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Sample records for modified homotopy perturbation

  1. Approximate Analytical Solutions of the Regularized Long Wave Equation Using the Optimal Homotopy Perturbation Method

    PubMed Central

    Căruntu, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents the optimal homotopy perturbation method, which is a new method to find approximate analytical solutions for nonlinear partial differential equations. Based on the well-known homotopy perturbation method, the optimal homotopy perturbation method presents an accelerated convergence compared to the regular homotopy perturbation method. The applications presented emphasize the high accuracy of the method by means of a comparison with previous results. PMID:25003150

  2. Application of the Homotopy Perturbation Method to the Nonlinear Pendulum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belendez, A.; Hernandez, A.; Belendez, T.; Marquez, A.

    2007-01-01

    The homotopy perturbation method is used to solve the nonlinear differential equation that governs the nonlinear oscillations of a simple pendulum, and an approximate expression for its period is obtained. Only one iteration leads to high accuracy of the solutions and the relative error for the approximate period is less than 2% for amplitudes as…

  3. Series Expansion of Functions with He's Homotopy Perturbation Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khattri, Sanjay Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Finding a series expansion, such as Taylor series, of functions is an important mathematical concept with many applications. Homotopy perturbation method (HPM) is a new, easy to use and effective tool for solving a variety of mathematical problems. In this study, we present how to apply HPM to obtain a series expansion of functions. Consequently,…

  4. Analytical method for space-fractional telegraph equation by homotopy perturbation transform method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Amit

    2016-06-01

    The object of the present article is to study spacefractional telegraph equation by fractional Homotopy perturbation transform method (FHPTM). The homotopy perturbation transform method is an innovative adjustment in Laplace transform algorithm. Three test examples are presented to show the efficiency of the proposed technique.

  5. Laplace homotopy perturbation method for Burgers equation with space- and time-fractional order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, S. J.; Jafari, H.; Moshokoa, S. P.; Ariyan, V. M.; Baleanu, D.

    2016-07-01

    The fractional Burgers equation describes the physical processes of unidirectional propagation of weakly nonlinear acoustic waves through a gas-filled pipe. The Laplace homotopy perturbation method is discussed to obtain the approximate analytical solution of space-fractional and time-fractional Burgers equations. The method used combines the Laplace transform and the homotopy perturbation method. Numerical results show that the approach is easy to implement and accurate when applied to partial differential equations of fractional orders.

  6. Numerical Solution of Problems in Calculus of Variations by Homotopy Perturbation Method

    SciTech Connect

    Jafari, M. A.; Aminataei, A.

    2008-09-01

    In this work we use Homotopy Perturbation Method (HPM) to solve differential equations that arise in variational problems. To illustrate the method some examples are provided. The results show the efficiency and accuracy of the HPM. HPM can be considered an alternative method to Adomian decomposition method. Both of these methods can obtain analytic form of the solution in some cases.

  7. Homotopy Perturbation Transform Method with He's Polynomial for Solution of Coupled Nonlinear Partial Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Dinkar; Singh, Prince; Chauhan, Shubha

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a combined form of the Laplace transform method with the homotopy perturbation method (HPTM) is applied to solve nonlinear systems of partial differential equations viz. the system of third order KdV Equations and the systems of coupled Burgers' equations in one- and two- dimensions. The nonlinear terms can be easily handled by the use of He's polynomials. The results shows that the HPTM is very efficient, simple and avoids the round-off errors. Four test examples are considered to illustrate the present scheme. Further the results are compared with Homotopy perturbation method (HPM) which shows that this method is a suitable method for solving systems of partial differential equations.

  8. Homotopy Perturbation Method-Based Analytical Solution for Tide-Induced Groundwater Fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Munusamy, Selva Balaji; Dhar, Anirban

    2016-05-01

    The groundwater variations in unconfined aquifers are governed by the nonlinear Boussinesq's equation. Analytical solution for groundwater fluctuations in coastal aquifers under tidal forcing can be solved using perturbation methods. However, the perturbation parameters should be properly selected and predefined for traditional perturbation methods. In this study, a new dimensional, higher-order analytical solution for groundwater fluctuations is proposed by using the homotopy perturbation method with a virtual perturbation parameter. Parameter-expansion method is used to remove the secular terms generated during the solution process. The solution does not require any predefined perturbation parameter and valid for higher values of amplitude parameter A/D, where A is the amplitude of the tide and D is the aquifer thickness. PMID:26340338

  9. Modified Hyperspheres Algorithm to Trace Homotopy Curves of Nonlinear Circuits Composed by Piecewise Linear Modelled Devices

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Leal, H.; Jimenez-Fernandez, V. M.; Benhammouda, B.; Filobello-Nino, U.; Sarmiento-Reyes, A.; Ramirez-Pinero, A.; Marin-Hernandez, A.; Huerta-Chua, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a homotopy continuation method (HCM) for finding multiple operating points of nonlinear circuits composed of devices modelled by using piecewise linear (PWL) representations. We propose an adaptation of the modified spheres path tracking algorithm to trace the homotopy trajectories of PWL circuits. In order to assess the benefits of this proposal, four nonlinear circuits composed of piecewise linear modelled devices are analysed to determine their multiple operating points. The results show that HCM can find multiple solutions within a single homotopy trajectory. Furthermore, we take advantage of the fact that homotopy trajectories are PWL curves meant to replace the multidimensional interpolation and fine tuning stages of the path tracking algorithm with a simple and highly accurate procedure based on the parametric straight line equation. PMID:25184157

  10. Modified hyperspheres algorithm to trace homotopy curves of nonlinear circuits composed by piecewise linear modelled devices.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Leal, H; Jimenez-Fernandez, V M; Benhammouda, B; Filobello-Nino, U; Sarmiento-Reyes, A; Ramirez-Pinero, A; Marin-Hernandez, A; Huerta-Chua, J

    2014-01-01

    We present a homotopy continuation method (HCM) for finding multiple operating points of nonlinear circuits composed of devices modelled by using piecewise linear (PWL) representations. We propose an adaptation of the modified spheres path tracking algorithm to trace the homotopy trajectories of PWL circuits. In order to assess the benefits of this proposal, four nonlinear circuits composed of piecewise linear modelled devices are analysed to determine their multiple operating points. The results show that HCM can find multiple solutions within a single homotopy trajectory. Furthermore, we take advantage of the fact that homotopy trajectories are PWL curves meant to replace the multidimensional interpolation and fine tuning stages of the path tracking algorithm with a simple and highly accurate procedure based on the parametric straight line equation. PMID:25184157

  11. Solving the Helmholtz equation in conformal mapped ARROW structures using homotopy perturbation method.

    PubMed

    Reck, Kasper; Thomsen, Erik V; Hansen, Ole

    2011-01-31

    The scalar wave equation, or Helmholtz equation, describes within a certain approximation the electromagnetic field distribution in a given system. In this paper we show how to solve the Helmholtz equation in complex geometries using conformal mapping and the homotopy perturbation method. The solution of the mapped Helmholtz equation is found by solving an infinite series of Poisson equations using two dimensional Fourier series. The solution is entirely based on analytical expressions and is not mesh dependent. The analytical results are compared to a numerical (finite element method) solution. PMID:21368995

  12. Laplace transform homotopy perturbation method for the approximation of variational problems.

    PubMed

    Filobello-Nino, U; Vazquez-Leal, H; Rashidi, M M; Sedighi, H M; Perez-Sesma, A; Sandoval-Hernandez, M; Sarmiento-Reyes, A; Contreras-Hernandez, A D; Pereyra-Diaz, D; Hoyos-Reyes, C; Jimenez-Fernandez, V M; Huerta-Chua, J; Castro-Gonzalez, F; Laguna-Camacho, J R

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes the application of Laplace Transform-Homotopy Perturbation Method and some of its modifications in order to find analytical approximate solutions for the linear and nonlinear differential equations which arise from some variational problems. As case study we will solve four ordinary differential equations, and we will show that the proposed solutions have good accuracy, even we will obtain an exact solution. In the sequel, we will see that the square residual error for the approximate solutions, belongs to the interval [0.001918936920, 0.06334882582], which confirms the accuracy of the proposed methods, taking into account the complexity and difficulty of variational problems. PMID:27006884

  13. Calculation of the neutron diffusion equation by using Homotopy Perturbation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koklu, H.; Ersoy, A.; Gulecyuz, M. C.; Ozer, O.

    2016-03-01

    The distribution of the neutrons in a nuclear fuel element in the nuclear reactor core can be calculated by the neutron diffusion theory. It is the basic and the simplest approximation for the neutron flux function in the reactor core. In this study, the neutron flux function is obtained by the Homotopy Perturbation Method (HPM) that is a new and convenient method in recent years. One-group time-independent neutron diffusion equation is examined for the most solved geometrical reactor core of spherical, cubic and cylindrical shapes, in the frame of the HPM. It is observed that the HPM produces excellent results consistent with the existing literature.

  14. Application of He's homotopy perturbation method to boundary layer flow and convection heat transfer over a flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeilpour, M.; Ganji, D. D.

    2007-12-01

    In this Letter, the problem of forced convection over a horizontal flat plate is presented and the homotopy perturbation method (HPM) is employed to compute an approximation to the solution of the system of nonlinear differential equations governing on the problem. It has been attempted to show the capabilities and wide-range applications of the homotopy perturbation method in comparison with the previous ones in solving heat transfer problems. The obtained solutions, in comparison with the exact solutions admit a remarkable accuracy. A clear conclusion can be drawn from the numerical results that the HPM provides highly accurate numerical solutions for nonlinear differential equations.

  15. A Homotopy Perturbation-Based Method for Large Deflection of a Cantilever Beam Under a Terminal Follower Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong-Gang; Lin, Wen-Hui; Liu, Ning

    2012-05-01

    The large deflection problem of a uniform cantilever beam subjected to a terminal concentrated follower force is investigated. The governing equations, which characterize a two-point boundary value problem, are transformed into an initial-value problem. A new algorithm based on the homotopy perturbation method is proposed and applied to the resulting problem and the characteristics of load versus displacement are obtained analytically. The convergence of this method is discussed and the details of load-deflection curves are present. Compared with other existing methods, the present scheme is shown to be highly accurate, while only lower order perturbation is required.

  16. A novel solution procedure for a three-level atom interacting with one-mode cavity field via modified homotopy analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Wahab, N. H.; Salah, Ahmed

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, the interaction of a three-level -configration atom and a one-mode quantized electromagnetic cavity field has been studied. The detuning parameters, the Kerr nonlinearity and the arbitrary form of both the field and intensity-dependent atom-field coupling have been taken into account. The wave function when the atom and the field are initially prepared in the excited state and coherent state, respectively, by using the Schrödinger equation has been given. The analytical approximation solution of this model has been obtained by using the modified homotopy analysis method (MHAM). The homotopy analysis method is mentioned summarily. MHAM can be obtained from the homotopy analysis method (HAM) applied to Laplace, inverse Laplace transform and Pade approximate. MHAM is used to increase the accuracy and accelerate the convergence rate of truncated series solution obtained by the HAM. The time-dependent parameters of the anti-bunching of photons, the amplitude-squared squeezing and the coherent properties have been calculated. The influence of the detuning parameters, Kerr nonlinearity and photon number operator on the temporal behavior of these phenomena have been analyzed. We noticed that the considered system is sensitive to variations in the presence of these parameters.

  17. Density perturbations in general modified gravitational theories

    SciTech Connect

    De Felice, Antonio; Tsujikawa, Shinji; Mukohyama, Shinji

    2010-07-15

    We derive the equations of linear cosmological perturbations for the general Lagrangian density f(R,{phi},X)/2+L{sub c}, where R is a Ricci scalar, {phi} is a scalar field, and X=-{partial_derivative}{sup {mu}{phi}{partial_derivative}}{sub {mu}{phi}/}2 is a field kinetic energy. We take into account a nonlinear self-interaction term L{sub c}={xi}({phi}) {open_square}{phi}({partial_derivative}{sup {mu}{phi}{partial_derivative}}{sub {mu}{phi}}) recently studied in the context of ''Galileon'' cosmology, which keeps the field equations at second order. Taking into account a scalar-field mass explicitly, the equations of matter density perturbations and gravitational potentials are obtained under a quasistatic approximation on subhorizon scales. We also derive conditions for the avoidance of ghosts and Laplacian instabilities associated with propagation speeds. Our analysis includes most of modified gravity models of dark energy proposed in literature; and thus it is convenient to test the viability of such models from both theoretical and observational points of view.

  18. Homotopy optimization methods for global optimization.

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlavy, Daniel M.; O'Leary, Dianne P.

    2005-12-01

    We define a new method for global optimization, the Homotopy Optimization Method (HOM). This method differs from previous homotopy and continuation methods in that its aim is to find a minimizer for each of a set of values of the homotopy parameter, rather than to follow a path of minimizers. We define a second method, called HOPE, by allowing HOM to follow an ensemble of points obtained by perturbation of previous ones. We relate this new method to standard methods such as simulated annealing and show under what circumstances it is superior. We present results of extensive numerical experiments demonstrating performance of HOM and HOPE.

  19. Computing model independent perturbations in dark energy and modified gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Battye, Richard A.; Pearson, Jonathan A. E-mail: jonathan.pearson@durham.ac.uk

    2014-03-01

    We present a methodology for computing model independent perturbations in dark energy and modified gravity. This is done from the Lagrangian for perturbations, by showing how field content, symmetries, and physical principles are often sufficient ingredients for closing the set of perturbed fluid equations. The fluid equations close once ''equations of state for perturbations'' are identified: these are linear combinations of fluid and metric perturbations which construct gauge invariant entropy and anisotropic stress perturbations for broad classes of theories. Our main results are the proof of the equation of state for perturbations presented in a previous paper, and the development of the required calculational tools.

  20. Modified contour-improved perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Cvetic, Gorazd; Loewe, Marcelo; Martinez, Cristian; Valenzuela, Cristian

    2010-11-01

    The semihadronic tau decay width allows a clean extraction of the strong coupling constant at low energies. We present a modification of the standard ''contour-improved'' method based on a derivative expansion of the Adler function. The new approach has some advantages compared to contour-improved perturbation theory. The renormalization scale dependence is weaker by more than a factor of 2 and the last term of the expansion is reduced by about 10%, while the renormalization scheme dependence remains approximately equal. The extracted QCD coupling at the tau mass scale is by 2% lower than the contour-improved value. We find {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z}{sup 2})=0.1211{+-}0.0010.

  1. Perturbations of single-field inflation in modified gravity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Taotao; Xia, Jun-Qing

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we study the case of single field inflation within the framework of modified gravity theory where the gravity part has an arbitrary form f (R). Via a conformal transformation, this case can be transformed into its Einstein frame where it looks like a two-field inflation model. However, due to the existence of the isocurvature modes in such a multi-degree-of-freedom (m.d.o.f.) system, the (curvature) perturbations are not equivalent in two frames, so despite of its convenience, it is illegal to treat the perturbations in its Einstein frame as the "real" ones as we always do for pure f (R) theory or single field with nonminimal coupling. Here by pulling the results of curvature perturbations back into its original Jordan frame, we show explicitly the power spectrum and spectral index of the perturbations in the Jordan frame, as well as how it differs from the Einstein frame. We also fit our results with the newest Planck data. Since there is large parameter space in these models, we show that it is easy to fit the data very well.

  2. Modified artificial bee colony optimization with block perturbation strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Dongli; Duan, Xintao; Khurram Khan, Muhammad

    2015-05-01

    As a newly emerged swarm intelligence-based optimizer, the artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm has attracted the interest of researchers in recent years owing to its ease of use and efficiency. In this article, a modified ABC algorithm with block perturbation strategy (BABC) is proposed. Unlike basic ABC, in the BABC algorithm, not one element but a block of elements from the parent solutions is changed while producing a new solution. The performance of the BABC algorithm is investigated and compared with that of the basic ABC, modified ABC, Brest's differential evolution, self-adaptive differential evolution and restart covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy (IPOP-CMA-ES) over a set of widely used benchmark functions. The obtained results show that the performance of BABC is better than, or at least comparable to, that of the basic ABC, improved differential evolution variants and IPOP-CMA-ES in terms of convergence speed and final solution accuracy.

  3. Vacuum structure for scalar cosmological perturbations in modified gravity models

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, Antonio De; Suyama, Teruaki E-mail: teruaki.suyama@uclouvain.be

    2009-06-01

    We have found for the general class of Modified Gravity Models f(R, G) a new instability which can arise in vacuum for the scalar modes of the cosmological perturbations if the background is not de Sitter. In particular, the short-wavelength modes, if stable, in general have a group velocity which depends linearly in k, the wave number. Therefore these modes will be in general superluminal. We have also discussed the condition for which in general these scalar modes will be ghost-like. There is a subclass of these models, defined out of properties of the function f(R, G) and to which the f(R) and f(G) models belong, which however do not have this feature.

  4. Noncommutative geometry modified non-Gaussianities of cosmological perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Kejie; Xue Wei; Chen Bin

    2008-03-15

    We investigate the noncommutative effect on the non-Gaussianities of primordial cosmological perturbation. In the lowest order of string length and slow-roll parameter, we find that in the models with small speed of sound the noncommutative modifications could be observable if assuming a relatively low string scale. In particular, the dominant modification of the non-Gaussianity estimator f{sub NL} could reach O(1) in Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) inflation and K-inflation. The corrections are sensitive to the speed of sound and the choice of string length scale. Moreover the shapes of the corrected non-Gaussianities are distinct from that of ordinary ones.

  5. Practical approach to cosmological perturbations in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestri, Alessandra; Pogosian, Levon; Buniy, Roman V.

    2013-05-01

    The next generation of large scale surveys will not only measure cosmological parameters within the framework of general relativity, but will also allow for precision tests of the framework itself. At the order of linear perturbations, departures from the growth in the standard cosmological model can be quantified in terms of two functions of time and Fourier number k. We argue that in local theories of gravity, in the quasistatic approximation, these functions must be ratios of polynomials in k, with the numerator of one function being equal to the denominator of the other. Moreover, the polynomials are even and of second degree in practically all viable models considered today. This means that, without significant loss of generality, one can use data to constrain only five functions of a single variable, instead of two functions of two variables. Furthermore, since the five functions are expected to be slowly varying, one can fit them to data in a nonparametric way with the aid of an explicit smoothness prior. We discuss practical application of this parametrization to forecasts and fits.

  6. Open-closed homotopy algebra in mathematical physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kajiura, Hiroshige; Stasheff, Jim

    2006-02-15

    In this paper we discuss various aspects of open-closed homotopy algebras (OCHAs) presented in our previous paper, inspired by Zwiebach's open-closed string field theory, but that first paper concentrated on the mathematical aspects. Here we show how an OCHA is obtained by extracting the tree part of Zwiebach's quantum open-closed string field theory. We clarify the explicit relation of an OCHA with Kontsevich's deformation quantization and with the B-models of homological mirror symmetry. An explicit form of the minimal model for an OCHA is given as well as its relation to the perturbative expansion of open-closed string field theory. We show that our open-closed homotopy algebra gives us a general scheme for deformation of open string structures (A{sub {infinity}} algebras) by closed strings (L{sub {infinity}} algebras)

  7. Homotopy theory in toric topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grbić, J.; Theriault, S.

    2016-04-01

    In toric topology one associates with each simplicial complex K on m vertices two key spaces, the Davis-Januszkiewicz space DJK and the moment-angle complex \\mathscr{Z}K, which are related by a homotopy fibration \\mathscr{Z}K\\xrightarrow{\\tilde{w}}DJ_K\\to \\prodi=1m{C}P∞. A great deal of work has been done to study the properties of DJK and \\mathscr{Z}K, their generalizations to polyhedral products, and applications to algebra, combinatorics, and geometry. Chap. 1 surveys some of the main results in the homotopy theory of these spaces. Chap. 2 breaks new ground by initiating a study of the map \\tilde{w}. It is shown that, for a certain family of simplicial complexes K, the map \\tilde{w} is a sum of higher and iterated Whitehead products. Bibliography: 49 titles.

  8. Perturbations of Schwarzschild black holes in Chern-Simons modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunes, Nicolás; Sopuerta, Carlos F.

    2008-03-01

    We study perturbations of a Schwarzschild black hole in Chern-Simons modified gravity. We begin by showing that Birkhoff’s theorem holds for a wide family of Chern-Simons coupling functions, a scalar field present in the theory that controls the strength of the Chern-Simons correction to the Einstein-Hilbert action. After decomposing the perturbations in spherical harmonics, we study the linearized modified field equations and find that axial and polar modes are coupled, in contrast to general relativity. The divergence of the modified equations leads to the Pontryagin constraint, which forces the vanishing of the Cunningham-Price-Moncrief master function associated with axial modes. We analyze the structure of these equations and find that the appearance of the Pontryagin constraint yields an overconstrained system that does not allow for generic black hole oscillations. We illustrate this situation by studying the case characterized by a canonical choice of the coupling function and pure-parity perturbative modes. We end with a discussion of how to extend Chern-Simons modified gravity to bypass the Pontryagin constraint and the suppression of perturbations.

  9. A cohomological framework for homotopy moment maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frégier, Yaël; Laurent-Gengoux, Camille; Zambon, Marco

    2015-11-01

    Given a Lie group acting on a manifold M preserving a closed n + 1-form ω, the notion of homotopy moment map for this action was introduced in Fregier (0000), in terms of L∞-algebra morphisms. In this note we describe homotopy moment maps as coboundaries of a certain complex. This description simplifies greatly computations, and we use it to study various properties of homotopy moment maps: their relation to equivariant cohomology, their obstruction theory, how they induce new ones on mapping spaces, and their equivalences. The results we obtain extend some of the results of Fregier (0000).

  10. Homotopy Classification of Bosonic String Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münster, Korbinian; Sachs, Ivo

    2014-09-01

    We prove the decomposition theorem for the loop homotopy Lie algebra of quantum closed string field theory and use it to show that closed string field theory is unique up to gauge transformations on a given string background and given S-matrix. For the theory of open and closed strings we use results in open-closed homotopy algebra to show that the space of inequivalent open string field theories is isomorphic to the space of classical closed string backgrounds. As a further application of the open-closed homotopy algebra, we show that string field theory is background independent and locally unique in a very precise sense. Finally, we discuss topological string theory in the framework of homotopy algebras and find a generalized correspondence between closed strings and open string field theories.

  11. Homotopy invariance of η-invariants

    PubMed Central

    Weinberger, Shmuel

    1988-01-01

    Intersection homology and results related to the higher signature problem are applied to show that certain combinations of η-invariants of the signature operator are homotopy invariant in various circumstances. PMID:16593961

  12. Matter density perturbations in modified gravity models with arbitrary coupling between matter and geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nesseris, Savvas

    2009-02-15

    We consider theories with an arbitrary coupling between matter and gravity and obtain the perturbation equation of matter on subhorizon scales. Also, we derive the effective gravitational constant G{sub eff} and two parameters {sigma} and {eta}, which along with the perturbation equation of the matter density are useful to constrain the theory from growth factor and weak lensing observations. Finally, we use a completely solvable toy model which exhibits nontrivial phenomenology to investigate specific features of the theory. We obtain the analytic solution of the modified Friedmann equation for the scale factor a in terms of time t and use the age of the oldest star clusters and the primordial nucleosynthesis bounds in order to constrain the parameters of our toy model.

  13. On the selection of auxiliary functions, operators, and convergence control parameters in the application of the Homotopy Analysis Method to nonlinear differential equations: A general approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Gorder, Robert A.; Vajravelu, K.

    2009-12-01

    The Homotopy Analysis Method of Liao [Liao SJ. Beyond perturbation: introduction to the Homotopy Analysis Method. Boca Raton: Chapman & Hall/CRC Press; 2003] has proven useful in obtaining analytical solutions to various nonlinear differential equations. In this method, one has great freedom to select auxiliary functions, operators, and parameters in order to ensure the convergence of the approximate solutions and to increase both the rate and region of convergence. We discuss in this paper the selection of the initial approximation, auxiliary linear operator, auxiliary function, and convergence control parameter in the application of the Homotopy Analysis Method, in a fairly general setting. Further, we discuss various convergence requirements on solutions.

  14. An Efficient Algorithm for Perturbed Orbit Integration Combining Analytical Continuation and Modified Chebyshev Picard Iteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgohary, T.; Kim, D.; Turner, J.; Junkins, J.

    2014-09-01

    Several methods exist for integrating the motion in high order gravity fields. Some recent methods use an approximate starting orbit, and an efficient method is needed for generating warm starts that account for specific low order gravity approximations. By introducing two scalar Lagrange-like invariants and employing Leibniz product rule, the perturbed motion is integrated by a novel recursive formulation. The Lagrange-like invariants allow exact arbitrary order time derivatives. Restricting attention to the perturbations due to the zonal harmonics J2 through J6, we illustrate an idea. The recursively generated vector-valued time derivatives for the trajectory are used to develop a continuation series-based solution for propagating position and velocity. Numerical comparisons indicate performance improvements of ~ 70X over existing explicit Runge-Kutta methods while maintaining mm accuracy for the orbit predictions. The Modified Chebyshev Picard Iteration (MCPI) is an iterative path approximation method to solve nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The MCPI utilizes Picard iteration with orthogonal Chebyshev polynomial basis functions to recursively update the states. The key advantages of the MCPI are as follows: 1) Large segments of a trajectory can be approximated by evaluating the forcing function at multiple nodes along the current approximation during each iteration. 2) It can readily handle general gravity perturbations as well as non-conservative forces. 3) Parallel applications are possible. The Picard sequence converges to the solution over large time intervals when the forces are continuous and differentiable. According to the accuracy of the starting solutions, however, the MCPI may require significant number of iterations and function evaluations compared to other integrators. In this work, we provide an efficient methodology to establish good starting solutions from the continuation series method; this warm start improves the performance of the

  15. Nonlinear filters with log-homotopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daum, Fred; Huang, Jim

    2007-09-01

    We derive and test a new nonlinear filter that implements Bayes' rule using an ODE rather than with a pointwise multiplication of two functions. This avoids one of the fundamental and well known problems in particle filters, namely "particle collapse" as a result of Bayes' rule. We use a log-homotopy to construct this ODE. Our new algorithm is vastly superior to the classic particle filter, and we do not use any proposal density supplied by an EKF or UKF or other outside source. This paper was written for normal engineers, who do not have homotopy for breakfast.

  16. Experiments with conjugate gradient algorithms for homotopy curve tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irani, Kashmira M.; Ribbens, Calvin J.; Watson, Layne T.; Kamat, Manohar P.; Walker, Homer F.

    1991-01-01

    There are algorithms for finding zeros or fixed points of nonlinear systems of equations that are globally convergent for almost all starting points, i.e., with probability one. The essence of all such algorithms is the construction of an appropriate homotopy map and then tracking some smooth curve in the zero set of this homotopy map. HOMPACK is a mathematical software package implementing globally convergent homotopy algorithms with three different techniques for tracking a homotopy zero curve, and has separate routines for dense and sparse Jacobian matrices. The HOMPACK algorithms for sparse Jacobian matrices use a preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm for the computation of the kernel of the homotopy Jacobian matrix, a required linear algebra step for homotopy curve tracking. Here, variants of the conjugate gradient algorithm are implemented in the context of homotopy curve tracking and compared with Craig's preconditioned conjugate gradient method used in HOMPACK. The test problems used include actual large scale, sparse structural mechanics problems.

