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Sample records for models zebrafish medaka

  1. Zebrafish and medaka: model organisms for a comparative developmental approach of brain asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Signore, Iskra A.; Guerrero, Néstor; Loosli, Felix; Colombo, Alicia; Villalón, Aldo; Wittbrodt, Joachim; Concha, Miguel L.

    2008-01-01

    Comparison between related species is a successful approach to uncover conserved and divergent principles of development. Here, we studied the pattern of epithalamic asymmetry in zebrafish (Danio rerio) and medaka (Oryzias latipes), two related teleost species with 115–200 Myr of independent evolution. We found that these species share a strikingly conserved overall pattern of asymmetry in the parapineal–habenular–interpeduncular system. Nodal signalling exhibits comparable spatial and temporal asymmetric expressions in the presumptive epithalamus preceding the development of morphological asymmetries. Neuroanatomical asymmetries consist of left-sided asymmetric positioning and connectivity of the parapineal organ, enlargement of neuropil in the left habenula compared with the right habenula and segregation of left–right habenular efferents along the dorsoventral axis of the interpeduncular nucleus. Despite the overall conservation of asymmetry, we observed heterotopic changes in the topology of parapineal efferent connectivity, heterochronic shifts in the timing of developmental events underlying the establishment of asymmetry and divergent degrees of canalization of embryo laterality. We offer new tools for developmental time comparison among species and propose, for each of these transformations, novel hypotheses of ontogenic mechanisms that explain interspecies variations that can be tested experimentally. Together, these findings highlight the usefulness of zebrafish and medaka as comparative models to study the developmental mechanisms of epithalamic asymmetry in vertebrates. PMID:19064351

  2. Current Status of Sperm Cryopreservation in Biomedical Research Fish Models: Zebrafish, Medaka, and Xiphophorus*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huiping; Tiersch, Terrence R.

    2009-01-01

    Aquarium fishes are becoming increasingly important because of their value in biomedical research and the ornamental fish trade, and because many have become threatened or endangered in the wild. This review summarizes the current status of sperm cryopreservation in three fishes widely used in biomedical research: zebrafish, medaka, and live-bearing fishes of the genus Xiphophorus, and will focus on the needs and opportunities for future research and application of cryopreservation in aquarium fish. First, we summarize the basic biological characteristics regarding natural habitat, testis structure, spermatogenesis, sperm morphology, and sperm physiology. Second, we compare protocol development of sperm cryopreservation. Third, we emphasize the importance of artificial fertilization in sperm cryopreservation to evaluate the viability of thawed sperm. We conclude with a look to future research directions for sperm cryopreservation and the application of this technique in aquarium species. PMID:18691673

  3. A Comparative Analysis of Glomerulus Development in the Pronephros of Medaka and Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ichimura, Koichiro; Bubenshchikova, Ekaterina; Powell, Rebecca; Fukuyo, Yayoi; Nakamura, Tomomi; Tran, Uyen; Oda, Shoji; Tanaka, Minoru; Wessely, Oliver; Kurihara, Hidetake; Sakai, Tatsuo; Obara, Tomoko

    2012-01-01

    The glomerulus of the vertebrate kidney links the vasculature to the excretory system and produces the primary urine. It is a component of every single nephron in the complex mammalian metanephros and also in the primitive pronephros of fish and amphibian larvae. This systematic work highlights the benefits of using teleost models to understand the pronephric glomerulus development. The morphological processes forming the pronephric glomerulus are astoundingly different between medaka and zebrafish. (1) The glomerular primordium of medaka - unlike the one of zebrafish - exhibits a C-shaped epithelial layer. (2) The C-shaped primordium contains a characteristic balloon-like capillary, which is subsequently divided into several smaller capillaries. (3) In zebrafish, the bilateral pair of pronephric glomeruli is fused at the midline to form a glomerulus, while in medaka the two parts remain unmerged due to the interposition of the interglomerular mesangium. (4) Throughout pronephric development the interglomerular mesangial cells exhibit numerous cytoplasmic granules, which are reminiscent of renin-producing (juxtaglomerular) cells in the mammalian afferent arterioles. Our systematic analysis of medaka and zebrafish demonstrates that in fish, the morphogenesis of the pronephric glomerulus is not stereotypical. These differences need be taken into account in future analyses of medaka mutants with glomerulus defects. PMID:23028906

  4. Essential techniques for introducing medaka to a zebrafish laboratory--towards the combined use of medaka and zebrafish for further genetic dissection of the function of the vertebrate genome.

    PubMed

    Porazinski, Sean R; Wang, Huijia; Furutani-Seiki, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    The medaka, Oryzias latipes, a small egg-laying freshwater fish, is one of the three vertebrate model organisms in which genome-wide phenotype-driven mutant screens have been carried out. Despite a number of large-scale screens in zebrafish, a substantial number of mutants with new distinct phenotypes were identified in similar large-scale screens in the medaka. This observed difference in phenotype is due to the two species having a unique combination of genetic, biological and evolutional properties. The two genetic models share a whole-genome duplication event over that of tetrapods; however, each has independently specialized or lost the function of one of the two paralogues. The two fish species complement each other as genetic systems as straightforward comparison of phenotypes, ease of side-by-side analysis using the same techniques and simple and inexpensive husbandry of mutants make these small teleosts quite powerful in combination. Furthermore, both have draft genome sequences and bioinformatic tools available that facilitate further genetic dissection including whole-genome approaches. Together with the gene-driven approach to generate gene knockout mutants of the fish models, the two fish models complement the mouse in genetically dissecting vertebrate genome functions. The external embryogenesis and transparent embryos of the fish allow systematic isolation of embryonic lethal mutations, the most difficult targets in mammalian mutant screens. This chapter will describe how to work with both medaka and zebrafish almost as one species in a lab, focusing on medaka and highlighting the differences between the medaka and zebrafish systems. PMID:21805266

  5. Development of a transient expression assay for detecting environmental oestrogens in zebrafish and medaka embryos

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    our construct works in medaka, another model fish test species, suggesting the transient assay is applicable for testing oestrogenic chemicals in fish generally. Conclusion Our results indicate that the transient expression assay system can be used as a rapid integrated testing system for environmental oestrogens and to detect the oestrogenic target sites in developing fish embryos. PMID:22726887

  6. Conservation of Skeletal Regulators in the Fish Model Medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, T.; Renn, J.; Koester, R.; Goerlich, R.; Schartl, M.; Winkler, C.

    Small aquarium fish species, like the well known zebrafish (Danio rerio) and the related Medaka (Oryzias latipes) represent vertebrate models that offer many advantages to study biomineralization in vivo. These fish produce large numbers of completely transparent embryos, thus allowing real-time analysis of skeletal development in living specimens. Using the calcium-binding fluorochrome Calcein and confocal laser scanning microscopy in Medaka, we followed the formation of calcified bone from day 6 of embryonic development until day 20 post hatching. To establish fish as models for human bone disease, we furthermore isolated 11 genes in medaka, the orthologs of which are known to be important regulators of osteoblast, osteoclast and chondrocyte formation in human. We show that these genes are highly conserved between fish and mammals in both sequence and expression pattern. This includes osteonectin, the major non-collagenous component of the mammalian bone matrix. Medaka osteonectin is expressed in osteoblasts and chondrocytes, e.g. in the developing vertebrae. For functional characterization of all these skeletal factors, they are ectopically expressed after gene transfer into fish embryos and their effect on bone formation is analyzed by Calcein staining in developing fish in vivo. Alternatively, the activity of these factors can be blocked by antisense oligonucleotide mediated gene knock-down. In addition, the Medaka offers the unique opportunity to study biomineralization processes in fish in vitro by using embryonic stem (ES) cells. In an approach to study calcification events at the cellular level, candidate genes will be ectopically expressed in these ES cells, thereby driving differentiation of stem cells into the osteoblast lineage. Acknowledgement: This work is supported by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) (50 WB 0152) and the European Space Agency (AO-LS-99-MAP-LSS-003).

  7. A new model for fish ion regulation: identification of ionocytes in freshwater- and seawater-acclimated medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hao-Hsuan; Lin, Li-Yih; Tseng, Yung-Che; Horng, Jiun-Lin; Hwang, Pung-Pung

    2014-07-01

    The ion regulation mechanisms of fishes have been recently studied in zebrafish (Danio rerio), a stenohaline species. However, recent advances using this organism are not necessarily applicable to euryhaline fishes. The euryhaline species medaka (Oryzias latipes), which, like zebrafish, is genetically well categorized and amenable to molecular manipulation, was proposed as an alternative model for studying osmoregulation during acclimation to different salinities. To establish its suitability as an alternative, the present study was conducted to (1) identify different types of ionocytes in the embryonic skin and (2) analyze gene expressions of the transporters during seawater acclimation. Double/triple in situ hybridization and/or immunocytochemistry revealed that freshwater (FW) medaka contain three types of ionocyte: (1) Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3 (NHE3) cells with apical NHE3 and basolateral Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC), Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase (NKA) and anion exchanger (AE); (2) Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC) cells with apical NCC and basolateral H(+)-ATPase; and (3) epithelial Ca(2+) channel (ECaC) cells [presumed accessory (AC) cells] with apical ECaC. On the other hand, seawater (SW) medaka has a single predominant ionocyte type, which possesses apical cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and NHE3 and basolateral NKCC and NKA and is accompanied by smaller AC cells that express lower levels of basolateral NKA. Reciprocal gene expressions of decreased NHE3, AE, NCC and ECaC and increased CFTR and NKCC in medaka gills during SW were revealed by quantative PCR analysis. PMID:24842048

  8. Zebrafish models of Tauopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Qing; Burton, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    Tauopathies are a group of incurable neurodegenerative diseases, in which loss of neurons is accompanied by intracellular deposition of fibrillar material composed of hyper phosphorylated forms of the microtubule associated protein Tau. A zebrafish model of Tauopathy could complement existing murine models by providing a platform for genetic and chemical screens, in order to identify novel therapeutic targets and compounds with disease-modifying potential. In addition, Tauopathy zebrafish would be useful for hypothesis-driven experiments, especially those exploiting the potential to deploy in vivo imaging modalities. Several considerations, including conservation of specialized neuronal and other cellular populations, and biochemical pathways implicated in disease pathogenesis, suggest that the zebrafish brain is an appropriate setting in which to model these complex disorders. Novel transgenic zebrafish lines expressing wild-type and mutant forms of human Tau inCNS neurons have recently been reported. These studies show evidence that human Tau undergoes disease-relevant changes in zebrafish neurons, including somato-dendritic relocalization, hyper phosphorylation and aggregation. In addition, preliminary evidence suggests that Tau transgene expression can precipitate neuronal dysfunction and death. These initial studies are encouraging that the zebrafish holds considerable promise as a model in which to study Tauopathies. Further studies are necessary to clarify the phenotypes of transgenic lines and to develop assays and models suitable for unbiased high-throughput screening approaches. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Zebrafish Models of Neurological Diseases. PMID:20849952

  9. Zebrafish for modeling skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Cline, Abigail; Feldman, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    The experimental advantages of zebrafish make this model system highly amenable to the field of dermatology. Zebrafish skin development is similar to humans and its genome is ~70% orthologous to the human genome. Its external developmental process allows for genetic manipulation and analysis of embryogenesis within a short time frame with all important internal organs and skin compartments formed within 6 days. Zebrafish models of cutaneous human diseases offer insight into pathogenesis and a unique platform for testing of potential therapies. This review details the specific advantages of zebrafish and highlights its use in dermatological research. PMID:27617951

  10. Beyond the zebrafish: diverse fish species for modeling human disease

    PubMed Central

    Schartl, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In recent years, zebrafish, and to a lesser extent medaka, have become widely used small animal models for human diseases. These organisms have convincingly demonstrated the usefulness of fish for improving our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to pathological conditions, and for the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic tools. Despite the usefulness of zebrafish and medaka in the investigation of a wide spectrum of traits, there is evidence to suggest that other fish species could be better suited for more targeted questions. With the emergence of new, improved sequencing technologies that enable genomic resources to be generated with increasing efficiency and speed, the potential of non-mainstream fish species as disease models can now be explored. A key feature of these fish species is that the pathological condition that they model is often related to specific evolutionary adaptations. By exploring these adaptations, new disease-causing and disease-modifier genes might be identified; thus, diverse fish species could be exploited to better understand the complexity of disease processes. In addition, non-mainstream fish models could allow us to study the impact of environmental factors, as well as genetic variation, on complex disease phenotypes. This Review will discuss the opportunities that such fish models offer for current and future biomedical research. PMID:24271780

  11. Zebrafish as a cancer model.

    PubMed

    Feitsma, Harma; Cuppen, Edwin

    2008-05-01

    The zebrafish has developed into an important model organism for biomedical research over the last decades. Although the main focus of zebrafish research has traditionally been on developmental biology, keeping and observing zebrafish in the lab led to the identification of diseases similar to humans, such as cancer, which subsequently became a subject for study. As a result, about 50 articles have been published since 2000 in which zebrafish were used as a cancer model. Strategies used include carcinogenic treatments, transplantation of mammalian cancer cells, forward genetic screens for proliferation or genomic instability, reverse genetic target-selected mutagenesis to inactivate known tumor suppressor genes, and the generation of transgenics to express human oncogenes. Zebrafish have been found to develop almost any tumor type known from human, with similar morphology and, according to gene expression array studies, comparable signaling pathways. However, tumor incidences are relatively low, albeit highly comparable between different mutants, and tumors develop late in life. In addition, tumor spectra are sometimes different when compared with mice and humans. Nevertheless, the zebrafish model has created its own niche in cancer research, complementing existing models with its specific experimental advantages and characteristics. Examples of these are imaging of tumor progression in living fish by fluorescence, treatment with chemical compounds, and screening possibilities not only for chemical modifiers but also for genetic enhancers and suppressors. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the state of the art of zebrafish as a model in cancer research. (Mol Cancer Res 2008;6(5):685-94). PMID:18505914

  12. New zebrafish models of neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Martín-Jiménez, Rebeca; Campanella, Michelangelo; Russell, Claire

    2015-06-01

    In modern biomedicine, the increasing need to develop experimental models to further our understanding of disease conditions and delineate innovative treatments has found in the zebrafish (Danio rerio) an experimental model, and indeed a valuable asset, to close the gap between in vitro and in vivo assays. Translation of ideas at a faster pace is vital in the field of neurodegeneration, with the attempt to slow or prevent the dramatic impact on the society's welfare being an essential priority. Our research group has pioneered the use of zebrafish to contribute to the quest for faster and improved understanding and treatment of neurodegeneration in concert with, and inspired by, many others who have primed the study of the zebrafish to understand and search for a cure for disorders of the nervous system. Aware of the many advantages this vertebrate model holds, here, we present an update on the recent zebrafish models available to study neurodegeneration with the goal of stimulating further interest and increasing the number of diseases and applications for which they can be exploited. We shall do so by citing and commenting on recent breakthroughs made possible via zebrafish, highlighting their benefits for the testing of therapeutics and dissecting of disease mechanisms. PMID:25903297

  13. Viable Neuronopathic Gaucher Disease Model in Medaka (Oryzias latipes) Displays Axonal Accumulation of Alpha-Synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Uemura, Norihito; Koike, Masato; Ansai, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Masato; Ishikawa-Fujiwara, Tomoko; Matsui, Hideaki; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Sakamoto, Naoaki; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Todo, Takeshi; Takeda, Shunichi; Yamakado, Hodaka; Takahashi, Ryosuke

    2015-01-01

    Homozygous mutations in the glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene result in Gaucher disease (GD), the most common lysosomal storage disease. Recent genetic studies have revealed that GBA mutations confer a strong risk for sporadic Parkinson’s disease (PD). To investigate how GBA mutations cause PD, we generated GBA nonsense mutant (GBA-/-) medaka that are completely deficient in glucocerebrosidase (GCase) activity. In contrast to the perinatal death in humans and mice lacking GCase activity, GBA-/- medaka survived for months, enabling analysis of the pathological progression. GBA-/- medaka displayed the pathological phenotypes resembling human neuronopathic GD including infiltration of Gaucher cell-like cells into the brains, progressive neuronal loss, and microgliosis. Detailed pathological findings represented lysosomal abnormalities in neurons and alpha-synuclein (α-syn) accumulation in axonal swellings containing autophagosomes. Unexpectedly, disruption of α-syn did not improve the life span, formation of axonal swellings, neuronal loss, or neuroinflammation in GBA-/- medaka. Taken together, the present study revealed GBA-/- medaka as a novel neuronopathic GD model, the pahological mechanisms of α-syn accumulation caused by GCase deficiency, and the minimal contribution of α-syn to the pathogenesis of neuronopathic GD. PMID:25835295

  14. In vivo Magnetic Resonance Microscopy and Hypothermic Anaesthesia of a Disease Model in Medaka

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Hirokazu; Hiraishi, Masahiro; Amano, Hideaki; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Sugimoto, Naozo

    2016-01-01

    In medical and pharmacological research, various human disease models in small fish, such as medaka (Oryzias latipes), have been created. To investigate these disease models noninvasively, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is suitable because these small fish are no longer transparent as adults. However, their small body size requires a high spatial resolution, and a water pool should be avoided to maximize the strength of MRI. We developed in vivo magnetic resonance microscopy (MR microscopy) without a water pool by combining hypothermic anaesthesia and a 14.1 T MR microscope. Using in vivo MR microscopy, we noninvasively evaluated the hepatic steatosis level of a non-alcoholic fatty liver disease model in medaka and followed the individual disease progression. The steatosis level was quantified by the MRI-estimated proton density fat-fraction (MRI-PDFF), which estimates the triglyceride fat concentration in liver tissue and is recognized as an imaging biomarker. The MRI-PDFF results agreed with a histological analysis. Moreover, we optimized the hypothermic anaesthesia procedure to obtain a recovery proportion of 1 in the experiment involving MR microscopy. Recovered medaka could not be distinguished from naïve medaka after the experiment. Therefore, the in vivo MR microscopy will expand the possibilities of a human disease model in fish. PMID:27251889

  15. Generation and Characterization of Neurogeninl-GFP Transgenic Medaka for High Throughput Developmental Neurotoxicity Screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fish models such as zebrafish and medaka are increasingly used as alternatives to rodents in developmental and toxicological studies. These developmental and toxicological studies can be facilitated by the use of transgenic reporters that permit the real-time, noninvasive observa...

  16. MEPD: medaka expression pattern database, genes and more

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Barba, Juan I.; Rahman, Raza-Ur; Wittbrodt, Joachim; Mateo, Juan L.

    2016-01-01

    The Medaka Expression Pattern Database (MEPD; http://mepd.cos.uni-heidelberg.de/) is designed as a repository of medaka expression data for the scientific community. In this update we present two main improvements. First, we have changed the previous clone-centric view for in situ data to a gene-centric view. This is possible because now we have linked all the data present in MEPD to the medaka gene annotation in ENSEMBL. In addition, we have also connected the medaka genes in MEPD to their corresponding orthologous gene in zebrafish, again using the ENSEMBL database. Based on this, we provide a link to the Zebrafish Model Organism Database (ZFIN) to allow researches to compare expression data between these two fish model organisms. As a second major improvement, we have modified the design of the database to enable it to host regulatory elements, promoters or enhancers, expression patterns in addition to gene expression. The combination of gene expression, by traditional in situ, and regulatory element expression, typically by fluorescence reporter gene, within the same platform assures consistency in terms of annotation. In our opinion, this will allow researchers to uncover new insights between the expression domain of genes and their regulatory landscape. PMID:26450962

  17. Hooked! Modeling human disease in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Santoriello, Cristina; Zon, Leonard I

    2012-07-01

    Zebrafish have been widely used as a model system for studying developmental processes, but in the last decade, they have also emerged as a valuable system for modeling human disease. The development and function of zebrafish organs are strikingly similar to those of humans, and the ease of creating mutant or transgenic fish has facilitated the generation of disease models. Here, we highlight the use of zebrafish for defining disease pathways and for discovering new therapies. PMID:22751109

  18. Inflammatory diseases modelling in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Morales Fénero, Camila Idelí; Colombo Flores, Alicia Angelina; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2016-02-20

    The ingest of diets with high content of fats and carbohydrates, low or no physical exercise and a stressful routine are part of the everyday lifestyle of most people in the western world. These conditions are triggers for different diseases with complex interactions between the host genetics, the metabolism, the immune system and the microbiota, including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), obesity and diabetes. The incidence of these disorders is growing worldwide; therefore, new strategies for its study are needed. Nowadays, the majority of researches are in use of murine models for understand the genetics, physiopathology and interaction between cells and signaling pathways to find therapeutic solutions to these diseases. The zebrafish, a little tropical water fish, shares 70% of our genes and conserves anatomic and physiological characteristics, as well as metabolical pathways, with mammals, and is rising as a new complementary model for the study of metabolic and inflammatory diseases. Its high fecundity, fast development, transparency, versatility and low cost of maintenance makes the zebrafish an interesting option for new researches. In this review, we offer a discussion of the existing genetic and induced zebrafish models of two important Western diseases that have a strong inflammatory component, the IBD and the obesity. PMID:26929916

  19. Inflammatory diseases modelling in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Morales Fénero, Camila Idelí; Colombo Flores, Alicia Angelina; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2016-01-01

    The ingest of diets with high content of fats and carbohydrates, low or no physical exercise and a stressful routine are part of the everyday lifestyle of most people in the western world. These conditions are triggers for different diseases with complex interactions between the host genetics, the metabolism, the immune system and the microbiota, including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), obesity and diabetes. The incidence of these disorders is growing worldwide; therefore, new strategies for its study are needed. Nowadays, the majority of researches are in use of murine models for understand the genetics, physiopathology and interaction between cells and signaling pathways to find therapeutic solutions to these diseases. The zebrafish, a little tropical water fish, shares 70% of our genes and conserves anatomic and physiological characteristics, as well as metabolical pathways, with mammals, and is rising as a new complementary model for the study of metabolic and inflammatory diseases. Its high fecundity, fast development, transparency, versatility and low cost of maintenance makes the zebrafish an interesting option for new researches. In this review, we offer a discussion of the existing genetic and induced zebrafish models of two important Western diseases that have a strong inflammatory component, the IBD and the obesity. PMID:26929916

  20. A medaka model of cancer allowing direct observation of transplanted tumor cells in vivo at a cellular-level resolution.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Sumitaka; Maruyama, Kouichi; Takenaka, Hikaru; Furukawa, Takako; Saga, Tsuneo

    2009-08-18

    The recent success with small fish as an animal model of cancer with the aid of fluorescence technique has attracted cancer modelers' attention because it would be possible to directly visualize tumor cells in vivo in real time. Here, we report a medaka model capable of allowing the observation of various cell behaviors of transplanted tumor cells, such as cell proliferation and metastasis, which were visualized easily in vivo. We established medaka melanoma (MM) cells stably expressing GFP and transplanted them into nonirradiated and irradiated medaka. The tumor cells were grown at the injection sites in medaka, and the spatiotemporal changes were visualized under a fluorescence stereoscopic microscope at a cellular-level resolution, and even at a single-cell level. Tumor dormancy and metastasis were also observed. Interestingly, in irradiated medaka, accelerated tumor growth and metastasis of the transplanted tumor cells were directly visualized. Our medaka model provides an opportunity to visualize in vivo tumor cells "as seen in a culture dish" and would be useful for in vivo tumor cell biology. PMID:19666513

  1. A medaka model of cancer allowing direct observation of transplanted tumor cells in vivo at a cellular-level resolution

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Sumitaka; Maruyama, Kouichi; Takenaka, Hikaru; Furukawa, Takako; Saga, Tsuneo

    2009-01-01

    The recent success with small fish as an animal model of cancer with the aid of fluorescence technique has attracted cancer modelers' attention because it would be possible to directly visualize tumor cells in vivo in real time. Here, we report a medaka model capable of allowing the observation of various cell behaviors of transplanted tumor cells, such as cell proliferation and metastasis, which were visualized easily in vivo. We established medaka melanoma (MM) cells stably expressing GFP and transplanted them into nonirradiated and irradiated medaka. The tumor cells were grown at the injection sites in medaka, and the spatiotemporal changes were visualized under a fluorescence stereoscopic microscope at a cellular-level resolution, and even at a single-cell level. Tumor dormancy and metastasis were also observed. Interestingly, in irradiated medaka, accelerated tumor growth and metastasis of the transplanted tumor cells were directly visualized. Our medaka model provides an opportunity to visualize in vivo tumor cells “as seen in a culture dish” and would be useful for in vivo tumor cell biology. PMID:19666513

  2. A new in vitro ovulation model for medaka based on whole ovary culture.

    PubMed

    Ogiwara, Katsueki; Ikeda, Takashi; Takahashi, Takayuki

    2010-09-01

    We sought to establish a new in vitro ovulation model using the whole ovaries of the medaka. Ovaries of the fish, which had been acclimated to the usual reproductive conditions (26 degrees C, 14 h light/10 h dark) and which had then been kept at least one day at 30 degrees C, were isolated 2 h before the expected in vivo ovulation time. When the ovaries were cultured in 90% medium 199 solution at 30 degrees C or 36 degrees C, oocytes were liberated with a gradual increase in the ovulation rate at 2 to 5 h of ovulation time. The maximum ovulation rate was approximately 45%. Ovulated oocytes were fertilized and subsequently developed into adults. In vitro ovulation of medaka ovaries was inhibited by the addition of metalloproteinase inhibitors to the culture. In this in vitro ovulation model, the holes formed on the follicle layer upon follicle rupture at ovulation were sealed, strongly suggesting the importance of the germinal epithelium in the process. The present study indicates that our new in vitro ovulation model is useful for investigating the role of germinal epithelial cells in the ovulate process of the medaka fish. PMID:20822405

  3. Zebrafish as a model for human osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Mohseny, A B; Hogendoorn, P C W

    2014-01-01

    For various reasons involving biological comparativeness, expansive technological possibilities, accelerated experimental speed, and competitive costs, zebrafish has become a comprehensive model for cancer research. Hence, zebrafish embryos and full-grown fish have been instrumental for studies of leukemia, melanoma, pancreatic cancer, bone tumors, and other malignancies. Although because of its similarities to human osteogenesis zebrafish appears to be an appealing model to investigate osteosarcoma, only a few osteosarcoma specific studies have been accomplished yet. Here, we review interesting related and unrelated reports of which the findings might be extrapolated to osteosarcoma. More importantly, rational but yet unexplored applications of zebrafish are debated to expand the window of opportunities for future establishment of osteosarcoma models. Accordingly technological advances of zebrafish based cancer research, such as robotic high-throughput multicolor injection systems and advanced imaging methods are discussed. Furthermore, various use of zebrafish embryos for screening drug regimens by combinations of chemotherapy, novel drug deliverers, and immune system modulators are suggested. Concerning the etiology, the high degree of genetic similarity between zebrafish and human cancers indicates that affected regions are evolutionarily conserved. Therefore, zebrafish as a swift model system that allows for the investigation of multiple candidate gene-defects is presented. PMID:24924177

  4. A zebrafish model of hyperammonemia.

    PubMed

    Feldman, B; Tuchman, M; Caldovic, L

    2014-01-01

    Hyperammonemia is the principal consequence of urea cycle defects and liver failure, and the exposure of the brain to elevated ammonia concentrations leads to a wide range of neuro-cognitive deficits, intellectual disabilities, coma and death. Current treatments focus almost exclusively on either reducing ammonia levels through the activation of alternative pathways for ammonia disposal or on liver transplantation. Ammonia is toxic to most fish and its pathophysiology appears to be similar to that in mammals. Since hyperammonemia can be induced in fish simply by immersing them in water with elevated concentration of ammonia, we sought to develop a zebrafish (Danio rerio) model of hyperammonemia. When exposed to 3mM ammonium acetate (NH4Ac), 50% of 4-day old (dpf) fish died within 3hours and 4mM NH4Ac was 100% lethal. We used 4dpf zebrafish exposed to 4mM NH4Ac to test whether the glutamine synthetase inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (MSO) and/or NMDA receptor antagonists MK-801, memantine and ketamine, which are known to protect the mammalian brain from hyperammonemia, prolong survival of hyperammonemic fish. MSO, MK-801, memantine and ketamine all prolonged the lives of the ammonia-treated fish. Treatment with the combination of MSO and an NMDA receptor antagonist was more effective than either drug alone. These results suggest that zebrafish can be used to screen for ammonia-neuroprotective agents. If successful, drugs that are discovered in this screen could complement current treatment approaches to improve the outcome of patients with hyperammonemia. PMID:25069822

  5. Neuroblastoma and Its Zebrafish Model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shizhen; Thomas Look, A

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, an important developmental tumor arising in the peripheral sympathetic nervous system (PSNS), accounts for approximately 10 % of all cancer-related deaths in children. Recent genomic analyses have identified a spectrum of genetic alterations in this tumor. Amplification of the MYCN oncogene is found in 20 % of cases and is often accompanied by mutational activation of the ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase) gene, suggesting their cooperation in tumor initiation and spread. Understanding how complex genetic changes function together in oncogenesis has been a continuing and daunting task in cancer research. This challenge was addressed in neuroblastoma by generating a transgenic zebrafish model that overexpresses human MYCN and activated ALK in the PSNS, leading to tumors that closely resemble human neuroblastoma and new opportunities to probe the mechanisms that underlie the pathogenesis of this tumor. For example, coexpression of activated ALK with MYCN in this model triples the penetrance of neuroblastoma and markedly accelerates tumor onset, demonstrating the interaction of these modified genes in tumor development. Further, MYCN overexpression induces adrenal sympathetic neuroblast hyperplasia, blocks chromaffin cell differentiation, and ultimately triggers a developmentally-timed apoptotic response in the hyperplastic sympathoadrenal cells. In the context of MYCN overexpression, activated ALK provides prosurvival signals that block this apoptotic response, allowing continued expansion and oncogenic transformation of hyperplastic neuroblasts, thus promoting progression to neuroblastoma. This application of the zebrafish model illustrates its value in rational assessment of the multigenic changes that define neuroblastoma pathogenesis and points the way to future studies to identify novel targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27165366

  6. Zebrafish Models for Human Acute Organophosphorus Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Melissa; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Padrós, Francesc; Babin, Patrick J.; Sebastián, David; Cachot, Jérôme; Prats, Eva; Arick II, Mark; Rial, Eduardo; Knoll-Gellida, Anja; Mathieu, Guilaine; Le Bihanic, Florane; Escalon, B. Lynn; Zorzano, Antonio; Soares, Amadeu M.V.M; Raldúa, Demetrio

    2015-01-01

    Terrorist use of organophosphorus-based nerve agents and toxic industrial chemicals against civilian populations constitutes a real threat, as demonstrated by the terrorist attacks in Japan in the 1990 s or, even more recently, in the Syrian civil war. Thus, development of more effective countermeasures against acute organophosphorus poisoning is urgently needed. Here, we have generated and validated zebrafish models for mild, moderate and severe acute organophosphorus poisoning by exposing zebrafish larvae to different concentrations of the prototypic organophosphorus compound chlorpyrifos-oxon. Our results show that zebrafish models mimic most of the pathophysiological mechanisms behind this toxidrome in humans, including acetylcholinesterase inhibition, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation, and calcium dysregulation as well as inflammatory and immune responses. The suitability of the zebrafish larvae to in vivo high-throughput screenings of small molecule libraries makes these models a valuable tool for identifying new drugs for multifunctional drug therapy against acute organophosphorus poisoning. PMID:26489395

  7. Zebrafish Models for Human Acute Organophosphorus Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Faria, Melissa; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Padrós, Francesc; Babin, Patrick J; Sebastián, David; Cachot, Jérôme; Prats, Eva; Arick Ii, Mark; Rial, Eduardo; Knoll-Gellida, Anja; Mathieu, Guilaine; Le Bihanic, Florane; Escalon, B Lynn; Zorzano, Antonio; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Raldúa, Demetrio

    2015-01-01

    Terrorist use of organophosphorus-based nerve agents and toxic industrial chemicals against civilian populations constitutes a real threat, as demonstrated by the terrorist attacks in Japan in the 1990 s or, even more recently, in the Syrian civil war. Thus, development of more effective countermeasures against acute organophosphorus poisoning is urgently needed. Here, we have generated and validated zebrafish models for mild, moderate and severe acute organophosphorus poisoning by exposing zebrafish larvae to different concentrations of the prototypic organophosphorus compound chlorpyrifos-oxon. Our results show that zebrafish models mimic most of the pathophysiological mechanisms behind this toxidrome in humans, including acetylcholinesterase inhibition, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation, and calcium dysregulation as well as inflammatory and immune responses. The suitability of the zebrafish larvae to in vivo high-throughput screenings of small molecule libraries makes these models a valuable tool for identifying new drugs for multifunctional drug therapy against acute organophosphorus poisoning. PMID:26489395

  8. Generation and analysis of zebrafish melanoma models.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowska, S; van Rooijen, E; Ceol, C; Patton, E E; White, R M

    2016-01-01

    The rapid emergence of the zebrafish as a cancer model has been aided by advances in genetic, chemical, and imaging technologies. Melanoma in particular highlights both the power and challenges associated with cancer modeling in zebrafish. This chapter focuses on the lessons that have emerged from the melanoma models as paradigmatic of what will apply to nearly all cancer models in the zebrafish system. We specifically focus on methodologies related to germline and mosaic transgenic melanoma generation, and how these can be used to deeply interrogate additional cooperating oncogenes or tumor suppressors. These transgenic tumors can in turn be used to generate zebrafish-specific, stable melanoma cell lines which can be fluorescently labeled, modified by cDNA/CRISPR techniques, and used for detailed in vivo imaging of cancer progression in real time. These zebrafish melanoma models are beginning to elucidate both cell intrinsic and microenvironmental factors in melanoma that have broader implications for human disease. We envision that nearly all of the techniques described here can be applied to other zebrafish cancer models, and likely expanded beyond what we describe here. PMID:27312504

  9. Live imaging of osteoclast inhibition by bisphosphonates in a medaka osteoporosis model

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tingsheng; Witten, Paul Eckhard; Huysseune, Ann; Buettner, Anita; To, Thuy Thanh; Winkler, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Osteoclasts are bone-resorbing cells derived from the monocyte/macrophage lineage. Excess osteoclast activity leads to reduced bone mineral density, a hallmark of diseases such as osteoporosis. Processes that regulate osteoclast activity are therefore targeted in current osteoporosis therapies. To identify and characterize drugs for treatment of bone diseases, suitable in vivo models are needed to complement cell-culture assays. We have previously reported transgenic medaka lines expressing the osteoclast-inducing factor receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (Rankl) under control of a heat shock-inducible promoter. Forced Rankl expression resulted in ectopic osteoclast formation, as visualized by live imaging in fluorescent reporter lines. This led to increased bone resorption and a dramatic reduction of mineralized matrix similar to the situation in humans with osteoporosis. In an attempt to establish the medaka as an in vivo model for osteoporosis drug screening, we treated Rankl-expressing larvae with etidronate and alendronate, two bisphosphonates commonly used in human osteoporosis therapy. Using live imaging, we observed an efficient, dose-dependent inhibition of osteoclast activity, which resulted in the maintenance of bone integrity despite an excess of osteoclast formation. Strikingly, we also found that bone recovery was efficiently promoted after inhibition of osteoclast activity and that osteoblast distribution was altered, suggesting effects on osteoblast-osteoclast coupling. Our data show that transgenic medaka lines are suitable in vivo models for the characterization of antiresorptive or bone-anabolic compounds by live imaging and for screening of novel osteoporosis drugs. PMID:26704995

  10. Expression Profiles of Branchial FXYD Proteins in the Brackish Medaka Oryzias dancena: A Potential Saltwater Fish Model for Studies of Osmoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Kai; Kang, Chao-Kai; Chang, Chia-Hao; Hsu, An-Di; Lee, Tsung-Han; Hwang, Pung-Pung

    2013-01-01

    FXYD proteins are novel regulators of Na+-K+-ATPase (NKA). In fish subjected to salinity challenges, NKA activity in osmoregulatory organs (e.g., gills) is a primary driving force for the many ion transport systems that act in concert to maintain a stable internal environment. Although teleostean FXYD proteins have been identified and investigated, previous studies focused on only a limited group of species. The purposes of the present study were to establish the brackish medaka (Oryzias dancena) as a potential saltwater fish model for osmoregulatory studies and to investigate the diversity of teleostean FXYD expression profiles by comparing two closely related euryhaline model teleosts, brackish medaka and Japanese medaka (O. latipes), upon exposure to salinity changes. Seven members of the FXYD protein family were identified in each medaka species, and the expression of most branchial fxyd genes was salinity-dependent. Among the cloned genes, fxyd11 was expressed specifically in the gills and at a significantly higher level than the other fxyd genes. In the brackish medaka, branchial fxyd11 expression was localized to the NKA-immunoreactive cells in gill epithelia. Furthermore, the FXYD11 protein interacted with the NKA α-subunit and was expressed at a higher level in freshwater-acclimated individuals relative to fish in other salinity groups. The protein sequences and tissue distributions of the FXYD proteins were very similar between the two medaka species, but different expression profiles were observed upon salinity challenge for most branchial fxyd genes. Salinity changes produced different effects on the FXYD11 and NKA α-subunit expression patterns in the gills of the brackish medaka. To our knowledge, this report is the first to focus on FXYD expression in the gills of closely related euryhaline teleosts. Given the advantages conferred by the well-developed Japanese medaka system, we propose the brackish medaka as a saltwater fish model for

  11. Gaining translational momentum: more zebrafish models for neuroscience research.

    PubMed

    Kalueff, Allan V; Echevarria, David J; Stewart, Adam Michael

    2014-12-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are rapidly becoming a popular model organism in translational neuroscience and biological psychiatry research. Here we discuss conceptual, practical and other related aspects of using zebrafish in this field ("from tank to bedside"), and critically evaluate both advantages and limitations of zebrafish models of human brain disorders. We emphasize the need to more actively develop zebrafish models for neuroscience research focusing on complex traits. PMID:24593944

  12. The Toolbox for Conditional Zebrafish Cancer Models.

    PubMed

    Mayrhofer, Marie; Mione, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe the conditional zebrafish cancer toolbox, which allows for fine control of the expression of oncogenes or downregulation of tumor suppressors at the spatial and temporal level. Methods such as the Gal4/UAS or the Cre/lox systems paved the way to the development of elegant tumor models, which are now being used to study cancer cell biology, clonal evolution, identification of cancer stem cells and anti-cancer drug screening. Combination of these tools, as well as novel developments such as the promising genome editing system through CRISPR/Cas9 and clever application of light reactive proteins will enable the development of even more sophisticated zebrafish cancer models. Here, we introduce this growing toolbox of conditional transgenic approaches, discuss its current application in zebrafish cancer models and provide an outlook on future perspectives. PMID:27165348

  13. Homology-modeled ligand-binding domains of medaka estrogen receptors and androgen receptors: A model system for the study of reproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Cui Jianzhou Shen Xueyan; Yan Zuowei; Zhao Haobin; Nagahama, Yoshitaka

    2009-02-27

    Estrogen and androgen and their receptors play critical roles in physiological processes such as sexual differentiation and development. Using the available structural models for the human estrogen receptors alpha and beta and androgen receptor as templates, we designed in silico agonist and antagonist models of medaka estrogen receptor (meER) alpha, beta-1, and beta-2, and androgen receptor (meAR) alpha and beta. Using these models, we studied (1) the structural relationship between the ligand-binding domains (LBDs) of ERs and ARs of human and medaka, and (2) whether medaka ER and AR can be potential models for studying the ligand-binding activities of various agonists and antagonists of these receptors by docking analysis. A high level of conservation was observed between the sequences of the ligand-binding domains of meER{alpha} and huER{alpha}, meER{beta}1 and huER{beta}, meER{beta}2, and huER{beta} with 62.8%, 66.4%, and 65.1% identity, respectively. The sequence conservation between meAR{alpha} and huAR, meAR{beta}, and huAR was found with 70.1% and 61.0% of identity, respectively. Thirty-three selected endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), including both agonists and antagonists, were docked into the LBD of ER and AR, and the corresponding docking score for medaka models and human templates were calculated. In order to confirm the conservation of the overall geometry and the binding pocket, the backbone root mean square deviation (RMSD) for C{alpha} atoms was derived from the structure superposition of all 10 medaka homology models to the six human templates. Our results suggested conformational conservation between the ERs and ARs of medaka and human, Thus, medaka could be highly useful as a model system for studies involving estrogen and androgen interaction with their receptors.

  14. Antiangiogenic cancer drug using the zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Massimo M

    2014-09-01

    The process of de novo vessel formation, called angiogenesis, is essential for tumor progression and spreading. Targeting of molecular pathways involved in such tumor angiogenetic processes by using specific drugs or inhibitors is important for developing new anticancer therapies. Drug discovery remains to be the main focus for biomedical research and represents the essence of antiangiogenesis cancer research. To pursue these molecular and pharmacological goals, researchers need to use animal models that facilitate the elucidation of tumor angiogenesis mechanisms and the testing of antiangiogenic therapies. The past few years have seen the zebrafish system emerge as a valid model organism to study developmental angiogenesis and, more recently, as an alternative vertebrate model for cancer research. In this review, we will discuss why the zebrafish model system has the advantage of being a vertebrate model equipped with easy and powerful transgenesis as well as imaging tools to investigate not only physiological angiogenesis but also tumor angiogenesis. We will also highlight the potential of zebrafish for identifying antitumor angiogenesis drugs to block tumor development and progression. We foresee the zebrafish model as an important system that can possibly complement well-established mouse models in cancer research to generate novel insights into the molecular mechanism of the tumor angiogenesis. PMID:24903092

  15. The zebrafish as a model system for human disease.

    PubMed

    Ward, Alister C; Lieschke, Graham J

    2002-04-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has been widely utilised for the study of developmental biology, which has lead to the evolution of sophisticated cellular and molecular approaches. More recently, the rapid progress of various zebrafish genomic infrastructure initiatives is facilitating the development of zebrafish models of human disease. This review aims to describe several representative examples of how the zebrafish can be successfully used to identify novel genes and assign gene function, providing invaluable clues to human pathophysiology. PMID:11897571

  16. Zebrafish as an emerging model for studying complex brain disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kalueff, Allan V.; Stewart, Adam Michael; Gerlai, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is rapidly becoming a popular model organism in pharmacogenetics and neuropharmacology. Both larval and adult zebrafish are currently used to increase our understanding of brain function, dysfunction, and their genetic and pharmacological modulation. Here we review the developing utility of zebrafish in the analysis of complex brain disorders (including, for example, depression, autism, psychoses, drug abuse and cognitive disorders), also covering zebrafish applications towards the goal of modeling major human neuropsychiatric and drug-induced syndromes. We argue that zebrafish models of complex brain disorders and drug-induced conditions have become a rapidly emerging critical field in translational neuropharmacology research. PMID:24412421

  17. Zebrafish Embryo Model of Bartonella henselae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Amorce; Cha, Byeong J.; Amin, Jahanshah; Smith, Lisa K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Bartonella henselae (Bh) is an emerging zoonotic pathogen that has been associated with a variety of human diseases, including bacillary angiomatosis that is characterized by vasoproliferative tumor-like lesions on the skin of some immunosuppressed individuals. The study of Bh pathogenesis has been limited to in vitro cell culture systems due to the lack of an animal model. Therefore, we wanted to investigate whether the zebrafish embryo could be used to model human infection with Bh. Our data showed that Tg(fli1:egfp)y1 zebrafish embryos supported a sustained Bh infection for 7 days with >10-fold bacterial replication when inoculated in the yolk sac. We showed that Bh recruited phagocytes to the site of infection in the Tg(mpx:GFP)uwm1 embryos. Infected embryos showed evidence of a Bh-induced angiogenic phenotype and an increase in the expression of genes encoding pro-inflammatory factors and pro-angiogenic markers. However, infection of zebrafish embryos with a deletion mutant in the major adhesin (BadA) resulted in little or no bacterial replication and a diminished host response, providing the first evidence that BadA is critical for in vivo infection. Thus, the zebrafish embryo provides the first practical model of Bh infection that will facilitate efforts to identify virulence factors and define molecular mechanisms of Bh pathogenesis. PMID:25026365

  18. Transgenic medaka fish as models to analyze bone homeostasis under micro-gravity conditions in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, C.; Wagner, T.; Renn, J.; Goerlich, R.; Schartl, M.

    Long-term space flight and microgravity results in bone loss that can be explained by reduced activity of bone-forming osteoblast cells and/or an increase in activity of bone resorbing osteoclast cells. Osteoprotegerin (OPG), a secreted protein of 401 amino acids, has been shown to regulate the balance between osteoblast and osteoclast formation and thereby warrants constant bone mass under normal gravitational conditions. Consistent with this, earlier reports using transgenic mice have shown that increased activation of OPG leads to exc essive bone formation (osteopetrosis), while inactivation of OPG leads to bone loss (osteoporosis). Importantly, it has recently been reported that expression of murine OPG is regulated by vector averaged gravity (Kanematsu et al., 2002, Bone 30, p553). The small bony fish medaka (Oryzias latipes ) has attracted increasing attention as genetic model system to study developmental and pathological processes. To analyze the molecular mechanisms of bone formation in this small vertebrate, we have isolated two related genes, opr-1 and opr -2, from medaka. Our phylogenetic analysis revealed that both genes originated from a common ancestor by fish-specific gene duplication and represent the orthologs of the mammalian OPG gene. Both opr genes are differentially expressed during embryonic and larval development, in adult tissues and in cultured primary osteoblast cells. We have characterized their promoter regions and identified consensus binding sites for transcription factors of the bone-morphogenetic-protein (BMP) p thway and for core-binding-factor-1Aa (cbfa1). Cbfa1 has been shown to be the key regulator of OPG expression during several steps of osteoblast differentiation in mammals. This opens the possibility that the mechanisms controlling bone formation in teleost fish and higher vertebrates are regulated by related mechanisms. We are currently generating transgenic medakafish expressing a GFP reporter gene under control of the

  19. The teleost fish medaka ( Oryzias latipes) as genetic model to study gravity dependent bone homeostasis in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, T. U.; Renn, J.; Riemensperger, T.; Volff, J.-N.; Köster, R. W.; Goerlich, R.; Schartl, M.; Winkler, C.

    2003-10-01

    Long-term space flight and microgravity result in bone loss that can be explained by reduced activity of bone-forming cells (osteoblasts) and/or an increase in activity of bone resorbing cells (osteoclasts). Osteoprotegerin (OPG) has been shown to regulate the balance between osteoblast and osteoclast cell numbers and is involved in maintaining constant bone mass under normal gravitational conditions. The small bony fish medaka ( Oryzias latipes) has attracted increasing attention as a genetic model system to study normal embryonic developmental and pathological processes. To analyze the molecular mechanisms of bone formation in this small vertebrate, we have isolated two opg genes, opgl and opg2, from medaka. Our phylogenetic analysis reveals that both genes originated from a common ancestor by fish-specific gene duplication and represent the orthologs of the mammalian opg gene. Both opg genes are differentially expressed during embryonic and larval development, in adult tissues and in cultured primary osteoblast-like cells. Furthermore, we have characterized the opg2 promoter region and identified consensus binding sites for the transcription factor core-binding-factor-1A (CBFA1). In mammals, CBFA1 has been shown to be a regulator of opg expression and to be essential for several steps during osteoblast differentiation. Here we show that sequence and expression domains of opg, cbfal and a member of the dlx gene family are highly conserved between medaka and higher vertebrates. This suggests that not only single genes but entire genetic networks for bone formation are conserved between teleosts and mammals. These findings will open medaka fish as a genetic model to monitor bone formation under different gravity conditions in a living whole animal allowing the identification of novel factors involved in bone homeostasis.

  20. A Zebrafish Thrombosis Model for Assessing Antithrombotic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Hong-Cui; Guo, Sheng-Ya; Xia, Bo; Song, Ru-Shun; Lao, Qiao-Cong; Xuan, Yao-Xian; Li, Chun-Qi

    2016-08-01

    Thrombosis is a leading cause of death and the development of effective and safe therapeutic agents for thrombotic diseases has been proven challenging. In this study, taking advantage of the transparency of larval zebrafish, we developed a larval zebrafish thrombosis model for drug screening and efficacy assessment. Zebrafish at 2 dpf (days post fertilization) were treated with phenylhydrazine (PHZ) and a testing drug for 24 h. Tested drugs were administered into the zebrafish either by direct soaking or circulation microinjection. Antithrombotic efficacy was quantitatively evaluated based on our previously patented technology characterized as an image analysis of the heart red blood cells stained with O-dianisidine staining. Zebrafish at 2 dpf treated with PHZ at a concentration of 1.5 μM for a time period of 24 h were determined as the optimum conditions for the zebrafish thrombosis model development. Induced thrombosis in zebrafish was visually confirmed under a dissecting stereomicroscope and quantified by the image assay. All 6 human antithrombotic drugs (aspirin, clopidogrel, diltiazem hydrochloride injection, xuanshuantong injection, salvianolate injection, and astragalus injection) showed significant preventive and therapeutic effects on zebrafish thrombosis (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, & p < 0.001) in this zebrafish thrombosis model. The larval zebrafish thrombosis model developed and validated in this study could be used for in vivo thrombosis studies and for rapid screening and efficacy assessment of antithrombotic drugs. PMID:27333081

  1. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model for disposition of 2,3,7,8-TCDD in fathead minnow and medaka.

    PubMed

    Parhizgari, Zahra; Li, James

    2014-05-01

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model was developed for the disposition of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD) in 2 fish species--fathead minnow and medaka. The model was developed based on the empirical data on disposition of dioxins in fish tissues, as well as existing knowledge on the mechanisms of uptake, distribution, storage, and elimination of dioxins in various species (other than fish). The present study examined the applicability of mechanisms known to occur in other species for fish and concluded that the same mechanisms defined for disposition of 2,3,7,8-TCDD in (mostly) rodents can be applicable for the 2 fish species examined as well. Parameter values for the model were selected and/or calibrated using available databases. Model compartments included the gill, kidney, liver, and other richly-perfused tissues, as well as fat and other slowly-perfused tissues. The model was calibrated using 2 independent datasets for exposure of fathead minnow and medaka to 2,3,7,8-TCDD in water. The initial values of the model parameters were selected from several sources, and calibrated to represent the 2 exposure datasets. With very few exceptions, the estimated parameter values for the 2 species were comparable, and the final predictions were in strong agreement with the observations. The model developed in the present study can therefore be used in the prediction of the body burden of 2,3,7,8-TCDD in fathead minnow and medaka. Uncertainty in the model prediction as a result of variability in input parameters is discussed for the parameters with the highest impacts on the model outcome. PMID:24375498

  2. Using the zebrafish model for Alzheimer’s disease research

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Morgan; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil; Lardelli, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Rodent models have been extensively used to investigate the cause and mechanisms behind Alzheimer’s disease. Despite many years of intensive research using these models we still lack a detailed understanding of the molecular events that lead to neurodegeneration. Although zebrafish lack the complexity of advanced cognitive behaviors evident in rodent models they have proven to be a very informative model for the study of human diseases. In this review we give an overview of how the zebrafish has been used to study Alzheimer’s disease. Zebrafish possess genes orthologous to those mutated in familial Alzheimer’s disease and research using zebrafish has revealed unique characteristics of these genes that have been difficult to observe in rodent models. The zebrafish is becoming an increasingly popular model for the investigation of Alzheimer’s disease and will complement studies using other models to help complete our understanding of this disease. PMID:25071820

  3. A purified diet for medaka (Oryzias latipes): refining a fish model for toxicological research

    SciTech Connect

    DeKoven, D.L.; Nunez, J.M.; Lester, S.M.; Conklin, D.E.; Marty, G.D.; Parker, L.M.; Hinton, D.E. )

    1992-04-01

    The overall nutritional adequacy of a purified casein-based diet (PC-diet) for the medaka (Oryzias latipes) was evaluated and compared with three diets: commercially available flaked fish food (FL-diet), live newly hatched Artemia (A-diet), and a combination of FL-diet plus A-diet (F/A-diet). Survival, growth, reproductive success, general and liver histopathology, and selected hepatic enzyme activities were compared in medaka from first feeding through reproductive maturity. The PC-diet proved adequate in all of the above criteria. When compared with fish fed F/A-diet, an initial lag in early growth rates (i.e., 0 to 30 days) occurred with the fish fed PC-diet. The FL-diet alone was not nutritionally adequate for medaka, resulting in poor growth, reduced reproductive success, lower survival, and emaciation. A significant number of spinal deformities (5.4%) were noted in medaka fed the F/A diet. Ethoxycoumarin 0-deethylase and glutathione S-transferase activities were monitored and a trend toward increasing activity with age was noted. This suggests that PC- and F/A-diets provide adequate nutrition for development of the xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes necessary for detoxification and activation of endogenous and foreign compounds. The PC-diet supported good survival, growth, reproduction, and normal histology. This diet provides a standardized, nutritionally adequate, and consistent alternative to undefined conventional diets and is less likely to contain the range of xenobiotics possible in whole, live food.

  4. Host-Pathogen Interactions Made Transparent with the Zebrafish Model

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, Annemarie H; Spaink, Herman P

    2011-01-01

    The zebrafish holds much promise as a high-throughput drug screening model for immune-related diseases, including inflammatory and infectious diseases and cancer. This is due to the excellent possibilities for in vivo imaging in combination with advanced tools for genomic and large scale mutant analysis. The context of the embryo’s developing immune system makes it possible to study the contribution of different immune cell types to disease progression. Furthermore, due to the temporal separation of innate immunity from adaptive responses, zebrafish embryos and larvae are particularly useful for dissecting the innate host factors involved in pathology. Recent studies have underscored the remarkable similarity of the zebrafish and human immune systems, which is important for biomedical applications. This review is focused on the use of zebrafish as a model for infectious diseases, with emphasis on bacterial pathogens. Following a brief overview of the zebrafish immune system and the tools and methods used to study host-pathogen interactions in zebrafish, we discuss the current knowledge on receptors and downstream signaling components that are involved in the zebrafish embryo’s innate immune response. We summarize recent insights gained from the use of bacterial infection models, particularly the Mycobacterium marinum model, that illustrate the potential of the zebrafish model for high-throughput antimicrobial drug screening. PMID:21366518

  5. A bioenergetic model for zebrafish Danio rerio (Hamilton)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chizinski, C.J.; Sharma, Bibek; Pope, K.L.; Patino, R.

    2008-01-01

    A bioenergetics model was developed from observed consumption, respiration and growth rates for zebrafish Danio rerio across a range (18-32?? C) of water temperatures, and evaluated with a 50 day laboratory trial at 28?? C. No significant bias in variable estimates was found during the validation trial; namely, predicted zebrafish mass generally agreed with observed mass. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  6. Zebrafish models for translational neuroscience research: from tank to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Adam Michael; Braubach, Oliver; Spitsbergen, Jan; Gerlai, Robert; Kalueff, Allan V.

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is emerging as a new important species for studying mechanisms of brain function and dysfunction. Focusing on selected central nervous system (CNS) disorders (brain cancer, epilepsy, and anxiety) and using them as examples, we discuss the value of zebrafish models in translational neuroscience. We further evaluate the contribution of zebrafish to neuroimaging, circuit level, and drug discovery research. Outlining the role of zebrafish in modeling a wide range of human brain disorders, we also summarize recent applications and existing challenges in this field. Finally, we emphasize the potential of zebrafish models in behavioral phenomics and high-throughput genetic/small molecule screening, which is critical for CNS drug discovery and identifying novel candidate genes. PMID:24726051

  7. Dual control by a single gene of secondary sexual characters and mating preferences in medaka

    PubMed Central

    Fukamachi, Shoji; Kinoshita, Masato; Aizawa, Kouichi; Oda, Shoji; Meyer, Axel; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Background Animals utilize a wide variety of tactics to attract reproductive partners. Behavioral experiments often indicate an important role for visual cues in fish, but their molecular basis remains almost entirely unknown. Studies on model species (such as zebrafish and medaka) allow investigations into this fundamental question in behavioral and evolutionary biology. Results Through mate-choice experiences using several laboratory strains of various body colors, we successfully identified one medaka mutant (color interfere; ci) that is distinctly unattractive to reproductive partners. This unattractiveness seems to be due to reduced orange pigment cells (xanthophores) in the skin. The ci strain carries a mutation on the somatolactin alpha (SLa) gene, therefore we expected over-expression of SLa to make medaka hyper-attractive. Indeed, extremely strong mating preferences were detected in a choice between the ci and SLa-transgenic (Actb-SLa:GFP) medaka. Intriguingly, however, the strains showed opposite biases; that is, the mutant and transgenic medaka liked to mate with partners from their own strain, similar to becoming sexually isolated. Conclusion This study spotlighted SLa as a novel mate-choice gene in fish. In addition, these results are the first demonstration of a single gene that can pleiotropically and harmoniously change both secondary sexual characters and mating preferences. Although theoretical models have long suggested joint evolution of linked genes on a chromosome, a mutation on a gene-regulatory region (that is, switching on/off of a single gene) might be sufficient to trigger two 'runaway' processes in different directions to promote (sympatric) speciation. PMID:19788724

  8. Zebrafish as an appealing model for optogenetic studies.

    PubMed

    Simmich, Joshua; Staykov, Eric; Scott, Ethan

    2012-01-01

    Optogenetics, the use of light-based protein tools, has begun to revolutionize biological research. The approach has proven especially useful in the nervous system, where light has been used both to detect and to manipulate activity in targeted neurons. Optogenetic tools have been deployed in systems ranging from cultured cells to primates, with each offering a particular combination of advantages and drawbacks. In this chapter, we provide an overview of optogenetics in zebrafish. Two of the greatest attributes of the zebrafish model system are external fertilization and transparency in early life stages. Combined, these allow researchers to observe the internal structures of developing zebrafish embryos and larvae without dissections or other interference. This transparency, combined with the animals' small size, simple husbandry, and similarity to mammals in many structures and processes, has made zebrafish a particularly popular model system in developmental biology. The easy optical access also dovetails with optogenetic tools, allowing their use in intact, developing, and behaving animals. This means that optogenetic studies in embryonic and larval zebrafish can be carried out in a high-throughput fashion with relatively simple equipment. As a consequence, zebrafish have been an important proving ground for optogenetic tools and approaches and have already yielded important new knowledge about the neural circuits underlying behavior. Here, we provide a general introduction to zebrafish as a model system for optogenetics. Through descriptions and analyses of important optogenetic studies that have been done in zebrafish, we highlight the advantages and liabilities that the system brings to optogenetic experiments. PMID:22341325

  9. montalcino, a Zebrafish Model for Variegate Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, Kimberly A.; Fraenkel, Paula G.; Langer, Nathaniel B.; Schmid, Bettina; Davidson, Alan J.; Weber, Gerhard; Chiang, Ken; Foott, Helen; Dwyer, Caitlin; Wingert, Rebecca A.; Zhou, Yi; Paw, Barry H.; Zon, Leonard I.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Inherited or acquired mutations in the heme biosynthetic pathway lead to a debilitating class of diseases collectively known as porphyrias, with symptoms that can include anemia, cutaneous photosensitivity, and neurovisceral dysfunction. In a genetic screen for hematopoietic mutants, we isolated a zebrafish mutant, montalcino (mno), which displays hypochromic anemia and porphyria. The objective of this study was to identify the defective gene and characterize the phenotype of the zebrafish mutant. Methods Genetic linkage analysis was utilized to identify the region harboring the mno mutation. Candidate gene analysis together with RT-PCR was utilized to identify the genetic mutation, which was confirmed via allele specific oligo hybridizations. Whole mount in situ hybridizations and 0-dianisidine staining were used to characterize the phenotype of the mno mutant. mRNA and morpholino microinjections were performed to phenocopy and/or rescue the mutant phenotype. Results Homozygous mno mutant embryos have a defect in the protoporphyrinogen oxidase (ppox) gene, which encodes the enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of protoporphyrinogen. Homozygous mutant embryos are deficient in hemoglobin, and by 36 hpf are visibly anemic and porphyric. The hypochromic anemia of mno embryos was partially rescued by human ppox, providing evidence for the conservation of function between human and zebrafish ppox. Conclusion In humans, mutations in ppox result in variegate porphyria. At present, effective treatment for acute attacks requires the administration intravenous hemin and/or glucose. Thus, mno represents a powerful model for investigation, and a tool for future screens aimed at identifying chemical modifiers of variegate porphyria. PMID:18550261

  10. Zebrafish Models of Human Liver Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Benjamin J.; Pack, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The liver performs a large number of essential synthetic and regulatory functions that are acquired during fetal development and persist throughout life. Their disruption underlies a diverse group of heritable and acquired diseases that affect both pediatric and adult patients. Although experimental analyses used to study liver development and disease are typically performed in cell culture models or rodents, the zebrafish is increasingly used to complement discoveries made in these systems. Forward and reverse genetic analyses over the past two decades have shown that the molecular program for liver development is largely conserved between zebrafish and mammals, and that the zebrafish can be used to model heritable human liver disorders. Recent work has demonstrated that zebrafish can also be used to study the mechanistic basis of acquired liver diseases. Here, we provide a comprehensive summary of how the zebrafish has contributed to our understanding of human liver development and disease. PMID:23897685

  11. Zebrafish models for the functional genomics of neurogenetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Kabashi, Edor; Brustein, Edna; Champagne, Nathalie; Drapeau, Pierre

    2011-03-01

    In this review, we consider recent work using zebrafish to validate and study the functional consequences of mutations of human genes implicated in a broad range of degenerative and developmental disorders of the brain and spinal cord. Also we present technical considerations for those wishing to study their own genes of interest by taking advantage of this easily manipulated and clinically relevant model organism. Zebrafish permit mutational analyses of genetic function (gain or loss of function) and the rapid validation of human variants as pathological mutations. In particular, neural degeneration can be characterized at genetic, cellular, functional, and behavioral levels. Zebrafish have been used to knock down or express mutations in zebrafish homologs of human genes and to directly express human genes bearing mutations related to neurodegenerative disorders such as spinal muscular atrophy, ataxia, hereditary spastic paraplegia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), epilepsy, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, fronto-temporal dementia, and Alzheimer's disease. More recently, we have been using zebrafish to validate mutations of synaptic genes discovered by large-scale genomic approaches in developmental disorders such as autism, schizophrenia, and non-syndromic mental retardation. Advances in zebrafish genetics such as multigenic analyses and chemical genetics now offer a unique potential for disease research. Thus, zebrafish hold much promise for advancing the functional genomics of human diseases, the understanding of the genetics and cell biology of degenerative and developmental disorders, and the discovery of therapeutics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Zebrafish Models of Neurological Diseases. PMID:20887784

  12. Adult Zebrafish model of streptococcal infection

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, Hilary A.; Runft, Donna L.

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcal pathogens cause a wide array of clinical syndromes in humans, including invasive systemic infections resulting in high mortality rates. Many of these pathogens are human specific, and therefore difficult to analyze in vivo using typical animal models, as these models rarely replicate what is observed in human infections. This unit describes the use of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) as an animal model for streptococcal infection to analyze multiple disease states. This model closely mimics the necrotizing fasciitis/myositis pathology observed in humans from a Streptococcus pyogenes infection. The use of a zoonotic pathogen, Streptococcus iniae, which replicates systemic infections caused by many streptococcal pathogens, including dissemination to the brain, is also described. Included protocols describe both intraperitoneal and intramuscular infections, as well as methods for histological and quantitative measurements of infection. PMID:19412913

  13. Zebrafish (Danio rerio): A Potential Model for Toxinological Studies.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Rafael Antonio; Sarmiento, Karen; Vásquez, Isabel Cristina

    2015-10-01

    Zebrafish are an emerging basic biomedical research model that has multiple advantages compared with other research models. Given that biotoxins, such as toxins, poisons, and venoms, represent health hazards to animals and humans, a low-cost biological model that is highly sensitive to biotoxins is useful to understand the damage caused by such agents and to develop biological tests to prevent and reduce the risk of poisoning in potential cases of bioterrorism or food contamination. In this article, a narrative review of the general aspects of zebrafish as a model in basic biomedical research and various studies in the field of toxinology that have used zebrafish as a biological model are presented. This information will provide useful material to beginner students and researchers who are interested in developing toxinological studies with the zebrafish model. PMID:26196742

  14. Conserved function of medaka pink-eyed dilution in melanin synthesis and its divergent transcriptional regulation in gonads among vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Fukamachi, Shoji; Asakawa, Shuichi; Wakamatsu, Yuko; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Mitani, Hiroshi; Shima, Akihiro

    2004-11-01

    Medaka is emerging as a model organism for the study of vertebrate development and genetics, and its effectiveness in forward genetics should prove equal to that of zebrafish. Here, we identify by positional cloning a gene responsible for the medaka i-3 albino mutant. i-3 larvae have weakly tyrosinase-positive cells but lack strongly positive and dendritic cells, suggesting loss of fully differentiated melanophores. The region surrounding the i-3 locus is syntenic to human 19p13, but a BAC clone covering the i-3 locus contained orthologs located at 15q11-13, including OCA2 (P). Medaka P consists of 842 amino acids and shares approximately 65% identity with mammalian P proteins. The i-3 mutation is a four-base deletion in exon 13, which causes a frameshift and truncation of the protein. We detected medaka P transcripts in melanin-producing eyeballs and (putative) skin melanophores on embryos and an alternatively spliced form in the non-melanin-producing ovary or oocytes. The mouse p is similarly expressed in gonads, but not alternatively spliced. This is the first isolation of nonmammalian P, the functional mechanism of action of which has not yet been elucidated, even in mammals. Further investigation of the functions of P proteins and the regulation of their expression will provide new insight into body color determination and gene evolution. PMID:15579703

  15. Teratogenic potential of antiepileptic drugs in the zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Hak; Kang, Jung Won; Lin, Tao; Lee, Jae Eun; Jin, Dong Il

    2013-01-01

    The zebrafish model is an attractive candidate for screening of developmental toxicity during early drug development. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) arouse concern for the risk of teratogenicity, but the data are limited. In this study, we evaluated the teratogenic potential of seven AEDs (carbamazepine (CBZ), ethosuximide (ETX), valproic acid (VPN), lamotrigine (LMT), lacosamide (LCM), levetiracetam (LVT), and topiramate (TPM)) in the zebrafish model. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to AEDs from initiation of gastrula (5.25 hours post-fertilization (hpf)) to termination of hatching (72 hpf) which mimic the mammalian teratogenic experimental design. The lethality and teratogenic index (TI) of AEDs were determined and the TI values of each drug were compared with the US FDA human pregnancy categories. Zebrafish model was useful screening model for teratogenic potential of antiepilepsy drugs and was in concordance with in vivo mammalian data and human clinical data. PMID:24324971

  16. Conserved Expression Signatures between Medaka and Human Pigment Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Schartl, Manfred; Kneitz, Susanne; Wilde, Brigitta; Wagner, Toni; Henkel, Christiaan V.; Spaink, Herman P.; Meierjohann, Svenja

    2012-01-01

    Aberrations in gene expression are a hallmark of cancer cells. Differential tumor-specific transcript levels of single genes or whole sets of genes may be critical for the neoplastic phenotype and important for therapeutic considerations or useful as biomarkers. As an approach to filter out such relevant expression differences from the plethora of changes noted in global expression profiling studies, we searched for changes of gene expression levels that are conserved. Transcriptomes from massive parallel sequencing of different types of melanoma from medaka were generated and compared to microarray datasets from zebrafish and human melanoma. This revealed molecular conservation at various levels between fish models and human tumors providing a useful strategy for identifying expression signatures strongly associated with disease phenotypes and uncovering new melanoma molecules. PMID:22693581

  17. Think Small: Zebrafish as a Model System of Human Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, J. R.; Jobin, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Although human pathologies have mostly been modeled using higher mammal systems such as mice, the lower vertebrate zebrafish has gained tremendous attention as a model system. The advantages of zebrafish over classical vertebrate models are multifactorial and include high genetic and organ system homology to humans, high fecundity, external fertilization, ease of genetic manipulation, and transparency through early adulthood that enables powerful imaging modalities. This paper focuses on four areas of human pathology that were developed and/or advanced significantly in zebrafish in the last decade. These areas are (1) wound healing/restitution, (2) gastrointestinal diseases, (3) microbe-host interactions, and (4) genetic diseases and drug screens. Important biological processes and pathologies explored include wound-healing responses, pancreatic cancer, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and mycobacterium infection. The utility of zebrafish in screening for novel genes important in various pathologies such as polycystic kidney disease is also discussed. PMID:22701308

  18. Zebrafish models for human FKRP muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Genri; Guyon, Jeffrey R; Nakamura, Yukio; Kunkel, Louis M

    2010-02-15

    Various muscular dystrophies are associated with the defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan and are known to result from mutations in genes encoding glycosyltransferases. Fukutin-related protein (FKRP) was identified as a homolog of fukutin, the defective protein in Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), that is thought to function as a glycosyltransferase. Mutations in FKRP have been linked to a variety of phenotypes including Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS), limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) 2I and congenital muscular dystrophy 1C (MDC1C). Zebrafish are a useful animal model to reveal the mechanism of these diseases caused by mutations in FKRP gene. Downregulating FKRP expression in zebrafish by two different morpholinos resulted in embryos which had developmental defects similar to those observed in human muscular dystrophies associated with mutations in FKRP. The FKRP morphants showed phenotypes involving alterations in somitic structure and muscle fiber organization, as well as defects in developing eye morphology. Additionally, they were found to have a reduction in alpha-dystroglycan glycosylation and a shortened myofiber length. Moreover, co-injection of fish or human FKRP mRNA along with the morpholino restored normal development, alpha-dystroglycan glycosylation and laminin binding activity of alpha-dystroglycan in the morphants. Co-injection of the human FKRP mRNA containing causative mutations found in human patients of WWS, MDC1C and LGMD2I could not restore their phenotypes significantly. Interestingly, these morphant fish having human FKRP mutations showed a wide phenotypic range similar to that seen in humans. PMID:19955119

  19. Zebrafish models for human FKRP muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Genri; Guyon, Jeffrey R.; Nakamura, Yukio; Kunkel, Louis M.

    2010-01-01

    Various muscular dystrophies are associated with the defective glycosylation of α-dystroglycan and are known to result from mutations in genes encoding glycosyltransferases. Fukutin-related protein (FKRP) was identified as a homolog of fukutin, the defective protein in Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), that is thought to function as a glycosyltransferase. Mutations in FKRP have been linked to a variety of phenotypes including Walker–Warburg syndrome (WWS), limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) 2I and congenital muscular dystrophy 1C (MDC1C). Zebrafish are a useful animal model to reveal the mechanism of these diseases caused by mutations in FKRP gene. Downregulating FKRP expression in zebrafish by two different morpholinos resulted in embryos which had developmental defects similar to those observed in human muscular dystrophies associated with mutations in FKRP. The FKRP morphants showed phenotypes involving alterations in somitic structure and muscle fiber organization, as well as defects in developing eye morphology. Additionally, they were found to have a reduction in α-dystroglycan glycosylation and a shortened myofiber length. Moreover, co-injection of fish or human FKRP mRNA along with the morpholino restored normal development, α-dystroglycan glycosylation and laminin binding activity of α-dystroglycan in the morphants. Co-injection of the human FKRP mRNA containing causative mutations found in human patients of WWS, MDC1C and LGMD2I could not restore their phenotypes significantly. Interestingly, these morphant fish having human FKRP mutations showed a wide phenotypic range similar to that seen in humans. PMID:19955119

  20. Making waves in cancer research: new models in the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Berghmans, Stephane; Jette, Cicely; Langenau, David; Hsu, Karl; Stewart, Rodney; Look, Thomas; Kanki, John P

    2005-08-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has proven to be a powerful vertebrate model system for the genetic analysis of developmental pathways and is only beginning to be exploited as a model for human disease and clinical research. The attributes that have led to the emergence of the zebrafish as a preeminent embryological model, including its capacity for forward and reverse genetic analyses, provides a unique opportunity to uncover novel insights into the molecular genetics of cancer. Some of the advantages of the zebrafish animal model system include fecundity, with each female capable of laying 200-300 eggs per week, external fertilization that permits manipulation of embryos ex utero, and rapid development of optically clear embryos, which allows the direct observation of developing internal organs and tissues in vivo. The zebrafish is amenable to transgenic and both forward and reverse genetic strategies that can be used to identify or generate zebrafish models of different types of cancer and may also present significant advantages for the discovery of tumor suppressor genes that promote tumorigenesis when mutationally inactivated. Importantly, the transparency and accessibility of the zebrafish embryo allows the unprecedented direct analysis of pathologic processes in vivo, including neoplastic cell transformation and tumorigenic progression. Ultimately, high-throughput modifier screens based on zebrafish cancer models can lead to the identification of chemicals or genes involved in the suppression or prevention of the malignant phenotype. The identification of small molecules or gene products through such screens will serve as ideal entry points for novel drug development for the treatment of cancer. This review focuses on the current technology that takes advantage of the zebrafish model system to further our understanding of the genetic basis of cancer and its treatment. PMID:16116796

  1. REVIEW: Zebrafish: A Renewed Model System For Functional Genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiao-Yan

    2008-01-01

    In the post genome era, a major goal in molecular biology is to determine the function of the many thousands of genes present in the vertebrate genome. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) provides an almost ideal genetic model to identify the biological roles of these novel genes, in part because their embryos are transparent and develop rapidly. The zebrafish has many advantages over mouse for genome-wide mutagenesis studies, allowing for easier, cheaper and faster functional characterization of novel genes in the vertebrate genome. Many molecular research tools such as chemical mutagenesis, transgenesis, gene trapping, gene knockdown, TILLING, gene targeting, RNAi and chemical genetic screen are now available in zebrafish. Combining all the forward, reverse, and chemical genetic tools, it is expected that zebrafish will make invaluable contribution to vertebrate functional genomics in functional annotation of the genes, modeling human diseases and drug discoveries.

  2. The zebrafish as a model for complex tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gemberling, Matthew; Bailey, Travis J.; Hyde, David R.; Poss, Kenneth D.

