Science.gov

Sample records for models plasma

  1. Global Core Plasma Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis L.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort, R. H.

    1999-01-01

    Abstract. The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) provides, empirically derived, core plasma density as a function of geomagnetic and solar conditions throughout the inner magnetosphere. It is continuous in value and gradient and is composed of separate models for the ionosphere, the plasmasphere, the plasmapause, the trough, and the polar cap. The relative composition of plasmaspheric H+, He+, and O+ is included in the GCPM. A blunt plasmaspheric bulge and rotation of the bulge with changing geomagnetic conditions is included. The GCPM is an amalgam of density models, intended to serve as a framework for continued improvement as new measurements become available and are used to characterize core plasma density, composition, and temperature.

  2. Pulsed Plasma Accelerator Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, M.; Kazeminezhad, F.; Owens, T.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents the main results of the modeling task of the PPA project. The objective of this task is to make major progress towards developing a new computational tool with new capabilities for simulating cylindrically symmetric 2.5 dimensional (2.5 D) PPA's. This tool may be used for designing, optimizing, and understanding the operation of PPA s and other pulsed power devices. The foundation for this task is the 2-D, cylindrically symmetric, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code PCAPPS (Princeton Code for Advanced Plasma Propulsion Simulation). PCAPPS was originally developed by Sankaran (2001, 2005) to model Lithium Lorentz Force Accelerators (LLFA's), which are electrode based devices, and are typically operated in continuous magnetic field to the model, and implementing a first principles, self-consistent algorithm to couple the plasma and power circuit that drives the plasma dynamics.

  3. Plasma-Sheath Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemann, Karl-Ulrich

    2012-10-01

    In typical gas discharges a quasineutral plasma is shielded from a negativ absorbing wall by a thin positive sheath that is nearly planar and collision-free. The subdivision of ``plasma'' and ``sheath'' was introduced by Langmuir and is based on a small ratio of the electron Debye lenghth λD to the dominant competing characteristic plasma length l. Depending on the special conditions, l may represent, e.g., the plasma extension, the ionization length, the ion mean free path, the ion gyro radius, or a geometric length. Strictly speaking, this subdivion is possible only in the asymptotic limit λD/l->0. The asymptotic analysis results in singularities at the ``sheath edge'' closely related to the ``Bohm criterion.'' Due to these singularities a direct smooth matching of the separate plasma and sheath soltions is not possible. To obtain a consistent smooth transition, the singular sheath edge must be bridged by an additinal narrow ``intermediate'' model zone accounting both for plasma processes (e.g., collisions) and for the first build up of space charge. Due to this complexity and to different interpretations of the ``classical'' papers by Langmuir and Bohm, the asymptotic plasma-sheath concept and the definition of the sheath edge were questioned and resulted in controversies during the last two decades. We discuss attempts to re-define the sheath edge, to account for finite values of λD/l in the Bohm criterion, and demonstrate the consistent matching of plasma and sheath. The investigations of the plasma-sheath transition discussed so far are based on a simplified fluid analysis that cannot account for the essential inhomogeneity of the boundary layer and for the dominant role of slow ions in space charge formation. Therefore we give special emphasis to the kinetic theory of the plasma-sheath transition. Unfortunately this approach results in an additional mathematical difficulty caused by ions with zero velocity. We discuss attempts to avoid this singularity by

  4. Modeling electronegative plasma discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenberg, A.J.; Lieberman, M.A.

    1995-12-31

    Macroscopic analytic models for a three-component electronegative gas discharge are developed. Assuming the negative ions to be in Boltzmann equilibrium, a positive ion ambipolar diffusion equation is derived. The discharge consists of an electronegative core and electropositive edges. The electron density in the core is nearly uniform, allowing a parabolic approximation to the plasma profile to be employed. The resulting equilibrium equations are solved analytically and matched to a constant mobility transport model of an electropositive edge plasma. The solutions are compared to a simulation of a parallel-plane r.f. driven oxygen plasma for p = 50 mTorr and n{sub eo}= 2.4 x 10{sup 15} m{sup -3}. The ratio {alpha}{sub o} of central negative ion density to electron density, and the electron temperature T{sub e}, found in the simulation, are in reasonable agreement with the values calculated from the model. The model is extended to: (1) low pressures, where a variable mobility model is used in the electropositive edge region; and (2) high {alpha}{sub o} in which the edge region disappears. The inclusion of a second positive ion species, which can be very important in describing electronegative discharges used for materials processing, is a possible extension of the model.

  5. Plasma Modeling of Electrosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Scott; Friedrichs, Daniel; Gilbert, James; Park, Wounjhang; Maksimovic, Dragan

    2014-10-01

    Electrosurgery is the use of high frequency alternating current (AC) to illicit a clinical response in tissue, such as cutting or cauterization. Power electronics converters have been demonstrated to generate the necessary output voltage and current for electrosurgery. The design goal of the converter is to regulate output power while supplying high frequency AC. The design is complicated by fast current and voltage transients that occur when the current travels through air in the form of an arc. To assist in designing a converter that maintains the desired output power during these transients, we have used the COMSOL Plasma Module to determine the output voltage and current characteristics during an arc. This plasma model, used in conjunction with linear circuit elements, allows the full electrosurgical system to be validated. Two models have been tested with the COMSOL Plasma Module. One is a four-species, four-reaction model based on the local field approximation technique. The second simulates the underlying air chemistry using 30 species, 151 chemical reactions, and a coupled electron energy distribution function. Experimental output voltage and current samples have been collected and compared to both models.

  6. Hybrid plasma modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; DeChant, Lawrence Justin.; Piekos, Edward Stanley; Pointon, Timothy David

    2009-02-01

    This report summarizes the work completed during FY2007 and FY2008 for the LDRD project ''Hybrid Plasma Modeling''. The goal of this project was to develop hybrid methods to model plasmas across the non-continuum-to-continuum collisionality spectrum. The primary methodology to span these regimes was to couple a kinetic method (e.g., Particle-In-Cell) in the non-continuum regions to a continuum PDE-based method (e.g., finite differences) in continuum regions. The interface between the two would be adjusted dynamically ased on statistical sampling of the kinetic results. Although originally a three-year project, it became clear during the second year (FY2008) that there were not sufficient resources to complete the project and it was terminated mid-year.

  7. Modelling of Complex Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akdim, Mohamed Reda

    2003-09-01

    Nowadays plasmas are used for various applications such as the fabrication of silicon solar cells, integrated circuits, coatings and dental cleaning. In the case of a processing plasma, e.g. for the fabrication of amorphous silicon solar cells, a mixture of silane and hydrogen gas is injected in a reactor. These gases are decomposed by making a plasma. A plasma with a low degree of ionization (typically 10_5) is usually made in a reactor containing two electrodes driven by a radio-frequency (RF) power source in the megahertz range. Under the right circumstances the radicals, neutrals and ions can react further to produce nanometer sized dust particles. The particles can stick to the surface and thereby contribute to a higher deposition rate. Another possibility is that the nanometer sized particles coagulate and form larger micron sized particles. These particles obtain a high negative charge, due to their large radius and are usually trapped in a radiofrequency plasma. The electric field present in the discharge sheaths causes the entrapment. Such plasmas are called dusty or complex plasmas. In this thesis numerical models are presented which describe dusty plasmas in reactive and nonreactive plasmas. We started first with the development of a simple one-dimensional silane fluid model where a dusty radio-frequency silane/hydrogen discharge is simulated. In the model, discharge quantities like the fluxes, densities and electric field are calculated self-consistently. A radius and an initial density profile for the spherical dust particles are given and the charge and the density of the dust are calculated with an iterative method. During the transport of the dust, its charge is kept constant in time. The dust influences the electric field distribution through its charge and the density of the plasma through recombination of positive ions and electrons at its surface. In the model this process gives an extra production of silane radicals, since the growth of dust is

  8. Modeling of Photoionized Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kallman, Timothy R.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper I review the motivation and current status of modeling of plasmas exposed to strong radiation fields, as it applies to the study of cosmic X-ray sources. This includes some of the astrophysical issues which can be addressed, the ingredients for the models, the current computational tools, the limitations imposed by currently available atomic data, and the validity of some of the standard assumptions. I will also discuss ideas for the future: challenges associated with future missions, opportunities presented by improved computers, and goals for atomic data collection.

  9. Modeling plasma loudspeakers.

    PubMed

    Béquin, Ph; Castor, K; Herzog, Ph; Montembault, V

    2007-04-01

    This paper deals with the acoustic modeling and measurement of a needle-to-grid plasma loudspeaker using a negative Corona discharge. In the first part, we summarize the model described in previous papers, where the electrode gap is divided into a charged particle production region near the needle and a drift region which occupies most of the inter-electrode gap. In each region, interactions between charged and neutral particles in the ionized gas lead to a perturbation of the surrounding air, and thus generate an acoustic field. In each region, viewed as a separate acoustic source, an acoustical model requiring only a few parameters is proposed. In the second part of the paper, an experimental setup is presented for measuring acoustic pressures and directivities. This setup was developed and used to study the evolution of the parameters with physical properties, such as the geometrical and electrical configuration and the needle material. In the last part of this paper, a study on the electroacoustic efficiency of the plasma loudspeaker is described, and differences with respect to the design parameters are analyzed. Although this work is mainly aimed at understanding transduction phenomena, it may be found useful for the development of an audio loudspeaker. PMID:17471712

  10. Model for resonant plasma probe.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Johnson, William Arthur; Hebner, Gregory Albert; Jorgenson, Roy E.; Coats, Rebecca Sue

    2007-04-01

    This report constructs simple circuit models for a hairpin shaped resonant plasma probe. Effects of the plasma sheath region surrounding the wires making up the probe are determined. Electromagnetic simulations of the probe are compared to the circuit model results. The perturbing effects of the disc cavity in which the probe operates are also found.

  11. Helicon plasma thruster discharge model

    SciTech Connect

    Lafleur, T.

    2014-04-15

    By considering particle, momentum, and energy balance equations, we develop a semi-empirical quasi one-dimensional analytical discharge model of radio-frequency and helicon plasma thrusters. The model, which includes both the upstream plasma source region as well as the downstream diverging magnetic nozzle region, is compared with experimental measurements and confirms current performance levels. Analysis of the discharge model identifies plasma power losses on the radial and back wall of the thruster as the major performance reduction factors. These losses serve as sinks for the input power which do not contribute to the thrust, and which reduce the maximum plasma density and hence propellant utilization. With significant radial plasma losses eliminated, the discharge model (with argon) predicts specific impulses in excess of 3000 s, propellant utilizations above 90%, and thruster efficiencies of about 30%.

  12. Helicon plasma thruster discharge model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafleur, T.

    2014-04-01

    By considering particle, momentum, and energy balance equations, we develop a semi-empirical quasi one-dimensional analytical discharge model of radio-frequency and helicon plasma thrusters. The model, which includes both the upstream plasma source region as well as the downstream diverging magnetic nozzle region, is compared with experimental measurements and confirms current performance levels. Analysis of the discharge model identifies plasma power losses on the radial and back wall of the thruster as the major performance reduction factors. These losses serve as sinks for the input power which do not contribute to the thrust, and which reduce the maximum plasma density and hence propellant utilization. With significant radial plasma losses eliminated, the discharge model (with argon) predicts specific impulses in excess of 3000 s, propellant utilizations above 90%, and thruster efficiencies of about 30%.

  13. Modeling of Plasma Spray Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chong H.

    1996-10-01

    A comprehensive computational model for thermal plasma processes is being developed with sufficient generality and flexibility to apply to a wide variety of present and proposed plasma processing concepts and devices. In our model for gas-particle flows, the gas is represented as a continuous multicomponent chemically reacting gas with temperature-dependent thermodynamic and transport properties. Ions and electrons are considered as separate components or species of the mixture, while ionization and dissociation reactions are treated as chemical reactions. Entrained particles interacting with the plasma are represented by a stochastic particle model in which the velocities, temperatures, sizes, and other characteristics of typical particles are computed simultaneously with the plasma flow. The model in its present form can simulate particle injection, heating, and melting, but not evaporation and condensation. This model is embodied in the LAVA computer code, which has previously been applied to simulate plasma spraying, mixing and demixing of plasma gases, and departures from chemical (ionization/dissociation), thermal, and excitation equilibrium in plasmas. A transient simulation has been performed of stainless steel particles injected into a swirling high-velocity nitrogen-hydrogen plasma jet in air under typical operating conditions for a newly developed high-velocity high-power (HVHP) torch, which produces plasma jets with peak velocities in excess of 3000 m/s. The calculational results show that strong departures from ionization and dissociation equilibrium develop in the downstream region as the chemical reactions freeze out at lower temperatures. The calculational results also show good agreement with experimental data on particle temperature, velocity, and spray pattern, together with important statistical effects associated with distributions in particle properties and injection conditions. This work was performed under the auspices of the U. S

  14. Modeling the Europa plasma torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreier, Ron; Eviatar, Aharon; Vasyliunas, Vytenis M.; Richardson, John D.

    1993-01-01

    The existence of a torus of plasma generated by sputtering from Jupiter's satellite Europa has long been suspected but never yet convincingly demonstrated. Temperature profiles from Voyager plasma observations indicate the presence of hot, possibly freshly picked-up ions in the general vicinity of the orbit of Europa, which may be interpreted as evidence for a local plasma torus. Studies of ion partitioning in the outer regions of the Io torus reveal that the oxygen to sulfur mixing ratio varies with radial distance; this may indicates that oxygen-rich matter is injected from a non-Io source, most probably Europa. We have constructed a quantitative model of a plasma torus near the orbit of Europa which takes into account plasma input from the Io torus, sputtering from the surface of Europa, a great number of ionization and charge exchange processes, and plasma loss by diffusive transport. When the transport time is chosen so that the model's total number density in consistent with the observed total plasma density, the contribution from Europa is found to be significant although not dominant. The model predicts in detail the ion composition, charge states, and the relative fractions of hot Europa-generated and (presumed) cold Io-generated ions. The results are generally consistent with observations from Voyager and can in principle (subject to limitations of data coverage) be confirmed in more detail by Ulysses.

  15. Plasma disruption modeling and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, A.

    1994-07-01

    Disruptions in tokamak reactors are considered a limiting factor to successful operation and a reliable design. The behavior of plasma-facing components during a disruption is critical to the overall integrity of the reactor. Erosion of plasma facing-material (PFM) surfaces due to thermal energy dump during the disruption can severely limit the lifetime of these components and thus diminish the economic feasibility of the reactor.Initially, the incident plasma particles will deposit their energy directly on the PFM surface, heating it to a very high temperature where ablation occurs. Models for plasma-material interactions have been developed and used to predict material thermal evolution during the disruption. Within a few microseconds after the start of the disruption, enough material is vaporized to intercept most of the incoming plasma particles. Models for plasma-vapor interactions are necessary to predict vapor cloud expansion and hydrodynamics. Continuous heating of the vapor cloud above the material surface by the incident plasma particles will excite, ionize, and cause vapor atoms to emit thermal radiation. Accurate models for radiation transport in the vapor are essential for calculating the net radiated flux to the material surface which determines the final erosion thickness and consequently component lifetime. A comprehensive model that takes into account various stages of plasma-material interaction has been developed and used to predict erosion rates during reactor disruption, as well during induced disruption in laboratory experiments. Differences between various simulation experiments and reactor conditions are discussed. A two-dimensional radiation transport model has been developed to particularly simulate the effect of small test samples used in laboratory disruption experiments.

  16. Modelling the Plasma Jet in Multi-Arc Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.; Schein, J.; Zimmermann, S.; Möhwald, K.; Lummer, C.

    2016-08-01

    Particle in-flight characteristics in atmospheric plasma spraying process are determined by impulse and heat energy transferred between the plasma jet and injected powder particles. One of the important factors for the quality of the plasma-sprayed coatings is thus the distribution of plasma gas temperatures and velocities in plasma jet. Plasma jets generated by conventional single-arc plasma spraying systems and their interaction with powder particles were subject matter of intensive research. However, this does not apply to plasma jets generated by means of multi-arc plasma spraying systems yet. In this study, a numerical model has been developed which is designated to dealing with the flow characteristics of the plasma jet generated by means of a three-cathode spraying system. The upstream flow conditions, which were calculated using a priori conducted plasma generator simulations, have been coupled to the plasma jet simulations. The significances of the relevant numerical assumptions and aspects of the models are analyzed. The focus is placed on to the turbulence and diffusion/demixing modelling. A critical evaluation of the prediction power of the models is conducted by comparing the numerical results to the experimental results determined by means of emission spectroscopic computed tomography. It is evident that the numerical models exhibit a good accuracy for their intended use.

  17. Plasma model of superconducting crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netesova, Nadezhda P.

    2016-04-01

    Within inharmonious plasma oscillation model the superconducting crystal AB is considered consisting of two subsystems 2AB=A2+B2. In high-temperature superconductors spontaneous division into two phases: superconducting and isolating was revealed. Phase separation was caused by plasma instability. It is obtained the transition superconducting phase temperature dependence Tc = F (q12, q1, q2, V12, V1, V2) on the isotopic substitution physical parameters: q - initial and component interaction parameters, V - volume in initial and component crystal lattices. The isotopic transition superconducting phase temperature displacement ΔTc is associated with the change of the initial and component interaction and crystal lattice parameters. From the plasma mechanism of superconductivity follows superconducting crystals exist at room temperature.

  18. Comprehensive computational model for thermal plasma processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C. H.

    A new numerical model is described for simulating thermal plasmas containing entrained particles, with emphasis on plasma spraying applications. The plasma is represented as a continuum multicomponent chemically reacting ideal gas, while the particles are tracked as discrete Lagrangian entities coupled to the plasma. The overall computational model is embodied in a new computer code called LAVA. Computational results are presented from a transient simulation of alumina spraying in a turbulent argon-helium plasma jet in air environment, including torch geometry, substrate, and multiple species with chemical reactions. Plasma-particle interactions including turbulent dispersion have been modeled in a fully self-consistent manner.

  19. Model of the plasma universe

    SciTech Connect

    Alfven, H.

    1986-12-01

    This paper is a review of a number of publications during the last ten years about those changes in our views of the cosmic environment that are the result of advances in plasma physics. To a large extent, these originate from new observational material that space research has supplied. An attempt is made to construct a model of the ''plasma universe'' which is claimed to be an alternative to the traditional ''visual universe'' based mainly on observations in the visual octave. Besides the Hubble expansion there is also a ''knowledge expansion,'' which means that knowledge originating from plasma experiments in the laboratory is spreading to the magnetospheres and, it is predicted, sooner or later will also penetrate astrophysics in general. As an example of the usefulness of this model, it is applied to cosmogony, and a review is given of new results from an analysis of the Saturnian rings. The recent reconstruction of certain cosmogonic events with an accuracy better than 1 percent is reviewed and developed.

  20. Kinetic Modeling of Divertor Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiguro, Seiji; Hasegawa, Hiroki; Pianpanit, Theerasarn

    2015-11-01

    Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulation with the Monte Carlo collisions and the cumulative scattering angle coulomb collision can present kinetic dynamics of divertor plasmas. We are developing two types of PIC codes. The first one is the three dimensional bounded PIC code where three dimensional kinetic dynamics of blob is studied and current flow structures related to sheath formation are unveiled. The second one is the one spatial three velocity space dimensional (1D3V) PIC code with the Monte Carlo collisions where formation of detach plasma is studied. First target of our research is to construct self-consistent full kinetic simulation modeling of the linear divertor simulation experiments. This work is performed with the support and under the auspices of NIFS Collaboration Research program (NIFS15KNSS059, NIFS14KNXN279, and NIFS13KNSS038) and the Research Cooperation Program on Hierarchy and Holism in Natural Science at NINS.

  1. Plasma neutralization models for intense ion beam transport in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; O'Rourke, Sean; Lee, Edward P.

    2003-05-01

    Plasma neutralization of an intense ion pulse is of interest for many applications, including plasma lenses, heavy ion fusion, cosmic ray propagation, etc. An analytical electron fluid model has been developed based on the assumption of long charge bunches (l{sub b} >> r{sub b}). Theoretical predictions are compared with the results of calculations utilizing a particle-in-cell (PIC) code. The cold electron fluid results agree well with the PIC simulations for ion beam propagation through a background plasma. The analytical predictions for the degree of ion beam charge and current neutralization also agree well with the results of the numerical simulations. The model predicts very good charge neutralization (>99%) during quasi-steady-state propagation, provided the beam pulse duration {tau}{sub b} is much longer than the electron plasma period 2{pi}/{omega}{sub p}, where {omega}{sub p} = (4{pi}e{sup 2}n{sub p}/m){sup 1/2} is the electron plasma frequency, and n{sub p} is the background plasma density. In the opposite limit, the beam pulse excites large-amplitude plasma waves. The analytical formulas derived in this paper can provide an important benchmark for numerical codes, and provide scaling relations for different beam and plasma parameters.

  2. Mathematical and computational models of plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brushlinsky, K. V.

    Investigations of plasma flows are of interest, firstly, due to numerous applications, and secondly, because of their general principles, which form a special branch of physics: the plasma dynamics. Numerical simulation and computation, together with theoretic and experimental methods, play an important part in these investigations. Speaking on flows, a relatively dense plasma is mentioned, so its mathematical models appertain to the fluid mechanics, i.e., they are based on the magnetohydrodynamic description of plasma. Time dependent two dimensional models of plasma flows of two wide-spread types are considered: the flows across the magnetic field and those in the magnetic field plane.

  3. Plasma Reactor Modeling and Validation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, M.; Bose, D.; Hash, D.; Hwang, H.; Cruden, B.; Sharma, S. P.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Plasma processing is a key processing stop in integrated circuit manufacturing. Low pressure, high density plum reactors are widely used for etching and deposition. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source has become popular recently in many processing applications. In order to accelerate equipment and process design, an understanding of the physics and chemistry, particularly, plasma power coupling, plasma and processing uniformity and mechanism is important. This understanding is facilitated by comprehensive modeling and simulation as well as plasma diagnostics to provide the necessary data for model validation which are addressed in this presentation. We have developed a complete code for simulating an ICP reactor and the model consists of transport of electrons, ions, and neutrals, Poisson's equation, and Maxwell's equation along with gas flow and energy equations. Results will be presented for chlorine and fluorocarbon plasmas and compared with data from Langmuir probe, mass spectrometry and FTIR.

  4. Modeling atmospheric pressure plasmas for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, David

    2007-10-01

    The use of cold, atmospheric pressure plasmas for biomedical treatments is an exciting new application in gaseous electronics. Investigations to date include various tissue treatments and surgery, bacterial destruction, and the promotion of wound healing, among others. In this talk, I will present results from modeling the `plasma needle,' an atmospheric pressure plasma configuration that has been explored by several groups around the world. The biomedical efficacy of the plasma needle has been demonstrated but the mechanisms of cell and tissue modification or bacterial destruction are only just being established. One motivation for developing models is to help interpret experiments and evaluate postulated mechanisms. The model reveals important elements of the plasma needle sustaining mechanisms and operating modes. However, the extraordinary complexity of plasma-tissue interactions represents a long-term challenge for this burgeoning field.

  5. Water bag modeling of a multispecies plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, P.; Gravier, E.; Besse, N.; Klein, R.; Ghizzo, A.; Bertrand, P.; Bourdelle, C.; Garbet, X.

    2011-03-15

    We report in the present paper a new modeling method to study multiple species dynamics in magnetized plasmas. Such a method is based on the gyrowater bag modeling, which consists in using a multistep-like distribution function along the velocity direction parallel to the magnetic field. The choice of a water bag representation allows an elegant link between kinetic and fluid descriptions of a plasma. The gyrowater bag model has been recently adapted to the context of strongly magnetized plasmas. We present its extension to the case of multi ion species magnetized plasmas: each ion species being modeled via a multiwater bag distribution function. The water bag modelization will be discussed in details, under the simplification of a cylindrical geometry that is convenient for linear plasma devices. As an illustration, results obtained in the linear framework for ion temperature gradient instabilities are presented, that are shown to agree qualitatively with older works.

  6. Incorporating swarm data into plasma models and plasma surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makabe, Toshiaki

    2009-10-01

    Since the mid-1980s, modeling of non-equilibrium plasmas in a collisional region driven at radio frequency has been developed at pressure greater than ˜Pa. The collisional plasma has distinct characteristics induced by a quantum property of each of feed gas molecules through collisions with electrons or heavy particles. That is, there exists a proper function caused by chemically active radicals, negative-ions, and radiations based on a molecular quantum structure through short-range interactions mainly with electrons. This differs from high-density, collisionless plasma controlled by the long-range Coulomb interaction. The quantum property in the form of the collision cross section is the first essential through swarm parameters in order to investigate the collisional plasma structure and to predict the function. These structure and function, of course, appear under a self- organized spatiotemporal distribution of electrons and positive ions subject to electromagnetic theory, i.e., bulk-plasma and ion-sheath. In a plasma interacting with a surface, the flux, energy and angle of particles incident on a surface are basic quantities. It will be helpful to learn the limits of the swarm data in a quasi-equilibrium situation and to find a way out of the difficulty, when we predict the collisional plasma, the function, and related surface processes. In this talk we will discuss some of these experiences in the case of space and time varying radiofrequency plasma and the micro/nano-surface processes. This work is partly supported by Global-COE program in Keio University, granted by MEXT Japan.

  7. RF models for plasma-surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas; Smithe, David; Lin, Ming-Chieh; Kruger, Scott; Stoltz, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Computational models for DC and oscillatory (RF-driven) sheath potentials, arising at metal or dielectric-coated surfaces in contact with plasma, are developed within the VSim code and applied in parameter regimes characteristic of fusion plasma experiments and plasma processing scenarios. Results from initial studies quantifying the effects of various dielectric wall coating materials and thicknesses on these sheath potentials, as well as on the ensuing flux of plasma particles to the wall, are presented. As well, the developed models are used to model plasma-facing ICRF antenna structures in the ITER device; we present initial assessments of the efficacy of dielectric-coated antenna surfaces in reducing sputtering-induced high-Z impurity contamination of the fusion reaction. Funded by U.S. DoE via a Phase I SBIR grant, award DE-SC0009501.

  8. A Plasma Algorithm for Plasmoid Accelerator Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loverich, John

    2006-10-01

    In this paper we present a discontinuous Galerkin approach to resistive/ideal MHD and Hall MHD plasma models. Divergence cleaning is used to ensure that divergence errors are contained. Results of typical plasma physics benchmarks and axisymmetric simulations of FRC accelerators for high powered spacecraft propulsion will be presented.

  9. Analytic models of warm plasma dispersion relations

    SciTech Connect

    Seough, J. J.; Yoon, P. H.

    2009-09-15

    The present paper is concerned with analytic models of warm plasma dispersion relations for electromagnetic waves propagating parallel to the ambient magnetic field. Specifically, effects of finite betas on two slow modes, namely, the left-hand circularly polarized ion-cyclotron mode and the right-hand circularly polarized whistler mode, are investigated. Analytic models of the warm plasma dispersion relations are constructed on the basis of conjecture and upon comparisons with numerically found roots. It is shown that the model solutions are good substitutes for actual roots. The significance of the present work in the context of nonlinear plasma research is discussed.

  10. Dust in fusion plasmas: theory and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, R. D.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Mendis, D. A.; Rosenberg, M.; Rudakov, D.; Tanaka, Y.; Rognlien, T. D.; Soboleva, T. K.; Shukla, P. K.; Bray, B. D.; West, W. P.; Roquemore, A. L.; Skinner, C. H.

    2008-09-07

    Dust may have a large impact on ITER-scale plasma experiments including both safety and performance issues. However, the physics of dust in fusion plasmas is very complex and multifaceted. Here, we discuss different aspects of dust dynamics including dust-plasma, and dust-surface interactions. We consider the models of dust charging, heating, evaporation/sublimation, dust collision with material walls, etc., which are suitable for the conditions of fusion plasmas. The physical models of all these processes have been incorporated into the DUST Transport (DUSTT) code. Numerical simulations demonstrate that dust particles are very mobile and accelerate to large velocities due to the ion drag force (cruise speed >100 m/s). Deep penetration of dust particles toward the plasma core is predicted. It is shown that DUSTT is capable of reproducing many features of recent dust-related experiments, but much more work is still needed.

  11. Modeling of Plasma Assisted Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akashi, Haruaki

    2012-10-01

    Recently, many experimental study of plasma-assisted combustion has been done. However, numerous complex reactions in combustion of hydrocarbons are preventing from theoritical study for clarifying inside the plasma-assisted combustion, and the effect of plasma-assist is still not understood. Shinohara and Sasaki [1,2] have reported that the shortening of flame length by irradiating microwave without increase of gas temperature. And they also reported that the same phenomena would occur when applying dielectric barrier discharges to the flame using simple hydrocarbon, methane. It is suggested that these phenomena may result by the electron heating. To clarify this phenomena, electron behavior under microwave and DBD was examined. For the first step of DBD plasma-assisted combustion simulation, electron Monte Carlo simulation in methane, oxygen and argon mixture gas(0.05:0.14:0.81) [2] has been done. Electron swarm parameters are sampled and electron energy distribution function (EEDF)s are also determined. In the combustion, gas temperature is higher(>1700K), so reduced electric field E/N becomes relatively high(>10V/cm/Torr). The electrons are accelerated to around 14 eV. This result agree with the optical emission from argon obtained by the experiment of reference [2]. Dissociation frequency of methane and oxygens are obtained in high. This might be one of the effect of plasma-assist. And it is suggested that the electrons should be high enough to dissociate methane, but plasma is not needed.[4pt] [1] K. Shinohara et al, J. Phys. D:Appl. Phys., 42, 182008 (1-7) (2009).[0pt] [2] K. Sasaki, 64th Annual Gaseous Electronic Conference, 56, 15 CT3.00001(2011).

  12. Modeling and simulation of plasma processing equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Heon Chang

    Currently plasma processing technology is utilized in a wide range of applications including advanced Integrated Circuit (IC) fabrication. Traditionally, plasma processing equipments have been empirically designed and optimized at great expense of development time and cost. This research proposes the development of a first principle based, multidimensional plasma process simulator with the aim of enhancing the equipment design procedure. The proposed simulator accounts for nonlinear interactions among various plasma chemistry and physics, neutral chemistry and transport, and dust transport phenomena. A three moment modeling approach is employed that shows good predictive capabilities at reasonable computational expense. For numerical efficiency, various versions of explicit and implicit Essentially Non- Oscillatory (ENO) algorithms are employed. For the rapid evaluation of time-periodic steady-state solutions, a feedback control approach is employed. Two dimensional simulation results of capacitively coupled rf plasmas show that ion bombardment uniformity can be improved through simulation based design of the plasma process. Through self-consistent simulations of an rf triode, it is also shown that effects of secondary rf voltage and frequency on ion bombardment energy can be accurately captured. These results prove that scaling relations among important process variables can be identified through the three moment modeling and simulation approach. Through coupling of the plasma model with a neutral chemistry and transport model, spatiotemporal distributions of both charged and uncharged species, including metastables, are predicted for an oxygen plasma. Furthermore, simulation results also verify the existence of a double layer in this electronegative plasma. Through Lagrangian simulation of dust in a plasma reactor, it is shown that small particles are accumulate near the center and the radial sheath boundary depending on their initial positions while large

  13. Qualitative model of a plasma photoelectric converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbunov, N. A.; Flamant, G.

    2009-01-01

    A converter of focused optical radiation into electric current is considered on the basis of the photovoltaic effect in plasmas. The converter model is based on analysis of asymmetric spatial distributions of charge particle number density and ambipolar potential in the photoplasma produced by external optical radiation focused in a heat pipe filled with a mixture of alkali vapor and a heavy inert gas. Energy balance in the plasma photoelectric converter is analyzed. The conditions in which the external radiation energy is effectively absorbed in the converter are indicated. The plasma parameters for which the energy of absorbed optical radiation is mainly spent on sustaining the ambipolar field in the plasma are determined. It is shown that the plasma photoelectric converter makes it possible to attain a high conversion efficiency for focused solar radiation.

