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Sample records for modified homotopy perturbation

  1. Approximate Analytical Solutions of the Regularized Long Wave Equation Using the Optimal Homotopy Perturbation Method

    PubMed Central

    Căruntu, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents the optimal homotopy perturbation method, which is a new method to find approximate analytical solutions for nonlinear partial differential equations. Based on the well-known homotopy perturbation method, the optimal homotopy perturbation method presents an accelerated convergence compared to the regular homotopy perturbation method. The applications presented emphasize the high accuracy of the method by means of a comparison with previous results. PMID:25003150

  2. Application of the Homotopy Perturbation Method to the Nonlinear Pendulum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belendez, A.; Hernandez, A.; Belendez, T.; Marquez, A.

    2007-01-01

    The homotopy perturbation method is used to solve the nonlinear differential equation that governs the nonlinear oscillations of a simple pendulum, and an approximate expression for its period is obtained. Only one iteration leads to high accuracy of the solutions and the relative error for the approximate period is less than 2% for amplitudes as…

  3. Series Expansion of Functions with He's Homotopy Perturbation Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khattri, Sanjay Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Finding a series expansion, such as Taylor series, of functions is an important mathematical concept with many applications. Homotopy perturbation method (HPM) is a new, easy to use and effective tool for solving a variety of mathematical problems. In this study, we present how to apply HPM to obtain a series expansion of functions. Consequently,…

  4. Analytical method for space-fractional telegraph equation by homotopy perturbation transform method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Amit

    2016-06-01

    The object of the present article is to study spacefractional telegraph equation by fractional Homotopy perturbation transform method (FHPTM). The homotopy perturbation transform method is an innovative adjustment in Laplace transform algorithm. Three test examples are presented to show the efficiency of the proposed technique.

  5. Laplace homotopy perturbation method for Burgers equation with space- and time-fractional order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, S. J.; Jafari, H.; Moshokoa, S. P.; Ariyan, V. M.; Baleanu, D.

    2016-07-01

    The fractional Burgers equation describes the physical processes of unidirectional propagation of weakly nonlinear acoustic waves through a gas-filled pipe. The Laplace homotopy perturbation method is discussed to obtain the approximate analytical solution of space-fractional and time-fractional Burgers equations. The method used combines the Laplace transform and the homotopy perturbation method. Numerical results show that the approach is easy to implement and accurate when applied to partial differential equations of fractional orders.

  6. Numerical Solution of Problems in Calculus of Variations by Homotopy Perturbation Method

    SciTech Connect

    Jafari, M. A.; Aminataei, A.

    2008-09-01

    In this work we use Homotopy Perturbation Method (HPM) to solve differential equations that arise in variational problems. To illustrate the method some examples are provided. The results show the efficiency and accuracy of the HPM. HPM can be considered an alternative method to Adomian decomposition method. Both of these methods can obtain analytic form of the solution in some cases.

  7. Homotopy Perturbation Transform Method with He's Polynomial for Solution of Coupled Nonlinear Partial Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Dinkar; Singh, Prince; Chauhan, Shubha

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a combined form of the Laplace transform method with the homotopy perturbation method (HPTM) is applied to solve nonlinear systems of partial differential equations viz. the system of third order KdV Equations and the systems of coupled Burgers' equations in one- and two- dimensions. The nonlinear terms can be easily handled by the use of He's polynomials. The results shows that the HPTM is very efficient, simple and avoids the round-off errors. Four test examples are considered to illustrate the present scheme. Further the results are compared with Homotopy perturbation method (HPM) which shows that this method is a suitable method for solving systems of partial differential equations.

  8. Homotopy Perturbation Method-Based Analytical Solution for Tide-Induced Groundwater Fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Munusamy, Selva Balaji; Dhar, Anirban

    2016-05-01

    The groundwater variations in unconfined aquifers are governed by the nonlinear Boussinesq's equation. Analytical solution for groundwater fluctuations in coastal aquifers under tidal forcing can be solved using perturbation methods. However, the perturbation parameters should be properly selected and predefined for traditional perturbation methods. In this study, a new dimensional, higher-order analytical solution for groundwater fluctuations is proposed by using the homotopy perturbation method with a virtual perturbation parameter. Parameter-expansion method is used to remove the secular terms generated during the solution process. The solution does not require any predefined perturbation parameter and valid for higher values of amplitude parameter A/D, where A is the amplitude of the tide and D is the aquifer thickness. PMID:26340338

  9. Modified hyperspheres algorithm to trace homotopy curves of nonlinear circuits composed by piecewise linear modelled devices.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Leal, H; Jimenez-Fernandez, V M; Benhammouda, B; Filobello-Nino, U; Sarmiento-Reyes, A; Ramirez-Pinero, A; Marin-Hernandez, A; Huerta-Chua, J

    2014-01-01

    We present a homotopy continuation method (HCM) for finding multiple operating points of nonlinear circuits composed of devices modelled by using piecewise linear (PWL) representations. We propose an adaptation of the modified spheres path tracking algorithm to trace the homotopy trajectories of PWL circuits. In order to assess the benefits of this proposal, four nonlinear circuits composed of piecewise linear modelled devices are analysed to determine their multiple operating points. The results show that HCM can find multiple solutions within a single homotopy trajectory. Furthermore, we take advantage of the fact that homotopy trajectories are PWL curves meant to replace the multidimensional interpolation and fine tuning stages of the path tracking algorithm with a simple and highly accurate procedure based on the parametric straight line equation. PMID:25184157

  10. Modified Hyperspheres Algorithm to Trace Homotopy Curves of Nonlinear Circuits Composed by Piecewise Linear Modelled Devices

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Leal, H.; Jimenez-Fernandez, V. M.; Benhammouda, B.; Filobello-Nino, U.; Sarmiento-Reyes, A.; Ramirez-Pinero, A.; Marin-Hernandez, A.; Huerta-Chua, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a homotopy continuation method (HCM) for finding multiple operating points of nonlinear circuits composed of devices modelled by using piecewise linear (PWL) representations. We propose an adaptation of the modified spheres path tracking algorithm to trace the homotopy trajectories of PWL circuits. In order to assess the benefits of this proposal, four nonlinear circuits composed of piecewise linear modelled devices are analysed to determine their multiple operating points. The results show that HCM can find multiple solutions within a single homotopy trajectory. Furthermore, we take advantage of the fact that homotopy trajectories are PWL curves meant to replace the multidimensional interpolation and fine tuning stages of the path tracking algorithm with a simple and highly accurate procedure based on the parametric straight line equation. PMID:25184157

  11. Solving the Helmholtz equation in conformal mapped ARROW structures using homotopy perturbation method.

    PubMed

    Reck, Kasper; Thomsen, Erik V; Hansen, Ole

    2011-01-31

    The scalar wave equation, or Helmholtz equation, describes within a certain approximation the electromagnetic field distribution in a given system. In this paper we show how to solve the Helmholtz equation in complex geometries using conformal mapping and the homotopy perturbation method. The solution of the mapped Helmholtz equation is found by solving an infinite series of Poisson equations using two dimensional Fourier series. The solution is entirely based on analytical expressions and is not mesh dependent. The analytical results are compared to a numerical (finite element method) solution. PMID:21368995

  12. Laplace transform homotopy perturbation method for the approximation of variational problems.

    PubMed

    Filobello-Nino, U; Vazquez-Leal, H; Rashidi, M M; Sedighi, H M; Perez-Sesma, A; Sandoval-Hernandez, M; Sarmiento-Reyes, A; Contreras-Hernandez, A D; Pereyra-Diaz, D; Hoyos-Reyes, C; Jimenez-Fernandez, V M; Huerta-Chua, J; Castro-Gonzalez, F; Laguna-Camacho, J R

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes the application of Laplace Transform-Homotopy Perturbation Method and some of its modifications in order to find analytical approximate solutions for the linear and nonlinear differential equations which arise from some variational problems. As case study we will solve four ordinary differential equations, and we will show that the proposed solutions have good accuracy, even we will obtain an exact solution. In the sequel, we will see that the square residual error for the approximate solutions, belongs to the interval [0.001918936920, 0.06334882582], which confirms the accuracy of the proposed methods, taking into account the complexity and difficulty of variational problems. PMID:27006884

  13. Calculation of the neutron diffusion equation by using Homotopy Perturbation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koklu, H.; Ersoy, A.; Gulecyuz, M. C.; Ozer, O.

    2016-03-01

    The distribution of the neutrons in a nuclear fuel element in the nuclear reactor core can be calculated by the neutron diffusion theory. It is the basic and the simplest approximation for the neutron flux function in the reactor core. In this study, the neutron flux function is obtained by the Homotopy Perturbation Method (HPM) that is a new and convenient method in recent years. One-group time-independent neutron diffusion equation is examined for the most solved geometrical reactor core of spherical, cubic and cylindrical shapes, in the frame of the HPM. It is observed that the HPM produces excellent results consistent with the existing literature.

  14. Application of He's homotopy perturbation method to boundary layer flow and convection heat transfer over a flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeilpour, M.; Ganji, D. D.

    2007-12-01

    In this Letter, the problem of forced convection over a horizontal flat plate is presented and the homotopy perturbation method (HPM) is employed to compute an approximation to the solution of the system of nonlinear differential equations governing on the problem. It has been attempted to show the capabilities and wide-range applications of the homotopy perturbation method in comparison with the previous ones in solving heat transfer problems. The obtained solutions, in comparison with the exact solutions admit a remarkable accuracy. A clear conclusion can be drawn from the numerical results that the HPM provides highly accurate numerical solutions for nonlinear differential equations.

  15. A Homotopy Perturbation-Based Method for Large Deflection of a Cantilever Beam Under a Terminal Follower Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong-Gang; Lin, Wen-Hui; Liu, Ning

    2012-05-01

    The large deflection problem of a uniform cantilever beam subjected to a terminal concentrated follower force is investigated. The governing equations, which characterize a two-point boundary value problem, are transformed into an initial-value problem. A new algorithm based on the homotopy perturbation method is proposed and applied to the resulting problem and the characteristics of load versus displacement are obtained analytically. The convergence of this method is discussed and the details of load-deflection curves are present. Compared with other existing methods, the present scheme is shown to be highly accurate, while only lower order perturbation is required.

  16. A novel solution procedure for a three-level atom interacting with one-mode cavity field via modified homotopy analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Wahab, N. H.; Salah, Ahmed

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, the interaction of a three-level -configration atom and a one-mode quantized electromagnetic cavity field has been studied. The detuning parameters, the Kerr nonlinearity and the arbitrary form of both the field and intensity-dependent atom-field coupling have been taken into account. The wave function when the atom and the field are initially prepared in the excited state and coherent state, respectively, by using the Schrödinger equation has been given. The analytical approximation solution of this model has been obtained by using the modified homotopy analysis method (MHAM). The homotopy analysis method is mentioned summarily. MHAM can be obtained from the homotopy analysis method (HAM) applied to Laplace, inverse Laplace transform and Pade approximate. MHAM is used to increase the accuracy and accelerate the convergence rate of truncated series solution obtained by the HAM. The time-dependent parameters of the anti-bunching of photons, the amplitude-squared squeezing and the coherent properties have been calculated. The influence of the detuning parameters, Kerr nonlinearity and photon number operator on the temporal behavior of these phenomena have been analyzed. We noticed that the considered system is sensitive to variations in the presence of these parameters.

  17. Density perturbations in general modified gravitational theories

    SciTech Connect

    De Felice, Antonio; Tsujikawa, Shinji; Mukohyama, Shinji

    2010-07-15

    We derive the equations of linear cosmological perturbations for the general Lagrangian density f(R,{phi},X)/2+L{sub c}, where R is a Ricci scalar, {phi} is a scalar field, and X=-{partial_derivative}{sup {mu}{phi}{partial_derivative}}{sub {mu}{phi}/}2 is a field kinetic energy. We take into account a nonlinear self-interaction term L{sub c}={xi}({phi}) {open_square}{phi}({partial_derivative}{sup {mu}{phi}{partial_derivative}}{sub {mu}{phi}}) recently studied in the context of ''Galileon'' cosmology, which keeps the field equations at second order. Taking into account a scalar-field mass explicitly, the equations of matter density perturbations and gravitational potentials are obtained under a quasistatic approximation on subhorizon scales. We also derive conditions for the avoidance of ghosts and Laplacian instabilities associated with propagation speeds. Our analysis includes most of modified gravity models of dark energy proposed in literature; and thus it is convenient to test the viability of such models from both theoretical and observational points of view.

  18. Homotopy optimization methods for global optimization.

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlavy, Daniel M.; O'Leary, Dianne P.

    2005-12-01

    We define a new method for global optimization, the Homotopy Optimization Method (HOM). This method differs from previous homotopy and continuation methods in that its aim is to find a minimizer for each of a set of values of the homotopy parameter, rather than to follow a path of minimizers. We define a second method, called HOPE, by allowing HOM to follow an ensemble of points obtained by perturbation of previous ones. We relate this new method to standard methods such as simulated annealing and show under what circumstances it is superior. We present results of extensive numerical experiments demonstrating performance of HOM and HOPE.

  19. Computing model independent perturbations in dark energy and modified gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Battye, Richard A.; Pearson, Jonathan A. E-mail: jonathan.pearson@durham.ac.uk

    2014-03-01

    We present a methodology for computing model independent perturbations in dark energy and modified gravity. This is done from the Lagrangian for perturbations, by showing how field content, symmetries, and physical principles are often sufficient ingredients for closing the set of perturbed fluid equations. The fluid equations close once ''equations of state for perturbations'' are identified: these are linear combinations of fluid and metric perturbations which construct gauge invariant entropy and anisotropic stress perturbations for broad classes of theories. Our main results are the proof of the equation of state for perturbations presented in a previous paper, and the development of the required calculational tools.

  20. Modified contour-improved perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Cvetic, Gorazd; Loewe, Marcelo; Martinez, Cristian; Valenzuela, Cristian

    2010-11-01

    The semihadronic tau decay width allows a clean extraction of the strong coupling constant at low energies. We present a modification of the standard ''contour-improved'' method based on a derivative expansion of the Adler function. The new approach has some advantages compared to contour-improved perturbation theory. The renormalization scale dependence is weaker by more than a factor of 2 and the last term of the expansion is reduced by about 10%, while the renormalization scheme dependence remains approximately equal. The extracted QCD coupling at the tau mass scale is by 2% lower than the contour-improved value. We find {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z}{sup 2})=0.1211{+-}0.0010.

  1. Perturbations of single-field inflation in modified gravity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Taotao; Xia, Jun-Qing

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we study the case of single field inflation within the framework of modified gravity theory where the gravity part has an arbitrary form f (R). Via a conformal transformation, this case can be transformed into its Einstein frame where it looks like a two-field inflation model. However, due to the existence of the isocurvature modes in such a multi-degree-of-freedom (m.d.o.f.) system, the (curvature) perturbations are not equivalent in two frames, so despite of its convenience, it is illegal to treat the perturbations in its Einstein frame as the "real" ones as we always do for pure f (R) theory or single field with nonminimal coupling. Here by pulling the results of curvature perturbations back into its original Jordan frame, we show explicitly the power spectrum and spectral index of the perturbations in the Jordan frame, as well as how it differs from the Einstein frame. We also fit our results with the newest Planck data. Since there is large parameter space in these models, we show that it is easy to fit the data very well.

  2. Modified artificial bee colony optimization with block perturbation strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Dongli; Duan, Xintao; Khurram Khan, Muhammad

    2015-05-01

    As a newly emerged swarm intelligence-based optimizer, the artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm has attracted the interest of researchers in recent years owing to its ease of use and efficiency. In this article, a modified ABC algorithm with block perturbation strategy (BABC) is proposed. Unlike basic ABC, in the BABC algorithm, not one element but a block of elements from the parent solutions is changed while producing a new solution. The performance of the BABC algorithm is investigated and compared with that of the basic ABC, modified ABC, Brest's differential evolution, self-adaptive differential evolution and restart covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy (IPOP-CMA-ES) over a set of widely used benchmark functions. The obtained results show that the performance of BABC is better than, or at least comparable to, that of the basic ABC, improved differential evolution variants and IPOP-CMA-ES in terms of convergence speed and final solution accuracy.

  3. Vacuum structure for scalar cosmological perturbations in modified gravity models

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, Antonio De; Suyama, Teruaki E-mail: teruaki.suyama@uclouvain.be

    2009-06-01

    We have found for the general class of Modified Gravity Models f(R, G) a new instability which can arise in vacuum for the scalar modes of the cosmological perturbations if the background is not de Sitter. In particular, the short-wavelength modes, if stable, in general have a group velocity which depends linearly in k, the wave number. Therefore these modes will be in general superluminal. We have also discussed the condition for which in general these scalar modes will be ghost-like. There is a subclass of these models, defined out of properties of the function f(R, G) and to which the f(R) and f(G) models belong, which however do not have this feature.

  4. Noncommutative geometry modified non-Gaussianities of cosmological perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Kejie; Xue Wei; Chen Bin

    2008-03-15

    We investigate the noncommutative effect on the non-Gaussianities of primordial cosmological perturbation. In the lowest order of string length and slow-roll parameter, we find that in the models with small speed of sound the noncommutative modifications could be observable if assuming a relatively low string scale. In particular, the dominant modification of the non-Gaussianity estimator f{sub NL} could reach O(1) in Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) inflation and K-inflation. The corrections are sensitive to the speed of sound and the choice of string length scale. Moreover the shapes of the corrected non-Gaussianities are distinct from that of ordinary ones.

  5. Practical approach to cosmological perturbations in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestri, Alessandra; Pogosian, Levon; Buniy, Roman V.

    2013-05-01

    The next generation of large scale surveys will not only measure cosmological parameters within the framework of general relativity, but will also allow for precision tests of the framework itself. At the order of linear perturbations, departures from the growth in the standard cosmological model can be quantified in terms of two functions of time and Fourier number k. We argue that in local theories of gravity, in the quasistatic approximation, these functions must be ratios of polynomials in k, with the numerator of one function being equal to the denominator of the other. Moreover, the polynomials are even and of second degree in practically all viable models considered today. This means that, without significant loss of generality, one can use data to constrain only five functions of a single variable, instead of two functions of two variables. Furthermore, since the five functions are expected to be slowly varying, one can fit them to data in a nonparametric way with the aid of an explicit smoothness prior. We discuss practical application of this parametrization to forecasts and fits.

  6. Open-closed homotopy algebra in mathematical physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kajiura, Hiroshige; Stasheff, Jim

    2006-02-15

    In this paper we discuss various aspects of open-closed homotopy algebras (OCHAs) presented in our previous paper, inspired by Zwiebach's open-closed string field theory, but that first paper concentrated on the mathematical aspects. Here we show how an OCHA is obtained by extracting the tree part of Zwiebach's quantum open-closed string field theory. We clarify the explicit relation of an OCHA with Kontsevich's deformation quantization and with the B-models of homological mirror symmetry. An explicit form of the minimal model for an OCHA is given as well as its relation to the perturbative expansion of open-closed string field theory. We show that our open-closed homotopy algebra gives us a general scheme for deformation of open string structures (A{sub {infinity}} algebras) by closed strings (L{sub {infinity}} algebras)

  7. Homotopy theory in toric topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grbić, J.; Theriault, S.

    2016-04-01

    In toric topology one associates with each simplicial complex K on m vertices two key spaces, the Davis-Januszkiewicz space DJK and the moment-angle complex \\mathscr{Z}K, which are related by a homotopy fibration \\mathscr{Z}K\\xrightarrow{\\tilde{w}}DJ_K\\to \\prodi=1m{C}P∞. A great deal of work has been done to study the properties of DJK and \\mathscr{Z}K, their generalizations to polyhedral products, and applications to algebra, combinatorics, and geometry. Chap. 1 surveys some of the main results in the homotopy theory of these spaces. Chap. 2 breaks new ground by initiating a study of the map \\tilde{w}. It is shown that, for a certain family of simplicial complexes K, the map \\tilde{w} is a sum of higher and iterated Whitehead products. Bibliography: 49 titles.

  8. Perturbations of Schwarzschild black holes in Chern-Simons modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunes, Nicolás; Sopuerta, Carlos F.

    2008-03-01

    We study perturbations of a Schwarzschild black hole in Chern-Simons modified gravity. We begin by showing that Birkhoff’s theorem holds for a wide family of Chern-Simons coupling functions, a scalar field present in the theory that controls the strength of the Chern-Simons correction to the Einstein-Hilbert action. After decomposing the perturbations in spherical harmonics, we study the linearized modified field equations and find that axial and polar modes are coupled, in contrast to general relativity. The divergence of the modified equations leads to the Pontryagin constraint, which forces the vanishing of the Cunningham-Price-Moncrief master function associated with axial modes. We analyze the structure of these equations and find that the appearance of the Pontryagin constraint yields an overconstrained system that does not allow for generic black hole oscillations. We illustrate this situation by studying the case characterized by a canonical choice of the coupling function and pure-parity perturbative modes. We end with a discussion of how to extend Chern-Simons modified gravity to bypass the Pontryagin constraint and the suppression of perturbations.

  9. A cohomological framework for homotopy moment maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frégier, Yaël; Laurent-Gengoux, Camille; Zambon, Marco

    2015-11-01

    Given a Lie group acting on a manifold M preserving a closed n + 1-form ω, the notion of homotopy moment map for this action was introduced in Fregier (0000), in terms of L∞-algebra morphisms. In this note we describe homotopy moment maps as coboundaries of a certain complex. This description simplifies greatly computations, and we use it to study various properties of homotopy moment maps: their relation to equivariant cohomology, their obstruction theory, how they induce new ones on mapping spaces, and their equivalences. The results we obtain extend some of the results of Fregier (0000).

  10. Homotopy Classification of Bosonic String Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münster, Korbinian; Sachs, Ivo

    2014-09-01

    We prove the decomposition theorem for the loop homotopy Lie algebra of quantum closed string field theory and use it to show that closed string field theory is unique up to gauge transformations on a given string background and given S-matrix. For the theory of open and closed strings we use results in open-closed homotopy algebra to show that the space of inequivalent open string field theories is isomorphic to the space of classical closed string backgrounds. As a further application of the open-closed homotopy algebra, we show that string field theory is background independent and locally unique in a very precise sense. Finally, we discuss topological string theory in the framework of homotopy algebras and find a generalized correspondence between closed strings and open string field theories.

  11. Homotopy invariance of η-invariants

    PubMed Central

    Weinberger, Shmuel

    1988-01-01

    Intersection homology and results related to the higher signature problem are applied to show that certain combinations of η-invariants of the signature operator are homotopy invariant in various circumstances. PMID:16593961

  12. Matter density perturbations in modified gravity models with arbitrary coupling between matter and geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nesseris, Savvas

    2009-02-15

    We consider theories with an arbitrary coupling between matter and gravity and obtain the perturbation equation of matter on subhorizon scales. Also, we derive the effective gravitational constant G{sub eff} and two parameters {sigma} and {eta}, which along with the perturbation equation of the matter density are useful to constrain the theory from growth factor and weak lensing observations. Finally, we use a completely solvable toy model which exhibits nontrivial phenomenology to investigate specific features of the theory. We obtain the analytic solution of the modified Friedmann equation for the scale factor a in terms of time t and use the age of the oldest star clusters and the primordial nucleosynthesis bounds in order to constrain the parameters of our toy model.

  13. On the selection of auxiliary functions, operators, and convergence control parameters in the application of the Homotopy Analysis Method to nonlinear differential equations: A general approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Gorder, Robert A.; Vajravelu, K.

    2009-12-01

    The Homotopy Analysis Method of Liao [Liao SJ. Beyond perturbation: introduction to the Homotopy Analysis Method. Boca Raton: Chapman & Hall/CRC Press; 2003] has proven useful in obtaining analytical solutions to various nonlinear differential equations. In this method, one has great freedom to select auxiliary functions, operators, and parameters in order to ensure the convergence of the approximate solutions and to increase both the rate and region of convergence. We discuss in this paper the selection of the initial approximation, auxiliary linear operator, auxiliary function, and convergence control parameter in the application of the Homotopy Analysis Method, in a fairly general setting. Further, we discuss various convergence requirements on solutions.

  14. An Efficient Algorithm for Perturbed Orbit Integration Combining Analytical Continuation and Modified Chebyshev Picard Iteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgohary, T.; Kim, D.; Turner, J.; Junkins, J.

    2014-09-01

    Several methods exist for integrating the motion in high order gravity fields. Some recent methods use an approximate starting orbit, and an efficient method is needed for generating warm starts that account for specific low order gravity approximations. By introducing two scalar Lagrange-like invariants and employing Leibniz product rule, the perturbed motion is integrated by a novel recursive formulation. The Lagrange-like invariants allow exact arbitrary order time derivatives. Restricting attention to the perturbations due to the zonal harmonics J2 through J6, we illustrate an idea. The recursively generated vector-valued time derivatives for the trajectory are used to develop a continuation series-based solution for propagating position and velocity. Numerical comparisons indicate performance improvements of ~ 70X over existing explicit Runge-Kutta methods while maintaining mm accuracy for the orbit predictions. The Modified Chebyshev Picard Iteration (MCPI) is an iterative path approximation method to solve nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The MCPI utilizes Picard iteration with orthogonal Chebyshev polynomial basis functions to recursively update the states. The key advantages of the MCPI are as follows: 1) Large segments of a trajectory can be approximated by evaluating the forcing function at multiple nodes along the current approximation during each iteration. 2) It can readily handle general gravity perturbations as well as non-conservative forces. 3) Parallel applications are possible. The Picard sequence converges to the solution over large time intervals when the forces are continuous and differentiable. According to the accuracy of the starting solutions, however, the MCPI may require significant number of iterations and function evaluations compared to other integrators. In this work, we provide an efficient methodology to establish good starting solutions from the continuation series method; this warm start improves the performance of the

  15. Nonlinear filters with log-homotopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daum, Fred; Huang, Jim

    2007-09-01

    We derive and test a new nonlinear filter that implements Bayes' rule using an ODE rather than with a pointwise multiplication of two functions. This avoids one of the fundamental and well known problems in particle filters, namely "particle collapse" as a result of Bayes' rule. We use a log-homotopy to construct this ODE. Our new algorithm is vastly superior to the classic particle filter, and we do not use any proposal density supplied by an EKF or UKF or other outside source. This paper was written for normal engineers, who do not have homotopy for breakfast.

  16. Experiments with conjugate gradient algorithms for homotopy curve tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irani, Kashmira M.; Ribbens, Calvin J.; Watson, Layne T.; Kamat, Manohar P.; Walker, Homer F.

    1991-01-01

    There are algorithms for finding zeros or fixed points of nonlinear systems of equations that are globally convergent for almost all starting points, i.e., with probability one. The essence of all such algorithms is the construction of an appropriate homotopy map and then tracking some smooth curve in the zero set of this homotopy map. HOMPACK is a mathematical software package implementing globally convergent homotopy algorithms with three different techniques for tracking a homotopy zero curve, and has separate routines for dense and sparse Jacobian matrices. The HOMPACK algorithms for sparse Jacobian matrices use a preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm for the computation of the kernel of the homotopy Jacobian matrix, a required linear algebra step for homotopy curve tracking. Here, variants of the conjugate gradient algorithm are implemented in the context of homotopy curve tracking and compared with Craig's preconditioned conjugate gradient method used in HOMPACK. The test problems used include actual large scale, sparse structural mechanics problems.

  17. Direct perturbation analysis on the localized waves of the modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation under nonvanishing boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Xu, Tao; Wang, Lei

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation is investigated via the direct perturbation method, which can describe the femtosecond optical pulse propagation in a monomodal optical fiber. Considering the quintic nonlinear perturbation, we obtain the approximate solution with the first-order correction, which can be expressed by the solution and symmetry of the derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Under the nonvanishing boundary conditions, the approximate dark and anti-dark soliton solutions are derived and the existence conditions are also given. The effects of the perturbation on the propagations and interactions of the solitons on the nonzero background are discussed by comparing the physical quantities of solitons with the unperturbed case. It is found that the quintic nonlinear perturbation can lead to the change of the velocity as well as the pulse compression, but has no influence on the dynamics of the elastic interactions. Finally, numerical simulations are performed to support the theoretical results.

  18. Power System Transient Stability Analysis through a Homotopy Analysis Method

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shaobu; Du, Pengwei; Zhou, Ning

    2014-04-01

    As an important function of energy management systems (EMSs), online contingency analysis plays an important role in providing power system security warnings of instability. At present, N-1 contingency analysis still relies on time-consuming numerical integration. To save computational cost, the paper proposes a quasi-analytical method to evaluate transient stability through time domain periodic solutions’ frequency sensitivities against initial values. First, dynamic systems described in classical models are modified into damping free systems whose solutions are either periodic or expanded (non-convergent). Second, because the sensitivities experience sharp changes when periodic solutions vanish and turn into expanded solutions, transient stability is assessed using the sensitivity. Third, homotopy analysis is introduced to extract frequency information and evaluate the sensitivities only from initial values so that time consuming numerical integration is avoided. Finally, a simple case is presented to demonstrate application of the proposed method, and simulation results show that the proposed method is promising.

  19. Modified fractional variational iteration method for solving the generalized time-space fractional Schrödinger equation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Baojian; Lu, Dianchen

    2014-01-01

    Based on He's variational iteration method idea, we modified the fractional variational iteration method and applied it to construct some approximate solutions of the generalized time-space fractional Schrödinger equation (GFNLS). The fractional derivatives are described in the sense of Caputo. With the help of symbolic computation, some approximate solutions and their iterative structure of the GFNLS are investigated. Furthermore, the approximate iterative series and numerical results show that the modified fractional variational iteration method is powerful, reliable, and effective when compared with some classic traditional methods such as homotopy analysis method, homotopy perturbation method, adomian decomposition method, and variational iteration method in searching for approximate solutions of the Schrödinger equations. PMID:25276865

  20. Parameter estimation for metabolic networks with two stage Bregman regularization homotopy inversion algorithm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Wang, Xi-cheng

    2014-02-21

    Metabolism is a very important cellular process and its malfunction contributes to human disease. Therefore, building dynamic models for metabolic networks with experimental data in order to analyze biological process rationally has attracted a lot of attention. Owing to the technical limitations, some unknown parameters contained in models need to be estimated effectively by means of the computational method. Generally, problems of parameter estimation of nonlinear biological network are known to be ill condition and multimodal. In particular, with the increasing amount and enlarging the scope of parameters, many optimization algorithms often fail to find a global solution. In this paper, two-stage variable factor Bregman regularization homotopy method is proposed. Discrete homotopy is used to identify the possible extreme region and continuous homotopy is executed for the purpose of stability of path tracing in the special region. Meanwhile, Latin hypercube sampling is introduced to get the good initial guess value and a perturbation strategy is developed to jump out of the local optimum. Three metabolic network inverse problems are investigated to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:24060619

  1. Co-contraction modifies the stretch reflex elicited in muscles shortened by a joint perturbation

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Gwyn N.; MacKinnon, Colum D.; Trumbower, Randy; Perreault, Eric J.

    2011-01-01

    Simultaneous contraction of agonist and antagonist muscles acting about a joint influences joint stiffness and stability. Although several studies have shown that reflexes in the muscle lengthened by a joint perturbation are modulated during co-contraction, little attention has been given to reflex regulation in the antagonist (shortened) muscle. The goal of the present study was to determine whether co-contraction gives rise to altered reflex regulation across the joint by examining reflexes in the muscle shortened by a joint perturbation. Reflexes were recorded from electromyographic activity in elbow flexors and extensors while positional perturbations to the elbow joint were applied. Perturbations were delivered during isolated activation of the flexor or extensor muscles as well as during flexor and extensor co-contraction. Across the group, the shortening reflex in the elbow extensor switched from suppression during isolated extensor muscle activation to facilitation during co-contraction. The shortening reflex in the elbow flexor remained suppressive during co-contraction but was significantly smaller compared to the response obtained during isolated elbow flexor activation. This response in the shortened muscle was graded by the level of activation in the lengthened muscle. The lengthening reflex did not change during co-contraction. These results support the idea that reflexes are regulated across multiple muscles around a joint. We speculate that the facilitatory response in the shortened muscle arises through a fast-conducting oligosynaptic pathway involving Ib interneurons. PMID:20878148

  2. From Atiyah Classes to Homotopy Leibniz Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhuo; Stiénon, Mathieu; Xu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    A celebrated theorem of Kapranov states that the Atiyah class of the tangent bundle of a complex manifold X makes T X [-1] into a Lie algebra object in D + ( X), the bounded below derived category of coherent sheaves on X. Furthermore, Kapranov proved that, for a Kähler manifold X, the Dolbeault resolution {Ω^{bullet-1}(T_X^{1, 0})} of T X [-1] is an L ∞ algebra. In this paper, we prove that Kapranov's theorem holds in much wider generality for vector bundles over Lie pairs. Given a Lie pair ( L, A), i.e. a Lie algebroid L together with a Lie subalgebroid A, we define the Atiyah class α E of an A-module E as the obstruction to the existence of an A- compatible L-connection on E. We prove that the Atiyah classes α L/ A and α E respectively make L/ A[-1] and E[-1] into a Lie algebra and a Lie algebra module in the bounded below derived category {D^+(A)} , where {A} is the abelian category of left {U(A)} -modules and {U(A)} is the universal enveloping algebra of A. Moreover, we produce a homotopy Leibniz algebra and a homotopy Leibniz module stemming from the Atiyah classes of L/ A and E, and inducing the aforesaid Lie structures in {D^+(A)}.

  3. New exact solutions to the perturbed nonlinear Schrödinger’s equation with Kerr law nonlinearity via modified trigonometric function series method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zai-yun; Li, Yun-xiang; Liu, Zhen-hai; Miao, Xiu-jin

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, the modified trigonometric function series method is employed to solve the perturbed nonlinear Schrödinger's equation (NLSE) with Kerr law nonlinearity. Exact traveling wave solutions are obtained.

  4. Experimental Perturbations Modify the Performance of Early Warning Indicators of Regime Shift.

    PubMed

    Benedetti-Cecchi, Lisandro; Tamburello, Laura; Maggi, Elena; Bulleri, Fabio

    2015-07-20

    Ecosystems may shift abruptly between alternative states in response to environmental perturbations. Early warning indicators have been proposed to anticipate such regime shifts, but experimental field tests of their validity are rare. We exposed rocky intertidal algal canopies to a gradient of press perturbations and recorded the response of associated assemblages over 7 years. Reduced cover and biomass of algal canopies promoted the invasion of algal turfs, driving understory assemblages toward collapse upon total canopy removal. A dynamic model indicated the existence of a critical threshold separating the canopy- and turf-dominated states. We evaluated common indicators of regime shift as the system approached the threshold, including autocorrelation, SD, and skewness. These indicators captured changes in understory cover due to colonization of algal turfs. All indicators increased significantly as the system approached the critical threshold, in agreement with theoretical predictions. The performance of indicators changed when we superimposed a pulse disturbance on the press perturbation that amplified environmental noise. This treatment caused several experimental units to switch repeatedly between the canopy- and the turf-dominated state, resulting in a significant increase in overall variance of understory cover, a negligible effect on skewness and no effect on autocorrelation. Power analysis indicated that autocorrelation and SD were better suited at anticipating a regime shift under mild and strong fluctuations of the state variable, respectively. Our results suggest that regime shifts may be anticipated under a broad range of fluctuating conditions using the appropriate indicator. PMID:26166776

  5. Open-Closed Homotopy Algebras and Strong Homotopy Leibniz Pairs Through Koszul Operad Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefel, Eduardo; Livernet, Muriel

    2012-08-01

    Open-closed homotopy algebras (OCHA) and strong homotopy Leibniz pairs (SHLP) were introduced by Kajiura and Stasheff in 2004. In an appendix to their paper, Markl observed that an SHLP is equivalent to an algebra over the minimal model of a certain operad, without showing that the operad is Koszul. In the present paper, we show that both OCHA and SHLP are algebras over the minimal model of the zeroth homology of two versions of the Swiss-cheese operad and prove that these two operads are Koszul. As an application, we show that the OCHA operad is non-formal as a 2-colored operad but is formal as an algebra in the category of 2-collections.

  6. Efficient Homotopy Continuation Algorithms with Application to Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David A.

    New homotopy continuation algorithms are developed and applied to a parallel implicit finite-difference Newton-Krylov-Schur external aerodynamic flow solver for the compressible Euler, Navier-Stokes, and Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation turbulence model. Many new analysis tools, calculations, and numerical algorithms are presented for the study and design of efficient and robust homotopy continuation algorithms applicable to solving very large and sparse nonlinear systems of equations. Several specific homotopies are presented and studied and a methodology is presented for assessing the suitability of specific homotopies for homotopy continuation. . A new class of homotopy continuation algorithms, referred to as monolithic homotopy continuation algorithms, is developed. These algorithms differ from classical predictor-corrector algorithms by combining the predictor and corrector stages into a single update, significantly reducing the amount of computation and avoiding wasted computational effort resulting from over-solving in the corrector phase. The new algorithms are also simpler from a user perspective, with fewer input parameters, which also improves the user's ability to choose effective parameters on the first flow solve attempt. Conditional convergence is proved analytically and studied numerically for the new algorithms. The performance of a fully-implicit monolithic homotopy continuation algorithm is evaluated for several inviscid, laminar, and turbulent flows over NACA 0012 airfoils and ONERA M6 wings. The monolithic algorithm is demonstrated to be more efficient than the predictor-corrector algorithm for all applications investigated. It is also demonstrated to be more efficient than the widely-used pseudo-transient continuation algorithm for all inviscid and laminar cases investigated, and good performance scaling with grid refinement is demonstrated for the inviscid cases. Performance is also demonstrated

  7. Homotopy Algorithm for Optimal Control Problems with a Second-order State Constraint

    SciTech Connect

    Hermant, Audrey

    2010-02-15

    This paper deals with optimal control problems with a regular second-order state constraint and a scalar control, satisfying the strengthened Legendre-Clebsch condition. We study the stability of structure of stationary points. It is shown that under a uniform strict complementarity assumption, boundary arcs are stable under sufficiently smooth perturbations of the data. On the contrary, nonreducible touch points are not stable under perturbations. We show that under some reasonable conditions, either a boundary arc or a second touch point may appear. Those results allow us to design an homotopy algorithm which automatically detects the structure of the trajectory and initializes the shooting parameters associated with boundary arcs and touch points.

  8. Benchmark of a modified iterated perturbation theory approach on the fcc lattice at strong coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Louis-François; Sémon, Patrick; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    2012-08-01

    The dynamical mean-field theory approach to the Hubbard model requires a method to solve the problem of a quantum impurity in a bath of noninteracting electrons. Iterated perturbation theory (IPT) has proven its effectiveness as a solver in many cases of interest. Based on general principles and on comparisons with an essentially exact continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo (CTQMC) solver, here we show that the standard implementation of IPT fails away from half-filling when the interaction strength is much larger than the bandwidth. We propose a slight modification to the IPT algorithm that replaces one of the equations by the requirement that double occupancy calculated with IPT gives the correct value. We call this method IPT-D. We recover the Fermi liquid ground state away from half-filling. The Fermi liquid parameters, density of states, chemical potential, energy, and specific heat on the fcc lattice are calculated with both IPT-D and CTQMC as benchmark examples. We also calculated the resistivity and the optical conductivity within IPT-D. Particle-hole asymmetry persists even at coupling twice the bandwidth. A generalization to the multiorbital case is suggested. Several algorithms that speed up the calculations are described in appendixes.

  9. A Choice Reaction Time Index of Callosal Anatomical Homotopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desjardins, Sameul; Braun, Claude M. J.; Achim, Andre; Roberge, Carl

    2009-01-01

    Tachistoscopically presented bilateral stimulus pairs not parallel to the meridian produced significantly longer RTs on a task requiring discrimination of shapes (Go/no-Go) than pairs emplaced symmetrically on each side of the meridian in Desjardins and Braun [Desjardins, S., & Braun, C. M. J. (2006). Homotopy and heterotopy and the bilateral…

  10. Splitting a simple homotopy equivalence along a submanifold with filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Bak, A; Muranov, Yu V

    2008-06-30

    A simple homotopy equivalence f:M{sup n}{yields}X{sup n} of manifolds splits along a submanifold Y subset of X if it is homotopic to a map that is a simple homotopy equivalence on the transversal preimage of the submanifold and on the complement of this preimage. The problem of splitting along a submanifold with filtration is a natural generalization of this problem. In this paper we define groups LSF{sub *} of obstructions to splitting along a submanifold with filtration and describe their properties. We apply the results obtained to the problem of the realization of surgery and splitting obstructions by maps of closed manifolds and consider several examples. Bibliography: 36 titles.

  11. Homotopy theory of strong and weak topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Ricardo; Guggenheim, Charles

    2015-06-01

    We use homotopy theory to extend the notion of strong and weak topological insulators to the nonstable regime (low numbers of occupied/empty energy bands). We show that for strong topological insulators in d spatial dimensions to be "truly d -dimensional," i.e., not realizable by stacking lower-dimensional insulators, a more restrictive definition of "strong" is required outside the stable regime. However, this does not exclude weak topological insulators from being "truly d -dimensional," which we demonstrate by an example. Additionally, we prove some useful technical results, including the homotopy theoretic derivation of the factorization of invariants over the torus into invariants over spheres in the stable regime, as well as the rigorous justification of the parameter space replacements Td→Sd and Tdk×Sdx→Sdk+dx used widely in the current literature.

  12. Dynamic homotopy and landscape dynamical set topology in quantum control

    SciTech Connect

    Dominy, Jason; Rabitz, Herschel

    2012-08-15

    We examine the topology of the subset of controls taking a given initial state to a given final state in quantum control, where 'state' may mean a pure state Double-Vertical-Line {psi}>, an ensemble density matrix {rho}, or a unitary propagator U(0, T). The analysis consists in showing that the endpoint map acting on control space is a Hurewicz fibration for a large class of affine control systems with vector controls. Exploiting the resulting fibration sequence and the long exact sequence of basepoint-preserving homotopy classes of maps, we show that the indicated subset of controls is homotopy equivalent to the loopspace of the state manifold. This not only allows us to understand the connectedness of 'dynamical sets' realized as preimages of subsets of the state space through this endpoint map, but also provides a wealth of additional topological information about such subsets of control space.

  13. Particle flow for nonlinear filters with log-homotopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daum, Fred; Huang, Jim

    2008-04-01

    We describe a new nonlinear filter that is vastly superior to the classic particle filter. In particular, the computational complexity of the new filter is many orders of magnitude less than the classic particle filter with optimal estimation accuracy for problems with dimension greater than 2 or 3. We consider nonlinear estimation problems with dimensions varying from 1 to 20 that are smooth and fully coupled (i.e. dense not sparse). The new filter implements Bayes' rule using particle flow rather than with a pointwise multiplication of two functions; this avoids one of the fundamental and well known problems in particle filters, namely "particle collapse" as a result of Bayes' rule. We use a log-homotopy to derive the ODE that describes particle flow. This paper was written for normal engineers, who do not have homotopy for breakfast.

  14. On the singular perturbations for fractional differential equation.

    PubMed

    Atangana, Abdon

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to examine the possible extension of the singular perturbation differential equation to the concept of fractional order derivative. To achieve this, we presented a review of the concept of fractional calculus. We make use of the Laplace transform operator to derive exact solution of singular perturbation fractional linear differential equations. We make use of the methodology of three analytical methods to present exact and approximate solution of the singular perturbation fractional, nonlinear, nonhomogeneous differential equation. These methods are including the regular perturbation method, the new development of the variational iteration method, and the homotopy decomposition method. PMID:24683357

  15. Homotopy of rational maps and the quantization of Skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krusch, Steffen

    2003-04-01

    The Skyrme model is a classical field theory which models the strong interaction between atomic nuclei. It has to be quantized in order to compare it to nuclear physics. When the Skyrme model is semi-classically quantized it is important to take the Finkelstein-Rubinstein constraints into account. The aim of this paper is to show how to calculate these FR constraints directly from the rational map ansatz using basic homotopy theory. We then apply this construction in order to quantize the Skyrme model in the simplest approximation, the zero mode quantization. This is carried out for up to 22 nucleons and the results are compared to experiment.

  16. Topological phases: Isomorphism, homotopy and K-theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiang, Guo Chuan

    2015-06-01

    Equivalence classes of gapped Hamiltonians compatible with given symmetry constraints, such as those underlying topological insulators, can be defined in many ways. For the non-chiral classes modeled by vector bundles over Brillouin tori, physically relevant equivalences include isomorphism, homotopy, and K-theory, which are inequivalent but closely related. We discuss an important subtlety which arises in the chiral Class AIII systems, where the winding number invariant is shown to be relative rather than absolute as is usually assumed. These issues are then analyzed and reconciled in the language of K-theory.

  17. An Investigation of How a Meteor Light Curve is Modified by Meteor Shape and Atmospheric Density Perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokan, E.; Campbell-Brown, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    This is a preliminary investigation of how perturbations to meteoroid shape or atmospheric density affect a meteor light curve. A simple equation of motion and ablation are simultaneously solved numerically to give emitted light intensity as a function of height. It is found that changing the meteoroid shape, by changing the relationship between the cross-section area and the mass, changes the curvature and symmetry of the light curve, while making a periodic oscillation in atmospheric density gives a small periodic oscillation in the light curve.

  18. Modified Iterated perturbation theory in the strong coupling regime and its application to the 3d FCC lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Louis-François; Sémon, Patrick; Shastry, B. Sriram; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    2012-02-01

    The Dynamical Mean-Field theory(DMFT) approach to the Hubbard model requires a method to solve the problem of a quantum impurity in a bath of non-interacting electrons. Iterated Perturbation Theory(IPT)[1] has proven its effectiveness as a solver in many cases of interest. Based on general principles and on comparisons with an essentially exact Continuous-Time Quantum Monte Carlo (CTQMC)[2], here we show that the standard implementation of IPT fails when the interaction is much larger than the bandwidth. We propose a slight modification to the IPT algorithm by requiring that double occupancy calculated with IPT gives the correct value. We call this method IPT-D. We show how this approximate impurity solver compares with respect to CTQMC. We consider a face centered cubic lattice(FCC) in 3d for different physical properties. We also use IPT-D to study the thermopower using two recently proposed approximations[3]S^* and SKelvin that do not require analytical continuation and show how thermopower is essentially the entropy per particle in the incoherent regime but not in the coherent one.[1]H.Kajueter et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 131(1996)[2]P. Werner, et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 076405(2006)[3]B.S. Sriram Shastry Rep. Prog. Phys. 72 016501(2009)

  19. Generalized perturbation (n, M)-fold Darboux transformations and multi-rogue-wave structures for the modified self-steepening nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiao-Yong; Yang, Yunqing; Yan, Zhenya

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a simple and constructive method is presented to find the generalized perturbation (n,M)-fold Darboux transformations (DTs) of the modified nonlinear Schrödinger (MNLS) equation in terms of fractional forms of determinants. In particular, we apply the generalized perturbation (1,N-1)-fold DTs to find its explicit multi-rogue-wave solutions. The wave structures of these rogue-wave solutions of the MNLS equation are discussed in detail for different parameters, which display abundant interesting wave structures, including the triangle and pentagon, etc., and may be useful to study the physical mechanism of multirogue waves in optics. The dynamical behaviors of these multi-rogue-wave solutions are illustrated using numerical simulations. The same Darboux matrix can also be used to investigate the Gerjikov-Ivanov equation such that its multi-rogue-wave solutions and their wave structures are also found. The method can also be extended to find multi-rogue-wave solutions of other nonlinear integrable equations. PMID:26274257

  20. The order of a homotopy invariant in the stable case

    SciTech Connect

    Podkorytov, Semen S

    2011-08-31

    Let X, Y be cell complexes, let U be an Abelian group, and let f:[X,Y]{yields}U be a homotopy invariant. By definition, the invariant f has order at most r if the characteristic function of the rth Cartesian power of the graph of a continuous map a:X{yields}Y determines the value f([a]) Z-linearly. It is proved that, in the stable case (that is, when dimX<2n-1, and Y is (n-1)-connected for some natural number n), for a finite cell complex X the order of the invariant f is equal to its degree with respect to the Curtis filtration of the group [X,Y]. Bibliography: 9 titles.

  1. A monolithic homotopy continuation algorithm with application to computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David A.; Zingg, David W.

    2016-09-01

    A new class of homotopy continuation methods is developed suitable for globalizing quasi-Newton methods for large sparse nonlinear systems of equations. The new continuation methods, described as monolithic homotopy continuation, differ from the classical predictor-corrector algorithm in that the predictor and corrector phases are replaced with a single phase which includes both a predictor and corrector component. Conditional convergence and stability are proved analytically. Using a Laplacian-like operator to construct the homotopy, the new algorithm is shown to be more efficient than the predictor-corrector homotopy continuation algorithm as well as an implementation of the widely-used pseudo-transient continuation algorithm for some inviscid and turbulent, subsonic and transonic external aerodynamic flows over the ONERA M6 wing and the NACA 0012 airfoil using a parallel implicit Newton-Krylov finite-difference flow solver.

  2. Note on unit tangent vector computation for homotopy curve tracking on a hypercube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakraborty, A.; Allison, D. C. S.; Ribbens, C. J.; Watson, L. T.

    1991-01-01

    Probability-one homotopy methods are a class of methods for solving nonlinear systems of equations that are globally convergent from an arbitrary starting point. The essence of all such algorithms is the construction of an appropriate homotopy map and subsequent tracking of some smooth curve in the zero set of the homotopy map. Tracking a homotopy curve involves finding the unit tangent vector at different points along the zero curve, which amounts to calculating the kernel of the n x (n + 1) Jacobian matrix. While computing the tangent vector is just one part of the curve tracking algorithm, it can require a significant percentage of the total tracking time. This note presents computational results showing the performance of several different parallel orthogonal factorization/triangular system solving algorithms for the tangent vector computation on a hypercube.

  3. Single-shooting homotopy method for parameter identification in dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Vyasarayani, C P; Uchida, Thomas; McPhee, John

    2012-03-01

    An algorithm for identifying parameters in dynamical systems is developed in this work using homotopy transformations and the single-shooting method. The equations governing the dynamics of the mathematical model are augmented with observer-like homotopy terms that smooth the objective function. As a result, premature convergence to a local minimum is avoided and the obtained parameter estimates are globally optimal. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the application of the proposed approach to chaotic systems. PMID:22587155

  4. Stable homotopy classification of A n 4 -polyhedra with 2- torsion free homology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, JianZhong; Zhu, ZhongJian

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study the stable homotopy types of $\\mathbf{F}^4_{n(2)}$-polyhedra, i.e., $(n-1)$-connected, at most $(n+4)$-dimensional polyhedra with 2-torsion free homologies. We are able to classify the indecomposable $\\mathbf{F}^4_{n(2)}$-polyhedra. The proof relies on the matrix problem technique which was developed in the classification of representaions of algebras and applied to homotopy theory by Baues and Drozd.

  5. On the complexity of a combined homotopy interior method for convex programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bo; Xu, Qing; Feng, Guochen

    2007-03-01

    In [G.C. Feng, Z.H. Lin, B. Yu, Existence of an interior pathway to a Karush-Kuhn-Tucker point of a nonconvex programming problem, Nonlinear Anal. 32 (1998) 761-768; G.C. Feng, B. Yu, Combined homotopy interior point method for nonlinear programming problems, in: H. Fujita, M. Yamaguti (Eds.), Advances in Numerical Mathematics, Proceedings of the Second Japan-China Seminar on Numerical Mathematics, Lecture Notes in Numerical and Applied Analysis, vol. 14, Kinokuniya, Tokyo, 1995, pp. 9-16; Z.H. Lin, B. Yu, G.C. Feng, A combined homotopy interior point method for convex programming problem, Appl. Math. Comput. 84 (1997) 193-211.], a combined homotopy was constructed for solving non-convex programming and convex programming with weaker conditions, without assuming the logarithmic barrier function to be strictly convex and the solution set to be bounded. It was proven that a smooth interior path from an interior point of the feasible set to a K-K-T point of the problem exists. This shows that combined homotopy interior point methods can solve the problem that commonly used interior point methods cannot solveE However, so far, there is no result on its complexity, even for linear programming. The main difficulty is that the objective function is not monotonically decreasing on the combined homotopy path. In this paper, by taking a piecewise technique, under commonly used conditions, polynomiality of a combined homotopy interior point method is given for convex nonlinear programming.

  6. Electronic and optical properties of pure and modified diamondoids studied by many-body perturbation theory and time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Demján, Tamás; Vörös, Márton; Palummo, Maurizia; Gali, Adam

    2014-08-14

    Diamondoids are small diamond nanoparticles (NPs) that are built up from diamond cages. Unlike usual semiconductor NPs, their atomic structure is exactly known, thus they are ideal test-beds for benchmarking quantum chemical calculations. Their usage in spintronics and bioimaging applications requires a detailed knowledge of their electronic structure and optical properties. In this paper, we apply density functional theory (DFT) based methods to understand the electronic and optical properties of a few selected pure and modified diamondoids for which accurate experimental data exist. In particular, we use many-body perturbation theory methods, in the G0W0 and G0W0+BSE approximations, and time-dependent DFT in the adiabatic local density approximation. We find large quasiparticle gap corrections that can exceed thrice the DFT gap. The electron-hole binding energy can be as large as 4 eV but it is considerably smaller than the GW corrections and thus G0W0+BSE optical gaps are about 50% larger than the Kohn-Sham (KS) DFT gaps. We find significant differences between KS time-dependent DFT and GW+BSE optical spectra on the selected diamondoids. The calculated G0W0 quasiparticle levels agree well with the corresponding experimental vertical ionization energies. We show that nuclei dynamics in the ionization process can be significant and its contribution may reach about 0.5 eV in the adiabatic ionization energies. PMID:25134572

  7. Numerical Polynomial Homotopy Continuation Method and String Vacua

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mehta, Dhagash

    2011-01-01

    Finding vmore » acua for the four-dimensional effective theories for supergravity which descend from flux compactifications and analyzing them according to their stability is one of the central problems in string phenomenology. Except for some simple toy models, it is, however, difficult to find all the vacua analytically. Recently developed algorithmic methods based on symbolic computer algebra can be of great help in the more realistic models. However, they suffer from serious algorithmic complexities and are limited to small system sizes. In this paper, we review a numerical method called the numerical polynomial homotopy continuation (NPHC) method, first used in the areas of lattice field theories, which by construction finds all of the vacua of a given potential that is known to have only isolated solutions. The NPHC method is known to suffer from no major algorithmic complexities and is embarrassingly parallelizable , and hence its applicability goes way beyond the existing symbolic methods. We first solve a simple toy model as a warm-up example to demonstrate the NPHC method at work. We then show that all the vacua of a more complicated model of a compactified M theory model, which has an S U ( 3 ) structure, can be obtained by using a desktop machine in just about an hour, a feat which was reported to be prohibitively difficult by the existing symbolic methods. Finally, we compare the various technicalities between the two methods.« less

  8. A homotopy algorithm for digital optimal projection control GASD-HADOC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Emmanuel G., Jr.; Richter, Stephen; Davis, Lawrence D.