    2013-01-01

    For centuries, philosophers and scientists have been fascinated by the principles and implications of regeneration in lower vertebrate species. Two features have made zebrafish an informative model system for determining mechanisms of regenerative events. First, they are highly regenerative, able to regrow amputated fins, as well as a lesioned brain, retina, spinal cord, heart, and other tissues. Second, they are amenable to both forward and reverse genetic approaches, with a research toolset regularly updated by an expanding community of zebrafish researchers. Zebrafish studies have helped identify new mechanistic underpinnings of regeneration in multiple tissues, and in some cases have served as a guide for contemplating regenerative strategies in mammals. Here, we review the recent history of zebrafish as a genetic model system for understanding how and why tissue regeneration occurs. PMID:23927865

  3. The zebrafish as a model to study intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Brugman, Sylvia

    2016-11-01

    Starting out as a model for developmental biology, during the last decade, zebrafish have also gained the attention of the immunologists and oncologists. Due to its small size, high fecundity and full annotation of its genome, the zebrafish is an attractive model system. The fact that fish are transparent early in life combined with the growing list of immune cell reporter fish, enables in vivo tracking of immune responses in a complete organism. Since zebrafish develop ex utero from a fertilized egg, immune development can be monitored from the start of life. Given that several gut functions and immune genes are conserved between zebrafish and mammals, the zebrafish is an interesting model organism to investigate fundamental processes underlying intestinal inflammation and injury. This review will first provide some background on zebrafish intestinal development, bacterial colonization and immunity, showing the similarities and differences compared to mammals. This will be followed by an overview of the existing models for intestinal disease, and concluded by future perspectives in light of the newest technologies and insights. PMID:26902932

  4. The emerging use of zebrafish to model metabolic disease

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Asha; Stemple, Derek L.; Barroso, Inês

    2013-01-01

    The zebrafish research community is celebrating! The zebrafish genome has recently been sequenced, the Zebrafish Mutation Project (launched by the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) has published the results of its first large-scale ethylnitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen, and a host of new techniques, such as the genome editing technologies TALEN and CRISPR-Cas, are enabling specific mutations to be created in model organisms and investigated in vivo. The zebrafish truly seems to be coming of age. These powerful resources invoke the question of whether zebrafish can be increasingly used to model human disease, particularly common, chronic diseases of metabolism such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. In recent years, there has been considerable success, mainly from genomic approaches, in identifying genetic variants that are associated with these conditions in humans; however, mechanistic insights into the role of implicated disease loci are lacking. In this Review, we highlight some of the advantages and disadvantages of zebrafish to address the organism’s utility as a model system for human metabolic diseases. PMID:24046387

  5. Persistent impaired glucose metabolism in a zebrafish hyperglycemia model.

    PubMed

    Capiotti, Katiucia Marques; Antonioli, Régis; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Bonan, Carla Denise; Da Silva, Rosane Souza

    2014-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) affects over 10% of the world's population. Hyperglycemia is the main feature for the diagnosis of this disease. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an established model organism for the study of various metabolic diseases. In this paper, hyperglycemic zebrafish, when immersed in a 111 mM glucose solution for 14 days, developed increased glycation of proteins from the eyes, decreased mRNA levels of insulin receptors in the muscle, and a reversion of high blood glucose level after treatment with anti-diabetic drugs (glimepiride and metformin) even after 7 days of glucose withdrawal. Additionally, hyperglycemic zebrafish developed an impaired response to exogenous insulin, which was recovered after 7 days of glucose withdrawal. These data suggest that the exposure of adult zebrafish to high glucose concentration is able to induce persistent metabolic changes probably underlined by a hyperinsulinemic state and impaired peripheral glucose metabolism. PMID:24704522

  6. ZFIN: enhancements and updates to the zebrafish model organism database

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Yvonne; Conlin, Tom; Dunn, Nathan; Fashena, David; Frazer, Ken; Howe, Douglas G.; Knight, Jonathan; Mani, Prita; Martin, Ryan; Moxon, Sierra A. T.; Paddock, Holly; Pich, Christian; Ramachandran, Sridhar; Ruef, Barbara J.; Ruzicka, Leyla; Bauer Schaper, Holle; Schaper, Kevin; Shao, Xiang; Singer, Amy; Sprague, Judy; Sprunger, Brock; Van Slyke, Ceri; Westerfield, Monte

    2011-01-01

    ZFIN, the Zebrafish Model Organism Database, http://zfin.org, serves as the central repository and web-based resource for zebrafish genetic, genomic, phenotypic and developmental data. ZFIN manually curates comprehensive data for zebrafish genes, phenotypes, genotypes, gene expression, antibodies, anatomical structures and publications. A wide-ranging collection of web-based search forms and tools facilitates access to integrated views of these data promoting analysis and scientific discovery. Data represented in ZFIN are derived from three primary sources: curation of zebrafish publications, individual research laboratories and collaborations with bioinformatics organizations. Data formats include text, images and graphical representations. ZFIN is a dynamic resource with data added daily as part of our ongoing curation process. Software updates are frequent. Here, we describe recent additions to ZFIN including (i) enhanced access to images, (ii) genomic features, (iii) genome browser, (iv) transcripts, (v) antibodies and (vi) a community wiki for protocols and antibodies. PMID:21036866

  7. Zebrafish Models of Human Leukemia: Technological Advances and Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Nicholas R.; Laroche, Fabrice J.F.; Gutierrez, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Insights concerning leukemic pathophysiology have been acquired in various animal models and further efforts to understand the mechanisms underlying leukemic treatment resistance and disease relapse promise to improve therapeutic strategies. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a vertebrate organism with a conserved hematopoietic program and unique experimental strengths suiting it for the investigation of human leukemia. Recent technological advances in zebrafish research including efficient transgenesis, precise genome editing, and straightforward transplantation techniques have led to the generation of a number of leukemia models. The transparency of the zebrafish when coupled with improved lineage-tracing and imaging techniques has revealed exquisite details of leukemic initiation, progression, and regression. With these advantages, the zebrafish represents a unique experimental system for leukemic research and additionally, advances in zebrafish-based high-throughput drug screening promise to hasten the discovery of novel leukemia therapeutics. To date, investigators have accumulated knowledge of the genetic underpinnings critical to leukemic transformation and treatment resistance and without doubt, zebrafish are rapidly expanding our understanding of disease mechanisms and helping to shape therapeutic strategies for improved outcomes in leukemic patients. PMID:27165361

  8. Medaka fish exhibits longevity gender gap, a natural drop in estrogen and telomere shortening during aging: a unique model for studying sex-dependent longevity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Females having a longer telomere and lifespan than males have been documented in many animals. Such linkage however has never been reported in fish. Progressive shortening of telomere length is an important aging mechanism. Mounting in vitro evidence has shown that telomere shortening beyond a critical length triggered replicative senescence or cell death. Estrogen has been postulated as a key factor contributing to maintenance of telomere and sex-dependent longevity in animals. This postulation remains unproven due to the lack of a suitable animal system for testing. Here, we introduce a teleost model, the Japanese medaka Oryzias latipes, which shows promise for research into the molecular mechanism(s) controlling sex difference in aging. Results Using the medaka, we demonstrate for the first time in teleost that (i) sex differences (female > male) in telomere length and longevity also exist in fish, and (ii) a natural, ‘menopause’-like decline of plasma estrogen was evident in females during aging. Estrogen levels significantly correlated with telomerase activity as well as telomere length in female organs (not in males), suggesting estrogen could modulate telomere length via telomerase activation in a sex -specific manner. A hypothetical in vivo ‘critical’ terminal restriction fragment (TRF, representing telomere) length of approximately 4 kb was deduced in medaka liver for prediction of organismal mortality, which is highly comparable with that for human cells. An age conversion model was also established to enable age translation between medaka (in months) and human (in years). These novel tools are useful for future research on comparative biology of aging using medaka. Conclusion The striking similarity in estrogen profile between aging female O. latipes and women enables studying the influence of “postmenopausal” decline of estrogen on telomere and longevity without the need of invasive ovariectomy. Medaka fish is advantageous

  9. Conservation and early expression of zebrafish tyrosine kinases support the utility of zebrafish as a model for tyrosine kinase biology.

    PubMed

    Challa, Anil Kumar; Chatti, Kiranam

    2013-09-01

    Tyrosine kinases have significant roles in cell growth, apoptosis, development, and disease. To explore the use of zebrafish as a vertebrate model for tyrosine kinase signaling and to better understand their roles, we have identified all of the tyrosine kinases encoded in the zebrafish genome and quantified RNA expression of selected tyrosine kinases during early development. Using profile hidden Markov model analysis, we identified 122 zebrafish tyrosine kinase genes and proposed unambiguous gene names where needed. We found them to be organized into 39 nonreceptor and 83 receptor type, and 30 families consistent with human tyrosine kinase family assignments. We found five human tyrosine kinase genes (epha1, bmx, fgr, srm, and insrr) with no identifiable zebrafish ortholog, and one zebrafish gene (yrk) with no identifiable human ortholog. We also found that receptor tyrosine kinase genes were duplicated more often than nonreceptor tyrosine kinase genes in zebrafish. We profiled expression levels of 30 tyrosine kinases representing all families using direct digital detection at different stages during the first 24 hours of development. The profiling experiments clearly indicate regulated expression of tyrosine kinases in the zebrafish, suggesting their role during early embryonic development. In summary, our study has resulted in the first comprehensive description of the zebrafish tyrosine kinome. PMID:23234507

  10. Conservation and Early Expression of Zebrafish Tyrosine Kinases Support the Utility of Zebrafish as a Model for Tyrosine Kinase Biology

    PubMed Central

    Challa, Anil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Tyrosine kinases have significant roles in cell growth, apoptosis, development, and disease. To explore the use of zebrafish as a vertebrate model for tyrosine kinase signaling and to better understand their roles, we have identified all of the tyrosine kinases encoded in the zebrafish genome and quantified RNA expression of selected tyrosine kinases during early development. Using profile hidden Markov model analysis, we identified 122 zebrafish tyrosine kinase genes and proposed unambiguous gene names where needed. We found them to be organized into 39 nonreceptor and 83 receptor type, and 30 families consistent with human tyrosine kinase family assignments. We found five human tyrosine kinase genes (epha1, bmx, fgr, srm, and insrr) with no identifiable zebrafish ortholog, and one zebrafish gene (yrk) with no identifiable human ortholog. We also found that receptor tyrosine kinase genes were duplicated more often than nonreceptor tyrosine kinase genes in zebrafish. We profiled expression levels of 30 tyrosine kinases representing all families using direct digital detection at different stages during the first 24 hours of development. The profiling experiments clearly indicate regulated expression of tyrosine kinases in the zebrafish, suggesting their role during early embryonic development. In summary, our study has resulted in the first comprehensive description of the zebrafish tyrosine kinome. PMID:23234507

  11. Analysing regenerative potential in zebrafish models of congenital muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Wood, A J; Currie, P D

    2014-11-01

    The congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of muscle disorders. Clinically hypotonia is present from birth, with progressive muscle weakness and wasting through development. For the most part, CMDs can mechanistically be attributed to failure of basement membrane protein laminin-α2 sufficiently binding with correctly glycosylated α-dystroglycan. The majority of CMDs therefore arise as the result of either a deficiency of laminin-α2 (MDC1A) or hypoglycosylation of α-dystroglycan (dystroglycanopathy). Here we consider whether by filling a regenerative medicine niche, the zebrafish model can address the present challenge of delivering novel therapeutic solutions for CMD. In the first instance the readiness and appropriateness of the zebrafish as a model organism for pioneering regenerative medicine therapies in CMD is analysed, in particular for MDC1A and the dystroglycanopathies. Despite the recent rapid progress made in gene editing technology, these approaches have yet to yield any novel zebrafish models of CMD. Currently the most genetically relevant zebrafish models to the field of CMD, have all been created by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis. Once genetically relevant models have been established the zebrafish has several important facets for investigating the mechanistic cause of CMD, including rapid ex vivo development, optical transparency up to the larval stages of development and relative ease in creating transgenic reporter lines. Together, these tools are well suited for use in live-imaging studies such as in vivo modelling of muscle fibre detachment. Secondly, the zebrafish's contribution to progress in effective treatment of CMD was analysed. Two approaches were identified in which zebrafish could potentially contribute to effective therapies. The first hinges on the augmentation of functional redundancy within the system, such as upregulating alternative laminin chains in the candyfloss

  12. A jump persistent turning walker to model zebrafish locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Mwaffo, Violet; Anderson, Ross P.; Butail, Sachit; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish are gaining momentum as a laboratory animal species for the investigation of several functional and dysfunctional biological processes. Mathematical models of zebrafish behaviour are expected to considerably aid in the design of hypothesis-driven studies by enabling preliminary in silico tests that can be used to infer possible experimental outcomes without the use of zebrafish. This study is motivated by observations of sudden, drastic changes in zebrafish locomotion in the form of large deviations in turn rate. We demonstrate that such deviations can be captured through a stochastic mean reverting jump diffusion model, a process that is commonly used in financial engineering to describe large changes in the price of an asset. The jump process-based model is validated on trajectory data of adult subjects swimming in a shallow circular tank obtained from an overhead camera. Through statistical comparison of the empirical distribution of the turn rate against theoretical predictions, we demonstrate the feasibility of describing zebrafish as a jump persistent turning walker. The critical role of the jump term is assessed through comparison with a simplified mean reversion diffusion model, which does not allow for describing the heavy-tailed distributions observed in the fish turn rate. PMID:25392396

  13. Life-cycle experiments of medaka fish aboard the international space station.

    PubMed

    Ijiri, Kenichi

    2003-01-01

    Fish are the most likely candidates to be the first vertebrate to live their life cycle aboard the International Space Station (ISS). In the space-shuttle experiment using medaka, the fry born in space had the same number of germ cells as the ground control fish, and these germ cells later developed to produce the offspring on the ground. Fry hatched in space did not exhibit any looping behavior regardless of their strain, visual acuity, etc. The aquatic habitat (AQH) is a space habitat designed for long-term breeding of medaka, zebrafish and Xenopus, and recent advancements in this hardware also support fish life-cycle experiments. From the crosses between two strains, fish having good eyesight and less sensitivity to gravity were obtained, and their tolerance to microgravity was tested by parabolic flight using an airplane. The fish exhibited less looping and no differences in degree of looping between light and dark conditions. These are possible candidates for the first adult medaka (parent fish) to start a life cycle aboard ISS. Embryos were treated with a three-dimensional clinostat. Such simulated microgravity caused no differences in tissue architecture or in gene expression within the retina, nor in formation of cartilage (head skeleton). Otolith formation in embryos and fry was investigated for wild-type and mutant (ha) medaka. The ha embryos could not form utricular otoliths. They formed saccular otoliths but with a delay. Fry of the mutant fish lacking the utricular otoliths are highly light-dependent at the time of hatching, showing a perfect dorsal-light response (DLR). As they grow, they eventually shift from being light dependent to gravity dependent. Continuous treatment of the fry with altered light direction suppressed this shift to gravity dependence. Being less dependent on gravity, these fish can serve as model fish in studying the differences expected for the fish that have experienced a life cycle in microgravity. PMID:14631634

  14. ZFIN, the Zebrafish Model Organism Database: updates and new directions

    PubMed Central

    Ruzicka, Leyla; Bradford, Yvonne M.; Frazer, Ken; Howe, Douglas G.; Paddock, Holly; Ramachandran, Sridhar; Singer, Amy; Toro, Sabrina; Van Slyke, Ceri E.; Eagle, Anne E.; Fashena, David; Kalita, Patrick; Knight, Jonathan; Mani, Prita; Martin, Ryan; Moxon, Sierra A. T.; Pich, Christian; Schaper, Kevin; Shao, Xiang; Westerfield, Monte

    2015-01-01

    The Zebrafish Model Organism Database (ZFIN; http://zfin.org) is the central resource for genetic and genomic data from zebrafish (Danio rerio) research. ZFIN staff curate detailed information about genes, mutants, genotypes, reporter lines, sequences, constructs, antibodies, knockdown reagents, expression patterns, phenotypes, gene product function, and orthology from publications. Researchers can submit mutant, transgenic, expression, and phenotype data directly to ZFIN and use the ZFIN Community Wiki to share antibody and protocol information. Data can be accessed through topic-specific searches, a new site-wide search, and the data-mining resource ZebrafishMine (http://zebrafishmine.org). Data download and web service options are also available. ZFIN collaborates with major bioinformatics organizations to verify and integrate genomic sequence data, provide nomenclature support, establish reciprocal links and participate in the development of standardized structured vocabularies (ontologies) used for data annotation and searching. ZFIN-curated gene, function, expression, and phenotype data are available for comparative exploration at several multi-species resources. The use of zebrafish as a model for human disease is increasing. ZFIN is supporting this growing area with three major projects: adding easy access to computed orthology data from gene pages, curating details of the gene expression pattern changes in mutant fish, and curating zebrafish models of human diseases. PMID:26097180

  15. ZFIN, The zebrafish model organism database: Updates and new directions.

    PubMed

    Ruzicka, Leyla; Bradford, Yvonne M; Frazer, Ken; Howe, Douglas G; Paddock, Holly; Ramachandran, Sridhar; Singer, Amy; Toro, Sabrina; Van Slyke, Ceri E; Eagle, Anne E; Fashena, David; Kalita, Patrick; Knight, Jonathan; Mani, Prita; Martin, Ryan; Moxon, Sierra A T; Pich, Christian; Schaper, Kevin; Shao, Xiang; Westerfield, Monte

    2015-08-01

    The Zebrafish Model Organism Database (ZFIN; http://zfin.org) is the central resource for genetic and genomic data from zebrafish (Danio rerio) research. ZFIN staff curate detailed information about genes, mutants, genotypes, reporter lines, sequences, constructs, antibodies, knockdown reagents, expression patterns, phenotypes, gene product function, and orthology from publications. Researchers can submit mutant, transgenic, expression, and phenotype data directly to ZFIN and use the ZFIN Community Wiki to share antibody and protocol information. Data can be accessed through topic-specific searches, a new site-wide search, and the data-mining resource ZebrafishMine (http://zebrafishmine.org). Data download and web service options are also available. ZFIN collaborates with major bioinformatics organizations to verify and integrate genomic sequence data, provide nomenclature support, establish reciprocal links, and participate in the development of standardized structured vocabularies (ontologies) used for data annotation and searching. ZFIN-curated gene, function, expression, and phenotype data are available for comparative exploration at several multi-species resources. The use of zebrafish as a model for human disease is increasing. ZFIN is supporting this growing area with three major projects: adding easy access to computed orthology data from gene pages, curating details of the gene expression pattern changes in mutant fish, and curating zebrafish models of human diseases. PMID:26097180

  16. Analysis of the Retina in the Zebrafish Model

    PubMed Central

    Avanesov, Andrei; Malicki, Jarema

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish is one of the leading models for the analysis of the vertebrate visual system. A wide assortment of molecular, genetic, and cell biological approaches is available to study zebrafish visual system development and function. As new techniques become available, genetic analysis and imaging continue to be the strengths of the zebrafish model. In particular, recent developments in the use of transposons and zinc finger nucleases to produce new generations of mutant strains enhance both forward and reverse genetic analysis. Similarly, the imaging of developmental and physiological processes benefits from a wide assortment of fluorescent proteins and the ways to express them in the embryo. The zebrafish is also highly attractive for high-throughput screening of small molecules, a promising strategy to search for compounds with therapeutic potential. Here we discuss experimental approaches used in the zebrafish model to study morpho−genetic transformations, cell fate decisions, and the differentiation of fine morphological features that ultimately lead to the formation of the functional vertebrate visual system. PMID:21111217

  17. Zebrafish: A Model for the Study of Addiction Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Klee, Eric W; Schneider, Henning; Clark, Karl; Cousin, Margot; Ebbert, Jon; Hooten, Michael; Karpyak, Victor; Warner, David; Ekker, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Drug abuse and dependence are multifaceted disorders with complex genetic underpinnings. Identifying specific genetic correlates is challenging and may be more readily accomplished by defining endophenotypes specific for addictive disorders. Symptoms and syndromes, including acute drug response, consumption, preference, and withdrawal, are potential endophenotypes characterizing addiction that have been investigated using model organisms. We present a review of major genes involved in serotonergic, dopaminergic, GABAergic, and adrenoreceptor signaling that are considered to be directly involved in nicotine, opioid, cannabinoid, and ethanol use and dependence. The zebrafish genome encodes likely homologs of the vast majority of these loci. We also review the known expression patterns of these genes in zebrafish. The information presented in this review provides support for the use of zebrafish as a viable model for studying genetic factors related to drug addiction. Expansion of investigations into drug response using model organisms holds the potential to advance our understanding of drug response and addiction in humans. PMID:22207143

  18. Distinct phenotypes in zebrafish models of human startle disease☆

    PubMed Central

    Ganser, Lisa R.; Yan, Qing; James, Victoria M.; Kozol, Robert; Topf, Maya; Harvey, Robert J.; Dallman, Julia E.

    2013-01-01

    Startle disease is an inherited neurological disorder that causes affected individuals to suffer noise- or touch-induced non-epileptic seizures, excessive muscle stiffness and neonatal apnea episodes. Mutations known to cause startle disease have been identified in glycine receptor subunit (GLRA1 and GLRB) and glycine transporter (SLC6A5) genes, which serve essential functions at glycinergic synapses. Despite the significant successes in identifying startle disease mutations, many idiopathic cases remain unresolved. Exome sequencing in these individuals will identify new candidate genes. To validate these candidate disease genes, zebrafish is an ideal choice due to rapid knockdown strategies, accessible embryonic stages, and stereotyped behaviors. The only existing zebrafish model of startle disease, bandoneon (beo), harbors point mutations in glrbb (one of two zebrafish orthologs of human GLRB) that cause compromised glycinergic transmission and touch-induced bilateral muscle contractions. In order to further develop zebrafish as a model for startle disease, we sought to identify common phenotypic outcomes of knocking down zebrafish orthologs of two known startle disease genes, GLRA1 and GLRB, using splice site-targeted morpholinos. Although both morphants were expected to result in phenotypes similar to the zebrafish beo mutant, our direct comparison demonstrated that while both glra1 and glrbb morphants exhibited embryonic spasticity, only glrbb morphants exhibited bilateral contractions characteristic of beo mutants. Likewise, zebrafish over-expressing a dominant startle disease mutation (GlyR α1R271Q) exhibited spasticity but not bilateral contractions. Since GlyR βb can interact with GlyR α subunits 2–4 in addition to GlyR α1, loss of the GlyR βb subunit may produce more severe phenotypes by affecting multiple GlyR subtypes. Indeed, immunohistochemistry of glra1 morphants suggests that in zebrafish, alternate GlyR α subunits can compensate for the

  19. Exploring Hallucinogen Pharmacology and Psychedelic Medicine with Zebrafish Models.

    PubMed

    Kyzar, Evan J; Kalueff, Allan V

    2016-10-01

    After decades of sociopolitical obstacles, the field of psychiatry is experiencing a revived interest in the use of hallucinogenic agents to treat brain disorders. Along with the use of ketamine for depression, recent pilot studies have highlighted the efficacy of classic serotonergic hallucinogens, such as lysergic acid diethylamide and psilocybin, in treating addiction, post-traumatic stress disorder, and anxiety. However, many basic pharmacological and toxicological questions remain unanswered with regard to these compounds. In this study, we discuss psychedelic medicine as well as the behavioral and toxicological effects of hallucinogenic drugs in zebrafish. We emphasize this aquatic organism as a model ideally suited to assess both the potential toxic and therapeutic effects of major known classes of hallucinogenic compounds. In addition, novel drugs with hallucinogenic properties can be efficiently screened using zebrafish models. Well-designed preclinical studies utilizing zebrafish can contribute to the reemerging treatment paradigm of psychedelic medicine, leading to new avenues of clinical exploration for psychiatric disorders. PMID:27002655

  20. The use of mature zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a model for human aging and disease.

    PubMed

    Keller, Evan T; Murtha, Jill M

    2004-07-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) have been extensively utilized for understanding mechanisms of development. These studies have led to a wealth of resources including genetic tools, informational databases, and husbandry methods. In spite of all these resources, zebrafish have been underutilized for exploring pathophysiology of disease and the aging process. Zebrafish offer several advantages over mammalian models for these studies, including the ability to perform saturation mutagenesis and the capability to contain thousands of animals in a small space. In this review, we will discuss the use of mature zebrafish as an animal model and provide specific examples to support this novel use of zebrafish. Examples include demonstrating that clinical pathology can be performed in mature zebrafish and that age-associated changes in heat shock response can be observed in zebrafish. These highlights demonstrate the utility of zebrafish as a model for disease and aging. PMID:15533791

  1. Zebrafish as a Model to Investigate Dynamin 2-Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bragato, Cinzia; Gaudenzi, Germano; Blasevich, Flavia; Pavesi, Giulio; Maggi, Lorenzo; Giunta, Michele; Cotelli, Franco; Mora, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the dynamin-2 gene (DNM2) cause autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy (CNM) and dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathy type B (CMTDIB). As the relation between these DNM2-related diseases is poorly understood, we used zebrafish to investigate the effects of two different DNM2 mutations. First we identified a new alternatively spliced zebrafish dynamin-2a mRNA (dnm2a-v2) with greater similarity to human DNM2 than the deposited sequence. Then we knocked-down the zebrafish dnm2a, producing defects in muscle morphology. Finally, we expressed two mutated DNM2 mRNA by injecting zebrafish embryos with human mRNAs carrying the R522H mutation, causing CNM, or the G537C mutation, causing CMT. Defects arose especially in secondary motor neuron formation, with incorrect branching in embryos injected with CNM-mutated mRNA, and total absence of branching in those injected with CMT-mutated mRNA. Muscle morphology in embryos injected with CMT-mutated mRNA appeared less regularly organized than in those injected with CNM-mutated mRNA. Our results showing, a continuum between CNM and CMTDIB phenotypes in zebrafish, similarly to the human conditions, confirm this animal model to be a powerful tool to investigate mutations of DNM2 in vivo. PMID:26842864

  2. Nephrotoxin Microinjection in Zebrafish to Model Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    McKee, Robert A; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2016-01-01

    The kidneys are susceptible to harm from exposure to chemicals they filter from the bloodstream. This can lead to organ injury associated with a rapid decline in renal function and development of the clinical syndrome known as acute kidney injury (AKI). Pharmacological agents used to treat medical circumstances ranging from bacterial infection to cancer, when administered individually or in combination with other drugs, can initiate AKI. Zebrafish are a useful animal model to study the chemical effects on renal function in vivo, as they form an embryonic kidney comprised of nephron functional units that are conserved with higher vertebrates, including humans. Further, zebrafish can be utilized to perform genetic and chemical screens, which provide opportunities to elucidate the cellular and molecular facets of AKI and develop therapeutic strategies such as the identification of nephroprotective molecules. Here, we demonstrate how microinjection into the zebrafish embryo can be utilized as a paradigm for nephrotoxin studies. PMID:27500823

  3. Use of Medaka in Toxicity Testing

    PubMed Central

    Cowden, John; Hinton, David E.; Johnson, Rodney; Flynn, Kevin; Hardman, Ronald C.; Yuen, Bonny; Law, Sheran; Kullman, Seth W.; Au, Doris W.T.

    2015-01-01

    Small aquarium fishes are increasingly used as animal models, and one of these, Japanese Medaka (Oryzias latipes), is frequently utilized for toxicity testing. While these vertebrates have many similarities with their terrestrial counterparts, there are differences that must be considered if these organisms are to be used to their highest potential. Testing commonly may employ either the developing embryo or adults; both are easy to use and to work with. We present here three main protocols to illustrate the utility and breadth of toxicity testing possible using medaka fish. The first protocol assesses neurotoxicity in developing embryos. The second protocol describes the sexual genotyping of medaka to evaluate toxicant effects on sexual phenotype after treatment with endocrine disrupting chemicals. The third protocol assesses hepatotoxicity in adult fish after treatment with a model hepatotoxicant. The methods run the gamut from immunohistology through PCR to basic histological techniques. PMID:20922755

  4. Zebrafish Egg Infection Model for Studying Candida albicans Adhesion Factors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yin-Zhi; Yang, Yun-Liang; Chu, Wen-Li; You, May-Su; Lo, Hsiu-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Disseminated candidiasis is associated with 30-40% mortality in severely immunocompromised patients. Among the causal agents, Candida albicans is the dominant one. Various animal models have been developed for investigating gene functions in C. albicans. Zebrafish injection models have increasingly been applied in elucidating C. albicans pathogenesis because of the conserved immunity, prolific fecundity of the zebrafish and the low costs of care systems. In this study, we established a simple, noninvasive zebrafish egg bath infection model, defined its optimal conditions, and evaluated the model with various C. albicans mutant strains. The deletion of SAP6 did not have significant effect on the virulence. By contrast, the deletion of BCR1, CPH1, EFG1, or TEC1 significantly reduced the virulence under current conditions. Furthermore, all embryos survived when co-incubated with bcr1/bcr1, cph1/cph1 efg1/efg1, efg1/efg1, or tec1/tec1 mutant cells. The results indicated that our novel zebrafish model is time-saving and cost effective. PMID:26569623

  5. Developing an Experimental Model of Vascular Toxicity in Embryonic Zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developing an Experimental Model of Vascular Toxicity in Embryonic Zebrafish Tamara Tal, Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, U.S. EPA Background: There are tens of thousands of chemicals that have yet to be fully evaluated for their toxicity by validated in vivo testing ...

  6. The zebrafish as a model to study polycystic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Tietz Bogert, Pamela S; Huang, Bing Q; Gradilone, Sergio A; Masyuk, Tetyana V; Moulder, Gary L; Ekker, Stephen C; Larusso, Nicholas F

    2013-06-01

    In the polycystic liver diseases (PLD), genetic defects initiate the formation of cysts in the liver and kidney. In rodent models of PLD (i.e., the PCK rat and Pkd2(WS25/-) mouse), we have studied hepatorenal cystic disease and therapeutic approaches. In this study, we employed zebrafish injected with morpholinos against genes involved in the PLD, including sec63, prkcsh, and pkd1a. We calculated the liver cystic area, and based on our rodent studies, we exposed the embryos to pasireotide [1 μM] or vitamin K3 [100 μM] and assessed the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in cholangiocytes in embryos treated with 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA). Our results show that (a) morpholinos against sec63, prkcsh, and pkd1a eliminate expression of the respective proteins; (b) phenotypic body changes included curved tail and the formation of hepatic cysts in zebrafish larvae; (c) exposure of embryos to pasireotide inhibited hepatic cystogenesis in the zebrafish models; and (d) exposure of embryos to 4-PBA resulted in the ER in cholangiocytes resolving from a curved to a smooth appearance. Our results suggest that the zebrafish model of PLD may provide a means to screen drugs that could inhibit hepatic cystogenesis. PMID:23668934

  7. Modeling PTSD in the zebrafish: are we there yet?

    PubMed

    Caramillo, Erika M; Khan, Kanza M; Collier, Adam D; Echevarria, David J

    2015-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder is an anxiety disorder that can develop following one or more traumatic events that threaten one's safety or make the victim feel helpless. Currently there are an increasing number of cases in the population in part due to the number of soldiers returning from combat. The disorder is characterized by symptoms that include hypervigilance, sleep disturbances, social and cognitive degradation, and memory flashbacks. Most of the research has been centered on the human and rodent as subjects but recently another viable contender has emerged - the zebrafish (Danio rerio). The zebrafish is a strong comparative model with the ability to exhibit a wide variety of behaviors, complex learning, and neurobiological changes that can be extrapolated to the human condition. The zebrafish is an ideal organism to study pharmacological treatments as well as the neurological underpinnings of the disorder. Here we review a sampling of the human and rodent model literature on post-traumatic stress disorder focusing on symptomology, current treatments, and stress paradigms. We also make the argument for the inclusion of the zebrafish model in future studies investigating the causes, symptoms, and treatments of post-traumatic stress disorder. PMID:24821404

  8. Zebrafish as a disease model for studying human hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jeng-Wei; Ho, Yi-Jung; Yang, Yi-Ju; Liao, Heng-An; Ciou, Shih-Ci; Lin, Liang-In; Ou, Da-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Liver cancer is one of the world’s most common cancers and the second leading cause of cancer deaths. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a primary hepatic cancer, accounts for 90%-95% of liver cancer cases. The pathogenesis of HCC consists of a stepwise process of liver damage that extends over decades, due to hepatitis, fatty liver, fibrosis, and cirrhosis before developing fully into HCC. Multiple risk factors are highly correlated with HCC, including infection with the hepatitis B or C viruses, alcohol abuse, aflatoxin exposure, and metabolic diseases. Over the last decade, genetic alterations, which include the regulation of multiple oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes and the activation of tumorigenesis-related pathways, have also been identified as important factors in HCC. Recently, zebrafish have become an important living vertebrate model organism, especially for translational medical research. In studies focusing on the biology of cancer, carcinogen induced tumors in zebrafish were found to have many similarities to human tumors. Several zebrafish models have therefore been developed to provide insight into the pathogenesis of liver cancer and the related drug discovery and toxicology, and to enable the evaluation of novel small-molecule inhibitors. This review will focus on illustrative examples involving the application of zebrafish models to the study of human liver disease and HCC, through transgenesis, genome editing technology, xenografts, drug discovery, and drug-induced toxic liver injury. PMID:26576090

  9. A zebrafish model for subgenomic hepatitis C virus replication.

    PubMed

    Ding, Cun-Bao; Zhao, Ye; Zhang, Jing-Pu; Peng, Zong-Gen; Song, Dan-Qing; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2015-03-01

    Persistent infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major risk factor in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. The elucidation of the pathogenesis of HCV-associated liver disease is hampered by the absence of an appropriate small animal model. Zebrafish exhibits high genetic homology to mammals, and is easily manipulated experimentally. In this study, we describe the use of a zebrafish model for the analysis of HCV replication mechanisms. As the 5' untranslated region (UTR), the core protein, the non-structural protein 5B (NS5B) and the 3'UTR are essential for HCV replication, we constructed a HCV sub-replicon gene construct including the 4 gene sequences and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter gene; these genes were transcribed through the mouse hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (mHNF4) promoter. By microinjection of the subgenomic replicon vector into zebrafish larvae, the virus was easily detected by observing EGFP fluorescence in the liver. The positive core and NS5B signals showed positive expression of the HCV gene construct in zebrafish by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analysis. Importantly, the negative strand sequence of the HCV subgenomic RNA was detected by RT-PCR and hybridization in situ, demonstrating that the HCV sub-replicon has positive replication activity. Furthermore, the hybridization signal mainly appeared in the liver region of larvae, as detected by the sense probe of the core protein or NS5B, which confirmed that the sub-replicon amplification occurred in the zebrafish liver. The amplification of the sub-replicon caused alterations in the expression of certain genes, which is similar to HCV infection in human liver cells. To verify the use of this zebrafish model in drug evaluation, two drugs against HCV used in clinical practice, ribavirin and oxymatrine, were tested and these drugs showed significant inhibition of replication of the HCV sub-replicon in the larvae. In

  10. Zebrafish as a Model for the Study of Chaperonopathies.

    PubMed

    Bellipanni, Gianfranco; Cappello, Francesco; Scalia, Federica; Conway de Macario, Everly; Macario, Alberto J L; Giordano, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    There is considerable information on the clinical manifestations and mode of inheritance for many genetic chaperonopathies but little is known on the molecular mechanisms underlying the cell and tissue abnormalities that characterize them. This scarcity of knowledge is mostly due to the lack of appropriate animal models that mimic closely the human molecular, cellular, and histological characteristics. In this article we introduce zebrafish as a suitable model to study molecular and cellular mechanisms pertaining to human chaperonopathies. Genetic chaperonopathies manifest themselves from very early in life so it is necessary to examine the impact of mutant chaperone genes during development, starting with fertilization and proceeding throughout the entire ontogenetic process. Zebrafish is amenable to such developmental analysis as well as studies during adulthood. In addition, the zebrafish genome contains a wide range of genes encoding proteins similar to those that form the chaperoning system of humans. This, together with the availability of techniques for genetic manipulations and for examination of all stages of development, makes zebrafish the organism of choice for the analysis of the molecular features and pathogenic mechanisms pertaining to human chaperonopathies. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2107-2114, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26812965

  11. Trolling for the ideal model host: zebrafish take the bait

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jonathan P; Neely, Melody N

    2010-01-01

    As little as 10 years ago, murine models of infectious disease were the host of choice for analyzing interactions between the pathogen and host during infection. However, not all pathogens can infect mice, nor do they always replicate the clinical syndromes observed in human infections. Furthermore, in the current economic environment, using mammalian models for large-scale screens may be less economically feasible. The emergence of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) as an infectious disease host model, as well as a model for vertebrate immune system development, has provided new information and insights into pathogenesis that, in many instances, would not have been possible using a murine model host. In this article we highlight some of the key findings and the latest techniques along with the many advantages of using the zebrafish host model to gain new insights into pathogenic mechanisms in a live vertebrate host. PMID:20353298

  12. Zebrafish as animal model for aquaculture nutrition research.

    PubMed

    Ulloa, Pilar E; Medrano, Juan F; Feijoo, Carmen G

    2014-01-01

    The aquaculture industry continues to promote the diversification of ingredients used in aquafeed in order to achieve a more sustainable aquaculture production system. The evaluation of large numbers of diets in aquaculture species is costly and requires time-consuming trials in some species. In contrast, zebrafish (Danio rerio) can solve these drawbacks as an experimental model, and represents an ideal organism to carry out preliminary evaluation of diets. In addition, zebrafish has a sequenced genome allowing the efficient utilization of new technologies, such as RNA-sequencing and genotyping platforms to study the molecular mechanisms that underlie the organism's response to nutrients. Also, biotechnological tools like transgenic lines with fluorescently labeled neutrophils that allow the evaluation of the immune response in vivo, are readily available in this species. Thus, zebrafish provides an attractive platform for testing many ingredients to select those with the highest potential of success in aquaculture. In this perspective article aspects related to diet evaluation in which zebrafish can make important contributions to nutritional genomics and nutritional immunity are discussed. PMID:25309575

  13. Zebrafish as animal model for aquaculture nutrition research

    PubMed Central

    Ulloa, Pilar E.; Medrano, Juan F.; Feijoo, Carmen G.

    2014-01-01

    The aquaculture industry continues to promote the diversification of ingredients used in aquafeed in order to achieve a more sustainable aquaculture production system. The evaluation of large numbers of diets in aquaculture species is costly and requires time-consuming trials in some species. In contrast, zebrafish (Danio rerio) can solve these drawbacks as an experimental model, and represents an ideal organism to carry out preliminary evaluation of diets. In addition, zebrafish has a sequenced genome allowing the efficient utilization of new technologies, such as RNA-sequencing and genotyping platforms to study the molecular mechanisms that underlie the organism’s response to nutrients. Also, biotechnological tools like transgenic lines with fluorescently labeled neutrophils that allow the evaluation of the immune response in vivo, are readily available in this species. Thus, zebrafish provides an attractive platform for testing many ingredients to select those with the highest potential of success in aquaculture. In this perspective article aspects related to diet evaluation in which zebrafish can make important contributions to nutritional genomics and nutritional immunity are discussed. PMID:25309575

  14. Zebrafish as a model to study chemokine function.

    PubMed

    Kochhan, Eva; Siekmann, Arndt F

    2013-01-01

    Zebrafish have emerged as a powerful model organism to study embryo morphogenesis. Due to their optical clarity, they are uniquely suited for time-lapse imaging studies, providing insights into the dynamic processes underlying tissue formation and cell migration. These studies have been tremendously facilitated by the availability of transgenic zebrafish lines, labelling distinct embryonic structures, individual cells, or even subcellular structures, such as the nucleus. Zebrafish studies have revealed that the migration of several different cell types in the embryo is controlled by chemokines, small vertebrate-specific proteins. Here, we report methods to analyze the expression pattern of a given chemokine and its receptor in transgenic zebrafish using fluorescent in situ hybridization in combination with an anti-green fluorescent protein (GFP) antibody staining. We furthermore illustrate how to image migrating cell populations using time-lapse microscopy in double-transgenic embryos. We show how to investigate cell number and direction of migration by using a nuclear-localized GFP. The combination of this transgene with a membrane-targeted red fluorescent protein allows for the simultaneous determination of changes in cell shape, such as the formation of filopodial extensions. We exemplify this by describing how a mutation in the chemokine receptor cxcr4a affects endothelial cell migration and blood vessel formation. Finally, we provide a method to perform fluorescent angiography to monitor blood vessel perfusion in chemokine receptor mutants. PMID:23625497

  15. An Individual-Based Model of Zebrafish Population Dynamics Accounting for Energy Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Beaudouin, Rémy; Goussen, Benoit; Piccini, Benjamin; Augustine, Starrlight; Devillers, James; Brion, François; Péry, Alexandre R. R.

    2015-01-01

    Developing population dynamics models for zebrafish is crucial in order to extrapolate from toxicity data measured at the organism level to biological levels relevant to support and enhance ecological risk assessment. To achieve this, a dynamic energy budget for individual zebrafish (DEB model) was coupled to an individual based model of zebrafish population dynamics (IBM model). Next, we fitted the DEB model to new experimental data on zebrafish growth and reproduction thus improving existing models. We further analysed the DEB-model and DEB-IBM using a sensitivity analysis. Finally, the predictions of the DEB-IBM were compared to existing observations on natural zebrafish populations and the predicted population dynamics are realistic. While our zebrafish DEB-IBM model can still be improved by acquiring new experimental data on the most uncertain processes (e.g. survival or feeding), it can already serve to predict the impact of compounds at the population level. PMID:25938409

  16. The Developing Utility of Zebrafish Models for Cognitive Enhancers Research

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Adam Michael; Kalueff, Allan V

    2012-01-01

    Whereas cognitive impairment is a common symptom in multiple brain disorders, predictive and high-throughput animal models of cognition and behavior are becoming increasingly important in the field of translational neuroscience research. In particular, reliable models of the cognitive deficits characteristic of numerous neurobehavioral disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia have become a significant focus of investigation. While rodents have traditionally been used to study cognitive phenotypes, zebrafish (Danio rerio) are gaining popularity as an excellent model to complement current translational neuroscience research. Here we discuss recent advances in pharmacological and genetic approaches using zebrafish models to study cognitive impairments and to discover novel cognitive enhancers and neuroprotective mechanisms. PMID:23449968

  17. Data-driven stochastic modelling of zebrafish locomotion.

    PubMed

    Zienkiewicz, Adam; Barton, David A W; Porfiri, Maurizio; di Bernardo, Mario

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we develop a data-driven modelling framework to reproduce the locomotion of fish in a confined environment. Specifically, we highlight the primary characteristics of the motion of individual zebrafish (Danio rerio), and study how these can be suitably encapsulated within a mathematical framework utilising a limited number of calibrated model parameters. Using data captured from individual zebrafish via automated visual tracking, we develop a model using stochastic differential equations and describe fish as a self propelled particle moving in a plane. Based on recent experimental evidence of the importance of speed regulation in social behaviour, we extend stochastic models of fish locomotion by introducing experimentally-derived processes describing dynamic speed regulation. Salient metrics are defined which are then used to calibrate key parameters of coupled stochastic differential equations, describing both speed and angular speed of swimming fish. The effects of external constraints are also included, based on experimentally observed responses. Understanding the spontaneous dynamics of zebrafish using a bottom-up, purely data-driven approach is expected to yield a modelling framework for quantitative investigation of individual behaviour in the presence of various external constraints or biological assays. PMID:25358499

  18. Generation of Transparent Zebrafish with Fluorescent Ovaries: A Living Visible Model for Reproductive Biology.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Afroza; Kumagai, Ryo-Ichi; Roy, Shimi Rani; Ii, Sanae; Tokumoto, Mika; Hossain, Babul; Wang, Jun; Klangnurak, Wanlada; Miyazaki, Takehiro; Tokumoto, Toshinobu

    2016-06-01

    The transparent zebrafish enables researchers to study the morphology and distribution of cells and tissues in vivo. To capture the dynamic processes of germ cell proliferation and juvenile ovarian development in zebrafish in vivo, we established transgenic (TG) lines to allow us to monitor the changes in the ovaries of living fish. The original transgenic line with ovarian fluorescence was occasionally established. Although the cDNA integrated in the strain was constructed for the expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) driven by the medaka β-actin promoter, expression of EGFP is restricted to the oocytes and gills in adult fish. Mutant strains with transparent bodies, roy and ruby, were isolated in zebrafish. In this study, we crossed the TG strain with fluorescent ovary with transparent strains and established the TG (β-actin:EGFP);ruby strain. The strain is highly transparent, and the oocytes are easily observed in living fish. We identified a fluorescent tissue that might contain the undifferentiated germ cells close to the cloaca in the strain. This strain can be used for analysis of ovarian development in vivo. PMID:26914666

  19. Embryonic Medaka Model of Microglia in the Developing CNS Allowing In Vivo Analysis of Their Spatiotemporal Recruitment in Response to Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Takako; Oda, Shoji; Hibi, Yusuke; Satoh, Satomi; Nagata, Kento; Hirakawa, Kei; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Sagara, Hiroshi; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is pivotal in the treatment of many central nervous system (CNS) pathologies; however, exposure to RT in children is associated with a higher risk of secondary CNS tumors. Although recent research interest has focused on the reparative and therapeutic role of microglia, their recruitment following RT has not been elucidated, especially in the developing CNS. Here, we investigated the spatiotemporal dynamics of microglia during tissue repair in the irradiated embryonic medaka brain by whole-mount in situ hybridization using a probe for Apolipoprotein E (ApoE), a marker for activated microglia in teleosts. Three-dimensional imaging of the distribution of ApoE-expressing microglia in the irradiated embryonic brain clearly showed that ApoE-expressing microglia were abundant only in the late phase of phagocytosis during tissue repair induced by irradiation, while few microglia expressed ApoE in the initial phase of phagocytosis. This strongly suggests that ApoE has a significant function in the late phase of phagocytosis by microglia in the medaka brain. In addition, the distribution of microglia in p53-deficient embryos at the late phase of phagocytosis was almost the same as in wild-type embryos, despite the low numbers of irradiation-induced apoptotic neurons, suggesting that constant numbers of activated microglia were recruited at the late phase of phagocytosis irrespective of the extent of neuronal injury. This medaka model of microglia demonstrated specific recruitment after irradiation in the developing CNS and could provide a useful potential therapeutic strategy to counteract the detrimental effects of RT. PMID:26061282

  20. Computational Graph Theoretical Model of the Zebrafish Sensorimotor Pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Joshua M.; Stobb, Michael; Mazzag, Bori; Gahtan, Ethan

    2011-11-01

    Mapping the detailed connectivity patterns of neural circuits is a central goal of neuroscience and has been the focus of extensive current research [4, 3]. The best quantitative approach to analyze the acquired data is still unclear but graph theory has been used with success [3, 1]. We present a graph theoretical model with vertices and edges representing neurons and synaptic connections, respectively. Our system is the zebrafish posterior lateral line sensorimotor pathway. The goal of our analysis is to elucidate mechanisms of information processing in this neural pathway by comparing the mathematical properties of its graph to those of other, previously described graphs. We create a zebrafish model based on currently known anatomical data. The degree distributions and small-world measures of this model is compared to small-world, random and 3-compartment random graphs of the same size (with over 2500 nodes and 160,000 connections). We find that the zebrafish graph shows small-worldness similar to other neural networks and does not have a scale-free distribution of connections.

  1. Germ cell mutagenesis in medaka fish after exposures to high-energy cosmic ray nuclei: A human model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Atsuko; Shima, Akihiro; Nojima, Kumie; Seino, Yo; Setlow, Richard B.

    2005-04-01

    Astronauts beyond the Earth's orbit are exposed to high-energy cosmic-ray nuclei with high values of linear energy transfer (LET), resulting in much more biological damage than from x-rays or -rays and may result in mutations and cancer induction. The relative biological effectiveness of these nuclei depends on the LET, rising to as high as 50 at LET values of 100-200 keV/µm. An endpoint of concern is germ cell mutations passed on to offspring, arising from exposure to these nuclei. A vertebrate model for germ cell mutation is Medaka fish (Oryzias latipes). We exposed wild type males to doses of 1 GeV per nucleon Fe nuclei or to 290 MeV per nucleon C nuclei. They were mated to females with recessive mutations at five-color loci. The transparent embryos from >100 days of mating (representing exposed sperm, spermatids, or spermatogonia) were observed so as to detect dominant lethal mutations and total color mutations, even though the embryos might not hatch. The relative number of mutant embryos as a function of dose were compared with those induced by -rays. The relative biological effectiveness values for dominant lethal mutations and total color mutations for exposed sperm and spermatids were 1.3-2.1 for exposure to C nuclei and 1.5-3.0 for exposure to Fe nuclei. (The spermatogonial data were uncertain.) These low values, and the negligible number of viable mutations, compared with those for mutations in somatic cells and for neoplastic transformation, indicate that germ cell mutations arising from exposures to cosmic ray nuclei are not a significant hazard to astronauts. astronaut hazards | linear energy transfer | relative biological effect

  2. Histopathology of a wavy medaka

    PubMed Central

    Irie, Kota; Kuroda, Yusuke; Mimori, Norihiko; Hayashi, Seigo; Abe, Masayoshi; Tsuji, Naho; Sugiyama, Akihiko; Furukawa, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Wavy medakas are medakas that exhibit spinal curvature characterized by dorsoventrally curved vertebrae. We found a spontaneous wavy medaka in our experimental stock and subjected it to a histopathological examination. Macroscopically, the wavy medaka’s spine formed an M shape, and its vertebrae displayed a dorsoventral curvature that started at the third vertebral bone. Microscopically, the vertebral cavities were filled with fibrous tissue, which was similar to that seen in the central parts of the intervertebral discs of a normal medaka. The vertebral joints were composed of vacuolated notochord cells without intervertebral disc formation. These changes were also observed in the caudal region, which exhibited less curvature. In the normal medaka, the intervertebral discs form via the regression of the notochord that plays a key role in the development of vertebrae and disc formation. We concluded that notochordal subinvolution had induced intervertebral disc dysplasia, leading to lordokyphosis, in the wavy medaka. PMID:27182116

  3. Toxicity of silver nanoparticles in zebrafish models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asharani, P. V.; Lian Wu, Yi; Gong, Zhiyuan; Valiyaveettil, Suresh

    2008-06-01

    This study was initiated to enhance our insight on the health and environmental impact of silver nanoparticles (Ag-np). Using starch and bovine serum albumin (BSA) as capping agents, silver nanoparticles were synthesized to study their deleterious effects and distribution pattern in zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio). Toxicological endpoints like mortality, hatching, pericardial edema and heart rate were recorded. A concentration-dependent increase in mortality and hatching delay was observed in Ag-np treated embryos. Additionally, nanoparticle treatments resulted in concentration-dependent toxicity, typified by phenotypes that had abnormal body axes, twisted notochord, slow blood flow, pericardial edema and cardiac arrhythmia. Ag+ ions and stabilizing agents showed no significant defects in developing embryos. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the embryos demonstrated that nanoparticles were distributed in the brain, heart, yolk and blood of embryos as evident from the electron-dispersive x-ray analysis (EDS). Furthermore, the acridine orange staining showed an increased apoptosis in Ag-np treated embryos. These results suggest that silver nanoparticles induce a dose-dependent toxicity in embryos, which hinders normal development.

  4. Zebrafish as a systems toxicology model for developmental neurotoxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Yuhei; Murakami, Soichiro; Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Sasagawa, Shota; Umemoto, Noriko; Shimada, Yasuhito; Tanaka, Toshio

    2015-02-01

    The developing brain is extremely sensitive to many chemicals. Exposure to neurotoxicants during development has been implicated in various neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders, including autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperactive disorder, schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease. Although rodents have been widely used for developmental neurotoxicity testing, experiments using large numbers of rodents are time-consuming, expensive, and raise ethical concerns. Using alternative non-mammalian animal models may relieve some of these pressures by allowing testing of large numbers of subjects while reducing expenses and minimizing the use of mammalian subjects. In this review, we discuss some of the advantages of using zebrafish in developmental neurotoxicity testing, focusing on central nervous system development, neurobehavior, toxicokinetics, and toxicodynamics in this species. We also describe some important examples of developmental neurotoxicity testing using zebrafish combined with gene expression profiling, neuroimaging, or neurobehavioral assessment. Zebrafish may be a systems toxicology model that has the potential to reveal the pathways of developmental neurotoxicity and to provide a sound basis for human risk assessments. PMID:25109898

  5. Mucosal inflammation at the respiratory interface: a zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Progatzky, Fränze; Cook, H Terence; Lamb, Jonathan R; Bugeon, Laurence; Dallman, Margaret J

    2016-03-15

    Inflammatory diseases of the respiratory system such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are increasing globally and remain poorly understood conditions. Although attention has long focused on the activation of type 1 and type 2 helper T cells of the adaptive immune system in these diseases, it is becoming increasingly apparent that there is also a need to understand the contributions and interactions between innate immune cells and the epithelial lining of the respiratory system. Cigarette smoke predisposes the respiratory tissue to a higher incidence of inflammatory disease, and here we have used zebrafish gills as a model to study the effect of cigarette smoke on the respiratory epithelium. Zebrafish gills fulfill the same gas-exchange function as the mammalian airways and have a similar structure. Exposure to cigarette smoke extracts resulted in an increase in transcripts of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and MMP9 in the gill tissue, which was at least in part mediated via NF-κB activation. Longer term exposure of fish for 6 wk to cigarette smoke extract resulted in marked structural changes to the gills with lamellar fusion and mucus cell formation, while signs of inflammation or fibrosis were absent. This shows, for the first time, that zebrafish gills are a relevant model for studying the effect of inflammatory stimuli on a respiratory epithelium, since they mimic the immunopathology involved in respiratory inflammatory diseases of humans. PMID:26719149

  6. Recent findings on vertebrate developmental immunity using the zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Villegas, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    To grant survival against sterile or microbe induced inflammation, all animals rely on correct immune system functioning. The development of immunity occurs in vertebrates during embryogenesis in a process called hematopoiesis, which is characterized by the formation of blood cellular components such as embryonic erythrocytes and primitive macrophages. These cells are formed in a sterile environment from a rare subset of pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) during a brief period of the primitive hematopoietic wave. Diverse signals, like Notch, are indispensable in HSC emergence and differentiation. However, to successfully replicate the process in vitro using pluripotent precursors, the full set of required signals is still a matter of debate. Among the latest findings, proinflammatory signals produced by transient primitive myelocites in zebrafish have been seen to act as essential mediators in establishing the HSC program of the adult vertebrate hematopoietic system. In this regard, the zebrafish immune model has emerged as a feasible live vertebrate model for examining developmental immunity and related host-microbe interactions, both at the molecular and cellular level. Thus, using the zebrafish embryo, this review summarizes recent findings, on the signals required for immune development and further maturation of the system, in a context where no adaptive immune response has yet been developed. PMID:26589453

  7. Zebrafish: A complete animal model to enumerate the nanoparticle toxicity.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Sharma, Ashish Ranjan; Sharma, Garima; Lee, Sang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Presently, nanotechnology is a multi-trillion dollar business sector that covers a wide range of industries, such as medicine, electronics and chemistry. In the current era, the commercial transition of nanotechnology from research level to industrial level is stimulating the world's total economic growth. However, commercialization of nanoparticles might offer possible risks once they are liberated in the environment. In recent years, the use of zebrafish (Danio rerio) as an established animal model system for nanoparticle toxicity assay is growing exponentially. In the current in-depth review, we discuss the recent research approaches employing adult zebrafish and their embryos for nanoparticle toxicity assessment. Different types of parameters are being discussed here which are used to evaluate nanoparticle toxicity such as hatching achievement rate, developmental malformation of organs, damage in gill and skin, abnormal behavior (movement impairment), immunotoxicity, genotoxicity or gene expression, neurotoxicity, endocrine system disruption, reproduction toxicity and finally mortality. Furthermore, we have also highlighted the toxic effect of different nanoparticles such as silver nanoparticle, gold nanoparticle, and metal oxide nanoparticles (TiO2, Al2O3, CuO, NiO and ZnO). At the end, future directions of zebrafish model and relevant assays to study nanoparticle toxicity have also been argued. PMID:27544212

  8. Zebrafish as a Natural Host Model for Vibrio cholerae Colonization and Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Runft, Donna L.; Mitchell, Kristie C.; Abuaita, Basel H.; Allen, Jonathan P.; Bajer, Sarah; Ginsburg, Kevin; Neely, Melody N.

    2014-01-01

    The human diarrheal disease cholera is caused by the aquatic bacterium Vibrio cholerae. V. cholerae in the environment is associated with several varieties of aquatic life, including insect egg masses, shellfish, and vertebrate fish. Here we describe a novel animal model for V. cholerae, the zebrafish. Pandemic V. cholerae strains specifically colonize the zebrafish intestinal tract after exposure in water with no manipulation of the animal required. Colonization occurs in close contact with the intestinal epithelium and mimics colonization observed in mammals. Zebrafish that are colonized by V. cholerae transmit the bacteria to naive fish, which then become colonized. Striking differences in colonization between V. cholerae classical and El Tor biotypes were apparent. The zebrafish natural habitat in Asia heavily overlaps areas where cholera is endemic, suggesting that zebrafish and V. cholerae evolved in close contact with each other. Thus, the zebrafish provides a natural host model for the study of V. cholerae colonization, transmission, and environmental survival. PMID:24375135

  9. Impaired Lymphocytes Development and Xenotransplantation of Gastrointestinal Tumor Cells in Prkdc-Null SCID Zebrafish Model.

    PubMed

    Jung, In Hye; Chung, Yong-Yoon; Jung, Dawoon E; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Do Hee; Kim, Kyung-Sik; Park, Seung Woo

    2016-08-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice have widely been used as hosts for human tumor cell xenograft study. This animal model, however, is labor intensive. As zebrafish is largely emerging as a promising model system for studying human diseases including cancer, developing efficient immunocompromised strains for tumor xenograft study are also demanded in zebrafish. Here, we have created the Prkdc-null SCID zebrafish model which provides the stable immune-deficient background required for xenotransplantation of tumor cell. In this study, the two transcription activator-like effector nucleases that specifically target the exon3 of the zebrafish Prkdc gene were used to induce a frame shift mutation, causing a complete knockout of the gene function. The SCID zebrafish showed susceptibility to spontaneous infection, a well-known phenotype found in the SCID mutation. Further characterization revealed that the SCID zebrafish contained no functional T and B lymphocytes which reflected the phenotypes identified in the mice SCID model. Intraperitoneal injection of human cancer cells into the adult SCID zebrafish clearly showed tumor cell growth forming into a solid mass. Our present data show the suitability of using the SCID zebrafish strain for xenotransplantation experiments, and in vivo monitoring of the tumor cell growth in the zebrafish demonstrates use of the animal model as a new platform of tumor xenograft study. PMID:27566103

  10. Mycobacterium ulcerans causes minimal pathogenesis and colonization in Medaka (Oryzias latipes): An experimental fish model of disease transmission

    PubMed Central

    Mosi, Lydia; Mutoji, Nadine K.; Basile, Fritz A; Donnell, Robert; Jackson, Kathrine L.; Spangenberg, Thomas; Kishi, Yoshito; Ennis, Don G.; Small, Pamela L.C.

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans causes Buruli ulcer in humans, a progressive ulcerative epidermal lesion due to the mycolactone toxin produced by the bacterium. Molecular analysis of M. ulcerans reveals it is closely related to M. marinum, a pathogen of both fish and man. Molecular evidence from diagnostic PCR assays for the insertion sequence IS2404 suggests an association of M. ulcerans with fish. However, fish infections by M. ulcerans have not been well documented and IS2404 has been found in other mycobacteria. We have thus, employed two experimental approaches to test for M. ulcerans in fish. We show here for the first time that M. ulcerans with or without the toxin does not mount acute or chronic infections in Japanese Medaka “Oryzias latipes” even at high doses. Moreover, M. ulcerans-infected medaka do not exhibit any visible signs of infection nor disease and the bacteria do not appear to replicate over time. In contrast, similar high doses of the wild-type M. marinum or a mycolactone producing M. marinum “DL” strain are able to mount an acute disease with mortality in medaka. Although these results would suggest that M. ulcerans does not mount infections in fish we have evidence that CLC macrophages from goldfish are susceptible to mycolactones. PMID:22465732

  11. Zebrafish as model organisms for studying drug-induced liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Vliegenthart, A D Bastiaan; Tucker, Carl S; Del Pozo, Jorge; Dear, James W

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a major challenge in clinical medicine and drug development. New models are needed for predicting which potential therapeutic compounds will cause DILI in humans, and new markers and mediators of DILI still need to be identified. This review highlights the strengths and weaknesses of using zebrafish as a high-throughput in vivo model for studying DILI. Although the zebrafish liver architecture is different from that of the mammalian liver, the main physiological processes remain similar. Zebrafish metabolize drugs using similar pathways to those in humans; they possess a wide range of cytochrome P450 enzymes that enable metabolic reactions including hydroxylation, conjugation, oxidation, demethylation and de-ethylation. Following exposure to a range of hepatotoxic drugs, the zebrafish liver develops histological patterns of injury comparable to those of mammalian liver, and biomarkers for liver injury can be quantified in the zebrafish circulation. The zebrafish immune system is similar to that of mammals, but the zebrafish inflammatory response to DILI is not yet defined. In order to quantify DILI in zebrafish, a wide variety of methods can be used, including visual assessment, quantification of serum enzymes and experimental serum biomarkers and scoring of histopathology. With further development, the zebrafish may be a model that complements rodents and may have value for the discovery of new disease pathways and translational biomarkers. PMID:24773296

  12. A two-scale model for correlation between B cell VDJ usage in zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Keyao; Deem, Michael

    2011-03-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is one of the model animals for study of immunology. The dynamics of the adaptive immune system in zebrafish is similar to that in higher animals. In this work, we built a two-scale model to simulate the dynamics of B cells in primary and secondary immune reactions in zebrafish and to explain the reported correlation between VDJ usage of B cell repertoires in distinct zebrafish. The first scale of the model consists of a generalized NK model to simulate the B cell maturation process in the 10-day primary immune response. The second scale uses a delay ordinary differential equation system to model the immune responses in the 6-month lifespan of zebrafish. The generalized NK model shows that mature B cells specific to one antigen mostly possess a single VDJ recombination. The probability that mature B cells in two zebrafish have the same VDJ recombination increases with the B cell population size or the B cell selection intensity and decreases with the B cell hypermutation rate. The ODE model shows a distribution of correlation in the VDJ usage of the B cell repertoires in two six-month-old zebrafish that is highly similar to that from experiment. This work presents a simple theory to explain the experimentally observed correlation in VDJ usage of distinct zebrafish B cell repertoires after an immune response.

  13. Medaka (Oryzias latipes) as a sentinel species for aquatic animals: Medaka cells exhibit a similar genotoxic response as North Atlantic right whale cells★

    PubMed Central

    Wise, John Pierce; Wise, Sandra S.; Goodale, Britton C.; Shaffiey, Fariba; Kraus, Scott; Walter, Ronald B.

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is emerging as a major concern for aquatic environments, particularly marine environments. Medaka (Oryzias latipes) has been used as a model species for human and aquatic health, including the marine environment, though few studies have directly compared toxicological responses in medaka to humans or other aquatic species. We used a medaka fin cell line to compare the genotoxic response of medaka to Cr(VI) to the response observed in North Atlantic right whale cells to see if responses in medaka were similar to those of other aquatic species, particularly aquatic mammals. We used the production of chromosomal aberrations as a measure of genotoxicity. We found that in medaka cells, concentrations of 1, 5 and 10 μM sodium chromate damaged 17, 32 and 43% of metaphases, respectively and these same concentrations 1, 2.5, 5 and 10 μM sodium chromate damaged 14, 24 and 49% of metaphases, respectively, in North Atlantic right whale lung cells and 11, 32 and 41% of metaphases, respectively, in North Atlantic right whale testes cells. These data show that genotoxic responses in medaka are comparable to those seen in North Atlantic right whale cells, consistent with the hypothesis that medaka are a useful model for other aquatic species. PMID:18930840

  14. Medaka (Oryzias latipes) as a sentinel species for aquatic animals: Medaka cells exhibit a similar genotoxic response as North Atlantic right whale cells.

    PubMed

    Wise, John Pierce; Wise, Sandra S; Goodale, Britton C; Shaffiey, Fariba; Kraus, Scott; Walter, Ronald B

    2009-03-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is emerging as a major concern for aquatic environments, particularly marine environments. Medaka (Oryzias latipes) has been used as a model species for human and aquatic health, including the marine environment, though few studies have directly compared toxicological responses in medaka to humans or other aquatic species. We used a medaka fin cell line to compare the genotoxic response of medaka to Cr(VI) to the response observed in North Atlantic right whale cells to see if responses in medaka were similar to those of other aquatic species, particularly aquatic mammals. We used the production of chromosomal aberrations as a measure of genotoxicity. We found that in medaka cells, concentrations of 1, 5 and 10 microM sodium chromate damaged 17, 32 and 43% of metaphases, respectively and these same concentrations 1, 2.5, 5 and 10 microM sodium chromate damaged 14, 24 and 49% of metaphases, respectively, in North Atlantic right whale lung cells and 11, 32 and 41% of metaphases, respectively, in North Atlantic right whale testes cells. These data show that genotoxic responses in medaka are comparable to those seen in North Atlantic right whale cells, consistent with the hypothesis that medaka are a useful model for other aquatic species. PMID:18930840

  15. The zebrafish as a model of heart regeneration.

    PubMed

    Raya, Angel; Consiglio, Antonella; Kawakami, Yasuhiko; Rodriguez-Esteban, Concepcion; Izpisúa-Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2004-01-01

    Regeneration is a complex biological process by which animals can restore the shape, structure and function of body parts lost after injury, or after experimental amputation. Only a few species of vertebrates display the capacity to regenerate body parts during adulthood. In the case of the heart, newts display a remarkable ability to regenerate large portions of myocardium after amputation, although the mechanisms underlying this process have not been addressed. Recently, it has been shown that adult zebrafish can also regenerate their hearts, thus offering new possibilities for experimentally approaching this fascinating biological phenomenon. The first insights into heart regeneration gained by studying this model organism are reviewed here. PMID:15671662

  16. On the diabetic menu: Zebrafish as a model for pancreas development and function

    PubMed Central

    Kinkel, Mary D.; Prince, Victoria E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Development of the vertebrate pancreas is a complex stepwise process comprising regionalization, cell differentiation, and morphogenesis. Studies in zebrafish are contributing to an emerging picture of pancreas development in which extrinsic signaling molecules influence intrinsic transcriptional programs to allow ultimate differentiation of specific pancreatic cell types. Zebrafish experiments have revealed roles for several signaling molecules in aspects of this process; for example our own work has shown that Retinoic Acid signals specify the pre-pancreatic endoderm. Time-lapse imaging of live zebrafish embryos has started to provide detailed information about early pancreas morphogenesis. In addition to modeling embryonic development, the zebrafish has recently begun to be used as a model for pancreas regeneration studies. Here we review the significant progress in these areas and consider the future potential of zebrafish as a diabetes research model. PMID:19204986

  17. Zebrafish as a model to investigate CNS myelination.

    PubMed

    Preston, Marnie A; Macklin, Wendy B

    2015-02-01

    Myelin plays a critical role in proper neuronal function by providing trophic and metabolic support to axons and facilitating energy-efficient saltatory conduction. Myelination is influenced by numerous molecules including growth factors, hormones, transmembrane receptors and extracellular molecules, which activate signaling cascades that drive cellular maturation. Key signaling molecules and downstream signaling cascades controlling myelination have been identified in cell culture systems. However, in vitro systems are not able to faithfully replicate the complex in vivo signaling environment that occurs during development or following injury. Currently, it remains time-consuming and expensive to investigate myelination in vivo in rodents, the most widely used model for studying mammalian myelination. As such, there is a need for alternative in vivo myelination models, particularly ones that can test molecular mechanisms without removing oligodendrocyte lineage cells from their native signaling environment or disrupting intercellular interactions with other cell types present during myelination. Here, we review the ever-increasing role of zebrafish in studies uncovering novel mechanisms controlling vertebrate myelination. These innovative studies range from observations of the behavior of single cells during in vivo myelination as well as mutagenesis- and pharmacology-based screens in whole animals. Additionally, we discuss recent efforts to develop novel models of demyelination and oligodendrocyte cell death in adult zebrafish for the study of cellular behavior in real time during repair and regeneration of damaged nervous systems. PMID:25263121

  18. The zebrafish as a model for nociception studies.

    PubMed

    Malafoglia, Valentina; Bryant, Bruce; Raffaeli, William; Giordano, Antonio; Bellipanni, Gianfranco

    2013-10-01

    Nociception is the sensory mechanism used to detect cues that can harm an organism. The understanding of the neural networks and molecular controls of the reception of pain remains an ongoing challenge for biologists. While we have made significant progress in identifying a number of molecules and pathways that are involved in transduction of noxious stimuli, from the skin through the sensory receptor cell and from this to the spinal cord on into the central nervous system, we still lack a clear understanding of the perceptual processes, the responses to pain and the regulation of pain perception. Mice and rat animal models have been extensively used for nociception studies. However, the study of pain and noiception in these organisms can be rather laborious, costly and time consuming. Conversely, the use of Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans may be affected by the large evolutionary distance between these animals and humans. We outline here the reasons why zebrafish presents a new and attractive model for studying pain reception and responses and the most interesting findings in the study of nociception that have been obtained using the zebrafish model. PMID:23559073

  19. Fish from Head to Tail: The 9th European Zebrafish Meeting in Oslo.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Gareth; Müller, Ferenc; Ledin, Johan; Patton, E Elizabeth; Gjøen, Tor; Lobert, Viola Hélène; Winther-Larsen, Hanne Cecilie; Mullins, Mary; Joly, Jean-Stephane; Weltzien, Finn-Arne; Press, Charles McLean; Aleström, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The 9th European Zebrafish Meeting took place recently in Oslo (June 28-July 2, 2015). A total of 650 participants came to hear the latest research news focused on the zebrafish, Danio rerio, and to its distant evolutionary relative medaka, Oryzias latipes. The packed program included keynote and plenary talks, short oral presentations and poster sessions, workshops, and strategic discussions. The meeting was a great success and revealed dramatically how important the zebrafish in particular has become as a model system for topics, such as developmental biology, functional genomics, biomedicine, toxicology, and drug development. A new emphasis was given to its potential as a model for aquaculture, a topic of great economic interest to the host country Norway and for the future global food supply in general. Zebrafish husbandry as well as its use in teaching were also covered in separate workshops. As has become a tradition in these meetings, there was a well-attended Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and ZFIN workshop focused on Zebrafish Genome Resources on the first day. The full EZM 2015 program with abstracts can be read and downloaded from the EZM 2015 Web site zebrafish2015.org . PMID:26859625

  20. Little fish, big catch: zebrafish as a model for kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Poureetezadi, Shahram Jevin; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2016-06-01

    The zebrafish, Danio rerio, is a relevant vertebrate model for biomedical research and translational studies because of its broad genetic conservation with humans. In recent years, scientists have formulated a growing list of zebrafish kidney disease paradigms, the study of which has contributed a multitude of insights into the basic biology of human conditions and even identified potential therapeutic agents. Conversely, there are also distinctive aspects of zebrafish biology lacking in higher vertebrates, such as the capacity to heal without lasting scar formation after tissue damage and the ability to generate nephrons throughout their lifespan, which makes the zebrafish uniquely suited to study regeneration in the context of the kidney. Here, we review several informative zebrafish models of kidney disease and discuss their future applications in nephrology. PMID:27165832

  1. A multi-scale model for correlation in B cell VDJ usage of zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Keyao; Deem, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is one of the model animals for study of immunology because the dynamics in the adaptive immune system of zebrafish are similar to that in higher animals. In this work, we built a multi-scale model to simulate the dynamics of B cells in the primary and secondary immune responses of zebrafish. We use this model to explain the reported correlation between VDJ usage of B cell repertoires in individual zebrafish. We use a delay ordinary differential equation (ODE) system to model the immune responses in the 6-month lifespan of a zebrafish. This mean field theory gives the number of high affinity B cells as a function of time during an infection. The sequences of those B cells are then taken from a distribution calculated by a “microscopic” random energy model. This generalized NK model shows that mature B cells specific to one antigen largely possess a single VDJ recombination. The model allows first-principles calculation of the probability, p, that two zebrafish responding to the same antigen will select the same VDJ recombination. This probability p increases with the B cell population size and the B cell selection intensity. The probability p decreases with the B cell hypermutation rate. The multi-scale model predicts correlations in the immune system of the zebrafish that are highly similar to that from experiment. PMID:21832808

  2. A multi-scale model for correlation in B cell VDJ usage of zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Keyao; Deem, Michael W.

    2011-10-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is one of the model animals used for the study of immunology because the dynamics in the adaptive immune system of zebrafish are similar to that in higher animals. In this work, we built a multi-scale model to simulate the dynamics of B cells in the primary and secondary immune responses of zebrafish. We use this model to explain the reported correlation between VDJ usage of B cell repertoires in individual zebrafish. We use a delay ordinary differential equation (ODE) system to model the immune responses in the 6-month lifespan of a zebrafish. This mean field theory gives the number of high-affinity B cells as a function of time during an infection. The sequences of those B cells are then taken from a distribution calculated by a 'microscopic' random energy model. This generalized NK model shows that mature B cells specific to one antigen largely possess a single VDJ recombination. The model allows first-principle calculation of the probability, p, that two zebrafish responding to the same antigen will select the same VDJ recombination. This probability p increases with the B cell population size and the B cell selection intensity. The probability p decreases with the B cell hypermutation rate. The multi-scale model predicts correlations in the immune system of the zebrafish that are highly similar to that from experiment.

  3. Toward a Molecular Equivalent Dose: Use of the Medaka Model in Comparative Risk Assessment.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent challenges in risk assessment underscore the need to compare the results of toxicity and dose-response testing among a growing list of animal models and, possibly, an array of in vitro screening assays. Assays that quantify types of DNA damage that are directly relevant to...

  4. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a model organism for investigating endocrine disruption.