  14. Jovian plasma modeling for mission design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Henry B.; Kim, Wousik; Belland, Brent; Evans, Robin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to address uncertainties in the plasma models at Jupiter responsible for surface charging and to update the jovian plasma models using the most recent data available. The updated plasma environment models were then used to evaluate two proposed Europa mission designs for spacecraft charging effects using the Nascap-2k code. The original Divine/Garrett jovian plasma model (or "DG1", T. N. Divine and H. B. Garrett, "Charged particle distributions in Jupiter's magnetosphere," J. Geophys. Res., vol. 88, pp. 6889-6903,1983) has not been updated in 30 years, and there are known errors in the model. As an example, the cold ion plasma temperatures between approx.5 and 10 Jupiter radii (Rj) were found by the experimenters who originally published the data to have been underestimated by approx.2 shortly after publication of the original DG1 model. As knowledge of the plasma environment is critical to any evaluation of the surface charging at Jupiter, the original DG1 model needed to be updated to correct for this and other changes in our interpretation of the data so that charging levels could beproperly estimated using the Nascap-2k charging code. As an additional task, the Nascap-2k spacecraft charging tool has been adapted to incorporate the so-called Kappa plasma distribution function--an important component of the plasma model necessary to compute the particle fluxes between approx.5 keV and 100 keV (at the outset of this study,Nascap-2k did not directly incorporate this common representation of the plasma thus limiting the accuracy of our charging estimates). The updating of the DG1 model and its integration into the Nascap-2k design tool means that charging concerns can now be more efficiently evaluated and mitigated. (We note that, given the subsequent decision by the Europa project to utilize solar arrays for its baseline design, surface charging effects have becomeeven more of an issue for its mission design). The modifications and

  15. Jovian Plasma Modeling for Mission Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Henry B.; Kim, Wousik; Belland, Brent; Evans, Robin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to address uncertainties in the plasma models at Jupiter responsible for surface charging and to update the jovian plasma models using the most recent data available. The updated plasma environment models were then used to evaluate two proposed Europa mission designs for spacecraft charging effects using the Nascap-2k code. The original Divine/Garrett jovian plasma model (or "DG1", T. N. Divine and H. B. Garrett, "Charged particle distributions in Jupiter's magnetosphere," J. Geophys. Res., vol. 88, pp. 6889-6903,1983) has not been updated in 30 years, and there are known errors in the model. As an example, the cold ion plasma temperatures between approx.5 and 10 Jupiter radii (Rj) were found by the experimenters who originally published the data to have been underestimated by approx.2 shortly after publication of the original DG1 model. As knowledge of the plasma environment is critical to any evaluation of the surface charging at Jupiter, the original DG1 model needed to be updated to correct for this and other changes in our interpretation of the data so that charging levels could beproperly estimated using the Nascap-2k charging code. As an additional task, the Nascap-2k spacecraft charging tool has been adapted to incorporate the so-called Kappa plasma distribution function--an important component of the plasma model necessary to compute the particle fluxes between approx.5 keV and 100 keV (at the outset of this study,Nascap-2k did not directly incorporate this common representation of the plasma thus limiting the accuracy of our charging estimates). The updating of the DG1 model and its integration into the Nascap-2k design tool means that charging concerns can now be more efficiently evaluated and mitigated. (We note that, given the subsequent decision by the Europa project to utilize solar arrays for its baseline design, surface charging effects have becomeeven more of an issue for its mission design). The modifications and

  16. A model for transonic plasma flow

    SciTech Connect

    Guazzotto, Luca; Hameiri, Eliezer

    2014-02-15

    A linear, two-dimensional model of a transonic plasma flow in equilibrium is constructed and given an explicit solution in the form of a complex Laplace integral. The solution indicates that the transonic state can be solved as an elliptic boundary value problem, as is done in the numerical code FLOW [Guazzotto et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 604 (2004)]. Moreover, the presence of a hyperbolic region does not necessarily imply the presence of a discontinuity or any other singularity of the solution.

  17. Computational study of nonlinear plasma waves. [plasma simulation model applied to electrostatic waves in collisionless plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuda, Y.

    1974-01-01

    A low-noise plasma simulation model is developed and applied to a series of linear and nonlinear problems associated with electrostatic wave propagation in a one-dimensional, collisionless, Maxwellian plasma, in the absence of magnetic field. It is demonstrated that use of the hybrid simulation model allows economical studies to be carried out in both the linear and nonlinear regimes with better quantitative results, for comparable computing time, than can be obtained by conventional particle simulation models, or direct solution of the Vlasov equation. The characteristics of the hybrid simulation model itself are first investigated, and it is shown to be capable of verifying the theoretical linear dispersion relation at wave energy levels as low as .000001 of the plasma thermal energy. Having established the validity of the hybrid simulation model, it is then used to study the nonlinear dynamics of monochromatic wave, sideband instability due to trapped particles, and satellite growth.

  18. Generalized hydrodynamics model for strongly coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaw, A.; Murillo, M. S.

    2015-07-01

    Beginning with the exact equations of the Bogoliubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon hierarchy, we obtain the density, momentum, and stress tensor-moment equations. We close the moment equations with two closures, one that guarantees an equilibrium state given by density-functional theory and another that includes collisions in the relaxation of the stress tensor. The introduction of a density functional-theory closure ensures self-consistency in the equation-of-state properties of the plasma (ideal and excess pressure, electric fields, and correlations). The resulting generalized hydrodynamics thus includes all impacts of Coulomb coupling, viscous damping, and the high-frequency (viscoelastic) response. We compare our results with those of several known models, including generalized hydrodynamic theory and models obtained using the Singwi-Tosi-Land-Sjolander approximation and the quasilocalized charge approximation. We find that the viscoelastic response, including both the high-frequency elastic generalization and viscous wave damping, is important for correctly describing ion-acoustic waves. We illustrate this result by considering three very different systems: ultracold plasmas, dusty plasmas, and dense plasmas. The new model is validated by comparing its results with those of the current autocorrelation function obtained from molecular-dynamics simulations of Yukawa plasmas, and the agreement is excellent. Generalizations of this model to mixtures and quantum systems should be straightforward.

  19. Model of a Hollow Cathode Insert Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Polk, James E.

    2004-01-01

    A 2-D axisymmetric fluid model of the plasma in the insert region of a hollow cathode is presented. The level of sophistication included in the model is motivated in part by the need to determine quantitatively plasma fluxes to the emitter surface. The ultimate goal is to assess whether plasma effects can degrade the life of impregnated inserts beyond those documented throughout the 30-50 year history of vacuum cathode technologies. Results from simulations of a 1.2-cm diameter cathode operating at a discharge current of 25 A, and a gas flow rate of 5 sccm, suggest that approximately 10 A of electron current, and 3.5 A of ion current return to the emitter surface. The total emitted electron current computed by the model is about 35 A. Comparisons with plasma measurements suggest that anomalous heating of the plasma due to two-stream instabilities is possible near the orifice region. Solution to the heavy species energy equation, with classical transport and no viscous effects, predicts heavy species temperatures as high as 2640 K.

  20. A model of hollow cathode plasma chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, I.; Anderson, J. R.; Polk, J. E.; Brophy, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a new model of hollow cathode plasma chemistry based on the observation that xenon ion mobility is diffusion limited due to resonant charge exchange reactions. The model shows that vapor phase barium atoms are ionized almost immediately and electric fields accelerate the ions upstream from the emission zone. We have also applied the model to the orifice region, where the resultant ion generation profile correlates with previously reported orifice erosion.

  1. Modeling TeV Class Plasma Afterburners

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.; Clayton, C.; Johnson, d.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Mori, W.; Zhou, M.; Barnes, C.; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.; Iverson, R.; Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

    2006-01-30

    Plasma wakefield acceleration can sustain acceleration gradients three orders of magnitude larger than conventional RF accelerator. In the recent E164X experiment, substantial energy gain of about 3-4 GeV has been observed. Thus, a plasma afterburner, which has been proposed to double the incoming beam energy for a future linear collider, is now of great interest. In an afterburner, a particle beam drives a plasma wave and generates a strong wakefield which has a phase velocity equal to the velocity of the beam. This wakefield can then be used to accelerate part of the drive beam or a trailing beam. Several issues such as the efficient transfer of energy and the stable propagation of both the drive and trailing beams in the plasma are critical to the afterburner concept. We investigate the nonlinear beam-plasma interaction in such scenario using the 3D computer modeling code QuickPIC. We will report on the preliminary simulation results of both 100 GeV and 1 TeV plasma afterburner stages for electrons including the beam-loading of a trailing beam. Analytic analysis of hosing instability in this regime will be presented.

  2. A collisionless plasma thruster plume expansion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merino, Mario; Cichocki, Filippo; Ahedo, Eduardo

    2015-06-01

    A two-fluid model of the unmagnetized, collisionless far region expansion of the plasma plume for gridded ion thrusters and Hall effect thrusters is presented. The model is integrated into two semi-analytical solutions valid in the hypersonic case. These solutions are discussed and compared against the results from the (exact) method of characteristics; the relative errors in density and velocity increase slowly axially and radially and are of the order of 10-2-10-3 in the cases studied. The plasma density, ion flux and ambipolar electric field are investigated. A sensitivity analysis of the problem parameters and initial conditions is carried out in order to characterize the far plume divergence angle in the range of interest for space electric propulsion. A qualitative discussion of the physics of the secondary plasma plume is also provided.

  3. Modelling of RF Discharge in Argon Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jelinek, P.; Virostko, P.; Hubicka, Z.; Bartos, P.

    2007-12-26

    An one-dimensional hybrid model of RF discharge in low-temperature argon plasma is presented in our paper. The hybrid model consists of two parts--particle model which simulates fast electrons while fluid model simulates slow electrons and positive argon ions. In the particle model the positions and velocities of fast electrons are calculated by means of deterministic Verlet algorithm while the collision processes are treated by the stochastic way. For the solution of fluid equations, for slow electrons and positive argon ions, the Scharfetter-Gummel exponential algorithm was used. Typical results of our calculations presented in this paper are total RF current and RF voltage waveforms on the planar substrate immersed into argon plasma. The next results which can be found here are the ion, electron and displacement current waveforms on the substrate. Especially, the knowledge of waveform of the ion current is very important for experimental physicists during the deposition of thin films.

  4. Sensitivity Analysis in Complex Plasma Chemistry Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Miles

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of a plasma chemistry model is prediction of chemical species densities, including understanding the mechanisms by which such species are formed. These aims are compromised by an uncertain knowledge of the rate constants included in the model, which directly causes uncertainty in the model predictions. We recently showed that this predictive uncertainty can be large--a factor of ten or more in some cases. There is probably no context in which a plasma chemistry model might be used where the existence of uncertainty on this scale could not be a matter of concern. A question that at once follows is: Which rate constants cause such uncertainty? In the present paper we show how this question can be answered by applying a systematic screening procedure--the so-called Morris method--to identify sensitive rate constants. We investigate the topical example of the helium-oxygen chemistry. Beginning with a model with almost four hundred reactions, we show that only about fifty rate constants materially affect the model results, and as few as ten cause most of the uncertainty. This means that the model can be improved, and the uncertainty substantially reduced, by focussing attention on this tractably small set of rate constants. Work supported by Science Foundation Ireland under grant08/SRC/I1411, and by COST Action MP1101 ``Biomedical Applications of Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas.''

  5. Advancements in predictive plasma formation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purvis, Michael A.; Schafgans, Alexander; Brown, Daniel J. W.; Fomenkov, Igor; Rafac, Rob; Brown, Josh; Tao, Yezheng; Rokitski, Slava; Abraham, Mathew; Vargas, Mike; Rich, Spencer; Taylor, Ted; Brandt, David; Pirati, Alberto; Fisher, Aaron; Scott, Howard; Koniges, Alice; Eder, David; Wilks, Scott; Link, Anthony; Langer, Steven

    2016-03-01

    We present highlights from plasma simulations performed in collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Labs. This modeling is performed to advance the rate of learning about optimal EUV generation for laser produced plasmas and to provide insights where experimental results are not currently available. The goal is to identify key physical processes necessary for an accurate and predictive model capable of simulating a wide range of conditions. This modeling will help to drive source performance scaling in support of the EUV Lithography roadmap. The model simulates pre-pulse laser interaction with the tin droplet and follows the droplet expansion into the main pulse target zone. Next, the interaction of the expanded droplet with the main laser pulse is simulated. We demonstrate the predictive nature of the code and provide comparison with experimental results.

  6. Mathematical modeling plasma transport in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Quiang, Ji

    1995-12-31

    In this work, the author applied a systematic calibration, validation and application procedure based on the methodology of mathematical modeling to international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) ignition studies. The multi-mode plasma transport model used here includes a linear combination of drift wave branch and ballooning branch instabilities with two a priori uncertain constants to account for anomalous plasma transport in tokamaks. A Bayesian parameter estimation method is used including experimental calibration error/model offsets and error bar rescaling factors to determine the two uncertain constants in the transport model with quantitative confidence level estimates for the calibrated parameters, which gives two saturation levels of instabilities. This method is first tested using a gyroBohm multi-mode transport model with a pair of DIII-D discharge experimental data, and then applied to calibrating a nominal multi-mode transport model against a broad database using twelve discharges from seven different tokamaks. The calibrated transport model is then validated on five discharges from JT-60 with no adjustable constants. The results are in a good agreement with experimental data. Finally, the resulting class of multi-mode tokamak plasma transport models is applied to the transport analysis of the ignition probability in a next generation machine, ITER. A reference simulation of basic ITER engineering design activity (EDA) parameters shows that a self-sustained thermonuclear burn with 1.5 GW output power can be achieved provided that impurity control makes radiative losses sufficiently small at an average plasma density of 1.2 X 10{sup 20}/m{sup 3} with 50 MW auxiliary heating. The ignition probability of ITER for the EDA parameters, can be formally as high as 99.9% in the present context. The same probability for concept design activity (CDA) parameters of ITER, which has smaller size and lower current, is only 62.6%.

  7. Modeling of the vacuum plasma spray process

    SciTech Connect

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Neiser, R.A.; Smith, M.F.

    1992-10-01

    Experimental and analytical studies have been conducted to investigate gas, particle, and coating dynamics in the vacuum plasma spray (VPS) process for a tungsten powder. VPS coatings were examined metallographically and the results compared with the model`s predictions. The plasma was numerically modeled from the cathode tip to the spray distance in the free plume for the experimental conditions of this study. This information was then used as boundary conditions to solve the particle dynamics. The predicted temperature and velocity of the powder particles at standoff were then used as initial conditions for a coating dynamics code. The code predicts the coating morphology for the specific process parameters. The predicted characteristics exhibit good correlation with the observed coating properties.

  8. Spectroscopic Modeling of Single Element Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ghomeishi, Mostafa; Yap, S. L.; Wong, C. S.; Saboohi, S.; Chan, L. S.

    2011-03-30

    A strategy for spectroscopic analysis of single element plasmas is through modeling. An experimental investigation or generation of a specified emission spectrum can be attempted based on the modeling results which are currently under investigating by many researchers in the world. In the emission spectroscopy, the K-shell emission is more interesting than emissions from other shells due to their unique EUV and SXR frequencies that can be applied in various scientific and industrial applications. Population information of our model is based on a steady state kinetic code which is calculated for a given electron temperature and an estimated electron density. Thus for each single element plasma it needs large amounts of experimental or theoretical database. Depending on the parameter of the plasma, theories based on local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE are considered. In the non-LTE case, the Corona model is used and the total absolute number densities are calculated based on the ion densities that are related to the electron density corresponds to the mean charge of the ions. The spectra generated by the model can then be compared with spectroscopic data obtained experimentally.

  9. Multidimensional Plasma Sheath Modeling Using The Three Fluid Plasma Model in General Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilly, Robert; Shumlak, Uri

    2012-10-01

    There has been renewed interest in the use of plasma actuators for high speed flow control applications. In the plasma actuator, current is driven through the surrounding weakly ionized plasma to impart control moments on the hypersonic vehicle. This expanded general geometry study employs the three-fluid (electrons, ions,neutrals) plasma model as it allows the capture of electron inertial effects, as well as energy and momentum transfer between the charged and neutral species. Previous investigations have typically assumed an electrostatic electric field. This work includes the full electrodynamics in general geometries. Past work utilizing the research code WARPX (Washington Approximate Riemann Problem) employed cartesian grids. In this work, the problem is expanded to general geometries with the euler fluid equations employing Braginskii closure. In addition, WARPX general geometry grids are generated from Cubit or CAD files. Comparisons are made against AFRL magnetized plasma actuator experiments.

  10. Modeling of the vacuum plasma spray process

    SciTech Connect

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr. ); Neiser, R.A.; Smith, M.F. )

    1992-01-01

    Experimental and analytical studies have been conducted to investigate gas, particle, and coating dynamics in the vacuum plasma spray (VPS) process for a tungsten powder. VPS coatings were examined metallographically and the results compared with the model's predictions. The plasma was numerically modeled from the cathode tip to the spray distance in the free plume for the experimental conditions of this study. This information was then used as boundary conditions to solve the particle dynamics. The predicted temperature and velocity of the powder particles at standoff were then used as initial conditions for a coating dynamics code. The code predicts the coating morphology for the specific process parameters. The predicted characteristics exhibit good correlation with the observed coating properties.

  11. Landau Fluid Models for Magnetized Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sulem, P. L.; Passot, T.; Marradi, L.

    2008-10-15

    A Landau fluid model for a magnetized plasma, that retains a linear description of low-frequency kinetic effects involving transverse scales significantly smaller than the ion Larmor radius, is discussed and validated in the context of nonlinear wave dynamics. Preliminary simulations of the turbulent regime are presented in one space dimension, as a first step towards more realistic three-dimensional computations, aimed to analyze the combined effect of dispersion and collisionless dissipation on the energy cascade.

  12. Fluxon modeling of low-beta plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deforest, C. E.; Kankelborg, C. C.

    2007-02-01

    We have developed a new, quasi-Lagrangian approach for numerical modeling of magnetohydrodynamics in low to moderate β plasmas such as the solar corona. We introduce the concept of a “fluxon”, a discretized field line. Fluxon models represent the magnetic field as a skeleton of such discrete field lines, and interpolate field values from the geometry of the skeleton where needed, reversing the usual direction of the field line transform. The fluxon skeleton forms the grid for a collection of 1-D Eulerian models of plasma along individual flux tubes. Fluxon models have no numerical resistivity, because they preserve topology explicitly. Our prototype code, FLUX, is currently able to find 3-D nonlinear force-free field solutions with a specified field topology, and work is ongoing to validate and extend the code to full magnetohydrodynamics. FLUX has significant scaling advantages over conventional models: for “magnetic carpet” models, with photospheric line-tied boundary conditions, FLUX simulations scale in complexity like a conventional 2-D grid although the full 3-D field is represented. The code is free software and is available online. In this current paper we introduce fluxons and our prototype code, and describe the course of future work with the code.

  13. Atomic modeling of the plasma EUV sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Akira; Sunahara, Atsushi; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Nishihara, Katsunobu; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Koike, Fumihiro; Tanuma, Hajime

    2009-09-01

    We present the development of population kinetics models for tin plasmas that can be employed to design an EUV source for microlithography. The atomic kinetic code is constrained for the requirement that the model must be able to calculate spectral emissivity and opacity that can be used in radiation hydrodynamic simulations. Methods to develop compact and reliable atomic model with an appropriate set of atomic states are discussed. Specifically, after investigation of model dependencies and comparison experiment, we improve the effect of configuration interaction and the treatment of satellite lines. Using the present atomic model we discuss the temperature and density dependencies of the emissivity, as well as conditions necessary to obtain high efficiency EUV power at λ = 13.5 nm.

  14. Astrophysical Plasmas: Codes, Models, and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canto, Jorge; Rodriguez, Luis F.

    2000-05-01

    The conference Astrophysical Plasmas: Codes, Models, and Observations was aimed at discussing the most recent advances, arid some of the avenues for future work, in the field of cosmical plasmas. It was held (hiring the week of October 25th to 29th 1999, at the Centro Nacional de las Artes (CNA) in Mexico City, Mexico it modern and impressive center of theaters and schools devoted to the performing arts. This was an excellent setting, for reviewing the present status of observational (both on earth and in space) arid theoretical research. as well as some of the recent advances of laboratory research that are relevant, to astrophysics. The demography of the meeting was impressive: 128 participants from 12 countries in 4 continents, a large fraction of them, 29% were women and most of them were young persons (either recent Ph.Ds. or graduate students). This created it very lively and friendly atmosphere that made it easy to move from the ionization of the Universe and high-redshift absorbers, to Active Galactic Nucleotides (AGN)s and X-rays from galaxies, to the gas in the Magellanic Clouds and our Galaxy, to the evolution of H II regions and Planetary Nebulae (PNe), and to the details of plasmas in the Solar System and the lab. All these topics were well covered with 23 invited talks, 43 contributed talks. and 22 posters. Most of them are contained in these proceedings, in the same order of the presentations.

  15. Modeling of nonequilibrium space plasma flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gombosi, Tamas

    1995-01-01

    Godunov-type numerical solution of the 20 moment plasma transport equations. One of the centerpieces of our proposal was the development of a higher order Godunov-type numerical scheme to solve the gyration dominated 20 moment transport equations. In the first step we explored some fundamental analytic properties of the 20 moment transport equations for a low b plasma, including the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of propagating disturbances. The eigenvalues correspond to wave speeds, while the eigenvectors characterize the transported physical quantities. In this paper we also explored the physically meaningful parameter range of the normalized heat flow components. In the second step a new Godunov scheme type numerical method was developed to solve the coupled set of 20 moment transport equations for a quasineutral single-ion plasma. The numerical method and the first results were presented at several national and international meetings and a paper describing the method has been published in the Journal of Computational Physics. To our knowledge this is the first numerical method which is capable of producing stable time-dependent solutions to the full 20 (or 16) moment set of transport equations, including the full heat flow equation. Previous attempts resulted in unstable (oscillating) solutions of the heat flow equations. Our group invested over two man-years into the development and implementation of the new method. The present model solves the 20 moment transport equations for an ion species and thermal electrons in 8 domain extending from a collision dominated to a collisionless region (200 km to 12,000 km). This model has been applied to study O+ acceleration due to Joule heating in the lower ionosphere.

  16. Modeling Growth of Nanostructures in Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Helen H.; Bose, Deepak; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    As semiconductor circuits shrink to CDs below 0.1 nm, it is becoming increasingly critical to replace and/or enhance existing technology with nanoscale structures, such as nanowires for interconnects. Nanowires grown in plasmas are strongly dependent on processing conditions, such as gas composition and substrate temperature. Growth occurs at specific sites, or step-edges, with the bulk growth rate of the nanowires determined from the equation of motion of the nucleating crystalline steps. Traditional front-tracking algorithms, such as string-based or level set methods, suffer either from numerical complications in higher spatial dimensions, or from difficulties in incorporating surface-intense physical and chemical phenomena. Phase field models have the robustness of the level set method, combined with the ability to implement surface-specific chemistry that is required to model crystal growth, although they do not necessarily directly solve for the advancing front location. We have adopted a phase field approach and will present results of the adatom density and step-growth location in time as a function of processing conditions, such as temperature and plasma gas composition.

  17. Electromagnetic plasma models for microwave plasma cavity reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frasch, L.; Asmussen, J.

    1984-01-01

    A procedure used to design cavity applicators that efficiently produce cylindrical and disk microwave discharges is reviewed. In contrast to most microwave applicators these cavities utilize single mode excitation of the plasma. This method of excitation has the advantage of providing efficient coupling (zero reflected power) to the plasma over a wide range of discharge loading conditions while also allowing, if desired, electric feedback control of the heating process. The design procedure is generalized to any lossy dielectric. Experimental and theoretical research required to further understand microwave discharges is also discussed.

  18. A More General, Quasineutral Plasma Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernsler, Richard

    2003-10-01

    More than seventy-five years ago, Irving Langmuir proposed a quasineutral plasma model still widely used today. The electrostatic field is derived from the electron density using the Boltzmann approximation, while the electron density is obtained from the ion densities using quasineutrality. However, the Boltzmann approximation is not always valid and has no relationship to quasineutrality. Moreover, the solutions thus obtained are usually singular near the ion sound speed, thus necessitating an additional boundary condition known as the Bohm condition. This condition is difficult to use when multiple ion species are present, is ill posed in kinetic treatments, and does not always apply. In this talk, a more general quasineutral model is presented to circumvent these limitations.

  19. Modelling of relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berwick, Stuart James

    In order to characterise the propagation and stability of linearly polarised laser pulses of arbitrary intensity interacting with underdense plasma, a one-dimensional, fully relativistic, covariant electron fluid model is derived. As a first step, the model is Lorentz transformed into a frame moving with the group velocity of the laser pulse. A linear instability analysis is undertaken which generates an infinite hierarchy of homogeneous mode-coupling equations describing the decay of the laser pump via stimulated Raman forward scattering (SRFS), stimulated Raman back scattering (SRBS) and the relativistic modulational instability (RMI). SRFS and RMI are seen to merge into a hybrid instability at high intensities (1>1018Wcm-2) and a 6-wave analysis (rather than the conventional 3 or 4-wave) is required to accurately predict growth. Next, an Eulerian fluid code is developed in order to evolve the full non- linear equations. The method of characteristics is used to integrate the electromagnetic wave equation and a predictor-corrector algorithm is used to integrate the equations of continuity and momentum. After testing, this code is used to simulate the propagation and stability of ultra-short (<200fs), 'table-top' and cos2 modulated laser pulses of relativistic intensities in underdense plasma. Comparison is made to the predictions of the dispersion relation and growth rates obtained in each case are reconciled. The spatiotemporal behaviour is discussed with reference to the results of a 3-wave WKB model of the interaction. The importance of seeding mechanisms, pulse shape and relativity on the evolution of the instabilities is also discussed.

  20. Simple model of plasma acceleration in a magnetic nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sercel, Joel C.

    1990-01-01

    A collisionless, steady-state, cold-plasma model is used to calculate the three-dimensional trajectory of a plasma as it is accelerated through a diverging magnetic field. The magnetic field is assumed to be axisymmetric with nonzero radial and axial components and zero azimuthal component. Although random thermal motion of plasma species is neglected in the cold plasma approximation, an important effect of plasma thermal energy is accounted for in the model as the kinetic energy of electrons in their Larmor motion about magnetic field lines. Calculations based on this model confirm previous studies which suggested that plasma separation from the field of a magnetic nozzle can take place even in the absence of collisional diffusion. It is shown that plasma divergence in a magnetic nozzle can be controlled by tailoring the field geometry.

  1. A New Global Core Plasma Model of the Plasmasphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Comfort, R. H.; Craven, P. D.

    2014-01-01

    The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) is the first empirical model for thermal inner magnetospheric plasma designed to integrate previous models and observations into a continuous in value and gradient representation of typical total densities. New information about the plasmasphere, in particular, makes possible significant improvement. The IMAGE Mission Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) has obtained the first observations of total plasma densities along magnetic field lines in the plasmasphere and polar cap. Dynamics Explorer 1 Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer (RIMS) has provided densities in temperatures in the plasmasphere for 5 ion species. These and other works enable a new more detailed empirical model of thermal in the inner magnetosphere that will be presented.

  2. Modeling and Simulation of Plasma Edge Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Charles K. Birdsall, Professor

    2002-02-14

    A typical steady state plasma edge consists of a strongly nonneutral sheath region, starting from the wall, joined to a quasineutral pre-sheath region, & then becoming the plasma bulk, which is essentially neutral. In particular, we find that the sheath/pre-sheath boundary not static, but dynamic, both in a stable thermal plasma, with considerable sheath boundary motion and heating.

  3. Numerical Modeling of Plasmas in which Nanoparticles Nucleate and Grow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Pulkit

    Dusty plasmas refer to a broad category of plasmas. Plasmas such as argon-silane plasmas in which particles nucleate and grow are widely used in semiconductor processing and nanoparticle manufacturing. In such dusty plasmas, the plasma and the dust particles are strongly coupled to each other. This means that the presence of dust particles significantly affects the plasma properties and vice versa. Therefore such plasmas are highly complex and they involve several interesting phenomena like nucleation, growth, coagulation, charging and transport. Dusty plasma afterglow is equally complex and important. Especially, residual charge on dust particles carries special significance in several industrial and laboratory situations and it has not been well understood. A 1D numerical model was developed of a low-pressure capacitively-coupled plasma in which nanoparticles nucleate and grow. Polydispersity of particle size distributions can be important in such plasmas. Sectional method, which is well known in aerosol literature, was used to model the evolving particle size and charge distribution. The numerical model is transient and one-dimensional and self consistently accounts for nucleation, growth, coagulation, charging and transport of dust particles and their effect on plasma properties. Nucleation and surface growth rates were treated as input parameters. Results were presented in terms of particle size and charge distribution with an emphasis on importance of polydispersity in particle growth and dynamics. Results of numerical model were compared with experimental measurements of light scattering and light emission from plasma. Reasonable qualitative agreement was found with some discrepancies. Pulsed dusty plasma can be important for controlling particle production and/or unwanted particle deposition. In this case, it is important to understand the behavior of the particle cloud during the afterglow following plasma turn-off. Numerical model was modified to self

  4. Theoretical model for plasma opening switch

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, L.

    1980-07-01

    The theory of an explosive plasma switch is developed and compared with the experimental results of Pavlovskii and work at Sandia. A simple analytic model is developed, which predicts that such switches may achieve opening times of approximately 100 ns. When the switching time is limited by channel mixing it scales as t = C(m d/sub 0/)/sup 1/2/P/sub 0//sup 2/P/sub e//sup -5/2/ where m is the foil mass per unit area, d/sub 0/ the channel thickness and P/sub 0/ the channel pressure (at explosive breakout), P/sub e/ the explosive pressure, C a constant of order 10 for c.g.s. units. Thus faster switching times may be achieved by minimizing foil mass and channel pressure, or increasing explosive product pressure, with the scaling exponents as shown suggesting that changes in pressures would be more effective.

  5. Modeling of thermal plasma arc technology FY 1994 report

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkes, G.L.; Nguyen, H.D.; Paik, S.; McKellar, M.G.

    1995-03-01

    The thermal plasma arc process is under consideration to thermally treat hazardous and radioactive waste. A computer model for the thermal plasma arc technology was designed as a tool to aid in the development and use of the plasma arc-Joule beating process. The value of this computer model is to: (a) aid in understanding the plasma arc-Joule beating process as applied to buried waste or exhumed buried waste, (b) help design melter geometry and electrode configuration, (c) calculate the process capability of vitrifying waste (i.e., tons/hour), (d) develop efficient plasma and melter operating conditions to optimize the process and/or reduce safety hazards, (e) calculate chemical reactions during treatment of waste to track chemical composition of off-gas products, and composition of final vitrified waste form and (f) help compare the designs of different plasma-arc facilities. A steady-state model of a two-dimensional axisymmetric transferred plasma arc has been developed and validated. A parametric analysis was performed that studied the effects of arc length, plasma gas composition, and input power on the temperatures and velocity profiles of the slag and plasma gas. A two-dimensional transient thermo-fluid model of the US Bureau of Mines plasma arc melter has been developed. This model includes the growth of a slag pool. The thermo-fluid model is used to predict the temperature and pressure fields within a plasma arc furnace. An analysis was performed to determine the effects of a molten metal pool on the temperature, velocity, and voltage fields within the slag. A robust and accurate model for the chemical equilibrium calculations has been selected to determine chemical composition of final waste form and off-gas based on the temperatures and pressures within the plasma-arc furnace. A chemical database has been selected. The database is based on the materials to be processed in the plasma arc furnaces.