    1993-01-01

    The linear-quadratic-gaussian (LQG) compensator was developed to facilitate the design of control laws for multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) systems. The compensator is computed by solving two algebraic equations for which standard closed-loop solutions exist. Unfortunately, the minimal dimension of an LQG compensator is almost always equal to the dimension of the plant and can thus often violate practical implementation constraints on controller order. This deficiency is especially highlighted when considering control-design for high-order systems such as flexible space structures. This deficiency motivated the development of techniques that enable the design of optimal controllers whose dimension is less than that of the design plant. A homotopy approach based on the optimal projection equations that characterize the necessary conditions for optimal reduced-order control. Homotopy algorithms have global convergence properties and hence do not require that the initializing reduced-order controller be close to the optimal reduced-order controller to guarantee convergence. However, the homotopy algorithm previously developed for solving the optimal projection equations has sublinear convergence properties and the convergence slows at higher authority levels and may fail. A new homotopy algorithm for synthesizing optimal reduced-order controllers for discrete-time systems is described. Unlike the previous homotopy approach, the new algorithm is a gradient-based, parameter optimization formulation and was implemented in MATLAB. The results reported may offer the foundation for a reliable approach to optimal, reduced-order controller design.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Investigations of the Local Structural Characteristics of DNA Oligonucleotides: Studies of Helical Axis Deformations, Conformational Sequence Dependence and Modified Nucleoside Perturbations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louise-May, Shirley

    The present DNA studies investigate the local structure of DNA oligonucleotides in order to characterize helical axis deformations, sequence dependent fine structure and modified nucleoside perturbations of selected oligonucleotide sequences. The molecular dynamics method is used to generate an ensemble of energetically feasible DNA conformations which can then be analyzed for dynamical conformational properties, some of which can be compared to experimentally derived values. A theory and graphical presentation for the analysis of helical deformations of DNA based on the configurational statistics of polymers, called "Persistence Analysis", was designed. The results of the analysis on prototype forms, static crystal structures and two solvated MD simulations of the sequence d(CGCGAATTCGCG) indicate that all of the expected features of bending can be sensitively and systematically identified by this approach. Comparison of the relative performance of three molecular dynamics potential functions commonly used for dynamical modeling of biological macromolecules; CHARMm, AMBER and GROMOS was investigated via in vacuo MD simulations on the dodecamer sequence d(CGCGAATTCGCG)_2 with respect to the conformational properties of each dynamical model and their ability to support A and B families of DNA. Vacuum molecular dynamics simulations using the CHARMm force field carried out on simple homo- and heteropolymers of DNA led to the conclusion that sequence dependent fine structure appears to be well defined for adenine-thymine rich sequences both at the base pair and base step level whereas much of the the fine structure found in cytosine -guanine rich sequences appears to be context dependent. The local conformational properties of the homopolymer poly (dA) -poly (dT) revealed one dynamical model which was found in general agreement with fiber models currently available. Investigation of the relative structural static and dynamical effect of the misincorporation of

  10. Electronic and optical properties of pure and modified diamondoids studied by many-body perturbation theory and time-dependent density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Demján, Tamás; Vörös, Márton; Palummo, Maurizia; Gali, Adam

    2014-08-14

    Diamondoids are small diamond nanoparticles (NPs) that are built up from diamond cages. Unlike usual semiconductor NPs, their atomic structure is exactly known, thus they are ideal test-beds for benchmarking quantum chemical calculations. Their usage in spintronics and bioimaging applications requires a detailed knowledge of their electronic structure and optical properties. In this paper, we apply density functional theory (DFT) based methods to understand the electronic and optical properties of a few selected pure and modified diamondoids for which accurate experimental data exist. In particular, we use many-body perturbation theory methods, in the G{sub 0}W{sub 0} and G{sub 0}W{sub 0}+BSE approximations, and time-dependent DFT in the adiabatic local density approximation. We find large quasiparticle gap corrections that can exceed thrice the DFT gap. The electron-hole binding energy can be as large as 4 eV but it is considerably smaller than the GW corrections and thus G{sub 0}W{sub 0}+BSE optical gaps are about 50% larger than the Kohn-Sham (KS) DFT gaps. We find significant differences between KS time-dependent DFT and GW+BSE optical spectra on the selected diamondoids. The calculated G{sub 0}W{sub 0} quasiparticle levels agree well with the corresponding experimental vertical ionization energies. We show that nuclei dynamics in the ionization process can be significant and its contribution may reach about 0.5 eV in the adiabatic ionization energies.

  11. Global Study of the Simple Pendulum by the Homotopy Analysis Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bel, A.; Reartes, W.; Torresi, A.

    2012-01-01

    Techniques are developed to find all periodic solutions in the simple pendulum by means of the homotopy analysis method (HAM). This involves the solution of the equations of motion in two different coordinate representations. Expressions are obtained for the cycles and periods of oscillations with a high degree of accuracy in the whole range of…

  12. Control optimization of a lifting body entry problem by an improved and a modified method of perturbation function. Ph.D. Thesis - Houston Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, F., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A study of the solution problem of a complex entry optimization was studied. The problem was transformed into a two-point boundary value problem by using classical calculus of variation methods. Two perturbation methods were devised. These methods attempted to desensitize the contingency of the solution of this type of problem on the required initial co-state estimates. Also numerical results are presented for the optimal solution resulting from a number of different initial co-states estimates. The perturbation methods were compared. It is found that they are an improvement over existing methods.

  13. Tracing structural optima as a function of available resources by a homotopy method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, Raphael T.; Watson, Layne T.; Plaut, Raymond H.; Shin, Yung S.

    1988-01-01

    Optimization problems are typically solved by starting with an initial estimate and proceeding iteratively to improve it until the optimum is found. The design points along the path from the initial estimate to the optimum are usually of no value. The present work proposes a strategy for tracing a path of optimum solutions parameterized by the amount of available resources. The paper specifically treats the optimum design of a structure to maximize its buckling load. Equations for the optimum path are obtained using Lagrange multipliers, and solved by a homotopy method. The solution path has several transitions from unimodal to bimodal solutions. The Lagrange multipliers and second-order optimality conditions are used to detect branching points and to switch to the optimum solution path. The procedure is applied to the design of a foundation which supports a column for maximum buckling load. Using the total available foundation stiffness as a homotopy parameter, a set of optimum foundation designs is obtained.

  14. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Defects in liquid crystals: homotopy theory and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurik, Mikhail V.; Lavrentovich, O. D.

    1988-03-01

    The fundamental concepts of the homotopy theory of defects in liquid crystals and the results of experimental studies in this field are presented. The concepts of degeneracy space, homotopy groups, and topological charge, which are used for classifying the topologically stable inhomogeneous distributions in different liquid-crystalline phases are examined (uni and biaxial nematics, cholesterics, smectics, and columnar phases). Experimental data are given for the different mesophases on the structure and properties of dislocations, disclinations, point defects in the volume (hedgehogs) and on the surface of the medium (boojums), monopoles, domain formations, and solitons. Special attention is paid to the results of studies of defects in closed volumes (spherical drops, cylindrical capillaries), and to the connection between the topological charges of these defects and the character of the orientation of the molecules of the liquid crystal at the surface. A set of fundamentally new effects that can occur in studying the topological properties of defects in liquid crystals is discussed.

  15. Solution of the Falkner-Skan wedge flow by a revised optimal homotopy asymptotic method.

    PubMed

    Madaki, A G; Abdulhameed, M; Ali, M; Roslan, R

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a revised optimal homotopy asymptotic method (OHAM) is applied to derive an explicit analytical solution of the Falkner-Skan wedge flow problem. The comparisons between the present study with the numerical solutions using (fourth order Runge-Kutta) scheme and with analytical solution using HPM-Padé of order [4/4] and order [13/13] show that the revised form of OHAM is an extremely effective analytical technique. PMID:27186477

  16. Multivalued behavior for a two-level system using Homotopy Analysis Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquino, A. I.; Bo-ot, L. Ma. T.

    2016-02-01

    We use the Homotopy Analysis Method (HAM) to solve the system of equations modeling the two-level system and extract results which will pinpoint to turbulent behavior. We look at multivalued solutions as indicative of turbulence or turbulent-like behavior. We take different specific cases which result in multivalued velocities. The solutions are in series form and application of HAM ensures convergence in some region.

  17. PERTURBING LIGNIFICATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perturbing lignification is possible in multiple and diverse ways. Without obvious growth/development phenotypes, transgenic angiosperms can have lignin levels reduced to half the normal level, can have compositions ranging from very high-guaiacyl/low-syringyl to almost totally syringyl, and can eve...

  18. Cosmological Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesgourges, J.

    2013-08-01

    We present a self-contained summary of the theory of linear cosmological perturbations. We emphasize the effect of the six parameters of the minimal cosmological model, first, on the spectrum of Cosmic Microwave Background temperature anisotropies, and second, on the linear matter power spectrum. We briefly review at the end the possible impact of a few non-minimal dark matter and dark energy models.

  19. Development of homotopy algorithms for fixed-order mixed H2/H(infinity) controller synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whorton, M.; Buschek, H.; Calise, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    A major difficulty associated with H-infinity and mu-synthesis methods is the order of the resulting compensator. Whereas model and/or controller reduction techniques are sometimes applied, performance and robustness properties are not preserved. By directly constraining compensator order during the optimization process, these properties are better preserved, albeit at the expense of computational complexity. This paper presents a novel homotopy algorithm to synthesize fixed-order mixed H2/H-infinity compensators. Numerical results are presented for a four-disk flexible structure to evaluate the efficiency of the algorithm.

  20. Communication: Newton homotopies for sampling stationary points of potential energy landscapes

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, Dhagash; Chen, Tianran; Hauenstein, Jonathan D.; Wales, David J.

    2014-09-28

    One of the most challenging and frequently arising problems in many areas of science is to find solutions of a system of multivariate nonlinear equations. There are several numerical methods that can find many (or all if the system is small enough) solutions but they all exhibit characteristic problems. Moreover, traditional methods can break down if the system contains singular solutions. Here, we propose an efficient implementation of Newton homotopies, which can sample a large number of the stationary points of complicated many-body potentials. We demonstrate how the procedure works by applying it to the nearest-neighbor ϕ{sup 4} model and atomic clusters.

  1. Homotopy Algorithm for Fixed Order Mixed H2/H(infinity) Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whorton, Mark; Buschek, Harald; Calise, Anthony J.

    1996-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of robust multivariable control have merged the theories of H-infinity and H-2 control. This mixed H-2/H-infinity compensator formulation allows design for nominal performance by H-2 norm minimization while guaranteeing robust stability to unstructured uncertainties by constraining the H-infinity norm. A key difficulty associated with mixed H-2/H-infinity compensation is compensator synthesis. A homotopy algorithm is presented for synthesis of fixed order mixed H-2/H-infinity compensators. Numerical results are presented for a four disk flexible structure to evaluate the efficiency of the algorithm.

  2. A homotopy analysis method for the option pricing PDE in illiquid markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    E-Khatib, Youssef

    2012-09-01

    One of the shortcomings of the Black and Scholes model on option pricing is the assumption that trading the underlying asset does not affect the underlying asset price. This can happen in perfectly liquid markets and it is evidently not viable in markets with imperfect liquidity (illiquid markets). It is well-known that markets with imperfect liquidity are more realistic. Thus, the presence of price impact while studying options is very important. This paper investigates a solution for the option pricing PDE in illiquid markets using the homotopy analysis method.

  3. A homotopy algorithm for synthesizing robust controllers for flexible structures via the maximum entropy design equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Emmanuel G., Jr.; Richter, Stephen

    1990-01-01

    One well known deficiency of LQG compensators is that they do not guarantee any measure of robustness. This deficiency is especially highlighted when considering control design for complex systems such as flexible structures. There has thus been a need to generalize LQG theory to incorporate robustness constraints. Here we describe the maximum entropy approach to robust control design for flexible structures, a generalization of LQG theory, pioneered by Hyland, which has proved useful in practice. The design equations consist of a set of coupled Riccati and Lyapunov equations. A homotopy algorithm that is used to solve these design equations is presented.

  4. Discrete reductive perturbation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, Decio; Petrera, Matteo

    2006-04-15

    We expand a partial difference equation (P{delta}E) on multiple lattices and obtain the P{delta}E which governs its far field behavior. The perturbative-reductive approach is here performed on well-known nonlinear P{delta}Es, both integrable and nonintegrable. We study the cases of the lattice modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equation, the Hietarinta equation, the lattice Volterra-Kac-Van Moerbeke equation and a nonintegrable lattice KdV equation. Such reductions allow us to obtain many new P{delta}Es of the nonlinear Schroedinger type.

  5. Perturbative fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Pirner, H.-J.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan; Tarasov, A. V.

    2008-03-01

    The Berger model of perturbative fragmentation of quarks to pions is improved by providing an absolute normalization and keeping all terms in a (1-z) expansion, which makes the calculation valid at all values of fractional pion momentum z. We also replace the nonrelativistic wave function of a loosely bound pion by the more realistic procedure of projecting to the light-cone pion wave function, which in turn is taken from well known models. The full calculation does not confirm the (1-z){sup 2} behavior of the fragmentation function (FF) predicted in [E. L. Berger, Z. Phys. C 4, 289 (1980); Phys. Lett. 89B, 241 (1980] for z>0.5, and only works at very large z>0.95, where it is in reasonable agreement with phenomenological FFs. Otherwise, we observe quite a different z-dependence which grossly underestimates data at smaller z. The disagreement is reduced after the addition of pions from decays of light vector mesons, but still remains considerable. The process dependent higher twist terms are also calculated exactly and found to be important at large z and/or p{sub T}.

  6. Comparison of two reliable analytical methods based on the solutions of fractional coupled Klein-Gordon-Zakharov equations in plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha Ray, S.; Sahoo, S.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, homotopy perturbation transform method and modified homotopy analysis method have been applied to obtain the approximate solutions of the time fractional coupled Klein-Gordon-Zakharov equations. We consider fractional coupled Klein-Gordon-Zakharov equation with appropriate initial values using homotopy perturbation transform method and modified homotopy analysis method. Here we obtain the solution of fractional coupled Klein-Gordon-Zakharov equation, which is obtained by replacing the time derivatives with a fractional derivatives of order α ∈ (1, 2], β ∈ (1, 2]. Through error analysis and numerical simulation, we have compared approximate solutions obtained by two present methods homotopy perturbation transform method and modified homotopy analysis method. The fractional derivatives here are described in Caputo sense.

  7. Homotopy-Theoretic Study &Atomic-Scale Observation of Vortex Domains in Hexagonal Manganites.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Chiang, Fu-Kuo; Chen, Zhen; Ma, Chao; Chu, Ming-Wen; Chen, Cheng-Hsuan; Tian, Huanfang; Yang, Huaixin; Li, Jianqi

    2016-01-01

    Essential structural properties of the non-trivial "string-wall-bounded" topological defects in hexagonal manganites are studied through homotopy group theory and spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. The appearance of a "string-wall-bounded" configuration in RMnO3 is shown to be strongly linked with the transformation of the degeneracy space. The defect core regions (~50 Å) mainly adopt the continuous U(1) symmetry of the high-temperature phase, which is essential for the formation and proliferation of vortices. Direct visualization of vortex strings at atomic scale provides insight into the mechanisms and macro-behavior of topological defects in crystalline materials. PMID:27324701

  8. Homotopy-Theoretic Study & Atomic-Scale Observation of Vortex Domains in Hexagonal Manganites

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Chiang, Fu-Kuo; Chen, Zhen; Ma, Chao; Chu, Ming-Wen; Chen, Cheng-Hsuan; Tian, Huanfang; Yang, Huaixin; Li, Jianqi

    2016-01-01

    Essential structural properties of the non-trivial “string-wall-bounded” topological defects in hexagonal manganites are studied through homotopy group theory and spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. The appearance of a “string-wall-bounded” configuration in RMnO3 is shown to be strongly linked with the transformation of the degeneracy space. The defect core regions (~50 Å) mainly adopt the continuous U(1) symmetry of the high-temperature phase, which is essential for the formation and proliferation of vortices. Direct visualization of vortex strings at atomic scale provides insight into the mechanisms and macro-behavior of topological defects in crystalline materials. PMID:27324701

  9. On the homotopy type of spaces of Morse functions on surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryavtseva, Elena A

    2013-01-31

    Let M be a smooth closed orientable surface. Let F be the space of Morse functions on M with a fixed number of critical points of each index such that at least {chi}(M)+1 critical points are labelled by different labels (numbered). The notion of a skew cylindric-polyhedral complex is introduced, which generalizes the notion of a polyhedral complex. The skew cylindric-polyhedral complex K-tilde ('the complex of framed Morse functions') associated with the space F is defined. In the case M=S{sup 2} the polytope K-tilde is finite; its Euler characteristic {chi}(K-tilde) is calculated and the Morse inequalities for its Betti numbers {beta}{sub j}(K-tilde) are obtained. The relation between the homotopy types of the polytope K-tilde and the space F of Morse functions equipped with the C{sup {infinity}}-topology is indicated. Bibliography: 51 titles.

  10. Application of Homotopy analysis method for mechanical model of deepwater SCR installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Xiangcheng; Xu, Hang

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, considering the process of deepwater SCR installation with the limitations of small deformation theory of beam and catenary theory, a mechanical model of deepwater SCR installation is given based on large deformation beam model. In the following model, getting the relation of the length of the riser, bending stiffness and the unit weight by dimensional analysis, the simple approximate analytical expressions are obtained by using Homotopy Analysis Method. In the same condition, the calculated results are compared with the proposed approximate analytical expressions, the catenary theory or the commercial software of nonlinear finite element program ORCAFLEX. Hopefully, a convenient and effective method for mechanical model of deepwater SCR installation is provided.

  11. Topological and geometrical quantum computation in cohesive Khovanov homotopy type theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospina, Juan

    2015-05-01

    The recently proposed Cohesive Homotopy Type Theory is exploited as a formal foundation for central concepts in Topological and Geometrical Quantum Computation. Specifically the Cohesive Homotopy Type Theory provides a formal, logical approach to concepts like smoothness, cohomology and Khovanov homology; and such approach permits to clarify the quantum algorithms in the context of Topological and Geometrical Quantum Computation. In particular we consider the so-called "open-closed stringy topological quantum computer" which is a theoretical topological quantum computer that employs a system of open-closed strings whose worldsheets are open-closed cobordisms. The open-closed stringy topological computer is able to compute the Khovanov homology for tangles and for hence it is a universal quantum computer given than any quantum computation is reduced to an instance of computation of the Khovanov homology for tangles. The universal algebra in this case is the Frobenius Algebra and the possible open-closed stringy topological quantum computers are forming a symmetric monoidal category which is equivalent to the category of knowledgeable Frobenius algebras. Then the mathematical design of an open-closed stringy topological quantum computer is involved with computations and theorem proving for generalized Frobenius algebras. Such computations and theorem proving can be performed automatically using the Automated Theorem Provers with the TPTP language and the SMT-solver Z3 with the SMT-LIB language. Some examples of application of ATPs and SMT-solvers in the mathematical setup of an open-closed stringy topological quantum computer will be provided.

  12. The influence of mild carbon dioxide on brain functional homotopy using resting-state fMRI.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Olga; Uh, Jinsoo; Lurie, Daniel; Lu, Hanzhang; Milham, Michael P; Ge, Yulin

    2015-10-01

    Homotopy reflects the intrinsic functional architecture of the brain through synchronized spontaneous activity between corresponding bilateral regions, measured as voxel mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC). Hypercapnia is known to have clear impact on brain hemodynamics through vasodilation, but have unclear effect on neuronal activity. This study investigates the effect of hypercapnia on brain homotopy, achieved by breathing 5% carbon dioxide (CO2 ) gas mixture. A total of 14 healthy volunteers completed three resting state functional MRI (RS-fMRI) scans, the first and third under normocapnia and the second under hypercapnia. VMHC measures were calculated as the correlation between the BOLD signal of each voxel and its counterpart in the opposite hemisphere. Group analysis was performed between the hypercapnic and normocapnic VMHC maps. VMHC showed a diffused decrease in response to hypercapnia. Significant regional decreases in VMHC were observed in all anatomical lobes, except for the occipital lobe, in the following functional hierarchical subdivisions: the primary sensory-motor, unimodal, heteromodal, paralimbic, as well as in the following functional networks: ventral attention, somatomotor, default frontoparietal, and dorsal attention. Our observation that brain homotopy in RS-fMRI is affected by arterial CO2 levels suggests that caution should be used when comparing RS-fMRI data between healthy controls and patients with pulmonary diseases and unusual respiratory patterns such as sleep apnea or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:26138728

  13. Piecewise-homotopy analysis method (P-HAM) for first order nonlinear ODE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, F. Y.; Lem, K. H.; Chong, F. S.

    2013-09-01

    In homotopy analysis method (HAM), the determination for the value of the auxiliary parameter h is based on the valid region of the h-curve in which the horizontal segment of the h-curve will decide the valid h-region. All h-value taken from the valid region, provided that the order of deformation is large enough, will in principle yield an approximation series that converges to the exact solution. However it is found out that the h-value chosen within this valid region does not always promise a good approximation under finite order. This paper suggests an improved method called Piecewise-HAM (P-HAM). In stead of a single h-value, this method suggests using many h-values. Each of the h-values comes from an individual h-curve while each h-curve is plotted by fixing the time t at a different value. Each h-value is claimed to produce a good approximation only about a neighborhood centered at the corresponding t which the h-curve is based on. Each segment of these good approximations is then joined to form the approximation curve. By this, the convergence region is enhanced further. The P-HAM is illustrated and supported by examples.

  14. A Fast and Accurate Sparse Continuous Signal Reconstruction by Homotopy DCD with Non-Convex Regularization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tianyun; Lu, Xinfei; Yu, Xiaofei; Xi, Zhendong; Chen, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, various applications regarding sparse continuous signal recovery such as source localization, radar imaging, communication channel estimation, etc., have been addressed from the perspective of compressive sensing (CS) theory. However, there are two major defects that need to be tackled when considering any practical utilization. The first issue is off-grid problem caused by the basis mismatch between arbitrary located unknowns and the pre-specified dictionary, which would make conventional CS reconstruction methods degrade considerably. The second important issue is the urgent demand for low-complexity algorithms, especially when faced with the requirement of real-time implementation. In this paper, to deal with these two problems, we have presented three fast and accurate sparse reconstruction algorithms, termed as HR-DCD, Hlog-DCD and Hlp-DCD, which are based on homotopy, dichotomous coordinate descent (DCD) iterations and non-convex regularizations, by combining with the grid refinement technique. Experimental results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms and related analysis. PMID:24675758

  15. A fast and accurate sparse continuous signal reconstruction by homotopy DCD with non-convex regularization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianyun; Lu, Xinfei; Yu, Xiaofei; Xi, Zhendong; Chen, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, various applications regarding sparse continuous signal recovery such as source localization, radar imaging, communication channel estimation, etc., have been addressed from the perspective of compressive sensing (CS) theory. However, there are two major defects that need to be tackled when considering any practical utilization. The first issue is off-grid problem caused by the basis mismatch between arbitrary located unknowns and the pre-specified dictionary, which would make conventional CS reconstruction methods degrade considerably. The second important issue is the urgent demand for low-complexity algorithms, especially when faced with the requirement of real-time implementation. In this paper, to deal with these two problems, we have presented three fast and accurate sparse reconstruction algorithms, termed as HR-DCD, Hlog-DCD and Hlp-DCD, which are based on homotopy, dichotomous coordinate descent (DCD) iterations and non-convex regularizations, by combining with the grid refinement technique. Experimental results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms and related analysis. PMID:24675758

  16. Cosmological perturbations in unimodular gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Caixia; Brandenberger, Robert H.; Cai, Yifu; Chen, Pisin E-mail: rhb@hep.physics.mcgill.ca E-mail: chen@slac.stanford.edu

    2014-09-01

    We study cosmological perturbation theory within the framework of unimodular gravity. We show that the Lagrangian constraint on the determinant of the metric required by unimodular gravity leads to an extra constraint on the gauge freedom of the metric perturbations. Although the main equation of motion for the gravitational potential remains the same, the shift variable, which is gauge artifact in General Relativity, cannot be set to zero in unimodular gravity. This non-vanishing shift variable affects the propagation of photons throughout the cosmological evolution and therefore modifies the Sachs-Wolfe relation between the relativistic gravitational potential and the microwave temperature anisotropies. However, for adiabatic fluctuations the difference between the result in General Relativity and unimodular gravity is suppressed on large angular scales. Thus, no strong constraints on the theory can be derived.

  17. Density perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Palenik, Mark C.; Dunlap, Brett I.

    2015-07-28

    Despite the fundamental importance of electron density in density functional theory, perturbations are still usually dealt with using Hartree-Fock-like orbital equations known as coupled-perturbed Kohn-Sham (CPKS). As an alternative, we develop a perturbation theory that solves for the perturbed density directly, removing the need for CPKS. This replaces CPKS with a true Hohenberg-Kohn density perturbation theory. In CPKS, the perturbed density is found in the basis of products of occupied and virtual orbitals, which becomes ever more over-complete as the size of the orbital basis set increases. In our method, the perturbation to the density is expanded in terms of a series of density basis functions and found directly. It is possible to solve for the density in such a way that it makes the total energy stationary even if the density basis is incomplete.

  18. A homotopy-based sparse representation for fast and accurate shape prior modeling in liver surgical planning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guotai; Zhang, Shaoting; Xie, Hongzhi; Metaxas, Dimitris N; Gu, Lixu

    2015-01-01

    Shape prior plays an important role in accurate and robust liver segmentation. However, liver shapes have complex variations and accurate modeling of liver shapes is challenging. Using large-scale training data can improve the accuracy but it limits the computational efficiency. In order to obtain accurate liver shape priors without sacrificing the efficiency when dealing with large-scale training data, we investigate effective and scalable shape prior modeling method that is more applicable in clinical liver surgical planning system. We employed the Sparse Shape Composition (SSC) to represent liver shapes by an optimized sparse combination of shapes in the repository, without any assumptions on parametric distributions of liver shapes. To leverage large-scale training data and improve the computational efficiency of SSC, we also introduced a homotopy-based method to quickly solve the L1-norm optimization problem in SSC. This method takes advantage of the sparsity of shape modeling, and solves the original optimization problem in SSC by continuously transforming it into a series of simplified problems whose solution is fast to compute. When new training shapes arrive gradually, the homotopy strategy updates the optimal solution on the fly and avoids re-computing it from scratch. Experiments showed that SSC had a high accuracy and efficiency in dealing with complex liver shape variations, excluding gross errors and preserving local details on the input liver shape. The homotopy-based SSC had a high computational efficiency, and its runtime increased very slowly when repository's capacity and vertex number rose to a large degree. When repository's capacity was 10,000, with 2000 vertices on each shape, homotopy method cost merely about 11.29 s to solve the optimization problem in SSC, nearly 2000 times faster than interior point method. The dice similarity coefficient (DSC), average symmetric surface distance (ASD), and maximum symmetric surface distance measurement

  19. Automated Lattice Perturbation Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    I review recent developments in automated lattice perturbation theory. Starting with an overview of lattice perturbation theory, I focus on the three automation packages currently "on the market": HiPPy/HPsrc, Pastor and PhySyCAl. I highlight some recent applications of these methods, particularly in B physics. In the final section I briefly discuss the related, but distinct, approach of numerical stochastic perturbation theory.

  20. Frame independent cosmological perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Prokopec, Tomislav; Weenink, Jan E-mail: j.g.weenink@uu.nl

    2013-09-01

    We compute the third order gauge invariant action for scalar-graviton interactions in the Jordan frame. We demonstrate that the gauge invariant action for scalar and tensor perturbations on one physical hypersurface only differs from that on another physical hypersurface via terms proportional to the equation of motion and boundary terms, such that the evolution of non-Gaussianity may be called unique. Moreover, we demonstrate that the gauge invariant curvature perturbation and graviton on uniform field hypersurfaces in the Jordan frame are equal to their counterparts in the Einstein frame. These frame independent perturbations are therefore particularly useful in relating results in different frames at the perturbative level. On the other hand, the field perturbation and graviton on uniform curvature hypersurfaces in the Jordan and Einstein frame are non-linearly related, as are their corresponding actions and n-point functions.

  1. Minimum-fuel station-change for geostationary satellites using low-thrust considering perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, ShuGe; Zhang, JingRui

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this paper is to find the minimum-fuel station change for geostationary satellites with low-thrust while considering significant perturbation forces for geostationary Earth orbit (GEO). The effect of Earth's triaxiality, lunisolar perturbations, and solar radiation pressure on the terminal conditions of a long duration GEO transfer is derived and used for establishing the station change model with consideration of significant perturbation forces. A method is presented for analytically evaluating the effect of Earth's triaxiality on the semimajor axis and longitude during a station change. The minimum-fuel problem is solved by the indirect optimization method. The easier and related minimum-energy problem is first addressed and then the energy-to-fuel homotopy is employed to finally obtain the solution of the minimum-fuel problem. Several effective techniques are employed in solving the two-point boundary-value problem with a shooting method to overcome the problem of the small convergence radius and the sensitivity of the initial costate variables. These methods include normalization of the initial costate vector, computation of the analytic Jacobians matrix, and switching detection. The simulation results show that the solution of the minimum-fuel station change with low-thrust considering significant perturbation forces can be obtained by applying these preceding techniques.

  2. The Perturbed Puma Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Shu-Jun; Liu, Qiu-Yu

    2012-04-01

    The puma model on the basis of the Lorentz and CPT violation may bring an economical interpretation to the conventional neutrinos oscillation and part of the anomalous oscillations. We study the effect of the perturbation to the puma model. In the case of the first-order perturbation which keeps the (23) interchange symmetry, the mixing matrix element Ue3 is always zero. The nonzero mixing matrix element Ue3 is obtained in the second-order perturbation that breaks the (23) interchange symmetry.

  3. Chiral Perturbation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiburzi, Brian C.

    The era of high-precision lattice QCD has led to synergy between lattice computations and phenomenological input from chiral perturbation theory. We provide an introduction to chiral perturbation theory with a bent towards understanding properties of the nucleon and other low-lying baryons. Four main topics are the basis for this chapter. We begin with a discussion of broken symmetries and the procedure to construct the chiral Lagrangian. The second topic concerns specialized applications of chiral perturbation theory tailored to lattice QCD, such as partial quenching, lattice discretization, and finite-volume effects. We describe inclusion of the nucleon in chiral perturbation theory using a heavy-fermion Euclidean action. Issues of convergence are taken up as our final topic. We consider expansions in powers of the strange-quark mass, and the appearance of unphysical singularities in the heavy-particle formulation. Our aim is to guide lattice practitioners in understanding the predictions chiral perturbation theory makes for baryons, and show how the lattice will play a role in testing the rigor of the chiral expansion at physical values of the quark masses.

  4. Vortex perturbation dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criminale, W. O.; Lasseigne, D. G.; Jackson, T. L.

    1995-01-01

    An initial value approach is used to examine the dynamics of perturbations introduced into a vortex under strain. Both the basic vortex considered and the perturbations are taken as fully three-dimensional. An explicit solution for the time evolution of the vorticity perturbations is given for arbitrary initial vorticity. Analytical solutions for the resulting velocity components are found when the initial vorticity is assumed to be localized. For more general initial vorticity distributions, the velocity components are determined numerically. It is found that the variation in the radial direction of the initial vorticity disturbance is the most important factor influencing the qualitative behavior of the solutions. Transient growth in the magnitude of the velocity components is found to be directly attributable to the compactness of the initial vorticity.

  5. Cosmological perturbations in antigravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oltean, Marius; Brandenberger, Robert

    2014-10-01

    We compute the evolution of cosmological perturbations in a recently proposed Weyl-symmetric theory of two scalar fields with oppositely signed conformal couplings to Einstein gravity. It is motivated from the minimal conformal extension of the standard model, such that one of these scalar fields is the Higgs while the other is a new particle, the dilaton, introduced to make the Higgs mass conformally symmetric. At the background level, the theory admits novel geodesically complete cyclic cosmological solutions characterized by a brief period of repulsive gravity, or "antigravity," during each successive transition from a big crunch to a big bang. For simplicity, we consider scalar perturbations in the absence of anisotropies, with potential set to zero and without any radiation. We show that despite the necessarily wrong-signed kinetic term of the dilaton in the full action, these perturbations are neither ghostlike nor tachyonic in the limit of strongly repulsive gravity. On this basis, we argue—pending a future analysis of vector and tensor perturbations—that, with respect to perturbative stability, the cosmological solutions of this theory are viable.

  6. Semi-computational simulation of magneto-hemodynamic flow in a semi-porous channel using optimal homotopy and differential transform methods.

    PubMed

    Basiri Parsa, A; Rashidi, M M; Anwar Bég, O; Sadri, S M

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, the semi-numerical techniques known as the optimal homotopy analysis method (HAM) and Differential Transform Method (DTM) are applied to study the magneto-hemodynamic laminar viscous flow of a conducting physiological fluid in a semi-porous channel under a transverse magnetic field. The two-dimensional momentum conservation partial differential equations are reduced to ordinary form incorporating Lorentizian magnetohydrodynamic body force terms. These ordinary differential equations are solved by the homotopy analysis method, the differential transform method and also a numerical method (fourth-order Runge-Kutta quadrature with a shooting method), under physically realistic boundary conditions. The homotopy analysis method contains the auxiliary parameter ℏ, which provides us with a simple way to adjust and control the convergence region of solution series. The differential transform method (DTM) does not require an auxiliary parameter and is employed to compute an approximation to the solution of the system of nonlinear differential equations governing the problem. The influence of Hartmann number (Ha) and transpiration Reynolds number (mass transfer parameter, Re) on the velocity profiles in the channel are studied in detail. Interesting fluid dynamic characteristics are revealed and addressed. The HAM and DTM solutions are shown to both correlate well with numerical quadrature solutions, testifying to the accuracy of both HAM and DTM in nonlinear magneto-hemodynamics problems. Both these semi-numerical techniques hold excellent potential in modeling nonlinear viscous flows in biological systems. PMID:23930807

  7. Liouvillian perturbations of black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couch, W. E.; Holder, C. L.

    2007-10-01

    We apply the well-known Kovacic algorithm to find closed form, i.e., Liouvillian solutions, to the differential equations governing perturbations of black holes. Our analysis includes the full gravitational perturbations of Schwarzschild and Kerr, the full gravitational and electromagnetic perturbations of Reissner-Nordstrom, and specialized perturbations of the Kerr-Newman geometry. We also include the extreme geometries. We find all frequencies ω, in terms of black hole parameters and an integer n, which allow Liouvillian perturbations. We display many classes of black hole parameter values and their corresponding Liouvillian perturbations, including new closed-form perturbations of Kerr and Reissner-Nordstrom. We also prove that the only type 1 Liouvillian perturbations of Schwarzschild are the known algebraically special ones and that type 2 Liouvillian solutions do not exist for extreme geometries. In cases where we do not prove the existence or nonexistence of Liouvillian perturbations we obtain sequences of Diophantine equations on which decidability rests.

  8. Aspects of perturbative unitarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmi, Damiano

    2016-07-01

    We reconsider perturbative unitarity in quantum field theory and upgrade several arguments and results. The minimum assumptions that lead to the largest time equation, the cutting equations and the unitarity equation are identified. Using this knowledge and a special gauge, we give a new, simpler proof of perturbative unitarity in gauge theories and generalize it to quantum gravity, in four and higher dimensions. The special gauge interpolates between the Feynman gauge and the Coulomb gauge without double poles. When the Coulomb limit is approached, the unphysical particles drop out of the cuts and the cutting equations are consistently projected onto the physical subspace. The proof does not extend to nonlocal quantum field theories of gauge fields and gravity, whose unitarity remains uncertain.

  9. Topology and perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjavidze, J.

    2000-08-01

    This paper contains description of the fields nonlinear modes successive quantization scheme. It is shown that the path integrals for absorption part of amplitudes are defined on the Dirac (δ-like) functional measure. This permits arbitrary transformation of the functional integral variables. New form of the perturbation theory achieved by mapping the quantum dynamics in the space WG of the (action, angle)-type collective variables. It is shown that the transformed perturbation theory contributions are accumulated exactly on the boundary ∂WG. Abilities of the developed formalism are illustrated by the Coulomb problem. This model is solved in the WC=(angle, angular momentum, Runge-Lentz vector) space and the reason of its exact integrability is emptiness of ∂WC.

  10. Renormalized Lie perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rosengaus, E.; Dewar, R.L.

    1981-07-01

    A Lie operator method for constructing action-angle transformations continuously connected to the identity is developed for area preserving mappings. By a simple change of variable from action to angular frequency a perturbation expansion is obtained in which the small denominators have been renormalized. The method is shown to lead to the same series as the Lagrangian perturbation method of Greene and Percival, which converges on KAM surfaces. The method is not superconvergent, but yields simple recursion relations which allow automatic algebraic manipulation techniques to be used to develop the series to high order. It is argued that the operator method can be justified by analytically continuing from the complex angular frequency plane onto the real line. The resulting picture is one where preserved primary KAM surfaces are continuously connected to one another.

  11. Intermolecular perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, I. C.; Hurst, G. J. B.; Stone, A. J.

    The new intermolecular perturbation theory described in the preceding papers is applied to some van der Waals molecules. HeBe is used as a test case, and the perturbation method converges well at interatomic distances down to about 4 a0, giving results in excellent agreement with supermolecule calculations. ArHF and ArHCl have been studied using large basis sets, and the results agree well with experimental data. The ArHX configuration is favoured over the ArXH configuration mainly because of larger polarization and charge-transfer contributions. In NeH2 the equilibrium geometry is determined by a delicate balance between opposing effects; with a double-zeta-polarization basis the correct configuration is predicted.

  12. Homotopy semi-numerical simulation of peristaltic flow of generalised Oldroyd-B fluids with slip effects.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Dharmendra; Bég, O Anwar; Curiel-Sosa, J L

    2014-01-01

    This investigation deals with the peristaltic flow of generalised Oldroyd-B fluids (with the fractional model) through a cylindrical tube under the influence of wall slip conditions. The analysis is carried out under the assumptions of long wavelength and low Reynolds number. Analytical approximate solutions are obtained by using the highly versatile and rigorous semi-numerical procedure known as the homotopy analysis method. It is assumed that the cross section of the tube varies sinusoidally along the length of the tube. The effects of the dominant hydromechanical parameters, i.e. fractional parameters, material constants, slip parameter, time and amplitude on the pressure difference across one wavelength, are studied. Graphical plots reveal that the influence of both fractional parameters on pressure is opposite to each other. Interesting responses to a variation in the constants are obtained. Pressure is shown to be reduced by increasing the slip parameter. Furthermore, the pressure in the case of fractional models (fractional Oldroyd-B model and fractional Maxwell model) of viscoelastic fluids is considerably more substantial than that in the corresponding classical viscoelastic models (Oldroyd-B and Maxwell models). Applications of the study arise in biophysical food processing, embryology and gastro-fluid dynamics. PMID:22616875

  13. Study of a homotopy continuation method for early orbit determination with the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. L.; Huang, C.

    1986-01-01

    A recent mathematical technique for solving systems of equations is applied in a very general way to the orbit determination problem. The study of this technique, the homotopy continuation method, was motivated by the possible need to perform early orbit determination with the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS), using range and Doppler tracking alone. Basically, a set of six tracking observations is continuously transformed from a set with known solution to the given set of observations with unknown solutions, and the corresponding orbit state vector is followed from the a priori estimate to the solutions. A numerical algorithm for following the state vector is developed and described in detail. Numerical examples using both real and simulated TDRSS tracking are given. A prototype early orbit determination algorithm for possible use in TDRSS orbit operations was extensively tested, and the results are described. Preliminary studies of two extensions of the method are discussed: generalization to a least-squares formulation and generalization to an exhaustive global method.

  14. Dynamic Compressed HRRP Generation for Random Stepped-Frequency Radar Based on Complex-Valued Fast Sequential Homotopy

    PubMed Central

    You, Peng; Liu, Zhen; Wang, Hongqiang; Wei, Xizhang; Li, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Compressed sensing has been applied to achieve high resolution range profiles (HRRPs) using a stepped-frequency radar. In this new scheme, much fewer pulses are required to recover the target's strong scattering centers, which can greatly reduce the coherent processing interval (CPI) and improve the anti-jamming capability. For practical applications, however, the required number of pulses is difficult to determine in advance and any reduction of the transmitted pulses is attractive. In this paper, a dynamic compressed sensing strategy for HRRP generation is proposed, in which the estimated HRRP is updated with sequentially transmitted and received pulses until the proper stopping rules are satisfied. To efficiently implement the sequential update, a complex-valued fast sequential homotopy (CV-FSH) algorithm is developed based on group sparse recovery. This algorithm performs as an efficient recursive procedure of sparse recovery, thus avoiding solving a new optimization problem from scratch. Furthermore, the proper stopping rules are presented according to the special characteristics of HRRP. Therefore, the optimal number of pulses required in each CPI can be sought adapting to the echo signal. The results using simulated and real data show the effectiveness of the proposed approach and demonstrate that the established dynamic strategy is more suitable for uncooperative targets. PMID:24815679

  15. Entropy perturbations in N-flation

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Ronggen; Hu Bin; Piao Yunsong

    2009-12-15

    In this paper we study the entropy perturbations in N-flation by using the {delta}N formalism. We calculate the entropy corrections to the power spectrum of the overall curvature perturbation P{sub {zeta}}. We obtain an analytic form of the transfer coefficient T{sub RS}{sup 2}, which describes the correlation between the curvature and entropy perturbations, and investigate its behavior numerically. It turns out that the entropy perturbations cannot be neglected in N-flation because the amplitude of entropy components is approximately in the same order as the adiabatic one at the end of inflation T{sub RS}{sup 2}{approx}O(1). The spectral index n{sub S} is calculated and it becomes smaller after the entropy modes are taken into account, i.e., the spectrum becomes redder, compared to the pure adiabatic case. Finally we study the modified consistency relation of N-flation, and find that the tensor-to-scalar ratio (r{approx_equal}0.006) is greatly suppressed by the entropy modes, compared to the pure adiabatic one (r{approx_equal}0.017) at the end of inflation.

  16. Primordial power spectrum of tensor perturbations in Finsler spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Wang, Sai

    2016-02-01

    We first investigate the gravitational wave in the flat Finsler spacetime. In the Finslerian universe, we derive the perturbed gravitational field equation with tensor perturbations. The Finslerian background spacetime breaks rotational symmetry and induces parity violation. Then we obtain the modified primordial power spectrum of the tensor perturbations. The parity violation feature requires that the anisotropic effect contributes to the TT, TE, EE, BB angular correlation coefficients with l'=l+1 and TB, EB with l'=l. The numerical results show that the anisotropic contributions to the angular correlation coefficients depend on m, and TE and ET angular correlation coefficients are different.

  17. Gauge-invariant perturbation theory for trans-Planckian inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Shankaranarayanan, S.; Lubo, Musongela

    2005-12-15

    The possibility that the scale-invariant inflationary spectrum may be modified due to the hidden assumptions about the Planck scale physics--dubbed as trans-Planckian inflation--has received considerable attention. To mimic the possible trans-Planckian effects, among various models, modified dispersion relations have been popular in the literature. In almost all the earlier analyses, unlike the canonical scalar field driven inflation, the trans-Planckian effects are introduced to the scalar/tensor perturbation equations in an ad hoc manner--without calculating the stress tensor of the cosmological perturbations from the covariant Lagrangian. In this work, we perform the gauge-invariant cosmological perturbations for the single scalar-field inflation with the Jacobson-Corley dispersion relation by computing the fluctuations of all the fields including the unit-timelike vector field which defines a preferred rest frame. We show that: (i) The nonlinear effects introduce corrections only to the perturbed energy density. The corrections to the energy density vanish in the super-Hubble scales. (ii) The scalar perturbations, in general, are not purely adiabatic. (iii) The equation of motion of the Mukhanov-Sasaki variable corresponding to the inflaton field is different from those presumed in the earlier analyses. (iv) The tensor perturbation equation remains unchanged. We perform the classical analysis for the resultant system of equations and also compute the power spectrum of the scalar perturbations in a particular limit. We discuss the implications of our results and compare with the earlier results.

  18. Adjustments after an ankle dorsiflexion perturbation during human running.

    PubMed

    Scohier, M; De Jaeger, D; Schepens, B

    2012-01-01

    In this study we investigated the effect of a mechanical perturbation of unexpected timing during human running. With the use of a powered exoskeleton, we evoked a dorsiflexion of the right ankle during its swing phase while subjects ran on a treadmill. The perturbation resulted in an increase of the right ankle dorsiflexion of at least 5°. The first two as well as the next five steps after the perturbation were analyzed to observe the possible immediate and late biomechanical adjustments. In all cases subjects continued to run after the perturbation. The immediate adjustments were the greatest and the most frequent when the delay between the right ankle perturbation and the subsequent right foot touch-down was the shortest. For example, the vertical impact peak force was strongly modified on the first step after the perturbations and this adjustment was correlated to a right ankle angle still clearly modified at touch-down. Some late adjustments were observed in the subsequent steps predominantly occurring during left steps. Subjects maintained the step length and the step period as constant as possible by adjusting other step parameters in order to avoid stumbling and continue running at the speed imposed by the treadmill. To our knowledge, our experiments are the first to investigate perturbations of unexpected timing during human running. The results show that humans have a time-dependent, adapted strategy to maintain their running pattern. PMID:21872474

  19. Baryon chiral perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, S.

    2012-03-01

    We provide a short introduction to the one-nucleon sector of chiral perturbation theory and address the issue of power counting and renormalization. We discuss the infrared regularization and the extended on-mass-shell scheme. Both allow for the inclusion of further degrees of freedom beyond pions and nucleons and the application to higher-loop calculations. As applications we consider the chiral expansion of the nucleon mass to order Script O(q6) and the inclusion of vector and axial-vector mesons in the calculation of nucleon form factors. Finally, we address the complex-mass scheme for describing unstable particles in effective field theory.

  20. Perturbative theory for Brownian vortexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyses, Henrique W.; Bauer, Ross O.; Grosberg, Alexander Y.; Grier, David G.

    2015-06-01

    Brownian vortexes are stochastic machines that use static nonconservative force fields to bias random thermal fluctuations into steadily circulating currents. The archetype for this class of systems is a colloidal sphere in an optical tweezer. Trapped near the focus of a strongly converging beam of light, the particle is displaced by random thermal kicks into the nonconservative part of the optical force field arising from radiation pressure, which then biases its diffusion. Assuming the particle remains localized within the trap, its time-averaged trajectory traces out a toroidal vortex. Unlike trivial Brownian vortexes, such as the biased Brownian pendulum, which circulate preferentially in the direction of the bias, the general Brownian vortex can change direction and even topology in response to temperature changes. Here we introduce a theory based on a perturbative expansion of the Fokker-Planck equation for weak nonconservative driving. The first-order solution takes the form of a modified Boltzmann relation and accounts for the rich phenomenology observed in experiments on micrometer-scale colloidal spheres in optical tweezers.

  1. Chiral perturbation theory with nucleons

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, U.G.

    1991-09-01

    I review the constraints posed on the interactions of pions, nucleons and photons by the spontaneously broken chiral symmetry of QCD. The framework to perform these calculations, chiral perturbation theory, is briefly discussed in the meson sector. The method is a simultaneous expansion of the Greens functions in powers of external moments and quark masses around the massless case, the chiral limit. To perform this expansion, use is made of a phenomenological Lagrangian which encodes the Ward-identities and pertinent symmetries of QCD. The concept of chiral power counting is introduced. The main part of the lectures of consists in describing how to include baryons (nucleons) and how the chiral structure is modified by the fact that the nucleon mass in the chiral limit does not vanish. Particular emphasis is put on working out applications to show the strengths and limitations of the methods. Some processes which are discussed are threshold photopion production, low-energy compton scattering off nucleons, {pi}N scattering and the {sigma}-term. The implications of the broken chiral symmetry on the nuclear forces are briefly described. An alternative approach, in which the baryons are treated as very heavy fields, is touched upon.

  2. Perturbative theory for Brownian vortexes.

    PubMed

    Moyses, Henrique W; Bauer, Ross O; Grosberg, Alexander Y; Grier, David G

    2015-06-01

    Brownian vortexes are stochastic machines that use static nonconservative force fields to bias random thermal fluctuations into steadily circulating currents. The archetype for this class of systems is a colloidal sphere in an optical tweezer. Trapped near the focus of a strongly converging beam of light, the particle is displaced by random thermal kicks into the nonconservative part of the optical force field arising from radiation pressure, which then biases its diffusion. Assuming the particle remains localized within the trap, its time-averaged trajectory traces out a toroidal vortex. Unlike trivial Brownian vortexes, such as the biased Brownian pendulum, which circulate preferentially in the direction of the bias, the general Brownian vortex can change direction and even topology in response to temperature changes. Here we introduce a theory based on a perturbative expansion of the Fokker-Planck equation for weak nonconservative driving. The first-order solution takes the form of a modified Boltzmann relation and accounts for the rich phenomenology observed in experiments on micrometer-scale colloidal spheres in optical tweezers. PMID:26172698

  3. Canonical floquet perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlen, David J.

    1992-12-01

    Classical Floquet theory is examined in order to generate a canonical transformation to modal variables for periodic system. This transformation is considered canonical if the periodic matrix of eigenvectors is symplectic at the initial time. Approaches for symplectic normalization of the eigenvectors had to be examined for each of the different Poincare eigenvalue cases. Particular attention was required in the degenerate case, which depended on the solution of a generalized eigenvector. Transformation techniques to ensure real modal variables and real periodic eigenvectors were also needed. Periodic trajectories in the restricted three-body case were then evaluated using the canonical Floquet solution. The system used for analyses is the Sun-Jupiter system. This system was especially useful since it contained two of the more difficult Poincare eigenvalue cases, the degenerate case and the imaginary eigenvalue case. The perturbation solution to the canonical modal variables was examined using both an expansion of the Hamiltonian and using a representation that was considered exact. Both methods compared quite well for small perturbations to the initial condition. As expected, the expansion solution failed first due to truncation after the third order term of the expansion.

  4. Numerical and perturbative computations of solitary waves of the Benjamin-Ono equation with higher order nonlinearity using Christov rational basis functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, John P.; Xu, Zhengjie

    2012-02-01

    Computation of solitons of the cubically-nonlinear Benjamin-Ono equation is challenging. First, the equation contains the Hilbert transform, a nonlocal integral operator. Second, its solitary waves decay only as O(1/∣ x∣ 2). To solve the integro-differential equation for waves traveling at a phase speed c, we introduced the artificial homotopy H( uXX) - c u + (1 - δ) u2 + δu3 = 0, δ ∈ [0, 1] and solved it in two ways. The first was continuation in the homotopy parameter δ, marching from the known Benjamin-Ono soliton for δ = 0 to the cubically-nonlinear soliton at δ = 1. The second strategy was to bypass continuation by numerically computing perturbation series in δ and forming Padé approximants to obtain a very accurate approximation at δ = 1. To further minimize computations, we derived an elementary theorem to reduce the two-parameter soliton family to a parameter-free function, the soliton symmetric about the origin with unit phase speed. Solitons for higher order Benjamin-Ono equations are also computed and compared to their Korteweg-deVries counterparts. All computations applied the pseudospectral method with a basis of rational orthogonal functions invented by Christov, which are eigenfunctions of the Hilbert transform.

  5. Flatbands under Correlated Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodyfelt, Joshua D.; Leykam, Daniel; Danieli, Carlo; Yu, Xiaoquan; Flach, Sergej

    2014-12-01

    Flatband networks are characterized by the coexistence of dispersive and flatbands. Flatbands (FBs) are generated by compact localized eigenstates (CLSs) with local network symmetries, based on destructive interference. Correlated disorder and quasiperiodic potentials hybridize CLSs without additional renormalization, yet with surprising consequences: (i) states are expelled from the FB energy EFB, (ii) the localization length of eigenstates vanishes as ξ ˜1 /ln (E -EFB) , (iii) the density of states diverges logarithmically (particle-hole symmetry) and algebraically (no particle-hole symmetry), and (iv) mobility edge curves show algebraic singularities at EFB . Our analytical results are based on perturbative expansions of the CLSs and supported by numerical data in one and two lattice dimensions.

  6. Flatbands under correlated perturbations.

    PubMed

    Bodyfelt, Joshua D; Leykam, Daniel; Danieli, Carlo; Yu, Xiaoquan; Flach, Sergej

    2014-12-01

    Flatband networks are characterized by the coexistence of dispersive and flatbands. Flatbands (FBs) are generated by compact localized eigenstates (CLSs) with local network symmetries, based on destructive interference. Correlated disorder and quasiperiodic potentials hybridize CLSs without additional renormalization, yet with surprising consequences: (i) states are expelled from the FB energy E_{FB}, (ii) the localization length of eigenstates vanishes as ξ∼1/ln(E-E_{FB}), (iii) the density of states diverges logarithmically (particle-hole symmetry) and algebraically (no particle-hole symmetry), and (iv) mobility edge curves show algebraic singularities at E_{FB}. Our analytical results are based on perturbative expansions of the CLSs and supported by numerical data in one and two lattice dimensions. PMID:25526142

  7. Discrete Newtonian cosmology: perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, George F. R.; Gibbons, Gary W.

    2015-03-01

    In a previous paper (Gibbons and Ellis 2014 Discrete Newtonian cosmology Class. Quantum Grav. 31 025003), we showed how a finite system of discrete particles interacting with each other via Newtonian gravitational attraction would lead to precisely the same dynamical equations for homothetic motion as in the case of the pressure-free Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker cosmological models of general relativity theory, provided the distribution of particles obeys the central configuration equation. In this paper we show that one can obtain perturbed such Newtonian solutions that give the same linearized structure growth equations as in the general relativity case. We also obtain the Dmitriev-Zel’dovich equations for subsystems in this discrete gravitational model, and show how it leads to the conclusion that voids have an apparent negative mass.

  8. Perturbed effects at radiation physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Külahcı, Fatih; Şen, Zekâi

    2013-09-01

    Perturbation methodology is applied in order to assess the linear attenuation coefficient, mass attenuation coefficient and cross-section behavior with random components in the basic variables such as the radiation amounts frequently used in the radiation physics and chemistry. Additionally, layer attenuation coefficient (LAC) and perturbed LAC (PLAC) are proposed for different contact materials. Perturbation methodology provides opportunity to obtain results with random deviations from the average behavior of each variable that enters the whole mathematical expression. The basic photon intensity variation expression as the inverse exponential power law (as Beer-Lambert's law) is adopted for perturbation method exposition. Perturbed results are presented not only in terms of the mean but additionally the standard deviation and the correlation coefficients. Such perturbation expressions provide one to assess small random variability in basic variables.

  9. Homotopy Analysis Method for the heat transfer of a non-Newtonian fluid flow in an axisymmetric channel with a porous wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeilpour, M.; Domairry, G.; Sadoughi, N.; Davodi, A. G.

    2010-09-01

    In this article, a powerful analytical method, called the Homotopy Analysis Method (HAM) is introduced to obtain the exact solutions of heat transfer equation of a non-Newtonian fluid flow in an axisymmetric channel with a porous wall for turbine cooling applications. The HAM is employed to obtain the expressions for velocity and temperature fields. Tables are presented for various parameters on the velocity and temperature fields. These results are compared with the solutions which are obtained by Numerical Methods (NM). Also the convergence of the obtained HAM solution is discussed explicitly. These comparisons show that this analytical method is strongly powerful to solve nonlinear problems arising in heat transfer.

  10. Cosmological perturbations in massive bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Lagos, Macarena; Ferreira, Pedro G. E-mail: p.ferreira1@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of classical scalar, vector and tensor cosmological perturbations in ghost-free massive bigravity. In particular, we find the full evolution equations and analytical solutions in a wide range of regimes. We show that there are viable cosmological backgrounds but, as has been found in the literature, these models generally have exponential instabilities in linear perturbation theory. However, it is possible to find stable scalar cosmological perturbations for a very particular choice of parameters. For this stable subclass of models we find that vector and tensor perturbations have growing solutions. We argue that special initial conditions are needed for tensor modes in order to have a viable model.

  11. Canonical density matrix perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Cawkwell, M J; Rubensson, Emanuel H; Rudberg, Elias

    2015-12-01

    Density matrix perturbation theory [Niklasson and Challacombe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 193001 (2004)] is generalized to canonical (NVT) free-energy ensembles in tight-binding, Hartree-Fock, or Kohn-Sham density-functional theory. The canonical density matrix perturbation theory can be used to calculate temperature-dependent response properties from the coupled perturbed self-consistent field equations as in density-functional perturbation theory. The method is well suited to take advantage of sparse matrix algebra to achieve linear scaling complexity in the computational cost as a function of system size for sufficiently large nonmetallic materials and metals at high temperatures. PMID:26764847

  12. Perturbed atoms in molecules and solids: The PATMOS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Røeggen, Inge; Gao, Bin

    2013-09-01

    A new computational method for electronic-structure studies of molecules and solids is presented. The key element in the new model - denoted the perturbed atoms in molecules and solids model - is the concept of a perturbed atom in a complex. The basic approximation of the new model is unrestricted Hartree Fock (UHF). The UHF orbitals are localized by the Edmiston-Ruedenberg procedure. The perturbed atoms are defined by distributing the orbitals among the nuclei in such a way that the sum of the intra-atomic UHF energies has a minimum. Energy corrections with respect to the UHF energy, are calculated within the energy incremental scheme. The most important three- and four-electron corrections are selected by introducing a modified geminal approach. Test calculations are performed on N2, Li2, and parallel arrays of hydrogen atoms. The character of the perturbed atoms is illustrated by calculations on H2, CH4, and C6H6.

