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Sample records for modified pillared clays

  1. Active containment systems incorporating modified pillared clays

    SciTech Connect

    Lundie, P. |; McLeod, N.

    1997-12-31

    The application of treatment technologies in active containment systems provides a more advanced and effective method for the remediation of contaminated sites. These treatment technologies can be applied in permeable reactive walls and/or funnel and gate systems. The application of modified pillared clays in active containment systems provides a mechanism for producing permeable reactive walls with versatile properties. These pillared clays are suitably modified to incorporate reactive intercalatants capable of reacting with both a broad range of organic pollutants of varying molecular size, polarity and reactivity. Heavy metals can be removed from contaminated water by conventional ion-exchange and other reactive processes within the clay structure. Complex contamination problems can be addressed by the application of more than one modified clay on a site specific basis. This paper briefly describes the active containment system and the structure/chemistry of the modified pillared clay technology, illustrating potential applications of the in-situ treatment process for contaminated site remediation.

  2. Study on structural characteristics of pillared clay modified phosphate fertilizers and its increase efficiency mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ping-xiao; Liao, Zong-wen

    2005-01-01

    Three types of new high-efficiency phosphate fertilizers were made when pillared clays at certain proportions were added into ground phosphate rock. Chemical analyses showed that their soluble phosphorus content decreased more than that of superphosphate. Pot experiment showed that, under equal weights, the new fertilizers increased their efficiency by a large margin over that of superphosphate. Researches on their structures by means of XRD, IR and EPR spectrum revealed that their crystal structures changed considerably, improving their activity and preventing the fixation of available phosphorus in the soil, and consequently, greatly improved the bioavailability and became the main cause of the increase of biomass. PMID:15682504

  3. Naphthene upgrading with pillared synthetic clay catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R.K.; Olson, E.S.

    1995-12-31

    Catalytic hydrotreatment of methylcyclohexane was investigated to model upgrading of coal-derived naphthenes. Nickel-substituted synthetic mica montmorillonite (NiSMM), alumina-pillared NiSMM and Zirconia-pillared NiSMM were prepared and tested for hydrocracking and hydroisomerization of methylcyclohexane. Infrared and thermal desorption studies of the pyridine-adsorbed catalysts indicated the presence of Lewis and Bronsted acid sites. Total acidity and surface area increased with pillaring of NiSMM with polyoxy aluminum and polyoxy zirconium cations. Methylcyclohexane was reacted with these catalysts under a variety of conditions. Pillared clays gave higher gas yields and higher hydrocracking but lower hydroisomerization activity than nonpillared clay. The majority of the products were branched alkanes (isoparaffinic). These catalysts effectively use hydrogen as indicated by the minimal formation of aromatic hydrocarbons, coke, or other oligomeric materials. The effect of various operating conditions, i.e., reaction temperature, contact time, H{sub 2} pressure, and catalyst, on the product distribution will be described.

  4. Catalytic Wastewater Treatment Using Pillared Clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perathoner, Siglinda; Centi, Gabriele

    After introduction on the use of solid catalysts in wastewater treatment technologies, particularly advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), this review discussed the use of pillared clay (PILC) materials in three applications: (i) wet air catalytic oxidation (WACO), (ii) wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) on Cu-PILC and Fe-PILC, and (iii) behavior of Ti-PILC and Fe-PILC in the photocatalytic or photo-Fenton conversion of pollutants. Literature data are critically analyzed to evidence the main direction to further investigate, in particularly with reference to the possible practical application of these technologies to treat industrial, municipal, or agro-food production wastewater.

  5. Synthesis of titania modified silica-pillared clay (SPC) with highly ordered interlayered mesoporous structure for removing toxic metal ion Cr(VI) from aqueous state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Huihui; Zhu, Kongnan; Li, Baoshan; Yao, Chao; Kong, Yong

    2014-02-01

    Titanium-functionalized silica-pillared clays synthesized through post synthetic route was utilized as adsorbers for the removal of Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions under different temperatures and initial concentrations. The starting mesostructured silica-pillared clay is assembled by intragallery ammonia-catalyzed hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane using cationic surfactant as gallery template, and subsequently, the formed interlayered pore walls were decorated with nano-sized TiO2 particle through organic titanium functionalization process. The kind of structural transformation has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), elemental analysis (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Such results indicate that most of the grafted titanium species was combined with Si-OH on the surface of gallery pores. By changing the concentration of organic titanium source during synthesis, the porous structure system is effected. Under suitable conditions, these materials exhibit high adsorption capacity and efficiency. Qualitative estimates of the thermodynamic parameters showed that the overall adsorption process is spontaneous (ΔG° < 0) and endothermic (ΔH° > 0). The adsorption isotherms of Cr(VI) on titanium-functionalized silica-pillared clay were best fitted by Redlich-Peterson models. Detail results of thermodynamics and kinetics are also presented.

  6. Naphthene upgrading with pillared synthetic clay catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R.K.; Olson, E.S.

    1995-12-31

    Catalytic hydrotreatment of methylcyclohexane was investigated to model upgrading of coal-derived naphthenes. Nickel-substituted synthetic mica montmorillonite (NiSMM), alumina-pillared NiSMM, and zirconia-pillared NiSMM were prepared and tested for hydrocracking and hydroisomerization of mediylcyclohexane. Infrared and thermal desorption studies of the pyridine-adsorbed catalysts indicated the presence of Lewis as well as Bronsted acid sites. Total acidity and surface area increased with pillaring of NiSMM with polyoxy aluminum and polyoxy zirconium cations. Most of the products were branched alkanes (isoparaffins). These compositions are highly desirable for environmentally acceptable transportation fuels. Furthermore, dehydrogenation was not a major pathway, as indicated by the minimal formation of aromatic hydrocarbons, coke, or other oligomeric materials. This paper describes the effect of various operating conditions, which included reaction temperature, contact time, hydrogen pressure, and catalyst on the product distribution.

  7. Pillared smectite clay coatings for ceramic-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jagota, S.; Harmer, M.A.; Lemon, M.F.; Jagota, A.; McCarron, E.M. III.

    1995-08-01

    This paper describes a novel route for the low-temperature formation of mullite, from pillared smectite clay precursors, for use as fiber coatings in ceramic-matrix composites. In particular, alumina-pillared bentonite converts in part to mullite at the unusually low temperature of about 800 C. The clay precursors display excellent film-forming capability and have been coated onto silicon carbide fibers. Mechanical tests on composites of the coated fibers and a borosilicate glass demonstrate their success as debond coatings, suggesting that this approach is a viable and simple route to oxide coatings for fibers.

  8. Xenon-129 NMR study of the microporous structure of clays and pillared clays

    SciTech Connect

    Tsiao, C.; Carrado, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    {sup 129}Xe NMR studies have been carried out using xenon gas adsorbed in clays and pillared clays. Data from the measurements provide information on the pore structure of clays before and after pillaring. The results indicate that the effective pore diameter of montmorillonite increases, for example, from 5.4 {Angstrom} to 8.0 {Angstrom} after pillaring cheto-montmorillonite with aluminum polyoxohydroxy Keggin cations. The data are consistent with X-ray powder diffraction results, which show a corresponding increase in the interlamellar gallery height from 5.6 {Angstrom} to 8.4 {Angstrom}.

  9. Modified clay sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Fogler, H. Scott; Srinivasan, Keeran R.

    1990-01-01

    A novel modified clay sorbent and method of treating industrial effluents to remove trace pollutants, such as dioxins, biphenyls, and polyaromatics such as benzo(a)pyrene and pentachlorophenol. The novel clay sorbent has a composite structure in which the interlayer space of an expandable clay, such as smectite, is filled with polyvalent or multivalent inorganic cations which forces weaker surfactant cations to locate on the surface of the clay in such an orientation that the resulting composite is hydrophilic in nature. A specific example is cetylpyridinium-hydroxy aluminum-montmorillonite. In certain embodiments, a non-expanding clay, such as kaolinite, is used and surfactant cations are necessarily located on an external surface of the clay. A specific example is cetylpyridinium-kaolinite.

  10. Single and multi-component adsorptive removal of bisphenol A and 2,4-dichlorophenol from aqueous solutions with transition metal modified inorganic-organic pillared clay composites: Effect of pH and presence of humic acid.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Martínez, Krisiam; Reddy, Pratap; Cabrera-Lafaurie, Wilman A; Román, Félix R; Hernández-Maldonado, Arturo J

    2016-07-15

    Pillared clay based composites containing transition metals and a surfactant, namely MAlOr-NaBt (Bt=bentonite; Or=surfactant; M=Ni(2+), Cu(2+)or Co(2+)), were prepared to study selectivity and capacity toward single and multiple-component adsorption of bisphenol A (BPA) and 2,4-diclorophenol (DCP) from water. Tests were also performed to account for the presence of natural organic matter in the form of humic acid (HA). Equilibrium adsorption capacities for single components increased as follows: NaBtpillared clay capacities. Inclusion of the transition metal brought an increase of nearly two-fold in adsorption capacity over the materials modified only with surfactant. The MAlOr-NaBt adsorbents displayed remarkable selectivity for BPA. Multi-component fixed-bed tests, however, revealed competition between the adsorbates, with the exception of the CuAlOr-NaBt beds. Inclusion of HA, surprisingly, enhanced the phenols adsorption capacity. Preliminary regeneration tests suggested that the adsorbent capacity can be recovered via thermal treatment or by washing with alkaline solutions. The former strategy, however, requires surfactant replenishment. More complex schemes would be needed to deal with absorbed HA. PMID:27037481

  11. Interactions of Monovalent Organic Cations with Pillared Clays.

    PubMed

    Mishael; Rytwo; Nir; Crespin; Annabi-Bergaya; Van Damme H

    1999-01-01

    Interactions between an acid-activated pillared clay and several organic cations including dyes (methylene blue, MB; crystal violet, CV; acriflavin, AF) and benzyl derivatives (benzyltrimethylammonium, BTMA; benzyltriethylammonium, BTEA) were studied by adsorption measurements and X-ray diffraction. When the dyes were adsorbed from low ionic strength solutions, adsorption was irreversible but saturated at levels below the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the clay (0.6 meq/g). The difference with CEC value was largest for CV. This mode of adsorption was interpreted in terms of interlayer adsorption with steric hindrance in the pillared galleries. On the other hand, when the dyes were adsorbed from high ionic strength solutions, adsorption levels well beyond the CEC of the clay could be reached, in particular for MB and CV. This was interpreted in terms of a second adsorption mode, involving formation of molecular aggregates on the outer surface of the clay, as evidenced by X-ray diffraction. The behavior of the cationic benzyl derivatives was markedly different, with an adsorption level always below the CEC and a decrease of adsorption as the ionic strength was increased, as expected for non-complex-forming cations. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:9878144

  12. Pillared Interlayered Clays as Adsorbents of Gases and Vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, J.; Pinto, M. L.

    This chapter reviews recent works where porous materials prepared from clays, particularly pillared interlayered clays (PILCs), were studied as gas phase adsorbents. It also includes the cases which used the adsorption of gases and vapors for the nanotextural characterization of the materials, other than the usual low temperature nitrogen adsorption. This is, for instance, the case of the adsorption of molecules of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), with various dimensions and shapes, which can be used as probe molecules for the characterization of the porosity or concerning the topic of the VOCs abatement. A similar situation occurs with water adsorption, whose results can be informative not only on the desiccant properties of the materials but also on their surface chemistry. A more recent line of studies of adsorption by materials prepared from clays, namely, the hydrocarbon purification from natural gas or biogas, was also addressed.

  13. Hydroconversion reactions catalyzed by highly stable pillared clays

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, S.A.; Mosqueira, L.; Espinosa, J.; Fuentes, G.A.

    1993-12-31

    Al-pillared clays (Al-PILC) and Al-X-PILC (X = Ga, Ni), structurally stable at high temperature - in the case of Ga above 800{degrees}C-have been synthesized by controlling intercalation steps and stabilization procedures. New bidimensional materials with an interlaminar distance about 10-12{angstrom} and with different chemical reactivities in the pillars have thus been produced. The analytical techniques employed to characterize the materials and the processes involved during stabilization include N{sub 2} adsorption, AA, XRD, NH{sub 3}-TPD, TGA-DTA, HR- and MAS-NMR (Al, Si, and Ga) and in-situ IR and DRIFTS. Chemical characterization using high pressure reactions with probe molecules such as diphenylmethane and tert-butylbenzene shows selectivity patterns than can be clearly associated with the microstructure of the PILC used, as well as an effect due to the composition of the pillars. Similar studies with zeolites give patterns that differ from those of PILC, probably because of the change in dimensionality of the internal structure. Poisoning studies with metal porphyrins prove that PLIC have improved resistance compared to standard catalysts. Hydrotreatment of Maya crude results a significant reduction in total sulfur under conditions suitable for commercial operation.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of TiO2-pillared Romanian clay and their application for azoic dyes photodegradation.

    PubMed

    Dvininov, E; Popovici, E; Pode, R; Cocheci, L; Barvinschi, P; Nica, V

    2009-08-15

    The synthesis and properties of metal oxide pillared cationic clays (PILCs) has been subject to numerous studies in the last decades. In order to obtain TiO(2)-pillared type materials, sodium montmorillonite from Romania-areal of Valea Chioarului, having the following composition (% wt): SiO(2)-72.87; Al(2)O(3)-14.5; MgO-2.15; Fe(2)O(3)-1.13; Na(2)O-0.60; K(2)O-0.60; CaO-0.90; PC-5.70 and cation exchange capacity, determined by ammonium acetate method, of 82 meq/100g, as matrix, was used. Sodium form of the clay was modified, primarily, by intercalation of cetyl-trimethylammonium cations between negatively charged layers which will lead to the expansion of the interlayer space. For the preparation of the TiO(2)-pillared clay, the alkoxide molecules, as titania precursor, were adsorbed onto/into clay samples (1 mmol Ti/g clay), in hydrochloric acid environment, the resulted species being converted into TiO(2) pillars by calcination. The as-prepared materials have been used as catalysts for Congo Red dye photodegradation, under UV. The photocatalytic activity of the pillared clays is a function of TiO(2) pillars size, their increase leading to the enhancement of the contact areas between dye solution and photoactive species present in the interlayer space. The structural characteristics and properties of the obtained materials were investigated by X-ray Diffraction, Thermogravimetry Analysis, UV-vis Diffuse Reflectance, Transmission Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis. PMID:19250741

  15. Use of Pillared Clay-Based Catalysts for Wastewater Treatment Through Fenton-Like Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herney-Ramírez, J.; Madeira, Luis M.

    Clays, both natural and physical-chemically modified, are attractive materials for the preparation of supported catalysts. In this chapter, a review is made regarding the use of pillared interlayered clays (PILCs) in heterogeneous Fenton-like advanced oxidation processes. Their applications in pollutants degradation is summarized, with particular emphasis on the effect of the main operating conditions (e.g., initial H2O2 or parent compound concentration, catalyst load, pH, or temperature) on oxidation efficiency. Special attention is also given to the type of catalyst or precursor used, to the importance and advantages of the heterogeneous versus homogeneous process, and to significant aspects like catalyst stability. Among the technological issues that are of concern, the importance of using continuous flow reactors (e.g., fixed-bed) is discussed. Finally, some mechanistic studies are reviewed as well as modeling works, based on phenomenological or semi-empiric models (e.g., using statistic tools like design of experiments).

  16. Effect of the platinum content on the microstructure and micropore size distribution of Pt/alumina-pillared clays.

    PubMed

    Barrera-Vargas, M; Valencia-Rios, J; Vicente, M A; Korili, S A; Gil, A

    2005-12-15

    The aim of this work is to study the effect of the platinum content (0-1.8 wt % Pt) on the microstructure of an alumina-pillared clay. For this purpose, the nitrogen physisorption data at -196 degrees C, the micropore size distributions of the supported platinum catalysts, and the hydrogen chemisorption results at 30 degrees C have been analyzed and compared. The preparation of the catalysts has modified the textural properties of the Al-pillared clay support, giving rise to a loss of surface area and micropore volume. After reduction at 420 degrees C, the presence of dispersed metallic platinum with mean crystallite size in the 22-55 A range has been found by hydrogen adsorption. Comparison of all results reveals that the platinum species block the micropore entrances by steric hindrance to nitrogen access as the platinum content increases. PMID:16375319

  17. Single and multi-component adsorption of salicylic acid, clofibric acid, carbamazepine and caffeine from water onto transition metal modified and partially calcined inorganic-organic pillared clay fixed beds.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Lafaurie, Wilman A; Román, Félix R; Hernández-Maldonado, Arturo J

    2015-01-23

    Fixed-beds of transition metal (Co(2+), Ni(2+) or Cu(2+)) inorganic-organic pillared clays (IOCs) were prepared to study single- and multi-component non-equilibrium adsorption of a set of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs: salicylic acid, clofibric acid, carbamazepine and caffeine) from water. Adsorption capacities for single components revealed that the copper(II) IOCs have better affinity toward salicylic and clofibric acid. However, multi-component adsorption tests showed a considerable decrease in adsorption capacity for the acids and an unusual selectivity toward carbamazepine depending on the transition metal. This was attributed to a combination of competition between PPCPs for adsorption sites, adsorbate-adsorbate interactions, and plausible pore blocking caused by carbamazepine. The cobalt(II) IOC bed that was partially calcined to fractionate the surfactant moiety showcased the best selectivity toward caffeine, even during multi-component adsorption. This was due to a combination of a mildly hydrophobic surface and interaction between the PPCP and cobalt(II). In general, the tests suggest that these IOCs may be a potential solution for the removal of PPCPs if employed in a layered-bed configuration, to take care of families of adsorbates in a sequence that would produce sharpened concentration wavefronts. PMID:24680542

  18. Sorption of basic dyes onto granulated pillared clays: thermodynamic and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Cheknane, B; Zermane, F; Baudu, M; Bouras, O; Basly, J P

    2012-09-01

    Effect of the granulation process onto the thermodynamic and kinetic sorption parameters of two basic dyes (Basic Yellow 28-BY 28 and Basic Green 4-BG 4) was evaluated in the present work. The charge surface properties of the surfactant-modified aluminium-pillared clay (CTAB-Al-Mont-PILC) particles were not modified, and the isoelectric point remains constant after high shear wet granulation. The Gibbs free energy of both BY 28 and BG 4 sorption was negative and decreased with the granulation; the endothermic nature of the sorption process was confirmed by the positive values of ΔH°. Adsorption kinetics of the two dyes, studied at pH 6 and 150 mg L(-1), follow the pseudo-first order kinetic model with observed rate constants of 2.5-4.2×10(-2) min(-1). The intraparticle diffusion model, proposed by Weber and Morris, was applied, and the intraparticle plots revealed three distinct sections representing external mass transfer, intraparticle diffusion and adsorption/desorption equilibrium. Diffusion coefficients, calculated from the Boyd kinetic equation, increased with the granulation and the particle size. Pseudo-first order kinetic constants, intraparticle diffusion rate constants and diffusion coefficients were determined for two other initial concentrations (50 and 100 mg L(-1)) and include in a statistical study to evaluate the impact of granulation and initial concentration on the kinetic parameters. Kruskal-Wallis tests, Spearman's rank order correlation and factor analysis revealed a correlation between (i) the diffusion coefficients and granulation, and between (ii) the intraparticle diffusion rate constants and initial concentration. PMID:22721789

  19. Self-assembling electron-transport chains at electrodes modified with clay and related microporous solids

    SciTech Connect

    Rong, D.

    1992-01-01

    Clay-modified electrodes (CME) were made by binding Al[sub 13]O[sub 4](OH)[sub 28][sup 3+]-pillared montmorillonite to SnO[sub 2] surfaces via a 2-4 monolayer thick coating of polymerized silane. The cationic polymer provides binding sites for anions, while the relatively remote clay surface strongly absorbs cations. When the CME is exchanged with Fe(CN)[sub 6][sup 4[minus

  20. Pillared clays as superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Second semiannual report, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, R.T.; Li, W.B.; Sirilumpen, M.; Tharapiwattananon, N.

    1997-08-01

    During the first six months of the program, the work has progressed as planned. We have constructed a reactor system and assembled all laboratory essentials for conducting the three-year project. First, the catalytic activities of the Cu(2+) ion exchanged alumina-pillared clay for the selective catalytic reduction of NO by ethylene were measured. The temperature range was 250-500{degrees}C. The activities of this catalyst were substantially higher than the catalyst that has been extensively studied in the literature, Cu-ZSM-5. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to study the acidity of the catalyst. The second part of the work was an in-depth FTIR study of the NO decomposition mechanism on the catalyst. This was planned as the first and the key step to obtain an understanding of the reaction mechanism. Key surface intermediates were identified from the FTIR spectra, and a redox type Eley-Rideal mechanism was proposed for the NO decomposition on this catalyst. This report will be divided into two parts. In Part One, we report results on the catalytic activities of the Cu-alumina-pillared clay and a direct comparison with other known catalysts. In Part two, we focus on the FTIR study and from the results, we propose a NO decomposition mechanism on this new catalyst. Plans for the next six months include tests of different pillared clays as well as the catalytic mechanism. The micro reactor will continue to be the key equipment for measuring the catalytic activities. FTIR will continue to be the major technique for identifying surface species and hence understanding the reaction mechanism.

  1. Fe-Al-Pillared Clays: Catalysts for Wet Peroxide Oxidation of Phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guélou, Erwan; Tatibouët, Jean-Michel; Barrault, Joël

    Catalytic phenol oxidation with hydrogen peroxide (CWPO) was performed over iron containing clays, pillared with Al or mixed Fe-Al complexes. This study deals with the better conditions for the oxidation reaction (temperature, pH, hydrogen peroxide concentration, atmosphere, etc.) in the presence of homogeneous or heterogeneous catalysts. The reaction was performed in a dynamic fixed-bed reactor, which gave the effect of the main experimental variables and an estimation of the kinetic parameters. The catalysts were characterized by classical techniques and by electron spin resonance (ESR). From ESR experiments the reaction mechanism involving hydroxyl radicals was also investigated.

  2. Montmorillonite-based porous clay heterostructures (PCHs) intercalated with silica-titania pillars-synthesis and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Chmielarz, Lucjan; Gil, Barbara; Kustrowski, Piotr; Piwowarska, Zofia; Dudek, Barbara; Michalik, Marek

    2009-05-15

    Porous clay heterostructures (PCHs) were synthesized using natural montmorillonite as a raw material. Apart from pure silica pillars also silica-titania pillars were intercalated into the interlayer space of the parent clay. The detailed studies of the calcination process of the as-prepared PCH samples as well as thermal stability of the pillared structure of these materials were performed. The pillared structure of PCHs intercalated with both silica and silica-titania clusters was found to be thermally stable up to temperatures exceeding 600 deg. C. It was found that titanium incorporated into the silica pillars was present mainly in the form of separated tetracoordinated cations. For the samples with the higher Ti loading also small contribution of titanium in the form of the polymeric oxide species was detected. Titanium incorporated into the PCH materials significantly increased their surface acidity forming mainly Bronsted acid sites. - Graphical abstract: Synthesis of the montmorillonite based porous clay heterostructures (PCHs) intercalated with silica-titania pillars has been performed. The mechanism of the thermal degradation of organic templates in the pore system of PCHs was studied. PCHs were characterized with respect to structure, texture, composition, surface acidity, thermal stability and form of introduced titanium.

  3. Synthesis of mesoporous iron-incorporated silica-pillared clay and catalytic performance for phenol hydroxylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shengjun; Liang, Guozheng; Gu, Aijuan; Mao, Huihui

    2013-11-01

    Fe-incorporated silica-pillared clays (Fe-SPCs) with ordered interlayer mesoporous structure have been synthesized through a new two-step procedure including the modification of the silica nano-pillars with potassium ferricyanide (K3Fe(CN)6) and successive calcination. X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectra, X-ray fluorescence analyses, diffuse reflectance UV-vis spectra and X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectra were used to characterize the structures and the synthesizing mechanism of Fe-SPCs. Results show that all iron species were tetrahedrally coordinated with the interlayer silica nano-pillars, and the cationic surfactant molecule plays an important role in the intercalation of tetraethoxysilane and the introduction of iron into the intragallery silica framework. Moreover, the structural parameters of Fe-SPC can be adjusted by controlling the concentration of K3Fe(CN)6, as the concentration of K3Fe(CN)6 increases from 1 M to 2 M, the gallery height of Fe-SPC increases from 2.51 to 2.66 nm, while the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, pore volume and Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) pore size decrease from 856 to 794 m2/g, 0.75 to 0.69 cm3/g, and 2.2 to 2.0 nm, respectively. The Fe-SPCs show good catalytic activity in phenol hydroxylation using H2O2 as oxidant (phenol:H2O2 = 1:1, water), specifically, the phenol conversion is 46.2%, and the selectivity of dihydroxybenzenes is 70.6% at 343 K.

  4. Adsorption of probe molecules in pillared interlayered clays: Experiment and computer simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gallardo, A. Guil, J. M.; Lomba, E.; Almarza, N. G.; Khatib, S. J.; Cabrillo, C.; Sanz, A.; Pires, J.

    2014-06-14

    In this paper we investigate the adsorption of various probe molecules in order to characterize the porous structure of a series of pillared interlayered clays (PILC). To that aim, volumetric and microcalorimetric adsorption experiments were performed on various Zr PILC samples using nitrogen, toluene, and mesitylene as probe molecules. For one of the samples, neutron scattering experiments were also performed using toluene as adsorbate. Various structural models are proposed and tested by means of a comprehensive computer simulation study, using both geometric and percolation analysis in combination with Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations in order to model the volumetric and microcalorimetric isotherms. On the basis of this analysis, we propose a series of structural models that aim at accounting for the adsorption experimental behavior, and make possible a microscopic interpretation of the role played by the different interactions and steric effects in the adsorption processes in these rather complex disordered microporous systems.

  5. CWPO of 4-CP and industrial wastewater with Al-Fe pillared clays.

    PubMed

    Molina, C B; Zazo, J A; Casas, J A; Rodriguez, J J

    2010-01-01

    Catalysts based on pillared clays with Al-Fe have been synthesised from a commercial bentonite and tested for catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) of aqueous 4-Chlorophenol (4-CP) solution and industrial wastewater from cosmetics manufacture. The effect of the synthesis procedure, the iron load and reaction temperature on the catalytic activity was studied using 4-CP as target compound. A lower temperature in the preparation of the pillaring solution, as well as a higher Fe load, gave rise to a higher catalytic activity, but also a higher leaching of the active phase. The best catalyst, in terms of catalytic activity, was also tested for treating cosmetic wastewater by CWPO. Experiments were carried out at 90 degrees C and atmospheric pressure and the influence of Fe load, catalyst concentration and H(2)O(2)/COD ratio (between 0.5 and 2 times the stoichiometric ratio) were analysed. Higher values of these parameters favour COD reduction. The Fe leaching in all cases was lower than 1.2 mg/L, indicating that these catalysts have a high stability under these experimental conditions. PMID:20389016

  6. PILLARED CLAYS AS SUPERIOR CATALYSTS FOR SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITRIC OXIDE

    SciTech Connect

    R.Q. Long; N. Tharappiwattananon; W.B. Li; R.T. Yang

    2000-09-01

    Removal of NO{sub x} (NO + NO{sub 2}) from exhaust gases is a challenging subject. V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-based catalysts are commercial catalysts for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH{sub 3} for stationary sources. However, for diesel and lean-burn gasoline engines in vehicles, hydrocarbons would be the preferred reducing agents over NH{sub 3} because of the practical problems associated with the use of NH{sub 3} (i.e., handling and slippage through the reactor). The noble-metal three-way catalysts are not effective under these conditions. The first catalyst found to be active for selective catalytic reduction of NO by hydrocarbons in the presence of excess oxygen was copper exchanged ZSM-5 and other zeolites, reported in 1990 by Iwamoto in Japan and Held et al. in Germany. Although Cu-ZSM-5 is very active and the most intensively studied catalyst, it suffers from severe deactivation in engine tests, mainly due to H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}. In this project, we found that ion-exchanged pillared clays and MCM-41 catalysts showed superior SCR activities of NO with hydrocarbon. All Cu{sup 2+}-exchanged pillared clays showed higher SCR activities than Cu-ZSM-5 reported in the literature. In particular, H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2} only slightly deactivated the SCR activity of Cu-TiO{sub 2}-PILC, whereas severe deactivation was observed for Cu-ZSM-5. Moreover, Pt/MCM-41 provided the highest specific NO reduction rates as compared with other Pt doped catalysts, i.e., Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Pt/SiO{sub 2} and Pt/ZSM-5. The Pt/MCM-41 catalyst also showed a good stability in the presence of H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}.

  7. Organically modified clay removes oil from water

    SciTech Connect

    Alther, G.R.

    1995-12-31

    When bentonite or other clays and zeolites are modified with quaternary amines, they become organophilic. Such modified bentonites are used to remove mechanically emulsified oil and grease, and other sparingly soluble organics. If the organoclay is granulated, it is placed into a liquid phase carbon filter vessel to remove FOG`s and chlorinated hydrocarbons. In this application the clay is mixed with anthrazite to prevent early plugging of the filter by oil or grease droplets. In batch systems a powered organoclay is employed. Types of oil found in water can include fats, lubricants, cutting fluids, heavy hydrocarbons such as tars, grease, crude oil, diesel oils; and light hydrocarbons such as kerosene, jet fuel, and gasoline.

  8. Highly thermostable anatase titania-pillared clay for the photocatalytic degradation of airborne styrene.

    PubMed

    Lim, Melvin; Zhou, Yan; Wood, Barry; Wang, Lian Zhou; Rudolph, Victor; Lu, Gao Qing

    2009-01-15

    Airborne styrene is a suspected human carcinogen, and traditional ways of mitigation include the use of adsorption technologies (activated carbon or zeolites) or thermal destruction. These methods presenttheir own shortcomings, i.e., adsorbents need to be regenerated or replaced regularly, and relatively large energy inputs are required in thermal treatment. Photocatalysis offers a potentially sustainable and clean means of controlling such fugitive emissions of styrene in air. The present study demonstrates a new type of well-characterized, highly thermostable titania-pillared clay photocatalysts for airborne styrene decomposition in a custom-designed fluidized-bed photoreactor. This photocatalytic system is found to be capable of destroying up to 87% of 300 ppmV airborne styrene in the presence of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The effects of relative humidity (RH: 0 or 20%) are also studied, together with the arising physical structures (in terms of porosity and surface characteristics) of the catalysts when subjected to relatively high calcination temperatures of 1000-1200 degrees C. Such a temperature range may be encountered, e.g., in flue gas emissions (1). It is found that relative humidity levels of 20% retard the degradation efficiencies of airborne styrene when using highly porous catalysts. PMID:19238991

  9. Iron oxide pillared clay with large gallery height: Synthesis and properties as a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Rightor, E.G.; Tsou, Mingshin; Pinnavaia, T.J. )

    1991-07-01

    New iron oxide pillared montmorillonites have been prepared by the reaction of Na{sup +} montmorillonite with base-hydrolyzed solutions of Fe{sup 3+} salts and subsequent thermal conversion of the intercalated polycations. Depending on the hydrolysis conditions used to generate the pillaring solutions, pillared products with basal spacings in the range 18 to 25 {angstrom} were obtained. Under optimum hydrolysis conditions (base/metal = 2.0 meq/mol, aging time = 23-147 hr) the pillared products contained 6.8-9.8 Fe{sup 3+} ions per O{sub 20}(OH){sub 4} unit cell and exhibited basal spacings of 25-29 {angstrom}. These latter spacings corresponded to exceptionally large gallery heights of 15-19 {angstrom}. Upon calcination at 300C, the spacings decreased to 23-27 {angstrom}. N{sub 2} BET surface areas after outgassing at 350C were in the range 270 to 350 m{sup 2}/g. The pillared products are active catalysts that have undergone Fischer-Tropsch synthesis of hydrocarbons at 275 C and 120 {minus}psi (CO:H{sub 2}=1:2). The hydrocarbon distribution in the C{sub 1}-C{sub 6} range (1.3% conversion) followed Anderson-Schulz-Flory statistics with a chain propagation probability of {alpha} = 0.49. X-ray energy dispersive analysis indicated that substantial amounts of the intercalated iron migrated to the edge sites of the clay particles under reaction conditions. The redistribution of iron resulted in a distribution of gallery heights sufficiently heterogeneous to preclude Bragg X-ray scattering along the 001 direction. Iron migration also occurred upon exposure of the pillared products to the ambient atmosphere for prolonged periods ({ge}3 months).