  6. Modeling of dynamic bipolar plasma sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, J. M.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Ottinger, P. F.

    1992-01-01

    The behavior of a one-dimensional plasma sheath is described in regimes where the sheath is not in equilibrium because it carries current densities that are either time dependent, or larger than the bipolar Child-Langmuir level determined from the injected ion flux. Earlier models of dynamic bipolar sheaths assumed that ions and electrons evolve in a series of quasiequilibria. In addition, sheath growth was described by the equation Zen0ẋs=‖ ji‖-Zen0u0, where ẋs is the velocity of the sheath edge, ji is the ion current density, n0u0 is the injected ion flux density, and Ze is the ion charge. In this paper, a generalization of the bipolar electron-to-ion current density ratio formula is derived to study regimes where ions are not in equilibrium. A generalization of the above sheath growth equation is also developed, which is consistent with the ion continuity equation and which reveals new physics of sheath behavior associated with the emitted electrons and their evolution. Based on these findings, two new models of dynamic bipolar sheaths are developed. Larger sheath sizes and potentials than those of earlier models are found. In certain regimes, explosive sheath growth is predicted.

  7. A quantitative model of plasma in Neptune's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. D.

    1993-07-01

    A model encompassing plasma transport and energy processes is applied to Neptune's magnetosphere. Starting with profiles of the neutral densities and the electron temperature, the model calculates the plasma density and ion temperature profiles. Good agreement between model results and observations is obtained for a neutral source of 5 x 10 exp 25/s if the diffusion coefficient is 10 exp -8 L3R(N)/2s, plasma is lost at a rate 1/3 that of the strong diffusion rate, and plasma subcorotates in the region outside Triton.

  8. Kinetic Modeling of the Moon-Solar Wind Plasma Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatemi, S.; Poppe, A. R.; Halekas, J. S.; Delory, G. T.; Holmstrom, M.; Farrell, W. M.

    2016-05-01

    We use a three-dimensional self-consistent hybrid model of plasma (kinetic ions, fluid electrons) to study solar wind plasma interaction with the Moon. We have studied lunar wake, interaction with crustal fields, and lunar interior with our model.

  9. Modelling spectral properties of non-equilibrium atomic hydrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ammando, G.; Pietanza, L. D.; Colonna, G.; Longo, S.; Capitelli, M.

    2010-02-01

    A model to predict the emissivity and absorption coefficient of atomic hydrogen plasma is presented in detail. Non-equilibrium plasma is studied through coupling of the model with a collisional-radiative code for the excited states population as well as with the Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function.

  10. Modelling Coulomb Collisions in Anisotropic Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellinger, P.; Travnicek, P. M.

    2009-12-01

    Collisional transport in anisotropic plasmas is investigated comparing the theoretical transport coefficients (Hellinger and Travnicek, 2009) for anisotropic particles with the results of the corresponding Langevin equation, obtained as a generalization of Manheimer et al. (1997). References: Hellinger, P., and P. M. Travnicek (2009), On Coulomb collisions in bi-Maxwellian plasmas, Phys. Plasmas, 16, 054501. Manheimer, W. M., M. Lampe and G. Joyce (1997), Langevin representation of Coulomb collisions in PIC simulations, J. Comput. Phys., 138, 563-584.

  11. Simulations of plasma sheaths using continuum kinetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Hakim, Ammar

    2015-11-01

    Understanding plasma sheath physics is important for the performance of devices such as Hall thrusters due to the effect of energetic particles on electrode erosion. Plasma sheath physics is studied using kinetic and multi-fluid models with relevance to secondary electron emissions and plasma-surface interactions. Continuum kinetic models are developed to directly solve the Vlasov-Poisson equation using the discontinuous Galerkin method for each of the ion and electron species. A steady-state sheath is simulated by including a simple model for a neutral fluid. Multi-fluid simulations for the plasma sheath are also performed using the discontinuous Galerkin method to solve a complete set of fluid equations for each of the ion and electron species. The kinetic plasma sheath is compared to a multi-fluid plasma sheath. Supported by Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  12. Fully implicit kinetic modelling of collisional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mousseau, V.A.

    1996-05-01

    This dissertation describes a numerical technique, Matrix-Free Newton Krylov, for solving a simplified Vlasov-Fokker-Planck equation. This method is both deterministic and fully implicit, and may not have been a viable option before current developments in numerical methods. Results are presented that indicate the efficiency of the Matrix-Free Newton Krylov method for these fully-coupled, nonlinear integro-differential equations. The use and requirement for advanced differencing is also shown. To this end, implementations of Chang-Cooper differencing and flux limited Quadratic Upstream Interpolation for Convective Kinematics (QUICK) are presented. Results are given for a fully kinetic ion-electron problem with a self consistent electric field calculated from the ion and electron distribution functions. This numerical method, including advanced differencing, provides accurate solutions, which quickly converge on workstation class machines. It is demonstrated that efficient steady-state solutions can be achieved to the non-linear integro-differential equation, obtaining quadratic convergence, without incurring the large memory requirements of an integral operator. Model problems are presented which simulate plasma impinging on a plate with both high and low neutral particle recycling typical of a divertor in a Tokamak device. These model problems demonstrate the performance of the new solution method.

  13. Understanding Plasmas with a High Degree of Correlation Through Modeling: From Rydberg and Fermionic Plasmas to Penning Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christlieb, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Ultra cold neutral plasmas have gained attention over the past 15 years as being a unique environment for studying moderately to strongly coupled neutral systems. The first ultra cold neutral plasmas were generated by ionizing a Bose Einstein condensate, generating a plasma with .1K ions and 2-4K electrons. These neutral plasmas have the unique property that the ratio of their potential energy to their kinetic energy, (Γ = PE / KE), can greatly exceed 1, leading to a strongly correlated system. The high degree of correlation means that everything from wave propagation through collision dynamics behaves quite differently from their counterpart in traditional neutral plasmas. Currently, a range of gases and different methods for cooling have been used to generate these plasmas from supersonic expansion, through penning trap configurations (reference Tom, Jake and Ed). These systems have time scales form picoseconds to milliseconds have a particle numbers from 105 to 109. These systems present a unique environment for studying the physics of correlation due to their low particle number and small size. We start by reviewing ultra cold plasmas and the current sate of the art in generating these correlated systems. Then we introduce the methods we will use for exploring these systems through direct simulation of Molecular Dynamics models; Momentum Dependent Potentials, Treecodes and Particle-Particle Particle-Mesh methods. We use these tools to look at two key areas of ultra cold plasmas; development of methods to generate a plasma with a Γ >> 1 and the impact of correlation of collisional relaxation. Our eventual goal is to use what we learn to develop models that can simulate correlation in large plasma systems that are outside of the scope of Molecular Dynamics models. In collaboration with Gautham Dharmuman, Mayur Jain, Michael Murillo and John Verboncoeur. This work it supposed by Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  14. A computer model of solar panel-plasma interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, D. L.; Freeman, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    High power solar arrays for satellite power systems are presently being planned with dimensions of kilometers, and with tens of kilovolts distributed over their surface. Such systems face many plasma interaction problems, such as power leakage to the plasma, particle focusing, and anomalous arcing. These effects cannot be adequately modeled without detailed knowledge of the plasma sheath structure and space charge effects. Laboratory studies of 1 by 10 meter solar array in a simulated low Earth orbit plasma are discussed. The plasma screening process is discussed, program theory is outlined, and a series of calibration models is presented. These models are designed to demonstrate that PANEL is capable of accurate self consistant space charge calculations. Such models include PANEL predictions for the Child-Langmuir diode problem.

  15. 2-D Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of A Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Cassibry, J. T.; Wu, S. T.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Experiments are being performed on the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) MK-1 pulsed plasma thruster. Data produced from the experiments provide an opportunity to further understand the plasma dynamics in these thrusters via detailed computational modeling. The detailed and accurate understanding of the plasma dynamics in these devices holds the key towards extending their capabilities in a number of applications, including their applications as high power (greater than 1 MW) thrusters, and their use for producing high-velocity, uniform plasma jets for experimental purposes. For this study, the 2-D MHD modeling code, MACH2, is used to provide detailed interpretation of the experimental data. At the same time, a 0-D physics model of the plasma initial phase is developed to guide our 2-D modeling studies.

  16. PlasmaPIC: A tool for modeling low-temperature plasma discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muehlich, Nina Sarah; Becker, Michael; Henrich, Robert; Heiliger, Christian

    2015-09-01

    PlasmaPIC is a three-dimensional particle in cell (PIC) code. It consists of an electrostatic part for modeling dc and rf-ccp discharges as well as an electrodynamic part for modeling inductively coupled discharges. The three-dimensional description enables the modeling of discharges in arbitrary geometries without limitations to any symmetry. These geometries can be easily imported from common CAD tools. A main feature of PlasmaPIC is the ability of an excellent massive parallelization of the computation, which scales linearly up to a few hundred cpu cores. This is achieved by using a multigrid algorithm for the field solver as well as an effective load balancing of the particles. Moreover, PlasmaPIC includes the interaction of the neutral gas and the plasma discharge. Because the neutral gas and the plasma simulation are acting on different time scales we perform the simulation of both separately in a self-consistent treatment, whereas the neutral gas distribution is calculated using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC). The merge of these features turns PlasmaPIC into a powerful simulation tool for a wide range of plasma discharges and introduces a new way of understanding and optimizing low-temperature plasma applications. This work has been supported by the ``Bundesministerium fuer Wirtschaft und Energie.'' Grant 50RS1507.

  17. Theoretical Model for Plasma Rotation Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppi, B.; Penn, G.

    1998-04-01

    Significant plasma rotation has been observed in toroidal plasmas subject to ICRF heating in the absence of direct angular momentum inputs( J.E. Rice, M.J. Greenwald, I.H. Hutchinson, et al., MIT report PSFC/JA-97-4, submitted to Nuclear Fusion.). The plasma rotates in the direction of the plasma current with typical toroidal velocities of 10^4 m/s at the magnetic axis in Alcator C-Mod experiments. A process to induce this rotation is proposed that is related to the excitation of a special class of magnetosonic modes which are radially confined only if they have a poloidal phase velocity in the ion cyclotron direction, resulting in a correlated toroidal phase velocity. These ``contained modes''( B. Coppi, G. Penn, C. Riconda, Annals of Physics 261) (1997) 117. will deposit their angular momentum to the plasma as they damp out. In contrast, modes having the opposite phase velocity can be expected to convert into external modes which will then be absorbed by the enclosing wall. The resulting torque on the plasma is in the same direction as the toroidal current. We find that this mechanism is consistent with the observed magnitude and direction of the plasma rotation. A relevant issue is the transport of angular momentum from the mode layer to the magnetic axis, for which secondary instabilities may have to be considered.

  18. Numerical modeling of waveguide heated microwave plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateswaran, S.; Schwer, D.A.; Merkle, C.L.

    1993-12-01

    Waveguide-heated microwave plasmas for space propulsion applications are analyzed by a two-dimensional numerical solution of the combined Navier-Stokes and Maxwell equations. Two waveguide configurations -- one purely transmitting and the other with a reflecting end wall -- are considered. Plasma stability and absorption characteristics are studied and contrasted with the characteristic of resonant cavity heated plasmas. In addition, preliminary estimates of the overall efficiency and the thrust and specific impulse of the propulsion system are also made. The computational results are used to explain experimental trends and to better understand the working of these devices.

  19. Modeling of Erosion and Deposition on Plasma Facing Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Ohya, K.

    2010-05-20

    The unavoidable contact of plasmas with surrounding walls results in plasma-surface interactions (PSIs) that are strongly interlinked and cannot be studied separately. Computer modeling has become increasingly important in understanding mechanisms of PSIs in present devices, ITER and beyond. Modeling of erosion and deposition requires self-consistent calculations of (1) erosion of the wall surface, (2) transport of eroded impurities in the plasma above the surface, (3) redeposition of returning impurities on the surface and (4) resultant material mixing below the surface. In addition, it is necessary to use exact rate coefficients for collision reactions in the plasma and related data for the surface reactions on plasma-facing walls. This chapter describes modeling codes in terms of such PSI issues and the physical and chemical bases of the interactions.

  20. Modeling of plasma jet production from rail and coaxial guns for imploding plasma liner formation*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, R. J.; Faehl, R. J.; Kirikpatrick, R. C.; Witherspoon, D.; Cassibry, J.

    2010-11-01

    We study the generation of plasma jets for forming imploding plasma liners using an enhanced version of the ePLAS implicit/hybrid model.^1 Typically, the jets are partially ionized D or Ar gases, in initial 3-10 cm long slugs at 10^16-10^18 electron/cm^3, accelerated for microseconds along 15-30 cm rail or coaxial guns with a 1 cm inter-electrode gap and driven by magnetic fields of a few Tesla. We re-examine the B-field penetration mechanisms that can be active in such wall-connected plasmas,^2 including erosion and EMHD influences, which can subsequently impact plasma liner formation and implosion. For the background and emitted plasma components we discuss optimized PIC and fluid modeling techniques, and the use of implicit fields and hybridized electrons to speed simulation. The plasmas are relatively cold (˜3 eV), so results with fixed atomic Z are compared to those from a simple analytic EOS, and allowing radiative heat loss from the plasma. The use of PIC ions is explored to extract large mean-free-path kinetic effects. 1. R. J. Mason and C. Cranfill, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. PS-14, 45 (1986) 2. R. Mason, et al., Phys. Fluids B, 5, 1115 (1993). [4pt] *Research supported in part by USDOE Grant DE-SC0004207.

  1. Models for the probability densities of the turbulent plasma flux in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergsaker, A. S.; Fredriksen, Å; Pécseli, H. L.; Trulsen, J. K.

    2015-10-01

    Observations of turbulent transport in magnetized plasmas indicate that plasma losses can be due to coherent structures or bursts of plasma rather than a classical random walk or diffusion process. A model for synthetic data based on coherent plasma flux events is proposed, where all basic properties can be obtained analytically in terms of a few control parameters. One basic parameter in the present case is the density of burst events in a long time-record, together with parameters in a model of the individual pulse shapes and the statistical distribution of these parameters. The model and its extensions give the probability density of the plasma flux. An interesting property of the model is a prediction of a near-parabolic relation between skewness and kurtosis of the statistical flux distribution for a wide range of parameters. The model is generalized by allowing for an additive random noise component. When this noise dominates the signal we can find a transition to standard results for Gaussian random noise. Applications of the model are illustrated by data from the toroidal Blaamann plasma.

  2. Mathematical Model Of Variable-Polarity Plasma Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    Mathematical model of variable-polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding process developed for use in predicting characteristics of welds and thus serves as guide for selection of process parameters. Parameters include welding electric currents in, and durations of, straight and reverse polarities; rates of flow of plasma and shielding gases; and sizes and relative positions of welding electrode, welding orifice, and workpiece.

  3. Self-consistent discharge growing model of helicon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isayama, Shogo; Hada, Tohru; Shinohara, Shunjiro; Tanikawa, Takao

    2015-11-01

    Helicon plasma is a high-density and low-temperature plasma generated by the electromagnetic (Helicon) wave excited in the plasma. It is thought to be useful for various applications including electric thrusters. Physics of helicon plasma production involves such fundamental processes as the wave propagation (dispersion relation), collisional and non-collisional wave damping, plasma heating, ionization/recombination of neutral particles, and modification of the dispersion relation by newly ionized plasma. There remain a number of unsolved physical issues such as, how the Helicon and the TG modes influence the plasma density, electron temperature and their spatial profiles. While the Helicon mode is absorbed in the bulk plasma, the TG mode is mostly absorbed near the edge of the plasma. The local power deposition in the helicon plasma is mostly balanced by collisional loss. This local power balance can give rise to the inhomogeneous electron temperature profile that leads to time evolution of density profile and dispersion relation. In our study, we construct a self-consistent model of the discharge evolution that includes the wave excitation, electron heat transfer, and diffusion of charged particles.

  4. Alternative modeling methods for plasma-based Rf ion sources.

    PubMed

    Veitzer, Seth A; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Stoltz, Peter H; Beckwith, Kristian R C

    2016-02-01

    Rf-driven ion sources for accelerators and many industrial applications benefit from detailed numerical modeling and simulation of plasma characteristics. For instance, modeling of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) internal antenna H(-) source has indicated that a large plasma velocity is induced near bends in the antenna where structural failures are often observed. This could lead to improved designs and ion source performance based on simulation and modeling. However, there are significant separations of time and spatial scales inherent to Rf-driven plasma ion sources, which makes it difficult to model ion sources with explicit, kinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation codes. In particular, if both electron and ion motions are to be explicitly modeled, then the simulation time step must be very small, and total simulation times must be large enough to capture the evolution of the plasma ions, as well as extending over many Rf periods. Additional physics processes such as plasma chemistry and surface effects such as secondary electron emission increase the computational requirements in such a way that even fully parallel explicit PIC models cannot be used. One alternative method is to develop fluid-based codes coupled with electromagnetics in order to model ion sources. Time-domain fluid models can simulate plasma evolution, plasma chemistry, and surface physics models with reasonable computational resources by not explicitly resolving electron motions, which thereby leads to an increase in the time step. This is achieved by solving fluid motions coupled with electromagnetics using reduced-physics models, such as single-temperature magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), extended, gas dynamic, and Hall MHD, and two-fluid MHD models. We show recent results on modeling the internal antenna H(-) ion source for the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the fluid plasma modeling code USim. We compare demonstrate plasma temperature equilibration in two-temperature MHD

  5. Alternative modeling methods for plasma-based Rf ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitzer, Seth A.; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Stoltz, Peter H.; Beckwith, Kristian R. C.

    2016-02-01

    Rf-driven ion sources for accelerators and many industrial applications benefit from detailed numerical modeling and simulation of plasma characteristics. For instance, modeling of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) internal antenna H- source has indicated that a large plasma velocity is induced near bends in the antenna where structural failures are often observed. This could lead to improved designs and ion source performance based on simulation and modeling. However, there are significant separations of time and spatial scales inherent to Rf-driven plasma ion sources, which makes it difficult to model ion sources with explicit, kinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation codes. In particular, if both electron and ion motions are to be explicitly modeled, then the simulation time step must be very small, and total simulation times must be large enough to capture the evolution of the plasma ions, as well as extending over many Rf periods. Additional physics processes such as plasma chemistry and surface effects such as secondary electron emission increase the computational requirements in such a way that even fully parallel explicit PIC models cannot be used. One alternative method is to develop fluid-based codes coupled with electromagnetics in order to model ion sources. Time-domain fluid models can simulate plasma evolution, plasma chemistry, and surface physics models with reasonable computational resources by not explicitly resolving electron motions, which thereby leads to an increase in the time step. This is achieved by solving fluid motions coupled with electromagnetics using reduced-physics models, such as single-temperature magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), extended, gas dynamic, and Hall MHD, and two-fluid MHD models. We show recent results on modeling the internal antenna H- ion source for the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the fluid plasma modeling code USim. We compare demonstrate plasma temperature equilibration in two-temperature MHD models

  6. Wound healing modeling: investigating ambient gas plasma treatment efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orazov, Marat; Sakiyama, Yukinori; Graves, David B.

    2012-11-01

    Chronic wounds are thought to be caused, in part, by the presence and persistence of aerobic microbes that deplete the local oxygen concentration and prevent or slow the rate of oxygen-dependent healing. Atmospheric-pressure gas plasmas have been shown to be strong bactericidal agents and there is evidence that plasma treatment can safely kill bacteria in wounds and speed wound healing. In this study, we adapted a six-species reaction-diffusion model of epithelial wound healing and used it to predict the efficacy of various plasma treatment protocols. We assume that the only effect of plasma application to the wound is to reduce the bacterial load and that this in turn reduces the bacterial oxygen consumption in the wound. The model follows the spatial and temporal concentration or density profiles within the wound of oxygen, chemoattractants, capillary sprouts, blood vessels, fibroblasts and extracellular matrix material. We highlight the importance of the effects of plasma application on the rate of bacterial regrowth in the wound. Even a relatively large initial reduction in the bacterial wound population may not be sufficient for improved healing if bacterial regrowth is not limited. Although it is clear that current efforts to model wound healing in general and the effects of plasma in particular are in their early stage, the present results suggest several important directions for coupling plasma models with models of tissue biochemical responses.

  7. A note on antenna models in a warm isotropic plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.

    1980-01-01

    The electron-transparent and electron-reflecting models of antennas in a warm isotropic plasma are reexamined. It is shown that a purely electrical treatment of both the models without an explicit use of the boundary condition on electron velocity yields the same results as those previously obtained through an electromechanical treatment. The essential difference between the two models is that for the electron-reflecting model, fields are nonzero only in the exterior region, while for the electron-transparent model, they are nonzero both in the exterior and interior regions of the antenna. This distinction helps in clarifying some misconceptions about these models of antennas in warm isotropic plasma.

  8. A New Global Core Plasma Model of the Plasmasphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Comfort, R. H.; Craven, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) is the first empirical model for thermal inner magnetospheric plasma designed to integrate previous models and observations into a global, continuous in value and gradient, representation of typical total densities. New information about the plasmasphere, in particular, makes possible significant improvement. The IMAGE Mission Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) has obtained the first observations of total plasma densities along magnetic field lines in the plasmasphere and polar cap. Dynamics Explorer 1 Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer (RIMS) has provided densities and temperatures in the plasmasphere for five ion species. These and other works enable a new more robust empirical model of thermal in the inner magnetosphere that will be presented.

  9. Collisional-radiative modelling of an Ar helicon plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loch, Stuart

    2005-10-01

    We report on recent modelling results of emission observed from a helicon plasma, comparing theoretical and observed line intensities and line ratios of Ar, Ar^+ and Ar^2+. Our Helicon plasma is from the ASTRAL device at Auburn University, with spectral measurements from 275 nm through to 1015 nm. We concentrate on the Ar^+ ion stage, and present the results of a collisional-radiative model using various qualities of atomic data. In particular, we compare the modelling results using Plane-Wave Born, Distorted-Wave and R-matrix electron impact excitation data with those observed from the plasma. As part of the modelling work, we investigate the potential use of various lines as plasma diagnostic tools.

  10. Time of relaxation in dusty plasma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Dust particles in plasma may have different values of average kinetic energy for vertical and horizontal motion. The partial equilibrium of the subsystems and the relaxation processes leading to this asymmetry are under consideration. A method for the relaxation time estimation in nonideal dusty plasma is suggested. The characteristic relaxation times of vertical and horizontal motion of dust particles in gas discharge are estimated by analytical approach and by analysis of simulation results. These relaxation times for vertical and horizontal subsystems appear to be different. A single hierarchy of relaxation times is proposed.

  11. Kinetic modeling of the Saturn ring-ionosphere plasma environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, G. R.; Waite, J. H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A time-independent kinetic plasma model was developed on the basis of the Li et al. (1988) semikinetic plasma model and was used to study the interaction of the Saturnian ionosphere and ring plasma. The model includes the gravitational magnetic mirror and centripetal and ambipolar electric forces, and the effect of the mixing of two plasma populations. The results obtained indicate that the density, temperature, and composition of plasma near the rings changing in the direction from the inner C ring to the outer A ring, due to the fact that the predominant source of plasma changes from the ionosphere to the rings. The model results also suggest that the outflow of hydrogen from the ionosphere to the rings may be shut off for field lines passing through the outer B and A ring, due to the ambipolar electric field set up by the warm ring plasma trapped near the ring plane by the centipetal force. In these regions, there will be a net flux of O(+) ions from the rings to the ionosphere.

  12. The Martian Plasma Environment: Model Calculations and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenegger, H. I. M.; Dubinin, E.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Riedler, W.

    Based on a modified version of the model of an induced martian magnetosphere developed by Luhmann (1990), the dynamics and spatial distribution of different planetary ion species is examined. Three main regions are identified: A cloud of ions travelling along cycloidal trajectories, a plasma mantle and a plasma sheet. The latter predominantly consists of oxygen ions of ionospheric origin with minor portions of light particles. Comparison of model results with Phobos-2 observations shows reasonable agreement.

  13. Collisional Radiative Models for non-Maxwellian plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartgers, Bart; van Dijk, Jan; van der Mullen, Joost

    1999-10-01

    Collisional Radiative models are a useful tool for studying plasmas. In their simplest form, they are used to calculate an atomic state distribution function (ASDF) from given electron and neutral densities and an electron temperature. Additionally, global ionization and recombination coefficients can be calculated as a function of electron density and temperature. In turn, these coefficients are used as input for the general plasma model

  14. Singular perturbation methods and the warm plasma model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. W.; Deschamps, G. A.

    1971-01-01

    The application of techniques of the singular perturbation theory to the analysis of warm plasma is discussed. Typically, the cold plasma model can be applied over wide ranges of parameters and only over narrow ranges forming so-called boundary layers is the warm plasma model used. Simplified equations can be used and the solutions matched on both sides of the layer's boundary. Simple examples to illustrate the solution are presented. The analysis confirms that some results are highly sensitive to the values of: (1) wire radius or gap size for an antenna, (2) temperature of the medium, and (3) incident angle of a plane wave.

  15. Recent progress in plasma modelling at INFN-LNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, L.; Castro, G.; Torrisi, G.; Galatà, A.; Mascali, D.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.

    2016-02-01

    At Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (INFN-LNS), the development of intense ion and proton sources has been supported by a great deal of work on the modelling of microwave generated plasmas for many years. First, a stationary version of the particle-in-cell code was developed for plasma modelling starting from an iterative strategy adopted for the space charge dominated beam transport simulations. Electromagnetic properties of the plasma and full-waves simulations are now affordable for non-homogenous and non-isotropic magnetized plasma via "cold" approximation. The effects of Coulomb collisions on plasma particles dynamics was implemented with the Langevin formalism, instead of simply applying the Spitzer 90° collisions through a Monte Carlo technique. A wide database of different cross sections related to reactions occurring in a hydrogen plasma was implemented. The next step consists of merging such a variety of approaches for retrieving an "as-a-whole" picture of plasma dynamics in ion sources. The preliminary results will be summarized in the paper for a microwave discharge ion source designed for intense and high quality proton beams production, proton source for European Spallation Source project. Even if the realization of a predictive software including the complete processes involved in plasma formation is still rather far, a better comprehension of the source behavior is possible and so the simulations may support the optimization phase.

  16. Recent progress in plasma modelling at INFN-LNS.

    PubMed

    Neri, L; Castro, G; Torrisi, G; Galatà, A; Mascali, D; Celona, L; Gammino, S

    2016-02-01

    At Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (INFN-LNS), the development of intense ion and proton sources has been supported by a great deal of work on the modelling of microwave generated plasmas for many years. First, a stationary version of the particle-in-cell code was developed for plasma modelling starting from an iterative strategy adopted for the space charge dominated beam transport simulations. Electromagnetic properties of the plasma and full-waves simulations are now affordable for non-homogenous and non-isotropic magnetized plasma via "cold" approximation. The effects of Coulomb collisions on plasma particles dynamics was implemented with the Langevin formalism, instead of simply applying the Spitzer 90° collisions through a Monte Carlo technique. A wide database of different cross sections related to reactions occurring in a hydrogen plasma was implemented. The next step consists of merging such a variety of approaches for retrieving an "as-a-whole" picture of plasma dynamics in ion sources. The preliminary results will be summarized in the paper for a microwave discharge ion source designed for intense and high quality proton beams production, proton source for European Spallation Source project. Even if the realization of a predictive software including the complete processes involved in plasma formation is still rather far, a better comprehension of the source behavior is possible and so the simulations may support the optimization phase. PMID:26931913

  17. Modeling plasma/material interactions during a tokamak disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, I.

    1994-10-01

    Disruptions in tokamak reactors are still of serious concern and present a potential obstacle for successful operation and reliable design. Erosion of plasma-facing materials due to thermal energy dump during a disruption can severely limit the lifetime of these components, therefore diminishing the economic feasibility of the reactor. A comprehensive disruption erosion model which takes into account the interplay of major physical processes during plasma-material interaction has been developed. The initial burst of energy delivered to facing-material surfaces from direct impact of plasma particles causes sudden ablation of these materials. As a result, a vapor cloud is formed in front of the incident plasma particles. Shortly thereafter, the plasma particles are stopped in the vapor cloud, heating and ionizing it. The energy transmitted to the material surfaces is then dominated by photon radiation. It is the dynamics and the evolution of this vapor cloud that finally determines the net erosion rate and, consequently, the component lifetime. The model integrates with sufficient detail and in a self-consistent way, material thermal evolution response, plasma-vapor interaction physics, vapor hydrodynamics, and radiation transport in order to realistically simulate the effects of a plasma disruption on plasma-facing components. Candidate materials such as beryllium and carbon have been analyzed. The dependence of the net erosion rate on disruption physics and various parameters was analyzed and is discussed.

  18. Model for a transformer-coupled toroidal plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Rauf, Shahid; Balakrishna, Ajit; Chen Zhigang; Collins, Ken

    2012-01-15

    A two-dimensional fluid plasma model for a transformer-coupled toroidal plasma source is described. Ferrites are used in this device to improve the electromagnetic coupling between the primary coils carrying radio frequency (rf) current and a secondary plasma loop. Appropriate components of the Maxwell equations are solved to determine the electromagnetic fields and electron power deposition in the model. The effect of gas flow on species transport is also considered. The model is applied to 1 Torr Ar/NH{sub 3} plasma in this article. Rf electric field lines form a loop in the vacuum chamber and generate a plasma ring. Due to rapid dissociation of NH{sub 3}, NH{sub x}{sup +} ions are more prevalent near the gas inlet and Ar{sup +} ions are the dominant ions farther downstream. NH{sub 3} and its by-products rapidly dissociate into small fragments as the gas flows through the plasma. With increasing source power, NH{sub 3} dissociates more readily and NH{sub x}{sup +} ions are more tightly confined near the gas inlet. Gas flow rate significantly influences the plasma characteristics. With increasing gas flow rate, NH{sub 3} dissociation occurs farther from the gas inlet in regions with higher electron density. Consequently, more NH{sub 4}{sup +} ions are produced and dissociation by-products have higher concentrations near the outlet.

  19. Modelling and Simulation of the Advanced Plasma Source

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Benjamin; Peter, Ralf; Harhausen, Jens; Ohl, Andreas

    2011-08-15

    Plasma ion assisted-deposition (PIAD) is a combination of conventional thermal evaporation deposition and plasma-beam surface modification; it serves as a well-established technology for the creation of high quality coatings on mirrors, lenses, and other optical devices. It is closely related to ion-assisted deposition to the extent that electrons preserve quasineutrality of the ion beam. This paper investigates the Advanced Plasma Source (APS), a plasma beam source employed for PIAD. A field enhanced glow discharge generates a radially expanding plasma flow with an ion energy of about 80-120 eV. Charge exchange collisions with the neutral background gas (pressure 0.1 Pa and below) produce a cold secondary plasma, which expands as well. A model is developed which describes the primary ions by a simplified Boltzmann equation, the secondary ions by the equations of continuity and momentum balance, and the electrons by the condition of Boltzmann equilibrium. Additionally, quasineutrality is assumed. The model can be reduced to a single nonlinear differential equation for the velocity of the secondary ions, which has several removable singularities and one essential singularity, identified as the Bohm singularity. Solving the model yields macroscopic plasma features, such as fluxes, densities, and the electrical field. An add-on Monte-Carlo simulation is employed to calculate the ion energy distribution function at the substrate. All results compare well to experiments conducted at a commercial APS system.

  20. An FDTD model of scattering from meteor head plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, R. A.; Close, S.