  17. Direct perturbation analysis on the localized waves of the modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation under nonvanishing boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Xu, Tao; Wang, Lei

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation is investigated via the direct perturbation method, which can describe the femtosecond optical pulse propagation in a monomodal optical fiber. Considering the quintic nonlinear perturbation, we obtain the approximate solution with the first-order correction, which can be expressed by the solution and symmetry of the derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Under the nonvanishing boundary conditions, the approximate dark and anti-dark soliton solutions are derived and the existence conditions are also given. The effects of the perturbation on the propagations and interactions of the solitons on the nonzero background are discussed by comparing the physical quantities of solitons with the unperturbed case. It is found that the quintic nonlinear perturbation can lead to the change of the velocity as well as the pulse compression, but has no influence on the dynamics of the elastic interactions. Finally, numerical simulations are performed to support the theoretical results.

  18. Power System Transient Stability Analysis through a Homotopy Analysis Method

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shaobu; Du, Pengwei; Zhou, Ning

    2014-04-01

    As an important function of energy management systems (EMSs), online contingency analysis plays an important role in providing power system security warnings of instability. At present, N-1 contingency analysis still relies on time-consuming numerical integration. To save computational cost, the paper proposes a quasi-analytical method to evaluate transient stability through time domain periodic solutions’ frequency sensitivities against initial values. First, dynamic systems described in classical models are modified into damping free systems whose solutions are either periodic or expanded (non-convergent). Second, because the sensitivities experience sharp changes when periodic solutions vanish and turn into expanded solutions, transient stability is assessed using the sensitivity. Third, homotopy analysis is introduced to extract frequency information and evaluate the sensitivities only from initial values so that time consuming numerical integration is avoided. Finally, a simple case is presented to demonstrate application of the proposed method, and simulation results show that the proposed method is promising.

  19. Modified fractional variational iteration method for solving the generalized time-space fractional Schrödinger equation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Baojian; Lu, Dianchen

    2014-01-01

    Based on He's variational iteration method idea, we modified the fractional variational iteration method and applied it to construct some approximate solutions of the generalized time-space fractional Schrödinger equation (GFNLS). The fractional derivatives are described in the sense of Caputo. With the help of symbolic computation, some approximate solutions and their iterative structure of the GFNLS are investigated. Furthermore, the approximate iterative series and numerical results show that the modified fractional variational iteration method is powerful, reliable, and effective when compared with some classic traditional methods such as homotopy analysis method, homotopy perturbation method, adomian decomposition method, and variational iteration method in searching for approximate solutions of the Schrödinger equations. PMID:25276865

  20. Parameter estimation for metabolic networks with two stage Bregman regularization homotopy inversion algorithm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Wang, Xi-cheng

    2014-02-21

    Metabolism is a very important cellular process and its malfunction contributes to human disease. Therefore, building dynamic models for metabolic networks with experimental data in order to analyze biological process rationally has attracted a lot of attention. Owing to the technical limitations, some unknown parameters contained in models need to be estimated effectively by means of the computational method. Generally, problems of parameter estimation of nonlinear biological network are known to be ill condition and multimodal. In particular, with the increasing amount and enlarging the scope of parameters, many optimization algorithms often fail to find a global solution. In this paper, two-stage variable factor Bregman regularization homotopy method is proposed. Discrete homotopy is used to identify the possible extreme region and continuous homotopy is executed for the purpose of stability of path tracing in the special region. Meanwhile, Latin hypercube sampling is introduced to get the good initial guess value and a perturbation strategy is developed to jump out of the local optimum. Three metabolic network inverse problems are investigated to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:24060619

  1. Co-contraction modifies the stretch reflex elicited in muscles shortened by a joint perturbation

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Gwyn N.; MacKinnon, Colum D.; Trumbower, Randy; Perreault, Eric J.

    2011-01-01

    Simultaneous contraction of agonist and antagonist muscles acting about a joint influences joint stiffness and stability. Although several studies have shown that reflexes in the muscle lengthened by a joint perturbation are modulated during co-contraction, little attention has been given to reflex regulation in the antagonist (shortened) muscle. The goal of the present study was to determine whether co-contraction gives rise to altered reflex regulation across the joint by examining reflexes in the muscle shortened by a joint perturbation. Reflexes were recorded from electromyographic activity in elbow flexors and extensors while positional perturbations to the elbow joint were applied. Perturbations were delivered during isolated activation of the flexor or extensor muscles as well as during flexor and extensor co-contraction. Across the group, the shortening reflex in the elbow extensor switched from suppression during isolated extensor muscle activation to facilitation during co-contraction. The shortening reflex in the elbow flexor remained suppressive during co-contraction but was significantly smaller compared to the response obtained during isolated elbow flexor activation. This response in the shortened muscle was graded by the level of activation in the lengthened muscle. The lengthening reflex did not change during co-contraction. These results support the idea that reflexes are regulated across multiple muscles around a joint. We speculate that the facilitatory response in the shortened muscle arises through a fast-conducting oligosynaptic pathway involving Ib interneurons. PMID:20878148

  2. New exact solutions to the perturbed nonlinear Schrödinger’s equation with Kerr law nonlinearity via modified trigonometric function series method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zai-yun; Li, Yun-xiang; Liu, Zhen-hai; Miao, Xiu-jin

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, the modified trigonometric function series method is employed to solve the perturbed nonlinear Schrödinger's equation (NLSE) with Kerr law nonlinearity. Exact traveling wave solutions are obtained.

  3. From Atiyah Classes to Homotopy Leibniz Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhuo; Stiénon, Mathieu; Xu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    A celebrated theorem of Kapranov states that the Atiyah class of the tangent bundle of a complex manifold X makes T X [-1] into a Lie algebra object in D + ( X), the bounded below derived category of coherent sheaves on X. Furthermore, Kapranov proved that, for a Kähler manifold X, the Dolbeault resolution {Ω^{bullet-1}(T_X^{1, 0})} of T X [-1] is an L ∞ algebra. In this paper, we prove that Kapranov's theorem holds in much wider generality for vector bundles over Lie pairs. Given a Lie pair ( L, A), i.e. a Lie algebroid L together with a Lie subalgebroid A, we define the Atiyah class α E of an A-module E as the obstruction to the existence of an A- compatible L-connection on E. We prove that the Atiyah classes α L/ A and α E respectively make L/ A[-1] and E[-1] into a Lie algebra and a Lie algebra module in the bounded below derived category {D^+(A)} , where {A} is the abelian category of left {U(A)} -modules and {U(A)} is the universal enveloping algebra of A. Moreover, we produce a homotopy Leibniz algebra and a homotopy Leibniz module stemming from the Atiyah classes of L/ A and E, and inducing the aforesaid Lie structures in {D^+(A)}.

  4. Experimental Perturbations Modify the Performance of Early Warning Indicators of Regime Shift.

    PubMed

    Benedetti-Cecchi, Lisandro; Tamburello, Laura; Maggi, Elena; Bulleri, Fabio

    2015-07-20

    Ecosystems may shift abruptly between alternative states in response to environmental perturbations. Early warning indicators have been proposed to anticipate such regime shifts, but experimental field tests of their validity are rare. We exposed rocky intertidal algal canopies to a gradient of press perturbations and recorded the response of associated assemblages over 7 years. Reduced cover and biomass of algal canopies promoted the invasion of algal turfs, driving understory assemblages toward collapse upon total canopy removal. A dynamic model indicated the existence of a critical threshold separating the canopy- and turf-dominated states. We evaluated common indicators of regime shift as the system approached the threshold, including autocorrelation, SD, and skewness. These indicators captured changes in understory cover due to colonization of algal turfs. All indicators increased significantly as the system approached the critical threshold, in agreement with theoretical predictions. The performance of indicators changed when we superimposed a pulse disturbance on the press perturbation that amplified environmental noise. This treatment caused several experimental units to switch repeatedly between the canopy- and the turf-dominated state, resulting in a significant increase in overall variance of understory cover, a negligible effect on skewness and no effect on autocorrelation. Power analysis indicated that autocorrelation and SD were better suited at anticipating a regime shift under mild and strong fluctuations of the state variable, respectively. Our results suggest that regime shifts may be anticipated under a broad range of fluctuating conditions using the appropriate indicator. PMID:26166776

  5. Open-Closed Homotopy Algebras and Strong Homotopy Leibniz Pairs Through Koszul Operad Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefel, Eduardo; Livernet, Muriel

    2012-08-01

    Open-closed homotopy algebras (OCHA) and strong homotopy Leibniz pairs (SHLP) were introduced by Kajiura and Stasheff in 2004. In an appendix to their paper, Markl observed that an SHLP is equivalent to an algebra over the minimal model of a certain operad, without showing that the operad is Koszul. In the present paper, we show that both OCHA and SHLP are algebras over the minimal model of the zeroth homology of two versions of the Swiss-cheese operad and prove that these two operads are Koszul. As an application, we show that the OCHA operad is non-formal as a 2-colored operad but is formal as an algebra in the category of 2-collections.

  6. Efficient Homotopy Continuation Algorithms with Application to Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David A.

    New homotopy continuation algorithms are developed and applied to a parallel implicit finite-difference Newton-Krylov-Schur external aerodynamic flow solver for the compressible Euler, Navier-Stokes, and Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation turbulence model. Many new analysis tools, calculations, and numerical algorithms are presented for the study and design of efficient and robust homotopy continuation algorithms applicable to solving very large and sparse nonlinear systems of equations. Several specific homotopies are presented and studied and a methodology is presented for assessing the suitability of specific homotopies for homotopy continuation. . A new class of homotopy continuation algorithms, referred to as monolithic homotopy continuation algorithms, is developed. These algorithms differ from classical predictor-corrector algorithms by combining the predictor and corrector stages into a single update, significantly reducing the amount of computation and avoiding wasted computational effort resulting from over-solving in the corrector phase. The new algorithms are also simpler from a user perspective, with fewer input parameters, which also improves the user's ability to choose effective parameters on the first flow solve attempt. Conditional convergence is proved analytically and studied numerically for the new algorithms. The performance of a fully-implicit monolithic homotopy continuation algorithm is evaluated for several inviscid, laminar, and turbulent flows over NACA 0012 airfoils and ONERA M6 wings. The monolithic algorithm is demonstrated to be more efficient than the predictor-corrector algorithm for all applications investigated. It is also demonstrated to be more efficient than the widely-used pseudo-transient continuation algorithm for all inviscid and laminar cases investigated, and good performance scaling with grid refinement is demonstrated for the inviscid cases. Performance is also demonstrated

  7. Homotopy Algorithm for Optimal Control Problems with a Second-order State Constraint

    SciTech Connect

    Hermant, Audrey

    2010-02-15

    This paper deals with optimal control problems with a regular second-order state constraint and a scalar control, satisfying the strengthened Legendre-Clebsch condition. We study the stability of structure of stationary points. It is shown that under a uniform strict complementarity assumption, boundary arcs are stable under sufficiently smooth perturbations of the data. On the contrary, nonreducible touch points are not stable under perturbations. We show that under some reasonable conditions, either a boundary arc or a second touch point may appear. Those results allow us to design an homotopy algorithm which automatically detects the structure of the trajectory and initializes the shooting parameters associated with boundary arcs and touch points.

  8. Benchmark of a modified iterated perturbation theory approach on the fcc lattice at strong coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Louis-François; Sémon, Patrick; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    2012-08-01

    The dynamical mean-field theory approach to the Hubbard model requires a method to solve the problem of a quantum impurity in a bath of noninteracting electrons. Iterated perturbation theory (IPT) has proven its effectiveness as a solver in many cases of interest. Based on general principles and on comparisons with an essentially exact continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo (CTQMC) solver, here we show that the standard implementation of IPT fails away from half-filling when the interaction strength is much larger than the bandwidth. We propose a slight modification to the IPT algorithm that replaces one of the equations by the requirement that double occupancy calculated with IPT gives the correct value. We call this method IPT-D. We recover the Fermi liquid ground state away from half-filling. The Fermi liquid parameters, density of states, chemical potential, energy, and specific heat on the fcc lattice are calculated with both IPT-D and CTQMC as benchmark examples. We also calculated the resistivity and the optical conductivity within IPT-D. Particle-hole asymmetry persists even at coupling twice the bandwidth. A generalization to the multiorbital case is suggested. Several algorithms that speed up the calculations are described in appendixes.

  9. A Choice Reaction Time Index of Callosal Anatomical Homotopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desjardins, Sameul; Braun, Claude M. J.; Achim, Andre; Roberge, Carl

    2009-01-01

    Tachistoscopically presented bilateral stimulus pairs not parallel to the meridian produced significantly longer RTs on a task requiring discrimination of shapes (Go/no-Go) than pairs emplaced symmetrically on each side of the meridian in Desjardins and Braun [Desjardins, S., & Braun, C. M. J. (2006). Homotopy and heterotopy and the bilateral…

  10. Splitting a simple homotopy equivalence along a submanifold with filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Bak, A; Muranov, Yu V

    2008-06-30

    A simple homotopy equivalence f:M{sup n}{yields}X{sup n} of manifolds splits along a submanifold Y subset of X if it is homotopic to a map that is a simple homotopy equivalence on the transversal preimage of the submanifold and on the complement of this preimage. The problem of splitting along a submanifold with filtration is a natural generalization of this problem. In this paper we define groups LSF{sub *} of obstructions to splitting along a submanifold with filtration and describe their properties. We apply the results obtained to the problem of the realization of surgery and splitting obstructions by maps of closed manifolds and consider several examples. Bibliography: 36 titles.

  11. Homotopy theory of strong and weak topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Ricardo; Guggenheim, Charles

    2015-06-01

    We use homotopy theory to extend the notion of strong and weak topological insulators to the nonstable regime (low numbers of occupied/empty energy bands). We show that for strong topological insulators in d spatial dimensions to be "truly d -dimensional," i.e., not realizable by stacking lower-dimensional insulators, a more restrictive definition of "strong" is required outside the stable regime. However, this does not exclude weak topological insulators from being "truly d -dimensional," which we demonstrate by an example. Additionally, we prove some useful technical results, including the homotopy theoretic derivation of the factorization of invariants over the torus into invariants over spheres in the stable regime, as well as the rigorous justification of the parameter space replacements Td→Sd and Tdk×Sdx→Sdk+dx used widely in the current literature.

  12. Dynamic homotopy and landscape dynamical set topology in quantum control

    SciTech Connect

    Dominy, Jason; Rabitz, Herschel

    2012-08-15

    We examine the topology of the subset of controls taking a given initial state to a given final state in quantum control, where 'state' may mean a pure state Double-Vertical-Line {psi}>, an ensemble density matrix {rho}, or a unitary propagator U(0, T). The analysis consists in showing that the endpoint map acting on control space is a Hurewicz fibration for a large class of affine control systems with vector controls. Exploiting the resulting fibration sequence and the long exact sequence of basepoint-preserving homotopy classes of maps, we show that the indicated subset of controls is homotopy equivalent to the loopspace of the state manifold. This not only allows us to understand the connectedness of 'dynamical sets' realized as preimages of subsets of the state space through this endpoint map, but also provides a wealth of additional topological information about such subsets of control space.

  13. Particle flow for nonlinear filters with log-homotopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daum, Fred; Huang, Jim

    2008-04-01

    We describe a new nonlinear filter that is vastly superior to the classic particle filter. In particular, the computational complexity of the new filter is many orders of magnitude less than the classic particle filter with optimal estimation accuracy for problems with dimension greater than 2 or 3. We consider nonlinear estimation problems with dimensions varying from 1 to 20 that are smooth and fully coupled (i.e. dense not sparse). The new filter implements Bayes' rule using particle flow rather than with a pointwise multiplication of two functions; this avoids one of the fundamental and well known problems in particle filters, namely "particle collapse" as a result of Bayes' rule. We use a log-homotopy to derive the ODE that describes particle flow. This paper was written for normal engineers, who do not have homotopy for breakfast.

  14. On the singular perturbations for fractional differential equation.

    PubMed

    Atangana, Abdon

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to examine the possible extension of the singular perturbation differential equation to the concept of fractional order derivative. To achieve this, we presented a review of the concept of fractional calculus. We make use of the Laplace transform operator to derive exact solution of singular perturbation fractional linear differential equations. We make use of the methodology of three analytical methods to present exact and approximate solution of the singular perturbation fractional, nonlinear, nonhomogeneous differential equation. These methods are including the regular perturbation method, the new development of the variational iteration method, and the homotopy decomposition method. PMID:24683357

  15. Homotopy of rational maps and the quantization of Skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krusch, Steffen

    2003-04-01

    The Skyrme model is a classical field theory which models the strong interaction between atomic nuclei. It has to be quantized in order to compare it to nuclear physics. When the Skyrme model is semi-classically quantized it is important to take the Finkelstein-Rubinstein constraints into account. The aim of this paper is to show how to calculate these FR constraints directly from the rational map ansatz using basic homotopy theory. We then apply this construction in order to quantize the Skyrme model in the simplest approximation, the zero mode quantization. This is carried out for up to 22 nucleons and the results are compared to experiment.

  16. Topological phases: Isomorphism, homotopy and K-theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiang, Guo Chuan

    2015-06-01

    Equivalence classes of gapped Hamiltonians compatible with given symmetry constraints, such as those underlying topological insulators, can be defined in many ways. For the non-chiral classes modeled by vector bundles over Brillouin tori, physically relevant equivalences include isomorphism, homotopy, and K-theory, which are inequivalent but closely related. We discuss an important subtlety which arises in the chiral Class AIII systems, where the winding number invariant is shown to be relative rather than absolute as is usually assumed. These issues are then analyzed and reconciled in the language of K-theory.

  17. An Investigation of How a Meteor Light Curve is Modified by Meteor Shape and Atmospheric Density Perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokan, E.; Campbell-Brown, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    This is a preliminary investigation of how perturbations to meteoroid shape or atmospheric density affect a meteor light curve. A simple equation of motion and ablation are simultaneously solved numerically to give emitted light intensity as a function of height. It is found that changing the meteoroid shape, by changing the relationship between the cross-section area and the mass, changes the curvature and symmetry of the light curve, while making a periodic oscillation in atmospheric density gives a small periodic oscillation in the light curve.

  18. Modified Iterated perturbation theory in the strong coupling regime and its application to the 3d FCC lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Louis-François; Sémon, Patrick; Shastry, B. Sriram; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    2012-02-01

    The Dynamical Mean-Field theory(DMFT) approach to the Hubbard model requires a method to solve the problem of a quantum impurity in a bath of non-interacting electrons. Iterated Perturbation Theory(IPT)[1] has proven its effectiveness as a solver in many cases of interest. Based on general principles and on comparisons with an essentially exact Continuous-Time Quantum Monte Carlo (CTQMC)[2], here we show that the standard implementation of IPT fails when the interaction is much larger than the bandwidth. We propose a slight modification to the IPT algorithm by requiring that double occupancy calculated with IPT gives the correct value. We call this method IPT-D. We show how this approximate impurity solver compares with respect to CTQMC. We consider a face centered cubic lattice(FCC) in 3d for different physical properties. We also use IPT-D to study the thermopower using two recently proposed approximations[3]S^* and SKelvin that do not require analytical continuation and show how thermopower is essentially the entropy per particle in the incoherent regime but not in the coherent one.[1]H.Kajueter et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 131(1996)[2]P. Werner, et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 076405(2006)[3]B.S. Sriram Shastry Rep. Prog. Phys. 72 016501(2009)

  19. Generalized perturbation (n, M)-fold Darboux transformations and multi-rogue-wave structures for the modified self-steepening nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiao-Yong; Yang, Yunqing; Yan, Zhenya

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a simple and constructive method is presented to find the generalized perturbation (n,M)-fold Darboux transformations (DTs) of the modified nonlinear Schrödinger (MNLS) equation in terms of fractional forms of determinants. In particular, we apply the generalized perturbation (1,N-1)-fold DTs to find its explicit multi-rogue-wave solutions. The wave structures of these rogue-wave solutions of the MNLS equation are discussed in detail for different parameters, which display abundant interesting wave structures, including the triangle and pentagon, etc., and may be useful to study the physical mechanism of multirogue waves in optics. The dynamical behaviors of these multi-rogue-wave solutions are illustrated using numerical simulations. The same Darboux matrix can also be used to investigate the Gerjikov-Ivanov equation such that its multi-rogue-wave solutions and their wave structures are also found. The method can also be extended to find multi-rogue-wave solutions of other nonlinear integrable equations. PMID:26274257

  20. The order of a homotopy invariant in the stable case

    SciTech Connect

    Podkorytov, Semen S

    2011-08-31

    Let X, Y be cell complexes, let U be an Abelian group, and let f:[X,Y]{yields}U be a homotopy invariant. By definition, the invariant f has order at most r if the characteristic function of the rth Cartesian power of the graph of a continuous map a:X{yields}Y determines the value f([a]) Z-linearly. It is proved that, in the stable case (that is, when dimX<2n-1, and Y is (n-1)-connected for some natural number n), for a finite cell complex X the order of the invariant f is equal to its degree with respect to the Curtis filtration of the group [X,Y]. Bibliography: 9 titles.

  1. Note on unit tangent vector computation for homotopy curve tracking on a hypercube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakraborty, A.; Allison, D. C. S.; Ribbens, C. J.; Watson, L. T.

    1991-01-01

    Probability-one homotopy methods are a class of methods for solving nonlinear systems of equations that are globally convergent from an arbitrary starting point. The essence of all such algorithms is the construction of an appropriate homotopy map and subsequent tracking of some smooth curve in the zero set of the homotopy map. Tracking a homotopy curve involves finding the unit tangent vector at different points along the zero curve, which amounts to calculating the kernel of the n x (n + 1) Jacobian matrix. While computing the tangent vector is just one part of the curve tracking algorithm, it can require a significant percentage of the total tracking time. This note presents computational results showing the performance of several different parallel orthogonal factorization/triangular system solving algorithms for the tangent vector computation on a hypercube.

  2. A monolithic homotopy continuation algorithm with application to computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David A.; Zingg, David W.

    2016-09-01

    A new class of homotopy continuation methods is developed suitable for globalizing quasi-Newton methods for large sparse nonlinear systems of equations. The new continuation methods, described as monolithic homotopy continuation, differ from the classical predictor-corrector algorithm in that the predictor and corrector phases are replaced with a single phase which includes both a predictor and corrector component. Conditional convergence and stability are proved analytically. Using a Laplacian-like operator to construct the homotopy, the new algorithm is shown to be more efficient than the predictor-corrector homotopy continuation algorithm as well as an implementation of the widely-used pseudo-transient continuation algorithm for some inviscid and turbulent, subsonic and transonic external aerodynamic flows over the ONERA M6 wing and the NACA 0012 airfoil using a parallel implicit Newton-Krylov finite-difference flow solver.

  3. Single-shooting homotopy method for parameter identification in dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Vyasarayani, C P; Uchida, Thomas; McPhee, John

    2012-03-01

    An algorithm for identifying parameters in dynamical systems is developed in this work using homotopy transformations and the single-shooting method. The equations governing the dynamics of the mathematical model are augmented with observer-like homotopy terms that smooth the objective function. As a result, premature convergence to a local minimum is avoided and the obtained parameter estimates are globally optimal. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the application of the proposed approach to chaotic systems. PMID:22587155

  4. Stable homotopy classification of A n 4 -polyhedra with 2- torsion free homology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, JianZhong; Zhu, ZhongJian

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study the stable homotopy types of $\\mathbf{F}^4_{n(2)}$-polyhedra, i.e., $(n-1)$-connected, at most $(n+4)$-dimensional polyhedra with 2-torsion free homologies. We are able to classify the indecomposable $\\mathbf{F}^4_{n(2)}$-polyhedra. The proof relies on the matrix problem technique which was developed in the classification of representaions of algebras and applied to homotopy theory by Baues and Drozd.

  5. On the complexity of a combined homotopy interior method for convex programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bo; Xu, Qing; Feng, Guochen

    2007-03-01

    In [G.C. Feng, Z.H. Lin, B. Yu, Existence of an interior pathway to a Karush-Kuhn-Tucker point of a nonconvex programming problem, Nonlinear Anal. 32 (1998) 761-768; G.C. Feng, B. Yu, Combined homotopy interior point method for nonlinear programming problems, in: H. Fujita, M. Yamaguti (Eds.), Advances in Numerical Mathematics, Proceedings of the Second Japan-China Seminar on Numerical Mathematics, Lecture Notes in Numerical and Applied Analysis, vol. 14, Kinokuniya, Tokyo, 1995, pp. 9-16; Z.H. Lin, B. Yu, G.C. Feng, A combined homotopy interior point method for convex programming problem, Appl. Math. Comput. 84 (1997) 193-211.], a combined homotopy was constructed for solving non-convex programming and convex programming with weaker conditions, without assuming the logarithmic barrier function to be strictly convex and the solution set to be bounded. It was proven that a smooth interior path from an interior point of the feasible set to a K-K-T point of the problem exists. This shows that combined homotopy interior point methods can solve the problem that commonly used interior point methods cannot solveE However, so far, there is no result on its complexity, even for linear programming. The main difficulty is that the objective function is not monotonically decreasing on the combined homotopy path. In this paper, by taking a piecewise technique, under commonly used conditions, polynomiality of a combined homotopy interior point method is given for convex nonlinear programming.

