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Sample records for modified mortar adhesion

  1. Solid state NMR and LVSEM studies on the hardening of latex modified tile mortar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rottstegge, J.; Arnold, M.; Herschke, L.; Glasser, G.; Wilhelm, M.; Spiess, H.W. . E-mail: spiess@mpip-mainz.mpg.de; Hergeth, W.D.

    2005-12-15

    Construction mortars contain a broad variety of both inorganic and organic additives beside the cement powder. Here we present a study of tile mortar systems based on portland cement, quartz, methyl cellulose and different latex additives. As known, the methyl cellulose stabilizes the freshly prepared cement paste, the latex additive enhances final hydrophobicity, flexibility and adhesion. Measurements were performed by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and low voltage scanning electron microscopy (LVSEM) to probe the influence of the latex additives on the hydration, hardening and the final tile mortar properties. While solid state NMR enables monitoring of the bulk composition, scanning electron microscopy affords visualization of particles and textures with respect to their shape and the distribution of the different phases. Within the alkaline cement paste, the poly(vinyl acetate) (VAc)-based latex dispersions stabilized by poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) were found to be relatively stable against hydrolysis. The influence of the combined organic additives methyl cellulose, poly(vinyl alcohol) and latexes stabilized by poly(vinyl alcohol) on the final silicate structure of the cement hydration products is small. But even small amounts of additives result in an increased ratio of ettringite to monosulfate within the final hydrated tile mortar as monitored by {sup 27}Al NMR. The latex was found to be adsorbed to the inorganic surfaces, acting as glue to the inorganic components. For similar latex water interfaces built up by poly(vinyl alcohol), a variation in the latex polymer composition results in modified organic textures. In addition to the networks of the inorganic cement and of the latex, there is a weak network build up by thin polymer fibers, most probably originating from poly(vinyl alcohol). Besides the weak network, polymer fibers form well-ordered textures covering inorganic crystals such as portlandite.

  2. Adhesives from modified soy protein

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Susan; Wang, Donghai; Zhong, Zhikai; Yang, Guang

    2008-08-26

    The, present invention provides useful adhesive compositions having similar adhesive properties to conventional UF and PPF resins. The compositions generally include a protein portion and modifying ingredient portion selected from the group consisting of carboxyl-containing compounds, aldehyde-containing compounds, epoxy group-containing compounds, and mixtures thereof. The composition is preferably prepared at a pH level at or near the isoelectric point of the protein. In other preferred forms, the adhesive composition includes a protein portion and a carboxyl-containing group portion.

  3. Influence of Prepackaged Polymer-Modified Mortar as a Modifier on Strength of Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saand, Abdullah; Ismail, Mohammad; Radin Sumadi, Salihuddin

    This study introduce a new trend of utilising Prepackaged Polymer-Modified Mortar (PPMM) as a modifier to ordinary concrete for producing Polymer-Modified Concrete (PMC). The experimental study articulates the strength development of proposed polymer-modified concrete. A range of quantities of PPMM, as 5 to 50%, were mixed with ordinary concrete of 30 N mmG2 characteristic strength to produce polymer-modified concrete and to evaluate for compressive strength, tensile strength, density and workability. The material behaviour in terms of compressive strength and tensile strength, together with density and slump was investigated by casting and testing cubes of 100 mm size, cylinders 100 mm dia and 200 mm height. This Preliminary study shows that compressive strength and tensile strength is improved significantly by inclusion of various quantities as percentages of PPMM to ordinary concrete and curing regime as specified by JIS. PPMM dosages of 5 to 20% resulted considerably higher compressive and tensile strength than that of ordinary concrete, on the other hand further increase in percentage of PPMM gave less strengths. Results demonstrated more prominent percentage increase in tensile strength than compressive strength of produced polymer-modified concrete. Polymer-mod fied concrete mixes with all percentage dosages of PPMM were found cohesive and workable.

  4. Influence of viscosity modifying admixtures on the rheological behavior of cement and mortar pastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouras, R.; Kaci, A.; Chaouche, M.

    2012-03-01

    The influence of Viscosity-modifying admixtures (VMA) dosage rate on the steady state rheological properties, including the yield stress, fluid consistency index and flow behaviour index, of cementitious materials is considered experimentally. The investigation is undertaken both at cement paste and mortar scales. It is found that the rheological behaviour of the material is in general dependent upon shear-rate interval considered. At sufficiently low shear-rates the materials exhibit shear-thinning. This behaviour is attributed to flow-induced defloculation of the solid particles and VMA polymer disentanglement and alignment. At relatively high shear-rates the pastes becomes shear-thickening, due to repulsive interactions among the solid particles. There is a qualitative difference between the influence of VMA dosage at cement and mortar scales: at cement scale we obtain a monotonic increase of the yield stress, while at mortar scale there exists an optimum VMA dosage for which the yield stress is a minimum. The flow behaviour index exhibit a maximum in the case of cement pastes and monotonically decreases in the case of mortars. On the other hand, the fluid consistency index presents a minimum for both cement pastes and mortars.

  5. Effect of the pre-treatment and the aggregate content on the adhesion strength of repair mortars on Miocene porous limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szemerey-Kiss, Balázs; Török, Ákos

    2016-04-01

    The adhesion between porous limestone and newly prepared repair mortars are crucial in the preservation of historic stone structures. Besides mechanical compatibility other matches such as chemical composition and porosity are also essential, but the current research focuses on the adhesion strength of repair mortars that are used in the restoration of Hungarian porous limestone. 8 mortars (4 commercial and 4 specially prepared) were selected for the tests. Mortars with different amount of aggregate were prepared and caste to stone surface. The stone substrate was highly porous Miocene limestone. The strength was tested by standardized pull-out tests which method is commonly used for concrete testing. The limestone surfaces were either used in their natural conditions or were pre-treated (pre-wetting). The strength of the stone/mortar bond was tested. The failure mechanism was documented and various failure modes were identified. Strength test results suggest that especially pre-treatment influences strongly the pull-out strength at mortar/stone interface. Increasing aggregate content also reduces pull out strength of tested repair mortars, but at various rates depending on the mortar type. The financial support of OTKA post-doctoral grant to BSZK (reference number is: PD 112-955) and National Research, Development and Innovation (NKFI) Fund to ÁT (ref. no. K 116532) are appreciated.

  6. Fibroblasts adhesion on ion beam modified polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švorčík, V.; Tomášová, P.; Dvořánková, B.; Hnatowicz, V.; Ochsner, R.; Ryssel, H.

    2004-02-01

    Polyethylene (PE) was irradiated with 15 keV O +, P + and Ar + ions to the fluences from 3 × 10 12 to 1 × 10 15 cm -2. The changes of surface structure and polarity and oxygen concentration were examined on pristine and as-irradiated PE. The in vitro adhesion of rat 3T3 fibroblasts on the modified PE was evaluated 24 h after inoculation. Degradation of PE is manifested by the creation of conjugated double bonds and oxidation of the PE main chain. It was proved that the implanted P atoms are chemically bound onto degraded polymer chain. Wettability of the polymer surface is affected by the structure and composition of the modified surface layer. In comparison with pristine PE (i) higher cell adhesion is observed on implanted PE and (ii) the cells cultivated on implanted PE are larger and their adherence is significantly more homogeneous. The enhancement of 3T3 cells adhesion is highest and smallest for PE implanted with O + and Ar + ions, respectively. Highest cell adhesion was observed on PE implanted to the fluence of 1 × 10 13 cm -2 regardless of the ion specie. It was shown that the cell adhesion is related to the wettability of the PE surface and that there exists an optimal wettability with respect to the cell adhesion.

  7. Adhesion of colloidal particles on modified electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Volodymyr; Papastavrou, Georg

    2012-12-01

    The adhesion between colloidal silica particles and modified electrodes has been studied by direct force measurements with the colloidal probe technique based on the atomic force microscope (AFM). The combination of potentiostatic control of gold electrodes and chemical modification of their surface with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) allows for the decoupling of forces due to the electrical double layers and functional groups at the solid/liquid interface. Adhesion on such electrodes can be tuned over a large range using the externally applied potential and the aqueous solution's ionic strength. By utilizing cantilevers with a high force constant, it is possible to separate the various contributions to adhesion in an unambiguous manner. These contributions comprise diffuse-layer overlap, van der Waals forces, solvent exclusion, and electrocapillarity. A quantitative description of the observed adhesion forces is obtained by taking into account the surface roughness of the silica particle. The main component of the adhesion forces originates from the overlap of the electrical double layers, which is tuned by the external potential. By contrast, effects due to electrocapillarity are of only minor importance. Based on our quantitative analysis, a new approach is proposed that allows tuning of the adhesion force as a function of the externally applied potential. We expect this approach to have important applications for the design of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), the development of electrochemical sensors, and the application of micro- and nanomanipulation. PMID:23072548

  8. The effect of different surfactants/plastisizers on the electrical behavior of CNT nano-modified cement mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla, P. T.; Alafogianni, P.; Tragazikis, I. K.; Exarchos, D. A.; Dassios, K.; Barkoula, N.-M.; Matikas, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    Cement-based materials have in general low electrical conductivity. Electrical conductivity is the measure of the ability of the material to resist the passage of electrical current. The addition of a conductive admixture such as Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) in a cement-based material increases the conductivity of the structure. This research aims to characterize nano-modified cement mortars with MWCNT reinforcements. Such nano-composites would possess smartness and multi-functionality. Multifunctional properties include electrical, thermal and piezo-electric characteristics. One of these properties, the electrical conductivity, was measured using a custom made apparatus that allows application of known D.C. voltage on the nano-composite. In this study, the influence of different surfactants/plasticizers on CNT nano-modified cement mortar specimens with various concentrations of CNTs (0.2% wt. cement CNTs - 0.8% wt. cement CNTs) on the electrical conductivity is assessed.

  9. Doxycycline-encapsulated nanotube-modified dentin adhesives.

    PubMed

    Feitosa, S A; Palasuk, J; Kamocki, K; Geraldeli, S; Gregory, R L; Platt, J A; Windsor, L J; Bottino, M C

    2014-12-01

    This article presents details of fabrication, biological activity (i.e., anti-matrix metalloproteinase [anti-MMP] inhibition), cytocompatibility, and bonding characteristics to dentin of a unique doxycycline (DOX)-encapsulated halloysite nanotube (HNT)-modified adhesive. We tested the hypothesis that the release of DOX from the DOX-encapsulated nanotube-modified adhesive can effectively inhibit MMP activity. We incorporated nanotubes, encapsulated or not with DOX, into the adhesive resin of a commercially available bonding system (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose [SBMP]). The following groups were tested: unmodified SBMP (control), SBMP with nanotubes (HNT), and DOX-encapsulated nanotube-modified adhesive (HNT+DOX). Changes in degree of conversion (DC) and microtensile bond strength were evaluated. Cytotoxicity was examined on human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). To prove the successful encapsulation of DOX within the adhesives-but, more important, to support the hypothesis that the HNT+DOX adhesive would release DOX at subantimicrobial levels-we tested the antimicrobial activity of synthesized adhesives and the DOX-containing eluates against Streptococcus mutans through agar diffusion assays. Anti-MMP properties were assessed via β-casein cleavage assays. Increasing curing times (10, 20, 40 sec) led to increased DC values. There were no statistically significant differences (p > .05) in DC within each increasing curing time between the modified adhesives compared to SBMP. No statistically significant differences in microtensile bond strength were noted. None of the adhesives eluates were cytotoxic to the human dental pulp stem cells. A significant growth inhibition of S. mutans by direct contact illustrates successful encapsulation of DOX into the experimental adhesive. More important, DOX-containing eluates promoted inhibition of MMP-1 activity when compared to the control. Collectively, our findings provide a solid background for further testing of encapsulated MMP

  10. Investigation of modified cottonseed protein adhesives for wood composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several modified cottonseed protein isolates were studied and compared to corresponding soy protein isolates for their adhesive properties when bonded to wood composites. Modifications included treatments with alkali, guanidine hydrochloride, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and urea. Wood composites...

  11. Doxycycline-Encapsulated Nanotube-Modified Dentin Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Feitosa, S.A.; Palasuk, J.; Kamocki, K.; Geraldeli, S.; Gregory, R.L.; Platt, J.A.; Windsor, L.J.; Bottino, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents details of fabrication, biological activity (i.e., anti–matrix metalloproteinase [anti-MMP] inhibition), cytocompatibility, and bonding characteristics to dentin of a unique doxycycline (DOX)–encapsulated halloysite nanotube (HNT)–modified adhesive. We tested the hypothesis that the release of DOX from the DOX-encapsulated nanotube-modified adhesive can effectively inhibit MMP activity. We incorporated nanotubes, encapsulated or not with DOX, into the adhesive resin of a commercially available bonding system (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose [SBMP]). The following groups were tested: unmodified SBMP (control), SBMP with nanotubes (HNT), and DOX-encapsulated nanotube-modified adhesive (HNT+DOX). Changes in degree of conversion (DC) and microtensile bond strength were evaluated. Cytotoxicity was examined on human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). To prove the successful encapsulation of DOX within the adhesives—but, more important, to support the hypothesis that the HNT+DOX adhesive would release DOX at subantimicrobial levels—we tested the antimicrobial activity of synthesized adhesives and the DOX-containing eluates against Streptococcus mutans through agar diffusion assays. Anti-MMP properties were assessed via β-casein cleavage assays. Increasing curing times (10, 20, 40 sec) led to increased DC values. There were no statistically significant differences (p > .05) in DC within each increasing curing time between the modified adhesives compared to SBMP. No statistically significant differences in microtensile bond strength were noted. None of the adhesives eluates were cytotoxic to the human dental pulp stem cells. A significant growth inhibition of S. mutans by direct contact illustrates successful encapsulation of DOX into the experimental adhesive. More important, DOX-containing eluates promoted inhibition of MMP-1 activity when compared to the control. Collectively, our findings provide a solid background for further testing of

  12. Modified Surface Having Low Adhesion Properties to Mitigate Insect Residue Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J., Jr. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Penner, Ronald K. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A process to modify a surface to provide reduced adhesion surface properties to mitigate insect residue adhesion. The surface may include the surface of an article including an aircraft, an automobile, a marine vessel, all-terrain vehicle, wind turbine, helmet, etc. The process includes topographically and chemically modifying the surface by applying a coating comprising a particulate matter, or by applying a coating and also topographically modifying the surface by various methods, including but not limited to, lithographic patterning, laser ablation and chemical etching, physical vapor phase deposition, chemical vapor phase deposition, crystal growth, electrochemical deposition, spin casting, and film casting.

  13. Polyimide adhesives - Modified with ATBN and silicone elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; St. Clair, T. L.; Ezzell, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    A series of studies evaluating the effects of added elastomers on the properties of a high-temperature addition polyimide adhesive is reviewed. First, thermoset polyimides containing various butadiene/acrylonitrile and silicone elastomers were synthesized either as physical polybends or by chemically reacting the elastomers directly onto the polymer backbone. The modified adhesive resins were characterized for thermomechanical properties, fracture toughness and adhesive strength. A second series of elastomer-containing polyimides was also prepared in order to study the effects of the elastomer chain length on polymer properties. Aromatic amine-terminated silicone rubbers with repeat units varying from n = 10 to 105 were reacted onto the polyimide backbone, and the resulting polymers were characterized for their adhesive properties.

  14. Static and fatigue fracture characteristics of rubber modified epoxy adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Hosaka, Y.; Miyazaki, K.; Fujii, T.; Okubo, H.; Nejigaka, K.; Kurosawa, K.

    1993-12-31

    A conventional epoxy adhesive is modified with Closs-linked NBR-COOH to increase the fracture toughness. This paper presents the static and fatigue fracture characteristics of the rubber modified epoxy adhesives under Mode 1 loading. The fracture toughness under static loading is measured using Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimens. The energy release rate is used as a parameter of fracture toughness. Rubber contents are 2.8% and 5.5% in weight. Generally, toughened adhesives show relatively large plastic deformation ahead the crack tip. The crack extension is thought to be influenced by loading condition. Namely, monotonous loading up to the final failure gives the toughness which is different from the toughness obtained under loading-unloading condition. Therefore, two loading conditions are adopted under static loading in order to show the effect of loading history. Under cyclic loading, the fatigue crack velocity is measured with respect to number of loading cycles. The effect of rubber content on the fatigue crack growth is examined. The effect of adhesive thickness on both static and fatigue fracture also is examined. All tests are conducted at the laboratory condition at room temperature. Following conclusions are obtained from this study. The rubber modified adhesives show higher fracture toughness and fatigue resistance than unmodified one. Higher rubber content always show higher fracture toughness. The effect of rubber content on the fracture toughness is influenced by adhesive thickness. The observed fracture toughness increases with an increase of adhesive thickness while no effect of adherend thickness is found at the present condition. The stable crack extension force is higher than that at the crack starting moment. Rubber modification reduces the fatigue crack velocity. The fracture surface topology becomes different according to rubber content.

  15. Rapid Development of Wet Adhesion between Carboxymethylcellulose Modified Cellulose Surfaces Laminated with Polyvinylamine Adhesive.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Emil; Pelton, Robert; Wågberg, Lars

    2016-09-14

    The surface of regenerated cellulose membranes was modified by irreversible adsorption of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). Pairs of wet CMC-modified membranes were laminated with polyvinylamine (PVAm) at room temperature, and the delamination force for wet membranes was measured for both dried and never-dried laminates. The wet adhesion was studied as a function of PVAm molecular weight, amine content, and deposition pH of the polyelectrolyte. Surprisingly the PVAm-CMC system gave substantial wet adhesion that exceeded that of TEMPO-oxidized membranes with PVAm for both dried and never-dried laminates. The greatest wet adhesion was achieved for fully hydrolyzed high molecular weight PVAm. Bulk carboxymethylation of cellulose membranes gave inferior wet adhesion combined with PVAm as compared to CMC adsorption which indicates that a CMC layer of the order of 10 nm was necessary. There are no obvious covalent cross-linking reactions between CMC and PVAm at room temperature, and on the basis of our results, we are instead attributing the wet adhesion to complex formation between the PVAm and the irreversibly adsorbed CMC at the cellulose surface. We propose that interdigitation of PVAm chains into the CMC layer is responsible for the high wet adhesion values. PMID:27552256

  16. 21 CFR 872.3480 - Polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... adhesive. 872.3480 Section 872.3480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive is a device composed of polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) intended...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3480 - Polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... adhesive. 872.3480 Section 872.3480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive is a device composed of polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) intended...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3480 - Polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... adhesive. 872.3480 Section 872.3480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive is a device composed of polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) intended...

  19. Sciatic nerve repair using adhesive bonding and a modified conduit

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiangdang; Cai, Hongfei; Hao, Yongyu; Sun, Geng; Song, Yaoyao; Chen, Wen

    2014-01-01

    When repairing nerves with adhesives, most researchers place glue directly on the nerve stumps, but this method does not fix the nerve ends well and allows glue to easily invade the nerve ends. In this study, we established a rat model of completely transected sciatic nerve injury and repaired it using a modified 1 cm-length conduit with inner diameter of 1.5 mm. Each end of the cylindrical conduit contains a short linear channel, while the enclosed central tube protects the nerve ends well. Nerves were repaired with 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate and suture, which complement the function of the modified conduit. The results demonstrated that for the same conduit, the average operation time using the adhesive method was much shorter than with the suture method. No significant differences were found between the two groups in sciatic function index, motor evoked potential latency, motor evoked potential amplitude, muscular recovery rate, number of medullated nerve fibers, axon diameter, or medullary sheath thickness. Thus, the adhesive method for repairing nerves using a modified conduit is feasible and effective, and reduces the operation time while providing an equivalent repair effect. PMID:25206861

  20. Modifying Matrix Materials to Increase Wetting and Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhong, Katie

    2011-01-01

    In an alternative approach to increasing the degrees of wetting and adhesion between the fiber and matrix components of organic-fiber/polymer matrix composite materials, the matrix resins are modified. Heretofore, it has been common practice to modify the fibers rather than the matrices: The fibers are modified by chemical and/or physical surface treatments prior to combining the fibers with matrix resins - an approach that entails considerable expense and usually results in degradation (typically, weakening) of fibers. The alternative approach of modifying the matrix resins does not entail degradation of fibers, and affords opportunities for improving the mechanical properties of the fiber composites. The alternative approach is more cost-effective, not only because it eliminates expensive fiber-surface treatments but also because it does not entail changes in procedures for manufacturing conventional composite-material structures. The alternative approach is best described by citing an example of its application to a composite of ultra-high-molecular- weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibers in an epoxy matrix. The epoxy matrix was modified to a chemically reactive, polarized epoxy nano-matrix to increase the degrees of wetting and adhesion between the fibers and the matrix. The modification was effected by incorporating a small proportion (0.3 weight percent) of reactive graphitic nanofibers produced from functionalized nanofibers into the epoxy matrix resin prior to combining the resin with the UHMWPE fibers. The resulting increase in fiber/matrix adhesion manifested itself in several test results, notably including an increase of 25 percent in the maximum fiber pullout force and an increase of 60-65 percent in fiber pullout energy. In addition, it was conjectured that the functionalized nanofibers became involved in the cross linking reaction of the epoxy resin, with resultant enhancement of the mechanical properties and lower viscosity of the matrix.

  1. Adhesion of single crystals on modified surfaces in crystallization fouling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Moriz; Augustin, Wolfgang; Scholl, Stephan

    2012-12-01

    In crystallization fouling it has been observed that during a certain initial phase the fouling is formed by a non-uniform layer consisting of a population of single crystals. These single crystals are frequently formed by inverse soluble salts such as CaCO3. During heterogeneous nucleation and heterogeneous growth an interfacial area between the crystal and the heat transfer surface occurs. The development of this interfacial area is the reason for the adhesion of each single crystal and of all individual crystals, once a uniform layer has been built up. The emerging interfacial area is intrinsic to the heterogeneous nucleation of crystals and can be explained by the thermodynamic principle of the minimum of the Gibbs free energy. In this study CaCO3 crystals were grown heterogeneously on untreated and on modified surfaces inside a flow channel. An untreated stainless steel (AISI 304) surface was used as a reference. Following surface modifications were investigated: enameled and electropolished stainless steel as well as diamond-like-carbon based coatings on stainless steel substrate. The adhesion was measured through a novel measurement technique using a micromanipulator to shear off single crystals from the substrate which was fixed to a spring table inside a SEM.

  2. Copolyimide Surface Modifying Agents for Particle Adhesion Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Connell, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Marine biofouling, insect adhesion on aircraft surfaces, microbial contamination of sterile environments, and particle contamination all present unique challenges for which researchers have adopted an array of mitigation strategies. Particulate contamination is of interest to NASA regarding exploration of the Moon, Mars, asteroids, etc.1 Lunar dust compromised seals, clogged filters, abraded visors and space suit surfaces, and was a significant health concern during the Apollo missions.2 Consequently, NASA has instituted a multi-faceted approach to address dust including use of sacrificial surfaces, active mitigation requiring the use of an external energy source, and passive mitigation utilizing materials with an intrinsic resistance to surface contamination. One passive mitigation strategy is modification of a material s surface energy either chemically or topographically. The focus of this paper is the synthesis and evaluation of novel copolyimide materials with surface modifying agents (SMA, oxetanes) enabling controlled variation of surface chemical composition.

  3. Adhesion Improvement of Zirconium Coating on Polyurethane Modified by Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Hao, Xiaofei; Liu, Jiwei

    2016-02-01

    In order to improve the adhesion of the middle frequency magnetic sputtered zirconium coating on a polyurethane film, an anode layer source was used to pretreat the polyurethane film with nitrogen and oxygen ions. SEMs and AFM roughness profiles of treated samples and the contrast groups were obtained. Besides, XPS survey spectrums and high resolution spectrums were also investigated. The adhesion test revealed that ion bombardment could improve the adhesion to the polyurethane coating substrate. A better etching result of oxygen ions versus nitrogen predicts a higher bonding strength of zirconium coating on polyurethane and, indeed, the highest bonding strengths are for oxygen ion bombardment upto 13.3 MPa. As demonstrated in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the oxygen ion also helps to introduce more active groups, and, therefore, it achieves a high value of adhesion strength.

  4. Preparation and characterization of phenol-formaldehyde adhesives modified with enzymatic hydrolysis lignin.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yanqiao; Cheng, Xiansu; Zheng, Zuanbin

    2010-03-01

    Phenol-formaldehyde (PF) adhesives modified with enzymatic hydrolysis lignin (EHL) were synthesized by a one-step process. The phenol component of the PF adhesives was partially substituted by EHL extracted from the residues of cornstalks used to produce bio-ethanol. The EHL-PF adhesives were used to prepare plywoods by hot-pressing. The pH value, viscosity, solid content, free phenol content, free formaldehyde content and brominable substance content of EHL-PF resins were investigated. The bonding strengths of the plywoods were determined, and the influences of the replacement percentage of phenol by EHL (a) and the NaOH content (b) on the properties of the adhesives were investigated. The results showed that the performance of the modified adhesives and the plywoods glued with them almost met the Chinese National Standard (GB/T 14732-2006) for first grade plywood when 20 wt% of the phenol was replaced by EHL. PMID:19854642

  5. Neuronal cell biocompatibility and adhesion to modified CMOS electrodes.

    PubMed

    Graham, Anthony H D; Bowen, Chris R; Taylor, John; Robbins, Jon

    2009-10-01

    The use of CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) integrated circuits to create electrodes for biosensors, implants and drug-discovery has several potential advantages over passive multi-electrode arrays (MEAs). However, unmodified aluminium CMOS electrodes may corrode in a physiological environment. We have investigated a low-cost electrode design based on the modification of CMOS metallisation to produce a nanoporous alumina electrode as an interface to mammalian neuronal cells and corrosion inhibitor. Using NG108-15 mouse neuroblastoma x rat glioma hybrid cells, results show that porous alumina is biocompatible and that the inter-pore distance (pore pitch) of the alumina has no effect on cell vitality. To establish whether porous alumina and a cell membrane can produce a tight junction required for good electrical coupling between electrode and cell, we devised a novel cell detachment centrifugation assay to assess the long-term adhesion of cells. Results show that porous alumina substrates produced with a large pore pitch of 206 nm present a significantly improved surface compared to the unmodified aluminium control and that small pore-pitches of 17 nm and 69 nm present a less favourable surface for cell adhesion. PMID:19459049

  6. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... adhesions Ovarian cyst References Munireddy S, Kavalukas SL, Barbul A. Intra-abdominal healing: gastrointestinal tract and adhesions. Surg Clin N Am Kulaylat MN, Dayton, MT. Surgical complications. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, ...

  7. Modified Phenylethynyl Containing Imides for Secondary Bonding: Non-Autoclave, Low Temperature Processable Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezern, James F. (Technical Monitor); Chang, Alice C.

    1999-01-01

    As part of a program to develop structural adhesives for high performance aerospace applications, research continued on the development of modified phenylethynyl containing imides, LaRC(trademark)MPEIs. In previous reports, the polymer properties were controlled by varying the molecular weight, the amount of branching, and the phenylethynyl content and by blending with low molecular weight materials. This research involves changing the flexibility in the copolyimide backbone of the branched, phenylethynyl terminated adhesives. These adhesives exhibit excellent processability at pressures as low as 15 psi and temperatures as low as 288 C. The Ti/Ti lap shear specimens are processable in an autoclave or a temperature programmable oven under a vacuum bag at 288-300 C without external pressure. The cured polymers exhibit high mechanical properties and excellent solvent resistance. The chemistry and properties of these adhesives are presented.

  8. Injectable Dopamine-Modified Poly(ethylene glycol) Nanocomposite Hydrogel with Enhanced Adhesive Property and Bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A synthetic mimic of mussel adhesive protein, dopamine-modified four-armed poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-D4), was combined with a synthetic nanosilicate, Laponite (Na0.7+(Mg5.5Li0.3Si8)O20(OH)4)0.7–), to form an injectable naoncomposite tissue adhesive hydrogel. Incorporation of up to 2 wt % Laponite significantly reduced the cure time while enhancing the bulk mechanical and adhesive properties of the adhesive due to strong interfacial binding between dopamine and Laponite. The addition of Laponite did not alter the degradation rate and cytocompatibility of PEG-D4 adhesive. On the basis of subcutaneous implantation in rat, PEG-D4 nanocomposite hydrogels elicited minimal inflammatory response and exhibited an enhanced level of cellular infiltration as compared to Laponite-free samples. The addition of Laponite is potentially a simple and effective method for promoting bioactivity in a bioinert, synthetic PEG-based adhesive while simultaneously enhancing its mechanical and adhesive properties. PMID:25222290

  9. Injectable dopamine-modified poly(ethylene glycol) nanocomposite hydrogel with enhanced adhesive property and bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Meng, Hao; Konst, Shari; Sarmiento, Ryan; Rajachar, Rupak; Lee, Bruce P

    2014-10-01

    A synthetic mimic of mussel adhesive protein, dopamine-modified four-armed poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-D4), was combined with a synthetic nanosilicate, Laponite (Na(0.7+)(Mg5.5Li0.3Si8)O20(OH)4)(0.7-)), to form an injectable naoncomposite tissue adhesive hydrogel. Incorporation of up to 2 wt % Laponite significantly reduced the cure time while enhancing the bulk mechanical and adhesive properties of the adhesive due to strong interfacial binding between dopamine and Laponite. The addition of Laponite did not alter the degradation rate and cytocompatibility of PEG-D4 adhesive. On the basis of subcutaneous implantation in rat, PEG-D4 nanocomposite hydrogels elicited minimal inflammatory response and exhibited an enhanced level of cellular infiltration as compared to Laponite-free samples. The addition of Laponite is potentially a simple and effective method for promoting bioactivity in a bioinert, synthetic PEG-based adhesive while simultaneously enhancing its mechanical and adhesive properties. PMID:25222290

  10. 21 CFR 872.3480 - Polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... denture retention and comfort. (b) Classification. Class III. (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the Food and... (modified cationic) denture adhesive shall have an approved PMA or a declared completed PDP in effect...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3480 - Polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... denture retention and comfort. (b) Classification. Class III. (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the Food and... (modified cationic) denture adhesive shall have an approved PMA or a declared completed PDP in effect...

  12. Platelet adhesion and activation on polyethylene glycol modified polyurethane surfaces. Measurement of cytoplasmic calcium.

    PubMed

    Park, K D; Suzuki, K; Lee, W K; Lee, J E; Kim, Y H; Sakurai, Y; Okano, T

    1996-01-01

    Polyurethane (PU) surfaces were modified by coupling polyethylene glycol (PEG; molecular weight, 1,000) chains carrying different terminal groups (PU-PEG1K-OH, PU-PEG1K-NH2, PU-PEG1K-SO3) and longer PEG chains (MW, 3,350; PU-PEG3.4K-OH). The modified PU surfaces have the same PEG (1K) chain density. Surface induced platelet activation was evaluated by measuring cytoplasmic free calcium concentration in platelets contacting modified surfaces, and platelet adhesion onto modified surfaces was investigated in vitro. Cytoplasmic free calcium levels in platelets contacting PU-PEG-SO3 remained relatively constant, in contrast to the significant increase observed for PU-PEG-NH2, PU-PEG-OH, and control PU surfaces. The degree of platelet adhesion clearly demonstrates that all PEG graft surfaces prevented platelet adhesion. Among PEG1K surfaces, PU-PEG-SO3 shows the lowest platelet adhesion. In the case of relatively longer PEG grafted surfaces (PU-PEG3.4K-OH and PU-PEG3.4K-Hep), both surfaces were found to prevent the increase in both cytoplasmic free calcium and platelet adhesion. These results suggest that longer PEG chain grafting is more effective than shorter grafting in preventing platelet activation and adhesion because of the highly dynamic movement of hydrated PEG chains at the interface. In addition, in vitro platelet interaction is dependent upon terminal groups of PEG chains on PEG1K series surfaces. PMID:8945010

  13. Effect of Fluoride-Modified Titanium Surface on Early Adhesion of Irradiated Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun Yuan; Zheng, Li Wu; Ma, Li; Kwong, Dora Lai Wan; Cheung, Lim Kwong; Pow, Edmond Ho Nang

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of fluoride-modified titanium surface on adhesion of irradiated osteoblasts. Materials and Methods. Fluoride-modified surface was obtained and the morphology, roughness, and chemical composition of the surface were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The adhesion of irradiated osteoblast-like cells, in terms of number, area, and fluorescence intensity on the titanium surface, was evaluated using immunofluorescence staining. Results. Numerous nanosize pits were seen only in the F-TiO surface. The pits were more remarkable and uniform on F-TiO surface than on TiO surface; however, the amplitude of peaks and bottoms on F-TiO surface appeared to be smaller than on TiO surface. The Sa value and Sdr percentage of TiO surfaces were significantly higher than those of F-TiO surface. The concentrations of main elements such as titanium, oxygen, and carbon were similar on both surfaces. The number of irradiated osteoblasts adhered on the control surface was larger than on fluoride-modified surface. Meanwhile, the cells on the fluoride-modified surface formed more actin filaments. Conclusions. The fluoride-modified titanium surface alters the adhesion of irradiated osteoblasts. Further studies are needed to investigate the proliferation, differentiation, maturation, gene expression, and cytokine production of irradiated osteoblasts on fluoride-modified titanium surface. PMID:26266253

  14. Compatibility of repair mortar with migrating corrosion inhibiting admixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Bjegovic, D.; Ukrainczyk, V.; Ukrainczyk, B.; Miksic, B.

