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Sample records for modified unex group

  1. Effect of Unex on ethylene glycol-induced urolithiasis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jarald, Elias Edwin; Kushwah, Pankaj; Edwin, Sheeja; Asghar, Suhail; Patni, Showkat Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of the Unex capsule on albino rats as a preventive agent against the development of kidney stones. The Unex capsule is a marketed product of Unijules Life Sciences, Nagpur, containing the extracts of Boerhaavia diffusa and Tribulus terrestris. Activity of Unex was studied using the ethylene glycol-induced urolithiasis model. Standard drug used was Cystone. Several parameters were used including urinary volume, urine pH, urine analysis, and serum analysis to assess the activity. The results indicated that the administration of Unex to rats with ethylene glycol-induced lithiasis significantly reduced and prevented the growth of urinary stones (P < 0.01). Also, the treatment of lithiasis-induced rats by Unex restored all the elevated biochemical parameters (creatinine, uric acid, and blood urea nitrogen), restored the urine pH to normal, and increased the urine volume significantly (P < 0.01) when compared to the model control drug. This study supports the usage of Unex in urolithiasis and the utility could further be confirmed in other animal models. PMID:21845008

  2. FUNDAMENTAL CHEMISTRY OF THE UNIVERSAL EXTRACTANT (UNEX) FOR THE SIMULTANEOUS SEPARATION OF FISSION PRODUCTS AND TRANSURANICS FROM HIGH-LEVEL WASTE STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Collaborative research by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and the Khlopin Radium Institute (St. Petersburg, Russia) has already developed and validated the concept of a Universal Extraction (UNEX) solvent for simultaneously removing radioactive stronti...

  3. DIAMIDE DERIVATIVES OF DIPICOLINIC ACID AS ACTINIDE AND LANTHANIDE EXTRACTANTS IN A VARIATION OF THE UNEX PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    D. R. Peterman; R. S. Herbst; J. D. Law; R. D. Tillotson; T. G. Garn; T. A. Todd; V. N. Romanovskiy; V. A. Babain; M. Yu. Alyapyshev; I. V. Smirnov

    2007-09-01

    The Universal Extraction (UNEX) process has been developed for simultaneous extraction of cesium, strontium, and actinides from acidic solutions. This process utilizes an extractant consisting of 0.08 M chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide (HCCD), 0.007-0.02 M polyethylene glycol (PEG-400), and 0.02 M diphenyl-N,N-di-n-butylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (Ph2CMPO) in the diluent trifluoromethylphenyl sulfone (CF3C6H5SO2, designated FS-13) and provides simultaneous extraction of Cs, Sr, actinides, and lanthanides from HNO3 solutions. The UNEX process is of limited utility for processing acidic solutions containing large quantities of lanthanides and/or actinides, such as dissolved spent nuclear fuel solutions. These constraints are primarily attributed to the limited concentrations of CMPO (a maximum of ~0.02 M) in the organic phase and limited solubility of the CMPO-metal complexes. As a result, alternative actinide and lanthanide extractants are being investigated for use with HCCD as an improvement for waste processing and for applications where higher concentrations of the metals are present. Our preliminary results indicate that diamide derivatives of dipicolinic acid may function as efficient actinide and lanthanide extractants. The results to be presented indicate that, of the numerous diamides studied to date, the tetrabutyldiamide of dipicolinic acid, TBDPA, shows the most promise as an alternative actinide/lanthanide extractant in the UNEX process.

  4. Improving Student Group Marketing Presentations: A Modified Pecha Kucha Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Jason; Kowalczyk, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Student presentations can often seem like a formality rather than a lesson in representing oneself or group in a professional manner. To improve the quality of group presentations, the authors modified the popular presentation style of Pecha Kucha (20 slides, 20 seconds per slide) for marketing courses to help students prepare and deliver…

  5. Position of modifying groups on starch chains of octenylsuccinic anhydride-modified waxy maize starch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Octenylsuccinic anhydride (OSA)-modified starches with degree of substitution of 0.018 (OS-S-L) and 0.092 (OS-S-H) were prepared from granular native waxy maize starch in an aqueous slurry system. The substitution distribution of OS groups was investigated by enzyme hydrolysis followed by chromatogr...

  6. In vitro apatite formation on polyamide containing carboxyl groups modified with silanol groups.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Takahiro; Ohtsuki, Chikara; Kamitakahara, Masanobu; Hosoya, Kayo; Tanihara, Masao; Miyazaki, Toshiki; Sakaguchi, Yoshimitsu; Konagaya, Shigeji

    2007-06-01

    Modification of organic polymer with silanol groups in combination with calcium salts enables the polymer to show bioactivity, that is, the polymer forms apatite on its surface after exposure to body environment. However, how modification with silanol groups influences ability of apatite formation on the polymer substrate and adhesive strength between polymer and apatite is not yet known. In the present study, polyamide containing carboxyl groups was modified with different amounts of silanol groups, and its apatite-forming ability in 1.5SBF, which contained ion concentrations 1.5 times those of simulated body fluid (SBF), was examined. The rate of apatite formation increased with increasing content of silanol groups in the polyamide films. This may be attributed to enhancement of dipole interactions. A tendency for the adhesive strength of the apatite layer on the polyamide film to be decreased with increasing content of silanol groups was observed. This may be attributed to swelling in 1.5SBF and having a high degree of shrinkage after drying. These findings clearly show that modification of organic polymers with the functional groups induces apatite deposition, and also determines the adhesive strength of the apatite layer to the organic substrates. PMID:17243002

  7. Position of modifying groups on starch chains of octenylsuccinic anhydride-modified waxy maize starch.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yanjie; Kaufman, Rhett C; Wilson, Jeff D; Shi, Yong-Cheng

    2014-06-15

    Octenylsuccinic anhydride (OSA)-modified starches with a low (0.018) and high (0.092) degree of substitution (DS) were prepared from granular native waxy maize starch in aqueous slurry. The position of OS substituents along the starch chains was investigated by enzyme hydrolysis followed by chromatographic analysis. Native starch and two OS starches with a low and high DS had β-limit values of 55.9%, 52.8%, and 34.4%, respectively. The weight-average molecular weight of the β-limit dextrin from the OS starch with a low DS was close to that of the β-limit dextrin from native starch but lower than that of the β-limit dextrin from the OS starch with a high DS. Debranching of OS starches was incomplete compared with native starch. OS groups in the OS starch with a low DS were located on the repeat units near the branching points, whereas the OS substituents in the OS starch with a high DS occurred both near the branching points and the non-reducing ends. PMID:24491720

  8. Demonstration of the UNEX Process for the Simultaneous Separation of Cesium, Strontium, and the Actinides from Actual INEEL Sodium-Bearing Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Jack Douglas; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Todd, Terry Allen; Romanovskiy, V.; Smirnov, I.; Babain, V.; Zaitsev, B.; Esimantovskiy, V.

    1999-11-01

    A universal solvent extraction (UNEX) process for the simultaneous separation of cesium, strontium, and the actinides from actual radioactive acidic tank waste was demonstrated at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The waste solution used in the countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was obtained from tank WM-185. The UNEX process uses a tertiary solvent containing 0.08 M chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, 0.5% polyethylene glycol-400 (PEG-400), and 0.02 M diphenyl-N,N-dibutylcarbamoyl phosphine oxide (Ph2Bu2CMPO) in a diluent consisting of phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone (FS-13). The countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was performed in a shielded cell facility using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors. Removal efficiencies of 99.4%, 99.995%, and 99.96% were obtained for 137Cs, 90Sr, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of 137Cs, 90Sr, and actinides in the WM-185 waste to below NRC Class A LLW requirements. Flooding and/or precipitate formation were not observed during testing. Significant amounts of the Zr (87%), Ba (>99%), Pb (98.8%), Fe (8%), Ca (10%), Mo (32%), and K (28%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet. 99Tc, Al, Hg, and Na were essentially inextractable (<1% extracted).

  9. A facile method to modify carbon nanotubes with nitro/amino groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Feng, Shouai; Zhao, Jianghong; Zheng, Jianfeng; Wang, Zhijian; Li, Li; Zhu, Zhenping

    2010-08-01

    Nitro groups (-NO 2) have been introduced on the surface of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by treatment with a mixture of concentrated H 2SO 4/HNO 3 solution at low temperature (60 °C). Such a low-temperature treatment simultaneously can well prevent MWCNTs from the structural damage. From the nitro-modified MWCNTs, MWCNTs can be readily modified with amino groups by reduction of nitro groups. The prepared amino-modified MWCNTs are highly soluble in polar solvents such as dimethylformamide (DMF), alcohol and acetone. Further, as a demonstration, MWCNTs can be functionalized with guest objects, provided by the strong bonding ability of amino groups.

  10. Group theoretical interpretation of the modified gravity in de Sitter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghani, M.

    2016-03-01

    A framework has been presented for theoretical interpretation of various modified gravitational models which is based on the group theoretical approach and unitary irreducible representations (UIR's) of de Sitter (dS) group. In order to illustrate the application of the proposed method, a model of modified gravity has been investigated. The background field method has been utilized and the linearized modified gravitational field equation has been obtained in the 4-dimensional dS space-time as the background. The field equation has been written as the eigne-value equation of the Casimir operators of dS space using the flat 5-dimensional ambient space notations. The Minkowskian correspondence of the theory has been obtained by taking the zero curvature limit. It has been shown that under some simple conditions, the linearized modified field equation transforms according to two of the UIR's of dS group labeled by Π 2,1 ± and Π 2,2 ± in the discrete series. It means that the proposed modified gravitational theory can be a suitable one to describe the quantum gravitational effects in its linear approximation on dS space. The field equation has been solved and the solution has been written as the multiplication of a symmetric rank-2 polarization tensor and a massless scalar field using the ambient space notations. Also the two-point function has been calculated in the ambient space formalism. It is dS invariant and free of any theoretical problems.

  11. A Modified Frequency Estimation Equating Method for the Common-Item Nonequivalent Groups Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Tianyou; Brennan, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    Frequency estimation, also called poststratification, is an equating method used under the common-item nonequivalent groups design. A modified frequency estimation method is proposed here, based on altering one of the traditional assumptions in frequency estimation in order to correct for equating bias. A simulation study was carried out to…

  12. KEY ISSUES FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF THE ALLERGENIC POTENTIAL OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOODS: BREAKOUT GROUP REPORTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    On the final afternoon of the Workshop, Assessment of the Allergenic Potential of Genetically Modified Foods, speakers and participants met in breakout groups to discuss specific questions in the areas of 1) Use of Human Clinical Data; 2) Animal Models to Assess Food ...

  13. Key issues for the assessment of the allergenic potential of genetically modified foods: breakout group reports.

    PubMed Central

    Germolec, Dori R; Kimber, Ian; Goldman, Lynn; Selgrade, MaryJane

    2003-01-01

    On the final afternoon of the workshop "Assessment of the Allergenic Potential of Genetically Modified Foods," held 10-12 December 2001 in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, speakers and participants met in breakout groups to discuss specific questions in the areas of use of human clinical data, animal models to assess food allergy, biomarkers of exposure and effect, sensitive populations, dose-response assessment, and postmarket surveillance. Each group addressed general questions regarding allergenicity of genetically modified foods and specific questions for each subject area. This article is a brief summary of the discussions of each of the six breakout groups regarding our current state of knowledge and what information is needed to advance the field. PMID:12826486

  14. The synthesis of monomers with pendent ethynyl group for modified high performance thermoplastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nwokogu, Godson C.; Antoine, Miquel D.; Ansong, Omari

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to develop synthetic schemes for the following classes of modified monomers: (1) difunctional triarylethanes with pendent acetylenic groups; and (2) tertiary aspartimides with terminal acetylene groups at the two ends. Our efforts have resulted in the successful development of high yield schemes for the syntheses of several diamino and bisphenolic analogs of difunctional triarylethanes with pendent ethynyl group. A scheme for one new tertiary aspartimide was also established. Multi-gram samples of all prepared new monomers were provided to our technical contact at NASA-LaRC and preliminary polymerization studies were encouraging. Details of the accomplished work within the last four years are described.

  15. Group size modifies the patterns and muscle carbohydrate effects of aggression in Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Haller, J

    1992-08-01

    Aggressive encounters of previously isolated individuals were investigated in dyads and groups of five. Fights were longer and more intense when they were performed in dyads compared to fights involving five fishes. During aggressive encounters, an elevation in carbohydrate catabolism was noticed in both dyads and groups. Losing a fight resulted in a reduction in glycogen content and an increase in glycogen synthesis. Similar changes in winners did not appear; thus, the metabolic response in losers was different from that noticed in winners, both in dyads and groups. In dyadic contest winners, a marked increase in the free glucose content and glucose consumption was noticed (without changes in losers). In groups, free glucose content of the winners was not modified, while glucose consumption was enhanced both in winners and losers. Thus, the differences existing between winners and losers were greater in dyads compared to those noticed in groups. The energy cost of aggression seems to be different in dyads compared to groups of five. The rate of glucose oxidation was strongly reduced in dyads (there were no differences between winners and losers in this respect), while in groups, this parameter was not modified. PMID:1523255

  16. Nanocomposites prepared from acrylonitrile butadiene rubber and organically modified montmorillonite with vinyl groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Mijeong; Kim, Hoonjung; Kim, Eunkyoung

    2006-01-01

    Nanocomposites were prepared from acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR), vinyl groups containing organically modified montmorillonite and additives, such as zinc oxide, stearic acid, and sulfur. The organically modified montmorillonites used in these nanocomposites were prepared by ion exchange reactions of N,N'-dimethylalkyl-(p-vinylbenzyl)-ammonium chlorides (DAVBAs, alkyl = octyl, dodecyl, and octadecyl) with sodium montmorillonite (Na+-MMT). NBR nanocomposites were obtained by controlling both the mixing and vulcanization conditions, by using a Brabender mixer and hot-press process. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows that, depending on the amount of montmorillonite that is added, both exfoliated and intercalated nanocomposite structures are formed. The NBR/DAVBA-MMT nanocomposites exhibit much higher mechanical properties (e.g., tensile strength, Young's modulus, 300% modulus, and hardness) as well as gas barrier properties as compared to NBR Na+-MMT or NBR composites generated from modified montmorillonites without vinyl groups. Consistent with the results of XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that the intercalation and exfoliation structures of the nanocomposites coexist and that the DAVBA-MMT layers are well dispersed in NBR.

  17. The Electrical Properties for Phenolic Isocyanate-Modified Bisphenol-Based Epoxy Resins Comprising Benzoate Group.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Yong; Chae, Il Seok; Park, Dongkyung; Suh, Hongsuk; Kang, Sang Wook

    2016-03-01

    Epoxy resin has been required to have a low dielectric constant (D(k)), low dissipation factor (Df), low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), low water absorption, high mechanical, and high adhesion properties for various applications. A series of novel phenolic isocyanate-modified bisphenol-based epoxy resins comprising benzoate group were prepared for practical electronic packaging applications. The developed epoxy resins showed highly reduced dielectric constants (D(k)-3.00 at 1 GHz) and low dissipation values (Df-0.014 at 1 GHz) as well as enhanced thermal properties. PMID:27455751

  18. Long range ordered alloys modified by group IV-B metals

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chain T.; Inouye, Henry; Schaffhauser, Anthony C.

    1983-01-01

    Ductile long range ordered alloys having high critical ordering temperatures exist in the (V,M)(Fe,Ni,Co).sub.3 system having the composition comprising by weight 20.6%-22.6% V, 14-50% Fe, 0-64% Co, and 0-40% Ni, and 0.4-1.4% M, where M is a metal selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf, and their mixtures. These modified alloys have an electron density no greater than 8.00 and exhibit marked increases at elevated temperature in ductility and other mechanical properties over previously known ordered alloys.

  19. Geometric and Electronic Properties of Graphene Modified by “External” N-Containing Groups

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xinde; Cai, Qiuxia; Zhuang, Guilin; Zhong, Xing; Mei, Donghai; Li, Xiaonian; Wang, Jianguo

    2014-10-14

    By means of the first-principles spin polarized density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we investigated structures and electronic properties of “external” nitrogen-containing groups (pyridine derivatives) modified graphene via single or double bonding mode. This study of single-bond pyridine derivatives modified graphene (SBPG) shows that the ortho-carbon is the most favorable adsorption site for pyridine derivatives on graphene, as confirmed by bader charge analysis. The external stability of pyridine derivatives on graphene by [2+2] cycloaddition is caused by the match between frontier orbitals of pyridine derivatives and those of graphene, which leading to the formation of stronger chemical bonds. Interestingly, electronic structure analysis reveals that the spin-up and spin-down parts DOS of SBPG clearly split, while it is not found for double-bonds pyridine derivatives modified graphene (DBPG). This work was supported by the 973 project (2013CB733501) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China ( 21101137, 21136001, 21176221, 21306169 and 91334013). D. Mei is supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle.

  20. Group Invariance Properties of the Inviscid Compressible Flow Equations for a Modified Tait Equation of State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, Scott; Baty, Roy

    2015-11-01

    This work considers the group invariance properties of the inviscid compressible flow equations (Euler equations) under the assumptions of one-dimensional symmetry and a modified Tait equation of state (EOS) closure model. When written in terms of an adiabatic bulk modulus, a transformed version of these equations is found to be identical to that for an ideal gas EOS. As a result, the Lie group invariance structure of these equations - and their subsequent reduction to a lower-order system - is identical to the published results for the ideal gas case. Following the reduction of the Euler equations to a system of ordinary differential equations, a variety of elementary closed-form solutions are derived. These solutions are then used in conjunction with the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions to construct discontinuous shock wave and free surface solutions that are analogous to the classical Noh, Sedov, Guderley, and Hunter similarity solutions of the Euler equations for an ideal gas EOS. The versions of these problems for the modified Tait EOS are found to be semi-analytic in that a transcendental root extraction (and in some cases numerical integration of ordinary differential equations) enables solution of the relevant equations.

  1. The Use of a Modified Marathon in Conjunction with Group Counseling in Short-term Treatment of Alcoholics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gazda, G. M.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Two conclusions drawn from the application of the modified marathon to a short term treatment center were that the modified marathon had the advantages of holding" alcoholics for treatment once they were sober and it enhanced the quality of typical group counseling and therapy treatment. (Author)

  2. Impact modification of polyamide 11 by the reactive blending with epoxy group modified polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Oono, Yuko; Li, Yongjin; Nakayama, Kazuo; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2006-12-01

    Polyamide 11 (PA11) and epoxy group modified polyethylene (EGMA) were melt-blended in a segment mixer at 230 degrees C. The reactive nature of the blend is reflected in the mixing torque behavior of the blend at different compositions. The dynamic mechanical analysis reveals shifted glass transition temperatures for both PAl 1 and EGMA, indicating the improved miscibility by the reactive blending. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows that EGMA is precisely dispersed in PAl 1 matrix with the domain size of several hundred nanometers for the reactive blends. The mechanical properties were also measured for the obtained material and it exhibits greatly improved impact strength as compared with the neat PA11. In addition, the toughening mechanism for the blend system was also studied. PMID:17256352

  3. Modified H-statistic with adaptive Winsorized mean in two groups test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teh, Kian Wooi; Abdullah, Suhaida; Yahaya, Sharipah Soaad Syed; Yusof, Zahayu Md

    2014-06-01

    t-test is a commonly used test statistics when comparing two independent groups. The computation of this test is simple yet it is powerful under normal distribution and equal variance dataset. However, in real life data, sometimes it is hard to get dataset which has this package. The violation of assumptions (normality and equal variances) will give the devastating effect on the Type I error rate control to the t-test. On the same time, the statistical power also will be reduced. Therefore in this study, the adaptive Winsorised mean with hinge estimator in H-statistic (AWM-H) is proposed. The H-statistic is one of the robust statistics that able to handle the problem of nonnormality in comparing independent group. This procedure originally used Modified One-step M (MOM) estimator which employed trimming process. In the AWM-H procedure, the MOM estimator is replaced with the adaptive Winsorized mean (AWM) as the central tendency measure of the test. The Winsorization process is based on hinge estimator HQ or HQ1. Overall results showed that the proposed method performed better than the original method and the classical method especially under heavy tailed distribution.

