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Sample records for modern ultrasound techniques

  1. [Modernization of ophthalmoscopic techniques].

    PubMed

    Pomerantzeff, O; Vallat, M

    1987-01-01

    The great principles of ophthalmoscopy have been known for many decades. This paper intends show the new possibilities allowed by modern technology, especially in two fields. First of all, it is possible, even in keeping basic principles, to improve previous machines with, for example, better magnification, new ophthalmoscopic lens, or to create new materials as telescopes for clinical practice or intra-ocular surgery, wide angle or high magnification fundus cameras for posterior pole examination. Secondary, by revolutionary principles, it is possible to introduce laser in the ophthalmoscopic field and to imagine new ophthalmoscopes: SLO i.e. Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope or SLM i.e. Scanning Laser Microscope, which opens a window on the future. PMID:3598060

  2. Ultrasound Techniques for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rooney, James A.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasound has proven to be a safe non-invasive technique for imaging organs and measuring cardiovascular function. It has unique advantages for application to problems with man in space including evaluation of cardiovascular function both in serial studies and during critical operations. In addition, specialized instrumentation may be capable of detecting the onset of decompression sickness during EVA activities. A spatial location and three-dimensional reconstruction system is being developed to improve the accuracy and reproducibility for serial comparative ultrasound studies of cardiovascular function. The three-dimensional method permits the acquisition of ultrasonic images from many views that can be recombined into a single reconstruction of the heart or vasculature. In addition to conventional imaging and monitoring systems, it is sometimes necessary or desirable to develop instrumentation for special purposes. One example of this type of development is the design of a pulsed-Doppler system to monitor cerebral blood flow during critical operations such as re-entry. A second example is the design of a swept-frequency ultrasound system for the detection of bubbles in the circulatory system and/or soft tissues as an early indication of the onset of decompression sickness during EVA activities. This system exploits the resonant properties of bubbles and can detect both fundamental and second harmonic emissions from the insonified region.

  3. Ultrasound elastography: principles, techniques, and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Dewall, Ryan J

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography is an emerging set of imaging modalities used to image tissue elasticity and are often referred to as virtual palpation. These techniques have proven effective in detecting and assessing many different pathologies, because tissue mechanical changes often correlate with tissue pathological changes. This article reviews the principles of ultrasound elastography, many of the ultrasound-based techniques, and popular clinical applications. Originally, elastography was a technique that imaged tissue strain by comparing pre- and postcompression ultrasound images. However, new techniques have been developed that use different excitation methods such as external vibration or acoustic radiation force. Some techniques track transient phenomena such as shear waves to quantitatively measure tissue elasticity. Clinical use of elastography is increasing, with applications including lesion detection and classification, fibrosis staging, treatment monitoring, vascular imaging, and musculoskeletal applications. PMID:23510006

  4. New ultrasound techniques for lymph node evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xin-Wu; Jenssen, Christian; Saftoiu, Adrian; Ignee, Andre; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2013-01-01

    Conventional ultrasound (US) is the recommended imaging method for lymph node (LN) diseases with the advantages of high resolution, real time evaluation and relative low costs. Current indications of transcutaneous ultrasound and endoscopic ultrasound include the detection and characterization of lymph nodes and the guidance for LN biopsy. Recent advances in US technology, such as contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), contrast enhanced endoscopic ultrasound (CE-EUS), and real time elastography show potential to improve the accuracy of US for the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant lymph nodes. In addition, CEUS and CE-EUS have been also used for the guidance of fine needle aspiration and assessment of treatment response. Complementary to size criteria, CEUS could also be used to evaluate response of tumor angiogenesis to anti-angiogenic therapies. In this paper we review current literature regarding evaluation of lymphadenopathy by new and innovative US techniques. PMID:23946589

  5. Pulse Compression Techniques for Laser Generated Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anastasi, R. F.; Madaras, E. I.

    1999-01-01

    Laser generated ultrasound for nondestructive evaluation has an optical power density limit due to rapid high heating that causes material damage. This damage threshold limits the generated ultrasound amplitude, which impacts nondestructive evaluation inspection capability. To increase ultrasound signal levels and improve the ultrasound signal-to-noise ratio without exceeding laser power limitations, it is possible to use pulse compression techniques. The approach illustrated here uses a 150mW laser-diode modulated with a pseudo-random sequence and signal correlation. Results demonstrate the successful generation of ultrasonic bulk waves in aluminum and graphite-epoxy composite materials using a modulated low-power laser diode and illustrate ultrasound bandwidth control.

  6. Ultrasound techniques in the evaluation of the mediastinum, part I: endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) and transcutaneous mediastinal ultrasound (TMUS), introduction into ultrasound techniques

    PubMed Central

    Annema, Jouke Tabe; Clementsen, Paul; Cui, Xin Wu; Borst, Mathias Maximilian; Jenssen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging has gained importance in pulmonary medicine over the last decades including conventional transcutaneous ultrasound (TUS), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), and endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS). Mediastinal lymph node staging affects the management of patients with both operable and inoperable lung cancer (e.g., surgery vs. combined chemoradiation therapy). Tissue sampling is often indicated for accurate nodal staging. Recent international lung cancer staging guidelines clearly state that endosonography (EUS and EBUS) should be the initial tissue sampling test over surgical staging. Mediastinal nodes can be sampled from the airways [EBUS combined with transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA)] or the esophagus [EUS fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA)]. EBUS and EUS have a complementary diagnostic yield and in combination virtually all mediastinal lymph nodes can be biopsied. Additionally endosonography has an excellent yield in assessing granulomas in patients suspected of sarcoidosis. The aim of this review, in two integrative parts, is to discuss the current role and future perspectives of all ultrasound techniques available for the evaluation of mediastinal lymphadenopathy and mediastinal staging of lung cancer. A specific emphasis will be on learning mediastinal endosonography. Part I is dealing with an introduction into ultrasound techniques, mediastinal lymph node anatomy and diagnostic reach of ultrasound techniques and part II with the clinical work up of neoplastic and inflammatory mediastinal lymphadenopathy using ultrasound techniques and how to learn mediastinal endosonography. PMID:26543620

  7. Assessing the Risks for Modern Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    William, Jr.

    1998-05-01

    Some 35 years after Paul-Jacques and Pierre Curie discovered piezoelectricity, ultrasonic imaging was developed by Paul Langevin. During this work, ultrasonic energy was observed to have a detrimental biological effect. These observations were confirmed a decade later by R. W. Wood and A. L. Loomis. It was not until the early 1950s that ultrasonic exposure conditions were controlled and specified so that studies could focus on the mechanisms by which ultrasound influenced biological materials. In the late 1940s, pioneering work was initiated to image the human body by ultrasonic techniques. These engineers and physicians were aware of the deleterious ultrasound effects at sufficiently high levels; this endeavored them to keep the exposure levels reasonably low. Over the past three decades, diagnostic ultrasound has become a sophisticated technology. Yet, our understanding of the potential risks has not changed appreciably. It is very encouraging that human injury has never been attributed to clinical practice of diagnostic ultrasound.

  8. Ultrasound elastographic techniques in focal liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Clara Benedetta; Cavalcoli, Federica; Fraquelli, Mirella; Conte, Dario; Massironi, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Elastographic techniques are new ultrasound-based imaging techniques developed to estimate tissue deformability/stiffness. Several ultrasound elastographic approaches have been developed, such as static elastography, transient elastography and acoustic radiation force imaging methods, which include point shear wave and shear wave imaging elastography. The application of these methods in clinical practice aims at estimating the mechanical tissues properties. One of the main settings for the application of these tools has been liver stiffness assessment in chronic liver disease, which has been studied mainly using transient elastography. Another field of application for these techniques is the assessment of focal lesions, detected by ultrasound in organs such as pancreas, prostate, breast, thyroid, lymph nodes. Considering the frequency and importance of the detection of focal liver lesions through routine ultrasound, some studies have also aimed to assess the role that elestography can play in studying the stiffness of different types of liver lesions, in order to predict their nature and thus offer valuable non-invasive methods for the diagnosis of liver masses. PMID:26973405

  9. Modern control techniques for accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, R.W.; Shea, M.F.

    1984-05-01

    Beginning in the mid to late sixties, most new accelerators were designed to include computer based control systems. Although each installation differed in detail, the technology of the sixties and early to mid seventies dictated an architecture that was essentially the same for the control systems of that era. A mini-computer was connected to the hardware and to a console. Two developments have changed the architecture of modern systems: (a) the microprocessor and (b) local area networks. This paper discusses these two developments and demonstrates their impact on control system design and implementation by way of describing a possible architecture for any size of accelerator. Both hardware and software aspects are included.

  10. Modern Observational Techniques for Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, J. C. (Editor); Greenberg, J. M. (Editor); Donn, B. (Editor); Rahe, J. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    Techniques are discussed in the following areas: astrometry, photometry, infrared observations, radio observations, spectroscopy, imaging of coma and tail, image processing of observation. The determination of the chemical composition and physical structure of comets is highlighted.

  11. Teaching Modern Technique through Experiential Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salk, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    ````````Incorporation of an experiential anatomy component into the modern technique class educates students about the body in a way that permanently and positively impacts how they move. It is our responsibility as dance educators, whether at the elementary, secondary, or college level, to teach students how to care for their bodies and make…

  12. Modern Experimental Techniques in Turbine Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Bruckner, R. J.; Bencic, T. J.; Braunscheidel, E. P.

    1996-01-01

    The paper describes application of two modern experimental techniques, thin-film thermocouples and pressure sensitive paint, to measurement in turbine engine components. A growing trend of using computational codes in turbomachinery design and development requires experimental techniques to refocus from overall performance testing to acquisition of detailed data on flow and heat transfer physics to validate these codes for design applications. The discussed experimental techniques satisfy this shift in focus. Both techniques are nonintrusive in practical terms. The thin-film thermocouple technique improves accuracy of surface temperature and heat transfer measurements. The pressure sensitive paint technique supplies areal surface pressure data rather than discrete point values only. The paper summarizes our experience with these techniques and suggests improvements to ease the application of these techniques for future turbomachinery research and code verifications.

  13. Study of Beamforming Techniques for Ultrasound Imaging in Nondestructive Testing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorayeb, Sleiman Riad

    Many of the innovations in modern materials testing technology make use of ultrasound. Therefore, the theory and application of ultrasound have become of extreme importance in nondestructive inspection of complete engineered systems. However, despite the fact that most of these ultrasound inspection techniques are based on well-established phenomena, two key problems pertaining to their application still remain unresolved. These problems can be identified as (1) the material being tested is assumed to be isotropic and homogeneous by nature, and (2) the scanning/data collection process, prior to the reconstruction scheme, is very time consuming. As a result, techniques for fast, accurate testing of anisotropic and nonhomogeneous media have been the focus of attention in modern non-destructive testing research. This dissertation first describes the development and implementation of a time domain synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) to reconstruct flaws imbedded within Plexiglass^{rm TM/ } and Graphite/Epoxy samples. A modification to the present SAFT algorithm is then proposed in order to improve the quality of the images produced by SAFT when applied to composites. In addition, since the finite element method (FEM) can be used to solve hyperbolic partial differential equations, which govern wave propagation, FEM solutions are used to mimic a SAFT measurement. That is, the FEM is used to simulate the action of a transducer array. This is done to study the sensitivity of parameters involved in the SAFT algorithm. Using the same FEM model as a test bed, the data independent beamformer, in its basic form, is studied to determine its performance in reducing data acquisition time. It is seen that this technique is capable of adjusting the weights of the interpolating filter (beamformer) to predict an incoming signal from a desired direction while discriminating against other signals from different directions. SAFT results indicate that the FEM model can be used as

  14. A pioneer in the development of modern ultrasound: Robert William Boyle (1883-1955).

    PubMed

    Arshadi, Roozbeh; Cobbold, Richard S C

    2007-01-01

    Robert William Boyle was one of the pioneers in the development and application of ultrasound. His remarkable career has not been previously traced in any depth, nor have his contributions, especially those during WWI, been carefully described. In collaboration with Lord Rutherford, his work on the development of ultrasound methods for submarine detection paralleled those in France under Paul Langevin (1872-1946), who many consider to be the father of modern ultrasound. This biographic account of Boyle's life focuses on his ultrasound research contributions, particularly the developments during WWI and those in the 10 years after. Evidence is presented that his pioneering research, along with that of Langevin, provided much of the foundation for modern ultrasound developments. Although this paper is partially based on somewhat dispersed biographic information performed by others, original letters and research papers, in addition to records and verbal accounts provided by relatives, have been used and consulted. PMID:17189042

  15. Cache Energy Optimization Techniques For Modern Processors

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Sparsh

    2013-01-01

    Modern multicore processors are employing large last-level caches, for example Intel's E7-8800 processor uses 24MB L3 cache. Further, with each CMOS technology generation, leakage energy has been dramatically increasing and hence, leakage energy is expected to become a major source of energy dissipation, especially in last-level caches (LLCs). The conventional schemes of cache energy saving either aim at saving dynamic energy or are based on properties specific to first-level caches, and thus these schemes have limited utility for last-level caches. Further, several other techniques require offline profiling or per-application tuning and hence are not suitable for product systems. In this book, we present novel cache leakage energy saving schemes for single-core and multicore systems; desktop, QoS, real-time and server systems. Also, we present cache energy saving techniques for caches designed with both conventional SRAM devices and emerging non-volatile devices such as STT-RAM (spin-torque transfer RAM). We present software-controlled, hardware-assisted techniques which use dynamic cache reconfiguration to configure the cache to the most energy efficient configuration while keeping the performance loss bounded. To profile and test a large number of potential configurations, we utilize low-overhead, micro-architecture components, which can be easily integrated into modern processor chips. We adopt a system-wide approach to save energy to ensure that cache reconfiguration does not increase energy consumption of other components of the processor. We have compared our techniques with state-of-the-art techniques and have found that our techniques outperform them in terms of energy efficiency and other relevant metrics. The techniques presented in this book have important applications in improving energy-efficiency of higher-end embedded, desktop, QoS, real-time, server processors and multitasking systems. This book is intended to be a valuable guide for both newcomers

  16. Tumor Functional and Molecular Imaging Utilizing Ultrasound and Ultrasound-Mediated Optical Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Baohong; Rychak, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Tumor functional and molecular imaging has significantly contributed to cancer preclinical research and clinical applications. Among typical imaging modalities, ultrasonic and optical techniques are two commonly used methods; both share several common features such as cost efficiency, absence of ionizing radiation, relatively inexpensive contrast agents, and comparable maximum-imaging depth. Ultrasonic and optical techniques are also complementary in imaging resolution, molecular sensitivity, and imaging space (vascular and extravascular). The marriage between ultrasonic and optical techniques takes advantages of both techniques. This review introduces tumor functional and molecular imaging using microbubble-based ultrasound and ultrasound-mediated optical imaging techniques. PMID:23219728

  17. The technique of ultrasound guided prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Romics, Imre

    2004-11-01

    This article discusses the preparations for ultrasound guided prostate biopsy, the conditions used and the process of performing a biopsy. The first step in preparing the patient is a cleansing enema before biopsy. Every author proposes the use of a preoperative antibiotic based prophylaxis. Differences may be found in the type, dosage and the duration of this preoperative application, which can last from 2 h to 2 days. For anaesthesia, lidocaine has been proposed, which may be used as a gel applied in the rectum or in the form of a prostate infiltrate. Quite a few colleagues administer a brief intravenous narcosis. A major debate goes on in respect of defining the number of biopsy samples needed. Hodge proposed sextant biopsy in 1989, for which we had false negative findings in 20% of all cases. Because of this, it has recently been suggested that eight or rather ten samples be taken. There are some who question even this. Twelve biopsy samples do offer an advantage compared to six, although in the case of eight this is not the case. We shall present an in depth discussion of the various opinions on the different numbers of biopsies samples required. For the sample site, the apex, the base and the middle part are proposed, and (completing the process) two additional samples can also be taken from the transition zone (TZ), since 20% of all prostate cancers originate from TZ. In case of a palpable nodule or any lesion made visible by TRUS, an additional, targeted, biopsy has to be performed. Certain new techniques like the 3-D Doppler, contrast, intermittent and others shall also be presented. The control of the full length of samples taken by a gun, as well as the proper conservation of the samples, are parts of pathological processing and of the technical tasks. A repeated biopsy is necessary in the case of PIN atypia, beyond which the author also discusses other indications for a repeated biopsy. We may expect the occurrence of direct postoperative complications

  18. Technique as a Consideration in Modern Dance Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Ruth L.; Micheli, Lyle J.

    1986-01-01

    The many different techniques of modern dance each make unique demands on the dancer's body. A study of 164 modern dancers compared injury sites and frequency with the dance technique. Results indicate technique is a factor in injuries. (Author/MT)

  19. Techniques for Field Application of Lingual Ultrasound Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gick, Bryan; Bird, Sonya; Wilson, Ian

    2005-01-01

    Techniques are discussed for using ultrasound for lingual imaging in field-related applications. The greatest challenges we have faced distinguishing the field setting from the laboratory setting are the lack of controlled head/transducer movement, and the related issue of tissue compression. Two experiments are reported. First, a pilot study…

  20. Modern Ultrasound Imaging: AN Exciting Window Into the Sub-Surface World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonetti, F.

    2009-03-01

    Progress in solid state electronics and micromachining has led to the rapid development of ultrasound array technology. It is now possible to measure spatial maps of ultrasonic fields almost instantaneously, with high sensitivity and under various insonification conditions. The technology has become central to imaging in combination with beamforming techniques for applications in medical diagnostics and now in NDE for defect characterization. However, the resolution of current beamforming technology is limited. Indeed, it is not possible to observe the sub-wavelength structure of an object due to diffraction as demonstrated by Lord Rayleigh more than a century ago. This paper introduces the notion that ultrasonic measurements encode more information about the object's structure than beamforming can extract. The key to unlock this information is provided by the knowledge of the scattering mechanism that has caused the encoding in the first instance. This leads to a modern imaging strategy that goes beyond beamforming, can achieve subwavelength resolution and shares some of the underpinning physics with near field microscopy—known to break the Rayleigh criterion. These arguments are supported by experimental images showing unprecedented subwavelength resolution and tomographic reconstructions of a complex 3-D breast phantom that exhibit striking similarities with X-ray CT.

  1. Ultrasound imaging techniques in density separation of polyolefin waste.

    PubMed

    Sanaee, Seyed Ali; Bakker, M C M

    2012-12-01

    Ultrasound imaging techniques are investigated using a multi-element sensor array for purposes of monitoring and measurement ofpolyolefin waste particles inside the black ferrous liquid ofa magnetic density separator (MDS). A medical ultrasound imaging system with real-time capability was adapted first to assess the potential of imaging technology inside the MDS. An image processing routine was developed to determine the depth distribution of the detected particles as they are carried by the flow in the MDS channel. This real-time information is vital for optimizing the splitter position, which directly influences quality and recovery of the MDS polyolefin products. Despite successes in the laboratory, the medical technology proved unsatisfactory for continuous high-quality image forming in the industrial set-up as it requires regular operator intervention. Therefore, research has been initiated into alternative imaging methods, which are also being investigated in other fields such as non-destructive testing and geophysics. The influence of different ultrasound datasets and related image-forming techniques were investigated, for which dedicated algorithms were implemented in Matlab. The main advantages and disadvantages of the different techniques are addressed. It is concluded that the alternative imaging methods may be more robust and deliver higher image quality compared to the commercial medical imager. In particular, sizing of polyolefin particles may improve significantly if the method takes into account the correct ultrasound velocities of both the ferrous liquid and the immersed polyolefin particles. PMID:23437658

  2. Investigation of Manipulation Technique of Microbubbles Using Focused Ultrasound.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osaki, Taichi; Inoue, Kazuhito; Matsumoto, Yoichiro; Takagi, Shu; Azuma, Takashi; Ichiyanagi, Mitsuhisa

    2015-11-01

    Recently, it has been thought that the application of ultrasound and microbubbles(MB) is utility to the medical field. Should MB be manipulated contactlessly, it will contribute to the mechanism investigation on the drug delivery system using MB as drug carrier. However no technique has yet to be established that can trap MB at any desired position, manipulate them along any desired path. Accordingly in this research, we investigated whether it was possible to trap MB at desired position, manipulate them along desired paths through experiments aimed at the development of MB manipulation tools that utilize ultrasound. Moreover, we analyzed the microbubble behaviors in ultrasound field. Bubbles in the ultrasound wave field are subjected to the primary Bjerknes force. Our method aimed that MB are trapped at the antinode or the node and manipulated with moving the antinode or node. We fabricated a concave transducer which radiates focused ultrasound and used sonazoid as MB and they were trapped at the focus as a cluster. The transducer moves its own position to move its focus and manipulate MB. Besides, we observed the trapped cluster with several incident frequencies. MB were trapped and manipulated along a locus of alphabet ?M? about 100 µm. From this result, it is implied that MB can be manipulated along any desired path. Moreover, there was the inverse correlation between the trapped cluster size and the incident frequency.

  3. Technique as a Consideration in Modern Dance Injuries.

    PubMed

    Solomon, R L; Micheli, L J

    1986-08-01

    In brief: Modern dance encompasses many different techniques, each of which makes unique demands on the dancer's body. When these demands are amplified by the repetition required to learn and use any technique, overuse injuries sometimes result. To provide a data base for studying injuries in a significant sample of the modern dance community, we surveyed 164 modern dancers, who reported a total of 229 injuries over the past five years. Injury sites and frequency varied with the dance technique. For example, the rate of knee injuries was higher among dancers using the Graham technique than among those using the Horton technique (25% and 10.8%, respectively), whereas lower back injuries occurred more frequently in Horton than in Graham dancers (21.6% and 16.7%, respectively). Hence, technique is a factor to consider when studying modern dance injuries. PMID:27441616

  4. Wrist ultrasound examination – scanning technique and ultrasound anatomy. Part 1: Dorsal wrist

    PubMed Central

    Łasecki, Mateusz; Zaleska-Dorobisz, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging of the musculoskeletal system is superior to other imaging methods in many aspects, such as multidimensional character of imaging, possibility of dynamic evaluation and precise assessment of soft tissues. Moreover, it is a safe and relatively inexpensive method, broadly available and well-tolerated by patients. A correctly conducted ultrasound examination of the wrist delivers detailed information concerning the condition of tendons, muscles, ligaments, nerves and vessels. However, the knowledge of anatomy is crucial to establish a correct ultrasound diagnosis, also in wrist assessment. An ultrasound examination of the wrist is one of the most common US examinations conducted in patients with rheumatological diseases. Ultrasonographic signs depend on the advancement of the disease. The examination is equally frequently conducted in patients with pain or swelling of the wrist due to non-rheumatological causes. The aim of this publication was to present ultrasound images and anatomic schemes corresponding to them. The correct scanning technique of the dorsal part of the wrist was discussed and some practical tips, thanks to which highly diagnostic images can be obtained, were presented. The following anatomical structures should be visualized in an ultrasound examination of the dorsal wrist: distal radio-ulnar joint, radiocarpal joint, midcarpal joint, carpometacarpal joints, dorsal radiocarpal ligament, compartments of extensor tendons, radial artery, cephalic vein, two small branches of the radial nerve: superficial and deep, as well as certain midcarpal ligaments, particularly the scapholunate ligament and lunotriquetral ligament. The paper was distinguished in 2014 as the “poster of the month” (poster number C-1896) during the poster session of the European Congress of Radiology in Vienna. PMID:26675810

  5. Wrist ultrasound examination - scanning technique and ultrasound anatomy. Part 1: Dorsal wrist.

    PubMed

    Olchowy, Cyprian; Łasecki, Mateusz; Zaleska-Dorobisz, Urszula

    2015-06-01

    Ultrasound imaging of the musculoskeletal system is superior to other imaging methods in many aspects, such as multidimensional character of imaging, possibility of dynamic evaluation and precise assessment of soft tissues. Moreover, it is a safe and relatively inexpensive method, broadly available and well-tolerated by patients. A correctly conducted ultrasound examination of the wrist delivers detailed information concerning the condition of tendons, muscles, ligaments, nerves and vessels. However, the knowledge of anatomy is crucial to establish a correct ultrasound diagnosis, also in wrist assessment. An ultrasound examination of the wrist is one of the most common US examinations conducted in patients with rheumatological diseases. Ultrasonographic signs depend on the advancement of the disease. The examination is equally frequently conducted in patients with pain or swelling of the wrist due to non-rheumatological causes. The aim of this publication was to present ultrasound images and anatomic schemes corresponding to them. The correct scanning technique of the dorsal part of the wrist was discussed and some practical tips, thanks to which highly diagnostic images can be obtained, were presented. The following anatomical structures should be visualized in an ultrasound examination of the dorsal wrist: distal radio-ulnar joint, radiocarpal joint, midcarpal joint, carpometacarpal joints, dorsal radiocarpal ligament, compartments of extensor tendons, radial artery, cephalic vein, two small branches of the radial nerve: superficial and deep, as well as certain midcarpal ligaments, particularly the scapholunate ligament and lunotriquetral ligament. The paper was distinguished in 2014 as the "poster of the month" (poster number C-1896) during the poster session of the European Congress of Radiology in Vienna. PMID:26675810

  6. Ultrasound techniques in the evaluation of the mediastinum, part 2: mediastinal lymph node anatomy and diagnostic reach of ultrasound techniques, clinical work up of neoplastic and inflammatory mediastinal lymphadenopathy using ultrasound techniques and how to learn mediastinal endosonography

    PubMed Central

    Jenssen, Christian; Annema, Jouke Tabe; Clementsen, Paul; Cui, Xin-Wu; Borst, Mathias Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging has gained importance in pulmonary medicine over the last decades including conventional transcutaneous ultrasound (TUS), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), and endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS). Mediastinal lymph node (MLN) staging affects the management of patients with both operable and inoperable lung cancer (e.g., surgery vs. combined chemoradiation therapy). Tissue sampling is often indicated for accurate nodal staging. Recent international lung cancer staging guidelines clearly state that endosonography should be the initial tissue sampling test over surgical staging. Mediastinal nodes can be sampled from the airways [endobronchial ultrasound combined with transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA)] or the esophagus [endoscopic ultrasound fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA)]. EBUS and EUS have a complementary diagnostic yield and in combination virtually all MLNs can be biopsied. Additionally endosonography has an excellent yield in assessing granulomas in patients suspected of sarcoidosis. The aim of this review in two integrative parts is to discuss the current role and future perspectives of all ultrasound techniques available for the evaluation of mediastinal lymphadenopathy and mediastinal staging of lung cancer. A specific emphasis will be on learning mediastinal endosonography. Part 1 deals with an introduction into ultrasound techniques, MLN anatomy and diagnostic reach of ultrasound techniques and part 2 with the clinical work up of neoplastic and inflammatory mediastinal lymphadenopathy using ultrasound techniques and how to learn mediastinal endosonography. PMID:26623120

  7. Modern non-invasive diagnostic techniques in the detection of early cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kardynal, Agnieszka; Olszewska, Malgorzata

    2014-03-31

    Over the past few years melanoma has grown into a disease of socio-economic importance due to the increasing incidence and persistently high mortality rates. Melanoma is a malignant tumor with a high tendency to metastasize. Therefore, an extremely important part of the therapeutic process is to identify the disease at an early stage: in situ or stage I. Many tools for early diagnosis of melanoma are available today, including dermoscopy, videodermoscopy and in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy. Other methods such as high frequency ultrasound, optical coherence tomography and electrical impedance spectroscopy may serve as additional diagnostic aids. Modern imaging techniques also allow the monitoring of melanocytic skin lesions over months or years to detect the moment of malignant transformation. This review summarizes the current knowledge about modern diagnostic techniques, which may aid early diagnosis of melanoma. PMID:24748903

  8. Clinical Impact of Ultrasound-Related Techniques on the Diagnosis of Focal Liver Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, Veronica; Bolondi, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    Since its introduction in clinical practice, ultrasound technology has greatly impacted patient management, particularly in the case of liver diseases, where hepatologists usually perform ultrasound examinations. Clinicians are increasingly aware of the great potential of ultrasound waves and of the recent innovations that exploit the mechanical properties of ultrasound waves. Thus, at present, not only B-mode ultrasound but also contrast-enhanced ultrasound and, more recently, elastosonography are used worldwide in various settings. This review aims to describe why clinicians should be aware of ultrasound-based techniques, how they should use these techniques for assessing focal liver lesions, and how these techniques impact patient management. We will review the clinical potential of ultrasound-related techniques, starting from lesion detection, moving to characterization, and concluding with their utility in guiding treatments and analyzing their effects. PMID:24159588

  9. Automatic Cataract Hardness Classification Ex Vivo by Ultrasound Techniques.

    PubMed

    Caixinha, Miguel; Santos, Mário; Santos, Jaime

    2016-04-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of a new methodology for cataract hardness characterization and automatic classification using ultrasound techniques, different cataract degrees were induced in 210 porcine lenses. A 25-MHz ultrasound transducer was used to obtain acoustical parameters (velocity and attenuation) and backscattering signals. B-Scan and parametric Nakagami images were constructed. Ninety-seven parameters were extracted and subjected to a Principal Component Analysis. Bayes, K-Nearest-Neighbours, Fisher Linear Discriminant and Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers were used to automatically classify the different cataract severities. Statistically significant increases with cataract formation were found for velocity, attenuation, mean brightness intensity of the B-Scan images and mean Nakagami m parameter (p < 0.01). The four classifiers showed a good performance for healthy versus cataractous lenses (F-measure ≥ 92.68%), while for initial versus severe cataracts the SVM classifier showed the higher performance (90.62%). The results showed that ultrasound techniques can be used for non-invasive cataract hardness characterization and automatic classification. PMID:26742891

  10. CW laser generated ultrasound techniques for microstructure material properties evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thursby, Graham; Culshaw, Brian; Pierce, Gareth; Cleary, Alison; McKee, Campbell; Veres, Istvan

    2009-03-01

    Mechanical properties of materials may be obtained from the inversion of ultrasonic Lamb wave dispersion curves. In order to do this broadband excitation and detection of ultrasound is required. As sample size and, in particular, thickness, are reduced to those of microstructures, ultrasound frequencies in the range of the gigahertz region will be required. We look at two possible cw laser excitation techniques which, having far lower peak powers than the more frequently used Q-switched lasers, therefore give a negligible risk of damaging the sample through ablation. In the first method the modulation frequency of a sinusoidally modulated laser is swept over the required range. In the second, the laser is modulated with a series of square pulses whose timing is given by a PRBS (pseudo random binary sequence) in the form of a modified m-sequence.

  11. High intensity focused ultrasound surgery (HIFU) of the brain: A historical perspective, with modern applications

    PubMed Central

    Jagannathan, Jay; Sanghvi, Narendra K; Crum, Lawrence A; Yen, Chun-Po; Medel, Ricky; Dumont, Aaron S; Sheehan, Jason P; Steiner, Ladislau; Jolesz, Ferenc; Kassell, Neal F

    2014-01-01

    The field of MRI-guided high intensity focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) is a rapidly evolving one with many potential applications in neurosurgery. This is the first of three articles on MRgFUS, this paper focuses on the historical development of the technology and it's potential applications to modern neurosurgery. The evolution of MRgFUS has occurred in parallel with modern neurological surgery and the two seemingly distinct disciplines share many of the same pioneering figures. Early studies on focused ultrasound treatment in the 1940's and 1950's demonstrated the ability to perform precise lesioning in the human brain, with a favorable risk-benefit profile. However, the need for a craniotomy, as well as lack of sophisticated imaging technology resulted in limited growth of HIFU for neurosurgery. More recently, technological advances, have permitted the combination of HIFU along with MRI guidance to provide an opportunity to effectively treat a variety of CNS disorders. Although challenges remain, HIFU-mediated neurosurgery may offer the ability to target and treat CNS conditions that were previously extremely difficult to perform. The remaining two articles in this series will focus on the physical principles of modern MRgFUS as well as current and future avenues for investigation. PMID:19190451

  12. Target deconvolution techniques in modern phenotypic profiling

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jiyoun; Bogyo, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    The past decade has seen rapid growth in the use of diverse compound libraries in classical phenotypic screens to identify modulators of a given process. The subsequent process of identifying the molecular targets of active hits, also called ‘target deconvolution’, is an essential step for understanding compound mechanism of action and for using the identified hits as tools for further dissection of a given biological process. Recent advances in ‘omics’ technologies, coupled with in silico approaches and the reduced cost of whole genome sequencing, have greatly improved the workflow of target deconvolution and have contributed to a renaissance of ‘modern’ phenotypic profiling. In this review, we will outline how both new and old techniques are being used in the difficult process of target identification and validation as well as discuss some of the ongoing challenges remaining for phenotypic screening. PMID:23337810

  13. An innovative technique for recording picture-in-picture ultrasound videos.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Sathish; Finnoff, Jonathan T

    2013-08-01

    Many ultrasound educational products and ultrasound researchers present diagnostic and interventional ultrasound information using picture-in-picture videos, which simultaneously show the ultrasound image and transducer and patient positions. Traditional techniques for creating picture-in-picture videos are expensive, nonportable, or time-consuming. This article describes an inexpensive, simple, and portable way of creating picture-in-picture ultrasound videos. This technique uses a laptop computer with a video capture device to acquire the ultrasound feed. Simultaneously, a webcam captures a live video feed of the transducer and patient position and live audio. Both sources are streamed onto the computer screen and recorded by screen capture software. This technique makes the process of recording picture-in-picture ultrasound videos more accessible for ultrasound educators and researchers for use in their presentations or publications. PMID:23887962

  14. Ultrasound-guided implantation techniques in treatment of prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, S.S.; Torp-Pedersen, S.T.; Holm, H.H. )

    1989-11-01

    Percutaneous ultrasound-guided interstitial radiotherapy is an attractive and elegant technique for the administration of high-dose local radiotherapy to the prostate. The complications of seed implantation are those associated with the radiation rather than with the technique of implantation. However, radiotherapy has not provided impressive local control of the disease or prolonged survival. The poor disease control was not attributed to poor seed placement, but rather to the inadequacy of {sup 125}I in controlling the cancer. The essence of nonsurgical treatment for prostate cancer is the use of effective imaging. Experience in the field of minimally invasive surgery has shown that ultrasound is the ideal imaging system for targeting treatments because of its ease of use and the absence of adverse effects. As the newer techniques of implantation come to be accepted, it is hoped that the complications of rectal and bladder radiation injury will decrease and the therapeutic benefits increase. The clinical trials required to define the precise role of each of the modalities of treatment must take nodal staging into account and must be compared with the gold standard of radical prostatectomy in the treatment of early confined disease.

  15. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Ultrasound is a type of imaging. It uses high-frequency sound waves to look at organs and ... liver, and other organs. During pregnancy, doctors use ultrasound to view the fetus. Unlike x-rays, ultrasound ...

  16. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Ultrasound is a useful procedure for monitoring the baby's development in the uterus. Ultrasound uses inaudible sound waves to ... no known risks for ultrasound at present, it is highly recommended that pregnant women consult their physician ...

  17. Cardiac Limited Ultrasound Examination Techniques to Augment the Bedside Cardiac Physical Examination.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Bruce J; Shaw, David J; Amundson, Stan A; Phan, James N; Blanchard, Daniel G; DeMaria, Anthony N

    2015-09-01

    The current practice of physical diagnosis is dependent on physician skills and biases, inductive reasoning, and time efficiency. Although the clinical utility of echocardiography is well known, few data exist on how to integrate 2-dimensional screening "quick-look" ultrasound applications into a novel, modernized cardiac physical examination. We discuss the evidence basis behind ultrasound "signs" pertinent to the cardiovascular system and elemental in synthesis of bedside diagnoses and propose the application of a brief cardiac limited ultrasound examination based on these signs. An ultrasound-augmented cardiac physical examination can be taught in traditional medical education and has the potential to improve bedside diagnosis and patient care. PMID:26269293

  18. Noninvasive skin tightening: focus on new ultrasound techniques

    PubMed Central

    Fabi, Sabrina Guillen

    2015-01-01

    Microfocused ultrasound (MFU) has been recently developed to meet the ever-growing public demand for achieving significant, noninvasive skin lifting and tightening. MFU can be focused on subcutaneous tissue where the temperature briefly reaches greater than 60°C, producing small (<1 mm3) thermal coagulation points to a depth of up to 5 mm within the mid-to-deep reticular layer of the dermis and subdermis. The intervening papillary dermal and epidermal layers of skin remain unaffected. The application of heat at these discrete thermal coagulation points causes collagen fibers in the facial planes such as the superficial musculoaponeurotic system and platysma, as well as the deep reticular dermis, to become denatured, contracting and stimulating de novo collagen. A commercially available device combines MFU with high-resolution ultrasound imaging (MFU-V), which enables visualization of tissue planes to a depth of 8 mm and allows the user to see where the MFU energy will be applied (Ultherapy®; Ulthera Inc., Mesa, AZ, USA). Using different transducers, MFU-V treatment can be customized to meet the unique physical characteristics of each patient by adjusting energy and focal depth of the emitted ultrasound. By targeting the facial superficial musculoaponeurotic system, noninvasive tightening and lifting of sagging facial and neck skin and improvements in the appearance of wrinkles can be achieved. MFU-V can also improve lines and wrinkles of the décolleté. Treatment protocols for the use of MFU-V continue to be refined, and its use in combination with other rejuvenation techniques has been demonstrated. Brief discomfort that often occurs during treatment can be minimized with oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Other treatment-related adverse events include transient erythema, edema, and occasional bruising. MFU-V is best suited for patients with mild-to-moderate skin and soft tissue laxity. For older patients with severe skin laxity and marked platysmal

  19. Unifying Concepts of Statistical and Spectral Quantitative Ultrasound Techniques.

    PubMed

    Destrempes, François; Franceschini, Emilie; Yu, François T H; Cloutier, Guy

    2016-02-01

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) techniques using radiofrequency (RF) backscattered signals have been used for tissue characterization of numerous organ systems. One approach is to use the magnitude and frequency dependence of backscatter echoes to quantify tissue structures. Another approach is to use first-order statistical properties of the echo envelope as a signature of the tissue microstructure. We propose a unification of these QUS concepts. For this purpose, a mixture of homodyned K-distributions is introduced to model the echo envelope, together with an estimation method and a physical interpretation of its parameters based on the echo signal spectrum. In particular, the total, coherent and diffuse signal powers related to the proposed mixture model are expressed explicitly in terms of the structure factor previously studied to describe the backscatter coefficient (BSC). Then, this approach is illustrated in the context of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation. It is experimentally shown that the total, coherent and diffuse signal powers are determined by a structural parameter of the spectral Structure Factor Size and Attenuation Estimator. A two-way repeated measures ANOVA test showed that attenuation (p-value of 0.077) and attenuation compensation (p-value of 0.527) had no significant effect on the diffuse to total power ratio. These results constitute a further step in understanding the physical meaning of first-order statistics of ultrasound images and their relations to QUS techniques. The proposed unifying concepts should be applicable to other biological tissues than blood considering that the structure factor can theoretically model any spatial distribution of scatterers. PMID:26415165

  20. The use of modern technologies and techniques in material testing

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, M.G. ); Lombard, M.D. )

    1993-01-01

    We live in a world of change, and the material procurement area is one of the most dynamic in our industry. We have experienced a significant increase in external pressures and regulations, which are contributing to the escalating cost of producing power. At the same time, we are being asked by our management to reduce cost within our organizations. To exist as a profitable utility in the 1990s and beyond, we need to adapt our procurement activities to the ever-changing marketplace by utilizing modern technologies and techniques. By utilizing these modern technologies and techniques along with the recent Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) guidelines, Niagara Mohawk can improve the procurement process, give ourselves a higher level of assurance of getting the right items, and provide our utility with significant monetary savings. This paper focuses on the technical and economic benefits of Niagara Mohawk's Material Testing Facility.

  1. A comparison of material classification techniques for ultrasound inverse imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Broschat, Shira L; Flynn, Patrick J

    2002-01-01

    The conjugate gradient method with edge preserving regularization (CGEP) is applied to the ultrasound inverse scattering problem for the early detection of breast tumors. To accelerate image reconstruction, several different pattern classification schemes are introduced into the CGEP algorithm. These classification techniques are compared for a full-sized, two-dimensional breast model. One of these techniques uses two parameters, the sound speed and attenuation, simultaneously to perform classification based on a Bayesian classifier and is called bivariate material classification (BMC). The other two techniques, presented in earlier work, are univariate material classification (UMC) and neural network (NN) classification. BMC is an extension of UMC, the latter using attenuation alone to perform classification, and NN classification uses a neural network. Both noiseless and noisy cases are considered. For the noiseless case, numerical simulations show that the CGEP-BMC method requires 40% fewer iterations than the CGEP method, and the CGEP-NN method requires 55% fewer. The CGEP-BMC and CGEP-NN methods yield more accurate reconstructions than the CGEP method. A quantitative comparison of the CGEP-BMC, CGEP-NN, and GN-UMC methods shows that the CGEP-BMC and CGEP-NN methods are more robust to noise than the GN-UMC method, while all three are similar in computational complexity. PMID:11831821

  2. A comparison of material classification techniques for ultrasound inverse imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Broschat, Shira L.; Flynn, Patrick J.

    2002-01-01

    The conjugate gradient method with edge preserving regularization (CGEP) is applied to the ultrasound inverse scattering problem for the early detection of breast tumors. To accelerate image reconstruction, several different pattern classification schemes are introduced into the CGEP algorithm. These classification techniques are compared for a full-sized, two-dimensional breast model. One of these techniques uses two parameters, the sound speed and attenuation, simultaneously to perform classification based on a Bayesian classifier and is called bivariate material classification (BMC). The other two techniques, presented in earlier work, are univariate material classification (UMC) and neural network (NN) classification. BMC is an extension of UMC, the latter using attenuation alone to perform classification, and NN classification uses a neural network. Both noiseless and noisy cases are considered. For the noiseless case, numerical simulations show that the CGEP-BMC method requires 40% fewer iterations than the CGEP method, and the CGEP-NN method requires 55% fewer. The CGEP-BMC and CGEP-NN methods yield more accurate reconstructions than the CGEP method. A quantitative comparison of the CGEP-BMC, CGEP-NN, and GN-UMC methods shows that the CGEP-BMC and CGEP-NN methods are more robust to noise than the GN-UMC method, while all three are similar in computational complexity.

  3. Endoscopic ultrasound-assisted gastrointestinal hemostasis: an evolving technique

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepanshu; Thosani, Nirav; Singhal, Shashideep

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding can range from grossly visible blood in stool or vomitus to microscopic bleed. However, any kind of bleeding can lead to potential life-threatening consequences. A small proportion of patients with gastrointestinal bleeding remain refractory to initial endoscopic hemostasis. While some are successfully managed by repeat endoscopic intervention, a few fail to respond or are not amenable to endoscopic hemostasis. As of now, the next level of intervention is passed on to either surgeons or interventional radiologists. There is new evidence suggesting the increased utility of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in diagnosis and treatment of culprit vascular lesions across the gut. In addition, EUS-assisted technique has also been used in the primary prevention of bleeding from gastroesophageal varices. In this review article, we have summarized case series and reports describing the use of EUS-assisted hemostasis. Indications, techniques, complications and success rates reported are discussed. While most of the authors describe their experience with primary and secondary treatment of gastric varices, treatment of other gastrointestinal lesions with EUS assisted hemostatic techniques is also discussed. PMID:27366229

  4. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Ultrasound uses high-frequency sound waves to make images of organs and structures inside the body. ... An ultrasound machine makes images so that organs inside the body can be examined. The machine sends out high- ...

  5. Basics, principles, techniques and modern methods in paediatric ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Riccabona, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is the mainstay of paediatric Radiology. This review aims at revisiting basic US principles, to list specific needs throughout childhood, and to discuss the application of new and modern US methods. The various sections elude to basic US physics, technical requisites and tips for handling, diagnostically valuable applications of modern techniques, and how to properly address hazards, risks and limitations. In conclusion, US holds vast potential throughout childhood in almost all body regions and many childhood specific queries - helping to reduce the need for or to optimize more invasive or irradiating imaging. Make the most of US and offerings a dedicated paediatric US service throughout the day, the week and the year thus is and will stay a major task of Paediatric Radiology. PMID:24932845

  6. A Robust Model-Based Coding Technique for Ultrasound Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Docef, Alen; Smith, Mark J. T.

    1995-01-01

    This paper introduces a new approach to coding ultrasound video, the intended application being very low bit rate coding for transmission over low cost phone lines. The method exploits both the characteristic noise and the quasi-periodic nature of the signal. Data compression ratios between 250:1 and 1000:1 are shown to be possible, which is sufficient for transmission over ISDN and conventional phone lines. Preliminary results show this approach to be promising for remote ultrasound examinations.

  7. Nde of Advanced Automotive Composite Materials that Apply Ultrasound Infrared Thermography Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seung-Hyun; Park, Soo-Keun; Kim, Jae-Yeol

    The infrared thermographic nondestructive inspection technique is a quality inspection and stability assessment method used to diagnose the physical characteristics and defects by detecting the infrared ray radiated from the object without destructing it. Recently, the nondestructive inspection and assessment that use the ultrasound-infrared thermography technique are widely adopted in diverse areas. The ultrasound-infrared thermography technique uses the phenomenon that the ultrasound wave incidence to an object with cracks or defects on its mating surface generates local heat on the surface. The car industry increasingly uses composite materials for their lightweight, strength, and environmental resistance. In this study, the car piston passed through the ultrasound-infrared thermography technique for nondestructive testing, among the composite material car parts. This study also examined the effects of the frequency and power to optimize the nondestructive inspection.

  8. Ultrasound Imaging Techniques for Spatiotemporal Characterization of Composition, Microstructure, and Mechanical Properties in Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Deng, Cheri X; Hong, Xiaowei; Stegemann, Jan P

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound techniques are increasingly being used to quantitatively characterize both native and engineered tissues. This review provides an overview and selected examples of the main techniques used in these applications. Grayscale imaging has been used to characterize extracellular matrix deposition, and quantitative ultrasound imaging based on the integrated backscatter coefficient has been applied to estimating cell concentrations and matrix morphology in tissue engineering. Spectral analysis has been employed to characterize the concentration and spatial distribution of mineral particles in a construct, as well as to monitor mineral deposition by cells over time. Ultrasound techniques have also been used to measure the mechanical properties of native and engineered tissues. Conventional ultrasound elasticity imaging and acoustic radiation force imaging have been applied to detect regions of altered stiffness within tissues. Sonorheometry and monitoring of steady-state excitation and recovery have been used to characterize viscoelastic properties of tissue using a single transducer to both deform and image the sample. Dual-mode ultrasound elastography uses separate ultrasound transducers to produce a more potent deformation force to microscale characterization of viscoelasticity of hydrogel constructs. These ultrasound-based techniques have high potential to impact the field of tissue engineering as they are further developed and their range of applications expands. PMID:26771992

  9. Ultrasound in sports medicine: relevance of emerging techniques to clinical care of athletes.

    PubMed

    Yim, Eugene Sun; Corrado, Gianmichael

    2012-08-01

    The applications of ultrasound in managing the clinical care of athletes have been expanding over the past decade. This review provides an analysis of the research that has been published regarding the use of ultrasound in athletes and focuses on how these emerging techniques can impact the clinical management of athletes by sports medicine physicians. Electronic database literature searches were performed using the subject terms 'ultrasound' and 'athletes' from the years 2003 to 2012. The following databases were searched: PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and SPORTDiscus™. The search produced 617 articles in total, with a predominance of articles focused on cardiac and musculoskeletal ultrasound. 266 of the studies involved application of ultrasound in evaluating the cardiovascular properties of athletes, and 151 studies involved musculoskeletal ultrasound. Other applications of ultrasound included abdominal, vascular, bone density and volume status. New techniques in echocardiography have made significant contributions to the understanding of the physiological changes that occur in the athlete's heart in response to the haemodynamic stress associated with different types of activity. The likely application of these techniques will be in managing athletes with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and the techniques are near ready for application into clinical practice. These techniques are highly specialized, however, and will require referral to dedicated laboratories to influence the clinical management of athletes. Investigation of aortic root pathology and pulmonary vascular haemodynamics are also emerging, but will require additional studies with larger numbers and outcomes analysis to validate their clinical utility. Some of these techniques are relatively simple, and thus hold the potential to enter clinical management in a point-of-care fashion. Musculoskeletal ultrasound has demonstrated a number of diagnostic and therapeutic techniques

  10. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... please enable JavaScript. Ultrasound uses high-frequency sound waves to make images of organs and structures inside ... examined. The machine sends out high-frequency sound waves, which reflect off body structures. A computer receives ...

  11. In situ sensor techniques in modern bioprocess monitoring.

    PubMed

    Beutel, Sascha; Henkel, Steffen

    2011-09-01

    New reactor concepts as multi-parallel screening systems or disposable bioreactor systems for decentralized and reproducible production increase the need for new and easy applicable sensor technologies to access data for process control. These sophisticated reactor systems require sensors to work with the lowest sampling volumes or, even better, to measure directly in situ, but in situ sensors are directly incorporated into a reactor or fermenter within the sterility barrier and have therefore to stand the sterilization procedures. Consequently, these in situ sensor technologies should enable the measurement of multi-analytes simultaneously online and in real-time at a low price for the robust sensing element. Current research therefore focuses on the implementation of noninvasive spectroscopic and optical technologies, and tries to employ them through fiber optics attached to disposable sensing connectors. Spectroscopic methods reach from ultraviolet to infrared and further comprising fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy. Also, optic techniques like microscopy are adapted for the direct use in bioreactor systems (Ulber et al. in Anal Bioanal Chem 376:342-348, 2003) as well as various electrochemical methods (Joo and Brown in Chem Rev 108:638-651, 2008). This review shows the variety of modern in situ sensing principles in bioprocess monitoring with emphasis on spectroscopic and optical techniques and the progress in the adaption to latest reactor concepts. PMID:21785932

  12. Ultrasound-Guided Pain Interventions - A Review of Techniques for Peripheral Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Soneji, Neilesh

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound has emerged to become a commonly used modality in the performance of chronic pain interventions. It allows direct visualization of tissue structure while allowing real time guidance of needle placement and medication administration. Ultrasound is a relatively affordable imaging tool and does not subject the practitioner or patient to radiation exposure. This review focuses on the anatomy and sonoanatomy of peripheral non-axial structures commonly involved in chronic pain conditions including the stellate ganglion, suprascapular, ilioinguinal, iliohypogastric, genitofemoral and lateral femoral cutaneous nerves. Additionally, the review discusses ultrasound guided intervention techniques applicable to these structures. PMID:23614071

  13. An update around the evidence base for the lower extremity ultrasound regional block technique

    PubMed Central

    Fanelli, Andrea; Ghisi, Daniela; Melotti, Rita Maria

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound guidance currently represents the gold standard for regional anesthesia. In particular for lower extremity blocks, despite the heterogeneity and the lack of large randomized controlled trials, current literature shows a modest improvement in block onset and quality compared with other localization techniques. This review aims to present the most recent findings on the application of ultrasound guidance for each single lower extremity approach. PMID:26918177

  14. A novel software-based technique for quantifying placental calcifications and infarctions from ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, John T.; McAuliffe, Fionnuala; Higgins, Mary; Stanton, Marie; Brennan, Patrick

    2008-03-01

    In obstetrics, antenatal ultrasound assessment of placental morphology comprises an important part of the estimation of fetal health. Ultrasound analysis of the placenta may reveal abnormalities such as placental calcification and infarcts. Current methods of quantification of these abnormalities are subjective and involve a grading system of Grannum stages I-III. The aim of this project is to develop a software tool that quantifies semi-automatically placental ultrasound images and facilitates the assessment of placental morphology. We have developed a 2D ultrasound imaging software tool that allows the obstetrician or sonographer to define the placental region of interest. A secondary reference map is created for use in our quantification algorithm. Using a slider technique the user can easily define an upper threshold based on high intensity for calcification classification and a lower threshold to define infarction regions based on low intensity within the defined region of interest. The percentage of the placental area that is calcified and also the percentage of infarction is calculated and this is the basis of our new metric. Ultrasound images of abnormal and normal placentas have been acquired to aid our software development. A full clinical prospective evaluation is currently being performed and we are currently applying this technology to the three-dimensional ultrasound domain. We have developed a novel software-based technique for calculating the extent of placental calcification and infarction, providing a new metric in this field. Our new metric may provide a more accurate measurement of placental calcification and infarction than current techniques.

  15. Developing High-Frequency Quantitative Ultrasound Techniques to Characterize Three-Dimensional Engineered Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado, Karla Patricia E.

    Tissue engineering holds great promise for the repair or replacement of native tissues and organs. Further advancements in the fabrication of functional engineered tissues are partly dependent on developing new and improved technologies to monitor the properties of engineered tissues volumetrically, quantitatively, noninvasively, and nondestructively over time. Currently, engineered tissues are evaluated during fabrication using histology, biochemical assays, and direct mechanical tests. However, these techniques destroy tissue samples and, therefore, lack the capability for real-time, longitudinal monitoring. The research reported in this thesis developed nondestructive, noninvasive approaches to characterize the structural, biological, and mechanical properties of 3-D engineered tissues using high-frequency quantitative ultrasound and elastography technologies. A quantitative ultrasound technique, using a system-independent parameter known as the integrated backscatter coefficient (IBC), was employed to visualize and quantify structural properties of engineered tissues. Specifically, the IBC was demonstrated to estimate cell concentration and quantitatively detect differences in the microstructure of 3-D collagen hydrogels. Additionally, the feasibility of an ultrasound elastography technique called Single Tracking Location Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (STL-ARFI) imaging was demonstrated for estimating the shear moduli of 3-D engineered tissues. High-frequency ultrasound techniques can be easily integrated into sterile environments necessary for tissue engineering. Furthermore, these high-frequency quantitative ultrasound techniques can enable noninvasive, volumetric characterization of the structural, biological, and mechanical properties of engineered tissues during fabrication and post-implantation.

  16. Modern Radar Techniques for Geophysical Applications: Two Examples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arokiasamy, B. J.; Bianchi, C.; Sciacca, U.; Tutone, G.; Zirizzotti, A.; Zuccheretti, E.

    2005-01-01

    The last decade of the evolution of radar was heavily influenced by the rapid increase in the information processing capabilities. Advances in solid state radio HF devices, digital technology, computing architectures and software offered the designers to develop very efficient radars. In designing modern radars the emphasis goes towards the simplification of the system hardware, reduction of overall power, which is compensated by coding and real time signal processing techniques. Radars are commonly employed in geophysical radio soundings like probing the ionosphere; stratosphere-mesosphere measurement, weather forecast, GPR and radio-glaciology etc. In the laboratorio di Geofisica Ambientale of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), Rome, Italy, we developed two pulse compression radars. The first is a HF radar called AIS-INGV; Advanced Ionospheric Sounder designed both for the purpose of research and for routine service of the HF radio wave propagation forecast. The second is a VHF radar called GLACIORADAR, which will be substituting the high power envelope radar used by the Italian Glaciological group. This will be employed in studying the sub glacial structures of Antarctica, giving information about layering, the bed rock and sub glacial lakes if present. These are low power radars, which heavily rely on advanced hardware and powerful real time signal processing. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  17. Assess sleep stage by modern signal processing techniques.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hau-tieng; Talmon, Ronen; Lo, Yu-Lun

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, two modern adaptive signal processing techniques, empirical intrinsic geometry and synchrosqueezing transform, are applied to quantify different dynamical features of the respiratory and electroencephalographic signals. We show that the proposed features are theoretically rigorously supported, as well as capture the sleep information hidden inside the signals. The features are used as input to multiclass support vector machines with the radial basis function to automatically classify sleep stages. The effectiveness of the classification based on the proposed features is shown to be comparable to human expert classification-the proposed classification of awake, REM, N1, N2, and N3 sleeping stages based on the respiratory signal (resp. respiratory and EEG signals) has the overall accuracy 81.7% (resp. 89.3%) in the relatively normal subject group. In addition, by examining the combination of the respiratory signal with the electroencephalographic signal, we conclude that the respiratory signal consists of ample sleep information, which supplements to the information stored in the electroencephalographic signal. PMID:25438301

  18. Inside Out: Modern Imaging Techniques to Reveal Animal Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Lauridsen, Henrik; Hansen, Kasper; Wang, Tobias; Agger, Peter; Andersen, Jonas L.; Knudsen, Peter S.; Rasmussen, Anne S.; Uhrenholt, Lars; Pedersen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Animal anatomy has traditionally relied on detailed dissections to produce anatomical illustrations, but modern imaging modalities, such as MRI and CT, now represent an enormous resource that allows for fast non-invasive visualizations of animal anatomy in living animals. These modalities also allow for creation of three-dimensional representations that can be of considerable value in the dissemination of anatomical studies. In this methodological review, we present our experiences using MRI, CT and μCT to create advanced representation of animal anatomy, including bones, inner organs and blood vessels in a variety of animals, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, mammals, and spiders. The images have a similar quality to most traditional anatomical drawings and are presented together with interactive movies of the anatomical structures, where the object can be viewed from different angles. Given that clinical scanners found in the majority of larger hospitals are fully suitable for these purposes, we encourage biologists to take advantage of these imaging techniques in creation of three-dimensional graphical representations of internal structures. PMID:21445356

  19. Degradation of glass artifacts: application of modern surface analytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Melcher, Michael; Wiesinger, Rita; Schreiner, Manfred

    2010-06-15

    A detailed understanding of the stability of glasses toward liquid or atmospheric attack is of considerable importance for preserving numerous objects of our cultural heritage. Glasses produced in the ancient periods (Egyptian, Greek, or Roman glasses), as well as modern glass, can be classified as soda-lime-silica glasses. In contrast, potash was used as a flux in medieval Northern Europe for the production of window panes for churches and cathedrals. The particular chemical composition of these potash-lime-silica glasses (low in silica and rich in alkali and alkaline earth components), in combination with increased levels of acidifying gases (such as SO(2), CO(2), NO(x), or O(3)) and airborne particulate matter in today's urban or industrial atmospheres, has resulted in severe degradation of important cultural relics, particularly over the last century. Rapid developments in the fields of microelectronics and computer sciences, however, have contributed to the development of a variety of nondestructive, surface analytical techniques for the scientific investigation and material characterization of these unique and valuable objects. These methods include scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy- or wavelength-dispersive spectrometry (SEM/EDX or SEM/WDX), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). In this Account, we address glass analysis and weathering mechanisms, exploring the possibilities (and limitations) of modern analytical techniques. Corrosion by liquid substances is well investigated in the glass literature. In a tremendous number of case studies, the basic reaction between aqueous solutions and the glass surfaces was identified as an ion-exchange reaction between hydrogen-bearing species of the attacking liquid and the alkali and alkaline earth ions in the glass, causing a depletion of the latter in the outermost surface layers. Although mechanistic analogies to liquid corrosion are obvious, atmospheric

  20. Ultrasound Recycling of Silicone Rubber, Characterized with NMR Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parr, J. C.; von Meerwall, E.; Shim, S. E.; Isayev, A.

    2000-10-01

    We have used proton NMR transverse relaxation and pulsed-gradient spin-echo self-diffusion measurements at 70 deg. C to study molecular and segmental mobilities in poly (dimethyl siloxane) rubber before and after crosslinking, and after subsequent devulcanization by intense ultrasound. Transverse NMR relaxation cannot clearly distinguish the effects of entanglements and crosslinks. Hence the three distinct components of the T2 decays are attributed to entangled and crosslinked network; light sol and network fragments; and oligomers including an unreactive component of 4 percent. Devulcanization produces extractable sol dependent on cavity gap width and transducer amplitude. Our results correlate strongly with the amount of sol: all three mobilities and the amounts of the two more mobile fractions increase with sol content, but the diffusion rates decrease, likely due to a broadening of the molecular mass distribution. These results resemble those of our previous studies of ultrasound devulcanization of styrene-butadiene and natural rubbers. The main difference is the much greater extent in PDMS of loosely attached network fragments.

  1. A novel particle separation technique using 20-kHz-order ultrasound irradiation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Hiroya; Yanai, Sayuri; Mizushima, Yuki; Saito, Takayuki

    2015-12-01

    Ultrasound techniques such as washing, fine-particle manipulation and mixing have been investigated. MHz-band ultrasound was usually used in the previous work, and studies of kHz-order ultrasound are very rare. In the usual manipulation technique, μm- order particles are targeted due to wavelength limitations. We discovered an interesting phenomenon that holds promise for a novel particle separation technique using kHz-order ultrasound. Here, particles with sub-mm- or mm-order diameters were flocculated into a swarm in water irradiated by 20-kHz ultrasound. To develop a practical separation process, we investigated the stationary position and dia. of the particle swarms and the sound- pressure profiles in a vessel, as well as the flocculation mechanism, by varying the irradiation frequency, water level, particle diameter and particle amount. The primary stationary position corresponded to the wavelength calculated from the resonant frequency regardless of the particle diameter. Subtle changes in the frequency and water level resulted in a significant change in the stationary position. Based on these results, we propose a new separation process based on the particle diameter for sub-mm- or mm-order particles.

  2. Ultrasound Elastography and MR Elastography for Assessing Liver Fibrosis: Part 1, Principles and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Tang, An; Cloutier, Guy; Szeverenyi, Nikolaus M.; Sirlin, Claude B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of ultrasound and magnetic resonance elastography, including a glossary of relevant terminology, a classification of elastography techniques, and a discussion of their respective strengths and limitations. Conclusion Elastography is an emerging technique for the non-invasive assessment of mechanical tissue properties. These techniques report metrics related to tissue stiffness such as shear wave speed, magnitude of the complex shear modulus, and Young’s modulus. PMID:25905647

  3. Comparison of Ultrasound-Guided and Fluoroscopy-Assisted Antegrade Common Femoral Artery Puncture Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Slattery, Michael M.; Goh, Gerard S.; Power, Sarah; Given, Mark F.; McGrath, Frank P.; Lee, Michael J.