    1997-08-01

    One of the methods for corrosion protection of reinforced concrete is the use of migrating corrosion inhibitor as an admixture in repair mortars. The admixture must be effective for corrosion protection and compatible with polymers added to repair mortar to improve properties of fresh and hardened mortar. This paper presents experimental results on compatibility of a migrating corrosion inhibitor added to two repair mortars based on an inorganic binder modified with polymers. The influence of a migrating inhibitor on the properties of fresh and hardened mortars was tested. The effectiveness on reinforcement corrosion protection has been tested according to ASTM G 109. Test results prove that the investigated migrating inhibitor is compatible with repair mortars and that it delays corrosion of the reinforcement.

  15. In vitro evaluation of tissue adhesives composed of hydrophobically modified gelatins and disuccinimidyl tartrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Miyuki; Taguchi, Tetsushi

    2012-12-01

    The effect of the hydrophobic group content in gelatin on the bonding strength of novel tissue-penetrating tissue adhesives was evaluated. The hydrophobic groups introduced into gelatin were the saturated hexanoyl, palmitoyl, and stearoyl groups, and the unsaturated oleoyl group. A collagen casing was employed as an adherend to model soft tissue for the in vitro determination of bonding strength of tissue adhesives composed of various hydrophobically modified gelatins and disuccinimidyl tartrate. The adhesive composed of stearoyl-modified gelatin (7.4% stearoyl; 10Ste) and disuccinimidyl tartrate showed the highest bonding strength. The bonding strength of the adhesives decreased as the degree of substitution of the hydrophobic groups increased. Cell culture experiments demonstrated that fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled 10Ste was integrated onto the surface of smooth muscle cells and showed no cytotoxicity. These results suggest that 10Ste interacted with the hydrophobic domains of collagen casings, such as hydrophobic amino acid residues and cell membranes. Therefore, 10Ste-disuccinimidyl tartrate is a promising adhesive for use in aortic dissection.

  16. The effect of elastomer chain length on properties of silicone-modified polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L.; Ezzell, S.

    1981-01-01

    A series of polyimides containing silicone elastomers was synthesized in order to study the effects of the elastomer chain length on polymer properties. The elastomer with repeat units varying from n=10 to 105 was chemically reacted into the backbone of an addition polyimide oligomer via reactive aromatic amine groups. Glass transition temperatures of the elastomer and polyimide phases were observed by torsional braid analysis. The elastomer-modified polyimides were tested as adhesives for bonding titanium in order to determine their potential for aerospace applications. Adhesive lap shear tests were performed before and after aging bonded specimens at elevated temperatures.

  17. An in vitro bacterial adhesion assessment of surface-modified medical-grade PVC.

    PubMed

    Asadinezhad, Ahmad; Novák, Igor; Lehocký, Marián; Sedlarík, Vladimir; Vesel, Alenka; Junkar, Ita; Sáha, Petr; Chodák, Ivan

    2010-06-01

    Medical-grade polyvinyl chloride was surface modified by a multistep physicochemical approach to improve bacterial adhesion prevention properties. This was fulfilled via surface activation by diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge plasma followed by radical graft copolymerization of acrylic acid through surface-initiated pathway to render a structured high density brush. Three known antibacterial agents, bronopol, benzalkonium chloride, and chlorhexidine, were then individually coated onto functionalized surface to induce biological properties. Various modern surface probe techniques were employed to explore the effects of the modification steps. In vitro bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation assay was performed. Escherichia coli strain was found to be more susceptible to modifications rather than Staphylococcus aureus as up to 85% reduction in adherence degree of the former was observed upon treating with above antibacterial agents, while only chlorhexidine could retard the adhesion of the latter by 50%. Also, plasma treated and graft copolymerized samples were remarkably effective to diminish the adherence of E. coli. PMID:20189783

  18. Effects of delayed polymerization time and bracket manipulation on orthodontic resin modified glass ionomer adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Danielle Wiggins

    This study examined the effect of varying delayed polymerization times in combination with bracket manipulation on shear bond strength (SBS), degree of conversion (DC), and adhesive remnant index (ARI) score when using a resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) adhesive. Specimens were divided into three groups of clinically relevant delay times (0.5, 2, and 4-min) to simulate the delay that frequently occurs between bracket placement and manipulation and subsequent light curing. Based on an analysis of variance (alpha=.05), the SBS was not significantly different between the three groups. While one of the goals of this study was to be the first study to quantify DC of RMGI using Raman microspectroscopy, several challenges, including weak peak signal with and without fluorescence, were encountered and as a result, DC could not be determined. A significant difference (p<0.05) in ARI score was detected between the 0.5-min and 4.0-min delay groups with more adhesive remaining on the bracket with increasing delay time. A Spearman correlation between SBS and ARI indicated no positive association between SBS and ARI measures across delay times. The results of this study suggest that clinically relevant delay times of 0.5, 2, and 4-min do not negatively impact the SBS of a RMGI adhesive. However, with increasing delay time, the results suggest that more adhesive might remain on the bracket during debonding. With more adhesive remaining on the bracket, this could be beneficial in that less adhesive needs to be removed from enamel by grinding at the time of bracket removal when orthodontic treatment is completed.

  19. Adhesion of MRC-5 and A549 cells on poly(dimethylsiloxane) surface modified by proteins.

    PubMed

    Zuchowska, Agnieszka; Kwiatkowski, Piotr; Jastrzebska, Elzbieta; Chudy, Michal; Dybko, Artur; Brzozka, Zbigniew

    2016-02-01

    PDMS is a very popular material used for fabrication of Lab-on-a-Chip systems for biological applications. Although PDMS has numerous advantages, it is a highly hydrophobic material, which inhibits adhesion and proliferation of the cells. PDMS surface modifications are used to enrich growth of the cells. However, due to the fact that each cell type has specific adhesion, it is necessary to optimize the parameters of these modifications. In this paper, we present an investigation of normal (MRC-5) and carcinoma (A549) human lung cell adhesion and proliferation on modified PDMS surfaces. We have chosen these cell types because often they are used as models for basic cancer research. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first presentation of this type of investigation. The combination of a gas-phase processing (oxygen plasma or ultraviolet irradiation) and wet chemical methods based on proteins' adsorption was used in our experiments. Different proteins such as poly-l-lysine, fibronectin, laminin, gelatin, and collagen were incubated with the activated PDMS samples. To compare with other works, here, we also examined how ratio of prepolymer to curing agent (5:1, 10:1, and 20:1) influences PDMS hydrophilicity during further modifications. The highest adhesion of the tested cells was observed for the usage of collagen, regardless of PDMS ratio. However, the MRC-5 cell line demonstrated better adhesion than A549 cells. This is probably due to the difference in their morphology and type (normal/cancer). PMID:26311334

  20. Hydrophobic and high adhesive polyaniline layer of rectangular microtubes fabricated by a modified interfacial polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuanqiang; Gong, Xiangxiang; Qu, Yun; Han, Jie

    2016-08-01

    A modified interfacial polymerization of aniline is developed to fabricate hydrophobic and adhesive polyaniline (PANI) layer of rectangular microtubes on the glass substrate. The modified method uses pentanol as an organic medium to dissolve aniline monomer, with the water film of oxidant and surfactant on the glass substrate as water phase. The effects of some synthetic parameters (such as monomer concentration, alcohol molecular structure and surfactant type) on the morphology of PANI layer are studied for better understanding the fabrication of PANI nanostructures on the film. The alcohol molecular structure plays key role for the supermolecular assembly of PANI chains into nanostructures, while the surfactant may direct the array and deposition of these nanostructures on the glass substrate. The formation reason of PANI rectangular sub-microtubes is roughly interpreted according to our previous works. Wettability experiment indicates that the as-prepared PANI layer exhibits excellent hydrophobicity and high adhesive properties to water drop.

  1. A modified method by differential adhesion for enrichment of bladder cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yong-tong; Pang, Shi-yu; Luo, Yang; Chen, Wei; Bao, Ji-ming; Tan, Wan-long

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: In a previous study the vaccine was effective against bladder cancer in a mouse model. However, a small portion of tumors regrew because the vaccine could not eliminate bladder cancer stem cells (CSCs). In this study, we showed a modified method for the isolation of bladder CSCs using a combination of differential adhesion method and serum-free culture medium (SFM) method. Materials and Methods: Trypsin-resistant cells and trypsin-sensitive cells were isolated from MB49, EJ and 5637 cells by a combination of differential adhesion method and SFM method. The CSCs characterizations of trypsin-resistant cells were verified by the flow cytometry, the western blotting, the quantitative polymerase chain reaction, the resistance to chemotherapy assay, the transwell assay, and the tumor xenograft formation assay. Results: Trypsin-resistant cells were isolated and identified in CSCs characters, with high expression of CSCs markers, higher resistance to chemotherapy, greater migration in vitro, and stronger tumorigenicity in vivo. Conclusion: Trypsin-resistant cells displayed specific CSCs properties. Our study showed trypsin-resistant cells were isolated successfully with a modified method using a combination of differential adhesion method and SFM method. PMID:27564296

  2. Mortar launched surveillance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Carl E.; Carlton, Lindley A.

    2001-02-01

    Accurate Automation Corporation has completed the conceptual design of a mortar launched air vehicle system to perform close range or over-the-horizon surveillance missions. Law enforcement and military units require an organic capability to obtain real time intelligence information of time critical targets. Our design will permit law enforcement to detect, classify, locate and track these time critical targets. The surveillance system is a simple, unmanned fixed-winged aircraft deployed via a conventional mortar tube. The aircraft's flight surfaces are deployed following mortar launch to permit maximum range and time over target. The aircraft and sensor system are field retrievable. The aircraft can be configured with an engine to permit extended time over target or range. The aircraft has an integrated surveillance sensor system; a programmable CMOS sensor array. The integrated RF transmitted to capable of down- linking real-time video over line-of-sight distances exceeding 10 kilometers. The major benefit of the modular design is the ability to provide surveillance or tracking quickly at a low cost. Vehicle operational radius and sensor field coverage as well as design trade results of vehicle range and endurance performance and payload capacity at operational range are presented for various mortar configurations.

  3. Adhesion-dependent negative friction coefficient on chemically modified graphite at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhao; Smolyanitsky, Alex; Li, Qunyang; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Cannara, Rachel J.

    2012-12-01

    From the early tribological studies of Leonardo da Vinci to Amontons’ law, friction has been shown to increase with increasing normal load. This trend continues to hold at the nanoscale, where friction can vary nonlinearly with normal load. Here we present nanoscale friction force microscopy (FFM) experiments for a nanoscale probe tip sliding on a chemically modified graphite surface in an atomic force microscope (AFM). Our results demonstrate that, when adhesion between the AFM tip and surface is enhanced relative to the exfoliation energy of graphite, friction can increase as the load decreases under tip retraction. This leads to the emergence of an effectively negative coefficient of friction in the low-load regime. We show that the magnitude of this coefficient depends on the ratio of tip-sample adhesion to the exfoliation energy of graphite. Through both atomistic- and continuum-based simulations, we attribute this unusual phenomenon to a reversible partial delamination of the topmost atomic layers, which then mimic few- to single-layer graphene. Lifting of these layers with the AFM tip leads to greater deformability of the surface with decreasing applied load. This discovery suggests that the lamellar nature of graphite yields nanoscale tribological properties outside the predictive capacity of existing continuum mechanical models.

  4. Adhesion-dependent negative friction coefficient on chemically modified graphite at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhao; Smolyanitsky, Alex; Li, Qunyang; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Cannara, Rachel J

    2012-12-01

    From the early tribological studies of Leonardo da Vinci to Amontons' law, friction has been shown to increase with increasing normal load. This trend continues to hold at the nanoscale, where friction can vary nonlinearly with normal load. Here we present nanoscale friction force microscopy (FFM) experiments for a nanoscale probe tip sliding on a chemically modified graphite surface in an atomic force microscope (AFM). Our results demonstrate that, when adhesion between the AFM tip and surface is enhanced relative to the exfoliation energy of graphite, friction can increase as the load decreases under tip retraction. This leads to the emergence of an effectively negative coefficient of friction in the low-load regime. We show that the magnitude of this coefficient depends on the ratio of tip-sample adhesion to the exfoliation energy of graphite. Through both atomistic- and continuum-based simulations, we attribute this unusual phenomenon to a reversible partial delamination of the topmost atomic layers, which then mimic few- to single-layer graphene. Lifting of these layers with the AFM tip leads to greater deformability of the surface with decreasing applied load. This discovery suggests that the lamellar nature of graphite yields nanoscale tribological properties outside the predictive capacity of existing continuum mechanical models. PMID:23064494

  5. Domain decomposition methods for mortar finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Widlund, O.

    1996-12-31

    In the last few years, domain decomposition methods, previously developed and tested for standard finite element methods and elliptic problems, have been extended and modified to work for mortar and other nonconforming finite element methods. A survey will be given of work carried out jointly with Yves Achdou, Mario Casarin, Maksymilian Dryja and Yvon Maday. Results on the p- and h-p-version finite elements will also be discussed.

  6. Elastic modulus, oxidation depth and adhesion force of surface modified polystyrene studied by AFM and XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubarsky, G. V.; Davidson, M. R.; Bradley, R. H.

    2004-06-01

    AFM and XPS have been used to investigate the surface and near-surface properties of polystyrene (PS) substrates which have been subjected to one of three controlled surface modification processes performed in situ in a specially constructed cell. The cell was fitted to a Digital Instruments Nanoscope III AFM measuring head and allowed close control of the gaseous environment and made it possible to UV irradiate the sample during AFM measurements. Treatments were carried out using UV at 184.9 and 253.7 nm wavelengths, in oxygen (UV-ozone), and in nitrogen (UV-only). Polystyrene surfaces were also modified by an exposure to an atmosphere of ozone in the absence of UV (ozone-only). Data show that adhesion force is highest between tip and sample for the UV-ozone exposed surfaces and that the adhesion force increases with sample exposure time. Exposure to UV-only or ozone alone results in lower ultimate adhesion levels with a slower rate of increase with exposure time. Evaluation of Young's modulus for unmodified PS gave a value of 3.37 (±0.52) GPa which agrees well with the textbook value which ranges from 2 to 4 GPa depending on the measurement technique. A 60 s exposure to combined UV-ozone resulted in the formation of a surface layer with a modulus at the surface of 1.25 (±0.19) GPa which increased to 2.5 (±0.37) GPa at a depth of 3.5 nm. The sample exposed for 60 s to UV-only had a Young's modulus of 2.6 (±0.39) GPa but showed no reduced modulus layer at the surface. The modulus of the ozone-only treated material was the least affected with a decrease of around 0.75 GPa with some evidence for a surface layer with a modulus ranging from 2.6 (±0.39) GPa at the surface to 3.2 (±0.48) GPa at a depth of 2 nm. XPS analyses reveal that the oxygen content of the modified surfaces decreased in the order of UV-ozone > UV > ozone with approximate concentrations for a 60 s exposure of 5, 0.7 and 0.05 at.%, respectively. Friction force imaging of patterned surfaces

  7. Properties of Cement Mortar Produced from Mixed Waste Materials with Pozzolanic Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Yen, Chi-Liang; Tseng, Dyi-Hwa; Wu, Yue-Ze

    2012-07-01

    Waste materials with pozzolanic characteristics, such as sewage sludge ash (SSA), coal combustion fly ash (FA), and granulated blast furnace slag (GBS), were reused as partial cement replacements for making cement mortar in this study. Experimental results revealed that with dual replacement of cement by SSA and GBS and triple replacement by SSA, FA, and GBS at 50% of total cement replacement, the compressive strength (Sc) of the blended cement mortars at 56 days was 93.7% and 92.9% of the control cement mortar, respectively. GBS had the highest strength activity index value and could produce large amounts of CaO to enhance the pozzolanic activity of SSA/FA and form calcium silicate hydrate gels to fill the capillary pores of the cement mortar. Consequently, the Sc development of cement mortar with GBS replacement was better than that without GBS, and the total pore volume of blended cement mortars with GBS/SSA replacement was less than that with FA/SSA replacement. In the cement mortar with modified SSA and GBS at 70% of total cement replacement, the Sc at 56 days was 92.4% of the control mortar. Modifying the content of calcium in SSA also increased its pozzolanic reaction. CaCl(2) accelerated the pozzolanic activity of SSA better than lime did. Moreover, blending cement mortars with GBS/SSA replacement could generate more monosulfoaluminate to fill capillary pores. PMID:22783062

  8. Properties of Cement Mortar Produced from Mixed Waste Materials with Pozzolanic Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Chi-Liang; Tseng, Dyi-Hwa; Wu, Yue-Ze

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Waste materials with pozzolanic characteristics, such as sewage sludge ash (SSA), coal combustion fly ash (FA), and granulated blast furnace slag (GBS), were reused as partial cement replacements for making cement mortar in this study. Experimental results revealed that with dual replacement of cement by SSA and GBS and triple replacement by SSA, FA, and GBS at 50% of total cement replacement, the compressive strength (Sc) of the blended cement mortars at 56 days was 93.7% and 92.9% of the control cement mortar, respectively. GBS had the highest strength activity index value and could produce large amounts of CaO to enhance the pozzolanic activity of SSA/FA and form calcium silicate hydrate gels to fill the capillary pores of the cement mortar. Consequently, the Sc development of cement mortar with GBS replacement was better than that without GBS, and the total pore volume of blended cement mortars with GBS/SSA replacement was less than that with FA/SSA replacement. In the cement mortar with modified SSA and GBS at 70% of total cement replacement, the Sc at 56 days was 92.4% of the control mortar. Modifying the content of calcium in SSA also increased its pozzolanic reaction. CaCl2 accelerated the pozzolanic activity of SSA better than lime did. Moreover, blending cement mortars with GBS/SSA replacement could generate more monosulfoaluminate to fill capillary pores. PMID:22783062

  9. Plasmodium falciparum gametocyte adhesion to C32 cells via CD36 is inhibited by antibodies to modified band 3.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, N J; Targett, G A; Hall, B S

    1996-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum gametocyte-infected erythrocytes are characterized by their ability to sequester in the microvasculature of various organs, primarily the spleen and bone marrow. This phenomenon is thought to play a critical role in the development and survival of the sexual stages. Little is known, however, about ligands on the gametocyte-infected erythrocyte. Infection of erythrocytes with mature asexual stages of P. falciparum (trophozoites and schizonts) has been shown to induce modification of the erythrocyte anion transporter, band 3, and this has been linked to the acquisition of an adherent phenotype. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that immature gametocyte-infected erythrocytes also express modified band 3. In vitro binding assays demonstrate that gametocyte-infected erythrocytes of the 3D7 strain utilize this surface receptor for adhesion to C32 amelanotic melanoma cells via the host cell receptor CD36 (platelet glycoprotein IIIb). Adhesion of gametocyte-infected erythrocytes to CD36-transfected CHO cells is also dependent on modified band 3. However, modified band 3 does not mediate adhesion of gametocyte-infected erythrocytes to intercellular adhesion molecule 1, a second host receptor for gametocytes expressed on C32 cells. PMID:8926098

  10. Vibrio fischeri and Escherichia coli adhesion tendencies towards photolithographically modified nanosmooth poly (tert-butyl methacrylate) polymer surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Elena P; Mitik-Dineva, Natasa; Mocanasu, Radu C; Murphy, Sarah; Wang, James; van Riessen, Grant; Crawford, Russell J

    2008-01-01

    This study reports the adhesion behavior of two bacterial species, Vibrio fischeri and Escherichia coli, to the photoresistant poly(tert-butyl methacrylate) (P(tBMA)) polymer surface. The data has demonstrated that ultraviolet irradiation of P(tBMA) was able to provide control over bacterial adhesion tendencies. Following photolithography, several of the surface characteristics of P(tBMA) were found to be altered. Atomic force microscopy analysis indicated that photolithographically modified P(tBMA) (henceforth termed ‘modified polymer’) appeared as a ‘nanosmooth’ surface with an average surface roughness of 1.6 nm. Although confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis clearly demonstrated that V. fischeri and E. coli presented largely different patterns of attachment in order to adhere to the same surfaces, both species exhibited a greater adhesion propensity towards the ‘nanosmooth’ surface. The adhesion of both species to the modified polymer surface appeared to be facilitated by an elevated production of extracellular polymeric substances when in contact with the substrate. PMID:24198459

  11. Adhesion and removal kinetics of Bacillus cereus biofilms on Ni-PTFE modified stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kang; McLandsborough, Lynne A; Goddard, Julie M

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm control remains a challenge to food safety. A well-studied non-fouling coating involves codeposition of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) during electroless plating. This coating has been reported to reduce foulant build-up during pasteurization, but opportunities remain in demonstrating its efficacy in inhibiting biofilm formation. Herein, the initial adhesion, biofilm formation, and removal kinetics of Bacillus cereus on Ni-PTFE-modified stainless steel (SS) are characterized. Coatings lowered the surface energy of SS and reduced biofilm formation by > 2 log CFU cm(-2). Characterization of the kinetics of biofilm removal during cleaning demonstrated improved cleanability on the Ni-PTFE coated steel. There was no evidence of biofilm after cleaning by either solution on the Ni-PTFE coated steel, whereas more than 3 log and 1 log CFU cm(-2) of bacteria remained on the native steel after cleaning with water and an alkaline cleaner, respectively. This work demonstrates the potential application of Ni-PTFE non-fouling coatings on SS to improve food safety by reducing biofilm formation and improving the cleaning efficiency of food processing equipment. PMID:27020838

  12. Rac1 inactivation by lethal toxin from Clostridium sordellii modifies focal adhesions upstream of actin depolymerization.

    PubMed

    Geny, Blandine; Grassart, Alexandre; Manich, Maria; Chicanne, Gaëtan; Payrastre, Bernard; Sauvonnet, Nathalie; Popoff, Michel R

    2010-02-01

    Inactivation of different small GTPases upon their glucosylation by lethal toxin from Clostridium sordellii strain IP82 (LT-82) is already known to lead to cell rounding, adherens junction (AJ) disorganization and actin depolymerization. In the present work, we observed that LT-82 induces a rapid dephosphorylation of paxillin, a protein regulating focal adhesion (FA), independently of inactivation of paxillin kinases such as Src, Fak and Pyk2. Among the small GTPases inactivated by this toxin, including Rac, Ras, Rap and Ral, we identified Rac1, as responsible for paxillin dephosphorylation using cells overexpressing Rac1(V12). Rac1 inactivation by LT-82 modifies interactions between proteins from AJ and FA complexes as shown by pull-down assays. We showed that in Triton X-100-insoluble membrane proteins from these complexes, namely E-cadherin, beta-catenin, p120-catenin and talin, are decreased upon LT-82 intoxication, a treatment that also induces a rapid decrease in cell phosphoinositide content. Therefore, we proposed that Rac inactivation by LT-82 alters phosphoinositide metabolism leading to FA and AJ complex disorganization and actin depolymerization. PMID:19840028

  13. Loss of Modifier of Cell Adhesion Reveals a Pathway Leading to Axonal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Peto, Charles A.; Shelton, G. Diane; Mizisin, Andrew; Sawchenko, Paul E.; Schubert, David

    2009-01-01

    Axonal dysfunction is the major phenotypic change in many neurodegenerative diseases, but the processes underlying this impairment are not clear. Modifier of cell adhesion (MOCA) is a presenilin binding protein that functions as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rac1. The loss of MOCA in mice leads to axonal degeneration and causes sensorimotor impairments by decreasing cofilin phosphorylation and altering its upstream signaling partners LIM kinase and p21-activated kinase, an enzyme directly downstream of Rac1. The dystrophic axons found in MOCA-deficient mice are associated with abnormal aggregates of neurofilament protein, the disorganization of the axonal cytoskeleton, and the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles and polyubiquitinated proteins. Furthermore, MOCA deficiency causes an alteration in the actin cytoskeleton and the formation of cofilin-containing rod-like structures. The dystrophic axons show functional abnormalities, including impaired axonal transport. These findings demonstrate that MOCA is required for maintaining the functional integrity of axons and define a model for the steps leading to axonal degeneration. PMID:19129390

  14. Adhesion of Poly(phenylene sulfide) Resin with Polymeric Film of Triazine Thiol on Aluminum Surface Modified by Anodic Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Eun Hyuk; Jang, Eun Kyung; Hong, Tae Eun; Kim, Jong Pil; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Jin, Jong Sung; Hyun, Myung Ho; Shin, Dong Su; Bae, Jong-Seong; Jeong, Euh Duck

    2015-01-01

    Various surface modifications have been applied to improve the adhesion properties of aluminum for the cap plate and sealing quality of electrolyte on Li ion batteries. In this study, we have tried to find the effective condition for the polymerization of triazine thiols (TT) on modified aluminum surfaces by anodic aluminum oxide. Characterization of polymerized films on aluminum was explored by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy analysis. Scanning electron microscopy results reveal that meaningful roughness was formed on aluminum surfaces by anodic oxidation. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy analysis results represent that the peel strength was found to depend on film thickness and the composition of the adhesion layer. As a result, Al/PPS (polyphenylene sulfide) resin assemblies developed in this study have superior adhesive property. Therefore, these assemblies might be a viable candidate for a sealing technique for Li ion batteries. PMID:26301310

  15. [Therapeutic evaluation of the polylactic acid gel (PLA-G) used for preventing skin flap adhesion in modified radical mastectomy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Guojing; Liu, Tao

    2013-12-01

    The present preliminary study was to observe the feasibility of the use of polylactic acid gel (PLA-G) in modified radical mastectomy and the ability of the PLA-G in the prevention of flap adhesion after operation. Sixty-eight patients were diagnosed with breast cancer, and received modified radical mastectomy from Jan. 2004 to Dec. 2006. The patients were divided randomly into a treatment group and a control group (with 34 cases each). The PLA-G was used under the surface of the auxiliary operative wound in the treatment group, and nothing was used in the control group. The wound healing, the wound complication, the amount of drainage solution, the indwelling time of the drainage tube and the auxiliary skin adhesion were evaluated after operation in both groups. There were no statistical difference on wound healing between the first intension (29:27) and the second intention (5:7), and the wound dehiscence after taking the stitches out (0:0) between the two intensions, the hematoma (0:1) and the effusion of the wound (5:6), and the flap necrosis (1:2) between two groups. There were also no statistical difference on the amount of drainage solution per day (6 +/- 3) and indwelling time of the drainage tube (6 +/- 4) after operation between the two groups (P > 0.5). After the operation, the case load with no flap adhesion in the treatment group was significant higher compared with the control group (22:8). The case load with complete acquired skin flap adhesion in the treatment group was visibly lower than in the control group (3:19), which proved that there was a significant statistical difference between the two groups (P < 0.05). This study suggested that the using of PLA-G in the breast cancer modified radical mastectomy could prevent skin flap adhesion without any harmful effects in the wound healing. PMID:24645611

  16. The effect of modified polysialic acid based hydrogels on the adhesion and viability of primary neurons and glial cells.

    PubMed

    Haile, Yohannes; Berski, Silke; Dräger, Gerald; Nobre, Andrè; Stummeyer, Katharina; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Grothe, Claudia

    2008-04-01

    In this study we present the enzymatic and biological analysis of polysialic acid (polySia) based hydrogel in terms of its degradation and cytocompatibility. PolySia based hydrogel is completely degradable by endosialidase enzyme which may avoid second surgery after tissue recovery. Viability assay showed that soluble components of polySia hydrogel did not cause any toxic effect on cultured Schwann cells. Moreover, green fluorescence protein transfected neonatal and adult Schwann cells, neural stem cells and dorsal root ganglionic cells (unlabelled) were seeded on polySia hydrogel modified with poly-L-lysine (Pll), poly-L-ornithine-laminin (porn-laminin) or collagen. Water soluble tetrazolium salt assay revealed that modification of the hydrogel significantly improved cell adhesion and viability. These results infer that polySia based scaffolds in combination with cell adhesion molecules and cells genetically modified to express growth factors would potentially be promising alternative in reconstructive therapeutic strategies. PMID:18255143

  17. Chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, O.M.; Hansen, P.F.; Coats, A.M.; Glasser, F.P.

    1999-09-01

    In this paper chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar is followed by electron probe microanalysis. The influence of several paste and exposure parameters on chloride ingress are examined (e.g., water-cement ratio, silica fume addition, exposure time, and temperature). The measurements are modelled on Fick's law modified by a term for chloride binding. Inclusion of chloride binding significantly improves the profile shape of the modelled ingress profiles. The presence of fine aggregate and formation of interfacial transition zones at paste-aggregate boundaries does not significantly affect diffusion rates.

  18. Surface characterization and adhesion of oxygen plasma-modified LARC-TPI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, J. W.; Wightman, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    LARC-TPI, an aromatic thermoplastic polyimide, was exposed to an oxygen plasma as a surface pretreatment for adhesive bonding. Chemical and physical changes which occurred in the polyimide surface as a result of the plasma treatment were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IR-RAS), contact-angle analysis, ellipsometry, and high resolution SEM. A 180-deg peel test with an acrylate-based pressure sensitive adhesive as a flexible adherent was utilized to study the interactions of the plasma-treated polyimide surface with other polymeric materials. The surface characterization and adhesion testing results showed that the oxygen plasma treatment, while creating a more hydrophilic, polar surface, also caused chain scission, resulting in the formation of a weak boundary layer which inhibited adhesion.

  19. Enhanced adhesion and field emission of CuO nanowires synthesized by simply modified thermal oxidation technique.

    PubMed

    Tang, C M; Wang, Y B; Yao, R H; Ning, H L; Qiu, W Q; Liu, Z W

    2016-09-30

    Metal oxide nanowires (NWs) can be easily grown by the thermal oxidation method, but the low adhesion between the NWs and the substrate restricts their practical applications in functional devices. In this work, the conventional hotplate technique is simply modified by introducing one or two stainless steel plates to supply a more stable oxidation environment, which is found to be beneficial to the growth and adhesion of CuO NWs on the Cu substrate. In detail, the Cu foils were heated on the hotplate directly, on one plate over the hotplate, and between two plates over the hotplate at 400 °C in ambient condition. It is found that the NWs obtained between two plates exhibit large length and diameter with moderate density. The sufficient activated oxygen, stable temperature, and proper temperature gradient configuration caused by the two plates accelerate the formation of CuO NWs, and result in the longest NWs with enhanced adhesion. The grain-boundary diffusion and Kirkendall effect are proposed to explain the mechanism of NWs growth and the formation of cracks. The NWs obtained between two plates also showed the best field emission properties, with lowest turn-on field (5.31 V μm(-1)) and threshold field (9.8 V μm(-1)). Excellent field emission properties and enhanced NW-substrate adhesion indicate that these NW arrays could be potentially used as the cathode of field emission displays. PMID:27560484

  20. NMR relaxometry study of plaster mortar with polymer additives

    SciTech Connect

    Jumate, E.; Manea, D.; Moldovan, D.; Fechete, R.

    2013-11-13

    The cement mixed with water forms a plastic paste or slurry which stiffness in time and finally hardens into a resistant stone. The addition of sand aggregates, polymers (Walocel) and/or calcium carbonate will modify dramatically the final mortar mechanic and thermal properties. The hydration processes can be observed using the 1D NMR measurements of transverse T{sub 2} relaxation times distributions analysed by a Laplace inversion algorithm. These distributions were obtained for mortar pasta measured at 2 hours after preparation then at 3, 7 and 28 days after preparation. Multiple components are identified in the T{sub 2} distributions. These can be associated with the proton bounded chemical or physical to the mortar minerals characterized by a short T{sub 2} relaxation time and to water protons in pores with three different pore sizes as observed from SEM images. The evaporation process is faster in the first hours after preparation, while the mortar hydration (bonding of water molecules to mortar minerals) can be still observed after days or months from preparation. Finally, the mechanic resistance was correlated with the transverse T{sub 2} relaxation rates corresponding to the bound water.

  1. Epithelial cell morphology and adhesion on diamond films deposited and chemically modified by plasma processes.

    PubMed

    Rezek, Bohuslav; Ukraintsev, Egor; Krátká, Marie; Taylor, Andrew; Fendrych, Frantisek; Mandys, Vaclav

    2014-09-01

    The authors show that nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films prepared by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition apparatus with a linear antenna delivery system are well compatible with epithelial cells (5637 human bladder carcinoma) and significantly improve the cell adhesion compared to reference glass substrates. This is attributed to better adhesion of adsorbed layers to diamond as observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) beneath the cells. Moreover, the cell morphology can be adjusted by appropriate surface treatment of diamond by using hydrogen and oxygen plasma. Cell bodies, cytoplasmic rims, and filopodia were characterized by Peakforce AFM. Oxidized NCD films perform better than other substrates under all conditions (96% of cells adhered well). A thin adsorbed layer formed from culture medium and supplemented with fetal bovine serum (FBS) covered the diamond surface and played an important role in the cell adhesion. Nevertheless, 50-100 nm large aggregates formed from the RPMI medium without FBS facilitated cell adhesion also on hydrophobic hydrogenated NCD (increase from 23% to 61%). The authors discuss applicability for biomedical uses. PMID:25280853

  2. Improved adhesion between PMMA and stainless steel modified with PMMA brushes.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kyoko; Malmos, Kristoffer; Holm, Allan Hjarbæk; Pedersen, Steen Uttrup; Daasbjerg, Kim; Hinge, Mogens

    2014-12-10

    In this work, various lengths and densities of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) brushes were synthesized on stainless steel (SS) surfaces via surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. Subsequently, the joints between the bulk PMMA and the PMMA brushed stainless steel were obtained by injection molding, and for these the degree of adhesion was assessed by tensile testing. Several conditions are required to facilitate the mixing between the brushes and the bulk polymer and to reduce the residual stress at the interface: preheating of the SS samples before the injection molding; a long packing time; and a mold temperature above the glass transition temperature (Tg) of PMMA during the injection molding. This treatment leads to a cohesive failure in the bulk PMMA. It was observed that the stress concentrated at the rim, due to contraction of bulk PMMA during cooling, results in a weak adhesion at the rim of the joint. A combination of high density and long brush length of PMMA film provides better adhesion. The large number of PMMA brush chains apparently promotes good penetration into the bulk PMMA chains and ultimately results in high adhesion strength. PMID:25348044

  3. Role of leukotrienes in leukocyte adhesion following systemic administration of oxidatively modified human low density lipoprotein in hamsters.