    2015-07-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD) model of scattering of radar waves from meteor head plasma. The model treats the meteor head plasma as a cold, collisional, and magnetized plasma, and solves Maxwell's equations and the Langevin equation simultaneously and self-consistently in and around the plasma. We use this model to investigate scattering of radar waves from a meteor head (the "head echo") under a range of plasma densities, meteor scale sizes, and wave frequencies. In this way we relate the radar cross section (RCS) to these variable parameters. We find that computed RCS disagrees with previous analytical theory at certain meteor sizes and densities, in some cases by over an order of magnitude. We find that the calculated meteor head RCS is monotonically related to the "overdense area" of the meteor, defined as the cross-section area of the part of the meteor where the plasma frequency exceeds the wave frequency. These results provides a physical measure of the meteor size and density that can be inferred from measured RCS values from ground-based radars. Meteoroid mass can then be inferred from the meteor plasma distribution using established methods.

  1. Modeling RF-induced Plasma-Surface Interactions with VSim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Smithe, David N.; Pankin, Alexei Y.; Roark, Christine M.; Stoltz, Peter H.; Zhou, Sean C.-D.; Kruger, Scott E.

    2014-10-01

    An overview of ongoing enhancements to the Plasma Discharge (PD) module of Tech-X's VSim software tool is presented. A sub-grid kinetic sheath model, developed for the accurate computation of sheath potentials near metal and dielectric-coated walls, enables the physical effects of DC and RF sheath dynamics to be included in macroscopic-scale plasma simulations that need not explicitly resolve sheath scale lengths. Sheath potential evolution, together with particle behavior near the sheath (e.g. sputtering), can thus be simulated in complex, experimentally relevant geometries. Simulations of RF sheath-enhanced impurity production near surfaces of the C-Mod field-aligned ICRF antenna are presented to illustrate the model; impurity mitigation techniques are also explored. Model extensions to capture the physics of secondary electron emission and of multispecies plasmas are summarized, together with a discussion of improved tools for plasma chemistry and IEDF/EEDF visualization and modeling. The latter tools are also highly relevant for commercial plasma processing applications. Ultimately, we aim to establish VSimPD as a robust, efficient computational tool for modeling fusion and industrial plasma processes. Supported by U.S. DoE SBIR Phase I/II Award DE-SC0009501.

  2. Plasma jet accelerator optimization with supple membrane model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, S. A.; Bogatu, I. N.; Kim, J. S.

    2006-10-01

    High density (>=3x10^17cm-3) and high Mach number (M>10) plasma jets have important applications such as plasma rotation, refueling and disruption mitigation in tokamaks. The most deleterious blow-by instability occurs in coaxial plasma accelerators; hence electrode shape optimization is required to accelerate plasmas to ˜200 km/s [1]. A full 3D particle simulation takes a huge computational time. We have developed a membrane model to provide a good starting point and further physical insight for a full 3D optimization. Our model approximates the axisymmetrical plasma by a thin supple conducting membrane with a distributed mass, located between the electrodes, and connects them to model dynamics of the blow-by instability and to conduct the optimization. The supple membrane is allowed to slip along the conductors freely or with some friction as affected by Lorenz force, generated by magnetic field inside the chamber and current on membrane. The total mass and the density distribution represent the initial plasma. The density is redistributed adiabatically during the acceleration. An external electrical circuit with capacitance, inductance and resistivity is a part of the model. The membrane model simulation results will be compared to the 2D fluid MACH2 results and then will be used to guide a full 3D optimization by the LSP code. 1. http://hyperv.com/projects/pic/

  3. Plasma Response Models for Controller Design on TCV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, J. B.; Vyas, P.; Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, G.; Ariola, M.; Villone, F.; Coutlis, A.; Limebeer, D. J. N.; Wainwright, J. P.

    1997-11-01

    The control of the plasma position and shape on present tokamaks is usually based on simple but reliable PID controllers. These controllers are either empirically tuned or based on simplistic models. More detailed models could be exploited by modern control theory to benefit the controller design, since the improvement in performance depends on the accuracy of the model. Linearized models of the plasma shape and position have been developed for TCV limited and diverted plasmas. These include a simple rigid current displacement model for zIp and the CREATE-L model for position and shape. The latter is an a priori phenomenological model which assumes that the plasma is in permanent MHD equilibrium and that the current profile is determined by only l_i, β_p, and I_p. Variations of the CREATE-L model based on different assumptions are also tested. A purely mathematical model developed from experimental observations on TCV was also developed. The accuracy and consistency of these models has been extensively tested on TCV and the CREATE-L model is in excellent agreement with open and closed loop experiments. The implications for controller design on TCV, and the suitability of these models for ITER controller design is assessed.

  4. Numerical modeling of the Parker instability in a rotating plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalzov, Ivan; Brown, Ben; Katz, Noam; Forest, Cary

    2011-10-01

    We study numerically the analogue of the Parker (magnetic buoyancy) instability in a rotating plasma screw pinch confined in a bounded cylinder. The goal of the study is to show the possibility of reaching the Parker instability for the plasma parameters achievable in the Madison Plasma Couette Experiment (MPCX). Simulations are performed using the extended magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code NIMROD for an isothermal compressible plasma model. Both linear and nonlinear regimes of the instability are studied, and the obtained results are compared with analytic results for a slab geometry. It is shown that the effect of plasma rotation in a cylindrical geometry is two-fold: first, centrifugal acceleration acts as analogue of gravity and provides the equilibrium density stratification; second, the presence of Coriolis force results in increase of critical gradient of magnetic field required for the onset of instability.

  5. Theoretical model for plasma expansion generated by hypervelocity impact

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Qingming Zhang, Dongjiang; Long, Renrong; Chen, Li; Huang, Fenglei; Gong, Zizheng

    2014-09-15

    The hypervelocity impact experiments of spherical LY12 aluminum projectile diameter of 6.4 mm on LY12 aluminum target thickness of 23 mm have been conducted using a two-stage light gas gun. The impact velocity of the projectile is 5.2, 5.7, and 6.3 km/s, respectively. The experimental results show that the plasma phase transition appears under the current experiment conditions, and the plasma expansion consists of accumulation, equilibrium, and attenuation. The plasma characteristic parameters decrease as the plasma expands outward and are proportional with the third power of the impact velocity, i.e., (T{sub e}, n{sub e}) ∝ v{sub p}{sup 3}. Based on the experimental results, a theoretical model on the plasma expansion is developed and the theoretical results are consistent with the experimental data.

  6. Nonlinear lower hybrid modeling in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Napoli, F.; Schettini, G.; Castaldo, C.; Cesario, R.

    2014-02-12

    We present here new results concerning the nonlinear mechanism underlying the observed spectral broadening produced by parametric instabilities occurring at the edge of tokamak plasmas in present day LHCD (lower hybrid current drive) experiments. Low frequency (LF) ion-sound evanescent modes (quasi-modes) are the main parametric decay channel which drives a nonlinear mode coupling of lower hybrid (LH) waves. The spectrum of the LF fluctuations is calculated here considering the beating of the launched LH wave at the radiofrequency (RF) operating line frequency (pump wave) with the noisy background of the RF power generator. This spectrum is calculated in the frame of the kinetic theory, following a perturbative approach. Numerical solutions of the nonlinear LH wave equation show the evolution of the nonlinear mode coupling in condition of a finite depletion of the pump power. The role of the presence of heavy ions in a Deuterium plasma in mitigating the nonlinear effects is analyzed.

  7. Modeling Agglomeration of Dust Particles in Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Lorin S.; Land, Victor; Ma Qianyu; Perry, Jonathan D.; Hyde, Truell W.

    2011-11-29

    The charge on an aggregate immersed in a plasma environment distributes itself over the aggregate's surface; this can be approximated theoretically by assuming a multipole distribution. The dipole-dipole (or higher order) charge interactions between fractal aggregates lead to rotations of the grains as they interact. Other properties of the dust grains also influence the agglomeration process, such as the monomer shape (spherical or ellipsoidal) or the presence of magnetic material. Finally, the plasma and grain properties also determine the morphology of the resultant aggregates. Porous and fluffy aggregates are more strongly coupled to the gas, leading to reduced collisional velocities, and greater collisional cross sections. These factors in turn can determine the growth rate of the aggregates and evolution of the dust cloud. This paper gives an overview of the numerical and experimental methods used to study dust agglomeration at CASPER and highlights some recent results.

  8. Numerical modeling of deflagration mode in coaxial plasma guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitaraman, Hariswaran; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2012-10-01

    Pulsed coaxial plasma guns have been used in several applications in the field of space propulsion, nuclear fusion and materials processing. These devices operate in two modes based on the delay between gas injection and breakdown initiation. Larger delay led to the plasma detonation mode where a compression wave in the form of a luminous front propagates from the breech to the muzzle. Shorter delay led to the more efficient deflagration mode characterized by a relatively diffuse plasma with higher resistivity. The overall physics of the discharge in the two modes of operation and in particular the latter remain relatively unexplored. Here we perform a computational modeling study by solving the non-ideal Magneto-hydrodynamics equations for the quasi-neutral plasma in the coaxial plasma gun. A finite volume formulation on an unstructured mesh framework with an implicit scheme is used to do stable computations. The final work will present details of important species in the plasma, particle energies and Mach number at the muzzle. A comparison of the plasma parameters will be made with the experiments reported in ref. [1]. [4pt] [1] F. R. Poehlmann et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 123508 (2010)

  9. An Extended Magnetohydrodynamics Model for Relativistic Weakly Collisional Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Mani; Gammie, Charles F.; Foucart, Francois; Quataert, Eliot

    2015-09-01

    Black holes that accrete far below the Eddington limit are believed to accrete through a geometrically thick, optically thin, rotationally supported plasma that we will refer to as a radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF). RIAFs are typically collisionless in the sense that the Coulomb mean free path is large compared to {GM}/{c}2, and relativistically hot near the event horizon. In this paper we develop a phenomenological model for the plasma in RIAFs, motivated by the application to sources such as Sgr A* and M87. The model is derived using Israel–Stewart theory, which considers deviations up to second order from thermal equilibrium, but modified for a magnetized plasma. This leads to thermal conduction along magnetic field lines and a difference in pressure, parallel and perpendicular to the field lines (which is equivalent to anisotropic viscosity). In the non-relativistic limit, our model reduces to the widely used Braginskii theory of magnetized, weakly collisional plasmas. We compare our model to the existing literature on dissipative relativistic fluids, describe the linear theory of the plasma, and elucidate the physical meaning of the free parameters in the model. We also describe limits of the model when the conduction is saturated and when the viscosity implies a large pressure anisotropy. In future work, the formalism developed in this paper will be used in numerical models of RIAFs to assess the importance of non-ideal processes for the dynamics and radiative properties of slowly accreting black holes.

  10. Modeling of High Kinetic Energy Plasma Jets for Fusion Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogatu, I. N.; Galkin, S. A.; Kim, J. S.

    2006-10-01

    We used semi-analytical models for high velocity (>200 km/s) and density (>10^17 cm-3) plasma jets to describe the acceleration in coaxial electrodes geometry, the collision, and plasma liner implosion, assuming that jets have merged into a spherical or cylindrical shell. The results are compared with experimental data and are being used for guiding LSP and MACH2 codes simulation and for optimization. The simplest model which uses the adiabatic invariant for oscillator revealed the basic relation between the velocity and the parameters of the plasma accelerator. Plasma slug model was extended for including friction and mass addition by electrode erosion. A simple model of blow-by instability by using the canting angle of the plasma current was formulated. As plasma jets collision at high interfacial Mach number generates shock fronts, we analyzed their possible consequences on the merging process and liner formation. The structure of the spherical shell liner during adiabatic implosion and the effect of the shock wave generated at void closure on the confinement time were also investigated.

  11. Modeling laser-plasma acceleration in the laboratory frame

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    A simulation of laser-plasma acceleration in the laboratory frame. Both the laser and the wakefield buckets must be resolved over the entire domain of the plasma, requiring many cells and many time steps. While researchers often use a simulation window that moves with the pulse, this reduces only the multitude of cells, not the multitude of time steps. For an artistic impression of how to solve the simulation by using the boosted-frame method, watch the video "Modeling laser-plasma acceleration in the wakefield frame."

  12. Some problems of pulsar physics. [magnetospheric plasma model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arons, J.

    1979-01-01

    The theories of particle acceleration along polar field lines are reviewed, and the total energization of the charge separated plasma is summarized, when pair creation is absent. The application of these theories and plasma supply to pulsars is discussed, with attention given to the total amount of electron-positron plasma created and its momentum distribution. Various aspects of radiation emission and transport are analyzed, based on a polar current flow model with pair creation, and the phenomenon of marching subpulses is considered. The coronation beaming and the relativistically expanding current sheet models for pulsar emission are also outlined, and the paper concludes with a brief discussion of the relation between the theories of polar flow with pair plasma and the problem of the energization of the Crab Nebula.

  13. Kinetic model for the collisionless sheath of a collisional plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xian-Zhu; Guo, Zehua

    2016-08-01

    Collisional plasmas typically have mean-free-path still much greater than the Debye length, so the sheath is mostly collisionless. Once the plasma density, temperature, and flow are specified at the sheath entrance, the profile variation of electron and ion density, temperature, flow speed, and conductive heat fluxes inside the sheath is set by collisionless dynamics, and can be predicted by an analytical kinetic model distribution. These predictions are contrasted here with direct kinetic simulations, showing good agreement.

  14. A preliminary model of ion beam neutralization. [in thruster plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, D. E.; Katz, I.

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical model of neutralized thruster ion beam plasmas has been developed. The basic premise is that the beam forms an electrostatic trap for the neutralizing electrons. A Maxwellian spectrum of electron energies is maintained by collisions between trapped electrons and by collective randomization of velocities of electrons injected from the neutralizer into the surrounding plasma. The theory contains the observed barometric law relationship between electron density and electron temperatures and ion beam spreading in good agreement with measured results.

  15. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Intranasal Scopolamine in Plasma Saliva and Urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Chow, D. S. L.; Tam, V.; Putcha, L.

    2014-01-01

    An intranasal gel formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness. The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) were evaluated under the Food and Drug Administration guidelines for clinical trials for an Investigative New Drug (IND). The aim of this project was to develop a PK model that can predict the relationship between plasma, saliva and urinary scopolamine concentrations using data collected from the IND clinical trial with INSCOP. METHODS: Twelve healthy human subjects were administered three dose levels (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mg) of INSCOP. Serial blood, saliva and urine samples were collected between 5 min to 24 h after dosing and scopolamine concentrations measured by using a validated LC-MS-MS assay. Pharmacokinetic Compartmental models, using actual dosing and sampling times, were built using Phoenix (version 1.2). Model discrimination was performed, by minimizing the Akaike Information Criteria (AIC), maximizing the coefficient of determination (r²) and by comparison of the quality of fit plots. RESULTS: The best structural model to describe scopolamine disposition after INSCOP administration (minimal AIC =907.2) consisted of one compartment for plasma, saliva and urine respectively that were inter-connected with different rate constants. The estimated values of PK parameters were compiled in Table 1. The model fitting exercises revealed a nonlinear PK for scopolamine between plasma and saliva compartments for K21, Vmax and Km. CONCLUSION: PK model for INSCOP was developed and for the first time it satisfactorily predicted the PK of scopolamine in plasma, saliva and urine after INSCOP administration. Using non-linear PK yielded the best structural model to describe scopolamine disposition between plasma and saliva compartments, and inclusion of non-linear PK resulted in a significant improved model fitting. The model can be utilized to predict scopolamine plasma concentration using saliva and/or urine data that

  16. Mathematical model of gas plasma applied to chronic wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. G.; Liu, X. Y.; Liu, D. W.; Lu, X. P.; Zhang, Y. T.

    2013-11-01

    Chronic wounds are a major burden for worldwide health care systems, and patients suffer pain and discomfort from this type of wound. Recently gas plasmas have been shown to safely speed chronic wounds healing. In this paper, we develop a deterministic mathematical model formulated by eight-species reaction-diffusion equations, and use it to analyze the plasma treatment process. The model follows spatial and temporal concentration within the wound of oxygen, chemoattractants, capillary sprouts, blood vessels, fibroblasts, extracellular matrix material, nitric oxide (NO), and inflammatory cell. Two effects of plasma, increasing NO concentration and reducing bacteria load, are considered in this model. The plasma treatment decreases the complete healing time from 25 days (normal wound healing) to 17 days, and the contributions of increasing NO concentration and reducing bacteria load are about 1/4 and 3/4, respectively. Increasing plasma treatment frequency from twice to three times per day accelerates healing process. Finally, the response of chronic wounds of different etiologies to treatment with gas plasmas is analyzed.

  17. Mathematical model of gas plasma applied to chronic wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. G.; Liu, X. Y.; Liu, D. W.; Lu, X. P.; Zhang, Y. T.

    2013-11-15

    Chronic wounds are a major burden for worldwide health care systems, and patients suffer pain and discomfort from this type of wound. Recently gas plasmas have been shown to safely speed chronic wounds healing. In this paper, we develop a deterministic mathematical model formulated by eight-species reaction-diffusion equations, and use it to analyze the plasma treatment process. The model follows spatial and temporal concentration within the wound of oxygen, chemoattractants, capillary sprouts, blood vessels, fibroblasts, extracellular matrix material, nitric oxide (NO), and inflammatory cell. Two effects of plasma, increasing NO concentration and reducing bacteria load, are considered in this model. The plasma treatment decreases the complete healing time from 25 days (normal wound healing) to 17 days, and the contributions of increasing NO concentration and reducing bacteria load are about 1/4 and 3/4, respectively. Increasing plasma treatment frequency from twice to three times per day accelerates healing process. Finally, the response of chronic wounds of different etiologies to treatment with gas plasmas is analyzed.

  18. Multi-Scale Multi-Species Modeling for Plasma Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Samuel Jun

    This dissertation describes three computational models developed to simulate important aspects of low-temperature plasma devices, most notably ring-cusp ion discharges and thrusters. The main findings of this dissertation are related to (1) the mechanisms of cusp confinement for micro-scale plasmas, (2) the implementation and merits of magnetic field aligned meshes, and (3) an improved method for describing heavy species interactions. The Single Cusp (SC) model focuses on the near-cusp region of the discharge chamber to investigate the near surface cusp confinement of a micro-scale plasma. The model employs the multi-species iterative Monte Carlo method and uses various advanced methods such as electric field calculation and particle weighting algorithm that are compatible with a non-uniform mesh in cylindrical coordinates. Three different plasma conditions are simulated with the SC model, including an electron plasma, a sparse plasma, and a weakly ionized plasma. It is found that the scaling of plasma loss to the cusp for a sparse plasma can be similar to that for a weakly ionized plasma, while the loss mechanism is significantly different; the primary electrons strongly influence the loss structure of the sparse plasma. The model is also used, along with experimental results, to describe the importance of the local magnetic field on the primary electron loss behavior at the cusp. Many components of the 2D/3D hybrid fluid/particle model (DC-ION) are improved from the original version. The DC-ION code looks at the macroscopic structure of the discharge plasma and can be used to address the design and optimization challenges of miniature to micro discharges on the order of 3 cm to 1 cm in diameter. Among the work done for DC-ION, detailed steps for the magnetic field aligned (MFA) mesh are provided. Solving the plasma diffusion equation in the ring-cusp configuration, the benefit of the MFA mesh has been fully investigated by comparing the solution with a uniform

  19. A feedback model of magnetron sputtering plasmas in HIPIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, A. E.; Ganesan, R.; Bilek, M. M. M.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2015-04-01

    We present a 1D feedback model that captures the essential elements of plasma pulse initiation and is useful for control and diagnostics of sputtering plasmas. Our model falls into the class of single-species population models with recruitment and time delay, which show no oscillatory behaviour. The model can reproduce essential features of published time-current traces from plasma discharges and is useful to determine the key parameters affecting the evolution of the discharge. We include the external circuit and we focus on the time evolution of the current as a function of the applied voltage and the plasma parameters. We find the necessity of a nonlinear loss term in the time-dependent plasma ion population to ensure a stable discharge, and we show that a higher secondary electron emission coefficient reduces the time delay for current initiation. We report that I-V characteristics in the plateau region, where it exists, fit a power curve of the form I = kVn, where n is influenced most strongly by the nonlinear loss term.

  20. A new model for plasma transport and chemistry at Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, John D.

    1992-01-01

    A model of plasma transport and chemistry is described which calculates the evolution of a plasma population in latitude and radial distance. This model is applied to the magnetosphere of Saturn, where it is used to fit the density profile of the heavy ions assuming both satellite and ring sources of plasma. Use of an extended source region is found to significantly alter the resulting plasma profile. Water ions cannot fit the observed density profile inside L = 6 even with a large ring source. Oxygen ions can fit the density profile throughout the region inside L = 12 given a suitable profile of neutral hydrogen; a suitable profile contains up to 5 H/cu cm outside L = 4 with the number increasing inside this. Preferred values of K are 1-3 x 10 exp -10 R(S)2/s, but any value K less than 10 exp -9 R(S)2/s can be accommodated. The temperature profile is shown to favor models invoking in situ plasma formation and loss as opposed to models where transport is important.

  1. Modeling of Magnetron Argon Plasma Issuing into Ambient Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin-Cun; Xia, Wei-Dong

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented to describe the heat transfer and fluid flow in a magnetron plasma torch, by means of a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code fluent. Specific calculations are presented for a gas-mixing system (i.e., an argon plasma discharging into an air environment), operating in a laminar mode. Numerical results show that an external axial magnetic field (AMF) may have a significant effect on the behavior of an arc plasma, i.e., the AMF will impel the plasma to retract axially and expand radially. In addition, the use of an AMF induces a strong air indraft at the torch spout, and the air mixing with the argon gas results in a marked increase in arc voltage. An increment in the amount of the oncoming argon gas restrains the quantity of the air indraft, and this should be responsible for a lower arc voltage in such an AMF torch when a larger gas inflow is used.

  2. Simple model for fine particle (dust) clouds in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totsuji, Hiroo

    2016-04-01

    In the cloud of fine particles (dusts) in plasmas, the charge neutrality can be much enhanced due to large charge numbers of fine particles. The required condition is not difficult to satisfy even when their charge density is substantially smaller than electrons or ions. Based on this fact, a simple model of fine particle clouds is proposed and the cloud radius is related to the half-width, the radius where the density of surrounding plasmas drops by half, in cylindrically and spherically symmetric cases under microgravity. When fine particles are gradually introduced with parameters of surrounding plasma especially the half-width being fixed, the size of clouds first increases and then saturates at the value determined by the plasma half-width, giving a possibility to control the size and density of clouds independently.

  3. Modeling of Oxidation of Molybdenum Particles during Plasma Spray Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fincke, James Russell; Wan, Y. P.; Jiang, X. Y.; Sampath, S.; Prasad, V.; Herman, H.

    2001-06-01

    An oxidation model for molybdenum particles during the plasma spray deposition process is presented. Based on a well-verified model for plasma chemistry and the heating and phase change of particles in a plasma plume, this model accounts for the oxidant diffusion around the surface of particles or splats, oxidation on the surface, as well as oxygen diffusion in molten molybdenum. Calculations are performed for a single molybdenum particle sprayed under Metco-9MB spraying conditions. The oxidation features of particles during the flight are compared with those during the deposition. The result shows the dominance of oxidation of a molybdenum particle during the flight, as well as during deposition when the substrate temperature is high (above 400 °C).

  4. A novel local equilibrium model for shaped tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Weihong; Zhou Deng; Xiang Nong

    2012-07-15

    A model is proposed for a local up-down symmetric equilibrium in the vicinity of a specified magnetic surface with given elongation and triangularity. Different from the Miller's model [R. L. Miller et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 973 (1998)], the derivative of the Shafranov shift in the present model is self-consistently determined. The equilibrium accounts for all the essential features, like the elongation, the triangularity, and the Shafranov shift etc., of a shaped cross section. Hence, it can be used for investigation of radially localized plasma modes, like reversed shear Alfvenic eigenmodes and ballooning mode, etc., and it is also suitable for local equilibrium construction used for flux tube plasma simulations.

  5. Mathematical modeling of plasma deposition and hardening of coatings-switched electrical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadyrmetov, A. M.; Sharifullin, S. N.; Pustovalov, AS

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of simulation of plasma deposition and hardening of coatings in modulating the electrical parameters. Mathematical models are based on physical models of gas-dynamic mechanisms more dynamic and thermal processes of the plasma jet. As an example the modeling of dynamic processes of heterogeneous plasma jet, modulated current pulses indirect arc plasma torch.

  6. The Empowerment of Plasma Modeling by Fundamental Electron Scattering Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-09-01

    Modeling of low temperature plasmas addresses at least 3 goals - investigation of fundamental processes, analysis and optimization of current technologies, and prediction of performance of as yet unbuilt systems for new applications. The former modeling may be performed on somewhat idealized systems in simple gases, while the latter will likely address geometrically and electromagnetically intricate systems with complex gas mixtures, and now gases in contact with liquids. The variety of fundamental electron and ion scattering data (FSD) required for these activities increases from the former to the latter, while the accuracy required of that data probably decreases. In each case, the fidelity, depth and impact of the modeling depends on the availability of FSD. Modeling is, in fact, empowered by the availability and robustness of FSD. In this talk, examples of the impact of and requirements for FSD in plasma modeling will be discussed from each of these three perspectives using results from multidimensional and global models. The fundamental studies will focus on modeling of inductively coupled plasmas sustained in Ar/Cl2 where the electron scattering from feed gases and their fragments ultimately determine gas temperatures. Examples of the optimization of current technologies will focus on modeling of remote plasma etching of Si and Si3N4 in Ar/NF3/N2/O2 mixtures. Modeling of systems as yet unbuilt will address the interaction of atmospheric pressure plasmas with liquids Work was supported by the US Dept. of Energy (DE-SC0001939), National Science Foundation (CHE-124752), and the Semiconductor Research Corp.

  7. Ion sphere model for Yukawa systems (dusty plasmas)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrapak, S. A.; Khrapak, A. G.; Ivlev, A. V.; Thomas, H. M.

    2014-12-01

    Application of the ion sphere model (ISM), well known in the context of the one-component-plasma, to estimate thermodynamic properties of model Yukawa systems is discussed. It is shown that the ISM approximation provides fairly good estimate of the internal energy of the strongly coupled Yukawa systems, in both fluid and solid phases. Simple expressions for the excess pressure and isothermal compressibility are derived, which can be particularly useful in connection to wave phenomena in strongly coupled dusty plasmas. It is also shown that in the regime of strong screening a simple consideration of neighboring particles interactions can be sufficient to obtain quite accurate estimates of thermodynamic properties of Yukawa systems.

  8. Verification strategies for fluid-based plasma simulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, Shankar

    2012-10-01

    Verification is an essential aspect of computational code development for models based on partial differential equations. However, verification of plasma models is often conducted internally by authors of these programs and not openly discussed. Several professional research bodies including the IEEE, AIAA, ASME and others have formulated standards for verification and validation (V&V) of computational software. This work focuses on verification, defined succinctly as determining whether the mathematical model is solved correctly. As plasma fluid models share several aspects with the Navier-Stokes equations used in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), the CFD verification process is used as a guide. Steps in the verification process: consistency checks, examination of iterative, spatial and temporal convergence, and comparison with exact solutions, are described with examples from plasma modeling. The Method of Manufactured Solutions (MMS), which has been used to verify complex systems of PDEs in solid and fluid mechanics, is introduced. An example of the application of MMS to a self-consistent plasma fluid model using the local mean energy approximation is presented. The strengths and weaknesses of the techniques presented in this work are discussed.

  9. Spectroscopic modeling and analysis of plasma conditions in implosion cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovkin, Igor E.

    In this dissertation we discuss the effects of opacity and plasma gradients on the analysis and interpretation of Ar K-shell line emission from Ar-doped inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and introduce a spectroscopic technique for the determination of core plasma gradients. In particular, the Ar Heβ composite spectral feature is used for core plasma temperature and density diagnostics. We present a versatile, spectroscopic-quality Non-Local-Thermodynamic- Equilibrium radiation transport model that takes into account the effects of collisional-radiative atomic kinetics, plasma gradients, Stark-broadened line shapes and radiation transport. The code computes the radiative properties of the plasma, and it can be easily adapted to treat different problems of spectra formation. We discuss the importance of high-order satellite emission in the formation of Heβ spectral feature, and the interpretation of core averaged electron temperatures and densities extracted from space integrated spectra of non- uniform plasmas. We also present an application of Genetic Algorithms to the analysis of experimental X-ray spectra. This algorithm drives the search for plasma parameters that yield the best fits to experimental spectra. We discuss the applicability of Case Injected Genetic Algorithms to accelerate analysis of spectra. Furthermore, we introduce a novel method for the determination of plasma temperature and density gradients in imploded cores. The gradients are extracted from the self-consistent analysis of time-resolved X-ray spectra and spatial emissivity distributions obtained from X-ray monochromatic images. In this case, the search in the complex parameter space of gradient functions is driven by a multi-objective Niched Pareto Genetic Algorithm. We discuss the analysis of time resolved spectra recorded during Ar-doped ICF implosions at the NOVA laser facility. Time histories of core averaged electron densities and temperatures during the collapse of the

  10. Laboratory photoionized plasma experiments at Z - Comparison with modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayes, D.; Lockard, T.; Durmaz, T.; Hall, I.; Mancini, R.; Bailey, J.; Rochau, G.; Loisel, G.; Heeter, R.; Liedahl, D.

    2013-10-01

    Photoionized plasmas are common in astrophysical environments, such as x-ray binaries and active galactic nuclei. We discuss an experimental and modeling effort to study the atomic kinetics in plasmas of this type via K-shell line absorption spectroscopy. Results from a first pass thru our 2nd-generation dataset are compared with results of several modeling codes attempting to simulate our experimental conditions. The experiment employs the intense x-ray flux emitted by the collapse of a z-pinch to produce and backlight a Neon photoionized plasma in a cm-scale gas cell at various distances from the z-pinch. The filling pressure is monitored in situ providing the plasma particle number density. High-resolution spectra from a TREX spectrometer are processed with a suite of specially designed IDL tools to produce transmission spectra, which show absorption in several ionization stages of Neon. Analysis independent of atomic kinetics calculations yields the charge state distribution and ion areal densities used to benchmark atomic kinetics codes. In addition, the electron temperature, extracted from a level population ratio, is used to test heating models. This work is sponsored in part by the National Nuclear Security Administration under the High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas grant program through DOE Grant DE-FG52-09NA29551, and the Z Facility Fundamental Science Program of SNL.

  11. Self-consistent chemical model of partially ionized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Arkhipov, Yu. V.; Baimbetov, F. B.; Davletov, A. E.

    2011-01-15

    A simple renormalization theory of plasma particle interactions is proposed. It primarily stems from generic properties of equilibrium distribution functions and allows one to obtain the so-called generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation for an effective interaction potential of two chosen particles in the presence of a third one. The same equation is then strictly derived from the Bogolyubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon (BBGKY) hierarchy for equilibrium distribution functions in the pair correlation approximation. This enables one to construct a self-consistent chemical model of partially ionized plasmas, correctly accounting for the close interrelation of charged and neutral components thereof. Minimization of the system free energy provides ionization equilibrium and, thus, permits one to study the plasma composition in a wide range of its parameters. Unlike standard chemical models, the proposed one allows one to study the system correlation functions and thereby to obtain an equation of state which agrees well with exact results of quantum-mechanical activity expansions. It is shown that the plasma and neutral components are strongly interrelated, which results in the short-range order formation in the corresponding subsystem. The mathematical form of the results obtained enables one to both firmly establish this fact and to determine a characteristic length of the structure formation. Since the cornerstone of the proposed self-consistent chemical model of partially ionized plasmas is an effective pairwise interaction potential, it immediately provides quite an efficient calculation scheme not only for thermodynamical functions but for transport coefficients as well.