  4. Multinuclear group 4 catalysis: olefin polymerization pathways modified by strong metal-metal cooperative effects.

    PubMed

    McInnis, Jennifer P; Delferro, Massimiliano; Marks, Tobin J

    2014-08-19

    homogeneous and heterogeneous systems, macromolecules with dramatically altered properties, and large-scale industrial processes. It is noteworthy that many metalloenzymes employ multiple active centers operating in close synergistic proximity to achieve high activity and selectivity. Such enzymes were the inspiration for the research discussed in this Account, focused on the properties of multimetallic olefin polymerization catalysts. Here we discuss how modifications in organic ligand architecture, metal···metal proximity, and cocatalyst can dramatically modify polyolefin molecular weight, branch structure, and selectively for olefinic comonomer enchainment. We first discuss bimetallic catalysts with identical group 4 metal centers and then heterobimetallic systems with either group 4 or groups 4 + 6 catalytic centers. We compare and contrast the polymerization properties of the bimetallic catalysts with their monometallic analogues, highlighting marked cooperative enchainment effects and unusual polymeric products possible via the proximate catalytic centers. Such multinuclear olefin polymerization catalysts exhibit the following distinctive features: (1) unprecedented levels of polyolefin branching; (2) enhanced enchainment selectivity for linear and encumbered α-olefin comonomers; (3) enhanced polyolefin tacticity and molecular weight; (4) unusual 1,2-insertion regiochemistry for styrenic monomers; (5) modified chain transfer kinetics, such as M-polymer β-hydride transfer to the metal or incoming monomer; (6) LLDPE synthesis with a single binuclear catalyst and ethylene. PMID:25075755

  5. Genetic modifiers of ambulation in the cooperative international Neuromuscular research group Duchenne natural history study

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Luca; Kesari, Akanchha; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Cnaan, Avital; Morgenroth, Lauren P; Punetha, Jaya; Duong, Tina; Henricson, Erik K; Pegoraro, Elena; McDonald, Craig M; Hoffman, Eric P

    2015-01-01

    Objective We studied the effects of LTBP4 and SPP1 polymorphisms on age at loss of ambulation (LoA) in a multiethnic Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) cohort. Methods We genotyped SPP1 rs28357094 and LTBP4 haplotype in 283 of 340 participants in the Cooperative International Neuromuscular Research Group Duchenne Natural History Study (CINRG-DNHS). Median ages at LoA were compared by Kaplan–Meier analysis and log-rank test. We controlled polymorphism analyses for concurrent effects of glucocorticoid corticosteroid (GC) treatment (time-varying Cox regression) and for population stratification (multidimensional scaling of genome-wide markers). Results Hispanic and South Asian participants (n = 18, 41) lost ambulation 2.7 and 2 years earlier than Caucasian subjects (p = 0.003, <0.001). The TG/GG genotype at SPP1 rs28357094 was associated to 1.2-year-earlier median LoA (p = 0.048). This difference was greater (1.9 years, p = 0.038) in GC-treated participants, whereas no difference was observed in untreated subjects. Cox regression confirmed a significant effect of SPP1 genotype in GC-treated participants (hazard ratio = 1.61, p = 0.016). LTBP4 genotype showed a direction of association with age at LoA as previously reported, but it was not statistically significant. After controlling for population stratification, we confirmed a strong effect of LTBP4 genotype in Caucasians (2.4 years, p = 0.024). Median age at LoA with the protective LTBP4 genotype in this cohort was 15.0 years, 16.0 for those who were treated with GC. Interpretation SPP1 rs28357094 acts as a pharmacodynamic biomarker of GC response, and LTBP4 haplotype modifies age at LoA in the CINRG-DNHS cohort. Adjustment for GC treatment and population stratification appears crucial in assessing genetic modifiers in DMD. PMID:25641372

  6. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Largazole Analogues with Modified Surface Recognition Cap Groups

    PubMed Central

    Bhansali, Pravin; Hanigan, Christin L.; Perera, Lalith; Casero, Robert A.; Viranga Tillekeratne, L. M.

    2014-01-01

    Several largazole analogues with modified surface recognition cap groups were synthesized and their HDAC inhibitory activities were determined. The C7-epimer 12 caused negligible inhibition of HDAC activity, failed to induce global histone 3 (H3) acetylation in the HCT116 colorectal cancer cell line and demonstrated minimal effect on growth. Although previous studies have shown some degree of tolerance of structural changes at C7 position of largazole, these data show the negative effect of conformational change accompanying change of configuration at this position. Similarly, analogue 16a with D-1-naphthylmethyl side chain at C2 too had negligible inhibition of HDAC activity, failed to induce global histone 3 (H3) acetylation in the HCT116 colorectal cancer cell line and demonstrated minimal effect on growth. In contrast, the L-allyl analogue 16b and the L-1-naphthylmethyl analogue 16c were potent HDAC inhibitors, showing robust induction of global H3 acetylation and significant effect on cell growth. The data suggest that even bulky substituents are tolerated at this position, provided the stereochemistry at C2 is retained. With bulky substituents, inversion of configuration at C2 results in loss of inhibitory activity. The activity profiles of 16b and 16c on Class I HDAC1 vs Class II HDAC6 are similar to those of largazole and, taken together with x-ray crystallography information of HDAC8-largazole complex, may suggest that the C2 position of largazole is not a suitable target for structural optimization to achieve isoform selectivity. The results of these studies may guide the synthesis of more potent and selective HDAC inhibitors. PMID:25203782

  7. Bioactive polymethylmethacrylate bone cement modified with combinations of phosphate group-containing monomers and calcium acetate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinkun; Shirosaki, Yuki; Miyazaki, Toshiki

    2015-04-01

    Bone cement from polymethylmethacrylate powder and methylmethacrylate liquid has been successfully demonstrated as artificial material to anchor joint replacements in bone. However, it lacks the capability to bond directly to bone, so long-term implantation leads to an increased risk of loosening. Bioactive materials show better performance in fixation to bone, and the chemical bonding depends on bone-like apatite formation. This is triggered by surface reactions with body fluid. For these reactions, superficial functional groups like silanol (Si-OH) are ideal sites to induce apatite nucleation and the release of Ca(2+) ions accelerates the apatite growth. Therefore, incorporation of materials containing these key components may provide the cement with apatite-forming ability. In this study, phosphoric acid 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate ester or bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate supplying a phosphate group (PO4H2) was added into methylmethacrylate liquid, while calcium acetate as a source of Ca(2+) ions was mixed into polymethylmethacrylate powder. The influences of the combinations on the setting time and compressive strength were also investigated. Apatite was formed on the cements modified with 30 mass% of phosphoric acid 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate ester or bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate. The induction period was shortened with increased amounts of Ca(CH3COO)2. The setting time could be controlled by the Ca(CH3COO)2/monomer mass ratio. Faster setting was achieved at a ratio close to the mixing ratio of the powder/liquid (2:1), and both increases and decreases in the amount of Ca(CH3COO)2 prolonged the setting time based on this ratio. The highest compressive strength was 88.8 ± 2.6 MPa, higher than the lowest limit of ISO 5833 but was lower than that of the simulated body fluid-soaked reference. The increase of additives caused the decline in compressive strength. In view of balancing apatite formation and clinical standard, bis[2

  8. Process for depositing thin film layers onto surfaces modified with organic functional groups and products formed thereby

    DOEpatents

    Tarasevich, B.J.; Rieke, P.C.

    1998-06-02

    A method is provided for producing a thin film product, comprising a first step in which an underlying substrate of a first material is provided. The underlying substrate includes a plurality of unmodified sites. The underlying substrate is then chemically modified wherein a plurality of organic functional groups are attached to a plurality of the unmodified sites. The arrangement and type of the functional group used can be selected for the purpose of controlling particular properties of the second material deposited. A thin film layer of at least one second material is then deposited onto the chemically modified underlying substrate. This can be accomplished by connecting the thin film to the underlying substrate by binding the thin film to the functional groups. 5 figs.

  9. Process for depositing thin film layers onto surfaces modified with organic functional groups and products formed thereby

    DOEpatents

    Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Rieke, Peter C.

    1998-01-01

    A method is provided for producing a thin film product, comprising a first step in which an underlying substrate of a first material is provided. The underlying substrate includes a plurality of unmodified sites. The underlying substrate is then chemically modified wherein a plurality of organic functional groups are attached to a plurality of the unmodified sites. The arrangement and type of the functional group used can be selected for the purpose of controlling particular properties of the second material deposited. A thin film layer of at least one second material is then deposited onto the chemically modified underlying substrate. This can be accomplished by connecting the thin film to the underlying substrate by binding the thin film to the functional groups.

  10. Defining Quality Criteria for Online Continuing Medical Education Modules Using Modified Nominal Group Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shortt, S. E. D.; Guillemette, Jean-Marc; Duncan, Anne Marie; Kirby, Frances

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The rapid increase in the use of the Internet for continuing education by physicians suggests the need to define quality criteria for accredited online modules. Methods: Continuing medical education (CME) directors from Canadian medical schools and academic researchers participated in a consensus process, Modified Nominal Group…

  11. Surface structures, photovoltages, and stability of n-Si(111) electrodes surface modified with metal nanodots and various organic groups.

    PubMed

    Takabayashi, Susumu; Ohashi, Masato; Mashima, Kazushi; Liu, Yang; Yamazaki, Shoko; Nakato, Yoshihiro

    2005-09-13

    The surface structures, photovoltages, and stability of n-Si(111) electrodes surface-modified with Pt nanodots and organic groups were studied in an I-/I3- redox electrolyte, using alkyls of varied chain length and those having a double bond and ester at the terminal as the organic groups. The n-Si was first modified with the organic groups, and then Pt was electrodeposited on it. Linear sweep voltammetry revealed that, for the modification with alkyls, the overvoltage for the Pt deposition became significantly larger with increasing alkyl chain length, though this does not necessarily hold for the modification with alkyls having a double bond and ester. Scanning electron microscopic inspection showed that the Pt particle density decreased and the particle size increased, with increasing alkyl chain length. The photovoltaic characteristics and stability for the n-Si electrodes modified with the organic groups were much improved by the Pt nanodot coating, though they became somewhat inferior with increasing alkyl chain length. On the basis of these results, it is concluded that surface alkylation at high coverage together with coating with small Pt nanodots gives efficient and stable n-Si electrodes. PMID:16142967

  12. Chemically modified polymeric resins for solid-phase extraction and group separation prior to analysis by liquid or gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, L.W.

    1993-07-01

    Polystyrene divinylbenzene was modified by acetyl, sulfonic acid, and quaternary ammonium groups. A resin functionalized with an acetyl group was impregnated in a PTFE membrane and used to extract and concentrate phenolic compounds from aqueous samples. The acetyl group created a surface easily wetted, making it an efficient adsorbent for polar compounds in water. The membrane stabilized the resin bed. Partially sulfonated high surface area resins are used to extract and group separate an aqueous mixture of neutral and basic organics; the bases are adsorbed electrostatically to the sulfonic acid groups, while the neutraons are adsorbed hydrophobically. A two-step elution is then used to separate the two fractions. A partially functionalized anion exchange resin is used to separate organic acids and phenols from neutrals in a similar way. Carboxylic acids are analyzed by HPLC and phenols by GC.

  13. "The children's feedback game": an approach for modifying disruptive group behavior.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Y M; Borduin, C M

    1984-01-01

    Adult leaders of groups for children are almost invariably confronted with the problem of disruptive child behavior. Although these adults are usually able to effect at least some level of child compliance, the achievement of such compliance often demands a considerable expenditure of time and forces the leader and children into an adversary relationship. An alternative approach toward disruptive group behavior avoids some of these difficulties by engaging the children themselves as agents of change. The "Children's Feedback Game" provides a mechanism for implementing peer-group modification of undesirable behavior. The game uses an incentive system to teach the children to give and to receive both positive and negative feedback. As these interpersonal skills are developed, group supportiveness and cooperation are enhanced and other group goals are more easily met. The game can be readily adapted to a variety of clinical and teaching situations that involve a group of children. PMID:6711711

  14. ABO blood grouping from hard and soft tissues of teeth by modified absorption-elution technique

    PubMed Central

    Ramnarayan, BK; Manjunath, M; Joshi, Anagha Ananth

    2013-01-01

    Background: Teeth have always been known as stable tissue that can be preserved both physically and chemically for long periods of time. Blood group substances have been known to be present in both the hard and soft tissues of the teeth. Objectives: This study aimed at detection of ABO blood group substances from soft and hard tissues of teeth and also to evaluate the reliability of teeth stored for a relatively long period as a source of blood group substances by absorption–elution technique with some modifications. Results: Blood group obtained from the teeth was compared with those obtained from the blood sample. Pulp showed a very large correlation in both fresh and long-standing teeth though it decreased slightly in the latter. Hard tissue showed a large correlation in both the groups indicating that hard tissue is quite reliable to detect blood group and that there is no much difference in the reliability in both the groups. However, combining pulp and hard tissue, correlation is moderate. Correlation of blood grouping with the age, sex, and jaw distribution was carried out. Conclusion: Blood group identification from hard and soft tissues of teeth aids in the identification of an individual. PMID:23960412

  15. Effect of carboxymethyl groups on degradation of modified pullulan by pullulanase from Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ghina; Rihouey, Christophe; Le Cerf, Didier; Picton, Luc

    2013-03-01

    Pullulanase is an enzyme that hydrolyses the α-1,6 linkages of pullulan (Pull) to produce maltotriose units. We studied the capacity of pullulanase to cleave its modified substrate: carboxymethylpullulan (CMPull), synthesized with two different degrees of substitution (DS=0.16 and 0.8). Size exclusion chromatography with on line multi angle light scattering and differential refractive index detection (SEC/MALS/DRI) was used to estimate both number and weight average molar masses, respectively, Mn and Mw, of pullulan and CMPulls together with the percentage of maltotriose formed during hydrolysis. Determination of reduced sugars gave also a Mn that is compared to data obtained by SEC. It revealed that CMPull is partially degraded by pullulanase and the rate of hydrolysis decreased with increased DS. At the end of the hydrolysis, Mn is decreased by a factor of 23 and 1.7 for CMPull with a DS of 0.16 and 0.8 respectively. The percentage of produced maltotriose decreased also when increasing DS (24% and 7% for CMPull DS 0.16 and 0.8 respectively). The kinetic properties of pullulanase were also investigated with Pull and CMPulls by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) using simple injection method. Based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics, Vmax (maximal velocity) decreased and KM (Michaelis constant) increased when DS of modified pullulan CMPull increased. PMID:23465908

  16. Modifying the ECC-based grouping-proof RFID system to increase inpatient medication safety.

    PubMed

    Ko, Wen-Tsai; Chiou, Shin-Yan; Lu, Erl-Huei; Chang, Henry Ker-Chang

    2014-09-01

    RFID technology is increasingly used in applications that require tracking, identification, and authentication. It attaches RFID-readable tags to objects for identification and execution of specific RFID-enabled applications. Recently, research has focused on the use of grouping-proofs for preserving privacy in RFID applications, wherein a proof of two or more tags must be simultaneously scanned. In 2010, a privacy-preserving grouping proof protocol for RFID based on ECC in public-key cryptosystem was proposed but was shown to be vulnerable to tracking attacks. A proposed enhancement protocol was also shown to have defects which prevented proper execution. In 2012, Lin et al. proposed a more efficient RFID ECC-based grouping proof protocol to promote inpatient medication safety. However, we found this protocol is also vulnerable to tracking and impersonation attacks. We then propose a secure privacy-preserving RFID grouping proof protocol for inpatient medication safety and demonstrate its resistance to such attacks. PMID:24997856

  17. Investigation hydrogen-bonding capabilities of modified amide groups using calculated nuclear quadruple coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmi, F.; Hadipour, N. L.; Safinezhad, F.

    2003-07-01

    Nuclear quadrupole coupling constants, χs, for 17 chemical species are calculated. These are retroamide, N-hydroxamide, N-amino amide, thioamide, methylamine and complexes which amide generates with retroamide and other modified amides. The charge distributions around quadrupolar nuclei are most affected upon intermolecular hydrogen bond formations. χs of these nuclei are computed using ab initio calculations. Some of our findings for average values of χs of 2H, 14N and 17O in hydrogen bonds are 200.00 kHz, 4.40 MHz and 10.50 MHz, respectively. There is a fairly linear dependency between RO⋯H and the logarithm of 2H χs. This correlation is approximately linear for 17O and 14N nuclei.

  18. Hyperbranched Aliphatic Polyester Modified Activated Carbon Particles with Homogenized Surface Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Zhang, Liuxue

    The hyperbranched aliphatic polyester grafted activated carbon (HAPE-AC), was successfully prepared by the simple "one-pot" method. The surface functional groups of commercial activated carbon particles were homogenized to hydroxyl groups by being oxidized with nitric acid and then reduced with lithium tetrahydroaluminate (LiAlH4) at first. Secondly, the surface hydroxyl groups were used as the active sites for the solution polycondensation of the AB2 monomer, 2, 2-bis(hydroxymethyl)propionic acid (bis-MPA), with the catalysis of p-toluenesulfonic acid (p-TSA). The homogenization of the surface groups of the activated carbon particles and the graft polymerization of the hyperbranched aliphatic polyester were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) technique. The products were also characterized with Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The competitive adsorption properties of the products toward the heavy metal ions (Cu(II), Hg(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II)) also proved the translations of the surface groups.

  19. Polarity of an MCM-41 adsorbent surface modified with methyl and phenyl groups based on data from gas chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhareva, D. A.; Gus'kov, V. Yu.; Karpov, S. I.; Kudasheva, F. Kh.; Roessner, F.; Borodina, E. V.

    2016-02-01

    The polarity of an MCM-41 adsorbent surface and organosilylated composites based on it with grafted trimethylsilane and dimethylphenylsilane groups is studied via inverse gas chromatography at infinite dilution. The dispersion and specific components of the value proportional to the Helmholtz adsorption energy are calculated, and a comparative analysis of the surface polarity of MCM-41 and its modified analogs relative to the commercially available C-120 silica gel is performed. The electrostatic and donor-acceptor components of the specific Helmholtz adsorption energy are calculated through linear decomposition of the adsorption energy. It is established that MCM-41 is less polar than C-120. The modification of the initial adsorbent surface leads to a reduction in polarity, due mainly to the weakening of induction and orientation interactions. It is concluded that the surfaces of the modified samples retain the ability to form hydrogen bonds.

  20. Magneto-Sensitive Adsorbents Modified by Functional Nitrogen-Containing Groups.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Inna V; Gdula, Karolina; Dąbrowski, Andrzej; Zub, Yuriy L

    2016-12-01

    In order to obtain amino-functionalized silica materials with magnetic core, one-step synthesis was carried out. Several materials, differ in number and structure of amino groups, were synthesized on the basis of sol-gel method. The synthesized materials were examined by several analytical techniques. The presence and content of amino groups were measured by using Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy and acid-base titration, respectively. Specific surface areas were measured by nitrogen/adsorption desorption isotherms. It was proved that sol-gel approach leads to obtain materials with high content of amino groups built into their surfaces (in the range 1.6-2.7 mmol/g). As-obtained materials were tested as potential adsorbents for copper(II) ions. The received maximum adsorption capacities were in the range 0.4-0.7 mmol/g. PMID:26842794

  1. Magneto-Sensitive Adsorbents Modified by Functional Nitrogen-Containing Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnyk, Inna V.; Gdula, Karolina; Dąbrowski, Andrzej; Zub, Yuriy L.

    2016-02-01

    In order to obtain amino-functionalized silica materials with magnetic core, one-step synthesis was carried out. Several materials, differ in number and structure of amino groups, were synthesized on the basis of sol-gel method. The synthesized materials were examined by several analytical techniques. The presence and content of amino groups were measured by using Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy and acid-base titration, respectively. Specific surface areas were measured by nitrogen/adsorption desorption isotherms. It was proved that sol-gel approach leads to obtain materials with high content of amino groups built into their surfaces (in the range 1.6-2.7 mmol/g). As-obtained materials were tested as potential adsorbents for copper(II) ions. The received maximum adsorption capacities were in the range 0.4-0.7 mmol/g.