  6. Electronic and optical properties of pure and modified diamondoids studied by many-body perturbation theory and time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Demján, Tamás; Vörös, Márton; Palummo, Maurizia; Gali, Adam

    2014-08-14

    Diamondoids are small diamond nanoparticles (NPs) that are built up from diamond cages. Unlike usual semiconductor NPs, their atomic structure is exactly known, thus they are ideal test-beds for benchmarking quantum chemical calculations. Their usage in spintronics and bioimaging applications requires a detailed knowledge of their electronic structure and optical properties. In this paper, we apply density functional theory (DFT) based methods to understand the electronic and optical properties of a few selected pure and modified diamondoids for which accurate experimental data exist. In particular, we use many-body perturbation theory methods, in the G0W0 and G0W0+BSE approximations, and time-dependent DFT in the adiabatic local density approximation. We find large quasiparticle gap corrections that can exceed thrice the DFT gap. The electron-hole binding energy can be as large as 4 eV but it is considerably smaller than the GW corrections and thus G0W0+BSE optical gaps are about 50% larger than the Kohn-Sham (KS) DFT gaps. We find significant differences between KS time-dependent DFT and GW+BSE optical spectra on the selected diamondoids. The calculated G0W0 quasiparticle levels agree well with the corresponding experimental vertical ionization energies. We show that nuclei dynamics in the ionization process can be significant and its contribution may reach about 0.5 eV in the adiabatic ionization energies. PMID:25134572

  7. Numerical Polynomial Homotopy Continuation Method and String Vacua

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mehta, Dhagash

    2011-01-01

    Finding vmore » acua for the four-dimensional effective theories for supergravity which descend from flux compactifications and analyzing them according to their stability is one of the central problems in string phenomenology. Except for some simple toy models, it is, however, difficult to find all the vacua analytically. Recently developed algorithmic methods based on symbolic computer algebra can be of great help in the more realistic models. However, they suffer from serious algorithmic complexities and are limited to small system sizes. In this paper, we review a numerical method called the numerical polynomial homotopy continuation (NPHC) method, first used in the areas of lattice field theories, which by construction finds all of the vacua of a given potential that is known to have only isolated solutions. The NPHC method is known to suffer from no major algorithmic complexities and is embarrassingly parallelizable , and hence its applicability goes way beyond the existing symbolic methods. We first solve a simple toy model as a warm-up example to demonstrate the NPHC method at work. We then show that all the vacua of a more complicated model of a compactified M theory model, which has an S U ( 3 ) structure, can be obtained by using a desktop machine in just about an hour, a feat which was reported to be prohibitively difficult by the existing symbolic methods. Finally, we compare the various technicalities between the two methods.« less

  8. Molecular Dynamics Investigations of the Local Structural Characteristics of DNA Oligonucleotides: Studies of Helical Axis Deformations, Conformational Sequence Dependence and Modified Nucleoside Perturbations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louise-May, Shirley

    The present DNA studies investigate the local structure of DNA oligonucleotides in order to characterize helical axis deformations, sequence dependent fine structure and modified nucleoside perturbations of selected oligonucleotide sequences. The molecular dynamics method is used to generate an ensemble of energetically feasible DNA conformations which can then be analyzed for dynamical conformational properties, some of which can be compared to experimentally derived values. A theory and graphical presentation for the analysis of helical deformations of DNA based on the configurational statistics of polymers, called "Persistence Analysis", was designed. The results of the analysis on prototype forms, static crystal structures and two solvated MD simulations of the sequence d(CGCGAATTCGCG) indicate that all of the expected features of bending can be sensitively and systematically identified by this approach. Comparison of the relative performance of three molecular dynamics potential functions commonly used for dynamical modeling of biological macromolecules; CHARMm, AMBER and GROMOS was investigated via in vacuo MD simulations on the dodecamer sequence d(CGCGAATTCGCG)_2 with respect to the conformational properties of each dynamical model and their ability to support A and B families of DNA. Vacuum molecular dynamics simulations using the CHARMm force field carried out on simple homo- and heteropolymers of DNA led to the conclusion that sequence dependent fine structure appears to be well defined for adenine-thymine rich sequences both at the base pair and base step level whereas much of the the fine structure found in cytosine -guanine rich sequences appears to be context dependent. The local conformational properties of the homopolymer poly (dA) -poly (dT) revealed one dynamical model which was found in general agreement with fiber models currently available. Investigation of the relative structural static and dynamical effect of the misincorporation of

  9. A homotopy algorithm for digital optimal projection control GASD-HADOC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Emmanuel G., Jr.; Richter, Stephen; Davis, Lawrence D.

    1993-01-01

    The linear-quadratic-gaussian (LQG) compensator was developed to facilitate the design of control laws for multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) systems. The compensator is computed by solving two algebraic equations for which standard closed-loop solutions exist. Unfortunately, the minimal dimension of an LQG compensator is almost always equal to the dimension of the plant and can thus often violate practical implementation constraints on controller order. This deficiency is especially highlighted when considering control-design for high-order systems such as flexible space structures. This deficiency motivated the development of techniques that enable the design of optimal controllers whose dimension is less than that of the design plant. A homotopy approach based on the optimal projection equations that characterize the necessary conditions for optimal reduced-order control. Homotopy algorithms have global convergence properties and hence do not require that the initializing reduced-order controller be close to the optimal reduced-order controller to guarantee convergence. However, the homotopy algorithm previously developed for solving the optimal projection equations has sublinear convergence properties and the convergence slows at higher authority levels and may fail. A new homotopy algorithm for synthesizing optimal reduced-order controllers for discrete-time systems is described. Unlike the previous homotopy approach, the new algorithm is a gradient-based, parameter optimization formulation and was implemented in MATLAB. The results reported may offer the foundation for a reliable approach to optimal, reduced-order controller design.

  10. Electronic and optical properties of pure and modified diamondoids studied by many-body perturbation theory and time-dependent density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Demján, Tamás; Vörös, Márton; Palummo, Maurizia; Gali, Adam

    2014-08-14

    Diamondoids are small diamond nanoparticles (NPs) that are built up from diamond cages. Unlike usual semiconductor NPs, their atomic structure is exactly known, thus they are ideal test-beds for benchmarking quantum chemical calculations. Their usage in spintronics and bioimaging applications requires a detailed knowledge of their electronic structure and optical properties. In this paper, we apply density functional theory (DFT) based methods to understand the electronic and optical properties of a few selected pure and modified diamondoids for which accurate experimental data exist. In particular, we use many-body perturbation theory methods, in the G{sub 0}W{sub 0} and G{sub 0}W{sub 0}+BSE approximations, and time-dependent DFT in the adiabatic local density approximation. We find large quasiparticle gap corrections that can exceed thrice the DFT gap. The electron-hole binding energy can be as large as 4 eV but it is considerably smaller than the GW corrections and thus G{sub 0}W{sub 0}+BSE optical gaps are about 50% larger than the Kohn-Sham (KS) DFT gaps. We find significant differences between KS time-dependent DFT and GW+BSE optical spectra on the selected diamondoids. The calculated G{sub 0}W{sub 0} quasiparticle levels agree well with the corresponding experimental vertical ionization energies. We show that nuclei dynamics in the ionization process can be significant and its contribution may reach about 0.5 eV in the adiabatic ionization energies.

  11. Global Study of the Simple Pendulum by the Homotopy Analysis Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bel, A.; Reartes, W.; Torresi, A.

    2012-01-01

    Techniques are developed to find all periodic solutions in the simple pendulum by means of the homotopy analysis method (HAM). This involves the solution of the equations of motion in two different coordinate representations. Expressions are obtained for the cycles and periods of oscillations with a high degree of accuracy in the whole range of…

  12. Control optimization of a lifting body entry problem by an improved and a modified method of perturbation function. Ph.D. Thesis - Houston Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, F., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A study of the solution problem of a complex entry optimization was studied. The problem was transformed into a two-point boundary value problem by using classical calculus of variation methods. Two perturbation methods were devised. These methods attempted to desensitize the contingency of the solution of this type of problem on the required initial co-state estimates. Also numerical results are presented for the optimal solution resulting from a number of different initial co-states estimates. The perturbation methods were compared. It is found that they are an improvement over existing methods.

  13. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Defects in liquid crystals: homotopy theory and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurik, Mikhail V.; Lavrentovich, O. D.

    1988-03-01

    The fundamental concepts of the homotopy theory of defects in liquid crystals and the results of experimental studies in this field are presented. The concepts of degeneracy space, homotopy groups, and topological charge, which are used for classifying the topologically stable inhomogeneous distributions in different liquid-crystalline phases are examined (uni and biaxial nematics, cholesterics, smectics, and columnar phases). Experimental data are given for the different mesophases on the structure and properties of dislocations, disclinations, point defects in the volume (hedgehogs) and on the surface of the medium (boojums), monopoles, domain formations, and solitons. Special attention is paid to the results of studies of defects in closed volumes (spherical drops, cylindrical capillaries), and to the connection between the topological charges of these defects and the character of the orientation of the molecules of the liquid crystal at the surface. A set of fundamentally new effects that can occur in studying the topological properties of defects in liquid crystals is discussed.

  14. Tracing structural optima as a function of available resources by a homotopy method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, Raphael T.; Watson, Layne T.; Plaut, Raymond H.; Shin, Yung S.

    1988-01-01

    Optimization problems are typically solved by starting with an initial estimate and proceeding iteratively to improve it until the optimum is found. The design points along the path from the initial estimate to the optimum are usually of no value. The present work proposes a strategy for tracing a path of optimum solutions parameterized by the amount of available resources. The paper specifically treats the optimum design of a structure to maximize its buckling load. Equations for the optimum path are obtained using Lagrange multipliers, and solved by a homotopy method. The solution path has several transitions from unimodal to bimodal solutions. The Lagrange multipliers and second-order optimality conditions are used to detect branching points and to switch to the optimum solution path. The procedure is applied to the design of a foundation which supports a column for maximum buckling load. Using the total available foundation stiffness as a homotopy parameter, a set of optimum foundation designs is obtained.

  15. Solution of the Falkner-Skan wedge flow by a revised optimal homotopy asymptotic method.

    PubMed

    Madaki, A G; Abdulhameed, M; Ali, M; Roslan, R

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a revised optimal homotopy asymptotic method (OHAM) is applied to derive an explicit analytical solution of the Falkner-Skan wedge flow problem. The comparisons between the present study with the numerical solutions using (fourth order Runge-Kutta) scheme and with analytical solution using HPM-Padé of order [4/4] and order [13/13] show that the revised form of OHAM is an extremely effective analytical technique. PMID:27186477

  16. Multivalued behavior for a two-level system using Homotopy Analysis Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquino, A. I.; Bo-ot, L. Ma. T.

    2016-02-01

    We use the Homotopy Analysis Method (HAM) to solve the system of equations modeling the two-level system and extract results which will pinpoint to turbulent behavior. We look at multivalued solutions as indicative of turbulence or turbulent-like behavior. We take different specific cases which result in multivalued velocities. The solutions are in series form and application of HAM ensures convergence in some region.

  17. PERTURBING LIGNIFICATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perturbing lignification is possible in multiple and diverse ways. Without obvious growth/development phenotypes, transgenic angiosperms can have lignin levels reduced to half the normal level, can have compositions ranging from very high-guaiacyl/low-syringyl to almost totally syringyl, and can eve...

  18. Cosmological Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesgourges, J.

    2013-08-01

    We present a self-contained summary of the theory of linear cosmological perturbations. We emphasize the effect of the six parameters of the minimal cosmological model, first, on the spectrum of Cosmic Microwave Background temperature anisotropies, and second, on the linear matter power spectrum. We briefly review at the end the possible impact of a few non-minimal dark matter and dark energy models.

  19. Homotopy Algorithm for Fixed Order Mixed H2/H(infinity) Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whorton, Mark; Buschek, Harald; Calise, Anthony J.

    1996-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of robust multivariable control have merged the theories of H-infinity and H-2 control. This mixed H-2/H-infinity compensator formulation allows design for nominal performance by H-2 norm minimization while guaranteeing robust stability to unstructured uncertainties by constraining the H-infinity norm. A key difficulty associated with mixed H-2/H-infinity compensation is compensator synthesis. A homotopy algorithm is presented for synthesis of fixed order mixed H-2/H-infinity compensators. Numerical results are presented for a four disk flexible structure to evaluate the efficiency of the algorithm.

  20. Development of homotopy algorithms for fixed-order mixed H2/H(infinity) controller synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whorton, M.; Buschek, H.; Calise, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    A major difficulty associated with H-infinity and mu-synthesis methods is the order of the resulting compensator. Whereas model and/or controller reduction techniques are sometimes applied, performance and robustness properties are not preserved. By directly constraining compensator order during the optimization process, these properties are better preserved, albeit at the expense of computational complexity. This paper presents a novel homotopy algorithm to synthesize fixed-order mixed H2/H-infinity compensators. Numerical results are presented for a four-disk flexible structure to evaluate the efficiency of the algorithm.

  1. Communication: Newton homotopies for sampling stationary points of potential energy landscapes

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, Dhagash; Chen, Tianran; Hauenstein, Jonathan D.; Wales, David J.

    2014-09-28

    One of the most challenging and frequently arising problems in many areas of science is to find solutions of a system of multivariate nonlinear equations. There are several numerical methods that can find many (or all if the system is small enough) solutions but they all exhibit characteristic problems. Moreover, traditional methods can break down if the system contains singular solutions. Here, we propose an efficient implementation of Newton homotopies, which can sample a large number of the stationary points of complicated many-body potentials. We demonstrate how the procedure works by applying it to the nearest-neighbor ϕ{sup 4} model and atomic clusters.

  2. A homotopy analysis method for the option pricing PDE in illiquid markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    E-Khatib, Youssef

    2012-09-01

    One of the shortcomings of the Black and Scholes model on option pricing is the assumption that trading the underlying asset does not affect the underlying asset price. This can happen in perfectly liquid markets and it is evidently not viable in markets with imperfect liquidity (illiquid markets). It is well-known that markets with imperfect liquidity are more realistic. Thus, the presence of price impact while studying options is very important. This paper investigates a solution for the option pricing PDE in illiquid markets using the homotopy analysis method.

  3. A homotopy algorithm for synthesizing robust controllers for flexible structures via the maximum entropy design equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Emmanuel G., Jr.; Richter, Stephen

    1990-01-01

    One well known deficiency of LQG compensators is that they do not guarantee any measure of robustness. This deficiency is especially highlighted when considering control design for complex systems such as flexible structures. There has thus been a need to generalize LQG theory to incorporate robustness constraints. Here we describe the maximum entropy approach to robust control design for flexible structures, a generalization of LQG theory, pioneered by Hyland, which has proved useful in practice. The design equations consist of a set of coupled Riccati and Lyapunov equations. A homotopy algorithm that is used to solve these design equations is presented.

  4. Discrete reductive perturbation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, Decio; Petrera, Matteo

    2006-04-15

    We expand a partial difference equation (P{delta}E) on multiple lattices and obtain the P{delta}E which governs its far field behavior. The perturbative-reductive approach is here performed on well-known nonlinear P{delta}Es, both integrable and nonintegrable. We study the cases of the lattice modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equation, the Hietarinta equation, the lattice Volterra-Kac-Van Moerbeke equation and a nonintegrable lattice KdV equation. Such reductions allow us to obtain many new P{delta}Es of the nonlinear Schroedinger type.

  5. Perturbative fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Pirner, H.-J.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan; Tarasov, A. V.

    2008-03-01

    The Berger model of perturbative fragmentation of quarks to pions is improved by providing an absolute normalization and keeping all terms in a (1-z) expansion, which makes the calculation valid at all values of fractional pion momentum z. We also replace the nonrelativistic wave function of a loosely bound pion by the more realistic procedure of projecting to the light-cone pion wave function, which in turn is taken from well known models. The full calculation does not confirm the (1-z){sup 2} behavior of the fragmentation function (FF) predicted in [E. L. Berger, Z. Phys. C 4, 289 (1980); Phys. Lett. 89B, 241 (1980] for z>0.5, and only works at very large z>0.95, where it is in reasonable agreement with phenomenological FFs. Otherwise, we observe quite a different z-dependence which grossly underestimates data at smaller z. The disagreement is reduced after the addition of pions from decays of light vector mesons, but still remains considerable. The process dependent higher twist terms are also calculated exactly and found to be important at large z and/or p{sub T}.

  6. Comparison of two reliable analytical methods based on the solutions of fractional coupled Klein-Gordon-Zakharov equations in plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha Ray, S.; Sahoo, S.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, homotopy perturbation transform method and modified homotopy analysis method have been applied to obtain the approximate solutions of the time fractional coupled Klein-Gordon-Zakharov equations. We consider fractional coupled Klein-Gordon-Zakharov equation with appropriate initial values using homotopy perturbation transform method and modified homotopy analysis method. Here we obtain the solution of fractional coupled Klein-Gordon-Zakharov equation, which is obtained by replacing the time derivatives with a fractional derivatives of order α ∈ (1, 2], β ∈ (1, 2]. Through error analysis and numerical simulation, we have compared approximate solutions obtained by two present methods homotopy perturbation transform method and modified homotopy analysis method. The fractional derivatives here are described in Caputo sense.

  7. On the homotopy type of spaces of Morse functions on surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryavtseva, Elena A

    2013-01-31

    Let M be a smooth closed orientable surface. Let F be the space of Morse functions on M with a fixed number of critical points of each index such that at least {chi}(M)+1 critical points are labelled by different labels (numbered). The notion of a skew cylindric-polyhedral complex is introduced, which generalizes the notion of a polyhedral complex. The skew cylindric-polyhedral complex K-tilde ('the complex of framed Morse functions') associated with the space F is defined. In the case M=S{sup 2} the polytope K-tilde is finite; its Euler characteristic {chi}(K-tilde) is calculated and the Morse inequalities for its Betti numbers {beta}{sub j}(K-tilde) are obtained. The relation between the homotopy types of the polytope K-tilde and the space F of Morse functions equipped with the C{sup {infinity}}-topology is indicated. Bibliography: 51 titles.

  8. Homotopy-Theoretic Study &Atomic-Scale Observation of Vortex Domains in Hexagonal Manganites.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Chiang, Fu-Kuo; Chen, Zhen; Ma, Chao; Chu, Ming-Wen; Chen, Cheng-Hsuan; Tian, Huanfang; Yang, Huaixin; Li, Jianqi

    2016-01-01

    Essential structural properties of the non-trivial "string-wall-bounded" topological defects in hexagonal manganites are studied through homotopy group theory and spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. The appearance of a "string-wall-bounded" configuration in RMnO3 is shown to be strongly linked with the transformation of the degeneracy space. The defect core regions (~50 Å) mainly adopt the continuous U(1) symmetry of the high-temperature phase, which is essential for the formation and proliferation of vortices. Direct visualization of vortex strings at atomic scale provides insight into the mechanisms and macro-behavior of topological defects in crystalline materials. PMID:27324701

  9. Application of Homotopy analysis method for mechanical model of deepwater SCR installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Xiangcheng; Xu, Hang

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, considering the process of deepwater SCR installation with the limitations of small deformation theory of beam and catenary theory, a mechanical model of deepwater SCR installation is given based on large deformation beam model. In the following model, getting the relation of the length of the riser, bending stiffness and the unit weight by dimensional analysis, the simple approximate analytical expressions are obtained by using Homotopy Analysis Method. In the same condition, the calculated results are compared with the proposed approximate analytical expressions, the catenary theory or the commercial software of nonlinear finite element program ORCAFLEX. Hopefully, a convenient and effective method for mechanical model of deepwater SCR installation is provided.

  10. Homotopy-Theoretic Study & Atomic-Scale Observation of Vortex Domains in Hexagonal Manganites

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Chiang, Fu-Kuo; Chen, Zhen; Ma, Chao; Chu, Ming-Wen; Chen, Cheng-Hsuan; Tian, Huanfang; Yang, Huaixin; Li, Jianqi

    2016-01-01

    Essential structural properties of the non-trivial “string-wall-bounded” topological defects in hexagonal manganites are studied through homotopy group theory and spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. The appearance of a “string-wall-bounded” configuration in RMnO3 is shown to be strongly linked with the transformation of the degeneracy space. The defect core regions (~50 Å) mainly adopt the continuous U(1) symmetry of the high-temperature phase, which is essential for the formation and proliferation of vortices. Direct visualization of vortex strings at atomic scale provides insight into the mechanisms and macro-behavior of topological defects in crystalline materials. PMID:27324701

  11. Topological and geometrical quantum computation in cohesive Khovanov homotopy type theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospina, Juan

    2015-05-01

    The recently proposed Cohesive Homotopy Type Theory is exploited as a formal foundation for central concepts in Topological and Geometrical Quantum Computation. Specifically the Cohesive Homotopy Type Theory provides a formal, logical approach to concepts like smoothness, cohomology and Khovanov homology; and such approach permits to clarify the quantum algorithms in the context of Topological and Geometrical Quantum Computation. In particular we consider the so-called "open-closed stringy topological quantum computer" which is a theoretical topological quantum computer that employs a system of open-closed strings whose worldsheets are open-closed cobordisms. The open-closed stringy topological computer is able to compute the Khovanov homology for tangles and for hence it is a universal quantum computer given than any quantum computation is reduced to an instance of computation of the Khovanov homology for tangles. The universal algebra in this case is the Frobenius Algebra and the possible open-closed stringy topological quantum computers are forming a symmetric monoidal category which is equivalent to the category of knowledgeable Frobenius algebras. Then the mathematical design of an open-closed stringy topological quantum computer is involved with computations and theorem proving for generalized Frobenius algebras. Such computations and theorem proving can be performed automatically using the Automated Theorem Provers with the TPTP language and the SMT-solver Z3 with the SMT-LIB language. Some examples of application of ATPs and SMT-solvers in the mathematical setup of an open-closed stringy topological quantum computer will be provided.

  12. The influence of mild carbon dioxide on brain functional homotopy using resting-state fMRI.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Olga; Uh, Jinsoo; Lurie, Daniel; Lu, Hanzhang; Milham, Michael P; Ge, Yulin

    2015-10-01

    Homotopy reflects the intrinsic functional architecture of the brain through synchronized spontaneous activity between corresponding bilateral regions, measured as voxel mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC). Hypercapnia is known to have clear impact on brain hemodynamics through vasodilation, but have unclear effect on neuronal activity. This study investigates the effect of hypercapnia on brain homotopy, achieved by breathing 5% carbon dioxide (CO2 ) gas mixture. A total of 14 healthy volunteers completed three resting state functional MRI (RS-fMRI) scans, the first and third under normocapnia and the second under hypercapnia. VMHC measures were calculated as the correlation between the BOLD signal of each voxel and its counterpart in the opposite hemisphere. Group analysis was performed between the hypercapnic and normocapnic VMHC maps. VMHC showed a diffused decrease in response to hypercapnia. Significant regional decreases in VMHC were observed in all anatomical lobes, except for the occipital lobe, in the following functional hierarchical subdivisions: the primary sensory-motor, unimodal, heteromodal, paralimbic, as well as in the following functional networks: ventral attention, somatomotor, default frontoparietal, and dorsal attention. Our observation that brain homotopy in RS-fMRI is affected by arterial CO2 levels suggests that caution should be used when comparing RS-fMRI data between healthy controls and patients with pulmonary diseases and unusual respiratory patterns such as sleep apnea or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:26138728

  13. A fast and accurate sparse continuous signal reconstruction by homotopy DCD with non-convex regularization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianyun; Lu, Xinfei; Yu, Xiaofei; Xi, Zhendong; Chen, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, various applications regarding sparse continuous signal recovery such as source localization, radar imaging, communication channel estimation, etc., have been addressed from the perspective of compressive sensing (CS) theory. However, there are two major defects that need to be tackled when considering any practical utilization. The first issue is off-grid problem caused by the basis mismatch between arbitrary located unknowns and the pre-specified dictionary, which would make conventional CS reconstruction methods degrade considerably. The second important issue is the urgent demand for low-complexity algorithms, especially when faced with the requirement of real-time implementation. In this paper, to deal with these two problems, we have presented three fast and accurate sparse reconstruction algorithms, termed as HR-DCD, Hlog-DCD and Hlp-DCD, which are based on homotopy, dichotomous coordinate descent (DCD) iterations and non-convex regularizations, by combining with the grid refinement technique. Experimental results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms and related analysis. PMID:24675758

  14. Piecewise-homotopy analysis method (P-HAM) for first order nonlinear ODE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, F. Y.; Lem, K. H.; Chong, F. S.

    2013-09-01

    In homotopy analysis method (HAM), the determination for the value of the auxiliary parameter h is based on the valid region of the h-curve in which the horizontal segment of the h-curve will decide the valid h-region. All h-value taken from the valid region, provided that the order of deformation is large enough, will in principle yield an approximation series that converges to the exact solution. However it is found out that the h-value chosen within this valid region does not always promise a good approximation under finite order. This paper suggests an improved method called Piecewise-HAM (P-HAM). In stead of a single h-value, this method suggests using many h-values. Each of the h-values comes from an individual h-curve while each h-curve is plotted by fixing the time t at a different value. Each h-value is claimed to produce a good approximation only about a neighborhood centered at the corresponding t which the h-curve is based on. Each segment of these good approximations is then joined to form the approximation curve. By this, the convergence region is enhanced further. The P-HAM is illustrated and supported by examples.

  15. A Fast and Accurate Sparse Continuous Signal Reconstruction by Homotopy DCD with Non-Convex Regularization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tianyun; Lu, Xinfei; Yu, Xiaofei; Xi, Zhendong; Chen, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, various applications regarding sparse continuous signal recovery such as source localization, radar imaging, communication channel estimation, etc., have been addressed from the perspective of compressive sensing (CS) theory. However, there are two major defects that need to be tackled when considering any practical utilization. The first issue is off-grid problem caused by the basis mismatch between arbitrary located unknowns and the pre-specified dictionary, which would make conventional CS reconstruction methods degrade considerably. The second important issue is the urgent demand for low-complexity algorithms, especially when faced with the requirement of real-time implementation. In this paper, to deal with these two problems, we have presented three fast and accurate sparse reconstruction algorithms, termed as HR-DCD, Hlog-DCD and Hlp-DCD, which are based on homotopy, dichotomous coordinate descent (DCD) iterations and non-convex regularizations, by combining with the grid refinement technique. Experimental results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms and related analysis. PMID:24675758

  16. Cosmological perturbations in unimodular gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Caixia; Brandenberger, Robert H.; Cai, Yifu; Chen, Pisin E-mail: rhb@hep.physics.mcgill.ca E-mail: chen@slac.stanford.edu

    2014-09-01

    We study cosmological perturbation theory within the framework of unimodular gravity. We show that the Lagrangian constraint on the determinant of the metric required by unimodular gravity leads to an extra constraint on the gauge freedom of the metric perturbations. Although the main equation of motion for the gravitational potential remains the same, the shift variable, which is gauge artifact in General Relativity, cannot be set to zero in unimodular gravity. This non-vanishing shift variable affects the propagation of photons throughout the cosmological evolution and therefore modifies the Sachs-Wolfe relation between the relativistic gravitational potential and the microwave temperature anisotropies. However, for adiabatic fluctuations the difference between the result in General Relativity and unimodular gravity is suppressed on large angular scales. Thus, no strong constraints on the theory can be derived.

  17. Density perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Palenik, Mark C.; Dunlap, Brett I.

    2015-07-28

    Despite the fundamental importance of electron density in density functional theory, perturbations are still usually dealt with using Hartree-Fock-like orbital equations known as coupled-perturbed Kohn-Sham (CPKS). As an alternative, we develop a perturbation theory that solves for the perturbed density directly, removing the need for CPKS. This replaces CPKS with a true Hohenberg-Kohn density perturbation theory. In CPKS, the perturbed density is found in the basis of products of occupied and virtual orbitals, which becomes ever more over-complete as the size of the orbital basis set increases. In our method, the perturbation to the density is expanded in terms of a series of density basis functions and found directly. It is possible to solve for the density in such a way that it makes the total energy stationary even if the density basis is incomplete.