    PubMed Central

    Lehr, H A; Hübner, C; Finckh, B; Angermüller, S; Nolte, D; Beisiegel, U; Kohlschütter, A; Messmer, K

    1991-01-01

    In vitro studies indicate that oxidatively modified low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) promotes leukocyte adhesion to the vascular endothelium, a constant feature of early atherogenesis. Using intravital fluorescence microscopy in the dorsal skinfold chamber model in awake Syrian golden hamsters, we studied whether (a) oxLDL elicits leukocyte/endothelium interaction in vivo, and whether (b) leukotrienes play a mediator role in this event. Leukocyte/endothelium interaction was assessed in the time course after intravenous injection of native human LDL (4 mg/kg body wt) and of oxLDL (7.5 microM Cu++, 6 h, 37 degrees C) into control hamsters and into hamsters, pretreated with the selective leukotriene biosynthesis inhibitor MK-886 (20 mumol/kg, i.v.). While no effect was seen after injection of native LDL, oxLDL elicited an immediate induction of leukocyte adhesion to the endothelium of arterioles and postcapillary venules. Total and differential leukocyte counts suggest that all leukocyte subsets were likewise affected by oxLDL with no specific preference for monocytes. Stimulation of leukocyte adhesion was entirely prevented in inhibitor-treated animals, suggesting the important mediator role of leukotrienes in oxLDL-induced leukocyte/endothelium interaction. Images PMID:2056134

  4. Enhanced human bone marrow stromal cell affinity for modified poly(L-lactide) surfaces by the upregulation of adhesion molecular genes.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xueli; Peng, Hui; Ling, Junqi; Friis, Thor; Whittaker, Andrew K; Crawford, Ross; Xiao, Yin

    2009-12-01

    To enhance and regulate cell affinity for poly (L-lactic acid) (PLLA) based materials, two hydrophilic ligands, poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly (L-lysine) (PLL), were used to develop triblock copolymers: methoxy-terminated poly (ethylene glycol)-block-poly (L-lactide)-block-poly (L-lysine) (MPEG-b-PLLA-b-PLL) in order to regulate protein absorption and cell adhesion. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were cultured on different composition of MPEG-b-PLLA-b-PLL copolymer films to determine the effect of modified polymer surfaces on BMSC attachment. To understand the molecular mechanism governing the initial cell adhesion on difference polymer surfaces, the mRNA expression of 84 human extracellular matrix (ECM) and adhesion molecules was analysed using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). It was found that down regulation of adhesion molecules was responsible for the impaired BMSC attachment on PLLA surface. MPEG-b-PLLA-b-PLL copolymer films improved significantly the cell adhesion and cytoskeleton expression by upregulation of relevant molecule genes significantly. Six adhesion genes (CDH1, ITGL, NCAM1, SGCE, COL16A1, and LAMA3) were most significantly influenced by the modified PLLA surfaces. In summary, polymer surfaces altered adhesion molecule gene expression of BMSCs, which consequently regulated cell initial attachment on modified PLLA surfaces. PMID:19796804

  5. Influence of surfaces modified with biomimetic extracellular matrices on adhesion and proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells and osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cai, Rong; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2015-02-01

    Preparation of surfaces modified with biomimetic extracellular matrices (ECMs) is important for investigation of the interaction between ECMs and cells. In the present study, surfaces modified with ECMs from normal somatic cells, stem cells and tumor cells were prepared by cell culture method. The ECMs derived from bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), dermal fibroblasts (FBs), osteoblasts (OBs) and MG63 osteosarcoma cells were deposited on the surfaces of cell-culture polystyrene plates (TCPS). The ECMs from different cell types had different compositions. The effects of the ECM-deposited surfaces on the adhesion, spreading and proliferation of MSCs and MG63 human osteosarcoma cells were dependent on the type of both ECMs and cells. The surfaces deposited with ECMs from MSCs, FBs and OBs promoted cell adhesion more strongly than surfaces deposited with ECMs from MG63 cells and TCPS. Compared to TCPS, the ECM-deposited surfaces promoted proliferation of MSCs while they inhibited the proliferation of MG63 cells. PMID:25516267

  6. Mortar-launched surveillance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Carl E.; Cooper, Steve; Carlton, Lindley A.

    2001-09-01

    Accurate Automation Corporation has completed the conceptual design of a mortar launched air vehicle system to perform close range or over-the-horizon surveillance missions. Law enforcement and military units require an organic capability to obtain real time intelligence information of time critical targets. Our design will permit law enforcement to detect, classify, locate and track these time critical targets. The surveillance system is a simple, unmanned fixed-winged aircraft deployed via a conventional mortar tube. The aircraft's flight surfaces are deployed following mortar launch to permit maximum range and time over target. The aircraft and sensor system are field retrievable. The aircraft can be configured with an engine to permit extended time over target or range. The aircraft has an integrated surveillance sensor system; a programmable CMOS sensor array. The integrated RF transmitter is capable of down- linking real-time video over line-of-sight distances exceeding 10 kilometers. The major benefit of the modular design is the ability to provide surveillance or tracking quickly at a low cost. Vehicle operational radius and sensor field coverage as well as design trade results of vehicle range and endurance performance and payload capacity at operational range are presented for various mortar configurations.

  7. Water transfer properties and shrinkage in lime-based rendering mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arizzi, A.; Cultrone, G.

    2012-04-01

    Rendering is the practice of covering a wall or a building façade with one or more layers of mortar, with the main aim to protect the masonry structure against weathering. The render applied must show high flexibility, good adhesion and compatibility with the support (i.e. stone, brick) and, overall, it should be characterised by low water absorption and high water vapour permeability. Water (in the solid, liquid and vapour state) is one of the main factors that drive construction materials to deterioration. Therefore, to evaluate the quality and durability of a rendering mortar, thus ensuring its protective function in the masonry structure, it is fundamental to assess the behaviour of this mortar towards water. Mortars were elaborated with a calcitic dry hydrated lime, a calcareous aggregate, a pozzolan, a lightweight aggregate, a water-retaining agent and a plasticiser. Four types of lime mortars were prepared, in which the binder-to-aggregate ratios were 1:3, 1:4, 1:6 and 1:9 by weight, whilst the pozzolan was kept at 10% of the lime (by mass) and the total admixtures proportion was less than 2% of the total mass. The influence of the characteristics of mortars pore system on the amount of water absorbed and the kinetics of absorption was investigated by means of: free water absorption and drying; capillary uptake; water permeability; water vapour permeability. Interesting deductions can be made from the values of water and water vapour permeability found for mortars: the former increases exponentially with the sand volume of the mortar, whilst the latter increases almost exponentially with the initial water content added to the mortar mixes during their elaboration. However, the relationship obtained between porosity of mortars and permeability values is not really clear. This finding suggests that the permeability of a material cannot be estimated on the basis of its porosity as it can be made for the capillary uptake and free water absorption. Another

  8. Cell adhesion and growth on surfaces modified by plasma and ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, W. W. R.; Teixeira, F. S.; da Silva, G. N.; Salvadori, D. M. F.; Salvadori, M. C.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we show and discuss the results of the interaction of living CHO (Chinese Hamster Ovary) cells, in terms of adhesion and growth on glass, SU-8 (epoxi photoresist), PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane), and DLC (hydrogen free diamond-like carbon) surfaces. Glass, SU-8, and DLC but not PDMS showed to be good surfaces for cell growth. DLC surfaces were treated by oxygen plasma (DLC-O) and sulfur hexafluoride plasma (DLC-F). After 24 h of cell culture, the number of cells on DLC-O was higher than on DLC-F surface. SU-8 with silver implanted, creating nanoparticles 12 nm below the surface, increased significantly the number of cells per unit area.

  9. Assessment of tolerance to multistresses and in vitro cell adhesion in genetically modified Lactobacillus plantarum 590.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiyan; Xu, Wentao; Luo, Yunbo; Tian, Hongtao; Wang, Hongxin; Guo, Xing; Yuan, Yanfang; Huang, Kunlun

    2011-03-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum (Lp) is a lactic acid bacterium that has many excellent traits that meet the needs of industrial production. Genetically modified (GM) Lp590 was obtained from Lp that was modified by the insertion of the gene nisI, which can confer resistance to nisin and play a role as a bio-preservative. Here, explorations were made to assess the safety of GM Lp590 and establish an in vitro evaluation model. The ability of Lp590 to tolerate both environmental stresses (such as temperatures ranging from 52 to 4 °C, or exposure to ethanol, oxygen, and osmotic stresses) and gastrointestinal transit was assessed. Lp590 showed a tolerance to 4 °C and ethanol (20%) within a period of 240 min that was similar to Lp. Notably, Lp590 can tolerate higher temperature (52 °C) and higher levels of H(2)O(2) (2%) and NaCl (4.0 M) than Lp. In contrast, Lp590 has the same gastrointestinal transit tolerance as Lp. In addition, Lp590 can adhere to Caco-2 cells, and it has no adverse effect on the cell membrane in vitro. These results indicate that GM Lp590 has many desirable biological characteristics and has good prospects for industrial applications. A useful and comprehensive exploration has been undertaken to establish a new in vitro evaluation model for genetically modified microorganisms (GMMs). PMID:21104198

  10. The relationship between cellular adhesion and surface roughness in polystyrene modified by microwave plasma radiation

    PubMed Central

    Biazar, Esmaeil; Heidari, Majid; Asefnezhad, Azadeh; Montazeri, Naser

    2011-01-01

    Background: Surface modification of medical polymers can improve biocompatibility. Pure polystyrene is hydrophobic and cannot provide a suitable environment for cell cultures. The conventional method for surface modification of polystyrene is treatment with plasma. In this study, conventional polystyrene was exposed to microwave plasma treatment with oxygen and argon gases for 30, 60, and 180 seconds. Methods and results: Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectra investigations of irradiated samples indicated clearly the presence of functional groups. Atomic force microscopic images of samples irradiated with inert and active gases indicated nanometric surface topography. Samples irradiated with oxygen plasma showed more roughness (31 nm) compared with those irradiated with inert plasma (16 nm) at 180 seconds. Surface roughness increased with increasing duration of exposure, which could be due to reduction of the contact angle of samples irradiated with oxygen plasma. Contact angle analysis showed reduction in samples irradiated with inert plasma. Samples irradiated with oxygen plasma showed a lower contact angle compared with those irradiated by argon plasma. Conclusion: Cellular investigations with unrestricted somatic stem cells showed better adhesion, cell growth, and proliferation for samples radiated by oxygen plasma with increasing duration of exposure than those of normal samples. PMID:21698084

  11. The relationship between cellular adhesion and surface roughness for polyurethane modified by microwave plasma radiation

    PubMed Central

    Keshel, Saeed Heidari; Azhdadi, S Neda Kh; Asefnezhad, Azadeh; Sadraeian, Mohammad; Montazeri, Mohamad; Biazar, Esmaeil

    2011-01-01

    Surface modification of medical polymers is carried out to improve biocompatibility. In this study, conventional polyurethane was exposed to microwave plasma treatment with oxygen and argon gases for 30 seconds and 60 seconds. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectra investigations of irradiated samples indicated the presence of functional groups. Atomic force microscope images of samples irradiated with inert and active gases indicated the nanometric topography of the sample surfaces. Samples irradiated by oxygen plasma indicated high roughness compared with those irradiated by inert plasma for the different lengths of time. In addition, surface roughness increased with time, which can be due to a reduction of contact angle of samples irradiated by oxygen plasma. Contact angle analysis indicated a reduction in samples irradiated with both types of plasma. However, samples irradiated with oxygen plasma indicated lower contact angle compared with those irradiated by argon plasma. Cellular investigations with unrestricted somatic stem cells showed better adhesion, cell growth, and proliferation among samples radiated by oxygen plasma for longer than for normal samples. PMID:21556340

  12. Adhesion, growth and differentiation of osteoblasts on surface-modified materials developed for bone implants.

    PubMed

    Vandrovcová, M; Bačáková, L

    2011-01-01

    This review briefly outlines the history and possibilities of bone reconstruction using various types of artificial materials, which allow interaction with cells only on the surface of the implant or enable ingrowth of cells inside the material. Information is also provided on the most important properties of bone cells taking part in bone tissue development, and on diseases and regeneration. The most common cell types used for testing cell-material interaction in vitro are listed, and the most commonly used approaches to this testing are also mentioned. A considerable part of this review is dedicated to the physical and chemical properties of the material surface, which are decisive for the cell-material interaction, and also to modifications to the surface of the material aimed at integrating it better with the surrounding bone tissue. Special attention is paid to the effects of nanoscale and microscale surface roughness on cell behaviour, to material surface patterning, which allows regionally-selective adhesion and growth of cells, and also to the surface chemistry. In addition, coating the materials with bioactive layers is examined, particularly those created by deposition of fullerenes, hybrid metal-fullerene composites, carbon nanotubes, nanocrystalline diamond films, diamond-like carbon, and nanocomposite hydrocarbon plasma polymer films enriched with metals. PMID:21401307

  13. Medium-density particleboards from modified rice husks and soybean protein concentrate-based adhesives.

    PubMed

    Ciannamea, Emiliano M; Stefani, Pablo M; Ruseckaite, Roxana A

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of this work was to evaluate the technical feasibility of using rice husk (RH) as wood substitute in the production of environmentally sound medium-density particleboards using adhesives from soybean protein concentrate (SPC). Chemical modification of rice husk with sodium hydroxide and sodium hydroxide followed by hydrogen peroxide (bleaching) were undertaken to evaluate the effect of such treatments on the composition and topology of rice husk and the performance of produced panels. Both treatments were efficient in partially eliminating hemicelluloses, lignin and silica from RH, as evidenced by thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). Scanning electron microscopy observations suggested that alkaline treatment resulted in a more damaged RH substrate than bleaching. The dependence of mechanical properties (modulus of rupture, modulus of elasticity, and internal bond) and the physical properties (water absorption and thickness swelling) on chemical treatments performed on both, rice husk and SPC was studied. Bleached-rice husk particleboards bonded with alkaline-treated soybean protein concentrate displayed the best set of final properties. Particleboards with this formulation met the minimum requirements of internal bond, modulus of elasticity and modulus of rupture recommended by the US Standard ANSI/A208.1 specifications for M1, MS and M2-grade medium-density particleboards, but failed to achieve the thickness swelling value recommended for general use panels. This limitation of soybean protein concentrate-bonded rice husk particleboards was counterbalanced by the advantage of being formaldehyde-free which makes them a suitable alternative for indoor applications. PMID:19766482

  14. In vitro analysis of riboflavin-modified, experimental, two-step etch-and-rinse dentin adhesive: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and micro-Raman studies

    PubMed Central

    Daood, Umer; Swee Heng, Chan; Neo Chiew Lian, Jennifer; Fawzy, Amr S

    2015-01-01

    To modify two-step experimental etch-and-rinse dentin adhesive with different concentrations of riboflavin and to study its effect on the bond strength, degree of conversion, along with resin infiltration within the demineralized dentin substrate, an experimental adhesive-system was modified with different concentrations of riboflavin (m/m, 0, 1%, 3%, 5% and 10%). Dentin surfaces were etched with 37% phosphoric acid, bonded with respective adhesives, restored with restorative composite–resin, and sectioned into resin–dentin slabs and beams to be stored for 24 h or 9 months in artificial saliva. Micro-tensile bond testing was performed with scanning electron microscopy to analyse the failure of debonded beams. The degree of conversion was evaluated with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) at different time points along with micro-Raman spectroscopy analysis. Data was analyzed with one-way and two-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's for pair-wise comparison. Modification with 1% and 3% riboflavin increased the micro-tensile bond strength compared to the control at 24 h and 9-month storage with no significant differences in degree of conversion (P<0.05). The most predominant failure mode was the mixed fracture among all specimens except 10% riboflavin-modified adhesive specimens where cohesive failure was predominant. Raman analysis revealed that 1% and 3% riboflavin adhesives specimens showed relatively higher resin infiltration. The incorporation of riboflavin in the experimental two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive at 3% (m/m) improved the immediate bond strengths and bond durability after 9-month storage in artificial saliva without adversely affecting the degree of conversion of the adhesive monomers and resin infiltration. PMID:25257880

  15. In vitro analysis of riboflavin-modified, experimental, two-step etch-and-rinse dentin adhesive: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and micro-Raman studies.

    PubMed

    Daood, Umer; Swee Heng, Chan; Neo Chiew Lian, Jennifer; Fawzy, Amr S

    2015-06-01

    To modify two-step experimental etch-and-rinse dentin adhesive with different concentrations of riboflavin and to study its effect on the bond strength, degree of conversion, along with resin infiltration within the demineralized dentin substrate, an experimental adhesive-system was modified with different concentrations of riboflavin (m/m, 0, 1%, 3%, 5% and 10%). Dentin surfaces were etched with 37% phosphoric acid, bonded with respective adhesives, restored with restorative composite-resin, and sectioned into resin-dentin slabs and beams to be stored for 24 h or 9 months in artificial saliva. Micro-tensile bond testing was performed with scanning electron microscopy to analyse the failure of debonded beams. The degree of conversion was evaluated with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) at different time points along with micro-Raman spectroscopy analysis. Data was analyzed with one-way and two-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's for pair-wise comparison. Modification with 1% and 3% riboflavin increased the micro-tensile bond strength compared to the control at 24 h and 9-month storage with no significant differences in degree of conversion (P<0.05). The most predominant failure mode was the mixed fracture among all specimens except 10% riboflavin-modified adhesive specimens where cohesive failure was predominant. Raman analysis revealed that 1% and 3% riboflavin adhesives specimens showed relatively higher resin infiltration. The incorporation of riboflavin in the experimental two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive at 3% (m/m) improved the immediate bond strengths and bond durability after 9-month storage in artificial saliva without adversely affecting the degree of conversion of the adhesive monomers and resin infiltration. PMID:25257880

  16. Novel silsesquioxane mixture-modified high elongation polyurethane with reduced platelet adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, William; Zhou, Hongyang; Zhang, Yan; Li, Gang

    2008-02-01

    We have successfully synthesized a kind of novel silsesquioxane mixture that can be used to modify the surface of biomaterial polyurethane (PU) for the purpose of making silsesquioxane/PU as low-price and high-quality biomaterial. HPLC, FTIR and 29Si NMR are used to characterize as-synthesized silsesquioxane mixture. XPS figure and SEM images show the silsesquioxane particles really self-assemble on the PU surface. Contact angle measurements verify that there is a large hysteresis loop, which relates to low- and high-surface free energy component on the surface. Platelet adsorption at 90 min of PU/silsesquioxane mixture is lower than that of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) and PU (two-way ANOVA, p < 0.05). Furthermore, SEM images show "island" morphologic pattern with Cooper grades I platelet adsorption morphology on the smooth PU/silsesquioxane surface, and mechanic test shows that the samples with silsesquioxane mixture can increase mechanic property of PU. On the basis of these results, we conclude that this kind of nanocomposite has promise for application in biomaterials.

  17. Simple Analysis of Historical Lime Mortars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pires, Joa~o

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is described in which a simple characterization of a historical lime mortar is made by the determination of its approximate composition by a gravimetric method. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) are also used for the qualitative characterization of the lime mortar components. These…

  18. rFN/Cad-11-Modified Collagen Type II Biomimetic Interface Promotes the Adhesion and Chondrogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongfeng; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Zhengsheng; Kang, Fei; Yang, Bo; Kang, Xia; Wen, Can; Yan, Yanfei; Jiang, Bo; Fan, Yujiang

    2013-01-01

    Properties of the cell-material interface are determining factors in the successful function of cells for cartilage tissue engineering. Currently, cell adhesion is commonly promoted through the use of polypeptides; however, due to their lack of complementary or modulatory domains, polypeptides must be modified to improve their ability to promote adhesion. In this study, we utilized the principle of matrix-based biomimetic modification and a recombinant protein, which spans fragments 7–10 of fibronectin module III (heterophilic motif ) and extracellular domains 1–2 of cadherin-11 (rFN/Cad-11) (homophilic motif ), to modify the interface of collagen type II (Col II) sponges. We showed that the designed material was able to stimulate cell proliferation and promote better chondrogenic differentiation of rabbit mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro than both the FN modified surfaces and the negative control. Further, the Col II/rFN/Cad-11-MSCs composite stimulated cartilage formation in vivo; the chondrogenic effect of Col II alone was much less significant. These results suggested that the rFN/Cad-11-modified collagen type II biomimetic interface has dual biological functions of promoting adhesion and stimulating chondrogenic differentiation. This substance, thus, may serve as an ideal scaffold material for cartilage tissue engineering, enhancing repair of injured cartilage in vivo. PMID:23919505

  19. Study on the structural evolution of modified phenol formaldehyde resin adhesive for the high-temperature bonding of graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jigang; Jiang, Nan; Guo, Quangui; Liu, Lang; Song, Jinren

    2006-01-01

    A novel adhesive for carbon materials composed of phenol-formaldehyde resin, boron carbide and fumed silica, was prepared. The adhesive property of graphite joints bonded by the above adhesive treated at high-temperatures was tested. Results showed that the adhesive was found to have outstanding high-temperature bonding properties for graphite. The adhesive structure was dense and uniform even after the graphite joints were heat-treated at 1500 °C. Bonding strength was 17.1 MPa. The evolution of adhesive structure was investigated. The results indicated that the addition of the secondary additive, fumed silica, improved the bonding performance greatly. Borosilicate phase with better stability was formed during the heat-treatment process, and the volume shrinkage was restrained effectively, which was responsible for the satisfactory high-temperature bonding performance of graphite.

  20. Use of cactus in mortars and concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, S.; Eklund, L.; Villarreal, R.R.

    1998-01-01

    Natural polymers have been used in ancient times to improve the durability of lime-based mortars and concretes. The natural polymers used were locally available. In this work, cactus extract from Mexico has been tested in a Portland cement mortar. It is seen that cactus extract increases the plasticity of the mortar and improves water absorption and freeze-salt resistance. Calcium hydroxide produced by Portland cement hydration interacts with the components of cactus extract, polysaccharides or proteins, and forms complexes. It affects the crystallization process. Painting of the concrete with this extract has also shown improved water resistance.

  1. Modeling and numerical simulation of interior ballistic processes in a 120mm mortar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Ragini

    by using a high-resolution Godunov-type shock-capturing approach was used where the discretization is done directly on the integral formulation of the conservation laws. A linearized approximate Riemann Solver was modified in this work for the two-phase flows to compute fully non-linear wave interactions and to directly provide upwinding properties in the scheme. An entropy fix based on Harten-Heyman method was used with van Leer flux limiter for total variation diminishing. The three dimensional effects were simulated by incorporating an unsplit multi-dimensional wave propagation method, which accounted for discontinuities traveling in both normal and oblique coordinate directions. For each component, the predicted pressure-time traces showed significant pressure wave phenomena, which closely simulated the measured pressure-time traces obtained at PSU. The pressure-time traces at the breech-end of the mortar tube were obtained at Aberdeen Test Center with 0, 2, and 4 charge increments. The 3D-MIB code was also used to simulate the effect of flash tube vent-hole pattern on the pressure-wave phenomenon in the ignition cartridge. A comparison of the pressure difference between primer-end and projectile-end locations of the original and modified ignition cartridges with each other showed that the early-phase pressure-wave phenomenon can be significantly reduced with the modified pattern. The flow property distributions predicted by the 3D-MIB for 0, 2, and 4 charge increment cases as well the projectile dynamics predictions provided adequate validation of theory by experiments.

  2. Systems toxicology-based assessment of the candidate modified risk tobacco product THS2.2 for the adhesion of monocytic cells to human coronary arterial endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Poussin, Carine; Laurent, Alexandra; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia; De Leon, Hector

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of endothelial adhesive properties by cigarette smoke (CS) can progressively favor the development of atherosclerosis which may cause cardiovascular disorders. Modified risk tobacco products (MRTPs) are tobacco products developed to reduce smoking-related risks. A systems biology/toxicology approach combined with a functional in vitro adhesion assay was used to assess the impact of a candidate heat-not-burn technology-based MRTP, Tobacco Heating System (THS) 2.2, on the adhesion of monocytic cells to human coronary arterial endothelial cells (HCAECs) compared with a reference cigarette (3R4F). HCAECs were treated for 4h with conditioned media of human monocytic Mono Mac 6 (MM6) cells preincubated with low or high concentrations of aqueous extracts from THS2.2 aerosol or 3R4F smoke for 2h (indirect treatment), unconditioned media (direct treatment), or fresh aqueous aerosol/smoke extracts (fresh direct treatment). Functional and molecular investigations revealed that aqueous 3R4F smoke extract promoted the adhesion of MM6 cells to HCAECs via distinct direct and indirect concentration-dependent mechanisms. Using the same approach, we identified significantly reduced effects of aqueous THS2.2 aerosol extract on MM6 cell-HCAEC adhesion, and reduced molecular changes in endothelial and monocytic cells. Ten- and 20-fold increased concentrations of aqueous THS2.2 aerosol extract were necessary to elicit similar effects to those measured with 3R4F in both fresh direct and indirect exposure modalities, respectively. Our systems toxicology study demonstrated reduced effects of an aqueous aerosol extract from the candidate MRTP, THS2.2, using the adhesion of monocytic cells to human coronary endothelial cells as a surrogate pathophysiologically relevant event in atherogenesis. PMID:26655683

  3. Energy absorption at high strain rate of glass fiber reinforced mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenu, Luigi; Forni, Daniele; Cadoni, Ezio

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the dynamic behaviour of cement mortars reinforced with glass fibers was studied. The influence of the addition of glass fibers on energy absorption and tensile strength at high strain-rate was investigated. Static tests in compression, in tension and in bending were first performed. Dynamic tests by means of a Modified Hopkinson Bar were then carried out in order to investigate how glass fibers affected energy absorption and tensile strength at high strain-rate of the fiber reinforced mortar. The Dynamic Increase Factor (DIF) was finally evaluated.

  4. Effects of a hybrid micro/nanorod topography-modified titanium implant on adhesion and osteogenic differentiation in rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenjie; Li, Zihui; Huang, Qingfeng; Xu, Ling; Li, Jinhua; Jin, Yuqin; Wang, Guifang; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2013-01-01

    Background and methods Various methods have been used to modify titanium implant surfaces with the aim of achieving better osseointegration. In this study, we fabricated a clustered nanorod structure on an acid-etched, microstructured titanium plate surface using hydrogen peroxide. We also evaluated biofunctionalization of the hybrid micro/nanorod topography on rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction were used to investigate the surface topography and phase composition of the modified titanium plate. Rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were cultured and seeded on the plate. The adhesion ability of the cells was then assayed by cell counting at one, 4, and 24 hours after cell seeding, and expression of adhesion-related protein integrin β1 was detected by immunofluorescence. In addition, a polymerase chain reaction assay, alkaline phosphatase and Alizarin Red S staining assays, and osteopontin and osteocalcin immunofluorescence analyses were used to evaluate the osteogenic differentiation behavior of the cells. Results The hybrid micro/nanoscale texture formed on the titanium surface enhanced the initial adhesion activity of the rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Importantly, the hierarchical structure promoted osteogenic differentiation of these cells. Conclusion This study suggests that a hybrid micro/nanorod topography on a titanium surface fabricated by treatment with hydrogen peroxide followed by acid etching might facilitate osseointegration of a titanium implant in vivo. PMID:23345973

  5. Antibacterial activity of resin adhesives, glass ionomer and resin-modified glass ionomer cements and a compomer in contact with dentin caries samples.

    PubMed

    Herrera, M; Castillo, A; Bravo, M; Liébana, J; Carrión, P

    2000-01-01

    A total of 103 clinical samples of carious dentin were used to study the antibacterial action of different dental resin adhesive materials (Gluma 2000, Syntac, Prisma Universal Bond 3, Scotchbond Multi-Purpose and Prime&Bond 2.0) glass ionomer cements (Ketac-Cem, Ketac-Bond, Ketac-Silver, Ketac-Fil) resin-modified glass ionomer cements (Fuji II LC, Vitremer and Vitrebond) and a compomer (Dyract). The agar plate diffusion method was used for the microbial cultures and a chlorhexidine control. The growth of the caries-producing microorganisms was effectively inhibited by the Vitremer and Vitrebond cements, and to a lesser extent by the Scotchbond Multi-Purpose adhesive system. Overall, there were statistically significant differences in the antibacterial activity of the products tested. PMID:11203829

  6. Use of polypropylene fibers coated with nano-silica particles into a cementitious mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, B.; Di Maio, L.; Scarfato, P.; Incarnato, L.

    2015-12-01

    Fiber reinforced cementitious composite (FRCC) materials have been widely used during last decades in order to overcome some of traditional cementitious materials issues: brittle behaviour, fire resistance, cover spalling, impact strength. For composite materials, fiber/matrix bond plays an important role because by increasing fiber/matrix interactions is possible to increase the behaviour of the entire material. In this study, in order to improve fiber to matrix adhesion, two chemical treatments of polypropylene fibers were investigated: alkaline hydrolysis and nano-silica sol-gel particles deposition. Treatmtents effect on fibers morphology and mechanical properties was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and tensile tests. SEM investigations report the presence of spherical nano-silica particles on fiber surface, in the case of sol-gel process, while alkaline hydrolysis leads to an increase of fibers roughness. Both treatments have negligible influence on fibers mechanical properties confirming the possibility of their use in a cementitious mortar. Pullout tests were carried out considering three embedded length of fibers in mortar samples (10, 20 and 30 mm, respectively) showing an increase of pullout energy for treated fibers. The influence on fiber reinforced mortar mechanical properties was investigated by three-point flexural tests on prismatic specimens considering two fibers length (15 and 30 mm) and two fibers volume fractions (0.50 and 1.00 %). A general increase of flexural strength over the reference mix was achieved and an overall better behaviour is recognizable for mortars containing treated fibers.

  7. Use of polypropylene fibers coated with nano-silica particles into a cementitious mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Coppola, B. Di Maio, L.; Scarfato, P.; Incarnato, L.

    2015-12-17

    Fiber reinforced cementitious composite (FRCC) materials have been widely used during last decades in order to overcome some of traditional cementitious materials issues: brittle behaviour, fire resistance, cover spalling, impact strength. For composite materials, fiber/matrix bond plays an important role because by increasing fiber/matrix interactions is possible to increase the behaviour of the entire material. In this study, in order to improve fiber to matrix adhesion, two chemical treatments of polypropylene fibers were investigated: alkaline hydrolysis and nano-silica sol-gel particles deposition. Treatmtents effect on fibers morphology and mechanical properties was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and tensile tests. SEM investigations report the presence of spherical nano-silica particles on fiber surface, in the case of sol-gel process, while alkaline hydrolysis leads to an increase of fibers roughness. Both treatments have negligible influence on fibers mechanical properties confirming the possibility of their use in a cementitious mortar. Pullout tests were carried out considering three embedded length of fibers in mortar samples (10, 20 and 30 mm, respectively) showing an increase of pullout energy for treated fibers. The influence on fiber reinforced mortar mechanical properties was investigated by three-point flexural tests on prismatic specimens considering two fibers length (15 and 30 mm) and two fibers volume fractions (0.50 and 1.00 %). A general increase of flexural strength over the reference mix was achieved and an overall better behaviour is recognizable for mortars containing treated fibers.

  8. Characterization of historical mortars in Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Heras, M.; Arce, I.; Lopez-Arce, P.; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the petrographic and mineralogical characterization of mortars from different archaeological sites in Jordan which encompass Nabatean, Late-Antique and Early Islamic (Umayyad) sites, in some cases offering a sequence of different period mortars from the same building. These sites include the Nabataean city of Petra, the Late Antique town of Umm al Jimal and the castle of Qasr Al Hallabat. These mortars were produced with different raw materials and manufacturing technologies, which are reflected on distinctive variations of mineralogy, texture and crystal size and aggregates composition (including volcanic ashes, ceramic fragments, burnt organic material) size and their puzzolanic properties. As a consequence these mortars present different physical properties and reveal nowadays very different states of conservation. There is a dramatic change in mortar properties between those manufactured in pre-Islamic period and those from early Islamic - Ummayad times with a general trend in which these last ones present coarser crystal and aggregate sizes with less puzzolanic aggregates that result in less durable mortars. All of this reflects changes in the different stages of production of the mortar, from the use of either hydraulic, lime putty or slaked lime and the selection of aggregates to the application techniques (polishing). This reflects the evolution of building technology that took place in this area during early Islamic period and how petrological information can shed light on historical interpretation of building technologies. Research funded by AECID (PCI A/032184/10), GEOMATERIALES (S2009/MAT-16) and MCU (Analisis y Documentación de tipología arquitectónica y técnicas constructivas en el periodo de transición Bizantino-Omeya en Jordania)

  9. Immobilization of IFR salt wastes in mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, D.F.; Johnson, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    Portland cement-base mortars are being considered for immobilizing chloride salt wastes produced by the fuel cycles of Integral Fast Reactors (IFR). The IFR is a sodium-cooled fast reactor with metal alloy fuels. It has a close-coupled fuel cycle in which fission products are separated from the actinides in an electrochemical cell operating at 500/degree/C. This cell has a liquid cadmium anode in which the fuels are dissolved and a liquid salt electrolyte. The salt will be a mixture of either lithium, potassium, and sodium chlorides or lithium, calcium, barium, and sodium chlorides. One method being considered for immobilizing the treated nontransuranic salt waste is to disperse the salt in a portland cement-base mortar that will be sealed in corrosion-resistant containers. For this application, the grout must be sufficiently fluid that it can be pumped into canister-molds where it will solidify into a strong, leach-resistant material. The set times must be longer than a few hours to allow sufficient time for processing, and the mortar must reach a reasonable compressive strength (/approximately/7 MPa) within three days to permit handling. Because fission product heating will be high, about 0.6 W/kg for a mortar containing 10% waste salt, the effects of elevated temperatures during curing and storage on mortar properties must be considered.