  10. PILLARED CLAYS AS SUPERIOR CATALYSTS FOR SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITRIC OXIDE

    SciTech Connect

    R. T. Yang; R.Q. Long

    1999-03-31

    In the last annual reports, we reported Cu-exchanged pillared clays as superior selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. During the past year we explored the possibilities with MCM-41, a new class of molecular sieve. In this report, Rh exchanged Al-MCM-41 is studied for the SCR of NO by C{sub 3}H{sub 6} in the presence of excess oxygen. It shows a high activity in converting NO to N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O at low temperatures. In situ FT-IR studies indicate that Rh-NO{sup +} species (1910-1898 cm{sup {minus}1}) is formed on the Rh-Al-MCM-41 catalyst in flowing NO/He, NO+O{sub 2}/He and NO+C{sub 3}H{sub 6}+O{sub 2}/He at 100-350 C. This species is quite active in reacting with propylene and/or propylene adspecies (e.g., {pi}-C{sub 3}H{sub 5}, polyene, etc.) at 250 C in the presence/absence of oxygen, leading to the formation of the isocyanate species (Rh-NCO, at 2174 cm{sup {minus}1}), CO and CO{sub 2}. Rh-NCO is also detected under reaction conditions. A possible reaction pathway for reduction of NO by C{sub 3}H{sub 6} is proposed. In the SCR reaction, Rh-NO{sup +} and propylene adspecies react to generate the Rh-NCO species, then Rh-NCO reacts with O{sub 2}, NO and NO{sub 2} to produce N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}. Rh-NO{sup +} and Rh-NCO species are two main intermediates for the SCR reaction on Rh-Al-MCM-41 catalyst.

  11. Organically modified clay removes oil from water

    SciTech Connect

    Alther, G.R.

    1995-12-31

    When bentonite or other clays and zeolite are modified with quaternary amines, they become organophilic. Such modified bentonites are used to remove mechanically emulsified oil and grease, and other sparingly soluble organics. Types of oil found in water can include fats, lubricants, cutting fluids, heavy hydrocarbons such as tars, grease, crude oil, diesel oils; and light hydrocarbons such as kerosene, jet fuel, and gasoline. If the organoclay is granulated, it is placed into a liquid phase carbon filter vessel to remove FOGs (Free Oil and Grease) and chlorinated hydrocarbons. In this application the clay is mixed with anthrazite to prevent early plugging of the filter by oil or grease droplets. In batch systems a powdered organoclay is employed. Organoclay removes mechanically emulsified oil and grease at 5--7 times the rate of activated carbon, or 50% of its dry weight. Oil and grease and other large sparingly soluble chlorinated hydrocarbons and NOMs (Natural Organic Matter) blind the pores of activated carbon (and ion-exchange resins), reducing its effectiveness significantly. It is therefore economically advantageous for the end user to prepolish the water before it enters carbon vessels. Operating costs can often be reduced by 50% or more.

  12. Effective Removal of Heavy Metals from Wastewater Using Modified Clay.

    PubMed

    Song, Mun-Seon; Vijayarangamuthu, K; Han, EunJi; Jeon, Ki-Joon

    2016-05-01

    We report an economical and eco-friendly way to remove the heavy metal pollutant using modified clay. The modification of clay was done by calcining the natural clay from Kyushu region in Japan. Further, the removal efficiency for various pH and contact time was evaluated. The morphology of the clays was studied using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The structural and chemical analyses of modified clay were done by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and Energy dispersion analysis (EDAX) to understand the properties related to the removal of heavy metal pollutant. Further, we studied the absorption efficiency of clay for various pH and contacting time using Ni polluted water. The modified clays show better removal efficiency for all pH with different saturation time. The adsorption follows pseudo-second order kinetics and the adsorption capacity of modified clay is 1.5 times larger than that of natural clay. The increase in the adsorption efficiency of modified clay was correlated to the increase in hematite phase along with increase in surface area due to surface morphological changes. PMID:27483775

  13. Epoxy nanocomposites based on high temperature pyridinium-modified clays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingxin; Naito, Kimiyoshi; Qi, Ben; Kagawa, Yutaka

    2009-01-01

    Polymer/clay nanocomposites are generally fabricated by thermal curing or melt compounding at elevated temperatures, however the thermal stability of common alkyl ammonium treated clays is poor and decomposition occurs inevitably during high temperature processing. In this study, we modified clays with an aromatic pyridinium salt. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the onset degradation temperature (Td(onset)) and maximum decomposition temperature (Td(max)) of the pyridinium treatment clays was up to 310 and 457 degrees C respectively implying high thermal stability. The thermal decomposition behaviour of the pyridinium modified clays was discussed. A series of epoxy/clay nanocomposites were synthesized using a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy and diethyltoluene diamine (DETDA). The morphology of epoxy/clay nanocomposites was characterized with wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM), and intercalated structures were observed. The storage modulus of epoxy was increased but glass transition temperature was decreased with clay incorporation. The effects of clays on glass transition temperature (Tg) of epoxy were also discussed. PMID:19441298

  14. Controlling harmful algae blooms using aluminum-modified clay.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Cao, Xihua; Yu, Zhiming; Song, Xiuxian; Qiu, Lixia

    2016-02-15

    The performances of aluminum chloride modified clay (AC-MC), aluminum sulfate modified clay (AS-MC) and polyaluminum chloride modified clay (PAC-MC) in the removal of Aureococcus anophagefferens were compared, and the potential mechanisms were analyzed according to the dispersion medium, suspension pH and clay surface charges. The results showed that AC-MC and AS-MC had better efficiencies in removing A.anophagefferens than PAC-MC. The removal mechanisms of the three modified clays varied. At optimal coagulation conditions, the hydrolysates of AC and AS were mainly monomers, and they transformed into Al(OH)3(am) upon their addition to algae culture, with the primary mechanism being sweep flocculation. The PAC mainly hydrolyzed to the polyaluminum compounds, which remained stable when added to the algae culture, and the flocculation mainly occurred through polyaluminum compounds. The suspension pH significantly influenced the aluminum hydrolysate and affected the flocculation between the modified clay and algae cells. PMID:26763322

  15. Cyclic voltammetry of aquocobalamin on clay-modified electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Borek, V.; Morra, M.J.

    1998-07-15

    Halogenated synthetic compounds are widespread contaminants of the environment. Although corrinoids reductively dehalogenate synthetic contaminants in solution, the redox behavior of sorbed tetrapyrroles has received limited attention. Colloidal clay suspensions were prepared as Ca{sup 2+} forms of hectorite (SHCa-1), montmorillonite (SWy-1, Syn-1, and SAz-1), and vermiculite (VTx-1) and spin coated on platinum electrodes. Cyclic voltammetry was performed with the clay-modified electrodes immersed in buffered solutions containing 1.0 mM aquocobalamin. Aquocobalamin in the presence of vermiculite-coated electrodes displayed the same cathodic and anodic peak potentials as unmodified electrodes immersed in aquocobalamin solutions. All other clay-modified electrodes shifted cathodic peaks to more negative values, while anodic peak shifts varied with the clay. Hectorite caused the largest shift in formal redox potential as compared to aquocobalamin in solution. The redox behavior of aquocobalamin as modified by sorption to clay minerals potentially affects dehalogenation rates of synthetic organic compounds in the environment. Clays lowering the formal redox potential of the tetrapyrrole create a potentially more efficient catalyst for pollutant degradation. However, thermodynamic data as obtained using cyclic voltammetry cannot be used to make definitive predictions about the kinetics of contaminant dehalogenation. Reductive dehalogenation will be a function of altered electrochemical properties of the tetrapyrrole as well as rates of contaminant diffusion to the site of tetrapyrrole sorption.

  16. Fenton-like processes and adsorption using iron oxide-pillared clay with magnetic properties for organic compound mitigation.

    PubMed

    Tireli, Aline Auxiliadora; Guimarães, Iara do Rosário; Terra, Júlio César de Souza; da Silva, Robson Rosa; Guerreiro, Mário Cesar

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a new step was added to the classic route of iron-pillared clay obtention, resulting in a material with both magnetic and oxidative properties. The saturation of the material surface intercalated with trinuclear acetate-hydroxo iron (III) nitrate in glacial acetic acid atmosphere before heat treatment promoted magnetic phase formation (FePMAG). The material was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms, scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). FePMAG showed an increase of 0.57 nm in basal spacing which contributed to the specific surface area increase from 39.1 to 139.2 m(2)/g. The iron phase identified by XRD and XPS was maghemite, with a little presence of hematite formed by the trinuclear acetate-hydroxo iron (III) nitrate decomposition during heat treatment. In the adsorption tests, FePMAG displayed a good capacity for organic dye methylene blue (MB) removal, reaching 41 % at 150 min. Under photo-Fenton conditions, the material showed an excellent MB oxidation capacity, completely removing the color of the solution within 90 min. Identification of the oxidation products with lower molecular (m/z = 160, 220, and 369) mass was performed by electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS). PMID:24809496

  17. Surfactant-modified bentonite clays: preparation, characterization, and atrazine removal.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Anirban; Singh, Neera

    2015-03-01

    Bentonite clay was modified using quaternary ammonium cations, viz. phenyltrimethylammonium (PTMA), hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA), trioctylmethylammonium (TOMA) [100 % of cation exchange capacity of clay], and stearylkonium (SK) [100 % (SK-I) and 250 % (SK-II) of cation exchange capacity of clay]. The organoclays were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Atrazine adsorption on modified clays was studied using a batch method. Bentonite clay was a poor adsorbent of atrazine as 9.4 % adsorption was observed at 1 μg mL(-1) atrazine concentration. Modification of clay by PTMA cation did not improve atrazine adsorption capacity. However, atrazine adsorption in HDTMA-, TOMA-, and SK-bentonites varied between 49 and 72.4 % and data fitted well to the Freundlich adsorption isotherm (R > 0.96). Adsorption of atrazine in organoclays was nonlinear and slope (1/n) values were <1. The product of Freundlich adsorption constants, K f(1/n) in HDTMA-, TOMA-, and SK-I-bentonites was 239.2, 302.4, and 256.6, respectively, while increasing the SK cation loading in the clay (SK-II) decreased atrazine adsorption [K f(1/n) - 196.4]. Desorption of atrazine from organoclays showed hysteresis and TOMA- and SK-I-bentonites were the best organoclays to retain the adsorbed atrazine. Organoclays showed better atrazine removal from wastewater than an aqueous solution. The synthesized organoclays may find application in soil and water decontamination and as a carrier for atrazine-controlled released formulations. PMID:25273519

  18. Modified clays for waste containment and pollutant attenuation

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, I.M.C.; Mak, R.K.M.; Lee, S.C.H.

    1997-01-01

    In this study, the use of organically modified clay to remove the high-strength organic pollutants in leachate as well as reduce its liquid flow was investigated. Various physical and chemical factors that may affect the suitability of using the modified clay in removing and retarding the movement of contaminants have been examined. These factors include the structural stability of the modified clay, soil and swelling properties, sorption capacity for nonpolar and polar organics at different pH solutions, and chemical permeants on clay permeability under different effective stresses. The uptake of eight organics (benzene, toluene, o-xylene, ethylbenzene, phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol) by organoclay BB-40 is found to be significant and increases with an increase in their hydrophobicity. The hydraulic conductivities of organoclay BB-40 under an effective stress of 70 kN/m{sup 2} ({approximately}10 psi) are 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} cm/s to tap water, 1.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} cm/s to landfill codisposal leachate, and 1.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} cm/s to synthetic leachate. The experimental results suggest that the use of organoclay as a liner material would provide a barrier with the ability to effectively remove dissolved organic contaminants, and to resist the flow of leachate.

  19. Searching for reciclability of modified clays for an environmental application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Hoyo Martínez, Carmen; Solange Lozano García, Marina; Sánchez Escribano, Vicente; Antequera, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    Thanks to the development of the science and the technology of the nourishment in the last 50 years, there have revealed itself several new substances that can fulfill beneficial functions in the food, and these substances, named food additives, are today within reach of all. The food additives recover a very important role in the complex nourishing supply. The additives fulfill several useful functions in the food, which often we give for sat. Nevertheless the widespread use of food additives in the food production also influences the public health. The food industries, which are very important for the economy, spill residues proved from its activity that they have to be controlled to evaluate the environmental impact and to offer the necessary information about the quantitative evaluation of the chemical risk of the use of food additives for the public health. The clay materials have led to numerous applications in the field of public health (del Hoyo, 2007; Volzone, 2007) having been demonstrated its effectiveness as adsorbents of all contaminants. Some biodegradable materials are used for for adsorption of chemical contaminants: lignins (Valderrabano et al., 2008) and also clays and clay minerals, whose colloidal properties, ease of generating structural changes, abundance in nature, and low cost make them very suitable for this kind of applications. Among the strategies used at present to preserve the quality of the water and this way to diminish the environmental risk that supposes the chemical pollution, stands out the use of adsorbents of under cost, already they are natural or modified, to immobilize these compounds and to avoid the pollution of the water with the consequent reduction of environmental and economic costs. We have studied the adsorption of several contaminants related to the food industry by natural or modified clays, searching their interaction mechanisms and the possible recycling of these materials for environmental purposes and

  20. Biodegradable nanocomposites from toughened polyhydroxybutyrate and titanate-modified montmorillonite clay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Montmorillonite clay treated with neopentyl (diallyl)oxy tri( dioctyl) pyrophosphato-titanate was used as a reinforcement for toughened bacterial bioplastic, Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) in order to develop novel biodegradable nanocomposites. The modified clay, PHB, toughening partner and specific comp...

  1. Electrokinetic potentials of clay surfaces modified by polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Sondi, I.; Pravdic, V.; Milat, O.

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes the influence of two polymers, fulvic acid (FA) and polyacrylic acids (PAAs) of comparable molecular mass, on the electrokinetic potential of model surfaces encountered in clay minerals: silica (SiO{sub 2}), aluminum oxide ({gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and gibbsite [{gamma}-Al(OH){sub 3}]. Measurements at pH 6.5 {+-} 0.2 show that FA and PAAs modify the potentials of aluminum oxide and gibbsite, but leave the silica surface unchanged. A chlorite clay mineral (ripidolite), milled to increase the numbers of oxy-hydroxy groups at newly created surfaces, was exposed to FA and PAAs, carriers of carboxylic groups, to study their influence on electrokinetic potential. The key to the interaction is that polymers hold metal ions (Al, Mg, Fe) in the edge surfaces, while siloxane groups show limited interaction or none at all. The results offer an explanation of why clay mineral particles are always negatively charged in natural waters.

  2. Interaction of surface-modified silica nanoparticles with clay minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omurlu, Cigdem; Pham, H.; Nguyen, Q. P.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the adsorption of 5-nm silica nanoparticles onto montmorillonite and illite is investigated. The effect of surface functionalization was evaluated for four different surfaces: unmodified, surface-modified with anionic (sulfonate), cationic (quaternary ammonium (quat)), and nonionic (polyethylene glycol (PEG)) surfactant. We employed ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy to determine the concentration of adsorbed nanoparticles in conditions that are likely to be found in subsurface reservoir environments. PEG-coated and quat/PEG-coated silica nanoparticles were found to significantly adsorb onto the clay surfaces, and the effects of electrolyte type (NaCl, KCl) and concentration, nanoparticle concentration, pH, temperature, and clay type on PEG-coated nanoparticle adsorption were studied. The type and concentration of electrolytes were found to influence the degree of adsorption, suggesting a relationship between the interlayer spacing of the clay and the adsorption ability of the nanoparticles. Under the experimental conditions reported in this paper, the isotherms for nanoparticle adsorption onto montmorillonite at 25 °C indicate that adsorption occurs less readily as the nanoparticle concentration increases.

  3. CLAY AND CLAY-SUPPORTED REAGENTS IN ORGANIC SYNTHESES

    EPA Science Inventory

    CLAY AND CLAY-SUPPORTED REAGENTS HAVE BEEN USED EXTENSIVELY FOR SYNTHETIC ORGANIC TRANSFORMATIONS. THIS OVERVIEW DESCRIBES THE SALIENT STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF VARIOUS CLAY MATERIALS AND EXTENDS THE DISCUSSION TO PILLARED CLAYS AND REAGENTS SUPPORTED ON CLAY MATERIALS. A VARIET...

  4. Metal adsorption and desorption characteristics of surfactant-modified clay complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Malakul, P.; Srinivasan, K.R.; Wang, H.Y.

    1998-11-01

    Several modified clays have been designed and created for selective removal and recovery of heavy metals such as Cd, Cu, Cr, etc. These surfactant-clay complexes were prepared using hectorite or montmorillonite as the base clay. A simple two-step approach has been developed to synthesize these modified-clay complexes through ion exchange and hydrophobic anchoring of several surfactants such as long-chain alkyldiamines, long-chain dialkylamines, and long-chain carboxylic acids onto the clay matrices. The adsorption capacities and affinity constants of the modified clays can be found to approach those of commercial chelating resin (Chelex 100, Bio-Rad). Using cadmium as a model metal and montmorillonite-cetylbenzyldimethylammonium-palmitic acid (M-CBDA-PA) as a model modified-clay complex, the maximum adsorption capacity of the modified clay is found to be 42 {+-} 0.8 mg/g of clay and the affinity constant is 3.0 {+-} 0.1 mg/L. The metal adsorption has been shown to be mainly through chemical complexation rather than ion exchange. The immobilization of the metal ions is pH dependent, and thus, pH can act as a molecular switch to regenerate the modified-clay complexes.

  5. The characterization of CrCe-doped on TiO2-pillared clay nanocomposites for NO oxidation and the promotion effect of CeOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingxin; Zhang, Shule; Cai, Wei; Zhong, Qin

    2013-03-01

    A series of chromium-ceria doped on TiO2-pillared clay nanocomposites catalysts with various Cr/Ce ratios were investigated in the oxidation of NO. This study aimed to not only synthesize the CrCe/TiO2-PILC nanocomposites, but also figure out the promotion effect of Ce in the oxidation process and the interaction between chromium and ceria on the surface of TiO2-PILC. The samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, XPS and H2-TPR methods. The best catalyst Cr(1)Ce(0.25)/TiO2-pillared clay yielded 69% NO to NO2 conversion at 350 °C (in the condition of GHSV = 35,400 h-1). With the content of ceria increasing, the NO conversion increased significantly while when the Cr/Ce equaled 1:1, the activity decreased. The chromium oxides were well dispersed on the surface of the support. Analysis of XPS indicated that the addition of ceria oxides could promote the formation of chemisorbed oxygen and raise the quantivalency of Cr. The powerful electron withdrawing ability of Ce made the electron density around Ti atoms decrease. The result showed that CeOx enhanced the metal-support interaction. H2-TPR indicated that the proper addition of CeOx increased the reducible phase that was beneficial to the reaction. Moreover, the catalysts showed a good resistance to SO2 and H2O. When SO2 and H2O were added in the feed gas, the catalytic activity decreased but when removed, the activity recovered. The deactivation was not totally irreversible.

  6. Encapsulation of clay by ad-miniemulsion polymerization: the influence of clay size and modifier reactivity on latex morphology and physical properties.

    PubMed

    Zengeni, Eddson; Hartmann, Patrice C; Pasch, Harald

    2012-12-01

    The influence of clay platelet size and type of organic modifier (reactive or nonreactive) on highly filled hybrid latex morphology and physical properties of the resultant polymer/clay nanocomposites (PCNs) were investigated. The hybrid latexes, containing clay loadings between 30 and 50 wt % clay, were prepared using ad-miniemulsion polymerization. These materials have potential use in the packaging and coating industry since clay platelets are well-known for barrier property improvements. Comparative studies on the use of montmorillonite (MMT), a large clay platelet (average size: 50-500 nm), and Laponite (Lap), small-sized clay platelets (average size: 25-40 nm), were conducted. Two different clay modifiers were used to modify the clays, i.e., a conventional nonreactive modifier (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)) and a reactive modifier (vinylbenzyldodecyldimethylammonium chloride (VBDAC)). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging of the hybrid latexes clearly showed strong morphological dependency on both the type of modifier and the clay platelet size. Furthermore, TEM together with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) showed that the extent of clay exfoliation was strongly dependent on the reactivity of the clay modifier, irrespective of the clay platelet size. Both the type of modifier and clay platelets size were found to have an influence on different physical properties of the resultant PCNs. The influence of clay size was clearly indicated by storage modulus and thermal stability behaviors, while that of the clay modifier was indicated by the T(g). Lap-based PCNs exhibited constant or increasing storage modulus and no change in thermal stability with increasing clay content, while MMT-based PCNs showed a decreasing trend in both storage modulus and thermal stability. PCNs based on clay modified with CTAB showed a decreasing T(g) with increasing clay content, while those based on clay modified with VBDAC showed an increasing trend. It was

  7. Fe/Ti co-pillared clay for enhanced arsenite removal and photo oxidation under UV irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Cai, Xiaojiao; Guo, Jingwei; Zhou, Shimin; Na, Ping

    2015-01-01

    A series of iron and titanium co-pillared montmorillonites (Fe-Ti/MMT) were prepared using hydrolysis of inserted titanium and different iron content in montmorillonite (MMT). The Fe-Ti/MMT were characterized by X-ray fluorescence, N2 adsorption and desorption, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), confirming the effective insertion of Fe species and TiO2 in the MMT. The Fe-Ti/MMT was used to remove arsenite (As(III)) from aqueous solutions under different conditions. The result of As(III) adsorption under UV irradiation showed that the photo activity can be enhanced by incorporating Fe and Ti in MMT. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis indicated that the hydroxyl groups bonded to metal oxide (M-OH) played an important role in the adsorption of As(III)

  8. Effects of modified clay on cysts of Scrippsiella trochoidea for harmful algal bloom control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhifu; Yu, Zhiming; Song, Xiuxian; Cao, Xihua; Han, Xiaotian

    2014-11-01

    We present results on the effect of modified clay on cyst formation of Scrippsiella trochoidea in harmful algal bloom (HAB). Modified clay (in concentration of 0, 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 g/L) were added to cultures, and observations were made on cysts of S. trochoidea under controlled laboratory conditions. Results indicate that the removal rate of algal cells reached 97.7% at the clay concentration of 1.0 g/L. The cyst formation rate increased from 4.6% to 24.6% when the concentration of clay was increased from 0 to 1.0 g/L. Two cyst metamorphs were observed: spinal calcareous cysts and smooth noncalcareous ones. The proportion of the spinal cysts decreased from 76.9% to 24.1% when clay concentration increased from 0 to 1.0 g/L. In addition, modified clay affected cyst germination. The germination rate decreased with the increases in the clay concentrations. Non-calcareous cysts had a lower germination rate with a longer germination time. We conclude that modified clay could depress algal cell multiplication and promote formation of temporal cysts of S. trochoidea, which may help in controlling HAB outbreaks.

  9. Immobilization of fungal laccase onto a nonionic surfactant-modified clay material: application to PAH degradation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Tang; Lee, Jiunn-Fwu; Liu, Keng-Hua; Liao, Yi-Fen; Yang, Vivian

    2016-03-01

    Nonionic surfactant-modified clay is a useful absorbent material that effectively removes hydrophobic organic compounds from soil/groundwater. We developed a novel material by applying an immobilized fungal laccase onto nonionic surfactant-modified clay. Low-water-solubility polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (naphthalene/phenanthrene) were degraded in the presence of this bioactive material. PAH degradation by free laccase was higher than degradation by immobilized laccase when the surfactant concentration was allowed to form micelles. PAH degradation by immobilized laccase on TX-100-modified clay was higher than on Brij35-modified clay. Strong laccase degradation of PAH can be maintained by adding surfactant monomers or micelles. The physical adsorption of nonionic surfactants onto clay plays an important role in PAH degradation by laccase, which can be explained by the structure and molecular interactions of the surfactant with the clay and enzyme. A system where laccase is immobilized onto TX-100-monomer-modified clay is a good candidate bioactive material for in situ PAHs bioremediation. PMID:25739840

  10. Novel Organically Modified Core-Shell Clay for Epoxy Composites-"SOBM Filler 1".

    PubMed

    Iheaturu, Nnamdi Chibuike; Madufor, Innocent Chimezie

    2014-01-01

    Preparation of a novel organically modified clay from spent oil base drilling mud (SOBM) that could serve as core-shell clay filler for polymers is herein reported. Due to the hydrophilic nature of clay, its compatibility with polymer matrix was made possible through modification of the surface of the core clay sample with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (3-APTES) compound prior to its use. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was used to characterize clay surface modification. Electron dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDX) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to expose filler chemical composition and morphology, while electrophoresis measurement was used to examine level of filler dispersion. Results show an agglomerated core clay powder after high temperature treatment, while EDX analysis shows that the organically modified clay is composed of chemical inhomogeneities, wherein elemental compositions in weight percent vary from one point to the other in a probe of two points. Micrographs of the 3-APTES coupled SOBM core-shell clay filler clearly show cloudy appearance, while FT-IR indicates 25% and 5% increases in fundamental vibrations band at 1014 cm(-1) and 1435 cm(-1), respectively. Furthermore, 3-APTES coupled core-shell clay was used to prepare epoxy composites and tested for mechanical properties. PMID:27355022

  11. Novel Organically Modified Core-Shell Clay for Epoxy Composites—“SOBM Filler 1”

    PubMed Central

    Iheaturu, Nnamdi Chibuike; Madufor, Innocent Chimezie

    2014-01-01

    Preparation of a novel organically modified clay from spent oil base drilling mud (SOBM) that could serve as core-shell clay filler for polymers is herein reported. Due to the hydrophilic nature of clay, its compatibility with polymer matrix was made possible through modification of the surface of the core clay sample with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (3-APTES) compound prior to its use. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was used to characterize clay surface modification. Electron dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDX) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to expose filler chemical composition and morphology, while electrophoresis measurement was used to examine level of filler dispersion. Results show an agglomerated core clay powder after high temperature treatment, while EDX analysis shows that the organically modified clay is composed of chemical inhomogeneities, wherein elemental compositions in weight percent vary from one point to the other in a probe of two points. Micrographs of the 3-APTES coupled SOBM core-shell clay filler clearly show cloudy appearance, while FT-IR indicates 25% and 5% increases in fundamental vibrations band at 1014 cm−1 and 1435 cm−1, respectively. Furthermore, 3-APTES coupled core-shell clay was used to prepare epoxy composites and tested for mechanical properties. PMID:27355022

  12. Mechanisms and factors affecting the adsorption of sodium alginate onto modified clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yongxin; Cao, Xihua; Song, Xiuxian; Wang, Nan; Yu, Zhiming

    2013-07-01

    Algal organic materials (AOMs) are one critical factor affecting the efficiency of modified clays used for the mitigation of harmful algal blooms (HABs). This study was conducted to develop a deeper understanding of the mechanisms and factors affecting the adsorption of AOMs onto modified clays. Sodium alginate (polysaccharide) and kaolinite modified with polyaluminium chloride (PACl) were used as AOMs and modified clay model substances, respectively, and the effects of modifier dosage, contact time, solution pH and ionic strength were investigated through batch adsorption experiments. Kinetics revealed that the alginate adsorption rate was described well by a pseudo-second order model. PACl effectively enhanced the adsorption capacity of kaolinite and increased the adsorption rate, and the optimum additive amount of PACl was 5%. The experimental data fitted both the Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption equations well. The adsorption thermodynamics for alginate onto modified clays suggests that alginate adsorption is a spontaneous process. The adsorption of alginate onto modified clays was highly dependent on pH, with a decrease in adsorption observed with increased pH to 9.48, but the opposite was true above pH 9.48. Finally, adsorption increased with increasing ionic strength.

  13. SO2 gas adsorption by modified kaolin clays: influence of previous heating and time acid treatments.

    PubMed

    Volzone, Cristina; Ortiga, Jose

    2011-10-01

    Modified kaolin clays were used as adsorbents for SO(2) gas adsorptions. The clays were heated up to 900 °C previous to acid treatments with 0.5 N sulfuric acid solutions at boiling temperature during different times up to 1440 min. Equilibrium adsorption at 25 °C and 0.1 MPa was carried out by using a volumetric apparatus. The samples were characterized by chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction and infrared analysis. The heating of the clays followed by acid treatment improved the adsorption capacity of the kaolin clays. The presence of amorphous silica and hydroxyl in the final products improved SO(2) adsorption capacity. Better properties for SO(2) adsorption were found in kaolin rich in not well ordered kaolinite clay mineral. PMID:21696883

  14. Electrokinetics of natural and mechanically modified ripidolite and beidellite clays

    SciTech Connect

    Sondi, I.; Pravdic, V.

    1996-08-10

    Particles of clay minerals were studied due to their importance in geochemical processes in natural waters, such as adsorption and transfer of ionic contaminants, stabilization by organics, and flocculation and sedimentation phenomena. Information on the behavior of clays was sought by experiments with model systems. Measurements of electrophoretic mobilities in relation to pH, at varying concentrations of well-characterized fulvic acid (FA), were performed on two structurally well defined, representative clay minerals prepared with clean surfaces: ripidolite (a well-known trioctahedral nonswelling chlorite) and beidellite (a typical dioctahedral smectite). Natural ripidolite and beidellite show high negative electrokinetic potentials in the range pH 2 ({minus}10 and {minus}20 mV, respectively) to pH 10 ({minus}60 and {minus}50 mV, respectively). Experiments utilizing mechanical particle disintegration (dry milling), mimicking natural wear and physical weathering, resulted in increases of specific surface area (12.3 and 1.5 times, respectively) and of cation exchange capacity (3.2 and 1.2 times, respectively). Such small-sized particles, shown by SEM figures, retain their crystal structure (X ray) and the nature of their structural bonds (FTIR), exhibiting an IEP (at pH 6.0 and 3.0, respectively). This was interpreted to be the creation of positively charged edge surfaces. Exposed to fulvic acid in solutions of 10{sup {minus}3} NaCl at pH = 6.5, these new surfaces showed an increase in negative {zeta}-potential for ripidolite, and, to a smaller extent, for beidellite. In the interaction of clay mineral particles with aqueous medium, it is concluded that the degree of mechanical wear is more decisive than the type of the mineral.