  18. A homotopy-based sparse representation for fast and accurate shape prior modeling in liver surgical planning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guotai; Zhang, Shaoting; Xie, Hongzhi; Metaxas, Dimitris N; Gu, Lixu

    2015-01-01

    Shape prior plays an important role in accurate and robust liver segmentation. However, liver shapes have complex variations and accurate modeling of liver shapes is challenging. Using large-scale training data can improve the accuracy but it limits the computational efficiency. In order to obtain accurate liver shape priors without sacrificing the efficiency when dealing with large-scale training data, we investigate effective and scalable shape prior modeling method that is more applicable in clinical liver surgical planning system. We employed the Sparse Shape Composition (SSC) to represent liver shapes by an optimized sparse combination of shapes in the repository, without any assumptions on parametric distributions of liver shapes. To leverage large-scale training data and improve the computational efficiency of SSC, we also introduced a homotopy-based method to quickly solve the L1-norm optimization problem in SSC. This method takes advantage of the sparsity of shape modeling, and solves the original optimization problem in SSC by continuously transforming it into a series of simplified problems whose solution is fast to compute. When new training shapes arrive gradually, the homotopy strategy updates the optimal solution on the fly and avoids re-computing it from scratch. Experiments showed that SSC had a high accuracy and efficiency in dealing with complex liver shape variations, excluding gross errors and preserving local details on the input liver shape. The homotopy-based SSC had a high computational efficiency, and its runtime increased very slowly when repository's capacity and vertex number rose to a large degree. When repository's capacity was 10,000, with 2000 vertices on each shape, homotopy method cost merely about 11.29 s to solve the optimization problem in SSC, nearly 2000 times faster than interior point method. The dice similarity coefficient (DSC), average symmetric surface distance (ASD), and maximum symmetric surface distance measurement

  19. Automated Lattice Perturbation Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    I review recent developments in automated lattice perturbation theory. Starting with an overview of lattice perturbation theory, I focus on the three automation packages currently "on the market": HiPPy/HPsrc, Pastor and PhySyCAl. I highlight some recent applications of these methods, particularly in B physics. In the final section I briefly discuss the related, but distinct, approach of numerical stochastic perturbation theory.

  20. Frame independent cosmological perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Prokopec, Tomislav; Weenink, Jan E-mail: j.g.weenink@uu.nl

    2013-09-01

    We compute the third order gauge invariant action for scalar-graviton interactions in the Jordan frame. We demonstrate that the gauge invariant action for scalar and tensor perturbations on one physical hypersurface only differs from that on another physical hypersurface via terms proportional to the equation of motion and boundary terms, such that the evolution of non-Gaussianity may be called unique. Moreover, we demonstrate that the gauge invariant curvature perturbation and graviton on uniform field hypersurfaces in the Jordan frame are equal to their counterparts in the Einstein frame. These frame independent perturbations are therefore particularly useful in relating results in different frames at the perturbative level. On the other hand, the field perturbation and graviton on uniform curvature hypersurfaces in the Jordan and Einstein frame are non-linearly related, as are their corresponding actions and n-point functions.

  1. Minimum-fuel station-change for geostationary satellites using low-thrust considering perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, ShuGe; Zhang, JingRui

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this paper is to find the minimum-fuel station change for geostationary satellites with low-thrust while considering significant perturbation forces for geostationary Earth orbit (GEO). The effect of Earth's triaxiality, lunisolar perturbations, and solar radiation pressure on the terminal conditions of a long duration GEO transfer is derived and used for establishing the station change model with consideration of significant perturbation forces. A method is presented for analytically evaluating the effect of Earth's triaxiality on the semimajor axis and longitude during a station change. The minimum-fuel problem is solved by the indirect optimization method. The easier and related minimum-energy problem is first addressed and then the energy-to-fuel homotopy is employed to finally obtain the solution of the minimum-fuel problem. Several effective techniques are employed in solving the two-point boundary-value problem with a shooting method to overcome the problem of the small convergence radius and the sensitivity of the initial costate variables. These methods include normalization of the initial costate vector, computation of the analytic Jacobians matrix, and switching detection. The simulation results show that the solution of the minimum-fuel station change with low-thrust considering significant perturbation forces can be obtained by applying these preceding techniques.

  2. The Perturbed Puma Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Shu-Jun; Liu, Qiu-Yu

    2012-04-01

    The puma model on the basis of the Lorentz and CPT violation may bring an economical interpretation to the conventional neutrinos oscillation and part of the anomalous oscillations. We study the effect of the perturbation to the puma model. In the case of the first-order perturbation which keeps the (23) interchange symmetry, the mixing matrix element Ue3 is always zero. The nonzero mixing matrix element Ue3 is obtained in the second-order perturbation that breaks the (23) interchange symmetry.

  3. Chiral Perturbation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiburzi, Brian C.

    The era of high-precision lattice QCD has led to synergy between lattice computations and phenomenological input from chiral perturbation theory. We provide an introduction to chiral perturbation theory with a bent towards understanding properties of the nucleon and other low-lying baryons. Four main topics are the basis for this chapter. We begin with a discussion of broken symmetries and the procedure to construct the chiral Lagrangian. The second topic concerns specialized applications of chiral perturbation theory tailored to lattice QCD, such as partial quenching, lattice discretization, and finite-volume effects. We describe inclusion of the nucleon in chiral perturbation theory using a heavy-fermion Euclidean action. Issues of convergence are taken up as our final topic. We consider expansions in powers of the strange-quark mass, and the appearance of unphysical singularities in the heavy-particle formulation. Our aim is to guide lattice practitioners in understanding the predictions chiral perturbation theory makes for baryons, and show how the lattice will play a role in testing the rigor of the chiral expansion at physical values of the quark masses.

  4. Vortex perturbation dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criminale, W. O.; Lasseigne, D. G.; Jackson, T. L.

    1995-01-01

    An initial value approach is used to examine the dynamics of perturbations introduced into a vortex under strain. Both the basic vortex considered and the perturbations are taken as fully three-dimensional. An explicit solution for the time evolution of the vorticity perturbations is given for arbitrary initial vorticity. Analytical solutions for the resulting velocity components are found when the initial vorticity is assumed to be localized. For more general initial vorticity distributions, the velocity components are determined numerically. It is found that the variation in the radial direction of the initial vorticity disturbance is the most important factor influencing the qualitative behavior of the solutions. Transient growth in the magnitude of the velocity components is found to be directly attributable to the compactness of the initial vorticity.

  5. Cosmological perturbations in antigravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oltean, Marius; Brandenberger, Robert

    2014-10-01

    We compute the evolution of cosmological perturbations in a recently proposed Weyl-symmetric theory of two scalar fields with oppositely signed conformal couplings to Einstein gravity. It is motivated from the minimal conformal extension of the standard model, such that one of these scalar fields is the Higgs while the other is a new particle, the dilaton, introduced to make the Higgs mass conformally symmetric. At the background level, the theory admits novel geodesically complete cyclic cosmological solutions characterized by a brief period of repulsive gravity, or "antigravity," during each successive transition from a big crunch to a big bang. For simplicity, we consider scalar perturbations in the absence of anisotropies, with potential set to zero and without any radiation. We show that despite the necessarily wrong-signed kinetic term of the dilaton in the full action, these perturbations are neither ghostlike nor tachyonic in the limit of strongly repulsive gravity. On this basis, we argue—pending a future analysis of vector and tensor perturbations—that, with respect to perturbative stability, the cosmological solutions of this theory are viable.

  6. Semi-computational simulation of magneto-hemodynamic flow in a semi-porous channel using optimal homotopy and differential transform methods.

    PubMed

    Basiri Parsa, A; Rashidi, M M; Anwar Bég, O; Sadri, S M

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, the semi-numerical techniques known as the optimal homotopy analysis method (HAM) and Differential Transform Method (DTM) are applied to study the magneto-hemodynamic laminar viscous flow of a conducting physiological fluid in a semi-porous channel under a transverse magnetic field. The two-dimensional momentum conservation partial differential equations are reduced to ordinary form incorporating Lorentizian magnetohydrodynamic body force terms. These ordinary differential equations are solved by the homotopy analysis method, the differential transform method and also a numerical method (fourth-order Runge-Kutta quadrature with a shooting method), under physically realistic boundary conditions. The homotopy analysis method contains the auxiliary parameter ℏ, which provides us with a simple way to adjust and control the convergence region of solution series. The differential transform method (DTM) does not require an auxiliary parameter and is employed to compute an approximation to the solution of the system of nonlinear differential equations governing the problem. The influence of Hartmann number (Ha) and transpiration Reynolds number (mass transfer parameter, Re) on the velocity profiles in the channel are studied in detail. Interesting fluid dynamic characteristics are revealed and addressed. The HAM and DTM solutions are shown to both correlate well with numerical quadrature solutions, testifying to the accuracy of both HAM and DTM in nonlinear magneto-hemodynamics problems. Both these semi-numerical techniques hold excellent potential in modeling nonlinear viscous flows in biological systems. PMID:23930807

  7. Liouvillian perturbations of black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couch, W. E.; Holder, C. L.

    2007-10-01

    We apply the well-known Kovacic algorithm to find closed form, i.e., Liouvillian solutions, to the differential equations governing perturbations of black holes. Our analysis includes the full gravitational perturbations of Schwarzschild and Kerr, the full gravitational and electromagnetic perturbations of Reissner-Nordstrom, and specialized perturbations of the Kerr-Newman geometry. We also include the extreme geometries. We find all frequencies ω, in terms of black hole parameters and an integer n, which allow Liouvillian perturbations. We display many classes of black hole parameter values and their corresponding Liouvillian perturbations, including new closed-form perturbations of Kerr and Reissner-Nordstrom. We also prove that the only type 1 Liouvillian perturbations of Schwarzschild are the known algebraically special ones and that type 2 Liouvillian solutions do not exist for extreme geometries. In cases where we do not prove the existence or nonexistence of Liouvillian perturbations we obtain sequences of Diophantine equations on which decidability rests.

  8. Topology and perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjavidze, J.

    2000-08-01

    This paper contains description of the fields nonlinear modes successive quantization scheme. It is shown that the path integrals for absorption part of amplitudes are defined on the Dirac (δ-like) functional measure. This permits arbitrary transformation of the functional integral variables. New form of the perturbation theory achieved by mapping the quantum dynamics in the space WG of the (action, angle)-type collective variables. It is shown that the transformed perturbation theory contributions are accumulated exactly on the boundary ∂WG. Abilities of the developed formalism are illustrated by the Coulomb problem. This model is solved in the WC=(angle, angular momentum, Runge-Lentz vector) space and the reason of its exact integrability is emptiness of ∂WC.

  9. Renormalized Lie perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rosengaus, E.; Dewar, R.L.

    1981-07-01

    A Lie operator method for constructing action-angle transformations continuously connected to the identity is developed for area preserving mappings. By a simple change of variable from action to angular frequency a perturbation expansion is obtained in which the small denominators have been renormalized. The method is shown to lead to the same series as the Lagrangian perturbation method of Greene and Percival, which converges on KAM surfaces. The method is not superconvergent, but yields simple recursion relations which allow automatic algebraic manipulation techniques to be used to develop the series to high order. It is argued that the operator method can be justified by analytically continuing from the complex angular frequency plane onto the real line. The resulting picture is one where preserved primary KAM surfaces are continuously connected to one another.

  10. Intermolecular perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, I. C.; Hurst, G. J. B.; Stone, A. J.

    The new intermolecular perturbation theory described in the preceding papers is applied to some van der Waals molecules. HeBe is used as a test case, and the perturbation method converges well at interatomic distances down to about 4 a0, giving results in excellent agreement with supermolecule calculations. ArHF and ArHCl have been studied using large basis sets, and the results agree well with experimental data. The ArHX configuration is favoured over the ArXH configuration mainly because of larger polarization and charge-transfer contributions. In NeH2 the equilibrium geometry is determined by a delicate balance between opposing effects; with a double-zeta-polarization basis the correct configuration is predicted.

  11. Aspects of perturbative unitarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmi, Damiano

    2016-07-01

    We reconsider perturbative unitarity in quantum field theory and upgrade several arguments and results. The minimum assumptions that lead to the largest time equation, the cutting equations and the unitarity equation are identified. Using this knowledge and a special gauge, we give a new, simpler proof of perturbative unitarity in gauge theories and generalize it to quantum gravity, in four and higher dimensions. The special gauge interpolates between the Feynman gauge and the Coulomb gauge without double poles. When the Coulomb limit is approached, the unphysical particles drop out of the cuts and the cutting equations are consistently projected onto the physical subspace. The proof does not extend to nonlocal quantum field theories of gauge fields and gravity, whose unitarity remains uncertain.

  12. Entropy perturbations in N-flation

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Ronggen; Hu Bin; Piao Yunsong

    2009-12-15

    In this paper we study the entropy perturbations in N-flation by using the {delta}N formalism. We calculate the entropy corrections to the power spectrum of the overall curvature perturbation P{sub {zeta}}. We obtain an analytic form of the transfer coefficient T{sub RS}{sup 2}, which describes the correlation between the curvature and entropy perturbations, and investigate its behavior numerically. It turns out that the entropy perturbations cannot be neglected in N-flation because the amplitude of entropy components is approximately in the same order as the adiabatic one at the end of inflation T{sub RS}{sup 2}{approx}O(1). The spectral index n{sub S} is calculated and it becomes smaller after the entropy modes are taken into account, i.e., the spectrum becomes redder, compared to the pure adiabatic case. Finally we study the modified consistency relation of N-flation, and find that the tensor-to-scalar ratio (r{approx_equal}0.006) is greatly suppressed by the entropy modes, compared to the pure adiabatic one (r{approx_equal}0.017) at the end of inflation.

  13. Primordial power spectrum of tensor perturbations in Finsler spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Wang, Sai

    2016-02-01

    We first investigate the gravitational wave in the flat Finsler spacetime. In the Finslerian universe, we derive the perturbed gravitational field equation with tensor perturbations. The Finslerian background spacetime breaks rotational symmetry and induces parity violation. Then we obtain the modified primordial power spectrum of the tensor perturbations. The parity violation feature requires that the anisotropic effect contributes to the TT, TE, EE, BB angular correlation coefficients with l'=l+1 and TB, EB with l'=l. The numerical results show that the anisotropic contributions to the angular correlation coefficients depend on m, and TE and ET angular correlation coefficients are different.

  14. Homotopy semi-numerical simulation of peristaltic flow of generalised Oldroyd-B fluids with slip effects.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Dharmendra; Bég, O Anwar; Curiel-Sosa, J L

    2014-01-01

    This investigation deals with the peristaltic flow of generalised Oldroyd-B fluids (with the fractional model) through a cylindrical tube under the influence of wall slip conditions. The analysis is carried out under the assumptions of long wavelength and low Reynolds number. Analytical approximate solutions are obtained by using the highly versatile and rigorous semi-numerical procedure known as the homotopy analysis method. It is assumed that the cross section of the tube varies sinusoidally along the length of the tube. The effects of the dominant hydromechanical parameters, i.e. fractional parameters, material constants, slip parameter, time and amplitude on the pressure difference across one wavelength, are studied. Graphical plots reveal that the influence of both fractional parameters on pressure is opposite to each other. Interesting responses to a variation in the constants are obtained. Pressure is shown to be reduced by increasing the slip parameter. Furthermore, the pressure in the case of fractional models (fractional Oldroyd-B model and fractional Maxwell model) of viscoelastic fluids is considerably more substantial than that in the corresponding classical viscoelastic models (Oldroyd-B and Maxwell models). Applications of the study arise in biophysical food processing, embryology and gastro-fluid dynamics. PMID:22616875

  15. Dynamic Compressed HRRP Generation for Random Stepped-Frequency Radar Based on Complex-Valued Fast Sequential Homotopy

    PubMed Central

    You, Peng; Liu, Zhen; Wang, Hongqiang; Wei, Xizhang; Li, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Compressed sensing has been applied to achieve high resolution range profiles (HRRPs) using a stepped-frequency radar. In this new scheme, much fewer pulses are required to recover the target's strong scattering centers, which can greatly reduce the coherent processing interval (CPI) and improve the anti-jamming capability. For practical applications, however, the required number of pulses is difficult to determine in advance and any reduction of the transmitted pulses is attractive. In this paper, a dynamic compressed sensing strategy for HRRP generation is proposed, in which the estimated HRRP is updated with sequentially transmitted and received pulses until the proper stopping rules are satisfied. To efficiently implement the sequential update, a complex-valued fast sequential homotopy (CV-FSH) algorithm is developed based on group sparse recovery. This algorithm performs as an efficient recursive procedure of sparse recovery, thus avoiding solving a new optimization problem from scratch. Furthermore, the proper stopping rules are presented according to the special characteristics of HRRP. Therefore, the optimal number of pulses required in each CPI can be sought adapting to the echo signal. The results using simulated and real data show the effectiveness of the proposed approach and demonstrate that the established dynamic strategy is more suitable for uncooperative targets. PMID:24815679

  16. Study of a homotopy continuation method for early orbit determination with the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. L.; Huang, C.

    1986-01-01

    A recent mathematical technique for solving systems of equations is applied in a very general way to the orbit determination problem. The study of this technique, the homotopy continuation method, was motivated by the possible need to perform early orbit determination with the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS), using range and Doppler tracking alone. Basically, a set of six tracking observations is continuously transformed from a set with known solution to the given set of observations with unknown solutions, and the corresponding orbit state vector is followed from the a priori estimate to the solutions. A numerical algorithm for following the state vector is developed and described in detail. Numerical examples using both real and simulated TDRSS tracking are given. A prototype early orbit determination algorithm for possible use in TDRSS orbit operations was extensively tested, and the results are described. Preliminary studies of two extensions of the method are discussed: generalization to a least-squares formulation and generalization to an exhaustive global method.

  17. Adjustments after an ankle dorsiflexion perturbation during human running.

    PubMed

    Scohier, M; De Jaeger, D; Schepens, B

    2012-01-01

    In this study we investigated the effect of a mechanical perturbation of unexpected timing during human running. With the use of a powered exoskeleton, we evoked a dorsiflexion of the right ankle during its swing phase while subjects ran on a treadmill. The perturbation resulted in an increase of the right ankle dorsiflexion of at least 5°. The first two as well as the next five steps after the perturbation were analyzed to observe the possible immediate and late biomechanical adjustments. In all cases subjects continued to run after the perturbation. The immediate adjustments were the greatest and the most frequent when the delay between the right ankle perturbation and the subsequent right foot touch-down was the shortest. For example, the vertical impact peak force was strongly modified on the first step after the perturbations and this adjustment was correlated to a right ankle angle still clearly modified at touch-down. Some late adjustments were observed in the subsequent steps predominantly occurring during left steps. Subjects maintained the step length and the step period as constant as possible by adjusting other step parameters in order to avoid stumbling and continue running at the speed imposed by the treadmill. To our knowledge, our experiments are the first to investigate perturbations of unexpected timing during human running. The results show that humans have a time-dependent, adapted strategy to maintain their running pattern. PMID:21872474

  18. Gauge-invariant perturbation theory for trans-Planckian inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Shankaranarayanan, S.; Lubo, Musongela

    2005-12-15

    The possibility that the scale-invariant inflationary spectrum may be modified due to the hidden assumptions about the Planck scale physics--dubbed as trans-Planckian inflation--has received considerable attention. To mimic the possible trans-Planckian effects, among various models, modified dispersion relations have been popular in the literature. In almost all the earlier analyses, unlike the canonical scalar field driven inflation, the trans-Planckian effects are introduced to the scalar/tensor perturbation equations in an ad hoc manner--without calculating the stress tensor of the cosmological perturbations from the covariant Lagrangian. In this work, we perform the gauge-invariant cosmological perturbations for the single scalar-field inflation with the Jacobson-Corley dispersion relation by computing the fluctuations of all the fields including the unit-timelike vector field which defines a preferred rest frame. We show that: (i) The nonlinear effects introduce corrections only to the perturbed energy density. The corrections to the energy density vanish in the super-Hubble scales. (ii) The scalar perturbations, in general, are not purely adiabatic. (iii) The equation of motion of the Mukhanov-Sasaki variable corresponding to the inflaton field is different from those presumed in the earlier analyses. (iv) The tensor perturbation equation remains unchanged. We perform the classical analysis for the resultant system of equations and also compute the power spectrum of the scalar perturbations in a particular limit. We discuss the implications of our results and compare with the earlier results.

  19. Baryon chiral perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, S.

    2012-03-01

    We provide a short introduction to the one-nucleon sector of chiral perturbation theory and address the issue of power counting and renormalization. We discuss the infrared regularization and the extended on-mass-shell scheme. Both allow for the inclusion of further degrees of freedom beyond pions and nucleons and the application to higher-loop calculations. As applications we consider the chiral expansion of the nucleon mass to order Script O(q6) and the inclusion of vector and axial-vector mesons in the calculation of nucleon form factors. Finally, we address the complex-mass scheme for describing unstable particles in effective field theory.

  20. Perturbative theory for Brownian vortexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyses, Henrique W.; Bauer, Ross O.; Grosberg, Alexander Y.; Grier, David G.

    2015-06-01

    Brownian vortexes are stochastic machines that use static nonconservative force fields to bias random thermal fluctuations into steadily circulating currents. The archetype for this class of systems is a colloidal sphere in an optical tweezer. Trapped near the focus of a strongly converging beam of light, the particle is displaced by random thermal kicks into the nonconservative part of the optical force field arising from radiation pressure, which then biases its diffusion. Assuming the particle remains localized within the trap, its time-averaged trajectory traces out a toroidal vortex. Unlike trivial Brownian vortexes, such as the biased Brownian pendulum, which circulate preferentially in the direction of the bias, the general Brownian vortex can change direction and even topology in response to temperature changes. Here we introduce a theory based on a perturbative expansion of the Fokker-Planck equation for weak nonconservative driving. The first-order solution takes the form of a modified Boltzmann relation and accounts for the rich phenomenology observed in experiments on micrometer-scale colloidal spheres in optical tweezers.

  1. Chiral perturbation theory with nucleons

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, U.G.

    1991-09-01

    I review the constraints posed on the interactions of pions, nucleons and photons by the spontaneously broken chiral symmetry of QCD. The framework to perform these calculations, chiral perturbation theory, is briefly discussed in the meson sector. The method is a simultaneous expansion of the Greens functions in powers of external moments and quark masses around the massless case, the chiral limit. To perform this expansion, use is made of a phenomenological Lagrangian which encodes the Ward-identities and pertinent symmetries of QCD. The concept of chiral power counting is introduced. The main part of the lectures of consists in describing how to include baryons (nucleons) and how the chiral structure is modified by the fact that the nucleon mass in the chiral limit does not vanish. Particular emphasis is put on working out applications to show the strengths and limitations of the methods. Some processes which are discussed are threshold photopion production, low-energy compton scattering off nucleons, {pi}N scattering and the {sigma}-term. The implications of the broken chiral symmetry on the nuclear forces are briefly described. An alternative approach, in which the baryons are treated as very heavy fields, is touched upon.

  2. Perturbative theory for Brownian vortexes.

    PubMed

    Moyses, Henrique W; Bauer, Ross O; Grosberg, Alexander Y; Grier, David G

    2015-06-01

    Brownian vortexes are stochastic machines that use static nonconservative force fields to bias random thermal fluctuations into steadily circulating currents. The archetype for this class of systems is a colloidal sphere in an optical tweezer. Trapped near the focus of a strongly converging beam of light, the particle is displaced by random thermal kicks into the nonconservative part of the optical force field arising from radiation pressure, which then biases its diffusion. Assuming the particle remains localized within the trap, its time-averaged trajectory traces out a toroidal vortex. Unlike trivial Brownian vortexes, such as the biased Brownian pendulum, which circulate preferentially in the direction of the bias, the general Brownian vortex can change direction and even topology in response to temperature changes. Here we introduce a theory based on a perturbative expansion of the Fokker-Planck equation for weak nonconservative driving. The first-order solution takes the form of a modified Boltzmann relation and accounts for the rich phenomenology observed in experiments on micrometer-scale colloidal spheres in optical tweezers. PMID:26172698

  3. Canonical floquet perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlen, David J.

    1992-12-01

    Classical Floquet theory is examined in order to generate a canonical transformation to modal variables for periodic system. This transformation is considered canonical if the periodic matrix of eigenvectors is symplectic at the initial time. Approaches for symplectic normalization of the eigenvectors had to be examined for each of the different Poincare eigenvalue cases. Particular attention was required in the degenerate case, which depended on the solution of a generalized eigenvector. Transformation techniques to ensure real modal variables and real periodic eigenvectors were also needed. Periodic trajectories in the restricted three-body case were then evaluated using the canonical Floquet solution. The system used for analyses is the Sun-Jupiter system. This system was especially useful since it contained two of the more difficult Poincare eigenvalue cases, the degenerate case and the imaginary eigenvalue case. The perturbation solution to the canonical modal variables was examined using both an expansion of the Hamiltonian and using a representation that was considered exact. Both methods compared quite well for small perturbations to the initial condition. As expected, the expansion solution failed first due to truncation after the third order term of the expansion.

  4. Numerical and perturbative computations of solitary waves of the Benjamin-Ono equation with higher order nonlinearity using Christov rational basis functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, John P.; Xu, Zhengjie

    2012-02-01

    Computation of solitons of the cubically-nonlinear Benjamin-Ono equation is challenging. First, the equation contains the Hilbert transform, a nonlocal integral operator. Second, its solitary waves decay only as O(1/∣ x∣ 2). To solve the integro-differential equation for waves traveling at a phase speed c, we introduced the artificial homotopy H( uXX) - c u + (1 - δ) u2 + δu3 = 0, δ ∈ [0, 1] and solved it in two ways. The first was continuation in the homotopy parameter δ, marching from the known Benjamin-Ono soliton for δ = 0 to the cubically-nonlinear soliton at δ = 1. The second strategy was to bypass continuation by numerically computing perturbation series in δ and forming Padé approximants to obtain a very accurate approximation at δ = 1. To further minimize computations, we derived an elementary theorem to reduce the two-parameter soliton family to a parameter-free function, the soliton symmetric about the origin with unit phase speed. Solitons for higher order Benjamin-Ono equations are also computed and compared to their Korteweg-deVries counterparts. All computations applied the pseudospectral method with a basis of rational orthogonal functions invented by Christov, which are eigenfunctions of the Hilbert transform.

  5. Flatbands under correlated perturbations.

    PubMed

    Bodyfelt, Joshua D; Leykam, Daniel; Danieli, Carlo; Yu, Xiaoquan; Flach, Sergej

    2014-12-01

    Flatband networks are characterized by the coexistence of dispersive and flatbands. Flatbands (FBs) are generated by compact localized eigenstates (CLSs) with local network symmetries, based on destructive interference. Correlated disorder and quasiperiodic potentials hybridize CLSs without additional renormalization, yet with surprising consequences: (i) states are expelled from the FB energy E_{FB}, (ii) the localization length of eigenstates vanishes as ξ∼1/ln(E-E_{FB}), (iii) the density of states diverges logarithmically (particle-hole symmetry) and algebraically (no particle-hole symmetry), and (iv) mobility edge curves show algebraic singularities at E_{FB}. Our analytical results are based on perturbative expansions of the CLSs and supported by numerical data in one and two lattice dimensions. PMID:25526142

  6. Flatbands under Correlated Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodyfelt, Joshua D.; Leykam, Daniel; Danieli, Carlo; Yu, Xiaoquan; Flach, Sergej

    2014-12-01

    Flatband networks are characterized by the coexistence of dispersive and flatbands. Flatbands (FBs) are generated by compact localized eigenstates (CLSs) with local network symmetries, based on destructive interference. Correlated disorder and quasiperiodic potentials hybridize CLSs without additional renormalization, yet with surprising consequences: (i) states are expelled from the FB energy EFB, (ii) the localization length of eigenstates vanishes as ξ ˜1 /ln (E -EFB) , (iii) the density of states diverges logarithmically (particle-hole symmetry) and algebraically (no particle-hole symmetry), and (iv) mobility edge curves show algebraic singularities at EFB . Our analytical results are based on perturbative expansions of the CLSs and supported by numerical data in one and two lattice dimensions.