  10. 46. DETAIL VIEW OF THE MORTAR BOXES, STAMP BATTERIES AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. DETAIL VIEW OF THE MORTAR BOXES, STAMP BATTERIES AND AMALGAMATION TABLES. NOTE FULTON IRON WORKS, SAM FRANCISCO 1908 STAMPED INTO THE MORTAR BOX. ALSO NOTE THE DIES RESTING ON THE OUTSIDE OF THE MORTAR BOX BY THE SECOND STAMP BATTERY FROM THE CAMERA POSITION. - Standard Gold Mill, East of Bodie Creek, Northeast of Bodie, Bodie, Mono County, CA

  11. Use of Modified Polysaccharide 4DryField (®) PH for Adhesion Prevention and Hemostasis in Gynecological Surgery: A Two-Center Observational Study by Second-Look Laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Korell, Matthias; Ziegler, Nicole; De Wilde, Rudy Leon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study evaluates both scopes of 4DryField PH, certified for adhesion prevention and hemostasis, in patients undergoing surgery for various and severe gynecological disorders. Methods. This is a two-institutional study. Adhesion prevention efficacy was evaluated using video documentation of first-look laparoscopies (FLL) and second-look laparoscopies (SLL); other patient data were analyzed retrospectively. Twenty patients with various disorders were evaluated, 4 assigned to a uterus pathology, 10 to endometriosis, and 6 to an adhesion disease group. Nine patients received 4DryField primarily for hemostasis and 11 solely for adhesion prevention. Nineteen patients had SLL after 5 to 12 weeks and one after 13 months. Results. At FLL with 4DryField, immediate hemostasis could be achieved in diffuse bleeding. At SLL, effective adhesion prevention was observed in 18 of all 20 women, with only 2 revealing major adhesions. In particular, only 1 of the 6 women with adhesion disease as predominant disorder showed major adhesions at SLL. Conclusions. Modified polysaccharide 4DryField is not only effective in diffuse bleeding. In this cohort with extensive surgery for various gynecological pathologies, 4DryField showed effective adhesion prevention as confirmed at SLL, too. Its use as premixed gel is a convenient variant for treatment of large peritoneal wounds. PMID:26904672

  12. Use of Modified Polysaccharide 4DryField® PH for Adhesion Prevention and Hemostasis in Gynecological Surgery: A Two-Center Observational Study by Second-Look Laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Korell, Matthias; Ziegler, Nicole; De Wilde, Rudy Leon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study evaluates both scopes of 4DryField PH, certified for adhesion prevention and hemostasis, in patients undergoing surgery for various and severe gynecological disorders. Methods. This is a two-institutional study. Adhesion prevention efficacy was evaluated using video documentation of first-look laparoscopies (FLL) and second-look laparoscopies (SLL); other patient data were analyzed retrospectively. Twenty patients with various disorders were evaluated, 4 assigned to a uterus pathology, 10 to endometriosis, and 6 to an adhesion disease group. Nine patients received 4DryField primarily for hemostasis and 11 solely for adhesion prevention. Nineteen patients had SLL after 5 to 12 weeks and one after 13 months. Results. At FLL with 4DryField, immediate hemostasis could be achieved in diffuse bleeding. At SLL, effective adhesion prevention was observed in 18 of all 20 women, with only 2 revealing major adhesions. In particular, only 1 of the 6 women with adhesion disease as predominant disorder showed major adhesions at SLL. Conclusions. Modified polysaccharide 4DryField is not only effective in diffuse bleeding. In this cohort with extensive surgery for various gynecological pathologies, 4DryField showed effective adhesion prevention as confirmed at SLL, too. Its use as premixed gel is a convenient variant for treatment of large peritoneal wounds. PMID:26904672

  13. [The Analysis of Traditional Lime Mortars from Zhejiang Province, China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-bin; Cui, Biao; Zhang, Bing-jian

    2016-01-01

    The components of ancient mortars have always been an important research field in historic building conservation. It has been well known that using traditional mortars in conservation projects have many advantages, such as compatibility and stability. So, developing new binding materials based on traditional mortar has become an international study hotspot. With China's economic development, the protection of ancient buildings also began to put on the agenda, but the understanding on Chinese traditional mortar is limited, and rare literatures are reported. In the present work, the authors investigate seven ancient city wall sites in Zhejiang Province in situ, and subsequently laboratory analysis were carried out on collected mortar samples. The characterizations of mortar samples were made by multi-density gauge, XRD, FTIR, TG-DSC and wet chemical analysis. The experimental results showed that: the main component of masonry mortars is calcium carbonate, the content between 75% - 90%, and they should be made from relatively pure lime mortar. The raw materials of mortar samples were mainly calcareous quick lime, and sample from Taizhou city also contained magnesium quick lime. There are four city walls were built by sticky-rice mortars. It suggests that the technology of adding the sticky rice soup into mortar was universal in the Ming Dynasties. These mortars have lower density between 1.2 and 1.9 g x cm(-3); this outcome should be the result of long-term natural erosion. We have also analyzed other chemical and physical characteristics of these masonry mortars. The results can afford the basic data for the future repairmen programs, development of new protective materials, and comparative study of mortars. PMID:27228774

  14. Nanostructured Ti6Al4V alloy fabricated using modified alkali-heat treatment: Characterization and cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Su, Yingmin; Komasa, Satoshi; Sekino, Tohru; Nishizaki, Hiroshi; Okazaki, Joji

    2016-02-01

    In order to optimize the creation of a nanostructured surface on Ti6Al4V titanium alloy, an alkali treatment was performed using a 10-M NaOH solution at various temperatures (30, 40, 50, and 60°C) so as to determine the optimal temperature. This was combined with subsequent heat treatments (200, 400, 600, and 800°C) in air. The effects of different temperatures for the latter treatments on the nanostructure surface and the initial cell adhesion were evaluated, and the optimal temperature of the alkali solution was found to be 30°C. Further, the nanotopography, surface chemistry, and surface roughness of the nanoporous structure were retained after heat treatments performed at 200, 400, and 600°C, and only the phase structure was altered. The amorphous sodium titanate phase, the content of which increased with increased heat-treatment temperature, may have played a role in promoting cell adhesion on the nanoporous surface. However, heat treatment at 800°C did not enhance the cell-surface attachment. Rather, the nanostructure degraded significantly with the reappearance of Al and V. PMID:26652415

  15. ASR potential of quartz based on expansion values and microscopic characteristics of mortar bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stastna, Aneta; Sachlova, Sarka; Kuchynova, Marketa; Pertold, Zdenek; Prikryl, Richard

    2016-04-01

    The alkali-silica reaction (ASR) is one of the most damaging factors for concrete structures. Different analytical techniques are used to quantify ASR potential of aggregates. The accelerated mortar bar test (ASTM C1260) in combination with the petrographic examination of aggregates by microscopic techniques belongs to the frequently employed methods. Such a methodical approach enables quantification of the ASR potential, based on the expansion values of accelerated mortar bars; and also to identify deleterious components in aggregates. In this study, the accelerated mortar bar test (ASTM C1260) was modified and combined with the scanning electron microscopy of polished sections prepared from mortar bars. The standard 14-day test period of mortar bars was prolonged to 1-year. ASR potential of aggregates was assessed based on expansion values (both 14-day and 1-year) of mortar bars and microscopic analysis of ASR products (alkali silica gels, microcracks, dissolution gaps) detected in the sections. Different varieties of quartz-rich rocks including chert, quartz meta-greywacke, three types of quartzite and pegmatite were used as aggregate. Only quartz from pegmatite was assessed to be non reactive (14-day expansion of 0.08%, 1-year expansion of 1.25%). Aggregate sections exhibited minor ASR products even after 1-year of mortar bar immersion in 1 M NaOH. Expansion values of the rest of samples exceeded the limit of 0.10% after 14-day test period indicating aggregates as reactive. The highest ASR potential was detected in mortar bars containing chert (14-day expansion of 0.55%, 1-year expansion of 2.70%) and quartz meta-greywacke (14-day expansion of 0.46%, 1-year expansion of 2.41%). The high ASR potential was explained by presence of cryptocrystalline matrix in significant volumes (24 - 65 vol%). Influence of the lengths of the immersion in the alkaline solution was observed mainly in the microstructure of the cement paste and on the extension of ASR products. The

  16. Enhanced In Vitro Biocompatibility of Chemically Modified Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Surfaces for Stable Adhesion and Long-term Investigation of Brain Cerebral Cortex Cells.

    PubMed

    Kuddannaya, Shreyas; Bao, Jingnan; Zhang, Yilei

    2015-11-18

    Studies on the mammalian brain cerebral cortex have gained increasing importance due to the relevance of the region in controlling critical higher brain functions. Interactions between the cortical cells and surface extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins play a pivotal role in promoting stable cell adhesion, growth, and function. Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) based platforms have been increasingly used for on-chip in vitro cellular system analysis. However, the inherent hydrophobicity of the PDMS surface has been unfavorable for any long-term cell system investigations due to transitory physical adsorption of ECM proteins on PDMS surfaces followed by eventual cell dislodgement due to poor anchorage and viability. To address this critical issue, we employed the (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) based cross-linking strategy to stabilize ECM protein immobilization on PDMS. The efficiency of surface modification in supporting adhesion and long-term viability of neuronal and glial cells was analyzed. The chemically modified surfaces showed a relatively higher cell survival with an increased neurite length and neurite branching. These changes were understood in terms of an increase in surface hydrophilicity, protein stability, and cell-ECM protein interactions. The modification strategy could be successfully applied for stable cortical cell culture on the PDMS microchip for up to 3 weeks in vitro. PMID:26506436

  17. CAD/CAM monolithic restorations and full-mouth adhesive rehabilitation to restore a patient with a past history of bulimia: the modified three-step technique.

    PubMed

    Vailati, Francesca; Carciofo, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Due to an increasing awareness about dental erosion, many clinicians would like to propose treatments even at the initial stages of the disease. However, when the loss of tooth structure is visible only to the professional eye, and it has not affected the esthetics of the smile, affected patients do not usually accept a full-mouth rehabilitation. Reducing the cost of the therapy, simplifying the clinical steps, and proposing noninvasive adhesive techniques may promote patient acceptance. In this article, the treatment of an ex-bulimic patient is illustrated. A modified approach of the three-step technique was followed. The patient completed the therapy in five short visits, including the initial one. No tooth preparation was required, no anesthesia was delivered, and the overall (clinical and laboratory) costs were kept low. At the end of the treatment, the patient was very satisfied from a biologic and functional point of view. PMID:26835523

  18. Tissue-engineered endothelial cell layers on surface-modified Ti for inhibiting in vitro platelet adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiupeng; He, Fupo; Li, Xia; Ito, Atsuo; Sogo, Yu; Maruyama, Osamu; Kosaka, Ryo; Ye, Jiandong

    2013-06-01

    A tissue-engineered endothelial layer was prepared by culturing endothelial cells on a fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2)-l-ascorbic acid phosphate magnesium salt n-hydrate (AsMg)-apatite (Ap) coated titanium plate. The FGF-2-AsMg-Ap coated Ti plate was prepared by immersing a Ti plate in supersaturated calcium phosphate solutions supplemented with FGF-2 and AsMg. The FGF-2-AsMg-Ap layer on the Ti plate accelerated proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and showed slightly higher, but not statistically significant, nitric oxide release from HUVECs than on as-prepared Ti. The endothelial layer maintained proper function of the endothelial cells and markedly inhibited in vitro platelet adhesion. The tissue-engineered endothelial layer formed on the FGF-2-AsMg-Ap layer is promising for ameliorating platelet activation and thrombus formation on cardiovascular implants.

  19. An Engineered Cysteine-Modified Diabody For Imaging Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule (ALCAM)-Positive Tumors

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Katelyn E.; Liu, Bin; Marks, James D.; Tomlinson, James S.; Wu, Hong; Wu, Anna M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To generate and evaluate a positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer targeting activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM/CD166). Procedures A human anti-ALCAM single chain variable fragment was reformatted to produce a covalent dimer, termed a cys-diabody (CysDb). Purified CysDb was characterized by gel electrophoresis and size exclusion chromatography, and immunoreactivity was assessed by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence. Targeting and imaging of ALCAM-positive tumors using 64Cu-DOTA-CysDb were evaluated in mice bearing human pancreatic adenocarcinoma xenografts (HPAF-II or BxPC-3). Results CysDb binds specifically to ALCAM-positive cells in vitro with an apparent affinity in the range of 1–3 nM. MicroPET images at 4 h showed specific targeting of positive tumors in vivo, a finding confirmed by biodistribution analysis, with positive-to-negative tumor ratios of 1.9±0.6 and 2.4±0.6, and positive tumor-to-blood ratios of 2.5±0.9 and 2.9±0.6 (HPAF-II and BxPC-3, respectively). Conclusions Successful imaging with 64Cu-DOTA-CysDb in animal models suggests further investigation of ALCAM as an imaging biomarker is warranted. PMID:21630083

  20. Sulfate and acid resistant concrete and mortar

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction and other applications, which hardenable mixtures demonstrate significant levels of acid and sulfate resistance while maintaining acceptable compressive strength properties. The acid and sulfate hardenable mixtures of the invention containing fly ash comprise cementitious materials and a fine aggregate. The cementitous materials may comprise fly ash as well as cement. The fine aggregate may comprise fly ash as well as sand. The total amount of fly ash in the hardenable mixture ranges from about 60% to about 120% of the total amount of cement, by weight, whether the fly ash is included as a cementious material, fine aggregate, or an additive, or any combination of the foregoing. In specific examples, mortar containing 50% fly ash and 50% cement in cementitious materials demonstrated superior properties of corrosion resistance.

  1. Sulfate and acid resistant concrete and mortar

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1998-06-30

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction and other applications, which hardenable mixtures demonstrate significant levels of acid and sulfate resistance while maintaining acceptable compressive strength properties. The acid and sulfate hardenable mixtures of the invention containing fly ash comprise cementitious materials and a fine aggregate. The cementitous materials may comprise fly ash as well as cement. The fine aggregate may comprise fly ash as well as sand. The total amount of fly ash in the hardenable mixture ranges from about 60% to about 120% of the total amount of cement, by weight, whether the fly ash is included as a cementious material, fine aggregate, or an additive, or any combination of the foregoing. In specific examples, mortar containing 50% fly ash and 50% cement in cementitious materials demonstrated superior properties of corrosion resistance. 6 figs.

  2. Quick chip assay using locked nucleic acid modified epithelial cell adhesion molecule and nucleolin aptamers for the capture of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Maremanda, Nihal G; Roy, Kislay; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Shyamsundar, Vidyarani; Ramshankar, Vijayalakshmi; Krishnamurthy, Arvind; Krishnakumar, Subramanian; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2015-09-01

    The role of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in disease diagnosis, prognosis, monitoring of the therapeutic efficacy, and clinical decision making is immense and has attracted tremendous focus in the last decade. We designed and fabricated simple, flat channel microfluidic devices polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS based) functionalized with locked nucleic acid (LNA) modified aptamers (targeting epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) and nucleolin expression) for quick and efficient capture of CTCs and cancer cells. With optimized flow rates (10 μl/min), it was revealed that the aptamer modified devices offered reusability for up to six times while retaining optimal capture efficiency (>90%) and specificity. High capture sensitivity (92%) and specificity (100%) was observed in whole blood samples spiked with Caco-2 cells (10-100 cells/ml). Analysis of blood samples obtained from 25 head and neck cancer patients on the EpCAM LNA aptamer functionalized chip revealed that an average count of 5 ± 3 CTCs/ml of blood were captured from 22/25 samples (88%). EpCAM intracellular domain (EpICD) immunohistochemistry on 9 oral squamous cell carcinomas showed the EpICD positivity in the tumor cells, confirming the EpCAM expression in CTCs from head and neck cancers. These microfluidic devices also maintained viability for in vitro culture and characterization. Use of LNA modified aptamers provided added benefits in terms of cost effectiveness due to increased reusability and sustainability of the devices. Our results present a robust, quick, and efficient CTC capture platform with the use of simple PDMS based devices that are easy to fabricate at low cost and have an immense potential in cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic planning. PMID:26487896

  3. Estimating transport properties of mortars using image analysis on backscattered electron images

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, H.S. . E-mail: hong.wong@imperial.ac.uk; Buenfeld, N.R.; Head, M.K.

    2006-08-15

    The pore structure of two ordinary Portland cement mortars at water-cement ratio of 0.35 and 0.70 was characterised using quantitative backscattered electron imaging. The mortars were cured and conditioned to produce a range of pore structure characteristics. Image analysis was used to characterise the pore structure in terms of simple morphological parameters such as resolvable porosity and the specific surface area. These were found to be correlated to measured transport coefficients (diffusivity, permeability and sorptivity), suggesting the feasibility of image analysis to derive valuable quantitative information describing the pore structure that can be used as input values for a transport prediction model. A simple analytical model incorporating tortuosity and constrictivity was used to predict oxygen diffusivity and a variant of the Kozeny-Carman model was used to predict oxygen permeability. The diffusion model tended to over-predict for the lower w/c ratio mortar, but the general agreement was reasonable, with 90% of the estimated values within a factor of two from the measured values. The modified Kozeny-Carman model, however, over-predicted all permeability values with an error of between half to one order of magnitude.

  4. Application of antifungal CFB to increase the durability of cement mortar.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Myong; Park, Sung-Jin; Kim, Wha-Jung; Ghim, Sa-Youl

    2012-07-01

    Antifungal cement mortar or microbiological calcium carbonate precipitation on cement surface has been investigated as functional concrete research. However, these research concepts have never been fused with each other. In this study, we introduced the antifungal calciteforming bacteria (CFB) Bacillus aryabhattai KNUC205, isolated from an urban tunnel (Daegu, South Korea). The major fungal deteriogens in urban tunnel, Cladosporium sphaerospermum KNUC253, was used as a sensitive fungal strain. B. aryabhattai KNUC205 showed CaCO3 precipitation on B4 medium. Cracked cement mortar pastes were made and neutralized by modified methods. Subsequently, the mixture of B. aryabhattai KNUC205, conidiospore of C. sphaerospermum KNUC253, and B4 agar was applied to cement cracks and incubated at 18 degrees C for 16 days. B. aryabhattai KNUC205 showed fungal growth inhibition against C. sphaerospermum. Furthermore, B. aryabhattai KNUC205 showed crack remediation ability and water permeability reduction of cement mortar pastes. Taken together, these results suggest that the CaCO3 precipitation and antifungal properties of B. aryabhattai KNUC205 could be used as an effective sealing or coating material that can also prevent deteriorative fungal growth. This study is the first application and evaluation research that incorporates calcite formation with antifungal capabilities of microorganisms for an environment-friendly and more effective protection of cement materials. In this research, the conception of microbial construction materials was expanded. PMID:22580322

  5. Changes in focal adhesion kinase expression in rats with collagen-induced arthritis and efficacy of intervention with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs alone or in combination

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hui-Ying; Luo, Jing; Li, Xiao-Feng; Lv, Qian; Wen, Hong-Yan; Song, Qing-Zhen; Zhao, Wen-Peng; Zhao, Xiang-Cong; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Si-Yu; Zhi, Jian-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is known to promote the proliferation, migration and survival of synovial cells and plays an important role in the occurrence, development and pathological process of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the present study was to observe FAK changes in synovial cells of rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and after intervention with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) alone or in combination in a CIA female SD rat model induced by collagen type II. The rats were randomized to 8 groups: normal control group, CIA model control group, methotrexate (MTX, 0.9 mg/kg/w) group, cyclophosphamide (CTX, 24 mg/kg/3 w) group, leflunomide (LEF, 1.2 mg/kg/d) group, MTX + CTX group, LEF + CTX group, and MTX + LEF group. They were intervened with DMARDs alone or in combination for six weeks. The experiment lasted a total of 9 weeks in vivo. Articular inflammation was measured during the process of drug intervention in terms of the degree of swelling degree in the right hind foot using a venire caliper. All animals were sacrificed by breaking the neck after 9 weeks. Then, the ankle was fixed, decalcified, embedded, and HE stained, and prepared into slices to observe pathological changes in the synovial tissue. FAK expression in synovial cells was assayed by immunohistochemistry and the mean optical density (OD) value was measured using the HPIAS-2000 image analysis system. It was found that FAK expression was negative in normal control group, positive in CIA model control group, and decreased in the three DMARD combination treatment groups significantly as compared with that in the three single-drug groups (P < 0.05). FAK expression in LEF + CTX group or MTX + CTX group decreased more significantly than that in MTX + LEF group (P < 0.05), and there was no statistically significant difference between LEF + CTX and MTX + CTX groups. The arthritis index and pathological change in the synovial tissue in LEF + CTX group or MTX + CTX group

  6. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to three different liners: TheraCal LC, Biodentine, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using universal adhesive: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Deepa, Velagala L; Dhamaraju, Bhargavi; Bollu, Indira Priyadharsini; Balaji, Tandri S

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To compare and evaluate the bonding ability of resin composite (RC) to three different liners: TheraCal LC™ (TLC), a novel resin-modified (RM) calcium silicate cement, Biodentine™ (BD), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) using an universal silane-containing adhesive and characterizing their failure modes. Materials and Methods: Thirty extracted intact human molars with occlusal cavity (6-mm diameter and 2-mm height) were mounted in acrylic blocks and divided into three groups of 10 samples each based on the liner used as Group A (TLC), Group B (BD), and Group C (RMGIC). Composite post of 3 mm diameter and 3 mm height was then bonded to each sample using universal adhesive. Shear bond strength (SBS) analysis was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc test using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20. Results: No significant difference was observed between group A and group C (P = 0.573) while group B showed the least bond strength values with a highly significant difference (P = 0.000). The modes of failure were predominantly cohesive in Groups A and B (TLC and BD) while RMGIC showed mixed and adhesive failures. Conclusions: Hence, this present study concludes that the bond strength of composite resin to TLC and RMGIC was similar and significantly higher than that of BD following application of universal adhesive. PMID:27099425

  7. Early age monitoring of cement mortar using embedded piezoelectric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Arun; Subramaniam, Kolluru V. L.

    2016-04-01

    A piezoceramic based sensor consisting of embedded Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) patch is developed for assessing the progression of hydration and evolution of properties of cement mortar. A method for continuous assessment of cement mortar with different water to cement ratios after casting is presented. The method relies on monitoring changes in the electromechanical (EM) conductance of a PZT patch embedded in mortar. Changes in conductance are shown to sensitively reflect the changes in the mechanical impedance of the cementitious material as it transforms from fluid to solid state.

  8. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abdominal Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91– ... are abdominal adhesions and intestinal obstructions ... generally do not require treatment. Surgery is the only way to treat abdominal ...

  9. Anti-adhesive characteristics of CHF{sub 3}/O{sub 2} and C{sub 4}F{sub 8}/O{sub 2} plasma-modified silicon molds for nanoimprint lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jaemin; Lee, Junmyung; Lee, Hyun Woo; Kwon, Kwang-Ho

    2015-09-15

    The anti-adhesive characteristics of a plasma-modified silicon mold surface for nanoimprint lithography are presented. Both CHF{sub 3}/O{sub 2} and C{sub 4}F{sub 8}/O{sub 2} plasma were used to form an anti-adhesive layer on silicon mold surfaces. The gas mixing ratios of CHF{sub 3}/O{sub 2} and C{sub 4}F{sub 8}/O{sub 2} were experimentally changed between 0% and 80% to optimize the plasma conditions to obtain a low surface energy of the silicon mold. The plasma characteristics were examined by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). In order to investigate the changes in surface energy and surface chemistry of the anti-adhesive layer during repeated demolding cycles, contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were performed on the plasma-modified silicon mold surface. Simultaneously, the surface morphology of the demolded resists was evaluated by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) in order to examine the effect of the anti-adhesive layers on the duplicated patterns of the resists. It was observed that the anti-adhesive layer formed by CHF{sub 3}/O{sub 2} plasma treatment was worn out more easily during repeated demolding cycles than the film formed by C{sub 4}F{sub 8}/O{sub 2} plasma treatment, because CHF{sub 3}/O{sub 2} gas plasma formed a thinner plasma-polymerized film over the same plasma treatment time.

  10. A chemometric approach to the characterisation of historical mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Rampazzi, L. . E-mail: laura.rampazzi@uninsubria.it; Pozzi, A.; Sansonetti, A.; Toniolo, L.; Giussani, B.

    2006-06-15

    The compositional knowledge of historical mortars is of great concern in case of provenance and dating investigations and of conservation works since the nature of the raw materials suggests the most compatible conservation products. The classic characterisation usually goes through various analytical determinations, while conservation laboratories call for simple and quick analyses able to enlighten the nature of mortars, usually in terms of the binder fraction. A chemometric approach to the matter is here undertaken. Specimens of mortars were prepared with calcitic and dolomitic binders and analysed by Atomic Spectroscopy. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) was used to investigate the features of specimens and samples. A Partial Least Square (PLS1) regression was done in order to predict the binder/aggregate ratio. The model was applied to historical mortars from the churches of St. Lorenzo (Milan) and St. Abbondio (Como). The accordance between the predictive model and the real samples is discussed.

  11. 7. Detail, beaded mortar joint, stepped wingwall coping at the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Detail, beaded mortar joint, stepped wingwall coping at the east portal of Tunnel 18, 135mm lens with electronic flash fill. - Southern Pacific Railroad Natron Cutoff, Tunnel No. 18, Milepost 410, Dorris, Siskiyou County, CA

  12. Atmospheric deterioration of ancient and modern hydraulic mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbioni, C.; Zappia, G.; Riontino, C.; Blanco-Varela, M. T.; Aguilera, J.; Puertas, F.; Balen, K. Van; Toumbakari, E. E.

    Different types of ancient and recent hydraulic mortars were collected from well-documented archaeological, historic and modern buildings in various geographical locations (urban, suburban, rural and maritime) of Italy, Spain and Belgium, representative of different environmental impacts, types and degrees of deterioration. A synthesis of the characteristics of the collected samples is presented, along with the identification of the formation products that occurred on the sample surfaces as a result of the reaction of the mortars with atmospheric pollutants. The analyses were performed by means of optical microscopy (OM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDX) and ion chromatography (IC). The results obtained prove that sulphation processes takes place on hydraulic mortars, leading to gypsum formation on the external surface of the samples. Through the reaction of gypsum with the aluminate hydrate of the binder, ettringite formation was found to occur on a cement-based restoration mortar sampled in Antwerp.

  13. VIEW OF MORTARED ROCK FOOTING THAT ONCE SUPPORTED THE TWIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF MORTARED ROCK FOOTING THAT ONCE SUPPORTED THE TWIN FLUME'S OUTLET TO TUMALO FEED CANAL, WITH BRIDGE. LOOKING NORTHWEST - Tumalo Irrigation District, Tumalo Project, West of Deschutes River, Tumalo, Deschutes County, OR

  14. VIEW OF MORTARED ROCK AND CONCRETE INLET TO COUCH LATERAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF MORTARED ROCK AND CONCRETE INLET TO COUCH LATERAL CANAL, UPSTREAM OF COLLINS ROAD. LOOKING NORTH/NORTHEAST - Tumalo Irrigation District, Tumalo Project, West of Deschutes River, Tumalo, Deschutes County, OR

  15. Applicability of Carbonated Electric Arc Furnace Slag to Mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, S.; Arisawa, R.; Hisyamudin, M. N. N.; Murakami, K.; Maegawa, A.; Izaki, M.

    2012-03-01

    Authors have been studying the absorption of CO2 in the steelmaking slag. In this study, an application of the electric arc furnace slag after the carbonation to admixture of mortar was investigated with the JIS (A6206-1997) method for ground granulated blast-furnace slag for concrete. The percent flows for the test mortar were smaller than that for the standard mortar. The percent flow of the carbonated slag whose average particle size of more than approximately 4 μm increased with an increase in the average size of the particles. Because the compressive strengths of the test mortar cured for 91 days were almost the same as those cured 28 days, the slag after the carbonation was thought not to have self-hardening property for a medium and long term. The compressive strength for the test mortar was almost unchanged within a range of approximately 2 to 7 μm of the average particle size, and it in this range was highest. The activity indexes for the test mortar prepared with the slag after the carbonation ranged from approximately 40 to 60 %.

  16. Properties of wastepaper sludge in geopolymer mortars for masonry applications.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shiqin; Sagoe-Crentsil, Kwesi

    2012-12-15

    This paper presents the results of an investigation into the use of wastepaper sludge in geopolymer mortar systems for manufacturing construction products. The investigation was driven by the increasing demand for reuse options in paper-recycling industry. Both fresh and hardened geopolymer mortar properties are evaluated for samples incorporating dry wastepaper sludge, and the results indicate potential end-use benefits in building product manufacture. Addition of wastepaper sludge to geopolymer mortar reduces flow properties, primarily due to dry sludge absorbing water from the binder mix. The average 91-day compressive strength of mortar samples incorporating 2.5 wt% and 10 wt% wastepaper sludge respectively retained 92% and 52% of the reference mortar strength. However, contrary to the normal trend of increasing drying shrinkage with increasing paper sludge addition to Portland cement matrices, the corresponding geopolymer drying shrinkage decreased by 34% and 64%. Equally important, the water absorption of hardened geopolymer mortar decreased with increasing paper sludge content at ambient temperatures, providing good prospects of overall potential for wastepaper sludge incorporation in the production of building and masonry elements. The results indicate that, despite its high moisture absorbance due to the organic matter and residual cellulose fibre content, wastepaper sludge appears compatible with geopolymer chemistry, and hence serves as a potential supplementary additive to geopolymer cementitious masonry products. PMID:22868380

  17. Properties of microcement mortar with nano particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimeneti, Narasimha Reddy

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and Carbon nanofibers (CNF) are one of the toughest and stiffest materials in the world presently with extreme properties yet to be discovered in terms of elastic modulus and tensile strength. Due to the advanced properties of these materials they are being used in almost all fields of science at nanolevel and are being used in construction industry recently for improvement of material properties. Microcement is fine ground cement which as half the particle size of ordinary Portland cement. In this research the behavior of cement mortar of micro cement with the addition of nanoparticles is studied. Due to high aspect ratio and strong van der Waal forces between the particles of CNT and CNF, they agglomerate and form bundles when mixed with water, sonication method is used to mix nanoparticles with few drops of surfactant and super plasticizer. Mechanical properties such as compressive strength and flexural strength with CNT and CNF composites are examined and compared with control samples. 0.1% and 0.05 % of nanoparticles (both CNT and CNF) by the weight of cement are used in this research and 0.8% of super plasticizer by weight of cement was also used along with 0.4, 0.45 and 0.50 water cement ratios for making specimens for compression test. The compressive strength results are not satisfactory as there was no constant increase in strength with all the composites, however strength of few nanocomposites increased by a good percentage. 0.5 water cement ratio cement mortar had compressive strength of 7.15 ksi (49.3 MPa), whereas sample with 0.1% CNT showed 8.38 ksi (57.8 MPa) with 17% increase in strength after 28 days. Same trend was followed by 0.4 water cement ratio as the compressive strength of control sample was 8.89 ksi (61.3 MPa), with 0.05% of CNT strength increased to 10.90 ksi (75.2 MPa) with 23% increase in strength. 0.4 water cement ratio was used for flexural tests including 0.1%, 0.05% of CNT and 0.1%, 0.05% of CNF with 0

  18. Micro- and meso-scale pore structure in mortar in relation to aggregate content

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yun; De Schutter, Geert; Ye, Guang

    2013-10-15

    Mortar is often viewed as a three-phase composite consisting of aggregate, bulk paste, and an interfacial transition zone (ITZ). However, this description is inconsistent with experimental findings because of the basic assumption that larger pores are only present within the ITZ. In this paper, we use backscattered electron (BSE) imaging to investigate the micro- and meso-scale structure of mortar with varying aggregate content. The results indicate that larger pores are present not only within the ITZ but also within areas far from aggregates. This phenomenon is discussed in detail based on a series of analytical calculations, such as the effective water binder ratio and the inter-aggregate spacing. We developed a modified computer model that includes a two-phase structure for bulk paste. This model interprets previous mercury intrusion porosimetry data very well. -- Highlights: •Based on BSE, we examine the HCSS model. •We develop the HCSS-DBLB model. •We use the modified model to interpret the MIP data.

  19. Fully Phosphorothioate-Modified CpG ODN with PolyG Motif Inhibits the Adhesion of B16 Melanoma Cells In Vitro and Tumorigenesis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueju; Wang, Liying; Wan, Min; Wu, Xiuli; Yu, Yongli

    2013-01-01

    Adhesion to the extracellular matrix and endothelial lining of blood vessels is critical for tumor cells to grow at original or metastatic sites. Inhibition of tumor cell adhesion can be an antitumor strategy. Guanosine-rich (G-rich) oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) can inhibit the adhesion of certain tumor cells. However, no data exist on how inclusion of the CpG motif in the G-rich sequence influences tumor cell adhesion and subsequent tumorigenesis. In this study, in vitro and in vivo assays were used to evaluate how a panel of ODN-containing contiguous guanosines and the CpG motif influenced adhesion of B16 melanoma cells. The results showed that a self-designed ODN, named BW001, containing the polyG motif and a full phosphorothioate modification backbone could inhibit B16 melanoma cell adhesion on a culture plate or on a plate coated with various substances. In vivo data revealed that B16 melanoma cells co-administered with BW001 and intraperitoneally injected into mice formed fewer tumor colonies in peritoneal cavities. This effect was related to the polyG motif and the full phosphorothioate modification backbone and enhanced by the existence of the CpG motif. Additional in vivo data showed that survival of tumor-bearing mice in the BW001 group was significantly prolonged, subcutaneous melanoma developed much more slowly, and lung dissemination colonies formed much less often than in mice inoculated with B16 melanoma cells only. The effect was CpG motif-dependent. These results suggest that BW001 may exert an integrated antitumor effect. PMID:23848522

  20. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91–111. Seek Help for ... and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website ... Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 700 West Virginia ...

