU), which is balanced by the time-mean recirculations and by the net effect of eddy salinity-velocity correlations. This balance ensures that the total meridional transport of salt is close to zero, a necessary condition for maintaining a quasi-stationary salinity distribution. Our model confirms that the eddy salt transport cannot be neglected: it is comparable to the transport by the time-mean recirculation (up to 15 Sv PSU) at the poleward and equatorial boundaries of the subtropical gyres. Two different mechanisms are found: eddy contributions are localized in intense currents such as the Kuroshio at the poleward boundary of the subtropical gyres, while they are distributed across the basins at the equatorward boundaries. Closer to the Equator, salinity-velocity correlations are mainly due to the seasonal cycle and large-scale perturbations such as tropical instability waves.

  4. Meridional transport of salt in the global ocean from an eddy-resolving model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treguier, A. M.; Deshayes, J.; Le Sommer, J.; Lique, C.; Madec, G.; Penduff, T.; Molines, J.-M.; Barnier, B.; Bourdalle-Badie, R.; Talandier, C.

    2013-12-01

    The meridional transport of salt is computed in a global eddy-resolving numerical model (1/12° resolution) in order to improve our understanding of the ocean salinity budget. A methodology is proposed that allows a global analysis of the salinity balance in relation with surface water fluxes, without defining a "freshwater anomaly" based on an arbitrary reference salinity. The method consists in a decomposition of the meridional transport into (i) the transport by the time-longitude-depth mean velocity, (ii) time-mean velocity recirculations and (iii) transient eddy perturbations. Water is added (rainfall) or removed (evaporation) at the ocean surface at different latitudes, which creates convergences and divergences of mass tranport with maximum and minimum values close to ±1 Sv. The resulting meridional velocity effects a net transport of salt at each latitude (±30 Sv PSU), which is balanced by the time-mean recirculations and by the net effect of eddy salinity-velocity correlations. This balance ensures that the total meridional transport of salt is close to zero, a necessary condition to maintain a quasi-stationary salinity distribution. Our model confirms that the eddy salt transport cannot be neglected: it is comparable to the transport by the time-mean recirculation (up to 15 Sv PSU) at the poleward and equatorial boundaries of the subtropical gyres. Two different mechanisms are found: eddy contributions are localized in intense currents such as the Kuroshio at the poleward boundary of the subtropical gyres, while they are distributed across the basins at the equatorward boundaries. Closer to the equator, salinity-velocity correlations are mainly due to the seasonal cycle and large scale perturbations such as tropical instability waves.

  5. Effect of excess dietary salt on calcium metabolism and bone mineral in a spaceflight rat model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navidi, Meena; Wolinsky, Ira; Fung, Paul; Arnaud, Sara B.

    1995-01-01

    High levels of salt promote urinary calcium (UCa) loss and have the potential to cause bone mineral deficits if intestinal Ca absorption does not compensate for these losses. To determine the effect of excess dietary salt on the osteopenia that follows skeletal unloading, we used a spaceflight model that unloads the hindlimbs of 200-g rats by tail suspension (S). Rats were studied for 2 wk on diets containing high salt (4 and 8%) and normal calcium (0.45%) and for 4 wk on diets containing 8% salt (HiNa) and 0.2% Ca (LoCa). Final body weights were 9-11% lower in S than in control rats (C) in both experiments, reflecting lower growth rates in S than in C during pair feeding. UCa represented 12% of dietary Ca on HiNA diets and was twofold higher in S than in C transiently during unloading. Net intestinal Ca absorption was consistently 11-18% lower in S than in C. Serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D was unaffected by either LoCa or HiNa diets in S but was increased by LoCa and HiNa diets in C. Despite depressed intestinal Ca absoption in S and a sluggish response of the Ca endocrine system to HiNa diets, UCa loss did not appear to affect the osteopenia induced by unloading. Although any deficit in bone mineral content from HiNa diets may have been too small to detect or the duration of the study too short to manifest, there were clear differences in Ca metabolism from control levels in the response of the spaceflight model to HiNa diets, indicated by depression of intestinal Ca absorption and its regulatory hormone.

  6. Compositional variations in the inner solar system: Insights from interior modeling and spectroscopy of Mercury, the Moon and asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riner, Miriam A.

    Compositional variations between the planets of the inner solar system hold clues to the origin and evolution of terrestrial planets, but clues to their compositions are masked by processes such as magmatic activity, early magma oceans, and space weathering. The ferrous iron content of Mercury may be a particularly important clue to the degree to which material was radially mixed in the early solar system. This dissertation explores methods for determining the compositions of inner solar system rocky bodies, especially Mercury. Geophysical models for Mercury's interior, assuming a solid inner core and a molten outer core surrounded by a silicate mantle, show a wide range of plausible interior structures and compositions. These models provide context for interpreting future spacecraft data, especially from the MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) and Bepi-Colombo missions. Turning to planetary surfaces, laboratory spectra of opaque minerals present on the lunar surface and proposed candidate minerals on Mercury's surface are used to study magma oceans on the Moon and Mercury. Analysis of laboratory spectra of opaque oxides and lunar soils shows that ultraviolet-visible (UVVIS) color alone does not provide a useful diagnostic of titanium content in the lunar maria. The opaque oxide spectra are also used to consider the nature of the opaque components on Mercury. The global darkening agent responsible for Mercury's low albedo is unlikely to be any of the iron, titanium-bearing opaque minerals that are common on the Moon. However, these same minerals are consistent with the low-reflectance material exposed by some impact craters on Mercury's surface, consistent with a preserved cumulate pile from a low-iron magma ocean. Finally, a global survey of color variations on the asteroid 433 Eros, as measured by the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) mission is used to investigate surface processes on Eros and to assess the effects of

  7. Impacts of inhomogeneous landscapes in oasis interior on the oasis self-maintaining mechanism by integrating numerical model with satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, X.; Lu, S.; Zhang, T.; Ao, Y.; Li, S.; Bao, Y.; Wen, L.; Luo, S.

    2012-02-01

    Mesoscale meteorological modeling is an important tool to help understand the energy budget of the oasis. While basic dynamic and thermodynamic processes for oasis self-maintaining in the desert environment is well investigated, influence of heterogeneous landscapes of oasis interior on the processes are still important and remain to be investigated. In this study, two simulations are designed for investigating the influence of inhomogeneity. In the first case, land surface parameters including land-use types, vegetation cover fraction, and surface layer soil moisture are derived by satellite remote sensing data from EOS/MODIS, and then be used specify the respective options in the MM5 model, to describe a real inhomogeneity for the oasis interior. In the other run, land use types are set to MM5 default, in which landscapes in the oasis interior is relative uniform, and then surface layer soil moisture and vegetation fraction is set to be averages of the first case for the respective oasis and desert surface lying, to represent a relative homogeneity. Results show that the inhomogeneity leads to a weaker oasis "cold-wet island" effect and a stronger turbulence over the oasis interior, both of which will reduce the oasis-desert secondary circulation and increase the evaporation over the oasis, resulting in a negative impact on the oasis self-protecting mechanism. The simulation of homogeneity indicates that the oasis may be more stable even with relative lower soil moisture if landscapes in the oasis interior are comparatively uniform.

  8. Modelling the impacts of strategic tree plantings on salt loads and flows in the Macquarie river catchment, NSW, Australia.

    PubMed

    Herron, Natasha; Davis, Richard; Dawes, Warrick; Evans, Ray

    2003-05-01

    In Australia, problems of dryland and stream salinity have recently become the focus of a National Action Plan. In many river catchments, preliminary stream salt load and salinity targets have been set to define maximum permissible export levels in 2015. Afforestation has been proposed as a strategy for meeting these targets, although several studies suggest that widespread commercial tree plantations are likely to deliver net dis-benefits. However, the impacts on stream salt loads of more localised tree plantings in high salt yielding areas have not been quantified. In this paper we use a simple empirical model to predict the effects of various strategic and non-strategic tree planting scenarios on flows and salt loads in the mid-Macquarie catchment, New South Wales. A simple salt routing model is then used to estimate the effect of these changes on salt loads at the end-of-valley monitoring site for the Macquarie catchment. Results suggest that widespread land management interventions will be required to meet the preliminary salt load targets for this catchment. On their own, small-scale, strategic tree planting in high salt export areas of the mid-Macquarie area will not have a significant impact on salt loads at the end-of-valley monitoring site. While widespread tree plantings may reduce salt loads in the longer term, they are likely to cause streamflow losses in the shorter term. Thus, stream salinities are expected to rise initially, due to the different response times of groundwater and surface water systems to land use change. PMID:12767861

  9. SDSS-II: Determination of shape and color parameter coefficients for SALT-II fit model

    SciTech Connect

    Dojcsak, L.; Marriner, J.; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    In this study we look at the SALT-II model of Type IA supernova analysis, which determines the distance moduli based on the known absolute standard candle magnitude of the Type IA supernovae. We take a look at the determination of the shape and color parameter coefficients, {alpha} and {beta} respectively, in the SALT-II model with the intrinsic error that is determined from the data. Using the SNANA software package provided for the analysis of Type IA supernovae, we use a standard Monte Carlo simulation to generate data with known parameters to use as a tool for analyzing the trends in the model based on certain assumptions about the intrinsic error. In order to find the best standard candle model, we try to minimize the residuals on the Hubble diagram by calculating the correct shape and color parameter coefficients. We can estimate the magnitude of the intrinsic errors required to obtain results with {chi}{sup 2}/degree of freedom = 1. We can use the simulation to estimate the amount of color smearing as indicated by the data for our model. We find that the color smearing model works as a general estimate of the color smearing, and that we are able to use the RMS distribution in the variables as one method of estimating the correct intrinsic errors needed by the data to obtain the correct results for {alpha} and {beta}. We then apply the resultant intrinsic error matrix to the real data and show our results.

  10. Thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures: Theoretical model supported by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Gheribi, Aïmen E; Chartrand, Patrice

    2016-02-28

    A theoretical model for the description of thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures as a function of composition and temperature is presented. The model is derived by considering the classical kinetic theory and requires, for its parametrization, only information on thermal conductivity of pure compounds. In this sense, the model is predictive. For most molten salt mixtures, no experimental data on thermal conductivity are available in the literature. This is a hindrance for many industrial applications (in particular for thermal energy storage technologies) as well as an obvious barrier for the validation of the theoretical model. To alleviate this lack of data, a series of equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations has been performed on several molten chloride systems in order to determine their thermal conductivity in the entire range of composition at two different temperatures: 1200 K and 1300 K. The EMD simulations are first principles type, as the potentials used to describe the interactions have been parametrized on the basis of first principle electronic structure calculations. In addition to the molten chlorides system, the model predictions are also compared to a recent similar EMD study on molten fluorides and with the few reliable experimental data available in the literature. The accuracy of the proposed model is within the reported numerical and/or experimental errors. PMID:26931711

  11. Transports and budgets of volume, heat, and salt from a global eddy-resolving ocean model

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, M.P.; Semtner, A.J. Jr.; Chervin, R.M.

    1994-07-01

    The results from an integration of a global ocean circulation model have been condensed into an analysis of the volume, heat, and salt transports among the major ocean basins. Transports are also broken down between the model`s Ekman, thermocline, and deep layers. Overall, the model does well. Horizontal exchanges of mass, heat, and salt between ocean basins have reasonable values: and the volume of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) transport is in general agreement with what limited observations exist. On a global basis the zonally integrated meridional heat transport is poleward at all latitudes except for the latitude band 30{degrees}S to 45{degrees}S. This anomalous transport is most likely a signature of the model`s inability to form Antarctic Intermediate (AAIW) and Antarctic bottom water (AABW) properly. Eddy heat transport is strong at the equator where its convergence heats the equatorial Pacific about twice as much as it heats the equatorial Atlantic. The greater heating in the Pacific suggests that mesoscale eddies may be a vital mechanism for warming and maintaining an upwelling portion of the global conveyor-belt circulation. The model`s fresh water transport compares well with observations. However, in the Atlantic there is an excessive southward transport of fresh water due to the absence of the Mediterranean outflow and weak northward flow of AAIW. Perhaps the model`s greatest weakness is the lack of strong AAIW and AABW circulation cells. Accurate thermohaline forcing in the North Atlantic (based on numerous hydrographic observations) helps the model adequately produce NADW. In contrast, the southern ocean is an area of sparse observation. Better thermohaline observations in this area may be needed if models such as this are to produce the deep convection that will achieve more accurate simulations of the global 3-dimensional circulation. 41 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Iron(III)-induced activation of chloride and bromide from modeled salt pans.

    PubMed

    Wittmer, Julian; Bleicher, Sergej; Zetzsch, Cornelius

    2015-05-14

    The photochemistry of halides in sea spray aerosol, on salt pans, and on other salty surfaces leads to a formation of reactive halogen species. We investigated the photochemical formation of atomic chlorine (Cl) and bromine (Br) in the gas phase in the presence of laboratory-modeled salt pans consisting of sodium chloride doped with iron(III) chloride hexahydrate (0.5 and 2 wt %). The samples were spread on a Teflon sheet and exposed to simulated sunlight in a Teflon smog chamber in purified, humidified air in the presence of a test mixture of hydrocarbons at the ppb level to determine Cl, Br, and OH formation by the radical clock method. Driven by the photolytic reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II), the production rates of the Fe(III)-doped NaCl salt samples (up to10(7) atoms cm(-3) s(-1)) exceeded the release of Cl above a pure NaCl sample by more than an order of magnitude in an initially O3-free environment at low NOX. In bromide-doped samples (0.5 wt % NaBr), a part of the Cl release was replaced by Br when Fe(III) was present. Additions of sodium sulfate, sodium oxalate, oxalic acid, and catechol to NaCl/FeCl3 samples were found to restrain the activation of chloride. PMID:25243918

  13. A decision support model to assess vulnerability to salt water intrusion in the great bend prairie aquifer of Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sophocleous, M.; Ma, T.

    1998-01-01

    A relatively simple ground water decision support system (DSS) was developed to assist in identifying salt water vulnerable areas and in developing management policies to prevent salt water intrusion in central Kansas. The DSS is based on a combination of numerical modeling sensitivity analyses, multiple regression analyses, and classification procedures derived from our knowledge of the area. Six ground water salinity models are proposed to evaluate irrigation well permit applications. The choice of model depends on the availability of site-specific data. The DSS takes advantage of GIS database management procedures, and is applied to an actual salt water intrusion problem site in south-central Kansas. This approach can help local ground water management districts make better decisions on protecting ground water use in salt water vulnerable areas.

  14. Regional-scale hydrologic modeling of flow and reactive salt transport in the San Joaquin Valley, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopmans, J. W.; Schoups, G.

    2005-12-01

    A hydro-salinity model was developed to integrate subsurface hydrology with reactive salt transport for a 1,400 km2 study area in the San Joaquin Valley, CA. For the first time, such a modeling framework was used to reconstruct historical changes in salt storage by irrigated agriculture over the past 60 years. We show that patterns in soil and groundwater salinity were caused by spatial variations in soil hydrology, the switching from local groundwater to snowmelt water as the main irrigation water supply, and by occasional droughts. Gypsum dissolution was a critical component of the regional salt balance. Although results show that the total salt input and output were about equal for the past 20 years, the model also predicts salinization of the deeper aquifers, thereby questioning the sustainability of irrigated agriculture.

  15. A Model for the Thermal and Chemical Evolution of the Moon's Interior: Implications for the Onset of Mare Volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Paul C.; Parmentier, E. M.

    1995-01-01

    Crystallization of the lunar magma ocean creates a chemically stratified Moon consisting of an anorthositic crust and magma ocean cumulates overlying the primitive lunar interior. Within the magma ocean cumulates the last liquids to crystallize form dense, ilmenite-rich cumulates that contain high concentrations of incompatible radioactive elements. The underlying olivine-orthopyroxene cumulates are also stratified with later crystallized, denser, more Fe-rich compositions at the top. This paper explores the chemical and thermal consequences of an internal evolution model accounting for the possible role of these sources of chemical buoyancy. Rayleigh-Taylor instability causes the dense ilmenite-rich cumulate layer and underlying Fe-rich cumulates to sink toward the center of the Moon, forming a dense lunar core. After this overturn, radioactive heating within the ilmenite-rich cumulate core heats the overlying mantle, causing it to melt. In this model, the source region for high-TiO2 mare basalts is a convectively mixed layer above the core-mantle boundary which would contain small and variable amounts of admixed ilmenite and KREEP. This deep high-pressure melting, as required for mare basalts, occurs after a reasonable time interval to explain the onset of mare basalt volcanism if the content of radioactive elements in the core and the chemical density gradients above the core are sufficiently high but within a range of values that might have been present in the Moon. Regardless of details implied by particular model parameters, gravitational overturn driven by the high density of magma ocean Fe-rich cumulates should concentrate high-TiO2 mare basalt sources, and probably a significant fraction of radioactive heating, toward the center of the Moon. This will have important implications for both the thermal evolution of the Moon and for mare basalt genesis.

  16. Comparison and Tensorial Formulation of Inelastic Constitutive Models of Salt Rock Behaviour and Efficient Numerical Implementatio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, T.; Böttcher, N.; Görke, U. J.; Kolditz, O.

    2014-12-01

    The design process of geotechnical installations includes the application of numerical simulation tools for safety assessment, dimensioning and long term effectiveness estimations. Underground salt caverns can be used for the storage of natural gas, hydrogen, oil, waste or compressed air. For their design one has to take into account fluctuating internal pressures due to different levels of filling, the stresses imposed by the surrounding rock mass, irregular geometries and possibly heterogeneous material properties [3] in order to estimate long term cavern convergence as well as locally critical wall stresses. Constitutive models applied to rock salt are usually viscoplastic in nature and most often based on a Burgers-type rheological model extended by non-linear viscosity functions and/or plastic friction elements. Besides plastic dilatation, healing and damage are sometimes accounted for as well [2]. The scales of the geotechnical system to be simulated and the laboratory tests from which material parameters are determined are vastly different. The most common material testing modalities to determine material parameters in geoengineering are the uniaxial and the triaxial compression tests. Some constitutive formulations in widespread use are formulated based on equivalent rather than tensorial quantities valid under these specific test conditions and are subsequently applied to heterogeneous underground systems and complex 3D load cases. We show here that this procedure is inappropriate and can lead to erroneous results. We further propose alternative formulations of the constitutive models in question that restore their validity under arbitrary loading conditions. For an efficient numerical simulation, the discussed constitutive models are integrated locally with a Newton-Raphson algorithm that directly provides the algorithmically consistent tangent matrix for the global Newton iteration of the displacement based finite element formulation. Finally, the finite

  17. Modelling the coupling between salt kinematics and subsidence evolution: Inferences for the Miocene evolution of the Transylvanian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilita, Marius; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Matenco, Liviu; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2015-09-01

    Large-scale diapiric salt movements affect the architecture of sedimentary basins and often prevent the understanding of their mechanics by hiding or distorting subsidence patterns. One good example is the evolution of the Transylvanian Basin, which formed during Miocene times in an area located in between the rapid slab rollback and continental collision recorded at the exterior of the Carpathians and the extension of the neighbouring Pannonian Basin. In the absence of major genetic fault systems, quantifying these external tectonic forcing factors requires an accurate reconstruction of subsidence evolution. Having the advent of a detailed 3D geometrical model of the Transylvanian Basin, we apply a 3D numerical modelling technique that couples salt re-distribution and subsidence evolution to quantify and understand the basin kinematics and vertical motions. Two techniques, backward and forward modelling are coupled in order to discriminate between salt migration driven by overburden and the influence of external tectonic forcing factors. The results show that salt kinematics was more complex than simple unidirectional migration, suggesting the existence of areas with significant subsidence hidden by the inward salt migration and areas with apparent large subsidence that are in reality artefacts of outwards salt migration. Additionally, the results suggest that parts of the basin have been successively affected by in- and out-ward salt migration events, an effect of localising subsidence and overburden. Furthermore, accelerated moments of salt migration took place during the main Miocene contraction events recorded at the exterior of the Carpathians, demonstrating that salt migration is enhanced by intraplate stresses. Our study also infers that the subsidence of the Transylvanian Basin is the result of the superposition of the contraction at the exterior of the orogenic chain and the back-arc extension.

  18. Hydrogeophysical Modeling of Spatial and Temporal Salt Flushing of a Tailings Dam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheema, T. J.; Mendoza, C. A.; Price, A.

    2009-12-01

    The Southwest Sand Storage (SWSS) is a large tailings dam located at Syncrude Canada’s Mildred Lake Operations, 40 km north of Fort McMurray, Alberta. It is 25 km2 in area, up to 40 m high and contains 300 million cubic metres of tailings sand. Sand was mounded and compacted to form a perimeter dyke that consists of 10 m high slopes separated by benches that are either “tipped-in” or “tipped-out”. The dyke is undrained and has an overall shallow slope of 10:1. The pond within the dam receives a slurry of sand tailings containing about 50% (by weight) of process affected water with high concentrations of sodium, calcium, sulphate and bicarbonate ions. The performance and viability of the reclaimed and vegetated landform following closure was questioned because the landscape might be negatively affected by the movement and discharge of process affected water through the dam. Some degree of temporal salt flushing from the percolation of rainwater was anticipated, but the vertical and the lateral extent of this flushing could not be modeled in the absence of detailed field measurements. To quantify the spatial and temporal flushing of salt at SWSS, two detailed monitoring transects were established. Nests of piezometers were installed along each transect to obtain point measurements for hydraulic head, electrical conductivity, soil-moisture and temperature. Water samples were periodically collected from the piezometers and from multi-level sampling ports distributed across the watertable. To supplement and complement the hydrogeologic data, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) surveys were conducted concurrently with hydrogeologic data collection in 2001, 2004, and 2008. Electrical conductivity difference plots (DmS/m) illustrate temporal salt flushing along the transects. The results indicate that the degree of flushing is closely associated with groundwater flow system scale, recharge rates, and dyke topography. Tipped-in (i.e., relatively flat) benches

  19. 25 CFR Appendix A to Part 1000 - Model Compact of Self-Governance Between the Tribe and the Department of the Interior

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Model Compact of Self-Governance Between the Tribe and... Compact of Self-Governance Between the Tribe and the Department of the Interior Article I—Authority and Purpose Section 1—Authority This agreement, denoted a compact of Self-Governance (hereinafter referred...

  20. 25 CFR Appendix A to Part 1000 - Model Compact of Self-Governance Between the Tribe and the Department of the Interior

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Model Compact of Self-Governance Between the Tribe and... Compact of Self-Governance Between the Tribe and the Department of the Interior Article I—Authority and Purpose Section 1—Authority This agreement, denoted a compact of Self-Governance (hereinafter referred...

  1. 25 CFR Appendix A to Part 1000 - Model Compact of Self-Governance Between the Tribe and the Department of the Interior

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Model Compact of Self-Governance Between the Tribe and... Compact of Self-Governance Between the Tribe and the Department of the Interior Article I—Authority and Purpose Section 1—Authority This agreement, denoted a compact of Self-Governance (hereinafter referred...

  2. 25 CFR Appendix A to Part 1000 - Model Compact of Self-Governance Between the Tribe and the Department of the Interior

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Model Compact of Self-Governance Between the Tribe and... Compact of Self-Governance Between the Tribe and the Department of the Interior Article I—Authority and Purpose Section 1—Authority This agreement, denoted a compact of Self-Governance (hereinafter referred...

  3. Assessing the wildlife habitat value of New England salt marshes: II. Model testing and validation.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Richard A; Charpentier, Michael A; Wigand, Cathleen

    2009-07-01

    We tested a previously described model to assess the wildlife habitat value of New England salt marshes by comparing modeled habitat values and scores with bird abundance and species richness at sixteen salt marshes in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island USA. As a group, wildlife habitat value assessment scores for the marshes ranged from 307-509, or 31-67% of the maximum attainable score. We recorded 6 species of wading birds (Ardeidae; herons, egrets, and bitterns) at the sites during biweekly survey. Species richness (r (2)=0.24, F=4.53, p=0.05) and abundance (r (2)=0.26, F=5.00, p=0.04) of wading birds significantly increased with increasing assessment score. We optimized our assessment model for wading birds by using Akaike information criteria (AIC) to compare a series of models comprised of specific components and categories of our model that best reflect their habitat use. The model incorporating pre-classification, wading bird habitat categories, and natural land surrounding the sites was substantially supported by AIC analysis as the best model. The abundance of wading birds significantly increased with increasing assessment scores generated with the optimized model (r (2)=0.48, F=12.5, p=0.003), demonstrating that optimizing models can be helpful in improving the accuracy of the assessment for a given species or species assemblage. In addition to validating the assessment model, our results show that in spite of their urban setting our study marshes provide substantial wildlife habitat value. This suggests that even small wetlands in highly urbanized coastal settings can provide important wildlife habitat value if key habitat attributes (e.g., natural buffers, habitat heterogeneity) are present. PMID:18597178

  4. Modeling the Influence of River Flow and Salt Water Intrusion in the Terengganu Estuary, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. L.; Tangang, F.; Hamid, M. R.; Benson, Y.; Razali, M. R.

    2016-07-01

    Salinity intrusion is a major concern when the freshwater extraction station is located in the estuary. This paper attempt to predict the salt intrusion length in the upper stretch of estuary, by applying different magnitudes of freshwater discharge at the river regime. The integrated two dimensional hydrodynamics model associated with advection dispersion model was performed to investigate the salinity intrusion. The model was well calibrated and verified by the measured data undertaken during dry season. The maximum salt intrusion length to the threshold of salinity density is 1.00 ppt on the existing condition was predicted at 9.97 km from the river mouth. Moreover, with the magnitude of 100.00 m3s-1 and 30.00 m3s-1 freshwater discharges at the upstream boundary (Kpg Tanggol), it was predicted the maximum salt intrusion length was 11.84 km and 21.41 km, respectively, from the river mouth. Therefore, it was determined the minimum freshwater discharge of approximately 100.00 m3s-1 is required at the Kpg Tanggol river gauging station, in order to maintain the acceptable salinity levels at the Pulau Musang freshwater pump house. However, the actual water discharge at the Kpg Tanggol boundary station should be higher, since the minimum discharge does not take into consideration the amount of water extraction by the Pulau Musang and SATU pump stations. Further analysis is required to execute the consequences of water extraction toward the salinity intrusion in the Terengganu estuary that coupled with projected sea level rise.

  5. Physical analog (centrifuge) model investigation of contrasting structural styles in the Salt Range and Potwar Plateau, northern Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, Shah; Dixon, John M.

    2015-08-01

    We use scaled physical analog (centrifuge) modeling to investigate along- and across-strike structural variations in the Salt Range and Potwar Plateau of the Himalayan foreland fold-thrust belt of Pakistan. The models, composed of interlayered plasticine and silicone putty laminae, comprise four mechanical units representing the Neoproterozoic Salt Range Formation (basal detachment), Cambrian-Eocene carapace sequence, and Rawalpindi and Siwalik Groups (Neogene molasse), on a rigid base representing the Indian craton. Pre-cut ramps simulate basement faults with various structural geometries. A pre-existing north-dipping basement normal fault under the model foreland induces a frontal ramp and a prominent fault-bend-fold culmination, simulating the Salt Range. The ramp localizes displacement on a frontal thrust that occurs out-of-sequence with respect to other foreland folds and thrusts. With a frontal basement fault terminating to the east against a right-stepping, east-dipping lateral ramp, deformation propagates further south in the east; strata to the east of the lateral ramp are telescoped in ENE-trending detachment folds, fault-propagation folds and pop-up structures above a thick basal detachment (Salt Range Formation), in contrast to translated but less-deformed strata with E-W-trending Salt-Range structures to the west. The models are consistent with Salt Range-Potwar Plateau structural style contrasts being due to basement fault geometry and variation in detachment thickness.

  6. Modeling deformation processes of salt caverns for gas storage due to fluctuating operation pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, N.; Nagel, T.; Goerke, U.; Khaledi, K.; Lins, Y.; König, D.; Schanz, T.; Köhn, D.; Attia, S.; Rabbel, W.; Bauer, S.; Kolditz, O.

    2013-12-01

    In the course of the Energy Transition in Germany, the focus of the country's energy sources is shifting from fossil to renewable and sustainable energy carriers. Since renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar power, are subjected to annual, seasonal, and diurnal fluctuations, the development and extension of energy storage capacities is a priority in German R&D programs. Common methods of energy storage are the utilization of subsurface caverns as a reservoir for natural or artificial fuel gases, such as hydrogen, methane, or the storage of compressed air. The construction of caverns in salt rock is inexpensive in comparison to solid rock formations due to the possibility of solution mining. Another advantage of evaporite as a host material is the self-healing capacity of salt rock. Gas caverns are capable of short-term energy storage (hours to days), so the operating pressures inside the caverns are fluctuating periodically with a high number of cycles. This work investigates the influence of fluctuating operation pressures on the stability of the host rock of gas storage caverns utilizing numerical models. Therefore, we developed a coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical (THM) model based on the finite element method utilizing the open-source software platform OpenGeoSys. Our simulations include the thermodynamic behaviour of the gas during the loading/ unloading of the cavern. This provides information on the transient pressure and temperature distribution on the cavern boundary to calculate the deformation of its geometry. Non-linear material models are used for the mechanical analysis, which describe the creep and self-healing behavior of the salt rock under fluctuating loading pressures. In order to identify the necessary material parameters, we perform experimental studies on the mechanical behaviour of salt rock under varying pressure and temperature conditions. Based on the numerical results, we further derive concepts for monitoring THM quantities in the

  7. Salted matters: modifying gelatine rheology for subduction thrust fault seismicity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brizzi, Silvia; Funiciello, Francesca; Corbi, Fabio; Di Giuseppe, Erika; Mojoli, Giorgio

    2016-04-01

    Most of the world's greatest earthquakes (Mw > 8.5, usually known as mega-earthquakes) occur at shallow depths along the subduction thrust fault (STF), i.e., the frictional interface between the subducting and overriding plates. The contribution of each subduction zone to the globally released seismic moment is not homogeneous, as well as the maximum Mw recorded in the instrumental and historical catalogues. To contribute to the unravelling of the seismic cycle along the STF, we used analogue models. Viscoelastic laboratory experiments realised with type A gelatine 2.5 wt% at 10 °C (Corbi et al., 2013) successfully simulate the seismic cycle along the STF, providing dynamic similarities with earthquakes in nature. However, analogue earthquakes are still not perfectly comparable to the natural prototype. In this work, we try to improve STF seismicity models by modifying the rheological behaviour of gelatine with the addition of NaCl. After testing salted gelatine rheology as a function of increasing concentration of NaCl, we selected 20 wt% NaCl gelatine, as this NaCl concentration provides a quasi-viscoelastic lithospheric analogue. Subduction interplate seismicity models were performed using both pure and salted gelatine to highlight the strengths and advantages this new material can provide for simulating the seismic cycle along the STF. We analysed analogue earthquakes Mw, recurrence time and rupture duration, which at first-order characterise the seismogenic behaviour of the STF. Results show that the experimental source parameters cover a wider range of values than obtained with pure gelatine, which is more compatible to the high variability globally observed. In particular, salted gelatine allows to simulate also smaller seismic events, giving the opportunity to apply the G-R law to the experimental seismicity of STF. Recurrence time and rupture duration are also characterised by an increased range of values when salted gelatine is used as analogue material

  8. A Salt Marsh Erosion Model: Interplay Between Biotic and Physical Factors at the Seaward Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, M. E.; Gilbert, L. A.; Alves, C. L.; Poole, P. A.; Schleicher, S.

    2014-12-01

    We present a new model to monitor the cycle of erosion occurring on the seaward edge of salt marshes as sea level rises. In our model, a southern New England salt marsh edge is stable when the bank edge exhibits a normal slope, is fringed by the low-marsh grass Spartina alterniflora, and the ribbed mussel Guekensia demissa is abundant. As erosion proceeds, the seaward bank becomes vertical (Stage 1), then undercut (Stage 2), then slumped (Stage 3), and finally a detached island (Stage 4) to expose a new vertical bank. If erosion progresses relatively slowly, S. alterniflora will dominate and G. demissa will be abundant. We applied this model to four sites at the Barn Island Salt Marsh in southeastern Connecticut. The central headland of the heavily mosquito-ditched Headquarters Marsh appears to be the most rapidly retreating: from 2006 to 2014, the seaward bank advanced two erosional stages and lost 3 m horizontally. This headland is dominated by low-marsh S. alterniflora, with mid-marsh grasses Distichlis spicata and Spartina patens also present on the seaward edge. By comparison, the nearby seaward edge of Wequetequock Point has only S. alterniflora and bare patches with no mid-marsh species. Wequetequock Point also appears more stable, with about one quarter of the seaward bank on a normal slope and abundant mussels (mean 4,500 m-2; max 20,000 m-2). Repeat surveys since 2006 show mussel vacancy rate is related to the rate of erosion. Open holes appear in normal slope banks due to wave erosion of rocks and other material embedded in the exposed peat. Banks that remain in the same erosion stage for multiple years show increased mussel occupation of these holes. In contrast, rapidly eroding banks at Barn Island Marsh have very few mussels (<100 m-2) and are typically fringed by grasses other than S. alterniflora. Much of the Barn Island Marsh bank is eroding too rapidly for mussel settlement and growth and normal marsh grass succession. In addition to documenting

  9. Non-monotonic course of protein solubility in aqueous polymer-salt solutions can be modeled using the sol-mxDLVO model.