  13. Perturbed atoms in molecules and solids: The PATMOS model.

    PubMed

    Røeggen, Inge; Gao, Bin

    2013-09-01

    A new computational method for electronic-structure studies of molecules and solids is presented. The key element in the new model - denoted the perturbed atoms in molecules and solids model - is the concept of a perturbed atom in a complex. The basic approximation of the new model is unrestricted Hartree Fock (UHF). The UHF orbitals are localized by the Edmiston-Ruedenberg procedure. The perturbed atoms are defined by distributing the orbitals among the nuclei in such a way that the sum of the intra-atomic UHF energies has a minimum. Energy corrections with respect to the UHF energy, are calculated within the energy incremental scheme. The most important three- and four-electron corrections are selected by introducing a modified geminal approach. Test calculations are performed on N2, Li2, and parallel arrays of hydrogen atoms. The character of the perturbed atoms is illustrated by calculations on H2, CH4, and C6H6. PMID:24028099

  14. Life expectancy change in perturbed communities: derivation and qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Dambacher, Jeffrey M; Levins, Richard; Rossignol, Philippe A

    2005-09-01

    Pollution, loss of habitat, and climate change are introducing dramatic perturbations to natural communities and affecting public health. Populations in perturbed communities can change dynamically, in both abundance and age structure. While analysis of the community matrix can predict changes in population abundance arising from a sustained or press perturbation, perturbations also have the potential to modify life expectancy, which adds yet another means to falsify experimental hypotheses and to monitor management interventions in natural systems. In some instances, an input to a community will produce no change in the abundance of a population but create a major shift in its mean age. We present an analysis of change in both abundance and life expectancy, leading to a formal quantitative assessment as well as qualitative predictions, and illustrate the usefulness of the technique through general examples relating to vector-borne disease and fisheries. PMID:16043195

  15. Resumming the string perturbation series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, Alba; Mariño, Marcos; Zakany, Szabolcs

    2015-05-01

    We use the AdS/CFT correspondence to study the resummation of a perturbative genus expansion appearing in the type II superstring dual of ABJM theory. Although the series is Borel summable, its Borel resummation does not agree with the exact non-perturbative answer due to the presence of complex instantons. The same type of behavior appears in the WKB quantization of the quartic oscillator in Quantum Mechanics, which we analyze in detail as a toy model for the string perturbation series. We conclude that, in these examples, Borel summability is not enough for extracting non-perturbative information, due to non-perturbative effects associated to complex instantons. We also analyze the resummation of the genus expansion for topological string theory on local , which is closely related to ABJM theory. In this case, the non-perturbative answer involves membrane instantons computed by the refined topological string, which are crucial to produce a well-defined result. We give evidence that the Borel resummation of the perturbative series requires such a non-perturbative sector.

  16. On dark energy isocurvature perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Xinmin; Li, Mingzhe E-mail: limz@nju.edu.cn

    2011-06-01

    Determining the equation of state of dark energy with astronomical observations is crucially important to understand the nature of dark energy. In performing a likelihood analysis of the data, especially of the cosmic microwave background and large scale structure data the dark energy perturbations have to be taken into account both for theoretical consistency and for numerical accuracy. Usually, one assumes in the global fitting analysis that the dark energy perturbations are adiabatic. In this paper, we study the dark energy isocurvature perturbation analytically and discuss its implications for the cosmic microwave background radiation and large scale structure. Furthermore, with the current astronomical observational data and by employing Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, we perform a global analysis of cosmological parameters assuming general initial conditions for the dark energy perturbations. The results show that the dark energy isocurvature perturbations are very weakly constrained and that purely adiabatic initial conditions are consistent with the data.

  17. Computing singularities of perturbation series

    SciTech Connect

    Kvaal, Simen; Jarlebring, Elias; Michiels, Wim

    2011-03-15

    Many properties of current ab initio approaches to the quantum many-body problem, both perturbational and otherwise, are related to the singularity structure of the Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation series. A numerical procedure is presented that in principle computes the complete set of singularities, including the dominant singularity which limits the radius of convergence. The method approximates the singularities as eigenvalues of a certain generalized eigenvalue equation which is solved using iterative techniques. It relies on computation of the action of the Hamiltonian matrix on a vector and does not rely on the terms in the perturbation series. The method can be useful for studying perturbation series of typical systems of moderate size, for fundamental development of resummation schemes, and for understanding the structure of singularities for typical systems. Some illustrative model problems are studied, including a helium-like model with {delta}-function interactions for which Moeller-Plesset perturbation theory is considered and the radius of convergence found.

  18. Statistical anisotropy of the curvature perturbation from vector field perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Karciauskas, Mindaugas; Lyth, David H.; Rodriguez, Yeinzon E-mail: m.karciauskas@lancaster.ac.uk E-mail: yeinzon.rodriguez@uan.edu.co

    2009-05-15

    The {delta}N formula for the primordial curvature perturbation {zeta} is extended to include vector as well as scalar fields. Formulas for the tree-level contributions to the spectrum and bispectrum of {zeta} are given, exhibiting statistical anisotropy. The one-loop contribution to the spectrum of {zeta} is also worked out. We then consider the generation of vector field perturbations from the vacuum, including the longitudinal component that will be present if there is no gauge invariance. Finally, the {delta}N formula is applied to the vector curvaton and vector inflation models with the tensor perturbation also evaluated in the latter case.

  19. Cosmological perturbations during radion stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashcroft, P. R.; van de Bruck, C.; Davis, A.-C.

    2005-01-01

    We consider the evolution of cosmological perturbations during radion stabilization, which we assume to happen after a period of inflation in the early universe. Concentrating on the Randall-Sundrum brane world scenario, we find that, if matter is present both on the positive and negative tension branes, the coupling of the radion to matter fields could have significant impact on the evolution of the curvature perturbation and on the production of entropy perturbations. We investigate both the case of a long-lived and a short-lived radion and outline similarities and differences to the curvaton scenario.

  20. Causal compensated perturbations in cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeraraghavan, Shoba; Stebbins, Albert

    1990-01-01

    A theoretical framework is developed to calculate linear perturbations in the gravitational and matter fields which arise causally in response to the presence of stiff matter sources in a FRW cosmology. It is shown that, in order to satisfy energy and momentum conservation, the gravitational fields of the source must be compensated by perturbations in the matter and gravitational fields, and the role of such compensation in containing the initial inhomogeneities in their subsequent evolution is discussed. A complete formal solution is derived in terms of Green functions for the perturbations produced by an arbitrary source in a flat universe containing cold dark matter. Approximate Green function solutions are derived for the late-time density perturbations and late-time gravitational waves in a universe containing a radiation fluid. A cosmological energy-momentum pseudotensor is defined to clarify the nature of energy and momentum conservation in the expanding universe.

  1. Isocurvature perturbations in extra radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Koichi; Nakayama, Kazunori; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu E-mail: miyamone@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: oyokazu.sekiguchi@nagoya-u.jp

    2012-02-01

    Recent cosmological observations, including measurements of the CMB anisotropy and the primordial helium abundance, indicate the existence of an extra radiation component in the Universe beyond the standard three neutrino species. In this paper we explore the possibility that the extra radiation has isocurvatrue fluctuations. A general formalism to evaluate isocurvature perturbations in the extra radiation is provided in the mixed inflaton-curvaton system, where the extra radiation is produced by the decay of both scalar fields. We also derive constraints on the abundance of the extra radiation and the amount of its isocurvature perturbation. Current observational data favors the existence of an extra radiation component, but does not indicate its having isocurvature perturbation. These constraints are applied to some particle physics motivated models. If future observations detect isocurvature perturbations in the extra radiation, it will give us a hint to the origin of the extra radiation.

  2. Dust-ion-acoustic solitons with transverse perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Moslem, Waleed M.; El-Taibany, W.F.; El-Shewy, E.K.; El-Shamy, E.F.

    2005-05-15

    The ionization source model is considered, for the first time, to study the combined effects of trapped electrons, transverse perturbation, ion streaming velocity, and dust charge fluctuations on the propagation of dust-ion-acoustic solitons in dusty plasmas. The solitary waves are investigated through the derivation of the damped modified Kadomtsev-Petviashivili equation using the reductive perturbation method. Conditions for the formation of solitons as well as their properties are clearly explained. The relevance of our investigation to supernovae shells is also discussed.

  3. Next-to-leading resummations in cosmological perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Anselmi, Stefano; Matarrese, Sabino; Pietroni, Massimo E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it

    2011-06-01

    One of the nicest results in cosmological perturbation theory is the analytical resummaton of the leading corrections at large momentum, which was obtained by Crocce and Scoccimarro for the propagator in Crocce (2005). Using an exact evolution equation, we generalize this result, by showing that a class of next-to-leading corrections can also be resummed at all orders in perturbation theory. The new corrections modify the propagator by a few percent in the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation range of scales, and therefore cannot be neglected in resummation schemes aiming at an accuracy compatible with future generation galaxy surveys. Similar tools can be employed to derive improved approximations for the Power Spectrum.

  4. Non-adiabatic perturbations in Ricci dark energy model

    SciTech Connect

    Karwan, Khamphee; Thitapura, Thiti E-mail: nanodsci2523@hotmail.com

    2012-01-01

    We show that the non-adiabatic perturbations between Ricci dark energy and matter can grow both on superhorizon and subhorizon scales, and these non-adiabatic perturbations on subhorizon scales can lead to instability in this dark energy model. The rapidly growing non-adiabatic modes on subhorizon scales always occur when the equation of state parameter of dark energy starts to drop towards -1 near the end of matter era, except that the parameter α of Ricci dark energy equals to 1/2. In the case where α = 1/2, the rapidly growing non-adiabatic modes disappear when the perturbations in dark energy and matter are adiabatic initially. However, an adiabaticity between dark energy and matter perturbations at early time implies a non-adiabaticity between matter and radiation, this can influence the ordinary Sachs-Wolfe (OSW) effect. Since the amount of Ricci dark energy is not small during matter domination, the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect is greatly modified by density perturbations of dark energy, leading to a wrong shape of CMB power spectrum. The instability in Ricci dark energy is difficult to be alleviated if the effects of coupling between baryon and photon on dark energy perturbations are included.

  5. Robust stability under additive perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhaya, A.; Desoer, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    A MIMO linear time-invariant feedback system 1S(P,C) is considered which is assumed to be U-stable. The plant P is subjected to an additive perturbation Delta P which is proper but not necessarily stable. It is proved that the perturbed system is U-stable if and only if Delta P(I + Q x Delta P) exp -1 is U-stable.

  6. Modified cyanobacteria

    DOEpatents

    Vermaas, Willem F J.

    2014-06-17

    Disclosed is a modified photoautotrophic bacterium comprising genes of interest that are modified in terms of their expression and/or coding region sequence, wherein modification of the genes of interest increases production of a desired product in the bacterium relative to the amount of the desired product production in a photoautotrophic bacterium that is not modified with respect to the genes of interest.

  7. The Nervous System Uses Nonspecific Motor Learning in Response to Random Perturbations of Varying Nature

    PubMed Central

    Wert, Daniel; Körding, Konrad

    2010-01-01

    We constantly make small errors during movement and use them to adapt our future movements. Movement experiments often probe this error-driven learning by perturbing movements and analyzing the after-effects. Past studies have applied perturbations of varying nature such as visual disturbances, position- or velocity-dependent forces and modified inertia properties of the limb. However, little is known about how the specific nature of a perturbation influences subsequent movements. For a single perturbation trial, the nature of a perturbation may be highly uncertain to the nervous system, given that it receives only noisy information. One hypothesis is that the nervous system can use this rough estimate to partially correct for the perturbation on the next trial. Alternatively, the nervous system could ignore uncertain information about the nature of the perturbation and resort to a nonspecific adaptation. To study how the brain estimates and responds to incomplete sensory information, we test these two hypotheses using a trial-by-trial adaptation experiment. On each trial, the nature of the perturbation was chosen from six distinct types, including a visuomotor rotation and different force fields. We observed that corrective forces aiming to oppose the perturbation in the following trial were independent of the nature of the perturbation. Our results suggest that the nervous system uses a nonspecific strategy when it has high uncertainty about the nature of perturbations during trial-by-trial learning. PMID:20861427

  8. Approximate solution of two-term fractional-order diffusion, wave-diffusion, and telegraph models arising in mathematical physics using optimal homotopy asymptotic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwar, S.; Rashidi, M. M.

    2016-07-01

    This paper deals with the investigation of the analytical approximate solutions for two-term fractional-order diffusion, wave-diffusion, and telegraph equations. The fractional derivatives are defined in the Caputo sense, whose orders belong to the intervals [0,1], (1,2), and [1,2], respectively. In this paper, we extended optimal homotopy asymptotic method (OHAM) for two-term fractional-order wave-diffusion equations. Highly approximate solution is obtained in series form using this extended method. Approximate solution obtained by OHAM is compared with the exact solution. It is observed that OHAM is a prevailing and convergent method for the solutions of nonlinear-fractional-order time-dependent partial differential problems. The numerical results rendering that the applied method is explicit, effective, and easy to use, for handling more general fractional-order wave diffusion, diffusion, and telegraph problems.

  9. Optimal Homotopy Asymptotic Method for Flow and Heat Transfer of a Viscoelastic Fluid in an Axisymmetric Channel with a Porous Wall

    PubMed Central

    Mabood, Fazle; Khan, Waqar A.; Ismail, Ahmad Izani

    2013-01-01

    In this article, an approximate analytical solution of flow and heat transfer for a viscoelastic fluid in an axisymmetric channel with porous wall is presented. The solution is obtained through the use of a powerful method known as Optimal Homotopy Asymptotic Method (OHAM). We obtained the approximate analytical solution for dimensionless velocity and temperature for various parameters. The influence and effect of different parameters on dimensionless velocity, temperature, friction factor, and rate of heat transfer are presented graphically. We also compared our solution with those obtained by other methods and it is found that OHAM solution is better than the other methods considered. This shows that OHAM is reliable for use to solve strongly nonlinear problems in heat transfer phenomena. PMID:24376722

  10. Shock wave perturbation decay in granular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vogler, Tracy J.

    2015-11-05

    A technique in which the evolution of a perturbation in a shock wave front is monitored as it travels through a sample is applied to granular materials. Although the approach was originally conceived as a way to measure the viscosity of the sample, here it is utilized as a means to probe the deviatoric strength of the material. Initial results for a tungsten carbide powder are presented that demonstrate the approach is viable. Simulations of the experiments using continuum and mesoscale modeling approaches are used to better understand the experiments. The best agreement with the limited experimental data is obtained for the mesoscale model, which has previously been shown to give good agreement with planar impact results. The continuum simulations indicate that the decay of the perturbation is controlled by material strength but is insensitive to the compaction response. Other sensitivities are assessed using the two modeling approaches. The simulations indicate that the configuration used in the preliminary experiments suffers from certain artifacts and should be modified to remove them. As a result, the limitations of the current instrumentation are discussed, and possible approaches to improve it are suggested.

  11. Shock wave perturbation decay in granular materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vogler, Tracy J.

    2015-11-05

    A technique in which the evolution of a perturbation in a shock wave front is monitored as it travels through a sample is applied to granular materials. Although the approach was originally conceived as a way to measure the viscosity of the sample, here it is utilized as a means to probe the deviatoric strength of the material. Initial results for a tungsten carbide powder are presented that demonstrate the approach is viable. Simulations of the experiments using continuum and mesoscale modeling approaches are used to better understand the experiments. The best agreement with the limited experimental data is obtainedmore » for the mesoscale model, which has previously been shown to give good agreement with planar impact results. The continuum simulations indicate that the decay of the perturbation is controlled by material strength but is insensitive to the compaction response. Other sensitivities are assessed using the two modeling approaches. The simulations indicate that the configuration used in the preliminary experiments suffers from certain artifacts and should be modified to remove them. As a result, the limitations of the current instrumentation are discussed, and possible approaches to improve it are suggested.« less

  12. Perturbative stability of SFT-based cosmological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Federico; Koshelev, Alexey S.

    2011-05-01

    We review the appearance of multiple scalar fields in linearized SFT based cosmological models with a single non-local scalar field. Some of these local fields are canonical real scalar fields and some are complex fields with unusual coupling. These systems only admit numerical or approximate analysis. We introduce a modified potential for multiple scalar fields that makes the system exactly solvable in the cosmological context of Friedmann equations and at the same time preserves the asymptotic behavior expected from SFT. The main part of the paper consists of the analysis of inhomogeneous cosmological perturbations in this system. We show numerically that perturbations corresponding to the new type of complex fields always vanish. As an example of application of this model we consider an explicit construction of the phantom divide crossing and prove the perturbative stability of this process at the linear order. The issue of ghosts and ways to resolve it are briefly discussed.

  13. Orbit Averaging in Perturbed Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Glen R.

    2015-11-01

    The orbital period is typically much shorter than the time scale for dynamical evolution of large-scale structures in planetary rings. This large separation in time scales motivates the derivation of reduced models by averaging the equations of motion over the local orbit period (Borderies et al. 1985, Shu et al. 1985). A more systematic procedure for carrying out the orbit averaging is to use Lie transform perturbation theory to remove the dependence on the fast angle variable from the problem order-by-order in epsilon, where the small parameter epsilon is proportional to the fractional radial distance from exact resonance. This powerful technique has been developed and refined over the past thirty years in the context of gyrokinetic theory in plasma physics (Brizard and Hahm, Rev. Mod. Phys. 79, 2007). When the Lie transform method is applied to resonantly forced rings near a mean motion resonance with a satellite, the resulting orbit-averaged equations contain the nonlinear terms found previously, but also contain additional nonlinear self-gravity terms of the same order that were missed by Borderies et al. and by Shu et al. The additional terms result from the fact that the self-consistent gravitational potential of the perturbed rings modifies the orbit-averaging transformation at nonlinear order. These additional terms are the gravitational analog of electrostatic ponderomotive forces caused by large amplitude waves in plasma physics. The revised orbit-averaged equations are shown to modify the behavior of nonlinear density waves in planetary rings compared to the previously published theory. This reserach was supported by NASA's Outer Planets Reserach program.

  14. Gravitational waves from perturbed stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, V.

    2011-12-01

    Non radial oscillations of neutron stars are associated with the emission of gravitational waves. The characteristic frequencies of these oscillations can be computed using the theory of stellar perturbations, and they are shown to carry detailed information on the internal structure of the emitting source. Moreover, they appear to be encoded in various radiative processes, as for instance, in the tail of the giant flares of Soft Gamma Repeaters. Thus, their determination is central to the theory of stellar perturbation. A viable approach to the problem consists in formulating this theory as a problem of resonant scattering of gravitational waves incident on the potential barrier generated by the spacetime curvature. This approach discloses some unexpected correspondences between the theory of stellar perturbations and the theory of quantum mechanics, and allows us to predict new relativistic effects.

  15. Gravitational waves from perturbed stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, V.

    2011-03-01

    Non radial oscillations of neutron stars are associated with the emission of gravitational waves. The characteristic frequencies of these oscillations can be computed using the theory of stellar perturbations, and they are shown to carry detailed information on the internal structure of the emitting source. Moreover, they appear to be encoded in various radiative processes, as for instance in the tail of the giant flares of Soft Gamma Repeaters. Thus, their determination is central to the theory of stellar perturbation. A viable approach to the problem consists in formulating this theory as a problem of resonant scattering of gravitational waves incident on the potential barrier generated by the spacetime curvature. This approach discloses some unexpected correspondences between the theory of stellar perturbations and the theory of quantum mechanics, and allows us to predict new relativistic effects.

  16. Jet Perturbation by HE target

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, P; Kuklo, R M

    2001-03-01

    We have previously reported the degree of attenuation and perturbation by a Cu jet passing through Comp B explosive. Similar tests have now been performed with high explosive (HE) targets having CJ pressures higher than and lower than the CJ pressure of Comp B. The explosives were LX-14 and TNT, respectively. We found that the measured exit velocity of the jet where it transitions from perturbed to solid did not vary significantly as a function of HE type for each HE thickness. The radial momentum imparted to the perturbed jet segment did vary as a function of HE type, however, and we report the radial spreading of the jet and the penetration of a downstream target as a function of HE type and thickness.

  17. Perturbed motion at small eccentricities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emel'yanov, N. V.

    2015-09-01

    In the study of the motion of planets and moons, it is often necessary to have a simple approximate analytical motion model, which takes into account major perturbations and preserves almost the same accuracy at long time intervals. A precessing ellipse model is used for this purpose. In this paper, it is shown that for small eccentricities this model of the perturbed orbit does not correspond to body motion characteristics. There is perturbed circular motion with a constant zero mean anomaly. The corresponding solution satisfies the Lagrange equations with respect to Keplerian orbital elements. There are two families of solutions with libration and circulation changes in the mean anomaly close to this particular solution. The paper shows how the eccentricity and mean anomaly change in these solutions. Simple analytical models of the motion of the four closest moons of Jupiter consistent with available ephemerides are proposed, which in turn are obtained by the numerical integration of motion equations and are refined by observations.

  18. Thermal perturbation of the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twigg, L. W.; Endal, A. S.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation of thermal perturbations of the solar convective zone via changes in the mixing length parameter were carried out, with a view toward understanding the possible solar radius and luminosity changes cited in the literature. The results show that: (a) a single perturbation of alpha is probably not the cause of the solar radius change and (b) the parameter W = d lambda nR./d lambda nL. can not be characterized by a single value, as implied in recent work.

  19. Constraining dark sector perturbations II: ISW and CMB lensing tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soergel, B.; Giannantonio, T.; Weller, J.; Battye, R. A.

    2015-02-01

    Any Dark Energy (DE) or Modified Gravity (MG) model that deviates from a cosmological constant requires a consistent treatment of its perturbations, which can be described in terms of an effective entropy perturbation and an anisotropic stress. We have considered a recently proposed generic parameterisation of DE/MG perturbations and compared it to data from the Planck satellite and six galaxy catalogues, including temperature-galaxy (Tg), CMB lensing-galaxy (varphi g) and galaxy-galaxy (gg) correlations. Combining these observables of structure formation with tests of the background expansion allows us to investigate the properties of DE/MG both at the background and the perturbative level. Our constraints on DE/MG are mostly in agreement with the cosmological constant paradigm, while we also find that the constraint on the equation of state w (assumed to be constant) depends on the model assumed for the perturbation evolution. We obtain w=-0.92+0.20-0.16 (95% CL; CMB+gg+Tg) in the entropy perturbation scenario; in the anisotropic stress case the result is w=-0.86+0.17-0.16. Including the lensing correlations shifts the results towards higher values of w. If we include a prior on the expansion history from recent Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) measurements, we find that the constraints tighten closely around w=-1, making it impossible to measure any DE/MG perturbation evolution parameters. If, however, upcoming observations from surveys like DES, Euclid or LSST show indications for a deviation from a cosmological constant, our formalism will be a useful tool towards model selection in the dark sector.

  20. AGK Rules in Perturbative QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Jochen

    2006-06-01

    I summarize the present status of the AGK cutting rules in perturbative QCD. Particular attention is given to the application of the AGK analysis to diffraction and multiple scattering in DIS at HERA and to pp collisions at the LHC. I also discuss the bootstrap conditions which appear in pQCD.

  1. VHS Movies: Perturbations for Morphogenesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Danny L.

    This paper discusses the concept of a family system in terms of an interactive system of interrelated, interdependent parts and suggests that VHS movies can act as perturbations, i.e., change promoting agents, for certain dysfunctional family systems. Several distinct characteristics of a family system are defined with particular emphasis on…

  2. Adaptation Strategies in Perturbed /s/

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Jana; Hoole, Phil; Perrier, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the role of three articulatory parameters (tongue position, jaw position and tongue grooving) in the production of /s/. Six normal speakers' speech was perturbed by a palatal prosthesis. The fricative was recorded acoustically and through electromagnetic articulography in four conditions: (1) unperturbed,…

  3. Basics of QCD perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Soper, D.E.

    1997-06-01

    This is an introduction to the use of QCD perturbation theory, emphasizing generic features of the theory that enable one to separate short-time and long-time effects. The author also covers some important classes of applications: electron-positron annihilation to hadrons, deeply inelastic scattering, and hard processes in hadron-hadron collisions. 31 refs., 38 figs.

  4. Generalized perturbations in neutrino mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jiajun; Marfatia, D.; Whisnant, K.

    2015-10-01

    We derive expressions for the neutrino mixing parameters that result from complex perturbations on (1) the Majorana neutrino mass matrix (in the basis of charged lepton mass eigenstates) and on (2) the charged lepton mass matrix, for arbitrary initial (unperturbed) mixing matrices. In the first case, we find that the phases of the elements of the perturbation matrix, and the initial values of the Dirac and Majorana phases, strongly impact the leading-order corrections to the neutrino mixing parameters and phases. For experimentally compatible scenarios wherein the initial neutrino mass matrix has μ -τ symmetry, we find that the Dirac phase can take any value under small perturbations. Similarly, in the second case, perturbations to the charged lepton mass matrix can generate large corrections to the mixing angles and phases of the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata (PMNS) matrix. As an illustration of our generalized procedure, we apply it to a situation in which nonstandard scalar and nonstandard vector interactions simultaneously affect neutrino oscillations.

  5. Seven topics in perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Buras, A.J.

    1980-09-01

    The following topics of perturbative QCD are discussed: (1) deep inelastic scattering; (2) higher order corrections to e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, to photon structure functions and to quarkonia decays; (3) higher order corrections to fragmentation functions and to various semi-inclusive processes; (4) higher twist contributions; (5) exclusive processes; (6) transverse momentum effects; (7) jet and photon physics.

  6. Vector perturbations of galaxy number counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrer, Ruth; Tansella, Vittorio

    2016-07-01

    We derive the contribution to relativistic galaxy number count fluctuations from vector and tensor perturbations within linear perturbation theory. Our result is consistent with the the relativistic corrections to number counts due to scalar perturbation, where the Bardeen potentials are replaced with line-of-sight projection of vector and tensor quantities. Since vector and tensor perturbations do not lead to density fluctuations the standard density term in the number counts is absent. We apply our results to vector perturbations which are induced from scalar perturbations at second order and give numerical estimates of their contributions to the power spectrum of relativistic galaxy number counts.

  7. Neptune's story. [Triton's orbit perturbation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldreich, P.; Murray, N.; Longaretti, P. Y.; Banfield, D.

    1989-01-01

    It is conjectured that Triton was captured from a heliocentric orbit as the result of a collision with what was then one of Neptune's regular satellites. The immediate post-capture orbit was highly eccentric. Dissipation due to tides raised by Neptune in Triton caused Triton's orbit to evolve to its present state in less than one billion years. For much of this time Triton was almost entirely molten. While its orbit was evolving, Triton cannibalized most of the regular satellites of Neptune and also perturbed Nereid, thus accounting for that satellite's highly eccentric and inclined orbit. The only regular satellites of Neptune that survived were those that formed well within 5 Neptune radii, and they move on inclined orbits as the result of chaotic perturbations forced by Triton.

  8. Identifying Network Perturbation in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Grechkin, Maxim; Logsdon, Benjamin A; Gentles, Andrew J; Lee, Su-In

    2016-05-01

    We present a computational framework, called DISCERN (DIfferential SparsE Regulatory Network), to identify informative topological changes in gene-regulator dependence networks inferred on the basis of mRNA expression datasets within distinct biological states. DISCERN takes two expression datasets as input: an expression dataset of diseased tissues from patients with a disease of interest and another expression dataset from matching normal tissues. DISCERN estimates the extent to which each gene is perturbed-having distinct regulator connectivity in the inferred gene-regulator dependencies between the disease and normal conditions. This approach has distinct advantages over existing methods. First, DISCERN infers conditional dependencies between candidate regulators and genes, where conditional dependence relationships discriminate the evidence for direct interactions from indirect interactions more precisely than pairwise correlation. Second, DISCERN uses a new likelihood-based scoring function to alleviate concerns about accuracy of the specific edges inferred in a particular network. DISCERN identifies perturbed genes more accurately in synthetic data than existing methods to identify perturbed genes between distinct states. In expression datasets from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), breast cancer and lung cancer, genes with high DISCERN scores in each cancer are enriched for known tumor drivers, genes associated with the biological processes known to be important in the disease, and genes associated with patient prognosis, in the respective cancer. Finally, we show that DISCERN can uncover potential mechanisms underlying network perturbation by explaining observed epigenomic activity patterns in cancer and normal tissue types more accurately than alternative methods, based on the available epigenomic data from the ENCODE project. PMID:27145341

  9. Adiabatic perturbations in pre-big bang models: Matching conditions and scale invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrer, Ruth; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2002-10-01

    At low energy, the four-dimensional effective action of the ekpyrotic model of the universe is equivalent to a slightly modified version of the pre-big bang model. We discuss cosmological perturbations in these models. In particular we address the issue of matching the perturbations from a collapsing to an expanding phase. We show that, under certain physically motivated and quite generic assumptions on the high energy corrections, one obtains n=0 for the spectrum of scalar perturbations in the original pre-big bang model (with a vanishing potential). With the same assumptions, when an exponential potential for the dilaton is included, a scale invariant spectrum (n=1) of adiabatic scalar perturbations is produced under very generic matching conditions, both in a modified pre-big bang and ekpyrotic scenario. We also derive the resulting spectrum for arbitrary power law scale factors matched to a radiation-dominated era.

  10. R evolution: Improving perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Andre H.; Jain, Ambar; Stewart, Iain W.; Scimemi, Ignazio

    2010-07-01

    Perturbative QCD results in the MS scheme can be dramatically improved by switching to a scheme that accounts for the dominant power law dependence on the factorization scale in the operator product expansion. We introduce the ''MSR scheme'' which achieves this in a Lorentz and gauge invariant way and has a very simple relation to MS. Results in MSR depend on a cutoff parameter R, in addition to the {mu} of MS. R variations can be used to independently estimate (i.) the size of power corrections, and (ii.) higher-order perturbative corrections (much like {mu} in MS). We give two examples at three-loop order, the ratio of mass splittings in the B*-B and D*-D systems, and the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule as a function of momentum transfer Q in deep inelastic scattering. Comparing to data, the perturbative MSR results work well even for Q{approx}1 GeV, and power corrections are reduced compared to MS.

  11. Path integral for inflationary perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopec, Tomislav; Rigopoulos, Gerasimos

    2010-07-01

    The quantum theory of cosmological perturbations in single-field inflation is formulated in terms of a path integral. Starting from a canonical formulation, we show how the free propagators can be obtained from the well-known gauge-invariant quadratic action for scalar and tensor perturbations, and determine the interactions to arbitrary order. This approach does not require the explicit solution of the energy and momentum constraints, a novel feature which simplifies the determination of the interaction vertices. The constraints and the necessary imposition of gauge conditions is reflected in the appearance of various commuting and anticommuting auxiliary fields in the action. These auxiliary fields are not propagating physical degrees of freedom but need to be included in internal lines and loops in a diagrammatic expansion. To illustrate the formalism we discuss the tree-level three-point and four-point functions of the inflaton perturbations, reproducing the results already obtained by the methods used in the current literature. Loop calculations are left for future work.

  12. R evolution: Improving perturbative QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, André H.; Jain, Ambar; Scimemi, Ignazio; Stewart, Iain W.

    2010-07-01

    Perturbative QCD results in the MS¯ scheme can be dramatically improved by switching to a scheme that accounts for the dominant power law dependence on the factorization scale in the operator product expansion. We introduce the “MSR scheme” which achieves this in a Lorentz and gauge invariant way and has a very simple relation to MS¯. Results in MSR depend on a cutoff parameter R, in addition to the μ of MS¯. R variations can be used to independently estimate (i.) the size of power corrections, and (ii.) higher-order perturbative corrections (much like μ in MS¯). We give two examples at three-loop order, the ratio of mass splittings in the B*-B and D*-D systems, and the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule as a function of momentum transfer Q in deep inelastic scattering. Comparing to data, the perturbative MSR results work well even for Q˜1GeV, and power corrections are reduced compared to MS¯.

  13. Perturbation growth in accreting filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, S. D.; Whitworth, A. P.; Hubber, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    We use smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations to investigate the growth of perturbations in infinitely long filaments as they form and grow by accretion. The growth of these perturbations leads to filament fragmentation and the formation of cores. Most previous work on this subject has been confined to the growth and fragmentation of equilibrium filaments and has found that there exists a preferential fragmentation length-scale which is roughly four times the filament's diameter. Our results show a more complicated dispersion relation with a series of peaks linking perturbation wavelength and growth rate. These are due to gravo-acoustic oscillations along the longitudinal axis during the sub-critical phase of growth. The positions of the peaks in growth rate have a strong dependence on both the mass accretion rate onto the filament and the temperature of the gas. When seeded with a multiwavelength density power spectrum, there exists a clear preferred core separation equal to the largest peak in the dispersion relation. Our results allow one to estimate a minimum age for a filament which is breaking up into regularly spaced fragments, as well as an average accretion rate. We apply the model to observations of filaments in Taurus by Tafalla & Hacar and find accretion rates consistent with those estimated by Palmeirim et al.

  14. Cosmological perturbations: Vorticity, isocurvature and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopherson, Adam J.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, I review some recent, interlinked, work undertaken using cosmological perturbation theory — a powerful technique for modeling inhomogeneities in the universe. The common theme which underpins these pieces of work is the presence of nonadiabatic pressure, or entropy, perturbations. After a brief introduction covering the standard techniques of describing inhomogeneities in both Newtonian and relativistic cosmology, I discuss the generation of vorticity. As in classical fluid mechanics, vorticity is not present in linearized perturbation theory (unless included as an initial condition). Allowing for entropy perturbations, and working to second order in perturbation theory, I show that vorticity is generated, even in the absence of vector perturbations, by purely scalar perturbations, the source term being quadratic in the gradients of first order energy density and isocurvature, or nonadiabatic pressure perturbations. This generalizes Crocco's theorem to a cosmological setting. I then introduce isocurvature perturbations in different models, focusing on the entropy perturbation in standard, concordance cosmology, and in inflationary models involving two scalar fields. As the final topic, I investigate magnetic fields, which are a potential observational consequence of vorticity in the early universe. I briefly review some recent work on including magnetic fields in perturbation theory in a consistent way. I show, using solely analytical techniques, that magnetic fields can be generated by higher order perturbations, albeit too small to provide the entire primordial seed field, in agreement with some numerical studies. I close this paper with a summary and some potential extensions of this work.

  15. Superconvergent perturbation method in quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, W. )

    1995-02-27

    An analog of Kolmogorov's superconvergent perturbation theory in classical mechanics is constructed for self-adjoint operators. It is different from the usual Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation theory and yields expansions for eigenvalues and eigenvectors in terms of functions of the perturbation parameter.

  16. Geometric Hamiltonian structures and perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Omohundro, S.

    1984-08-01

    We have been engaged in a program of investigating the Hamiltonian structure of the various perturbation theories used in practice. We describe the geometry of a Hamiltonian structure for non-singular perturbation theory applied to Hamiltonian systems on symplectic manifolds and the connection with singular perturbation techniques based on the method of averaging.

  17. Cosmological perturbations and quasistatic assumption in f (R ) theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Mu-Chen; Taylor, Andy; Shu, Chenggang; Tu, Hong

    2015-11-01

    f (R ) gravity is one of the simplest theories of modified gravity to explain the accelerated cosmic expansion. Although it is usually assumed that the quasi-Newtonian approach (a combination of the quasistatic approximation and sub-Hubble limit) for cosmic perturbations is good enough to describe the evolution of large scale structure in f (R ) models, some studies have suggested that this method is not valid for all f (R ) models. Here, we show that in the matter-dominated era, the pressure and shear equations alone, which can be recast into four first-order equations to solve for cosmological perturbations exactly, are sufficient to solve for the Newtonian potential, Ψ , and the curvature potential, Φ . Based on these two equations, we are able to clarify how the exact linear perturbations fit into different limits. We find that the Compton length controls the quasistatic behaviors in f (R ) gravity. In addition, regardless the validity of quasistatic approximation, a strong version of the sub-Hubble limit alone is sufficient to reduce the exact linear perturbations in any viable f (R ) gravity to second order. Our findings disagree with some previous studies where we find little difference between our exact and quasi-Newtonian solutions even up to k =10 c-1H0.

  18. A new approach to cosmological perturbations in f(R) models

    SciTech Connect

    Bertacca, Daniele; Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino E-mail: nicola.bartolo@pd.infn.it

    2012-08-01

    We propose an analytic procedure that allows to determine quantitatively the deviation in the behavior of cosmological perturbations between a given f(R) modified gravity model and a ΛCDM reference model. Our method allows to study structure formation in these models from the largest scales, of the order of the Hubble horizon, down to scales deeply inside the Hubble radius, without employing the so-called 'quasi-static' approximation. Although we restrict our analysis here to linear perturbations, our technique is completely general and can be extended to any perturbative order.

  19. Preliminary Orbit Determination System (PODS) for Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS)-tracked target Spacecraft using the homotopy continuation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirschner, S. M.; Samii, M. V.; Broaddus, S. R.; Doll, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    The Preliminary Orbit Determination System (PODS) provides early orbit determination capability in the Trajectory Computation and Orbital Products System (TCOPS) for a Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS)-tracked spacecraft. PODS computes a set of orbit states from an a priori estimate and six tracking measurements, consisting of any combination of TDRSS range and Doppler tracking measurements. PODS uses the homotopy continuation method to solve a set of nonlinear equations, and it is particularly effective for the case when the a priori estimate is not well known. Since range and Doppler measurements produce multiple states in PODS, a screening technique selects the desired state. PODS is executed in the TCOPS environment and can directly access all operational data sets. At the completion of the preliminary orbit determination, the PODS-generated state, along with additional tracking measurements, can be directly input to the differential correction (DC) process to generate an improved state. To validate the computational and operational capabilities of PODS, tests were performed using simulated TDRSS tracking measurements for the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite and using real TDRSS measurements for the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) spacecraft. The effects of various measurement combinations, varying arc lengths, and levels of degradation of the a priori state vector on the PODS solutions were considered.

  20. Identifying Network Perturbation in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Logsdon, Benjamin A.; Gentles, Andrew J.; Lee, Su-In

    2016-01-01

    We present a computational framework, called DISCERN (DIfferential SparsE Regulatory Network), to identify informative topological changes in gene-regulator dependence networks inferred on the basis of mRNA expression datasets within distinct biological states. DISCERN takes two expression datasets as input: an expression dataset of diseased tissues from patients with a disease of interest and another expression dataset from matching normal tissues. DISCERN estimates the extent to which each gene is perturbed—having distinct regulator connectivity in the inferred gene-regulator dependencies between the disease and normal conditions. This approach has distinct advantages over existing methods. First, DISCERN infers conditional dependencies between candidate regulators and genes, where conditional dependence relationships discriminate the evidence for direct interactions from indirect interactions more precisely than pairwise correlation. Second, DISCERN uses a new likelihood-based scoring function to alleviate concerns about accuracy of the specific edges inferred in a particular network. DISCERN identifies perturbed genes more accurately in synthetic data than existing methods to identify perturbed genes between distinct states. In expression datasets from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), breast cancer and lung cancer, genes with high DISCERN scores in each cancer are enriched for known tumor drivers, genes associated with the biological processes known to be important in the disease, and genes associated with patient prognosis, in the respective cancer. Finally, we show that DISCERN can uncover potential mechanisms underlying network perturbation by explaining observed epigenomic activity patterns in cancer and normal tissue types more accurately than alternative methods, based on the available epigenomic data from the ENCODE project. PMID:27145341

  1. Hadronic Structure from Perturbative Dressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arash, Firooz

    2005-09-01

    Perturbative dressing of a valence quark in QCD produces the internal structure of an extended object, the so-called Valon. The valon structure is universal and independent of the hosting hadron. Polarized and unpolarized proton and pion structure functions are calculated in the valon representation. One finds that although all the available data on g1p,n,d are easily reproduced, a sizable orbital angular momentum associated with the partonic structure of the valon is required in order to have a spin 1/2 valon.

  2. Scaled Energy Spectroscopy of Collisionally Perturbed Potassium Rydberg States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeler, Matthew Len; Setzer, William

    2010-03-01

    We will present preliminary results on the recurrence spectroscopy (or scaled energy spectroscopy) of highly-excited potassium in the presence of collisional perturbations. Recurrence spectroscopy, with the aid of closed orbit theory, has produced useful insights into the semi-classical description of non-hydrogenic spectral features of excited atoms in external fields. We demonstrate how to apply recurrence spectroscopy to the Stark spectrum of potassium subject to collisional line-shift and line-broadening. When krypton gas is added to the system the absorption spectrum experiences line broadening, differential line shifts, and state mixing. With an appropriately modified energy scale, perturbations of the absorption spectrum become meaningful features within the scaled-energy spectrum. New features found within the recurrence spectra can then, with semi-classical closed orbit theory, be interpreted in terms of classical decoherence, elastic and inelastic collisions.

  3. Dark matter perturbations and viscosity: A causal approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acquaviva, Giovanni; John, Anslyn; Pénin, Aurélie

    2016-08-01

    The inclusion of dissipative effects in cosmic fluids modifies their clustering properties and could have observable effects on the formation of large-scale structures. We analyze the evolution of density perturbations of cold dark matter endowed with causal bulk viscosity. The perturbative analysis is carried out in the Newtonian approximation and the bulk viscosity is described by the causal Israel-Stewart (IS) theory. In contrast to the noncausal Eckart theory, we obtain a third-order evolution equation for the density contrast that depends on three free parameters. For certain parameter values, the density contrast and growth factor in IS mimic their behavior in Λ CDM when z ≥1 . Interestingly, and contrary to intuition, certain sets of parameters lead to an increase of the clustering.

  4. A Schwarz alternating procedure for singular perturbation problems

    SciTech Connect

    Garbey, M.; Kaper, H.G.

    1994-12-31

    The authors show that the Schwarz alternating procedure offers a good algorithm for the numerical solution of singular perturbation problems, provided the domain decomposition is properly designed to resolve the boundary and transition layers. They give sharp estimates for the optimal position of the domain boundaries and present convergence rates of the algorithm for various second-order singular perturbation problems. The splitting of the operator is domain-dependent, and the iterative solution of each subproblem is based on a modified asymptotic expansion of the operator. They show that this asymptotic-induced method leads to a family of efficient massively parallel algorithms and report on implementation results for a turning-point problem and a combustion problem.

  5. Stochastic Perturbations in Type I Planetary Migraiton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Fred C.; Bloch, A. M.

    2009-05-01

    This talk presents a generalized treatment of Type I planetary migration in the presence of stochastic perturbations. In many planet-forming disks, the Type I migration mechanism, driven by asymmetric torques, can compromise planet formation. If the disk also supports MHD instabilities, however, the corresponding turbulent fluctuations produce additional stochastic torques that modify the steady inward migration scenario. This work studies the migration of planetary cores in the presence of stochastic fluctuations using complementary methods, including iterative maps and a Fokker-Planck approach. Stochastic torques have two main effects: [1] Through outward diffusion, a small fraction of the planetary cores can survive in the face of Type I inward migration. [2] For a given starting condition, the result of any particular realization of migration is uncertain, so that results must be described in terms of the distributions of outcomes. In addition to exploring different regimes of parameter space, this paper considers the effects of the outer disk boundary condition and time-dependence of the torque parameters. For disks with finite radii, the fraction of surviving planets decreases exponentially with time. We find the survival fractions and decay rates for a range of disk models, and find the expected distribution of locations for surviving planets. The survival fraction is expected to lie in the range 0.01 < p_S < 0.1.

  6. Phase perturbation measurements through a heated ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, A.; Gordon, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    High frequency radiowaves incident on an overdense (i.e., HF-frequency penetration frequency) ionosphere produce electron density irregularities. The effect of such ionospheric irregularities on the phase of UHF-radiowaves was determined. For that purpose the phase of radiowaves originating from celestial radio sources was observed with two antennas. The radiosources were chosen such that the line of sight to at least one of the antennas (usually both) passed through the modified volume of the ionosphere. Observations at 430 MHz and at 2380 MHz indicate that natural irregularities have a much stronger effect on the UHF phase fluctuations than the HF-induced irregularities for presently achieved HF-power densities of 20-80 uW/sq m. It is not clear whether some of the effects observed are the result of HF-modification of the ionosphere. Upper limits on the phase perturbations produced by HF-modification are 10 deg at 2380 MHz and 80 deg at 430 MHz.

  7. The stability of the dust acoustic waves under transverse perturbations in a magnetized and collisionless dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Dong-Ning; Qi, Xin; Hong, Xue-Ren; Yang, Xue; Duan, Wen-Shan; Yang, Lei; Yang

    2014-06-01

    Numerical and theoretical investigations are carried out for the stability of the dust acoustic waves (DAWs) under the transverse perturbation in a two-ion temperature magnetized and collisionless dusty plasma. The Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation, modified ZK equation, and Extended ZK (EZK) equation of the DAWs are given by using the reductive perturbation technique. The cut-off frequency is obtained by applying higher-order transverse perturbations to the soliton solution of the EZK equation. The propagation velocity of solitary waves, the real cut-off frequency, as well as the growth rate of the higher-order perturbation to the solitary wave are obtained.

  8. "Phonon" scattering beyond perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, WuJie; Ke, XueZhi; Xi, LiLi; Wu, LiHua; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, WenQing

    2016-02-01

    Searching and designing materials with intrinsically low lattice thermal conductivity (LTC) have attracted extensive consideration in thermoelectrics and thermal management community. The concept of part-crystalline part-liquid state, or even part-crystalline part-amorphous state, has recently been proposed to describe the exotic structure of materials with chemical- bond hierarchy, in which a set of atoms is weakly bonded to the rest species while the other sublattices retain relatively strong rigidity. The whole system inherently manifests the coexistence of rigid crystalline sublattices and fluctuating noncrystalline substructures. Representative materials in the unusual state can be classified into two categories, i.e., caged and non-caged ones. LTCs in both systems deviate from the traditional T -1 relationship ( T, the absolute temperature), which can hardly be described by small-parameter-based perturbation approaches. Beyond the classical perturbation theory, an extra rattling-like scattering should be considered to interpret the liquid-like and sublattice-amorphization-induced heat transport. Such a kind of compounds could be promising high-performance thermoelectric materials, due to the extremely low LTCs. Other physical properties for these part-crystalline substances should also exhibit certain novelty and deserve further exploration.

  9. Phytochemicals Perturb Membranes and Promiscuously Alter Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A wide variety of phytochemicals are consumed for their perceived health benefits. Many of these phytochemicals have been found to alter numerous cell functions, but the mechanisms underlying their biological activity tend to be poorly understood. Phenolic phytochemicals are particularly promiscuous modifiers of membrane protein function, suggesting that some of their actions may be due to a common, membrane bilayer-mediated mechanism. To test whether bilayer perturbation may underlie this diversity of actions, we examined five bioactive phenols reported to have medicinal value: capsaicin from chili peppers, curcumin from turmeric, EGCG from green tea, genistein from soybeans, and resveratrol from grapes. We find that each of these widely consumed phytochemicals alters lipid bilayer properties and the function of diverse membrane proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations show that these phytochemicals modify bilayer properties by localizing to the bilayer/solution interface. Bilayer-modifying propensity was verified using a gramicidin-based assay, and indiscriminate modulation of membrane protein function was demonstrated using four proteins: membrane-anchored metalloproteases, mechanosensitive ion channels, and voltage-dependent potassium and sodium channels. Each protein exhibited similar responses to multiple phytochemicals, consistent with a common, bilayer-mediated mechanism. Our results suggest that many effects of amphiphilic phytochemicals are due to cell membrane perturbations, rather than specific protein binding. PMID:24901212

  10. Phytochemicals perturb membranes and promiscuously alter protein function.

    PubMed

    Ingólfsson, Helgi I; Thakur, Pratima; Herold, Karl F; Hobart, E Ashley; Ramsey, Nicole B; Periole, Xavier; de Jong, Djurre H; Zwama, Martijn; Yilmaz, Duygu; Hall, Katherine; Maretzky, Thorsten; Hemmings, Hugh C; Blobel, Carl; Marrink, Siewert J; Koçer, Armağan; Sack, Jon T; Andersen, Olaf S

    2014-08-15

    A wide variety of phytochemicals are consumed for their perceived health benefits. Many of these phytochemicals have been found to alter numerous cell functions, but the mechanisms underlying their biological activity tend to be poorly understood. Phenolic phytochemicals are particularly promiscuous modifiers of membrane protein function, suggesting that some of their actions may be due to a common, membrane bilayer-mediated mechanism. To test whether bilayer perturbation may underlie this diversity of actions, we examined five bioactive phenols reported to have medicinal value: capsaicin from chili peppers, curcumin from turmeric, EGCG from green tea, genistein from soybeans, and resveratrol from grapes. We find that each of these widely consumed phytochemicals alters lipid bilayer properties and the function of diverse membrane proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations show that these phytochemicals modify bilayer properties by localizing to the bilayer/solution interface. Bilayer-modifying propensity was verified using a gramicidin-based assay, and indiscriminate modulation of membrane protein function was demonstrated using four proteins: membrane-anchored metalloproteases, mechanosensitive ion channels, and voltage-dependent potassium and sodium channels. Each protein exhibited similar responses to multiple phytochemicals, consistent with a common, bilayer-mediated mechanism. Our results suggest that many effects of amphiphilic phytochemicals are due to cell membrane perturbations, rather than specific protein binding. PMID:24901212

  11. Perturbations i have Known and Loved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Robert W.

    2011-06-01

    A spectroscopic perturbation is a disruption of a ^1Σ-^1Σ-like regular pattern that can embody level-shifts, extra lines, and intensity anomalies. Once upon a time, when a band was labeled ``perturbed,'' it was considered worthless because it could at best yield molecular constants unsuited for archival tables. Nevertheless, a few brave spectroscopists, notably Albin Lagerqvist and Richard Barrow, collected perturbations because they knew that the pattern of multiple perturbations formed an intricate puzzle that would eventually reveal the presence and electronic symmetry of otherwise unobservable electronic states. There are many kinds of patterns of broken patterns. In my PhD thesis I showed how to determine absolute vibrational assignments for the perturber from patterns among the observed values of perturbation matrix elements. When a ^3Π state is perturbed, its six (Ω, parity) components capture a pattern of level shifts and intensity anomalies that reveals more about the nature of the perturber than a simple perturbation of the single component of a ^1Σ state. In perturbation-facilitated OODR, a perturbed singlet level acts as a spectroscopic doorway through which the entire triplet manifold may be systematically explored. For polyatomic molecule vibrations, a vibrational polyad (a group of mutually perturbing vibrational levels, among which the perturbation matrix elements are expected to follow harmonic oscillator scaling rules) can contain more components than a ^3Π state and intrapolyad patterns can be exquisitely sensitive not merely to the nature of an interloper within the polyad but also to the eigenvector character of the vibronic state from which the polyad is viewed. Variation of scaled polyad interaction parameters from one polyad to the next, a pattern of patterns, can signal proximity to an isomerization barrier. Everything in Rydberg-land seems to scale as N⋆-3, yet a trespassing valence state causes all scaling and propensity rules go

  12. Speech Compensation for Time-Scale-Modified Auditory Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogane, Rintaro; Honda, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine speech compensation in response to time-scale-modified auditory feedback during the transition of the semivowel for a target utterance of /ija/. Method: Each utterance session consisted of 10 control trials in the normal feedback condition followed by 20 perturbed trials in the modified auditory…

  13. Entropy mode loops and cosmological correlations during perturbative reheating

    SciTech Connect

    Kaya, Ali; Kutluk, Emine Seyma E-mail: seymakutluk@gmail.com

    2015-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that during preheating the entropy modes circulating in the loops, which correspond to the inflaton decay products, meaningfully modify the cosmological correlation functions at superhorizon scales. In this paper, we determine the significance of the same effect when reheating occurs in the perturbative regime. In a typical two scalar field model, the magnitude of the loop corrections are shown to depend on several parameters like the background inflaton amplitude in the beginning of reheating, the inflaton decay rate and the inflaton mass. Although the loop contributions turn out to be small as compared to the preheating case, they still come out larger than the loop effects during inflation.

  14. Matter perturbations in scaling cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuño, A. Romero; Hipólito-Ricaldi, W. S.; Zimdahl, W.

    2016-04-01

    A suitable nonlinear interaction between dark matter with an energy density ρM and dark energy with an energy density ρX is known to give rise to a non-canonical scaling ρM ∝ ρXa-ξ, where ξ is a parameter which generally deviates from ξ = 3. Here, we present a covariant generalization of this class of models and investigate the corresponding perturbation dynamics. The resulting matter power spectrum for the special case of a time-varying Lambda model is compared with data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR9 catalogue (Ahn et al.). We find a best-fitting value of ξ = 3.25 which corresponds to a decay of dark matter into the cosmological term. Our results are compatible with the Lambda Cold Dark Matter model at the 2σ confidence level.

  15. Perturbativity in the seesaw mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaka, Takehiko; Tsuyuki, Takanao

    2016-02-01

    We consider the Standard Model extended by right-handed neutrinos to explain massive neutrinos through the seesaw mechanism. The new fermion can be observed when it has a sufficiently small mass and large mixings to left-handed neutrinos. If such a particle is the lightest right-handed neutrino, its contribution to the mass matrix of active neutrinos needs to be canceled by that of a heavier one. Yukawa couplings of the heavier one are then larger than those of the lightest one. We show that the perturbativity condition gives a severe upper bound on the mixing of the lightest right-handed neutrino, depending on the masses of heavier ones. Models of high energy phenomena, such as leptogenesis, can be constrained by low energy experiments.

  16. Perturbations of vortex ring pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubser, Steven S.; Horn, Bart; Parikh, Sarthak

    2016-02-01

    We study pairs of coaxial vortex rings starting from the action for a classical bosonic string in a three-form background. We complete earlier work on the phase diagram of classical orbits by explicitly considering the case where the circulations of the two vortex rings are equal and opposite. We then go on to study perturbations, focusing on cases where the relevant four-dimensional transfer matrix splits into two-dimensional blocks. When the circulations of the rings have the same sign, instabilities are mostly limited to wavelengths smaller than a dynamically generated length scale at which single-ring instabilities occur. When the circulations have the opposite sign, larger wavelength instabilities can occur.

  17. Sudakov safety in perturbative QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Marzani, Simone; Thaler, Jesse

    2015-06-01

    Traditional calculations in perturbative quantum chromodynamics (pQCD) are based on an order-by-order expansion in the strong coupling αs. Observables that are calculable in this way are known as "safe." Recently, a class of unsafe observables was discovered that do not have a valid αs expansion but are nevertheless calculable in pQCD using all-orders resummation. These observables are called "Sudakov safe" since singularities at each αs order are regulated by an all-orders Sudakov form factor. In this paper, we give a concrete definition of Sudakov safety based on conditional probability distributions, and we study a one-parameter family of momentum sharing observables that interpolate between the safe and unsafe regimes. The boundary between these regimes is particularly interesting, as the resulting distribution can be understood as the ultraviolet fixed point of a generalized fragmentation function, yielding a leading behavior that is independent of αs.

  18. Robust control with structured perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keel, Leehyun

    1988-01-01

    Two important problems in the area of control systems design and analysis are discussed. The first is the robust stability using characteristic polynomial, which is treated first in characteristic polynomial coefficient space with respect to perturbations in the coefficients of the characteristic polynomial, and then for a control system containing perturbed parameters in the transfer function description of the plant. In coefficient space, a simple expression is first given for the l(sup 2) stability margin for both monic and non-monic cases. Following this, a method is extended to reveal much larger stability region. This result has been extended to the parameter space so that one can determine the stability margin, in terms of ranges of parameter variations, of the closed loop system when the nominal stabilizing controller is given. The stability margin can be enlarged by a choice of better stabilizing controller. The second problem describes the lower order stabilization problem, the motivation of the problem is as follows. Even though the wide range of stabilizing controller design methodologies is available in both the state space and transfer function domains, all of these methods produce unnecessarily high order controllers. In practice, the stabilization is only one of many requirements to be satisfied. Therefore, if the order of a stabilizing controller is excessively high, one can normally expect to have a even higher order controller on the completion of design such as inclusion of dynamic response requirements, etc. Therefore, it is reasonable to have a lowest possible order stabilizing controller first and then adjust the controller to meet additional requirements. The algorithm for designing a lower order stabilizing controller is given. The algorithm does not necessarily produce the minimum order controller; however, the algorithm is theoretically logical and some simulation results show that the algorithm works in general.