  1. A study of interface and adhesion of c-BN film on Si(1 0 0) modified by nitrogen plasma based ion implantation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Jingze; Zhang Qing; Xia Lifang; Yoon, S.F.; Ahn, J.; Byon, E.S.; Zhou, Q.; Wang, S.G.; Li, J.Q.; Yang, D.J

    2004-06-08

    Cubic boron nitride (c-BN) films were deposited on Si substrate with poor adhesion using magnetically enhanced active reaction evaporation (ME-ARE). An attempt has been made to enhance the adhesion strength between c-BN film and substrate by nitrogen plasma based ion implantation (PBII) into c-BN film. Nitrogen ion doses range from 5x10{sup 16} to 1x10{sup 17} ions cm{sup -2} at an implant voltage of 50 kV. The nitrogen ion implanted c-BN films were analyzed using FTIR, scratch test, and XPS to investigate the change of structure, adhesion strength of c-BN film, and interfacial mixing between the initial turbostratic BN (t-BN) film layer and substrate caused by nitrogen ion implantation. FTIR spectra showed little change of c-BN phase content in the films under the above implantation conditions but XPS depth elemental profile of N{sup +}-implanted boron nitride films displayed a mixed layer consisting of elements from film and substrate formed at interface. A highly optimized dynamic Monte Carlo program TAMIX was used to simulate the PBII process in a good agreement with above measured depth elemental profile. The scratch test showed that the adhesion strength evaluated in terms of the critical load of N{sup +}-implanted c-BN film was 1.4 times higher than that of as deposited c-BM film.

  2. Fibroblast adhesion on ECM-derived peptide modified poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) brushes: ligand co-presentation and 3D-localization.

    PubMed

    Desseaux, Solenne; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2015-03-01

    Polymer brushes prepared via surface-initiated polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate are powerful platforms for the fabrication of model biointerfaces to study cell-substrate interactions. In this manuscript, the versatility of surface-initiated polymerization and the poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) polymer brush platform are used to address two fundamental questions, viz. the effects of ligand co-presentation and of the 3D localization of biochemical cues on cell behavior. Using a series of PHEMA brushes that present RGD and PHSRN ligands in various relative surface concentrations, the present study unequivocally demonstrates that: (i) co-presentation of PHSRN cues on an RGD functionalized substrate enhances cell adhesion and (ii) this synergetic effect is highest when the two ligands are presented at equal surface concentrations. In the second part of this study, adhesion of 3T3 fibroblasts on a series of PHEMA brushes that present the RGD ligand at a distance of 12, 23 or 42 nm away from the cell substrate interface is investigated. While cells were found to adhere to surfaces that presented the cell adhesive peptides at distances up to 23 nm from the interface, polymer brushes that contained the RGD ligands 42 nm away from the interface did not support cell adhesion. PMID:25617123

  3. Artillery/mortar type classification based on detected acoustic transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morcos, Amir; Grasing, David; Desai, Sachi

    2008-04-01

    Feature extraction methods based on the statistical analysis of the change in event pressure levels over a period and the level of ambient pressure excitation facilitate the development of a robust classification algorithm. The features reliably discriminates mortar and artillery variants via acoustic signals produced during the launch events. Utilizing acoustic sensors to exploit the sound waveform generated from the blast for the identification of mortar and artillery variants as type A, etcetera through analysis of the waveform. Distinct characteristics arise within the different mortar/artillery variants because varying HE mortar payloads and related charges emphasize varying size events at launch. The waveform holds various harmonic properties distinct to a given mortar/artillery variant that through advanced signal processing and data mining techniques can employed to classify a given type. The skewness and other statistical processing techniques are used to extract the predominant components from the acoustic signatures at ranges exceeding 3000m. Exploiting these techniques will help develop a feature set highly independent of range, providing discrimination based on acoustic elements of the blast wave. Highly reliable discrimination will be achieved with a feed-forward neural network classifier trained on a feature space derived from the distribution of statistical coefficients, frequency spectrum, and higher frequency details found within different energy bands. The processes that are described herein extend current technologies, which emphasis acoustic sensor systems to provide such situational awareness.

  4. Mortar radiocarbon dating: preliminary accuracy evaluation of a novel methodology.

    PubMed

    Marzaioli, Fabio; Lubritto, Carmine; Nonni, Sara; Passariello, Isabella; Capano, Manuela; Terrasi, Filippo

    2011-03-15

    Mortars represent a class of building and art materials that are widespread at archeological sites from the Neolithic period on. After about 50 years of experimentation, the possibility to evaluate their absolute chronology by means of radiocarbon ((14)C) remains still uncertain. With the use of a simplified mortar production process in the laboratory environment, this study shows the overall feasibility of a novel physical pretreatment for the isolation of the atmospheric (14)CO(2) (i.e., binder) signal absorbed by the mortars during their setting. This methodology is based on the assumption that an ultrasonic attack in liquid phase isolates a suspension of binder carbonates from bulk mortars. Isotopic ((13)C and (14)C), % C, X-ray diffractometry (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses were performed to characterize the proposed methodology. The applied protocol allows suppression of the fossil carbon (C) contamination originating from the incomplete burning of the limestone during the quick lime production, providing unbiased dating for "laboratory" mortars produced operating at historically adopted burning temperatures. PMID:21338118

  5. Use of rubble from building demolition in mortars.

    PubMed

    Corinaldesi, V; Giuggiolini, M; Moriconi, G

    2002-01-01

    Because of increasing waste production and public concerns about the environment, it is desirable to recycle materials from building demolition. If suitably selected, ground, cleaned and sieved in appropriate industrial crushing plants, these materials can be profitably used in concrete. Nevertheless, the presence of masonry instead of concrete rubble is particularly detrimental to the mechanical performance and durability of recycled-aggregate concrete and the same negative effect is detectable when natural sand is replaced by fine recycled aggregate fraction. An alternative use of both masonry rubble and fine recycled material fraction could be in mortars. These could contain either recycled instead of natural sand or powder obtained by bricks crushing as partial cement substitution. In particular, attention is focused on the modification that takes place when either polypropylene or stainless steel fibers are added to these mortars. Polypropylene fibers are added in order to reduce shrinkage of mortars, stainless steel fibers for improving their flexural strength. The combined use of polypropylene fibers and fine recycled material from building demolition could allow the preparation of mortars showing good performance, in particular when coupled with bricks. Furthermore, the combined use of stainless steel fibers and mortars containing brick powder seems to be an effective way to guarantee a high flexural strength. PMID:12423051

  6. Oyster shell as substitute for aggregate in mortar.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyunsuk; Park, Sangkyu; Lee, Kiho; Park, Junboum

    2004-06-01

    Enormous amounts of oyster shell waste have been illegally disposed of at oyster farm sites along the southern coast of Korea. In this study to evaluate the possibility of recycling this waste for use as a construction material, the mechanical characteristics of pulverized oyster shell were investigated in terms of its potential utilization as a substitute for the aggregates used in mortar. The unconfined compressive strengths of various soil mortar specimens, with varying blending ratios of cement, water and oyster shell, were evaluated by performing unconfined compression tests, and the results were compared with the strengths of normal cement mortar made with sand. In addition, the effect of organic chemicals on the hardening of concrete was evaluated by preparing ethyl-benzene-mixed mortar specimens. The long-term strength improvement resulting from the addition of fly ash was also examined by performing unconfined compression tests on specimens with fly-ash content. There was no significant reduction in the compressive strength of the mortars containing small oyster shell particles instead of sand. From these test data, the possible application of oyster shells in construction materials could be verified, and the change in the strength parameters according to the presence of organic compounds was also evaluated. PMID:15253499

  7. Strength and pore structure of ternary blended cement mortars containing blast furnace slag and silica fume

    SciTech Connect

    Bagel, L.

    1998-07-01

    Blended cement mortars with fixed workability and incorporating blast furnace slag and silica fume, were tested for compressive strength and mercury intrusion, with a view to comparing their performance with that of plain Portland cement mortar and/or slag-cement mortar. The obtained results showed that with high portions of slag and silica fume in the binding system, the mortars reached relatively satisfactory level of compressive strength and contributed to the significantly denser pore structure.

  8. Assesment of uniaxial compressive strenght of repair mortars by using in situ non destructive techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szemerey-Kiss, Balázs; Török, Ákos

    2014-05-01

    The present paper provides information on the strength assessment of restoration mortars by using ultrasonic pulse velocity. The aims of the tests were to determine the compressive strength of the mortars by using non destructive test methods. Four commercially available types of restoration mortars were tested. Besides the pure mortars, specimens with 30 and 50 wt% of limestone sand aggregate (from Sóskút quarry) were also made. The material properties of the tested mortars have been described in details previously (Szemerey-Kiss et al. 2013). Cubic test specimens of 3cm x 3cm x 3cm were prepared from the mortars and after casting and consolidation 10 cubes of each mortar type were tested. Ultrasonic pulse velocity was measured according to the guidelines given by EN 14579:2005. Uniaxial compressive strength of test specimens were measured following the instructions of EN 1015-11:2000. An exponential mathematical formula was outlined that describes the uniaxial compressive strength of mortars based on ultrasonic pulse velocity data. The best fit was found for two mortars while the formula with different constants could be also used for other mortars, too. These experiments have proved that non destructive tests can be used in the assessment of the strength of historic mortars. References: Szemerey-Kiss, B., Török, Á., Siegesmund S 2013. The influence of binder/aggregate ratio on the properties and strength of repair mortars. Environmental Earth Sciences, 69:1439-1449.

  9. Durability of waste glass flax fiber reinforced mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Aly, M.; Hashmi, M. S. J.; Olabi, A. G.; Messeiry, M.

    2011-01-17

    The main concern for natural fibre reinforced mortar composites is the durability of the fibres in the alkaline environment of cement. The composites may undergo a reduction in strength as a result of weakening of the fibres by a combination of alkali attack and fibre mineralisation. In order to enhance the durability of natural fiber reinforced cement composites several approaches have been studied including fiber impregnation, sealing of the matrix pore system and reduction of matrix alkalinity through the use of pozzolanic materials. In this study waste glass powder was used as a pozzolanic additive to improve the durability performance of flax fiber reinforced mortar (FFRM). The durability of the FFRM was studied by determining the effects of ageing in water and exposure to wetting and drying cycles; on the microstructures and flexural behaviour of the composites. The mortar tests demonstrated that the waste glass powder has significant effect on improving the durability of FFRM.

  10. Influence of pore structure on compressive strength of cement mortar.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haitao; Xiao, Qi; Huang, Donghui; Zhang, Shiping

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation into the pore structure of cement mortar using mercury porosimeter. Ordinary Portland cement, manufactured sand, and natural sand were used. The porosity of the manufactured sand mortar is higher than that of natural sand at the same mix proportion; on the contrary, the probable pore size and threshold radius of manufactured sand mortar are finer. Besides, the probable pore size and threshold radius increased with increasing water to cement ratio and sand to cement ratio. In addition, the existing models of pore size distribution of cement-based materials have been reviewed and compared with test results in this paper. Finally, the extended Bhattacharjee model was built to examine the relationship between compressive strength and pore structure. PMID:24757414

  11. Durability of Waste Glass Flax Fiber Reinforced Mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aly, M.; Hashmi, M. S. J.; Olabi, A. G.; Messeiry, M.

    2011-01-01

    The main concern for natural fibre reinforced mortar composites is the durability of the fibres in the alkaline environment of cement. The composites may undergo a reduction in strength as a result of weakening of the fibres by a combination of alkali attack and fibre mineralisation. In order to enhance the durability of natural fiber reinforced cement composites several approaches have been studied including fiber impregnation, sealing of the matrix pore system and reduction of matrix alkalinity through the use of pozzolanic materials. In this study waste glass powder was used as a pozzolanic additive to improve the durability performance of flax fiber reinforced mortar (FFRM). The durability of the FFRM was studied by determining the effects of ageing in water and exposure to wetting and drying cycles; on the microstructures and flexural behaviour of the composites. The mortar tests demonstrated that the waste glass powder has significant effect on improving the durability of FFRM.

  12. Various mortars for anti-fouling purposes in marine environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kanematsu, Hideyuki; Masuda, Tomoka; Miura, Yoko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Hirai, Nobumitsu; Yokoyama, Seiji

    2014-02-20

    The antifouling properties for some mortars with steel making slags were investigated by real marine immersion tests and a unique laboratory acceleration tests with a specially devised biofilm acceleration reactors. Mortars mixed with steel making slags containing abundant iron elements tended to form biofilm and also bifouling. The two kinds of biofilm formation tests were used in this study. Real immersion in marine environments and laboratory test with a specially devised biofilm acceleration reactor. The former evaluated the biofouling characteristics more properly, while the latter did the biofilm formation characteristics more effectively.

  13. Ancient mortars from Cape Verde: mineralogical and physical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Fernando; Costa, Cristiana; Velosa, Ana; Quintela, Ana; Terroso, Denise; Marques, Vera

    2014-05-01

    Times and locations of different building constructions means different knowledge, habits, different construction methods and materials. The study and safeguarding of the architectural heritage takes nowadays a progressive importance as a vehicle for transmission of cultures and history of nations. The coatings are of great importance in the durability of a building due to the protective role of the masonry. The compatibility between the materials with which they are executed (masonry, mortar and grout settlement) promotes the proper functioning of the wall and a consequent increase in durability. Therefore, it becomes important to study and characterize the mortar coating of buildings to know its characteristics and to use compatible materials in the rehabilitation and maintenance of buildings. This study aims to characterize the chemical, physical, mechanical and mineralogical mortar samples collected in buildings in three islands of Cape Verde, for the conservation, rehabilitation and preservation of them. The collected samples belong to buildings constructed in the end of XIX century and in the beginning of XX century. In order to characterize the mortar samples some tests was made, such as X-Ray Diffraction, X- Ray Fluorescence, acid attack and mechanical strength. The samples were divided into three groups depending on origin; so we have a first group collected on the island of Santiago, the second on the island of Saint Vincent and the third on the island of Santo Antao. The samples are all carbonated, but Santiago samples have a lower carbonates content. In terms of insoluble residue (from the acid attack) it was concluded that the samples have similar value ranging from 9 to 26%. The compressive strength of the mortars have a range between 1.36 and 4.55 MPa, which is related to the presence of more binder in samples with higher resistance. The chemical and mineralogical analyzes showed that these consist of lime mortars (binder), natural pozzolan and

  14. Study on basalt fiber parameters affecting fiber-reinforced mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, A. A.; Chernykh, T. N.; Sashina, A. V.; Bogusevich, D. V.

    2015-01-01

    This article considers the effect of different dosages and diameters of basalt fibers on tensile strength increase during bending of fiberboard-reinforced mortar samples. The optimal dosages of fiber, providing maximum strength in bending are revealed. The durability of basalt fiber in an environment of cement, by means of microscopic analysis of samples of fibers and fiberboard-reinforced mortar long-term tests is examined. The article also compares the behavior of basalt fiber in the cement stone environment to a glass one and reveals that the basalt fiber is not subject to destruction.

  15. On the relationship between the formation factor and propan-2-ol diffusivity in mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Tumidajski, P.J.; Schumacher, A.S.

    1996-09-01

    For porous rocks saturated with saltwater and with solid phases of high resistivity, early work showed that the ratio of the saltwater saturated rock resistivity to the resistivity of the saltwater was inversely related to the respective diffusivities (or permeabilities). The applicability of resistivity-diffusivity relationships for mortars is addressed. The following equation: F = R(mortar)/R(porewater) = D(porewater)/D(mortar) relating the formation factor (F) to the resistivity (R) and diffusivity (D) was investigated for Portland cement mortars and for mortars incorporating silica fume, fly ash and blast furnace slag.

  16. Seismic augmentation of acoustic monitoring of mortar fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Thomas S.

    2007-10-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers Research and Development Center participated in a joint ARL-NATO TG-53 field experiment and data collect at Yuma Proving Ground, AZ in early November 2005. Seismic and acoustic signatures from both muzzle blasts and impacts of small arms fire and artillery were recorded using 7 seismic arrays and 3 acoustic arrays. Arrays comprised of 12 seismic and 12 acoustic sensors each were located from 700 m to 18 km from gun positions. Preliminary analysis of signatures attributed to 60mm, 81mm, 120 mm mortars recorded at a seismic-acoustic array 1.1 km from gun position are presented. Seismic and acoustic array f-k analysis is performed to detect and characterize the source signature. Horizontal seismic data are analyzed to determine efficacy of a seismic discriminant for mortar and artillery sources. Rotation of North and East seismic components to radial and transverse components relative to the source-receiver path provide maximum surface wave amplitude on the transverse component. Angles of rotation agree well with f-k analysis of both seismic and acoustic signals. The spectral energy of the rotated transverse surface wave is observable on the all caliber of mortars at a distance of 1.1 km and is a reliable source discriminant for mortar sources at this distance. In a step towards automation, travel time stencils using local seismic and acoustic velocities are applied to seismic data for analysis and determination of source characteristics.

  17. 2. VIEW, LOOKING FROM THE NORTHEAST. THESE THREE CONCRETE MORTAR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW, LOOKING FROM THE NORTHEAST. THESE THREE CONCRETE MORTAR BLOCKS WERE FOR THE MILL'S 3-STAMP BATTERIES ERECTED IN 1903, NORTH OF THE TWO 1901 BATTERIES WHICH WERE MOUNTED ON WOODEN TIMBERS - Wilbur-Womble Mill, Southern Edge Of Salt Spring Valley, Copperopolis, Calaveras County, CA

  18. Workability and strength of lignite bottom ash geopolymer mortar.

    PubMed

    Sathonsaowaphak, Apha; Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Pimraksa, Kedsarin

    2009-08-30

    In this paper, the waste lignite bottom ash from power station was used as a source material for making geopolymer. Sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) were used as liquid for the mixture and heat curing was used to activate the geopolymerization. The fineness of bottom ash, the liquid alkaline/ash ratio, the sodium silicate/NaOH ratio and the NaOH concentration were studied. The effects of the additions of water, NaOH and napthalene-based superplasticizer on the workability and strength of the geopolymer mortar were also studied. Relatively high strength geopolymer mortars of 24.0-58.0 MPa were obtained with the use of ground bottom ash with 3% retained on sieve no. 325 and mean particle size of 15.7 microm, using liquid alkaline/ash ratios of 0.429-0.709, the sodium silicate/NaOH ratios of 0.67-1.5 and 7.5-12.5M NaOH. The incorporation of water improved the workability of geopolymer mortar more effectively than the use of napthalene-based superplasticizer with similar slight reduction in strengths. The addition of NaOH solution slightly improves the workability of the mix while maintaining the strength of the geopolymer mortars. PMID:19264400

  19. Modeling the thermal characteristics of masonry mortar containing recycled materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laney, Morgan Gretchen

    As the building industry in the United States rapidly expands, the reuse of recycled demolition waste aggregates is becoming increasingly more important. Currently, the building industry is the largest consumer of natural resources. The constant use of raw virgin aggregate is resulting in depleting resources, lack of space for landfills, increasing costs, and heightened levels of pollution. The use of these recycled aggregates in building envelopes and the study of thermal properties are becoming a popular area of research in order to improve building energy usage. The construction of Zero Energy Buildings (ZEB) is encouraged by the United States government as a result of the unresolved finite resources and environmental pollution. The focus of this research is on the impact of using recycled demolition waste aggregates on thermal properties, including specific heat capacity and thermal conductivity, in masonry mortar applications. The new forms of aggregate were analyzed for efficiency and practical utilization in construction in seven locations across the United States by embedding the new material into the building envelope of a strip mall mercantile build model from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in the EnergyPlus Building Energy Simulation Program (BESP). It was determined that the recycled aggregate mortar mixtures performed as well as or better than the traditional mortar mix. Opportunities for future research in recycled aggregate mortar mixtures exist in a regional analysis, a regional recycled aggregate cost analysis, and a life cycled cost analysis (LCCA).

  20. Do Schools Still Need Brick-and-Mortar Libraries?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Doug; Mastrion, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Do all schools need brick-and-mortar libraries? In this article, Johnson and Mastrion share their contradictory thoughts to the question. Johnson says some schools don't need library facilities or programs or librarians. These schools' teachers and administrators: (1) feel no need for a collaborative learning space; (2) feel the ability to process…

  1. Natural Underwater Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Russell J.; Ransom, Todd C.; Hlady, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    The general topic of this review is protein-based underwater adhesives produced by aquatic organisms. The focus is on mechanisms of interfacial adhesion to native surfaces and controlled underwater solidification of natural water-borne adhesives. Four genera that exemplify the broad range of function, general mechanistic features, and unique adaptations are discussed in detail: blue mussels, acorn barnacles, sandcastle worms, and freshwater caddisfly larva. Aquatic surfaces in nature are charged and in equilibrium with their environment, populated by an electrical double layer of ions as well as adsorbed natural polyelectrolytes and microbial biofilms. Surface adsorption of underwater bioadhesives likely occurs by exchange of surface bound ligands by amino acid sidechains, driven primarily by relative affinities and effective concentrations of polymeric functional groups. Most aquatic organisms exploit modified amino acid sidechains, in particular phosphorylated serines and hydroxylated tyrosines (dopa), with high-surface affinity that form coordinative surface complexes. After delivery to the surfaces as a fluid, permanent natural adhesives solidify to bear sustained loads. Mussel plaques are assembled in a manner superficially reminiscent of in vitro layer-by-layer strategies, with sequentially delivered layers associated through Fe(dopa)3 coordination bonds. The adhesives of sandcastle worms, caddisfly larva, and barnacles may be delivered in a form somewhat similar to in vitro complex coacervation. Marine adhesives are secreted, or excreted, into seawater that has a significantly higher pH and ionic strength than the internal environment. Empirical evidence suggests these environment triggers could provide minimalistic, fail-safe timing mechanisms to prevent premature solidification (insolubilization) of the glue within the secretory system, yet allow rapid solidification after secretion. Underwater bioadhesives are further strengthened by secondary covalent

  2. Adhesion of nitrile rubber to UV-assisted surface chemical modified PET fabric, part II: Interfacial characterization of MDI grafted PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavizadeh, Mahmoud; Jamshidi, Masoud

    2016-08-01

    Fiber to rubber adhesion is an important subject in rubber industry. It is well known that surface treatment (i.e. physical, mechanical and chemical) is an effective method to improve interfacial bonding of fibers and/or fabrics to rubbers. UV irradiation is an effective method which has been used to increase fabric-rubber interfacial interactions. In this research UV assisted chemical modification of PET fabrics was used to increase PET to nitrile rubber (NBR) adhesion. Nitrile rubber is a perfect selection as fuel and oil resistant rubber. However it has weak bonding to PET fabric. For this purpose PET fabric was carboxylated under UV irradiation and then methylenediphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) was grafted on carboxylated PET. The chemical composition of the fabric before and after surface treatment was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The sectional morphology of the experimental PET fibers and the interface between rubber compound and PET fabric was studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The morphology and structure of the product were analyzed by an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX). FTIR-ATR and H NMR analysis were used to assess surface modifications on the PET irradiated fabrics.

  3. Polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, D. J.; Bell, V. L.; Saintclair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A process of preparing aromatic polyamide-acids for use as adhesives is described. An equimolar quantity of an aromatic dianhydride is added to a stirred solution of an aromatic diamine in a water or alcohol-miscible ether solvent to obtain a viscous polymer solution. The polymeric-acid intermediate polymer does not become insoluble but directly forms a smooth viscous polymer solution. These polyamic-acid polymers are converted, by heating in the range of 200-300 C and with pressure, to form polyimides with excellent adhesive properties.

  4. Comparing the Environmental Impacts of Alkali Activated Mortar and Traditional Portland Cement Mortar using Life Cycle Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheu, P. S.; Ellis, K.; Varela, B.

    2015-11-01

    Since the year 1908 there has been research into the use alkali activated materials (AAM) in order to develop cementitious materials with similar properties to Ordinary Portland Cement. AAMs are considered green materials since their production and synthesis is not energy intensive. Even though AAMs have a high compressive strength, the average cost of production among other issues limits its feasibility. Previous research by the authors yielded a low cost AAM that uses mine tailings, wollastonite and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS). This mortar has an average compressive strength of 50MPa after 28 days of curing. In this paper the software SimaPro was used to create a product base cradle to gate Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). This compared the environmental impact of the AAM mortar to an Ordinary Portland Cement mortar (PCHM) with similar compressive strength. The main motivation for this research is the environmental impact of producing Ordinary Portland Cement as compared to alkali activated slag materials. The results of this LCA show that the Alkali Activated Material has a lower environmental impact than traditional Portland cement hydraulic mortar, in 10 out of 12 categories including Global Warming Potential, Ecotoxicity, and Smog. Areas of improvement and possible future work were also discovered with this analysis.

  5. Chemical composition influence of cement based mortars on algal biofouling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estelle, Dalod; Alexandre, Govin; Philippe, Grosseau; Christine, Lors; René, Guyonnet; Denis, Damidot

    2013-04-01

    The main cause of building-facade biodegradation is the growth of microorganisms. This phenomenon depends on several parameters such as the geographical situation, the environmental conditions and the surface state of the substrate. Several researches have been devoted to the study of the effect of porosity and roughness on the biofouling of stones and mortars. However, none of them have addressed the influence of the mortar chemistry on the microorganism growth kinetic. The main objective of this study is to highlight the influence of the mortar chemistry in relationship with its physical properties on biological weathering. Earlier work showed a good resistance of Calcium Aluminate Cements to biodeterioration by acidogenic bacteria (Thiobacillus) and fungi (Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus Niger and Coniosporium uncinatum). In order to characterize the influence of the mortar chemistry on biofouling, two Portland cements and two alumina cements are used. Among micro-organisms able to grow, green algae are most involved in the aesthetic deterioration of facades. Indeed, they can colonize any type of media and can be a source of nutrients for other micro-organisms such as fungi. The green algae Klebsormidium flaccidum is chosen because of its representativeness. It is indeed the species the most frequently identified and isolated from samples taken on sites. The biofouling kinetic is followed on samples exposed outdoor and on samples tested in a laboratory bench which consists in spraying an algae culture on mortar specimens. The results obtained by in situ trials are compared with the results obtained on the laboratory bench. The microorganism growth kinetic is measured by image analysis. To improve the detection of algae on the surface of the cementitious samples, the raw image is converted in the YIQ color space. Y, I and Q correspond respectively to luminance, in-phase, and quadrature. On the Q channel, the areas covered by algae and the areas of clean mortar

  6. Effects of fly ash particle size on strength of Portland cement fly ash mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Erdogdu, K.; Tuerker, P.

    1998-09-01

    Fly ashes do not have the same properties for different size fractions. It can be accepted that the effect of a fly ash on mortar strength is a combined effect of its size fractions. Therefore, it was concluded that by separating the size fractions and replacing cement with them, the combined bulk effect of a fly ash on strength can be better analyzed. In this study, different size fractions of fly ash were used to replace cement partially in standard compressive strength mortars. The authors attempted to interpret the strength of Portland cement-fly ash mortars in terms of the chemical, mineralogical, morphological, and physical properties of different fly ash size fractions used. Strengths of the mortars were compared at 2, 7, 28, and 90 days. Also strength of mortars with all-in ash (original ash containing all the fractions) were estimated by using strength of mortars with size fractions and the suitability of this estimation was discussed.

  7. Plastic shrinkage of mortars with shrinkage reducing admixture and lightweight aggregates studied by neutron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrzykowski, Mateusz; Trtik, Pavel; Münch, Beat; Weiss, Jason; Vontobel, Peter; Lura, Pietro

    2015-07-15

    Water transport in fresh, highly permeable concrete and rapid water evaporation from the concrete surface during the first few hours after placement are the key parameters influencing plastic shrinkage cracking. In this work, neutron tomography was used to determine both the water loss from the concrete surface due to evaporation and the redistribution of fluid that occurs in fresh mortars exposed to external drying. In addition to the reference mortar with a water to cement ratio (w/c) of 0.30, a mortar with the addition of pre-wetted lightweight aggregates (LWA) and a mortar with a shrinkage reducing admixture (SRA) were tested. The addition of SRA reduced the evaporation rate from the mortar at the initial stages of drying and reduced the total water loss. The pre-wetted LWA released a large part of the absorbed water as a consequence of capillary pressure developing in the fresh mortar due to evaporation.

  8. Strength, porosity, and chloride resistance of mortar using the combination of two kinds of pozzolanic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rukzon, Sumrerng; Chindaprasirt, Prinya

    2013-08-01

    This article presents a study on the resistance to chloride penetration, corrosion, porosity, and strength of mortar containing fine fly ash (FA), ground rice husk-bark ash (RB), and ground bagasse ash (BA). Ordinary Portland cement (CT) was blended with a single pozzolan and two pozzolans. Strength, porosity, rapid chloride penetration, immersion, and corrosion tests were performed to characterize the mortar. Test results showed that the use of ternary blends of CT, FA, and RB or BA decreased the porosity of the mortar, as compared with binary blended mortar containing CT and RB or BA. The resistance to chloride penetration of the mortar improved substantially with partial replacement of CT with FA, RB, and BA. The use of ternary blends of CT, FA and RB or BA produced the mortar with good strength and resistance to chloride penetration. The resistance to chloride penetration was higher with an increase in the replacement level due to the reduced calcium hydroxide.

  9. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1998-12-29

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

  10. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1997-04-29

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

  11. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

  12. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

  13. A three-level BDDC algorithm for Mortar discretizations

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.; Tu, X.

    2007-12-09

    In this paper, a three-level BDDC algorithm is developed for the solutions of large sparse algebraic linear systems arising from the mortar discretization of elliptic boundary value problems. The mortar discretization is considered on geometrically non-conforming subdomain partitions. In two-level BDDC algorithms, the coarse problem needs to be solved exactly. However, its size will increase with the increase of the number of the subdomains. To overcome this limitation, the three-level algorithm solves the coarse problem inexactly while a good rate of convergence is maintained. This is an extension of previous work, the three-level BDDC algorithms for standard finite element discretization. Estimates of the condition numbers are provided for the three-level BDDC method and numerical experiments are also discussed.

  14. Ancient gypsum mortars from Cyprus: characterization and reinvention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodoridou, M.; Ioannou, I.

    2012-04-01

    Mortars with various binding materials have been used across different pre-historic and historic periods to meet several construction applications, such as jointing masonry blocks, finishing walls and isolating water bearing structures. In the framework of an ongoing research programme (NEA ΥΠOΔOMH/NEKΥΠ/0308/17) funded by the Cyprus Research Promotion Foundation, the Republic of Cyprus and the European Union Regional Development Fund, 25 samples of gypsum mortars from different archaeological sites in Cyprus were collected and characterized following a systematic analytical approach. Petrographic observations of thin sections were carried out using polarizing optical microscope. Scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray microanalyser (SEM-EDX) was used to examine the microstructure and texture of the mortar samples and to determine semi-quantitatively the chemical composition and interface of their binders. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was performed to identify the main mineral crystalline phases of the specimens' binder and aggregates. Thermal analyses (TG/DTA) were used as a further confirmation of the material composition. The pore structure and volume of the ancient mortars were also determined by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) analysis. Last but not least, a portable drilling resistance measurement system (DRMS) was used for micro-destructive assessment of the mechanical state of the samples. The results confirmed the predominant presence of hydrous calcium sulphate in all samples. Calcite was also found both in the binder and aggregates. Small proportions of SiO2 were also detected. The common ratio of binder to aggregates was 1:2.5. MIP showed porosity values between 14-48% and real densities between 1-1.7 g/cm3. The average pore diameters were smaller in the case of mortars with lower porosity. The use of DRMS indicated lower resistance to drilling for the case of joint mortars (as opposed to analysed gypsum plasters). This

  15. Nonconforming mortar element methods: Application to spectral discretizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maday, Yvon; Mavriplis, Cathy; Patera, Anthony

    1988-01-01

    Spectral element methods are p-type weighted residual techniques for partial differential equations that combine the generality of finite element methods with the accuracy of spectral methods. Presented here is a new nonconforming discretization which greatly improves the flexibility of the spectral element approach as regards automatic mesh generation and non-propagating local mesh refinement. The method is based on the introduction of an auxiliary mortar trace space, and constitutes a new approach to discretization-driven domain decomposition characterized by a clean decoupling of the local, structure-preserving residual evaluations and the transmission of boundary and continuity conditions. The flexibility of the mortar method is illustrated by several nonconforming adaptive Navier-Stokes calculations in complex geometry.

  16. Link between microstructure and tritiated water diffusivity in mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larbi, B.; Dridi, W.; Le Bescop, P.; Dangla, P.; Petit, L.

    2013-07-01

    Ions and radionuclide diffusivity in concrete is one of the most important factors that determine service life and safety assessment of cement based structures in nuclear power plants and radioactive-waste repositories. Apart from the influence of cement paste microstructure, the presence of aggregates may have an impact on transport properties of the material. The well-known interfacial transition zone, denoted by ITZ, is created near the aggregates and characterized by a greater porosity. The goal of this study is to investigate the competition between the more diffusing ITZ zone and the less diffusing aggregates. To this end, several series of tritiated water diffusion tests are conducted on mortars characterized by different water-to-cement ratios and sand volume fractions. In parallel, microstructure of these materials is explored by mercury and water porosimetry. It was observed that at low sand content (0% - 50%), diffusion properties of mortars are dominated by aggregates dilution effect. At 60% sand, diffusion increases significantly suggesting that percolation's pores threshold has been reached. Results indicate also that sand particle size distribution has a great impact on the diffusivity of mortars.