    PubMed

    Segner, Helmut

    2009-03-01

    Endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) are widespread in the aquatic environment and can cause alterations in development, physiological homeostasis and health of vertebrates. Zebrafish, Danio rerio, has been suggested as a model species to identify targets as well as modes of EDC action. In fact, zebrafish has been found useful in EDC screening, in EDC effects assessment and in studying targets and mechanisms of EDC action. Since many of the environmental EDCs interfere with the sex steroid system of vertebrates, most EDC studies with zebrafish addressed disruption of sexual differentiation and reproduction. However, other targets of EDCs action must not be overlooked. For using a species as a toxicological model, a good knowledge of the biological traits of this species is a pre-requisite for the rational design of test protocols and endpoints as well as for the interpretation and extrapolation of the toxicological findings. Due to the genomic resources available for zebrafish and the long experience with zebrafish in toxicity testing, it is easily possible to establish molecular endpoints for EDC effects assessment. Additionally, the zebrafish model offers a number of technical advantages including ease and cost of maintenance, rapid development, high fecundity, optical transparency of embryos supporting phenotypic screening, existence of many mutant strains, or amenability for both forward and reverse genetics. To date, the zebrafish has been mainly used to identify molecular targets of EDC action and to determine effect thresholds, while the potential of this model species to study immediate and delayed physiological consequences of molecular interactions has been instrumentalized only partly. One factor that may limit the exploitation of this potential is the still rather fragmentary knowledge of basic biological and endocrine traits of zebrafish. Information on species-specific features in endocrine processes and biological properties, however, need to be

  5. The genomic and genetic toolbox of the teleost medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Kirchmaier, Stephan; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Wittbrodt, Joachim; Loosli, Felix

    2015-04-01

    The Japanese medaka, Oryzias latipes, is a vertebrate teleost model with a long history of genetic research. A number of unique features and established resources distinguish medaka from other vertebrate model systems. A large number of laboratory strains from different locations are available. Due to a high tolerance to inbreeding, many highly inbred strains have been established, thus providing a rich resource for genetic studies. Furthermore, closely related species native to different habitats in Southeast Asia permit comparative evolutionary studies. The transparency of embryos, larvae, and juveniles allows a detailed in vivo analysis of development. New tools to study diverse aspects of medaka biology are constantly being generated. Thus, medaka has become an important vertebrate model organism to study development, behavior, and physiology. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of established genetic and molecular-genetic tools that render medaka fish a full-fledged vertebrate system. PMID:25855651

  6. The Genomic and Genetic Toolbox of the Teleost Medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    PubMed Central

    Kirchmaier, Stephan; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Wittbrodt, Joachim; Loosli, Felix

    2015-01-01

    The Japanese medaka, Oryzias latipes, is a vertebrate teleost model with a long history of genetic research. A number of unique features and established resources distinguish medaka from other vertebrate model systems. A large number of laboratory strains from different locations are available. Due to a high tolerance to inbreeding, many highly inbred strains have been established, thus providing a rich resource for genetic studies. Furthermore, closely related species native to different habitats in Southeast Asia permit comparative evolutionary studies. The transparency of embryos, larvae, and juveniles allows a detailed in vivo analysis of development. New tools to study diverse aspects of medaka biology are constantly being generated. Thus, medaka has become an important vertebrate model organism to study development, behavior, and physiology. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of established genetic and molecular-genetic tools that render medaka fish a full-fledged vertebrate system. PMID:25855651

  7. The Visual System of Zebrafish and its Use to Model Human Ocular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gestri, Gaia; Link, Brian A; Neuhauss, Stephan CF

    2011-01-01

    Free swimming zebrafish larvae depend mainly on their sense of vision to evade predation and to catch prey. Hence there is strong selective pressure on the fast maturation of visual function and indeed the visual system already supports a number of visually-driven behaviors in the newly hatched larvae. The ability to exploit the genetic and embryonic accessibility of the zebrafish in combination with a behavioral assessment of visual system function has made the zebrafish a popular model to study vision and its diseases. Here, we review the anatomy, physiology and development of the zebrafish eye as the basis to relate the contributions of the zebrafish to our understanding of human ocular diseases. PMID:21595048

  8. Emergence of zebrafish models in oncology for validating novel anticancer drug targets and nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Mimeault, Murielle; Batra, Surinder K.

    2013-01-01

    The in vivo zebrafish models have recently attracted great attention in molecular oncology to investigate multiple genetic alterations associated with the development of human cancers and validate novel anticancer drug targets. Particularly, the transparent zebrafish models can be used as a xenotransplantation system to rapidly assess the tumorigenicity and metastatic behavior of cancer stem and/or progenitor cells and their progenies. Moreover, the zebrafish models have emerged as powerful tools for an in vivo testing of novel anticancer agents and nanomaterials for counteracting tumor formation and metastases and improving the efficacy of current radiation and chemotherapeutic treatments against aggressive, metastatic and lethal cancers. PMID:22903142

  9. Vertebrate development in the environment of space: models, mechanisms, and use of the medaka

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolgemuth, D. J.; Herrada, G.; Kiss, S.; Cannon, T.; Forsstrom, C.; Pranger, L. A.; Weismann, W. P.; Pearce, L.; Whalon, B.; Phillips, C. R.

    1997-01-01

    With the advent of space travel, it is of immediate interest and importance to study the effects of exposure to various aspects of the altered environment of space, including microgravity, on Earth-based life forms. Initial studies of space travel have focused primarily on the short-term effects of radiation and microgravity on adult organisms. However, with the potential for increased lengths of time in space, it is critical to now address the effects of space on all phases of an organism's life cycle, from embryogenesis to post-natal development to reproduction. It is already possible for certain species to undergo multiple generations within the confines of the Mir Space Station. The possibility now exists for scientists to consider the consequences of even potentially subtle defects in development through multiple phases of an organism's life cycle, or even through multiple generations. In this discussion, we highlight a few of the salient observations on the effects of the space environment on vertebrate development and reproductive function. We discuss some of the many unanswered questions, in particular, in the context of the choice of appropriate models in which to address these questions, as well as an assessment of the availability of hardware already existing or under development which would be useful in addressing these questions.

  10. Quaternary and tertiary aldoxime antidotes for organophosphate exposure in a zebrafish model system

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Hayden R.; Radić, Zoran; Taylor, Palmer; Fradinger, Erica A.

    2015-04-15

    The zebrafish is rapidly becoming an important model system for screening of new therapeutics. Here we evaluated the zebrafish as a potential pharmacological model for screening novel oxime antidotes to organophosphate (OP)-inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The k{sub i} values determined for chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) and dichlorvos (DDVP) showed that CPO was a more potent inhibitor of both human and zebrafish AChE, but overall zebrafish AChE was less sensitive to OP inhibition. In contrast, aldoxime antidotes, the quaternary ammonium 2-PAM and tertiary amine RS-194B, showed generally similar overall reactivation kinetics, k{sub r}, in both zebrafish and human AChE. However, differences between the K{sub ox} and k{sub 2} constants suggest that zebrafish AChE associates more tightly with oximes, but has a slower maximal reactivation rate than human AChE. Homology modeling suggests that these kinetic differences result from divergences in the amino acids lining the entrance to the active site gorge. Although 2-PAM had the more favorable in vitro reactivation kinetics, RS-194B was more effective antidote in vivo. In intact zebrafish embryos, antidotal treatment with RS-194B rescued embryos from OP toxicity, whereas 2-PAM had no effect. Dechorionation of the embryos prior to antidotal treatment allowed both 2-PAM and RS-194B to rescue zebrafish embryos from OP toxicity. Interestingly, RS-194B and 2-PAM alone increased cholinergic motor activity in dechorionated embryos possibly due to the reversible inhibition kinetics, K{sub i} and αK{sub i}, of the oximes. Together these results demonstrate that the zebrafish at various developmental stages provides an excellent model for investigating membrane penetrant antidotes to OP exposure. - Highlights: • Zebrafish AChE shares significant structural similarities with human AChE. • OP-inhibited zebrafish and human AChE exhibit similar reactivation kinetics. • The zebrafish chorion is permeable to BBB penetrant and not

  11. Zebrafish Melanophores: A Model for Teaching Second Messenger Systems.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Brian H

    2016-08-01

    A strong literature base supports the notion that active learning improves retention in the science classroom. To that end, a course was designed to allow students to develop their own experiments around a central biological question. The model system used in this particular course is control of melanosome dispersal via second messenger systems in zebrafish (Danio rerio) scales. Students start by applying agonists and antagonists to the cAMP and Ca(2+) second messenger systems, and then can progress to more refined questions with the model system. This project is advantageous because it could be easily adapted to fit the needs of many different courses and ability levels; it is relatively easy to perform; it is enjoyable to teach; and students can be largely given a free reign to decide upon the design of their experiments. PMID:27294411

  12. A Possible Zebrafish Model of Polycystic Kidney Disease: Knockdown of wnt5a Causes Cysts in Zebrafish Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Liwei; Xiao, An; Wecker, Andrea; McBride, Daniel A.; Choi, Soo Young; Zhou, Weibin; Lipschutz, Joshua H.

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is one of the most common causes of end-stage kidney disease, a devastating disease for which there is no cure. The molecular mechanisms leading to cyst formation in PKD remain somewhat unclear, but many genes are thought to be involved. Wnt5a is a non-canonical glycoprotein that regulates a wide range of developmental processes. Wnt5a works through the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway that regulates oriented cell division during renal tubular cell elongation. Defects of the PCP pathway have been found to cause kidney cyst formation. Our paper describes a method for developing a zebrafish cystic kidney disease model by knockdown of the wnt5a gene with wnt5a antisense morpholino (MO) oligonucleotides. Tg(wt1b:GFP) transgenic zebrafish were used to visualize kidney structure and kidney cysts following wnt5a knockdown. Two distinct antisense MOs (AUG - and splice-site) were used and both resulted in curly tail down phenotype and cyst formation after wnt5a knockdown. Injection of mouse Wnt5a mRNA, resistant to the MOs due to a difference in primary base pair structure, rescued the abnormal phenotype, demonstrating that the phenotype was not due to “off-target” effects of the morpholino. This work supports the validity of using a zebrafish model to study wnt5a function in the kidney. PMID:25489842

  13. A zebrafish (Danio rerio) model of infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV) infection

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Xiaopeng; Zhang Lichun; Weng Shaoping; Huang Zhijian; Lu Jing; Lan Dongming; Zhong Xuejun; Yu Xiaoqiang; Xu Anlong He Jianguo

    2008-06-20

    Zebrafish is a model animal for studies of genetics, development, toxicology, oncology, and immunology. In this study, infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV) was used to establish an infection in zebrafish, and the experimental conditions were established and characterized. Mortality of adult zebrafish infected with ISKNV by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection exceeded 60%. ISKNV can be passed stably in zebrafish for over ten passages. The ailing zebrafish displayed petechial hemorrhaging and scale protrusion. Histological analysis of moribund fish revealed necrosis of tissue and enlarged cells in kidney and spleen. The real-time RT-PCR analysis of mRNA level confirmed that ISKNV was replicated in zebrafish. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analyses further confirmed the presence of ISKNV-infected cells in almost all organs of the infected fish. Electron microscope analyses showed that the ISKNV particle was present in the infected tissues. The establishment of zebrafish infection model of ISKNV can offer a valuable tool for studying the interactions between ISKNV and its host.

  14. Zebrafish as a Model for the Study of Human Myeloid Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jeng-Wei; Hsieh, Meng-Shan; Liao, Heng-An; Yang, Yi-Ju; Ho, Yi-Jung; Lin, Liang-In

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid malignancies are heterogeneous disorders characterized by uncontrolled proliferation or/and blockage of differentiation of myeloid progenitor cells. Although a substantial number of gene alterations have been identified, the mechanism by which these abnormalities interact has yet to be elucidated. Over the past decades, zebrafish have become an important model organism, especially in biomedical research. Several zebrafish models have been developed to recapitulate the characteristics of specific myeloid malignancies that provide novel insight into the pathogenesis of these diseases and allow the evaluation of novel small molecule drugs. This report will focus on illustrative examples of applications of zebrafish models, including transgenesis, zebrafish xenograft models, and cell transplantation approaches, to the study of human myeloid malignancies. PMID:26064935

  15. Zebrafish – As an Integrative Model for Twenty-first Century Toxicity Testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    The zebrafish embryo is a useful small model for investigating vertebrate development because of its transparency, low cost, transgenic and morpholino capabilities, conservation of cell signaling, and concordance with mammalian developmental phenotypes. From these advantages, the...

  16. Transcriptome analysis of Rpl11-deficient zebrafish model of Diamond-Blackfan Anemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaojun; Jia, Haibo; Zhang, Qian; Wan, Yang; Song, Binfeng; Jia, Qiong; Liu, Hanzhi; Zhu, Xiaofan; Fang, Xiangdong

    2014-12-01

    To comprehensively reflect the roles of Rpl11 on the transcriptome of zebrafish model of Diamond-Blackfan Anemia (DBA), we performed whole-genome transcriptome sequencing on the Illumina Hi-Seq 2000 sequencing platform. Two different transcriptomes of zebrafish Rpl11-deficient and control Morpholino (Mo) embryos were collected and analyzed. The experimental design and methods, including sample preparation, RNA-Seq data evaluation and treatment, were described in details so that representative high-throughput sequencing data were acquired for assessing the actual impacts of Rpl11 on zebrafish embryos. We provided the accession number GSE51326 for easy access to the database. PMID:26484089

  17. [Establishment of an anesthesia model induced by etomidate in larval zebrafish].

    PubMed

    DU, Wen-Jie; DU, Jiu-Lin; Yu, Tian

    2016-06-25

    Despite the wide application of general anesthetic drugs in clinic, it is still unclear how these drugs induce the state of general anesthesia. Larval zebrafish has emerged as an ideal model for dissecting the mechanism of neural systems due to the conserved and simple brain structure. In the present study, we established an anesthesia model from behavioral to electrophysiological levels using larval zebrafish for the first time. Bath application of etomidate, as a kind of intravenous anesthetic drugs, suppressed the spontaneous locomotion of zebrafish in a concentration-dependent manner. Consistently, in vivo fictive motor patterns of spinal motoneurons recorded extracellularly were significantly inhibited as well. Furthermore, using in vivo extracellular recording and whole-cell recording, we found that etomidate application suppressed local field potentials (LFP) of the brain and blocked visually evoked responses of optic tectal neurons. The study indicates that larval zebrafish can serve as an ideal vertebrate animal model for studying neural mechanisms underlying general anesthesia. PMID:27350203

  18. Robotic injection of zebrafish embryos for high-throughput screening in disease models.

    PubMed

    Spaink, Herman P; Cui, Chao; Wiweger, Malgorzata I; Jansen, Hans J; Veneman, Wouter J; Marín-Juez, Rubén; de Sonneville, Jan; Ordas, Anita; Torraca, Vincenzo; van der Ent, Wietske; Leenders, William P; Meijer, Annemarie H; Snaar-Jagalska, B Ewa; Dirks, Ron P

    2013-08-15

    The increasing use of zebrafish larvae for biomedical research applications is resulting in versatile models for a variety of human diseases. These models exploit the optical transparency of zebrafish larvae and the availability of a large genetic tool box. Here we present detailed protocols for the robotic injection of zebrafish embryos at very high accuracy with a speed of up to 2000 embryos per hour. These protocols are benchmarked for several applications: (1) the injection of DNA for obtaining transgenic animals, (2) the injection of antisense morpholinos that can be used for gene knock-down, (3) the injection of microbes for studying infectious disease, and (4) the injection of human cancer cells as a model for tumor progression. We show examples of how the injected embryos can be screened at high-throughput level using fluorescence analysis. Our methods open up new avenues for the use of zebrafish larvae for large compound screens in the search for new medicines. PMID:23769806

  19. Studies on sensitivity of zebrafish as a model organism for Parkinson's disease: Comparison with rat model

    PubMed Central

    Makhija, Dinesh T.; Jagtap, Aarti G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the utility of zebra fish as an animal model for Parkinson's disease (PD) in comparison with rat model. Materials and Methods: MTT assay was performed on rat and zebrafish brain synaptosomal fractions using rotenone as a neurotoxic agent. Quercetin and resveratrol were used as standards to compare anti-apoptotic activity in both organisms. Catalepsy was induced in zebrafish by exposing them to haloperidol (9 μM) solution. Drug-treated groups were exposed to bromocriptine and pramipexole, 30 min prior to haloperidol exposure at the dose of 2, 5, and 10 μg/mL. Swimming speed, time spent in the bottom of the tank, and complete cataleptic time were evaluated to assess behavioral changes. In rats, catalepsy was induced using haloperidol (1.25 mg/kg i.p.). Drug-treated groups received bromocriptine (2.5 mg/kg.) and pramipexole (1 mg/kg) orally. Bar test, block test, and locomotor activity were carried out to assess behavioral changes. Results: Resveratrol and quercetin showed comparable inhibition of apoptosis in rats and zebrafish. In anti-cataleptic study, bromocriptine and pramipexole-treated groups showed significant difference (P < 0.05) in behavioral parameters as compared to haloperidol control group in both the experimental organisms. Results obtained from fish model were in correlation with rat model. Conclusion: Findings of the present study revealed that zebrafish model is highly sensitive and can be used for basic screening of drugs against PD. PMID:24554909

  20. Zebrafish: A Versatile Animal Model for Fertility Research

    PubMed Central

    Hoo, Jing Ying; Kumari, Yatinesh; Shaikh, Mohd Farooq; Hue, Seow Mun

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of zebrafish in biomedical research is very common in the research world nowadays. Today, it has emerged as a favored vertebrate organism for the research in science of reproduction. There is a significant growth in amount numbers of scientific literature pertaining to research discoveries in reproductive sciences in zebrafish. It has implied the importance of zebrafish in this particular field of research. In essence, the current available literature has covered from the very specific brain region or neurons of zebrafish, which are responsible for reproductive regulation, until the gonadal level of the animal. The discoveries and findings have proven that this small animal is sharing a very close/similar reproductive system with mammals. More interestingly, the behavioral characteristics and along with the establishment of animal courtship behavior categorization in zebrafish have laid an even stronger foundation and firmer reason on the suitability of zebrafish utilization in research of reproductive sciences. In view of the immense importance of this small animal for the development of reproductive sciences, this review aimed at compiling and describing the proximate close similarity of reproductive regulation on zebrafish and human along with factors contributing to the infertility, showing its versatility and its potential usage for fertility research. PMID:27556045

  1. Zebrafish: A Versatile Animal Model for Fertility Research.

    PubMed

    Hoo, Jing Ying; Kumari, Yatinesh; Shaikh, Mohd Farooq; Hue, Seow Mun; Goh, Bey Hing

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of zebrafish in biomedical research is very common in the research world nowadays. Today, it has emerged as a favored vertebrate organism for the research in science of reproduction. There is a significant growth in amount numbers of scientific literature pertaining to research discoveries in reproductive sciences in zebrafish. It has implied the importance of zebrafish in this particular field of research. In essence, the current available literature has covered from the very specific brain region or neurons of zebrafish, which are responsible for reproductive regulation, until the gonadal level of the animal. The discoveries and findings have proven that this small animal is sharing a very close/similar reproductive system with mammals. More interestingly, the behavioral characteristics and along with the establishment of animal courtship behavior categorization in zebrafish have laid an even stronger foundation and firmer reason on the suitability of zebrafish utilization in research of reproductive sciences. In view of the immense importance of this small animal for the development of reproductive sciences, this review aimed at compiling and describing the proximate close similarity of reproductive regulation on zebrafish and human along with factors contributing to the infertility, showing its versatility and its potential usage for fertility research. PMID:27556045

  2. A precursor-inducible zebrafish model of acute protoporphyria with hepatic protein aggregation and multiorganelle stress.

    PubMed

    Elenbaas, Jared S; Maitra, Dhiman; Liu, Yang; Lentz, Stephen I; Nelson, Bradley; Hoenerhoff, Mark J; Shavit, Jordan A; Omary, M Bishr

    2016-05-01

    Protoporphyria is a metabolic disease that causes excess production of protoporphyrin IX (PP-IX), the final biosynthetic precursor to heme. Hepatic PP-IX accumulation may lead to end-stage liver disease. We tested the hypothesis that systemic administration of porphyrin precursors to zebrafish larvae results in protoporphyrin accumulation and a reproducible nongenetic porphyria model. Retro-orbital infusion of PP-IX or the iron chelator deferoxamine mesylate (DFO), with the first committed heme precursor α-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), generates high levels of PP-IX in zebrafish larvae. Exogenously infused or endogenously produced PP-IX accumulates preferentially in the liver of zebrafish larvae and peaks 1 to 3 d after infusion. Similar to patients with protoporphyria, PP-IX is excreted through the biliary system. Porphyrin accumulation in zebrafish liver causes multiorganelle protein aggregation as determined by mass spectrometry and immunoblotting. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and induction of autophagy were noted in zebrafish larvae and corroborated in 2 mouse models of protoporphyria. Furthermore, electron microscopy of zebrafish livers from larvae administered ALA + DFO showed hepatocyte autophagosomes, nuclear membrane ruffling, and porphyrin-containing vacuoles with endoplasmic reticulum distortion. In conclusion, systemic administration of the heme precursors PP-IX or ALA + DFO into zebrafish larvae provides a new model of acute protoporphyria with consequent hepatocyte protein aggregation and proteotoxic multiorganelle alterations and stress.-Elenbaas, J. S., Maitra, D., Liu, Y., Lentz, S. I., Nelson, B., Hoenerhoff, M. J., Shavit, J. A., Omary, M. B. A precursor-inducible zebrafish model of acute protoporphyria with hepatic protein aggregation and multiorganelle stress. PMID:26839379

  3. Molecular and cellular markers of toxicity in the Japanese Medaka @

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, L.R.; McCarthy, J.F.; D'Surney, S.J.; Greeley, M.S. Jr.; Hull, C.G.

    1990-01-01

    The Japanese Medaka (Oryzias latipes) has been recommended for use as a model organism to detect carcinogenic, teratogenic, cytotoxic, and genotoxic compounds in aquatic systems. Because a long latent period often occurs between initial contact with deleterious chemicals and subsequent expression of the pathology, we are investigating early biologically-relevant responses that can be used as genotoxicity markers of exposure and effect. This project focuses on the development of genotoxic bioassays and experimental protocols for exposing Japanese Medaka to genotoxic compounds. 21 refs., 8 figs, 2 tabs.

  4. A model 450 million years in the making: zebrafish and vertebrate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Renshaw, Stephen A.; Trede, Nikolaus S.

    2012-01-01

    Since its first splash 30 years ago, the use of the zebrafish model has been extended from a tool for genetic dissection of early vertebrate development to the functional interrogation of organogenesis and disease processes such as infection and cancer. In particular, there is recent and growing attention in the scientific community directed at the immune systems of zebrafish. This development is based on the ability to image cell movements and organogenesis in an entire vertebrate organism, complemented by increasing recognition that zebrafish and vertebrate immunity have many aspects in common. Here, we review zebrafish immunity with a particular focus on recent studies that exploit the unique genetic and in vivo imaging advantages available for this organism. These unique advantages are driving forward our study of vertebrate immunity in general, with important consequences for the understanding of mammalian immune function and its role in disease pathogenesis. PMID:22228790

  5. Modeling mucosal candidiasis in larval zebrafish by swimbladder injection.

    PubMed

    Gratacap, Remi L; Bergeron, Audrey C; Wheeler, Robert T

    2014-01-01

    Early defense against mucosal pathogens consists of both an epithelial barrier and innate immune cells. The immunocompetency of both, and their intercommunication, are paramount for the protection against infections. The interactions of epithelial and innate immune cells with a pathogen are best investigated in vivo, where complex behavior unfolds over time and space. However, existing models do not allow for easy spatio-temporal imaging of the battle with pathogens at the mucosal level. The model developed here creates a mucosal infection by direct injection of the fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, into the swimbladder of juvenile zebrafish. The resulting infection enables high-resolution imaging of epithelial and innate immune cell behavior throughout the development of mucosal disease. The versatility of this method allows for interrogation of the host to probe the detailed sequence of immune events leading to phagocyte recruitment and to examine the roles of particular cell types and molecular pathways in protection. In addition, the behavior of the pathogen as a function of immune attack can be imaged simultaneously by using fluorescent protein-expressing C. albicans. Increased spatial resolution of the host-pathogen interaction is also possible using the described rapid swimbladder dissection technique. The mucosal infection model described here is straightforward and highly reproducible, making it a valuable tool for the study of mucosal candidiasis. This system may also be broadly translatable to other mucosal pathogens such as mycobacterial, bacterial or viral microbes that normally infect through epithelial surfaces. PMID:25490695

  6. Modeling Mucosal Candidiasis in Larval Zebrafish by Swimbladder Injection

    PubMed Central

    Gratacap, Remi L.; Bergeron, Audrey C.; Wheeler, Robert T.

    2016-01-01

    Early defense against mucosal pathogens consists of both an epithelial barrier and innate immune cells. The immunocompetency of both, and their intercommunication, are paramount for the protection against infections. The interactions of epithelial and innate immune cells with a pathogen are best investigated in vivo, where complex behavior unfolds over time and space. However, existing models do not allow for easy spatio-temporal imaging of the battle with pathogens at the mucosal level. The model developed here creates a mucosal infection by direct injection of the fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, into the swimbladder of juvenile zebrafish. The resulting infection enables high-resolution imaging of epithelial and innate immune cell behavior throughout the development of mucosal disease. The versatility of this method allows for interrogation of the host to probe the detailed sequence of immune events leading to phagocyte recruitment and to examine the roles of particular cell types and molecular pathways in protection. In addition, the behavior of the pathogen as a function of immune attack can be imaged simultaneously by using fluorescent protein-expressing C. albicans. Increased spatial resolution of the host-pathogen interaction is also possible using the described rapid swimbladder dissection technique. The mucosal infection model described here is straightforward and highly reproducible, making it a valuable tool for the study of mucosal candidiasis. This system may also be broadly translatable to other mucosal pathogens such as mycobacterial, bacterial or viral microbes that normally infect through epithelial surfaces. PMID:25490695

  7. Characterization of fish schooling behavior with different numbers of Medaka (Oryzias latipes) and goldfish (Carassius auratus) using a Hidden Markov Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Wonju; Kang, Seung-Ho; Leem, Joo-Baek; Lee, Sang-Hee

    2013-05-01

    Fish that swim in schools benefit from increased vigilance, and improved predator recognition and assessment. Fish school size varies according to species and environmental conditions. In this study, we present a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) that we use to characterize fish schooling behavior in different sized schools, and explore how school size affects schooling behavior. We recorded the schooling behavior of Medaka (Oryzias latipes) and goldfish (Carassius auratus) using different numbers of individual fish (10-40), in a circular aquarium. Eight to ten 3 s video clips were extracted from the recordings for each group size. Schooling behavior was characterized by three variables: linear speed, angular speed, and Pearson coefficient. The values of the variables were categorized into two events each for linear and angular speed (high and low), and three events for the Pearson coefficient (high, medium, and low). Schooling behavior was then described as a sequence of 12 events (2×2×3), which was input to an HMM as data for training the model. Comparisons of model output with observations of actual schooling behavior demonstrated that the HMM was successful in characterizing fish schooling behavior. We briefly discuss possible applications of the HMM for recognition of fish species in a school, and for developing bio-monitoring systems to determine water quality.

  8. Fishing for Nature's Hits: Establishment of the Zebrafish as a Model for Screening Antidiabetic Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Tabassum, Nadia; Tai, Hongmei; Jung, Da-Woon; Williams, Darren R.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects millions of people worldwide and significantly impacts their quality of life. Moreover, life threatening diseases, such as myocardial infarction, blindness, and renal disorders, increase the morbidity rate associated with diabetes. Various natural products from medicinal plants have shown potential as antidiabetes agents in cell-based screening systems. However, many of these potential “hits” fail in mammalian tests, due to issues such as poor pharmacokinetics and/or toxic side effects. To address this problem, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) model has been developed as a “bridge” to provide an experimentally convenient animal-based screening system to identify drug candidates that are active in vivo. In this review, we discuss the application of zebrafish to drug screening technologies for diabetes research. Specifically, the discovery of natural product-based antidiabetes compounds using zebrafish will be described. For example, it has recently been demonstrated that antidiabetic natural compounds can be identified in zebrafish using activity guided fractionation of crude plant extracts. Moreover, the development of fluorescent-tagged glucose bioprobes has allowed the screening of natural product-based modulators of glucose homeostasis in zebrafish. We hope that the discussion of these advances will illustrate the value and simplicity of establishing zebrafish-based assays for antidiabetic compounds in natural products-based laboratories. PMID:26681965

  9. Zebrafish Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Phelps, Michael; Chen, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    In vivo models of Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) have proven instrumental in understanding the development and progression of this devastating pediatric sarcoma. Both vertebrate and invertebrate model systems have been developed to study the tumor biology of both embryonal (ERMS) and alveolar (ARMS) RMS subtypes. Zebrafish RMS models have been particularly amenable for high-throughput studies to identify drug targetable pathways because of their short tumor latency, ease of ex vivo manipulation and conserved tumor biology. The transgenic KRASG12D-induced ERMS model allows for molecular and cellular characterization of distinct tumor cell subpopulations including the tumor propagating cells. Comparative genomic approaches have also been utilized in zebrafish ERMS to identify conserved candidate driver genes. Recent advances in zebrafish genome engineering have further enabled the ability to probe the functional significance of potential driver genes. Using the unique strengths of the zebrafish model organisms with the wealth of cellular and molecular tools currently available, zebrafish RMS models provide a powerful in vivo system for which to study RMS tumorigenesis. PMID:27165362

  10. Zebrafish Embryo Toxicity Microscale Model for Ichthyotoxicity Evaluation of Marine Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hong; Kong, Wen-Wen; Shao, Chang-Lun; Li, Yun; Liu, Yun-Zhang; Liu, Min; Guan, Fei-Fei; Wang, Chang-Yun

    2016-04-01

    Marine organisms often protect themselves against their predators by chemical defensive strategy. The second metabolites isolated from marine organisms and their symbiotic microbes have been proven to play a vital role in marine chemical ecology, such as ichthyotoxicity, allelopathy, and antifouling. It is well known that the microscale models for marine chemoecology assessment are urgently needed for trace quantity of marine natural products. Zebrafish model has been widely used as a microscale model in the fields of environment ecological evaluation and drug safety evaluation, but seldom reported for marine chemoecology assessment. In this work, zebrafish embryo toxicity microscale model was established for ichthyotoxicity evaluation of marine natural products by using 24-well microplate based on zebrafish embryo. Ichthyotoxicity was evaluated by observation of multiple toxicological endpoints, including coagulation egg, death, abnormal heartbeat, no spontaneous movement, delayed hatch, and malformation of the different organs during zebrafish embryogenesis periods at 24, 48, and 72 h post-fertilization (hpf). 3,4-Dichloroaniline was used as the positive control for method validation. Subsequently, the established model was applied to test the ichthyotoxic activity of the compounds isolated from corals and their symbiotic microbes and to isolate the bioactive secondary metabolites from the gorgonian Subergorgia mollis under bioassay guidance. It was suggested that zebrafish embryo toxicity microscale model is suitable for bioassay-guided isolation and preliminary bioactivity screening of marine natural products. PMID:26838966

  11. Recent advances using zebrafish animal models for muscle disease drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Maves, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Animal models have enabled great progress in the discovery and understanding of pharmacological approaches for treating muscle diseases like Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Areas covered With this article, the author provides the reader with a description of the zebrafish animal model, which has been employed to identify and study pharmacological approaches to muscle disease. In particular, the author focuses on how both large-scale chemical screens and targeted drug treatment studies have established zebrafish as an important model for muscle disease drug discovery. Expert opinion There are a number of opportunities arising for the use of zebrafish models for further developing pharmacological approaches to muscle diseases, including studying drug combination therapies and utilizing genome editing to engineer zebrafish muscle disease models. It is the author’s particular belief that the availability of a wide range of zebrafish transgenic strains for labeling immune cell types, combined with live imaging and drug treatment of muscle disease models, should allow for new elegant studies demonstrating how pharmacological approaches might influence inflammation and the immune response in muscle disease. PMID:24931439

  12. Experiments on learning in zebrafish (Danio rerio): a promising model of neurocognitive function.

    PubMed

    Blaser, R E; Vira, D G

    2014-05-01

    The past decade has seen rapid proliferation of behavioral research with zebrafish, and an emergence of interest in their potential as a model of neurocognitive function. Already, zebrafish have been proposed as a model of autism, Alzheimer's, drug abuse, schizophrenia, and other disorders involving cognitive dysfunction. Zebrafish have the sophisticated sensory and motor systems necessary for complex learning experiments, and their power as a genetic and developmental model has already been established. Currently, however, learning procedures remain unrefined, and behavioral variability presents a major problem for researchers. Before zebrafish can be effectively used to study the neurological bases of learning, a set of robust and replicable techniques must be characterized and standardized. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview and critique of learning procedures that have been used with zebrafish and their results. We hope that such an analysis will prove useful in this early stage of research to guide future learning experiments and thereby improve the efficiency and validity of research with this promising new animal model. PMID:24631853

  13. A transgenic zebrafish model for monitoring xbp1 splicing and endoplasmic reticulum stress in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Junling; Chen, Zhiliang; Gao, Lian-Yong; Colorni, Angelo; Ucko, Michal; Fang, Shengyun; Du, Shao Jun

    2015-08-01

    Accumulation of misfolded or unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) triggers ER stress that initiates unfolded protein response (UPR). XBP1 is a transcription factor that mediates one of the key signaling pathways of UPR to cope with ER stress through regulating gene expression. Activation of XBP1 involves an unconventional mRNA splicing catalyzed by IRE1 endonuclease that removes an internal 26 nucleotides from xbp1 mRNA transcripts in the cytoplasm. Researchers have taken advantage of this unique activation mechanism to monitor XBP1 activation, thereby UPR, in cell culture and transgenic models. Here we report a Tg(ef1α:xbp1δ-gfp) transgenic zebrafish line to monitor XBP1 activation using GFP as a reporter especially in zebrafish oocytes and developing embryos. The Tg(ef1α:xbp1δ-gfp) transgene was constructed using part of the zebrafish xbp1 cDNA containing the splicing element. ER stress induced splicing results in the cDNA encoding a GFP-tagged partial XBP1 without the transactivation activation domain (XBP1Δ-GFP). The results showed that xbp1 transcripts mainly exist as the spliced active isoform in unfertilized oocytes and zebrafish embryos prior to zygotic gene activation at 3 hours post fertilization. A strong GFP expression was observed in unfertilized oocytes, eyes, brain and skeletal muscle in addition to a weak expression in the hatching gland. Incubation of transgenic zebrafish embryos with (dithiothreitol) DTT significantly induced XBP1Δ-GFP expression. Collectively, these studies unveil the presence of maternal xbp1 splicing in zebrafish oocytes, fertilized eggs and early stage embryos. The Tg(ef1α:xbp1δ-gfp) transgenic zebrafish provides a useful model for in vivo monitoring xbp1 splicing during development and under ER stress conditions. PMID:25892297

  14. Protective effect of fucoidan against AAPH-induced oxidative stress in zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-A; Lee, Seung-Hong; Ko, Chang-ik; Cha, Seon-Heui; Kang, Min-Cheol; Kang, Sung-Myung; Ko, Seok-Chun; Lee, Won-Woo; Ko, Ju-Young; Lee, Ji-Hyeok; Kang, Nalae; Oh, Jae-Young; Ahn, Ginnae; Jee, Young Heun; Jeon, You-Jin

    2014-02-15

    Fucoidan, extracted from Ecklonia cava, has been extensively studied because of its wide biological activities. However, antioxidative activities have not been yet examined. Therefore we evaluated in vitro and in vivo studies on antioxidative activities of E. cava fucoidan (ECF). ECF exhibited more prominent effects in peroxyl radical scavenging activity, compared to the other scavenging activities. Thus, ECF was further evaluated for its protective ability against 2,2'-azobis dihydrochloride induced oxidative stress in Vero cells and ECF strongly reduced the AAPH-induced oxidative damage through scavenging intracellular reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, we evaluated protective effect of ECF against AAPH-induced oxidative stress in zebrafish model. ECF significantly reduced ROS generation, lipid peroxidation and cell death in zebrafish model. These findings indicate that ECF has antioxidant activities in vitro Vero cells and in vivo zebrafish model, even though ECF is not a polyphenol or flavonoid compound and does not contain benzene rings or conjugated structures. PMID:24507271

  15. The role of the DNA damage response in zebrafish and cellular models of Diamond Blackfan anemia.

    PubMed

    Danilova, Nadia; Bibikova, Elena; Covey, Todd M; Nathanson, David; Dimitrova, Elizabeth; Konto, Yoan; Lindgren, Anne; Glader, Bertil; Radu, Caius G; Sakamoto, Kathleen M; Lin, Shuo

    2014-07-01

    Ribosomal biogenesis involves the processing of pre-ribosomal RNA. A deficiency of some ribosomal proteins (RPs) impairs processing and causes Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA), which is associated with anemia, congenital malformations and cancer. p53 mediates many features of DBA, but the mechanism of p53 activation remains unclear. Another hallmark of DBA is the upregulation of adenosine deaminase (ADA), indicating changes in nucleotide metabolism. In RP-deficient zebrafish, we found activation of both nucleotide catabolism and biosynthesis, which is consistent with the need to break and replace the faulty ribosomal RNA. We also found upregulation of deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP) synthesis - a typical response to replication stress and DNA damage. Both RP-deficient zebrafish and human hematopoietic cells showed activation of the ATR/ATM-CHK1/CHK2/p53 pathway. Other features of RP deficiency included an imbalanced dNTP pool, ATP depletion and AMPK activation. Replication stress and DNA damage in cultured cells in non-DBA models can be decreased by exogenous nucleosides. Therefore, we treated RP-deficient zebrafish embryos with exogenous nucleosides and observed decreased activation of p53 and AMPK, reduced apoptosis, and rescue of hematopoiesis. Our data suggest that the DNA damage response contributes to p53 activation in cellular and zebrafish models of DBA. Furthermore, the rescue of RP-deficient zebrafish with exogenous nucleosides suggests that nucleoside supplements could be beneficial in the treatment of DBA. PMID:24812435

  16. ZFIN, the Zebrafish Model Organism Database: increased support for mutants and transgenics.

    PubMed

    Howe, Douglas G; Bradford, Yvonne M; Conlin, Tom; Eagle, Anne E; Fashena, David; Frazer, Ken; Knight, Jonathan; Mani, Prita; Martin, Ryan; Moxon, Sierra A Taylor; Paddock, Holly; Pich, Christian; Ramachandran, Sridhar; Ruef, Barbara J; Ruzicka, Leyla; Schaper, Kevin; Shao, Xiang; Singer, Amy; Sprunger, Brock; Van Slyke, Ceri E; Westerfield, Monte

    2013-01-01

    ZFIN, the Zebrafish Model Organism Database (http://zfin.org), is the central resource for zebrafish genetic, genomic, phenotypic and developmental data. ZFIN curators manually curate and integrate comprehensive data involving zebrafish genes, mutants, transgenics, phenotypes, genotypes, gene expressions, morpholinos, antibodies, anatomical structures and publications. Integrated views of these data, as well as data gathered through collaborations and data exchanges, are provided through a wide selection of web-based search forms. Among the vertebrate model organisms, zebrafish are uniquely well suited for rapid and targeted generation of mutant lines. The recent rapid production of mutants and transgenic zebrafish is making management of data associated with these resources particularly important to the research community. Here, we describe recent enhancements to ZFIN aimed at improving our support for mutant and transgenic lines, including (i) enhanced mutant/transgenic search functionality; (ii) more expressive phenotype curation methods; (iii) new downloads files and archival data access; (iv) incorporation of new data loads from laboratories undertaking large-scale generation of mutant or transgenic lines and (v) new GBrowse tracks for transgenic insertions, genes with antibodies and morpholinos. PMID:23074187

  17. Novel use of zebrafish as a vertebrate model to screen radiation protectors and sensitizers

    SciTech Connect

    McAleer, Mary Frances . E-mail: adam.dicker@mail.tju.edu; Davidson, Christian; Davidson, William Robert; Yentzer, Brad; Farber, Steven A.; Rodeck, Ulrich; Dicker, Adam P.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos provide a unique vertebrate model to screen therapeutic agents easily and rapidly because of their relatively close genetic relationship to humans, ready abundance and accessibility, short embryonal development, and optical clarity. To validate zebrafish embryos as a screen for radiation modifiers, we evaluated the effects of ionizing radiation in combination with a known radioprotector (free radical scavenger Amifostine) or radiosensitizing agent (tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1478). Methods and materials: Viable zebrafish embryos were exposed to 0-10 Gy single-fraction 250 kVp X-rays with or without either Amifostine (0-4 mM) or AG1478 (0-10 {mu}M) at defined developmental stages from 1-24 h postfertilization (hpf). Embryos were examined for morphologic abnormalities and viability until 144 hpf. Results: Radiation alone produced a time- and dose-dependent perturbation of normal embryonic development and survival with maximal sensitivity at doses {>=}4 Gy delivered before 4 hpf. Amifostine markedly attenuated this effect, whereas AG1478 enhanced teratogenicity and lethality, particularly at therapeutically relevant (2-6 Gy) radiation doses. Conclusions: Collectively, these data validate the use of zebrafish as a vertebrate model to assess the effect of radiation alone or with radiation response modulators. Zebrafish embryos may thus provide a rapid, facile system to screen novel agents ultimately intended for human use in the context of therapeutic or accidental radiation exposure.

  18. Dietary Strontium Increases Bone Mineral Density in Intact Zebrafish (Danio rerio): A Potential Model System for Bone Research

    PubMed Central

    Padgett-Vasquez, Steve; Garris, Heath W.; Nagy, Tim R.; D'Abramo, Louis R.; Watts, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Zebrafish (Danio rerio) skeletal bone possesses properties similar to human bone, which suggests that they may be used as a model to study mineralization characteristics of the human Haversian system, as well as human bone diseases. One prerequisite for the use of zebrafish as an alternative osteoporotic bone model is to determine whether their bone displays functional plasticity similar to that observed in other bone models. Strontium citrate was supplemented into a laboratory-prepared diet (45% crude protein) to produce dietary strontium levels of 0%, 0.63%, 1.26%, 1.89%, and 2.43% and fed ad libitum twice daily for 12 weeks to 28-day-old intact zebrafish. Length was determined at 4-week intervals, and both weight and length were recorded at 12 weeks. At 12 weeks, seven zebrafish from each dietary level were analyzed for total bone mineral density by microcomputed tomography. Dietary strontium citrate supplementation significantly (p < 0.05) increased zebrafish whole-body and spinal column bone mineral density. In addition, trace amounts of strontium were incorporated into the scale matrix in those zebrafish that consumed strontium-supplemented diets. These findings suggest that zebrafish bone displays plasticity similar to that reported for other bone models (i.e., rat, mouse, and monkey) that received supplements of strontium compounds and zebrafish should be viewed as an increasingly valuable bone model. PMID:20874492

  19. Dietary strontium increases bone mineral density in intact zebrafish (Danio rerio): a potential model system for bone research.

    PubMed

    Siccardi, Anthony J; Padgett-Vasquez, Steve; Garris, Heath W; Nagy, Tim R; D'Abramo, Louis R; Watts, Stephen A

    2010-09-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) skeletal bone possesses properties similar to human bone, which suggests that they may be used as a model to study mineralization characteristics of the human Haversian system, as well as human bone diseases. One prerequisite for the use of zebrafish as an alternative osteoporotic bone model is to determine whether their bone displays functional plasticity similar to that observed in other bone models. Strontium citrate was supplemented into a laboratory-prepared diet (45% crude protein) to produce dietary strontium levels of 0%, 0.63%, 1.26%, 1.89%, and 2.43% and fed ad libitum twice daily for 12 weeks to 28-day-old intact zebrafish. Length was determined at 4-week intervals, and both weight and length were recorded at 12 weeks. At 12 weeks, seven zebrafish from each dietary level were analyzed for total bone mineral density by microcomputed tomography. Dietary strontium citrate supplementation significantly (p < 0.05) increased zebrafish whole-body and spinal column bone mineral density. In addition, trace amounts of strontium were incorporated into the scale matrix in those zebrafish that consumed strontium-supplemented diets. These findings suggest that zebrafish bone displays plasticity similar to that reported for other bone models (i.e., rat, mouse, and monkey) that received supplements of strontium compounds and zebrafish should be viewed as an increasingly valuable bone model. PMID:20874492

  20. Developmental nephrotoxicity of aristolochic acid in a zebrafish model

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yu-Ju; Chen, Yau-Hung

    2012-05-15

    Aristolochic acid (AA) is a component of Aristolochia plant extracts which is used as a treatment for different pathologies and their toxicological effects have not been sufficiently studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate AA-induced nephrotoxicity in zebrafish embryos. After soaking zebrafish embryos in AA, the embryos displayed malformed kidney phenotypes, such as curved, cystic pronephric tubes, pronephric ducts, and cases of atrophic glomeruli. The percentages of embryos with malformed kidney phenotypes increased as the exposure dosages of AA increased. Furthermore, AA-treated embryos exhibited significantly reduced glomerular filtration rates (GFRs) in comparison with mock-control littermates (mock-control: 100 ± 2.24% vs. 10 ppm AA treatment for 3–5 h: 71.48 ± 18.84% ∼ 39.41 ± 15.88%), indicating that AA treatment not only caused morphological kidney changes but also induced renal failure. In addition to kidney malformations, AA-treated zebrafish embryos also exhibited deformed hearts, swollen pericardiums, impaired blood circulation and the accumulation(s) of red blood cells. Whole-mount in situ hybridization studies using cmlc2 and wt1b as riboprobes indicated that the kidney is more sensitive than the heart to AA damage. Real-time PCR showed that AA can up-regulate the expression of proinflammatory genes like TNFα, cox2 and mpo. These results support the following conclusions: (1) AA-induced renal failure is mediated by inflammation, which causes circulation dysfunction followed by serious heart malformation; and (2) the kidney is more sensitive than the heart to AA injury. -- Highlights: ► Zebrafish were used to evaluate aristolochic acid (AA)-induced nephrotoxicity. ► AA-treated zebrafish embryos exhibited deformed heart as well as malformed kidney. ► Kidney is more sensitive to AA injury than the heart.

  1. Zebrafish Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Charles K

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma skin cancer is a potentially deadly disease in humans and has remained extremely difficult to treat once it has metastasized. In just the last 10 years, a number of models of melanoma have been developed in the zebrafish that are biologically faithful to the human disease and have already yielded important insights into the fundamental biology of melanoma and offered new potential avenues for treatment. With the diversity and breadth of the molecular genetic tools available in the zebrafish, these melanoma models will continue to be refined and expanded upon to keep pace with the rapidly evolving field of melanoma biology. PMID:27165365

  2. A new model system swims into focus: using the zebrafish to visualize intestinal metabolism in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Carten, Juliana D; Farber, Steven A

    2009-01-01

    Many fundamental questions remain regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of digestive lipid metabolism. One major impediment to answering important questions in the field has been the lack of a tractable and sufficiently complex model system. Until recently, most studies of lipid metabolism have been performed in vitro or in mice, yet each approach possesses certain limitations. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) offers an excellent model system in which to study lipid metabolism in vivo, owing to its small size, genetic tractability and optical clarity. Fluorescent lipid dyes and optical reporters of lipid-modifying enzymes are now being used in live zebrafish to generate visible readouts of digestive physiology. Here we review recent advances in visualizing intestinal lipid metabolism in live larval zebrafish. PMID:20174460

  3. Generation and validation of a zebrafish model of EAST (epilepsy, ataxia, sensorineural deafness and tubulopathy) syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Fahad; Mozere, Monika; Zdebik, Anselm A.; Stanescu, Horia C.; Tobin, Jonathan; Beales, Philip L.; Kleta, Robert; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Russell, Claire

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Recessive mutations in KCNJ10, which encodes an inwardly rectifying potassium channel, were recently identified as the cause of EAST syndrome, a severe and disabling multi-organ disorder consisting of epilepsy, ataxia, sensorineural deafness and tubulopathy that becomes clinically apparent with seizures in infancy. A Kcnj10 knockout mouse shows postnatal mortality and is therefore not suitable for drug discovery. Because zebrafish are ideal for in vivo screening for potential therapeutics, we tested whether kcnj10 knockdown in zebrafish would fill this need. We cloned zebrafish kcnj10 and demonstrated that its function is equivalent to that of human KCNJ10. We next injected splice- and translation-blocking kcnj10 antisense morpholino oligonucleotides and reproduced the cardinal symptoms of EAST syndrome – ataxia, epilepsy and renal tubular defects. Several of these phenotypes could be assayed in an automated manner. We could rescue the morphant phenotype with complementary RNA (cRNA) encoding human wild-type KCNJ10, but not with cRNA encoding a KCNJ10 mutation identified in individuals with EAST syndrome. Our results suggest that zebrafish will be a valuable tool to screen for compounds that are potentially therapeutic for EAST syndrome or its individual symptoms. Knockdown of kcnj10 represents the first zebrafish model of a salt-losing tubulopathy, which has relevance for blood pressure control. PMID:23471908

  4. Lysosomal localization of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) Neu1 sialidase and its highly conserved enzymatic profiles with human.

    PubMed

    Ryuzono, Sena; Takase, Ryo; Oishi, Kazuki; Ikeda, Asami; Chigwechokha, Petros Kingstone; Funahashi, Aki; Komatsu, Masaharu; Miyagi, Taeko; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-10

    lysosome to human. Moreover, the present study showed the possibility of medaka as a model animal of human NEU1 sialidase. PMID:26432003

  5. Omics of the marine medaka (Oryzias melastigma) and its relevance to marine environmental research.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo-Mi; Kim, Jaebum; Choi, Ik-Young; Raisuddin, Sheikh; Au, Doris W T; Leung, Kenneth M Y; Wu, Rudolf S S; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, the marine medaka (Oryzias melastigma), also known as the Indian medaka or brackish medaka, has been recognized as a model fish species for ecotoxicology and environmental research in the Asian region. O. melastigma has several promising features for research, which include a short generation period (3-4 months), daily spawning, small size (3-4 cm), transparent embryos, sexual dimorphism, and ease of mass culture in the laboratory. There have been extensive transcriptome and genome studies on the marine medaka in the past decade. Such omics data can be useful in understanding the signal transduction pathways of small teleosts in response to environmental stressors. An omics-integrated approach in the study of the marine medaka is important for strengthening its role as a small fish model for marine environmental studies. In this review, we present current omics information about the marine medaka and discuss its potential applications in the study of various molecular pathways that can be targets of marine environmental stressors, such as chemical pollutants. We believe that this review will encourage the use of this small fish as a model species in marine environmental research. PMID:26716363

  6. Improvement of surface ECG recording in adult zebrafish reveals that the value of this model exceeds our expectation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chi Chi; Li, Li; Lam, Yun Wah; Siu, Chung Wah; Cheng, Shuk Han

    2016-01-01

    The adult zebrafish has been used to model the electrocardiogram (ECG) for human cardiovascular studies. Nonetheless huge variations are observed among studies probably because of the lack of a reliable and reproducible recording method. In our study, an adult zebrafish surface ECG recording technique was improved using a multi-electrode method and by pre-opening the pericardial sac. A convenient ECG data analysis method without wavelet transform was also established. Intraperitoneal injection of KCl in zebrafish induced an arrhythmia similar to that of humans, and the arrhythmia was partially rescued by calcium gluconate. Amputation and cryoinjury of the zebrafish heart induced ST segment depression and affected QRS duration after injury. Only cryoinjury decelerated the heart rate. Different changes were also observed in the QT interval during heart regeneration in these two injury models. We also characterized the electrocardiophysiology of breakdance zebrafish mutant with a prolonged QT interval, that has not been well described in previous studies. Our study provided a reliable and reproducible means to record zebrafish ECG and analyse data. The detailed characterization of the cardiac electrophysiology of zebrafish and its mutant revealed that the potential of the zebrafish in modeling the human cardiovascular system exceeds expectations. PMID:27125643

  7. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a model for the study of aging and exercise: physical ability and trainability decrease with age.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Matthew J H; Zerulla, Tanja C; Tierney, Keith B

    2014-02-01

    A rapidly aging global population has motivated the development and use of models for human aging. Studies on aging have shown parallels between zebrafish and humans at the internal organization level; however, few parallels have been studied at the whole-organism level. Furthermore, the effectiveness of exercise as a method to mitigate the effects of aging has not been studied in zebrafish. We investigated the effects of aging and intermittent exercise on swimming performance, kinematics and behavior. Young, middle-aged and old zebrafish (20-29, 36-48 and 60-71% of average lifespan, respectively) were exercised to exhaustion in endurance and sprint swimming tests once a week for four weeks. Both endurance and sprint performance decreased with increased age. Swimming performance improved with exercise training in young and middle-aged zebrafish, but not in old zebrafish. Tail-beat amplitude, which is akin to stride length in humans, increased for all age groups with training. Zebrafish turning frequency, which is an indicator of routine activity, decreased with age but showed no change with exercise. In sum, our results show that zebrafish exhibit a decline in whole-organism performance and trainability with age. These findings closely resemble the senescence-related declines in physical ability experienced by humans and mammalian aging models and therefore support the use of zebrafish as a model for human exercise and aging. PMID:24316042

  8. The State of the Art of the Zebrafish Model for Toxicology and Toxicologic Pathology Research—Advantages and Current Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Spitsbergen, Jan M.; Kent, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is now the pre-eminent vertebrate model system for clarification of the roles of specific genes and signaling pathways in development. The zebrafish genome will be completely sequenced within the next 1–2 years. Together with the substantial historical database regarding basic developmental biology, toxicology, and gene transfer, the rich foundation of molecular genetic and genomic data makes zebrafish a powerful model system for clarifying mechanisms in toxicity. In contrast to the highly advanced knowledge base on molecular developmental genetics in zebrafish, our database regarding infectious and noninfectious diseases and pathologic lesions in zebrafish lags far behind the information available on most other domestic mammalian and avian species, particularly rodents. Currently, minimal data are available regarding spontaneous neoplasm rates or spontaneous aging lesions in any of the commonly used wild-type or mutant lines of zebrafish. Therefore, to fully utilize the potential of zebrafish as an animal model for understanding human development, disease, and toxicology we must greatly advance our knowledge on zebrafish diseases and pathology. PMID:12597434

  9. Improvement of surface ECG recording in adult zebrafish reveals that the value of this model exceeds our expectation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chi Chi; Li, Li; Lam, Yun Wah; Siu, Chung Wah; Cheng, Shuk Han

    2016-01-01

    The adult zebrafish has been used to model the electrocardiogram (ECG) for human cardiovascular studies. Nonetheless huge variations are observed among studies probably because of the lack of a reliable and reproducible recording method. In our study, an adult zebrafish surface ECG recording technique was improved using a multi-electrode method and by pre-opening the pericardial sac. A convenient ECG data analysis method without wavelet transform was also established. Intraperitoneal injection of KCl in zebrafish induced an arrhythmia similar to that of humans, and the arrhythmia was partially rescued by calcium gluconate. Amputation and cryoinjury of the zebrafish heart induced ST segment depression and affected QRS duration after injury. Only cryoinjury decelerated the heart rate. Different changes were also observed in the QT interval during heart regeneration in these two injury models. We also characterized the electrocardiophysiology of breakdance zebrafish mutant with a prolonged QT interval, that has not been well described in previous studies. Our study provided a reliable and reproducible means to record zebrafish ECG and analyse data. The detailed characterization of the cardiac electrophysiology of zebrafish and its mutant revealed that the potential of the zebrafish in modeling the human cardiovascular system exceeds expectations. PMID:27125643

  10. Zebrafish: An in vivo model for the study of neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Best, J D; Alderton, Wendy K

    2008-01-01

    As the population ages, there is a growing need for effective therapies for the treatment of neurological diseases. A limited number of therapeutics are currently available to improve cognitive function and research is limited by the need for in vivo models. Zebrafish have recently become a focus of neurobehavioral studies since larvae display neuropathological and behavioral phenotypes that are quantifiable and relate to those seen in man. Due to the small size of Zebrafish larvae, assays can be undertaken in 96 well plates and as the larvae can live in as little as 200 μl of fluid, only a few milligrams of compound are needed for screening. Thus in vivo analysis of the effects of compounds can be undertaken at much earlier stages in the drug discovery process. This review will look at the utility of the zebrafish in the study of neurological diseases and its role in improving the throughput of candidate compounds in in vivo screens. PMID:18830398

  11. Using visual lateralization to model learning and memory in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Madelene Åberg; Ek, Fredrik; Olsson, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Impaired learning and memory are common symptoms of neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases. Present, there are several behavioural test employed to assess cognitive functions in animal models, including the frequently used novel object recognition (NOR) test. However, although atypical functional brain lateralization has been associated with neuropsychiatric conditions, spanning from schizophrenia to autism, few animal models are available to study this phenomenon in learning and memory deficits. Here we present a visual lateralization NOR model (VLNOR) in zebrafish larvae as an assay that combines brain lateralization and NOR. In zebrafish larvae, learning and memory are generally assessed by habituation, sensitization, or conditioning paradigms, which are all representatives of nondeclarative memory. The VLNOR is the first model for zebrafish larvae that studies a memory similar to the declarative memory described for mammals. We demonstrate that VLNOR can be used to study memory formation, storage, and recall of novel objects, both short and long term, in 10-day-old zebrafish. Furthermore we show that the VLNOR model can be used to study chemical modulation of memory formation and maintenance using dizocilpine (MK-801), a frequently used non-competitive antagonist of the NMDA receptor, used to test putative antipsychotics in animal models. PMID:25727677

  12. Copper toxicology, oxidative stress and inflammation using zebrafish as experimental model.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Talita Carneiro Brandão; Campos, Maria Martha; Bogo, Maurício Reis

    2016-07-01

    Copper is an essential micronutrient and a key catalytic cofactor in a wide range of enzymes. As a trace element, copper levels are tightly regulated and both its deficit and excess are deleterious to the organism. Under inflammatory conditions, serum copper levels are increased and trigger oxidative stress responses that activate inflammatory responses. Interestingly, copper dyshomeostasis, oxidative stress and inflammation are commonly present in several chronic diseases. Copper exposure can be easily modeled in zebrafish; a consolidated model in toxicology with increasing interest in immunity-related research. As a result of developmental, economical and genetic advantages, this freshwater teleost is uniquely suitable for chemical and genetic large-scale screenings, representing a powerful experimental tool for a whole-organism approach, mechanistic studies, disease modeling and beyond. Copper toxicological and more recently pro-inflammatory effects have been investigated in both larval and adult zebrafish with breakthrough findings. Here, we provide an overview of copper metabolism in health and disease and its effects on oxidative stress and inflammation responses in zebrafish models. Copper-induced inflammation is highlighted owing to its potential to easily mimic pro-oxidative and pro-inflammatory features that combined with zebrafish genetic tractability could help further in the understanding of copper metabolism, inflammatory responses and related diseases. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26888422

  13. Evaluation of zebrafish as a model to study the pathogenesis of the opportunistic pathogen Cronobacter turicensis

    PubMed Central

    Fehr, Alexander; Eshwar, Athmanya K; Neuhauss, Stephan CF; Ruetten, Maja; Lehner, Angelika; Vaughan, Lloyd

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the genus Cronobacter spp. have been recognized as causative agents of life-threatening systemic infections, primarily in premature, low-birth weight and/or immune-compromised neonates. Knowledge remains scarce regarding the underlying molecular mechanisms of disease development. In this study, we evaluated the use of a zebrafish model to study the pathogenesis of Cronobacter turicensis LMG 23827T, a clinical isolate responsible for two fatal sepsis cases in neonates. Here, the microinjection of approximately 50 colony forming units (CFUs) into the yolk sac resulted in the rapid multiplication of bacteria and dissemination into the blood stream at 24 h post infection (hpi), followed by the development of a severe bacteremia and larval death within 3 days. In contrast, the innate immune response of the embryos was sufficiently developed to control infection after the intravenous injection of up to 104 CFUs of bacteria. Infection studies using an isogenic mutant devoid of surviving and replicating in human macrophages (ΔfkpA) showed that this strain was highly attenuated in its ability to kill the larvae. In addition, the suitability of the zebrafish model system to study the effectiveness of antibiotics to treat Cronobacter infections in zebrafish embryos was examined. Our data indicate that the zebrafish model represents an excellent vertebrate model to study virulence-related aspects of this opportunistic pathogen in vivo. PMID:26060602

  14. Modeling mixtures of thyroid gland function disruptors in a vertebrate alternative model, the zebrafish eleutheroembryo

    SciTech Connect

    Thienpont, Benedicte; Barata, Carlos; Raldúa, Demetrio

    2013-06-01

    Maternal thyroxine (T4) plays an essential role in fetal brain development, and even mild and transitory deficits in free-T4 in pregnant women can produce irreversible neurological effects in their offspring. Women of childbearing age are daily exposed to mixtures of chemicals disrupting the thyroid gland function (TGFDs) through the diet, drinking water, air and pharmaceuticals, which has raised the highest concern for the potential additive or synergic effects on the development of mild hypothyroxinemia during early pregnancy. Recently we demonstrated that zebrafish eleutheroembryos provide a suitable alternative model for screening chemicals impairing the thyroid hormone synthesis. The present study used the intrafollicular T4-content (IT4C) of zebrafish eleutheroembryos as integrative endpoint for testing the hypotheses that the effect of mixtures of TGFDs with a similar mode of action [inhibition of thyroid peroxidase (TPO)] was well predicted by a concentration addition concept (CA) model, whereas the response addition concept (RA) model predicted better the effect of dissimilarly acting binary mixtures of TGFDs [TPO-inhibitors and sodium-iodide symporter (NIS)-inhibitors]. However, CA model provided better prediction of joint effects than RA in five out of the six tested mixtures. The exception being the mixture MMI (TPO-inhibitor)-KClO{sub 4} (NIS-inhibitor) dosed at a fixed ratio of EC{sub 10} that provided similar CA and RA predictions and hence it was difficult to get any conclusive result. There results support the phenomenological similarity criterion stating that the concept of concentration addition could be extended to mixture constituents having common apical endpoints or common adverse outcomes. - Highlights: • Potential synergic or additive effect of mixtures of chemicals on thyroid function. • Zebrafish as alternative model for testing the effect of mixtures of goitrogens. • Concentration addition seems to predict better the effect of

  15. Zebrafish: as an integrative model for twenty-first century toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Sipes, Nisha S; Padilla, Stephanie; Knudsen, Thomas B

    2011-09-01

    The zebrafish embryo is a useful small model for investigating vertebrate development because of its transparency, low cost, transgenic and morpholino capabilities, conservation of cell signaling, and concordance with mammalian developmental phenotypes. From these advantages, the zebrafish embryo has been considered as an alternative model for traditional in vivo developmental toxicity screening. The use of this organism in conjunction with traditional in vivo developmental toxicity testing has the potential to reduce cost and increase throughput of testing the chemical universe, prioritize chemicals for targeted toxicity testing, generate predictive models of developmental toxicants, and elucidate mechanisms and adverse outcome pathways for abnormal development. This review gives an overview of the zebrafish embryo for pre dictive toxicology and 21st century toxicity testing. Developmental eye defects were selected as an example to evaluate data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's ToxCast program comparing responses in zebrafish embryos with those from pregnant rats and rabbits for a subset of 24 environmental chemicals across >600 in vitro assay targets. Cross-species comparisons implied a common basis for biological pathways associated with neuronal defects, extracellular matrix remodeling, and mitotic arrest. PMID:21932434

  16. Function Over Form: Modeling Groups of Inherited Neurological Conditions in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kozol, Robert A.; Abrams, Alexander J.; James, David M.; Buglo, Elena; Yan, Qing; Dallman, Julia E.

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish are a unique cell to behavior model for studying the basic biology of human inherited neurological conditions. Conserved vertebrate genetics and optical transparency provide in vivo access to the developing nervous system as well as high-throughput approaches for drug screens. Here we review zebrafish modeling for two broad groups of inherited conditions that each share genetic and molecular pathways and overlap phenotypically: neurodevelopmental disorders such as Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), Intellectual Disability (ID) and Schizophrenia (SCZ), and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Cerebellar Ataxia (CATX), Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP) and Charcot-Marie Tooth Disease (CMT). We also conduct a small meta-analysis of zebrafish orthologs of high confidence neurodevelopmental disorder and neurodegenerative disease genes by looking at duplication rates and relative protein sizes. In the past zebrafish genetic models of these neurodevelopmental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases have provided insight into cellular, circuit and behavioral level mechanisms contributing to these conditions. Moving forward, advances in genetic manipulation, live imaging of neuronal activity and automated high-throughput molecular screening promise to help delineate the mechanistic relationships between different types of neurological conditions and accelerate discovery of therapeutic strategies. PMID:27458342

  17. Function Over Form: Modeling Groups of Inherited Neurological Conditions in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kozol, Robert A; Abrams, Alexander J; James, David M; Buglo, Elena; Yan, Qing; Dallman, Julia E

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish are a unique cell to behavior model for studying the basic biology of human inherited neurological conditions. Conserved vertebrate genetics and optical transparency provide in vivo access to the developing nervous system as well as high-throughput approaches for drug screens. Here we review zebrafish modeling for two broad groups of inherited conditions that each share genetic and molecular pathways and overlap phenotypically: neurodevelopmental disorders such as Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), Intellectual Disability (ID) and Schizophrenia (SCZ), and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Cerebellar Ataxia (CATX), Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP) and Charcot-Marie Tooth Disease (CMT). We also conduct a small meta-analysis of zebrafish orthologs of high confidence neurodevelopmental disorder and neurodegenerative disease genes by looking at duplication rates and relative protein sizes. In the past zebrafish genetic models of these neurodevelopmental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases have provided insight into cellular, circuit and behavioral level mechanisms contributing to these conditions. Moving forward, advances in genetic manipulation, live imaging of neuronal activity and automated high-throughput molecular screening promise to help delineate the mechanistic relationships between different types of neurological conditions and accelerate discovery of therapeutic strategies. PMID:27458342

  18. Developmental Roles of D-bifunctional Protein-A Zebrafish Model of Peroxisome Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Il; Bhandari, Sushil; Lee, Joon No; Yoo, Kyeong-Won; Kim, Se-Jin; Oh, Gi-Su; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Cho, Meyoung; Kwak, Jong-Young; So, Hong-Seob; Park, Raekil; Choe, Seong-Kyu

    2014-01-01

    The peroxisome is an intracellular organelle that responds dynamically to environmental changes. Various model organisms have been used to study the roles of peroxisomal proteins in maintaining cellular homeostasis. By taking advantage of the zebrafish model whose early stage of embryogenesis is dependent on yolk components, we examined the developmental roles of the D-bifunctional protein (Dbp), an essential enzyme in the peroxisomal β-oxidation. The knockdown of dbp in zebrafish phenocopied clinical manifestations of its deficiency in human, including defective craniofacial morphogenesis, growth retardation, and abnormal neuronal development. Overexpression of murine Dbp rescued the morphological phenotypes induced by dbp knockdown, indicative of conserved roles of Dbp during zebrafish and mammalian development. Knockdown of dbp impaired normal development of blood, blood vessels, and most strikingly, endoderm-derived organs including the liver and pancreas - a phenotype not reported elsewhere in connection with peroxisome dysfunction. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that zebrafish might be a useful model animal to study the role of peroxisomes during vertebrate development. PMID:24552713

  19. Progress Towards the Development of a Fathead Minnow Embryo Test and Comparison to the Zebrafish Embryo Test for Assessing Acute Fish Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Zebrafish Embryo Test (ZFET) for acute fish toxicity is a well developed method nearing adoption as an OECD Test Guideline. Early drafts of the test guideline (TG) envisioned a suite of potential test species to be covered including zebrafish, fathead minnow, Japanese Medaka...

  20. The zebrafish as a gerontology model in nervous system aging, disease, and repair.

    PubMed

    Van Houcke, Jessie; De Groef, Lies; Dekeyster, Eline; Moons, Lieve

    2015-11-01

    Considering the increasing number of elderly in the world's population today, developing effective treatments for age-related pathologies is one of the biggest challenges in modern medical research. Age-related neurodegeneration, in particular, significantly impacts important sensory, motor, and cognitive functions, seriously constraining life quality of many patients. Although our understanding of the causal mechanisms of aging has greatly improved in recent years, animal model systems still have much to tell us about this complex process. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) have gained enormous popularity for this research topic over the past decade, since their life span is relatively short but, like humans, they are still subject to gradual aging. In addition, the extensive characterization of its well-conserved molecular and cellular physiology makes the zebrafish an excellent model to unravel the underlying mechanisms of aging, disease, and repair. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the progress made in zebrafish gerontology, with special emphasis on nervous system aging. We review the evidence that classic hallmarks of aging can also be recognized within this small vertebrate, both at the molecular and cellular level. Moreover, we illustrate the high level of similarity with age-associated human pathologies through a survey of the functional deficits that arise as zebrafish age. PMID:26538520

  1. The behavioral space of zebrafish locomotion and its neural network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girdhar, Kiran; Benitez-Jones, Maria; Thi, Ha Pham; Nelson, Mark; Gruebele, Martin; Chemla, Yann

    2014-03-01

    How does one describe quantitatively the complex motion of vertebrates? To answer this question, we investigated a model system for vertebrate locomotion: zebrafish swimming. We performed a quantitative analysis of all stereotyped behavioral swimming patterns of zebrafish larvae: spontaneous swimming, escape response to stimulus, and prey tracking. Previous attempts to analyze zebrafish swimming motion quantitatively have imposed many arbitrary parameters. Here, we instead used a parameter-independent method that produces an orthogonal set of ``eigen-shapes'' of fish backbones to describe swimming motion in a low-dimensional space. We show that a linear combination of only three such ``eigen-shapes'' is sufficient to describe 97% of zebrafish shapes. Moreover, stereotyped swimming behaviors fall on two low-dimensional attractors embedded in this three dimensional behavioral space. We also show using a two-dimensional correlation analysis that ``scoots'' and ``R-turns,'' which were previously described as discrete behavioral states, in fact represent extrema in a continuum in this low-dimensional behavioral space. To understand the neural basis of the behavior, we have also developed a neural network model of spontaneous swimming of fish larvae. We present a set of neural parameters such as synaptic conductance, stimulus amplitude that produces swimming behavior and reconstructed the low-dimensional behavioral space obtained from experimental results.

  2. New Model Systems to Illuminate Thyroid Organogenesis. Part I: An Update on the Zebrafish Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Opitz, Robert; Antonica, Francesco; Costagliola, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid dysgenesis (TD) resulting from defects during embryonic thyroid development represents a major cause of congenital hypothyroidism. The pathogenetic mechanisms of TD in human newborns, however, are still poorly understood and disease-causing genetic variants have been identified in only a small percentage of TD cases. This limited understanding of the pathogenesis of TD is partly due to a lack of knowledge on how intrinsic factors and extrinsic signalling cues orchestrate the differentiation of thyroid follicular cells and the morphogenesis of thyroid tissue. Recently, embryonic stem cells and zebrafish embryos emerged as novel model systems that allow for innovative experimental approaches in order to decipher cellular and molecular mechanisms of thyroid development and to unravel pathogenic mechanisms of TD. Zebrafish embryos offer several salient properties for studies on thyroid organogenesis including rapid and external development, optical transparency, ease of breeding, relative short generation time and amenability for genome editing. In this review, we will highlight recent advances in the zebrafish toolkit to visualize cellular dynamics of organ development and discuss specific prospects of the zebrafish model for studies on vertebrate thyroid development and human congenital thyroid diseases. PMID:24783054

  3. NAD+ Biosynthesis Ameliorates a Zebrafish Model of Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Goody, Michelle F.; Kelly, Meghan W.; Reynolds, Christine J.; Khalil, Andre; Crawford, Bryan D.; Henry, Clarissa A.