  15. Transformation of anthracene on various cation-modified clay minerals.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Jia, Hanzhong; Li, Xiyou; Wang, Chuanyi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, anthracene was employed as a probe to explore the potential catalytic effect of clay minerals in soil environment. Clay minerals saturated with various exchangeable cations were tested. The rate of anthracene transformation follows the order: Fe-smectite > Cu-smectite > Al-smectite ≈ Ca-smectite ≈ Mg-smectite ≈ Na-smectite. This suggests that transition-metal ions such as Fe(III) play an important role in anthracene transformation. Among Fe(III)-saturated clays, Fe(III)-smectite exhibits the highest catalytic activity followed by Fe(III)-illite, Fe(III)-pyrophyllite, and Fe(III)-kaolinite, which is in agreement with the interlayer Fe(III) content. Moreover, effects by two common environmental factors, pH and relative humidity (RH), were evaluated. With an increase in pH or RH, the rate of anthracene transformation decreases rapidly at first and then is leveled off. GC-MS analysis identifies that the final product of anthracene transformation is 9,10-anthraquinone, a more bioavailable molecule compared to anthracene. The transformation process mainly involves cation-π bonding, electron transfer leading to cation radical, and further oxidation by chemisorbed O2. The present work provides valuable insights into the abiotic transformation and the fate of PAHs in the soil environment and the development of contaminated land remediation technologies. PMID:25135171

  16. Aflatoxin Toxicity Reduction in Feed by Enhanced Binding to Surface-Modified Clay Additives

    PubMed Central

    Jaynes, William F.; Zartman, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    Animal feeding studies have demonstrated that clay additives, such as bentonites, can bind aflatoxins in ingested feed and reduce or eliminate the toxicity. Bentonite deposits are found throughout the world and mostly consist of expandable smectite minerals, such as montmorillonite. The surfaces of smectite minerals can be treated with organic compounds to create surface-modified clays that more readily bind some contaminants than the untreated clay. Montmorillonites treated with organic cations, such as hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) and phenyltrimethylammonium (PTMA), more effectively remove organic contaminants, such as benzene and toluene, from water than untreated clay. Similarly, montmorillonite treated with PTMA (Kd = 24,100) retained more aflatoxin B1 (AfB1) from aqueous corn flour than untreated montmorillonite (Kd = 944). Feed additives that reduced aflatoxin toxicity in animal feeding studies adsorbed more AfB1 from aqueous corn flour than feed additives that were less effective. The organic cations HDTMA and PTMA are considered toxic and would not be suitable for clay additives used in feed or food, but other non-toxic or nutrient compounds can be used to prepare surface-modified clays. Montmorillonite (SWy) treated with choline (Kd = 13,800) and carnitine (Kd = 3960) adsorbed much more AfB1 from aqueous corn flour than the untreated clay (Kd = 944). A choline-treated clay prepared from a reduced-charge, high-charge montmorillonite (Kd = 20,100) adsorbed more AfB1 than the choline-treated high-charge montmorillonite (Kd = 1340) or the untreated montmorillonite (Kd = 293). Surface-modified clay additives prepared using low-charge smectites and nutrient or non-toxic organic compounds might be used to more effectively bind aflatoxins in contaminated feed or food and prevent toxicity. PMID:22069725

  17. Modified clay minerals efficiency against chemical and biological warfare agents for civil human protection.

    PubMed

    Plachá, Daniela; Rosenbergová, Kateřina; Slabotínský, Jiří; Kutláková, Kateřina Mamulová; Studentová, Soňa; Martynková, Gražyna Simha

    2014-04-30

    Sorption efficiencies of modified montmorillonite and vermiculite of their mono ionic Na and organic HDTMA and HDP forms were studied against chemical and biological warfare agents such as yperite and selected bacterial strains. Yperite interactions with modified clay minerals were observed through its capture in low-density polyethylene foil-modified clay composites by measuring yperite gas permeation with using chemical indication and gas chromatography methods. The antibacterial activities of synthetized organoclays were tested against selected Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial species in minimum inhibitory concentration tests. The obtained results showed a positive influence of modified clay minerals on the significant yperite breakthrough-time increase. The most effective material was the polyethylene-Na form montmorillonite, while the polyethylene-Na form vermiculite showed the lowest efficiency. With increasing organic cations loading in the interlayer space the montmorillonite efficiency decreased, and in the case of vermiculite an opposite effect was observed. Generally the modified montmorillonites were more effective than modified vermiculites. The HDP cations seem to be more effective compare to the HDTMA. The antibacterial activity tests confirmed efficiency of all organically modified clay minerals against Gram-positive bacteria. The confirmation of antibacterial activity against Y. pestis, plague bacteria, is the most interesting result of this part of the study. PMID:24603112

  18. Modified clay sorbents for wastewater treatment and immobilization of heavy metals in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlakovs, Juris; Klavins, Maris; Vincevica-Gaile, Zane; Stapkevica, Mara

    2014-05-01

    Soil and groundwater pollution with heavy metals is the result of both, anthropogenic and natural processes in the environment. Anthropogenic influence in great extent appears from industry, mining, treatment of metal ores and waste incineration. Contamination of soil and water can be induced by diffuse sources such as applications of agrochemicals and fertilizers in agriculture, air pollution from industry and transport, and by point sources, e.g., wastewater streams, runoff from dump sites and factories. Treatment processes used for metal removal from polluted soil and water include methodologies based on chemical precipitation, ion exchange, carbon adsorption, membrane filtration, adsorption and co-precipitation. Optimal removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous medium can be achieved by adsorption process which is considered as one of the most effective methods due to its cost-effectiveness and high efficiency. Immobilization of metals in contaminated soil also can be done with different adsorbents as the in situ technology. Use of natural and modified clay can be developed as one of the solutions in immobilization of lead, zinc, copper and other elements in polluted sites. Within the present study clay samples of different geological genesis were modified with sodium and calcium chlorides, iron oxyhydroxides and ammonium dihydrogen phosphate in variable proportions of Ca/P equimolar ratio to test and compare immobilization efficiency of metals by sorption and batch leaching tests. Sorption capacity for raw clay samples was considered as relatively lower referring to the modified species of the same clay type. In addition, clay samples were tested for powder X-ray difractometry, cation exchange, surface area properties, elemental composition, as well as scanning electron microscopy pictures of clay sample surface structures were obtained. Modified clay sorbents were tested for sorption of lead as monocontaminant and for complex contamination of heavy metals. The

  19. Direct electron transfer and enhanced electrocatalytic activity of hemoglobin at iron-rich clay modified electrodes.

    PubMed

    Charradi, Khaled; Forano, Claude; Prevot, Vanessa; Ben Haj Amara, Abdesslem; Mousty, Christine

    2009-09-01

    The possible role of structural iron in clays to promote direct electron transfer of hemoglobin (Hb) was investigated. Clays containing different amounts of iron situated in octahedral or tetrahedral sites have been used to modify glassy carbon electrodes: nontronite, synthetic montmorillonite, and saponite. A synthetic montmorillonite containing non-iron impurities was used as a reference. Interactions between Hb and these clays were studied with the establishment of adsorption isotherms and by the analysis of X-ray diffraction patterns, FTIR, and UV-vis spectra of the Hb-clay samples. The electrochemical behavior of clay modified electrodes (CME) was characterized by cyclic voltammetry in the presence of Hb in solution or adsorbed within the clays. Nontronite, which contains the highest amount of structural iron, enhanced significantly direct electron transfer of Hb. Finally, the electrocatalytic behavior of Hb-Nontronite CME in the presence of hydrogen peroxide was also studied, and the H(2)O(2) calibration curve was recorded under amperometric conditions for different bioelectrode configurations. PMID:19518082

  20. Oxyanion sorption and surface anion exchange by surfactant-modified clay minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.

    1999-10-01

    In this study the sorption of nitrate (NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}) and chromate (CrO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}) from aqueous solution by surfactant-modified clay minerals was investigated. Both the sorption and desorption of oxyanions were found to follow a Langmuir sorption isotherm. In general, the sorption affinity is higher for chromate than for nitrate, reflecting that the interaction between the divalent anions and the surfactant bilayer is stronger than that between the monovalent anions and the surfactant bilayer. Surfactant-modified kaolinite has a higher sorption capacity for chromate. The sorption capacities for chromate and nitrate are equal for surfactant-modified illite while the sorption capacity for nitrate is higher for surfactant-modified smectite. Desorption by water revealed that chromate sorption was irreversible, while nitrate sorption was slightly reversible. In a mixed solution system, nitrate and chromate compete for the same sorption sites, resulting in a decrease in sorption capacity for each anion. Stoichiometric counterion desorption due to chromate and/or nitrate sorption further confirms that sorption of oxyanions by surfactant-modified clay minerals was due to surface anion exchange. The selectivity coefficients were higher for chromate to replace bromide than for nitrate to replace bromide for surfactant-modified kaolinite, but lower when surfactant-modified illite and smectite were the anion exchangers. The results indicate that surfactant-modified clay minerals are effective sorbents to remove anionic contaminants from water. However, the types of clay minerals should be correctly selected to maximize the contaminant removal efficiency.

  1. Effect of supercritical carbon dioxide as an exfoliation aid on bio-based polyethylene terephthalate glycol-modified/clay nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Kwangho; Lee, Jae Wook; Hong, In-Kwon; Lee, Sangmook

    2013-08-01

    Bio-based PETG (bio-based glycol modified polyethylene terephthalate, Ecozen T95) / clay (organo-modified montmorillonite, OMMT, C10A) nanocomposites were prepared by co-rotating twin screw extruder attached with supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) injection system. The effects of nano-clay and scCO2 on the properties of PETG/clay nanocomposites were investigated by measuring thermal, rheological, tensile, impact, and barrier properties. The thermal and mechanical properties decreased with increasing nano-clay content, but they recovered or even exceeded the properties of neat PETG as scCO2 was added. It was verified due to a good dispersion of the nano-clay in PETG matrix for PETG/clay nanocomposites by XRD, SEM, and TEM. It was thought that scCO2 could be an effective exfoliation agent for many nanocomposites systems as well as for bio-based PET/clay nanocomposites.

  2. New Soft Rock Pillar Strength Formula Derived Through Parametric FEA Using a Critical State Plasticity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastiello, Giuseppe; Federico, Francesco; Screpanti, Silvio

    2015-09-01

    Many abandoned room and pillar mines have been excavated not far from the surface of large areas of important European cities. In Rome, these excavations took place at shallow depths (3-15 m below the ground surface) in weak pyroclastic soft rocks. Many of these cavities have collapsed; others appear to be in a stable condition, although an appreciable percentage of their structural components (pillars, roofs, etc.) have shown increasing signs of distress from both the morphological and mechanical points of view. In this study, the stress-strain behaviour of soft rock pillars sustaining systems of cavities under vertical loads was numerically simulated, starting from the in situ initial conditions due to excavation of the cavities. The mechanical behaviour of the constituent material of the pillar was modelled according to the Modified Cam-Clay constitutive law (elasto-plastic with strain hardening). The influence of the pillar geometry (cross-section area, shape, and height) and mechanical parameters of the soft rock on the ultimate compressive strength of the pillar as a whole was parametrically investigated first. Based on the numerical results, an original relationship for pillar strength assessment was developed. Finally, the estimated pillar strengths according to the proposed formula and well-known formulations in the literature were compared.

  3. Sol-gel network silica/modified montmorillonite clay hybrid nanocomposites for hydrophobic surface coatings.

    PubMed

    Meera, Kamal Mohamed Seeni; Sankar, Rajavelu Murali; Murali, Adhigan; Jaisankar, Sellamuthu N; Mandal, Asit Baran

    2012-02-01

    Sol-gel silica/nanoclay composites were prepared through sol-gel polymerization technique using tetraethylorthosilicate precursor and montmorillonite (MMT) clay in aqueous media. In this study, both montmorillonite-K(+) and organically modified MMT (OMMT) clays were used. The prepared composites were coated on glass substrate by making 1 wt% solution in ethyltrichlorosilane. The incorporation of nanoclay does not alter the intensity of characteristic Si-O-Si peak of silica network. Thermogravimetric studies show that increasing clay content increased the degradation temperature of the composites. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results of organically modified MMT nanoclay incorporated composite show a shift in the melting behavior up to 38°C. From DSC thermograms, we observed that the ΔH value decreased with increasing clay loading. X-ray diffraction patterns prove the presence of nanoclay in the composite and increase in the concentration of organically modified nanoclay from 3 to 5 wt% increases the intensity of the peak at 2θ=8° corresponds to OMMT. Morphology of the control silica gel composite was greatly influenced by the incorporation of OMMT. The presence of nanoclay changed the surface of control silica gel composite into cleaved surface with brittle in nature. Contact angle measurements were done for the coatings to study their surface behavior. These hybrid coatings on glass substrate may have applications for hydrophobic coatings on leather substrate. PMID:22056084

  4. Fatty hydrazides modified clay for polylactide/polycaprolactone (PLA/PCL) nanocomposite preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hairaldin, Siti Zulaiha; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa

    2012-10-01

    Fatty hydrazides (FH) synthesized from palm oil functions was use to modify the nature of natrium montmorillonite (Na-MMT). The 90% and 10% of polylactide (PLA) and polycaprolactone (PCL) polymer was chosen respectively to mixing with the modified clay to produce PLA/PCL-FHMMT. The others sample was prepared which is PLA/PCL was blend with Na-MMT to produce PLA/PCL-NaMMT as a comparison. To characterize the polymer nanocomposite, X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), derivative thermalgravimetry (DTG) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis were conducted. X-Ray diffraction (XRD) results indicated the intercalation of the PLA/PCL into silicate nanosize interlayers for the nanocomposites. The presence of modified clays in nanocomposite was confirmed by FTIR spectrum and TEM micrograph.

  5. Chromate adsorption on acid-treated and amines-modified clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajjaji, M.; Beraa, A.

    2015-03-01

    Acid-treated montmorillonite-rich clay and amines (methylamine, morpholine, and aniline)-modified clay adsorbents were investigated and their abilities to remove chromate from aqueous solution were studied. For the later purpose, kinetic studies were carried out under different operating conditions (chromate concentration, adsorbent content, and temperature), and adsorption isotherm measurements were performed. It was found that the kinetic of adsorption was fast and the data followed the pseudo-second rate equation. The rate of adsorption was controlled by the intra-particle diffusion and mass transfer through the liquid film, and the relative importance of these limiting steps depended on the operating conditions. Chromate adsorption was an endothermic process and took place spontaneously by physisorption. The free energy at 25 ≤ T ≤ 40 °C varied from -1.5 to -46 kJ/mol. Adsorption isotherms of Na+-saturated clay (AN), acid-treated clay (AA), and methylamine-clay and morpholine-clay (A-Me, A-Mo) were type V, whereas those of aniline-clay (A-An) were type III. The estimated maximum uptakes were 105, 29, 15, 11, and 10 mmol/kg for A-An, AN, A-Mo, AA, and A-Me, respectively. The mechanism of chromate adsorption was discussed based on the shape of the isotherms. Considering for instance the most efficient absorbent (A-An), the isotherm followed the Freundlich equation and hydrogen chromate (the main stable form at working pH) adsorbed to solid particles once aniline species were entirely desorbed.

  6. Synthesis of polymer latex particles decorated with organically-modified laponite clay platelets via emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Norma Negrete; Persoz, Stéphanie; Putaux, Jean-Luc; David, Laurent; Bourgeat-Lami, Elodie

    2006-02-01

    We report a new route to colloidal nanocomposites consisting of polymer latex particles covered with Laponite clay nanoplatelets. These composite particles are prepared by seeded emulsion (co)polymerization of styrene and butyl acrylate from Laponite clay suspensions previously functionalized by ion exchange using either a free radical initiator: 2,2-azobis (2-methylpropionamidine) hydrochloride (AIBA) or a cationic vinyl monomer: 2-(methacryloyloxy) ethyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (MADQUAT). The successful intercalation of the cationic reactive molecules was confirmed by elemental analysis, FTIR, 13C solid-state NMR and WAXD. The organically-modified clays were dispersed into water with the help of tetrasodium pyrophosphate and an anionic surfactant. stable latexes, produced under different experimental conditions, were successfully obtained from the clay suspensions. Cryo-TEM images of the resulting latexes showed spherical composite particles with diameters in the 50-250 nm range with clay sheets located on their surface. This paper reports on the effect of the processing conditions on the particle morphology and latex stability, and describes the mechanism of formation of the nanocomposite particles. PMID:16573041

  7. Electrochemical detection of phenolic estrogenic compounds at clay modified carbon paste electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkamssa, N.; Ouattara, L.; Kawachi, A.; Tsujimura, M.; Isoda, H.; Chtaini, A.; Ksibi, M.

    2015-04-01

    A simple and sensitive electroanalytical method was developed to determine the Endocrine Disrupting chemical 4-tert-octylphenol on clay modified carbon paste electrode (Clay/CPE). The electrochemical response of the proposed electrode was studied by means of cyclic and square wave voltammetry. It has found that the oxidation of 4-tert-octylphenol on the clay/CPE displayed a well-defined oxidation peak. Under these optimal conditions, a linear relation between concentrations of 4-tert-octylphenol current response was obtained over range of 7.26×10-6 to 3.87×10-7 with a detection and quantification limit of 9.2×10-7 M and 3.06×10-6 M, respectively. The correlation coefficient is 0.9963. The modified electrode showed suitable sensitivity, high stability and an accurate detection of 4-tert-octylphenol. The modified electrode also relevant suitable selectivity for various phenolic estrogenic compounds.

  8. Facile fabrication of mesoporous iron modified Al2O3 nanoparticles pillared montmorillonite nanocomposite: a smart photo-Fenton catalyst for quick removal of organic dyes.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Amaresh C; Varadwaj, G Bishwa Bidita; Parida, K M

    2013-11-14

    A mesoporous iron modified Al2O3 nanoparticle pillared montmorillonite nanocomposite (mesoporous Fe/APM nanocomposite) was synthesized by using sodium exchanged montmorillonite by cation-exchange, gallery-templated synthesis and impregnation method. Formation of Al2O3 nanoparticles (Al2O3 NPs) having average particle size 5.20-6.50 nm within montmorillonite, formation of mesoporous Al2O3 NPs pillared montmorillonite (mesoporous APM) from montmorillonite and formation of a mesoporous Fe/APM nanocomposite signifies the present investigation. The roles of ammonia, CTAB, octyl amine and calcination temperature for fabrication of mesoporous Fe/APM nanocomposite were highly significant. Ammonia was used for post-synthesis treatment, which helped in the formation of micellar assemblies in the interlayer space. The materials were characterized by different techniques such as N2 adsorption-desorption study, which demonstrated the mesoporosity of the material. A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image proves the morphology and size of the Al2O3 NPs and mesoporous Fe/APM nanocomposites. X-ray diffraction technique (XRD) describes the formation of the pillaring of the Al2O3 NPs within montmorillonite (APM). It has been noted that pure montmorillonite is a micro/mesoporous material. But after pillaring of Al2O3 NPs within the montmorillonite, mesoporosity developed, which is the vital aspect of present investigation. It was observed that the mesoporous Fe/APM nanocomposite has high photo-Fenton activity towards degradation of organic dyes such as acid blue (AB) and reactive blue (RB). Nearly 100% degradation took place within 30 minutes with high concentration of dye (500 mg L(-1)) by mesoporous 5 Fe/APM nanocomposite under ambient conditions. Small particle sizes of nanocomposite, quick reduction of Fe(III) and mesoporosity are the key points for proficient degradation of AB and RB. PMID:24002045

  9. Surface characteristics and photoactivity of silver-modified palygorskite clays coated with nanosized titanium dioxide particles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Difang . E-mail: zdf6910@163.com; Zhou Jie; Liu Ning

    2007-03-15

    This paper presents the results of a study in which nanosized titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) crystal particles were coated onto the surface of palygorskite fibrous clay which had been modified by silver ions using titanium tetrachloride as a precursor. Coated TiO{sub 2} particles with the anatase structure were formed after calcining at 400 deg. C for 2 h in air. Various analytical techniques were used to characterize the surface properties of titanium dioxide particles on the palygorskite. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses showed that TiO{sub 2} particles were supported on the surface of the palygorskite clays and their size was in the range of 3-6 nm. The titanium oxide coatings were found to be very active for the photocatalytic decomposition of methylene blue.

  10. Characterization, antimicrobial activities, and biocompatibility of organically modified clays and their nanocomposites with polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-Chien; Lin, Jiang-Jen; Tseng, Hsiang-Jung; Hsu, Shan-hui

    2012-01-01

    A novel method to exfoliate the montmorillonite clay was developed previously to generate random nanosilicate platelets (NSP), one kind of delaminated clay. To improve their dispersion in a polymer, we modified NSPs by three types of surfactants (cationic Qa, nonionic Qb, and anionic Qc) in this study and used them to prepare nanocomposites with polyurethane (PU). The zeta potential, antimicrobial ability, and biocompatibility of these surfactant-modified NSPs (abbreviated "NSQ") were characterized. It was found that the zeta potential of Qa-modified NSP (NSQa) was positive, whereas those of NSP and the other two NSQs (NSQb and NSQc) were negative. All NSQ presented less cytotoxicity than NSP. NSQa and NSQc showed excellent antimicrobial activities against S. aureus (Gram-positive strain) and E. coli (Gram-negative strain). The nanocomposites of NSQ with PU were then characterized for surface and mechanical properties, cell attachment and proliferation, antimicrobial activity in vitro, and biocompatibility in vivo. A higher surfactant to NSP ratio was found to improve the dispersion of NSQ in PU matrix. The mechanical properties of all PU/NSQ nanocomposites were significantly enhanced. Among various NSQ, only NSQa were observed to migrate to the composite surface. The attachment and proliferation of endothelial cells and fibroblasts in vitro as well as biocompatibility in vivo were significantly better for PU/NSQa containing 1% of NSQa than other materials. The microbiostasis ratios of PU/NSQ nanocomposites containing 1% NSQa or NSQc were >90%. These results proposed the safety and potential antimicrobial applications of surfactant-modified delaminated clays and their nanocomposites with PU polymer. PMID:22128903

  11. Effect of organically modified clay on mechanical properties, cytotoxicity and bactericidal properties of poly(ɛ-caprolactone) nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sachin; Mishra, Anupam; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of organically-modified clay nanoparticles in poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) for developing biodegradable composites. PCL nanocomposites reinforced with two different types of organically-modified clay (Cloisite 30B, C30B and Cloisite 93A, C93A) were prepared by melt-mixing. Morphology of PCL/clay nanocomposites characterized by scanning electron microscopy indicated good dispersion of nanoclay in the PCL matrix. Reinforcement of nanoclay in PCL enhanced mechanical properties without affecting thermal and degradation properties of PCL. Cytocompatibility of PCL/clay nanocomposites was studied using both osteoblasts and endothelial cells in vitro. Both composites (PCL/C30B and PCL/C93A) were cytotoxic with high toxicity observed for C30B even at low content of 1 wt %. The cytotoxicity was found to arise due to leachables from PCL/clay composites. Electrical conductivity measurements of aqueous media confirmed leaching of cationic surfactant from the PCL/clay composites PCL matrix. Both composites were found to be bactericidal but C30B was more effective than C93A. Taken together, it was observed that organically-modified nanoclay as fillers in PCL improves mechanical properties and imparts bactericidal properties but with increased risk of toxicity. These PCL/clay composites may be useful as stronger packaging material with antibacterial properties but are not suited as biomedical implants or for food packaging applications.

  12. One-pot synthesis and physicochemical properties of an organo-modified saponite clay.

    PubMed

    Bisio, Chiara; Carniato, Fabio; Paul, Geo; Gatti, Giorgio; Boccaleri, Enrico; Marchese, Leonardo

    2011-06-01

    An organo-saponite clay containing intercalated cetyltrimethylammonium (CTA(+)) cations was synthesized by an efficient one-step hydrothermal method and was compared with a CTA-exchanged saponite prepared by a classical postsynthesis intercalation route. In both hybrid samples, surfactant loading up to 10% was achieved. A comparative investigation of the physicochemical properties of both solids was carried out by a multidisciplinary approach, by using a combination of spectroscopic, structural, and thermal characterization tools. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) data indicated that the one-pot-prepared solid showed that the presence of CTA(+) molecules in the synthesis gel did not affect the clay structure. In addition, thermal analysis suggested that the inorganic layers play an active role in stabilizing and protecting the surfactant molecules by increasing their thermal stability. A different arrangement of intercalated CTA(+) ions in the two hybrid clays was observed by solid state NMR in combination with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and assigned to a different all-trans/gauche conformation ratio of the surfactant depending on the synthetic method used to prepare the two final materials. The surfactant organization is also influenced by the lamellae charge density, which is different in the two organo-modified materials as found by (27)Al and (29)Si MAS NMR experiments. PMID:21553926

  13. A comparative study of the acidity toward the aqueous phase and adsorptive properties of Al{sub 13}-pillared montmorillonite and Al{sub 13}-pillared saponite

    SciTech Connect

    Bergaoui, L.; Mrad, I.; Ghorbel, A.; Lambert, J.F.

    1999-04-15

    The selectivity of an Al{sub 13}-pillared saponite and an Al{sub 13}-pillared montmorillonite for Cd{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+} adsorption was studied. The quantity of metal adsorbed on both pillared clays depends on the pH of the solution and the pillars density. Adsorption equilibria are regulated by the protonation equilibria of the amphoteric sites on the pillars. Pillared clays adsorb more cadmium and copper than classic aluminum hydroxides which is simply attributable to a higher density of surface aluminum groups. Significant differences in behavior are observed between pillared montmorillonite and pillared saponite. Pillared montmorillonite appears to be more acidic, which is correlated with a more advanced degree of structural modification of the pillars on calcination. The authors propose a tentative, partial structural model of pillar transformation compatible with these differences. At the same time, both pillared clays have similar affinities for cadmium II at low pH (5--6), but pillared montmorillonite seems to be a more efficient cadmium trap at pH = 8 when its surface groups are negatively ionized. Thus, the nature of the clay layers conditions the structural modifications of the intercalated [Al{sub 13}] polycations, which in turn determine adsorptive behavior.

  14. Ultrasonic treatment and synthesis of sugar alcohol modified Na+-montmorillonite clay.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Deeptangshu; Liu, Huihua

    2013-01-01

    Na(+)-montmorillonite clay (generally referred to as MMT) is very useful for reinforcing polymeric matrix at very low concentrations (typically, 2-5% wt). These clay particles are typically exfoliated before they can demonstrate the significant gains in heat deflection temperature, modulus, and elongation properties. In the case of hydrophilic biopolymer based matrices, such as carbohydrates and chitosan, exfoliating these nanoclay particles needs greater attention because the exfoliation is typically carried out using hydrophobic oligomers through ion-exchange. This study reports a new method of synthesizing completely hydrophilic MMT-assemblages using hydrophilic plasticizers for biopolymers. We used sugar alcohols (glycerol, xylitol with 3 and 5 hydroxyl groups) and polysaccharide maltodextrin to exfoliate the MMT. Sonication was conducted for MMT nanoclay and plasticizers at different weight ratios. It was confirmed that all plasticizer/modifier led to expansion of MMT gallery spacing (d-spacing) and the change in d-spacing could be related to the molecular structure of the plasticizer. Meanwhile, the extent of exfoliation was maximum with maltodextrin (fully exfoliation with 1:10 and 1:20 ratio of MMT:plasticizer) across all test samples and interestingly, glycerol and xylitol samples quickly established within the MMT galleries and exhibited minimal influence with further increase in relative concentrations. PMID:22985953

  15. Acetylcholinesterase biosensor for inhibitor measurements based on glassy carbon electrode modified with carbon black and pillar[5]arene.

    PubMed

    Shamagsumova, Rezeda V; Shurpik, Dmitry N; Padnya, Pavel L; Stoikov, Ivan I; Evtugyn, Gennady A

    2015-11-01

    New acetylcholinesterase (AChE) biosensor based on unsubstituted pillar[5]arene (P[5]A) as electron mediator was developed and successfully used for highly sensitive detection of organophosphate and carbamate pesticides. The AChE from electric eel was immobilized by carbodiimide binding on carbon black (CB) placed on glassy carbon electrode. The working potential of 200mV was obtained in chronoamperometric mode with the measurement time of 180 s providing best inter-biosensors precision of the results. The AChE biosensor developed made it possible to detect 1×10(-11)-1×10(-6) M of malaoxon, 1×10(-8)-7×10(-6) M of methyl-paraoxon, 1×10(-10)-2×10(-6) M of carbofuran and 7×10(-9)-1×10(-5) M of aldicarb with 10 min incubation. The limits of detection were 4×10(-12), 5×10(-9), 2×10(-11) and 6×10(-10) M, respectively. The AChE biosensor was tested in the analysis of pesticide residuals in spiked samples of peanut and beetroot. The protecting effect of P[5]A derivative bearing quaternary ammonia groups on malaoxon inhibition was shown. PMID:26452862

  16. Study of malachite green adsorption by organically modified clay using a batch method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arellano-Cárdenas, Sofía; López-Cortez, Socorro; Cornejo-Mazón, Maribel; Mares-Gutiérrez, Juan Carlos

    2013-09-01

    The adsorption of toxic dye malachite green from aqueous effluents by organically modified clay was studied in a batch system. The organoclay (OC) used was prepared by the intercalation of cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide in a Mexican montmorillonite. The effects of initial dye concentration, temperature, pH, and contact time were investigated. The OC showed a high dye removal (99.6%) from an initial dye concentration of 60 mg L-1 at pH 6 and 25 °C. The adsorption capacity was independent of pH and increased with the temperature. Equilibrium data were well fitted by Langmuir adsorption model. The rate of sorption was adjusted to a pseudo second-order kinetic model.

  17. Radionuclide separations using pillared layered materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Clearfield, A.

    1995-08-31

    The objective of this project is to prepare an all inorganic strontium specific sorbent or ion exchanger for the removal of highly alkaline nuclear waste solutions. A series of clays and layered titanates were pillared and calcined to convert their essentially two dimensional structure to three dimensional porous structures with high surface areas. The pillaring agents were alumina, zirconia, chromia and silica based. The pillared clays, particularly those containing Zr pillars, achieved moderate (Kd as high at 13,700 ml/g with V:m = 28) selectivities for Sr{sup 2+}. In contrast, the silica pillared titanates showed exceptional affinities for Sr{sup 2+} with Kd values in excess of 100,000 ml/g in 5M NaNO{sup 3} + 1M NaOH. These latter results suggest a more detailed study of the pillared titanates in the presence of simulants closely resembling real waste solutions.

  18. Adsorption-regeneration by heterogeneous Fenton process using modified carbon and clay materials for removal of indigo blue.