  2. Adsorption of volatile sulphur compounds onto modified activated carbons: effect of oxygen functional groups.

    PubMed

    Vega, Esther; Lemus, Jesús; Anfruns, Alba; Gonzalez-Olmos, Rafael; Palomar, José; Martin, María J

    2013-08-15

    The effect of physical and chemical properties of activated carbon (AC) on the adsorption of ethyl mercaptan, dimethyl sulphide and dimethyl disulphide was investigated by treating a commercial AC with nitric acid and ozone. The chemical properties of ACs were characterised by temperature programme desorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. AC treated with nitric acid presented a larger amount of oxygen functional groups than materials oxidised with ozone. This enrichment allowed a significant improvement on adsorption capacities for ethyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulphide but not for dimethyl disulphide. In order to gain a deeper knowledge on the effect of the surface chemistry of AC on the adsorption of volatile sulphur compounds, the quantum-chemical COSMO-RS method was used to simulate the interactions between AC surface groups and the studied volatile sulphur compounds. In agreement with experimental data, this model predicted a greater affinity of dimethyl disulphide towards AC, unaffected by the incorporation of oxygen functional groups in the surface. Moreover, the model pointed out to an increase of the adsorption capacity of AC by the incorporation of hydroxyl functional groups in the case of ethyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulphide due to the hydrogen bond interactions. PMID:23708449

  3. The synthesis of monomers with pendent ethynyl groups for modified high performance thermoplastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nwokogu, Godson C.; Antoine, Miquel D.; Ansong, Omari

    1994-01-01

    Synthetic schemes were developed and optimized for twelve new monomers possessing unique structural features and one aspartimide. Two synthetic pathways were compared for preparation of the triarylethane monomers with pendent ethynyl groups. The results show that one of these pathways can be generally applied. The alternative pathway was applicable to the preparation of only one of the twelve compounds, the problem being secondary reactions of the initially formed desired product.

  4. Insights into the evolution of Archaea and eukaryotic protein modifier systems revealed by the genome of a novel archaeal group.

    PubMed

    Nunoura, Takuro; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Kakuta, Jungo; Nishi, Shinro; Sugahara, Junichi; Kazama, Hiromi; Chee, Gab-Joo; Hattori, Masahira; Kanai, Akio; Atomi, Haruyuki; Takai, Ken; Takami, Hideto

    2011-04-01

    The domain Archaea has historically been divided into two phyla, the Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Although regarded as members of the Crenarchaeota based on small subunit rRNA phylogeny, environmental genomics and efforts for cultivation have recently revealed two novel phyla/divisions in the Archaea; the 'Thaumarchaeota' and 'Korarchaeota'. Here, we show the genome sequence of Candidatus 'Caldiarchaeum subterraneum' that represents an uncultivated crenarchaeotic group. A composite genome was reconstructed from a metagenomic library previously prepared from a microbial mat at a geothermal water stream of a sub-surface gold mine. The genome was found to be clearly distinct from those of the known phyla/divisions, Crenarchaeota (hyperthermophiles), Euryarchaeota, Thaumarchaeota and Korarchaeota. The unique traits suggest that this crenarchaeotic group can be considered as a novel archaeal phylum/division. Moreover, C. subterraneum harbors an ubiquitin-like protein modifier system consisting of Ub, E1, E2 and small Zn RING finger family protein with structural motifs specific to eukaryotic system proteins, a system clearly distinct from the prokaryote-type system recently identified in Haloferax and Mycobacterium. The presence of such a eukaryote-type system is unprecedented in prokaryotes, and indicates that a prototype of the eukaryotic protein modifier system is present in the Archaea. PMID:21169198

  5. Large-scale climate variation modifies the winter grouping behavior of endangered Indiana bats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thogmartin, Wayne E.; McKann, Patrick C.

    2014-01-01

    Power laws describe the functional relationship between 2 quantities, such as the frequency of a group as the multiplicative power of group size. We examined whether the annual size of well-surveyed wintering populations of endangered Indiana bats (Myotis sodalis) followed a power law, and then leveraged this relationship to predict whether the aggregation of Indiana bats in winter was influenced by global climate processes. We determined that Indiana bat wintering populations were distributed according to a power law (mean scaling coefficient α = −0.44 [95% confidence interval {95% CI} = −0.61, −0.28). The antilog of these annual scaling coefficients ranged between 0.67 and 0.81, coincident with the three-fourths power found in many other biological phenomena. We associated temporal patterns in the annual (1983–2011) scaling coefficient with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index in August (βNAOAugust = −0.017 [90% CI = −0.032, −0.002]), when Indiana bats are deciding when and where to hibernate. After accounting for the strong effect of philopatry to habitual wintering locations, Indiana bats aggregated in larger wintering populations during periods of severe winter and in smaller populations in milder winters. The association with August values of the NAO indicates that bats anticipate future winter weather conditions when deciding where to roost, a heretofore unrecognized role for prehibernation swarming behavior. Future research is needed to understand whether the three-fourths–scaling patterns we observed are related to scaling in metabolism.

  6. Distribution of phosphorus and hydroxypropyl groups within granules of modified sweet potato starches as determined after chemical peeling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianwei; Schols, Henk A; Chen, Zhenghong; Jin, Zhengyu; Buwalda, Piet; Gruppen, Harry

    2015-11-01

    The distributions of phosphorus and hydroxypropyl groups within granules of cross-linked and hydroxypropylated sweet potato starches were investigated. Chemical surface peeling of starch granules was performed after sieving of native and modified starches into large-size (diameter ≥ 20 μm) and small-size (diameter < 20 μm) fractions. Starch granules were surface gelatinized in a 4M calcium chloride solution at different levels. After the peeling step, the remaining starch granules were analysed for the content of phosphorus and hydroxypropyl groups. The phosphorus level of the parental starch gradually decreased from periphery to core of the granules. The increase in phosphorus content after cross-linking in periphery was higher than that in core. The subsequent hydroxypropylation reaction resulted in lower phosphate levels. Hydroxypropylation resulted in a gradient of hydroxypropyl group concentration from periphery to core. Cross-linking prior to the hydroxypropylation resulted in lower levels of hydroxypropyl groups and less pronounced differences between periphery and core. PMID:26256390

  7. Detecting local heterogeneity and ionization ability in the head group region of different lipidic phases using modified fluorescent probes.

    PubMed

    Abou-Zied, Osama K; Zahid, N Idayu; Khyasudeen, M Faisal; Giera, David S; Thimm, Julian C; Hashim, Rauzah

    2015-01-01

    Local heterogeneity in lipid self-assembly is important for executing the cellular membrane functions. In this work, we chemically modified 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) and attached a C8 alkyl chain in two different locations to probe the microscopic environment of four lipidic phases of dodecyl β-maltoside. The fluorescence change in HBO and the new probes (HBO-1 and HBO-2) shows that in all phases (micellar, hexagonal, cubic and lamellar) three HBO tautomeric species (solvated syn-enol, anionic, and closed syn-keto) are stable. The formation of multi tautomers reflects the heterogeneity of the lipidic phases. The results indicate that HBO and HBO-1 reside in a similar location within the head group region, whereas HBO-2 is slightly pushed away from the sugar-dominated area. The stability of the solvated syn-enol tautomer is due to the formation of a hydrogen bond between the OH group of the HBO moiety and an adjacent oxygen atom of a sugar unit. The detected HBO anions was proposed to be a consequence of this solvation effect where a hydrogen ion abstraction by the sugar units is enhanced. Our results point to a degree of local heterogeneity and ionization ability in the head group region as a consequence of the sugar amphoterism. PMID:25731606

  8. Detecting local heterogeneity and ionization ability in the head group region of different lipidic phases using modified fluorescent probes

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Zied, Osama K.; Zahid, N. Idayu; Khyasudeen, M. Faisal; Giera, David S.; Thimm, Julian C.; Hashim, Rauzah

    2015-01-01

    Local heterogeneity in lipid self-assembly is important for executing the cellular membrane functions. In this work, we chemically modified 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) and attached a C8 alkyl chain in two different locations to probe the microscopic environment of four lipidic phases of dodecyl β-maltoside. The fluorescence change in HBO and the new probes (HBO-1 and HBO-2) shows that in all phases (micellar, hexagonal, cubic and lamellar) three HBO tautomeric species (solvated syn-enol, anionic, and closed syn-keto) are stable. The formation of multi tautomers reflects the heterogeneity of the lipidic phases. The results indicate that HBO and HBO-1 reside in a similar location within the head group region, whereas HBO-2 is slightly pushed away from the sugar-dominated area. The stability of the solvated syn-enol tautomer is due to the formation of a hydrogen bond between the OH group of the HBO moiety and an adjacent oxygen atom of a sugar unit. The detected HBO anions was proposed to be a consequence of this solvation effect where a hydrogen ion abstraction by the sugar units is enhanced. Our results point to a degree of local heterogeneity and ionization ability in the head group region as a consequence of the sugar amphoterism. PMID:25731606

  9. Detecting local heterogeneity and ionization ability in the head group region of different lipidic phases using modified fluorescent probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Zied, Osama K.; Zahid, N. Idayu; Khyasudeen, M. Faisal; Giera, David S.; Thimm, Julian C.; Hashim, Rauzah

    2015-03-01

    Local heterogeneity in lipid self-assembly is important for executing the cellular membrane functions. In this work, we chemically modified 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) and attached a C8 alkyl chain in two different locations to probe the microscopic environment of four lipidic phases of dodecyl β-maltoside. The fluorescence change in HBO and the new probes (HBO-1 and HBO-2) shows that in all phases (micellar, hexagonal, cubic and lamellar) three HBO tautomeric species (solvated syn-enol, anionic, and closed syn-keto) are stable. The formation of multi tautomers reflects the heterogeneity of the lipidic phases. The results indicate that HBO and HBO-1 reside in a similar location within the head group region, whereas HBO-2 is slightly pushed away from the sugar-dominated area. The stability of the solvated syn-enol tautomer is due to the formation of a hydrogen bond between the OH group of the HBO moiety and an adjacent oxygen atom of a sugar unit. The detected HBO anions was proposed to be a consequence of this solvation effect where a hydrogen ion abstraction by the sugar units is enhanced. Our results point to a degree of local heterogeneity and ionization ability in the head group region as a consequence of the sugar amphoterism.

  10. Composition of a Vision Screen for Servicemembers With Traumatic Brain Injury: Consensus Using a Modified Nominal Group Technique

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Marsha; Llanos, Imelda; Scheiman, Mitchell; Wagener, Sharon Gowdy

    2014-01-01

    Vision impairment is common in the first year after traumatic brain injury (TBI), including among service members whose brain injuries occurred during deployment in Iraq and Afghanistan. Occupational therapy practitioners provide routine vision screening to inform treatment planning and referral to vision specialists, but existing methods are lacking because many tests were developed for children and do not screen for vision dysfunction typical of TBI. An expert panel was charged with specifying the composition of a vision screening protocol for servicemembers with TBI. A modified nominal group technique fostered discussion and objective determinations of consensus. After considering 29 vision tests, the panel recommended a nine-test vision screening that examines functional performance, self-reported problems, far–near acuity, reading, accommodation, convergence, eye alignment and binocular vision, saccades, pursuits, and visual fields. Research is needed to develop reliable, valid, and clinically feasible vision screening protocols to identify TBI-related vision disorders in adults. PMID:25005505

  11. Preparation of carboxyl group-modified palladium nanoparticles in an aqueous solution and their conjugation with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhifei; Li, Hongying; Zhen, Shuang; He, Nongyue

    2012-05-01

    The use of nanomaterials in biomolecular labeling and their corresponding detection has been attracting much attention, recently. There are currently very few studies on palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) due to their lack of appropriate surface functionalities for conjugation with DNA. In this paper, we thus firstly present an approach to prepare carboxyl group-modified Pd NPs (with an average size of 6 nm) by the use of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUDA) as a stabilizer in the aqueous solution. The effect of the various reducing reaction conditions on the morphology of the Pd NPs was investigated. The particles were further characterized by TEM, UV-vis, FT-IR and XPS techniques. DNA was finally covalently conjugated to the surface of the Pd NPs through the activation of the carboxyl group, which was confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis and fluorescence analysis. The resulting Pd NPs-DNA conjugates show high single base pair mismatch discrimination capabilities. This work therefore sets a good foundation for further applications of Pd NPs in bio-analytical research.

  12. H-statistic with winsorized modified one-step M-estimator for two independent groups design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xao, Ong Gie; Yahaya, Sharipah Soaad Syed; Abdullah, Suhaida; Yusof, Zahayu Md

    2014-07-01

    Two-sample independent t-test is a classical method which is widely used to test the equality of two groups. However, this test is easily affected by any deviation in normality, more obvious when heterogeneity of variances and group sizes exist. It is well known that the violation in the assumption of these tests will lead to inflation in Type I error rate and depression in statistical test power. In mitigating the problem, robust methods can be used as alternatives. One such method is H-statistic. When used with modified one-step M-estimator (MOM), this test statistic (MOM-H) produce good control of Type I error even under small sample size but inconsistent across certain conditions investigated. Furthermore, power of the test is low which might be due to the trimming process. In this study, MOM is winsorized (WMOM) to sustain the original sample size. The H-statistic with WMOM as the central tendency measures (denoted as WMOM-H) showed better control of Type I error as compared to MOM-H especially under balance design regardless of the shapes of distribution investigated in the study. It also performed well under highly skewed and heavy tailed distribution for unbalanced design. In general, this study demonstrated that winsorization process (WMOM) could improve the performance of H-statistic in terms of Type I error rate control.

  13. Two new polyoxometalate-based hybrids consisting of Keggin-type cluster modified by (Ag{sub 4}) group

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xiaofang; Sun, Xiaowei; Han, Zhangang; Zhao, Chuan; Yu, Haitao; Zhai, Xueliang

    2013-11-15

    Two new supramolecular polyoxometalate compounds [Ag{sub 2}(mbpy){sub 3}][Ag(mbpy){sub 2}][PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}] (1) and [Ag{sub 2}(mbpy){sub 3}]{sub 2}[SiW{sub 12}O{sub 40}] (2) (mbpy=4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-dipyridyl), have been hydrothermally synthesized and characterized by IR, TG, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. The structural feature of 1–2 is in the cationic moiety of a tetra-core (Ag{sub 4}) cluster through weak Ag…Ag interactions. The silver(I) centers show three-, four- and five-coordinated geometries. In 1 the tetrameric silver atoms in ([Ag{sub 2}(mbpy){sub 3}]{sub 2}){sup 4+} covalently bind to [PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 3−} anion via Ag3O bonds, while there is only intermolecular hydrogen bonding between ([Ag{sub 2}(mbpy){sub 3}]{sub 2}){sup 4+} and [SiW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 4−} in 2. The coordination environments of the tetrameric silver cations have a great influence on the structure richness of the Keggin-based hybrids. The fluorescence properties of compounds 1 and 2 also have been discussed. - Graphical abstract: New polyoxometalate-based hybrids consisting of Keggin-type clusters modified by (Ag{sub 4}) groups had been synthesized and characterized, and their photoluminescence properties were also discussed. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Two Keggin-type polyoxometalates consisting of (Ag{sub 4}) clusters through weak Ag…Ag interactions have been synthesized. • There exist face-to-face and dot-to-face π…π interactions in (Ag-ligand){sub 4} fragment. • The fluorescence properties of (Ag{sub 4}) modified POMs are also discussed.

  14. Comparatively studying the ultrasound present in a mild two-stage approach on the content of functional groups in modified MWCNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Run; Liang, Shaolei; Li, Guangfen; Zhang, Yanxia; Shi, Le

    2016-04-01

    A two-stage approach assisted with ultrasound for oxidation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with ultra-high content of functional groups was utilized. The effect of ultrasound on the content of functional groups of the modified MWCNTs from different stages was analyzed by FE-SEM, HR-TEM, FTIR, Raman, TGA, XPS and triple double-backward titration method. The results confirm that more oxygen-containing functional groups were grafted on MWCNT with little damage to the structure integrity of nanotubes. The particle size distribution and the dispersion photography of MWCNTs in water and in ethanol further show a better dispersion of modified MWCNTs in polar solvent.

  15. Frequency of Aminoglycoside-Modifying Enzymes and ArmA Among Different Sequence Groups of Acinetobacter baumannii in Iran.

    PubMed

    Hasani, Alka; Sheikhalizadeh, Vajihe; Ahangarzadeh Rezaee, Mohammad; Rahmati-Yamchi, Mohammad; Hasani, Akbar; Ghotaslou, Reza; Goli, Hamid Reza

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated aminoglycoside resistance in 87 Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated from four hospitals located in the North West region of Iran and typed them in sequence groups (SGs) using trilocus sequence-based scheme to compare their clonal relationships with international clones. Resistance toward aminoglycosides was assayed by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and presence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs), and ArmA-encoding genes were evaluated in different SGs. The majority of isolates belonged to SG1 (39%), SG2 (33.3%), and SG3 (12.6%), whereas the remaining ones were assigned to six novel variants of SGs. MIC determination revealed netilmicin as the most and kanamycin as the least active aminoglycosides against all groups. Among the varied SGs, isolates of SG2 showed more susceptibility toward all tested aminoglycosides. APH(3'')-VIa-encoding gene was predominant in SG1 (47%), SG2 (62%), and SG6-9 (100%). However, AAC(3')-Ia (100%) and ANT(2')-Ia (90.9%) were the dominant AMEs in SG3. There was significant association between harboring of aminoglycoside resistance genes and specific aminoglycosides: gene encoded by APH(3')-VIa was allied to resistance against amikacin and kanamycin, whereas ANT(2')-Ia was related to the resistance toward gentamicin and tobramycin in SG2. In SG1, tobramycin resistance was correlated with harboring of AAC(6')-Ib. Screening of armA demonstrated the presence of this gene in SG1 (58.8%), SG2 (10.3%), as well as SG3 (9%). Our results revealed definite correlation between the phenotypes and genotypes of aminoglycoside resistance in different clonal lineages of A. baumannii. PMID:26779992

  16. Measuring cultural identity: validation of a modified Cortes, Rogler and Malgady Bicultural Scale in three ethnic groups in New York.

    PubMed

    Mezzich, Juan E; Ruiperez, Maria A; Yoon, Gihyun; Liu, Jason; Zapata-Vega, Maria I

    2009-09-01

    Cultural identity is central to health. Acculturation may be formulated with a bicultural model, assessing in parallel the degree of identification with both the original and the host culture. The Cortes, Rogler and Malgady Bicultural Scale (CRM-BS) is composed of two subscales: "original" culture and "mainstream-United States" (US) culture. It was modified into three ethnic versions: Latino, Korean and Chinese. Validation of the CRM-BS was conducted using health professionals and psychiatric patients from the above three ethnic groups and a control sample of mainstream-US (main-US) health professionals in New York City (n = 394). Mean time of completion was 3.7 min and 73% judged it to be easy to use. Strong test-retest reliability correlation coefficients were found (original culture, 0.78; mainstream-US, 0.82). The internal consistency was documented by high Cronbach's alpha values (original culture, 0.88; mainstream-US, 0.80). Factorial analysis revealed two factors, the first one involving all the items of the original culture and the second all of the mainstream-US items. Concerning its discriminant validity, non-main-US subjects scored significantly higher than main-US subjects on the original culture subscale, and vice versa. Construct validity was assessed comparing intergenerational mean scores on both subscales; as generations become older, mean scores for the original culture decreased, while those for the "host" culture increased. Results for each specific ethnic version are also presented. Cutoff scores were calculated to categorize the involvement with the original culture or the host culture, both of them, or neither. PMID:19543817

  17. Standard Setting in a Small Scale OSCE: A Comparison of the Modified Borderline-Group Method and the Borderline Regression Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Timothy J.; Humphrey-Murto, Susan M.; Norman, Geoffrey R.