    2012-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are common, currently incurable diseases. A subset of dystrophies result from genetic disruptions in complexes that attach muscle fibers to their surrounding extracellular matrix microenvironment. Cell-matrix adhesions are exquisite sensors of physiological conditions and mediate responses that allow cells to adapt to changing conditions. Thus, one approach towards finding targets for future therapeutic applications is to identify cell adhesion pathways that mediate these dynamic, adaptive responses in vivo. We find that nicotinamide riboside kinase 2b-mediated NAD+ biosynthesis, which functions as a small molecule agonist of muscle fiber-extracellular matrix adhesion, corrects dystrophic phenotypes in zebrafish lacking either a primary component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex or integrin alpha7. Exogenous NAD+ or a vitamin precursor to NAD+ reduces muscle fiber degeneration and results in significantly faster escape responses in dystrophic embryos. Overexpression of paxillin, a cell adhesion protein downstream of NAD+ in this novel cell adhesion pathway, reduces muscle degeneration in zebrafish with intact integrin receptors but does not improve motility. Activation of this pathway significantly increases organization of laminin, a major component of the extracellular matrix basement membrane. Our results indicate that the primary protective effects of NAD+ result from changes to the basement membrane, as a wild-type basement membrane is sufficient to increase resilience of dystrophic muscle fibers to damage. The surprising result that NAD+ supplementation ameliorates dystrophy in dystrophin-glycoprotein complex– or integrin alpha7–deficient zebrafish suggests the existence of an additional laminin receptor complex that anchors muscle fibers to the basement membrane. We find that integrin alpha6 participates in this pathway, but either integrin alpha7 or the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex is required in conjunction with integrin

  4. NAD+ biosynthesis ameliorates a zebrafish model of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Goody, Michelle F; Kelly, Meghan W; Reynolds, Christine J; Khalil, Andre; Crawford, Bryan D; Henry, Clarissa A

    2012-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are common, currently incurable diseases. A subset of dystrophies result from genetic disruptions in complexes that attach muscle fibers to their surrounding extracellular matrix microenvironment. Cell-matrix adhesions are exquisite sensors of physiological conditions and mediate responses that allow cells to adapt to changing conditions. Thus, one approach towards finding targets for future therapeutic applications is to identify cell adhesion pathways that mediate these dynamic, adaptive responses in vivo. We find that nicotinamide riboside kinase 2b-mediated NAD+ biosynthesis, which functions as a small molecule agonist of muscle fiber-extracellular matrix adhesion, corrects dystrophic phenotypes in zebrafish lacking either a primary component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex or integrin alpha7. Exogenous NAD+ or a vitamin precursor to NAD+ reduces muscle fiber degeneration and results in significantly faster escape responses in dystrophic embryos. Overexpression of paxillin, a cell adhesion protein downstream of NAD+ in this novel cell adhesion pathway, reduces muscle degeneration in zebrafish with intact integrin receptors but does not improve motility. Activation of this pathway significantly increases organization of laminin, a major component of the extracellular matrix basement membrane. Our results indicate that the primary protective effects of NAD+ result from changes to the basement membrane, as a wild-type basement membrane is sufficient to increase resilience of dystrophic muscle fibers to damage. The surprising result that NAD+ supplementation ameliorates dystrophy in dystrophin-glycoprotein complex- or integrin alpha7-deficient zebrafish suggests the existence of an additional laminin receptor complex that anchors muscle fibers to the basement membrane. We find that integrin alpha6 participates in this pathway, but either integrin alpha7 or the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex is required in conjunction with integrin alpha

  5. Whole Body Melanoma Transcriptome Response in Medaka

    PubMed Central

    Schartl, Manfred; Shen, Yingjia; Maurus, Katja; Walter, Ron; Tomlinson, Chad; Wilson, Richard K.; Postlethwait, John; Warren, Wesley C.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of malignant melanoma continues to increase each year with poor prognosis for survival in many relapse cases. To reverse this trend, whole body response measures are needed to discover collaborative paths to primary and secondary malignancy. Several species of fish provide excellent melanoma models because fish and human melanocytes both appear in the epidermis, and fish and human pigment cell tumors share conserved gene expression signatures. For the first time, we have examined the whole body transcriptome response to invasive melanoma as a prelude to using transcriptome profiling to screen for drugs in a medaka (Oryzias latipes) model. We generated RNA-seq data from whole body RNA isolates for controls and melanoma fish. After testing for differential expression, 396 genes had significantly different expression (adjusted p-value <0.02) in the whole body transcriptome between melanoma and control fish; 379 of these genes were matched to human orthologs with 233 having annotated human gene symbols and 14 matched genes that contain putative deleterious variants in human melanoma at varying levels of recurrence. A detailed canonical pathway evaluation for significant enrichment showed the top scoring pathway to be antigen presentation but also included the expected melanocyte development and pigmentation signaling pathway. Results revealed a profound down-regulation of genes involved in the immune response, especially the innate immune system. We hypothesize that the developing melanoma actively suppresses the immune system responses of the body in reacting to the invasive malignancy, and that this mal-adaptive response contributes to disease progression, a result that suggests our whole-body transcriptomic approach merits further use. In these findings, we also observed novel genes not yet identified in human melanoma expression studies and uncovered known and new candidate drug targets for further testing in this malignant melanoma medaka model. PMID

  6. Whole Body Melanoma Transcriptome Response in Medaka.

    PubMed

    Schartl, Manfred; Shen, Yingjia; Maurus, Katja; Walter, Ron; Tomlinson, Chad; Wilson, Richard K; Postlethwait, John; Warren, Wesley C

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of malignant melanoma continues to increase each year with poor prognosis for survival in many relapse cases. To reverse this trend, whole body response measures are needed to discover collaborative paths to primary and secondary malignancy. Several species of fish provide excellent melanoma models because fish and human melanocytes both appear in the epidermis, and fish and human pigment cell tumors share conserved gene expression signatures. For the first time, we have examined the whole body transcriptome response to invasive melanoma as a prelude to using transcriptome profiling to screen for drugs in a medaka (Oryzias latipes) model. We generated RNA-seq data from whole body RNA isolates for controls and melanoma fish. After testing for differential expression, 396 genes had significantly different expression (adjusted p-value <0.02) in the whole body transcriptome between melanoma and control fish; 379 of these genes were matched to human orthologs with 233 having annotated human gene symbols and 14 matched genes that contain putative deleterious variants in human melanoma at varying levels of recurrence. A detailed canonical pathway evaluation for significant enrichment showed the top scoring pathway to be antigen presentation but also included the expected melanocyte development and pigmentation signaling pathway. Results revealed a profound down-regulation of genes involved in the immune response, especially the innate immune system. We hypothesize that the developing melanoma actively suppresses the immune system responses of the body in reacting to the invasive malignancy, and that this mal-adaptive response contributes to disease progression, a result that suggests our whole-body transcriptomic approach merits further use. In these findings, we also observed novel genes not yet identified in human melanoma expression studies and uncovered known and new candidate drug targets for further testing in this malignant melanoma medaka model. PMID

  7. A novel model of demyelination and remyelination in a GFP-transgenic zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yangwu; Lei, Xudan; Li, Xiang; Chen, Yanan; Xu, Fei; Feng, Xizeng; Wei, Shihui; Li, Yuhao

    2014-01-01

    Demyelinating diseases consist of a variety of autoimmune conditions in which the myelin sheath is damaged due to genetic and/or environmental factors. During clinical treatment, some patients undergo partial remyelination, especially during the early disease stages. However, the mechanisms that regulate demyelination remain unclear. The myelin structure, myelin formation and myelin-related gene expression are highly conserved between mammals and zebrafish. Therefore, the zebrafish is an ideal model organism to study myelination. In this study, we generated a transgenic zebrafish Tg(mbp:nfsB-egfp) expressing a fusion protein composed of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and NTR from the myelin basic protein (mbp) promoter. Tg(mbp:nfsB-egfp) expressed NTR-EGFP reproducibly and hereditarily in oligodendrocytes along the spinal cord. Treatment of zebrafish larvae Tg(mbp:nfsB-egfp) with metronidazole (Mtz) resulted in the selective ablation of oligodendrocytes and led to demyelination, accompanied by behavioral changes, including decreased total movement distance, velocity, total movement time and fast movement time. After withdrawal of Mtz for a seven day recovery period, the expression of EGFP and MBP protein was observed again which indicates remyelination. Additionally, locomotor capacity was restored. Collectively, Tg(mbp:nfsB-egfp), a heritable and stable transgenic line, provides a novel, powerful tool to study the mechanisms of demyelination and remyelination. PMID:25527642

  8. Therapeutic effect of deferoxamine on iron overload-induced inhibition of osteogenesis in a zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Yan, Yi-Lin; Liu, Chen; Bo, Lin; Li, Guang-Fei; Wang, Han; Xu, You-Jia

    2014-03-01

    Osteoporosis results from an imbalance in bone remodeling, in which osteoclastic bone resorption exceeds osteoblastic bone formation. Iron has recently been recognized as an independent risk factor for osteoporosis. Reportedly, excess iron could promote osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We evaluated the effect of iron on osteoblast differentiation and bone formation in zebrafish and further investigated the potential benefits of deferoxamine (DFO), a powerful iron chelator, in iron-overloaded zebrafish. The zebrafish model of iron overload described in this study demonstrated an apparent inhibition of bone formation, accompanied by decreased expression of osteoblast-specific genes (runx2a, runx2b, osteocalcin, osteopontin, ALP, and collagen type I). The negative effect of iron on osteoblastic activity and bone formation could be attributed to increased ROS generation and oxidative stress. Most importantly, we revealed that DFO was capable of removing whole-body iron and attenuating oxidative stress in iron-overloaded larval zebrafish, which facilitated larval recovery from the reductions in bone formation and osteogenesis induced by iron overload. PMID:24414856

  9. The common neural parasite Pseudoloma neurophilia is associated with altered startle response habituation in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio): Implications for the zebrafish as a model organism.

    PubMed

    Spagnoli, Sean; Xue, Lan; Kent, Michael L

    2015-09-15

    The zebrafish's potential as a model for human neurobehavioral research appears nearly limitless despite its relatively recent emergence as an experimental organism. Since the zebrafish has only been part of the research community for a handful of decades, pathogens from its commercial origins continue to plague laboratory stocks. One such pathogen is Pseudoloma neurophilia, a common microparasite in zebrafish laboratories world-wide that generally produces subclinical infections. Given its high prevalence, its predilection for the host's brain and spinal cord, and the delicate nature of neurobehavioral research, the behavioral consequences of subclinical P. neurophilia infection must be explored. Fish infected via cohabitation were tested for startle response habituation in parallel with controls in a device that administered ten taps over 10 min along with taps at 18 and 60 min to evaluate habituation extinction. After testing, fish were euthanized and evaluated for infection via histopathology. Infected fish had a significantly smaller reduction in startle velocity during habituation compared to uninfected tankmates and controls. Habituation was eliminated in infected and control fish at 18 min, whereas exposed negative fish retained partial habituation at 18 min. Infection was also associated with enhanced capture evasion: Despite the absence of external symptoms, infected fish tended to be caught later than uninfected fish netted from the same tank. The combination of decreased overall habituation, early extinction of habituation compared to uninfected cohorts, and enhanced netting evasion indicates that P. neurophilia infection is associated with a behavioral phenotype distinct from that of controls and uninfected cohorts. Because of its prevalence in zebrafish facilities, P. neurophilia has the potential to insidiously influence a wide range of neurobehavioral studies if these associations are causative. Rigorous health screening is therefore vital to the

  10. Identification of a Heritable Model of Testicular Germ Cell Tumor in the Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Joanie C.; Dovey, Jennifer Shepard; Chandler, Garvin L.; Carbajal, Liliana

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Germ cell tumors (GCTs) affect infants, children, and adults and are the most common cancer type in young men. Progress in understanding the molecular basis of GCTs has been hampered by a lack of suitable animal models. Here we report the identification of a zebrafish model of highly penetrant, heritable testicular GCT isolated as part of a forward genetic screen for cancer susceptibility genes. The mutant line develops spontaneous testicular tumors at a median age of 7 months, and pedigree analysis indicates dominant inheritance of the GCT susceptibility trait. The zebrafish model exhibits disruption of testicular tissue architecture and the accumulation of primitive, spermatogonial-like cells with loss of spermatocytic differentiation. Radiation treatment leads to apoptosis of the tumor cells and tumor regression. The GCT-susceptible line can serve as a model for understanding the mechanisms regulating germ cells in normal development and disease and as a platform investigating new therapeutic approaches for GCTs. PMID:20047465

  11. Phenotypic and biomarker evaluation of zebrafish larvae as an alternative model to predict mammalian hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Verstraelen, Sandra; Peers, Bernard; Maho, Walid; Hollanders, Karen; Remy, Sylvie; Berckmans, Pascale; Covaci, Adrian; Witters, Hilda

    2016-09-01

    Zebrafish phenotypic assays have shown promise to assess human hepatotoxicity, though scoring of liver morphology remains subjective and difficult to standardize. Liver toxicity in zebrafish larvae at 5 days was assessed using gene expression as the biomarker approach, complementary to phenotypic analysis and analytical data on compound uptake. This approach aimed to contribute to improved hepatotoxicity prediction, with the goal of identifying biomarker(s) as a step towards the development of transgenic models for prioritization. Morphological effects of hepatotoxic compounds (acetaminophen, amiodarone, coumarin, methapyrilene and myclobutanil) and saccharin as the negative control were assessed after exposure in zebrafish larvae. The hepatotoxic compounds induced the expected zebrafish liver degeneration or changes in size, whereas saccharin did not have any phenotypic adverse effect. Analytical methods based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry were optimized to measure stability of selected compounds in exposure medium and internal concentration in larvae. All compounds were stable, except amiodarone for which precipitation was observed. There was a wide variation between the levels of compound in the zebrafish larvae with a higher uptake of amiodarone, methapyrilene and myclobutanil. Detection of hepatocyte markers (CP, CYP3A65, GC and TF) was accomplished by in situ hybridization of larvae to coumarin and myclobutanil and confirmed by real-time reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Experiments showed decreased expression of all markers. Next, other liver-specific biomarkers (i.e. FABP10a and NR1H4) and apoptosis (i.e. CASP-3 A and TP53) or cytochrome P450-related (CYP2K19) and oxidoreductase activity-related (ZGC163022) genes, were screened. Links between basic mechanisms of liver injury and results of biomarker responses are described. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26946349

  12. USE OF THE JAPANESE MEDAKA (ORYZIAS LATIPES) AND GUPPY (POECILIA RETICULATA) IN CARCINOGENESIS TESTING UNDER NATIONAL TOXICOLOGY PROGRAM PROTOCOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    that are economical, sensitive, and scientifically acceptable. Among small fish models, the Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) is preeminent for investigating effects of carcinogenic and/or toxic waterborne hazards to humans. The guppy (Poecilia reticulata), although less widely u...

  13. Zebrafish models in translational research: tipping the scales toward advancements in human health

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Jennifer B.; Westerfield, Monte

    2014-01-01

    Advances in genomics and next-generation sequencing have provided clinical researchers with unprecedented opportunities to understand the molecular basis of human genetic disorders. This abundance of information places new requirements on traditional disease models, which have the potential to be used to confirm newly identified pathogenic mutations and test the efficacy of emerging therapies. The unique attributes of zebrafish are being increasingly leveraged to create functional disease models, facilitate drug discovery, and provide critical scientific bases for the development of new clinical tools for the diagnosis and treatment of human disease. In this short review and the accompanying poster, we highlight a few illustrative examples of the applications of the zebrafish model to the study of human health and disease. PMID:24973743

  14. A transgenic zebrafish liver tumor model with inducible Myc expression reveals conserved Myc signatures with mammalian liver tumors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Zheng, Weiling; Wang, Zhengyuan; Zeng, Zhiqiang; Zhan, Huiqing; Li, Caixia; Zhou, Li; Yan, Chuan; Spitsbergen, Jan M.; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Myc is a pleiotropic transcription factor that is involved in many cellular activities relevant to carcinogenesis, including hepatocarcinogenesis. The zebrafish has been increasingly used to model human diseases and it is particularly valuable in helping to identify common and conserved molecular mechanisms in vertebrates. Here we generated a liver tumor model in transgenic zebrafish by liver-specific expression of mouse Myc using a Tet-On system. Dosage-dependent induction of Myc expression specifically in the liver was observed in our Myc transgenic zebrafish, TO(Myc), and the elevated Myc expression caused liver hyperplasia, which progressed to hepatocellular adenoma and carcinoma with prolonged induction. Next generation sequencing-based transcriptomic analyses indicated that ribosome proteins were overwhelmingly upregulated in the Myc-induced liver tumors. Cross-species analyses showed that the zebrafish Myc model correlated well with Myc transgenic mouse models for liver cancers. The Myc-induced zebrafish liver tumors also possessed molecular signatures highly similar to human those of hepatocellular carcinoma. Finally, we found that a small Myc target gene set of 16 genes could be used to identify liver tumors due to Myc upregulation. Thus, our zebrafish model demonstrated the conserved role of Myc in promoting hepatocarcinogenesis in all vertebrate species. PMID:23038063

  15. Zebrafish as a model for acetylcholinesterase-inhibiting organophosphorus agent exposure and oxime reactivation.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Jeffrey A; Dao, Thuy L; Kan, Robert K; Shih, Tsung-Ming

    2016-06-01

    The current research progression efforts for investigating novel treatments for exposure to organophosphorus (OP) compounds that inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE), including pesticides and chemical warfare nerve agents (CWNAs), rely solely on in vitro cell assays and in vivo rodent models. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a popular, well-established vertebrate model in biomedical research that offers high-throughput capabilities and genetic manipulation not readily available with rodents. A number of research studies have investigated the effects of subacute developmental exposure to OP pesticides in zebrafish, observing detrimental effects on gross morphology, neuronal development, and behavior. Few studies, however, have utilized this model to evaluate treatments, such as oxime reactivators, anticholinergics, or anticonvulsants, following acute exposure. Preliminary work has investigated the effects of CWNA exposure. The results clearly demonstrated relative toxicity and oxime efficacy similar to that reported for the rodent model. This review surveys the current literature utilizing zebrafish as a model for OP exposure and highlights its potential use as a high-throughput system for evaluating AChE reactivator antidotal treatments to acute pesticide and CWNA exposure. PMID:27123828

  16. Model organisms in the fight against muscular dystrophy: lessons from drosophila and Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Plantié, Emilie; Migocka-Patrzałek, Marta; Daczewska, Małgorzata; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MD) are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that cause muscle weakness, abnormal contractions and muscle wasting, often leading to premature death. More than 30 types of MD have been described so far; those most thoroughly studied are Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and congenital MDs. Structurally, physiologically and biochemically, MDs affect different types of muscles and cause individual symptoms such that genetic and molecular pathways underlying their pathogenesis thus remain poorly understood. To improve our knowledge of how MD-caused muscle defects arise and to find efficacious therapeutic treatments, different animal models have been generated and applied. Among these, simple non-mammalian Drosophila and zebrafish models have proved most useful. This review discusses how zebrafish and Drosophila MD have helped to identify genetic determinants of MDs and design innovative therapeutic strategies with a special focus on DMD, DM1 and congenital MDs. PMID:25859781

  17. A Zebrafish Larval Model to Assess Virulence of Porcine Streptococcus suis Strains.

    PubMed

    Zaccaria, Edoardo; Cao, Rui; Wells, Jerry M; van Baarlen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an encapsulated Gram-positive bacterium, and the leading cause of sepsis and meningitis in young pigs resulting in considerable economic losses in the porcine industry. It is also considered an emerging zoonotic agent. In the environment, both avirulent and virulent strains occur in pigs, and virulent strains appear to cause disease in both humans and pigs. There is a need for a convenient, reliable and standardized animal model to assess S. suis virulence. A zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae infection model has several advantages, including transparency of larvae, low cost, ease of use and exemption from ethical legislation up to 6 days post fertilization, but has not been previously established as a model for S. suis. Microinjection of different porcine strains of S. suis in zebrafish larvae resulted in highly reproducible dose- and strain-dependent larval death, strongly correlating with presence of the S. suis capsule and to the original virulence of the strain in pigs. Additionally we compared the virulence of the two-component system mutant of ciaRH, which is attenuated for virulence in both mice and pigs in vivo. Infection of larvae with the ΔciaRH strain resulted in significantly higher survival rate compared to infection with the S10 wild-type strain. Our data demonstrate that zebrafish larvae are a rapid and reliable model to assess the virulence of clinical porcine S. suis isolates. PMID:26999052

  18. A Zebrafish Larval Model to Assess Virulence of Porcine Streptococcus suis Strains

    PubMed Central

    Zaccaria, Edoardo; Cao, Rui; Wells, Jerry M.; van Baarlen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an encapsulated Gram-positive bacterium, and the leading cause of sepsis and meningitis in young pigs resulting in considerable economic losses in the porcine industry. It is also considered an emerging zoonotic agent. In the environment, both avirulent and virulent strains occur in pigs, and virulent strains appear to cause disease in both humans and pigs. There is a need for a convenient, reliable and standardized animal model to assess S. suis virulence. A zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae infection model has several advantages, including transparency of larvae, low cost, ease of use and exemption from ethical legislation up to 6 days post fertilization, but has not been previously established as a model for S. suis. Microinjection of different porcine strains of S. suis in zebrafish larvae resulted in highly reproducible dose- and strain-dependent larval death, strongly correlating with presence of the S. suis capsule and to the original virulence of the strain in pigs. Additionally we compared the virulence of the two-component system mutant of ciaRH, which is attenuated for virulence in both mice and pigs in vivo. Infection of larvae with the ΔciaRH strain resulted in significantly higher survival rate compared to infection with the S10 wild-type strain. Our data demonstrate that zebrafish larvae are a rapid and reliable model to assess the virulence of clinical porcine S. suis isolates. PMID:26999052

  19. Molecular psychiatry of zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Adam Michael; Ullmann, Jeremy F.P.; Norton, William H.J.; Brennan, Caroline H.; Parker, Matthew O.; Gerlai, Robert; Kalueff, Allan V.

    2014-01-01

    Due to their well-characterized neural development and high genetic homology to mammals, zebrafish (Danio rerio) have emerged as a powerful model organism in the field of biological psychiatry. Here, we discuss the molecular psychiatry of zebrafish, and its implications for translational neuroscience research and modeling CNS disorders. In particular, we outline recent genetic and technological developments allowing for in-vivo examinations, high-throughput screening and whole-brain analyses in larval and adult zebrafish. We also summarize the application of these molecular techniques to the understanding of neuropsychiatric disease, outlining the potential of zebrafish for modeling complex brain disorders, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), aggression, post-traumatic stress and substance abuse. Critically evaluating the advantages and limitations of larval and adult fish tests, we suggest that zebrafish models become a rapidly emerging new field in modern biological psychiatry research. PMID:25349164

  20. Molecular psychiatry of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Stewart, A M; Ullmann, J F P; Norton, W H J; Parker, M O; Brennan, C H; Gerlai, R; Kalueff, A V

    2015-02-01

    Due to their well-characterized neural development and high genetic homology to mammals, zebrafish (Danio rerio) have emerged as a powerful model organism in the field of biological psychiatry. Here, we discuss the molecular psychiatry of zebrafish, and its implications for translational neuroscience research and modeling central nervous system (CNS) disorders. In particular, we outline recent genetic and technological developments allowing for in vivo examinations, high-throughput screening and whole-brain analyses in larval and adult zebrafish. We also summarize the application of these molecular techniques to the understanding of neuropsychiatric disease, outlining the potential of zebrafish for modeling complex brain disorders, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), aggression, post-traumatic stress and substance abuse. Critically evaluating the advantages and limitations of larval and adult fish tests, we suggest that zebrafish models become a rapidly emerging new field in modern molecular psychiatry research. PMID:25349164

  1. Recombinant medaka (Oryzias melastigmus) pro-hepcidin: Multifunctional characterization.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ling; Cai, Jing-Jing; Liu, Hai-Peng; Fan, Dan-Qing; Peng, Hui; Wang, Ke-Jian

    2012-02-01

    Recently, two hepcidin variant genes (Om-hep1 and Om-hep2) were identified in a model fish marine medaka and both were highly induced in vivo with bacterial challenge, suggesting that the medaka hepcidin may have a similar function to other reported teleostean hepcidins. In the present study, the antibacterial, antiviral and antitumor activities of Om-hep1 were determined using its synthetic and recombinant pro-peptides. The recombinant pro-hepcidin1 was expressed in Escherichia coli and an effective method to produce recombinant Pro-Omhep1 was developed in order to obtain a right folded structure. The results showed that both the synthetic mature peptide and recombinant pro-peptide had similar antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and negative bacteria. In particular, both the synthetic mature Om-hep1 and recombinant Pro-Omhep1 inhibited the viral replication of white spot syndrome virus in the hematopoietic tissue cells of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus. Om-hep1 also presented antitumor activity on the cultured human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. In addition, the antimicrobial mechanism of Om-hep1 was measured and it was found that Om-hep1 was likely to be non-membranolytic. The recombinant Pro-Omhep1 performed better biological activity compared to the synthetic mature Om-hep1. This study suggested that Om-hep1 was likely to be an important multifunction protein involved in various resistance actions in the marine medaka immune system. PMID:22051539

  2. Germline replacement by blastula cell transplantation in the fish medaka.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingyou; Hong, Ni; Xu, Hongyan; Song, Jianxing; Hong, Yunhan

    2016-01-01

    Primordial germ cell (PGC) specification early in development establishes the germline for reproduction and reproductive technologies. Germline replacement (GR) is a powerful tool for conservation of valuable or endangered animals. GR is achievable by germ cell transplantation into the PGC migration pathway or gonads. Blastula cell transplantation (BCT) can also lead to the chimeric germline containing PGCs of both donor and host origins. It has remained largely unknown whether BCT is able to achieve GR at a high efficiency. Here we report efficient GR by BCT into blastula embryos in the fish medaka (Oryzias latipes). Specifically, dnd depletion completely ablated host PGCs and fertility, and dnd overexpression remarkably boosted PGCs in donor blastulae. BCT between normal donor and host produced a germline transmission rate of ~4%. This rate was enhanced up to ~30% upon PGC boosting in donors. Most importantly, BCT between PGC-boosted donors and PGC-ablated hosts led to more than 90% fertility restoration and 100% GR. Therefore, BCT features an extremely high efficiency of fertility recovery and GR in medaka. This finding makes medaka an ideal model to analyze genetic and physiological donor-host compatibilities for BCT-mediated surrogate production and propagation of endangered lower vertebrates and biodiversity. PMID:27406328

  3. Genetic Analysis of Craniofacial Traits in the Medaka

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Tetsuaki; Shimada, Atsuko; Sakai, Noriyoshi; Mitani, Hiroshi; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Tamiya, Gen; Shinya, Minori

    2007-01-01

    Family and twin studies suggest that a substantial genetic component underlies individual differences in craniofacial morphology. In the current study, we quantified 444 craniofacial traits in 100 individuals from two inbred medaka (Oryzias latipes) strains, HNI and Hd-rR. Relative distances between defined landmarks were measured in digital images of the medaka head region. A total of 379 traits differed significantly between the two strains, indicating that many craniofacial traits are controlled by genetic factors. Of these, 89 traits were analyzed via interval mapping of 184 F2 progeny from an intercross between HNI and Hd-rR. We identified quantitative trait loci for 66 craniofacial traits. The highest logarithm of the odds score was 6.2 for linkage group (LG) 9 and 11. Trait L33, which corresponds to the ratio of head length to head height at eye level, mapped to LG9; trait V15, which corresponds to the ratio of snout length to head width measured behind the eyes, mapped to LG11. Our initial results confirm the potential of the medaka as a model system for the genetic analysis of complex traits such as craniofacial morphology. PMID:18073435

  4. Germline replacement by blastula cell transplantation in the fish medaka

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingyou; Hong, Ni; Xu, Hongyan; Song, Jianxing; Hong, Yunhan

    2016-01-01

    Primordial germ cell (PGC) specification early in development establishes the germline for reproduction and reproductive technologies. Germline replacement (GR) is a powerful tool for conservation of valuable or endangered animals. GR is achievable by germ cell transplantation into the PGC migration pathway or gonads. Blastula cell transplantation (BCT) can also lead to the chimeric germline containing PGCs of both donor and host origins. It has remained largely unknown whether BCT is able to achieve GR at a high efficiency. Here we report efficient GR by BCT into blastula embryos in the fish medaka (Oryzias latipes). Specifically, dnd depletion completely ablated host PGCs and fertility, and dnd overexpression remarkably boosted PGCs in donor blastulae. BCT between normal donor and host produced a germline transmission rate of ~4%. This rate was enhanced up to ~30% upon PGC boosting in donors. Most importantly, BCT between PGC-boosted donors and PGC-ablated hosts led to more than 90% fertility restoration and 100% GR. Therefore, BCT features an extremely high efficiency of fertility recovery and GR in medaka. This finding makes medaka an ideal model to analyze genetic and physiological donor-host compatibilities for BCT-mediated surrogate production and propagation of endangered lower vertebrates and biodiversity. PMID:27406328

  5. Establishment of Infection Models in Zebrafish Larvae (Danio rerio) to Study the Pathogenesis of Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed

    Saraceni, Paolo R; Romero, Alejandro; Figueras, Antonio; Novoa, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen of fish and terrestrial animals. In humans, A. hydrophila mainly causes gastroenteritis, septicaemia, and tissue infections. The mechanisms of infection, the main virulence factors and the host immune response triggered by A. hydrophila have been studied in detail using murine models and adult fish. However, the great limitation of studying adult animals is that the animal must be sacrificed and its tissues/organs extracted, which prevents the study of the infectious processes in the whole living animal. Zebrafish larvae are being used for the analysis of several infectious diseases, but their use for studying the pathogenesis of A. hydrophila has never been explored. The great advantage of zebrafish larvae is their transparency during the first week after fertilization, which allows detailed descriptions of the infectious processes using in vivo imaging techniques such as differential interferential contrast (DIC) and fluorescence microscopy. Moreover, the availability of fluorescent pathogens and transgenic reporter zebrafish lines expressing fluorescent immune cells, immune marker genes or cytokines/chemokines allows the host-pathogen interactions to be characterized. The present study explores the suitability of zebrafish larvae to study the pathogenesis of A. hydrophila and the interaction mechanisms between the bacterium and the innate immune responses through an infection model using different routes for infection. We used an early-embryo infection model at 3 days post-fertilization (dpf) through the microinjection of A. hydrophila into the duct of Cuvier, caudal vein, notochord, or muscle and two bath infection models using 4 dpf healthy and injured larvae. The latter resembled the natural conditions under which A. hydrophila produces infectious diseases in animals. We compared the cellular processes after infection in each anatomical site by confocal fluorescence imaging and determined the

  6. Establishment of Infection Models in Zebrafish Larvae (Danio rerio) to Study the Pathogenesis of Aeromonas hydrophila

    PubMed Central

    Saraceni, Paolo R.; Romero, Alejandro; Figueras, Antonio; Novoa, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen of fish and terrestrial animals. In humans, A. hydrophila mainly causes gastroenteritis, septicaemia, and tissue infections. The mechanisms of infection, the main virulence factors and the host immune response triggered by A. hydrophila have been studied in detail using murine models and adult fish. However, the great limitation of studying adult animals is that the animal must be sacrificed and its tissues/organs extracted, which prevents the study of the infectious processes in the whole living animal. Zebrafish larvae are being used for the analysis of several infectious diseases, but their use for studying the pathogenesis of A. hydrophila has never been explored. The great advantage of zebrafish larvae is their transparency during the first week after fertilization, which allows detailed descriptions of the infectious processes using in vivo imaging techniques such as differential interferential contrast (DIC) and fluorescence microscopy. Moreover, the availability of fluorescent pathogens and transgenic reporter zebrafish lines expressing fluorescent immune cells, immune marker genes or cytokines/chemokines allows the host–pathogen interactions to be characterized. The present study explores the suitability of zebrafish larvae to study the pathogenesis of A. hydrophila and the interaction mechanisms between the bacterium and the innate immune responses through an infection model using different routes for infection. We used an early-embryo infection model at 3 days post-fertilization (dpf) through the microinjection of A. hydrophila into the duct of Cuvier, caudal vein, notochord, or muscle and two bath infection models using 4 dpf healthy and injured larvae. The latter resembled the natural conditions under which A. hydrophila produces infectious diseases in animals. We compared the cellular processes after infection in each anatomical site by confocal fluorescence imaging and determined the

  7. Zebrafish as a Model to Study the Role of Peroxisome Proliferating-Activated Receptors in Adipogenesis and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Den Broeder, Marjo J.; Kopylova, Victoria A.; Kamminga, Leonie M.; Legler, Juliette

    2015-01-01

    The Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors (PPARs) PPARA and PPARD are regulators of lipid metabolism with important roles in energy release through lipid breakdown, while PPARG plays a key role in lipid storage and adipogenesis. The aim of this review is to describe the role of PPARs in lipid metabolism, adipogenesis, and obesity and evaluate the zebrafish as an emerging vertebrate model to study the function of PPARs. Zebrafish are an appropriate model to study human diseases, including obesity and related metabolic diseases, as pathways important for adipogenesis and lipid metabolism which are conserved between mammals and fish. This review synthesizes knowledge on the role of PPARs in zebrafish and focuses on the putative function of PPARs in zebrafish adipogenesis. Using in silico analysis, we confirm the presence of five PPARs (pparaa, pparab, pparda, ppardb, and pparg) in the zebrafish genome with 67–74% identity to human and mouse PPARs. During development, pparda/b paralogs and pparg show mRNA expression around the swim bladder and pancreas, the region where adipocytes first develop, whereas pparg is detectable in adipocytes at 15 days post fertilization (dpf). This review indicates that the zebrafish is a promising model to investigate the specific functions of PPARs in adipogenesis and obesity. PMID:26697060

  8. How mitochondrial dysfunction affects zebrafish development and cardiovascular function: an in vivo model for testing mitochondria-targeted drugs

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, Brígida R; Santos, Miguel M; Fonseca-Silva, Anabela; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B; Oliveira, Jorge M A

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Mitochondria are a drug target in mitochondrial dysfunction diseases and in antiparasitic chemotherapy. While zebrafish is increasingly used as a biomedical model, its potential for mitochondrial research remains relatively unexplored. Here, we perform the first systematic analysis of how mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibitors affect zebrafish development and cardiovascular function, and assess multiple quinones, including ubiquinone mimetics idebenone and decylubiquinone, and the antimalarial atovaquone. Experimental Approach Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were chronically and acutely exposed to mitochondrial inhibitors and quinone analogues. Concentration-response curves, developmental and cardiovascular phenotyping were performed together with sequence analysis of inhibitor-binding mitochondrial subunits in zebrafish versus mouse, human and parasites. Phenotype rescuing was assessed in co-exposure assays. Key Results Complex I and II inhibitors induced developmental abnormalities, but their submaximal toxicity was not additive, suggesting active alternative pathways for complex III feeding. Complex III inhibitors evoked a direct normal-to-dead transition. ATP synthase inhibition arrested gastrulation. Menadione induced hypochromic anaemia when transiently present following primitive erythropoiesis. Atovaquone was over 1000-fold less lethal in zebrafish than reported for Plasmodium falciparum, and its toxicity partly rescued by the ubiquinone precursor 4-hydroxybenzoate. Idebenone and decylubiquinone delayed rotenone- but not myxothiazol- or antimycin-evoked cardiac dysfunction. Conclusion and Implications This study characterizes pharmacologically induced mitochondrial dysfunction phenotypes in zebrafish, laying the foundation for comparison with future studies addressing mitochondrial dysfunction in this model organism. It has relevant implications for interpreting zebrafish disease models linked to complex I/II inhibition. Further

  9. Apoc2 loss-of-function zebrafish mutant as a genetic model of hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Gates, Keith P; Fang, Longhou; Amar, Marcelo J; Schneider, Dina A; Geng, Honglian; Huang, Wei; Kim, Jungsu; Pattison, Jennifer; Zhang, Jian; Witztum, Joseph L; Remaley, Alan T; Dong, P Duc; Miller, Yury I

    2015-08-01

    Apolipoprotein C-II (APOC2) is an obligatory activator of lipoprotein lipase. Human patients with APOC2 deficiency display severe hypertriglyceridemia while consuming a normal diet, often manifesting xanthomas, lipemia retinalis and pancreatitis. Hypertriglyceridemia is also an important risk factor for development of cardiovascular disease. Animal models to study hypertriglyceridemia are limited, with no Apoc2-knockout mouse reported. To develop a genetic model of hypertriglyceridemia, we generated an apoc2 mutant zebrafish characterized by the loss of Apoc2 function. apoc2 mutants show decreased plasma lipase activity and display chylomicronemia and severe hypertriglyceridemia, which closely resemble the phenotype observed in human patients with APOC2 deficiency. The hypertriglyceridemia in apoc2 mutants is rescued by injection of plasma from wild-type zebrafish or by injection of a human APOC2 mimetic peptide. Consistent with a previous report of a transient apoc2 knockdown, apoc2 mutant larvae have a minor delay in yolk consumption and angiogenesis. Furthermore, apoc2 mutants fed a normal diet accumulate lipid and lipid-laden macrophages in the vasculature, which resemble early events in the development of human atherosclerotic lesions. In addition, apoc2 mutant embryos show ectopic overgrowth of pancreas. Taken together, our data suggest that the apoc2 mutant zebrafish is a robust and versatile animal model to study hypertriglyceridemia and the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of associated human diseases. PMID:26044956

  10. Apoc2 loss-of-function zebrafish mutant as a genetic model of hyperlipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Gates, Keith P.; Fang, Longhou; Amar, Marcelo J.; Schneider, Dina A.; Geng, Honglian; Huang, Wei; Kim, Jungsu; Pattison, Jennifer; Zhang, Jian; Witztum, Joseph L.; Remaley, Alan T.; Dong, P. Duc; Miller, Yury I.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Apolipoprotein C-II (APOC2) is an obligatory activator of lipoprotein lipase. Human patients with APOC2 deficiency display severe hypertriglyceridemia while consuming a normal diet, often manifesting xanthomas, lipemia retinalis and pancreatitis. Hypertriglyceridemia is also an important risk factor for development of cardiovascular disease. Animal models to study hypertriglyceridemia are limited, with no Apoc2-knockout mouse reported. To develop a genetic model of hypertriglyceridemia, we generated an apoc2 mutant zebrafish characterized by the loss of Apoc2 function. apoc2 mutants show decreased plasma lipase activity and display chylomicronemia and severe hypertriglyceridemia, which closely resemble the phenotype observed in human patients with APOC2 deficiency. The hypertriglyceridemia in apoc2 mutants is rescued by injection of plasma from wild-type zebrafish or by injection of a human APOC2 mimetic peptide. Consistent with a previous report of a transient apoc2 knockdown, apoc2 mutant larvae have a minor delay in yolk consumption and angiogenesis. Furthermore, apoc2 mutants fed a normal diet accumulate lipid and lipid-laden macrophages in the vasculature, which resemble early events in the development of human atherosclerotic lesions. In addition, apoc2 mutant embryos show ectopic overgrowth of pancreas. Taken together, our data suggest that the apoc2 mutant zebrafish is a robust and versatile animal model to study hypertriglyceridemia and the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of associated human diseases. PMID:26044956

  11. Anti-inflammatory effect of fucoidan extracted from Ecklonia cava in zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hong; Ko, Chang-Ik; Jee, Youngheun; Jeong, Yoonhwa; Kim, Misook; Kim, Jin-Soo; Jeon, You-Jin

    2013-01-30

    Fucoidan extracted from Ecklonia cava had strong anti-inflammatory activities. However, the direct effects of fucoidan of E. cava on anti-inflammatory activities in vivo model remained to be determined. Therefore, the present study was designed to assess in vivo anti-inflammatory effect of fucoidan extracted from E. cava (ECF) using tail-cutting-induced and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated zebrafish model. Treating zebrafish model with tail-cutting and LPS-treatment significantly increased the ROS and NO level. However, ECF inhibited this tail-cutting-induced and LPS-stimulated ROS and NO generation. These results show that ECF alleviated inflammation by inhibiting the ROS and NO generation induced by tail-cutting and LPS-treatment. In addition, ECF has a protective effect against the toxicity induced by LPS exposure in zebrafish embryos. This outcome could explain the potential anti-inflammatory activity of ECF, which might have a beneficial effect during the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23218269

  12. Invasiveness and metastasis of retinoblastoma in an orthotopic zebrafish tumor model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoyun; Wang, Jian; Cao, Ziquan; Hosaka, Kayoko; Jensen, Lasse; Yang, Huasheng; Sun, Yuping; Zhuang, Rujie; Liu, Yizhi; Cao, Yihai

    2015-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is a highly invasive malignant tumor that often invades the brain and metastasizes to distal organs through the blood stream. Invasiveness and metastasis of retinoblastoma can occur at the early stage of tumor development. However, an optimal preclinical model to study retinoblastoma invasiveness and metastasis in relation to drug treatment has not been developed. Here, we developed an orthotopic zebrafish model in which retinoblastoma invasion and metastasis can be monitored at a single cell level. We took the advantages of immune privilege and transparent nature of developing zebrafish embryos. Intravitreal implantation of color-coded retinoblastoma cells allowed us to kinetically monitor tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Further, interactions between retinoblastoma cells and surrounding microvasculatures were studied using a transgenic zebrafish that exhibited green fluorescent signals in blood vessels. We discovered that tumor cells invaded neighboring tissues and blood stream when primary tumors were at the microscopic sizes. These findings demonstrate that retinoblastoma metastasis occurs at the early stage and antiangiogenic drugs such as Vegf morpholino and sunitinib could potentially interfere with tumor invasiveness and metastasis. Thus, this orthotopic retinoblastoma model offers a new and unique opportunity to study the early events of tumor invasion, metastasis and drug responses. PMID:26169357

  13. Perspectives on Zebrafish Models of Hallucinogenic Drugs and Related Psychotropic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Among different classes of psychotropic drugs, hallucinogenic agents exert one of the most prominent effects on human and animal behaviors, markedly altering sensory, motor, affective, and cognitive responses. The growing clinical and preclinical interest in psychedelic, dissociative, and deliriant hallucinogens necessitates novel translational, sensitive, and high-throughput in vivo models and screens. Primate and rodent models have been traditionally used to study cellular mechanisms and neural circuits of hallucinogenic drugs’ action. The utility of zebrafish (Danio rerio) in neuroscience research is rapidly growing due to their high physiological and genetic homology to humans, ease of genetic manipulation, robust behaviors, and cost effectiveness. Possessing a fully characterized genome, both adult and larval zebrafish are currently widely used for in vivo screening of various psychotropic compounds, including hallucinogens and related drugs. Recognizing the growing importance of hallucinogens in biological psychiatry, here we discuss hallucinogenic-induced phenotypes in zebrafish and evaluate their potential as efficient preclinical models of drug-induced states in humans. PMID:23883191

  14. Model of voluntary ethanol intake in zebrafish: Effect on behavior and hypothalamic orexigenic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, M.E.; Karatayev, O.; Chang, G.-Q.; Algava, D.B.; Leibowitz, S.F

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies in zebrafish have shown that exposure to ethanol in tank water affects various behaviors, including locomotion, anxiety and aggression, and produces changes in brain neurotransmitters, such as serotonin and dopamine. Building on these investigations, the present study had two goals: first, to develop a method for inducing voluntary ethanol intake in individual zebrafish, which can be used as a model in future studies to examine how this behavior is affected by various manipulations, and second, to characterize the effects of this ethanol intake on different behaviors and the expression of hypothalamic orexigenic peptides, galanin (GAL) and orexin (OX), which are known in rodents to stimulate consumption of ethanol and alter behaviors associated with alcohol abuse. Thus, we first developed a new model of voluntary intake of ethanol in fish by presenting this ethanol mixed with gelatin, which they readily consume. Using this model, we found that individual zebrafish can be trained in a short period of time to consume stable levels of 10% or 20% ethanol (v/v) mixed with gelatin and that their intake of this ethanol-gelatin mixture leads to pharmacologically-relevant blood ethanol concentrations which are strongly, positively correlated with the amount ingested. Intake of this ethanol-gelatin mixture increased locomotion, reduced anxiety, and stimulated aggressive behavior, while increasing expression of GAL and OX in specific hypothalamic areas. These findings, confirming results in rats, provide a method in zebrafish for investigating with forward genetics and pharmacological techniques the role of different brain mechanisms in controlling ethanol intake. PMID:25257106

  15. Modeling mixtures of thyroid gland function disruptors in a vertebrate alternative model, the zebrafish eleutheroembryo.

    PubMed

    Thienpont, Benedicte; Barata, Carlos; Raldúa, Demetrio

    2013-06-01

    Maternal thyroxine (T4) plays an essential role in fetal brain development, and even mild and transitory deficits in free-T4 in pregnant women can produce irreversible neurological effects in their offspring. Women of childbearing age are daily exposed to mixtures of chemicals disrupting the thyroid gland function (TGFDs) through the diet, drinking water, air and pharmaceuticals, which has raised the highest concern for the potential additive or synergic effects on the development of mild hypothyroxinemia during early pregnancy. Recently we demonstrated that zebrafish eleutheroembryos provide a suitable alternative model for screening chemicals impairing the thyroid hormone synthesis. The present study used the intrafollicular T4-content (IT4C) of zebrafish eleutheroembryos as integrative endpoint for testing the hypotheses that the effect of mixtures of TGFDs with a similar mode of action [inhibition of thyroid peroxidase (TPO)] was well predicted by a concentration addition concept (CA) model, whereas the response addition concept (RA) model predicted better the effect of dissimilarly acting binary mixtures of TGFDs [TPO-inhibitors and sodium-iodide symporter (NIS)-inhibitors]. However, CA model provided better prediction of joint effects than RA in five out of the six tested mixtures. The exception being the mixture MMI (TPO-inhibitor)-KClO4 (NIS-inhibitor) dosed at a fixed ratio of EC10 that provided similar CA and RA predictions and hence it was difficult to get any conclusive result. There results support the phenomenological similarity criterion stating that the concept of concentration addition could be extended to mixture constituents having common apical endpoints or common adverse outcomes. PMID:23562343

  16. Zebrafish models of idiopathic scoliosis link cerebrospinal fluid flow defects to spine curvature.

    PubMed

    Grimes, D T; Boswell, C W; Morante, N F C; Henkelman, R M; Burdine, R D; Ciruna, B

    2016-06-10

    Idiopathic scoliosis (IS) affects 3% of children worldwide, yet the mechanisms underlying this spinal deformity remain unknown. Here we show that ptk7 mutant zebrafish, a faithful developmental model of IS, exhibit defects in ependymal cell cilia development and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow. Transgenic reintroduction of Ptk7 in motile ciliated lineages prevents scoliosis in ptk7 mutants, and mutation of multiple independent cilia motility genes yields IS phenotypes. We define a finite developmental window for motile cilia in zebrafish spine morphogenesis. Notably, restoration of cilia motility after the onset of scoliosis blocks spinal curve progression. Together, our results indicate a critical role for cilia-driven CSF flow in spine development, implicate irregularities in CSF flow as an underlying biological cause of IS, and suggest that noninvasive therapeutic intervention may prevent severe scoliosis. PMID:27284198

  17. A zebrafish melanoma model reveals emergence of neural crest identity during melanoma initiation.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Charles K; Mosimann, Christian; Fan, Zi Peng; Yang, Song; Thomas, Andrew J; Ablain, Julien; Tan, Justin L; Fogley, Rachel D; van Rooijen, Ellen; Hagedorn, Elliott J; Ciarlo, Christie; White, Richard M; Matos, Dominick A; Puller, Ann-Christin; Santoriello, Cristina; Liao, Eric C; Young, Richard A; Zon, Leonard I

    2016-01-29

    The "cancerized field" concept posits that cancer-prone cells in a given tissue share an oncogenic mutation, but only discreet clones within the field initiate tumors. Most benign nevi carry oncogenic BRAF(V600E) mutations but rarely become melanoma. The zebrafish crestin gene is expressed embryonically in neural crest progenitors (NCPs) and specifically reexpressed in melanoma. Live imaging of transgenic zebrafish crestin reporters shows that within a cancerized field (BRAF(V600E)-mutant; p53-deficient), a single melanocyte reactivates the NCP state, revealing a fate change at melanoma initiation in this model. NCP transcription factors, including sox10, regulate crestin expression. Forced sox10 overexpression in melanocytes accelerated melanoma formation, which is consistent with activation of NCP genes and super-enhancers leading to melanoma. Our work highlights NCP state reemergence as a key event in melanoma initiation. PMID:26823433

  18. Use of TSHβ:EGFP transgenic zebrafish as a rapid in vivo model for assessing thyroid-disrupting chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Cheng; Jin, Xia; He, Jiangyan; Yin, Zhan

    2012-07-15

    Accumulating evidence indicates that a wide range of chemicals have the ability to interfere with the hypothalamic–pituitary–thyroid (HPT) axis. Novel endpoints should be evaluated in addition to existing methods in order to effectively assess the effects of these chemicals on the HPT axis. Thyroid-stimulating hormone subunit β (TSHβ) plays central regulatory roles in the HPT system. We identified the regulatory region that determines the expression level of zebrafish TSHβ in the anterior pituitary. In the transgenic zebrafish with EGFP driven by the TSHβ promoter, the similar responsive patterns between the expression levels of TSHβ:EGFP and endogenous TSHβ mRNA in the pituitary are observed following treatments with goitrogen chemicals and exogenous thyroid hormones (THs). These results suggest that the TSHβ:EGFP transgenic reporter zebrafish may be a useful alternative in vivo model for the assessment of chemicals interfering with the HPT system. Highlights: ► The promoter of zebrafish TSHβ gene has been identified. ► The stable TSHβ:EGFP transgenic zebrafish reporter germline has been generated. ► The EGFP in the transgenic fish recapitulated the pattern of pituitary TSHβ mRNA. ► The transgenic zebrafish may be an in vivo model for EDC assessment.

  19. Modelling the binding affinity of steroids to zebrafish sex hormone-binding globulin.

    PubMed

    Saxena, A K; Devillers, J; Pery, A R R; Beaudouin, R; Balaramnavar, V M; Ahmed, S

    2014-01-01

    The circulating endogenous steroids are transported in the bloodstream. These are bound to a highly specific sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and in lower affinity to proteins such as the corticosteroid-binding protein and albumin in vertebrates, including fish. It is generally believed that the glycoprotein SHBG protects these steroids from rapid metabolic degradation and thus intervenes in its availability at the target tissues. Endocrine disrupters binding to SHBG affect the normal activity of natural steroids. Since xenobiotics are primarily released in the aquatic environment, there is a need to evaluate the binding affinity of xenosteroid mimics on fish SHBG, especially in zebrafish (Danio rerio), a small freshwater fish originating in India and widely employed in ecotoxicology, toxicology, and genetics. In this context, a zebrafish SHBG (zfSHBG) homology model was developed using the human SHBG (hSHBG) receptor structure as template. It was shown that interactions with amino acids Ser-36, Asp-59 and Thr-54 were important for binding affinity. A ligand-based pharmacophore model was also developed for both zfSHBG and hSHBG inhibitors that differentiated binders from non-binders, but also demonstrated structural requirements for zfSHBG and hSHBG ligands. The study provides insights into the mechanism of action of endocrine disruptors in zebrafish as well as providing a useful tool for identifying anthropogenic compounds inhibiting zfSHBG. PMID:24874994

  20. Model-free information-theoretic approach to infer leadership in pairs of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Butail, Sachit; Mwaffo, Violet; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Collective behavior affords several advantages to fish in avoiding predators, foraging, mating, and swimming. Although fish schools have been traditionally considered egalitarian superorganisms, a number of empirical observations suggest the emergence of leadership in gregarious groups. Detecting and classifying leader-follower relationships is central to elucidate the behavioral and physiological causes of leadership and understand its consequences. Here, we demonstrate an information-theoretic approach to infer leadership from positional data of fish swimming. In this framework, we measure social interactions between fish pairs through the mathematical construct of transfer entropy, which quantifies the predictive power of a time series to anticipate another, possibly coupled, time series. We focus on the zebrafish model organism, which is rapidly emerging as a species of choice in preclinical research for its genetic similarity to humans and reduced neurobiological complexity with respect to mammals. To overcome experimental confounds and generate test data sets on which we can thoroughly assess our approach, we adapt and calibrate a data-driven stochastic model of zebrafish motion for the simulation of a coupled dynamical system of zebrafish pairs. In this synthetic data set, the extent and direction of the coupling between the fish are systematically varied across a wide parameter range to demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of transfer entropy in inferring leadership. Our approach is expected to aid in the analysis of collective behavior, providing a data-driven perspective to understand social interactions. PMID:27176333

  1. Behavioral and synaptic circuit features in a zebrafish model of fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ming-Chong; Yang, Yi-Ling; Lu, Kwok-Tung

    2013-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most frequent inherited form of human mental retardation. It is characterized by cognitive impairment and physical and behavioral problems and is caused by the silencing of fmr1 transcription and the absence of the fmr1 protein (FMRP). Recently, animal models of FXS have greatly facilitated the investigation of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of this loss-of-function disorder. The present study was aimed to further characterize the role of FMRP in behavior and synaptic function by using fmr1 knockout zebrafish. In adult zebrafish, we found that fmr1 knockout produces the anxiolytic-like responses of increased exploratory behavior in light/dark and open-field tests and avoidance learning impairment. Furthermore, electrophysiological recordings from telencephalic slice preparations of knockout fish displayed markedly reduced long-term potentiation and enhanced long-term depression compared to wild-type fish; however, basal glutamatergic transmission and presynaptic function at the lateral (Dl) and medial (Dm) division of the dorsal telencephalon synapse remained normal. Taken together, our study not only evaluates the mechanism of FRMP but also suggests that zebrafish have valuable potential as a complementary vertebrate model in studying the molecular pathogenesis of human fragile X syndrome. PMID:23536755

  2. Model-free information-theoretic approach to infer leadership in pairs of zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butail, Sachit; Mwaffo, Violet; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Collective behavior affords several advantages to fish in avoiding predators, foraging, mating, and swimming. Although fish schools have been traditionally considered egalitarian superorganisms, a number of empirical observations suggest the emergence of leadership in gregarious groups. Detecting and classifying leader-follower relationships is central to elucidate the behavioral and physiological causes of leadership and understand its consequences. Here, we demonstrate an information-theoretic approach to infer leadership from positional data of fish swimming. In this framework, we measure social interactions between fish pairs through the mathematical construct of transfer entropy, which quantifies the predictive power of a time series to anticipate another, possibly coupled, time series. We focus on the zebrafish model organism, which is rapidly emerging as a species of choice in preclinical research for its genetic similarity to humans and reduced neurobiological complexity with respect to mammals. To overcome experimental confounds and generate test data sets on which we can thoroughly assess our approach, we adapt and calibrate a data-driven stochastic model of zebrafish motion for the simulation of a coupled dynamical system of zebrafish pairs. In this synthetic data set, the extent and direction of the coupling between the fish are systematically varied across a wide parameter range to demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of transfer entropy in inferring leadership. Our approach is expected to aid in the analysis of collective behavior, providing a data-driven perspective to understand social interactions.

  3. Macrophage-pathogen interactions in infectious diseases: new therapeutic insights from the zebrafish host model

    PubMed Central

    Torraca, Vincenzo; Masud, Samrah; Spaink, Herman P.; Meijer, Annemarie H.

    2014-01-01

    Studying macrophage biology in the context of a whole living organism provides unique possibilities to understand the contribution of this extremely dynamic cell subset in the reaction to infections, and has revealed the relevance of cellular and molecular processes that are fundamental to the cell-mediated innate immune response. In particular, various recently established zebrafish infectious disease models are contributing substantially to our understanding of the mechanisms by which different pathogens interact with macrophages and evade host innate immunity. Transgenic zebrafish lines with fluorescently labeled macrophages and other leukocyte populations enable non-invasive imaging at the optically transparent early life stages. Furthermore, there is a continuously expanding availability of vital reporters for subcellular compartments and for probing activation of immune defense mechanisms. These are powerful tools to visualize the activity of phagocytic cells in real time and shed light on the intriguing paradoxical roles of these cells in both limiting infection and supporting the dissemination of intracellular pathogens. This Review will discuss how several bacterial and fungal infection models in zebrafish embryos have led to new insights into the dynamic molecular and cellular mechanisms at play when pathogens encounter host macrophages. We also describe how these insights are inspiring novel therapeutic strategies for infectious disease treatment. PMID:24973749

  4. Transcriptome analysis of anti-fatty liver action by Campari tomato using a zebrafish diet-induced obesity model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background High dietary intake of vegetable products is beneficial against obesity and its related diseases such as dyslipidemia, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and cancer. We previously developed a diet-induced obesity model of zebrafish (DIO-zebrafish) that develops visceral adiposity, dyslipidemia, and liver steatosis. Zebrafish is a polyphagous animal; thus we hypothesized that DIO-zebrafish could be used for transcriptome analysis of anti-obesity effects of vegetables. Results Each vegetable exhibited different effects against obesity. We focused on "Campari" tomato, which suppressed increase of body weight, plasma TG, and lipid droplets in livers of DIO-zebrafish. Campari tomato decreased srebf1 mRNA by increase of foxo1 gene expression, which may depend on high contents of β-carotene in this strain. Conclusions Campari tomato ameliorates diet-induced obesity, especially dyslipidemia and liver steatosis via downregulation of gene expression related to lipogenesis. DIO-zebrafish can discriminate the anti-obesity effects of different strains of vegetables, and will become a powerful tool to assess outcomes and find novel mechanisms of anti-obesity effects of natural products. PMID:22152339

  5. A TALEN-Exon Skipping Design for a Bethlem Myopathy Model in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Radev, Zlatko; Hermel, Jean-Michel; Elipot, Yannick; Bretaud, Sandrine; Arnould, Sylvain; Duchateau, Philippe; Ruggiero, Florence; Joly, Jean-Stéphane; Sohm, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Presently, human collagen VI-related diseases such as Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) and Bethlem myopathy (BM) remain incurable, emphasizing the need to unravel their etiology and improve their treatments. In UCMD, symptom onset occurs early, and both diseases aggravate with ageing. In zebrafish fry, morpholinos reproduced early UCMD and BM symptoms but did not allow to study the late phenotype. Here, we produced the first zebrafish line with the human mutation frequently found in collagen VI-related disorders such as UCMD and BM. We used a transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) to design the col6a1ama605003-line with a mutation within an essential splice donor site, in intron 14 of the col6a1 gene, which provoke an in-frame skipping of exon 14 in the processed mRNA. This mutation at a splice donor site is the first example of a template-independent modification of splicing induced in zebrafish using a targetable nuclease. This technique is readily expandable to other organisms and can be instrumental in other disease studies. Histological and ultrastructural analyzes of homozygous and heterozygous mutant fry and 3 months post-fertilization (mpf) fish revealed co-dominantly inherited abnormal myofibers with disorganized myofibrils, enlarged sarcoplasmic reticulum, altered mitochondria and misaligned sarcomeres. Locomotion analyzes showed hypoxia-response behavior in 9 mpf col6a1 mutant unseen in 3 mpf fish. These symptoms worsened with ageing as described in patients with collagen VI deficiency. Thus, the col6a1ama605003-line is the first adult zebrafish model of collagen VI-related diseases; it will be instrumental both for basic research and drug discovery assays focusing on this type of disorders. PMID:26221953

  6. A TALEN-Exon Skipping Design for a Bethlem Myopathy Model in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Elipot, Yannick; Bretaud, Sandrine; Arnould, Sylvain; Duchateau, Philippe; Ruggiero, Florence; Joly, Jean-Stéphane; Sohm, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Presently, human collagen VI-related diseases such as Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) and Bethlem myopathy (BM) remain incurable, emphasizing the need to unravel their etiology and improve their treatments. In UCMD, symptom onset occurs early, and both diseases aggravate with ageing. In zebrafish fry, morpholinos reproduced early UCMD and BM symptoms but did not allow to study the late phenotype. Here, we produced the first zebrafish line with the human mutation frequently found in collagen VI-related disorders such as UCMD and BM. We used a transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) to design the col6a1ama605003-line with a mutation within an essential splice donor site, in intron 14 of the col6a1 gene, which provoke an in-frame skipping of exon 14 in the processed mRNA. This mutation at a splice donor site is the first example of a template-independent modification of splicing induced in zebrafish using a targetable nuclease. This technique is readily expandable to other organisms and can be instrumental in other disease studies. Histological and ultrastructural analyzes of homozygous and heterozygous mutant fry and 3 months post-fertilization (mpf) fish revealed co-dominantly inherited abnormal myofibers with disorganized myofibrils, enlarged sarcoplasmic reticulum, altered mitochondria and misaligned sarcomeres. Locomotion analyzes showed hypoxia-response behavior in 9 mpf col6a1 mutant unseen in 3 mpf fish. These symptoms worsened with ageing as described in patients with collagen VI deficiency. Thus, the col6a1ama605003-line is the first adult zebrafish model of collagen VI-related diseases; it will be instrumental both for basic research and drug discovery assays focusing on this type of disorders. PMID:26221953

  7. Mind the fish: zebrafish as a model in cognitive social neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Rui F.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how the brain implements social behavior on one hand, and how social processes feedback on the brain to promote fine-tuning of behavioral output according to changes in the social environment is a major challenge in contemporary neuroscience. A critical step to take this challenge successfully is finding the appropriate level of analysis when relating social to biological phenomena. Given the enormous complexity of both the neural networks of the brain and social systems, the use of a cognitive level of analysis (in an information processing perspective) is proposed here as an explanatory interface between brain and behavior. A conceptual framework for a cognitive approach to comparative social neuroscience is proposed, consisting of the following steps to be taken across different species with varying social systems: (1) identification of the functional building blocks of social skills; (2) identification of the cognitive mechanisms underlying the previously identified social skills; and (3) mapping these information processing mechanisms onto the brain. Teleost fish are presented here as a group of choice to develop this approach, given the diversity of social systems present in closely related species that allows for planned phylogenetic comparisons, and the availability of neurogenetic tools that allows the visualization and manipulation of selected neural circuits in model species such as the zebrafish. Finally, the state-of-the art of zebrafish social cognition and of the tools available to map social cognitive abilities to neural circuits in zebrafish are reviewed. PMID:23964204

  8. Tanshinone IIA exhibits anticonvulsant activity in zebrafish and mouse seizure models.

    PubMed

    Buenafe, Olivia Erin; Orellana-Paucar, Adriana; Maes, Jan; Huang, Hao; Ying, Xuhui; De Borggraeve, Wim; Crawford, Alexander D; Luyten, Walter; Esguerra, Camila V; de Witte, Peter

    2013-11-20

    Danshen or Chinese red sage (Salvia miltiorrhiza, Bunge) is used by traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) practitioners to treat neurological, cardiovascular, and cerebrovascular disorders and is included in some TCM formulations to control epileptic seizures. In this study, acetonic crude extracts of danshen inhibited pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizure activity in zebrafish larvae. Subsequent zebrafish bioassay-guided fractionation of the extract resulted in the isolation of four major tanshinones, which suppressed PTZ-induced activity to varying degrees. One of the active tanshinones, tanshinone IIA, also reduced c-fos expression in the brains of PTZ-exposed zebrafish larvae. In rodent seizure models, tanshinone IIA showed anticonvulsive activity in the mouse 6-Hz psychomotor seizure test in a biphasic manner and modified seizure thresholds in a complex manner for the mouse i.v. PTZ seizure assay. Interestingly, tanshinone IIA is used as a prescription drug in China to address cerebral ischemia in patients. Here, we provide the first in vivo evidence demonstrating that tanshinone IIA has anticonvulsant properties as well. PMID:23937066

  9. Using Zebrafish as a Model System for Studying the Transgenerational Effects of Dioxin

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Tracie R.; Peterson, Richard E.; Heideman, Warren

    2014-01-01

    2,3,7,8 Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has been associated with many disease states in humans. A rising concern is that exposure early in life can lead to adult toxicity and toxicity in subsequent generations. Juvenile zebrafish exposed to TCDD (50 pg/ml in water; 1 h exposure) at 3 and 7 weeks post fertilization showed toxicity only later in adulthood. We have maintained the offspring of these exposed F0 fish to determine whether we could find adverse affects in the next two generations of F1 and F2 offspring. TCDD exposure produced a significantly higher female:male ratio in all three generations. Scoliosis-like axial skeleton abnormalities, not normally observed in controls, were present in the F1 and F2 generations descended from the treated F0 founders. Egg release and fertilization success were reduced in the TCDD lineage F1 and F2 generations. This reduction in fertility in the TCDD lineage F2 generation could be attributed to alterations in the F2 males. Using zebrafish as a model allowed the simultaneous maintenance of different generations with relatively small space and costs. The zebrafish showed clear signs of transgenerational responses persisting into generations never directly exposed to TCDD. PMID:24470537

  10. Zebrafish eleutheroembryos provide a suitable vertebrate model for screening chemicals that impair thyroid hormone synthesis.

    PubMed

    Thienpont, Benedicte; Tingaud-Sequeira, Angèle; Prats, Eva; Barata, Carlos; Babin, Patrick J; Raldúa, Demetrio

    2011-09-01

    Thyroxine-immunofluorescence quantitative disruption test (TIQDT) was designed to provide a simple, rapid, alternative bioassay for assessing the potential of chemical pollutants and drugs to disrupt thyroid gland function. This study demonstrated that zebrafish eleutheroembryos provided a suitable vertebrate model, not only for screening the potential thyroid disrupting effect of molecules, but also for estimating the potential hazards associated with exposure to chemicals directly impairing thyroxine (T4) synthesis. Amitrole, potassium perchlorate, potassium thiocyanate, methimazole (MMI), phloroglucinol, 6-propyl-2-thiouracil, ethylenethiourea, benzophenone-2, resorcinol, pyrazole, sulfamethoxazole, sodium bromide, mancozeb, and genistein were classified as thyroid gland function disruptors. Concordance between TIQDT on zebrafish and mammalian published data was very high and the physiological relevance of T4-intrafollicular content was clearly higher than regulation at the transcriptional level of tg or slc5a5. Moreover, concentration-response analysis provided information about the thyroid disrupting potency and hazard of selected positive compounds. Finally, the effect of perchlorate, but not MMI, was completely rescued by low-micromolar amounts of iodide. TIQDT performed on zebrafish eleutheroembryos is an alternative whole-organism screening assay that provides relevant information for environmental and human risk assessments. PMID:21800831

  11. Susceptibility of zebrafish (Danio rerio) to a model pathogen, spring viremia of carp virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanders, George E.; Batts, William N.; Winton, James R.

    2003-01-01

    To improve our understanding of the genetic basis of fish disease, we developed a pathogen model, using zebrafish (Danio rerio) and spring virema of carp virus (SVCV). Replicate groups of 10 fish were acclimated to 20 or 24°C, then were exposed to SVCV concentrations of 103 to 105 plaque-forming units per milliliter (PFU/ml) of water and observed daily. In a second trial, fish were acclimated to 15°C, and replicate groups of 10 fish were exposed to SVCV at a concentration of 105 PFU/ml; however, the temperature was raised 1°C/wk. Moribund fish were collected for histologic examination, and dead fish were assayed for virus by use of cell culture and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Mortality exceeded 50% in fish exposed to 105 PFU of SVCV/ml at the lower temperatures. Clinical signs of disease became evident seven days after viral exposure and were observed most consistently in fish of the 105 PFU/ml groups. Affected zebrafish were anorectic and listless, with epidermal petechial hemorrhages followed by death. Use of plaque assays and RT-PCR analysis confirmed presence of SVCV at titers ≥ 104 PFU/g of tissue. Histologic lesions included multifocal brachial necrosis and melanomacrophage proliferation in gills, liver, and kidneys. These results indicate that zebrafish are susceptible to infection by SVCV under conditions that mimic a natural route of exposure.

  12. Pharmacological modulation of HDAC1 and HDAC6 in vivo in a zebrafish model: Therapeutic implications for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Brígida R; Reis, Sara D; Guedes-Dias, Pedro; Leitão-Rocha, Ana; Quintas, Clara; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B; Santos, Miguel M; Oliveira, Jorge M A

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are key epigenetic enzymes and emerging drug targets in cancer and neurodegeneration. Pan-HDAC inhibitors provided neuroprotection in Parkinson's Disease (PD) models, however, the HDAC isoforms with highest neuroprotective potential remain unknown. Zebrafish larvae (powerful pharmacological testing tools bridging cellular and in vivo studies) have thus far been used in PD modelling with limited phenotypic characterization. Here we characterize the behavioural and metabolic phenotypes of a zebrafish PD model induced with MPP(+), assess the feasibility of targeting zebrafish HDAC1 and HDAC6 isoforms, and test the in vivo effects of their selective inhibitors MS-275 and tubastatin A, respectively. MPP(+) induced a concentration-dependent decrease in metabolic activity and sensorimotor reflexes, and induced locomotor impairments rescuable by the dopaminergic agonist apomorphine. Zebrafish HDAC1 and HDAC6 isoforms show high sequence identity with mammalian homologues at the deacetylase active sites, and pharmacological inhibition increased acetylation of their respective histone and tubulin targets. MS-275 and tubastatin rescued the MPP(+)-induced decrease in diencephalic tyrosine hydroxylase immunofluorescence and in whole-larvae metabolic activity, without modifying mitochondrial complex activity or biogenesis. MS-275 or tubastatin alone modulated spontaneous locomotion. When combined with MPP(+), however, neither MS-275 nor tubastatin rescued locomotor impairments, although tubastatin did ameliorate the head-reflex impairment. This study demonstrates the feasibility of pharmacologically targeting the zebrafish HDAC1 and HDAC6 isoforms, and indicates that their inhibition can rescue cellular metabolism in a PD model. Absence of improvement in locomotion, however, suggests that monotherapy with either HDAC1 or HDAC6 inhibitors is unlikely to provide strong benefits in PD. This study highlights parameters dependent on the integrity of

  13. Microfluidic tools for developmental studies of small model organisms--nematodes, fruit flies, and zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyundoo; Lu, Hang

    2013-02-01

    Studying the genetics of development with small model organisms such as the zebrafish (Danio Rerio), the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster), and the soil-dwelling nematode (Caenorhabditis elegans), provide unique opportunities for understanding related processes and diseases in humans. These model organisms also have potential for use in drug discovery and toxicity-screening applications. There have been sweeping developments in microfabrication and microfluidic technologies for manipulating and imaging small objects, including small model organisms, which allow high-throughput quantitative biological studies. Here, we review recent progress in microfluidic tools able to manipulate small organisms and project future directions and applications of these techniques and technologies. PMID:23161817

  14. Genomic and Phenotypic Characterization of a Wild Medaka Population: Towards the Establishment of an Isogenic Population Genetic Resource in Fish

    PubMed Central

    Spivakov, Mikhail; Auer, Thomas O.; Peravali, Ravindra; Dunham, Ian; Dolle, Dirk; Fujiyama, Asao; Toyoda, Atsushi; Aizu, Tomoyuki; Minakuchi, Yohei; Loosli, Felix; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Birney, Ewan; Wittbrodt, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Oryzias latipes (medaka) has been established as a vertebrate genetic model for more than a century and recently has been rediscovered outside its native Japan. The power of new sequencing methods now makes it possible to reinvigorate medaka genetics, in particular by establishing a near-isogenic panel derived from a single wild population. Here we characterize the genomes of wild medaka catches obtained from a single Southern Japanese population in Kiyosu as a precursor for the establishment of a near-isogenic panel of wild lines. The population is free of significant detrimental population structure and has advantageous linkage disequilibrium properties suitable for the establishment of the proposed panel. Analysis of morphometric traits in five representative inbred strains suggests phenotypic mapping will be feasible in the panel. In addition, high-throughput genome sequencing of these medaka strains confirms their evolutionary relationships on lines of geographic separation and provides further evidence that there has been little significant interbreeding between the Southern and Northern medaka population since the Southern/Northern population split. The sequence data suggest that the Southern Japanese medaka existed as a larger older population that went through a relatively recent bottleneck approximately 10,000 years ago. In addition, we detect patterns of recent positive selection in the Southern population. These data indicate that the genetic structure of the Kiyosu medaka samples is suitable for the establishment of a vertebrate near-isogenic panel and therefore inbreeding of 200 lines based on this population has commenced. Progress of this project can be tracked at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/birney-srv/medaka-ref-panel. PMID:24408034

  15. Switching to zebrafish neurobehavioral models: The obsessive-compulsive disorder paradigm.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Davide; Estivill, Xavier; Terriente, Javier

    2015-07-15

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is the tenth most disabling illness of any kind. OCD stands as a paradigm for complex neurobehavioral disorders due to its polygenic origin. It presents heterogenic clinical presentation, variable disease onset, progression and treatment responses, what makes its understanding a major neuropsychiatric challenge. Like with other neurobehavioral disorders, animal models are essential tools for decoding OCD genetic complexity, understanding its biological base and discovering novel treatments and diagnostic methods. 20 years of rodent OCD modeling have helped to understand the disease better, but multiple questions remain regarding OCD. Innovative whole genome sequencing (WGS) approaches might provide important answers on OCD risk associated genes. However, exploiting those large data sets through the use of traditional animal models is costly and time consuming. Zebrafish might be an appropriate animal model to streamline the pipeline of gene functional validation. This animal model shows several advantages versus rodent models, such as faster and cheaper genetic manipulation, strong impact on the 3Rs implementation, behavioral phenotypic reproducibility of OCD-like behaviors (obsessions and compulsions) and feasibility to develop high-throughput assays for novel OCD drug therapies discovery. In conclusion, zebrafish could be an innovative and relevant model for understanding OCD. PMID:25814246

  16. Non-invasive Imaging of the Innate Immune Response in a Zebrafish Larval Model of Streptococcus iniae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Harvie, Elizabeth A.; Huttenlocher, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The aquatic pathogen, Streptococcus iniae, is responsible for over 100 million dollars in annual losses for the aquaculture industry and is capable of causing systemic disease in both fish and humans. A better understanding of S. iniae disease pathogenesis requires an appropriate model system. The genetic tractability and the optical transparency of the early developmental stages of zebrafish allow for the generation and non-invasive imaging of transgenic lines with fluorescently tagged immune cells. The adaptive immune system is not fully functional until several weeks post fertilization, but zebrafish larvae have a conserved vertebrate innate immune system with both neutrophils and macrophages. Thus, the generation of a larval infection model allows the study of the specific contribution of innate immunity in controlling S. iniae infection. The site of microinjection will determine whether an infection is systemic or initially localized. Here, we present our protocols for otic vesicle injection of zebrafish aged 2-3 days post fertilization as well as our techniques for fluorescent confocal imaging of infection. A localized infection site allows observation of initial microbe invasion, recruitment of host cells and dissemination of infection. Our findings using the zebrafish larval model of S. iniae infection indicate that zebrafish can be used to examine the differing contributions of host neutrophils and macrophages in localized bacterial infections. In addition, we describe how photolabeling of immune cells can be used to track individual host cell fate during the course of infection. PMID:25938624

  17. Zebrafish Heart Failure Models for the Evaluation of Chemical Probes and Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Monte, Aaron; Cook, James M.; Kabir, Mohd Shahjahan; Peterson, Karl P.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Heart failure is a complex disease that involves genetic, environmental, and physiological factors. As a result, current medication and treatment for heart failure produces limited efficacy, and better medication is in demand. Although mammalian models exist, simple and low-cost models will be more beneficial for drug discovery and mechanistic studies of heart failure. We previously reported that aristolochic acid (AA) caused cardiac defects in zebrafish embryos that resemble heart failure. Here, we showed that cardiac troponin T and atrial natriuretic peptide were expressed at significantly higher levels in AA-treated embryos, presumably due to cardiac hypertrophy. In addition, several human heart failure drugs could moderately attenuate the AA-induced heart failure by 10%–40%, further verifying the model for drug discovery. We then developed a drug screening assay using the AA-treated zebrafish embryos and identified three compounds. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor (MEK-I), an inhibitor for the MEK-1/2 known to be involved in cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, showed nearly 60% heart failure attenuation. C25, a chalcone derivative, and A11, a phenolic compound, showed around 80% and 90% attenuation, respectively. Time course experiments revealed that, to obtain 50% efficacy, these compounds were required within different hours of AA treatment. Furthermore, quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that C25, not MEK-I or A11, strongly suppressed inflammation. Finally, C25 and MEK-I, but not A11, could also rescue the doxorubicin-induced heart failure in zebrafish embryos. In summary, we have established two tractable heart failure models for drug discovery and three potential drugs have been identified that seem to attenuate heart failure by different mechanisms. PMID:24351044

  18. A privileged intraphagocyte niche is responsible for disseminated infection of Staphylococcus aureus in a zebrafish model

    PubMed Central

    Prajsnar, Tomasz K; Hamilton, Ruth; Garcia-Lara, Jorge; McVicker, Gareth; Williams, Alexander; Boots, Michael; Foster, Simon J; Renshaw, Stephen A

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune system is the primary defence against the versatile pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus. How this organism is able to avoid immune killing and cause infections is poorly understood. Using an established larval zebrafish infection model, we have shown that overwhelming infection is due to subversion of phagocytes by staphylococci, allowing bacteria to evade killing and found foci of disease. Larval zebrafish coinfected with two S. aureus strains carrying different fluorescent reporter gene fusions (but otherwise isogenic) had bacterial lesions, at the time of host death, containing predominantly one strain. Quantitative data using two marked strains revealed that the strain ratios, during overwhelming infection, were often skewed towards the extremes, with one strain predominating. Infection with passaged bacterial clones revealed the phenomenon not to bedue to adventitious mutations acquired by the pathogen. After infection of the host, all bacteria are internalized by phagocytes and the skewing of population ratios is absolutely dependent on the presence of phagocytes. Mathematical modelling of pathogen population dynamics revealed the data patterns are consistent with the hypothesis that a small number of infected phagocytes serve as an intracellular reservoir for S. aureus, which upon release leads to disseminated infection. Strategies to specifically alter neutrophil/macrophage numbers were used to map the potential subpopulation of phagocytes acting as a pathogen reservoir, revealing neutrophils as the likely ‘niche’. Subsequently in a murine sepsis model, S. aureus abscesses in kidneys were also found to be predominantly clonal, therefore likely founded by an individual cell, suggesting a potential mechanism analogous to the zebrafish model with few protected niches. These findings add credence to the argument that S. aureus control regimes should recognize both the intracellular as well as extracellular facets of the S. aureus life cycle

  19. LARGE SCALE CARCINOGEN DOSE RESPONSE STUDIES WITH JAPANESE MEDAKA (ORYZIAS LATIPES)

    EPA Science Inventory

    To investigate the responses to low carcinogen doses in animal models, large sample sizes are needed and it is an advantage if the model has a low spontaneous tumor rate. Three large scale dose response studies were conducted using Japanese medaka and the carcinogen diethylnitros...