    2015-06-15

    PurposeTo prospectively compare the procedural time and complication rates of ultrasound-guided and fluoroscopy-assisted antegrade common femoral artery (CFA) puncture techniques.Materials and MethodsHundred consecutive patients, undergoing a vascular procedure for which an antegrade approach was deemed necessary/desirable, were randomly assigned to undergo either ultrasound-guided or fluoroscopy-assisted CFA puncture. Time taken from administration of local anaesthetic to vascular sheath insertion in the superficial femoral artery (SFA), patients’ age, body mass index (BMI), fluoroscopy radiation dose, haemostasis method and immediate complications were recorded. Mean and median values were calculated and statistically analysed with unpaired t tests.ResultsSixty-nine male and 31 female patients underwent antegrade puncture (mean age 66.7 years). The mean BMI was 25.7 for the ultrasound-guided (n = 53) and 25.3 for the fluoroscopy-assisted (n = 47) groups. The mean time taken for the ultrasound-guided puncture was 7 min 46 s and for the fluoroscopy-assisted technique was 9 min 41 s (p = 0.021). Mean fluoroscopy dose area product in the fluoroscopy group was 199 cGy cm{sup 2}. Complications included two groin haematomas in the ultrasound-guided group and two retroperitoneal haematomas and one direct SFA puncture in the fluoroscopy-assisted group.ConclusionUltrasound-guided technique is faster and safer for antegrade CFA puncture when compared to the fluoroscopic-assisted technique alone.

  4. Application of wavelet techniques for cancer diagnosis using ultrasound images: A Review.

    PubMed

    Sudarshan, Vidya K; Mookiah, Muthu Rama Krishnan; Acharya, U Rajendra; Chandran, Vinod; Molinari, Filippo; Fujita, Hamido; Ng, Kwan Hoong

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound is an important and low cost imaging modality used to study the internal organs of human body and blood flow through blood vessels. It uses high frequency sound waves to acquire images of internal organs. It is used to screen normal, benign and malignant tissues of various organs. Healthy and malignant tissues generate different echoes for ultrasound. Hence, it provides useful information about the potential tumor tissues that can be analyzed for diagnostic purposes before therapeutic procedures. Ultrasound images are affected with speckle noise due to an air gap between the transducer probe and the body. The challenge is to design and develop robust image preprocessing, segmentation and feature extraction algorithms to locate the tumor region and to extract subtle information from isolated tumor region for diagnosis. This information can be revealed using a scale space technique such as the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT). It decomposes an image into images at different scales using low pass and high pass filters. These filters help to identify the detail or sudden changes in intensity in the image. These changes are reflected in the wavelet coefficients. Various texture, statistical and image based features can be extracted from these coefficients. The extracted features are subjected to statistical analysis to identify the significant features to discriminate normal and malignant ultrasound images using supervised classifiers. This paper presents a review of wavelet techniques used for preprocessing, segmentation and feature extraction of breast, thyroid, ovarian and prostate cancer using ultrasound images. PMID:26761591

  5. Microwave, ultrasound, thermal treatments, and bead milling as intensification techniques for extraction of lipids from oleaginous Yarrowia lipolytica yeast for a biojetfuel application.

    PubMed

    Meullemiestre, Alice; Breil, Cassandra; Abert-Vian, Maryline; Chemat, Farid

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, two different ways of lipids extraction from Yarrowia lipolytica yeast were investigated in order to maximize the extraction yield. Firstly, various modern techniques of extraction including ultrasound, microwave, and bead milling were tested to intensify the efficiency of lipid recovery. Secondly, several pretreatments such as freezing/defrosting, cold drying, bead milling, and microwave prior two washing of mixture solvent of chloroform:methanol (1:2, v/v) were study to evaluate the impact on lipid recovery. All these treatments were compared to conventional maceration, in terms of lipids extraction yield and lipid composition analysis. The main result of this study is the large difference of lipid recovery among treatments and the alteration of lipids profile after microwave and ultrasound techniques. PMID:27017129

  6. Ultrasound-Guided Interventional Procedures About the Shoulder: Anatomy, Indications, and Techniques.

    PubMed

    Pourcho, Adam M; Colio, Sean W; Hall, Mederic M

    2016-08-01

    Chronic and acute shoulder pain and dysfunction are common complaints among patients. Shoulder pain may be the result of abnormality involving the rotator cuff, subacromial-subdeltoid bursa, biceps tendon, glenoid labrum, glenohumeral joint, acromioclavicular joint, sternoclavicular joint, or glenohumeral joint capsule. Ultrasound-guided (USG) procedures of the shoulder are well established for interventional management. Ultrasound provides the advantages of excellent soft tissue resolution, injection accuracy, low cost, accessibility, portability, lack of ionizing radiation, and the ability to perform real-time image-guided procedures. The purpose of this article is to review common indications and effective techniques for USG injections about the shoulder. PMID:27468666

  7. Nondestructive Measurement Material Characterization of Thermal Sprayed Nickel Aluminum Coatings by using Laser Ultrasound Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Cheng Hung; Wu, Tai Chieh; Yang, Che Hua

    This research focused on characterization of mechanical properties in Nickel-Aluminum coating with different thermal technique and processing parameters at high temperature environment up to 295°C. With the laser ultrasound technique (LUT), guided acoustic waves are generated to propagate on the Ni-Al sprayed coatings. By measuring dispersive phase velocity followed by SCE-UA inversion algorithm. The Young's modulus of coatings which fabricated by HVOF technique is higher than APS technique. This technique is potentially useful to probe the material characterization at high temperature environment in a remote and non-destructive way.

  8. Ultrasound-based technique for intrathoracic surgical guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xishi; Hill, Nicholas A.; Peters, Terry M.

    2005-04-01

    Image-guided procedures within the thoracic cavity require accurate registration of a pre-operative virtual model to the patient. Currently, surface landmarks are used for thoracic cavity registration; however, this approach is unreliable due to skin movement relative to the ribs. An alternative method for providing surgeons with image feedback in the operating room is to integrate images acquired during surgery with images acquired pre-operatively. This integration process is required to be automatic, fast, accurate and robust; however inter-modal image registration is difficult due to the lack of a direct relationship between the intensities of the two image sets. To address this problem, Computed Tomography (CT) was used to acquire pre-operative images and Ultrasound (US) was used to acquire peri-operative images. Since bone has a high electron density and is highly echogenic, the rib cage is visualized as a bright white boundary in both datasets. The proposed approach utilizes the ribs as the basis for an intensity-based registration method -- mutual information. We validated this approach using a thorax phantom. Validation results demonstrate that this approach is accurate and shows little variation between operators. The fiducial registration error, the registration error between the US and CT images, was < 1.5mm. We propose this registration method as a basis for precise tracking of minimally invasive thoracic procedures. This method will permit the planning and guidance of image-guided minimally invasive procedures for the lungs, as well as for both catheter-based and direct trans-mural interventions within the beating heart.

  9. A novel technique of ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block in calves.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Jiro; Yamagishi, Norio; Sasaki, Kouya; Kim, Danil; Devkota, Bhuminand; Furuhama, Kazuhisa

    2012-12-01

    An interventional ultrasound technique to increase the safety of surgical treatment of the calf forelimb was tested. First, the brachial plexus was evaluated using ultrasonography and then 2% lidocaine was injected under ultrasound guidance. Ultrasonically, the brachial plexus appeared as multiple hypoechoic areas surrounded by a hyperechoic rim or a hyperechoic structure characterised by multiple discontinuous lines. It was located between the omotransverse muscle and axillary artery and vein. The sensitive effect in the forelimb was seen mainly in the area supplied by the musculocutaneous nerve, indicating successful blockage in the nerve plexus. Out of the eight forelimbs, the motor effect was observed in seven forelimbs. These results suggest the clinical feasibility of ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block in bovine medicine, although further studies are needed to examine various approaches, including the sites of needle insertion and the appropriate volume and dosage of anaesthetic. PMID:22682007

  10. Comparison of mouse mammary gland imaging techniques and applications: Reflectance confocal microscopy, GFP Imaging, and ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Tilli, Maddalena T; Parrish, Angela R; Cotarla, Ion; Jones, Laundette P; Johnson, Michael D; Furth, Priscilla A

    2008-01-01

    Background Genetically engineered mouse models of mammary gland cancer enable the in vivo study of molecular mechanisms and signaling during development and cancer pathophysiology. However, traditional whole mount and histological imaging modalities are only applicable to non-viable tissue. Methods We evaluated three techniques that can be quickly applied to living tissue for imaging normal and cancerous mammary gland: reflectance confocal microscopy, green fluorescent protein imaging, and ultrasound imaging. Results In the current study, reflectance confocal imaging offered the highest resolution and was used to optically section mammary ductal structures in the whole mammary gland. Glands remained viable in mammary gland whole organ culture when 1% acetic acid was used as a contrast agent. Our application of using green fluorescent protein expressing transgenic mice in our study allowed for whole mammary gland ductal structures imaging and enabled straightforward serial imaging of mammary gland ducts in whole organ culture to visualize the growth and differentiation process. Ultrasound imaging showed the lowest resolution. However, ultrasound was able to detect mammary preneoplastic lesions 0.2 mm in size and was used to follow cancer growth with serial imaging in living mice. Conclusion In conclusion, each technique enabled serial imaging of living mammary tissue and visualization of growth and development, quickly and with minimal tissue preparation. The use of the higher resolution reflectance confocal and green fluorescent protein imaging techniques and lower resolution ultrasound were complementary. PMID:18215290

  11. An Integrated Backscatter Ultrasound Technique for the Detection of Coronary and Carotid Atherosclerotic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    The instability of carotid and coronary plaques has been reported to be associated with acute coronary syndrome, strokes and other cerebrovascular events. Therefore, recognition of the tissue characteristics of carotid and coronary plaques is important to understand and prevent coronary and cerebral artery disease. Recently, an ultrasound integrated backscatter (IB) technique has been developed. The ultrasound IB power ratio is a function of the difference in acoustic characteristic impedance between the medium and target tissue, and the acoustic characteristic impedance is determined by the density of tissue multiplied by the speed of sound. This concept allows for tissue characterization of carotid and coronary plaques for risk stratification of patients with coronary and cerebral artery disease. Two- and three-dimensional IB color-coded maps for the evaluation of tissue components consist of four major components: fibrous, dense fibrosis, lipid pool and calcification. Although several ultrasound techniques using special mathematical algorithms have been reported, a growing body of literature has shown the reliability and usefulness of the IB technique for the tissue characterization of carotid and coronary plaques. This review summarizes concepts, experimental procedures, image reliability and the application of the IB technique. Furthermore, the IB technique is compared with other techniques. PMID:25574937

  12. An integrated backscatter ultrasound technique for the detection of coronary and carotid atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    The instability of carotid and coronary plaques has been reported to be associated with acute coronary syndrome, strokes and other cerebrovascular events. Therefore, recognition of the tissue characteristics of carotid and coronary plaques is important to understand and prevent coronary and cerebral artery disease. Recently, an ultrasound integrated backscatter (IB) technique has been developed. The ultrasound IB power ratio is a function of the difference in acoustic characteristic impedance between the medium and target tissue, and the acoustic characteristic impedance is determined by the density of tissue multiplied by the speed of sound. This concept allows for tissue characterization of carotid and coronary plaques for risk stratification of patients with coronary and cerebral artery disease. Two- and three-dimensional IB color-coded maps for the evaluation of tissue components consist of four major components: fibrous, dense fibrosis, lipid pool and calcification. Although several ultrasound techniques using special mathematical algorithms have been reported, a growing body of literature has shown the reliability and usefulness of the IB technique for the tissue characterization of carotid and coronary plaques. This review summarizes concepts, experimental procedures, image reliability and the application of the IB technique. Furthermore, the IB technique is compared with other techniques. PMID:25574937

  13. In vivo evaluation of drug delivery after ultrasound application: A new use for the photoacoustic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barja, P. R.; Acosta-Avalos, D.; Rompe, P. C. B.; Dos Anjos, F. H.; Marciano, F. R.; da Silva, M. D.

    2005-06-01

    Ultrasound application is a therapeutical resource widely employed in physiotherapy. One of its applications is the phonophoresis, a technique in which the ultrasound radiation is utilized to deliver drugs through the skin to soft tissues. The proposal of our study was to employ the Photoacoustic Technique to evaluate the efficacy of such treatment, analyzing if phonophoresis could enhance drug delivery through skin when compared to the more traditional method of manual massage. The configuration of the system employed was such that it was possible to perform in vivo measurements, which is a pre-requisite for this kind of study. The changes observed in the photoacoustic signal amplitude after each form of drug application were attributed to changes in the thermal effusivity of the system, due to penetration of the drug. The technique was able to detect differences in drug delivery between the specified physiotherapy treatments, indicating that phonophoresis enhances drug absorption by tissue.

  14. Modern Computational Techniques for the HMMER Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the latest research and critical reviews on modern computing architectures, software and hardware accelerated algorithms for bioinformatics data analysis with an emphasis on one of the most important sequence analysis applications—hidden Markov models (HMM). We show the detailed performance comparison of sequence analysis tools on various computing platforms recently developed in the bioinformatics society. The characteristics of the sequence analysis, such as data and compute-intensive natures, make it very attractive to optimize and parallelize by using both traditional software approach and innovated hardware acceleration technologies. PMID:25937944

  15. Evaluation of macrozone dimensions by ultrasound and EBSD techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Moreau, Andre; Toubal, Lotfi; Bocher, Philippe; Humbert, Michel; Uta, Elena; Gey, Nathalie

    2013-01-15

    Titanium alloys are known to have texture heterogeneities, i.e. regions much larger than the grain dimensions, where the local orientation distribution of the grains differs from one region to the next. The electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD) technique is the method of choice to characterize these macro regions, which are called macrozones. Qualitatively, the images obtained by EBSD show that these macrozones may be larger or smaller, elongated or equiaxed. However, often no well-defined boundaries are observed between the macrozones and it is very hard to obtain objective and quantitative estimates of the macrozone dimensions from these data. In the present work, we present a novel, non-destructive ultrasonic technique that provides objective and quantitative characteristic dimensions of the macrozones. The obtained dimensions are based on the spatial autocorrelation function of fluctuations in the sound velocity. Thus, a pragmatic definition of macrozone dimensions naturally arises from the ultrasonic measurement. This paper has three objectives: 1) to disclose the novel, non-destructive ultrasonic technique to measure macrozone dimensions, 2) to propose a quantitative and objective definition of macrozone dimensions adapted to and arising from the ultrasonic measurement, and which is also applicable to the orientation data obtained by EBSD, and 3) to compare the macrozone dimensions obtained using the two techniques on two samples of the near-alpha titanium alloy IMI834. In addition, it was observed that macrozones may present a semi-periodical arrangement. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discloses a novel, ultrasonic NDT technique to measure macrozone dimensions Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proposes a quantitative and objective definition of macrozone dimensions Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compares macrozone dimensions obtained using EBSD and ultrasonics on 2 Ti samples Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Observes that macrozones may have a semi

  16. A review of ultrasound common carotid artery image and video segmentation techniques.

    PubMed

    Loizou, Christos P

    2014-12-01

    The determination of the wall thickness [intima-media thickness (IMT)], the delineation of the atherosclerotic carotid plaque, the measurement of the diameter in the common carotid artery (CCA), as well as the grading of its stenosis are important for the evaluation of the atherosclerosis disease. All these measurements are also considered to be significant markers for the clinical evaluation of the risk of stroke. A number of CCA segmentation techniques have been proposed in the last few years either for the segmentation of the intima-media complex (IMC), the lumen of the CCA, or for the atherosclerotic carotid plaque from ultrasound images or videos of the CCA. The present review study proposes and discusses the methods and systems introduced so far in the literature for performing automated or semi-automated segmentation in ultrasound images or videos of the CCA. These are based on edge detection, active contours, level sets, dynamic programming, local statistics, Hough transform, statistical modeling, neural networks, and an integration of the above methods. Furthermore, the performance of these systems is evaluated and discussed based on various evaluation metrics. We finally propose the best performing method that can be used for the segmentation of the IMC and the atherosclerotic carotid plaque in ultrasound images and videos. We end the present review study with a discussion of the different image and video CCA segmentation techniques, future perspectives, and further extension of these techniques to ultrasound video segmentation and wall tracking of the CCA. Future work on the segmentation of the CCA will be focused on the development of integrated segmentation systems for the complete segmentation of the CCA as well as the segmentation and motion analysis of the plaque and or the IMC from ultrasound video sequences of the CCA. These systems will improve the evaluation, follow up, and treatment of patients affected by advanced atherosclerosis disease

  17. A novel ultrasound technique to study the biomechanics of the human esophagus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Torahiko; Kassab, Ghassan; Liu, Jianmin; Puckett, James L; Mittal, Rishi R; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2002-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to validate a novel ultrasound technique and to use it to study the circumferential stress-strain properties of the human esophagus in vivo. A manometric catheter equipped with a high-compliance bag and a high-frequency intraluminal ultrasonography probe was used to record esophageal pressure and images. Validation studies were performed in vitro followed by in vivo studies in healthy human subjects. Esophageal distensions were performed with either an isovolumic (5-20 ml of water) or with an isobaric (10-60 mmHg) technique. Sustained distension was also performed for 3 min in each subject. The circumferential wall stress and strain were calculated. In vitro studies indicate that the ultrasound technique can make measurements of the esophageal wall with an accuracy of 0.01 mm. The in vivo studies provide the necessary data to compute the Kirchhoff's stress, Green's strain, and Young's elastic modulus during esophageal distensions. The stress-strain relationship revealed a linear shape, the slope of which corresponds to the Young's modulus. During sustained distensions, we found dynamic changes of stress and strain during the period of distension. We describe and validate a novel ultrasound technique that allows measurement of biomechanical properties of the esophagus in vivo in humans. PMID:11960775

  18. The Interview: Dramatization Techniques in Dance--A New Approach to Teaching Modern Dance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamm, Gwendolyn Croom; Snygg, Fran

    1979-01-01

    The use of the interview dramatization as a teaching technique for presenting historical and chronological background information in the field of modern dance is described. Samples of the interviews are included. (JMF)

  19. Therapy ultrasound equipment characterization: Comparison of three techniques.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, M I; Leija, L; Vera, A

    2008-01-01

    Methods for characterizing ultrasonic therapy equipment rapidly and easily have to be implemented in order to avoid damages to patients; the existent methods measure different parameters in the ultrasonic beam that can be used to determine if the equipment works appropriately. In this paper, a comparison of three methods to characterize the ultrasonic beam is presented. The first one is a C-scan with microprobe which uses a hydrophone for measuring the signal and a positioning system. The second method is the IR-thermography which uses a phantom to absorb the ultrasonic energy and to convert it into heat. Here, the heat distribution is obtained with an IR camera. The third method uses a sheet of thermochromic liquid crystals (TLC) as sensor and a phantom to absorb the energy. The heat distribution is obtained with a normal camera because the TLCs change their color as a function of temperature. The results indicate that each technique has its own benefits, but the most important parameters can be obtained with only one of them. PMID:19163868

  20. Visualization of ultrasound induced cavitation bubbles using the synchrotron x-ray Analyzer Based Imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izadifar, Zahra; Belev, George; Izadifar, Mohammad; Izadifar, Zohreh; Chapman, Dean

    2014-12-01

    Observing cavitation bubbles deep within tissue is very difficult. The development of a method for probing cavitation, irrespective of its location in tissues, would improve the efficiency and application of ultrasound in the clinic. A synchrotron x-ray imaging technique, which is capable of detecting cavitation bubbles induced in water by a sonochemistry system, is reported here; this could possibly be extended to the study of therapeutic ultrasound in tissues. The two different x-ray imaging techniques of Analyzer Based Imaging (ABI) and phase contrast imaging (PCI) were examined in order to detect ultrasound induced cavitation bubbles. Cavitation was not observed by PCI, however it was detectable with ABI. Acoustic cavitation was imaged at six different acoustic power levels and six different locations through the acoustic beam in water at a fixed power level. The results indicate the potential utility of this technique for cavitation studies in tissues, but it is time consuming. This may be improved by optimizing the imaging method.

  1. The Political Persuaders; The Techniques of Modern Election Campaigns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimmo, Dan

    Over the last 20 years, a successful election campaign has come to depend in large part on successful use of the broadcast media. As a result, media experts are part of most politicians' teams, and their strategies help determine the results of the election. Usually, themes or "images" are more important than issues. The techniques of mass…

  2. A Review of Modern Surgical Hair Restoration Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Shiell, Richard C

    2008-01-01

    The field of hair restoration has had a chequered history. From the days of punch grafting to the present day techniques of follicular unit hair transplantation, the field has seen a number of new advances. This article reviews these developments. PMID:20300332

  3. Combination of Modern Visualization Techniques for Imaging of Biological Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyda, Frantisek; Dammer, Jiri

    2012-08-01

    We have used several visualization techniques to characterize biological objects. A micro-radiography with the hybrid single photon counting silicon pixel detector Medipix2 (matrix 256 x 256 sq. pixels of 55 μm pitch) is an imaging technique using X-rays in the studies of internal structures of objects. The detector Medipix2 is used as an imager of an ionizing radiation, emitted by X-ray tubes (micro or nano-focus FeinFocus). An unlimited dynamic range of the Medipix2 detector and a high spatial resolution below 1μm is particularly suitable for a non-destructive and non-invasive radiographic imaging of small biological samples in a living state, including in vivo observations and a micro-tomography. Contrast agents (based on iodine or lanthanum) could be used for dynamic studies inside of organisms. Infrared digital photography has ability to shot still photographs or movies in complete dark. Is it also possible to use it for studies of internal organs and structures inside of living biological objects. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) in low temperature mode is sophisticated recent technique successfully used in biological laboratories. The main advantage is ability to study details of tissues and cells close to living state at very high magnification. Special cryotransfer system connected to FESEM allows deeply frozen samples to be prepared in way like freeze-fracturing followed by freeze-etching for observation directly inside of electron microscope. Combination of information from all above mentioned techniques could give us very powerful visualization tool for complex studies of biological specimen.

  4. Validation of a novel translumbar ultrasound technique for measuring renal dimensions in horses.

    PubMed

    Habershon-Butcher, Jocelyn; Bowen, Mark; Hallowell, Gayle

    2014-01-01

    A reliable method for obtaining renal ultrasonographic measurements in the horse is important for diagnosis and monitoring of clinical renal disease. The aims of this prospective study were to develop and validate a novel translumbar ultrasound technique for measuring renal dimensions in horses. Six Thoroughbred or Thoroughbred part bred horses were recruited. All horses were scheduled for euthanasia due to reasons unrelated to the kidneys. Two observers recorded renal length, width, and depth; and dimensions of the cortex, medulla, pyramids, and pelvis for both kidneys in each horse using novel translumbar and conventional transabdominal ultrasound methods. The same measurements were recorded from post-mortem renal specimens. Both kidneys were consistently identified by both methods in the 15-17th intercostal spaces and paralumbar fossa. Using the translumbar technique, maximal dimensions were obtained for the left kidney in the 16th intercostal space (length 16.2 ± 2.0 cm, width 11.8 ± 0.5 cm, depth 6.4 ± 0.9 cm) and for the right kidney in the 15th intercostal space (length 16.1 ± 1.2 cm, width 13.4 ± 1.2 cm, depth 6.7 ± 0.7 cm). Renal dimensions obtained by transabdominal and translumbar projections did not differ (P > 0.05). Good correlations were found between overall renal dimensions and post-mortem measurements for both ultrasound techniques (r(2) > 0.8), but were better for the translumbar method (mean r(2) = 0.92 cf. 0.88). Good-to-excellent reliability was found for all translumbar ultrasound measurements except for the renal cortex. Reproducibility was better for the larger (overall length, width, and depth) than the smaller (cortex, medulla, and pyramids) structures. Findings indicated that translumbar ultrasonography is a valid method for measuring renal dimensions in horses. PMID:24118511

  5. Comparison of ultrasound and optical coherence tomography techniques for evaluation of integrity of spontaneously repaired horse cartilage.

    PubMed

    Virén, T; Huang, Y P; Saarakkala, S; Pulkkinen, H; Tiitu, V; Linjama, A; Kiviranta, I; Lammi, M J; Brünott, A; Brommer, H; Van Weeren, R; Brama, P A J; Zheng, Y P; Jurvelin, J S; Töyräs, J

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare sensitivity of ultrasound and optical coherence tomography (OCT) techniques for the evaluation of the integrity of spontaneously repaired horse cartilage. Articular surfaces of horse intercarpal joints, featuring both intact tissue and spontaneously healed chondral or osteochondral defects, were imaged ex vivo with arthroscopic ultrasound and laboratory OCT devices. Quantitative ultrasound (integrated reflection coefficient (IRC), apparent integrated backscattering coefficient (AIB) and ultrasound roughness index (URI)) and optical parameters (optical reflection coefficient (ORC), optical roughness index (ORI) and optical backscattering (OBS)) were determined and compared with histological integrity and mechanical properties of the tissue. Spontaneously healed tissue could be quantitatively discerned from the intact tissue with ultrasound and OCT techniques. Furthermore, several significant correlations (p < 0.05) were detected between ultrasound and OCT parameters. Superior resolution of OCT provided a more accurate measurement of cartilage surface roughness, while the ultrasound backscattering from the inner structures of the cartilage matched better with the histological findings. Since the techniques were found to be complementary to each other, dual modality imaging techniques could provide a useful tool for the arthroscopic evaluation of the integrity of articular cartilage. PMID:22439802

  6. Modern Micro and Nanoparticle-Based Imaging Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ryvolova, Marketa; Chomoucka, Jana; Drbohlavova, Jana; Kopel, Pavel; Babula, Petr; Hynek, David; Adam, Vojtech; Eckschlager, Tomas; Hubalek, Jaromir; Stiborova, Marie; Kaiser, Jozef; Kizek, Rene

    2012-01-01

    The requirements for early diagnostics as well as effective treatment of insidious diseases such as cancer constantly increase the pressure on development of efficient and reliable methods for targeted drug/gene delivery as well as imaging of the treatment success/failure. One of the most recent approaches covering both the drug delivery as well as the imaging aspects is benefitting from the unique properties of nanomaterials. Therefore a new field called nanomedicine is attracting continuously growing attention. Nanoparticles, including fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots) and magnetic nanoparticles, have proven their excellent properties for in vivo imaging techniques in a number of modalities such as magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging, respectively. In this article, we review the main properties and applications of nanoparticles in various in vitro imaging techniques, including microscopy and/or laser breakdown spectroscopy and in vivo methods such as magnetic resonance imaging and/or fluorescence-based imaging. Moreover the advantages of the drug delivery performed by nanocarriers such as iron oxides, gold, biodegradable polymers, dendrimers, lipid based carriers such as liposomes or micelles are also highlighted. PMID:23202187

  7. Automatic Cataract Classification based on Ultrasound Technique Using Machine Learning: A comparative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caxinha, Miguel; Velte, Elena; Santos, Mário; Perdigão, Fernando; Amaro, João; Gomes, Marco; Santos, Jaime

    This paper addresses the use of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for the cataract classification based on ultrasound technique. Ultrasound A-scan signals were acquired in 220 porcine lenses. B-mode and Nakagami images were constructed. Ninety-seven parameters were extracted from acoustical, spectral and image textural analyses and were subjected to feature selection by Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Bayes, K Nearest-Neighbors (KNN), Fisher Linear Discriminant (FLD) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers were tested. The classification of healthy and cataractous lenses shows a good performance for the four classifiers (F-measure ≥92.68%) with SVM showing the highest performance (90.62%) for initial versus severe cataract classification.

  8. Modern Techniques in Acoustical Signal and Image Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V

    2002-04-04

    Acoustical signal processing problems can lead to some complex and intricate techniques to extract the desired information from noisy, sometimes inadequate, measurements. The challenge is to formulate a meaningful strategy that is aimed at performing the processing required even in the face of uncertainties. This strategy can be as simple as a transformation of the measured data to another domain for analysis or as complex as embedding a full-scale propagation model into the processor. The aims of both approaches are the same--to extract the desired information and reject the extraneous, that is, develop a signal processing scheme to achieve this goal. In this paper, we briefly discuss this underlying philosophy from a ''bottom-up'' approach enabling the problem to dictate the solution rather than visa-versa.

  9. Surfactant roles in modern sample preparation techniques: a review.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Morteza; Yamini, Yadollah

    2012-09-01

    The pressure to decrease organic solvent usage in laboratories is increasing. Thus miniaturization and improvement of sample handling using alternatives is a challenge that has been discussed by several researchers. From this perspective, surfactant-based sample preparations were an educated choice. Since the introduction of cloud point extraction by Watanabe, considerable studies have been focused on the chemical properties of surfactants in the extraction methods. The unique properties of surfactants make them flexible agents for different miniaturized sample preparation techniques based on solid- or liquid-phase extraction. As a result, the use of surfactants with different roles in sample-preparation methodologies (such as surfactant as an emulsifier, surfactant rich phase as an extraction medium, ion pair-based extraction, hemimicelle/admicelle extraction, surfactant-coated magnetic nanoparticle, solid-phase microextraction with micellar desorption) is an important contribution to minimizing the problems arising from preliminary operations, which are the weakest step in analytical measurement. This paper reviews the literature dealing with the application of surfactant-based sample preparations to the separation and the preconcentration of organic and inorganic species. PMID:22887709

  10. Modern integral equation techniques for quantum reactive scattering theory

    SciTech Connect

    Auerbach, S.M.

    1993-11-01

    Rigorous calculations of cross sections and rate constants for elementary gas phase chemical reactions are performed for comparison with experiment, to ensure that our picture of the chemical reaction is complete. We focus on the H/D+H{sub 2} {yields} H{sub 2}/DH + H reaction, and use the time independent integral equation technique in quantum reactive scattering theory. We examine the sensitivity of H+H{sub 2} state resolved integral cross sections {sigma}{sub v{prime}j{prime},vj}(E) for the transitions (v = 0,j = 0) to (v{prime} = 1,j{prime} = 1,3), to the difference between the Liu-Siegbahn-Truhlar-Horowitz (LSTH) and double many body expansion (DMBE) ab initio potential energy surfaces (PES). This sensitivity analysis is performed to determine the origin of a large discrepancy between experimental cross sections with sharply peaked energy dependence and theoretical ones with smooth energy dependence. We find that the LSTH and DMBE PESs give virtually identical cross sections, which lends credence to the theoretical energy dependence.

  11. Modern Integral Equation Techniques for Quantum Reactive Scattering Theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, Scott Michael

    Rigorous calculations of cross sections and rate constants for elementary gas phase chemical reactions are performed for comparison with experiment, to ensure that our picture of the chemical reaction is complete. We focus on the H/D + H_2 to H _2/DH + H reaction, and use the time independent integral equation technique in quantum reactive scattering theory. We examine the sensitivity of H + H_2 state resolved integral cross sections sigma_{v^' j^ ',vj}(E) for the transitions (v = 0, j = 0) to (v^' = 1,j^ ' = 1,3), to the difference between the Liu-Siegbahn-Truhlar-Horowitz (LSTH) and double many body expansion (DMBE) ab initio potential energy surfaces (PES). This sensitivity analysis is performed to determine the origin of a large discrepancy between experimental cross sections with sharply peaked energy dependence and theoretical ones with smooth energy dependence. We find that the LSTH and DMBE PESs give virtually identical cross sections, which lends credence to the theoretical energy dependence. To facilitate quantum calculations on more complex reactive systems, we develop a new method to compute the energy Green's function with absorbing boundary conditions (ABC), for use in calculating the cumulative reaction probability. The method is an iterative technique to compute the inverse of a non-Hermitian matrix which is based on Fourier transforming time dependent dynamics, and which requires very little core memory. The Hamiltonian is evaluated in a sinc-function based discrete variable representation (DVR) which we argue may often be superior to the fast Fourier transform method for reactive scattering. We apply the resulting power series Green's function to the benchmark collinear H + H_2 system over the energy range 3.37 to 1.27 eV. The convergence of the power series is stable at all energies, and is accelerated by the use of a stronger absorbing potential. The practicality of computing the ABC-DVR Green's function in a polynomial of the Hamiltonian is

  12. Comparison of an ultrasound-guided technique versus a landmark-guided technique for internal jugular vein cannulation.

    PubMed

    Dolu, Hasan; Goksu, Sıtkı; Sahin, Levent; Ozen, Onder; Eken, Levent

    2015-02-01

    Central venous cannulation is a commonly preformed procedure in many branches of medicine, particularly in anaesthesia and intensive care medicine. The purpose of this study was to compare the landmark-guided technique to the ultrasound-guided technique for internal jugular vein cannulation in cardiovascular surgery patients. One hundred cardiovascular surgery patients, of whom 65 were male and 35 were female with ages ranging from 22 to 65, who had internal jugular cannulation between December 2010-March 2011 in our clinic were investigated prospectively. Patients were randomized into two groups; ultrasound guided internal jugular cannulation cases in group U (n=50), and anatomic landmark guided cases in group A (n=50). The number of attempts until successful catheterization, the time required for successful catheterization, arising complications, the demographics and the duration of catheterization were recorded for each patient. There were no significant differences found in the demographic features between the two groups. The number of attempts for successful catheterization was statistically lower in group U (1.1±0.5) than in group A (2.2±1.6). The time required for successful catheterization was statistically lower in group U (109.4±30.4) than in group A (165.9±91.5). There were no significant differences found in the total complications of the two groups (p=0.092). Four patients had an arterial punction [group U (n=0) and group A (n=4)] and two patients had a hematoma [group U (n=1) and group A (n=1)]. Arterial punction complication was increased significantly in landmark group (p=0.041). The findings of this study indicate that internal jugular vein catheterization guided by real-time ultrasound results in a lower access time and a lower rate of attempts. PMID:24838550

  13. A noninvasive ultrasound elastography technique for measuring surface waves on the lung.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Osborn, Thomas; Kalra, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to demonstrate an ultrasound based surface wave elastography (SWE) technique for generating and detecting surface waves on the lung. The motivation was to develop a noninvasive technique for assessing superficial lung tissue disease including interstitial lung disease (ILD). ILD comprises a number of lung disorders in which the lung tissue is stiffened and damaged due to fibrosis of the lung tissue. Currently, chest radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are the most common clinical methods for evaluating lung disease, but they are associated with radiation and cannot measure lung mechanical properties. The novelty of SWE is to develop a noninvasive and nonionizing technique to measure the elastic properties of superficial lung tissue. We propose to generate waves on the lung surface through wave propagation from a local harmonic vibration excitation on the chest through an intercostal space. The resulting surface wave propagation on the lung is detected using an ultrasound probe through the intercostal space. To demonstrate that surface waves can be generated on the lung, an ex vivo muscle-lung model was developed to evaluate lung surface wave generation and detection. In this model, swine muscle was laid atop a swine lung. A vibration excitation of 0.1s 100Hz wave was generated on the muscle surface and the surface waves on the lung were detected using a linear array ultrasound probe at 5MHz. To test its feasibility for patient use, SWE was used to measure both lungs of an ILD patient through eight intercostal spaces. The mean wave speed was 1.71±0.20m/s (±SD) at the functional residual capacity, while the mean wave speed was 2.36±0.33m/s at the total lung capacity. These studies support the feasibility of SWE for noninvasive measurement of elastic properties of lung and demonstrate potential for assessment of ILD. PMID:27392204

  14. Technique for ultrasound-guided intraarticular cervical articular process injection in the dog.

    PubMed

    Levy, Matthew; Gaschen, Lorrie; Rademacher, Nathalie; Bragulla, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided intraarticular injection of cervical articular process joints is a well-established procedure in both humans and horses for neck pain resulting from osteoarthritis, but the technique has not been described in dogs. Aims of this study were to describe the ultrasonographic anatomy and landmarks for cervical articular process joint injections in the dog, develop a technique for articular process joint injections using these landmarks, and determine the accuracy of injections and factors that may influence it. Eleven canine cadavers were used and bilateral joint spaces from C2-3 to C7-T1 were injected under ultrasound guidance with a blue radiopaque solution. A computed tomographic scan was acquired following each injection, and an injection score was assigned and compared with other patient-specific factors. Of the 132 injections performed, 110 (83.3%) were intraarticular, 20 (15.1%) were periarticular within 5 mm, and 2 (1.5%) were periarticular beyond 5 mm from the joint. There was no significant difference in mean scores between dogs. Only C2-3 had a significantly lower mean score than any other joint. There was no significant correlation between injection score and any other factors measured. The transverse processes of the cervical vertebrae served as excellent ultrasonographic landmarks for identifying the cervical articular process joints in dogs regardless of the size of the dog or location along the vertebrae. Accuracy of ultrasound-guided intraarticular process joint injection was 83% in dogs and similar to published techniques in horses. Further studies are needed to examine the safety and efficacy of this procedure in live animals. PMID:24506833

  15. Real-Time MRI Navigated Ultrasound for Preoperative Tumor Evaluation in Breast Cancer Patients: Technique and Clinical Implementation.

    PubMed

    Park, Ah Young; Seo, Bo Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    Real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) navigated ultrasound is an image fusion technique to display the results of both MRI and ultrasonography on the same monitor. This system is a promising technique to improve lesion detection and analysis, to maximize advantages of each imaging modality, and to compensate the disadvantages of both MRI and ultrasound. In evaluating breast cancer stage preoperatively, MRI and ultrasound are the most representative imaging modalities. However, sometimes difficulties arise in interpreting and correlating the radiological features between these two different modalities. This pictorial essay demonstrates the technical principles of the real-time MRI navigated ultrasound, and clinical implementation of the system in preoperative evaluation of tumor extent, multiplicity, and nodal status in breast cancer patients. PMID:27587958

  16. Real-Time MRI Navigated Ultrasound for Preoperative Tumor Evaluation in Breast Cancer Patients: Technique and Clinical Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ah Young

    2016-01-01

    Real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) navigated ultrasound is an image fusion technique to display the results of both MRI and ultrasonography on the same monitor. This system is a promising technique to improve lesion detection and analysis, to maximize advantages of each imaging modality, and to compensate the disadvantages of both MRI and ultrasound. In evaluating breast cancer stage preoperatively, MRI and ultrasound are the most representative imaging modalities. However, sometimes difficulties arise in interpreting and correlating the radiological features between these two different modalities. This pictorial essay demonstrates the technical principles of the real-time MRI navigated ultrasound, and clinical implementation of the system in preoperative evaluation of tumor extent, multiplicity, and nodal status in breast cancer patients. PMID:27587958

  17. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration: The wet suction technique.

    PubMed

    Villa, Nicolas A; Berzosa, Manuel; Wallace, Michael B; Raijman, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has become a fundamental tool in obtaining cytopathological diagnosis of pancreatic tumors. When sampling solid lesions of the pancreas, the endosonographer can use two suction techniques to enhance tissue acquisition; the dry and the wet suction techniques. The standard dry suction technique relies on applying negative pressure suction on the proximal end of the needle after the stylet is removed with a pre-vacuum syringe. The wet suction technique relies on pre-flushing the needle with saline to replace the column of air with fluid followed by aspiration the proximal end by using a prefilled syringe with saline. A new modified wet suction technique (hybrid suction technique) relies on preloading the needle with saline, but having continuous negative pressure with a pre-vacuum syringe to avoid manual intermittent suction. Tissue acquisition can be enhanced by applying fluid dynamic principles to the current aspiration techniques, such as the column of water used in the needle of the wet technique. In this review, we will focus on EUS-FNA using the wet suction technique for sampling of pancreatic solid lesions. PMID:26879162

  18. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration: The wet suction technique

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Nicolas A.; Berzosa, Manuel; Wallace, Michael B.; Raijman, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has become a fundamental tool in obtaining cytopathological diagnosis of pancreatic tumors. When sampling solid lesions of the pancreas, the endosonographer can use two suction techniques to enhance tissue acquisition; the dry and the wet suction techniques. The standard dry suction technique relies on applying negative pressure suction on the proximal end of the needle after the stylet is removed with a pre-vacuum syringe. The wet suction technique relies on pre-flushing the needle with saline to replace the column of air with fluid followed by aspiration the proximal end by using a prefilled syringe with saline. A new modified wet suction technique (hybrid suction technique) relies on preloading the needle with saline, but having continuous negative pressure with a pre-vacuum syringe to avoid manual intermittent suction. Tissue acquisition can be enhanced by applying fluid dynamic principles to the current aspiration techniques, such as the column of water used in the needle of the wet technique. In this review, we will focus on EUS-FNA using the wet suction technique for sampling of pancreatic solid lesions. PMID:26879162

  19. Speckle noise reduction in ultrasound images using a discrete wavelet transform-based image fusion technique.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun Ho; Lee, Ju Hwan; Kim, Sung Min; Park, Sung Yun

    2015-01-01

    Here, the speckle noise in ultrasonic images is removed using an image fusion-based denoising method. To optimize the denoising performance, each discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and filtering technique was analyzed and compared. In addition, the performances were compared in order to derive the optimal input conditions. To evaluate the speckle noise removal performance, an image fusion algorithm was applied to the ultrasound images, and comparatively analyzed with the original image without the algorithm. As a result, applying DWT and filtering techniques caused information loss and noise characteristics, and did not represent the most significant noise reduction performance. Conversely, an image fusion method applying SRAD-original conditions preserved the key information in the original image, and the speckle noise was removed. Based on such characteristics, the input conditions of SRAD-original had the best denoising performance with the ultrasound images. From this study, the best denoising technique proposed based on the results was confirmed to have a high potential for clinical application. PMID:26405924

  20. Current role of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ozyigit, Gokhan; Gultekin, Melis

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of malignancy in females. Advances in systemic therapies and radiotherapy (RT) provided long survival rates in breast cancer patients. RT has a major role in the management of breast cancer. During the past 15 years several developments took place in the field of imaging and irradiation techniques, intensity modulated RT, hypofractionation and partial-breast irradiation. Currently, improvements in the RT technology allow us a subsequent decrease in the treatment-related complications such as fibrosis and long-term cardiac toxicity while improving the loco-regional control rates and cosmetic results. Thus, it is crucial that modern radiotherapy techniques should be carried out with maximum care and efficiency. Several randomized trials provided evidence for the feasibility of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer. However, the role of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer will continue to be defined by the mature results of randomized trials. Current review will provide an up-to-date evidence based data on the role of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer. PMID:25114857

  1. Doppler ultrasound surveillance in deep tunneling compressed-air work with Trimix breathing: bounce dive technique compared to saturation-excursion technique.

    PubMed

    Vellinga, T P van Rees; Sterk, W; de Boer, A G E M; van der Beek, A J; Verhoeven, A C; van Dijk, F J H

    2008-01-01

    The Western Scheldt Tunneling Project in The Netherlands provided a unique opportunity to evaluate two deep-diving techniques with Doppler ultrasound surveillance. Divers used the bounce diving techniques for repair and maintenance of the TBM. The tunnel boring machine jammed at its deepest depth. As a result the work time was not sufficient. The saturation diving technique was developed and permitted longer work time at great depth. Thirty-one divers were involved in this project. Twenty-three divers were examined using Doppler ultrasound. Data analysis addressed 52 exposures to Trimix at 4.6-4.8 bar gauge using the bounce technique and 354 exposures to Trimix at 4.0-6.9 bar gauge on saturation excursions. No decompression incidents occurred with either technique during the described phase of the project. Doppler ultrasound revealed that the bubble loads assessed in both techniques were generally low. We find out, that despite longer working hours, shorter decompression times and larger physical workloads, the saturation-excursion technique was associated with significant lower bubble grades than in the bounce technique using Doppler Ultrasound. We conclude that the saturation-excursion technique with Trimix is a good option for deep and long exposures in caisson work. The Doppler technique proved valuable, and it should be incorporated in future compressed-air work. PMID:19175196

  2. Consequences of modern anthropometric dimensions for radiographic techniques and patient radiation exposures

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Chintan; Jones, A. Kyle; Willis, Charles E.

    2008-01-01

    Radiographic techniques are devised on the basis of anatomic dimensions. Inaccurate dimensions can cause radiographs to be exposed inappropriately and patient radiation exposures to be calculated incorrectly. The source of anatomic dimensions in common usage dates back to 1948. The objective of this study was to compare traditional and modern anthropometric data, use modern dimensions to estimate potential errors in patient exposure, and suggest modified technique guidelines. Anthropometry software was used to derive modern anatomic dimensions. Data from routine annual testing were analyzed to develop an x-ray generator output curve. Published tabulated data were used to determine the relationship between tissue half-value layer and kilovoltage. These relationships were used to estimate entrance skin exposure and create a provisional technique guide. While most anatomic regions were actually larger than previously indicated, some were similar, and a few were smaller. Accordingly, exposure estimates were higher, similar, or lower, depending on the anatomic region. Exposure estimates using modern dimensions for clinically significant regions of the trunk were higher than those calculated with traditional dimensions. Exposures of the postero-anterior chest, lateral chest, antero-posterior (AP) abdomen, male AP pelvis, and female AP pelvis were larger by 48%, 31%, 54%, 52%, and 112%, respectively. The dimensions of bony regions of the anatomy, such as the joints and skull, were unchanged. These findings are consistent with the idea that anatomic areas where fat is deposited are larger in the modern U.S. population than they were in previous years. Exposure techniques for manual radiography and calculations of patient dose for automatic exposure control radiography should be adjusted according to the modern dimensions. Population radiation exposure estimates calculated in national surveys should also be modified appropriately. PMID:18777922

  3. Dynamics of micron-sized particles in dilute and concentrated suspensions probed by dynamic ultrasound scattering techniques.

    PubMed

    Konno, Tomoyuki; Norisuye, Tomohisa; Sugita, Kazuki; Nakanishi, Hideyuki; Tran-Cong-Miyata, Qui

    2016-02-01

    A novel ultrasound technique called Frequency-Domain Dynamic ultraSound Scattering (FD-DSS) was employed to determine sedimentation velocities and the diameters of microparticles in a highly turbid suspension. The paper describes the importance of the scattering vector q for dynamic scattering experiments using broadband ultrasound pulses because q (or frequency) corresponds to the spatial length scale whereas the pulses involve inevitable uncertainty in the time domain due to the frequency distribution of broadband pulse. The results obtained from Stokes velocity of monodispersed silica and polydivinylbenzene (PDVB) particles were compared to those obtained by a Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FE-SEM). A novel method to extract the particle size distribution is also demonstrated based on an ultrasound scattering theory. PMID:26547118

  4. A numerical analysis of a focused ultrasound technique to measure perfusion.

    PubMed

    Anderson, G T; Ye, X

    1994-05-01

    A noninvasive technique to measure perfusion using a focused ultrasound heating source and a thermistor placed on the surface of a tissue is proposed. The method is numerically examined in a model of the canine kidney. The perfusion measurement is shown to depend on several transducer and tissue thermal properties. A two level fractional factorial design simulation is used to map out a parameter value combination that maximizes the sensitivity of the measurement. A technique to numerically assess the uncertainty in the measurement due to uncertainties in the tissue and transducer parameter values is also described. The effects of the medulla and a subcapsular surface layer in the kidney are examined. It is determined that the maximum error in the measured perfusion rate due to all the factors considered is 17 percent for a kidney with a nominal perfusion rate of 300 mL/100g-min and a surface layer of 0.04 cm thickness. PMID:8078324

  5. A modified technique for real time ultrasound guided pediatric percutaneous renal biopsy: the angled tangential approach

    PubMed Central

    Caliskan, Kosti Can; Turkoglu, Ozlem Kolcak; Cakmakci, Selma; Ozcelik, Gul; Yilmaz, Engin; Turk, Sebnem; Ozagari, Aysim; Ucan, Berna

    2014-01-01

    Aim Pediatric renal biopsy may result in serious hemorrhagic complications, requiring additional diagnostic procedures, blood transfusion, vascular interventions, and prolongation of hospitalization. The aim of the present study was to propose the angled tangential approach technique for real-time ultrasound-guided pediatric percutaneous renal biopsy. Methods A retrospective analysis of 166 percutaneous biopsies from June 2004 to May 2009 was performed. Patients’ medical records, pathology results, and complications were reviewed. Results No major complications were seen in the study group. The most frequently occurring minor complication was macroscopic hematuria, which occurred at the rate of 9.6%. Hematoma was detected in three cases and regressed spontaneously in all cases. Conclusions The angled tangential approach is a safe technique and an alternative option in pediatric percutaneous renal biopsies. PMID:24914420

  6. Application of metabonomic analytical techniques in the modernization and toxicology research of traditional Chinese medicine

    PubMed Central

    Lao, Yong-Min; Jiang, Jian-Guo; Yan, Lu

    2009-01-01

    In the recent years, a wide range of metabonomic analytical techniques are widely used in the modern research of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). At the same time, the international community has attached increasing importance to TCM toxicity problems. Thus, many studies have been implemented to investigate the toxicity mechanisms of TCM. Among these studies, many metabonomic-based methods have been implemented to facilitate TCM toxicity investigation. At present, the most prevailing methods for TCM toxicity research are mainly single analysis techniques using only one analytical means. These techniques include nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), etc.; with these techniques, some favourable outcomes have been gained in the toxic reaction studies of TCM, such as the action target organs assay, the establishment of action pattern, the elucidation of action mechanism and the exploration of action material foundation. However, every analytical technique has its advantages and drawbacks, no existing analytical technique can be versatile. Multi-analysed techniques can partially overcome the shortcomings of single-analysed techniques. Combination of GC-MS and LC-MS metabolic profiling approaches has unravelled the pathological outcomes of aristolochic acid-induced nephrotoxicity, which can not be achieved by single-analysed techniques. It is believed that with the further development of metabonomic analytical techniques, especially multi-analysed techniques, metabonomics will greatly promote TCM toxicity research and be beneficial to the modernization of TCM in terms of extending the application of modern means in the TCM safety assessment, assisting the formulation of TCM safety norms and establishing the international standards indicators. PMID:19508399

  7. Screening and early diagnosis of osteoporosis through X-ray and ultrasound based techniques

    PubMed Central

    Pisani, Paola; Renna, Maria Daniela; Conversano, Francesco; Casciaro, Ernesto; Muratore, Maurizio; Quarta, Eugenio; Paola, Marco Di; Casciaro, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Effective prevention and management of osteoporosis would require suitable methods for population screenings and early diagnosis. Current clinically-available diagnostic methods are mainly based on the use of either X-rays or ultrasound (US). All X-ray based methods provide a measure of bone mineral density (BMD), but it has been demonstrated that other structural aspects of the bone are important in determining fracture risk, such as mechanical features and elastic properties, which cannot be assessed using densitometric techniques. Among the most commonly used techniques, dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is considered the current “gold standard” for osteoporosis diagnosis and fracture risk prediction. Unfortunately, as other X-ray based techniques, DXA has specific limitations (e.g., use of ionizing radiation, large size of the equipment, high costs, limited availability) that hinder its application for population screenings and primary care diagnosis. This has resulted in an increasing interest in developing reliable pre-screening tools for osteoporosis such as quantitative ultrasound (QUS) scanners, which do not involve ionizing radiation exposure and represent a cheaper solution exploiting portable and widely available devices. Furthermore, the usefulness of QUS techniques in fracture risk prediction has been proven and, with the last developments, they are also becoming a more and more reliable approach for assessing bone quality. However, the US assessment of osteoporosis is currently used only as a pre-screening tool, requiring a subsequent diagnosis confirmation by means of a DXA evaluation. Here we illustrate the state of art in the early diagnosis of this “silent disease” and show up recent advances for its prevention and improved management through early diagnosis. PMID:24349644

  8. Prostate clinical study of a full inversion unconstrained ultrasound elastography technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, S. Reza; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Czarnota, Gregory J.; Samani, Abbas

    2014-03-01

    Prostate cancer detection at early stages is crucial for desirable treatment outcome. Among available imaging modalities, ultrasound (US) elastography is being developed as an effective clinical tool for prostate cancer diagnosis. Current clinical US elastography systems utilise strain imaging where tissue strain images are generated to approximate the tissue elastic modulus distribution. While strain images can be generated in real-time fashion, they lack the accuracy necessary for having desirable sensitivity and specificity. To improve strain imaging, full inversion based elastography techniques were proposed. Among these techniques, a constrained elastography technique was developed which showed promising results as long as the tumor and prostate geometry can be obtained accurately from the imaging modality used in conjunction with the elastography system. This requirement is not easy to fulfill, especially with US imaging. To address this issue, we present an unconstrained full inversion prostate elastography method in conjunction with US imaging where knowledge of tissue geometry is not necessary. One of the reasons that full inversion elastography techniques have not been routinely used in the clinic is lack of clinical validation studies. To our knowledge, no quasistatic full inversion based prostate US elastography technique has been applied in vivo before. In this work, the proposed method was applied to clinical prostate data and reconstructed elasticity images were compared to corresponding annotated histopathology images which is the first quasi-static full inversion based prostate US elastography technique applied successfully in vivo. Results demonstrated a good potential for clinical utility of the proposed method.

  9. Solving real decay and conservation problems of building materials by ultrasounds technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez de Buergo, Monica; Fort, Rafael; Gomez-Heras, Miguel; Vazquez-Calvo, Carmen

    2010-05-01

    In this study a variety of case studies and different building materials in which ultrasounds velocity played a significant role are shown, either to characterize building materials, to measure deterioration, to assess conservation techniques or for preventive purposes. Regarding to materials properties, ultrasounds velocity provided interesting indices such as the quality index (useful when selecting replacing materials, materials for new constructions or either for sculptures); alteration index (very much related to pores and voids, and fissures); mechanical strength (assessing its reduction when materials are affected by several decay processes, being fire one of them) or anisotropy indices, which highly condition the decay of elements and materials in buildings and sculptures, and which vary themselves with decay progress. The technique is also a tool for detecting and locating elements inside structures, like metallic ones, and also to detect and locate discontinuities inside elements, both for consolidation purposes or even in cases of structures movement, which is quite common nowadays. Using some specific software, ultrasounds results can be plotted as iso-areas, which allows to define areas or zones of structures with the highest risk of detachment in a short-time in order to plan the most adequate interventions. Not new is also the aid of ultrasonics to assess consolidation products and to determine the degree of materials decay when submitted to artificial ageing. Much more innovative is the fact that ultrasonics measurement can be also helpful to determine different building periods in a same building, even the fact of determining an element's lifetime. The results obtained by this non destructive and portable technique that will be presented in this session correspond to both real case studies (results that helped to solve a real problem), some of them corresponding to emblematic monuments de España (Royal Palace of Madrid and some other monuments

  10. Comparison of two techniques for ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus blockade in cats.

    PubMed

    Ansón, Agustina; Laredo, Francisco G; Gil, Francisco; Soler, Marta; Belda, Eliseo; Ayala, Maria D; Agut, Amalia

    2015-06-01

    Axillary blockade of the brachial plexus (BP) is advocated in humans and dogs for surgical procedures carried out on the foot, carpus and elbow as it provides complete analgesia distally from above the elbow joint. The aim of this study was to develop an ultrasound (US)-guided approach to block the BP in cats. Two groups of 12 feline cadavers each were used to compare two different techniques to block the BP at the axillary level. The reliability of the techniques was assessed by anatomical and computed tomography (CT) studies. Cadavers of the first group were positioned in dorsal recumbency with the forelimb to be blocked adducted (thoracic limbs flexed and orientated caudally) (FAD technique). The second group was positioned in dorsal recumbency with the forelimb abducted 90° (FAB technique). The accuracy of the techniques was determined by US after injecting 1 ml blue ink along the BP nerves, and by CT after injecting 1 ml of an iodinated contrast medium. The anatomical and CT studies confirmed the accuracy of the US location of the BP nerves. Staining of the axillaris, musculocutaneous, radialis, medianus and ulnaris nerves was observed in 100% of cats using the FAB technique and in 66% of the cats using the FAD technique. Rate of complications was higher in the FAD technique. In conclusion, a US-guided axillary approach to the BP by the use of a FAB technique is a safe and feasible procedure to block the BP in the cat. Further studies are needed to ascertain whether the technique can be applied in a clinical setting. PMID:25193280

  11. Compensation technique for the intrinsic error in ultrasound motion estimation using a speckle tracking method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taki, Hirofumi; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shiina, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Toru

    2015-07-01

    High-accuracy ultrasound motion estimation has become an essential technique in blood flow imaging, elastography, and motion imaging of the heart wall. Speckle tracking has been one of the best motion estimators; however, conventional speckle-tracking methods neglect the effect of out-of-plane motion and deformation. Our proposed method assumes that the cross-correlation between a reference signal and a comparison signal depends on the spatio-temporal distance between the two signals. The proposed method uses the decrease in the cross-correlation value in a reference frame to compensate for the intrinsic error caused by out-of-plane motion and deformation without a priori information. The root-mean-square error of the estimated lateral tissue motion velocity calculated by the proposed method ranged from 6.4 to 34% of that using a conventional speckle-tracking method. This study demonstrates the high potential of the proposed method for improving the estimation of tissue motion using an ultrasound speckle-tracking method in medical diagnosis.

  12. Prediction of ultrasound-mediated disruption of cell membranes using machine learning techniques and statistical analysis of acoustic spectra.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eva K; Gallagher, Richard J; Campbell, Ann Melissa; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2004-01-01

    Although biological effects of ultrasound must be avoided for safe diagnostic applications, ultrasound's ability to disrupt cell membranes has attracted interest as a method to facilitate drug and gene delivery. This paper seeks to develop "prediction rules" for predicting the degree of cell membrane disruption based on specified ultrasound parameters and measured acoustic signals. Three techniques for generating prediction rules (regression analysis, classification trees and discriminant analysis) are applied to data obtained from a sequence of experiments on bovine red blood cells. For each experiment, the data consist of four ultrasound parameters, acoustic measurements at 400 frequencies, and a measure of cell membrane disruption. To avoid over-training, various combinations of the 404 predictor variables are used when applying the rule generation methods. The results indicate that the variable combination consisting of ultrasound exposure time and acoustic signals measured at the driving frequency and its higher harmonics yields the best rule for all three rule generation methods. The methods used for deriving the prediction rules are broadly applicable, and could be used to develop prediciton rules in other scenarios involving different cell types or tissues. These rules and the methods used to derive them could be used for real-time feedback about ultrasound's biological effects. PMID:14723497

  13. A review of modern instrumental techniques for measurements of ice cream characteristics.

    PubMed

    Bahram-Parvar, Maryam

    2015-12-01

    There is an increasing demand of the food industries and research institutes to have means of measurement allowing the characterization of foods. Ice cream, as a complex food system, consists of a frozen matrix containing air bubbles, fat globules, ice crystals, and an unfrozen serum phase. Some deficiencies in conventional methods for testing this product encourage the use of alternative techniques such as rheometry, spectroscopy, X-ray, electro-analytical techniques, ultrasound, and laser. Despite the development of novel instrumental applications in food science, use of some of them in ice cream testing is few, but has shown promising results. Developing the novel methods should increase our understanding of characteristics of ice cream and may allow online testing of the product. This review article discusses the potential of destructive and non-destructive methodologies in determining the quality and characteristics of ice cream and similar products. PMID:26041240

  14. [Consensus document on ultrasound training in Intensive Care Medicine. Care process, use of the technique and acquisition of professional skills].

    PubMed

    Ayuela Azcárate, J M; Clau-Terré, F; Vicho Pereira, R; Guerrero de Mier, M; Carrillo López, A; Ochagavia, A; López Pérez, J M; Trenado Alvarez, J; Pérez, L; Llompart-Pou, J A; González de Molina, F J; Fojón, S; Rodríguez Salgado, A; Martínez Díaz, M C; Royo Villa, C; Romero Bermejo, F J; Ruíz Bailén, M; Arroyo Díez, M; Argueso García, M; Fernández Fernández, J L

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound has become an essential tool in assisting critically ill patients. His knowledge, use and instruction requires a statement by scientific societies involved in its development and implementation. Our aim are to determine the use of the technique in intensive care medicine, clinical situations where its application is recommended, levels of knowledge, associated responsibility and learning process also implement the ultrasound technique as a common tool in all intensive care units, similar to the rest of european countries. The SEMICYUC's Working Group Cardiac Intensive Care and CPR establishes after literature review and scientific evidence, a consensus document which sets out the requirements for accreditation in ultrasound applied to the critically ill patient and how to acquire the necessary skills. Training and learning requires a structured process within the specialty. The SEMICYUC must agree to disclose this document, build relationships with other scientific societies and give legal cover through accreditation of the training units, training courses and different levels of training. PMID:24315132

  15. Fourier-based shape feature extraction technique for computer-aided B-Mode ultrasound diagnosis of breast tumor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Ha; Seong, Yeong Kyeong; Chang, Chu-Ho; Park, Jinman; Park, Moonho; Woo, Kyoung-Gu; Ko, Eun Young

    2012-01-01

    Early detection of breast tumor is critical in determining the best possible treatment approach. Due to its superiority compared with mammography in its possibility to detect lesions in dense breast tissue, ultrasound imaging has become an important modality in breast tumor detection and classification. This paper discusses the novel Fourier-based shape feature extraction techniques that provide enhanced classification accuracy for breast tumor in the computer-aided B-mode ultrasound diagnosis system. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method, experiments were performed using 4,107 ultrasound images with 2,508 malignancy cases. Experimental results show that the breast tumor classification accuracy of the proposed technique was 15.8%, 5.43%, 17.32%, and 13.86% higher than the previous shape features such as number of protuberances, number of depressions, lobulation index, and dissimilarity, respectively. PMID:23367430

  16. Experimental study of inspection on a metal plate with defect using ultrasound lock-in thermographic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junyan; Qin, Lei; Tang, Qingju; Wang, Yang

    2012-07-01

    The ultrasound lock-in thermographic technique was developed to detect interfacial defects and cracks in a metal plate. Discrete correlation method (DCM), Fourier transformation method (FTM), Short Time Fourier transformation (STF) and Discrete Wavelet Transformation (DWT) algorithms were used to extract the characteristic information of the thermal wave signal generated by ultrasonic wave modulated. It is found that STF and DWT algorithms are available for analyzing the thermal wave signal generated by ultrasonic wave modulated due to higher signal-noise ratio. Experiments were performed to investigate the effect on the amplitude contrast and phase angle contrast by the ultrasound transducer position, initial sonotrode action force and modulation frequency, respectively. Experimental results show that transducer position closed to the defect, higher initial sonotrode action force loaded and optimal modulation frequency selected are help to detect the defects of metal plate using ultrasound lock-in thermographic technique.