  12. A Generalized Hydrodynamics Model for Strongly Coupled Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaw, Abdourahmane; Murillo, Michael Sean

    2015-11-01

    Starting with the equations of the Bogoliubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon hierarchy, we obtain the density, momentum and stress tensor-moment equations. The closure proceeds in two steps. The first that guarantees an equilibrium state is given by density functional theory. It ensures self consistency in the equation-of-state properties of the plasma. The second involves modifying the two-body distribution function to include collisions in the relaxation of the stress tensor. The resulting generalized hydrodynamics thus includes all impacts of Coulomb coupling, viscous damping, and the high-frequency response. We compare our results with those of several known models, including generalized hydrodynamic theory and models obtained using the Singwi-Tosi-Land-Sjolander approximation and the quasi-localized charge approximation. We find that the viscoelastic response, including both the high-frequency elastic generalization and viscous wave damping, is important for correctly describing ion-acoustic waves. We illustrate this result by considering three very different systems: ultracold plasmas, dusty plasmas, and dense plasmas. The new model is validated by comparing its results with those obtained from molecular-dynamics simulations of Yukawa plasmas, and the agreement is excellent. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (Grant No. FA9550-12-1-0344).

  13. Coronal Loops: Observations and Modeling of Confined Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reale, Fabio

    2014-07-01

    Coronal loops are the building blocks of the X-ray bright solar corona. They owe their brightness to the dense confined plasma, and this review focuses on loops mostly as structures confining plasma. After a brief historical overview, the review is divided into two separate but not independent parts: the first illustrates the observational framework, the second reviews the theoretical knowledge. Quiescent loops and their confined plasma are considered and, therefore, topics such as loop oscillations and flaring loops (except for non-solar ones, which provide information on stellar loops) are not specifically addressed here. The observational section discusses the classification, populations, and the morphology of coronal loops, its relationship with the magnetic field, and the loop stranded structure. The section continues with the thermal properties and diagnostics of the loop plasma, according to the classification into hot, warm, and cool loops. Then, temporal analyses of loops and the observations of plasma dynamics, hot and cool flows, and waves are illustrated. In the modeling section, some basics of loop physics are provided, supplying fundamental scaling laws and timescales, a useful tool for consultation. The concept of loop modeling is introduced and models are divided into those treating loops as monolithic and static, and those resolving loops into thin and dynamic strands. More specific discussions address modeling the loop fine structure and the plasma flowing along the loops. Special attention is devoted to the question of loop heating, with separate discussion of wave (AC) and impulsive (DC) heating. Large-scale models including atmosphere boxes and the magnetic field are also discussed. Finally, a brief discussion about stellar coronal loops is followed by highlights and open questions.

  14. Plasma Modeling Enabled Technology Development Empowered by Fundamental Scattering Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-05-01

    Technology development increasingly relies on modeling to speed the innovation cycle. This is particularly true for systems using low temperature plasmas (LTPs) and their role in enabling energy efficient processes with minimal environmental impact. In the innovation cycle, LTP modeling supports investigation of fundamental processes that seed the cycle, optimization of newly developed technologies, and prediction of performance of unbuilt systems for new applications. Although proof-of-principle modeling may be performed for idealized systems in simple gases, technology development must address physically complex systems that use complex gas mixtures that now may be multi-phase (e.g., in contact with liquids). The variety of fundamental electron and ion scattering, and radiation transport data (FSRD) required for this modeling increases as the innovation cycle progresses, while the accuracy required of that data depends on the intended outcome. In all cases, the fidelity, depth and impact of the modeling depends on the availability of FSRD. Modeling and technology development are, in fact, empowered by the availability and robustness of FSRD. In this talk, examples of the impact of and requirements for FSRD in the innovation cycle enabled by plasma modeling will be discussed using results from multidimensional and global models. Examples of fundamental studies and technology optimization will focus on microelectronics fabrication and on optically pumped lasers. Modeling of systems as yet unbuilt will address the interaction of atmospheric pressure plasmas with liquids. Work supported by DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science and the National Science Foundation.

  15. The Modeling of Pickup Ion or Energetic Particle Mediated Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, G. P.; Mostafavi, P.; Hunana, P.

    2016-05-01

    Suprathermal energetic particles, such as solar energetic particles (SEPs) in the inner heliosphere and pickup ions (PUIs) in the outer heliosphere and the very local interstellar medium, often form a thermodynamically dominant component in their various environments. In the supersonic solar wind beyond > 10 AU, in the inner heliosheath (IHS), and in the very local interstellar medium (VLISM), PUIs do not equilibrate collisionally with the background plasma. Similarly, SEPs do not equilibrate collisionally with the background solar wind in the inner heliosphere. In the absence of equilibration between plasma components, a separate coupled plasma description for the energetic particles is necessary. Using a collisionless Chapman-Enskog expansion, we derive a closed system of multi-component equations for a plasma comprised of thermal protons and electrons, and suprathermal particles (SEPs, PUIs). The energetic particles contribute an isotropic scalar pressure to leading order, a collisionless heat flux at the next order, and a collisionless stress tensor at the second-order. The collisionless heat conduction and viscosity in the multi-fluid description results from a nonisotropic energetic particle distribution. A simpler single-fluid MHD-like system of equations with distinct equations of state for both the background plasma and the suprathermal particles is derived. We note briefly potential pitfalls that can emerge in the numerical modeling of collisionless plasma flows that contain a dynamically important energetic particle component.

  16. Hydrodynamic Modeling of the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassibry, Jason; Hsu, Scott; Witherspoon, Doug; Gilmore, Marc

    2009-11-01

    Implosions of plasma liners in cylindrically or spherically convergent geometries can produce high pressures and temperatures with a confinement or dwell time of the order of the rarefaction timescale of the liner. The Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX), to be built at LANL, will explore and demonstrate the feasibility of forming imploding plasma liners with the spherical convergence of hypersonic plasma jets. Modeling will be performed using SPHC and MACH2. According to preliminary 3D SPHC results, high Z plasma liners imploding on vacuum with ˜1.5MJ of initial stored energy will reach ˜100kbar, which is a main objective of the experimental program. Among the objectives of the theoretical PLX effort are to assist in the diagnostic analysis of the PLX, identify possible deleterious effects due to instabilities or asymmetries, identify departures from ideal behavior due to thermal and radiative transport, and help determine scaling laws for possible follow-on applications of ˜1 Mbar HEDP plasmas and magneto-inertial fusion. An overview of the plan to accomplish these objectives will be presented, and preliminary results will be summarized.

  17. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Intranasal Scopolamine in Plasma Saliva and Urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Tam, V. H.; Chow, D. S. L.; Putcha, L.

    2015-01-01

    An intranasal gel dosage formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness (SMS). The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) were evaluated under IND (Investigational New Drug) guidelines. The aim of the project was to develop a PK model that can predict the relationships among plasma, saliva and urinary scopolamine concentrations using data collected from the IND clinical trial protocol with INSCOP. Twelve healthy human subjects were administered at three dose levels (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mg) of INSCOP. Serial blood, saliva and urine samples were collected between 5 min to 24 h after dosing and scopolamine concentrations were measured by using a validated LC-MS-MS assay. PK compartmental models, using actual dosing and sampling time, were established using Phoenix (version 1.2). Model selection was based on a likelihood ratio test on the difference of criteria (-2LL (i.e. log-likelihood ratio test)) and comparison of the quality of fit plots. The results: Predictable correlations among scopolamine concentrations in compartments of plasma, saliva and urine were established, and for the first time the model satisfactorily predicted the population and individual PK of INSCOP in plasma, saliva and urine. The model can be utilized to predict the INSCOP plasma concentration by saliva and urine data, and it will be useful for monitoring the PK of scopolamine in space and other remote environments using non-invasive sampling of saliva and/or urine.

  18. Anomalous transport modelling of tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsey, J.; Singer, C.; Malone, G.; Tiouririne, N.

    1992-12-31

    Theory based transport simulations of DIII-D, JET, ITER are compared to experimental data using a combination of anamolous transport models. The Multiple-mode Transport Model is calibrated to a give set of L-mode and H-mode discharges with an emphasis on testing the adequacy of anomalous flux contributions from drift/{eta}{sub i} and resistive ballooning mode theories. A survey of possible additions and/or alternatives to the model from recent theories on neoclassical MHD effects, hot ion modes, circulating electron modes, and high-m tearing modes is also included.

  19. Anomalous transport modelling of tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsey, J.; Singer, C.; Malone, G.; Tiouririne, N.

    1992-01-01

    Theory based transport simulations of DIII-D, JET, ITER are compared to experimental data using a combination of anamolous transport models. The Multiple-mode Transport Model is calibrated to a give set of L-mode and H-mode discharges with an emphasis on testing the adequacy of anomalous flux contributions from drift/[eta][sub i] and resistive ballooning mode theories. A survey of possible additions and/or alternatives to the model from recent theories on neoclassical MHD effects, hot ion modes, circulating electron modes, and high-m tearing modes is also included.

  20. Contribution to arc plasma modeling for welding TIG application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borel, Damien; Delalondre, Clarisse; Carpreau, Jean-Michel; Chéron, B. G.; Boubert, J.-P.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we present a numerical model that simulates transferred energy by a welding thermal plasma to the weld pool. This energy transfer allows materials melting. The originality of our model is to include the modeling of transition zones and the vaporization of the anode. The cathodic and anodic areas are taken into account in the model by means of heat balance at the gas-solid interfaces. We report the heating and cooling effects they induce on the solid (cathode, anode) and plasma. Code_Saturne® the CFD software developed at EDF R&D is used for this work Comparisons between simulations and measurements of temperature and electron density confirm the model assumptions for TIG welding.

  1. Modeling plasma pressure anisotropy's effect on Saturn's global magnetospheric dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilley, M.; Harnett, E. M.; Winglee, R.

    2014-12-01

    A 3D multi-fluid, multi-scale plasma model with a complete treatment of plasma pressure anisotropy is employed to study global magnetospheric dynamics at Saturn. Cassini has observed anisotropies in the Saturnian magnetosphere, and analyses have showed correlations between anisotropy and plasma convection, ring current structure and intensity, confinement of plasma to the equatorial plane, as well as mass transport to the outer magnetosphere. The energization and transport of plasma within Saturn's magnetosphere is impactful upon the induced magnetic environments and atmospheres of potentially habitable satellites such as Enceladus and Titan. Recent efforts to couple pressure anisotropy with 3D multi-fluid plasma modeling have shown a significant move towards matching observations for simulations of Earth's magnetosphere. Our approach is used to study the effects of plasma pressure anisotropy on global processes of the Saturnian magnetosphere such as identifying the effect of pressure anisotropy on the centrifugal interchange instability. Previous simulation results have not completely replicated all aspects of the structure and formation of the interchange 'fingers' measured by Cassini at Saturn. The related effects of anisotropy, in addition to those mentioned above, include contribution to formation of MHD waves (e.g. reduction of Alfvén wave speed) and formation of firehose and mirror instabilities. An accurate understanding of processes such as the interchange instability is required if a complete picture of mass and energy transport at Saturn is to be realized. The results presented here will detail how the inclusion of a full treatment of pressure anisotropy for idealized solar wind conditions modifies the interchange structure and shape of the tail current sheet. Simulation results are compared to observations made by Cassini.

  2. Modeling of the Plasma Flow and Anode Region Inside a Direct Current Plasma Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolot, Rodolphe; Coddet, Christian; Allimant, Alain; Billières, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    This study is devoted to the modeling of the arc formation in a direct current plasma gun newly commercialized by Saint-Gobain Coating Solutions (Avignon, France). The CFD computations were performed using the FLUENT code. The electromagnetic coupling was implemented on the basis of a three-dimensional model using additional scalars for the electromagnetic equations and user-defined functions to set up the problem. Whereas most of earlier models include the arc region only, the CFD domain was extended to the gas injection region (i.e., upstream part of the gun, including the gas diffuser), thus allowing a better description of the swirl injection on the plasma flow. Similarly, whereas numerous earlier works include the fluid domain only, the present model takes the fluid/solid coupling problem in the anode into account. In particular, the thermal and the electromagnetic equations are solved not only in the fluid parts but also in the tungsten and copper parts of the anode. This change was found to be important because the internal surface of the anode is no more a boundary of the domain. Thus, its temperature (and electric potential) becomes variable and is thus not necessarily imposed. Finally, the implemented model provides interesting results describing the arc behavior inside the plasma gun.

  3. A generalized model of atomic processes in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hyun-Kyung; Chen, M.; Ciricosta, O.; Vinko, S.; Wark, J.; Lee, R. W.

    2015-11-01

    A generalized model of atomic processes in plasmas, FLYCHK, has been developed over a decade to provide experimentalists fast and simple but reasonable predictions of atomic properties of plasmas. For a given plasma condition, it provides charge state distributions and spectroscopic properties, which have been extensively used for experimental design and data analysis and currently available through NIST web site. In recent years, highly transient and non-equilibrium plasmas have been created with X-ray free electron lasers (XFEL). As high intensity x-rays interact with matter, the inner-shell electrons are ionized and Auger electrons and photo electrons are generated. With time, electrons participate in the ionization processes and collisional ionization by these electrons dominates photoionization as electron density increases. To study highly complex XFEL produced plasmas, SCFLY, an extended version of FLYCHK code has been used. The code accepts the time-dependent history of x-ray energy and intensity to compute population distribution and ionization distribution self-consistently with electron temperature and density assuming an instantaneous equilibration. The model and its applications to XFEL experiments will be presented as well as its limitations.

  4. Challenges in Modeling of the Plasma-Material Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstic, Predrag; Meyer, Fred; Allain, Jean Paul

    2013-09-01

    Plasma-Material Interface mixes materials of the two worlds, creating a new entity, a dynamical surface, which communicates between the two and represent one of the most challenging areas of multidisciplinary science, with many fundamental processes and synergies. How to build an integrated theoretical-experimental approach? Without mutual validation of experiment and theory chances very slim to have believable results? The outreach of the PMI science modeling at the fusion plasma facilities is illustrated by the significant step forward in understanding achieved recently by the quantum-classical modeling of the lithiated carbon surfaces irradiated by deuterium, showing surprisingly large role of oxygen in the deuterium retention and erosion chemistry. The plasma-facing walls of the next-generation fusion reactors will be exposed to high fluxes of neutrons and plasma-particles and will operate at high temperatures for thermodynamic efficiency. To this end we have been studying the evolution dynamics of vacancies and interstitials to the saturated dpa doses of tungsten surfaces bombarded by self-atoms, as well as the plasma-surface interactions of the damaged surfaces (erosion, hydrogen and helium uptake and fuzz formation). PSK and FWM acknowledge support of the ORNL LDRD program.

  5. RF Models for Plasma-Surface Interactions in VSim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Smithe, D. N.; Pankin, A. Y.; Roark, C. M.; Zhou, C. D.; Stoltz, P. H.; Kruger, S. E.

    2014-10-01

    An overview of ongoing enhancements to the Plasma Discharge (PD) module of Tech-X's VSim software tool is presented. A sub-grid kinetic sheath model, developed for the accurate computation of sheath potentials near metal and dielectric-coated walls, enables the physical effects of DC and RF sheath physics to be included in macroscopic-scale plasma simulations that need not explicitly resolve sheath scale lengths. Sheath potential evolution, together with particle behavior near the sheath, can thus be simulated in complex geometries. Generalizations of the model to include sputtering, secondary electron emission, and effects from multiple ion species and background magnetic fields are summarized; related numerical results are also presented. In addition, improved tools for plasma chemistry and IEDF/EEDF visualization and modeling are discussed, as well as our initial efforts toward the development of hybrid fluid/kinetic transition capabilities within VSim. Ultimately, we aim to establish VSimPD as a robust, efficient computational tool for modeling industrial plasma processes. Supported by US DoE SBIR-I/II Award DE-SC0009501.

  6. The Darwin model as a tool for electromagnetic plasma simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A. N.; Rostler, P. S.

    1970-01-01

    The Darwin model of electromagnetic interaction is presented as a self-consistent theory, and is shown to be an excellent approximation to the Maxwell theory for slow electromagnetic waves. Since the fast waves of the Maxwell theory are absent, it is convenient for use in the computer simulation of the electromagnetic dynamics of nonrelativistic plasma.

  7. A New Global Core Plasma Model of the Plasmasphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Comfort, R. H.; Craven, P. D.

    2014-01-01

    The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) is the first empirical model for thermal inner magnetospheric plasma designed to integrate previous models and observations into a continuous in value and gradient representation of typical total densities. New information about the plasmasphere, in particular, make possible significant improvement. The IMAGE Mission Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) has obtained the first observations of total plasma densities along magnetic field lines in the plasmasphere and polar cap. Dynamics Explorer 1 Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer (RIMS) has provided densities in temperatures in the plasmasphere for 5 ion species. These and other works enable a new more detailed empirical model of thermal in the inner magnetosphere that will be presented. Specifically shown here are the inner-plasmasphere RIMS measurements, radial fits to densities and temperatures for H(+), He(+), He(++), O(+), and O(+) and the error associated with these initial simple fits. Also shown are more subtle dependencies on the f10.7 P-value (see Richards et al. [1994]).

  8. Modeling laser-plasma acceleration in the wakefield frame

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    A simulation of laser-plasma acceleration in the boosted frame of the wake, moving at near lightspeed. Space has contracted and time has stretched, separating events in time. Relatively few time steps are needed to model them, requiring less computer time.

  9. Experimental and Modeling Studies of Particles in Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daugherty, John Edward

    Particles that are generated during plasma processing are an important source of contamination in microelectronic device fabrication. In this work we investigate the transport of plasma-generated particles in a radiofrequency (rf) diode plasma reactor, and we characterize this transport in terms of the forces that act on particles in the plasma environment. In this way we determine the mechanisms by which particles transport to critical processing surfaces. Aluminum and copper particles are formed in a radiofrequency argon sputtering system. The spatial distribution of these particles is observed with elastic laser light scattering. The distribution of particles in the discharge is found to depend most strongly on discharge power and particle size. Large particles and particles in high power discharges tend to segregate near the plasma sheath boundary. Small particles and particles in very low power discharges tend to accumulate in the center of the discharge. The spatial distributions that are observed experimentally are consistent with a model of the forces on particles in a plasma environment. The model includes the electrostatic force, the thermophoretic force, gravity, and momentum transfer from drifting plasma ions and from drifting neutral gas. In addition, the charging of small particles is investigated. We find that the particle charge can usually be predicted using simplified theory rather than the full plasma kinetic theory. Also, the electrostatic potential distribution in the vicinity of a charged particle is found to resemble a Debye-Huckel potential profile. Particles are observed to affect the discharge structure. Spatially- and temporally-resolved optical emission intensities take on characteristics that are associated with discharges in electronegative gases. We take this as evidence that the particles act as heavy, multiply charged negative ions. Plasmas with particles have a smaller self bias, and they are more resistive than discharges in pure

  10. Beyond the Fluid Approximation: Improved Modeling of the Intracluster Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, Brian

    Cosmological simulations of galaxy clusters typically treat the intracluster medium as a simple magnetized fluid - an approximation that is now understood to be simplistic at best due to the physical characteristics of this hot, diffuse, and weakly magnetized plasma. The properties of the intracluster medium at or near the resolution limits of cosmological simulations - including its viscosity, conductivity, and turbulent dissipation of energy - rely strongly on the properties of the plasma at smaller scales. In addition, observations of the intracluster medium display features relating to bubbles from active galactic nuclei, as well as shocks and cold fronts relating to cluster mergers, that are not typically reproduced in cosmological simulations. It is clear that a closer examination of our treatment of diffuse, ionized intergalactic plasmas in cosmological simulations is required in order to be able to meaningfully interpret current and future observations of galaxy clusters. We propose to advance our understanding of the plasma physical processes that are relevant in the intracluster medium using a combination of cosmological magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations and targeted, parametrized simulations using non-ideal MHD, hybrid gyrokinetic + MHD, and particle-in-cell electrodynamics calculations. This proposal aims to create a unified, multiscale model of the intracluster medium, tying together plasma microinstabilities at the parsec and sub-parsec scale to the behavior and observable properties of galaxy clusters at the multi-kiloparsec and megaparsec scales. Using this coupling, we will be able to constrain our theoretical models using X-ray, Sunyaev-Zel'dovich, and radio observations of the intracluster medium. More broadly, this project addresses the clear need to closely examine our treatment of diffuse, ionized plasmas in cosmological simulations, in order to be able to meaningfully make predictions for, and interpret data from, large astronomical

  11. Multi-fluid plasma modeling with Braginskii collisional transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, A.; Shumlak, U.; Miller, S. T.

    2015-11-01

    Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) works well where transport processes are primarily advective. Extensions of the MHD model are capable of capturing some collisional phenomena such as electrical resistivity, which are important in systems with mean free paths less than the characteristic length. However, MHD models have difficulties resolving systems where the Debye length cannot be assumed to approach zero. These systems arise in low density, hot plasmas. By modeling the ions and electrons as distinct fluids, the 5-moment multi-fluid plasma model is able to capture these short-range transport processes that are not accounted for in MHD. To model the transport processes the Braginskii transport terms are added to the 5-moment model, which introduces viscosity, heat conduction, and binary species interactions. These transport properties are affected by strong magnetic fields, resulting in anisotropic collisional effects. The multi-fluid equations are evolved explicitly and are coupled with Maxwell's equations. This research extends the University of Washington's WARPXM code to include the Braginskii terms with the 5-moment multi-fluid plasma model. The implementation is validated against theoretical results from a Hartmann flow benchmark problem. This work is supported by a grant from the United States Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  12. A collisional-radiative average atom model for hot plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rozsnyai, B.F.

    1996-10-17

    A collisional-radiative `average atom` (AA) model is presented for the calculation of opacities of hot plasmas not in the condition of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The electron impact and radiative rate constants are calculated using the dipole oscillator strengths of the average atom. A key element of the model is the photon escape probability which at present is calculated for a semi infinite slab. The Fermi statistics renders the rate equation for the AA level occupancies nonlinear, which requires iterations until the steady state. AA level occupancies are found. Detailed electronic configurations are built into the model after the self-consistent non-LTE AA state is found. The model shows a continuous transition from the non-LTE to the LTE state depending on the optical thickness of the plasma. 22 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Quark-Gluon Plasma Model and Origin of Magic Numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Ghahramany, N.; Ghanaatian, M.; Hooshmand, M.

    2008-04-21

    Using Boltzman distribution in a quark-gluon plasma sample it is possible to obtain all existing magic numbers and their extensions without applying the spin and spin-orbit couplings. In this model it is assumed that in a quark-gluon thermodynamic plasma, quarks have no interactions and they are trying to form nucleons. Considering a lattice for a central quark and the surrounding quarks, using a statistical approach to find the maximum number of microstates, the origin of magic numbers is explained and a new magic number is obtained.

  14. Viscous quark-gluon plasma model through fluid QCD approach

    SciTech Connect

    Djun, T. P.; Soegijono, B.; Mart, T.; Handoko, L. T. E-mail: Laksana.tri.handoko@lipi.go.id

    2014-09-25

    A Lagrangian density for viscous quark-gluon plasma has been constructed within the fluid-like QCD framework. Gauge symmetry is preserved for all terms inside the Lagrangian, except for the viscous term. The transition mechanism from point particle field to fluid field, and vice versa, are discussed. The energy momentum tensor that is relevant to the gluonic plasma having the nature of fluid bulk of gluon sea is derived within the model. By imposing conservation law in the energy momentum tensor, shear viscosity appears as extractable from the equation.

  15. Model of opacity and emissivity of non-equilibrium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Politov, V. Y.

    2008-05-01

    In this work the model describing absorption and emission properties of the non-equilibrium plasma is presented. It is based on the kinetics equations for populations of the ground, singly and doubly excited states of multi-charged ions. After solving these equations, the states populations together with the spectroscopic data, supplied in the special database for a lot ionization stages, are used for building the spectral distributions of plasma opacity and emissivity in STA approximation. Results of kinetics simulation are performed for such important X-ray converter as gold, which is investigated intensively in ICF-experiments.

  16. Continuum kinetic modeling of the tokamak plasma edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorf, M. A.; Dorr, M. R.; Hittinger, J. A.; Cohen, R. H.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2016-05-01

    The first 4D (axisymmetric) high-order continuum gyrokinetic transport simulations that span the magnetic separatrix of a tokamak are presented. The modeling is performed with the COGENT code, which is distinguished by fourth-order finite-volume discretization combined with mapped multiblock grid technology to handle the strong anisotropy of plasma transport and the complex X-point divertor geometry with high accuracy. The calculations take into account the effects of fully nonlinear Fokker-Plank collisions, electrostatic potential variations, and anomalous radial transport. Topics discussed include: (a) ion orbit loss and the associated toroidal rotation and (b) edge plasma relaxation in the presence of anomalous radial transport.

  17. PLASMA NEAR THE HELIOSHEATH: OBSERVATIONS AND MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Borovikov, Sergey N.; Pogorelov, Nikolai V.; Burlaga, Leonard F.; Richardson, John D.

    2011-02-10

    Sound numerical modeling is capable of providing important predictive information about the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium. The results of our three-dimensional simulation show a good agreement with Voyager observations from 2007 to 2010. We analyze the termination shock properties at the Voyager crossing points and juxtapose them with the observed data. The heliospheric current sheet structure in the inner heliosheath is examined.

  18. 3D Modeling of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huba, Joseph; Joyce, Glenn; Krall, Jonathan

    2011-10-01

    Post-sunset ionospheric irregularities in the equatorial F region were first observed by Booker and Wells (1938) using ionosondes. This phenomenon has become known as equatorial spread F (ESF). During ESF the equatorial ionosphere becomes unstable because of a Rayleigh-Taylor-like instability: large scale (10s km) electron density ``bubbles'' can develop and rise to high altitudes (1000 km or greater at times). Understanding and modeling ESF is important because of its impact on space weather: it causes radio wave scintillation that degrades communication and navigation systems. In fact, it is the focus of of the Air Force Communications/Navigation Outage Forecast Satellite (C/NOFS) mission. We will describe 3D simulation results from the NRL ionosphere models SAMI3 and SAMI3/ESF of this phenomenon. In particular, we will examine the causes of the day-to-day ariability of ESF which is an unresolved problem at this time. Post-sunset ionospheric irregularities in the equatorial F region were first observed by Booker and Wells (1938) using ionosondes. This phenomenon has become known as equatorial spread F (ESF). During ESF the equatorial ionosphere becomes unstable because of a Rayleigh-Taylor-like instability: large scale (10s km) electron density ``bubbles'' can develop and rise to high altitudes (1000 km or greater at times). Understanding and modeling ESF is important because of its impact on space weather: it causes radio wave scintillation that degrades communication and navigation systems. In fact, it is the focus of of the Air Force Communications/Navigation Outage Forecast Satellite (C/NOFS) mission. We will describe 3D simulation results from the NRL ionosphere models SAMI3 and SAMI3/ESF of this phenomenon. In particular, we will examine the causes of the day-to-day ariability of ESF which is an unresolved problem at this time. Research supported by ONR.

  19. Advanced modeling techniques in application to plasma pulse treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashchenko, A. F.; Pashchenko, F. F.

    2016-06-01

    Different approaches considered for simulation of plasma pulse treatment process. The assumption of a significant non-linearity of processes in the treatment of oil wells has been confirmed. Method of functional transformations and fuzzy logic methods suggested for construction of a mathematical model. It is shown, that models, based on fuzzy logic are able to provide a satisfactory accuracy of simulation and prediction of non-linear processes observed.

  20. Laboratory Plasma Source as an MHD Model for Astrophysical Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, Robert M.

    1997-01-01

    The significance of the work described herein lies in the demonstration of Magnetized Coaxial Plasma Gun (MCG) devices like CPS-1 to produce energetic laboratory magneto-flows with embedded magnetic fields that can be used as a simulation tool to study flow interaction dynamic of jet flows, to demonstrate the magnetic acceleration and collimation of flows with primarily toroidal fields, and study cross field transport in turbulent accreting flows. Since plasma produced in MCG devices have magnetic topology and MHD flow regime similarity to stellar and extragalactic jets, we expect that careful investigation of these flows in the laboratory will reveal fundamental physical mechanisms influencing astrophysical flows. Discussion in the next section (sec.2) focuses on recent results describing collimation, leading flow surface interaction layers, and turbulent accretion. The primary objectives for a new three year effort would involve the development and deployment of novel electrostatic, magnetic, and visible plasma diagnostic techniques to measure plasma and flow parameters of the CPS-1 device in the flow chamber downstream of the plasma source to study, (1) mass ejection, morphology, and collimation and stability of energetic outflows, (2) the effects of external magnetization on collimation and stability, (3) the interaction of such flows with background neutral gas, the generation of visible emission in such interaction, and effect of neutral clouds on jet flow dynamics, and (4) the cross magnetic field transport of turbulent accreting flows. The applicability of existing laboratory plasma facilities to the study of stellar and extragalactic plasma should be exploited to elucidate underlying physical mechanisms that cannot be ascertained though astrophysical observation, and provide baseline to a wide variety of proposed models, MHD and otherwise. The work proposed herin represents a continued effort on a novel approach in relating laboratory experiments to

  1. Modeling of transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas with neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Meneghini, O.; Luna, C. J.; Smith, S. P.; Lao, L. L.

    2014-06-15

    A new transport model that uses neural networks (NNs) to yield electron and ion heat flux profiles has been developed. Given a set of local dimensionless plasma parameters similar to the ones that the highest fidelity models use, the NN model is able to efficiently and accurately predict the ion and electron heat transport profiles. As a benchmark, a NN was built, trained, and tested on data from the 2012 and 2013 DIII-D experimental campaigns. It is found that NN can capture the experimental behavior over the majority of the plasma radius and across a broad range of plasma regimes. Although each radial location is calculated independently from the others, the heat flux profiles are smooth, suggesting that the solution found by the NN is a smooth function of the local input parameters. This result supports the evidence of a well-defined, non-stochastic relationship between the input parameters and the experimentally measured transport fluxes. The numerical efficiency of this method, requiring only a few CPU-μs per data point, makes it ideal for scenario development simulations and real-time plasma control.

  2. Modeling of far SOL plasma transport in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Sergei Krasheninnikov; Alexander Pigarov

    2005-11-02

    For better understanding and characterization of non-diffusive transport occurring in the NSTX tokamak edge plasma, we performed extensive simulations of NSTX edge plasmas with the multi-fluid two-dimensional UEDGE code by using realistic model for impurity sputtering sources and hybrid model for anomalous cross-field transport. Our cross-field transport model incorporates the effects of non-diffusive intermittent transport by introducing anomalous convective velocities whose spatial profile is adjusted for each ion charge state to match available experimental data. The research in 2002-2005 financial years was focused on the following areas: (i) development of capabilities for UEDGE simulation of NSTX spectroscopy data (i.e., the 3D real-geometry postprocessor UEDGE tools for comparison between UEDGE and experimental data), (ii) simulation of multi-diagnostic data from NSTX with UEDGE, (iii) study of anomalous cross-field convective transport of impurity ions, (iv) analysis of divertor plasma opacity to resonance radiation, and (v) study the effects of ballooning-like anomalous cross-field transport and spherical-torus magnetic configuration on parallel plasma flows in the SOL.