    PubMed

    Herhut, Marcel; Brandenbusch, Christoph; Sadowski, Gabriele

    2016-02-01

    Protein purification is often performed using cost-intensive chromatographic steps. To discover economic alternatives (e.g., crystallization), knowledge on protein solubility as a function of temperature, pH, and additives in solution as well as their concentration is required. State-of-the-art models for predicting protein solubility almost exclusively consider aqueous salt systems, whereas "salting-in" and "salting-out" effects induced by the presence of an additional polymer are not considered. Thus, we developed the sol-mxDLVO model. Using this newly developed model, protein solubility in the presence of one salt and one polymer, especially the non-monotonic course of protein solubility, could be predicted. Systems considered included salts (NaCl, Na-p-Ts, (NH(4))(2) SO(4)) and the polymer polyethylene glycol (MW: 2000 g/mol, 12000 g/mol) and proteins lysozyme from chicken egg white (pH 4 to 5.5) and D-xylose ketol-isomerase (pH 7) at 298.15 K. The results show that by using the sol-mxDLVO model, protein solubility in polymer-salt solutions can be modeled in good agreement with the experimental data for both proteins considered. The sol-mxDLVO model can describe the non-monotonic course of protein solubility as a function of polymer concentration and salt concentration, previously not covered by state-of-the-art models. PMID:26579880

  10. A revised Pitzer model for low-temperature soluble salt assemblages at the Phoenix site, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, J. D.; Catling, D. C.; Light, B.

    2015-10-01

    The Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) on the Mars Phoenix Lander measured ions in a soil-water extraction and found Na+, K+, H+ (pH), Ca2+, Mg2+, SO42-, ClO4-, and Cl-. Equilibrium models offer insights into salt phases that were originally present in the Phoenix soil, which dissolved to form the measured WCL solution; however, there are few experimental datasets for single cation perchlorates (ClO4-), and none for mixed perchlorates, at low temperatures, which are needed to build models. In this study, we measure ice and salt solubilities in binary and ternary solutions in the Na-Ca-Mg-ClO4 system, and then use this data, along with existing data, to construct a low-temperature Pitzer model for perchlorate brines. We then apply our model to a nominal WCL solution. Previous studies have modeled either freezing of a WCL solution or evaporation at a single temperature. For the first time, we model evaporation at subzero temperatures, which is relevant for dehydration conditions that might occur at the Phoenix site. Our model indicates that a freezing WCL solution will form ice, KClO4, hydromagnesite (3MgCO3·Mg(OH)2·3H2O), calcite (CaCO3), meridianiite (MgSO4·11H2O), MgCl2·12H2O, NaClO4·2H2O, and Mg(ClO4)2·6H2O at the eutectic (209 K). The total water held in hydrated salt phases at the eutectic is ∼1.2 wt.%, which is much greater than hydrated water contents when evaporation is modeled at 298.15 K (∼0.3 wt.%). Evaporation of WCL solutions at lower temperatures (down to 210 K) results in lower water activities and the formation of more dehydrated minerals, e.g. kieserite (MgSO4·H2O) instead of meridianiite. Potentially habitable brines, with water activity aw > 0.6, can occur when soil temperatures are above 220 K and when the soil liquid water content is greater than 0.4 wt.% (100 ×gH2O gsoil-1). In general, modeling indicates that mineral assemblages derived from WCL-type solutions are characteristic of the soil temperature, water content, and water

  11. Sensitivity of modeled atmospheric nitrogen species to variations in sea salt emissions in the North and Baltic Sea regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, D.; Matthias, V.; Bieser, J.; Aulinger, A.; Quante, M.

    2015-10-01

    Coarse sea salt particles are emitted ubiquitously from the oceans' surfaces by wave breaking and bubble bursting processes. These particles impact atmospheric chemistry by affecting condensation of gas-phase species and nucleation of new fine particles, particularly in regions with high air pollution. In this study, atmospheric particle concentrations are modeled for the North and Baltic Sea regions, Northwestern Europe, using the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system and evaluated against European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) measurement data. As model extension, sea salt emissions are scaled by water salinity because of low salinity in large parts of the Baltic Sea and in certain river estuaries. The resulting improvement in predicted sea salt concentrations is assessed. The contribution of surf zone emissions is separately considered. Additionally, the impact of sea salt particles on atmospheric nitrate, ammonium and sulfate concentrations is evaluated. The comparisons show that sea salt concentrations are commonly overestimated at coastal stations and partly underestimated when going inland. The introduced salinity scaling improves predicted Baltic Sea sea salt concentrations considerably. Dates of measured peak concentrations are appropriately reproduced by the model. The impact of surf zone emissions is negligible in both seas. Nevertheless, they might be relevant because surf zone emissions were cut at an upper threshold in this study. Deactivating sea salt leads to a minor increase of NH4+ and NO3- and a minor decrease of SO42- concentrations. However, the overall effect is very low and lower than the deviation from measurements. Size resolved measurements of Na+, NH4+, NO3-, and SO42- are needed for a more detailed analysis on the impact of sea salt particles.

  12. Steady-State Creep of Rock Salt: Improved Approaches for Lab Determination and Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, R.-M.; Salzer, K.; Popp, T.; Lüdeling, C.

    2015-11-01

    Actual problems in geotechnical design, e.g., of underground openings for radioactive waste repositories or high-pressure gas storages, require sophisticated constitutive models and consistent parameters for rock salt that facilitate reliable prognosis of stress-dependent deformation and associated damage. Predictions have to comprise the active mining phase with open excavations as well as the long-term development of the backfilled mine or repository. While convergence-induced damage occurs mostly in the vicinity of openings, the long-term behaviour of the backfilled system is dominated by the damage-free steady-state creep. However, because in experiments the time necessary to reach truly stationary creep rates can range from few days to years, depending mainly on temperature and stress, an innovative but simple creep testing approach is suggested to obtain more reliable results: A series of multi-step tests with loading and unloading cycles allows a more reliable estimate of stationary creep rate in a reasonable time. For modelling, we use the advanced strain-hardening approach of Günther-Salzer, which comprehensively describes all relevant deformation properties of rock salt such as creep and damage-induced rock failure within the scope of an unified creep ansatz. The capability of the combination of improved creep testing procedures and accompanied modelling is demonstrated by recalculating multi-step creep tests at different loading and temperature conditions. Thus reliable extrapolations relevant to in-situ creep rates (10^{-9} to 10^{-13} s^{-1}) become possible.

  13. Modelling Hydrodynamics, Sediment Transport and Provenance in the South San Francisco Bay Salt Ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holleman, R. C.; Gross, E. S.; MacVean, L. J.; Stacey, M. T.; Fringer, O. B.

    2012-12-01

    Restoration of the South San Francisco Bay Salt Ponds is an immense and ongoing project with potentially far-reaching ramifications related to sediment supply, resuspension of contaminants, salt intrusion dynamics, tidal propagation and morphologic change. The rate of accretion in breached ponds depends on many factors, and the source of deposited material may be local or from other embayments. We present a high resolution hydrodynamic model of San Francisco Bay which resolves a broad range of spatial scales ranging from tens of kilometers in the coastal ocean, down to meters in a series of breached levees located in the Island Ponds. Complexities of the hydrodynamic model include both the generation of intertidal bathymetry and the numerical stability of wetting and drying when grid resolution is at the meter scale. Tides and currents show good validation against observed flows near the breaches. Hydrodynamic results are used to drive a particle-tracking based sediment model, allowing for detailed sediment provenance studies. Results demonstrate the viability of pond-deposited sediments sourced from beyond Calaveras Point even over short time periods.

  14. Progress in Studying Salt Secretion from the Salt Glands in Recretohalophytes: How Do Plants Secrete Salt?

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Fang; Leng, Bingying; Wang, Baoshan

    2016-01-01

    To survive in a saline environment, halophytes have evolved many strategies to resist salt stress. The salt glands of recretohalophytes are exceptional features for directly secreting salt out of a plant. Knowledge of the pathway(s) of salt secretion in relation to the function of salt glands may help us to change the salt-tolerance of crops and to cultivate the extensive saline lands that are available. Recently, ultrastructural studies of salt glands and the mechanism of salt secretion, particularly the candidate genes involved in salt secretion, have been illustrated in detail. In this review, we summarize current researches on salt gland structure, salt secretion mechanism and candidate genes involved, and provide an overview of the salt secretion pathway and the asymmetric ion transport of the salt gland. A new model recretohalophyte is also proposed. PMID:27446195

  15. Deformations of the Protection Shelf in the "Wapno" Salt Mine, Based on Model Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortas, Grzegorz; Maj, Agnieszka

    2014-12-01

    The catastrophic mine failure resulting from the inrush of water into the Wapno Salt Mine was probably caused by a fracture in the roof protection shelf. The purpose of the present study was to apply the method of the homogenization of the multi-level room-and-pillar structure in the Wapno Salt Mine for 3D+t modelling of the elastic-viscous medium to determine the distribution of stress and strain, and, on that basis, to estimate the geomechanical conditions existing in the roof shelf. This paper presents briefly the spatial development of the salt mine's structure and the results of the surveying measurements carried out during the salt mine's operation and after the mine was flooded. Those results constituted a basis for the verification of the introduced homogenization parameters, i.e. the time-dependent changes of the elasticity modulus and the susceptibility to creep at particular salt mine's levels. A simulated process demonstrated the development of positive values of principle stresses, increasing with time, and of omnidirectional tensile strains. In such conditions, the cracking of the protection shelf body could proceed, also with opening of water flow paths from the dome cap into the salt mine's workings. This paper presents a new research method, the results of its application, and the obtained distribution of stresses and strains that can be useful for the assessment of water hazard in other salt mines. Katastrofa górnicza wywołana wdarciem wody do kopalni soli w Wapnie spowodowana była prawdopodobnie pęknięciem ochronnej półki stropowej. Celem tej pracy było zastosowanie metody homogenizacji struktury komorowo-filarowej wielopoziomowej kopalni Wapno do modelowania ośrodka sprężysto-lepkiego 3D+t dla określenia rozkładu naprężeń i odkształceń oraz na tej podstawie oszacowania warunków geomechanicznych w półce stropowej. W pracy przedstawiono krótko rozwój przestrzenny struktury kopalni oraz wyniki przeprowadzonych pomiar

  16. 32. INTERIOR LAYOUT PLAN OF CROSSCUT STEAM AND DIESEL PLANT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. INTERIOR LAYOUT PLAN OF CROSSCUT STEAM AND DIESEL PLANT, TRACED FROM DRAWING BY C.C. MOORE AND CO., ENGINEERS. July 1947 - Crosscut Steam Plant, North side Salt River near Mill Avenue & Washington Street, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  17. 16. VIEW OF THE HOUSE INTERIOR, WEST AND NORTH WALLS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. VIEW OF THE HOUSE INTERIOR, WEST AND NORTH WALLS OF THE BASEMENT SHOWING FOUNDATION MATERIALS; LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Richard M. Fairbourn Farm, 170 West, 11,400 South, South Jordan, Salt Lake County, UT

  18. 12. INTERIOR VIEW OF TRANSFORMER BUILDING, HIGHLINE PUMP PLANT, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. INTERIOR VIEW OF TRANSFORMER BUILDING, HIGHLINE PUMP PLANT, SHOWING NEW SWITCHES AND METERS, December 3, 1952 - Highline Canal & Pumping Station, South side of Salt River between Tempe, Phoenix & Mesa, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  19. INTERIOR VIEW OF COLUMN TOPS. CARBON DIOXIDE BUBBLED THROUGH AMMONIONATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF COLUMN TOPS. CARBON DIOXIDE BUBBLED THROUGH AMMONIONATED SALT BRINE TO MAKE BICARBONATE OF SODA. - Solvay Process Company, SA Wetside Building, Between Willis & Milton Avenue, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  20. Modeling of the T S D E Heater Test to Investigate Crushed Salt Reconsolidation and Rock Salt Creep for the Underground Disposal of High-Level Nuclear Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco Martin, L.; Rutqvist, J.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Wolters, R.; Lux, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    Rock salt is a potential medium for the underground disposal of nuclear waste because it has several assets, in particular its water and gas tightness in the undisturbed state, its ability to heal induced fractures and its high thermal conductivity as compared to other shallow-crustal rocks. In addition, the run-of-mine, granular salt, may be used to backfill the mined open spaces. We present simulation results associated with coupled thermal, hydraulic and mechanical processes in the TSDE (Thermal Simulation for Drift Emplacement) experiment, conducted in the Asse salt mine in Germany [1]. During this unique test, conceived to simulate reference repository conditions for spent nuclear fuel, a significant amount of data (temperature, stress changes and displacements, among others) was measured at 20 cross-sections, distributed in two drifts in which a total of six electrical heaters were emplaced. The drifts were subsequently backfilled with crushed salt. This test has been modeled in three-dimensions, using two sequential simulators for flow (mass and heat) and geomechanics, TOUGH-FLAC and FLAC-TOUGH [2]. These simulators have recently been updated to accommodate large strains and time-dependent rheology. The numerical predictions obtained by the two simulators are compared within the framework of an international benchmark exercise, and also with experimental data. Subsequently, a re-calibration of some parameters has been performed. Modeling coupled processes in saliniferous media for nuclear waste disposal is a novel approach, and in this study it has led to the determination of some creep parameters that are very difficult to assess at the laboratory-scale because they require extremely low strain rates. Moreover, the results from the benchmark are very satisfactory and validate the capabilities of the two simulators used to study coupled thermal, mechanical and hydraulic (multi-component, multi-phase) processes relative to the underground disposal of high

  1. Hanford Supplemental Treatment: Literature and Modeling Review of SRS HLW Salt Dissolution and Fractional Crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, A. S.; Flach, G. P.; Martino, C. J.; Zamecnik, J. R.; Harris, M. K.; Wilmarth, W. R.; Calloway, T. B.

    2005-03-23

    In order to accelerate waste treatment and disposal of Hanford tank waste by 2028, the Department of Energy (DOE) and CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CHG), Inc. are evaluating alternative technologies which will be used in conjunction with the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) to safely pretreat and immobilize the tank waste. Several technologies (Bulk Vitrification and Steam Reforming) are currently being evaluated for immobilizing the pretreated waste. Since the WTP does not have sufficient capacity to pretreat all the waste going to supplemental treatment by the 2028 milestone, two technologies (Selective Dissolution and Fractional Crystallization) are being considered for pretreatment of salt waste. The scope of this task was to: (1) evaluate the recent Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 41 dissolution campaign and other literature to provide a more complete understanding of selective dissolution, (2) provide an update on the progress of salt dissolution and modeling activities at SRS, (3) investigate SRS experience and outside literature sources on industrial equipment and experimental results of previous fractional crystallization processes, and (4) evaluate recent Hanford AP104 boildown experiments and modeling results and recommend enhancements to the Environmental Simulation Program (ESP) to improve its predictive capabilities. This report provides a summary of this work and suggested recommendations.

  2. The impact of ice I rheology on interior models of Ganymede: The elastic vs. the visco-elastic case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbrügge, Gregor; Hussmann, Hauke; Sohl, Frank; Oberst, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Many investigations on key processes of icy satellites are driven by the rheological behavior of planetary ices. Future missions to Jupiter's icy moons (e.g. JUICE / Europa clipper) aimed at constraining the thickness of the outer ice shell using radio science and/or laser altimetry will have to address this problem. We investigate for the case of Ganymede under which conditions the ice I viscosity could be constrained by measuring the phase-lag of the tidal response using laser altimetry. In the absence of seismic data, interior structure models are constrained by the satellite's mean density and mean moment-of-inertia factor. One key observable to reduce the ambiguity of the corresponding structural models is the measurement of the dynamic response of the satellite's outer ice shells to tidal forces exerted by Jupiter and characterized by the body tide surface Love numbers h2 and k2. The Love number k2 measures the variation of the gravitational potential due to tidally induced internal redistribution of mass and can be inferred from radio science experiments. The Love number h2 is a measure for the tide-induced radial displacement of the satellite's surface. It is an advantage that Ganymede's surface displacement Love number h2 can be expected to be measured with a high accuracy using laser altimetry (Steinbrügge et al., 2014). However, the determination of the resulting ice thickness further depends on the possible existence of a liquid subsurface water ocean and on the tidally effective rheology of the outer ice shell (Moore and Schubert, 2003). Here, we distinguish between an elastic, visco-elastic or even fluid behavior in the sense of the Maxwell model and alternative rheological models. In the case of Ganymede the fluid case would imply high ice temperatures which are at odds with thermal equilibrium models calculated by Spohn and Schubert (2003). However the visco-elastic case is still possible. Laboratory measurements of ice I (e.g. Sotin et al., 1998

  3. Salt tectonics on Venus

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, C.A.; Amsbury, D.

    1986-05-01

    The discovery of a surprisingly high deuterium/hydrogen ratio on Venus immediately led to the speculation that Venus may have once had a volume of surface water comparable to that of the terrestrial oceans. The authors propose that the evaporation of this putative ocean may have yielded residual salt deposits that formed various terrain features depicted in Venera 15 and 16 radar images. By analogy with models for the total evaporation of the terrestrial oceans, evaporite deposits on Venus should be at least tens to hundreds of meters thick. From photogeologic evidence and in-situ chemical analyses, it appears that the salt plains were later buried by lava flows. On Earth, salt diapirism leads to the formation of salt domes, anticlines, and elongated salt intrusions - features having dimensions of roughly 1 to 100 km. Due to the rapid erosion of salt by water, surface evaporite landforms are only common in dry regions such as the Zagros Mountains of Iran, where salt plugs and glaciers exist. Venus is far drier than Iran; extruded salt should be preserved, although the high surface temperature (470/sup 0/C) would probably stimulate rapid salt flow. Venus possesses a variety of circular landforms, tens to hundreds of kilometers wide, which could be either megasalt domes or salt intrusions colonizing impact craters. Additionally, arcurate bands seen in the Maxwell area of Venus could be salt intrusions formed in a region of tectonic stress. These large structures may not be salt features; nonetheless, salt features should exist on Venus.

  4. SALMO and S3M: A Saliva Model and a Single Saliva Salt Model for Equilibrium Studies

    PubMed Central

    De Stefano, Concetta

    2015-01-01

    A model of synthetic saliva (SALMO, SALiva MOdel) is proposed for its use as standard medium in in vitro equilibrium and speciation studies of real saliva. The concentrations come out from the literature analysis of the composition of both real saliva and synthetic saliva. The chief interactions of main inorganic components of saliva, as well as urea and amino acids, are taken into account on the basis of a complex formation model, which also considers the dependence of the stability constants of these species on ionic strength and temperature. These last features allow the modelling of the speciation of saliva in different physiological conditions deriving from processes like dilution, pH, and temperature changes. To simplify equilibrium calculations, a plain approach is also proposed, in order to take into account all the interactions among the major components of saliva, by considering the inorganic components of saliva as a single 1 : 1 salt (MX), whose concentration is cMX = (1/2)∑ci (ci = analytical concentration of all the ions) and z ion charge calculated as z=±(I/cMX)1/2 = ±1.163. The use of the Single Saliva Salt Model (S3M) considerably reduces the complexity of the systems to be investigated. In fact, only four species deriving from internal ionic medium interactions must be considered. PMID:25733975

  5. Speciation of the major inorganic salts in atmospheric aerosols of Beijing, China: Measurements and comparison with model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiong; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Ci, Zhijia; Guo, Jia; Wang, Jiaqi

    2016-05-01

    In the winter and summer of 2013-2014, we used a sampling system, which consists of annular denuder, back-up filter and thermal desorption set-up, to measure the speciation of major inorganic salts in aerosols and the associated trace gases in Beijing. This sampling system can separate volatile ammonium salts (NH4NO3 and NH4Cl) from non-volatile ammonium salts ((NH4)2SO4), as well as the non-volatile nitrate and chloride. The measurement data was used as input of a thermodynamic equilibrium model (ISORROPIA II) to investigate the gas-aerosol equilibrium characteristics. Results show that (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3 and NH4Cl were the major inorganic salts in aerosols and mainly existed in the fine particles. The sulfate, nitrate and chloride associated with crustal ions were also important in Beijing where mineral dust concentrations were high. About 19% of sulfate in winter and 11% of sulfate in summer were associated with crustal ions and originated from heterogeneous reactions or direct emissions. The non-volatile nitrate contributed about 33% and 15% of nitrate in winter and summer, respectively. Theoretical thermodynamic equilibrium calculations for NH4NO3 and NH4Cl suggest that the gaseous precursors were sufficient to form stable volatile ammonium salts in winter, whereas the internal mixing with sulfate and crustal species were important for the formation of volatile ammonium salts in summer. The results of the thermodynamic equilibrium model reasonably agreed with the measurements of aerosols and gases, but large discrepancy existed in predicting the speciation of inorganic ammonium salts. This indicates that the assumption on crustal species in the model was important for obtaining better understanding on gas-aerosol partitioning and improving the model prediction.

  6. Numerical model of the salt-wedge reach of the Duwamish River estuary, King County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prych, Edmund A.; Haushild, W.L.; Stoner, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical model of a salt-wedge estuary developed by Fischer (1974) has been expanded and used to calculate the distributions of salinity, temperature, chlorophyll a concentration, biochemical oxygen demand, and dissolved-oxygen concentration in the Duwamish River estuary, King County, Wash. The model was used to predict the dissolved-oxygen concentrations in the Duwamish River estuary when the Renton Treatment Plant sewage-effluent discharge is increased to its proposed maximum of 223 cubic feet per second. The computed monthly average dissolved-oxygen concentrations in the estuary decreased by a maximum of 2 milligrams per liter when compared with computations for the summer of 1971, when the effluent discharge averaged 37 cubic feet per second. The increase in effluent discharge is not expected to cause large changes in phytoplankton concentrations in the estuary. (Woodard-USGS)

  7. Compressed Sensing Based Interior Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hengyong; Wang, Ge

    2010-01-01

    While the conventional wisdom is that the interior problem does not have a unique solution, by analytic continuation we recently showed that the interior problem can be uniquely and stably solved if we have a known sub-region inside a region-of-interest (ROI). However, such a known sub-region does not always readily available, and it is even impossible to find in some cases. Based on the compressed sensing theory, here we prove that if an object under reconstruction is essentially piecewise constant, a local ROI can be exactly and stably reconstructed via the total variation minimization. Because many objects in CT applications can be approximately modeled as piecewise constant, our approach is practically useful and suggests a new research direction of interior tomography. To illustrate the merits of our finding, we develop an iterative interior reconstruction algorithm that minimizes the total variation of a reconstructed image, and evaluate the performance in numerical simulation. PMID:19369711

  8. A model for the atmospheric fate of sea salt particles incoastal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demoisson, Ambre; Tedeschi, Gilles; Piazzola, Jacques

    2013-04-01

    Aerosol particles affect climate by scattering and absorbing radiation (Charlson et al., 1992), and may affect the heat budget. Among them, the particles generated at the air-sea interface by wave breaking represent a major component of the natural aerosol (Andreae, 1995). Sea-spray aerosols are mechanically produced by the interaction between wind and wave: when the wind speed increases beyond a critical value, waves break to dissipate the excess of energy. This is accompanied by the occurrence of whitecaps (Monahan and O'Muircheartaigh, 1980) and the primary marine aerosol production is directly related to the whitecap fraction. Air entrained into the water breaks up into bubbles, which may be transported to depths of several meters. When the bubbles rise and reach the surface, they burst and produce two kinds of droplets : film drops and jet drops (Blanchard, 1963; Blanchard, 1983; Resch and Afeti, 1991; Resch and Afeti, 1992). Sea-salts dominate atmospheric deposition in maritime regions (Gustafsson and Franzen, 1996; Farrell et al., 1995). However, the fate of marine aerosol particles in the marine atmosphere is still largely unknown. A model for the aerosol transport in coastal areas is then of great interest for a large number of applications among them, climate change and studies on air and water quality. Tedeschi and Piazzola (2011) presented the development of the Marine Aerosol Concentration Model (MACMod), which is a 2D unsteady model dedicated to the atmospheric transport of marine aerosols in the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer. However, such a transport model needs to implement an accurate source term for the sea-salt particles. Uncertainties on the sea-salt source function are still large (see Lewis and Schwartz, 2004). In particular, in coastal areas, the sea-spray production through breaking waves depends on both the fetch and the wind speed conditions. In this study, we propose to improve the MACMod model predictions by introducing an accurate

  9. Synthesis, antimicrobial evaluation and molecular modeling of 5-hydroxyisoquinolinium salt series; the effect of the hydroxyl moiety.

    PubMed

    Soukup, Ondrej; Dolezal, Rafael; Malinak, David; Marek, Jan; Salajkova, Sarka; Pasdiorova, Marketa; Honegr, Jan; Korabecny, Jan; Nachtigal, Petr; Nachon, Florian; Jun, Daniel; Kuca, Kamil

    2016-02-15

    In the present paper, we describe the synthesis of a new group of 5-hydroxyisoquinolinium salts with different lengths of alkyl side-chain (C10-C18), and their chromatographic analysis and biological assay for in vitro activity against bacterial and fungal strains. We compare the lipophilicity and efficacy of hydroxylated isoquinolinium salts with the previously published (non-hydroxylated) isoquinolinium salts from the point of view of antibacterial and antifungal versatility and cytotoxic safety. Compound 11 (C18) had to be excluded from the testing due to its low solubility. Compounds 9 and 10 (C14, C16) showed only moderate efficacy against G+ bacteria, notably with excellent potency against Staphyloccocus aureus, but no effect against G- bacteria. In contrast, non-hydroxylated isoquinolinium salts showed excellent antimicrobial efficacy within the whole series, particularly 14 (C14) against G+ strains and 15 (C16) against fungi. The electronic properties and desolvation energies of 5-hydroxyisoquinolinium and isoquinolinium salts were studied by quantum-chemistry calculations employing B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method and an implicit water-solvent simulation model (SCRF). Despite the positive mesomeric effect of the hydroxyl moiety reducing the electron density of the quaternary nitrogen, it is probably the higher lipophilicity and lower desolvation energy of isoquinolinium salts, which is responsible for enhanced antimicrobial versatility and efficacy. PMID:26774252

  10. Analysis of Multistage and Other Creep Data for Domal Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, D.E.

    1998-10-01

    There have existed for some time relatively sparse creep databases for a number of domal salts. Although all of these data were analyzed at the time they were reported, to date there has not been a comprehensive, overall evaluation within the same analysis framework. Such an evaluation may prove of value. The analysis methodology is based on the Multimechanism Deformation (M-D) description of salt creep and the corresponding model parameters determined from conventional creep tests. The constitutive model of creep wss formulated through application of principles involved in micromechanical modeling. It was possible, at minimum, to obtain the steady state parameters of the creep model from the data on the domal salts. When this was done, the creep of the domal salts, as compared to the well-defined Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) bedded clean salt, was either essentially identical to, or significantly harder (more creep resistant) than WIPP salt. Interestingly, the domal salts form two distinct groups, either sofl or hard, where the difference is roughly a factor often in creep rate between the twcl groups. As might be expected, this classification corresponds quite well to the differences in magnitude of effective creep volume losses of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) caverns as determined by the CAVEMAN cavern pressure history analysis, depending upon the specific dome or region within the dome. Creep response shoulcl also correlate to interior cavern conditions that produce salt falls. WMle, in general, the caverns in hard sah have a noticeably greater propensity for salt falls, a smaller number of similar events are exhibited even in the caverns in soft salt.

  11. Numerical modelling of salt diapirism and the surrounding temperature field during thin-skinned extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieulot, Cedric; Harms, Guido

    2016-04-01

    The occurrence of salt diapirs is strongly associated with potential geothermal and hydrocarbon energy sources. Many numerical modelling studies of diapirism have been done in the past, though very few of these in fact use geologically realistic settings and materials. Besides, only analogue and structural studies have been done on full scale diapirism during thin-skinned extension. Two-dimensional numerical modelling of this problem using a Finite Element code aims at addressing the following questions: which geometrical or material parameters affect the growth rate and shape of the diapir and how? what is the effect of this diapirism on the temperature field and surface heat flux? How does the inclusion of simple surface processes influence these observations to first order ? Our results show that, in compliance with both analogue modelling and structural geological studies, a diapir formed during thin-skinned extension undergoes three phases: reactional piercement, active piercement and passive piercement. Extension rates directly influence the total time required for the diapir to reach the surface, as well as how long the system remains in a state of reactional diapirism, which both affect the shape of the resulting diapir. Erosion efficiency is found to affect the growth rate of the diapir during its active stage and the total rising time, which affects in turn its the shape. The density contrast between the salt and the sediments also influences the growth rate during active and passive piercement. Finally, the temperature surrounding a rising diapir (especially in the region above it) is found to be heightened by a few dozens of degrees.

  12. An approach to better understanding of salt weathering on stone monuments - the "petraSalt" research project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrichs, K.; Azzam, R.

    2012-04-01

    sensor network (WSN), facilitating improved steps of evaluation. The 3D models, images and cross-sections of the monuments derived from laser scanning contributed, for example, to the assessment of the monumentś original geometry, thus providing the basis for precise quantification of apparent weathering damage on the monuments, in particular loss of stone material. An autonomously operating wireless sensor network was developed for continuous temporal and spatial high-resolution monitoring of environmental conditions affecting stone surface and stone interior of the monuments and acting as driving forces for the salt weathering processes. The extraordinary data output is to provide the basis for a differentiated numerical analysis of partial or complete salt crystallization / salt dissolution cycles, considering diurnal and seasonal variation. Methodological approach and results of the 'petraSalt' research project are presented.

  13. Dynamic modelling and simulation of linear Fresnel solar field model based on molten salt heat transfer fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakkarainen, Elina; Tähtinen, Matti

    2016-05-01

    Demonstrations of direct steam generation (DSG) in linear Fresnel collectors (LFC) have given promising results related to higher steam parameters compared to the current state-of-the-art parabolic trough collector (PTC) technology using oil as heat transfer fluid (HTF). However, DSG technology lacks feasible solution for long-term thermal energy storage (TES) system. This option is important for CSP technology in order to offer dispatchable power. Recently, molten salts have been proposed to be used as HTF and directly as storage medium in both line-focusing solar fields, offering storage capacity of several hours. This direct molten salt (DMS) storage concept has already gained operational experience in solar tower power plant, and it is under demonstration phase both in the case of LFC and PTC systems. Dynamic simulation programs offer a valuable effort for design and optimization of solar power plants. In this work, APROS dynamic simulation program is used to model a DMS linear Fresnel solar field with two-tank TES system, and example simulation results are presented in order to verify the functionality of the model and capability of APROS for CSP modelling and simulation.

  14. Nutritional modelling: distributions of salt intake from processed foods in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Barbara M

    2009-09-01

    The salt content of processed foods is important because of the high intake of Na by most New Zealanders. A database of Na concentrations in fifty-eight processed foods was compiled from existing and new data and combined with 24 h diet recall data from two national nutrition surveys (5771 respondents) to derive salt intakes for seven population groups. Mean salt intakes from processed foods ranged from 6.9 g/d for young males aged 19-24 years to 3.5 g/d for children aged 5-6 years. A total of > or = 50 % of children aged 5-6 years, boys aged 11-14 years and young males aged 19-24 years had salt intakes that exceeded the upper limit for Na, calculated as salt (3.2-5.3 g/d), from processed foods only. Bread accounted for the greatest contribution to salt intake for each population group (35-43 % of total salt intake). Other foods that contributed 2 % or more and common across most age groups were sausage, meat pies, pizza, instant noodles and cheese. The Na concentrations of key foods have changed little over the 16-year period from 1987 to 2003 except for corned beef and whole milk that have decreased by 34 and 50 % respectively. Bread is an obvious target for salt reduction but the implication on iodine intake needs consideration as salt is used as a vehicle for iodine fortification of bread. PMID:19296874

  15. Micro-mechanical modelling of cellulose aerogels from molten salt hydrates.

    PubMed

    Rege, Ameya; Schestakow, Maria; Karadagli, Ilknur; Ratke, Lorenz; Itskov, Mikhail

    2016-09-14

    In this paper, a generalised micro-mechanical model capable of capturing the mechanical behaviour of polysaccharidic aerogels, in particular cellulose aerogels, is proposed. To this end, first the mechanical structure and properties of these highly nanoporous cellulose aerogels prepared from aqueous salt hydrate melts (calcium thiocyanate, Ca(SCN)2·6H2O and zinc chloride, ZnCl2·4H2O) are studied. The cellulose content within these aerogels is found to have a direct relation to the microstructural quantities such as the fibril length and diameter. This, along with porosity, appears to influence the resulting mechanical properties. Furthermore, experimental characterisation of cellulose aerogels was done using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), pore-size data analysis, and compression tests. Cellulose aerogels are of a characteristic cellular microstructures and accordingly a network formed by square shaped cells is considered in the micro-mechanical model proposed in this paper. This model is based on the non-linear bending and collapse of such cells of varying pore sizes. The extended Euler-Bernoulli beam theory for large deflections is used to describe the bending in the cell walls. The proposed model is physically motivated and demonstrates a good agreement with our experimental data of both ZnCl2 and Ca(SCN)2 based cellulose aerogels with different cellulose contents. PMID:27487115

  16. Cloning and characterization of a salt stress-inducible small GTPase gene from the model grass species Lolium temulentum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A gene encoding a small GTP binding protein (smGTP) related to the Rab2 gene family of GTPases was identified during the analysis of a salt stress suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) expression library from the model grass species Lolium temulentum L. (Darnel ryegrass). The smGTP gene was fo...

  17. Interannual to decadal climate variability of sea salt aerosols in the coupled climate model CESM1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li; Pierce, David W.; Russell, Lynn M.; Miller, Arthur J.; Somerville, Richard C. J.; Twohy, Cynthia H.; Ghan, Steven J.; Singh, Balwinder; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Rasch, Philip J.

    2015-02-01

    This study examines multiyear climate variability associated with sea salt aerosols and their contribution to the variability of shortwave cloud forcing (SWCF) using a 150 year simulation for preindustrial conditions of the Community Earth System Model version 1.0. The results suggest that changes in sea salt and related cloud and radiative properties on interannual timescales are dominated by the El Niño-Southern Oscillation cycle. Sea salt variability on longer (interdecadal) timescales is associated with low-frequency variability in the Pacific Ocean similar to the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation but does not show a statistically significant spectral peak. A multivariate regression suggests that sea salt aerosol variability may contribute to SWCF variability in the tropical Pacific, explaining up to 20-30% of the variance in that region. Elsewhere, there is only a small sea salt aerosol influence on SWCF through modifying cloud droplet number and liquid water path that contributes to the change of cloud effective radius and cloud optical depth (and hence cloud albedo), producing a multiyear aerosol-cloud-wind interaction.