  17. Endoscopic ultrasound fine needle aspiration: Technique and applications in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Tharian, Benjamin; Tsiopoulos, Fotios; George, Nayana; Pietro, Salvatore Di; Attili, Fabia; Larghi, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Since its initial report in 1992, endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has now been incorporated into the diagnostic and staging algorithm for the evaluation of benign and malignant diseases of the gastrointestinal tract and of adjacent organs. Its introduction constitutes a major breakthrough in the endoscopic field and has gradually transformed EUS from a pure imaging modality into a more interventional procedure. In addition, the possibility of collecting samples, providing a definitive cytological and/or histological evidence of the presence of malignancy, has strongly contributed to changing EUS from a subjective, highly operator dependant procedure into a more objective one. This article will review the instrumentation, technique and the most important clinical applications of EUS-FNA. PMID:23293723

  18. A novel dehydration technique for carrot slices implementing ultrasound and vacuum drying methods.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Gang; Guo, Xiao-Yu; Wu, Tao

    2016-05-01

    A novel drying technique using a combination of ultrasound and vacuum dehydration was developed to shorten the drying time and improve the quality of carrot slices. Carrot slices were dried with ultrasonic vacuum (USV) drying and vacuum drying at 65 °C and 75 °C. The drying rate was significantly influenced by the drying techniques and temperatures. Compared with vacuum drying, USV drying resulted in a 41-53% decrease in the drying time. The drying time for the USV and vacuum drying techniques at 75 °C was determined to be 140 and 340 min for carrot slices, respectively. The rehydration potential, nutritional value (retention of β-carotene and ascorbic acid), color, and textural properties of USV-dried carrot slices are predominately better compared to vacuum-dried carrot slices. Moreover, lower energy consumption was used in the USV technique. The drying data (time versus moisture ratio) were successfully fitted to Wang and Singh model. PMID:26703199

  19. Ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin injection technique for the iliopsoas muscle.

    PubMed

    Westhoff, Bettina; Seller, Konrad; Wild, Alexander; Jaeger, Marcus; Krauspe, Ruediger

    2003-12-01

    Intramuscular botulinum toxin A injections are beneficial for the treatment of functional shortening of the iliopsoas muscle, but it is difficult to achieve precise needle positioning and injection. As a solution to this we present an ultrasound-guided injection technique for the iliopsoas muscle using an anterior approach from the groin. The procedure was performed 26 times in 13 patients (seven males, six females; mean age 11 years, SD 9 years 8 months; age range 4 to 31 years), 10 times bilaterally. Indications were functional iliopsoas shortening due to cerebral palsy (17 hips), hereditary spastic paraplegia (four hips), and Perthes disease (five hips). In all cases the iliopsoas muscle was identified easily by ultrasound; the placement of the injection needle and injection into the site of interest were observed during real time. No complications were encountered. Botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injections have become established as a standard procedure for the treatment of functional shortening of different muscles in persons with spasticity or dystonia (Kessler et al. 1999, Bakheit et al. 2001, Kirschner et al. 2001). Optimal needle placement is essential to avoid severe side effects and to assess lack of response to the drug or incorrect region of injection. While injection into superficial, very palpable muscles is quite easy, the approach to other muscles such as the iliopsoas muscle may be more difficult and the placement of the needle for an optimal injection site is harder to control. As a solution to this, we present an ultrasound-guided injection technique. The main indications for BTX-A injections in the iliopsoas muscle are dynamic hip flexion deformities mostly due to spastic conditions which may compromise walking (increased anterior pelvic tilt during the whole gait cycle, decreased hip extension at terminal stance, increased peak hip flexion during swing; Molenaers et al. 1999. Another indication might be decentration of the femoral head (as part of

  20. Ultrasound-guided catheterization of the portal vein in 11 cows using the Seldinger technique.

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Camenzind, D; Ossent, P

    2003-02-01

    Catheterization of the portal vein using the Seldinger technique [Acta Radiol. (1958) 38, 368] was performed in 11 cows. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous portocentesis, using a 25-cm, 14-gauge steel cannula, was performed from the 10th, 11th or 12th intercostal space on the right side. A stylet was placed through the cannula, which was then removed, and a polyurethane balloon-tipped catheter was advanced over the stylet into the portal vein and sutured to the skin (Seldinger, 1952). Blood samples were collected from the catheter at least once daily. The catheter was removed 9-15 days later when blood could no longer be aspirated. The cows were then slaughtered and a post-mortem examination was performed. During the study, appetite remained normal in nine of 11 cows. In three cows, the general behaviour and demeanour were mildly, but transiently, abnormal. Four cows had leucopoenia. The most frequently encountered problem was occlusion of the catheter, which usually was resolved by flushing with heparinized saline. The most common post-mortem lesion observed was an increase in fibrous connective tissue at the site of cannulation. In nine of 11cows, there was a thrombus in the portal vein at the site of catheterization. Generally, the severity of the lesions was mild. The results of this study demonstrated that ultrasound-guided percutaneous catheterization of the portal vein, using the Seldinger technique, is possible in cows. The catheter may be left in place for collection of blood samples for up to 15 days. PMID:12650501

  1. DEVELOPING A TECHNIQUE FOR ULTRASOUND-GUIDED INJECTION OF THE ADULT CANINE HIP.

    PubMed

    Bergamino, Chiara; Etienne, Anne-Laure; Busoni, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    An accurate method for guiding injections into the canine hip would facilitate diagnostic localization of lameness and targeted treatments. Ultrasound-guided hip injections are commonly used in humans and large animals. Aims of this prospective study were to describe ultrasound (US) anatomy of the adult canine hip and determine the feasibility and accuracy of intra-articular placement of injectate using US-guidance. Seven adult dogs were used to describe US anatomy, five dog cadavers were used to assess the feasibility of the injection technique and 11 dog cadavers were used to assess accuracy of injections. For the accuracy test, 22 joints were injected with iodinated contrast medium by three operators with different experience. With dogs in lateral recumbency, the hyperechoic femoral head surface was identified by following the femoral neck from the greater trochanter or the acetabular rim was localized by following caudally the ilium from the iliac wing. An anechoic gap between the femoral head and acetabular surface represented the joint. The capsule was visible as a triangular echoic structure and the femoral head articular cartilage appeared as an anechoic band. The needle was inserted axial to the greater trochanter and directed in a dorsolateral-ventromedial direction toward the joint space and then pushed through the capsule. Based on postinjection radiography, accuracy was 81.8% at first attempt and 100% at second attempt. This study indicated that US-guided injection is a feasible and accurate technique for injecting the adult canine hip. Future studies in live dogs are needed to assess safety and efficacy. PMID:25619481

  2. Duplex ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Vascular ultrasound; Peripheral vascular ultrasound ... A duplex ultrasound combines traditional ultrasound with Doppler ultrasound . Traditional ultrasound uses sound waves that bounce off blood vessels to create ...

  3. Sex-determination and sex-preselection tests in India: modern techniques for femicide.

    PubMed

    Patel, V

    1989-01-01

    "In India during recent years techniques that were developed to detect genetic deformities in fetuses have been increasingly used mainly for determining the sex of fetuses so that female fetuses can be exterminated. This paper explores the factors underlying this practice and the related practice of preselecting the sex of offspring, examining both the widespread availability and use of sex-determination and sex-preselection techniques and the root causes of female devaluation in India. Also presented and analyzed are the responses of women's groups and the government to these uses of modern technology to carry out the ultimate abuse of women--not allowing them to be born." PMID:12282012

  4. Procedural ultrasound in pediatric patients: techniques and tips for accuracy and safety.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sophia

    2016-06-01

    Point-of-care ultrasound is becoming more prevalent in pediatric emergency departments as a critical adjunct to both diagnosis and procedure guidance. It is cost-effective, safe for unstable patients, and easily repeatable as a patient's clinical status changes. Point-of-care ultrasound does not expose the patient to ionizing radiation and may care ultrasound in pediatric emergency medicine is relatively new, the body of literature evaluating its utility is small, but growing. Data from adult emergency medicine, radiology, critical care, and anesthesia evaluating the utility of ultrasound guidance must be extrapolated to pediatric emergency medicine. This issue will review the adult literature and the available pediatric literature comparing ultrasound guidance to more traditional approaches. Methods for using ultrasound guidance to perform various procedures, and the pitfalls associated with each procedure, will also be described. PMID:27232771

  5. A technique for evaluating the oil/heavy-oil viscosity changes under ultrasound in a simulated porous medium.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, Hossein; Mohammadian, Erfan; Junin, Radzuan; Rafati, Roozbeh; Manan, Mohammad; Azdarpour, Amin; Junid, Mundzir

    2014-02-01

    Theoretically, Ultrasound method is an economical and environmentally friendly or "green" technology, which has been of interest for more than six decades for the purpose of enhancement of oil/heavy-oil production. However, in spite of many studies, questions about the effective mechanisms causing increase in oil recovery still existed. In addition, the majority of the mechanisms mentioned in the previous studies are theoretical or speculative. One of the changes that could be recognized in the fluid properties is viscosity reduction due to radiation of ultrasound waves. In this study, a technique was developed to investigate directly the effect of ultrasonic waves (different frequencies of 25, 40, 68 kHz and powers of 100, 250, 500 W) on viscosity changes of three types of oil (Paraffin oil, Synthetic oil, and Kerosene) and a Brine sample. The viscosity calculations in the smooth capillary tube were based on the mathematical models developed from the Poiseuille's equation. The experiments were carried out for uncontrolled and controlled temperature conditions. It was observed that the viscosity of all the liquids was decreased under ultrasound in all the experiments. This reduction was more significant for uncontrolled temperature condition cases. However, the reduction in viscosity under ultrasound was higher for lighter liquids compare to heavier ones. Pressure difference was diminished by decreasing in the fluid viscosity in all the cases which increases fluid flow ability, which in turn aids to higher oil recovery in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations. Higher ultrasound power showed higher liquid viscosity reduction in all the cases. Higher ultrasound frequency revealed higher and lower viscosity reduction for uncontrolled and controlled temperature condition experiments, respectively. In other words, the reduction in viscosity was inversely proportional to increasing the frequency in temperature controlled experiments. It was concluded that cavitation

  6. Two-photon photoacoustics ultrasound measurement by a loss modulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yu-Hung; Chang, Chieh-Feng; Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2013-03-01

    In this work, we investigated the principle of the two-photon absorption (TPA) detection with a loss modulation technique, and first demonstrated the existence of two-photon photoacoustics ultrasound excited by a femtosecond high repetition rate laser. By using the AO modulation with different modulation frequencies, we successfully create the beating of the light signal when the two arms of the beams are both spatial and temporal overlapping. The pulse train of the femtosecond laser causes the narrow band excitation, providing the frequency selectivity and sensitivity. Moreover, the pulse energy is no more than 15nJ/pulse, which is at least 3 orders of magnitude smaller than that of the nanosecond laser, and therefore prevents the thermal damage of the sample. With the help of lock-in detection and a low noise amplifier, we can separate the signal of two-photon absorption from one-photon absorption. We used an ultrasonic transducer to detect the response of the sample, and verified the existence of the two-photon photoacoustics ultrasound generating by the femtosecond laser. Several contrast agents, such as the black carbon solution, the fluorescence dye and the nano-particles, were used in the experiment. In the end, we demonstrated the application, two photo-acoustic imaging, which provides the high spatial resolution (<10μm) and large penetration depth (~1mm), to the simulated biological tissue. This is a milestone to develop the two-photon photoacoustics microscopy, which, in principle, has the great potential to achieve the in vitro and in vivo high resolution deep tissue imaging.

  7. Delineation of atherosclerotic plaque using subharmonic imaging filtering techniques and a commercial intravascular ultrasound system.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Anush; Eisenbrey, John R; Machado, Priscilla; deMuinck, Ebo D; Doyley, Marvin M; Forsberg, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    The ability to delineate atherosclerotic plaque from the surrounding tissue using custom-developed subharmonic imaging (SHI) digital filtering techniques was investigated in vivo using a commercially available system. Atherosclerosis was induced in the aorta of two Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic rabbits following which injections of an ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, N Billerica, Massachusetts) were administered. Imaging was performed using a Galaxy intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) scanner (Boston Scientific, Natick, Massachusetts) equipped with an Atlantis® SR Pro Imaging Catheter (Boston Scientific). Four preliminary band-pass filters were designed to isolate the subharmonic signal (from surrounding tissue) and applied to the radio-frequency (RF) data. Preliminary filter performances were compared in terms of vessel-tissue contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) and visual examination. Based on preliminary results, a subharmonic adaptive filter and a stopband (SB) filter were designed and applied to the RF data. Images were classified as fundamental, SHI, and SB. Four readers performed qualitative analysis of 168 randomly selected images (across all three imaging modes). The images were scored for overall image quality, image noise, plaque visualization, and vessel lumen visualization. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare the scores followed by intraclass correlation (ICC) evaluation. Quantitative analysis was performed by calculating the CTRs for the vessel-to-plaque and vessel-to-tissue (compared using a paired student's t test). Qualitative analysis showed SHI and SB to have significantly less image noise relative to the fundamental mode (p < 0.001). Fundamental mode scored significantly higher than SHI and SB for the remaining three categories. ICC showed mixed results among reader evaluation for delineation of plaque. However, quantitatively, SHI produced the best vessel-plaque CTR. PMID:23287505

  8. Breast Ultrasound: Indications and Findings.

    PubMed

    Gundry, Kathleen R

    2016-06-01

    Breast ultrasound is a widely used adjuvant to mammography for the detection of breast cancer. This chapter will review some of the basic ultrasound technical factors and techniques, describe findings on ultrasound with an emphasis on the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System terminology, and present the indications for breast ultrasound. New innovations in breast ultrasound, such as elastography, ultrasound contrast, 3-dimensional, and automated whole-breast ultrasound, will be reviewed. Ultrasound-guided breast procedures are also presented. PMID:26974219

  9. A computer-controlled ultrasound pulser-receiver system for transskull fluid detection using a shear wave transmission technique.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sai Chun; Clement, Gregory T; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of a computer-controlled ultrasound pulser-receiver system incorporating a shear mode technique for transskull fluid detection. The presence of fluid in the sinuses of an ex vivo human skull was examined using a pulse-echo method by transmitting an ultrasound beam through the maxilla bone toward the back wall on the other side of the sinus cavity. The pulser was programmed to generate bipolar pulse trains with 5 cycles at a frequency of 1 MHz, repetition frequency of about 20 Hz, and amplitude of 100 V to drive a 1-MHz piezoelectric transducer. Shear and longitudinal waves in the maxilla bone were produced by adjusting the bone surface incident angle to 45 degrees and 0 degrees, respectively. Computer tomography (CT) scans of the skull were performed to verify the ultrasound experiment. Using the shear mode technique, the echo waveform clearly distinguishes the presence of fluid, and the estimated distance of the ultrasound traveled in the sinus is consistent with the measurement from the CT images. Contrarily, using the longitudinal mode, no detectable back wall echo was observed under the same conditions. As a conclusion, this study demonstrated that the proposed pulser-receiver system with the shear mode technique is promising for transskull fluid detecting, such as mucus in a sinus. PMID:17941383

  10. Three-dimensional endoanal ultrasound for diagnosis of perianal fistulas: Reliable and objective technique

    PubMed Central

    Garcés-Albir, Marina; García-Botello, Stephanie Anne; Espi, Alejandro; Pla-Martí, Vicente; Martin-Arevalo, Jose; Moro-Valdezate, David; Ortega, Joaquin

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate accuracy of three-dimensional endoanal ultrasound (3D-EAUS) as compared to 2D-EAUS and physical examination (PE) in diagnosis of perianal fistulas and correlate with intraoperative findings. METHODS: A prospective observational consecutive study was performed with patients included over a two years period. All patients were studied and operated on by the Colorectal Unit surgeons. The inclusion criteria were patients over 18, diagnosed with a criptoglandular perianal fistula. The PE, 2D-EAUS and 3D-EAUS was performed preoperatively by the same colorectal surgeon at the outpatient clinic prior to surgery and the fistula anatomy was defined and they were classified in intersphincteric, high or low transsphincteric, suprasphincteric and extrasphincteric. Special attention was paid to the presence of a secondary tract, the location of the internal opening (IO) and the site of external opening. The results of these different examinations were compared to the intraoperative findings. Data regarding location of the IO, primary tract, secondary tract, and the presence of abscesses or cavities was analysed. RESULTS: Seventy patients with a mean age of 47 years (range 21-77), 51 male were included. Low transsphincteric fistulas were the most frequent type found (33, 47.1%) followed by high transsphincteric (24, 34.3%) and intersphincteric fistulas (13, 18.6%). There are no significant differences between the number of IO diagnosed by the different techniques employed and surgery (P > 0.05) and, there is a good concordance between intraoperative findings and the 2D-EAUS (k = 0.67) and 3D-EAUS (k = 0.75) for the diagnosis of the primary tract. The ROC curves for the diagnosis of transsphincteric fistulas show that both ultrasound techniques are adequate for the diagnosis of low transsphincteric fistulas, 3D-EAUS is superior for the diagnosis of high transsphincteric fistulas and PE is weak for the diagnosis of both types. CONCLUSION: 3D-EAUS shows a higher

  11. Synthetic transmit aperture technique in medical ultrasound imaging implemented on a GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Chen, Xiaodong; Zhang, Chuang; Wang, Yi; Jiao, Zhihai; Yu, Daoyin

    2014-11-01

    In the medical ultrasound imaging, the synthetic transmit aperture (STA) technique is very promising and has been a hot research topic. It is dynamically focused in both transmit and receive yielding an improvement in resolution. But this imaging technique sets high demands on processing capabilities and makes implementation of a full STA system very challenging and costly. Many attempts have been made to reduce the demands on the system making it a more realistic task to implement. In this paper we don't consider how to reduce the demands, but consider how to accelerate the processing speed of the system. The recent introduction of general-purpose graphic processing units (GPU) seems to be quite promising in this view, especially for the affordable programming complexity. In this paper we explain the main computational features of STA processing unit, trying to disclose the degree of parallelism in the operations. On the basis of the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) programming model and the extremely flexible structure of the Single Instruction Multiple Threads (SIMT) model, we show that the optimization of STA processing unit can be performed more efficiently. The input data is read from Matlab, the post-processing and display also use Matlab. Performance shows that, using a single NIVDIA GTX-650 GPU board, this amount to a speed up of more than a factor of 30 compared to a highly optimized beamformer running on our test workstation with a 3.20-GHz Intel Core-i5 processor.

  12. 2-D array for 3-D Ultrasound Imaging Using Synthetic Aperture Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Nadim M.; Yen, Jesse T.

    2010-01-01

    A 2-D array of 256 × 256 = 65,536 elements, with total area 4 × 4 = 16 cm2, serves as a flexible platform for developing acquisition schemes for 3-D rectilinear ultrasound imaging at 10 MHz using synthetic aperture techniques. This innovative system combines a simplified interconnect scheme and synthetic aperture techniques with a 2-D array for 3-D imaging. A row-column addressing scheme is used to access different elements for different transmit events. This addressing scheme is achieved through a simple interconnect, consisting of one top, one bottom single layer flex circuits, which, compared to multi-layer flex circuits, are simpler to design, cheaper to manufacture and thinner so their effect on the acoustic response is minimized. We present three designs that prioritize different design objectives: volume acquisiton time, resolution, and sensitivity, while maintaining acceptable figures for the other design objectives. For example, one design overlooks time acquisition requirements, assumes good noise conditions, and optimizes for resolution, achieving −6 dB and −20 dB beamwidths of less than 0.2 and 0.5 millimeters, respectively, for an F/2 aperture. Another design can acquire an entire volume in 256 transmit events, with −6dB and −20 dB beamwidths in the order of 0.4 and 0.8 millimeters, respectively. PMID:16764446

  13. Thermal dependence of ultrasound contrast agents scattering efficiency for echographic imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagioni, Angelo; Bettucci, Andrea; Passeri, Daniele; Alippi, Adriano

    2015-06-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents are used in echographic imaging techniques to enhance image contrast. In addition, they may represent an interesting solution to the problem of non-invasive temperature monitoring inside the human body, based on some thermal variations of their physical properties. Contrast agents, indeed, are inserted into blood circulation and they reach the most important organs inside the human body; consequently, any thermometric property that they may possess, could be exploited for realizing a non-invasive thermometer. They essentially are a suspension of microbubbles containing a gas enclosed in a phospholipid membrane; temperature variations induce structural modifications of the microbubble phospholipid shell, thus causing thermal dependence of contrast agent's elastic characteristics. In this paper, the acoustic scattering efficiency of a bulk suspension of of SonoVue® (Bracco SpA Milan, Italy) has been studied using a pulse-echo technique in the frequency range 1-17 MHz, as it depends upon temperatures between 25 and 65°C. Experimental data confirm that the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient of SonoVue® depends on temperature between 25 and 60°C. Chemical composition of the bubble shell seem to support the hypothesis that a phase transition in the microstructure of lipid-coated microbubbles could play a key role in explaining such effect.

  14. Review of modern techniques to generate antireflective properties on thermoplastic polymers.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Ulrike

    2006-03-01

    Modern optical applications need solutions for providing polymer surfaces with antireflective properties. The problems involved in coating comprise thermal limitations, incompatible mechanical properties of coating and substrate materials, and interaction between polymers and plasma. As an alternative for coating, antireflective properties on polymers can also be obtained by hot embossing or by ion etching of surface structures. My objective is to provide the criteria for choosing suitable deposition or structuring methods based on an understanding of plasma-, radiation-, and ion-induced surface phenomena; material compatibility; mechanical and environmental performance; and cost issues. The potential to produce antireflective interference coatings is documented for plasma-enhanced physical- and chemical-vapor-deposition methods, including modern hybrid techniques, as well as for solgel wet-chemical processes. The review about state-of-the-art coatings focuses on the thermoplastic acrylic, polycarbonate, and cycloolefin polymers. PMID:16539270

  15. Review of modern techniques to generate antireflective properties on thermoplastic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Ulrike

    2006-03-01

    Modern optical applications need solutions for providing polymer surfaces with antireflective properties. The problems involved in coating comprise thermal limitations, incompatible mechanical properties of coating and substrate materials, and interaction between polymers and plasma. As an alternative for coating, antireflective properties on polymers can also be obtained by hot embossing or by ion etching of surface structures. My objective is to provide the criteria for choosing suitable deposition or structuring methods based on an understanding of plasma-, radiation-, and ion-induced surface phenomena; material compatibility; mechanical and environmental performance; and cost issues. The potential to produce antireflective interference coatings is documented for plasma-enhanced physical- and chemical-vapor-deposition methods, including modern hybrid techniques, as well as for solgel wet-chemical processes. The review about state-of-the-art coatings focuses on the thermoplastic acrylic, polycarbonate, and cycloolefin polymers.

  16. Complete evaluation of anatomy and morphology of the infertile patient in a single visit; the modern infertility pelvic ultrasound examination.

    PubMed

    Groszmann, Yvette S; Benacerraf, Beryl R

    2016-06-01

    The comprehensive "one-stop shop" ultrasound evaluation of an infertile woman, performed around cycle days 5 to 9, will reveal abundant information about the anatomy and morphology of the pelvic organs and thereby avoid costly radiation and iodinated contrast exposure. We propose a two-dimensional and three-dimensional ultrasound to examine the appearance and shape of the endometrium, endometrial cavity, myometrium, and junctional zone, to assess for müllerian duct anomalies fibroids, adenomyosis, and polyps. We then evaluate the adnexa with grayscale ultrasound and Doppler, looking for ovarian masses or cysts, and signs of tubal disease. The cul-de-sac is imaged to look for masses, endometriosis, and free fluid. We then push gently on the uterus and ovaries to assess mobility. Lack of free movement of the organs would suggest adhesions or endometriosis. The sonohysterogram then allows for more detailed evaluation of the endometrial cavity, endometrial lining, and any intracavitary lesions. Tubal patency is then assessed during the sonohysterogram in real time by introducing air and saline or contrast and imaging the tubes (HyCoSy). With this single comprehensive ultrasound examination, patients can obtain a reliable, time-efficient, minimally invasive infertility evaluation in their own clinician's office at significantly less cost and without radiation. PMID:27054310

  17. Testing the Reliability and Sensitivity of Foraminiferal Transfer Functions Based on the Modern Analog Technique (MAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lac, D.; Cullen, J. L.; Martin, A.

    2004-05-01

    Quantitative estimates of past sea-surface temperatures (SST's) based on surface sediment calibration data sets of planktic foraminifers and modern SST's have been widely used in the interpretation and modeling of past climates. One widely used approach, The Modern Analog Techniques (MAT) relies on comparing a downcore sample to the Brown University modern Global Data Base of 1265 seabed samples and choosing either the10 or 5 most similar modern samples using the squared-chord distance similarity metric. The SST's above the best modern analogs are then averaged to produce the downcore SST estimate. We have chosen a set of 8 modern sea-bed samples from the Global Data Base with a wide range of foraminiferal compositions; 3 from the Pacific, 3 from the Atlantic, and 2 from the Indian Ocean and have generated duplicate foraminiferal census counts from sets of 5-6 random splits from each of our 8 samples so that we can: 1. compare the degree of similarity between duplicate samples so that we can evaluate the differences in dissimilarity values that can be attributed to counting error and begin to better understand the sensitivity of the chosen dissimilarity measures to ecologically produced differences in foraminiferal composition, 2. evaluate differences in how the duplicate samples choose analogs from the Global Data Base, and 3. test the sensitivity of the MAT's ability to accurately and precisely predict SST's using analogs from the Global Data Base for each set of duplicate samples. Comparison of the dissimilarity coefficients within each set of duplicate samples produces maximum dissimilarity values that range from 0.03 to 0.14. Both mean and maximum dissimilarities are greatest in sample sets from the low latitudes. The 5 best analogs chosen from the Global Data Base for samples within each set of duplicates generate average dissimilarities that range from 0.01 to 0.04. However, between a total of 8 and 12 different modern analogs were needed to find the 5 best

  18. Laser ultrasound technique applied in material characterization of thermally sprayed nickel aluminum coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, C. H.; Yang, C. H.; Hsiao, W. T.; Su, C.-Y.

    2012-05-01

    Thermal spraying processing usually uses a nickel-aluminum alloy system as the major powder due to its strong adhesion to substrates. The contents of powder material and the processing parameters used in the spraying process cause material properties of coatings exhibiting a wide variation. This research aims at nondestructive characterization of thermal spraying coatings. A laser-generation/laser-detection laser ultrasound technique (LUT) is used for the measurements of dispersion spectra of surface waves propagating along the coated surfaces. Theoretical model for surface waves propagating along a multi-layered structure with coating and substrate is used to model the sprayed coatings. An inversion algorithm based on Shuffled Complex Evolution (SCE-UA) is used to extract mechanical properties from the measured dispersion spectra cooperating with theoretical model. Three coatings with different sprayed powders and powder processing are investigated. Results indicate that substantial linear scatterings are observed for the inverted properties due to the measured dispersion spectra with limited bandwidth inherited from the relatively high attenuations. The slope of linear scattering can be used to distinguish the coating properties. The ANiBNb sample with ball-milled coating has the best properties based on its highest velocity and least attenuation. This method is potentially useful to characterize the mechanical properties of thermally spraying coating in a nondestructive way.

  19. Air-coupled ultrasound: a novel technique for monitoring the curing of thermosetting matrices.

    PubMed

    Lionetto, Francesca; Tarzia, Antonella; Maffezzoli, Alfonso

    2007-07-01

    A custom-made, air-coupled ultrasonic device was applied to cure monitoring of thick samples (7-10 mm) of unsaturated polyester resin at room temperature. A key point was the optimization of the experimental setup in order to propagate compression waves during the overall curing reaction by suitable placement of the noncontact transducers, placed on the same side of the test material, in the so-called pitch-catch configuration. The progress of polymerization was monitored through the variation of the time of flight of the propagating longitudinal waves. The exothermic character of the polymerization was taken into account by correcting the measured value of time of flight with that one in air, obtained by sampling the air velocity during the experiment. The air-coupled ultrasonic results were compared with those obtained from conventional contact ultrasonic measurements. The good agreement between the air-coupled ultrasonic results and those obtained by the rheological analysis demonstrated the reliability of air-coupled ultrasound in monitoring the changes of viscoelastic properties at gelation and vitrification. The position of the transducers on the same side of the sample makes this technique suitable for on-line cure monitoring during several composite manufacturing technologies. PMID:17718333

  20. Chirp excitation technique to enhance microbubble displacement induced by ultrasound radiation force.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yi; Zhang, Dong; Zheng, Hairong; Gong, Xiufen

    2009-03-01

    Ultrasound radiation force has been proposed to increase the targeting efficiency in ultrasonic molecular imaging and drug delivery. A chirp excitation technique is proposed to increase the radiation force induced microbubble displacement and might potentially be used for enhancing the targeting efficiency of microbubble clouds. In this study, a modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation is used to estimate the radius-time behavior of insonified microbubbles, and the translation of insonified microbubbles is calculated by using the particle trajectory equation. Simulations demonstrate that the chirp excitation is superior to the sinusoidal one in displacing microbubbles with a wide-size distribution, and that the performance is dependent on the parameters of the chirp signal such as the center frequency and frequency range. For Gaussian size distributed microbubble clouds with mean diameter of 3.5 microm and variance of 1, a 2.25 MHz chirp with frequency range of 1.5 MHz induces about 59.59% more microbubbles over a distance of 10 microm during 200 micros insonification, compared to a 2.25 MHz sinusoidal excitation with equal acoustic pressure. PMID:19275298

  1. A comparative study of ultrasound and laser light diffraction techniques for particle size determination in dairy beverages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, S.; Berrut, S.; Goodenough, T. I. J.; Rajendram, V. S.; Pinfield, V. J.; Povey, M. J. W.

    2006-02-01

    The particle size distribution (PSD) of milkfat droplets of raw and homogenized milk was determined by a diagnostic ultrasound technique that was initially calibrated with colloidal silica. The quality of the fit between ultrasound theory and experiment is discussed and provides a basis for comparison with the reference laser light scattering technique. The predicted ultrasonic attenuation was determined from the ECAH (Epstein P S and Carhart R R 1953 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 25 553-65, Allegra J R and Hawley S A 1972 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 51 1545-64) model using thermophysical data for milkfat and milk serum. New thermophysical properties of milkfat were established. The experimental data were obtained with the Ultrasizer spectrometer. Both techniques were affected by the milk proteins and could provide only qualitative milkfat PSD for the raw and the homogenized milk samples. Therefore, they showed their limitations to characterize multiple emulsions. However, preliminary results are shown for the ultrasound technique that account for the impact of the protein on the measured data and hence obtain quantitative results for the milkfat size distributions.

  2. Improved image guidance technique for minimally invasive mitral valve repair using real-time tracked 3D ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, Adam; Moore, John; Bainbridge, Daniel; Peters, Terry

    2016-03-01

    In the past ten years, numerous new surgical and interventional techniques have been developed for treating heart valve disease without the need for cardiopulmonary bypass. Heart valve repair is now being performed in a blood-filled environment, reinforcing the need for accurate and intuitive imaging techniques. Previous work has demonstrated how augmenting ultrasound with virtual representations of specific anatomical landmarks can greatly simplify interventional navigation challenges and increase patient safety. These techniques often complicate interventions by requiring additional steps taken to manually define and initialize virtual models. Furthermore, overlaying virtual elements into real-time image data can also obstruct the view of salient image information. To address these limitations, a system was developed that uses real-time volumetric ultrasound alongside magnetically tracked tools presented in an augmented virtuality environment to provide a streamlined navigation guidance platform. In phantom studies simulating a beating-heart navigation task, procedure duration and tool path metrics have achieved comparable performance to previous work in augmented virtuality techniques, and considerable improvement over standard of care ultrasound guidance.

  3. Traditional endodontic surgery versus modern technique: a 5-year controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Tortorici, Silvia; Difalco, Paolo; Caradonna, Luigi; Tetè, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we compared outcomes of traditional apicoectomy versus modern apicoectomy, by means of a controlled clinical trial with a 5-year follow-up. The study investigated 938 teeth in 843 patients. On the basis of the procedure performed, the teeth were grouped in 3 groups. Differences between the groups were the method of osteotomy (type of instruments used), type of preparation of retrograde cavity (different apicoectomy angles and instruments used for root-end preparation), and root-end filling material used (gray mineral trioxide aggregate or silver amalgam). Outcome (tooth healing) was estimated after 1 and 5 years, postoperatively. Clinical success rates after 1 year were 67% (306 teeth), 90% (186 teeth), and 94% (256 teeth) according to traditional apicoectomy (group 1), modern microsurgical apicoectomy using burns for osteotomy (group 2) or using piezo-osteotomy (group 3), respectively. After 1 year, group comparison results were statistically significant (P < 0.0001). Linear trend test was also statistically significant (P < 0.0001), pointing out larger healing from group 1 to group 3. After 5 years, teeth were classified into 2 groups on the basis of root-end filling material used. Clinical success was 90.8% (197 teeth) in the silver amalgam group versus 96% (309 teeth) in the mineral trioxide aggregate group (P < 0.00214). Multiple logistic regression analysis found that surgical technique was independently associated to tooth healing. In conclusion, modern apicoectomy resulted in a probability of success more than 5 times higher (odds ratio, 5.20 [95% confidence interval, 3.94-6.92]; P < 0.001) compared with the traditional technique. PMID:24469371

  4. [Bulk-fill-composites. Modern application technique of direct composites for posterior teeth].

    PubMed

    Manhart, Jürgen; Hickel, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    Direct composite restorations in the posterior dentition have become an indispensable element of modern dentistry. The performance of these restoration, even in the masticatory load-bearing posterior region, has been conclusively proven in many clinical studies. This procedure is usually carreid out in an elaborate layering technique. This time-consuming procedure requires an economically sensible fee, corresponding to the effort involved. Aside from the possibilies that highly aesthetic composites offer in the application of polychromatic multiple-layer techniques, there is also a great market demand for the most simple and quick and therefore economical composite-based materials for posterior teeth. These products are offered in the category of bulk-fill composite. PMID:24665478

  5. An Innovative Ultrasound Technique for Evaluation of Tumor Vascularity in Breast Cancers: Superb Micro-Vascular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ah Young; Cha, Sang Hoon; Yeom, Suk Keu; Lee, Seung Wha; Chung, Hwan Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Tumor vascularity is an important indicator for differential diagnosis, tumor growth, and prognosis. Superb micro-vascular imaging (SMI) is an innovative ultrasound technique for vascular examination that uses a multidimensional filter to eliminate clutter and preserve extremely low-velocity flows. Theoretically, SMI could depict more vessels and more detailed vascular morphology, due to the increased sensitivity of slow blood flow. Here, we report the early experience of using SMI in 21 breast cancer patients. We evaluated tumor vascular features in breast cancer and compared SMI and conventional color or power Doppler imaging. SMI was superior to color or power Doppler imaging in detecting tumor vessels, the details of vessel morphology, and both peripheral and central vascular distribution. In conclusion, SMI is a promising ultrasound technique for evaluating microvascular information of breast cancers.

  6. Thermal Analysis of the Tibial Cement Interface with Modern Cementing Technique

    PubMed Central

    Vertullo, Christopher J.; Zbrojkiewicz, David; Vizesi, Frank; Walsh, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The major cause of cemented Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) failure is aseptic loosening of the tibial component necessitating revision surgery. Recently, multiple techniques have been described to maximize cement penetration depth and density in the proximal tibia during TKA to potentially avoid early loosening. While cement polymerisation is an exothermic reaction, minimal investigation into the proximal tibial thermal safety margin during cement polymerisation has been undertaken. In animal models osseous injury occurs at temperatures greater than 47 °C when applied for one minute. The aim of this study was to investigate the cement bone interface temperatures in TKA using modern tibial cementing techniques with a cadaveric tibial tray model. Methods: Eight adult cadavers were obtained with the proximal tibial surface prepared by a fellowship trained arthroplasty surgeon. Third generation cementation techniques were used and temperatures during cement polymerization on cadaveric knee arthroplasty models were recorded using thermocouples. Results: The results showed that no tibial cement temperature exceeded 44 °C for more than 1 minute. Two of the eight cadaveric tibias recorded maximum temperatures greater than 44 °C for 55 seconds and 33 seconds, just less than the 60 seconds reported to cause thermal injury. Average maximum polymerization temperatures did not correlate with deeper cement penetration or tray material. Maximum mantle temperatures were not statistically different between metal and all polyethylene tibial trays. Conclusion: Our investigation suggests that modern cementing techniques result in maximum mantle temperatures that are less than previously recorded temperatures required to cause thermal osseous injury, although this thermal injury safety margin is quite narrow at an average of 4.95 °C (95% confidence interval ± 4.31). PMID:27073585

  7. Unintentional epidural placement of a thoracic paravertebral catheter inserted using an ultrasound-guided technique: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takayuki; Shimizu, Hiroki; Furutani, Kenta; Baba, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    This is the first case report describing the epidural misplacement of an infusion catheter, which was intended to be located in the thoracic paravertebral space using an ultrasound-guided technique. The patient was a 57-year-old female undergoing a laparoscopy-assisted left partial nephrectomy. Before surgery, a Tuohy needle was inserted into the paravertebral space at the left ninth intercostal space using an in-plane transverse ultrasound-guided approach in the lateral-to-medial direction. A catheter was then threaded into the paravertebral space through the needle. Subsequently, the catheter position was secured, although ultrasound-guided confirmation of air injected through the catheter into the paravertebral space was not obtained. Twenty milliliters of 0.5 % levobupivacaine was administered through the catheter at both the initiation and conclusion of surgery. A neurologic examination following surgery revealed paraplegia, along with sensory deficits in the bilateral T3-S5 dermatome. The motor dysfunction in the lower extremities lasted 7 h, and the sensory block lasted 13.5 h. Postoperative radiologic confirmation of the catheter position concomitant with the spread of radiopaque dye revealed that the tip of the catheter was lying in the epidural space. Unless precise attention is paid to detection of the catheter tip location, a thoracic paravertebral catheter can enter into the epidural space even under ultrasound guidance. PMID:27040105

  8. Ultrasound-Guided Trigger Point Injection for Serratus Anterior Muscle Pain Syndrome: Description of Technique and Case Series.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Schaffer, Grisell; Nowakowsky, Michal; Eghtesadi, Marzieh; Cogan, Jennifer

    2015-09-15

    Chronic chest pain is a challenge, and serratus anterior muscle pain syndrome (SAMPS) is often overlooked. We have developed an ultrasound-guided technique for infiltrating local anesthetics and steroids in patients with SAMPS. In 8 patients, the duration of chronic pain was approximately 19 months. Three months after treatment, all patients had experienced a significant reduction in pain. Infiltration for SAMPS confirms the diagnosis and provides adequate pain relief. PMID:26361386

  9. [Interventional ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Blázquez Sánchez, N; Fernández Canedo, I; Valdés Vilches, L; de Troya Martín, M

    2015-11-01

    High-frequency ultrasound has become increasingly used in dermatology. This technique is accessible, non-invasive, and rapid and provides information in real time. Consequently, it has become of great diagnostic value in dermatology. However, high-frequency ultrasound also has a promising future as a complementary technique in interventional diagnostic procedures, even though its application in this field has been little studied by dermatologists. PMID:26895944

  10. Assessment of carotid diameter and wall thickness in ultrasound images using active contours improved by a multiresolution technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Marco A.; Pilon, Paulo E.; Lage, Silvia G.; Kopel, Liliane; Carvalho, Ricardo T.; Furuie, Sergio S.

    2002-04-01

    Carotid vessel ultrasound imaging is a reliable non-invasive technique to measure the arterial morphology. Vessel diameter, intima-media thickness (IMT) of the far wall and plaque presence can be reliably determined using B-mode ultrasound. In this paper we describe a semi-automatic approach to measure artery diameter and IMT based on an active contour technique improved by a multiresolution analysis. The operator selects a region-of-interest (ROI) in a series of carotid images obtained from B-mode ultrasound. This set of images is convolved with the corresponding partial derivatives of the Gaussian filter. The filter response is used to compute a 2D gradient magnitude image in order to refine the vessel's boundaries. Using an active contour technique the vessel's border is determined automatically. The near wall media-adventitia (NWMA), far wall media-adventitia (FWMA) and far wall lumen-intima (FWLI) borders are obtained by a least-square fitting of the active contours result. The distance between NWMA and FWLI (vessel diameter) and between FWLI and FWMA (far wall intima-media thickness) are obtained for all images and the mean value is computed during systole and diastole. The proposed method is a reliable and reproducible way of assessing the vessel diameter and far wall intima-media thickness of the carotid artery.

  11. New fabrication techniques for ring-array transducers for real-time 3D intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Light, Edward D; Lieu, Victor; Smith, Stephen W

    2009-10-01

    We have previously described miniature 2D array transducers integrated into a Cook Medical, Inc. vena cava filter deployment device. While functional, the fabrication technique was very labor intensive and did not lend itself well to efficient fabrication of large numbers of devices. We developed two new fabrication methods that we believe can be used to efficiently manufacture these types of devices in greater than prototype numbers. One transducer consisted of 55 elements operating near 5 MHz. The interelement spacing is 0.20 mm. It was constructed on a flat piece of copper-clad polyimide and then wrapped around an 11 French catheter of a Cook Medical, Inc. inferior vena cava (IVC) filter deployment device. We used a braided wiring technology from Tyco Electronics Corp. to connect the elements to our real-time 3D ultrasound scanner. Typical measured transducer element bandwidth was 20% centered at 4.7 MHz and the 50 Omega round trip insertion loss was --82 dB. The mean of the nearest neighbor cross talk was -37.0 dB. The second method consisted of a 46-cm long single layer flex circuit from MicroConnex that terminates in an interconnect that plugs directly into our system cable. This transducer had 70 elements at 0.157 mm interelement spacing operating at 4.8 MHz. Typical measured transducer element bandwidth was 29% and the 50 Omega round trip insertion loss was -83 dB. The mean of the nearest neighbor cross talk was -33.0 dB. PMID:20458877

  12. Obstetric ultrasound simulation.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Joshua F; Brost, Brian C

    2013-06-01

    Obstetric ultrasound is becoming an increasingly important part of the practice of maternal-fetal medicine. Thus, it is important to develop rigorous and effective training curricula for obstetrics and gynecology residents and maternal-fetal medicine fellows. Traditionally, this training has come almost entirely from exposure to ultrasound in the clinical setting. However, with the increased complexity of modern ultrasound and advent of duty-hour restrictions, a purely clinical training model is no longer viable. With the advent of high-fidelity obstetric ultrasound simulators, a significant amount of training can occur in a non-clinical setting which allows learners to obtain significant skill prior to their first patient ultrasound encounter and obtain proficiency in a shorter period of time. In this manuscript we discuss the available obstetric ultrasound simulators and ways to construct a comprehensive ultrasound training curricula to meet the increasing demands of modern maternal-fetal medicine. PMID:23721777

  13. Accuracy and sampling error of two age estimation techniques using rib histomorphometry on a modern sample.

    PubMed

    García-Donas, Julieta G; Dyke, Jeffrey; Paine, Robert R; Nathena, Despoina; Kranioti, Elena F

    2016-02-01

    Most age estimation methods are proven problematic when applied in highly fragmented skeletal remains. Rib histomorphometry is advantageous in such cases; yet it is vital to test and revise existing techniques particularly when used in legal settings (Crowder and Rosella, 2007). This study tested Stout & Paine (1992) and Stout et al. (1994) histological age estimation methods on a Modern Greek sample using different sampling sites. Six left 4th ribs of known age and sex were selected from a modern skeletal collection. Each rib was cut into three equal segments. Two thin sections were acquired from each segment. A total of 36 thin sections were prepared and analysed. Four variables (cortical area, intact and fragmented osteon density and osteon population density) were calculated for each section and age was estimated according to Stout & Paine (1992) and Stout et al. (1994). The results showed that both methods produced a systemic underestimation of the individuals (to a maximum of 43 years) although a general improvement in accuracy levels was observed when applying the Stout et al. (1994) formula. There is an increase of error rates with increasing age with the oldest individual showing extreme differences between real age and estimated age. Comparison of the different sampling sites showed small differences between the estimated ages suggesting that any fragment of the rib could be used without introducing significant error. Yet, a larger sample should be used to confirm these results. PMID:26698389

  14. Role of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in the diagnosis of endometrial pathology

    PubMed Central

    POP, CIPRIAN MIHAITA; MIHU, DAN; BADEA, RADU

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is the reference imaging procedure used for the exploration of endometrial pathology. As medical procedures improve and the requirements of modern medicine become more demanding, gray-scale ultrasound is insufficient in establishing gynecological diagnosis. Thus, more complex examination techniques are required: Doppler ultrasound, contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), 3D ultrasound, etc. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound is a special examination technique that gains more and more ground. This allows a detailed real-time evaluation of microcirculation in a certain territory, which is impossible to perform by Doppler ultrasound. The aim of this review is to synthesize current knowledge regarding CEUS applications in endometrial pathology, to detail the technical aspects of endometrial CEUS and the physical properties of the equipment and contrast agents used, as well as to identify the limitations of the method. PMID:26733740

  15. Introduction. [usefulness of modern remote sensing techniques for studying components of California water resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, R. N.

    1973-01-01

    Since May 1970, personnel on several campuses of the University of California have been conducting investigations which seek to determine the usefulness of modern remote sensing techniques for studying various components of California's earth resources complex. Emphasis has been given to California's water resources as exemplified by the Feather River project and other aspects of the California Water Plan. This study is designed to consider in detail the supply, demand, and impact relationships. The specific geographic areas studied are the Feather River drainage in northern California, the Chino-Riverside Basin and Imperial Valley areas in southern California, and selected portions of the west side of San Joaquin Valley in central California. An analysis is also given on how an effective benefit-cost study of remote sensing in relation to California's water resources might best be made.

  16. Modern control techniques in active flutter suppression using a control moment gyro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchek, P. M.

    1974-01-01

    Development of organized synthesis techniques, using concepts of modern control theory was studied for the design of active flutter suppression systems for two and three-dimensional lifting surfaces, utilizing a control moment gyro (CMG) to generate the required control torques. Incompressible flow theory is assumed, with the unsteady aerodynamic forces and moments for arbitrary airfoil motion obtained by using the convolution integral based on Wagner's indicial lift function. Linear optimal control theory is applied to find particular optimal sets of gain values which minimize a quadratic performance function. The closed loop system's response to impulsive gust disturbances and the resulting control power requirements are investigated, and the system eigenvalues necessary to minimize the maximum value of control power are determined.

  17. 20th International Conference for Students and Young Scientists: Modern Techniques and Technologies (MTT'2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-10-01

    The active involvement of young researchers in scientific processes and the acquisition of scientific experience by gifted youth currently have a great value for the development of science. One of the research activities of National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, aimed at the preparing and formation of the next generation of scientists, is the International Conference of Students and Young Scientists ''Modern Techniques and Technologies'', which was held in 2014 for the twentieth time. Great experience in the organization of scientific events has been acquired through years of carrying the conference. There are all the necessary resources for this: a team of organizers - employees of Tomsk Polytechnic University, premises provided with modern office equipment and equipment for demonstration, and leading scientists - professors of TPU, as well as the status of the university as a leading research university in Russia. This way the conference is able to attract world leading scientists for the collaboration. For the previous years the conference proved itself as a major scientific event at international level, which attracts more than 600 students and young scientists from Russia, CIS and other countries. The conference provides oral plenary and section reports. The conference is organized around lectures, where leading Russian and foreign scientists deliver plenary presentations to young audiences. An important indicator of this scientific event is the magnitude of the coverage of scientific fields: energy, heat and power, instrument making, engineering, systems and devices for medical purposes, electromechanics, material science, computer science and control in technical systems, nanotechnologies and nanomaterials, physical methods in science and technology, control and quality management, design and technology of artistic materials processing. The main issues considered by young researchers at the conference were related to the analysis of contemporary

  18. Echogenicity of benign adrenal focal lesions on imaging with new ultrasound techniques – report with pictorial presentation

    PubMed Central

    Kasperlik-Załuska, Anna A.; Migda, Bartosz; Otto, Maciej; Dobruch-Sobczak, Katarzyna; Jakubowski, Wiesław S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of the research was to assess the echogenicity of benign adrenal focal lesions using new ultrasound techniques. Material and method 34 benign adrenal masses in 29 patients were analyzed retrospectively. The examinations were conducted using Aplio XG (Toshiba, Japan) ultrasound scanner with a convex probe 1–6 MHz in the B-mode presentation with the combined use of new ultrasound techniques: harmonic imaging and spatial compound sonography. The size of the adrenal tumors, their echogenicity and homogeneity were analyzed. Statistical analysis was conducted using the STATISTICA 10 software. Results The following adrenal masses were assessed: 12 adenomas, 10 nodular hyperplasias of adrenal cortex, 7 myelolipomas, 3 pheochromocytomas, a hemangioma with hemorrhage and a cyst. The mean diameter of nodular hyperplasia of adrenal cortex was not statistically different from that of adenomas (p = 0.075). The possibility of differentiating between nodular hyperplasia and adenoma using the parameter of hypoechogenicity or homogeneity of the lesion was demonstrated with the sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 41.7%, respectively. The larger the benign adrenal tumor was, the more frequently did it turn out to have a mixed and inhomogenous echogenicity (p < 0.05; ROC areas under the curve: 0.832 and 0.805, respectively). Conclusions A variety of echogenicity patterns of benign adrenal focal lesions was demonstrated. The image of an adrenal tumor correlates with its size. The ultrasound examination, apart from its indisputable usefulness in detecting and monitoring adrenal tumors, may also allow for the differentiation between benign lesions. However, for lesions found incidentally an algorithm for the assessment of adrenal incidentalomas is applicable, which includes computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26807294

  19. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X-ray, MRI, ... it has its place as a diagnostic tool. Ultrasound scans use high frequency sound waves to produce ...

  20. Involved-Node Radiotherapy and Modern Radiation Treatment Techniques in Patients With Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Paumier, Amaury; Ghalibafian, Mithra; Beaudre, Anne; Ferreira, Ivaldo; Pichenot, Charlotte; Messai, Taha; Lessard, Nathalie Athalie; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Girinsky, Theodore

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical outcome of the involved-node radiotherapy (INRT) concept using modern radiation treatments (intensity-modulated radiotherapy [IMRT]or deep-inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy [DIBH) in patients with localized supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin lymphoma. Methods and Materials: All but 2 patients had early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma, and they were treated with chemotherapy prior to irradiation. Radiation treatments were delivered using the INRT concept according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer guidelines. IMRT was performed with the patient free-breathing. For the adapted breath-hold technique, a spirometer dedicated to DIBH radiotherapy was used. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy was performed with those patients. Results: Fifty patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (48 patients with primary Hodgkin lymphoma, 1 patient with recurrent disease, and 1 patient with refractory disease) entered the study from January 2003 to August 2008. Thirty-two patients were treated with IMRT, and 18 patients were treated with the DIBH technique. The median age was 28 years (range, 17-62 years). Thirty-four (68%) patients had stage I - (I-IIA) IIA disease, and 16 (32%) patients had stage I - (I-IIB) IIB disease. All but 3 patients received three to six cycles of adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD). The median radiation doses to patients treated with IMRT and DIBH were, respectively, 40 Gy (range, 21.6-40 Gy) and 30.6 Gy (range, 19.8-40 Gy). Protection of various organs at risk was satisfactory. Median follow-up was 53.4 months (range, 19.1-93 months). The 5-year progression-free and overall survival rates for the whole population were 92% (95% confidence interval [CI], 80%-97%) and 94% (95% CI, 75%-98%), respectively. Recurrences occurred in 4 patients: 2 patients had in-field relapses, and 2 patients had visceral recurrences. Grade 3 acute lung toxicity (transient pneumonitis) occurred in 1 case. Conclusions

  1. Measurement of the normalized broadband ultrasound attenuation in trabecular bone by using a bidirectional transverse transmission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kang Il

    2015-01-01

    A new method for measuring the normalized broadband ultrasound attenuation (nBUA) in trabecular bone by using a bidirectional transverse transmission technique was proposed and validated with measurements obtained by using the conventional transverse transmission technique. There was no significant difference between the nBUA measurements obtained for 14 bovine femoral trabecular bone samples by using the bidirectional and the conventional transverse transmission techniques. The nBUA measured by using the two transverse transmission techniques showed strong positive correlations of r = 0.87 to 0.88 with the apparent bone density, consistent with the behavior in human trabecular bone invitro. We expect that the new method can be usefully applied for improved accuracy and precision in clinical measurements.

  2. Workflow and intervention times of MR-guided focused ultrasound - Predicting the impact of new techniques.

    PubMed

    Loeve, Arjo J; Al-Issawi, Jumana; Fernandez-Gutiérrez, Fabiola; Langø, Thomas; Strehlow, Jan; Haase, Sabrina; Matzko, Matthias; Napoli, Alessandro; Melzer, Andreas; Dankelman, Jenny

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) has become an attractive, non-invasive treatment for benign and malignant tumours, and offers specific benefits for poorly accessible locations in the liver. However, the presence of the ribcage and the occurrence of liver motion due to respiration limit the applicability MRgFUS. Several techniques are being developed to address these issues or to decrease treatment times in other ways. However, the potential benefit of such improvements has not been quantified. In this research, the detailed workflow of current MRgFUS procedures was determined qualitatively and quantitatively by using observation studies on uterine MRgFUS interventions, and the bottlenecks in MRgFUS were identified. A validated simulation model based on discrete events simulation was developed to quantitatively predict the effect of new technological developments on the intervention duration of MRgFUS on the liver. During the observation studies, the duration and occurrence frequencies of all actions and decisions in the MRgFUS workflow were registered, as were the occurrence frequencies of motion detections and intervention halts. The observation results show that current MRgFUS uterine interventions take on average 213min. Organ motion was detected on average 2.9 times per intervention, of which on average 1.0 actually caused a need for rework. Nevertheless, these motion occurrences and the actions required to continue after their detection consumed on average 11% and up to 29% of the total intervention duration. The simulation results suggest that, depending on the motion occurrence frequency, the addition of new technology to automate currently manual MRgFUS tasks and motion compensation could potentially reduce the intervention durations by 98.4% (from 256h 5min to 4h 4min) in the case of 90% motion occurrence, and with 24% (from 5h 19min to 4h 2min) in the case of no motion. In conclusion, new tools were developed to predict how

  3. A comparison of the modern Lie scaling method to classical scaling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polsinelli, James; Kavvas, M. Levent

    2016-07-01

    In the past 2 decades a new modern scaling technique has emerged from the highly developed theory on the Lie group of transformations. This new method has been applied by engineers to several problems in hydrology and hydraulics, including but not limited to overland flow, groundwater dynamics, sediment transport, and open channel hydraulics. This study attempts to clarify the relationship this new technology has with the classical scaling method based on dimensional analysis, non-dimensionalization, and the Vaschy-Buckingham-Π theorem. Key points of the Lie group theory, and the application of the Lie scaling transformation, are outlined and a comparison is made with two classical scaling models through two examples: unconfined groundwater flow and contaminant transport. The Lie scaling method produces an invariant scaling transformation of the prototype variables, which ensures the dynamics between the model and prototype systems will be preserved. Lie scaling can also be used to determine the conditions under which a complete model is dynamically, kinematically, and geometrically similar to the prototype phenomenon. Similarities between the Lie and classical scaling methods are explained, and the relative strengths and weaknesses of the techniques are discussed.

  4. The design of a turboshaft speed governor using modern control techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delosreyes, G.; Gouchoe, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of this program were: to verify the model of off schedule compressor variable geometry in the T700 turboshaft engine nonlinear model; to evaluate the use of the pseudo-random binary noise (PRBN) technique for obtaining engine frequency response data; and to design a high performance power turbine speed governor using modern control methods. Reduction of T700 engine test data generated at NASA-Lewis indicated that the off schedule variable geometry effects were accurate as modeled. Analysis also showed that the PRBN technique combined with the maximum likelihood model identification method produced a Bode frequency response that was as accurate as the response obtained from standard sinewave testing methods. The frequency response verified the accuracy of linear models consisting of engine partial derivatives and used for design. A power turbine governor was designed using the Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) method of full state feedback control. A Kalman filter observer was used to estimate helicopter main rotor blade velocity. Compared to the baseline T700 power turbine speed governor, the LQR governor reduced droop up to 25 percent for a 490 shaft horsepower transient in 0.1 sec simulating a wind gust, and up to 85 percent for a 700 shaft horsepower transient in 0.5 sec simulating a large collective pitch angle transient.

  5. Advanced grazing-incidence techniques for modern soft-matter materials analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hexemer, Alexander; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The complex nano-morphology of modern soft-matter materials is successfully probed with advanced grazing-incidence techniques. Based on grazing-incidence small- and wide-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (GISAXS, GIWAXS, GISANS and GIWANS), new possibilities arise which are discussed with selected examples. Due to instrumental progress, highly interesting possibilities for local structure analysis in this material class arise from the use of micro- and nanometer-sized X-ray beams in micro- or nanofocused GISAXS and GIWAXS experiments. The feasibility of very short data acquisition times down to milliseconds creates exciting possibilities forin situandin operandoGISAXS and GIWAXS studies. Tuning the energy of GISAXS and GIWAXS in the soft X-ray regime and in time-of flight GISANS allows the tailoring of contrast conditions and thereby the probing of more complex morphologies. In addition, recent progress in software packages, useful for data analysis for advanced grazing-incidence techniques, is discussed.

  6. A comparison of the modern Lie scaling method to classical scaling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polsinelli, J.; Kavvas, M. L.

    2015-10-01

    In the past two decades a new modern scaling technique has emerged from the highly developed theory on the Lie group of transformations. This new method has been applied by engineers to several problems in hydrology and hydraulics including but not limited to groundwater dynamics, sediment transport, and open channel hydraulics. This study attempts to clarify the relationship this new technology has with the classical scaling method based on dimensional analysis, non dimensionalization, and the Buckingham Π theorem. Key points of the Lie group theory, and the application of the Lie scaling transformation, are outlined and a comparison is done with two classical scaling models through two examples: unconfined groundwater flow and contaminant transport. The Lie scaling method produces an invariant scaling transformation of the prototype variables which ensures the dynamics between the model and prototype systems will be preserved. Lie scaling can also be used to determine the conditions under which a complete model is dynamically, kinematically, and geometrically similar to the prototype phenomenon. Similarities between the Lie and classical scaling methods are explained, and the relative strengths and weaknesses of the techniques are discussed.

  7. Advanced grazing-incidence techniques for modern soft-matter materials analysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hexemer, Alexander; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The complex nano-morphology of modern soft-matter materials is successfully probed with advanced grazing-incidence techniques. Based on grazing-incidence small- and wide-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (GISAXS, GIWAXS, GISANS and GIWANS), new possibilities arise which are discussed with selected examples. Due to instrumental progress, highly interesting possibilities for local structure analysis in this material class arise from the use of micro- and nanometer-sized X-ray beams in micro- or nanofocused GISAXS and GIWAXS experiments. The feasibility of very short data acquisition times down to milliseconds creates exciting possibilities forin situandin operandoGISAXS and GIWAXS studies. Tuning the energy of GISAXS and GIWAXS in themore » soft X-ray regime and in time-of flight GISANS allows the tailoring of contrast conditions and thereby the probing of more complex morphologies. In addition, recent progress in software packages, useful for data analysis for advanced grazing-incidence techniques, is discussed.« less

  8. Advanced grazing-incidence techniques for modern soft-matter materials analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hexemer, Alexander; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The complex nano-morphology of modern soft-matter materials is successfully probed with advanced grazing-incidence techniques. Based on grazing-incidence small- and wide-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (GISAXS, GIWAXS, GISANS and GIWANS), new possibilities arise which are discussed with selected examples. Due to instrumental progress, highly interesting possibilities for local structure analysis in this material class arise from the use of micro- and nanometer-sized X-ray beams in micro- or nanofocused GISAXS and GIWAXS experiments. The feasibility of very short data acquisition times down to milliseconds creates exciting possibilities for in situ and in operando GISAXS and GIWAXS studies. Tuning the energy of GISAXS and GIWAXS in the soft X-ray regime and in time-of flight GISANS allows the tailoring of contrast conditions and thereby the probing of more complex morphologies. In addition, recent progress in software packages, useful for data analysis for advanced grazing-incidence techniques, is discussed. PMID:25610632

  9. 2013 European Thyroid Association Guidelines for Cervical Ultrasound Scan and Ultrasound-Guided Techniques in the Postoperative Management of Patients with Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leenhardt, L.; Erdogan, M.F.; Hegedus, L.; Mandel, S.J.; Paschke, R.; Rago, T.; Russ, G.

    2013-01-01

    Cervical ultrasound scanning (US) is considered a key examination, by all major thyroid and endocrine specialist societies for the postoperative follow-up of thyroid cancer patients to assess the risk of recurrence. Neck US imaging is readily available, non-invasive, relatively easy to perform, cost-effective, and can guide diagnostic and therapeutic procedures with low complication rates. Its main shortcoming is its operator-dependency. Because of the pivotal role of US in the care of thyroid cancer patients, the European Thyroid Association convened a panel of international experts to review technical aspects, indications, results, and limitations of cervical US in the initial staging and follow-up of thyroid cancer patients. The main aim is to establish guidelines for both a cervical US scanning protocol and US-guided diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in patients with thyroid cancer. This report presents (1) standardization of the US scanning procedure, techniques of US-guided fine-needle aspiration, and reporting of findings; (2) definition of criteria for classification of malignancy risk based on cervical US imaging characteristics of neck masses and lymph nodes; (3) indications for US-guided fine-needle aspiration and for biological in situ assessments; (4) proposal of an algorithm for the follow-up of thyroid cancer patients based on risk stratification following histopathological and cervical US findings, and (5) discussion of the potential use of US-guided localization and ablation techniques for locoregional thyroid metastases. PMID:24847448

  10. PREFACE: 21th International Conference for Students and Young Scientists: Modern Technique and Technologies (MTT'2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-10-01

    Involving young researchers in the scientific process, and allowing them to gain scientific experience, are important issues for scientific development. The International Conference for Students and Young Scientists ''Modern Technique and Technologies'' is one of a number of scientific events, held at National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University aimed at training and forming the scientific elite. During previous years the conference established itself as a serious scientific event at an international level, attracting members which annually number about 400 students and young scientists from Russia and near and far abroad. An important indicator of this scientific event is the large number of scientific areas covered, such as power engineering, heat power engineering, electronic devices for monitoring and diagnostics, instrumentation, materials and technologies of new generations, methods of research and diagnostics of materials, automatic control and system engineering, physical methods science and engineering, design and artistic aspects of engineering, social and humanitarian aspects of engineering. The main issues, which are discussed at the conference by young researchers, are connected with analysis of contemporary problems, application of new techniques and technologies, and consideration of their relationship. Over the years, the conference committee has gained a lot of experience in organizing scientific meetings. There are all the necessary conditions: the staff of organizers includes employees of Tomsk Polytechnic University; the auditoriums are equipped with modern demonstration and office equipment; leading scientists are TPU professors; the status of the Tomsk Polytechnic University as a leading research university in Russia also plays an important role. All this allows collaboration between leading scientists from all around the world, who are annually invited to give lectures at the conference. The editorial board expresses gratitude to the

  11. PREFACE: IX International Conference on Modern Techniques of Plasma Diagnostics and their Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savjolov, A. S.; Dodulad, E. I.