  19. Cosmological perturbations in f(T) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shih-Hung; Dent, James B.; Dutta, Sourish; Saridakis, Emmanuel N.

    2011-01-15

    We investigate the cosmological perturbations in f(T) gravity. Examining the pure gravitational perturbations in the scalar sector using a diagonal vierbein, we extract the corresponding dispersion relation, which provides a constraint on the f(T) Ansaetze that lead to a theory free of instabilities. Additionally, upon inclusion of the matter perturbations, we derive the fully perturbed equations of motion, and we study the growth of matter overdensities. We show that f(T) gravity with f(T) constant coincides with General Relativity, both at the background as well as at the first-order perturbation level. Applying our formalism to the power-law model we find that on large subhorizon scales (O(100 Mpc) or larger), the evolution of matter overdensity will differ from {Lambda}CDM cosmology. Finally, examining the linear perturbations of the vector and tensor sectors, we find that (for the standard choice of vierbein) f(T) gravity is free of massive gravitons.

  20. Observational tests of modified gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Bhuvnesh; Zhang Pengjie

    2008-09-15

    Modifications of general relativity provide an alternative explanation to dark energy for the observed acceleration of the Universe. Modified gravity theories have richer observational consequences for large-scale structures than conventional dark energy models, in that different observables are not described by a single growth factor even in the linear regime. We examine the relationships between perturbations in the metric potentials, density and velocity fields, and discuss strategies for measuring them using gravitational lensing, galaxy cluster abundances, galaxy clustering/dynamics, and the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. We show how a broad class of gravity theories can be tested by combining these probes. A robust way to interpret observations is by constraining two key functions: the ratio of the two metric potentials, and the ratio of the gravitational 'constant' in the Poisson equation to Newton's constant. We also discuss quasilinear effects that carry signatures of gravity, such as through induced three-point correlations. Clustering of dark energy can mimic features of modified gravity theories and thus confuse the search for distinct signatures of such theories. It can produce pressure perturbations and anisotropic stresses, which break the equality between the two metric potentials even in general relativity. With these two extra degrees of freedom, can a clustered dark energy model mimic modified gravity models in all observational tests? We show with specific examples that observational constraints on both the metric potentials and density perturbations can in principle distinguish modifications of gravity from dark energy models. We compare our result with other recent studies that have slightly different assumptions (and apparently contradictory conclusions)

  1. Singular perturbation applications in neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Losey, D.C.; Lee, J.C.

    1996-09-01

    This is a paper on singular perturbation applications in neutron transport for submission at the next ANS conference. A singular perturbation technique was developed for neutron transport analysis by postulating expansion in terms of a small ordering parameter {eta}. Our perturbation analysis is carried, without approximation, through {Omicron}({eta}{sup 2}) to derive a material interface correction for diffusion theory. Here we present results from an analytical application of the perturbation technique to a fixed source problem and then describe and implementation of the technique in a computational scheme.

  2. Kato expansion in quantum canonical perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, Andrey

    2016-06-01

    This work establishes a connection between canonical perturbation series in quantum mechanics and a Kato expansion for the resolvent of the Liouville superoperator. Our approach leads to an explicit expression for a generator of a block-diagonalizing Dyson's ordered exponential in arbitrary perturbation order. Unitary intertwining of perturbed and unperturbed averaging superprojectors allows for a description of ambiguities in the generator and block-diagonalized Hamiltonian. We compare the efficiency of the corresponding computational algorithm with the efficiencies of the Van Vleck and Magnus methods for high perturbative orders.

  3. Singularity perturbed zero dynamics of nonlinear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isidori, A.; Sastry, S. S.; Kokotovic, P. V.; Byrnes, C. I.

    1992-01-01

    Stability properties of zero dynamics are among the crucial input-output properties of both linear and nonlinear systems. Unstable, or 'nonminimum phase', zero dynamics are a major obstacle to input-output linearization and high-gain designs. An analysis of the effects of regular perturbations in system equations on zero dynamics shows that whenever a perturbation decreases the system's relative degree, it manifests itself as a singular perturbation of zero dynamics. Conditions are given under which the zero dynamics evolve in two timescales characteristic of a standard singular perturbation form that allows a separate analysis of slow and fast parts of the zero dynamics.

  4. Stellar oscillations in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakstein, Jeremy

    2013-12-01

    Starting from the equations of modified gravity hydrodynamics, we derive the equations of motion governing linear, adiabatic, radial perturbations of stars in scalar-tensor theories. There are two new features: first, the eigenvalue equation for the period of stellar oscillations is modified such that the eigenfrequencies are always larger than predicted by general relativity. Second, the general relativity condition for stellar instability is altered so that the adiabatic index can fall below 4/3 before unstable modes appear. Stars are more stable in modified gravity theories. Specializing to the case of chameleonlike theories, we investigate these effects numerically using both polytropic Lane-Emden stars and models coming from modified gravity stellar structure simulations. We find that the change in the oscillation period of Cepheid star models can be as large as 30% for order-one matter couplings and the change in the inferred distance using the period-luminosity relation can be up to three times larger than if one had only considered the modified equilibrium structure. We discuss the implications of these results for recent and upcoming astrophysical tests and estimate that previous methods can produce new constraints such that the modifications are screened in regions of Newtonian potential of O(10-8).

  5. System-reservoir theory with anharmonic baths: a perturbative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadra, Chitrak; Banerjee, Dhruba

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we develop the formalism of a general system coupled to a reservoir (the words ‘bath’ and ‘reservoir’ will be used interchangeably) consisting of nonlinear oscillators, based on perturbation theory at the classical level, by extending the standard Zwanzig approach of elimination of bath degrees of freedom order by order in perturbation. We observe that the fluctuation dissipation relation (FDR) of the second kind in its standard form for harmonic baths gets modified due to the nonlinearity and this is manifested through higher powers of {{k}\\text{B}}T in the expression for two-time noise correlation. On the flip side, this very modification allows us to define a dressed (renormalized) system-bath coupling that depends on the temperature and the nonlinear parameters of the bath in such a way that the structure of the FDR (of the second kind) is maintained. As an aside, we also observe that the first moment of the noise arising from a nonlinear bath can be non-zero, even in the absence of any external drive, if the reservoir potential is asymmetric with respect to one of its minima, about which one builds up the perturbation theory.

  6. Perturbation theory in light-cone quantization

    SciTech Connect

    Langnau, A.

    1992-01-01

    A thorough investigation of light-cone properties which are characteristic for higher dimensions is very important. The easiest way of addressing these issues is by analyzing the perturbative structure of light-cone field theories first. Perturbative studies cannot be substituted for an analysis of problems related to a nonperturbative approach. However, in order to lay down groundwork for upcoming nonperturbative studies, it is indispensable to validate the renormalization methods at the perturbative level, i.e., to gain control over the perturbative treatment first. A clear understanding of divergences in perturbation theory, as well as their numerical treatment, is a necessary first step towards formulating such a program. The first objective of this dissertation is to clarify this issue, at least in second and fourth-order in perturbation theory. The work in this dissertation can provide guidance for the choice of counterterms in Discrete Light-Cone Quantization or the Tamm-Dancoff approach. A second objective of this work is the study of light-cone perturbation theory as a competitive tool for conducting perturbative Feynman diagram calculations. Feynman perturbation theory has become the most practical tool for computing cross sections in high energy physics and other physical properties of field theory. Although this standard covariant method has been applied to a great range of problems, computations beyond one-loop corrections are very difficult. Because of the algebraic complexity of the Feynman calculations in higher-order perturbation theory, it is desirable to automatize Feynman diagram calculations so that algebraic manipulation programs can carry out almost the entire calculation. This thesis presents a step in this direction. The technique we are elaborating on here is known as light-cone perturbation theory.

  7. Non-perturbative approach for curvature perturbations in stochastic δ N formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Tomohiro; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Tada, Yuichiro E-mail: kawasaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-10-01

    In our previous paper [1], we have proposed a new algorithm to calculate the power spectrum of the curvature perturbations generated in inflationary universe with use of the stochastic approach. Since this algorithm does not need the perturbative expansion with respect to the inflaton fields on super-horizon scale, it works even in highly stochastic cases. For example, when the curvature perturbations are very large or the non-Gaussianities of the curvature perturbations are sizable, the perturbative expansion may break down but our algorithm enables to calculate the curvature perturbations. We apply it to two well-known inflation models, chaotic and hybrid inflation, in this paper. Especially for hybrid inflation, while the potential is very flat around the critical point and the standard perturbative computation is problematic, we successfully calculate the curvature perturbations.

  8. Importance of Plasma Response to Non-axisymmetric Perturbations in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Jong-kyu Park, Allen H. Boozer, Jonathan E. Menard, Andrea M. Garofalo, Michael J. Schaffer, Richard J. Hawryluk, Stanley M. Kaye, Stefan P. Gerhardt, Steve A. Sabbagh, and the NSTX Team

    2009-04-22

    Tokamaks are sensitive to deviations from axisymmetry as small as δB=B0 ~ 10-4. These non-axisymmetric perturbations greatly modify plasma confinement and performance by either destroying magnetic surfaces with subsequent locking or deforming magnetic surfaces with associated non-ambipolar transport. The Ideal Perturbed Equilibrium Code (IPEC) calculates ideal perturbed equilibria and provides important basis for understanding the sensitivity of tokamak plasmas to perturbations. IPEC calculations indicate that the ideal plasma response, or equiva- lently the effect by ideally perturbed plasma currents, is essential to explain locking experiments on National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) and DIII-D. The ideal plasma response is also important for Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity (NTV) in non-ambipolar transport. The consistency between NTV theory and magnetic braking experiments on NSTX and DIII-D can be improved when the variation in the field strength in IPEC is coupled with generalized NTV theory. These plasma response effects will be compared with the previous vacuum superpositions to illustrate the importance. However, plasma response based on ideal perturbed equilibria is still not suffciently accurate to predict the details of NTV transport, and can be inconsistent when currents associated with a toroidal torque become comparable to ideal perturbed currents.

  9. Quantum field perturbation theory revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matone, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Schwinger's formalism in quantum field theory can be easily implemented in the case of scalar theories in D dimension with exponential interactions, such as μDexp (α ϕ ). In particular, we use the relation exp (α δ/δ J (x ) )exp (-Z0[J ])=exp (-Z0[J +αx]) with J the external source, and αx(y )=α δ (y -x ). Such a shift is strictly related to the normal ordering of exp (α ϕ ) and to a scaling relation which follows by renormalizing μ . Next, we derive a new formulation of perturbation theory for the potentials V (ϕ )=λ/n ! :ϕn: , using the generating functional associated to :exp (α ϕ ):. The Δ (0 )-terms related to the normal ordering are absorbed at once. The functional derivatives with respect to J to compute the generating functional are replaced by ordinary derivatives with respect to auxiliary parameters. We focus on scalar theories, but the method is general and similar investigations extend to other theories.

  10. Non-Perturbative Field Theories.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, David

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Some non-perturbative aspects of field theories are studied by applying lattice gauge theory techniques. The low-lying hadronic mass spectrum is calculated numerically using quenched lattice quantum chromodynamics. The results of large numerical simulations performed on a distributed array processor are presented and analysed. Particular emphasis is stressed upon the understanding of systematic and statistical errors in the calculation. In addition, the pion decay constant and the chiral condensate are evaluated. An attempt is made to relate the numerical findings to the experimentally measured quantities. A pioneering attempt to understand Yukawa couplings is discussed. A toy Fermion-Higgs system is studied numerically on a transputer array. Dynamical fermions are included in the investigation of the behavior of the system over a wide range of Yukawa couplings. A phase diagram is found for the model which shows evidence of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking transitions. Extensions of the model are discussed together some speculations concerning the behaviour of Yukawa couplings in general. The possibility of using the lattice as a model for space-time is investigated by studying the propagation of particles on a fractal lattice. In addition, the use of truncated fractals as novel regulators is studied numerically in the hope that the problem of fermion doubling will be alleviated.

  11. Scalar Quantum Electrodynamics: Perturbation Theory and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, A.; Gutierrez-Guerrero, L. X.; Concha-Sanchez, Y.

    2006-09-25

    In this article, we calculate scalar propagator in arbitrary dimensions and gauge and the three-point scalar-photon vertex in arbitrary dimensions and Feynman gauge, both at the one loop level. We also discuss constraints on their non perturbative structure imposed by requirements of gauge invariance and perturbation theory.

  12. Degenerate Open Shell Density Perturbation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palenik, Mark; Dunlap, Brett

    The density perturbation theory (DPT) methodology we have developed applies the Hohenberg-Kohn theorem to perturbations in density functional theory. At each order, the energy is directly minimized with respect to the density at all lower orders. The difference between the perturbed and unperturbed densities is expanded in terms of a finite number of basis functions, and a single matrix inversion in this space reduces the complexity of the problem to that of non-interacting perturbation theory. For open-shell systems with symmetry, however, the situation becomes more complex. Typically, the perturbation will break the symmetry leading to a zeroth-order shift in the Kohn-Sham potential. Because the symmetry breaking is independent of the strength of the perturbation, the mapping from the initial to the perturbed KS potential is discontinuous and techniques from perturbation theory for noninteracting particles fail. We describe a rigorous formulation of DPT for use in systems that display an initial degeneracy, such as atoms and Fe55Cp*12 clusters and present initial calculations on these systems.

  13. Intelligent perturbation algorithms for space scheduling optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtzman, Clifford R.

    1991-01-01

    Intelligent perturbation algorithms for space scheduling optimization are presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: optimization of planning, scheduling, and manifesting; searching a discrete configuration space; heuristic algorithms used for optimization; use of heuristic methods on a sample scheduling problem; intelligent perturbation algorithms are iterative refinement techniques; properties of a good iterative search operator; dispatching examples of intelligent perturbation algorithm and perturbation operator attributes; scheduling implementations using intelligent perturbation algorithms; major advances in scheduling capabilities; the prototype ISF (industrial Space Facility) experiment scheduler; optimized schedule (max revenue); multi-variable optimization; Space Station design reference mission scheduling; ISF-TDRSS command scheduling demonstration; and example task - communications check.

  14. Covariant generalization of cosmological perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Enqvist, Kari; Hoegdahl, Janne; Nurmi, Sami; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2007-01-15

    We present an approach to cosmological perturbations based on a covariant perturbative expansion between two worldlines in the real inhomogeneous universe. As an application, at an arbitrary order we define an exact scalar quantity which describes the inhomogeneities in the number of e-folds on uniform density hypersurfaces and which is conserved on all scales for a barotropic ideal fluid. We derive a compact form for its conservation equation at all orders and assign it a simple physical interpretation. To make a comparison with the standard perturbation theory, we develop a method to construct gauge-invariant quantities in a coordinate system at arbitrary order, which we apply to derive the form of the nth order perturbation in the number of e-folds on uniform density hypersurfaces and its exact evolution equation. On large scales, this provides the gauge-invariant expression for the curvature perturbation on uniform density hypersurfaces and its evolution equation at any order.

  15. On the perturbation of the luminosity distance by peculiar motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Nick; Hudson, Michael J.

    2015-06-01

    We consider some aspects of the perturbation to the luminosity distance d(z) that are of relevance for SN1a cosmology and for future peculiar velocity surveys at non-negligible redshifts. (1) Previous work has shown that the correction to the lowest order perturbation δd/d = -δv/cz has the peculiar characteristic that it appears to depend on the absolute state of motion of sources, rather than on their motion relative to that of the observer. The resolution of this apparent violation of the equivalence principle is that it is necessary to allow for evolution of the velocities with time, and also, when considering perturbations on the scale of the observer-source separation, to include the gravitational redshift effect. We provide an expression for δd/d that provides a physically consistent way to measure peculiar velocities and determine their impact for SN1a cosmology. (2) We then calculate the perturbation to the redshift as a function of source flux density, which has been proposed as an alternative probe of large-scale motions. We show how the inclusion of surface brightness modulation modifies the relation between δz(m) and the peculiar velocity, and that, while the noise properties of this method might appear promising, the velocity signal is swamped by the effect of galaxy clustering for most scales of interest. (3) We show how, in linear theory, peculiar velocity measurements are biased downwards by the effect of smaller scale motions or by measurement errors (such as in photometric redshifts). Our results nicely explain the effects seen in simulations by Koda et al. We critically examine the prospects for extending peculiar velocity studies to larger scales with near-term future surveys.

  16. Tubulin-perturbing naphthoquinone spiroketals.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, Raghavan; Hopkins, Tamara D; Thomas, Catherine A; Wipf, Peter; Day, Billy W

    2008-02-01

    Several natural and synthetic naphthoquinone spiroketals are potent inhibitors of the thioredoxin-thioredoxin reductase redox system. Based on the antimitotic and weak antitubulin actions noted for SR-7 ([8-(furan-3-ylmethoxy)-1-oxo-1,4-dihydronaphthalene-4-spiro-2'-naphtho[1'',8''-de][1',3'][dioxin]), a library of related compounds was screened for tubulin-perturbing properties. Two compounds, TH-169 (5'-hydroxy-4'H-spiro[1,3-dioxolane-2,1'-naphthalen]-4'-one) and TH-223 (5'-methoxy-4'H-spiro[1,3-dioxane-2,1'-naphthalen]-4'-one), had substantial effects on tubulin assembly and were antiproliferative at low micromolar concentrations. TH-169 was the most potent at blocking GTP-dependent polymerization of 10 mum tubulin in vitro with a remarkable 50% inhibitory concentration of ca. 400 nm. It had no effect on paclitaxel-induced microtubule assembly and did not cause microtubule hypernucleation. TH-169 failed to compete with colchicine for binding to beta-tubulin. The 50% antiproliferative concentration of TH-169 against human cancer cells was at or slightly below 1 mum. Flow cytometry showed that 1 mum TH-169 caused an increase in G(2)/M and hypodiploid cells. TH-169 eliminated the PC-3 cells' polyploid population and increased their expression of p21(WAF1) and Hsp70 in a concentration-dependent manner. The antiproliferative effect of TH-169 was irreversible and independent of changes in caspases, actin, tubulin, glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase or Bcl-x(S/L). This structurally simple naphthoquinone spiroketal represents a small molecule, tubulin-interactive agent with a novel apoptotic pathway and attractive biological function. PMID:18194192

  17. Transient dynamics of perturbations in astrophysical disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razdoburdin, D. N.; Zhuravlev, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    We review some aspects of a major unsolved problem in understanding astrophysical (in particular, accretion) disks: whether the disk interiors can be effectively viscous in spite of the absence of magnetorotational instability. A rotational homogeneous inviscid flow with a Keplerian angular velocity profile is spectrally stable, making the transient growth of perturbations a candidate mechanism for energy transfer from regular motion to perturbations. Transient perturbations differ qualitatively from perturbation modes and can grow substantially in shear flows due to the nonnormality of their dynamical evolution operator. Because the eigenvectors of this operator, also known as perturbation modes, are not pairwise orthogonal, they can mutually interfere, resulting in the transient growth of their linear combinations. Physically, a growing transient perturbation is a leading spiral whose branches are shrunk as a result of the differential rotation of the flow. We discuss in detail the transient growth of vortex shearing harmonics in the spatially local limit, as well as methods for identifying the optimal (fastest growth) perturbations. Special attention is given to obtaining such solutions variationally by integrating the respective direct and adjoint equations forward and backward in time. The presentation is intended for experts new to the subject.

  18. Expansion of Perturbation Theory Applied to Shim Rotation Automation of the Advanced Test Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Joshua Loren

    In 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) declared the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This declaration expanded the focus of the ATR to include diversified classes of academic and industrial experiments. An essential part of the new suite of more accurate and flexible codes being deployed to support the NSUF is their ability to predict reactor behavior at startup, particularly the position of the outer shim control cylinders (OSCC). The current method used for calculating the OSCC positions during a cycle startup utilizes a heuristic trial and error approach that is impractical with the computationally intensive reactor physics tools, such as NEWT. It is therefore desirable that shim rotation prediction for startup be automated. Shim rotation prediction with perturbation theory was chosen to be investigated as one method for use with startup calculation automation. A modified form of first order perturbation theory, called phase space interpolated perturbation theory, was developed to more accurately model shim rotation prediction. Shim rotation prediction is just one application for this new modified form of perturbation theory. Phase space interpolated perturbation theory can be used on any application where the range of change to the system is known a priori, but the magnitude of change is not known. A cubic regression method was also developed to automate shim rotation prediction by using only forward solutions to the transport equation.

  19. Calculating nonadiabatic pressure perturbations during multifield inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huston, Ian; Christopherson, Adam J.

    2012-03-01

    Isocurvature perturbations naturally occur in models of inflation consisting of more than one scalar field. In this paper, we calculate the spectrum of isocurvature perturbations generated at the end of inflation for three different inflationary models consisting of two canonical scalar fields. The amount of nonadiabatic pressure present at the end of inflation can have observational consequences through the generation of vorticity and subsequently the sourcing of B-mode polarization. We compare two different definitions of isocurvature perturbations and show how these quantities evolve in different ways during inflation. Our results are calculated using the open source Pyflation numerical package which is available to download.

  20. Vector perturbations in a contracting Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Battefeld, T.J.; Brandenberger, R.

    2004-12-15

    In this note we show that vector perturbations exhibit growing mode solutions in a contracting Universe, such as the contracting phase of the pre big bang or the cyclic/ekpyrotic models of the Universe. This is not a gauge artifact and will in general lead to the breakdown of perturbation theory--a severe problem that has to be addressed in any bouncing model. We also comment on the possibility of explaining, by means of primordial vector perturbations, the existence of the observed large-scale magnetic fields. This is possible since they can be seeded by vorticity.

  1. Cosmological perturbations and the Weinberg theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhshik, Mohammad; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Jazayeri, Sadra

    2015-12-01

    The celebrated Weinberg theorem in cosmological perturbation theory states that there always exist two adiabatic scalar modes in which the comoving curvature perturbation is conserved on super-horizon scales. In particular, when the perturbations are generated from a single source, such as in single field models of inflation, both of the two allowed independent solutions are adiabatic and conserved on super-horizon scales. There are few known examples in literature which violate this theorem. We revisit the theorem and specify the loopholes in some technical assumptions which violate the theorem in models of non-attractor inflation, fluid inflation, solid inflation and in the model of pseudo conformal universe.

  2. Evolution of non-spherical perturbations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschan, P.

    1995-06-01

    In this paper I investigate the evolution of primordial non-spherical positive and negative fluctuations. They can be calculated by second order of perturbation theory. I solved analytically the second order equation for arbitrary density parameter {OMEGA}_M0_ and cosmological constant {LAMBDA} using the approximation introduced by Martell & Freundling (???). The second order solution is compared with the exact one in the spherical case. I find that the initial deformation grows rapidly for positive perturbations, while the negative perturbations (voids) are stable against deformations.

  3. Perturbation calculation of thermodynamic density of states

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Greg; Schulthess, Thomas C; Nicholson, Don M; Eisenbach, Markus; Stocks, George Malcolm

    2011-01-01

    The density of states g( ) is frequently used to calculate the temperature-dependent properties of a thermodynamic system. Here a derivation is given for calculating the warped density of states g ( ) resulting from the addition of a perturbation. The method is validated for a classical Heisenberg model of bcc Fe and the errors in the free energy are shown to be second order in the perturbation. Taking the perturbation to be the difference between a first-principles quantum-mechanical energy and a corresponding classical energy, this method can significantly reduce the computational effort required to calculate g( ) for quantum systems using the Wang-Landau approach.

  4. HIV-associated memory B cell perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhiliang; Luo, Zhenwu; Wan, Zhuang; Wu, Hao; Li, Wei; Zhang, Tong; Jiang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Memory B-cell depletion, hyperimmunoglobulinemia, and impaired vaccine responses are the hallmark of B cell perturbations inhuman immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. Although B cells are not the targets for HIV infection, there is evidence for B cell, especially memory B cell dysfunction in HIV disease mediated by other cells or HIV itself. This review will focus on HIV-associated phenotypic and functional alterations in memory B cells. Additionally, we will discuss the mechanism underlying these perturbations and the effect of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) on these perturbations. PMID:25887082

  5. Perturbing macroscopic magnetohydrodynamic stability for toroidal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comer, Kathryn J.

    We have introduced a new perturbative technique to rapidly explore the dependence of long wavelength ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities on equilibrium profiles, shaping properties, and wall parameters. Traditionally, these relations are studied with numerical parameter scans using computationally intensive stability codes. Our perturbative technique first finds the equilibrium and stability using traditional methods. Subsequent small changes in the original equilibrium parameters change the stability. We quickly find the new stability with an expansion of the energy principle, rather than with another run of the stability codes. We first semi-analytically apply the technique to the screw pinch after eliminating compressional Alfven wave effects. The screw pinch results validate the approach, but also indicate that allowable perturbations to equilibria with certain features may be restricted. Next, we extend the approach to toroidal geometry using experimental equilibria and a simple constructed equilibrium, with the ideal MHD stability code GATO. Stability properties are successfully predicted from perturbed toroidal equilibria when only the vacuum beyond the plasma is perturbed (through wall parameter variations), rather than the plasma itself. Small plasma equilibrium perturbations to both experimental and simple equilibria result in very large errors to the predicted stability, and valid results are found only over a narrow range of most perturbations. Despite the large errors produced when changing plasma parameters, the wall perturbations revealed two useful applications of this technique. Because the calculations are non-iterative matrix multiplications, the convergence issues that can disrupt a full MHD stability code are absent. Marginal stability, therefore, is much easier to find with the perturbative technique. Also, the perturbed results can be input as the initial guess for the eigenvalue for a full stability code, and improve subsequent

  6. A Model for Gaussian Perturbations of Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodson, C. T. J.

    2015-11-01

    Graphene consists nominally of a regular planar hexagonal carbon lattice monolayer. However, its structure experiences perturbations in the presence of external influences, whether from substrate properties, thermal or electromagnetic fields, or ambient fluid movement. Here we give an information geometric model to represent the state space of perturbations as a Riemannian pseudosphere with scalar curvature close to -1/2. This would allow the representation of a trajectory of states under a given ambient or process change, so opening the possibility for geometrically formulated dynamical models to link structural perturbations to the physics.

  7. Perturbations of black p-branes

    SciTech Connect

    Abdalla, Elcio; Fernandez Piedra, Owen Pavel; Oliveira, Jeferson de; Molina, C.

    2010-03-15

    We consider black p-brane solutions of the low-energy string action, computing scalar perturbations. Using standard methods, we derive the wave equations obeyed by the perturbations and treat them analytically and numerically. We have found that tensorial perturbations obtained via a gauge-invariant formalism leads to the same results as scalar perturbations. No instability has been found. Asymptotically, these solutions typically reduce to a AdS{sub (p+2)}xS{sup (8-p)} space which, in the framework of Maldacena's conjecture, can be regarded as a gravitational dual to a conformal field theory defined in a (p+1)-dimensional flat space-time. The results presented open the possibility of a better understanding the AdS/CFT correspondence, as originally formulated in terms of the relation among brane structures and gauge theories.

  8. The Perturbational MO Method for Saturated Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herndon, William C.

    1979-01-01

    Summarizes a theoretical approach using nonbonding MO's and perturbation theory to correlate properties of saturated hydrocarbons. Discussion is limited to correctly predicted using this method. Suggests calculations can be carried out quickly in organic chemistry. (Author/SA)

  9. Controlling roll perturbations in fruit flies.

    PubMed

    Beatus, Tsevi; Guckenheimer, John M; Cohen, Itai

    2015-04-01

    Owing to aerodynamic instabilities, stable flapping flight requires ever-present fast corrective actions. Here, we investigate how flies control perturbations along their body roll angle, which is unstable and their most sensitive degree of freedom. We glue a magnet to each fly and apply a short magnetic pulse that rolls it in mid-air. Fast video shows flies correct perturbations up to 100° within 30 ± 7 ms by applying a stroke-amplitude asymmetry that is well described by a linear proportional-integral controller. For more aggressive perturbations, we show evidence for nonlinear and hierarchical control mechanisms. Flies respond to roll perturbations within 5 ms, making this correction reflex one of the fastest in the animal kingdom. PMID:25762650

  10. SHARP ENTRYWISE PERTURBATION BOUNDS FOR MARKOV CHAINS

    PubMed Central

    THIEDE, ERIK; VAN KOTEN, BRIAN; WEARE, JONATHAN

    2015-01-01

    For many Markov chains of practical interest, the invariant distribution is extremely sensitive to perturbations of some entries of the transition matrix, but insensitive to others; we give an example of such a chain, motivated by a problem in computational statistical physics. We have derived perturbation bounds on the relative error of the invariant distribution that reveal these variations in sensitivity. Our bounds are sharp, we do not impose any structural assumptions on the transition matrix or on the perturbation, and computing the bounds has the same complexity as computing the invariant distribution or computing other bounds in the literature. Moreover, our bounds have a simple interpretation in terms of hitting times, which can be used to draw intuitive but rigorous conclusions about the sensitivity of a chain to various types of perturbations. PMID:26491218

  11. Cosmological perturbations in mimetic Horndeski gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroja, Frederico; Bartolo, Nicola; Karmakar, Purnendu; Matarrese, Sabino

    2016-04-01

    We study linear scalar perturbations around a flat FLRW background in mimetic Horndeski gravity. In the absence of matter, we show that the Newtonian potential satisfies a second-order differential equation with no spatial derivatives. This implies that the sound speed for scalar perturbations is exactly zero on this background. We also show that in mimetic G3 theories the sound speed is equally zero. We obtain the equation of motion for the comoving curvature perturbation (first order differential equation) and solve it to find that the comoving curvature perturbation is constant on all scales in mimetic Horndeski gravity. We find solutions for the Newtonian potential evolution equation in two simple models. Finally we show that the sound speed is zero on all backgrounds and therefore the system does not have any wave-like scalar degrees of freedom.

  12. Casimir energy for perturbed surfaces of revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Almazan, Pedro

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we explore the zeta function arising from a small perturbation on a surface of revolution and the effect of this on the functional determinant and on the change of the Casimir energy associated with the surface.

  13. Controlling roll perturbations in fruit flies

    PubMed Central

    Beatus, Tsevi; Guckenheimer, John M.; Cohen, Itai

    2015-01-01

    Owing to aerodynamic instabilities, stable flapping flight requires ever-present fast corrective actions. Here, we investigate how flies control perturbations along their body roll angle, which is unstable and their most sensitive degree of freedom. We glue a magnet to each fly and apply a short magnetic pulse that rolls it in mid-air. Fast video shows flies correct perturbations up to 100° within 30 ± 7 ms by applying a stroke-amplitude asymmetry that is well described by a linear proportional–integral controller. For more aggressive perturbations, we show evidence for nonlinear and hierarchical control mechanisms. Flies respond to roll perturbations within 5 ms, making this correction reflex one of the fastest in the animal kingdom. PMID:25762650

  14. Cosmological perturbations in theories with non-minimal coupling between curvature and matter

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolami, Orfeu; Frazão, Pedro; Páramos, Jorge E-mail: pedro.frazao@ist.utl.pt

    2013-05-01

    In this work, we examine how the presence of a non-minimal coupling between spacetime curvature and matter affects the evolution of cosmological perturbations on a homogeneous and isotropic Universe, and hence the formation of large-scale structure. This framework places constraints on the terms which arise due to the coupling with matter and, in particular, on the modified growth of matter density perturbations. We derive approximate analytical solutions for the evolution of matter overdensities during the matter dominated era and discuss the compatibility of the obtained results with the hypothesis that the late time acceleration of the Universe is driven by a non-minimal coupling.

  15. Constructing perturbation theory kernels for large-scale structure in generalized cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taruya, Atsushi

    2016-07-01

    We present a simple numerical scheme for perturbation theory (PT) calculations of large-scale structure. Solving the evolution equations for perturbations numerically, we construct the PT kernels as building blocks of statistical calculations, from which the power spectrum and/or correlation function can be systematically computed. The scheme is especially applicable to the generalized structure formation including modified gravity, in which the analytic construction of PT kernels is intractable. As an illustration, we show several examples for power spectrum calculations in f (R ) gravity and Λ CDM models.

  16. The relationship between the human state and external perturbations of atmospheric, geomagnetic and solar origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavryuseva, E.; Kroussanova, N.

    2002-12-01

    The relationship between the state of human body and the external factors such as the different phenomena of solar activity, geomagnetic perturbations and local atmospheric characteristics is studied. The monitoring of blood pressure and electro-conductivity of human body in acupuncture points for a group fo 28 people over the period of 1.5 year has been performed daily from February 2001 to August 2002 in Capodimonte Observatory in Naples, Italy. The modified Voll method of electropuncture diagnostics was used. The strong correlation between the human body state and meteo conditions is found and the probable correlation with geomagnetic perturbations is discussed.

  17. Covariant perturbations of f(R) black holes: the Weyl terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratten, Geraint

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we revisit non-spherical perturbations of the Schwarzschild black hole in the context of f(R) gravity. Previous studies were able to demonstrate the stability of the f(R) Schwarzschild black hole against gravitational perturbations in both the even and odd parity sectors. In particular, it was seen that the Regge-Wheeler (RW) and Zerilli equations in f(R) gravity obey the same equations as their general relativity (GR) counterparts. More recently, the 1+1+2 semi-tetrad formalism has been used to derive a set of two wave equations: one for transverse, trace-free (tensor) perturbations and one for the additional scalar modes that characterize fourth-order theories of gravitation. The master variable governing tensor perturbations was shown to be a modified RW tensor obeying the same equation as in GR. However, it is well known that there is a non-uniqueness in the definition of the master variable. In this paper we derive a set of two perturbation variables and their concomitant wave equations that describe gravitational perturbations in a covariant and gauge invariant manner. These variables can be related to the Newman-Penrose (NP) Weyl scalars as well as the master variables from the 2+2 formalism. As a byproduct of this study, we also derive a set of useful results relating the NP formalism to the 1+1+2 formalism valid for LRS-II spacetimes.

  18. On perturbations of a quintom bounce

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Yifu; Qiu Taotao; Zhang Xinmin; Brandenberger, Robert; Piao Yunsong E-mail: qiutt@mail.ihep.ac.cn E-mail: yspiao@gucas.ac.cn

    2008-03-15

    A quintom universe with an equation of state crossing the cosmological constant boundary can provide a bouncing solution dubbed the quintom bounce and thus resolve the big bang singularity. In this paper, we investigate the cosmological perturbations of the quintom bounce both analytically and numerically. We find that the fluctuations in the dominant mode in the post-bounce expanding phase couple to the growing mode of the perturbations in the pre-bounce contracting phase.

  19. Non Perturbative Aspects of Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, A.

    2009-04-20

    For any quantum field theory (QFT), there exists a set of Schwinger-Dyson equations (SDE) for all its Green functions. However, it is not always straight forward to extract quantitatively exact physical information from this set of equations, especially in the non perturbative regime. The situation becomes increasingly complex with growing number of external legs. I give a qualitative account of the hunt for the non perturbative Green functions in gauge theories.

  20. Thermally unstable perturbations in stratified conducting atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reale, Fabio; Serio, Salvatore; Peres, Giovanni

    1994-10-01

    We investigate the thermal stability of isobaric perturbations in a stratified isothermal background atmosphere with solar abundances, as resulting from the competition of optically thin plasma radiative cooling and of heating conducted from the surrounding atmosphere. We have analyzed the threshold line between stable and unstable perturbations, in the plane of the two important control parameters: the initial size of the perturbation and the temperature of the unperturbed medium; this line changes with the pressure of the unperturbed atmosphere. We have extended the results of linear perturbation analysis by means of numerical calculations of the evolution of spherical isobaric perturbations, using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic code including Spitzer heat conduction. We explore a wide range of the parameters appropriate to the solar and stellar upper atmospheres: the background uniform temperature is between 105 K and 107 K, the initial pressure betweeen 0.1 and 10 dyn/sq cm, and the perturbation size between 105 and 1010 cm. The numerical results are in substantial agreement with the linear analysis. We discuss possible implications of our results also in terms of observable effects, especially concerning plasma downflows, and propose thermal instability as a possible candidate to explain the observed redshifts in solar and stellar transition region lines.

  1. Near horizon extremal geometry perturbations: dynamical field perturbations vs. parametric variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajian, K.; Seraj, A.; Sheikh-Jabbari, M. M.

    2014-10-01

    In [1] we formulated and derived the three universal laws governing Near Horizon Extremal Geometries (NHEG). In this work we focus on the Entropy Perturbation Law (EPL) which, similarly to the first law of black hole thermodynamics, relates perturbations of the charges labeling perturbations around a given NHEG to the corresponding entropy perturbation. We show that field perturbations governed by the linearized equations of motion and symmetry conditions which we carefully specify, satisfy the EPL. We also show that these perturbations are limited to those coming from difference of two NHEG solutions (i.e. variations on the NHEG solution parameter space). Our analysis and discussions shed light on the "no-dynamics" statements of [2, 3].

  2. Perturbations of the Robertson-Walker space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jai Chan

    This dissertation contains three parts consisting of thirteen chapters. Each chapter is self-contained, and can be read independently. In chapter 1, we have presented a complete set of cosmological perturbation equations using the covariant equations. We also present an explicit solution for the evolution of large scale cosmological density perturbations assuming a perfect fluid. In chapter 2, two independent gauge-invariant variables are derived which are continuous at any transition where there is a discontinuous change in pressure. In chapter 3, we present a Newtonian counterpart to the general relativistic covariant approach to cosmological perturbations. In chapter 4, we present a simple way of deriving cosmological perturbation equations in generalized gravity theories which accounts for metric perturbations in gauge-invariant way. We apply this approach to the f(phi,R)-omega(phi)phi, cphi;c Lagrangian. In chapter 5, we have derived second order differential equations for cosmological perturbations in a Robertson-Walker space, for each of the following gravity theories: f(R) gravity, generalized scalar-tensor gravity, gravity with non-minimally coupled scalar field, and induced gravity. Asymptotic solutions are derived for the large and small scale limits. In chapter 6, classical evolution of density perturbations in the large scale limit is clarified in the generalized gravity theories. In chapter 7, we apply our method to a theory with the Lagrangian L approximately f(R) + gamma RR;c;c. In chapter 8, T(M)ab;b equals 0 is shown in a general ground. In chapter 9, the origin of the Friedmann-like behavior of the perturbed model in the large scale limit is clarified in a comoving gauge. Thus, when the imperfect fluid contributions are negligible, the large scale perturbations in a nearly flat background evolve like separate Friedmann models. In chapter 10, we generalize the perturbation equations applicable to a class of generalized gravity theories with multi

  3. Non-hard sphere thermodynamic perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiqi

    2011-08-01

    A non-hard sphere (HS) perturbation scheme, recently advanced by the present author, is elaborated for several technical matters, which are key mathematical details for implementation of the non-HS perturbation scheme in a coupling parameter expansion (CPE) thermodynamic perturbation framework. NVT-Monte Carlo simulation is carried out for a generalized Lennard-Jones (LJ) 2n-n potential to obtain routine thermodynamic quantities such as excess internal energy, pressure, excess chemical potential, excess Helmholtz free energy, and excess constant volume heat capacity. Then, these new simulation data, and available simulation data in literatures about a hard core attractive Yukawa fluid and a Sutherland fluid, are used to test the non-HS CPE 3rd-order thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT) and give a comparison between the non-HS CPE 3rd-order TPT and other theoretical approaches. It is indicated that the non-HS CPE 3rd-order TPT is superior to other traditional TPT such as van der Waals/HS (vdW/HS), perturbation theory 2 (PT2)/HS, and vdW/Yukawa (vdW/Y) theory or analytical equation of state such as mean spherical approximation (MSA)-equation of state and is at least comparable to several currently the most accurate Ornstein-Zernike integral equation theories. It is discovered that three technical issues, i.e., opening up new bridge function approximation for the reference potential, choosing proper reference potential, and/or using proper thermodynamic route for calculation of fex - ref, chiefly decide the quality of the non-HS CPE TPT. Considering that the non-HS perturbation scheme applies for a wide variety of model fluids, and its implementation in the CPE thermodynamic perturbation framework is amenable to high-order truncation, the non-HS CPE 3rd-order or higher order TPT will be more promising once the above-mentioned three technological advances are established.

  4. Perturbed Energy Metabolism and Neuronal Circuit Dysfunction in Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Kapogiannis, Dimitrios; Mattson, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Epidemiological, neuropathological and functional neuroimaging evidence implicates global and regional derangements in brain metabolism and energetics in the pathogenesis of cognitive impairment. Nerve cell microcircuits are modified adaptively by excitatory and inhibitory synaptic activity and neurotrophic factors. Aging and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) cause perturbations in cellular energy metabolism, level of excitation/inhibition and neurotrophic factor release that overwhelm compensatory mechanisms and result in neuronal microcircuit and brain network dysfunction. A prolonged positive energy balance impairs the ability of neurons to respond adaptively to oxidative and metabolic stress. Experimental studies in animals demonstrate how derangements related to chronic positive energy balance, such as diabetes, set the stage for accelerated cognitive aging and AD. Therapeutic interventions to allay cognitive dysfunction that target energy metabolism and adaptive stress responses (such as neurotrophin signaling) have shown efficacy in animal models and preliminary studies in humans. PMID:21147038

  5. Non-parametric reconstruction of cosmological matter perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, J. E.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Carvalho, J. C.

    2016-04-01

    Perturbative quantities, such as the growth rate (f) and index (γ), are powerful tools to distinguish different dark energy models or modified gravity theories even if they produce the same cosmic expansion history. In this work, without any assumption about the dynamics of the Universe, we apply a non-parametric method to current measurements of the expansion rate H(z) from cosmic chronometers and high-z quasar data and reconstruct the growth factor and rate of linearised density perturbations in the non-relativistic matter component. Assuming realistic values for the matter density parameter Ωm0, as provided by current CMB experiments, we also reconstruct the evolution of the growth index γ with redshift. We show that the reconstruction of current H(z) data constrains the growth index to γ=0.56 ± 0.12 (2σ) at z = 0.09, which is in full agreement with the prediction of the ΛCDM model and some of its extensions.

  6. Cosmological perturbations during the Bose-Einstein condensation of dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, R.C.; Gonçalves, S.V.B. E-mail: sergio.vitorino@pq.cnpq.br

    2013-04-01

    In the present work, we analyze the evolution of the scalar and tensorial perturbations and the quantities relevant for the physical description of the Universe, as the density contrast of the scalar perturbations and the gravitational waves energy density during the Bose-Einstein condensation of dark matter. The behavior of these parameters during the Bose-Einstein phase transition of dark matter is analyzed in details. To study the cosmological dynamics and evolution of scalar and tensorial perturbations in a Universe with and without cosmological constant we use both analytical and numerical methods. The Bose-Einstein phase transition modifies the evolution of gravitational waves of cosmological origin, as well as the process of large-scale structure formation.

  7. Application of Perturbation Method in Investigating the Interaction of thin Shock with Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Ao, X.; Zank, G. P.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Shaikh, D.

    2006-09-26

    A 2D hydrodynamical model describing the interaction of thin shock with turbulence is developed by adopting a multi-scale perturbation analysis. This is extended to a 2D MHD model. The interaction is found to be governed by a two-dimentional Burger's equation involving ''perturbation terms''. Different perturbation profiles are tested with numerical simulations to show how the shock front is modified by turbulence. The results indicate that while turbulence can balance the nonlinear steepening of shock waves at some regions, it also helps to create a higher jump in physical quantities at other regions. The plasma medium in these regions can therefore experience higher compression, which will result in a downstream state that differs from the usual Rankine-Hugoniot state.

  8. Nonlocal Symmetry and its Applications in Perturbed mKdV Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Bo; Lin, Ji

    2016-06-01

    Based on the modified direct method, the variable-coefficient perturbed mKdV equation is changed to the constant-coefficient perturbed mKdV equation. The truncated Painlevé method is applied to obtain the nonlocal symmetry of the constant-coefficient perturbed mKdV equation. By introducing one new dependent variable, the nonlocal symmetry can be localized to the Lie point symmetry. Thanks to the localization procedure, the finite symmetry transformation is presented by solving the initial value problem of the prolonged systems. Furthermore, many explicit interaction solutions among different types of solutions such as solitary waves, rational solutions, and Painlevé II solutions are obtained using the symmetry reduction method to the enlarged systems. Two special concrete soliton-cnoidal interaction solutions are studied in both analytical and graphical ways.

  9. Implementation of uniform perturbation method for potential flow past axisymmetric and two-dimensional bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, T. C.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1984-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of potential flow past an axisymmetric slender body and a thin airfoil are calculated using a uniform perturbation analysis method. The method is based on the superposition of potentials of point singularities distributed inside the body. The strength distribution satisfies a linear integral equation by enforcing the flow tangency condition on the surface of the body. The complete uniform asymptotic expansion of its solution is obtained with respect to the slenderness ratio by modifying and adapting an existing technique. Results calculated by the perturbation analysis method are compared with the existing surface singularity panel method and some available analytical solutions for a number of cases under identical conditions. From these comparisons, it is found that the perturbation analysis method can provide quite accurate results for bodies with small slenderness ratio. The present method is much simpler and requires less memory and computation time than existing surface singularity panel methods of comparable accuracy.

  10. Analyzing magneto-hydrodynamic squeezing flow between two parallel disks with suction or injection by a new hybrid method based on the Tau method and the homotopy analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaban, M.; Shivanian, E.; Abbasbandy, S.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper an algorithm based on the homotopy analysis method (HAM) is introduced to study the magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) squeeze flow between two parallel infinite disks where one disk is impermeable and the other is porous with either suction or injection of the fluid in the presence of an applied magnetic field. The continuity and momentum equations governing the squeeze flow are reduced to a single, nonlinear, ordinary differential equation via similarity transformations. In addition, by using the Tau method the problem converts to the algebraic equations to obtain the solution iteratively. The combined effect of inertia, electromagnetic forces for both suction and blowing cases is discussed. Additionally, the convergence of the obtained series solutions is explicitly studied and a proper discussion is given for the obtained results. The applicability, accuracy and efficiency of this new Tau modification of the HAM is demonstrated via the accomplished comparison.

  11. NONLINEAR DYNAMICAL FRICTION OF A CIRCULAR-ORBIT PERTURBER IN A GASEOUS MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Woong-Tae

    2010-12-10

    We use three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations to investigate the nonlinear gravitational responses of gas to, and the resulting drag forces on, very massive perturbers moving in circular orbits. This work extends our previous studies that explored the cases of low-mass perturbers in circular orbits and massive perturbers on straight-line trajectories. The background medium is assumed to be non-rotating, adiabatic with index 5/3, and uniform with density {rho}{sub 0} and sound speed a{sub 0}. We model the gravitating perturber using a Plummer sphere with mass M{sub p} and softening radius r{sub s} in a uniform circular motion at speed V{sub p} and orbital radius R{sub p} , and run various models with differing R{identical_to}r{sub s}/R{sub p}, M{identical_to}V{sub p}/a{sub 0}, and B{identical_to}GM{sub p}/(a{sub 0}{sup 2}R{sub p}). A quasi-steady density wake of a supersonic model consists of a hydrostatic envelope surrounding the perturber, an upstream bow shock, and a trailing low-density region. The continuous change in the direction of the perturber motion reduces the detached shock distance compared to the linear-trajectory cases, while the orbit-averaged gravity of the perturber gathers the gas toward the center of the orbit, modifying the background preshock density to {rho}{sub 1}{approx}(1+0.46B{sup 1.1}){rho}{sub 0} depending weakly on M. For sufficiently massive perturbers, the presence of a hydrostatic envelope makes the drag force smaller than the prediction of the linear perturbation theory, resulting in F=4{pi}{rho}{sub 1}(GM{sub p})?2/V{sub p}?2 x (0.7{eta}{sub B}?-?1) for {eta}{sub B{identical_to}}B/(M?2-1)>0.1; the drag force for low-mass perturbers with {eta}{sub B}<0.1 agrees well with the linear prediction. The nonlinear drag force becomes independent of R as long as R<{eta}{sub B}/2, which places an upper limit on the perturber size for accurate evaluation of the drag force in numerical simulations.

  12. Mode coupling of Schwarzschild perturbations: Ringdown frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Pazos, Enrique; Brizuela, David; Martin-Garcia, Jose M.; Tiglio, Manuel

    2010-11-15

    Within linearized perturbation theory, black holes decay to their final stationary state through the well-known spectrum of quasinormal modes. Here we numerically study whether nonlinearities change this picture. For that purpose we study the ringdown frequencies of gauge-invariant second-order gravitational perturbations induced by self-coupling of linearized perturbations of Schwarzschild black holes. We do so through high-accuracy simulations in the time domain of first and second-order Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli type equations, for a variety of initial data sets. We consider first-order even-parity (l=2, m={+-}2) perturbations and odd-parity (l=2, m=0) ones, and all the multipoles that they generate through self-coupling. For all of them and all the initial data sets considered we find that--in contrast to previous predictions in the literature--the numerical decay frequencies of second-order perturbations are the same ones of linearized theory, and we explain the observed behavior. This would indicate, in particular, that when modeling or searching for ringdown gravitational waves, appropriately including the standard quasinormal modes already takes into account nonlinear effects.

  13. Cohomology Methods in Causal Perturbation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigore, D. R.

    2010-01-01

    Various problems in perturbation theory of (quantum) gauge models can be rephrased in the language of cohomology theory. This was already noticed in the functional formulation of perturbative gauge theories. Causal perturbation theory is a fully quantum approach: is works only with the chronological products which are defined as operator-valued distributions in the Fock space of the model. The use of causal perturbation theory leads to similar cohomology problems; the main difference with respect to the functional methods comes from the fact that the gauge transformation of the causal approach is, essentially, the linear part of the non-linear BRST transformation. Using these methods it is possible to give a nice determination of the interaction Lagrangians for gauge models (Yang-Mills and gravitation in the linear approximation); one obtains with this method the unicity of the interaction Lagrangian up to trivial terms. The case of quantum gravity is highly non-trivial and can be generalized with this method to the massive graviton case. Going to higher orders of perturbation theory one finds quantum anomalies. Again the cohomological methods can be used to determine the generic form of these anomalies. Finally, one can investigate the arbitrariness of the chronological products in higher orders and reduce this problem to cohomology methods also.

  14. Supersymmetry restoration in superstring perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Ashoke

    2015-12-01

    Superstring perturbation theory based on the 1PI effective theory approach has been useful for addressing the problem of mass renormalization and vacuum shift. We derive Ward identities associated with space-time supersymmetry transformation in this approach. This leads to a proof of the equality of renormalized masses of bosons and fermions and identities relating fermionic amplitudes to bosonic amplitudes after taking into account the effect of mass renormalization. This also relates unbroken supersymmetry to a given order in perturbation theory to absence of tadpoles of massless scalars to higher order. The results are valid at the perturbative vacuum as well as in the shifted vacuum when the latter describes the correct ground state of the theory. We apply this to SO(32) heterotic string theory on Calabi-Yau 3-folds where a one loop Fayet-Iliopoulos term apparently breaks supersymmetry at one loop, but analysis of the low energy effective field theory indicates that there is a nearby vacuum where supersymmetry is restored. We explicitly prove that the perturbative amplitudes of this theory around the shifted vacuum indeed satisfy the Ward identities associated with unbroken supersymmetry. We also test the general arguments by explicitly verifying the equality of bosonic and fermionic masses at one loop order in the shifted vacuum, and the appearance of two loop dilaton tadpole in the perturbative vacuum where supersymmetry is expected to be broken.

  15. Cosmological perturbations in teleparallel Loop Quantum Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haro, Jaime

    2013-11-01

    Cosmological perturbations in Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC) are usually studied incorporating either holonomy corrections, where the Ashtekar connection is replaced by a suitable sinus function in order to have a well-defined quantum analogue, or inverse-volume corrections coming from the eigenvalues of the inverse-volume operator. In this paper we will develop an alternative approach to calculate cosmological perturbations in LQC based on the fact that, holonomy corrected LQC in the flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) geometry could be also obtained as a particular case of teleparallel F(T) gravity (teleparallel LQC). The main idea of our approach is to mix the simple bounce provided by holonomy corrections in LQC with the non-singular perturbation equations given by F(T) gravity, in order to obtain a matter bounce scenario as a viable alternative to slow-roll inflation. In our study, we have obtained an scale invariant power spectrum of cosmological perturbations. However, the ratio of tensor to scalar perturbations is of order 1, which does not agree with the current observations. For this reason, we suggest a model where a transition from the matter domination to a quasi de Sitter phase is produced in order to enhance the scalar power spectrum.

  16. Local perturbations perturb—exponentially–locally

    SciTech Connect

    De Roeck, W. Schütz, M.

    2015-06-15

    We elaborate on the principle that for gapped quantum spin systems with local interaction, “local perturbations [in the Hamiltonian] perturb locally [the groundstate].” This principle was established by Bachmann et al. [Commun. Math. Phys. 309, 835–871 (2012)], relying on the “spectral flow technique” or “quasi-adiabatic continuation” [M. B. Hastings, Phys. Rev. B 69, 104431 (2004)] to obtain locality estimates with sub-exponential decay in the distance to the spatial support of the perturbation. We use ideas of Hamza et al. [J. Math. Phys. 50, 095213 (2009)] to obtain similarly a transformation between gapped eigenvectors and their perturbations that is local with exponential decay. This allows to improve locality bounds on the effect of perturbations on the low lying states in certain gapped models with a unique “bulk ground state” or “topological quantum order.” We also give some estimate on the exponential decay of correlations in models with impurities where some relevant correlations decay faster than one would naively infer from the global gap of the system, as one also expects in disordered systems with a localized groundstate.

  17. Cosmological perturbations on the phantom brane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bag, Satadru; Viznyuk, Alexander; Shtanov, Yuri; Sahni, Varun

    2016-07-01

    We obtain a closed system of equations for scalar perturbations in a multi-component braneworld. Our braneworld possesses a phantom-like equation of state at late times, weff < ‑1, but no big-rip future singularity. In addition to matter and radiation, the braneworld possesses a new effective degree of freedom—the `Weyl fluid' or `dark radiation'. Setting initial conditions on super-Hubble spatial scales at the epoch of radiation domination, we evolve perturbations of radiation, pressureless matter and the Weyl fluid until the present epoch. We observe a gradual decrease in the amplitude of the Weyl-fluid perturbations after Hubble-radius crossing, which results in a negligible effect of the Weyl fluid on the evolution of matter perturbations on spatial scales relevant for structure formation. Consequently, the quasi-static approximation of Koyama and Maartens provides a good fit to the exact results during the matter-dominated epoch. We find that the late-time growth of density perturbations on the brane proceeds at a faster rate than in ΛCDM. Additionally, the gravitational potentials Φ and Ψ evolve differently on the brane than in ΛCDM, for which Φ = Ψ. On the brane, by contrast, the ratio Φ/Ψ exceeds unity during the late matter-dominated epoch (z lesssim 50). These features emerge as smoking gun tests of phantom brane cosmology and allow predictions of this scenario to be tested against observations of galaxy clustering and large-scale structure.

  18. Improved WKB analysis of cosmological perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Casadio, Roberto; Luzzi, Mattia; Venturi, Giovanni; Finelli, Fabio

    2005-02-15

    Improved Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB)-type approximations are presented in order to study cosmological perturbations beyond the lowest order. Our methods are based on functions which approximate the true perturbation modes over the complete range of the independent (Langer) variable, from subhorizon to superhorizon scales, and include the region near the turning point. We employ both a perturbative Green's function technique and an adiabatic (or semiclassical) expansion (for a linear turning point) in order to compute higher order corrections. Improved general expressions for the WKB scalar and tensor power spectra are derived for both techniques. We test our methods on the benchmark of power-law inflation, which allows comparison with exact expressions for the perturbations, and find that the next-to-leading order adiabatic expansion yields the amplitude of the power spectra with excellent accuracy, whereas the next-to-leading order with the perturbative Green's function method does not improve the leading order result significantly. However, in more general cases, either or both methods may be useful.

  19. Rolling axions during inflation: perturbativity and signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peloso, Marco; Sorbo, Lorenzo; Unal, Caner

    2016-09-01

    The motion of a pseudo-scalar field X during inflation naturally induces a significant amplification of the gauge fields to which it is coupled. The amplified gauge fields can source characteristic scalar and tensor primordial perturbations. Several phenomenological implications have been discussed in the cases in which (i) X is the inflaton, and (ii) X is a field different from the inflaton, that experiences a temporary speed up during inflation. In this second case, visible sourced gravitational waves (GW) can be produced at the CMB scales without affecting the scalar perturbations, even if the scale of inflation is several orders of magnitude below what is required to produce a visible vacuum GW signal. Perturbativity considerations can be used to limit the regime in which these results are under perturbative control. We revised limits recently claimed for the case (i), and we extend these considerations to the case (ii). We show that, in both cases, these limits are satisfied by the applications that generate signals at CMB scales. Applications that generate gravitational waves and primordial black holes at much smaller scales are at the limit of the validity of this perturbativity analysis, so we expect those results to be valid up to possibly order one corrections.