    2006-01-01

    When setting standards, administrators of small-scale OSCEs often face several challenges, including a lack of resources, a lack of available expertise in statistics, and difficulty in recruiting judges. The Modified Borderline-Group Method is a standard setting procedure that compensates for these challenges by using physician examiners and is…

  18. Use of Modified SOAP Notes and Peer-Led Small-Group Discussion in a Medical Physiology Course: Addressing the Hidden Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibble, Jonathan; Hansen, Penelope A.; Nelson, Loren

    2006-01-01

    Peer leading of small-group discussion of cases; use of modified subjective, objective, assessment of physiology (SOAP) notes; and opportunities for self-assessment were introduced into a Medical Physiology course to increase students' awareness and practice of professional behaviors. These changes arose from faculty members' understanding of the…

  19. Activation of the ERK1/2 Signaling Pathway during the Osteogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Cultured on Substrates Modified with Various Chemical Groups

    PubMed Central

    He, Jin; Li, Yan-Shu; Wang, Xiu-Mei; Ai, Hong-Jun; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined the influence of culture substrates modified with the functional groups –OH, –COOH, –NH2, and –CH3 using SAMs technology, in conjunction with TAAB control, on the osteogenic differentiation of rabbit BMSCs. The CCK-8 assay revealed that BMSCs exhibited substrate-dependent cell viability. The cells plated on –NH2- and –OH-modified substrates were well spread and homogeneous, but those on the –COOH- and –CH3-modified substrates showed more rounded phenotype. The mRNA expression of BMSCs revealed that –NH2-modified substrate promoted the mRNA expression and osteogenic differentiation of the BMSCs. The contribution of ERK1/2 signaling pathway to the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs cultured on the –NH2-modified substrate was investigated in vitro. The –NH2-modified substrate promoted the expression of integrins; the activation of FAK and ERK1/2. Inhibition of ERK1/2 activation by PD98059, a specific inhibitor of the ERK signaling pathway, blocked ERK1/2 activation in a dose-dependent manner, as revealed for expression of Cbfα-1 and ALP. Blockade of ERK1/2 phosphorylation in BMSCs by PD98059 suppressed osteogenic differentiation on chemical surfaces. These findings indicate a potential role for ERK in the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs on surfaces modified by specific chemical functional groups, indicating that the microenvironment affects the differentiation of BMSCs. This observation has important implications for bone tissue engineering. PMID:24069599

  20. Heterocyclic tri-urea isocyanurate bridged groups modified periodic mesoporous organosilica synthesized for Fe(III) adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, Vijay Kumar; Selvaraj, M.; Parambadath, Surendran; Chu, Sang-Wook; Park, Sung Soo; Mishra, Satyendra; Singh, Raj Pal; Ha, Chang-Sik

    2012-10-15

    To achieve a high level of heavy metal adsorption, 1,1 Prime ,1 Double-Prime -(1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-triyl)tris(3-(3-(triethoxysilyl)propyl)urea) (TTPU) was synthesized as a novel melamine precursor and incorporated on the silica surface of periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO). The melamine modified PMOs (MPMOs) were synthesized under acidic conditions using TTPU, tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) and Pluronic P123 as a template and the modified PMOs were characterized using the relevant instrumental techniques. The characteristic materials were used as adsorbents for the adsorption of Fe(III) ions. Fe(III) adsorption studies revealed MPMO-7.5 to be a good absorbent with higher adsorption efficiency than other MPMOs. - Graphical Abstract: A new organosilica precursor, TTPU, has been successfully synthesized and characterized to incorporate on the silica surface of periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO). The melamine modified PMOs (MPMOs), in particular, the MPMO-7.5 was found to exhibit good adsorption efficiency for Fe(III). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis of new melamine modified periodic mesoporous organosilicas (MPMOs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new organosilica precursor, TTPU, has been successfully synthesized for the MPMOs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MPMOs were characterized by the relevant instrumental techniques. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MPMO-7.5 exhibits higher adsorption efficiency for Fe(III) ions than other MPMOs.

  1. Heterocyclic tri-urea isocyanurate bridged groups modified periodic mesoporous organosilica synthesized for Fe(III) adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Vijay Kumar; Selvaraj, M.; Parambadath, Surendran; Chu, Sang-Wook; Park, Sung Soo; Mishra, Satyendra; Singh, Raj Pal; Ha, Chang-Sik

    2012-10-01

    To achieve a high level of heavy metal adsorption, 1,1',1″-(1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-triyl)tris(3-(3-(triethoxysilyl)propyl)urea) (TTPU) was synthesized as a novel melamine precursor and incorporated on the silica surface of periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO). The melamine modified PMOs (MPMOs) were synthesized under acidic conditions using TTPU, tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) and Pluronic P123 as a template and the modified PMOs were characterized using the relevant instrumental techniques. The characteristic materials were used as adsorbents for the adsorption of Fe(III) ions. Fe(III) adsorption studies revealed MPMO-7.5 to be a good absorbent with higher adsorption efficiency than other MPMOs.

  2. The research priorities of patients attending UK cancer treatment centres: findings from a modified nominal group study

    PubMed Central

    Corner, J; Wright, D; Hopkinson, J; Gunaratnam, Y; McDonald, J W; Foster, C

    2007-01-01

    Members of the public are increasingly consulted over health care and research priorities. Patient involvement in determining cancer research priorities, however, has remained underdeveloped. This paper presents the findings of the first consultation to be conducted with UK cancer patients concerning research priorities. The study adopted a participatory approach using a collaborative model that sought joint ownership of the study with people affected by cancer. An exploratory, qualitative approach was used. Consultation groups were the main method, combining focus group and nominal group techniques. Seventeen groups were held with a total of 105 patients broadly representative of the UK cancer population. Fifteen areas for research were identified. Top priority areas included the impact cancer has on life, how to live with cancer and related support issues; risk factors and causes of cancer; early detection and prevention. Although biological and treatment related aspects of science were identified as important, patients rated the management of practical, social and emotional issues as a higher priority. There is a mismatch between the research priorities identified by participants and the current UK research portfolio. Current research activity should be broadened to reflect the priorities of people affected by the disease. PMID:17342090

  3. Identification of functional groups on the surface of modified organic materials using the FT-IR/PAS method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofman, M.; Pasieczna-Patkowska, S.; Ryczkowski, J.; Wachowski, L.

    2008-02-01

    Interactions between NO and the surface of waste plum stones have been studied by FTIR-PAS in order to identify the nitrogen species formed. It is possible that there are some additional active centres generated on their surface. Identification of surface functional groups was needed to characterize their influence on the properties of obtained materials which were used as catalyst support in our further research.

  4. Influence of exchange group of modified glycidyl methacrylate polymer on phenol removal: A study by batch and continuous flow processes.

    PubMed

    Aversa, Thiago Muza; da Silva, Carla Michele Frota; da Rocha, Paulo Cristiano Silva; Lucas, Elizabete Fernandes

    2016-11-01

    Contamination of water by phenol is potentially a serious problem due to its high toxicity and its acid character. In this way some treatment process to remove or reduce the phenol concentration before contaminated water disposal on the environment is required. Currently, phenol can be removed by charcoal adsorption, but this process does not allow easy regeneration of the adsorbent. In contrast, polymeric resins are easily regenerated and can be reused in others cycles of adsorption process. In this work, the interaction of phenol with two polymeric resins was investigated, one of them containing a weakly basic anionic exchange group (GD-DEA) and the other, a strongly basic group (GD-QUAT). Both ion exchange resins were obtained through chemical modifications from a base porous resin composed of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) and divinyl benzene (DVB). Evaluation tests with resins were carried out with 30 mg/L of phenol in water solution, at pH 6 and 10, employing two distinct processes: (i) batch, to evaluate the effect of temperature, and (ii) continuous flow, to assess the breakthrough of the resins. Batch tests revealed that the systems did not follow the model proposed by Langmuir due to the negative values obtained for the constant b and for the maximum adsorption capacity, Q0. However, satisfactory results for the constants KF and n allowed assuming that the behavior of systems followed the Freundlich model, leading to the conclusion that resin GD-DEA had the best interaction with the phenol when in a solution having pH 10 (phenoxide ions). The continuous flow tests corroborated this conclusion since the performance of GD-DEA in removing phenol was also best at pH 10, indicating that the greater availability of the electron pair in the resin with the weakly basic donor group contributed to enhance the resin's interaction with the phenoxide ions. PMID:27494606

  5. Remarkable stabilization of antiparallel DNA triplexes by strong stacking effects of consecutively modified nucleobases containing thiocarbonyl groups.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kenji; Hattori, Yusaku; Inde, Takeshi; Kanamori, Takashi; Ohkubo, Akihiro; Seio, Kohji; Sekine, Mitsuo

    2013-02-01

    The consecutive arrangement of 2'-deoxy-6-thioguanosines (s(6)Gs) and 4-thiothymidines (s(4)Ts) in antiparallel triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) considerably stabilized the resulting antiparallel triplexes with high base recognition ability by the strong stacking effects of thiocarbonyl groups. This result was remarkable because chemical modifications of the sugar moieties and nucleobases of antiparallel TFOs generally destabilize triplex structures. Moreover, in comparison with unmodified TFOs, it was found that TFOs containing s(6)Gs and s(4)Ts could selectively bind to the complementary DNA duplex but not to mismatched DNA duplexes or single-stranded RNA. PMID:23287737

  6. Histone modifiers and marks define heterogeneous groups of colorectal carcinomas and affect responses to HDAC inhibitors in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Lisa; Fitzner, Ingrid Coutiño; Ahrens, Theresa; Geißler, Anna-Lena; Makowiec, Frank; Hopt, Ulrich T; Bogatyreva, Lioudmila; Hauschke, Dieter; Werner, Martin; Lassmann, Silke

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about histone modifiers and histone marks in colorectal cancers (CRC). The present study therefore addressed the role of histone acetylation and histone deacetylases (HDAC) in CRCs in situ and in vitro. Immunohistochemistry of primary CRCs (n=47) revealed that selected histone marks were frequently present (H3K4me3: 100%; H3K9me3: 77%; H3K9ac: 75%), partially displayed intratumoral heterogeneity (H3K9me3; H3K9ac) and were significantly linked to higher pT category (H3K9me3: p=0.023; H3K9ac: p=0.028). Furthermore, also HDAC1 (62%), HDAC2 (100%) and HDAC3 (72%) expression was frequent, revealing four CRC types: cases expressing 1) HDAC1, HDAC2 and HDAC3 (49%), 2) HDAC2 and HDAC3 (30%), 3) HDAC1 and HDAC2 (10.5%) and 4) exclusively HDAC2 (10.5%). Correlation to clinico-pathological parameters (pT, pN, G, MSI status) revealed that heterogeneous HDAC1 expression correlated with lymph node status (p=0.012). HDAC expression in situ was partially reflected by six CRC cell lines, with similar expression of all three HDACs (DLD1, LS174T), preferential HDAC2 and HDAC3 expression (SW480, Caco2) or lower HDAC2 and HDAC3 expression (HCT116, HT29). HDAC activity was variably higher in HCT116, HT29, DLD1 and SW480 compared to LS174T and Caco2 cells. Treatment with broad (SAHA) and specific (MS-275; FK228) HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) caused loss of cell viability in predominantly MSIpositive CRC cells (HCT116, LS174T, DLD1; SAHA, MS-275 and in part FK228). In contrast, MSI-negative CRC cells (Caco2, HT29, SW480) were resistant, except for high doses of FK228 (Caco2, HT29). Cell viability patterns were not linked to different efficacies of HDACi on reduction of HDAC activity or histone acetylation, p21 expression and/or induction of DNA damage (γH2A-X levels). In summary, this study reveals inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity of histone marks and HDAC expression in CRCs. This is reflected by diverse HDACi responses in vitro, which do not follow known modes of action

  7. Histone modifiers and marks define heterogeneous groups of colorectal carcinomas and affect responses to HDAC inhibitors in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Lisa; Fitzner, Ingrid Coutiño; Ahrens, Theresa; Geißler, Anna-Lena; Makowiec, Frank; Hopt, Ulrich T; Bogatyreva, Lioudmila; Hauschke, Dieter; Werner, Martin; Lassmann, Silke

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about histone modifiers and histone marks in colorectal cancers (CRC). The present study therefore addressed the role of histone acetylation and histone deacetylases (HDAC) in CRCs in situ and in vitro. Immunohistochemistry of primary CRCs (n=47) revealed that selected histone marks were frequently present (H3K4me3: 100%; H3K9me3: 77%; H3K9ac: 75%), partially displayed intratumoral heterogeneity (H3K9me3; H3K9ac) and were significantly linked to higher pT category (H3K9me3: p=0.023; H3K9ac: p=0.028). Furthermore, also HDAC1 (62%), HDAC2 (100%) and HDAC3 (72%) expression was frequent, revealing four CRC types: cases expressing 1) HDAC1, HDAC2 and HDAC3 (49%), 2) HDAC2 and HDAC3 (30%), 3) HDAC1 and HDAC2 (10.5%) and 4) exclusively HDAC2 (10.5%). Correlation to clinico-pathological parameters (pT, pN, G, MSI status) revealed that heterogeneous HDAC1 expression correlated with lymph node status (p=0.012). HDAC expression in situ was partially reflected by six CRC cell lines, with similar expression of all three HDACs (DLD1, LS174T), preferential HDAC2 and HDAC3 expression (SW480, Caco2) or lower HDAC2 and HDAC3 expression (HCT116, HT29). HDAC activity was variably higher in HCT116, HT29, DLD1 and SW480 compared to LS174T and Caco2 cells. Treatment with broad (SAHA) and specific (MS-275; FK228) HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) caused loss of cell viability in predominantly MSIpositive CRC cells (HCT116, LS174T, DLD1; SAHA, MS-275 and in part FK228). In contrast, MSI-negative CRC cells (Caco2, HT29, SW480) were resistant, except for high doses of FK228 (Caco2, HT29). Cell viability patterns were not linked to different efficacies of HDACi on reduction of HDAC activity or histone acetylation, p21 expression and/or induction of DNA damage (γH2A-X levels). In summary, this study reveals inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity of histone marks and HDAC expression in CRCs. This is reflected by diverse HDACi responses in vitro, which do not follow known modes of action

  8. Improvement of separation efficiencies of anion-exchange chromatography using monolithic silica capillary columns modified with polyacrylates and polymethacrylates containing tertiary amino or quaternary ammonium groups.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yuta; Ikegami, Tohru; Horie, Kanta; Hara, Takeshi; Jaafar, Jafariah; Tanaka, Nobuo

    2009-10-30

    Anion-exchange (AEX) columns were prepared by on-column polymerization of acrylates and methacrylates containing tertiary amino or quaternary ammonium groups on monolithic silica in a fused silica capillary modified with anchor groups. The columns provided a plate height (H) of less than 10 microm at optimum linear velocity (u) with keeping their high permeability (K=9-12 x 10(-14) m2). Among seven kinds of AEX columns, a monolithic silica column modified with poly(2-hydroxy-3-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)propyl methacrylates) (HMPMA) showed larger retentions and better selectivities for nucleotides and inorganic anions than the others. The HMPMA column of 410 mm length produced 42,000-55,000 theoretical plates (N) at a linear velocity of 0.97 mm/s with a backpressure of 3.8 MPa. The same column could be employed for a fast separation of inorganic anions in 1.8 min at a linear velocity of 5.3 mm/s with a backpressure of 20 MPa. In terms of van Deemter plot and separation impedance, the HMPMA column showed higher performance than a conventional particle-packed AEX column. The HMPMA column showed good recovery of a protein, trypsin inhibitor, and it was applied to the separation of proteins and tryptic digest of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in a gradient elution, to provide better separation compared to a conventional particle-packed AEX column. PMID:19683243

  9. Impact of ethnicity on gestational diabetes identified with the WHO and the modified International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups criteria: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Jenum, Anne K; Mørkrid, Kjersti; Sletner, Line; Vange, Siri; Torper, Johan L; Nakstad, Britt; Voldner, Nanna; Rognerud-Jensen, Odd H; Berntsen, Sveinung; Mosdøl, Annhild; Skrivarhaug, Torild; Vårdal, Mari H; Holme, Ingar; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Birkeland, Kåre I

    2012-01-01

    Objective The International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) recently proposed new criteria for diagnosing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We compared prevalence rates, risk factors, and the effect of ethnicity using the World Health Organization (WHO) and modified IADPSG criteria. Methods This was a population-based cohort study of 823 (74% of eligible) healthy pregnant women, of whom 59% were from ethnic minorities. Universal screening was performed at 28±2 weeks of gestation with the 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Venous plasma glucose (PG) was measured on site. GDM was diagnosed as per the definition of WHO criteria as fasting PG (FPG) ≥7.0 or 2-h PG ≥7.8 mmol/l; and as per the modified IADPSG criteria as FPG ≥5.1 or 2-h PG ≥8.5 mmol/l. Results OGTT was performed in 759 women. Crude GDM prevalence was 13.0% with WHO (Western Europeans 11%, ethnic minorities 15%, P=0.14) and 31.5% with modified IADPSG criteria (Western Europeans 24%, ethnic minorities 37%, P< 0.001). Using the WHO criteria, ethnic minority origin was an independent predictor (South Asians, odds ratio (OR) 2.24 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.26–3.97); Middle Easterners, OR 2.13 (1.12–4.08)) after adjustments for age, parity, and prepregnant body mass index (BMI). This increased OR was unapparent after further adjustments for body height (proxy for early life socioeconomic status), education and family history of diabetes. Using the modified IADPSG criteria, prepregnant BMI (1.09 (1.05–1.13)) and ethnic minority origin (South Asians, 2.54 (1.56–4.13)) were independent predictors, while education, body height and family history had little impact. Conclusion GDM prevalence was overall 2.4-times higher with the modified IADPSG criteria compared with the WHO criteria. The new criteria identified many subjects with a relatively mild increase in FPG, strongly associated with South Asian origin and prepregnant overweight. PMID:22108914

  10. Magnetic adsorbent of Fe3O4@SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles modified with thiol group for chloroauric ion adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roto, Roto; Yusran, Yusran; Kuncaka, Agus

    2016-07-01

    The magnetic adsorbent of Fe3O4@SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles modified with thiol group was synthesized for chloroauric ([AuCl4]-) adsorption. The Fe3O4 nanoparticles were prepared by co-precipitation method under mechanical stirring and coated with SiO2 by acid hydrolysis of Na2SiO3 under N2 purging. The coating of Fe3O4 nanoparticles with SiO2 prevents particles' agglomeration by forming Fe3O4 Fe3O4 Fe3O4@SiO2 core-shell and avoids dissolution of the Fe3O4 core in the acidic medium. The coated Fe3O4 particle was modified with a thiol group using 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane via silanization reaction. The results suggest that SiO2-coated Fe3O4 particles have a size of 10-20 nm. The FTIR and EDX data indicate that the thiol groups are successfully attached to the surface of the nanoparticles. The [AuCl4]- ion adsorption by the Fe3O4@SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles followed Langmuir isotherm model with a maximum adsorption capacity of 115 mg/g and free energy (ΔG°) of 24.8 kJ/mol. The thiourea solution can be used to desorb most of the adsorbed [AuCl4]- ion. The adsorption using magnetic compounds provides easy access to the separation for both preparation and recovery.

  11. Responses of plants and invertebrate trophic groups to contrasting herbicide regimes in the Farm Scale Evaluations of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant crops.

    PubMed

    Hawes, C; Haughton, A J; Osborne, J L; Roy, D B; Clark, S J; Perry, J N; Rothery, P; Bohan, D A; Brooks, D R; Champion, G T; Dewar, A M; Heard, M S; Woiwod, I P; Daniels, R E; Young, M W; Parish, A M; Scott, R J; Firbank, L G; Squire, G R

    2003-11-29

    Effects of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) and conventional crop management on invertebrate trophic groups (herbivores, detritivores, pollinators, predators and parasitoids) were compared in beet, maize and spring oilseed rape sites throughout the UK. These trophic groups were influenced by season, crop species and GMHT management. Many groups increased twofold to fivefold in abundance between early and late summer, and differed up to 10-fold between crop species. GMHT management superimposed relatively small (less than twofold), but consistent, shifts in plant and insect abundance, the extent and direction of these effects being dependent on the relative efficacies of comparable conventional herbicide regimes. In general, the biomass of weeds was reduced under GMHT management in beet and spring oilseed rape and increased in maize compared with conventional treatments. This change in resource availability had knock-on effects on higher trophic levels except in spring oilseed rape where herbivore resource was greatest. Herbivores, pollinators and natural enemies changed in abundance in the same directions as their resources, and detritivores increased in abundance under GMHT management across all crops. The result of the later herbicide application in GMHT treatments was a shift in resource from the herbivore food web to the detritivore food web. The Farm Scale Evaluations have demonstrated over 3 years and throughout the UK that herbivores, detritivores and many of their predators and parasitoids in arable systems are sensitive to the changes in weed communities that result from the introduction of new herbicide regimes. PMID:14561321

  12. Effect of small group treatment of the modified constraint induced movement therapy for clients with chronic stroke in a community setting.