    2016-01-01

    The IX Conference on ''Modern Techniques of Plasma Diagnosis and their Application'' was held on 5 - 7 November, 2014 at National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (NRNU MEPhI). The goal of the conference was an exchange of information on both high-temperature and low-temperature plasma diagnostics as well as deliberation and analysis of various diagnostic techniques and their applicability in science, industry, ecology, medicine and other fields. The Conference also provided young scientists from scientific centres and universities engaged in plasma diagnostics with an opportunity to attend the lectures given by the leading specialists in this field as well as present their own results and findings. The first workshop titled ''Modern problems of plasma diagnostics and their application for control of chemicals and the environment'' took place at Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute (MEPhI) in June 1998 with the support of the Section on Diagnostics of the Council of Russian Academic of Science on Plasma Physics and since then these forums have been held at MEPhI every two years. In 2008 the workshop was assigned a conference status. More than 150 specialists on plasma diagnostics and students took part in the last conference. They represented leading Russian scientific centres (such as Troitsk Institute of Innovative and Thermonuclear Research, National Research Centre ''Kurchatov Institute'', Russian Federal Nuclear Centre - All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics and others) and universities from Belarus, Ukraine, Germany, USA, Belgium and Sweden. About 30 reports were made by young researchers, students and post-graduate students. All presentations during the conference were broadcasted online over the internet with viewers in Moscow, Prague, St. Petersburgh and other cities. The Conference was held within the framework of the Centre of Plasma, Laser Research and Technology supported by MEPhI Academic Excellence Project (Russian

  12. Comparison of visual and ultrasound based techniques to measure head repositioning in healthy and neck-pain subjects.

    PubMed

    Roren, Alexandra; Mayoux-Benhamou, Marie-Anne; Fayad, Fouad; Poiraudeau, Serge; Lantz, Didier; Revel, Michel

    2009-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound based (US) and usual Revel visual techniques were compared to measure head repositioning ability in 41 healthy subjects and 41 subjects with neck pain. Head repositioning absolute value of the global error (AE) was calculated by both techniques after active head rotations. The AE was 3.6 degrees and 3.7 degrees for healthy subjects and 6.3 degrees and 6.1 degrees for neck-pain subjects for the visual and US techniques, respectively. The AE was higher in neck-pain subjects (p<0.001), and a value of 4.5 degrees was identified as a threshold of abnormal repositioning for both techniques. The test-retest reliability, calculated in the neck-pain subjects, was moderate (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]=0.68) for both techniques. The correlation between the two techniques for AE was poor for both groups with successive measurement of visual and US techniques (r=0.32 and 0.46, respectively) but excellent with simultaneous measurement (r=0.95 for both groups). Moreover, we showed substantial agreement between the techniques in discriminating healthy and neck-pain subjects (kappa=0.65). The Revel visual technique is more appropriate for clinical practice, but with improved software, the 3D US method could provide additional quantitative and qualitative data invaluable for research. PMID:18514016

  13. Diuretic Agent and Normal Saline Infusion Technique for Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Nephrostomies in Nondilated Pelvicaliceal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yagci, Cemil Ustuner, Evren Atman, Ebru Dusunceli; Baltaci, Sumer; Uzun, Caglar Akyar, Serdar

    2013-04-15

    Percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) in a nondilated pelvicaliceal system is technically challenging. We describe an effective method to achieve transient dilatation of the pelvicaliceal system via induction of diuresis using infusion of a diuretic agent in normal saline, therefore allowing easier access to the pelvicaliceal system. Under real-time ultrasound guidance, the technique had been tested in 22 nephrostomies with nondilated system (a total of 20 patients with 2 patients having bilateral nephrostomies) during a 5-year period. Patients were given 40 mg of furosemide in 250 ml of normal saline solution intravenously by rapid infusion. As soon as maximum calyceal dilatation of more than 5 mm was observed, which is usually 15 min later after the end of rapid infusion, patients were positioned obliquely, and PCN procedure under ultrasound guidance was performed. The procedure was successful in 19 of the nephrostomies in 17 patients with a success rate of 86.36 % per procedure and 85 % per patient in nondilated pelvicaliceal systems. No major nephrostomy-, drug-, or technique-related complications were encountered. The technique failed to work in three patients due to the presence of double J catheters and preexisting calyceal perforation which avoided transient dilation of the pelvicaliceal system with diuresis. Diuretic infusion in saline is a feasible and effective method for PCN in nondilated pelvicaliceal systems.

  14. Advances in head and neck fine-needle aspiration and ultrasound technique for the pathologist.

    PubMed

    Jakowski, Joseph D; DiNardo, Laurence J

    2015-07-01

    The success of fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy in the evaluation of head and neck (H&N) masses has already been established. Herein we outline the most recent advancement for the pathologist who performs traditional palpation-guided FNA (PGFNA) in the H&N while also incorporating ultrasound-guided FNA (UGFNA) into their practice. We provide an overview of the educational and training opportunities in H&N ultrasound and UGFNA with emphasis on the advantages and limitations for the pathologist. Throughout are useful clinical and technical pearls, many of which may also interest those who practice PGFNA, including local anesthesia use and FNA procedures in pediatric patients. PMID:25677264

  15. Can 3D ultrasound identify trochlea dysplasia in newborns? Evaluation and applicability of a technique.

    PubMed

    Kohlhof, Hendrik; Heidt, Christoph; Bähler, Alexandrine; Kohl, Sandro; Gravius, Sascha; Friedrich, Max J; Ziebarth, Kai; Stranzinger, Enno

    2015-06-01

    Femoro-patellar dysplasia is considered as a significant risk factor of patellar instability. Different studies suggest that the shape of the trochlea is already developed in early childhood. Therefore early identification of a dysplastic configuration might be relevant information for the treating physician. An easy applicable routine screening of the trochlea is yet not available. The purpose of this study was to establish and evaluate a screening method for femoro-patellar dysplasia using 3D ultrasound. From 2012 to 2013 we prospectively imaged 160 consecutive femoro-patellar joints in 80 newborns from the 36th to 61st gestational week that underwent a routine hip sonography (Graf). All ultrasounds were performed by a pediatric radiologist with only minimal additional time to the routine hip ultrasound. In 30° flexion of the knee, axial, coronal, and sagittal reformats were used to standardize a reconstructed axial plane through the femoral condyle and the mid-patella. The sulcus angle, the lateral-to-medial facet ratio of the trochlea and the shape of the patella (Wiberg Classification) were evaluated. In all examinations reconstruction of the standardized axial plane was achieved, the mean trochlea angle was 149.1° (SD 4.9°), the lateral-to-medial facet ratio of the trochlea ratio was 1.3 (SD 0.22), and a Wiberg type I patella was found in 95% of the newborn. No statistical difference was detected between boys and girls. Using standardized reconstructions of the axial plane allows measurements to be made with lower operator dependency and higher accuracy in a short time. Therefore 3D ultrasound is an easy applicable and powerful tool to identify trochlea dysplasia in newborns and might be used for screening for trochlea dysplasia. PMID:25843417

  16. [A New Teaching Model for Practicing Ultrasound-guided Regional Anesthesia Techniques].

    PubMed

    Kimura, Maiko; Inomata, Shinichi; Fujikura, Ai; Ogawa, Tsuyoshi; Saito, Shigeyuki; Tanaka, Makoto

    2015-06-01

    We developed a simulator using "slime" composed of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and borax to evaluate this new ultrasound-guided nerve block training model. Seventeen subjects used the training model in the present study. They had no previous experience in performing ultrasound-guided nerve block. A plastic case measuring 25 x 18 x 12 cm was filled with 8 cm of slime. Three pieces of gauze were placed between the slime layers at 2 cm intervals. An in-plane approach was used to visualize the needle for the nerve block, and the amount of time required to stop the needle on the second gauze was measured 5 times for each subject. Significant differences were observed between the times for the first experiment and those for the third experiment to the fifth experiment In the fourth and fifth experiments, all subjects visualized the nerve block needle clearly above the target layer and were able to stop the needle at the target layer. The present simulation using our proposed ultrasound-guided nerve block training model was useful in terms of the amount of time required to perform the procedure and as well as in terms of its safety. PMID:26437564

  17. A novel ultrasound based technique for classifying gas bubble sizes in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Walid; Salman Khan, Muhammad; Zamorano, Juan; Espic, Felipe; Becerra Yoma, Nestor

    2014-12-01

    Characterizing gas bubbles in liquids is crucial to many biomedical, environmental and industrial applications. In this paper a novel method is proposed for the classification of bubble sizes using ultrasound analysis, which is widely acknowledged for being non-invasive, non-contact and inexpensive. This classification is based on 2D templates, i.e. the average spectrum of events representing the trace of bubbles when they cross an ultrasound field. The 2D patterns are obtained by capturing ultrasound signals reflected by bubbles. Frequency-domain based features are analyzed that provide discrimination between bubble sizes. These features are then fed to an artificial neural network, which is designed and trained to classify bubble sizes. The benefits of the proposed method are that it facilitates the processing of multiple bubbles simultaneously, the issues concerning masking interference among bubbles are potentially reduced and using a single sinusoidal component makes the transmitter-receiver electronics relatively simpler. Results from three bubble sizes indicate that the proposed scheme can achieve an accuracy in their classification that is as high as 99%.

  18. Modern Chemistry Techniques Applied to Metal Behavior and Chelation in Medical and Environmental Systems ? Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, M; Andresen, B; Burastero, S R; Chiarappa-Zucca, M L; Chinn, S C; Coronado, P R; Gash, A E; Perkins, J; Sawvel, A M; Szechenyi, S C

    2005-02-03

    This report details the research and findings generated over the course of a 3-year research project funded by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD). Originally tasked with studying beryllium chemistry and chelation for the treatment of Chronic Beryllium Disease and environmental remediation of beryllium-contaminated environments, this work has yielded results in beryllium and uranium solubility and speciation associated with toxicology; specific and effective chelation agents for beryllium, capable of lowering beryllium tissue burden and increasing urinary excretion in mice, and dissolution of beryllium contamination at LLNL Site 300; {sup 9}Be NMR studies previously unstudied at LLNL; secondary ionization mass spec (SIMS) imaging of beryllium in spleen and lung tissue; beryllium interactions with aerogel/GAC material for environmental cleanup. The results show that chelator development using modern chemical techniques such as chemical thermodynamic modeling, was successful in identifying and utilizing tried and tested beryllium chelators for use in medical and environmental scenarios. Additionally, a study of uranium speciation in simulated biological fluids identified uranium species present in urine, gastric juice, pancreatic fluid, airway surface fluid, simulated lung fluid, bile, saliva, plasma, interstitial fluid and intracellular fluid.

  19. "Reinventing" Techniques for the Estimation of the Area of Irregular Plane Figures: From the Eighteenth Century to the Modern Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papadopoulos, Ioannis

    2010-01-01

    The issue of the area of irregular shapes is absent from the modern mathematical textbooks in elementary education in Greece. However, there exists a collection of books written for educational purposes by famous Greek scholars dating from the eighteenth century, which propose certain techniques concerning the estimation of the area of such…

  20. Ultrasound-guided ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric nerve block, a comparison with the conventional technique: An observational study

    PubMed Central

    Khedkar, Sunita Milind; Bhalerao, Pradnya Milind; Yemul-Golhar, Shweta Rahul; Kelkar, Kalpana Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Background: The conventional technique of ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric nerve block may be associated with drug toxicity, block failure and needs large drug volume. The ultrasound-guided (USG) nerve block enables accurate needle positioning that may reduce the chances of drug toxicity, drug dose and block failure. Aim: In this study, we compared the onset and duration of the motor and sensory nerve block, the drug volume required and time to rescue analgesic between USG and conventional technique. Settings and Design: Sixty male patients aged between 18 and 60 years, belonging to American society of Anesthesiology I-II, scheduled for inguinal hernia repair were enrolled in this prospective study and were randomly allocated into two groups of thirty each by computerized method. Materials and Methods: Group A patients received hernia block by conventional method using 0.75% ropivacaine 15 ml, and Group B patients were given the block guided by ultrasound using 0.75% ropivacaine, till the nerves were surrounded on all sides by the drug. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed using two independent sample t-tests for demographic and hemodynamic parameters. Nonparametric test (Mann-Whitney U-test) was used to find the significance between visual analog scale. Results: There was significantly early onset of sensory block in Group B 14.03 ± 2.82 min as compared to Group A 15.57 ± 1.52 min (P = 0.047). The onset of motor block was also earlier in Group B 19.40 ± 2.85 min as compared to Group A 20.67 ± 1.90 min. The time to rescue analgesia was more in Group B 7.22 ± 0.97 h as compared to Group A 6.80 ± 0.70 h (P = 0.062). The volume of drug required was less with ultrasound guided block. Conclusions: Ultrasound-guided hernia block thus has the advantage of early onset, less dose requirement and increase in time to rescue analgesia. PMID:26240549

  1. [Ultrasound and color Doppler in nephrology. Physical and technical principles].

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2012-01-01

    Sonography is an imaging technique that generates tomographic images using ultrasound. The sound constitutes mechanical energy transmitted in a medium by pressure waves. Sound waves with frequencies greater than 20 kHz are called ultrasounds. Diagnostic ultrasounds use frequencies from 1 to 20 MHz. Ultrasound equipment is composed of a scanner, an image monitor, and different transducers that transform acoustic energy into electrical signals and electrical energy into acoustic energy (piezoelectric effect). The spatial resolution defines the minimum distance between two reflectors or echogenic regions that can be imaged as separate reflectors. The spatial resolution is mainly determined by the array design (linear, curved and sectorial) and by the operative system of the transducer. Modern ultrasound machines are very sophisticated medical devices that often support many transducers, imaging modes and display devices. The scan converter memory is the device in which images are formed and then presented to the monitor and to the hard copy devices. PMID:22388909

  2. Multimodal in vivo imaging of oral cancer using fluorescence lifetime, photoacoustic and ultrasound techniques

    PubMed Central

    Fatakdawala, Hussain; Poti, Shannon; Zhou, Feifei; Sun, Yang; Bec, Julien; Liu, Jing; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Tinling, Steven P.; Gandour-Edwards, Regina F.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Marcu, Laura

    2013-01-01

    This work reports a multimodal system for label-free tissue diagnosis combining fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm), ultrasound backscatter microscopy (UBM), and photoacoustic imaging (PAI). This system provides complementary biochemical, structural and functional features allowing for enhanced in vivo detection of oral carcinoma. Results from a hamster oral carcinoma model (normal, precancer and carcinoma) are presented demonstrating the ability of FLIm to delineate biochemical composition at the tissue surface, UBM and related radiofrequency parameters to identify disruptions in the tissue microarchitecture and PAI to map optical absorption associated with specific tissue morphology and physiology. PMID:24049693

  3. Ultrasound-assisted emulsification of cosmetic samples prior to elemental analysis by different atomic spectrometric techniques.

    PubMed

    Lavilla, I; Cabaleiro, N; Costas, M; de la Calle, I; Bendicho, C

    2009-11-15

    In this work, ultrasound-assisted emulsification with a probe system is proposed as a rapid and simple sample treatment for atomic spectrometric determinations (Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectrometry, Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry, Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry and Cold Vapour Atomic Absorption Spectrometry) of trace elements (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mg, Mn, Ni, Sr and Zn) in cosmetic samples such as shampoos, gel (hair gel), crèmes (body milk, hair conditioner) and oil (body oil). The type of dispersion medium, the sample mass-to-dispersion medium volume ratio, as well as the parameters related to the ultrasound-assisted emulsification (sonication amplitude and treatment time) were exhaustively studied. Only 1 min of ultrasonic shaking and a dispersion medium containing 0.5% (w/v) of SDS+3% (v/v) of HNO(3) or HCl allows obtaining a stable emulsion at least for 3 months. Thermal programs, nebulization of emulsions, speed of pumps and concentration of reagents used in cold vapour generation were optimized. Calibration using aqueous standards was feasible in all cases. Calibration by the standard addition method and recovery studies was also applied for validation. Microwave-assisted digestion and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry were used for comparison purposes. Relative standard deviations from analysis of five independent emulsions were less than 9% in all cases. PMID:19782199

  4. Evaluation of cost-effectiveness from the funding body's point of view of ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion compared with the conventional technique

    PubMed Central

    Noritomi, Danilo Teixeira; Zigaib, Rogério; Ranzani, Otavio T.; Teich, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the cost-effectiveness, from the funding body's point of view, of real-time ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion compared to the traditional method, which is based on the external anatomical landmark technique. Methods A theoretical simulation based on international literature data was applied to the Brazilian context, i.e., the Unified Health System (Sistema Único de Saúde - SUS). A decision tree was constructed that showed the two central venous catheter insertion techniques: real-time ultrasonography versus external anatomical landmarks. The probabilities of failure and complications were extracted from a search on the PubMed and Embase databases, and values associated with the procedure and with complications were taken from market research and the Department of Information Technology of the Unified Health System (DATASUS). Each central venous catheter insertion alternative had a cost that could be calculated by following each of the possible paths on the decision tree. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated by dividing the mean incremental cost of real-time ultrasound compared to the external anatomical landmark technique by the mean incremental benefit, in terms of avoided complications. Results When considering the incorporation of real-time ultrasound and the concomitant lower cost due to the reduced number of complications, the decision tree revealed a final mean cost for the external anatomical landmark technique of 262.27 Brazilian reals (R$) and for real-time ultrasound of R$187.94. The final incremental cost of the real-time ultrasound-guided technique was -R$74.33 per central venous catheter. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was -R$2,494.34 due to the pneumothorax avoided. Conclusion Real-time ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion was associated with decreased failure and complication rates and hypothetically reduced costs from the view of the funding body, which in this

  5. Targeted drug delivery across the blood–brain barrier using ultrasound technique

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Cheri X

    2011-01-01

    Effective delivery of therapeutic agents into the brain can greatly improve the treatments of neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. Application of focused ultrasound facilitated by microbubbles has shown the potential to deliver drugs across the blood–brain barrier into targeted sites within the brain noninvasively. This review provides a summary of the technological background and principle, highlights of recent significant developments and research progress, as well as a critical commentary on the challenges and future directions in the field. This review also outlines and discusses the tasks that researchers face in order to successfully translate the technology into a clinical reality, including obtaining improved understanding of the mechanisms, demonstration of therapeutic efficacy and safety for specific applications, and development of methodology for rational design to achieve optimized and consistent outcome. PMID:21785679

  6. Flight control design using a blend of modern nonlinear adaptive and robust techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaolong

    In this dissertation, the modern control techniques of feedback linearization, mu synthesis, and neural network based adaptation are used to design novel control laws for two specific applications: F/A-18 flight control and reusable launch vehicle (an X-33 derivative) entry guidance. For both applications, the performance of the controllers is assessed. As a part of a NASA Dryden program to develop and flight test experimental controllers for an F/A-18 aircraft, a novel method of combining mu synthesis and feedback linearization is developed to design longitudinal and lateral-directional controllers. First of all, the open-loop and closed-loop dynamics of F/A-18 are investigated. The production F/A-18 controller as well as the control distribution mechanism are studied. The open-loop and closed-loop handling qualities of the F/A-18 are evaluated using low order transfer functions. Based on this information, a blend of robust mu synthesis and feedback linearization is used to design controllers for a low dynamic pressure envelope of flight conditions. For both the longitudinal and the lateral-directional axes, a robust linear controller is designed for a trim point in the center of the envelope. Then by including terms to cancel kinematic nonlinearities and variations in the aerodynamic forces and moments over the flight envelope, a complete nonlinear controller is developed. In addition, to compensate for the model uncertainty, linearization error and variations between operating points, neural network based adaptation is added to the designed longitudinal controller. The nonlinear simulations, robustness and handling qualities analysis indicate that the performance is similar to or better than that for the production F/A-18 controllers. When the dynamic pressure is very low, the performance of both the experimental and the production flight controllers is degraded, but Level I handling qualities are still achieved. A new generation of Reusable Launch Vehicles

  7. Basic techniques in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration for solid lesions: Adverse events and avoiding them

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Larissa L.; Levy, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) is often the preferred technique for tissue acquisition in the diagnosis of suspected intrathoracic and intraabdominal pathology. Although EUS FNA is a safe and accurate procedure, it has been associated with a low risk of adverse events. The unique properties of the echoendoscope and its ability to acquire tissue outside of the gastrointestinal lumen impart risks that are not associated with routine endoscopic procedures. In this review, we discuss the risk of perforation related to the echoendoscope itself and adverse events related to FNA of solid masses including infections, bleeding, pancreatitis and pancreatic duct leak, bile duct leak and tumor seeding. We also provide tips on how to avoid the most common adverse events related to EUS-FNA. PMID:24949409

  8. Peripheral nerve blocks on the upper extremity: Technique of landmark-based and ultrasound-guided approaches.

    PubMed

    Steinfeldt, T; Volk, T; Kessler, P; Vicent, O; Wulf, H; Gottschalk, A; Lange, M; Schwartzkopf, P; Hüttemann, E; Tessmann, R; Marx, A; Souquet, J; Häger, D; Nagel, W; Biscoping, J; Schwemmer, U

    2015-11-01

    The German Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Anästhesiologie und Intensivmedizin, DGAI) established an expert panel to develop preliminary recommendations for the application of peripheral nerve blocks on the upper extremity. The present recommendations state in different variations how ultrasound and/or electrical nerve stimulation guided nerve blocks should be performed. The description of each procedure is rather a recommendation than a guideline. The anaesthesiologist should select the variation of block which provides the highest grade of safety according to his individual opportunities. The first section comprises recommendations regarding dosages of local anaesthetics, general indications and contraindications for peripheral nerve blocks and informations about complications. In the following sections most common blocks techniques on the upper extremity are described. PMID:26408023

  9. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound for imaging blunt abdominal trauma - indications, description of the technique and imaging review.

    PubMed

    Cokkinos, D; Antypa, E; Stefanidis, K; Tserotas, P; Kostaras, V; Parlamenti, A; Tavernaraki, K; Piperopoulos, P N

    2012-02-01

    Patients with blunt abdominal trauma are initially imaged with ultrasound (US) for the evaluation of free abdominal fluid. However, lacerations of solid organs can be overlooked. Although computed tomography (CT) is the gold standard technique for abdominal trauma imaging, overutilization, ionizing radiation, need to transport the patient and potential artifacts are well known disadvantages. Contrast-enhanced US (CEUS) can be used as an imaging tool between the two methods. It can easily and reliably reveal solid abdominal organ injuries in patients with low-energy localized trauma and decrease the number of CT scans performed. It can be rapidly performed at the patient's bedside with no need for transportation. There are only very few contraindications and anaphylactoid reactions are extremely rare. Altogether, CEUS has proved to be very helpful for the initial imaging of traumatic lesions of the liver, kidney and spleen, as well as for patient follow-up. PMID:22274907

  10. Search of Superfluidity of Solid 4He in a Porous Vycor Glass by Means of the Ultrasound Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Fukazawa, S.; Taniguchi, J.; Suzuki, M.; Shirahama, K.

    2006-09-01

    Kim and Chan have reported that solid 4He shows a reduction of the rotational moment of inertia below 0.2 K, which suggests an onset of superfluidity. Ultrasound should be sensitive to mass decoupling caused by superfluidity. If a superfluid component exists, the sound velocity of a porous material filled with solid 4He could increase. We have carried out ultrasonic measurements for a porous Vycor glass filled with solid 4He. Since the reported "critical velocity" is very low, we have adopted a continuous wave resonance technique which realizes the oscillating velocity less than 1 × 10-7 m/s. The resolution of the sound velocity is 10-5 for small oscillating velocities, and is enough to detect the expected mass decoupling. Although the present experimental conditions are rather limited, no signature of supersolid has been observed.

  11. A review of post-modern management techniques as currently applied to Turkish forestry.

    PubMed

    Dölarslan, Emre Sahin

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the effects of six post-modern management concepts as applied to Turkish forestry. Up to now, Turkish forestry has been constrained, both in terms of its operations and internal organization, by a highly bureaucratic system. The application of new thinking in forestry management, however, has recently resulted in new organizational and production concepts that promise to address problems specific to this Turkish industry and bring about positive changes. This paper will elucidate these specific issues and demonstrate how post-modern management thinking is influencing the administration and operational capacity of Turkish forestry within its current structure. PMID:18194835

  12. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Removal of Wooden Foreign Bodies in the Extremities with Hydro-Dissection Technique

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Jin; Lee, So Yeon; Son, Eun Seok; Chung, Eun Chul; Rho, Myung Ho; Lee, Sun Joo

    2015-01-01

    Objective We described the technique of ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous removal of the foreign bodies (FB) with hydro-dissection in the radiologic department and presented video files of several cases. Materials and Methods Four patients referred to the radiology department for US evaluation and US-guided percutaneous removal of the FBs in the upper and lower extremities between November, 2006 and November, 2013 were included in this study. The procedures started with US evaluation for the exact location and shape of the FB. A 5 mm-sized skin incision was made at the site of the nearest point from the FB where no passing arteries or tendons were present. We adopted a hydrodissection technique to separate the FB from adjacent tissue using a 2% lidocaine solution. Injected anesthetics detached the FBs from surrounding tissue and thereby facilitated removal. After the tip of the mosquito forceps reached the FB, the wooden FBs were removed. Results The mean time required for the entire procedure was approximately 20 minutes. There were no significant complications during the US-guided removal or long-term complications after the procedure. All 4 FBs were successfully removed from the soft tissue under US guidance. Conclusion Ultrasound-guided percutaneous removal of the FBs with hydro-dissection in the radiology department is a less invasive and safe method over surgical removal in the operating room. Additionally, the use of a guide wire and serial dilator may help minimize soft tissue injury and facilitate the introduction of forceps. PMID:26576123

  13. Modern Foreign Languages in the Elementary School: Teaching Techniques. Bulletin, 1960, No. 29. OE-27007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keesee, Elizabeth

    1960-01-01

    The growing practice of beginning instruction in a modern foreign language in the elementary school has created a need for many classroom teachers to become oriented to a whole new field of foreign-language teaching methodology and materials. Since teachers tend to think of language instruction in terms of the English-language arts, the language…

  14. Basic technique in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration for solid lesions: How many passes?

    PubMed

    Petrone, Maria Chiara; Arcidiacono, Paolo Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has evolved to become an indispensable tool for tissue acquisition in patients with luminal and extra luminal gastrointestinal cancers. Despite the extensive use of EUS-FNA, there still exists a wide variation in the number of samples required to ensure acquisition of diagnostic material from different kind of lesions. There are several factors that may influence the number of fine needle passes made during EUS-FNA, but the main factor seems to be the presence of a Cytopathologist during the EUS procedure. The diagnostic yield of EUS-FNA with rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE) in most studies exceeds 90%. Nevertheless, ROSE is not available in many centers. Various studies have investigated the adequate number of needle passes that should be performed if ROSE is not used. Differences exist based on the nature of the target lesion: Five to seven passes for pancreatic masses, three passes for lymphnodes, only one pass for pancreatic cystic lesions. Consider using a core biopsy needle or a 19-G FNA needle for histology could improve the diagnostic yield. Even though EUS-FNA is widely available, some patients still do not receive conclusive diagnoses upon initial EUS-FNA. One way to maximize the benefits for patients might be to centralize cases to several well-equipped, high-volume centers with experienced endosonographers that have universal availability of ROSE. PMID:24949407

  15. Monitoring of HIFU thermal damage using integrated photoacoustic imaging and high intensity focused ultrasound technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Huizhong; Yang, Xinmai

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we applied an integrated photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) system to noninvasively monitor the thermal damage due to HIFU ablation in vivo. A single-element, spherically focused ultrasonic transducer, with a central frequency of 5MHz, was used to generate a HIFU area in soft tissue. Photoacoustic signals were detected by the same ultrasonic transducer before and after HIFU treatments using different wavelengths. The feasibility of combined contrast imaging and treatment of solid tumor in vivo by the integrated PAI and HIFU system was also studied. Gold nanorods were used to enhance PAI during the imaging of a CT26 tumor, which was subcutaneously inoculated on the hip of a BALB/c mouse. Subsequently, the CT26 tumor was ablated by HIFU with the guidance of photoacoustic images. Our results suggested that the tumor was clearly visible on photoacoustic images after the injection of gold nanorods and was ablated by HIFU. In conclusion, PAI may potentially be used for monitoring HIFU thermal lesions with possible diagnosis and treatment of solid tumors.

  16. A Novel Ultrasound Technique for Detection of Osteochondral Defects in the Ankle Joint: A Parametric and Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Sarkalkan, Nazli; Loeve, Arjo J.; van Dongen, Koen W. A.; Tuijthof, Gabrielle J. M.; Zadpoor, Amir A.

    2015-01-01

    (Osteo)chondral defects (OCDs) in the ankle are currently diagnosed with modalities that are not convenient to use in long-term follow-ups. Ultrasound (US) imaging, which is a cost-effective and non-invasive alternative, has limited ability to discriminate OCDs. We aim to develop a new diagnostic technique based on US wave propagation through the ankle joint. The presence of OCDs is identified when a US signal deviates from a reference signal associated with the healthy joint. The feasibility of the proposed technique is studied using experimentally-validated 2D finite-difference time-domain models of the ankle joint. The normalized maximum cross correlation of experiments and simulation was 0.97. Effects of variables relevant to the ankle joint, US transducers and OCDs were evaluated. Variations in joint space width and transducer orientation made noticeable alterations to the reference signal: normalized root mean square error ranged from 6.29% to 65.25% and from 19.59% to 8064.2%, respectively. The results suggest that the new technique could be used for detection of OCDs, if the effects of other parameters (i.e., parameters related to the ankle joint and US transducers) can be reduced. PMID:25609040

  17. Application of enhanced modern structured analysis techniques to Space Station Freedom electric power system requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biernacki, John; Juhasz, John; Sadler, Gerald

    1991-01-01

    A team of Space Station Freedom (SSF) system engineers are in the process of extensive analysis of the SSF requirements, particularly those pertaining to the electrical power system (EPS). The objective of this analysis is the development of a comprehensive, computer-based requirements model, using an enhanced modern structured analysis methodology (EMSA). Such a model provides a detailed and consistent representation of the system's requirements. The process outlined in the EMSA methodology is unique in that it allows the graphical modeling of real-time system state transitions, as well as functional requirements and data relationships, to be implemented using modern computer-based tools. These tools permit flexible updating and continuous maintenance of the models. Initial findings resulting from the application of EMSA to the EPS have benefited the space station program by linking requirements to design, providing traceability of requirements, identifying discrepancies, and fostering an understanding of the EPS.

  18. Intravascular ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    IVUS; Ultrasound - coronary artery; Endovascular ultrasound; Intravascular echocardiography ... A tiny ultrasound wand is attached to the top of a thin tube called a catheter. This ultrasound catheter is inserted ...

  19. Duplex ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... ultrasound with Doppler ultrasound . Traditional ultrasound uses sound waves that bounce off blood vessels to create pictures. Doppler ultrasound records sound waves reflecting off moving objects, such as blood, to ...

  20. Contrast-Enhanced Endoscopic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph F.; Sharma, M.; Hocke, M.

    2012-01-01

    The European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) introduced guidelines on the use of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in 2004. This EFSUMB-document focused mainly on liver applications. However, new applications extending beyond the liver were developed thereafter. Increased interest in recent years in CEUS technique and in the application of CEUS in novel fields like endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has revolutionized indications and applications. As a result, the EFSUMB initiated a new update of the guidelines in 2011 to include this additional knowledge. Some of the contrast-enhanced EUS (CE-EUS) indications are established, whereas others are preliminary; these latter indications are categorized as emergent CEUS applications since the available evidence is insufficient for general recommendation. This article focuses on the use of CE-EUS in various clinical settings. The reader will get an overview of current indications and possible applications of CE-EUS. This involves the introduction of different contrast studies including color Doppler techniques (known as contrast-enhanced high mechanical index endosonography or CEHMI-EUS) as well as more modern high-resolution contrast-enhanced techniques (known as contrast-enhanced low mechanical index endosonography or CELMI EUS). PMID:24949350

  1. Modern surgical techniques for management of soft tissue sarcomas involving the spine: outcomes and complications.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Tobias A; Teles, Alisson R; Mendel, Ehud

    2015-04-01

    Several types of soft tissue sarcomas may locally extend to the spine. The best therapeutic strategy for such lesions strongly depends on the histological diagnosis. In this article the authors provide an up-to-date review of current guidelines regarding the management of soft tissue sarcomas involving the spine. Special attention is given to outcomes and complications of modern surgical series in order to highlight current challenges in the management of such lesions. PMID:25413665

  2. Management of pudendal neuralgia using ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency: a report of two cases and discussion of pudendal nerve block techniques.

    PubMed

    Hong, Myong-Joo; Kim, Yeon-Dong; Park, Jeong-Ki; Hong, Hyon-Joo

    2016-04-01

    Pudendal neuralgia is characterized by chronic pain or discomfort in the area innervated by the pudendal nerve, with no obvious cause. A successful pudendal nerve block is crucial for the diagnosis of pudendal neuralgia. Blind or fluoroscopy-guided pudendal nerve blocks have been conventionally used for diagnosis and treatment; however, ultrasound-guided pudendal nerve blocks were also reported recently. With regard to the achievement of long-term effects, although pulsed radiofrequency performed under fluoroscopic guidance has been reported, that performed under ultrasound guidance is not well reported. This report describes two cases of pudendal neuralgia that were successfully managed using ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency and presents a literature review of pudendal nerve block techniques. However, in the management of chronic neuropathic pain, physicians should keep in mind that the placebo effect related to invasive approaches must not be neglected. PMID:26699147

  3. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided sheath placement to guide transbronchial biopsy of mediastinal lymphadenopathy and lung mass: a new technique.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kassem; Bessich, Jamie; Sterman, Daniel H

    2015-04-01

    A patient with a history of lung adenocarcinoma, which was treated with chemoradiation, presented to our interventional pulmonology clinic for suspicion of recurrent lung cancer. The patient had a PET-avid right upper-lobe mass and subcarinal lymphadenopathy. We performed a curvilinear endobronchial ultrasound (CP-EBUS) with transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA), followed by transbronchial EBUS-guided biopsies (TBB) of the subcarinal lymph node using miniforceps. The EBUS needle sheath was inserted over the needle through the bronchial wall and advanced into the lymph node. The EBUS-guided placement of the transbronchial sheath facilitated the miniforcep insertion and the performance of multiple transbronchial biopsies. Given success with this method, we further developed this technique in a second patient with a right lower-lobe mass. In an effort to obtain adequate tissue and minimize repeated efforts at miniforcep guidance into the lesion, we inserted a radial EBUS guide sheath through the curvilinear EBUS scope and guided it into the lesion using the miniforceps. We therefore used the radial sheath as a placeholder while obtaining repeated TBB using miniforceps as described. These modifications of previously described techniques allow for maximal and expeditious sampling of target lymph nodes and masses, with sufficient material obtained for histopathologic analysis. PMID:25887015

  4. Indirect fluorometric detection techniques on thin layer chromatography and effect of ultrasound on gel electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Yinfa, Ma.

    1990-12-10

    Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) is a broadly applicable separation technique. It offers many advantages over high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), such as easily adapted for two-dimensional separation, for whole-column'' detection and for handling multiple samples, etc. However, due to its draggy development of detection techniques comparing with HPLC, TLC has not received the attention it deserves. Therefore, exploring new detection techniques is very important to the development of TLC. It is the principal of this dissertation to present a new detection method for TLC -- indirect fluorometric detection method. This detection technique is universal sensitive, nondestructive, and simple. This will be described in detail from Sections 1 through Section 5. Section 1 and 3 describe the indirect fluorometric detection of anions and nonelectrolytes in TLC. In Section 2, a detection method for cations based on fluorescence quenching of ethidium bromide is presented. In Section 4, a simple and interesting TLC experiment is designed, three different fluorescence detection principles are used for the determination of caffeine, saccharin and sodium benzoate in beverages. A laser-based indirect fluorometric detection technique in TLC is developed in Section 5. Section 6 is totally different from Sections 1 through 5. An ultrasonic effect on the separation of DNA fragments in agarose gel electrophoresis is investigated. 262 refs.

  5. SIMMAX: A modern analog technique to deduce Atlantic sea surface temperatures from planktonic foraminifera in deep-sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflaumann, Uwe; Duprat, Josette; Pujol, Claude; Labeyrie, Laurent D.

    1996-02-01

    We present a data set of 738 planktonic foraminiferal species counts from sediment surface samples of the eastern North Atlantic and the South Atlantic between 87°N and 40°S, 35°E and 60°W including published Climate: Long-Range Investigation, Mapping, and Prediction (CLIMAP) data. These species counts are linked to Levitus's [1982] modern water temperature data for the four caloric seasons, four depth ranges (0, 30, 50, and 75 m), and the combined means of those depth ranges. The relation between planktonic foraminiferal assemblages and sea surface temperature (SST) data is estimated using the newly developed SIMMAX technique, which is an acronym for a modern analog technique (MAT) with a similarity index, based on (1) the scalar product of the normalized faunal percentages and (2) a weighting procedure of the modern analog's SSTs according to the inverse geographical distances of the most similar samples. Compared to the classical CLIMAP transfer technique and conventional MAT techniques, SIMMAX provides a more confident reconstruction of paleo-SSTs (correlation coefficient is 0.994 for the caloric winter and 0.993 for caloric summer). The standard deviation of the residuals is 0.90°C for caloric winter and 0.96°C for caloric summer at 0-m water depth. The SST estimates reach optimum stability (standard deviation of the residuals is 0.88°C) at the average 0- to 75-m water depth. Our extensive database provides SST estimates over a range of -1.4 to 27.2°C for caloric winter and 0.4 to 28.6°C for caloric summer, allowing SST estimates which are especially valuable for the high-latitude Atlantic during glacial times. An electronic supplement of this material may be obtained on adiskette or Anonymous FTP from KOSMOS.AGU.ORG. (LOGIN toAGU's FTP account using ANONYMOUS as the username and GUESTas the password. Go to the right directory by typing CD APPEND. TypeLS to see what files are available. Type GET and the name of the file toget it. Finally type EXIT to

  6. Portable ultrasound in disaster triage: a focused review.

    PubMed

    Wydo, S M; Seamon, M J; Melanson, S W; Thomas, P; Bahner, D P; Stawicki, S P

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound technology has become ubiquitous in modern medicine. Its applications span the assessment of life-threatening trauma or hemodynamic conditions, to elective procedures such as image-guided peripheral nerve blocks. Sonographers have utilized ultrasound techniques in the pre-hospital setting, emergency departments, operating rooms, intensive care units, outpatient clinics, as well as during mass casualty and disaster management. Currently available ultrasound devices are more affordable, portable, and feature user-friendly interfaces, making them well suited for use in the demanding situation of a mass casualty incident (MCI) or disaster triage. We have reviewed the existing literature regarding the application of sonology in MCI and disaster scenarios, focusing on the most promising and practical ultrasound-based paradigms applicable in these settings. PMID:26038019

  7. The iLappSurgery taTME app: a modern adjunct to the teaching of surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Atallah, S; Brady, R R W

    2016-09-01

    Application-based technology has emerged as a method of modern information communication, and this has been applied towards surgical training and education. It allows surgeons the ability to obtain portable and instant access to information that is otherwise difficult to deliver. The iLappSurgery Foundation has recently launched the transanal total mesorectal excision educational application (taTME app) which provides a useful adjunct, especially for surgeons interested in mastery of the taTME technique and its principles. The article provides a detailed review of the application, which has achieved a large user-base since its debut in June, 2016. PMID:27503235

  8. Last interglacial sea-surface temperature estimates from the California margin; improvements to the modern analog technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, Harry J.; Poore, Richard Z.

    1999-01-01

    Total faunal analyses of planktic foraminifer assemblages are used to derive sea surface temperature estimates for the last interglacial from Ocean Drilling Program Sites 1018 and 1020 off northern and central California. Foraminifer assemblage data were transformed to sea-surface temperature (SST) estimates by using the modern analog technique (MAT). In order to improve our ability to estimate SST in this area, the coretop calibration data base used in the MAT was augmented by 13 new age-validated coretop assemblages from the U.S. Pacific Margin.

  9. Modern analytical techniques in the assessment of the authenticity of Serbian honey.

    PubMed

    Milojković Opsenica, Dušanka; Lušić, Dražen; Tešić, Živoslav

    2015-12-01

    Food authenticity in a broader sense means fulfilling chemical and physical criteria prescribed by the proposed legislation. In the case of honey authenticity, two aspects are of major concern: the manufacturing process and the labelling of final products in terms of their geographical and botanical origin. A reliable assessment of honey authenticity has been a longterm preoccupation of chemists-analysts and it usually involves the use of several criteria and chemical markers, as well as a combination of analytical and statistical (chemometric) methods. This paper provides an overview of different criteria and modern methods for the assessment of honey authenticity in the case of a statistically significant number of authentic honey samples of several botanical types from various regions of Serbia. PMID:26751854

  10. A Course in Heterogeneous Catalysis: Principles, Practice, and Modern Experimental Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Eduardo E.

    1981-01-01

    Outlines a multidisciplinary course which comprises fundamental, practical, and experimental aspects of heterogeneous catalysis. The course structure is a combination of lectures and demonstrations dealing with the use of spectroscopic techniques for surface analysis. (SK)

  11. Quantitative estimation of bioclimatic parameters from presence/absence vegetation data in North America by the modern analog technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, R.S.; Anderson, K.H.; Bartlein, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    The method of modern analogs is widely used to obtain estimates of past climatic conditions from paleobiological assemblages, and despite its frequent use, this method involved so-far untested assumptions. We applied four analog approaches to a continental-scale set of bioclimatic and plant-distribution presence/absence data for North America to assess how well this method works under near-optimal modern conditions. For each point on the grid, we calculated the similarity between its vegetation assemblage and those of all other points on the grid (excluding nearby points). The climate of the points with the most similar vegetation was used to estimate the climate at the target grid point. Estimates based the use of the Jaccard similarity coefficient had smaller errors than those based on the use of a new similarity coefficient, although the latter may be more robust because it does not assume that the "fossil" assemblage is complete. The results of these analyses indicate that presence/absence vegetation assemblages provide a valid basis for estimating bioclimates on the continental scale. However, the accuracy of the estimates is strongly tied to the number of species in the target assemblage, and the analog method is necessarily constrained to produce estimates that fall within the range of observed values. We applied the four modern analog approaches and the mutual overlap (or "mutual climatic range") method to estimate bioclimatic conditions represented by the plant macrofossil assemblage from a packrat midden of Last Glacial Maximum age from southern Nevada. In general, the estimation approaches produced similar results in regard to moisture conditions, but there was a greater range of estimates for growing-degree days. Despite its limitations, the modern analog technique can provide paleoclimatic reconstructions that serve as the starting point to the interpretation of past climatic conditions.

  12. Degradation of aromatic amines in textile-dyeing sludge by combining the ultrasound technique with potassium permanganate treatment.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jieying; Ning, Xun-An; An, Taicheng; Sun, Jian; Zhang, Yaping; Wang, Yujie

    2016-08-15

    This paper reports, for the first time, a combined technique of ultrasound (US) with KMnO4 degradation of aromatic amines in a textile-dyeing sludge. The reaction mechanisms and the degradation kinetics of aromatic amines at various operating parameters (KMnO4 dosage, US power density and pH) were systematically examined by the combined system of US-KMnO4. The results indicated that there was a synergistic effect between US and KMnO4, as US greatly enhanced KMnO4 in the degradation of aromatic amines and exhibited apparent sludge disintegration and separated pollutants from the sludge. In addition to accelerating the Mn(VII) reaction with pollutants in the filtrate, US also caused Mn(VII) to enter the porous sludge and sufficiently facilitated the reaction of the strongly absorbed aromatic amines. The combined treatment of US-KMnO4 was effective in the degradation of aromatic amines in textile-dyeing sludge. On average, 58.7% of monocyclic anilines, 88.3% of other forms of aromatic amines, and 24.0% of TOC were removed under the optimal operating conditions of a KMnO4 dosage of 12mM, an US power density of 1.80W/cm(3) and pH 5. The present study proposed US-KMnO4 treatment as a practical method for the disposal of aromatic amines in textile-dyeing sludge. PMID:27107230

  13. A technique for measuring velocity and attenuation of ultrasound in liquid foams.

    PubMed

    Pierre, J; Elias, F; Leroy, V

    2013-02-01

    We describe an experimental setup specifically designed for measuring the ultrasonic transmission through liquid foams, over a broad range of frequencies (60-600kHz). The question of determining the ultrasonic properties of the foam (density, phase velocity and attenuation) from the transmission measurements is addressed. An inversion method is proposed, tested on synthetic data, and applied to a liquid foam at different times during the coarsening. The ultrasonic velocity and attenuation are found to be very sensitive to the foam bubble sizes, suggesting that a spectroscopy technique could be developed for liquid foams. PMID:23168271

  14. Ultrasound-Guided Interventional Procedures of the Wrist and Hand: Anatomy, Indications, and Techniques.

    PubMed

    Colio, Sean W; Smith, Jay; Pourcho, Adam M

    2016-08-01

    Acute and chronic wrist and hand conditions are commonly seen by neuromuscular and musculoskeletal specialists. High-frequency diagnostic ultrasonography (US) has facilitated advances in the diagnosis and interventional management of wrist and hand disorders. US provides excellent soft tissue resolution, accessibility, portability, lack of ionizing radiation, and the ability to dynamically assess disorders and precisely guide interventional procedures. This article review the relevant anatomy, indications, and interventional techniques for common disorders of the wrist and hand, including radiocarpal joint arthritis, scaphotrapeziotrapezoidal joint arthritis, trapeziometacarpal joint arthritis, phalangeal joint arthritis, first dorsal compartment tenosynovitis, ganglion cysts, and stenosing tenosynovitis. PMID:27468668

  15. Use of Modern Chemical Protein Synthesis and Advanced Fluorescent Assay Techniques to Experimentally Validate the Functional Annotation of Microbial Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, Stephen

    2012-07-20

    The objective of this research program was to prototype methods for the chemical synthesis of predicted protein molecules in annotated microbial genomes. High throughput chemical methods were to be used to make large numbers of predicted proteins and protein domains, based on microbial genome sequences. Microscale chemical synthesis methods for the parallel preparation of peptide-thioester building blocks were developed; these peptide segments are used for the parallel chemical synthesis of proteins and protein domains. Ultimately, it is envisaged that these synthetic molecules would be ‘printed’ in spatially addressable arrays. The unique ability of total synthesis to precision label protein molecules with dyes and with chemical or biochemical ‘tags’ can be used to facilitate novel assay technologies adapted from state-of-the art single molecule fluorescence detection techniques. In the future, in conjunction with modern laboratory automation this integrated set of techniques will enable high throughput experimental validation of the functional annotation of microbial genomes.

  16. Practical Problems in the Cement Industry Solved by Modern Research Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Kenneth E.; Robertson, Les D.

    1972-01-01

    Practical chemical problems in the cement industry are being solved by such techniques as infrared spectroscopy, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, atomic absorption and arc spectroscopy, thermally evolved gas analysis, Mossbauer spectroscopy, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. (CP)

  17. [The development of chemical narcotic and related anesthetic techniques in modern times].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui; Zhang, Yan-Rong

    2012-11-01

    Before the 19(th) century, ether and nitrous oxide were synthesized. However, they were just used as a kind of enjoyable things at night gatherings for their hypnotic and analgesic effect. In the 19(th) century, ether and nitrous oxide came into use in clinical anesthesia. Thereafter, more and more chemical narcotics were synthesized and applied to clinical anesthesia. In 1872, chloroform was injected into man's vein for anesthesia. In the 20(th) century, along with many kinds of barbiturates being synthesized, intravenous anesthesia got much development and application. At the same time, related techniques of anesthesia also improved. In the early 19(th) century, open inhalation anesthesia was often used. In 1900, there came a new anesthesia method by blowing into the windpipe through the cut of throat. Later on, the technique of endotracheal anesthesia and artificial respiration anesthesia (1908), the anesthetic instrument of endotracheal intubation and laryngeal mask and laryngoscope were invented. In the mid 19(th) century, the appearance of injection syringe and cocaine made local anesthesia possible. In 1880, local anesthesia also became successful. Thereafter, a variety of local anesthetic drugs were synthesized and applied, companying with various techniques of local anesthesia such as subarachnoid anesthesia (1900), sacral anesthesia (1901), epidural block (1903), plexus block (1902) and so on. In order to control the depth of anesthesia and respiration effectively, people attempted a lot so that anesthesia machine (1910), improved endotracheal anesthesia (1921), cryogenic technique (1902), controlled hypotension (1940s) and artificial hibernation (1950) came into being. PMID:23363851

  18. Dysphagia Screening: Contributions of Cervical Auscultation Signals and Modern Signal-Processing Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Dudik, Joshua M.; Coyle, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Cervical auscultation is the recording of sounds and vibrations caused by the human body from the throat during swallowing. While traditionally done by a trained clinician with a stethoscope, much work has been put towards developing more sensitive and clinically useful methods to characterize the data obtained with this technique. The eventual goal of the field is to improve the effectiveness of screening algorithms designed to predict the risk that swallowing disorders pose to individual patients’ health and safety. This paper provides an overview of these signal processing techniques and summarizes recent advances made with digital transducers in hopes of organizing the highly varied research on cervical auscultation. It investigates where on the body these transducers are placed in order to record a signal as well as the collection of analog and digital filtering techniques used to further improve the signal quality. It also presents the wide array of methods and features used to characterize these signals, ranging from simply counting the number of swallows that occur over a period of time to calculating various descriptive features in the time, frequency, and phase space domains. Finally, this paper presents the algorithms that have been used to classify this data into ‘normal’ and ‘abnormal’ categories. Both linear as well as non-linear techniques are presented in this regard. PMID:26213659

  19. Overview of Some New Techniques for Inspection: Using 1950's Physics to Solve Modern Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanza, Richard

    2007-04-01

    The goal of any inspection technique is to non-intrusively determine the presence of such materials in a manner which is consistent with not interrupting the normal scheme of commerce and which, at the same time, exhibits a high probability of detection and a low probability of false alarms. A great deal of work has been reported in the literature on neutron based techniques for the detection of explosives with by far the largest impetus coming from the requirements of the commercial aviation industry for the inspection of luggage and, to a lesser extent, cargo; for baggage, the major techniques are either x-ray based or are chemical trace detection methods which look for small traces of explosive residues. Nuclear techniques have been proposed for the detection of explosives and contraband for a number of years due to their ability to penetrate shielding and to identify the elemental composition of materials, thus leading to enhanced detection probability and lower false alarm rates. Nuclear techniques are virtually the only method which can both detect and identify the presence of fissile materials, either in the form of bulk material or assembled weapons. Some examples of current work in nuclear based systems currently under development will be discussed such as nuclear resonance radiography, nuclear resonance fluorescence, pulsed fast neutron analysis and pulsed photonuclear detection. The physical basis of these techniques is well known, the physics having been studied in the 1950's, but there remain limitations on current technology with respect to e.g. radiation sources and detectors and data acquisition methods. Accelerator-based systems often are large and are often not well suited for field use; radiation detectors often suffer from limited count rate ability, low sensitivity and poor energy resolution and data acquisition and analysis methods usually rely on analog techniques which are not always stable in field operation. Current research in basic

  20. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided aspiration of an anterior cruciate ligament ganglion cyst: description of technique and case presentation.

    PubMed

    Krill, Michael; Peck, Evan

    2014-12-01

    An anterior cruciate ligament ganglion cyst is an infrequent but potentially clinically significant cause of knee pain. Although the cyst may be removed surgically, percutaneous ultrasound-guided anterior cruciate ligament ganglion cyst aspiration and injection is feasible. To our knowledge, we present the first reported case description of the utilization of ultrasound guidance to perform this procedure with a successful clinical outcome. PMID:25088315

  1. Applications of ultrasound in food technology: Processing, preservation and extraction.

    PubMed

    Chemat, Farid; Zill-e-Huma; Khan, Muhammed Kamran

    2011-07-01

    Ultrasound is well known to have a significant effect on the rate of various processes in the food industry. Using ultrasound, full reproducible food processes can now be completed in seconds or minutes with high reproducibility, reducing the processing cost, simplifying manipulation and work-up, giving higher purity of the final product, eliminating post-treatment of waste water and consuming only a fraction of the time and energy normally needed for conventional processes. Several processes such as freezing, cutting, drying, tempering, bleaching, sterilization, and extraction have been applied efficiently in the food industry. The advantages of using ultrasound for food processing, includes: more effective mixing and micro-mixing, faster energy and mass transfer, reduced thermal and concentration gradients, reduced temperature, selective extraction, reduced equipment size, faster response to process extraction control, faster start-up, increased production, and elimination of process steps. Food processes performed under the action of ultrasound are believed to be affected in part by cavitation phenomena and mass transfer enhancement. This review presents a complete picture of current knowledge on application of ultrasound in food technology including processing, preservation and extraction. It provides the necessary theoretical background and some details about ultrasound the technology, the technique, and safety precautions. We will also discuss some of the factors which make the combination of food processing and ultrasound one of the most promising research areas in the field of modern food engineering. PMID:21216174

  2. Comparison and analysis of two modern methods in the structural health monitoring techniques in aerospace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riahi, Mohammad; Ahmadi, Alireza

    2016-04-01

    Role of air transport in the development and expansion of world trade leading to economic growth of different countries is undeniable. Continuing the world's trade sustainability without expansion of aerospace is next to impossible. Based on enormous expenses for design, manufacturing and maintenance of different aerospace structures, correct and timely diagnosis of defects in those structures to provide for maximum safety has the highest importance. Amid all this, manufacturers of commercial and even military aircrafts are after production of less expensive, lighter, higher fuel economy and nonetheless, higher safety. As such, two events has prevailed in the aerospace industries: (1) Utilization of composites for the fuselage as well as other airplane parts, (2) using modern manufacturing methods. Arrival of two these points have created the need for upgrading of the present systems as well as innovating newer methods in diagnosing and detection of defects in aerospace structures. Despite applicability of nondestructive testing (NDT) methods in aerospace for decades, due to some limitations in the defect detection's certainty, particularly for composite material and complex geometries, shadow of doubt has fallen on maintaining complete confidence in using NDT. These days, two principal approach are ahead to tackle the above mentioned problems. First, approach for the short range is the creative and combinational mean to increase the reliability of NDT and for the long run, innovation of new methods on the basis of structural health monitoring (SHM) is in order. This has led to new philosophy in the maintenance area and in some instances; field of design has also been affected by it.

  3. Brain dose-sparing radiotherapy techniques for localized intracranial germinoma: Case report and literature review of modern irradiation.

    PubMed

    Leung, H W C; Chan, A L F; Chang, M B

    2016-05-01

    We examined the effects of intensity-modulated radiation therapy with dose-sparing and avoidance technique on a pediatric patient with localized intracranial germinoma. We also reviewed the literature regarding modern irradiation techniques in relation to late neurocognitive sequelae. A patient with a localized intracranial germinoma in the third ventricle anterior to the pineal gland received a dose-sparing intensity-modulated radiation therapy. The planning was compared to the radiation oncologist's guide of organs at risk and dose constraints for dosimetric analyses. The patient received radiation therapy alone. The total dose was 54Gy delivered in 2.0Gy fractions to the primary tumour and 37Gy in 1.4Gy fractions to whole ventricles using a dose-sculpting plan. Dosimetry analyses showed that dose-sparing intensity-modulated radiation therapy delivered reduced doses to the whole brain, temporal lobes, hippocampi, cochleae, and optic nerves. With a follow-up of 22 months, failure-free survival was 100% for the patient and no adverse events during radiation treatment process. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy with dose sparing and avoidance technique can spare the limbic circuit, central nervous system, and hippocampus for pineal germ cell tumours. This technique reduces the integral dose delivered to the uninvolved normal brain tissues and may reduce late neurocognitive sequelae caused by cranial radiotherapy. PMID:27080575

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  5. Hip Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  6. Ultrasound -- Vascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  7. Musculoskeletal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  8. Ultrasound - Scrotum

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  9. Modern numerical techniques and software for photo- and thermoemission electron optical systems computer-aided design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monastyrski, Mikhail A.; Andreev, Sergei V.; Gaidukova, Inna S.; Tarasov, Victor A.; Filachev, Anatoly M.

    1997-09-01

    The paper is devoted to software development for simulation, optimization, and computer-aided design of photo/thermo- emission electron optical systems and units. The first part of the paper presents the applied program package (APP) 'ELIMDYNAMICS\\ intended for computer-aided design of dynamic photo-emission image tubes with electro/magnetostatic focusing and deflection (streak tubes). The developed software allows highly precise computation of basic image quality characteristics both in static and streak modes. One of the main advantages of the new program version presented is that 'through' electron beam computation from the photocathode to image receiver is available with regard to dynamic aberrations caused by scattering fields located nearby the edges of deflecting plates. In the second part, the possibility is shown to generalize some numerical techniques being effectively applied in photo-emission imaging electron optics (namely, the (tau) -variation - and the first kind integral equations techniques) to simulation of the thermo-emission electron beam technology units. Functions of the new APP 'CHARGE' are presented, and some numerical aspects of the self-coordinated problem are discussed.

  10. A randomised cross-over comparison of the transverse and longitudinal techniques for ultrasound-guided identification of the cricothyroid membrane in morbidly obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, M S; Teoh, W H; Rudolph, S S; Hesselfeldt, R; Børglum, J; Tvede, M F

    2016-06-01

    We compared the transverse and longitudinal approaches to ultrasound-guided identification of the cricothyroid membrane, to determine which was faster and more successful. Forty-two anaesthetists received a one-hour structured training programme consisting of e-learning, a lecture and hands-on training, and then applied both techniques in a randomised, cross-over sequence to obese females with body mass index 39.0 - 43.9 kg.m(-2) . The mean (SD) time to identify the cricothyroid membrane was 24.0 (12.4) s using the transverse technique compared with 37.6 (17.9) s for the longitudinal technique (p = 0.0003). Successful identification of the cricothyroid membrane was achieved by 38 (90%) anaesthetists using either technique. All anaesthetists were successful in identifying the cricothyroid membrane with at least one of the techniques. We advocate the learning and application of these two techniques for identification of the cricothyroid membrane before starting anaesthesia in difficult patients, especially when anatomical landmarks are impalpable. Further use in emergency situations is feasible, if clinicians have experience and the ultrasound machine is readily available. PMID:27037981

  11. Testing the applicability of six macroscopic skeletal aging techniques on a modern Southeast Asian sample.

    PubMed

    Gocha, Timothy P; Ingvoldstad, Megan E; Kolatorowicz, Adam; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Meghan-Tomasita J; Sciulli, Paul W

    2015-04-01

    Most macroscopic skeletal aging techniques used by forensic anthropologists have been developed and tested only on reference material from western populations. This study examined the performance of six aging techniques on a known age sample of 88 Southeast Asian individuals. Methods examined included the Suchey-Brooks method of aging the symphyseal face of the os pubis (Brooks and Suchey, Hum. Evol. 5 (1990) 227), Buckberry and Chamberlain's, Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 119 (2002) 231 and Osborne et al.'s, J. Forensic Sci. 49 (2004) 1 revisions of the Lovejoy et al., Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 68 (1985) 15 method of aging the auricular surface of the ilium, İşcan et al.'s, J. Forensic Sci. 29 (1984) 1094, İşcan et al.'s, J. Forensic Sci. 30 (1985) 853 method of aging the sternal end of the fourth rib, and Meindl and Lovejoy's, Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 68 (1985) 57 methods for aging both lateral-anterior and vault sutures on the cranium. The results of this study indicate that application of aging techniques commonly used in forensic anthropology to individuals identified as Asian, and more specifically Southeast Asian, should not be undertaken injudiciously. Of the six individual methods tested here, the Suchey-Brooks pubic symphysis aging method performs best, though average age estimates were still off by nearly 10 years or greater. Methods for aging the auricular surface perform next best, though the Osborne et al. method works better for individuals below 50 years and the Buckberry and Chamberlain method works better for those above 50 years. Methods for age estimation from the sternal ends of the fourth rib and vault and lateral-anterior cranial sutures perform poorly and are not recommended for use on remains of Southeast Asian ancestry. Combining age estimates from multiple indicators, specifically the pubic symphysis and one auricular surface method, was superior to individual methods. Data and a worked example are provided for calculating the conditional

  12. Biogeosystem technique - the fundamental base of modern Water Policy and Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinitchenko, Valery; Batukaev, Abdulmalik; Minkina, Tatiana; Solntseva, Natalia; Skovpen, Andrey; Zarmaev, Ali; Jusupov, Vaha; Lohmanova, Olga

    2014-05-01

    out from active biosphere stage to vadose zone. These substances are entering the undesired stage of sedimentation and lithogenesis. Such adverse events are enhanced by irrigation. As a result, up to 80-90% of the fresh water taken for irrigation from lakes, rivers, storage reservoirs, desalinators are lost useless entailing economic losses. As a result of irrigation the quality of water is deteriorated as well as the quality of soil and landscape. A quality of human environment and a quality of biosphere as a whole is reduced. It is much more dangerous than economic losses. The irrigation paradigm shift is essential for successful water policy and water management in modern world. In a framework of Biogeosystem technics the new intrasoil pulse continuous-discrete paradigm of irrigation is developed. Water is supplied by small discrete portions into individual volumes of a soil continuum without excess soil mass transfer, transpiration, evaporation and seepage. New paradigm of irrigation optimizes plant growth, reduces consumption of water per unit of biological product, the yield increases. It provides the soil and landscape conservation, fresh water - the global deficit - saving up to 10-20 times, biological productivity and sustainability of biosphere. Intrasoil pulse continuous-discrete robotic irrigation technologies match the nowadays noosphere technological platform.