  17. The Interfacial Transition Zone in Alkali-Activated Slag Mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San Nicolas, Rackel; Provis, John

    2015-12-01

    The interfacial transition zone (ITZ) is known to strongly influence the mechanical and transport properties of mortars and concretes. This paper studies the ITZ between siliceous (quartz) aggregates and alkali activated slag binders in the context of mortar specimens. Backscattered electron images (BSE) generated in an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) are used to identify unreacted binder components, reaction products and porosity in the zone surrounding aggregate particles, by composition and density contrast. X-ray mapping is used to exclude the regions corresponding to the aggregates from the BSE image of the ITZ, thus enabling analysis of only the binder phases, which are segmented into binary images by grey level discrimination. A distinct yet dense ITZ region is present in the alkali-activated slag mortars, containing a reduced content of unreacted slag particles compared to the bulk binder. The elemental analysis of this region shows that it contains a (C,N)-A-S-H gel which seems to have a higher content of Na (potentially deposited through desiccation of the pore solution) and a lower content of Ca than the bulk inner and outer products forming in the main binding region. These differences are potentially important in terms of long-term concrete performance, as the absence of a highly porous interfacial transition zone region is expected to provide a positive influence on the mechanical and transport properties of alkali-activated slag concretes.

  18. Cement-mortar pipes as a source of aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Berend, K.; Trouwborst, T.

    1999-07-01

    In 1996 in Curacao, acute aluminum (Al) intoxication sickened patients in a dialysis center that used tap water to prepare dialysate. The mortality rate was 32%. A new factory-lined cement-mortar water distribution pipe had recently been installed. It is known that substantial amounts of barium, cadmium, and chromium can leach from cement-mortar linings. This article shows that high concentrations of Al can leach from cement mortars for at least two years in soft, aggressive water. The newly installed pipe, cement containing four times as much Al as usual, corrosive water, the high pH and temperature of the water, long residence time, and perhaps the corrosion inhibitor polyphosphate may have promoted this leaching. Certification of cements used to line water pipes is warranted. Central water treatment plants must distribute noncorrosive water, especially plants that use membrane desalination or other reverse osmosis or nanofiltration processes. Dialysis units should be promptly informed of any impending change in water treatment that might increase the Al content of tap water and also of any accidental pollution of the water distributed. Dialysis centers should always practice extended purification of tap water used for dialysate. Although Al as a risk factor for Alzheimer`s disease in the general population is still debated, there is no doubt that Al causes dialysis encephalopathy.

  19. Analysis of main parameters affecting substrate/mortar contact area through tridimensional laser scanner.

    PubMed

    Stolz, Carina M; Masuero, Angela B

    2015-10-01

    This study assesses the influence of the granulometric composition of sand, application energy and the superficial tension of substrates on the contact area of rendering mortars. Three substrates with distinct wetting behaviors were selected and mortars were prepared with different sand compositions. Characterization tests were performed on fresh and hardened mortars, as well as the rheological characterization. Mortars were applied to substrates with two different energies. The interfacial area was then digitized with 3D scanner. Results show that variables are all of influence on the interfacial contact in the development area. Furthermore, 3D laser scanning proved to be a good method to contact area measurement. PMID:26046982

  20. Avirulent K88 (F4)+ Escherichia coli strains constructed to express modified enterotoxins protect young piglets from challenge with a virulent enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain that expresses the same adhesion and enterotoxins.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Mateo, Kristina; Zhao, Mojun; Lin, Jun; Zhang, Weiping; Francis, David H

    2012-10-12

    Virulence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is associated with fimbrial adhesins and enterotoxins such as heat-labile (LT) and/or heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins. Previous studies using a cell culture model suggest that exclusion of ETEC from attachment to epithelial cells requires expression of both an adhesin such as K88 (F4) fimbriae, and LT. To test the ability of non-pathogenic E. coli constructs to exclude virulent ETEC sufficiently to prevent clinical disease, we utilized a piglet ETEC challenge model. Thirty-nine 5-day-old piglets were inoculated with a placebo (control), or with either of the three K88(+)E. coli strains isogenic with regard to modified LT expression: 8017 (pBR322 plasmid vector control), non-toxigenic mutant 8221 (LT(R192G)) in pBR322, or 8488, with the LT gene fused to the STb gene in pBR322 (LT(R192G)-STb). Piglets were challenged with virulent ETEC Strain 3030-2 (K88(+)/LT/STb) 24h post-inoculation. K88ac receptor-positive piglets in the control group developed diarrhea and became dehydrated 12-24h post-challenge. Piglets inoculated with 8221 or 8488 did not exhibit clinical signs of ETEC disease; most piglets inoculated with 8017 showed diarrhea. Control pigs exhibited significant weight loss, increased blood total protein, and higher numbers of colony-forming units of 3030-2 E. coli in washed ileum and jejunum than treated pigs. This study shows for the first time that pre-inoculation with an avirulent strain expressing adhesive fimbriae and a non-toxic form of LT provides significant short term protection from challenge with a virulent ETEC strain that expresses the same fimbrial adhesion and enterotoxin. PMID:22541162

  1. Strength properties of polyester mortar using PET and fly ash wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Rebeiz, K.S.; Rosett, J.W.; Craft, A.P.

    1996-04-01

    The effect of sand and fly ash on the strength properties of polyester mortar (PM) using unsaturated polyester resins based on recycled poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) plastic waste have been evaluated in this study. Useful equations were also developed to predict the strength and modulus of PM using various amounts of sand and fly ash fillers individually as well as a combination of both. This evaluation is important not only from the standpoint that waste materials are being used, but also because no information is available in this area with PM using virgin materials. The test results show that the use of fly ash and PET wastes is very beneficial for the production of good-quality and relatively low-cost PM. In addition, the utilization of these wastes in PM would help save energy and alleviate an environmental problem. The PM could be utilized in a variety of construction applications such as the overlay of pavements, dams, and industrial floors, or as an adhesive to bond materials of similar or dissimilar compositions.

  2. Study of sticky rice-lime mortar technology for the restoration of historical masonry construction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fuwei; Zhang, Bingjian; Ma, Qinglin

    2010-06-15

    Replacing or repairing masonry mortar is usually necessary in the restoration of historical constructions, but the selection of a proper mortar is often problematic. An inappropriate choice can lead to failure of the restoration work, and perhaps even further damage. Thus, a thorough understanding of the original mortar technology and the fabrication of appropriate replacement materials are important research goals. Many kinds of materials have been used over the years in masonry mortars, and the technology has gradually evolved from the single-component mortar of ancient times to hybrid versions containing several ingredients. Beginning in 2450 BCE, lime was used as masonry mortar in Europe. In the Roman era, ground volcanic ash, brick powder, and ceramic chip were added to lime mortar, greatly improving performance. Because of its superior properties, the use of this hydraulic (that is, capable of setting underwater) mortar spread, and it was adopted throughout Europe and western Asia. Perhaps because of the absence of natural materials such as volcanic ash, hydraulic mortar technology was not developed in ancient China. However, a special inorganic-organic composite building material, sticky rice-lime mortar, was developed. This technology was extensively used in important buildings, such as tombs, in urban constructions, and even in water conservancy facilities. It may be the first widespread inorganic-organic composite mortar technology in China, or even in the world. In this Account, we discuss the origins, analysis, performance, and utility in historic preservation of sticky rice-lime mortar. Mortar samples from ancient constructions were analyzed by both chemical methods (including the iodine starch test and the acid attack experiment) and instrumental methods (including thermogravimetric differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared, and scanning electron microscopy). These analytical results show that the ancient masonry

  3. Dual-Mode Adhesive Pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartz, Leslie

    1994-01-01

    Tool helps worker grip and move along large, smooth structure with no handgrips or footholds. Adheres to surface but easily released by actuating simple mechanism. Includes handle and segmented contact-adhesive pad. Bulk of pad made of soft plastic foam conforming to surface of structure. Each segment reinforced with rib. In sticking mode, ribs braced by side catches. In peeling mode, side catches retracted, and segmented adhesive pad loses its stiffness. Modified versions useful in inspecting hulls of ships and scaling walls in rescue operations.

  4. Influence of recycled fine aggregates on the resistance of mortars to magnesium sulfate attack

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung-Tae

    2009-08-15

    The influence of recycled fine aggregates, which had been reclaimed from field-demolished concretes, on the resistance of mortar specimens to magnesium sulfate attack was investigated. Mortar specimens were prepared with recycled fine aggregates at different replacement levels (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of natural fine aggregate by mass). The mortar specimens were exposed to 4.24% magnesium sulfate solution for about 1 year at ambient temperature, and regularly monitored for visual appearance, compressive strength loss and expansion. Additionally, in order to identify products of magnesium sulfate attack, mortar samples incorporating 0%, 25% and 100% replacement levels of the recycled fine aggregates were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. Experimental results confirmed that the use of recycled fine aggregates up to a maximum 50% replacement level is effective under severe magnesium sulfate environment, irrespective of type of recycled fine aggregates. However, the worse performance was observed in mortar specimens incorporating 100% replacement level. It was found that the water absorption of recycled fine aggregates affected deterioration of mortar specimens, especially at a higher replacement level. XRD results indicated that the main cause of deterioration of the mortar specimens was primarily due to the formation of gypsum and thaumasite by magnesium sulfate attack. In addition, it appeared that the conversion of C-S-H into M-S-H by the attack probably influenced mechanical deterioration of mortar specimens with recycled fine aggregates.

  5. The N-terminal SH4 region of the Src family kinase Fyn is modified by methylation and heterogeneous fatty acylation: role in membrane targeting, cell adhesion, and spreading.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiquan; Lu, Yun; Wilkes, Meredith; Neubert, Thomas A; Resh, Marilyn D

    2004-02-27

    The N-terminal SH4 domain of Src family kinases is responsible for promoting membrane binding and plasma membrane targeting. Most Src family kinases contain an N-terminal Met-Gly-Cys consensus sequence that undergoes dual acylation with myristate and palmitate after removal of methionine. Previous studies of Src family kinase fatty acylation have relied on radiolabeling of cells with radioactive fatty acids. Although this method is useful for verifying that a given fatty acid is attached to a protein, it does not reveal whether other fatty acids or other modifying groups are attached to the protein. Here we use matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry to identify fatty acylated species of the Src family kinase Fyn. Our results reveal that Fyn is efficiently myristoylated and that some of the myristoylated proteins are also heterogeneously S-acylated with palmitate, palmitoleate, stearate, or oleate. Furthermore, we show for the first time that Fyn is trimethylated at lysine residues 7 and/or 9 within its N-terminal region. Both myristoylation and palmitoylation were required for methylation of Fyn. However, a general methylation inhibitor had no inhibitory effect on myristoylation and palmitoylation of Fyn, suggesting that methylation occurs after myristoylation and palmitoylation. Lysine mutants of Fyn that could not be methylated failed to promote cell adhesion and spreading, suggesting that methylation is important for Fyn function. PMID:14660555

  6. A DNA Prime-Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Boost Vaccine Encoding Thrombospondin-Related Adhesion Protein but Not Circumsporozoite Protein Partially Protects Healthy Malaria-Naive Adults against Plasmodium falciparum Sporozoite Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Dunachie, S. J.; Walther, M.; Epstein, J. E.; Keating, S.; Berthoud, T.; Andrews, L.; Andersen, R. F.; Bejon, P.; Goonetilleke, N.; Poulton, I.; Webster, D. P.; Butcher, G.; Watkins, K.; Sinden, R. E.; Levine, G. L.; Richie, T. L.; Schneider, J.; Kaslow, D.; Gilbert, S. C.; Carucci, D. J.; Hill, A. V. S.

    2006-01-01

    The safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of DNA and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) prime-boost regimes were assessed by using either thrombospondin-related adhesion protein (TRAP) with a multiple-epitope string ME (ME-TRAP) or the circumsporozoite protein (CS) of Plasmodium falciparum. Sixteen healthy subjects who never had malaria (malaria-naive subjects) received two priming vaccinations with DNA, followed by one boosting immunization with MVA, with either ME-TRAP or CS as the antigen. Immunogenicity was assessed by ex vivo gamma interferon (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT) and antibody assay. Two weeks after the final vaccination, the subjects underwent P. falciparum sporozoite challenge, with six unvaccinated controls. The vaccines were well tolerated and immunogenic, with the DDM-ME TRAP regimen producing stronger ex vivo IFN-γ ELISPOT responses than DDM-CS. One of eight subjects receiving the DDM-ME TRAP regimen was completely protected against malaria challenge, with this group as a whole showing significant delay to parasitemia compared to controls (P = 0.045). The peak ex vivo IFN-γ ELISPOT response in this group correlated strongly with the number of days to parasitemia (P = 0.033). No protection was observed in the DDM-CS group. Prime-boost vaccination with DNA and MVA encoding ME-TRAP but not CS resulted in partial protection against P. falciparum sporozoite challenge in the present study. PMID:16988273

  7. Effect of surfactants on pressure-sensitivity of CNT filled cement mortar composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Baoguo; Yu, Xun

    2014-11-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (NaDDBS) were used as surfactants to disperse multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) in cement mortar and fabricate pressure-sensitive carbon nanotubes filled cement mortar composites. The pressure-sensitivity of cement mortar composites with different concentrations of MWNT and different surfactants was explored under repeated loading and impulsive loading, respectively. Experimental results indicate that the response of the electrical resistance of composites with NaDDBS to external force is more stable and sensitive than that of composites with SDS. Therefore, NaDDBS has higher efficiency than SDS for the dispersion of MWNT in cement mortar, and it is an effective surfactant for fabricating MWNT filled cement mortar composites with superior pressure-sensitivity.

  8. [Study on the traditional lime mortar from the memorial archway in the southern Anhui province].

    PubMed

    Wei, Guo-Feng; Sun, Sheng; Wang, Cheng-Xing; Zhang, Bing-Jian; Chen, Xi-Min

    2013-07-01

    The traditional lime mortar was investigated by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffractometry and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). The results show that the mortar from the memorial archway in the southern Anhui province was the organic-inorganic composite materials composed of lime with tung oil or sticky rice. It was found that the excellent performance of the tung oil-lime mortar can be explained by the compact lamellar organic-inorganic composite structure that was produced by carbonization reaction of lime, cross-linking reactions of tung oil and oxygen and complexing reaction of Ca2+ and -COO-. The compact micro-structure of sticky rice-lime mortar, which was produced due to carbonation process of lime controlled by amylopectin, should be the cause of the good performance of this kind of organic-inorganic mortar. PMID:24059213

  9. Mechanical resilience and cementitious processes in Imperial Roman architectural mortar.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Marie D; Landis, Eric N; Brune, Philip F; Vitti, Massimo; Chen, Heng; Li, Qinfei; Kunz, Martin; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J M; Ingraffea, Anthony R

    2014-12-30

    The pyroclastic aggregate concrete of Trajan's Markets (110 CE), now Museo Fori Imperiali in Rome, has absorbed energy from seismic ground shaking and long-term foundation settlement for nearly two millenia while remaining largely intact at the structural scale. The scientific basis of this exceptional service record is explored through computed tomography of fracture surfaces and synchroton X-ray microdiffraction analyses of a reproduction of the standardized hydrated lime-volcanic ash mortar that binds decimeter-sized tuff and brick aggregate in the conglomeratic concrete. The mortar reproduction gains fracture toughness over 180 d through progressive coalescence of calcium-aluminum-silicate-hydrate (C-A-S-H) cementing binder with Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.8-0.9 and crystallization of strätlingite and siliceous hydrogarnet (katoite) at ≥ 90 d, after pozzolanic consumption of hydrated lime was complete. Platey strätlingite crystals toughen interfacial zones along scoria perimeters and impede macroscale propagation of crack segments. In the 1,900-y-old mortar, C-A-S-H has low Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.45-0.75. Dense clusters of 2- to 30-µm strätlingite plates further reinforce interfacial zones, the weakest link of modern cement-based concrete, and the cementitious matrix. These crystals formed during long-term autogeneous reaction of dissolved calcite from lime and the alkali-rich scoriae groundmass, clay mineral (halloysite), and zeolite (phillipsite and chabazite) surface textures from the Pozzolane Rosse pyroclastic flow, erupted from the nearby Alban Hills volcano. The clast-supported conglomeratic fabric of the concrete presents further resistance to fracture propagation at the structural scale. PMID:25512521

  10. Mechanical resilience and cementitious processes in Imperial Roman architectural mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Marie D.; Landis, Eric N.; Brune, Philip F.; Vitti, Massimo; Chen, Heng; Li, Qinfei; Kunz, Martin; Wenk, Hans -Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    2014-12-15

    The pyroclastic aggregate concrete of Trajan’s Markets (110 CE), now Museo Fori Imperiali in Rome, has absorbed energy from seismic ground shaking and long-term foundation settlement for nearly two millenia while remaining largely intact at the structural scale. The scientific basis of this exceptional service record is explored through computed tomography of fracture surfaces and synchroton X-ray microdiffraction analyses of a reproduction of the standardized hydrated lime–volcanic ash mortar that binds decimeter-sized tuff and brick aggregate in the conglomeratic concrete. The mortar reproduction gains fracture toughness over 180 d through progressive coalescence of calcium–aluminum-silicate–hydrate (C-A-S-H) cementing binder with Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.8–0.9 and crystallization of strätlingite and siliceous hydrogarnet (katoite) at ≥90 d, after pozzolanic consumption of hydrated lime was complete. Platey strätlingite crystals toughen interfacial zones along scoria perimeters and impede macroscale propagation of crack segments. In the 1,900 year old mortar, C-A-S-H has low Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.45–0.75. Dense clusters of 2- to 30-µm strätlingite plates further reinforce interfacial zones, the weakest link of modern cement-based concrete, and the cementitious matrix. These crystals formed during long-term autogeneous reaction of dissolved calcite from lime and the alkali-rich scoriae groundmass, clay mineral (halloysite), and zeolite (phillipsite and chabazite) surface textures from the Pozzolane Rosse pyroclastic flow, erupted from the nearby Alban Hills volcano. The clast-supported conglomeratic fabric of the concrete presents further resistance to fracture propagation at the structural scale.

  11. Mechanical resilience and cementitious processes in Imperial Roman architectural mortar

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jackson, Marie D.; Landis, Eric N.; Brune, Philip F.; Vitti, Massimo; Chen, Heng; Li, Qinfei; Kunz, Martin; Wenk, Hans -Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    2014-12-15

    The pyroclastic aggregate concrete of Trajan’s Markets (110 CE), now Museo Fori Imperiali in Rome, has absorbed energy from seismic ground shaking and long-term foundation settlement for nearly two millenia while remaining largely intact at the structural scale. The scientific basis of this exceptional service record is explored through computed tomography of fracture surfaces and synchroton X-ray microdiffraction analyses of a reproduction of the standardized hydrated lime–volcanic ash mortar that binds decimeter-sized tuff and brick aggregate in the conglomeratic concrete. The mortar reproduction gains fracture toughness over 180 d through progressive coalescence of calcium–aluminum-silicate–hydrate (C-A-S-H) cementing binder with Ca/(Si+Al) ≈more » 0.8–0.9 and crystallization of strätlingite and siliceous hydrogarnet (katoite) at ≥90 d, after pozzolanic consumption of hydrated lime was complete. Platey strätlingite crystals toughen interfacial zones along scoria perimeters and impede macroscale propagation of crack segments. In the 1,900 year old mortar, C-A-S-H has low Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.45–0.75. Dense clusters of 2- to 30-µm strätlingite plates further reinforce interfacial zones, the weakest link of modern cement-based concrete, and the cementitious matrix. These crystals formed during long-term autogeneous reaction of dissolved calcite from lime and the alkali-rich scoriae groundmass, clay mineral (halloysite), and zeolite (phillipsite and chabazite) surface textures from the Pozzolane Rosse pyroclastic flow, erupted from the nearby Alban Hills volcano. The clast-supported conglomeratic fabric of the concrete presents further resistance to fracture propagation at the structural scale.« less

  12. Mechanical resilience and cementitious processes in Imperial Roman architectural mortar

    PubMed Central

    Landis, Eric N.; Brune, Philip F.; Vitti, Massimo; Chen, Heng; Li, Qinfei; Kunz, Martin; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    2014-01-01

    The pyroclastic aggregate concrete of Trajan’s Markets (110 CE), now Museo Fori Imperiali in Rome, has absorbed energy from seismic ground shaking and long-term foundation settlement for nearly two millenia while remaining largely intact at the structural scale. The scientific basis of this exceptional service record is explored through computed tomography of fracture surfaces and synchroton X-ray microdiffraction analyses of a reproduction of the standardized hydrated lime–volcanic ash mortar that binds decimeter-sized tuff and brick aggregate in the conglomeratic concrete. The mortar reproduction gains fracture toughness over 180 d through progressive coalescence of calcium–aluminum-silicate–hydrate (C-A-S-H) cementing binder with Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.8–0.9 and crystallization of strätlingite and siliceous hydrogarnet (katoite) at ≥90 d, after pozzolanic consumption of hydrated lime was complete. Platey strätlingite crystals toughen interfacial zones along scoria perimeters and impede macroscale propagation of crack segments. In the 1,900-y-old mortar, C-A-S-H has low Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.45–0.75. Dense clusters of 2- to 30-µm strätlingite plates further reinforce interfacial zones, the weakest link of modern cement-based concrete, and the cementitious matrix. These crystals formed during long-term autogeneous reaction of dissolved calcite from lime and the alkali-rich scoriae groundmass, clay mineral (halloysite), and zeolite (phillipsite and chabazite) surface textures from the Pozzolane Rosse pyroclastic flow, erupted from the nearby Alban Hills volcano. The clast-supported conglomeratic fabric of the concrete presents further resistance to fracture propagation at the structural scale. PMID:25512521

  13. Thermographic measurement of the effect of humidity in mortar porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poblete, A.; Acebes Pascual, M.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this analysis is to examine the influence of the moisture in the porosity measurement by means of thermal non-destructive test and ultrasound techniques. It is possible to determine the concrete durability by the calculation of its porosity. Porosity is determined in an indirect way, measuring mortar diffusivity by means of active thermography. Using ultrasound techniques, the porosity is related with the ultrasonic propagation of velocity. The diffusivity has been calculated using the W.J. Parker equation. In the ultrasound technique, using the pulse transmission method, ultrasonic propagation velocity was measured as a function of the water content. The conclusions express the correlation between both methods.

  14. Differentiating seawater and groundwater sulfate attack in Portland cement mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Santhanam, Manu . E-mail: manus@iitm.ac.in; Cohen, Menashi; Olek, Jan

    2006-12-15

    The study reported in this article deals with understanding the physical, chemical and microstructural differences in sulfate attack from seawater and groundwater. Portland cement mortars were completely immersed in solutions of seawater and groundwater. Physical properties such as length, mass, and compressive strength were monitored periodically. Thermal analysis was used to study the relative amounts of phases such as ettringite, gypsum, and calcium hydroxide, and microstructural studies were conducted by scanning electron microscopy. Portland cement mortars performed better in seawater solution compared to groundwater solution. The difference in performance could be attributed to the reduction in the quantity of the expansive attack products (gypsum and ettringite). The high Cl concentration of seawater could have played an important role by binding the C{sub 3}A to form chloroaluminate compounds, such as Friedel's salt (detected in the microstructural studies), and also by lowering the expansive potential of ettringite. Furthermore, the thicker layer of brucite forming on the specimens in seawater could have afforded better protection against ingress of the solution than in groundwater.

  15. Laboratory evaluation of adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Barkmeier, W W; Cooley, R L

    1992-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of resin materials to acid-conditioned enamel is a clinically proven technique in preventative, restorative, and orthodontic procedures. Laboratory evaluations of etched-enamel resin bonding have shown excellent bond strengths and the virtual elimination of marginal microleakage. Adhesion to dentin has been more of a challenge. Earlier-generation dentin bonding systems did not yield high bond strengths in the laboratory or prevent marginal microleakage. Newer-generation adhesive systems generally use a dentin conditioner to modify or remove the smear layer and a subsequent application of an adhesive resin bonding agent. Laboratory evaluations of newer systems have shown bond strengths that approach or actually exceed that of etched enamel resin bonding. Bond strengths have improved with the evolution of dentin bonding systems, and microleakage from the cementum/dentin margin has been significantly reduced or prevented with the newer systems. Although laboratory testing of adhesive systems provides a mechanism to screen and compare newly developed systems, clinical trials are essential to document long-term clinical performance. PMID:1470553

  16. Effect of copolymer latexes on physicomechanical properties of mortar containing high volume fly ash as a replacement material of cement.

    PubMed

    Negim, El-Sayed; Kozhamzharova, Latipa; Gulzhakhan, Yeligbayeva; Khatib, Jamal; Bekbayeva, Lyazzat; Williams, Craig

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the physicomechanical properties of mortar containing high volume of fly ash (FA) as partial replacement of cement in presence of copolymer latexes. Portland cement (PC) was partially replaced with 0, 10, 20, 30 50, and 60% FA. Copolymer latexes were used based on 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate (2-HEA) and 2-hydroxymethylacrylate (2-HEMA). Testing included workability, setting time, absorption, chemically combined water content, compressive strength, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The addition of FA to mortar as replacement of PC affected the physicomechanical properties of mortar. As the content of FA in the concrete increased, the setting times (initial and final) were elongated. The results obtained at 28 days of curing indicate that the maximum properties of mortar occur at around 30% FA. Beyond 30% FA the properties of mortar reduce and at 60% FA the properties of mortar are lower than those of the reference mortar without FA. However, the addition of polymer latexes into mortar containing FA improved most of the physicomechanical properties of mortar at all curing times. Compressive strength, combined water, and workability of mortar containing FA premixed with latexes are higher than those of mortar containing FA without latexes. PMID:25254256

  17. Effect of Copolymer Latexes on Physicomechanical Properties of Mortar Containing High Volume Fly Ash as a Replacement Material of Cement

    PubMed Central

    Kozhamzharova, Latipa; Gulzhakhan, Yeligbayeva; Bekbayeva, Lyazzat; Williams, Craig

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the physicomechanical properties of mortar containing high volume of fly ash (FA) as partial replacement of cement in presence of copolymer latexes. Portland cement (PC) was partially replaced with 0, 10, 20, 30 50, and 60% FA. Copolymer latexes were used based on 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate (2-HEA) and 2-hydroxymethylacrylate (2-HEMA). Testing included workability, setting time, absorption, chemically combined water content, compressive strength, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The addition of FA to mortar as replacement of PC affected the physicomechanical properties of mortar. As the content of FA in the concrete increased, the setting times (initial and final) were elongated. The results obtained at 28 days of curing indicate that the maximum properties of mortar occur at around 30% FA. Beyond 30% FA the properties of mortar reduce and at 60% FA the properties of mortar are lower than those of the reference mortar without FA. However, the addition of polymer latexes into mortar containing FA improved most of the physicomechanical properties of mortar at all curing times. Compressive strength, combined water, and workability of mortar containing FA premixed with latexes are higher than those of mortar containing FA without latexes. PMID:25254256

  18. Compatibility study and adaption of stone repair mortars for the Lede stone (Belgium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Kock, T.; Vandevoorde, D.; Boone, M. A.; Dewanckele, J.; De Boever, W.; Lanzón, M.; De Schutter, G.; Van Hoorebeke, L.; Jacobs, P.; Cnudde, V.

    2012-04-01

    One of the main historic building materials in northern Belgium is the Lede stone. This arenaceous limestone from Lutetian age was excavated in the region of Ghent and Brussels and was transported northwards by main rivers such as the Scheldt and Zenne. Thanks to this natural transport route, the stone in also found in many cities which lie abroad the excavation area, such as Antwerp (Belgium) and various cities in the Netherlands (Breda, Zierikzee, …). Due to its dominant occurrence in our cultural heritage, it is frequently subjected to restoration and renovation works. Depending on the degree of decay, most frequent stone operations are cleaning, healing with mortar or replacing it by (often exotic) fresh blocks. Originally, this limestone has a greenish-gray colour, but when being exposed to atmospheric conditions it acquires a yellowish to rusty coloured patina. The origin of the latter is most likely the oxidation of glauconite minerals which are present in a few percent in the stone. In addition, the stone often demonstrates black crust formation due to sulphation. Cleaning of the stone often results in an excess removal of this black gypsum crusts and patina, thus exposing deeper parts of the stone which appear more greenish-gray again. When the stone is subsequently healed by adding repair mortar to damaged parts, the question rises which mortar colour is more appropriate. The choice of repair mortar is greatly depending on commercial aspects. When handling entire facades on monuments, a mineral mortar based on ZnCl is most often applied in Belgium. The big advantage of this mortar is its fast curing. Three colour types have been developed for the Lede stone in specific. However, the hardness of this mortar is sometimes in conflict with reversibility. For the handling of individual sculptures some conservators choose for the application of (hydraulic) lime mortars. The advantage of using such mortars is their high compatibility and reversibility. The

  19. Resistance of biofilm-covered mortars to microbiologically influenced deterioration simulated by sulfuric acid exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Soleimani, Sahar Isgor, O. Burkan Ormeci, Banu

    2013-11-15

    Following the reported success of biofilm applications on metal surfaces to inhibit microbiologically influenced corrosion, effectiveness and sustainability of E. coli DH5α biofilm on mortar surface to prevent microbiologically influenced concrete deterioration (MICD) are investigated. Experiments simulating microbial attack were carried out by exposing incrementally biofilm-covered mortar specimens to sulfuric acid solutions with pH ranging from 3 to 6. Results showed that calcium concentration in control reactors without biofilm was 23–47% higher than the reactors with biofilm-covered mortar. Formation of amorphous silica gel as an indication of early stages of acid attack was observed only on the control mortar specimens without biofilm. During acidification, the biofilm continued to grow and its thickness almost doubled from ∼ 30 μm before acidification to ∼ 60 μm after acidification. These results demonstrated that E. coli DH5α biofilm was able to provide a protective and sustainable barrier on mortar surfaces against medium to strong sulfuric acid attack. -- Highlights: •Effectiveness of E.coli DH5α biofilm to prevent MICD was studied. •Conditions that lead to MICD were simulated by chemical acidification. •Biofilm-covered mortar specimens were exposed to sulfuric acid solutions. •The presence of biofilm helped reduce the chemically-induced mortar deterioration. •Biofilm remained alive and continued to grow during the acidification process.

  20. Use of limestone obtained from waste of the mussel cannery industry for the production of mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Ballester, Paloma; Marmol, Isabel; Morales, Julian; Sanchez, Luis . E-mail: luis-sanchez@uco.es

    2007-04-15

    Various types of cement-SiO{sub 2}-CaCO{sub 3} mortar were prepared by replacing quarry limestone aggregate with limestone obtained as a by-product from waste of the mussel cannery industry. The CaCO{sub 3} aggregate consists mainly of elongated prismatic particles less than 4 {mu}m long rather than of the rounded particles of smaller size (2-6 {mu}m) obtained with quarry limestone. The mechanical and structural properties of the mortars were found to be influenced by aggregate morphology. Setting of the different types of mortar after variable curing times was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TG) and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) techniques. Mortars with a high content in mussel shell limestone exhibited a more packed microstructure, which facilitates setting of cement and results in improved mortar strength. The enhanced mechanical properties of the new mortars allow the cement content in the final mortar composition to be decreased and production costs to be reduced as a result.

  1. Reuse of de-inking sludge from wastepaper recycling in cement mortar products.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shiqin; Sagoe-Crentsil, Kwesi; Shapiro, Gretta

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents results of an investigation into the use of de-inking sludge from a paper recycling mill as feedstock material in the manufacture of cement mortar products, including masonry blocks and mortar renders. Both physical and mechanical properties of mortar specimens containing various amounts of de-inking sludge were investigated. It was observed that the addition of de-inking sludge to cement mortar at a fixed water-to-cement ratio significantly reduced flow properties and increased setting time. Water absorption and volume of permeable voids of cement mortar increased with increased dosage of de-inking sludge, with a corresponding reduction of bulk density. The 91-day compressive strength of mortar samples with 2.5 wt% and 20 wt% de-inking sludge loadings retained 83% and 62% respectively of the reference mortar strength. The corresponding drying shrinkage increased by up to 160% compared to reference samples. However, a de-inking sludge loading of up to 2.5 wt% did not significantly alter measured physical and mechanical properties. The results demonstrate that despite the high moisture absorbance of de-inking sludge due to its organic matter and residual cellulose fibre content, it serves as a potential supplementary additive and its cellulosic content proving to be an active set retardant to cementitious masonry products. PMID:21507557

  2. Carbonation and pH in mortars manufactured with supplementary cementitious materials

    SciTech Connect

    McPolin, D.O.; Basheer, P.A.M.; Long, A.E.

    2009-05-15

    An investigation of carbonation in mortars and methods of measuring the degree of carbonation and pH change is presented. The mortars were manufactured using ordinary portland cement, pulverized fuel ash, ground granulated blast-furnace slag, metakaolin, and microsilica. The mortars were exposed to a carbon dioxide-rich environment (5% CO{sub 2}) to accelerate carbonation. The resulting carbonation was measured using phenolphthalein indicator and thermogravimetric analysis. The pH of the pore fluid and a powdered sample, extracted from the mortar, was measured to give an accurate indication of the actual pH of the concrete. The pH of the extracted powder mortar sample was found to be similar to the pH of the pore fluid expressed from the mortars. The thermogravimetric analysis suggested two distinct regions of transport of CO{sub 2} within mortar, a surface region where convection was prevalent and a deeper region where diffusion was dominant. The use of microsilica has been shown to decrease the rate of carbonation, while pulverized fuel ash and ground granulated blast-furnace slag have a detrimental effect on carbonation. Metakaolin has little effect on carbonation.