  20. The first mecp2-null zebrafish model shows altered motor behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Pietri, Thomas; Roman, Angel-Carlos; Guyon, Nicolas; Romano, Sebastián A.; Washbourne, Philip; Moens, Cecilia B.; de Polavieja, Gonzalo G.; Sumbre, Germán

    2013-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder and one of the most common causes of mental retardation in affected girls. Other symptoms include a rapid regression of motor and cognitive skills after an apparently early normal development. Sporadic mutations in the transcription factor MECP2 has been shown to be present in more than 90% of the patients and several models of MeCP2-deficient mice have been created to understand the role of this gene. These models have pointed toward alterations in the maintenance of the central nervous system rather than its development, in line with the late onset of the disease in humans. However, the exact functions of MeCP2 remain difficult to delineate and the animal models have yielded contradictory results. Here, we present the first mecp2-null allele mutation zebrafish model. Surprisingly and in contrast to MeCP2-null mouse models, mecp2-null zebrafish are viable and fertile. They present nonetheless clear behavioral alterations during their early development, including spontaneous and sensory-evoked motor anomalies, as well as defective thigmotaxis. PMID:23874272

  1. An Evolutionarily-Conserved Mechanism of Calcium-Dependent Neurotoxicity in a Zebrafish Model of FASD

    PubMed Central

    Flentke, George R.; Klingler, Rebekah H.; Tanguay, Robert L.; Carvan, Michael J.; Smith, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) are a leading cause of neurodevelopmental disability. Non-human animal models offer novel insights into its underlying mechanisms. Although the developing zebrafish has great promise for FASD research, a significant challenge to its wider adoption is the paucity of clear, mechanistic parallels between its ethanol responses and those of non-piscine, established models. Inconsistencies in the published pharmodynamics for ethanol-exposed zebrafish, alongside the use of comparatively high ethanol doses, challenge the interpretation of this model’s clinical relevance. Methods To address these limitations, we developed a binge, single-exposure model of ethanol exposure in the early zebrafish embryo. Results Brief (3hr) ethanol exposure is sufficient to cause significant neural crest losses and craniofacial alterations, with peak vulnerability during neurogenesis and early somitogenesis. These losses are apoptotic, documented using TUNEL assay and secA5-YFP-reporter fish. Apoptosis is dose-dependent with an EC50 = 56.2mM ± 14.3mM ethanolint, a clinically-relevant value within the range producing apoptosis in chick and mouse neural crest. This apoptosis requires the calcium-dependent activation of CaMKII and recapitulates the well-described ethanol signaling mechanism in avian neural crest. Importantly, we resolve the existing confusion regarding zebrafish ethanol kinetics. We show that steady-state ethanol concentrations within both chorion-intact and dechorionated embryos are maintained at 35.7% ± 2.8% of ethanolext levels across the range from 50 to 300 mM ethanolext, a value consistent with several published reports. Equilibrium is rapid and complete within 5min of ethanol addition. Conclusions The calcium/CaMKII mechanism of ethanol's neurotoxicity is shared between an amniote (chick) and teleost fish, indicating this mechanism is evolutionarily conserved. Our data suggest that ethanolext concentrations greater

  2. A zebrafish model of manganism reveals reversible and treatable symptoms that are independent of neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Bakthavatsalam, Subha; Das Sharma, Shreya; Sonawane, Mahendra; Thirumalai, Vatsala; Datta, Ankona

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (manganese ion; referred to as Mn) is essential for neuronal function, yet it is toxic at high concentrations. Environmental and occupational exposure to high concentrations of Mn causes manganism, a well-defined movement disorder in humans, with symptoms resembling Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, manganism is distinct from PD and the neural basis of its pathology is poorly understood. To address this issue, we generated a zebrafish model of manganism by incubating larvae in rearing medium containing Mn. We find that Mn-treated zebrafish larvae exhibit specific postural and locomotor defects. Larvae begin to float on their sides, show a curved spine and swim in circles. We discovered that treatment with Mn causes postural defects by interfering with mechanotransduction at the neuromasts. Furthermore, we find that the circling locomotion could be caused by long-duration bursting in the motor neurons, which can lead to long-duration tail bends in the Mn-treated larvae. Mn-treated larvae also exhibited fewer startle movements. Additionally, we show that the intensity of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity is reversibly reduced after Mn-treatment. This led us to propose that reduced dopamine neuromodulation drives the changes in startle movements. To test this, when we supplied an external source of dopamine to Mn-treated larvae, the larvae exhibited a normal number of startle swims. Taken together, these results indicate that Mn interferes with neuronal function at the sensory, motor and modulatory levels, and open avenues for therapeutically targeted studies on the zebrafish model of manganism. PMID:25261567

  3. A genetic model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in zebrafish displays phenotypic hallmarks of motoneuron disease.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Tennore; Lyon, Alison N; Pineda, Ricardo H; Wang, Chunping; Janssen, Paul M L; Canan, Benjamin D; Burghes, Arthur H M; Beattie, Christine E

    2010-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that, for approximately 80% of patients, is fatal within five years of diagnosis. To better understand ALS, animal models have been essential; however, only rodent models of ALS exhibit the major hallmarks of the disease. Here, we report the generation of transgenic zebrafish overexpressing mutant Sod1. The construct used to generate these lines contained the zebrafish sod1 gene and approximately 16 kb of flanking sequences. We generated lines expressing the G93R mutation, as well as lines expressing wild-type Sod1. Focusing on two G93R lines, we found that they displayed the major phenotypes of ALS. Changes at the neuromuscular junction were observed at larval and adult stages. In adulthood the G93R mutants exhibited decreased endurance in a swim tunnel test. An analysis of muscle revealed normal muscle force, however, at the end stage the fish exhibited motoneuron loss, muscle atrophy, paralysis and premature death. These phenotypes were more severe in lines expressing higher levels of mutant Sod1 and were absent in lines overexpressing wild-type Sod1. Thus, we have generated a vertebrate model of ALS to complement existing mammal models. PMID:20504969

  4. The Zebrafish Brain in Research and Teaching: A Simple in Vivo and in Vitro Model for the Study of Spontaneous Neural Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vargas, R.; Johannesdottir, I. P.; Sigurgeirsson, B.; Porsteinsson, H.; Karlsson, K. AE.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the zebrafish ("Danio rerio") has been established as a key animal model in neuroscience. Behavioral, genetic, and immunohistochemical techniques have been used to describe the connectivity of diverse neural circuits. However, few studies have used zebrafish to understand the function of cerebral structures or to study neural circuits.…

  5. Exposure to the synthetic FXR agonist GW4064 causes alterations in gene expression and sublethal hepatotoxicity in eleutheroembryo medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    SciTech Connect

    Howarth, Deanna L.; Law, Sheran H.W.; Law, J. McHugh; Mondon, J.A.; Kullman, Seth W.; Hinton, David E.

    2010-02-15

    The small freshwater teleost, medaka (Oryzias latipes), has a history of usage in studies of chronic toxicity of liver and biliary system. Recent progress with this model has focused on defining the medaka hepatobiliary system. Here we investigate critical liver function and toxicity by examining the in vivo role and function of the farnesoid X receptor alpha (FXRalpha, NR1H4), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that plays an essential role in the regulation of bile acid homeostasis. Quantitative mRNA analysis of medaka FXRalpha demonstrates differential expression of two FXRalpha isoforms designated Fxralpha1 and Fxralpha2, in both free swimming medaka embryos with remaining yolk (eleutheroembryos, EEs) and adults. Activation of medaka Fxralpha in vivo with GW4064 (a strong FXRalpha agonist) resulted in modification of gene expression for defined FXRalpha gene targets including the bile salt export protein, small heterodimer partner, and cytochrome P450 7A1. Histological examination of medaka liver subsequent to GW4064 exposure demonstrated significant lipid accumulation, cellular and organelle alterations in both hepatocytes and biliary epithelial cells of the liver. This report of hepatobiliary injury following GW4064 exposure extends previous investigations of the intrahepatic biliary system in medaka, reveals sensitivity to toxicant exposure, and illustrates the need for added resolution in detection and interpretation of toxic responses in this vertebrate.

  6. Neurodegeneration and Epilepsy in a Zebrafish Model of CLN3 Disease (Batten Disease)

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Sonia; Cooper, Jonathan D.; Harvey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses are a group of lysosomal storage disorders that comprise the most common, genetically heterogeneous, fatal neurodegenerative disorders of children. They are characterised by childhood onset, visual failure, epileptic seizures, psychomotor retardation and dementia. CLN3 disease, also known as Batten disease, is caused by autosomal recessive mutations in the CLN3 gene, 80–85% of which are a ~1 kb deletion. Currently no treatments exist, and after much suffering, the disease inevitably results in premature death. The aim of this study was to generate a zebrafish model of CLN3 disease using antisense morpholino injection, and characterise the pathological and functional consequences of Cln3 deficiency, thereby providing a tool for future drug discovery. The model was shown to faithfully recapitulate the pathological signs of CLN3 disease, including reduced survival, neuronal loss, retinopathy, axonopathy, loss of motor function, lysosomal storage of subunit c of mitochondrial ATP synthase, and epileptic seizures, albeit with an earlier onset and faster progression than the human disease. Our study provides proof of principle that the advantages of the zebrafish over other model systems can be utilised to further our understanding of the pathogenesis of CLN3 disease and accelerate drug discovery. PMID:27327661

  7. Hypoxia-Induced Retinal Neovascularization in Zebrafish Embryos: A Potential Model of Retinopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Alex; Hsi, Brian; Lee, Shwu-Huey; Chen, Yau-Hung; Wang, I-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity, formerly known as a retrolental fibroplasia, is a leading cause of infantile blindness worldwide. Retinopathy of prematurity is caused by the failure of central retinal vessels to reach the retinal periphery, creating a nonperfused peripheral retina, resulting in retinal hypoxia, neovascularization, vitreous hemorrhage, vitreoretinal fibrosis, and loss of vision. We established a potential retinopathy of prematurity model by using a green fluorescent vascular endothelium zebrafish transgenic line treated with cobalt chloride (a hypoxia-inducing agent), followed by GS4012 (a vascular endothelial growth factor inducer) at 24 hours postfertilization, and observed that the number of vascular branches and sprouts significantly increased in the central retinal vascular trunks 2–4 days after treatment. We created an angiography method by using tetramethylrhodamine dextran, which exhibited severe vascular leakage through the vessel wall into the surrounding retinal tissues. The quantification of mRNA extracted from the heads of the larvae by using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed a twofold increase in vegfaa and vegfr2 expression compared with the control group, indicating increased vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in the hypoxic condition. In addition, we demonstrated that the hypoxic insult could be effectively rescued by several antivascular endothelial growth factor agents such as SU5416, bevacizumab, and ranibizumab. In conclusion, we provide a simple, highly reproducible, and clinically relevant retinopathy of prematurity model based on zebrafish embryos; this model may serve as a useful platform for clarifying the mechanisms of human retinopathy of prematurity and its progression. PMID:25978439

  8. Neurodegeneration and Epilepsy in a Zebrafish Model of CLN3 Disease (Batten Disease).

    PubMed

    Wager, Kim; Zdebik, Anselm A; Fu, Sonia; Cooper, Jonathan D; Harvey, Robert J; Russell, Claire

    2016-01-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses are a group of lysosomal storage disorders that comprise the most common, genetically heterogeneous, fatal neurodegenerative disorders of children. They are characterised by childhood onset, visual failure, epileptic seizures, psychomotor retardation and dementia. CLN3 disease, also known as Batten disease, is caused by autosomal recessive mutations in the CLN3 gene, 80-85% of which are a ~1 kb deletion. Currently no treatments exist, and after much suffering, the disease inevitably results in premature death. The aim of this study was to generate a zebrafish model of CLN3 disease using antisense morpholino injection, and characterise the pathological and functional consequences of Cln3 deficiency, thereby providing a tool for future drug discovery. The model was shown to faithfully recapitulate the pathological signs of CLN3 disease, including reduced survival, neuronal loss, retinopathy, axonopathy, loss of motor function, lysosomal storage of subunit c of mitochondrial ATP synthase, and epileptic seizures, albeit with an earlier onset and faster progression than the human disease. Our study provides proof of principle that the advantages of the zebrafish over other model systems can be utilised to further our understanding of the pathogenesis of CLN3 disease and accelerate drug discovery. PMID:27327661

  9. Zebrafish and conditioned place preference: a translational model of drug reward.

    PubMed

    Collier, Adam D; Khan, Kanza M; Caramillo, Erika M; Mohn, Richard S; Echevarria, David J

    2014-12-01

    Addiction and substance abuse are found ubiquitously throughout human society. In the United States, these disorders are responsible for amassing hundreds of billions of dollars in annual costs associated with healthcare, crime and lost productivity. Efficacious treatments remain few in number, the development of which will be facilitated by comprehension of environmental, genetic, pharmacological and neurobiological mechanisms implicated in the pathogenesis of addiction. Animal models such as the zebrafish (Danio rerio) have gained momentum within various domains of translational research, and as a model of complex brain disorders (e.g., drug abuse). Behavioral quantification within the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm serves as a measure of the rewarding qualities of a given substance. If the animal develops an increase in preference for the drug paired environment, it is inferred that the drug has positive-reinforcing properties. This paper discusses the utility of the zebrafish model in conjunction with the CPP paradigm and reports CPP behavior following acute exposure to 0.0%, 0.25%, 0.50%, and 1.00% alcohol, and 0 mg/L, 50 mg/L, 100 mg/L and 150 mg/L caffeine. PMID:24887295

  10. Hypoxia-induced retinal neovascularization in zebrafish embryos: a potential model of retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Ching; Chang, Chao-Yuan; Kao, Alex; Hsi, Brian; Lee, Shwu-Huey; Chen, Yau-Hung; Wang, I-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity, formerly known as a retrolental fibroplasia, is a leading cause of infantile blindness worldwide. Retinopathy of prematurity is caused by the failure of central retinal vessels to reach the retinal periphery, creating a nonperfused peripheral retina, resulting in retinal hypoxia, neovascularization, vitreous hemorrhage, vitreoretinal fibrosis, and loss of vision. We established a potential retinopathy of prematurity model by using a green fluorescent vascular endothelium zebrafish transgenic line treated with cobalt chloride (a hypoxia-inducing agent), followed by GS4012 (a vascular endothelial growth factor inducer) at 24 hours postfertilization, and observed that the number of vascular branches and sprouts significantly increased in the central retinal vascular trunks 2-4 days after treatment. We created an angiography method by using tetramethylrhodamine dextran, which exhibited severe vascular leakage through the vessel wall into the surrounding retinal tissues. The quantification of mRNA extracted from the heads of the larvae by using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed a twofold increase in vegfaa and vegfr2 expression compared with the control group, indicating increased vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in the hypoxic condition. In addition, we demonstrated that the hypoxic insult could be effectively rescued by several antivascular endothelial growth factor agents such as SU5416, bevacizumab, and ranibizumab. In conclusion, we provide a simple, highly reproducible, and clinically relevant retinopathy of prematurity model based on zebrafish embryos; this model may serve as a useful platform for clarifying the mechanisms of human retinopathy of prematurity and its progression. PMID:25978439

  11. Use of the Zebrafish Larvae as a Model to Study Cigarette Smoke Condensate Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Lee D.; Soo, Evelyn C.; Achenbach, John C.; Morash, Michael G.; Soanes, Kelly H.

    2014-01-01

    The smoking of tobacco continues to be the leading cause of premature death worldwide and is linked to the development of a number of serious illnesses including heart disease, respiratory diseases, stroke and cancer. Currently, cell line based toxicity assays are typically used to gain information on the general toxicity of cigarettes and other tobacco products. However, they provide little information regarding the complex disease-related changes that have been linked to smoking. The ethical concerns and high cost associated with mammalian studies have limited their widespread use for in vivo toxicological studies of tobacco. The zebrafish has emerged as a low-cost, high-throughput, in vivo model in the study of toxicology. In this study, smoke condensates from 2 reference cigarettes and 6 Canadian brands of cigarettes with different design features were assessed for acute, developmental, cardiac, and behavioural toxicity (neurotoxicity) in zebrafish larvae. By making use of this multifaceted approach we have developed an in vivo model with which to compare the toxicity profiles of smoke condensates from cigarettes with different design features. This model system may provide insights into the development of smoking related disease and could provide a cost-effective, high-throughput platform for the future evaluation of tobacco products. PMID:25526262

  12. Polyethylene glycol modification decreases the cardiac toxicity of carbonaceous dots in mouse and zebrafish models

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian-tao; Sun, Hua-qin; Wang, Wei-liang; Xu, Wen-ming; He, Qin; Shen, Shun; Qian, Jun; Gao, Hui-le

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Carbonaceous dots (CDs), which have been used for diagnosis, drug delivery and gene delivery, are accumulated in heart at high concentrations. To improve their biocompatibility, polyethylene glycol-modified CDs (PEG-CDs) were prepared. In this study we compared the cardiac toxicity of CDs and PEG-CDs in mouse and zebrafish models. Methods: Mice were intravenously treated with CDs (size: 4.9 nm, 5 mg·kg−1·d−1) or PEG-CDs (size: 8.3 nm, 5 mg·kg−1·d−1) for 21 d. Their blood biochemistry indices, ECG, and histological examination were examined for evaluation of cardiac toxicity. CDs or PEG-CDs was added in incubator of cmlc2 transgenic Zebrafish embryos at 6 hpf, and the shape and size of embryos' hearts were observed at 48 hpf using a fluorescent microscope. Furthermore, whole-mount in situ hybridization was used to examine the expression of early cardiac marker gene (clml2) at 48 hpf. Results: Administration of CDs or PEG-CDs in mice caused mild, but statistically insignificant reduction in serum creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels detected at 7 d, which were returned to the respective control levels at 21 d. Neither CDs nor PEG-CDs caused significant changes in the morphology of heart cells. Administration of CDs, but not PEG-CDs, in mice caused marked increase of heart rate. Both CDs and PEG-CDs did not affect other ECG parameters. In the zebrafish embryos, addition of CDs (20 μg/mL) caused heart development delay, whereas addition of CDs (80 μg/mL) led to heart malformation. In contrast, PEG-CDs caused considerably small changes in heart development, which was consistent with the results from the in situ hybridization experiments. Conclusion: CDs causes greater cardiac toxicity, especially regarding heart development. Polyethylene glycol modification can attenuate the cardiac toxicity of CDs. PMID:26456589

  13. Unique and potent effects of acute ibogaine on zebrafish: the developing utility of novel aquatic models for hallucinogenic drug research.

    PubMed

    Cachat, Jonathan; Kyzar, Evan J; Collins, Christopher; Gaikwad, Siddharth; Green, Jeremy; Roth, Andrew; El-Ounsi, Mohamed; Davis, Ari; Pham, Mimi; Landsman, Samuel; Stewart, Adam Michael; Kalueff, Allan V

    2013-01-01

    An indole alkaloid, ibogaine is the principal psychoactive component of the iboga plant, used by indigenous peoples in West Africa for centuries. Modulating multiple neurotransmitter systems, the drug is a potent hallucinogen in humans, although its psychotropic effects remain poorly understood. Expanding the range of model species is an important strategy for translational neuroscience research. Here we exposed adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) to 10 and 20mg/L of ibogaine, testing them in the novel tank, light-dark box, open field, mirror stimulation, social preference and shoaling tests. In the novel tank test, the zebrafish natural diving response (geotaxis) was reversed by ibogaine, inducing initial top swimming followed by bottom dwelling. Ibogaine also attenuated the innate preference for dark environments (scototaxis) in the light-dark box test. While it did not exert overt locomotor or thigmotaxic responses in the open field test, the drug altered spatiotemporal exploration of novel environment, inducing clear preference of some areas over others. Ibogaine also promoted 'mirror' exploration in the mirror stimulation test, disrupted group cohesion in the shoaling test, and evoked strong coloration responses due to melanophore aggregation, but did not alter brain c-fos expression or whole-body cortisol levels. Overall, our results support the complex pharmacological profile of ibogaine and its high sensitivity in zebrafish models, dose-dependently affecting multiple behavioral domains. While future investigations in zebrafish may help elucidate the mechanisms underlying these unique behavioral effects, our study strongly supports the developing utility of aquatic models in hallucinogenic drug research. High sensitivity of three-dimensional phenotyping approaches applied here to behavioral effects of ibogaine in zebrafish provides further evidence of how 3D reconstructions of zebrafish swimming paths may be useful for high-throughput pharmacological screening

  14. Gucy2f zebrafish knockdown – a model for Gucy2d-related leber congenital amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Stiebel-Kalish, Hadas; Reich, Ehud; Rainy, Nir; Vatine, Gad; Nisgav, Yael; Tovar, Anna; Gothilf, Yoav; Bach, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in retinal-specific guanylate cyclase (Gucy2d) are associated with Leber congenital amaurosis-1 (LCA1). Zebrafish offer unique advantages relative to rodents, including their excellent color vision, precocious retinal development, robust visual testing strategies, low cost, relatively easy transgenesis and shortened experimental times. In this study we will demonstrate the feasibility of using gene-targeting in the zebrafish as a model for the photoreceptor-specific GUCY2D-related LCA1, by reporting the visual phenotype and retinal histology resulting from Gucy2f knockdown. Gucy2f zebrafish LCA-orthologous cDNA was identified and isolated by PCR amplification. Its expression pattern was determined by whole-mount in-situ hybridization and its function was studied by gene knockdown using two different morpholino-modified oligos (MO), one that blocks translation of Gucy2f and one that blocks splicing of Gucy2f. Visual function was assessed with an optomotor assay on 6-days-post-fertilization larvae, and by analyzing changes in retinal histology. Gucy2f knockdown resulted in significantly lower vision as measured by the optomotor response compared with uninjected and control MO-injected zebrafish larvae. Histological changes in the Gucy2f-knockdown larvae included loss and shortening of cone and rod outer segments. A zebrafish model of Gucy2f-related LCA1 displays early visual dysfunction and photoreceptor layer dystrophy. This study serves as proof of concept for the use of zebrafish as a simple, inexpensive model with excellent vision on which further study of LCA-related genes is possible. PMID:22378290

  15. A transgenic zebrafish model of a human cardiac sodium channel mutation exhibits bradycardia, conduction-system abnormalities and early death.

    PubMed

    Huttner, Inken G; Trivedi, Gunjan; Jacoby, Arie; Mann, Stefan A; Vandenberg, Jamie I; Fatkin, Diane

    2013-08-01

    The recent exponential increase in human genetic studies due to the advances of next generation sequencing has generated unprecedented numbers of new gene variants. Determining which of these are causative of human disease is a major challenge. In-vitro studies and murine models have been used to study inherited cardiac arrhythmias but have several limitations. Zebrafish models provide an attractive alternative for modeling human heart disease due to similarities in cardiac electrophysiology and contraction, together with ease of genetic manipulation, external development and optical transparency. Although zebrafish cardiac mutants and morphants have been widely used to study loss and knockdown of zebrafish gene function, the phenotypic effects of human dominant-negative gene mutations expressed in transgenic zebrafish have not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to generate and characterize a transgenic zebrafish arrhythmia model harboring the pathogenic human cardiac sodium channel mutation SCN5A-D1275N, that has been robustly associated with a range of cardiac phenotypes, including conduction disease, sinus node dysfunction, atrial and ventricular arrhythmias, and dilated cardiomyopathy in humans and in mice. Stable transgenic fish with cardiac expression of human SCN5A were generated using Tol2-mediated transgenesis and cardiac phenotypes were analyzed using video microscopy and ECG. Here we show that transgenic zebrafish expressing the SCN5A-D1275N mutation, but not wild-type SCN5A, exhibit bradycardia, conduction-system abnormalities and premature death. We furthermore show that SCN5A-WT, and to a lesser degree SCN5A-D1275N, are able to compensate the loss of endogenous zebrafish cardiac sodium channels, indicating that the basic pathways, through which SCN5A acts, are conserved in teleosts. This proof-of-principle study suggests that zebrafish may be highly useful in vivo models to differentiate functional from benign human genetic variants in cardiac

  16. Use of TSHβ:EGFP transgenic zebrafish as a rapid in vivo model for assessing thyroid-disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Ji, Cheng; Jin, Xia; He, Jiangyan; Yin, Zhan

    2012-07-15

    Accumulating evidence indicates that a wide range of chemicals have the ability to interfere with the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis. Novel endpoints should be evaluated in addition to existing methods in order to effectively assess the effects of these chemicals on the HPT axis. Thyroid-stimulating hormone subunit β (TSHβ) plays central regulatory roles in the HPT system. We identified the regulatory region that determines the expression level of zebrafish TSHβ in the anterior pituitary. In the transgenic zebrafish with EGFP driven by the TSHβ promoter, the similar responsive patterns between the expression levels of TSHβ:EGFP and endogenous TSHβ mRNA in the pituitary are observed following treatments with goitrogen chemicals and exogenous thyroid hormones (THs). These results suggest that the TSHβ:EGFP transgenic reporter zebrafish may be a useful alternative in vivo model for the assessment of chemicals interfering with the HPT system. PMID:22571824

  17. The Zebrafish, a Novel Model Organism for Screening Compounds Affecting Acute and Chronic Ethanol-Induced Effects.

    PubMed

    Tran, S; Facciol, A; Gerlai, R

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol addiction is a major unmet medical and economic issue for which very few efficacious pharmacological treatment options are currently available. The development and identification of new compounds and drugs to treat alcohol addiction is hampered by the high costs and low amenability of traditional laboratory rodents to high-throughput behavioral screens. The zebrafish represents an excellent compromise between systems complexity and practical simplicity by overcoming many limitations inherent in these rodent models. In this chapter, we review current advances in the behavioral and neurochemical characterization of ethanol-induced changes in zebrafish. We also discuss the basic principles and methods of and the most recent advances in using paradigms with which one can screen for compounds altering acute and chronic ethanol-induced effects in zebrafish. PMID:27055623

  18. Micrometam C Protects against Oxidative Stress in Inflammation Models in Zebrafish and RAW264.7 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao; Ge, Hui; Chen, Zhi-Bin; Luo, Xiong-Ming; Su, Feng-Juan; Liang, Yan-Bing; Li, Zhen-Yu; Wu, Jing-Guo; Yang, Qing; Zeng, Li-Jin; Ma, Zhong-Fu

    2015-09-01

    Micrometam C is a core of novel marine compound isolated from the mangrove associates Micromelum falcatum. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of micrometam C in inflammation models in the transgenic zebrafish line Tg (corola: eGFP) and RAW264.7 macrophages. We found that micrometam C significantly suppressed the migration of immune cells in tail-cutting-induced inflammation in transgenic zebrafish and reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) in both zebrafish and macrophages. In addition, micrometam C also restored LPS-induced reduction of endogenous antioxidants, such as catalase (CAT), glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). The protective effects of micrometam C were in parallel to its inhibition of NADPH oxidase and nuclear factor-kappa-binding (NF-κB) activity. Thus, the present results demonstrate that micrometam C protects against LPS-induced inflammation possibly through its antioxidant property. PMID:26343688

  19. Estrogen prevents cardiac and vascular failure in the 'listless' zebrafish (Danio rerio) developmental model.

    PubMed

    Allgood, Ottie E; Hamad, Alia; Fox, Joshua; Defrank, Anna; Gilley, Ryan; Dawson, Frederick; Sykes, Benjamin; Underwood, Tarenne J; Naylor, Rachel C; Briggs, Ashley A; Lassiter, Christopher S; Bell, Wade E; Turner, James E

    2013-08-01

    The presence of a robust estrogen (E2) response system throughout heart and blood vessel tissues of vertebrates, including humans, has led to the speculation that this ubiquitous hormone may play a prominent role in the health and maintenance of the adult cardiovascular system (CVS). We previously established an embryonic zebrafish model called 'listless', which results from the inhibition of E2 synthesis by treatment with aromatase enzyme inhibitors (AI). These fish have outward symptoms similar to the human condition of congestive heart failure and tamponade. E2 replacement therapy (1) reduced the severity of cardiac sac abnormalities, (2) protected heart function, (3) prevented reduction in heart size, and (4) reduced blood vessel deterioration. Nitric oxide may be a critical downstream mediator of these events. We also demonstrate that removal of fluid around the heart increases survival of AI-treated fish. These results strongly indicate the importance of E2 in the developing CVS of the zebrafish and offer a potential model for the study of its role in CVS development, maintenance, and disease conditions. PMID:23631900

  20. RAP-011 improves erythropoiesis in zebrafish model of Diamond-Blackfan anemia through antagonizing lefty1.

    PubMed

    Ear, Jason; Huang, Haigen; Wilson, Tianna; Tehrani, Zahra; Lindgren, Anne; Sung, Victoria; Laadem, Abderrahmane; Daniel, Thomas O; Chopra, Rajesh; Lin, Shuo

    2015-08-13

    Diamond-Blackfan Anemia (DBA) is a bone marrow failure disorder characterized by low red blood cell count. Mutations in ribosomal protein genes have been identified in approximately half of all DBA cases. Corticosteriod therapy and bone marrow transplantation are common treatment options for patients; however, significant risks and complications are associated with these treatment options. Therefore, novel therapeutic approaches are needed for treating DBA. Sotatercept (ACE-011, and its murine ortholog RAP-011) acts as an activin receptor type IIA ligand trap, increasing hemoglobin and hematocrit in pharmacologic models, in healthy volunteers, and in patients with β-thalassemia, by expanding late-stage erythroblasts through a mechanism distinct from erythropoietin. Here, we evaluated the effects of RAP-011 in zebrafish models of RPL11 ribosome deficiency. Treatment with RAP-011 dramatically restored hemoglobin levels caused by ribosome stress. In zebrafish embryos, RAP-011 likely stimulates erythropoietic activity by sequestering lefty1 from erythroid cells. These findings identify lefty1 as a signaling component in the development of erythroid cells and rationalize the use of sotatercept in DBA patients. PMID:26109203

  1. Modeling Nociception in Zebrafish: A Way Forward for Unbiased Analgesic Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Curtright, Andrew; Rosser, Micaela; Goh, Shamii; Keown, Bailey; Wagner, Erinn; Sharifi, Jasmine; Raible, David W.; Dhaka, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic pain conditions are often debilitating, inflicting severe physiological, emotional and economic costs and affect a large percentage of the global population. However, the development of therapeutic analgesic agents based primarily on targeted drug development has been largely ineffective. An alternative approach to analgesic development would be to develop low cost, high throughput, untargeted animal based behavioral screens that model complex nociceptive behaviors in which to screen for analgesic compounds. Here we describe the development of a behavioral based assay in zebrafish larvae that is effective in identifying small molecule compounds with analgesic properties. In a place aversion assay, which likely utilizes supraspinal neuronal circuitry, individually arrayed zebrafish larvae show temperature-dependent aversion to increasing and decreasing temperatures deviating from rearing temperature. Modeling thermal hyperalgesia, the addition of the noxious inflammatory compound and TRPA1 agonist allyl isothiocyanate sensitized heat aversion and reversed cool aversion leading larvae to avoid rearing temperature in favor of otherwise acutely aversive cooler temperatures. We show that small molecules with known analgesic properties are able to inhibit acute and/or sensitized temperature aversion. PMID:25587718

  2. Zebrafish as a Model System for Environmental Health Studies in the Grade 9–12 Classroom

    PubMed Central

    Hesselbach, Renee; Carvan, Michael John; Goldberg, Barbara; Berg, Craig A.; Petering, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Developing zebrafish embryos were used as a model system for high school students to conduct scientific investigations that reveal features of normal development and to test how different environmental toxicants impact the developmental process. The primary goal of the module was to engage students from a wide range of socio-economic backgrounds, with particular focus on underserved inner-city high schools, in inquiry-based learning and hands-on experimentation. In addition, the module served as a platform for both teachers and students to design additional inquiry-based experiments. In this module, students spawned adult zebrafish to generate developing embryos, exposed the embryos to various toxicants, then gathered, and analyzed data obtained from control and experimental embryos. The module provided a flexible, experimental framework for students to test the effects of numerous environmental toxicants, such as ethanol, caffeine, and nicotine, on the development of a model vertebrate organism. Students also observed the effects of dose on experimental outcomes. From observations of the effects of the chemical agents on vertebrate embryos, students drew conclusions on how these chemicals could impact human development and health. Results of pre-tests and post-tests completed by participating students indicate statistically significant changes in awareness of the impact of environmental agents on fish and human beings In addition, the program's evaluator concluded that participation in the module resulted in significant changes in the attitude of students and teachers toward science in general and environmental health in particular. PMID:24941301

  3. The zebrafish: an emerging animal model for investigating the hypothalamic regulation of reproduction.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Ivan; ANDRé, Valentina; Marelli, Federica; Vezzoli, Valeria; Merlo, Giorgio R; Cariboni, Anna; Persani, Luca; Gothilf, Yoav; Bonomi, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons have a pivotal role in the physiological functions of hypotahlamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. The pulsatile releasing of GnRH hormone into the hypophyseal portal circulation at the median eminence represent the first domino in the HPG cascade of events that regulate the development, fertility and aging in all vertebrates. These neurons principally originate in the olfactory placode and migrate during early embryonal stages into the hypothalamus. Alterations in developmental processes or in the releasing of GnRH hormone lead to a rare and complex disorder of the reproductive axis called congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH). Genetic screening of human patients and the use of model systems have led to the identification of several genes involved in the CHH pathogenesis underlying its oligogenic nature. Nevertheless CHH remains, for a large cohort of patients, idiopathic and GnRH neurogenesis processes not fully understood. This is due to intrinsic difficulties that exist in the analysis of earliest embryonic developmental stages and in the methodologies developed to study the CHH-causing genes. In this regard, zebrafish embryos, on account of its external fertilization and development, allow a real-time analysis that could overcome some of the above mentioned limitations. Moreover, the recent availability of several transgenic zebrafish reporter lines makes it an excellent model for the study of the oligogenic mechanisms leading to CHH. PMID:26934719

  4. Fluoxetine prevents dystrophic changes in a zebrafish model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Waugh, Trent A.; Horstick, Eric; Hur, Junguk; Jackson, Samuel W.; Davidson, Ann E.; Li, Xingli; Dowling, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a common and relentlessly progressive muscle disease. Some interventions have been identified that modestly slow progression and prolong survival, but more meaningful therapies are lacking. The goal of this study is to identify new therapeutic pathways for DMD using a zebrafish model of the disease. To accomplish this, we performed a non-biased drug screen in sapje, a zebrafish line with a recessive nonsense mutation in dystrophin. We identified 6 positive hits (out of 640 total drugs tested) by their ability to prevent abnormal birefringence in sapje. Follow-up analyses demonstrated that fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), provided the most substantial benefit. Morpholino-based experimentation confirmed that modulation of the serotonin pathway alone can prevent the dystrophic phenotype, and transcriptomic analysis revealed changes in calcium homeostasis as a potential mechanism. In all, we demonstrate that monoamine agonists can prevent disease in a vertebrate model of DMD. Given the safe and widespread use of SSRIs in clinical practice, our study identifies an attractive target pathway for therapy development. PMID:24760771

  5. Chronic fluoxetine treatment induces anxiolytic responses and altered social behaviors in medaka, Oryzias latipes.

    PubMed

    Ansai, Satoshi; Hosokawa, Hiroshi; Maegawa, Shingo; Kinoshita, Masato

    2016-04-15

    Medaka (Oryzias latipes) is a small freshwater teleost that is an emerging model system for neurobehavioral research and toxicological testing. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class of antidepressants such as fluoxetine is one of the widely prescribed drugs, but little is known about the effects of these drugs on medaka behaviors. To assess the behavioral effects of fluoxetine, we chronically administrated fluoxetine to medaka adult fish and analyzed the anxiety-related and social behaviors using five behavioral paradigms (diving, open-field, light-dark transition, mirror-biting, and social interaction) with an automated behavioral testing system. Fish chronically treated with fluoxetine exhibited anxiolytic responses such as an overall increased time spent in the top area in the diving test and an increased time spent in center area in the open-field test. Analysis of socially evoked behavior showed that chronic fluoxetine administration decreased the number of mirror biting times in the mirror-biting test and increased latency to first contact in the social interaction test. Additionally, chronic fluoxetine administration reduced the horizontal locomotor activity in the open-field test but not the vertical activity in the diving test. These investigations are mostly consistent with previous reports in the other teleost species and rodent models. These results indicate that behavioral assessment in medaka adult fish will become useful for screening of effects of pharmaceutical and toxicological compounds in animal behaviors. PMID:26821288

  6. CARCINOMA OF THE EXOCRINE PANCREAS IN MEDAKA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eight cases of acinar cell carcinoma of the exocrine pancreas were diagnosed in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) from a pool of approximately 10,000 specimens used in a variety of carcinogenesis bioassays. hree cases occurred in specimens from control groups and one case in a sp...

  7. Total synthesis of Herbarin A and B, determination of their antioxidant properties and toxicity in zebrafish embryo model.

    PubMed

    Heimberger, Julia; Cade, Hannah C; Padgett, Jihan; Sittaramane, Vinoth; Shaikh, Abid

    2015-03-15

    Herbarin A and B were isolated from the fungal strains of Cladosporium herbarum found in marine sponges Aplysina aerophoba and Callyspongia aerizusa. Total synthesis of Herbarin A and B was achieved by carrying out a multi-step synthesis approach, and the antioxidant properties were evaluated using FRAP assay. Toxicity of these compounds was determined using a zebrafish embryo model. PMID:25690788

  8. Zebrafish assessment of cognitive improvement and anxiolysis: Filling the gap between in vitro and rodent models for drug development

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Edward D.

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish can provide a valuable animal model to screen potential cognitive enhancing and anxiolytic drugs. They are economical and can provide a relatively quick indication of possible functional efficacy. In as much as they have a complex nervous system and elaborate behavioral repertoire, zebrafish can provide a good intermediate model between in vitro receptor and cell-based assays and classic mammalian models for drug screening. In addition, the variety of molecular tools available in zebrafish makes them outstanding models for helping to determine the neuromolecular mechanisms for psychoactive drugs. However, to use zebrafish as a translational model we must have validated, sensitive and efficient behavioral tests. In a series of studies, our lab has developed tests of cognitive function and stress response, which are sensitive to drug effects in a similar manner as rodent models and humans for cognitive enhancement and alleviating stress response. In particular, the three-chamber task for learning and memory was shown to be sensitive to the cognitive enhancing effects of nicotine and has been useful in helping to determine neural mechanisms crucial for nicotinic-induced cognitive enhancement. The novel tank diving test was shown to be a valid and efficient test of stress response. It is sensitive to the reduction of stress-related behaviors of the anxiolytic drugs diazepam and buspirone but not chlordiazepoxide. Nicotine also causes stress alleviating effects which can be interpreted as anxiolytic effects. Zebrafish models of behavioral pharmacology can be useful to efficiently screen test compounds for drug development and can be useful for helping to determine the mechanisms crucial for new therapeutic treatments of neurobehavioral impairments. PMID:21615262

  9. A zebrafish melanoma model reveals emergence of neural crest identity during melanoma initiation

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Charles K.; Mosimann, Christian; Fan, Zi Peng; Yang, Song; Thomas, Andrew; Ablain, Julien; Tan, Justin L.; Fogley, Rachel D.; van Rooijen, Ellen; Hagedorn, Elliott; Ciarlo, Christie; White, Richard; Matos, Dominick; Puller, Ann-Christin; Santoriello, Cristina; Liao, Eric; Young, Richard A.; Zon, Leonard I.

    2016-01-01

    The “cancerized field” concept posits that cells in a given tissue share an oncogenic mutation or insult and are thus cancer-prone, yet only discreet clones within the field initiate tumors. Nearly all benign nevi carry oncogenic BRAFV600E mutations, but they only rarely become melanoma. The zebrafish crestin gene is expressed embryonically in neural crest progenitors (NCP’s) and is specifically re-expressed in melanoma. We show by live imaging of transgenic zebrafish crestin reporters that, within a cancerized field (BRAFV600E-mutant; p53-deficient), a single melanocyte reactivates the NCP state, and this establishes that a fate change occurs at melanoma initiation in this model. We show the crestin element is regulated by NCP transcription factors, including sox10. Forced sox10 overexpression in melanocytes accelerated melanoma formation, consistent with activation of a NCP gene signature and super-enhancers leading to melanoma. Our work highlights the importance of NCP state reemergence as a key event in melanoma initiation. PMID:26823433

  10. Interaction of mercury and selenium in the larval stage zebrafish vertebrate model.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Tracy C; Korbas, Malgorzata; James, Ashley K; Sylvain, Nicole J; Hackett, Mark J; Nehzati, Susan; Krone, Patrick H; George, Graham N; Pickering, Ingrid J

    2015-08-01

    The compounds of mercury can be more toxic than those of any other non-radioactive heavy element. Despite this, environmental mercury pollution and human exposure to mercury are widespread, and are increasing. While the unusual ability of selenium to cancel the toxicity of mercury compounds has been known for nearly five decades, only recently have some aspects of the molecular mechanisms begun to be understood. We report herein a study of the interaction of mercury and selenium in the larval stage zebrafish, a model vertebrate system, using X-ray fluorescence imaging. Exposure of larval zebrafish to inorganic mercury shows nano-scale structures containing co-localized mercury and selenium. No such co-localization is seen with methylmercury exposure under similar conditions. Micro X-ray absorption spectra support the hypothesis that the co-localized deposits are most likely comprised of highly insoluble mixed chalcogenide HgSxSe(1-x) where x is 0.4-0.9, probably with the cubic zincblende structure. PMID:26178186

  11. Crossing the blood-brain-barrier with transferrin conjugated carbon dots: A zebrafish model study.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanghao; Peng, Zhili; Dallman, Julia; Baker, James; Othman, Abdelhameed M; Blackwelder, Patrica L; Leblanc, Roger M

    2016-09-01

    Drug delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) in biological systems remains a major medical challenge due to the tight junctions between endothelial cells known as the blood-brain-barrier (BBB). Here we use a zebrafish model to explore the possibility of using transferrin-conjugated carbon dots (C-Dots) to ferry compounds across the BBB. C-Dots have previously been reported to inhibit protein fibrillation, and they are also used to deliver drugs for disease treatment. In terms of the potential medical application of C-Dots for the treatment of CNS diseases, one of the most formidable challenges is how to deliver them inside the CNS. To achieve this in this study, human transferrin was covalently conjugated to C-Dots. The conjugates were then injected into the vasculature of zebrafish to examine the possibility of crossing the BBB in vivo via transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis. The experimental observations suggest that the transferrin-C-Dots can enter the CNS while C-Dots alone cannot. PMID:27187189

  12. Promotion of Remyelination by Sulfasalazine in a Transgenic Zebrafish Model of Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suhyun; Lee, Yun-Il; Chang, Ki-Young; Lee, Dong-Won; Cho, Sung Chun; Ha, Young Wan; Na, Ji Eun; Rhyu, Im Joo; Park, Sang Chul; Park, Hae-Chul

    2015-01-01

    Most of the axons in the vertebrate nervous system are surrounded by a lipid-rich membrane called myelin, which promotes rapid conduction of nerve impulses and protects the axon from being damaged. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disease of the CNS characterized by infiltration of immune cells and progressive damage to myelin and axons. One potential way to treat MS is to enhance the endogenous remyelination process, but at present there are no available treatments to promote remyelination in patients with demyelinating diseases. Sulfasalazine is an anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating drug that is used in rheumatology and inflammatory bowel disease. Its anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties prompted us to test the ability of sulfasalazine to promote remyelination. In this study, we found that sulfasalazine promotes remyelination in the CNS of a transgenic zebrafish model of NTR/MTZ-induced demyelination. We also found that sulfasalazine treatment reduced the number of macrophages/microglia in the CNS of demyelinated zebrafish larvae, suggesting that the acceleration of remyelination is mediated by the immunomodulatory function of sulfasalazine. Our data suggest that temporal modulation of the immune response by sulfasalazine can be used to overcome MS by enhancing myelin repair and remyelination in the CNS. PMID:26549504

  13. Leadership emergence in a data-driven model of zebrafish shoals with speed modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zienkiewicz, A.; Barton, D. A. W.; Porfiri, M.; Di Bernardo, M.

    2015-11-01

    Models of collective animal motion can greatly aid in the design and interpretation of behavioural experiments that seek to unravel, isolate, and manipulate the determinants of leader-follower relationships. Here, we develop an initial model of zebrafish social behaviour, which accounts for both speed and angular velocity regulatory interactions among conspecifics. Using this model, we analyse the macroscopic observables of small shoals influenced by an "informed" agent, showing that leaders which actively modulate their speed with respect to their neighbours can entrain and stabilise collective dynamics of the naïve shoal. Supplementary material in the form of two mp4 files available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjst/e2015-50093-5

  14. Use of the Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) and guppy (Poecilia reticulata) in carcinogenesis testing under national toxicology program protocols.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, William E; Walker, William W; Fournie, John W; Manning, C Steve; Krol, Rena M

    2003-01-01

    A need exists for whole animal toxicity, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis models that are alternative to the traditional rodent test models and that are economical, sensitive, and scientifically acceptable. Among small fish models, the Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) is preeminent for investigating effects of carcinogenic and/or toxic waterborne hazards to humans. The guppy (Poecilia reticulata), although less widely used, is valuable as a comparison species. Both species are easy to maintain and handle in the laboratory and there is a large body of background information on their responsiveness to a range of classes of carcinogens. There are considerable data on the occurrence of background diseases and on spontaneous neoplastic lesions, both of which occur relatively rarely. With few modifications, the medaka and guppy are amenable to carcinogenicity testing under the rigid standards established by the National Toxicology Program (NTP) for rodent tests. The advantages of the small fish in carcinogenesis studies are best realized in long-term studies that involve environmentally realistic exposures. Studies to identify chronic effects can be conducted in about 12 months, near the life span of medaka in our laboratory. Practically, 9-month studies are optimal but shorter study cycles and a variety of exposure/growout and initiation/promotion scenarios are available. Studies on 3 compounds tested in medaka under NTP protocols are under review and preliminary analysis indicates that chronic carcinogenicity bioassays with medaka, guppy, and potentially with other small fish species are feasible and scientifically valid. PMID:12597435

  15. Retinoic acid expands the evolutionarily reduced dentition of zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Seritrakul, Pawat; Samarut, Eric; Lama, Tenzing T. S.; Gibert, Yann; Laudet, Vincent; Jackman, William R.

    2012-01-01

    Zebrafish lost anterior teeth during evolution but retain a posterior pharyngeal dentition that requires retinoic acid (RA) cell-cell signaling for its development. The purposes of this study were to test the sufficiency of RA to induce tooth development and to assess its role in evolution. We found that exposure of embryos to exogenous RA induces a dramatic anterior expansion of the number of pharyngeal teeth that later form and shifts anteriorly the expression patterns of genes normally expressed in the posterior tooth-forming region, such as pitx2 and dlx2b. After RA exposure, we also observed a correlation between cartilage malformations and ectopic tooth induction, as well as abnormal cranial neural crest marker gene expression. Additionally, we observed that the RA-induced zebrafish anterior teeth resemble in pattern and number the dentition of fish species that retain anterior pharyngeal teeth such as medaka but that medaka do not express the aldh1a2 RA-synthesizing enzyme in tooth-forming regions. We conclude that RA is sufficient to induce anterior ectopic tooth development in zebrafish where teeth were lost in evolution, potentially by altering neural crest cell development, and that changes in the location of RA synthesis correlate with evolutionary changes in vertebrate dentitions.—Seritrakul, P., Samarut, E., Lama, T. T. S., Gibert, Y., Laudet, V., Jackman, W. R. Retinoic acid expands the evolutionarily reduced dentition of zebrafish. PMID:22942074

  16. Angiogenesis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Schuermann, Annika; Helker, Christian S M; Herzog, Wiebke

    2014-07-01

    The vasculature consists of an extensively branched network of blood and lymphatic vessels that ensures the efficient circulation and thereby the supply of all tissues with oxygen and nutrients. Research within the last decade has tremendously advanced our understanding of how this complex network is formed, how angiogenic growth is controlled and how differences between individual endothelial cells contribute to achieving this complex pattern. The small size and the optical clarity of the zebrafish embryo in combination with the advancements in imaging technologies cleared the way for the zebrafish as an important in vivo model for elucidating the mechanisms of angiogenesis. In this review we discuss the recent contributions of the analysis of zebrafish vascular development on how vessels establish their characteristic morphology and become patent. We focus on the morphogenetic cellular behaviors as well as the molecular mechanisms that drive these processes in the developing zebrafish embryo. PMID:24813365

  17. Validation of visualized transgenic zebrafish as a high throughput model to assay bradycardia related cardio toxicity risk candidates.

    PubMed

    Wen, Dingsheng; Liu, Aiming; Chen, Feng; Yang, Julin; Dai, Renke

    2012-10-01

    Drug-induced QT prolongation usually leads to torsade de pointes (TdP), thus for drugs in the early phase of development this risk should be evaluated. In the present study, we demonstrated a visualized transgenic zebrafish as an in vivo high-throughput model to assay the risk of drug-induced QT prolongation. Zebrafish larvae 48 h post-fertilization expressing green fluorescent protein in myocardium were incubated with compounds reported to induce QT prolongation or block the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) K⁺ current. The compounds sotalol, indapaminde, erythromycin, ofoxacin, levofloxacin, sparfloxacin and roxithromycin were additionally administrated by microinjection into the larvae yolk sac. The ventricle heart rate was recorded using the automatic monitoring system after incubation or microinjection. As a result, 14 out of 16 compounds inducing dog QT prolongation caused bradycardia in zebrafish. A similar result was observed with 21 out of 26 compounds which block hERG current. Among the 30 compounds which induced human QT prolongation, 25 caused bradycardia in this model. Thus, the risk of compounds causing bradycardia in this transgenic zebrafish correlated with that causing QT prolongation and hERG K⁺ current blockage in established models. The tendency that high logP values lead to high risk of QT prolongation in this model was indicated, and non-sensitivity of this model to antibacterial agents was revealed. These data suggest application of this transgenic zebrafish as a high-throughput model to screen QT prolongation-related cardio toxicity of the drug candidates. PMID:22744888

  18. A Novel Zebrafish Model to Provide Mechanistic Insights into the Inflammatory Events in Carrageenan-Induced Abdominal Edema

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shi-Ying; Feng, Chien-Wei; Hung, Han-Chun; Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Chen, Chun-Hong; Chen, Wu-Fu; Jean, Yen-Hsuan; Wang, Hui-Min David; Sung, Chun-Sung; Sun, Yu-Min; Wu, Chang-Yi; Liu, Wangta; Hsiao, Chung-Der; Wen, Zhi-Hong

    2014-01-01

    A suitable small animal model may help in the screening and evaluation of new drugs, especially those from natural products, which can be administered at lower dosages, fulfilling an urgent worldwide need. In this study, we explore whether zebrafish could be a model organism for carrageenan-induced abdominal edema. The research results showed that intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of 1.5% λ-carrageenan in a volume of 20 µL significantly increased abdominal edema in adult zebrafish. Levels of the proinflammatory proteins tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were increased in carrageenan-injected adult zebrafish during the development of abdominal edema. An associated enhancement was also observed in the leukocyte marker, myeloperoxidase (MPO). To support these results, we further observed that i.p. methylprednisolone (MP; 1 µg), a positive control, significantly inhibited carrageenan-induced inflammation 24 h after carrageenan administration. Furthermore, i.p. pretreatment with either an anti-TNF-α antibody (1∶5 dilution in a volume of 20 µL) or the iNOS-selective inhibitor aminoguanidine (AG; 1 µg) inhibited carrageenan-induced abdominal edema in adult zebrafish. This new animal model is uncomplicated, easy to develop, and involves a straightforward inducement of inflammatory edema for the evaluation of small volumes of drugs or test compounds. PMID:25141004

  19. Sharing the Roles: An Assessment of Japanese Medaka Estrogen Receptors in Vitellogenin Induction.

    PubMed

    Lee Pow, Crystal S D; Yost, Erin E; Aday, D Derek; Kullman, Seth W

    2016-08-16

    Teleost fish express at least three estrogen receptor (ER) subtypes. To date, however, the individual role of these ER subtypes in regulating expression of estrogen responsive genes remains ambiguous. Here, we investigate putative roles of three ER subtypes in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes), using vitellogenin (VTG) I and II as model genes. We identify specific ligand/receptor/promoter dynamics, using transient transactivation assays that incorporate luciferase reporters comprising 3kb promoter/enhancer regions of medaka VTGI and VTGII genes. Four steroidal estrogens (17β-estradiol, estrone, estriol, and 17α-estradiol) were tested in these assays. Results indicate that all three medaka ERs (mERs) are capable of initiating transactivation of both VTG I and II, with ERβ2 exhibiting greatest activity. Promoter deletion analysis suggests that ligand-specific receptor transactivation and utilization of regional-specific estrogen response elements may be associated with differential activities of each medaka ER. Further, cluster analysis of in vivo gene expression and in vitro transactivation suggests that all three ER subtypes putatively play a role in up-regulation of VTG. Results illustrate that preferential ligand/receptor/promoter interactions may have direct implications for VTG gene expression and other ER-mediated regulatory functions that are relevant to the risk assessment of estrogenic compounds. PMID:27391190

  20. Discovery and functional characterization of novel miRNAs in the marine medaka Oryzias melastigma.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing-Woei; Lin, Xiao; Tse, Anna; Cheung, Angela; Chan, Ting Fung; Kong, Richard Yuen Chong; Lai, Keng Po; Wu, Rudolf Shiu Sun

    2016-06-01

    The marine medaka Oryzias melastigma has often been used as a marine fish model to investigate the biological responses to environmental stresses and pollutants in marine environments. miRNAs are post-transcriptional regulators of many biological processes in a variety of organisms, and have been shown to be affected by environmental stresses, but the novel miRNA profile of marine medaka has not been reported. Using both genome and small RNA sequencings coupled with different bioinformatics analyses, we have discovered 58, 82, 234, and 201 unannotated miRNAs in the brain, liver, ovary and testis tissues of marine medaka, respectively. Furthermore, these novel miRNAs were found to target genes with tissue-specific roles such as neuron development and synaptic transmission in the brain, glucose and fat metabolism in the liver and steroidogenesis in the gonads. We here report, for the first time, novel miRNA profile of marine medaka, which will provide a foundation for future biomarkers and transgenerational studies for the assessment of environmental stresses and pollutions in the marine environments. In a boarder context, our data will provide novel insight into our knowledge of miRNome and miR research. PMID:27002527

  1. Towards a comprehensive eye model for zebrafish retinal imaging using full range spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, Maria; Weber, Anke; Cimalla, Peter; Köttig, Felix; Brand, Michael; Koch, Edmund

    2014-03-01

    In regenerative medicine, the zebrafish is a prominent animal model for studying degeneration and regeneration processes, e.g. of photoreceptor cells in the retina. By means of optical coherence tomography (OCT), these studies can be conducted over weeks using the same individual and hence reducing the variability of the results. To allow an improvement of zebrafish retinal OCT imaging by suitable optics, we developed a zebrafish eye model using geometrical data obtained by in vivo dispersion encoded full range OCT as well as a dispersion comprising gradient index (GRIN) lens model based on refractive index data found in the literature. Using non-sequential ray tracing, the focal length of the spherical GRIN lens (diameter of 0.96 mm) was determined to be 1.22 mm at 800 nm wavelength giving a Matheissen's ratio (ratio of focal length to radius of the lens) of 2.54, which fits well into the range between 2.19 and 2.82, found for various fish lenses. Additionally, a mean refractive index of 1.64 at 800 nm could be retrieved for the lens to yield the same focal position as found for the GRIN condition. With the aid of the zebrafish eye model, the optics of the OCT scanner head were adjusted to provide high-resolution retinal images with a field of view of 30° x 30°. The introduced model therefore provides the basis for improved retinal imaging with OCT and can be further used to study the image formation within the zebrafish eye.

  2. ptk7 mutant zebrafish models of congenital and idiopathic scoliosis implicate dysregulated Wnt signalling in disease

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Madeline; Gao, Xiaochong; Yu, Lisa X; Paria, Nandina; Henkelman, R. Mark; Wise, Carol A.; Ciruna, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Scoliosis is a complex genetic disorder of the musculoskeletal system, characterized by three-dimensional rotation of the spine. Curvatures caused by malformed vertebrae (congenital scoliosis (CS)) are apparent at birth. Spinal curvatures with no underlying vertebral abnormality (idiopathic scoliosis (IS)) most commonly manifest during adolescence. The genetic and biological mechanisms responsible for IS remain poorly understood due largely to limited experimental models. Here we describe zygotic ptk7 (Zptk7) mutant zebrafish, deficient in a critical regulator of Wnt signalling, as the first genetically defined developmental model of IS. We identify a novel sequence variant within a single IS patient that disrupts PTK7 function, consistent with a role for dysregulated Wnt activity in disease pathogenesis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that embryonic loss-of-gene function in maternal-zygotic ptk7 mutants (MZptk7) leads to vertebral anomalies associated with CS. Our data suggest novel molecular origins of, and genetic links between, congenital and idiopathic forms of disease. PMID:25182715

  3. Inhibition of signaling between human CXCR4 and zebrafish ligands by the small molecule IT1t impairs the formation of triple-negative breast cancer early metastases in a zebrafish xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Tulotta, Claudia; Stefanescu, Cristina; Beletkaia, Elena; Bussmann, Jeroen; Tarbashevich, Katsiaryna; Schmidt, Thomas; Snaar-Jagalska, B. Ewa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a highly aggressive and recurrent type of breast carcinoma that is associated with poor patient prognosis. Because of the limited efficacy of current treatments, new therapeutic strategies need to be developed. The CXCR4-CXCL12 chemokine signaling axis guides cell migration in physiological and pathological processes, including breast cancer metastasis. Although targeted therapies to inhibit the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis are under clinical experimentation, still no effective therapeutic approaches have been established to block CXCR4 in TNBC. To unravel the role of the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis in the formation of TNBC early metastases, we used the zebrafish xenograft model. Importantly, we demonstrate that cross-communication between the zebrafish and human ligands and receptors takes place and human tumor cells expressing CXCR4 initiate early metastatic events by sensing zebrafish cognate ligands at the metastatic site. Taking advantage of the conserved intercommunication between human tumor cells and the zebrafish host, we blocked TNBC early metastatic events by chemical and genetic inhibition of CXCR4 signaling. We used IT1t, a potent CXCR4 antagonist, and show for the first time its promising anti-tumor effects. In conclusion, we confirm the validity of the zebrafish as a xenotransplantation model and propose a pharmacological approach to target CXCR4 in TNBC. PMID:26744352

  4. Inhibition of signaling between human CXCR4 and zebrafish ligands by the small molecule IT1t impairs the formation of triple-negative breast cancer early metastases in a zebrafish xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Tulotta, Claudia; Stefanescu, Cristina; Beletkaia, Elena; Bussmann, Jeroen; Tarbashevich, Katsiaryna; Schmidt, Thomas; Snaar-Jagalska, B Ewa

    2016-02-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a highly aggressive and recurrent type of breast carcinoma that is associated with poor patient prognosis. Because of the limited efficacy of current treatments, new therapeutic strategies need to be developed. The CXCR4-CXCL12 chemokine signaling axis guides cell migration in physiological and pathological processes, including breast cancer metastasis. Although targeted therapies to inhibit the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis are under clinical experimentation, still no effective therapeutic approaches have been established to block CXCR4 in TNBC. To unravel the role of the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis in the formation of TNBC early metastases, we used the zebrafish xenograft model. Importantly, we demonstrate that cross-communication between the zebrafish and human ligands and receptors takes place and human tumor cells expressing CXCR4 initiate early metastatic events by sensing zebrafish cognate ligands at the metastatic site. Taking advantage of the conserved intercommunication between human tumor cells and the zebrafish host, we blocked TNBC early metastatic events by chemical and genetic inhibition of CXCR4 signaling. We used IT1t, a potent CXCR4 antagonist, and show for the first time its promising anti-tumor effects. In conclusion, we confirm the validity of the zebrafish as a xenotransplantation model and propose a pharmacological approach to target CXCR4 in TNBC. PMID:26744352

  5. INDUCED AND SPONTANEOUS NEOPLASIA IN ZEBRAFISH.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To address the potential of zebrafish as a cancer model, it is important to determine the susceptibility of zebrafish to tumors, and to compare zebrafish tumors with human tumors. To determine whether the commonly-used germ line mutagen, ethylnitrosourea (ENU) induces tumors, we ...

  6. Circadian variations in the liver metabolites of medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Koichi; Takami, Taro; Kimoto, Yoshitaka; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Terai, Shuji; Sakaida, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are biological rhythms with a period of around 24 hours. In this study, we compared the metabolome of the liver of medaka during the day and night. To comprehensively analyze the circadian variations in the levels of metabolites in the liver, livers were isolated from Zeitgeber time (ZT)4 and ZT16, and the variations in metabolite levels were evaluated. Inosinemonophosphate (IMP) and uridinemonophosphate (UMP) were found to be increased at night, indicating that nucleotide synthesis is most active during the night. Furthermore, the levels of metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid cycle were also reduced at night. In addition, the levels of many amino acids were reduced during the night, suggesting that the amino acids had been degraded. Moreover, the citrulline/ornithine ratio, which is related to arginine consumption, was lower during the day than at night. This pattern suggests that the urea cycle is activated during the day, whereas large amounts of nitric oxide and citrulline may be produced from arginine via nitric oxide synthase during the night. The results of this metabolomic analysis may be useful in future fundamental research to provide insight into chronobiology as well as applied research on drug evaluations using medaka as a model species. PMID:26862003

  7. Circadian variations in the liver metabolites of medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    PubMed Central

    Fujisawa, Koichi; Takami, Taro; Kimoto, Yoshitaka; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Terai, Shuji; Sakaida, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are biological rhythms with a period of around 24 hours. In this study, we compared the metabolome of the liver of medaka during the day and night. To comprehensively analyze the circadian variations in the levels of metabolites in the liver, livers were isolated from Zeitgeber time (ZT)4 and ZT16, and the variations in metabolite levels were evaluated. Inosinemonophosphate (IMP) and uridinemonophosphate (UMP) were found to be increased at night, indicating that nucleotide synthesis is most active during the night. Furthermore, the levels of metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid cycle were also reduced at night. In addition, the levels of many amino acids were reduced during the night, suggesting that the amino acids had been degraded. Moreover, the citrulline/ornithine ratio, which is related to arginine consumption, was lower during the day than at night. This pattern suggests that the urea cycle is activated during the day, whereas large amounts of nitric oxide and citrulline may be produced from arginine via nitric oxide synthase during the night. The results of this metabolomic analysis may be useful in future fundamental research to provide insight into chronobiology as well as applied research on drug evaluations using medaka as a model species. PMID:26862003

  8. Salmonella plasmid virulence gene spvB enhances bacterial virulence by inhibiting autophagy in a zebrafish infection model.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Ting; Gao, Song; Xu, Guang-Mei; Niu, Hua; Huang, Rui; Wu, Shu-Yan

    2016-02-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium (S. typhimurium) is a facultative intracellular pathogen that can cause gastroenteritis and systemic infection in a wide range of hosts. Salmonella plasmid virulence gene spvB is closely related to bacterial virulence in different cells and animal models, and the encoded protein acts as an intracellular toxin required for ADP-ribosyl transferase activity. However, until now there is no report about the pathogenecity of spvB gene on zebrafish. Due to the outstanding advantages of zebrafish in analyzing bacteria-host interactions, a S. typhimurium infected zebrafish model was set up here to study the effect of spvB on autophagy and intestinal pathogenesis in vivo. We found that spvB gene could decrease the LD50 of S. typhimurium, and the strain carrying spvB promoted bacterial proliferation and aggravated the intestinal damage manifested by the narrowed intestines, fallen microvilli, blurred epithelium cell structure and infiltration of inflammatory cells. Results demonstrated the enhanced virulence induced by spvB in zebrafish. In spvB-mutant strain infected zebrafish, the levels of Lc3 turnover and Beclin1 expression increased, and the double-membraned autophagosome structures were observed, suggesting that spvB can inhibit autophagy activity. In summary, our results indicate that S. typhimurium strain containing spvB displays more virulence, triggering an increase in bacterial survival and intestine injuries by suppressing autophagy for the first time. This model provides novel insights into the role of Salmonella plasmid virulence gene in bacterial pathogenesis, and can help to further elucidate the relationship between bacteria and host immune response. PMID:26723267

  9. Exploring the zebrafish embryo as an alternative model for the evaluation of liver toxicity by histopathology and expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Driessen, Marja; Kienhuis, Anne S; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Pronk, Tessa E; van de Brandhof, Evert-Jan; Roodbergen, Marianne; Spaink, Herman P; van de Water, Bob; van der Ven, Leo T M

    2013-05-01

    The whole zebrafish embryo model (ZFE) has proven its applicability in developmental toxicity testing. Since functional hepatocytes are already present from 36 h post fertilization onwards, whole ZFE have been proposed as an attractive alternative to mammalian in vivo models in hepatotoxicity testing. The goal of the present study is to further underpin the applicability of whole ZFE for hepatotoxicity testing by combining histopathology and next-generation sequencing-based gene expression profiling. To this aim, whole ZFE and adult zebrafish were exposed to a set of hepatotoxic reference compounds. Histopathology revealed compound and life-stage-specific effects indicative of toxic injury in livers of whole ZFE and adult zebrafish. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) was used to compare transcript profiles in pooled individual RNA samples of whole ZFE and livers of adult zebrafish. This revealed that hepatotoxicity-associated expression can be detected beyond the overall transcription noise in the whole embryo. In situ hybridization verified liver specificity of selected highly expressed markers in whole ZFE. Finally, cyclosporine A (CsA) was used as an illustrative case to support applicability of ZFE in hepatotoxicity testing by comparing CsA-induced gene expression between ZFE, in vivo mouse liver and HepaRG cells on the levels of single genes, pathways and transcription factors. While there was no clear overlap on single gene level between the whole ZFE and in vivo mouse liver, strong similarities were observed between whole ZFE and in vivo mouse liver in regulated pathways related to hepatotoxicity, as well as in relevant overrepresented transcription factors. In conclusion, both the use of NGS of pooled RNA extracts analysis combined with histopathology and traditional microarray in single case showed the potential to detect liver-related genes and processes within the transcriptome of a whole zebrafish embryo. This supports the applicability of the whole ZFE

  10. Time-dependent sensitization of stress responses in zebrafish: A putative model for post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Lima, Monica Gomes; Silva, Rhayra Xavier do Carmo; Silva, Suéllen de Nazaré Dos Santos; Rodrigues, Lais do Socorro Dos Santos; Oliveira, Karen Renata Herculano Matos; Batista, Evander de Jesus Oliveira; Maximino, Caio; Herculano, Anderson Manoel

    2016-07-01

    Time-dependent sensitization (TDS)-the delayed increase in neurobehavioral responses to heterotypic stressors after exposure to an intense, inescapable stressor-has been proposed as an animal model for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Translationally relevant stressors used in TDS are capable of affecting more than one behavioral domain and produce interindividual variability in responsiveness. Here, conspecific alarm substance (CAS) is shown to induce TDS in zebrafish in inter- and intra-population-specific way. Exposure to CAS, an ecologically relevant stimulus which produces fear-like responses acutely, increased anxiety and arousal in zebrafish from the blue shortfin (BSF) phenotype 24h after stimulus delivery. Anxiety-like responses were differently affected immediately and 24h after stimulus delivery. Anxiety-like responses were more sensitized in zebrafish from the longfin (LOF) than in the BSF phenotype, an effect which is reminiscent of "basal" differences in anxiety-like behavior. After application of behavioral cutoff criteria, CAS was shown to produce intense TDS in ∼25% of LOF animals, while ∼20% of exposed animals showed little evidence of TDS. Overall, these results suggest that CAS induces TDS in zebrafish after a 24h "incubation" period, with inter- and intra-population variability that underlines its face and ecological validity. PMID:27102763

  11. Large-Scale Phenotype-Based Antiepileptic Drug Screening in a Zebrafish Model of Dravet Syndrome1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Dinday, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mutations in a voltage-gated sodium channel (SCN1A) result in Dravet Syndrome (DS), a catastrophic childhood epilepsy. Zebrafish with a mutation in scn1Lab recapitulate salient phenotypes associated with DS, including seizures, early fatality, and resistance to antiepileptic drugs. To discover new drug candidates for the treatment of DS, we screened a chemical library of ∼1000 compounds and identified 4 compounds that rescued the behavioral seizure component, including 1 compound (dimethadione) that suppressed associated electrographic seizure activity. Fenfluramine, but not huperzine A, also showed antiepileptic activity in our zebrafish assays. The effectiveness of compounds that block neuronal calcium current (dimethadione) or enhance serotonin signaling (fenfluramine) in our zebrafish model suggests that these may be important therapeutic targets in patients with DS. Over 150 compounds resulting in fatality were also identified. We conclude that the combination of behavioral and electrophysiological assays provide a convenient, sensitive, and rapid basis for phenotype-based drug screening in zebrafish mimicking a genetic form of epilepsy. PMID:26465006

  12. Additive reductions in zebrafish PRPS1 activity result in a spectrum of deficiencies modeling several human PRPS1-associated diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Wuhong; Xu, Lisha; Varshney, Gaurav K.; Carrington, Blake; Bishop, Kevin; Jones, MaryPat; Huang, Sunny C.; Idol, Jennifer; Pretorius, Pamela R.; Beirl, Alisha; Schimmenti, Lisa A.; Kindt, Katie S.; Sood, Raman; Burgess, Shawn M.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase-1 (PRPS1) is a key enzyme in nucleotide biosynthesis, and mutations in PRPS1 are found in several human diseases including nonsyndromic sensorineural deafness, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease-5, and Arts Syndrome. We utilized zebrafish as a model to confirm that mutations in PRPS1 result in phenotypic deficiencies in zebrafish similar to those in the associated human diseases. We found two paralogs in zebrafish, prps1a and prps1b and characterized each paralogous mutant individually as well as the double mutant fish. Zebrafish prps1a mutants and prps1a;prps1b double mutants showed similar morphological phenotypes with increasingly severe phenotypes as the number of mutant alleles increased. Phenotypes included smaller eyes and reduced hair cell numbers, consistent with the optic atrophy and hearing impairment observed in human patients. The double mutant also showed abnormal development of primary motor neurons, hair cell innervation, and reduced leukocytes, consistent with the neuropathy and recurrent infection of the human patients possessing the most severe reductions of PRPS1 activity. Further analyses indicated the phenotypes were associated with a prolonged cell cycle likely resulting from reduced nucleotide synthesis and energy production in the mutant embryos. We further demonstrated the phenotypes were caused by delays in the tissues most highly expressing the prps1 genes. PMID:27425195

  13. Large-Scale Phenotype-Based Antiepileptic Drug Screening in a Zebrafish Model of Dravet Syndrome(1,2,3).

    PubMed

    Dinday, Matthew T; Baraban, Scott C

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in a voltage-gated sodium channel (SCN1A) result in Dravet Syndrome (DS), a catastrophic childhood epilepsy. Zebrafish with a mutation in scn1Lab recapitulate salient phenotypes associated with DS, including seizures, early fatality, and resistance to antiepileptic drugs. To discover new drug candidates for the treatment of DS, we screened a chemical library of ∼1000 compounds and identified 4 compounds that rescued the behavioral seizure component, including 1 compound (dimethadione) that suppressed associated electrographic seizure activity. Fenfluramine, but not huperzine A, also showed antiepileptic activity in our zebrafish assays. The effectiveness of compounds that block neuronal calcium current (dimethadione) or enhance serotonin signaling (fenfluramine) in our zebrafish model suggests that these may be important therapeutic targets in patients with DS. Over 150 compounds resulting in fatality were also identified. We conclude that the combination of behavioral and electrophysiological assays provide a convenient, sensitive, and rapid basis for phenotype-based drug screening in zebrafish mimicking a genetic form of epilepsy. PMID:26465006

  14. Additive reductions in zebrafish PRPS1 activity result in a spectrum of deficiencies modeling several human PRPS1-associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Pei, Wuhong; Xu, Lisha; Varshney, Gaurav K; Carrington, Blake; Bishop, Kevin; Jones, MaryPat; Huang, Sunny C; Idol, Jennifer; Pretorius, Pamela R; Beirl, Alisha; Schimmenti, Lisa A; Kindt, Katie S; Sood, Raman; Burgess, Shawn M

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase-1 (PRPS1) is a key enzyme in nucleotide biosynthesis, and mutations in PRPS1 are found in several human diseases including nonsyndromic sensorineural deafness, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease-5, and Arts Syndrome. We utilized zebrafish as a model to confirm that mutations in PRPS1 result in phenotypic deficiencies in zebrafish similar to those in the associated human diseases. We found two paralogs in zebrafish, prps1a and prps1b and characterized each paralogous mutant individually as well as the double mutant fish. Zebrafish prps1a mutants and prps1a;prps1b double mutants showed similar morphological phenotypes with increasingly severe phenotypes as the number of mutant alleles increased. Phenotypes included smaller eyes and reduced hair cell numbers, consistent with the optic atrophy and hearing impairment observed in human patients. The double mutant also showed abnormal development of primary motor neurons, hair cell innervation, and reduced leukocytes, consistent with the neuropathy and recurrent infection of the human patients possessing the most severe reductions of PRPS1 activity. Further analyses indicated the phenotypes were associated with a prolonged cell cycle likely resulting from reduced nucleotide synthesis and energy production in the mutant embryos. We further demonstrated the phenotypes were caused by delays in the tissues most highly expressing the prps1 genes. PMID:27425195

  15. Quantitative Phenotyping-Based In Vivo Chemical Screening in a Zebrafish Model of Leukemia Stem Cell Xenotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Beibei; Shimada, Yasuhito; Kuroyanagi, Junya; Umemoto, Noriko; Nishimura, Yuhei; Tanaka, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish-based chemical screening has recently emerged as a rapid and efficient method to identify important compounds that modulate specific biological processes and to test the therapeutic efficacy in disease models, including cancer. In leukemia, the ablation of leukemia stem cells (LSCs) is necessary to permanently eradicate the leukemia cell population. However, because of the very small number of LSCs in leukemia cell populations, their use in xenotransplantation studies (in vivo) and the difficulties in functionally and pathophysiologically replicating clinical conditions in cell culture experiments (in vitro), the progress of drug discovery for LSC inhibitors has been painfully slow. In this study, we developed a novel phenotype-based in vivo screening method using LSCs xenotransplanted into zebrafish. Aldehyde dehydrogenase-positive (ALDH+) cells were purified from chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells tagged with a fluorescent protein (Kusabira-orange) and then implanted in young zebrafish at 48 hours post-fertilization. Twenty-four hours after transplantation, the animals were treated with one of eight different therapeutic agents (imatinib, dasatinib, parthenolide, TDZD-8, arsenic trioxide, niclosamide, salinomycin, and thioridazine). Cancer cell proliferation, and cell migration were determined by high-content imaging. Of the eight compounds that were tested, all except imatinib and dasatinib selectively inhibited ALDH+ cell proliferation in zebrafish. In addition, these anti-LSC agents suppressed tumor cell migration in LSC-xenotransplants. Our approach offers a simple, rapid, and reliable in vivo screening system that facilitates the phenotype-driven discovery of drugs effective in suppressing LSCs. PMID:24454867

  16. Prediction of acute toxicity of cadmium and lead to zebrafish larvae by using a refined toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yongfei; Feng, Jianfeng; Zhu, Lin

    2015-12-01

    The biotic ligand model (BLM) and the toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic (TK-TD) model are essential in predicting the acute toxicity of metals in various species and exposure conditions; however, these models are usually separately utilized. In this study, a mechanistic TK-TD model was developed to predict the acute toxicity of 10(-6)M Cd and 10(-6)M Pb to zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae. The novel approach links the BLM with relevant TK processes to simulate the bioaccumulation processes of Cd or Pb as a function of the maximum uptake rate of each metal, the affinity constants, and the concentrations of free metal ions and H(+) in test solutions. Results showed that the refined TK-TD model can accurately predict the accumulation and acute toxicity of Cd and Pb to zebrafish larvae at pH 5.5, 6.5, and 7.0. PMID:26513221

  17. Zebrafish as a model to assess cancer heterogeneity, progression and relapse

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Jessica S.; Langenau, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Clonal evolution is the process by which genetic and epigenetic diversity is created within malignant tumor cells. This process culminates in a heterogeneous tumor, consisting of multiple subpopulations of cancer cells that often do not contain the same underlying mutations. Continuous selective pressure permits outgrowth of clones that harbor lesions that are capable of enhancing disease progression, including those that contribute to therapy resistance, metastasis and relapse. Clonal evolution and the resulting intratumoral heterogeneity pose a substantial challenge to biomarker identification, personalized cancer therapies and the discovery of underlying driver mutations in cancer. The purpose of this Review is to highlight the unique strengths of zebrafish cancer models in assessing the roles that intratumoral heterogeneity and clonal evolution play in cancer, including transgenesis, imaging technologies, high-throughput cell transplantation approaches and in vivo single-cell functional assays. PMID:24973745

  18. Transient Exposure to Ethanol during Zebrafish Embryogenesis Results in Defects in Neuronal Differentiation: An Alternative Model System to Study FASD

    PubMed Central

    Joya, Xavier; Garcia-Algar, Oscar; Vall, Oriol; Pujades, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Background The exposure of the human embryo to ethanol results in a spectrum of disorders involving multiple organ systems, including the impairment of the development of the central nervous system (CNS). In spite of the importance for human health, the molecular basis of prenatal ethanol exposure remains poorly understood, mainly to the difficulty of sample collection. Zebrafish is now emerging as a powerful organism for the modeling and the study of human diseases. In this work, we have assessed the sensitivity of specific subsets of neurons to ethanol exposure during embryogenesis and we have visualized the sensitive embryonic developmental periods for specific neuronal groups by the use of different transgenic zebrafish lines. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to evaluate the teratogenic effects of acute ethanol exposure, we exposed zebrafish embryos to ethanol in a given time window and analyzed the effects in neurogenesis, neuronal differentiation and brain patterning. Zebrafish larvae exposed to ethanol displayed small eyes and/or a reduction of the body length, phenotypical features similar to the observed in children with prenatal exposure to ethanol. When neuronal populations were analyzed, we observed a clear reduction in the number of differentiated neurons in the spinal cord upon ethanol exposure. There was a decrease in the population of sensory neurons mainly due to a decrease in cell proliferation and subsequent apoptosis during neuronal differentiation, with no effect in motoneuron specification. Conclusion Our investigation highlights that transient exposure to ethanol during early embryonic development affects neuronal differentiation although does not result in defects in early neurogenesis. These results establish the use of zebrafish embryos as an alternative research model to elucidate the molecular mechanism(s) of ethanol-induced developmental toxicity at very early stages of embryonic development. PMID:25383948

  19. Optimized cell transplantation using adult rag2 mutant zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qin; Abdelfattah, Nouran S.; Blackburn, Jessica S.; Moore, John C.; Martinez, Sarah A.; Moore, Finola E.; Lobbardi, Riadh; Tenente, Inês M.; Ignatius, Myron S.; Berman, Jason N.; Liwski, Robert S.; Houvras, Yariv; Langenau, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Cell transplantation into adult zebrafish has lagged behind mouse due to the lack of immune compromised models. Here, we have created homozygous rag2E450fs mutant zebrafish that have reduced numbers of functional T and B cells but are viable and fecund. Mutant fish engraft zebrafish muscle, blood stem cells, and cancers. rag2E450fs mutant zebrafish are the first immune compromised zebrafish model that permits robust, long-term engraftment of multiple tissues and cancer. PMID:25042784

  20. Pdgfra protects against ethanol-induced craniofacial defects in a zebrafish model of FASD.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Neil; Wetherill, Leah; Lovely, C Ben; Swartz, Mary E; Foroud, Tatiana M; Eberhart, Johann K

    2013-08-01

    Human birth defects are highly variable and this phenotypic variability can be influenced by both the environment and genetics. However, the synergistic interactions between these two variables are not well understood. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) is the umbrella term used to describe the wide range of deleterious outcomes following prenatal alcohol exposure. Although FASD are caused by prenatal ethanol exposure, FASD are thought to be genetically modulated, although the genes regulating sensitivity to ethanol teratogenesis are largely unknown. To identify potential ethanol-sensitive genes, we tested five known craniofacial mutants for ethanol sensitivity: cyp26b1, gata3, pdgfra, smad5 and smoothened. We found that only platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (pdgfra) interacted with ethanol during zebrafish craniofacial development. Analysis of the PDGF family in a human FASD genome-wide dataset links PDGFRA to craniofacial phenotypes in FASD, prompting a mechanistic understanding of this interaction. In zebrafish, untreated pdgfra mutants have cleft palate due to defective neural crest cell migration, whereas pdgfra heterozygotes develop normally. Ethanol-exposed pdgfra mutants have profound craniofacial defects that include the loss of the palatal skeleton and hypoplasia of the pharyngeal skeleton. Furthermore, ethanol treatment revealed latent haploinsufficiency, causing palatal defects in ∼62% of pdgfra heterozygotes. Neural crest apoptosis partially underlies these ethanol-induced defects in pdgfra mutants, demonstrating a protective role for Pdgfra. This protective role is mediated by the PI3K/mTOR pathway. Collectively, our results suggest a model where combined genetic and environmental inhibition of PI3K/mTOR signaling leads to variability within FASD. PMID:23861062

  1. Pdgfra protects against ethanol-induced craniofacial defects in a zebrafish model of FASD

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Neil; Wetherill, Leah; Lovely, C. Ben; Swartz, Mary E.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Eberhart, Johann K.