  18. Adaptation of Staphylococcus xylosus to Nutrients and Osmotic Stress in a Salted Meat Model.

    PubMed

    Vermassen, Aurore; Dordet-Frisoni, Emilie; de La Foye, Anne; Micheau, Pierre; Laroute, Valérie; Leroy, Sabine; Talon, Régine

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus xylosus is commonly used as starter culture for meat fermentation. Its technological properties are mainly characterized in vitro, but the molecular mechanisms for its adaptation to meat remain unknown. A global transcriptomic approach was used to determine these mechanisms. S. xylosus modulated the expression of about 40-50% of the total genes during its growth and survival in the meat model. The expression of many genes involved in DNA machinery and cell division, but also in cell lysis, was up-regulated. Considering that the S. xylosus population remained almost stable between 24 and 72 h of incubation, our results suggest a balance between cell division and cell lysis in the meat model. The expression of many genes encoding enzymes involved in glucose and lactate catabolism was up-regulated and revealed that glucose and lactate were used simultaneously. S. xylosus seemed to adapt to anaerobic conditions as revealed by the overexpression of two regulatory systems and several genes encoding cofactors required for respiration. In parallel, genes encoding transport of peptides and peptidases that could furnish amino acids were up-regulated and thus concomitantly a lot of genes involved in amino acid synthesis were down-regulated. Several genes involved in glutamate homeostasis were up-regulated. Finally, S. xylosus responded to the osmotic stress generated by salt added to the meat model by overexpressing genes involved in transport and synthesis of osmoprotectants, and Na(+) and H(+) extrusion. PMID:26903967

  19. Adaptation of Staphylococcus xylosus to Nutrients and Osmotic Stress in a Salted Meat Model

    PubMed Central

    Vermassen, Aurore; Dordet-Frisoni, Emilie; de La Foye, Anne; Micheau, Pierre; Laroute, Valérie; Leroy, Sabine; Talon, Régine

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus xylosus is commonly used as starter culture for meat fermentation. Its technological properties are mainly characterized in vitro, but the molecular mechanisms for its adaptation to meat remain unknown. A global transcriptomic approach was used to determine these mechanisms. S. xylosus modulated the expression of about 40–50% of the total genes during its growth and survival in the meat model. The expression of many genes involved in DNA machinery and cell division, but also in cell lysis, was up-regulated. Considering that the S. xylosus population remained almost stable between 24 and 72 h of incubation, our results suggest a balance between cell division and cell lysis in the meat model. The expression of many genes encoding enzymes involved in glucose and lactate catabolism was up-regulated and revealed that glucose and lactate were used simultaneously. S. xylosus seemed to adapt to anaerobic conditions as revealed by the overexpression of two regulatory systems and several genes encoding cofactors required for respiration. In parallel, genes encoding transport of peptides and peptidases that could furnish amino acids were up-regulated and thus concomitantly a lot of genes involved in amino acid synthesis were down-regulated. Several genes involved in glutamate homeostasis were up-regulated. Finally, S. xylosus responded to the osmotic stress generated by salt added to the meat model by overexpressing genes involved in transport and synthesis of osmoprotectants, and Na+ and H+ extrusion. PMID:26903967

  20. Salt II: Illusion and Reality. World Order Models Project. Working Paper Number Nine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansen, Robert C.

    The document discusses miscalculations by public officials, arms control experts, journalists, and the general public regarding the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks; assesses the Salt II treaty; and suggests criteria for appraising Salt II. The objective is to stimulate research, education, dialogue, and political action which will contribute to a…

  1. An optical model for heat and salt budget estimation for shallow seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrior, Hari; Carder, Kendall

    2007-12-01

    The effects of the underwater light field on heat-budget calculations for shallow waters are developed and applied for the region of Bahamas. Most of the general circulation models use a simplified heat budget scheme based on Jerlov water types, and do not account for optical bottom effects. By optical bottom effect, we mean the bottom absorption and reflection of the short-wave radiation, which in turn affects the thermal stratification and heat exchange with the atmosphere. In this paper, this optical bottom effect is added to a 3D turbulence model (a 1D model called GOTM is coupled to a 3D model called POM) and the evolution of the temperature structure studied. We call the coupled model 3DGOTM. This optical bottom effect is found to be important in the areas with clear water, shallow depths and small solar zenith angle. On the basis of the coastal meteorological measurements from Andros Island, we have used this three-dimensional turbulence closure model (3DGOTM) to show the influence of bottom reflection and absorption on the sea surface temperature field. The final temperature of the developed water column depends on water depth and bottom albedo. Effects of varying the bottom albedo were studied by comparing results for coral sand and sea grass bottoms. This has an appreciable contribution to the heat budget and salt budget of the shallow waters in these coastal regions. The salinities of the shallow regions near Andros Island have been found to reach as high as 46 psu by summer. In addition to the thermohaline plumes generated by these bottom effects, this warming process has an impact on the moisture feedbacks into the atmosphere due to evaporation.

  2. Interior intrusion detection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.R.; Matter, J.C. ); Dry, B. )

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of this NUREG is to present technical information that should be useful to NRC licensees in designing interior intrusion detection systems. Interior intrusion sensors are discussed according to their primary application: boundary-penetration detection, volumetric detection, and point protection. Information necessary for implementation of an effective interior intrusion detection system is presented, including principles of operation, performance characteristics and guidelines for design, procurement, installation, testing, and maintenance. A glossary of sensor data terms is included. 36 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Optically measuring interior cavities

    DOEpatents

    Stone, Gary Franklin

    2009-11-03

    A method of measuring the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of an interior cavity includes the steps of collecting a first optical slice of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, collecting additional optical slices of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, and combining the first optical slice of data and the additional optical slices of data to calculate of the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity.

  4. Optically measuring interior cavities

    DOEpatents

    Stone, Gary Franklin

    2008-12-21

    A method of measuring the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of an interior cavity includes the steps of collecting a first optical slice of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, collecting additional optical slices of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, and combining the first optical slice of data and the additional optical slices of data to calculate of the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity.

  5. Comparing field-based and numerically modelled reconstructions of the last Cordilleran Ice Sheet deglaciation over the Thompson Plateau, southern interior British Columbia, Canada.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cripps, Jonathan; Brennand, Tracy; Seguinot, Julien; Perkins, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Palaeoglaciological and palaeoclimate reconstructions of the deglaciation of the last Cordilleran Ice Sheet (CIS) over British Columbia (BC), Canada, are limited by the relative lack of understanding of the late-glacial ice sheet margins and dynamics. Deglaciation of the last CIS over the southern Interior Plateau of BC has been characterised as proceeding via stagnation and downwasting into dead ice lobes in valleys where ice was thickest. This conceptual model explains the apparent lack of moraines, which may otherwise imply active recession, and known palaeo-glacial lakes are explained as being dammed by these dead ice lobes. However, downwasting alone is at odds with coeval ice sheets which receded systematically towards their interiors. Presented here is a comparison between a new field-based reconstruction of the deglaciation of the northern Thompson Plateau, and ice sheet model results of the same area. Glacioisostatic tilts, reconstructed using mapped shoreline elevations, rise to the north-northwest at around 1.8 m/km, implying an ice surface slope, and likely active recession, towards the Coast Mountains. New reconstructions of the stages of glacial Lake Nicola (gLN), utilising field and aerial photographic mapping of shorelines, and sedimentology and geophysical surveys on ice-marginal and glaciolacustrine landforms, largely support this interpretation; the lake expanded and lowered to the north-northwest as progressively lower outlets were opened during ice retreat in this direction. Fields of newly discovered glaciotectonised moraines, grounding-line deposits and overridden glacial lake sediments record ice margin oscillations and minor readvances within gLN; the general alignment of these features further supports recession to the north-northwest. Numerical simulations of deglaciation of the area results in ice retreat to the north-northeast, which is inconsistent with the north-north-westward evolution of gLN. Excess precipitation over the eastern

  6. A new approach for modeling and analysis of molten salt reactors using SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, J. J.; Harrison, T. J.; Gehin, J. C.

    2013-07-01

    The Office of Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) of the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy is performing an evaluation and screening of potential fuel cycle options to provide information that can support future research and development decisions based on the more promising fuel cycle options. [1] A comprehensive set of fuel cycle options are put into evaluation groups based on physics and fuel cycle characteristics. Representative options for each group are then evaluated to provide the quantitative information needed to support the valuation of criteria and metrics used for the study. Included in this set of representative options are Molten Salt Reactors (MSRs), the analysis of which requires several capabilities that are not adequately supported by the current version of SCALE or other neutronics depletion software packages (e.g., continuous online feed and removal of materials). A new analysis approach was developed for MSR analysis using SCALE by taking user-specified MSR parameters and performing a series of SCALE/TRITON calculations to determine the resulting equilibrium operating conditions. This paper provides a detailed description of the new analysis approach, including the modeling equations and radiation transport models used. Results for an MSR fuel cycle option of interest are also provided to demonstrate the application to a relevant problem. The current implementation is through a utility code that uses the two-dimensional (2D) TRITON depletion sequence in SCALE 6.1 but could be readily adapted to three-dimensional (3D) TRITON depletion sequences or other versions of SCALE. (authors)

  7. A model for the stimulation of taste receptor cells by salt.

    PubMed Central

    DeSimone, J A; Price, S

    1976-01-01

    A taste cell mucosal surface is regarded as a planar region containing bound anionic sites and openings to ionic channels. It is assumed that the bulk aqueous properties of the exterior phase are not continuous with the surface but terminate at a plane near the surface. The region between the (Stern) plane and the membrane is regarded as having a lower dielectric constant than bulk water. This fact admits the possibility of ion pair formation between fixed sites and mobile cations. Mobile ion pairs entering the region may also bind to a fixed anionic site. Thus, it is assumed that mobile cations and ion pairs are potential determining species at the surface. Binding cations neutralizes surface charges, whereas binding mobile ion pairs does not. This competition accounts for the observed anion effect on stimulation of tast receptors by sodium salts. The potential profile is constructed by superimposing the phase boundary potentials with an ionic diffusion potential across the membrane. The model accounts for the anion effect on receptor potential, pH effects, the reversal of polarity when cells are treated with FeCl3, and the so-called "water reponse," depolarization of the taste cell upon dilution of the stimulant solution below a critical lower limit. The proposed model does not require both bound cationic and anionic receptors, and further suggests that limited access to a Stern-like region continuous with membrane channels may generally serve to control transport of ions. PMID:938727

  8. Faraday Discussion 160 Introductory Lecture: Interpreting and Predicting Hofmeister Salt Ion and Solute Effects on Biopolymer and Model Processes Using the Solute Partitioning Model

    PubMed Central

    Record, M. Thomas; Guinn, Emily; Pegram, Laurel; Capp, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how Hofmeister salt ions and other solutes interact with proteins, nucleic acids, other biopolymers and water and thereby affect protein and nucleic acid processes as well as model processes (e.g solubility of model compounds) in aqueous solution is a longstanding goal of biophysical research. Empirical Hofmeister salt and solute “m-values” (derivatives of the observed standard free energy change for a model or biopolymer process with respect to solute or salt concentration m3) are equal to differences in chemical potential derivatives: m-value = Δ(dμ2/dm3) = Δμ23 which quantify the preferential interactions of the solute or salt with the surface of the biopolymer or model system (component 2) exposed or buried in the process. Using the SPM, we dissect μ23 values for interactions of a solute or Hofmeister salt with a set of model compounds displaying the key functional groups of biopolymers to obtain interaction potentials (called α-values) that quantify the interaction of the solute or salt per unit area of each functional group or type of surface. Interpreted using the SPM, these α-values provide quantitative information about both the hydration of functional groups and the competitive interaction of water and the solute or salt with functional groups. The analysis corroborates and quantifies previous proposals that the Hofmeister anion and cation series for biopolymer processes are determined by ion-specific, mostly unfavorable interactions with hydrocarbon surfaces; the balance between these unfavorable nonpolar interactions and often-favorable interactions of ions with polar functional groups determine the series null points. The placement of urea and glycine betaine (GB) at opposite ends of the corresponding series of nonelectrolytes results from the favorable interactions of urea, and unfavorable interactions of GB, with many (but not all) biopolymer functional groups. Interaction potentials and local-bulk partition coefficients

  9. The use of molten salts as physical models for the study of solidification in metals and semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koziol, Jurek K.; Sadoway, Donald R.

    1987-01-01

    It is presently noted that molten salts possess attributes rendering them attractive as physical models of cast metals in solidification studies. Molten alkali halides have an approximately correct Prandtl number for this modeling of metallic melts, and are transparent to visible light. Attention is given to solidification in the LiCl-KCl system, in order to determine whether such phenomena as solute rejection can be observed and characterized through the application of laser schlieren imaging.

  10. Statistical mechanics of light elements at high pressure. IV - A model free energy for the metallic phase. [for Jovian type planet interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewitt, H. E.; Hubbard, W. B.

    1976-01-01

    A large quantity of data on the thermodynamic properties of hydrogen-helium metallic liquids have been obtained in extended computer calculations in which a Monte Carlo code essentially identical to that described by Hubbard (1972) was used. A model free energy for metallic hydrogen with a relatively small mass fraction of helium is discussed, taking into account the definition of variables, a procedure for choosing the free energy, values for the fitting parameters, and the evaluation of the entropy constants. Possibilities concerning a use of the obtained data in studies of the interiors of the outer planets are briefly considered.

  11. Salt geometry influence on present-day stress orientations in the Nile Delta: Insights from numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Andreas; Zhang, Weicheng

    2016-02-01

    The offshore Nile Delta displays sharply contrasting orientations of the maximum horizontal stress, SH, in regions above Messinian evaporites (suprasalt) and regions below Messinian evaporites (subsalt). Published stress orientation data predominantly show margin-normal suprasalt SH orientations but a margin-parallel subsalt SH orientation. While these data sets provide the first major evidence that evaporite sequences can act as mechanical detachment horizons, the cause for the stress orientation contrast remains unclear. In this study, 3D finite element analysis is used to investigate the causes for stress re-orientation based on two different hypotheses. The modeling study evaluates the influence of different likely salt geometries and whether stress reorientations are the result of basal drag forces induced by gravitational gliding or whether they represent localized variations due to mechanical property contrasts. The modeling results show that when salt is present as a continuous layer, gravitational gliding occurs and basal drag forces induced in the suprasalt layers result in the margin-normal principal stress becoming the maximum horizontal stress. With the margin-normal stress increase being confined to the suprasalt layers, the salt acts as a mechanical detachment horizon, resulting in different SH orientations in the suprasalt compared to the subsalt layers. When salt is present as isolated bodies localized stress variations occur due to the mechanical property contrasts imposed by the salt, also resulting in different SH orientations in the suprasalt compared to the subsalt layers. The modeling results provide additional quantitative evidence to confirm the role of evaporite sequences as mechanical detachment horizons.

  12. Modeling of Structural-Acoustic Interaction Using Coupled FE/BE Method and Control of Interior Acoustic Pressure Using Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Shi, Yacheng

    1997-01-01

    A coupled finite element (FE) and boundary element (BE) approach is presented to model full coupled structural/acoustic/piezoelectric systems. The dual reciprocity boundary element method is used so that the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the coupled system can be obtained, and to extend this approach to time dependent problems. The boundary element method is applied to interior acoustic domains, and the results are very accurate when compared with limited exact solutions. Structural-acoustic problems are then analyzed with the coupled finite element/boundary element method, where the finite element method models the structural domain and the boundary element method models the acoustic domain. Results for a system consisting of an isotropic panel and a cubic cavity are in good agreement with exact solutions and experiment data. The response of a composite panel backed cavity is then obtained. The results show that the mass and stiffness of piezoelectric layers have to be considered. The coupled finite element and boundary element equations are transformed into modal coordinates, which is more convenient for transient excitation. Several transient problems are solved based on this formulation. Two control designs, a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) and a feedforward controller, are applied to reduce the acoustic pressure inside the cavity based on the equations in modal coordinates. The results indicate that both controllers can reduce the interior acoustic pressure and the plate deflection.

  13. Salt Lake Community College Veterans Services: A Model of Serving Veterans in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahern, Aaron; Foster, Michael; Head, Darlene

    2015-01-01

    This chapter outlines the birth and growth of a veterans' program in Salt Lake City, Utah, and discusses next steps in spurring additional innovations and advancements to improve service for student veterans in community colleges.

  14. Charged patchy particle models in explicit salt: Ion distributions, electrostatic potentials, and effective interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yigit, Cemil; Dzubiella, Joachim; Heyda, Jan

    2015-08-14

    We introduce a set of charged patchy particle models (CPPMs) in order to systematically study the influence of electrostatic charge patchiness and multipolarity on macromolecular interactions by means of implicit-solvent, explicit-ion Langevin dynamics simulations employing the Gromacs software. We consider well-defined zero-, one-, and two-patched spherical globules each of the same net charge and (nanometer) size which are composed of discrete atoms. The studied mono- and multipole moments of the CPPMs are comparable to those of globular proteins with similar size. We first characterize ion distributions and electrostatic potentials around a single CPPM. Although angle-resolved radial distribution functions reveal the expected local accumulation and depletion of counter- and co-ions around the patches, respectively, the orientation-averaged electrostatic potential shows only a small variation among the various CPPMs due to space charge cancellations. Furthermore, we study the orientation-averaged potential of mean force (PMF), the number of accumulated ions on the patches, as well as the CPPM orientations along the center-to-center distance of a pair of CPPMs. We compare the PMFs to the classical Derjaguin-Verwey-Landau-Overbeek theory and previously introduced orientation-averaged Debye-Hückel pair potentials including dipolar interactions. Our simulations confirm the adequacy of the theories in their respective regimes of validity, while low salt concentrations and large multipolar interactions remain a challenge for tractable theoretical descriptions.

  15. Imidazolium salts as small-molecule urinary bladder exfoliants in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Wagers, Patrick O; Tiemann, Kristin M; Shelton, Kerri L; Kofron, William G; Panzner, Matthew J; Wooley, Karen L; Youngs, Wiley J; Hunstad, David A

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel family of small-molecule urinary bladder exfoliants that are expected to be of great value in preclinical studies of urologic conditions and have improved potential for translation compared with prior agents. There is broad urologic interest in the therapeutic potential of such exfoliating agents. The primary agent used in preclinical models, the cationic peptide protamine sulfate (PS), has limited translational potential due to concerns including systemic adverse reactions and bladder tissue injury. Intravesical application of a safe, systemically nontoxic exfoliant would have potential utility in the eradication of Escherichia coli and other uropathogens that reside in the bladder epithelium following cystitis, as well as in chronic bladder pain and bladder cancer. Here, we introduce a family of imidazolium salts with potent and focused exfoliating activity on the bladder epithelium. Synthesis and purification were straightforward and scalable, and the compounds exhibited prolonged stability in lyophilized form. Most members of the compound family were cytotoxic to cultured uroepithelial cells, with >10-fold differences in potency across the series. Upon topical (intravesical) administration of selected compounds to the murine bladder, complete epithelial exfoliation was achieved with physiologically relevant imidazolium concentrations and brief contact times. The exfoliative activity of these compounds was markedly improved in comparison to PS, as assessed by microscopy, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting for uroplakins. Bladder uroepithelium regenerated within days to yield a histologically normal appearance, and no toxicity was observed. Finally, the chemical scaffold offers an opportunity for inclusion of antimicrobials or conjugation with chemotherapeutic or other moieties. PMID:26124168

  16. Solvation of actinide salts in water using a polarizable continuum model.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Narendra; Seminario, Jorge M

    2015-01-29

    In order to determine how actinide atoms are dressed when solvated in water, density functional theory calculations have been carried out to study the equilibrium structure of uranium plutonium and thorium salts (UO2(2+), PuO2(2+), Pu(4+), and Th(4+)) both in vacuum as well as in solution represented by a conductor-like polarizable continuum model. This information is of paramount importance for the development of sensitive nanosensors. Both UO2(2+) and PuO2(2+) ions show coordination number of 4-5 with counterions replacing one or two water molecules from the first coordination shell. On the other hand, Pu(4+), has a coordination number of 8 both when completely solvated and also in the presence of chloride and nitrate ions with counterions replacing water molecules in the first shell. Nitrates were found to bind more strongly to Pu(IV) than chloride anions. In the case of the Th(IV) ion, the coordination number was found to be 9 or 10 in the presence of chlorides. Moreover, the Pu(IV) ion shows greater affinity for chlorides than the Th(IV) ion. Adding dispersion and ZPE corrections to the binding energy does not alter the trends in relative stability of several conformers because of error cancelations. All structures and energetics of these complexes are reported. PMID:25563344

  17. Charged patchy particle models in explicit salt: Ion distributions, electrostatic potentials, and effective interactions.

    PubMed

    Yigit, Cemil; Heyda, Jan; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2015-08-14

    We introduce a set of charged patchy particle models (CPPMs) in order to systematically study the influence of electrostatic charge patchiness and multipolarity on macromolecular interactions by means of implicit-solvent, explicit-ion Langevin dynamics simulations employing the Gromacs software. We consider well-defined zero-, one-, and two-patched spherical globules each of the same net charge and (nanometer) size which are composed of discrete atoms. The studied mono- and multipole moments of the CPPMs are comparable to those of globular proteins with similar size. We first characterize ion distributions and electrostatic potentials around a single CPPM. Although angle-resolved radial distribution functions reveal the expected local accumulation and depletion of counter- and co-ions around the patches, respectively, the orientation-averaged electrostatic potential shows only a small variation among the various CPPMs due to space charge cancellations. Furthermore, we study the orientation-averaged potential of mean force (PMF), the number of accumulated ions on the patches, as well as the CPPM orientations along the center-to-center distance of a pair of CPPMs. We compare the PMFs to the classical Derjaguin-Verwey-Landau-Overbeek theory and previously introduced orientation-averaged Debye-Hückel pair potentials including dipolar interactions. Our simulations confirm the adequacy of the theories in their respective regimes of validity, while low salt concentrations and large multipolar interactions remain a challenge for tractable theoretical descriptions. PMID:26277163

  18. Imidazolium Salts as Small-Molecule Urinary Bladder Exfoliants in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Wagers, Patrick O.; Tiemann, Kristin M.; Shelton, Kerri L.; Kofron, William G.; Panzner, Matthew J.; Wooley, Karen L.; Youngs, Wiley J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel family of small-molecule urinary bladder exfoliants that are expected to be of great value in preclinical studies of urologic conditions and have improved potential for translation compared with prior agents. There is broad urologic interest in the therapeutic potential of such exfoliating agents. The primary agent used in preclinical models, the cationic peptide protamine sulfate (PS), has limited translational potential due to concerns including systemic adverse reactions and bladder tissue injury. Intravesical application of a safe, systemically nontoxic exfoliant would have potential utility in the eradication of Escherichia coli and other uropathogens that reside in the bladder epithelium following cystitis, as well as in chronic bladder pain and bladder cancer. Here, we introduce a family of imidazolium salts with potent and focused exfoliating activity on the bladder epithelium. Synthesis and purification were straightforward and scalable, and the compounds exhibited prolonged stability in lyophilized form. Most members of the compound family were cytotoxic to cultured uroepithelial cells, with >10-fold differences in potency across the series. Upon topical (intravesical) administration of selected compounds to the murine bladder, complete epithelial exfoliation was achieved with physiologically relevant imidazolium concentrations and brief contact times. The exfoliative activity of these compounds was markedly improved in comparison to PS, as assessed by microscopy, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting for uroplakins. Bladder uroepithelium regenerated within days to yield a histologically normal appearance, and no toxicity was observed. Finally, the chemical scaffold offers an opportunity for inclusion of antimicrobials or conjugation with chemotherapeutic or other moieties. PMID:26124168

  19. Charged patchy particle models in explicit salt: Ion distributions, electrostatic potentials, and effective interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yigit, Cemil; Heyda, Jan; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2015-08-01

    We introduce a set of charged patchy particle models (CPPMs) in order to systematically study the influence of electrostatic charge patchiness and multipolarity on macromolecular interactions by means of implicit-solvent, explicit-ion Langevin dynamics simulations employing the Gromacs software. We consider well-defined zero-, one-, and two-patched spherical globules each of the same net charge and (nanometer) size which are composed of discrete atoms. The studied mono- and multipole moments of the CPPMs are comparable to those of globular proteins with similar size. We first characterize ion distributions and electrostatic potentials around a single CPPM. Although angle-resolved radial distribution functions reveal the expected local accumulation and depletion of counter- and co-ions around the patches, respectively, the orientation-averaged electrostatic potential shows only a small variation among the various CPPMs due to space charge cancellations. Furthermore, we study the orientation-averaged potential of mean force (PMF), the number of accumulated ions on the patches, as well as the CPPM orientations along the center-to-center distance of a pair of CPPMs. We compare the PMFs to the classical Derjaguin-Verwey-Landau-Overbeek theory and previously introduced orientation-averaged Debye-Hückel pair potentials including dipolar interactions. Our simulations confirm the adequacy of the theories in their respective regimes of validity, while low salt concentrations and large multipolar interactions remain a challenge for tractable theoretical descriptions.

  20. Theory Of Salt Effects On Protein Solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Yuba; Schmit, Jeremy

    Salt is one of the major factors that effects protein solubility. Often, at low salt concentration regime, protein solubility increases with the salt concentration(salting in) whereas at high salt concentration regime, solubility decreases with the increase in salt concentration(salting out). There are no quantitative theories to explain salting in and salting out. We have developed a model to describe the salting in and salting out. Our model accounts for the electrostatic Coulomb energy, salt entropy and non-electrostatic interaction between proteins. We analytically solve the linearized Poisson Boltzmann equation modelling the protein charge by a first order multipole expansion. In our model, protein charges are modulated by the anion binding. Consideration of only the zeroth order term in protein charge doesn't help to describe salting in phenomenon because of the repulsive interaction. To capture the salting in behaviour, it requires an attractive electrostatic interaction in low salt regime. Our work shows that at low salt concentration, dipole interaction is the cause for salting in and at high salt concentration a salt-dependent depletion interaction dominates and gives the salting out. Our theoretical result is consistent with the experimental result for Chymosin protein NIH Grant No R01GM107487.

  1. Salt effects on ionization equilibria of histidines in myoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Y H; Fitch, C A; Bhattacharya, S; Sarkisian, C J; Lecomte, J T; García-Moreno E, B

    2000-01-01

    The salt dependence of histidine pK(a) values in sperm whale and horse myoglobin and in histidine-containing peptides was measured by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. Structure-based pK(a) calculations were performed with continuum methods to test their ability to capture the effects of solution conditions on pK(a) values. The measured pK(a) of most histidines, whether in the protein or in model compounds, increased by 0.3 pH units or more between 0.02 M and 1.5 M NaCl. In myoglobin two histidines (His(48) and His(36)) exhibited a shallower dependence than the average, and one (His(113)) showed a steeper dependence. The (1)H-NMR data suggested that the salt dependence of histidine pK(a) values in the protein was determined primarily by the preferential stabilization of the charged form of histidine with increasing salt concentrations rather than by screening of electrostatic interactions. The magnitude and salt dependence of interactions between ionizable groups were exaggerated in pK(a) calculations with the finite-difference Poisson-Boltzmann method applied to a static structure, even when the protein interior was treated with arbitrarily high dielectric constants. Improvements in continuum methods for calculating salt effects on pK(a) values will require explicit consideration of the salt dependence of model compound pK(a) values used for reference in the calculations. PMID:10969024

  2. A modeling study of water and salt exchange for a micro-tidal, stratified northern Gulf of Mexico estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Choong-Ki; Park, Kyeong

    2012-08-01

    A three-dimensional hydrodynamic model is applied to the Mobile Bay system to study water and salt exchange with the northern Gulf of Mexico via Main Pass (MP) and eastern Mississippi Sound via Pass-aux-Herons (PaH). On average, more water leaves the Bay through MP than through PaH, and the Bay gains salt through MP and loses about the same amount through PaH. However, the volume discharge rate Qf and salt transport rate FS vary greatly in response to wind and river discharge with the range of variation 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than the corresponding mean. Stratification plays a key role for salt transport through MP. During periods of large river discharge, the landward shear dispersive transport FE peaking during equatorial tides and the landward tidal oscillatory transport FT peaking during tropic tides, respectively, balance the seaward advective transport QfS0. During periods of relatively weak stratification, FS at MP is almost entirely determined by QfS0 and its variability is well correlated with north-south (along-estuary) wind, associated with the barotropic (water level) adjustment. At the shallow, weakly stratified PaH, FS is almost identical to QfS0, and Qf is well correlated with east-west wind, with the correlation becoming stronger during the dry period.

  3. ALLOPURINOL DOES NOT DECREASE BLOOD PRESSURE OR PREVENT THE DEVELOPMENT OF HYPERTENSION IN THE DOCA-SALT RAT MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Szasz, Theodora; Linder, A. Elizabeth; Davis, Robert P.; Burnett, Robert; Fink, Gregory D.; Watts, Stephanie W.

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension, disease in which ROS levels and markers of oxidative stress are increased. Xanthine oxidase (XO) is a ROS-producing enzyme the activity of which may increase during hypertension. Studies on XO inhibition effects on BP have yielded controversial results. We hypothesized that XO inhibition would decrease BP or attenuate the development of DOCA-salt hypertension. We administered the XO inhibitor, allopurinol (50 mg/kg/day, orally) or its vehicle to rats during the established or development stages of DOCA-salt hypertension. We validated XO inhibition by HPLC measurements of XO metabolites in urine, serum and tissues demonstrating decrease in products, increase in substrates and detection of the active metabolite of allopurinol, oxypurinol. We monitored BP continuously via radiotelemetry and performed gross evaluations of target organs of hypertension. Allopurinol treatment did not impact the course of DOCA-salt hypertension, regardless of the timing of administration. Aside from a significant decrease in pulse pressure in allopurinol-treated rats, no positive differences were observed between the allopurinol and the vehicle-treated rats. We conclude that XO does not play an important role in the development or maintenance of hypertension in the rat DOCA-salt hypertension model. PMID:20881613

  4. Do gamblers eat more salt? Testing a latent trait model of covariance in consumption.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Belinda C; Browne, Matthew; Rockloff, Matthew; Donaldson, Phillip

    2015-09-01

    A diverse class of stimuli, including certain foods, substances, media, and economic behaviours, may be described as 'reward-oriented' in that they provide immediate reinforcement with little initial investment. Neurophysiological and personality concepts, including dopaminergic dysfunction, reward sensitivity and rash impulsivity, each predict the existence of a latent behavioural trait that leads to increased consumption of all stimuli in this class. Whilst bivariate relationships (co-morbidities) are often reported in the literature, to our knowledge, a multivariate investigation of this possible trait has not been done. We surveyed 1,194 participants (550 male) on their typical weekly consumption of 11 types of reward-oriented stimuli, including fast food, salt, caffeine, television, gambling products, and illicit drugs. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to compare models in a 3×3 structure, based on the definition of a single latent factor (none, fixed loadings, or estimated loadings), and assumed residual covariance structure (none, a-priori / literature based, or post-hoc / data-driven). The inclusion of a single latent behavioural 'consumption' factor significantly improved model fit in all cases. Also confirming theoretical predictions, estimated factor loadings on reward-oriented indicators were uniformly positive, regardless of assumptions regarding residual covariances. Additionally, the latent trait was found to be negatively correlated with the non-reward-oriented indicators of fruit and vegetable consumption. The findings support the notion of a single behavioural trait leading to increased consumption of reward-oriented stimuli across multiple modalities. We discuss implications regarding the concentration of negative lifestyle-related health behaviours. PMID:26551907

  5. Do gamblers eat more salt? Testing a latent trait model of covariance in consumption

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Belinda C.; Browne, Matthew; Rockloff, Matthew; Donaldson, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    A diverse class of stimuli, including certain foods, substances, media, and economic behaviours, may be described as ‘reward-oriented’ in that they provide immediate reinforcement with little initial investment. Neurophysiological and personality concepts, including dopaminergic dysfunction, reward sensitivity and rash impulsivity, each predict the existence of a latent behavioural trait that leads to increased consumption of all stimuli in this class. Whilst bivariate relationships (co-morbidities) are often reported in the literature, to our knowledge, a multivariate investigation of this possible trait has not been done. We surveyed 1,194 participants (550 male) on their typical weekly consumption of 11 types of reward-oriented stimuli, including fast food, salt, caffeine, television, gambling products, and illicit drugs. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to compare models in a 3×3 structure, based on the definition of a single latent factor (none, fixed loadings, or estimated loadings), and assumed residual covariance structure (none, a-priori / literature based, or post-hoc / data-driven). The inclusion of a single latent behavioural ‘consumption’ factor significantly improved model fit in all cases. Also confirming theoretical predictions, estimated factor loadings on reward-oriented indicators were uniformly positive, regardless of assumptions regarding residual covariances. Additionally, the latent trait was found to be negatively correlated with the non-reward-oriented indicators of fruit and vegetable consumption. The findings support the notion of a single behavioural trait leading to increased consumption of reward-oriented stimuli across multiple modalities. We discuss implications regarding the concentration of negative lifestyle-related health behaviours. PMID:26551907

  6. Modeling carbon dioxide emissions reductions for three commercial reference buildings in Salt Lake City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucich, Stephen M.