  20. Nonderivative modified gravity: a classification

    SciTech Connect

    Comelli, D.; Nesti, F.; Pilo, L. E-mail: fabrizio.nesti@irb.hr

    2014-11-01

    We analyze the theories of gravity modified by a generic nonderivative potential built from the metric, under the minimal requirement of unbroken spatial rotations. Using the canonical analysis, we classify the potentials V according to the number of degrees of freedom (DoF) that propagate at the nonperturbative level. We then compare the nonperturbative results with the perturbative DoF propagating around Minkowski and FRW backgrounds. A generic V implies 6 propagating DoF at the non-perturbative level, with a ghost on Minkowski background. There exist potentials which propagate 5 DoF, as already studied in previous works. Here, no V with unbroken rotational invariance admitting 4 DoF is found. Theories with 3 DoF turn out to be strongly coupled on Minkowski background. Finally, potentials with only the 2 DoF of a massive graviton exist. Their effect on cosmology is simply equivalent to a cosmological constant. Potentials with 2 or 5 DoF and explicit time dependence appear to be a further viable possibility.

  1. Non-gravitational perturbations and satellite geodesy

    SciTech Connect

    Milani, A.; Nobill, A.M.; Farinella, P.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the basic ideas of the physics of non-gravitational perturbations and the mathematics required to compute their orbital effects. It conveys the relevance of the different problems that must be solved to achieve a given level of accuracy in orbit determination and in recovery of geophysically significant parameters. Selected Contents are: Orders of Magnitude of the Perturbing Forces, Tides and Apparent Forces, Tools from Celestial Mechanics, Solar Radiation Pressure-Direct Effects: Satellite-Solar Radiation Interaction, Long-Term Effects on Semi-Major Axis, Radiation Pressure-Indirect Effects: Earth-Reflected Radiation Pressure, Anisotropic Thermal Emission, Drag: Orbital Perturbations by a Drag-Like Force, and Charged Particle Drag.

  2. Perturbations in a regular bouncing universe

    SciTech Connect

    Battefeld, T.J.; Geshnizjani, G.

    2006-03-15

    We consider a simple toy model of a regular bouncing universe. The bounce is caused by an extra timelike dimension, which leads to a sign flip of the {rho}{sup 2} term in the effective four dimensional Randall Sundrum-like description. We find a wide class of possible bounces: big bang avoiding ones for regular matter content, and big rip avoiding ones for phantom matter. Focusing on radiation as the matter content, we discuss the evolution of scalar, vector and tensor perturbations. We compute a spectral index of n{sub s}=-1 for scalar perturbations and a deep blue index for tensor perturbations after invoking vacuum initial conditions, ruling out such a model as a realistic one. We also find that the spectrum (evaluated at Hubble crossing) is sensitive to the bounce. We conclude that it is challenging, but not impossible, for cyclic/ekpyrotic models to succeed, if one can find a regularized version.

  3. Non-perturbative quantum geometry III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krefl, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    The Nekrasov-Shatashvili limit of the refined topological string on toric Calabi-Yau manifolds and the resulting quantum geometry is studied from a non-perturbative perspective. The quantum differential and thus the quantum periods exhibit Stokes phenomena over the combined string coupling and quantized Kähler moduli space. We outline that the underlying formalism of exact quantization is generally applicable to points in moduli space featuring massless hypermultiplets, leading to non-perturbative band splitting. Our prime example is local ℙ1 + ℙ1 near a conifold point in moduli space. In particular, we will present numerical evidence that in a Stokes chamber of interest the string based quantum geometry reproduces the non-perturbative corrections for the Nekrasov-Shatashvili limit of 4d supersymmetric SU(2) gauge theory at strong coupling found in the previous part of this series. A preliminary discussion of local ℙ2 near the conifold point in moduli space is also provided.

  4. Interactions of Blast Waves with Perturbed Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry de Frahan, Marc; Johnsen, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities induce hydrodynamic mixing in many important physical systems such as inertial confinement fusion, supernova collapse, and scramjet combustion. Blast waves interacting with perturbed interfaces are prevelant in such applications and dictate the mixing dynamics. This study increases our understanding of blast-driven hydrodynamic instabilities by providing models for the time-dependent perturbation growth and vorticity production mechanisms. The strength and length of the blast wave determine the different growth regimes and the importance of the Richtmyer-Meshkov or Rayleigh-Taylor growth. Our analysis is based on simulations of a 2D planar blast wave, modeled by a shock (instantaneous acceleration) followed by a rarefaction (time-dependent deceleration), interacting with a sinusoidal perturbation at an interface between two fluids. A high-order accurate Discontinuous Galerkin method is used to solve the multifluid Euler equations.

  5. Hypersurface-invariant approach to cosmological perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salopek, D. S.; Stewart, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Using Hamilton-Jacobi theory, we develop a formalism for solving semiclassical cosmological perturbations which does not require an explicit choice of time hypersurface. The Hamilton-Jacobi equation for gravity interacting with matter (either a scalar or dust field) is solved by making an ansatz which includes all terms quadratic in the spatial curvature. Gravitational radiation and scalar perturbations are treated on an equal footing. Our technique encompasses linear perturbation theory and it also describes some mild nonlinear effects. As a concrete example of the method, we compute the galaxy-galaxy correlation function as well as large-angle microwave background fluctuations for power-law inflation, and we compare with recent observations.

  6. Elementary theorems regarding blue isocurvature perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Yoo, Hojin

    2015-04-01

    Blue CDM-photon isocurvature perturbations are attractive in terms of observability and may be typical from the perspective of generic mass relations in supergravity. We present and apply three theorems useful for blue isocurvature perturbations arising from linear spectator scalar fields. In the process, we give a more precise formula for the blue spectrum associated with the axion model of Kasuya and Kawasaki [Axion Isocurvature Fluctuations with Extremely Blue Spectrum, Phys. Rev. D 80, 023516 (2009).], which can in a parametric corner give a factor of O (10 ) correction. We explain how a conserved current associated with Peccei-Quinn symmetry plays a crucial role and explicitly plot several example spectra including the breaks in the spectra. We also resolve a little puzzle arising from a naive multiplication of isocurvature expression that sheds light on the gravitational imprint of the adiabatic perturbations on the fields responsible for blue isocurvature fluctuations.

  7. Perturbation measurement of waveguides for acoustic thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H.; Feng, X. J.; Zhang, J. T.

    2013-09-01

    Acoustic thermometers normally embed small acoustic transducers in the wall bounding a gas-filled cavity resonator. At high temperature, insulators of transducers loss electrical insulation and degrade the signal-to-noise ratio. One essential solution to this technical trouble is to couple sound by acoustic waveguides between resonator and transducers. But waveguide will break the ideal acoustic surface and bring perturbations(Δf+ig) to the ideal resonance frequency. The perturbation model for waveguides was developed based on the first-order acoustic theory in this paper. The frequency shift Δf and half-width change g caused by the position, length and radius of waveguides were analyzed using this model. Six different length of waveguides (52˜1763 mm) were settled on the cylinder resonator and the perturbation (Δf+ig) were measured at T=332 K and p=250˜500 kPa. The experiment results agreed with the theoretical prediction very well.

  8. Perturbation analysis of electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Haijun

    2014-06-15

    Lagrangian displacement and magnetic field perturbation response to the geodesic acoustic mode is analyzed by using the ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations in a large-aspect-ratio tokamak. δB{sub θ}, the poloidal component of magnetic field perturbation, has poloidal wave number m = 2 created by the poloidal displacement ξ{sub θ}. The parallel perturbation of magnetic field, δB{sub ∥}, has a poloidally asymmetric structure with m = 1 and is on the same order of magnitude with δB{sub θ} to the leading order. The radial displacement ξ{sub r} is of order O(βϵξ{sub θ}) but plays a significant role in determining δB{sub ∥}, where β is the plasma/magnetic pressure ratio and ϵ is the inverse aspect ratio.

  9. Instability of charged Lovelock black holes: Vector perturbations and scalar perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Tomohiro

    2013-01-01

    We examine the stability of charged Lovelock black hole solutions under vector-type and scalar-type perturbations. We find suitable master variables for the stability analysis; the equations for these variables are Schrödinger-type equations with two components, and these Schrödinger operators are symmetric. By these master equations, we show that charged Lovelock black holes are stable under vector-type perturbations. For scalar-type perturbations, we show the criteria for instability and check these numerically. In our previous paper [T. Takahashi, Prog. Theor. Phys. 125, 1289 (2011)], we have shown that nearly extreme black holes show instability under tensor-type perturbations. In this paper, we find that black holes with a small charge show instability under scalar-type perturbations even if they have a relatively large mass.

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RESONANT CAUSTIC PERTURBATION

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Sun-Ju

    2009-11-01

    Four of nine exoplanets found by microlensing were detected by the resonant caustic, which represents the merging of the planetary and central caustics at the position when the projected separation of a host star and a bounded planet is s approx 1. One of the resonant caustic lensing events, OGLE-2005-BLG-169, was a caustic-crossing high-magnification event with A {sub max}approx 800 and the source star was much smaller than the caustic, nevertheless the perturbation was not obviously apparent on the light curve of the event. In this paper, we investigate the perturbation pattern of the resonant caustic to understand why the perturbations induced by the caustic do not leave strong traces on the light curves of high-magnification events despite a small source/caustic size ratio. From this study, we find that the regions with small magnification excess around the center of the resonant caustic are rather widely formed, and the event passing the small-excess region produces a high-magnification event with a weak perturbation that is small relative to the amplification caused by the star and thus does not noticeably appear on the light curve of the event. We also find that the positive excess of the inside edge of the resonant caustic and the negative excess inside the caustic become stronger and wider as q increases, and thus the resonant caustic-crossing high-magnification events with the weak perturbation occur in the range of q <= 10{sup -4}. We determine the probability of the occurrence of events with the small excess |epsilon| <= 3% in high-magnification events induced by a resonant caustic. As a result, we find that for Earth-mass planets with a separation of approx2.5 AU the resonant caustic high-magnification events with the weak perturbation can occur with a significant frequency.

  11. Perturbative Lagrangian approach to gravitational instability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, F. R.; Colombi, S.; Hivon, E.; Juszkiewicz, R.

    1995-04-01

    This paper deals with the time evolution in the matter era of perturbations in Friedman-Lemaitre models with arbitrary density parameter {OMEGA}, with either a zero cosmological constant, {LAMBDA}=0, or with a non-zero cosmological constant in a spatially flat Universe. Unlike the classical Eulerian approach where the density contrast is expanded in a perturbative series, this analysis relies instead on a perturbative expansion of particles trajectories in Lagrangian coordinates. This brings a number of advantages over the classical analysis. In particular, it enables the description of stronger density contrasts. Indeed the linear term in the Lagrangian perturbative series is the famous Zeldovich approximate solution (1970). The idea to consider the higher order terms was introduced by Moutarde et al. (1991), generalized by Bouchet et al. (1992), and further developed by many others. We present here a systematic and detailed account of this approach. We give analytical results (or fits to numerical results) up to the third order (which is necessary to compute, for instance, the four point spatial correlation function or the corrections to the linear evolution of the two-point correlation function, as well as the secondary temperature anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background). We then proceed to explore the link between the Lagrangian description and statistical measures. We show in particular that Lagrangian perturbation theory provides a natural framework to compute the effect of redshift distortions, using the skewness of the density distribution function as an example. Finally, we show how well the second order theory does as compared to other approximations in the case of spherically symmetric perturbations. We also compare this second order approximation and Zeldovich solution to N-body simulations with scale-free (n=-2) Gaussian initial conditions. We find that second order theory is both simple and powerful.

  12. Nonlinear Growth of Singular Vector Based Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, C. A.

    2002-12-01

    The nonlinearity of singular vector-based perturbation growth is examined within the context of a global atmospheric forecast model. The characteristics of these nonlinearities and their impact on the utility of SV-based diagnostics are assessed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Nonlinearities are quantified by examining the symmetry of evolving positive and negative "twin" perturbations. Perturbations initially scaled to be consistent with estimates of analysis uncertainty become significantly nonlinear by 12 hours. However, the relative magnitude of the nonlinearities is a strong function of scale and metric. Small scales become nonlinear very quickly while synoptic scales can remain significantly linear out to three day. Small shifts between positive and negative perturbations can result in significant nonlinearities even when the basic anomaly patterns are quite similar. Thus, singular vectors may be qualitatively useful even when nonlinearities are large. Post-time pseudo-inverse experiments show that despite significant nonlinear perturbation growth, the nonlinear forecast corrections are similar to the expected linear corrections, even at 72 hours. When the nonlinear correction does differ significantly from the expected linear correction, the nonlinear correction is usually better, indicating that in some cases the pseudo-inverse correction effectively suppresses error growth outside the subspace defined by the leading (dry) singular vectors. Because a significant portion of the nonlinear growth occurs outside of the dry singular vector subspace, an a priori nonlinearity index based on the full perturbations is not a good predictor of when pseudo-inverse based corrections will be ineffective. However, one can construct a reasonable predictor of pseudo-inverse ineffectiveness by focusing on nonlinearities in the synoptic scales or in the singular vector subspace only.

  13. Tensor-vector-scalar cosmology: Covariant formalism for the background evolution and linear perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skordis, Constantinos

    2006-11-01

    A relativistic theory of gravity has recently been proposed by Bekenstein, where gravity is mediated by a tensor, a vector, and a scalar field, thus called TeVeS. The theory aims at modifying gravity in such a way as to reproduce Milgrom’s modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) in the weak field, nonrelativistic limit, which provides a framework to solve the missing mass problem in galaxies without invoking dark matter. In this paper I apply a covariant approach to formulate the cosmological equations for this theory, for both the background and linear perturbations. I derive the necessary perturbed equations for scalar, vector, and tensor modes without adhering to a particular gauge. Special gauges are considered in the appendixes.

  14. Modification of plasma rotation with resonant magnetic perturbations in the STOR-M tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgriw, S.; Liu, Y.; Hirose, A.; Xiao, C.

    2016-04-01

    The toroidal plasma flow velocity of impurity ions has been significantly modified in the Saskatchewan Torus-Modified (STOR-M) tokamak by means of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP). It has been found that the toroidal flow velocities of OV and CVI impurity ions change towards the co-current direction after the application of a current through a set of (l  =  2, n  =  1) RMP field coils. It has been observed that the reduction of the toroidal flow velocity is closely correlated to the reduction of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuation frequency measured by Mirnov coils. Modulation of the flow velocity has been achieved by switching the RMP current pulses. Non-resonant magnetic perturbations have also induced a much smaller change in the toroidal plasma flow. A theoretical model has been adopted to assess the contributions of different drift mechanisms to magnetic islands rotation in STOR-M.

  15. Perturbative approach to Markovian open quantum systems

    PubMed Central

    Li, Andy C. Y.; Petruccione, F.; Koch, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The exact treatment of Markovian open quantum systems, when based on numerical diagonalization of the Liouville super-operator or averaging over quantum trajectories, is severely limited by Hilbert space size. Perturbation theory, standard in the investigation of closed quantum systems, has remained much less developed for open quantum systems where a direct application to the Lindblad master equation is desirable. We present such a perturbative treatment which will be useful for an analytical understanding of open quantum systems and for numerical calculation of system observables which would otherwise be impractical. PMID:24811607

  16. Evolution of perturbations in an inflationary universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieman, J. A.; Will, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    The evolution of inhomogeneous density perturbations in a model of the very early universe that is dominated for a time by a constant energy density of a false quantum-mechanical vacuum is analyzed. During this period, the universe inflates exponentially and supercools exponentially, until a phase transition back to the true vacuum reheats the matter and radiation. Focus is on the physically measurable, coordinate-independent modes of inhomogeneous perturbations of this model and it is found that all modes either are constant or are exponentially damped during the inflationary era.

  17. Death to perturbative QCD in exclusive processes?

    SciTech Connect

    Eckardt, R.; Hansper, J.; Gari, M.F.

    1994-04-01

    The authors discuss the question of whether perturbative QCD is applicable in calculations of exclusive processes at available momentum transfers. They show that the currently used method of determining hadronic quark distribution amplitudes from QCD sum rules yields wave functions which are completely undetermined because the polynomial expansion diverges. Because of the indeterminacy of the wave functions no statement can be made at present as to whether perturbative QCD is valid. The authors emphasize the necessity of a rigorous discussion of the subject and the importance of experimental data in the range of interest.

  18. Perturbations in bouncing and cyclic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Tirthabir; Mayes, Riley; Lattyak, Colleen

    2016-03-01

    Being able to reliably track perturbations across bounces and turnarounds in cyclic and bouncing cosmology lies at the heart of being able to compare the predictions of these models with the cosmic microwave background observations. This has been a challenging task due to the unknown nature of the physics involved during the bounce as well as the technical challenge of matching perturbations precisely between the expansion and contraction phases. In this paper, we present some general techniques (analytical and numerical) that can be applied to understand the physics of the fluctuations, especially those with "long" wavelengths, and apply our techniques to nonsingular cosmological models such as the bounce inflation and cyclic inflation.

  19. Non-Gaussianity from isocurvature perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Nakayama, Kazunori; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Suyama, Teruaki; Takahashi, Fuminobu E-mail: nakayama@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: suyama@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2008-11-15

    We develop a formalism for studying non-Gaussianity in both curvature and isocurvature perturbations. It is shown that non-Gaussianity in the isocurvature perturbation between dark matter and photons leaves distinct signatures in the cosmic microwave background temperature fluctuations, which may be confirmed in future experiments, or possibly even in the currently available observational data. As an explicit example, we consider the quantum chromodynamics axion and show that it can actually induce sizable non-Gaussianity for the inflationary scale, H{sub inf} = O(10{sup 9}-10{sup 11}) GeV.

  20. Continuum methods in lattice perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Becher, Thomas G

    2002-11-15

    We show how methods of continuum perturbation theory can be used to simplify perturbative lattice calculations. We use the technique of asymptotic expansions to expand lattice loop integrals around the continuum limit. After the expansion, all nontrivial dependence on momenta and masses is encoded in continuum loop integrals and the only genuine lattice integrals left are tadpole integrals. Using integration-by-parts relations all of these can be expressed in terms of a small number of master integrals. Four master integrals are needed for bosonic one loop integrals, sixteen in QCD with Wilson or staggered fermions.

  1. Robustness of braneworld scenarios against tensorial perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Menezes, R.; Olmo, Gonzalo J.; Rubiera-Garcia, D.

    2015-11-01

    Inspired by the peculiarities of the effective geometry of crystalline structures, we reconsider thick brane scenarios from a metric-affine perspective. We show that for a rather general family of theories of gravity, whose Lagrangian is an arbitrary function of the metric and the Ricci tensor, the background and scalar field equations can be written in first-order form, and tensorial perturbations have a non negative definite spectrum, which makes them stable under linear perturbations regardless of the form of the gravity Lagrangian. We find, in particular, that the tensorial zero modes are exactly the same as predicted by Einstein’s theory regardless of the scalar field and gravitational Lagrangians.

  2. Perturbative renormalization of the electric field correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, C.; Laine, M.

    2016-04-01

    The momentum diffusion coefficient of a heavy quark in a hot QCD plasma can be extracted as a transport coefficient related to the correlator of two colour-electric fields dressing a Polyakov loop. We determine the perturbative renormalization factor for a particular lattice discretization of this correlator within Wilson's SU(3) gauge theory, finding a ∼ 12% NLO correction for values of the bare coupling used in the current generation of simulations. The impact of this result on existing lattice determinations is commented upon, and a possibility for non-perturbative renormalization through the gradient flow is pointed out.

  3. Conservative perturbation theory for nonconservative systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Tirth; Chattopadhyay, Rohitashwa; Vaidya, Kedar; Chakraborty, Sagar

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we show how to use canonical perturbation theory for dissipative dynamical systems capable of showing limit-cycle oscillations. Thus, our work surmounts the hitherto perceived barrier for canonical perturbation theory that it can be applied only to a class of conservative systems, viz., Hamiltonian systems. In the process, we also find Hamiltonian structure for an important subset of Liénard system—a paradigmatic system for modeling isolated and asymptotic oscillatory state. We discuss the possibility of extending our method to encompass an even wider range of nonconservative systems.

  4. Spontaneous breaking of Lorentz symmetry by ghost condensation in perturbative quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizal, Mir

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we will study the spontaneous breakdown of the Lorentz symmetry by ghost condensation in perturbative quantum gravity. Our analysis will be done in the Curci-Ferrari gauge. We will also analyse the modification of the BRST and anti-BRST transformations by the formation of this ghost condensate. It will be shown that even though the modified BRST and anti-BRST transformations are not nilpotent, their nilpotency is restored on-shell.

  5. Perturbed particle orbits and kinetic plasma response in non-axisymmetric tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kimin; Park, J.-K.; Boozer, A. H.; Logan, N. C.; Wang, Z. R.; Menard, J. E.

    2014-10-01

    Non-axisymmetric magnetic fields interact with the drift trajectories of ions and electrons to create an anisotropic plasma pressure. The force produced by the gradient of this anisotropic pressure produces a torque, the Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity (NTV), which tends to relax the plasma rotation to a specific offset rotation, and modifies the energy required to perturb the plasma. Complexities, such as resonances of the ExB drift with particle bounce frequencies, finite orbit width, and full collisional effects, require full numerical simulation to determine the NTV and the perturbation energy. The POCA delta-f drift kinetic particle code has been used to: (1) demonstrate the existence of the bounce resonances with the ExB drift and show that they often dominate the magnitude of the NTV, (2) show the NTV of perturbations with different toroidal mode numbers are generally decoupled, and (3) verify a quadratic NTV dependence on the asymmetric magnetic field. Such results imply the pressure anisotropy is linear in the magnetic perturbation and can produce a significant change in the applied non-axisymmetric field. Progress on integrating this pressure anisotropy into a perturbed equilibrium solver to obtain self-consistent solutions is presented. This work was supported by US DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  6. Gauge-invariant cosmological perturbation theory with seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Durrer, R. )

    1990-10-15

    Gauge-invariant cosmological perturbation theory is extended to handle perturbations induced by seeds. A calculation of the Sachs-Wolfe effect is presented. A second-order differential equation for the growth of density perturbations is derived and the perturbation of Liouville's equation for collisionless particles is also given. The results are illustrated by a simple analytic example of a single texture knot, where we calculate the induced perturbations of the energy of microwave photons, of baryonic matter, and of collisionless particles.

  7. Modified gravity as dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawicki, Ignacy

    2007-08-01

    We study the effects of introducing modifications to general relativity ("GR") at large scales as an alternative to exotic forms of matter required to replicate the observed cosmic acceleration. We survey the effects on cosmology and solar-system tests of Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati ("DGP") gravity, f ( R ) he changes to the background expansion history of the universe, these modifications have substantial impact on structure formation and its observable predictions. For DGP, we develop a scaling approximation for the behaviour of perturbations off the brane, for which the predicted integrated Sachs-Wolf ("ISW") effect is much stronger than observed, requiring new physics at around horizon scale to bring it into agreement with data. We develop a test based on cross-correlating galaxies and the ISW effect which is independent of the initial power spectrum for perturbations and is a smoking-gun test for DGP gravity. For f ( R ) models, we find that, for the expansion history to resemble that of Lambda-CDM, it is required that the second derivative of f with respect to R be non-negative. We then find the conditions on f ( R ) which allow this subset of models to pass solar-system tests. Provided that gravity behave like GR in the galaxy, these constraints are weak. However, for a model to allow large deviations from GR in the cosmology, the galactic halo must differ significantly from that predicted by structure evolution in GR. We then discuss the effect that these models have on structure formation, and find that even in the most conservative of models, percent-level deviations in the matter power spectrum will exist and should be detectable in the future. Finally, for MSG, we investigate the cosmology of a theory of gravity with a modified constraint structure. The acceleration era can be replicated in these models; however, linear perturbations become unstable as the universe begins to accelerate. Once the perturbations become non-linear, the model reverts to GR

  8. Circumstellar Debris Disks: Diagnosing the Unseen Perturber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvold, Erika R.; Naoz, Smadar; Vican, Laura; Farr, Will M.

    2016-07-01

    The first indication of the presence of a circumstellar debris disk is usually the detection of excess infrared emission from the population of small dust grains orbiting the star. This dust is short-lived, requiring continual replenishment, and indicating that the disk must be excited by an unseen perturber. Previous theoretical studies have demonstrated that an eccentric planet orbiting interior to the disk will stir the larger bodies in the belt and produce dust via interparticle collisions. However, motivated by recent observations, we explore another possible mechanism for heating a debris disk: a stellar-mass perturber orbiting exterior to and inclined to the disk and exciting the disk particles’ eccentricities and inclinations via the Kozai–Lidov mechanism. We explore the consequences of an exterior perturber on the evolution of a debris disk using secular analysis and collisional N-body simulations. We demonstrate that a Kozai–Lidov excited disk can generate a dust disk via collisions and we compare the results of the Kozai–Lidov excited disk with a simulated disk perturbed by an interior eccentric planet. Finally, we propose two observational tests of a dust disk that can distinguish whether the dust was produced by an exterior brown dwarf or stellar companion or an interior eccentric planet.

  9. Do cosmological perturbations have zero mean?

    SciTech Connect

    Armendariz-Picon, Cristian

    2011-03-01

    A central assumption in our analysis of cosmic structure is that cosmological perturbations have a constant ensemble mean, which can be set to zero by appropriate choice of the background. This property is one of the consequences of statistical homogeneity, the invariance of correlation functions under spatial translations. In this article we explore whether cosmological perturbations indeed have zero mean, and thus test one aspect of statistical homogeneity. We carry out a classical test of the zero mean hypothesis against a class of alternatives in which primordial perturbations have inhomogeneous non-vanishing means, but homogeneous and isotropic covariances. Apart from Gaussianity, our test does not make any additional assumptions about the nature of the perturbations and is thus rather generic and model-independent. The test statistic we employ is essentially Student's t statistic, applied to appropriately masked, foreground-cleaned cosmic microwave background anisotropy maps produced by the WMAP mission. We find evidence for a non-zero mean in a particular range of multipoles, but the evidence against the zero mean hypothesis goes away when we correct for multiple testing. We also place constraints on the mean of the temperature multipoles as a function of angular scale. On angular scales smaller than four degrees, a non-zero mean has to be at least an order of magnitude smaller than the standard deviation of the temperature anisotropies.

  10. Degenerate adiabatic perturbation theory: Foundations and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigolin, Gustavo; Ortiz, Gerardo

    2014-08-01

    We present details and expand on the framework leading to the recently introduced degenerate adiabatic perturbation theory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 170406 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.104.170406], and on the formulation of the degenerate adiabatic theorem, along with its necessary and sufficient conditions [given in Phys. Rev. A 85, 062111 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevA.85.062111]. We start with the adiabatic approximation for degenerate Hamiltonians that paves the way to a clear and rigorous statement of the associated degenerate adiabatic theorem, where the non-Abelian geometric phase (Wilczek-Zee phase) plays a central role to its quantitative formulation. We then describe the degenerate adiabatic perturbation theory, whose zeroth-order term is the degenerate adiabatic approximation, in its full generality. The parameter in the perturbative power-series expansion of the time-dependent wave function is directly associated to the inverse of the time it takes to drive the system from its initial to its final state. With the aid of the degenerate adiabatic perturbation theory we obtain rigorous necessary and sufficient conditions for the validity of the adiabatic theorem of quantum mechanics. Finally, to illustrate the power and wide scope of the methodology, we apply the framework to a degenerate Hamiltonian, whose closed-form time-dependent wave function is derived exactly, and also to other nonexactly solvable Hamiltonians whose solutions are numerically computed.

  11. Aharonov-Bohm Effect in Perturbation Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Kay M.; Henneberger, Walter C.

    1978-01-01

    The Aharonov-Bohn effect is obtained in first-order perturbation theory. It is shown that the effect occurs only when the initial state is a superposition of eigenstates of Lz corresponding to eigenvalues having opposite sign. (Author/GA)

  12. On the divergences of inflationary superhorizon perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Enqvist, K; Nurmi, S; Podolsky, D; Rigopoulos, G I E-mail: sami.nurmi@helsinki.fi E-mail: gerasimos.rigopoulos@helsinki.fi

    2008-04-15

    We discuss the infrared divergences that appear to plague cosmological perturbation theory. We show that, within the stochastic framework, they are regulated by eternal inflation so that the theory predicts finite fluctuations. Using the {Delta}N formalism to one loop, we demonstrate that the infrared modes can be absorbed into additive constants and the coefficients of the diagrammatic expansion for the connected parts of two-and three-point functions of the curvature perturbation. As a result, the use of any infrared cutoff below the scale of eternal inflation is permitted, provided that the background fields are appropriately redefined. The natural choice for the infrared cutoff would, of course, be the present horizon; other choices manifest themselves in the running of the correlators. We also demonstrate that it is possible to define observables that are renormalization-group-invariant. As an example, we derive a non-perturbative, infrared finite and renormalization point-independent relation between the two-point correlators of the curvature perturbation for the case of the free single field.

  13. What Perturbs the ggrdgr Rings of Uranus?

    PubMed

    French, R G; Kangas, J A; Elliot, J L

    1986-01-31

    The gamma and delta rings have by far the largest radial perturbations of any of the nine known Uranian rings. These two rings deviate from Keplerian orbits, having typical root-mean-square residuals of about 3 kilometers (compared to a few hundred meters for the other seven known rings). Possible causes for the perturbations include nearby shepherd satellites and Lindblad resonances. If shepherd satellites are responsible, they could be as large as several tens of kilometers in diameter. The perturbation patterns of the gamma and delta rings have been examined for evidence of Lindblad resonances of azimuthal wave number m = 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4. The beta ring radial residuals are well matched by a 2:1 Lindblad resonance. If this represents a real physical phenomenon and is not an artifact of undersampling, then the most plausible interpretation is that there is an undiscovered satellite orbiting 76,522 +/- 8 kilometers from Uranus, with an orbital period of 15.3595 +/- 0.0001 hours and a radius of 75 to 100 kilometers. Such a satellite would be easily detected by the Voyager spacecraft when it encounters Uranus. The 2:1 resonance location is 41 +/- 9 kilometers inside the delta ring, which makes it unlikely that the resonance is due to a viscous instability within the ring. In contrast, no low-order Lindblad resonance matches the gamma ring perturbations, which are probably caused by one or more shepherd satellites large enough to be clearly visible in Voyager images. PMID:17776019

  14. On-Shell Methods in Perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, Zvi; Dixon, Lance J.; Kosower, David A.

    2007-04-25

    We review on-shell methods for computing multi-parton scattering amplitudes in perturbative QCD, utilizing their unitarity and factorization properties. We focus on aspects which are useful for the construction of one-loop amplitudes needed for phenomenological studies at the Large Hadron Collider.

  15. Magnetic perturbation inspection of inner bearing races

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, J. R.; Lankford, J.

    1972-01-01

    Approximately 100 inner race bearings were inspected nondestructively prior to endurance testing. Two of the bearings which failed during testing spalled at the sites of subsurface inclusions previously detected by using magnetic field perturbation. At other sites initially judged to be suspect, subsurface inclusion-nucleated cracking was observed. Inspection records and metallurgical sectioning results are presented and discussed.

  16. Partially Quenched Chiral Perturbation Theory to NNLO

    SciTech Connect

    Laehde, Timo; Bijnens, Johan; Danielsson, Niclas

    2006-07-11

    This paper summarizes the recent calculations of the masses and decay constants of the pseudoscalar mesons at the two-loop level, or NNLO, in Partially Quenched Chiral Perturbation theory (PQ{chi}PT). Possible applications include chiral extrapolations of Lattice QCD, as well as the determination of the low-energy constants (LEC:s) of QCD.

  17. Staggered heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Jon A.

    2008-03-01

    Although taste violations significantly affect the results of staggered calculations of pseudoscalar and heavy-light mesonic quantities, those entering staggered calculations of baryonic quantities have not been quantified. Here I develop staggered chiral perturbation theory in the light-quark baryon sector by mapping the Symanzik action into heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory. For 2+1 dynamical quark flavors, the masses of flavor-symmetric nucleons are calculated to third order in partially quenched and fully dynamical staggered chiral perturbation theory. To this order the expansion includes the leading chiral logarithms, which come from loops with virtual decuplet-like states, as well as terms of O(mπ3), which come from loops with virtual octet-like states. Taste violations enter through the meson propagators in loops and tree-level terms of O(a2). The pattern of taste symmetry breaking and the resulting degeneracies and mixings are discussed in detail. The resulting chiral forms are appropriate to lattice results obtained with operators already in use and could be used to study the restoration of taste symmetry in the continuum limit. I assume that the fourth root of the fermion determinant can be incorporated in staggered chiral perturbation theory using the replica method.

  18. Cell cycle population effects in perturbation studies

    PubMed Central

    O'Duibhir, Eoghan; Lijnzaad, Philip; Benschop, Joris J; Lenstra, Tineke L; van Leenen, Dik; Groot Koerkamp, Marian JA; Margaritis, Thanasis; Brok, Mariel O; Kemmeren, Patrick; Holstege, Frank CP

    2014-01-01

    Growth condition perturbation or gene function disruption are commonly used strategies to study cellular systems. Although it is widely appreciated that such experiments may involve indirect effects, these frequently remain uncharacterized. Here, analysis of functionally unrelated Saccharyomyces cerevisiae deletion strains reveals a common gene expression signature. One property shared by these strains is slower growth, with increased presence of the signature in more slowly growing strains. The slow growth signature is highly similar to the environmental stress response (ESR), an expression response common to diverse environmental perturbations. Both environmental and genetic perturbations result in growth rate changes. These are accompanied by a change in the distribution of cells over different cell cycle phases. Rather than representing a direct expression response in single cells, both the slow growth signature and ESR mainly reflect a redistribution of cells over different cell cycle phases, primarily characterized by an increase in the G1 population. The findings have implications for any study of perturbation that is accompanied by growth rate changes. Strategies to counter these effects are presented and discussed. PMID:24952590

  19. Theoretical priors on modified growth parametrisations

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yong-Seon; Hollenstein, Lukas; Caldera-Cabral, Gabriela; Koyama, Kazuya E-mail: Lukas.Hollenstein@unige.ch E-mail: Kazuya.Koyama@port.ac.uk

    2010-04-01

    Next generation surveys will observe the large-scale structure of the Universe with unprecedented accuracy. This will enable us to test the relationships between matter over-densities, the curvature perturbation and the Newtonian potential. Any large-distance modification of gravity or exotic nature of dark energy modifies these relationships as compared to those predicted in the standard smooth dark energy model based on General Relativity. In linear theory of structure growth such modifications are often parameterised by virtue of two functions of space and time that enter the relation of the curvature perturbation to, first, the matter over- density, and second, the Newtonian potential. We investigate the predictions for these functions in Brans-Dicke theory, clustering dark energy models and interacting dark energy models. We find that each theory has a distinct path in the parameter space of modified growth. Understanding these theoretical priors on the parameterisations of modified growth is essential to reveal the nature of cosmic acceleration with the help of upcoming observations of structure formation.

  20. Non-adiabatic perturbations in multi-component perfect fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Koshelev, N.A.

    2011-04-01

    The evolution of non-adiabatic perturbations in models with multiple coupled perfect fluids with non-adiabatic sound speed is considered. Instead of splitting the entropy perturbation into relative and intrinsic parts, we introduce a set of symmetric quantities, which also govern the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation in models with energy transfer. We write the gauge invariant equations for the variables that determine on a large scale the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation and the rate of changes of the comoving curvature perturbation. The analysis of evolution of the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation has been made for several particular models.

  1. Evolution of the curvature perturbations during warm inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Tomohiro

    2009-06-15

    This paper considers warm inflation as an interesting application of multi-field inflation. Delta-N formalism is used for the calculation of the evolution of the curvature perturbations during warm inflation. Although the perturbations considered in this paper are decaying after the horizon exit, the corrections to the curvature perturbations sourced by these perturbations can remain and dominate the curvature perturbations at large scales. In addition to the typical evolution of the curvature perturbations, inhomogeneous diffusion rate is considered for warm inflation, which may lead to significant non-Gaussianity of the spectrum.

  2. Cosmological tests of modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Kazuya

    2016-04-01

    We review recent progress in the construction of modified gravity models as alternatives to dark energy as well as the development of cosmological tests of gravity. Einstein’s theory of general relativity (GR) has been tested accurately within the local universe i.e. the Solar System, but this leaves the possibility open that it is not a good description of gravity at the largest scales in the Universe. This being said, the standard model of cosmology assumes GR on all scales. In 1998, astronomers made the surprising discovery that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, not slowing down. This late-time acceleration of the Universe has become the most challenging problem in theoretical physics. Within the framework of GR, the acceleration would originate from an unknown dark energy. Alternatively, it could be that there is no dark energy and GR itself is in error on cosmological scales. In this review, we first give an overview of recent developments in modified gravity theories including f(R) gravity, braneworld gravity, Horndeski theory and massive/bigravity theory. We then focus on common properties these models share, such as screening mechanisms they use to evade the stringent Solar System tests. Once armed with a theoretical knowledge of modified gravity models, we move on to discuss how we can test modifications of gravity on cosmological scales. We present tests of gravity using linear cosmological perturbations and review the latest constraints on deviations from the standard Λ CDM model. Since screening mechanisms leave distinct signatures in the non-linear structure formation, we also review novel astrophysical tests of gravity using clusters, dwarf galaxies and stars. The last decade has seen a number of new constraints placed on gravity from astrophysical to cosmological scales. Thanks to on-going and future surveys, cosmological tests of gravity will enjoy another, possibly even more, exciting ten years.

  3. Cosmological tests of modified gravity.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kazuya

    2016-04-01

    We review recent progress in the construction of modified gravity models as alternatives to dark energy as well as the development of cosmological tests of gravity. Einstein's theory of general relativity (GR) has been tested accurately within the local universe i.e. the Solar System, but this leaves the possibility open that it is not a good description of gravity at the largest scales in the Universe. This being said, the standard model of cosmology assumes GR on all scales. In 1998, astronomers made the surprising discovery that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, not slowing down. This late-time acceleration of the Universe has become the most challenging problem in theoretical physics. Within the framework of GR, the acceleration would originate from an unknown dark energy. Alternatively, it could be that there is no dark energy and GR itself is in error on cosmological scales. In this review, we first give an overview of recent developments in modified gravity theories including f(R) gravity, braneworld gravity, Horndeski theory and massive/bigravity theory. We then focus on common properties these models share, such as screening mechanisms they use to evade the stringent Solar System tests. Once armed with a theoretical knowledge of modified gravity models, we move on to discuss how we can test modifications of gravity on cosmological scales. We present tests of gravity using linear cosmological perturbations and review the latest constraints on deviations from the standard [Formula: see text]CDM model. Since screening mechanisms leave distinct signatures in the non-linear structure formation, we also review novel astrophysical tests of gravity using clusters, dwarf galaxies and stars. The last decade has seen a number of new constraints placed on gravity from astrophysical to cosmological scales. Thanks to on-going and future surveys, cosmological tests of gravity will enjoy another, possibly even more, exciting ten years. PMID:27007681

  4. Thermostat-Like Perturbations of an Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidlin, Mark

    2016-07-01

    We consider an oscillator with one degree of freedom perturbed by a deterministic thermostat-like perturbation and another system, in particular, another oscillator, coupled with the first one. If the Hamiltonian of the first system has saddle points, the whole system has, in a sense, a stochastic behavior on long time intervals. Under certain conditions, one can introduce the relative entropy and describe metastability and other large deviation effects in this deterministic system. If the coupled system is also an oscillator, the long time evolution of the energy of this oscillator has a diffusion approximation. To get these results one has to regularize the system. But the results are, to some extent, independent of the regularization: the stochasticity is due to instabilities at saddle points of the original system.

  5. Resummation Approach in QCD Analytic Perturbation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakulev, Alexander P.; Potapova, Irina V.

    2011-10-01

    We discuss the resummation approach in QCD Analytic Perturbation Theory (APT). We start we a simple example of asymptotic ower series for a zero-dimensional analog of the scalar g φ model. Then we give a short historic preamble of APT and show that renormgroup improvement of the QCD perturbation theory dictates to use the Fractional APT (FAPT). After that we discuss the (F)PT resummation of nonpower series and provide the one-, two-, and three-loop resummation recipes. We show the results of applications of these recipes to the estimation of the Adler function D(Q) in the N=4 region of Q and of the Higgs-boson-decay width Γ(mH2) for M=100-180 GeV.

  6. Perturbative type II amplitudes for BPS interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Anirban

    2016-02-01

    We consider the perturbative contributions to the {{ R }}4, {D}4{{ R }}4 and {D}6{{ R }}4 interactions in toroidally compactified type II string theory. These BPS interactions do not receive perturbative contributions beyond genus three. We derive Poisson equations satisfied by these moduli dependent string amplitudes. These T-duality invariant equations have eigenvalues that are completely determined by the structure of the integrands of the multi-loop amplitudes. The source terms are given by boundary terms of the moduli space of Riemann surfaces corresponding to both separating and non-separating nodes. These are determined directly from the string amplitudes, as well as from U-duality constraints and logarithmic divergences of maximal supergravity. We explicitly solve these Poisson equations in nine and eight-dimensions.

  7. A Renormalisation Group Method. III. Perturbative Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauerschmidt, Roland; Brydges, David C.; Slade, Gordon

    2015-05-01

    This paper is the third in a series devoted to the development of a rigorous renormalisation group method for lattice field theories involving boson fields, fermion fields, or both. In this paper, we motivate and present a general approach towards second-order perturbative renormalisation, and apply it to a specific supersymmetric field theory which represents the continuous-time weakly self-avoiding walk on . Our focus is on the critical dimension . The results include the derivation of the perturbative flow of the coupling constants, with accompanying estimates on the coefficients in the flow. These are essential results for subsequent application to the 4-dimensional weakly self-avoiding walk, including a proof of existence of logarithmic corrections to their critical scaling. With minor modifications, our results also apply to the 4-dimensional -component spin model.

  8. Inflationary tensor perturbations after BICEP2.

    PubMed

    Caligiuri, Jerod; Kosowsky, Arthur

    2014-05-16

    The measurement of B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background at large angular scales by the BICEP experiment suggests a stochastic gravitational wave background from early-Universe inflation with a surprisingly large amplitude. The power spectrum of these tensor perturbations can be probed both with further measurements of the microwave background polarization at smaller scales and also directly via interferometry in space. We show that sufficiently sensitive high-resolution B-mode measurements will ultimately have the ability to test the inflationary consistency relation between the amplitude and spectrum of the tensor perturbations, confirming their inflationary origin. Additionally, a precise B-mode measurement of the tensor spectrum will predict the tensor amplitude on solar system scales to 20% accuracy for an exact power-law tensor spectrum, so a direct detection will then measure the running of the tensor spectral index to high precision. PMID:24877926

  9. RECONSTRUCTING COSMOLOGICAL MATTER PERTURBATIONS USING STANDARD CANDLES AND RULERS

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Ujjaini; Sahni, Varun; Starobinsky, Alexei A. E-mail: varun@iucaa.ernet.i

    2009-10-20

    For a large class of dark energy (DE) models, for which the effective gravitational constant is a constant and there is no direct exchange of energy between DE and dark matter (DM), knowledge of the expansion history suffices to reconstruct the growth factor of linearized density perturbations in the non-relativistic matter component on scales much smaller than the Hubble distance. In this paper, we develop a non-parametric method for extracting information about the perturbative growth factor from data pertaining to the luminosity or angular size distances. A comparison of the reconstructed density contrast with observations of large-scale structure and gravitational lensing can help distinguish DE models such as the cosmological constant and quintessence from models based on modified gravity theories as well as models in which DE and DM are either unified or interact directly. We show that for current supernovae (SNe) data, the linear growth factor at z = 0.3 can be constrained to 5% and the linear growth rate to 6%. With future SNe data, such as expected from the Joint Dark Energy Mission, we may be able to constrain the growth factor to 2%-3% and the growth rate to 3%-4% at z = 0.3 with this unbiased, model-independent reconstruction method. For future baryon acoustic oscillation data which would deliver measurements of both the angular diameter distance and the Hubble parameter, it should be possible to constrain the growth factor at z = 2.5%-9%. These constraints grow tighter with the errors on the data sets. With a large quantity of data expected in the next few years, this method can emerge as a competitive tool for distinguishing between different models of dark energy.

  10. Reconstructing cosmological matter perturbations using standard candles and rulers

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Ujjaini; Sahni, Varun; Starobinsky, Alexei A

    2008-01-01

    For a large class of dark energy (DE) models, for which the effective gravitational constant is a constant and there is no direct exchange of energy between DE and dark matter (DM), knowledge of the expansion history suffices to reconstruct the growth factor of linearized density perturbations in the non-relativistic matter component on scales much smaller than the Hubble distance. In this paper, we develop a non-parametric method for extracting information about the perturbative growth factor from data pertaining to the luminosity or angular size distances. A comparison of the reconstructed density contrast with observations of large-scale structure and gravitational lensing can help distinguish DE models such as the cosmological constant and quintessence from models based on modified gravity theories as well as models in which DE and DM are either unified or interact directly. We show that for current supernovae (SNe) data, the linear growth factor at z = 0.3 can be constrained to 5% and the linear growth rate to 6%. With future SNe data, such as expected from the Joint Dark Energy Mission, we may be able to constrain the growth factor to 2%-3% and the growth rate to 3%-4% at z = 0.3 with this unbiased, model-independent reconstruction method. For future baryon acoustic oscillation data which would deliver measurements of both the angular diameter distance and the Hubble parameter, it should be possible to constrain the growth factor at z = 2.5%-9%. These constraints grow tighter with the errors on the data sets. With a large quantity of data expected in the next few years, this method can emerge as a competitive tool for distinguishing between different models of dark energy.

  11. Study of the spectrum of inflaton perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Glenz, Matthew M.; Parker, Leonard

    2009-09-15

    We examine the spectrum of inflaton fluctuations resulting from any given long period of exponential inflation. Infrared and ultraviolet divergences in the inflaton dispersion summed over all modes do not appear in our approach. We show how the scale invariance of the perturbation spectrum arises. We also examine the spectrum of scalar perturbations of the metric that is created by the inflaton fluctuations that have left the Hubble sphere during inflation and the spectrum of density perturbations that they produce at reentry after inflation has ended. When the inflaton dispersion spectrum is renormalized during the expansion, we show (for the case of the quadratic inflaton potential) that the density perturbation spectrum approaches a mass-independent limit as the inflaton mass approaches zero, and remains near that limiting value for masses less than about 1/4 of the inflationary Hubble constant. We show that this limiting behavior does not occur if one only makes the Minkowski space subtraction, without the further adiabatic subtractions that involve time derivatives of the expansion scale factor a(t). We also find a parametrized expression for the energy density produced by the change in a(t) as inflation ends. If the end of inflation were sufficiently abrupt, then the temperature corresponding to this energy density could be very significant. We also show that fluctuations of the inflaton field that are present before inflation starts are not dissipated during inflation and could have a significant observational effect today. The mechanism for this is caused by the initial fluctuations through stimulated emission from the vacuum.

  12. Tests of Chiral Perturbation Theory with COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, Jan

    2010-12-28

    The COMPASS experiment at CERN studies with high precision pion-photon induced reactions on nuclear targets via the Primakoff effect. This offers the possibility to test chiral perturbation theory (ChPT) in various channels: Pion Compton scattering allows to clarify the longstanding question of the pion polarisabilities, single neutral pion production is related to the chiral anomaly, and for the two-pion production cross sections exist as yet untested ChPT predictions.

  13. Geometric perturbation theory and plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Omohundro, S.M.

    1985-04-04

    Modern differential geometric techniques are used to unify the physical asymptotics underlying mechanics, wave theory and statistical mechanics. The approach gives new insights into the structure of physical theories and is suited to the needs of modern large-scale computer simulation and symbol manipulation systems. A coordinate-free formulation of non-singular perturbation theory is given, from which a new Hamiltonian perturbation structure is derived and related to the unperturbed structure. The theory of perturbations in the presence of symmetry is developed, and the method of averaging is related to reduction by a circle group action. The pseudo-forces and magnetic Poisson bracket terms due to reduction are given a natural asymptotic interpretation. Similar terms due to changing reference frames are related to the method of variation of parameters, which is also given a Hamiltonian formulation. These methods are used to answer a question about nearly periodic systems. The answer leads to a new secular perturbation theory that contains no ad hoc elements. Eikonal wave theory is given a Hamiltonian formulation that generalizes Whitham's Lagrangian approach. The evolution of wave action density on ray phase space is given a Hamiltonian structure using a Lie-Poisson bracket. The relationship between dissipative and Hamiltonian systems is discussed. A new type of attractor is defined which attracts both forward and backward in time and is shown to occur in infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian systems with dissipative behavior. The theory of Smale horseshoes is applied to gyromotion in the neighborhood of a magnetic field reversal and the phenomenon of reinsertion in area-preserving horseshoes is introduced. The central limit theorem is proved by renormalization group techniques. A natural symplectic structure for thermodynamics is shown to arise asymptotically from the maximum entropy formalism.

  14. Stability of SIRS system with random perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qiuying

    2009-09-01

    Epidemiological models with bilinear incidence rate λSI usually have an asymptotically stable trivial equilibrium corresponding to the disease-free state, or an asymptotically stable non-trivial equilibrium (i.e. interior equilibrium) corresponding to the endemic state. In this paper, we consider an epidemiological model, which is an SIRS model with or without distributed time delay influenced by random perturbations. We present the stability conditions of the disease-free equilibrium of the associated stochastic SIRS system.

  15. Perturbation Theory for Superfluid in Nonuniform Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshida, Shinji; Kato, Yusuke

    2016-05-01

    Perturbation theory of superfluid fraction in terms of nonuniform potential is constructed. We find that the coefficient of the leading term is determined by the dynamical structure factor or density fluctuation of the system. The results for the ideal Bose gas and the interacting Bose system with linear dispersion are consistent to implications from Landau's criterion. We also find that the superfluidity of Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid with K>2 is shown to be stable against nonuniform potential.

  16. Intelligent perturbation algorithms to space scheduling optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtzman, Clifford R.

    1991-01-01

    The limited availability and high cost of crew time and scarce resources make optimization of space operations critical. Advances in computer technology coupled with new iterative search techniques permit the near optimization of complex scheduling problems that were previously considered computationally intractable. Described here is a class of search techniques called Intelligent Perturbation Algorithms. Several scheduling systems which use these algorithms to optimize the scheduling of space crew, payload, and resource operations are also discussed.

  17. (Perturbed angular correlations in zirconia ceramics)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This is the progress report for the first year of the currently-approved three year funding cycle. We have carried on a vigorous program of experimental and theoretical research on microscopic properties of zirconia and ceria using the Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) experimental technique. The experimental method was described in the original proposal and in a number of references as well as several of the technical reports that accompany this progress report.

  18. Perturbations of nested branes with induced gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sbisà, Fulvio; Koyama, Kazuya E-mail: kazuya.koyama@port.ac.uk

    2014-06-01

    We study the behaviour of weak gravitational fields in models where a 4D brane is embedded inside a 5D brane equipped with induced gravity, which in turn is embedded in a 6D spacetime. We consider a specific regularization of the branes internal structures where the 5D brane can be considered thin with respect to the 4D one. We find exact solutions corresponding to pure tension source configurations on the thick 4D brane, and study perturbations at first order around these background solutions. To perform the perturbative analysis, we adopt a bulk-based approach and we express the equations in terms of gauge invariant and master variables using a 4D scalar-vector-tensor decomposition. We then propose an ansatz on the behaviour of the perturbation fields when the thickness of the 4D brane goes to zero, which corresponds to configurations where gravity remains finite everywhere in the thin limit of the 4D brane. We study the equations of motion using this ansatz, and show that they give rise to a consistent set of differential equations in the thin limit, from which the details of the internal structure of the 4D brane disappear. We conclude that the thin limit of the ''ribbon'' 4D brane inside the (already thin) 5D brane is well defined (at least when considering first order perturbations around pure tension configurations), and that the gravitational field on the 4D brane remains finite in the thin limit. We comment on the crucial role of the induced gravity term on the 5D brane.

  19. Neutron stars in a perturbative f(R) gravity model with strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Deliduman, Cemsinan; Güngör, Can; Keleş, Vildan; Ryu, C.Y.; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J. E-mail: cemsinan@msgsu.edu.tr E-mail: kelesvi@itu.edu.tr E-mail: kajino@nao.ac.jp

    2013-10-01

    In Kaluza-Klein electromagnetism it is natural to associate modified gravity with strong electromagnetic fields. Hence, in this paper we investigate the combined effects of a strong magnetic field and perturbative f(R) gravity on the structure of neutron stars. The effect of an interior strong magnetic field of about 10{sup 17−18} G on the equation of state is derived in the context of a quantum hadrodynamics (QHD) equation of state (EoS) including effects of the magnetic pressure and energy along with occupied Landau levels. Adopting a random orientation of interior field domains, we solve the modified spherically symmetric hydrostatic equilibrium equations derived for a gravity model with f(R) = R+αR{sup 2}. Effects of both the finite magnetic field and the modified gravity are detailed for various values of the magnetic field and the perturbation parameter α along with a discussion of their physical implications. We show that there exists a parameter space of the modified gravity and the magnetic field strength, in which even a soft equation of state can accommodate a large ( > 2 M{sub s}un) maximum neutron star mass.

  20. Cosmic perturbations through the cyclic ages

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Joel K.; Gratton, Steven; Steinhardt, Paul J.; Turok, Neil

    2007-06-15

    We analyze the evolution of cosmological perturbations in the cyclic model, paying particular attention to their behavior and interplay over multiple cycles. Our key results are: (1) galaxies and large scale structure present in one cycle are generated by the quantum fluctuations in the preceding cycle without interference from perturbations or structure generated in earlier cycles and without interfering with structure generated in later cycles; (2) the ekpyrotic phase, an epoch of gentle contraction with equation of state w>>1 preceding the hot big bang, makes the universe homogeneous, isotropic and flat within any given observer's horizon; and (3) although the universe is uniform within each observer's horizon, the structure of the cyclic universe on very large scales is more complex, owing to the effects of superhorizon length perturbations, and cannot be described globally as a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology. In particular, we show that the ekpyrotic contraction phase is so effective in smoothing, flattening and isotropizing the universe within the horizon that this phase alone suffices to solve the horizon and flatness problems even without an extended period of dark energy domination (a kind of low energy inflation). Instead, the cyclic model rests on a genuinely novel, noninflationary mechanism (ekpyrotic contraction) for resolving the classic cosmological conundrums.

  1. Non-perturbative effects in spin glasses.

    PubMed

    Castellana, Michele; Parisi, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    We present a numerical study of an Ising spin glass with hierarchical interactions--the hierarchical Edwards-Anderson model with an external magnetic field (HEA). We study the model with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations in the mean-field (MF) and non-mean-field (NMF) regions corresponding to d ≥ 4 and d < 4 for the d-dimensional ferromagnetic Ising model respectively. We compare the MC results with those of a renormalization-group (RG) study where the critical fixed point is treated as a perturbation of the MF one, along the same lines as in the -expansion for the Ising model. The MC and the RG method agree in the MF region, predicting the existence of a transition and compatible values of the critical exponents. Conversely, the two approaches markedly disagree in the NMF case, where the MC data indicates a transition, while the RG analysis predicts that no perturbative critical fixed point exists. Also, the MC estimate of the critical exponent ν in the NMF region is about twice as large as its classical value, even if the analog of the system dimension is within only ~2% from its upper-critical-dimension value. Taken together, these results indicate that the transition in the NMF region is governed by strong non-perturbative effects. PMID:25733337

  2. Noninflationary model with scale invariant cosmological perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, Patrick; Pinho, Emanuel J. C.; Pinto-Neto, Nelson

    2007-01-15

    We show that a contracting universe which bounces due to quantum cosmological effects and connects to the hot big-bang expansion phase, can produce an almost scale invariant spectrum of perturbations provided the perturbations are produced during an almost matter dominated era in the contraction phase. This is achieved using Bohmian solutions of the canonical Wheeler-DeWitt equation, thus treating both the background and the perturbations in a fully quantum manner. We find a very slightly blue spectrum (n{sub S}-1>0). Taking into account the spectral index constraint as well as the cosmic microwave background normalization measure yields an equation of state that should be less than {omega} < or approx. 8x10{sup -4}, implying n{sub S}-1{approx}O(10{sup -4}), and that the characteristic curvature scale of the Universe at the bounce is L{sub 0}{approx}10{sup 3}l{sub Pl}, a region where one expects that the Wheeler-DeWitt equation should be valid without being spoiled by string or loop quantum gravity effects. We have also obtained a consistency relation between the tensor-to-scalar ratio T/S and the scalar spectral index as T/S{approx}4.6x10{sup -2}{radical}(n{sub S}-1), leading to potentially measurable differences with inflationary predictions.