    PubMed

    Leung, Daniel P K; Ng, Adelina K Y; Fong, Kenneth N K

    2009-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of the group treatment component of the modified constraint induced movement therapy (mCIMT) protocol for clients with chronic stroke in a community setting. A within-subjects longitudinal study was conducted to which eight participants with chronic stroke being treated in a community setting in Hong Kong were recruited. Ten 3-h group sessions were conducted on two occasions within a four-week period, with four participants per group. Participants' less-affected hands were restrained in a mitt, with a target of wearing it for 4h per weekday. Laboratory based tests and the Motor Activity Log (MAL) were used repeatedly to measure participants' hemiparetic upper extremity functions and the use of the limb in real-life on four measurement occasions: at baseline (four weeks before training), pre-test (one day before training), post-test (one day after training), and follow-up (four weeks after training). The Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed participants' baselines were stable four weeks before the intervention. The Friedman test found significant differences between pre-test, post-test and follow-up in the Box and Block Test (BBT), the total score, grasp and pinch subscores of the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), and the Hong Kong Version of the Functional Test for the Hemiplegic Upper Extremity (FTHUE-HK), the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT), and the MAL. All these gains were maintained during the 1-month follow-up. The small group treatment component of the mCIMT was found to be effective, feasible, and capable of improving both motor performance and functional use of the affected upper extremity for patients with chronic stroke in a community setting. PMID:19837473

  13. Role of the concentration and nature of grafted groups in the adsorption of hydrocarbon vapors on silica modified by monofunctional polyfluoroalkylsilanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshchina, T. M.; Shoniya, N. K.; Tayakina, O. Ya.; Tkachenko, O. P.; Kustov, L. M.; Bernardoni, F.; Fadeev, A. Y.

    2012-03-01

    The role of the grafting density of monofunctional polyfluoroalkylsilanes of the C n F2 n - 1(CH2) m Si(CH3)2Cl general formula (where n = 3, 4, and 6; and m = 2 and 3) and their composition in intermolecular interactions of the molecules of saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons with a surface of chemically modified silica is studied by means of IR spectroscopy and adsorption-static and gas chromatography. It is shown that the higher the concentration and the shorter the length of the grafted chain, the greater (by a factor of 2 to 25) the drop in the adsorption values of hydrocarbons as a result of modifications, due to an increase in the degree of oleophobization of surface upon the formation of polyorganofluorine coatings. The high specificity of the surface with respect to benzene, which is due to the active participation of the polar fragment of a grafted chain in adsorption process, is related to the features of a relatively low-density sample with a concentration of grafted perfluorobutyl groups of 1.7 nm-2. It is shown that the thermodestruction of polyfluoroalkyl silica remains virtually unobserved upon heating to 523 K in an argon flow.

  14. Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus group 2 allergen bound to 8-OH modified adenine reduces the Th2-mediated airway inflammation without inducing a Th17 response and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Pratesi, Sara; Nencini, Francesca; Filì, Lucia; Occhiato, Ernesto G; Romagnani, Sergio; Parronchi, Paola; Maggi, Enrico; Vultaggio, Alessandra

    2016-09-01

    8-OH modified adenine bound to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus group 2 (nDer p2-Conj), a novel allergen-TLR7 agonist conjugate, improves murine airway inflammation in priming and therapeutic settings, however no data are known on the activity of this construct on Th17 cells. The aim of the study was to evaluate if nDer p2-Conj elicited in vivo Th17 cells and Th17-driven autoimmune responses, by using both short- and long-term priming and therapeutic protocols in a nDer p2-driven model of murine airway inflammation. The conjugate induced the in vitro production of cytokines favouring the Th17 polarization by bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. In short-term protocols, the priming or treatment with the conjugate ameliorated the airway inflammation by shifting Th2 allergen-specific cells into T cells producing IFN-γ, IL-10, but not IL-17A. Similar results were found in long-term protocol where the conjugate down-regulated airway inflammation without any evidence of autoimmune response and B cell compartment expansion. nDer p2-Conj also failed to shorten the spontaneous onset of diabetes on conjugates-primed NOD/LtJ mice. We found that neutrophils in BALF, ROR-γt and IL-17A expression in lungs were increased in conjugate-treated IL-10KO mice. These data emphasize the role of conjugate-driven IL-10 production, which can regulate the activity of memory Th17 cells and prevent the onset of autoimmune response. PMID:27475304

  15. Who Are the Students Who May Qualify for an Alternate Assessment Based on Modified Academic Achievement Standards (AA-MAS)?: Focus Group Results. Synthesis Report 79

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berndt, Sandra; Ebben, Barbara; Kubinski, Eva; Sim, Grant; Liu, Kristin; Lazarus, Sheryl; Thurlow, Martha; Christian, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Beginning in 2007, federal regulations to two major education laws gave state departments of education the option to develop an alternate assessment based on modified achievement standards (AA-MAS) for some students with disabilities. The regulations stated that the AA-MAS was intended for students who were being instructed in the grade-level…

  16. The Effects of Pre Modified Input, Interactionally Modified Input, and Modified Output on EFL Learners' Comprehension of New Vocabularies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maleki, Zinat; Pazhakh, AbdolReza

    2012-01-01

    The present study was an attempt to investigate the effects of premodified input, interactionally modified input and modified output on 80 EFL learners' comprehension of new words. The subjects were randomly assigned into four groups of pre modified input, interactionally modified input, modified output and unmodified (control) groups. Each group…

  17. Macroscopic observations of molecular recognition: discrimination of the substituted position on the naphthyl group by polyacrylamide gel modified with β-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yongtai; Hashidzume, Akihito; Takashima, Yoshinori; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Harada, Akira

    2011-11-15

    Macroscopic molecular recognition observations were realized using polyacrylamide-based gels modified with α-cyclodextrin (α-CD), β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), 1-naphthylmethyl (1Np), and 2-naphthylmethyl (2Np) moieties, which are denoted as αCD(x)-gel, βCD(x)-gel, 1Np(y)-gel, and 2Np(y)-gel, where x and y indicate the mol % of CD and Np moieties, respectively. The αCD(5)-gel did not adhere to either the 1Np(5)-gel or 2Np(5)-gel, whereas the βCD(5)-gel interacted with both to form alternating or checkered assemblies. Although the difference in the association constants of β-CD for the model polymers was small, the βCD(x)-gel successfully discriminated between 1Np(y)-gel and 2Np(y)-gel at the appropriate x and y. PMID:21978319

  18. Modified cyanobacteria

    DOEpatents

    Vermaas, Willem F J.

    2014-06-17

    Disclosed is a modified photoautotrophic bacterium comprising genes of interest that are modified in terms of their expression and/or coding region sequence, wherein modification of the genes of interest increases production of a desired product in the bacterium relative to the amount of the desired product production in a photoautotrophic bacterium that is not modified with respect to the genes of interest.

  19. Comparison of performance of the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society, the European Spondyloarthropathy Study Group and the modified New York criteria in a cohort of Chinese patients with spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ho Yin; Lau, Chak Sing; Wu, Ka Pik; Wong, Woon Sing; MOK, Mo Yin

    2011-07-01

    Early diagnosis of spondyloarthritis (SpA) is essential as anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy can achieve significant symptomatic relief and control of disease activity. This study aims to compare the clinical characteristics, disease activity, and functional status of a Chinese cohort of SpA patients who were re-classified into ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients fulfilling the modified New York (MNY) criteria, those with undifferentiated SpA (USpA) fulfilling the European Spondyloarthropathy Study Group (ESSG) classification criteria only (USpA/ESSG) and those who fulfill Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society (ASAS) only (USpA/ASAS). Disease activity was evaluated by Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), severity of morning stiffness, patient global assessment, and C-reactive protein. Functional status was evaluated by Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), modified Schober index, and dimension of chest expansion. One hundred and twenty-eight patients with disease duration of 16.3 ± 10.4 years were recruited. Patients in USpA/ESSG and USpA/ASAS were significantly younger (p = 0.01), had shorter disease duration (p < 0.01), and lower BASFI (p = 0.03) than established AS patients. All three groups have active disease with comparable BASDAI >3. BASFI correlated inversely with dimension of chest expansion and negatively modified Schober index in AS patients (p < 0.01) and modestly with BASDAI (r = 0.25, p < 0.01). BASFI correlated moderately with BASDAI in USpA/ESSG (r = 0.61, p < 0.01) but not with chest expansion or modified Schober index. Compared with established AS patients recognized by MNY criteria, patients fulfilling USpA defined by ESSG or ASAS criteria had earlier disease, as active disease and less irreversible functional deficit. PMID:21336823

  20. A Consensus for Classification and Pathologic Reporting of Pseudomyxoma Peritonei and Associated Appendiceal Neoplasia: The Results of the Peritoneal Surface Oncology Group International (PSOGI) Modified Delphi Process.

    PubMed

    Carr, Norman J; Cecil, Thomas D; Mohamed, Faheez; Sobin, Leslie H; Sugarbaker, Paul H; González-Moreno, Santiago; Taflampas, Panos; Chapman, Sara; Moran, Brendan J

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) is a complex disease with unique biological behavior that usually arises from appendiceal mucinous neoplasia. The classification of PMP and its primary appendiceal neoplasia is contentious, and an international modified Delphi consensus process was instigated to address terminology and definitions. A classification of mucinous appendiceal neoplasia was developed, and it was agreed that "mucinous adenocarcinoma" should be reserved for lesions with infiltrative invasion. The term "low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasm" was supported and it was agreed that "cystadenoma" should no longer be recommended. A new term of "high-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasm" was proposed for lesions without infiltrative invasion but with high-grade cytologic atypia. Serrated polyp with or without dysplasia was preferred for tumors with serrated features confined to the mucosa with an intact muscularis mucosae. Consensus was achieved on the pathologic classification of PMP, defined as the intraperitoneal accumulation of mucus due to mucinous neoplasia characterized by the redistribution phenomenon. Three categories of PMP were agreed-low grade, high grade, and high grade with signet ring cells. Acellular mucin should be classified separately. It was agreed that low-grade and high-grade mucinous carcinoma peritonei should be considered synonymous with disseminated peritoneal adenomucinosis and peritoneal mucinous carcinomatosis, respectively. A checklist for the pathologic reporting of PMP and appendiceal mucinous neoplasms was also developed. By adopting the classifications and definitions that were agreed, different centers will be able to use uniform terminology that will allow meaningful comparison of their results. PMID:26492181

  1. The A0 blood group genotype modifies the jejunal glycomic binding pattern profile of piglets early associated with a simple or complex microbiota.

    PubMed

    Priori, D; Colombo, M; Koopmans, S-J; Jansman, A J M; van der Meulen, J; Trevisi, P; Bosi, P

    2016-02-01

    The intestinal epithelium glycocalyx sugar motif is an important determinant of the bacterial-host interaction and may be affected in pigs by gut microbiota and by blood group genotype. The aim was to study the effect of intestinal association with different microbiota and A0 blood group genotypes on the expressed glycomic pattern in the small intestine. Twelve caesarean-derived pigs previously associated with a simple association (SA) or complex association (CA) microbiota were selected at 26 to 37 d of age. In each subject, different jejunal loops were perfused for 8 h with enterotoxigenic K88 (ETEC), ETEC fimbriae (F4), (LAM), or a saline control. The piglets were genotyped for A0 blood group and the glycomic profile was evaluated by microscopic screening of lectin binding: peanut agglutinin (PNA), which is galactose specific; agglutinin I (UEA), which is fucose specific; lectin II (MALii), which is sialic acid specific; concavalin A, which is mannose specific; soybean agglutinin (SBA), which is -acetyl-galactosamine specific; and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), which is -acetyl-glucosamine specific. A0 pigs had fewer UEA-positive cells, MALii-positive cells ( < 0.001), and SBA-positive cells ( < 0.10) than 00 pigs. Simple association pigs had more SBA positive cells ( < 0.01) than CA pigs. Enterotoxigenic K88-perfused intestinal loops had fewer UEA-positive cells ( < 0.01) and WGA positive cells ( < 0.001) cells and more PNA positive cells (only in SA pigs, < 0.01). No effects of introduction of F4 and LAM in the intestinal lumen were observed. The porcine A0 blood group genotype and the luminal presence of ETEC strongly affected the jejunal mucosa glycomic pattern profile whereas an early oral simple or complex microbial association had limited effects. Pig genetic background has relevance on the cross talk between intestinal epithelium glycocalyx sugar motif and ETEC and, ultimately, on the gut microbial colonization in later life. PMID:27065129

  2. Psychometric Properties of the Modified Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Scale among Women with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Substance Use Disorders Receiving Outpatient Group Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Ruglass, Lesia M; Papini, Santiago; Trub, Leora; Hien, Denise A

    2015-01-01

    Objective The use of psychometrically sound measures to assess and monitor PTSD treatment response over time is critical for better understanding the relationship between PTSD symptoms and Substance Use Disorder (SUD) symptoms throughout treatment. We examined the psychometric properties of the Modified Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Symptom Scale, Self-Report (MPSS-SR). Methods Three hundred fifty three women diagnosed with co-occurring PTSD (full or sub-threshold) and SUD who participated in a multisite treatment trial completed the MPSS-SR at pre-treatment, weekly during treatment, and posttreatment. Reliability and validity analyses were applied to the data. Results Internal consistency was excellent throughout the course of the trial demonstrating the MPSS-SR's high reliability. Strong correlations between MPSS-SR scores and the Brief Symptom Inventory and the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) severity scores demonstrated the MPSS-SR's convergent and concurrent validity. We conducted a classification analysis at posttreatment and compared the MPSS-SR at various cutoff scores with the CAPS diagnosis. A cutoff score of 29 on the MPSS-SR yielded a sensitivity rate of 89%, a specificity rate of 77%, and an overall classification rate of 80%, indicating the measure's robust ability to accurately identify individuals with PTSD in our sample at posttreatment. Conclusions Findings support the use of the MPSS-SR as a reliable and valid tool to assess and monitor changes in PTSD symptoms over the course of treatment and as an alternative to structured clinical interviews to assess PTSD symptoms among populations with SUDs. PMID:26543877

  3. Hemocytes and plasma of the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) display a diverse repertoire of sulfated and blood group A-modified N-glycans.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Simone; Jin, Chunsheng; Hykollari, Alba; Gregorich, Daniel; Giomarelli, Barbara; Vasta, Gerardo R; Wilson, Iain B H; Paschinger, Katharina

    2013-08-23

    The eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) has become a useful model system for glycan-dependent host-parasite interactions due to the hijacking of the oyster galectin CvGal1 for host entry by the protozoan parasite Perkinsus marinus, the causative agent of Dermo disease. In this study, we examined the N-glycans of both the hemocytes, which via CvGal1 are the target of the parasite, and the plasma of the oyster. In combination with HPLC fractionation, exoglycosidase digestion, and fragmentation of the glycans, mass spectrometry revealed that the major N-glycans of plasma are simple hybrid structures, sometimes methylated and core α1,6-fucosylated, with terminal β1,3-linked galactose; a remarkable high degree of sulfation of such glycans was observed. Hemocytes express a larger range of glycans, including core-difucosylated paucimannosidic forms, whereas bi- and triantennary glycans were found in both sources, including structures carrying sulfated and methylated variants of the histo-blood group A epitope. The primary features of the oyster whole hemocyte N-glycome were also found in dominin, the major plasma glycoprotein, which had also been identified as a CvGal1 glycoprotein ligand associated with hemocytes. The occurrence of terminal blood group moieties on oyster dominin and on hemocyte surfaces can account in part for their affinity for the endogenous CvGal1. PMID:23824194

  4. Peroxide-Dependent Analyte Conversion by the Heme Prosthetic Group, the Heme Peptide “Microperoxidase-11” and Cytochrome c on Chitosan Capped Gold Nanoparticles Modified Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Yarman, Aysu; Neumann, Bettina; Bosserdt, Maria; Gajovic-Eichelmann, Nenad; Scheller, Frieder W.

    2012-01-01

    In view of the role ascribed to the peroxidatic activity of degradation products of cytochrome c (cyt c) in the processes of apoptosis, we investigate the catalytic potential of heme and of the cyt c derived heme peptide MP-11 to catalyse the cathodic reduction of hydrogen peroxide and to oxidize aromatic compounds. In order to check whether cyt c has an enzymatic activity in the native state where the protein matrix should suppress the inherent peroxidatic activity of its heme prosthetic group, we applied a biocompatible immobilization matrix and very low concentrations of the co-substrate H2O2. The biocatalysts were entrapped on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode in a biocompatible chitosan layer which contained gold nanoparticles. The electrochemical signal for the peroxide reduction is generated by the redox conversion of the heme group, whilst a reaction product of the substrate oxidation is cathodically reduced in the substrate indication. The catalytic efficiency of microperoxidase-11 is sufficient for sensors indicating HRP substrates, e.g., p-aminophenol, paracetamol and catechol, but also the hydroxylation of aniline and dehalogenation of 4-fluoroaniline. The lower limit of detection for p-aminophenol is comparable to previously published papers with different enzyme systems. The peroxidatic activity of cyt c immobilized in the chitosan layer for catechol was found to be below 1 per mill and for p-aminophenol about 3% as compared with that of heme or MP-11. PMID:25585710

  5. Hemocytes and Plasma of the Eastern Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) Display a Diverse Repertoire of Sulfated and Blood Group A-modified N-Glycans*

    PubMed Central

    Kurz, Simone; Jin, Chunsheng; Hykollari, Alba; Gregorich, Daniel; Giomarelli, Barbara; Vasta, Gerardo R.; Wilson, Iain B. H.; Paschinger, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    The eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) has become a useful model system for glycan-dependent host-parasite interactions due to the hijacking of the oyster galectin CvGal1 for host entry by the protozoan parasite Perkinsus marinus, the causative agent of Dermo disease. In this study, we examined the N-glycans of both the hemocytes, which via CvGal1 are the target of the parasite, and the plasma of the oyster. In combination with HPLC fractionation, exoglycosidase digestion, and fragmentation of the glycans, mass spectrometry revealed that the major N-glycans of plasma are simple hybrid structures, sometimes methylated and core α1,6-fucosylated, with terminal β1,3-linked galactose; a remarkable high degree of sulfation of such glycans was observed. Hemocytes express a larger range of glycans, including core-difucosylated paucimannosidic forms, whereas bi- and triantennary glycans were found in both sources, including structures carrying sulfated and methylated variants of the histo-blood group A epitope. The primary features of the oyster whole hemocyte N-glycome were also found in dominin, the major plasma glycoprotein, which had also been identified as a CvGal1 glycoprotein ligand associated with hemocytes. The occurrence of terminal blood group moieties on oyster dominin and on hemocyte surfaces can account in part for their affinity for the endogenous CvGal1. PMID:23824194

  6. A Computational Study of the Hydrolysis of dGTP Analogues with Halomethylene Modified Leaving Groups in Solution: Implications for the Mechanism of DNA Polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Kamerlin, Shina C. L.; McKenna, Charles E.; Goodman, Myron F.; Warshel, A.