  13. Accuracy required and achievable in radiotherapy dosimetry: have modern technology and techniques changed our views?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thwaites, David

    2013-06-01

    In this review of the accuracy required and achievable in radiotherapy dosimetry, older approaches and evidence-based estimates for 3DCRT have been reprised, summarising and drawing together the author's earlier evaluations where still relevant. Available evidence for IMRT uncertainties has been reviewed, selecting information from tolerances, QA, verification measurements, in vivo dosimetry and dose delivery audits, to consider whether achievable uncertainties increase or decrease for current advanced treatments and practice. Overall there is some evidence that they tend to increase, but that similar levels should be achievable. Thus it is concluded that those earlier estimates of achievable dosimetric accuracy are still applicable, despite the changes and advances in technology and techniques. The one exception is where there is significant lung involvement, where it is likely that uncertainties have now improved due to widespread use of more accurate heterogeneity models. Geometric uncertainties have improved with the wide availability of IGRT.

  14. A Temporal View of Soft Tissue Quantitative Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, William D.

    The objective of soft tissue quantitative ultrasound (QUS) is to improve diagnostic ultrasound imaging capabilities via quantitative outcomes. Over the past three or so decades, there have been an increasing number of QUS successes. A temporal view moves us back in history almost six decades when techniques and theoretical developments were in their earliest stages that impacted modern QUS successes. The earliest theoretical developments and techniques some six decades ago can be attributed to Lev Chernov, Philip Morse, Herman Feshbach, Uno Ingard, John Wild and Jack Reid. Later, Floyd Dunn developed important views as to how connective tissue affected the interaction between ultrasound and soft tissue. Then, as the theory of wave propagation in soft tissues with random inhomogeneities was extended and applied by Fred Lizzi, Jim Zagzebski and Mike Insana (and their colleagues), contemporary QUS successes started to emerge.

  15. Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided TOPAZ Radiofrequency Coblation: A Novel Coaxial Technique for the Treatment of Recalcitrant Plantar Fasciitis-Our Experience.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amit; Best, Alistair J; Rennie, Winston J

    2016-06-01

    Various therapeutic options are available for treatment of recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. Studies using TOPAZ coblation (ArthroCare, Sunnyvale, CA) have had good early results. The current coblation technique involves a surgical incision or breach of the highly specialized plantar fat pad, which can be associated with risks. We describe a novel technique of ultrasound-guided percutaneous coblation with a lateral heel approach. Advantages include precise targeting of the plantar fascia by direct dynamic visualization of the coblation tip, a true percutaneous approach with a needle skin puncture (<5 mm), and preservation of the plantar fat pad by using a lateral heel approach. PMID:27162283

  16. Ultrasound and deep eutectic solvent (DES): a novel blend of techniques for rapid and energy efficient synthesis of oxazoles.

    PubMed

    Singh, Balvant S; Lobo, Hyacintha R; Pinjari, Dipak V; Jarag, Krishna J; Pandit, Aniruddha B; Shankarling, Ganapati S

    2013-01-01

    The present work deals with the synthesis of novel oxazole compounds by using effective combination of ultrasound (US) and deep eutectic solvent (DES). The reaction was also conducted by thermal method (NUS) and the comparative studies are provided. It was observed that applying ultrasound not only improved yields and reduced reaction times but also saved more than 85% energy as shown by energy consumption calculations. The advantages of using DES as reaction medium is highlighted from the fact that it is bio-degradable, non-toxic, recyclable and could be easily prepared using inexpensive raw materials. The recyclability for DES was studied wherein it was found that ultrasound has no negative effects on DES even up to four runs. In addition, the present work is the first report on the combinative use of DES and US in organic synthesis. PMID:22784641

  17. Do Elderly Patients Fare Worse Following Operative Treatment of Distal Femur Fractures Using Modern Techniques?

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, Brandon S.; Patsalos-Fox, Bianka; Lopez, Nicole; Konda, Sanjit R.; Tejwani, Nirmal C.; Egol, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to compare the functional outcomes and quality of life of older and younger patients with similarly treated distal femur fractures. Methods: We conducted an assessment of 57 patients who sustained distal femur fractures (Orthopaedic Trauma Association Type 33B, C) and underwent surgical treatment at our academic medical center. Patients were divided into 2 groups for analysis: an elderly cohort of patients aged 65 or older and a comparison cohort of patients younger than age of 65. A retrospective review of demographics, preoperative ambulatory status, radiographic data, and physical examination data was collected from the medical records. Follow-up functional data were collected via telephone at a mean of 2.5 years (range 6 months-8 years) using a Short Musculoskeletal Functional Assessment (SMFA). All patients underwent standard operative treatment of either nail or plate fixation. Results: There was no statistical difference in gender, fracture type, surgical technique, surgeon, or institution where the surgery was performed. The percentage of patients with healed fractures at 6-months follow-up was not significantly different between the cohorts. The elderly cohort had slightly worse knee range of motion at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively but there was not a statistically significant difference between the groups. The SMFA Daily Activity, Functional, and Bother indices were significantly worse in the older cohort (P < .01, P = .01, P = .02, respectively). However, there was no significant difference in the SMFA Emotional or Mobility indices. Conclusion: Despite lower quality of life and functional scores, this study suggests that relatively good clinical outcomes can be achieved with surgical fixation of distal femoral fractures in the elderly patients. Age should not be used as a determinate in deciding against operative treatment of distal femur fractures in the elderly patients. PMID:24660097

  18. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X- ... use high frequency sound waves to produce an image and do not expose the individual to radiation. ...

  19. A new construction technique of high granularity and high transparency drift chambers for modern high energy physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiarello, G.; Chiri, C.; Corvaglia, A.; Grancagnolo, F.; Miccoli, A.; Panareo, M.; Pepino, A.; Pinto, C.; Primiceri, P.; Spedicato, M.; Tassielli, G. F.

    2016-07-01

    Modern experiments for the search of extremely rare processes require high resolutions (order of 50-200 keV/c) tracking systems for particle momenta in the range of 50-300 MeV/c, dominated by multiple scattering contributions. We will present a newly developed construction technique for ultra-low mass Drift Chambers fulfilling this goal. It consists of (1) a semiautomatic wiring machine with a high degree of control over wire mechanical tensioning (better than 0.2 g) and over wire positioning (of the order of 20 μm) for simultaneous wiring of multi-wire layers; (2) a contact-less IR laser soldering tool designed for a feed-through-less wire anchoring system; (3) an automatic handling system for storing and transporting the multi-wire layers to be placed over the drift chamber end-plates. These techniques have been successfully implemented at INFN-Lecce and University of Salento and are currently being used for the construction of Drift Chamber of the MEG (μ → eγ) upgrade experiment.

  20. Motion tracking in the liver: Validation of a method based on 4D ultrasound using a nonrigid registration technique

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayan, Sinara; Klein, Stefan; Hofstad, Erlend Fagertun; Langø, Thomas; Lindseth, Frank; Ystgaard, Brynjulf

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Treatments like radiotherapy and focused ultrasound in the abdomen require accurate motion tracking, in order to optimize dosage delivery to the target and minimize damage to critical structures and healthy tissues around the target. 4D ultrasound is a promising modality for motion tracking during such treatments. In this study, the authors evaluate the accuracy of motion tracking in the liver based on deformable registration of 4D ultrasound images. Methods: The offline analysis was performed using a nonrigid registration algorithm that was specifically designed for motion estimation from dynamic imaging data. The method registers the entire 4D image data sequence in a groupwise optimization fashion, thus avoiding a bias toward a specifically chosen reference time point. Three healthy volunteers were scanned over several breathing cycles (12 s) from three different positions and angles on the abdomen; a total of nine 4D scans for the three volunteers. Well-defined anatomic landmarks were manually annotated in all 96 time frames for assessment of the automatic algorithm. The error of the automatic motion estimation method was compared with interobserver variability. The authors also performed experiments to investigate the influence of parameters defining the deformation field flexibility and evaluated how well the method performed with a lower temporal resolution in order to establish the minimum frame rate required for accurate motion estimation. Results: The registration method estimated liver motion with an error of 1 mm (75% percentile over all datasets), which was lower than the interobserver variability of 1.4 mm. The results were only slightly dependent on the degrees of freedom of the deformation model. The registration error increased to 2.8 mm with an eight times lower temporal resolution. Conclusions: The authors conclude that the methodology was able to accurately track the motion of the liver in the 4D ultrasound data. The authors believe

  1. Pain related to robotic cholecystectomy with lower abdominal ports: effect of the bilateral ultrasound-guided split injection technique of rectus sheath block in female patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Soo; Choi, Jong Bum; Lee, Sook Young; Kim, Wook Hwan; Baek, Nam Hyun; Kim, Jayoun; Park, Chu Kyung; Lee, Yeon Ju; Park, Sung Yong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Robotic cholecystectomy (RC) using port sites in the lower abdominal area (T12-L1) rather than the upper abdomen has recently been introduced as an alternative procedure for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Therefore, we investigated the time course of different components of pain and the analgesic effect of the bilateral ultrasound-guided split injection technique for rectus sheath block (sRSB) after RC in female patients. Methods: We randomly assigned 40 patients to undergo ultrasound-guided sRSB (RSB group, n = 20) or to not undergo any block (control group, n = 20). Pain was subdivided into 3 components: superficial wound pain, deep abdominal pain, and referred shoulder pain, which were evaluated with a numeric rating scale (from 0 to 10) at baseline (time of awakening) and at 1, 6, 9, and 24 hours postoperatively. Consumption of fentanyl and general satisfaction were also evaluated 1 hour (before discharge from the postanesthesia care unit) and 24 hours postoperatively (end of study). Results: Superficial wound pain was predominant only at awakening, and after postoperative 1 hour in the control group. Bilateral ultrasound-guided sRSB significantly decreased superficial pain after RC (P < 0.01) and resulted in a better satisfaction score (P < 0.05) 1 hour after RC in the RSB group compared with the control group. The cumulative postoperative consumption of fentanyl at 6, 9, and 24 hours was not significantly different between groups. Conclusions: After RC with lower abdominal ports, superficial wound pain predominates over deep intra-abdominal pain and shoulder pain only at the time of awakening. Afterwards, superficial and deep pain decreased to insignificant levels in 6 hours. Bilateral ultrasound-guided sRSB was effective only during the first hour. This limited benefit should be balanced against the time and risks entailed in performing RSB. PMID:27495072

  2. An ultrasound-guided fascia iliaca catheter technique does not impair ambulatory ability within a clinical pathway for total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mudumbai, Seshadri C.; Kim, T. Edward; Howard, Steven K.; Giori, Nicholas J.; Woolson, Steven; Ganaway, Toni; Kou, Alex; King, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background Both neuraxial and peripheral regional analgesic techniques offer postoperative analgesia for total hip arthroplasty (THA) patients. While no single technique is preferred, quadriceps muscle weakness from peripheral nerve blocks may impede rehabilitation. We designed this study to compare postoperative ambulation outcome in THA patients who were treated with a new ultrasound-guided fascia iliaca catheter (FIC) technique or intrathecal morphine (ITM). Methods We reviewed the electronic health records of a sequential series of primary unilateral THA patients who were part of a standardized clinical pathway; apart from differences in regional analgesic technique, all other aspects of the pathway were the same. Our primary outcome was total ambulation distance (meters) combined for postoperative days 1 and 2. Secondary outcomes included daily opioid consumption (morphine milligram equivalents) and analgesic-related side effects. We examined the association between the primary outcome and analgesic technique by performing crude and adjusted ordinary least-squares linear regression. A P value < 0.05 was considered statistically-significant. Results The study analyzed the records of 179 patients (fascia iliaca, n = 106; intrathecal, n = 73). The primary outcome (total ambulation distance) did not differ between the groups (P = 0.08). Body mass index (BMI) was the only factor (β = -1.7 [95% CI -0.5 to -2.9], P < 0.01) associated with ambulation distance. Opioid consumption did not differ, while increased pruritus was seen in the intrathecal group (P < 0.01). Conclusions BMI affects postoperative ambulation outcome after hip arthroplasty, whereas the type of regional analgesic technique used does not. An ultrasound-guided FIC technique offers similar analgesia with fewer side effects when compared with ITM. PMID:27482314

  3. Cardiac 4D Ultrasound Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'hooge, Jan

    Volumetric cardiac ultrasound imaging has steadily evolved over the last 20 years from an electrocardiography (ECC) gated imaging technique to a true real-time imaging modality. Although the clinical use of echocardiography is still to a large extent based on conventional 2D ultrasound imaging it can be anticipated that the further developments in image quality, data visualization and interaction and image quantification of three-dimensional cardiac ultrasound will gradually make volumetric ultrasound the modality of choice. In this chapter, an overview is given of the technological developments that allow for volumetric imaging of the beating heart by ultrasound.

  4. Value of Ultrasound in Rheumatologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Taeyoung; Horton, Laura; Emery, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The use of musculoskeletal ultrasound in rheumatology clinical practice has rapidly increased over the past decade. Ultrasound has enabled rheumatologists to diagnose, prognosticate and monitor disease outcome. Although international standardization remains a concern still, the use of ultrasound in rheumatology is expected to grow further as costs fall and the opportunity to train in the technique improves. We present a review of value of ultrasound, focusing on major applications of ultrasound in rheumatologic diseases. PMID:23580002

  5. Ultrasound-Induced Organogel Formation Followed by Thin Film Fabrication via Simple Doctor Blading Technique for Field-Effect Transistor Applications.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiaju; Wang, Yulong; Shan, Haiquan; Lin, Yiwei; Chen, Qian; Roy, V A L; Xu, Zongxiang

    2016-07-27

    We demonstrate doctor blading technique to fabricate high performance transistors made up of printed small molecular materials. In this regard, we synthesize a new soluble phthalocyanine, tetra-n-butyl peripheral substituted copper(II) phthalocaynine (CuBuPc), that can easily undergo gel formation upon ultrasonic irradiation, leading to the formation of three-dimensional (3D) network composed of one-dimensional (1D) nanofibers structure. Finally, taking the advantage of thixotropic nature of the CuBuPc organogel, we use the doctor blade processing technique that limits the material wastage for the fabrication of transistor devices. Due to the ultrasound induced stronger π-π interaction, the transistor fabricated by doctor blading based on CuBuPc organogel exhibits significant increase in charge carrier mobility in comparison with other solution process techniques, thus paving a way for a simple and economically viable preparation of electronic circuits. PMID:27377991

  6. Mutational Spectrum of DMD Mutations in Dystrophinopathy Patients: Application of Modern Diagnostic Techniques to a Large Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Flanigan, Kevin M.; Dunn, Diane; von Niederhausern, Andrew; Soltanzadeh, Payam; Gappmaier, Eduard; Howard, Michael T.; Sampson, Jacinda; Mendell, Jerry; Wall, Cheryl; King, Wendy; Pestronk, Alan; Florence, Julaine; Connolly, Anne; Mathews, Katherine D.; Stephan, Carrie; Laubenthal, Karla; Wong, Brenda; Morehart, Paula; Meyer, Amy; Finkel, Richard; Bonnemann, Carsten G.; Medne, Livija; Day, John W.; Dalton, Joline C.; Margolis, Marcia; Hinton, Veronica; Weiss, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the DMD gene, encoding the dystrophin protein, are responsible for the dystrophinopathies Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD), and X-linked Dilated Cardiomyopathy (XLDC). Mutation analysis has traditionally been challenging, due to the large gene size (79 exons over 2.2 Mb of genomic DNA). We report a very large aggregate data set comprised of DMD mutations detected in samples from patients enrolled in the United Dystrophinopathy Project, a multicenter research consortium, and in referral samples submitted for mutation analysis with a diagnosis of dystrophinopathy. We report 1111 mutations in the DMD gene, including 891 mutations with associated phenotypes. These results encompass 506 point mutations (including 294 nonsense mutations) and significantly expand the number of mutations associated with the dystrophinopathies, highlighting the utility of modern diagnostic techniques. Our data supports the uniform hypermutability of CGA>TGA mutations, establishes the frequency of polymorphic muscle (Dp427m) protein isoforms and reveals unique genomic haplotypes associated with `private' mutations. We note that 60% of these patients would be predicted to benefit from skipping of a single DMD exon using antisense oligonucleotide therapy, and 62% would be predicted to benefit from an inclusive multi-exon skipping approach directed toward exons 45 through 55. PMID:19937601

  7. Monitoring Prostate Tumor Growth in an Orthotopic Mouse Model Using Three-Dimensional Ultrasound Imaging Technique12

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Jie; Cozzi, Paul; Hung, Tzong-Tyng; Hao, Jingli; Graham, Peter; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the most commonly diagnosed and the second leading cause of death from cancer in males in USA. Prostate orthotopic mouse model has been widely used to study human CaP in preclinical settings. Measurement of changes in tumor size obtained from noninvasive diagnostic images is a standard method for monitoring responses to anticancer modalities. This article reports for the first time the usage of a three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound system equipped with photoacoustic (PA) imaging in monitoring longitudinal prostate tumor growth in a PC-3 orthotopic NODSCID mouse model (n = 8). Two-dimensional and 3D modes of ultrasound show great ability in accurately depicting the size and shape of prostate tumors. PA function on two-dimensional and 3D images showed average oxygen saturation and average hemoglobin concentration of the tumor. Results showed a good fit in representative exponential tumor growth curves (n = 3; r2 = 0.948, 0.955, and 0.953, respectively) and a good correlation of tumor volume measurements performed in vivo with autopsy (n = 8, r = 0.95, P < .001). The application of 3D ultrasound imaging proved to be a useful imaging modality in monitoring tumor growth in an orthotopic mouse model, with advantages such as high contrast, uncomplicated protocols, economical equipment, and nonharmfulness to animals. PA mode also enabled display of blood oxygenation surrounding the tumor and tumor vasculature and angiogenesis, making 3D ultrasound imaging an ideal tool for preclinical cancer research. PMID:26947880

  8. Total Skin Electron Therapy for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma Using a Modern Dual-Field Rotational Technique

    PubMed Central

    Heumann, Thatcher R.; Esiashvili, Natia; Parker, Sareeta; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; Dhabbaan, Anees; Goodman, Michael; Lechowicz, Mary Jo; Flowers, Christopher R.; Khan, Mohammad K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report our experience with rotational total skin electron irradiation (RTSEI) in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), and to examine response by disease stage and race. Methods and Materials We reviewed our outcomes for 68 CTCL patients who received RTSEI (≥30 Gy) from 2000 to 2013. Primary outcomes were complete clinical response (CCR), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Using log–rank tests and Cox proportional hazards, OS and RFS were compared across tumor stages at time of RTSEI with further racial subgroup analysis. Results Median age at diagnosis and at time of radiation was 52 and 56 years, respectively. Median follow-up was 5.1 years, 49% were African American, and 49% were female. At time of treatment, 18, 37, and 13 patients were T stage 2, 3, and 4, respectively. At 6 weeks after RTSEI, overall CCR was 82% (88%, 83%, and 69% for T2, T3, and T4, respectively). Median RFS was 11 months for all patients and 14, 10, and 12 months for stage T2, T3, and T4, respectively. Tumor stage was not associated with RFS or CCR. Maintenance therapy after RTSEI was associated with improved RFS in both crude and multivariable analysis, controlling for T stage. Median OS was 76 months (91 and 59 months for T3 and T4, respectively). With the exception of improved OS in African Americans compared with whites at stage T2, race was not associated with CCR, RFS, or OS. Conclusions These results represent the largest RTSEI clinical outcomes study in the modern era using a dual-field rotational technique. Our observed response rates match or improve upon the standard set by previous outcome studies using conventional TSEI techniques, despite a large percentage of advanced CTCL lesions in our cohort. We found that clinical response after RTSEI did not seem to be affected by T stage or race. PMID:25670538

  9. Total Skin Electron Therapy for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma Using a Modern Dual-Field Rotational Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Heumann, Thatcher R.; Esiashvili, Natia; Parker, Sareeta; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; Dhabbaan, Anees; Goodman, Michael; Lechowicz, Mary Jo; Flowers, Christopher R.; Khan, Mohammad K.

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: To report our experience with rotational total skin electron irradiation (RTSEI) in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), and to examine response by disease stage and race. Methods and Materials: We reviewed our outcomes for 68 CTCL patients who received RTSEI (≥30 Gy) from 2000 to 2013. Primary outcomes were complete clinical response (CCR), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Using log–rank tests and Cox proportional hazards, OS and RFS were compared across tumor stages at time of RTSEI with further racial subgroup analysis. Results: Median age at diagnosis and at time of radiation was 52 and 56 years, respectively. Median follow-up was 5.1 years, 49% were African American, and 49% were female. At time of treatment, 18, 37, and 13 patients were T stage 2, 3, and 4, respectively. At 6 weeks after RTSEI, overall CCR was 82% (88%, 83%, and 69% for T2, T3, and T4, respectively). Median RFS was 11 months for all patients and 14, 10, and 12 months for stage T2, T3, and T4, respectively. Tumor stage was not associated with RFS or CCR. Maintenance therapy after RTSEI was associated with improved RFS in both crude and multivariable analysis, controlling for T stage. Median OS was 76 months (91 and 59 months for T3 and T4, respectively). With the exception of improved OS in African Americans compared with whites at stage T2, race was not associated with CCR, RFS, or OS. Conclusions: These results represent the largest RTSEI clinical outcomes study in the modern era using a dual-field rotational technique. Our observed response rates match or improve upon the standard set by previous outcome studies using conventional TSEI techniques, despite a large percentage of advanced CTCL lesions in our cohort. We found that clinical response after RTSEI did not seem to be affected by T stage or race.

  10. Treatment of nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancer with modern radiotherapy techniques in the postoperative setting-the MSKCC experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Bradford S.; Stegman, Lauren D.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Patel, Snehal G.; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Lee, Nancy Y. . E-mail: leen2@mskcc.org

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To perform a retrospective analysis of patients with paranasal sinus (PNS) cancer treated with postoperative radiotherapy (RT) at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: Between January 1987 and July 2005, 85 patients with PNS and nasal cavity cancer underwent postoperative RT. Most patients had squamous cell carcinoma (49%; n = 42), T4 tumors (52%; n = 36), and the maxillary sinus (53%; n = 45) as the primary disease site. The median radiation dose was 63 Gy. Of the 85 patients, 76 underwent CT simulation and 53 were treated with either three-dimensional conformal RT (27%; n = 23) or intensity-modulated RT (35%; n = 30). Acute and late toxicities were scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiation morbidity scoring criteria. Results: With a median follow-up for surviving patients of 60 months, the 5-year estimates of local progression-free, regional progression-free, distant metastasis-free, disease-free, and overall survival rates were 62%, 87%, 82%, 55%, and 67%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, squamous cell histology and cribriform plate involvement predicted for an increased likelihood of local recurrence, and squamous cell histologic features predicted for worse overall survival. None of the patients who underwent CT simulation and were treated with modern techniques developed a Grade 3-4 late complication of the eye. Conclusion: Complete surgical resection followed by adjuvant RT is an effective and safe approach in the treatment of PNS cancer. Emerging tools, such as three-dimensional conformal treatment and, in particular, intensity-modulated RT for PNS tumors, may minimize the occurrence of late complications associated with conventional RT techniques. Local recurrence remains a significant problem.

  11. Monitoring Radiofrequency Ablation Using Real-Time Ultrasound Nakagami Imaging Combined with Frequency and Temporal Compounding Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhuhuang; Wu, Shuicai; Wang, Chiao-Yin; Ma, Hsiang-Yang; Lin, Chung-Chih; Tsui, Po-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    Gas bubbles induced during the radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of tissues can affect the detection of ablation zones (necrosis zone or thermal lesion) during ultrasound elastography. To resolve this problem, our previous study proposed ultrasound Nakagami imaging for detecting thermal-induced bubble formation to evaluate ablation zones. To prepare for future applications, this study (i) created a novel algorithmic scheme based on the frequency and temporal compounding of Nakagami imaging for enhanced ablation zone visualization, (ii) integrated the proposed algorithm into a clinical scanner to develop a real-time Nakagami imaging system for monitoring RFA, and (iii) investigated the applicability of Nakagami imaging to various types of tissues. The performance of the real-time Nakagami imaging system in visualizing RFA-induced ablation zones was validated by measuring porcine liver (n = 18) and muscle tissues (n = 6). The experimental results showed that the proposed algorithm can operate on a standard clinical ultrasound scanner to monitor RFA in real time. The Nakagami imaging system effectively monitors RFA-induced ablation zones in liver tissues. However, because tissue properties differ, the system cannot visualize ablation zones in muscle fibers. In the future, real-time Nakagami imaging should be focused on the RFA of the liver and is suggested as an alternative monitoring tool when advanced elastography is unavailable or substantial bubbles exist in the ablation zone. PMID:25658424

  12. Computer vision approach for ultrasound Doppler angle estimation.

    PubMed

    Saad, Ashraf A; Loupas, Thanasis; Shapiro, Linda G

    2009-12-01

    Doppler ultrasound is an important noninvasive diagnostic tool for cardiovascular diseases. Modern ultrasound imaging systems utilize spectral Doppler techniques for quantitative evaluation of blood flow velocities, and these measurements play a crucial rule in the diagnosis and grading of arterial stenosis. One drawback of Doppler-based blood flow quantification is that the operator has to manually specify the angle between the Doppler ultrasound beam and the vessel orientation, which is called the Doppler angle, in order to calculate flow velocities. In this paper, we will describe a computer vision approach to automate the Doppler angle estimation. Our approach starts with the segmentation of blood vessels in ultrasound color Doppler images. The segmentation step is followed by an estimation technique for the Doppler angle based on a skeleton representation of the segmented vessel. We conducted preliminary clinical experiments to evaluate the agreement between the expert operator's angle specification and the new automated method. Statistical regression analysis showed strong agreement between the manual and automated methods. We hypothesize that the automation of the Doppler angle will enhance the workflow of the ultrasound Doppler exam and achieve more standardized clinical outcome. PMID:18488268

  13. Combination of modified mixing technique and low frequency ultrasound to control the elution profile of vancomycin-loaded acrylic bone cement

    PubMed Central

    Wendling, A.; Mar, D.; Wischmeier, N.; Anderson, D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to determine if combining variations in mixing technique of antibiotic-impregnated polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement with low frequency ultrasound (LFUS) improves antibiotic elution during the initial high phase (Phase I) and subsequent low phase (Phase II) while not diminishing mechanical strength. Methods Three batches of vancomycin-loaded PMMA were prepared with different mixing techniques: a standard technique; a delayed technique; and a control without antibiotic. Daily elution samples were analysed using flow injection analysis (FIA). Beginning in Phase II, samples from each mix group were selected randomly to undergo either five, 15, 45, or 0 minutes of LFUS treatment. Elution amounts between LFUS treatments were analysed. Following Phase II, compression testing was done to quantify strength. A-priori t-tests and univariate ANOVAs were used to compare elution and mechanical test results between the two mix groups and the control group. Results The delayed technique showed a significant increase in elution on day one compared with the standard mix technique (p < 0.001). The transition point from Phase I to Phase II occurred on day ten. LFUS treatments significantly increased elution amounts for all groups above control. Delayed technique resulted in significantly higher elution amounts for the five-minute- (p = 0.004) and 45-minute- (p < 0.001) duration groups compared with standard technique. Additionally, the correlations between LFUS duration and total elution amount for both mix techniques were significant (p = 0.03). Both antibiotic-impregnated groups exhibited a significant decrease in offset yield stress compared with the control group (p < 0.001), however, their lower 95% confidence intervals were all above the 70 MPa limit defined by International Standards Organization (ISO) 5833-2 reference standard for acrylic bone cement. Conclusion The combination of a delayed mix technique with LFUS treatments

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Endoscopic ultrasound is a type of imaging test. It is used to see organs in and near the digestive ... Ultrasound is a way to see the inside of the body using high-frequency sound waves. Endoscopic ...

  15. Scrotal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... the scrotal sac to help transmit the sound waves. A handheld probe (the ultrasound transducer) is then ... The ultrasound machine sends out high-frequency sound waves. These waves reflect off areas in the scrotum ...

  16. Pregnancy ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3D ultrasound References Richards DS. Obstetrical ultrasound: Imaging, dating, and growth. In: Gabbe SG, Niebyl JR, Simpson ... the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A. ...

  17. Biogeosystem technique as a method to overcome the Biological and Environmental Hazards of modern Agricultural, Irrigational and Technological Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinitchenko, Valery; Batukaev, Abdulmalik; Zinchenko, Vladimir; Zarmaev, Ali; Magomadov, Ali; Chernenko, Vladimir; Startsev, Viktor; Bakoev, Serojdin; Dikaev, Zaurbek

    2014-05-01

    Modern challenge for humanity is to replace the paradigm of nature use and overcome environmental hazards of agronomy, irrigation, industry, and other human activities in biosphere. It is utterly reasonable to stop dividing biosphere on shares - the human habitat and the environment. In the 21st century it is an outdated anthropocentrism. Contradicting himself to biosphere Humankind has the problems. The new paradigm of biosphere control by methods of Biogeosystem technique is on agenda of Humankind. Key directions of Biogeosystem technique. Tillage. Single rotary milling 20…30-50…60 sm soil layer optimizes the evolution and environment of soil, creates a favorable conditions for the rhizosphere, increases the biological productivity of biosphere by 30-50% compared to the standard agricultural practices for the period up to 40 years. Recycle material. Recycling of mineral and organic substances in soil layer of 20…30-50…60 sm in rotary milling soil processing provides wastes clean return to biosphere. Direct intrasoil substances synthesis. Environmentally friendly robot wasteless nanotechnology provides direct substances synthesis, including fertilizers, inside the soil. It eliminates the prerequisites of the wastes formation under standard industrial technologies. Selective substance's extraction from soil. Electrochemical robotic nanotechnology provides selective substances extraction from soil. The technology provides recovery, collection and subsequent safe industrial use of extracted substances out of landscape. Saving fresh water. An important task is to save fresh water in biosphere. Irrigation spends water 4-5 times more of biological requirements of plants, leads to degradation of soil and landscape. The intrasoil pulse continuous-discrete paradigm of irrigation is proposed. It provides the soil and landscape conservation, increases the biological productivity, save the fresh water up to 10-20 times. The subsurface soil rotary processing and

  18. Differentiating between spatial and temporal effects by applying modern data analyzing techniques to measured soil moisture data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenbrink, Tobias L.; Lischeid, Gunnar; Schindler, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    Large data sets containing time series of soil hydrological variables exist due to extensive monitoring work in the last decades. The interplay of different processes and influencing factors cause spatial and temporal patterns which contribute to the total variance. That implies that monitoring data sets contain information about the most relevant processes. That information can be extracted using modern data analysis techniques. Our objectives were (i) to decompose the total variance of an example data set of measured soil moisture time series in independent components and (ii) relate them to specific influencing factors. Soil moisture had been measured at 12 plots in an Albeluvisol located in Müncheberg, northeastern Germany, between May 1st, 2008 and July 1st, 2011. Each plot was equipped with FDR probes in 7 depths between 30 cm and 300 cm. Six plots were cultivated with winter rye and silage maize (Crop Rotation System I) and the other six with silage maize, winter rye/millet, triticale/lucerne and lucerne (Crop Rotation System II). We applied a principal component analysis to the soil moisture data set. The first component described the mean behavior in time of all soil moisture time series. The second component reflected the impact of soil depth. Together they explained 80 % of the data set's total variance. An analysis of the first two components confirmed that measured plots showed similar signal damping extend in each depth. The fourth component revealed the impact of the two different crop rotation systems which explained about 4 % of the total variance and 13 % of the spatial variance of soil moisture data. That is only a minor fraction compared to small scale soil texture heterogeneity effects. Principal component analysis has proven to be a useful tool to extract less apparent signals.

  19. Effective porosity and density of carbonate rocks (Maynardville Limestone and Copper Ridge Dolomite) within Bear Creek Valley on the Oak Ridge Reservation based on modern petrophysical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Dorsch, J.

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide quantitative data on effective porosity of carbonate rock from the Maynardville Limestone and Copper Ridge Dolomite within Bear Creek Valley based on modern petrophysical techniques. The data will be useful for groundwater-flow and contaminant-flow modeling in the vicinity of the Y-12 Plant on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Furthermore, the data provides needed information on the amount of interconnected pore space potentially available for operation of matrix diffusion as a transport process within the fractured carbonate rock. A second aspect of this study is to compare effective porosity data based on modern petrophysical techniques to effective porosity data determined earlier by Goldstrand et al. (1995) with a different technique. An added bonus of the study is quantitative data on the bulk density and grain density of dolostone and limestone of the Maynardville Limestone and Copper Ridge Dolomite which might find use for geophysical modeling on the ORR.

  20. Ultrasound simulation in bone.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Jonathan J; Luo, Gangming; Siffert, Robert S

    2008-01-01

    The manner in which ultrasound interacts with bone is of key interest in therapy and diagnosis alike. These may include applications directly to bone, as, for example, in treatment to accelerate the healing of bone fractures and in assessment of bone density in osteoporosis, or indirectly in diagnostic imaging of soft tissue with interest in assessing exposure levels to nearby bone. Because of the lack of analytic solutions to virtually every "practical problem" encountered clinically, ultrasound simulation has become a widely used technique for evaluating ultrasound interactions in bone. This paper provides an overview of the use of ultrasound simulation in bone. A brief description of the mathematical model used to characterize ultrasound propagation in bone is first provided. A number of simulation examples are then presented that explain how simulation may be utilized in a variety of practical configurations. The focus of this paper in terms of examples presented is on diagnostic applications in bone, and, in particular, for assessment of osteoporosis. However, the use of simulation in other areas of interest can easily be extrapolated from the examples presented. In conclusion, this paper describes the use of ultrasound simulation in bone and demonstrates the power of computational methods for ultrasound research in general and tissue and bone applications in particular. PMID:18599409

  1. A Modern Automatic Chamber Technique as a Powerful Tool for CH4 and CO2 Flux Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastepanov, M.; Christensen, T. R.; Lund, M.; Pirk, N.

    2014-12-01

    A number of similar systems were used for monitoring of CH4 and CO2 exchange by the automatic chamber method in a range of different ecosystems. The measurements were carried out in northern Sweden (mountain birch forest near Abisko, 68°N, 2004-2010), southern Sweden (forest bog near Hässleholm, 56°N, 2007-2014), northeastern Greenland (arctic fen in Zackenberg valley, 74°N, 2005-2014), southwestern Greenland (fen near Nuuk, 64°N, 2007-2014), central Svalbard (arctic fen near Longyearbyen, 78°N, 2011-2014). Those in total 37 seasons of measurements delivered not only a large amount of valuable flux data, including a few novel findings (Mastepanov et al., Nature, 2008; Mastepanov et al., Biogeosciences, 2013), but also valuable experience with implementation of the automatic chamber technique using modern analytical instruments and computer technologies. A range of high resolution CH4 analysers (DLT-100, FMA, FGGA - Los Gatos Research), CO2 analyzers (EGM-4, SBA-4 - PP Systems; Li-820 - Li-Cor Biosciences), as well as Methane Carbon Isotope Analyzer (Los Gatos Research) has shown to be suitable for precise measurements of fluxes, from as low as 0.1 mg CH4 m-1 d-1 (wintertime measurements at Zackenberg, unpublished) to as high as 2.4 g CH4 m-1 d-1 (autumn burst 2007 at Zackenberg, Mastepanov et al., Nature, 2008). Some of these instruments had to be customized to accommodate 24/7 operation in harsh arctic conditions. In this presentation we will explain some of these customizations. High frequency of concentration measurements (1 Hz in most cases) provides a unique opportunity for quality control of flux calculations; on the other hand, this enormous amount of data can be analyzed only using highly automated algorithms. A specialized software package was developed and improved through the years of measurements and data processing. This software automates the data flow from raw concentration data of different instruments and sensors and various status records

  2. Medical ultrasound systems

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Jeff; Kremkau, Frederick

    2011-01-01

    Medical ultrasound imaging has advanced dramatically since its introduction only a few decades ago. This paper provides a short historical background, and then briefly describes many of the system features and concepts required in a modern commercial ultrasound system. The topics addressed include array beam formation, steering and focusing; array and matrix transducers; echo image formation; tissue harmonic imaging; speckle reduction through frequency and spatial compounding, and image processing; tissue aberration; Doppler flow detection; and system architectures. It then describes some of the more practical aspects of ultrasound system design necessary to be taken into account for today's marketplace. It finally discusses the recent explosion of portable and handheld devices and their potential to expand the clinical footprint of ultrasound into regions of the world where medical care is practically non-existent. Throughout the article reference is made to ways in which ultrasound imaging has benefited from advances in the commercial electronics industry. It is meant to be an overview of the field as an introduction to other more detailed papers in this special issue. PMID:22866226

  3. The Utility of MicroPure™ Ultrasound Technique in Assessing Grouped Microcalcifications without a Mass on Mammography

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ah Young; Cho, Kyu Ran; Woo, Ok Hee

    2016-01-01

    The term "grouped microcalcifications" refers to the smallest arrangement of a relatively few calcifications noted on mammography, and has a wide range of clinical associations. For the pathologic diagnosis of suspicious-looking grouped microcalcifications without an associated mass, a mammography-guided procedure should be considered, because visualization of microcalcifications by conventional ultrasound (US) is limited. A mammography-guided procedure requires radiation exposure, is associated with pain, and is more time-consuming to perform than an US-guided procedure. However, an innovative US technology called MicroPure™ (Toshiba Medical Systems Corp., Tokyo, Japan) imaging improves detection and visualization of microcalcifications. We demonstrate the early clinical experience with and utility of MicroPure US examination of 10 breast lesions involving grouped microcalcifications without a mass on mammography screening. PMID:27066098

  4. A novel procedure employing laser ultrasound technique and simplex algorism for the characterization of mechanical and geometrical properties in Zircaloy tubes with different levels of hydrogen charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, I.-Hung; Yang, Che-Hua

    2011-01-01

    In this research, a procedure employing a laser ultrasound technique (LUT) and an inversion algorism is reported for nondestructive characterization of mechanical and geometrical properties in Zircaloy tubes with different levels of hydrogen charging. With the LUT, guided acoustic waves are generated to propagate in the Zircaloy tubes and are detected remotely by optical means. By measuring the dispersive wavespeeds followed by the inversion algorism, mechanical properties such as elastic moduli and geometrical property such as wall-thickness of Zircaloy tubes are characterized for different levels of hydrogen charging. Having the advantages of remote, non-contact and point-wise generation/detection, the reported procedure serves as a competitive candidate for the characterization of Zircaloy tubes generally operated in irradiative and temperature-elevated environments.

  5. Ultrasound tracking for intra-fractional motion compensation in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Schwaab, J; Prall, M; Sarti, C; Kaderka, R; Bert, C; Kurz, C; Parodi, K; Günther, M; Jenne, J

    2014-07-01

    Modern techniques as ion beam therapy or 4D imaging require precise target position information. However, target motion particularly in the abdomen due to respiration or patient movement is still a challenge and demands methods that detect and compensate this motion. Ultrasound represents a non-invasive, dose-free and model-independent alternative to fluoroscopy, respiration belt or optical tracking of the patient surface. Thus, ultrasound based motion tracking was integrated into irradiation with actively scanned heavy ions. In a first in vitro experiment, the ultrasound tracking system was used to compensate diverse sinusoidal target motions in two dimensions. A time delay of ∼200 ms between target motion and reported position data was compensated by a prediction algorithm (artificial neural network). The irradiated films proved feasibility of the proposed method. Furthermore, a practicable and reliable calibration workflow was developed to enable the transformation of ultrasound tracking data to the coordinates of the treatment delivery or imaging system - even if the ultrasound probe moves due to respiration. A first proof of principle experiment was performed during time-resolved positron emission tomography (4DPET) to test the calibration workflow and to show the accuracy of an ultrasound based motion tracking in vitro. The results showed that optical ultrasound tracking can reach acceptable accuracies and encourage further research. PMID:24695273

  6. Interventional ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, H.H.; Kristensen, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses: Introduction to interventional ultrasound/handling of aspirated material/general principles of fine needle aspiration cytology/procedure and principles in ultrasonically guided puncture/puncture of focal liver lesions/intraoperative puncture of the liver guided by ultrasound/Interventional ultrasound in cancer therapy/Interventional echocardiography/Fine-needle aspiration biopsy: Are there any risks./Puncture of renal mass lesions/Intrauterine needle diagnosis/Percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

  7. Medical Imaging with Ultrasound: Some Basic Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosling, R.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed are medical applications of ultrasound. The physics of the wave nature of ultrasound including its propagation and production, return by the body, spatial and contrast resolution, attenuation, image formation using pulsed echo ultrasound techniques, measurement of velocity and duplex scanning are described. (YP)

  8. A comparative approach of four different image registration techniques for quantitative assessment of coronary artery calcium lesions using intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Araki, Tadashi; Ikeda, Nobutaka; Dey, Nilanjan; Chakraborty, Sayan; Saba, Luca; Kumar, Dinesh; Godia, Elisa Cuadrado; Jiang, Xiaoyi; Gupta, Ajay; Radeva, Petia; Laird, John R; Nicolaides, Andrew; Suri, Jasjit S

    2015-02-01

    In IVUS imaging, constant linear velocity and a constant angular velocity of 1800 rev/min causes displacement of the calcium in subsequent image frames. To overcome this error in intravascular ultrasound video, IVUS image frames must be registered prior to the lesion quantification. This paper presents a comprehensive comparison of four registration methods, namely: Rigid, Affine, B-Splines and Demons on five set of calcium lesion quantification parameters namely: (i) the mean lesion area, (ii) mean lesion arc, (iii) mean lesion span, (iv) mean lesion length, and (v) mean lesion distance from catheter. Using our IRB approved data of 100 patient volumes, our results shows that all four registrations showed a decrease in five calcium lesion parameters as follows: for Rigid registration, the values were: 4.92%, 5.84%, 5.89%, 5.27%, and 4.57%, respectively, for Affine registration the values were: 6.06%, 6.51%, 7.28%, 6.50%, and 5.94%, respectively, for B-Splines registration the values were: 7.35%, 8.03%, 9.54%, 8.18%, and 7.62%, respectively, and for Demons registration the five parameters were 7.32%, 8.02%, 10.11%, 7.94%, and 8.92% respectively. The relative overlap of identified lesions decreased by 5.91% in case of Rigid registration, 6.23% in case of Affine registration, 4.48% for Demons registration, whereas it increased by 3.05% in case of B-Splines registration. Rigid and Affine transformation-based registration took only 0.1936 and 0.2893 s per frame, respectively. Demons and B-Splines framework took only 0.5705 and 0.9405 s per frame, respectively, which were significantly slower than Rigid and Affine transformation based image registration. PMID:25523233

  9. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided placement of the lumen-apposing self-expandable metallic stent for gallbladder drainage: a promising technique

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Rashmee; Ona, Mel A.; Papafragkakis, Charilaos; Anand, Sury; Duddempudi, Sushil

    2016-01-01

    Acute cholecystitis and other clinical problems requiring gallbladder removal or drainage have conventionally been treated with surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or percutaneous transhepatic drainage of the gallbladder and/or extrahepatic bile duct. Patients unable to undergo these procedures due to functional status or anatomical anomalies are candidates for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided gallbladder drainage with stent placement. The aim of this review was to evaluate the technical feasibility and efficacy of EUS-guided placement of the recently developed lumen-apposing self-expandable metallic stent (LASEMS). A literature review was performed to identify the studies describing this technique. In this review article we have summarized case series or reports describing EUS-guided LASEMS placement. The indications, techniques, limitations and complications reported are discussed. A total of 78 patients were included across all studies described thus far in the literature. Studies have reported near 100% technical and clinical success rates in selected cases. No major complications were reported. EUS-guided gallbladder drainage and LASEMS placement can be a safe and effective alternative approach in the management of selected patients. PMID:27065728

  10. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided placement of the lumen-apposing self-expandable metallic stent for gallbladder drainage: a promising technique.

    PubMed

    Patil, Rashmee; Ona, Mel A; Papafragkakis, Charilaos; Anand, Sury; Duddempudi, Sushil

    2016-01-01

    Acute cholecystitis and other clinical problems requiring gallbladder removal or drainage have conventionally been treated with surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or percutaneous transhepatic drainage of the gallbladder and/or extrahepatic bile duct. Patients unable to undergo these procedures due to functional status or anatomical anomalies are candidates for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided gallbladder drainage with stent placement. The aim of this review was to evaluate the technical feasibility and efficacy of EUS-guided placement of the recently developed lumen-apposing self-expandable metallic stent (LASEMS). A literature review was performed to identify the studies describing this technique. In this review article we have summarized case series or reports describing EUS-guided LASEMS placement. The indications, techniques, limitations and complications reported are discussed. A total of 78 patients were included across all studies described thus far in the literature. Studies have reported near 100% technical and clinical success rates in selected cases. No major complications were reported. EUS-guided gallbladder drainage and LASEMS placement can be a safe and effective alternative approach in the management of selected patients. PMID:27065728

  11. Modern techniques of magnetic resonance in the evaluation of primary central nervous system lymphoma: contributions to the diagnosis and differential diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha, Antonio José; Sobreira Guedes, Bruno Vasconcelos; da Silveira da Rocha, Talita Maira Bueno; Maia Junior, Antonio Carlos Martins; Chiattone, Carlos Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    In addition to findings from conventional magnetic resonance imaging, modern magnetic resonance imaging techniques have provided important information about tumor metabolism, in vivo metabolite formation, water molecule diffusion, microvascular density, and blood-brain barrier permeability, all of which have improved the in vivo diagnostic accuracy of this method in the evaluation of primary central nervous system lymphoma. These nonconventional magnetic resonance techniques are useful in the clinical practice because they enhance conventional magnetic resonance imaging by reinforcing the possibility of a diagnosis and by allowing the early detection of disease recurrence. This report is a review of the most relevant contributions of nonconventional magnetic resonance techniques to the imaging diagnosis of primary central nervous system lymphoma, the differential diagnosis of this disease, and the prognosis of patients. This paper aims to describe a wide range of presentations of primary central nervous system lymphoma, their appearance in imaging, and the differential diagnoses of this disease. PMID:26969774

  12. 2-D PSTD Simulation of the time-reversed ultrasound-encoded deep-tissue imaging technique

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Snow H.; Ting, Wei-Lun; Wang, Shiang-Jiu

    2014-01-01

    We present a robust simulation technique to model the time-reversed ultrasonically encoded (TRUE) technique for deep-tissue imaging. The pseudospectral time-domain (PSTD) algorithm is employed to rigorously model the electromagnetic wave interaction of light propagating through a macroscopic scattering medium. Based upon numerical solutions of Maxwell’s equations, the amplitude and phase are accurately accounted for to analyze factors that affect the TRUE propagation of light through scattering media. More generally, we demonstrate the feasibility of modeling light propagation through a virtual tissue model of macroscopic dimensions with numerical solutions of Maxwell’s equations. PMID:24688821

  13. Experimental validation of a nonlinear derating technique based upon Gaussian-modal representation of focused ultrasound beams.

    PubMed

    Dibaji, Seyed Ahmad Reza; Banerjee, Rupak K; Liu, Yunbo; Soneson, Joshua E; Myers, Matthew R

    2016-05-01

    A technique useful for performing derating at acoustic powers where significant harmonic generation occurs is illustrated and validated with experimental measurements. The technique was previously presented using data from simulations. The method is based upon a Gaussian representation of the propagation modes, resulting in simple expressions for the modal quantities, but a Gaussian source is not required. The nonlinear interaction of modes within tissue is estimated from the nonlinear interaction in water, using appropriate amounts of source reduction and focal-point reduction derived from numerical simulations. An important feature of this nonlinear derating method is that focal temperatures can be estimated with little additional effort beyond that required to determine the focal pressure waveforms. Hydrophone measurements made in water were used to inform the derating algorithm, and the resulting pressure waveforms and increases in temperature were compared with values directly measured in tissue phantoms. For a 1.05 MHz focused transducer operated at 80 W and 128 W, the derated pressures (peak positive, peak negative) agreed with the directly measured values to within 11%. Focal temperature rises determined by the derating method agreed with values measured using a remote thermocouple technique with a difference of 17%. PMID:27250156

  14. Validation of Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound Technique to Wire Localization of Sentinel Lymph Node in Patients with Early Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Esfehani, Maryam H; Yazdankhah-Kenari, Adel; Omranipour, Ramesh; Mahmoudzadeh, Habib Allah; Shahriaran, Shahriar; Zafarghandi, Mohammad Reza; Amoli, Hadi Ahmadi

    2015-12-01

    Axillary staging is one of the primary steps in management of Breast cancer patients. Current standard methods including blue dye and radicolloid have limitations and disadvantages. In this study, the feasibility of visualization of lymph node pathways and localization of SLN with the help of CEUS was assessed. 50 patients with early breast cancer diagnosis underwent CEUS and wire localization, methylenblue dye, and isotope scan methods for SLN detection. The pathology findings of the wired SLN were compared with those obtained from, methylenblue dye, and isotope scan methods. Lymph node wiring was successfully performed in 48 patients.Radio-isotope technique detected SLN in all 50 patients while blue-dye succeeded in 48. Sensitivity of CEUS to detect SLN compared with radio-isotope and blue dye methods was 96 % and 100 %, respectively. Considering costs and facilities required to perform radio-isotope technique and complications of blue dye we may accept CEUS with the help of micro-bubble contrasts as a viable alternative. However, more studies with larger sample volumes, using various drugs, and including non-selective population are warranted to better clarify feasibility and accuracy of this technique in comparison with current methods. PMID:27065663

  15. AMUM LECTURE: Therapeutic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence A.

    2004-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in medicine is now quite commonplace, especially with the recent introduction of small, portable and relatively inexpensive, hand-held diagnostic imaging devices. Moreover, ultrasound has expanded beyond the imaging realm, with methods and applications extending to novel therapeutic and surgical uses. These applications broadly include: tissue ablation, acoustocautery, lipoplasty, site-specific and ultrasound mediated drug activity, extracorporeal lithotripsy, and the enhancement of natural physiological functions such as wound healing and tissue regeneration. A particularly attractive aspect of this technology is that diagnostic and therapeutic systems can be combined to produce totally non-invasive, imageguided therapy. This general lecture will review a number of these exciting new applications of ultrasound and address some of the basic scientific questions and future challenges in developing these methods and technologies for general use in our society. We shall particularly emphasize the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of benign and malignant tumors as well as the introduction of acoustic hemostasis, especially in organs which are difficult to treat using conventional medical and surgical techniques.

  16. Clinical ophthalmic ultrasound improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, J. B.; Piro, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    The use of digital synthetic aperture techniques to obtain high resolution ultrasound images of eye and orbit was proposed. The parameters of the switched array configuration to reduce data collection time to a few milliseconds to avoid eye motion problems in the eye itself were established. An assessment of the effects of eye motion on the performance of the system was obtained. The principles of synthetic techniques are discussed. Likely applications are considered.

  17. Safety Assurance in Obstetrical Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Douglas L

    2008-01-01

    Safety assurance for diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics began with a tacit assumption of safety allowed by a federal law enacted in 1976 for then-existing medical ultrasound equipment. The implementation of the 510(k) pre-market approval process for diagnostic ultrasound resulted in the establishment of guideline upper limits for several examination categories in 1985. The obstetrical category has undergone substantial evolution from initial limits (I. e., 46 mW/cm2 spatial peak temporal average (SPTA) intensity) set in 1985. Thermal and mechanical exposure indices, which are displayed on-screen according to an Output Display Standard (ODS), were developed for safety assurance with relaxed upper limits. In 1992, with the adoption of the ODS, the allowable output for obstetrical ultrasound was increased both in terms of the average exposure (e. g. to a possible 720 mW/cm2 SPTA intensity) and of the peak exposure (via the Mechanical Index). There has been little or no subsequent research with the modern obstetrical ultrasound machines to systematically assess potential risks to the fetus using either relevant animal models of obstetrical exposure or human epidemiology studies. The assurance of safety for obstetrical ultrasound therefore is supported by three ongoing means: (I) review of a substantial but uncoordinated bioeffect research literature, (ii) the theoretical evaluation of diagnostic ultrasound exposure in terms of thermal and nonthermal mechanisms for bioeffects, and (iii) the skill and knowledge of professional sonographers. At this time, there is no specific reason to suspect that there is any significant health risk to the fetus or mother from exposure to diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics. This assurance of safety supports the prudent use of diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics by trained professionals for any medically indicated examination. PMID:18450141

  18. Safety assurance in obstetrical ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas L

    2008-04-01

    Safety assurance for diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics began with a tacit assumption of safety allowed by a federal law enacted in 1976 for then-existing medical ultrasound equipment. The implementation of the 510(k) pre-market-approval process for diagnostic ultrasound resulted in the establishment of guideline upper limits for several examination categories in 1985. The obstetrical category has undergone substantial evolution from initial limits (ie, 46 mW/cm2 spatial peak temporal average [SPTA] intensity) set in 1985. Thermal and mechanical exposure indices, which are displayed onscreen according to an Output Display Standard, were developed for safety assurance with relaxed upper limits. In 1992, with the adoption of the Output Display Standard, the allowable output for obstetrical ultrasound was increased in terms of both the average exposure (eg, to a possible 720 mW/cm2 SPTA intensity) and the peak exposure (via the Mechanical Index). There has been little or no subsequent research with the modern obstetrical ultrasound machines to systematically assess potential risks to the fetus using either relevant animal models of obstetrical exposure or human epidemiology studies. The assurance of safety for obstetrical ultrasound therefore is supported by three ongoing means: (1) review of a substantial but uncoordinated bioeffect research literature; (2) the theoretical evaluation of diagnostic ultrasound exposure in terms of thermal and nonthermal mechanisms for bioeffects; and (3) the skill and knowledge of professional sonographers. At this time, there is no specific reason to suspect that there is any significant health risk to the fetus or mother from exposure to diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics. This assurance of safety supports the prudent use of diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics by trained professionals for any medically indicated examination. PMID:18450141

  19. Ultrasound - Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... discharge) and to characterize potential abnormalities seen on mammography or breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ultrasound imaging ... supply in breast lesions . Supplemental Breast Cancer Screening Mammography is the only screening tool for breast cancer ...

  20. Transvaginal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... germ cell neoplasms, sex-cord stromal tumors. In: Lentz GM, Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, Katz VL, eds. ... oviduct, ovary, ultrasound imaging of pelvic structures. In: Lentz GM, Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, Katz VL, eds. ...

  1. Abdominal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  2. Obstetrical Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  3. Thyroid ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Performed Ultrasound is a painless method that uses sound waves to create images of the inside of the ... neck to help with the transmission of the sound waves. Next, the technician moves a wand, called a ...

  4. Breast ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript. Breast ultrasound is a test that uses sound waves to examine the breasts. How the Test is ... to the left or right. The device sends sound waves to the breast tissue. The sound waves help ...

  5. Pregnancy ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... findings that might indicate an increased risk for Down syndrome A pregnancy ultrasound may also be done in ... weeks of pregnancy to look for signs of Down syndrome or other problems in the developing baby. This ...

  6. Optimization of pulsed ultrasound-assisted technique for extraction of phenolics from pomegranate peel of Malas variety: Punicalagin and hydroxybenzoic acids.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Milad; Karim, Roselina; Mirhosseini, Hamed; Abdul Hamid, Azizah

    2016-09-01

    Pomegranate peel is a rich source of phenolic compounds (such as punicalagin and hydroxybenzoic acids). However, the content of such bioactive compounds in the peel extract can be affected by extraction type and condition. It was hypothesized that the optimization of a pulsed ultrasound-assisted extraction (PUAE) technique could result in the pomegranate peel extract with higher yield and antioxidant activity. The main goal was to optimize PUAE condition resulting in the highest yield and antioxidant activity as well as the highest contents of punicalagin and hydroxybenzoic acids. The operation at the intensity level of 105W/cm(2) and duty cycle of 50% for a short time (10min) had a high efficiency for extraction of phenolics from pomegranate peel. The application of such short extraction can save the energy and cost of the production. Punicalagin and ellagic acid were the most predominant phenolic compounds quantified in the pomegranate peel extract (PPE) from Malas variety. PPE contained a minor content of gallic acid. PMID:27041311

  7. Quantitative Study of Elasticity of Rabbit VX2 Liver Tumor with Alternated Cooling and Heating Treatment based on ARFI Ultrasound Imaging Technique.

    PubMed

    Sun, Di; Wei, Cong; Shen, E; Ying, Tao; Hu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) ultrasound imaging technique is used to quantitatively evaluate the elasticity of rabbit VX2 liver tumor with alternated cooling and heating treatment (ACHT). ACHT was performed on fifteen VX2 liver tumor models established in fifteen male New Zealand white rabbits with open tumor plant. ARFI was performed on day 0, 1, 7 and 14 after ACHT and shear wave velocity (SWV) in ARFI was recorded to evaluate the elasticity of the treated area. The SWV value of the lesion on day 0, 1, 7 and 14 was 2.33 ± 0.19 m/s, 3.09 ± 0.40 m/s, 2.64 ± 0.37 m/s and 2.26 ± 0.24 m/s, respectively, indicating the treated areas get stiffer on day 1 and then get softer gradually by day. All the difference between adjacent time points was statistically significant. The SWV value of different parts on day 7 approved that the hardness of the treated area is heterogenous: the treated area in the center >the peripheral strip-shaped area >normal liver tissues, consistent with pathological changes. Meanwhile, ARFI combined with conventional US imaging can qualitatively and quantitatively exam the healing process of rabbit VX2 liver tumor after ACHT, and corresponds well to the pathological results. PMID:27381362

  8. Quantitative Study of Elasticity of Rabbit VX2 Liver Tumor with Alternated Cooling and Heating Treatment based on ARFI Ultrasound Imaging Technique

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Di; Wei, Cong; Shen, E.; Ying, Tao; Hu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) ultrasound imaging technique is used to quantitatively evaluate the elasticity of rabbit VX2 liver tumor with alternated cooling and heating treatment (ACHT). ACHT was performed on fifteen VX2 liver tumor models established in fifteen male New Zealand white rabbits with open tumor plant. ARFI was performed on day 0, 1, 7 and 14 after ACHT and shear wave velocity (SWV) in ARFI was recorded to evaluate the elasticity of the treated area. The SWV value of the lesion on day 0, 1, 7 and 14 was 2.33 ± 0.19 m/s, 3.09 ± 0.40 m/s, 2.64 ± 0.37 m/s and 2.26 ± 0.24 m/s, respectively, indicating the treated areas get stiffer on day 1 and then get softer gradually by day. All the difference between adjacent time points was statistically significant. The SWV value of different parts on day 7 approved that the hardness of the treated area is heterogenous: the treated area in the center >the peripheral strip-shaped area >normal liver tissues, consistent with pathological changes. Meanwhile, ARFI combined with conventional US imaging can qualitatively and quantitatively exam the healing process of rabbit VX2 liver tumor after ACHT, and corresponds well to the pathological results. PMID:27381362

  9. Intrahepatic versus extrahepatic cholestasis. Discrimination with biliary scintigraphy combined with ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, D.A.; Krishnamurthy, G.T.

    1986-03-01

    Biliary scintigraphy and ultrasound imaging were performed in 52 patients with suspected biliary tract pathology. Results were correlated with the findings of direct cholangiography. Several new innovations in scintigraphic technique were used. The combination of ultrasound imaging and scintigraphy correctly identified biliary tract obstruction in 17 of 19 patients, 12 of whom had dilated bile ducts on ultrasonography. Intrahepatic cholestasis was correctly diagnosed in 11 of 13 patients. Accurate discrimination between intrahepatic and extrahepatic cholestasis was achieved in 28 of 32 patients (88%) with the combined studies. Scintigraphy also provided a correct diagnosis of acute cholecystitis in all 9 patients with surgically confirmed disease. Eleven additional patients with gallbladder or pancreatic disease had normal bile ducts at scintigraphy, which was confirmed with cholangiography. When combined with ultrasound imaging, modern biliary scintigraphy can (a) provide excellent discrimination between intrahepatic and extrahepatic cholestasis and (b) help determine the need for subsequent invasive diagnostic studies in selected patients.

  10. Application of Modern Aperture Integration (AI) and Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD) Techniques for Analysis of Large Reflector Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudduck, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The application of aperture integration (AI) and geometrical theory of diffraction (GTO) techniques to analyze large reflector antennas is outlined. The following techniques were used: computer modeling, validation of analysis and computer codes, computer aided design modifications, limitation on the conventional aperture integration (AIC) method, extended aperture integration (AIE) method, the AIE method for feed scattering calculations, near field probing predictions for 15 meter model, limitation on AIC for surface tolerance effects, aperture integration on the surface (AIS) method, and AIC and GTD calculations for compact range reflector.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Uterine Fibroids: Effect of Bowel Interposition on Procedure Feasibility and a Unique Bowel Displacement Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-sun; Lim, Hyo Keun; Rhim, Hyunchul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of bowel interposition on assessing procedure feasibility, and the usefulness and limiting conditions of bowel displacement techniques in magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) ablation of uterine fibroids. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approved this study. A total of 375 screening MR exams and 206 MR-HIFU ablations for symptomatic uterine fibroids performed between August 2010 and March 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. The effect of bowel interposition on procedure feasibility was assessed by comparing pass rates in periods before and after adopting a unique bowel displacement technique (bladder filling, rectal filling and subsequent bladder emptying; BRB maneuver). Risk factors for BRB failure were evaluated using logistic regression analysis. Results Overall pass rates of pre- and post-BRB periods were 59.0% (98/166) and 71.7% (150/209), and in bowel-interposed cases they were 14.6% (7/48) and 76.4% (55/72), respectively. BRB maneuver was technically successful in 81.7% (49/60). Through-the-bladder sonication was effective in eight of eleven BRB failure cases, thus MR-HIFU could be initiated in 95.0% (57/60). A small uterus on treatment day was the only significant risk factor for BRB failure (B = 0.111, P = 0.017). Conclusion The BRB maneuver greatly reduces the fraction of patients deemed ineligible for MR-HIFU ablation of uterine fibroids due to interposed bowels, although care is needed when the uterus is small. PMID:27186881

  12. Cranial Ultrasound/Head Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  13. Image quality for five modern chest radiography techniques: a modified FROC study with an anthropomorphic chest phantom.