    PubMed

    Almazán-Sánchez, Perla Tatiana; Solache-Ríos, Marcos J; Linares-Hernández, Ivonne; Martínez-Miranda, Verónica

    2016-01-01

    Indigo blue dye is mainly used in dyeing of denim clothes and its presence in water bodies could have adverse effects on the aquatic system; for this reason, the objective of this study was to promote the removal of indigo blue dye from aqueous solutions by iron and copper electrochemically modified clay and activated carbon and the saturated materials were regenerated by a Fenton-like process. Montmorillonite clay was modified at pH 2 and 7; activated carbon at pH 2 and pH of the system. The elemental X-ray dispersive spectroscopy analysis showed that the optimum pH for modification of montmorillonite with iron and copper was 7 and for activated carbon was 2. The dye used in this work was characterized by infrared. Unmodified and modified clay samples showed the highest removal efficiencies of the dye (90-100%) in the pH interval from 2 to 10 whereas the removal efficiencies decrease as pH increases for samples modified at pH 2. Unmodified clay and copper-modified activated carbon at pH 2 were the most efficient activated materials for the removal of the dye. The adsorption kinetics data of all materials were best adjusted to the pseudo-second-order model, indicating a chemisorption mechanism and the adsorption isotherms data showed that the materials have a heterogeneous surface. The iron-modified clay could be regenerated by a photo-Fenton-like process through four adsorption-regeneration cycles, with 90% removal efficiency. PMID:26878687

  19. Speciation of uranium in surface-modified, hydrothermally treated, (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+}-exchanged smectite clays

    SciTech Connect

    Giaquinta, D.M.; Soderholm, L.; Yuchs, S.E.; Wasserman, S.R.

    1997-08-01

    A successful solution to the problem of disposal and permanent storage of water soluble radioactive species must address two issues: exclusion of the radionuclides from the environment and the prevention of leaching from the storage media into the environment. Immobilization of radionuclides in clay minerals has been studied. In addition to the use of clays as potential waste forms, information about the interactions of radionuclides with clays and how such interactions affect their speciations is crucial for successful modeling of actinide-migration. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is used to determine the uranium speciation in exchanged and surface-modified clays. The XAS data from uranyl-loaded bentonite clay are compared with those obtained after the particle surfaces have been coated with alkylsilanes. These silane films, which render the surface of the clay hydrophobic, are added in order to minimize the ability of external water to exchange with the water in the clay interlayer, thereby decreasing the release rate of the exchanged-uranium species. Mild hydrothermal conditions are used in an effort to mimic potential geologic conditions that may occur during long-term radioactive waste storage. The XAS spectra indicate that the uranyl monomer species remain unchanged in most samples, except in those samples that were both coated with an alkylsilane and hydrothermally treated. When the clay was coated with an organic film, formed by the acidic deposition of octadecyltrimethoxysilane, hydrothermal treatment results in the formation of aggregated uranium species in which the uranium is reduced from U{sup VI} to U{sup IV}.

  20. Influence of dissolved organic carbon on the efficiency of P sequestration by a lanthanum modified clay.

    PubMed

    Dithmer, Line; Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Lundberg, Daniel; Reitzel, Kasper

    2016-06-15

    A laboratory scale experiment was set up to test the effect of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as well as ageing of the La-P complex formed during phosphorus (P) sequestration by a La modified clay (Phoslock(®)). Short term (7 days) P adsorption studies revealed a significant negative effect of added DOC on the P sequestration of Phoslock(®), whereas a long-term P adsorption experiment revealed that the negative effect of added DOC was reduced with time. The reduced P binding efficiency is kinetic, as evident from solid-state (31)P magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy, who showed that the P binding did not change in the presence of DOC. (31)P MAS NMR also reveals that up to 26% of the sequestered phosphate is as loosely bound redox-sensitive P species on the surface of rhabdophane (LaPO4 · nH2O, n ≤ 3). The ratio between the loosely bound P and lanthanum phosphate did not change with time, however both NMR and La LIII-extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy shows a transformation of lanthanum phosphate from the initially formed rhabdophane towards the more stable monazite (LaPO4). Furthermore, the effect of natural DOC on the P binding capacity was tested using water and pore water from 16 Danish lakes. Whilst DOC has an immediate negative impact on P binding in the lake water, with time this effect is reduced. PMID:26277214

  1. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    The efficient production of environmentally acceptable distillate fuels requires catalysts for hydrogenation and cleavage of the coal macromolecules and removal of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur heteroatoms. The goal of the proposed research is to develop new catalysts for the direct liquefaction of coal. This type of catalyst consists of fine clay particles that have been treated with reagents which form pillaring structures between the aluminosilicate layers of the clay. The pillars not only hold the layers apart but also constitute the active catalytic sites for hydrogenation of the coal and the solvent used in the liquefaction. The pillaring catalytic sites are composed of pyrrhotite, which has been previously demonstrated to be active for coal liquefaction. The pyrrhotite sites are generated in situ by sulfiding the corresponding oxyiron species. The size of the catalyst will be less than 40 nm in order to promote intimate contact with the coal material. Since the clays and reagents for pillaring and activating the clays are inexpensive, the catalysts can be discarded after use, rather than regenerated by a costly process. The proposed work will evaluate methods for preparing the fine particle iron-pillared clay dispersions and for activating the particles to generate the catalysts. Characterization studies of the pillared clays and activated catalysts will be performed. The effectiveness of the pillared clay dispersion for hydrogenation and coal liquefaction will be determined in several types of testing.

  2. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    The efficient production of environmentally acceptable distillate fuels requires catalysts for hydrogenation and cleavage of the coal macromolecules and removal of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur heteroatoms. The goal of the proposed research is to develop new catalysts for the direct liquefaction of coal. This type of catalyst consists of fine clay particles that have been treated with reagents which form pillaring structures between the aluminosilicate layers of the clay. The pillars not only hold the layers apart but also constitute the active catalytic sites for hydrogenation of the coal and solvent used in the liquefaction. The pillaring catalytic sites are composed of pyrrhotite, which has been previously demonstrated to be active for coal liquefaction. The pyrrhotite sites are generated in situ by sulfiding the corresponding oxyiron species. The size of the catalyst will be less than 40 nm in order to promote intimate contact with the coal material. Since the clays and reagents for pillaring and activating the clays are inexpensive, the catalysts can be discarded after use, rather than regenerated by a costly process. The proposed work will evaluate methods for preparing the fine particle iron-pillared clay dispersions and for activating the particles to generate the catalysts. Characterization studies of the pillared clays and activated catalysts will performed. The effectiveness of the pillared clay dispersion for hydrogenation and coal liquefaction will be determined in several types of testing. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  3. Tetrabutylammonium-modified clay film electrodes: characterization and application to the detection of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Maghear, Adela; Tertiş, Mihaela; Fritea, Luminţa; Marian, Iuliu O; Indrea, Emil; Walcarius, Alain; Săndulescu, Robert

    2014-07-01

    This work describes the preparation and characterization of smectite clay partially exchanged with tetrabutylammonium ions (TBA(+)) and its subsequent deposition onto glassy carbon electrode (GCE) for application to the preconcentration electroanalysis of metal ions (Cd, Pb, and Cu). Such partial exchange of TBA(+) induces the expansion of the interlayer region between the clay sheets (as ascertained by XRD) while maintaining its ion exchange capacity, which resulted in enhanced mass transport rates (as pointed out by electrochemical monitoring of permeability properties of these thin (organo)clay films on GCE). This principle was applied here to the anodic stripping square wave voltammetric analysis of metal ions after accumulation at open circuit. Among others, detection limits as low as 3.6×10(-8)M for copper and 7.2×10(-8)M for cadmium have been achieved. PMID:24840412

  4. Lanthanum from a Modified Clay Used in Eutrophication Control Is Bioavailable to the Marbled Crayfish (Procambarus fallax f. virginalis)

    PubMed Central

    van Oosterhout, Frank; Goitom, Eyerusalem; Roessink, Ivo; Lürling, Miquel

    2014-01-01

    To mitigate eutrophication in fresh standing waters the focus is on phosphorus (P) control, i.e. on P inflows to a lake as well as a lake's sediment as internal P source. The in-lake application of the lanthanum (La) modified clays – i.e. La modified bentonite (Phoslock) or La modified kaolinite, aim at dephosphatising the water column and at reducing the release of P from a lake's sediment. Application of these clays raises the question whether La from these clays can become bioavailable to biota. We investigated the bioavailability of La from Phoslock in a controlled parallel groups experiment in which we measured the La in carapace, gills, ovaries, hepatopancreas and abdominal muscle after 0, 14 and 28 days of exposure to Phoslock. Expressing the treatment effect as the difference of the median concentration between the two treatment groups (Phoslock minus control group) yield the following effects, the plus sign (+) indicating an increase, concentrations in µg g−1 dry weight: Day 14: carapace +10.5 µg g−1, gills +112 µg g−1, ovaries +2.6 µg g−1, hepatopancreas +32.9 µg g−1 and abodminal muscle +3.2 µg g−1. Day 28: carapace +17.9 µg g−1; gills +182 µg g−1; ovaries +2.2 µg g−1; hepatopancreas +41.9 µg g−1 and abodminal muscle +7.6 µg g−1, all effects were statistically significant. As La from Phoslock is bio-available to and taken up by the marbled crayfishes (Procambarus fallax f. virginalis), we advocate that the application of in-lake chemical water treatments to mitigate eutrophication should be accompanied by a thorough study on potential side effects. PMID:25068309

  5. On the structural stability and catalytic properties of smectities pillared with RE-Al, Al-Ga polyoxications

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero, L.; Dominguez, J.M.; De los Santos, J.L.

    1995-12-01

    Pillaring of Smectite type clays offers the possibility to develop highly porous catalytic materials with surface acid properties, (1) their me in hydrotreating and FCC hydrocarbon processes has been extensively discussed (2) and still some research on the stabilization of the clays structure is being carried out. Therefore, the aim of the present work was to investigate thermal stability of Montmorillonite type clays, by means of pillaring with distinct polyoxications and by ion-exchanging and treating the clays under several conditions.

  6. Study of colloidal properties of natural and Al-pillared smectite and removal of copper ions from an aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Sartor, Lucas Resmini; de Azevedo, Antonio Carlos; Andrade, Gabriel Ramatis Pugliese

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an Al-pillared smectite was synthesized and changes in its colloidal properties were investigated. The pillaring solution was prepared by mixing 0.4 mol L(-1) NaOH and 0.2 mol L(-1) AlCl3.6H2O solutions. Intercalated clays were heated to obtain the pillared clay, and X-ray diffractometry (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and N2 sorption/desorption isotherms analysis were done to characterize the changes in clay properties. Moreover, adsorption experiments were carried out in order to evaluate the capacity of the pillared clays to remove Cu2+ from an aqueous solution and to characterize the interaction between adsorbent and adsorbate. The results indicate that the natural clay has a basal spacing of 1.26 nm, whereas the pillared clays reached 1.78 nm (500°C) and 1.80 nm (350°C) after calcination. XRF analysis revealed an increase in the Al3+ in the pillared clay as compared to the natural clay. The surface area and pore volume (micro and mesoporous) were higher for the pillared clays. Experimental data from the adsorption experiment were fit to Langmuir and Freundlich and Temkin adsorption models, and the former one was the best fit (highest r2 value) for all the clays and lower standard deviation (Δg%) for the natural clay. On the other hand, the Temkin model exhibited Δg% value lower for the pillared clays. Thermodynamics parameters demonstrate that the Cu2+ adsorption process is spontaneous for all the clays, but with higher values for the pillared materials. In addition, application of the Dubinin-Radushkevich model revealed that the bond between the metal and the clay are weak, characterizing a physisorption. PMID:25253565

  7. A novel polythiophene - ionic liquid modified clay composite solid phase microextraction fiber: Preparation, characterization and application to pesticide analysis.

    PubMed

    Pelit, Füsun Okçu; Pelit, Levent; Dizdaş, Tuğberk Nail; Aftafa, Can; Ertaş, Hasan; Yalçınkaya, E E; Türkmen, Hayati; Ertaş, F N

    2015-02-15

    This report comprises the novel usage of polythiophene - ionic liquid modified clay surfaces for solid phase microextraction (SPME) fiber production to improve the analysis of pesticides in fruit juice samples. Montmorillonite (Mmt) clay intercalated with ionic liquids (IL) was co-deposited with polythiophene (PTh) polymer coated electrochemically on an SPME fiber. The surface of the fibers were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Operational parameters effecting the extraction efficiency namely; the sample volume and pH, adsorption temperature and time, desorption temperature and time, stirring rate and salt amount were optimized. In order to reveal the major effects, these eight factors were selected and Plackett-Burman Design was constructed. The significant parameters detected; adsorption and temperature along with the stirring rate, were further investigated by Box-Behnken design. Under optimized conditions, calibration graphs were plotted and detection limits were calculated in the range of 0.002-0.667ng mL(-1). Relative standard deviations were no higher than 18%. Overall results have indicated that this novel PTh-IL-Mmt SPME surface developed by the aid of electrochemical deposition could offer a selective and sensitive head space analysis for the selected pesticide residues. PMID:25622604

  8. Antimicrobial nanocomposites based on natural modified materials: a review of carbons and clays.

    PubMed

    Martynková, Grazyna Simha; Valásková, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The review is focused on the recent research and development of antimicrobial nanocomposites based on selected carbon nanomaterials and natural nanoclay minerals. The nanocomposites comprised of two or several components, where at least one presents antimicrobial properties, are discussed. Yet the most popular agent remains silver as nanoparticle or in ionic form. Second, broadly studied group, are organics as additives or polymeric matrices. Both carbons and clays in certain forms possess antimicrobial properties. A lot of interest is put on to research graphene oxide. The low-environmental impact technologies-based on sustainable biopolymers have been studied. Testing of antimicrobial properties of nanomaterials is performed most frequently on E. coli and S. aureus bacterias. PMID:24730289

  9. The modified cam clay model for constrained compression of human morsellised bone: effects of porosity on the mechanical behaviour.

    PubMed

    Lunde, Knut B; Skallerud, Bjørn

    2009-01-01

    Morsellised cortico-cancellous bone (MCB) is often used in revision surgery for filling skeletal defects. The MCB porosity is found to influence the degree of bone ingrowth. Thus expressing a material model in terms of porosity may be attractive from a clinical point of view. We analysed the moisture content and performed constrained compression testing of human impacted and unimpacted MCB, in order to determine material parameters for the common constitutive soil model: modified cam clay. The model seemed to be suitable for the unimpacted pellets with a logarithmic bulk modulus kappa=0.059+/-0.0019 and a logarithmic hardening constant lambda=0.36+/-0.014. This model, relating the specific volume (and porosity) to the logarithm of stress, may be suited to find the best compromise of stiffness and porosity for MCB. PMID:19627806

  10. Analysis of longwall pillar stability

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, C.

    1987-01-01

    This dissertation proposes a new method for longwall pillar design, developed primarily from underground measurements. This dissertation addresses three areas of direct relevance to longwall pillar design: (1) The magnitude, time-of-arrival, and distribution of the abutment loads applied to longwall pillars; (2) The strength and behavior of coal pillars; (3) The relationship between pillar sizing and entry stability, and other factors affecting the roof/pillar/floor interaction during longwall mining. The research focused on two field studies performed in adjacent longwall panels at a West Virginia coal mine. In each study, measurements of pillar stress, pillar deformation, and entry stability were obtained during and after the approach of the longwall face. Other research included detailed reanalyses of field data from other studies, an in-depth comparative study of available longwall pillar design methods, numerical modeling to determine post-development longwall pillar loads, and an evaluation of two index tests used to determine coal strength. The proposed longwall pillar design method incorporates a new approach to estimating abutment loads hat was developed from the research. The method also employs existing empirical pillar strength formulas that were shown to be applicable to longwall pillars. The proposed design method represents an improvement over the existing methods, because it can be used with designs employing combinations of differently sized pillars, and because it can calculate stability factors for the several different service functions of pillars around a longwall.

  11. Fluorine-mediated acidity of alumina-pillared fluorohectorite

    SciTech Connect

    Butruille, J.R.; Pinnavaia, T.J. ); Michot, L.J.; Barres, O. )

    1993-02-01

    Structural fluorine atoms in the 2:1 layered silicate framework of fluorohectorite have a profound effect on the acidity of alumina-pillared derivatives prepared by intercalation of Al[sub 13] polycations and subsequent calcination at elevated temperatures. The alumina-pillared clay formed by calcination at 350[degrees]C exhibits greatly enhanced catalytic activity for propylene alkylation of biphenyl, relative to nonfluorinated smectite hosts. However, calcination of the Al[sub 13] intercalate at 500[degrees]C results in a relatively inactive clay with greatly diminished NH[sub 3] and pyridine chemisorption properties. The effect of the calcination process on the clay layer structure was carefully studied by [sup 27]Al, [sup 29]Si, and [sup 19]F MAS-NMR and FTIR spectroscopic methods and by mass spectrometric analysis of volatile by-products. It was shown that between 30 and 500[degrees]C, specific lattice fluorine atoms adjacent to charged sites in the octahedral sheet of the layers are replaced by hydroxyl groups. At calcination temperatures below 350[degrees]C the Broensted acidity of protonated hydroxyl groups in the layers is enhanced by the electron-withdrawing effect of near-neighbor fluorine atoms at neutral sites in the octahedral sheet. A mechanism for fluorine hydrolysis is proposed in which gallery water molecules, formed by the dehydroxylation of the alumina pillars, migrate to hexagonal oxygen cavities above the reactive fluorine positions. Between 350 and 500[degrees]C, a second process occurs that causes dehydroxylation of the layers, and this results in a sharp decrease in the acidity and catalytic activity of the pillared clay. The relationships between structure and reactivity suggest that the acid-catalytic activity of an alumina-pillared clay can be mediated by controlling the relative amounts of hydroxyl groups at charged octahedral sites and fluorine atoms at neutral octahedral sites in the host clay. 22 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Use of modified clays for removal of phosphorus from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Moharami, Somayeh; Jalali, Mohsen

    2015-10-01

    Phosphorus (P) removal from aqueous solutions was investigated using modified bentonite, calcite, kaolinite, and zeolite with FeCl3, CaCl2, and NaCl. The maximum sorption capacity of P was obtained by modified adsorbents with Fe(3+) ions (Fe-adsorbents). The results showed that P sorption capacity by Fe-adsorbents (bentonite (1.31 mg g(-1)), calcite (1.97 mg g(-1)), kaolinite (1.31 mg g(-1)), and zeolite (1.58 mg g(-1))) was improved by ∼467, 107, 409, and 427 %, respectively, compared to unmodified adsorbents (bentonite (0.28 mg g(-1)), calcite (1.82 mg g(-1)), kaolinite (0.32 mg g(-1)), and zeolite (0.37 mg g(-1))). Sorption isotherms were well described by the Freundlich model. Desorption experiments showed that the desorption capacity was in order of unmodified adsorbents > modified adsorbents with Na(+) ions (Na-adsorbents) > modified adsorbents with Ca(2+) ions (Ca adsorbents) > Fe-adsorbents. Effect of pH and ion strength was also investigated. At different pH, changes in the ionic strength had little effect on the adsorption. Results showed that double-layer model (DLM) could model P adsorption onto modified adsorbents over a wide range of pH and varying ionic strength. According to the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images and saturation indices (SIs), high P removal by adsorbents was partly due to the P precipitation. PMID:26400089

  13. Pillared montmorillonite catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R.K.; Olson, E.S.

    1994-12-31

    Pillared clays contain large micropores and have considerable potential for catalytic hydrogenation and cleavage of coal macromolecules. Pillared montmorillonite-supported catalysts were prepared by the intercalation of polynuclear hydroxychromium cations and subsequent impregnation of nickel and molybdenum. Infrared and thermogravimetric studies of pyridine-adsorbed catalysts indicated the presence of both Lewis and Bronsted acid sites. Thus, the catalysts have both acidic properties that can aid in hydrocracking and cleavage of carbon-heteroatom bonds as well as hydrogen-activating bimetallic sites. These catalysts were applied to the hydrodesulfurization and liquefaction of coal-derived intermediates. The reactions of model organosulfur compounds and coal liquids were carried out at 300{degrees}-400{degrees}C for 3 hours in the presence of 1000 psi of molecular hydrogen. Reaction products were analyzed by GC/FT-IR/MS/AED. The catalysts have been found to be very effective in removing sulfur from model compounds as well as liquefaction products.

  14. Simultaneous removal of multiple pesticides from water: effect of organically modified clays as coagulant aid and adsorbent in coagulation-flocculation process.

    PubMed

    Shabeer, T P Ahammed; Saha, Ajoy; Gajbhiye, V T; Gupta, Suman; Manjaiah, K M; Varghese, Eldho

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of drinking water sources with agrochemical residues became a major concern in the twenty-first century. Coagulation-flocculation is the most widely used water-treatment process, but the efficiency to remove pesticides and other organic pollutants are limited compared to adsorption process. Thus, simultaneous action of adsorption on normal bentonite or organo-modified montmorillonite clays [modified with octadecylamine (ODA-M) and octadecylamine + amino-propyltriethoxysilane (ODAAPS-M)] followed by coagulation-flocculation by alum and poly aluminium chloride has been evaluated for removal of 10 different pesticides, namely atrazine, lindane, metribuzin, aldrin, chlorpyriphos, pendimethalin, alpha-endosulphan, beta-endosulphan, p,p'-DDT, cypermethrin and two of its metabolites, endosulphan sulphate and p,p'-DDE, from water. The coagulation without integration of adsorption was less effective (removal % varies from 12 to 49) than the adsorption-coagulation integrated system (removal % varies from 71 to 100). Further, coagulation integrated with adsorption was more effective when organically modified montmorillonite was used as adsorbent compared to normal bentonite. The removal efficiency of organic clay depends upon the concentration of pesticides, doses of clay minerals, and efficiency was more for ODAAPS-M as compared to ODA-M. The combination of ODAAPS-M-clay with coagulants was also used efficiently for the removal of pesticides from natural and fortified natural water collected and the results exhibit the usefulness of this remediation technique for application in water decontamination and in treatment of industrial and agricultural waste waters. PMID:25145219

  15. Role of organic modifiers on the enhancement of nanochemical properties of clay-based nanocomposites: A nanoscale experimental and multiscale modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikdar, Debashis

    Polymer clay nanocomposite (PCN) is a novel composite material which is synthesized by mixing expansive clay minerals with polymeric materials in the nanometer length scale. In this research, we have found the mechanisms responsible for enhanced mechanical properties in PCN in comparison to pristine polymer. Photoacoustic (PA) Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of PCN shows that there are only nonbonded interactions between constituents of PCN. Interaction energies are a measure of interactions between different constituents of composite materials. For quantitative evaluation of nonbonded interactions between constituents of PCN, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using representative intercalated models of PCN are constructed in an innovative way by combining experimental (X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR) and modeling results. The resulting PCN models are used to calculate interaction energies between the constituents of PCN using MD simulation. The results show that the organic modifier has a significant role on the interactions between different constituents of PCN. Results obtained from nanomechanical experiments of those PCN samples synthesized with identical polymer and clay but different organic modifiers show that the organic modifier has a major influence on the crystallinity and nanomechanical properties of PCN, and lower the crystallinity of polymer, the higher is the elastic modulus of PCNs. MD simulations on these PCN samples show that interactions between intercalated polymer and organic modifiers are key for altering crystallinity and nanomechanical properties of PCNs. PA-FTIR tests on PCNs show that organic modifiers alter the crystal structure of clay. This work has led us proposing a new "altered phase" model for PCNs. Further MD-result, and nanomechanical experiments shows that crystallinity and interactions between constituents of PCN can be tailored to a significant extent by varying the backbone chain length of modifier. To

  16. Effects of modified clay flocculation on major nutrients and diatom aggregation during Skeletonema costatum blooms in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guangyuan; Song, Xiuxian; Yu, Zhiming; Cao, Xihua; Yuan, Yongquan

    2015-07-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) can elicit several negative effects on aquatic environment (such as depleting the oxygen, blocking the sunlight, destroying the habitats of organisms) and life health (including poisoning/killing marine mammals, birds and human). Among the various control strategies for HABs (physical manipulation needs lots of manpower and expensive equipment, chemicals treatment has some toxic byproduct and high residual, microbial agents only has limited in laboratory research), the coagulation-flocculation of HAB species by modified clay (MC) has been proven to be an effective, low-cost and environmentally friendly method that has been widely applied in the field, particularly in eastern Asia. In order to examine the long-term effects of MC treatment, this study investigated the alternations in seawater of Skeletonema costatum, a high biomass dominant HAB species along the Chinese coast, by comparing the degradation of S. costatum detritus (A1) with the application of MC treatment (A2) and MC treatment in sediment condition (A3). The low dosage of 0.25 g/L MC could efficiently remove 4×108 cells/L of S. costatum cells within 3.5 h (approximately 97% removal). In addition, the results showed that both inorganic and organic nutrients were effectively reduced from seawater by MC particles. Compared to the total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) concentrations in A1 seawater, 44% of TN and 93% of TP in A2 seawater, as well as 72% of TN and 93% of TP in A3 seawater were removed during the one-month incubation period. Simultaneously, 64% of DISi in A2 and 44% of DISi in A3 significantly decreased ( P<0.001). This study demonstrated that MC treatment was able to significantly increase the downward flux of nutrients and delay the release velocity of inorganic nutrient from MC-algae matrix into the overlying seawater, particularly within sediment environment.

  17. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-08-01

    In an effort to develop new disposable catalysts for direct coal liquefaction, several types of clay-supported pyrrhotite catalysts were prepared and tested. These included iron-pillared montmorillonite, mixed iron/alumina-pillared montmorillonite, iron-impregnated montmorillonite, and iron oxometallate-impregnated montmorillonite.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of TiO2 pillared montmorillonites: application for methylene blue degradation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Daimei; Du, Gaoxiang; Zhu, Qian; Zhou, Fengsan

    2013-11-01

    TiO2 pillared clay composites were prepared by modifying of montmorillonite (Mt) with cetyl-trimethyammoniumbromide (CTAB) and then using an acidic solution of hydrolyzed Ti alkoxide to intercalate into the interlayer space of the organic modified Mt. The as-prepared materials were characterized by XRD, FTIR, TEM, SEM TG-DTA, specific surface area and porosity measurements. The composites had a porous delaminated structure with pillared fragments and well dispersed TiO2 nanoparticles. Introduction of CTAB into the synthetic system accelerated the hydrolysis and condensation of the Ti source, which promoted TiO2 formation. In addition, the CTAB also significantly increased the porosity and surface area of the composites. A number of anatase particles, with crystal sizes of 5-10 nm, were homogenously distributed on the surface of the Mt as the result of the templating role of CTAB. The resultant TiO2 pillared Mt exhibited good thermal stability as indicated by its surface area after calcination at 800°C. No phase transformations from anatase to rutile were observed even under calcination at 900°C. The grain size of the anatase in prepared sample increased from 2.67 nm to 13.42 nm as the calcination temperature increased from 300°C to 900°C. The photocatalytic performance of these new porous materials was evaluated by using methylene blue degradation. The composite exhibited better photocatalytic property than P 25. The maximum removal efficiency of this composite was up to 99% within 60 min. PMID:23957927

  19. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    The article reports on the global market performance of ball clay in 2009 and presents an outlook for its 2010 performance. Several companies mined ball call in the country including Old Hickey Clay Co., Kentucky-Tennessee Clay Co., and H.C. Spinks Clay Co. Information on the decline in ball clay imports and exports is also presented.

  20. [Efficiency of Sediment Amendment with Zirconium-Modified Kaolin Clay to Control Phosphorus Release from Sediments in Heavily Polluted Rivers].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Lin, Jian-wei; Zhan, Yan-hui; Zhang, Zhe; Wang, Di-ru

    2015-10-01

    A zirconium-modified kaolin- clay (ZrMK) was prepared and used as a sediment amendment to control the release of phosphorus (P) from sediments in heavily polluted rivers under low dissolved oxygen (DO) condition. Results showed that the ZrMK exhibited excellent adsorption performance of phosphate in water. The phosphate adsorption capacity of the ZrMK increased with the increasing of loading amount of zirconium in the ZrMK. The phosphate adsorption capacity of the ZrMK increased with the increase of the precipitated pH value from 8 to 10, remained basically unchangeable with the increase of the precipitated pH value from 10 to 11, but decreased with the increase of the precipitated pH value from 11 to 12. The phosphate equilibrium adsorption data of the ZrMK can be better described by the Langmuir isotherm model than the Freundlich isotherm model when the ZrMK was prepared with the precipitated pH value 10. Sequential extraction of P from the phosphate-adsorbed ZrMK showed that most of phosphate-P bound by the ZrMK (about 84% of total P) existed in the form of the metal oxide P (NaOH-P) and residual P (Res-P), which was unlikely to be released under hypoxia and common pH (5-9) conditions. The fluxes of phosphate-P and total P (TP) from sediments into the overlying water column were greatly reduced with the adding of ZrMK to sediments under low dissolved oxygen conditions. The ZrMK-amended sediments exhibited much higher phosphate adsorption capacity than the original sediments, and the former had much lower phosphate adsorption/desorption equilibrium concentration (EPC,) than the latter. Our findings suggest that the ZrMK can be used as an efficient sediment amendment for controlling P release from sediments in heavily polluted rivers under low dissolved oxygen conditions. PMID:26841604

  1. The extraction of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 89}Sr from waste simulants using pillared montmorillonite

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvester, P.; Clearfield, A.

    1998-08-01

    Two samples of a silica-pillared montmorillonite produced using 3-aminopropyltrimethoxy silane and an alumina-pillared montmorillonite were evaluated for the removal of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 89}Sr from a simulated nuclear waste solution and a simulated groundwater, and the results were compared to the parent montmorillonite and two zeolites, AW500 (chabazite) and clinoptilolite. The parent and pillared clays were characterized using x-ray powder diffraction and surface area analysis by nitrogen adsorption/desorption studies. The pillared clays exhibited d-spacings of between 17.43 and 18.32 {angstrom} after calcination, and surface areas ranging from 71.3 to 264.4 m{sup 2}/g. Both of the silica-pillared clays and the alumina-pillared clay exhibited excellent K{sub d}s for {sup 137}Cs from simulated groundwater with values of 23,650, 23,260 and 144,570 mL/g, respectively. These were far better than the K{sub d}s obtained by clinoptilolite and AW500 which had K{sub d}s of only 14,560 and 9,650 mL/g, respectively. None of the pillared clays showed a high selectivity for {sup 89}Sr from groundwater or {sup 137}Cs from simulated alkaline tank waste. They did, however, show a slight selectivity for {sup 89}Sr in the simulated Hanford tank wastes, but this is thought to be due to a precipitation mechanism rather than to ion exchange.

  2. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, four companies including H.C. Spinks Clay, Kentucky-Tennessee Clay, Old Hickory Clay and Unimin mined ball clay in four states. Based on a preliminary survey of the ball clay industry, production reached 1.32 Mt valued at $53.3 million. Tennessee was the leading ball clay producer state with 61% of domestic production, followed by Texas, Mississippi and Kentucky.

  3. Clays, specialty

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Part of a special section on the state of industrial minerals in 1997. The state of the specialty clay industry worldwide for 1997 is discussed. The specialty clays mined in the U.S. are ball clay, fuller's earth, bentonite, fire clay, and kaolin. Sales of specialty clays in the U.S. were around 17 Mt in 1997. Approximately 53 kt of specialty clays were imported.