    2013-01-01

    Human birth defects are highly variable and this phenotypic variability can be influenced by both the environment and genetics. However, the synergistic interactions between these two variables are not well understood. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) is the umbrella term used to describe the wide range of deleterious outcomes following prenatal alcohol exposure. Although FASD are caused by prenatal ethanol exposure, FASD are thought to be genetically modulated, although the genes regulating sensitivity to ethanol teratogenesis are largely unknown. To identify potential ethanol-sensitive genes, we tested five known craniofacial mutants for ethanol sensitivity: cyp26b1, gata3, pdgfra, smad5 and smoothened. We found that only platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (pdgfra) interacted with ethanol during zebrafish craniofacial development. Analysis of the PDGF family in a human FASD genome-wide dataset links PDGFRA to craniofacial phenotypes in FASD, prompting a mechanistic understanding of this interaction. In zebrafish, untreated pdgfra mutants have cleft palate due to defective neural crest cell migration, whereas pdgfra heterozygotes develop normally. Ethanol-exposed pdgfra mutants have profound craniofacial defects that include the loss of the palatal skeleton and hypoplasia of the pharyngeal skeleton. Furthermore, ethanol treatment revealed latent haploinsufficiency, causing palatal defects in ∼62% of pdgfra heterozygotes. Neural crest apoptosis partially underlies these ethanol-induced defects in pdgfra mutants, demonstrating a protective role for Pdgfra. This protective role is mediated by the PI3K/mTOR pathway. Collectively, our results suggest a model where combined genetic and environmental inhibition of PI3K/mTOR signaling leads to variability within FASD. PMID:23861062

  2. Analysis of RNAseq datasets from a comparative infectious disease zebrafish model using GeneTiles bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Veneman, Wouter J; de Sonneville, Jan; van der Kolk, Kees-Jan; Ordas, Anita; Al-Ars, Zaid; Meijer, Annemarie H; Spaink, Herman P

    2015-03-01

    We present a RNA deep sequencing (RNAseq) analysis of a comparison of the transcriptome responses to infection of zebrafish larvae with Staphylococcus epidermidis and Mycobacterium marinum bacteria. We show how our developed GeneTiles software can improve RNAseq analysis approaches by more confidently identifying a large set of markers upon infection with these bacteria. For analysis of RNAseq data currently, software programs such as Bowtie2 and Samtools are indispensable. However, these programs that are designed for a LINUX environment require some dedicated programming skills and have no options for visualisation of the resulting mapped sequence reads. Especially with large data sets, this makes the analysis time consuming and difficult for non-expert users. We have applied the GeneTiles software to the analysis of previously published and newly obtained RNAseq datasets of our zebrafish infection model, and we have shown the applicability of this approach also to published RNAseq datasets of other organisms by comparing our data with a published mammalian infection study. In addition, we have implemented the DEXSeq module in the GeneTiles software to identify genes, such as glucagon A, that are differentially spliced under infection conditions. In the analysis of our RNAseq data, this has led to the possibility to improve the size of data sets that could be efficiently compared without using problem-dedicated programs, leading to a quick identification of marker sets. Therefore, this approach will also be highly useful for transcriptome analyses of other organisms for which well-characterised genomes are available. PMID:25503064

  3. Development of the Fish Medaka in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolgemuth, Debra J.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of these experiments was to determine the effect of microgravity on the early development of the fish medaka. There were two objectives for this flight series. The primary objective was to assess the effects of microgravity on different stages of development and to ascertain whether the relevant developmental questions can be addressed at the gross morphological level or if the issues involve more subtle questions about regulation at the molecular and cellular levels. The secondary objective was the assessment of the utility of flight hardware with the capabilities to perform embryological studies. We have been able to take advantage of the flight testing phase of the STL-B hardware to also study the effects of microgravity on the early development of the fish, Medaka. Our initial studies involved monitoring the early Medaka development and raising flight embryos for breeding. Images of the developing embryos were collected either via video which was either taken by the astronauts or broadcast to Earth. Sample video images were digitized and stored on a hard drive resident within the on-board STL-B unit. Embryos were fixed at specific intervals, returned to Earth and are being analyzed for the timing and location of molecular events associated with controlling the morphological pattern for the onset of adult structures.

  4. Altered Glycolysis and Mitochondrial Respiration in a Zebrafish Model of Dravet Syndrome123

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Maneesh G.; Rowley, Shane; Fulton, Ruth; Dinday, Matthew T.; Baraban, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Altered metabolism is an important feature of many epileptic syndromes but has not been reported in Dravet syndrome (DS), a catastrophic childhood epilepsy associated with mutations in a voltage-activated sodium channel, Nav1.1 (SCN1A). To address this, we developed novel methodology to assess real-time changes in bioenergetics in zebrafish larvae between 4 and 6 d postfertilization (dpf). Baseline and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) stimulated glycolytic flux and mitochondrial respiration were simultaneously assessed using a Seahorse Biosciences extracellular flux analyzer. Scn1Lab mutant zebrafish showed a decrease in baseline glycolytic rate and oxygen consumption rate (OCR) compared to controls. A ketogenic diet formulation rescued mutant zebrafish metabolism to control levels. Increasing neuronal excitability with 4-AP resulted in an immediate increase in glycolytic rates in wild-type zebrafish, whereas mitochondrial OCR increased slightly and quickly recovered to baseline values. In contrast, scn1Lab mutant zebrafish showed a significantly slower and exaggerated increase of both glycolytic rates and OCR after 4-AP. The underlying mechanism of decreased baseline OCR in scn1Lab mutants was not because of altered mitochondrial DNA content or dysfunction of enzymes in the electron transport chain or tricarboxylic acid cycle. Examination of glucose metabolism using a PCR array identified five glycolytic genes that were downregulated in scn1Lab mutant zebrafish. Our findings in scn1Lab mutant zebrafish suggest that glucose and mitochondrial hypometabolism contribute to the pathophysiology of DS. PMID:27066534

  5. Altered Glycolysis and Mitochondrial Respiration in a Zebrafish Model of Dravet Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Maneesh G; Rowley, Shane; Fulton, Ruth; Dinday, Matthew T; Baraban, Scott C; Patel, Manisha

    2016-01-01

    Altered metabolism is an important feature of many epileptic syndromes but has not been reported in Dravet syndrome (DS), a catastrophic childhood epilepsy associated with mutations in a voltage-activated sodium channel, Nav1.1 (SCN1A). To address this, we developed novel methodology to assess real-time changes in bioenergetics in zebrafish larvae between 4 and 6 d postfertilization (dpf). Baseline and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) stimulated glycolytic flux and mitochondrial respiration were simultaneously assessed using a Seahorse Biosciences extracellular flux analyzer. Scn1Lab mutant zebrafish showed a decrease in baseline glycolytic rate and oxygen consumption rate (OCR) compared to controls. A ketogenic diet formulation rescued mutant zebrafish metabolism to control levels. Increasing neuronal excitability with 4-AP resulted in an immediate increase in glycolytic rates in wild-type zebrafish, whereas mitochondrial OCR increased slightly and quickly recovered to baseline values. In contrast, scn1Lab mutant zebrafish showed a significantly slower and exaggerated increase of both glycolytic rates and OCR after 4-AP. The underlying mechanism of decreased baseline OCR in scn1Lab mutants was not because of altered mitochondrial DNA content or dysfunction of enzymes in the electron transport chain or tricarboxylic acid cycle. Examination of glucose metabolism using a PCR array identified five glycolytic genes that were downregulated in scn1Lab mutant zebrafish. Our findings in scn1Lab mutant zebrafish suggest that glucose and mitochondrial hypometabolism contribute to the pathophysiology of DS. PMID:27066534

  6. GUIDELINES FOR THE CULTURE OF THE MEDAKA, ORYZIAS LATIPES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes culture techniques for producing large numbers of all life stages of Japanese medaka, Oryzias latipes for use in biological research. he biology of the medaka is described as it relates to culturing practices and the physical systems used to maintain a large ...

  7. NON-INVASIVE NEUROTOXICITY ASSAY USING LARVAL MEDAKA

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present a method for non-invasive electrophysiological analysis of rapid escape responses in intact, freely behaving larval medaka (Oryzias latipes) before and after short-term exposure to environmental toxicants. ecordings are obtained as a larval medaka swims in a small cham...

  8. Adult zebrafish intestine resection: a novel model of short bowel syndrome, adaptation, and intestinal stem cell regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Schall, K. A.; Holoyda, K. A.; Grant, C. N.; Levin, D. E.; Torres, E. R.; Maxwell, A.; Pollack, H. A.; Moats, R. A.; Frey, M. R.; Darehzereshki, A.; Al Alam, D.; Lien, C.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of significant intestinal length from congenital anomaly or disease may lead to short bowel syndrome (SBS); intestinal failure may be partially offset by a gain in epithelial surface area, termed adaptation. Current in vivo models of SBS are costly and technically challenging. Operative times and survival rates have slowed extension to transgenic models. We created a new reproducible in vivo model of SBS in zebrafish, a tractable vertebrate model, to facilitate investigation of the mechanisms of intestinal adaptation. Proximal intestinal diversion at segment 1 (S1, equivalent to jejunum) was performed in adult male zebrafish. SBS fish emptied distal intestinal contents via stoma as in the human disease. After 2 wk, S1 was dilated compared with controls and villus ridges had increased complexity, contributing to greater villus epithelial perimeter. The number of intervillus pockets, the intestinal stem cell zone of the zebrafish increased and contained a higher number of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled cells after 2 wk of SBS. Egf receptor and a subset of its ligands, also drivers of adaptation, were upregulated in SBS fish. Igf has been reported as a driver of intestinal adaptation in other animal models, and SBS fish exposed to a pharmacological inhibitor of the Igf receptor failed to demonstrate signs of intestinal adaptation, such as increased inner epithelial perimeter and BrdU incorporation. We describe a technically feasible model of human SBS in the zebrafish, a faster and less expensive tool to investigate intestinal stem cell plasticity as well as the mechanisms that drive intestinal adaptation. PMID:26089336

  9. The Zebrafish- Danio rerio – Is a Useful Model for Measuring the Effects of Small-molecule Mitigators of Late Effects of Ionizing Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    EPPERLY, MICHAEL W.; BAHARY, NATHAN; QUADER, MUBINA; DEWALD, VALERIE; GREENBERGER, JOEL S.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim Use of zebrafish models may decrease the cost of screening new irradiation protectors and mitigators. Materials and Methods Zebrafish (Danio rerio) models were tested for screening water-soluble radiation protectors and mitigators. Irradiation of embryos and monitoring survival, and measuring fibrosis of the caudal musculature of adults allowed for testing of acute and late effects, respectively. Results Incubation of zebrafish embryos either before or after irradiation in ethyl pyruvate (1 mM) increased survival. Irradiation of adults to 15 to 75 Gy, delivered in single-fraction at 13 Gy/min, showed dose-dependent fibrosis at 30 days, quantitated as physiological decrease in swimming tail movement, and histopathological detection of collagen deposition in the dorsal musculature. Continuous administration of small-molecule radioprotector drugs in the water after irradiation reduced both acute and chronic injuries. Conclusion The zebrafish is cost-effective for screening new radiation countermeasures. PMID:23160669

  10. A stochastic vision-based model inspired by zebrafish collective behaviour in heterogeneous environments

    PubMed Central

    Collignon, Bertrand; Séguret, Axel; Halloy, José

    2016-01-01

    Collective motion is one of the most ubiquitous behaviours displayed by social organisms and has led to the development of numerous models. Recent advances in the understanding of sensory system and information processing by animals impels one to revise classical assumptions made in decisional algorithms. In this context, we present a model describing the three-dimensional visual sensory system of fish that adjust their trajectory according to their perception field. Furthermore, we introduce a stochastic process based on a probability distribution function to move in targeted directions rather than on a summation of influential vectors as is classically assumed by most models. In parallel, we present experimental results of zebrafish (alone or in group of 10) swimming in both homogeneous and heterogeneous environments. We use these experimental data to set the parameter values of our model and show that this perception-based approach can simulate the collective motion of species showing cohesive behaviour in heterogeneous environments. Finally, we discuss the advances of this multilayer model and its possible outcomes in biological, physical and robotic sciences. PMID:26909173

  11. A stochastic vision-based model inspired by zebrafish collective behaviour in heterogeneous environments.

    PubMed

    Collignon, Bertrand; Séguret, Axel; Halloy, José

    2016-01-01

    Collective motion is one of the most ubiquitous behaviours displayed by social organisms and has led to the development of numerous models. Recent advances in the understanding of sensory system and information processing by animals impels one to revise classical assumptions made in decisional algorithms. In this context, we present a model describing the three-dimensional visual sensory system of fish that adjust their trajectory according to their perception field. Furthermore, we introduce a stochastic process based on a probability distribution function to move in targeted directions rather than on a summation of influential vectors as is classically assumed by most models. In parallel, we present experimental results of zebrafish (alone or in group of 10) swimming in both homogeneous and heterogeneous environments. We use these experimental data to set the parameter values of our model and show that this perception-based approach can simulate the collective motion of species showing cohesive behaviour in heterogeneous environments. Finally, we discuss the advances of this multilayer model and its possible outcomes in biological, physical and robotic sciences. PMID:26909173

  12. A zebrafish larval model reveals early tissue-specific innate immune responses to Mucor circinelloides

    PubMed Central

    Voelz, Kerstin; Gratacap, Remi L.; Wheeler, Robert T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mucormycosis is an emerging fungal infection that is clinically difficult to manage, with increasing incidence and extremely high mortality rates. Individuals with diabetes, suppressed immunity or traumatic injury are at increased risk of developing disease. These individuals often present with defects in phagocytic effector cell function. Research using mammalian models and phagocytic effector cell lines has attempted to decipher the importance of the innate immune system in host defence against mucormycosis. However, these model systems have not been satisfactory for direct analysis of the interaction between innate immune effector cells and infectious sporangiospores in vivo. Here, we report the first real-time in vivo analysis of the early innate immune response to mucormycete infection using a whole-animal zebrafish larval model system. We identified differential host susceptibility, dependent on the site of infection (hindbrain ventricle and swim bladder), as well as differential functions of the two major phagocyte effector cell types in response to viable and non-viable spores. Larval susceptibility to mucormycete spore infection was increased upon immunosuppressant treatment. We showed for the first time that macrophages and neutrophils were readily recruited in vivo to the site of infection in an intact host and that spore phagocytosis can be observed in real-time in vivo. While exploring innate immune effector recruitment dynamics, we discovered the formation of phagocyte clusters in response to fungal spores that potentially play a role in fungal spore dissemination. Spores failed to activate pro-inflammatory gene expression by 6 h post-infection in both infection models. After 24 h, induction of a pro-inflammatory response was observed only in hindbrain ventricle infections. Only a weak pro-inflammatory response was initiated after spore injection into the swim bladder during the same time frame. In the future, the zebrafish larva as a live

  13. A zebrafish larval model reveals early tissue-specific innate immune responses to Mucor circinelloides.

    PubMed

    Voelz, Kerstin; Gratacap, Remi L; Wheeler, Robert T

    2015-11-01

    Mucormycosis is an emerging fungal infection that is clinically difficult to manage, with increasing incidence and extremely high mortality rates. Individuals with diabetes, suppressed immunity or traumatic injury are at increased risk of developing disease. These individuals often present with defects in phagocytic effector cell function. Research using mammalian models and phagocytic effector cell lines has attempted to decipher the importance of the innate immune system in host defence against mucormycosis. However, these model systems have not been satisfactory for direct analysis of the interaction between innate immune effector cells and infectious sporangiospores in vivo. Here, we report the first real-time in vivo analysis of the early innate immune response to mucormycete infection using a whole-animal zebrafish larval model system. We identified differential host susceptibility, dependent on the site of infection (hindbrain ventricle and swim bladder), as well as differential functions of the two major phagocyte effector cell types in response to viable and non-viable spores. Larval susceptibility to mucormycete spore infection was increased upon immunosuppressant treatment. We showed for the first time that macrophages and neutrophils were readily recruited in vivo to the site of infection in an intact host and that spore phagocytosis can be observed in real-time in vivo. While exploring innate immune effector recruitment dynamics, we discovered the formation of phagocyte clusters in response to fungal spores that potentially play a role in fungal spore dissemination. Spores failed to activate pro-inflammatory gene expression by 6 h post-infection in both infection models. After 24 h, induction of a pro-inflammatory response was observed only in hindbrain ventricle infections. Only a weak pro-inflammatory response was initiated after spore injection into the swim bladder during the same time frame. In the future, the zebrafish larva as a live whole

  14. Thalidomide Effects in Patients with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia During Therapeutic Treatment and in Fli-EGFP Transgenic Zebrafish Model

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hong-Ling; Yi, Yi-Fang; Zhou, Shun-Ke; Xie, Si-Si; Zhang, Guang-Sen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by recurrent epistaxis, mucocutaneous telangiectasia, and arteriovenous malformations. The efficacy of traditional treatments for HHT is very limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic role of thalidomide in HHT patients and the effect in FLI-EGFP transgenic zebrafish model. Methods: HHT was diagnosed according to Shovlin criteria. Five HHT patients were treated with thalidomide (100 mg/d). The Epistaxis Severity Score (ESS), telangiectasia spots, and hepatic computed tomography angiography (CTA) were used to assess the clinical efficacy of thalidomide. The Fli-EGFP zebrafish model was investigated for the effect of thalidomide on angiogenesis. Dynamic real-time polymerase chain reaction assay, ELISA and Western blotting from patient's peripheral blood mononuclear cells and plasma were used to detect the expression of transforming growth factor beta 3 (TGF-β3) messenger RNA (mRNA) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein before and after 6 months of thalidomide treatment. Results: The average ESS before and after thalidomide were 6.966 ± 3.093 and 1.799 ± 0.627, respectively (P = 0.009). The “telangiectatic spot” on the tongue almost vanished; CTA examination of case 2 indicated a smaller proximal hepatic artery and decreased or ceased hepatic artery collateral circulation. The Fli-EGFP zebrafish model manifested discontinuous vessel development and vascular occlusion (7 of 10 fishes), and the TGF-β3 mRNA expression of five patients was lower after thalidomide therapy. The plasma VEGF protein expression was down-regulated in HHT patients. Conclusions: Thalidomide reverses telangiectasia and controls nosebleeds by down-regulating the expression of TGF-β3 and VEGF in HHT patients. It also leads to vascular remodeling in the zebrafish model. PMID:26608985

  15. Neurochemical measurements in the zebrafish brain

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Lauren J.; McCutcheon, James E.; Young, Andrew M. J.; Norton, William H. J.

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish is an ideal model organism for behavioral genetics and neuroscience. The high conservation of genes and neurotransmitter pathways between zebrafish and other vertebrates permits the translation of research between species. Zebrafish behavior can be studied at both larval and adult stages and recent research has begun to establish zebrafish models for human disease. Fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is an electrochemical technique that permits the detection of neurotransmitter release and reuptake. In this study we have used in vitro FSCV to measure the release of analytes in the adult zebrafish telencephalon. We compare different stimulation methods and present a characterization of neurochemical changes in the wild-type zebrafish brain. This study represents the first FSCV recordings in zebrafish, thus paving the way for neurochemical analysis of the fish brain. PMID:26441575

  16. Zebrafish as an Emerging Model Organism to Study Angiogenesis in Development and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chávez, Myra N; Aedo, Geraldine; Fierro, Fernando A; Allende, Miguel L; Egaña, José T

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is the process through which new blood vessels are formed from preexisting ones and plays a critical role in several conditions including embryonic development, tissue repair and disease. Moreover, enhanced therapeutic angiogenesis is a major goal in the field of regenerative medicine and efficient vascularization of artificial tissues and organs is one of the main hindrances in the implementation of tissue engineering approaches, while, on the other hand, inhibition of angiogenesis is a key therapeutic target to inhibit for instance tumor growth. During the last decades, the understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in this process has been matter of intense research. In this regard, several in vitro and in vivo models have been established to visualize and study migration of endothelial progenitor cells, formation of endothelial tubules and the generation of new vascular networks, while assessing the conditions and treatments that either promote or inhibit such processes. In this review, we address and compare the most commonly used experimental models to study angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. In particular, we focus on the implementation of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a model to study angiogenesis and discuss the advantages and not yet explored possibilities of its use as model organism. PMID:27014075

  17. Exploring the HIFs, buts and maybes of hypoxia signalling in disease: lessons from zebrafish models

    PubMed Central

    Elks, Philip M.; Renshaw, Stephen A.; Meijer, Annemarie H.; Walmsley, Sarah R.; van Eeden, Fredericus J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A low level of tissue oxygen (hypoxia) is a physiological feature of a wide range of diseases, from cancer to infection. Cellular hypoxia is sensed by oxygen-sensitive hydroxylase enzymes, which regulate the protein stability of hypoxia-inducible factor α (HIF-α) transcription factors. When stabilised, HIF-α binds with its cofactors to HIF-responsive elements (HREs) in the promoters of target genes to coordinate a wide-ranging transcriptional programme in response to the hypoxic environment. This year marks the 20th anniversary of the discovery of the HIF-1α transcription factor, and in recent years the HIF-mediated hypoxia response is being increasingly recognised as an important process in determining the outcome of diseases such as cancer, inflammatory disease and bacterial infections. Animal models have shed light on the roles of HIF in disease and have uncovered intricate control mechanisms that involve multiple cell types, observations that might have been missed in simpler in vitro systems. These findings highlight the need for new whole-organism models of disease to elucidate these complex regulatory mechanisms. In this Review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of hypoxia and HIFs in disease that have emerged from studies of zebrafish disease models. Findings from such models identify HIF as an integral player in the disease processes. They also highlight HIF pathway components and their targets as potential therapeutic targets against conditions that range from cancers to infectious disease. PMID:26512123

  18. Zebrafish as an Emerging Model Organism to Study Angiogenesis in Development and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chávez, Myra N.; Aedo, Geraldine; Fierro, Fernando A.; Allende, Miguel L.; Egaña, José T.

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is the process through which new blood vessels are formed from preexisting ones and plays a critical role in several conditions including embryonic development, tissue repair and disease. Moreover, enhanced therapeutic angiogenesis is a major goal in the field of regenerative medicine and efficient vascularization of artificial tissues and organs is one of the main hindrances in the implementation of tissue engineering approaches, while, on the other hand, inhibition of angiogenesis is a key therapeutic target to inhibit for instance tumor growth. During the last decades, the understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in this process has been matter of intense research. In this regard, several in vitro and in vivo models have been established to visualize and study migration of endothelial progenitor cells, formation of endothelial tubules and the generation of new vascular networks, while assessing the conditions and treatments that either promote or inhibit such processes. In this review, we address and compare the most commonly used experimental models to study angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. In particular, we focus on the implementation of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a model to study angiogenesis and discuss the advantages and not yet explored possibilities of its use as model organism. PMID:27014075

  19. Retinoic acid expands the evolutionarily reduced dentition of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Seritrakul, Pawat; Samarut, Eric; Lama, Tenzing T S; Gibert, Yann; Laudet, Vincent; Jackman, William R

    2012-12-01

    Zebrafish lost anterior teeth during evolution but retain a posterior pharyngeal dentition that requires retinoic acid (RA) cell-cell signaling for its development. The purposes of this study were to test the sufficiency of RA to induce tooth development and to assess its role in evolution. We found that exposure of embryos to exogenous RA induces a dramatic anterior expansion of the number of pharyngeal teeth that later form and shifts anteriorly the expression patterns of genes normally expressed in the posterior tooth-forming region, such as pitx2 and dlx2b. After RA exposure, we also observed a correlation between cartilage malformations and ectopic tooth induction, as well as abnormal cranial neural crest marker gene expression. Additionally, we observed that the RA-induced zebrafish anterior teeth resemble in pattern and number the dentition of fish species that retain anterior pharyngeal teeth such as medaka but that medaka do not express the aldh1a2 RA-synthesizing enzyme in tooth-forming regions. We conclude that RA is sufficient to induce anterior ectopic tooth development in zebrafish where teeth were lost in evolution, potentially by altering neural crest cell development, and that changes in the location of RA synthesis correlate with evolutionary changes in vertebrate dentitions. PMID:22942074

  20. Targeted Laser Ablation of the Zebrafish Larval Heart Induces Models of Heart Block, Valvular Regurgitation, and Outflow Tract Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Matrone, Gianfranco; Maqsood, Sana; Taylor, Jonathan; Mullins, John J.; Tucker, Carl S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Mammalian models of cardiac disease have provided unique and important insights into human disease but have become increasingly challenging to produce. The zebrafish could provide inexpensive high-throughput models of cardiac injury and repair. We used a highly targeted laser, synchronized to fire at specific phases of the cardiac cycle, to induce regional injury to the ventricle, atrioventricular (AV) cushion, and bulbus arteriosus (BA). We assessed the impact of laser injury on hearts of zebrafish early larvae at 72 h postfertilization, to different regions, recording the effects on ejection fraction (EF), heart rate (HR), and blood flow at 2 and 24 h postinjury (hpi). Laser injury to the apex, midzone, and outflow regions of the ventricle resulted in reductions of the ventricle EF at 2 hpi with full recovery of function by 24 hpi. Laser injury to the ventricle, close to the AV cushion, was more likely to cause bradycardia and atrial–ventricular dysfunction, suggestive of an electrical conduction block. At 2 hpi, direct injury to the AV cushion resulted in marked regurgitation of blood from the ventricle to the atrium. Laser injury to the BA caused temporary outflow tract obstruction with cessation of ventricle contraction and circulation. Despite such damage, 80% of embryos showed complete recovery of the HR and function within 24 h of laser injury. Precision laser injury to key structures in the zebrafish developing heart provides a range of potentially useful models of hemodynamic overload, injury, and repair. PMID:25272304

  1. The Zebrafish as Model for Deciphering the Regulatory Architecture of Vertebrate Genomes.

    PubMed

    Rastegar, S; Strähle, U

    2016-01-01

    Despite enormous progress to map cis-regulatory modules (CRMs), like enhancers and promoters in genomes, elucidation of the regulatory landscape of the developing embryo remains a challenge. The zebrafish embryo with its experimental virtues has a great potential to contribute to this endeavor. However, so far progress remained behind expectation. We discuss here available methods and their limitations and how the zebrafish embryo could contribute in the future to unravel the wiring of the vertebrate genome. PMID:27503358

  2. Using Mouse and Zebrafish Models to Understand the Etiology of Developmental Defects in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    KAWAUCHI, SHIMAKO; SANTOS, ROSAYSELA; MUTO, AKIHIKO; LOPEZ-BURKS, MARTHA E.; SCHILLING, THOMAS F.; LANDER, ARTHUR D.; CALOF, ANNE L.

    2016-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is a multisystem birth defects disorder that affects every tissue and organ system in the body. Understanding the factors that contribute to the origins, prevalence, and severity of these developmental defects provides the most direct approach for developing screens and potential treatments for individuals with CdLS. Since the majority of cases of CdLS are caused by haploinsufficiency for NIPBL (Nipped-B-like, which encodes a cohesin-associated protein), we have developed mouse and zebrafish models of CdLS by using molecular genetic tools to create Nipbl-deficient mice and zebrafish (Nipbl+/− mice, zebrafish nipbl morphants). Studies of these vertebrate animal models have yielded novel insights into the developmental etiology and genes/gene pathways that contribute to CdLS-associated birth defects, particularly defects of the gut, heart, craniofacial structures, nervous system, and limbs. Studies of these mouse and zebrafish CdLS models have helped clarify how deficiency for NIPBL, a protein that associates with cohesin and other transcriptional regulators in the nucleus, affects processes important to the emergence of the structural and physiological birth defects observed in CdLS: NIPBL exerts chromosome position-specific effects on gene expression; it influences long-range interactions between different regulatory elements of genes; and it regulates combinatorial and synergistic actions of genes in developing tissues. Our current understanding is that CdLS should be considered as not only a cohesinopathy, but also a “transcriptomopathy,” that is, a disease whose underlying etiology is the global dysregulation of gene expression throughout the organism. PMID:27120001

  3. Using mouse and zebrafish models to understand the etiology of developmental defects in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kawauchi, Shimako; Santos, Rosaysela; Muto, Akihiko; Lopez-Burks, Martha E; Schilling, Thomas F; Lander, Arthur D; Calof, Anne L

    2016-06-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is a multisystem birth defects disorder that affects every tissue and organ system in the body. Understanding the factors that contribute to the origins, prevalence, and severity of these developmental defects provides the most direct approach for developing screens and potential treatments for individuals with CdLS. Since the majority of cases of CdLS are caused by haploinsufficiency for NIPBL (Nipped-B-like, which encodes a cohesin-associated protein), we have developed mouse and zebrafish models of CdLS by using molecular genetic tools to create Nipbl-deficient mice and zebrafish (Nipbl(+/-) mice, zebrafish nipbl morphants). Studies of these vertebrate animal models have yielded novel insights into the developmental etiology and genes/gene pathways that contribute to CdLS-associated birth defects, particularly defects of the gut, heart, craniofacial structures, nervous system, and limbs. Studies of these mouse and zebrafish CdLS models have helped clarify how deficiency for NIPBL, a protein that associates with cohesin and other transcriptional regulators in the nucleus, affects processes important to the emergence of the structural and physiological birth defects observed in CdLS: NIPBL exerts chromosome position-specific effects on gene expression; it influences long-range interactions between different regulatory elements of genes; and it regulates combinatorial and synergistic actions of genes in developing tissues. Our current understanding is that CdLS should be considered as not only a cohesinopathy, but also a "transcriptomopathy," that is, a disease whose underlying etiology is the global dysregulation of gene expression throughout the organism. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27120001

  4. Pharmacological HIF2α inhibition improves VHL disease–associated phenotypes in zebrafish model

    PubMed Central

    Metelo, Ana Martins; Noonan, Haley R.; Li, Xiang; Jin, Youngnam; Baker, Rania; Kamentsky, Lee; Zhang, Yiyun; van Rooijen, Ellen; Shin, Jordan; Carpenter, Anne E.; Yeh, Jing-Ruey; Peterson, Randall T.; Iliopoulos, Othon

    2015-01-01

    Patients with a germline mutation in von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) develop renal cell cancers and hypervascular tumors of the brain, adrenal glands, and pancreas as well as erythrocytosis. These phenotypes are driven by aberrant expression of HIF2α, which induces expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and red blood cell production. Currently, there are no effective treatments available for VHL disease. Here, using an animal model of VHL, we report a marked improvement of VHL-associated phenotypes following treatment with HIF2α inhibitors. Inactivation of vhl in zebrafish led to constitutive activation of HIF2α orthologs and modeled several aspects of the human disease, including erythrocytosis, pathologic angiogenesis in the brain and retina, and aberrant kidney and liver proliferation. Treatment of vhl–/– mutant embryos with HIF2α-specific inhibitors downregulated Hif target gene expression in a dose-dependent manner, improved abnormal hematopoiesis, and substantially suppressed erythrocytosis and angiogenic sprouting. Moreover, pharmacologic inhibition of HIF2α reversed the compromised cardiac contractility of vhl–/– embryos and partially rescued early lethality. This study demonstrates that small-molecule targeting of HIF2α improves VHL-related phenotypes in a vertebrate animal model and supports further exploration of this strategy for treating VHL disease. PMID:25866969

  5. Zebrafish Models for Ectopic Mineralization Disorders: Practical Issues from Morpholino Design to Post-Injection Observations

    PubMed Central

    Hosen, Mohammad Jakir; Vanakker, Olivier M.; Willaert, Andy; Huysseune, Ann; Coucke, Paul; De Paepe, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Zebrafish (ZF, Danio rerio) has emerged as an important and popular model species to study different human diseases. Key regulators of skeletal development and calcium metabolism are highly conserved between mammals and ZF. The corresponding orthologs share significant sequence similarities and an overlap in expression patterns when compared to mammals, making ZF a potential model for the study of mineralization-related disorders and soft tissue mineralization. To characterize the function of early mineralization-related genes in ZF, these genes can be knocked down by injecting morpholinos into early stage embryos. Validation of the morpholino needs to be performed and the concern of aspecific effects can be addressed by applying one or more independent techniques to knock down the gene of interest. Post-injection assessment of early mineralization defects can be done using general light microscopy, calcein staining, Alizarin red staining, Alizarin red-Alcian blue double staining, and by the use of transgenic lines. Examination of general molecular defects can be done by performing protein and gene expression analysis, and more specific processes can be explored by investigating ectopic mineralization-related mechanisms such as apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction. In this paper, we will discuss all details about the aforementioned techniques; shared knowledge will be very useful for the future investigation of ZF models for ectopic mineralization disorders and to understand the underlying pathways involved in soft tissue calcification. PMID:23760765

  6. Protective effect of dieckol isolated from Ecklonia cava against ethanol caused damage in vitro and in zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Cheol; Kim, Kil-Nam; Kang, Sung-Myung; Yang, Xiudong; Kim, Eun-A; Song, Choon Bok; Nah, Jae-Woon; Jang, Mi-Kyeong; Lee, Jung-Suck; Jung, Won-Kyo; Jeon, You-Jin

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, the protective effects of phlorotannins isolated from Ecklonia cava against ethanol-induced cell damage and apoptosis were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Three phlorotannin compounds, namely phloroglucinol, eckol and dieckol, were successively isolated and identified from the extract. Dieckol showed the strongest protective effect against ethanol-induced cell apoptosis in Chang liver cells, with the lowest cytotoxicity. It was observed that dieckol reduced cell apoptosis through activation of Bcl-xL and PARP, and down-regulation of Bax and caspase-3 in Western blot analyses. In the in vivo study, the protective effect of ethanol induced by dieckol was investigated in a zebrafish model. The dieckol treated group scavenged intracellural reactive oxygen species and prevented lipid peroxidation and ethanol induced cell death in the zebrafish embryo. In conclusion, dieckol isolated from E. cava might possess a potential protective effect against ethanol-induced liver diseases. PMID:24189014

  7. Sqstm1 knock-down causes a locomotor phenotype ameliorated by rapamycin in a zebrafish model of ALS/FTLD.

    PubMed

    Lattante, Serena; de Calbiac, Hortense; Le Ber, Isabelle; Brice, Alexis; Ciura, Sorana; Kabashi, Edor

    2015-03-15

    Mutations in SQSTM1, encoding for the protein SQSTM1/p62, have been recently reported in 1-3.5% of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (ALS/FTLD). Inclusions positive for SQSTM1/p62 have been detected in patients with neurodegenerative disorders, including ALS/FTLD. In order to investigate the pathogenic mechanisms induced by SQSTM1 mutations in ALS/FTLD, we developed a zebrafish model. Knock-down of the sqstm1 zebrafish ortholog, as well as impairment of its splicing, led to a specific phenotype, consisting of behavioral and axonal anomalies. Here, we report swimming deficits associated with shorter motor neuronal axons that could be rescued by the overexpression of wild-type human SQSTM1. Interestingly, no rescue of the loss-of-function phenotype was observed when overexpressing human SQSTM1 constructs carrying ALS/FTLD-related mutations. Consistent with its role in autophagy regulation, we found increased mTOR levels upon knock-down of sqstm1. Furthermore, treatment of zebrafish embryos with rapamycin, a known inhibitor of the mTOR pathway, yielded an amelioration of the locomotor phenotype in the sqstm1 knock-down model. Our results suggest that loss-of-function of SQSTM1 causes phenotypic features characterized by locomotor deficits and motor neuron axonal defects that are associated with a misregulation of autophagic processes. PMID:25410659

  8. H. pylori virulence factor CagA increases intestinal cell proliferation by Wnt pathway activation in a transgenic zebrafish model

    PubMed Central

    Neal, James T.; Peterson, Tracy S.; Kent, Michael L.; Guillemin, Karen

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Infection with Helicobacter pylori is a major risk factor for the development of gastric cancer, and infection with strains carrying the virulence factor CagA significantly increases this risk. To investigate the mechanisms by which CagA promotes carcinogenesis, we generated transgenic zebrafish expressing CagA ubiquitously or in the anterior intestine. Transgenic zebrafish expressing either the wild-type or a phosphorylation-resistant form of CagA exhibited significantly increased rates of intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and showed significant upregulation of the Wnt target genes cyclinD1, axin2 and the zebrafish c-myc ortholog myca. Coexpression of CagA with a loss-of-function allele encoding the β-catenin destruction complex protein Axin1 resulted in a further increase in intestinal proliferation. Coexpression of CagA with a null allele of the key β-catenin transcriptional cofactor Tcf4 restored intestinal proliferation to wild-type levels. These results provide in vivo evidence of Wnt pathway activation by CagA downstream of or in parallel to the β-catenin destruction complex and upstream of Tcf4. Long-term transgenic expression of wild-type CagA, but not the phosphorylation-resistant form, resulted in significant hyperplasia of the adult intestinal epithelium. We further utilized this model to demonstrate that oncogenic cooperation between CagA and a loss-of-function allele of p53 is sufficient to induce high rates of intestinal small cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, establishing the utility of our transgenic zebrafish model in the study of CagA-associated gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:23471915

  9. Acquisition of glial cells missing 2 Enhancers Contributes to a Diversity of Ionocytes in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Shono, Takanori; Kurokawa, Daisuke; Miyake, Tsutomu; Okabe, Masataka

    2011-01-01

    Glial cells missing 2 (gcm2) encoding a GCM-motif transcription factor is expressed in the parathyroid in amniotes. In contrast, gcm2 is expressed in pharyngeal pouches (a homologous site of the parathyroid), gills, and H+-ATPase–rich cells (HRCs), a subset of ionocytes on the skin surface of the teleost fish zebrafish. Ionocytes are specialized cells that are involved in osmotic homeostasis in aquatic vertebrates. Here, we showed that gcm2 is essential for the development of HRCs and Na+-Cl− co-transporter–rich cells (NCCCs), another subset of ionocytes in zebrafish. We also identified gcm2 enhancer regions that control gcm2 expression in ionocytes of zebrafish. Comparisons of the gcm2 locus with its neighboring regions revealed no conserved elements between zebrafish and tetrapods. Furthermore, We observed gcm2 expression patterns in embryos of the teleost fishes Medaka (Oryzias latipes) and fugu (Fugu niphobles), the extant primitive ray-finned fishes Polypterus (Polypterus senegalus) and sturgeon (a hybrid of Huso huso × Acipenser ruhenus), and the amphibian Xenopus (Xenopus laevis). Although gcm2-expressing cells were observed on the skin surface of Medaka and fugu, they were not found in Polypterus, sturgeon, or Xenopus. Our results suggest that an acquisition of enhancers for the expression of gcm2 contributes to a diversity of ionocytes in zebrafish during evolution. PMID:21858216

  10. Microgavage of zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Cocchiaro, Jordan L; Rawls, John F

    2013-01-01

    The zebrafish has emerged as a powerful model organism for studying intestinal development(1-5), physiology(6-11), disease(12-16), and host-microbe interactions(17-25). Experimental approaches for studying intestinal biology often require the in vivo introduction of selected materials into the lumen of the intestine. In the larval zebrafish model, this is typically accomplished by immersing fish in a solution of the selected material, or by injection through the abdominal wall. Using the immersion method, it is difficult to accurately monitor or control the route or timing of material delivery to the intestine. For this reason, immersion exposure can cause unintended toxicity and other effects on extraintestinal tissues, limiting the potential range of material amounts that can be delivered into the intestine. Also, the amount of material ingested during immersion exposure can vary significantly between individual larvae(26). Although these problems are not encountered during direct injection through the abdominal wall, proper injection is difficult and causes tissue damage which could influence experimental results. We introduce a method for microgavage of zebrafish larvae. The goal of this method is to provide a safe, effective, and consistent way to deliver material directly to the lumen of the anterior intestine in larval zebrafish with controlled timing. Microgavage utilizes standard embryo microinjection and stereomicroscopy equipment common to most laboratories that perform zebrafish research. Once fish are properly positioned in methylcellulose, gavage can be performed quickly at a rate of approximately 7-10 fish/ min, and post-gavage survival approaches 100% depending on the gavaged material. We also show that microgavage can permit loading of the intestinal lumen with high concentrations of materials that are lethal to fish when exposed by immersion. To demonstrate the utility of this method, we present a fluorescent dextran microgavage assay that can be

  11. Dok-7 promotes slow muscle integrity as well as neuromuscular junction formation in a zebrafish model of congenital myasthenic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Müller, Juliane S; Jepson, Catherine D; Laval, Steven H; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2010-05-01

    The small signalling adaptor protein Dok-7 has recently been reported as an essential protein of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Mutations resulting in partial loss of Dok-7 activity cause a distinct limb-girdle subtype of the inherited NMJ disorder congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs), whereas complete loss of Dok-7 results in a lethal phenotype in both mice and humans. Here we describe the zebrafish orthologue of Dok-7 and study its in vivo function. Dok-7 deficiency leads to motility defects in zebrafish embryos and larvae. The relative importance of Dok-7 at different stages of NMJ development varies; it is crucial for the earliest step, the formation of acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clusters in the middle of the muscle fibre prior to motor neuron contact. At later stages, presence of Dok-7 is not absolutely essential, as focal and non-focal synapses do form when Dok-7 expression is downregulated. These contacts however are smaller than in the wild-type zebrafish, reminiscent of the neuromuscular endplate pathology seen in patients with DOK7 mutations. Intriguingly, we also observed changes in slow muscle fibre arrangement; previously, Dok-7 has not been linked to functions other than postsynaptic AChR clustering. Our results suggest an additional role of Dok-7 in muscle. This role seems to be independent of the muscle-specific tyrosine kinase MuSK, the known binding partner of Dok-7 at the NMJ. Our findings in the zebrafish model contribute to a better understanding of the signalling pathways at the NMJ and the pathomechanisms of DOK7 CMSs. PMID:20147321

  12. Changes in the dielectric properties of medaka fish embryos during development, studied by electrorotation

    SciTech Connect

    Shirakashi, Ryo; Mischke, Miriam; Fischer, Peter; Memmel, Simon; Krohne, Georg; Fuhr, Guenter R.; Zimmermann, Heiko; Sukhorukov, Vladimir L.

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electrorotation offers a non-invasive tool for dielectric analysis of fish embryos. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The three-shell dielectric model matches the rotation spectra of medaka eggs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The capacitance value suggests a double-membrane structure of yolk envelope. -- Abstract: The Japanese medaka fish, Oryzias latipes, has become a powerful vertebrate model organism in developmental biology and genetics. The present study explores the dielectric properties of medaka embryos during pre-hatching development by means of the electrorotation (ROT) technique. Due to their layered structure, medaka eggs exhibited up to three ROT peaks in the kHz-MHz frequency range. During development from blastula to early somite stage, ROT spectra varied only slightly. But as the embryo progressed to the late-somite stage, the ROT peaks underwent significant changes in frequency and amplitude. Using morphological data obtained by light and electron microscopy, we analyzed the ROT spectra with a three-shell dielectric model that accounted for the major embryonic compartments. The analysis yielded a very high value for the ionic conductivity of the egg shell (chorion), which was confirmed by independent osmotic experiments. A relatively low capacitance of the yolk envelope was consistent with its double-membrane structure revealed by transmission electron microscopy. Yolk-free dead eggs exhibited only one co-field ROT peak, shifted markedly to lower frequencies with respect to the corresponding peak of live embryos. The dielectric data may be useful for monitoring the development and changes in fish embryos' viability/conditions in basic research and industrial aquaculture.

  13. Dnd Is a Critical Specifier of Primordial Germ Cells in the Medaka Fish.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ni; Li, Mingyou; Yuan, Yongming; Wang, Tiansu; Yi, Meisheng; Xu, Hongyan; Zeng, Huaqiang; Song, Jianxing; Hong, Yunhan

    2016-03-01

    Primordial germ cell (PGC) specification occurs early in development. PGC specifiers have been identified in Drosophila, mouse, and human but remained elusive in most animals. Here we identify the RNA-binding protein Dnd as a critical PGC specifier in the medaka fish (Oryzias latipes). Dnd depletion specifically abolished PGCs, and its overexpression boosted PGCs. We established a single-cell culture procedure enabling lineage tracing in vitro. We show that individual blastomeres from cleavage embryos at the 32- and 64-cell stages are capable of PGC production in culture. Importantly, Dnd overexpression increases PGCs via increasing PGC precursors. Strikingly, dnd RNA forms prominent particles that segregate asymmetrically. Dnd concentrates in germ plasm and stabilizes germ plasm RNA. Therefore, Dnd is a critical specifier of fish PGCs and utilizes particle partition as a previously unidentified mechanism for asymmetric segregation. These findings offer insights into PGC specification and manipulation in medaka as a lower vertebrate model. PMID:26852942

  14. Dnd Is a Critical Specifier of Primordial Germ Cells in the Medaka Fish

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ni; Li, Mingyou; Yuan, Yongming; Wang, Tiansu; Yi, Meisheng; Xu, Hongyan; Zeng, Huaqiang; Song, Jianxing; Hong, Yunhan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Primordial germ cell (PGC) specification occurs early in development. PGC specifiers have been identified in Drosophila, mouse, and human but remained elusive in most animals. Here we identify the RNA-binding protein Dnd as a critical PGC specifier in the medaka fish (Oryzias latipes). Dnd depletion specifically abolished PGCs, and its overexpression boosted PGCs. We established a single-cell culture procedure enabling lineage tracing in vitro. We show that individual blastomeres from cleavage embryos at the 32- and 64-cell stages are capable of PGC production in culture. Importantly, Dnd overexpression increases PGCs via increasing PGC precursors. Strikingly, dnd RNA forms prominent particles that segregate asymmetrically. Dnd concentrates in germ plasm and stabilizes germ plasm RNA. Therefore, Dnd is a critical specifier of fish PGCs and utilizes particle partition as a previously unidentified mechanism for asymmetric segregation. These findings offer insights into PGC specification and manipulation in medaka as a lower vertebrate model. PMID:26852942

  15. Indole Alkaloids from Fischerella Inhibit Vertebrate Development in the Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Embryo Model

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Katherine; Gantar, Miroslav; Gibbs, Patrick D. L.; Schmale, Michael C.; Berry, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are recognized producers of toxic or otherwise bioactive metabolite associated, in particular, with so-called “harmful algal blooms” (HABs) and eutrophication of freshwater systems. In the present study, two apparently teratogenic indole alkaloids from a freshwater strain of the widespread cyanobacterial genus, Fischerella (Stigonemataceae), were isolated by bioassay-guided fractionation, specifically using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo, as a model of vertebrate development. The two alkaloids include the previously known 12-epi-hapalindole H isonitrile (1), and a new nitrile-containing variant, 12-epi-ambiguine B nitrile (2). Although both compounds were toxic to developing embryos, the former compound was shown to be relatively more potent, and to correlate best with the observed embryo toxicity. Related indole alkaloids from Fischerella, and other genera in the Stigonemataceae, have been widely reported as antimicrobial compounds, specifically in association with apparent allelopathy. However, this is the first report of their vertebrate toxicity, and the observed teratogenicity of these alkaloids supports a possible contribution to the toxicity of this widespread cyanobacterial family, particularly in relation to freshwater HABs and eutrophication. PMID:25533520

  16. Towards a digital model of zebrafish embryogenesis. Integration of cell tracking and gene expression quantification.

    PubMed

    Castro-Gonzalez, Carlos; Luengo-Oroz, Miguel Angel; Douloquin, Louise; Savy, Thierry; Melani, Camilo; Desnoulez, Sophie; Ledesma-Carbayo, Maria Jesus; Bourginey, Paul; Peyrieras, Nadine; Santos, Andres

    2010-01-01

    We elaborate on a general framework composed of a set of computational tools to accurately quantificate cellular position and gene expression levels throughout early zebrafish embryogenesis captured over a time-lapse series of in vivo 3D images. Our modeling strategy involves nuclei detection, cell geometries extraction, automatic gene levels quantification and cell tracking to reconstruct cell trajectories and lineage tree which describe the animal development. Each cell in the embryo is then precisely described at each given time t by a vector composed of the cell 3D spatial coordinates (x; y; z) along with its gene expression level g. This comprehensive description of the embryo development is used to assess the general connection between genetic expression and cell movement. We also investigate genetic expression propagation between a cell and its progeny in the lineage tree. More to the point, this paper focuses on the evolution of the expression pattern of transcriptional factor goosecoid (gsc) through the gastrulation process between 6 and 9 hours post fertilization (hpf). PMID:21096468

  17. Neural and Synaptic Defects in slytherin a Zebrafish Model for Human Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation

    SciTech Connect

    Y Song; J Willer; P Scherer; J Panzer; A Kugath; E Skordalakes; R Gregg; G Willer; R Balice-Gordon

    2011-12-31

    Congenital disorder of glycosylation type IIc (CDG IIc) is characterized by mental retardation, slowed growth and severe immunodeficiency, attributed to the lack of fucosylated glycoproteins. While impaired Notch signaling has been implicated in some aspects of CDG IIc pathogenesis, the molecular and cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. We have identified a zebrafish mutant slytherin (srn), which harbors a missense point mutation in GDP-mannose 4,6 dehydratase (GMDS), the rate-limiting enzyme in protein fucosylation, including that of Notch. Here we report that some of the mechanisms underlying the neural phenotypes in srn and in CGD IIc are Notch-dependent, while others are Notch-independent. We show, for the first time in a vertebrate in vivo, that defects in protein fucosylation leads to defects in neuronal differentiation, maintenance, axon branching, and synapse formation. Srn is thus a useful and important vertebrate model for human CDG IIc that has provided new insights into the neural phenotypes that are hallmarks of the human disorder and has also highlighted the role of protein fucosylation in neural development.

  18. Neural and Synaptic Defects in slytherin, a Zebrafish Model for Human Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yuanquan; Willer, Jason R.; Scherer, Paul C.; Panzer, Jessica A.; Kugath, Amy; Skordalakes, Emmanuel; Gregg, Ronald G.; Willer, Gregory B.; Balice-Gordon, Rita J.

    2010-01-01

    Congenital disorder of glycosylation type IIc (CDG IIc) is characterized by mental retardation, slowed growth and severe immunodeficiency, attributed to the lack of fucosylated glycoproteins. While impaired Notch signaling has been implicated in some aspects of CDG IIc pathogenesis, the molecular and cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. We have identified a zebrafish mutant slytherin (srn), which harbors a missense point mutation in GDP-mannose 4,6 dehydratase (GMDS), the rate-limiting enzyme in protein fucosylation, including that of Notch. Here we report that some of the mechanisms underlying the neural phenotypes in srn and in CGD IIc are Notch-dependent, while others are Notch-independent. We show, for the first time in a vertebrate in vivo, that defects in protein fucosylation leads to defects in neuronal differentiation, maintenance, axon branching, and synapse formation. Srn is thus a useful and important vertebrate model for human CDG IIc that has provided new insights into the neural phenotypes that are hallmarks of the human disorder and has also highlighted the role of protein fucosylation in neural development. PMID:21060795

  19. Microcephaly models in the developing zebrafish retinal neuroepithelium point to an underlying defect in metaphase progression

    PubMed Central

    Novorol, Claire; Burkhardt, Janina; Wood, Kirstin J.; Iqbal, Anila; Roque, Claudio; Coutts, Nicola; Almeida, Alexandra D.; He, Jie; Wilkinson, Christopher J.; Harris, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) is a congenital disorder characterized by significantly reduced brain size and mental retardation. Nine genes are currently known to be associated with the condition, all of which encode centrosomal or spindle pole proteins. MCPH is associated with a reduction in proliferation of neural progenitors during fetal development. The cellular mechanisms underlying the proliferation defect, however, are not fully understood. The zebrafish retinal neuroepithelium provides an ideal system to investigate this question. Mutant or morpholino-mediated knockdown of three known MCPH genes (stil, aspm and wdr62) and a fourth centrosomal gene, odf2, which is linked to several MCPH proteins, results in a marked reduction in head and eye size. Imaging studies reveal a dramatic rise in the fraction of proliferating cells in mitosis in all cases, and time-lapse microscopy points to a failure of progression through prometaphase. There was also increased apoptosis in all the MCPH models but this appears to be secondary to the mitotic defect as we frequently saw mitotically arrested cells disappear, and knocking down p53 apoptosis did not rescue the mitotic phenotype, either in whole retinas or clones. PMID:24153002

  20. Carbon Quantum Dots for Zebrafish Fluorescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yan-Fei; Li, Yu-Hao; Fang, Yang-Wu; Xu, Yang; Wei, Xiao-Mi; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Carbon quantum dots (C-QDs) are becoming a desirable alternative to metal-based QDs and dye probes owing to their high biocompatibility, low toxicity, ease of preparation, and unique photophysical properties. Herein, we describe fluorescence bioimaging of zebrafish using C-QDs as probe in terms of the preparation of C-QDs, zebrafish husbandry, embryo harvesting, and introduction of C-QDs into embryos and larvae by soaking and microinjection. The multicolor of C-QDs was validated with their imaging for zebrafish embryo. The distribution of C-QDs in zebrafish embryos and larvae were successfully observed from their fluorescence emission. the bio-toxicity of C-QDs was tested with zebrafish as model and C-QDs do not interfere to the development of zebrafish embryo. All of the results confirmed the high biocompatibility and low toxicity of C-QDs as imaging probe. The absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion route (ADME) of C-QDs in zebrafish was revealed by their distribution. Our work provides the useful information for the researchers interested in studying with zebrafish as a model and the applications of C-QDs. The operations related zebrafish are suitable for the study of the toxicity, adverse effects, transport, and biocompatibility of nanomaterials as well as for drug screening with zebrafish as model. PMID:26135470

  1. Carbon Quantum Dots for Zebrafish Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yan-Fei; Li, Yu-Hao; Fang, Yang-Wu; Xu, Yang; Wei, Xiao-Mi; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Carbon quantum dots (C-QDs) are becoming a desirable alternative to metal-based QDs and dye probes owing to their high biocompatibility, low toxicity, ease of preparation, and unique photophysical properties. Herein, we describe fluorescence bioimaging of zebrafish using C-QDs as probe in terms of the preparation of C-QDs, zebrafish husbandry, embryo harvesting, and introduction of C-QDs into embryos and larvae by soaking and microinjection. The multicolor of C-QDs was validated with their imaging for zebrafish embryo. The distribution of C-QDs in zebrafish embryos and larvae were successfully observed from their fluorescence emission. the bio-toxicity of C-QDs was tested with zebrafish as model and C-QDs do not interfere to the development of zebrafish embryo. All of the results confirmed the high biocompatibility and low toxicity of C-QDs as imaging probe. The absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion route (ADME) of C-QDs in zebrafish was revealed by their distribution. Our work provides the useful information for the researchers interested in studying with zebrafish as a model and the applications of C-QDs. The operations related zebrafish are suitable for the study of the toxicity, adverse effects, transport, and biocompatibility of nanomaterials as well as for drug screening with zebrafish as model. PMID:26135470

  2. Carbon Quantum Dots for Zebrafish Fluorescence Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yan-Fei; Li, Yu-Hao; Fang, Yang-Wu; Xu, Yang; Wei, Xiao-Mi; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2015-07-01

    Carbon quantum dots (C-QDs) are becoming a desirable alternative to metal-based QDs and dye probes owing to their high biocompatibility, low toxicity, ease of preparation, and unique photophysical properties. Herein, we describe fluorescence bioimaging of zebrafish using C-QDs as probe in terms of the preparation of C-QDs, zebrafish husbandry, embryo harvesting, and introduction of C-QDs into embryos and larvae by soaking and microinjection. The multicolor of C-QDs was validated with their imaging for zebrafish embryo. The distribution of C-QDs in zebrafish embryos and larvae were successfully observed from their fluorescence emission. the bio-toxicity of C-QDs was tested with zebrafish as model and C-QDs do not interfere to the development of zebrafish embryo. All of the results confirmed the high biocompatibility and low toxicity of C-QDs as imaging probe. The absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion route (ADME) of C-QDs in zebrafish was revealed by their distribution. Our work provides the useful information for the researchers interested in studying with zebrafish as a model and the applications of C-QDs. The operations related zebrafish are suitable for the study of the toxicity, adverse effects, transport, and biocompatibility of nanomaterials as well as for drug screening with zebrafish as model.

  3. Changes in the dielectric properties of medaka fish embryos during development, studied by electrorotation.

    PubMed

    Shirakashi, Ryo; Mischke, Miriam; Fischer, Peter; Memmel, Simon; Krohne, Georg; Fuhr, Günter R; Zimmermann, Heiko; Sukhorukov, Vladimir L

    2012-11-01

    The Japanese medaka fish, Oryzias latipes, has become a powerful vertebrate model organism in developmental biology and genetics. The present study explores the dielectric properties of medaka embryos during pre-hatching development by means of the electrorotation (ROT) technique. Due to their layered structure, medaka eggs exhibited up to three ROT peaks in the kHz-MHz frequency range. During development from blastula to early somite stage, ROT spectra varied only slightly. But as the embryo progressed to the late-somite stage, the ROT peaks underwent significant changes in frequency and amplitude. Using morphological data obtained by light and electron microscopy, we analyzed the ROT spectra with a three-shell dielectric model that accounted for the major embryonic compartments. The analysis yielded a very high value for the ionic conductivity of the egg shell (chorion), which was confirmed by independent osmotic experiments. A relatively low capacitance of the yolk envelope was consistent with its double-membrane structure revealed by transmission electron microscopy. Yolk-free dead eggs exhibited only one co-field ROT peak, shifted markedly to lower frequencies with respect to the corresponding peak of live embryos. The dielectric data may be useful for monitoring the development and changes in fish embryos' viability/conditions in basic research and industrial aquaculture. PMID:23063978

  4. Live Imaging of Host-Parasite Interactions in a Zebrafish Infection Model Reveals Cryptococcal Determinants of Virulence and Central Nervous System Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Tenor, Jennifer L.; Oehlers, Stefan H.; Yang, Jialu L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans is capable of infecting a broad range of hosts, from invertebrates like amoebas and nematodes to standard vertebrate models such as mice and rabbits. Here we have taken advantage of a zebrafish model to investigate host-pathogen interactions of Cryptococcus with the zebrafish innate immune system, which shares a highly conserved framework with that of mammals. Through live-imaging observations and genetic knockdown, we establish that macrophages are the primary immune cells responsible for responding to and containing acute cryptococcal infections. By interrogating survival and cryptococcal burden following infection with a panel of Cryptococcus mutants, we find that virulence factors initially identified as important in causing disease in mice are also necessary for pathogenesis in zebrafish larvae. Live imaging of the cranial blood vessels of infected larvae reveals that C. neoformans is able to penetrate the zebrafish brain following intravenous infection. By studying a C. neoformans FNX1 gene mutant, we find that blood-brain barrier invasion is dependent on a known cryptococcal invasion-promoting pathway previously identified in a murine model of central nervous system invasion. The zebrafish-C. neoformans platform provides a visually and genetically accessible vertebrate model system for cryptococcal pathogenesis with many of the advantages of small invertebrates. This model is well suited for higher-throughput screening of mutants, mechanistic dissection of cryptococcal pathogenesis in live animals, and use in the evaluation of therapeutic agents. PMID:26419880

  5. Novel Vitamin K analogues suppress seizures in zebrafish and mouse models of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Rahn, Jennifer J.; Bestman, Jennifer E.; Josey, Benjamin J.; Inks, Elizabeth S.; Stackley, Krista D.; Rogers, Carolyn E.; Chou, C. James; Chan, Sherine S. L.

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is a debilitating disease affecting 1-2% of the world’s population. Despite this high prevalence, 30% of patients suffering from epilepsy are not successfully managed by current medication suggesting a critical need for new anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). In an effort to discover new therapeutics for the management of epilepsy, we began our study by screening drugs that, like some currently used AEDs, inhibit HDACs using a well-established larval zebrafish model. In this model, 7-day post fertilization (dpf) larvae are treated with the widely used seizure-inducing compound pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) which stimulates a rapid increase in swimming behavior previously determined to be a measurable manifestation of seizures. In our first screen, we tested a number of different HDAC inhibitors and found that one, NQN1, significantly decreased swim activity to levels equal to that of VPA. We continued to screen structurally related compounds including Vitamin K3 (VK3) and a number of novel Vitamin K (VK) analogues. We found that VK3 was a robust inhibitor of the PTZ-induced swim activity, as were several of our novel compounds. Three of these compounds were subsequently tested on mouse seizure models at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Anticonvulsant Screening Program. Compound 2h reduced seizures particularly well in the minimal clonic seizure (6 Hz) and corneal kindled mouse models of epilepsy, with no observable toxicity. As VK3 affects mitochondrial function, we tested the effects of our compounds on mitochondrial respiration and ATP production in a mouse hippocampal cell line. We demonstrate that these compounds affect ATP metabolism and increase total cellular ATP. Our data indicate the potential utility of these and other VK analogues for prevention of seizures and suggest the potential mechanism for this protection may lie in the ability of these compounds to affect energy production. PMID:24291671

  6. Host immune response and acute disease in a zebrafish model of francisella pathogenesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vojtech, L.N.; Sanders, G.E.; Conway, C.; Ostland, V.; Hansen, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    Members of the bacterial genus Francisella are highly virulent and infectious pathogens. New models to study Francisella pathogenesis in evolutionarily distinct species are needed to provide comparative insight, as the mechanisms of host resistance and pathogen virulence are not well understood. We took advantage of the recent discovery of a novel species of Francisella to establish a zebrafish/Francisella comparative model of pathogenesis and host immune response. Adult zebraflsh were susceptible to acute Francisella-induced disease and suffered mortality in a dose-dependent manner. Using immunohistochemical analysis, we localized bacterial antigens primarily to lymphoid tissues and livers of zebraflsh following infection by intraperitoneal injection, which corresponded to regions of local cellular necrosis. Francisella sp. bacteria replicated rapidly in these tissues beginning 12 h postinfection, and bacterial titers rose steadily, leveled off, and then decreased by 7 days postinfection. Zebraflsh mounted a significant tissue-specific proinflammatory response to infection as measured by the upregulation of interleukin-l?? (IL-1??), gamma interferon, and tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA beginning by 6 h postinfection and persisting for up to 7 days postinfection. In addition, exposure of zebraflsh to heat-killed bacteria demonstrated that the significant induction of IL-?? was highly specific to live bacteria. Taken together, the pathology and immune response to acute Francisella infection in zebraflsh share many features with those in mammals, highlighting the usefulness of this new model system for addressing both general and specific questions about Francisella host-pathogen interactions via an evolutionary approach. Copyright ?? 2009, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Zebrafish orthologs of human muscular dystrophy genes

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Leta S; Guyon, Jeffrey R; Vogel, Emily D; Beltre, Rosanna; Pusack, Timothy J; Zhou, Yi; Zon, Leonard I; Kunkel, Louis M

    2007-01-01

    Background Human muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders which cause decreased muscle strength and often result in premature death. There is no known cure for muscular dystrophy, nor have all causative genes been identified. Recent work in the small vertebrate zebrafish Danio rerio suggests that mutation or misregulation of zebrafish dystrophy orthologs can also cause muscular degeneration phenotypes in fish. To aid in the identification of new causative genes, this study identifies and maps zebrafish orthologs for all known human muscular dystrophy genes. Results Zebrafish sequence databases were queried for transcripts orthologous to human dystrophy-causing genes, identifying transcripts for 28 out of 29 genes of interest. In addition, the genomic locations of all 29 genes have been found, allowing rapid candidate gene discovery during genetic mapping of zebrafish dystrophy mutants. 19 genes show conservation of syntenic relationships with humans and at least two genes appear to be duplicated in zebrafish. Significant sequence coverage on one or more BAC clone(s) was also identified for 24 of the genes to provide better local sequence information and easy updating of genomic locations as the zebrafish genome assembly continues to evolve. Conclusion This resource supports zebrafish as a dystrophy model, suggesting maintenance of all known dystrophy-associated genes in the zebrafish genome. Coupled with the ability to conduct genetic screens and small molecule screens, zebrafish are thus an attractive model organism for isolating new dystrophy-causing genes/pathways and for use in high-throughput therapeutic discovery. PMID:17374169

  8. In vivo visual reporter system for detection of estrogen-like substances by transgenic medaka.

    PubMed

    Kurauchi, Kanta; Nakaguchi, Yoshitsugu; Tsutsumi, Makiko; Hori, Hirosi; Kurihara, Ryo; Hashimoto, Shinya; Ohnuma, Ryoko; Yamamoto, Yoshikazu; Matsuoka, Sumiko; Kawai, Shin'Ichiro; Hirata, Takashi; Kinoshita, Masato

    2005-04-15

    Detection of endocrine disrupting chemicals, in particular, environmental estrogens with living organisms, has many advantages if compared to chemical analysis. The screening of novel pollutants with meaningful endpoints, the integration of uptake, bioconcentration, and excretion as well as the evaluation of endocrine disrupting effects with respect to toxicity require in vivo biotests for estrogen-like substances (ELSs). Critical disadvantages of whole organism biotests are their low sensitivity and the need for laborious and time-consuming work. To overcome these problems, we have developed a transgenic medaka strain harboring the green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene driven by choriogenin H gene regulatory elements. Choriogenin H is an egg envelope protein induced by estrogens in the liver. With yolk sac larvae of this strain, GFP induction in liver was observed 24 h after onset of aqueous exposure to 0.63 nM 17beta-estradiol (E2), 0.34 nM ethynylestradiol, or 14.8 nM estrone. Furthermore, concentrated sewage treatment effluent induced GFP expression. Comparison of E2 equivalents estimated by GFP-induction in transgenic medaka, a YES assay, and GC/MS showed detection limits in the same order of magnitude. These results indicated that the sensitivity of the transgenic medaka strain was sufficient for application as an alternative model in monitoring environmental water samples for ELSs. PMID:15884374

  9. Arginine vasotocin neuronal development and its projection in the adult brain of the medaka.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Nao; Honda, Akira; Zenno, Akiko; Omoto, Ryosuke; Imanaka, Saya; Takehana, Yusuke; Naruse, Kiyoshi

    2016-02-01

    The neurohypophysial peptide arginine vasotocin (AVT) and its mammalian ortholog arginine vasopressin function in a wide range of physiological and behavioral events. Here, we generated a new line of transgenic medaka (Oryzias latipes), which allowed us to monitor AVT neurons by enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and demonstrate AVT neuronal development in the embryo and the projection of AVT neurons in the adult brain of avt-egfp transgenic medaka. The onset of AVT expression manifested at 2 days postfertilization (dpf) as a pair of signals in the telencephalon of the brain. The telencephalic AVT neurons migrated and converged on the preoptic area (POA) by 4dpf. At the same stage, another onset of AVT expression manifested in the central optic tectum (OT), and they migrated to the ventral part of the hypothalamus (VH) by 6dpf. In the adult brain, the AVT somata with EGFP signals existed in the gigantocellular POA (gPOA), magnocellular POA (mPOA), and parvocellular POA (pPOA) and in the VH. Whereas the major projection of AVT fibers was found from the pPOA and VH to the posterior pituitary, it was also found that AVT neurons in the three POAs send their fibers into wide regions of the brain such as the telencephalon, mesencephalon and diencephalon. This study suggests that the avt-egfp transgenic medaka is a useful model to explore AVT neuronal development and function. PMID:26739197

  10. [{sup 3}H]-2,3,7,8-TCDD uptake and elimination kinetics of medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    SciTech Connect

    Schmieder, P.; Lothenbach, D.; Tietge, J.; Erickson, R.; Johnson, R.