  3. AMS radiocarbon dating of mortar: The case study of the medieval UNESCO site of Modena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmine, Lubritto; Caroselli, Marta; Lugli, Stefano; Marzaioli, Fabio; Nonni, Sara; Marchetti Dori, S.; Terrasi, Filippo

    2015-10-01

    The carbon dioxide contributing to binder formation during the set of a lime mortar reflects the atmospheric 14C content at the time of construction of a building. For this reason, the 14C dating of mortars is used with increasing frequencies in archaeological and architectural research. Mortars, however, may also contain carbonaceous contaminants potentially affecting radiocarbon dating. The Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental heritage (CIRCE) of the Second University of Naples (SUN) has recently obtained some promising results in mortar radiocarbon dating thanks to the development of a procedure (i.e. CryoSoniC/Cryo2SoniC) aiming to eliminate exogenous C contamination that may occur in a mortar. The construction history of the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Modena (Italy) is still controversial and represents a challenging case study for the application of absolute dating methodologies for different reasons. From the point of view of 14C dating, for example, given the high percentage of carbonate aggregates composing these samples, Modena mortars represent an experimental test particularly indicative of exogenous carbon sources suppression ensuring methodology accuracy. In this paper several AMS Radiocarbon dates were carried out on lime lumps with the aim to: (i) verify procedure accuracy by a comparison of the results obtainable from lime lumps dated after different treatments (i.e. bulk lime lumps vs. CryoSoniC purified lime lumps); (ii) compare different building phases absolute chronology for the medieval UNESCO site of Modena, with that assumed by historical sources in order to assess preliminary the 14C dating feasibility for of the site. Historical temporal constraints and mortar clustering, based on petrography, have been applied to define a temporal framework of the analyzed structure. Moreover, a detailed petrographic characterization of mortars was used both as a preliminary tool for the choice of samples and to infer about the

  4. Thermal Characterization of Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spomer, Ken A.

    1999-01-01

    The current Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle adhesive bond system is being replaced due to obsolescence. Down-selection and performance testing of the structural adhesives resulted in the selection of two candidate replacement adhesives, Resin Technology Group's Tiga 321 and 3M's EC2615XLW. This paper describes rocket motor testing of these two adhesives. Four forty-pound charge motors were fabricated in configurations that would allow side by side comparison testing of the candidate replacement adhesives and the current RSRM adhesives. The motors provided an environment where the thermal performance of adhesives in flame surface bondlines was compared. Results of the FPC testing show that: 1) The phenolic char depths on radial bond lines is approximately the same and vary depending on the position in the blast tube regardless of which adhesive was used; 2) The adhesive char depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the char depth of the current adhesives; 3) The heat-affected depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the heat-affected depth of the current adhesives; and 4) The ablation rates for both replacement adhesives are slower than that of the current adhesives.

  5. Thermo-mechanical properties of polyester mortar using recycled PET

    SciTech Connect

    Rebeiz, K.S.; Craft, A.P.

    1997-07-01

    The thermo-mechanical properties of polyester mortar (PM) using unsaturated polyester resins based on recycled PET are investigated in this paper (the recycled PET waste is mainly obtained from used plastic beverage bottles). The use of recycled PET in PM formulation is important because it helps produce good quality PM at a relatively low cost, save energy and alleviate an environmental problem posed by plastic wastes. PM construction applications include the repair of dams, piers, runways, bridges and other structures. Test results show that the effective use of PM overlays on portland cement concrete slabs is best achieved by utilizing flexible resins with low modulus and high elongation capacity at failure. The use of flexible resins in PM production is especially important in situations involving large thermal movements.

  6. Mineralogical and microstructural studies of mortars from the bath complex of the Roman villa rustica near Mosnje (Slovenia)

    SciTech Connect

    Kramar, Sabina; Zalar, Vesna; Urosevic, Maja; Mauko, Alenka; Mirtic, Breda; Lux, Judita; Mladenovic, Ana

    2011-11-15

    This study deals with the characterization of mortars collected from bath complex of the Roman villa rustica from an archeological site near Mosnje (Slovenia). The mortar layers of the mosaics, wall paintings and mortar floors were investigated. A special aggregate consisting of brick fragments was present in the mortars studied. The mineralogical and petrographic compositions of the mortars were determined by means of optical microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and FTIR spectroscopy. Analysis of aggregate-binder interfaces using SEM-EDS revealed various types of reactivity rims. In order to assess the hydraulic characteristics of the mortars, the acid-soluble fractions were determined by ICP-OES. Furthermore, the results of Hg-porosimetry and gas sorption isotherms showed that mortars with a higher content of brick fragments particles exhibited a higher porosity and a greater BET surface area but a lower average pore diameter compared to mortars lacking this special aggregate. - Highlights: {yields} Mineral and microstructural characterizations of brick-lime mortars. {yields} Hydraulic character of mortars in Roman baths complex. {yields} Reaction rims were observed around brick fragments and dolomitic grains. {yields} Higher content of brick particles yielded a higher BET surface area. {yields} Addition of brick particles increased porosity and diminished pore size diameter.

  7. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    H. G. Silverman; F. F. Roberto

    2007-12-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are waterimpervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion.

  8. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Francisco F.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  9. Understanding marine mussel adhesion.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Heather G; Roberto, Francisco F

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  10. Effects of Surfactants on the Properties of Mortar Containing Styrene/Methacrylate Superplasticizer

    PubMed Central

    Negim, El-Sayed; Kozhamzharova, Latipa; Khatib, Jamal; Bekbayeva, Lyazzat; Williams, Craig

    2014-01-01

    The physical and mechanical properties of mortar containing synthetic cosurfactants as air entraining agent are investigated. The cosurfactants consist of a combination of 2% dodecyl benzene sodium sulfonate (DBSS) and either 1.5% polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) or 1.5% polyoxyethylene glycol monomethyl ether (POE). Also these cosurfactants were used to prepare copolymers latex: styrene/butyl methacrylate (St/BuMA), styrene/methyl methacrylate (St/MMA), and styrene/glycidyl methacrylate (St/GMA), in order to study their effects on the properties of mortar. The properties of mortar examined included flow table, W/C ratio, setting time, water absorption, compressive strength, and combined water. The results indicate that the latex causes improvement in mortar properties compared with cosurfactants. Also polymer latex containing DBSS/POE is more effective than that containing DBSS/PVA. PMID:24955426

  11. Practical Issues Associated with Mortar Projections in Large Deformation Contact/Impact Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Laursen, T A; Puso, M A; Heinstein, M W

    2002-05-02

    Several recent works have considered variants of the mortar-finite element method for numerical treatment of contact phenomena. The method has shown considerable promise for the spatial discretization of contact interactions, particularly for kinematically linear applications where one or both of the contacting surfaces are flat. Desirable features already demonstrated for the method in this specialized setting include passage of patch tests, preservation of convergence rates that would be obtained with a perfectly conforming mesh, and accurate resolution of contact stresses on interfaces. This paper concerns itself with the successful extension of these methods to encompass contact of geometrically noncoincident surfaces. The issue of patch test passage over curved interfaces will be discussed. It will be shown that a generalization of the mortar projection method is required to pass patch tests in this instance. Issues relating to the exact numerical integration of the mortar projection integrals will also be outlined, and a convergence study for a mortar tying application will be presented.

  12. Mineralogical characterization of rendering mortars from decorative details of a baroque building in Kozuchow (SW Poland)

    SciTech Connect

    Bartz, W.; Filar, T.

    2010-01-15

    Optical microscopic observations, scanning electron microscopy and microprobe with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray diffraction and differential thermal/thermogravimetric analysis allowed detailed characterization of rendering mortars from decorative details (figures of Saints) of a baroque building in Kozuchow (Lubuskie Voivodship, Western Poland). Two separate coats of rendering mortars have been distinguished, differing in composition of their filler. The under coat mortar has filler composed of coarse-grained siliceous sand, whereas the finishing one has much finer grained filler, dominated by a mixture of charcoal and Fe-smelting slag, with minor amounts of quartz grains. Both mortars have air-hardening binder composed of gypsum and micritic calcite, exhibiting microcrystalline structure.

  13. Tracing formation and durability of calcite in a Punic-Roman cistern mortar (Pantelleria Island, Italy).

    PubMed

    Dietzel, Martin; Schön, Frerich; Heinrichs, Jens; Deditius, Artur P; Leis, Albrecht

    2016-01-01

    Ancient hydraulic lime mortar preserves chemical and isotopic signatures that provide important information about historical processing and its durability. The distribution and isotopic composition of calcite in a mortar of a well-preserved Punic-Roman cistern at Pantelleria Island (Italy) was used to trace the formation conditions, durability, and individual processing periods of the cistern mortar. The analyses of stable carbon and oxygen isotopes of calcite revealed four individual horizons, D, E, B-1 and B-2, of mortar from the top to the bottom of the cistern floor. Volcanic and ceramic aggregates were used for the production of the mortar of horizons E/D and B-1/B-2, respectively. All horizons comprise hydraulic lime mortar characterized by a mean cementation index of 1.5 ± 1, and a constant binder to aggregate ratio of 0.31 ± 0.01. This suggests standardized and highly effective processing of the cistern. The high durability of calcite formed during carbonation of slaked lime within the matrix of the ancient mortar, and thus the excellent resistance of the hydraulic lime mortar against water, was documented by (i) a distinct positive correlation of δ(18)Ocalcite and δ(13)Ccalcite; typical for carbonation through a mortar horizon, (ii) a characteristic evolution of δ(18)Ocalcite and δ(13)Ccalcite through each of the four mortar horizons; lighter follow heavier isotopic values from upper to lower part of the cistern floor, and (iii) δ(18)Ocalcite varying from -10 to -5 ‰ Vienna Pee Dee belemnite (VPDB). The range of δ(18)Ocalcite values rule out recrystallization and/or neoformation of calcite through chemical attack of water stored in cistern. The combined studies of the chemical composition of the binder and the isotopic composition of the calcite in an ancient mortar provide powerful tools for elucidating the ancient techniques and processing periods. This approach helps to evaluate the durability of primary calcite and demonstrates the

  14. Effect of dry deposition of pollutants on the degradation of lime mortars with sepiolite

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Ramirez, S.; Thompson, G.E.; Puertas, F.; Blanco-Varela, M.T.

    1998-01-01

    The behavior of lime mortars containing sepiolite or sepiolite plus pentaclorophenol in atmospheric simulation chambers has been studied. The pollutant gases used in this study have been NO, NO{sub 2}, and SO{sub 2}. The studies have been done in wet and dry conditions as well as with and without ozone. In the case of NO and NO{sub 2}, the aggressive agent would be HNO{sub 3}, which reacts with lime mortar binder CaCO{sub 3}, producing Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} formation. On this process, the influence of the presence of an oxidant as well as water has been studied. The catalyst effect of the oxidation is known to be accelerated by water presence, so mortars exposed to NO + O{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O and NO{sub 2} + O{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O environments undergo a greater salts formation than those exposed to the rest of he aggressive media. The three mortars` behaviors are similar and independent of their composition, producing small amount of salts in every case. When SO{sub 2} is the gas used, the aggressive agent of mortar will be H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} that reacts with mortar binder, CaCO{sub 3} to produce calcium sulfate in the form of gypsum. Oxidant and/or water influence has been studied, and the (SO{sub 2} + O{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O) chamber was found to be the one with greater aggressivity to mortars. However, in these conditions, sepiolite presence within the mortars delayed gypsum formation.

  15. Utilization of ground waste seashells in cement mortars for masonry and plastering.

    PubMed

    Lertwattanaruk, Pusit; Makul, Natt; Siripattarapravat, Chalothorn

    2012-11-30

    In this research, four types of waste seashells, including short-necked clam, green mussel, oyster, and cockle, were investigated experimentally to develop a cement product for masonry and plastering. The parameters studied included water demand, setting time, compressive strength, drying shrinkage and thermal conductivity of the mortars. These properties were compared with those of a control mortar that was made of a conventional Portland cement. The main parameter of this study was the proportion of ground seashells used as cement replacement (5%, 10%, 15%, or 20% by weight). Incorporation of ground seashells resulted in reduced water demand and extended setting times of the mortars, which are advantages for rendering and plastering in hot climates. All mortars containing ground seashells yielded adequate strength, less shrinkage with drying and lower thermal conductivity compared to the conventional cement. The results indicate that ground seashells can be applied as a cement replacement in mortar mixes and may improve the workability of rendering and plastering mortar. PMID:22841935

  16. A Study on the Properties of Carbon Black Mortar Using Granulated Blast Furnace Slag and Polymer.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hong-Seok; Jeon, Ui-Hyeon; So, Seung-Young

    2015-11-01

    White Portland Cement (WPC) and inorganic pigment have been used in colored concrete, but there are some physical problems such as increases in efflorescence, and poor workability and low economics. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of GBFS and polymer (methyl cellulose) on the physical properties of carbon black mortar. For this purpose, a flow test, compressive strength test and color evaluation and was carried out on cement mortar mixed with polymer by changing the proportion of cement and ratio of GBFS. The results show that the addition of polymer influences significantly the color value efficiency in colored mortar. This is due to the reduction of overall amount of micro pore. This polymer films prevent the transport of soluble calcium towards the surface, and decreases efflorescence. And the flow of colored mortar was increased in proportion to the addition rate of the GBFS. In addition the strength of colored mortars with GBFS at the long-term aged (after 28 days) was higher than that of the general WPC mortar, although its strength was developed slowly at the early ages. PMID:26726652

  17. Concretes and mortars with waste paper industry: Biomass ash and dregs.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lage, Isabel; Velay-Lizancos, Miriam; Vázquez-Burgo, Pablo; Rivas-Fernández, Marcos; Vázquez-Herrero, Cristina; Ramírez-Rodríguez, Antonio; Martín-Cano, Miguel

    2016-10-01

    This article describes a study on the viability of using waste from the paper industry: biomass boiler ash and green liquor dregs to fabricate mortars and concretes. Both types of ash were characterized by obtaining their chemical and mineralogical composition, their organic matter content, granulometry, adsorption and other common tests for construction materials. Seven different mortars were fabricated, one for reference made up of cement, sand, and water, three in which 10, 20, or 30% of the cement was replaced by biomass ash, and three others in which 10, 20, or 30% of the cement was replaced with dregs. Test specimens were fabricated with these mortars to conduct flexural and compression tests. Flexural strength is reduced for all the mortars studied. Compressive strength increases for the mortars fabricated with biomass ash and decreases for the mortar with dregs. Finally, 5 concretes were made, one of them as a reference (neither biomass ash nor dregs added), two of them with replacements of 10 and 20% of biomass ash instead of cement and another two with replacements of 10 and 20% of dregs instead of cement. The compressive and tensile splitting strength increase when a 10% of ash is replaced and decrease in all the other cases. The modulus of elasticity always decreases. PMID:27397843

  18. The Effect of Mortar Grade and Thickness on the Impact Resistance of Ferrocement Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che Muda, Zakaria; Syamsir, Agusril; Nasharuddin Mustapha, Kamal; Sulleman, Sorefan; Beddu, Salmia; Thiruchelvam, Sivadass; Ismail, Firas B.; Usman, Fathoni; Liyana Mohd Kamal, Nur; Ashraful Alam, Md; Birima, Ahmed H.; Itam, Zarina; Zaroog, O. S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigate the effect of the thickness and mesh spacing on the impact of ferrocement for the concrete slab of 300mm × 300mm size reinforced subjected to low impact projectile test. A self-fabricated drop-weight impact test rig with a steel ball weight of 1.236 kg drop at height of 150 mm, 350mm, and 500mm has been used in this research work. The objective of this research is to study the relationship of impact resistance of ferrocement against the mortar grade and slab thickness. There is a good linear correlation between impact resistance of ferrocement against the mortar grade and the thickness of ferrocement slab. The first and ultimate crack impact resistance of mortar grade 43 (for 40 mm thick slab with mesh reinforcement) are 1.60 times and 1.53 times respectively against the mortar grade 17 slab (of same thickness with mesh reinforcement). The first and ultimate crack impact resistance for 40 mm thick slab (mortar grade 43 with mesh reinforcement) are 3.55 times and 4.49 times respectively against the 20 mm thick slab (of same mortar grade with mesh reinforcement).

  19. Use of Artificial Neural Network for the Simulation of Radon Emission Concentration of Granulated Blast Furnace Slag Mortar.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hong-Seok; Xing, Shuli; Lee, Malrey; Lee, Young-Keun; So, Seung-Young

    2016-05-01

    In this study, an artificial neural networks study was carried out to predict the quantity of radon of Granulated Blast Furnace Slag (GBFS) cement mortar. A data set of a laboratory work, in which a total of 3 mortars were produced, was utilized in the Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) study. The mortar mixture parameters were three different GBFS ratios (0%, 20%, 40%). Measurement radon of moist cured specimens was measured at 3, 10, 30, 100, 365 days by sensing technology for continuous monitoring of indoor air quality (IAQ). ANN model is constructed, trained and tested using these data. The data used in the ANN model are arranged in a format of two input parameters that cover the cement, GBFS and age of samples and, an output parameter which is concentrations of radon emission of mortar. The results showed that ANN can be an alternative approach for the predicting the radon concentration of GBFS mortar using mortar ingredients as input parameters. PMID:27483913

  20. Adhesive behavior of aluminum layers evaporated on polyester films

    SciTech Connect

    Vallat, M.F.; Haidara, H.; Ziegler, P.; Rey, D.; Papirer, Y.; Schultz, J.

    1996-01-01

    The adhesive performance of thin aluminum coatings deposited onto polymer substrates is considered. The effects of the evaporation conditions and the metal thickness on the adhesive properties of polyester/aluminum assemblies are examined. A ultrasonic test for adherence measurements of thin metal layers is proposed and its shown that a thermal treatment under stress modifies the adhesive properties of such metallized polymer films. (AIP) {copyright}{ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    DOEpatents

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  2. Metal-Filled Adhesives Amenable To X-Ray Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermansen, Ralph D.; Sutherland, Thomas H.; Predmore, Roamer

    1994-01-01

    Adhesive joints between metal parts made amenable to nondestructive radiographic inspection by incorporating radiopaque fillers that increase x-ray contrasts of joints. Adhesives can be epoxies, urethanes, acrylics, phenolics, or silicones, with appropriate curing agents and with such modifiers as polysulfides, polyamides, or butadiene rubbers.

  3. Nondestructive testing of adhesive bonds by nuclear quadrupole resonance method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewitt, R. R.

    1971-01-01

    Inert, strain sensitive tracer, cuprous oxide, added to polymeric adhesive ensures sufficiently large signal to noise ratio in NQR system output. Method is successful, provided that RF-transparent structural materials are used between modified adhesive and probe of NQR spectrometer.

  4. Parallel 3D Mortar Element Method for Adaptive Nonconforming Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Huiyu; Mavriplis, Catherine; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Biswas, Rupak

    2004-01-01

    High order methods are frequently used in computational simulation for their high accuracy. An efficient way to avoid unnecessary computation in smooth regions of the solution is to use adaptive meshes which employ fine grids only in areas where they are needed. Nonconforming spectral elements allow the grid to be flexibly adjusted to satisfy the computational accuracy requirements. The method is suitable for computational simulations of unsteady problems with very disparate length scales or unsteady moving features, such as heat transfer, fluid dynamics or flame combustion. In this work, we select the Mark Element Method (MEM) to handle the non-conforming interfaces between elements. A new technique is introduced to efficiently implement MEM in 3-D nonconforming meshes. By introducing an "intermediate mortar", the proposed method decomposes the projection between 3-D elements and mortars into two steps. In each step, projection matrices derived in 2-D are used. The two-step method avoids explicitly forming/deriving large projection matrices for 3-D meshes, and also helps to simplify the implementation. This new technique can be used for both h- and p-type adaptation. This method is applied to an unsteady 3-D moving heat source problem. With our new MEM implementation, mesh adaptation is able to efficiently refine the grid near the heat source and coarsen the grid once the heat source passes. The savings in computational work resulting from the dynamic mesh adaptation is demonstrated by the reduction of the the number of elements used and CPU time spent. MEM and mesh adaptation, respectively, bring irregularity and dynamics to the computer memory access pattern. Hence, they provide a good way to gauge the performance of computer systems when running scientific applications whose memory access patterns are irregular and unpredictable. We select a 3-D moving heat source problem as the Unstructured Adaptive (UA) grid benchmark, a new component of the NAS Parallel

  5. Effects of the restoration mortar on chalk stone buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ion, R. M.; Teodorescu, S.; Ştirbescu, R. M.; Dulamă, I. D.; Şuică-Bunghez, I. R.; Bucurică, I. A.; Fierăscu, R. C.; Fierscu, I.; Ion, M. L.

    2016-06-01

    The monument buildings as components of cultural heritage are exposed to degradation of surfaces and chemical and mechanical degradation, often associated to soiling and irreversible deterioration of the building. In many conservative and restorative works, a cement-based mortar was used without knowing all the adverse effects of this material on the building. This paper deals with the study of the effects of natural cement used in restorative works in the particular case of the Basarabi-Murfatlar Churches Ensemble. Cement-based materials exposed to sulfate present in the chalk stone - gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O), can induce signs of deterioration, due to ettringite ([Ca3Al (OH)612H2O]2(SO4)32H2O) or thaumasite (Ca3[Si(OH)612H2O](CO3)SO4) formation. These phases contribute to strain within the material, inducing expansion, strength loss, spalling and severe degradation. Several combined techniques (XRD, EDXRF, ICP-AES, SEM, EDS, sulphates content, FT-IR and Raman analysis were carried out to put into evidence the effects of them on the building walls.

  6. Analyses and design of underground reinforced plastic mortar pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Magid, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    A simplified design procedure for underground Reinforced Plastic Mortar (RPM) pipe is proposed. This procedure is based on finite-element analyses of the pipe-soil system and composite laminate analysis of the pipe. With the proposed method, the designer is able to select the best trench geometry and backfill conditions, to determine the construction effects, and to devise the constituent pipe materials according to the given installation conditions for a reliable and cost-effective design. Existing design methods of underground flexible pipes were evaluated. A thorough investigation of the problems encountered with the RPM pipe is made to study the possible modes and causes of failure. The new design method is based on a composite beam element model to account for the failure modes pertinent to fiberglass-reinforced plastic pipes. The design procedure and the required soil and pipe materials data are described. It is shown that simpler performance limits are needed and that the proposed design procedure can be fully implemented once these data are provided.

  7. Estimation of corrosion damage in steel reinforced mortar using waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, Henrique; Ervin, Benjamin L.; Kuchma, Daniel A.; Bernhard, Jennifer

    2005-05-01

    Corrosion of reinforced concrete is a chronic infrastructure problem, particularly in areas with deicing salt and marine exposure. To maintain structural integrity, a testing method is needed to identify areas of corroding reinforcement. For purposes of rehabilitation, the method must also be able to evaluate the degree, rate and location of damage. Towards the development of a wireless embedded sensor system to monitor and assess corrosion damage in reinforced concrete, reinforced mortar specimens were manufactured with seeded defects to simulate corrosion damage. Taking advantage of waveguide effects of the reinforcing bars, these specimens were then tested using an ultrasonic approach. Using the same ultrasonic approach, specimens without seeded defects were also monitored during accelerated corrosion tests. Both the ultrasonic sending and the receiving transducers were mounted on the steel rebar. Advantage was taken of the lower frequency (<250 kHz) fundamental flexural propagation mode because of its relatively large displacements at the interface between the reinforcing steel and the surrounding concrete. Waveform energy (indicative of attenuation) is presented and discussed in terms of corrosion damage. Current results indicate that the loss of bond strength between the reinforcing steel and the surrounding concrete can be detected and evaluated.

  8. Properties of mortars made by uncalcined FGD gypsum-fly ash-ground granulated blast furnace slag composite binder

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Shiyun; Ni Kun; Li Jinmei

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mortar with uncalcined FGD gypsum has suitable workability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The strength of mortar with uncalcined FGD gypsum is higher than that of mortar without uncalcined FGD gypsum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dry shrinkage of mortar with uncalcined FGD gypsum is lower than that of mortar without uncalcined FGD gypsum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The leaching of sulfate ion of mortar is studied. - Abstract: A series of novel mortars were developed from composite binder of uncalcined FGD gypsum, fly ash (FA) and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) for the good utilization of flue gas desulphurization (FGD) gypsum. At a fixed ratio (20%) of GGBFS to the composite binder, keeping consistency of the mortar between 9.5 and 10.0 cm, the properties of the composite mortar were studied. The results show that higher water/binder (W/B) is required to keep the consistency when increasing the percentage of FGD gypsum. No obvious influences of the W/B and content of FGD gypsum on the bleeding of paste were observed which keeps lower than 2% under all experimental conditions tried. The highest compressive and flexural strengths (ratio is 20% FGD gypsum, 20% GGBFS and 60% FA) are 22.6 and 4.3 MPa at 28 days, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicate that massive ettringite crystals and C-S-H gels exist in the hydration products. At 90 days the mortars with FGD gypsum is dramatically smaller drying shrinkage (563-938 micro strain) than that without FGD gypsum (about 2250 micro strain). The release of the SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} from the mortar was analyzed, indicating that the dissolution of sulfate increases with FGD gypsum. The concentration of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} releasing from the mortar with 10% FGD gypsum is almost equal to that obtained from the mortar without FGD gypsum. The release of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} from the mortar with 20% FGD gypsum is 9200 mg

  9. Adhesion of Dental Materials to Tooth Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sumita B.

    2000-03-01

    The understanding and proper application of the principles of adhesion has brought forth a new paradigm in the realm of esthetic dentistry. Modern restorative tooth procedures can now conserve the remaining tooth-structure and also provide for the strengthening of the tooth. Adhesive restorative techniques call for the application and curing of the dental adhesive at the interface between the tooth tissue and the filling material. Hence the success of the restoration depends largely on the integrity of this interface. The mechanism of adhesion of the bonding materials to the dental hard tissue will be discussed in this paper. There are four main steps that occur during the application of the dental adhesive to the oral hard tissues: 1) The first step is the creation of a microstructure in the tooth enamel or dentin by means of an acidic material. This can be through the application of a separate etchant or can be accomplished in situ by the adhesive/primer. This agent has to be effective in removing or modifying the proteinaceous “smear” layer, which would otherwise act as a weak boundary layer on the surface to be bonded. 2) The primer/adhesive must then be able to wet and penetrate the microstructure created in the tooth. Since the surface energies of etched enamel and that of etched dentin are different finding one material to prime both types of dental tissues can be quite challenging. 3) The ionomer types of materials, particularly those that are carboxylate ion-containing, can chemically bond with the calcium ions of the hydroxyapatite mineral. 4) Polymerization in situ allows for micromechanical interlocking of the adhesive. The importance of having the right mechanical properties of the cured adhesive layer and its role in absorbing and dissipating stresses encountered by a restored tooth will also be discussed.

  10. Classifiers utilized to enhance acoustic based sensors to identify round types of artillery/mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasing, David; Desai, Sachi; Morcos, Amir

    2008-04-01

    Feature extraction methods based on the statistical analysis of the change in event pressure levels over a period and the level of ambient pressure excitation facilitate the development of a robust classification algorithm. The features reliably discriminates mortar and artillery variants via acoustic signals produced during the launch events. Utilizing acoustic sensors to exploit the sound waveform generated from the blast for the identification of mortar and artillery variants as type A, etcetera through analysis of the waveform. Distinct characteristics arise within the different mortar/artillery variants because varying HE mortar payloads and related charges emphasize varying size events at launch. The waveform holds various harmonic properties distinct to a given mortar/artillery variant that through advanced signal processing and data mining techniques can employed to classify a given type. The skewness and other statistical processing techniques are used to extract the predominant components from the acoustic signatures at ranges exceeding 3000m. Exploiting these techniques will help develop a feature set highly independent of range, providing discrimination based on acoustic elements of the blast wave. Highly reliable discrimination will be achieved with a feedforward neural network classifier trained on a feature space derived from the distribution of statistical coefficients, frequency spectrum, and higher frequency details found within different energy bands. The processes that are described herein extend current technologies, which emphasis acoustic sensor systems to provide such situational awareness.

  11. Artillery/mortar round type classification to increase system situational awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Sachi; Grasing, David; Morcos, Amir; Hohil, Myron

    2008-04-01

    Feature extraction methods based on the statistical analysis of the change in event pressure levels over a period and the level of ambient pressure excitation facilitate the development of a robust classification algorithm. The features reliably discriminates mortar and artillery variants via acoustic signals produced during the launch events. Utilizing acoustic sensors to exploit the sound waveform generated from the blast for the identification of mortar and artillery variants as type A, etcetera through analysis of the waveform. Distinct characteristics arise within the different mortar/artillery variants because varying HE mortar payloads and related charges emphasize varying size events at launch. The waveform holds various harmonic properties distinct to a given mortar/artillery variant that through advanced signal processing and data mining techniques can employed to classify a given type. The skewness and other statistical processing techniques are used to extract the predominant components from the acoustic signatures at ranges exceeding 3000m. Exploiting these techniques will help develop a feature set highly independent of range, providing discrimination based on acoustic elements of the blast wave. Highly reliable discrimination will be achieved with a feedforward neural network classifier trained on a feature space derived from the distribution of statistical coefficients, frequency spectrum, and higher frequency details found within different energy bands. The processes that are described herein extend current technologies, which emphasis acoustic sensor systems to provide such situational awareness.

  12. Addition of cement to lime-based mortars: Effect on pore structure and vapor transport

    SciTech Connect

    Mosquera, M.J. . E-mail: mariajesus.mosquera@uca.es; Silva, B.; Prieto, B.; Ruiz-Herrera, E.

    2006-09-15

    The main focus of this work is to determine the effect of cement addition, a common practice in many restorations, on the pore structure of lime-based mortars. A second target is to establish correlations between microstructure and water vapor transport across the mortar, which is a key characteristic of building decay. In order to achieve these objectives, we prepared a set of mortars consisting of air-hardening lime with a progressively increasing cement content, as well as a mortar containing hydraulic lime. Several different techniques, most notably mercury intrusion porosimetry and scanning electron microscopy in the backscatter mode, were used to investigate the pore structure. The results from these procedures led to the conclusion that porosity and pore size are progressively reduced as cement content increases. Moreover, an excellent correlation between pore radius parameter and the vapor diffusion coefficient was established. Hydraulic lime mortar exhibited textural parameters and diffusivity values halfway between those of the different lime/cement mixes studied.

  13. Use of waste brick as a partial replacement of cement in mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Naceri, Abdelghani Hamina, Makhloufi Chikouche

    2009-08-15

    The aim of this study is to investigate the use of waste brick as a partial replacement for cement in the production of cement mortar. Clinker was replaced by waste brick in different proportions (0%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%) by weight for cement. The physico-chemical properties of cement at anhydrous state and the hydrated state, thus the mechanical strengths (flexural and compressive strengths after 7, 28 and 90 days) for the mortar were studied. The microstructure of the mortar was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the mineralogical composition (mineral phases) of the artificial pozzolan was investigated by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the particle size distributions was obtained from laser granulometry (LG) of cements powders used in this study. The results obtained show that the addition of artificial pozzolan improves the grinding time and setting times of the cement, thus the mechanical characteristics of mortar. A substitution of cement by 10% of waste brick increased mechanical strengths of mortar. The results of the investigation confirmed the potential use of this waste material to produce pozzolanic cement.

  14. Lime-pozzolana mortars in Roman catacombs: composition, structures and restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Moral, Sergio; Soler, Vicente; Garcia-Guinea, Javier

    2005-08-01

    Analyses of microsamples collected from Roman catacombs and samples of lime-pozzolana mortars hardened in the laboratory display higher contents in carbonated binder than other subaerial Roman monuments. The measured environmental data inside the Saint Callistus and Domitilla catacombs show a constant temperature of 15-17 deg C, a high CO{sub 2} content (1700 to 3500 ppm) and a relative humidity close to 100%. These conditions and particularly the high CO{sub 2} concentration speed-up the lime calcitization roughly by 500% and reduce the cationic diffusion to form hydrous calcium aluminosilicates. The structure of Roman catacomb mortars shows (i) coarser aggregates and thicker beds on the inside, (ii) thin, smoothed, light and fine-grained external surfaces with low content of aggregates and (iii) paintings and frescoes on the outside. The observed high porosity of the mortars can be attributed to cracking after drying linked with the high binder content. Hardened lime lumps inside the binder denote low water/mortar ratios for slaking. The aggregate tephra pyroclasts rich in aluminosilicate phases with accessorial amounts of Ba, Sr, Rb, Cu and Pb were analysed through X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) and also by environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) to identify the size and distribution of porosity. Results support procedures using local materials, special mortars and classic techniques for restoration purposes in hypogeal backgrounds.

  15. Neutron attenuation characteristics of polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, and heavy aggregate concrete and mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Abdul-Majid, S.; Othman, F.