    In the United States, the buildings sector is responsible for approximately 40% of the national carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. CO2 is created during the generation of heat and electricity, and has been linked to climate change, acid rain, a variety of health threats, surface water depletion, and the destruction of natural habitats. Building energy modeling is a powerful educational tool that building owners, architects, engineers, city planners, and policy makers can use to make informed decisions. The aim of this thesis is to simulate the reduction in CO2 emissions that may be achieved for three commercial buildings located in Salt Lake City, UT. The following two questions were used to guide this process: 1. How much can a building's annual CO2 emissions be reduced through a specific energy efficiency upgrade or policy? 2. How much can a building's annual CO2 emissions be reduced through the addition of a photovoltaic (PV) array? How large should the array be? Building energy simulations were performed with the Department of Energy's EnergyPlus software, commercial reference building models, and TMY3 weather data. The chosen models were a medium office building, a primary school, and a supermarket. Baseline energy consumption data were simulated for each model in order to identify changes that would have a meaningful impact. Modifications to the buildings construction and operation were considered before a PV array was incorporated. These modifications include (1) an improved building envelope, (2) reduced lighting intensity, and (3) modified HVAC temperature set points. The PV array sizing was optimized using a demand matching approach based on the method of least squares. The arrays tilt angle was optimized using the golden section search algorithm. Combined, energy efficiency upgrades and the PV array reduced building CO2 emissions by 58.6, 54.0, and 52.2% for the medium office, primary school, and supermarket, respectively. However, for these models, it was

  7. Modeling the effects of fire severity and climate warming on active layer and soil carbon dynamics of black spruce forests across the landscape in interior Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Genet, H.; McGuire, Anthony David; Barrett, K.; Breen, A.; Euskirchen, E.S.; Johnstone, J.F.; Kasischke, E.S.; Melvin, A.M.; Bennett, A.; Mack, M.C.; Rupp, T.S.; Schuur, A.E.G.; Turetsky, M.R.; Yuan, F.

    2013-01-01

    There is a substantial amount of carbon stored in the permafrost soils of boreal forest ecosystems, where it is currently protected from decomposition. The surface organic horizons insulate the deeper soil from variations in atmospheric temperature. The removal of these insulating horizons through consumption by fire increases the vulnerability of permafrost to thaw, and the carbon stored in permafrost to decomposition. In this study we ask how warming and fire regime may influence spatial and temporal changes in active layer and carbon dynamics across a boreal forest landscape in interior Alaska. To address this question, we (1) developed and tested a predictive model of the effect of fire severity on soil organic horizons that depends on landscape-level conditions and (2) used this model to evaluate the long-term consequences of warming and changes in fire regime on active layer and soil carbon dynamics of black spruce forests across interior Alaska. The predictive model of fire severity, designed from the analysis of field observations, reproduces the effect of local topography (landform category, the slope angle and aspect and flow accumulation), weather conditions (drought index, soil moisture) and fire characteristics (day of year and size of the fire) on the reduction of the organic layer caused by fire. The integration of the fire severity model into an ecosystem process-based model allowed us to document the relative importance and interactions among local topography, fire regime and climate warming on active layer and soil carbon dynamics. Lowlands were more resistant to severe fires and climate warming, showing smaller increases in active layer thickness and soil carbon loss compared to drier flat uplands and slopes. In simulations that included the effects of both warming and fire at the regional scale, fire was primarily responsible for a reduction in organic layer thickness of 0.06 m on average by 2100 that led to an increase in active layer thickness

  8. Modeling the effects of fire severity and climate warming on active layer thickness and soil carbon storage of black spruce forests across the landscape in interior Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genet, H.; McGuire, A. D.; Barrett, K.; Breen, A.; Euskirchen, E. S.; Johnstone, J. F.; Kasischke, E. S.; Melvin, A. M.; Bennett, A.; Mack, M. C.; Rupp, T. S.; Schuur, A. E. G.; Turetsky, M. R.; Yuan, F.

    2013-12-01

    There is a substantial amount of carbon stored in the permafrost soils of boreal forest ecosystems, where it is currently protected from decomposition. The surface organic horizons insulate the deeper soil from variations in atmospheric temperature. The removal of these insulating horizons through consumption by fire increases the vulnerability of permafrost to thaw, and the carbon stored in permafrost to decomposition. In this study we ask how warming and fire regime may influence spatial and temporal changes in active layer and carbon dynamics across a boreal forest landscape in interior Alaska. To address this question, we (1) developed and tested a predictive model of the effect of fire severity on soil organic horizons that depends on landscape-level conditions and (2) used this model to evaluate the long-term consequences of warming and changes in fire regime on active layer and soil carbon dynamics of black spruce forests across interior Alaska. The predictive model of fire severity, designed from the analysis of field observations, reproduces the effect of local topography (landform category, the slope angle and aspect and flow accumulation), weather conditions (drought index, soil moisture) and fire characteristics (day of year and size of the fire) on the reduction of the organic layer caused by fire. The integration of the fire severity model into an ecosystem process-based model allowed us to document the relative importance and interactions among local topography, fire regime and climate warming on active layer and soil carbon dynamics. Lowlands were more resistant to severe fires and climate warming, showing smaller increases in active layer thickness and soil carbon loss compared to drier flat uplands and slopes. In simulations that included the effects of both warming and fire at the regional scale, fire was primarily responsible for a reduction in organic layer thickness of 0.06 m on average by 2100 that led to an increase in active layer thickness

  9. Modeling the effects of fire severity and climate warming on active layer thickness and soil carbon storage of black spruce forests across the landscape in interior Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Genet, Helene; McGuire, A. David; Barrett, K.; Breen, Amy; Euskirchen, Eugenie S; Johnstone, J. F.; Kasischke, Eric S.; Melvin, A. M.; Bennett, A.; Mack, M. C.; Rupp, Scott T.; Schuur, Edward; Turetsky, M. R.; Yuan, Fengming

    2013-01-01

    There is a substantial amount of carbon stored in the permafrost soils of boreal forest ecosystems, where it is currently protected from decomposition. The surface organic horizons insulate the deeper soil from variations in atmospheric temperature. The removal of these insulating horizons through consumption by fire increases the vulnerability of permafrost to thaw, and the carbon stored in permafrost to decomposition. In this study we ask how warming and fire regime may influence spatial and temporal changes in active layer and carbon dynamics across a boreal forest landscape in interior Alaska. To address this question, we (1) developed and tested a predictive model of the effect of fire severity on soil organic horizons that depends on landscape-level conditions and (2) used this model to evaluate the long-term consequences of warming and changes in fire regime on active layer and soil carbon dynamics of black spruce forests across interior Alaska. The predictive model of fire severity, designed from the analysis of field observations, reproduces the effect of local topography (landform category, the slope angle and aspect and flow accumulation), weather conditions (drought index, soil moisture) and fire characteristics (day of year and size of the fire) on the reduction of the organic layercaused by fire. The integration of the fire severity model into an ecosystem process-based model allowed us to document the relative importance and interactions among local topography, fire regime and climate warming on active layer and soil carbon dynamics. Lowlands were more resistant to severe fires and climate warming, showing smaller increases in active layer thickness and soil carbon loss compared to drier flat uplands and slopes. In simulations that included the effects of both warming and fire at the regional scale, fire was primarily responsible for a reduction in organic layer thickness of 0.06 m on average by 2100 that led to an increase in active layer thickness

  10. Sensitivity Analysis for Model Simulations of the Effects of Irrigation Water Management on Crop Yields and Groundwater Salt Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaggs, T. H.; Suarez, D. L.; Corwin, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    One strategy for sustaining irrigated agricultural productivity in the face of diminishing water and land availability is to make greater use of marginal quality water for crop production. In implementing such a strategy, a key factor for maintaining productivity will be soil salinity. Irrigation waters, especially recycled or otherwise marginal quality waters, contain salts that can accumulate in soils over time and reduce yields. In arid regions where rainfall is not sufficient to flush the salts from the root zone, it is necessary to apply excess irrigation water to leach the soil. To avoid wasting water, and to lessen impacts on groundwater quality, it is desirable that soil leaching be minimized to the extent possible. Classical guidelines for managing salinity are intended to be general, providing a conservative estimate of the leaching requirement that is appropriate across a range of soils and waters. A consequence of this generality is that in some cases the guidelines recommend more leaching (and hence more salt and nutrient loading to groundwater) than is necessary. A simulation modeling approach offers potential advantages over classical methods for site-specific management, but the technique is considerably more complex, and difficulties exist with respect to developing procedures for routine use. The models typically have a large number of parameters and the simulations can have a high degree of uncertainty. Global sensitivity analyses can reveal which parameter variations or uncertainties have the greatest impact on variations or uncertainties in model predictions. In this work we evaluate UNSATCHEM model parameter sensitivities in simulating a seasonal irrigated cropping scenario. Parameters sensitivities are determined with respect to three performance measures: crop yield, root zone average soil salinity, and salt loading to groundwater.

  11. Internal boundary layer devleopment over a salt pan: Measured and modelled dust emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J.; Wiggs, G.; Haustein, K.; Eckardt, F. D.; Thomas, D. S. G.; Washington, R.

    2014-12-01

    A key component of a dust emission scheme is the threshold for sediment transport, which is a function of soil size distribution, soil moisture, air and soil particle density, and surface roughness. For a particular region or landform that is not vegetated the variable that controls the transport threshold the most is soil moisture. This is because it is assumed that the other components vary little (air and soil particle densities) or are kept constant (soil size distribution and surface roughness). This puts the emphasis very heavily on soil moisture and wind stress as the key drivers of dust emission for specific landforms and dust emission schemes. Dust emission measurements were undertaken in 2011 on Sua Pan in Botswana, a large, flat, unvegetated salt pan, as part of the Dust Observation for Models (DO4 Models) campaign. The observations consisted of 11 climate stations placed within a 144 km2. Out of the measured and calculated erodibility parameters responsible for predicting transport threshold within current schemes, surface soil moisture and aerodynamic roughness length varied the most over the duration of the project and spatially across the pan. In 2011, the pan was drying from extensive flooding and rainfall in the previous wet season. Within the dry winter season months of June through September the dominantly eastern winds dried the pan developing a directional increase in aerodynamic roughness length over time. This cumulated in a region of maximum roughness length with the highest potential for dust emissions. In some cases, the aerodynamic roughness length of the bare soil increased by three orders of magnitude within the three month period. This increase in roughness almost doubles the modelled threshold shear velocity required for this surface to be emissive. The temporal and spatial variability of the calculated transport threshold is explored with observed data and compared with the modelled transport threshold for this region for the

  12. Interior provinces in Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschner, C.E.; Fisher, M.A.; Bruns, T.R.; Stanley, R.G.

    1985-04-01

    Three types of interior provinces have been tested by exploratory drilling for their petroleum potential: three Tertiary nonmarine basins, two Jurassic and Cretaceous flysch and fold belts, and a Paleozoic thrust belt. Although the presence of hydrocarbons has not yet been demonstrated, the present data base is too limited to make a definitive assessment of hydrocarbon potential. During the 1983-84 field seasons, the authors acquired new gravity data and collected rock samples in and adjacent to the Yukon flats and the Nenana basins. These basins contain upper Tertiary, primarily nonmarine, sedimentary rock in extensional graben and half-graben complexes that are superimposed across preexisting terrane boundaries. The location and development of the basins result from strike-slip motion along the Tintina and Denali fault systems. Adjacent to the basins and within the fault systems are thick sections of nonmarine lower Tertiary coal-bearing rocks in deformed basin remnants. If these lower Tertiary rocks are present beneath the upper Tertiary fill, their greater depth and advanced maturation could enhance the hydrocarbon generative potential. Gravity modelling suggests the Tertiary fill is at least 3 km thick in the deeper parts of the basins and may be significantly thicker.

  13. 76. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, WING 1200 WEST, INTERIOR DEPARTMENT MUSEUM, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    76. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, WING 1200 WEST, INTERIOR DEPARTMENT MUSEUM, LOBBY, BRONZE GRILL (4' x 5' negative; 8' x 10' print) - U.S. Department of the Interior, Eighteenth & C Streets Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  14. FXR-dependent reduction of hepatic steatosis in a bile salt deficient mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kunne, Cindy; Acco, Alexandra; Duijst, Suzanne; de Waart, Dirk R; Paulusma, Coen C; Gaemers, Ingrid; Oude Elferink, Ronald P J

    2014-05-01

    It has been established that bile salts play a role in the regulation of hepatic lipid metabolism. Accordingly, overt signs of steatosis have been observed in mice with reduced bile salt synthesis. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism of hepatic steatosis in mice with bile salt deficiency due to a liver specific disruption of cytochrome P450 reductase. In this study mice lacking hepatic cytochrome P450 reductase (Hrn) or wild type (WT) mice were fed a diet supplemented with or without either 0.1% cholic acid (CA) or 0.025% obeticholic acid, a specific FXR-agonist. Feeding a CA-supplemented diet resulted in a significant decrease of plasma ALT in Hrn mice. Histologically, hepatic steatosis ameliorated after CA feeding and this was confirmed by reduced hepatic triglyceride content (115.5±7.3mg/g liver and 47.9±4.6mg/g liver in control- and CA-fed Hrn mice, respectively). The target genes of FXR-signaling were restored to normal levels in Hrn mice when fed cholic acid. VLDL secretion in both control and CA-fed Hrn mice was reduced by 25% compared to that in WT mice. In order to gain insight in the mechanism behind these bile salt effects, the FXR agonist also was administered for 3weeks. This resulted in a similar decrease in liver triglycerides, indicating that the effect seen in bile salt fed Hrn animals is FXR dependent. In conclusion, steatosis in Hrn mice is ameliorated when mice are fed bile salts. This effect is FXR dependent. Triglyceride accumulation in Hrn liver may partly involve impaired VLDL secretion. PMID:24548803

  15. Ocean Turbulence. Paper 2; One-Point Closure Model Momentum, Heat and Salt Vertical Diffusivities in the Presence of Shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Howard, A.; Cheng, Y.; Dubovikov, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    We develop and test a 1-point closure turbulence model with the following features: 1) we include the salinity field and derive the expression for the vertical turbulent diffusivities of momentum K(sub m) , heat K(sub h) and salt K(sub s) as a function of two stability parameters: the Richardson number R(sub i) (stratification vs. shear) and the Turner number R(sub rho) (salinity gradient vs. temperature gradient). 2) to describe turbulent mixing below the mixed layer (ML), all previous models have adopted three adjustable "background diffusivities" for momentum, heat and salt. We propose a model that avoids such adjustable diffusivities. We assume that below the ML, the three diffusivities have the same functional dependence on R( sub i) and R(sub rho) as derived from the turbulence model. However, in order to compute R(sub i) below the ML, we use data of vertical shear due to wave-breaking.measured by Gargett et al. The procedure frees the model from adjustable background diffusivities and indeed we employ the same model throughout the entire vertical extent of the ocean. 3) in the local model, the turbulent diffusivities K(sub m,h,s) are given as analytical functions of R(sub i) and R(sub rho). 5) the model is used in an O-GCM and several results are presented to exhibit the effect of double diffusion processes. 6) the code is available upon request.

  16. A New Elasto-Viscoplastic Damage Model Combined with the Generalized Hoek-Brown Failure Criterion for Bedded Rock Salt and its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lin-jian; Liu, Xin-yu; Fang, Qin; Xu, Hong-fa; Xia, Hui-min; Li, Er-bing; Yang, Shi-gang; Li, Wen-pei

    2013-01-01

    According to the requirement of the West-East Gas Transmission Project in China, the solution-mined cavities located in the Jintan bedded salt formation of Jiangsu province will be utilized for natural gas storage. This task is more challenging than conventional salt dome cavern construction and operation due to the heterogeneous bedding layers of the bedded salt formation. A three-dimensional creep damage constitutive model combined with the generalized Hoek-Brown model is exclusively formulated and validated with a series of strength and creep tests for the bedded rock salt. The viscoplastic model, which takes the coupled creep damage and the failure behavior under various stress states into account, enables both the three creep phases and the deformation induced by vicious damage and plastic flow to be calculated. A further geomechanical analysis of the rapid gas withdrawal for the thin-bedded salt cavern was performed by implementing the proposed model in the finite difference software FLAC3D. The volume convergence, the damage and failure propagation of the cavern, as well as the strain rate of the salt around the cavern, were evaluated and discussed in detail. Finally, based on the simulation study, a 7-MPa minimum internal pressure is suggested to ensure the structural stability of the Jintan bedded salt cavern. The results obtained from these investigations provide the necessary input for the design and construction of the cavern project.

  17. The antiallergic mechanisms of Citrus sunki and bamboo salt (K-ALL) in an allergic rhinitis model.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyun-A; Kim, Myong-Jo; Shin, Tae-Yong; Kim, Hyung-Min; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2014-01-01

    The antiallergic effects of traditional medicines have long been studied. Traditional Korean medicine, Citrus sunki and bamboo salt, has been used for the treatment of allergic diseases in Korea. K-ALL, composed of Citrus sunki and bamboo salt, is a newly prepared prescription for allergic patients. To develop the new antiallergic agent, we examined the effects of K-ALL through in vivo and in vitro models. K-ALL and naringin (an active compound of K-ALL) significantly inhibited histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells. This inhibitory effect of K-ALL on histamine release was higher than effects from other known histamine inhibitors such as bamboo salt, Citrus sunki or disodium cromoglycate. K-ALL significantly inhibited systemic anaphylactic shock induced by the compound 48/80 and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis induced by the IgE. K-ALL also inhibited production and mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and the calcium ionophore A23187 on HMC-1 cells (a human mast cell line). In the ovalbumin-induced allergic rhinitis animal model, rub scores, histamine, IgE, inflammatory cytokines and inflammatory cell counts were all reduced by the oral or nasal administration of K-ALL (pre and posttreatment). These results indicate the great potential of K-ALL as an active immune modulator for the treatment of mast cell-mediated allergic diseases. PMID:24131540

  18. Multiple Site Evaluation of a Dynamic Organic Soil Model for Analyzing Carbon Responses of Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change and Fire Disturbance in Interior Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, F.; Yi, S.; McGuire, D.; Johnson, K. D.; Liang, J.; Kasischke, E.; Harden, J. W.

    2009-12-01

    Regional scale analysis of ecosystem carbon (C) dynamics requires extensive evaluation of ecosystem models to reliably predict C responses to climate change and disturbance. This study presents a multiple site evaluation of the dynamic organic soil version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (DOS-TEM) for the linkages among plant growth and organic soil C dynamics in taiga of four terrestrial vegetation types (black spruce, white spruce, broad-leaved deciduous forest, and upland tundra) in the Interior Alaska. We assembled vegetation biomass and soil C data from the literature and from forest inventory and soil surveys in the study region. Vegetation types in both well-drained and poorly-drained landscape positions were considered separately because of their contrasting growth and soil C storage characteristics. These data were first used to calibrate the model, and then the model dynamics were evaluated using available forest inventory and soil survey data (e.g. organic horizon data) to assess the ability of the model to capture the effects of climate variability and fire disturbance on C dynamics across the region. Our model development and integrative evaluation of simulated C dynamics provides a sound foundation for the application of DOS-TEM to analyze the response of C in the region to projected changes in climate and fire disturbance.

  19. Modeling the influence of river discharge on salt intrusion and residual circulation in Danshuei River estuary, Taiwan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, W.-C.; Chen, W.-B.; Cheng, R.T.; Hsu, M.-H.; Kuo, A.Y.

    2007-01-01

    A 3-D, time-dependent, baroclinic, hydrodynamic and salinity model was implemented and applied to the Danshuei River estuarine system and the adjacent coastal sea in Taiwan. The model forcing functions consist of tidal elevations along the open boundaries and freshwater inflows from the main stream and major tributaries in the Danshuei River estuarine system. The bottom friction coefficient was adjusted to achieve model calibration and verification in model simulations of barotropic and baroclinic flows. The turbulent diffusivities were ascertained through comparison of simulated salinity time series with observations. The model simulation results are in qualitative agreement with the available field data. The validated model was then used to investigate the influence of freshwater discharge on residual current and salinity intrusion under different freshwater inflow condition in the Danshuei River estuarine system. The model results reveal that the characteristic two-layered estuarine circulation prevails most of the time at Kuan-Du station near the river mouth. Comparing the estuarine circulation under low- and mean flow conditions, the circulation strengthens during low-flow period and its strength decreases at moderate river discharge. The river discharge is a dominating factor affecting the salinity intrusion in the estuarine system. A correlation between the distance of salt intrusion and freshwater discharge has been established allowing prediction of salt intrusion for different inflow conditions. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A fully predictive model for salt intrusion in estuaries applied to the Yangtze estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Huayang; Savenije, Hubert H. G.; Zuo, Shuhua; Jiang, Chenjuan; Chua, Vivien P.

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the way the salinity distribution in an estuary reacts to external drivers (e.g., tide, fresh water discharge, dredging etc.) is important for both water quality and water resources management in estuaries. The salinity distribution depends strongly on the geometry of an estuary, but also on the fresh water discharge that counteracts the salt intrusion. In estuaries it is notoriously hard to estimate this discharge and subsequently to predict the parameters that determine the mixing behaviour depending on it. Recently a method has been developed to predict the fresh water discharge on the basis of water level observations. In addition predictive equations for tidal mixing have been updated and revised. In this paper, these two predictive methods are combined and subsequently applied to the Yangtze estuary under a wide variation of fresh water discharge. The predicted salt distribution appears to be in good agreement with observations. To provide insight into the optimum use of water resources (e.g., to determine the amount of fresh water discharge required to maintain a specific salt intrusion length), we further studied the salt intrusion pattern under different fresh water discharge conditions.

  1. A predictive model for salt intrusion in estuaries applied to the Yangtze estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Huayang; Savenije, Hubert H. G.; Zuo, Shuhua; Jiang, Chenjuan; Chua, Vivien P.

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the way salinity distribution in an estuary reacts to external drivers (e.g., tide, fresh water discharge, dredging, etc.) is important for both water quality and water resources management in estuaries. The salinity distribution depends strongly on the geometry of an estuary, but also on the fresh water discharge that counteracts the salt intrusion. In estuaries it is notoriously hard to estimate this discharge and subsequently to predict the parameters that determine the mixing behaviour depending on it. Recently a method has been developed to predict the fresh water discharge on the basis of water level observations. In addition, predictive equations for tidal mixing have been updated and revised. In this paper, these two predictive methods are combined and subsequently applied to the Yangtze estuary under a wide variation of fresh water discharge. The predicted salt distribution appears to be in good agreement with observations. To provide insight into the optimum use of water resources (e.g., to determine the amount of fresh water discharge required to maintain a specific salt intrusion length), we further study the salt intrusion pattern under different tide and fresh water discharge conditions.

  2. A dynamic nitrogen budget model of a Pacific Northwest salt marsh

    EPA Science Inventory

    The role of salt marshes as either nitrogen sinks or sources in relation to their adjacent estuaries has been a focus of ecosystem service research for many decades. The complex hydrology of these systems is driven by tides, upland surface runoff, precipitation, evapotranspirati...

  3. Analytical prediction of the interior noise for cylindrical models of aircraft fuselages for prescribed exterior noise fields. Phase 2: Models for sidewall trim, stiffened structures and cabin acoustics with floor partition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, L. D.; Wilby, E. G.

    1982-01-01

    An airplane interior noise prediction model is developed to determine the important parameters associated with sound transmission into the interiors of airplanes, and to identify apropriate noise control methods. Models for stiffened structures, and cabin acoustics with floor partition are developed. Validation studies are undertaken using three test articles: a ring stringer stiffened cylinder, an unstiffened cylinder with floor partition, and ring stringer stiffened cylinder with floor partition and sidewall trim. The noise reductions of the three test articles are computed using the heoretical models and compared to measured values. A statistical analysis of the comparison data indicates that there is no bias in the predictions although a substantial random error exists so that a discrepancy of more than five or six dB can be expected for about one out of three predictions.

  4. Modeling the thermal inactivation kinetics of heat-resistant Salmonella Enteritidis and Oranienburg in 10 percent salted liquid egg yolk.

    PubMed

    Gurtler, Joshua B; Marks, Harry M; Jones, Deana R; Bailey, Rebecca R; Bauer, Nathan E

    2011-06-01

    There is no suitable model for predicting thermal inactivation kinetics of Salmonella spp. for many types of liquid egg products, including salted liquid egg yolk, for use in updating U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) pasteurization guidelines. This is because, in part, of the variations in Salmonella strains and the changes in the processing of liquid egg products over the past 40 years. The objectives of the present study were to determine the thermal inactivation kinetics and to create a general thermal inactivation kinetics model that can be used for estimating log reductions of salmonellae in 10% salted liquid egg yolk for temperatures between 62.2 and 69°C. This model can be used by processors to help ensure adequate pasteurization. This was accomplished by studying the inactivation kinetics of a three-strain composite of heat-resistant Salmonella serovars Enteritidis and Oranienburg, inoculated into commercially processed 10% salted liquid egg yolk. The survival curves were convex, with asymptotic D-values. From these curves, a general model was developed to predict log reductions for given times at specified temperatures. For example, at a temperature of 67.3°C (153.1°F) for 3.5 min, our model predicts a 5-log reduction would be obtained, whereas with the current USDA minimum required pasteurization regimen (63.33°C [146°F] for 3.5 min), our model predicts that a reduction of only 2.7 log would be obtained. The results of this study provide information that can be used by processors to aid in producing safe, pasteurized egg yolk products, and for satisfying USDA pasteurization performance standards and developing industry guidance. PMID:21669063

  5. Fry spacing of deformed and undeformed modeled and natural salt domes

    SciTech Connect

    Roennlund, P.; Koyi, H.

    1988-05-01

    Fry's center-point spacing strain analysis is applied to experiments of gravity-driven overturn of horizontal fluid layers on scales of centimeters or decimeters, and to natural salt diapirs on scales of kilometers to tens of kilometers. Laboratory experiments in which about 100 diapirs formed from initially plane horizontal layers resulted in laterally isotropic spacing and yielded an open circle on a Fry plot with a radius equal to the wavelength (W). Lateral deformation and initial departures from horizontal layers with uniform properties may influence W. Sample experiments of diapirism with and without lateral deformation are compared to natural equivalents. The spacing of post-Late Triassic diapirs in the Zechstein salt of Germany and of post-Jurassic diapirs in the Hormuz salt of Arabia yields circles on Fry plots which indicate that these gravity structures developed without additional lateral forces. Fry plots of the spacing of salt diapirs in the Zagros Mountains define a strain ellipse with the long axis (=W in Arabia) parallel and the short axis perpendicular to post-Miocene regional fold axes. The ratio of the Zagros strain ellipse is about 1.7, which suggests a northeast-southwest shortening of 41%, rather than 10%-21% as estimated from folding alone. This mismatch may be a result of unquantified shortening due to thrusts and/or layer-parallel shortening. Center-point spacing of post-Late Triassic domes of Zechstein salt in the central North Sea also gives an ellipse. Here, the long axis coincides with the direction of Middle Jurassic to Cretaceous extension. The axial ratio of the North Sea strain ellipse is about 2.8, compared to estimates of about 1.5-2.0 by Sclater and Christie, and 1.8 by Wood and Barton.

  6. 4D RECONSTRUCTIONS FROM LOW-COUNT SPECT DATA USING DEFORMABLE MODELS WITH SMOOTH INTERIOR INTENSITY VARIATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. CUNNINGHAM; A. LEHOVICH

    2000-01-01

    The Bayes Inference Engine (BIE) has been used to perform a 4D reconstruction of a first-pass radiotracer bolus distribution inside a CardioWest Total Artificial Heart, imaged with the University of Arizona's FastSPECT system. The BIE estimates parameter values that define the 3D model of the radiotracer distribution at each of 41 times spanning about two seconds. The 3D models have two components: a closed surface, composed of hi-quadratic Bezier triangular surface patches, that defines the interface between the part of the blood pool that contains radiotracer and the part that contains no radiotracer, and smooth voxel-to-voxel variations in intensity within the closed surface. Ideally, the surface estimates the ventricular wall location where the bolus is infused throughout the part of the blood pool contained by the right ventricle. The voxel-to-voxel variations are needed to model an inhomogeneously-mixed bolus. Maximum a posterior (MAP) estimates of the Bezier control points and voxel values are obtained for each time frame. We show new reconstructions using the Bezier surface models, and discuss estimates of ventricular volume as a function of time, ejection fraction, and wall motion. The computation time for our reconstruction process, which directly estimates complex 3D model parameters from the raw data, is performed in a time that is competitive with more traditional voxel-based methods (ML-EM, e.g.).

  7. A new structural model of the Pachitea Basin, Peru: Interaction of thick-skinned tectonics and salt detached thrusting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, J.; Rebaza, J.; Westlund, D.; Stratton, M.; Alegria, C.

    2015-11-01

    We present four new structural transects, a new seismo-stratigraphic correlation, a refined structural model and new shortening rates for the Pachitea Basin (=PB), Peru. Our results are based on the integration and detailed interpretation of newly acquired industry seismic (2D, 2005 vintage), existing well data, existing and proprietary surface geology data and newly acquired aero magnetic data (2007 vintage). Our assessment confirms the presence of at least four distinct structural styles in the area, thick-skinned structures, thin-skinned detachment thrusting, salt-tectonics and localized strike-slip tectonics. Based on seismo-stratigraphic correlations we conclude that the oldest rocks carried to outcrop by the San Matias (=SM) thrust are of Jurassic age. We interpret the thin-skinned master detachment to be located in varying positions, directly below or above, autochtonous salt pillows. Timing assessment of the SM thrust sheet reveals that it has been active from at least ˜5 Ma to post-2 Ma, supporting regionally published timing data for this latitude. Positive topographic surface expressions indicate ongoing contraction along the mountain front of the Peruvian Eastern Cordillera (=EC). Across the PB we calculate between 2.6% and 5.5% for thick-skinned shortening and at least 25.5% for the thin-skinned shortening. For the SM thrust sheet we calculate a slip-rate of ˜1-1.6 mm/yr, which is in line with published slip rates on individual thrusts from around the world. Observations along the SM thrust system indicate that thin- and thick-skinned systems interact mechanically, and that they have been active intermittently. We conclude that the location of salt pillows as well as pre-existing or growing basement-involved structures helped trigger the SM thrust. Different types of salt bodies are present in the PB, autochtonous pillows, slightly thrusted pillows and allochtonous diapirs. Our results provide new insight into the structural interplay, particularly

  8. Analytical prediction of the interior noise for cylindrical models of aircraft fuselages for prescribed exterior noise fields. Phase 1: Development and validation of preliminary analytical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, L. D.; Rennison, D. C.; Wilby, E. G.

    1980-01-01

    The basic theoretical work required to understand sound transmission into an enclosed space (that is, one closed by the transmitting structure) is developed for random pressure fields and for harmonic (tonal) excitation. The analysis is used to predict the noise reducton of unpressurized unstiffened cylinder, and also the interior response of the cylinder given a tonal (plane wave) excitation. Predictions and measurements are compared and the transmission is analyzed. In addition, results for tonal (harmonic) mechanical excitation are considered.

  9. Modeling CH4 and CO2 cycling using porewater stable isotopes in a thermokarst bog, interior Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, R. B.; Blazewicz, S.; Waldrop, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Methane emitted from wetlands represents the end product of various microbial processes operating within anaerobic wetland soils. Determining the rate at which these microbial reactions occur is challenging, making it difficult to gain a mechanistic understanding of the factors and conditions that influence microbial rates and ultimately methane emissions. One approach for estimating in-situ reaction rates involves tracking the time evolution of porewater concentrations and stable carbon isotopes of CH4 and CO2. Microbes preferentially use isotopically light carbon substrates, which causes the carbon product pool to become isotopically lighter and the carbon substrate pool become isotopically heavier. Different microbial biochemical pathways fractionate carbon to different extents, allowing for differentiation between microbial reactions. This is a powerful approach to estimate in-situ rates, but, as we show in our presentation, it is possible for different combinations of reaction rates to provide equally good fits to the evolution of these data. The solution is non-unique and depends on the set of considered reactions. We used two different reaction network models on a set of porewater data collected from a thermokarst bog at the Alaska Peatland Experiment (APEX) outside of Fairbanks, AK to estimate in-situ microbial reaction rates during the summer season. Both models included methane production, methane oxidation and fermentation/respiration, but only one model included homoacetogenesis. We found that both reaction networks explained the evolution of dissolved gas concentrations and stable carbon isotope data, but predicted rates that differed from each other by up to a factor of six. The methane production rates estimated by the model that included homoacetogenesis aligned better with measured rates of methane emission. Despite differences in the magnitude of modeled rates, results from the two models told a similar story about the spatial and temporal

  10. Modeling of Flow, Transport and Controlled Sedimentation Phenomena during Mixing of Salt Solutions in Complex Porous Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skouras, Eugene D.; Jaho, Sofia; Pavlakou, Efstathia I.; Sygouni, Varvara; Petsi, Anastasia; Paraskeva, Christakis A.