    1995-10-01

    Uptake and elimination rate constants for [{sup 3}H]-2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin ([{sup 3}H]TCDD) were estimated by exposing medaka (Oryzias latipes) to [{sup 3}H]TCDD in flowing water with no solvent carriers. Uptake was determined from body-burdens measured on exposure days 0, 2, 4, 6, 10, and 12. Elimination was quantified for whole fish after 28, 90, and 175 d in uncontaminated water. Medaka accumulated [{sup 3}H]TCDD at a rapid rate, achieving residues 24,000 times the water concentration after 12 d, with no indication of approach to steady state. After 6 months in uncontaminated water, the pg TCDD/g decreased by 69%, much of the decrease due to growth dilution as evidenced by only a 47% decrease in the pg TCDD/fish. Uptake and elimination rate constant (2,300 ml/g/d and 0.0045/d, respectively) were estimated by fitting a one-compartment, linear, mass-balance model to the data, adjusting for growth rate. The experimental design, including solvent-free delivery of [{sup 3}H]TCDD, exposure at concentrations below maximum water solubility, and measurement of fish growth and lipid content during a 6-month elimination phase, resulted in a predicted steady-state bioconcentration factor (BCF) for medaka of 510,000, a number considerably higher than previously reported for dioxin BCFs. Kinetic parameters were used to successfully predict TCDD BCF in medaka exposed independently.

  11. Studying rod photoreceptor development in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Morris, A.C.; Fadool, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The zebrafish has rapidly become a favored model vertebrate organism, well suited for studies of developmental processes using large-scale genetic screens. In particular, zebrafish morphological and behavioral genetic screens have led to the identification of genes important for development of the retinal photoreceptors. This may help clarify the genetic mechanisms underlying human photoreceptor development and dysfunction in retinal diseases. In this review, we present the advantages of zebrafish as a vertebrate model organism, summarize retinal and photoreceptor cell development in zebrafish, with emphasis on the rod photoreceptors, and describe zebrafish visual behaviors that can be used for genetic screens. We then describe some of the photoreceptor cell mutants that have been isolated in morphological and behavioral screens and discuss the limitations of current screening methods for uncovering mutations that specifically affect rod function. Finally, we present some alternative strategies to target the rod developmental pathway in zebrafish. PMID:16199068

  12. Zebrafish neurobehavioral phenomics for aquatic neuropharmacology and toxicology research.

    PubMed

    Kalueff, Allan V; Echevarria, David J; Homechaudhuri, Sumit; Stewart, Adam Michael; Collier, Adam D; Kaluyeva, Aleksandra A; Li, Shaomin; Liu, Yingcong; Chen, Peirong; Wang, JiaJia; Yang, Lei; Mitra, Anisa; Pal, Subharthi; Chaudhuri, Adwitiya; Roy, Anwesha; Biswas, Missidona; Roy, Dola; Podder, Anupam; Poudel, Manoj K; Katare, Deepshikha P; Mani, Ruchi J; Kyzar, Evan J; Gaikwad, Siddharth; Nguyen, Michael; Song, Cai

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are rapidly emerging as an important model organism for aquatic neuropharmacology and toxicology research. The behavioral/phenotypic complexity of zebrafish allows for thorough dissection of complex human brain disorders and drug-evoked pathological states. As numerous zebrafish models become available with a wide spectrum of behavioral, genetic, and environmental methods to test novel drugs, here we discuss recent zebrafish phenomics methods to facilitate drug discovery, particularly in the field of biological psychiatry. Additionally, behavioral, neurological, and endocrine endpoints are becoming increasingly well-characterized in zebrafish, making them an inexpensive, robust and effective model for toxicology research and pharmacological screening. We also discuss zebrafish behavioral phenotypes, experimental considerations, pharmacological candidates and relevance of zebrafish neurophenomics to other 'omics' (e.g., genomic, proteomic) approaches. Finally, we critically evaluate the limitations of utilizing this model organism, and outline future strategies of research in the field of zebrafish phenomics. PMID:26372090

  13. l-leucine partially rescues translational and developmental defects associated with zebrafish models of Cornelia de Lange syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Baoshan; Sowa, Nenja; Cardenas, Maria E.; Gerton, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Cohesinopathies are human genetic disorders that include Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) and Roberts syndrome (RBS) and are characterized by defects in limb and craniofacial development as well as mental retardation. The developmental phenotypes of CdLS and other cohesinopathies suggest that mutations in the structure and regulation of the cohesin complex during embryogenesis interfere with gene regulation. In a previous project, we showed that RBS was associated with highly fragmented nucleoli and defects in both ribosome biogenesis and protein translation. l-leucine stimulation of the mTOR pathway partially rescued translation in human RBS cells and development in zebrafish models of RBS. In this study, we investigate protein translation in zebrafish models of CdLS. Our results show that phosphorylation of RPS6 as well as 4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1) was reduced in nipbla/b, rad21 and smc3-morphant embryos, a pattern indicating reduced translation. Moreover, protein biosynthesis and rRNA production were decreased in the cohesin morphant embryo cells. l-leucine partly rescued protein synthesis and rRNA production in the cohesin morphants and partially restored phosphorylation of RPS6 and 4EBP1. Concomitantly, l-leucine treatment partially improved cohesinopathy embryo development including the formation of craniofacial cartilage. Interestingly, we observed that alpha-ketoisocaproate (α-KIC), which is a keto derivative of leucine, also partially rescued the development of rad21 and nipbla/b morphants by boosting mTOR-dependent translation. In summary, our results suggest that cohesinopathies are caused in part by defective protein synthesis, and stimulation of the mTOR pathway through l-leucine or its metabolite α-KIC can partially rescue development in zebrafish models for CdLS. PMID:25378554

  14. L-leucine partially rescues translational and developmental defects associated with zebrafish models of Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xu, Baoshan; Sowa, Nenja; Cardenas, Maria E; Gerton, Jennifer L

    2015-03-15

    Cohesinopathies are human genetic disorders that include Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) and Roberts syndrome (RBS) and are characterized by defects in limb and craniofacial development as well as mental retardation. The developmental phenotypes of CdLS and other cohesinopathies suggest that mutations in the structure and regulation of the cohesin complex during embryogenesis interfere with gene regulation. In a previous project, we showed that RBS was associated with highly fragmented nucleoli and defects in both ribosome biogenesis and protein translation. l-leucine stimulation of the mTOR pathway partially rescued translation in human RBS cells and development in zebrafish models of RBS. In this study, we investigate protein translation in zebrafish models of CdLS. Our results show that phosphorylation of RPS6 as well as 4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1) was reduced in nipbla/b, rad21 and smc3-morphant embryos, a pattern indicating reduced translation. Moreover, protein biosynthesis and rRNA production were decreased in the cohesin morphant embryo cells. l-leucine partly rescued protein synthesis and rRNA production in the cohesin morphants and partially restored phosphorylation of RPS6 and 4EBP1. Concomitantly, l-leucine treatment partially improved cohesinopathy embryo development including the formation of craniofacial cartilage. Interestingly, we observed that alpha-ketoisocaproate (α-KIC), which is a keto derivative of leucine, also partially rescued the development of rad21 and nipbla/b morphants by boosting mTOR-dependent translation. In summary, our results suggest that cohesinopathies are caused in part by defective protein synthesis, and stimulation of the mTOR pathway through l-leucine or its metabolite α-KIC can partially rescue development in zebrafish models for CdLS. PMID:25378554

  15. Zebrafish as a Model for Systems Medicine R&D: Rethinking the Metabolic Effects of Carrier Solvents and Culture Buffers Determined by (1)H NMR Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Muhammad T; Mushtaq, Mian Y; Verpoorte, Robert; Richardson, Michael K; Choi, Young H

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish is a frequently employed model organism in systems medicine and biomarker discovery. A crosscutting fundamental question, and one that has been overlooked in the field, is the "system-wide" (omics) effects induced in zebrafish by metabolic solvents and culture buffers. Indeed, any bioactivity or toxicity test requires that the target compounds are dissolved in an appropriate nonpolar solvent or aqueous media. It is important to know whether the solvent or the buffer itself has an effect on the zebrafish model organism. We evaluated the effects of two organic carrier solvents used in research with zebrafish, as well as in drug screening: dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and ethanol, and two commonly used aqueous buffers (egg water and Hank's balanced salt solution). The effects of three concentrations (0.01, 0.1, and 1%) of DMSO and ethanol were tested in the 5-day-old zebrafish embryo using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) based metabolomics. DMSO (1% and 0.1%, but not 0.01%) exposure significantly decreased the levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), betaine, alanine, histidine, lactate, acetate, and creatine (p < 0.05). By contrast, ethanol exposure did not alter the embryos' metabolome at any concentration tested. The two different aqueous media noted above impacted the zebrafish embryo metabolome as evidenced by changes in valine, alanine, lactate, acetate, betaine, glycine, glutamate, adenosine triphosphate, and histidine. These results show that DMSO has greater effects on the embryo metabolome than ethanol, and thus is used with caution as a carrier solvent in zebrafish biomarker research and oral medicine. Moreover, the DMSO concentration should not be higher than 0.01%. Careful attention is also warranted for the use of the buffers egg water and Hank's balanced salt solution in zebrafish. In conclusion, as zebrafish is widely used as a model organism in life sciences, metabolome changes induced by solvents and culture buffers warrant further

  16. Construction of a Linkage Map of the Medaka (Oryzias latipes) and Mapping of the Da Mutant Locus Defective in Dorsoventral Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuka, Masato; Makino, Satoshi; Yoda, Kinya; Wada, Hironori; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Mitani, Hiroshi; Shima, Akihiro; Ozato, Kenjiro; Kimura, Minoru; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    1999-01-01

    Double anal fin (Da) is a medaka with an autosomal semidominant mutation that causes mirror image duplication of the ventral region concentrating on the caudal region. The chromosomal location of the Da gene and its sequence have remained unknown. We constructed a medaka linkage map as a first step to approach positional cloning of the gene. The segregation analysis was performed on the basis of genetic recombination during female meiosis using 134 random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers, 13 sequence-tagged sites (STSs), 15 polymorphic sequences from known genes, and the Da gene. One hundred forty-six markers from the above markers segregated into 26 linkage groups. The size of the genome was estimated to be 1776 cM in length. We identified four syntenic regions between medaka and zebrafish (and human) by mapping the known genes and found one of them to be located in close proximity to the Da gene. By mapping the region surrounding the Da gene in high resolution, two markers were detected flanking the Da gene at 0.32 and 0.80 cM. The detected markers providing a vital clue to initiate chromosome walking will lead us to the definite location of the Da gene. PMID:10613850

  17. Anatomical features for the adequate choice of experimental animal models in biomedicine: I. Fishes.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Livia; Lossi, Laura; Merighi, Adalberto; de Girolamo, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    Fish constitute the oldest and most diverse class of vertebrates, and are widely used in basic research due to a number of advantages (e.g., rapid development ex-utero, large-scale genetic screening of human disease). They represent excellent experimental models for addressing studies on development, morphology, physiology and behavior function in other related species, as well as informative analysis of conservation and diversity. Although less complex, fish share many anatomical and physiological features with mammals, including humans, which make them an important complement to research in mammalian models. In this review we describe and compare the most relevant anatomical features of the most used teleostean species in research, to be taken into consideration when selecting an animal model: zebrafish (Danio rerio), medaka (Oryzias latypes), the turquoise killifish (Nothobranchius furzeri), and goldfish (Carassius auratus). Zebrafish and medaka are the mainstream models for genetic manipulability and studies on developmental biology; the turquoise killifish is an excellent model for aging research; goldfish has been largely employed for neuroendocrine studies. PMID:26925824

  18. Thrombin Generation in Zebrafish Blood

    PubMed Central

    Hemker, Coenraad; Lindhout, Theo; Kelchtermans, Hilde; de Laat, Bas

    2016-01-01

    To better understand hypercoagulability as an underlying cause for thrombosis, the leading cause of death in the Western world, new assays to study ex vivo coagulation are essential. The zebrafish is generally accepted as a good model for human hemostasis and thrombosis, as the hemostatic system proved to be similar to that in man. Their small size however, has been a hurdle for more widespread use in hemostasis related research. In this study we developed a method that enables the measurement of thrombin generation in a single drop of non-anticoagulated zebrafish blood. Pre-treatment of the fish with inhibitors of FXa and thrombin, resulted in a dose dependent diminishing of thrombin generation, demonstrating the validity of the assay. In order to establish the relationship between whole blood thrombin generation and fibrin formation, we visualized the resulting fibrin network by scanning electron microscopy. Taken together, in this study we developed a fast and reliable method to measure thrombin generation in whole blood collected from a single zebrafish. Given the similarities between coagulation pathways of zebrafish and mammals, zebrafish may be an ideal animal model to determine the effect of novel therapeutics on thrombin generation. Additionally, because of the ease with which gene functions can be silenced, zebrafish may serve as a model organism for mechanistical research in thrombosis and hemostasis. PMID:26872266

  19. A genetic screen in zebrafish identifies the mutants vps18, nf2 and foie gras as models of liver disease.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Kirsten C; Amsterdam, Adam; Soroka, Carol; Boyer, James; Hopkins, Nancy

    2005-08-01

    Hepatomegaly is a sign of many liver disorders. To identify zebrafish mutants to serve as models for hepatic pathologies, we screened for hepatomegaly at day 5 of embryogenesis in 297 zebrafish lines bearing mutations in genes that are essential for embryonic development. Seven mutants were identified, and three have phenotypes resembling different liver diseases. Mutation of the class C vacuolar protein sorting gene vps18 results in hepatomegaly associated with large, vesicle-filled hepatocytes, which we attribute to the failure of endosomal-lysosomal trafficking. Additionally, these mutants develop defects in the bile canaliculi and have marked biliary paucity, suggesting that vps18 also functions to traffic vesicles to the hepatocyte apical membrane and may play a role in the development of the intrahepatic biliary tree. Similar findings have been reported for individuals with arthrogryposis-renal dysfunction-cholestasis (ARC) syndrome, which is due to mutation of another class C vps gene. A second mutant, resulting from disruption of the tumor suppressor gene nf2, develops extrahepatic choledochal cysts in the common bile duct, suggesting that this gene regulates division of biliary cells during development and that nf2 may play a role in the hyperplastic tendencies observed in biliary cells in individuals with choledochal cysts. The third mutant is in the novel gene foie gras, which develops large, lipid-filled hepatocytes, resembling those in individuals with fatty liver disease. These mutants illustrate the utility of zebrafish as a model for studying liver development and disease, and provide valuable tools for investigating the molecular pathogenesis of congenital biliary disorders and fatty liver disease. PMID:16000385

  20. von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor mutants faithfully model pathological hypoxia-driven angiogenesis and vascular retinopathies in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    van Rooijen, Ellen; Voest, Emile E; Logister, Ive; Bussmann, Jeroen; Korving, Jeroen; van Eeden, Fredericus J; Giles, Rachel H; Schulte-Merker, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Biallelic inactivation of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene predisposes human patients to the development of highly vascularized neoplasms in multiple organ systems. We show that zebrafish vhl mutants display a marked increase in blood vessel formation throughout the embryo, starting at 2 days post-fertilization. The most severe neovascularization is observed in distinct areas that overlap with high vegfa mRNA expression, including the vhl mutant brain and eye. Real-time quantitative PCR revealed increased expression of the duplicated VEGFA orthologs vegfaa and vegfab, and of vegfb and its receptors flt1, kdr and kdr-like, indicating increased vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegf) signaling in vhl mutants. Similar to VHL-associated retinal neoplasms, diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration, we show, by tetramethyl rhodamine-dextran angiography, that vascular abnormalities in the vhl(-/-) retina lead to vascular leakage, severe macular edema and retinal detachment. Significantly, vessels in the brain and eye express cxcr4a, a marker gene expressed by tumor and vascular cells in VHL-associated hemangioblastomas and renal cell carcinomas. VEGF receptor (VEGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibition (through exposure to sunitinib and 676475) blocked vhl(-/-)-induced angiogenesis in all affected tissues, demonstrating that Vegfaa, Vegfab and Vegfb are key effectors of the vhl(-/-) angiogenic phenotype through Flt1, Kdr and Kdr-like signaling. Since we show that the vhl(-/-) angiogenic phenotype shares distinct characteristics with VHL-associated vascular neoplasms, zebrafish vhl mutants provide a valuable in vivo vertebrate model to elucidate underlying mechanisms contributing to the development of these lesions. Furthermore, vhl mutant zebrafish embryos carrying blood vessel-specific transgenes represent a unique and clinically relevant model for tissue-specific, hypoxia-induced pathological angiogenesis and vascular retinopathies. Importantly

  1. Similarly Lethal Strains of Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli Trigger Markedly Diverse Host Responses in a Zebrafish Model of Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Amelia E.; Fleming, Brittany A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In individuals with sepsis, the infecting microbes are commonly viewed as generic inducers of inflammation while the host background is considered the primary variable affecting disease progression and outcome. To study the effects of bacterial strain differences on the maladaptive immune responses that are induced during sepsis, we employed a novel zebrafish embryo infection model using extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) isolates. These genetically diverse pathogens are a leading cause of sepsis and are becoming increasingly dangerous because of the rise of multidrug-resistant strains. Zebrafish infected with ExPEC isolates exhibit many of the pathophysiological features seen in septic human patients, including dysregulated inflammatory responses (cytokine storms), tachycardia, endothelial leakage, and progressive edema. However, only a limited subset of ExPEC isolates can trigger a sepsis-like state and death of the host when introduced into the bloodstream. Mirroring the situation in human patients, antibiotic therapy reduced ExPEC titers and improved host survival rates but was only effective within limited time frames that varied, depending on the infecting pathogen. Intriguingly, we find that phylogenetically distant but similarly lethal ExPEC isolates can stimulate markedly different host transcriptional responses, including disparate levels of inflammatory mediators. These differences correlate with the amounts of bacterial flagellin expression during infection, as well as differential activation of Toll-like receptor 5 by discrete flagellar serotypes. Altogether, this work establishes zebrafish as a relevant model of key aspects of human sepsis and highlights the ability of genetically distinct ExPEC isolates to induce divergent host responses independently of baseline host attributes. IMPORTANCE Sepsis is a life-threatening systemic inflammatory condition that is initiated by the presence of microorganisms in the bloodstream. In

  2. Similarly Lethal Strains of Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli Trigger Markedly Diverse Host Responses in a Zebrafish Model of Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Barber, Amelia E; Fleming, Brittany A; Mulvey, Matthew A

    2016-01-01

    In individuals with sepsis, the infecting microbes are commonly viewed as generic inducers of inflammation while the host background is considered the primary variable affecting disease progression and outcome. To study the effects of bacterial strain differences on the maladaptive immune responses that are induced during sepsis, we employed a novel zebrafish embryo infection model using extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) isolates. These genetically diverse pathogens are a leading cause of sepsis and are becoming increasingly dangerous because of the rise of multidrug-resistant strains. Zebrafish infected with ExPEC isolates exhibit many of the pathophysiological features seen in septic human patients, including dysregulated inflammatory responses (cytokine storms), tachycardia, endothelial leakage, and progressive edema. However, only a limited subset of ExPEC isolates can trigger a sepsis-like state and death of the host when introduced into the bloodstream. Mirroring the situation in human patients, antibiotic therapy reduced ExPEC titers and improved host survival rates but was only effective within limited time frames that varied, depending on the infecting pathogen. Intriguingly, we find that phylogenetically distant but similarly lethal ExPEC isolates can stimulate markedly different host transcriptional responses, including disparate levels of inflammatory mediators. These differences correlate with the amounts of bacterial flagellin expression during infection, as well as differential activation of Toll-like receptor 5 by discrete flagellar serotypes. Altogether, this work establishes zebrafish as a relevant model of key aspects of human sepsis and highlights the ability of genetically distinct ExPEC isolates to induce divergent host responses independently of baseline host attributes. IMPORTANCE Sepsis is a life-threatening systemic inflammatory condition that is initiated by the presence of microorganisms in the bloodstream. In the

  3. Chemical screening with zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hanbing; Lin, Shuo

    2011-01-01

    Functional chemicals are very useful tools for molecular biology studies. Due to its small size, large progeny clutch, and embryonic transparency, zebrafish serves as a superb in vivo animal model for chemical compound screens and characterization. During zebrafish embryogenesis, multiple developmental phenotypes can be easily examined under the microscope, therefore allowing a more comprehensive evaluation for identifying novel functional chemicals than cell-based assays. Ever since the first zebrafish-based chemical screen was conducted in the year 2000, many functional chemicals have been discovered using this strategy. In this chapter, we describe how to perform a typical zebrafish-based chemical screen and discuss the details of the protocol by using the example of the identification and characterization of two new Smo inhibitors with a Gli:GFP transgenic line. PMID:21318908

  4. PROLIFERATIVE LESIONS IN SWIMBLADDER OF JAPANESE MEDAKA ORYZIAS LATIPES AND GUPPY POECILIA RETICULATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thirteen cases of proliferative lesions of the swimbladder were encountered in Japanese medaka Oryzias latipes and guppy Poecilia reticulata from about 10,000 medaka and 5,000 guppies used in carcinogenicity tests and histologically examined. Two of the four cases from medaka and...

  5. Viral Diseases in Zebrafish: What Is Known and Unknown

    PubMed Central

    Crim, Marcus J.; Riley, Lela K.

    2013-01-01

    Naturally occurring viral infections have the potential to introduce confounding variability that leads to invalid and misinterpreted data. Whereas the viral diseases of research rodents are well characterized and closely monitored, no naturally occurring viral infections have been characterized for the laboratory zebrafish (Danio rerio), an increasingly important biomedical research model. Despite the ignorance about naturally occurring zebrafish viruses, zebrafish models are rapidly expanding in areas of biomedical research where the confounding effects of unknown infectious agents present a serious concern. In addition, many zebrafish research colonies remain linked to the ornamental (pet) zebrafish trade, which can contribute to the introduction of new pathogens into research colonies, whereas mice used for research are purpose bred, with no introduction of new mice from the pet industry. Identification, characterization, and monitoring of naturally occurring viruses in zebrafish are crucial to the improvement of zebrafish health, the reduction of unwanted variability, and the continued development of the zebrafish as a model organism. This article addresses the importance of identifying and characterizing the viral diseases of zebrafish as the scope of zebrafish models expands into new research areas and also briefly addresses zebrafish susceptibility to experimental viral infection and the utility of the zebrafish as an infection and immunology model. PMID:23382345

  6. Potential of zebrafish as a model for exploring the role of the amygdala in emotional memory and motivational behavior.

    PubMed

    Perathoner, Simon; Cordero-Maldonado, Maria Lorena; Crawford, Alexander D

    2016-06-01

    Emotion is a key aspect of behavior, enabling humans and animals to assign either positive or negative values to sensory inputs and thereby to make appropriate decisions. Classical experiments in mammalian models, mainly in primates and rodents, have shown that the amygdala is essential for appetitive and aversive associative processing and that dysfunction of this brain region leads to various psychiatric conditions, including depression, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, phobias, autism, and posttraumatic stress disorder. In the past 2 decades, the zebrafish (Danio rerio; Cyprinidae) has emerged as a versatile, reliable vertebrate model organism for the in vivo study of development, gene function, and numerous aspects of human pathologies. Small size, high fecundity, rapid external development, transparency, genetic tractability, and high genetic and physiologic homology with humans are among the factors that have contributed to the success with this small fish in different biomedical research areas. Recent findings indicate that, despite the anatomical differences in the brain structure of teleosts and tetrapods, fish possess a structure homologous to the mammalian amygdala, a hypothesis that is supported by the expression of molecular markers, analyses of neuronal projections in different brain areas, and behavioral studies. This Review summarizes this evidence and highlights a number of relevant bioassays in zebrafish to study emotional memory and motivational behavior. PMID:26833658

  7. Epigenetic therapy restores normal hematopoiesis in a zebrafish model of NUP98-HOXA9-induced myeloid disease.

    PubMed

    Deveau, A P; Forrester, A M; Coombs, A J; Wagner, G S; Grabher, C; Chute, I C; Léger, D; Mingay, M; Alexe, G; Rajan, V; Liwski, R; Hirst, M; Steigmaier, K; Lewis, S M; Look, A T; Berman, J N

    2015-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) occurs when multiple genetic aberrations alter white blood cell development, leading to hyperproliferation and arrest of cell differentiation. Pertinent animal models link in vitro studies with the use of new agents in clinical trials. We generated a transgenic zebrafish expressing human NUP98-HOXA9 (NHA9), a fusion oncogene found in high-risk AML. Embryos developed a preleukemic state with anemia and myeloid cell expansion, and adult fish developed a myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). We leveraged this model to show that NHA9 increases the number of hematopoietic stem cells, and that oncogenic function of NHA9 depends on downstream activation of meis1, the PTGS/COX pathway and genome hypermethylation through the DNA methyltransferase, dnmt1. We restored normal hematopoiesis in NHA9 embryos with knockdown of meis1 or dnmt1, as well as pharmacologic treatment with DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitors or cyclo-oxygenase (COX) inhibitors. DNMT inhibitors reduced genome methylation to near normal levels. Strikingly, we discovered synergy when we combined sub-monotherapeutic doses of a histone deacetylase inhibitor plus either a DNMT inhibitor or COX inhibitor to block the effects of NHA9 on zebrafish blood development. Our work proposes novel drug targets in NHA9-induced myeloid disease, and suggests rational therapies by combining minimal doses of known bioactive compounds. PMID:26017032

  8. Zebrafish as a model system for characterization of nanoparticles against cancer.

    PubMed

    Evensen, Lasse; Johansen, Patrick L; Koster, Gerbrand; Zhu, Kaizheng; Herfindal, Lars; Speth, Martin; Fenaroli, Federico; Hildahl, Jon; Bagherifam, Shahla; Tulotta, Claudia; Prasmickaite, Lina; Mælandsmo, Gunhild M; Snaar-Jagalska, Ewa; Griffiths, Gareth

    2016-01-14

    Therapeutic nanoparticles (NPs) have great potential to deliver drugs against human diseases. Encapsulation of drugs in NPs protects them from being metabolized, while they are delivered specifically to a target site, thereby reducing toxicity and other side-effects. However, non-specific tissue accumulation of NPs, for example in macrophages, especially in the spleen and liver is a general problem with many NPs being developed for cancer therapy. To address the problem of non-specific tissue accumulation of NPs we describe the development of the zebrafish embryo as a transparent vertebrate system for characterization of NPs against cancer. We show that injection of human cancer cells results in tumor-like structures, and that subsequently injected fluorescent NPs, either made of polystyrene or liposomes can be imaged in real-time. NP biodistribution and general in vivo properties can be easily monitored in embryos having selective fluorescent labeling of specific tissues. We demonstrate in vitro, by using optical tweezer micromanipulation, microscopy and flow cytometry that polyethylene glycol (PEG) coating of NPs decreases the level of adhesion of NPs to macrophages, and also to cancer cells. In vivo in zebrafish embryos, PEG coating resulted in longer NP circulation times, decreased macrophage uptake, and reduced adhesion to the endothelium. Importantly, liposomes were observed to accumulate passively and selectively in tumor-like structures comprised of human cancer cells. These results show that zebrafish embryo is a powerful system for microscopy-based screening of NPs on the route to preclinical testing. PMID:26648525

  9. A relational-tubular (ReTu) deformable model for vasculature quantification of zebrafish embryo from microangiography image series.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun; Ip, Horace H S; Cheng, Shuk H; Chan, Po K

    2004-09-01

    Embryonic cardiovascular system plays a vital role in embryonic development of human and animal. In this work, we introduce a novel deformable model, which we called Relational-tubular (ReTu) deformable model for segmenting and quantifying the embryonic vasculature of zebrafish embryo from microangiography image series. Particularly, to incorporate additional constraints on the spatial relationships among vessel branches, we introduce a new energy term called relation energy into the model energy function. This energy item acts as a repulsion force between neighboring vessels during the deformation to encourage them to move towards their respective volume data. Using the ReTu deformable model, the deformation process is an iterative two-stage procedure: vascular axis deformation and vascular surface deformation. The efficiency and robustness of this approach are demonstrated by experiments which show that satisfactory quantifications of the vasculature can be obtained after 3-4 iterations. PMID:15294311

  10. Smad6 determines BMP-regulated invasive behaviour of breast cancer cells in a zebrafish xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    de Boeck, Miriam; Cui, Chao; Mulder, Aat A; Jost, Carolina R; Ikeno, Souichi; ten Dijke, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family is known to play critical roles in cancer progression. While the dual role of TGF-β is well described, the function of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) is unclear. In this study, we established the involvement of Smad6, a BMP-specific inhibitory Smad, in breast cancer cell invasion. We show that stable overexpression of Smad6 in breast cancer MCF10A M2 cells inhibits BMP signalling, thereby mitigating BMP6-induced suppression of mesenchymal marker expression. Using a zebrafish xenograft model, we demonstrate that overexpression of Smad6 potentiates invasion of MCF10A M2 cells and enhances the aggressiveness of breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells in vivo, whereas a reversed phenotype is observed after Smad6 knockdown. Interestingly, BMP6 pre-treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells induced cluster formation at the invasive site in the zebrafish. BMP6 also stimulated cluster formation of MDA-MB-231 cells co-cultured on Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells (HMEC)-1 in vitro. Electron microscopy illustrated an induction of cell-cell contact by BMP6. The clinical relevance of our findings is highlighted by a correlation of high Smad6 expression with poor distant metastasis free survival in ER-negative cancer patients. Collectively, our data strongly indicates the involvement of Smad6 and BMP signalling in breast cancer cell invasion in vivo. PMID:27113436

  11. Smad6 determines BMP-regulated invasive behaviour of breast cancer cells in a zebrafish xenograft model.

    PubMed

    de Boeck, Miriam; Cui, Chao; Mulder, Aat A; Jost, Carolina R; Ikeno, Souichi; Ten Dijke, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family is known to play critical roles in cancer progression. While the dual role of TGF-β is well described, the function of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) is unclear. In this study, we established the involvement of Smad6, a BMP-specific inhibitory Smad, in breast cancer cell invasion. We show that stable overexpression of Smad6 in breast cancer MCF10A M2 cells inhibits BMP signalling, thereby mitigating BMP6-induced suppression of mesenchymal marker expression. Using a zebrafish xenograft model, we demonstrate that overexpression of Smad6 potentiates invasion of MCF10A M2 cells and enhances the aggressiveness of breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells in vivo, whereas a reversed phenotype is observed after Smad6 knockdown. Interestingly, BMP6 pre-treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells induced cluster formation at the invasive site in the zebrafish. BMP6 also stimulated cluster formation of MDA-MB-231 cells co-cultured on Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells (HMEC)-1 in vitro. Electron microscopy illustrated an induction of cell-cell contact by BMP6. The clinical relevance of our findings is highlighted by a correlation of high Smad6 expression with poor distant metastasis free survival in ER-negative cancer patients. Collectively, our data strongly indicates the involvement of Smad6 and BMP signalling in breast cancer cell invasion in vivo. PMID:27113436

  12. Teratogenicity of Ochratoxin A and the Degradation Product, Ochratoxin α, in the Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Embryo Model of Vertebrate Development.

    PubMed

    Haq, Mehreen; Gonzalez, Nelson; Mintz, Keenan; Jaja-Chimedza, Asha; De Jesus, Christopher Lawrence; Lydon, Christina; Welch, Aaron; Berry, John P

    2016-02-01

    Ochratoxins, and particularly ochratoxin A (OTA), are toxic fungal-derived contaminants of food and other agricultural products. Growing evidence supports the degradation of OTA by chemical, enzymatic and/or microbial means as a potential approach to remove this mycotoxin from food products. In particular, hydrolysis of OTA to ochratoxin α (OTα) and phenylalanine is the presumptive product of degradation in most cases. In the current study, we employed the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo, as a model of vertebrate development to evaluate, the teratogenicity of OTA and OTα. These studies show that OTA is potently active in the zebrafish embryo toxicity assay (ZETA), and that toxicity is both concentration- and time-dependent with discernible and quantifiable developmental toxicity observed at nanomolar concentrations. On the other hand, OTα had no significant effect on embryo development at all concentrations tested supporting a decreased toxicity of this degradation product. Taken together, these results suggest that ZETA is a useful, and highly sensitive, tool for evaluating OTA toxicity, as well as its degradation products, toward development of effective detoxification strategies. Specifically, the results obtained with ZETA, in the present study, further demonstrate the toxicity of OTA, and support its degradation via hydrolysis to OTα as an effective means of detoxification. PMID:26861395

  13. Teratogenicity of Ochratoxin A and the Degradation Product, Ochratoxin α, in the Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Embryo Model of Vertebrate Development

    PubMed Central

    Haq, Mehreen; Gonzalez, Nelson; Mintz, Keenan; Jaja-Chimedza, Asha; De Jesus, Christopher Lawrence; Lydon, Christina; Welch, Aaron Z.; Berry, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxins, and particularly ochratoxin A (OTA), are toxic fungal-derived contaminants of food and other agricultural products. Growing evidence supports the degradation of OTA by chemical, enzymatic and/or microbial means as a potential approach to remove this mycotoxin from food products. In particular, hydrolysis of OTA to ochratoxin α (OTα) and phenylalanine is the presumptive product of degradation in most cases. In the current study, we employed the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo, as a model of vertebrate development to evaluate, the teratogenicity of OTA and OTα. These studies show that OTA is potently active in the zebrafish embryo toxicity assay (ZETA), and that toxicity is both concentration- and time-dependent with discernible and quantifiable developmental toxicity observed at nanomolar concentrations. On the other hand, OTα had no significant effect on embryo development at all concentrations tested supporting a decreased toxicity of this degradation product. Taken together, these results suggest that ZETA is a useful, and highly sensitive, tool for evaluating OTA toxicity, as well as its degradation products, toward development of effective detoxification strategies. Specifically, the results obtained with ZETA, in the present study, further demonstrate the toxicity of OTA, and support its degradation via hydrolysis to OTα as an effective means of detoxification. PMID:26861395

  14. Expression of mep50 in adult and embryos of medaka fish (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Nana; Guo, Maomao; Chang, Pei; Zhang, Xueyan; Zhang, Runshuai; Qi, Chao; Zhong, Xueping; Zhou, Qingchun; Zhao, Haobin

    2016-06-01

    Protein arginine methylation is important for gene regulation and biological processes. Methylosome protein 50 (Mep50) is identified as a partner of protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (Prmt5), a major enzyme capable of symmetric dimethylation, in mammals and Xenopus. The isolation and characterization of medaka mep50 were reported in this paper. Medaka Mep50 is a homolog of human MEP50 with six WD40 domains. Medaka mep50 was ubiquitously expressed in the adult tissues and had maternal origin with continuous and dynamical expression during embryonic development detected by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization. A strong interaction of medaka Mep50 and Prmt5 was shown by yeast two hybridization. The expression pattern of mep50 is similar to that of prmt5 in medaka. The results suggested that medaka Mep50 could be a partner of Prmt5 and might play major roles in a variety of tissues in medaka. PMID:26749004

  15. Zebrafish as a model system for characterization of nanoparticles against cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evensen, Lasse; Johansen, Patrick L.; Koster, Gerbrand; Zhu, Kaizheng; Herfindal, Lars; Speth, Martin; Fenaroli, Federico; Hildahl, Jon; Bagherifam, Shahla; Tulotta, Claudia; Prasmickaite, Lina; Mælandsmo, Gunhild M.; Snaar-Jagalska, Ewa; Griffiths, Gareth

    2015-12-01

    Therapeutic nanoparticles (NPs) have great potential to deliver drugs against human diseases. Encapsulation of drugs in NPs protects them from being metabolized, while they are delivered specifically to a target site, thereby reducing toxicity and other side-effects. However, non-specific tissue accumulation of NPs, for example in macrophages, especially in the spleen and liver is a general problem with many NPs being developed for cancer therapy. To address the problem of non-specific tissue accumulation of NPs we describe the development of the zebrafish embryo as a transparent vertebrate system for characterization of NPs against cancer. We show that injection of human cancer cells results in tumor-like structures, and that subsequently injected fluorescent NPs, either made of polystyrene or liposomes can be imaged in real-time. NP biodistribution and general in vivo properties can be easily monitored in embryos having selective fluorescent labeling of specific tissues. We demonstrate in vitro, by using optical tweezer micromanipulation, microscopy and flow cytometry that polyethylene glycol (PEG) coating of NPs decreases the level of adhesion of NPs to macrophages, and also to cancer cells. In vivo in zebrafish embryos, PEG coating resulted in longer NP circulation times, decreased macrophage uptake, and reduced adhesion to the endothelium. Importantly, liposomes were observed to accumulate passively and selectively in tumor-like structures comprised of human cancer cells. These results show that zebrafish embryo is a powerful system for microscopy-based screening of NPs on the route to preclinical testing.Therapeutic nanoparticles (NPs) have great potential to deliver drugs against human diseases. Encapsulation of drugs in NPs protects them from being metabolized, while they are delivered specifically to a target site, thereby reducing toxicity and other side-effects. However, non-specific tissue accumulation of NPs, for example in macrophages, especially in

  16. The utility of the zebrafish model in conditioned place preference to assess the rewarding effects of drugs.

    PubMed

    Collier, Adam D; Echevarria, David J

    2013-09-01

    Substance abuse is a significant public health concern both domestically and worldwide. The persistent use of substances regardless of aversive consequences forces the user to give higher priority to the drug than to normal activities and obligations. The harmful and hazardous use of psychoactive substances can lead to a dependence syndrome. In this regard, the genetic and neurobiological underpinnings of reward-seeking behavior need to be fully understood in order to develop effective pharmacotherapies and other methods of treatment. Animal models are often implemented in preclinical screening for testing the efficacy of novel treatments. Several paradigms exist that model various facets of addiction including sensitization, tolerance, withdrawal, drug seeking, extinction, and relapse. Self-administration and, most notably, conditioned place preference (CPP) are relatively simple tests that serve as indicators of the aforementioned aspects of addiction by means of behavioral quantification. CPP is a commonly used technique to evaluate the motivational effects of compounds and experiences that have been associated with a positive or negative reward, which capitalizes on the basic principles of Pavlovian conditioning. During training, the unconditioned stimulus is consistently paired with a neutral set of environmental stimuli, which obtain, during conditioning, secondary motivational properties that elicit approach behavior in the absence of the unconditioned stimulus. For over 50 years, rodents have been the primary test subjects. However, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) is gaining favor as a valuable model organism in the fields of biology, genetics, and behavioral neuroscience. This paper presents a discussion on the merits, advantages, and limitations of the zebrafish model and its utility in relation to CPP. PMID:23811781

  17. Transcriptomic responses of marine medaka's ovary to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Lai, Keng Po; Li, Jing Woei; Tse, Anna Chung Kwan; Cheung, Angela; Wang, Simon; Chan, Ting Fung; Kong, Richard Yuen Chong; Wu, Rudolf Shiu Sun

    2016-08-01

    Hypoxia, an endocrine disruptor, is pressing global problem affecting marine organisms in over 400 "Dead Zones" worldwide. There is growing evident demonstrated the disruptive effect of hypoxia on reproductive systems of marine fish through the impairments of steroidogenic gene expression, leading to the alteration of sex hormone production in gonads. But the detailed molecular mechanism underlying the responses of female reproductive systems to hypoxic stress remains largely unknown. In the present report, we used marine medaka Oryzias melastigma as a model, together with high-throughput transcriptome sequencing and bioinformatics analysis, aiming to determine the changes in transcriptional signature in the ovary of marine fish under hypoxic stress. Our result discovered over two hundred differential expressed genes in ovary in response to hypoxia. The bioinformatics analysis together with quantitative RT-PCR validation on the deregulated genes highlighted the dysregulations of a number of female reproductive functions including interruptions of ovarian follicle development, gonad development and steroid metabolic process. Additionally, we revealed that these deregulations are through the modulation of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). The result of this work complements previous studies and provides additional insights into the underlying molecular mechanism of hypoxia-induced impairment of female reproductive system. PMID:27423118

  18. Turnover of Sex Chromosomes in Celebensis Group Medaka Fishes.

    PubMed

    Myosho, Taijun; Takehana, Yusuke; Hamaguchi, Satoshi; Sakaizumi, Mitsuru

    2015-12-01

    Sex chromosomes and the sex-determining (SD) gene are variable in vertebrates. In particular, medaka fishes in the genus Oryzias show an extremely large diversity in sex chromosomes and the SD gene, providing a good model to study the evolutionary process by which they turnover. Here, we investigated the sex determination system and sex chromosomes in six celebensis group species. Our sex-linkage analysis demonstrated that all species had an XX-XY sex determination system, and that the Oryzias marmoratus and O. profundicola sex chromosomes were homologous to O. latipes linkage group (LG) 10, while those of the other four species, O. celebensis, O. matanensis, O. wolasi, and O. woworae, were homologous to O. latipes LG 24. The phylogenetic relationship suggested a turnover of the sex chromosomes from O. latipes LG 24 to LG 10 within this group. Six sex-linkage maps showed that the former two and the latter four species shared a common SD locus, respectively, suggesting that the LG 24 acquired the SD function in a common ancestor of the celebensis group, and that the LG 10 SD function appeared in a common ancestor of O. marmoratus and O. profundicola after the divergence of O. matanensis. Additionally, fine mapping and association analysis in the former two species revealed that Sox3 on the Y chromosome is a prime candidate for the SD gene, and that the Y-specific 430-bp insertion might be involved in its SD function. PMID:26497145

  19. In vivo and in silico analyses of estrogenic potential of bisphenol analogs in medaka (Oryzias latipes) and common carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Akemi; Ishibashi, Hiroshi; Arizono, Koji; Tominaga, Nobuaki

    2015-10-01

    Various studies have demonstrated the estrogenic effect of bisphenol A (BPA), a member of bisphenol analogs (BPs), in in vitro and in vivo assays. However, limited data are available on the estrogenic potentials and risks of other BPs in aquatic organisms. In addition, the estrogenic effect of chemicals is known to have species-specific responses in teleost fish. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential estrogenic effects of BPs on the medaka (Oryzias latipes) and common carp (Cyprinus carpio) using in vivo and in silico assays. Our quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed that the expression levels of several hepatic estrogen-responsive biomarker genes in male medaka responded to various types and concentrations of BPs in a dose-response manner. The order of in vivo estrogenic potencies of BPs was as follows: BPC≈BPAF>BPB>BPA⋙BPP. To further investigate the interaction potential of BPs with medaka estrogen receptor α (ERα) in silico, a three-dimensional model of the ERα ligand-binding domain (LBD) was built and docking simulations were performed. The docking simulation analysis revealed that BPC interaction potential for medaka ERα LBD was the most potent, followed by BPAF and BPA. Comparing this with carp ERα LBD revealed that the interaction potentials of these BPs to medaka ERα LBD were more stable than to carp ERα LBD. Furthermore, we identified key amino acid residues in medaka ERα LBD that interacted with BPC (Glu356, Arg397, and Cys533), BPAF (Thr350 and Glu356), and BPA (Glu356 and Met424), and found some differences in these key amino acid residues between medaka and carp ERα LBDs. These results of in vivo and in silico analyses showed potential estrogenic effects of BPs in teleost fish, and they also indicated that the differences in interaction potentials and key amino acid residues between medaka and carp ERα LBDs may be due to the differences between the species and estrogenic potencies of the selected BPs. PMID

  20. Mayo Clinic Zebrafish Facility Overview.

    PubMed

    Leveque, Ryan E; Clark, Karl J; Ekker, Stephen C

    2016-07-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a premier nonmammalian vertebrate model organism. This small aquatic fish is utilized in multiple disciplines in the Mayo Clinic community and by many laboratories around the world because of its biological similarity to humans, its advanced molecular genetics, the elucidation of its genome sequence, and the ever-expanding and outstanding new biological tools now available to the zebrafish researcher. The Mayo Clinic Zebrafish Facility (MCZF) houses ∼2,000 tanks annotated using an in-house, Internet cloud-based bar-coding system tied to our established zfishbook.org web infrastructure. Paramecia are the primary food source for larval fish rearing, using a simplified culture protocol described herein. The MCZF supports the specific ongoing research in a variety of laboratories, while also serving as a local hub for new scientists as they learn to tap into the potential of this model system for understanding normal development, disease, and as models of health. PMID:27023741

  1. A New Zebrafish Model of Oro-Intestinal Pathogen Colonization Reveals a Key Role for Adhesion in Protection by Probiotic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bégaud, Evelyne; Herbomel, Philippe; Levraud, Jean-Pierre; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    The beneficial contribution of commensal bacteria to host health and homeostasis led to the concept that exogenous non-pathogenic bacteria called probiotics could be used to limit disease caused by pathogens. However, despite recent progress using gnotobiotic mammal and invertebrate models, mechanisms underlying protection afforded by commensal and probiotic bacteria against pathogens remain poorly understood. Here we developed a zebrafish model of controlled co-infection in which germ-free zebrafish raised on axenic living protozoa enabled the study of interactions between host and commensal and pathogenic bacteria. We screened enteric fish pathogens and identified Edwardsiella ictaluri as a virulent strain inducing a strong inflammatory response and rapid mortality in zebrafish larvae infected by the natural oro-intestinal route. Using mortality induced by infection as a phenotypic read-out, we pre-colonized zebrafish larvae with 37 potential probiotic bacterial strains and screened for survival upon E. ictaluri infection. We identified 3 robustly protective strains, including Vibrio parahaemolyticus and 2 Escherichia coli strains. We showed that the observed protective effect of E. coli was not correlated with a reduced host inflammatory response, nor with the release of biocidal molecules by protective bacteria, but rather with the presence of specific adhesion factors such as F pili that promote the emergence of probiotic bacteria in zebrafish larvae. Our study therefore provides new insights into the molecular events underlying the probiotic effect and constitutes a potentially high-throughput in vivo approach to the study of the molecular basis of pathogen exclusion in a relevant model of vertebrate oro-intestinal infection. PMID:22911651

  2. Histological and Transcriptomic Analysis of Adult Japanese Medaka Sampled Onboard the International Space Station

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Yasuhiko; Yasuda, Takako; Watanabe-Asaka, Tomomi; Oda, Shoji; Mantoku, Akiko; Takeyama, Kazuhiro; Chatani, Masahiro; Kudo, Akira; Uchida, Satoko; Suzuki, Hiromi; Tanigaki, Fumiaki; Shirakawa, Masaki; Fujisawa, Koichi; Hamamoto, Yoshihiko; Terai, Shuji; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    To understand how humans adapt to the space environment, many experiments can be conducted on astronauts as they work aboard the Space Shuttle or the International Space Station (ISS). We also need animal experiments that can apply to human models and help prevent or solve the health issues we face in space travel. The Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) is a suitable model fish for studying space adaptation as evidenced by adults of the species having mated successfully in space during 15 days of flight during the second International Microgravity Laboratory mission in 1994. The eggs laid by the fish developed normally and hatched as juveniles in space. In 2012, another space experiment (“Medaka Osteoclast”) was conducted. Six-week-old male and female Japanese medaka (Cab strain osteoblast transgenic fish) were maintained in the Aquatic Habitat system for two months in the ISS. Fish of the same strain and age were used as the ground controls. Six fish were fixed with paraformaldehyde or kept in RNA stabilization reagent (n = 4) and dissected for tissue sampling after being returned to the ground, so that several principal investigators working on the project could share samples. Histology indicated no significant changes except in the ovary. However, the RNA-seq analysis of 5345 genes from six tissues revealed highly tissue-specific space responsiveness after a two-month stay in the ISS. Similar responsiveness was observed among the brain and eye, ovary and testis, and the liver and intestine. Among these six tissues, the intestine showed the highest space response with 10 genes categorized as oxidation–reduction processes (gene ontogeny term GO:0055114), and the expression levels of choriogenin precursor genes were suppressed in the ovary. Eleven genes including klf9, klf13, odc1, hsp70 and hif3a were upregulated in more than four of the tissues examined, thus suggesting common immunoregulatory and stress responses during space adaptation. PMID:26427061

  3. Histological and Transcriptomic Analysis of Adult Japanese Medaka Sampled Onboard the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yasuhiko; Yasuda, Takako; Watanabe-Asaka, Tomomi; Oda, Shoji; Mantoku, Akiko; Takeyama, Kazuhiro; Chatani, Masahiro; Kudo, Akira; Uchida, Satoko; Suzuki, Hiromi; Tanigaki, Fumiaki; Shirakawa, Masaki; Fujisawa, Koichi; Hamamoto, Yoshihiko; Terai, Shuji; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    To understand how humans adapt to the space environment, many experiments can be conducted on astronauts as they work aboard the Space Shuttle or the International Space Station (ISS). We also need animal experiments that can apply to human models and help prevent or solve the health issues we face in space travel. The Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) is a suitable model fish for studying space adaptation as evidenced by adults of the species having mated successfully in space during 15 days of flight during the second International Microgravity Laboratory mission in 1994. The eggs laid by the fish developed normally and hatched as juveniles in space. In 2012, another space experiment ("Medaka Osteoclast") was conducted. Six-week-old male and female Japanese medaka (Cab strain osteoblast transgenic fish) were maintained in the Aquatic Habitat system for two months in the ISS. Fish of the same strain and age were used as the ground controls. Six fish were fixed with paraformaldehyde or kept in RNA stabilization reagent (n = 4) and dissected for tissue sampling after being returned to the ground, so that several principal investigators working on the project could share samples. Histology indicated no significant changes except in the ovary. However, the RNA-seq analysis of 5345 genes from six tissues revealed highly tissue-specific space responsiveness after a two-month stay in the ISS. Similar responsiveness was observed among the brain and eye, ovary and testis, and the liver and intestine. Among these six tissues, the intestine showed the highest space response with 10 genes categorized as oxidation-reduction processes (gene ontogeny term GO:0055114), and the expression levels of choriogenin precursor genes were suppressed in the ovary. Eleven genes including klf9, klf13, odc1, hsp70 and hif3a were upregulated in more than four of the tissues examined, thus suggesting common immunoregulatory and stress responses during space adaptation. PMID:26427061

  4. Development of retroviral vectors for insertional mutagenesis in medaka haploid cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fan; Liu, Qizhi; Yuan, Yongming; Hong, Yunhan

    2015-12-01

    Insertional mutagenesis (IM) by retrovirus (RV) is a high-throughput approach for interrogating gene functions in model species. Haploid cell provides a unique system for genetic screening by IM and prosperous progress has been achieved in mammal cells. However, little was known in lower vertebrate cells. Here, we report development of retroviral vectors (rvSAchCVgfp, rvSAchCVpf and rvSAchSTpf) and establishment of IM library in medaka haploid cells. Each vector contains a modified gene trapping (GT) cassette, which could extend the mutated cell population including GT insertions not in-frame or in weakly expressed genes. Virus titration determined by flow cytometry showed that rvSAchSTpf possessed the highest supernatant virus titer (1.5×10(5)TU/ml) in medaka haploid cell, while rvSAchCVpf produced the lowest titer (2.8×10(4)TU/ml). However, quantification of proviral DNAs in transduced cells by droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) demonstrated that the "real titer" may be similar among the three vectors. Furthermore, an IM library was established by FACS of haploid cells transduced with rvSAchCVgfp at a MOI of 0.1. A single copy RV integration in the majority of cells was confirmed by ddPCR in the library. Notably, there was a significant decrease of haploid cell percentage after FACS, suggesting potential trapping for survival/growth essential genes. Our results demonstrated successful development of retroviral vectors for IM in medaka haploid cells, serving for haploid genetic screening of host factors for virus infection and genes underlying certain cellular processes in fish model. PMID:26192464

  5. TCDD Induced Pericardial Edema and Relative COX-2 Expression in Medaka (Oryzias Latipes) Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wu; Matsumura, Fumio; Kullman, Seth W.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to dioxin and other aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands results in multiple, specific developmental cardiovascular phenotypes including pericardial edema and circulatory failure in small aquarium fish models. Although phenotypes are well described, mechanistic underpinnings for such toxicities remain elusive. Here we suggest that AhR activation results in stimulation of inflammation and “eicosanoid” pathways, which contribute to the observed developmental, cardiovascular phenotypes. We demonstrate that medaka embryos exposed to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) (0.05–1 ppb) during early development result in a dose-related increase in the prevalence of pericardial edema and that this phenotype correlates with an increase in cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene expression. Those individuals exhibiting the edema phenotype had significantly greater COX-2 mRNA than their nonedematous cohort. Selective pharmacological inhibition of COX-2, with NS-398, and genetic knock down of COX-2 with a translation initiation morpholino significantly attenuated prevalence and severity of edema phenotype. Subsequently, exposures of medaka embryos to arachidonic acid (AA) resulted in recapitulation of the pericardial edema phenotype and significantly increased COX-2 expression only in those individuals exhibiting the edema phenotype compared with their nonedematous cohort. AA exposure does not result in significant induction of cytochrome P450 1A expression, suggesting that pericardial edema can be induced independent of AhR/aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator/dioxin response element interactions. Results from this study demonstrate that developmental exposure to TCDD results in an induction of inflammatory mediators including COX-2, which contribute to the onset, and progression of heart dysmorphogenesis in the medaka model. PMID:20801906

  6. Genetic and environmental melanoma models in fish

    PubMed Central

    Patton, E Elizabeth; Mitchell, David L; Nairn, Rodney S

    2010-01-01

    Experimental animal models are extremely valuable for the study of human diseases, especially those with underlying genetic components. The exploitation of various animal models, from fruitflies to mice, has led to major advances in our understanding of the etiologies of many diseases, including cancer. Cutaneous malignant melanoma is a form of cancer for which both environmental insult (i.e., UV) and hereditary predisposition are major causative factors. Fish melanoma models have been used in studies of both spontaneous and induced melanoma formation. Genetic hybrids between platyfish and swordtails, different species of the genus Xiphophorus, have been studied since the 1920s to identify genetic determinants of pigmentation and melanoma formation. Recently, transgenesis has been used to develop zebrafish and medaka models for melanoma research. This review will provide a historical perspective on the use of fish models in melanoma research, and an updated summary of current and prospective studies using these unique experimental systems. PMID:20230482

  7. Zebrafish Sensitivity to Botulinum Neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Chatla, Kamalakar; Gaunt, Patricia S; Petrie-Hanson, Lora; Ford, Lorelei; Hanson, Larry A

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are the most potent known toxins. The mouse LD50 assay is the gold standard for testing BoNT potency, but is not sensitive enough to detect the extremely low levels of neurotoxin that may be present in the serum of sensitive animal species that are showing the effects of BoNT toxicity, such as channel catfish affected by visceral toxicosis of catfish. Since zebrafish are an important animal model for diverse biomedical and basic research, they are readily available and have defined genetic lines that facilitate reproducibility. This makes them attractive for use as an alternative bioassay organism. The utility of zebrafish as a bioassay model organism for BoNT was investigated. The 96 h median immobilizing doses of BoNT/A, BoNT/C, BoNT/E, and BoNT/F for adult male Tübingen strain zebrafish (0.32 g mean weight) at 25 °C were 16.31, 124.6, 4.7, and 0.61 picograms (pg)/fish, respectively. These findings support the use of the zebrafish-based bioassays for evaluating the presence of BoNT/A, BoNT/E, and BoNT/F. Evaluating the basis of the relatively high resistance of zebrafish to BoNT/C and the extreme sensitivity to BoNT/F may reveal unique functional patterns to the action of these neurotoxins. PMID:27153088

  8. Zebrafish Sensitivity to Botulinum Neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Chatla, Kamalakar; Gaunt, Patricia S.; Petrie-Hanson, Lora; Ford, Lorelei; Hanson, Larry A.

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are the most potent known toxins. The mouse LD50 assay is the gold standard for testing BoNT potency, but is not sensitive enough to detect the extremely low levels of neurotoxin that may be present in the serum of sensitive animal species that are showing the effects of BoNT toxicity, such as channel catfish affected by visceral toxicosis of catfish. Since zebrafish are an important animal model for diverse biomedical and basic research, they are readily available and have defined genetic lines that facilitate reproducibility. This makes them attractive for use as an alternative bioassay organism. The utility of zebrafish as a bioassay model organism for BoNT was investigated. The 96 h median immobilizing doses of BoNT/A, BoNT/C, BoNT/E, and BoNT/F for adult male Tübingen strain zebrafish (0.32 g mean weight) at 25 °C were 16.31, 124.6, 4.7, and 0.61 picograms (pg)/fish, respectively. These findings support the use of the zebrafish-based bioassays for evaluating the presence of BoNT/A, BoNT/E, and BoNT/F. Evaluating the basis of the relatively high resistance of zebrafish to BoNT/C and the extreme sensitivity to BoNT/F may reveal unique functional patterns to the action of these neurotoxins. PMID:27153088

  9. Differences in cardiovascular toxicities associated with cigarette smoking and snuff use revealed using novel zebrafish models.

    PubMed

    Folkesson, Maggie; Sadowska, Natalia; Vikingsson, Svante; Karlsson, Matts; Carlhäll, Carl-Johan; Länne, Toste; Wågsäter, Dick; Jensen, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco use is strongly associated with cardiovascular disease and the only avoidable risk factor associated with development of aortic aneurysm. While smoking is the most common form of tobacco use, snuff and other oral tobacco products are gaining popularity, but research on potentially toxic effects of oral tobacco use has not kept pace with the increase in its use. Here, we demonstrate that cigarette smoke and snuff extracts are highly toxic to developing zebrafish embryos. Exposure to such extracts led to a palette of toxic effects including early embryonic mortality, developmental delay, cerebral hemorrhages, defects in lymphatics development and ventricular function, and aneurysm development. Both cigarette smoke and snuff were more toxic than pure nicotine, indicating that other compounds in these products are also associated with toxicity. While some toxicities were found following exposure to both types of tobacco product, other toxicities, including developmental delay and aneurysm development, were specifically observed in the snuff extract group, whereas cerebral hemorrhages were only found in the group exposed to cigarette smoke extract. These findings deepen our understanding of the pathogenic effects of cigarette smoking and snuff use on the cardiovascular system and illustrate the benefits of using zebrafish to study mechanisms involved in aneurysm development. PMID:27334697

  10. Differences in cardiovascular toxicities associated with cigarette smoking and snuff use revealed using novel zebrafish models

    PubMed Central

    Folkesson, Maggie; Sadowska, Natalia; Vikingsson, Svante; Karlsson, Matts; Carlhäll, Carl-Johan; Länne, Toste; Wågsäter, Dick

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tobacco use is strongly associated with cardiovascular disease and the only avoidable risk factor associated with development of aortic aneurysm. While smoking is the most common form of tobacco use, snuff and other oral tobacco products are gaining popularity, but research on potentially toxic effects of oral tobacco use has not kept pace with the increase in its use. Here, we demonstrate that cigarette smoke and snuff extracts are highly toxic to developing zebrafish embryos. Exposure to such extracts led to a palette of toxic effects including early embryonic mortality, developmental delay, cerebral hemorrhages, defects in lymphatics development and ventricular function, and aneurysm development. Both cigarette smoke and snuff were more toxic than pure nicotine, indicating that other compounds in these products are also associated with toxicity. While some toxicities were found following exposure to both types of tobacco product, other toxicities, including developmental delay and aneurysm development, were specifically observed in the snuff extract group, whereas cerebral hemorrhages were only found in the group exposed to cigarette smoke extract. These findings deepen our understanding of the pathogenic effects of cigarette smoking and snuff use on the cardiovascular system and illustrate the benefits of using zebrafish to study mechanisms involved in aneurysm development. PMID:27334697

  11. Multi-organ Abnormalities and mTORC1 Activation in Zebrafish Model of Multiple Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seok-Hyung; Scott, Sarah A.; Bennett, Michael J.; Carson, Robert P.; Fessel, Joshua; Brown, H. Alex; Ess, Kevin C.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency (MADD) is a severe mitochondrial disorder featuring multi-organ dysfunction. Mutations in either the ETFA, ETFB, and ETFDH genes can cause MADD but very little is known about disease specific mechanisms due to a paucity of animal models. We report a novel zebrafish mutant dark xavier (dxavu463) that has an inactivating mutation in the etfa gene. dxavu463 recapitulates numerous pathological and biochemical features seen in patients with MADD including brain, liver, and kidney disease. Similar to children with MADD, homozygote mutant dxavu463 zebrafish have a spectrum of phenotypes ranging from moderate to severe. Interestingly, excessive maternal feeding significantly exacerbated the phenotype. Homozygous mutant dxavu463 zebrafish have swollen and hyperplastic neural progenitor cells, hepatocytes and kidney tubule cells as well as elevations in triacylglycerol, cerebroside sulfate and cholesterol levels. Their mitochondria were also greatly enlarged, lacked normal cristae, and were dysfunctional. We also found increased signaling of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) with enlarged cell size and proliferation. Treatment with rapamycin partially reversed these abnormalities. Our results indicate that etfa gene function is remarkably conserved in zebrafish as compared to humans with highly similar pathological, biochemical abnormalities to those reported in children with MADD. Altered mTORC1 signaling and maternal nutritional status may play critical roles in MADD disease progression and suggest novel treatment approaches that may ameliorate disease severity. PMID:23785301

  12. vox homeobox gene: a novel regulator of midbrain-hindbrain boundary development in medaka fish?

    PubMed

    Fabian, Peter; Pantzartzi, Chrysoula N; Kozmikova, Iryna; Kozmik, Zbynek

    2016-03-01

    The midbrain-hindbrain boundary (MHB) is one of the key organizing centers of the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS). Its patterning is governed by a well-described gene regulatory network (GRN) involving several transcription factors, namely, pax, gbx, en, and otx, together with signaling molecules of the Wnt and Fgf families. Here, we describe the onset of these markers in Oryzias latipes (medaka) early brain development in comparison to previously known zebrafish expression patterns. Moreover, we show for the first time that vox, a member of the vent gene family, is expressed in the developing neural tube similarly to CNS markers. Overexpression of vox leads to profound changes in the gene expression patterns of individual components of MHB-specific GRN, most notably of fgf8, a crucial organizer molecule of MHB. Our data suggest that genes from the vent family, in addition to their crucial role in body axis formation, may play a role in regionalization of vertebrate CNS. PMID:26965282

  13. Identification, Modeling and Ligand Affinity of Early Deuterostome CYP51s, and Functional Characterization of Recombinant Zebrafish Sterol 14α-Demethylase

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Ann Michelle Stanley; Goldstone, Jared V.; Lamb, David C.; Kubota, Akira; Lemaire, Benjamin; Stegeman, John. J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sterol 14α-demethylase (cytochrome P450 51, CYP51, P45014DM) is a microsomal enzyme that in eukaryotes catalyzes formation of sterols essential for cell membrane function and as precursors in biosynthesis of steroid hormones. Functional properties of CYP51s are unknown in non-mammalian deuterostomes. Methods PCR-cloning and sequencing and computational analyses (homology modeling and docking) addressed CYP51 in zebrafish Danio rerio, the reef fish sergeant major Abudefduf saxatilis, and the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Following N-terminal amino acid modification, zebrafish CYP51 was expressed in Escherichia coli, and lanosterol 14α-demethylase activity and azole inhibition of CYP51 activity were characterized using GC/MS. Results Molecular phylogeny positioned S. purpuratus CYP51 at the base of the deuterostome clade. In zebrafish, CYP51 is expressed in all organs examined, most strongly in intestine. The recombinant protein bound lanosterol and catalyzed 14α-demethylase activity, at 3.2 nmol/min/nmol CYP51. The binding of azoles to zebrafish CYP51 gave KS (dissociation constant) values of 0.26 μM for ketoconazole and 0.64 μM for propiconazole. Displacement of carbon monoxide also indicated zebrafish CYP51 has greater affinity for ketoconazole. Docking to homology models showed that lanosterol docks in fish and sea urchin CYP51s with an orientation essentially the same as in mammalian CYP51. Docking of ketoconazole indicates it would inhibit fish and sea urchin CYP51s. Conclusions Biochemical and computational analyses are consistent with lanosterol being a substrate for early deuterostome CYP51s. General Significance The results expand the phylogenetic view of animal CYP51, with evolutionary, environmental and therapeutic implications. PMID:24361620

  14. Quantifying Aggressive Behavior in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Teles, Magda C; Oliveira, Rui F

    2016-01-01

    Aggression is a complex behavior that influences social relationships and can be seen as adaptive or maladaptive depending on the context and intensity of expression. A model organism suitable for genetic dissection of the underlying neural mechanisms of aggressive behavior is still needed. Zebrafish has already proven to be a powerful vertebrate model organism for the study of normal and pathological brain function. Despite the fact that zebrafish is a gregarious species that forms shoals, when allowed to interact in pairs, both males and females express aggressive behavior and establish dominance hierarchies. Here, we describe two protocols that can be used to quantify aggressive behavior in zebrafish, using two different paradigms: (1) staged fights between real opponents and (2) mirror-elicited fights. We also discuss the methodology for the behavior analysis, the expected results for both paradigms, and the advantages and disadvantages of each paradigm in face of the specific goals of the study. PMID:27464816

  15. Bioconcentration, Metabolism and Excretion of Triclocarban in larval Qurt Medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    PubMed Central

    Schebb, Nils Helge; Flores, Ida; Kurobe, Tomofumi; Franze, Bastian; Ranganathan, Anupama; Hammock, Bruce D.; Teh, Swee

    2011-01-01

    The antimicrobial triclocarban (TCC) is frequently found in personal care products and commonly observed in surface waters and sediments. Due to its long environmental persistence TCC accumulates in sewage sludge. It also shows a high unintended biological activity as a potent inhibitor of the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) and may be an endocrine disruptor. In this study, we investigated bioconcentration, metabolism and elimination of TCC in fish using Medaka (Oryzias latipes) as a model. Medaka larvae (7±1 days post hatching) were exposed to 63 nM (20 µg/L) TCC water for 24 hours. The LC-MS/MS analysis of water and tissues provided bioconcentration of TCC and its metabolites in fish body and rapid excretion into culture water. Results from tissue samples showed a tissue concentration of 34 µmol/kg and a log bioconcentration factor (BCF) of 2.86. These results are slightly lower than previous findings in snails and algae. A significant portion of the absorbed TCC was oxidatively metabolized by the fish to hydroxylated products. These metabolites underwent extensive phase II metabolism to yield sulfate and glucuronic acid conjugates. The most abundant metabolite in fish tissue was the glucuronide of 2’-OH-TCC. Elimination of TCC after transferring the fish to fresh water was rapid, with a half-life of 1 hour. This study shows that larval medaka metabolize TCC similarly to mammals. The rapid rate of metabolism results in a lower bioconcentration than calculated from the n-octanol/water partition coefficient of TCC. PMID:21872556

  16. Adapting the medaka embryo assay to a high-throughput approach for developmental toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Oxendine, Sharon L; Cowden, John; Hinton, David E; Padilla, Stephanie

    2006-09-01

    Chemical exposure during embryonic development may cause persistent effects, yet developmental toxicity data exist for very few chemicals. Current testing procedures are time consuming and costly, underlining the need for rapid and low cost screening strategies. While in vitro methods are useful for screening, these methods do not replicate all the intricacies of embryonic development and should ideally be complemented by an in vivo screening strategy. In this study, we modify a medaka fish embryo assay to meet the requirements of high-throughput, developmental toxicant testing in vivo. The Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) offers several advantages over traditional mammalian model systems, including economic husbandry, high fecundity, and rapid ex utero development. In most studies where fish eggs are exposed to a chemical, the exposure takes place in a common vessel, with many embryos being exposed to the same solution. This type of design is not amenable to high-throughput methodology, does not allow the investigator to follow the same embryo throughout gestation, and may confound statistical analysis of the results. Therefore, we developed a 96-well microtiter plate method to facilitate exposure of individual medaka embryos in single wells and compared this approach to the common vessel method using the industrial solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as the test compound. At lower DMSO concentrations (0% or 1%), the 96-well microtiter plate assay replicated results obtained using the common vessel exposure method. There was, however, increased lethality and decreased hatching rate in the bottle-reared embryos treated with the higher DMSO concentrations (5% or 10%). Because the embryos reared in the 96-well microtiter plates never showed increased adverse effects (as compared to the bottle-reared embryos) at any DMSO concentration, we conclude that the 96-well microtiter plate assay provides a rapid and efficient alternative for developmental toxicity screens that

  17. Analysis of the Ush2a Gene in Medaka Fish (Oryzias latipes)

    PubMed Central

    Aller, Elena; Sánchez-Sánchez, Ana V.; Chicote, Javier U.; García-García, Gema; Udaondo, Patricia; Cavallé, Laura; Piquer-Gil, Marina; García-España, Antonio; Díaz-Llopis, Manuel; Millán, José M.; Mullor, José L.

    2013-01-01

    Patients suffering from Usher syndrome (USH) exhibit sensorineural hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and, in some cases, vestibular dysfunction. USH is the most common genetic disorder affecting hearing and vision and is included in a group of hereditary pathologies associated with defects in ciliary function known as ciliopathies. This syndrome is clinically classified into three types: USH1, USH2 and USH3. USH2 accounts for well over one-half of all Usher cases and mutations in the USH2A gene are responsible for the majority of USH2 cases, but also for atypical Usher syndrome and recessive non-syndromic RP. Because medaka fish (Oryzias latypes) is an attractive model organism for genetic-based studies in biomedical research, we investigated the expression and function of the USH2A ortholog in this teleost species. Ol-Ush2a encodes a protein of 5.445 aa codons, containing the same motif arrangement as the human USH2A. Ol-Ush2a is expressed during early stages of medaka fish development and persists into adulthood. Temporal Ol-Ush2a expression analysis using whole mount in situ hybridization (WMISH) on embryos at different embryonic stages showed restricted expression to otoliths and retina, suggesting that Ol-Ush2a might play a conserved role in the development and/or maintenance of retinal photoreceptors and cochlear hair cells. Knockdown of Ol-Ush2a in medaka fish caused embryonic developmental defects (small eyes and heads, otolith malformations and shortened bodies with curved tails) resulting in late embryo lethality. These embryonic defects, observed in our study and in other ciliary disorders, are associated with defective cell movement specifically implicated in left-right (LR) axis determination and planar cell polarity (PCP). PMID:24086419

  18. TGFβ-2 signaling is essential for osteoblast migration and differentiation during fracture healing in medaka fish.

    PubMed

    Takeyama, Kazuhiro; Chatani, Masahiro; Inohaya, Keiji; Kudo, Akira

    2016-05-01

    TGFβ is known as a canonical coupling factor based on its effects on bone formation and bone resorption. There are 3 different isoforms of it related to bone metabolism in mammals. TGFβ function in vivo is complicated, and each isoform shows a different function. Since TGFβs are secreted during inflammation accompanied by the release of latent TGFβ from inside of the bones where they are stored in the extracellular matrix, TGFβ function is potentially related to fracture healing. Although a few reports examined the TGFβ expression during fracture healing, the function of TGFβ in this process is poorly understood. To investigate TGFβ function during fracture healing in vivo, we used the fracture healing model of the medaka fish, which enabled us to observe the behavior and function of living cells in response to a bone-specific injury. RNA in-situ hybridization analysis showed that only tgfβ-2 of the 4 TGFβ isoforms in medaka was expressed in the bone-forming region. To examine the TGFβ-2 function for bone formation by osteoblasts, we used a medaka transgenic line, Tg (type X collagen: GFP); and the results revealed that type X collagen-positive immature osteoblasts migrated to the fracture site and differentiated to osterix-positive osteoblasts. However, only a few type X collagen-positive osteoblasts exhibited BrdU incorporation after the fracture. Then we inhibited TGFβ signaling by using a chemical TGFβ receptor kinase inhibitor (SB431542), and demonstrated that inhibition of TGFβ strongly impaired osteoblast migration and differentiation. In addition, this TGFβ inhibitor reduced the RANKL expression and caused a delay of osteoclast differentiation. Our findings thus demonstrated that TGFβ-2 functioned specifically during fracture healing to stimulate the migration of osteoblasts as well as the differentiation of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. PMID:26947892

  19. Quantifiable Biomarkers of Normal Aging in the Japanese Medaka Fish (Oryzias latipes)

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lingling; Kuhne, Wendy W.; Hinton, David E.; Song, Jian; Dynan, William S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Small laboratory fish share many anatomical and histological characteristics with other vertebrates, yet can be maintained in large numbers at low cost for lifetime studies. Here we characterize biomarkers associated with normal aging in the Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes), a species that has been widely used in toxicology studies and has potential utility as a model organism for experimental aging research. Principal Findings The median lifespan of medaka was approximately 22 months under laboratory conditions. We performed quantitative histological analysis of tissues from age-grouped individuals representing young adults (6 months old), mature adults (16 months old), and adults that had survived beyond the median lifespan (24 months). Livers of 24-month old individuals showed extensive morphologic changes, including spongiosis hepatis, steatosis, ballooning degeneration, inflammation, and nuclear pyknosis. There were also phagolysosomes, vacuoles, and residual bodies in parenchymal cells and congestion of sinusoidal vessels. Livers of aged individuals were characterized by increases in lipofuscin deposits and in the number of TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells. Some of these degenerative characteristics were seen, to a lesser extent, in the livers of 16-month old individuals, but not in 6-month old individuals. The basal layer of the dermis showed an age-dependent decline in the number of dividing cells and an increase in senescence-associated β-galactosidase. The hearts of aged individuals were characterized by fibrosis and lipofuscin deposition. There was also a loss of pigmented cells from the retinal epithelium. By contrast, age-associated changes were not apparent in skeletal muscle, the ocular lens, or the brain. Significance The results provide a set of markers that can be used to trace the process of normal tissue aging in medaka and to evaluate the effect of environmental stressors. PMID:20949019

  20. A Zebrafish Model of Roberts Syndrome Reveals That Esco2 Depletion Interferes with Development by Disrupting the Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Mönnich, Maren; Kuriger, Zoë; Print, Cristin G.; Horsfield, Julia A.