  4. Study of the acidic properties of ZrO2-pillared bentonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suseno, Ahmad; Priyono; Wijaya, Karna; Trisunaryanti, Wega

    2016-02-01

    Research on pillared clays prepared from purified bentonite of Boyolali Central Jawa, Indonesia, and polycation Zr at various concentration and calcination temperature had been done. Effect of acidity characteristic and structure of resulting materials were studied. The nature of acidic site of the material was identified on the basis of FTIRspectra of pyridine adsorbed on ZrO2- pillared bentonite catalysts. Analysis showed that increasing calcination temperature was followed by decreasing acidity and increasing ZrO2 content in the pillared bentonite accompanied by the increase of its acidity. FTIR spectra showed there was an intensity increase of the characteristic band of 1635 cm-1that indicates a Bronsted acid.

  5. Clay Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Liz; Steffan, Dana

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to use clay as a potential material for young children to explore. As teachers, the authors find that their dialogue about the potential of clay as a learning medium raises many questions: (1) What makes clay so enticing? (2) Why are teachers noticing different play and conversation around the clay table as compared to…

  6. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Part of the 2000 annual review of the industrial minerals sector. A general overview of the ball clay industry is provided. In 2000, sales of ball clay reached record levels, with sanitary ware and tile applications accounting for the largest sales. Ball clay production, consumption, prices, foreign trade, and industry news are summarized. The outlook for the ball clay industry is also outlined.

  7. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, November 9, 1991--February 8, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-10-01

    The investigation of methods for the production and testing of iron-pillared clay catalysts was continued in this quarter. The surface area of the mixed alumina/iron pillared clay catalyst decreased to 51 m{sup 2}/g on sulfidation. Thus the stability of the alumina pillars during the sulfidation and thermal treatments prevented the total collapse that occurred in the case of the iron-pillared clays. Previously the mixed alumina/iron pillared clays were tested for hydrocracking activities with bibenzyl. This testing was extended to a determination of activity with a second model compound substrate (pyrene), representative of the polynuclear aromatic systems present in coal. Testing of the mixed alumina/iron-pillared catalysts with 1-methylnaphthalene gave interesting results that demonstrate shape selectivity. The clay-supported iron hydroxyoxide catalysts prepared by impregnation of iron species on acidic clays were further investigated. Sulfidation of these catalysts using the carbon disulfide in situ method gave hydrocracking activities with bibenzyl that were somewhat less than those obtained by presulfidation with H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}S mixtures. Liquefaction of Wyodak subbituminous coal was very successful with the iron impregnated clay catalyst, giving a highly soluble product. High conversions were also obtained with the mixed alumina/iron-pillared clay catalyst, but the yield of oil-solubles was considerably lower. Several new catalysts were synthesized with the idea of decreasing the pillar density and thereby increasing the micropore volume. These catalysts were prepared by first pillaring with an organic ammonium pillaring agent, then introducing a lower number of silica or alumina pillars. Finally the iron component was added either before or after thermal removal of organic pillars.

  8. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical report, May 9, 1991--August 8, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1991-12-31

    The efficient production of environmentally acceptable distillate fuels requires catalysts for hydrogenation and cleavage of the coal macromolecules and removal of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur heteroatoms. The goal of the proposed research is to develop new catalysts for the direct liquefaction of coal. This type of catalyst consists of fine clay particles that have been treated with reagents which form pillaring structures between the aluminosilicate layers of the clay. The pillars not only hold the layers apart but also constitute the active catalytic sites for hydrogenation of the coal and the solvent used in the liquefaction. The pillaring catalytic sites are composed of pyrrhotite, which has been previously demonstrated to be active for coal liquefaction. The pyrrhotite sites are generated in situ by sulfiding the corresponding oxyiron species. The size of the catalyst will be less than 40 nm in order to promote intimate contact with the coal material. Since the clays and reagents for pillaring and activating the clays are inexpensive, the catalysts can be discarded after use, rather than regenerated by a costly process. The proposed work will evaluate methods for preparing the fine particle iron-pillared clay dispersions and for activating the particles to generate the catalysts. Characterization studies of the pillared clays and activated catalysts will be performed. The effectiveness of the pillared clay dispersion for hydrogenation and coal liquefaction will be determined in several types of testing.

  9. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    The article offers information on ball clay. Among the companies that mine ball clay in the U.S. are H.C. Spinks Clay, Kentucky-Tennessee Clay and Old Hickory Clay. In 2006, an estimated 1.2 million tons of the mineral was sold or used domestically and exported. Forty-percent of the total sales is accounted for ceramic floor and wall tile followed by sanitaryware and miscellaneous ceramics. Its average value was $ 45 per ton in 2006.

  10. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the global ball clay mining industry, particularly in the U.S., as of June 2011. It cites several firms that are involved in ball clay mining in the U.S., including HC Spins Clay Co. Inc., the Imerys Group and Old Hickory Clay Co. Among the products made from ball clay are ceramic tiles, sanitaryware, as well as fillers, extenders and binders.

  11. Stress reduction for pillar filled structures

    DOEpatents

    Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Conway, Adam; Shao, Qinghui; Voss, Lars; Cheung, Chin Li; Dar, Mushtaq A.

    2015-09-01

    According to one embodiment, an apparatus for detecting neutrons includes an array of pillars, wherein each of the pillars comprises a rounded cross sectional shape where the cross section is taken perpendicular to a longitudinal axis of the respective pillar, a cavity region between each of the pillars, and a neutron sensitive material located in each cavity region.

  12. Pillar Structured Thermal Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolic, R; Conway, A; Reinhardt, C; Graff, R; Wang, T; Deo, N; Cheung, C

    2008-06-10

    This work describes an innovative solid state device structure that leverages advanced semiconductor fabrication technology to produce an efficient device for thermal neutron detection which we have coined the 'Pillar Detector'. State-of-the-art thermal neutron detectors have shortcomings in simultaneously achieving high efficiency, low operating voltage while maintaining adequate fieldability performance. By using a three dimensional silicon PIN diode pillar array filled with isotopic {sup 10}boron ({sup 10}B), a high efficiency device is theoretically possible. Here we review the design considerations for going from a 2-D to 3-D device and discuss the materials trade-offs. The relationship between the geometrical features and efficiency within our 3-D device is investigated by Monte Carlo radiation transport method coupled with finite element drift-diffusion carrier transport simulations. To benchmark our simulations and validate the predicted efficiency scaling, experimental results of a prototype device are illustrated. The fabricated pillar structures reported in this work are composed of 2 {micro}m diameter silicon pillars with a 2 {micro}m spacing and pillar height of 12 {micro}m. The pillar detector with a 12 {micro}m height achieved a thermal neutron detection efficiency of 7.3% at a reverse bias of -2 V.

  13. Characterization of phosphate sequestration by a lanthanum modified bentonite clay: A solid- state NMR, EXAFS and PXRD study

    SciTech Connect

    Dithmer, Line; Lipton, Andrew S.; Reitzel, Kasper; Warner, Terence E.; Lundberg, Daniel; Nielsen, Ulla Gro

    2015-04-07

    Phosphate (P) sequestration by a lanthanum (La) exchanged bentonite (a clay mineral), which is extensively used in chemical lake restoration, was investigated on the molecular level using a combination of 31P and 139La solid state NMR spectroscopy (SSNMR), extended X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EX-AFS) and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) in combination with sorption studies. 31P SSNMR show that all phosphate is immobilized as rhabdophane, LaPO4·xH2O, which is further supported by 139La SSNMR and EXAFS; whereas PXRD results are ambiguous with respect to rhabdophane and monazite (LaPO4). Adsorption studies show that, at humic acids (HA) concentrations above ca. 250 μM the binding capacity is only 50 % of the theoretical value or even less. No other lanthanum or phosphate phases are detected by SSNMR and EXAFS indicating the effect of HA is kinetic. Moreover, 31P SSNMR shows that rhabdophane formed upon P sequestration is in close proximity to the clay matrix.

  14. Characterization of phosphate sequestration by a lanthanum modified bentonite clay: a solid-state NMR, EXAFS, and PXRD study.

    PubMed

    Dithmer, Line; Lipton, Andrew S; Reitzel, Kasper; Warner, Terence E; Lundberg, Daniel; Nielsen, Ulla Gro

    2015-04-01

    Phosphate (Pi) sequestration by a lanthanum (La) exchanged clay mineral (La-Bentonite), which is extensively used in chemical lake restoration, was investigated on the molecular level using a combination of (31)P and (139)La solid state NMR spectroscopy (SSNMR), extended X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and sorption studies. (31)P SSNMR show that all Pi was immobilized as rhabdophane (LaPO4·n H2O, n ≤ 3), which was further supported by (139)La SSNMR and EXAFS. However, PXRD results were ambiguous with respect to rhabdophane and monazite (LaPO4). Adsorption studies showed that at dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration above ca. 250 μM the binding capacity was only 50% of the theoretical value or even less. No other La or Pi phases were detected by SSNMR and EXAFS indicating the effect of DOC is kinetic. Moreover, (31)P SSNMR showed that rhabdophane formed upon Pi sequestration is in close proximity to the clay matrix. PMID:25747941

  15. Formation and Stabilization of Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals Induced by the Interaction of Anthracene with Fe(III)-Modified Clays.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hanzhong; Nulaji, Gulimire; Gao, Hongwei; Wang, Fu; Zhu, Yunqing; Wang, Chuanyi

    2016-06-21

    Environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) are occasionally detected in Superfund sites but the formation of EPFRs induced by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is not well understood. In the present work, the formation of EPFRs on anthracene-contaminated clay minerals was quantitatively monitored via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, and surface/interface-related environmental influential factors were systematically explored. The obtained results suggest that EPFRs are more readily formed on anthracene-contaminated Fe(III)-montmorillonite than in other tested systems. Depending on the reaction condition, more than one type of organic radicals including anthracene-based radical cations with g-factors of 2.0028-2.0030 and oxygenic carbon-centered radicals featured by g-factors of 2.0032-2.0038 were identified. The formed EPFRs are stabilized by their interaction with interlayer surfaces, and such surface-bound EPFRs exhibit slow decay with 1/e-lifetime of 38.46 days. Transformation pathway and possible mechanism are proposed on the basis of experimental results and quantum mechanical simulations. Overall, the formation of EPFRs involves single-electron-transfer from anthracene to Fe(III) initially, followed by H2O addition on formed aromatic radical cation. Because of their potential exposure in soil and atmosphere, such clay surface-associated EPFRs might induce more serious toxicity than PAHs and exerts significant impacts on human health. PMID:27224055

  16. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, February 9, 1992--May 8, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-10-01

    An investigation of new methods for the production of iron-pillared clay catalysts and clay-supported iron hydroxyoxide catalysts and the determination of their catalytic activities was continued in this quarter. Previous work in this project showed that a catalyst prepared by adding ferric nitrate and ammonia to an acid-washed clay gave an active catalyst following sulfidation. Further testing of this catalyst with a model compound showed that its hydrocracking activity was considerably lower when used in 10% concentration rather than 50%. In contrast, the mixed iron/alumina pillared clay catalysts were still highly effective at 10% concentration and gave good conversions at one and two hour reaction times. An investigation of preparation methods demonstrated that calcination of both the iron hydroxyoxide-impregnated clay and the mixed iron/alumina pillared clays is essential for activity. High activity was obtained for these catalysts only when they were removed from the aqueous media rapidly, dried, and calcined. The use of ferric sulfate to prepare a clay-supported sulfated iron catalyst was attempted, the resulting catalyst was relatively inactive for hydrocracking. Several new catalysts were synthesized with the idea of decreasing the pillar density and thereby increasing the micropore volume. A zirconia-pillared clay with low pillar density was prepared and intercalated with triiron complex. The hydrocracking activity of this catalyst was somewhat lower than that of the mixed alumina/iron-pillared catalyst. Other new catalysts, that were prepared by first pillaring with an organic ammonium pillaring agent, then introducing a lower number of silica or alumina pillars, and finally the iron component, were also tested. The mixed alumina/iron-pillared catalysts was further tested at low concentration for pyrene hydrogenating and hydrocracking activities.

  17. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2013-01-01

    Four companies — H.C. Spinks Clay Co., Inc., Imerys, Old Hickory Clay Co. and Unimin Corp. — mined ball clay in five U.S. states in 2012. Production, on the basis of preliminary data, was 900 kt (992,000 st), with an estimated value of $42.3 million. This was a slight increase in tonnage from 886 kt (977,000 st), with a value of $40.9 million in 2011. Tennessee was the leading ball clay producing state, with 63 percent of domestic production, followed by Texas, Mississippi, Kentucky and Indiana. Reported ball clay production from Indiana probably was fire clay rather than ball clay. About 69 percent of total ball clay production was airfloat, 20 percent was crude and 11 percent was water-slurried.

  18. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the fire clay industry, particularly in the U.S., as of June 2011. It claims that the leading fire clay producer in the U.S. is the state of Missouri. The other major producers include California, Texas and Washington. It reports that the use of heavy clay products made of fire clay like brick, cement and lightweight aggregate has increased slightly in 2010.

  19. Clays, common

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Part of a special section on the state of industrial minerals in 1997. The state of the common clay industry worldwide for 1997 is discussed. Sales of common clay in the U.S. increased from 26.2 Mt in 1996 to an estimated 26.5 Mt in 1997. The amount of common clay and shale used to produce structural clay products in 1997 was estimated at 13.8 Mt.

  20. Clay Houses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedro, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project designed for fourth-graders that involves making clay relief sculptures of houses. Knowing the clay houses will become a family heirloom makes this lesson even more worth the time. It takes three classes to plan and form the clay, and another two to underglaze and glaze the final products.

  1. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2013-01-01

    Four companies mined fire clay in three states in 2012. Production, based on a preliminary survey of the fire clay industry, was estimated to be 230 kt (254,000 st) valued at $6.98 million, an increase from 215 kt (237,000 st) valued at $6.15 million in 2011. Missouri was the leading producing state, followed by Colorado and Texas, in decreasing order by quantity. The number of companies mining fire clay declined in 2012 because several common clay producers that occasionally mine fire clay indicated that they did not do so in 2012.

  2. Processing research and development of 'green' polymer nanoclay composites containing a polyhydroxybutyrate, vinyl acetates, and modified montmorillonite clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKirahan, James N., Jr.

    The purpose of this research was to determine the feasibility of direct melt-blending (intercalation) montmorillonite nanoclay to polyhydroxybutyrate along with vinyl acetate, at different weight percentages, to enhance plasticization using typical plastic processing equipment and typical processing methodology. The purpose was to determine and compare the specific mechanical properties of tensile strength and flexural strength developed as a result from this processing. Single screw and twin screw extrusion, Banbury mixer compounding, and compression molding were used to intercalate montmorillonite, and for sample preparation purposes, to test tensile and flexural strength of the resultant polymer clay nanocomposites (PCN). Results indicate Polyhydroxybutyrate and Ethylene vinyl acetate, and weight percentages of 70%, 65% and 60% PHB, and 15%, 20%, and 25% of EVA, respectively, influenced mechanical properties. The resultant materials remained in a mostly amorphous state. The nanoclay, at specific weight percentage of 10%, acted as an antimicrobial and preservative for the materials produced during the research. The intention of the research was to promote knowledge and understanding concerning these materials and processes so technology transfer regarding the use, mechanical properties, manufacture, and process ability of these bio-friendly materials to academia, industry, and society can occur.

  3. Design of coal mine roof support and yielding pillars for longwall mining in the Appalachian coalfield

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    In this thesis, the existing Geomechanics Classification (Bieniawski, 1979) was modified for use in underground coal mines through the introduction of adjustment modifiers for strata weathering, horizontal stress, and roof support. Sixty-two roof case histories were collected from two mines exploiting the Pittsburgh and Lower Kittanning coal seams. Geologic and material property variables were examined with respect to supported stand-up time, while survival and regression analyses were used in deriving the adjustment multipliers. Guidelines for roofspan selection and roof support design were an integral facet of the modified classification scheme. Tentative design guidelines for chain pillars are provided on the basis of a field investigation and numerical modeling of longwall chain pillar behavior. A longwall chain pillar was instrumented with vibrating wire stressmeters to quantify the change in stress distribution as longwall mining proceeded out by the pillar. A sonic probe was used to conduct a velocity profile across the pillar before and after mining to delineate the failed and stable regions of the pillar. Velocity profiles across the pillar were supplemented by an examination of changes in the dynamic modulus and the shear wave frequency. The main contributions of the research lies in: (i) modifications introduced to the Geomechanics Classification (RMR System), (ii) the correlation between changes in pillar stress and the extent of the yield zone surrounding a longwall chain pillar, and (iii) the proposal of design procedures involving coal mine roof support and chain pillars. Numerical examples obtained from mine case histories are provided to illustrate the use of the design procedures.

  4. Six Pillars of Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullins, Joseph J.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an approach to teaching organic chemistry, which is to have students build their knowledge of organic chemistry upon a strong foundation of the fundamental concepts of the subject. Specifically, the article focuses upon a core set of concepts that I call "the six pillars of organic chemistry": electronegativity, polar…

  5. Six Pillars of Dynamic Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Steven W.; Chapman, Paul E.

    2009-01-01

    "Six Pillars of Dynamic Schools" uncovers an often overlooked truth--effective change is the product of hard work and dedication. There is no silver bullet; no matter how many programs, software packages, or new initiatives a district uses, the magic won't just "happen." Dynamic schools result from consistent and redundant focus on the fundamental…

  6. Nanoscale pillar arrays for separations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kirchner, Teresa; Strickhouser, Rachel; Hatab, Nahla; Charlton, Jennifer; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Sepaniak, Michael J.

    2015-04-01

    The work presented herein evaluates silicon nano-pillar arrays for use in planar chromatography. Electron beam lithography and metal thermal dewetting protocols were used to create nano-thin layer chromatography platforms. With these fabrication methods we are able to reduce the size of the characteristic features in a separation medium below that used in ultra-thin layer chromatography; i.e. pillar heights are 1-2μm and pillar diameters are typically in the 200- 400nm range. In addition to the intrinsic nanoscale aspects of the systems, it is shown they can be further functionalized with nanoporous layers and traditional stationary phases for chromatography; hence exhibit broad-rangingmore » lab-on-a-chip and point-of-care potential. Because of an inherent high permeability and very small effective mass transfer distance between pillars, chromatographic efficiency can be very high but is enhanced herein by stacking during development and focusing while drying, yielding plate heights in the nm range separated band volumes. Practical separations of fluorescent dyes, fluorescently derivatized amines, and anti-tumor drugs are illustrated.« less

  7. Nanoscale pillar arrays for separations

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchner, Teresa; Strickhouser, Rachel; Hatab, Nahla; Charlton, Jennifer; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Sepaniak, Michael J.

    2015-04-01

    The work presented herein evaluates silicon nano-pillar arrays for use in planar chromatography. Electron beam lithography and metal thermal dewetting protocols were used to create nano-thin layer chromatography platforms. With these fabrication methods we are able to reduce the size of the characteristic features in a separation medium below that used in ultra-thin layer chromatography; i.e. pillar heights are 1-2μm and pillar diameters are typically in the 200- 400nm range. In addition to the intrinsic nanoscale aspects of the systems, it is shown they can be further functionalized with nanoporous layers and traditional stationary phases for chromatography; hence exhibit broad-ranging lab-on-a-chip and point-of-care potential. Because of an inherent high permeability and very small effective mass transfer distance between pillars, chromatographic efficiency can be very high but is enhanced herein by stacking during development and focusing while drying, yielding plate heights in the nm range separated band volumes. Practical separations of fluorescent dyes, fluorescently derivatized amines, and anti-tumor drugs are illustrated.

  8. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, six companies mined fire clay in Missouri, Ohio and South Carolina. Production was estimate to be 300 kt with a value of $8.3 million. Missouri was the leading producer state followed by Ohio and South Carolina. For the third consecutive year, sales and use of fire clays have been relatively unchanged. For the next few years, sales of fire clay is forecasted to remain around 300 kt/a.

  9. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. The state of the ball clay industry in 1999 is presented. Record highs in the sales and use of ball clay were attained in 1999 due to the continued strength of the U.S. economy. U.S. production was estimated at 1.25 million st for the year, with more than half of that amount mined in Tennessee. Details of the consumption, price, imports, and exports of ball clay in 1999 and the outlook for ball clay over the next few years are provided.

  10. All Pillars Point to Eta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Eta Carinae Starforming RegionSimulated Infrared View of Comet Tempel 1 (artist's concept)

    These false-color image taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the 'South Pillar' region of the star-forming region called the Carina Nebula. Like cracking open a watermelon and finding its seeds, the infrared telescope 'busted open' this murky cloud to reveal star embryos (yellow or white) tucked inside finger-like pillars of thick dust (pink). Hot gases are green and foreground stars are blue. Not all of the newfound star embryos can be easily spotted.

    Though the nebula's most famous and massive star, Eta Carinae, is too bright to be observed by infrared telescopes, the downward-streaming rays hint at its presence above the picture frame. Ultraviolet radiation and stellar winds from Eta Carinae and its siblings have shredded the cloud to pieces, leaving a mess of tendrils and pillars. This shredding process triggered the birth of the new stars uncovered by Spitzer.

    The inset visible-light picture (figure 2) of the Carina Nebula shows quite a different view. Dust pillars are fewer and appear dark because the dust is soaking up visible light. Spitzer's infrared detectors cut through this dust, allowing it to see the heat from warm, embedded star embryos, as well as deeper, more buried pillars. The visible-light picture is from the National Optical Astronomy Observatory.

    Eta Carina is a behemoth of a star, with more than 100 times the mass of our Sun. It is so massive that it can barely hold itself together. Over the years, it has brightened and faded as material has shot away from its surface. Some astronomers think Eta Carinae might die in a supernova blast within our lifetime.

    Eta Carina's home, the Carina Nebula, is located in the southern portion of our Milky Way galaxy, 10,000 light-years from Earth. This colossal cloud of gas and dust

  11. Environmental applications of inorganic-organic clays for recalcitrant organic pollutants removal: Bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Rathnayake, Suramya I; Xi, Yunfei; Frost, Ray L; Ayoko, Godwin A

    2016-05-15

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) adsorption onto inorganic-organic clays (IOCs) was investigated. For this purpose, IOCs synthesised using octadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (ODTMA, organic modifier) and hydroxy aluminium (Al13, inorganic modifier) were used. Three intercalation methods were employed with varying ODTMA concentration in the synthesis of IOCs. Molecular interactions of clay surfaces with ODTMA and Al13 and their arrangements within the interlayers were determined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Surface area and porous structure of IOCs were determined by applying Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) method to N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms. Surface area decreased upon ODTMA intercalation while it increased with Al13 pillaring. As a result, BET specific surface area of IOCs was considerably higher than those of organoclays. Initial concentration of BPA, contact time and adsorbent dose significantly affected BPA adsorption into IOCs. Pseudo-second order kinetics model is the best fit for BPA adsorption into IOCs. Both Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms were applicable for BPA adsorption (R(2)>0.91) for IOCs. Langmuir maximum adsorption capacity for IOCs was as high as 109.89mgg(-1) and it was closely related to the loaded ODTMA amount into the clay. Hydrophobic interactions between long alkyl chains of ODTMA and BPA are responsible for BPA adsorption into IOCs. PMID:26945114

  12. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    Five companies mined fire clay in four states in 2011. Production, based on a preliminary survey of the fire clay industry, was estimated to be 240 kt (265,000 st), valued at $7.68 million, an increase from 216 kt (238,000 st), valued at $6.12 million in 2010. Missouri was the leading producing state, followed by Texas, Washington and Ohio, in decreasing order by quantity.

  13. Photoinduced catalytic adsorption of model contaminants on Bi/Cu pillared montmorillonite in the visible light range

    EPA Science Inventory

    Montmorillonite K10 clay was pillared with BiCl3 and Cu(NO3)2 to extend its applicability as catalytic adsorbent to degrade aqueous solution of anionic azo-dye Methyl Orange (MO) in the presence of visible light irradiation. The preparation of Bi/Cu-montmorillonite utilized benig...

  14. Modified Hydra Bioassay to Evaluate the Toxicity of Multiple Mycotoxins and Predict the Detoxification Efficacy of a Clay-Based Sorbent

    PubMed Central

    Brown, KA; Mays, T; Romoser, A; Marroquin-Cardona, A; Mitchell, NJ; Elmore, SE; Phillips, TD

    2013-01-01

    Food shortages and lack of food supply regulation in developing countries often leads to chronic exposure of vulnerable populations to hazardous mixtures of mycotoxins, including aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and fumonisin B1 (FB1). A refined calcium montmorillonite clay (i.e. UPSN) has been reported to tightly bind these toxins, thereby decreasing bioavailability in humans and animals. Hence, our objectives in the present work were to examine the ability of UPSN to bind mixtures of AFB1 and FB1at gastrointestinally relevant pH in vitro, and to utilize a rapid in vivo bioassay to evaluate AFB1 and FB1 toxicity and UPSN efficacy. Isothermal sorption data indicated tight AFB1 binding to UPSN surfaces at both pH 2.0 and 6.5, but substantially more FB1 bound at pH 2.0 than 6.5. Site-specific competition occurred between the toxins when exposed to UPSN in combination. Importantly, treatment with UPSN resulted in significant protection to mycotoxin-exposed hydra maintained at pH 6.9-7.0. Hydra were exposed to FB1, AFB1 and FB1/AFB1 combinations with and without UPSN. Toxic response over 92 hours was rated based on morphology and mortality. Hydra assay results indicated a minimum effective concentration (MEC) of 20 μg/mLfor AFB1, while the MEC for FB1 was not reached. The MEC for co-exposure was 400 μg/mL FB1 + 10 μg/mL AFB1. This study demonstrates that UPSN sorbs both mycotoxins tightly at physiologically relevant pH levels, resulting in decreased bioavailability, and that a modified hydra bioassay can be used as an initial screen in vivo to predict efficacy of toxin binding agents. PMID:23047854

  15. Modified hydra bioassay to evaluate the toxicity of multiple mycotoxins and predict the detoxification efficacy of a clay-based sorbent.

    PubMed

    Brown, K A; Mays, T; Romoser, A; Marroquin-Cardona, A; Mitchell, N J; Elmore, S E; Phillips, T D

    2014-01-01

    Food shortages and a lack of food supply regulation in developing countries often leads to chronic exposure of vulnerable populations to hazardous mixtures of mycotoxins, including aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) and fumonisin B(1) (FB(1)). A refined calcium montmorillonite clay [i.e. uniform particle size NovaSil (UPSN)] has been reported to tightly bind these toxins, thereby decreasing bioavailability in humans and animals. Hence, our objectives in the present study were to examine the ability of UPSN to bind mixtures of AFB(1) and FB(1) at gastrointestinally relevant pH in vitro, and to utilize a rapid in vivo bioassay to evaluate AFB(1) and FB(1) toxicity and UPSN efficacy. Isothermal sorption data indicated tight AFB(1) binding to UPSN surfaces at both pH 2.0 and 6.5, but substantially more FB(1) bound at pH 2.0 than 6.5. Site-specific competition occurred between the toxins when exposed to UPSN in combination. Importantly, treatment with UPSN resulted in significant protection to mycotoxin-exposed hydra maintained at pH 6.9-7.0. Hydra were exposed to FB(1), AFB(1) and FB(1) /AFB(1) combinations with and without UPSN. A toxic response over 92 h was rated based on morphology and mortality. Hydra assay results indicated a minimum effective concentration (MEC) of 20 µg ml(-1) for AFB(1), whereas the MEC for FB(1) was not reached. The MEC for co-exposure was 400 µg ml(-1) FB(1) + 10 µg ml(-1) AFB(1). This study demonstrates that UPSN sorbs both mycotoxins tightly at physiologically relevant pH levels, resulting in decreased bioavailability, and that a modified hydra bioassay can be used as an initial screen in vivo to predict efficacy of toxin-binding agents. PMID:23047854

  16. Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Karl T.; Sanders, Rebecca L.; Washton, Nancy M.

    2014-03-14

    Clay minerals are important components of the environment and are involved or implicated in processes such as the uptake of pollutants and the release of nutrients and as potential platforms for a number of chemical reactions. Owing to their small particle sizes (typically, on the order of microns or smaller) and mixing with a variety of other minerals and soil components, advanced characterization methods are needed to study their structures, dynamics, and reactivities. In this article, we describe the use of solid-state NMR methods to characterize the structures and chemistries of clay minerals. Early one-pulse magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of 27Al and 29Si have now been enhanced and extended with new studies utilizing advanced methodologies (such as Multiple Quantum MAS) as well as studies of less-sensitive nuclei. In additional work, the issue of reactivity of clay minerals has been addressed, including studies of reactive surface area in the environment. Utilizations of NMR-sensitive nuclides within the clay minerals themselves, and in molecules that react with specific sites on the clay mineral surfaces, have aided in understanding the reactivity of these complex aluminosilicate systems.

  17. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    Four companies — H.C. Spinks Clay Co., Inc., Imerys Group, Old Hickory Clay Co., and Unimin Corp. — mined ball clay in four states in 2011. Production, on the basis of preliminary data, was 940 kt (1.04 million st) with an estimated value of $44.2 million. This is a 3-percent increase in tonnage from 912 kt (1.01 million st) with a value of $41.3 million that was produced in 2010. Tennessee was the leading producing state with 63 percent of domestic production, followed by Texas, Mississippi and Kentucky. About 69 percent of production was airfloat, 20 percent was crude and 11 percent was water-slurried.

  18. 30 CFR 75.207 - Pillar recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Roof Support § 75.207 Pillar recovery. Pillar recovery shall be... unstable floor or roof, falls of roof, oil and gas well barriers or surface subsidence require that...

  19. 30 CFR 75.207 - Pillar recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Roof Support § 75.207 Pillar recovery. Pillar recovery shall be... unstable floor or roof, falls of roof, oil and gas well barriers or surface subsidence require that...

  20. 30 CFR 75.207 - Pillar recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Roof Support § 75.207 Pillar recovery. Pillar recovery shall be... unstable floor or roof, falls of roof, oil and gas well barriers or surface subsidence require that...

  1. 30 CFR 75.207 - Pillar recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Roof Support § 75.207 Pillar recovery. Pillar recovery shall be... unstable floor or roof, falls of roof, oil and gas well barriers or surface subsidence require that...

  2. 30 CFR 75.207 - Pillar recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Roof Support § 75.207 Pillar recovery. Pillar recovery shall be... unstable floor or roof, falls of roof, oil and gas well barriers or surface subsidence require that...

  3. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, May 9, 1992--August 8, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-10-01

    An investigation of new methods for the production of mixed pillared clay catalysts and clay-supported catalysts and determination of their catalytic activities were continued in this quarter. To demonstrate the reproducibility of the preparative method for high activity iron/alumina-pillared montmorillonite catalysts, a new batch of the catalyst was prepared and tested for hydrocracking activity with bibenzyl. This preparation gave conversion and product distribution similar to that reported previously. The mixed iron/alumina-pillared clay was also prepared using a pillaring solution that was aged for longer period of time. To determine the importance of the type of pillaring support in hydrocracking activity, iron/zirconia-pillared montmorillonite was prepared using the same technique as that for iron/alumina-pillared montmorillonite. The reaction of bibenzyl with the sulfided iron/zirconia-pillared catalyst gave a lower hydrocracking conversion than the iron/alumina-pillared catalyst. Addition of a second catalytic metal to the clay support was attempted to determine if a synergistic effect could improve liquefaction. Ferric nitrate and stannous chloride were added to the clay, but the resulting catalyst was relatively poor for hydrocracking and hydrogenation compared with ferric nitrate supported on the clay. New disposable iron catalysts with high acidity and surface area are desired for coal liquefaction. Synthetic iron aluminosilicates were prepared by methods similar to those used for the nickel-substituted synthetic mica montmorillonite (NiSMM) catalysts, which are very effective for hydrogenation and reforming of hydrocarbons. The iron aluminosilicate catalysts were tested for hydrocracking and hydrogenation of bibenzyl, naphthalene and pyrene. Pyrene hydrogenation was effectively catalyzed by the sulfided synthetic iron catalyst.