    2009-01-01

    DNA polymerases are a family of enzymes responsible for regulating DNA replication and repair, which in turn maintains the integrity of the genome. However, despite intensive kinetic, crystallographic and computational studies, elucidation of the detailed enzymatic mechanism still presents a significant challenge. We recently developed an alternative strategy for exploring the fidelity and mechanism of DNA polymerases, by probing leaving group effects on nucleotidyl transfer using a series of dGTP bisphosphonate analogues in which the β, γ-bridging oxygen was replaced by a series of substituted methylene groups (X=CYZ, where Y,Z=H, halogen or other substituent). Pre-steady state kinetic measurements of DNA polymerase-catalyzed incorporation of correctly base paired (R) and mispaired (W) analogues demonstrated a strong linear free energy relationship (LFER) between the polymerase rate constant (kpol) and the highest pKa of the free bisphosphonic acid corresponding to the leaving group. However, unexpectedly, the data segregated into two distinctly different linear correlations depending on the nature of the substituent. The discrepancy between the two lines was considerably greater when the dGTP analogue formed an incorrect (G•T) rather than a correct (G•C) base pair, although the reason for this phenomenon remains unexplained. Here, we have evaluated the complete free energy surfaces for bisphosphonate hydrolysis in aqueous solution and evaluated the corresponding LFER. Our study, which employs several alternative solvation models, finds a split of the calculated LFER for the mono- and dihalogen compounds into two parallel lines, reflecting their behavior in the polymerase-catalyzed condensation reaction. We suggest that the division into two linear subsets may be a generalized solvation phenomenon involving the overall electrostatic interaction between the substrates and enzyme and would be observed in solution in the absence of the enzyme. In contrast, the

  7. Epigenetic chromatin modifiers in barley: IV. The study of barley Polycomb group (PcG) genes during seed development and in response to external ABA

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Epigenetic phenomena have been associated with the regulation of active and silent chromatin states achieved by modifications of chromatin structure through DNA methylation, and histone post-translational modifications. The latter is accomplished, in part, through the action of PcG (Polycomb group) protein complexes which methylate nucleosomal histone tails at specific sites, ultimately leading to chromatin compaction and gene silencing. Different PcG complex variants operating during different developmental stages have been described in plants. In particular, the so-called FIE/MEA/FIS2 complex governs the expression of genes important in embryo and endosperm development in Arabidopsis. In our effort to understand the epigenetic mechanisms regulating seed development in barley (Hordeum vulgare), an agronomically important monocot plant cultivated for its endosperm, we set out to characterize the genes encoding barley PcG proteins. Results Four barley PcG gene homologues, named HvFIE, HvE(Z), HvSu(z)12a, and HvSu(z)12b were identified and structurally and phylogenetically characterized. The corresponding genes HvFIE, HvE(Z), HvSu(z)12a, and HvSu(z)12b were mapped onto barley chromosomes 7H, 4H, 2H and 5H, respectively. Expression analysis of the PcG genes revealed significant differences in gene expression among tissues and seed developmental stages and between barley cultivars with varying seed size. Furthermore, HvFIE and HvE(Z) gene expression was responsive to the abiotic stress-related hormone abscisic acid (ABA) known to be involved in seed maturation, dormancy and germination. Conclusion This study reports the first characterization of the PcG homologues, HvFIE, HvE(Z), HvSu(z)12a and HvSu(z)12b in barley. All genes co-localized with known chromosomal regions responsible for malting quality related traits, suggesting that they might be used for developing molecular markers to be applied in marker assisted selection. The PcG differential expression

  8. Comparison of humoral and cellular immune responses to a pentavalent modified live virus vaccine in three age groups of calves with maternal antibodies, before and after BVDV type 2 challenge.

    PubMed

    Platt, Ratree; Widel, Philip W; Kesl, Lyle D; Roth, James A

    2009-07-16

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of a pentavalent (BVDV types 1 and 2, BHV-1, BRSV, and PI-3) modified live virus (MLV) vaccine given to 1-2-, 4-5-, and 7-8-week-old calves with maternal antibodies to induce humoral and cellular immune responses and protect calves from virulent BVDV type 2. Eight calves in each age group were vaccinated and four served as controls. All calves were challenged intranasally with BVDV type 2, 12 weeks after vaccination. SVN titers to all five viruses declined in all groups after vaccination (except 4-5-week-old calves to BVDV type 1). After challenge, the SVN titers for both types of BVDV showed anamnestic responses in calves vaccinated at 4-5 and 7-8 weeks, but not at 1-2 weeks of age. In all groups, T cell subsets responded specifically to BVDV types 1 and 2 but not to BHV-1, BRSV, or PI-3 after vaccination by increasing their expression of activation markers (CD25, IFN-gamma and IL-4). All vaccinated calves were significantly protected from BVDV type 2 challenge. PMID:19446589

  9. Modified blank ammunition injuries.

    PubMed

    Ogunc, Gokhan I; Ozer, M Tahir; Coskun, Kagan; Uzar, Ali Ihsan

    2009-12-15

    Blank firing weapons are designed only for discharging blank ammunition cartridges. Because they are cost-effective, are easily accessible and can be modified to live firearms plus their unclear legal situation in Turkish Law makes them very popular in Turkey. 2004 through 2008, a total of 1115 modified blank weapons were seized in Turkey. Blank firing weapons are easily modified by owners, making them suitable for discharging live firearm ammunition or modified blank ammunitions. Two common methods are used for modification of blank weapons. After the modification, these weapons can discharge the live ammunition. However, due to compositional durability problems with these types of weapons; the main trend is to use the modified blank ammunitions rather than live firearm ammunition fired from modified blank firing weapons. In this study, two types of modified blank weapons and two types of modified blank cartridges were tested on three different target models. Each of the models' shooting side was coated with 1.3+/-2 mm thickness chrome tanned cowhide as a skin simulant. The first model was only coated with skin simulant. The second model was coated with skin simulant and 100% cotton police shirt. The third model was coated with skin simulant and jean denim. After the literature evaluation four high risky anatomic locations (the neck area; the eyes; the thorax area and inguinal area) were pointed out for the steel and lead projectiles are discharged from the modified blank weapons especially in close range (0-50 cm). The target models were designed for these anatomic locations. For the target models six Transparent Ballistic Candle blocks (TCB) were prepared and divided into two test groups. The first group tests were performed with lead projectiles and second group with steel projectile. The shortest penetration depth (lead projectile: 4.358 cm; steel projectile 8.032 cm) was recorded in the skin simulant and jean denim coated block for both groups. In both groups

  10. The Pirate group intervention protocol: description and a case report of a modified constraint-induced movement therapy combined with bimanual training for young children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Pauline B; van Hartingsveldt, Margo; Anderson, Patricia G; van den Tillaar, Ingrid; van der Burg, Jan; Geurts, Alexander C

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe a child-friendly modified constraint-induced movement therapy protocol that is combined with goal-directed task-specific bimanual training (mCIMT-BiT). This detailed description elucidates the approach and supports various research reports. This protocol is used in a Pirate play group setting and aims to extend bimanual skills in play and self-care activities for children with cerebral palsy and unilateral spastic paresis of the upper limb. To illustrate the content and course of treatment and its effect, a case report of a two-year-old boy is presented. After the eight-week mCIMT-BiT intervention, the child improved the capacity of his affected arm and hand in both quantitative and qualitative terms and his bimanual performance in daily life as assessed by the Assisting Hand Assessment, ABILHAND-Kids, Video Observations Aarts and Aarts Module Determine Developmental Disregard, Canadian Occupational Performance Measure and Goal Attainment Scaling. It is argued that improvement of affected upper-limb capacity in a test situation may be achieved and retained relatively easily, but it may take a lot more training to stabilize the results and automate motor control of the upper limb. Future studies with groups of children should elaborate on these intensity and generalization issues. PMID:21751275

  11. Theoretical predictions of properties and volatility of chlorides and oxychlorides of group-4 elements. II. Adsorption of tetrachlorides and oxydichlorides of Zr, Hf, and Rf on neutral and modified surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Pershina, V.; Borschevsky, A.; Iliaš, M.; Türler, A.

    2014-08-14

    With the aim to interpret results of gas-phase chromatography experiments on volatility of group-4 tetrachlorides and oxychlorides including those of Rf, adsorption enthalpies of these species on neutral, and modified quartz surfaces were estimated on the basis of relativistic, two-component Density Functional Theory calculations of MCl{sub 4}, MOCl{sub 2}, MCl{sub 6}{sup −}, and MOCl{sub 4}{sup 2} with the use of adsorption models. Several mechanisms of adsorption were considered. In the case of physisorption of MCl{sub 4}, the trend in the adsorption energy in the group should be Zr > Hf > Rf, so that the volatility should change in the opposite direction. The latter trend complies with the one in the sublimation enthalpies, ΔH{sub sub}, of the Zr and Hf tetrachlorides, i.e., Zr < Hf. On the basis of a correlation between these quantities, ΔH{sub sub}(RfCl{sub 4}) was predicted as 104.2 kJ/mol. The energy of physisorption of MOCl{sub 2} on quartz should increase in the group, Zr < Hf < Rf, as defined by increasing dipole moments of these molecules along the series. In the case of adsorption of MCl{sub 4} on quartz by chemical forces, formation of the MOCl{sub 2} or MOCl{sub 4}{sup 2−} complexes on the surface can take place, so that the sequence in the adsorption energy should be Zr > Hf > Rf, as defined by the complex formation energies. In the case of adsorption of MCl{sub 4} on a chlorinated quartz surface, formation of the MCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} surface complexes can occur, so that the trend in the adsorption strength should be Zr ≤ Hf < Rf. All the predicted sequences, showing a smooth change of the adsorption energy in the group, are in disagreement with the reversed trend Zr ≈ Rf < Hf, observed in the “one-atom-at-a-time” gas-phase chromatography experiments. Thus, currently no theoretical explanation can be found for the experimental observations.

  12. Aminoglycoside Modifying Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Maria S.; Tolmasky, Marcelo E.

    2010-01-01

    Aminoglycosides have been an essential component of the armamentarium in the treatment of life-threatening infections. Unfortunately, their efficacy has been reduced by the surge and dissemination of resistance. In some cases the levels of resistance reached the point that rendered them virtually useless. Among many known mechanisms of resistance to aminoglycosides, enzymatic modification is the most prevalent in the clinical setting. Aminoglycoside modifying enzymes catalyze the modification at different −OH or −NH2 groups of the 2-deoxystreptamine nucleus or the sugar moieties and can be nucleotidyltranferases, phosphotransferases, or acetyltransferases. The number of aminoglycoside modifying enzymes identified to date as well as the genetic environments where the coding genes are located is impressive and there is virtually no bacteria that is unable to support enzymatic resistance to aminoglycosides. Aside from the development of new aminoglycosides refractory to as many as possible modifying enzymes there are currently two main strategies being pursued to overcome the action of aminoglycoside modifying enzymes. Their successful development would extend the useful life of existing antibiotics that have proven effective in the treatment of infections. These strategies consist of the development of inhibitors of the enzymatic action or of the expression of the modifying enzymes. PMID:20833577

  13. Modified Composite Materials Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicus, D. L. (Compiler)

    1978-01-01

    The reduction or elimination of the hazard which results from accidental release of graphite fibers from composite materials was studied at a workshop. At the workshop, groups were organized to consider six topics: epoxy modifications, epoxy replacement, fiber modifications, fiber coatings and new fibers, hybrids, and fiber release testing. Because of the time required to develop a new material and acquire a design data base, most of the workers concluded that a modified composite material would require about four to five years of development and testing before it could be applied to aircraft structures. The hybrid working group considered that some hybrid composites which reduce the risk of accidental fiber release might be put into service over the near term. The fiber release testing working group recommended a coordinated effort to define a suitable laboratory test.

  14. Surface modified aerogel monoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas (Inventor); Johnston, James C. (Inventor); Kuczmarski, Maria A. (Inventor); Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    This invention comprises reinforced aerogel monoliths such as silica aerogels having a polymer coating on its outer geometric surface boundary, and to the method of preparing said aerogel monoliths. The polymer coatings on the aerogel monoliths are derived from polymer precursors selected from the group consisting of isocyanates as a precursor, precursors of epoxies, and precursors of polyimides. The coated aerogel monoliths can be modified further by encapsulating the aerogel with the polymer precursor reinforced with fibers such as carbon or glass fibers to obtain mechanically reinforced composite encapsulated aerogel monoliths.

  15. Chemically modified polypyrrole

    SciTech Connect

    Inagaki, T.; Skotheim, T.A.; Lee, H.S.; Okamoto, Y.; Samuelson, L.; Tripathy, S.

    1988-01-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) films have been systematically modified with electroactive groups in the ..beta..-position to design electrode materials with specific electrochemical and surface active properties. Electrochemical copolymerization of pyrrole and 3-(6-ferrocenyl,6-hydroxyhexyl)pyrrole (P-6-Fc) yields a ferrocene functionalized polypyrrole with a controlled amount to ferrocene functionalization. And also, copolymers of pyrrole and 3-(4-(2,5- dimethoxyphenyl)butyl)pyrrole (P-MP) can be made by electrochemical polymerization and converted to the copolymers containing pH dependent electroactive hydroquinone moieties. Derivatized pyrroles have also been incorporated into Langmuir-Blodgett film structures. The surface pressure-area isotherms of 3-(13-ferrocenyl,13-hydroxytridecy)pyrrole (P-13-Fc) and the mixed monolayer of P-13-Fc and 3-n-hexadecylpyrrole (HDP) are shown. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Adhesives from modified soy protein

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Susan; Wang, Donghai; Zhong, Zhikai; Yang, Guang

    2008-08-26

    The, present invention provides useful adhesive compositions having similar adhesive properties to conventional UF and PPF resins. The compositions generally include a protein portion and modifying ingredient portion selected from the group consisting of carboxyl-containing compounds, aldehyde-containing compounds, epoxy group-containing compounds, and mixtures thereof. The composition is preferably prepared at a pH level at or near the isoelectric point of the protein. In other preferred forms, the adhesive composition includes a protein portion and a carboxyl-containing group portion.

  17. Group Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahler, Clarence A.

    1971-01-01

    This article reviews the major concerns of group counseling and differentiates among group guidance, group counseling, and group therapy. It also evaluates the research status of group counseling and presents implications for the future of this approach. Comment by Carl E. Thoresen follows. (Author)

  18. Modified immunotherapy for alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Yoshimasu, Takashi; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2016-07-01

    Squaric acid dibutylester (SADBE) is a commonly used contact sensitizer in immunotherapy for alopecia areata (AA). Severe contact dermatitis is induced by the currently high recommended sensitization dose of 1%-2% SADBE, often decreasing patient compliance. We assessed a modified immunotherapy for AA using SADBE at a starting concentration of 0.01% without sensitization. After one or two weeks of initial 0.01% SADBE application, the concentration of SADBE was increased gradually to 0.025%, 0.05%, 0.1%, 0.25%, 0.5%, 1% and 2% until the patients felt itching or erythema at the AA lesion site. The modified immunotherapy showed a response rate of 69.4% (25/36), equivalent to conventional immunotherapy using SADBE starting at 1%-2% sensitization. Furthermore, we investigated the combination therapy of SADBE and multiple courses of steroid pulses for AA. The response rate for combination therapy was 73.7% (28/38); however, the group receiving combination therapy showed a significant prevalence of severe AA compared with the group receiving modified immunotherapy only. We reviewed the efficacy and safety of modified immunotherapy without initial sensitization and combination therapy with immunotherapy and multiple courses of pulses for AA. PMID:26932732

  19. Synthesis of a stationary phase based on silica modified with branched octadecyl groups by Michael addition and photoinduced thiol-yne click chemistry for the separation of basic compounds.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guang; Ou, Junjie; Wang, Hongwei; Ji, Yongsheng; Wan, Hao; Zhang, Zhang; Peng, Xiaojun; Zou, Hanfa

    2016-04-01

    A novel silica-based stationary phase with branched octadecyl groups was prepared by the sequential employment of the Michael addition reaction and photoinduced thiol-yne click chemistry with 3-aminopropyl-functionalized silica microspheres as the initial material. The resulting stationary phase denoted as SiO2 -N(C18)4 was characterized by elemental analysis, FTIR spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, demonstrating the existence of branched octadecyl groups in silica microspheres. The separations of benzene homologous compounds, acid compounds and amine analogues were conducted, demonstrating mixed-mode separation mechanism on SiO2 -N(C18)4 . Baseline separation of basic drugs mixture was acquired with the mobile phase of acetonitrile/H2 O (5%, v/v). SiO2 -N(C18)4 was further applied to separate Corydalis yanhusuo Wang water extracts, and more baseline separation peaks were obtained for SiO2 -N(C18)4 than those on Atlantis dC18 column. It can be expected that this new silica-based stationary phase will exhibit great potential in the analysis of basic compounds. PMID:26910263

  20. How to find the optimal partner--studies of snurportin 1 interactions with U snRNA 5' TMG-cap analogues containing modified 2-amino group of 7-methylguanosine.

    PubMed

    Piecyk, Karolina; Niedzwiecka, Anna; Ferenc-Mrozek, Aleksandra; Lukaszewicz, Maciej; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Jankowska-Anyszka, Marzena

    2015-08-01

    Snurportin 1 is an adaptor protein that mediates the active nuclear import of uridine-rich small nuclear RNAs (U snRNA) by the importin-β receptor pathway. Its cellular activity influences the overall transport yield of small ribonucleoprotein complexes containing N(2),N(2),7-trimethylguanosine (TMG) capped U snRNA. So far little is still known about structural requirements related to molecular recognition of the trimethylguanosine moiety by snurportin in solution. Since these interactions are of a great biomedical importance, we synthesized a series of new 7-methylguanosine cap analogues with extended substituents at the exocyclic 2-amino group to gain a deeper insight into how the TMG-cap is adapted into the snurportin cap-binding pocket. Prepared chemical tools were applied in binding assays using emission spectroscopy. Surprisingly, our results revealed strict selectivity of snurportin towards the TMG-cap structure that relied mainly on its structural stiffness and compactness. PMID:26118337

  1. Organically Modified Silicas on Metal Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Organically modified silica coatings were prepared on metal nanowires using a variety of silicon alkoxides with different functional groups (i.e., carboxyl groups, polyethylene oxide, cyano, dihydroimidazole, and hexyl linkers). Organically modified silicas were deposited onto the surface of 6-μm-long, ∼300-nm-wide, cylindrical metal nanowires in suspension by the hydrolysis and polycondensation of silicon alkoxides. Syntheses were performed at several ratios of tetraethoxysilane to an organically modified silicon alkoxide to incorporate desired functional groups into thin organosilica shells on the nanowires. These coatings were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. All of the organically modified silicas prepared here were sufficiently porous to allow the removal of the metal nanowire cores by acid etching to form organically modified silica nanotubes. Additional functionality provided to the modified silicas as compared to unmodified silica prepared using only tetraethoxysilane precursors was demonstrated by chromate adsorption on imidazole-containing silicas and resistance to protein adsorption on polyethyleneoxide-containing silicas. Organically modified silica coatings on nanowires and other nano- and microparticles have potential application in fields such as biosensing or nanoscale therapeutics due to the enhanced properties of the silica coatings, for example, the prevention of biofouling. PMID:20715881

  2. Group X

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  3. Group Flow and Group Genius

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Keith Sawyer views the spontaneous collaboration of group creativity and improvisation actions as "group flow," which organizations can use to function at optimum levels. Sawyer establishes ideal conditions for group flow: group goals, close listening, complete concentration, being in control, blending egos, equal participation, knowing…

  4. Cell targeted gene delivery system based on modified pectin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus pectin modified with various amine groups have been studied for its potential as a novel non-viral gene delivery carrier. The modified cationic pectin was able to condense DNA and mediate transfection in a cell type specific manner. The modified pectin seems to be a promising carrier, attra...

  5. Isopermutation group

    SciTech Connect

    Muktibodh, A. S.

    2015-03-10

    The concept of ‘Isotopy’ as formulated by Ruggero Maria Santilli [1, 2, 3] plays a vital role in the development of Iso mathematics. Santilli defined iso-fields of characteristic zero. In this paper we extend this definition to define Iso-Galois fields [4] which are essentially of non-zero characteristic. Isotopically isomorphic realizations of a group define isopermutation group which gives a clear cut distinction between automorphic groups and isotopic groups.

  6. Separation Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addington, Jean

    1992-01-01

    Describes eight-week short-term group designed to help separated or divorced men and women move through related adjustment phase in focused group setting. Discusses constructs that form the foundations of this short-term psychoeducational and support group and presents brief overview of psychological difficulties that occur as result of marital…

  7. Polyurethane biocidal polymeric surface modifiers.

    PubMed

    Makal, Umit; Wood, Lynn; Ohman, Dennis E; Wynne, Kenneth J

    2006-03-01

    Polyurethanes (PUs) with soft blocks containing semifluorinated (-CH2OCH2CF3) and 5,5-dimethylhydantoin pendant groups were prepared and employed (2 wt%) as biocidal polymeric surface modifiers (PSMs) for a conventional PU coating comprised of an isophorone diisocyanate/1,4-butanediol-derived hard block (50%) and poly(tetramethylene oxide) soft block. Surface enrichment of the PSM was verified by dynamic contact angle measurements. The PSM modified PU was activated by converting near-surface amide groups to chloramide with 3wt% hypochlorite. The conversion of near-surface amide to chloramide is reflected in somewhat increased hydrophobic character for the antimicrobial chloramide functionalized surfaces. Biocidal activity against both Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli) bacteria was demonstrated by using a modified version of American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists (AATCC-100) test. By changing the PSM concentration it was found that only 1.6 wt% PSM (0.66 wt% biocide, 5,5-dimethylhydantoin) in a conventional PU affected complete kill of P. aeruginosa in 15 min by using this biocidal testing protocol. PMID:16181672

  8. Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tully, R. Brent

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times {{10}12}{{M}⊙ } are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of {{Ω}matter}˜ 0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  9. Galaxy groups

    SciTech Connect

    Brent Tully, R.