    2011-01-01

    The human developmental diseases Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) and Roberts Syndrome (RBS) are both caused by mutations in proteins responsible for sister chromatid cohesion. Cohesion is mediated by a multi-subunit complex called cohesin, which is loaded onto chromosomes by NIPBL. Once on chromosomes, cohesin binding is stabilized in S phase upon acetylation by ESCO2. CdLS is caused by heterozygous mutations in NIPBL or cohesin subunits SMC1A and SMC3, and RBS is caused by homozygous mutations in ESCO2. The genetic cause of both CdLS and RBS reside within the chromosome cohesion apparatus, and therefore they are collectively known as “cohesinopathies”. However, the two syndromes have distinct phenotypes, with differences not explained by their shared ontology. In this study, we have used the zebrafish model to distinguish between developmental pathways downstream of cohesin itself, or its acetylase ESCO2. Esco2 depleted zebrafish embryos exhibit features that resemble RBS, including mitotic defects, craniofacial abnormalities and limb truncations. A microarray analysis of Esco2-depleted embryos revealed that different subsets of genes are regulated downstream of Esco2 when compared with cohesin subunit Rad21. Genes downstream of Rad21 showed significant enrichment for transcriptional regulators, while Esco2-regulated genes were more likely to be involved the cell cycle or apoptosis. RNA in situ hybridization showed that runx1, which is spatiotemporally regulated by cohesin, is expressed normally in Esco2-depleted embryos. Furthermore, myca, which is downregulated in rad21 mutants, is upregulated in Esco2-depleted embryos. High levels of cell death contributed to the morphology of Esco2-depleted embryos without affecting specific developmental pathways. We propose that cell proliferation defects and apoptosis could be the primary cause of the features of RBS. Our results show that mutations in different elements of the cohesion apparatus have distinct

  1. Modeling the zebrafish segmentation clock's gene regulatory network constrained by expression data suggests evolutionary transitions between oscillating and nonoscillating transcription.

    PubMed

    Schwendinger-Schreck, Jamie; Kang, Yuan; Holley, Scott A

    2014-06-01

    During segmentation of vertebrate embryos, somites form in accordance with a periodic pattern established by the segmentation clock. In the zebrafish (Danio rerio), the segmentation clock includes six hairy/enhancer of split-related (her/hes) genes, five of which oscillate due to negative autofeedback. The nonoscillating gene hes6 forms the hub of a network of 10 Her/Hes protein dimers, which includes 7 DNA-binding dimers and 4 weak or non-DNA-binding dimers. The balance of dimer species is critical for segmentation clock function, and loss-of-function studies suggest that the her genes have both unique and redundant functions within the clock. However, the precise regulatory interactions underlying the negative feedback loop are unknown. Here, we combine quantitative experimental data, in silico modeling, and a global optimization algorithm to identify a gene regulatory network (GRN) designed to fit measured transcriptional responses to gene knockdown. Surprisingly, we find that hes6, the clock gene that does not oscillate, responds to negative feedback. Consistent with prior in silico analyses, we find that variation in transcription, translation, and degradation rates can mediate the gain and loss of oscillatory behavior for genes regulated by negative feedback. Extending our study, we found that transcription of the nonoscillating Fgf pathway gene sef responds to her/hes perturbation similarly to oscillating her genes. These observations suggest a more extensive underlying regulatory similarity between the zebrafish segmentation clock and the mouse and chick segmentation clocks, which exhibit oscillations of her/hes genes as well as numerous other Notch, Fgf, and Wnt pathway genes. PMID:24663100

  2. Toxicity to embryo and adult zebrafish of copper complexes with two malonic acids as models for dissolved organic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, F.B.; Evans, C.W.; Butler, C.A.; Timperley, M.H.

    1998-08-01

    The toxicity to embryo and adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) of Cu complexes with two substituted malonic acids, benzyl- and n-hexadecyl-, chosen as models for low-molecular-weight natural dissolved organic matter, were investigated. Toxicity test solutions at pH 6.5 {+-} 0.1 with the required Cu ion-specific electrode. In the absence of malonic acids, concentrations of Cu{sup 2+} up to 1.13 {mu}mol/L increased the embryo hatching time from approx. 2 d in control solutions (no Cu or malonic acid) and solutions containing malonic acids without Cu to approx. 8 d. The Cu-benzylmalonic acid complex in the presence of inorganic Cu species did not delay hatching beyond that attributable to Cu{sup 2+}. In contrast, 0.60 {mu}mol/L Cu-n-hexadecylmalonic complexes delayed hatching by 5.5 d in excess of that attributable to 1.13 {mu}mol/L Cu{sup 2+}, assuming that the hatching delays caused by the different Cu species were additive, possibly because of Cu entry into the embryo as the lipophilic Cu-n-hexadecylmalonic complex. None of the Cu-malonic acid complexes was acutely toxic to adult zebrafish at concentrations up to 1.4 {mu}mol/L, possibly because Cu was removed from the Cu-malonic acid complexes by stronger chelating groups at the gill surface. Substituted malonic acids with similar proton and Cu association constants can be readily prepared with a variety of simple substituents, radiolabeled if required. Their results show that these acids could be useful ligands for investigating intracellular transport and metabolism of metal-organic complexes.

  3. Zebrafish in hematology: sushi or science?

    PubMed Central

    Carradice, Duncan

    2008-01-01

    After a decade of the “modern era” of zebrafish hematology research, what have been their major contributions to hematology and what challenges does the model face? This review argues that, in hematology, zebrafish have demonstrated their suitability, are proving their utility, have supplied timely and novel discoveries, and are poised for further significant contributions. It presents an overview of the anatomy, physiology, and genetics of zebrafish hematopoiesis underpinning their use in hematology research. Whereas reverse genetic techniques enable functional studies of particular genes of interest, forward genetics remains zebrafish's particular strength. Mutants with diverse and interesting hematopoietic defects are emerging from multiple genetic screens. Some mutants model hereditary blood diseases, occasionally leading to disease genes first; others provide insights into developmental hematology. Models of malignant hematologic disorders provide tools for drug-target and pharmaceutics discovery. Numerous transgenic zebrafish with fluorescently marked blood cells enable live-cell imaging of inflammatory responses and host-pathogen interactions previously inaccessible to direct observation in vivo, revealing unexpected aspects of leukocyte behavior. Zebrafish disease models almost uniquely provide a basis for efficient whole animal chemical library screens for new therapeutics. Despite some limitations and challenges, their successes and discovery potential mean that zebrafish are here to stay in hematology research. PMID:18182572

  4. Navigation by environmental geometry: the use of zebrafish as a model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Ah; Vallortigara, Giorgio; Flore, Michele; Spelke, Elizabeth S; Sovrano, Valeria A

    2013-10-01

    Sensitivity to environmental shape in spatial navigation has been found, at both behavioural and neural levels, in virtually every species tested, starting early in development. Moreover, evidence that genetic deletions can cause selective deficits in such navigation behaviours suggests a genetic basis to navigation by environmental geometry. Nevertheless, the geometric computations underlying navigation have not been specified in any species. The present study teases apart the geometric components within the traditionally used rectangular enclosure and finds that zebrafish selectively represent distance and directional relationships between extended boundary surfaces. Similar behavioural results in geometric navigation tasks with human children provide prima facie evidence for similar underlying cognitive computations and open new doors for probing the genetic foundations that give rise to these computations. PMID:23788708

  5. RNA-Sequencing Analysis of TCDD-Induced Responses in Zebrafish Liver Reveals High Relatedness to In Vivo Mammalian Models and Conserved Biological Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi-Hua; Xu, Hongyan; Zheng, Weiling; Lam, Siew Hong; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2013-01-01

    TCDD is one of the most persistent environmental toxicants in biological systems and its effect through aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) has been well characterized. However, the information on TCDD-induced toxicity in other molecular pathways is rather limited. To fully understand molecular toxicity of TCDD in an in vivo animal model, adult zebrafish were exposed to TCDD at 10 nM for 96 h and the livers were sampled for RNA-sequencing based transcriptomic profiling. A total of 1,058 differently expressed genes were identified based on fold-change>2 and TPM (transcripts per million) >10. Among the top 20 up-regulated genes, 10 novel responsive genes were identified and verified by RT-qPCR analysis on independent samples. Transcriptomic analysis indicated several deregulated pathways associated with cell cycle, endocrine disruptors, signal transduction and immune systems. Comparative analyses of TCDD-induced transcriptomic changes between fish and mammalian models revealed that proteomic pathway is consistently up-regulated while calcium signaling pathway and several immune-related pathways are generally down-regulated. Finally, our study also suggested that zebrafish model showed greater similarity to in vivo mammalian models than in vitro models. Our study indicated that the zebrafish is a valuable in vivo model in toxicogenomic analyses for understanding molecular toxicity of environmental toxicants relevant to human health. The expression profiles associated with TCDD could be useful for monitoring environmental dioxin and dioxin-like contamination. PMID:24204792

  6. Application of Coiled Coil Peptides in Liposomal Anticancer Drug Delivery Using a Zebrafish Xenograft Model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Shimada, Yasuhito; Olsthoorn, René C L; Snaar-Jagalska, B Ewa; Spaink, Herman P; Kros, Alexander

    2016-08-23

    The complementary coiled coil forming peptides E4 [(EIAALEK)4] and K4 [(KIAALKE)4] are known to trigger liposomal membrane fusion when tethered to lipid vesicles in the form of lipopeptides. In this study, we examined whether these coiled coil forming peptides can be used for drug delivery applications. First, we prepared E4 peptide modified liposomes containing the far-red fluorescent dye TO-PRO-3 iodide (E4-Lipo-TP3) and confirmed that E4-liposomes could deliver TP3 into HeLa cells expressing K4 peptide on the membrane (HeLa-K) under cell culture conditions in a selective manner. Next, we prepared doxorubicin-containing E4-liposomes (E4-Lipo-DOX) and confirmed that E4-liposomes could also deliver DOX into HeLa-K cells. Moreover, E4-Lipo-DOX showed enhanced cytotoxicity toward HeLa-K cells compared to free doxorubicin. To prove the suitability of E4/K4 coiled coil formation for in vivo drug delivery, we injected E4-Lipo-TP3 or E4-Lipo-DOX into zebrafish xenografts of HeLa-K. As a result, E4-liposomes delivered TP3 to the implanted HeLa-K cells, and E4-Lipo-DOX could suppress cancer proliferation in the xenograft when compared to nontargeted conditions (i.e., zebrafish xenograft with free DOX injection). These data demonstrate that coiled coil formation enables drug selectivity and efficacy in vivo. It is envisaged that these findings are a step forward toward biorthogonal targeting systems as a tool for clinical drug delivery. PMID:27504667

  7. Zebrafish as a model for apolipoprotein biology: comprehensive expression analysis and a role for ApoA-IV in regulating food intake

    PubMed Central

    Otis, Jessica P.; Zeituni, Erin M.; Thierer, James H.; Anderson, Jennifer L.; Brown, Alexandria C.; Boehm, Erica D.; Cerchione, Derek M.; Ceasrine, Alexis M.; Avraham-Davidi, Inbal; Tempelhof, Hanoch; Yaniv, Karina; Farber, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Improved understanding of lipoproteins, particles that transport lipids throughout the circulation, is vital to developing new treatments for the dyslipidemias associated with metabolic syndrome. Apolipoproteins are a key component of lipoproteins. Apolipoproteins are proteins that structure lipoproteins and regulate lipid metabolism through control of cellular lipid exchange. Constraints of cell culture and mouse models mean that there is a need for a complementary model that can replicate the complex in vivo milieu that regulates apolipoprotein and lipoprotein biology. Here, we further establish the utility of the genetically tractable and optically clear larval zebrafish as a model of apolipoprotein biology. Gene ancestry analyses were implemented to determine the closest human orthologs of the zebrafish apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), apoB, apoE and apoA-IV genes and therefore ensure that they have been correctly named. Their expression patterns throughout development were also analyzed, by whole-mount mRNA in situ hybridization (ISH). The ISH results emphasized the importance of apolipoproteins in transporting yolk and dietary lipids: mRNA expression of all apolipoproteins was observed in the yolk syncytial layer, and intestinal and liver expression was observed from 4–6 days post-fertilization (dpf). Furthermore, real-time PCR confirmed that transcription of three of the four zebrafish apoA-IV genes was increased 4 hours after the onset of a 1-hour high-fat feed. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that zebrafish ApoA-IV performs a conserved role to that in rat in the regulation of food intake by transiently overexpressing ApoA-IVb.1 in transgenic larvae and quantifying ingestion of co-fed fluorescently labeled fatty acid during a high-fat meal as an indicator of food intake. Indeed, ApoA-IVb.1 overexpression decreased food intake by approximately one-third. This study comprehensively describes the expression and function of eleven zebrafish apolipoproteins

  8. Zebrafish as a model for apolipoprotein biology: comprehensive expression analysis and a role for ApoA-IV in regulating food intake.

    PubMed

    Otis, Jessica P; Zeituni, Erin M; Thierer, James H; Anderson, Jennifer L; Brown, Alexandria C; Boehm, Erica D; Cerchione, Derek M; Ceasrine, Alexis M; Avraham-Davidi, Inbal; Tempelhof, Hanoch; Yaniv, Karina; Farber, Steven A

    2015-03-01

    Improved understanding of lipoproteins, particles that transport lipids throughout the circulation, is vital to developing new treatments for the dyslipidemias associated with metabolic syndrome. Apolipoproteins are a key component of lipoproteins. Apolipoproteins are proteins that structure lipoproteins and regulate lipid metabolism through control of cellular lipid exchange. Constraints of cell culture and mouse models mean that there is a need for a complementary model that can replicate the complex in vivo milieu that regulates apolipoprotein and lipoprotein biology. Here, we further establish the utility of the genetically tractable and optically clear larval zebrafish as a model of apolipoprotein biology. Gene ancestry analyses were implemented to determine the closest human orthologs of the zebrafish apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), apoB, apoE and apoA-IV genes and therefore ensure that they have been correctly named. Their expression patterns throughout development were also analyzed, by whole-mount mRNA in situ hybridization (ISH). The ISH results emphasized the importance of apolipoproteins in transporting yolk and dietary lipids: mRNA expression of all apolipoproteins was observed in the yolk syncytial layer, and intestinal and liver expression was observed from 4-6 days post-fertilization (dpf). Furthermore, real-time PCR confirmed that transcription of three of the four zebrafish apoA-IV genes was increased 4 hours after the onset of a 1-hour high-fat feed. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that zebrafish ApoA-IV performs a conserved role to that in rat in the regulation of food intake by transiently overexpressing ApoA-IVb.1 in transgenic larvae and quantifying ingestion of co-fed fluorescently labeled fatty acid during a high-fat meal as an indicator of food intake. Indeed, ApoA-IVb.1 overexpression decreased food intake by approximately one-third. This study comprehensively describes the expression and function of eleven zebrafish apolipoproteins and

  9. Non invasive in vivo investigation of hepatobiliary structure and function in STII medaka (Oryzias latipes): methodology and applications

    PubMed Central

    Hardman, Ron C; Kullman, Seth W; Hinton, David E

    2008-01-01

    Background A novel transparent stock of medaka (Oryzias latipes; STII), recessive for all pigments found in chromatophores, permits transcutaneous imaging of internal organs and tissues in living individuals. Findings presented describe the development of methodologies for non invasive in vivo investigation in STII medaka, and the successful application of these methodologies to in vivo study of hepatobiliary structure, function, and xenobiotic response, in both 2 and 3 dimensions. Results Using brightfield, and widefield and confocal fluorescence microscopy, coupled with the in vivo application of fluorescent probes, structural and functional features of the hepatobiliary system, and xenobiotic induced toxicity, were imaged at the cellular level, with high resolution (< 1 μm), in living individuals. The findings presented demonstrate; (1) phenotypic response to xenobiotic exposure can be investigated/imaged in vivo with high resolution (< 1 μm), (2) hepatobiliary transport of solutes from blood to bile can be qualitatively and quantitatively studied/imaged in vivo, (3) hepatobiliary architecture in this lower vertebrate liver can be studied in 3 dimensions, and (4) non invasive in vivo imaging/description of hepatobiliary development in this model can be investigated. Conclusion The non-invasive in vivo methodologies described are a unique means by which to investigate biological structure, function and xenobiotic response with high resolution in STII medaka. In vivo methodologies also provide the future opportunity to integrate molecular mechanisms (e.g., genomic, proteomic) of disease and toxicity with phenotypic changes at the cellular and system levels of biological organization. While our focus has been the hepatobiliary system, other organ systems are equally amenable to in vivo study, and we consider the potential for discovery, within the context of in vivo investigation in STII medaka, as significant. PMID:18838008

  10. Developmental toxicity and DNA damage from exposure to parking lot runoff retention pond samples in the Japanese Medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    PubMed Central

    Colton, Meryl D.; Kwok, Kevin W.H.; Brandon, Jennifer A.; Warren, Isaac H.; Ryde, Ian T.; Cooper, Ellen M.; Hinton, David E.; Rittschof, Daniel; Meyer, Joel N.

    2015-01-01

    Parking lot runoff retention ponds (PLRRP) receive significant chemical input, but the biological effects of parking lot runoff are not well understood. We used the Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) as a model to study the toxicity of water and sediment samples from a PLRRP in Morehead City, NC. Medaka exposed in ovo to a dilution series of PLRRP water had increased odds of death before hatching, but not teratogenesis or delayed hatching. Next, we adapted a long-amplicon quantitative PCR (LA-QPCR) assay for DNA damage for use with the Japanese medaka. We employed LA-QPCR to test the hypotheses that PLRRP water and sediments would cause nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage with and without full-spectrum, natural solar radiation. Fluoranthene with and without natural sunlight was a positive control for phototoxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-induced DNA damage. Fluoranthene exposure did not result in detectable DNA damage by itself, but in combination with sunlight caused significant DNA damage to both genomes. PLRRP samples caused DNA damage to both genomes, and this was not increased by sunlight exposure, suggesting the DNA damage was unlikely the result of PAH phototoxicity. We report for the first time that PLRRP-associated pollutants cause both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage, and that fluoranthene-mediated phototoxicity results in similar levels of damage to the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. These effects may be especially significant in sensitive marine ecosystems. PMID:24816191

  11. Comparative hazard analysis and toxicological modeling of diverse nanomaterials using the embryonic zebrafish (EZ) metric of toxicity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Harper, Bryan; Thomas, Dennis G.; Chikkagoudar, Satish; Baker, Nathan A.; Tang, Kaizhi; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Lins, Roberto D.; Harper, Stacey

    2015-06-04

    The integration of rapid assays, large data sets, informatics and modeling can overcome current barriers in understanding nanomaterial structure-toxicity relationships by providing a weight-of-the-evidence mechanism to generate hazard rankings for nanomaterials. Here we present the use of a rapid, low-cost assay to perform screening-level toxicity evaluations of nanomaterials in vivo. Calculated EZ Metric scores, a combined measure of morbidity and mortality, were established at realistic exposure levels and used to develop a predictive model of nanomaterial toxicity. Hazard ranking and clustering analysis of 68 diverse nanomaterials revealed distinct patterns of toxicity related to both core composition and outermost surface chemistrymore » of nanomaterials. The resulting clusters guided the development of a predictive model of gold nanoparticle toxicity to embryonic zebrafish. In addition, our findings suggest that risk assessments based on the size and core composition of nanomaterials alone may be wholly inappropriate, especially when considering complex engineered nanomaterials. These findings reveal the need to expeditiously increase the availability of quantitative measures of nanomaterial hazard and broaden the sharing of that data and knowledge to support predictive modeling. In addition, research should continue to focus on methodologies for developing predictive models of nanomaterial hazard based on sub-lethal responses to low dose exposures.« less

  12. Comparative hazard analysis and toxicological modeling of diverse nanomaterials using the embryonic zebrafish (EZ) metric of toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, Bryan; Thomas, Dennis G.; Chikkagoudar, Satish; Baker, Nathan A.; Tang, Kaizhi; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Lins, Roberto D.; Harper, Stacey

    2015-06-04

    The integration of rapid assays, large data sets, informatics and modeling can overcome current barriers in understanding nanomaterial structure-toxicity relationships by providing a weight-of-the-evidence mechanism to generate hazard rankings for nanomaterials. Here we present the use of a rapid, low-cost assay to perform screening-level toxicity evaluations of nanomaterials in vivo. Calculated EZ Metric scores, a combined measure of morbidity and mortality, were established at realistic exposure levels and used to develop a predictive model of nanomaterial toxicity. Hazard ranking and clustering analysis of 68 diverse nanomaterials revealed distinct patterns of toxicity related to both core composition and outermost surface chemistry of nanomaterials. The resulting clusters guided the development of a predictive model of gold nanoparticle toxicity to embryonic zebrafish. In addition, our findings suggest that risk assessments based on the size and core composition of nanomaterials alone may be wholly inappropriate, especially when considering complex engineered nanomaterials. These findings reveal the need to expeditiously increase the availability of quantitative measures of nanomaterial hazard and broaden the sharing of that data and knowledge to support predictive modeling. In addition, research should continue to focus on methodologies for developing predictive models of nanomaterial hazard based on sub-lethal responses to low dose exposures.

  13. Oestrogen reporter transgenic medaka for non-invasive evaluation of aromatase activity.

    PubMed

    Spirhanzlova, Petra; Leleu, Mathilde; Sébillot, Anthony; Lemkine, Gregory F; Iguchi, Taisen; Demeneix, Barbara A; Tindall, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate reproduction involves complex steroid hormone interplay and inter-conversion. A critical element in maintaining sex steroid levels is the enzyme aromatase (cytochrome P450 19A1) which converts androgens to oestrogens. In turn oestrogen signalling is targeted by numerous chemicals, from pharmaceuticals to agricultural chemicals, both frequent sources of contamination in waste waters and consequently rivers. Although many models are now available to address disruption of oestrogen signalling, there are currently no published protocols allowing discrimination between alterations in testosterone metabolism and in oestrogenic signalling. It was with this limitation in mind that we optimised this protocol. We show using a 48h protocol that pre-feeding fry of the choriogenin h-gfp (chgh-gfp) medaka line are sensitive to 0.05nM EE2 (15ng/L), within the range of the lowest published observable physiological effect concentrations for medaka. In addition, co-treatment with testosterone can reveal potential effects of test substances on aromatase enzymatic activity. As the measurements are visualised in real-time without affecting embryo viability, repeated measures are possible. We demonstrate the ability of this model to detect oestrogen receptor agonists, aromatisable androgens, P450 aromatase activity modulators and selective oestrogen response modulators. Importantly, the range of this assay is physiologically relevant. PMID:26352216

  14. Defects of protein production in erythroid cells revealed in a zebrafish Diamond-Blackfan anemia model for mutation in RPS19.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Ear, J; Yang, Z; Morimoto, K; Zhang, B; Lin, S

    2014-01-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a rare congenital red cell aplasia that classically presents during early infancy in DBA patients. Approximately, 25% of patients carry a mutation in the ribosomal protein (RP) S19 gene; mutations in RPS24, RPS17, RPL35A, RPL11, and RPL5 have been reported. How ribosome protein deficiency causes defects specifically to red blood cells in DBA has not been well elucidated. To genetically model the predominant ribosome defect in DBA, we generated an rps19 null mutant through the use of TALEN-mediated gene targeting in zebrafish. Molecular characterization of this mutant line demonstrated that rps19 deficiency reproduced the erythroid defects of DBA, including a lack of mature red blood cells and p53 activation. Notably, we found that rps19 mutants' production of globin proteins was significantly inhibited; however, globin transcript level was either increased or unaffected in rps19 mutant embryos. This dissociation of RNA/protein levels of globin genes was confirmed in another zebrafish DBA model with defects in rpl11. Using transgenic zebrafish with specific expression of mCherry in erythroid cells, we showed that protein production in erythroid cells was decreased when either rps19 or rpl11 was mutated. L-Leucine treatment alleviated the defects of protein production in erythroid cells and partially rescued the anemic phenotype in both rps19 and rpl11 mutants. Analysis of this model suggests that the decreased protein production in erythroid cells likely contributes to the blood-specific phenotype of DBA. Furthermore, the newly generated rps19 zebrafish mutant should serve as a useful animal model to study DBA. Our in vivo findings may provide clues for the future therapy strategy for DBA. PMID:25058426

  15. Measuring thigmotaxis in larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Schnörr, S J; Steenbergen, P J; Richardson, M K; Champagne, D L

    2012-03-17

    One of the most commonly used behavioral endpoints measured in preclinical studies using rodent models is thigmotaxis (or "wall-hugging"). Thigmotaxis is a well-validated index of anxiety in animals and humans. While assays measuring thigmotaxis in adult zebrafish have been developed, a thigmotaxis assay has not yet been validated in larval zebrafish. Here we present a novel assay for measurement of thigmotaxis in zebrafish larvae that is triggered by a sudden change in illumination (i.e. sudden light-to-darkness transition) and performed in a standard 24-well plate. We show that zebrafish larvae as young as 5 days post fertilization respond to this challenge by engaging in thigmotaxis. Thigmotaxis was significantly attenuated by anxiolytic (diazepam) and significantly enhanced by anxiogenic (caffeine) drugs, thus representing the first validated thigmotaxis assay for larval zebrafish. We also show that exposure to sudden darkness per se may represent an anxiogenic situation for larval zebrafish since less contrasting light-to-darkness transitions (achieved by lowering darkness degrees) significantly decreased thigmotaxis levels in a manner similar to what was achieved with diazepam. These findings suggest that stimuli such as exposure to sudden darkness could be used proficiently to trigger the expression of anxiety-like behaviors in laboratory settings. In sum, this is a versatile protocol allowing testing of both anxiolytic and anxiogenic drugs in a cost-effective manner (only 10 min). This assay is also amenable to medium to high-throughput capacity while constituting a valuable tool for stress and central nervous system research as well as for preclinical drug screening and discovery. PMID:22197677

  16. Enhanced antitumor activity and mechanism of biodegradable polymeric micelles-encapsulated chetomin in both transgenic zebrafish and mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qinjie; Li, Guoyou; Deng, Senyi; Ouyang, Liang; Li, Ling; Liu, Lei; Luo, Na; Song, Xiangrong; He, Gu; Gong, Changyang; Wei, Yuquan

    2014-09-01

    Chetomin is a promising molecule with anti-tumor activities in the epipolythiodioxopiperazine family of fungal secondary metabolites; however, strong hydrophobicity has limited its further applications. In this work, chetomin was encapsulated into polymeric micelles to obtain an aqueous formulation, and the chetomin loaded micelles (Che-M) exhibited small particle size and high encapsulation efficiency. When the concentration of copolymer was higher than the critical gelation concentration, the Che-M could form a thermosensitive hydrogel (Che-H), which was free-flowing sol at ambient temperature and converted into a non-flowing gel at body temperature. The molecular modeling study has indicated that chetomin interacted with PCL as a core, which was embraced by PEG as a shell. Che-M showed equal cytotoxicity with free chetomin, but the apoptosis inducing effects of Che-M were more significant. Besides, Che-M could increase the GSSG level, decrease the GSH level, and increase the ROS in CT26 cells. Furthermore, stronger inhibitory effects of Che-M were observed on embryonic angiogenesis, tumor-induced angiogenesis and tumor growth in transgenic zebrafish models. In addition, Che-M was effective in inhibiting tumor growth and prolonging survival in a subcutaneous CT26 tumor model. In a colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis model, both Che-M and Che-H showed excellent therapeutic effects, but Che-H was more effective. In conclusion, Che-M and Che-H may serve as candidates for cancer therapy.

  17. A vertebrate model for the study of lipid binding/transfer protein function: conservation of OSBP-related proteins between zebrafish and human.

    PubMed

    Zhou, You; Wohlfahrt, Gerd; Paavola, Jere; Olkkonen, Vesa M

    2014-04-11

    Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) and OSBP-related (ORP) or OSBP-like (OSBPL) proteins constitute a family of lipid-binding/transfer proteins (LTPs) present in eukaryotes from yeast to man. The mechanisms of ORP function have remained incompletely understood. However, several ORPs are present at membrane contact sites and act as either lipid transporters or sensors that control lipid metabolism, cell signaling, and vesicle transport. Zebrafish, Danio rerio, has gained increasing popularity as a model organism in developmental biology, human disease, toxicology, and drug discovery. However, LTPs in the fish are thus far unexplored. In this article we report a series of bioinformatic analyses showing that the OSBPL gene family is highly conserved between the fish and human. The OSBPL subfamily structure is markedly similar between the two organisms, and all 12 human genes have orthologs, designated osbpl and located on 11 chromosomes in D. rerio. Interestingly, osbpl2 and osbpl3 are present as two closely related homologs (a and b), due to gene duplication events in the teleost lineage. Moreover, the domain structures of the distinct ORP proteins are almost identical between zebrafish and man, and molecular modeling in the present study suggests that ORD liganding by phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI4P) is a feature conserved between yeast Osh3p, human ORP3, and zebrafish Osbpl3. The present analysis identifies D. rerio as an attractive model to study the functions of ORPs in vertebrate development and metabolism. PMID:24326072

  18. The Zebrafish Models to Explore Genetic and Epigenetic Impacts on Evolutionary Developmental Origins of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Kishi, Shuji

    2014-01-01

    Can we reset, reprogram, rejuvenate or reverse the organismal aging process? Certain genetic manipulations could at least reset and reprogram epigenetic dynamics beyond phenotypic plasticity and elasticity in cells, which can be further manipulated into organisms. However, in a whole complex aging organism, how can we rejuvenate intrinsic resources and infrastructures in an intact/noninvasive manner? The incidence of diseases increases exponentially with age, accompanied by progressive deteriorations of physiological functions in organisms. Aging-associated diseases are sporadic but essentially inevitable complications arising from senescence. Senescence is often considered the antithesis of early development, but yet there may be factors and mechanisms in common between these two phenomena to rejuvenate over the dynamic process of aging. The association between early development and late-onset disease with advancing age is thought to come from a consequence of developmental plasticity, the phenomenon by which one genotype can give rise to a range of physiologically and/or morphologically adaptive states based on diverse epigenotypes, in response to intrinsic or extrinsic environmental cues and genetic perturbations. We hypothesized that the future aging process can be predictive based on adaptivity during the early developmental period. Modulating the thresholds and windows of plasticity and its robustness by molecular genetic and chemical epigenetic approaches, we have successfully conducted experiments to isolate zebrafish mutants expressing apparently altered senescence phenotypes during their embryonic and/or larval stages (“embryonic/larval senescence”). Subsequently, at least some of these mutant animals were found to show shortened lifespan, while some others would be expected to live longer in adulthoods. We anticipate that previously uncharacterized developmental genes may mediate the aging process and play a pivotal role in senescence. On the other

  19. Identification and Expression Profiling of MicroRNAs in the Brain, Liver and Gonads of Marine Medaka (Oryzias melastigma) and in Response to Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Karen; Lai, Keng Po; Bao, Jessie Yun Juan; Zhang, Na; Tse, Anna; Tong, Amy; Li, Jing Woei; Lok, Si; Kong, Richard Yuen Chong; Lui, Wing Yee; Wong, Alice; Wu, Rudolf Shiu Sun

    2014-01-01

    The marine medaka (Oryzias melastigma) has been increasingly used as a fish model for detecting environmental stresses and chemical contaminants in the marine environment. Recent mammalian studies have shown that environmental stresses can alter the expression profiles of microRNAs (miRNAs), leading to transgenerational effects. Here, we use high-throughput Illumina RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) for miRNA transcriptome analysis of brain, liver, and gonads from sexually mature male and female marine medaka. A total of 128,883,806 filtered sequence reads were generated from six small RNA libraries, identifying a total of 2,125,663 non-redundant sequences. These sequences were aligned and annotated to known animal miRNAs (miRBase) using the BLAST method. A total of 223 distinct miRNA types were identified, with the greatest number expressed in brain tissue. Our data suggested that 55 miRNA types from 34 families are common to all tested tissues, while some of the miRNAs are tissue-enriched or sex-enriched. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis further demonstrated that let-7a, miR-122, and miR-9-3p were downregulated in hypoxic female medaka, while miR-2184 was specifically upregulated in the testis of hypoxic male fish. This is the first study to identify miRNAs in O. melastigma using small RNA deep sequencing technology. Because miRNA expression is highly conserved between marine medaka and other vertebrates, marine medaka may serve as a good model for studies on the functional roles of miRNAs in hypoxia stress response and signaling in marine fish. PMID:25350659

  20. Genome-Wide Identification of Molecular Pathways and Biomarkers in Response to Arsenic Exposure in Zebrafish Liver

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongyan; Lam, Siew Hong; Shen, Yuan; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2013-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a worldwide metalloid pollutant in environment. Although extensive studies on arsenic-induced toxicity have been conducted using in vivo and in vitro models, the exact molecular mechanism of arsenate toxicity remains elusive. Here, the RNA-SAGE (serial analysis of gene expression) sequencing technology was used to analyse hepatic response to arsenic exposure at the transcriptome level. Based on more than 12 million SAGE tags mapped to zebrafish genes, 1,444 differentially expressed genes (750 up-regulated and 694 down-regulated) were identified from a relatively abundant transcripts (>10 TPM [transcripts per million]) based on minimal two-fold change. By gene ontology analyses, these differentially expressed genes were significantly enriched in several major biological processes including oxidation reduction, translation, iron ion transport, cell redox, homeostasis, etc. Accordingly, the main pathways disturbed include metabolic pathways, proteasome, oxidative phosphorylation, cancer, etc. Ingenity Pathway Analysis further revealed a network with four important upstream factors or hub genes, including Jun, Kras, APoE and Nr2f2. The network indicated apparent molecular events involved in oxidative stress, carcinogenesis, and metabolism. In order to identify potential biomarker genes for arsenic exposure, 27 out of 29 up-regulated transcripts were validated by RT-qPCR analysis in pooled RNA samples. Among these, 14 transcripts were further confirmed for up-regulation by a lower dosage of arsenic in majority of individual zebrafish. Finally, at least four of these genes, frh3 (ferrintin H3), mgst1 (microsomal glutathione S-transferase-like), cmbl (carboxymethylenebutenolidase homolog) and slc40a1 (solute carrier family 40 [iron-regulated transporter], member 1) could be confirmed in individual medaka fish similarly treated by arsenic; thus, these four genes might be robust arsenic biomarkers across species. Thus, our work represents the first

  1. Normal growth of the "see-through" medaka.

    PubMed

    Iwamatsu, Takashi; Nakamura, Hitomi; Ozato, Kenjiro; Wakamatsu, Yuko

    2003-05-01

    The see-through stock in the medaka Oryzias latipes, causes pigments to be absent from the whole body and has a transparent body in the adult stage as well as during embryonic stages. To establish a standard table of growth stages for this model fish, morphological features were examined during the growing period from hatching to adulthood. The main observations were performed on morphological changes in external and internal organs that could be seen through the body wall of the living fish during growth. Finally, five growth stages from just after hatching to the adult stage were defined on the basis of synchronized or definite changes in morphology as follows: (1) stage 40 in which the nodes (joints) in bony rays of the caudal and pectoral fins first appear, (2) the stage 41 in which the ribs and the anal, dorsal and ventral fins are formed by degeneration of the membrane fin folds, as recognized by the first appearance of nodes in the fin rays of the anal, pectoral and dorsal fins, and the parallel distribution of the dorsal artery and ventral vein of the tail, (3) stage 42 in which the 2-spiral pattern of the gut, the ray nodes in the ventral fins, and the scales first appear, (4) stage 43 in which early secondary sexual characters such as urinogenital protruberances (female) and papillar processes (male) appear, (5) stage 44 in which the 3-spiral pattern of the gut and the papillar process on the 2nd ray of pectral fins (male) appear. PMID:12777831

  2. Ectopic expression of single transcription factors directs differentiation of a medaka spermatogonial cell line.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Eva C; Wagner, Toni U; Weber, Isabell P; Herpin, Amaury; Fischer, Andreas; Schartl, Manfred

    2011-08-01

    The capability to form all cell types of the body is a unique feature of stem cells. However, many questions remain concerning the mechanisms regulating differentiation potential. The derivation of spermatogonial cell lines (SGs) from mouse and human, which can differentiate across germ-layer borders, suggested male germ cells as a potential stem cell source in addition to embryonic stem cells. Here, we present a differentiation system using an SG of the vertebrate model organism Oryzias latipes (medaka). We report differentiation of this cell line into 4 different ectodermal and mesodermal somatic cell types. In addition to differentiation into adipocytes by retinoic acid treatment, we demonstrate for the first time that directed differentiation of an SG can be induced by ectopic expression of single transcription factors, completely independent of culture conditions. Transient transfection with mitf-m, a transcription factor that has been shown to induce differentiation into melanocytes in medaka embryonic stem cells, resulted in the formation of the same cell type in spermatogonia. Similarly, the formation of neuron-like cells and matrix-depositing osteoblasts was induced by ectopic expression of mash1 and cbfa1, respectively. Interestingly, we found that the expression of all mentioned fate-inducing transcription factors leads to recapitulation of the temporal pattern of marker gene expression known from in vivo studies. PMID:21090990

  3. Genome editing in zebrafish: a practical overview.

    PubMed

    Sertori, Robert; Trengove, Monique; Basheer, Faiza; Ward, Alister C; Liongue, Clifford

    2016-07-01

    Zebrafish is a powerful model for the study of vertebrate development, being amenable to a wide range of genetic and other manipulations to probe the molecular basis of development and its perturbation in disease. Over recent years, genome editing approaches have become increasingly used as an efficient and sophisticated approach to precisely engineer the zebrafish genome, which has further enhanced the utility of this organism. This review provides a practical overview of genome editing and its application in zebrafish research, including alternate strategies for introducing and screening for specific genetic changes. PMID:26654901

  4. Imaging blood vessels in the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Makoto; Isogai, Sumio; Pan, Weijun; Weinstein, Brant M

    2010-01-01

    Understanding on the mechanisms of vascular branching morphogenesis has become a subject of enormous scientific and clinical interest. Zebrafish, which have small, accessible, transparent embryos and larvae, provides a unique living animal model to facilitating high-resolution imaging on ubiquitous and deep localization of vessels within embryo development and also in adult tissues. In this chapter, we have summarized various methods for vessel imaging in zebrafish, including in situ hybridization for vascular-specific genes, resin injection- or dye injection-based vessel visualization, and alkaline phosphatase staining. We also described detail protocols for live imaging of vessels by microangiography or using various transgenic zebrafish lines. PMID:21111213

  5. Linking Genomo- and Pathotype: Exploiting the Zebrafish Embryo Model to Investigate the Divergent Virulence Potential among Cronobacter spp.

    PubMed Central

    Eshwar, Athmanya K.; Tall, Ben D.; Gangiredla, Jayanthi; Gopinath, Gopal R.; Patel, Isha R.; Neuhauss, Stephan C. F.; Stephan, Roger; Lehner, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the genus Cronobacter have been recognized as causative agents of life-threatening systemic infections primarily in premature, low-birth weight and immune-compromised neonates. Apparently not all Cronobacter species are linked to infantile infections and it has been proposed that virulence varies among strains. Whole genome comparisons and in silico analysis have proven to be powerful tools in elucidating potential virulence determinants, the presence/absence of which may explain the differential virulence behaviour of strains. However, validation of these factors has in the past been hampered by the availability of a suitable neonatal animal model. In the present study we have used zebrafish embryos to model Cronobacter infections in vivo using wild type and genetically engineered strains. Our experiments confirmed the role of the RepF1B-like plasmids as “virulence plasmids” in Cronobacter and underpinned the importantce of two putative virulence factors—cpa and zpx—in in vivo pathogenesis. We propose that by using this model in vivo infection studies are now possible on a large scale level which will boost the understanding on the virulence strategies employed by these pathogens. PMID:27355472

  6. Development of a Patient-Derived Xenograft (PDX) of Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis in a Zebrafish Model

    PubMed Central

    Mercatali, Laura; La Manna, Federico; Groenewoud, Arwin; Casadei, Roberto; Recine, Federica; Miserocchi, Giacomo; Pieri, Federica; Liverani, Chiara; Bongiovanni, Alberto; Spadazzi, Chiara; de Vita, Alessandro; van der Pluijm, Gabri; Giorgini, Andrea; Biagini, Roberto; Amadori, Dino; Ibrahim, Toni; Snaar-Jagalska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a complex process that needs to be better understood in order to help clinicians prevent and treat it. Xenografts using patient-derived material (PDX) rather than cancer cell lines are a novel approach that guarantees more clinically realistic results. A primary culture of bone metastasis derived from a 67-year-old patient with breast cancer was cultured and then injected into zebrafish (ZF) embryos to study its metastatic potential. In vivo behavior and results of gene expression analyses of the primary culture were compared with those of cancer cell lines with different metastatic potential (MCF7 and MDA-MB-231). The MCF7 cell line, which has the same hormonal receptor status as the bone metastasis primary culture, did not survive in the in vivo model. Conversely, MDA-MB-231 disseminated and colonized different parts of the ZF, including caudal hematopoietic tissues (CHT), revealing a migratory phenotype. Primary culture cells disseminated and in later stages extravasated from the vessels, engrafting into ZF tissues and reaching the CHT. Primary cell behavior reflected the clinical course of the patient’s medical history. Our results underline the potential for using PDX models in bone metastasis research and outline new methods for the clinical application of this in vivo model. PMID:27556456

  7. Development of a Patient-Derived Xenograft (PDX) of Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis in a Zebrafish Model.

    PubMed

    Mercatali, Laura; La Manna, Federico; Groenewoud, Arwin; Casadei, Roberto; Recine, Federica; Miserocchi, Giacomo; Pieri, Federica; Liverani, Chiara; Bongiovanni, Alberto; Spadazzi, Chiara; de Vita, Alessandro; van der Pluijm, Gabri; Giorgini, Andrea; Biagini, Roberto; Amadori, Dino; Ibrahim, Toni; Snaar-Jagalska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a complex process that needs to be better understood in order to help clinicians prevent and treat it. Xenografts using patient-derived material (PDX) rather than cancer cell lines are a novel approach that guarantees more clinically realistic results. A primary culture of bone metastasis derived from a 67-year-old patient with breast cancer was cultured and then injected into zebrafish (ZF) embryos to study its metastatic potential. In vivo behavior and results of gene expression analyses of the primary culture were compared with those of cancer cell lines with different metastatic potential (MCF7 and MDA-MB-231). The MCF7 cell line, which has the same hormonal receptor status as the bone metastasis primary culture, did not survive in the in vivo model. Conversely, MDA-MB-231 disseminated and colonized different parts of the ZF, including caudal hematopoietic tissues (CHT), revealing a migratory phenotype. Primary culture cells disseminated and in later stages extravasated from the vessels, engrafting into ZF tissues and reaching the CHT. Primary cell behavior reflected the clinical course of the patient's medical history. Our results underline the potential for using PDX models in bone metastasis research and outline new methods for the clinical application of this in vivo model. PMID:27556456

  8. Linking Genomo- and Pathotype: Exploiting the Zebrafish Embryo Model to Investigate the Divergent Virulence Potential among Cronobacter spp.

    PubMed

    Eshwar, Athmanya K; Tall, Ben D; Gangiredla, Jayanthi; Gopinath, Gopal R; Patel, Isha R; Neuhauss, Stephan C F; Stephan, Roger; Lehner, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the genus Cronobacter have been recognized as causative agents of life-threatening systemic infections primarily in premature, low-birth weight and immune-compromised neonates. Apparently not all Cronobacter species are linked to infantile infections and it has been proposed that virulence varies among strains. Whole genome comparisons and in silico analysis have proven to be powerful tools in elucidating potential virulence determinants, the presence/absence of which may explain the differential virulence behaviour of strains. However, validation of these factors has in the past been hampered by the availability of a suitable neonatal animal model. In the present study we have used zebrafish embryos to model Cronobacter infections in vivo using wild type and genetically engineered strains. Our experiments confirmed the role of the RepF1B-like plasmids as "virulence plasmids" in Cronobacter and underpinned the importantce of two putative virulence factors-cpa and zpx-in in vivo pathogenesis. We propose that by using this model in vivo infection studies are now possible on a large scale level which will boost the understanding on the virulence strategies employed by these pathogens. PMID:27355472

  9. Probiotic treatment reduces appetite and glucose level in the zebrafish model

    PubMed Central

    Falcinelli, Silvia; Rodiles, Ana; Unniappan, Suraj; Picchietti, Simona; Gioacchini, Giorgia; Merrifield, Daniel Lee; Carnevali, Oliana

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota regulates metabolic pathways that modulate the physiological state of hunger or satiety. Nutrients in the gut stimulate the release of several appetite modulators acting at central and peripheral levels to mediate appetite and glucose metabolism. After an eight-day exposure of zebrafish larvae to probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus, high-throughput sequence analysis evidenced the ability of the probiotic to modulate the microbial composition of the gastrointestinal tract. These changes were associated with a down-regulation and up-regulation of larval orexigenic and anorexigenic genes, respectively, an up-regulation of genes related to glucose level reduction and concomitantly reduced appetite and body glucose level. BODIPY-FL-pentanoic-acid staining revealed higher short chain fatty acids levels in the intestine of treated larvae. These results underline the capability of the probiotic to modulate the gut microbiota community and provides insight into how the probiotic interacts to regulate a novel gene network involved in glucose metabolism and appetite control, suggesting a possible role for L. rhamnosus in the treatment of impaired glucose tolerance and food intake disorders by gut microbiota manipulation. PMID:26727958

  10. Probiotic treatment reduces appetite and glucose level in the zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Falcinelli, Silvia; Rodiles, Ana; Unniappan, Suraj; Picchietti, Simona; Gioacchini, Giorgia; Merrifield, Daniel Lee; Carnevali, Oliana

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota regulates metabolic pathways that modulate the physiological state of hunger or satiety. Nutrients in the gut stimulate the release of several appetite modulators acting at central and peripheral levels to mediate appetite and glucose metabolism. After an eight-day exposure of zebrafish larvae to probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus, high-throughput sequence analysis evidenced the ability of the probiotic to modulate the microbial composition of the gastrointestinal tract. These changes were associated with a down-regulation and up-regulation of larval orexigenic and anorexigenic genes, respectively, an up-regulation of genes related to glucose level reduction and concomitantly reduced appetite and body glucose level. BODIPY-FL-pentanoic-acid staining revealed higher short chain fatty acids levels in the intestine of treated larvae. These results underline the capability of the probiotic to modulate the gut microbiota community and provides insight into how the probiotic interacts to regulate a novel gene network involved in glucose metabolism and appetite control, suggesting a possible role for L. rhamnosus in the treatment of impaired glucose tolerance and food intake disorders by gut microbiota manipulation. PMID:26727958

  11. River waters induced neurotoxicity in an embryo-larval zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    García-Cambero, Jesús Pablo; Catalá, Myriam; Valcárcel, Yolanda

    2012-10-01

    Some investigations have revealed an increased release of psychoactive drugs into the aquatic environments near big cities. However, despite the alert generated by the presence of such neurotoxic compounds, there is a lack of studies evaluating the impact on living organisms. One solution consists in the development of bioassays able to address specific risks, such as neurotoxicity, but on the other hand suitable to assess complex matrices like river samples. The objective of this work was to assess surface water toxicity by means of a zebrafish embryo-larval combined toxicity assay, which is based on a variety of toxicological endpoints, especially those related to neurodevelopment. For such a purpose, we selected the Tagus River in which a previous monitoring study revealed the presence of psychoactive drugs. Results showed that most of the toxicological endpoints evaluated remained unaltered in the exposed embryos, except for the tail length that was larger in the exposed larvae, and the locomotor activity in the 6-day larvae, which was decreased in four groups of exposure (n=5 sampling points). In the absence of systemic toxicity, changes in larval locomotion are indicative of neurotoxicity. This result suggests that the Tagus River can convey neurotoxic compounds at levels that may represent an early and specific threat over the aquatic species of vertebrates, what can have dramatic consequences under the ecological point of view. PMID:22906717

  12. A Model of Excitotoxic Brain Injury in Larval Zebrafish: Potential Application for High-Throughput Drug Evaluation to Treat Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    McCutcheon, Victoria; Park, Eugene; Liu, Elaine; Wang, Youdong; Wen, Xiao-Yan; Baker, Andrew J

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and morbidity with no effective therapeutic treatments for secondary injury. Preclinical drug evaluation in rodent models of TBI is a lengthy process. In this regard, the zebrafish has numerous advantages to address the technical and time-dependent obstacles associated with drug evaluation. We developed a reproducible brain injury using glutamate excitoxicity in zebrafish larvae, a known initiator of delayed cell death in TBI. Glutamate challenge resulted in dose-dependent lethality over an 84-h observation period. We report significant decrease in locomotion (p < 0.0001) and mean velocity (p < 0.001) with 10 μM glutamate application as measured through automated 96-well plate behavioral analysis. Application of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 (400 nM) or the calpain inhibitor, MDL-28170 (20 μM), resulted in significant recovery of locomotor function. A secA5-YFP transgenic line was used to visualize the localization of cell death due to glutamate exposure in vivo using confocal fluorescence microscopy. Our results indicate that zebrafish larvae exhibit responses to excitotoxic injury and pharmacotherapeutic intervention with pathophysiological relevance to mammalian excitotoxic brain injury. This system has potential to be applied as a high-throughput drug screening model to quickly identify candidate lead compounds for further evaluation. PMID:27028704

  13. Understanding the transformation, speciation, and hazard potential of copper particles in a model septic tank system using zebrafish to monitor the effluent.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sijie; Taylor, Alicia A; Ji, Zhaoxia; Chang, Chong Hyun; Kinsinger, Nichola M; Ueng, William; Walker, Sharon L; Nel, André E

    2015-02-24

    Although copper-containing nanoparticles are used in commercial products such as fungicides and bactericides, we presently do not understand the environmental impact on other organisms that may be inadvertently exposed. In this study, we used the zebrafish embryo as a screening tool to study the potential impact of two nano Cu-based materials, CuPRO and Kocide, in comparison to nanosized and micron-sized Cu and CuO particles in their pristine form (0-10 ppm) as well as following their transformation in an experimental wastewater treatment system. This was accomplished by construction of a modeled domestic septic tank system from which effluents could be retrieved at different stages following particle introduction (10 ppm). The Cu speciation in the effluent was identified as nondissolvable inorganic Cu(H2PO2)2 and nondiffusible organic Cu by X-ray diffraction, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT), and Visual MINTEQ software. While the nanoscale materials, including the commercial particles, were clearly more potent (showing 50% hatching interference above 0.5 ppm) than the micron-scale particulates with no effect on hatching up to 10 ppm, the Cu released from the particles in the septic tank underwent transformation into nonbioavailable species that failed to interfere with the function of the zebrafish embryo hatching enzyme. Moreover, we demonstrate that the addition of humic acid, as an organic carbon component, could lead to a dose-dependent decrease in Cu toxicity in our high content zebrafish embryo screening assay. Thus, the use of zebrafish embryo screening, in combination with the effluents obtained from a modeled exposure environment, enables a bioassay approach to follow the change in the speciation and hazard potential of Cu particles instead of difficult-to-perform direct particle tracking. PMID:25625504

  14. Mutations in zebrafish pitx2 model congenital malformations in Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome but do not disrupt left-right placement of visceral organs.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yongchang; Buel, Sharleen M; Amack, Jeffrey D

    2016-08-01

    Pitx2 is a conserved homeodomain transcription factor that has multiple functions during embryonic development. Mutations in human PITX2 cause autosomal dominant Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS), characterized by congenital eye and tooth malformations. Pitx2(-/-) knockout mouse models recapitulate aspects of ARS, but are embryonic lethal. To date, ARS treatments remain limited to managing individual symptoms due to an incomplete understanding of PITX2 function. In addition to regulating eye and tooth development, Pitx2 is a target of a conserved Nodal (TGFβ) signaling pathway that mediates left-right (LR) asymmetry of visceral organs. Based on its highly conserved asymmetric expression domain, the Nodal-Pitx2 axis has long been considered a common denominator of LR development in vertebrate embryos. However, functions of Pitx2 during asymmetric organ morphogenesis are not well understood. To gain new insight into Pitx2 function we used genome editing to create mutations in the zebrafish pitx2 gene. Mutations in the pitx2 homeodomain caused phenotypes reminiscent of ARS, including aberrant development of the cornea and anterior chamber of the eye and reduced or absent teeth. Intriguingly, LR asymmetric looping of the heart and gut was normal in pitx2 mutants. These results suggest conserved roles for Pitx2 in eye and tooth development and indicate Pitx2 is not required for asymmetric looping of zebrafish visceral organs. This work establishes zebrafish pitx2 mutants as a new animal model for investigating mechanisms underlying congenital malformations in ARS and high-throughput drug screening for ARS therapeutics. Additionally, pitx2 mutants present a unique opportunity to identify new genes involved in vertebrate LR patterning. We show Nodal signaling-independent of Pitx2-controls asymmetric expression of the fatty acid elongase elovl6 in zebrafish, pointing to a potential novel pathway during LR organogenesis. PMID:27297886

  15. Understanding the Transformation, Speciation, and Hazard Potential of Copper Particles in a Model Septic Tank System using Zebrafish to Monitor the Effluent

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Sijie; Taylor, Alicia A.; Zhaoxia, Ji; Chang, Chong Hyun; Kinsinger, Nichola M.; Ueng, William; Walker, Sharon L.; Nel, André E.

    2015-01-01

    Although copper-containing nanoparticles are used in commercial products such as fungicides and bactericides, we presently do not understand the environmental impact on other organisms that may be inadvertently exposed. In this study, we used the zebrafish embryo as a screening tool to study the potential impact of two nano Cu-based materials, CuPRO and Kocide, in comparison to nano-sized and micron-sized Cu and CuO particles in their pristine form (0 – 10 ppm) as well as following their transformation in an experimental wastewater treatment system. This was accomplished by construction of a modeled domestic septic tank system from which effluents could be retrieved at different stages following particle introduction (10 ppm). The Cu speciation in the effluent was identified as non-dissolvable inorganic Cu(H2PO2)2 and non-diffusible organic Cu by X-ray diffraction, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT), and Visual MINTEQ software. While the nanoscale materials, including the commercial particles, were clearly more potent (showing 50% hatching interference above 0.5 ppm) than the micron-scale particulates with no effect on hatching up to 10 ppm, the Cu released from the particles in the septic tank underwent transformation into non-bioavailable species that failed to interfere with the function of the zebrafish embryo hatching enzyme. Moreover, we demonstrate that the addition of humic acid, as an organic carbon component, could lead to a dose-dependent decrease in Cu toxicity in our high content zebrafish embryo screening assay. Thus, the use of zebrafish embryo screening, in combination with the effluents obtained from a modeled exposure environment, enables a bioassay approach to follow the change in the speciation, and hazard potential of Cu particles instead of difficult-to-perform direct particle tracking. PMID:25625504

  16. VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor II (VRI) induced vascular insufficiency in zebrafish as a model for studying vascular toxicity and vascular preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shang; Dang, Yuan Ye; Oi Lam Che, Ginny; Kwan, Yiu Wa; Chan, Shun Wan; Leung, George Pak Heng; Lee, Simon Ming Yuen; Hoi, Maggie Pui Man

    2014-11-01

    In ischemic disorders such as chronic wounds and myocardial ischemia, there is inadequate tissue perfusion due to vascular insufficiency. Besides, it has been observed that prolonged use of anti-angiogenic agents in cancer therapy produces cardiovascular toxicity caused by impaired vessel integrity and regeneration. In the present study, we used VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor II (VRI) to chemically induce vascular insufficiency in zebrafish in vivo and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in vitro to further study the mechanisms of vascular morphogenesis in these pathological conditions. We also explored the possibility of treating vascular insufficiency by enhancing vascular regeneration and repair with pharmacological intervention. We observed that pretreatment of VRI induced blood vessel loss in developing zebrafish by inhibiting angiogenesis and increasing endothelial cell apoptosis, accompanied by down-regulation of kdr, kdrl and flt-1 genes expression. The VRI-induced blood vessel loss in zebrafish could be restored by post-treatment of calycosin, a cardiovascular protective isoflavone. Similarly, VRI induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HUVEC which could be rescued by calycosin post-treatment. Further investigation of the underlying mechanisms showed that the PI3K/AKT/Bad cell survival pathway was a main contributor of the vascular regenerative effect of calycosin. These findings indicated that the cardiovascular toxicity in anti-angiogenic therapy was mainly caused by insufficient endothelial cell survival, suggesting its essential role in vascular integrity, repair and regeneration. In addition, we showed that VRI-induced blood vessel loss in zebrafish represented a simple and effective in vivo model for studying vascular insufficiency and evaluating cancer drug vascular toxicities. - Highlights: • In vivo VRI model • Rescue effects of calycosin • Calycosin EC survival pathways.

  17. Biodegradable polymeric micelle-encapsulated quercetin suppresses tumor growth and metastasis in both transgenic zebrafish and mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qinjie; Deng, Senyi; Li, Ling; Sun, Lu; Yang, Xi; Liu, Xinyu; Liu, Lei; Qian, Zhiyong; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Changyang

    2013-11-01

    Quercetin (Que) loaded polymeric micelles were prepared to obtain an aqueous formulation of Que with enhanced anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activities. A simple solid dispersion method was used, and the obtained Que micelles had a small particle size (about 31 nm), high drug loading, and high encapsulation efficiency. Que micelles showed improved cellular uptake, an enhanced apoptosis induction effect, and stronger inhibitory effects on proliferation, migration, and invasion of 4T1 cells than free Que. The enhanced in vitro antiangiogenesis effects of Que micelles were proved by the results that Que micelles significantly suppressed proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Subsequently, transgenic zebrafish models were employed to investigate anti-tumor and anti-metastasis effects of Que micelles, in which stronger inhibitory effects of Que micelles were observed on embryonic angiogenesis, tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor growth, and tumor metastasis. Furthermore, in a subcutaneous 4T1 tumor model, Que micelles were more effective in suppressing tumor growth and spontaneous pulmonary metastasis, and prolonging the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Besides, immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent assays suggested that tumors in the Que micelle-treated group showed more apoptosis, fewer microvessels, and fewer proliferation-positive cells. In conclusion, Que micelles, which are synthesized as an aqueous formulation of Que, possess enhanced anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activity, which can serve as potential candidates for cancer therapy.

  18. A zebrafish model of Poikiloderma with Neutropenia recapitulates the human syndrome hallmarks and traces back neutropenia to the myeloid progenitor

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Elisa A.; Carra, Silvia; Fontana, Laura; Bresciani, Erica; Cotelli, Franco; Larizza, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    Poikiloderma with Neutropenia (PN) is an autosomal recessive genodermatosis characterized by early-onset poikiloderma, pachyonychia, hyperkeratosis, bone anomalies and neutropenia, predisposing to myelodysplasia. The causative C16orf57/USB1 gene encodes a conserved phosphodiesterase that regulates the stability of spliceosomal U6-RNA. The involvement of USB1 in splicing has not yet allowed to unveil the pathogenesis of PN and how the gene defects impact on skin and bone tissues besides than on the haematological compartment. We established a zebrafish model of PN using a morpholino-knockdown approach with two different splicing morpholinos. Both usb1-depleted embryos displayed developmental abnormalities recapitulating the signs of the human syndrome. Besides the pigmentation and osteochondral defects, usb1-knockdown caused defects in circulation, manifested by a reduced number of circulating cells. The overall morphant phenotype was also obtained by co-injecting sub-phenotypic dosages of the two morpholinos and could be rescued by human USB1 RNA. Integrated in situ and real-time expression analyses of stage-specific markers highlighted defects of primitive haematopoiesis and traced back the dramatic reduction in neutrophil myeloperoxidase to the myeloid progenitors showing down-regulated pu.1 expression. Our vertebrate model of PN demonstrates the intrinsic requirement of usb1 in haematopoiesis and highlights PN as a disorder of myeloid progenitors associated with bone marrow dysfunction. PMID:26522474

  19. Multifactorial Origins of Heart and Gut Defects in nipbl-Deficient Zebrafish, a Model of Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Muto, Akihiko; Calof, Anne L.

    2011-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is the founding member of a class of multi-organ system birth defect syndromes termed cohesinopathies, named for the chromatin-associated protein complex cohesin, which mediates sister chromatid cohesion. Most cases of CdLS are caused by haploinsufficiency for Nipped-B-like (Nipbl), a highly conserved protein that facilitates cohesin loading. Consistent with recent evidence implicating cohesin and Nipbl in transcriptional regulation, both CdLS cell lines and tissues of Nipbl-deficient mice show changes in the expression of hundreds of genes. Nearly all such changes are modest, however—usually less than 1.5-fold—raising the intriguing possibility that, in CdLS, severe developmental defects result from the collective action of many otherwise innocuous perturbations. As a step toward testing this hypothesis, we developed a model of nipbl-deficiency in zebrafish, an organism in which we can quantitatively investigate the combinatorial effects of gene expression changes. After characterizing the structure and embryonic expression of the two zebrafish nipbl genes, we showed that morpholino knockdown of these genes produces a spectrum of specific heart and gut/visceral organ defects with similarities to those in CdLS. Analysis of nipbl morphants further revealed that, as early as gastrulation, expression of genes involved in endodermal differentiation (sox32, sox17, foxa2, and gata5) and left-right patterning (spaw, lefty2, and dnah9) is altered. Experimental manipulation of the levels of several such genes—using RNA injection or morpholino knockdown—implicated both additive and synergistic interactions in causing observed developmental defects. These findings support the view that birth defects in CdLS arise from collective effects of quantitative changes in gene expression. Interestingly, both the phenotypes and gene expression changes in nipbl morphants differed from those in mutants or morphants for genes encoding cohesin

  20. A prebiotic role of Ecklonia cava improves the mortality of Edwardsiella tarda-infected zebrafish models via regulating the growth of lactic acid bacteria and pathogen bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lee, WonWoo; Oh, Jae Young; Kim, Eun-A; Kang, Nalae; Kim, Kil-Nam; Ahn, Ginnae; Jeon, You-Jin

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the beneficial prebiotic roles of Ecklonia cava (E. cava, EC) were evaluated on the growth of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and pathogen bacteria and the mortality of pathogen-bacteria infected zebrafish model. The result showed that the original E. cava (EC) led to the highest growth effects on three LABs (Lactobacillus brevis, L. brevis; Lactobacillus pentosus, L. pentosus; Lactobacillus plantarum; L. plantarum) and it was dose-dependent manners. Also, EC, its Celluclast enzymatic (ECC) and 100% ethanol extracts (ECE) showed the anti-bacterial activities on the fish pathogenic bacteria such as (Edwardsiella tarda; E. tarda, Streptococcus iniae; S. iniae, and Vibrio harveyi; V. harveyi). Interestingly, EC induced the higher production of the secondary metabolites from L. plantarum in MRS medium. The secondary metabolites produced by EC significantly inhibited the growth of pathogen bacteria. In further in vivo study, the co-treatment of EC and L. plantarum improved the growth and mortality of E. tarda-infected zebrafish as regulating the expression of inflammatory molecules such as iNOS and COX2. Taken together, our present study suggests that the EC plays an important role as a potential prebiotic and has a protective effect against the infection caused by E. tarda injection in zebrafish. Also, our conclusion from this evidence is that EC can be used and applied as a useful prebiotic. PMID:27192145

  1. Combining Zebrafish and Mouse Models to Test the Function of Deubiquitinating Enzyme (Dubs) Genes in Development: Role of USP45 in the Retina.

    PubMed

    Toulis, Vasileios; Garanto, Alejandro; Marfany, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitination is a dynamic and reversible posttranslational modification. Much effort has been devoted to characterize the function of ubiquitin pathway genes in the cell context, but much less is known on their functional role in the development and maintenance of organs and tissues in the organism. In fact, several ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) are implicated in human pathological disorders, from cancer to neurodegeneration. The aim of our work is to explore the relevance of DUBs in retinal function in health and disease, particularly since some genes related to the ubiquitin or SUMO pathways cause retinal dystrophies, a group of rare diseases that affect 1:3000 individuals worldwide. We propose zebrafish as an extremely useful and informative genetic model to characterize the function of any particular gene in the retina, and thus complement the expression data from mouse. A preliminary characterization of gene expression in mouse retinas (RT-PCR and in situ hybridization) was performed to select particularly interesting genes, and we later replicated the experiments in zebrafish. As a proof of concept, we selected ups45 to be knocked down by morpholino injection in zebrafish embryos. Morphant phenotypic analysis showed moderate to severe eye morphological defects, with a defective formation of the retinal structures, therefore supporting the relevance of DUBs in the formation and differentiation of the vertebrate retina, and suggesting that genes encoding ubiquitin pathway enzymes are good candidates for causing hereditary retinal dystrophies. PMID:27613029

  2. Methods for studying the zebrafish brain: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Cameron; Bartoszek, Ewelina M; Yaksi, Emre

    2015-07-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is one of the most promising new model organisms. The increasing popularity of this amazing small vertebrate is evident from the exponentially growing numbers of research articles, funded projects and new discoveries associated with the use of zebrafish for studying development, brain function, human diseases and screening for new drugs. Thanks to the development of novel technologies, the range of zebrafish research is constantly expanding with new tools synergistically enhancing traditional techniques. In this review we will highlight the past and present techniques which have made, and continue to make, zebrafish an attractive model organism for various fields of biology, with a specific focus on neuroscience. PMID:25900095

  3. Patterns of thyroid hormone receptor expression in zebrafish and generation of a novel model of resistance to thyroid hormone action.

    PubMed

    Marelli, Federica; Carra, Silvia; Agostini, Maura; Cotelli, Franco; Peeters, Robin; Chatterjee, Krishna; Persani, Luca

    2016-03-15

    Resistance to thyroid hormone can be due to heterozygous, dominant negative (DN) THRA (RTHα) or THRB (RTHβ) mutations, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Here, we delineate the spatiotemporal expression of TH receptors (TRs) in zebrafish and generated morphants expressing equivalent amounts of wild-type and DN TRαs (thraa_MOs) and TRβs (thrb_MOs) in vivo. Both morphants show severe developmental abnormalities. The phenotype of thraa_MOs includes brain and cardiac defects, but normal thyroid volume and tshba expression. A combined modification of dio2 and dio3 expression can explain the high T3/T4 ratio seen in thraa_MOs, as in RTHα. Thrb_MOs show abnormal eyes and otoliths, with a typical RTHβ pattern of thyroid axis. The coexpression of wild-type, but not mutant, human TRs can rescue the phenotype in both morphants. High T3 doses can partially revert the dominant negative action of mutant TRs in morphant fish. Therefore, our morphants recapitulate the RTHα and RTHβ key manifestations representing new models in which the functional consequences of human TR mutations can be rapidly and faithfully evaluated. PMID:26802880

  4. DarT: The embryo test with the Zebrafish Danio rerio--a general model in ecotoxicology and toxicology.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Roland

    2002-01-01

    The acute fish test is an animal test whose ecotoxicological relevance is worthy of discussion. The primary aim of protection in ecotoxicology is the population and not the individual. Furthermore the concentration of pollutants in the environment is normally not in the lethal range. Therefore the acute fish test covers solely the situation after chemical spills. Nevertheless, acute fish toxicity data still belong to the base set used for the assessment of chemicals. The embryo test with the zebrafish Danio rerio (DarT) is recommended as a substitute for the acute fish test. For validation an international laboratory comparison test was carried out. A summary of the results is presented in this paper. Based on the promising results of testing chemicals and waste water the test design was validated by the DIN-working group "7.6 Fischei-Test". A normed test guideline for testing waste water with fish is available. The test duration is short (48 h) and within the test different toxicological endpoints can be examined. Endpoints from the embryo test are suitable for QSAR-studies. Besides the use in ecotoxicology the introduction as a toxicological model was investigated. Disturbance of pigmentation and effects on the frequency of heart-beat were examined. A further important application is testing of teratogenic chemicals. Based on the results DarT could be a screening test within preclinical studies. PMID:12096329

  5. Pathogenesis of POLR1C-dependent Type 3 Treacher Collins Syndrome revealed by a zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Lau, Marco Chi Chung; Kwong, Ernest Man Lok; Lai, Keng Po; Li, Jing-Woei; Ho, Jeff Cheuk Hin; Chan, Ting-Fung; Wong, Chris Kong Chu; Jiang, Yun-Jin; Tse, William Ka Fai

    2016-06-01

    Treacher Collins Syndrome (TCS) is a rare congenital birth disorder (1 in 50,000 live births) characterized by severe craniofacial defects, including the downward slanting palpebral fissures, hypoplasia of the facial bones, and cleft palate (CP). Over 90% of patients with TCS have a mutation in the TCOF1 gene. However, some patients exhibit mutations in two new causative genes, POLR1C and POLR1D, which encode subunits of RNA polymerases I and III, that affect ribosome biogenesis. In this study, we examine the role of POLR1C in TCS using zebrafish as a model system. Our data confirmed that polr1c is highly expressed in the facial region, and dysfunction of this gene by knockdown or knock-out resulted in mis-expression of neural crest cells during early development that leads to TCS phenotype. Next generation sequencing and bioinformatics analysis of the polr1c mutants further demonstrated the up-regulated p53 pathway and predicted skeletal disorders. Lastly, we partially rescued the TCS facial phenotype in the background of p53 mutants, which supported the hypothesis that POLR1C-dependent type 3 TCS is associated with the p53 pathway. PMID:26972049

  6. Human melanoma cells transplanted into zebrafish proliferate, migrate, produce melanin, form masses and stimulate angiogenesis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Haldi, Maryann; Ton, Christopher; Seng, Wen Lin; McGrath, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    In this research, we optimized parameters for xenotransplanting WM-266-4, a metastatic melanoma cell line, including zebrafish site and stage for transplantation, number of cells, injection method, and zebrafish incubation temperature. Melanoma cells proliferated, migrated and formed masses in vivo. We transplanted two additional cancer cell lines, SW620, a colorectal cancer cell line, and FG CAS/Crk, a pancreatic cancer cell line and these human cancers also formed masses in zebrafish. We also transplanted CCD-1092Sk, a human fibroblast cell line established from normal foreskin and this cell line migrated, but did not proliferate or form masses. We quantified the number of proliferating melanoma and normal skin fibroblasts by dissociating xenotransplant zebrafish, dispensing an aliquot of CM-DiI labeled human cells from each zebrafish onto a hemocytometer slide and then visually counting the number of fluorescently labeled cancer cells. Since zebrafish are transparent until approximately 30 dpf, the interaction of labeled melanoma cells and zebrafish endothelial cells (EC) can be visualized by whole-mount immunochemical staining. After staining with Phy-V, a mouse anti-zebrafish monoclonal antibody (mAb) that specifically labels activated EC and angioblasts, using immunohistology and 2-photon microscopy, we observed activated zebrafish EC embedded in human melanoma cell masses. The zebrafish model offers a rapid efficient approach for assessing human cancer cells at various stages of tumorigenesis. PMID:17051341

  7. Cryoprotectants protect medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos from chilling injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-Jing; Zhou, Guang-Bin; Wang, Yan-Ping; Fu, Xiang-Wei; Zhu, Shi-En

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of six cryoprotectants (dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), glycerol (Gly), methanol (MeOH), ethylene glycol (EG), 1,2-propylene glycol (PG) and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) on the survival of medaka (Oryzias lapites) embryos at low temperatures (0 and -5C). Firstly, the embryos at 8 to 16-cell stages were exposed to different concentrations (1 to 4 mol per L) of DMSO, Gly, MeOH, EG, PG and DMF for 40min at 26C. After removal of the cryoprotectants (CPAs), the embryo survivals were assessed by their development into live fries following 9 day of culture. The results showed that the higher concentration of the CPA, the lower survival of the embryos; and that the toxicity of the six CPAs to medaka embryos is in the order of PG < MeOH = DMSO < Gly < EG < DMF (P < 0.05). Secondly, based on the results obtained above, embryos at 8 to 16-cell stages or other stages were exposed to 2 mol per L of PG, MeOH or DMSO for up to 180 min at 0C and up to 80 min at -5C respectively. The 8 to 16-cell embryos treated with MeOH at low temperatures showed highest survival. Thirdly, when embryos at different stages were treated with 2 mol per L of MeOH at -5C for 60 min, 16-somite stage embryos showed highest survival, followed by 4-somite, neurula, 50 percent epiboly, blastula, 32-cell and 8 to 16-cell embryos. These results demonstrated that PG had the lowest toxicity to medaka embryos among the six permeable CPAs at 26C, whereas MeOH showed highest cryoprotective efficiency under chilling conditions and chilling injury decreased gradually with the development of medaka embryos. PMID:22576114

  8. Female mate preference for longer fins in medaka.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Shingo; Kawajiri, Maiko; Kitano, Jun; Yamahira, Kazunori

    2014-11-01

    Medaka, Oryzias latipes complex, display sexual dimorphisms in anal- and dorsal-fin lengths that suggest that females may prefer males with longer fins. However, female preference for longer anal and/or dorsal fins has not yet been described for the medaka. One reason that previous studies have not investigated this relationship may be because variations in male fin lengths within a single population are too small to experimentally detect female preference. In this study, we artificially crossed individuals from two wild populations (Aomori and Okinawa) that differed in male anal- and dorsal-fin lengths to increase phenotypic variation. We then tested female mate preference using these hybrid males. The results of the mating experiments and stepwise multiple regression analyses indicate that anal- and/or dorsal-fin lengths of the males contributed to female preference (i.e., males with longer anal and/or dorsal fins were less likely to be rejected by females). Variation in male standard length did not affect female preference. The evolution of female preference for longer fins in the medaka species complex may be explained by the "sexy son" hypothesis or the direct benefit hypothesis. PMID:25366151

  9. GENDER-SPECIFIC GROWTH AND HEPATIC NEOPLASIA IN MEDAKA (ORYZIAS LATIPES). (R825433)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brief exposure of hatchling medaka (Oryzias latipes), to diethylnitrosamine (DEN), resulted in hepatic tumor formation in female medaka at an incidence of 2–3-fold higher than that of their male cohorts. Spontaneous liver tumor incidence was reported in unexposed...

  10. INFLUENCE OF EXPOSURE HISTORY ON VITELLOGENIN INDUCTION IN MEDAKA: A CASE OF "ESTROGEN MEMORY"?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Influence of Exposure History on Vitellogenin Induction in Medaka: a Case of "Estrogen Memory"? (Abstract). Mar. Environ. Res. 50(1-5):196.

    In this study, we exposed female medaka to aqueous solutions of o,p'-DDT until tissues residues reached approximately 100 g/g. Male...

  11. Microbead Implantation in the Zebrafish Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, Gary F.; Morales, Elvin E.; Wingert, Rebecca A.

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish has emerged as a valuable genetic model system for the study of developmental biology and disease. Zebrafish share a high degree of genomic conservation, as well as similarities in cellular, molecular, and physiological processes, with other vertebrates including humans. During early ontogeny, zebrafish embryos are optically transparent, allowing researchers to visualize the dynamics of organogenesis using a simple stereomicroscope. Microbead implantation is a method that enables tissue manipulation through the alteration of factors in local environments. This allows researchers to assay the effects of any number of signaling molecules of interest, such as secreted peptides, at specific spatial and temporal points within the developing embryo. Here, we detail a protocol for how to manipulate and implant beads during early zebrafish development. PMID:26274386

  12. Discovering miRNA Regulatory Networks in Holt–Oram Syndrome Using a Zebrafish Model

    PubMed Central

    D’Aurizio, Romina; Russo, Francesco; Chiavacci, El