  7. Discrete Newtonian cosmology: perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, George F. R.; Gibbons, Gary W.

    2015-03-01

    In a previous paper (Gibbons and Ellis 2014 Discrete Newtonian cosmology Class. Quantum Grav. 31 025003), we showed how a finite system of discrete particles interacting with each other via Newtonian gravitational attraction would lead to precisely the same dynamical equations for homothetic motion as in the case of the pressure-free Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker cosmological models of general relativity theory, provided the distribution of particles obeys the central configuration equation. In this paper we show that one can obtain perturbed such Newtonian solutions that give the same linearized structure growth equations as in the general relativity case. We also obtain the Dmitriev-Zel’dovich equations for subsystems in this discrete gravitational model, and show how it leads to the conclusion that voids have an apparent negative mass.

  8. Perturbed effects at radiation physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Külahcı, Fatih; Şen, Zekâi

    2013-09-01

    Perturbation methodology is applied in order to assess the linear attenuation coefficient, mass attenuation coefficient and cross-section behavior with random components in the basic variables such as the radiation amounts frequently used in the radiation physics and chemistry. Additionally, layer attenuation coefficient (LAC) and perturbed LAC (PLAC) are proposed for different contact materials. Perturbation methodology provides opportunity to obtain results with random deviations from the average behavior of each variable that enters the whole mathematical expression. The basic photon intensity variation expression as the inverse exponential power law (as Beer-Lambert's law) is adopted for perturbation method exposition. Perturbed results are presented not only in terms of the mean but additionally the standard deviation and the correlation coefficients. Such perturbation expressions provide one to assess small random variability in basic variables.

  9. Homotopy Analysis Method for the heat transfer of a non-Newtonian fluid flow in an axisymmetric channel with a porous wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeilpour, M.; Domairry, G.; Sadoughi, N.; Davodi, A. G.

    2010-09-01

    In this article, a powerful analytical method, called the Homotopy Analysis Method (HAM) is introduced to obtain the exact solutions of heat transfer equation of a non-Newtonian fluid flow in an axisymmetric channel with a porous wall for turbine cooling applications. The HAM is employed to obtain the expressions for velocity and temperature fields. Tables are presented for various parameters on the velocity and temperature fields. These results are compared with the solutions which are obtained by Numerical Methods (NM). Also the convergence of the obtained HAM solution is discussed explicitly. These comparisons show that this analytical method is strongly powerful to solve nonlinear problems arising in heat transfer.

  10. Cosmological perturbations in massive bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Lagos, Macarena; Ferreira, Pedro G. E-mail: p.ferreira1@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of classical scalar, vector and tensor cosmological perturbations in ghost-free massive bigravity. In particular, we find the full evolution equations and analytical solutions in a wide range of regimes. We show that there are viable cosmological backgrounds but, as has been found in the literature, these models generally have exponential instabilities in linear perturbation theory. However, it is possible to find stable scalar cosmological perturbations for a very particular choice of parameters. For this stable subclass of models we find that vector and tensor perturbations have growing solutions. We argue that special initial conditions are needed for tensor modes in order to have a viable model.

  11. Canonical density matrix perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Cawkwell, M J; Rubensson, Emanuel H; Rudberg, Elias

    2015-12-01

    Density matrix perturbation theory [Niklasson and Challacombe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 193001 (2004)] is generalized to canonical (NVT) free-energy ensembles in tight-binding, Hartree-Fock, or Kohn-Sham density-functional theory. The canonical density matrix perturbation theory can be used to calculate temperature-dependent response properties from the coupled perturbed self-consistent field equations as in density-functional perturbation theory. The method is well suited to take advantage of sparse matrix algebra to achieve linear scaling complexity in the computational cost as a function of system size for sufficiently large nonmetallic materials and metals at high temperatures. PMID:26764847

  12. Perturbed atoms in molecules and solids: The PATMOS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Røeggen, Inge; Gao, Bin

    2013-09-01

    A new computational method for electronic-structure studies of molecules and solids is presented. The key element in the new model - denoted the perturbed atoms in molecules and solids model - is the concept of a perturbed atom in a complex. The basic approximation of the new model is unrestricted Hartree Fock (UHF). The UHF orbitals are localized by the Edmiston-Ruedenberg procedure. The perturbed atoms are defined by distributing the orbitals among the nuclei in such a way that the sum of the intra-atomic UHF energies has a minimum. Energy corrections with respect to the UHF energy, are calculated within the energy incremental scheme. The most important three- and four-electron corrections are selected by introducing a modified geminal approach. Test calculations are performed on N2, Li2, and parallel arrays of hydrogen atoms. The character of the perturbed atoms is illustrated by calculations on H2, CH4, and C6H6.

  13. Life expectancy change in perturbed communities: derivation and qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Dambacher, Jeffrey M; Levins, Richard; Rossignol, Philippe A

    2005-09-01

    Pollution, loss of habitat, and climate change are introducing dramatic perturbations to natural communities and affecting public health. Populations in perturbed communities can change dynamically, in both abundance and age structure. While analysis of the community matrix can predict changes in population abundance arising from a sustained or press perturbation, perturbations also have the potential to modify life expectancy, which adds yet another means to falsify experimental hypotheses and to monitor management interventions in natural systems. In some instances, an input to a community will produce no change in the abundance of a population but create a major shift in its mean age. We present an analysis of change in both abundance and life expectancy, leading to a formal quantitative assessment as well as qualitative predictions, and illustrate the usefulness of the technique through general examples relating to vector-borne disease and fisheries. PMID:16043195

  14. Perturbed atoms in molecules and solids: The PATMOS model.

    PubMed

    Røeggen, Inge; Gao, Bin

    2013-09-01

    A new computational method for electronic-structure studies of molecules and solids is presented. The key element in the new model - denoted the perturbed atoms in molecules and solids model - is the concept of a perturbed atom in a complex. The basic approximation of the new model is unrestricted Hartree Fock (UHF). The UHF orbitals are localized by the Edmiston-Ruedenberg procedure. The perturbed atoms are defined by distributing the orbitals among the nuclei in such a way that the sum of the intra-atomic UHF energies has a minimum. Energy corrections with respect to the UHF energy, are calculated within the energy incremental scheme. The most important three- and four-electron corrections are selected by introducing a modified geminal approach. Test calculations are performed on N2, Li2, and parallel arrays of hydrogen atoms. The character of the perturbed atoms is illustrated by calculations on H2, CH4, and C6H6. PMID:24028099

  15. Resumming the string perturbation series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, Alba; Mariño, Marcos; Zakany, Szabolcs

    2015-05-01

    We use the AdS/CFT correspondence to study the resummation of a perturbative genus expansion appearing in the type II superstring dual of ABJM theory. Although the series is Borel summable, its Borel resummation does not agree with the exact non-perturbative answer due to the presence of complex instantons. The same type of behavior appears in the WKB quantization of the quartic oscillator in Quantum Mechanics, which we analyze in detail as a toy model for the string perturbation series. We conclude that, in these examples, Borel summability is not enough for extracting non-perturbative information, due to non-perturbative effects associated to complex instantons. We also analyze the resummation of the genus expansion for topological string theory on local , which is closely related to ABJM theory. In this case, the non-perturbative answer involves membrane instantons computed by the refined topological string, which are crucial to produce a well-defined result. We give evidence that the Borel resummation of the perturbative series requires such a non-perturbative sector.

  16. Computing singularities of perturbation series

    SciTech Connect

    Kvaal, Simen; Jarlebring, Elias; Michiels, Wim

    2011-03-15

    Many properties of current ab initio approaches to the quantum many-body problem, both perturbational and otherwise, are related to the singularity structure of the Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation series. A numerical procedure is presented that in principle computes the complete set of singularities, including the dominant singularity which limits the radius of convergence. The method approximates the singularities as eigenvalues of a certain generalized eigenvalue equation which is solved using iterative techniques. It relies on computation of the action of the Hamiltonian matrix on a vector and does not rely on the terms in the perturbation series. The method can be useful for studying perturbation series of typical systems of moderate size, for fundamental development of resummation schemes, and for understanding the structure of singularities for typical systems. Some illustrative model problems are studied, including a helium-like model with {delta}-function interactions for which Moeller-Plesset perturbation theory is considered and the radius of convergence found.

  17. On dark energy isocurvature perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Xinmin; Li, Mingzhe E-mail: limz@nju.edu.cn

    2011-06-01

    Determining the equation of state of dark energy with astronomical observations is crucially important to understand the nature of dark energy. In performing a likelihood analysis of the data, especially of the cosmic microwave background and large scale structure data the dark energy perturbations have to be taken into account both for theoretical consistency and for numerical accuracy. Usually, one assumes in the global fitting analysis that the dark energy perturbations are adiabatic. In this paper, we study the dark energy isocurvature perturbation analytically and discuss its implications for the cosmic microwave background radiation and large scale structure. Furthermore, with the current astronomical observational data and by employing Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, we perform a global analysis of cosmological parameters assuming general initial conditions for the dark energy perturbations. The results show that the dark energy isocurvature perturbations are very weakly constrained and that purely adiabatic initial conditions are consistent with the data.

  18. Statistical anisotropy of the curvature perturbation from vector field perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Karciauskas, Mindaugas; Lyth, David H.; Rodriguez, Yeinzon E-mail: m.karciauskas@lancaster.ac.uk E-mail: yeinzon.rodriguez@uan.edu.co

    2009-05-15

    The {delta}N formula for the primordial curvature perturbation {zeta} is extended to include vector as well as scalar fields. Formulas for the tree-level contributions to the spectrum and bispectrum of {zeta} are given, exhibiting statistical anisotropy. The one-loop contribution to the spectrum of {zeta} is also worked out. We then consider the generation of vector field perturbations from the vacuum, including the longitudinal component that will be present if there is no gauge invariance. Finally, the {delta}N formula is applied to the vector curvaton and vector inflation models with the tensor perturbation also evaluated in the latter case.

  19. Cosmological perturbations during radion stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashcroft, P. R.; van de Bruck, C.; Davis, A.-C.

    2005-01-01

    We consider the evolution of cosmological perturbations during radion stabilization, which we assume to happen after a period of inflation in the early universe. Concentrating on the Randall-Sundrum brane world scenario, we find that, if matter is present both on the positive and negative tension branes, the coupling of the radion to matter fields could have significant impact on the evolution of the curvature perturbation and on the production of entropy perturbations. We investigate both the case of a long-lived and a short-lived radion and outline similarities and differences to the curvaton scenario.

  20. Causal compensated perturbations in cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeraraghavan, Shoba; Stebbins, Albert

    1990-01-01

    A theoretical framework is developed to calculate linear perturbations in the gravitational and matter fields which arise causally in response to the presence of stiff matter sources in a FRW cosmology. It is shown that, in order to satisfy energy and momentum conservation, the gravitational fields of the source must be compensated by perturbations in the matter and gravitational fields, and the role of such compensation in containing the initial inhomogeneities in their subsequent evolution is discussed. A complete formal solution is derived in terms of Green functions for the perturbations produced by an arbitrary source in a flat universe containing cold dark matter. Approximate Green function solutions are derived for the late-time density perturbations and late-time gravitational waves in a universe containing a radiation fluid. A cosmological energy-momentum pseudotensor is defined to clarify the nature of energy and momentum conservation in the expanding universe.

  1. Isocurvature perturbations in extra radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Koichi; Nakayama, Kazunori; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu E-mail: miyamone@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: oyokazu.sekiguchi@nagoya-u.jp

    2012-02-01

    Recent cosmological observations, including measurements of the CMB anisotropy and the primordial helium abundance, indicate the existence of an extra radiation component in the Universe beyond the standard three neutrino species. In this paper we explore the possibility that the extra radiation has isocurvatrue fluctuations. A general formalism to evaluate isocurvature perturbations in the extra radiation is provided in the mixed inflaton-curvaton system, where the extra radiation is produced by the decay of both scalar fields. We also derive constraints on the abundance of the extra radiation and the amount of its isocurvature perturbation. Current observational data favors the existence of an extra radiation component, but does not indicate its having isocurvature perturbation. These constraints are applied to some particle physics motivated models. If future observations detect isocurvature perturbations in the extra radiation, it will give us a hint to the origin of the extra radiation.

  2. Next-to-leading resummations in cosmological perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Anselmi, Stefano; Matarrese, Sabino; Pietroni, Massimo E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it

    2011-06-01

    One of the nicest results in cosmological perturbation theory is the analytical resummaton of the leading corrections at large momentum, which was obtained by Crocce and Scoccimarro for the propagator in Crocce (2005). Using an exact evolution equation, we generalize this result, by showing that a class of next-to-leading corrections can also be resummed at all orders in perturbation theory. The new corrections modify the propagator by a few percent in the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation range of scales, and therefore cannot be neglected in resummation schemes aiming at an accuracy compatible with future generation galaxy surveys. Similar tools can be employed to derive improved approximations for the Power Spectrum.

  3. Dust-ion-acoustic solitons with transverse perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Moslem, Waleed M.; El-Taibany, W.F.; El-Shewy, E.K.; El-Shamy, E.F.

    2005-05-15

    The ionization source model is considered, for the first time, to study the combined effects of trapped electrons, transverse perturbation, ion streaming velocity, and dust charge fluctuations on the propagation of dust-ion-acoustic solitons in dusty plasmas. The solitary waves are investigated through the derivation of the damped modified Kadomtsev-Petviashivili equation using the reductive perturbation method. Conditions for the formation of solitons as well as their properties are clearly explained. The relevance of our investigation to supernovae shells is also discussed.

  4. Non-adiabatic perturbations in Ricci dark energy model

    SciTech Connect

    Karwan, Khamphee; Thitapura, Thiti E-mail: nanodsci2523@hotmail.com

    2012-01-01

    We show that the non-adiabatic perturbations between Ricci dark energy and matter can grow both on superhorizon and subhorizon scales, and these non-adiabatic perturbations on subhorizon scales can lead to instability in this dark energy model. The rapidly growing non-adiabatic modes on subhorizon scales always occur when the equation of state parameter of dark energy starts to drop towards -1 near the end of matter era, except that the parameter α of Ricci dark energy equals to 1/2. In the case where α = 1/2, the rapidly growing non-adiabatic modes disappear when the perturbations in dark energy and matter are adiabatic initially. However, an adiabaticity between dark energy and matter perturbations at early time implies a non-adiabaticity between matter and radiation, this can influence the ordinary Sachs-Wolfe (OSW) effect. Since the amount of Ricci dark energy is not small during matter domination, the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect is greatly modified by density perturbations of dark energy, leading to a wrong shape of CMB power spectrum. The instability in Ricci dark energy is difficult to be alleviated if the effects of coupling between baryon and photon on dark energy perturbations are included.

  5. Robust stability under additive perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhaya, A.; Desoer, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    A MIMO linear time-invariant feedback system 1S(P,C) is considered which is assumed to be U-stable. The plant P is subjected to an additive perturbation Delta P which is proper but not necessarily stable. It is proved that the perturbed system is U-stable if and only if Delta P(I + Q x Delta P) exp -1 is U-stable.

  6. Modified cyanobacteria

    DOEpatents

    Vermaas, Willem F J.

    2014-06-17

    Disclosed is a modified photoautotrophic bacterium comprising genes of interest that are modified in terms of their expression and/or coding region sequence, wherein modification of the genes of interest increases production of a desired product in the bacterium relative to the amount of the desired product production in a photoautotrophic bacterium that is not modified with respect to the genes of interest.

  7. The Nervous System Uses Nonspecific Motor Learning in Response to Random Perturbations of Varying Nature

    PubMed Central

    Wert, Daniel; Körding, Konrad

    2010-01-01

    We constantly make small errors during movement and use them to adapt our future movements. Movement experiments often probe this error-driven learning by perturbing movements and analyzing the after-effects. Past studies have applied perturbations of varying nature such as visual disturbances, position- or velocity-dependent forces and modified inertia properties of the limb. However, little is known about how the specific nature of a perturbation influences subsequent movements. For a single perturbation trial, the nature of a perturbation may be highly uncertain to the nervous system, given that it receives only noisy information. One hypothesis is that the nervous system can use this rough estimate to partially correct for the perturbation on the next trial. Alternatively, the nervous system could ignore uncertain information about the nature of the perturbation and resort to a nonspecific adaptation. To study how the brain estimates and responds to incomplete sensory information, we test these two hypotheses using a trial-by-trial adaptation experiment. On each trial, the nature of the perturbation was chosen from six distinct types, including a visuomotor rotation and different force fields. We observed that corrective forces aiming to oppose the perturbation in the following trial were independent of the nature of the perturbation. Our results suggest that the nervous system uses a nonspecific strategy when it has high uncertainty about the nature of perturbations during trial-by-trial learning. PMID:20861427

  8. Approximate solution of two-term fractional-order diffusion, wave-diffusion, and telegraph models arising in mathematical physics using optimal homotopy asymptotic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwar, S.; Rashidi, M. M.

    2016-07-01

    This paper deals with the investigation of the analytical approximate solutions for two-term fractional-order diffusion, wave-diffusion, and telegraph equations. The fractional derivatives are defined in the Caputo sense, whose orders belong to the intervals [0,1], (1,2), and [1,2], respectively. In this paper, we extended optimal homotopy asymptotic method (OHAM) for two-term fractional-order wave-diffusion equations. Highly approximate solution is obtained in series form using this extended method. Approximate solution obtained by OHAM is compared with the exact solution. It is observed that OHAM is a prevailing and convergent method for the solutions of nonlinear-fractional-order time-dependent partial differential problems. The numerical results rendering that the applied method is explicit, effective, and easy to use, for handling more general fractional-order wave diffusion, diffusion, and telegraph problems.

  9. Optimal Homotopy Asymptotic Method for Flow and Heat Transfer of a Viscoelastic Fluid in an Axisymmetric Channel with a Porous Wall

    PubMed Central

    Mabood, Fazle; Khan, Waqar A.; Ismail, Ahmad Izani

    2013-01-01

    In this article, an approximate analytical solution of flow and heat transfer for a viscoelastic fluid in an axisymmetric channel with porous wall is presented. The solution is obtained through the use of a powerful method known as Optimal Homotopy Asymptotic Method (OHAM). We obtained the approximate analytical solution for dimensionless velocity and temperature for various parameters. The influence and effect of different parameters on dimensionless velocity, temperature, friction factor, and rate of heat transfer are presented graphically. We also compared our solution with those obtained by other methods and it is found that OHAM solution is better than the other methods considered. This shows that OHAM is reliable for use to solve strongly nonlinear problems in heat transfer phenomena. PMID:24376722

  10. Shock wave perturbation decay in granular materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vogler, Tracy J.

    2015-11-05

    A technique in which the evolution of a perturbation in a shock wave front is monitored as it travels through a sample is applied to granular materials. Although the approach was originally conceived as a way to measure the viscosity of the sample, here it is utilized as a means to probe the deviatoric strength of the material. Initial results for a tungsten carbide powder are presented that demonstrate the approach is viable. Simulations of the experiments using continuum and mesoscale modeling approaches are used to better understand the experiments. The best agreement with the limited experimental data is obtainedmore » for the mesoscale model, which has previously been shown to give good agreement with planar impact results. The continuum simulations indicate that the decay of the perturbation is controlled by material strength but is insensitive to the compaction response. Other sensitivities are assessed using the two modeling approaches. The simulations indicate that the configuration used in the preliminary experiments suffers from certain artifacts and should be modified to remove them. As a result, the limitations of the current instrumentation are discussed, and possible approaches to improve it are suggested.« less

  11. Shock wave perturbation decay in granular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vogler, Tracy J.

    2015-11-05

    A technique in which the evolution of a perturbation in a shock wave front is monitored as it travels through a sample is applied to granular materials. Although the approach was originally conceived as a way to measure the viscosity of the sample, here it is utilized as a means to probe the deviatoric strength of the material. Initial results for a tungsten carbide powder are presented that demonstrate the approach is viable. Simulations of the experiments using continuum and mesoscale modeling approaches are used to better understand the experiments. The best agreement with the limited experimental data is obtained for the mesoscale model, which has previously been shown to give good agreement with planar impact results. The continuum simulations indicate that the decay of the perturbation is controlled by material strength but is insensitive to the compaction response. Other sensitivities are assessed using the two modeling approaches. The simulations indicate that the configuration used in the preliminary experiments suffers from certain artifacts and should be modified to remove them. As a result, the limitations of the current instrumentation are discussed, and possible approaches to improve it are suggested.

  12. Perturbative stability of SFT-based cosmological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Federico; Koshelev, Alexey S.

    2011-05-01

    We review the appearance of multiple scalar fields in linearized SFT based cosmological models with a single non-local scalar field. Some of these local fields are canonical real scalar fields and some are complex fields with unusual coupling. These systems only admit numerical or approximate analysis. We introduce a modified potential for multiple scalar fields that makes the system exactly solvable in the cosmological context of Friedmann equations and at the same time preserves the asymptotic behavior expected from SFT. The main part of the paper consists of the analysis of inhomogeneous cosmological perturbations in this system. We show numerically that perturbations corresponding to the new type of complex fields always vanish. As an example of application of this model we consider an explicit construction of the phantom divide crossing and prove the perturbative stability of this process at the linear order. The issue of ghosts and ways to resolve it are briefly discussed.

  13. Orbit Averaging in Perturbed Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Glen R.

    2015-11-01

    The orbital period is typically much shorter than the time scale for dynamical evolution of large-scale structures in planetary rings. This large separation in time scales motivates the derivation of reduced models by averaging the equations of motion over the local orbit period (Borderies et al. 1985, Shu et al. 1985). A more systematic procedure for carrying out the orbit averaging is to use Lie transform perturbation theory to remove the dependence on the fast angle variable from the problem order-by-order in epsilon, where the small parameter epsilon is proportional to the fractional radial distance from exact resonance. This powerful technique has been developed and refined over the past thirty years in the context of gyrokinetic theory in plasma physics (Brizard and Hahm, Rev. Mod. Phys. 79, 2007). When the Lie transform method is applied to resonantly forced rings near a mean motion resonance with a satellite, the resulting orbit-averaged equations contain the nonlinear terms found previously, but also contain additional nonlinear self-gravity terms of the same order that were missed by Borderies et al. and by Shu et al. The additional terms result from the fact that the self-consistent gravitational potential of the perturbed rings modifies the orbit-averaging transformation at nonlinear order. These additional terms are the gravitational analog of electrostatic ponderomotive forces caused by large amplitude waves in plasma physics. The revised orbit-averaged equations are shown to modify the behavior of nonlinear density waves in planetary rings compared to the previously published theory. This reserach was supported by NASA's Outer Planets Reserach program.

  14. Gravitational waves from perturbed stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, V.

    2011-12-01

    Non radial oscillations of neutron stars are associated with the emission of gravitational waves. The characteristic frequencies of these oscillations can be computed using the theory of stellar perturbations, and they are shown to carry detailed information on the internal structure of the emitting source. Moreover, they appear to be encoded in various radiative processes, as for instance, in the tail of the giant flares of Soft Gamma Repeaters. Thus, their determination is central to the theory of stellar perturbation. A viable approach to the problem consists in formulating this theory as a problem of resonant scattering of gravitational waves incident on the potential barrier generated by the spacetime curvature. This approach discloses some unexpected correspondences between the theory of stellar perturbations and the theory of quantum mechanics, and allows us to predict new relativistic effects.

  15. Gravitational waves from perturbed stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, V.

    2011-03-01

    Non radial oscillations of neutron stars are associated with the emission of gravitational waves. The characteristic frequencies of these oscillations can be computed using the theory of stellar perturbations, and they are shown to carry detailed information on the internal structure of the emitting source. Moreover, they appear to be encoded in various radiative processes, as for instance in the tail of the giant flares of Soft Gamma Repeaters. Thus, their determination is central to the theory of stellar perturbation. A viable approach to the problem consists in formulating this theory as a problem of resonant scattering of gravitational waves incident on the potential barrier generated by the spacetime curvature. This approach discloses some unexpected correspondences between the theory of stellar perturbations and the theory of quantum mechanics, and allows us to predict new relativistic effects.

  16. Jet Perturbation by HE target

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, P; Kuklo, R M

    2001-03-01

    We have previously reported the degree of attenuation and perturbation by a Cu jet passing through Comp B explosive. Similar tests have now been performed with high explosive (HE) targets having CJ pressures higher than and lower than the CJ pressure of Comp B. The explosives were LX-14 and TNT, respectively. We found that the measured exit velocity of the jet where it transitions from perturbed to solid did not vary significantly as a function of HE type for each HE thickness. The radial momentum imparted to the perturbed jet segment did vary as a function of HE type, however, and we report the radial spreading of the jet and the penetration of a downstream target as a function of HE type and thickness.

  17. Perturbed motion at small eccentricities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emel'yanov, N. V.

    2015-09-01

    In the study of the motion of planets and moons, it is often necessary to have a simple approximate analytical motion model, which takes into account major perturbations and preserves almost the same accuracy at long time intervals. A precessing ellipse model is used for this purpose. In this paper, it is shown that for small eccentricities this model of the perturbed orbit does not correspond to body motion characteristics. There is perturbed circular motion with a constant zero mean anomaly. The corresponding solution satisfies the Lagrange equations with respect to Keplerian orbital elements. There are two families of solutions with libration and circulation changes in the mean anomaly close to this particular solution. The paper shows how the eccentricity and mean anomaly change in these solutions. Simple analytical models of the motion of the four closest moons of Jupiter consistent with available ephemerides are proposed, which in turn are obtained by the numerical integration of motion equations and are refined by observations.

  18. Thermal perturbation of the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twigg, L. W.; Endal, A. S.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation of thermal perturbations of the solar convective zone via changes in the mixing length parameter were carried out, with a view toward understanding the possible solar radius and luminosity changes cited in the literature. The results show that: (a) a single perturbation of alpha is probably not the cause of the solar radius change and (b) the parameter W = d lambda nR./d lambda nL. can not be characterized by a single value, as implied in recent work.

  19. Constraining dark sector perturbations II: ISW and CMB lensing tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soergel, B.; Giannantonio, T.; Weller, J.; Battye, R. A.

    2015-02-01

    Any Dark Energy (DE) or Modified Gravity (MG) model that deviates from a cosmological constant requires a consistent treatment of its perturbations, which can be described in terms of an effective entropy perturbation and an anisotropic stress. We have considered a recently proposed generic parameterisation of DE/MG perturbations and compared it to data from the Planck satellite and six galaxy catalogues, including temperature-galaxy (Tg), CMB lensing-galaxy (varphi g) and galaxy-galaxy (gg) correlations. Combining these observables of structure formation with tests of the background expansion allows us to investigate the properties of DE/MG both at the background and the perturbative level. Our constraints on DE/MG are mostly in agreement with the cosmological constant paradigm, while we also find that the constraint on the equation of state w (assumed to be constant) depends on the model assumed for the perturbation evolution. We obtain w=-0.92+0.20-0.16 (95% CL; CMB+gg+Tg) in the entropy perturbation scenario; in the anisotropic stress case the result is w=-0.86+0.17-0.16. Including the lensing correlations shifts the results towards higher values of w. If we include a prior on the expansion history from recent Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) measurements, we find that the constraints tighten closely around w=-1, making it impossible to measure any DE/MG perturbation evolution parameters. If, however, upcoming observations from surveys like DES, Euclid or LSST show indications for a deviation from a cosmological constant, our formalism will be a useful tool towards model selection in the dark sector.