    2015-04-01

    The deposition of salts in porous media is a major engineering phenomenon encountered in a plethora of industrial and environmental applications where in some cases is desirable and in other not (oil production, geothermal systems, soil stabilization etc). Systematic approach of these problems requires knowledge of the key mechanisms of precipitating salts within the porous structures, in order to develop new methods to control the process. In this work, the development and the solution of spatiotemporally variable mass balances during salt solution mixing along specific pores were performed. Both analytical models and finite differences CFD models were applied for the study of flow and transport with simultaneous homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation (by crystal growth on the surface of the pores) in simple geometries, while unstructured finite elements and meshless methods were developed and implemented for spatial discretization, reconstruction, and solution of transport equations and homogeneous / heterogeneous reactions in more complex geometries. At initial stages of this work, critical problem parameters were identified, such as the characteristics of the porosity, the number of dissolved components, etc. The parameters were then used for solving problems which correspond to available experimental data. For each combination of ions and materials, specific data and process characteristics were included: (a) crystal kinetics (nucleation, growth rates or reaction surface rates of crystals, critical suspension concentrations), (b) physico-chemical properties (bulk density, dimensions of generated crystals, ion diffusion coefficients in the solution), (c) operating parameters (macroscopic velocity, flow, or pressure gradient of the solution, ion concentration) (d) microfluidic data (geometry, flow area), (e) porosity data in Darcy description (initial porosity, specific surface area, tortuosity). During the modeling of flow and transport in three

  11. Meaning of Interior Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ge; Yu, Hengyong

    2013-01-01

    The classic imaging geometry for computed tomography is for collection of un-truncated projections and reconstruction of a global image, with the Fourier transform as the theoretical foundation that is intrinsically non-local. Recently, interior tomography research has led to theoretically exact relationships between localities in the projection and image spaces and practically promising reconstruction algorithms. Initially, interior tomography was developed for x-ray computed tomography. Then, it has been elevated as a general imaging principle. Finally, a novel framework known as “omni-tomography” is being developed for grand fusion of multiple imaging modalities, allowing tomographic synchrony of diversified features. PMID:23912256

  12. Estimation of Fresh Water and Salt Transports in the Northern Indian Ocean Using Aquarius and Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Addezio, J. M.; Bulusu, S.; Murty, V. S. N.; Nyadjro, E. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Northern Indian Ocean presents a unique dipolar Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) structure with the salty Arabian Sea (AS) on the west and the fresher Bay of Bengal (BoB) on the east. By using a combination of observational data, reanalyses, and model studies, the salinity structure of this dichotomous yet interconnected region is quantified. At the surface, the largest driver of salinity interseasonal variability is caused by the monsoonal winds and their ability to transport volume between the two water masses. Time-depth profiles reveal a rich vertical salinity profile. The AS presents with a mild salinity inversion, with salty waters above fresher ones for the majority of each annual cycle. This vertical gradient is approximately 1 psu between the surface and 200m depth. In the BoB the opposite occurs, where larger volumes of precipitation and river runoff create a lens of freshwater from the surface to approximately 50m depth year around. Salt and freshwater fluxes at the surface show a strong zonal component between the two basins along Sri Lanka twice a year. Within the basins, meridional fluxes dominate especially along the coastal regions where the EICC and WICC flow. Meridional depth-integrated salt, freshwater, and volume transports along a slice of each basin at 6°N reveal the approximate time its takes for each basin to return to equilibrium after strong transports during each monsoonal seasons advect salt and/or freshwater into or out of each respective region.

  13. Integrated Salt Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urai, Janos L.; Kukla, Peter A.

    2015-04-01

    The growing importance of salt in the energy, subsurface storage, and chemical and food industries also increases the challenges with prediction of geometries, kinematics, stress and transport in salt. This requires an approach, which integrates a broader range of knowledge than is traditionally available in the different scientific and engineering disciplines. We aim to provide a starting point for a more integrated understanding of salt, by presenting an overview of the state of the art in a wide range of salt-related topics, from (i) the formation and metamorphism of evaporites, (ii) rheology and transport properties, (iii) salt tectonics and basin evolution, (iv) internal structure of evaporites, (v) fluid flow through salt, to (vi) salt engineering. With selected case studies we show how integration of these domains of knowledge can bring better predictions of (i) sediment architecture and reservoir distribution, (ii) internal structure of salt for optimized drilling and better cavern design, (iii) reliable long-term predictions of deformations and fluid flow in subsurface storage. A fully integrated workflow is based on geomechanical models, which include all laboratory and natural observations and links macro- and micro-scale studies. We present emerging concepts for (i) the initiation dynamics of halokinesis, (ii) the rheology and deformation of the evaporites by brittle and ductile processes, (iii) the coupling of processes in evaporites and the under- and overburden, and (iv) the impact of the layered evaporite rheology on the structural evolution.

  14. Great Salt Lake halophilic microorganisms as models for astrobiology: evidence for desiccation tolerance and ultraviolet irradiation resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Bonnie K.; Eddington, Breanne; Riddle, Misty R.; Webster, Tabitha N.; Avery, Brian J.

    2007-09-01

    Great Salt Lake (GSL) is home to halophiles, salt-tolerant Bacteria and Archaea, which live at 2-5M NaCl. In addition to salt tolerance, GSL halophiles exhibit resistance to both ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and desiccation. First, to understand desiccation resistance, we sought to determine the diversity of GSL halophiles capable of surviving desiccation in either recently formed GSL halite crystals or GSL Artemia (brine shrimp) cysts. From these desiccated environments, surviving microorganisms were cultured and isolated, and genomic DNA was extracted from the individual species for identification by 16S rRNA gene homology. From the surface-sterilized cysts we also extracted DNA of the whole microbial population for non-cultivation techniques. We amplified the archaeal or bacterial 16S rRNA gene from all genomic DNA, cloned the cyst population amplicons, and sequenced. These sequences were compared to gene databases for determination of closest matched species. Interestingly, the isolates from the crystal dissolution are distinct from those previously isolated from GSL brine. The cyst population results reveal species not found in crystals or brine, and may indicate microorganisms that live as endosymbionts of this hypersaline arthropod. Second, we explored UV resistance in a GSL haloarchaea species, "H. salsolis." This strain resists UV irradiation an order of magnitude better than control species, all of which have intact repair systems. To test the hypothesis that halophiles have a photoprotection system, which prevents DNA damage from occurring, we designed an immunoassay to detect thymine dimers following UV irradiation. "H. salsolis" showed remarkable resistance to dimer formation. Evidence for both UV and desiccation resistance in these salt-tolerant GSL halophiles makes them well-suited as models for Astrobiological studies in pursuit of questions about life beyond earth.

  15. Planetary Interior in the Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Chau, R; Bastea, M; Mitchell, A C; Minich, R W; Nellis, W J

    2003-01-31

    In the three years of this project, we have provided a complete database of the electrical conductivity of planetary materials to 180 GPa. The electrical conductivities of these planetary materials now provide a basis for future modeling of planets taking into account full magnetohydrodynamics. By using a full magnetohydrodynamics simulation, the magnetic fields of the planets can then be taken into account. Moreover, the electrical conductivities of the planetary materials have given us insight into the structure and nature of these dense fluids. We showed that simple monoatomic fluids such as hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen at planetary interior conditions undergo a common metallization process which can be explained on a simple basis of their radial charge density distributions. This model also shows that the metallization process is actually rather common and likely to take place in a number of materials such as carbon monoxide which is also present within planetary objects. On the other hand, we have also showed that a simple two component fluid like water and methane take on much different behaviors than say nitrogen due to the chemical interactions within these systems. The dynamics of an even more complex system, ''synthetic Uranus'' are still being analyzed but suggest that on some levels the behavior is very simple, i.e. the electrical conductivity is essentially the same as water, but the local dynamics are very complex. This project has shed much light on the nature of electrical transport within planetary interiors but also has shown that understanding chemical processes in the complex fluids within planetary interiors to be very important. Understanding those local interactions and processes is required to gain further insight into planetary interiors.

  16. Sensitivity of modeled atmospheric nitrogen species and nitrogen deposition to variations in sea salt emissions in the North Sea and Baltic Sea regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Daniel; Matthias, Volker; Bieser, Johannes; Aulinger, Armin; Quante, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Coarse sea salt particles are emitted ubiquitously from the ocean surface by wave-breaking and bubble-bursting processes. These particles impact the atmospheric chemistry by affecting the condensation of gas-phase species and, thus, indirectly the nucleation of new fine particles, particularly in regions with significant air pollution. In this study, atmospheric particle concentrations are modeled for the North Sea and Baltic Sea regions in northwestern Europe using the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system and are compared to European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) measurement data. The sea salt emission module is extended by a salinity-dependent scaling of the sea salt emissions because the salinity in large parts of the Baltic Sea is very low, which leads to considerably lower sea salt mass emissions compared to other oceanic regions. The resulting improvement in predicted sea salt concentrations is assessed. The contribution of surf zone emissions is considered separately. Additionally, the impacts of sea salt particles on atmospheric nitrate and ammonium concentrations and on nitrogen deposition are evaluated. The comparisons with observational data show that sea salt concentrations are commonly overestimated at coastal stations and partly underestimated farther inland. The introduced salinity scaling improves the predicted Baltic Sea sea salt concentrations considerably. The dates of measured peak concentrations are appropriately reproduced by the model. The impact of surf zone emissions is negligible in both seas. Nevertheless, they might be relevant because surf zone emissions were cut at an upper threshold in this study. Deactivating sea salt leads to minor increases in NH3 + NH4+ and HNO3 + NO3- and a decrease in NO3- concentrations. However, the overall effect on NH3 + NH4+ and HNO3 + NO3- concentrations is smaller than the deviation from the measurements. Nitrogen wet deposition is underestimated by the model at most

  17. Multi-scale modelling for the assessment of water quality and land subsidence due to salt layers dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourdier, Sébastien; Bazargan-Sabet, Behrooz; Quang Vong, Chan

    2016-04-01

    Long term evolution of salt mine depends on mechanical behavior of the material but also on specific conditions like the intrusion of water into working areas. Such phenomenon has been observed in the Nancy Basin (East of France) where brine percolates through access shafts accompanied by significant subsidence at the surface level, bringing about growing societal concerns. In order to understand the mechanisms and kinetics of dissolution of salt inducing the phenom-enon of subsidence, a numerical model is implemented. The circulation of water between the salt layer and the impervious layer induces the creation of dissolution channels. In active disso-lution zones, the channel network constantly evolves: new channels appear with new dissolution zones while others collapse because of their too important dimensions. The model simulates the phenomenon of dissolution at the channel scale first, then at the basin scale. Dissolution channels modeling has been realized using COMSOL Multiphysics® with Darcy's Law and Solute Transport interfaces. At the channel scale, realistic parameters used as input data gave raise to output results con-sistent with the expected range of values for numerical assessment of the transient period and mass fluxes. At the basin scale, initial porosity and hydraulic conductivity fields, related to each other by a cubic law, are assumed to follow a Weibull distribution. From this initial state, the transient model calculates the evolution of porosity with time, taking into account Darcy's velocity as it was formulated by Yao et al. (2014). Progress in dissolution and transport gives rise to the creation of dissolution channels. Channels mechanical behavior is investigated through extending 2D model into 3D one. The calculations show that open channels collapse when they reach a width of approximatively one meter. The results of these investigations are consistent with the in situ measurements, notably with the estimation of the subsidence rate

  18. In vitro model systems to investigate bile salt export pump (BSEP) activity and drug interactions: A review.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yaofeng; Woolf, Thomas F; Gan, Jinping; He, Kan

    2016-08-01

    The bile salt export pump protein (BSEP), expressed on the canalicular membranes of hepatocytes, is primarily responsible for the biliary excretion of bile salts. The inhibition of BSEP transport activity can lead to an increase in intracellular bile salt levels and liver injury. This review discusses the various in vitro assays currently available for assessing the effect of drugs or other chemical entities to modulate BSEP transport activity. BSEP transporter assays use one of the following platforms: Xenopus laevis oocytes; canalicular membrane vesicles (CMV); BSEP-expressed membrane vesicles; cell lines expressing BSEP; sandwich cultured hepatocytes (SCH); and hepatocytes in suspension. Two of these, BSEP-expressed insect membrane vesicles and sandwich cultured hepatocytes, are the most commonly used assays. BSEP membrane vesicles prepared from transfected insect cells are useful for assessing BSEP inhibition or substrate specificity and exploring mechanisms of BSEP-associated genetic diseases. This model can be applied in a high-throughput format for discovery-drug screening. However, experimental results from use of membrane vesicles may lack physiological relevance and the model does not allow for investigation of in situ metabolism in modulation of BSEP activity. Hepatocyte-based assays that use the SCH format provide results that are generally more physiologically relevant than membrane assays. The SCH model is useful in detailed studies of the biliary excretion of drugs and BSEP inhibition, but due to the complexity of SCH preparation, this model is used primarily for determining biliary clearance and BSEP inhibition in a limited number of compounds. The newly developed hepatocyte in suspension assay avoids many of the complexities of the SCH method. The use of pooled cryopreserved hepatocytes in suspension minimizes genetic variance and individual differences in BSEP activity and also provides the opportunity for higher throughput screening and cross

  19. Planetary Interiors and Geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehant, Veronique

    2013-04-01

    Lander and orbiter, even rover at the surface of planets or moons of the solar system help in determining their interior properties. First of all orbiters feel the gravity of the planet and its change. In particular, the tidal mass redistribution induces changes in the acceleration of the spacecraft orbiting around a planet. The Love number k2 has been determined for Venus, Mars and the Earth, as well as for Titan and will be deduced for instance for Mercury (MESSENGER and BepiColombo missions) and for the Galilean satellite from new missions such as JUICE (Jupiter Icy satellite Explorer). The properties of the interior can also be determined from the observation of the rotation of the celestial body. Radar observation from the Earth ground stations of Mercury has allowed Margo et al. (2012, JGR) to determine the moments of inertia of Mercury with an unprecedented accuracy. Rovers such as the MERs (Mars Exploration Rovers) allow as well to obtain the precession and nutation of Mars from which the moments of inertia of the planet and its core can be deduced. Future missions such as InSIGHT (Interior exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy, and Heat Transport) will further help in the determination of Mars interior and evolution.

  20. Interior of the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Basic questions regarding the interior of the Earth in the 1990's are discussed. Research problems in the areas of plate tectonics, the Earth mantle the Earth core, and continental structure are discussed. Observational requirements of the GRAVSAT satellite mission are discussed.

  1. A descriptive model of the molten salt reactor experiment after shutdown: Review of FY 1995 progress

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.F.; Del Cul, G.D.; Toth, L.M.

    1996-01-01

    During FY 1995 considerable progress was made toward gaining a better understanding of the chemistry and transport processes that continue to govern the behavior of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE). As measurements in the MSRE proceed, laboratory studies continue, and better analyses are available, our understanding of the state of the MSRE and the best path toward remediation improves. Because of the immediate concern about the deposit in the auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB), laboratory studies in the past year focused on carbon-fluorine chemistry. Secondary efforts were directed toward investigation of gas generation from MSRE salts by both radiolytic and nonradiolytic pathways. In addition to the laboratory studies, field measurements at the MSRE provided the basis for estimating the inventory of uranium and fluorine in the ACB. Analysis of both temperature and radiation measurements provided independent and consistent estimates of about 2.6 kg of uranium deposited in the top of the ACB. Further analysis efforts included a refinement in the estimates of the fuel- salt source term, the deposited decay energy, and the projected rate of radiolytic gas generation. This report also provides the background material necessary to explain new developments and to review areas of particular interest. The detailed history of the MSRE is extensively documented and is cited where appropriate. This work is also intended to update and complement the more recent MSRE assessment reports.

  2. Modeling of salt-water migration through spod-podzolic soils under the field and laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronzhina, Tatiana

    2013-04-01

    The assessment of highly mineralized water influence on soils is an important issue in the contemporary world. Various regions with different conditions are exposed to salt-affected soils forming. Salinization of soils is a complex process of the chemical and physical properties changes. Therefore the chain of the laboratory and field experiments should be done in order to assess the main factors promoting highly mineralized water migration. In addition to it modelling is a good way to understand and evaluate main chemical and physical transformations in soils. The chain of experiments was done to assess salt water movement in spod-podzolic soils under field and laboratory conditions. The main goals were to evaluate the rate of salt water movement through soils and to estimate velocity of the desalinization process. Field experiment was conducted on spod-podzolic soils of Kaliningrad region. There were 4 sites measuring 20*25 cm watering with salt water in amount of 5 liters per each area. The mineralization of the solution was 100 g/l. In addition to the salt affected sites, 2 non polluted grounds were assessed too. Soils samples were collected in the period of 1 week, 1 month, 3 month and 1 year after the spill had been done. The samples were taken each 10 cm 110 cm deep and in double repeatability. Main chemical and physical parameters, such as volume water content, pH, conductivity, amount of calcium ion, magnesium, sodium, and chlorite in soils etc. were measured in each sample. The second experiment was conducted to evaluate the rate of soils solutions transformation under the laboratory conditions. Organic horizon was taken from the field and was stuffed in columns with 1.0 g/cm3 density. There were 16 columns with 4 cm diameter. 14 columns were showered with salt water with the same mineralization as in the field experiment. The amount of salt water injected in columns was 104 mm per one sample which is equal to the salt water volume spilled per one area in

  3. Base Aptian Salt Palaeo-bathymetry of the Angolan Rifted Margin from Reverse Post-Breakup Subsidence Modelling and Gravity Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelo dos Santos Silva, R.; Kusznir, N. J.; Cowie, L.

    2013-12-01

    The bathymetric datum with respect to global sea-level for Aptian salt deposition in the S. Atlantic is hotly debated. Some models propose that salt was deposited in an isolated 'Messinian' style ocean basin in which local sea-level was 2-3 km below the global level. Alternative models propose that salt may have been deposited in deep water. In this study we determine the palaeo-bathymetry of base Aptian salt deposition on the Angolan rifted continental margin using reverse post-breakup thermal subsidence modelling. The reverse post-breakup thermal subsidence modelling process consists of sequential flexural isostatic backstripping of the post-breakup sedimentary sequences, decompaction of remaining sedimentary units and reverse modelling of post-breakup lithosphere thermal subsidence. The reverse modelling of post-breakup lithosphere thermal subsidence is carried out in 2D and requires 2D knowledge of the rifted continental margin lithosphere beta stretching factor (McKenzie 1978) which is determined from gravity inversion. The analysis has been applied to the P14, P7+11 and P3 seismic cross-sections of Contrucci et al. (2004) offshore N Angola, and the ION-GXT CS1-2400 deep long-offset seismic reflection profile further south. A compaction controlled sediment density is assumed for non-salt lithologies. The gravity inversion used to determine the lithosphere beta stretching factor profiles are carried out in the 3D spectral domain and includes a correction for the lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly generated by elevated geothermal gradients within stretched continental margin and adjacent ocean basin lithosphere. Moho depths determined from the gravity inversion are in good agreement with those determined from the seismic refraction seismology of Contrucci et al. (2004) and deep long-offset reflection seismology. Reverse post-breakup subsidence modelling restores the proximal autochthonous base salt to near sea-level at breakup time but not the most distal base

  4. Interior Design in Architectural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurel, Meltem O.; Potthoff, Joy K.

    2006-01-01

    The domain of interiors constitutes a point of tension between practicing architects and interior designers. Design of interior spaces is a significant part of architectural profession. Yet, to what extent does architectural education keep pace with changing demands in rendering topics that are identified as pertinent to the design of interiors?…

  5. Development of an annoyance model based upon elementary auditory sensations for steady-state aircraft interior noise containing tonal components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angerer, James R.; Mccurdy, David A.; Erickson, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to develop a noise annoyance model, superior to those already in use, for evaluating passenger response to sounds containing tonal components which may be heard within current and future commercial aircraft. The sound spectra investigated ranged from those being experienced by passengers on board turbofan powered aircraft now in service to those cabin noise spectra passengers may experience within advanced propeller-driven aircraft of the future. A total of 240 sounds were tested in this experiment. Sixty-six of these 240 sounds were steady state, while the other 174 varied temporally due to tonal beating. Here, the entire experiment is described, but the analysis is limited to those responses elicited by the 66 steady-state sounds.

  6. Modelling coupled chemico-osmotic and advective-diffusive transport of nitrate salts in the Callovo-Oxfordian Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baechler, S.; Croisé, J.; Altmann, S.

    2012-12-01

    Chemico-osmosis is a recognized phenomenon taking place in clay mineral-rich sedimentary formations and a number of questions have been raised concerning its potential effects on pressure fields in and around underground radioactive waste repositories installed in such formations. Certain radioactive waste packages contain large quantities of nitrate salts whose release might result in the presence of highly concentrated salt solutions in the disposal cells, during their resaturation after closure of the facility. This would lead to large solute concentration gradients within the formation's porewater which could then potentially induce significant chemico-osmotic fluxes. In this paper, we assess the impact of chemico-osmotic fluxes on the water pressure during the post-closure period of a typical disposal cell for intermediate-level, long-lived bituminised radioactive waste in the Callovo-Oxfordian Clay formation. A numerical model of chemico-osmotic water flow and solute transport has been developed based on the work of Bader and Kooi (2005) [5], and including Bresler's dependence of osmotic efficiency on concentration and compaction state [9]. Model validity has been extended to highly concentrated solutions by incorporating a concentration-dependent activity coefficient, based on the Pitzer's equations. Results show that due to the strong dependence of the osmotic coefficient on concentration, the impact of chemico-osmosis on water flow and on the pressure field around the disposal cell is relatively low. A maximum overpressure of the order of 1 MPa was obtained. No difference in the simulation results were noticed for disposal cell solutions having concentrations higher than 1 M NaNO3. Differences between simulations were found to be almost entirely due to Bresler's relationship i.e., the model of the dependence between osmotic efficiency and concentration, and only slightly on the activity coefficient correction. Questions remain regarding the appropriate

  7. A comparison of the coupled fresh water-salt water flow and the Ghyben-Herzberg sharp interface approaches to modeling of transient behavior in coastal aquifer systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Essaid, H.I.

    1986-01-01

    A quasi-three dimensional finite difference model which simulates coupled, fresh water and salt water flow, separated by a sharp interface, is used to investigate the effects of storage characteristics, transmissivity, boundary conditions and anisotropy on the transient responses of such flow systems. The magnitude and duration of the departure of aquifer response from the behavior predicted using the Ghyben-Herzberg, one-fluid approach is a function of the ease with which flow can be induced in the salt water region. In many common hydrogeologic settings short-term fresh water head responses, and transitional responses between short-term and long-term, can only be realistically reproduced by including the effects of salt water flow on the dynamics of coastal flow systems. The coupled fresh water-salt water flow modeling approach is able to reproduce the observed annual fresh water head response of the Waialae aquifer of southeastern Oahu, Hawaii. ?? 1986.

  8. INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING BATCH SCALES. SERIES OF FIVE SCALES WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING BATCH SCALES. SERIES OF FIVE SCALES WITH SIX DIFFERENT MATERIALS. MIX SIFTED DOWN FROM SILOS ABOVE. INGREDIENTS: SAND, SODA ASH, DOLOMITE LIMESTONE, NEPHELINE SYENITE, SALT CAKE. - Chambers-McKee Window Glass Company, Batch Plant, Clay Avenue Extension, Jeannette, Westmoreland County, PA

  9. 3. VIEW OF INTERIOR, EAST SIDE (SIDE A) OF BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF INTERIOR, EAST SIDE (SIDE A) OF BUILDING 883. INSTALLATION OF EQUIPMENT FOR THE MOLTEN SALT BATHS AND ROLLING MILLS PROCESSES. (4/25/57) - Rocky Flats Plant, Uranium Rolling & Forming Operations, Southeast section of plant, southeast quadrant of intersection of Central Avenue & Eighth Street, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  10. 6. INTERIOR OF NORTH END OF STEAM PLANT, GROUND FLOOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. INTERIOR OF NORTH END OF STEAM PLANT, GROUND FLOOR, SHOWING FORMER LOCATION OF DIESEL ENGINES. THIS WAS THE FIRST PART OF THE BUILDING TO BE CONSTRUCTED, WHEN IT HOUSED ONLY THE DIESEL ENGINES. December 4, 1990 - Crosscut Steam Plant, North side Salt River near Mill Avenue & Washington Street, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  11. 24 CFR 3285.803 - Interior close-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Exterior and Interior Close-Up § 3285.803 Interior... doors. (b) Interior close up items necessary to join all sections of the home or items subject to transportation damage may be packaged or shipped with the home for site installation. (c) Shipped-loose...

  12. 24 CFR 3285.803 - Interior close-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Interior close-up. 3285.803 Section... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Exterior and Interior Close-Up § 3285.803 Interior close-up. (a) All shipping blocking, strapping, or bracing must be removed from appliances, windows,...

  13. 24 CFR 3285.803 - Interior close-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Interior close-up. 3285.803 Section... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Exterior and Interior Close-Up § 3285.803 Interior close-up. (a) All shipping blocking, strapping, or bracing must be removed from appliances, windows,...

  14. 24 CFR 3285.803 - Interior close-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interior close-up. 3285.803 Section... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Exterior and Interior Close-Up § 3285.803 Interior close-up. (a) All shipping blocking, strapping, or bracing must be removed from appliances, windows,...

  15. 24 CFR 3285.803 - Interior close-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Interior close-up. 3285.803 Section... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Exterior and Interior Close-Up § 3285.803 Interior close-up. (a) All shipping blocking, strapping, or bracing must be removed from appliances, windows,...

  16. 6. INTERIOR VIEW OF CROSSCUT HYDRO PLANT, SHOWING 25 CYCLE60 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. INTERIOR VIEW OF CROSSCUT HYDRO PLANT, SHOWING 25 CYCLE-60 CYCLE FREQUENCY CHANGER Photographer unknown, December 14, 1940 - Cross Cut Hydro Plant, North Side of Salt River, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  17. A summary of methods for approximating salt creep and disposal room closure in numerical models of multiphase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Freeze, G.A.; Larson, K.W.; Davies, P.B.

    1995-10-01

    Eight alternative methods for approximating salt creep and disposal room closure in a multiphase flow model of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were implemented and evaluated: Three fixed-room geometries three porosity functions and two fluid-phase-salt methods. The pressure-time-porosity line interpolation method is the method used in current WIPP Performance Assessment calculations. The room closure approximation methods were calibrated against a series of room closure simulations performed using a creep closure code, SANCHO. The fixed-room geometries did not incorporate a direct coupling between room void volume and room pressure. The two porosity function methods that utilized moles of gas as an independent parameter for closure coupling. The capillary backstress method was unable to accurately simulate conditions of re-closure of the room. Two methods were found to be accurate enough to approximate the effects of room closure; the boundary backstress method and pressure-time-porosity line interpolation. The boundary backstress method is a more reliable indicator of system behavior due to a theoretical basis for modeling salt deformation as a viscous process. It is a complex method and a detailed calibration process is required. The pressure lines method is thought to be less reliable because the results were skewed towards SANCHO results in simulations where the sequence of gas generation was significantly different from the SANCHO gas-generation rate histories used for closure calibration. This limitation in the pressure lines method is most pronounced at higher gas-generation rates and is relatively insignificant at lower gas-generation rates. Due to its relative simplicity, the pressure lines method is easier to implement in multiphase flow codes and simulations have a shorter execution time.

  18. Reactions of coal and model coal compounds in room temperature molten salt mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, D.S.; Winans, R.E.; McBeth, R.L.

    1984-05-01

    A 2:1 AlCl/sub 3/-pyridinium chloride molten salt solution was used as the reaction medium for the alkylation of diphenylethane and a bituminous coal by 2-propanol. Probably accompanying the room temperature Friedel-Crafts alkylation is a reduction of C=O to -C-OH. Completely deuterated 2-propanol did not react at all with the pyridinium ring. The pyridinium chloride serves to lower the temperature at which the AlCl/sub 3/ is able to catalyze the reactions. The pyridinium chloride also catalyzes the Friedel-Crafts alkylation.

  19. Interior of Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Cutaway view of the possible internal structure of Callisto. The surface of the satellite is a mosaic of images obtained in 1979 by NASA's Voyager spacecraft. The interior characteristics are inferred from gravity field and magnetic field measurements by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. Callisto's radius is 2403 km, larger than our Moon's radius. Callisto's interior is shown as a relatively uniform mixture of comparable amounts of ice and rock. The surface layer of Callisto is shown as white to indicate that it may differ from the underlying ice/rock layer in a variety of ways including, for example, the percentage of rock it contains.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  20. Ocean Turbulence. Paper 3; Two-Point Closure Model Momentum, Heat and Salt Vertical Diffusivities in the Presence of Shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Dubovikov, M. S.; Howard, A.; Cheng, Y.

    1999-01-01

    In papers 1 and 2 we have presented the results of the most updated 1-point closure model for the turbulent vertical diffusivities of momentum, heat and salt, K(sub m,h,s). In this paper, we derive the analytic expressions for K(sub m,h,s) using a new 2-point closure model that has recently been developed and successfully tested against some approx. 80 turbulence statistics for different flows. The new model has no free parameters. The expressions for K(sub m, h. s) are analytical functions of two stability parameters: the Turner number R(sub rho) (salinity gradient/temperature gradient) and the Richardson number R(sub i) (temperature gradient/shear). The turbulent kinetic energy K and its rate of dissipation may be taken local or non-local (K-epsilon model). Contrary to all previous models that to describe turbulent mixing below the mixed layer (ML) have adopted three adjustable "background diffusivities" for momentum. heat and salt, we propose a model that avoids such adjustable diffusivities. We assume that below the ML, K(sub m,h,s) have the same functional dependence on R(sub i) and R(sub rho) derived from the turbulence model. However, in order to compute R(sub i) below the ML, we use data of vertical shear due to wave-breaking measured by Gargett et al. (1981). The procedure frees the model from adjustable background diffusivities and indeed we use the same model throughout the entire vertical extent of the ocean. Using the new K(sub m,h, s), we run an O-GCM and present a variety of results that we compare with Levitus and the KPP model. Since the traditional 1-point (used in papers 1 and 2) and the new 2-point closure models used here represent different modeling philosophies and procedures, testing them in an O-GCM is indispensable. The basic motivation is to show that the new 2-point closure model gives results that are overall superior to the 1-point closure in spite of the fact that the latter rely on several adjustable parameters while the new 2-point

  1. Three dimensional model evaluation of physical alterations of the Caloosahatchee River and Estuary: Impact on salt transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Detong; Wan, Yongshan; Qiu, Chelsea

    2016-05-01

    Numerical hydrodynamic modeling provides quantitative understanding of how physical alterations of an estuary may alter the waterbody hydrodynamics and the rate of mixing with the ocean. In this study, a three dimensional hydrodynamic model (CH3D) was used to compare simulated salinities between the existing condition and five historical cases representing varying physical alterations of the Caloosahatchee Estuary involving (1) removal of the headwater structure (S-79); (2) removal of the downstream causeway to Sanibel Island; (3) backfilling an oyster bar near the estuary month; (4) refilling the navigation channel; and (5) the pre-development bathymetric condition. The results suggested that some alterations including the Sanibel Causeway, backfilling the oyster bar and the S-79 structure may have some local effects but did not change estuarine salinity structure significantly. Refilling the navigation channel had a more profound effect, resulting in a dry season salinity reduction of about 5 when compared with the existing condition. The reduced salt transport was more pronounced with the pre-development bathymetry because the estuary as a whole was much shallower than today. The significant system-wide increase in salt transport caused by the historic dredging of the navigation channel in the Caloosahatchee Estuary has significant implications in the development of attainable environmental flow targets for protecting the estuarine ecosystem.

  2. An elastic rod model to evaluate effects of ionic concentration on equilibrium configuration of DNA in salt solution.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ye; Huang, Zaixing; Wang, Shengnan

    2014-03-01

    As a coarse-gained model, a super-thin elastic rod subjected to interfacial interactions is used to investigate the condensation of DNA in a multivalent salt solution. The interfacial traction between the rod and the solution environment is determined in terms of the Young-Laplace equation. Kirchhoff's theory of elastic rod is used to analyze the equilibrium configuration of a DNA chain under the action of the interfacial traction. Two models are established to characterize the change of the interfacial traction and elastic modulus of DNA with the ionic concentration of the salt solution, respectively. The influences of the ionic concentration on the equilibrium configuration of DNA are discussed. The results show that the condensation of DNA is mainly determined by competition between the interfacial energy and elastic strain energy of the DNA itself, and the interfacial traction is one of forces that drive DNA condensation. With the change of concentration, the DNA segments will undergo a series of alteration from the original configuration to the condensed configuration, and the spiral-shape appearing in the condensed configuration of DNA is independent of the original configuration. PMID:24691983

  3. Chronic Antagonism of the Mineralocorticoid Receptor Ameliorates Hypertension and End Organ Damage in a Rodent Model of Salt-Sensitive Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoyan; Crook, Martin F; Sharif-Rodriguez, Wanda; Zhu, Yonghua; Ruben, Zadok; Pan, Yi; Urosevic-Price, Olga; Wang, Li; Flattery, Amy M; Forrest, Gail; Szeto, Daphne; Zhao, Huawei; Roy, Sophie; Forrest, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effects of chronic mineralocorticoid receptor blockade with eplerenone on the development and progression of hypertension and end organ damage in Dahl salt-sensitive rats. Eplerenone significantly attenuated the progressive rise in systolic blood pressure (SBP) (204 ± 3 vs. 179±3 mmHg, p < 0.05), reduced proteinuria (605.5 ± 29.6 vs. 479.7 ± 26.1 mg/24h, p < 0.05), improved injury scores of glomeruli, tubules, renal interstitium, and vasculature in Dahl salt-sensitive rats fed a high-salt diet. These results demonstrate that mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism provides target organ protection and attenuates the development of elevated blood pressure (BP) in a model of salt-sensitive hypertension. PMID:21950654

  4. 49. INTERIOR OF GILLEY ROOM: Interior view towards southeast of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. INTERIOR OF GILLEY ROOM: Interior view towards southeast of the Gilley Room on the second floor of the powerhouse and ear barn. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  5. 3. INTERIOR VIEW OF PARTITIONS IN DRESSING ROOM; INTERIOR HALLWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. INTERIOR VIEW OF PARTITIONS IN DRESSING ROOM; INTERIOR HALLWAY FOR HYDROTHERAPY AREA AT RIGHT - Fort McCoy, Building No. T-1054, South side of South Tenth Avenue, Block 10, Sparta, Monroe County, WI

  6. 28. Interior view of telegrapher's bay, east wall, showing interior ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Interior view of telegrapher's bay, east wall, showing interior finishes, framing, and furring over stonework - Bend Railroad Depot, 1160 Northeast Divion Street (At foot of Kearny Street), Bend, Deschutes County, OR

  7. 48. INTERIOR OF MAIN OFFICE: Interior view towards southeast of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. INTERIOR OF MAIN OFFICE: Interior view towards southeast of Main Office on second floor of the Washington and Mason powerhouse and car barn. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  8. 43. ELEVATOR HEADHOUSE INTERIOR: Interior view towards southeast of elevator ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. ELEVATOR HEAD-HOUSE INTERIOR: Interior view towards southeast of elevator head-house at the Washington and Mason Street powerhouse. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  9. Interior view of interior upstairs loft corner, north portion; camera ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of interior upstairs loft corner, north portion; camera facing east. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Ordnance Warehouse, Blake Avenue, northeast corner of Blake Avenue & Railroad Avenue, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  10. 9. Southeast view interior, typical interior office, supervisor's office, room ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Southeast view interior, typical interior office, supervisor's office, room 24A - Selfridge Field, Building No. 1050, Northwest corner of Doolittle Avenue & D Street; Harrison Township, Mount Clemens, Macomb County, MI

  11. Expected Constraints on Rhea's Interior from Cassini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castillo, J. C.