  3. Relativistic Positioning System in perturbed spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostić, Uroš; Horvat, Martin; Gomboc, Andreja

    2015-11-01

    We present a variant of a Global Navigation Satellite System called a Relativistic Positioning System (RPS), which is based on emission coordinates. We modelled the RPS dynamics in a spacetime around Earth, described by a perturbed Schwarzschild metric, where we included the perturbations due to Earth multipoles (up to the 6th), the Moon, the Sun, Venus, Jupiter, solid tide, ocean tide, and Kerr rotation effect. The exchange of signals between the satellites and a user was calculated using a ray-tracing method in the Schwarzschild spacetime. We find that positioning in a perturbed spacetime is feasible and is highly accurate already with standard numerical procedures: the positioning algorithms used to transform between the emission and the Schwarzschild coordinates of the user are very accurate and time efficient—on a laptop it takes 0.04 s to determine the user’s spatial and time coordinates with a relative accuracy of {10}-28-{10}-26 and {10}-32-{10}-30, respectively.

  4. Dark matter dispersion tensor in perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aviles, Alejandro

    2016-03-01

    We compute the dark matter velocity dispersion tensor up to third order in perturbation theory using the Lagrangian formalism, revealing growing solutions at the third and higher orders. Our results are general and can be used for any other perturbative formalism. As an application, corrections to the matter power spectrum are calculated, and we find that some of them have the same structure as those in the effective field theory of large-scale structure, with "EFT-like" coefficients that grow quadratically with the linear growth function and are further suppressed by powers of the logarithmic linear growth factor f ; other corrections present additional k dependence. Due to the velocity dispersions, there exists a free-streaming scale that suppresses the whole 1-loop power spectrum. Furthermore, we find that as a consequence of the nonlinear evolution, the free-streaming length is shifted towards larger scales, wiping out more structure than that expected in linear theory. Therefore, we argue that the formalism developed here is better suited for a perturbation treatment of warm dark matter or neutrino clustering, where the velocity dispersion effects are well known to be important. We discuss implications related to the nature of dark matter.

  5. Using Lagrangian perturbation theory for precision cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, Naonori S.

    2014-06-10

    We explore the Lagrangian perturbation theory (LPT) at one-loop order with Gaussian initial conditions. We present an expansion method to approximately compute the power spectrum LPT. Our approximate solution has good convergence in the series expansion and enables us to compute the power spectrum in LPT accurately and quickly. Non-linear corrections in this theory naturally satisfy the law of conservation of mass because the relation between matter density and the displacement vector of dark matter corresponds to the conservation of mass. By matching the one-loop solution in LPT to the two-loop solution in standard perturbation theory, we present an approximate solution of the power spectrum which has higher order corrections than the two-loop order in standard perturbation theory with the conservation of mass satisfied. With this approximation, we can use LPT to compute a non-linear power spectrum without any free parameters, and this solution agrees with numerical simulations at k = 0.2 h Mpc{sup –1} and z = 0.35 to better than 2%.

  6. Predicting pathway perturbations in Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, K

    2003-01-01

    Comparative annotation of human chromosome 21 genomic sequence with homologous regions of mouse chromosomes 16, 17 and 10 has identified 170 orthologous gene pairs. Functional annotation of these genes, based on literature reports and computationally-derived predictions, shows that a broad range of cellular processes are represented. A goal of Down syndrome research is to determine which of these processes are perturbed by overexpression of chromosome 21 genes, and which may, therefore, contribute to the cognitive deficits that characterize Down syndrome. Eleven chromosome 21 genes are annotated to interact with or be affected by components of the MAP Kinase pathway and eight are involved in Ca2+/calcineurin signaling. Both pathways are critical for normal neurological function, and consequently their perturbations are proposed as candidates for phenotypic relevance. We present evidence suggesting that the MAP Kinase pathway is perturbed in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome at 4-6 months of age. Analysis is complicated by the observation that overexpression of chromosome 21 genes in trisomy may be affected by method of detection, organism, tissue or brain region, and/or developmental age. PMID:15068236

  7. Perturbative gravity in the causal approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigore, D. R.

    2010-01-01

    Quantum theory of the gravitation in the causal approach is studied up to the second order of perturbation theory in the causal approach. We emphasize the use of cohomology methods in this framework. After describing in detail the mathematical structure of the cohomology method we apply it in three different situations: (a) the determination of the most general expression of the interaction Lagrangian; (b) the proof of gauge invariance in the second order of perturbation theory for the pure gravity system—massless and massive; (c) the investigation of the arbitrariness of the second-order chronological products compatible with renormalization principles and gauge invariance (i.e. the renormalization problem in the second order of perturbation theory). In case (a) we investigate pure gravity systems and the interaction of massless gravity with matter (described by scalars and spinors) and massless Yang-Mills fields. We obtain a difference with respect to the classical field theory due to the fact that in quantum field theory one cannot enforce the divergenceless property on the vector potential and this spoils the divergenceless property of the usual energy-momentum tensor. To correct this one needs a supplementary ghost term in the interaction Lagrangian. In all three case, the computations are more simple than by the usual methods.

  8. Perturbative Critical Behavior from Spacetime Dependent Couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Xi; Horn, Bart; Silverstein, Eva; Torroba, Gonzalo

    2012-08-03

    We find novel perturbative fixed points by introducing mildly spacetime-dependent couplings into otherwise marginal terms. In four-dimensional QFT, these are physical analogues of the small-{epsilon} Wilson-Fisher fixed point. Rather than considering 4-{epsilon} dimensions, we stay in four dimensions but introduce couplings whose leading spacetime dependence is of the form {lambda}x{sup {kappa}}{mu}{sup {kappa}}, with a small parameter {kappa} playing a role analogous to {epsilon}. We show, in {phi}{sup 4} theory and in QED and QCD with massless flavors, that this leads to a critical theory under perturbative control over an exponentially wide window of spacetime positions x. The exact fixed point coupling {lambda}{sub *}(x) in our theory is identical to the running coupling of the translationally invariant theory, with the scale replaced by 1/x. Similar statements hold for three-dimensional {phi}{sup 6} theories and two-dimensional sigma models with curved target spaces. We also describe strongly coupled examples using conformal perturbation theory.

  9. Topological quantum order: Stability under local perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Bravyi, Sergey; Hastings, Matthew B.; Michalakis, Spyridon

    2010-09-15

    We study zero-temperature stability of topological phases of matter under weak time-independent perturbations. Our results apply to quantum spin Hamiltonians that can be written as a sum of geometrically local commuting projectors on a D-dimensional lattice with certain topological order conditions. Given such a Hamiltonian H{sub 0}, we prove that there exists a constant threshold {epsilon}>0 such that for any perturbation V representable as a sum of short-range bounded-norm interactions, the perturbed Hamiltonian H=H{sub 0}+{epsilon}V has well-defined spectral bands originating from low-lying eigenvalues of H{sub 0}. These bands are separated from the rest of the spectra and from each other by a constant gap. The band originating from the smallest eigenvalue of H{sub 0} has exponentially small width (as a function of the lattice size). Our proof exploits a discrete version of Hamiltonian flow equations, the theory of relatively bounded operators, and the Lieb-Robinson bound.

  10. Combining coupled cluster and perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooijen, Marcel

    1999-12-01

    Single reference coupled cluster (CC) singles and doubles theory is combined with low-order perturbation theory (PT) to treat ground state electron correlation. Two variants of the general scheme are discussed that differ in the type of amplitudes that are approximated perturbatively and which are treated to infinite order. The combined CC/PT methods to include ground state correlation are merged with equation-of-motion (EOM) and similarity transformed EOM methods to describe excitation spectra of the highly correlated s-tetrazine, MnO4- and Ni(CO)4 systems. It is shown that the computationally efficient CC/PT schemes can reproduce full CCSD results even if perturbation theory by itself is a very poor approximation, as is the case for many transition metal compounds. In a second test CC/PT is applied to determine ground state equilibrium molecular structures and harmonic vibrational frequencies for a set of small molecules. Using either variant of CC/PT, full CCSD geometries are easily recovered, while vibrational frequencies can be more sensitive to details of the approximation.

  11. Baryonic matter perturbations in decaying vacuum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Marttens, R.F. vom; Zimdahl, W.; Hipólito-Ricaldi, W.S. E-mail: wiliam.ricaldi@ufes.br

    2014-08-01

    We consider the perturbation dynamics for the cosmic baryon fluid and determine the corresponding power spectrum for a Λ(t)CDM model in which a cosmological term decays into dark matter linearly with the Hubble rate. The model is tested by a joint analysis of data from supernovae of type Ia (SNIa) (Constitution and Union 2.1), baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO), the position of the first peak of the anisotropy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and large-scale-structure (LSS) data (SDSS DR7). While the homogeneous and isotropic background dynamics is only marginally influenced by the baryons, there are modifications on the perturbative level if a separately conserved baryon fluid is included. Considering the present baryon fraction as a free parameter, we reproduce the observed abundance of the order of 5% independently of the dark-matter abundance which is of the order of 32% for this model. Generally, the concordance between background and perturbation dynamics is improved if baryons are explicitly taken into account.

  12. Multifrequency perturbations in matter-wave interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, A.; Rembold, A.; Schütz, G.; Stibor, A.

    2015-11-01

    High-contrast matter-wave interferometry is essential in various fundamental quantum mechanical experiments as well as for technical applications. Thereby, contrast and sensitivity are typically reduced by decoherence and dephasing effects. While decoherence accounts for a general loss of quantum information in a system due to entanglement with the environment, dephasing is due to collective time-dependent external phase shifts, which can be related to temperature drifts, mechanical vibrations, and electromagnetic oscillations. In contrast to decoherence, dephasing can, in principle, be reversed. Here, we demonstrate in experiment and theory a method for the analysis and reduction of the influence of dephasing noise and perturbations consisting of several external frequencies in an electron interferometer. This technique uses the high spatial and temporal resolution of a delay-line detector to reveal and remove dephasing perturbations by second-order correlation analysis. It allows matter-wave experiments under perturbing laboratory conditions and can be applied, in principle, to electron, atom, ion, neutron, and molecule interferometers.

  13. Fluvial response to environmental perturbations: a perspective from physical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savi, Sara; Tofelde, Stefanie; Wickert, Andrew; Schildgen, Taylor; Paola, Chris; Strecker, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    Fluvial terraces and alluvial fans that are perched above the modern base level testify to environmental conditions that were different from today. Sedimentological studies combined with chronological constraints can be used to reconstruct the evolution of these landforms in the context of past changes in regional to global forcing. Despite the improvements in the most commonly used dating techniques (e.g. cosmogenic nuclides, 14C, and OSL), field data from fluvial and alluvial archives often represent only a brief glimpse into the evolution of that particular landscape. As such, the challenge of interpreting landscape development and its relationship to external forcing in the remaining time gaps is often unclear. To gain more insight, we performed physical experiments to test how a fluvial system responds to changes in the boundary conditions. This approach allows us to continuously record the evolution of the fluvial system and to observe, step by step, the response of the fluvial system and the development of the landscape. Additionally, we can directly link the geomorphic modifications to a specific environmental perturbation. Starting with a simple model and a single channel, we changed the amount of discharge (Qw) and sediment supply (Qs) in the system. The most prominent response results from a sudden increase in water discharge. In general, changes in the Qs/Qw ratio control the fluvial morphology (particularly the height/width ratio), the channel's profile, the dynamics of the river, and its ability to modify the surrounding landscape. Responses get more complex with the introduction of a lateral tributary, which changes the dynamics of the main stem and creates feed-back mechanisms between the two systems. For example, a change in the main stem can influence the fluvial morphology and the steepness of the tributary (even with no perturbations in the tributary) and vice-versa, illustrating the potential for non-unique interpretations of fluvial landforms

  14. A Lattice Non-Perturbative Definition of an SO(10) Chiral Gauge Theory and Its Induced Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiao-Gang

    2013-11-01

    The standard model is a chiral gauge theory where the gauge fields couple to the right-hand and the left-hand fermions differently. The standard model is defined perturbatively and describes all elementary particles (except gravitons) very well. However, for a long time, we do not know if we can have a non-perturbative definition of the standard model as a Hamiltonian quantum mechanical theory. Here we propose a way to give a modified standard model (with 48 two-component Weyl fermions) a non-perturbative definition by embedding the modified standard model into an SO (10) chiral gauge theory. We show that the SO (10) chiral gauge theory can be put on a lattice (a 3D spatial lattice with a continuous time) if we allow fermions to interact. Such a non-perturbatively defined standard model is a Hamiltonian quantum theory with a finite-dimensional Hilbert space for a finite space volume. More generally, using the defining connection between gauge anomalies and the symmetry-protected topological orders, one can show that any truly anomaly-free chiral gauge theory can be non-perturbatively defined by putting it on a lattice in the same dimension.

  15. Quantum-to-classical transition for ekpyrotic perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battarra, Lorenzo; Lehners, Jean-Luc

    2014-03-01

    We examine the processes of quantum squeezing and decoherence of density perturbations produced during a slowly contracting ekpyrotic phase in which entropic perturbations are converted to curvature perturbations before the bounce to an expanding phase. During the generation phase, the entropic fluctuations evolve into a highly squeezed quantum state, analogous to the evolution of inflationary perturbations. Subsequently, during the conversion phase, quantum coherence is lost very efficiently due to the interactions of entropy and adiabatic modes. Moreover, while decoherence occurs, the adiabatic curvature perturbations inherit their semiclassicality from the entropic perturbations. Our results confirm that, just as for inflation, an ekpyrotic phase can generate nearly scale-invariant curvature perturbations which may be treated as a statistical ensemble of classical density perturbations, in agreement with observations of the cosmic background radiation.

  16. The collision singularity in a perturbed n-body problem.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sperling, H. J.

    1972-01-01

    Collision of all bodies in a perturbed n-body problem is analyzed by an extension of the author's results for a perturbed two-body problem (1969). A procedure is set forth to prove that the absolute value of energy in a perturbed n-body system remains bounded until the moment of collision. It is shown that the characteristics of motion in both perturbed problems are basically the same.

  17. CDM/baryon isocurvature perturbations in a sneutrino curvaton model

    SciTech Connect

    Harigaya, Keisuke; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Hayakawa, Taku; Yokoyama, Shuichiro E-mail: taku1215@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: shuichiro@rikkyo.ac.jp

    2014-10-01

    Matter isocurvature perturbations are strictly constrained from cosmic microwave background observations. We study a sneutrino curvaton model where both cold dark matter (CDM)/baryon isocurvature perturbations are generated. In our model, total matter isocurvature perturbations are reduced since the CDM/baryon isocurvature perturbations compensate for each other. We show that this model can not only avoid the stringent observational constraints but also suppress temperature anisotropies on large scales, which leads to improved agreement with observations.

  18. Nonlinear electromagnetic perturbations in a degenerate ultrarelativistic electron-positron plasma.

    PubMed

    El-Taibany, W F; Mamun, A A

    2012-02-01

    Nonlinear propagation of fast and slow magnetosonic perturbation modes in an ultrarelativistic, ultracold, degenerate (extremely dense) electron positron (EP) plasma (containing ultrarelativistic, ultracold, degenerate electron and positron fluids) has been investigated by the reductive perturbation method. The Alfvén wave velocity is modified due to the presence of the enthalpy correction in the fluid equations of motion. The degenerate EP plasma system (under consideration) supports the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) solitons, which are associated with either fast or slow magnetosonic perturbation modes. It is found that the ultrarelativistic model leads to compressive (rarefactive) electromagnetic solitons corresponding to the fast (slow) wave mode. There are certain critical angles, θ(c), at which no soliton solution is found corresponding to the fast wave mode. For the slow mode, the magnetic-field intensity affects both the soliton amplitude and width. It is also illustrated that the basic features of the electromagnetic solitary structures, which are found to exist in such a degenerate EP plasma, are significantly modified by the effects of enthalpy correction, electron and positron degeneracy, magnetic-field strength, and the relativistic effect. The applications of the results in a pair-plasma medium, which occurs in many astrophysical objects (e.g., pulsars, white dwarfs, and neutron stars) are briefly discussed. PMID:22463336

  19. Exact Controllability and Perturbation Analysis for Elastic Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Moreles, Miguel Angel

    2004-05-15

    The Rayleigh beam is a perturbation of the Bernoulli-Euler beam. We establish convergence of the solution of the Exact Controllability Problem for the Rayleigh beam to the corresponding solution of the Bernoulli-Euler beam. Convergence is related to a Singular Perturbation Problem. The main tool in solving this perturbation problem is a weak version of a lower bound for hyperbolic polynomials.

  20. Covariant Perturbation Expansion of Off-Diagonal Heat Kernel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Yu-Zi; Li, Wen-Du; Zhang, Ping; Dai, Wu-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Covariant perturbation expansion is an important method in quantum field theory. In this paper an expansion up to arbitrary order for off-diagonal heat kernels in flat space based on the covariant perturbation expansion is given. In literature, only diagonal heat kernels are calculated based on the covariant perturbation expansion.

  1. On spectral perturbation caused by bounded variation of potential

    SciTech Connect

    Ismagilov, R S

    2014-01-31

    The harmonic oscillator operator is perturbed by an arbitrary bounded continuous term. This results in the perturbation of the spectrum. The map sending the first of these perturbations into the second is examined. Its approximation by a linear map is studied. Bibliography: 2 titles.

  2. Perturbations of matter fields in the second-order gauge-invariant cosmological perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kouji

    2009-12-01

    To show that the general framework of the second-order gauge-invariant perturbation theory developed by K. Nakamura [Prog. Theor. Phys. 110, 723 (2003)PTPKAV0033-068X10.1143/PTP.110.723; Prog. Theor. Phys. 113, 481 (2005)PTPKAV0033-068X10.1143/PTP.113.481] is applicable to a wide class of cosmological situations, some formulas for the perturbations of the matter fields are summarized within the framework of the second-order gauge-invariant cosmological perturbation theory in a four-dimensional homogeneous isotropic universe, which is developed in Prog. Theor. Phys. 117, 17 (2007)PTPKAV0033-068X10.1143/PTP.117.17. We derive the formulas for the perturbations of the energy-momentum tensors and equations of motion for a perfect fluid, an imperfect fluid, and a single scalar field, and show that all equations are derived in terms of gauge-invariant variables without any gauge fixing. Through these formulas, we may say that the decomposition formulas for the perturbations of any tensor field into gauge-invariant and gauge-variant parts, which are proposed in the above papers, are universal.

  3. Application of functional analysis to perturbation theory of differential equations. [nonlinear perturbation of the harmonic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdan, V. M.; Bond, V. B.

    1980-01-01

    The deviation of the solution of the differential equation y' = f(t, y), y(O) = y sub O from the solution of the perturbed system z' = f(t, z) + g(t, z), z(O) = z sub O was investigated for the case where f and g are continuous functions on I x R sup n into R sup n, where I = (o, a) or I = (o, infinity). These functions are assumed to satisfy the Lipschitz condition in the variable z. The space Lip(I) of all such functions with suitable norms forms a Banach space. By introducing a suitable norm in the space of continuous functions C(I), introducing the problem can be reduced to an equivalent problem in terminology of operators in such spaces. A theorem on existence and uniqueness of the solution is presented by means of Banach space technique. Norm estimates on the rate of growth of such solutions are found. As a consequence, estimates of deviation of a solution due to perturbation are obtained. Continuity of the solution on the initial data and on the perturbation is established. A nonlinear perturbation of the harmonic oscillator is considered a perturbation of equations of the restricted three body problem linearized at libration point.

  4. Generating scale-invariant tensor perturbations in the non-inflationary universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingzhe

    2014-09-01

    It is believed that the recent detection of large tensor perturbations strongly favors the inflation scenario in the early universe. This common sense depends on the assumption that Einstein's general relativity is valid at the early universe. In this paper we show that nearly scale-invariant primordial tensor perturbations can be generated during a contracting phase before the radiation dominated epoch if the theory of gravity is modified by the scalar-tensor theory at that time. The scale-invariance protects the tensor perturbations from suppressing at large scales and they may have significant amplitudes to fit BICEP2's result. We construct a model to achieve this purpose and show that the universe can bounce to the hot big bang after long time contraction, and at almost the same time the theory of gravity approaches to general relativity through stabilizing the scalar field. Theoretically, such models are dual to inflation models if we change to the frame in which the theory of gravity is general relativity. Dual models are related by the conformal transformations. With this study we reinforce the point that only the conformal invariant quantities such as the scalar and tensor perturbations are physical. How did the background evolve before the radiation time depends on the frame and has no physical meaning. It is impossible to distinguish different pictures by later time cosmological probes.

  5. A non-perturbative approach to freezing of superfuid 4He in density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minoguchi, T.; Galli, De; Rossi, M.; Yoshimori, A.

    2012-12-01

    Freezing of various classical liquids is successfully described by density functional theory (DFT). On the other hand, so far no report has been published that DFT describes the freezing of superfuid 4He correctly. In fact, DFT gives too stable solid phase and the superfuid phase does not exist at finite positive pressures within a second order perturbation. In this paper we try a non-perturbative version of DFT, that is modified weighted density approximation (MWDA) to go beyond second order perturbation for the freezing of superfuid 4He. Via an exact zero temperature quantum Monte-Carlo (QMC) method we have computed the equation of state and the compressibility of superfuid 4He. By utilizing a recently introduced analytic continuation method (the GIFT method), we have obtained also density response functions at different densities from QMC imaginary time correlation functions. Contrary to second order perturbation, by employing these QMC data as DFT input we find a too stable superfuid phase, preventing freezing around the experimentally observed freezing pressure. We find the same pathological behavior by using another model energy functional of superfuid 4He (Orsay-Trento model). We conclude that the straightforward MWDA calculation gives such a poor result when liquid-gas transition is present.

  6. Investigation of the spatial structure and developmental dynamics of near-Earth plasma perturbations under the action of powerful HF radio waves

    SciTech Connect

    Belov, A. S.

    2015-10-15

    Results of numerical simulations of the near-Earth plasma perturbations induced by powerful HF radio waves from the SURA heating facility are presented. The simulations were performed using a modified version of the SAMI2 ionospheric model for the input parameters corresponding to the series of in-situ SURA–DEMETER experiments. The spatial structure and developmental dynamics of large-scale plasma temperature and density perturbations have been investigated. The characteristic formation and relaxation times of the induced large-scale plasma perturbations at the altitudes of the Earth’s outer ionosphere have been determined.

  7. Effect of Ambipolar Plasma Flow on the Penetration of Resonant Magnetic Perturbations in a Quasi-axisymmetric Stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    A. Reiman; M. Zarnstorff; D. Mikkelsen; L. Owen; H. Mynick; S. Hudson; D. Monticello

    2005-04-19

    A reference equilibrium for the U.S. National Compact Stellarator Experiment is predicted to be sufficiently close to quasi-symmetry to allow the plasma to flow in the toroidal direction with little viscous damping, yet to have sufficiently large deviations from quasi-symmetry that nonambipolarity significantly affects the physics of the shielding of resonant magnetic perturbations by plasma flow. The unperturbed velocity profile is modified by the presence of an ambipolar potential, which produces a broad velocity profile. In the presence of a resonant magnetic field perturbation, nonambipolar transport produces a radial current, and the resulting j x B force resists departures from the ambipolar velocity and enhances the shielding.

  8. Compensated isocurvature perturbations in the curvaton model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chen; Grin, Daniel; Hu, Wayne

    2015-09-01

    Primordial fluctuations in the relative number densities of particles, or isocurvature perturbations, are generally well constrained by cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. A less probed mode is the compensated isocurvature perturbation (CIP), a fluctuation in the relative number densities of cold dark matter and baryons. In the curvaton model, a subdominant field during inflation later sets the primordial curvature fluctuation ζ . In some curvaton-decay scenarios, the baryon and cold dark matter isocurvature fluctuations nearly cancel, leaving a large CIP correlated with ζ . This correlation can be used to probe these CIPs more sensitively than the uncorrelated CIPs considered in past work, essentially by measuring the squeezed bispectrum of the CMB for triangles whose shortest side is limited by the sound horizon. Here, the sensitivity of existing and future CMB experiments to correlated CIPs is assessed, with an eye towards testing specific curvaton-decay scenarios. The planned CMB Stage 4 experiment could detect the largest CIPs attainable in curvaton scenarios with more than 3 σ significance. The significance could improve if small-scale CMB polarization foregrounds can be effectively subtracted. As a result, future CMB observations could discriminate between some curvaton-decay scenarios in which baryon number and dark matter are produced during different epochs relative to curvaton decay. Independent of the specific motivation for the origin of a correlated CIP perturbation, cross-correlation of CIP reconstructions with the primary CMB can improve the signal-to-noise ratio of a CIP detection. For fully correlated CIPs the improvement is a factor of ˜2 - 3 .

  9. Exponentially modified QCD coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Cvetic, Gorazd; Valenzuela, Cristian

    2008-04-01

    We present a specific class of models for an infrared-finite analytic QCD coupling, such that at large spacelike energy scales the coupling differs from the perturbative one by less than any inverse power of the energy scale. This condition is motivated by the Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics operator product expansion philosophy. Allowed by the ambiguity in the analytization of the perturbative coupling, the proposed class of couplings has three parameters. In the intermediate energy region, the proposed coupling has low loop-level and renormalization scheme dependence. The present modification of perturbative QCD must be considered as a phenomenological attempt, with the aim of enlarging the applicability range of the theory of the strong interactions at low energies.

  10. Tests of Chiral perturbation theory with COMPASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Jan M.

    2014-06-01

    The COMPASS experiment at CERN accesses pion-photon reactions via the Primakoff effect., where high-energetic pions react with the quasi-real photon field surrounding the target nuclei. When a single real photon is produced, pion Compton scattering is accessed and from the measured cross-section shape, the pion polarisability is determined. The COMPASS measurement is in contradiction to the earlier dedicated measurements, and rather in agreement with the theoretical expectation from ChPT. In the same experimental data taking, reactions with neutral and charged pions in the final state are measured and analyzed in the context of chiral perturbation theory.

  11. Optimized Perturbation Theory:. Finite Temperature Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Marcus Benghi

    2001-09-01

    We review the optimized perturbation theory (or linear δ-expansion) illustrating with an application to the anharmonic oscillator. We then apply the method to multi-field O(N1) × O(N2) scalar theories at high temperatures to investigate the possibility of inverse symmetry breaking (or symmetry non restoration). Our results support inverse symmetry breaking and reveal the possibility of other high temperature symmetry breaking patterns for which the last term in the breaking sequence is O(N1 - 1) × O(N2 - 1).

  12. Exciton dynamics in perturbed vibronic molecular aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Brüning, C.; Wehner, J.; Hausner, J.; Wenzel, M.; Engel, V.

    2015-01-01

    A site specific perturbation of a photo-excited molecular aggregate can lead to a localization of excitonic energy. We investigate this localization dynamics for laser-prepared excited states. Changing the parameters of the electric field significantly influences the exciton localization which offers the possibility for a selective control of this process. This is demonstrated for aggregates possessing a single vibrational degree of freedom per monomer unit. It is shown that the effects identified for the molecular dimer can be generalized to larger aggregates with a high density of vibronic states. PMID:26798840

  13. Anisotropic perturbations due to dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battye, Richard A.; Moss, Adam

    2006-08-01

    A variety of observational tests seem to suggest that the Universe is anisotropic. This is incompatible with the standard dogma based on adiabatic, rotationally invariant perturbations. We point out that this is a consequence of the standard decomposition of the stress-energy tensor for the cosmological fluids, and that rotational invariance need not be assumed, if there is elastic rigidity in the dark energy. The dark energy required to achieve this might be provided by point symmetric domain wall network with P/ρ=-2/3, although the concept is more general. We illustrate this with reference to a model with cubic symmetry and discuss various aspects of the model.

  14. Light-Front Perturbation Without Spurious Singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przeszowski, Jerzy A.; Dzimida-Chmielewska, Elżbieta; Żochowski, Jan

    2016-07-01

    A new form of the light front Feynman propagators is proposed. It contains no energy denominators. Instead the dependence on the longitudinal subinterval x^2_L = 2 x+ x- is explicit and a new formalism for doing the perturbative calculations is invented. These novel propagators are implemented for the one-loop effective potential and various 1-loop 2-point functions for a massive scalar field. The consistency with results for the standard covariant Feynman diagrams is obtained and no spurious singularities are encountered at all. Some remarks on the calculations with fermion and gauge fields in QED and QCD are added.

  15. Cosmological explosions from cold dark matter perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    The cosmological-explosion model is examined for a universe dominated by cold dark matter in which explosion seeds are produced from the growth of initial density perturbations of a given form. Fragmentation of the exploding shells is dominated by the dark-matter potential wells rather than the self-gravity of the shells, and particular conditions are required for the explosions to bootstrap up to very large scales. The final distribution of dark matter is strongly correlated with the baryons on small scales, but uncorrelated on large scales.

  16. Light-Front Perturbation Without Spurious Singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przeszowski, Jerzy A.; Dzimida-Chmielewska, Elżbieta; Żochowski, Jan

    2016-03-01

    A new form of the light front Feynman propagators is proposed. It contains no energy denominators. Instead the dependence on the longitudinal subinterval x^2_L = 2 x+ x- is explicit and a new formalism for doing the perturbative calculations is invented. These novel propagators are implemented for the one-loop effective potential and various 1-loop 2-point functions for a massive scalar field. The consistency with results for the standard covariant Feynman diagrams is obtained and no spurious singularities are encountered at all. Some remarks on the calculations with fermion and gauge fields in QED and QCD are added.

  17. Amplification of curvature perturbations in cyclic cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jun; Liu Zhiguo; Piao Yunsong

    2010-12-15

    We analytically and numerically show that through the cycles with nonsingular bounce, the amplitude of curvature perturbation on a large scale will be amplified and the power spectrum will redden. In some sense, this amplification will eventually destroy the homogeneity of the background, which will lead to the ultimate end of cycles of the global universe. We argue that for the model with increasing cycles, it might be possible that a fissiparous multiverse will emerge after one or several cycles, in which the cycles will continue only at corresponding local regions.

  18. Gravitational perturbation and Kerr/CFT correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezelbash, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    We find the explicit form of two-point function for the conformal spin-2 energy momentum operators on the near horizon of a near extremal Kerr black hole by variation of a proper boundary action. In this regard, we consider an appropriate boundary action for the gravitational perturbation of the Kerr black hole. We show that the variation of the boundary action with respect to the boundary fields yields the two-point function for the energy momentum tensor of a conformal field theory. We find agreement between the two-point function and the correlators of the dual conformal field theory to the Kerr black hole.

  19. Exciton dynamics in perturbed vibronic molecular aggregates.

    PubMed

    Brüning, C; Wehner, J; Hausner, J; Wenzel, M; Engel, V

    2016-07-01

    A site specific perturbation of a photo-excited molecular aggregate can lead to a localization of excitonic energy. We investigate this localization dynamics for laser-prepared excited states. Changing the parameters of the electric field significantly influences the exciton localization which offers the possibility for a selective control of this process. This is demonstrated for aggregates possessing a single vibrational degree of freedom per monomer unit. It is shown that the effects identified for the molecular dimer can be generalized to larger aggregates with a high density of vibronic states. PMID:26798840

  20. Numerical simulation of small perturbation transonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seebass, A. R.; Yu, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a systematic study of small perturbation transonic flows are presented. Both the flow over thin airfoils and the flow over wedges were investigated. Various numerical schemes were employed in the study. The prime goal of the research was to determine the efficiency of various numerical procedures by accurately evaluating the wave drag, both by computing the pressure integral around the body and by integrating the momentum loss across the shock. Numerical errors involved in the computations that affect the accuracy of drag evaluations were analyzed. The factors that effect numerical stability and the rate of convergence of the iterative schemes were also systematically studied.

  1. Approximate conservation laws in perturbed integrable lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierzejewski, Marcin; Prosen, Tomaž; Prelovšek, Peter

    2015-11-01

    We develop a numerical algorithm for identifying approximately conserved quantities in models perturbed away from integrability. In the long-time regime, these quantities fully determine correlation functions of local observables. Applying the algorithm to the perturbed XXZ model, we find that the main effect of perturbation consists in expanding the support of conserved quantities. This expansion follows quadratic dependence on the strength of perturbation. The latter result, together with correlation functions of conserved quantities obtained from the memory function analysis, confirms the feasibility of the perturbation theory.

  2. Perturbative charged rotating 5D Einstein-Maxwell black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Lérida, Francisco

    2010-12-01

    We present perturbative charged rotating 5D Einstein-Maxwell black holes with spherical horizon topology. The electric charge Q is the perturbative parameter, the perturbations being performed up to 4th order. The expressions for the relevant physical properties of these black holes are given. The gyromagnetic ratio g, in particular, is explicitly shown to be non-constant in higher order, and thus to deviate from its lowest order value, g = 3. Comparison of the perturbative analytical solutions with their non-perturbative numerical counterparts shows remarkable agreement.

  3. On the generation of a non-gaussian curvature perturbation during preheating

    SciTech Connect

    Kohri, Kazunori; Lyth, David H.; Valenzuela-Toledo, Cesar A. E-mail: d.lyth@lancaster.ac.uk

    2010-02-01

    The perturbation of a light field might affect preheating and hence generate a contribution to the spectrum and non-gaussianity of the curvature perturbation ζ. The field might appear directly in the preheating model (curvaton-type preheating) or indirectly through its effect on a mass or coupling (modulated preheating). We give general expressions for ζ based on the δN formula, and apply them to the cases of quadratic and quartic chaotic inflation. For the quadratic case, curvaton-type preheating is ineffective in contributing to ζ, but modulated preheating can be effective. For quartic inflation, curvaton-type preheating may be effective but the usual δN formalism has to be modified. We see under what circumstances the recent numerical simulation of Bond et al. [0903.3407] may be enough to provide a rough estimate for this case.

  4. Analysis of a Leslie-Gower-type prey-predator model with periodic impulsive perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yiping; Liu, Zhijun; Haque, Mainul

    2009-08-01

    A modified Leslie-Gower-type prey-predator model with periodic impulsive perturbations is proposed and investigated. It is proved that there exists an asymptotically stable prey-free periodic solution when the impulsive period is less than some critical value. Otherwise, the above system can be permanent. And then the numerical simulations are carried out to study the effects of the impulsive varying parameters of the system. The results of simulations show that the model we consider, under the effects of impulsive perturbations for biologically feasible parametric values, has more complex dynamics including cycle, period adding, 3 T -period oscillation, chaos, period-doubling bifurcation, period-halving bifurcation, period windows, symmetry-breaking pitchfork bifurcation, and non-unique dynamics, meaning that several attractors coexist.

  5. An Experimental Device for Generating High Frequency Perturbations in Supersonic Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the analytical study of a device that has been proposed as a mechanism for generating gust-like perturbations in supersonic wind tunnels. The device is envisioned as a means to experimentally validate dynamic models and control systems designed for high-speed inlets. The proposed gust generator is composed of two flat trapezoidal plates that modify the properties of the flow ingested by the inlet. One plate may be oscillated to generate small perturbations in the flow. The other plate is held stationary to maintain a constant angle-of-attack. Using an idealized approach, design equations and performance maps for the new device were developed from the compressible flow relations. A two-dimensional CFD code was used to confirm the correctness of these results. The idealized approach was then used to design and evaluate a new gust generator for a 3.05-meter by 3.05-meter (10-foot by 10-foot) supersonic wind tunnel.

  6. Ideal plasma response to vacuum magnetic fields with resonant magnetic perturbations in non-axisymmetric tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kimin; Ahn, J-W; Scotti, F.; Park, J-K; Menard, J. E.

    2015-09-03

    Ideal plasma shielding and amplification of resonant magnetic perturbations in non-axisymmetric tokamak is presented by field line tracing simulation with full ideal plasma response, compared to measurements of divertor lobe structures. Magnetic field line tracing simulations in NSTX with toroidal non-axisymmetry indicate the ideal plasma response can significantly shield/amplify and phase shift the vacuum resonant magnetic perturbations. Ideal plasma shielding for n = 3 mode is found to prevent magnetic islands from opening as consistently shown in the field line connection length profile and magnetic footprints on the divertor target. It is also found that the ideal plasma shielding modifies the degree of stochasticity but does not change the overall helical lobe structures of the vacuum field for n = 3. Amplification of vacuum fields by the ideal plasma response is predicted for low toroidal mode n = 1, better reproducing measurements of strong striation of the field lines on the divertor plate in NSTX.

  7. Ideal plasma response to vacuum magnetic fields with resonant magnetic perturbations in non-axisymmetric tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kimin; Ahn, J. -W.; Scotti, F.; Park, J. -K.; Menard, J. E.

    2015-09-03

    Ideal plasma shielding and amplification of resonant magnetic perturbations in non-axisymmetric tokamak is presented by field line tracing simulation with full ideal plasma response, compared to measurements of divertor lobe structures. Magnetic field line tracing simulations in NSTX with toroidal non-axisymmetry indicate the ideal plasma response can significantly shield/amplify and phase shift the vacuum resonant magnetic perturbations. Ideal plasma shielding for n = 3 mode is found to prevent magnetic islands from opening as consistently shown in the field line connection length profile and magnetic footprints on the divertor target. It is also found that the ideal plasma shielding modifies the degree of stochasticity but does not change the overall helical lobe structures of the vacuum field for n = 3. Furthermore, amplification of vacuum fields by the ideal plasma response is predicted for low toroidal mode n = 1, better reproducing measurements of strong striation of the field lines on the divertor plate in NSTX.

  8. General Analysis of Type I Planetary Migration with Stochastic Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Fred C.; Bloch, Anthony M.

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents a generalized treatment of Type I planetary migration in the presence of stochastic perturbations. In many planet-forming disks, the Type I migration mechanism, driven by asymmetric torques, acts on a short timescale and compromises planet formation. If the disk also supports magnetohydrodynamics instabilities, however, the corresponding turbulent fluctuations produce additional stochastic torques that modify the steady inward migration scenario. This work studies the migration of planetary cores in the presence of stochastic fluctuations using complementary methods, including a Fokker-Planck approach and iterative maps. Stochastic torques have two main effects. (1) Through outward diffusion, a small fraction of the planetary cores can survive in the face of Type I inward migration. (2) For a given starting condition, the result of any particular realization of migration is uncertain, so that results must be described in terms of the distributions of outcomes. In addition to exploring different regimes of parameter space, this paper considers the effects of the outer disk boundary condition, varying initial conditions, and time dependence of the torque parameters. For disks with finite radii, the fraction of surviving planets decreases exponentially with time. We find the survival fractions and decay rates for a range of disk models, and find the expected distribution of locations for surviving planets. For expected disk properties, the survival fraction lies in the range 0.01 < pS < 0.1.

  9. GATO Code Modification to Compute Plasma Response to External Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, A. D.; Chu, M. S.; Ng, E.; Li, X. S.; James, A.

    2006-10-01

    It has become increasingly clear that the plasma response to an external nonaxiymmetric magnetic perturbation cannot be neglected in many situations of interest. This response can be described as a linear combination of the eigenmodes of the ideal MHD operator. The eigenmodes of the system can be obtained numerically with the GATO ideal MHD stability code, which has been modified for this purpose. A key requirement is the removal of inadmissible continuum modes. For Finite Hybrid Element codes such as GATO, a prerequisite for this is their numerical restabilization by addition of small numerical terms to δ,to cancel the analytic numerical destabilization. In addition, robustness of the code was improved and the solution method speeded up by use of the SuperLU package to facilitate calculation of the full set of eigenmodes in a reasonable time. To treat resonant plasma responses, the finite element basis has been extended to include eigenfunctions with finite jumps at rational surfaces. Some preliminary numerical results for DIII-D equilibria will be given.

  10. Perturbation Theory for Parent Hamiltonians of Matrix Product States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szehr, Oleg; Wolf, Michael M.

    2015-05-01

    This article investigates the stability of the ground state subspace of a canonical parent Hamiltonian of a Matrix product state against local perturbations. We prove that the spectral gap of such a Hamiltonian remains stable under weak local perturbations even in the thermodynamic limit, where the entire perturbation might not be bounded. Our discussion is based on preceding work by Yarotsky that develops a perturbation theory for relatively bounded quantum perturbations of classical Hamiltonians. We exploit a renormalization procedure, which on large scale transforms the parent Hamiltonian of a Matrix product state into a classical Hamiltonian plus some perturbation. We can thus extend Yarotsky's results to provide a perturbation theory for parent Hamiltonians of Matrix product states and recover some of the findings of the independent contributions (Cirac et al in Phys Rev B 8(11):115108, 2013) and (Michalakis and Pytel in Comm Math Phys 322(2):277-302, 2013).

  11. Molecular cluster perturbation theory. I. Formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrd, Jason N.; Jindal, Nakul; Molt, Robert W., Jr.; Bartlett, Rodney J.; Sanders, Beverly A.; Lotrich, Victor F.

    2015-11-01

    We present second-order molecular cluster perturbation theory (MCPT(2)), a linear scaling methodology to calculate arbitrarily large systems with explicit calculation of individual wave functions in a coupled-cluster framework. This new MCPT(2) framework uses coupled-cluster perturbation theory and an expansion in terms of molecular dimer interactions to obtain molecular wave functions that are infinite order in both the electronic fluctuation operator and all possible dimer (and products of dimers) interactions. The MCPT(2) framework has been implemented in the new SIA/Aces4 parallel architecture, making use of the advanced dynamic memory control and fine-grained parallelism to perform very large explicit molecular cluster calculations. To illustrate the power of this method, we have computed energy shifts, lattice site dipole moments, and harmonic vibrational frequencies via explicit calculation of the bulk system for the polar and non-polar polymorphs of solid hydrogen fluoride. The explicit lattice size (without using any periodic boundary conditions) was expanded up to 1000 HF molecules, with 32,000 basis functions and 10,000 electrons. Our obtained HF lattice site dipole moments and harmonic vibrational frequencies agree well with the existing literature.

  12. Aircraft Range Optimization Using Singular Perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oconnor, Joseph Taffe

    1973-01-01

    An approximate analytic solution is developed for the problem of maximizing the range of an aircraft for a fixed end state. The problem is formulated as a singular perturbation and solved by matched inner and outer asymptotic expansions and the minimum principle of Pontryagin. Cruise in the stratosphere, and on transition to and from cruise at constant Mach number are discussed. The state vector includes altitude, flight path angle, and mass. Specific fuel consumption becomes a linear function of power approximating that of the cruise values. Cruise represents the outer solution; altitude and flight path angle are constants, and only mass changes. Transitions between cruise and the specified initial and final conditions correspond to the inner solutions. The mass is constant and altitude and velocity vary. A solution is developed which is valid for cruise but which is not for the initial and final conditions. Transforming of the independent variable near the initial and final conditions result in solutions which are valid for the two inner solutions but not for cruise. The inner solutions can not be obtained without simplifying the state equations. The singular perturbation approach overcomes this difficulty. A quadratic approximation of the state equations is made. The resulting problem is solved analytically, and the two inner solutions are matched to the outer solution.

  13. Hormonal Perturbations in Occupationally Exposed Nickel Workers

    PubMed Central

    Beshir, Safia; Ibrahim, Khadiga Salah; Shaheen, Weam; Shahy, Eman M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nickel exposure is recognized as an endocrine disruptor because of its adverse effects on reproduction. AIM: This study was designed to investigate the possible testiculo-hormonal perturbations on workers occupationally exposed to nickel and to assess its effects on human male sexual function. METHODS: Cross-sectional comparative study, comprising 105 electroplating male non-smoker, non-alcoholic workers exposed to soluble nickel and 60 controls was done. Serum luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, testosterone levels and urinary nickel concentrations were determined for the studied groups. RESULTS: Serum luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, urinary nickel and the simultaneous incidence of more than one sexual disorder were significantly higher in the exposed workers compared to controls. The occurrence of various types of sexual disorders (decreased libido, impotence and premature ejaculation) in the exposed workers was 9.5, 5.1 and 4.4 folds respectively than the controls. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to nickel produces possible testiculo-hormonal perturbations in those exposed workers. PMID:27335607

  14. Perturbed cholesterol homeostasis in aging spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Gemma M; Dayas, Christopher V; Smith, Doug W

    2016-09-01

    The spinal cord is vital for the processing of sensorimotor information and for its propagation to and from both the brain and the periphery. Spinal cord function is affected by aging, however, the mechanisms involved are not well-understood. To characterize molecular mechanisms of spinal cord aging, microarray analyses of gene expression were performed on cervical spinal cords of aging rats. Of the metabolic and signaling pathways affected, cholesterol-associated pathways were the most comprehensively altered, including significant downregulation of cholesterol synthesis-related genes and upregulation of cholesterol transport and metabolism genes. Paradoxically, a significant increase in total cholesterol content was observed-likely associated with cholesterol ester accumulation. To investigate potential mechanisms for the perturbed cholesterol homeostasis, we quantified the expression of myelin and neuroinflammation-associated genes and proteins. Although there was minimal change in myelin-related expression, there was an increase in phagocytic microglial and astrogliosis markers, particularly in the white matter. Together, these results suggest that perturbed cholesterol homeostasis, possibly as a result of increased inflammatory activation in spinal cord white matter, may contribute to impaired spinal cord function with aging. PMID:27459933

  15. Articulatory and acoustic adaptation to palatal perturbation.

    PubMed

    Thibeault, Mélanie; Ménard, Lucie; Baum, Shari R; Richard, Gabrielle; McFarland, David H

    2011-04-01

    Previous work has established that speakers have difficulty making rapid compensatory adjustments in consonant production (especially in fricatives) for structural perturbations of the vocal tract induced by artificial palates with thicker-than-normal alveolar regions. The present study used electromagnetic articulography and simultaneous acoustic recordings to estimate tongue configurations during production of [s š t k] in the presence of a thin and a thick palate, before and after a practice period. Ten native speakers of English participated in the study. In keeping with previous acoustic studies, fricatives were more affected by the palate than were the stops. The thick palate lowered the center of gravity and the jaw was lower and the tongue moved further backwards and downwards. Center of gravity measures revealed complete adaptation after training, and with practice, subjects' decreased interlabial distance. The fact that adaptation effects were found for [k], which are produced with an articulatory gesture not directly impeded by the palatal perturbation, suggests a more global sensorimotor recalibration that extends beyond the specific articulatory target. PMID:21476667

  16. Quasi-periodic oscillations of perturbed tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Varadarajan; Manousakis, Antonios; Kluźniak, Włodzimierz

    2016-05-01

    We performed axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations of oscillating tori orbiting a non-rotating black hole. The tori in equilibrium were constructed with a constant distribution of angular momentum in a pseudo-Newtonian potential (Kluźniak-Lee). Motions of the torus were triggered by adding subsonic velocity fields: radial, vertical and diagonal to the tori in equilibrium. As the perturbed tori evolved in time, we measured L2 norm of density and obtained the power spectrum of L2 norm which manifested eigenfrequencies of tori modes. The most prominent modes of oscillation excited in the torus by a quasi-random perturbation are the breathing mode and the radial and vertical epicyclic modes. The radial and the plus modes, as well as the vertical and the breathing modes will have frequencies in an approximate 3:2 ratio if the torus is several Schwarzschild radii away from the innermost stable circular orbit. Results of our simulations may be of interest in the context of high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations observed in stellar-mass black hole binaries, as well as in supermassive black holes.

  17. BICEP2, the curvature perturbation and supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyth, David H.

    2014-11-01

    The tensor fraction r simeq 0.16 found by BICEP2 corresponds to a Hubble parameter H simeq 1.0 × 1014 GeV during inflation. This has two implications for the (single-field) slow-roll inflation hypothesis. First, the inflaton perturbation must account for much more than 10% of the curvature perturbation ζ, which barring fine-tuning means that it accounts for practically all of it. It follows that a curvaton-like mechanism for generating ζ requires an alternative to slow roll such as k-inflation. Second, accepting slow-roll inflation, the excursion of the inflaton field is at least of order Planck scale. As a result, the flatness of the inflaton presumably requires a shift symmetry. I point out that if such is the case, the resulting potential is likely to have at least approximately the quadratic form suggested in 1983 by Linde, which is known to be compatible with the observed r as well as the observed spectral index ns. The shift symmetry does not require supersymmetry. Also, the big H may rule out a GUT by restoring the symmetry and producing fatal cosmic strings. The absence of a GUT would correspond to the absence of superpartners for the Standard Model particles, which indeed have yet to be found at the LHC.

  18. Coupled oscillator model for nonlinear gravitational perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huan; Zhang, Fan; Green, Stephen R.; Lehner, Luis

    2015-04-01

    Motivated by the gravity-fluid correspondence, we introduce a new method for characterizing nonlinear gravitational interactions. Namely we map the nonlinear perturbative form of the Einstein equation to the equations of motion of a collection of nonlinearly coupled harmonic oscillators. These oscillators correspond to the quasinormal or normal modes of the background spacetime. We demonstrate the mechanics and the utility of this formalism within the context of perturbed asymptotically anti-de Sitter black brane spacetimes. We confirm in this case that the boundary fluid dynamics are equivalent to those of the hydrodynamic quasinormal modes of the bulk spacetime. We expect this formalism to remain valid in more general spacetimes, including those without a fluid dual. In other words, although born out of the gravity-fluid correspondence, the formalism is fully independent and it has a much wider range of applicability. In particular, as this formalism inspires an especially transparent physical intuition, we expect its introduction to simplify the often highly technical analytical exploration of nonlinear gravitational dynamics.

  19. Perturbative unitarity of Higgs derivative interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuta, Yohei; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro

    2013-05-01

    We study the perturbative unitarity bound given by dimension six derivative interactions consisting of Higgs doublets. These interactions emerge from kinetic terms of composite Higgs models or integrating out heavy particles that interact with Higgs doublets. They lead to new phenomena beyond the Standard Model. One of characteristic contributions from derivative interactions appear in vector boson scattering processes. Longitudinal modes of massive vector bosons can be regarded as Nambu Goldstone bosons eaten by each vector field. Since their effects become larger and larger as the collision energy of vector bosons increases, vector boson scattering processes become important in the high energy region around the TeV scale. On the other hand, in such a high energy region, we have to take into account the unitarity of amplitudes. We have obtained the unitarity condition in terms of the parameter included in the effective Lagrangian for one Higgs doublet models. Applying it to some models, we have found that contributions of derivative interactions are not so large enough to clearly discriminate them from the Standard Model ones. We also study the unitarity bound in two Higgs doublet models. Because they are too complex to obtain it in the general effective Lagrangian, we have calculated it in explicit models. These analyses tell that the perturbative unitarity bounds are highly model dependent.

  20. Perturbative Corrections for Staggered Fermion Bilinears

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Apoorva; Sharpe, Stephen

    1992-01-01

    We calculate the perturbative corrections to fermion bilinears that are used in numerical simulations when extracting weak matric elements using staggered fermions.This extends previous calculations of Golterman and Smit, and Daniel and Sheard.In particular, we calculate the corrections for non-local bilinears defined in Landau gauge with gauge links excluded.We do this for the simplest operators, i.e. those defined on a 2^4 hypercube, and for tree level improved operators which live on 4^4 hypercubes.We also consider gauge invariant operators in which the "tadpole" contributions are suppressed by projecting the sums of products of gauge links back in to the gauge group.In all cases, we find that the variation in the size of the perturbative corrections is smaller than those with the gauge invariant unimproved operators.This is most strikingly true for the smeared operators.We investigate the efficacy of the mean-field method of Lepage and Mackenzie at summing up tadpole

  1. Gradient expansion, curvature perturbations, and magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannini, Massimo; Rezaei, Zahra

    2011-04-15

    The properties of magnetized plasmas are always investigated under the hypothesis that the relativistic inhomogeneities stemming from the fluid sources and from the geometry itself are sufficiently small to allow for a perturbative description prior to photon decoupling. The latter assumption is hereby relaxed and predecoupling plasmas are described within a suitable expansion where the inhomogeneities are treated to a given order in the spatial gradients. It is argued that the (general relativistic) gradient expansion shares the same features of the drift approximation, customarily employed in the description of cold plasmas, so that the two schemes are physically complementary in the large-scale limit and for the low-frequency branch of the spectrum of plasma modes. The two-fluid description, as well as the magnetohydrodynamical reduction, is derived and studied in the presence of the spatial gradients of the geometry. Various solutions of the coupled system of evolution equations in the anti-Newtonian regime and in the quasi-isotropic approximation are presented. The relation of this analysis to the so-called separate universe paradigm is outlined. The evolution of the magnetized curvature perturbations in the nonlinear regime is addressed for the magnetized adiabatic mode in the plasma frame.

  2. Quantum cosmological perturbations of multiple fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Patrick; Pinto-Neto, N.; Vitenti, Sandro D. P.

    2016-01-01

    The formalism to treat quantization and evolution of cosmological perturbations of multiple fluids is described. We first construct the Lagrangian for both the gravitational and matter parts, providing the necessary relevant variables and momenta leading to the quadratic Hamiltonian describing linear perturbations. The final Hamiltonian is obtained without assuming any equations of motions for the background variables. This general formalism is applied to the special case of two fluids, having in mind the usual radiation and matter mix which made most of our current Universe history. Quantization is achieved using an adiabatic expansion of the basis functions. This allows for an unambiguous definition of a vacuum state up to the given adiabatic order. Using this basis, we show that particle creation is well defined for a suitable choice of vacuum and canonical variables, so that the time evolution of the corresponding quantum fields is unitary. This provides constraints for setting initial conditions for an arbitrary number of fluids and background time evolution. We also show that the common choice of variables for quantization can lead to an ill-defined vacuum definition. Our formalism is not restricted to the case where the coupling between fields is small, but is only required to vary adiabatically with respect to the ultraviolet modes, thus paving the way to consistent descriptions of general models not restricted to single-field (or fluid).

  3. Perturbative quantum gravity in double field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boels, Rutger H.; Horst, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    We study perturbative general relativity with a two-form and a dilaton using the double field theory formulation which features explicit index factorisation at the Lagrangian level. Explicit checks to known tree level results are performed. In a natural covariant gauge a ghost-like scalar which contributes even at tree level is shown to decouple consistently as required by perturbative unitarity. In addition, a lightcone gauge is explored which bypasses the problem altogether. Using this gauge to study BCFW on-shell recursion, we can show that most of the D-dimensional tree level S-matrix of the theory, including all pure graviton scattering amplitudes, is reproduced by the double field theory. More generally, we argue that the integrand may be reconstructed from its single cuts and provide limited evidence for off-shell cancellations in the Feynman graphs. As a straightforward application of the developed technology double field theory-like expressions for four field string corrections are derived.

  4. Parallel magnetic field perturbations in gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Joiner, N.; Hirose, A.; Dorland, W.

    2010-07-15

    At low beta it is common to neglect parallel magnetic field perturbations on the basis that they are of order beta{sup 2}. This is only true if effects of order beta are canceled by a term in the nablaB drift also of order beta[H. L. Berk and R. R. Dominguez, J. Plasma Phys. 18, 31 (1977)]. To our knowledge this has not been rigorously tested with modern gyrokinetic codes. In this work we use the gyrokinetic code GS2[Kotschenreuther et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 88, 128 (1995)] to investigate whether the compressional magnetic field perturbation B{sub ||} is required for accurate gyrokinetic simulations at low beta for microinstabilities commonly found in tokamaks. The kinetic ballooning mode (KBM) demonstrates the principle described by Berk and Dominguez strongly, as does the trapped electron mode, in a less dramatic way. The ion and electron temperature gradient (ETG) driven modes do not typically exhibit this behavior; the effects of B{sub ||} are found to depend on the pressure gradients. The terms which are seen to cancel at long wavelength in KBM calculations can be cumulative in the ion temperature gradient case and increase with eta{sub e}. The effect of B{sub ||} on the ETG instability is shown to depend on the normalized pressure gradient beta{sup '} at constant beta.