  20. VHS Movies: Perturbations for Morphogenesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Danny L.

    This paper discusses the concept of a family system in terms of an interactive system of interrelated, interdependent parts and suggests that VHS movies can act as perturbations, i.e., change promoting agents, for certain dysfunctional family systems. Several distinct characteristics of a family system are defined with particular emphasis on…

  1. Adaptation Strategies in Perturbed /s/

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Jana; Hoole, Phil; Perrier, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the role of three articulatory parameters (tongue position, jaw position and tongue grooving) in the production of /s/. Six normal speakers' speech was perturbed by a palatal prosthesis. The fricative was recorded acoustically and through electromagnetic articulography in four conditions: (1) unperturbed,…

  2. AGK Rules in Perturbative QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Jochen

    2006-06-01

    I summarize the present status of the AGK cutting rules in perturbative QCD. Particular attention is given to the application of the AGK analysis to diffraction and multiple scattering in DIS at HERA and to pp collisions at the LHC. I also discuss the bootstrap conditions which appear in pQCD.

  3. Seven topics in perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Buras, A.J.

    1980-09-01

    The following topics of perturbative QCD are discussed: (1) deep inelastic scattering; (2) higher order corrections to e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, to photon structure functions and to quarkonia decays; (3) higher order corrections to fragmentation functions and to various semi-inclusive processes; (4) higher twist contributions; (5) exclusive processes; (6) transverse momentum effects; (7) jet and photon physics.

  4. Generalized perturbations in neutrino mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jiajun; Marfatia, D.; Whisnant, K.

    2015-10-01

    We derive expressions for the neutrino mixing parameters that result from complex perturbations on (1) the Majorana neutrino mass matrix (in the basis of charged lepton mass eigenstates) and on (2) the charged lepton mass matrix, for arbitrary initial (unperturbed) mixing matrices. In the first case, we find that the phases of the elements of the perturbation matrix, and the initial values of the Dirac and Majorana phases, strongly impact the leading-order corrections to the neutrino mixing parameters and phases. For experimentally compatible scenarios wherein the initial neutrino mass matrix has μ -τ symmetry, we find that the Dirac phase can take any value under small perturbations. Similarly, in the second case, perturbations to the charged lepton mass matrix can generate large corrections to the mixing angles and phases of the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata (PMNS) matrix. As an illustration of our generalized procedure, we apply it to a situation in which nonstandard scalar and nonstandard vector interactions simultaneously affect neutrino oscillations.

  5. Basics of QCD perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Soper, D.E.

    1997-06-01

    This is an introduction to the use of QCD perturbation theory, emphasizing generic features of the theory that enable one to separate short-time and long-time effects. The author also covers some important classes of applications: electron-positron annihilation to hadrons, deeply inelastic scattering, and hard processes in hadron-hadron collisions. 31 refs., 38 figs.

  6. Vector perturbations of galaxy number counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrer, Ruth; Tansella, Vittorio

    2016-07-01

    We derive the contribution to relativistic galaxy number count fluctuations from vector and tensor perturbations within linear perturbation theory. Our result is consistent with the the relativistic corrections to number counts due to scalar perturbation, where the Bardeen potentials are replaced with line-of-sight projection of vector and tensor quantities. Since vector and tensor perturbations do not lead to density fluctuations the standard density term in the number counts is absent. We apply our results to vector perturbations which are induced from scalar perturbations at second order and give numerical estimates of their contributions to the power spectrum of relativistic galaxy number counts.

  7. Neptune's story. [Triton's orbit perturbation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldreich, P.; Murray, N.; Longaretti, P. Y.; Banfield, D.

    1989-01-01

    It is conjectured that Triton was captured from a heliocentric orbit as the result of a collision with what was then one of Neptune's regular satellites. The immediate post-capture orbit was highly eccentric. Dissipation due to tides raised by Neptune in Triton caused Triton's orbit to evolve to its present state in less than one billion years. For much of this time Triton was almost entirely molten. While its orbit was evolving, Triton cannibalized most of the regular satellites of Neptune and also perturbed Nereid, thus accounting for that satellite's highly eccentric and inclined orbit. The only regular satellites of Neptune that survived were those that formed well within 5 Neptune radii, and they move on inclined orbits as the result of chaotic perturbations forced by Triton.

  8. Identifying Network Perturbation in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Grechkin, Maxim; Logsdon, Benjamin A; Gentles, Andrew J; Lee, Su-In

    2016-05-01

    We present a computational framework, called DISCERN (DIfferential SparsE Regulatory Network), to identify informative topological changes in gene-regulator dependence networks inferred on the basis of mRNA expression datasets within distinct biological states. DISCERN takes two expression datasets as input: an expression dataset of diseased tissues from patients with a disease of interest and another expression dataset from matching normal tissues. DISCERN estimates the extent to which each gene is perturbed-having distinct regulator connectivity in the inferred gene-regulator dependencies between the disease and normal conditions. This approach has distinct advantages over existing methods. First, DISCERN infers conditional dependencies between candidate regulators and genes, where conditional dependence relationships discriminate the evidence for direct interactions from indirect interactions more precisely than pairwise correlation. Second, DISCERN uses a new likelihood-based scoring function to alleviate concerns about accuracy of the specific edges inferred in a particular network. DISCERN identifies perturbed genes more accurately in synthetic data than existing methods to identify perturbed genes between distinct states. In expression datasets from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), breast cancer and lung cancer, genes with high DISCERN scores in each cancer are enriched for known tumor drivers, genes associated with the biological processes known to be important in the disease, and genes associated with patient prognosis, in the respective cancer. Finally, we show that DISCERN can uncover potential mechanisms underlying network perturbation by explaining observed epigenomic activity patterns in cancer and normal tissue types more accurately than alternative methods, based on the available epigenomic data from the ENCODE project. PMID:27145341

  9. Adiabatic perturbations in pre-big bang models: Matching conditions and scale invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrer, Ruth; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2002-10-01

    At low energy, the four-dimensional effective action of the ekpyrotic model of the universe is equivalent to a slightly modified version of the pre-big bang model. We discuss cosmological perturbations in these models. In particular we address the issue of matching the perturbations from a collapsing to an expanding phase. We show that, under certain physically motivated and quite generic assumptions on the high energy corrections, one obtains n=0 for the spectrum of scalar perturbations in the original pre-big bang model (with a vanishing potential). With the same assumptions, when an exponential potential for the dilaton is included, a scale invariant spectrum (n=1) of adiabatic scalar perturbations is produced under very generic matching conditions, both in a modified pre-big bang and ekpyrotic scenario. We also derive the resulting spectrum for arbitrary power law scale factors matched to a radiation-dominated era.

  10. Perturbation growth in accreting filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, S. D.; Whitworth, A. P.; Hubber, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    We use smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations to investigate the growth of perturbations in infinitely long filaments as they form and grow by accretion. The growth of these perturbations leads to filament fragmentation and the formation of cores. Most previous work on this subject has been confined to the growth and fragmentation of equilibrium filaments and has found that there exists a preferential fragmentation length-scale which is roughly four times the filament's diameter. Our results show a more complicated dispersion relation with a series of peaks linking perturbation wavelength and growth rate. These are due to gravo-acoustic oscillations along the longitudinal axis during the sub-critical phase of growth. The positions of the peaks in growth rate have a strong dependence on both the mass accretion rate onto the filament and the temperature of the gas. When seeded with a multiwavelength density power spectrum, there exists a clear preferred core separation equal to the largest peak in the dispersion relation. Our results allow one to estimate a minimum age for a filament which is breaking up into regularly spaced fragments, as well as an average accretion rate. We apply the model to observations of filaments in Taurus by Tafalla & Hacar and find accretion rates consistent with those estimated by Palmeirim et al.

  11. R evolution: Improving perturbative QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, André H.; Jain, Ambar; Scimemi, Ignazio; Stewart, Iain W.

    2010-07-01

    Perturbative QCD results in the MS¯ scheme can be dramatically improved by switching to a scheme that accounts for the dominant power law dependence on the factorization scale in the operator product expansion. We introduce the “MSR scheme” which achieves this in a Lorentz and gauge invariant way and has a very simple relation to MS¯. Results in MSR depend on a cutoff parameter R, in addition to the μ of MS¯. R variations can be used to independently estimate (i.) the size of power corrections, and (ii.) higher-order perturbative corrections (much like μ in MS¯). We give two examples at three-loop order, the ratio of mass splittings in the B*-B and D*-D systems, and the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule as a function of momentum transfer Q in deep inelastic scattering. Comparing to data, the perturbative MSR results work well even for Q˜1GeV, and power corrections are reduced compared to MS¯.

  12. R evolution: Improving perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Andre H.; Jain, Ambar; Stewart, Iain W.; Scimemi, Ignazio

    2010-07-01

    Perturbative QCD results in the MS scheme can be dramatically improved by switching to a scheme that accounts for the dominant power law dependence on the factorization scale in the operator product expansion. We introduce the ''MSR scheme'' which achieves this in a Lorentz and gauge invariant way and has a very simple relation to MS. Results in MSR depend on a cutoff parameter R, in addition to the {mu} of MS. R variations can be used to independently estimate (i.) the size of power corrections, and (ii.) higher-order perturbative corrections (much like {mu} in MS). We give two examples at three-loop order, the ratio of mass splittings in the B*-B and D*-D systems, and the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule as a function of momentum transfer Q in deep inelastic scattering. Comparing to data, the perturbative MSR results work well even for Q{approx}1 GeV, and power corrections are reduced compared to MS.

  13. Path integral for inflationary perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopec, Tomislav; Rigopoulos, Gerasimos

    2010-07-01

    The quantum theory of cosmological perturbations in single-field inflation is formulated in terms of a path integral. Starting from a canonical formulation, we show how the free propagators can be obtained from the well-known gauge-invariant quadratic action for scalar and tensor perturbations, and determine the interactions to arbitrary order. This approach does not require the explicit solution of the energy and momentum constraints, a novel feature which simplifies the determination of the interaction vertices. The constraints and the necessary imposition of gauge conditions is reflected in the appearance of various commuting and anticommuting auxiliary fields in the action. These auxiliary fields are not propagating physical degrees of freedom but need to be included in internal lines and loops in a diagrammatic expansion. To illustrate the formalism we discuss the tree-level three-point and four-point functions of the inflaton perturbations, reproducing the results already obtained by the methods used in the current literature. Loop calculations are left for future work.

  14. Geometric Hamiltonian structures and perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Omohundro, S.

    1984-08-01

    We have been engaged in a program of investigating the Hamiltonian structure of the various perturbation theories used in practice. We describe the geometry of a Hamiltonian structure for non-singular perturbation theory applied to Hamiltonian systems on symplectic manifolds and the connection with singular perturbation techniques based on the method of averaging.

  15. Cosmological perturbations: Vorticity, isocurvature and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopherson, Adam J.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, I review some recent, interlinked, work undertaken using cosmological perturbation theory — a powerful technique for modeling inhomogeneities in the universe. The common theme which underpins these pieces of work is the presence of nonadiabatic pressure, or entropy, perturbations. After a brief introduction covering the standard techniques of describing inhomogeneities in both Newtonian and relativistic cosmology, I discuss the generation of vorticity. As in classical fluid mechanics, vorticity is not present in linearized perturbation theory (unless included as an initial condition). Allowing for entropy perturbations, and working to second order in perturbation theory, I show that vorticity is generated, even in the absence of vector perturbations, by purely scalar perturbations, the source term being quadratic in the gradients of first order energy density and isocurvature, or nonadiabatic pressure perturbations. This generalizes Crocco's theorem to a cosmological setting. I then introduce isocurvature perturbations in different models, focusing on the entropy perturbation in standard, concordance cosmology, and in inflationary models involving two scalar fields. As the final topic, I investigate magnetic fields, which are a potential observational consequence of vorticity in the early universe. I briefly review some recent work on including magnetic fields in perturbation theory in a consistent way. I show, using solely analytical techniques, that magnetic fields can be generated by higher order perturbations, albeit too small to provide the entire primordial seed field, in agreement with some numerical studies. I close this paper with a summary and some potential extensions of this work.

  16. Superconvergent perturbation method in quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, W. )

    1995-02-27

    An analog of Kolmogorov's superconvergent perturbation theory in classical mechanics is constructed for self-adjoint operators. It is different from the usual Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation theory and yields expansions for eigenvalues and eigenvectors in terms of functions of the perturbation parameter.

  17. Cosmological perturbations and quasistatic assumption in f (R ) theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Mu-Chen; Taylor, Andy; Shu, Chenggang; Tu, Hong

    2015-11-01

    f (R ) gravity is one of the simplest theories of modified gravity to explain the accelerated cosmic expansion. Although it is usually assumed that the quasi-Newtonian approach (a combination of the quasistatic approximation and sub-Hubble limit) for cosmic perturbations is good enough to describe the evolution of large scale structure in f (R ) models, some studies have suggested that this method is not valid for all f (R ) models. Here, we show that in the matter-dominated era, the pressure and shear equations alone, which can be recast into four first-order equations to solve for cosmological perturbations exactly, are sufficient to solve for the Newtonian potential, Ψ , and the curvature potential, Φ . Based on these two equations, we are able to clarify how the exact linear perturbations fit into different limits. We find that the Compton length controls the quasistatic behaviors in f (R ) gravity. In addition, regardless the validity of quasistatic approximation, a strong version of the sub-Hubble limit alone is sufficient to reduce the exact linear perturbations in any viable f (R ) gravity to second order. Our findings disagree with some previous studies where we find little difference between our exact and quasi-Newtonian solutions even up to k =10 c-1H0.

  18. A new approach to cosmological perturbations in f(R) models

    SciTech Connect

    Bertacca, Daniele; Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino E-mail: nicola.bartolo@pd.infn.it

    2012-08-01

    We propose an analytic procedure that allows to determine quantitatively the deviation in the behavior of cosmological perturbations between a given f(R) modified gravity model and a ΛCDM reference model. Our method allows to study structure formation in these models from the largest scales, of the order of the Hubble horizon, down to scales deeply inside the Hubble radius, without employing the so-called 'quasi-static' approximation. Although we restrict our analysis here to linear perturbations, our technique is completely general and can be extended to any perturbative order.

  19. Preliminary Orbit Determination System (PODS) for Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS)-tracked target Spacecraft using the homotopy continuation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirschner, S. M.; Samii, M. V.; Broaddus, S. R.; Doll, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    The Preliminary Orbit Determination System (PODS) provides early orbit determination capability in the Trajectory Computation and Orbital Products System (TCOPS) for a Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS)-tracked spacecraft. PODS computes a set of orbit states from an a priori estimate and six tracking measurements, consisting of any combination of TDRSS range and Doppler tracking measurements. PODS uses the homotopy continuation method to solve a set of nonlinear equations, and it is particularly effective for the case when the a priori estimate is not well known. Since range and Doppler measurements produce multiple states in PODS, a screening technique selects the desired state. PODS is executed in the TCOPS environment and can directly access all operational data sets. At the completion of the preliminary orbit determination, the PODS-generated state, along with additional tracking measurements, can be directly input to the differential correction (DC) process to generate an improved state. To validate the computational and operational capabilities of PODS, tests were performed using simulated TDRSS tracking measurements for the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite and using real TDRSS measurements for the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) spacecraft. The effects of various measurement combinations, varying arc lengths, and levels of degradation of the a priori state vector on the PODS solutions were considered.

  20. Identifying Network Perturbation in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Logsdon, Benjamin A.; Gentles, Andrew J.; Lee, Su-In

    2016-01-01

    We present a computational framework, called DISCERN (DIfferential SparsE Regulatory Network), to identify informative topological changes in gene-regulator dependence networks inferred on the basis of mRNA expression datasets within distinct biological states. DISCERN takes two expression datasets as input: an expression dataset of diseased tissues from patients with a disease of interest and another expression dataset from matching normal tissues. DISCERN estimates the extent to which each gene is perturbed—having distinct regulator connectivity in the inferred gene-regulator dependencies between the disease and normal conditions. This approach has distinct advantages over existing methods. First, DISCERN infers conditional dependencies between candidate regulators and genes, where conditional dependence relationships discriminate the evidence for direct interactions from indirect interactions more precisely than pairwise correlation. Second, DISCERN uses a new likelihood-based scoring function to alleviate concerns about accuracy of the specific edges inferred in a particular network. DISCERN identifies perturbed genes more accurately in synthetic data than existing methods to identify perturbed genes between distinct states. In expression datasets from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), breast cancer and lung cancer, genes with high DISCERN scores in each cancer are enriched for known tumor drivers, genes associated with the biological processes known to be important in the disease, and genes associated with patient prognosis, in the respective cancer. Finally, we show that DISCERN can uncover potential mechanisms underlying network perturbation by explaining observed epigenomic activity patterns in cancer and normal tissue types more accurately than alternative methods, based on the available epigenomic data from the ENCODE project. PMID:27145341

  1. Hadronic Structure from Perturbative Dressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arash, Firooz

    2005-09-01

    Perturbative dressing of a valence quark in QCD produces the internal structure of an extended object, the so-called Valon. The valon structure is universal and independent of the hosting hadron. Polarized and unpolarized proton and pion structure functions are calculated in the valon representation. One finds that although all the available data on g1p,n,d are easily reproduced, a sizable orbital angular momentum associated with the partonic structure of the valon is required in order to have a spin 1/2 valon.

  2. Scaled Energy Spectroscopy of Collisionally Perturbed Potassium Rydberg States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeler, Matthew Len; Setzer, William

    2010-03-01

    We will present preliminary results on the recurrence spectroscopy (or scaled energy spectroscopy) of highly-excited potassium in the presence of collisional perturbations. Recurrence spectroscopy, with the aid of closed orbit theory, has produced useful insights into the semi-classical description of non-hydrogenic spectral features of excited atoms in external fields. We demonstrate how to apply recurrence spectroscopy to the Stark spectrum of potassium subject to collisional line-shift and line-broadening. When krypton gas is added to the system the absorption spectrum experiences line broadening, differential line shifts, and state mixing. With an appropriately modified energy scale, perturbations of the absorption spectrum become meaningful features within the scaled-energy spectrum. New features found within the recurrence spectra can then, with semi-classical closed orbit theory, be interpreted in terms of classical decoherence, elastic and inelastic collisions.

  3. Dark matter perturbations and viscosity: A causal approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acquaviva, Giovanni; John, Anslyn; Pénin, Aurélie

    2016-08-01

    The inclusion of dissipative effects in cosmic fluids modifies their clustering properties and could have observable effects on the formation of large-scale structures. We analyze the evolution of density perturbations of cold dark matter endowed with causal bulk viscosity. The perturbative analysis is carried out in the Newtonian approximation and the bulk viscosity is described by the causal Israel-Stewart (IS) theory. In contrast to the noncausal Eckart theory, we obtain a third-order evolution equation for the density contrast that depends on three free parameters. For certain parameter values, the density contrast and growth factor in IS mimic their behavior in Λ CDM when z ≥1 . Interestingly, and contrary to intuition, certain sets of parameters lead to an increase of the clustering.

  4. A Schwarz alternating procedure for singular perturbation problems

    SciTech Connect

    Garbey, M.; Kaper, H.G.

    1994-12-31

    The authors show that the Schwarz alternating procedure offers a good algorithm for the numerical solution of singular perturbation problems, provided the domain decomposition is properly designed to resolve the boundary and transition layers. They give sharp estimates for the optimal position of the domain boundaries and present convergence rates of the algorithm for various second-order singular perturbation problems. The splitting of the operator is domain-dependent, and the iterative solution of each subproblem is based on a modified asymptotic expansion of the operator. They show that this asymptotic-induced method leads to a family of efficient massively parallel algorithms and report on implementation results for a turning-point problem and a combustion problem.

  5. The stability of the dust acoustic waves under transverse perturbations in a magnetized and collisionless dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Dong-Ning; Qi, Xin; Hong, Xue-Ren; Yang, Xue; Duan, Wen-Shan; Yang, Lei; Yang

    2014-06-01

    Numerical and theoretical investigations are carried out for the stability of the dust acoustic waves (DAWs) under the transverse perturbation in a two-ion temperature magnetized and collisionless dusty plasma. The Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation, modified ZK equation, and Extended ZK (EZK) equation of the DAWs are given by using the reductive perturbation technique. The cut-off frequency is obtained by applying higher-order transverse perturbations to the soliton solution of the EZK equation. The propagation velocity of solitary waves, the real cut-off frequency, as well as the growth rate of the higher-order perturbation to the solitary wave are obtained.

  6. Stochastic Perturbations in Type I Planetary Migraiton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Fred C.; Bloch, A. M.

    2009-05-01

    This talk presents a generalized treatment of Type I planetary migration in the presence of stochastic perturbations. In many planet-forming disks, the Type I migration mechanism, driven by asymmetric torques, can compromise planet formation. If the disk also supports MHD instabilities, however, the corresponding turbulent fluctuations produce additional stochastic torques that modify the steady inward migration scenario. This work studies the migration of planetary cores in the presence of stochastic fluctuations using complementary methods, including iterative maps and a Fokker-Planck approach. Stochastic torques have two main effects: [1] Through outward diffusion, a small fraction of the planetary cores can survive in the face of Type I inward migration. [2] For a given starting condition, the result of any particular realization of migration is uncertain, so that results must be described in terms of the distributions of outcomes. In addition to exploring different regimes of parameter space, this paper considers the effects of the outer disk boundary condition and time-dependence of the torque parameters. For disks with finite radii, the fraction of surviving planets decreases exponentially with time. We find the survival fractions and decay rates for a range of disk models, and find the expected distribution of locations for surviving planets. The survival fraction is expected to lie in the range 0.01 < p_S < 0.1.

  7. Phase perturbation measurements through a heated ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, A.; Gordon, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    High frequency radiowaves incident on an overdense (i.e., HF-frequency penetration frequency) ionosphere produce electron density irregularities. The effect of such ionospheric irregularities on the phase of UHF-radiowaves was determined. For that purpose the phase of radiowaves originating from celestial radio sources was observed with two antennas. The radiosources were chosen such that the line of sight to at least one of the antennas (usually both) passed through the modified volume of the ionosphere. Observations at 430 MHz and at 2380 MHz indicate that natural irregularities have a much stronger effect on the UHF phase fluctuations than the HF-induced irregularities for presently achieved HF-power densities of 20-80 uW/sq m. It is not clear whether some of the effects observed are the result of HF-modification of the ionosphere. Upper limits on the phase perturbations produced by HF-modification are 10 deg at 2380 MHz and 80 deg at 430 MHz.

  8. "Phonon" scattering beyond perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, WuJie; Ke, XueZhi; Xi, LiLi; Wu, LiHua; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, WenQing

    2016-02-01

    Searching and designing materials with intrinsically low lattice thermal conductivity (LTC) have attracted extensive consideration in thermoelectrics and thermal management community. The concept of part-crystalline part-liquid state, or even part-crystalline part-amorphous state, has recently been proposed to describe the exotic structure of materials with chemical- bond hierarchy, in which a set of atoms is weakly bonded to the rest species while the other sublattices retain relatively strong rigidity. The whole system inherently manifests the coexistence of rigid crystalline sublattices and fluctuating noncrystalline substructures. Representative materials in the unusual state can be classified into two categories, i.e., caged and non-caged ones. LTCs in both systems deviate from the traditional T -1 relationship ( T, the absolute temperature), which can hardly be described by small-parameter-based perturbation approaches. Beyond the classical perturbation theory, an extra rattling-like scattering should be considered to interpret the liquid-like and sublattice-amorphization-induced heat transport. Such a kind of compounds could be promising high-performance thermoelectric materials, due to the extremely low LTCs. Other physical properties for these part-crystalline substances should also exhibit certain novelty and deserve further exploration.

  9. Phytochemicals perturb membranes and promiscuously alter protein function.

    PubMed

    Ingólfsson, Helgi I; Thakur, Pratima; Herold, Karl F; Hobart, E Ashley; Ramsey, Nicole B; Periole, Xavier; de Jong, Djurre H; Zwama, Martijn; Yilmaz, Duygu; Hall, Katherine; Maretzky, Thorsten; Hemmings, Hugh C; Blobel, Carl; Marrink, Siewert J; Koçer, Armağan; Sack, Jon T; Andersen, Olaf S

    2014-08-15

    A wide variety of phytochemicals are consumed for their perceived health benefits. Many of these phytochemicals have been found to alter numerous cell functions, but the mechanisms underlying their biological activity tend to be poorly understood. Phenolic phytochemicals are particularly promiscuous modifiers of membrane protein function, suggesting that some of their actions may be due to a common, membrane bilayer-mediated mechanism. To test whether bilayer perturbation may underlie this diversity of actions, we examined five bioactive phenols reported to have medicinal value: capsaicin from chili peppers, curcumin from turmeric, EGCG from green tea, genistein from soybeans, and resveratrol from grapes. We find that each of these widely consumed phytochemicals alters lipid bilayer properties and the function of diverse membrane proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations show that these phytochemicals modify bilayer properties by localizing to the bilayer/solution interface. Bilayer-modifying propensity was verified using a gramicidin-based assay, and indiscriminate modulation of membrane protein function was demonstrated using four proteins: membrane-anchored metalloproteases, mechanosensitive ion channels, and voltage-dependent potassium and sodium channels. Each protein exhibited similar responses to multiple phytochemicals, consistent with a common, bilayer-mediated mechanism. Our results suggest that many effects of amphiphilic phytochemicals are due to cell membrane perturbations, rather than specific protein binding. PMID:24901212

  10. Phytochemicals Perturb Membranes and Promiscuously Alter Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A wide variety of phytochemicals are consumed for their perceived health benefits. Many of these phytochemicals have been found to alter numerous cell functions, but the mechanisms underlying their biological activity tend to be poorly understood. Phenolic phytochemicals are particularly promiscuous modifiers of membrane protein function, suggesting that some of their actions may be due to a common, membrane bilayer-mediated mechanism. To test whether bilayer perturbation may underlie this diversity of actions, we examined five bioactive phenols reported to have medicinal value: capsaicin from chili peppers, curcumin from turmeric, EGCG from green tea, genistein from soybeans, and resveratrol from grapes. We find that each of these widely consumed phytochemicals alters lipid bilayer properties and the function of diverse membrane proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations show that these phytochemicals modify bilayer properties by localizing to the bilayer/solution interface. Bilayer-modifying propensity was verified using a gramicidin-based assay, and indiscriminate modulation of membrane protein function was demonstrated using four proteins: membrane-anchored metalloproteases, mechanosensitive ion channels, and voltage-dependent potassium and sodium channels. Each protein exhibited similar responses to multiple phytochemicals, consistent with a common, bilayer-mediated mechanism. Our results suggest that many effects of amphiphilic phytochemicals are due to cell membrane perturbations, rather than specific protein binding. PMID:24901212

  11. Perturbations i have Known and Loved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Robert W.

    2011-06-01

    A spectroscopic perturbation is a disruption of a ^1Σ-^1Σ-like regular pattern that can embody level-shifts, extra lines, and intensity anomalies. Once upon a time, when a band was labeled ``perturbed,'' it was considered worthless because it could at best yield molecular constants unsuited for archival tables. Nevertheless, a few brave spectroscopists, notably Albin Lagerqvist and Richard Barrow, collected perturbations because they knew that the pattern of multiple perturbations formed an intricate puzzle that would eventually reveal the presence and electronic symmetry of otherwise unobservable electronic states. There are many kinds of patterns of broken patterns. In my PhD thesis I showed how to determine absolute vibrational assignments for the perturber from patterns among the observed values of perturbation matrix elements. When a ^3Π state is perturbed, its six (Ω, parity) components capture a pattern of level shifts and intensity anomalies that reveals more about the nature of the perturber than a simple perturbation of the single component of a ^1Σ state. In perturbation-facilitated OODR, a perturbed singlet level acts as a spectroscopic doorway through which the entire triplet manifold may be systematically explored. For polyatomic molecule vibrations, a vibrational polyad (a group of mutually perturbing vibrational levels, among which the perturbation matrix elements are expected to follow harmonic oscillator scaling rules) can contain more components than a ^3Π state and intrapolyad patterns can be exquisitely sensitive not merely to the nature of an interloper within the polyad but also to the eigenvector character of the vibronic state from which the polyad is viewed. Variation of scaled polyad interaction parameters from one polyad to the next, a pattern of patterns, can signal proximity to an isomerization barrier. Everything in Rydberg-land seems to scale as N⋆-3, yet a trespassing valence state causes all scaling and propensity rules go

  12. Speech Compensation for Time-Scale-Modified Auditory Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogane, Rintaro; Honda, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine speech compensation in response to time-scale-modified auditory feedback during the transition of the semivowel for a target utterance of /ija/. Method: Each utterance session consisted of 10 control trials in the normal feedback condition followed by 20 perturbed trials in the modified auditory…

  13. Entropy mode loops and cosmological correlations during perturbative reheating

    SciTech Connect

    Kaya, Ali; Kutluk, Emine Seyma E-mail: seymakutluk@gmail.com

    2015-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that during preheating the entropy modes circulating in the loops, which correspond to the inflaton decay products, meaningfully modify the cosmological correlation functions at superhorizon scales. In this paper, we determine the significance of the same effect when reheating occurs in the perturbative regime. In a typical two scalar field model, the magnitude of the loop corrections are shown to depend on several parameters like the background inflaton amplitude in the beginning of reheating, the inflaton decay rate and the inflaton mass. Although the loop contributions turn out to be small as compared to the preheating case, they still come out larger than the loop effects during inflation.