  3. Order of lipid phases in model and plasma membranes

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Hermann-Josef; Lingwood, Daniel; Levental, Ilya; Sampaio, Julio L.; Kalvodova, Lucie; Rajendran, Lawrence; Simons, Kai

    2009-01-01

    Lipid rafts are nanoscopic assemblies of sphingolipids, cholesterol, and specific membrane proteins that contribute to lateral heterogeneity in eukaryotic membranes. Separation of artificial membranes into liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered phases is regarded as a common model for this compartmentalization. However, tight lipid packing in Lo phases seems to conflict with efficient partitioning of raft-associated transmembrane (TM) proteins. To assess membrane order as a component of raft organization, we performed fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy with the membrane probes Laurdan and C-laurdan. First, we assessed lipid packing in model membranes of various compositions and found cholesterol and acyl chain dependence of membrane order. Then we probed cell membranes by using two novel systems that exhibit inducible phase separation: giant plasma membrane vesicles [Baumgart et al. (2007) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104:3165–3170] and plasma membrane spheres. Notably, only the latter support selective inclusion of raft TM proteins with the ganglioside GM1 into one phase. We measured comparable small differences in order between the separated phases of both biomembranes. Lateral packing in the ordered phase of giant plasma membrane vesicles resembled the Lo domain of model membranes, whereas the GM1 phase in plasma membrane spheres exhibited considerably lower order, consistent with different partitioning of lipid and TM protein markers. Thus, lipid-mediated coalescence of the GM1 raft domain seems to be distinct from the formation of a Lo phase, suggesting additional interactions between proteins and lipids to be effective. PMID:19805351

  4. Line shape modeling in warm and dense hydrogen plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferri, S.; Calisti, A.; Mossé, C.; Talin, B.; Gigosos, M. A.; González, M. A.

    2007-05-01

    A study of hydrogen lines emitted in warm ( T˜1eV) and dense ( N≥1018cm -3) plasmas is presented. Under such plasma conditions, the electronic and the ionic contributions to the line width are comparable, and the general question related to a transition from impact to quasi-static broadening arises not only for the far wings but also for the core of spectral lines. The transition from impact to quasi-static broadening for electrons is analyzed by means of Frequency Fluctuation Model (FFM). In parallel, direct integration of the semi-classical evolution equation is performed using electron electric fields calculated by Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations that permit one to correctly describe the emitter environment. New cross comparisons between benchmark MD simulations and FFM are carried out for electron broadening of the Balmer series lines, and, especially, for the Hα line, for which a few experiments in the warm and dense plasma regimes are available.

  5. A model for plasma volume changes during short duration spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John E.

    1989-01-01

    It is well established that plasma volume decreases during spaceflight and simulated weightlessness (bedrest). The decrement in plasma volume is thought to contribute to the orthostatic intolerance that has been observed in some crew members following spaceflight. To date, no studies have evaluated the effectiveness of fluid countermeasures of varying osmolality in the restoration of plasma volume and orthostatic tolerance in a controlled study. The overall objectives of this project were to: (1) provide a model that would rapidly and safely produce a fluid loss comparable to that which occurs during short duration spaceflight; and (2) design a study that would determine the optimal drink solution to restore orthostatic tolerance and describe the mechanism(s) whereby orthostatic tolerance is restored. In summary, Lasix can be used as a way of simulating the plasma volume changes that occur during short duration spaceflight. The total loss of plasma is comparable to spaceflight. Lasix is fast acting, and has relatively few side effects. The present design for evaluating the optimal fluid countermeasures will have important implications in restoring orthostatic tolerance and function in the latter stages of spaceflight when it is essential for safe operation of the spacecraft.

  6. Two-dimensional s-polarized solitary waves in relativistic plasmas. I. The fluid plasma model

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Arriaga, G.; Lefebvre, E.

    2011-09-15

    The properties of two-dimensional linearly s-polarized solitary waves are investigated by fluid-Maxwell equations and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. These self-trapped electromagnetic waves appear during laser-plasma interactions, and they have a dominant electric field component E{sub z}, normal to the plane of the wave, that oscillates at a frequency below the electron plasma frequency {omega}{sub pe}. A set of equations that describe the waves are derived from the plasma fluid model in the case of cold or warm plasma and then solved numerically. The main features, including the maximum value of the vector potential amplitude, the total energy, the width, and the cavitation radius are presented as a function of the frequency. The amplitude of the vector potential increases monotonically as the frequency of the wave decreases, whereas the width reaches a minimum value at a frequency of the order of 0.82 {omega}{sub pe}. The results are compared with a set of PIC simulations where the solitary waves are excited by a high-intensity laser pulse.

  7. Numerical model of the plasma formation at electron beam welding

    SciTech Connect

    Trushnikov, D. N.; Mladenov, G. M.

    2015-01-07

    The model of plasma formation in the keyhole in liquid metal as well as above the electron beam welding zone is described. The model is based on solution of two equations for the density of electrons and the mean electron energy. The mass transfer of heavy plasma particles (neutral atoms, excited atoms, and ions) is taken into account in the analysis by the diffusion equation for a multicomponent mixture. The electrostatic field is calculated using the Poisson equation. Thermionic electron emission is calculated for the keyhole wall. The ionization intensity of the vapors due to beam electrons and high-energy secondary and backscattered electrons is calibrated using the plasma parameters when there is no polarized collector electrode above the welding zone. The calculated data are in good agreement with experimental data. Results for the plasma parameters for excitation of a non-independent discharge are given. It is shown that there is a need to take into account the effect of a strong electric field near the keyhole walls on electron emission (the Schottky effect) in the calculation of the current for a non-independent discharge (hot cathode gas discharge). The calculated electron drift velocities are much bigger than the velocity at which current instabilities arise. This confirms the hypothesis for ion-acoustic instabilities, observed experimentally in previous research.

  8. PLASIMO model of micro-plasma jet for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailova, Diana; Sobota, Ana; Graef, Wouter; van Dijk, Jan; Hagelaar, Gerjan

    2014-10-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure micro-plasma jets are widely studied for use in biotechnology, including treatment of human tissue. The setup under study consists of capillary powered electrode through which helium gas flows and a grounded ring electrode placed a distance of few mm in front of the capillary. The discharge is excited by sinusoidal voltage with amplitude of 2 kV and 30 KHz repetition rate. The plume emanating from the jet, or the plasma bullets, propagates through a Pyrex tube and the gas phase channel of helium into the surrounding air.aim of this work is to get insight into the plasma constituents that can affect directly or indirectly living tissue. This includes radicals (OH, NO, O,), ions and electrons, UV radiation, electrical fields. PLASIMO modelling toolkit is used to simulate the capillary plasma-jet in order to quantify the delivery of fluxes and fields to the treated tissue. Verification is made by comparing results obtained with the PLASIMO and MAGMA codes (developed at LAPLACE, Toulouse) for the same input specifications. Both models are validated by comparison with experimental observations at various operating parameters.

  9. A dynamical model of plasma turbulence in the solar wind

    PubMed Central

    Howes, G. G.

    2015-01-01

    A dynamical approach, rather than the usual statistical approach, is taken to explore the physical mechanisms underlying the nonlinear transfer of energy, the damping of the turbulent fluctuations, and the development of coherent structures in kinetic plasma turbulence. It is argued that the linear and nonlinear dynamics of Alfvén waves are responsible, at a very fundamental level, for some of the key qualitative features of plasma turbulence that distinguish it from hydrodynamic turbulence, including the anisotropic cascade of energy and the development of current sheets at small scales. The first dynamical model of kinetic turbulence in the weakly collisional solar wind plasma that combines self-consistently the physics of Alfvén waves with the development of small-scale current sheets is presented and its physical implications are discussed. This model leads to a simplified perspective on the nature of turbulence in a weakly collisional plasma: the nonlinear interactions responsible for the turbulent cascade of energy and the formation of current sheets are essentially fluid in nature, while the collisionless damping of the turbulent fluctuations and the energy injection by kinetic instabilities are essentially kinetic in nature. PMID:25848075

  10. Observations and modeling of plasma flows driven by solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannon, Sean Robert

    One of the fundamental statements that can be made about the solar atmosphere is that it is structured. This structuring is generally believed to be the result of both the arrangement of the magnetic field in the corona and the distribution of plasma along magnetic loops. The standard model of solar flares involves plasma transported into coronal loops via a process known as chromospheric evaporation, and the resulting evolution of the flare loops is believed to be sensitive to the physical mechanism of energy input into the chromosphere by the flare. We present here the results of three investigations into chromospheric plasma flows driven by solar flare energy release and transport. First, we develop a 1-D hydrodynamic code to simulate the response of a simplified model chromosphere to energy input via thermal conduction from reconnection-driven shocks. We use the results from a set of simulations spanning a parameter space in both shock speed and chromospheric-to-coronal temperature ratio to infer power-law relationships between these quantities and observable evaporation properties. Second, we use imaging and spectral observations of a quasi-periodic oscillation of a flare ribbon to determine the phase relationship between Doppler shifts of the ribbon plasma and the oscillation. The phase difference we find leads us to suggest an origin in a current sheet instability. Finally, we use imaging and spectral data of an on-disk flare event and resulting flare loop plasma flows to generally validate the standard picture of flare loop evolution, including evaporation, cooling time, and draining downflows, and we use a simple free-fall model to produce the first direct comparison between observed and synthetic downflow spectra.

  11. Analytic model for coaxial helicity injection in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Weening, R. H.

    2011-12-15

    Using a partial differential equation for the time evolution of the mean-field poloidal magnetic flux that incorporates resistivity {eta} and hyper-resistivity {Lambda} terms, an exact analytic solution is obtained for steady-state coaxial helicity injection (CHI) in force-free large aspect ratio tokamaks. The analytic mean-field Ohm's law model allows for calculation of the tokamak CHI current drive efficiency and the plasma inductances at arbitrary levels of magnetic fluctuations, or dynamo activity. The results of the mean-field model suggest that CHI approaching Ohmic efficiency is only possible in tokamaks when the size of the effective current drive boundary layer, {delta}{identical_to}({Lambda}/{eta}){sup 1/2}, becomes greater than half the size of the plasma, {delta}>a/2, with a the plasma minor radius. The electron thermal diffusivity due to magnetic fluctuation induced transport is obtained from the expression {chi}{sub e}={Lambda}/{mu}{sub 0}d{sub e}{sup 2}, with {mu}{sub 0} the permeability of free space and d{sub e} the electron skin depth, which for typical tokamak fusion plasma parameters is on the order of a millimeter. Thus, the ratio of the energy confinement time to the resistive diffusion time in a tokamak plasma driven by steady-state CHI approaching Ohmic efficiency is shown to be constrained by the relation {tau}{sub E}/{tau}{sub {eta}}<(d{sub e}/a){sup 2}{approx_equal}10{sup -6}. The mean-field model suggests that steady-state CHI can be viewed most simply as a boundary layer of stochastically wandering magnetic field lines.

  12. Modeling the Parker instability in a rotating plasma screw pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalzov, I. V.; Brown, B. P.; Katz, N.; Forest, C. B.

    2012-02-01

    We analytically and numerically study the analogue of the Parker (magnetic buoyancy) instability in a uniformly rotating plasma screw pinch confined in a cylinder. Uniform plasma rotation is imposed to create a centrifugal acceleration, which mimics the gravity required for the classical Parker instability. The goal of this study is to determine how the Parker instability could be unambiguously identified in a weakly magnetized, rapidly rotating screw pinch, in which the rotation provides an effective gravity and a radially varying azimuthal field is controlled to give conditions for which the plasma is magnetically buoyant to inward motion. We show that an axial magnetic field is also required to circumvent conventional current driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities such as the sausage and kink modes that would obscure the Parker instability. These conditions can be realized in the Madison plasma Couette experiment (MPCX). Simulations are performed using the extended MHD code NIMROD for an isothermal compressible plasma model. Both linear and nonlinear regimes of the instability are studied, and the results obtained for the linear regime are compared with analytical results from a slab geometry. Based on this comparison, it is found that in a cylindrical pinch, the magnetic buoyancy mechanism dominates at relatively large Mach numbers (M > 5), while at low Mach numbers (M < 1), the instability is due to the curvature of magnetic field lines. At intermediate values of Mach number (1 < M < 5), the Coriolis force has a strong stabilizing effect on the plasma. A possible scenario for experimental demonstration of the Parker instability in MPCX is discussed.

  13. Challenges in plasma and extraction modelling of negative ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvas, Taneli

    2013-09-01

    The physical processes taking place in negative ion source plasmas are modelled by state-of-the-art 3D particle-in-cell (PIC) codes. These codes are used to gain understanding and to find optimal solutions for negative ion beam production. The PIC codes can be made to match to the reality if all relevant processes were included. This is unfortunately limited by the availability of data about the processes and the huge amount of computational resources needed for the simulations. The optimization of the extraction system and beam transport ion optics is often made using computationally less intensive methods utilized in so-called gun codes. These codes use simplified plasma models to provide a starting point for the extracted beams being simulated. The relatively fast computation allows systematic studies, which are not practical with PIC codes. The gun codes often match well to reality, but they do have difficulties reproducing some effects, especially in negative ion extraction, due to the approximations made in the plasma model. Could the future solutions for beam production modelling couple the two types of simulations?

  14. Model of the plasma jet originating from a cathode spot

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilov, V.N.; Litvinov, E.A.; Mesyats, G.A.

    1995-12-31

    The 2-D NM model of the vacuum-arc plasma jet presented here is in outgrowth of the 1-D hydrodynamic model discussed by us. The computation carried out in 1-D approximation have provided the principal characteristics of a cathode jet being in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. Nevertheless, there results cannot be considered completely adequate, since actually the plum parameters of a cathode jet are distributed highly nonuniformly over its cross section. Furthermore, a 1-D model falls to take in to account the effects related to the influence of the self-magnetic field of the cathode jet.

  15. Modeling Plasmas with a Kappa Electron Energy Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Michael; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2016-05-01

    Nonthermal kappa electron energy distributions have been observed in the Earth's magnetosphere and the solar wind, and are likely also present in the solar corona and in solar flares. In order to model the spectra of these plasmas, it is necessary to obtain the appropriate collision rate coefficients. We show that this can be done simply by summing appropriately weighted Maxwellian rate coefficients. The resulting data have similar or better accuracies than are obtained with other approaches. Summing Maxwellians has the additional advantages of being easy to implement and extendable to many different collision processes. We apply this technique to modeling the charge state distribution (CSD) of kappa-distribution plasmas. In particular, we examine the influence of electron impact multiple ionization on the equilibrium CSD and calculate the time variation of the CSD during a solar flare.

  16. Modeling Plasmas with a Kappa Electron Energy Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Michael; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2016-06-01

    Nonthermal kappa electron energy distributions have been observed in the Earth's magnetosphere and the solar wind, and are likely also present in the solar corona and in solar flares. In order to model the spectra of these plasmas, it is necessary to obtain the appropriate collision rate coefficients. We show that this can be done simply by summing appropriately weighted Maxwellian rate coefficients. The resulting data have similar or better accuracies than are obtained with other approaches. Summing Maxwellians has the additional advantages of being easy to implement and extendable to many different collision processes. We apply this technique to modeling the charge state distribution (CSD) of kappa-distribution plasmas. In particular, we examine the influence of electron impact multiple ionization on the equilibrium CSD and calculate the time variation of the CSD during a solar flare.

  17. A Multicell Converter Model of DBD Plasma Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Flores-Fuentes, A. A.; Piedad-Beneitez, A. de la; Pena-Eguiluz, R.; Mercado-Cabrera, A.; Valencia A, R.; Barocio, S. R.; Lopez-Callejas, R.; Godoy-Cabrera, O. G.; Benitez-Read, J. S.; Pacheco-Sotelo, J. O.

    2006-12-04

    A compact Matlab model of plasma discharges in a DBD reactor consisting of two parallel electrode plates with a small gap and a thin dielectric sheet between them is reported. Its DBD plasma is modelled as a voltage controlled current-source switched on when the voltage across the gap exceeds the breakdown voltage. A three cell voltage-source inverter, configured in half-bridge, has been used as a power supply. This configuration has an excellent performance when operating as an open-loop. The distribution of total energy between a large number of low power converters proofs to be advantageous, allowing an efficient high power drive. Simulation results show that the current source and its output current tend to follow an exponential behaviour. A phenomenological characteristic of the voltage-current behaviour of DBD is then described by power laws with different voltage exponent function values.

  18. Effect of Hydrogen Plasma on Model Corrosion Layers of Bronze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fojtíková, P.; Sázavská, V.; Mika, F.; Krčma, F.

    2016-05-01

    Our work is about plasmachemical reduction of model corrosion layers. The model corrosion layers were produced on bronze samples with size of 10 × 10 × 5 mm3, containing Cu and Sn. Concentrated hydrochloric acid was used as a corrosive environment. The application of reduction process in low-pressure low-temperature hydrogen plasma followed. A quartz cylindrical reactor with two outer copper electrodes was used. Plasma discharge was generated in pure hydrogen by a RF generator. Each corroded sample was treated in different conditions (supplied power and a continual or pulsed regime with a variable duty cycle mode). Process monitoring was ensured by optical emission spectroscopy. After treatment, samples were analyzed by SEM and EDX.

  19. Modeling of formation of deposited layer by plasma spray process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joo-Dong; Ra, Hyung-Yong; Hong, Kyung-Tae; Hur, Sung-Kang

    1992-03-01

    An analytical model is developed to describe the plasma deposition process in which average solidified thickness and coating and substrate temperatures are obtained. During the deposition process, the solidification rate is periodically varied, due to the impingement of liquid splats, and the amount of liquid in the coating layer increases. Periodical variation of the solidification rate causes temperature fluctuation in coating and substrate. The nature of interfacial structure of plasma-sprayed NiCrBSi MA powder is compared with the result predicted using the model, which indicates that the liquid deposited at the coating surface during deposition causes discontinuous boundaries within the coating. The spraying rate and the solidification rate reverse periodically with spraying process.

  20. Modeling of non-thermal plasma in flammable gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napartovich, A. P.; Kochetov, I. V.; Leonov, S. B.

    2008-07-01

    An idea of using plasma-assisted methods of fuel ignition is based on non-equilibrium generation of chemically active species that speed up the combustion process. It is believed that gain in energy consumed for combustion acceleration by plasmas is due to the non-equilibrium nature of discharge plasma, which allows radicals to be produced in an above-equilibrium amount. Evidently, the size of the effect is strongly dependent on the initial temperature, pressure, and composition of the mixture. Of particular interest is comparison between thermal ignition of a fuel-air mixture and non-thermal plasma initiation of the combustion. Mechanisms of thermal ignition in various fuel-air mixtures have been studied for years, and a number of different mechanisms are known providing an agreement with experiments at various conditions. The problem is -- how to conform thermal chemistry approach to essentially non-equilibrium plasma description. The electric discharge produces much above-equilibrium amounts of chemically active species: atoms, radicals and ions. The point is that despite excess concentrations of a number of species, total concentration of these species is far below concentrations of the initial gas mixture. Therefore, rate coefficients for reactions of these discharge produced species with other gas mixture components are well known quantities controlled by the translational temperature, which can be calculated from the energy balance equation taking into account numerous processes initiated by plasma. A numerical model was developed combining traditional approach of thermal combustion chemistry with advanced description of the plasma kinetics based on solution of electron Boltzmann equation. This approach allows us to describe self-consistently strongly non-equilibrium electric discharge in chemically unstable (ignited) gas. Equations of pseudo-one-dimensional gas dynamics were solved in parallel with a system of thermal chemistry equations, kinetic equations

  1. 3-Dimensional Modeling of Capacitively and Inductively Coupled Plasma Etching Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, Shahid

    2008-10-01

    Low temperature plasmas are widely used for thin film etching during micro and nano-electronic device fabrication. Fluid and hybrid plasma models were developed 15-20 years ago to understand the fundamentals of these plasmas and plasma etching. These models have significantly evolved since then, and are now a major tool used for new plasma hardware design and problem resolution. Plasma etching is a complex physical phenomenon, where inter-coupled plasma, electromagnetic, fluid dynamics, and thermal effects all have a major influence. The next frontier in the evolution of fluid-based plasma models is where these models are able to self-consistently treat the inter-coupling of plasma physics with fluid dynamics, electromagnetics, heat transfer and magnetostatics. We describe one such model in this paper and illustrate its use in solving engineering problems of interest for next generation plasma etcher design. Our 3-dimensional plasma model includes the full set of Maxwell equations, transport equations for all charged and neutral species in the plasma, the Navier-Stokes equation for fluid flow, and Kirchhoff's equations for the lumped external circuit. This model also includes Monte Carlo based kinetic models for secondary electrons and stochastic heating, and can take account of plasma chemistry. This modeling formalism allows us to self-consistently treat the dynamics in commercial inductively and capacitively coupled plasma etching reactors with realistic plasma chemistries, magnetic fields, and reactor geometries. We are also able to investigate the influence of the distributed electromagnetic circuit at very high frequencies (VHF) on the plasma dynamics. The model is used to assess the impact of azimuthal asymmetries in plasma reactor design (e.g., off-center pump, 3D magnetic field, slit valve, flow restrictor) on plasma characteristics at frequencies from 2 -- 180 MHz. With Jason Kenney, Ankur Agarwal, Ajit Balakrishna, Kallol Bera, and Ken Collins.

  2. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Intranasal Scopolamine in Plasma Saliva and Urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Tam, V.; Chow, Diana S. L.; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2014-01-01

    An intranasal gel formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness. The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) were evaluated under the Food and Drug Administration guidelines for clinical trials with an Investigative New Drug (IND). The aim of this project was to develop a PK model that can predict the relationship between plasma, saliva and urinary scopolamine concentrations using data collected from the IND clinical trial with INSCOP.

  3. Modelling of microwave-driven micro-plasmas in HCPCF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, L. L.; Leroy, O.; Boisse-Laporte, C.; Leprince, P.; Debord, B.; Gerome, F.; Jamier, R.; Benabid, F.

    2012-10-01

    New UV sources based on microwave-driven micro-plasmas filling a Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fibre (HCPCF) [1], exhibit an unprecedented compactness, flexibility, low-cost and high conversion efficiency. The micro-plasma (>10^14 cm-3 electron density, estimated by electromagnetic calculations) is produced by a surface-wave discharge (2.45 GHz frequency) in argon, at 1000-1400 K gas temperatures (measured by OES diagnostics). Our first approach to simulate this system replaces the cladding structure of the fibre (air-holes region) by a capillary cylindrical quartz tube. Simulations use a one-dimensional (radial) stationary model that solves the fluid transport equations for electrons and positive ions, the electron mean energy transport equations, Poisson's and Maxwell's equations for the fields and the gas energy balance equation, coupled to the electron Boltzmann equation for the calculation of the relevant electron parameters [2,3]. We analyze the modification of the plasma with changes in the work conditions, presenting simulations for various HCPCF core radii (50--500 μm) and electron densities (1--5x10^14 cm-3), at 1mbar pressure. [1] B. Debord et al, ECOC conference Mo.2.LeCervin.5. (2011) [2] L.L. Alves et al, Phys. Rev. E 79, 016403 (2009) [3] J. Greg'orio et al, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 21, 015013 (2012)

  4. Unified Model of the rf Plasma Sheath, Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Merle

    1996-10-01

    By developing an approximation to the first integral of the Poisson equation, one can obtain solutions for the current-voltage characteristics of an rf plasma sheath that are valid over the whole range of inertial response of the ions to an imposed rf voltage or current. (M.E.Riley, 1995 GEC, abstract QA5, published in Bull. Am. Phys. Soc., 40, 1587 (1995).) The theory has been shown to adequately reproduce current-voltage characteristics of two extreme cases (M.A. Lieberman, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 16, 638 (1988). A. Metze, D.W. Ernie, and H.J.Oskam, J.Appl.Phys., 60, 3081 (1986).) of ion response. In this work I show the effect of different conventions for connecting the sheath model to the bulk plasma. Modifications of the Mach number and a finite electric field at the Bohm point are natural choices. The differences are examined for a sheath in a high density Ar plasma and are found to be insignificant. A theoretical argument favors the electric field modification. *Work performed at Sandia National Labs and supported by US DoE under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Multi-level molecular modelling for plasma medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogaerts, Annemie; Khosravian, Narjes; Van der Paal, Jonas; Verlackt, Christof C. W.; Yusupov, Maksudbek; Kamaraj, Balu; Neyts, Erik C.

    2016-02-01

    Modelling at the molecular or atomic scale can be very useful for obtaining a better insight in plasma medicine. This paper gives an overview of different atomic/molecular scale modelling approaches that can be used to study the direct interaction of plasma species with biomolecules or the consequences of these interactions for the biomolecules on a somewhat longer time-scale. These approaches include density functional theory (DFT), density functional based tight binding (DFTB), classical reactive and non-reactive molecular dynamics (MD) and united-atom or coarse-grained MD, as well as hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods. Specific examples will be given for three important types of biomolecules, present in human cells, i.e. proteins, DNA and phospholipids found in the cell membrane. The results show that each of these modelling approaches has its specific strengths and limitations, and is particularly useful for certain applications. A multi-level approach is therefore most suitable for obtaining a global picture of the plasma-biomolecule interactions.

  6. Modeling the plasma plume of a hollow cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Iain D.; Crofton, Mark W.

    2004-04-01

    In this study, a numerical model is developed to simulate the xenon plasma plume from a thermionic hollow cathode employing an orifice plate used for propellant ionization and beam neutralization in an electrostatic space propulsion system. The model uses a detailed fluid model to describe the electrons and a particle-based kinetic approach is used to model the heavy xenon ions and atoms. A number of key assumptions in terms of physical modeling and boundary conditions of the simulations are assessed through direct comparisons with experimental measurements. For two of the three cathode operating conditions considered, good agreement with the measured data is obtained. The third condition appears to lie in a different physical regime where elevated electron and ion temperatures and decreased transport coefficients are required in the simulation to provide agreement between the model and the measured data.

  7. Growth model of binary alloy nanopowders for thermal plasma synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Shigeta, Masaya; Watanabe, Takayuki

    2010-08-15

    A new model is developed for numerical analysis of the entire growth process of binary alloy nanopowders in thermal plasma synthesis. The model can express any nanopowder profile in the particle size-composition distribution (PSCD). Moreover, its numerical solution algorithm is arithmetic and straightforward so that the model is easy to use. By virtue of these features, the model effectively simulates the collective and simultaneous combined process of binary homogeneous nucleation, binary heterogeneous cocondensation, and coagulation among nanoparticles. The effect of the freezing point depression due to nanoscale particle diameters is also considered in the model. In this study, the metal-silicon systems are particularly chosen as representative binary systems involving cocondensation processes. In consequence, the numerical calculation with the present model reveals the growth mechanisms of the Mo-Si and Ti-Si nanopowders by exhibiting their PSCD evolutions. The difference of the materials' saturation pressures strongly affects the growth behaviors and mature states of the binary alloy nanopowder.

  8. Modeling of neutral gas dynamics in high-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canupp, Patrick Wellington

    This thesis describes a physical model of chemically reactive neutral gas flow and discusses numerical solutions of this model for the flow in an inductively coupled plasma etch reactor. To obtain these solutions, this research develops an efficient, implicit numerical method. As a result of the enhanced numerical stability of the scheme, large time steps advance the solution from initial conditions to a final steady state in fewer iterations and with less computational expense than simpler explicit methods. This method would incorporate suitably as a module in currently existing large scale plasma simulation tools. In order to demonstrate the accuracy of the numerical technique, this thesis presents results from two simulations of flows that possess theoretical solutions. The first case is the inviscid flow of a gas through a converging nozzle. A comparison of the numerical solution to isentropic flow theory shows that the numerical technique capably captures the essential flow features of this environment. The second case is the Couette flow of a gas between two parallel plates. The simulation results compare well with the exact solution for this flow. After establishing the accuracy of the numerical technique, this thesis discusses results for the flow of chemically reactive gases in a chlorine plasma etch reactor. This research examines the influence of the plasma on the neutral gas and the dynamics exhibited by the neutral gas in the reactor. This research finds that the neutral gas temperature strongly depends on the rate at which inelastic, electron-impact dissociation reactions occur and on atomic chlorine wall recombination rates. Additionally, the neutral gas Aow in the reactor includes a significant mass flux of etch product from the wafer surface. Resolution of these effects is useful for neutral gas simulation. Finally, this thesis demonstrates that continuum fluid models provide reasonable accuracy for these low pressure reactor flows due to the fact

  9. Modeling of the angular dependence of plasma etching

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Wei; Sawin, Herbert H.

    2009-11-15

    An understanding of the angular dependence of etching yield is essential to investigate the origins of sidewall roughness during plasma etching. In this article the angular dependence of polysilicon etching in Cl{sub 2} plasma was modeled as a combination of individual angular-dependent etching yields for ion-initiated processes including physical sputtering, ion-induced etching, vacancy generation, and removal. The modeled etching yield exhibited a maximum at {approx}60 degree sign off-normal ion angle at low flux ratio, indicative of physical sputtering. It transformed to the angular dependence of ion-induced etching with the increase in the neutral-to-ion flux ratio. Good agreement between the modeling and the experiments was achieved for various flux ratios and ion energies. The variation of etching yield in response to the ion angle was incorporated in the three-dimensional profile simulation and qualitative agreement was obtained. The surface composition was calculated and compared to x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The modeling indicated a Cl areal density of 3x10{sup 15} atoms/cm{sup 2} on the surface that is close to the value determined by the XPS analysis. The response of Cl fraction to ion energy and flux ratio was modeled and correlated with the etching yields. The complete mixing-layer kinetics model with the angular dependence effect will be used for quantitative surface roughening analysis using a profile simulator in future work.

  10. Status of the ITER plasma modeling activities in JAEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Junya; Honda, Mitsuru; Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Aiba, Nobuyuki; Toma, Mitsunori; Matsuyama, Akinobu; Naito, Osamu; Miyata, Yoshiaki; Inoue, Shizuo; Narita, Emi; Shimizu, Katsuhiro; Hamamatsu, Kiyotaka; Ide, Shunsuke; Yagi, Masatoshi

    2015-11-01

    JAEA has been contributing to the ITER plasma modeling in a wide range of research areas. Among them we report recent integrated modeling activities in JAEA. The integrated modeling is indispensable for predictive simulations of autonomous ITER plasmas, which exhibit multi-physics nature. JAEA has been developing an integrated modeling code, the TOPICS suite. The TOPICS suite has been incorporating many physics factors to enhance its prediction capability and has delivered many important findings on ITER plasm. A recent achievement is the success of predictive simulation of toroidal rotation in ITER. The TOPICS suite has been coupled with the 3D equilibrium code VMEC and the 3D drift-kinetic solver FORTEC-3D to compute the NTV, the radial electric field, and the resultant toroidal rotation self-consistently. Another achievement is the quantitative estimate of reduction of ELM energy loss by pellet injection in ITER. The TOPICS suite has been coupled with a new pellet model and with the MHD stability code MARG2D to calculate finite-n modes for modeling the ELM-enhanced diffusivities.

  11. Nonlocal Transport Model for Two-Component Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhen

    My PhD thesis concerns nonlocal effects on the transport processes in two-component (electron and ion) plasmas. My objective is to construct a self-consistent nonlocal transport model that is applicable in fully-ionized homogeneous Maxwellian plasmas with small-amplitude perturbations for arbitrary particle collisionalities. The fundamental method starts with a rigorous solution of the full set of linearized Fokker-Planck kinetic equations with the Landau collision operators for two-component plasmas. Then a procedure is implemented for derivation of the linear fluid equations which are closed by the transport relations. Thereby a complete list of transport coefficients for each component is computed in the broad range of temporal and spatial scales. Some new transport coefficients are found from the nonlocal hydrodynamic formulation. Ion collisions are self-consistently included in all the calculations. The electric susceptibilities and dispersion relation can thus be derived from this linear nonlocal hydrodynamics for both isothermal and non-isothermal cases. With the aid of these formulations, some important plasma quantities are successfully calculated and some practical fitting formulae are proposed, i.e., the mode frequencies and damping rates of ion acoustic wave (IAW) and entropy wave (ENW). In addition, this linear nonlocal hydrodynamics has been applied to a derivation of the dynamic form factor S(k,w) that serves to describe and explain correctly the features of the frequency spectra observed in Thomson scattering experiments. The most significant accomplishment in my research work is a thorough investigation and a deep analysis of nonlocal ion effects on longitudinal low-frequency plasma fluctuations.