    2005-01-01

    We model the interior of Rhea based on observational constraints and the results from geodynamical models available in the literature. Ten main types of models are defined, depending on the presence or absence of a high-pressure ice layer (ice II), and the extent of separation of the rock component from the volatiles. We present degree-two gravity components computed for each of these models in order to assess which properties of the interior are likely to be inferred from Cassini radio science measurements scheduled on November 26, 2005.

  12. Characteristics of capacitance-micro-displacement for model of complex interior surface of the 3D Taiji ball and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ruo-Gu; Jiang, Kun; Qing, Zhao-Bo; Liu, Yue-Hui; Yan, Jun

    2006-11-01

    Taiji image originated from ancient China. It is not only the Taoism emblem but also the ancient graphic presentation sign to everything origin. It either has a too far-reaching impact on traditional culture of China, or is influencing the development of current natural science. On the basis of analyzing the classical philosophic theory of two-dimensional (2-D) Taiji image, we developed it into the model of complex interior surface-three-dimensional (3-D) Taiji ball, and explored its possible applications. Combining modern mathematics and physics knowledge, we have studied on the physical meaning of 3-D Taiji ball, thus the plane change of original Taiji image is developed into space change which is more close to the real world. The change layers are obvious increased notably, and the amount of information included in this model increases correspondingly. We also realized a special paper 3-D Taiji ball whose surface is coved with metal foil by means of laser manufacture. A new experiment set-up for measuring micro displace has been designed and constituted thus the relation between capacitance and micro displacement for the 3-D Taiji ball has performed. Experimental and theoretical analyses are also finished. This models of 3-D Taiji ball for physical characteristics are the first time set up. Experimental data and fitting curves between capacitance and micro displacement for the special paper Taiji ball coved with metal foil are suggested. It is shown that the special Taiji ball has less leakage capacitance or more strengthen electric field than an ordinary half ball capacitance. Finally their potential applied values are explored.

  13. Modeling and Field Test Planning Activities in Support of Disposal of Heat-Generating Waste in Salt

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Blanco Martin, Laura; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2014-09-26

    The modeling efforts in support of the field test planning conducted at LBNL leverage on recent developments of tools for modeling coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in salt and their effect on brine migration at high temperatures. This work includes development related to, and implementation of, essential capabilities, as well as testing the model against relevant information and published experimental data related to the fate and transport of water. These are modeling capabilities that will be suitable for assisting in the design of field experiment, especially related to multiphase flow processes coupled with mechanical deformations, at high temperature. In this report, we first examine previous generic repository modeling results, focusing on the first 20 years to investigate the expected evolution of the different processes that could be monitored in a full-scale heater experiment, and then present new results from ongoing modeling of the Thermal Simulation for Drift Emplacement (TSDE) experiment, a heater experiment on the in-drift emplacement concept at the Asse Mine, Germany, and provide an update on the ongoing model developments for modeling brine migration. LBNL also supported field test planning activities via contributions to and technical review of framework documents and test plans, as well as participation in workshops associated with field test planning.

  14. Bile salt-stimulated lipase: an animal model for human lactation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamosh, M.; Freed, L.M.; York, C.M.; Sturman, J.A.; Hamosh, P.

    1986-03-01

    To date, bile salt-stimulated lipase (BSSL), an important digestive enzyme for the newborn, has only been described in the milk of primates - human and gorilla. The authors report the presence of BSSL in milks of dog and cat. Serial collections from two dogs (day 1-49) and cats (day 5-57) were analyzed for BSSL activity using a /sup 3/H-triolein emulsion as substrate. Comparable analyses of pooled, term human milk were made for comparison. BSSL activity in individual dog milks (x = 32.0; range: 4.8-107.4 U/ml) was similar, while that in cat milk (x = 6.6; range: 2.2-16.9 U/ml) was lower than in human milk (x = 37.0; range: 10-80 U/ml; n = 35). Longitudinal patterns for BSSL differed depending upon the enzyme source. Dog, cat and human milk BSSL all showed a neutral to alkaline pH optimum (pH 7.0-8.4), stability at low pH, and 95-100% inhibition (at concentrations of 0.6 mM) by NaCl and eserine. BSSL activity from all sources had an obligate requirement for primary bile salts. These data are the first to show BSSL activity in milk from mammals other than human and gorilla. Presence of BSSL in nonprimate milk will permit the careful study of BSSL biology in the mammary gland as well as its role in neonatal fat digestion.

  15. Interior of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Renee C.

    2013-01-01

    A variety of geophysical measurements made from Earth, from spacecraft in orbit around the Moon, and by astronauts on the lunar surface allow us to probe beyond the lunar surface to learn about its interior. Similarly to the Earth, the Moon is thought to consist of a distinct crust, mantle, and core. The crust is globally asymmetric in thickness, the mantle is largely homogeneous, and the core is probably layered, with evidence for molten material. This chapter will review a range of methods used to infer the Moon's internal structure, and briefly discuss the implications for the Moon's formation and evolution.

  16. Microbial transglutaminase for cold-set binding of unsalted/salted pork models and restructured dry ham.

    PubMed

    Romero de Avila, M D; Ordóñez, J A; de la Hoz, L; Herrero, A M; Cambero, M I

    2010-04-01

    The viability of using microbial transglutaminase (MTGase) as a cold-set binder for restructuring and manufacturing deboned dry ham (RDH) was evaluated. The influence of meat pre-treatment, preparation of the MTGase, packing system and set temperature on the binding rate and force was tested using pork models and deboned legs. The best binding parameters were obtained when meat surfaces were evenly distributed with salts (NaCl, KNO(3), NaNO(2)) and then washed with a saline solution (W), afterwards powder (P) or liquid (L) MTGase was applied, and simultaneous salting and vacuum packing (S) set at 7 degrees C were performed. The RDH manufactured following these procedures (WPS and WLS) was stable during drying and could resist the handling and production process. Binding force increased (p<0.05) during 8 weeks of drying. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed an increase of cross-links during the drying period of RDH related to the increase in binding force. PMID:20374852

  17. Ozonolysis of Unsaturated Phosphocholines on NaCl as a Model for Organics on Sea Salt Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagulian, F.; Lea, A.; Finlayson-Pitts, B.

    2007-12-01

    Sea salt particles, which are a major contributor to the global aerosol burden, may be coated with organic material. A major source of organic material is the decomposition of marine organisms, which have biomembranes that are a mixture of lipids, hydrophobic proteins and carbohydrates. The ozonolysis of 1-oleoyl- 2-palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (OPPC) on NaCl as a model for this organic coating on sea salt was followed in real time using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrometry (DRIFTS). Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry and Auger electron spectroscopy were used to confirm the identification of the products. Upon exposure to O3, we observed a stable secondary ozonide (SOZ) as well as carbonyl-containing products. The kinetics of formation of these products and the impact of water vapor and photolysis on them were studied. Water vapor decreased the SOZ yield, and photolysis in the actinic region led to loss of the SOZ and the generation of aldehydes, carboxylic acids and anhydrides. These experiments elucidate the mechanism of formation of secondary ozonides on surfaces in polluted and relatively dry environments, which should be taken into account in the chemistry, photochemistry and toxicity of coastal atmospheres and those in the vicinity of dry, alkaline lakes.

  18. Antilisterial effects of antibacterial formulations containing essential oils, nisin, nitrite and organic acid salts in a sausage model.

    PubMed

    Ghabraie, Mina; Vu, Khanh Dang; Huq, Tanzina; Khan, Avik; Lacroix, Monique

    2016-06-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of sixteen antibacterial formulations against Listeria monocytogenes in a sausage model using a standard experimental design with 4 independent factors at 2 levels (2(4)). Four independent factors consisted of nisin (12.5-25 ppm), nitrite (100-200 ppm) and organic acid salts (1.55-3.1 %) and the mixture of Chinese cinnamon and Cinnamon bark Essential Oils (EOs) (0.025-0.05 %). Based on the analysis, utilization of low (0.025 %) or high concentration (0.05 %) of EOs in combination with low concentration of nitrite (100 ppm), organic acid salts (1.55 %), and nisin (12.5 ppm) could reduce respectively 1.5 or 2.6 log CFU/g of L. monocytogenes in sausage at day 7 of storage as compared to the control. A predictive equation was created to predict the growth of L. monocytogenes in sausage. The sensory evaluation was then performed on selected optimized formulations in cooked meat (both pork and beef sausages) with a trained jury consisting of 35 individuals, demonstrated the selected antimicrobial formulations were organoleptically acceptable. The results revealed an important role of hurdle technology to control L. monocytogenes in meat product. PMID:27478218

  19. A model for the evolution of brines in salt from the lower Salado Formation, southeastern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, C.L.; Krumhansl, J.L. )

    1988-05-01

    Fluid inclusions were collected from a bedded salt horizon in the lower Permian Salado Formation in the Delaware Basin, southeastern New Mexico. The sampling horizon, at a depth of approximately 645 meters, consists primarily of recrystallized halite, with thin layers of anhydrite. Other trace minerals, dispersed throughout the salt, include quartz, polyhalite, gypsum, K-feldspar, magnesite, and clays. The chemistry of the inclusion fluids and the associated mineralogy suggest that these brines represent Permian seawater that has undergone evaporation and subsequent modification by diagenetic reactions, dominated by the alteration of calcium sulfate to polyhalite and magnesite formation. The range of fluid inclusion compositions suggests a significant departure from a simple seawater evaporation model. Other brines from the same horizon in the Salado Formation were sampled and analyzed for the same elements as the fluid inclusions, and differed significantly from them primarily by the depletion of Mg relative to K. The association of these brines with argillaceous and/or anhydritic halite containing a suite of authigenic minerals (quartz, magnesite, and Mg-rich clays) suggests that these are intergranular brines with compositions determined over a much longer time scale than that required by the fluid inclusions. The principal reactions affecting intergranular brine chemistry are dehydration of gypsum, dewatering of detrital clays, and uptake of Mg during clay diagenesis. Overall, the observed variation in brine compositions implies that, if large-scale hydrologic circulation is occurring in the Salado halite, the time scale is limited by the rate required for low-temperature silicate diagenesis.

  20. 11. Detail of the interior, looking through an interior doorway ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Detail of the interior, looking through an interior doorway toward the front and east window. Note: This photograph shows that the building had been converted to a residence following its use as a school. In addition, the hazardous condition of the structure's interior is evident. Two ceilings which are visible in the photograph, (the upper, probably original plastered ceiling, and a secondary, adapted ceiling) as well as ceiling joists in the southernmost rooms have collapsed. Because of the dangerous condition of the interior of the building, additional interior photography was not attempted at this time. - Perry Township School No. 3, Middle Mount Vernon & Eickhoff Roads, Evansville, Vanderburgh County, IN

  1. 3D gravity modeling of a salt structure associated to the Trozza-Labaied lineament (Central Tunisia) constrained by seismic and borehole data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djebbi, M.; Gabtni, H.

    2015-03-01

    Gravity and seismic are two distinctive geophysical methods which are used combined in integrated geophysical studies. The rationale behind this integration is to construct a 3D gravity model for a salt structure associated to the Trozza-Labaied major tectonic deformation. The Trozza-Labaied area witnessed the occurrence of several tectonic events during the Atlassic phase resulting in the creation of various salt structures. Interpretation of the available seismic data revealed the different lithological units forming the geologic setting. Whereas the analysis of the gravity data contributed in exposing the existence of different gravity anomalies. Thus, the integrated seismic and gravity data are fundamental in constructing a 3D gravity model. The resulting model provides an accurate image of the salt body extent and its geometry and determines its effect over the surrounding sedimentary deposits.

  2. Interior structure of the sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacobbe, F. W.; Giacobbe, M. J.

    This paper describes a computational method of estimating physical and chemical properties within the solar interior without employing calculations involving opacities. Instead of using opacities to help determine how interior solar temperatures vary with the radial distance between the centre of the sun and its 'surface', an iterative technique employing empirical adiabatic 'cooling' and a fusion energy production rate expression were employed for this purpose. Other iterative calculations were also made (nearly simultaneously) to ensure that all known solar constraint conditions were precisely satisfied (except for the photospheric 'surface' temperature) during this computational process. In addition, all calculations could be performed using a conventional PC employing an Intel Pentium CPU and a computer program coded in ANSI C. Due to the simplifications that were possible using the techniques employed during this study, as well as the advantages associated with using a programming language that produces machine code when compiled, all solar structural details could be generated very rapidly using an ordinary computer. The results of this study were compared with more conventional results obtained by others. This comparison indicated that the methods employed within this paper produced interior intensive solar properties that were in reasonable agreement with similar properties obtained by employing more sophisticated computational approaches. Although it is not claimed that the results generated during this study are any better than more conventionally obtained findings, it is thought that these results, as well as our computational methods, are interesting and potentially useful to others. In particular, it is thought that the techniques outlined in this paper may provide a useful introduction to more complicated techniques of solar modelling.

  3. The lunar interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.; Kovach, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    The compressional velocities are estimated for materials in the lunar interior and compared with lunar seismic results. The lower crust has velocities appropriate for basalts or anorthosites. The high velocities associated with the uppermost mantle imply high densities and a change in composition to a lighter assemblage at depths of the order of 120 km. Calcium and aluminum are probably important components of the upper mantle and are deficient in the lower mantle. Much of the moon may have accreted from material similar in composition to eucrites. The important mineral of the upper mantle is garnet; possible accessory minerals are kyanite, spinel, and rutile. If the seismic results stand up, the high velocity layer in the moon is more likely to be a high pressure form of anorthosite than eclogite, pyroxenite, or dunite. The thickness of the layer is of the order of 50 km. Cosmic abundances can be maintained if the lower mantle is ferromagnesium silicate with minimal amounts of calcium and aluminum. Achondrites such as eucrites and howardites have more of the required characteristics of the lunar interior than carbonaceous chondrites. A density inversion in the moon is a strong possibility.

  4. Carbon metabolism in model microbial systems from a temperate salt marsh.

    PubMed

    Fallon, R D; Pfaender, F K

    1976-06-01

    The metabolism of a saltwater leachate of 14C-labeled Spartina alterniflora was examined in laboratory systems using mixed, salt marsh microbial communities and, by addition of appropriate antibiotics, communities with bacteria or eukaryotes inhibited. Label uptake was more rapid in the systems with bacteria alone and with the mixed microbial community than with fungi alone. Mineralization of the added label was more extensive in the mixed and bacterial systems, whereas the fungi appear more efficient at converting the label into particulate biomass. Particulate biomass production efficiencies ranged from a high of 0.82 for the fungal system to 0.21 in the mixed community, with the bacterial system giving an intermediate value of 0.54. The presence of protozoa and microcrustaceans in the mixed system appears to account for an increase in the mineralization of the label assimilated. Additional experiments with whole labeled Spartina, a leachate from Spartina, and Spartina after leaching revealed that the seawater-soluble portions of the plants were attacked most rapidly by the microbial community. PMID:938043

  5. Carbon metabolism in model microbial systems from a temperate salt marsh.

    PubMed Central

    Fallon, R D; Pfaender, F K

    1976-01-01

    The metabolism of a saltwater leachate of 14C-labeled Spartina alterniflora was examined in laboratory systems using mixed, salt marsh microbial communities and, by addition of appropriate antibiotics, communities with bacteria or eukaryotes inhibited. Label uptake was more rapid in the systems with bacteria alone and with the mixed microbial community than with fungi alone. Mineralization of the added label was more extensive in the mixed and bacterial systems, whereas the fungi appear more efficient at converting the label into particulate biomass. Particulate biomass production efficiencies ranged from a high of 0.82 for the fungal system to 0.21 in the mixed community, with the bacterial system giving an intermediate value of 0.54. The presence of protozoa and microcrustaceans in the mixed system appears to account for an increase in the mineralization of the label assimilated. Additional experiments with whole labeled Spartina, a leachate from Spartina, and Spartina after leaching revealed that the seawater-soluble portions of the plants were attacked most rapidly by the microbial community. PMID:938043

  6. Interior of Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Cutaway view of the possible internal structure of Io The surface of the satellite is a mosaic of images obtained in 1979 by NASA's Voyager spacecraft The interior characteristics are inferred from gravity field and magnetic field measurements by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. Io's radius is 1821 km, similar to the 1738 km radius of our Moon; Io has a metallic (iron, nickel) core (shown in gray) drawn to the correct relative size. The core is surrounded by a rock shell (shown in brown). Io's rock or silicate shell extends to the surface.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  7. BLENDING STUDY FOR SRR SALT DISPOSITION INTEGRATION: TANK 50H SCALE-MODELING AND COMPUTER-MODELING FOR BLENDING PUMP DESIGN, PHASE 2

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Fowley, M.

    2011-05-26

    The Salt Disposition Integration (SDI) portfolio of projects provides the infrastructure within existing Liquid Waste facilities to support the startup and long term operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Within SDI, the Blend and Feed Project will equip existing waste tanks in the Tank Farms to serve as Blend Tanks where 300,000-800,000 gallons of salt solution will be blended in 1.3 million gallon tanks and qualified for use as feedstock for SWPF. Blending requires the miscible salt solutions from potentially multiple source tanks per batch to be well mixed without disturbing settled sludge solids that may be present in a Blend Tank. Disturbing solids may be problematic both from a feed quality perspective as well as from a process safety perspective where hydrogen release from the sludge is a potential flammability concern. To develop the necessary technical basis for the design and operation of blending equipment, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) completed scaled blending and transfer pump tests and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. A 94 inch diameter pilot-scale blending tank, including tank internals such as the blending pump, transfer pump, removable cooling coils, and center column, were used in this research. The test tank represents a 1/10.85 scaled version of an 85 foot diameter, Type IIIA, nuclear waste tank that may be typical of Blend Tanks used in SDI. Specifically, Tank 50 was selected as the tank to be modeled per the SRR, Project Engineering Manager. SRNL blending tests investigated various fixed position, non-rotating, dual nozzle pump designs, including a blending pump model provided by the blend pump vendor, Curtiss Wright (CW). Primary research goals were to assess blending times and to evaluate incipient sludge disturbance for waste tanks. Incipient sludge disturbance was defined by SRR and SRNL as minor blending of settled sludge from the tank bottom into suspension due to blending pump operation, where

  8. Melatonin prevents kidney injury in a high salt diet-induced hypertension model by decreasing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Leibowitz, Avshalom; Volkov, Alexander; Voloshin, Konstantin; Shemesh, Chen; Barshack, Iris; Grossman, Ehud

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin, a potent antioxidant molecule, plays a role in blood pressure regulation. We hypothesized that melatonin may generate a protective effect in a high salt diet (HSD) rodent model mediated by decreasing renal oxidative stress. Dahl salt-sensitive rats were divided into three groups according to diet: normal chow (control); HSD; HSD with melatonin [30/mg/kg/day]) placed in their water (HSD + Mel) over an 8-wk period. Blood pressure was measured by the tail cuff method. Kidney injury was evaluated by 24 H urine protein excretion. Glomerular injury index (GII) (fibrotic glomeruli/100 glomeruli) was evaluated from a Masson's trichrome-stained section. Kidney oxidative stress was determined by superoxide production via dihydroethidium staining. Expression of oxidative stress-related genes was measured by reverse transcriptase-qPCR. Melatonin had no effect on blood pressure increase induced by HSD and attenuated proteinuria induced by HSD (HSD - 50.7 ± 12, HSD + Mel - 22.3 ± 4.3, controls - 6.5 ± 1.0 gram protein/gram creatinine, P < 0.001). HSD-induced glomerular damage was significantly diminished by melatonin (GII in HSD - 24 ± 6, HSD + Mel - 3.6 ± 0.8, controls - 0.8 ± 0.5, P < 0.05). Superoxide production was significantly higher in kidneys of HSD fed rats than the controls (99 ± 9 versus 60 ± 7 relative fluorescent units (RFU)/μm(2) , respectively, P < 0.05). Melatonin also decreased superoxide production (74 ± 5 RFU/μm(2) , P < 0.05). The expression of kidney inducible nitric oxide synthase and p67(phox) mRNA was significantly higher in HSD than in the controls and HSD + Mel rats. Treatment with melatonin eliminated the deleterious effect of HSD in the kidneys of Dahl salt-sensitive rats. The beneficial effect of melatonin is not mediated by lowering blood pressure but by a direct antioxidative effect. PMID:26465239

  9. Dynamics of salt playa polygons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goehring, L.; Fourrière, A.

    2014-12-01

    In natural salt playa or in evaporation pools for the salt extraction industry, one can sometimes see surprising regular structures formed by ridges of salt. These ridges connect together to form a self-organized network of polygons one to two meters in diameter, which we call salt polygons. Here we propose a mechanism based on porous media convection of salty water in soil to explain the formation and the scaling of the salt polygons. Surface evaporation causes a steady upward flow of salty water, which can cause precipitation near the surface. A vertical salt gradient then builds up in the porous soil, with heavy salt-saturated water lying over the less salty source water. This can drive convection when a threshold is reached, given by a critical Rayleigh number of about 7. We suggest that the salt polygons are the surface expression of the porous medium convection, with salt crystallizing along the positions of the convective downwellings. To study this instability directly, we developed a 2D analogue experiment using a Hele-Shaw cell filled with a porous medium saturated with a salt solution and heated from above. We perform a linear stability analysis of this system, and find that it is unstable to convection, with a most unstable wavelength that is set by a balance between salt diffusion and water evaporation. The Rayleigh number in our experiment is controlled by the particle size of our model soil, and the evaporation rate. We obtain results that scale with the observation of natural salt polygons. Using dye, we observe the convective movement of salty water and find downwelling convective plumes underneath the spots where surface salt ridges form, as shown in the attached figure.

  10. Phosphate salts

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken by mouth or used as enemas. Indigestion. Aluminum phosphate and calcium phosphate are FDA-permitted ingredients ... Phosphate salts containing sodium, potassium, aluminum, or calcium are LIKELY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth short-term, when sodium phosphate is inserted into the ...

  11. Numerical Modeling of an Active Salt System in Canyonlands, Utah: The Role of Topography in Driving Plastic Flow and Brittle Extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravitz, K.; Upton, P.; Mueller, K. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Needles District of Canyonlands, Utah contains a coupled array of extensional faults, salt diapirs and an elongate anticline produced by gravitational stresses associated with erosion and canyon cutting along the Colorado River and its tributaries. Three-dimensional numerical models using high-resolution topography have been produced using FLAC3D to test how plastic flow of evaporites and brittle extension of overburden are coupled during deformation and how they combine to form salt structures in the region. High resolution (50 m DEM) topographic models were built of the Needles District and of the region to the southwest of the Needles containing the Imperial Valley fault. The overburden in these models was described by a strain-softening Mohr-Coulomb rheology and is 400 m thick from the surface to the base of the Colorado River canyon. It overlays a flat, 340 m thick, viscous layer representing the salt, which outcrops in the Colorado river downstream of the grabens. The Needles District is dominated by horst and graben structures which extend updip from the Colorado River to the southeast. In models of the Needles, lateral displacement is dominantly to the northwest, toward the river canyon with the most displacement occurring in regions containing side canyons. In the canyon, salt flows upward to form an anticline that follows the sinuosity of the river, and diapirs appear adjacent to side canyons or where the canyon widens, which is observed in the field and the models. Without a salt layer, models show much smaller displacement rates that vary from northwest to southeast demonstrating the importance of a flat lying salt layer in propagating deformation toward the river. The region to the southwest is an area of broader subsidence bounded by a major fault (Imperial Valley fault) with fewer developed extensional faults near the river canyon. The Imperial Valley fault model shows similar patterns in which deformation is driven perpendicular to the river

  12. Demethylation of a model homogalacturonan with a citrus salt-independent pectin methylesterase: Effect of pH on block size and number and resulting functionality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A demethylation series with predicted degrees of methylesterification (DM) of 90, 80, 70, 60 and 50 % was produced from a model homogalacturonan (HG) by reacting it with a citrus salt-independent pectin methylesterase (PME) at pH 4.5 and 7.5. HG structural properties were probed by performing a limi...

  13. Demethylation of a model homogalacturonan with the salt-independent pectin methylesterase from citrus: I. effect of pH on demethylated block size and distribution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A model homogalacturonan (HG); composed of galacturonic acid (94-97 %) and galactose (3-6 %), having a 94 % degree of esterification (DE) was used to produce a demethylated HG series by reacting it with the salt-independent pectin methylesterase (PME) from citrus fruit at pH 4.5 and 7.5. HGs with a...

  14. Theoretical modeling of the urinary supersaturation of calcium salts in healthy individuals and kidney stone patients: Precursors, speciation and therapeutic protocols for decreasing its value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, Allen L.; Allie-Hamdulay, Shameez; Jackson, Graham E.; Durbach, Ian

    2013-11-01

    BackgroundSupersaturation (SS) of urinary salts has been extensively invoked for assessing the risk of renal stone formation, but precursors have often been ignored. Our objectives were to establish by computer modeling, which urinary components are essential for calculating reliable SS values, to investigate whether unique equilibrium processes occur in the urine of stone formers (SF) which might account for their higher SS levels relative to healthy controls (N), to determine the relative efficacies of three different, widely-used protocols for lowering urinary SS of calcium salts and to examine the influence of precursors.

  15. Multi-Physics Modeling of Molten Salt Transport in Solid Oxide Membrane (SOM) Electrolysis and Recycling of Magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Adam; Pati, Soobhankar

    2012-03-11

    Solid Oxide Membrane (SOM) Electrolysis is a new energy-efficient zero-emissions process for producing high-purity magnesium and high-purity oxygen directly from industrial-grade MgO. SOM Recycling combines SOM electrolysis with electrorefining, continuously and efficiently producing high-purity magnesium from low-purity partially oxidized scrap. In both processes, electrolysis and/or electrorefining take place in the crucible, where raw material is continuously fed into the molten salt electrolyte, producing magnesium vapor at the cathode and oxygen at the inert anode inside the SOM. This paper describes a three-dimensional multi-physics finite-element model of ionic current, fluid flow driven by argon bubbling and thermal buoyancy, and heat and mass transport in the crucible. The model predicts the effects of stirring on the anode boundary layer and its time scale of formation, and the effect of natural convection at the outer wall. MOxST has developed this model as a tool for scale-up design of these closely-related processes.

  16. A viscoplastic model with application to LiF-22 percent CaF2 hypereutectic salt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, A. D.; Walker, K. P.

    1990-01-01

    A viscoplastic model for class M (metal-like behavior) materials is presented. One novel feature is its use of internal variables to change the stress exponent of creep (where n is approximately = 5) to that of natural creep (where n = 3), in accordance with experimental observations. Another feature is the introduction of a coupling in the evolution equations of the kinematic and isotropic internal variables, making thermal recovery of the kinematic variable implicit. These features enable the viscoplastic model to reduce to that of steady-state creep in closed form. In addition, the hardening parameters associated with the two internal state variables (one scalar-valued, the other tensor-valued) are considered to be functions of state, instead of being taken as constant-valued. This feature enables each internal variable to represent a much wider spectrum of internal states for the material. The model is applied to a LiF-22 percent CaF2 hypereutectic salt, which is being considered as a thermal energy storage material for space-based solar dynamic power systems.

  17. Interior of Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Cutaway view of the possible internal structure of Europa The surface of the satellite is a mosaic of images obtained in 1979 by NASA's Voyager spacecraft. The interior characteristics are inferred from gravity field and magnetic field measurements by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. Europa's radius is 1565 km, not too much smaller than our Moon's radius. Europa has a metallic (iron, nickel) core (shown in gray) drawn to the correct relative size. The core is surrounded by a rock shell (shown in brown). The rock layer of Europa (drawn to correct relative scale) is in turn surrounded by a shell of water in ice or liquid form (shown in blue and white and drawn to the correct relative scale). The surface layer of Europa is shown as white to indicate that it may differ from the underlying layers. Galileo images of Europa suggest that a liquid water ocean might now underlie a surface ice layer several to ten kilometers thick. However, this evidence is also consistent with the existence of a liquid water ocean in the past. It is not certain if there is a liquid water ocean on Europa at present.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  18. Update on Small Modular Reactors Dynamics System Modeling Tool -- Molten Salt Cooled Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, Richard Edward; Cetiner, Sacit M.; Fugate, David L.; Qualls, A L.; Borum, Robert C.; Chaleff, Ethan S.; Rogerson, Doug W.; Batteh, John J.; Tiller, Michael M.

    2014-08-01

    The Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Dynamic System Modeling Tool project is in the third year of development. The project is designed to support collaborative modeling and study of various advanced SMR (non-light water cooled) concepts, including the use of multiple coupled reactors at a single site. The objective of the project is to provide a common simulation environment and baseline modeling resources to facilitate rapid development of dynamic advanced reactor SMR models, ensure consistency among research products within the Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) technical area, and leverage cross-cutting capabilities while minimizing duplication of effort. The combined simulation environment and suite of models are identified as the Modular Dynamic SIMulation (MoDSIM) tool. The critical elements of this effort include (1) defining a standardized, common simulation environment that can be applied throughout the program, (2) developing a library of baseline component modules that can be assembled into full plant models using existing geometry and thermal-hydraulic data, (3) defining modeling conventions for interconnecting component models, and (4) establishing user interfaces and support tools to facilitate simulation development (i.e., configuration and parameterization), execution, and results display and capture.

  19. Comparison of four numerical models for simulating seepage from salt marsh sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Leonard Robert; Wilson, Alicia M.

    2006-09-01

    A boundary integral equation method (BIEM) model and three differently formulated finite element method (FEM) models were implemented to explore the spatial and temporal patterns in marsh pore water seepage that each generated. The BIEM model is based on the Laplace equation coupled to a dynamic free-surface condition that assumes that, as the water-table changes, the aquifer instantaneously loses or gains an amount of water equal to the change in head times the specific yield. The FEM models all implement a simplified Richards equation that allows gradual desaturation or resaturation and thus flow in both the saturated and unsaturated zones of the aquifer. Two of the FEM models are based on the governing equation for the USGS model SUTRA and thus take into account fluid and aquifer compressibility. One of these was modified to take into account the effect of tidal loading on the total stress, which is assumed to be constant in the derivation of the original version of SUTRA. The third FEM model assumes that neither the fluid or aquifer matrix is compressible so that changes in storage are due solely to changes in saturation. The unmodified SUTRA model generated instantaneous boundary fluxes that were up to two orders of magnitude greater, and spatially more uniform, than those of the other models. The FEM model without compressibility generated spatial and temporal patterns of the boundary fluxes very similar to those produced by the BIEM model. The SUTRA model with the tidal stress modification gave fluxes similar in magnitude to the BIEM and no compressibility models but with distinctly different distributions in space and time. These results indicate that accurate simulation of seepage from marsh soils is highly sensitive to aquifer compressibility and to proper formulation of the effect of tidal loading on the total stress in the aquifer. They also suggest that accurate simulation may require total stress correction not only for tidal loading but for changes

  20. 46. INTERIOR VIEW TO SOUTH ON SECOND FLOOR: Interior view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. INTERIOR VIEW TO SOUTH ON SECOND FLOOR: Interior view looking south along the east wall on the second floor of the powerhouse and car barn. Note the cable car truck in the foreground. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  1. 45. INTERIOR VIEW TO SOUTHWEST ON SECOND FLOOR: Interior view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. INTERIOR VIEW TO SOUTHWEST ON SECOND FLOOR: Interior view towards southwest on second floor of main portion of the powerhouse and car barn. This space is used for repair and storage of cable cars. Note wooden trussed roof. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  2. 44. SECOND FLOOR 'ANNEX' INTERIOR VIEW TO SOUTHWEST: Interior ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. SECOND FLOOR 'ANNEX' - INTERIOR VIEW TO SOUTHWEST: Interior view towards southwest on second floor of the powerhouse 'annex.' Note the steel column and beam construction and the old shunt car formerly used to move cable cars around the yard. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  3. 15. Interior view, greenhouse, from the northwest. The greenhouse interior ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Interior view, greenhouse, from the northwest. The greenhouse interior was quite modest, the space between the floor of the lower level and the joists carrying the loft floor is only five-and-one-half feet. - John Bartram House & Garden, Greenhouse, 54th Street & LIndbergh Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  4. Hangar no. 2 interior detail of roof structures and interior ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Hangar no. 2 interior detail of roof structures and interior work spaces. Note concrete piers and cross bracing. Seen at trusses no. 42, 43, & 44. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Southern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Near intersection of Windmill Road & Johnson Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  5. Long-Term Modeling of Coupled Processes in a Generic Salt Repository for Heat-Generating Nuclear Waste: Analysis of the Impacts of Halite Solubility Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco Martin, L.; Rutqvist, J.; Battistelli, A.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Rock salt is a potential medium for the underground disposal of nuclear waste because it has several assets, such as its ability to creep and heal fractures and its water and gas tightness in the undisturbed state. In this research, we focus on disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste and we consider a generic salt repository with in-drift emplacement of waste packages and crushed salt backfill. As the natural salt creeps, the crushed salt backfill gets progressively compacted and an engineered barrier system is subsequently created [1]. The safety requirements for such a repository impose that long time scales be considered, during which the integrity of the natural and engineered barriers have to be demonstrated. In order to evaluate this long-term integrity, we perform numerical modeling based on state-of-the-art knowledge. Here, we analyze the impacts of halite dissolution and precipitation within the backfill and the host rock. For this purpose, we use an enhanced equation-of-state module of TOUGH2 that properly includes temperature-dependent solubility constraints [2]. We perform coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical modeling and we investigate the influence of the mentioned impacts. The TOUGH-FLAC simulator, adapted for large strains and creep, is used [3]. In order to quantify the importance of salt dissolution and precipitation on the effective porosity, permeability, pore pressure, temperature and stress field, we compare numerical results that include or disregard fluids of variable salinity. The sensitivity of the results to some parameters, such as the initial saturation within the backfill, is also addressed. References: [1] Bechthold, W. et al. Backfilling and Sealing of Underground Repositories for Radioactive Waste in Salt (BAMBUS II Project). Report EUR20621 EN: European Atomic Energy Community, 2004. [2] Battistelli A. Improving the treatment of saline brines in EWASG for the simulation of hydrothermal systems. Proceedings, TOUGH Symposium 2012

  6. Fundamental Properties of Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Toni Y Gutknecht; Guy L Fredrickson

    2012-11-01

    Thermal properties of molten salt systems are of interest to electrorefining operations, pertaining to both the Fuel Cycle Research & Development Program (FCR&D) and Spent Fuel Treatment Mission, currently being pursued by the Department of Energy (DOE). The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner may be adversely impacted by the build-up of fission products in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided, during electrorefining operations, include (i) fissile elements build up in the salt that might approach the criticality limits specified for the vessel, (ii) electrolyte freezing at the operating temperature of the electrorefiner due to changes in the liquidus temperature, and (iii) phase separation (non-homogenous solution). The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can be monitored by studying the thermal characteristics of the molten salts as a function of impurity concentration. Simulated salt compositions consisting of the selected rare earth and alkaline earth chlorides, with a eutectic mixture of LiCl-KCl as the carrier electrolyte, were studied to determine the melting points (thermal characteristics) using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). The experimental data were used to model the liquidus temperature. On the basis of the this data, it became possible to predict a spent fuel treatment processing scenario under which electrorefining could no longer be performed as a result of increasing liquidus temperatures of the electrolyte.