  14. Perturbations of vortex ring pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubser, Steven S.; Horn, Bart; Parikh, Sarthak

    2016-02-01

    We study pairs of coaxial vortex rings starting from the action for a classical bosonic string in a three-form background. We complete earlier work on the phase diagram of classical orbits by explicitly considering the case where the circulations of the two vortex rings are equal and opposite. We then go on to study perturbations, focusing on cases where the relevant four-dimensional transfer matrix splits into two-dimensional blocks. When the circulations of the rings have the same sign, instabilities are mostly limited to wavelengths smaller than a dynamically generated length scale at which single-ring instabilities occur. When the circulations have the opposite sign, larger wavelength instabilities can occur.

  15. Matter perturbations in scaling cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuño, A. Romero; Hipólito-Ricaldi, W. S.; Zimdahl, W.

    2016-04-01

    A suitable nonlinear interaction between dark matter with an energy density ρM and dark energy with an energy density ρX is known to give rise to a non-canonical scaling ρM ∝ ρXa-ξ, where ξ is a parameter which generally deviates from ξ = 3. Here, we present a covariant generalization of this class of models and investigate the corresponding perturbation dynamics. The resulting matter power spectrum for the special case of a time-varying Lambda model is compared with data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR9 catalogue (Ahn et al.). We find a best-fitting value of ξ = 3.25 which corresponds to a decay of dark matter into the cosmological term. Our results are compatible with the Lambda Cold Dark Matter model at the 2σ confidence level.

  16. Perturbativity in the seesaw mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaka, Takehiko; Tsuyuki, Takanao

    2016-02-01

    We consider the Standard Model extended by right-handed neutrinos to explain massive neutrinos through the seesaw mechanism. The new fermion can be observed when it has a sufficiently small mass and large mixings to left-handed neutrinos. If such a particle is the lightest right-handed neutrino, its contribution to the mass matrix of active neutrinos needs to be canceled by that of a heavier one. Yukawa couplings of the heavier one are then larger than those of the lightest one. We show that the perturbativity condition gives a severe upper bound on the mixing of the lightest right-handed neutrino, depending on the masses of heavier ones. Models of high energy phenomena, such as leptogenesis, can be constrained by low energy experiments.

  17. Sudakov safety in perturbative QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Marzani, Simone; Thaler, Jesse

    2015-06-01

    Traditional calculations in perturbative quantum chromodynamics (pQCD) are based on an order-by-order expansion in the strong coupling αs. Observables that are calculable in this way are known as "safe." Recently, a class of unsafe observables was discovered that do not have a valid αs expansion but are nevertheless calculable in pQCD using all-orders resummation. These observables are called "Sudakov safe" since singularities at each αs order are regulated by an all-orders Sudakov form factor. In this paper, we give a concrete definition of Sudakov safety based on conditional probability distributions, and we study a one-parameter family of momentum sharing observables that interpolate between the safe and unsafe regimes. The boundary between these regimes is particularly interesting, as the resulting distribution can be understood as the ultraviolet fixed point of a generalized fragmentation function, yielding a leading behavior that is independent of αs.

  18. Robust control with structured perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keel, Leehyun

    1988-01-01

    Two important problems in the area of control systems design and analysis are discussed. The first is the robust stability using characteristic polynomial, which is treated first in characteristic polynomial coefficient space with respect to perturbations in the coefficients of the characteristic polynomial, and then for a control system containing perturbed parameters in the transfer function description of the plant. In coefficient space, a simple expression is first given for the l(sup 2) stability margin for both monic and non-monic cases. Following this, a method is extended to reveal much larger stability region. This result has been extended to the parameter space so that one can determine the stability margin, in terms of ranges of parameter variations, of the closed loop system when the nominal stabilizing controller is given. The stability margin can be enlarged by a choice of better stabilizing controller. The second problem describes the lower order stabilization problem, the motivation of the problem is as follows. Even though the wide range of stabilizing controller design methodologies is available in both the state space and transfer function domains, all of these methods produce unnecessarily high order controllers. In practice, the stabilization is only one of many requirements to be satisfied. Therefore, if the order of a stabilizing controller is excessively high, one can normally expect to have a even higher order controller on the completion of design such as inclusion of dynamic response requirements, etc. Therefore, it is reasonable to have a lowest possible order stabilizing controller first and then adjust the controller to meet additional requirements. The algorithm for designing a lower order stabilizing controller is given. The algorithm does not necessarily produce the minimum order controller; however, the algorithm is theoretically logical and some simulation results show that the algorithm works in general.

  19. Cosmological perturbations in f(T) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shih-Hung; Dent, James B.; Dutta, Sourish; Saridakis, Emmanuel N.

    2011-01-15

    We investigate the cosmological perturbations in f(T) gravity. Examining the pure gravitational perturbations in the scalar sector using a diagonal vierbein, we extract the corresponding dispersion relation, which provides a constraint on the f(T) Ansaetze that lead to a theory free of instabilities. Additionally, upon inclusion of the matter perturbations, we derive the fully perturbed equations of motion, and we study the growth of matter overdensities. We show that f(T) gravity with f(T) constant coincides with General Relativity, both at the background as well as at the first-order perturbation level. Applying our formalism to the power-law model we find that on large subhorizon scales (O(100 Mpc) or larger), the evolution of matter overdensity will differ from {Lambda}CDM cosmology. Finally, examining the linear perturbations of the vector and tensor sectors, we find that (for the standard choice of vierbein) f(T) gravity is free of massive gravitons.

  20. Observational tests of modified gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Bhuvnesh; Zhang Pengjie

    2008-09-15

    Modifications of general relativity provide an alternative explanation to dark energy for the observed acceleration of the Universe. Modified gravity theories have richer observational consequences for large-scale structures than conventional dark energy models, in that different observables are not described by a single growth factor even in the linear regime. We examine the relationships between perturbations in the metric potentials, density and velocity fields, and discuss strategies for measuring them using gravitational lensing, galaxy cluster abundances, galaxy clustering/dynamics, and the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. We show how a broad class of gravity theories can be tested by combining these probes. A robust way to interpret observations is by constraining two key functions: the ratio of the two metric potentials, and the ratio of the gravitational 'constant' in the Poisson equation to Newton's constant. We also discuss quasilinear effects that carry signatures of gravity, such as through induced three-point correlations. Clustering of dark energy can mimic features of modified gravity theories and thus confuse the search for distinct signatures of such theories. It can produce pressure perturbations and anisotropic stresses, which break the equality between the two metric potentials even in general relativity. With these two extra degrees of freedom, can a clustered dark energy model mimic modified gravity models in all observational tests? We show with specific examples that observational constraints on both the metric potentials and density perturbations can in principle distinguish modifications of gravity from dark energy models. We compare our result with other recent studies that have slightly different assumptions (and apparently contradictory conclusions)

  1. Kato expansion in quantum canonical perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, Andrey

    2016-06-01

    This work establishes a connection between canonical perturbation series in quantum mechanics and a Kato expansion for the resolvent of the Liouville superoperator. Our approach leads to an explicit expression for a generator of a block-diagonalizing Dyson's ordered exponential in arbitrary perturbation order. Unitary intertwining of perturbed and unperturbed averaging superprojectors allows for a description of ambiguities in the generator and block-diagonalized Hamiltonian. We compare the efficiency of the corresponding computational algorithm with the efficiencies of the Van Vleck and Magnus methods for high perturbative orders.

  2. Singularity perturbed zero dynamics of nonlinear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isidori, A.; Sastry, S. S.; Kokotovic, P. V.; Byrnes, C. I.

    1992-01-01

    Stability properties of zero dynamics are among the crucial input-output properties of both linear and nonlinear systems. Unstable, or 'nonminimum phase', zero dynamics are a major obstacle to input-output linearization and high-gain designs. An analysis of the effects of regular perturbations in system equations on zero dynamics shows that whenever a perturbation decreases the system's relative degree, it manifests itself as a singular perturbation of zero dynamics. Conditions are given under which the zero dynamics evolve in two timescales characteristic of a standard singular perturbation form that allows a separate analysis of slow and fast parts of the zero dynamics.

  3. Singular perturbation applications in neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Losey, D.C.; Lee, J.C.

    1996-09-01

    This is a paper on singular perturbation applications in neutron transport for submission at the next ANS conference. A singular perturbation technique was developed for neutron transport analysis by postulating expansion in terms of a small ordering parameter {eta}. Our perturbation analysis is carried, without approximation, through {Omicron}({eta}{sup 2}) to derive a material interface correction for diffusion theory. Here we present results from an analytical application of the perturbation technique to a fixed source problem and then describe and implementation of the technique in a computational scheme.

  4. Stellar oscillations in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakstein, Jeremy

    2013-12-01

    Starting from the equations of modified gravity hydrodynamics, we derive the equations of motion governing linear, adiabatic, radial perturbations of stars in scalar-tensor theories. There are two new features: first, the eigenvalue equation for the period of stellar oscillations is modified such that the eigenfrequencies are always larger than predicted by general relativity. Second, the general relativity condition for stellar instability is altered so that the adiabatic index can fall below 4/3 before unstable modes appear. Stars are more stable in modified gravity theories. Specializing to the case of chameleonlike theories, we investigate these effects numerically using both polytropic Lane-Emden stars and models coming from modified gravity stellar structure simulations. We find that the change in the oscillation period of Cepheid star models can be as large as 30% for order-one matter couplings and the change in the inferred distance using the period-luminosity relation can be up to three times larger than if one had only considered the modified equilibrium structure. We discuss the implications of these results for recent and upcoming astrophysical tests and estimate that previous methods can produce new constraints such that the modifications are screened in regions of Newtonian potential of O(10-8).

  5. System-reservoir theory with anharmonic baths: a perturbative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadra, Chitrak; Banerjee, Dhruba

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we develop the formalism of a general system coupled to a reservoir (the words ‘bath’ and ‘reservoir’ will be used interchangeably) consisting of nonlinear oscillators, based on perturbation theory at the classical level, by extending the standard Zwanzig approach of elimination of bath degrees of freedom order by order in perturbation. We observe that the fluctuation dissipation relation (FDR) of the second kind in its standard form for harmonic baths gets modified due to the nonlinearity and this is manifested through higher powers of {{k}\\text{B}}T in the expression for two-time noise correlation. On the flip side, this very modification allows us to define a dressed (renormalized) system-bath coupling that depends on the temperature and the nonlinear parameters of the bath in such a way that the structure of the FDR (of the second kind) is maintained. As an aside, we also observe that the first moment of the noise arising from a nonlinear bath can be non-zero, even in the absence of any external drive, if the reservoir potential is asymmetric with respect to one of its minima, about which one builds up the perturbation theory.

  6. Perturbation theory in light-cone quantization

    SciTech Connect

    Langnau, A.

    1992-01-01

    A thorough investigation of light-cone properties which are characteristic for higher dimensions is very important. The easiest way of addressing these issues is by analyzing the perturbative structure of light-cone field theories first. Perturbative studies cannot be substituted for an analysis of problems related to a nonperturbative approach. However, in order to lay down groundwork for upcoming nonperturbative studies, it is indispensable to validate the renormalization methods at the perturbative level, i.e., to gain control over the perturbative treatment first. A clear understanding of divergences in perturbation theory, as well as their numerical treatment, is a necessary first step towards formulating such a program. The first objective of this dissertation is to clarify this issue, at least in second and fourth-order in perturbation theory. The work in this dissertation can provide guidance for the choice of counterterms in Discrete Light-Cone Quantization or the Tamm-Dancoff approach. A second objective of this work is the study of light-cone perturbation theory as a competitive tool for conducting perturbative Feynman diagram calculations. Feynman perturbation theory has become the most practical tool for computing cross sections in high energy physics and other physical properties of field theory. Although this standard covariant method has been applied to a great range of problems, computations beyond one-loop corrections are very difficult. Because of the algebraic complexity of the Feynman calculations in higher-order perturbation theory, it is desirable to automatize Feynman diagram calculations so that algebraic manipulation programs can carry out almost the entire calculation. This thesis presents a step in this direction. The technique we are elaborating on here is known as light-cone perturbation theory.

  7. Non-perturbative approach for curvature perturbations in stochastic δ N formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Tomohiro; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Tada, Yuichiro E-mail: kawasaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-10-01

    In our previous paper [1], we have proposed a new algorithm to calculate the power spectrum of the curvature perturbations generated in inflationary universe with use of the stochastic approach. Since this algorithm does not need the perturbative expansion with respect to the inflaton fields on super-horizon scale, it works even in highly stochastic cases. For example, when the curvature perturbations are very large or the non-Gaussianities of the curvature perturbations are sizable, the perturbative expansion may break down but our algorithm enables to calculate the curvature perturbations. We apply it to two well-known inflation models, chaotic and hybrid inflation, in this paper. Especially for hybrid inflation, while the potential is very flat around the critical point and the standard perturbative computation is problematic, we successfully calculate the curvature perturbations.

  8. Importance of Plasma Response to Non-axisymmetric Perturbations in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Jong-kyu Park, Allen H. Boozer, Jonathan E. Menard, Andrea M. Garofalo, Michael J. Schaffer, Richard J. Hawryluk, Stanley M. Kaye, Stefan P. Gerhardt, Steve A. Sabbagh, and the NSTX Team

    2009-04-22

    Tokamaks are sensitive to deviations from axisymmetry as small as δB=B0 ~ 10-4. These non-axisymmetric perturbations greatly modify plasma confinement and performance by either destroying magnetic surfaces with subsequent locking or deforming magnetic surfaces with associated non-ambipolar transport. The Ideal Perturbed Equilibrium Code (IPEC) calculates ideal perturbed equilibria and provides important basis for understanding the sensitivity of tokamak plasmas to perturbations. IPEC calculations indicate that the ideal plasma response, or equiva- lently the effect by ideally perturbed plasma currents, is essential to explain locking experiments on National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) and DIII-D. The ideal plasma response is also important for Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity (NTV) in non-ambipolar transport. The consistency between NTV theory and magnetic braking experiments on NSTX and DIII-D can be improved when the variation in the field strength in IPEC is coupled with generalized NTV theory. These plasma response effects will be compared with the previous vacuum superpositions to illustrate the importance. However, plasma response based on ideal perturbed equilibria is still not suffciently accurate to predict the details of NTV transport, and can be inconsistent when currents associated with a toroidal torque become comparable to ideal perturbed currents.

  9. Non-Perturbative Field Theories.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, David

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Some non-perturbative aspects of field theories are studied by applying lattice gauge theory techniques. The low-lying hadronic mass spectrum is calculated numerically using quenched lattice quantum chromodynamics. The results of large numerical simulations performed on a distributed array processor are presented and analysed. Particular emphasis is stressed upon the understanding of systematic and statistical errors in the calculation. In addition, the pion decay constant and the chiral condensate are evaluated. An attempt is made to relate the numerical findings to the experimentally measured quantities. A pioneering attempt to understand Yukawa couplings is discussed. A toy Fermion-Higgs system is studied numerically on a transputer array. Dynamical fermions are included in the investigation of the behavior of the system over a wide range of Yukawa couplings. A phase diagram is found for the model which shows evidence of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking transitions. Extensions of the model are discussed together some speculations concerning the behaviour of Yukawa couplings in general. The possibility of using the lattice as a model for space-time is investigated by studying the propagation of particles on a fractal lattice. In addition, the use of truncated fractals as novel regulators is studied numerically in the hope that the problem of fermion doubling will be alleviated.

  10. Quantum field perturbation theory revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matone, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Schwinger's formalism in quantum field theory can be easily implemented in the case of scalar theories in D dimension with exponential interactions, such as μDexp (α ϕ ). In particular, we use the relation exp (α δ/δ J (x ) )exp (-Z0[J ])=exp (-Z0[J +αx]) with J the external source, and αx(y )=α δ (y -x ). Such a shift is strictly related to the normal ordering of exp (α ϕ ) and to a scaling relation which follows by renormalizing μ . Next, we derive a new formulation of perturbation theory for the potentials V (ϕ )=λ/n ! :ϕn: , using the generating functional associated to :exp (α ϕ ):. The Δ (0 )-terms related to the normal ordering are absorbed at once. The functional derivatives with respect to J to compute the generating functional are replaced by ordinary derivatives with respect to auxiliary parameters. We focus on scalar theories, but the method is general and similar investigations extend to other theories.

  11. Scalar Quantum Electrodynamics: Perturbation Theory and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, A.; Gutierrez-Guerrero, L. X.; Concha-Sanchez, Y.

    2006-09-25

    In this article, we calculate scalar propagator in arbitrary dimensions and gauge and the three-point scalar-photon vertex in arbitrary dimensions and Feynman gauge, both at the one loop level. We also discuss constraints on their non perturbative structure imposed by requirements of gauge invariance and perturbation theory.

  12. Degenerate Open Shell Density Perturbation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palenik, Mark; Dunlap, Brett

    The density perturbation theory (DPT) methodology we have developed applies the Hohenberg-Kohn theorem to perturbations in density functional theory. At each order, the energy is directly minimized with respect to the density at all lower orders. The difference between the perturbed and unperturbed densities is expanded in terms of a finite number of basis functions, and a single matrix inversion in this space reduces the complexity of the problem to that of non-interacting perturbation theory. For open-shell systems with symmetry, however, the situation becomes more complex. Typically, the perturbation will break the symmetry leading to a zeroth-order shift in the Kohn-Sham potential. Because the symmetry breaking is independent of the strength of the perturbation, the mapping from the initial to the perturbed KS potential is discontinuous and techniques from perturbation theory for noninteracting particles fail. We describe a rigorous formulation of DPT for use in systems that display an initial degeneracy, such as atoms and Fe55Cp*12 clusters and present initial calculations on these systems.

  13. Intelligent perturbation algorithms for space scheduling optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtzman, Clifford R.

    1991-01-01

    Intelligent perturbation algorithms for space scheduling optimization are presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: optimization of planning, scheduling, and manifesting; searching a discrete configuration space; heuristic algorithms used for optimization; use of heuristic methods on a sample scheduling problem; intelligent perturbation algorithms are iterative refinement techniques; properties of a good iterative search operator; dispatching examples of intelligent perturbation algorithm and perturbation operator attributes; scheduling implementations using intelligent perturbation algorithms; major advances in scheduling capabilities; the prototype ISF (industrial Space Facility) experiment scheduler; optimized schedule (max revenue); multi-variable optimization; Space Station design reference mission scheduling; ISF-TDRSS command scheduling demonstration; and example task - communications check.

  14. Covariant generalization of cosmological perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Enqvist, Kari; Hoegdahl, Janne; Nurmi, Sami; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2007-01-15

    We present an approach to cosmological perturbations based on a covariant perturbative expansion between two worldlines in the real inhomogeneous universe. As an application, at an arbitrary order we define an exact scalar quantity which describes the inhomogeneities in the number of e-folds on uniform density hypersurfaces and which is conserved on all scales for a barotropic ideal fluid. We derive a compact form for its conservation equation at all orders and assign it a simple physical interpretation. To make a comparison with the standard perturbation theory, we develop a method to construct gauge-invariant quantities in a coordinate system at arbitrary order, which we apply to derive the form of the nth order perturbation in the number of e-folds on uniform density hypersurfaces and its exact evolution equation. On large scales, this provides the gauge-invariant expression for the curvature perturbation on uniform density hypersurfaces and its evolution equation at any order.

  15. On the perturbation of the luminosity distance by peculiar motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Nick; Hudson, Michael J.

    2015-06-01

    We consider some aspects of the perturbation to the luminosity distance d(z) that are of relevance for SN1a cosmology and for future peculiar velocity surveys at non-negligible redshifts. (1) Previous work has shown that the correction to the lowest order perturbation δd/d = -δv/cz has the peculiar characteristic that it appears to depend on the absolute state of motion of sources, rather than on their motion relative to that of the observer. The resolution of this apparent violation of the equivalence principle is that it is necessary to allow for evolution of the velocities with time, and also, when considering perturbations on the scale of the observer-source separation, to include the gravitational redshift effect. We provide an expression for δd/d that provides a physically consistent way to measure peculiar velocities and determine their impact for SN1a cosmology. (2) We then calculate the perturbation to the redshift as a function of source flux density, which has been proposed as an alternative probe of large-scale motions. We show how the inclusion of surface brightness modulation modifies the relation between δz(m) and the peculiar velocity, and that, while the noise properties of this method might appear promising, the velocity signal is swamped by the effect of galaxy clustering for most scales of interest. (3) We show how, in linear theory, peculiar velocity measurements are biased downwards by the effect of smaller scale motions or by measurement errors (such as in photometric redshifts). Our results nicely explain the effects seen in simulations by Koda et al. We critically examine the prospects for extending peculiar velocity studies to larger scales with near-term future surveys.

  16. Tubulin-perturbing naphthoquinone spiroketals.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, Raghavan; Hopkins, Tamara D; Thomas, Catherine A; Wipf, Peter; Day, Billy W

    2008-02-01

    Several natural and synthetic naphthoquinone spiroketals are potent inhibitors of the thioredoxin-thioredoxin reductase redox system. Based on the antimitotic and weak antitubulin actions noted for SR-7 ([8-(furan-3-ylmethoxy)-1-oxo-1,4-dihydronaphthalene-4-spiro-2'-naphtho[1'',8''-de][1',3'][dioxin]), a library of related compounds was screened for tubulin-perturbing properties. Two compounds, TH-169 (5'-hydroxy-4'H-spiro[1,3-dioxolane-2,1'-naphthalen]-4'-one) and TH-223 (5'-methoxy-4'H-spiro[1,3-dioxane-2,1'-naphthalen]-4'-one), had substantial effects on tubulin assembly and were antiproliferative at low micromolar concentrations. TH-169 was the most potent at blocking GTP-dependent polymerization of 10 mum tubulin in vitro with a remarkable 50% inhibitory concentration of ca. 400 nm. It had no effect on paclitaxel-induced microtubule assembly and did not cause microtubule hypernucleation. TH-169 failed to compete with colchicine for binding to beta-tubulin. The 50% antiproliferative concentration of TH-169 against human cancer cells was at or slightly below 1 mum. Flow cytometry showed that 1 mum TH-169 caused an increase in G(2)/M and hypodiploid cells. TH-169 eliminated the PC-3 cells' polyploid population and increased their expression of p21(WAF1) and Hsp70 in a concentration-dependent manner. The antiproliferative effect of TH-169 was irreversible and independent of changes in caspases, actin, tubulin, glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase or Bcl-x(S/L). This structurally simple naphthoquinone spiroketal represents a small molecule, tubulin-interactive agent with a novel apoptotic pathway and attractive biological function. PMID:18194192

  17. Transient dynamics of perturbations in astrophysical disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razdoburdin, D. N.; Zhuravlev, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    We review some aspects of a major unsolved problem in understanding astrophysical (in particular, accretion) disks: whether the disk interiors can be effectively viscous in spite of the absence of magnetorotational instability. A rotational homogeneous inviscid flow with a Keplerian angular velocity profile is spectrally stable, making the transient growth of perturbations a candidate mechanism for energy transfer from regular motion to perturbations. Transient perturbations differ qualitatively from perturbation modes and can grow substantially in shear flows due to the nonnormality of their dynamical evolution operator. Because the eigenvectors of this operator, also known as perturbation modes, are not pairwise orthogonal, they can mutually interfere, resulting in the transient growth of their linear combinations. Physically, a growing transient perturbation is a leading spiral whose branches are shrunk as a result of the differential rotation of the flow. We discuss in detail the transient growth of vortex shearing harmonics in the spatially local limit, as well as methods for identifying the optimal (fastest growth) perturbations. Special attention is given to obtaining such solutions variationally by integrating the respective direct and adjoint equations forward and backward in time. The presentation is intended for experts new to the subject.

  18. Expansion of Perturbation Theory Applied to Shim Rotation Automation of the Advanced Test Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Joshua Loren

    In 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) declared the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This declaration expanded the focus of the ATR to include diversified classes of academic and industrial experiments. An essential part of the new suite of more accurate and flexible codes being deployed to support the NSUF is their ability to predict reactor behavior at startup, particularly the position of the outer shim control cylinders (OSCC). The current method used for calculating the OSCC positions during a cycle startup utilizes a heuristic trial and error approach that is impractical with the computationally intensive reactor physics tools, such as NEWT. It is therefore desirable that shim rotation prediction for startup be automated. Shim rotation prediction with perturbation theory was chosen to be investigated as one method for use with startup calculation automation. A modified form of first order perturbation theory, called phase space interpolated perturbation theory, was developed to more accurately model shim rotation prediction. Shim rotation prediction is just one application for this new modified form of perturbation theory. Phase space interpolated perturbation theory can be used on any application where the range of change to the system is known a priori, but the magnitude of change is not known. A cubic regression method was also developed to automate shim rotation prediction by using only forward solutions to the transport equation.