  12. Detailed atomic modeling of Sn plasmas for the EUV source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, A.; Sunahara, A.; Nishihawra, K.; Nishikawa, T.; Koike, F.; Tanuma, H.

    2008-05-01

    An atomic model of Sn plasmas is developed to calculate coefficients of radiative transfer, based on the calculated atomic data using the Hullac code. We find that the emission spectrum and conversion efficiency depend critically on the wavelength and spectral structure of the 4d-4f transition arrays. Satellite lines, which have a significant contribution to the emission, are determined after iterative calculations by changing the number of levels in the atomic model. We also correct transition wavelengths through comparison with experiments. Using the present emissivity and opacity, the radiation hydrodynamics simulation will be carried out toward the optimization of the EUV source.

  13. Intercomparison among plasma wake models for plasmaspheric and ionospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samir, U.; Comfort, R. H.; Wright, K. H., Jr.; Stone, N. H.

    1987-01-01

    The angular distributions of ions in the wake of a body moving through a space plasma computed from three different models are compared in order to investigate wake current depletion ratios under conditions simulating the topside ionosphere and plasmasphere. Results demonstrate the importance of taking into account the thermal flux at low Mach numbers and the angular acceptance of ion detectors in making theory-experiment comparisons. For all models considered, gradients in the angular variations of the fluxes are shown to be steeper near the wake-ambient interface than closer to the maximum rarefaction region.

  14. Effect of Electron Energy Distribution on the Hysteresis of Plasma Discharge: Theory, Experiment, and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-10-01

    Hysteresis, which is the history dependence of physical systems, is one of the most important topics in physics. Interestingly, bi-stability of plasma with a huge hysteresis loop has been observed in inductive plasma discharges. Despite long plasma research, how this plasma hysteresis occurs remains an unresolved question in plasma physics. Here, we report theory, experiment, and modeling of the hysteresis. It was found experimentally and theoretically that evolution of the electron energy distribution (EED) makes a strong plasma hysteresis. In Ramsauer and non-Ramsauer gas experiments, it was revealed that the plasma hysteresis is observed only at high pressure Ramsauer gas where the EED deviates considerably from a Maxwellian shape. This hysteresis was presented in the plasma balance model where the EED is considered. Because electrons in plasmas are usually not in a thermal equilibrium, this EED-effect can be regarded as a universal phenomenon in plasma physics.

  15. Effect of Electron Energy Distribution on the Hysteresis of Plasma Discharge: Theory, Experiment, and Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Hysteresis, which is the history dependence of physical systems, is one of the most important topics in physics. Interestingly, bi-stability of plasma with a huge hysteresis loop has been observed in inductive plasma discharges. Despite long plasma research, how this plasma hysteresis occurs remains an unresolved question in plasma physics. Here, we report theory, experiment, and modeling of the hysteresis. It was found experimentally and theoretically that evolution of the electron energy distribution (EED) makes a strong plasma hysteresis. In Ramsauer and non-Ramsauer gas experiments, it was revealed that the plasma hysteresis is observed only at high pressure Ramsauer gas where the EED deviates considerably from a Maxwellian shape. This hysteresis was presented in the plasma balance model where the EED is considered. Because electrons in plasmas are usually not in a thermal equilibrium, this EED-effect can be regarded as a universal phenomenon in plasma physics. PMID:26482650

  16. Modeling of Hydrogen Retention in Metallic Plasma Facing Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guterl, Jerome; Smirnov, R.

    2012-10-01

    The retention of hydrogen isotopes in the vacuum vessel of the ITER device is a critical plasma wall interaction issue for safety (tritium inventory) and operational reasons (hydrogen recycling). In particular, long-term retention of hydrogen have been observed both in the near-surface region and in the bulk of material in experiments reproducing ITER first wall conditions [1]. In this work, we present a modeling of the long-term hydrogen retention in a plasma exposed metallic walltaking into account processes both at the wall surface (material erosion, hydrogen adsorption, etc.) and in the bulk (hydrogen implantation, creation of trap sites, etc.). Using numerical simulations, the model is applied to analyze retention as a function of various parameters of the wall irradiated by hydrogen plasma for beryllium wall. Depth profiles of retained hydrogen for several ion energies as well as dependencies of retained hydrogen amount on wall temperature are obtained, showing good agreement with experimental data. The role of radiation-induced point-defects in the hydrogen retention as well as other aspects of retention are discussed in application to ITER conditions. [4pt] [1] R.A. Anderl, et al., J. Nucl. Mater. 273 (1999) 1

  17. Modeling laser-plasma interactions in NIF vacuum hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, E. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Still, C. H.; Langdon, A. B.; Olson, R. E.; Kline, J.

    2009-11-01

    In preparation for the NIF ignition campaign, a series of experiments are underway firing 96 and 192 beams of the NIF laser into empty gold hohlraums. The primary purpose of these experiments is to qualify the DANTE filtered x-ray diode radiation temerature diagnostic. We plan to have backscatter diagnostics available, giving us an opportunity to test our LPI modeling on the NIF scale. In addition to scaling with energy, we test the use of a gold-boron coating on the hohlraum wall to reduce SBS via increased ion Landau damping of the ion-acoustic waves. We use Lasnex to simulate the hydrodynamic evolution of the hohlraum plasma. Steady state gains were computed using our diagnostic NEWLIP. These were used to suggest appropriate backscatter simulations to be performed with pF3D, a massivel parallel code that couples paraxial light propagation with fluid models of the stimulated plasma ansd ion waves evolving on a background plasma. We describe the results of these simulations, pre- and post-shot, and compare them with experimental results.

  18. Modeling of stimulated Brillouin scattering in expanding plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüller, S.; Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Pesme, D.; Labaune, C.; Bandulet, H.

    2008-05-01

    Numerical simulations of mm-size expanding plasmas have been performed in comparison with recent experiments at the LULI facility. The features of Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) are studied for an intense mono-speckle laser beam in continuation of previous work on optically smoothed laser beams. Very good agreement between the theoretical-numerical modeling and the experimental results is found, in particular concerning the SBS activity in the plasma and the backscatter level. The results underline the importance of nonlocal transport effects affecting the onset of self-focusing for temperatures below 1keV. The simulations with the monospeckle beam allow to identify the resonant filament instability [1] and the subsequent loss of coherence of the laser beam as the reason of the observed low-level backscatter levels measured in the experiments. To achieve reliable numerical modeling, a good characterisation of the plasma profiles and the timing with respect to the laser pulse shape, prior to simulations, proves to be extremely important.

  19. Model of magnetic reconnection in space and astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2013-03-01

    Maxwell's equations imply that exponentially smaller non-ideal effects than commonly assumed can give rapid magnetic reconnection in space and astrophysical plasmas. In an ideal evolution, magnetic field lines act as stretchable strings, which can become ever more entangled but cannot be cut. High entanglement makes the lines exponentially sensitive to small non-ideal changes in the magnetic field. The cause is well known in popular culture as the butterfly effect and in the theory of deterministic dynamical systems as a sensitive dependence on initial conditions, but the importance to magnetic reconnection is not generally recognized. Two-coordinate models are too constrained geometrically for the required entanglement, but otherwise the effect is general and can be studied in simple models. A simple model is introduced, which is periodic in the x and y Cartesian coordinates and bounded by perfectly conducting planes in z. Starting from a constant magnetic field in the z direction, reconnection is driven by a spatially smooth, bounded force. The model is complete and could be used to study the impulsive transfer of energy between the magnetic field and the ions and electrons using a kinetic plasma model.

  20. Modelling electron transport in magnetized low-temperature discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagelaar, G. J. M.

    2007-02-01

    Magnetic fields are sometimes used to confine the plasma in low-pressure low-temperature gas discharges, for example in magnetron discharges, Hall-effect-thruster discharges, electron-cyclotron-resonance discharges and helicon discharges. We discuss how these magnetized discharges can be modelled by two-dimensional self-consistent models based on electron fluid equations. The magnetized electron flux is described by an anisotropic drift diffusion equation, where the electron mobility is much smaller perpendicular to the magnetic field than parallel to it. The electric potential is calculated either from Poisson's equation or from the electron equations, assuming quasineutrality. Although these models involve many assumptions, they are appropriate to study the main effects of the magnetic field on the charged particle transport and space charge electric fields in realistic two-dimensional discharge configurations. We demonstrate by new results that these models reproduce known phenomena such as the establishment of the Boltzmann relation along magnetic field lines, the penetration of perpendicular applied electric fields into the plasma bulk and the decrease in magnetic confinement by short-circuit wall currents. We also present an original method to prevent numerical errors arising from the extreme anisotropy of the electron mobility, which tend to invalidate model results from standard numerical methods.

  1. Model of magnetic reconnection in space and astrophysical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2013-03-15

    Maxwell's equations imply that exponentially smaller non-ideal effects than commonly assumed can give rapid magnetic reconnection in space and astrophysical plasmas. In an ideal evolution, magnetic field lines act as stretchable strings, which can become ever more entangled but cannot be cut. High entanglement makes the lines exponentially sensitive to small non-ideal changes in the magnetic field. The cause is well known in popular culture as the butterfly effect and in the theory of deterministic dynamical systems as a sensitive dependence on initial conditions, but the importance to magnetic reconnection is not generally recognized. Two-coordinate models are too constrained geometrically for the required entanglement, but otherwise the effect is general and can be studied in simple models. A simple model is introduced, which is periodic in the x and y Cartesian coordinates and bounded by perfectly conducting planes in z. Starting from a constant magnetic field in the z direction, reconnection is driven by a spatially smooth, bounded force. The model is complete and could be used to study the impulsive transfer of energy between the magnetic field and the ions and electrons using a kinetic plasma model.

  2. Simulation models for computational plasma physics: Concluding report

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, D.W.

    1994-03-05

    In this project, the authors enhanced their ability to numerically simulate bounded plasmas that are dominated by low-frequency electric and magnetic fields. They moved towards this goal in several ways; they are now in a position to play significant roles in the modeling of low-frequency electromagnetic plasmas in several new industrial applications. They have significantly increased their facility with the computational methods invented to solve the low frequency limit of Maxwell`s equations (DiPeso, Hewett, accepted, J. Comp. Phys., 1993). This low frequency model is called the Streamlined Darwin Field model (SDF, Hewett, Larson, and Doss, J. Comp. Phys., 1992) has now been implemented in a fully non-neutral SDF code BEAGLE (Larson, Ph.D. dissertation, 1993) and has further extended to the quasi-neutral limit (DiPeso, Hewett, Comp. Phys. Comm., 1993). In addition, they have resurrected the quasi-neutral, zero-electron-inertia model (ZMR) and began the task of incorporating internal boundary conditions into this model that have the flexibility of those in GYMNOS, a magnetostatic code now used in ion source work (Hewett, Chen, ICF Quarterly Report, July--September, 1993). Finally, near the end of this project, they invented a new type of banded matrix solver that can be implemented on a massively parallel computer -- thus opening the door for the use of all their ADI schemes on these new computer architecture`s (Mattor, Williams, Hewett, submitted to Parallel Computing, 1993).

  3. Physics-electrical hybrid model for real time impedance matching and remote plasma characterization in RF plasma sources.

    PubMed

    Sudhir, Dass; Bandyopadhyay, M; Chakraborty, A

    2016-02-01

    Plasma characterization and impedance matching are an integral part of any radio frequency (RF) based plasma source. In long pulse operation, particularly in high power operation where plasma load may vary due to different reasons (e.g. pressure and power), online tuning of impedance matching circuit and remote plasma density estimation are very useful. In some cases, due to remote interfaces, radio activation and, due to maintenance issues, power probes are not allowed to be incorporated in the ion source design for plasma characterization. Therefore, for characterization and impedance matching, more remote schemes are envisaged. Two such schemes by the same authors are suggested in these regards, which are based on air core transformer model of inductive coupled plasma (ICP) [M. Bandyopadhyay et al., Nucl. Fusion 55, 033017 (2015); D. Sudhir et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 013510 (2014)]. However, the influence of the RF field interaction with the plasma to determine its impedance, a physics code HELIC [D. Arnush, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3042 (2000)] is coupled with the transformer model. This model can be useful for both types of RF sources, i.e., ICP and helicon sources. PMID:26932040

  4. Architecture, modeling, and analysis of a plasma impedance probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaram, Magathi

    Variations in ionospheric plasma density can cause large amplitude and phase changes in the radio waves passing through this region. Ionospheric weather can have detrimental effects on several communication systems, including radars, navigation systems such as the Global Positioning Sytem (GPS), and high-frequency communications. As a result, creating models of the ionospheric density is of paramount interest to scientists working in the field of satellite communication. Numerous empirical and theoretical models have been developed to study the upper atmosphere climatology and weather. Multiple measurements of plasma density over a region are of marked importance while creating these models. The lack of spatially distributed observations in the upper atmosphere is currently a major limitation in space weather research. A constellation of CubeSat platforms would be ideal to take such distributed measurements. The use of miniaturized instruments that can be accommodated on small satellites, such as CubeSats, would be key to achieving these science goals for space weather. The accepted instrumentation techniques for measuring the electron density are the Langmuir probes and the Plasma Impedance Probe (PIP). While Langmuir probes are able to provide higher resolution measurements of relative electron density, the Plasma Impedance Probes provide absolute electron density measurements irrespective of spacecraft charging. The central goal of this dissertation is to develop an integrated architecture for the PIP that will enable space weather research from CubeSat platforms. The proposed PIP chip integrates all of the major analog and mixed-signal components needed to perform swept-frequency impedance measurements. The design's primary innovation is the integration of matched Analog-to-Digital Converters (ADC) on a single chip for sampling the probes current and voltage signals. A Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is performed by an off-chip Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA

  5. Rigid rotor equilibria with non-neutral plasma: analytical relativistic two fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Filipe L.; Soares, Diego N.; Lourenço, Weslley A.

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of non-neutral plasmas using fluid models in general implies on the resolutions of coupled differential equations, in particular the so-called rigid-rotor plasma equilibrium involves the solution of the Poisson-Ampère and moment equations. The present work shows an analytical solution for this model at a relativistic cold adiabatic plasma approximation considering a two species plasma where electric field gives an important contribution for the plasma confinement. According to the present study the most important plasma parameters responsible for confinement are the particles angular velocities, as expected, and mass ratio between the species.

  6. Modelling of plasma generation and thin film deposition by a non-thermal plasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigeneger, F.; Becker, M. M.; Foest, R.; Loffhagen, D.

    2016-09-01

    The gas flow and plasma in a miniaturized non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet for plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition has been investigated by means of hydrodynamic modelling. The investigation focuses on the interplay between the plasma generation in the active zone where the power is supplied by an rf voltage to the filaments, the transport of active plasma particles due to the gas flow into the effluent, their reactions with the thin film precursor molecules and the transport of precursor fragments towards the substrate. The main features of the spatially two-dimensional model used are given. The results of the numerical modelling show that most active particles of the argon plasma are mainly confined within the active volume in the outer capillary of the plasma jet, with the exception of molecular argon ions which are transported remarkably into the effluent together with slow electrons. A simplified model of the precursor kinetics yields radial profiles of precursor fragment fluxes onto the substrate, which agree qualitatively with the measured profiles of thin films obtained by static film deposition experiments.

  7. Recent developments in the modeling of dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Colgan, J.; Abdallah, J. Jr.; Fontes, C. J.; Streufert, B.

    2007-08-02

    Recent experiments using intense laser pulses on thin targets have produced spectra in which it has been speculated that certain features are due to multiple ionization or recombination events. To explore this possibility, the rate coefficients for collisional double ionization and its inverse process, four-body recombination, have been added to the collisional rate matrix computed within the Los Alamos plasma kinetics code ATOMIC. The collisional double ionization cross sections are obtained from semi-empirical fits to experimental measurements, and the corresponding four-body recombination rates are derived from detailed-balance considerations. We have examined emission spectra produced from solving the coupled rate equations, including the double ionization and four-body recombination rate coefficients, for an Ar plasma in which various fractions of hot electrons are present. We have also explored the sensitivity of our results to the approximations made for the ionization cross sections used in our calculations. We find that inclusion of these multiple-electron effects can make appreciable differences to the average ionization stage of the plasma and the resulting emission spectra at moderately high electron densities, but is strongly dependent on the form of the differential cross sections used in our model.

  8. Modeling and Simulation of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Aaron; Bett, Dominic; Cunningham, Monisha; Sen, Sudip

    2015-04-01

    Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) is a process used to deposit thin films from a gas state (vapor) to a solid state on a substrate. Recent study from the X-ray diffraction spectra of SnO2 films deposited as a function of RF power apparently indicates that RF power is playing a stabilizing role and hence in the better deposition. The results show that the RF power results in smoother morphology, improved crystallinity, and lower sheet resistance value in the PECVD process. The PECVD processing allows deposition at lower temperatures, which is often critical in the manufacture of semiconductors. In this talk we will address two aspects of the problem, first to develop a model to study the mechanism of how the PECVD is effected by the RF power, and second to actually simulate the effect of RF power on PECVD. As the PECVD is a very important component of the plasma processing technology with many applications in the semiconductor technology and surface science, the research proposed here has the prospect to revolutionize the plasma processing technology through the stabilizing role of the RF power.

  9. Approaches to modeling of plasmas containing impurity at arbitrary concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokar, Mikhail Z.

    2016-02-01

    A new approximate method to modeling of two-ion-species plasmas with arbitrary concentration of impurity is developed. It based on the usage of equations for the electron density and the ratio of the ion species densities as new dependent variables. In contrast to motion equations for the ion mass velocities used normally, those for the new variables have a singularity at the Debye sheath only, as in the case of a one species plasma. Computations for the most critical situations of weak and intermediate friction between species due to Coulomb collisions reproduce nearly perfectly the results got by solving the original equations, however within a calculation time reduced by a factor of 102-103. In the case of strong friction, where ions’ velocities are very close each other, the normal procedure does not converge at all, but the new one, being precise in this limit, operates very reliably. Calculations are done for conditions typical in the linear device PSI-2, with deuterium plasmas seeded by neon impurity. For fixed electron and ion temperatures a critical density of impurity atoms is found, at which the electron density grows without limits. Such a catastrophic behavior does not occur if the electron and ion heat balances are taken into account to calculate the temperature profiles self-consistently.

  10. Characterization and Modeling of Microwave Plasmas Used for Materials Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Peter

    1995-11-01

    Detailed models of the behavior of both charged and neutral species in nitrogen afterglows and hydrogen/argon discharges were developed in this study. Mass continuity equations were solved to investigate the dominant transport and rate processes in a low-pressure, non-isothermal nitrogen afterglow. Electron density and N-atom flux were measured as a function of position in the afterglow and compared with model results. It was found that the model, with no adjustable parameters, yielded very good agreement with experimental measurements. The radial gradient of N-atom concentration was shown to be insignificant, which reduced the model to a one-dimensional mass continuity equation. However, the model of charged species behavior must be carried out in two dimensions. Wall recombination play a very important role for both neutral and charges species while the homogeneous recombination can be ignored. A volume-averaged model coupling species and power balance equations was developed to predict the electron temperature and species concentration as a function of operating parameters in a pure hydrogen discharge. It was found that the pressure, power, flow rate, reactor radius, and gas temperature all affect the generation of H-atoms. Electron temperature is mainly determined by the gas pressure. Finally, the effect of argon addition on a hydrogen discharge was studied. The model results showed that the argon addition increases the electron density through direct ionization of ground state Ar, which in turn, enhances the degree of hydrogen dissociation. It was also found that the plasma retains the basic properties of a hydrogen plasma even for mixtures containing 90% Ar. Electron temperature and H-atom concentration are only slightly changed with argon addition, and the dominant ionic species is still H_3^+..

  11. EM Modelling of RF Propagation Through Plasma Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandolfo, L.; Bandinelli, M.; Araque Quijano, J. L.; Vecchi, G.; Pawlak, H.; Marliani, F.

    2012-05-01

    Electric propulsion is a commercially attractive solution for attitude and position control of geostationary satellites. Hall-effect ion thrusters generate a localized plasma flow in the surrounding of the satellite, whose impact on the communication system needs to be qualitatively and quantitatively assessed. An electromagnetic modelling tool has been developed and integrated into the Antenna Design Framework- ElectroMagnetic Satellite (ADF-EMS). The system is able to guide the user from the plume definition phases through plume installation and simulation. A validation activity has been carried out and the system has been applied to the plume modulation analysis of SGEO/Hispasat mission.

  12. Real-time Control and Modeling of Plasma Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarfaty, M.; Baum, C.; Harper, M.; Hershkowitz, N.; Shohet, J. L.

    1997-10-01

    The relatively high process rates in high density plasma tools as well as the shrinking thickness of the films, require fast estimate of the process state in order to implement real-time advanced process control. The fast etch rate estimate, within one second, in a single spot size of 1-2 mm and the time averaged rates across the wafer are obtained by a combined use of an in-situ two-color laser interferometer and a full wafer image interferometer, respectively. The gas phase state is monitored by optical emission spectroscopy and a residual gas analyzer. The magnetically confined ICP tool state, including gas flow, pressure, and RF power to the antenna and the electrostatic chuck, is computer controlled and monitored. The absolute thickness of the film is determined during the process, thus providing an end-point prediction. The advantages of two-color laser interferometry for real-time process monitoring, development and control will be described. Langmuir kinetics modeling of the measured etch rates of polysilicon and SiO2 films in Cl2 and CF4 discharges using tool state parameters will be described. The etch rate model enabled us to develop a model-based real-time control algorithm. The achieved real-time control of plasma etch rates of un-patterned SiO2 and polysilicon films will be described. This work is funded by NSF grant No. EEC-8721545.

  13. Predictive Modeling in Plasma Reactor and Process Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hash, D. B.; Bose, D.; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Research continues toward the improvement and increased understanding of high-density plasma tools. Such reactor systems are lauded for their independent control of ion flux and energy enabling high etch rates with low ion damage and for their improved ion velocity anisotropy resulting from thin collisionless sheaths and low neutral pressures. Still, with the transition to 300 mm processing, achieving etch uniformity and high etch rates concurrently may be a formidable task for such large diameter wafers for which computational modeling can play an important role in successful reactor and process design. The inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor is the focus of the present investigation. The present work attempts to understand the fundamental physical phenomena of such systems through computational modeling. Simulations will be presented using both computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques and the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method for argon and chlorine discharges. ICP reactors generally operate at pressures on the order of 1 to 10 mTorr. At such low pressures, rarefaction can be significant to the degree that the constitutive relations used in typical CFD techniques become invalid and a particle simulation must be employed. This work will assess the extent to which CFD can be applied and evaluate the degree to which accuracy is lost in prediction of the phenomenon of interest; i.e., etch rate. If the CFD approach is found reasonably accurate and bench-marked with DSMC and experimental results, it has the potential to serve as a design tool due to the rapid time relative to DSMC. The continuum CFD simulation solves the governing equations for plasma flow using a finite difference technique with an implicit Gauss-Seidel Line Relaxation method for time marching toward a converged solution. The equation set consists of mass conservation for each species, separate energy equations for the electrons and heavy species, and momentum equations for the gas

  14. Modelling Ar II spectral emission from the ASTRAL helicon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz Burgos, Jorge; Boivin, Robert; Loch, Stuart; Kamar, Ola; Ballance, Connor; Pindzola, Mitch

    2008-11-01

    We describe our spectral modeling of ArII emission from the ASTRAL helicon plasma at Auburn University. Collisional-radiative theory is used to model the emitted spectrum, with account being taken for the density and temperature variation along the line of sight. This study has two main aims. Firstly to test the atomic data used in the model and secondly to identify spectral line ratios in the 200 nm - 1000 nm range that could be used as temperature diagnostics. Using the temperature at which Ar II emission starts to be seen we have been able to test recent ionization and recombination data. Using selected spectral lines we were then able to test the importance of the continuum-coupling effects included in the most recent Ar+ electron impact excitation data. Selected spectral line ratios have been identified that show a strong temperature variation and have potential as a temperature diagnostic.

  15. Multidimensional hydrodynamic plasma-wall model for collisional plasma discharges with and without magnetic-field effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Haribalan; Roy, Subrata

    2005-09-15

    A numerical model for two-species plasma involving electrons and ions at pressure of 0.1 torr is presented here. The plasma-wall problem is modeled using one- and two-dimensional hydrodynamic equations coupled with Poisson equation. The model utilizes a finite-element algorithm to overcome the stiffness of the resulting plasma-wall equations. The one-dimensional result gives insight into the discharge characteristics including net charge density, electric field, and temporal space-charge sheath evolution. In two dimensions, the plasma formation over a flat plate is investigated for three different cases. The numerical algorithm is first benchmarked with published literature for plasma formed between symmetric electrodes in nitrogen gas. The characteristics of plasma are then analyzed for an infinitesimally thin electrode under dc and rf potentials in the presence of applied magnetic field using argon as a working gas. The magnetic field distorts the streamwise distribution because of a large y-momentum VxB coupling. Finally, the shape effects of the insulator-conductor edge for an electrode with finite thickness have been compared using a 90 degree sign shoulder and a 45 deg. chamfer. The 90 deg. chamfer displays a stronger body force created due to plasma in the downward and forward directions.

  16. Probabilistic Model of Beam-Plasma Interaction in Randomly Inhomogeneous Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voshchepynets, A.; Krasnoselskikh, V.; Artemyev, A.; Volokitin, A.

    2015-07-01

    We propose a new model that describes beam-plasma interaction in the presence of random density fluctuations with a known probability distribution. We use the property that, for the given frequency, the probability distribution of the density fluctuations uniquely determines the probability distribution of the phase velocity of waves. We present the system as discrete and consisting of small, equal spatial intervals with a linear density profile. This approach allows one to estimate variations in wave energy density and particle velocity, depending on the density gradient on any small spatial interval. Because the characteristic time for the evolution of the electron distribution function and the wave energy is much longer than the time required for a single wave-particle resonant interaction over a small interval, we determine the description for the relaxation process in terms of averaged quantities. We derive a system of equations, similar to the quasi-linear approximation, with the conventional velocity diffusion coefficient D and the wave growth rate γ replaced by the average in phase space, by making use of the probability distribution for phase velocities and by assuming that the interaction in each interval is independent of previous interactions. Functions D and γ are completely determined by the distribution function for the amplitudes of the fluctuations. For the Gaussian distribution of the density fluctuations, we show that the relaxation process is determined by the ratio of beam velocity to plasma thermal velocity, the dispersion of the fluctuations, and the width of the beam in the velocity space.

  17. Modeling of Localized Neutral Particle Sources in 3D Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Umansky, M V; Rognlien, T D; Fenstermacher, M E; Borchardt, M; Mutzke, A; Riemann, J; Schneider, R; Owen, L W

    2002-05-23

    A new edge plasma code BoRiS [1] has a fully 3D fluid plasma model. We supplement BoRiS with a 3D fluid neutral model including equations for parallel momentum and collisional perpendicular diffusion. This makes BoRiS an integrated plasma-neutral model suitable for a variety of applications. We present modeling results for a localized gas source in the geometry of the NCSX stellarator.

  18. Electrical and kinetic model of an atmospheric rf device for plasma aerodynamics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pinheiro, Mario J.; Martins, Alexandre A.

    2010-08-15

    The asymmetrically mounted flat plasma actuator is investigated using a self-consistent two-dimensional fluid model at atmospheric pressure. The computational model assumes the drift-diffusion approximation and uses a simple plasma kinetic model. It investigated the electrical and kinetic properties of the plasma, calculated the charged species concentrations, surface charge density, electrohydrodynamic forces, and gas speed. The present computational model contributes to understand the main physical mechanisms, and suggests ways to improve its performance.

  19. Plasma injection and atomic physics models for use in particle simulation codes

    SciTech Connect

    Procassini, R.J. California Univ., Berkeley, CA . Electronics Research Lab.)

    1991-06-12

    Models of plasma injection (creation) and charged/neutral atomic physics which are suitable for incorporation into particle simulation codes are described. Both planar and distributed source injection models are considered. Results obtained from planar injection into a collisionless plasma-sheath region are presented. The atomic physics package simulates the charge exchange and impact ionization interactions which occur between charged particles and neutral atoms in a partially-ionized plasma. These models are applicable to a wide range of problems, from plasma processing of materials to transport in the edge region of a tokamak plasma. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Modeling Variability of Plasma Conditions in the Io Torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delamere, P. A.; Bagenal, F.

    2003-01-01

    Telescopic observations an in situ measurements of the Io plasma torus show the density, temperature and composition to vary over time, sometimes up to a factor of 2. While previous models of the physical and chemical processes in the Io plasma torus have reasonably modeled the conditions of the Voyager 1 era, their authors have not addressed the observed variability nor explored the sensitivity of torus conditions to input parameters. In this paper we present a homogeneous torus model parameterized by five variables (transport timescale, neutral source strength, ratio of oxygen sulfur to atoms in the source, fraction of superthermal electrons, temperature of these hot electrons). The model incorporates the most recent data for ionization, recombination, charge exchange and radiative energy losses for the major torus species (S, S(sup +), S(sup ++), S(sup +++), O, O(sup +), O(sup ++). We solve equations of conservation of mass and energy to find equilibrium conditions for a set of input parameters. We compare model plasma conditions with those observed by Voyager 1 Voyager 2, and Cassini. Furthermore, we explore the sensitivity of torus conditions to each parameter. We find that (1) torus conditions are distinctly different for the Voyager 1, Voyager 2 and Cassini eras, (2) unique torus input parameters for any given era are poorly constrained given the wide range of solution space that is consistent with the range of observed torus conditions, (3) ion composition is highly sensitive to the specification of a non-thermal electron distribution, (4) neutral O/S source ratio is highly variable with model values ranging between 1.7 for Cassini to 4.0 for Voyager 1 conditions, (5) transport times range between 23 days for Voyager 2 to 50 days for Voyager 1 and Cassini, (6) neutral source strengths range between 7 to 30 x 10(sup -4) cm (sup -3) s(sup -1) which corresponds to a net production of 0.4 to 1.3 tons/s for a torus volume of 1.4 x 10(sup 31) cm(sup 3), or 38 R

  1. Simple predictive electron transport models applied to sawtoothing plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.; Merle, A.; Sauter, O.; Goodman, T. P.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we introduce two simple transport models to evaluate the time evolution of electron temperature and density profiles during sawtooth cycles (i.e. over a sawtooth period time-scale). Since the aim of these simulations is to estimate reliable profiles within a short calculation time, two simplified ad-hoc models have been developed. The goal for these models is to rely on a few easy-to-check free parameters, such as the confinement time scaling factor and the profiles’ averaged scale-lengths. Due to the simplicity and short calculation time of the models, it is expected that these models can also be applied to real-time transport simulations. We show that it works well for Ohmic and EC heated L- and H-mode plasmas. The differences between these models are discussed and we show that their predictive capabilities are similar. Thus only one model is used to reproduce with simulations the results of sawtooth control experiments on the TCV tokamak. For the sawtooth pacing, the calculated time delays between the EC power off and sawtooth crash time agree well with the experimental results. The map of possible locking range is also well reproduced by the simulation.