  7. Don Quixote Pond: A Small Scale Model of Weathering and Salt Accumulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englert, P.; Bishop, J. L.; Patel, S. N.; Gibson, E. K.; Koeberl, C.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of Don Quixote Pond in the North Fork of Wright Valley, Antarctica, is a model for unique terrestrial calcium, chlorine, and sulfate weathering, accumulation, and distribution processes. The formation of Don Quixote Pond by simple shallow and deep groundwater contrasts more complex models for Don Juan Pond in the South Fork of Wright Valley. Our study intends to understand the formation of Don Quixote Pond as unique terrestrial processes and as a model for Ca, C1, and S weathering and distribution on Mars.

  8. Optimization of experimental designs and model parameters exemplified by sedimentation in salt marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimer, J.; Schürch, M.; Slawig, T.

    2014-09-01

    The weighted least squares estimator for model parameters was presented together with its asymptotic properties. A popular approach to optimize experimental designs called local optimal experimental designs was described together with a lesser known approach which takes into account a potential nonlinearity of the model parameters. These two approaches were combined with two different methods to solve their underlying discrete optimization problem. All presented methods were implemented in an open source MATLAB toolbox called the Optimal Experimental Design Toolbox whose structure and handling was described. In numerical experiments, the model parameters and experimental design were optimized using this toolbox. Two models for sediment concentration in seawater of different complexity served as application example. The advantages and disadvantages of the different approaches were compared, and an evaluation of the approaches was performed.

  9. Interior Slopes of Copernican Craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, M. S.; Burns, K.; Stelling, R.; Speyerer, E.; Mahanti, P.

    2012-12-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) routinely acquires high resolution (50 to 200 cm pixel scales) stereo pairs from adjacent orbits through spacecraft slews; parallax angles are typically >20°, and the local incidence angle between 40° and 65°. These observations are reduced to digital elevation models (DEM) using a combination of ISIS (USGS) and SOCET Set (BAE Systems). For this study DEMs originally sampled at 2 m scales were reduced (averaging technique) to 5 m scales to provide slopes calculated over 3x3 pixel boxes (15 m x 15 m). The upper 50% of interior walls of Copernican craters (2 to 20 km diameter) typically have average slopes of 36°, with slopes locally above 40° not uncommon (i.e. Fig 1: 2.3 km diam, 17.68°S, 144.41°E). Giordano Bruno (GB; 35.97N°, 102.86°E) is likely the youngest 20-km diameter class crater on the Moon. Its floor is dominated by impact forms (ponds and flows), and inner walls exhibit a series of coalesced flow lobes emanating from steep upper slopes. The lobes appear to be composed of dry granular material based on the observation of boulder trails superposed on many examples. The upper slopes average 36° or more, with some slopes above 40°. For much of GB, slopes exceed 30° all the way to the crater floor (especially in the SE). The high slopes imply angular grains, some level of cohesion, and/or higher angles of repose due to the Moon's relatively low gravity. Larmor Q (28.56°N, 176.33°E), another large Copernican crater, is elliptical in plan (23 x 18 km diameter), with an interior floor dominated by large slump blocks. Like GB its walls exhibit overlapping lobes (granular materials) emanating from interior wall slopes that range from 30° to 36°. Other Copernican craters exhibit similar steep slopes on interior walls: Moore F (23 km diam), Necho (30 km), and two unnamed craters (9 km,13.31°S, 257.55°E; 9 km, 15.72°, 177.39°E). Slopes of the central peaks of Tycho crater (0

  10. Welcome detailed data, but with a grain of salt: accuracy, precision, uncertainty in flood inundation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dottori, Francesco; Di Baldassarre, Giuliano; Todini, Ezio

    2013-04-01

    New survey techniques are providing a huge amount of high-detailed and accurate data which can be extremely valuable for flood inundation modeling. Such data availability raises the issue of how to exploit their information content to provide reliable flood risk mapping and predictions. We think that these data should form the basis of hydraulic modelling anytime they are available. However, high expectations regarding these datasets should be tempered as some important issues should be considered. These include: the large number of uncertainty sources in model structure and available data; the difficult evaluation of model results, due to the scarcity of observed data; the computational efficiency; the false confidence that can be given by high-resolution results, as accuracy of results is not necessarily increased by higher precision. We briefly discuss these issues and existing approaches which can be used to manage high detailed data. In our opinion, methods based on sub-grid and roughness upscaling treatments would be in many instances an appropriate solution to maintain consistence with the uncertainty related to model structure and data available for model building and evaluation.

  11. Gas releases from salt

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, B.; Neal, J.; Hinkebein, T.

    1998-06-01

    The occurrence of gas in salt mines and caverns has presented some serious problems to facility operators. Salt mines have long experienced sudden, usually unexpected expulsions of gas and salt from a production face, commonly known as outbursts. Outbursts can release over one million cubic feet of methane and fractured salt, and are responsible for the lives of numerous miners and explosions. Equipment, production time, and even entire mines have been lost due to outbursts. An outburst creates a cornucopian shaped hole that can reach heights of several hundred feet. The potential occurrence of outbursts must be factored into mine design and mining methods. In caverns, the occurrence of outbursts and steady infiltration of gas into stored product can effect the quality of the product, particularly over the long-term, and in some cases renders the product unusable as is or difficult to transport. Gas has also been known to collect in the roof traps of caverns resulting in safety and operational concerns. The intent of this paper is to summarize the existing knowledge on gas releases from salt. The compiled information can provide a better understanding of the phenomena and gain insight into the causative mechanisms that, once established, can help mitigate the variety of problems associated with gas releases from salt. Outbursts, as documented in mines, are discussed first. This is followed by a discussion of the relatively slow gas infiltration into stored crude oil, as observed and modeled in the caverns of the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve. A model that predicts outburst pressure kicks in caverns is also discussed.

  12. 2. VIEW OF INTERIOR, EAST SIDE (SIDE A) OF BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF INTERIOR, EAST SIDE (SIDE A) OF BUILDING 883. INSTALLATION OF ROLLING MILLS AND MOLTEN SALT BATH EQUIPMENT FOR DEPLETED URANIUM FABRICATION. THE CRANE NEAR THE CEILING WAS USED TO INSTALL THE EQUIPMENT. BOXES ON THE FLOOR CONTAINED EQUIPMENT TO BE INSTALLED. (1/23/57) - Rocky Flats Plant, Uranium Rolling & Forming Operations, Southeast section of plant, southeast quadrant of intersection of Central Avenue & Eighth Street, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  13. A model for the atmospheric transport of sea-salt particles in coastal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demoisson, A.; Tedeschi, G.; Piazzola, J.

    2013-10-01

    A model for the aerosol transport in the lower atmosphere is of great interest for studies on air and water quality. One of the difficulties of such a model is to provide the accurate source terms. In particular, for maritime environment, the production of particles generated at the air-sea interface by breaking waves largely varies in time and space (Piazzola et al., 2009). More particularly, near the coastal zone, the sea-spray aerosol fluxes depend on the development of the wave field. The present paper proposes some improvement of the model MACMod, published by Tedeschi and Piazzola (2011), which is dedicated to the transport of aerosol particles in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL). Taking benefit of the experimental campaign MIRAMER conducted in the French Mediterranean in 2008, a new sea-spray source function has been introduced in the latter version of the model MACMod. This consists in a revisited version of the whitecap dependant formulation established by Monahan et al. (1986). The simulations were then validated using aerosol size distributions recorded on board the ship “Atalante” for different wind speeds. Error calculations show a good performance of the model since it predicts the aerosol concentration to within a maximum factor of 3 for particle radii between 0.5 to 5 μm.

  14. Kinetics model comparison for the inactivation of Salmonella serotypes Enteritidis and Oranienburg in 10% salted liquid whole egg.

    PubMed

    Gurtler, Joshua B; Marks, Harry M; Bailey, Rebecca B; Juneja, Vijay; Jones, Deana R

    2013-06-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the inactivation kinetics of Salmonella in commercial 10% salted liquid whole egg (LWE) to assist the U.S. Department of Agriculture in writing new liquid egg pasteurization guidelines. Current data are not sufficient for predicting thermal inactivation kinetics of Salmonella spp. for use in updating pasteurization guidelines for many types of liquid egg products, including salted LWE (SLWE). This is, in part, due to variations in Salmonella strains and changes in the processing of liquid egg products that have arisen in the past 40 years. Pasteurization guidelines are currently being reevaluated in light of recent risk assessments. Heat-resistant Salmonella serovars Enteritidis and Oranienburg were composited and mixed into 10% SLWE, resulting in final populations of approximately 5.7-7.8 log colony-forming units (CFU)/mL. Inoculated egg was injected into glass capillary tubes, flame-sealed, and heated in a water bath at 60, 62.2, 63.3, 64.3, or 66°C. Contents were surface-plated and incubated at 37°C for 24 h. Survival curves were not log-linear (log levels versus time), but decreased rapidly, and after initial periods became linear. Asymptotic decimal reduction values at each temperature were calculated from survivor curves with a minimum inactivation of 5.0 log CFU/mL. The asymptotic thermal D-values for SLWE were 3.47, 2.23, 1.79, 1.46, and 1.04 min at 60, 62.2, 63.3, 64.3, or 66°C, respectively. The calculated thermal z-value was 11.5°C. A model that predicts lethality for given times and temperatures that was developed predicted that the current pasteurization requirements for 10% SLWE (i.e., 63.3°C for 3.5 min, or 62.2°C for 6.2 min) are not sufficient to inactivate 7 log CFU/mL of Salmonella and only achieve approximately 4 log CFU/mL inactivation. This model will assist egg-products manufacturers and regulatory agencies in designing pasteurization processes to ensure product safety. PMID

  15. Palaeo-modeling of coastal salt water intrusion during the Holocene: an application to the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delsman, J. R.; Hu-a-ng, K. R. M.; Vos, P. C.; de Louw, P. G. B.; Oude Essink, G. H. P.; Stuyfzand, P. J.; Bierkens, M. F. P.

    2013-11-01

    Management of coastal fresh groundwater reserves requires a thorough understanding of the present-day groundwater salinity distribution and its possible future development. However, coastal groundwater often still reflects a complex history of marine transgressions and regressions, and is only rarely in equilibrium with current boundary conditions. In addition, the distribution of groundwater salinity is virtually impossible to characterize satisfactorily, complicating efforts to model and predict coastal groundwater flow. A way forward may be to account for the historical development of groundwater salinity when modeling present-day coastal groundwater flow. In this paper, we construct a palaeo-hydrogeological model to simulate the evolution of groundwater salinity in the coastal area of the Netherlands throughout the Holocene. While intended as a perceptual tool, confidence in our model results is warranted by a good correspondence with a hydrochemical characterization of groundwater origin. Model results attest to the impact of groundwater density differences on coastal groundwater flow on millennial timescales and highlight their importance in shaping today's groundwater salinity distribution. Not once reaching steady-state throughout the Holocene, our results demonstrate the long-term dynamics of salinity in coastal aquifers. This stresses the importance of accounting for the historical evolution of coastal groundwater salinity when modeling present-day coastal groundwater flow, or when predicting impacts of e.g. sea level rise on coastal aquifers. Of more local importance, our findings suggest a more significant role of pre-Holocene groundwater in the present-day groundwater salinity distribution in the Netherlands than previously recognized. The implications of our results extend beyond understanding the present-day distribution of salinity, as the proven complex history of coastal groundwater also holds important clues for understanding and predicting the

  16. Modelling of the reactive transport for rock salt-brine in geological repository systems based on improved thermodynamic database (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, W.; Alkan, H.; Xie, M.; Moog, H.; Sonnenthal, E. L.

    2009-12-01

    The release and migration of toxic contaminants from the disposed wastes is one of the main issues in long-term safety assessment of geological repositories. In the engineered and geological barriers around the nuclear waste emplacements chemical interactions between the components of the system may affect the isolation properties considerably. As the chemical issues change the transport properties in the near and far field of a nuclear repository, modelling of the transport should also take the chemistry into account. The reactive transport modelling consists of two main components: a code that combines the possible chemical reactions with thermo-hydrogeological processes interactively and a thermodynamic databank supporting the required parameters for the calculation of the chemical reactions. In the last decade many thermo-hydrogeological codes were upgraded to include the modelling of the chemical processes. TOUGHREACT is one of these codes. This is an extension of the well known simulator TOUGH2 for modelling geoprocesses. The code is developed by LBNL (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Univ. of California) for the simulation of the multi-phase transport of gas and liquid in porous media including heat transfer. After the release of its first version in 1998, this code has been applied and improved many times in conjunction with considerations for nuclear waste emplacement. A recent version has been extended to calculate ion activities in concentrated salt solutions applying the Pitzer model. In TOUGHREACT, the incorporated equation of state module ECO2N is applied as the EOS module for non-isothermal multiphase flow in a fluid system of H2O-NaCl-CO2. The partitioning of H2O and CO2 between liquid and gas phases is modelled as a function of temperature, pressure, and salinity. This module is applicable for waste repositories being expected to generate or having originally CO2 in the fluid system. The enhanced TOUGHREACT uses an EQ3/6-formatted database

  17. A RAT MODEL OF HEART FAILURE INDUCED BY ISOPROTERENOL AND A HIGH SALT DIET

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rat models of heart failure (HF) show varied pathology and time to disease outcome, dependent on induction method. We found that subchronic (4wk) isoproterenol (ISO) infusion in Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rats caused cardiac injury with minimal hypertrophy. O...

  18. Comparison of two different sea-salt aerosol schemes as implemented in air quality models applied to the Mediterranean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Guerrero, P.; Jorba, O.; Pay, M. T.; Montavez, J. P.; Jerez, S.; Gomez-Navarro, J. J.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    A number of attempts have been made to incorporate sea-salt aerosols (SSA) source functions in chemistry transport models with varying results according to the complexity of the scheme considered. This contribution compares the inclusion of two different SSA algorithms in two chemistry transport models: CMAQ and CHIMERE. The main goal is to examine the differences in average SSA mass and composition and to study the seasonality of the prediction of SSA when applied to the Mediterranean area with high resolution in a reference year. Dry and wet deposition schemes are also analyzed to better understand the differences observed between both models in the target area. The applied emission algorithm in CHIMERE uses a semi-empirical formulation which obtains the surface emission rate of SSA as a function of the surface wind speed cubed and particle size. The emission parameterization included within CMAQ is somehow more sophisticated, since fluxes of SSA are corrected with relative humidity. In order to evaluate their strengths and weaknesses, the participating algorithms as implemented in the chemistry transport models were evaluated against AOD measurements from Aeronet and available surface measurements in Southern Europe and the Mediterranean area, showing biases around -0.003 and -1.2 μg m-3, respectively. The results indicate that both models represent accurately the patterns and dynamics of SSA and its non-uniform behavior in the Mediterranean basin, showing a strong seasonality. The levels of SSA vary strongly across the Western and the Eastern Mediterranean, reproducing CHIMERE higher annual levels in the Aegean Sea (12 μg m-3) and CMAQ in the Gulf of Lion (9 μg m-3). The large difference found for the ratio PM2.5/total SSA in CMAQ and CHIMERE is also investigated. The dry and wet removal rates are very similar for both models despite the different schemes implemented. Dry deposition essentially follows the surface drag stress patterns, meanwhile wet

  19. Comparison of two different sea-salt aerosol schemes as implemented in air quality models applied to the Mediterranean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Guerrero, P.; Jorba, O.; Pay, M. T.; Montávez, J. P.; Jerez, S.; Gómez-Navarro, J. J.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2011-05-01

    A number of attempts have been made to incorporate sea-salt aerosol (SSA) source functions in chemistry transport models with varying results according to the complexity of the scheme considered. This contribution compares the inclusion of two different SSA algorithms in two chemistry transport models: CMAQ and CHIMERE. The main goal is to examine the differences in average SSA mass and composition and to study the seasonality of the prediction of SSA when applied to the Mediterranean area with high resolution for a reference year. Dry and wet deposition schemes are also analyzed to better understand the differences observed between both models in the target area. The applied emission algorithm in CHIMERE uses a semi-empirical formulation which obtains the surface emission rate of SSA as a function of the particle size and the surface wind speed raised to the power 3.41. The emission parameterization included within CMAQ is somehow more sophisticated, since fluxes of SSA are corrected with relative humidity. In order to evaluate their strengths and weaknesses, the participating algorithms as implemented in the chemistry transport models were evaluated against AOD measurements from Aeronet and available surface measurements in Southern Europe and the Mediterranean area, showing biases around -0.002 and -1.2 μg m-3, respectively. The results indicate that both models represent accurately the patterns and dynamics of SSA and its non-uniform behavior in the Mediterranean basin, showing a strong seasonality. The levels of SSA strongly vary across the Western and the Eastern Mediterranean, reproducing CHIMERE higher annual levels in the Aegean Sea (12 μg m-3) and CMAQ in the Gulf of Lion (9 μg m-3). The large difference found for the ratio PM2.5/total SSA in CMAQ and CHIMERE is also investigated. The dry and wet removal rates are very similar for both models despite the different schemes implemented. Dry deposition essentially follows the surface drag stress patterns

  20. Salting-out and Salting-in in Polyelectrolyte Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Wu, Jianzhong; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    The phase behavior of polyelectrolyte (PE) solutions is governed by complicated interplay involving the mixing entropy, excluded volume, chain connectivity, and electrostatic interactions. Here we study the phase behavior of PE solutions in both salt-free condition and with added salt using a liquid-state (LS) theory based thermodynamic model. The LS model accounts or the hard-core repulsion by the Canahan-Starling equation of state, correlations due to chain connectivity by the first-order thermodynamic perturbation theory, and electrostatic correlations by the mean-spherical approximation. In comparison to the prediction from the well-known Voorn-Overbeek theory, the LS model predicts loop-type binodal curves in the salt-PE concentration diagram at temperatures slightly above the critical temperature of PE solution in salt-free case, consistent with the experimental study. The phase separated region shrinks with increasing temperature. Three scenarios of salting-out and salting-in phenomenon are predicted with addition of salts based, depending on the PE concentration.

  1. Orbits and Interiors of Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batygin, Konstantin

    2012-05-01

    The focus of this thesis is a collection of problems of timely interest in orbital dynamics and interior structure of planetary bodies. The first three chapters are dedicated to understanding the interior structure of close-in, gaseous extrasolar planets (hot Jupiters). In order to resolve a long-standing problem of anomalously large hot Jupiter radii, we proposed a novel magnetohydrodynamic mechanism responsible for inflation. The mechanism relies on the electro-magnetic interactions between fast atmospheric flows and the planetary magnetic field in a thermally ionized atmosphere, to induce electrical currents that flow throughout the planet. The resulting Ohmic dissipation acts to maintain the interior entropies, and by extension the radii of hot Jupiters at an enhanced level. Using self-consistent calculations of thermal evolution of hot Jupiters under Ohmic dissipation, we demonstrated a clear tendency towards inflated radii for effective temperatures that give rise to significant ionization of K and Na in the atmosphere, a trend fully consistent with the observational data. Furthermore, we found that in absence of massive cores, low-mass hot Jupiters can over-flow their Roche-lobes and evaporate on Gyr time-scales, possibly leaving behind small rocky cores. Chapters four through six focus on the improvement and implications of a model for orbital evolution of the solar system, driven by dynamical instability (termed the "Nice" model). Hydrodynamical studies of the orbital evolution of planets embedded in protoplanetary disks suggest that giant planets have a tendency to assemble into multi-resonant configurations. Following this argument, we used analytical methods as well as self-consistent numerical N-body simulations to identify fully-resonant primordial states of the outer solar system, whose dynamical evolutions give rise to orbital architectures that resemble the current solar system. We found a total of only eight such initial conditions, providing

  2. Librational Response of Enceladus to Its Interior Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambaux, N.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Williams, J. G.; Karatekin, O.

    2010-03-01

    We will present the rotational motion of Enceladus perturbed by planetary perturbations and tidal torques and describe the main librations and short librations at 1.37 days amplitude for various interior models (computed with the Andrade model).

  3. Impaired Compensation for Salt-Induced Urinary Calcium Loss in a Space Flight Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navidi, Meena; Harper, J. S.; Evans, J.; Fung, P.; Wolinsky, I.; Arnaud, S. B.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The loss of urinary calcium (UCa) induced by high sodium (HiNa) diets is compensated for by an increase in net intestinal Ca absorption (abs.). To determine the capacity of the intestine to absorb Ca in a space flight model in which the formation of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25-D) is suppressed, we induced Ca loss with HiNa diets (8%) and restricted dietary Ca (0.2%). In 200 g rats with hind limbs unloaded by tail suspension (S), we examined intestinal Ca abs. by direct measurement in the duodenum (everted gut sac or S/M), vitamin D receptors (VDR) and Ca balance. We also measured serum ionized calcium (ICa), pH, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and 1,25D. PTH was related to ICa (r = -0.44, p is less than 0.02), pH (r = -0.47, p is less than 0.02) and %Ca abs. (r = -0.40, p is less than 0.05). 1,25-D was related to %Ca abs. (r = 0.60, p is less than 0.001) but not VDR or S/M. Effects of the model were lower serum 1,25-D (110 +/- 59 vs. 199 +/- 80 pg/ml, p is less than 0.005), %Ca abs. (83 +/- 6.9 vs. 93 +/- 3.2, p is less than 0.03) and Ca balance (27 +/- 0.2 vs. 30 +/- 0.3 mg/d, p is less than 0.001) in S than controls (C). The HiNa diet increased UCa excretion from 2 to 13% of dietary Ca. Responses to HiNa diets, compared to normal Na, revealed no differences in 1,25-D, Ca abs. or VDR. Ca balances were lower in HiNa (27 +/- 0.3 vs. 30 +/- 0.4 mg/d, p is less than 0.001) in spite of higher Ca intakes. The failure of S rats fed HiNa diets to increase Ca abs. in response to Na-induced Ca loss appears to be related to suppressed 1,25-D in the space flight model, the cause of which remains obscure.

  4. Salts and Radiation Products on the Surface of Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M. E.; Hand, K. P.

    2013-04-01

    The surface of Europa could contain the compositional imprint of an underlying interior ocean, but competing hypotheses differ over whether spectral observations from the Galileo spacecraft show the signature of ocean evaporates or simply surface radiation products unrelated to the interior. Using adaptive optics at the W. M. Keck Observatory, we have obtained spatially resolved spectra of most of the disk of Europa at a spectral resolution ∼40 times higher than seen by the Galileo spacecraft. These spectra show a previously undetected distinct signature of magnesium sulfate salts on Europa, but the magnesium sulfate is confined to the trailing hemisphere and spatially correlated with the presence of radiation products like sulfuric acid and SO2. On the leading, less irradiated, hemisphere, our observations rule out the presence of many of the proposed sulfate salts, but do show the presence of distorted water ice bands. Based on the association of the potential MgSO4 detection on the trailing side with other radiation products, we conclude that MgSO4 is also a radiation product, rather than a constituent of a Europa ocean brine. Based on ocean chemistry models, we hypothesize that, prior to irradiation, magnesium is primarily in the form of MgCl2, and we predict that NaCl and KCl are even more abundant, and, in fact, dominate the non-ice component of the leading hemisphere. We propose observational tests of this new hypothesis.

  5. SALTS AND RADIATION PRODUCTS ON THE SURFACE OF EUROPA

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M. E.; Hand, K. P.

    2013-04-15

    The surface of Europa could contain the compositional imprint of an underlying interior ocean, but competing hypotheses differ over whether spectral observations from the Galileo spacecraft show the signature of ocean evaporates or simply surface radiation products unrelated to the interior. Using adaptive optics at the W. M. Keck Observatory, we have obtained spatially resolved spectra of most of the disk of Europa at a spectral resolution {approx}40 times higher than seen by the Galileo spacecraft. These spectra show a previously undetected distinct signature of magnesium sulfate salts on Europa, but the magnesium sulfate is confined to the trailing hemisphere and spatially correlated with the presence of radiation products like sulfuric acid and SO{sub 2}. On the leading, less irradiated, hemisphere, our observations rule out the presence of many of the proposed sulfate salts, but do show the presence of distorted water ice bands. Based on the association of the potential MgSO{sub 4} detection on the trailing side with other radiation products, we conclude that MgSO{sub 4} is also a radiation product, rather than a constituent of a Europa ocean brine. Based on ocean chemistry models, we hypothesize that, prior to irradiation, magnesium is primarily in the form of MgCl{sub 2}, and we predict that NaCl and KCl are even more abundant, and, in fact, dominate the non-ice component of the leading hemisphere. We propose observational tests of this new hypothesis.

  6. 22. INTERIOR VIEW WITH INTERIOR VIEW OF MOLDING SANDS CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. INTERIOR VIEW WITH INTERIOR VIEW OF MOLDING SANDS CONTROL AND TEST LAB FOR UNIT NO. 2 GREY IRON DISAMATIC. SAND CASTING TECHNICIAN, ROY BATES, TESTS THE WEIGHT OF THE SAND, DRYS IT, AND WEIGHT IT AGAINST STANDARDS TO CALCULATE THE CORRECT MOISTURE NEEDED FOR DIFFERENT MOLDS. THE SAND MIX VARY WITH THE SIZE AND COMPOSITION OF THE CASTING. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  7. The salt and lipid composition of model cheeses modifies in-mouth flavour release and perception related to the free sodium ion content.

    PubMed

    Boisard, Lauriane; Andriot, Isabelle; Martin, Christophe; Septier, Chantal; Boissard, Vanessa; Salles, Christian; Guichard, Elisabeth

    2014-02-15

    Reducing salt and lipid levels in foodstuffs without any effect on acceptability is a major challenge, particularly because of their interactions with other ingredients. This study used a multimodal approach to understand the effects of changes to the composition of model cheeses (20/28, 24/24, 28/20 lipid/protein ratios, 0% and 1% added NaCl) on sodium ion mobility ((23)Na NMR), in-mouth sodium release and flavour perception. An increase in the salt content decreased cheese firmness and perceived hardness, and increased sodium ion mobility, in vivo sodium release and both saltiness and aroma perception. With the same amount of salt, a lower lipid/protein ratio increased the firmness of the cheeses, perceived hardness, and decreased sodium ion mobility, in vivo sodium release, saltiness and aroma perception. These findings suggest on one hand that it could be possible to increase saltiness perception by varying cheese composition, thus inducing differences in sodium ion mobility and in free sodium ion concentration, leading to differences in in-mouth sodium release and saltiness perception, and on the other hand that the reformulation of foods in line with health guidelines needs to take account of both salt content and the lipid/protein ratio. PMID:24128499

  8. Effects of propeller rotation direction on airplane interior noise levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, C. M.; Mayes, W. H.; Daniels, E. F.

    1985-01-01

    Interior noise measurements for upsweeping and downsweeping movement of the propeller blade tips past the fuselage were made on a twin-engine airplane and on two simplified fuselage models. Changes in interior noise levels of as much as 8 dB reversal of propeller rotation direction were measured for some configurations and test conditions.

  9. Model for antiorthostatic hypokinesia - Head-down tilt effects on water and salt excretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deavers, D. R.; Musacchia, X. J.; Meininger, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    Water and electrolyte excretion was investigated in antiorthostatic hypokinetic and orthostatic hypokinetic and control rats in metabolic cages. Significant (t test, P less than 0.05) diuresis, natriuresis, and kaliuresis occurred in the antiorthostatic hypokinetic subjects but did not occur in either the orthostatic hypokinetic or controls. Recovery from antiorthostatic hypokinesia was characterized by retention of water, sodium, and potassium. Patterns of changes in body weight and food and water consumption were virtually identical in antiorthostatic and orthostatic hypokinetic rats and thus could not account for the differences in renal handling of water and electrolytes. Also, differences in ingestion of food and water in controls could not account for differences in excretion of water and electrolytes between these and antiorthostatic hypokinetic rats. It was concluded that the antiorthostatic position was responsible for the diuresis and natriuresis and that the antiorthostatic hypokinetic rat appears to be a good model for the study of water and elecrolyte excretion during conditions such as bed rest, water immersion, and exposure to weightlessness.

  10. The influences of weir construction on salt water intrusion and water quality in a tidal estuary--assessment with modeling study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Bo; Liu, Wen-Cheng; Huang, Li-Ting

    2013-10-01

    A three-dimensional hydrodynamic and water quality model was developed and applied to predict the changes in physical and biochemical processes that would result from the proposed Dadu Weir construction in the Wu River estuary, located in central Taiwan. A high-resolution unstructured grid was constructed to represent the narrow channels in the tidal estuary. The model was calibrated and verified with available hydrographic and water quality data measured in 2011. The overall performance of the model is in reasonable agreement with the measured water level, salinity, and water quality state variables. The model was then used to investigate the changes in salt water intrusion and water quality as a result of weir construction under low-flow conditions. The model simulations indicate that more tidal energy will propagate into the estuary after weir construction because of decreased freshwater discharges. The limits of salt water intrusion before and after weir construction coincide at a distance of 11.6 km from the mouth of the Wu River. This salt water intrusion limit is the reason that the Dadu Weir will be constructed at a distance of 12 km from the mouth of the Wu River. The weir will become a barrier to salt water intrusion. The simulation results indicate that the concentrations of dissolved oxygen and nutrients will decrease slightly after weir construction, while the chlorophyll a concentration in the middle reach will increase after weir construction. However, construction of the weir is predicted to have little influence on water quality conditions downstream of the Wu River estuary. The results of this case study provide quantitative estimates of the physical and biochemical changes expected to occur in this nature system due to human action. PMID:23519845

  11. Using euhalophytes to understand salt tolerance and to develop saline agriculture: Suaeda salsa as a promising model

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jie; Wang, Baoshan

    2015-01-01

    Background As important components in saline agriculture, halophytes can help to provide food for a growing world population. In addition to being potential crops in their own right, halophytes are also potential sources of salt-resistance genes that might help plant breeders and molecular biologists increase the salt tolerance of conventional crop plants. One especially promising halophyte is Suaeda salsa, a euhalophytic herb that occurs both on inland saline soils and in the intertidal zone. The species produces dimorphic seeds: black seeds are sensitive to salinity and remain dormant in light under high salt concentrations, while brown seeds can germinate under high salinity (e.g. 600 mm NaCl) regardless of light. Consequently, the species is useful for studying the mechanisms by which dimorphic seeds are adapted to saline environments. S. salsa has succulent leaves and is highly salt tolerant (e.g. its optimal NaCl concentration for growth is 200 mm). A series of S. salsa genes related to salt tolerance have been cloned and their functions tested: these include SsNHX1, SsHKT1, SsAPX, SsCAT1, SsP5CS and SsBADH. The species is economically important because its fresh branches have high value as a vegetable, and its seed oil is edible and rich in unsaturated fatty acids. Because it can remove salts and heavy metals from saline soils, S. salsa can also be used in the restoration of salinized or contaminated saline land. Scope Because of its economic and ecological value in saline agriculture, S. salsa is one of the most important halophytes in China. In this review, the value of S. salsa as a source of food, medicine and forage is discussed. Its uses in the restoration of salinized or contaminated land and as a source of salt-resistance genes are also considered. PMID:25288631

  12. Fourth Aircraft Interior Noise Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, David G. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    The fourth in a series of NASA/SAE Interior Noise Workshops was held on May 19 and 20, 1992. The theme of the workshop was new technology and applications for aircraft noise with emphasis on source noise prediction; cabin noise prediction; cabin noise control, including active and passive methods; and cabin interior noise procedures. This report is a compilation of the presentations made at the meeting which addressed the above issues.

  13. Planetary seismology and interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toksoz, M. N.

    1979-01-01

    This report briefly summarizes knowledge gained in the area of planetary seismology in the period 1969-1979. Attention is given to the seismic instruments, the seismic environment (noise, characteristics of seismic wave propagation, etc.), and the seismicity of the moon and Mars as determined by the Apollo missions and Viking Lander experiments, respectively. The models of internal structures of the terrestrial planets are discussed, with the earth used for reference.