  19. Vector perturbations in a contracting Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Battefeld, T.J.; Brandenberger, R.

    2004-12-15

    In this note we show that vector perturbations exhibit growing mode solutions in a contracting Universe, such as the contracting phase of the pre big bang or the cyclic/ekpyrotic models of the Universe. This is not a gauge artifact and will in general lead to the breakdown of perturbation theory--a severe problem that has to be addressed in any bouncing model. We also comment on the possibility of explaining, by means of primordial vector perturbations, the existence of the observed large-scale magnetic fields. This is possible since they can be seeded by vorticity.

  20. Cosmological perturbations and the Weinberg theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhshik, Mohammad; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Jazayeri, Sadra

    2015-12-01

    The celebrated Weinberg theorem in cosmological perturbation theory states that there always exist two adiabatic scalar modes in which the comoving curvature perturbation is conserved on super-horizon scales. In particular, when the perturbations are generated from a single source, such as in single field models of inflation, both of the two allowed independent solutions are adiabatic and conserved on super-horizon scales. There are few known examples in literature which violate this theorem. We revisit the theorem and specify the loopholes in some technical assumptions which violate the theorem in models of non-attractor inflation, fluid inflation, solid inflation and in the model of pseudo conformal universe.

  1. Calculating nonadiabatic pressure perturbations during multifield inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huston, Ian; Christopherson, Adam J.

    2012-03-01

    Isocurvature perturbations naturally occur in models of inflation consisting of more than one scalar field. In this paper, we calculate the spectrum of isocurvature perturbations generated at the end of inflation for three different inflationary models consisting of two canonical scalar fields. The amount of nonadiabatic pressure present at the end of inflation can have observational consequences through the generation of vorticity and subsequently the sourcing of B-mode polarization. We compare two different definitions of isocurvature perturbations and show how these quantities evolve in different ways during inflation. Our results are calculated using the open source Pyflation numerical package which is available to download.

  2. HIV-associated memory B cell perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhiliang; Luo, Zhenwu; Wan, Zhuang; Wu, Hao; Li, Wei; Zhang, Tong; Jiang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Memory B-cell depletion, hyperimmunoglobulinemia, and impaired vaccine responses are the hallmark of B cell perturbations inhuman immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. Although B cells are not the targets for HIV infection, there is evidence for B cell, especially memory B cell dysfunction in HIV disease mediated by other cells or HIV itself. This review will focus on HIV-associated phenotypic and functional alterations in memory B cells. Additionally, we will discuss the mechanism underlying these perturbations and the effect of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) on these perturbations. PMID:25887082

  3. Perturbing macroscopic magnetohydrodynamic stability for toroidal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comer, Kathryn J.

    We have introduced a new perturbative technique to rapidly explore the dependence of long wavelength ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities on equilibrium profiles, shaping properties, and wall parameters. Traditionally, these relations are studied with numerical parameter scans using computationally intensive stability codes. Our perturbative technique first finds the equilibrium and stability using traditional methods. Subsequent small changes in the original equilibrium parameters change the stability. We quickly find the new stability with an expansion of the energy principle, rather than with another run of the stability codes. We first semi-analytically apply the technique to the screw pinch after eliminating compressional Alfven wave effects. The screw pinch results validate the approach, but also indicate that allowable perturbations to equilibria with certain features may be restricted. Next, we extend the approach to toroidal geometry using experimental equilibria and a simple constructed equilibrium, with the ideal MHD stability code GATO. Stability properties are successfully predicted from perturbed toroidal equilibria when only the vacuum beyond the plasma is perturbed (through wall parameter variations), rather than the plasma itself. Small plasma equilibrium perturbations to both experimental and simple equilibria result in very large errors to the predicted stability, and valid results are found only over a narrow range of most perturbations. Despite the large errors produced when changing plasma parameters, the wall perturbations revealed two useful applications of this technique. Because the calculations are non-iterative matrix multiplications, the convergence issues that can disrupt a full MHD stability code are absent. Marginal stability, therefore, is much easier to find with the perturbative technique. Also, the perturbed results can be input as the initial guess for the eigenvalue for a full stability code, and improve subsequent

  4. Evolution of non-spherical perturbations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschan, P.

    1995-06-01

    In this paper I investigate the evolution of primordial non-spherical positive and negative fluctuations. They can be calculated by second order of perturbation theory. I solved analytically the second order equation for arbitrary density parameter {OMEGA}_M0_ and cosmological constant {LAMBDA} using the approximation introduced by Martell & Freundling (???). The second order solution is compared with the exact one in the spherical case. I find that the initial deformation grows rapidly for positive perturbations, while the negative perturbations (voids) are stable against deformations.

  5. Perturbation calculation of thermodynamic density of states

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Greg; Schulthess, Thomas C; Nicholson, Don M; Eisenbach, Markus; Stocks, George Malcolm

    2011-01-01

    The density of states g( ) is frequently used to calculate the temperature-dependent properties of a thermodynamic system. Here a derivation is given for calculating the warped density of states g ( ) resulting from the addition of a perturbation. The method is validated for a classical Heisenberg model of bcc Fe and the errors in the free energy are shown to be second order in the perturbation. Taking the perturbation to be the difference between a first-principles quantum-mechanical energy and a corresponding classical energy, this method can significantly reduce the computational effort required to calculate g( ) for quantum systems using the Wang-Landau approach.

  6. A Model for Gaussian Perturbations of Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodson, C. T. J.

    2015-11-01

    Graphene consists nominally of a regular planar hexagonal carbon lattice monolayer. However, its structure experiences perturbations in the presence of external influences, whether from substrate properties, thermal or electromagnetic fields, or ambient fluid movement. Here we give an information geometric model to represent the state space of perturbations as a Riemannian pseudosphere with scalar curvature close to -1/2. This would allow the representation of a trajectory of states under a given ambient or process change, so opening the possibility for geometrically formulated dynamical models to link structural perturbations to the physics.

  7. Casimir energy for perturbed surfaces of revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Almazan, Pedro

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we explore the zeta function arising from a small perturbation on a surface of revolution and the effect of this on the functional determinant and on the change of the Casimir energy associated with the surface.

  8. SHARP ENTRYWISE PERTURBATION BOUNDS FOR MARKOV CHAINS

    PubMed Central

    THIEDE, ERIK; VAN KOTEN, BRIAN; WEARE, JONATHAN

    2015-01-01

    For many Markov chains of practical interest, the invariant distribution is extremely sensitive to perturbations of some entries of the transition matrix, but insensitive to others; we give an example of such a chain, motivated by a problem in computational statistical physics. We have derived perturbation bounds on the relative error of the invariant distribution that reveal these variations in sensitivity. Our bounds are sharp, we do not impose any structural assumptions on the transition matrix or on the perturbation, and computing the bounds has the same complexity as computing the invariant distribution or computing other bounds in the literature. Moreover, our bounds have a simple interpretation in terms of hitting times, which can be used to draw intuitive but rigorous conclusions about the sensitivity of a chain to various types of perturbations. PMID:26491218

  9. Cosmological perturbations in mimetic Horndeski gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroja, Frederico; Bartolo, Nicola; Karmakar, Purnendu; Matarrese, Sabino

    2016-04-01

    We study linear scalar perturbations around a flat FLRW background in mimetic Horndeski gravity. In the absence of matter, we show that the Newtonian potential satisfies a second-order differential equation with no spatial derivatives. This implies that the sound speed for scalar perturbations is exactly zero on this background. We also show that in mimetic G3 theories the sound speed is equally zero. We obtain the equation of motion for the comoving curvature perturbation (first order differential equation) and solve it to find that the comoving curvature perturbation is constant on all scales in mimetic Horndeski gravity. We find solutions for the Newtonian potential evolution equation in two simple models. Finally we show that the sound speed is zero on all backgrounds and therefore the system does not have any wave-like scalar degrees of freedom.

  10. Perturbations of black p-branes

    SciTech Connect

    Abdalla, Elcio; Fernandez Piedra, Owen Pavel; Oliveira, Jeferson de; Molina, C.

    2010-03-15

    We consider black p-brane solutions of the low-energy string action, computing scalar perturbations. Using standard methods, we derive the wave equations obeyed by the perturbations and treat them analytically and numerically. We have found that tensorial perturbations obtained via a gauge-invariant formalism leads to the same results as scalar perturbations. No instability has been found. Asymptotically, these solutions typically reduce to a AdS{sub (p+2)}xS{sup (8-p)} space which, in the framework of Maldacena's conjecture, can be regarded as a gravitational dual to a conformal field theory defined in a (p+1)-dimensional flat space-time. The results presented open the possibility of a better understanding the AdS/CFT correspondence, as originally formulated in terms of the relation among brane structures and gauge theories.

  11. The Perturbational MO Method for Saturated Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herndon, William C.

    1979-01-01

    Summarizes a theoretical approach using nonbonding MO's and perturbation theory to correlate properties of saturated hydrocarbons. Discussion is limited to correctly predicted using this method. Suggests calculations can be carried out quickly in organic chemistry. (Author/SA)

  12. Controlling roll perturbations in fruit flies.

    PubMed

    Beatus, Tsevi; Guckenheimer, John M; Cohen, Itai

    2015-04-01

    Owing to aerodynamic instabilities, stable flapping flight requires ever-present fast corrective actions. Here, we investigate how flies control perturbations along their body roll angle, which is unstable and their most sensitive degree of freedom. We glue a magnet to each fly and apply a short magnetic pulse that rolls it in mid-air. Fast video shows flies correct perturbations up to 100° within 30 ± 7 ms by applying a stroke-amplitude asymmetry that is well described by a linear proportional-integral controller. For more aggressive perturbations, we show evidence for nonlinear and hierarchical control mechanisms. Flies respond to roll perturbations within 5 ms, making this correction reflex one of the fastest in the animal kingdom. PMID:25762650

  13. Controlling roll perturbations in fruit flies

    PubMed Central

    Beatus, Tsevi; Guckenheimer, John M.; Cohen, Itai

    2015-01-01

    Owing to aerodynamic instabilities, stable flapping flight requires ever-present fast corrective actions. Here, we investigate how flies control perturbations along their body roll angle, which is unstable and their most sensitive degree of freedom. We glue a magnet to each fly and apply a short magnetic pulse that rolls it in mid-air. Fast video shows flies correct perturbations up to 100° within 30 ± 7 ms by applying a stroke-amplitude asymmetry that is well described by a linear proportional–integral controller. For more aggressive perturbations, we show evidence for nonlinear and hierarchical control mechanisms. Flies respond to roll perturbations within 5 ms, making this correction reflex one of the fastest in the animal kingdom. PMID:25762650

  14. Cosmological perturbations in theories with non-minimal coupling between curvature and matter

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolami, Orfeu; Frazão, Pedro; Páramos, Jorge E-mail: pedro.frazao@ist.utl.pt

    2013-05-01

    In this work, we examine how the presence of a non-minimal coupling between spacetime curvature and matter affects the evolution of cosmological perturbations on a homogeneous and isotropic Universe, and hence the formation of large-scale structure. This framework places constraints on the terms which arise due to the coupling with matter and, in particular, on the modified growth of matter density perturbations. We derive approximate analytical solutions for the evolution of matter overdensities during the matter dominated era and discuss the compatibility of the obtained results with the hypothesis that the late time acceleration of the Universe is driven by a non-minimal coupling.

  15. Constructing perturbation theory kernels for large-scale structure in generalized cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taruya, Atsushi

    2016-07-01

    We present a simple numerical scheme for perturbation theory (PT) calculations of large-scale structure. Solving the evolution equations for perturbations numerically, we construct the PT kernels as building blocks of statistical calculations, from which the power spectrum and/or correlation function can be systematically computed. The scheme is especially applicable to the generalized structure formation including modified gravity, in which the analytic construction of PT kernels is intractable. As an illustration, we show several examples for power spectrum calculations in f (R ) gravity and Λ CDM models.

  16. The relationship between the human state and external perturbations of atmospheric, geomagnetic and solar origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavryuseva, E.; Kroussanova, N.

    2002-12-01

    The relationship between the state of human body and the external factors such as the different phenomena of solar activity, geomagnetic perturbations and local atmospheric characteristics is studied. The monitoring of blood pressure and electro-conductivity of human body in acupuncture points for a group fo 28 people over the period of 1.5 year has been performed daily from February 2001 to August 2002 in Capodimonte Observatory in Naples, Italy. The modified Voll method of electropuncture diagnostics was used. The strong correlation between the human body state and meteo conditions is found and the probable correlation with geomagnetic perturbations is discussed.

  17. Covariant perturbations of f(R) black holes: the Weyl terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratten, Geraint

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we revisit non-spherical perturbations of the Schwarzschild black hole in the context of f(R) gravity. Previous studies were able to demonstrate the stability of the f(R) Schwarzschild black hole against gravitational perturbations in both the even and odd parity sectors. In particular, it was seen that the Regge-Wheeler (RW) and Zerilli equations in f(R) gravity obey the same equations as their general relativity (GR) counterparts. More recently, the 1+1+2 semi-tetrad formalism has been used to derive a set of two wave equations: one for transverse, trace-free (tensor) perturbations and one for the additional scalar modes that characterize fourth-order theories of gravitation. The master variable governing tensor perturbations was shown to be a modified RW tensor obeying the same equation as in GR. However, it is well known that there is a non-uniqueness in the definition of the master variable. In this paper we derive a set of two perturbation variables and their concomitant wave equations that describe gravitational perturbations in a covariant and gauge invariant manner. These variables can be related to the Newman-Penrose (NP) Weyl scalars as well as the master variables from the 2+2 formalism. As a byproduct of this study, we also derive a set of useful results relating the NP formalism to the 1+1+2 formalism valid for LRS-II spacetimes.

  18. Non Perturbative Aspects of Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, A.

    2009-04-20

    For any quantum field theory (QFT), there exists a set of Schwinger-Dyson equations (SDE) for all its Green functions. However, it is not always straight forward to extract quantitatively exact physical information from this set of equations, especially in the non perturbative regime. The situation becomes increasingly complex with growing number of external legs. I give a qualitative account of the hunt for the non perturbative Green functions in gauge theories.

  19. On perturbations of a quintom bounce

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Yifu; Qiu Taotao; Zhang Xinmin; Brandenberger, Robert; Piao Yunsong E-mail: qiutt@mail.ihep.ac.cn E-mail: yspiao@gucas.ac.cn

    2008-03-15

    A quintom universe with an equation of state crossing the cosmological constant boundary can provide a bouncing solution dubbed the quintom bounce and thus resolve the big bang singularity. In this paper, we investigate the cosmological perturbations of the quintom bounce both analytically and numerically. We find that the fluctuations in the dominant mode in the post-bounce expanding phase couple to the growing mode of the perturbations in the pre-bounce contracting phase.

  20. Thermally unstable perturbations in stratified conducting atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reale, Fabio; Serio, Salvatore; Peres, Giovanni

    1994-10-01

    We investigate the thermal stability of isobaric perturbations in a stratified isothermal background atmosphere with solar abundances, as resulting from the competition of optically thin plasma radiative cooling and of heating conducted from the surrounding atmosphere. We have analyzed the threshold line between stable and unstable perturbations, in the plane of the two important control parameters: the initial size of the perturbation and the temperature of the unperturbed medium; this line changes with the pressure of the unperturbed atmosphere. We have extended the results of linear perturbation analysis by means of numerical calculations of the evolution of spherical isobaric perturbations, using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic code including Spitzer heat conduction. We explore a wide range of the parameters appropriate to the solar and stellar upper atmospheres: the background uniform temperature is between 105 K and 107 K, the initial pressure betweeen 0.1 and 10 dyn/sq cm, and the perturbation size between 105 and 1010 cm. The numerical results are in substantial agreement with the linear analysis. We discuss possible implications of our results also in terms of observable effects, especially concerning plasma downflows, and propose thermal instability as a possible candidate to explain the observed redshifts in solar and stellar transition region lines.

  1. Near horizon extremal geometry perturbations: dynamical field perturbations vs. parametric variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajian, K.; Seraj, A.; Sheikh-Jabbari, M. M.

    2014-10-01

    In [1] we formulated and derived the three universal laws governing Near Horizon Extremal Geometries (NHEG). In this work we focus on the Entropy Perturbation Law (EPL) which, similarly to the first law of black hole thermodynamics, relates perturbations of the charges labeling perturbations around a given NHEG to the corresponding entropy perturbation. We show that field perturbations governed by the linearized equations of motion and symmetry conditions which we carefully specify, satisfy the EPL. We also show that these perturbations are limited to those coming from difference of two NHEG solutions (i.e. variations on the NHEG solution parameter space). Our analysis and discussions shed light on the "no-dynamics" statements of [2, 3].

  2. Perturbations of the Robertson-Walker space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jai Chan

    This dissertation contains three parts consisting of thirteen chapters. Each chapter is self-contained, and can be read independently. In chapter 1, we have presented a complete set of cosmological perturbation equations using the covariant equations. We also present an explicit solution for the evolution of large scale cosmological density perturbations assuming a perfect fluid. In chapter 2, two independent gauge-invariant variables are derived which are continuous at any transition where there is a discontinuous change in pressure. In chapter 3, we present a Newtonian counterpart to the general relativistic covariant approach to cosmological perturbations. In chapter 4, we present a simple way of deriving cosmological perturbation equations in generalized gravity theories which accounts for metric perturbations in gauge-invariant way. We apply this approach to the f(phi,R)-omega(phi)phi, cphi;c Lagrangian. In chapter 5, we have derived second order differential equations for cosmological perturbations in a Robertson-Walker space, for each of the following gravity theories: f(R) gravity, generalized scalar-tensor gravity, gravity with non-minimally coupled scalar field, and induced gravity. Asymptotic solutions are derived for the large and small scale limits. In chapter 6, classical evolution of density perturbations in the large scale limit is clarified in the generalized gravity theories. In chapter 7, we apply our method to a theory with the Lagrangian L approximately f(R) + gamma RR;c;c. In chapter 8, T(M)ab;b equals 0 is shown in a general ground. In chapter 9, the origin of the Friedmann-like behavior of the perturbed model in the large scale limit is clarified in a comoving gauge. Thus, when the imperfect fluid contributions are negligible, the large scale perturbations in a nearly flat background evolve like separate Friedmann models. In chapter 10, we generalize the perturbation equations applicable to a class of generalized gravity theories with multi

  3. Non-hard sphere thermodynamic perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiqi

    2011-08-01

    A non-hard sphere (HS) perturbation scheme, recently advanced by the present author, is elaborated for several technical matters, which are key mathematical details for implementation of the non-HS perturbation scheme in a coupling parameter expansion (CPE) thermodynamic perturbation framework. NVT-Monte Carlo simulation is carried out for a generalized Lennard-Jones (LJ) 2n-n potential to obtain routine thermodynamic quantities such as excess internal energy, pressure, excess chemical potential, excess Helmholtz free energy, and excess constant volume heat capacity. Then, these new simulation data, and available simulation data in literatures about a hard core attractive Yukawa fluid and a Sutherland fluid, are used to test the non-HS CPE 3rd-order thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT) and give a comparison between the non-HS CPE 3rd-order TPT and other theoretical approaches. It is indicated that the non-HS CPE 3rd-order TPT is superior to other traditional TPT such as van der Waals/HS (vdW/HS), perturbation theory 2 (PT2)/HS, and vdW/Yukawa (vdW/Y) theory or analytical equation of state such as mean spherical approximation (MSA)-equation of state and is at least comparable to several currently the most accurate Ornstein-Zernike integral equation theories. It is discovered that three technical issues, i.e., opening up new bridge function approximation for the reference potential, choosing proper reference potential, and/or using proper thermodynamic route for calculation of fex - ref, chiefly decide the quality of the non-HS CPE TPT. Considering that the non-HS perturbation scheme applies for a wide variety of model fluids, and its implementation in the CPE thermodynamic perturbation framework is amenable to high-order truncation, the non-HS CPE 3rd-order or higher order TPT will be more promising once the above-mentioned three technological advances are established.

  4. Perturbed Energy Metabolism and Neuronal Circuit Dysfunction in Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Kapogiannis, Dimitrios; Mattson, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Epidemiological, neuropathological and functional neuroimaging evidence implicates global and regional derangements in brain metabolism and energetics in the pathogenesis of cognitive impairment. Nerve cell microcircuits are modified adaptively by excitatory and inhibitory synaptic activity and neurotrophic factors. Aging and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) cause perturbations in cellular energy metabolism, level of excitation/inhibition and neurotrophic factor release that overwhelm compensatory mechanisms and result in neuronal microcircuit and brain network dysfunction. A prolonged positive energy balance impairs the ability of neurons to respond adaptively to oxidative and metabolic stress. Experimental studies in animals demonstrate how derangements related to chronic positive energy balance, such as diabetes, set the stage for accelerated cognitive aging and AD. Therapeutic interventions to allay cognitive dysfunction that target energy metabolism and adaptive stress responses (such as neurotrophin signaling) have shown efficacy in animal models and preliminary studies in humans. PMID:21147038

  5. Non-parametric reconstruction of cosmological matter perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, J. E.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Carvalho, J. C.

    2016-04-01

    Perturbative quantities, such as the growth rate (f) and index (γ), are powerful tools to distinguish different dark energy models or modified gravity theories even if they produce the same cosmic expansion history. In this work, without any assumption about the dynamics of the Universe, we apply a non-parametric method to current measurements of the expansion rate H(z) from cosmic chronometers and high-z quasar data and reconstruct the growth factor and rate of linearised density perturbations in the non-relativistic matter component. Assuming realistic values for the matter density parameter Ωm0, as provided by current CMB experiments, we also reconstruct the evolution of the growth index γ with redshift. We show that the reconstruction of current H(z) data constrains the growth index to γ=0.56 ± 0.12 (2σ) at z = 0.09, which is in full agreement with the prediction of the ΛCDM model and some of its extensions.

  6. Nonlocal Symmetry and its Applications in Perturbed mKdV Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Bo; Lin, Ji

    2016-06-01

    Based on the modified direct method, the variable-coefficient perturbed mKdV equation is changed to the constant-coefficient perturbed mKdV equation. The truncated Painlevé method is applied to obtain the nonlocal symmetry of the constant-coefficient perturbed mKdV equation. By introducing one new dependent variable, the nonlocal symmetry can be localized to the Lie point symmetry. Thanks to the localization procedure, the finite symmetry transformation is presented by solving the initial value problem of the prolonged systems. Furthermore, many explicit interaction solutions among different types of solutions such as solitary waves, rational solutions, and Painlevé II solutions are obtained using the symmetry reduction method to the enlarged systems. Two special concrete soliton-cnoidal interaction solutions are studied in both analytical and graphical ways.

  7. Cosmological perturbations during the Bose-Einstein condensation of dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, R.C.; Gonçalves, S.V.B. E-mail: sergio.vitorino@pq.cnpq.br

    2013-04-01

    In the present work, we analyze the evolution of the scalar and tensorial perturbations and the quantities relevant for the physical description of the Universe, as the density contrast of the scalar perturbations and the gravitational waves energy density during the Bose-Einstein condensation of dark matter. The behavior of these parameters during the Bose-Einstein phase transition of dark matter is analyzed in details. To study the cosmological dynamics and evolution of scalar and tensorial perturbations in a Universe with and without cosmological constant we use both analytical and numerical methods. The Bose-Einstein phase transition modifies the evolution of gravitational waves of cosmological origin, as well as the process of large-scale structure formation.

  8. Application of Perturbation Method in Investigating the Interaction of thin Shock with Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Ao, X.; Zank, G. P.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Shaikh, D.

    2006-09-26

    A 2D hydrodynamical model describing the interaction of thin shock with turbulence is developed by adopting a multi-scale perturbation analysis. This is extended to a 2D MHD model. The interaction is found to be governed by a two-dimentional Burger's equation involving ''perturbation terms''. Different perturbation profiles are tested with numerical simulations to show how the shock front is modified by turbulence. The results indicate that while turbulence can balance the nonlinear steepening of shock waves at some regions, it also helps to create a higher jump in physical quantities at other regions. The plasma medium in these regions can therefore experience higher compression, which will result in a downstream state that differs from the usual Rankine-Hugoniot state.

  9. Implementation of uniform perturbation method for potential flow past axisymmetric and two-dimensional bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, T. C.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1984-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of potential flow past an axisymmetric slender body and a thin airfoil are calculated using a uniform perturbation analysis method. The method is based on the superposition of potentials of point singularities distributed inside the body. The strength distribution satisfies a linear integral equation by enforcing the flow tangency condition on the surface of the body. The complete uniform asymptotic expansion of its solution is obtained with respect to the slenderness ratio by modifying and adapting an existing technique. Results calculated by the perturbation analysis method are compared with the existing surface singularity panel method and some available analytical solutions for a number of cases under identical conditions. From these comparisons, it is found that the perturbation analysis method can provide quite accurate results for bodies with small slenderness ratio. The present method is much simpler and requires less memory and computation time than existing surface singularity panel methods of comparable accuracy.

  10. NONLINEAR DYNAMICAL FRICTION OF A CIRCULAR-ORBIT PERTURBER IN A GASEOUS MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Woong-Tae

    2010-12-10

    We use three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations to investigate the nonlinear gravitational responses of gas to, and the resulting drag forces on, very massive perturbers moving in circular orbits. This work extends our previous studies that explored the cases of low-mass perturbers in circular orbits and massive perturbers on straight-line trajectories. The background medium is assumed to be non-rotating, adiabatic with index 5/3, and uniform with density {rho}{sub 0} and sound speed a{sub 0}. We model the gravitating perturber using a Plummer sphere with mass M{sub p} and softening radius r{sub s} in a uniform circular motion at speed V{sub p} and orbital radius R{sub p} , and run various models with differing R{identical_to}r{sub s}/R{sub p}, M{identical_to}V{sub p}/a{sub 0}, and B{identical_to}GM{sub p}/(a{sub 0}{sup 2}R{sub p}). A quasi-steady density wake of a supersonic model consists of a hydrostatic envelope surrounding the perturber, an upstream bow shock, and a trailing low-density region. The continuous change in the direction of the perturber motion reduces the detached shock distance compared to the linear-trajectory cases, while the orbit-averaged gravity of the perturber gathers the gas toward the center of the orbit, modifying the background preshock density to {rho}{sub 1}{approx}(1+0.46B{sup 1.1}){rho}{sub 0} depending weakly on M. For sufficiently massive perturbers, the presence of a hydrostatic envelope makes the drag force smaller than the prediction of the linear perturbation theory, resulting in F=4{pi}{rho}{sub 1}(GM{sub p})?2/V{sub p}?2 x (0.7{eta}{sub B}?-?1) for {eta}{sub B{identical_to}}B/(M?2-1)>0.1; the drag force for low-mass perturbers with {eta}{sub B}<0.1 agrees well with the linear prediction. The nonlinear drag force becomes independent of R as long as R<{eta}{sub B}/2, which places an upper limit on the perturber size for accurate evaluation of the drag force in numerical simulations.