  4. Clay-based Nanocomposites Possibilities and Limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papoulis, Dimitris

    2011-09-01

    In the last decades, clay mineral based nanocomposites and polymer-clay nanocomposites (PCNC) have been proposed as very useful materials for many uses including photocatalysis, medicinal uses as tissue engineering or modified drug delivery systems. Clay minerals and especially montmorillonite, kaolinite, halloysite palygorskite and sepiolite are the most used clay minerals because of their high surface areas, colloidal dimensions of their particles and other properties. This lecture aims at reporting on very recent developments in the use of clay minerals and PCNC as materials with photocatalytic and medical interest.

  5. Lake responses following lanthanum-modified bentonite clay (Phoslock®) application: an analysis of water column lanthanum data from 16 case study lakes.

    PubMed

    Spears, Bryan M; Lürling, Miquel; Yasseri, Said; Castro-Castellon, Ana T; Gibbs, Max; Meis, Sebastian; McDonald, Claire; McIntosh, John; Sleep, Darren; Van Oosterhout, Frank

    2013-10-01

    Phoslock(®) is a lanthanum (La) modified bentonite clay that is being increasingly used as a geo-engineering tool for the control of legacy phosphorus (P) release from lake bed sediments to overlying waters. This study investigates the potential for negative ecological impacts from elevated La concentrations associated with the use of Phoslock(®) across 16 case study lakes. Impact-recovery trajectories associated with total lanthanum (TLa) and filterable La (FLa) concentrations in surface and bottom waters were quantified over a period of up to 60 months following Phoslock(®) application. Both surface and bottom water TLa and FLa concentrations were <0.001 mg L(-1) in all lakes prior to the application of Phoslock(®). The effects of Phoslock(®) application were evident in the post-application maximum TLa and FLa concentrations reported for surface waters between 0.026 mg L(-1)-2.30 mg L(-1) and 0.002 mg L(-1) to 0.14 mg L(-1), respectively. Results of generalised additive modelling indicated that recovery trajectories for TLa and FLa in surface and bottom waters in lakes were represented by 2nd order decay relationships, with time, and that recovery reached an end-point between 3 and 12 months post-application. Recovery in bottom water was slower (11-12 months) than surface waters (3-8 months), most probably as a result of variation in physicochemical conditions of the receiving waters and associated effects on product settling rates and processes relating to the disturbance of bed sediments. CHEAQS PRO modelling was also undertaken on 11 of the treated lakes in order to predict concentrations of La(3+) ions and the potential for negative ecological impacts. This modelling indicated that the concentrations of La(3+) ions will be very low (<0.0004 mg L(-1)) in lakes of moderately low to high alkalinity (>0.8 mEq L(-1)), but higher (up to 0.12 mg L(-1)) in lakes characterised by very low alkalinity. The effects of elevated La(3+) concentrations following

  6. Clay for Little Fingers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koster, Joan Bouza

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the renewed interest in clay as a modeling compound in early childhood programs; describes the nature of clay and presents a working vocabulary. Suggests methods of working with clay, including introducing clay to children, discovering its uses, clean up, firing clay, and finishing baked clay. Includes activity suggestions and…

  7. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    Seven companies mined fire clay in four states during 2003. From 1984 to 1992, production declined to 383 kt (422,000 st) from a high of 1.04 Mt (1.14 million st) as markets for clay-based refractories declined. Since 1992, production levels have been erratic, ranging from 383 kt (422,000 st) in 1992 and 2001 to 583 kt (642,000 st) in 1995. Production in 2003, based on preliminary data, was estimated to be around 450 kt (496,000 st) with a value of about $10.5 million. This was about the same as in 2002. Missouri remained the leading producer state, followed by South Carolina, Ohio and California.

  8. Environmental Remediation and Sorption of Metal Cations Using Aluminum Pillared Nano-Bentonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rifai, Rifai; Abou El Safa, Magda

    2015-04-01

    The release of heavy metal cations into the environment is a potential threat to water and soil quality. Some clay minerals play an important role, as physical and chemical barriers, for the isolation of metal-rich wastes and to adsorb heavy metals as well as to avoid their environmental dispersion. In the present study, the bentonitic clay (southeast El-Hammam City, Egypt) was subjected to pillaring using hydroxyl-aluminum solution. The XRD patterns of the Aluminum Pillared Nano-Bentonite (APNB) showed severe alteration of the crystal structure after pillaring. Poly metal solutions with different metal concentrations of Cu, Co, Ni, Zn, Cd and Pb (0.001, 0.005 and 0.01 moles), and pH (1, 2.5, 5 and 6) were subjected to treatment by the APNB. The removal process is very rapid and spontaneous and the contact time may be short (several minutes) for most adsorption to occur. The criterion for environmental remediation of APNB is less stringent and a short contact time is sufficient. The rate of Cu2+, Zn2+, Co2+, Cd2+, Ni2+ and Pb2+sorption remained higher or equal to the CEC. The sorption of metal ions by APNB are complex and probably involve several mechanisms. In general, APNB can be used to immobilize Cu2+, Zn2+, Co2+, Cd2+, Ni2+ and Pb2+ to any extent. For each metal ion, the most effective immobilization occurs over a particular pH around 5. According to the experimental data obtained, the uptake amount of the studied cations by APNB increased with increasing solution pH, sorbent dose and contact time. The preference of the APNB adsorption for heavy metal ions that are through the cation exchange processes decreases in the order: Cu2+>Zn2+>Co2+>Cd2+ >Ni2+ >Pb2+. Keywords: Bentonitic clay, Egypt, Aluminum Pillared Nano-Bentonite, heavy metal, environmental remediation

  9. 33 CFR 80.1140 - Pillar Point Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pillar Point Harbor, CA. 80.1140... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1140 Pillar Point Harbor, CA. A line drawn from Pillar Point Harbor Light 6 to Pillar Point Harbor Entrance Light....

  10. 33 CFR 80.1140 - Pillar Point Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pillar Point Harbor, CA. 80.1140... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1140 Pillar Point Harbor, CA. A line drawn from Pillar Point Harbor Light 6 to Pillar Point Harbor Entrance Light....

  11. The Paramagnetic Pillared Bentonites as Digestive Tract MRI Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojović, Miloš; Daković, Marko; Omerašević, Mia; Mojović, Zorica; Banković, Predrag; Milutinović-Nikolić, Aleksandra; Jovanović, Dušan

    The increased use of imaging techniques in diagnostic studies, such as MRI, has contributed to the development of the wide range of new materials which could be successfully used as image improving agents. However, there is a lack of such substances in the area of gastrointestinal tract MRI. Many of the traditionally popular relaxation altering agents show poor results and disadvantages provoking black bowel, side effects of diarrhea and the presence of artifacts arising from clumping. Paramagnetic species seem to be potentially suitable agents for these studies, but contrast opacification has been reported and less than 60% of the gastrointestinal tract magnetic resonance scans showed improved delineation of abdominal pathologies. The new solution has been proposed as zeolites or smectite clays (hectorite and montmorillonite) enclosing of paramagnetic metal ions obtained by ion-exchange methods. However, such materials have problems of leakage of paramagnetic ions causing the appearance of the various side-effects. In this study we show that Co+2 and Dy+3 paramagnetic-pillared bentonites could be successfully used as MRI digestive tract non-leaching contrast agents, altering the longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of fluids in contact with the clay minerals.

  12. Pillar-Shaped Macrocyclic Hosts Pillar[n]arenes: New Key Players for Supramolecular Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ogoshi, Tomoki; Yamagishi, Tada-Aki; Nakamoto, Yoshiaki

    2016-07-27

    In 2008, we reported a new class of pillar-shaped macrocyclic hosts, known as "pillar[n]arenes". Today, pillar[n]arenes are recognized as key players in supramolecular chemistry because of their facile synthesis, unique pillar shape, versatile functionality, interesting host-guest properties, and original supramolecular assembly characteristics, which have resulted in numerous electrochemical and biomedical material applications. In this Review, we have provided historical background to macrocyclic chemistry, followed by a detailed discussion of the fundamental properties of pillar[n]arenes, including their synthesis, structure, and host-guest properties. Furthermore, we have discussed the applications of pillar[n]arenes to materials science, as well as their applications in supramolecular chemistry, in terms of their fundamental properties. Finally, we have described the future perspectives of pillar[n]arene chemistry. We hope that this Review will provide a useful reference for researchers working in the field and inspire discoveries concerning pillar[n]arene chemistry. PMID:27337002

  13. Amine-pillared Nanosheet Adsorbents for CO2 Capture Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hui

    Amine-functionalized solid adsorbents have gained attention within the last decade for their application in carbon dioxide capture, due to their many advantages such as low energy cost for regeneration, tunable structure, elimination of corrosion problems, and additional advantages. However, one of the challenges facing this technology is to accomplish both high CO 2 capture capacity along with high CO2 diffusion rates concurrently. Current amine-based solid sorbents such as porous materials similar to SBA-15 have large pores diffusion entering molecules; however, the pores become clogged upon amine inclusion. To meet this challenge, our group's solution involves the creation of a new type of material which we are calling-amino-pillared nanosheet (APN) adsorbents which are generated from layered nanosheet precursors. These materials are being proposed because of their unique lamellar structure which exhibits ability to be modified by organic or inorganic pillars through consecutive swelling and pillaring steps to form large mesoporous interlayer spaces. After the expansion of the layer space through swelling and pillaring, the large pore space can be functionalized with amine groups. This selective functionalization is possible by the choice of amine group introduced. Our choice, large amine molecules, do not access the micropore within each layer; however, either physically or chemically immobilized onto the surface of the mesoporous interlayer space between each layer. The final goal of the research is to investigate the ability to prepare APN adsorbents from a model nanoporous layered materials including nanosheets precursor material MCM-22(P) and nanoporous layered silicate material AMH-3. MCM-22(P) contains 2-dimensional porous channels, 6 membered rings (MB) openings perpendicular to the layers and 10 MB channels in the plane of the layers. However, the transport limiting openings (6 MB) to the layers is smaller than CO2 gas molecules. In contrast, AMH-3 has

  14. Water condensation on ultrahydrophobic flexible micro pillar surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narhe, Ramchandra

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the growth dynamics of water drops in controlled condensation on ultrahydrophobic geometrically patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) cylindrical micro pillars. At the beginning, the condensed drops size is comparable to the pattern dimensions. The interesting phenomenon we observe is that, as the condensation progresses, water drops between the pillars become unstable and enforced to grow in the upward direction along the pillars surface. The capillary force of these drops is of the order of μ\\text{N} and acts on neighboring pillars. That results into bending of the pillars. Pillars bending enhances the condensation and favors the most energetically stable Wenzel state.

  15. Predicting spontaneous heating in coal mine pillars

    SciTech Connect

    Timko, R.J.; Derick, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    This work is a follow-up to previous research that attempted to predict the location of spontaneous heating episodes in underground coal mine pillars. The objective of the original work was to see if the data obtained by commonly used detection methods could accurately predict spontaneous combustion episodes in coal pillars. Data accumulation during the study was enhanced when a spontaneously generated fire occurred within one of the pillars being examined. The fire provided researchers with realistic data that could be used to determine if f ire prediction was possible. Results from the initial study found that the atmospheric status equations that were used provided little advance notice that combustion would occur where it did. This study reevaluated the accumulated data by applying it to recently developed equations and compared these results with previously obtained information to determine if a combination of these techniques could more effectively predict impending combustion.

  16. Killer clays! Natural antibacterial clay minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, L.B.; Holland, M.; Eberl, D.D.; Brunet, T.; De Courrsou, L. B.

    2004-01-01

    The clay chemical properties that may be important in medicine were investigated. It was found that natural clay minerals can have striking and very specific effects on microbial populations. The effects can range from potentially enhanced microbial growth to complete sterilization. This paper presents evidence that natural clay minerals can be effective antimicrobial agents.

  17. Clay mineral provinces in tidal mud flats at Germany's North Sea coast with illite K-Ar ages potentially modified by biodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockamp, Olaf; Clauer, Norbert

    2012-07-01

    Mineralogical studies, chemical analyses and K-Ar dating were carried out on clay fractions from tidal mud flats along the Lower Saxony coast and its bays to identify material sources and sedimentary processes at this dynamic interface between air, land and sea. From the coast into the bays, sediments are enriched in fine-grained smectite relative to the coarser grained illite, chlorite and kaolinite, due to the weakening of the tidal current energy in the bays. In addition, the study area can be divided into two provinces on the basis of the illite K/Rb ratios and Mg contents. To the west [Schiermonnikoog, Dollart, Ley Bay up to Norderney island], longshore currents carry suspensions from the Belgian and Dutch coasts; to the east [from Langeoog island, Jade Bay to the Helgoland mud area] suspensions from the Elbe and Weser rivers are mixed with submarine reworked glacial sediments, whereas the portion of longshore current suspensions from the west decreases, becoming negligible in the Helgoland mud area off the Elbe and Weser estuaries. The illite K-Ar data vary considerably and fail as source indicators due to differential settling and mixing of the clay material and probably to Ar loss from illite by biodegradation during digestive processes. Only further offshore, outside the zone of dynamic sediment dispersion, do the K-Ar data fit provenance patterns.

  18. Mycotoxins modify the barrier function of Caco-2 cells through differential gene expression of specific claudin isoforms: Protective effect of illite mineral clay.

    PubMed

    Romero, Alejandro; Ares, Irma; Ramos, Eva; Castellano, Víctor; Martínez, Marta; Martínez-Larrañaga, María-Rosa; Anadón, Arturo; Martínez, María-Aránzazu

    2016-04-15

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), fumonisin B1 (FB1), ochratoxin A (OTA) and T-2 toxin (T2) are mycotoxins that commonly contaminate the food chain and cause various toxicological effects. Their global occurrence is regarded as an important risk factor for human and animal health. In this study, the results demonstrate that, in human Caco-2 cells, AFB1, FB1, OTA and T2 origin cytotoxic effects, determining cell viability through MTT assay and LDH leakage, and decrease trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER). The decrease in barrier properties is concomitant with a reduction in the expression levels of the tight junction constituents claudin-3, claudin-4 and occludin. The protective effect of mineral clays (diosmectite, montmorillonite and illite) on alterations in cell viability and epithelial barrier function induced by the mycotoxins was also evaluated. Illite was the best clay to prevent the mycotoxin effects. Illite plus mycotoxin co-treatment completely abolished AFB1 and FB1-induced cytotoxicity. Also, the decreases in the gene expression of claudins and the reduction of TEER induced by mycotoxins were reversed by the illite plus mycotoxin co-treatment. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that mycotoxins AFB1, FB1, T2 and OTA disrupt the intestinal barrier permeability by a mechanism involving reduction of claudin isoform expressions, and illite counteracts this disruption. PMID:27153755

  19. Manipulating the inter pillar gap in pillar array ultra-thin layer planar chromatography platforms.

    PubMed

    Crane, Nichole A; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Sepaniak, Michael J

    2016-02-21

    An advantage of separation platforms based on deterministic micro- and nano-fabrications, relative to traditional systems based on packed beds of particles, is the exquisite control of all morphological parameters. For example, with planar platforms based on lithographically-prepared pillar arrays, the size, shape, height, geometric arrangement, and inter pillar gaps can be independently adjusted. Since the inter pillar gap is expected to be important in determining resistance to mass transfer in the mobile phase as well as the flow rate, which influences the mass transfer effect and axial diffusion, we herein study the effect of reducing inter pillar gaps on capillary action-based flow and band dispersion. Atomic layer deposition is used to narrow the gap between the pillars for photo-lithographically defined pillar arrays. The plate height of gap-adjusted arrays is modeled based on predicted and observed flow rates. A reduction in the flow rate with smaller gaps hinders the efficiency in the modeled case and is correlated with actual separations. A conclusion is drawn that simultaneously reducing both the gap and the pillar diameter is the best approach in terms of improving the chromatographic efficiency. PMID:26824088

  20. Imprinted Clay Coil Vessels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohr, Tresa Rae

    2006-01-01

    The author teaches clay vessel construction in the fifth grade, and it is amazing what can be accomplished in one forty-five minute period when the expectations are clarified in the initial lesson. The author introduces clay coil vessels with a discussion of the sources of clay and how clay relates to fifth-grade science curriculum concepts such…

  1. Practical design methods for barrier pillars. Information circular/1995

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, J.R.; Tadolini, S.C.

    1995-11-01

    Effective barrier pillar design is essential for safe and productive underground coal mining. This U.S. Bureau of Mines report presents an overview of available barrier pillar design methodologies that incorporate sound engineering principles while remaining practical for everyday usage. Nomographs and examples are presented to assist in the determination of proper barrier pillar sizing. Additionally, performance evaluation techniques and criteria are included to assist in determining the effectiveness of selected barrier pillar configurations.

  2. Method of underground mining by pillar extraction

    DOEpatents

    Bowen, Ray J.; Bowen, William R.

    1980-08-12

    A method of sublevel caving and pillar and top coal extraction for mining thick coal seams includes the advance mining of rooms and crosscuts along the bottom of a seam to a height of about eight feet, and the retreat mining of the top coal from the rooms, crosscuts and portions of the pillars remaining from formation of the rooms and cross-cuts. In the retreat mining, a pocket is formed in a pillar, the top coal above the pocket is drilled, charged and shot, and then the fallen coal is loaded by a continuous miner so that the operator remains under a roof which has not been shot. The top coal from that portion of the room adjacent the pocket is then mined, and another pocket is formed in the pillar. The top coal above the second pocket is mined followed by the mining of the top coal of that portion of the room adjacent the second pocket, all by use of a continuous miner which allows the operator to remain under a roof portion which has not been shot.

  3. Elastocapillary coalescence of plates and pillars

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Z.; Schneider, T. M.; Kim, J.; Kim, H.-Y.; Aizenberg, J.; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-01-01

    When a fluid-immersed array of supported plates or pillars is dried, evaporation leads to the formation of menisci on the tips of the plates or pillars that bring them together to form complex patterns. Building on prior experimental observations, we use a combination of theory and computation to understand the nature of this instability and its evolution in both the two- and three-dimensional setting of the problem. For the case of plates, we explicitly derive the interaction torques based on the relevant physical parameters associated with pillar deformation, contact-line pinning/depinning and fluid volume changes. A Bloch-wave analysis for our periodic mechanical system captures the window of volumes where the two-plate eigenvalue characterizes the onset of the coalescence instability. We then study the evolution of these binary clusters and their eventual elastic arrest using numerical simulations that account for evaporative dynamics coupled to capillary coalescence. This explains both the formation of hierarchical clusters and the sensitive dependence of the final structures on initial perturbations, as seen in our experiments. We then generalize our analysis to treat the problem of pillar collapse in three dimensions, where the fluid domain is completely connected and the interface is a minimal surface with the uniform mean curvature. Our theory and simulations capture the salient features of experimental observations in a range of different situations and may thus be useful in controlling the ensuing patterns. PMID:25792949

  4. Construction of microcanonical entropy on thermodynamic pillars.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Michele

    2015-05-01

    A question that is currently highly debated is whether the microcanonical entropy should be expressed as the logarithm of the phase volume (volume entropy, also known as the Gibbs entropy) or as the logarithm of the density of states (surface entropy, also known as the Boltzmann entropy). Rather than postulating them and investigating the consequence of each definition, as is customary, here we adopt a bottom-up approach and construct the entropy expression within the microcanonical formalism upon two fundamental thermodynamic pillars: (i) The second law of thermodynamics as formulated for quasistatic processes: δQ/T is an exact differential, and (ii) the law of ideal gases: PV=k(B)NT. The first pillar implies that entropy must be some function of the phase volume Ω. The second pillar singles out the logarithmic function among all possible functions. Hence the construction leads uniquely to the expression S=k(B)lnΩ, that is, the volume entropy. As a consequence any entropy expression other than that of Gibbs, e.g., the Boltzmann entropy, can lead to inconsistencies with the two thermodynamic pillars. We illustrate this with the prototypical example of a macroscopic collection of noninteracting spins in a magnetic field, and show that the Boltzmann entropy severely fails to predict the magnetization, even in the thermodynamic limit. The uniqueness of the Gibbs entropy, as well as the demonstrated potential harm of the Boltzmann entropy, provide compelling reasons for discarding the latter at once. PMID:26066159

  5. 30 CFR 75.386 - Final mining of pillars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Final mining of pillars. 75.386 Section 75.386... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.386 Final mining of pillars. When only one mine opening is available due to final mining of pillars, no more than 20 miners at a time...

  6. 30 CFR 75.386 - Final mining of pillars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Final mining of pillars. 75.386 Section 75.386... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.386 Final mining of pillars. When only one mine opening is available due to final mining of pillars, no more than 20 miners at a time...

  7. 30 CFR 75.386 - Final mining of pillars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Final mining of pillars. 75.386 Section 75.386... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.386 Final mining of pillars. When only one mine opening is available due to final mining of pillars, no more than 20 miners at a time...

  8. 30 CFR 75.386 - Final mining of pillars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Final mining of pillars. 75.386 Section 75.386... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.386 Final mining of pillars. When only one mine opening is available due to final mining of pillars, no more than 20 miners at a time...

  9. 30 CFR 75.386 - Final mining of pillars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Final mining of pillars. 75.386 Section 75.386... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.386 Final mining of pillars. When only one mine opening is available due to final mining of pillars, no more than 20 miners at a time...

  10. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the global common clay and shale industry, particularly in the U.S. It claims that common clay and shale is mainly used in the manufacture of heavy clay products like brick, flue tile and sewer pipe. The main producing states in the U.S. include North Carolina, New York and Oklahoma. Among the firms that manufacture clay and shale-based products are Mid America Brick & Structural Clay Products LLC and Boral USA.

  11. Adsorption of dyes using different types of clay: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeyemo, Aderonke Ajibola; Adeoye, Idowu Olatunbosun; Bello, Olugbenga Solomon

    2015-09-01

    Increasing amount of dyes in the ecosystem particularly in wastewater has propelled the search for more efficient low-cost adsorbents. The effective use of the sorption properties (high surface area and surface chemistry, lack of toxicity and potential for ion exchange) of different clays as adsorbents for the removal of different type of dyes (basic, acidic, reactive) from water and wastewater as potential alternatives to activated carbons has recently received widespread attention because of the environmental-friendly nature of clay materials. Insights into the efficiencies of raw and modified/activated clay adsorbents and ways of improving their efficiencies to obtain better results are discussed. Acid-modified clay resulted in higher rate of dye adsorption and an increased surface area and porosity (49.05 mm2 and 53.4 %). Base-modified clay has lower adsorption capacities, while ZnCl2-modified clay had the least rate of adsorption with a surface area of 44.3 mm2 and porosity of 43.4 %. This review also explores the grey areas of the adsorption properties of the raw clays and the improved performance of activated/modified clay materials with particular reference to the effects of pH, temperature, initial dye concentration and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption capacities of the clays. Various challenges encountered in using clay materials are highlighted and a number of future prospects for the adsorbents are proposed.

  12. Design methods to control violent pillar failures in room-and-pillar mines

    SciTech Connect

    Zipf, R.K. Jr.; Mark, C.

    1996-12-01

    The sudden, violent collapse of large areas of room-and-pillar mines poses a special hazard to miners and mine operators. This type of failure, termed a {open_quotes}Cascading Pillar Failure{close_quotes} (CPF), occurs when one pillar in a mine layout fails transfering its load to neighboring pillars causing them to fail, and so forth. Recent examples of this kind of failure in coal, metal and nonmetal mines in the U.S. are documented. Mining engineers can limit the danger posed by these failures through improved mine design practices. Whether failure occurs in a slow, nonviolent manner or in a rapid, violent manner is governed by the local mine stiffness stability criterion. This stability criterion is used as the basis for three design approaches to control cascading pillar failure in room-and-pillar mines, namely, the containment approach, the prevention approach, and the full extraction mining approach. These design approaches are illustrated with practical examples for coal mining.

  13. Synthesis and photocatalytic performances of the TiO2 pillared montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Chen, Daimei; Zhu, Qian; Zhou, Fengsan; Deng, Xutao; Li, Fatang

    2012-10-15

    TiO(2) pillared clay materials were prepared by montmorillonite (Mt) and acidic solutions of hydrolyzed Ti alkoxides in the presence of high-molecular-weight polyoxypropylene (POP)-backboned di-quaternary salts (POP). The as-prepared materials were characterized by means of XRD, FTIR, TG-DTA, XRF, specific surface area and porosity determinations, TEM and SEM, respectively. The experiments showed that the resulting material was a porous delaminated structure containing pillared fragments and nano-scaled TiO(2) particles well dispersed among each other. Introducing polymer surfactant POP as an expanding agent of Mt cannot only promote the formation of the delaminated structure, but significantly improve the porosity and surface area of the composites. The resulting TiO(2) pillared Mt exhibited a good thermal stability as indicated by its surface area after calcination at 800 °C. No phase transformation from anatase to rutile was observed even under calcination at 900 °C. The grain size of anatase in as-prepared sample decreased with the increase of the POP concentration, but increased with the increment of calcination temperature. The photocatalytic performances of these new porous materials were evaluated by using methylene blue degradation. The composite solid exhibited superior photocatalyic property and the maximum removal efficiency was up to 98% within 90 min. PMID:22884731

  14. A theoretical description of elastic pillar substrates in biophysical experiments.

    PubMed

    Mohrdieck, Camilla; Wanner, Alexander; Roos, Wouter; Roth, Alexander; Sackmann, Erich; Spatz, Joachim P; Arzt, Eduard

    2005-08-12

    Arrays of elastic pillars are used in biophysical experiments as sensors for traction forces. The evaluation of the forces can be complicated if they are coupled to the pillar displacements over large distances. This is the case if many of the pillars are interconnected by elastic linkages as, for example, in fiber networks that are grown on top of pillars. To calculate the traction forces in such a network, we developed a set of nonlinear inhomogeneous equations relating the forces in the linking elements to the resulting pillar deflections. We chose a homogeneous, activated two-dimensional network of cytoskeletal actin filaments to illustrate that a pillar substrate is generally not a force sensor but a force-gradient sensor. In homogeneous networks the forces acting along the filaments can be approximated by analyzing only pillar deflections in the edge zones of the substrate and by integration over the corresponding force gradients. PMID:16082672

  15. Radionuclide separations using pillared layered materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, N.C.; Wade, K.L.; Morgan, D.M.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a two-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Pillared Layered Materials (PLMs) are layered inorganic ion exchangers propped apart by metal oxide pillars. PLMs have been synthesized to sorb strontium from liquid nuclear wastes. A study that compared over 60 sorbers for their ability to sorb strontium from Hanford simulants showed that PLMs were the best sorbers; strontium distribution coefficients ({sup Sr}K{sub d}) > 20000 mL/g were obtained. In addition, PLMs showed a high degree of selectivity for strontium over cesium, transition metals, lanthanides and actinides. The sorption of strontium is, however, inhibited by complexants (EDTA); {sup Sr}K{sub d} values drop to <20 mL/g when they are present. The most promising PLMs were the Cr, Ti, Zr, and Si pillared tantalum tungstate. The K{sub d} values for Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} show a strong pH dependence; K{sub d} values increase to >10{sup 4} above pH 12. The general surface complexation mechanism explains the sorption of these cations on PLMs.

  16. Coatings and films derived from clay/wax nanocomposites

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.; Leyva, Argentina A.

    2006-11-14

    The invention provides methods for making clay/wax nanocomposites and coatings and films of same with improved chemical resistance and gas barrier properties. The invention further provides methods for making and using emulsions of such clay/wax nanocomposites. Typically, an organophillic clay is combined with a wax or wax/polymer blend such that the cohesion energy of the clay matches that of the wax or wax/polymer blend. Suitable organophilic clays include mica and phyllosilicates that have been surface-treated with edge or edge and surface modifying agents. The resulting nanocomposites have applications as industrial coatings and in protective packaging.

  17. A model for the emergence of pillars, walls and royal chambers in termite nests

    PubMed Central

    Bonabeau, E.

    1998-01-01

    A simple model of the emergence of pillars in termite nests by Deneubourg is modified to include several additional features that break the homogeneity of the original model: (i) a convection air stream that drives molecules of pheromone along a given direction; (ii) a net flux of individuals in a specific direction; (iii) a well-defined self-maintained pheromone trail; and (iv) a pheromonal template representing the effect of the presence of a queen that continuously emits pheromone. It is shown that, under certain conditions, pillars are transformed into walls or galleries or chambers, and that this transformation may not be driven by any change in the termites' behaviour. Because the same type of response at the individual level can generate different patterns under different conditions, and because previous construction modifies current building conditions, we hypothesize that nest complexity can result from the unfolding of a morphogenetic process that progressively generates a diversity of history-dependent structures.

  18. Communicating with Clay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2000-01-01

    Presents a unit on clay that is centered around sign language in which students explore the slab method of working with clay. States that each student picks a letter of the sign language alphabet and fashions a clay hand to depict the letter. (CMK)

  19. Efficient stabilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae external invertase by immobilisation on modified beidellite nanoclays.

    PubMed

    Andjelković, Uroš; Milutinović-Nikolić, Aleksandra; Jović-Jovičić, Nataša; Banković, Predrag; Bajt, Teja; Mojović, Zorica; Vujčić, Zoran; Jovanović, Dušan

    2015-02-01

    The external invertase isoform 1 (EINV1) was immobilised on eight differently modified beidellite nanoclays. Modifications were composed of organo-modification with different amounts of surfactant - hexadecyl trimethylammonium cation (HDTMA), pillaring with Al/Fe containing polyhydroxy cations and acid modification of Na-enriched and pillared clays. The modified nanoclays were characterised by XRD, N2-physisorption, SEM and FT-IR spectroscopy. The amount of bound enzyme activity was significantly influenced by the modification of beidellite ranging from 50 to remarkable 2200U/g. Biochemical characterization was performed for five modified nanoclays showing the highest enzyme activity after invertase immobilisation. The investigation demonstrated that after immobilisation the structure and the catalytic properties of invertase were preserved, while Km values were slightly increased from 26 to 37mM. immobilisation significantly improved thermal and storage stability of EINV1. Results indicate that beidellite nanoclays obtained by low cost modifications can be applied as a suitable support for the immobilisation of invertase. The immobilizate can be efficiently engaged in sucrose hydrolysis in batch reactor. PMID:25172709

  20. Fabrication of Pillar-Structured Thermal Neutron Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolic, R J; Conway, A M; Reinhardt, C E; Graff, R T; Wang, T F; Deo, N; Cheung, C L

    2007-11-19

    Pillar detector is an innovative solid state device structure that leverages advanced semiconductor fabrication technology to produce a device for thermal neutron detection. State-of-the-art thermal neutron detectors have shortcomings in achieving simultaneously high efficiency, low operating voltage while maintaining adequate fieldability performance. By using a 3-dimensional silicon PIN diode pillar array filled with isotopic boron 10, ({sup 10}B) a high efficiency device is theoretically possible. The fabricated pillar structures reported in this work are composed of 2 {micro}m diameter silicon pillars with a 4 {micro}m pitch and pillar heights of 6 and 12 {micro}m. The pillar detector with a 12 {micro}m height achieved a thermal neutron detection efficiency of 7.3% at 2V.