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times 10{sup 12}M{sub ⊙} are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of Ω{sub matter}∼0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  10. Disulfiram as a radiation modifier

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.D.; Maners, A.W.; Salari, H.; Baker, M.; Walker, E.M. Jr.

    1986-11-01

    The radiation modifying effect and toxicity of tetraethylthiuram disulfide (disulfiram) have been studied. Disulfiram (DSM) inhibits aldehyde dehydrogenase, dopamine-beta-oxygenase, microsomal mixed-function oxidases and cytochrome P-450 enzymes. It is widely used for aversion therapy in alcoholism. Disulfiram also inhibits tumor formation by several known carcinogens. A biphasic toxicity pattern of DSM is reported in the L-929 mouse fibroblast culture system. Disulfiram is 100 percent toxic at 2 X 10(-7) M (0.05 micrograms per ml), 23 percent toxic at 3 X 10(-7) M (0.1 microgram per ml), and 100 percent toxic again at 3.4 X 10(-6) M (1.0 microgram per ml). The pattern is similar to the biphasic toxicity pattern of DMS's major metabolite, sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DTC). Reports of both radiation protection and radiation enhancement by DTC exist. Previously, a radioprotective effect by 2 X 10(-6) M DTC (dose modifying factor = 1.26) has been demonstrated in the L-929 cell system. To date, no radiation modifying properties of DSM have been reported. Our investigation of DSM as a radiation modifier at 3 X 10(-7) M (0.1 microgram per ml) did not show significant improvement in survival of irradiated cells treated with DSM relative to the irradiated control group, as determined by absence of a difference in the Do of the two groups. Considering DSM's close structural relationship to DTC, it is possible that DSM may exhibit a radioprotective effect when applied in a different concentration than what was used in our research.

  11. Nanoparticles modified with multiple organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Cook, Ronald Lee; Luebben, Silvia DeVito; Myers, Andrew William; Smith, Bryan Matthew; Elliott, Brian John; Kreutzer, Cory; Wilson, Carolina; Meiser, Manfred

    2007-07-17

    Surface-modified nanoparticles of boehmite, and methods for preparing the same. Aluminum oxyhydroxide nanoparticles are surface modified by reaction with selected amounts of organic acids. In particular, the nanoparticle surface is modified by reactions with two or more different carboxylic acids, at least one of which is an organic carboxylic acid. The product is a surface modified boehmite nanoparticle that has an inorganic aluminum oxyhydroxide core, or part aluminum oxyhydroxide core and a surface-bonded organic shell. Organic carboxylic acids of this invention contain at least one carboxylic acid group and one carbon-hydrogen bond. One embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that have been surface modified with two or more acids one of which additional carries at least one reactive functional group. Another embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that have been surface modified with multiple acids one of which has molecular weight or average molecular weight greater than or equal to 500 Daltons. Yet, another embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that are surface modified with two or more acids one of which is hydrophobic in nature and has solubility in water of less than 15 by weight. The products of the methods of this invention have specific useful properties when used in mixture with liquids, as filler in solids, or as stand-alone entities.

  12. Nanoparticles modified with multiple organic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Ronald Lee (Inventor); Luebben, Silvia DeVito (Inventor); Myers, Andrew William (Inventor); Smith, Bryan Matthew (Inventor); Elliott, Brian John (Inventor); Kreutzer, Cory (Inventor); Wilson, Carolina (Inventor); Meiser, Manfred (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Surface-modified nanoparticles of boehmite, and methods for preparing the same. Aluminum oxyhydroxide nanoparticles are surface modified by reaction with selected amounts of organic acids. In particular, the nanoparticle surface is modified by reactions with two or more different carboxylic acids, at least one of which is an organic carboxylic acid. The product is a surface modified boehmite nanoparticle that has an inorganic aluminum oxyhydroxide core, or part aluminum oxyhydroxide core and a surface-bonded organic shell. Organic carboxylic acids of this invention contain at least one carboxylic acid group and one carbon-hydrogen bond. One embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that have been surface modified with two or more acids one of which additional carries at least one reactive functional group. Another embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that have been surface modified with multiple acids one of which has molecular weight or average molecular weight greater than or equal to 500 Daltons. Yet, another embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that are surface modified with two or more acids one of which is hydrophobic in nature and has solubility in water of less than 15 by weight. The products of the methods of this invention have specific useful properties when used in mixture with liquids, as filler in solids, or as stand-alone entities.

  13. Lactone modified viscosity modifiers useful in oleaginous compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, A.; Lundberg, R.D.

    1990-06-12

    This patent describes a lactone modified reaction product useful as a viscosity index improver additive for lubricating oil compositions. It comprises: the reaction produce of: oil soluble ethylene copolymer comprising within the range of about 15 to 90 wt.% ethylene and about 10 to 85 wt.% of one or more C{sub 3} to C{sub 28} alpha-olefin, having a number average molecular weight within a range of about 15,000 to 500,000 and grafted with ethylenically unsaturated C{sub 4}--C{sub 10} monocarboxylic acid or anhydride or C{sub 4}--C{sub 0} dicarboxylic acid or anhydride wherein the carboxylic acid groups or anhydride groups are located on vicinal carbon atoms; amine selected from the group consisting of amines having at least two primary amine groups and amines having at least one primary amine group and at least one secondary amine group; long chain hydrocarbyl substituted succinic anhydride or acid having 25 to 400 carbon atoms; and lactone.

  14. Modifiers of Perceived Spaciousness and Crowding among Different Cultural Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasar, Jack L.; And Others

    Two studies of graduate students living in a 13-story dormitory examined the effects of natural lighting, usable space, sex, culture, and floor height on perceptions of spaciousness, personalization of space, crowding, and lightness. Previous research had indicated differences between males and females in this area, but had not considered cultural…

  15. Group Grammar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article Karen Adams demonstrates how to incorporate group grammar techniques into a classroom activity. In the activity, students practice using the target grammar to do something they naturally enjoy: learning about each other.

  16. Biological response modifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    Much of what used to be called immunotherapy is now included in the term biological response modifiers. Biological response modifiers (BRMs) are defined as those agents or approaches that modify the relationship between the tumor and host by modifying the host's biological response to tumor cells with resultant therapeutic effects.'' Most of the early work with BRMs centered around observations of spontaneous tumor regression and the association of tumor regression with concurrent bacterial infections. The BRM can modify the host response in the following ways: Increase the host's antitumor responses through augmentation and/or restoration of effector mechanisms or mediators of the host's defense or decrease the deleterious component by the host's reaction; Increase the host's defenses by the administration of natural biologics (or the synthetic derivatives thereof) as effectors or mediators of an antitumor response; Augment the host's response to modified tumor cells or vaccines, which might stimulate a greater response by the host or increase tumor-cell sensitivity to an existing response; Decrease the transformation and/or increase differentiation (maturation) of tumor cells; or Increase the ability of the host to tolerate damage by cytotoxic modalities of cancer treatment.

  17. Biological response modifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1988-10-01

    Much of what used to be called immunotherapy is now included in the term biological response modifiers. Biological response modifiers (BRMs) are those agents or approaches that modify the relationship between the tumor and host by modifying the host's biological response to tumor cells with resultant therapeutic effects. Most of the early work with BRMs centered around observations of spontaneous tumor regression and the association of tumor regression with concurrent bacterial infections. The BRM can modify the host response by increasing the host's antitumor responses through augmentation and/or restoration of effector mechanisms or mediators of the host's defense or decrease the deleterious component by the host's reaction, increasing the host's defenses by the administration of natural biologics (or the synthetic derivatives thereof) as effectors or mediators of an antitumor response, augmenting the host's response to modified tumor cells or vaccines, which might stimulate a greater response by the host or increase tumor-cell sensitivity to an existing response, decreasing the transformation and/or increase differentiation (maturation) of tumor cells, or increasing the ability of the host to tolerate damage by cytotoxic modalities of cancer treatment.

  18. Modified Nanodiamonds for Detoxification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Natalie Marie

    essential for interacting with charged molecules, like OTA. Furthermore, the increased ZPs lead to improved colloidal stabilities over a wide range of pH, which is important for their interaction in the GI tract. While the dyes and OTA illustrated primarily electrostatic adsorption mechanisms, neutrally charged AfB1's adsorption was predominantly based upon the aggregate size of the ND substrate. In addition to mycotoxins, fluorescent dyes, including propidium iodide, pyranine and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS), were initially utilized during methodological development. Fluorescent dye investigations helped assesses the adsorption mechanisms of NDs and demonstrated the significance of electrostatic interactions. Beyond electrostatic adsorption mechanisms, surface functional groups were also responsible for the amount of dye adsorbed, as was also true in OTA adsorption. Therefore, surface characterization was carried out for several ND samples by FTIR, TOF-SIMS and TDMS analysis. Final results of our studies show that our modified NDs perform better than yeast cells walls and other NDs but comparable to activated charcoal in the adsorption of AfB1, and outperform clay minerals in OTA studies. Moreover, it was demonstrated that adsorption can be maintained in a wide range of pH, thereby, increasing the possibility of NDs use in mycotoxins enterosorbent applications.

  19. Group dynamics.

    PubMed

    Scandiffio, A L

    1990-12-01

    Group dynamics play a significant role within any organization, culture, or unit. The important thing to remember with any of these structures is that they are made up of people--people with different ideas, motivations, background, and sometimes different agendas. Most groups, formal or informal, look for a leader in an effort to maintain cohesiveness of the unit. At times, that cultural bond must be developed; once developed, it must be nurtured. There are also times that one of the group no longer finds the culture comfortable and begins to act out behaviorally. It is these times that become trying for the leader as she or he attempts to remain objective when that which was once in the building phase of group cohesiveness starts to fall apart. At all times, the manager must continue to view the employee creating the disturbance as an integral part of the group. It is at this time that it is beneficial to perceive the employee exhibiting problem behaviors as a special employee, as one who needs the benefit of your experience and skills, as one who is still part of the group. It is also during this time that the manager should focus upon her or his own views in the area of power, communication, and the corporate culture of the unit that one has established before attempting to understand another's point of view. Once we understand our own motivation and accept ourselves, it is then that we may move on to offer assistance to another. Once we understand our insecurities recognizing staff dysfunction as a symptom of system dysfunction will not be so threatening to the concept of the manager that we perceive ourselves to be. It takes a secure person to admit that she or he favors staff before deciding to do something to change things. The important thing to know is that it can be done. The favored staff can find a new way of relating to others, the special employee can find new modes of behavior (and even find self-esteem in the process), the group can find new ways

  20. Group Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Susan

    1992-01-01

    Research suggests that cooperative learning works best when students are first taught group-processing skills, such as leadership, decision making, communication, trust building, and conflict management. Inadequate teacher training and boring assignments can torpedo cooperative learning efforts. Administrators should reassure teachers with…

  1. A Modified Impress Method for Beginning Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Russell W., Jr.

    A modified impress approach to teaching reading has been successfully used in a program involving first grade students. The program was multisensory and included aural, oral, visual, and kinesthetic learning experiences gained through listening, group discussions, dramatic play, art activities, audience reading, and recorded oral reading. These…

  2. Interocular grouping without awareness.

    PubMed

    Lin, San-Yuan; Yeh, Su-Ling

    2016-04-01

    Interocular grouping occurs when different parts of an image presented to each eye bound into a coherent whole. Previous studies anticipated that these parts are visible to both eyes simultaneously (i.e., the images altered back and forth). Although this view is consistent with the general consensus of binocular rivalry (BR) that suppressed stimuli receive no processing beyond rudimentary level (i.e., adaptation), it is actually inconsistent with studies that use continuous flash suppression (CFS). CFS is a form of interocular suppression that is more stable and causes stronger suppression of stimuli than BR. In the present study, we examined whether or not interocular grouping needs to occur at a conscious level as prior studies suggested. The modified double-rectangle paradigm used by Egly, Driver, and Rafal (1994) was adopted, and object-based attention was directed for successful grouping. To induce interocular grouping, we presented complementary parts of two rectangles dichoptically for possible interocular grouping and a dynamic Mondrian in front of one eye (i.e., CFS). Two concurrent targets were presented after one of the visible parts of the rectangles was cued. Participants were asked to judge which target appeared first. We found that the target showed on the cued rectangle after interocular grouping was reported to appear first more frequently than the target on the uncued rectangle. This result was based on the majority of trials where the suppressed parts of the objects remained invisible, which indicates that interocular grouping can occur without all the to-be-grouped parts being visible and without awareness. PMID:26851342

  3. Cantor Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathes, Ben; Dow, Chris; Livshits, Leo

    2011-01-01

    The Cantor subset of the unit interval [0, 1) is "large" in cardinality and also "large" algebraically, that is, the smallest subgroup of [0, 1) generated by the Cantor set (using addition mod 1 as the group operation) is the whole of [0, 1). In this paper, we show how to construct Cantor-like sets which are "large" in cardinality but "small"…

  4. Underrepresented groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, David A.

    1990-01-01

    The problem with the shortage of under represented groups in science and engineering is absolutely crucial, especially considering that U.S. will experience a shortage of 560,000 science and engineering personnel by the year 2010. Most studies by the National Science Foundation also concluded that projected shortages cannot be alleviated without significant increases in the involvement of Blacks, Hispanics, Native Americans, handicapped persons, and women.

  5. Modified Embedded Atom Method

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-08-01

    Interatomic force and energy calculation subroutine to be used with the molecular dynamics simulation code LAMMPS (Ref a.). The code evaluated the total energy and atomic forces (energy gradient) according to a cubic spline-based variant (Ref b.) of the Modified Embedded Atom Method (MEAM) with a additional Stillinger-Weber (SW) contribution.

  6. Cardiovascular group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blomqvist, Gunnar

    1989-01-01

    As a starting point, the group defined a primary goal of maintaining in flight a level of systemic oxygen transport capacity comparable to each individual's preflight upright baseline. The goal of maintaining capacity at preflight levels would seem to be a reasonable objective for several different reasons, including the maintenance of good health in general and the preservation of sufficient cardiovascular reserve capacity to meet operational demands. It is also important not to introduce confounding variables in whatever other physiological studies are being performed. A change in the level of fitness is likely to be a significant confounding variable in the study of many organ systems. The principal component of the in-flight cardiovascular exercise program should be large-muscle activity such as treadmill exercise. It is desirable that at least one session per week be monitored to assure maintenance of proper functional levels and to provide guidance for any adjustments of the exercise prescription. Appropriate measurements include evaluation of the heart-rate/workload or the heart-rate/oxygen-uptake relationship. Respiratory gas analysis is helpful by providing better opportunities to document relative workload levels from analysis of the interrelationships among VO2, VCO2, and ventilation. The committee felt that there is no clear evidence that any particular in-flight exercise regimen is protective against orthostatic hypotension during the early readaptation phase. Some group members suggested that maintenance of the lower body muscle mass and muscle tone may be helpful. There is also evidence that late in-flight interventions to reexpand blood volume to preflight levels are helpful in preventing or minimizing postflight orthostatic hypotension.

  7. Modified Faraday cup

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, John W.; Teruya, Alan T.; O'Brien, Dennis W.

    1996-01-01

    A tomographic technique for measuring the current density distribution in electron beams using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams. The modified Faraday cup includes a narrow slit and is rotated by a stepper motor and can be moved in the x, y and z directions. The beam is swept across the slit perpendicular thereto and controlled by deflection coils, and the slit rotated such that waveforms are taken every few degrees form 0.degree. to 360.degree. and the waveforms are recorded by a digitizing storage oscilloscope. Two-din-tensional and three-dimensional images of the current density distribution in the beam can be reconstructed by computer tomography from this information, providing quantitative information about the beam focus and alignment.

  8. Modified Faraday cup

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, J.W.; Teruya, A.T.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1996-09-10

    A tomographic technique for measuring the current density distribution in electron beams using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams is disclosed. The modified Faraday cup includes a narrow slit and is rotated by a stepper motor and can be moved in the x, y and z directions. The beam is swept across the slit perpendicular thereto and controlled by deflection coils, and the slit rotated such that waveforms are taken every few degrees from 0{degree} to 360{degree} and the waveforms are recorded by a digitizing storage oscilloscope. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional images of the current density distribution in the beam can be reconstructed by computer tomography from this information, providing quantitative information about the beam focus and alignment. 12 figs.

  9. Genetically modified bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Sagona, Antonia P; Grigonyte, Aurelija M; MacDonald, Paul R; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2016-04-18

    Phages or bacteriophages, viruses that infect and replicate inside bacteria, are the most abundant microorganisms on earth. The realization that antibiotic resistance poses a substantial risk to the world's health and global economy is revitalizing phage therapy as a potential solution. The increasing ease by which phage genomes can be modified, owing to the influx of new technologies, has led to an expansion of their natural capabilities, and a reduced dependence on phage isolation from environmental sources. This review will discuss the way synthetic biology has accelerated the construction of genetically modified phages and will describe the wide range of their applications. It will further provide insight into the societal and economic benefits that derive from the use of recombinant phages in various sectors, from health to biodetection, biocontrol and the food industry. PMID:26906932

  10. Modified entropic force

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Changjun

    2010-04-15

    The theory of statistical thermodynamics tells us the equipartition law of energy does not hold in the limit of very low temperatures. It is found the Debye model is very successful in explaining the experimental results for most of the solid objects. Motivated by this fact, we modify the entropic force formula which is proposed very recently. Since the Unruh temperature is proportional to the strength of the gravitational field, so the modified entropic force formula is an extension of the Newtonian gravity to the weak field. On the contrary, general relativity extends Newtonian gravity to the strong field case. Corresponding to Debye temperature, there exists a Debye acceleration g{sub D}. It is found the Debye acceleration is g{sub D}=10{sup -15} N kg{sup -1}. This acceleration is very much smaller than the gravitational acceleration 10{sup -4} N kg{sup -1} which is felt by Neptune and the gravitational acceleration 10{sup -10} N kg{sup -1} felt by the Sun. Therefore, the modified entropic force can be very well approximated by the Newtonian gravity in the Solar System and in the Galaxy. With this Debye acceleration, we find the current cosmic speeding up can be explained without invoking any kind of dark energy.

  11. Group evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Hayley H.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid fuel combustion process is greatly affected by the rate of droplet evaporation. The heat and mass exchanges between gas and liquid couple the dynamics of both phases in all aspects: mass, momentum, and energy. Correct prediction of the evaporation rate is therefore a key issue in engineering design of liquid combustion devices. Current analytical tools for characterizing the behavior of these devices are based on results from a single isolated droplet. Numerous experimental studies have challenged the applicability of these results in a dense spray. To account for the droplets' interaction in a dense spray, a number of theories have been developed in the past decade. Herein, two tasks are examined. One was to study how to implement the existing theoretical results, and the other was to explore the possibility of experimental verifications. The current theoretical results of group evaporation are given for a monodispersed cluster subject to adiabatic conditions. The time evolution of the fluid mechanic and thermodynamic behavior in this cluster is derived. The results given are not in the form of a subscale model for CFD codes.

  12. Wave propagation in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindroos, Jan Ø.; Llinares, Claudio; Mota, David F.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the propagation of scalar waves induced by matter sources in the context of scalar-tensor theories of gravity which include screening mechanisms for the scalar degree of freedom. The usual approach when studying these theories in the nonlinear regime of cosmological perturbations is based on the assumption that scalar waves travel at the speed of light. Within general relativity this approximation is valid and leads to no loss of accuracy in the estimation of observables. We find, however, that mass terms and nonlinearities in the equations of motion lead to propagation and dispersion velocities significantly different from the speed of light. As the group velocity is the one associated with the propagation of signals, a reduction of its value has direct impact on the behavior and dynamics of nonlinear structures within modified gravity theories with screening. For instance, the internal dynamics of galaxies and satellites submerged in large dark matter halos could be affected by the fact that the group velocity is smaller than the speed of light. It is therefore important, within such a framework, to take into account the fact that different parts of a galaxy will see changes in the environment at different times. A full nonstatic analysis may be necessary under those conditions.