    PubMed

    Månsson, L G; Kheddache, S; Lanhede, B; Tylén, U

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the image quality for one conventional and four digital chest radiography techniques. Three storage phosphor systems, one selenium drum system, and one film-screen system were compared using a modified receiver-operating-characteristics method. Simulated pathology was randomly positioned over the parenchymal regions and the mediastinum of an anthropomorphic phantom. Eight observers (four chest radiologists, one specialist in general radiology, one hospital physicist, and two radiographers) evaluated 60 images for each technique. The selenium drum system (Philips, Eindhoven, The Netherlands) rated best for the detection of parenchymal nodules. Together with the storage phosphor system of generation IIIN (Philips/Fuji), the selenium drum system also rated best for detection of thin linear structures. The storage phosphor system of generation V (Fuji) rated best for the detection of mediastinal nodules. The first generation of the storage phosphor system from Agfa (Mortsel, Belgium) rated worst for the detection of parenchymal nodules and thin linear structures. These differences were significant (p < 0.0001). Averaging the results for all test objects, the selenium drum system and the storage phosphor system of generation V were significantly better than the other systems tested. The film/screen system performed significantly better than the first-generation storage phosphor system from Agfa, equal to the generation IIIN storage phosphor system (Philips/Fuji) and significantly worse than the selenium drum system (Philips) and the generation-V storage phosphor system (Fuji). The conclusion is therefore that the image quality of selenium-based digital technique and of the more recent generations of storage phosphor systems is superior to both conventional technique and storage phosphor systems using image plates of older types. PMID:10602958

  14. Time-reversal Techniques in Ultrasound-assisted Convection-enhanced Drug Delivery to the Brain: Technology Development and In Vivo Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, George K.; Guarino, Sabrina; Gandhi, Gaurav; Filinger, Laurent; Lewis, George K.; Olbricht, Willam L.; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2011-01-01

    We describe a drug delivery method that combines Time-Reversal Acoustics (TRA) with Convection-Enhanced Delivery (CED) to improve the delivery of therapeutics to the interstitium of the brain. The Ultrasound-assisted CED approach (UCED) circumvents the blood-brain barrier by infusing compounds through a cannula that is inserted into the brain while simultaneously delivering ultrasound to improve the penetration of pharmaceuticals. CED without ultrasound-assistance has been used to treat a variety of neural disorders, including glioblastoma multiforme, a malignancy that presents a very poor prognosis for patients. We describe a novel system that is used to infuse fluids into the brain parenchyma while simultaneously exposing the tissue to safe levels of 1-MHz, low intensity, ultrasound energy. The system includes a combined infusion needle-hydrophone, a 10-channel ultralow-output impedance amplifier, a broad-band ultrasound resonator, and MatLab®-based TRA control and user-interface. TRA allows easy coupling of ultrasound therapy through the skull without complex phase-correction and array design. The smart targeting UCED system has been tested in vivo and results show it provides 1.5-mm spatial resolution for UCED and improves tracer distribution in the brain over CED alone. PMID:21881622

  15. Phased-array ultrasound technology enhances accuracy of dual frequency ultrasound measurements - towards improved ultrasound bone diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Linder, Hans; Malo, Markus K H; Liukkonen, Jukka; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2016-08-01

    Overlying soft tissues attenuate ultrasound backscattered from bone, complicating diagnostics of osteoporosis at the most important fracture sites. Dual-frequency ultrasound technique (DFUS) has been proposed to solve this problem through determination of thickness and composition of overlying soft tissue. This study applies DFUS technique for the first time with a phased-array transducer to investigate if the thickness of two interfering layers (oil and water) can be accurately determined in a variety of configurations. Results indicate that DFUS may be used with phased-array ultrasound systems, making them a suitable combination to consider in future development of clinical in vivo ultrasound methodologies. PMID:27187271

  16. Neurological applications of transcranial high intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tony R; Dallapiazza, Rob; Elias, W Jeff

    2015-05-01

    Advances in transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound have renewed interest in lesioning procedures in functional neurosurgery with a potential role in the treatment of neurological conditions such as chronic pain, brain tumours, movement disorders and psychiatric diseases. While the use of transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound represents a new innovation in neurosurgery, ultrasound has been used in neurosurgery for almost 60 years. This paper reviews the major historical milestones that have led to modern transcranial focused ultrasound and discusses current and evolving applications of ultrasound in the brain. PMID:25703389

  17. Straighten the Back to Sit: Belly-Cultivation Techniques as "Modern Health Methods" in Japan, 1900-1945.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Chuan

    2016-09-01

    In Japan, the first half of the twentieth century saw a remarkable revival of concern with the cultivation of the belly, with a variety of belly-cultivation techniques, particularly breathing exercise and meditative sitting, widely practiced for improving health and treating diseases. This article carefully examines some practitioners' experiences of belly-cultivation practice in attempting to understand its healing effects for them within their life histories and contemporary intellectual, social and cultural contexts. It shows that belly-cultivation practice served as a medium for some practitioners to reflect on and retell their life stories, and that the personal charisma of certain masters and the communities developing around them provided practitioners with a valuable sense of belonging in an increasingly industrialized and urbanized society. Moreover, these belly-cultivation techniques provided an embodied way for some to explore and affirm their sense of self and develop individual identity. While they were increasingly promoted as cultural traditions capable of cultivating national character, they also served as healing practices by inspiring practitioners with a sense of collective identity and purpose. With these analyses, this article sheds light on the complicated meanings of belly-cultivation for practitioners, and provides illustrative examples of the multitude of meanings of the body, bodily cultivation and healing. PMID:26848985

  18. [Quantitative ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Barkmann, R; Glüer, C-C

    2006-10-01

    Methods of quantitative ultrasound (QUS) can be used to obtain knowledge about bone fragility. Comprehensive study results exist showing the power of QUS for the estimation of osteoporotic fracture risk. Nevertheless, the variety of technologies, devices, and variables as well as different degrees of validation of the single devices have to be taken into account. Using methods to simulate ultrasound propagation, the complex interaction between ultrasound and bone could be understood and the propagation could be visualized. Preceding widespread clinical use, it has to be clarified if patients with low QUS values will profit from therapy, as it has been shown for DXA. Moreover, the introduction of quality assurance measures is essential. The user should know the limitations of the methods and be able to interpret the results correctly. Applied in an adequate manner QUS methods could then, due to lower costs and absence of ionizing radiation, become important players in osteoporosis management. PMID:16896637

  19. Bio-refinery of orange peels waste: a new concept based on integrated green and solvent free extraction processes using ultrasound and microwave techniques to obtain essential oil, polyphenols and pectin.

    PubMed

    Boukroufa, Meryem; Boutekedjiret, Chahrazed; Petigny, Loïc; Rakotomanomana, Njara; Chemat, Farid

    2015-05-01

    In this study, extraction of essential oil, polyphenols and pectin from orange peel has been optimized using microwave and ultrasound technology without adding any solvent but only "in situ" water which was recycled and used as solvent. The essential oil extraction performed by Microwave Hydrodiffusion and Gravity (MHG) was optimized and compared to steam distillation extraction (SD). No significant changes in yield were noticed: 4.22 ± 0.03% and 4.16 ± 0.05% for MHG and SD, respectively. After extraction of essential oil, residual water of plant obtained after MHG extraction was used as solvent for polyphenols and pectin extraction from MHG residues. Polyphenols extraction was performed by ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) and conventional extraction (CE). Response surface methodology (RSM) using central composite designs (CCD) approach was launched to investigate the influence of process variables on the ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE). The statistical analysis revealed that the optimized conditions of ultrasound power and temperature were 0.956 W/cm(2) and 59.83°C giving a polyphenol yield of 50.02 mgGA/100 g dm. Compared with the conventional extraction (CE), the UAE gave an increase of 30% in TPC yield. Pectin was extracted by conventional and microwave assisted extraction. This technique gives a maximal yield of 24.2% for microwave power of 500 W in only 3 min whereas conventional extraction gives 18.32% in 120 min. Combination of microwave, ultrasound and the recycled "in situ" water of citrus peels allow us to obtain high added values compounds in shorter time and managed to make a closed loop using only natural resources provided by the plant which makes the whole process intensified in term of time and energy saving, cleanliness and reduced waste water. PMID:25435398

  20. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction: toward a new strategy for diabetes treatment.

    PubMed

    Mozafari, Masoud; Shimoda, Masayuki; Urbanska, Aleksandra M; Laurent, Sophie

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) is a promising technique with an immense target-specific gene delivery potential deep inside the human body. The potential of this technique has recently been confirmed for diabetic patients. This technology allows the genes to transfer specifically into the inefficient pancreas using ultrasound energy without viral vector utilization. It has been speculated that this idea and the advent of modern gene therapy techniques could result in significant future advances. Undoubtedly, this strategy needs further investigation and many critical questions have to be answered before it can be successfully advanced. Herein, we introduce the salient features of this approach, the hurdles that must be overcome, the hopes associated with it and practical constraints to develop this method for diabetes treatment. PMID:26646254

  1. Endobronchial ultrasound elastography

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph F.; Jenssen, Christian; Herth, Felix J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Elastographic techniques have recently become available as advanced diagnostic tools for tissue characterization. Strain elastography is a real-time technique used with transcutaneous ultrasound (US) and endoscopic US. Convincing evidence is available demonstrating a significant value of strain elastography for the discrimination of benign and malignant lymph nodes (LNs). This paper reviews preliminary data demonstrating the feasibility of performing real-time elastography during endobronchial US (EBUS) and a potential application of this technique for selection of LNs for EBUS-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in patients with lung cancer and extrathoracic malignancies. PMID:27503154

  2. Analysis of Modern Techniques for Nuclear-test Yield Determination of NTS Events Using Data From the Leo Brady Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, K. A.; Bilek, S. L.; Abbott, R. E.

    2007-12-01

    Nuclear test detection is a challenging, but important task for treaty verification. Many techniques have been developed to discriminate between an explosion and an earthquake and if an explosion is detected, to determine its yield. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has maintained the Leo Brady Seismic Network (LBSN) since 1960 to record nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), providing a unique data set for yield determination. The LBSN is comprised of five permanent stations surrounding the NTS at regional distances, and data (in digital from post 1983) exists for almost all tests. Modern seismic data processing techniques can be used with this data to apply new methods to better determine the seismic yield. Using mb(Lg) we found that, when compared to published yields, our estimates were low for events over 100 kilotons (kt) and near the published value for events under 40 kt. We are currently measuring seismic-phase amplitudes, examining body- and surface-wave spectra and using seismic waveform modeling techniques to determine the seismic yield of NTS explosions using the waveforms from the LBSN.

  3. Tissue identification by ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecroissette, D. H.; Heyser, R. C.; Gammell, P. M.; Wilson, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The ultrasonic properties of animal and human soft tissue were measured over the frequency range of 1.5 to 10.0 MHz. The method employed a swept-frequency, coherent technique known as time delay spectrometry. Measurements of attenuation versus frequency on liver, backfat, kidney, pancreas, spleen, breast, and other tissue were made. Considerable attention was paid to tissue handling and in determining the effects of fixing on the attenuation of ultrasound in the tissue.

  4. On the identification of damping from non-stationary free decay signals using modern signal processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, Ricardo I.; Montejo, Luis A.

    2015-09-01

    A numerical implementation of system identification from non-linear and non-stationary signals is presented. The continuous wavelet transform (CWT) along with the complex Morlet wavelet skeleton curve extraction and Hilbert Transform (HT)-based methodologies are used for identification purposes. A comparison of the advantages of each technique in the analysis of non-stationary free decay systems is presented and improvements to the current methodologies are proposed. The HT approach offered good results in the estimation of the instantaneous amplitude in low damping and non-noisy signals. However, it is highly sensitive to impulses and irregularities in the signal, which affects the proper detection of frequency and amplitude parameters in real-life signals. The CWT exhibited better results for the analysis of noisy signals, from the resulting wavelet map the noise content can be distinguished from the actual system response. That is, the modes show a distinctive pattern in the map allowing proper modal extraction. However, for highly damped non-stationary decaying signals, the results are affected by the decay rate, round-up errors, and edge effects.

  5. Lessons in modern digital field geology: Open source software, 3D techniques, and the new world of digital mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlis, Terry; Hurtado, Jose; Langford, Richard; Serpa, Laura

    2014-05-01

    Although many geologists refuse to admit it, it is time to put paper-based geologic mapping into the historical archives and move to the full potential of digital mapping techniques. For our group, flat map digital geologic mapping is now a routine operation in both research and instruction. Several software options are available, and basic proficiency with the software can be learned in a few hours of instruction and practice. The first practical field GIS software, ArcPad, remains a viable, stable option on Windows-based systems. However, the vendor seems to be moving away from ArcPad in favor of mobile software solutions that are difficult to implement without GIS specialists. Thus, we have pursued a second software option based on the open source program QGIS. Our QGIS system uses the same shapefile-centric data structure as our ArcPad system, including similar pop-up data entry forms and generic graphics for easy data management in the field. The advantage of QGIS is that the same software runs on virtually all common platforms except iOS, although the Android version remains unstable as of this writing. A third software option we are experimenting with for flat map-based field work is Fieldmove, a derivative of the 3D-capable program Move developed by Midland Valley. Our initial experiments with Fieldmove are positive, particularly with the new, inexpensive (<300Euros) Windows tablets. However, the lack of flexibility in data structure makes for cumbersome workflows when trying to interface our existing shapefile-centric data structures to Move. Nonetheless, in spring 2014 we will experiment with full-3D immersion in the field using the full Move software package in combination with ground based LiDAR and photogrammetry. One new workflow suggested by our initial experiments is that field geologists should consider using photogrammetry software to capture 3D visualizations of key outcrops. This process is now straightforward in several software packages, and

  6. EFSUMB statement on medical student education in ultrasound [short version].

    PubMed

    Cantisani, V; Dietrich, C F; Badea, R; Dudea, S; Prosch, H; Cerezo, E; Nuernberg, D; Serra, A L; Sidhu, P S; Radzina, M; Piscaglia, F; Bachmann Nielsen, M; Calliada, F; Gilja, O H

    2016-02-01

    The European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) recommends that ultrasound should be used systematically as an easy accessible and instructive educational tool in the curriculum of modern medical schools. Medical students should acquire theoretical knowledge of the modality and hands-on training should be implemented and adhere to evidence-based principles. In this paper we summarise EFSUMB policy statements on medical student education in ultrasound. PMID:26871409

  7. Ultrasound Annual, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    The 1984 edition of Ultrasound Annual explores new applications of ultrasound in speech and swallowing and offers guidelines on the use of ultrasound and nuclear medicine in thyroid and biliary tract disease. Other areas covered include Doppler sonography of the abdomen, intraoperative abdominal ultrasound, sonography of the placenta, ultrasound of the neonatal head and abdomen, and sonographic echo patterns created by fat.

  8. Ultrasound in assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed

    Porter, Misty Blanchette

    2008-05-01

    Transvaginal ultrasound-guided oocyte retrieval is the gold standard for in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment. Despite its relative safety, oocyte retrieval is associated with risk to the adjacent pelvic organs, bleeding, and pelvic infection. The embryo transfer (ET) procedure is considered a crucial step in an IVF cycle. The success of the ET is dependent upon multiple factors including embryo quality, proper endometrial receptivity, and the technique by which the embryos are transferred. Optimizing the technique of ET would therefore provide the best chance for pregnancy. No standard evidence-based protocol exists, but ET with ultrasound guidance has been shown to significantly increase the chance of embryo implantation, an ongoing pregnancy, and a live birth and to improve the ease of transfer. Identifying appropriate ultrasound-guided simulation training techniques in ET would ensure adequate fellowship training without affecting the outcome of assisted reproductive technology cycles. PMID:18504701

  9. Bedside gallbladder ultrasound for the primary care physician.

    PubMed

    Tollefson, Brian J; Hoda, Nicholas E; Fromang, Graves; Stone, Mary

    2015-03-01

    Modern ultrasound machines are relatively inexpensive to own and simple to operate. Basic ultrasound exams can be easily learned and mastered. As with any clinical exam skill, practice makes perfect. Providers interested in learning ultrasound should seek hands-on guidance from an expert in the field. There are several quality hands-on ultrasound courses (http:// emergencyultrasound.com/) as well as free online videos (http:// emergency ultrasound teaching.com/index.html). The emergency ultrasound team at UMMC will be offering a hands-on ultrasound training course in the spring of 2015. Please contact Dr Brian Tollefson for specific dates and times of the course (btollefson@umc.edu). PMID:26050444

  10. Utility and Potential of Bedside Ultrasound in Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Dhamija, Ekta; Thulkar, Sanjay; Bhatnagar, Sushma

    2015-01-01

    Bedside ultrasound is an important tool in modern palliative care practice. It can be utilized for rapid diagnostic evaluation or as an image guidance to perform invasive therapeutic procedures. With advent of portable ultrasound machines, it can also be used in community or home care settings, apart from palliative care wards. Major applications of bedside ultrasound include drainage of malignant pleural effusions and ascites, nerve blocks, venous access, evaluation of urinary obstruction, deep vein thrombosis and abscesses. Bedside ultrasound leads to better clinical decision-making as well as more accurate and faster invasive therapeutic procedures. It also enhances patient comfort and reduces cost burden. However, use of bedside ultrasound is still not widespread among palliative care givers, owing to initial cost, lack of basic training in ultrasound and apprehensions about its use. A team approach involving radiologists is important to develop integration of bedside ultrasound in palliative care. PMID:26009664

  11. Hot topics in biomedical ultrasound: ultrasound therapy and its integration with ultrasonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everbach, E. Carr

    2005-09-01

    Since the development of biomedical ultrasound imaging from sonar after WWII, there has been a clear divide between ultrasonic imaging and ultrasound therapy. While imaging techniques are designed to cause as little change as possible in the tissues through which ultrasound propagates, ultrasound therapy typically relies upon heating or acoustic cavitation to produce a desirable therapeutic effect. Concerns over the increasingly high acoustic outputs of diagnostic ultrasound scanners prompted the adoption of the Mechanical Index (MI) and Thermal Index (TI) in the early 1990s. Therapeutic applications of ultrasound, meanwhile, have evolved from deep tissue heating in sports medicine to include targeted drug delivery, tumor and plaque ablation, cauterization via high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), and accelerated dissolution of blood clots. The integration of ultrasonic imaging and therapy in one device is just beginning, but the promise of improved patient outcomes is balanced by regulatory and practical impediments.

  12. Application of ultrasound in periodontics: Part I

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Vive K.; Mohan, Ranjana; Bains, Rhythm

    2008-01-01

    Ultrasonic is a branch of acoustics concerned with sound vibrations in frequency ranges above audible level. Ultrasound uses the transmission and reflection of acoustic energy. A pulse is propagated and its reflection is received, both by the transducer. For clinical purposes ultrasound is generated by transducers, which converts electrical energy into ultrasonic waves. This is usually achieved by magnetostriction or piezoelectricity. Primary effects of ultrasound are thermal, mechanical (cavitation and microstreaming), and chemical (sonochemicals). Knowledge of the basic and other secondary effects of ultrasound is essential for the development of techniques of application. PMID:20142941

  13. [Ultrasound in the management of inflammatory dermatosis].

    PubMed

    Habicheyn Hiar, S; Segura Palacios, J M; Bernal Ruiz, A I

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous ultrasound is a dermatological diagnostic imaging technique based on the interaction of high-frequency ultrasounds with the skin. Because it is non-invasive, rapid and accessible, it has increasingly wide clinical applications. This article reviews its use in the management of inflammatory dermatological diseases. PMID:26895938

  14. [High frequency ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Sattler, E

    2015-07-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound has become a standard procedure in clinical dermatology. Devices with intermediate high frequencies of 7.5-15 MHz are used in dermato-oncology for the staging and postoperative care of skin tumor patients and in angiology for improved vessel diagnostics. In contrast, the high frequency ultrasound systems with 20-100 MHz probes offer a much higher resolution, yet with a lower penetration depth of about 1 cm. The main indications are the preoperative measurements of tumor thickness in malignant melanoma and other skin tumors and the assessment of inflammatory and soft tissue diseases, offering information on the course of these dermatoses and allowing therapy monitoring. This article gives an overview on technical principles, devices, mode of examination, influencing factors, interpretation of the images, indications but also limitations of this technique. PMID:25636803

  15. Translabial ultrasound in the assessment of pelvic floor and anorectal function in women with defecatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Dietz, H P

    2014-05-01

    This article shows how modern ultrasound imaging can contribute to the investigation of patients with posterior vaginal wall prolapse, obstructed defecation, fecal incontinence and rectal intussusception/prolapse, conditions that should be similarly relevant and of interest to colorectal surgeons, gastroenterologists and gynecologists. Translabial/perineal ultrasound, a simple, universally available technique, may serve as a first-line diagnostic tool in women with posterior compartment prolapse and/or symptoms of obstructed defecation, largely replacing defecation proctography and magnetic resonance proctography. This has advantages for healthcare systems, since sonographic imaging is less expensive, non-invasive, less time-consuming and does not involve radiation exposure. However, there is a substantial need for teaching that remains unmet to date. This article illustrates in details the technique of translabial ultrasonography adopted by our unit and reviews the literature supporting this method of assessing pelvic floor and anorectal function in women with defecatory disorders. PMID:24515287

  16. Venous Ultrasound (Extremities)

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  17. Emergency department bedside ultrasound diagnosis of retinoblastoma in a child.

    PubMed

    Presley, Bradley C; Flannigan, Matthew J

    2013-10-01

    A 30-month-old boy presented to a Haitian emergency department with proptosis, periorbital edema, and progressive blindness. Bedside ultrasound examination revealed bilateral ocular masses with dense calcifications pathognomonic for retinoblastoma. This case illustrates the diagnostic utility of bedside ultrasound for an advanced case of retinoblastoma in a resource-poor setting. Ocular ultrasound technique is also reviewed. PMID:24084617

  18. High definition 3D ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, A K; Krumm, J C; Kozlowski, D M; Kuhlmann, J L; Wilson, C; Little, C; Dickey, F M; Kwok, K S; Rogers, B; Walsh, N

    1997-01-01

    We have demonstrated high definition and improved resolution using a novel scanning system integrated with a commercial ultrasound machine. The result is a volumetric 3D ultrasound data set that can be visualized using standard techniques. Unlike other 3D ultrasound images, image quality is improved from standard 2D data. Image definition and bandwidth is improved using patent pending techniques. The system can be used to image patients or wounded soldiers for general imaging of anatomy such as abdominal organs, extremities, and the neck. Although the risks associated with x-ray carcinogenesis are relatively low at diagnostic dose levels, concerns remain for individuals in high risk categories. In addition, cost and portability of CT and MRI machines can be prohibitive. In comparison, ultrasound can provide portable, low-cost, non-ionizing imaging. Previous clinical trials comparing ultrasound to CT were used to demonstrate qualitative and quantitative improvements of ultrasound using the Sandia technologies. Transverse leg images demonstrated much higher clarity and lower noise than is seen in traditional ultrasound images. An x-ray CT scan was provided of the same cross-section for comparison. The results of our most recent trials demonstrate the advantages of 3D ultrasound and motion compensation compared with 2D ultrasound. Metal objects can also be observed within the anatomy. PMID:10168958

  19. Renal imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Hierholzer, K; Hierholzer, J

    1997-01-01

    The ancient approach to obtain an image of the kidneys (and other internal organs) was 'section-inspection-imaging' by drawing, painting, sculpturing, and modelling. The present study follows chronologically the development and use of sectioning techniques from ancient (often forbidden) methods to modern microdissection and maceration of silicone-rubber-injected tubules. Inspection evolved from the use of the naked eye to magnifying lenses, microscopes and finally electron microscopy. Pertinent examples such as the description of the kidneys as the site of urine formation, the visualization of loop structures in the renal medulla and the imaging of tight junction strands are discussed. Inspection or visualization of renal structure and function has been revolutionized by modern noninvasive techniques, such as X-ray imaging, imaging by radioisotopes, ultrasound, computer tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance. Pertinent examples are given demonstrating the potency of the various techniques. The contribution of computerized data evaluation is discussed. The development of micropuncture and microperfusion techniques has opened the field for direct imaging not only of renal (sub)structural details but also of functional parameters such as transtubular reabsorption rates, single glomerular capillary filtration and conductance of the paracellular pathway. We focus particularly on techniques specifically designed to visualize renal hemodynamic and transport parameters. PMID:9189257

  20. Eye and orbit ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Echography - eye orbit; Ultrasound - eye orbit; Ocular ultrasonography; Orbital ultrasonography ... ophthalmology department of a hospital or clinic. Your eye is numbed with medicine (anesthetic drops). The ultrasound ...

  1. Diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. Ultrasound versus electromyography.

    PubMed

    Lee, D; van Holsbeeck, M T; Janevski, P K; Ganos, D L; Ditmars, D M; Darian, V B

    1999-07-01

    This article presents a new technique for diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome using ultrasound. The ultrasound characteristics of the normal and abnormal median nerve are discussed in relation to carpal tunnel syndrome. The development of ultrasound as a new diagnostic modality for carpal tunnel syndrome is presented in a three-part study correlating the ultrasound measurements of the median nerve and electromyogram of the median nerve. A new algorithm for evaluating patients with carpal tunnel syndrome is presented. PMID:10442084

  2. Neuromuscular Ultrasound of Cranial Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Eman A.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed. PMID:25851889

  3. A New Approach to Teaching Human Cardiovascular Physiology Using Doppler Ultrasound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Looker, T.

    1985-01-01

    Explains the principles of the Doppler ultrasound technique and reviews its potential applications to the teaching of cardiovascular physiology. Identifies the instrumentation needed for this technique; provides examples and illustrations of the waveforms from the ultrasound blood velocimeter. (ML)

  4. Safe and easy method with little modification in technique is useful for successful internal jugular vein cannulation on same side even after intra-arterial puncture without using ultrasound guidance in adult cardiac patients

    PubMed Central

    Thosani, Rajesh; Patel, Jigar; Gandhi, Hemang; Doshi, Chirag; Kothari, Jignesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The modification in technique is useful for successful right-sided internal jugular vein (IJV) cannulation on the same side even after intra-arterial puncture without using ultrasound guidance in adult patients. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out in total 160 adult patient from American Society of Anesthesiologists Grade II to III patients male (n = 95) and female (n = 65) who underwent cardiac surgery where cannulation was done on right sided by triple lumen catheter (7 French) using Seldinger technique. Results: Majority of patients were cannulated successfully by Seldinger technique with single or double attempt except for five patients in which arterial puncture occurred. All five patients were cannulated successfully on the same side with this modified technique without any significant major complications. They were managed by application of blocker at the end of arterial needle puncture without removing it. In our routine practice, we were used to removing this needle and applying compression for few minutes to prevent hematoma formation after an arterial puncture. In this study, cannula was used as a marker or guideline for the relocation of IJV on the same side and recannulation was performed by changing the direction of needle on same side lateral to the previous one and without going towards the same direction to prevent the arterial puncture again. Conclusion: Most simple and useful modified technique for institutes where the complications are most common with trainee doctors and in hospitals where there is no advanced facility like ultrasound-guided cannulation available. By this modification, it will be time saving, very comfortable, and user-friendly technique with high success rate. PMID:27052069

  5. Evaluation of agreement in corneal thickness measurements obtained using optical coherence tomography and ultrasound technique and determination of its specificity in keratoconus screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunvant, P.; Darner, R.

    2011-03-01

    The aims of the present study are 1) to evaluate inter and intra observer repeatability of optical coherence tomography corneal thickness measurements 2) to investigate the agreement in corneal thickness obtained using an ultrasound pachymeter and the non-contact high resolution optical coherence tomography 3) to evaluate the false positive rate of identifying keratoconic suspects on the basis of standard machine protocol. Measurements were performed on 51 eyes of 51 individuals without any known corneal pathology. Altman and Bland plots were analyzed to determine agreement of corneal thickness measurements obtained using optical coherence tomography and ultrasound pachymeter; linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate its interchangeability. The agreement between the optical coherence tomography and ultrasonic pachymeter measurements was best for the central corneal thickness with a mean bias of 13.4 microns, with optical coherence tomography values being lower than the ultrasound pachymeter. The agreement of measurements in the mid-peripheral cornea was poor, with bias in measurements ranging from 33 to 55 microns. The optical coherence tomography measurements were repeatable with no differences in values between intra and inter observer repeat measurements. Using standard machine protocol for keratoconus screening, utilizing 1 out of 4 criteria gave a specificity of 86% and using 2 of the 4 criteria gave a specificity of 98%.

  6. Ultrasound mediated gene transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Rene G.; Apfel, Robert E.; Brandsma, Janet L.

    2002-05-01

    Gene therapy is a promising modality for the treatment of a variety of human diseases both inherited and acquired, such as cystic fibrosis and cancer. The lack of an effective, safe method for the delivery of foreign genes into the cells, a process known as transfection, limits this effort. Ultrasound mediated gene transfection is an attractive method for gene delivery since it is a noninvasive technique, does not introduce any viral particles into the host and can offer very good temporal and spatial control. Previous investigators have shown that sonication increases transfection efficiency with and without ultrasound contrast agents. The mechanism is believed to be via a cavitation process where collapsing bubble nuclei permeabilize the cell membrane leading to increased DNA transfer. The research is focused on the use of pulsed wave high frequency focused ultrasound to transfect DNA into mammalian cells in vitro and in vivo. A better understanding of the mechanism behind the transfection process is also sought. A summary of some in vitro results to date will be presented, which includes the design of a sonication chamber that allows us to model the in vivo case more accurately.

  7. Prostate Focused Ultrasound Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Rouvière, Olivier; Crouzet, Sébastien; Gelet, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The tremendous progress in engineering and computing power coupled with ultrasound transducer technology and imaging modalities over the past 20 years have encouraged a revival of clinical interest in ultrasound therapy, mainly in High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). So far, the most extensive results from HIFU obtained in urology involve transrectal prostate ablation, which appears to be an effective therapeutic alternative for patients with malignant prostate tumors. Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in men. Several treatment options with different therapeutic approaches exist, including HIFU for localized PCa that has been in use for over 15 years. Since the early 2000s, two systems have been marketed for this application, and other devices are currently in clinical trials. HIFU treatment can be used either alone or in combination with (before- or after-) external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (before or after HIFU) and can be repeated multiple times. HIFU treatment is performed under real-time monitoring with ultrasound or guided by MRI. Two indications are validated today: Primary care treatment and EBRT failure. The results of HIFU for primary care treatment are similar to standard conformal EBRT, even though no randomized comparative studies have been performed and no 10-year follow up data is yet available for HIFU. Salvage HIFU after EBRT failure is increasing with oncological outcomes, similar to those achieved with surgery but with the advantage of fewer adverse effects. HIFU is an evolving technology perfectly adapted for focal treatment. Thus, HIFU focal therapy is another pathway that must be explored when considering the accuracy and reliability for PCa mapping techniques. HIFU would be particularly suited for such a therapy since it is clear that HIFU outcomes and toxicity are relative to the volume of prostate treated. PMID:26486330

  8. Ultrasound imaging of the anal sphincter complex: a review

    PubMed Central

    Abdool, Z; Sultan, A H; Thakar, R

    2012-01-01

    Endoanal ultrasound is now regarded as the gold standard for evaluating anal sphincter pathology in the investigation of anal incontinence. The advent of three-dimensional ultrasound has further improved our understanding of the two-dimensional technique. Endoanal ultrasound requires specialised equipment and its relative invasiveness has prompted clinicians to explore alternative imaging techniques. Transvaginal and transperineal ultrasound have been recently evaluated as alternative imaging modalities. However, the need for technique standardisation, validation and reporting is of paramount importance. We conducted a MEDLINE search (1950 to February 2010) and critically reviewed studies using the three imaging techniques in evaluating anal sphincter integrity. PMID:22374273

  9. Quantitative Ultrasound for Nondestructive Characterization of Engineered Tissues and Biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Dalecki, Diane; Mercado, Karla P; Hocking, Denise C

    2016-03-01

    Non-invasive, non-destructive technologies for imaging and quantitatively monitoring the development of artificial tissues are critical for the advancement of tissue engineering. Current standard techniques for evaluating engineered tissues, including histology, biochemical assays and mechanical testing, are destructive approaches. Ultrasound is emerging as a valuable tool for imaging and quantitatively monitoring the properties of engineered tissues and biomaterials longitudinally during fabrication and post-implantation. Ultrasound techniques are rapid, non-invasive, non-destructive and can be easily integrated into sterile environments necessary for tissue engineering. Furthermore, high-frequency quantitative ultrasound techniques can enable volumetric characterization of the structural, biological, and mechanical properties of engineered tissues during fabrication and post-implantation. This review provides an overview of ultrasound imaging, quantitative ultrasound techniques, and elastography, with representative examples of applications of these ultrasound-based techniques to the field of tissue engineering. PMID:26581347

  10. Ultrasound in Speech Therapy with Adolescents and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernhardt, Barbara; Gick, Bryan; Bacsfalvi, Penelope; Adler-Bock, Marcy

    2005-01-01

    The present paper comprises an overview of techniques using ultrasound in speech (re)habilitation. Ultrasound treatment techniques have been developed for English lingual stops, vowels, sibilants, and liquids. These techniques come from a series of small "n" studies with adolescents and adults with severe hearing impairment, residual speech…

  11. Ultrasound-Guided Hip Procedures.

    PubMed

    Payne, Jeffrey M

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the techniques for performing ultrasound-guided procedures in the hip region, including intra-articular hip injection, iliopsoas bursa injection, greater trochanter bursa injection, ischial bursa injection, and piriformis muscle injection. The common indications, pitfalls, accuracy, and efficacy of these procedures are also addressed. PMID:27468669

  12. Ultrasound annual, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides an analyses of developments in the field of diagnostic ultrasound. Endoscopic ultrasound and ultrasound-guided aspiration of ovarian follicles for in vitro fertilization are addressed. The use of Doppler ultrasound to measure blood flow in obstetrics is also examined.

  13. Ultrasound and Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafon, Cyril

    This paper begins with an overview and a description of the interactions between ultrasound and biological tissues encountered during treatment protocols. In a second part of this seminar, two clinical applications of therapeutic ultrasound will be described in details: -Kidney stone destruction by ultrasound (lithotripsy) and High Intensity Focused Ultrasound for treating prostate cancer (HIFU).

  14. Ultrasound of the male anterior urethra

    PubMed Central

    Shaida, N; Berman, L H

    2012-01-01

    Imaging of the anterior male urethra has traditionally been performed by fluoroscopic contrast urethrography. While providing easily interpretable images, this technique has a number of disadvantages associated with it. An alternative approach is to use ultrasound to assess the lumen of the urethra and the periurethral tissues. Here we describe the development of urethral ultrasound and the ascending and descending urethral ultrasound techniques employed in our institution with reference to commonly and uncommonly encountered pathologies. We also identify common pitfalls and how to avoid them. PMID:22674713

  15. Ultrasound Elastography in Breast Cancer Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, J; Ewertsen, C; Sletting, S; Vejborg, I; Schäfer, F K W; Cosgrove, D; Bachmann Nielsen, M

    2015-12-01

    Ultrasound elastography is an established method for characterization of focal lesions in the breast. Different techniques and analyses of the images may be used for the characterization. This article addresses the use of ultrasound elastography in breast cancer diagnosis. In the first part of the article the techniques behind both strain- and shear-wave-elastography are explained and followed by a section on how to obtain adequate elastography images and measurements. In the second part of the article the application of elastography as an adjunct to B-mode ultrasound in clinical practice is described, and the potential diagnostic gains and limitations of elastography are discussed. PMID:26274379

  16. Multi-scale model of the ionosphere from the combination of modern space-geodetic satellite techniques - project status and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M.; Hugentobler, U.; Jakowski, N.; Dettmering, D.; Liang, W.; Limberger, M.; Wilken, V.; Gerzen, T.; Hoque, M.; Berdermann, J.

    2012-04-01

    Near real-time high resolution and high precision ionosphere models are needed for a large number of applications, e.g. in navigation, positioning, telecommunications or astronautics. Today these ionosphere models are mostly empirical, i.e., based purely on mathematical approaches. In the DFG project 'Multi-scale model of the ionosphere from the combination of modern space-geodetic satellite techniques (MuSIK)' the complex phenomena within the ionosphere are described vertically by combining the Chapman electron density profile with a plasmasphere layer. In order to consider the horizontal and temporal behaviour the fundamental target parameters of this physics-motivated approach are modelled by series expansions in terms of tensor products of localizing B-spline functions depending on longitude, latitude and time. For testing the procedure the model will be applied to an appropriate region in South America, which covers relevant ionospheric processes and phenomena such as the Equatorial Anomaly. The project connects the expertise of the three project partners, namely Deutsches Geodätisches Forschungsinstitut (DGFI) Munich, the Institute of Astronomical and Physical Geodesy (IAPG) of the Technical University Munich (TUM) and the German Aerospace Center (DLR), Neustrelitz. In this presentation we focus on the current status of the project. In the first year of the project we studied the behaviour of the ionosphere in the test region, we setup appropriate test periods covering high and low solar activity as well as winter and summer and started the data collection, analysis, pre-processing and archiving. We developed partly the mathematical-physical modelling approach and performed first computations based on simulated input data. Here we present information on the data coverage for the area and the time periods of our investigations and we outline challenges of the multi-dimensional mathematical-physical modelling approach. We show first results, discuss problems

  17. Modernity's Prometheus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Argues for reframing and reforging the relationship between text and context. Argues that the silences that modernity's tribute to text invites are grotesque, untenable, and fundamentally anti-intellectual. (SR)

  18. Vaginal ultrasound in assisted reproduction.

    PubMed

    Wikland, M

    1992-06-01

    Vaginal scanning of the ovaries and the uterus is a diagnostic and monitoring tool of utmost importance in assisted conception. Although the value of ultrasound for monitoring follicular growth has been questioned, few groups working on assisted conception do not use it. Follicle aspiration under the guidance of vaginal sonography is the method of choice. With such a simple and safe technique available, using laparoscopy for retrieving oocytes for assisted conception cannot be justified. The introduction of ultrasound-guided transvaginal retrograde tubal catheterization has meant that laparoscopic GIFT and ZIFT procedures will probably soon be unnecessary. Vaginal sonography is one of the most clinically important diagnostic instruments in assisted conception. PMID:1424325

  19. Ultrasound in Space Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Sargsyan, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of ultrasound as a diagnostic tool in microgravity environments. The goals of research in ultrasound usage in space environments are: (1) Determine accuracy of ultrasound in novel clinical conditions. (2) Determine optimal training methodologies, (3) Determine microgravity associated changes and (4) Develop intuitive ultrasound catalog to enhance autonomous medical care. Also uses of Ultrasound technology in terrestrial applications are reviewed.

  20. Critical care ultrasound in cardiac arrest. Technological requirements for performing the SESAME-protocol--a holistic approach.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstein, Daniel; Malbrain, Manu L N G

    2015-01-01

    The use of ultrasound has gained its place in critical care as part of our day-to-day monitoring tools. A better understanding of ultrasound techniques and recent publications including protocols for the lungs, the abdomen and the blood vessels has introduced ultrasound to the bedside of our ICU patients. However, we will prove in this paper that early machines, dating back more than 25 years, were perfectly able to do the job as compared to modern laptop machines with more features but few additional advantages. Ultrasound is not only a diagnostic tool, but should also be seen as an extension of the traditional physical examination. This paper will focus on the use of the SESAME-protocol in cardiac arrest. The SESAME-protocol suggests starting with a lung scan to rule out possible causes leading to cardiac arrest. Firstly, pneumothorax needs to be ruled out. Secondly, a partial diagnosis of pulmonary embolism is done following the BLUE-protocol. Thirdly, fluid therapy can be guided, following the FALLS-protocol. The SESAME-protocol continues by scanning the lower femoral veins to check for signs of deep venous thrombosis, followed by (or before, in case of trauma) the abdomen to detect massive bleeding. Next comes the pericardium, to exclude pericardial tamponade. Finally, a transthoracic cardiac ultrasound is performed to check for other (cardiac) causes leading to cardiac arrest. The emphasis is on a holistic approach, where ultrasound can be seen as the modern stethoscope needed by clinicians to complete the full physiological examination of their critically ill unstable patients. PMID:26578398

  1. Ultrasound: From Earth to Space

    PubMed Central

    Law, Jennifer; Macbeth, Paul. B.

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonography is a versatile imaging modality that offers many advantages over radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. On Earth, the use of ultrasound has become standard in many areas of medicine including diagnosis of medical and surgical diseases, management of obstetric and gynecologic conditions, assessment of critically ill patients, and procedural guidance. Advances in telecommunications have enabled remotely-guided ultrasonography for both geographically isolated populations and astronauts aboard the International Space Station. While ultrasound has traditionally been used in spaceflight to study anatomical and physiological adaptations to microgravity and evaluate countermeasures, recent years have seen a growth of applications adapted from terrestrial techniques. Terrestrial, remote, and space applications for ultrasound are reviewed in this paper. PMID:22399873

  2. Google Glass, ultrasound and palpation: the anatomy teacher of the future?

    PubMed

    Benninger, Brion

    2015-03-01

    Traditional palpation techniques are used less often in today's modern medical arena. Technological advances in imaging, for example, often supplant the need for such types of tactility. Herein, we discuss our recent experience using Google Glass in the teaching of anatomy to medical students, a method that melds traditional medical palpation with cutting edge technology. Based on our study, teachers of the new millennium might use Google Glass coupled with ultrasound and palpation in the teaching of human anatomy to medical students. Such a technology combines palpation, diagnosis, visualization, and learning of anatomy. Glass has provided a platform to position a live ultrasound image for us to view while examining the patient. This technology will allow the physicians of the future to embrace placing ones hand on the body while receiving both palpation and visual stimulation. PMID:25377631

  3. The ultrasound challenge 2.0: introducing interinstitutional competition in medical student ultrasound education.

    PubMed

    Cortez, Eric J; Boulger, Creagh T; Eastin, Travis; Adkins, Eric J; Granitto, Emily; Pollard, Katherine; Bahner, David P

    2014-12-01

    The Ultrasound Challenge was developed at The Ohio State University College of Medicine to introduce focused ultrasound to medical students. The goal was to develop experience in ultrasound through practice and competition. Initially this competition was held between Ohio State University College of Medicine students from years 1 through 4. The Ultrasound Challenge 2.0 was held in 2013. The event expanded on the previous structure by including students from the Wayne State University College of Medicine. The goal of this article is to describe our experiences with expansion of our interinstitutional ultrasound event. The challenge consisted of 6 stations: focused assessment with sonography for trauma, aortic ultrasound, cardiac ultrasound, pelvic ultrasound, musculoskeletal ultrasound, and vascular access. The participants were given a handbook outlining the expectations for each station ahead of time. Vascular access was graded in real time using the Brightness Mode Quality Ultrasound Imaging Examination Technique (B-QUIET) method. The remainder were timed, saved, and graded after the event by 3 independent faculty members using the B-QUIET method. The highest score with the fastest time was the winner. The Ultrasound Challenge 2.0 included 40 participants: 31 from The Ohio State University College of Medicine and 9 from the Wayne State University College of Medicine. The makeup of the winners in all categories consisted of 1 first-year medical student, 7 second-year medical students, 3 third-year medical students, and 10 fourth-year medical students. The Ultrasound Challenge 2.0 was a success for those who participated. It provided the first known interinstitutional medical student ultrasound competition. Students from both institutions were able to practice their image acquisition skills, demonstrate abilities in a competitive environment, and develop collegiality and teamwork. PMID:25425378

  4. Ultrasound echoes as biometric navigators.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Benjamin M; McDannold, Nathan J

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate a new method of using ultrasound data to achieve prospective motion compensation in MRI, especially for respiratory motion during interventional MRI procedures in moving organs such as the liver. The method relies on fingerprint-like biometrically distinct ultrasound echo patterns produced by different locations in tissue, which are collated with geometrical information from MRI during a training stage to form a mapping table that relates ultrasound measurements to positions. During prospective correction, the system makes frequent ultrasound measurements and uses the map to determine the corresponding position. Results in motorized linear motion phantoms and freely breathing animals indicate that the system performs well. Apparent motion is reduced by up to 97.8%, and motion artifacts are reduced or eliminated in two-dimensional spoiled gradient-echo images. The motion compensation is sufficient to permit MRI thermometry of focused ultrasound heating during respiratory-like motion, with results similar to those obtained in the absence of motion. This new technique may have applications for MRI thermometry and other dynamic imaging in the abdomen during free breathing. PMID:22648783

  5. Ultrasound microbubble contrast and current clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Dindyal, Shiva; Kyriakides, Constantinos

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging is widely used worldwide principally because it is cheap, easily available and contains no exposure to ionizing radiation. The advent of microbubble ultrasound contrast has further increased the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of this technique thus widening its clinical applications. The third generation of ultrasound contrast agents consist of sulphur hexafluoride microbubbles encased in a phospholipid shell. This review will elaborate on the pharmacology, safety profile and method of action of these agents. We also aim to discuss the ever expanding uses for contrast enhanced ultrasound in a number of clinical specialities which include the liver, kidney, prostate, sentinel node detection, vascular tree and endovascular stent surveillance. We will also discuss some of the recent patents regarding the future uses of ultrasound microbubble contrast and recent technological advances in clinical applications. PMID:21222650

  6. Teaching prenatal ultrasound to family medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Dresang, Lee T; Rodney, William MacMillan; Dees, Jason

    2004-02-01

    Prenatal ultrasound is a powerful diagnostic tool, but there has been little research on how to teach ultrasound to family physicians. The available evidence supports teaching through didactics followed by supervised scanning. Didactic topics include physics and machine usage, indications, fetal biometry, anatomic survey, practice management, ethical issues, and resources. Supervised scanning reinforces the didactic components of training. A "hand-on-hand" supervised scanning technique is recommended for the transmission of psychomotor skills in these sessions. Curricula for teaching ultrasound should include information on which residents will be taught prenatal ultrasound, who will teach them, how to create time for learning ultrasound skills, and how to test for competency. The literature suggests that competency can be achieved within 25-50 supervised scans. Measures of competency include examination and qualitative analysis of scanning. Competency-based testing needs further development because no uniform standards have been established. PMID:14872356

  7. Applications of laser ultrasound NDT methods on composite structures in aerospace industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalms, Michael; Focke, Oliver; v. Kopylow, Christoph

    2008-09-01

    Composite materials are used more and more in aircraft production. Main composite types are Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP), Glass Fiber Reinforced Plastics (GFRP) and metal-aluminium laminates (e. g. Glass Fiber Aluminium Reinforced GLARE©). Typical parts made of CFRP material are flaps, vertical and horizontal tail planes, center wing boxes, rear pressure bulkheads, ribs and stringers. These composite parts require adequate nondestructive testing (NDT) methods. Flaws to be detected are delaminations and debondings, porosity and foreign body inclusion. Manual ultrasonic testing with single element transducers is still the most applied method for composite parts with small and medium size. The extension of the conventional ultrasound technique for nondestructive testing with the laser ultrasound method brings new possibilities into the production processes for example the inspection of complex CFRP-components and the possibilities of online observation under remote control. In this paper we describe the principle of laser ultrasound with respect to the demands of nondestructive testing especially of small complex CFRP and C/PPS parts. We report applications of laser-based ultrasound options with generated types of guided and bulk waves on modern aircraft materials.

  8. Applications of Doppler ultrasound in clinical vascular disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, R. W.; Hokanson, D. E.; Sumner, D. S.; Strandness, D. E., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound has become the most useful and versatile noninvasive technique for objective evaluation of clinical vascular disease. Commercially available continuous-wave instruments provide qualitative and quantitative assessment of venous and arterial disease. Pulsed Doppler ultrasound was developed to provide longitudinal and transverse cross-sectional images of the arterial lumen with a resolution approaching that of conventional X-ray techniques. Application of Doppler ultrasound in venous, peripheral arterial, and cerebrovascular diseases is reviewed.

  9. Editorial review: pediatric 3D ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional ultrasound is an established diagnostic imaging technique in many specialties. However, in neonates, infants and children three-dimensional ultrasound still is underutilized, partially due to time constraints for post-processing and restricted availability, of devices as well as dedicated pediatric transducers. Also reimbursement issues still need to be addressed. This editorial review presents more or less established pediatric three-dimensional ultrasound applications with proven diagnostic benefit as well as potential future applications of three-dimensional/four-dimensional ultrasound in infants and children, aiming at enhancing research and promoting practical use of three-dimensional ultrasound in relevant pediatric conditions. Particularly, applications in neonatal neurosonography, ultrasound of the urogenital tract as well as some other small part and miscellaneous queries are highlighted. Additional other potential and future indications are discussed briefly, also mentioning restrictions and potential future developments. In summary, three-dimensional ultrasound holds some potential to widen sonographic diagnostic capabilities throughout childhood and hopefully will be increasingly investigated and introduced into clinical practice provided respective equipment and pediatric three-dimensional/four-dimensional ultrasound transducers become available. PMID:26676068

  10. Synthetic aperture imaging in ultrasound calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameri, Golafsoun; Baxter, John S. H.; McLeod, A. Jonathan; Jayaranthe, Uditha L.; Chen, Elvis C. S.; Peters, Terry M.

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound calibration allows for ultrasound images to be incorporated into a variety of interventional applica­ tions. Traditional Z- bar calibration procedures rely on wired phantoms with an a priori known geometry. The line fiducials produce small, localized echoes which are then segmented from an array of ultrasound images from different tracked probe positions. In conventional B-mode ultrasound, the wires at greater depths appear blurred and are difficult to segment accurately, limiting the accuracy of ultrasound calibration. This paper presents a novel ultrasound calibration procedure that takes advantage of synthetic aperture imaging to reconstruct high resolution ultrasound images at arbitrary depths. In these images, line fiducials are much more readily and accu­ rately segmented, leading to decreased calibration error. The proposed calibration technique is compared to one based on B-mode ultrasound. The fiducial localization error was improved from 0.21mm in conventional B-mode images to 0.15mm in synthetic aperture images corresponding to an improvement of 29%. This resulted in an overall reduction of calibration error from a target registration error of 2.00mm to 1.78mm, an improvement of 11%. Synthetic aperture images display greatly improved segmentation capabilities due to their improved resolution and interpretability resulting in improved calibration.

  11. Ultrasound Annual, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    The 1983 edition of Ultrasound Annual features a state-of-the-art assessment of real-time ultrasound technology and a look at improvements in real-time equipment. Chapters discuss important new obstetric applications of ultrasound in measuring fetal umbilical vein blood flow and monitoring ovarian follicular development in vivo and in vitro fertilization. Other topics covered include transrectal prostate ultrasound using a linear array system; ultrasound of the common bile duct; ultrasound in tropical diseases; prenatal diagnosis of craniospinal anomalies; scrotal ultrasonography; opthalmic ultrasonography; and sonography of the upper abdominal venous system.

  12. Ultrasound elastography for musculoskeletal applications

    PubMed Central

    Drakonaki, E E; Allen, G M; Wilson, D J

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography (EUS) is a method to assess the mechanical properties of tissue, by applying stress and detecting tissue displacement using ultrasound. There are several EUS techniques used in clinical practice; strain (compression) EUS is the most common technique that allows real-time visualisation of the elastographic map on the screen. There is increasing evidence that EUS can be used to measure the mechanical properties of musculoskeletal tissue in clinical practice, with the future potential for early diagnosis to both guide and monitor therapy. This review describes the various EUS techniques available for clinical use, presents the published evidence on musculoskeletal applications of EUS and discusses the technical issues, limitations and future perspectives of this method in the assessment of the musculoskeletal system. PMID:23091287

  13. Detection of increased intracranial pressure by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hightower, Stephanie; Chin, Eric J; Heiner, Jason D

    2012-01-01

    Increases in intracranial pressure (ICP) may damage the brain by compression of its structures or restriction of its blood flow, and medical providers my encounter elevated ICP in conventional and non-conventional medical settings. Early identification of elevated ICP is critical to ensuring timely and appropriate management. However, few diagnostic methods are available for detecting increased ICP in an acutely ill patient, which can be performed quickly and noninvasively at the bedside. The optic nerve sheath is a continuation of the dura mater of the central nervous system and can be viewed by ocular ultrasound. Pressure changes within the intracranial cavity affect the diameter of the optic nerve sheath. Data acquired from multiple clinical settings suggest that millimetric increases in the optic nerve sheath diameter detected via ocular ultrasound correlate with increasing levels of ICP. In this review, we discuss the use of ocular ultrasound to evaluate for the presence of elevated ICP via assessment of optic nerve sheath diameter, and describe critical aspects of this valuable diagnostic procedure. Ultrasound is increasingly becoming a medical fixture in the modern battlefield where other diagnostic modalities can be unavailable or impractical to employ. As Special Forces and other austere medical providers become increasingly familiar with ultrasound, ocular ultrasound for the assessment of increased intracranial pressure may help optimize their ability to provide the most effective medical management for their patients. PMID:23032316

  14. Modern Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Gordon M.

    1970-01-01

    Presents the basic ideas of modern spectroscopy. Both the angular momenta and wave-nature approaches to the determination of energy level patterns for atomic and molecular systems are discussed. The interpretation of spectra, based on atomic and molecular models, is considered. (LC)

  15. Modern Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Education, London (England).

    This survey of educational practices in Great Britain is intended to allow a comparative view of the state of modern language instruction as it exists within the country and abroad. Chapters focus on general principles, language selection, grammar and secondary schools, instructional materials, foreign relations, teacher training, and teaching…

  16. [Liver ultrasound: focal lesions and diffuse diseases].

    PubMed

    Segura Grau, A; Valero López, I; Díaz Rodríguez, N; Segura Cabral, J M

    2016-01-01

    Liver ultrasound is frequently used as a first-line technique for the detection and characterization of the most common liver lesions, especially those incidentally found focal liver lesions, and for monitoring of chronic liver diseases. Ultrasound is not only used in the Bmode, but also with Doppler and, more recently, contrast-enhanced ultrasound. It is mainly used in the diagnosis of diffuse liver diseases, such as steatosis or cirrhosis. This article presents a practical approach for diagnosis workup, in which the different characteristics of the main focal liver lesions and diffuse liver diseases are reviewed. PMID:25523277

  17. Recent technological advancements in breast ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Eisenbrey, John R; Dave, Jaydev K; Forsberg, Flemming

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound is becoming increasingly common as an imaging tool for the detection and characterization of breast tumors. This paper provides an overview of recent technological advancements, especially those that may have an impact in clinical applications in the field of breast ultrasound in the near future. These advancements include close to 100% fractional bandwidth high frequency (5-18MHz) 2D and 3D arrays, automated breast imaging systems to minimize the operator dependence and advanced processing techniques, such as those used for detection of microcalcifications. In addition, elastography and contrast-enhanced ultrasound examinations that are expected to further enhance the clinical importance of ultrasound based breast tumor screening are briefly reviewed. These techniques have shown initial promise in clinical trials and may translate to more comprehensive clinical adoption in the future. PMID:27179143

  18. Prenatal ultrasound - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100197.htm Prenatal ultrasound - series To use the sharing features on this ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Prenatal Testing Ultrasound A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  19. Transvaginal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Transvaginal ultrasound is a method of imaging the genital tract in females. A hand held probe is inserted directly ... vaginal cavity to scan the pelvic structures, while ultrasound pictures are viewed on a monitor. The test ...

  20. Medical Ultrasound Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Explains the basic principles of ultrasound using everyday physics. Topics include the generation of ultrasound, basic interactions with material, and the measurement of blood flow using the Doppler effect. (Author/MM)

  1. Pelvic floor ultrasound: a review.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Hans Peter

    2010-04-01

    Imaging currently plays a limited role in the investigation of pelvic floor disorders. It is obvious that magnetic resonance imaging has limitations in urogynecology and female urology at present due to cost and access limitations and due to the fact that it is generally a static, not a dynamic, method. However, none of those limitations apply to sonography, a diagnostic method that is very much part of general practice in obstetrics and gynecology. Translabial or transperineal ultrasound is helpful in determining residual urine; detrusor wall thickness; bladder neck mobility; urethral integrity; anterior, central, and posterior compartment prolapse; and levator anatomy and function. It is at least equivalent to other imaging methods in visualizing such diverse conditions as urethral diverticula, rectal intussusception, mesh dislodgment, and avulsion of the puborectalis muscle. Ultrasound is the only imaging method able to visualize modern mesh slings and implants and may predict who actually needs such implants. Delivery-related levator trauma is the most important known etiologic factor for pelvic organ prolapse and not difficult to diagnose on 3-/4-dimensional and even on 2-dimensional pelvic floor ultrasound. It is likely that this will be an important driver behind the universal use of this technology. This review gives an overview of the method and its main current uses in clinical assessment and research. PMID:20350640

  2. Ultrasound Imaging System Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In this video, astronaut Peggy Whitson uses the Human Research Facility (HRF) Ultrasound Imaging System in the Destiny Laboratory of the International Space Station (ISS) to image her own heart. The Ultrasound Imaging System provides three-dimension image enlargement of the heart and other organs, muscles, and blood vessels. It is capable of high resolution imaging in a wide range of applications, both research and diagnostic, such as Echocardiography (ultrasound of the heart), abdominal, vascular, gynecological, muscle, tendon, and transcranial ultrasound.

  3. Cerebral ultrasound images in prenatal cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Tomà, P; Magnano, G M; Mezzano, P; Lazzini, F; Bonacci, W; Serra, G

    1989-01-01

    A male newborn with prenatal cytomegalovirus infection was referred for cranial ultrasound. The cranial ultrasound demonstrated areas of increased echogenicity in the thalamic and gray nuclei resembling "a branched candlestick". Doppler technique located the "branched candlestick" along the thalamostriate arteries. This image is particularly interesting because to our knowledge it has never before been described in congenital cytomegalovirus infection, but only in congenital rubella. PMID:2550848

  4. Cyberspace modernization :

    SciTech Connect

    Keliiaa, Curtis M.; McLane, Victor N.

    2014-07-01

    A common challenge across the communications and information technology (IT) sectors is Internet + modernization + complexity + risk + cost. Cyberspace modernization and cyber security risks, issues, and concerns impact service providers, their customers, and the industry at large. Public and private sectors are struggling to solve the problem. New service opportunities lie in mobile voice, video, and data, and machine-to-machine (M2M) information and communication technologies that are migrating not only to predominant Internet Protocol (IP) communications, but also concurrently integrating IP, version 4 (IPv4) and IP, version 6 (IPv6). With reference to the Second Internet and the Internet of Things, next generation information services portend business survivability in the changing global market. The planning, architecture, and design information herein is intended to increase infrastructure preparedness, security, interoperability, resilience, and trust in the midst of such unprecedented change and opportunity. This document is a product of Sandia National Laboratories Tribal Cyber and IPv6 project work. It is a Cyberspace Modernization objective advisory in support of bridging the digital divide through strategic partnership and an informed path forward.

  5. Ultrasound elastography for imaging tendons and muscles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography is a recently developed ultrasound-based method which allows the qualitative or quantitative evaluation of the mechanical properties of tissue. Strain (compression) ultrasound elastography is the commonest technique performed by applying mild compression with the hand-held transducer to create real-time strain distribution maps, which are color-coded and superimposed on the B-mode images. There is increasing evidence that ultrasound elastography can be used in the investigation of muscle, tendon and soft tissue disease in the clinical practice, as a supplementary tool to conventional ultrasound examination. Based on preliminary data, potential clinical applications include early diagnosis, staging, and guiding interventions musculotendinous and neuromuscular disease as well as monitoring disease during rehabilitation. Ultrasound elastography could also be used for research into the biomechanics and pathophysiology of musculotendinous disease. Despite the great interest in the technique, there is still limited evidence in the literature and there are several technical issues which limit the reproducibility of the method, including differences in quantification methods, artefacts, limitations and variation in the application of the technique by different users. This review presents the published evidence on musculoskeletal applications of strain elastography, discusses the technical issues and future perspectives of this method and emphasizes the need for standardization and further research. PMID:26673318

  6. An Ultrasound Assisted Anchoring Technique (BoneWelding® Technology) for Fixation of Implants to Bone – A Histological Pilot Study in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Langhoff, Jens D; Kuemmerle, Jan M; Mayer, Joerg; Weber, Urs; Berra, Milica; Mueller, Jessika M; Kaestner, Sabine B; Zlinszky, Katalin; Auer, Joerg A; von Rechenberg, Brigitte

    2009-01-01

    The BoneWelding® Technology offers new opportunities to anchor implants within bone. The technology melted the surface of biodegradable polymer pins by means of ultrasound energy to mould material into the structures of the predrilled bone. Temperature changes were measured at the sites of implantation in an in vitro experiment. In the in vivo part of the study two types of implants were implanted in the limb of sheep to investigate the biocompatibility of the method. One implant type was made of PL-DL-lactide (PLA), the second one was a titanium core partially covered with PLA. Healing period was 2 and 6 months, with 3 sheep per group. Bone samples were evaluated radiologically, histologically and histomorphometrically for bone remodeling and inflammatory reactions. Results demonstrated mild and short temperature increase during insertion. New bone formed at the implant without evidence of inflammatory reaction. The amount of adjacent bone was increased compared to normal cancellous bone. It was concluded that the BoneWelding® Technology proved to be a biocompatible technology to anchor biodegradable as well as titanium-PLA implants in bone. PMID:19572033

  7. Repeatability and Minimal Detectable Change in Longitudinal Median Nerve Excursion Measures During Upper Limb Neurodynamic Techniques in a Mixed Population: A Pilot Study Using Musculoskeletal Ultrasound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Philippe; Lamontagne, Martin; Higgins, Johanne; Gagnon, Dany H

    2015-07-01

    This study determined test-retest reliability and minimum detectable change in longitudinal median nerve excursion during upper limb neurodynamic tests (ULNTs). Seven participants with unilateral or bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome and 11 healthy participants were randomly tested with two ULNTs (i.e., tensioner and slider). Each ULNT was performed three times each at 45° and 90° of shoulder abduction on two separate visits. Video sequences of median nerve excursion, recorded by a physical therapist using ultrasound imaging, were quantified using computer software. The generalizability theory, encompassing a G-Study and a D-study, measured the dependability coefficient (Φ) along with standard error of measurement (SEM) accuracy and allowed various testing protocols to be proposed. The highest reliability (Φ = 0.84) and lowest minimal measurement error (SEM = 0.58 mm) of the longitudinal median nerve excursion were reached during the ULNT-slider performed with 45° of shoulder abduction and when measures obtained from three different image sequences recorded during a single visit were averaged. It is recommended that longitudinal median nerve excursion measures computed from three separate image sequences recorded during a single visit be averaged in clinical practice. Ideally, adding a second visit (six image sequences) is also suggested in research protocols. PMID:25868536

  8. Modern Chemical Technology, Volume 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecsok, Robert L.; Chapman, Kenneth

    This volume contains chapters 19 to 25 of the ACS "Modern Chemical Technology" (CHemTeC) curriculum material which is intended to prepare chemical technologists. Laboratory techniques and procedures are emphasized. The chapters cover the areas of the techniques of sampling, the techniques of weighing, sample preparation, the measurement of pH,…

  9. Three-dimensional obstetric ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Tache, Veronique; Tarsa, Maryam; Romine, Lorene; Pretorius, Dolores H

    2008-04-01

    Three-dimensional ultrasound has gained a significant popularity in obstetrical practice in recent years. The advantage of this modality in some cases is in question, however. This article provides a basic review of volume acquisition, mechanical positioning, and display modalities. Multiple uses of this technique in obstetrical care including first trimester applications and its utility in clarification of fetal anatomy such as brain, face, heart, and skeleton is discussed. PMID:18450140

  10. Endobronchial Ultrasound Bronchoscope Damage.

    PubMed

    Patil, Monali; Harris, Kassem; Krishnan, Amita; Alraiyes, Abdul H; Dhillon, Samjot S

    2016-07-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS)-guided transbronchial needle aspiration is an effective, safe, and cost-effective diagnostic bronchoscopy technique for the work-up of mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Concern has been raised, however, about the high cost of convex-probe EBUS bronchoscope repairs. The damage is usually due to breakage of the insertion tube (the flexible part that is advanced into the airways), moisture invasion and damages to the working channel, image guide bundle, or umbilical cord. Understanding the root cause of EBUS scope damage is important for its prevention. We describe 2 unusual cases of EBUS scope damage. In the first case, the distal black rubber covering of the EBUS scope insertion tube was damaged due to friction with the edge of an endotracheal tube and in the second case, the EBUS scope insertion tube was angulating laterally instead of vertically during the flexion maneuver, probably due to scope manipulation while wedged tightly in a segmental bronchus. PMID:27077640

  11. Clinical Evaluation of Spatial Accuracy of a Fusion Imaging Technique Combining Previously Acquired Computed Tomography and Real-Time Ultrasound for Imaging of Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Hakime, Antoine Deschamps, Frederic; Garcia Marques de Carvalho, Enio; Teriitehau, Christophe; Auperin, Anne; De Baere, Thierry

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the spatial accuracy of matching volumetric computed tomography (CT) data of hepatic metastases with real-time ultrasound (US) using a fusion imaging system (VNav) according to different clinical settings. Methods: Twenty-four patients with one hepatic tumor identified on enhanced CT and US were prospectively enrolled. A set of three landmarks markers was chosen on CT and US for image registration. US and CT images were then superimposed using the fusion imaging display mode. The difference in spatial location between the tumor visible on the CT and the US on the overlay images (reviewer no. 1, comment no. 2) was measured in the lateral, anterior-posterior, and vertical axis. The maximum difference (Dmax) was evaluated for different predictive factors.CT performed 1-30 days before registration versus immediately before. Use of general anesthesia for CT and US versus no anesthesia.Anatomic landmarks versus landmarks that include at least one nonanatomic structure, such as a cyst or a calcificationResultsOverall, Dmax was 11.53 {+-} 8.38 mm. Dmax was 6.55 {+-} 7.31 mm with CT performed immediately before VNav versus 17.4 {+-} 5.18 with CT performed 1-30 days before (p < 0.0001). Dmax was 7.05 {+-} 6.95 under general anesthesia and 16.81 {+-} 6.77 without anesthesia (p < 0.0015). Landmarks including at least one nonanatomic structure increase Dmax of 5.2 mm (p < 0.0001). The lowest Dmax (1.9 {+-} 1.4 mm) was obtained when CT and VNav were performed under general anesthesia, one immediately after the other. Conclusions: VNav is accurate when adequate clinical setup is carefully selected. Only under these conditions (reviewer no. 2), liver tumors not identified on US can be accurately targeted for biopsy or radiofrequency ablation using fusion imaging.