    1994-03-01

    Polyethylene and polyvinyl chloride pellets were introduced into concrete to improve its neutron attenuation characteristics while several types of heavy coarse aggregates were used to improve its gamma ray attenuation properties. Neutron and gamma ray attenuation were studied in concrete samples containing coarse aggregates of barite, pyrite, basalt, hematite, and marble as well as polyethylene and polyvinyl chloride pellets in narrow-beam geometry. The highest neutron attenuation was shown by polyethylene mortar, followed by polyvinyl chloride mortar; barite and pyrite concrete showed higher gamma ray attenuation than ordinary concrete. Broad-beam and continuous (infinite) medium geometries were used to study the neutron attenuation of samples containing polymers at different concentrations with and without heavy aggregates, the fitting equations were established, and from these the neutron removal coefficients were deduced. In a radiation field of neutrons and gamma rays, the appropriate concentration of polymer and heavy aggregate can be selected to give the optimum total dose attenuation depending on the relative intensities of each type of radiation. This would give much better design flexibility over ordinary concrete. The compressive strength tests performed on mortar and concrete samples showed that their value, in general, decreases as polymer concentration increases and that the polyvinyl chloride mortar showed higher values than the polyethylene mortar. For general construction purposes, the compression strength was considered acceptable in these samples. 34 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Coupled Effect of Elevated Temperature and Cooling Conditions on the Properties of Ground Clay Brick Mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali Abd El Aziz, Magdy; Abdelaleem, Salh; Heikal, Mohamed

    2013-12-01

    When a concrete structure is exposed to fire and cooling, some deterioration in its chemical resistivity and mechanical properties takes place. This deterioration can reach a level at which the structure may have to be thoroughly renovated or completely replaced. In this investigation, four types of cement mortars, ground clay bricks (GCB)/sand namely 0/3, 1/2, 2/1 and 3/0, were used. Three different cement contents were used: 350, 400 and 450 kg/m3. All the mortars were prepared and cured in tap water for 3 months and then kept in laboratory atmospheric conditions up to 6 months. The specimens were subjected to elevated temperatures up to 700°C for 3h and then cooled by three different conditions: water, furnace, and air cooling. The results show that all the mortars subjected to fire, irrespective of cooling mode, suffered a significant reduction in compressive strength. However, the mortars cooled in air exhibited a relativity higher reduction in compressive strength rather than those water or furnace cooled. The mortars containing GCB/sand (3/0) and GCB/sand (1/2) exhibited a relatively higher thermal stability than the others.

  17. Strength and Density of Geopolymer Mortar Cured at Ambient Temperature for Use as Repair Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warid Wazien, A. Z.; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al; Abd. Razak, Rafiza; Mohd Remy Rozainy, M. A. Z.; Faheem Mohd Tahir, Muhammad

    2016-06-01

    Geopolymers produced by synthesizing aluminosilicate source materials with an alkaline activator solution promised an excellent properties akin to the existing construction material. This study focused on the effect of various binder to sand ratio on geopolymer mortar properties. Mix design of geopolymer mortar was produced using NaOH concentration of 12 molars, ratio of fly ash/alkaline activator and ratio Na2SiO3/NaOH of 2.0 and 2.5 respectively. Samples subsequently ware cured at ambient temperature. The properties of geopolymer mortar were analysed in term of compressive strength and density at different period which are on the 3rd and 7th day of curing. Experimental results revealed that the addition of sand slightly increase the compressive strength of geopolymer. The optimum compressive strength obtained was up to 31.39 MPa on the 7th day. The density of geopolymer mortar was in the range between 2.0 g/cm3 to 2.23 g/cm3. Based on this findings, the special properties promoted by geopolymer mortar display high potential to be implemented in the field of concrete patch repair.

  18. Use of waste brick as a partial replacement of cement in mortar.

    PubMed

    Naceri, Abdelghani; Hamina, Makhloufi Chikouche

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the use of waste brick as a partial replacement for cement in the production of cement mortar. Clinker was replaced by waste brick in different proportions (0%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%) by weight for cement. The physico-chemical properties of cement at anhydrous state and the hydrated state, thus the mechanical strengths (flexural and compressive strengths after 7, 28 and 90 days) for the mortar were studied. The microstructure of the mortar was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the mineralogical composition (mineral phases) of the artificial pozzolan was investigated by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the particle size distributions was obtained from laser granulometry (LG) of cements powders used in this study. The results obtained show that the addition of artificial pozzolan improves the grinding time and setting times of the cement, thus the mechanical characteristics of mortar. A substitution of cement by 10% of waste brick increased mechanical strengths of mortar. The results of the investigation confirmed the potential use of this waste material to produce pozzolanic cement. PMID:19383569

  19. Immobilization in cement mortar of chromium removed from water using titania nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Husnain, Ahmed; Qazi, Ishtiaq Ahmed; Khaliq, Wasim; Arshad, Muhammad

    2016-05-01

    Because of the high toxicity of chromium, particularly as Cr (VI), it is removed from industrial effluents before their discharge into water bodies by a variety of techniques, including adsorption. Ultimate disposal of the sludge or the adsorbate, however, is a serious problem. While titania, in nanoparticle form, serves as a very good adsorbent for chromium, as an additive, it also helps to increase the compressive strength of mortar and concrete. Combining these two properties of the material, titania nanoparticles were used to adsorb chromium and then added to mortar up to a concentration of 20% by weight. The compressive strength of the resulting mortar specimens that replaced 15% of cement with chromium laden titania showed an improved strength than that without titania, thus confirming that this material had positive effect on the mortar strength. Leachate tests using the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP) confirmed that the mortar sample chromium leachate was well within the permissible limits. The proposed technique thus offers a safe and viable method for the ultimate disposal of toxic metal wastes, in general, and those laden waste chromium, in particular. PMID:26915979

  20. Superplasticized Portland cement: Production and compressive strength of mortars and concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Bouzoubaa, N.; Zhang, M.H.; Malhotra, V.M.

    1998-12-01

    This paper deals with the effect of intergrinding different percentages of a naphthalene-based superplasticizer with Portland cement clinker and gypsum on the fineness of the product, and on the water requirement and the compressive strength of the mortars made with the superplasticized cement. The properties of the fresh and hardened concrete made with the superplasticized cements were also investigated. The results showed that the intergrinding of a given amount of a naphthalene-based superplasticizer with Portland clinker and gypsum reduced the grinding time required for obtaining the same Blaine fineness as that of the control Portland cement without the superplasticizer. The water requirement of the mortars made with the superplasticized cements was similar to that of the mortars made with the control Portland cements when the same amount of the superplasticizer was added at the mortar mixer; for a given grinding time and a Blaine fineness of {approximately}4500 cm{sup 2}/g, the mortars made with the superplasticized cement had higher compressive strength than those made with the control Portland cement. For a given grinding time or Blaine fineness of cement {ge}5000 cm{sup 2}/g, the slump loss, air content stability, bleeding, autogenous temperature rise, setting times, and compressive strength of the concrete made with the superplasticized cements were generally comparable to those of the concrete made with the control Portland cements when the superplasticizer was added at the concrete mixer.

  1. Addition polyimide adhesives containing ATBN and silicone elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saint Clair, A. K.; Saint Clair, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of added elastomers on the thermal stability, adhesive strength, and fracture toughness of LARC-13, a high-temperature addition polyimide adhesive. Various butadiene/acrylonitrile and silicon elastomers were incorporated into the polyimide resin either as physical polyblends, or by chemically reacting the elastomers with the polyimide backbone. Adhesive single lap-shear and T-peel strengths were measured before and after ageing at elevated temperature. A tapered double-cantilever beam specimen was used to determine the fracture toughness of the elastomer-modified polyimide adhesives.

  2. The Impact of Involvement in Mortar Board Senior Honor Society on Lifelong Views of Civic Engagement and Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Daniel James

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the impact that involvement in Mortar Board National Senior Honor Society has on lifelong views of civic engagement and leadership. Mortar Board Senior Honor Society is a collegiate honor society established in 1918 that recognizes students for their outstanding contributions to their college or university community in the…

  3. Properties, characterization, and decay of sticky rice–lime mortars from the Wugang Ming dynasty city wall (China)

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Ya; Fu, Xuan; Gu, Haibing; Gao, Feng; Liu, Shaojun

    2014-04-01

    Urgent restoration of the Wugang Ming dynasty city wall brings about the need for a study of the formulation and properties of mortars. In the present paper, mortar samples from the Wugang Ming dynasty city wall were characterized in a combination of sheet polarized light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with X-ray energy dispersive spectrometer, thermogravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy. Results show that mortars are mainly built up from inorganic calcium carbonate based organic–inorganic hybrid material with a small amount of sticky rice, which plays a crucial role in forming dense and compact microstructure of mortars and effectively hindering penetration of water and air into mortars. Analysis of decayed products shows that the detrimental soluble salts originates from ambient environment. - Highlights: • Mortars used in the Wugang city wall are a calcium carbonate-sticky rice hybrid bonding material. • Carbonation processing is extremely slow due to dense and compact microstructure of mortars. • Decying of mortars results from the appearance of soluble salt from ambient environment.

  4. Studies of interdiffusion, chemical bonding, and intermolecular interactions in fiber-matrix adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Chiate.

    1990-01-01

    A study of the key factors involved in adhesion was conducted to determine a quantitative relation between the underlying physicochemical mechanisms of adhesion and the adhesive performance at the fiber-matrix interface. Aramid fiber was modified by attaching pendent chains to its surface to change the nature of its interaction with matrix materials. The relative importance of the three fundamental factors of adhesion (interdiffusion, intermolecular interactions, and chemical bonding) was studied by evaluating the fiber-matrix adhesive performance of these modified fiber-matrix systems.

  5. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  6. Adhesion at metal interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjea, Amitava; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A basic adhesion process is defined, the theory of the properties influencing metallic adhesion is outlined, and theoretical approaches to the interface problem are presented, with emphasis on first-principle calculations as well as jellium-model calculations. The computation of the energies of adhesion as a function of the interfacial separation is performed; fully three-dimensional calculations are presented, and universality in the shapes of the binding energy curves is considered. An embedded-atom method and equivalent-crystal theory are covered in the framework of issues involved in practical adhesion.

  7. Keratin film ablation for the fabrication of brick and mortar skin structure using femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, Bibi Safia; Khan, Hidayat Ullah; Dou, Yuehua; Alam, Khan; Attaullah, Shehnaz; Zari, Islam

    2015-09-01

    The patterning of thin keratin films has been explored to manufacture model skin surfaces based on the "bricks and mortar" view of the relationship between keratin and lipids. It has been demonstrated that laser light is capable of preparing keratin-based "bricks and mortar" wall structure as in epidermis, the outermost layer of the human skin. "Bricks and mortar" pattern in keratin films has been fabricated using an ArF excimer laser (193 nm wavelength) and femtosecond laser (800 and 400 nm wavelength). Due to the very low ablation threshold of keratin, femtosecond laser systems are practical for laser processing of proteins. These model skin structures are fabricated for the first time that will help to produce potentially effective moisturizing products for the protection of skin from dryness, diseases and wrinkles.

  8. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON THE APPLICATION OF HIGH STRENGTH FIBER REINFORCED MORTAR TO PRESTRESSED CONCRETE STRUCTURES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurada, Michihiro; Mori, Takuya; Ohyama, Hiroaki; Seki, Hiroshi

    In order to study the application of high strength fiber reinforced mortar which has design compressive strength 120N/mm2 to prestressed concrete structures, the authors carried out material tests, bending tests and shear tests of prestressed concrete beam specimens. From the material tests, we obtained material properties for the design of prestressed concrete structures such as compressive strength, tensile strength, Young's modulus, coefficient of creep, dry shrinkage and so on. The results of the bending tests and the shear tests of prestressed concrete beam specimen shows that experimental flexural strength and shear strength of prestressed concrete beam using high strength fiber reinforced mortar exceeds strength calculated by traditional design method. It is confirmed that high strength fiber reinforced mortar can be applied to prestressed concrete structures.

  9. Transient three-dimensional contact problems: mortar method. Mixed methods and conserving integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesch, Christian; Betsch, Peter

    2011-10-01

    The present work deals with the development of an energy-momentum conserving method to unilateral contact constraints and is a direct continuation of a previous work (Hesch and Betsch in Comput Mech 2011, doi: 10.1007/s00466-011-0597-2) dealing with the NTS method. In this work, we introduce the mortar method and a newly developed segmentation process for the consistent integration of the contact interface. For the application of the energy-momentum approach to mortar constraints, we extend an approach based on a mixed formulation to the segment definition of the mortar constraints. The enhanced numerical stability of the newly proposed discretization method will be shown in several examples.

  10. Performance Characteristics of Waste Glass Powder Substituting Portland Cement in Mortar Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kara, P.; Csetényi, L. J.; Borosnyói, A.

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, soda-lime glass cullet (flint, amber, green) and special glass cullet (soda-alkaline earth-silicate glass coming from low pressure mercury-discharge lamp cullet and incandescent light bulb borosilicate glass waste cullet) were ground into fine powders in a laboratory planetary ball mill for 30 minutes. CEM I 42.5N Portland cement was applied in mortar mixtures, substituted with waste glass powder at levels of 20% and 30%. Characterisation and testing of waste glass powders included fineness by laser diffraction particle size analysis, specific surface area by nitrogen adsorption technique, particle density by pycnometry and chemical analysis by X-ray fluorescence spectrophotometry. Compressive strength, early age shrinkage cracking and drying shrinkage tests, heat of hydration of mortars, temperature of hydration, X-ray diffraction analysis and volume stability tests were performed to observe the influence of waste glass powder substitution for Portland cement on physical and engineering properties of mortar mixtures.

  11. Effect of various superplasticizers on rheological properties of cement paste and mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Masood, I.; Agarwal, S.K. )

    1994-01-01

    The effect of eight commercial superplasticizers including one developed from Cashew Nut Shell Liquid (CNSL) at CBRI on the rheological properties viz. viscosity and flow of cement paste and mortars have been investigated. The viscosity measurements have been made at various shear rates (5--100 rpm). It is found that at higher rates (100 rpm) even with the low concentration of superplasticizers (0.1), the viscosity of the cement paste is more or less the same as that obtained with 0.6 % dosages of SPs at lesser shear rates. The effect of split addition (delayed addition) of superplasticizers on viscosity of cement paste and 1:3 cement sand mortar have also been studied. A decrease in viscosity due to split addition has been observed in the cement paste and there is an increase of 15--20 % in flow of mortars.

  12. Brick-and-Mortar Self-Assembly Approach to Graphitic Mesoporous Carbon Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Fulvio, Pasquale F; Mayes, Richard T; Wang, Xiqing; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Bauer, Christopher; Presser, Volker; Mcdonough, John; Gogotsi, Yury

    2011-01-01

    Mesoporous carbon materials do not have sufficient ordering at the atomic scale to exhibit good electronic conductivity. To date, mesoporous carbons having uniform mesopores and high surface areas have been prepared from partially-graphitizable precursors in the presence of templates. High temperature thermal treatments above 2000 C, which are usually required to increase conductivity, result in a partial or total collapse of the mesoporous structures and reduced surface areas induced by growth of graphitic domains, limiting their applications in electric double layer capacitors and lithium-ion batteries. In this work, we successfully implemented a 'brick-and-mortar' approach to obtain ordered graphitic mesoporous carbon nanocomposites with tunable mesopore sizes below 850 C without using graphitization catalysts or high temperature thermal treatments. Phenolic resin-based mesoporous carbons act as mortar to highly conductive carbon blacks and carbon onions (bricks). The capacitance and resistivity of final materials can be tailored by changing the mortar to brick ratios.

  13. Effect of brief heat-curing on microstructure and mechanical properties in fresh cement based mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Ballester, P.; Hidalgo, A.; Marmol, I.; Morales, J.; Sanchez, L.

    2009-07-15

    The effect of temperature on fresh mortar and cement paste was evaluated by simulating the curing conditions of external buildings plastering applied under extremely hot weather. The specimens were heated at controlled temperatures in the 40-80 {sup o}C range by exposure to IR radiation over short periods. The effect of soaking for a short time was also examined. The results of compressive strength tests, scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy and mercury porosimetry helped to characterize the mechanical and physico-chemical properties of the studied sample. Early age behaviour (28 days) in neat cement was barely affected by the temperature. By contrast, exposure to high temperatures caused significant microstructural changes in the mortar. However, successive soaking over short periods was found to reactivate the mechanism of curing and restore the expected mechanical properties. Based on the results, application of cement based mortar at high temperatures is effective when followed by a short, specific soaking process.

  14. Influence of bicarbonate ions on the deterioration of mortar bars in sulfate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kunther, W.; Lothenbach, B.; Scrivener, K.

    2013-02-15

    This work investigates the influence of bicarbonate ions on the deterioration of cementitious material exposed to sulfate ions. Mortars based on a CEM I and on a CEM III/B cement were investigated. Experimental investigations were compared to thermodynamic modeling and phase characterization to understand the differences in deterioration. The presence of bicarbonate ions significantly reduced the expansion of the CEM I mortars. Thermodynamic modeling showed that at high concentrations of bicarbonate ettringite and gypsum become unstable. Microstructural characterization combined with information from thermodynamic modeling suggests that conditions of high supersaturation with respect to ettringite are unlikely in the samples exposed in solutions containing bicarbonate. Consequently, expansive forces are not generated by the crystallization pressure of ettringite. There was little expansion of the CEM III/B sample even in the sodium sulfate solution. In the bicarbonate solution this mortar showed a highly leached zone at the surface in which calcite was observed.

  15. Stability Analysis of a mortar cover ejected at various Mach numbers and angles of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, Jane; Carnasciali, Maria-Isabel; Andrejczyk, Joe; Kandis, Mike

    2011-11-01

    This study utilized CFD software to predict the aerodynamic coefficient of a wedge-shaped mortar cover which is ejected from a spacecraft upon deployment of its Parachute Recovery System (PRS). Concern over recontact or collision between the mortar cover and spacecraft served as the impetus for this study in which drag and moment coefficients were determined at Mach numbers from 0.3 to 1.6 at 30-degree increments. These CFD predictions were then used as inputs to a two-dimensional, multi-body, three-DoF trajectory model to calculate the relative motion of the mortar cover and spacecraft. Based upon those simulations, the study concluded a minimal/zero risk of collision with either the spacecraft or PRS. Sponsored by Pioneer Aerospace.

  16. Influence of limestone fillers on combustion characteristics of asphalt mortar for pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ke; Zhu, Kai; Wu, Hao; Han, Jun; Wang, Jin-Chang; Huang, Zhi-Yi; Liang, Pei

    2014-07-01

    Asphalt materials will be ignited and release significant toxic fumes within tunnel fires. Thus, combustion characteristics of asphalt materials used in road tunnel should be studied in order to limit such an adverse effect. In the present work we study the influence of limestone fillers on combustion characteristics of asphalt mortar by thermogravimetric and kinetic analysis. It is shown that the combustion of asphalt mortar is not just a linear superposition of asphalt and limestone. The limestone will increase the ignition point and the activation energy of the primary volatile release, and will catalyze the char formation from the primary volatile release. Kinetic analysis shows that the primary volatile release stage of asphalt mortar combustion can be explained by a three-dimensional diffusion model, the secondary volatile release and char combustion stage can be explained by a model under the assumption of random nucleation and nuclei growth, whereas the limestone decomposition stage appears to follow the one-dimensional phase boundary model.

  17. Directing cell migration using micropatterned and dynamically adhesive polymer brushes.

    PubMed

    Costa, Patricia; Gautrot, Julien E; Connelly, John T

    2014-06-01

    Micropatterning techniques, such as photolithography and microcontact printing, provide robust tools for controlling the adhesive interactions between cells and their extracellular environment. However, the ability to modify these interactions in real time and examine dynamic cellular responses remains a significant challenge. Here we describe a novel strategy to create dynamically adhesive, micropatterned substrates, which afford precise control of cell adhesion and migration over both space and time. Specific functionalization of micropatterned poly(ethylene glycol methacrylate) (POEGMA) brushes with synthetic peptides, containing the integrin-binding arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif, was achieved using thiol-yne coupling reactions. RGD activation of POEGMA brushes promoted fibroblast adhesion, spreading and migration into previously non-adhesive areas, and migration speed could be tuned by adjusting the surface ligand density. We propose that this technique is a robust strategy for creating dynamically adhesive biomaterial surfaces and a useful assay for studying cell migration. PMID:24508539

  18. Elastic-plastic analysis of crack in ductile adhesive joint

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Toru; Miyazaki, Noriyuki; Yamashita, Akira; Munakata, Tsuyoshi

    1995-11-01

    The fracture of a crack in adhesive is important to the structural integrity of adhesive structures and composite materials. Though the fracture toughness of a material should be constant according to fracture mechanics, it is said that the fracture toughness of a crack in an adhesive joint depends on the bond thickness. In the present study, the elastic-plastic stress analyses of a crack in a thin adhesive layer are performed by the combination of the boundary element method and the finite element method. The effect of adhesive thickness on the J-integral, the Q`-factor which is a modified version of the Q-factor, and the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) are investigated. It is found from the analyses that the CTOD begins to decrease at very thin bond thickness, the Q`-factor being almost constant. The decrease of the fracture toughness at very thin adhesive layer is expected by the present analysis.

  19. Intrinsic adhesion force of lubricants to steel surface.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghwi

    2004-09-01

    The intrinsic adhesion forces of lubricants and other pharmaceutical materials to a steel surface were quantitatively compared using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). A steel sphere was attached to the tip of an AFM cantilever, and its adhesion forces to the substrate surfaces of magnesium stearate, sodium stearyl fumarate, lactose, 4-acetamidophenol, and naproxen were measured. Surface roughness varied by an order of magnitude among the materials. However, the results clearly showed that the two lubricants had about half the intrinsic adhesion force as lactose, 4-acetamidophenol, and naproxen. Differences in the intrinsic adhesion forces of the two lubricants were insignificant. The lubricant molecules were unable to cover the steel surface during AFM measurements. Intrinsic adhesion force can slightly be modified by surface treatment and compaction, and its tip-to-tip variation was not greater than its difference between lubricants and other pharmaceutical particles. This study provides a quantitative fundamental basis for understanding adhesion related issues. PMID:15295791

  20. Segment-based vs. element-based integration for mortar methods in computational contact mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farah, Philipp; Popp, Alexander; Wall, Wolfgang A.

    2015-01-01

    Mortar finite element methods provide a very convenient and powerful discretization framework for geometrically nonlinear applications in computational contact mechanics, because they allow for a variationally consistent treatment of contact conditions (mesh tying, non-penetration, frictionless or frictional sliding) despite the fact that the underlying contact surface meshes are non-matching and possibly also geometrically non-conforming. However, one of the major issues with regard to mortar methods is the design of adequate numerical integration schemes for the resulting interface coupling terms, i.e. curve integrals for 2D contact problems and surface integrals for 3D contact problems. The way how mortar integration is performed crucially influences the accuracy of the overall numerical procedure as well as the computational efficiency of contact evaluation. Basically, two different types of mortar integration schemes, which will be termed as segment-based integration and element-based integration here, can be found predominantly in the literature. While almost the entire existing literature focuses on either of the two mentioned mortar integration schemes without questioning this choice, the intention of this paper is to provide a comprehensive and unbiased comparison. The theoretical aspects covered here include the choice of integration rule, the treatment of boundaries of the contact zone, higher-order interpolation and frictional sliding. Moreover, a new hybrid scheme is proposed, which beneficially combines the advantages of segment-based and element-based mortar integration. Several numerical examples are presented for a detailed and critical evaluation of the overall performance of the different schemes within several well-known benchmark problems of computational contact mechanics.

  1. Finite Element Analysis of Crack-Path Selection in a Brick and Mortar Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrafi-Nour, Reza; Manoharan, Mohan; Johnson, Curtis A.

    Many natural composite materials rely on organized architectures that span several length scales. The structures of natural shells such as nacre (mother-of-pearl) and conch are prominent examples of such organizations where the calcium carbonate platelets, the main constituent of natural shells, are held together in an organized fashion within an organic matrix. At one or multiple length scales, these organized arrangements often resemble a brick-and-mortar structure, with calcium carbonate platelets acting as bricks connected through the organic mortar phase.

  2. Enhanced affordable methods for assessment of material characteristics and consolidation effects on stone and mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drdacky, M.; Slizkova, Z.

    2012-04-01

    In situ considerate testing of surface cohesion of historic stone and mortar materials suffers from a lack of suitable affordable non-destructive methods. The problem is mainly important for assessment of surface degradation characteristics and/or evaluation of effectiveness of consolidation treatment of degraded historic materials. The paper presents two innovations of simple testing methods which provide reliable data on material cohesion and water uptake. The so called "Scotch Tape Test" or peeling test has been introduced into the field of conservation for testing the cohesion qualities of historic materials mainly stone and renders in sixties without any standards or reliably verified recommendations for the above mentioned application in the conservation practice. Licentious use without adequate knowledge and sufficient understanding leads to non-comparable and non-reproducible as well as in many cases incorrect and severely biased results and assessments. Therefore, the authors after a research and comparative testing have established limits for its application, reliable procedures and a "standard" protocol for testing of cohesion characteristics of brittle and quasi brittle materials mainly mortars and stones. This article presents a detailed analysis of the peeling test procedures, and suggests recommendations for performing peeling tests and for evaluating the obtained results. Also in situ testing of material water uptake is a very basic and indispensable technique in conservation practice and it correlates significantly with some other material characteristics. The capillary properties of porous materials can be measured in situ using a Karsten tube and modified tools or methods which are quite cumbersome, and cannot be performed on inclined surfaces, e.g. vaults or ceilings. There are other difficulties with Karsten tube measurements, e.g. problems with fixing a heavy glass tube on vertical surfaces, a need for two operators, and soiling of the surface

  3. A bioinspired wet/dry microfluidic adhesive for aqueous environments.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Abhijit; Sharma, Ashutosh; Ghatak, Animangsu

    2010-01-01

    A pressure-sensitive, nonreacting and nonfouling adhesive which can perform well both in air and underwater is very desirable because of its potential applications in various settings such as biomedical, marine, and automobile. Taking a clue from nature that many natural adhesive pads have complex structures underneath the outer adhesive layer, we have prepared thin elastic adhesive films with subsurface microstructures using PDMS (poly(dimethylsiloxane)) and investigated their performance underwater. The presence of embedded structure enhances the energy of adhesion considerably both in air and underwater. Furthermore, filling the channels with liquid of suitable surface tension modifies the internal stress profile, resulting into significant enhancement in adhesive performance. As this increase in adhesion is mediated by mechanics and not by surface chemistry, the presence of water does not alter its performance much. For the same reason, this adhesion mechanism works with both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. The adhesive can be reused because of its elastic surface. Moreover, unlike many other present-day adhesives, its performance does not decrease with time. PMID:20038181

  4. Postoperative Peritoneal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Graeme B.; Grobéty, Jocelyne; Majno, Guido

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental model of peritoneal adhesions, in the rat, based on two relatively minor accidents that may occur during abdominal surgery in man: drying of the serosa, and bleeding. Drying alone had little effect; drying plus bleeding consistently produced adhesions to the dried area. Fresh blood alone produced adhesions between the three membranous structures [omentum and pelvic fat bodies (PFBs)]. The formation of persistent adhesions required whole blood. Preformed clots above a critical size induced adhesions even without previous serosal injury; they were usually captured by the omentum and PFBs. If all three membranous structures were excised, the clots caused visceral adhesions. The protective role of the omentum, its structure, and the mechanism of omental adhesions, are discussed. These findings are relevant to the pathogenesis of post-operative adhesions in man. ImagesFig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 12Fig 13Fig 1Fig 2Fig 14Fig 15Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11 PMID:5315369

  5. Surface tension and deformation in soft adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Katharine

    Modern contact mechanics was originally developed to account for the competition between adhesion and elasticity for relatively stiff deformable materials like rubber, but much softer sticky materials are ubiquitous in biology, engineering, and everyday consumer products. In such soft materials, the solid surface tension can also play an important role in resisting shape change, and significantly modify the physics of contact with soft matter. We report indentation and pull-off experiments that bring small, rigid spheres into adhesive contact with compliant silicone gel substrates, varying both the surface functionalization of the spheres and the bulk elastic properties of the gels. We map the resulting deformation profiles using optical microscopy and image analysis. We examine the substrate geometry in light of capillary and elastic theories in order to explore the interplay of surface tension and bulk elasticity in governing soft adhesion.

  6. Coatings for rubber bonding and paint adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulos, M. S.; Petschel, M.

    1997-08-01

    Conversion coatings form an important base for the adhesion of paint to metal substrates and for the bonding of rubber to metal parts. Four types of conversion coatings were assessed as base treatments for the bonding of rubber to steel and for the corrosion protection of metal substrates under paint: amorphous iron phosphate, heavy zinc phosphate, and three types of modified zinc phosphates that utilized one or more metal cations in addition to zinc. When applied, these conversion coatings formed a thin film over the metal substrate that was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and chemical methods. The performance of the coatings was assessed using physical methods such as dry adhesion, conical mandrel, impact, and stress adhesion for the rubber-bonded parts, and by corrosion resistance methods such as humidity, salt spray, and cyclic corrosion. Coating characterization and performance were correlated.

  7. Injectable pullulan hydrogel for the prevention of postoperative tissue adhesion.

    PubMed

    Bang, Sumi; Lee, Eungjae; Ko, Young-Gwang; Kim, Won Il; Kwon, Oh Hyeong

    2016-06-01

    Methods for reducing and preventing postoperative abdominal adhesions have been researched for decades; however, despite these efforts, the formation of postoperative peritoneal adhesions is continuously reported. Adhesions cause serious complications such as postoperative pain, intestinal obstruction, and infertility. Tissue adhesion barriers have been developed as films, membranes, knits, sprays, and hydrogels. Hydrogels have several advantages when used as adhesion barriers, including flexibility, low tissue adhesiveness, biodegradability, and non-toxic degraded products. Furthermore, compared with preformed hydrogels, injectable hydrogels can fill and cover spaces of any shape and do not require a surgical procedure for implantation. In this study, pullulan was modified through reaction with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC) to introduce carboxyl and phenyl groups as crosslinking sites. The grafting of tyramine on pullulan allows crosslinking branches on pullulan backbone. We successfully fabricated pullulan hydrogel with an enzymatic reaction using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The chemical structure of modified pullulan was analyzed with ATR-FTIR and (1)H NMR spectroscopies. Rheological properties were tested by measuring storage modulus with varying H2O2, HRP, polymer solution concentrations and tyramine substitution rates. Cell viability and animal tests were performed. The modified pullulan hydrogel is an invaluable advance in anti-adhesion agents. PMID:26879910

  8. Experimental Study of the Possibility to Make a Mortar with Ternary Sand (Natural and Artificial Fine Aggregates)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baali, L.; Naceri, A.; Rahmouni, Z.; Mehidi, M. W. Noui

    This experimental study investigates the possibility to make a mortar with a ternary sand (natural and artificial fine aggregates). This method is utilized to correct the particle size distribution of various sands used in mortar. For this investigation, three sands have been used: a dune sand (DS), a slag sand (SS), and brick sand (BS) at different proportions in mortar. After crushing, the artificial fine aggregate (blast furnace slag and waste brick fine aggregate) was sifted in order to use it as fine aggregate. The effect of the quality and grain size distribution of natural fine aggregate (i.e., DS) and artificial fine aggregates (i.e., SS and BS) on the physical properties of ternary sand confected (density, porosity, fineness modulus, equivalent sand, particle size distribution, water absorption) and properties of fresh and hardened mortar were analysed. In the same way for this study, the physical properties and chemical compositions of DS, SS, BS and cement were investigated. The results obtained show that the mechanical strength on mortar depends of the nature and particle size distribution of sand studied. The reuse of this recycled material (slag blast furnace and waste brick) in the industry would contribute to the protection of the environment. This study shows the potential of this method to make mortar with ternary sand (natural and artificial fine aggreagates) in order to improve the physical properties of sand. Utilising natural and artificial fine aggregates to produce quality mortar should yield significant environmental benefits.

  9. Removal of graffiti from the mortar by using Q-switched Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanjeevan, Poologanathan; Klemm, Agnieszka J.; Klemm, Piotr

    2007-08-01

    This paper presents part of the larger study on microstructural features of mortars and it's effects on laser cleaning process. It focuses on the influence of surface roughness, porosity and moisture content of mortars on the removal of graffiti by Nd:YAG laser. The properties of this laser are as follows: wavelength ( λ) 1.06 μm, energy: 500 mJ per pulse, pulse duration: 10 ns. The investigation shows that the variation of laser fluence with the number of pulses required for the laser cleaning can be divided into two zones, namely effective zone and ineffective zone. There is a linear relationship observed between number of pulses required for laser cleaning and the laser fluence in the effective zone, while the number of pulses required for the laser cleaning is almost constant even though the laser fluence increases in the ineffective zone. Moreover, surface roughness, porosity and moisture content of mortar samples have influence on the laser cleaning process. The effect of these parameters become however negligible at the high level of laser fluence. The number of pulses required for the laser cleaning is low for smooth surface or less porous mortar. Furthermore, the wetness of the samples facilitates the cleaning process.

  10. Application of AMDS mortar as a treatment agent for arsenic in subsurface environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Lee, H.; Choi, U. K.; Yang, I. J.

    2014-12-01

    Among the treatment technologies available for As in soil and groundwater, adsorption or precipitation using acid mine drainage (AMD) sludge has become a promised technique because of high efficiency, inexpensiveness and simple to handling. The adsorbents were prepared by addition of Cement, Joomoonjin sand, fly ash, and Ca(OH)2 to air dry AMD sludge. In this work, the adsorption of As (III) and As (V) on AMDS mortar has been studied as a function of kinetic, pH, and initial arsenic concentration. Results of batch study showed that 75-90% of both As (III) and As (V) were removed at pH 7. Arsenic adsorption capacities were the highest at neutral pH condition and the adsorption equilibrium time reached in 7 days using AMDS mortar. Additionally, the adsorption kinetic process is expressed well by pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption capacities of AMDS mortar for As(III) and As(V) were found 19.04 and 30.75 mg g-1, respectively. The results of As (III) adsorption isotherms were fitted well to the Freundlich model. Moreover, As (V) adsorption isotherms were fitted well to the Langmuir model rather than Freundlich model. Based on experimental results in this study, we could conclude that AMDS mortar can be effectively used for arsenic removal agent from subsurface environment.