  1. Pillars for the care of older persons in the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Powell, Dorothy L; Price, Addie J; Burns, Faith A; McConnell, Eleanor S; Hendrix, Cristina C; McWhinney-Dehaney, Leila; Lombardi, Marilyn M

    2012-01-01

    Pillars for the Care of Older Persons in the Caribbean: A Comprehensive Community-Based Framework (Pillars) is a hybrid of multiple public health frameworks developed through community-based participatory research processes. Health and social service professionals, governmental organizations, elderly persons, and others from across the English-speaking Caribbean countries developed the Pillars framework to address the growing elderly population and with an aim to increase the number of healthy and active years of life. The Pillars framework consists of four interrelated pillars organized across multiple sectors of society: primary care with care management; integrated services coordination; population-based health promotion and disease prevention; and planning and accountability. Pillars is enabled by an envisioned integrated system of information technology that will increase community-based services delivery, interprofessional communication and coordination, and will aggregate data with all identifiers removed for surveillance, planning, forecasting, policy making, evaluation, and research. PMID:22211755

  2. Clays in prebiological chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M.; Oro, J.; Odom, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    The ways in which clays have been utilized in studies of prebiological chemistry are reviewed, and an assessment is given of the possible role of clays in prebiological systems. The adsorption of organic molecules on clays has been demonstrated, as has the synthesis of bioorganic monomers in the presence of clays. For instance, amino acids, purines and pyrimidines have been obtained from carbon monoxide and nitric acid in the presence of clays at relatively high temperatures (250-325 C). The oligomerization of biochemical monomers, mediated by clays, has also been shown to result in the formation of polymer molecules basic to life. Clays have also been found to affect the condensation of mononucleotides to oligonucleotides.

  3. Controlling cyanobacterial blooms through effective flocculation and sedimentation with combined use of flocculants and phosphorus adsorbing natural soil and modified clay.

    PubMed

    Noyma, Natalia Pessoa; de Magalhães, Leonardo; Furtado, Luciana Lima; Mucci, Maíra; van Oosterhout, Frank; Huszar, Vera L M; Marinho, Marcelo Manzi; Lürling, Miquel

    2016-06-15

    Eutrophication often results in blooms of toxic cyanobacteria that hamper the use of lakes and reservoirs. In this paper, we experimentally evaluated the efficacy of a metal salt (poly-aluminium chloride, PAC) and chitosan, alone and combined with different doses of the lanthanum modified bentonite Phoslock(®) (LMB) or local red soil (LRS) to sediment positively buoyant cyanobacteria from Funil Reservoir, Brazil, (22°30'S, 44°45'W). We also tested the effect of calcium peroxide (CaO2) on suspended and settled cyanobacterial photosystem efficiency, and evaluated the soluble reactive P (SRP) adsorbing capacity of both LMB and LRS under oxic and anoxic conditions. Our data showed that buoyant cyanobacteria could be flocked and effectively precipitated using a combination of PAC or chitosan with LMB or LRS. The SRP sorption capacity of LMB was higher than that of LRS. The maximum P adsorption was lowered under anoxic conditions especially for LRS ballast. CaO2 addition impaired photosystem efficiency at 1 mg L(-1) or higher and killed precipitated cyanobacteria at 4 mg L(-1) or higher. A drawback was that oxygen production from the peroxide gave positive buoyancy again to the settled flocs. Therefore, further experimentations with slow release pellets are recommended. PMID:26706124

  4. Mid-infrared silicon pillar waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Neetesh; Hudson, Darren D.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2015-12-01

    In this work silicon pillar waveguides have been proposed to exploit the entire transparent window of silicon. These geometries posses a broad and at dispersion (from 2 to 6 μm) with four zero dispersion wavelengths. We calculate supercontinuum generation spanning over two octaves (2 to >8 μm) with long wavelengths interacting weakly with the lossy substrate. These structures have higher mode confinement in the silicon - away from the substrate, which makes them substrate independent and are promising for exploring new nonlinear phenomena and highly sensitive molecular sensing over the entire silicon's transparency range

  5. Efficient approach to improving the flame retardancy of poly(vinyl alcohol)/clay aerogels: incorporating piperazine-modified ammonium polyphosphate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Tao; Liao, Shi-Fu; Shang, Ke; Chen, Ming-Jun; Huang, Jian-Qian; Wang, Yu-Zhong; Schiraldi, David A

    2015-01-28

    Ammonium polyphosphates (APP) modified with piperazine (PA-APP) was used to improve the flame retardancy of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)/montmorillonite (MMT) aerogels, which were prepared via an environmentally friendly freeze-drying method. The thermal stabilities of the samples were evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis (TG); the flammability behaviors of samples were investigated by limiting oxygen index (LOI), vertical burning test (UL-94) and cone calorimeter (CC) tests. TG test results showed that the 5% weight loss temperature (T5%) of PVA/MMT/PA-APP was 10 °C higher than that of PVA/MMT/APP. In combustion testing, all of PVA/MMT/PA-APP aerogels achieved V-0 ratings and have a higher LOI values than the unmodified PVA/MMT aerogel. Moreover, the aerogel with 1% PA-APP5, which means that the content of piperazine is 5% in PA-APP, decreased the cone calorimetry THR value to 5.71 MJ/m(2), and increased the char residue to 52%. The compressive modulus of PVA/MMT/PA-APP was increased by 93.4% compared with PVA/MMT/APP because of the increase in interfacial adhesion between matrix and PA-APP fillers. The densities of the PVA/MMT/PA-APP samples were slightly lower than those of the unmodified aerogels because of reduced shrinkage in the presence of PA-APP. All the tests results indicated that the incorporation of PA-APP not only improved the thermal stability and flame retardancy of aerogels but also maintained their mechanical properties. PMID:25588129

  6. Supercapacitors based on pillared graphene nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian; Zhong, Jiebin; Bao, Duoduo; Reiber-Kyle, Jennifer; Wang, Wei; Vullev, Valentine; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2012-03-01

    We describe the fabrication of highly conductive and large-area three dimensional pillared graphene nanostructure (PGN) films from assembly of vertically aligned CNT pillars on flexible copper foils for applications in electric double layer capacitors (EDLC). The PGN films synthesized via a one-step chemical vapor deposition process on flexible copper foils exhibit high conductivity with sheet resistance as low as 1.6 ohms per square and possessing high mechanical flexibility. Raman spectroscopy indicates the presence of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and their morphology can be controlled by the growth conditions. It was discovered that nitric acid treatment can significantly increase the specific capacitance of the devices. EDLC devices based on PGN electrodes (surface area of 565 m2/g) demonstrate enhanced performance with specific capacitance value as high as 330 F/g extracted from the current density-voltage (CV) measurements and energy density value of 45.8 Wh/kg. The hybrid graphene-CNT nanostructures are attractive for applications including supercapacitors, fuel cells and batteries. PMID:22754980

  7. Molecular interactions alter clay and polymer structure in polymer clay nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Debashis; Katti, Kalpana S; Katti, Dinesh R

    2008-04-01

    In this work, using photoacoustic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) we have studied the structural distortion of clay crystal structure in organically modified montmorillonite (OMMT) and polymer clay nanocomposites (PCN). To study the effect of organic modifiers on the distortion of crystal structure of clay, we have synthesized OMMTs and PCNs containing same polymer and clay but with three different organic modifiers (12-aminolauric acid, n-dodecylamine, and 1,12-diaminododecane), and conducted the FTIR study on these PCNs. Our previous molecular dynamics (MD) study on these PCNs reveals that significant nonbonded interactions (van der Waals, electrostatic interactions) exist between the different constituents (polymer, organic modifier, and clay) of nanocomposites. Previous work based on X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) on the same set of PCNs shows that crystallinity of polymer in PCNs have changed significantly in comparison to those in pristine polymer; and, the nonbonded interactions between different constituents of PCN are responsible for the change in crystal structure of polymer in PCN. In this work to evaluate the structural distortion of crystal structure of clay in OMMTs and PCNs, the positions of bands corresponding to different modes of vibration of Si-O bonds are determined from the deconvolution of broad Si-O bands in OMMTs and PCNs obtained from FTIR spectra. Intensity and area under the Si-O bands are indicative of orientation of clay crystal structures in OMMTs and PCNs. Significant changes in the Si-O bands are observed from each vibration mode in OMMTs and PCNs containing three different organic modifiers indicating that organic modifiers influence the structural orientation of silica tetrahedra in OMMTs and PCNs. Deconvolution of Si-O bands in OMMTs indicate a band at approximately 1200 cm(-1) that is orientation-dependent Si-O band. The specific changes in intensity and area under this band for

  8. Permeability of Clay Concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, F.; Ekolu, S. O.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the effect of clay addition on water permeability and air permeability of concretes. Clay concrete mixes consisted of 0 to 40% clay content incorporated as cement replacement. Flow methods using triaxial cells and air permeameters were used for measuring the injected water and air flows under pressure. It was found that the higher the clay content in the mixture, the greater the permeability. At higher water-cement ratios (w/c), the paste matrix is less dense and easily allows water to ingress into concrete. But at high clay contents of 30 to 40% clay, the variation in permeability was significantly diminished among different concrete mixtures. It was confirmed that air permeability results were higher than the corresponding water permeability values when all permeability coefficients were converted to intrinsic permeability values.

  9. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. The clay and shale market in 1999 is reviewed. In the U.S., sales or use of clay and shale increased from 26.4 million st in 1998 to 27.3 million st in 1999, with an estimated 1999 value of production of $143 million. These materials were used to produce structural clay products, lightweight aggregates, cement, and ceramics and refractories. Production statistics for clays and shales and for their uses in 1999 are presented.

  10. Biomechanical Characterization of Cardiomyocyte Using PDMS Pillar with Microgrooves.

    PubMed

    Oyunbaatar, Nomin-Erdene; Lee, Deok-Hyu; Patil, Swati J; Kim, Eung-Sam; Lee, Dong-Weon

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the surface-patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) pillar arrays for enhancing cell alignment and contraction force in cardiomyocytes. The PDMS micropillar (μpillar) arrays with microgrooves (μgrooves) were fabricated using a unique micro-mold made using SU-8 double layer processes. The spring constant of the μpillar arrays was experimentally confirmed using atomic force microscopy (AFM). After culturing cardiac cells on the two different types of μpillar arrays, with and without grooves on the top of μpillar, the characteristics of the cardiomyocytes were analyzed using a custom-made image analysis system. The alignment of the cardiomyocytes on the μgrooves of the μpillars was clearly observed using a DAPI staining process. The mechanical force generated by the contraction force of the cardiomyocytes was derived from the displacement of the μpillar arrays. The contraction force of the cardiomyocytes aligned on the μgrooves was 20% higher than that of the μpillar arrays without μgrooves. The experimental results prove that applied geometrical stimulus is an effective method for aligning and improving the contraction force of cardiomyocytes. PMID:27517924

  11. Periodically structured Si pillars for high-performing heterojunction photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melvin David Kumar, M.; Yun, Ju-Hyung; Kim, Joondong

    2015-03-01

    A periodical array of silicon (Si) micro pillar structures was fabricated on Si substrates using PR etching process. Indium tin oxide (ITO) layer of 80 nm thickness was deposited over patterned Si substrates so as to make ITO/n-Si heterojunction devices. The influences of width and period of pillars on the optical and electrical properties of prepared devices were investigated. The surface morphology of the Si substrates revealed the uniform array of pillar structures. The 5/10 (width/period) Si pillar pattern reduced the optical reflectance to 6.5% from 17% which is of 5/7 pillar pattern. The current rectifying ratio was found higher for the device in which the pillars are situated in optimum periods. At both visible (600 nm) and near infrared (900 nm) range of wavelengths, the 5/7 and 5/10 pillar patterned device exhibited the better photoresponses which are suitable for making advanced photodetectors. This highly transmittance and photoresponsive pillar patterned Si substrates with an ITO layer would be a promising device for various photoelectric applications.

  12. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... EXPLORATION AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  13. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... EXPLORATION AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  14. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones. (a... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  15. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... EXPLORATION AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  16. Ten Pillars of a Good Childhood: A Finnish Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulkkinen, Lea

    2012-01-01

    The organizers of the Decade for Childhood have formulated Ten Pillars of a Good Childhood as basic requirements for an optimal childhood. The pillars can be used to analyze the quality of childhood in homes and nations, and to guide policies and practices related to the experience of childhood. In this article, the author shall illustrate, pillar…

  17. Numerical Modeling for Yield Pillar Design: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenfeng; Bai, Jianbiao; Peng, Syd; Wang, Xiangyu; Xu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Two single-entry gateroad systems employing a yield pillar for bump control in a Chinese coal mine were introduced. The overburden depth of the longwall panels was approximately 390 m. When the width/height (W/H) ratio of the yield pillar was 2.67, coal bumps in the tailgate occurred in front of the longwall retreating face. However, in another panel, the coal bump was eliminated because the W/H ratio was reduced to 1.67. Under this condition, instrumentation results indicated that the roof-to-floor and rib-to-rib convergences reached 1,050 and 790 mm, respectively, during longwall retreat. The numerical model was used to back-analyze the two cases of yield pillar application in the hope to find the principle for yield pillar design. In order to improve the reliability of the numerical model, the strain-hardening gob and strain-softening pillar materials were meticulously calibrated, and the coal/rock interface strength was determined by laboratory direct shear tests. The results of the validated model indicate that if the W/H ratio of the yield pillar equals 1.67, the peak vertical stress in the panel rib (37.7 MPa) is much larger than that in the yield pillar (21.1 MPa); however, the peak vertical stress in the panel rib (30.87 MPa) is smaller than that in the yield pillar (36 MPa) when the W/H ratio of yield pillar is 2.67. These findings may be helpful to the design of yield pillars for bump control.

  18. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotomácio, J. G.; Silva, P. S. C.; Mazzilli, B. P.

    2008-08-01

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and 40K in these clay minerals. The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of 238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay. Measurement for the determination of 238U and 232Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906±340 Bq kg-1 for 40K, 40±9 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra, 75±9 Bq kg-1 for 228Ra, 197±38 Bq kg-1 for 210Pb, 51±26 Bq kg-1 for 238U and 55±24 Bq kg-1 for 232Th, considering both kinds of clay.

  19. The Science of Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warwick, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    Students' natural curiosity provides a rich opportunity for teachers to make meaningful scientific connections between art and ceramics that will enhance the understanding of both natural forces and scientific aspects at work in the creation of clay artworks. This article discusses the scientific areas of study related to clay, which include…

  20. Columns in Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenhouts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a clay project for students studying Greece and Rome. It provides a wonderful way to learn slab construction techniques by making small clay column capitols. With this lesson, students learn architectural vocabulary and history, understand the importance of classical architectural forms and their influence on today's…

  1. Finicky clay divers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordry, Sean M.

    1998-02-01

    Clay spheres dropped into a dilute vinegar/baking-soda solution accumulate CO2 bubbles on their surfaces. Spheres below a certain size will then float, otherwise they remain sunken. Students must determine the maximum size that will float by considering the net density of the clay/bubble system.

  2. Clay Portrait Boxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilbert, Nancy Corrigan

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to incorporate sculptural elements into her ceramics program, the author decided to try direct plaster casting of the face to make a plaster mold for clay. In this article, the author shares an innovative ceramics lesson that teaches students in making plaster casts and casting the face in clay. This project gives students the…

  3. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    Part of the 2002 industrial minerals review. The production, consumption, and price of shale and common clay in the U.S. during 2002 are discussed. The impact of EPA regulations on brick and structural clay product manufacturers is also outlined.

  4. Effect of sulfuric acid concentration of bentonite and calcination time of pillared bentonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mara, Ady; Wijaya, Karna; Trisunaryati, Wega; Mudasir

    2016-04-01

    An activation of natural clay has been developed. Activation was applied by refluxing the natural bentonite in variation of the sulfuric acid concentration and calcination time of pillared bentonite (PLC). Calcination was applied using oven in microwave 2,45 GHz. Determination of acidity was applied by measuring the amount of adsorbed ammonia and pyridine. Morphological, functional groups and chrystanility characterizations were analyzed using SEM, TEM, FTIR and XRD. Porosity was analyzed using SSA. The results showed that the greater of the concentration of sulfuric acid and calcination time was, the greater the acidity of bentonite as well as the pore diameter were. FTIR spectra showed no fundamental changes in the structure of the natural bentonite, SEM, and TEM images were showing an increase in space or field due to pillarization while the XRD patterns showed a shift to a lower peak. Optimization was obtained at a concentration of 2 M of sulfuric acid and calcination time of 20 minutes, keggin ion of 2.2 and suspension of 10 mmol, respectively each amounted to 11.7490 mmol/gram of ammonia and 2.4437 mmol/gram of pyridine with 154.6391 m2/gram for surface area, 0.130470 m3/gram of pore volume and 3.37484 nm of pore diameter.

  5. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy for microfluidic pillar arrayed separation chips

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Lisa; Kirchner, Teresa B; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Sepaniak, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have addressed the challenges of implementing miniaturized microfluidic platforms for chemical and biological separation applications. However, the integration of real time detection schemes capable of providing valuable sample information under continuous, ultra low volume flow regimes has not fully been addressed. In this report we present a chip based chromatography system comprising of a pillar array separation column followed by a reagent channel for passive mixing of a silver colloidal solution into the eluent stream to enable surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) detection. Our design is the first integrated chip based microfluidic device to combine pressure driven separation capability with real time SERS detection. With this approach we demonstrate the ability to collect distinctive SERS spectra with or without complete resolution of chromatographic bands. Computational fluidic dynamic (CFD) simulations are used to model the diffusive mixing behavior and velocity profiles of the two confluent streams in the microfluidic channels. We evaluate the SERS spectral band intensity and chromatographic efficiency of model analytes with respect to kinetic factors as well as signal acquisition rates. Additionally, we discuss the use of a pluronic modified silver colloidal solution as a means of eliminating contamination generally caused by nanoparticle adhesion to channel surfaces.

  6. PILLARED CLAYS AS SUPERIOR CATALYSTS FOR SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITRIC OXIDE

    SciTech Connect

    R. Q. LONG; R.T. YANG

    1998-09-30

    Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x} by hydrocarbons was investigated on Pt doped MCM-41 and copper ion and/or cerium ion-exchanged Al-MCM-41 in the presence of excess oxygen. It was found that Pt/MCM-41 provided the highest specific NO reduction rates as compared with other Pt doped catalysts reported in the literature, such as Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Pt/ZSM-5. For different hydrocarbons, the catalytic activity decreased according to the sequence of C{sub 3}H{sub 6} {approx} C{sub 2}H{sub 4} >> C{sub 3}H{sub 8} > CH{sub 4}. This catalyst was also stable in the presence of H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}. Cu exchanged Al-MCM-41 and cerium promoted Cu-Al-MCM-41 (i.e., Ce-Cu-Al-MCM-41) were also found to be active in this reaction. Higher NO{sub x} conversions to N2 were obtained on the Ce-Cu-Al-MCM-41 as compared with Cu-Al-MCM-41. The activity of Ce-Cu-Al-MCM-41 was approximately the same as that of Cu-ZSM-5; but the former had a wider temperature window. TPR results indicated that only isolated Cu{sup 2+} and Cu{sup +} ions were detected in the Cu{sup 2+}-exchanged Al-MCM-41 samples, which may play an important role in the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} to N{sub 2}. After some cerium ions were introduced into Cu-Al-MCM-41, Cu{sup 2+} in the molecular sieve became more easily reducible by H{sub 2}. This may be related to the increase of catalytic activity of NO{sub x} reduction by ethylene.

  7. Ring-shaped polariton lasing in pillar microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kalevich, V. K. Afanasiev, M. M.; Lukoshkin, V. A.; Kavokin, K. V.; Tsintzos, S. I.; Savvidis, P. G.; Kavokin, A. V.

    2014-03-07

    Optically generated exciton-polaritons in cylindric semiconductor pillar microcavity with embedded GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells demonstrate a clear polariton lasing regime. When exciting in the center of the pillar, we detect a ring-shaped emission, where the peak of intensity can be separated from the excitation spot by more than 10 μm. The spatial coherence of the ring emission is verified by interferometry measurements. These observations are interpreted by drift of the exciton polariton condensate away from the excitation spot due to its repulsion from the exciton reservoir and by its spatial confinement by the pillar boundary.

  8. Fractal dimensions of flocs between clay particles and HAB organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongliang; Yu, Zhiming; Cao, Xihua; Song, Xiuxian

    2011-05-01

    The impact of harmful algal blooms (HABs) on public health and related economics have been increasing in many coastal regions of the world. Sedimentation of algal cells through flocculation with clay particles is a promising strategy for controlling HABs. Previous studies found that removal efficiency (RE) was influenced by many factors, including clay type and concentration, algal growth stage, and physiological aspects of HAB cells. To estimate the effect of morphological characteristics of the aggregates on HAB cell removal, fractal dimensions were measured and the RE of three species of HAB organism, Heterosigma akashiwo, Alexandrium tamarense, and Skeletonema costatum, by original clay and modified clay, was determined. For all HAB species, the modified clay had a higher RE than original clay. For the original clay, the two-dimensional fractal dimension ( D 2) was 1.92 and three-dimensional fractal dimension ( D 3) 2.81, while for the modified clay, D 2 was 1.84 and D 3 was 2.50. The addition of polyaluminum chloride (PACl) lead to a decrease of the repulsive barrier between clay particles, and resulted in lower D 2 and D 3. Due to the decrease of D 3, and the increase of the effective sticking coefficient, the flocculation rate between modified clay particles and HAB organisms increased, and thus resulted in a high RE. The fractal dimensions of flocs differed in HAB species with different cell morphologies. For example, Alexandrium tamarense cells are ellipsoidal, and the D 3 and D 2 of flocs were the highest, while for Skeletonema costatum, which has filamentous cells, the D 3 and D 2 of flocs were the lowest.

  9. Pillared and open-framework uranyl diphosphonates

    SciTech Connect

    Adelani, Pius O.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2011-09-15

    The hydrothermal reactions of uranium trioxide, uranyl acetate, or uranyl nitrate with 1,4-benzenebisphosphonic acid in the presence of very small amount of HF at 200 deg. C results in the formation of three different uranyl diphosphonate compounds, [H{sub 3}O]{sub 2}{l_brace}(UO{sub 2}){sub 6}[C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(PO{sub 3})(PO{sub 2}OH)]{sub 2}[C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(PO{sub 2}OH){sub 2}]{sub 2}[C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{r_brace}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (Ubbp-1), [H{sub 3}O]{sub 4}{l_brace}(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}[C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}F{sub 4}{r_brace}.H{sub 2}O (Ubbp-2), and {l_brace}(UO{sub 2})[C{sub 6}H{sub 2}F{sub 2}(PO{sub 2}OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){r_brace}{sub 2}.H{sub 2}O (Ubbp-3). The crystal structures of these compounds were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction experiments. Ubbp-1 consists of UO{sub 7} pentagonal bipyramids that are bridged by the phosphonate moieties to form a three-dimensional pillared structure. Ubbp-2 is composed of UO{sub 5}F{sub 2} pentagonal bipyramids that are bridged through the phosphonate oxygen atoms into one-dimensional chains that are cross-linked by the phenyl spacers into a pillared structure. The structure of Ubbp-3 is a three-dimensional open-framework with large channels containing water molecules with internal dimensions of approximately 10.9x10.9 A. Ubbp-1 and Ubbp-2 fluoresce at room temperature. - Graphical Abstract: Illustration of the three-dimensional open-framework structure of {l_brace}(UO{sub 2})[C{sub 6}H{sub 2}F{sub 2}(PO{sub 2}OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){r_brace}{sub 2}.H{sub 2}O viewed along the c-axis. The structure is constructed from UO{sub 7} units, pentagonal bipyramids=green, oxygen=red, phosphorus=magenta, carbon=black, hydrogen=white. Highlights: > The influence of the uranyl salt anions and pH were critically examined in relation to structural variation. > The acetate and nitrate counter ions of uranyl may be acting as structure directing agents. > The use of rigid phenyl spacer yield

  10. Clays as prebiotic photocatalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.; Lawless, J.; Lahav, N.; Sutton, S.; Sweeney, M.

    1981-01-01

    Clay minerals catalyze peptide bond formation in fluctuating environments. A number of plausible mechanisms have been proposed and tested. The possibility that clays may actually be energizing the reaction by means of electronic excitation, creating mobile or trapped holes and electrons in the lattice, is explored. It has been discovered that clays emit light upon dehydration. The correlation between dehydration-induced, or thermoluminescent, processes and the yield of glycine oligomers after treatments known to affect the luminescent yields is being tested, in an effort to understand the catalytic mechanism

  11. Screening Hofmann Compounds as CO 2 Sorbents: Nontraditional Synthetic Route to Over 40 Different Pore-Functionalized and Flexible Pillared Cyanonickelates

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, Jeffrey T.; Madden, Catherine; Kauffman, Kristi; Shi, Fan; Matranga, Christopher

    2013-04-15

    A simple reaction scheme based on the heterogeneous intercalation of pillaring ligands (HIPLs) provides a convenient method for systematically tuning pore size, pore functionality, and network flexibility in an extended series of pillared cyanonickelates (PICNICs), commonly referred to as Hofmann compounds. The versatility of the approach is demonstrated through the preparation of over 40 different PICNICs containing pillar ligands ranging from 4 to 15 Å in length and modified with a wide range of functional groups, including fluoro, aldehyde, alkylamine, alkyl, aryl, trifluoromethyl, ester, nitro, ether, and nonmetalated 4,4'-bipyrimidine. The HIPL method involves reaction of a suspension of preformed polymeric sheets of powdered anhydrous nickel cyanide with an appropriate pillar ligand in refluxing organic solvent, resulting in the conversion of the planar [Ni{sub 2}(CN){sub 4}]{sub n} networks into polycrystalline three-dimensional porous frameworks containing the organic pillar ligand. Preliminary investigations indicate that the HIPL reaction is also amenable to forming Co(L)Ni(CN){sub 4}, Fe(L)Ni(CN){sub 4}, and Fe(L)Pd(CN){sub 4} networks. The materials show variable adsorption behavior for CO{sub 2} depending on the pillar length and pillar functionalization. Several compounds show structurally flexible behavior during the adsorption and desorption of CO{sub 2}. Interestingly, the newly discovered flexible compounds include two flexible Fe(L)Ni(CN){sub 4} derivatives that are structurally related to previously reported porous spin-crossover compounds. The preparations of 20 pillar ligands based on ring-functionalized 4,4'-dipyridyls, 1,4-bis(4-pyridyl)benzenes, and N-(4-pyridyl)isonicotinamides are also described.

  12. Screening Hofmann Compounds as CO{sub 2} Sorbents: Nontraditional Synthetic Route to Over 40 Different Pore-Functionalized and Flexible Pillared Cyanonickelates

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, Jeffrey T; Madden, Catherine; Kauffman, Kristi; Shi, Fan; Matranga, Christopher

    2013-03-29

    A simple reaction scheme based on the heterogeneous intercalation of pillaring ligands (HIPLs) provides a convenient method for systematically tuning pore size, pore functionality, and network flexibility in an extended series of pillared cyanonickelates (PICNICs), commonly referred to as Hofmann compounds. The versatility of the approach is demonstrated through the preparation of over 40 different PICNICs containing pillar ligands ranging from ∼4 to ∼15 Å in length and modified with a wide range of functional groups, including fluoro, aldehyde, alkylamine, alkyl, aryl, trifluoromethyl, ester, nitro, ether, and nonmetalated 4,4′-bipyrimidine. The HIPL method involves reaction of a suspension of preformed polymeric sheets of powdered anhydrous nickel cyanide with an appropriate pillar ligand in refluxing organic solvent, resulting in the conversion of the planar [Ni{sub 2}(CN){sub 4}]{sub n} networks into polycrystalline three-dimensional porous frameworks containing the organic pillar ligand. Preliminary investigations indicate that the HIPL reaction is also amenable to forming Co(L)Ni(CN){sub 4}, Fe(L)Ni(CN){sub 4}, and Fe(L)Pd(CN){sub 4} networks. The materials show variable adsorption behavior for CO{sub 2} depending on the pillar length and pillar functionalization. Several compounds show structurally flexible behavior during the adsorption and desorption of CO{sub 2}. Interestingly, the newly discovered flexible compounds include two flexible Fe(L)Ni(CN){sub 4} derivatives that are structurally related to previously reported porous spin-crossover compounds. The preparations of 20 pillar ligands based on ring-functionalized 4,4′-dipyridyls, 1,4-bis(4- pyridyl)benzenes, and N-(4-pyridyl)isonicotinamides are also described.

  13. Modernity and putty-clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, Trichur Kailas

    This dissertation addresses issues arising out of the problems of capital accumulation, productivity growth and 'putty-clay' technology. The concept of economic modernity occupies a central place in the subject-matter studied here in that it expresses both the incessant drive for newness that characterizes economic reality and the persistence of dated techniques that successfully resist replacement. This study examines the way in which an expansive development-theoretic 'putty-clay' framework may be employed to explain the historical processes behind both the avalanche of newness (innovations) and the conservatism of technology in the U.S. economy. The guiding link is the fixity of investments in physical capital equipment over time and space. The dilemma of fixed capital is studied in the context of the constant entrepreneurial search for flexibility and liquidity. The thesis advanced is that a development (Entwicklung)-theoretic 'putty-clay' conceptualization of the economic system adequately addresses the recurring problems of fixity, flexibility, and liquidity, and thereby permits important insights into the enigma surrounding the persistent productivity growth slowdown and 'stagflation' of the late sixties and seventies and the related phenomena of physical 'capital obsolescence' and the financial or 'speculative explosions' of our times. The notion of 'putty-clay' used here is an innovative one in that it departs from the growth-theoretic literature to re-appear as a Schumpeterian theory of modernity modified by a Veblenite view of an economic system directed by the exigencies of the 'machine-process'. The empirical aptitude of a macroeconomic 'putty-clay' model to explain capital obsolescence mediated by the energy 'crises' (supply shocks) of the seventies and eighties is examined in a separate chapter with results that differ markedly from the standard (Berndt and Wood) conclusions for the U.S. economy. The final chapter in the dissertation reverts to the

  14. The interaction of a walking droplet and a pillar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, John; Harris, Daniel; Brun, Pierre-Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Droplets may bounce on the surface of a vibrating fluid bath, propelled forward by their own pilot-wave field. With a view to better understanding the interaction of such walking droplets with boundaries, we consider their impact on a submerged circular pillar. While simple scattering events are the norm, as the Faraday threshold is approached, the drop departs the pillar along a path corresponding to a logarithmic spiral. An effective wave force resulting from the pillar is inferred from the spiral, and takes the form of the Coriolis force that would arise in a frame of reference rotating with the instantaneous angular momentum of the drop about the pillar. An electromagnetic analog is explored. Thanks to the NSF.