  5. Perturbation analysis for patch occupancy dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Julien; Nichols, James D.; McIntyre, Carol L.; Ferraz, Goncalo; Hines, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Perturbation analysis is a powerful tool to study population and community dynamics. This article describes expressions for sensitivity metrics reflecting changes in equilibrium occupancy resulting from small changes in the vital rates of patch occupancy dynamics (i.e., probabilities of local patch colonization and extinction). We illustrate our approach with a case study of occupancy dynamics of Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) nesting territories. Examination of the hypothesis of system equilibrium suggests that the system satisfies equilibrium conditions. Estimates of vital rates obtained using patch occupancy models are used to estimate equilibrium patch occupancy of eagles. We then compute estimates of sensitivity metrics and discuss their implications for eagle population ecology and management. Finally, we discuss the intuition underlying our sensitivity metrics and then provide examples of ecological questions that can be addressed using perturbation analyses. For instance, the sensitivity metrics lead to predictions about the relative importance of local colonization and local extinction probabilities in influencing equilibrium occupancy for rare and common species.

  6. BICEP2, the curvature perturbation and supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Lyth, David H.

    2014-11-01

    The tensor fraction r ≅ 0.16 found by BICEP2 corresponds to a Hubble parameter H ≅ 1.0 × 10{sup 14} GeV during inflation. This has two implications for the (single-field) slow-roll inflation hypothesis. First, the inflaton perturbation must account for much more than 10% of the curvature perturbation ζ, which barring fine-tuning means that it accounts for practically all of it. It follows that a curvaton-like mechanism for generating ζ requires an alternative to slow roll such as k-inflation. Second, accepting slow-roll inflation, the excursion of the inflaton field is at least of order Planck scale. As a result, the flatness of the inflaton presumably requires a shift symmetry. I point out that if such is the case, the resulting potential is likely to have at least approximately the quadratic form suggested in 1983 by Linde, which is known to be compatible with the observed r as well as the observed spectral index n{sub s}. The shift symmetry does not require supersymmetry. Also, the big H may rule out a GUT by restoring the symmetry and producing fatal cosmic strings. The absence of a GUT would correspond to the absence of superpartners for the Standard Model particles, which indeed have yet to be found at the LHC.

  7. Perturbation solutions of combustion instability problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Googerdy, A.; Peddieson, J., Jr.; Ventrice, M.

    1979-01-01

    A method involving approximate modal analysis using the Galerkin method followed by an approximate solution of the resulting modal-amplitude equations by the two-variable perturbation method (method of multiple scales) is applied to two problems of pressure-sensitive nonlinear combustion instability in liquid-fuel rocket motors. One problem exhibits self-coupled instability while the other exhibits mode-coupled instability. In both cases it is possible to carry out the entire linear stability analysis and significant portions of the nonlinear stability analysis in closed form. In the problem of self-coupled instability the nonlinear stability boundary and approximate forms of the limit-cycle amplitudes and growth and decay rates are determined in closed form while the exact limit-cycle amplitudes and growth and decay rates are found numerically. In the problem of mode-coupled instability the limit-cycle amplitudes are found in closed form while the growth and decay rates are found numerically. The behavior of the solutions found by the perturbation method are in agreement with solutions obtained using complex numerical methods.

  8. Harmonically Perturbed Gas-Solid Fluidized System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nix, S. T.; Muller, M. R.

    1996-11-01

    Experiments were performed on a harmonically perturbed gas-solid fluidized system, to determine the extent to which the total system behaved as a liquid in regards to the aspects of resonant frequency, wave shapes, and damping effects. The fluidized system consists of a cylindrical alumina oxide/air fluidized bed which is vertically perturbed in a symmetrical fashion by externally vibrating the entire vessel. The external vibrations were carried out over various flow rates, amplitudes, and frequencies. The results obtained could then be compared to the natural frequencies of water for the same governing parameters by analytical means. The effects of excitations on the formation of voidage disturbances or "gas bubbles" was also investigated. Data acquisition enabled the determination of both the amplitude and frequency of the waves generated in the bath. Results indicate that external vertical vibration caused the mean surface level of the bed to drop. This can be attributed to a closer packing of the particles along with a decrease in the number and size of gas bubbles in the bed.

  9. Cosmological perturbations in a mimetic matter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Jiro; Odintsov, Sergei D.; Sushkov, Sergey V.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the cosmological evolution of a mimetic matter model with arbitrary scalar potential. The cosmological reconstruction—which is the method for constructing a model for an arbitrary evolution of the scale factor—is explicitly performed for different choices of potential. The cases where the mimetic matter model shows the evolution as cold dark matter (CDM), the w CDM model, dark matter and dark energy with a dynamical O m (z ) [where O m (z )≡[(H (z )/H0)2-1 ]/[(1 +z )3-1 ] ], and phantom dark energy with a phantom-nonphantom crossing are presented in detail. The cosmological perturbations for such evolutions are studied in the mimetic matter model. For instance, the evolution behavior of the matter density contrast (which is different than the usual one, i.e., δ ¨+2 H δ ˙-κ2ρ δ /2 =0 ) is investigated. The possibility of a peculiar evolution of δ in the model under consideration is shown. Special attention is paid to the behavior of the matter density contrast near the future singularity, where the decay of perturbations may occur much earlier than the singularity.

  10. Dynamic Epistasis under Varying Environmental Perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Brandon; Xu, Lin; Gu, Zhenglong

    2015-01-01

    Epistasis describes the phenomenon that mutations at different loci do not have independent effects with regard to certain phenotypes. Understanding the global epistatic landscape is vital for many genetic and evolutionary theories. Current knowledge for epistatic dynamics under multiple conditions is limited by the technological difficulties in experimentally screening epistatic relations among genes. We explored this issue by applying flux balance analysis to simulate epistatic landscapes under various environmental perturbations. Specifically, we looked at gene-gene epistatic interactions, where the mutations were assumed to occur in different genes. We predicted that epistasis tends to become more positive from glucose-abundant to nutrient-limiting conditions, indicating that selection might be less effective in removing deleterious mutations in the latter. We also observed a stable core of epistatic interactions in all tested conditions, as well as many epistatic interactions unique to each condition. Interestingly, genes in the stable epistatic interaction network are directly linked to most other genes whereas genes with condition-specific epistasis form a scale-free network. Furthermore, genes with stable epistasis tend to have similar evolutionary rates, whereas this co-evolving relationship does not hold for genes with condition-specific epistasis. Our findings provide a novel genome-wide picture about epistatic dynamics under environmental perturbations. PMID:25625594

  11. Fast ion loss associated with perturbed field by resonant magnetic perturbation coils in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jun Young; Kim, Junghee; Rhee, Tongnyeol; Yoon, S. W.; Park, G. Y.; Jeon, Y. M.; Isobe, M.; Shimizu, A.; Ogawa, K.; Park, J.-K.; Garcia-Munoz, M.

    2013-10-01

    Resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) is the most promising strategies for ELM mitigation/suppression. However, it has been found through the modeling and the experiments that RMP for the ELM mitigation can enhance the toroidally localized fast ion loss. During KSTAR experimental campaigns in 2011 and 2012, sudden increase or decrease of the fast ion loss has been observed by the scintillator-based fast ion loss detector (FILD) when the RMP is applied. Three-dimensional perturbed magnetic field by RMP coil in vacuum is calculated by Biot-Savart's law embedded in the Lorentz orbit code (LORBIT). The LORBIT code which is based on gyro-orbit following motion has been used for the simulation of the three-dimensional fast ion trajectories in presence of non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbation. It seems the measured fast ion loss rate at the localized position depends on not only the RMP field configuration but also the plasma profile such as safety factor and so on, varying the ratio between radial drift and stochastization of the fat-ion orbits. The simulation results of fast ion orbit under magnetic perturbation w/ and w/o plasma responses will be presented and compared with KSTAR FILD measurement results in various cases.

  12. Wave propagation in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindroos, Jan Ø.; Llinares, Claudio; Mota, David F.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the propagation of scalar waves induced by matter sources in the context of scalar-tensor theories of gravity which include screening mechanisms for the scalar degree of freedom. The usual approach when studying these theories in the nonlinear regime of cosmological perturbations is based on the assumption that scalar waves travel at the speed of light. Within general relativity this approximation is valid and leads to no loss of accuracy in the estimation of observables. We find, however, that mass terms and nonlinearities in the equations of motion lead to propagation and dispersion velocities significantly different from the speed of light. As the group velocity is the one associated with the propagation of signals, a reduction of its value has direct impact on the behavior and dynamics of nonlinear structures within modified gravity theories with screening. For instance, the internal dynamics of galaxies and satellites submerged in large dark matter halos could be affected by the fact that the group velocity is smaller than the speed of light. It is therefore important, within such a framework, to take into account the fact that different parts of a galaxy will see changes in the environment at different times. A full nonstatic analysis may be necessary under those conditions.

  13. Dynamics of free surface perturbations along an annular viscous film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolka, Linda B.; North, Justin; Guerra, Bree K.

    2008-03-01

    It is known that the free surface of an axisymmetric viscous film flowing down the outside of a thin vertical fiber under the influence of gravity becomes unstable to interfacial perturbations. We present an experimental study using fluids with different densities, surface tensions, and viscosities to investigate the growth and dynamics of these interfacial perturbations and to test the assumptions made by previous authors. We find that the initial perturbation growth is exponential, followed by a slower phase as the amplitude and wavelength saturate in size. Measurements of the perturbation growth for experiments conducted at low and moderate Reynolds numbers are compared to theoretical predictions developed from linear stability theory. Excellent agreement is found between predictions from a long-wave Stokes flow model [Craster and Matar, J. Fluid Mech. 553, 85 (2006)] and data, while fair to excellent agreement (depending on fiber size) is found between predictions from a moderate-Reynolds-number model [Sisoev , Chem. Eng. Sci. 61, 7279 (2006)] and data. Furthermore, we find that a known transition in the longer-time perturbation dynamics from unsteady to steady behavior at a critical flow rate Qc is correlated with a transition in the rate at which perturbations naturally form along the fiber. For Qperturbation formation is constant. As a result, the position along the fiber where perturbations form is nearly fixed, and the spacing between consecutive perturbations remains constant as they travel 2 m down the fiber. For Q>Qc (unsteady case), the rate of perturbation formation is modulated. As a result, the position along the fiber where perturbations form oscillates irregularly, and the initial speed and spacing between perturbations varies, resulting in the coalescence of neighboring perturbations further down the fiber.

  14. Perturbative analysis of sheared flow Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a weakly relativistic magnetized electron fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Sundar, Sita; Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman

    2012-05-15

    In the interaction of intense lasers with matter/plasma, energetic electrons having relativistic energies get created. These energetic electrons can often have sheared flow profiles as they propagate through the plasma medium. In an earlier study [Phys. Plasmas 17, 022101 (2010)], it was shown that a relativistic sheared electron flow modifies the growth rate and threshold condition of the conventional Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. A perturbative analytic treatment for the case of weakly relativistic regime has been provided here. It provides good agreement with the numerical results obtained earlier.

  15. Study on perturbation schemes for achieving the real PMNS matrix from various symmetric textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Tang, Jian; Li, Xue-Qian

    2013-10-01

    The Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakawaga-Sakata matrix displays an obvious symmetry but not exact. There are several textures proposed in the literature which possess various symmetry patterns and seem to originate from different physics scenarios at high energy scales. To be consistent with the experimental measurement, however, the symmetry must be broken. Following the schemes given in the literature, we modify the matrices (ten in total) to gain the real Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakawaga-Sakata matrix by perturbative rotations. The results may be useful for future model builders.

  16. Perturbative approach to open circuit QED systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Andy C. Y.; Petruccione, Francesco; Koch, Jens

    2014-03-01

    Perturbation theory (PT) is a powerful and commonly used tool in the investigation of closed quantum systems. In the context of open quantum systems, PT based on the Markovian quantum master equation is much less developed. The investigation of open systems mostly relies on exact diagonalization of the Liouville superoperator or quantum trajectories. In this approach, the system size is rather limited by current computational capabilities. Analogous to closed-system PT, we develop a PT suitable for open quantum systems. The proposed method is useful in the analytical understanding of open systems as well as in the numerical calculation of system observables, which would otherwise be impractical. This enables us to investigate a variety of open circuit QED systems, including the open Jaynes-Cummings lattice model.

  17. Robustness of topological quantum codes: Ising perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarei, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-02-01

    We study the phase transition from two different topological phases to the ferromagnetic phase by focusing on points of the phase transition. To this end, we present a detailed mapping from such models to the Ising model in a transverse field. Such a mapping is derived by rewriting the initial Hamiltonian in a new basis so that the final model in such a basis has a well-known approximated phase transition point. Specifically, we consider the toric codes and the color codes on various lattices with Ising perturbation. Our results provide a useful table to compare the robustness of the topological codes and to explicitly show that the robustness of the topological codes depends on triangulation of their underlying lattices.

  18. The onion method for multiple perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, R. J.

    1988-04-01

    We develop a method of successive approximations for molecular scattering theory. This consists of a recipe for removing from the Schrödinger equation, one by one, the wave functions of a set of approximate solutions. The radial wave function is expressed as a linear combination of the well-behaved and singular solutions of the first approximation, and a set of coupled differential equations is obtained for the coefficients of the approximate solutions. A similar set of coefficients is obtained for the next approximation, and the exact coefficients are expressed in terms of the approximate coefficients to yield a set of second-level coefficients. The process can be continued like pealing off the layers of an onion. At each stage the coupled differential equations for the coefficients is equivalent to the Schrödinger equation. Finally, one can either ignore the remaining coefficients or approximate the coupled equations by a simple perturbation theory.

  19. Orbit Perturbations Due to Solar Radiation Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    This disturbing force will be important for satellites with a large area to mass ratio and also for those whose orbits are high enough that atmospheric drag is not the more dominate force. The procedure for the analysis is to represent the radiation force as the gradient of a scalar function to be compatible with existing procedures for studying perturbations due to earth's oblateness. From this analysis, solar radiation pressure appears not to be responsible for any secular or long-periodic variations in the semi-major axis of the orbit nor does it provide any secular changes in the eccentricity of the orbit or the angle of inclination of the osculating plane. Solar radiation pressure does produce secular effects in the other orbital elements, but these are in the opposite sense of secularities caused by the gravitational attraction of the sun and tend to reduce the total secularity.

  20. Applications of partially quenched chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Golterman, M.F.; Leung, K.C.

    1998-05-01

    Partially quenched theories are theories in which the valence- and sea-quark masses are different. In this paper we calculate the nonanalytic one-loop corrections of some physical quantities: the chiral condensate, weak decay constants, Goldstone boson masses, B{sub K}, and the K{sup +}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} decay amplitude, using partially quenched chiral perturbation theory. Our results for weak decay constants and masses agree with, and generalize, results of previous work by Sharpe. We compare B{sub K} and the K{sup +} decay amplitude with their real-world values in some examples. For the latter quantity, two other systematic effects that plague lattice computations, namely, finite-volume effects and unphysical values of the quark masses and pion external momenta, are also considered. We find that typical one-loop corrections can be substantial. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Systematic analysis of endocytosis by cellular perturbations.

    PubMed

    Kühling, Lena; Schelhaas, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Endocytosis is an essential process of eukaryotic cells that facilitates numerous cellular and organismal functions. The formation of vesicles from the plasma membrane serves the internalization of ligands and receptors and leads to their degradation or recycling. A number of distinct mechanisms have been described over the years, several of which are only partially characterized in terms of mechanism and function. These are often referred to as novel endocytic pathways. The pathways differ in their mode of uptake and in their intracellular destination. Here, an overview of the set of cellular proteins that facilitate the different pathways is provided. Further, the approaches to distinguish between the pathways by different modes of perturbation are critically discussed, emphasizing the use of genetic tools such as dominant negative mutant proteins. PMID:24947372

  2. Perturbative double field theory on general backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohm, Olaf; Marques, Diego

    2016-01-01

    We develop the perturbation theory of double field theory around arbitrary solutions of its field equations. The exact gauge transformations are written in a manifestly background covariant way and contain at most quadratic terms in the field fluctuations. We expand the generalized curvature scalar to cubic order in fluctuations and thereby determine the cubic action in a manifestly background covariant form. As a first application we specialize this theory to group manifold backgrounds, such as S U (2 )≃S3 with H -flux. In the full string theory this corresponds to a Wess-Zumino-Witten background CFT. Starting from closed string field theory, the cubic action around such backgrounds has been computed before by Blumenhagen, Hassler, and Lüst. We establish precise agreement with the cubic action derived from double field theory. This result confirms that double field theory is applicable to arbitrary curved background solutions, disproving assertions in the literature to the contrary.

  3. New Representations of the Perturbative S Matrix.

    PubMed

    Baadsgaard, Christian; Bjerrum-Bohr, N E J; Bourjaily, Jacob L; Caron-Huot, Simon; Damgaard, Poul H; Feng, Bo

    2016-02-12

    We propose a new framework to represent the perturbative S matrix which is well defined for all quantum field theories of massless particles, constructed from tree-level amplitudes and integrable term by term. This representation is derived from the Feynman expansion through a series of partial fraction identities, discarding terms that vanish upon integration. Loop integrands are expressed in terms of "Q-cuts" that involve both off-shell and on-shell loop momenta, defined with a precise contour prescription that can be evaluated by ordinary methods. This framework implies recent results found in the scattering equation formalism at one loop, and it has a natural extension to all orders--even nonplanar theories without well-defined forward limits or good ultraviolet behavior. PMID:26918978

  4. Planck constraints on neutrino isocurvature density perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Valentino, Eleonora; Melchiorri, Alessandro

    2014-10-01

    The recent cosmic microwave background data from the Planck satellite experiment, when combined with Hubble Space Telescope determinations of the Hubble constant, are compatible with a larger, nonstandard number of relativistic degrees of freedom at recombination, parametrized by the neutrino effective number Neff . In the curvaton scenario, a larger value for Neff could arise from a nonzero neutrino chemical potential connected to residual neutrino isocurvature density (NID) perturbations after the decay of the curvaton field, the component of which is parametrized by the amplitude αNID . Here we present new constraints on Neff and αNID from an analysis of recent cosmological data. We find that the Planck+WMAP polarization data set does not show any indication of a NID component (severely constraining its amplitude), and that current indications for a nonstandard Neff are further relaxed.

  5. Perturbation approach applied to modal diffraction methods.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Joerg; Hehl, Karl

    2011-05-01

    Eigenvalue computation is an important part of many modal diffraction methods, including the rigorous coupled wave approach (RCWA) and the Chandezon method. This procedure is known to be computationally intensive, accounting for a large proportion of the overall run time. However, in many cases, eigenvalue information is already available from previous calculations. Some of the examples include adjacent slices in the RCWA, spectral- or angle-resolved scans in optical scatterometry and parameter derivatives in optimization. In this paper, we present a new technique that provides accurate and highly reliable solutions with significant improvements in computational time. The proposed method takes advantage of known eigensolution information and is based on perturbation method. PMID:21532698

  6. Eigenvector dynamics under perturbation of modular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Somwrita; Chawla, Sanjay; Robinson, P. A.; Fortunato, Santo

    2016-06-01

    Rotation dynamics of eigenvectors of modular network adjacency matrices under random perturbations are presented. In the presence of q communities, the number of eigenvectors corresponding to the q largest eigenvalues form a "community" eigenspace and rotate together, but separately from that of the "bulk" eigenspace spanned by all the other eigenvectors. Using this property, the number of modules or clusters in a network can be estimated in an algorithm-independent way. A general argument and derivation for the theoretical detectability limit for sparse modular networks with q communities is presented, beyond which modularity persists in the system but cannot be detected. It is shown that for detecting the clusters or modules using the adjacency matrix, there is a "band" in which it is hard to detect the clusters even before the theoretical detectability limit is reached, and for which the theoretically predicted detectability limit forms the sufficient upper bound. Analytic estimations of these bounds are presented and empirically demonstrated.

  7. Degenerate R-S perturbation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschfelder, J. O.; Certain, P. R.

    1973-01-01

    A concise, systematic procedure is given for determining the Rayleigh-Schrodinger energies and wave functions of degenerate states to arbitrarily high orders even when the degeneracies of the various states are resolved in arbitrary orders. The procedure is expressed in terms of an iterative cycle in which the energy through the (2n+1)st order is expressed in terms of the partially determined wave function through the n-th order. Both a direct and an operator derivation are given. The two approaches are equivalent and can be transcribed into each other. The direct approach deals with the wave functions (without the use of formal operators) and has the advantage that it resembles the usual treatment of nondegenerate perturbations and maintains close contact with the basic physics. In the operator approach, the wave functions are expressed in terms of infinite order operators which are determined by the successive resolution of the space of the zeroth order functions.

  8. NEXCADE: perturbation analysis for complex networks.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Gitanjali; Babu, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in network theory have led to considerable progress in our understanding of complex real world systems and their behavior in response to external threats or fluctuations. Much of this research has been invigorated by demonstration of the 'robust, yet fragile' nature of cellular and large-scale systems transcending biology, sociology, and ecology, through application of the network theory to diverse interactions observed in nature such as plant-pollinator, seed-dispersal agent and host-parasite relationships. In this work, we report the development of NEXCADE, an automated and interactive program for inducing disturbances into complex systems defined by networks, focusing on the changes in global network topology and connectivity as a function of the perturbation. NEXCADE uses a graph theoretical approach to simulate perturbations in a user-defined manner, singly, in clusters, or sequentially. To demonstrate the promise it holds for broader adoption by the research community, we provide pre-simulated examples from diverse real-world networks including eukaryotic protein-protein interaction networks, fungal biochemical networks, a variety of ecological food webs in nature as well as social networks. NEXCADE not only enables network visualization at every step of the targeted attacks, but also allows risk assessment, i.e. identification of nodes critical for the robustness of the system of interest, in order to devise and implement context-based strategies for restructuring a network, or to achieve resilience against link or node failures. Source code and license for the software, designed to work on a Linux-based operating system (OS) can be downloaded at http://www.nipgr.res.in/nexcade_download.html. In addition, we have developed NEXCADE as an OS-independent online web server freely available to the scientific community without any login requirement at http://www.nipgr.res.in/nexcade.html. PMID:22870252

  9. Relativistic Lagrangian displacement field and tensor perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampf, Cornelius; Wiegand, Alexander

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the purely spatial Lagrangian coordinate transformation from the Lagrangian to the basic Eulerian frame. We demonstrate three techniques for extracting the relativistic displacement field from a given solution in the Lagrangian frame. These techniques are (a) from defining a local set of Eulerian coordinates embedded into the Lagrangian frame; (b) from performing a specific gauge transformation; and (c) from a fully nonperturbative approach based on the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) split. The latter approach shows that this decomposition is not tied to a specific perturbative formulation for the solution of the Einstein equations. Rather, it can be defined at the level of the nonperturbative coordinate change from the Lagrangian to the Eulerian description. Studying such different techniques is useful because it allows us to compare and develop further the various approximation techniques available in the Lagrangian formulation. We find that one has to solve the gravitational wave equation in the relativistic analysis, otherwise the corresponding Newtonian limit will necessarily contain spurious nonpropagating tensor artifacts at second order in the Eulerian frame. We also derive the magnetic part of the Weyl tensor in the Lagrangian frame, and find that it is not only excited by gravitational waves but also by tensor perturbations which are induced through the nonlinear frame dragging. We apply our findings to calculate for the first time the relativistic displacement field, up to second order, for a Λ CDM Universe in the presence of a local primordial non-Gaussian component. Finally, we also comment on recent claims about whether mass conservation in the Lagrangian frame is violated.

  10. NEXCADE: Perturbation Analysis for Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Gitanjali; Babu, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in network theory have led to considerable progress in our understanding of complex real world systems and their behavior in response to external threats or fluctuations. Much of this research has been invigorated by demonstration of the ‘robust, yet fragile’ nature of cellular and large-scale systems transcending biology, sociology, and ecology, through application of the network theory to diverse interactions observed in nature such as plant-pollinator, seed-dispersal agent and host-parasite relationships. In this work, we report the development of NEXCADE, an automated and interactive program for inducing disturbances into complex systems defined by networks, focusing on the changes in global network topology and connectivity as a function of the perturbation. NEXCADE uses a graph theoretical approach to simulate perturbations in a user-defined manner, singly, in clusters, or sequentially. To demonstrate the promise it holds for broader adoption by the research community, we provide pre-simulated examples from diverse real-world networks including eukaryotic protein-protein interaction networks, fungal biochemical networks, a variety of ecological food webs in nature as well as social networks. NEXCADE not only enables network visualization at every step of the targeted attacks, but also allows risk assessment, i.e. identification of nodes critical for the robustness of the system of interest, in order to devise and implement context-based strategies for restructuring a network, or to achieve resilience against link or node failures. Source code and license for the software, designed to work on a Linux-based operating system (OS) can be downloaded at http://www.nipgr.res.in/nexcade_download.html. In addition, we have developed NEXCADE as an OS-independent online web server freely available to the scientific community without any login requirement at http://www.nipgr.res.in/nexcade.html. PMID:22870252

  11. Multiloop calculations in perturbative quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokland, Ian Richard

    This thesis deals with high-precision calculations in perturbative quantum field theory. In conjunction with detailed experimental measurements, perturbative quantum field theory provides the quantitative framework with which much of modern particle physics is understood. The results of three new theoretical calculations are presented. The first is a definitive resolution of a recent controversy involving the interaction of a muon with a magnetic field. Specifically, the light-by-light scattering contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon is shown to be of positive sign, thereby decreasing the discrepancy between theory and experiment. Despite this adjustment to the theoretical prediction, the remaining discrepancy might be a subtle signature of new kinds of particles. The second calculation involves the energy levels of a bound state formed from two charged particles of arbitrary masses. By employing recently developed mass expansion techniques, new classes of solutions are obtained for problems in a field of particle physics with a very rich history. The third calculation provides an improved prediction for the decay of a top quark. In order to obtain this result, a large class of multiloop integrals has been solved for the first time. Top quark decay is just one member of a family of interesting physical processes to which these new results apply. Since specialized calculational techniques are essential ingredients in all three calculations, they are motivated and explained carefully in this thesis. These techniques, once automated with symbolic computational software, have recently opened avenues of solution to a wide variety of important problems in particle physics.

  12. Adiabatic and isocurvature perturbation projections in multi-field inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Chris; Saffin, Paul M.

    2013-08-01

    Current data are in good agreement with the predictions of single field inflation. However, the hemispherical asymmetry, seen in the cosmic microwave background data, may hint at a potential problem. Generalizing to multi-field models may provide one possible explanation. A useful way of modeling perturbations in multi-field inflation is to investigate the projection of the perturbation along and perpendicular to the background fields' trajectory. These correspond to the adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations. However, it is important to note that in general there are no corresponding adiabatic and isocurvature fields. The purpose of this article is to highlight the distinction between a field redefinition and a perturbation projection. We provide a detailed derivation of the evolution of the isocurvature perturbation to show that no assumption of an adiabatic or isocurvature field is needed. We also show how this evolution equation is consistent with the field covariant evolution equations for the adiabatic perturbation in the flat field space limit.

  13. Non-perturbative String Theory from Water Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, Ramakrishnan; Johnson, Clifford V.; Pennington, Jeffrey S.; /SLAC

    2012-06-14

    We use a combination of a 't Hooft limit and numerical methods to find non-perturbative solutions of exactly solvable string theories, showing that perturbative solutions in different asymptotic regimes are connected by smooth interpolating functions. Our earlier perturbative work showed that a large class of minimal string theories arise as special limits of a Painleve IV hierarchy of string equations that can be derived by a similarity reduction of the dispersive water wave hierarchy of differential equations. The hierarchy of string equations contains new perturbative solutions, some of which were conjectured to be the type IIA and IIB string theories coupled to (4, 4k ? 2) superconformal minimal models of type (A, D). Our present paper shows that these new theories have smooth non-perturbative extensions. We also find evidence for putative new string theories that were not apparent in the perturbative analysis.

  14. Perturbative Expansion of τ Hadronic Spectral Function Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boito, Diogo

    2014-12-01

    In the extraction of αs from hadronic τ decay data several moments of the spectral functions have been employed. Furthermore, different renormalization group improvement (RGI) frameworks have been advocated, leading to conflicting values of αs. Recently, we performed a systematic study of the perturbative behavior of these moments in the context of the two main-stream RGI frameworks: Fixed Order Perturbation Theory (FOPT) and Contour Improved Perturbation Theory (CIPT). The yet unknown higher order coefficients of the perturbative series were modelled using the available knowledge of the renormalon singularities of the QCD Adler function. We were able to show that within these RGI frameworks some of the commonly employed moments should be avoided due to their poor perturbative behavior. Furthermore, under reasonable assumptions about the higher order behavior of the perturbative series FOPT provides the preferred RGI framework.

  15. Non-Gaussian isocurvature perturbations in dark radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakami, Etsuko; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Koichi; Nakayama, Kazunori; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu E-mail: kawasaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: kazunori@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2012-07-01

    We study non-Gaussian properties of the isocurvature perturbations in the dark radiation, which consists of the active neutrinos and extra light species, if exist. We first derive expressions for the bispectra of primordial perturbations which are mixtures of curvature and dark radiation isocurvature perturbations. We also discuss CMB bispectra produced in our model and forecast CMB constraints on the non-linearity parameters based on the Fisher matrix analysis. Some concrete particle physics motivated models are presented in which large isocurvature perturbations in extra light species and/or the neutrino density isocurvature perturbations as well as their non-Gaussianities may be generated. Thus detections of non-Gaussianity in the dark radiation isocurvature perturbation will give us an opportunity to identify the origin of extra light species and lepton asymmetry.

  16. Wild worm embryogenesis harbors ubiquitous polygenic modifier variation

    PubMed Central

    Paaby, Annalise B; White, Amelia G; Riccardi, David D; Gunsalus, Kristin C; Piano, Fabio; Rockman, Matthew V

    2015-01-01

    Embryogenesis is an essential and stereotypic process that nevertheless evolves among species. Its essentiality may favor the accumulation of cryptic genetic variation (CGV) that has no effect in the wild-type but that enhances or suppresses the effects of rare disruptions to gene function. Here, we adapted a classical modifier screen to interrogate the alleles segregating in natural populations of Caenorhabditis elegans: we induced gene knockdowns and used quantitative genetic methodology to examine how segregating variants modify the penetrance of embryonic lethality. Each perturbation revealed CGV, indicating that wild-type genomes harbor myriad genetic modifiers that may have little effect individually but which in aggregate can dramatically influence penetrance. Phenotypes were mediated by many modifiers, indicating high polygenicity, but the alleles tend to act very specifically, indicating low pleiotropy. Our findings demonstrate the extent of conditional functionality in complex trait architecture. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09178.001 PMID:26297805

  17. Investigations of Probe Induced Perturbations in a Hall Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    D. Staack; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2002-08-12

    An electrostatic probe used to measure spatial plasma parameters in a Hall thruster generates perturbations of the plasma. These perturbations are examined by varying the probe material, penetration distance, residence time, and the nominal thruster conditions. The study leads us to recommendations for probe design and thruster operating conditions to reduce discharge perturbations, including metal shielding of the probe insulator and operation of the thruster at lower densities.

  18. Constraints on primordial density perturbations from induced gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Assadullahi, Hooshyar; Wands, David

    2010-01-15

    We consider the stochastic background of gravitational waves produced during the radiation-dominated hot big bang as a constraint on the primordial density perturbation on comoving length scales much smaller than those directly probed by the cosmic microwave background or large-scale structure. We place weak upper bounds on the primordial density perturbation from current data. Future detectors such as BBO and DECIGO will place much stronger constraints on the primordial density perturbation on small scales.

  19. Equation-of-motion coupled cluster perturbation theory revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksen, Janus J. Jørgensen, Poul; Olsen, Jeppe; Gauss, Jürgen

    2014-05-07

    The equation-of-motion coupled cluster (EOM-CC) framework has been used for deriving a novel series of perturbative corrections to the coupled cluster singles and doubles energy that formally converges towards the full configuration interaction energy limit. The series is based on a Møller-Plesset partitioning of the Hamiltonian and thus size extensive at any order in the perturbation, thereby remedying the major deficiency inherent to previous perturbation series based on the EOM-CC ansatz.

  20. Multifield cosmological perturbations at third order and the ekpyrotic trispectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Lehners, Jean-Luc; Renaux-Petel, Sebastien

    2009-09-15

    Using the covariant formalism, we derive the equations of motion for adiabatic and entropy perturbations at third order in perturbation theory for cosmological models involving two scalar fields. We use these equations to calculate the trispectrum of ekpyrotic and cyclic models in which the density perturbations are generated via the entropic mechanism. In these models, the conversion of entropy into curvature perturbations occurs just before the big bang, either during the ekpyrotic phase or during the subsequent kinetic energy dominated phase. In both cases, we find that the nonlinearity parameters f{sub NL} and g{sub NL} combine to leave a very distinct observational imprint.

  1. Resonant magnetic perturbations and edge ergodization on the COMPASS tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Cahyna, P.; Fuchs, V.; Krlin, L.

    2008-09-15

    Results of calculations of resonant magnetic perturbation spectra on the COMPASS tokamak are presented. Spectra of the perturbations are calculated from the vacuum field of the perturbation coils. Ergodization is then estimated by applying the criterion of overlap of the resulting islands and verified by field line tracing. Results show that for the chosen configuration of perturbation coils an ergodic layer appears in the pedestal region. The ability to form an ergodic layer is similar to the theoretical results for the ELM suppression experiment at DIII-D; thus, a comparable effect on ELMs can be expected.

  2. Perturbations of generic Kasner spacetimes and their stability

    SciTech Connect

    Kofman, Lev; Uzan, Jean-Philippe; Pitrou, Cyril E-mail: cyril.pitrou@port.ac.uk

    2011-05-01

    This article investigates the stability of a generic Kasner spacetime to linear perturbations, both at late and early times. It demonstrates that the perturbation of the Weyl tensor diverges at late time in all cases but in the particular one in which the Kasner spacetime is the product of a two-dimensional Milne spacetime and a two-dimensional Euclidean space. At early times, the perturbation of the Weyl tensor also diverges unless one imposes a condition on the perturbations so as to avoid the most divergent modes to be excited.

  3. Non-linear isocurvature perturbations and non-Gaussianities

    SciTech Connect

    Langlois, David; Vernizzi, Filippo; Wands, David E-mail: filippo.vernizzi@cea.fr

    2008-12-15

    We study non-linear primordial adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations and their non-Gaussianity. After giving a general formulation in the context of an extended {delta}N formalism, we analyse in detail two illustrative examples. The first is a mixed curvaton-inflaton scenario in which fluctuations of both the inflaton and a curvaton (a light isocurvature field during inflation) contribute to the primordial density perturbation. The second example is that of double inflation involving two decoupled massive scalar fields during inflation. In the mixed curvaton-inflaton scenario we find that the bispectrum of primordial isocurvature perturbations may be large and comparable to the bispectrum of adiabatic curvature perturbations.

  4. A new method to compute lunisolar perturbations in satellite motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozai, Y.

    1973-01-01

    A new method to compute lunisolar perturbations in satellite motion is proposed. The disturbing function is expressed by the orbital elements of the satellite and the geocentric polar coordinates of the moon and the sun. The secular and long periodic perturbations are derived by numerical integrations, and the short periodic perturbations are derived analytically. The perturbations due to the tides can be included in the same way. In the Appendix, the motion of the orbital plane for a synchronous satellite is discussed; it is concluded that the inclination cannot stay below 7 deg.

  5. Bursting process of large- and small-scale structures in turbulent boundary layer perturbed by a cylinder roughness element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhanqi; Jiang, Nan; Zheng, Xiaobo; Wu, Yanhua

    2016-05-01

    Hot-wire measurements on a turbulent boundary layer flow perturbed by a wall-mounted cylinder roughness element (CRE) are carried out in this study. The cylindrical element protrudes into the logarithmic layer, which is similar to those employed in turbulent boundary layers by Ryan et al. (AIAA J 49:2210-2220, 2011. doi: 10.2514/1.j051012) and Zheng and Longmire (J Fluid Mech 748:368-398, 2014. doi: 10.1017/jfm.2014.185) and in turbulent channel flow by Pathikonda and Christensen (AIAA J 53:1-10, 2014. doi: 10.2514/1.j053407). The similar effects on both the mean velocity and Reynolds stress are observed downstream of the CRE perturbation. The series of hot-wire data are decomposed into large- and small-scale fluctuations, and the characteristics of large- and small-scale bursting process are observed, by comparing the bursting duration, period and frequency between CRE-perturbed case and unperturbed case. It is indicated that the CRE perturbation performs the significant impact on the large- and small-scale structures, but within the different impact scenario. Moreover, the large-scale bursting process imposes a modulation on the bursting events of small-scale fluctuations and the overall trend of modulation is not essentially sensitive to the present CRE perturbation, even the modulation extent is modified. The conditionally averaging fluctuations are also plotted, which further confirms the robustness of the bursting modulation in the present experiments.

  6. Invariant exchange perturbation theory for multicenter systems: Time-dependent perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Orlenko, E. V. Evstafev, A. V.; Orlenko, F. E.

    2015-02-15

    A formalism of exchange perturbation theory (EPT) is developed for the case of interactions that explicitly depend on time. Corrections to the wave function obtained in any order of perturbation theory and represented in an invariant form include exchange contributions due to intercenter electron permutations in complex multicenter systems. For collisions of atomic systems with an arbitrary type of interaction, general expressions are obtained for the transfer (T) and scattering (S) matrices in which intercenter electron permutations between overlapping nonorthogonal states belonging to different centers (atoms) are consistently taken into account. The problem of collision of alpha particles with lithium atoms accompanied by the redistribution of electrons between centers is considered. The differential and total charge-exchange cross sections of lithium are calculated.

  7. A perturbative approach to the redshift space power spectrum: beyond the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Benjamin; Koyama, Kazuya

    2016-08-01

    We develop a code to produce the power spectrum in redshift space based on standard perturbation theory (SPT) at 1-loop order. The code can be applied to a wide range of modified gravity and dark energy models using a recently proposed numerical method by A.Taruya to find the SPT kernels. This includes Horndeski's theory with a general potential, which accommodates both chameleon and Vainshtein screening mechanisms and provides a non-linear extension of the effective theory of dark energy up to the third order. Focus is on a recent non-linear model of the redshift space power spectrum which has been shown to model the anisotropy very well at relevant scales for the SPT framework, as well as capturing relevant non-linear effects typical of modified gravity theories. We provide consistency checks of the code against established results and elucidate its application within the light of upcoming high precision RSD data.

  8. Imposing Neumann boundary condition on cosmological perturbation equations and trajectories of particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenavar, Hossein

    2016-03-01

    We impose Neumann boundary condition to solve cosmological perturbation equations and we derive a modified Friedmann equation and a new lensing equation. To check the new lensing equation and the value of Neumann constant, a sample that contains ten strong lensing systems is surveyed. Except for one lens, masses of the other lenses are found to be within the constrains of the observational data. Furthermore, we argue that by using the concept of geometrodynamic clocks it is possible to modify the equation of motion of massive particles too. Also, a sample that includes 101 HSB and LSB galaxies is used to re-estimate the value of the Neumann constant and we found that this value is consistent with the prior evaluation from Friedmann and lensing equations. Finally, the growth of structure is studied by a Newtonian approach which resulted in a more rapid rate of the structure formation in matter dominated era.

  9. Perturbative and non-perturbative aspects of the two-dimensional string/Yang-Mills correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelli, Simone; Maggiore, Michele; Rissone, Anna

    2003-04-01

    It is known that YM 2 with gauge group SU( N) is equivalent to a string theory with coupling gs=1/ N, order by order in the 1/ N expansion. We show how this result can be obtained from the bosonization of the fermionic formulation of YM 2, improving on results in the literature, and we examine a number of non-perturbative aspects of this string/YM correspondence. We find contributions to the YM 2 partition function of order exp{- kA/( πα' gs)} with k an integer and A the area of the target space, which would correspond, in the string interpretation, to D1-branes. Effects which could be interpreted as D0-branes are instead strictly absent, suggesting a non-perturbative structure typical of type 0B string theories. We discuss effects from the YM side that are interpreted in terms of the stringy exclusion principle of Maldacena and Strominger. We also find numerically an interesting phase structure, with a region where YM 2 is described by a perturbative string theory separated from a region where it is described by a topological string theory.

  10. Enhanced diamagnetic perturbations and electric currents observed downstream of the high power helicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberson, B. Race; Winglee, Robert; Prager, James

    2011-05-01

    The high power helicon (HPH) is capable of producing a high density plasma (1017-1018 m-3) and directed ion energies greater than 20 eV that continue to increase tens of centimeters downstream of the thruster. In order to understand the coupling mechanism between the helicon antenna and the plasma outside the immediate source region, measurements were made in the plasma plume downstream from the thruster of the propagating wave magnetic field and the perturbation of the axial bulk field using a type `R' helicon antenna. This magnetic field perturbation (ΔB) peaks at more than 15 G in strength downstream of the plasma source, and is 3-5 times larger than those previously reported from HPH. Taking the curl of this measured magnetic perturbation and assuming azimuthal symmetry suggests that this magnetic field is generated by a (predominantly) azimuthal current ring with a current density on the order of tens of kA m-2. At this current density the diamagnetic field is intense enough to cancel out the B0 axial magnetic field near the source region. The presence of the diamagnetic current is important as it demonstrates modification of the vacuum fields well beyond the source region and signifies the presence of a high density, collimated plasma stream. This diamagnetic current also modifies the propagation of the helicon wave, which facilitates a better understanding of coupling between the helicon wave and the resultant plasma acceleration.

  11. Evidence of Dayside Asymmetries in High-Latitude Magnetic Perturbations Measured By ST5 and DMSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knipp, D. J.; Kilcommons, L. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Le, G.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Redmon, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetometer data from the three-spacecraft Space Technology 5 (ST5) mission and from two Defense Meteorological Spacecraft Program (DMSP) spacecraft are available during the 90-day ST5 mission (late March - late June, 2006). The ST5 spacecraft were in a 300 km x 4500 km orbit while the DMSP spacecraft were in near circular orbit at ~ 850 km. We removed gain jumps from the ST5 data and improved a high-latitude background removal method for DMSP. All data were processed through the Modified Apex Coordinate transformation and mapped to 110 km. Agreement between different spacecraft observations was verified by computing magnetic conjunctions and extracting data from a small region around each ST5-DMSP conjunction. We found excellent agreement between the magnetic perturbations at 277 conjunctions between DMSP and ST5. With these data we show: 1) a global view of storm-time field aligned current (FAC) perturbations; 2) a global view of calm-before-the-storm FAC events; and 3) clear evidence of hemispheric asymmetries in cusp region magnetic perturbation strength during the equinox season. Our methods provide a 'path forward' in terms of comparing on-orbit electric and magnetic field data from multiple spacecraft.

  12. Engineering of perturbation effects in onion-like heteronanocrystal quantum dot-quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SalmanOgli, A.; Rostami, R.

    2013-10-01

    In this article, the perturbation influences on optical characterization of quantum dot and quantum dot-quantum well (modified quantum dot) heteronanocrystal is investigated. The original aim of this article is to investigate the quantum dot-quantum well heteronanocrystal advantages and disadvantages, when used as a functionalized particle in biomedical applications. Therefore, all of the critical features of quantum dots are fundamentally studied and their influences on optical properties are simulated. For the first time, the perturbation effects on optical characteristics are observed in the quantum dot-quantum well heteronanocrystals by 8-band K.P theory. The impact of perturbation on optical features such as photoluminescence and shifting of wavelength is studied. The photoluminescence and operation wavelength of quantum dots play a vital role in biomedical applications, where their absorption and emission in biological assays are altered by shifting of wavelength. Furthermore, in biomedical applications, by tuning the emission wavelengths of the quantum dot into far-red and near-infrared ranges, non-invasive in-vivo imaging techniques have been easily developed. In this wavelength window, tissue absorption, scattering and auto-fluorescence intensities have minimum quantities; thus fixing or minimizing of wavelength shifting can be regarded as an important goal which is investigated in this work.

  13. Enhanced diamagnetic perturbations and electric currents observed downstream of the high power helicon

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, B. Race; Winglee, Robert; Prager, James

    2011-05-15

    The high power helicon (HPH) is capable of producing a high density plasma (10{sup 17}-10{sup 18} m{sup -3}) and directed ion energies greater than 20 eV that continue to increase tens of centimeters downstream of the thruster. In order to understand the coupling mechanism between the helicon antenna and the plasma outside the immediate source region, measurements were made in the plasma plume downstream from the thruster of the propagating wave magnetic field and the perturbation of the axial bulk field using a type 'R' helicon antenna. This magnetic field perturbation ({Delta}B) peaks at more than 15 G in strength downstream of the plasma source, and is 3-5 times larger than those previously reported from HPH. Taking the curl of this measured magnetic perturbation and assuming azimuthal symmetry suggests that this magnetic field is generated by a (predominantly) azimuthal current ring with a current density on the order of tens of kA m{sup -2}. At this current density the diamagnetic field is intense enough to cancel out the B{sub 0} axial magnetic field near the source region. The presence of the diamagnetic current is important as it demonstrates modification of the vacuum fields well beyond the source region and signifies the presence of a high density, collimated plasma stream. This diamagnetic current also modifies the propagation of the helicon wave, which facilitates a better understanding of coupling between the helicon wave and the resultant plasma acceleration.

  14. Applications of the Kustaanheimo-Stieffel transformation of the perturbed two-body problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, V. R.

    1973-01-01

    The Newtonian differential equations of motion for the two-body problem can be transformed into four linear harmonic-oscillator equations by simultaneously applying the regularization step dt/ds = r and the Kustaanheimo-Stieffel (KS) transformation. The regularization step changes the independent variable from time to a new variable s, and the KS transformation transforms the position and velocity vectors from Cartesian space into a four-dimensional space. A derivation of a uniform, regular solution for the perturbed two-body problem in the four-dimensional space is presented. The variation-of-parameters technique is used to develop expressions for the derivatives of ten elements (which are constants in the unperturbed motion) for the general case that includes both perturbations which can arise from a potential and perturbations which cannot be derived from a potential. This ten-element solution has mixed secular terms that degrade the long-term accuracy during numerical integration. Therefore, to eliminate these terms, the solution is modified by introducing two additional elements.

  15. Field-Aligned and Ionospheric Current Contributions to Ground Magnetic Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, M. G.; McPherron, R. L.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Russell, C. T.; Chu, X.

    2014-12-01

    AMPERE data provides global space-derived radial electric currents on temporal and spatial scales suited to studying magnetic fields at ULF frequencies. It responds little to ionspheric currents, which dominate ground-based measurements, so that AMPERE and ground datasets complement each other to give a comprehensive view of near-Earth electric currents. Connors et al. (GRL, 2014) found that a three-dimensional current system slightly modified from the original substorm current wedge (SCW) concept of McPherron et al. (JGR, 1973) represented substorm midnight sector perturbations well both in the auroral and subauroral regions, if a current equivalent to that found by integrating AMPERE downward current was used, located where clear SCW signatures were indicated by AMPERE, and featuring an ionospheric electrojet. The AMPERE upward current was found to exceed that in the SCW, at least in part since the evening sector electrojet fed into it. We extend these results with a more detailed accounting of field-aligned and ionospheric currents throughout the active period (including growth phase). Ionospheric currents for the study are obtained from ground perturbations through optimization of a simple forward model over regions or on a meridian chain. We also investigate the degree to which subauroral perturbations may be directly calculated from AMPERE results. We further find that auroral zone currents may be very localized, to the extent that the entire SCW ionospheric current flows in a very restricted latitudinal range near onset, possibly corresponding to a single auroral arc.

  16. Dose perturbation due to the polysulfone cap surrounding a Fletcher-Williamson colpostat.

    PubMed

    Price, Michael J; Kry, Stephen F; Eifel, Patricia J; Salehpour, Mohammad; Mourtada, Firas

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a metrological evaluation of the dosimetric impact due to the polysulfone cap used with the Fletcher-Williamson (FW) colpostat for 192Ir high-dose rate and pulsed-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy using Monte Carlo simulations. Polysulfone caps with diameter of 30 mm, 25 mm, 20 mm, and 16 mm (mini-ovoid) were simulated and the absorbed dose rate in the surrounding water was calculated and compared to the dose rate for a bare 192Ir source in water. The dose perturbation depended on the cap diameter, distance away from the cap surface, and angular position around the cap. The largest dose rate reductions were found to be in the direction of the tumor bed where the cap is thickest. The range of perturbation over all depths and cap diameters was +2.8% (dose enhancement) to -6.8% (dose reduction). The FW colpostat cap's material composition should be modified to reduce this dosimetric effect or brachytherapy treatment planning dose algorithms should be improved to account for this perturbation. PMID:20160700

  17. Stabilization of perturbed Boolean network attractors through compensatory interactions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding and ameliorating the effects of network damage are of significant interest, due in part to the variety of applications in which network damage is relevant. For example, the effects of genetic mutations can cascade through within-cell signaling and regulatory networks and alter the behavior of cells, possibly leading to a wide variety of diseases. The typical approach to mitigating network perturbations is to consider the compensatory activation or deactivation of system components. Here, we propose a complementary approach wherein interactions are instead modified to alter key regulatory functions and prevent the network damage from triggering a deregulatory cascade. Results We implement this approach in a Boolean dynamic framework, which has been shown to effectively model the behavior of biological regulatory and signaling networks. We show that the method can stabilize any single state (e.g., fixed point attractors or time-averaged representations of multi-state attractors) to be an attractor of the repaired network. We show that the approach is minimalistic in that few modifications are required to provide stability to a chosen attractor and specific in that interventions do not have undesired effects on the attractor. We apply the approach to random Boolean networks, and further show that the method can in some cases successfully repair synchronous limit cycles. We also apply the methodology to case studies from drought-induced signaling in plants and T-LGL leukemia and find that it is successful in both stabilizing desired behavior and in eliminating undesired outcomes. Code is made freely available through the software package BooleanNet. Conclusions The methodology introduced in this report offers a complementary way to manipulating node expression levels. A comprehensive approach to evaluating network manipulation should take an "all of the above" perspective; we anticipate that theoretical studies of interaction modification

  18. Carbon content on perturbed wetlands of Yucatan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales Ojeda, S. M.; Orellana, R.; Herrera Silveira, J.

    2013-05-01

    The north coast of Yucatan Peninsula is a karstic scenario where the water flows mainly underground through the so called "cenotes"-ring system ("sink holes") toward the coast. This underground water system enhances the connection between watershed condition and coastal ecosystem health. Inland activities such as livestock, agriculture and urban development produce changes in the landscape, hydrological connectivity and in the water quality that can decrease wetland coverage specially mangroves and seagrasses. We conducted studies on the description of structure, biomass and carbon content of the soil, above and below ground of four different types of wetland in a perturbed region. The wetland ecological types were freshwater (Typha domingensis), dwarf mangroves (Avicenia germinans), grassland (Cyperacea) and Seagrasses. Due to the area is mainly covered by mangroves, they represent the most important carbon storage nevertheless the condition of the structure determine the carbon content in soil. Through GIS tools we explore the relationships between land use and costal condition in order to determine priority areas for conservation within the watershed that could be efficient to preserve the carbon storage of this area.

  19. Waterhole: An auroral-ionosphere perturbation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalen, B. A.; Yau, A. W.; Creutzberg, F.; Pongratz, M. B.

    A sounding rocket carrying 100 kg of high explosives and plasma diagnostic instrumentation was launched from Churchill Research Range on 6 April 1980 over a premidnight auroral arc. The object of the experiment was to produce an ionospheric hole or plasma density depletion at about 300 km altitude on field lines connected to an auroral arc. The plasma depletion is produced when the explosive by-products (mostly water) charge-exchange with the ambient O+ ions and then rapidly recombine. It was speculated that the presence of the "hole" would interfere with the field-aligned current systems associated with the arc and would in turn perturb the auroral source mechanism. The release occurred about 10 km poleward of the auroral arc fieldlines. As expected, a large ionospheric hole was detected by rocket-borne plasma sensors. Within a few seconds following the release (a) the energetic electron precipitation observed in the hole dropped to background levels, (b) the luminosity of the auroral arc observed by a ground-based auroral scanning photometer decreased by a factor of two, and (c) the ionospheric E region density below the hole decayed at a rate consistent with a sudden reduction in particle precipitation. The simultaneous onset of these gross changes in electron precipitation coincident with the release strongly suggests a cause and effect relationship. In particular, these results suggest that the ionospheric plasma and the field-aligned current systems play a crucial role in the auroral acceleration process.

  20. Cerebral perturbations during exercise in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Verges, Samuel; Rupp, Thomas; Jubeau, Marc; Wuyam, Bernard; Esteve, François; Levy, Patrick; Perrey, Stéphane; Millet, Guillaume Y

    2012-04-15

    Reduction of aerobic exercise performance observed under hypoxic conditions is mainly attributed to altered muscle metabolism due to impaired O(2) delivery. It has been recently proposed that hypoxia-induced cerebral perturbations may also contribute to exercise performance limitation. A significant reduction in cerebral oxygenation during whole body exercise has been reported in hypoxia compared with normoxia, while changes in cerebral perfusion may depend on the brain region, the level of arterial oxygenation and hyperventilation induced alterations in arterial CO(2). With the use of transcranial magnetic stimulation, inconsistent changes in cortical excitability have been reported in hypoxia, whereas a greater impairment in maximal voluntary activation following a fatiguing exercise has been suggested when arterial O(2) content is reduced. Electromyographic recordings during exercise showed an accelerated rise in central motor drive in hypoxia, probably to compensate for greater muscle contractile fatigue. This accelerated development of muscle fatigue in moderate hypoxia may be responsible for increased inhibitory afferent signals to the central nervous system leading to impaired central drive. In severe hypoxia (arterial O(2) saturation <70-75%), cerebral hypoxia per se may become an important contributor to impaired performance and reduced motor drive during prolonged exercise. This review examines the effects of acute and chronic reduction in arterial O(2) (and CO(2)) on cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygenation, neuronal function, and central drive to the muscles. Direct and indirect influences of arterial deoxygenation on central command are separated. Methodological concerns as well as future research avenues are also considered. PMID:22319046

  1. Thermospheric density perturbations in response to substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, L. B. N.; Milan, S. E.; Grocott, A.

    2014-06-01

    We use 5 years (2001-2005) of CHAMP (Challenging Minisatellite Payload) satellite data to study average spatial and temporal mass density perturbations caused by magnetospheric substorms in the thermosphere. Using statistics from 2306 substorms to construct superposed epoch time series, we find that the largest average increase in mass density of about 6% occurs about 90 min after substorm expansion phase onset about 3 h of magnetic local time east of the onset region. Averaged over the entire polar auroral region, a mass density increase of about 4% is observed. Using a simple model to estimate the mass density increase at the satellite altitude, we find that an energy deposition rate of 30 GW applied for half an hour predominantly at an altitude of 110 km is able to produce mass density enhancements of the same magnitude. When taking into account previous work that has shown that 80% of the total energy input is due to Joule heating, i.e., enhanced electric fields, whereas 20% is due to precipitation of mainly electrons, our results suggest that the average substorm deposits about 6 GW in the polar thermosphere through particle precipitation. Our result is in good agreement with simultaneous measurements of the NOAA Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) Hemispheric Power Index; however, it is about 1 order of magnitude less than reported previously.

  2. Neutron star solutions in perturbative quadratic gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Deliduman, Cemsinan; Ekşi, K.Y.; Keleş, Vildan E-mail: eksi@itu.edu.tr

    2012-05-01

    We study the structure of neutron stars in R+βR{sup μν}R{sub μν} gravity model with perturbative method. We obtain mass-radius relations for six representative equations of state (EoSs). We find that, for |β| ∼ 10{sup 11} cm{sup 2}, the results differ substantially from the results of general relativity. Some of the soft EoSs that are excluded within the framework of general relativity can be reconciled for certain values of β of this order with the 2 solar mass neutron star recently observed. For values of β greater than a few 10{sup 11} cm{sup 2} we find a new solution branch allowing highly massive neutron stars. By referring some recent observational constraints on the mass–radius relation we try to constrain the value of β for each EoS. The associated length scale (β){sup 1/2} ∼ 10{sup 6} cm is of the order of the the typical radius of neutron stars, the probe used in this test. This implies that the true value of β is most likely much smaller than 10{sup 11} cm{sup 2}.