  12. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration with on-site cytopathology versus core biopsy: a comparison of both techniques performed at the same endoscopic session

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Michael; Hair, Clark D.; Green, Linda K.; Vela, Stacie A.; Patel, Kalpesh K.; Qureshi, Waqar A.; Shaib, Yasser H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) with bedside cytopathology is the gold standard for assessment of pancreatic, subepithelial, and other lesions in close proximity to the gastrointestinal tract, but it is time-consuming, has certain diagnostic limitations, and bedside cytopathology is not widely available. Aims: The goal of this study is to compare the diagnostic yield of EUS-guided FNA with on-site cytopathology and EUS-guided core biopsy. Methods: Twenty-six patients with gastrointestinal mass lesions requiring biopsy at a tertiary medical center were included in this retrospective analysis of a prospective cohort. Two core biopsies were taken using a 22 gauge needle followed by FNA guided by a bedside cytopathologist at the same endoscopic session. The diagnostic yield and test characteristics of EUS core biopsy and EUS FNA with bedside cytopathology were examined. Results: The mean number of passes was 3.2 for FNA, and the mean procedure time was 39.4 minutes. The final diagnosis was malignant in 92.3 %. Sensitivity and specificity were 83 % and 100 %, respectively, for FNA, and 91.7 % and 100 %, respectively, for core biopsy. Diagnostic accuracy was 92.3 % for FNA and 84.6 % for core biopsy. The two approaches were in agreement in 88.4 % with a kappa statistic of 0.66 (95 % confidence interval 0.33 – 0.99). Conclusions: An approach using two passes with a core biopsy needle is comparable to the current gold standard of FNA with bedside cytopathology. The performance of two core biopsies is time-efficient and could represent a good alternative to FNA with bedside cytopathology. PMID:26135096

  13. Prospective of the application of ultrasounds in archaeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, A.; Rodriguez, A.; Safont, G.; Vergara, L.

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a prospective analysis of non destructive testing (NDT) based on ultrasounds in the field of archaeology applications. Classical applications of ultrasounds techniques are reviewed, including ocean exploration to detect wrecks, imaging of archaeological sites, and cleaning archaeological objects. The potential of prospective applications is discussed from the perspective of signal processing, with emphasis on the area of linear time variant models. Thus, the use of ultrasound NDT is proposed for new ceramic cataloguing and restoration methods.

  14. Schlieren metrology for high frequency medical ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Zanelli, Claudio I; Howard, Samuel M

    2006-12-22

    The increased use of medical ultrasound above 40 MHz poses the challenge of measuring beam features that may be less than 40 microm. We have successfully used the optical Schlieren technique for transducers operating as high as 110 MHz. After a brief discussion of the technique, results are presented, including comparisons to state-of-the-art hydrophones and wire targets. PMID:16949117

  15. Whole breast tissue characterization with ultrasound tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter; Li, Cuiping; Roy, Olivier; Schmidt, Steve; Seamans, John; Wallen, Andrea; Bey-Knight, Lisa

    2015-03-01

    A number of clinical trials have shown that screening ultrasound, supplemental to mammography, detects additional cancers in women with dense breasts. However, labor intensity, operator dependence and high recall rates have limited adoption. This paper describes the use of ultrasound tomography for whole-breast tissue stiffness measurements as a first step toward addressing the issue of high recall rates. The validation of the technique using an anthropomorphic phantom is described. In-vivo applications are demonstrated on 13 breast masses, indicating that lesion stiffness correlates with lesion type as expected. Comparison of lesion stiffness measurements with standard elastography was available for 11 masses and showed a strong correlation between the 2 measures. It is concluded that ultrasound tomography can map out the 3 dimensional distribution of tissue stiffness over the whole breast. Such a capability is well suited for screening where additional characterization may improve the specificity of screening ultrasound, thereby lowering barriers to acceptance.

  16. Nucleic acid delivery with microbubbles and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Rychak, Joshua J; Klibanov, Alexander L

    2014-06-01

    Nucleic acid-based therapy is a growing field of drug delivery research. Although ultrasound has been suggested to enhance transfection decades ago, it took a combination of ultrasound with nucleic acid carrier systems (microbubbles, liposomes, polyplexes, and viral carriers) to achieve reasonable nucleic acid delivery efficacy. Microbubbles serve as foci for local deposition of ultrasound energy near the target cell, and greatly enhance sonoporation. The major advantage of this approach is in the minimal transfection in the non-insonated non-target tissues. Microbubbles can be simply co-administered with the nucleic acid carrier or can be modified to carry nucleic acid themselves. Liposomes with embedded gas or gas precursor particles can also be used to carry nucleic acid, release and deliver it by the ultrasound trigger. Successful testing in a wide variety of animal models (myocardium, solid tumors, skeletal muscle, and pancreas) proves the potential usefulness of this technique for nucleic acid drug delivery. PMID:24486388

  17. Nucleic acid delivery with microbubbles and ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Rychak, Joshua J.; Klibanov, Alexander L.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based therapy is a growing field of drug delivery research. Although ultrasound has been suggested to enhance transfection decades ago, it took a combination of ultrasound with nucleic acid carrier systems (microbubbles, liposomes, polyplexes, viral carriers) to achieve reasonable nucleic acid delivery efficacy. Microbubbles serve as foci for local deposition of ultrasound energy near the target cell, and greatly enhance sonoporation. Major advantage of this approach is in the minimal transfection in the non-insonated non-target tissues. Microbubbles can be simply co-administered with the nucleic acid carrier or can be modified to carry nucleic acid themselves. Liposomes with embedded gas or gas precursor particles can also be used to carry nucleic acid, release and deliver it by the ultrasound trigger. Successful testing in a wide variety of animal models (myocardium, solid tumors, skeletal muscle, pancreas) proves the potential usefulness of this technique for nucleic acid drug delivery. PMID:24486388

  18. MR-Guided Transcranial Focused Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Aubry, Jean-François; Tanter, Mickael

    2016-01-01

    Previous chapters introduced the ability of using focused ultrasound to ablate tissues. It has led to various clinical applications in the treatment of uterine fibroid, prostate or liver cancers. Nevertheless, treating the brain non-invasively with focused ultrasound has been considered beyond reach for almost a century: The skull bone protects the brain from mechanical injuries, but it also reflects and refracts ultrasound, making it difficult to target the brain with focused ultrasound. Fortunately, aberration correction techniques have been developed recently and thermal lesioning in the thalamus has been achieved clinically. This chapter introduces the aberration effect of the skull bone and how it can be corrected non-invasively. It also presents the latest clinical results obtained with thermal ablation and introduces novel non-thermal approaches that could revolutionize brain therapy in the future. PMID:26486334

  19. Hippocampal culture stimulus with 4-megahertz ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratore, Robert; LaManna, Justine K.; Lamprecht, Michael R.; Morrison, Barclay, III

    2012-10-01

    Among current modalities, ultrasound uniquely offers both millisecond and millimeter accuracy in noninvasively stimulating brain tissue. In addition, by sweeping the ultrasound beam within the refractory period of the neuronal tissue, ultrasonic neuromodulation can be adapted to target extended or multiply connected regions with quasi-simultaneity. Towards the development of this safe brain stimulus technique, the response of rat hippocampal cultures to ultrasound was investigated. Hippocampal slices, 0.4-mm thick, were obtained from 8-day old Sprague Dawley rats and cultured for 6 days. The in vitro cultures were exposed to multiple 100-ms 4.04-MHz ultrasound pulses from a 42-mm diameter, 90-mm spherical cap transducer. Peak pressure ranged from 0 through about 77 kPa. Responses in the form of electrical potentials from a sixty channel electrode array were digitized and recorded. The DG and CA1 regions of the hippocampus exhibited similar ultrasonically-evoked field potentials.

  20. Visualizing ultrasound through computational modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Theresa W.

    2004-01-01

    The Doppler Ultrasound Hematocrit Project (DHP) hopes to find non-invasive methods of determining a person s blood characteristics. Because of the limits of microgravity and the space travel environment, it is important to find non-invasive methods of evaluating the health of persons in space. Presently, there is no well developed method of determining blood composition non-invasively. This projects hopes to use ultrasound and Doppler signals to evaluate the characteristic of hematocrit, the percentage by volume of red blood cells within whole blood. These non-invasive techniques may also be developed to be used on earth for trauma patients where invasive measure might be detrimental. Computational modeling is a useful tool for collecting preliminary information and predictions for the laboratory research. We hope to find and develop a computer program that will be able to simulate the ultrasound signals the project will work with. Simulated models of test conditions will more easily show what might be expected from laboratory results thus help the research group make informed decisions before and during experimentation. There are several existing Matlab based computer programs available, designed to interpret and simulate ultrasound signals. These programs will be evaluated to find which is best suited for the project needs. The criteria of evaluation that will be used are 1) the program must be able to specify transducer properties and specify transmitting and receiving signals, 2) the program must be able to simulate ultrasound signals through different attenuating mediums, 3) the program must be able to process moving targets in order to simulate the Doppler effects that are associated with blood flow, 4) the program should be user friendly and adaptable to various models. After a computer program is chosen, two simulation models will be constructed. These models will simulate and interpret an RF data signal and a Doppler signal.

  1. Use of ultrasound in the management of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Lew, John I; Solorzano, Carmen C

    2010-01-01

    The use of ultrasound for thyroid cancer has evolved dramatically over the last few decades. Since the late 1960s, ultrasound has become essential in the examination of the thyroid gland with the increased availability of high-frequency linear array transducers and computer-enhanced imaging capabilities of modern day portable ultrasound equipment in a clinic- or office-based setting. As a noninvasive, rapid, and easily reproducible imaging study, ultrasound has been demonstrated to have a broadened utility beyond the simple confirmation of thyroid nodules and their sizes. Recently, office-based ultrasound has become an integral part of clinical practice, where it has demonstrated overwhelming benefits to patients being evaluated and treated for thyroid cancer. Ultrasound has become useful in the qualitative characterization of thyroid nodules based on benign or malignant features. On the basis of such classifications and the relative risk for thyroid malignancy, the need for ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration, preoperative and intraoperative staging, lymph node mapping, and the extent of surgery can subsequently be determined. Furthermore, ultrasound has additional value in the surveillance of patients treated for thyroid cancer. PMID:20215358

  2. Ultrasound in Acute Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Nalesso, Federico; Petrucci, Ilaria; Samoni, Sara; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Kidneys' imaging provides useful information in acute kidney injury (AKI) diagnosis and management. Today, several imaging techniques give information on kidneys anatomy, urinary obstruction, differential diagnosis between AKI and chronic kidney disease (CKD), renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate. Ultrasound is a safe, non-invasive and repeatable imaging technique so it is widely used in the first level work-up of AKI. The utility of contrast-enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in AKI or in AKI during CKD is limited because of renal toxicity associated with contrast agents used. PMID:27169556

  3. Control of fouling formation in membrane ultrafiltration by ultrasound irradiation.

    PubMed

    Naddeo, Vincenzo; Belgiorno, Vincenzo; Borea, Laura; Secondes, Mona Freda N; Ballesteros, Florencio

    2015-01-01

    The increasing application of membrane filtration in water and wastewater treatment necessitates techniques to improve performance, especially in fouling control. Ultrasound is one promising technology for this purpose as cavitational effects facilitate continuous cleaning of the membrane. This research studied the ultrafiltration of lake water in systems with constant permeate flux under medium frequency (45 kHz) ultrasound irradiation. Fouling was investigated by monitoring transmembrane pressure (TMP) using continuous or intermittent ultrasound irradiation and dead-end or crossflow operation. Best performance was observed with continuous ultrasound irradiation in crossflow mode. Intermittent irradiation reduced the rate of TMP build-up but nevertheless allowed irreversible fouling to develop. PMID:25384626

  4. Three-dimensional assessment of scoliosis based on ultrasound data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junhua; Li, Hongjian; Yu, Bo

    2015-12-01

    In this study, an approach was proposed to assess the 3D scoliotic deformity based on ultrasound data. The 3D spine model was reconstructed by using a freehand 3D ultrasound imaging system. The geometric torsion was then calculated from the reconstructed spine model. A thoracic spine phantom set at a given pose was used in the experiment. The geometric torsion of the spine phantom calculated from the freehand ultrasound imaging system was 0.041 mm-1 which was close to that calculated from the biplanar radiographs (0.025 mm-1). Therefore, ultrasound is a promising technique for the 3D assessment of scoliosis.

  5. Musculoskeletal Sonopathology and Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Macfarlane, Alan J. R.; Sites, Brian D.; Sites, Vincent R.; Naraghi, Ali M.; Chan, Vincent W. S.; Singh, Mandeep; Antonakakis, John G.

    2010-01-01

    The use of real-time ultrasound guidance has revolutionized the practice of regional anesthesia. Ultrasound is rapidly becoming the technique of choice for nerve blockade due to increased success rates, faster onset, and potentially improved safety. In the course of ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia, unexpected pathology may be encountered. Such anomalous or pathological findings may alter the choice of nerve block and occasionally affect surgical management. This case series presents a variety of musculoskeletal conditions that may be encountered during ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia practice. PMID:22294960

  6. Modernizing medical photography, part 1.

    PubMed

    Crompton, Paul

    2004-12-01

    Government, media and public focus on waiting times in the National Health Service in the United Kingdom has forced the organization to look closely at the process by which a patient progresses through an increasingly complex and ever changing system. In an effort to streamline the patient journey or care pathway, modernizers have turned to business and manufacturing for solutions. Whilst medical photographers need to recognize their role in this context, they are also facing major technological modernization through the development of digital photography. Part 1 of this paper looks at the origins of some of the techniques presently being used to modernize the patient journey. Part 2 shows how these tools of modernization can be utilized to harness the advantages of digital technology to provide a modern and appropriate medical photography service in a large, disparate teaching hospital. PMID:15805027

  7. Ultrasound of the Thyroid Gland

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  8. Medical ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2007-01-01

    The paper gives an introduction to current medical ultrasound imaging systems. The basics of anatomic and blood flow imaging are described. The properties of medical ultrasound and its focusing are described, and the various methods for two- and three-dimensional imaging of the human anatomy are shown. Systems using both linear and non-linear propagation of ultrasound are described. The blood velocity can also be non-invasively visualized using ultrasound and the basic signal processing for doing this is introduced. Examples for spectral velocity estimation, color flow imaging and the new vector velocity images are presented. PMID:17092547

  9. Computational complexity reduction techniques for real-time and high-resolution medical ultrasound imaging using the beam-space Capon method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Shigeaki; Taki, Hirofumi; Sato, Toru

    2016-07-01

    The beam-space (BS) Capon method is an adaptive beamforming technique that reduces computational complexity. However, the complexity is not low enough for real-time imaging. Reducing the number of time-delay and transformation processes from element-space to BS signal processing is required. We propose a technique that replaces the time-delay processes by the multiplication of steering vectors and covariance matrices. In addition, we propose a compensation technique for estimating the intensity accurately. In an experimental study using a 2.0 MHz transmission frequency on a 15 × 10.4 mm2 region of interest, the first side-lobe level, the ‑6 dB beam width, the intensity’s estimation error, and the calculation time of the conventional method were ‑15 dB, 0.70 mm, 3.2 dB, and 656 ms. Those of the proposed method were ‑17 dB, 0.36 mm, 1.6 dB, and 81 ms, respectively. Using our method on three CPUs achieves imaging of 37 frames/s.

  10. Fast and mechanistic ultrasound simulation using a point source/receiver approach.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Luis A; Cobbold, Richard S C; Steinman, David A

    2013-11-01

    Ultrasound simulators relying on impulse response methods are faithful to the mechanisms of image formation from the underlying radio-frequency signals, but as a result tend to be relatively slow. At the other extreme are fast techniques, often motivated by the development of teaching and training simulators, which approximate the image formation processes rather than rigorously modeling the underlying physics. Previously, we have shown that transmit field distributions from linear phased-array transducers can be modeled accurately and efficiently using arrays of point sources. This approach is now extended to point sources/receivers, which allows for simulation of the transmit/receive fields, and thus the physical processes underlying ultrasound image formation. Field distributions and fast-time signals are shown to compare favorably to those obtained using the impulse response method. Doppler spectrogram and B-mode images derived from these signals also show excellent agreement with the results obtained using the impulse response method, but with a computational savings of nearly two orders of magnitude. Because of the inherent simplicity of our Fast and Mechanistic Ultrasound Simulation (FAMUS) approach, CPU parallelization was readily achieved, and further orders of magnitude speed improvements, and thus real-time performance, can be anticipated via extension to modern graphics processing units. PMID:24158289

  11. Subcutaneous fat patterning in athletes: selection of appropriate sites and standardisation of a novel ultrasound measurement technique: ad hoc working group on body composition, health and performance, under the auspices of the IOC Medical Commission

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Wolfram; Lohman, Timothy G; Stewart, Arthur D; Maughan, Ronald J; Meyer, Nanna L; Sardinha, Luis B; Kirihennedige, Nuwanee; Reguant-Closa, Alba; Risoul-Salas, Vanessa; Sundgot-Borgen, Jorunn; Ahammer, Helmut; Anderhuber, Friedrich; Fürhapter-Rieger, Alfred; Kainz, Philipp; Materna, Wilfried; Pilsl, Ulrike; Pirstinger, Wolfram; Ackland, Timothy R

    2016-01-01

    Background Precise and accurate field methods for body composition analyses in athletes are needed urgently. Aim Standardisation of a novel ultrasound (US) technique for accurate and reliable measurement of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT). Methods Three observers captured US images of uncompressed SAT in 12 athletes and applied a semiautomatic evaluation algorithm for multiple SAT measurements. Results Eight new sites are recommended: upper abdomen, lower abdomen, erector spinae, distal triceps, brachioradialis, lateral thigh, front thigh, medial calf. Obtainable accuracy was 0.2 mm (18 MHz probe; speed of sound: 1450 m/s). Reliability of SAT thickness sums (N=36): R2=0.998, SEE=0.55 mm, ICC (95% CI) 0.998 (0.994 to 0.999); observer differences from their mean: 95% of the SAT thickness sums were within ±1 mm (sums of SAT thicknesses ranged from 10 to 50 mm). Embedded fibrous tissues were also measured. Conclusions A minimum of eight sites is suggested to accommodate inter-individual differences in SAT patterning. All sites overlie muscle with a clearly visible fascia, which eases the acquisition of clear images and the marking of these sites takes only a few minutes. This US method reaches the fundamental accuracy and precision limits for SAT measurements given by tissue plasticity and furrowed borders, provided the measurers are trained appropriately. PMID:26702017

  12. Nakagami imaging for detecting thermal lesions induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound in tissue.

    PubMed

    Rangraz, Parisa; Behnam, Hamid; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound induces focalized tissue coagulation by increasing the tissue temperature in a tight focal region. Several methods have been proposed to monitor high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions. Currently, ultrasound imaging techniques that are clinically used for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment are standard pulse-echo B-mode ultrasound imaging, ultrasound temperature estimation, and elastography-based methods. On the contrary, the efficacy of two-dimensional Nakagami parametric imaging based on the distribution of the ultrasound backscattered signals to quantify properties of soft tissue has recently been evaluated. In this study, ultrasound radio frequency echo signals from ex vivo tissue samples were acquired before and after high-intensity focused ultrasound exposures and then their Nakagami parameter and scaling parameter of Nakagami distribution were estimated. These parameters were used to detect high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions. Also, the effects of changing the acoustic power of the high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer on the Nakagami parameters were studied. The results obtained suggest that the Nakagami distribution's scaling and Nakagami parameters can effectively be used to detect high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in tissue ex vivo. These parameters can also be used to understand the degree of change in tissue caused by high-intensity focused ultrasound exposures, which could be interpreted as a measure of degree of variability in scatterer concentration in various parts of the high-intensity focused ultrasound lesion. PMID:24264647

  13. Modern Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2006-01-01

    New facilities at schools and universities are being designed that embrace the latest learning techniques and philosophies. The article describes two facilities that exemplify this trend: Thomas Jefferson Hall at the United States Military Academy at West Point, and Cass Technical High School library in Detroit, Michigan. Libraries, once thought…

  14. Quantitative Ultrasound Assessment of the Rat Cervix

    PubMed Central

    McFarlin, Barbara L.; O’Brien, William D.; Oelze, Michael L.; Zachary, James F.; White-Traut, Rosemary C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this research was to detect cervical ripening with a new quantitative ultrasound technique. Methods Cervices of 13 nonpregnant and 65 timed pregnant (days 15, 17, 19, 20, and 21 of pregnancy) Sprague Dawley rats were scanned ex vivo with a 70-MHz ultrasound transducer. Ultrasound scatterer property estimates (scatterer diameter [SD], acoustic concentration [AC], and scatterer strength factor [SSF]) from the cervices were quantified and then compared to hydroxyproline and water content. Insertion loss (attenuation) was measured in 3 rats in each of the 6 groups. Discriminant analysis was used to predict gestational age group (cervical ripening) from the ultrasound variables SD, SSF, and AC. Results Differences were observed between the groups (SD, AC, and SSF; P < .0001). Quantitative ultrasound measures changed as the cervix ripened: (1) SD increased from days 15 to 21; (2) AC decreased from days 15 to 21; and (3) SSF was the greatest in the nonpregnant group and the least in the day 21 group. Cervix hydroxyproline content increased as pregnancy progressed (P < .003) and correlated with group, SD, AC, and SSF (P < .001). Discriminant analysis of ultrasound variables predicted 56.4% of gestational group assignment (P < .001) and increased to 77% within 2 days of the predicted analysis. Cervix insertion loss was greatest for the nonpregnant group and least for the day 21 group. Conclusions Quantitative ultrasound predicted cervical ripening in the rat cervix, but before use in humans, quantitative ultrasound will need to predict gestational age in the later days of gestation with more precision. PMID:16870896

  15. Synthesis and Migratory-Insertion Reactivity of CpMo(CO)[subscript3](CH[subscript3]): Small-Scale Organometallic Preparations Utilizing Modern Glovebox Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whited, Matthew T.; Hofmeister, Gretchen E.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments are described for the reliable small-scale glovebox preparation of CpMo(CO)[subscript 3](CH[subscript 3]) and acetyl derivatives thereof through phosphine-induced migratory insertion. The robust syntheses introduce students to a variety of organometallic reaction mechanisms and glovebox techniques, and they are easily carried out…

  16. A probability tracking approach to segmentation of ultrasound prostate images using weak shape priors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Robert S.; Michailovich, Oleg V.; Solovey, Igor; Salama, Magdy M. A.

    2010-03-01

    Prostate specific antigen density is an established parameter for indicating the likelihood of prostate cancer. To this end, the size and volume of the gland have become pivotal quantities used by clinicians during the standard cancer screening process. As an alternative to manual palpation, an increasing number of volume estimation methods are based on the imagery data of the prostate. The necessity to process large volumes of such data requires automatic segmentation algorithms, which can accurately and reliably identify the true prostate region. In particular, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging has become a standard means of assessing the prostate due to its safe nature and high benefit-to-cost ratio. Unfortunately, modern TRUS images are still plagued by many ultrasound imaging artifacts such as speckle noise and shadowing, which results in relatively low contrast and reduced SNR of the acquired images. Consequently, many modern segmentation methods incorporate prior knowledge about the prostate geometry to enhance traditional segmentation techniques. In this paper, a novel approach to the problem of TRUS segmentation, particularly the definition of the prostate shape prior, is presented. The proposed approach is based on the concept of distribution tracking, which provides a unified framework for tracking both photometric and morphological features of the prostate. In particular, the tracking of morphological features defines a novel type of "weak" shape priors. The latter acts as a regularization force, which minimally bias the segmentation procedure, while rendering the final estimate stable and robust. The value of the proposed methodology is demonstrated in a series of experiments.

  17. Ultrasound for fetal assessment in early pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Whitworth, Melissa; Bricker, Leanne; Neilson, James P; Dowswell, Therese

    2014-01-01

    Background Diagnostic ultrasound is a sophisticated electronic technology, which utilises pulses of high frequency sound to produce an image. Diagnostic ultrasound examination may be employed in a variety of specific circumstances during pregnancy such as after clinical complications, or where there are concerns about fetal growth. Because adverse outcomes may also occur in pregnancies without clear risk factors, assumptions have been made that routine ultrasound in all pregnancies will prove beneficial by enabling earlier detection and improved management of pregnancy complications. Routine screening may be planned for early pregnancy, late gestation, or both. The focus of this review is routine early pregnancy ultrasound. Objectives To assess whether routine early pregnancy ultrasound for fetal assessment (i.e. its use as a screening technique) influences the diagnosis of fetal malformations, multiple pregnancies, the rate of clinical interventions, and the incidence of adverse fetal outcome when compared with the selective use of early pregnancy ultrasound (for specific indications). Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (September 2009). Selection criteria Published, unpublished, and ongoing randomised controlled trials that compared outcomes in women who experienced routine versus selective early pregnancy ultrasound (i.e. less than 24 weeks’ gestation). We have included quasi-randomised trials. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data for each included study. We used the Review Manager software to enter and analyse data. Main results Routine/revealed ultrasound versus selective ultrasound/concealed: 11 trials including 37505 women. Ultrasound for fetal assessment in early pregnancy reduces the failure to detect multiple pregnancy by 24 weeks’ gestation (risk ratio (RR) 0.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.03 to 0.17). Routine scan is associated with a reduction in

  18. A REVIEW OF LOW-INTENSITY ULTRASOUND FOR CANCER THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    WOOD, ANDREW K. W.; SEHGAL, CHANDRA M.

    2015-01-01

    The literature describing the use of low-intensity ultrasound in four major areas of cancer therapy was reviewed - sonodynamic therapy, ultrasound mediated chemotherapy, ultrasound mediated gene delivery and antivascular ultrasound therapy. Each technique consistently resulted in the death of cancer cells and the bioeffects of ultrasound were primarily attributed to thermal actions and inertial cavitation. In each therapeutic modality, theranostic contrast agents composed of microbubbles played a role in both therapy and vascular imaging. The development of these agents is important as it establishes a therapeutic-diagnostic platform which can monitor the success of anti-cancer therapy. Little attention, however, has been given to either the direct assessment of the underlying mechanisms of the observed bioeffects or to the viability of these therapies in naturally occurring cancers in larger mammals; if such investigations provided encouraging data there could be a prompt application of a therapy technique in treating cancer patients. PMID:25728459

  19. Ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization in prone position

    PubMed Central

    Sofi, Khalid; Arab, Samer

    2010-01-01

    Central venous catheterization (CVC) is a commonly performed intraoperative procedure. Traditionally, CVC placement is performed blindly using anatomic landmarks as a guide to vessel position. Real-time ultrasound provides the operator the benefit of visualizing the target vein and the surrounding anatomic structures prior to and during the catheter insertion, thereby minimizing complications and increasing speed of placement. A 22-year-old male underwent open reduction and internal fixation of acetabulum fracture in prone position. Excessive continuous bleeding intraoperatively warranted placement of CVC in right internal jugular vein (IJV), which was not possible in prone position without the help of ultrasound. Best view of right IJV was obtained and CVC was placed using real-time ultrasound without complications. Ultrasound-guided CVC placement can be done in atypical patient positions where traditional anatomic landmark technique has no role. Use of ultrasound not only increases the speed of placement but also reduces complications known with the traditional blind technique. PMID:20668564

  20. Frequency Dependence of Ultrasound Neurostimulation in the Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Ye, Patrick Peiyong; Brown, Julian R; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasound neuromodulation holds promise as a non-invasive technique for neuromodulation of the central nervous system. However, much remains to be determined about how the technique can be transformed into a useful technology, including the effect of ultrasound frequency. Previous studies have demonstrated neuromodulation in vivo using frequencies <1 MHz, with a trend toward improved efficacy with lower frequency. However, using higher frequencies could offer improved ultrasound spatial resolution. We investigate the ultrasound neuromodulation effects in mice at various frequencies both below and above 1 MHz. We find that frequencies up to 2.9 MHz can still be effective for generating motor responses, but we also confirm that as frequency increases, sonications require significantly more intensity to achieve equivalent efficacy. We argue that our results provide evidence that favors either a particle displacement or a cavitation-based mechanism for the phenomenon of ultrasound neuromodulation. PMID:27090861

  1. Musculoskeletal Ultrasound in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Harcke, H. Theodore

    1998-01-01

    Ultrasound is ideally suited to the evaluation of the pediatric musculoskeletal system because of the increased ratio of cartilage to bone in the immature skeleton. The purpose of this article is to review the current uses of musculoskeletal ultrasound in pediatric patients. Hip sonography is widely accepted; other applications are increasing in popularity. PMID:11387111

  2. Ultrasound skin imaging.

    PubMed

    Alfageme Roldán, F

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of high-frequency ultrasound waves with the skin provides the basis for noninvasive, fast, and accessible diagnostic imaging. This tool is increasingly used in skin cancer and inflammatory conditions as well as in cosmetic dermatology. This article reviews the basic principles of skin ultrasound and its applications in the different areas of dermatology. PMID:24838227

  3. Modern extraction techniques and their impact on the pharmacological profile of Serenoa repens extracts for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bioactive compounds from plants (i.e., Serenoa repens) are often used in medicine in the treatment of several pathologies, among which benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) associated to lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Discussion There are different techniques of extraction, also used in combination, with the aim of enhancing the amount of the target molecules, gaining time and reducing waste of solvents. However, the qualitative and quantitative composition of the bioactives depends on the extractive process, and so the brands of the recovered products from the same plant are different in terms of clinical efficacy (no product interchangeability among different commercial brands). Summary In this review, we report on several and recent extraction techniques and their impact on the composition/biological activity of S. repens-based available products. PMID:25112532

  4. Ultrasound image guidance of cardiac interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Terry M.; Pace, Danielle F.; Lang, Pencilla; Guiraudon, Gérard M.; Jones, Douglas L.; Linte, Cristian A.

    2011-03-01

    Surgical procedures often have the unfortunate side-effect of causing the patient significant trauma while accessing the target site. Indeed, in some cases the trauma inflicted on the patient during access to the target greatly exceeds that caused by performing the therapy. Heart disease has traditionally been treated surgically using open chest techniques with the patient being placed "on pump" - i.e. their circulation being maintained by a cardio-pulmonary bypass or "heart-lung" machine. Recently, techniques have been developed for performing minimally invasive interventions on the heart, obviating the formerly invasive procedures. These new approaches rely on pre-operative images, combined with real-time images acquired during the procedure. Our approach is to register intra-operative images to the patient, and use a navigation system that combines intra-operative ultrasound with virtual models of instrumentation that has been introduced into the chamber through the heart wall. This paper illustrates the problems associated with traditional ultrasound guidance, and reviews the state of the art in real-time 3D cardiac ultrasound technology. In addition, it discusses the implementation of an image-guided intervention platform that integrates real-time ultrasound with a virtual reality environment, bringing together the pre-operative anatomy derived from MRI or CT, representations of tracked instrumentation inside the heart chamber, and the intra-operatively acquired ultrasound images.

  5. Applications of ultrasound in food and bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2015-07-01

    Improving the quality and nutritional aspects of food is one of the key issues for healthy life of human beings. The stability during storage is an important parameter in quality assurance of food products. Various processing techniques such as high pressure, thermal, pulsed electric field and microwave have been used to prolong the shelf-life of food products. In recent years, ultrasound technology has been found to be a potential food processing technique. The passage of ultrasound in a liquid matrix generates mechanical agitation and other physical effects due to acoustic cavitation. Owing to its importance, a number of review articles and book chapters on the applications of ultrasound in food processing have been published in recent years. This article provides an overview of recent developments in ultrasonic processing of food and dairy systems with a particular focus on functionality of food and dairy ingredients. More specifically, the use of high frequency ultrasound in fat separation from milk and viscosity modification in starch systems and the use of low frequency ultrasound in generating nutritional food emulsions, viscosity modification and encapsulation of nutrients have been highlighted. The issues associated with the development of large scale ultrasonic food processing equipment have also been briefly discussed. PMID:25219872

  6. Development of Flexible Capacitive Ultrasound Transducers and the Use of Ultrasound for Bone Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentzell, Scott A.

    Ultrasound is a widely applicable technique for therapy in the biomedical arena. However, conventional ultrasound transducers are not conducive for non-planar surfaces. Therefore, we developed flexible transducers capable of performing ultrasound and evaluated their use in biomedical applications. Flexible capacitive ultrasound transducers based on micrometer-thick dielectric tapes were developed and fabricated. These transducers were able to be made by hand at low-cost while still demonstrating good tolerances in center operating frequency. Intensities of up to 120 mW/cm2 were recorded and operation was dependent upon the applied AC and DC voltages along with the thickness of the dielectric insulation. These capacitive ultrasound transducers were used to stimulate MC3T3-E1 murine osteoblast cells to investigate the effects of low-frequency ultrasound on osteogenic gene expression and anabolic signaling pathways. After stimulation by 94.5 kHz continuous wave ultrasound for 20 minutes, significant increases in the activation of the Wnt signaling pathway and concentration of intracellular calcium were observed. Daily stimulation by ultrasound showed a trend of increased osteogenic gene expression across the phases of matrix deposition, maturation and calcification by osteoblasts. Finally, the heating of osteoblasts for stimulating osteoclastogenic responses was investigated. The application of increased temperatures of 42 and 47 degrees Celsius for 5 minutes showed significant increases in the RANKL/OPG ratio in media conditioned by osteoblasts. However, the altered RANKL/OPG ratio was not able to generate increases in osteoclastogenesis for RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells culture in the condition media. This was possibly due to high overall osteoprotegerin expression, or unwanted inducement of M1 and M2 macrophage activation in the cell population. The overall work of this thesis demonstrates the development of novel capacitive transducers. These conformable

  7. For Uncontrolled Tremor, Ultrasound Instead of Brain Surgery?

    MedlinePlus

    ... a professor of neurosurgery at the University of Virginia. The technique is already being studied in Parkinson's ... chairman Focused Ultrasound Foundation, professor neurosurgery, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.; Aug. 25, 2016, New England Journal ...

  8. Virtual Ultrasound Guidance for Inexperienced Operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caine, Timothy; Martin, Davis

    2012-01-01

    Medical ultrasound or echocardiographic studies are highly operator-dependent and generally require lengthy training and internship to perfect. To obtain quality echocardiographic images in remote environments, such as on-orbit, remote guidance of studies has been employed. This technique involves minimal training for the user, coupled with remote guidance from an expert. When real-time communication or expert guidance is not available, a more autonomous system of guiding an inexperienced operator through an ultrasound study is needed. One example would be missions beyond low Earth orbit, in which the time delay inherent with communication will make remote guidance impractical.

  9. Ultrasound assessment of schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Richter, J; Botelho, M C; Holtfreter, M C; Akpata, R; El Scheich, T; Neumayr, A; Brunetti, E; Hatz, C; Dong, Y; Dietrich, C F

    2016-07-01

    In 2000, the World Health Organization (WHO) issued an ultrasound field protocol for assessing the morbidity due to Schistosoma (S.) haematobium and S. mansoni. The experience with this classification has recently been reviewed systematically. The WHO protocol was well accepted worldwide. Here we review the use of ultrasound to assess the morbidity due to schistosomiasis with emphasis on easy, quick, and reproducible ways that can be used in the field. Findings obtained with high-end ultrasound scanners in the hospital setting that might eventually have applications in the field are also described. PMID:27429103

  10. Developing an ultrasound correlation velocimetry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surup, Gerrit; White, Christopher; UNH Team

    2011-11-01

    The process of building an ultrasound correlation velocimetry (UCV) system by integrating a commercial medical ultrasound with a PC running commercial PIV software is described and preliminary validation measurements in pipe flow using UCV and optical particle image velocimetry (PIV) are reported. In principles of operation, UCV is similar to the technique of PIV, differing only in the image acquisition process. The benefits of UCV are that it does not require optical access to the flow field and can be used for measuring flows of opaque fluids. While the limitations of UVC are the inherently low frame rates (limited by the imaging capabilities of the commercial ultrasound system) and low spatial resolution, which limits the range of velocities and transient flow behavior that can be measured. The support of the NSF (CBET0846359, grant monitor Horst Henning Winter) is gratefully acknowledged.

  11. Quantitative Ultrasound Characterization of Silicon Carbide Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portune, A. R.; Haber, R. A.

    2010-02-01

    Silicon carbide mirrors were characterized using several qualitative and quantitative nondestructive ultrasound techniques in order to determine the most efficient method for rapid performance evaluations. Ultrasound testing was performed in immersion using both phased array and single transducer systems in pulse-echo configuration. C-scan images of top and bottom surface reflected signal peak amplitudes were used to qualitatively locate and identify homogeneity variations within the mirror materials. Quantitative analysis of normalized amplitude histograms revealed significant differences in homogeneity estimations between phased array and single transducer test methods. Acoustic spectroscopy over the 10-33 MHz regime identified bulk microstructural differences between high and low amplitude regions in the samples. While ultrasound phased array performed well at rapidly locating surface and subsurface heterogeneities, it could not match the resolution and clarity of single transducer C-scan images or the insight of acoustic spectroscopy analyses.

  12. [Lung ultrasound in the newborn].

    PubMed

    Yousef, N

    2016-03-01

    Lung ultrasound (LU) is becoming a bedside point-of-care technique in critical care and emergency medicine as it is performed and immediately interpreted by the clinician. LU is quick, easy, relatively inexpensive, and provides accurate diagnostic information when compared with conventional lung imaging methods, such as CT scans and chest radiographs, with the additional advantage of being non-irradiating, adapted to bedside use, and easily repeatable with no side effects for the patient. LU is easy to learn, does not require sophisticated ultrasound machines or settings, and shows low intra- and interobserver variability when a standardized approach is used. A comprehensive and standardized ultrasound semiology has been described and validated in both adults and children. In summary, LU allows for quick easy recognition of a normally aerated lung in contrast to an interstitial or alveolar pattern. Recognition of these patterns may be even easier in neonates due to their small size and the absence of obesity and heavy musculature. Specific LU findings have been described for some types of neonatal lung injury, such as neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, transient tachypnea of the neonate, meconium aspiration syndrome, and neonatal pneumonia. In the newborn, LU has proved its usefulness in predicting the need for hospital admission and/or intubation based on simple LU patterns. A recently proposed LU score, adapted for the neonate, correlates well with oxygenation status, independently of gestational age and underlying respiratory condition. The score reliably predicts the need for surfactant treatment in preterm babies less than 34 weeks gestation treated with nasal CPAP from birth. LU is a promising tool with numerous potential applications that warrant future studies. However, like every technique, LU has its limitations and should not completely replace standard radiography. LU can nevertheless largely reduce exposure to ionizing radiation by limiting the

  13. 3D Flow reconstruction using ultrasound PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poelma, C.; Mari, J. M.; Foin, N.; Tang, M.-X.; Krams, R.; Caro, C. G.; Weinberg, P. D.; Westerweel, J.

    2011-04-01

    Ultrasound particle image velocimetry (PIV) can be used to obtain velocity fields in non-transparent geometries and/or fluids. In the current study, we use this technique to document the flow in a curved tube, using ultrasound contrast bubbles as flow tracer particles. The performance of the technique is first tested in a straight tube, with both steady laminar and pulsatile flows. Both experiments confirm that the technique is capable of reliable measurements. A number of adaptations are introduced that improve the accuracy and applicability of ultrasound PIV. Firstly, due to the method of ultrasound image acquisition, a correction is required for the estimation of velocities from tracer displacements. This correction accounts for the fact that columns in the image are recorded at slightly different instances. The second improvement uses a slice-by-slice scanning approach to obtain three-dimensional velocity data. This approach is here demonstrated in a strongly curved tube. The resulting flow profiles and wall shear stress distribution shows a distinct asymmetry. To meaningfully interpret these three-dimensional results, knowledge of the measurement thickness is required. Our third contribution is a method to determine this quantity, using the correlation peak heights. The latter method can also provide the third (out-of-plane) component if the measurement thickness is known, so that all three velocity components are available using a single probe.

  14. Measurements in ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, B.B.; Kurtz, A.B.; Goldberg, P.

    1988-01-01

    This book gathers all published and original data pertaining to anatomical measurements as projected on ultrasound scans. It covers all major anatomic regions and organ systems, including abdomen, pelvic, obstetrical, head and neck, and heart.

  15. Ultrasound in pregnancy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The ultrasound has become a standard procedure used during pregnancy. It can demonstrate fetal growth and can detect increasing ... abnormalities, hydrocephalus, anencephaly, club feet, and other ... does not produce ionizing radiation and is considered ...

  16. Eye and orbit ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... the eye (vitreous hemorrhage) Cancer of the retina ( retinoblastoma ), under the retina, or in other parts of ... Cataract removal Melanoma of the eye Retinal detachment Retinoblastoma Ultrasound Update Date 2/23/2015 Updated by: ...

  17. Ultrasound: Pelvis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... pelvic area and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  18. Ultrasound: Infant Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... hip area, and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  19. Ultrasound: Abdomen (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... abdominal area and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  20. Ultrasound: Head (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  1. Ultrasound: Bladder (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bladder area and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  2. Ten good reasons to practice ultrasound in critical care.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstein, Daniel; van Hooland, Simon; Elbers, Paul; Malbrain, Manu L N G

    2014-01-01

    combination with lung ultrasound, with the appearance of B-lines considered to be the endpoint for fluid therapy. An advantage of lung ultrasound is that the patient is not exposed to radiation, and so the LUCI-FLR project (LUCI favouring limitation of radiation) can be unfolded in trauma patients. Although it has been practiced for 25 years, critical care ultrasound is a relatively young but expanding discipline and can be seen as the stethoscope of the modern intensivist. In this review, the usefulness and advantages of ultrasound in the critical care setting are discussed in ten points. The emphasis is on a holistic approach, with a central role for lung ultrasound. PMID:25432552

  3. Endoscopic Ultrasound Elastography: Current Clinical Use in Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Utpal; Henkes, Nichole; Patel, Sandeep; Rosenkranz, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Elastography is a newer technique for the assessment of tissue elasticity using ultrasound. Cancerous tissue is known to be stiffer (hence, less elastic) than corresponding healthy tissue, and as a result, could be identified in an elasticity-based imaging. Ultrasound elastography has been used in the breast, thyroid, and cervix to differentiate malignant from benign neoplasms and to guide or avoid unnecessary biopsies. In the liver, elastography has enabled a noninvasive and reliable estimate of fibrosis. Endoscopic ultrasound has become a robust diagnostic and therapeutic tool for the management of pancreatic diseases. The addition of elastography to endoscopic ultrasound enabled further characterization of pancreas lesions, and several European and Asian studies have reported encouraging results. The current clinical role of endoscopic ultrasound elastography in the management of pancreas disorders and related literature are reviewed. PMID:26825864

  4. Virtual Ultrasound Guidance for Inexperienced Operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caine, Timothy; Martin, David

    2012-01-01

    Medical ultrasound or echocardiographic studies are highly operator-dependent and generally require lengthy training and internship to perfect. To obtain quality echocardiographic images in remote environments, such as on-orbit, remote guidance of studies has been employed. This technique involves minimal training for the user, coupled with remote guidance from an expert. When real-time communication or expert guidance is not available, a more autonomous system of guiding an inexperienced operator through an ultrasound study is needed. One example would be missions beyond low Earth orbit in which the time delay inherent with communication will make remote guidance impractical. The Virtual Ultrasound Guidance system is a combination of hardware and software. The hardware portion includes, but is not limited to, video glasses that allow hands-free, full-screen viewing. The glasses also allow the operator a substantial field of view below the glasses to view and operate the ultrasound system. The software is a comprehensive video program designed to guide an inexperienced operator through a detailed ultrasound or echocardiographic study without extensive training or guidance from the ground. The program contains a detailed description using video and audio to demonstrate equipment controls, ergonomics of scanning, study protocol, and scanning guidance, including recovery from sub-optimal images. The components used in the initial validation of the system include an Apple iPod Classic third-generation as the video source, and Myvue video glasses. Initially, the program prompts the operator to power-up the ultrasound and position the patient. The operator would put on the video glasses and attach them to the video source. After turning on both devices and the ultrasound system, the audio-video guidance would then instruct on patient positioning and scanning techniques. A detailed scanning protocol follows with descriptions and reference video of each view along with

  5. Ultrasound in perinatology

    SciTech Connect

    Maklad, N.F.

    1986-01-01

    This 19th volume in the series Clinics in Diagnostic Ultrasound provides an overview and update of some of the recent applications of ultrasound (US) in the pernatal period. Prenatal topics include estimation of gestational age; evaluation of intrauterine growth retardation, non-immune hydrops, and fetal urinary abnormalities; fetal echocardiography; and biophysical scoring. The discussion of postnatal topics includes US studies of the head and abdomen, echocardiography, and interventional procedures.

  6. Exploring the potentialities of an improved ultrasound-assisted quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe-based extraction technique combined with ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection for determination of Zearalenone in cereals.

    PubMed

    Porto-Figueira, Priscilla; Camacho, Irene; Câmara, José S

    2015-08-21

    Zearalenone (ZEA), a secondary metabolite from Fusarium graminearum fungi that invade crops and grow during blooming in moist cool field conditions, is a nonsteroidal oestrogen, biologically very potent, although hardly toxic. Different analytical methods, among which a quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe (QuEChERS) strategy, combined with or liquid chromatography, have been proposed for ZEA determination in foods. However, this extraction procedure has the disadvantage of using large amount of organic solvents, partitioning salts and sample volume, which limits the technique application on the fields where the sample amount is critical. Therefore in this work an improved sample preparation step based on the original QuEChERS (O-QuEChERS) approach, the μ-QuEChERS, combined with ultrasound-assisted extraction (USAE) and ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) analysis with fluorescence detection (FLR) is proposed for the sensitive and high-throughput quantification of ZEA in cereals. The proposed analytical strategy, μ-QuEChERSUSAE, uses up to 32 times lower amounts of partitioning salts, lower sample amount and lower extraction solvents, in comparison with O-QuEChERS technique. The performance of the analytical approach was assessed by studying the selectivity, specificity, limits of detection and quantification, linear dynamic range, matrix effect and precision. Good linearity (r(2)>0.99) was achieved for ZEA, and limits of detection (LOD=3.4μgkg(-1)) and limits of quantification (LOQ=4.7μgkg(-1)) were found below the tolerance levels set by European Commission. Good recoveries were obtained with different spiked concentrations, ranged from 80.2% to 109.7%, with relative standard deviations (RSD) lower than 5.0%. The comparison of the analytical performance of the proposed μ-QuEChERSUSAE with O-QuEChERS showed the powerful ability of the proposed strategy since it gives comparable results but using lower amounts of sample, partitioning

  7. Ultrasound assessment of endothelial function in real-time (Honorable Mention Poster Award)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faita, Francesco; Gemignani, Vincenzo; Demi, Marcello

    2005-04-01

    The characterization of the endothelial function is one of the most attractive research topics in modern vascular medicine. The evaluation of the flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) of the brachial artery is a widely used measurement technique. Despite its widespread use, this technique has some limitations due to the difficulties in obtaining an accurate measurement of such a small vessel (3 to 5 mm) by using ultrasounds. The system we present in this paper can automatically measure the diameter of the artery with high accuracy on each image of a video sequence. Furthermore, it processes the data in real-time, thus providing the physician with an immediate response while the examination is still in progress. The main part of the system is a video processing board based on a state-of-the-art digital signal processor (DSP). The board acquires the video signal generated by the ultrasound equipment which furnishes a longitudinal section of the artery vessel. For each image, the DSP automatically locates the two borders of the vessel and subsequently computes the diameter. The algorithm used to automatically locate the borders of the vessel is based on a new operator of edge detection which was derived from the first absolute central moment. Tests in many clinical centers proved that the system provides very accurate measurements and is a remarkable step forward toward a more systematic evaluation of the FMD.

  8. Using light scattering to measure the response of individual ultrasound contrast microbubbles subjected to pulsed ultrasound in vitro.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jingfeng; Matula, Thomas J

    2004-11-01

    Light scattering was used to measure the radial pulsations of individual ultrasound contrast microbubbles subjected to pulsed ultrasound. Highly diluted Optison or Sonazoid microbubbles were injected into either a water bath or an aqueous solution containing small quantities of xanthan gum. Individual microbubbles were insonified by ultrasound pulses from either a commercial diagnostic ultrasound machine or a single element transducer. The instantaneous response curves of the microbubbles were measured. Linear and nonlinear microbubble oscillations were observed. Good agreement was obtained by fitting a bubble dynamics model to the data. The pulse-to-pulse evolution of individual microbubbles was investigated, the results of which suggest that the shell can be semipermeable, and possibly weaken with subsequent pulses. There is a high potential that light scattering can be used to optimize diagnostic ultrasound techniques, understand microbubble evolution, and obtain specific information about shell parameters. PMID:15603131

  9. Digital Processing of Ultrasound Signals Backscattered from Coarse Grained Austenitic Stainless Steel.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, Martin Lawrence

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. In this thesis, the characteristics of individual pulse-echo ultrasound signals received from a cast block of coarse grained austenitic stainless steel (ASS) are considered. Such signals are renowned for beam skewing effects and being rich in backscattered acoustic noise due to the nature of the material. Cast ASS is used for its mechanical properties in critical applications such as nuclear reactor systems and the acoustic noise is known to be detrimental to the pulse-echo non-destructive testing (NDT) of this form of steel. After a review of these subjects, this thesis describes the application of one-dimensional (1-D) time sequence analysis techniques to the digitally recorded ultrasound data in order to assess their ability to discriminate between data characteristics due to the material and that due to a reflection from the back surface of the block. This is seen as a first step in the evaluation of improving ultrasonic NDT of these materials by use of standard equipment in conjunction with digital signal processing techniques. Two data sets are examined; one from a broad band 5MHz centre frequency compression wave transducer and the other from a similar 1MHz transducer. Numerous 1-D signal processing techniques are applied to the data and their insensitivity to the effect of the material characteristics on the data is noted. Many techniques have not previously been applied to this type of ultrasound data. Cepstrum techniques have shown to be inappropriate when analysing such data and adaptive techniques were generally unsuccessful except for one variant when applied to the 5MHz data. Modern spectrum analysis techniques and a l_4 norm deconvolution technique have been shown to be promising in the analysis of such data but further work in this area is recommended, especially time-space processing in order to improve the statistics of the techniques. Also contained in this thesis is a description of a

  10. Guiding tissue regeneration with ultrasound in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalecki, Diane; Comeau, Eric S.; Raeman, Carol H.; Child, Sally Z.; Hobbs, Laura; Hocking, Denise C.

    2015-05-01

    Developing new technologies that enable the repair or replacement of injured or diseased tissues is a major focus of regenerative medicine. This paper will discuss three ultrasound technologies under development in our laboratories to guide tissue regeneration both in vitro and in vivo. A critical obstacle in tissue engineering is the need for rapid and effective tissue vascularization strategies. To address this challenge, we are developing acoustic patterning techniques for microvascular tissue engineering. Acoustic radiation forces associated with ultrasound standing wave fields provide a rapid, non-invasive approach to spatially pattern cells in three dimensions without affecting cell viability. Acoustic patterning of endothelial cells leads to the rapid formation of microvascular networks throughout the volumes of three-dimensional hydrogels, and the morphology of the resultant microvessel networks can be controlled by design of the ultrasound field. A second technology under development uses ultrasound to noninvasively control the microstructure of collagen fibers within engineered tissues. The microstructure of extracellular matrix proteins provides signals that direct cell functions critical to tissue regeneration. Thus, controlling collagen microfiber structure with ultrasound provides a noninvasive approach to regulate the mechanical properties of biomaterials and control cellular responses. The third technology employs therapeutic ultrasound to enhance the healing of chronic wounds. Recent studies demonstrate increased granulation tissue thickness and collagen deposition in murine dermal wounds exposed to pulsed ultrasound. In summary, ultrasound technologies offer noninvasive approaches to control cell behaviors and extracellular matrix organization and thus hold great promise to advance tissue regeneration in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Ultrasound Guidance for Deep Peripheral Nerve Blocks: A Brief Review

    PubMed Central

    Wadhwa, Anupama; Kandadai, Sunitha Kanchi; Tongpresert, Sujittra; Obal, Detlef; Gebhard, Ralf Erich

    2011-01-01

    Nerve stimulation and ultrasound have been introduced to the practice of regional anesthesia mostly in the last two decades. Ultrasound did not gain as much popularity as the nerve stimulation until a decade ago because of the simplicity, accuracy and portability of the nerve stimulator. Ultrasound is now available in most academic centers practicing regional anesthesia and is a popular tool amongst trainees for performance of nerve blocks. This review article specifically discusses the role of ultrasonography for deeply situated nerves or plexuses such as the infraclavicular block for the upper extremity and lumbar plexus and sciatic nerve blocks for the lower extremity. Transitioning from nerve stimulation to ultrasound-guided blocks alone or in combination is beneficial in certain scenarios. However, not every patient undergoing regional anesthesia technique benefits from the use of ultrasound, especially when circumstances resulting in difficult visualization such as deep nerve blocks and/or block performed by inexperienced ultrasonographers. The use of ultrasound does not replace experience and knowledge of relevant anatomy, especially for visualization of deep structures. In certain scenarios, ultrasound may not offer additional value and substantial amount of time may be spent trying to find relevant structures or even provide a false sense of security, especially to an inexperienced operator. We look at available literature on the role of ultrasound for the performance of deep peripheral nerve blocks and its benefits. PMID:21808644

  12. Standards of ultrasound imaging of the adrenal glands

    PubMed Central

    Jakubowski, Wiesław S.; Dobruch-Sobczak, Katarzyna; Kasperlik-Załuska, Anna A.

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal glands are paired endocrine glands located over the upper renal poles. Adrenal pathologies have various clinical presentations. They can coexist with the hyperfunction of individual cortical zones or the medulla, insufficiency of the adrenal cortex or retained normal hormonal function. The most common adrenal masses are tumors incidentally detected in imaging examinations (ultrasound, tomography, magnetic resonance imaging), referred to as incidentalomas. They include a range of histopathological entities but cortical adenomas without hormonal hyperfunction are the most common. Each abdominal ultrasound scan of a child or adult should include the assessment of the suprarenal areas. If a previously non-reported, incidental solid focal lesion exceeding 1 cm (incidentaloma) is detected in the suprarenal area, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging should be conducted to confirm its presence and for differentiation and the tumor functional status should be determined. Ultrasound imaging is also used to monitor adrenal incidentaloma that is not eligible for a surgery. The paper presents recommendations concerning the performance and assessment of ultrasound examinations of the adrenal glands and their pathological lesions. The article includes new ultrasound techniques, such as tissue harmonic imaging, spatial compound imaging, three-dimensional ultrasound, elastography, contrast-enhanced ultrasound and parametric imaging. The guidelines presented above are consistent with the recommendations of the Polish Ultrasound Society. PMID:26807295

  13. Standards of the Polish Ultrasound Society – update. Spleen examination

    PubMed Central

    Walas, Maria Krystyna

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound scan of the spleen is an integral part of the overall abdominal examination. Due to its anatomical position, physical examination of the spleen is frequently supplemented with an ultrasound which plays a special role in the differential diagnostics of splenic diseases and facilitates the determination of further diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Similarly to other types of ultrasound scans, the examiner should be familiar with all significant clinical information as well as results of examinations and tests conducted so far. This enables to narrow the scope of search for etiological factors and indicate specific disease entities in the findings as well as allows for accurate assessment of coexistent pathologies. The article presents the standards of the Polish Ultrasound Society concerning the apparatus, preparation for the examination, technique and description of the findings. The authors discuss the normal anatomy of the spleen and the most common pathologies ranging from splenomegaly to splenic traumas. The indications for the contrast-enhanced ultrasound and characteristic patterns of enhancement of individual focal lesions are presented. This article is supplemented with photographic documentation, which provides images of the discussed lesions. The ultrasound examination, if carried out in compliance with current standards, allows for accurate interpretation of detected changes. This article has been prepared on the basis of the Ultrasound Examination Standards of the Polish Ultrasound Society (2011) and updated with the current knowledge. PMID:26672802

  14. Osteoskeletal manifestations of scurvy: MRI and ultrasound findings.

    PubMed

    Polat, Ahmet Veysel; Bekci, Tumay; Say, Ferhat; Bolukbas, Emrah; Selcuk, Mustafa Bekir

    2015-08-01

    Scurvy has become very rare in the modern world. The incidence of scurvy in the pediatric population is extremely low. In the pediatric population, musculoskeletal manifestations are more common and multiple subperiosteal hematomas are an important indicator for the diagnosis of scurvy. Although magnetic resonance imaging findings of scurvy are well described in the literature, to our knowledge, ultrasound findings have not yet been described. In this article, we report a case of scurvy with associated magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound findings. PMID:25597047

  15. Noninvasive measurement of local thermal diffusivity using backscattered ultrasound and focused ultrasound heating.

    PubMed

    Anand, Ajay; Kaczkowski, Peter J

    2008-09-01

    Previously, noninvasive methods of estimating local tissue thermal and acoustic properties using backscattered ultrasound have been proposed in the literature. In this article, a noninvasive method of estimating local thermal diffusivity in situ during focused ultrasound heating using beamformed acoustic backscatter data and applying novel signal processing techniques is developed. A high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducer operating at subablative intensities is employed to create a brief local temperature rise of no more than 10 degrees C. Beamformed radio-frequency (RF) data are collected during heating and cooling using a clinical ultrasound scanner. Measurements of the time-varying "acoustic strain", that is, spatiotemporal variations in the RF echo shifts induced by the temperature related sound speed changes, are related to a solution of the heat transfer equation to estimate the thermal diffusivity in the heated zone. Numerical simulations and experiments performed in vitro in tissue mimicking phantoms and excised turkey breast muscle tissue demonstrate agreement between the ultrasound derived thermal diffusivity estimates and independent estimates made by a traditional hot-wire technique. The new noninvasive ultrasonic method has potential applications in thermal therapy planning and monitoring, physiological monitoring and as a means of noninvasive tissue characterization. PMID:18450361

  16. NONINVASIVE MEASUREMENT OF LOCAL THERMAL DIFFUSIVITY USING BACKSCATTERED ULTRASOUND AND FOCUSED ULTRASOUND HEATING

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Ajay; Kaczkowski, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    Previously, noninvasive methods of estimating local tissue thermal and acoustic properties using backscattered ultrasound have been proposed in the literature. In this article, a noninvasive method of estimating local thermal diffusivity in situ during focused ultrasound heating using beamformed acoustic backscatter data and applying novel signal processing techniques is developed. A high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducer operating at subablative intensities is employed to create a brief local temperature rise of no more than 10°C. Beamformed radio-frequency (RF) data are collected during heating and cooling using a clinical ultrasound scanner. Measurements of the time-varying “acoustic strain”, that is, spatiotemporal variations in the RF echo shifts induced by the temperature related sound speed changes, are related to a solution of the heat transfer equation to estimate the thermal diffusivity in the heated zone. Numerical simulations and experiments performed in vitro in tissue mimicking phantoms and excised turkey breast muscle tissue demonstrate agreement between the ultrasound derived thermal diffusivity estimates and independent estimates made by a traditional hot-wire technique. The new noninvasive ultrasonic method has potential applications in thermal therapy planning and monitoring, physiological monitoring and as a means of noninvasive tissue characterization. PMID:18450361

  17. Thermal Field Imaging Using Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andereck, D.; Rahal, S.; Fife, S.

    2000-01-01

    is then possible to find the average temperature at different locations along the chamber, thereby determining the temperature profile along the system. (In the future we will construct an array of transducers. This will give us the capability to determine the temperature profile much more rapidly than at present, an important consideration if time-dependent phenomena are to be studied.) To validate our procedure we introduced encapsulated liquid crystal particles into glycerol. The liquid crystal particles' color varies depending on the temperature of the fluid. A photograph of the fluid through transparent sidewalls therefore gives a picture of the temperature field of the convecting fluid, independent of our ultrasound imaging. A representative result is shown in the Figure 1, which reveals a very satisfying correspondence between the two techniques. Therefore we have a great deal of confidence that the ultrasound imaging approach is indeed measuring the actual temperature profile of the fluid. The technique has also been applied to convecting liquid metal flows, and representative data will be presented from those experiments as well.