  15. 9. Partial elevation of west side showing pillar, central and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Partial elevation of west side showing pillar, central and southern sections, from San Antonio Highway Bridge. - Puente Ferroviario San Antonio, Spanning San Antonio Channel at PR-1, San Juan, San Juan Municipio, PR

  16. Preparation of silica or alumina pillared crystalline titanates

    SciTech Connect

    Udomsak, S.; Nge, R.; Dufner, D.C.; Anthony, R.G.; Lott, S.E.

    1994-05-01

    Layered crystalline titanates (CT) [Anthony and Dosch, US Patent 5 177 045 (1993)] are pillared with tetraethyl orthosilicate, 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane, and aluminum acetylacetonate to prepare porous and high surface area supports for sulfided NiMo catalyst. Tetra-ethyl orthosilicate or aluminum acetylacetonate intercalated CT are prepared by stepwise intercalation. First, the basal distance is increased by n-alkylammonium ions prior to intercalation with inorganic compounds. However, an aqueous solution of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane could directly pillar CT without first swelling the titanate with n-alkylamine. The catalytic activities for hydrogenation of pyrene of sulfided NiMo supported silica or alumina pillared CT were higher than those of commercial catalysts (Shell324 and Amocat1C). The silicon and aluminum contents of the pillared CT, used as supports, have a considerable effect on the catalytic activities and physical properties of the supports.

  17. 16. LIGHTING AND PILLAR DETAIL VIEW ON HYPERION BOULEVARD VIADUCT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. LIGHTING AND PILLAR DETAIL VIEW ON HYPERION BOULEVARD VIADUCT AT OVERCROSSING OF RIVERSIDE DRIVE. LOOKING NORTH. - Glendale-Hyperion Viaduct, Spanning Golden State Freeway (I-5) & Los Angeles River at Glendale Boulevard, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    Part of the 2003 industrial minerals review. The legislation, production, and consumption of common clay and shale are discussed. The average prices of the material and outlook for the market are provided.

  19. Transparent conductor-Si pillars heterojunction photodetector

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Ju-Hyung; Kim, Joondong; Park, Yun Chang

    2014-08-14

    We report a high-performing heterojunction photodetector by enhanced surface effects. Periodically, patterned Si substrates were used to enlarge the photo-reactive regions and yield proportionally improved photo-responses. An optically transparent indium-tin-oxide (ITO) was deposited on a Si substrate and spontaneously formed an ITO/Si heterojunction. Due to an electrical conductive ITO film, ITO/Si heterojunction device can be operated at zero-bias, which effectively suppresses the dark current, resulting in better performances than those by a positive or a negative bias operation. This zero-bias operating heterojunction device exhibits a short response time (∼ 22.5 ms) due to the physical reaction to the incident light. We revealed that the location of the space charge region (SCR) is crucial for a specific photon-wavelength response. The SCR space has the highest collection efficiency of the photo-generated carriers. The photo-response can be maximized when we design the photodetector by superposing the SCR space over a corresponding photon-absorption length. The surface enhanced Si pillar devices significantly improved the photo-responses ratios from that of a planar Si device. According to this design scheme, a high photo-response ratio of 5560% was achieved at a wavelength of 600 nm. This surfaced-enhanced heterojunction design scheme would be a promising approach for various photoelectric applications.

  20. Designing in Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigrosh, Leon I.

    1977-01-01

    What can be done to transform a lump of wet clay into something more than a lump of glaze-fired clay? It is at this point when forming techniques have been mastered that good design becomes most important. Discusses six criteria involved in the search for good design so that students can discover what good design is and how important it is.…

  1. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    At present, 150 companies produce common clay and shale in 41 US states. According to the United States Geological Survey (USGS), domestic production in 2005 reached 24.8 Mt valued at $176 million. In decreasing order by tonnage, the leading producer states include North Carolina, Texas, Alabama, Georgia and Ohio. For the whole year, residential and commercial building construction remained the major market for common clay and shale products such as brick, drain tile, lightweight aggregate, quarry tile and structural tile.

  2. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cotomacio, J. G.; Silva, P. S. C.; Mazzilli, B. P

    2008-08-07

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and {sup 40}K in these clay minerals.The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 40}K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay.Measurement for the determination of {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 40}K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906{+-}340 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 40}K, 40{+-}9 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 226}Ra, 75{+-}9 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 228}Ra, 197{+-}38 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 210}Pb, 51{+-}26 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 238}U and 55{+-}24 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 232}Th, considering both kinds of clay.

  3. The surface modification of clay particles by RF plasma technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Keol

    In this study, the surface coatings of ball clay, organoclay and exfoliated clay prepared by sol-gel process were done by RF plasma polymerization to improve the surface activity of the clay filler. Characterization of the above plasma-treated clays has been carried out by various techniques. The effects of plasma-treated clays as substitute of carbon black in styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) and ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM) on the curing and mechanical properties were investigated. After plasma treatment, the tensile properties of organo and exfoliated clay were not unsatisfactory to that of carbon black filler system. Moreover, only 10 phr filler loading of plasma-treated organoclay in EPDM vulcanizates showed better results than 40 phr filler loading of carbon black in EPDM vulcanizates. The main objective of this study was to verify the applicability of the plasma technique for modifying clay surfaces for their use in the tire manufacturing industry. Another purpose was to reveal the advantage of the plasma technique used to obtain modified-clay and improved properties that those materials can display.

  4. Band gap in tubular pillar phononic crystal plate.

    PubMed

    Shu, Fengfeng; Liu, Yongshun; Wu, Junfeng; Wu, Yihui

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a phononic crystal (PC) plate with tubular pillars is presented and investigated. The band structures and mode displacement profiles are calculated by using finite element method. The result shows that a complete band gap opens when the ratio of the pillar height to the plate thickness is about 1.6. However, for classic cylinder pillar structures, a band gap opens when the ratio is equal or greater than 3. A tubular pillar design with a void room in it enhances acoustic multiple scattering and gives rise to the opening of the band gap. In order to verify it, a PC structure with double tubular pillars different in size (one within the other) is introduced and a more than 2times band gap enlargement is observed. Furthermore, the coupling between the resonant mode and the plate mode around the band gap is characterized, as well as the effect of the geometrical parameters on the band gap. The behavior of such structure could be utilized to design a pillar PC with stronger structural stability and to enlarge band gaps. PMID:27376841

  5. Planning and design for barrier pillar recovery: Three case histories

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, D.A.

    1995-11-01

    Barrier pillars created during mine development provide additional reserves during mine closure and can be the sole access to reserves previously abandoned because of mining height or out of seam dilution limitations. The safe and successful mining of barrier pillars requires a thorough knowledge of the magnitude and distribution of the vertical stress field in addition to the strength and physical properties of the coal, immediate roof, and immediate floor strata. Quantifying the vertical stress field is complicated by the combination of the overburden stress, abutment stresses transferred onto the barrier pillar from adjacent gob areas, and in multiple seam mining, stresses transferred from abandoned subjacent mines. These variables make the extraction and development of barrier pillar reserves a site specific consideration. Three case histories are presented in which barrier pillar development and extraction provides: (1) an access point and the means to ventilate a large area of low seam reserves left by a prior operator after developing only the thicker area of a multiple split reserve, (2) the means to increase total recovery of a deep, thick seam longwall reserve, and (3) opportunities for the development and retreat mining of a two mile long barrier pillar in thick seam reserves.

  6. From Pillar[n]arene Scaffolds for the Preparation of Nanomaterials to Pillar[5]arene-containing Rotaxanes.

    PubMed

    Nierengarten, Iwona; Deschenaux, Robert; Nierengarten, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Pillar[n]arenes are a new class of macrocycles that are efficiently prepared from readily available building blocks. In this particular field, our research teams became interested in the use of a pillar[5]arene core as a compact scaffold for the synthesis of nanomaterials with a controlled distribution of functional groups on both rims of the macrocyclic framework. Such compounds have found applications in biology as multivalent ligands for specific lectines or as polycationic compounds for gene delivery. Liquid-crystalline derivatives have been prepared by grafting mesogenic subunits on the pillar[5]arene core. On the other hand, we also became interested in the preparation of pillar[5]arene-containing [2]rotaxanes. In particular, we have shown that pillar[5] arene-based [2]rotaxanes can be obtained from the reaction of amine stoppers with pseudo-rotaxanes resulting from the association of a pillar[5]arene derivative with a diacyl chloride reagent. Finally, amphiphilic [2]rotaxanes have been prepared and incorporated in thin ordered films at the air-water interface. PMID:26931219

  7. Toxicological evaluation of clay minerals and derived nanocomposites: a review.

    PubMed

    Maisanaba, Sara; Pichardo, Silvia; Puerto, María; Gutiérrez-Praena, Daniel; Cameán, Ana M; Jos, Angeles

    2015-04-01

    Clays and clay minerals are widely used in many facets of our society. This review addresses the main clays of each phyllosilicate groups, namely, kaolinite, montmorillonite (Mt) and sepiolite, placing special emphasis on Mt and kaolinite, which are the clays that are more frequently used in food packaging, one of the applications that are currently exhibiting higher development. The improvements in the composite materials obtained from clays and polymeric matrices are remarkable and well known, but the potential toxicological effects of unmodified or modified clay minerals and derived nanocomposites are currently being investigated with increased interest. In this sense, this work focused on a review of the published reports related to the analysis of the toxicological profile of commercial and novel modified clays and derived nanocomposites. An exhaustive review of the main in vitro and in vivo toxicological studies, antimicrobial activity assessments, and the human and environmental impacts of clays and derived nanocomposites was performed. From the analysis of the scientific literature different conclusions can be derived. Thus, in vitro studies suggest that clays in general induce cytotoxicity (with dependence on the clay, concentration, experimental system, etc.) with different underlying mechanisms such as necrosis/apoptosis, oxidative stress or genotoxicity. However, most of in vivo experiments performed in rodents showed no clear evidences of systemic toxicity even at doses of 5000mg/kg. Regarding to humans, pulmonary exposure is the most frequent, and although clays are usually mixed with other minerals, they have been reported to induce pneumoconiosis per se. Oral exposure is also common both intentionally and unintentionally. Although they do not show a high toxicity through this pathway, toxic effects could be induced due to the increased or reduced exposure to mineral elements. Finally, there are few studies about the effects of clay minerals on

  8. Nanoscale Structure and Elasticity of Pillared DNA Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Himanshu; Kaushik, Atul; Seeman, Nadrian C; Maiti, Prabal K

    2016-08-23

    We present an atomistic model of pillared DNA nanotubes (DNTs) and their elastic properties which will facilitate further studies of these nanotubes in several important nanotechnological and biological applications. In particular, we introduce a computational design to create an atomistic model of a 6-helix DNT (6HB) along with its two variants, 6HB flanked symmetrically with two double helical DNA pillars (6HB+2) and 6HB flanked symmetrically by three double helical DNA pillars (6HB+3). Analysis of 200 ns all-atom simulation trajectories in the presence of explicit water and ions shows that these structures are stable and well behaved in all three geometries. Hydrogen bonding is well maintained for all variants of 6HB DNTs. From the equilibrium bending angle distribution, we calculate the persistence lengths of these tubes. The measured persistence lengths of these nanotubes are ∼10 μm, which is 2 orders of magnitude larger than that of dsDNA. We also find a gradual increase of persistence length with an increasing number of pillars, in quantitative agreement with previous experimental findings. To have a quantitative understanding of the stretch modulus of these tubes, we carried out nonequilibrium steered molecular dynamics (SMD). The linear part of the force-extension plot gives a stretch modulus in the range 6500 pN for 6HB without pillars, which increases to 11 000 pN for tubes with three pillars. The values of the stretch modulus calculated using contour length distribution obtained from equilibrium MD simulations are similar to those obtained from nonequilibrium SMD simulations. The addition of pillars makes these DNTs very rigid. PMID:27400249

  9. Organic-inorganic hybrids from renewable plant oils and clay.

    PubMed

    Uyama, Hiroshi; Kuwabara, Mai; Tsujimoto, Takashi; Nakano, Mitsuru; Usuki, Arimitsu; Kobayashi, Shiro

    2004-03-15

    This study deals with the preparation and properties of a new class of organic-inorganic hybrids from renewable resources. The hybrids were synthesized by an acid-catalyzed curing of epoxidized triglycerides in the presence of an organophilic montmorillonite (a modified clay). The mechanical properties were improved by the incorporation of clay in the oil-based polymer matrix. The reinforcement effect due to the addition of clay was confirmed by dynamic viscoelasticity analysis. The hybrids showed relatively high thermal stability. The co-curing of epoxidized soybean and linseed oils in the presence of clay produced hybrids with controlled mechanical and coating properties. The barrier property of the hybrid towards water vapor was superior to that of the oil polymer. The development of the present hybrids consisting of inexpensive renewable resources, triglyceride and clay is expected to contribute to global sustainability. PMID:15468227

  10. Molecular dynamics study on the wettability of a hydrophobic surface textured with nanoscale pillars.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengqing; Kim, Hyojeong; Ha, Man Yeong; Jang, Joonkyung

    2014-03-28

    Using molecular dynamics simulation, we studied the wetting properties of a surface textured with hydrophobic pillars, several nanometers in size. The drying transition of water confined between square or circular pillars was related to the Wenzel (WZ) to Cassie-Baxter (CB) transition of a water droplet deposited on periodic pillars. The inter-pillar spacing at which the drying occurs was compared to that predicted from the continuum theory. Such a comparison revealed that the line tension plays an important role in the drying behavior of the present nm-sized pillars. The water molecules near the pillar walls were layered and ordered in orientation. Our simulation showed a long-lived CB state which eventually turns into the WZ state. In this transition, water slowly penetrated down into the inter-pillar gap until it reached the half height of the pillar, and then quickly reached the base of the pillar. PMID:24513852

  11. Hybrid molecular simulation of methane storage inside pillared graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassani, Atieh; Hamed Mosavian, Mohammad Taghi; Ahmadpour, Ali; Farhadian, Nafiseh

    2015-06-01

    In this study, a hybrid molecular dynamics—grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation is carried out to investigate the storage capacity of methane in a new nanostructure adsorbent called pillared graphene. This new nanostructure is composed of graphene sheets in parallel with vertical carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which act as their holders. The adsorption ability of this new structure is compared to graphene sheets to evaluate its potential for methane storage. The results show that in a specific adsorbent volume, applying pillared graphene increases the number of adsorbed methane up to 22% in comparison to graphene sheets. Given the application of various isotherm models such as Langmuir, Freundlich, Sips, and Toth and calculation of their parameters, it is predicted that methane adsorption on pillared graphene displays a heterogeneous behavior. Furthermore, the effects of geometry parameters such as CNTs diameter, the number of CNTs, and graphene sheets layer spacing on the methane uptake are investigated. The results show that the pillared graphene containing 1 CNT per 30 nm2 graphene sheet areas provides the best configuration for methane adsorption. This optimum structure is characterized by a small diameter of about 0.938 nm and an optimal layer spacing of about 1.2 nm. Finally, our results show that this kind of pillared structure can be suitable for methane storage.

  12. Hybrid molecular simulation of methane storage inside pillared graphene.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Atieh; Hamed Mosavian, Mohammad Taghi; Ahmadpour, Ali; Farhadian, Nafiseh

    2015-06-21

    In this study, a hybrid molecular dynamics--grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation is carried out to investigate the storage capacity of methane in a new nanostructure adsorbent called pillared graphene. This new nanostructure is composed of graphene sheets in parallel with vertical carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which act as their holders. The adsorption ability of this new structure is compared to graphene sheets to evaluate its potential for methane storage. The results show that in a specific adsorbent volume, applying pillared graphene increases the number of adsorbed methane up to 22% in comparison to graphene sheets. Given the application of various isotherm models such as Langmuir, Freundlich, Sips, and Toth and calculation of their parameters, it is predicted that methane adsorption on pillared graphene displays a heterogeneous behavior. Furthermore, the effects of geometry parameters such as CNTs diameter, the number of CNTs, and graphene sheets layer spacing on the methane uptake are investigated. The results show that the pillared graphene containing 1 CNT per 30 nm(2) graphene sheet areas provides the best configuration for methane adsorption. This optimum structure is characterized by a small diameter of about 0.938 nm and an optimal layer spacing of about 1.2 nm. Finally, our results show that this kind of pillared structure can be suitable for methane storage. PMID:26093570

  13. Thermal simulation of flexible LED package enhanced with copper pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liu; Leung, Stanley Y. Y.; Wong, Cell K. Y.; Yuan, Cadmus A.; Guoqi, Zhang; Fenglian, Sun

    2015-06-01

    Chip on flexible substrate (COF) is a new packaging technology for light emitting diodes (LED). This paper investigated the effect of Cu-pillar in the polyimide (PI) layer on the thermal properties of COF LED packages by finite element analysis. The thermal distribution and thermal resistance were studied in both COF LED packages with and without Cu-pillar. The PI layer showed the highest thermal resistance in the typical package and led to a high chip temperature. With the addition of Cu-pillars, however, the thermal resistance of the PI layer significantly decreased due to the improvement of vertical thermal dissipation under LED chips. Based on the results of simulation and calculation, the relationship between the amount of Cu-pillar and thermal resistance of the COF package has been built. For the packages studied in this research, an 8 × 8 Cu-pillars array was adequate to improve the thermal performance of COF packages. Project supported by the Research and Scientific Foundation of Heilongjiang Education Department (No. 12541112).

  14. Glowing clay: Real time tracing using a suite of novel clay based fluorescent tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Robert; Quinton, John; Pates, Jackie; Coogan, Mike

    2015-04-01

    Clay is one of the most mobile fractions of soil due to its small particle size. It is also known to sorb many chemicals, such as nutrients (notably phosphorus), agrochemicals and heavy metals. The movement of clay is therefore linked with the transport and fate of these substances. A novel fluorescent clay tracing suite has been produced, together with an imaging technique. This suite consists of qualitative clay tracers, using rhodamine based fluorophores, and quantitative clay tracers, using metal based fluorophores. Efforts have also been made to allow integration of commercially available tracers, which are silt and sand sized. The clay tracers exploit the high affinity that montmorillonite has for Rhodamine B and Ru(bpy)3. This allows for an extremely thin layer of the fluorophore to be sorbed onto the clay's surface, in much that same way as materials in the natural environment will bind to clay. The tracer that is produced retains key chemical and physical properties of clay, such as size, shape and density. The retention of these micro-properties results in the retention of macro-properties, such as tendency to aggregate and cracking on drying. Imaging techniques have been developed to analyse these tracers. The imaging system uses diffused laser light to excite the tracer and a modified DSLR camera to image the soil surface. The images have been compiled into a time lapse video showing the movement of clay over the course of a rainfall event. This is the first time that the quantitative movement of clay has been recorded over a soil surface in real time. 4D data can be extracted from the images allowing the spatial location and intensity of tracer to be monitored over time, with mm precision and on the timescale of seconds. As the system can also work with a commercial tracer it is possible to investigate the movement of particles of almost any size and over a range of scales from soil box to hillside. This allows users to access this technique without

  15. Dynamics of effusive and diffusive gas separation on pillared graphene.

    PubMed

    Wesołowski, Radosław P; Terzyk, Artur P

    2016-06-22

    Pillared graphene structures, from a practical viewpoint, are very interesting novel carbon materials. Combining the properties of graphene and nanotubes, such as durability, chemical purity and a controlled structure, they were proven to be effective membranes for noble gas separation processes. Here, we examine their possible use for other, more commercially useful gas mixture separation, i.e. air and coal gas. The mechanism of air gas transport through the pillar channels is studied, and the prospective application of 2-D pillared membranes in effusion-like processes provided. The separative abilities of hybrid systems consisting of membranes with different channel diameters in relation to coal gas are proven to be promising. PMID:27297664

  16. Piling Up Pillar[5]arenes To Self-Assemble Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Nierengarten, Iwona; Guerra, Sebastiano; Ben Aziza, Haifa; Holler, Michel; Abidi, Rym; Barberá, Joaquín; Deschenaux, Robert; Nierengarten, Jean-François

    2016-04-25

    New liquid-crystalline pillar[5]arene derivatives have been prepared by grafting first-generation Percec-type poly(benzylether) dendrons onto the macrocyclic scaffold. The molecules adopt a disc-shaped structure perfectly suited for self-organization into a columnar liquid-crystalline phase. In this way, the pillar[5]arene cores are piled up, thus forming a nanotubular wire encased within a shell of peripheral dendrons. The capability of pillar[5]arenes to form inclusion complexes has been also exploited. Specifically, detailed binding studies have been carried out in solution with 1,6-dicyanohexane as the guest. Inclusion complexes have also been prepared in the solid state. Supramolecular organization into the Colh mesophase has been deduced from X-ray diffraction data and found to be similar to that observed within the crystal lattice of a model inclusion complex prepared from 1,4-dimethoxypillar[5]arene and 1,6-dicyanohexane. PMID:26888329

  17. Fabrication of Pillar Shaped Electrode Arrays for Artificial Retinal Implants

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eui Tae; Seo, Jong-Mo; Woo, Se Joon; Zhou, Jing Ai; Chung, Hum; Kim, Sung June

    2008-01-01

    Polyimide has been widely applied to neural prosthetic devices, such as the retinal implants, due to its well-known biocompatibility and ability to be micropatterned. However, planar films of polyimide that are typically employed show a limited ability in reducing the distance between electrodes and targeting cell layers, which limits site resolution for effective multi-channel stimulation. In this paper, we report a newly designed device with a pillar structure that more effectively interfaces with the target. Electrode arrays were successfully fabricated and safely implanted inside the rabbit eye in suprachoroidal space. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) showed well-preserved pillar structures of the electrode without damage. Bipolar stimulation was applied through paired sites (6:1) and the neural responses were successfully recorded from several regions in the visual cortex. Electrically evoked cortical potential by the pillar electrode array stimulation were compared to visual evoked potential under full-field light stimulation.

  18. Gold-Tipped Elastomeric Pillars for Cellular Mechanotransduction

    PubMed Central

    Ghassemi, S.; Rossier, O.; Sheetz, M. P.; Wind, S. J.; Hone, J.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a technique for the fabrication of arrays of elastomeric pillars whose top surfaces are treated with selective chemical functionalization to promote cellular adhesion in cellular force transduction experiments. The technique involves the creation of a rigid mold consisting of arrays of circular holes into which a thin layer of Au is deposited while the top surface of the mold and the sidewalls of the holes are protected by a sacrificial layer of Cr. When an elastomer is formed in the mold, the Au adheres to the tops of the molded pillars. This can then be selectively functionalized with a protein that induces cell adhesion, while the rest of the surface is treated with a repellent substance. An additional benefit is that the tops of the pillars can be fluorescently labeled for improved accuracy in force transduction measurements. PMID:20526428

  19. Rattles of Clay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banning, Donna

    1983-01-01

    Using the rattles of Native American cultures as inspiration, students used pinching, coiling, and slab and molding techniques to form the bodies of rattles and clay pellets for sound. Surface decoration included glazed and unglazed areas as well as added handles, feathers, and leather. (IS)

  20. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Part of the 2000 annual review of the industrial minerals sector. A general overview of the common clay and shale industry is provided. In 2000, U.S. production increased by 5 percent, while sales or use declined to 23.6 Mt. Despite the slowdown in the economy, no major changes are expected for the market.

  1. Clay Mineral Preferred Orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day-Stirrat, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Anisotropy of the orientation of clay minerals, often referred to as texture, may be unique to sediments' deposition, composition, deformation or diagenetic history. The literature is rich with studies that include preferred orientation generation in fault gouge, low-grade metamorphic rocks, sediments with variable clay content and during the smectite-to-illite transformation. Untangling the interplay between many competing factors in any one geologic situation has proven a significant challenge over many years. Understanding how, where and when clay minerals develop a preferred orientation has significant implications for permeability anisotropy in shallow burial, the way mechanical properties are projected from shallower to deeper settings in basin modeling packages and the way velocity anisotropy is accounted for in seismic data processing. The assessment of the anisotropic properties of fine-grained siliciclastic rocks is gaining significant momentum in rock physics research. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of how clay minerals develop a preferred orientation in space and time is crucial to the understanding of anisotropy of physical properties. The current study brings together a wealth of data that may be used in a predictive sense to account for fabric anisotropy that may impact any number of rock properties.

  2. Deformation mechanisms in nanoscale single crystalline electroplated copper pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Andrew T.

    Scientific research in nanotechnology has enabled advances in a diverse range of applications, such as: electronics, chemical sensing, and cancer treatment. In order to transition these nanotechnology-driven innovations out of the laboratory and into real-world applications, the resilience and mechanical reliability of nanoscale structures must be well understood in order to preserve functionality under real-world operating environments. Understanding the mechanical properties of nanoscale materials is especially important because several authors have shown that single crystalline metal pillars produced through focused-ion-beam milling have unique properties when the pillar diameter, D, approaches nanotechnology-relevant dimensions. The strength, sigma, of these pillars is size-dependent and is well described through a power-law relation showing that smaller is stronger: sigma∝D-n , where n is the exponent and is found to be 0.5≤n≤1.0 in face-centered-cubic metals. In this work, the fundamental deformation mechanisms governing the size-dependent mechanical properties are investigated through uniaxial compression and tension tests of electroplated single crystalline copper pillars with diameters between 75 nm and 1000 nm. At larger pillar diameters, D >125 nm, these copper pillars are shown to obey a similar size-dependent regime, demonstrating that the "smaller is stronger" phenomenon is a function of the pillar microstructure, as opposed to the fabrication route. Furthermore, the dominant dislocation mechanism in this size-dependent regime is shown to be the result of single-arm, or spiral, sources. At smaller pillar diameters, D≤125 nm, a strain-rate-dependent mechanism transition is observed through both the size-strength relation and also quantitative, experimental measures of the activation volume. This new deformation regime is characterized by a size-independent strength and is governed by surface dislocation nucleation, a thermally activated

  3. Activation-Enabled Syntheses of Functionalized Pillar[5]arene Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Han, Jie; Hou, Xisen; Ke, Chenfeng; Zhang, Huacheng; Strutt, Nathan L; Stern, Charlotte L; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2015-07-01

    A series of regioselective di- and trifunctionalized pillar[5]arene derivatives have been synthesized by a deprotection-followed-by-activation strategy, and their constitutions have been established as a result of having access to their solid-state structures. De-O-methylation occurs in a stepwise manner at lower temperatures under kinetic control, affording the desired oligo-substituted pillar[5]arene derivatives. In addition, the regioisomers of these derivatives can be isolated by installing triflate groups on the free hydroxyl groups. PMID:26083303

  4. Quantum-dot-induced phase shift in a pillar microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Young, A. B.; Hu, C. Y.; Rarity, J. G.; Oulton, R.; Thijssen, A. C. T.; Schneider, C.; Reitzenstein, S.; Kamp, M.; Hoefling, S.; Worschech, L.; Forchel, A.

    2011-07-15

    We perform high-resolution reflection spectroscopy of a quantum dot resonantly coupled to a pillar microcavity. We show the change in reflectivity as the quantum dot is tuned through the cavity resonance and measure the quantum-dot-induced phase shift using an ultrastable interferometer. The macroscopic phase shift we measure could be extended to the study of charged quantum dot pillar microcavity systems, where it could be exploited to realize a high-efficiency spin photon interface for hybrid quantum information schemes.

  5. Clay Animals and Their Habitats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, Kay

    2010-01-01

    Creating clay animals and their habitats with second-grade students has long been one of the author's favorite classroom activities. Students love working with clay and they also enjoy drawing animal homes. In this article, the author describes how the students created a diorama instead of drawing their clay animal's habitat. This gave students…

  6. Eco-Friendly Magnetic Iron Oxide Pillared Montmorillonite for Advanced Catalytic Degradation of Dichlorophenol

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eco-friendly pillared montmorillonites, in which the pillars consist of iron oxide are expected to have interesting and unusual magnetic properties that are applicable for environmental decontamination. Completely “green” and effective composite was synthesized using mild reactio...

  7. Pillars of Progress. Lumina Foundation Focus. Spring 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, David S., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs) often go above and beyond the call of duty to encourage engagement and provide support to traditionally underrepresented students. This issue of Lumina Foundation Focus magazine, titled "Pillars of progress," examines MSIs and their efforts to maximize student success. Following the President's Message, In…

  8. Superhydrophobic Analyte Concentration Utilizing Colloid-Pillar Array SERS Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Ryan A.; Charlton, Jennifer J.; Kirchner, Teresa B.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Datskos, Panos G.; Sepaniak, Michael J.

    2014-11-04

    In order to detect a few molecules present in a large sample it is important to know the trace components in the medicinal and environmental sample. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a technique that can be utilized to detect molecules at very low absolute numbers. However, detection at trace concentration levels in real samples requires properly designed delivery and detection systems. Moreover, the following work involves superhydrophobic surfaces that includes silicon pillar arrays formed by lithographic and dewetting protocols. In order to generate the necessary plasmonic substrate for SERS detection, simple and flow stable Ag colloid was added to the functionalized pillar array system via soaking. The pillars are used native and with hydrophobic modification. The pillars provide a means to concentrate analyte via superhydrophobic droplet evaporation effects. A 100-fold concentration of analyte was estimated, with a limit of detection of 2.9 10-12 M for mitoxantrone dihydrochloride. Additionally, analytes were delivered to the surface via a multiplex approach in order to demonstrate an ability to control droplet size and placement for scaled-up applications in real world applications. Finally, a concentration process involving transport and sequestration based on surface treatment selective wicking is demonstrated.

  9. Mine flooding and barrier pillar hydrology in the Pittsburgh basin

    SciTech Connect

    Leavitt, B.R.

    1999-07-01

    Pennsylvania began requiring barrier pillars between mines as early as 1930. The Ashley formula, resulting from a early commission on the problem, requires 20 feet of coal plus a thickness of coal equal to four times the seam height plus an additional thickness of coal equal to one tenth of the overburden thickness, or the maximum potential hydraulic head. For a 6-foot thick coal seam under 400 feet of cover, the barrier would be 20+24+40=84 feet. The Ashley formula is intended to protect coal miners from a catastrophic failure of a barrier pillar which has a high head of water impounded behind it. The paper gives several examples of flooded and unflooded mines and the performance of their barrier pillars with respect to acid mine drainage. It is concluded that for all practical purposes, barrier pillars designed with the Ashley formula are able to hydrologically isolate mines from one another. This hydrologic isolation promotes the inundation of closed mines. Inundation effectively stops acid formation, thus, fully inundated mines do not represent a perpetual source of acid mine drainage. Infiltrating ground water improves the mine water chemistry resulting in a net alkaline discharge which has greatly lowered iron concentrations. The best locations for acid mine drainage treatment plants is at the lowest surface elevation above the mine with mine flooded to near that elevation.

  10. Identification of markers closely linked to the peach "pillar" gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch], trees showing columnar (also termed "pillar" or "broomy") growth habit are of interest of high density production systems. However, in early breeding stages, the selection by this phenotype is very difficult, as the trait is recessively inherited and heterozyg...