  3. Previrialization: Perturbative and N-Body Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokas, E. L.; Juszkiewicz, R.; Bouchet, F. R.; Hivon, E.

    1996-08-01

    We present a series of N-body experiments which confirm the reality of the previrialization effect. We use also a weakly nonlinear perturbative approach to study the phenomenon. These two approaches agree when the rms density contrast, σ, is small; more surprisingly, they remain in agreement when σ ~ 1. When the slope of the initial power spectrum is n > -1, nonlinear tidal interactions slow down the growth of density fluctuations, and the magnitude of the suppression increases when n (i.e., the relative amount of small-scale power) is increased. For n < -1, we see an opposite effect: the fluctuations grow more rapidly than in linear theory. The transition occurs at n = -1 when the weakly nonlinear correction to σ is close to zero and the growth rate is close to linear. Our results resolve recent controversy between two N- body studies of previrialization. Peebles assumed n = 0 and found strong evidence in support of previrialization, while Evrard & Crone, who assumed n = -1, reached opposite conclusions. As we show here, the initial conditions with n = -1 are rather special because the nonlinear effects nearly cancel out for that particular spectrum. In addition to our calculations for scale-free initial spectra, we show results for a more realistic spectrum of Peacock & Dodds. Its slope near the scale usually adopted for normalization is close to -1, so σ is close to linear. Our results retroactively justify linear normalization at 8 h^-1^ Mpc while also demonstrating the danger and limitations of this practice.

  4. Cosmological perturbations across an S-brane

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, Robert H.; Kounnas, Costas; Partouche, Hervé; Patil, Subodh P.; Toumbas, Nicolaos E-mail: kounnas@lpt.ens.fr E-mail: subodh.patil@cern.ch

    2014-03-01

    Space-filling S-branes can mediate a transition between a contracting and an expanding universe in the Einstein frame. Following up on previous work that uncovered such bouncing solutions in the context of weakly coupled thermal configurations of a certain class of type II superstrings, we set up here the formalism in which we can study the evolution of metric fluctuations across such an S-brane. Our work shows that the specific nature of the S-brane, which is sourced by non-trivial massless thermal string states and appears when the universe reaches a maximal critical temperature, allows for a scale invariant spectrum of curvature fluctuations to manifest at late times via a stringy realization of the matter bounce scenario. The finite energy density at the transition from contraction to expansion provides calculational control over the propagation of the curvature perturbations through the bounce, furnishing a working proof of concept that such a stringy universe can result in viable late time cosmology.

  5. Red density perturbations and inflationary gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Pagano, Luca; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Cooray, Asantha; Kamionkowski, Marc E-mail: acooray@uci.edu E-mail: kamion@tapir.caltech.edu

    2008-04-15

    We study the implications of recent indications from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and other cosmological data for a red spectrum of primordial density perturbations for the detection of inflationary gravitational waves (IGWs) with forthcoming cosmic microwave background experiments. We consider a variety of single-field power-law, chaotic, spontaneous symmetry-breaking and Coleman-Weinberg inflationary potentials which are expected to provide a sizable tensor component and quantify the expected tensor-to-scalar ratio given existing constraints from WMAP on the tensor-to-scalar ratio and the power spectrum tilt. We discuss the ability of the near-future Planck satellite to detect the IGW background in the framework of those models. We find that the proposed satellite missions of the Cosmic Vision and Inflation Probe programs will be able to detect IGWs from all the models we have surveyed at better than 5{sigma} confidence level. We also provide an example of what is required if the IGW background is to remain undetected even by these latter experiments.

  6. Relativistically Covariant Many-Body Perturbation Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgren, Ingvar; Salomonson, Sten; Hedendahl, Daniel

    A covariant evolution operator (CEO) can be constructed, representing the time evolution of the relativistic wave unction or state vector. Like the nonrelativistic version, it contains (quasi-)singularities. The regular part is referred to as the Green’s operator (GO), which is the operator analogue of the Green’s function (GF). This operator, which is a field-theoretical concept, is closely related to the many-body wave operator and effective Hamiltonian, and it is the basic tool for our unified theory. The GO leads, when the perturbation is carried to all orders, to the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) in the equal-time or effective-potential approximation. When relaxing the equal-time restriction, the procedure is fully compatible with the exact BSE. The calculations are performed in the photonic Fock space, where the number of photons is no longer constant. The procedure has been applied to helium-like ions, and the results agree well with S-matrix results in cases when comparison can be performed. In addition, evaluation of higher-order quantum-electrodynamical (QED) correlational effects has been performed, and the effects are found to be quite significant for light and medium-heavy ions.

  7. Coupled Oscillator Model for Nonlinear Gravitational Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huan; Zhang, Fan; Green, Stephen; Lehner, Luis

    2015-04-01

    Motivated by the fluid/gravity correspondence, we introduce a new method for characterizing nonlinear gravitational interactions. Namely we map the nonlinear perturbative form of the Einstein's equation to the equations of motion of a series of nonlinearly-coupled harmonic oscillators. These oscillators correspond to the quasinormal modes of the background spacetime. We demonstrate the mechanics and the utility of this formalism with an asymptotically AdS black-brane spacetime, where the equations of motion for the oscillators are shown to be equivalent to the Navier-Stokes equation for the boundary fluid in the mode-expansion picture. We thereby expand on the explicit correspondence connecting the fluid and gravity sides for this particular physical set-up. Perhaps more importantly, we expect this formalism to remain valid in more general spacetimes, including those without a fluid/gravity correspondence. In other words, although born out of the correspondence, the formalism survives independently of it and has a much wider range of applicability.

  8. Parallelization of a multiconfigurational perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Vancoillie, Steven; Delcey, Mickaël G; Lindh, Roland; Vysotskiy, Victor; Malmqvist, Per-Åke; Veryazov, Valera

    2013-08-15

    In this work, we present a parallel approach to complete and restricted active space second-order perturbation theory, (CASPT2/RASPT2). We also make an assessment of the performance characteristics of its particular implementation in the Molcas quantum chemistry programming package. Parallel scaling is limited by memory and I/O bandwidth instead of available cores. Significant time savings for calculations on large and complex systems can be achieved by increasing the number of processes on a single machine, as long as memory bandwidth allows, or by using multiple nodes with a fast, low-latency interconnect. We found that parallel efficiency drops below 50% when using 8-16 cores on the shared-memory architecture, or 16-32 nodes on the distributed-memory architecture, depending on the calculation. This limits the scalability of the implementation to a moderate amount of processes. Nonetheless, calculations that took more than 3 days on a serial machine could be performed in less than 5 h on an InfiniBand cluster, where the individual nodes were not even capable of running the calculation because of memory and I/O requirements. This ensures the continuing study of larger molecular systems by means of CASPT2/RASPT2 through the use of the aggregated computational resources offered by distributed computing systems. PMID:23749386

  9. Perturbative string thermodynamics near black hole horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Thomas G.; Verschelde, Henri; Zakharov, Valentin I.

    2015-06-01

    We provide further computations and ideas to the problem of near-Hagedorn string thermodynamics near (uncharged) black hole horizons, building upon our earlier work [1]. The relevance of long strings to one-loop black hole thermodynamics is emphasized. We then provide an argument in favor of the absence of α'-corrections for the (quadratic) heterotic thermal scalar action in Rindler space. We also compute the large k limit of the cigar orbifold partition functions (for both bosonic and type II superstrings) which allows a better comparison between the flat cones and the cigar cones. A discussion is made on the general McClain-Roth-O'Brien-Tan theorem and on the fact that different torus embeddings lead to different aspects of string thermodynamics. The black hole/string correspondence principle for the 2d black hole is discussed in terms of the thermal scalar. Finally, we present an argument to deal with arbitrary higher genus partition functions, suggesting the breakdown of string perturbation theory (in g s ) to compute thermodynam-ical quantities in black hole spacetimes.

  10. Optimized perturbation theory: the pion form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.

    1981-10-01

    The order ..cap alpha../sup 2//sub s/(Q/sup 2/) corrections to the pion form-factor F/sub ..pi../(Q/sup 2/) are calculated using perturbative QCD and dimensional regularization. The result is compared in the MS and MOM subtraction schemes and plotted as a function of Q/sup 2//Q/sup 2/ where Q is the subtraction point. There is a large dependence on the scheme, the definition of the running coupling constant ..cap alpha../sub s/(Q/sup 2/) and the subtraction point Q. We find it best to invert the ..beta..-function equation for the definition of ..cap alpha../sub s/ rather than make an expansion in powers of log(Q/sup 2//..lambda../sup 2/). We study two methods to optimize the result with respect to Q: Stevenson's prescription and putting the 0(..cap alpha../sup 2//sub s/) term to zero. Both methods give almost the same value for Q/sup 2/F/sub ..pi../ and this value is scheme independent.

  11. MCNP Perturbation Capability for Monte Carlo Criticality Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, J.S.; Carter, L.L.; McKinney, G.W.

    1999-09-20

    The differential operator perturbation capability in MCNP4B has been extended to automatically calculate perturbation estimates for the track length estimate of k{sub eff} in MCNP4B. The additional corrections required in certain cases for MCNP4B are no longer needed. Calculating the effect of small design changes on the criticality of nuclear systems with MCNP is now straightforward.

  12. Reconfigurable Optical Spectra from Perturbations on Elliptical Whispering Gallery Resonances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohageg, Makan; Maleki, Lute

    2008-01-01

    Elastic strain, electrical bias, and localized geometric deformations were applied to elliptical whispering-gallery-mode resonators fabricated with lithium niobate. The resultant perturbation of the mode spectrum is highly dependant on the modal indices, resulting in a discretely reconfigurable optical spectrum. Breaking of the spatial degeneracy of the whispering-gallery modes due to perturbation is also observed.

  13. Variational Perturbation Treatment of the Confined Hydrogen Atom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, H. E., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The Schrodinger equation for the ground state of a hydrogen atom confined at the centre of an impenetrable cavity is treated using variational perturbation theory. Energies calculated from variational perturbation theory are comparable in accuracy to the results from a direct numerical solution. The goal of this exercise is to introduce the…

  14. Reconfigurable optical spectra from perturbations on elliptical whispering gallery resonances.

    PubMed

    Mohageg, Makan; Maleki, Lute

    2008-02-01

    Elastic strain, electrical bias, and localized geometric deformations were applied to elliptical whispering-gallery-mode resonators fabricated with lithium niobate. The resultant perturbation of the mode spectrum is highly dependant on the modal indices, resulting in a discretely reconfigurable optical spectrum. Breaking of the spatial degeneracy of the whispering-gallery modes due to perturbation is also observed. PMID:18542283

  15. An analytic solution for the J2 perturbed equatorial orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jezewski, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    An analytic solution for the J2 perturbed equatorial orbit is obtained in terms of elliptic functions and integrals. The necessary equations for computing the position and elocity vectors, and the time are given in terms of known functions. The perturbed periapsis and apoapsis distances are determined from the roots of a characteristic cubic.

  16. A Unified Approach for Solving Nonlinear Regular Perturbation Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khuri, S. A.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a simple alternative unified method of solving nonlinear regular perturbation problems. The procedure is based upon the manipulation of Taylor's approximation for the expansion of the nonlinear term in the perturbed equation. An essential feature of this technique is the relative simplicity used and the associated unified…

  17. Biological response modifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1988-10-01

    Much of what used to be called immunotherapy is now included in the term biological response modifiers. Biological response modifiers (BRMs) are those agents or approaches that modify the relationship between the tumor and host by modifying the host's biological response to tumor cells with resultant therapeutic effects. Most of the early work with BRMs centered around observations of spontaneous tumor regression and the association of tumor regression with concurrent bacterial infections. The BRM can modify the host response by increasing the host's antitumor responses through augmentation and/or restoration of effector mechanisms or mediators of the host's defense or decrease the deleterious component by the host's reaction, increasing the host's defenses by the administration of natural biologics (or the synthetic derivatives thereof) as effectors or mediators of an antitumor response, augmenting the host's response to modified tumor cells or vaccines, which might stimulate a greater response by the host or increase tumor-cell sensitivity to an existing response, decreasing the transformation and/or increase differentiation (maturation) of tumor cells, or increasing the ability of the host to tolerate damage by cytotoxic modalities of cancer treatment.

  18. Biological response modifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    Much of what used to be called immunotherapy is now included in the term biological response modifiers. Biological response modifiers (BRMs) are defined as those agents or approaches that modify the relationship between the tumor and host by modifying the host's biological response to tumor cells with resultant therapeutic effects.'' Most of the early work with BRMs centered around observations of spontaneous tumor regression and the association of tumor regression with concurrent bacterial infections. The BRM can modify the host response in the following ways: Increase the host's antitumor responses through augmentation and/or restoration of effector mechanisms or mediators of the host's defense or decrease the deleterious component by the host's reaction; Increase the host's defenses by the administration of natural biologics (or the synthetic derivatives thereof) as effectors or mediators of an antitumor response; Augment the host's response to modified tumor cells or vaccines, which might stimulate a greater response by the host or increase tumor-cell sensitivity to an existing response; Decrease the transformation and/or increase differentiation (maturation) of tumor cells; or Increase the ability of the host to tolerate damage by cytotoxic modalities of cancer treatment.

  19. Elliptic inflation: generating the curvature perturbation without slow-roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Tomohiro

    2006-09-01

    There are many inflationary models in which the inflaton field does not satisfy the slow-roll condition. However, in such models, it is always difficult to generate the curvature perturbation during inflation. Thus, to generate the curvature perturbation, one must introduce another component into the theory. To cite a case, curvatons may generate the dominant part of the curvature perturbation after inflation. However, we question whether it is realistic to consider the generation of the curvature perturbation during inflation without slow-roll. Assuming multifield inflation, we encounter the generation of curvature perturbation during inflation without slow-roll. The potential along the equipotential surface is flat by definition and thus we do not have to worry about symmetry. We also discuss KKLT (Kachru Kallosh Linde Trivedi) models, in which corrections lifting the inflationary direction may not become a serious problem if there is a symmetry enhancement at the tip (not at the moving brane) of the inflationary throat.

  20. Finite field-dependent symmetries in perturbative quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Sudhaker

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the absolutely anticommuting nilpotent symmetries for perturbative quantum gravity in general curved spacetime in linear and non-linear gauges. Further, we analyze the finite field-dependent BRST (FFBRST) transformation for perturbative quantum gravity in general curved spacetime. The FFBRST transformation changes the gauge-fixing and ghost parts of the perturbative quantum gravity within functional integration. However, the operation of such symmetry transformation on the generating functional of perturbative quantum gravity does not affect the theory on physical ground. The FFBRST transformation with appropriate choices of finite BRST parameter connects non-linear Curci-Ferrari and Landau gauges of perturbative quantum gravity. The validity of the results is also established at quantum level using Batalin-Vilkovisky (BV) formulation.

  1. Quasilinear perturbed equilibria of resistively unstable current carrying plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Di; Zakharov, Leonid E.

    2015-12-01

    > A formalism for consideration of island formation is presented using a model of a cylindrical resistively unstable plasma. Both current and pressure driven island formation at resonant surfaces are considered. The proposed formalism of perturbed equilibria avoids problems typical for linear analysis of resistive magneto-hydrodynamic instabilities related to extraction of the so-called small solution near the resonant surfaces. The matching technique of this paper is not sensitive to configuration parameters near the resonant surfaces. The comparison of the perturbed equilibrium method with the frequently used quasilinear mode analysis based on a perturbed averaged current density profile shows that the latter is limited in its applicability and underestimates the stability. Presented here for a cylindrical case, the perturbed equilibrium technique can be used in toroidal perturbed equilibrium codes with minor modifications.

  2. Duality between QCD perturbative series and power corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narison, S.; Zakharov, V. I.

    2009-08-01

    We elaborate on the relation between perturbative and power-like corrections to short-distance sensitive QCD observables. We confront theoretical expectations with explicit perturbative calculations existing in literature. As is expected, the quadratic correction is dual to a long perturbative series and one should use one of them but not both. However, this might be true only for very long perturbative series, with number of terms needed in most cases exceeding the number of terms available. What has not been foreseen, the quartic corrections might also be dual to the perturbative series. If confirmed, this would imply a crucial modification of the dogma. We confront this quadratic correction against existing phenomenology (QCD (spectral) sum rules scales, determinations of light quark masses and of αs from τ-decay). We find no contradiction and (to some extent) better agreement with the data and with recent lattice calculations.

  3. Reducing Plasma Perturbations with Segmented Metal Shielding on Electrostatic Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Staack, D.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch N.J.

    2002-10-02

    Electrostatic probes are widely used to measure spatial plasma parameters in the quasi-neutral plasma created in Hall thrusters and similar E x B electric discharge devices. Significant perturbations of the plasma, induced by such probes, can mask the actual physics involved in operation of these devices. In an attempt to reduce these perturbations in Hall thrusters, the perturbations were examined by varying the component material, penetration distance, and residence time of various probe designs. This study leads us to a conclusion that secondary electron emission from insulator ceramic tubes of the probe can affect local changes of the plasma parameters causing plasma perturbations. A probe design, which consists of a segmented metal shielding of the probe insulator, is suggested to reduce these perturbations. This new probe design can be useful for plasma applications in which the electron temperature is sufficient to produce secondary electron emission by interaction of plasma electrons with dielectric materials.

  4. Plasma-satellite interaction driven magnetic field perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Saeed-ur-Rehman; Marchand, Richard

    2014-09-15

    We report the first fully kinetic quantitative estimate of magnetic field perturbations caused by the interaction of a spacecraft with space environment. Such perturbations could affect measurements of geophysical magnetic fields made with very sensitive magnetometers on-board satellites. Our approach is illustrated with a calculation of perturbed magnetic fields near the recently launched Swarm satellites. In this case, magnetic field perturbations do not exceed 20 pT, and they are below the sensitivity threshold of the on-board magnetometers. Anticipating future missions in which satellites and instruments would be subject to more intense solar UV radiation, however, it appears that magnetic field perturbations associated with satellite interaction with space environment, might approach or exceed instruments' sensitivity thresholds.

  5. May chaos always be suppressed by parametric perturbations?

    PubMed

    Schwalger, Tilo; Dzhanoev, Arsen; Loskutov, Alexander

    2006-06-01

    The problem of chaos suppression by parametric perturbations is considered. Despite the widespread opinion that chaotic behavior may be stabilized by perturbations of any system parameter, we construct a counterexample showing that this is not necessarily the case. In general, chaos suppression means that parametric perturbations should be applied within a set of parameters at which the system has a positive maximal Lyapunov exponent. Analyzing the known Duffing-Holmes model by a Melnikov method, we showed that chaotic dynamics cannot be suppressed by harmonic perturbations of a certain parameter, independently from the other parameter values. Thus, to stabilize the behavior of chaotic systems, the perturbation and parameters should be carefully chosen. PMID:16822012

  6. A new model for realistic random perturbations of stochastic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieci, Luca; Li, Wuchen; Zhou, Haomin

    2016-08-01

    Classical theories predict that solutions of differential equations will leave any neighborhood of a stable limit cycle, if white noise is added to the system. In reality, many engineering systems modeled by second order differential equations, like the van der Pol oscillator, show incredible robustness against noise perturbations, and the perturbed trajectories remain in the neighborhood of a stable limit cycle for all times of practical interest. In this paper, we propose a new model of noise to bridge this apparent discrepancy between theory and practice. Restricting to perturbations from within this new class of noise, we consider stochastic perturbations of second order differential systems that -in the unperturbed case- admit asymptotically stable limit cycles. We show that the perturbed solutions are globally bounded and remain in a tubular neighborhood of the underlying deterministic periodic orbit. We also define stochastic Poincaré map(s), and further derive partial differential equations for the transition density function.

  7. Analyzing molecular static linear response properties with perturbed localized orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autschbach, Jochen; King, Harry F.

    2010-07-01

    Perturbed localized molecular orbitals (LMOs), correct to first order in an applied static perturbation and consistent with a chosen localization functional, are calculated using analytic derivative techniques. The formalism is outlined for a general static perturbation and variational localization functionals. Iterative and (formally) single-step approaches are compared. The implementation employs an iterative sequence of 2×2 orbital rotations. The procedure is verified by calculations of molecular electric-field perturbations. Boys LMO contributions to the electronic static polarizability and the electric-field perturbation of the ⟨r2⟩ expectation value are calculated and analyzed for ethene, ethyne, and fluoroethene (H2CCHF). For ethene, a comparison is made with results from a Pipek-Mezey localization. The calculations show that a chemically intuitive decomposition of the calculated properties is possible with the help of the LMO contributions and that the polarizability contributions in similar molecules are approximately transferable.

  8. Investigating perturbed pathway modules from gene expression data via structural equation models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is currently accepted that the perturbation of complex intracellular networks, rather than the dysregulation of a single gene, is the basis for phenotypical diversity. High-throughput gene expression data allow to investigate changes in gene expression profiles among different conditions. Recently, many efforts have been made to individuate which biological pathways are perturbed, given a list of differentially expressed genes (DEGs). In order to understand these mechanisms, it is necessary to unveil the variation of genes in relation to each other, considering the different phenotypes. In this paper, we illustrate a pipeline, based on Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) that allowed to investigate pathway modules, considering not only deregulated genes but also the connections between the perturbed ones. Results The procedure was tested on microarray experiments relative to two neurological diseases: frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitinated inclusions (FTLD-U) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Starting from DEGs and dysregulated biological pathways, a model for each pathway was generated using databases information biological databases, in order to design how DEGs were connected in a causal structure. Successively, SEM analysis proved if pathways differ globally, between groups, and for specific path relationships. The results confirmed the importance of certain genes in the analyzed diseases, and unveiled which connections are modified among them. Conclusions We propose a framework to perform differential gene expression analysis on microarray data based on SEM, which is able to: 1) find relevant genes and perturbed biological pathways, investigating putative sub-pathway models based on the concept of disease module; 2) test and improve the generated models; 3) detect a differential expression level of one gene, and differential connection between two genes. This could shed light, not only on the mechanisms affecting variations in gene

  9. Transmission and dose perturbations with high-Z materials in clinical electron beams.

    PubMed

    Das, Indra J; Cheng, Chee-Wai; Mitra, Raj K; Kassaee, Alireza; Tochner, Zelig; Solin, Lawrence J

    2004-12-01

    High density and atomic number (Z) materials used in various prostheses, eye shielding, and beam modifiers produce dose enhancements on the backscatter side in electron beams and is well documented. However, on the transmission side the dose perturbation is given very little clinical importance, which is investigated in this study. A simple and accurate method for dose perturbation at metallic interfaces with soft tissues and transmission through these materials is required for all clinical electron beams. Measurements were taken with thin-window parallel plate ion chambers for various high-Z materials (Al, Ti, Cu, and Pb) on a Varian and a Siemens accelerator in the energy range of 5-20 MeV. The dose enhancement on both sides of the metallic sheet is due to increased electron fluence that is dependent on the beam energy and Z. On the transmission side, the magnitude of dose enhancement depends on the thickness of the high-Z material. With increasing thickness, dose perturbation reduces to the electron transmission. The thickness of material to reduce 100% (range of dose perturbation), 50% and 10% transmission is linear with the beam energy. The slope (mm/MeV) of the transmission curve varies exponentially with Z. A nonlinear regression expression (t=E[alpha+beta exp(-0.1Z)]) is derived to calculate the thickness at a given transmission, namely 100%, 50%, and 10% for electron energy, E, which is simple, accurate and well suited for a quick estimation in clinical use. Caution should be given to clinicians for the selection of thickness of high-Z materials when used to shield critical structures as small thickness increases dose significantly at interfaces. PMID:15651605

  10. Transmission and dose perturbations with high-Z materials in clinical electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Indra J.; Cheng, C.-W.; Mitra, Raj K.; Kassaee, Alireza; Tochner, Zelig; Solin, Lawrence J.

    2004-12-01

    High density and atomic number (Z) materials used in various prostheses, eye shielding, and beam modifiers produce dose enhancements on the backscatter side in electron beams and is well documented. However, on the transmission side the dose perturbation is given very little clinical importance, which is investigated in this study. A simple and accurate method for dose perturbation at metallic interfaces with soft tissues and transmission through these materials is required for all clinical electron beams. Measurements were taken with thin-window parallel plate ion chambers for various high-Z materials (Al, Ti, Cu, and Pb) on a Varian and a Siemens accelerator in the energy range of 5-20 MeV. The dose enhancement on both sides of the metallic sheet is due to increased electron fluence that is dependent on the beam energy and Z. On the transmission side, the magnitude of dose enhancement depends on the thickness of the high-Z material. With increasing thickness, dose perturbation reduces to the electron transmission. The thickness of material to reduce 100% (range of dose perturbation), 50% and 10% transmission is linear with the beam energy. The slope (mm/MeV) of the transmission curve varies exponentially with Z. A nonlinear regression expression {l_brace}t=E[{alpha}+{beta} exp(-0.1Z)]{r_brace} is derived to calculate the thickness at a given transmission, namely 100%, 50%, and 10% for electron energy, E, which is simple, accurate and well suited for a quick estimation in clinical use. Caution should be given to clinicians for the selection of thickness of high-Z materials when used to shield critical structures as small thickness increases dose significantly at interfaces.

  11. Detection of perturbed quantization class stego images based on possible change modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Liu, Fenlin; Yang, Chunfang; Luo, Xiangyang; Song, Xiaofeng

    2015-11-01

    To improve the detection performance for perturbed quantization (PQ) class [PQ, energy-adaptive PQ (PQe), and texture-adaptive PQ (PQt)] stego images, a detection method based on possible change modes is proposed. First, by using the relationship between the changeable coefficients used for carrying secret messages and the second quantization steps, the modes having even second quantization steps are identified as possible change modes. Second, by referencing the existing features, the modified features that can accurately capture the embedding changes based on possible change modes are extracted. Next, feature sensitivity analyses based on the modifications performed before and after the embedding are carried out. These analyses show that the modified features are more sensitive to the original features. Experimental results indicate that detection performance of the modified features is better than that of the corresponding original features for three typical feature models [Cartesian calibrated PEVny (ccPEV), Cartesian calibrated co-occurrence matrix features (CF), and JPEG rich model (JRM)], and the integrated feature consisting of enhanced histogram features (EHF) and the modified JRM outperforms two current state-of-the-art feature models, namely, phase aware projection model (PHARM) and Gabor rich model (GRM).

  12. CMB constraint on non-Gaussianity in isocurvature perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Hikage, Chiaki; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: kawasaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2013-07-01

    We study the CMB constraints on non-Gaussianity in CDM isocurvature perturbations. Non-Gaussian isocurvature perturbations can be produced in various models at the very early stage of the Universe. Since the isocurvature perturbations little affect the structure formation at late times, CMB is the best probe of isocurvature non-Gaussianity at least in the near future. In this paper, we focus on non-Gaussian curvature and isocurvature perturbations of the local-type, which are uncorrelated and in the form ζ = ζ{sub G}+(3/5)f{sub NL}(ζ{sub G}{sup 2}−(ζ{sub G}{sup 2})) and S = S{sub G}+f{sub NL}{sup (ISO)}(S{sub G}−(S{sub G}{sup 2})), and constrain the non-linearity parameter of isocurvature perturbations, f{sub NL}{sup (ISO)}, as well as the curvature one f{sub NL}. For this purpose, we employ several state-of-art techniques for the analysis of CMB data and simulation. Assuming that isocurvature perturbations are subdominant, we apply our method to the WMAP 7-year data of temperature anisotropy and obtain constraints on a combination α{sup 2}f{sub NL}{sup (ISO)}, where α is the ratio of the power spectrum of isocurvature perturbations to that of the adiabatic ones. When the adiabatic perturbations are assumed to be Gaussian, we obtained a constraint α{sup 2}f{sub NL}{sup (ISO)} = 40±66 assuming the power spectrum of isocurvature perturbations is scale-invariant. When we assume that the adiabatic perturbations can also be non-Gaussian, we obtain f{sub NL} = 38±24 and α{sup 2}f{sub NL}{sup (ISO)} = −8±72. We also discuss implications of our results for the axion CDM isocurvature model.

  13. Effect of mechanical perturbation on the biomechanics, primary growth and secondary tissue development of inflorescence stems of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Paul-Victor, Cloé; Rowe, Nick

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Mechanical perturbation is known to inhibit elongation of the inflorescence stem of Arabidopsis thaliana. The phenomenon has been reported widely for both herbaceous and woody plants, and has implications for how plants adjust their size and form to survive in mechanically perturbed environments. While this response is an important aspect of the plant's architecture, little is known about how mechanical properties of the inflorescence stem are modified or how its primary and secondary tissues respond to mechanical perturbation. Methods Plants of the Columbia-0 ecotype were exposed to controlled brushing treatments and then submitted to three-point bending tests to determine stem rigidity and stiffness. Contributions of different tissues to the inflorescence stem geometry were analysed. Key Results Perturbed plants showed little difference in stem diameter, were 50 % shorter, 75 % less rigid and 70 % less stiff than controls. Changes in mechanical properties were linked to significant changes in tissue geometry – size and position of the pith, lignified interfascicular tissue and cortex – as well as a reduction in density of lignified cells. Stem mechanical properties were modified by changes in primary tissues and thus differ from changes observed in most woody plants tested with indeterminate growth – even though a vascular cambium is present in the inflorescence axis. Conclusions The study suggests that delayed development of key primary developmental features of the stem in this ecotype of Arabidopsis results in a ‘short and flexible’ rather than a ‘short and rigid’ strategy for maintaining upright axes in conditions of severe mechanical perturbation. The mechanism is comparable with more general phenomena in plants where changes in developmental rate can significantly affect the overall growth form of the plant in both ecological and evolutionary contexts. PMID:21118840

  14. Flexoelectricity from density-functional perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stengel, Massimiliano

    2013-11-01

    We derive the complete flexoelectric tensor, including electronic and lattice-mediated effects, of an arbitrary insulator in terms of the microscopic linear response of the crystal to atomic displacements. The basic ingredient, which can be readily calculated from first principles in the framework of density-functional perturbation theory, is the quantum-mechanical probability current response to a long-wavelength acoustic phonon. Its second-order Taylor expansion in the wave vector q around the Γ (q=0) point in the Brillouin zone naturally yields the flexoelectric tensor. At order one in q we recover Martin's theory of piezoelectricity [Martin, Phys. Rev. B 5, 1607 (1972)], thus providing an alternative derivation thereof. To put our derivations on firm theoretical grounds, we perform a thorough analysis of the nonanalytic behavior of the dynamical matrix and other response functions in a vicinity of Γ. Based on this analysis, we find that there is an ambiguity in the specification of the “zero macroscopic field” condition in the flexoelectric case; such arbitrariness can be related to an analytic band-structure term, in close analogy to the theory of deformation potentials. As a by-product, we derive a rigorous generalization of the Cochran-Cowley formula [Cochran and Cowley, J. Phys. Chem. Solids 23, 447 (1962)] to higher orders in q. This can be of great utility in building reliable atomistic models of electromechanical phenomena, as well as for improving the accuracy of the calculation of phonon dispersion curves. Finally, we discuss the physical interpretation of the various contributions to the flexoelectric response, either in the static or dynamic regime, and we relate our findings to earlier theoretical works on the subject.

  15. AGK Cutting Rules and Perturbative QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treleani, D.

    The purpose of this article is to describe a few features of semihard interactions, in high energy nuclear collisions, that are better understood with the help of the AGK cutting rules, and of the probabilistic picture of the interaction which follows. In the first part of the article the cutting rules are discussed for the simplest component of the forward three-body parton amplitude in the large s fixed t limit. The case considered corresponds to the term — at the lowest order in the coupling constant and with vacuum quantum number exchange in both t channels — of the amplitude which describes the interaction of a high energy quark with the two target quarks. The different leading cuts of the amplitude are shown to be proportional to one another with the same weights of the cutting rules derived in the context of multi-Pomeron exchange. The probabilistic picture of the multiple interactions, which originates from the cutting rules, and the self-shadowing cross sections are then discussed. The second part of the article deals with the semihard interactions. The semihard cross section in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions is represented as a self-shadowing cross section, and a feature which is pointed out is that the single scattering factorized expression of the perturbative QCD parton model holds at any order in the multiparton correlations, the relation being the analog of the AGK cancellation for the average number of soft interactions in high energy hadron-nucleus collisions. Finally, an infrared problem which finds a solution within the self-shadowing representation of the semihard cross section is discussed.

  16. The Tidal Perturbations of the Galilean Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Robert A.; Folkner, William M.

    2014-11-01

    To support the Juno mission currently enroute to Jupiter and preproject studies for the Europa Clipper mission, we developed new ephemerides for the Jovian satellites (the Galileans and four inners). The ephemerides are based on orbits that were determined by fitting a data set that included Earth-based astrometry from 1891 through 2013, Galilean satellite mutual events from 1973 through 2009, Galilean satellite eclipse timings from 1878 to 2013, and data acquired by the Pioneer, Voyager, Ulysses, Cassini, Galileo, and New Horizons spacecraft. As a part of the data fit we also redetermined the Jovian system gravity parameters and the spacecraft trajectories to be consistent with the satellite orbits. The dynamical model for the satellite orbits did not include tidal perturbations. Lainey et al. (2009 Nature 459, 957) determined tidal parameters for Jupiter and Io from a fit of the Galilean satellite orbits to Earth-based astrometry from 1891 to 2007 and mutual events from 1973 to 2003; he estimated only the satellite states and the tidal parameters. Subsequent to our ephemeris development, we activated the tide model and repeated our orbit analysis adding the determination of the tidal parameters. We found that if we omitted the spacecraft data and estimated only satellite states and tidal parameters, we obtained results similar to Lainey. However, when we included the spacecraft data in the fit, the tidal acceleration on Io was smaller but still caused a positive secular acceleration. The remaining task is to discriminate between the effects of the tide raised on Jupiter by Io and that raised on Io by Jupiter.

  17. Developing perturbations for Climate Change Impact Assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitson, Bruce

    Following the 2001 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Third Assessment Report [TAR; IPCC, 2001], and the paucity of climate change impact assessments from developing nations, there has been a significant growth in activities to redress this shortcoming. However, undertaking impact assessments (in relation to malaria, crop stress, regional water supply, etc.) is contingent on available climate-scale scenarios at time and space scales of relevance to the regional issues of importance. These scales are commonly far finer than even the native resolution of the Global Climate Models (GCMs) (the principal tools for climate change research), let alone the skillful resolution (scales of aggregation at which GCM observational error is acceptable for a given application) of GCMs.Consequently, there is a growing demand for regional-scale scenarios, which in turn are reliant on techniques to downscale from GCMs, such as empirical downscaling or nested Regional Climate Models (RCMs). These methods require significant skill, experiential knowledge, and computational infrastructure in order to derive credible regional-scale scenarios. In contrast, it is often the case that impact assessment researchers in developing nations have inadequate resources with limited access to scientists in the broader international scientific community who have the time and expertise to assist. However, where developing effective downscaled scenarios is problematic, it is possible that much useful information can still be obtained for impact assessments by examining the system sensitivity to largerscale climate perturbations. Consequently, one may argue that the early phase of assessing sensitivity and vulnerability should first be characterized by evaluation of the first-order impacts, rather than immediately addressing the finer, secondary factors that are dependant on scenarios derived through downscaling.

  18. Statistics and dynamics of the perturbed universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemson, G.

    1995-09-01

    Wilson discovered the corresponding radiation field, at a temperature of roughly 3K (Penzias & Wilson, 1965). It soon appeared that this microwave background radiation was isotropic to a high degree, which conrmed the assumptions made about the homogeneity of the early Universe. At present however, we see that the Universe is no longer featureless and smooth. Starting from the smallest scales we see matter organized in structures up to very large scales: from planets to stars to stellar systems to galaxies to groups and clusters of galaxies, up to super-clusters, where clusters and galaxies are organized in the largest structures known. Somewhere during the evolution of the Universe, these structures must have developed out of the featureless, uniform sea of matter and radiation. Various different theories have been developed to explain the emergence of structure, but in this thesis I will concentrate exclusively on the most generally accepted theory, that of gravitational instability. In this theory it is assumed that in the early Universe, small fluctuations in the density were present, and these would grow under the influence of gravity towards the presently observed structures. There is actually a rather complete theory of the early stages of this process, that regime where these deviations from homogeneity are small. In that case, the inhomogeneous field may be seen as a small disturbance to the uniform model, and the standard apparatus of perturbation theory may be applied. In this thesis I investigate the later stages of this process of structure formation, where the fluctuations have grown to such a size that this 'linear' perturbation approach breaks down. There is as yet no comprehensive model describing this 'nonlinear' regime as successfully as the linear theory describes the early stages of structure formation. Instead, the problem is approached from many different directions, using different, approximate models for describing the dynamics and other

  19. Challenges in the extraction of TMDs from SIDIS data: perturbative vs non-perturbative aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Boglione, Mariaelena; Gonzalez Hernandez, Jose O.; Melis, Stefano; Prokudin, Alexey

    2015-09-01

    We present our recent results on the study of the Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS) cross section as a function of the transverse momentum, qT. Using the Collins-Soper-Sterman (CSS) formalism, we study the matching between the region where fixed-order perturbative QCD can successfully be applied and the region where soft gluon resummation is necessary. We find that the commonly used prescription of matching through the so-called Y-factor cannot be applied in the SIDIS kinematical configurations we examine. We comment on the impact that the nonperturbative component has even at relatively high energies.

  20. Modified blank ammunition injuries.

    PubMed

    Ogunc, Gokhan I; Ozer, M Tahir; Coskun, Kagan; Uzar, Ali Ihsan

    2009-12-15

    Blank firing weapons are designed only for discharging blank ammunition cartridges. Because they are cost-effective, are easily accessible and can be modified to live firearms plus their unclear legal situation in Turkish Law makes them very popular in Turkey. 2004 through 2008, a total of 1115 modified blank weapons were seized in Turkey. Blank firing weapons are easily modified by owners, making them suitable for discharging live firearm ammunition or modified blank ammunitions. Two common methods are used for modification of blank weapons. After the modification, these weapons can discharge the live ammunition. However, due to compositional durability problems with these types of weapons; the main trend is to use the modified blank ammunitions rather than live firearm ammunition fired from modified blank firing weapons. In this study, two types of modified blank weapons and two types of modified blank cartridges were tested on three different target models. Each of the models' shooting side was coated with 1.3+/-2 mm thickness chrome tanned cowhide as a skin simulant. The first model was only coated with skin simulant. The second model was coated with skin simulant and 100% cotton police shirt. The third model was coated with skin simulant and jean denim. After the literature evaluation four high risky anatomic locations (the neck area; the eyes; the thorax area and inguinal area) were pointed out for the steel and lead projectiles are discharged from the modified blank weapons especially in close range (0-50 cm). The target models were designed for these anatomic locations. For the target models six Transparent Ballistic Candle blocks (TCB) were prepared and divided into two test groups. The first group tests were performed with lead projectiles and second group with steel projectile. The shortest penetration depth (lead projectile: 4.358 cm; steel projectile 8.032 cm) was recorded in the skin simulant and jean denim coated block for both groups. In both groups

  1. Aminoglycoside Modifying Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Maria S.; Tolmasky, Marcelo E.

    2010-01-01

    Aminoglycosides have been an essential component of the armamentarium in the treatment of life-threatening infections. Unfortunately, their efficacy has been reduced by the surge and dissemination of resistance. In some cases the levels of resistance reached the point that rendered them virtually useless. Among many known mechanisms of resistance to aminoglycosides, enzymatic modification is the most prevalent in the clinical setting. Aminoglycoside modifying enzymes catalyze the modification at different −OH or −NH2 groups of the 2-deoxystreptamine nucleus or the sugar moieties and can be nucleotidyltranferases, phosphotransferases, or acetyltransferases. The number of aminoglycoside modifying enzymes identified to date as well as the genetic environments where the coding genes are located is impressive and there is virtually no bacteria that is unable to support enzymatic resistance to aminoglycosides. Aside from the development of new aminoglycosides refractory to as many as possible modifying enzymes there are currently two main strategies being pursued to overcome the action of aminoglycoside modifying enzymes. Their successful development would extend the useful life of existing antibiotics that have proven effective in the treatment of infections. These strategies consist of the development of inhibitors of the enzymatic action or of the expression of the modifying enzymes. PMID:20833577

  2. Spherical dust fluctuations: The exact versus the perturbative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussman, Roberto A.; Hidalgo, Juan Carlos; Dunsby, Peter K. S.; German, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    We examine the relation between the dynamics of Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) dust models (with and without Λ ) and the dynamics of dust perturbations in two of the more familiar formalisms used in cosmology: the metric based cosmological perturbation theory (CPT) and the covariant gauge invariant (GIC) perturbations. For this purpose we recast the evolution of LTB models in terms of a covariant and gauge invariant formalism of local and nonlocal "exact fluctuations" on a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) background defined by suitable averages of covariant scalars. We examine the properties of these fluctuations, which can be defined for a confined comoving domain or for an asymptotic domain extending to whole time slices. In particular, the nonlocal density fluctuation provides a covariant and precise definition for the notion of the "density contrast." We show that in their linear regime these LTB exact fluctuations (local and nonlocal) are fully equivalent to the conventional cosmological perturbations in the synchronous-comoving gauge of CPT and to GIC perturbations. As an immediate consequence, we show the time-invariance of the spatial curvature perturbation in a simple form. The present work may provide important theoretical connections between the exact and perturbative (linear or nonlinear) approach to the dynamics of dust sources in general relativity.

  3. Transport of energetic ions by low-n magnetic perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Mynick, H.E.

    1992-10-01

    The stochastic transport of MeV ions induced by low-n magnetic perturbations is studied, focussing chiefly on the stochastic mechanism operative for passing particles in low frequency perturbations. Beginning with a single-harmonic form for the perturbing field, it iii first shown numerically and analytically that the stochastic threshold of energetic particles can be much lower than that of the magnetic field, contrary to earlier expectations, so that MHD perturbations could cause appreciable loss of energetic ions without destroying the bulk confinement. The analytic theory is then extended in a number of directions, to darity the relation of the present stochaistic mechanism to instances already found, to allow for more complex perturbations, and to consider the more general relationship between the stochasticity of magnetic fields, and that of particles of differing energies (and pitch angles) moving in those fields. It is shown that the stochastic threshold is in general a nonmonotonic function of energy, whose form can to some extent be tailored to achieve desired goals (e.g., burn control or ash removal) by a judicious choice of the perturbation. Illustrative perturbations are exhibited which are stochastic for low but not for high-energy ions, for high but not for low-energy ions, and for intermediate-energy ions, but not for low or high energy. The second possibility is the behavior needed for burn control; the third provides a possible mechanism for ash removal.

  4. Perturbing polynomials with all their roots on the unit circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mossinghoff, M. J.; Pinner, C. G.; Vaaler, J. D.

    1998-10-01

    Given a monic real polynomial with all its roots on the unit circle, we ask to what extent one can perturb its middle coefficient and still have a polynomial with all its roots on the unit circle. We show that the set of possible perturbations forms a closed interval of length at most 4, with 4 achieved only for polynomials of the form x(2n) + cx(n) + 1 with c in [-2, 2]. The problem can also be formulated in terms of perturbing the constant coefficient of a polynomial having all its roots in [-1, 1]. If we restrict to integer coefficients, then the polynomials in question are products of cyclotomics. We show that in this case there are no perturbations of length 3 that do not arise from a perturbation of length 4. We also investigate the connection between slightly perturbed products of cyclotomic polynomials and polynomials with small Mahler measure. We describe an algorithm for searching for polynomials with small Mahler measure by perturbing the middle coefficients of products of cyclotomic polynomials. We show that the complexity of this algorithm is O(C-root d), where d is the degree, and we report on the polynomials found by this algorithm through degree 64.

  5. Development of a perturbation generator for vortex stability studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riester, J. E.; Ash, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    Theory predicts vortex instability when subjected to certain types of disturbances. It was desired to build a device which could introduce controlled velocity perturbations into a trailing line vortex in order to study the effects on stability. A perturbation generator was designed and manufactured which can be attached to the centerbody of an airfoil type vortex generator. Details of design tests and manufacturing of the perturbation generator are presented. The device produced controlled perturbation with frequencies in excess of 250 Hz. Preliminary testing and evaluation of the perturbation generator performance was conducted in a 4 inch cylindrical pipe. Observations of vortex shedding frequencies from a centerbody were measured. Further evaluation with the perturbation generator attached to the vortex generator in a 2 x 3 foot wind tunnel were also conducted. Hot-wire anemometry was used to confirm the perturbation generator's ability to introduce controlled frequency fluctuations. Comparison of the energy levels of the disturbances in the vortex core was made between locations 42 chord lengths and 15 chord lengths downstream.

  6. Black hole perturbation theory in a light cone gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Brent

    The metric of a Schwarzschild black hole immersed in a uniform magnetic field is studied using black hole perturbation theory in a light crone coordinate system that penetrates the event horizon and possesses a clear geometrical meaning. The magnetic field, which is distorted due to the presence of the black hole, has strength B which is assumed to be small compared to the curvature of the spacetime which allows the perturbed metric to be calculated to order B 2 only. The coordinates allow for an easy identification of the event horizon and the properties of the perturbed black hole are studied. To interpret this perturbed metric, the advanced coordinates are decomposed into irreducible parts which yields the metric of a perturbed black hole in the limit r >> 2 M . Finally we compare our perturbed solution to an exact solution. We show that our perturbed solution is able to match the exact solution but has the freedom to describe a larger class of physically relevant solutions.

  7. Boundary Layer Instabilities Generated by Freestream Laser Perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Amanda; Schneider, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    A controlled, laser-generated, freestream perturbation was created in the freestream of the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel (BAM6QT). The freestream perturbation convected downstream in the Mach-6 wind tunnel to interact with a flared cone model. The geometry of the flared cone is a body of revolution bounded by a circular arc with a 3-meter radius. Fourteen PCB 132A31 pressure transducers were used to measure a wave packet generated in the cone boundary layer by the freestream perturbation. This wave packet grew large and became nonlinear before experiencing natural transition in quiet flow. Breakdown of this wave packet occurred when the amplitude of the pressure fluctuations was approximately 10% of the surface pressure for a nominally sharp nosetip. The initial amplitude of the second mode instability on the blunt flared cone is estimated to be on the order of 10 -6 times the freestream static pressure. The freestream laser-generated perturbation was positioned upstream of the model in three different configurations: on the centerline, offset from the centerline by 1.5 mm, and offset from the centerline by 3.0 mm. When the perturbation was offset from the centerline of a blunt flared cone, a larger wave packet was generated on the side toward which the perturbation was offset. The offset perturbation did not show as much of an effect on the wave packet on a sharp flared cone as it did on a blunt flared cone.

  8. Evolution equation for non-linear cosmological perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Brustein, Ram; Riotto, Antonio E-mail: Antonio.Riotto@cern.ch

    2011-11-01

    We present a novel approach, based entirely on the gravitational potential, for studying the evolution of non-linear cosmological matter perturbations. Starting from the perturbed Einstein equations, we integrate out the non-relativistic degrees of freedom of the cosmic fluid and obtain a single closed equation for the gravitational potential. We then verify the validity of the new equation by comparing its approximate solutions to known results in the theory of non-linear cosmological perturbations. First, we show explicitly that the perturbative solution of our equation matches the standard perturbative solutions. Next, using the mean field approximation to the equation, we show that its solution reproduces in a simple way the exponential suppression of the non-linear propagator on small scales due to the velocity dispersion. Our approach can therefore reproduce the main features of the renormalized perturbation theory and (time)-renormalization group approaches to the study of non-linear cosmological perturbations, with some possibly important differences. We conclude by a preliminary discussion of the nature of the full solutions of the equation and their significance.

  9. Perturbative and non-perturbative aspects of moments of the thrust distribution in e+e-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardi, Einan

    2000-04-01

    Resummation and power-corrections play a crucial role in the phenomenology of event-shape variables like the thrust T. Previous investigations showed that the perturbative contribution to the average thrust is dominated by gluons of small invariant mass, of the order of 10% of Q, where Q is the center-of-mass energy. The effect of soft gluons is also important, leading to a non-perturbative 1/Q correction. These conclusions are based on renormalon analysis in the single dressed gluon (SDG) approximation. Here we analyze higher moments of the thrust distribution using a similar technique. We find that the characteristic gluon invariant mass contributing to langle(1-T)mrangle increases with m. Yet, for m = 2 this scale is quite low, around 27% of Q, and therefore renormalon resummation is still very important. On the other hand, the power-correction to langle(1-T)2rangle from a single soft gluon emission is found to be highly suppressed: it scales as 1/Q3. In practice, langle(1-T)2rangle and higher moments depend also on soft gluon emission from configurations of three hard partons, which may lead to αs(Q2)/Q power-corrections. This issue is yet to be investigated.

  10. Storm Track Response to Perturbations in Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbengue, Cheikh Oumar

    This thesis advances our understanding of midlatitude storm tracks and how they respond to perturbations in the climate system. The midlatitude storm tracks are regions of maximal turbulent kinetic energy in the atmosphere. Through them, the bulk of the atmospheric transport of energy, water vapor, and angular momentum occurs in midlatitudes. Therefore, they are important regulators of climate, controlling basic features such as the distribution of surface temperatures, precipitation, and winds in midlatitudes. Storm tracks are robustly projected to shift poleward in global-warming simulations with current climate models. Yet the reasons for this shift have remained unclear. Here we show that this shift occurs even in extremely idealized (but still three-dimensional) simulations of dry atmospheres. We use these simulations to develop an understanding of the processes responsible for the shift and develop a conceptual model that accounts for it. We demonstrate that changes in the convective static stability in the deep tropics alone can drive remote shifts in the midlatitude storm tracks. Through simulations with a dry idealized general circulation model (GCM), midlatitude storm tracks are shown to be located where the mean available potential energy (MAPE, a measure of the potential energy available to be converted into kinetic energy) is maximal. As the climate varies, even if only driven by tropical static stability changes, the MAPE maximum shifts primarily because of shifts of the maximum of near-surface meridional temperature gradients. The temperature gradients shift in response to changes in the width of the tropical Hadley circulation, whose width is affected by the tropical static stability. Storm tracks generally shift in tandem with shifts of the subtropical terminus of the Hadley circulation. We develop a one-dimensional diffusive energy-balance model that links changes in the Hadley circulation to midlatitude temperature gradients and so to the storm

  11. Extreme Value Analysis of Tidal Stream Velocity Perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, Samuel; Thomson, Jim; Polagye, Brian; Richmond, Marshall C.; Durgesh, Vibhav; Bryden, Ian

    2011-04-26

    This paper presents a statistical extreme value analysis of maximum velocity perturbations from the mean flow speed in a tidal stream. This study was performed using tidal velocity data measured using both an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) and an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) at the same location which allows for direct comparison of predictions. The extreme value analysis implements of a Peak-Over-Threshold method to explore the effect of perturbation length and time scale on the magnitude of a 50-year perturbation.

  12. Perturbative analysis of multiple-field cosmological inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiri, Joydev . E-mail: gautam@theory.saha.ernet.in

    2006-04-15

    We develop a general formalism for analyzing linear perturbations in multiple-field cosmological inflation based on the gauge-ready approach. Our inflationary model consists of an arbitrary number of scalar fields with non-minimal kinetic terms. We solve the equations for scalar- and tensor-type perturbations during inflation to the first order in slow roll, and then obtain the super-horizon solutions for adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations after inflation. Analytic expressions for power-spectra and spectral indices arising from multiple-field inflation are presented.

  13. Disentangling perturbative and power corrections in precision tau decay analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbunov, D.S.; Pivovarov, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    Hadronic tau decay precision data are analyzed with account of both perturbative and power corrections of high orders within QCD. It is found that contributions of high order power corrections are essential for extracting a numerical value for the strange quark mass from the data on Cabibbo suppressed tau decays. We show that with inclusion of new five-loop perturbative corrections in the analysis the convergence of perturbation theory remains acceptable only for few low order moments. We obtain m{sub s}(M{sub {tau}})=130{+-}27 MeV in agreement with previous estimates.

  14. Stability of coflowing capillary jets under nonaxisymmetric perturbations.

    PubMed

    Montanero, J M; Gañán-Calvo, A M

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, linear hydrodynamic stability analysis is used to study the response of a capillary jet and a coflowing fluid to both axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric perturbations. The temporal analysis revealed that nonaxisymmetric perturbations were damped (or overdamped) within the region of parameter space explored, which involved equal velocities for the jet and focusing fluid. It is explained how an extension to a spatiotemporal analysis implies that those perturbations can yield no transition from convective (jetting) to absolute (whipping) instability for that parameter region. This result provides a theoretical explanation for the absence of that kind of transition in most experimental results in the literature. PMID:18517726

  15. Charged scalar perturbations around a regular magnetic black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yang; Liu, Dao-Jun

    2016-05-01

    We study charged scalar perturbations in the background of a regular magnetic black hole. In this case, the charged scalar perturbation does not result in superradiance. By using a careful time-domain analysis, we show that the charge of the scalar field can change the real part of the quasinormal frequency, but has little impact on the imaginary part of the quasinormal frequency and the behavior of the late-time tail. Therefore, the regular magnetic black hole may be stable under the perturbations of a charged scalar field at the linear level.

  16. Secular perturbations of the Uranian satellites - Theory and practice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malhotra, R.; Nicholson, P. D.; Fox, K.; Murray, C. D.

    1989-01-01

    A simple revised secular perturbation theory which incorporates the averaged secular effect of first-order near-resonances is derived. By including the effects of these near-resonances, the largest error in the secular frequencies is reduced from 16 percent to less than 3 percent. It is concluded that the revised secular perturbation theory is adequate for the quantitative modeling of the long-term perturbations in the Uranian satellite system. If incorporated within the general theory of Laskar (1986), this theory would lead to completely analytic theory.

  17. Current Density and Plasma Displacement Near Perturbed Rational Surface

    SciTech Connect

    A.H. Boozer and N. Pomphrey

    2010-10-10

    The current density in the vicinity of a rational surface of a force-free magnetic field subjected to an ideal perturbation is shown to be the sum of both a smooth and a delta-function distribution, which give comparable currents. The maximum perturbation to the smooth current density is comparable to a typical equilibrium current density and the width of the layer in which the current flows is shown to be proportional to the perturbation amplitude. In the standard linearized theory, the plasma displacement has an unphysical jump across the rational surface, but the full theory gives a continuous displacement.

  18. Axion inflation with cross-correlated axion isocurvature perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadota, Kenji; Kobayashi, Tatsuo; Otsuka, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    We study the inflation scenarios, in the framework of superstring theory, where the inflaton is an axion producing the adiabatic curvature perturbations while there exists another light axion producing the isocurvature perturbations. We discuss how the non-trivial couplings among string axions can generically arise, and calculate the consequent cross-correlations between the adiabatic and isocurvature modes through concrete examples. Based on the Planck analysis on the generally correlated isocurvature perturbations, we show that there is a preference for the existence of the correlated isocurvature modes for the axion monodromy inflation while the natural inflation disfavors such isocurvature modes.

  19. Stochastic systems with delay: Perturbation theory for second order statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, T. D.

    2016-03-01

    Within the framework of delay Fokker-Planck equations, a perturbation theoretical method is developed to determine second-order statistical quantities such as autocorrelation functions for stochastic systems with delay. Two variants of the perturbation theoretical approach are presented. The first variant is based on a non-local Fokker-Planck operator. The second variant requires to solve a Fokker-Planck equation with source term. It is shown that the two variants yield consistent results. The perturbation theoretical approaches are applied to study negative autocorrelations that are induced by feedback delays and mediated by the strength of the fluctuating forces that act on the feedback systems.

  20. A general analysis of non-gaussianity from isocurvature perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Nakayama, Kazunori; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Suyama, Teruaki; Takahashi, Fuminobu E-mail: nakayama@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: teruaki.suyama@uclouvain.be

    2009-01-15

    Light scalars may be ubiquitous in nature, and their quantum fluctuations can produce large non-Gaussianity in the cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropy. The non-Gaussianity may be accompanied with a small admixture of isocurvature perturbations, which often have correlations with the curvature perturbations. We present a general method to calculate the non-Gaussianity in the adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations with and without correlations, and see how it works in several explicit examples. We also show that they leave distinct signatures on the bispectrum of the cosmic microwave background temperature fluctuations.