  2. Impact of the plasma response in three-dimensional edge plasma transport modelling for RMP ELM control scenarios at ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Oliver

    2014-10-01

    The constrains used in magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) modeling of the plasma response to external resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields have a profound impact on the three-dimensional (3-D) shape of the plasma boundary induced by RMP fields. In this contribution, the consequences of the plasma response on the actual 3D boundary structure and transport during RMP application at ITER are investigated. The 3D fluid plasma and kinetic neutral transport code EMC3-Eirene is used for edge transport modeling. Plasma response modeling is conducted with the M3D-C1 code using a single fluid, non-linear and a two fluid, linear MHD constrain. These approaches are compared to results with an ideal MHD like plasma response. A 3D plasma boundary is formed for all cases consisting of magnetic finger structures at the X-point intersecting the divertor surface in a helical footprint pattern. The width of the helical footprint pattern is largely reduced compared to vacuum magnetic fields when using the ideal MHD like screening model. This yields increasing peak heat fluxes in contrast to a beneficial heat flux spreading seen with vacuum fields. The particle pump out as well as loss of thermal energy is reduced by a factor of two compared to vacuum fields. In contrast, the impact of the plasma response obtained from both MHD constrains in M3D-C1 is nearly negligible at the plasma boundary and only a small modification of the magnetic footprint topology is detected. Accordingly, heat and particle fluxes on the target plates as well as the edge transport characteristics are comparable to the vacuum solution. This span of modeling results with different plasma response models highlights the importance of thoroughly validating both, plasma response and 3D edge transport models for a robust extrapolation towards ITER. Supported by ITER Grant IO/CT/11/4300000497 and F4E Grant GRT-055 (PMS-PE) and by Start-Up Funds of the University of Wisconsin - Madison.

  3. Modeling a planar sheath in dust-containing plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, T. H.

    2014-01-15

    One-dimensional fluid model is utilized to describe the sheath at a dust-containing plasma-wall boundary. The model equations are solved on the scale of the electron Debye length. The spatial distributions of electric potential and of the velocities and densities of charged species are calculated in a wide range of control parameters. The dust charge number, electric force, and ion drag force are also investigated. The impacts of Havnes parameter, the electron to ion temperature ratio, the ion collisionality, and the ionization on the spatial distributions of the plasma species and the incident fluxes of the ions to the wall (or to the probe) are investigated. With increase of Havnes parameter, the sheath thickness and the ion flux to the wall are reduced, whereas the ion drift velocity is increased. Enhanced ion thermal motion causes the ion flux to the wall to increase. An increase in ion collisionality with neutrals causes both the sheath thickness and the ion flux to the wall to decrease. With increase of the ionization rate, the sheath thickness is found to decrease and the ion flux collected by a probe increases. The localization of dust particles above the electrode is intensified by the increases in Havnes parameter, the electron to ion temperature ratio, collisionality, and ionization rate.

  4. Modeling viscosity and diffusion of plasma mixtures across coupling regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnault, Philippe

    2014-10-01

    Viscosity and diffusion of plasma for pure elements and multicomponent mixtures are modeled from the high-temperature low-density weakly coupled regime to the low-temperature high-density strongly coupled regime. Thanks to an atom in jellium modeling, the effect of electron screening on the ion-ion interaction is incorporated through a self-consistent definition of the ionization. This defines an effective One Component Plasma, or an effective Binary Ionic Mixture, that is representative of the strength of the interaction. For the viscosity and the interdiffusion of mixtures, approximate kinetic expressions are supplemented by mixing laws applied to the excess viscosity and self-diffusion of pure elements. The comparisons with classical and quantum molecular dynamics results reveal deviations in the range 20--40% on average with almost no predictions further than a factor of 2 over many decades of variation. Applications in the inertial confinement fusion context could help in predicting the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities.

  5. Spectroscopic Non-LTE Modeling of Highly Charged Gold Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, A.; Ouart, N. D.; Giuliani, J. L.; Obenschain, S. P.; Clark, R. W.; Aglitskiy, Y.

    2013-10-01

    An X-ray spectrometer is under development at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) to investigate emissions from gold targets irradiated by the NIKE KrF facility. This effort is in support of the indirect drive campaign on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). To analyze and interpret the NIKE experimental spectra, we are theoretically exploring line emissions from a gold plasma in the M-band, i.e., 1.5 to 3.5 keV. We employ a detailed Non-LTE atomic model for ions near Ni-like gold by including an adequate number of configurations to obtain spectroscopic details in this range. The atomic states are coupled both collisionally and radiatively, including all dominant atomic processes that have significant contributions to the ionization and emitted synthetic spectra. In particular, we will investigate the effect of dielectronic recombination, which can have a dominant effect on level populations for highly ionized high Z plasmas. Since the radiation field can affect level populations through photoionization and photoexcitation, our collisional-radiative model will include non-local radiation transport. The line shapes of the strong overlapping lines will be resolved by a multifrequency radiation transport method. Synthetic spectra with radiation transport, including resonant photo-pumping, will be generated for realistic densities and temperatures to compare with the NIKE data. Work supported by DOE/NNSA.

  6. Multiscale modeling of blood-plasma separation in bifurcations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuejin; Popel, Aleksander; Karniadakis, George

    2011-11-01

    Motion of a suspension of red blood cells (RBCs) flowing in a Y-shaped bifurcating microfluidic channel is investigated using a low-dimensional RBC validated 3D model based on dissipative particle dynamics. No-slip wall boundary and adaptive boundary conditions were implemented to model hydrodynamic flow within a specific wall structure of diverging microfluidic channels. Plasma skimming and the all-or-nothing phenomenon of RBCs in a bifurcating microfluidic channel have been investigated in our simulations, including the size of cell-free layer on the daughter channels. The results show that the flowrate ratio of the daughter channels and the feed hematocrit level have considerable influence on blood-plasma separation. Compared with the particle recovery efficiencies of healthy RBCs, malaria-infected RBCs (iRBCs) have a tendency to travel into the low flowrate daughter channels because of the increased stiffness of iRBCs. The simulation results are consistent with previous experimental results and theoretical predictions. This work was suporrted by the National Institute of Health (NIH), Grant R01Hl094270 and the National Science Foundation (NSF) Grant CBET-0852948.

  7. Microwave N{sub 2}-Ar plasma torch. I. Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Henriques, J.; Tatarova, E.; Ferreira, C. M.

    2011-01-15

    The spatial structure of a microwave plasma torch driven by an azimuthally symmetric surface wave operating in a N{sub 2}-Ar mixture at atmospheric pressure is investigated. A two-dimensional (2D) self-consistent theoretical model is developed to investigate the entire spatial structure of the source, including the discharge zone, sustained by the field of the surface TM{sub 00} mode, and the postdischarge plasma. Maxwell's equations, the rate balance equations for the most important excited species - vibrationally and electronically excited states, ions and nitrogen atoms N({sup 4}S) - and the Boltzmann equation for electrons are consistently solved. Model calculations of the 2D spatial distributions of species of interest such as charged particles (electrons and positive ions), N{sub 2}({Chi} {sup 1{Sigma}}{sub g}{sup +},v) vibrationally excited molecules, N{sub 2}(A {sup 3{Sigma}}{sub u}{sup +}) metastable molecules, and N({sup 4}S) ground state atoms are presented and discussed.

  8. Modelling penetration and plasma response of a dense neutral gas jet in a post-thermal quenched plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, P. B.; Wu, W.

    2014-02-01

    This paper is about the dynamics of gas jet injection and propagation into the cold, current quench (CQ) discharge following the thermal quench (TQ) phase of a disruption event. Understanding the processes involved in the interpenetration between a dense, fast-moving supersonic gas jet and a magnetized plasma is fundamental to the solution of the disruption mitigation problem using massive gas injection. An analytical model was developed that provides the penetration depth of the jet in the CQ discharge. The model developed incorporates the injector, the vacuum space between injector and plasma, and the low beta CQ plasma through which the jet penetrates. The radially moving gas stagnates at some point inside the plasma by formation of a ‘bottle shock’, resulting in a certain penetration depth. Consistent with experimental findings, it is shown that high fuelling efficiency >70% and good penetration beyond the q = 2 surface is possible in such plasma discharges, but in normal (unquenched) plasma discharges penetration of dense gas jets will be quite poor. The paper also sheds light on how the external plasma responds to allow interpenetration of perfectly insulating gas jet through a strong magnetic field B2/2μ0 ≫ ρu2. The paper also develops semi-analytical models for the response of the cold, high-current, collision-dominated plasma to the insertion of a dense neutral jet: the propagation of cooling waves out along the magnetic field lines, the heated and ionized surface layer which also expands outwards along the magnetic field lines, and the electrical breakdown of the neutral gas within the jet volume. Although good penetration in the ITER post-TQ discharge can be achieved, the plasma resistivity is only marginally enhanced. This may render repetitive gas inject ineffective, as the concept requires a sizable resistivity enhancement to initiate a current profile contraction, and resulting kink-tearing activity to suppress runaway avalanching.

  9. A weakened cascade model for turbulence in astrophysical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Howes, G. G.; TenBarge, J. M.; Dorland, W.

    2011-10-15

    A refined cascade model for kinetic turbulence in weakly collisional astrophysical plasmas is presented that includes both the transition between weak and strong turbulence and the effect of nonlocal interactions on the nonlinear transfer of energy. The model describes the transition between weak and strong MHD turbulence and the complementary transition from strong kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) turbulence to weak dissipating KAW turbulence, a new regime of weak turbulence in which the effects of shearing by large scale motions and kinetic dissipation play an important role. The inclusion of the effect of nonlocal motions on the nonlinear energy cascade rate in the dissipation range, specifically the shearing by large-scale motions, is proposed to explain the nearly power-law energy spectra observed in the dissipation range of both kinetic numerical simulations and solar wind observations.

  10. Numerical modeling of arc plasma generator for chemical laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagar, Vidya; Ravikant, Chhaya; Singhal, Gaurav; Mittal, Alok P.

    2012-05-01

    The results of the numerical modeling of arc discharge phenomenon relevant to hydrogen fluoride/deuterium fluoride (HF/DF) laser applications are given. The overall mechanics of arc discharge phenomena on the basis of numerical modeling employing the commercial code COMSOL is discussed. The equations for a 2D axisymmetric, weakly compressible, laminar flow with heat transfer and the coupled hydrodynamic and electromagnetic equations are solved using the SIMPLE algorithm. The variations in the material properties, temperature, and velocity due to the generated arc are studied. A comparison of the results obtained with those from the studies available in the literature validates the computational data. Since each designed plasma arc tunnel is unique in itself and specific in application, this would enable one to alter arc discharge parameters to optimize a specific laser.

  11. Modeling hydrogen isotope behavior in fusion plasma-facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Alice; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we focus on understanding hydrogen isotope retention in plasma-facing materials in fusion devices. Three common simulation methods are usually used to study this problem that includes Monte Carlo, molecular dynamics, and numerical/analytical methods. A system of partial differential equations describing deuterium behavior in tungsten under various conditions is solved numerically to explain recent data compared to other methods. The developed model of hydrogen retention in metals includes classic, intercrystalline and trapped-induced Gorsky effects. The bombardment and depth profile of 200 eV deuterium in single crystal tungsten are simulated and compared with recent work. The total deuterium retention at various temperatures and fluences are also calculated and compared with available data. The results are in reasonable agreement with data and therefore, this model can be used to estimate deuterium inventory and recovery in future fusion devices.

  12. Radiophysical methods of modeling the electromagnetic waves propagation through a flat plasma layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovkin, V. G.; Bityurin, V. A.; Balakirev, B. A.; Bocharov, A. N.; Vedenin, P. V.; Korneev, V. N.; Pashchina, A. S.; Pervov, A. Yu; Petrovskiy, V. P.; Ryazanskiy, N. M.; Shkatov, O. Yu

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the model variants of plasma layer creating by microwave discharges and plasma jet sources. Methods of creation a model quasi-dynamic plasma antenna on the basis of plasma jet and antenna type plasma structures of microwave range are also considered. Pulsed discharge in a capillary with ablative wall can be used as a method of creating plasma antenna. A microwave discharge is another perspective method for plasma antennas creation in centimeter-decimeter wavelengths range that allows us to apply this approach for modeling different types of plasma antennas (dipole, traveling wave antenna, spiral antenna, and others). Numerical modeling was initiated to analyze the interaction of microwave radiation with plasma layer. It is assumed that 2D consideration will allow investigating the influence of various types of regular spatial plasma structures on the characteristics of the transmission and scattering of EM waves beams. The model allows investigating also the development of MW plasma structures (it is virtually impossible to implement in the framework of 3D modeling).

  13. Computer modeling of active experiments in space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollens, Ross John

    1993-01-01

    Our understanding of space plasmas is expanding rapidly. This is, in large part, due to the ambitious efforts of scientists from around the world who are performing large scale active experiments in the space plasma surrounding the earth. One such effort was designated the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE) and consisted of a series of plasma releases that were completed during 1984 and 1985. What makes the AMPTE experiments particularly interesting was the occurrence of a dramatic anomaly that was completely unpredicted. During the AMPTE experiment, three satellites traced the solar wind flow into the earth's magnetosphere. One satellite, built by West Germany, released a series of barium and lithium canisters that were detonated and subsequently photoionized via solar radiation, thereby creating an artificial comet. Another satellite, built by Great Britain and in the vicinity during detonation, carried, as did the first satellite, a comprehensive set of magnetic field, particle, and wave instruments. Upon detonation, what was observed by the satellites, as well as by aircraft and ground-based observers, was quite unexpected. The initial deflection of the ion clouds was not in the ambient solar wind's flow direction (V) but rather in the direction transverse to the solar wind and the background magnetic field (V x B). This result was not predicted by any existing theories or simulation models; it is the main subject discussed in this dissertation. A large three dimensional computer simulation was produced to demonstrate that this transverse motion can be explained in terms of a rocket effect. Due to the extreme computer resources utilized in producing this work, the computer methods used to complete the calculation and the visualization techniques used to view the results are also discussed.

  14. A simulation model of time-dependent plasma-spacecraft interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothwell, P. L.; Rubin, A. G.; Yates, G. K.

    1977-01-01

    A plasma simulation code is presented that models the time-dependent plasma properties in the vicinity of a spherical, charged spacecraft. After showing agreement with analytic, steady-state theories and ATS-6 satellite data, the following three problems are treated: (1) transient pulses from photoemission at various emission temperatures and ambient plasma conditions, (2) spacecharge limited emission, and (3) simulated plasma oscillations in the long wavelength limit.

  15. Finite Volume Time Domain modelling of microwave breakdown and plasma formation in a metallic aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamiaz, Adnane; Klein, Rudy; Ferrieres, Xavier; Pascal, Olivier; Boeuf, Jean-Pierre; Poirier, Jean-Rene

    2012-08-01

    The modelling of plasma formation during microwave breakdown is a difficult task because of the strong non-linear coupling between Maxwell's equations and plasma equations, and of the large plasma density gradients that form during breakdown. An original Finite Volume Time Domain (FVTD) method has been developed to solve Maxwell's equations coupled with a simplified fluid plasma model and is described in this paper. This method is illustrated with the study of the shielding of a metallic aperture by the plasma generated by an incident high power electromagnetic wave. Typical results obtained with the FVTD method for this shielding problem are shown.

  16. Ion boundary conditions in semi-infinite fluid models of electron beam-plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, Dmitry

    2014-10-15

    The modified Bohm criterion is derived for the plasma consisting of the monoenergetic electron beam and thermal electrons. This criterion allows us to define the accurate ion boundary conditions for semi-infinite collisionless fluid models of electron beam–plasma interaction. In the absence of electron beam, these boundary conditions give the classical sheath parameters. When the monoenergetic electron beam propagates through the plasma, the fluid model with proposed boundary conditions gives the results, which are in qualitative agreement with the results obtained earlier in M. Sharifian and B. Shokri, Phys. Plasmas 14, 093503 (2007). However, dynamics and parameters of the plasma sheath are different.

  17. Low-pressure hydrogen plasmas explored using a global model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuell, Cameron M.; Corr, Cormac S.

    2016-02-01

    Low-pressure hydrogen plasmas have found applications in a variety of technology areas including fusion, neutral beam injection and material processing applications. To better understand these discharges, a global model is developed to predict the behaviour of electrons, ground-state atomic and molecular hydrogen, three positive ion species (H+, \\text{H}2+ , and \\text{H}3+ ), a single negative ion species (H-), and fourteen vibrationally excited states of molecular hydrogen ({{\\text{H}}2}≤ft(\\upsilon =1\\right. -14)). The model is validated by comparison with experimental results from a planar inductively coupled GEC reference cell and subsequently applied to the MAGPIE linear helicon reactor. The MAGPIE reactor is investigated for a range of pressures from 1 to 100 mTorr and powers up to 5 kW. With increasing power between 50 W and 5 kW at 10 mTorr the density of all charged species increases as well as the dissociative fraction while the electron temperature remains almost constant at around 3 eV. For gas pressures from 1-100 mTorr at an input power of 1 kW, the electron density remains almost constant, the electron temperature and dissociative fraction decreases, while \\text{H}3+ density increases in density and also dominates amongst ion species. Across these power and pressure scans, electronegativity remains approximately constant at around 2.5%. The power and pressure determines the dominant ion species in the plasma with \\text{H}3+ observed to dominate at high pressures and low powers whereas H+ tends to be dominant at low pressures and high powers. A sensitivity analysis is used to demonstrate how experimental parameters (power, pressure, reactor wall material, geometry etc) influence individual species’ density as well as the electron temperature. Physical reactor changes including the length, radius and wall recombination coefficient are found to have the largest influence on outputs obtained from the model.

  18. Modeling chemical reactions in laser-induced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabanov, S. V.; Gornushkin, I. B.

    2015-11-01

    Under the assumption of local thermal equilibrium, a numerical algorithm is proposed to find the equation of state for laser-induced plasmas (LIPs) in which chemical reactions are permitted in addition to ionization processes. The Coulomb interaction in plasma is accounted for by the Debye-Hückel method. The algorithm is used to calculate the equation of state for LIPs containing carbon, silicon, nitrogen, and argon. The equilibrium reaction constants are calculated using the latest experimental and ab initio data of spectroscopic constants for the molecules {N}_2, {C}_2, {Si}_2, {CN}, {SiN}, {SiC} and their ions. The algorithm is incorporated into a fluid dynamic numerical model based on the Navier-Stokes equations describing an expansion of LIP plumes into an ambient gas. The dynamics of LIP plumes obtained by the ablation of SiC, solid silicon, or solid carbon in an ambient gas containing {N}_2 and Ar is simulated to study formation of molecules and molecular ions.

  19. 2D modeling of electromagnetic waves in cold plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Crombé, K.; Van Eester, D.; Koch, R.; Kyrytsya, V.

    2014-02-12

    The consequences of sheath (rectified) electric fields, resulting from the different mobility of electrons and ions as a response to radio frequency (RF) fields, are a concern for RF antenna design as it can cause damage to antenna parts, limiters and other in-vessel components. As a first step to a more complete description, the usual cold plasma dielectric description has been adopted, and the density profile was assumed to be known as input. Ultimately, the relevant equations describing the wave-particle interaction both on the fast and slow timescale will need to be tackled but prior to doing so was felt as a necessity to get a feeling of the wave dynamics involved. Maxwell's equations are solved for a cold plasma in a 2D antenna box with strongly varying density profiles crossing also lower hybrid and ion-ion hybrid resonance layers. Numerical modelling quickly becomes demanding on computer power, since a fine grid spacing is required to capture the small wavelengths effects of strongly evanescent modes.

  20. Modeling the chemistry of plasma polymerization using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ihrig, D F; Stockhaus, J; Scheide, F; Winkelhake, Oliver; Streuber, Oliver

    2003-04-01

    The goal of the project is a solvent free painting shop. The environmental technologies laboratory is developing processes of plasma etching and polymerization. Polymerized thin films are first-order corrosion protection and primer for painting. Using pure acetylene we get very nice thin films which were not bonded very well. By using air as bulk gas it is possible to polymerize, in an acetylene plasma, well bonded thin films which are stable first-order corrosion protections and good primers. UV/Vis spectroscopy shows nitrogen oxide radicals in the emission spectra of pure nitrogen and air. But nitrogen oxide is fully suppressed in the presence of acetylene. IR spectroscopy shows only C=O, CH(2) and CH(3) groups but no nitrogen species. With the aid of UV/Vis spectra and the chemistry of ozone formation it is possible to define reactive traps and steps, molecule depletion and processes of proton scavenging and proton loss. Using a numerical model it is possible to evaluate these processes and to calculate theoretical mass spectra. Adjustment of theoretical mass spectra to real measurements leads to specific channels of polymerization which are driven by radicals especially the acetyl radical. The estimated theoretical mass spectra show the specific channels of these chemical processes. It is possible to quantify these channels. This quantification represents the mass flow through this chemical system. With respect to these chemical processes it is possible to have an idea of pollutant production processes. PMID:12707764

  1. Modeling parametric scattering instabilities in large-scale expanding plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Hüller, S.; Pesme, D.; Casanova, M.; Loiseau, P.; Labaune, Ch.

    2006-06-01

    We present results from two-dimensional simulations of long scale-length laser-plasma interaction experiments performed at LULI. With the goal of predictive modeling of such experiments with our code Harmony2D, we take into account realistic plasma density and velocity profiles, the propagation of the laser light beam and the scattered light, as well as the coupling with the ion acoustic waves in order to describe Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS). Laser pulse shaping is taken into account to follow the evolution ofthe SBS reflectivity as close as possible to the experiment. The light reflectivity is analyzed by distinguishing the backscattered light confined in the solid angle defined by the aperture of the incident light beam and the scattered light outside this cone. As in the experiment, it is observed that the aperture of the scattered light tends to increase with the mean intensity of the RPP-smoothed laser beam. A further common feature between simulations and experiments is the observed localization of the SBS-driven ion acoustic waves (IAW) in the front part of the target (with respect to the incoming laser beam).

  2. Modeling and Data Needs of Atmospheric Pressure Gas Plasma and Biomaterial Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sakiyama, Yukinori; Graves, David B.

    2009-05-02

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas have received considerable attention recently. One promising application of non-thermal plasma devices appears to be biomaterial and biomedical treatment. Various biological and medical effects of non-thermal plasmas have been observed by a variety of investigators, including bacteria sterilization, cell apoptosis, and blood coagulation, among others. The mechanisms of the plasma-biomaterial interaction are however only poorly understood. A central scientific challenge is therefore how to answer the question: 'What plasma-generated agents are responsible for the observed biological effects?' Our modeling efforts are motivated by this question. In this paper, we review our modeling results of the plasma needle discharge. Then, we address data needs for further modeling and understanding of plasma-biomaterial interaction.

  3. A General Nonlinear Fluid Model for Reacting Plasma-Neutral Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, E T; Shumlak, U

    2012-04-06

    A generalized, computationally tractable fluid model for capturing the effects of neutral particles in plasmas is derived. The model derivation begins with Boltzmann equations for singly charged ions, electrons, and a single neutral species. Electron-impact ionization, radiative recombination, and resonant charge exchange reactions are included. Moments of the reaction collision terms are detailed. Moments of the Boltzmann equations for electron, ion, and neutral species are combined to yield a two-component plasma-neutral fluid model. Separate density, momentum, and energy equations, each including reaction transfer terms, are produced for the plasma and neutral equations. The required closures for the plasma-neutral model are discussed.

  4. Hybrid modeling of plasmas and applications to fusion and space physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazeminejad, Farzad

    Since the early days of controlled fusion research, plasma physicists have encountered great challenges in obtaining solutions to the highly nonlinear equations which govern the behavior of fusion plasmas; with the growth of other applications of plasma physics these problems have grown in importance. Obtaining reasonable solutions to the nonlinear equations is crucial to understanding the behavior of plasmas. With the advent of high speed computers, computer modeling of plasmas has moved into the front row of the tools used in research of their nonlinear plasma dynamics. There are roughly speaking two types of plasma models, particle models and fluid models. Particle models in general require larger memory for the computer due to the massive amounts of data associated with the particles' kinematical variables. Fluid models are better fit to handle large scales and long times. The drawback of fluid models however, is that they miss the physical phenomena taking place at the microscale and these phenomena can influence the properties of the fluids. Another approach is to start with fluid models and incorporate more physics. Such models are referred to as hybrid models: two such models are discussed. They are then applied to two problems; the first is a simulation of the artificial comet generated by the AMPTE experiment; the second is the production of enhanced noise in fusion plasmas by injected energetic ions or by fusion reaction products. In both cases, the models demonstrate qualitative agreement with the experimental observations.

  5. Plasma Simulation Using Gyrokinetic-Gyrofluid Hybrid Models

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Parker

    2009-04-09

    We are developing kinetic ion models for the simulation of extended MHD phenomena. The model they have developed uses full Lorentz force ions, and either drift-kinetic or gyro-kinetic electrons. Quasi-neutrality is assumed and the displacement current is neglected. They are also studying alpha particle driven Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE) in the GEM gyrokinetic code [Chen 07]. The basic kinetic ion MHD model was recently reported in an invited talk given by Dan Barnes at the 2007 American Physical Society - Division of Plasma Physics (APS-DPP) and it has been published [Jones 04, Barnes 08]. The model uses an Ohm's law that includes the Hall term, pressure term and the electron inertia [Jones 04]. These results focused on the ion physics and assumed an isothermal electron closure. It is found in conventional gyrokinetic turbulence simulations that the timestep cannot be made much greater than the ion cyclotron period. However, the kinetic ion MHD model has the compressional mode, which further limits the timestep. They have developed an implicit scheme to avoid this timestep constraint. They have also added drift kinetic electrons. This model has been benchmarked linearly. Waves investigated where shear and compressional Alfven, whisterl, ion acoustic, and drift waves, including the kinetic damping rates. This work is ongoing and was first reported at the 2008 Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference [Chen 08] and they are working on a publication. They have also formulated an integrated gyrokinetic electron model, which is of interest for studying electron gradient instabilities and weak guide-field magnetic reconnection.

  6. Continuum kinetic modeling of the tokamak plasma edge

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dorf, M. A.; Dorr, M.; Rognlien, T.; Hittinger, J.; Cohen, R.

    2016-03-10

    In this study, the first 4D (axisymmetric) high-order continuum gyrokinetic transport simulations that span the magnetic separatrix of a tokamak are presented. The modeling is performed with the COGENT code, which is distinguished by fourth-order finite-volume discretization combined with mapped multiblock grid technology to handle the strong anisotropy of plasmatransport and the complex X-point divertor geometry with high accuracy. The calculations take into account the effects of fully nonlinear Fokker-Plank collisions, electrostatic potential variations, and anomalous radial transport. Topics discussed include: (a) ion orbit loss and the associated toroidal rotation and (b) edge plasma relaxation in the presence of anomalousmore » radial transport.« less

  7. Preliminary empirical model of inner boundary of ion plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, J. B.; Zhang, D.; Reme, H.; Dandouras, I.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Fu, H. S.; Wei, X. H.

    2015-09-01

    The penetration of the plasma sheet into the inner magnetosphere is important to both ring current formation and spacecraft charging at geosynchronous orbit. This paper, using hot ion data recorded by HIA of TC-1/DSP, establishes an empirical model of the inner boundary of ion plasma sheet (IBIPS) on the near equatorial plane. All IBIPS are located inside geocentric radial distance of 9 RE. We divided local times (LT) into eight local time bins and found that during quiet times (Kp ⩽ 2-), the IBIPS is closest to the Earth on the pre-midnight side (LT = 1930-2130) and farthest on the dawn side (LT = 0430-0730), which differs from previous spiral models. The geocentric radius of IBIPS in each local time bin can be described by a linear fitting function: Rps = A + Bkp · Kp. The changing rate Bkp of the radius of IBIPS relative to Kp index on the midnight side (LT = 2230-0130) and post-night side (LT = 0130-0430) are the two largest (0.66 and 0.67), indicating that the IBIPS on the night side (LT = 2230-0430) moves fastest when Kp changes. Since the IBIPSs in different local times bins have different changing rates, both the size and shape of IBIPS change when Kp varies. The correlation coefficients between the radius of IBIPS and the instantaneous Kp increase with the increase of ΔT (the time difference between IBIPS crossing time and preceding Kp interval), which suggests that with the increase of ΔT, the radius of IBIPS is more and more controlled by instantaneous Kp, and the influence of preceding Kp becomes weaker. The response time of IBIPS to Kp is between 80 and 95 min. When ΔT > 95 min, the correlation coefficient basically keeps unchanged and only has a weak increase, suggesting that the IBIPS is mainly determined by the convection electric field represented by instantaneous Kp.

  8. Lung Cancer Signatures in Plasma Based on Proteome Profiling of Mouse Tumor Models

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Ayumu; Politi, Katerina; Pitteri, Sharon J.; Lockwood, William W.; Faça, Vitor M.; Kelly-Spratt, Karen; Wong, Chee-Hong; Zhang, Qing; Chin, Alice; Park, Kwon-Sik; Goodman, Gary; Gazdar, Adi F.; Sage, Julien; Dinulescu, Daniela M.; Kucherlapati, Raju; DePinho, Ronald A.; Kemp, Christopher J.; Varmus, Harold E.; Hanash, Samir M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY We investigated the potential of in-depth quantitative proteomics to reveal plasma protein signatures that reflect lung tumor biology. We compared plasma protein profiles of four mouse models of lung cancer with profiles of models of pancreatic, ovarian, colon, prostate, and breast cancer and two models of inflammation. A protein signature for Titf1/Nkx2-1, a known lineage-survival oncogene in lung cancer, was found in plasmas of mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma. An EGFR signature was found in plasma of an EGFR mutant model, and a distinct plasma signature related to neuroendocrine development was uncovered in the small-cell lung cancer model. We demonstrate relevance to human lung cancer of the protein signatures identified on the basis of mouse models. PMID:21907921

  9. Lung cancer signatures in plasma based on proteome profiling of mouse tumor models.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Ayumu; Politi, Katerina; Pitteri, Sharon J; Lockwood, William W; Faça, Vitor M; Kelly-Spratt, Karen; Wong, Chee-Hong; Zhang, Qing; Chin, Alice; Park, Kwon-Sik; Goodman, Gary; Gazdar, Adi F; Sage, Julien; Dinulescu, Daniela M; Kucherlapati, Raju; Depinho, Ronald A; Kemp, Christopher J; Varmus, Harold E; Hanash, Samir M

    2011-09-13

    We investigated the potential of in-depth quantitative proteomics to reveal plasma protein signatures that reflect lung tumor biology. We compared plasma protein profiles of four mouse models of lung cancer with profiles of models of pancreatic, ovarian, colon, prostate, and breast cancer and two models of inflammation. A protein signature for Titf1/Nkx2-1, a known lineage-survival oncogene in lung cancer, was found in plasmas of mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma. An EGFR signature was found in plasma of an EGFR mutant model, and a distinct plasma signature related to neuroendocrine development was uncovered in the small-cell lung cancer model. We demonstrate relevance to human lung cancer of the protein signatures identified on the basis of mouse models. PMID:21907921

  10. Time-dependent recycling modeling with edge plasma transport codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigarov, A.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Rognlien, T.; Taverniers, S.; Hollmann, E.

    2013-10-01

    First,we discuss extensions to Macroblob approach which allow to simulate more accurately dynamics of ELMs, pedestal and edge transport with UEDGE code. Second,we present UEDGE modeling results for H mode discharge with infrequent ELMs and large pedestal losses on DIII-D. In modeled sequence of ELMs this discharge attains a dynamic equilibrium. Temporal evolution of pedestal plasma profiles, spectral line emission, and surface temperature matching experimental data over ELM cycle is discussed. Analysis of dynamic gas balance highlights important role of material surfaces. We quantified the wall outgassing between ELMs as 3X the NBI fueling and the recycling coefficient as 0.8 for wall pumping via macroblob-wall interactions. Third,we also present results from multiphysics version of UEDGE with built-in, reduced, 1-D wall models and analyze the role of various PMI processes. Progress in framework-coupled UEDGE/WALLPSI code is discussed. Finally, implicit coupling schemes are important feature of multiphysics codes and we report on the results of parametric analysis of convergence and performance for Picard and Newton iterations in a system of coupled deterministic-stochastic ODE and proposed modifications enhancing convergence.