  18. Challenges and approaches in modern biometry and IOL calculation.

    PubMed

    Haigis, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of new intraocular lenses (IOLs), industry marketing to the public and patient expectations has warranted increased accuracy of IOL power calculations. Toric IOLs, multifocal IOLs, aspheric IOLs, phakic lenses, accommodative lenses, cases of refractive lens exchange and eyes that have undergone previous refractive surgery all require improved clinical measurements and IOL prediction formulas. Hence, measurement techniques and IOL calculation formulas are essential factors that affect the refractive outcome. Measurement with ultrasound has been the historic standard for measurement of ocular parameters for IOL calculation. However the introduction of optical biometry using partial coherence interferometry (PCI) has steadily established itself as the new standard. Additionally, modern optical instruments such as Scheimpflug cameras and optical coherence tomographers are being used to determine corneal power that was normally the purview of manual keratometry and topography. A number of methods are available to determine the IOL power including the empirical, analytical, numerical or combined methods. Ray tracing techniques or paraxial approximation by matrix methods or classical analytical 'IOL formulas' are actively used in for the prediction of IOL power. There is no universal formula for all cases - phakic and pseudophakic cases require different approaches, as do short eyes, long eyes, astigmatic eyes or post-refractive surgery eyes. Invariably, IOLs are characterized by different methods and lens constants, which require individual optimization. This review describes the current methods for biometry and IOL calculation. PMID:23960962

  19. Ultrasound as a Tool to Assess Body Fat

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Dale R.

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound has been used effectively to assess body fat for nearly 5 decades, yet this method is not known as well as many other body composition techniques. The purpose of this review is to explain the technical principles of the ultrasound method, explain the procedures for taking a measurement and interpreting the results, evaluate the reliability and validity of this method for measuring subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue, highlight the advantages and limitations of ultrasound relative to other body composition methods, consider its utility to clinical populations, and introduce new body composition-specific ultrasound technology. The focus of this review is adipose, although various tissue thicknesses (e.g., muscle and bone) can be measured with ultrasound. Being a portable imaging device that is capable of making fast regional estimates of body composition, ultrasound is an attractive assessment tool in instances when other methods are limited. Furthermore, much of the research suggests that it is reliable, reproducible, and accurate. The biggest limitations appear to be a lack of standardization for the measurement technique and results that are highly dependent on operator proficiency. New ultrasound devices and accompanying software designed specifically for the purpose of body composition assessment might help to minimize these limitations. PMID:24062944

  20. Real-time quasi-static ultrasound elastography

    PubMed Central

    Treece, Graham; Lindop, Joel; Chen, Lujie; Housden, James; Prager, Richard; Gee, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography is a technique used for clinical imaging of tissue stiffness with a conventional ultrasound machine. It was first proposed two decades ago, but active research continues in this area to the present day. Numerous clinical applications have been investigated, mostly related to cancer imaging, and though these have yet to prove conclusive, the technique has seen increasing commercial and clinical interest. This paper presents a review of the most widely adopted, non-quantitative, techniques focusing on technical innovations rather than clinical applications. The review is not intended to be exhaustive, concentrating instead on placing the various techniques in context according to the authors' perspective of the field. PMID:22866230

  1. Laser ultrasound technology for fault detection on carbon fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyrkammer, Robert; Reitinger, Bernhard; Grün, Hubert; Sekelja, Jakov; Burgholzer, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The marching in of carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) to mass production in the aeronautic and automotive industry requires reliable quality assurance methods. Laser ultrasound (LUS) is a promising nondestructive testing technique for sample inspection. The benefits compared to conventional ultrasound (US) testing are couplant free measurements and an easy access to complex shapes due to remote optical excitation and detection. Here the potential of LUS is present on composite test panels with relevant testing scenarios for industry. The results are evaluated in comparison to conventional ultrasound used in the aeronautic industry.

  2. Ultrasound propagation in the micropores of track membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Álvarez-Arenas, T. E.; González, B.; Apel, P. Yu.; Orelovitch, O. L.; Mitrofanov, A. V.

    2005-09-01

    Air-coupled and high-frequency ultrasonic spectroscopy is used to study ultrasound transmission through track membranes (TMs). Observed behavior, anomalous compared to that observed for other membranes, suggests independent ultrasound propagation through the pores. This is proved experimentally by studying frequency dependence of some acoustical parameters and by closing the pore aperture at the TM surface. This changes boundary conditions so that such wave is inhibited. Ultrasound propagation in such small pores opens up a new way to investigate gas behavior under rarefied conditions and provides a new technique to characterize TMs.

  3. Modern Brain Tumor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Barajas, Ramon F.; Cha, Soonmee

    2015-01-01

    The imaging and clinical management of patients with brain tumor continue to evolve over time and now heavily rely on physiologic imaging in addition to high-resolution structural imaging. Imaging remains a powerful noninvasive tool to positively impact the management of patients with brain tumor. This article provides an overview of the current state-of-the art clinical brain tumor imaging. In this review, we discuss general magnetic resonance (MR) imaging methods and their application to the diagnosis of, treatment planning and navigation, and disease monitoring in patients with brain tumor. We review the strengths, limitations, and pitfalls of structural imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging techniques, MR spectroscopy, perfusion imaging, positron emission tomography/MR, and functional imaging. Overall this review provides a basis for understudying the role of modern imaging in the care of brain tumor patients. PMID:25977902

  4. Modern Techniques for Searching the Chemical Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holm, Bart E.

    The chemists' information needs are for current awareness, selective dissemination, and retrospective search services, of research, development, engineering, production, and marketing information located internally or externally, and contained in journals, patents, theses, reports, data files, information services, and from people. This paper is…

  5. A technique for fabricating modern athletic mouthguards.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Ray R

    2005-05-01

    The prevention and treatment of orofacial trauma is now a very important part of the general practice. Children as well as adults are participating more in events where the probability of trauma is apparent. Attendance at health clubs and gymnasiums is on the rise. With the increase in sports participation comes an increase in orofacial injuries. The general population is taking its health more seriously. Athletic participation is on the rise, and Title IX has introduced increased female participation at all levels. This only increases the possibility that our patients will present themselves in our offices with the need for trauma treatment and also our opinions on the methods of preventing such traumatic experiences. PMID:16033039

  6. Modern endodontic practice: instruments and techniques.

    PubMed

    Kim, Syngcuk

    2004-01-01

    Like many other dental and medical specialties, endodontics has evolved and changed over the years. The changes that have occurred in the past 10 years, however, have been of great magnitude and profundity. The microscope, ultrasonic units with specially configured tips, superbly accurate microchip computerized apex locators, flexible nickel-titanium files in rotary engines, and greater emphasis on microscopic endodontic surgery have totally changed the way endodontics and endodontic surgery are practiced. Comparing these changes with formocreoszol medication, K-file and radiographic determination of working length are truly dramatic. These changes are bringing the specialty of endodontic practice into the twenty-first century with greater precision, fewer procedural errors, less discomfort to the patient, and faster case completions. Seven key advancements in endodontics were made in the last decade. This article discusses these advancements and their applicability to everyday practice. PMID:15066503

  7. Ultrasound-guided Pulsed Radiofrequency of the Third Occipital Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eung Don; Kim, Young Hoon; Park, Chong Min; Kwak, Jung Ah

    2013-01-01

    A C2-3 zygapophygeal joint is a major source of cervicogenic headache. Radiofrequency (RF) neurotomy is preformed widely for zygapophygeal joint pain. Conventional RF denervation technique is generally performed under fluoroscopic control. Recently, ultrasound-guided radiofrequency on zygapophygeal joint has emerged as an alternative method. We report our experiences of two successful ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequencies on 39-year-old and 42-year-old males, who complained occipital headache and posterior neck pain. PMID:23614084

  8. Educational ultrasound nondestructive testing laboratory.

    PubMed

    Genis, Vladimir; Zagorski, Michael

    2008-09-01

    The ultrasound nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of materials course was developed for applied engineering technology students at Drexel University's Goodwin College of Professional Studies. This three-credit, hands-on laboratory course consists of two parts: the first part with an emphasis on the foundations of NDE, and the second part during which ultrasound NDE techniques are utilized in the evaluation of parts and materials. NDE applications are presented and applied through real-life problems, including calibration and use of the latest ultrasonic testing instrumentation. The students learn engineering and physical principles of measurements of sound velocity in different materials, attenuation coefficients, material thickness, and location and dimensions of discontinuities in various materials, such as holes, cracks, and flaws. The work in the laboratory enhances the fundamentals taught during classroom sessions. This course will ultimately result in improvements in the educational process ["The greater expectations," national panel report, http://www.greaterexpectations.org (last viewed February, 2008); R. M. Felder and R. Brent "The intellectual development of Science and Engineering Students. Part 2: Teaching to promote growth," J. Eng. Educ. 93, 279-291 (2004)] since industry is becoming increasingly reliant on the effective application of NDE technology and the demand on NDE specialists is increasing. NDE curriculum was designed to fulfill levels I and II NDE in theory and training requirements, according to American Society for Nondestructive Testing, OH, Recommended Practice No. SNT-TC-1A (2006). PMID:19045633

  9. Ultrasound of Peripheral Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Jung Im; Walker, Francis O.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, neuromuscular ultrasound has emerged as a useful tool for the diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders. This article reviews sonographic findings of normal nerves including key quantitative ultrasound measurements that are helpful in the evaluation of focal and possibly generalized peripheral neuropathies. It also discusses several recent papers outlining the evidence base for the use of this technology, as well as new findings in compressive, traumatic, and generalized neuropathies. Ultrasound is well suited for use in electrodiagnostic laboratories where physicians, experienced in both the clinical evaluation of patients and the application of hands-on technology, can integrate findings from the patient’s history, physical examination, electrophysiological studies, and imaging for diagnosis and management. PMID:23314937

  10. Ultrasound in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, David S.; South, Donna A.; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Arbeille, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Physiology of the human body in space has been a major concern for space-faring nations since the beginning of the space era. Ultrasound (US) is one of the most cost effective and versatile forms of medical imaging. As such, its use in characterizing microgravity-induced changes in physiology is being realized. In addition to the use of US in related ground-based studies, equipment has also been modified to fly in space. This involves alteration to handle the stresses of launch and different power and cooling requirements. Study protocols also have been altered to accommodate the microgravity environment. Ultrasound studies to date have shown a pattern of adaptation to microgravity that includes changes in cardiac chamber sizes and vertebral spacing. Ultrasound has been and will continue to be an important component in the investigation of physiological and, possibly, pathologic changes occurring in space or as a result of spaceflight.

  11. Ultrasound enhanced thrombolysis in acute arterial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Culp, William C; Alexandrov, Andrei V

    2008-08-01

    investigated as a rapid noninvasive technique to identify thrombosed intracranial and peripheral vessels. Multi-national dose escalation studies of microspheres and the development of an operator independent ultrasound device are underway. PMID:18511094

  12. Emerging Imaging Techniques

    PubMed Central

    McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in selected imaging technologies focused on the cardiovascular system. The techniques covered are: ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM), microSPECT, microPET, near infrared imaging, and quantum dots. For each technique, the basic physical principles are explained and recent example applications demonstrated. PMID:16614313

  13. Renal denervation by intravascular ultrasound: Preliminary in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinelnikov, Yegor; McClain, Steve; Zou, Yong; Smith, David; Warnking, Reinhard

    2012-10-01

    Ultrasound denervation has recently become a subject of intense research in connection with the treatment of complex medical conditions including neurological conditions, development of pain management, reproduction of skin sensation, neuropathic pain and spasticity. The objective of this study is to investigate the use of intravascular ultrasound to produce nerve damage in renal sympathetic nerves without significant injury to the renal artery. This technique may potentially be used to treat various medical conditions, such as hypertension. The study was approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Ultrasound was applied to renal nerves of the swine model for histopathological evaluation. Therapeutic ultrasound energy was delivered circumferentially by an intravascular catheter maneuvered into the renal arteries. Fluoroscopic imaging was conducted pre-and post-ultrasound treatment. Animals were recovered and euthanized up to 30 hours post procedure, followed by necropsy and tissue sample collection. Histopathological examination showed evidence of extensive damage to renal nerves, characterized by nuclear pyknosis, hyalinization of stroma and multifocal hemorrhages, with little or no damage to renal arteries. This study demonstrates the feasibility of intravascular ultrasound as a minimally invasive renal denervation technique. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of this technique and its related clinical significance.

  14. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound for bone healing: an overview.

    PubMed

    Malizos, Konstantinos N; Hantes, Michael E; Protopappas, Vassilios; Papachristos, Athanasios

    2006-04-01

    Low-intensity ultrasound is a biophysical form of intervention in the fracture-repair process, which through several mechanisms accelerates healing of fresh fractures and enhances callus formation in delayed unions and nonunions. The goal of this review is to present the current knowledge obtained from basic science and animal studies, as well as existing evidence from clinical trials and case series with the different applications of ultrasound in the management of fractures, delayed unions, nonunions and distraction osteogenesis. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound is currently applied transcutaneously, although recent experimental studies have proven the efficacy of a trans-osseous application for both enhancement and monitoring of the bone healing process with modern smart implant technologies. PMID:16581076

  15. Focused Ultrasound and Lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Teiichiro; Yoshizawa, Shin; Koizumi, Norihiro; Mitsuishi, Mamoru; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy has generally been a first choice for kidney stone removal. The shock wave lithotripter uses an order of microsecond pulse durations and up to a 100 MPa pressure spike triggered at approximately 0.5-2 Hz to fragment kidney stones through mechanical mechanisms. One important mechanism is cavitation. We proposed an alternative type of lithotripsy method that maximizes cavitation activity to disintegrate kidney stones using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Here we outline the method according to the previously published literature (Matsumoto et al., Dynamics of bubble cloud in focused ultrasound. Proceedings of the second international symposium on therapeutic ultrasound, pp 290-299, 2002; Ikeda et al., Ultrasound Med Biol 32:1383-1397, 2006; Yoshizawa et al., Med Biol Eng Comput 47:851-860, 2009; Koizumi et al., A control framework for the non-invasive ultrasound the ragnostic system. Proceedings of 2009 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robotics and Systems (IROS), pp 4511-4516, 2009; Koizumi et al., IEEE Trans Robot 25:522-538, 2009). Cavitation activity is highly unpredictable; thus, a precise control system is needed. The proposed method comprises three steps of control in kidney stone treatment. The first step is control of localized high pressure fluctuation on the stone. The second step is monitoring of cavitation activity and giving feedback on the optimized ultrasound conditions. The third step is stone tracking and precise ultrasound focusing on the stone. For the high pressure control we designed a two-frequency wave (cavitation control (C-C) waveform); a high frequency ultrasound pulse (1-4 MHz) to create a cavitation cloud, and a low frequency trailing pulse (0.5 MHz) following the high frequency pulse to force the cloud into collapse. High speed photography showed cavitation collapse on a kidney stone and shock wave emission from the cloud. We also conducted in-vitro erosion tests of model and natural

  16. Imaging the hip joint in osteoarthritis: A place for ultrasound?

    PubMed

    Sudula, S N

    2016-05-01

    Osteoarthritis has traditionally been imaged with conventional radiographs; this has been regarded as the reference technique in osteoarthritis for a long time. However, in recent years, innovative imaging techniques such as ultrasonography have been used to obtain a better understanding of this disease. This is mainly due to tremendous technical advances and progressive developments of ultrasound equipment occurring over the past decade. Ultrasonography has been demonstrated to be a valuable imaging technique in the diagnosis and management of osteoarthritis of the hip joint. Application of this imaging methodology for osteoarthritis has improved the understanding of the disease process and may aid in the assessment of the efficacy of future therapies. The execution of ultrasound-guided procedures with safety and reliability has a relevant significance in patient management of osteoarthritis of the hip joint. This paper reviews the use of ultrasound as an imaging technique for the evaluation and treatment of osteoarthritis hip joint. PMID:27482280

  17. Research Explains Modern Art!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eickhorst, William S.

    1985-01-01

    This tongue-in-cheek article calls for the critical reexamination of the history of modern art. The author believes that modern art is neither an extension of the Renaissance aesthetic nor a collective by-product of artists possessed of creative genius. Creators of modern art were actually representational artists suffering from visual stuttering.…

  18. Breast ultrasound scans – surgeons’ expectations

    PubMed Central

    Bednarski, Piotr; Chrapowicki, Eryk; Jakubowski, Wiesław

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a dynamic development of mammary gland imaging techniques, particularly ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. A challenge related to these studies is the increase in the precision of the anatomical assessment of breast, particularly for early detection of subclinical lesions, performance of ultrasound-guided biopsy procedures, and accurate preoperative location of pathological lesions so as to optimize the surgical treatment. Ultrasound imaging is a primary and baseline diagnostic procedure the patient with suspected pathological lesions within breast is referred to by the surgeon. Lesions visualized in ultrasound scans are classified according to the BI-RADS US assessment categories. The successive categories (2 through 6) encompass individual pathological lesions, estimating the risk of malignancy and provide guidelines for further diagnostic and therapeutic management. This article described the important aspects of ultrasonographic imaging of focal lesions within the breasts as significant from the standpoint of surgical treatment of patients falling within BI-RADS US categories 3, 4, 5, and 6. Attention is drawn to the importance of ultrasound scans in the assessment of axillary fossa lymph nodes before the decision regarding the surgical treatment. PMID:26675118

  19. Contrast enhanced ultrasound of sentinel lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Cui, XinWu; Ignee, Andre; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; De Molo, Chiara; Pirri, Clara; Jedrzejczyk, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Sentinel lymph nodes are the first lymph nodes in the region that receive lymphatic drainage from a primary tumor. The detection or exclusion of sentinel lymph node micrometastases is critical in the staging of cancer, especially breast cancer and melanoma because it directly affects patient's prognosis and surgical management. Currently, intraoperative sentinel lymph node biopsies using blue dye and radioisotopes are the method of choice for the detection of sentinel lymph node with high identification rate. In contrast, conventional ultrasound is not capable of detecting sentinel lymph nodes in most cases. Contrast enhanced ultrasound with contrast specific imaging modes has been used for the evaluation and diagnostic work-up of peripherally located suspected lymphadenopathy. The method allows for real-time analysis of all vascular phases and the visualization of intranodal focal “avascular” areas that represent necrosis or deposits of neoplastic cells. In recent years, a number of animal and human studies showed that contrast enhanced ultrasound can be also used for the detection of sentinel lymph node, and may become a potential application in clinical routine. Several contrast agents have been used in those studies, including albumin solution, hydroxyethylated starch, SonoVue®, Sonazoid® and Definity®. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the use of ultrasound techniques in detection and evaluation of sentinel lymph node. PMID:26675994

  20. Contrast-enhanced and targeted ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Postema, Michiel; Gilja, Odd Helge

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonic imaging is becoming the most popular medical imaging modality, owing to the low price per examination and its safety. However, blood is a poor scatterer of ultrasound waves at clinical diagnostic transmit frequencies. For perfusion imaging, markers have been designed to enhance the contrast in B-mode imaging. These so-called ultrasound contrast agents consist of microscopically small gas bubbles encapsulated in biodegradable shells. In this review, the physical principles of ultrasound contrast agent microbubble behavior and their adjustment for drug delivery including sonoporation are described. Furthermore, an outline of clinical imaging applications of contrast-enhanced ultrasound is given. It is a challenging task to quantify and predict which bubble phenomenon occurs under which acoustic condition, and how these phenomena may be utilized in ultrasonic imaging. Aided by high-speed photography, our improved understanding of encapsulated microbubble behavior will lead to more sophisticated detection and delivery techniques. More sophisticated methods use quantitative approaches to measure the amount and the time course of bolus or reperfusion curves, and have shown great promise in revealing effective tumor responses to anti-angiogenic drugs in humans before tumor shrinkage occurs. These are beginning to be accepted into clinical practice. In the long term, targeted microbubbles for molecular imaging and eventually for directed anti-tumor therapy are expected to be tested. PMID:21218081

  1. Contrast-enhanced and targeted ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Postema, Michiel; Gilja, Odd Helge

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonic imaging is becoming the most popular medical imaging modality, owing to the low price per examination and its safety. However, blood is a poor scatterer of ultrasound waves at clinical diagnostic transmit frequencies. For perfusion imaging, markers have been designed to enhance the contrast in B-mode imaging. These so-called ultrasound contrast agents consist of microscopically small gas bubbles encapsulated in biodegradable shells. In this review, the physical principles of ultrasound contrast agent microbubble behavior and their adjustment for drug delivery including sonoporation are described. Furthermore, an outline of clinical imaging applications of contrast-enhanced ultrasound is given. It is a challenging task to quantify and predict which bubble phenomenon occurs under which acoustic condition, and how these phenomena may be utilized in ultrasonic imaging. Aided by high-speed photography, our improved understanding of encapsulated microbubble behavior will lead to more sophisticated detection and delivery techniques. More sophisticated methods use quantitative approaches to measure the amount and the time course of bolus or reperfusion curves, and have shown great promise in revealing effective tumor responses to anti-angiogenic drugs in humans before tumor shrinkage occurs. These are beginning to be accepted into clinical practice. In the long term, targeted microbubbles for molecular imaging and eventually for directed anti-tumor therapy are expected to be tested. PMID:21218081

  2. Evolving Role of Ultrasound in Therapeutic Injections of the Upper Extremity.

    PubMed

    Wilson, David J; Scully, William F; Rawlings, John M

    2015-11-01

    Ultrasound machines are creating more refined pictures and becoming more user-friendly and readily accessible. As a result, ultrasound is being increasingly used for therapeutic purposes. One example involves the use of ultrasound guidance in musculoskeletal interventional procedures, such as joint injections, tendon sheath injections, and peripheral nerve blocks. Technical considerations and therapeutic results have been described for multiple locations about the upper extremities, with varying levels of success. The implementation of ultrasound-guided injections in the orthopedist's clinic has therapeutic, financial, and provider role implications. Given these potential benefits, orthopedic providers, both in practice and residency, would benefit from increased exposure and education in ultrasound use. Ultrasound provides the benefit of real-time, dynamic imaging without the radiation exposure of fluoroscopy, and ultrasound-guided injections can be performed in the office, as opposed to the operating room, which is frequently required when using fluoroscopy. A basic knowledge of the principles and terms used in ultrasound is required. With these simple principles, a practitioner can review techniques for specific areas of the musculoskeletal system and begin using ultrasound to guide injections. Many locations for diagnostic and/or therapeutic injections in the upper extremities have improved accuracy and benefit with the use of ultrasound vs blind techniques, although a few have not been shown to have a significant difference in the literature. The educational and professional implications can be significant, but these potential benefits need to be carefully weighed against costs by each orthopedic practice. PMID:26558666

  3. Recent advances in medical ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound has become one of the most widely used imaging modalities in medicine; yet, before ultrasound-imaging systems became available, high intensity ultrasound was used as early as the 1950s to ablate regions in the brains of human patients. Recently, a variety of novel applications of ultrasound have been developed that include site-specific and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery, acoustocautery, lipoplasty, histotripsy, tissue regeneration, and bloodless surgery, among many others. This lecture will review several new applications of therapeutic ultrasound and address some of the basic scientific questions and future challenges in developing these methods and technologies for general use in our society. We shall particularly emphasize the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of benign and malignant tumors.

  4. [Ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Guliev, B G

    2014-01-01

    The study was aimed to the evaluation of the effectiveness and results of ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PNL) for the treatment of patients with large stones in renal pelvis. The results of PNL in 138 patients who underwent surgery for kidney stones from 2011 to 2013 were analyzed. Seventy patients (Group 1) underwent surgery with combined ultrasound and radiological guidance, and 68 patients (Group 2)--only with ultrasound guidance. The study included patients with large renal pelvic stones larger than 2.2 cm, requiring the formation of a single laparoscopic approach. Using the comparative analysis, the timing of surgery, the number of intra- and postoperative complications, blood loss and length of stay were evaluated. Percutaneous access was successfully performed in all patients. Postoperative complications (exacerbation of chronic pyelonephritis, gross hematuria) were observed in 14.3% of patients in Group 1 and in 14.7% of patients in Group 2. Bleeding requiring blood transfusion, and injuries of adjacent organs were not registered. Efficacy of PNL in the Group 1 was 95.7%; 3 (4.3%) patients required additional interventions. In Group 2, the effectiveness of PNL was 94.1%, 4 (5.9%) patients additionally underwent extracorporeal lithotripsy. There were no significant differences in the effectiveness of PNL, the volume of blood loss and duration of hospitalization. Ultrasound guided PNL can be performed in large pelvic stones and sufficient expansion of renal cavities, thus reducing radiation exposure of patients and medical staff. PMID:25807772

  5. Ultrasound and the IRB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Melissa A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assist researchers in writing their research protocols and subject consent forms so that both the Institutional Review Board (IRB) and subjects are assured of the minimal risk associated with diagnostic B-scan ultrasound as it is used in speech research. There have been numerous epidemiological studies on fetal…

  6. Review of Quantitative Ultrasound: Envelope Statistics and Backscatter Coefficient Imaging and Contributions to Diagnostic Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Oelze, Michael L; Mamou, Jonathan

    2016-02-01

    Conventional medical imaging technologies, including ultrasound, have continued to improve over the years. For example, in oncology, medical imaging is characterized by high sensitivity, i.e., the ability to detect anomalous tissue features, but the ability to classify these tissue features from images often lacks specificity. As a result, a large number of biopsies of tissues with suspicious image findings are performed each year with a vast majority of these biopsies resulting in a negative finding. To improve specificity of cancer imaging, quantitative imaging techniques can play an important role. Conventional ultrasound B-mode imaging is mainly qualitative in nature. However, quantitative ultrasound (QUS) imaging can provide specific numbers related to tissue features that can increase the specificity of image findings leading to improvements in diagnostic ultrasound. QUS imaging can encompass a wide variety of techniques including spectral-based parameterization, elastography, shear wave imaging, flow estimation, and envelope statistics. Currently, spectral-based parameterization and envelope statistics are not available on most conventional clinical ultrasound machines. However, in recent years, QUS techniques involving spectral-based parameterization and envelope statistics have demonstrated success in many applications, providing additional diagnostic capabilities. Spectral-based techniques include the estimation of the backscatter coefficient (BSC), estimation of attenuation, and estimation of scatterer properties such as the correlation length associated with an effective scatterer diameter (ESD) and the effective acoustic concentration (EAC) of scatterers. Envelope statistics include the estimation of the number density of scatterers and quantification of coherent to incoherent signals produced from the tissue. Challenges for clinical application include correctly accounting for attenuation effects and transmission losses and implementation of QUS on

  7. ["Dual Guidance"?- Parallel combination of ultrasound-guidance and nerve stimulation - Pro].

    PubMed

    Neuburger, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Combination of ultrasound and nerve stimulation technique could be useful under several conditions. Nerve stimulation canvarify the position of the nerve in case of bad preconditions during ultrasound. The knowledge of the importance of low and critical threshold currents could help to identify the needle tip. Thus the combination of ultrasound and nerve stimulation could lead to reduced unintentional intraneural injections and may result in a higher safety standard in peripheral regional anesthesia. PMID:26230888

  8. Tracked ultrasound elastography (TRUE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroughi, Pezhman

    Medical ultrasound research has experienced a renaissance in the past decade leading to innovations in flow mapping, elasticity and thermal imaging, measurement of optical properties, beamforming, and image enhancement. In this thesis, we focus on ultrasound elastography, an emerging imaging modality with great potential to become a part of several ultrasound diagnostic applications. Elastography images the stiffness of soft tissue by applying a mechanical stimulus and estimating the disturbance created by this stimulus. In freehand elastography, soft tissue is palpated by hand using the ultrasound transducer. The elastography image is generated by comparing the pre- and post-compression images to form a displacement map which is then differentiated to produce the final strain map. To achieve the best result in freehand elastography, the sonographer must compress and decompress the tissue uniformly in a specific direction with adequate compression. This can be a difficult task even for trained users. A small rotational or out-of-plane motion in the collected ultrasound frames can render them unusable for elastography. This has made freehand elastography highly qualitative and user-dependent. We tackle this issue by incorporating the extra information from a position sensor attached to the ultrasound transducer. Our aim is to show that the localization information of ultrasound images may be utilized to improve the quality and reliability of freehand elastography. For this purpose, we have developed a frame selection scheme that finds pairs of images with optimal compression and minimal lateral and out-of-plane displacement. Relying on the localization information, our algorithm merges multiple strain images computed from the selected frame pairs. This method is applicable to both 2D and 3D elastography. Our 3D elastography does not require for the transducer to be held still during the acquisition of each volume. Instead, the sonographer freely palpates the tissue

  9. Resolution enhancement in medical ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ploquin, Marie; Basarab, Adrian; Kouamé, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Image resolution enhancement is a problem of considerable interest in all medical imaging modalities. Unlike general purpose imaging or video processing, for a very long time, medical image resolution enhancement has been based on optimization of the imaging devices. Although some recent works purport to deal with image postprocessing, much remains to be done regarding medical image enhancement via postprocessing, especially in ultrasound imaging. We face a resolution improvement issue in the case of medical ultrasound imaging. We propose to investigate this problem using multidimensional autoregressive (AR) models. Noting that the estimation of the envelope of an ultrasound radio frequency (RF) signal is very similar to the estimation of classical Fourier-based power spectrum estimation, we theoretically show that a domain change and a multidimensional AR model can be used to achieve super-resolution in ultrasound imaging provided the order is estimated correctly. Here, this is done by means of a technique that simultaneously estimates the order and the parameters of a multidimensional model using relevant regression matrix factorization. Doing so, the proposed method specifically fits ultrasound imaging and provides an estimated envelope. Moreover, an expression that links the theoretical image resolution to both the image acquisition features (such as the point spread function) and a postprocessing feature (the AR model) order is derived. The overall contribution of this work is threefold. First, it allows for automatic resolution improvement. Through a simple model and without any specific manual algorithmic parameter tuning, as is used in common methods, the proposed technique simply and exclusively uses the ultrasound RF signal as input and provides the improved B-mode as output. Second, it allows for the a priori prediction of the improvement in resolution via the knowledge of the parametric model order before actual processing. Finally, to achieve

  10. MRI monitoring of high-temperature ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDannold, Nathan Judson

    More than fifty years ago, it was demonstrated that ultrasound could penetrate deep into tissue and induce a biological response. By focusing the ultrasound beam, localized heating in soft tissue is possible, allowing for a completely non-invasive technique to thermally ablate diseased tissue. Despite many promising results and advances in the last fifty years, widespread clinical implementation of therapeutic heating with ultrasound has not occurred because of the difficulty in guiding and monitoring the procedure. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown capable of monitoring thermal therapies such as focused ultrasound surgery. With MRI, the tumor can be accurately detected and targeted. Temperature-sensitive MRI techniques can be used to guide and monitor the ultrasound therapy. Thermal tissue damage induced by the ultrasound can be imaged. The purpose of this work was to test the use of MRI for guiding and monitoring high temperature ultrasound surgery. MRI-derived thermal imaging, which maps temperature-induced changes in the water proton resonant frequency, was implemented in a series of experiments. The first experiments demonstrated that MRI-derived temperature and thermal dose measurements correctly predict the onset of tissue damage in vivo, while the applied ultrasound power does not. The accuracy of the MRI-derived thermometry during long ultrasound exposures was also verified, and the limit of the technique in light of heating-induced tissue swelling was demonstrated. The accuracy of the thermometry to estimate online the extent of tissue damage was verified at the exposure time limit. Methods for using the temperature information gathered with MRI to estimate the ultrasound treatment parameters were also demonstrated experimentally. Focused ultrasound surgery in tumor models (animal and clinical breast tumor treatments) was shown feasible and demonstrated the need for image guidance. Finally, two new pulse sequences were shown capable of

  11. Design and development of an ultrasound calibration phantom and system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Alexis; Ackerman, Martin K.; Chirikjian, Gregory S.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-03-01

    Image-guided surgery systems are often used to provide surgeons with informational support. Due to several unique advantages such as ease of use, real-time image acquisition, and no ionizing radiation, ultrasound is a common medical imaging modality used in image-guided surgery systems. To perform advanced forms of guidance with ultrasound, such as virtual image overlays or automated robotic actuation, an ultrasound calibration process must be performed. This process recovers the rigid body transformation between a tracked marker attached to the ultrasound transducer and the ultrasound image. A phantom or model with known geometry is also required. In this work, we design and test an ultrasound calibration phantom and software. The two main considerations in this work are utilizing our knowledge of ultrasound physics to design the phantom and delivering an easy to use calibration process to the user. We explore the use of a three-dimensional printer to create the phantom in its entirety without need for user assembly. We have also developed software to automatically segment the three-dimensional printed rods from the ultrasound image by leveraging knowledge about the shape and scale of the phantom. In this work, we present preliminary results from using this phantom to perform ultrasound calibration. To test the efficacy of our method, we match the projection of the points segmented from the image to the known model and calculate a sum squared difference between each point for several combinations of motion generation and filtering methods. The best performing combination of motion and filtering techniques had an error of 1.56 mm and a standard deviation of 1.02 mm.

  12. Wavelet-based ultrasound image denoising: performance analysis and comparison.

    PubMed

    Rizi, F Yousefi; Noubari, H Ahmadi; Setarehdan, S K

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound images are generally affected by multiplicative speckle noise, which is mainly due to the coherent nature of the scattering phenomenon. Speckle noise filtering is thus a critical pre-processing step in medical ultrasound imaging provided that the diagnostic features of interest are not lost. A comparative study of the performance of alternative wavelet based ultrasound image denoising methods is presented in this article. In particular, the contourlet and curvelet techniques with dual tree complex and real and double density wavelet transform denoising methods were applied to real ultrasound images and results were quantitatively compared. The results show that curvelet-based method performs superior as compared to other methods and can effectively reduce most of the speckle noise content of a given image. PMID:22255196

  13. Volume flow in arteriovenous fistulas using vector velocity ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Peter Møller; Olesen, Jacob Bjerring; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Lange, Theis; Heerwagen, Søren; Pedersen, Mads Møller; Rix, Marianne; Lönn, Lars; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann

    2014-11-01

    Volume flow in arteriovenous fistulas for hemodialysis was measured using the angle-independent ultrasound technique Vector Flow Imaging and compared with flow measurements using the ultrasound dilution technique during dialysis. Using an UltraView 800 ultrasound scanner (BK Medical, Herlev, Denmark) with a linear transducer, 20 arteriovenous fistulas were scanned directly on the most superficial part of the fistula just before dialysis. Vector Flow Imaging volume flow was estimated with two different approaches, using the maximum and the average flow velocities detected in the fistula. Flow was estimated to be 242 mL/min and 404 mL/min lower than the ultrasound dilution technique estimate, depending on the approach. The standard deviations of the two Vector Flow Imaging approaches were 175.9 mL/min and 164.8 mL/min compared with a standard deviation of 136.9 mL/min using the ultrasound dilution technique. The study supports that Vector Flow Imaging is applicable for volume flow measurements. PMID:25282482

  14. Smart Ultrasound Remote Guidance Experiment (SURGE)- Concept of Operations Evaluation for Using Remote Guidance Ultrasound for Planetary Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurst, Victor, IV; Peterson, Sean; Garcia, Kathleen; Sargsyan, Ashot; Ebert, Douglas; Ham, David; Amponsah, David; Dulchavsky, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Use of remote guidance (RG) techniques aboard the International Space Station (ISS) has enabled astronauts to collect diagnostic-level ultrasound images. Exploration class missions will require this cohort of (typically) non-formally trained sonographers to operate with greater autonomy given the longer communication delays (2 seconds for ISS vs. >6 seconds for missions beyond the Moon) and communication blackouts. To determine the feasibility and training requirements for autonomous ultrasound image collection by non-expert ultrasound operators, ultrasound images were collected from a similar cohort using three different image collection protocols: RG only, RG with a computer-based learning tool (LT), and autonomous image collection with LT. The groups were assessed for both image quality and time to collect the images. Methods Subjects were randomized into three groups: RG only, RG with LT, and autonomous with LT. Each subject received 10 minutes of standardized training before the experiment. The subjects were tasked with making the following ultrasound assessments: 1) bone fracture and 2) focused assessment with sonography in trauma (FAST) to assess a patient s abdomen. Human factors-related questionnaire data were collected immediately after the assessments. Results The autonomous group did not out-perform the two groups that received RG. The mean time for the autonomous group to collect images was less than the RG groups, however the mean image quality for the autonomous group was less compared to both RG groups. Discussion Remote guidance continues to produce higher quality ultrasound images than autonomous ultrasound operation. This is likely due to near-instant feedback on image quality from the remote guider. Expansion in communication time delays, however, diminishes the capability to provide this feedback, thus requiring more autonomous ultrasound operation. The LT has the potential to be an excellent training and coaching component for

  15. Fuzzy similarity measures for ultrasound tissue characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emara, Salem M.; Badawi, Ahmed M.; Youssef, Abou-Bakr M.

    1995-03-01

    Computerized ultrasound tissue characterization has become an objective means for diagnosis of diseases. It is difficult to differentiate diffuse liver diseases, namely cirrhotic and fatty liver from a normal one, by visual inspection from the ultrasound images. The visual criteria for differentiating diffused diseases is rather confusing and highly dependent upon the sonographer's experience. The need for computerized tissue characterization is thus justified to quantitatively assist the sonographer for accurate differentiation and to minimize the degree of risk from erroneous interpretation. In this paper we used the fuzzy similarity measure as an approximate reasoning technique to find the maximum degree of matching between an unknown case defined by a feature vector and a family of prototypes (knowledge base). The feature vector used for the matching process contains 8 quantitative parameters (textural, acoustical, and speckle parameters) extracted from the ultrasound image. The steps done to match an unknown case with the family of prototypes (cirr, fatty, normal) are: Choosing the membership functions for each parameter, then obtaining the fuzzification matrix for the unknown case and the family of prototypes, then by the linguistic evaluation of two fuzzy quantities we obtain the similarity matrix, then by a simple aggregation method and the fuzzy integrals we obtain the degree of similarity. Finally, we find that the similarity measure results are comparable to the neural network classification techniques and it can be used in medical diagnosis to determine the pathology of the liver and to monitor the extent of the disease.

  16. Ultrasound in arc welding: a review.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Tiago Vieira; Bohórquez, Carlos Enrique Niño

    2015-02-01

    During the last decade, the introduction of ultrasound techniques in arc welding with the intention of improving the operational performance and technical characteristics of the welding processes have been studied intensively. In this work is presented a broad review of the literature surrounding the utilization of this technique. Firstly, we discuss the use of traditional mechanical transducers to generate ultrasound in arc welding. Furthermore, we describe the various methods and their application in arc-welding processes. After, is presented a recent method of introducing ultrasonic energy in arc welding, which forms a potential alternative to the use of traditional mechanical type transducers. This method was originally developed in the late 1990s and is called arc with ultrasonic excitation of current. Here, the arc acts not only as a thermal source but also as an emission mechanism for ultrasound, acting directly on the weld pool. We presented and discussed various innovative concepts based on this method, which allows the introduction of ultrasonic energy in the arc welding without the need of any auxiliary device of welding. In addition, we also presented the variations of this method reported in the literature. Finally, we have described the respective effects attributed to the use of this method in the welding of different materials using various welding processes. PMID:25455190

  17. Manipulating neuronal activity with low frequency transcranial ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Michele Elizabeth

    Stimulation of the rodent cerebral cortex is used to investigate the underlying biological basis for the restorative effects of slow wave sleep. Neuronal activation by optogenetic and ultrasound stimulation elicits changes in action potentials across the cerebral cortex that are recorded as electroencephalograms. Optogenetic stimulation requires an invasive implantation procedure limiting its application in human studies. We sought to determine whether ultrasound stimulation could be as effective as optogenetic techniques currently used, in an effort to further understand the physiological and metabolic requirements of sleep. We successfully recorded electroencephalograms in response to transcranial ultrasound stimulation of the barrel cortex at 1 and 7 Hz frequencies, comparing them to those recorded in response to optogenetic stimuli applied at the same frequencies. Our results showed application of a 473 nm blue LED positioned 6 cm above the skull and ultrasound stimulation at an output voltage of 1000 mVpp produced electroencephalograms with physiological responses of similar amplitude. We concluded that there exists an intensity-proportionate response in the optogenetic stimulation, but not with ultrasound stimulation at the frequencies we surveyed. Activation of neuronal cells in response to optogenetic stimulation in a Thy1-ChR2 transgenic mouse line is specifically targeted to pyramidal cells in the cerebral cortex. ChR2 responses to optogenetic stimulation are mediated by a focal activation of neuronal ion channels. We measured electrophysiological responses to ultrasound stimulation, comparing them to those recorded from optogenetic stimuli. Our results show striking similarities between ultrasound-induced responses and optogenetically-induced responses, which may indicate that transcranial ultrasound stimulation is also mediated by ion channel dependent processes in cerebral cortical neurons. The biophysical substrates for electrical excitability of

  18. Ultrasound-Assisted Freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, A. E.; Sun, Da-Wen

    Freezing is a well-known preservation method widely used in the food industry. The advantages of freezing are to a certain degree counterbalanced by the risk of damage caused by the formation and size of ice crystals. Over recent years new approaches have been developed to improve and control the crystallization process, and among these approaches sonocrystallization has proved to be very useful, since it can enhance both the nucleation rate and the crystal growth rate. Although ultrasound has been successfully used for many years in the evaluation of various aspects of foods and in medical applications, the use of power ultrasound to directly improve processes and products is less popular in food manufacturing. Foodstuffs are very complex materials, and research is needed in order to define the specific sound parameters that aid the freezing process and that can later be used for the scale-up and production of commercial frozen food products.

  19. [The efficacy of ultrasound-guided infraorbital nerve block with hockey stick typed probe].

    PubMed

    Iwase, Naoto; Fukui, Hidekimi; Yuunaiyama, Youko; Kaneko, Kouki; Ohseto, Kiyoshige; Uchino, Hiroyuki

    2013-10-01

    We report a case of ultrasound-guided infraorbital nerve block with a hockey stick typed probe in plane approach. Individual difference of infraorbital anatomy makes it difficult to puncture the infraorbital for a man, and the risks include bleeding, double vision and paranasal sinus puncture. The advantage of ultrasound-guided nerve block has been reported. Compared with conventional land mark method approach, ultrasound technique is thought to be easy to perform, more quickly and safely without any complications. From our results, we have demonstrated that ultrasound-guided infraorbital nerve block assisted by hockey stick typed probe could become one of the safe methods for this purpose. PMID:24228458

  20. Validity and reliability of an ultrasound system for estimating adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Loenneke, Jeremy P; Barnes, Jeremy T; Wagganer, Jason D; Wilson, Jacob M; Lowery, Ryan P; Green, Cody E; Pujol, Thomas J

    2014-03-01

    When health professionals measure the fitness levels of clients, body composition is usually estimated. In field settings, body composition is commonly estimated with skinfolds or bioelectrical impedance analysis. Recently, a portable ultrasound device has been manufactured to estimate what percentage of body mass is composed of adipose tissue (AT%). A reported advantage of using ultrasound is that inter- and intrarater variations may be minimized when compared with the skinfold technique. Therefore, the purpose of this pilot study was twofold; 1) to determine the validity of a portable ultrasound device compared with skinfolds and 2) determine the reliability of the portable ultrasound device. Participants had their measurements taken in the following order: urine specific gravity, body mass, height, skinfolds and ultrasound determined. Participants had their urine specific gravity and ultrasound determined AT% estimates measured again 48 h later. The current pilot study found that the ultrasound was not a valid estimate of AT% when compared with the skinfold estimate (TE > 4%). In addition, the 1-site estimate from the ultrasound was more reliable than the 3-site estimate of AT%. These data are of importance to practitioners because it demonstrates that while the ultrasound is not a valid estimate compared with skinfolds, the 1-site estimate may be able to track changes in AT% over time, making the ultrasound an option for assessing changes in body composition. PMID:23879395

  1. Detecting breast microcalcifications using super-resolution ultrasound imaging: a clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lianjie; Labyed, Yassin; Hanson, Kenneth; Sandoval, Daniel; Pohl, Jennifer; Williamson, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Imaging breast microcalcifications is crucial for early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. It is challenging for current clinical ultrasound to image breast microcalcifications. However, new imaging techniques using data acquired with a synthetic-aperture ultrasound system have the potential to significantly improve ultrasound imaging. We recently developed a super-resolution ultrasound imaging method termed the phase-coherent multiple-signal classification (PC-MUSIC). This signal subspace method accounts for the phase response of transducer elements to improve image resolution. In this paper, we investigate the clinical feasibility of our super-resolution ultrasound imaging method for detecting breast microcalcifications. We use our custom-built, real-time synthetic-aperture ultrasound system to acquire breast ultrasound data for 40 patients whose mammograms show the presence of breast microcalcifications. We apply our super-resolution ultrasound imaging method to the patient data, and produce clear images of breast calcifications. Our super-resolution ultrasound PC-MUSIC imaging with synthetic-aperture ultrasound data can provide a new imaging modality for detecting breast microcalcifications in clinic without using ionizing radiation.

  2. Black Endobronchial Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Samjot S; Harris, Kassem; Ylagan, Lourdes

    2015-10-01

    The infrequent bronchoscopic finding of black airway pigmentation due to a variety of causes has been labeled as "Black Bronchoscopy." Black bronchioalveolar lavage has been sometimes described in tobacco, marijuana, and crack cocaine smokers. To add to this interesting panorama of bronchoscopic findings, we describe cases of black endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspirates due to metastatic melanoma and anthracotic lymph nodes. PMID:26348692

  3. An open access thyroid ultrasound image database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedraza, Lina; Vargas, Carlos; Narváez, Fabián.; Durán, Oscar; Muñoz, Emma; Romero, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Computer aided diagnosis systems (CAD) have been developed to assist radiologists in the detection and diagnosis of abnormalities and a large number of pattern recognition techniques have been proposed to obtain a second opinion. Most of these strategies have been evaluated using different datasets making their performance incomparable. In this work, an open access database of thyroid ultrasound images is presented. The dataset consists of a set of B-mode Ultrasound images, including a complete annotation and diagnostic description of suspicious thyroid lesions by expert radiologists. Several types of lesions as thyroiditis, cystic nodules, adenomas and thyroid cancers were included while an accurate lesion delineation is provided in XML format. The diagnostic description of malignant lesions was confirmed by biopsy. The proposed new database is expected to be a resource for the community to assess different CAD systems.

  4. Nuclear weapons modernizations

    SciTech Connect

    Kristensen, Hans M.

    2014-05-09

    This article reviews the nuclear weapons modernization programs underway in the world's nine nuclear weapons states. It concludes that despite significant reductions in overall weapons inventories since the end of the Cold War, the pace of reductions is slowing - four of the nuclear weapons states are even increasing their arsenals, and all the nuclear weapons states are busy modernizing their remaining arsenals in what appears to be a dynamic and counterproductive nuclear competition. The author questions whether perpetual modernization combined with no specific plan for the elimination of nuclear weapons is consistent with the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and concludes that new limits on nuclear modernizations are needed.

  5. Nuclear weapons modernizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Hans M.

    2014-05-01

    This article reviews the nuclear weapons modernization programs underway in the world's nine nuclear weapons states. It concludes that despite significant reductions in overall weapons inventories since the end of the Cold War, the pace of reductions is slowing - four of the nuclear weapons states are even increasing their arsenals, and all the nuclear weapons states are busy modernizing their remaining arsenals in what appears to be a dynamic and counterproductive nuclear competition. The author questions whether perpetual modernization combined with no specific plan for the elimination of nuclear weapons is consistent with the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and concludes that new limits on nuclear modernizations are needed.

  6. An Introduction to Modern Missing Data Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baraldi, Amanda N.; Enders, Craig K.

    2010-01-01

    A great deal of recent methodological research has focused on two modern missing data analysis methods: maximum likelihood and multiple imputation. These approaches are advantageous to traditional techniques (e.g. deletion and mean imputation techniques) because they require less stringent assumptions and mitigate the pitfalls of traditional…

  7. Real-time SPECT and 2D ultrasound image registration.

    PubMed

    Bucki, Marek; Chassat, Fabrice; Galdames, Francisco; Asahi, Takeshi; Pizarro, Daniel; Lobo, Gabriel

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present a technique for fully automatic, real-time 3D SPECT (Single Photon Emitting Computed Tomography) and 2D ultrasound image registration. We use this technique in the context of kidney lesion diagnosis. Our registration algorithm allows a physician to perform an ultrasound exam after a SPECT image has been acquired and see in real time the registration of both modalities. An automatic segmentation algorithm has been implemented in order to display in 3D the positions of the acquired US images with respect to the organs. PMID:18044572

  8. [Modern mitral valve surgery].

    PubMed

    Bothe, W; Beyersdorf, F

    2016-04-01

    At the beginning of the 20th century, Cutler and Levine performed the first successful surgical treatment of a stenotic mitral valve, which was the only treatable heart valve defect at that time. Mitral valve surgery has evolved significantly since then. The introduction of the heart-lung machine in 1954 not only reduced the surgical risk, but also allowed the treatment of different mitral valve pathologies. Nowadays, mitral valve insufficiency has become the most common underlying pathomechanism of mitral valve disease and can be classified into primary and secondary mitral insufficiency. Primary mitral valve insufficiency is mainly caused by alterations of the valve (leaflets and primary order chords) itself, whereas left ventricular dilatation leading to papillary muscle displacement and leaflet tethering via second order chords is the main underlying pathomechanism for secondary mitral valve regurgitation. Valve reconstruction using the "loop technique" plus annuloplasty is the surgical strategy of choice and normalizes life expectancy in patients with primary mitral regurgitation. In patients with secondary mitral regurgitation, implanting an annuloplasty is not superior to valve replacement and results in high rates of valve re-insufficiency (up to 30 % after 3 months) due to ongoing ventricular dilatation. In order to improve repair results in these patients, we add a novel subvalvular technique (ring-noose-string) to the annuloplasty that aims to prevent ongoing ventricular remodeling and re-insufficiency. In modern mitral surgery, a right lateral thoracotomy is the approach of choice with excellent repair and cosmetic results. PMID:26907868

  9. Ultrasonographic percutaneous anatomy of the atlanto-occipital region and indirect ultrasound-guided cisternal puncture in the dog and the cat.

    PubMed

    Etienne, A-L; Audigié, F; Peeters, D; Gabriel, A; Busoni, V

    2015-04-01

    Cisternal puncture in dogs and cats is commonly carried out. This article describes the percutaneous ultrasound anatomy of the cisternal region in the dog and the cat and an indirect technique for ultrasound-guided cisternal puncture. Ultrasound images obtained ex vivo and in vivo were compared with anatomic sections and used to identify the landmarks for ultrasound-guided cisternal puncture. The ultrasound-guided procedure was established in cadavers and then applied in vivo in seven dogs and two cats. The anatomic landmarks for the ultrasound-guided puncture are the cisterna magna, the spinal cord, the two occipital condyles on transverse images, the external occipital crest and the dorsal arch of the first cervical vertebra on longitudinal images. Using these ultrasound anatomic landmarks, an indirect ultrasound-guided technique for cisternal puncture is applicable in the dog and the cat. PMID:24712312

  10. Synthetic tracked aperture ultrasound imaging: design, simulation, and experimental evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haichong K; Cheng, Alexis; Bottenus, Nick; Guo, Xiaoyu; Trahey, Gregg E; Boctor, Emad M

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasonography is a widely used imaging modality to visualize anatomical structures due to its low cost and ease of use; however, it is challenging to acquire acceptable image quality in deep tissue. Synthetic aperture (SA) is a technique used to increase image resolution by synthesizing information from multiple subapertures, but the resolution improvement is limited by the physical size of the array transducer. With a large F-number, it is difficult to achieve high resolution in deep regions without extending the effective aperture size. We propose a method to extend the available aperture size for SA-called synthetic tracked aperture ultrasound (STRATUS) imaging-by sweeping an ultrasound transducer while tracking its orientation and location. Tracking information of the ultrasound probe is used to synthesize the signals received at different positions. Considering the practical implementation, we estimated the effect of tracking and ultrasound calibration error to the quality of the final beamformed image through simulation. In addition, to experimentally validate this approach, a 6 degree-of-freedom robot arm was used as a mechanical tracker to hold an ultrasound transducer and to apply in-plane lateral translational motion. Results indicate that STRATUS imaging with robotic tracking has the potential to improve ultrasound image quality. PMID:27088108

  11. Can piezoelectric ultrasound osteotomies result in serious noise trauma?

    PubMed

    Kramer, F-J; Bornitz, M; Zahnert, T; Schliephake, H

    2015-11-01

    The use of ultrasound to cut bone in oral and craniofacial surgery has increased. There is concern that the application of ultrasound to the craniofacial skeleton might represent a potential hazard to the inner ear because of sound transmission by bone conduction resulting in hearing trauma. Conventional and ultrasound osteotomies were performed on human specimens of temporal bone containing an intact middle and inner ear. The equivalent sound pressure was measured with a microphone at the round window, which had been calibrated with a bone conduction audiometer. Conventional osteotomy with a rose burr resulted in maximum sound pressures of 125dB(A) consisting of major frequency components at 2100, 7600, and 9300Hz. Ultrasound osteotomy resulted in maximum sound pressures of 122dB(A) and exhibited major frequency components at around 10kHz, 20kHz, and 26.5kHz. Ultrasound osteotomies have no acoustic advantage over conventional osteotomies. Both osteotomy techniques can produce noise-induced hearing trauma, especially when applied over longer durations of time. This appears to be more relevant for ultrasound osteotomies, because the bone cutting efficiency is usually poorer than in conventional osteotomies. Surgeons should consider the risk of noise-induced potential damage to the inner ear when selecting the method of osteotomy. PMID:26227860

  12. American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... In | My Account | Renew | Join About Us Leadership History Awards Committees Mission & Constitution Join/Renew Communities Basic Science and Instrumentation Cardiovascular Ultrasound Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Dermatology ...

  13. ART MODERN/DIALOG.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheng, Katharine K.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews ART MODERN, an on-line data base which provides comprehensive coverage of current worldwide literature on modern art and design since 1800. Areas described include scope, coverage, arrangement of printed and on-line indexes, characteristics of basic index and code searching; also search hints, search negotiation, searchguide, and data base…

  14. MATERIALS FOR MODERNIZATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JACKSON, R. GRAHAM

    CHOICES AND ISSUES IN SELECTING MATERIALS FOR MODERNIZATION OF SCHOOL BUILDINGS ARE DISCUSSED IN THIS REPORT. BACKGROUND INFORMATION IS INTRODUCED IN TERMS OF REASONS FOR ABANDONMENT, THE CAUSES AND EFFECTS OF SCHOOL BUILDING OBSOLESCENCE, AND PROBLEMS IN THE MODERNIZATION PROCESS. INTERIOR PARTITIONS ARE DISCUSSED IN TERMS OF BUILDING MATERIALS,…

  15. Myth and Modern Man.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patai, Raphael

    Various theories about the purpose of myth are described briefly, and then the place of myth in modern life is explored. Modern man is found to still create his own myths, and his life is still influenced by mythical prototypes and images. Myths, mythical beliefs, and mythical thinking are discovered in socialist, Communist, and totalitarian…

  16. Astronomy in Modern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eker, Zeki; Demircan, Osman, Kirbiyik, Halil; Bilir, Selcuk

    2013-01-01

    Present-day astronomy and its development in the recent history of Turkey are described. Current astronomy education in modern-day Turkish Republic from primary to high schools, including modern-day university education is discussed. Astronomical and space research together with the existing observatories and present-day Turkish astronomy in the global state is presented.

  17. Ultrasound contrast agent fabricated from microbubbles containing instant adhesives, and its ultrasound imaging ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makuta, T.; Tamakawa, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Non-invasive surgery techniques and drug delivery system with acoustic characteristics of ultrasound contrast agent have been studied intensively in recent years. Ultrasound contrast agent collapses easily under the blood circulating and the ultrasound irradiating because it is just a stabilized bubble without solid-shell by surface adsorption of surfactant or lipid. For improving the imaging stability, we proposed the fabrication method of the hollow microcapsule with polymer shell, which can be fabricated just blowing vapor of commonly-used instant adhesive (Cyanoacrylate monomer) into water as microbubbles. Therefore, the cyanoacrylate vapor contained inside microbubble initiates polymerization on the gasliquid interface soon after microbubbles are generated in water. Consequently, hollow microspheres coated by cyanoacrylate thin film are generated. In this report, we revealed that diameter distributions of microbubbles and microcapsules were approximately same and most of them were less than 10 μm, that is, smaller than blood capillary. In addition, we also revealed that hollow microcapsules enhanced the acoustic signal especially in the harmonic contrast imaging and were broken or agglomerated under the ultrasound field. As for the yield of hollow microcapsules, we revealed that sodium dodecyl sulfate addition to water phase instead of deoxycolic acid made the fabrication yield increased.

  18. Acoustic Radiation Force Elasticity Imaging in Diagnostic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Joshua R.; Trahey, Gregg E.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.; Palmeri, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    The development of ultrasound-based elasticity imaging methods has been the focus of intense research activity since the mid-1990s. In characterizing the mechanical properties of soft tissues, these techniques image an entirely new subset of tissue properties that cannot be derived with conventional ultrasound techniques. Clinically, tissue elasticity is known to be associated with pathological condition and with the ability to image these features in vivo, elasticity imaging methods may prove to be invaluable tools for the diagnosis and/or monitoring of disease. This review focuses on ultrasound-based elasticity imaging methods that generate an acoustic radiation force to induce tissue displacements. These methods can be performed non-invasively during routine exams to provide either qualitative or quantitative metrics of tissue elasticity. A brief overview of soft tissue mechanics relevant to elasticity imaging is provided, including a derivation of acoustic radiation force, and an overview of the various acoustic radiation force elasticity imaging methods. PMID:23549529

  19. [Lung ultrasound in acute and critical care medicine].

    PubMed

    Zechner, P M; Seibel, A; Aichinger, G; Steigerwald, M; Dorr, K; Scheiermann, P; Schellhaas, S; Cuca, C; Breitkreutz, R

    2012-07-01

    The development of modern critical care lung ultrasound is based on the classical representation of anatomical structures and the need for the assessment of specific sonography artefacts and phenomena. The air and fluid content of the lungs is interpreted using few typical artefacts and phenomena, with which the most important differential diagnoses can be made. According to a recent international consensus conference these include lung sliding, lung pulse, B-lines, lung point, reverberation artefacts, subpleural consolidations and intrapleural fluid collections. An increased number of B-lines is an unspecific sign for an increased quantity of fluid in the lungs resembling interstitial syndromes, for example in the case of cardiogenic pulmonary edema or lung contusion. In the diagnosis of interstitial syndromes lung ultrasound provides higher diagnostic accuracy (95%) than auscultation (55%) and chest radiography (72%). Diagnosis of pneumonia and pulmonary embolism can be achieved at the bedside by evaluating subpleural lung consolidations. Detection of lung sliding can help to detect asymmetrical ventilation and allows the exclusion of a pneumothorax. Ultrasound-based diagnosis of pneumothorax is superior to supine anterior chest radiography: for ultrasound the sensitivity is 92-100% and the specificity 91-100%. For the diagnosis of pneumothorax a simple algorithm was therefore designed: in the presence of lung sliding, lung pulse or B-lines, pneumothorax can be ruled out, in contrast a positive lung point is a highly specific sign of the presence of pneumothorax. Furthermore, lung ultrasound allows not only diagnosis of pleural effusion with significantly higher sensitivity than chest x-ray but also visual control in ultrasound-guided thoracocentesis. PMID:22772347

  20. Effect of ultrasound radiation duration on emulsification and demulsification of paraffin oil and surfactant solution/brine using Hele-shaw models.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, Hossein; Mohammadian, Erfan; Asadullah, Mohammad; Azdarpour, Amin; Rafati, Roozbeh

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasound technique is one of the unconventional enhanced oil recovery methods which has been of interest for more than six decades. However, the majority of the oil recovery mechanisms under ultrasound reported in the previous studies are theoretical. Emulsification is one of the mechanisms happening at the interface of oil and water in porous media under ultrasound. Oppositely, ultrasound is one of the techniques using in oil industry for demulsification of oil/water emulsion. Therefore, the conditions in which emulsification becomes dominant over demulsification under ultrasound should be more investigated. Duration of ultrasound radiation could be one of the factors affecting emulsification and demulsification processes. In this study a technique was developed to investigate the effect of long and short period of ultrasound radiation on emulsification and demulsification of paraffin oil and surfactant solution in porous media. For this purpose, the 2D glass Hele-shaw models were placed inside the ultrasonic bath under long and short period of radiation of ultrasound. A microscope was used above the model for microscopic studies on the interface of oil and water. Diffusion of phases and formation of emulsion were observed in both long and short period of application of ultrasound at the beginning of ultrasound radiation. However, by passing time, demulsification and coalescence of brine droplets inside emulsion was initiated in long period of ultrasound application. Therefore, it was concluded that emulsification could be one of the significant oil recovery mechanisms happening in porous media under short period of application of ultrasound. PMID:25616638