  14. The influence of anti-icing salts on the chemical composition of precipitation in Moscow according to monitoring and modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremina, Irina; Aloyan, Artasch; Arutunan, Vardan; Larin, Igor; Chubarova, Natalia; Yermakov, Alex

    2015-04-01

    The monitoring data and results of analysis of variability of acidity and mineral composition of precipitation, which took place in Moscow in 2012, compared with the previous period are presented. It has been found that the source of chloride anions in precipitation in recent years could be mainly chlorides of anti-icing salts. The origin of the chloride anions (together with chlorides of metal components of these reagents), could be partly obliged to dissolution of the hydrogen chloride. It has been shown that appearance of hydrogen chloride in the atmosphere of Moscow (leading to acid rains) could be the result of heterophase chemical reactions involving anti-icing salts. Preliminary assessment of the impact of these chemicals on the mineral composition and the acidity of precipitation has been presented. Keywords: Acid rain, monitoring of atmospheric precipitation mineral composition, the chloride anions, anti-icing salts.

  15. Exploring Asteroid Interiors: The Deep Interior Mission Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asphaug, E.; Belton, M. J. S.; Cangahuala, A.; Keith, L.; Klaasen, K.; McFadden, L.; Neumann, G.; Ostro, S. J.; Reinert, R.; Safaeinili, A.

    2003-01-01

    Deep Interior is a mission to determine the geophysical properties of near-Earth objects, including the first volumetric image of the interior of an asteroid. Radio reflection tomography will image the 3D distribution of complex dielectric properties within the 1 km rendezvous target and hence map structural, density or compositional variations. Laser altimetry and visible imaging will provide high-resolution surface topography. Smart surface pods culminating in blast experiments, imaged by the high frame rate camera and scanned by lidar, will characterize active mechanical behavior and structure of surface materials, expose unweathered surface for NIR analysis, and may enable some characterization of bulk seismic response. Multiple flybys en route to this target will characterize a diversity of asteroids, probing their interiors with non-tomographic radar reflectance experiments. Deep Interior is a natural follow-up to the NEARShoemaker mission and will provide essential guidance for future in situ asteroid and comet exploration. While our goal is to learn the interior geology of small bodies and how their surfaces behave, the resulting science will enable pragmatic technologies required of hazard mitigation and resource utilization.

  16. Molten Salt Promoting Effect in Double Salt CO2 Absorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Keling; Li, Xiaohong S.; Chen, Haobo; Singh, Prabhakar; King, David L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on the concept of molten salts as catalysts for CO2 absorption by MgO, and extend these observations to the MgO-containing double salt oxides. We will show that the phenomena involved with CO2 absorption by MgO and MgO-based double salts are similar and general, but with some important differences. This paper focuses on the following key concepts: i) identification of conditions that favor or disfavor participation of isolated MgO during double salt absorption, and investigation of methods to increase the absorption capacity of double salt systems by including MgO participation; ii) examination of the relationship between CO2 uptake and melting point of the promoter salt, leading to the recognition of the role of pre-melting (surface melting) in these systems; and iii) extension of the reaction pathway model developed for the MgO-NaNO3 system to the double salt systems. This information advances our understanding of MgO-based CO2 absorption systems for application with pre-combustion gas streams.

  17. Models for incomplete nucleophilic attack on a protonated carbonyl group and electron-deficient alkenes: salts and zwitterions from 1-dimethylamino-naphthalene-8-carbaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Lari, Alberth; Pitak, Matuesz B; Coles, Simon J; Rees, Gregory J; Day, Stephen P; Smith, Mark E; Hanna, John V; Wallis, John D

    2012-10-14

    The X-ray crystal structures of salts and zwitterionic Knoevenagel products from 1-dimethylamino-naphthalene-8-carbaldehyde show long N-C bonds between peri-groups which provide models for incomplete nucleophilic attack on a protonated carbonyl group and electron-deficient alkenes respectively. For the salts the N-C bonds lie in the range 1.625-1.638 Å with C-OH bonds intermediate in length between single and double bonds, while for the zwitterions the N-C bonds lie in the range 1.612-1.660 Å. The structural assignment of the former is supported by solid state (13)C and (15)N NMR studies on doubly isotopically-labelled material. Several zwitterions were converted to naphtha[1,8-bc]azepines by a mechanism involving the tertiary amino effect. PMID:22910881

  18. Convective Overshoot in Stellar Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. S.

    2015-07-01

    In stellar interiors, the turbulent thermal convection transports matters and energy, and dominates the structure and evolution of stars. The convective overshoot, which results from the non-local convective transport from the convection zone to the radiative zone, is one of the most uncertain and difficult factors in stellar physics at present. The classical method for studying the convective overshoot is the non-local mixing-length theory (NMLT). However, the NMLT bases on phenomenological assumptions, and leads to contradictions, thus the NMLT was criticized in literature. At present, the helioseismic studies have shown that the NMLT cannot satisfy the helioseismic requirements, and have pointed out that only the turbulent convection models (TCMs) can be accepted. In the first part of this thesis, models and derivations of both the NMLT and the TCM were introduced. In the second part, i.e., the work part, the studies on the TCM (theoretical analysis and applications), and the development of a new model of the convective overshoot mixing were described in detail. In the work of theoretical analysis on the TCM, the approximate solution and the asymptotic solution were obtained based on some assumptions. The structure of the overshoot region was discussed. In a large space of the free parameters, the approximate/asymptotic solutions are in good agreement with the numerical results. We found an important result that the scale of the overshoot region in which the thermal energy transport is effective is 1 HK (HK is the scale height of turbulence kinetic energy), which does not depend on the free parameters of the TCM. We applied the TCM and a simple overshoot mixing model in three cases. In the solar case, it was found that the temperature gradient in the overshoot region is in agreement with the helioseismic requirements, and the profiles of the solar lithium abundance, sound speed, and density of the solar models are also improved. In the low-mass stars of open

  19. Application of the multi-mechanism deformation model for three-dimensional simulations of salt : behavior for the strategic petroleum reserve.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Sobolik, Steven Ronald; Bean, James E.

    2010-07-01

    The U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve stores crude oil in 62 solution-mined caverns in salt domes located in Texas and Louisiana. Historically, three-dimensional geomechanical simulations of the behavior of the caverns have been performed using a power law creep model. Using this method, and calibrating the creep coefficient to field data such as cavern closure and surface subsidence, has produced varying degrees of agreement with observed phenomena. However, as new salt dome locations are considered for oil storage facilities, pre-construction geomechanical analyses are required that need site-specific parameters developed from laboratory data obtained from core samples. The multi-mechanism deformation (M-D) model is a rigorous mathematical description of both transient and steady-state creep phenomena. Recent enhancements to the numerical integration algorithm within the model have created a more numerically stable implementation of the M-D model. This report presents computational analyses to compare the results of predictions of the geomechanical behavior at the West Hackberry SPR site using both models. The recently-published results using the power law creep model produced excellent agreement with an extensive set of field data. The M-D model results show similar agreement using parameters developed directly from laboratory data. It is also used to predict the behavior for the construction and operation of oil storage caverns at a new site, to identify potential problems before a final cavern layout is designed.

  20. Direct measurement of salt-bridge solvation energies using a peptide model system: implications for protein stability.

    PubMed Central

    Wimley, W C; Gawrisch, K; Creamer, T P; White, S H

    1996-01-01

    The solvation energies of salt bridges formed between the terminal carboxyl of the host pentapeptide AcWL- X-LL and the side chains of Arg or Lys in the guest (X) position have been measured. The energies were derived from octanol-to-buffer transfer free energies determined between pH 1 and pH 9. 13C NMR measurements show that the salt bridges form in the octanol phase, but not in the buffer phase, when the side chains and the terminal carboxyl group are charged. The free energy of salt-bridge formation in octanol is approximately -4 kcal/mol (1 cal = 4.184 J), which is equal to or slightly larger than the sum of the solvation energies of noninteracting pairs of charged side chains. This is about one-half the free energy that would result from replacing a charge pair in octanol with a pair of hydrophobic residues of moderate size. Therefore, salt bridging in octanol can change the favorable aqueous solvation energy of a pair of oppositely charged residues to neutral or slightly unfavorable but cannot provide the same free energy decrease as hydrophobic residues. This is consistent with recent computational and experimental studies of protein stability. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8610155

  1. Simulating Emission and Chemical Evolution of Coarse Sea-Salt Particles in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical processing of sea-salt particles in coastal environments significantly impacts concentrations of particle components and gas-phase species and has implications for human exposure to particulate matter and nitrogen deposition to sensitive ecosystems. Emission of sea-sal...

  2. Understanding Io's Interior Structure from Electromagnetic Induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurana, K. K.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; Jia, X.

    2015-12-01

    Io has long been suspected of a molten interior based on theoretical models of tidal dissipation in its interior. Extremely high temperature lava erupting on Io's surface would be consistent with an internal magma ocean but the highest reported eruption temperatures are questionable. Currently, the only direct evidence of a subsurface magma ocean in Io is the electromagnetic induction response observed by Galileo (Khurana et al. 2011, Science, 332, 1186). Using Jupiter's rotating magnetic field as a sounding signal, Khurana et al. (2011) provided evidence of a strong dipolar induction signature in Galileo's magnetometer data from four different flybys. They further showed that the signal is consistent with electromagnetic induction from large amounts of rock-melts in the asthenosphere of Io. Modeling showed that the induction response from a completely solid mantle model is inadequate to explain the magnetometer observations. However, a layer of asthenosphere >50 km in thickness with a melt fraction ≥20% is adequate to accurately match the observed magnetic field. Here we summarize our current knowledge of Io's interior from Galileo's induction measurements, and then outline a scheme to further infer properties of Io's interior, especially its internal temperature profile, by marrying the principles of thermodynamics with those of electromagnetism. In particular, we obtain guidance on stable mineral phases and their physical properties (such as density, melt state and electrical conductivity) from thermodynamic principles, whereas guidance on how the resulting internal conductivity profile affects the magnetic environment around Io is obtained from electromagnetic theory. We also explore how induction measurements can be obtained at multiple frequencies from a future mission and be used to constrain both the location and the thickness of the magma ocean. Finally, we explore the consequences of the global magma ocean on Io's physical properties such as the current

  3. Prostaglandin-E2 Mediated Increase in Calcium and Phosphate Excretion in a Mouse Model of Distal Nephron Salt Wasting

    PubMed Central

    Soleimani, Manoocher; Barone, Sharon; Xu, Jie; Alshahrani, Saeed; Brooks, Marybeth; McCormack, Francis X.; Smith, Roger D.; Zahedi, Kamyar

    2016-01-01

    Contribution of salt wasting and volume depletion to the pathogenesis of hypercalciuria and hyperphosphaturia is poorly understood. Pendrin/NCC double KO (pendrin/NCC-dKO) mice display severe salt wasting under basal conditions and develop profound volume depletion, prerenal renal failure, and metabolic alkalosis and are growth retarded. Microscopic examination of the kidneys of pendrin/NCC-dKO mice revealed the presence of calcium phosphate deposits in the medullary collecting ducts, along with increased urinary calcium and phosphate excretion. Confirmatory studies revealed decreases in the expression levels of sodium phosphate transporter-2 isoforms a and c, increases in the expression of cytochrome p450 family 4a isotypes 12 a and b, as well as prostaglandin E synthase 1, and cyclooxygenases 1 and 2. Pendrin/NCC-dKO animals also had a significant increase in urinary prostaglandin E2 (PGE-2) and renal content of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) levels. Pendrin/NCC-dKO animals exhibit reduced expression levels of the sodium/potassium/2chloride co-transporter 2 (NKCC2) in their medullary thick ascending limb. Further assessment of the renal expression of NKCC2 isoforms by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) reveled that compared to WT mice, the expression of NKCC2 isotype F was significantly reduced in pendrin/NCC-dKO mice. Provision of a high salt diet to rectify volume depletion or inhibition of PGE-2 synthesis by indomethacin, but not inhibition of 20-HETE generation by HET0016, significantly improved hypercalciuria and salt wasting in pendrin/NCC dKO mice. Both high salt diet and indomethacin treatment also corrected the alterations in NKCC2 isotype expression in pendrin/NCC-dKO mice. We propose that severe salt wasting and volume depletion, irrespective of the primary originating nephron segment, can secondarily impair the reabsorption of salt and calcium in the thick ascending limb of Henle and/or proximal tubule, and reabsorption of sodium and

  4. Prostaglandin-E2 Mediated Increase in Calcium and Phosphate Excretion in a Mouse Model of Distal Nephron Salt Wasting.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Manoocher; Barone, Sharon; Xu, Jie; Alshahrani, Saeed; Brooks, Marybeth; McCormack, Francis X; Smith, Roger D; Zahedi, Kamyar

    2016-01-01

    Contribution of salt wasting and volume depletion to the pathogenesis of hypercalciuria and hyperphosphaturia is poorly understood. Pendrin/NCC double KO (pendrin/NCC-dKO) mice display severe salt wasting under basal conditions and develop profound volume depletion, prerenal renal failure, and metabolic alkalosis and are growth retarded. Microscopic examination of the kidneys of pendrin/NCC-dKO mice revealed the presence of calcium phosphate deposits in the medullary collecting ducts, along with increased urinary calcium and phosphate excretion. Confirmatory studies revealed decreases in the expression levels of sodium phosphate transporter-2 isoforms a and c, increases in the expression of cytochrome p450 family 4a isotypes 12 a and b, as well as prostaglandin E synthase 1, and cyclooxygenases 1 and 2. Pendrin/NCC-dKO animals also had a significant increase in urinary prostaglandin E2 (PGE-2) and renal content of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) levels. Pendrin/NCC-dKO animals exhibit reduced expression levels of the sodium/potassium/2chloride co-transporter 2 (NKCC2) in their medullary thick ascending limb. Further assessment of the renal expression of NKCC2 isoforms by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) reveled that compared to WT mice, the expression of NKCC2 isotype F was significantly reduced in pendrin/NCC-dKO mice. Provision of a high salt diet to rectify volume depletion or inhibition of PGE-2 synthesis by indomethacin, but not inhibition of 20-HETE generation by HET0016, significantly improved hypercalciuria and salt wasting in pendrin/NCC dKO mice. Both high salt diet and indomethacin treatment also corrected the alterations in NKCC2 isotype expression in pendrin/NCC-dKO mice. We propose that severe salt wasting and volume depletion, irrespective of the primary originating nephron segment, can secondarily impair the reabsorption of salt and calcium in the thick ascending limb of Henle and/or proximal tubule, and reabsorption of sodium and

  5. Thermophysical properties of reconsolidating crushed salt.

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Stephen J.; Urquhart, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    Reconsolidated crushed salt is being considered as a backfilling material placed upon nuclear waste within a salt repository environment. In-depth knowledge of thermal and mechanical properties of the crushed salt as it reconsolidates is critical to thermal/mechanical modeling of the reconsolidation process. An experimental study was completed to quantitatively evaluate the thermal conductivity of reconsolidated crushed salt as a function of porosity and temperature. The crushed salt for this study came from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). In this work the thermal conductivity of crushed salt with porosity ranging from 1% to 40% was determined from room temperature up to 300oC, using two different experimental methods. Thermal properties (including thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat) of single-crystal salt were determined for the same temperature range. The salt was observed to dewater during heating; weight loss from the dewatering was quantified. The thermal conductivity of reconsolidated crushed salt decreases with increasing porosity; conversely, thermal conductivity increases as the salt consolidates. The thermal conductivity of reconsolidated crushed salt for a given porosity decreases with increasing temperature. A simple mixture theory model is presented to predict and compare to the data developed in this study.

  6. Post Voyager comparisons of the interiors of Uranus and Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podolak, M.; Reynolds, R. T.; Young, R.

    1990-01-01

    The recent Voyager flyby of Uranus and Neptune has provided refined values for the gravitational moments and rotation periods of those planets. Using these new parameters, models of the interiors of these planets show that their density distributions are very similar. This lends support to the conjecture that their compositions are similar as well. The models are indeed consistent with such a conjecture. The difference in the internal heat sources of these two planets may be due to the fact that heat transport from the interior of Uranus is inhibited by a statically stable interior.

  7. Ultrasonic cleaning of interior surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Odell, D. MacKenzie C.

    1996-01-01

    An ultrasonic cleaning method for cleaning the interior surfaces of tubes. The method uses an ultrasonic generator and reflector each coupled to opposing ends of the open-ended, fluid-filled tube. Fluid-tight couplings seal the reflector and generator to the tube, preventing leakage of fluid from the interior of the tube. The reflector and generator are operatively connected to actuators, whereby the distance between them can be varied. When the distance is changed, the frequency of the sound waves is simultaneously adjusted to maintain the resonant frequency of the tube so that a standing wave is formed in the tube, the nodes of which are moved axially to cause cavitation along the length of the tube. Cavitation maximizes mechanical disruption and agitation of the fluid, dislodging foreign material from the interior surface.

  8. Ultrasonic cleaning of interior surfaces

    DOEpatents

    MacKenzie, D.; Odell, C.

    1994-03-01

    An ultrasonic cleaning apparatus is described for cleaning the interior surfaces of tubes. The apparatus includes an ultrasonic generator and reflector each coupled to opposing ends of the open-ended, fluid-filled tube. Fluid-tight couplings seal the reflector and generator to the tube, preventing leakage of fluid from the interior of the tube. The reflector and generator are operatively connected to actuators, whereby the distance between them can be varied. When the distance is changed, the frequency of the sound waves is simultaneously adjusted to maintain the resonant frequency of the tube so that a standing wave is formed in the tube, the nodes of which are moved axially to cause cavitation along the length of the tube. Cavitation maximizes mechanical disruption and agitation of the fluid, dislodging foreign material from the interior surface. 3 figures.

  9. Ultrasonic cleaning of interior surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Odell, D. MacKenzie C.

    1994-01-01

    An ultrasonic cleaning apparatus for cleaning the interior surfaces of tubes. The apparatus includes an ultrasonic generator and reflector each coupled to opposing ends of the open-ended, fluid-filled tube. Fluid-tight couplings seal the reflector and generator to the tube, preventing leakage of fluid from the interior of the tube. The reflector and generator are operatively connected to actuators, whereby the distance between them can be varied. When the distance is changed, the frequency of the sound waves is simultaneously adjusted to maintain the resonant frequency of the tube so that a standing wave is formed in the tube, the nodes of which are moved axially to cause cavitation along the length of the tube. Cavitation maximizes mechanical disruption and agitation of the fluid, dislodging foreign material from the interior surface.

  10. Ultrasonic cleaning of interior surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Odell, D.M.C.

    1996-06-25

    An ultrasonic cleaning method is described for cleaning the interior surfaces of tubes. The method uses an ultrasonic generator and reflector each coupled to opposing ends of the open-ended, fluid-filled tube. Fluid-tight couplings seal the reflector and generator to the tube, preventing leakage of fluid from the interior of the tube. The reflector and generator are operatively connected to actuators, whereby the distance between them can be varied. When the distance is changed, the frequency of the sound waves is simultaneously adjusted to maintain the resonant frequency of the tube so that a standing wave is formed in the tube, the nodes of which are moved axially to cause cavitation along the length of the tube. Cavitation maximizes mechanical disruption and agitation of the fluid, dislodging foreign material from the interior surface. 3 figs.

  11. Marguerite Arnet Residence, interior walls and front door, and door ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Marguerite Arnet Residence, interior walls and front door, and door leading to next room - Adam & Bessie Arnet Homestead, Marguerite Arnet Residence, 560 feet northeast of Adam & Bessie Arnet Residence, Model, Las Animas County, CO

  12. Orbits and Interiors of Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batygin, Konstantin

    2012-05-01

    The focus of this thesis is a collection of problems of timely interest in orbital dynamics and interior structure of planetary bodies. The first three chapters are dedicated to understanding the interior structure of close-in, gaseous extrasolar planets (hot Jupiters). In order to resolve a long-standing problem of anomalously large hot Jupiter radii, we proposed a novel magnetohydrodynamic mechanism responsible for inflation. The mechanism relies on the electro-magnetic interactions between fast atmospheric flows and the planetary magnetic field in a thermally ionized atmosphere, to induce electrical currents that flow throughout the planet. The resulting Ohmic dissipation acts to maintain the interior entropies, and by extension the radii of hot Jupiters at an enhanced level. Using self-consistent calculations of thermal evolution of hot Jupiters under Ohmic dissipation, we demonstrated a clear tendency towards inflated radii for effective temperatures that give rise to significant ionization of K and Na in the atmosphere, a trend fully consistent with the observational data. Furthermore, we found that in absence of massive cores, low-mass hot Jupiters can over-flow their Roche-lobes and evaporate on Gyr time-scales, possibly leaving behind small rocky cores. Chapters four through six focus on the improvement and implications of a model for orbital evolution of the solar system, driven by dynamical instability (termed the "Nice" model). Hydrodynamical studies of the orbital evolution of planets embedded in protoplanetary disks suggest that giant planets have a tendency to assemble into multi-resonant configurations. Following this argument, we used analytical methods as well as self-consistent numerical N-body simulations to identify fully-resonant primordial states of the outer solar system, whose dynamical evolutions give rise to orbital architectures that resemble the current solar system. We found a total of only eight such initial conditions, providing

  13. Density of the lunar interior.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gast, P. W.; Giuli, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    It is attempted to derive the constraints that can be placed on the density of the lunar interior. The moment of inertia of the moon and its mean density are being considered in the investigation together with the mass and density of the lunar crust that have been inferred from the seismic refraction data recorded by the passive seismometer. The calculations presented show that the density of the lunar interior can easily approach values as high as 3.5 for a fraction of the lunar mass which lies in the range from 1/2 to 2/3.

  14. Models for aqueous electrolyte mixtures for systems extending from dilute range to the fused salt: Evaluation of parameters to high temperatures and pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Pabalan, R.T.; Pitzer, K.S.

    1988-09-01

    Models based on general equations for the excess Gibbs energy of the aqueous fluid provide thermodynamically consistent structures for evaluating and predicting aqueous electrolyte properties. These equations yield other quantities upon appropriate differentiation, including osmotic and activity coefficients, excess enthalpies, heat capacities, and volumes. For this reason a wide array of experimental data are available from which model parameters and their temperature or pressure dependence can be evaluated. For systems of moderate concentration, the most commonly used model at present is the ion-interaction approach and coworkers. For more concentrated solutions, including those extending to the fused salt, an alternate model based on a Margules-expansion and commonly used for nonelectrolytes was proposed. We discuss these two models and give examples of parameter evaluations for some geologically relevant systems to high temperatures and pressures; also we show applications of the models to calculations of solubility equilibria.

  15. Rheological contrasts in salt and their effects on flow in salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urai, Janos L.; Kukla, Peter A.

    2014-05-01

    The majority of numerical and analogue models of salt tectonics assume homogeneous rheological models, and consequently produce simple internal structures. This is in contrast to observations in salt mines and 3D seismic, showing complex folding at a wide range of scales, in combination with boudinage and fracturing, which point to large rheological contrasts in salt bodies. The rheology of rock salt during slow deformation can be both Newtonian and Power law. Dislocation creep and dissolution-precipitation processes, such as solution-precipitation creep and dynamic recrystallisation, both play a significant role and grain boundary healing in deforming salt may result in cyclic softening and hardening behaviour. The switch between these processes can cause major changes in rock salt rheology, at time scales both relevant to geologic evolution and subsurface operations. In the dislocation creep field, a compilation of laboratory data show that different rock salts can creep at four orders of magnitude different strain rates under otherwise the same conditions. Potassium - Magnesium salts are in turn much weaker, and Anhydrite much stronger than rock salt. Anhydrite - carbonate inclusions embedded in deforming salt bodies respond to the movements of the salt in a variety of ways including boudinage and folding. New methods of microstructure analysis integrated with paleorheology indicators observed in natural laboratories allows an integration of these data and the development of a unified model for salt creep for both underground cavities and natural deformation, including the effect of high fluid pressures in salt which lead to a dramatic increases in permeability. For example, modeling of anhydrite stringer sinking is an important way to obtain the long term rheology of the halite, indicating that the rheology of Zechstein salt during the Tertiary was dominated by dislocation creep. These form the basis of a new generation of mechanical models to predict the

  16. Meiobenthic gradients with special reference to Plathelminthes and Polychaeta in an estuarine salt marsh creek—a small-scale model for boreal tidal coasts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellwig-Armonies, Monika; Armonies, Werner

    1987-06-01

    Environmental conditions in salt marsh creeks are intermediate between the open tidal coast and estuaries. A large salt marsh creek at the island of Sylt (North Sea) was studied in order to test whether its fauna is more similar to that of the open tidal coast or to that of estuaries. Because of a sandy bar at the seaward opening, the tidal range is only 10 cm in the creek, and the water level never drops below the level of the sand bar. Zoobenthos in the sandy bottom and on the sandy shores was studied at both ends and in the middle of the creek. Polychaeta and Plathelminthes were determined to species level. On an average, 2115 metazoans were found below 10 cm2 of surface area. At the seaward end of the creek, abundance and taxonomic composition are similar to that of the adjoining Wadden area. Nematoda are the dominant taxon, followed by Copepoda, Plathelminthes and Oligochaeta. Taxonomic composition is different at the landward end. Plathelminthes and Nematoda are most abundant followed by Copepoda. Both Oligochaeta and Polychaeta are scarce at these newly eroded sites. Plathelminth abundance at the landward end of the creek is exceptionally high (770 935·10 cm-2). Contrary to what is generally found in estuaries, the species density of Plathelminthes shows a significant increase toward the land. The species composition of Polychaeta and Plathelminthes indicates that the sites below mean high tide level of the creek correspond to the adjacent eulittoral Wadden area while the fauna of the supralittoral sites of the creek is similar to the fauna of supralittoral tidal coasts. Typical sublittoral species did not occur in the salt marsh creek. Thus, salt marsh creeks may be regarded as a small-scale model for the tidal coast. In context with the results obtained, the definition of estuaries is discussed.

  17. Electrolyte salts for power sources

    DOEpatents

    Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

    1995-11-28

    Electrolyte salts are disclosed for power sources comprising salts of phenyl polysulfonic acids and phenyl polyphosphonic acids. The preferred salts are alkali and alkaline earth metal salts, most preferably lithium salts. 2 figs.

  18. Drilling the Messinian Salinity Crisis as a Model Analogue for Dolomite Deposition at the End of Massive Salt Deposition Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Judith A.; Aloisi, Giovanni; Anjos, Sylvia; Latgé, Ricardo; Matsuda, Nilo; Bontognali, Tomaso; Vasconcelos, Crisogono

    2015-04-01

    Sedimentologic and stratigraphic studies of the Lower Cretaceous sequence, deposited in the economically important Campos Basin, southeast Brazil, document the occurrence of ~20-m-thick dolomite intervals overlying the "massive salt" megasequences of the Lagoa Feia Formation. This stratigaphic succession marks the Aptian/Albian transition from extreme evaporitic conditions of the Lagoa Feia Formation to shallow marine conditions of the Macaé Formation, related to the early opening of the South Atlantic. The facies change from evaporites to dolomite is interpreted as a product of dolomitization resulting from the refuxing of hypersaline fluids from shallow embayments with intense evaporation (Latgé, 2001). Although the reflux model provides a mechanism to produce fluids with geochemical composition favorable for dolomite precipitation, it cannot account for all of the factors required to promote dolomite precipitation. In this study, we propose a different model to explain the post-evaporite deposition of massive dolomite based on the study of sequences deposited at the end Messinian Salinity Crisis, which were recovered from the deep basins of the Mediterranean Sea during DSDP/ODP drilling campaigns. At most of these deep-water sites, the cored interval contained unusual dolomite deposits overlying the uppermost evaporite sections. For example, the upper Messinian sedimentary sequence at DSDP Site 374 comprises non-fossiliferous dolomitic mudstone overlying dolomitic mudstone/gypsum cycles, which in turn overlie anhydrite and halite (Hsü, Montadert et al., 1978). We postulate that the end Messinian dolomite is a product of microbial activity under extreme hypersaline conditions. In the last 20 years, research into the factors controlling dolomite precipitation under Earth surface conditions has led to the development of new models involving the metabolism of microorganisms and associated biofilms to overcome the kinetic inhibitions associated with primary

  19. Interior Design: Teacher's Instructional Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Tricia

    This teacher's instructional guide, which is part of a family and consumer sciences education series focusing on a broad range of employment opportunities, is intended to assist teachers responsible for teaching one- and two-year interior design programs for Texas high school students. The following are among the items included: (1) introductory…

  20. Department of the Interior program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balsley, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The remote sensing activities of the Department of Interior are summarized. The use of satellite imagery in land and water management is described. Specific topics discussed include: land use mapping, exploration and discovery of metal, oil, and gas deposits, location of geological faults, and repetitive monitoring of dynamic environmental phenomena related to water resources.

  1. Interior Design: Challenges and Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Planning and Management, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Presents solutions to architectural challenges in school interior design; these solutions made the indoor environments more conducive and attractive for learning. Addresses four challenges: making a long corridor look less like a tunnel; maintaining tradition and minimizing cost in a new athletic facility; designing a kindergarten that is secure…

  2. Structural style of a compressive wedge with salt and coal shale decollement levels: Analogue and seismic modelling of the Kuqa Thrust Belt (North Tarim, China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callot, Jean Paul; Guichong, Wang; Moretti, Isabelle; Yongxing, Gu; Letouzey, Jean; Wu, Shengyu

    2013-04-01

    The Kuqa foreland fold and thrust belt developed at the contact between the uplifted basement block of the Tien Shan and the Tarim basin in foreland setting, since early Oligocene. It is mainly controlled by two major decollement levels. Thin skin deformation and Mesozoic thrust sheet develop above the Triassic and Jurassic coal and shale layers. The Paleogene and Neogene salt ridges and synclines developed above the stacked thrust sheets through the Paleogene salt layer. 4D Analogue models imaged with X-ray tomography are used to analyse the relative importance several parameters such as (1) the kinematic boundary conditions, (2) the rheological behaviour of the main decollement levels, and (3) erosion and sedimentation, on the present structure evolution. The experiments demonstrate that the geometry of the belt is controlled by the regional distribution of both decollement levels. The lower decollement requires a weak frictional behaviour, pinching toward the south, whereas the viscous Paleogene salt layer, pinching regularly to the South and passing gradually to clastic deposits to the North close to the Tien Shan boundary. The geometry of salt ridges and diapirs dvlopped during the early tectonic phase associated with a low sedimentation rate controls the shape and localisation of the future foreland synclines and boundaries. The synclines grow during the late stage of evolution with a rapid increase in flexure and sedimentation rate. The backstop geometry is the second major element, controlling the dip of the Mesozoic stacked thrust sheet below the salt. Inverted basement block associated to a basement short cut emplaced during the late stage of evolution are both needed to generate the overall geometry of these units. Based on the analogue models, the geometry of the thrust sheet and foreland syncline is used to perform a synthetic seismic profile in order to test the ability to image the deep parts of the thrust sheets below complex structures. The

  3. Interior Design Factors in Library Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Patricia Ann

    When planning the interior of a library facility, the planning team of librarian, library consultant, architect, and interior design consultant must focus attention on the basic principles of interior design and the psychological needs of the user. Colors for an interior should be selected with careful regard to space, light, and emotional and…

  4. Effects of salting-in interactions on macromolecule diffusiophoresis and salt osmotic diffusion.

    PubMed

    McAfee, Michele S; Annunziata, Onofrio

    2015-02-01

    Macromolecule diffusiophoresis (i.e., macromolecule migration induced by a salt concentration gradient) in water and salt osmotic diffusion (i.e., salt migration induced by a macromolecule concentration gradient) are two cross-diffusion mechanisms caused by macromolecule-salt interactions. We investigated the effect of salting-in interactions on the behavior of these two cross-diffusion mechanisms. Our results are distinct from those previously obtained in the case of salting-out interactions. Cross-diffusion was experimentally characterized by Rayleigh interferometry at 25 °C. Specifically, multicomponent diffusion coefficients were measured for a neutral polymer, polyethylene glycol (molar mass, 20 kg/mol), in aqueous solutions of three thiocyanate salts (NaSCN, KSCN, and NH₄SCN) as a function of salt concentration at low polymer concentration (0.5% w/w). Our results on salt osmotic diffusion, which were qualitatively different from those previously obtained for salting-out salts, were used to quantitatively characterize the strength of salting-in interactions. The behavior of polymer diffusiophoresis as a function of salt concentration and cation type reveals that polymer chains have an extrinsic negative charge, consistent with anion binding being the cause of salting-in interactions. To quantitatively examine the effect of anion binding on salt osmotic diffusion and polymer diffusiophoresis, we developed a theoretical model based on the linear laws of nonequilibrium thermodynamics for diffusion, the Scatchard binding model, and particle electrophoresis. This work contributes to the understanding of the multifaceted effects of molecular interactions on cross-diffusion mechanisms, salting-in interactions, and the Hofmeister series. PMID:25579202

  5. Quantum state of the black hole interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brustein, Ram; Medved, A. J. M.

    2015-08-01

    If a black hole (BH) is initially in an approximately pure state and it evaporates by a unitary process, then the emitted radiation will be in a highly quantum state. As the purifier of this radiation, the state of the BH interior must also be in some highly quantum state. So that, within the interior region, the mean-field approximation cannot be valid and the state of the BH cannot be described by some semiclassical metric. On this basis, we model the state of the BH interior as a collection of a large number of excitations that are packed into closely spaced but single-occupancy energy levels; a sort-of "Fermi sea" of all light-enough particles. This highly quantum state is surrounded by a semiclassical region that lies close to the horizon and has a non-vanishing energy density. It is shown that such a state looks like a BH from the outside and decays via gravitational pair production in the near-horizon region at a rate that agrees with the Hawking rate. We also consider the fate of a classical object that has passed through to the BH interior and show that, once it has crossed over the near-horizon threshold, the object meets its demise extremely fast. This result cannot be attributed to a "firewall", as the trauma to the in-falling object only begins after it has passed through the near-horizon region and enters a region where semiclassical spacetime ends but the energy density is still parametrically smaller than Planckian.

  6. Protein aggregation in salt solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kastelic, Miha; Kalyuzhnyi, Yurij V.; Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Dill, Ken A.; Vlachy, Vojko

    2015-01-01