  13. Confidentiality: a modified value.

    PubMed Central

    Emson, H E

    1988-01-01

    In its original expression as a medical value confidentiality may have been absolute; this concept has become eroded by patient consent, legal actions and change in the climate of public opinion. In particular requirements arising out of legal statutes and common law judgements have greatly modified the confidentiality of the doctor-patient relationship in societies deriving their law from English origins. Despite this, confidentiality remains a value which the physician must strive to preserve. He cannot however do this without considering its effect upon possible innocent third parties. PMID:3392723

  14. Histone Modifiers in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Idan; Poręba, Elżbieta; Kamieniarz, Kinga; Schneider, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Covalent modifications of histones can regulate all DNA-dependent processes. In the last few years, it has become more and more evident that histone modifications are key players in the regulation of chromatin states and dynamics as well as in gene expression. Therefore, histone modifications and the enzymatic machineries that set them are crucial regulators that can control cellular proliferation, differentiation, plasticity, and malignancy processes. This review discusses the biology and biochemistry of covalent histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs) and evaluates the dual role of their modifiers in cancer: as oncogenes that can initiate and amplify tumorigenesis or as tumor suppressors. PMID:21941619

  15. Lubrication of modified perfluoropolyether on magnetic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, H.; Hisamichi, Y.; Kamei, T.

    1996-03-01

    The effect of the polar group of perfluoropolyether (PFPE) on the friction of metal evaporated (ME) tape is presented in this paper. The newly synthesized amine salt has a better frictional characteristic than other conventional polar groups in 100 reciprocating motions and even shows a coefficient of 0.21, which becomes over 0.3 for the PFPE, and the difference is enhanced with surface smoothness. Stick-slip motion was not observed even for the smooth surface for the modified PFPE tape. The relation between the surface energy and friction is complicated, but the amine salt being tightly anchored to the rubbing surface covers uniformly which leads to better lubricity. Moreover, the modified PFPE are dissolved in alcohol and hexane, which makes practical use convenient without any environmental problems.

  16. Modifying Radiation Damage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwanghee; McBride, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation leaves a fairly characteristic footprint in biological materials, but this is rapidly all but obliterated by the canonical biological responses to the radiation damage. The innate immune recognition systems that sense “danger” through direct radiation damage and through associated collateral damage set in motion a chain of events that, in a tissue compromised by radiation, often unwittingly result in oscillating waves of molecular and cellular responses as tissues attempt to heal. Understanding “nature’s whispers” that inform on these processes will lead to novel forms of intervention targeted more precisely towards modifying them in an appropriate and timely fashion so as to improve the healing process and prevent or mitigate the development of acute and late effects of normal tissue radiation damage, whether it be accidental, as a result of a terrorist incident, or of therapeutic treatment of cancer. Here we attempt to discuss some of the non-free radical scavenging mechanisms that modify radiation responses and comment on where we see them within a conceptual framework of an evolving radiation-induced lesion. PMID:20583981

  17. Modified clay sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Fogler, H. Scott; Srinivasan, Keeran R.

    1990-01-01

    A novel modified clay sorbent and method of treating industrial effluents to remove trace pollutants, such as dioxins, biphenyls, and polyaromatics such as benzo(a)pyrene and pentachlorophenol. The novel clay sorbent has a composite structure in which the interlayer space of an expandable clay, such as smectite, is filled with polyvalent or multivalent inorganic cations which forces weaker surfactant cations to locate on the surface of the clay in such an orientation that the resulting composite is hydrophilic in nature. A specific example is cetylpyridinium-hydroxy aluminum-montmorillonite. In certain embodiments, a non-expanding clay, such as kaolinite, is used and surfactant cations are necessarily located on an external surface of the clay. A specific example is cetylpyridinium-kaolinite.

  18. [The modified Lapidus arthrodesis].

    PubMed

    Trnka, H-J; Hofstätter, S

    2005-08-01

    For the correction of hallux valgus, as one of the most common deformities of the lower limbs, a modified Lapidus arthrodesis is applied at the base of the hallux. After using a lateral tissue technique with medial capsular reefing, a general arthrodesis of the tarsometatarsal 1 joint is carried out. An unstable hallux is the indication for a classic Lapidus arthrodesis. Before determination of the indication, an exact clinical x-ray examination should be made in the dorsoplanar position as well as laterally standing. Complications associated with the Lapidus arthrodesis are postoperative metatarsalgia and pseudoarthrosis. Advantages of this technique are, for example, a high correction potential and better healing, although the surgical technique and post-operative care are more time consuming than for other methods. PMID:16028050

  19. [Adsorption of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) onto modified activated carbons].

    PubMed

    Tong, Xi-Zhen; Shi, Bao-You; Xie, Yue; Wang, Dong-Sheng

    2012-09-01

    Modified coal and coconut shell based powdered activated carbons (PACs) were prepared by FeCl3 and medium power microwave treatment, respectively. Batch experiments were carried out to evaluate the characteristics of adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) onto original and modified PACs. Based on pore structure and surface functional groups characterization, the adsorption behaviors of modified and original PACs were compared. The competitive adsorption of humic acid (HA) and PFOS on original and modified coconut shell PACs were also investigated. Results showed that both Fe3+ and medium power microwave treatments changed the pore structure and surface functional groups of coal and coconut shell PACs, but the changing effects were different. The adsorption of PFOS on two modified coconut shell-based PACs was significantly improved. While the adsorption of modified coal-based activated carbons declined. The adsorption kinetics of PFOS onto original and modified coconut shell-based activated carbons were the same, and the time of reaching adsorption equilibrium was about 6 hours. In the presence of HA, the adsorption of PFOS by modified PAC was reduced but still higher than that of the original. PMID:23243870

  20. Monitoring Transport Across Modified Nanoporous Alumina Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Penumetcha, Sai S.; Kona, Ravikanth; Hardin, Jonathan L.; Molder, Andrew L.; Steinle, Erich D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the use of several characterization methods to examine alumina nanotubule membranes that have been modified with specific silanes. The function of these silanes is to alter the transport properties through the membrane by changing the local environment inside the alumina nanotube. The presence of alkyl groups, either long (C18) or short and branched (isopropyl) hydrocarbon chains, on these silanes significantly decreases the rate of transport of permeant molecules through membranes containing alumina nanotubes as monitored via absorbance spectroscopy. The presence of an ionic surfactant can alter the polarity of these modified nanotubes, which correlates to an increased transport of ions. Fluorescent spectroscopy is also utilized to enhance the sensitivity of detecting these permeant molecules. Confirmation of the alkylsilane attachment to the alumina membrane is achieved with traditional infrared spectroscopy, which can also examine the lifetime of the modified membrane. The physical parameters of these silane-modified porous alumina membranes are studied via scanning electron microscopy. The alumina nanotubes are not physically closed off or capped by the silanes that are attached to the alumina surfaces.

  1. Modified carbohydrate-chitosan compounds, methods of making the same and methods of using the same

    DOEpatents

    Venditti, Richard A; Pawlak, Joel J; Salam, Abdus; El-Tahlawy, Khaled Fathy

    2015-03-10

    Compositions of matter are provided that include chitosan and a modified carbohydrate. The modified carbohydrate includes a carbohydrate component and a cross linking agent. The modified carbohydrate has increased carboxyl content as compared to an unmodified counterpart carbohydrate. A carboxyl group of the modified carbohydrate is covalently bonded with an amino group of chitosan. The compositions of matter provided herein may include cross linked starch citrate-chitosan and cross linked hemicellulose citrate-chitosan, including foams thereof. These compositions yield excellent absorbency and metal chelation properties. Methods of making cross linked modified carbohydrate-chitosan compounds are also provided.

  2. Group D Adenoviruses Infect Primary Central Nervous System Cells More Efficiently than Those from Group C

    PubMed Central

    Chillon, Miguel; Bosch, Assumpció; Zabner, Joseph; Law, Lane; Armentano, Donna; Welsh, Michael J.; Davidson, Beverly L.

    1999-01-01

    Group C adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to central nervous system cells is inefficient. We found that wild-type group D viruses, or recombinant adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) (group C) modified to contain Ad17 (group D) fiber, were more efficient in infecting primary cultures of neurons. Together with studies on primary vascular endothelial cells and tissue culture cell lines, our results indicate that there is not a universally applicable adenovirus serotype for use as a gene transfer vector. PMID:9971839

  3. Do Values Change in an Encounter Group? An Empirical Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annis, Lawrence V.

    Encounter groups represent an attempt to apply group methods for the enhancement of personal awareness and the acceleration of personal growth among "normal" people. The extent to which an individual's moral values are modified by disclosure and discussion of these values in an encounter group setting was investigated with a group of nine…

  4. Immobilization and characterization of hemoglobin on modified sporopollenin surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gubbuk, Ilkay Hilal; Ozmen, Mustafa; Maltas, Esra

    2012-06-01

    Hemoglobin was covalently immobilized onto modified sporopollenin surface with different functional groups by chemical reactions to enhance binding ability of protein. In this study, the influence of various silane linker molecules on the capacity of protein binding was studied. For this purpose, activated sporopollenin was modified by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS), 3-chloropropyltrimethoxysilane (CPTS) and (3-glycidyloxypropyl)trimethoxysilane (GPTS). Hemoglobin (Hb) was immobilized on modified sporopollenin surfaces in phosphate buffer saline solution (PBS, pH 7.4) at 4°C. Results showed that GPTS modified sporopollenin surfaces resulted in the highest binding capacity for Hb. Micro porosity of samples was observed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermal behavior of the samples were studied with thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) within a temperature range: 25-900°C. TGA studies demonstrated the advantages of silane modification for high temperature applications and illustrated differences of the structures due to the different tail groups. PMID:22537474

  5. WELLFOCUS PPT: Modifying positive psychotherapy for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Riches, Simon; Schrank, Beate; Rashid, Tayyab; Slade, Mike

    2016-03-01

    Positive psychotherapy (PPT) is an established psychological intervention initially validated with people experiencing symptoms of depression. PPT is a positive psychology intervention, an academic discipline that has developed somewhat separately from psychotherapy and focuses on amplifying well-being rather than ameliorating deficit. The processes targeted in PPT (e.g., strengths, forgiveness, gratitude, savoring) are not emphasized in traditional psychotherapy approaches to psychosis. The goal in modifying PPT is to develop a new clinical approach to helping people experiencing psychosis. An evidence-based theoretical framework was therefore used to modify 14-session standard PPT into a manualized intervention, called WELLFOCUS PPT, which aims to improve well-being for people with psychosis. Informed by a systematic review and qualitative research, modification was undertaken in 4 stages: qualitative study, expert consultation, manualization, and stake-holder review. The resulting WELLFOCUS PPT is a theory-based 11-session manualized group therapy. PMID:25961372

  6. Blood Groups in Infection and Host Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Blood group antigens represent polymorphic traits inherited among individuals and populations. At present, there are 34 recognized human blood groups and hundreds of individual blood group antigens and alleles. Differences in blood group antigen expression can increase or decrease host susceptibility to many infections. Blood groups can play a direct role in infection by serving as receptors and/or coreceptors for microorganisms, parasites, and viruses. In addition, many blood group antigens facilitate intracellular uptake, signal transduction, or adhesion through the organization of membrane microdomains. Several blood groups can modify the innate immune response to infection. Several distinct phenotypes associated with increased host resistance to malaria are overrepresented in populations living in areas where malaria is endemic, as a result of evolutionary pressures. Microorganisms can also stimulate antibodies against blood group antigens, including ABO, T, and Kell. Finally, there is a symbiotic relationship between blood group expression and maturation of the gastrointestinal microbiome. PMID:26085552

  7. On a modified electrodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, H.R.

    2012-01-01

    A modification of electrodynamics is proposed, motivated by previously unremarked paradoxes that can occur in the standard formulation. It is shown by specific examples that gauge transformations exist that radically alter the nature of a problem, even while maintaining the values of many measurable quantities. In one example, a system with energy conservation is transformed to a system where energy is not conserved. The second example possesses a ponderomotive potential in one gauge, but this important measurable quantity does not appear in the gauge-transformed system. A resolution of the paradoxes comes from noting that the change in total action arising from the interaction term in the Lagrangian density cannot always be neglected, contrary to the usual assumption. The problem arises from the information lost by employing an adiabatic cutoff of the field. This is not necessary. Its replacement by a requirement that the total action should not change with a gauge transformation amounts to a supplementary condition for gauge invariance that can be employed to preserve the physical character of the problem. It is shown that the adiabatic cutoff procedure can also be eliminated in the construction of quantum transition amplitudes, thus retaining consistency between the way in which asymptotic conditions are applied in electrodynamics and in quantum mechanics. The ‘gauge-invariant electrodynamics’ of Schwinger is shown to depend on an ansatz equivalent to the condition found here for maintenance of the ponderomotive potential in a gauge transformation. Among the altered viewpoints required by the modified electrodynamics, in addition to the rejection of the adiabatic cutoff, is the recognition that the electric and magnetic fields do not completely determine a physical problem, and that the electromagnetic potentials supply additional information that is required for completeness of electrodynamics. PMID:23105173

  8. Modified sol-gel coatings for biotechnological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beganskiene, A.; Raudonis, R.; Zemljic Jokhadar, S.; Batista, U.; Kareiva, A.

    2007-12-01

    The modified sol-gel derived silica coatings were prepared and characterized. The amino and methyl groups were introduced onto the colloidal silica. The silica coatings with different wettability properties: coloidal silica (water contact angle 17°), polysiloxane (61°), methyl-modified (158° and 46°) coatings samples were tested for CaCo-2 cells proliferation. Methyl-modified coating (46°) proved to be the best substrate for cell proliferation. CaCo-2 cell proliferation two days post seeding was significantly faster on almost laminine, fibronectin and collagen-1 coated samples compared to corresponding controls.

  9. Modified MyPyramid for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstein, Alice H; Rasmussen, Helen; Yu, Winifred W; Epstein, Susanna R; Russell, Robert M

    2008-01-01

    In 1999 we proposed a Modified Food Guide Pyramid for adults aged 70+ y. It has been extensively used in a variety of settings and formats to highlight the unique dietary challenges of older adults. We now propose a Modified MyPyramid for Older Adults in a format consistent with the MyPyramid graphic. It is not intended to substitute for MyPyramid, which is a multifunctional Internet-based program allowing for the calculation of individualized food-based dietary guidance and providing supplemental information on food choices and preparation. Pedagogic issues related to computer availability, Web access, and Internet literacy of older adults suggests a graphic version of MyPyramid is needed. Emphasized are whole grains and variety within the grains group; variety and nutrient density, with specific emphasis on different forms particularly suited to older adults' needs (e.g. frozen) in the vegetables and fruits groups; low-fat and non-fat forms of dairy products including reduced lactose alternatives in the milk group; low saturated fat and trans fat choices in the oils group; and low saturated fat and vegetable choices in the meat and beans group. Underlying themes stress nutrient- and fiber-rich foods within each group and food sources of nutrients rather than supplements. Fluid and physical activity icons serve as the foundation of MyPyramid for Older Adults. A flag to maintain an awareness of the potential need to consider supplemental forms of calcium, and vitamins D and B-12 is placed at the top of the pyramid. Discussed are newer concerns about potential overnutrition in the current food landscape available to older adults. PMID:18156396

  10. Nominal Modifiers in Mandarin Chinese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hou, John Y.

    In the surface structure of Chinese nominal modifiers (quantifiers, determiners, adjectives, measure phrase, relative clause, etc.) may occur either before or after a modified noun. In most of the transformational studies of Chinese syntax (e.g. Cheng 1966; Hashimoto 1966; Mei 1972; Tai 1973; Teng 1974), it has been assumed that such NP's have the…

  11. Modifiers and Perceived Stress Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linn, Margaret W.

    1986-01-01

    The Modifiers and Perceived Stress Scale measures stressful life events by number and amount of perceived stresses and provides scores for variables such as anticipation of events, responsibility for events, and amount of social support from family and friends in coping with each event that modify the way stress is perceived. (Author)

  12. Group Work Publication-1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimpfer, David G.

    1992-01-01

    Lists 21 new publications in group work, of which 9 are reviewed. Those discussed include publications on group counseling and psychotherapy, structured groups, support groups, psychodrama, and social group work. (Author/NB)

  13. Group Composition, Group Interaction and Achievement in Cooperative Small Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Noreen M.

    This study investigated interaction and achievement in cooperative small groups in four junior high school mathematics classrooms. Ninety-six students learned a one-week unit on consumer mathematics in mixed-ability or uniform-ability groups. Students in mixed-ability groups scored higher on a problem-solving test than students in uniform-ability…

  14. Group Cohesion in Experiential Growth Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Sam; Vasserman-Stokes, Elaina; Vannatta, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the effect of web-based journaling on changes in group cohesion within experiential growth groups. Master's students were divided into 2 groups. Both used a web-based platform to journal after each session; however, only 1 of the groups was able to read each other's journals. Quantitative data collected before and…

  15. Class Numbers and Groups of Algebraic Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platonov, V. P.; Bondarenko, A. A.; Rapinčuk, A. S.

    1980-06-01

    The class number of an algebraic group G defined over a global field is the number of double cosets of the adele group GA with respect to the subgroups of integral and principal adeles. In most cases the set of double cosets has the natural structure of an abelian group, called the class group of G. In this article the class number of a semisimple group G is computed, and it is proved that any finite abelian group can be realized as a class group.Bibliography: 24 titles.

  16. New modification of modified bentall procedure (A single centre experience)

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Ghulam; Ahmad, Naseem; Ahmad, Sohail; Baig, Mirza Ahmad Raza; Zaheer, Sara; Furkan, Aamir

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Modified Bentall procedure has become a gold standard in the treatment of combined aortic root and aortic valve diseases. Bleeding is an important predictor of morbidity and mortality after the Bentall operation. Our objective was to evaluate the early outcomes of Modified Button-Bentall procedure with cuff technique for aortic root replacement surgery regarding hemostasis. Methods: A total number of 32 patients who underwent elective Bentall operation from January 2008 to December 2014 were included in the study. In 18 patients (Group I) modified Button-Bentall procedure with formation of cuff was used and in 14 patients (Group II) Modified Button technique without cuff formation was used for aortic root replacement. Data was analyzed using SPSS V16. Chi-square test, Fisher’s Exact test and independent sample t-test was used to analyze Qualitative and Quantitative variables. Results: Three patients in Group II and two patients in group I was in congestive cardiac failure pre-operatively. Out of thirty two patients two patients were having Aortic root dissection one in each group. Total bypass time and cross-clamp time were significantly high in Group I. There was no significant difference regarding duration of inotropic support, ventilation time, ICU stay and hospital stay time in patients of Group I and Group II. But post-op Chest drainage was very high in Group II 1158+451.25 ml versus 488.89+168.27 ml in group I (p-value <0.0001). There was one in hospital death in Group II. Conclusions: Formation of cuff of remnant of aorta during proximal anastomosis results in significant reduction in post-operative bleeding and was better in hospital outcomes. PMID:26870089

  17. Group theories: relevance to group safety studies.

    PubMed

    Benevento, A L

    1998-01-01

    Promoting safety in the workplace has been attempted in a variety of ways. Increasingly, industries are using groups such as safety teams and quality circles to promote worker safety. Group influences on individual behavior and attitudes have long been studied in the social psychology literature, but the theories have not been commonly found outside the psychology arena. This paper describes the group theories of group polarization, risky shift, social loafing, groupthink and team think and attempts to apply these theories to existing studies that examine work group influences on safety. Interesting parallels were found but only one study examined group influences as their primary focus of research. Since groups are increasingly used for safety promotion, future research on safety that studies group influences with respect to current group theories is recommended. PMID:24441299

  18. Organic intercalation of structure modified vermiculite.

    PubMed

    Wu, Nian; Wu, Limei; Liao, Libing; Lv, Guocheng

    2015-11-01

    The experiment used cationic surfactants of different chain lengths to intercalate structure modified vermiculites. The influences of structure modification, chain length and dosage of surfactants on the intercalation behavior of vermiculites were studied, and intercalation mechanism and features of interlayer chemical reactions were discussed. Results indicate that structure modified vermiculites with different layer charge have different intercalation behavior. The basal spacing of the organic intercalated modified vermiculite is the largest when acid concentration used in structure modification is 0.003 mol/L, and increases with increasing the chain length and dosage of the organics. Molecular dynamics simulation verifies that interlayer organics align almost parallel to structure layer of vermiculite, with alkyl chain stretching to the middle of interlayer space. -N(+) groups of the three surfactants locate above the leached [SiO4], which has stronger interaction with interlayer organic cations. Electrostatic force is the main interaction force between interlayer organics and structure layer of vermiculite, and then is Van der Waals force, no chemical bond formed. PMID:26196709

  19. Modified polymers for gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeller, F. H.; Christensen, W.; Mayer, L.

    1979-01-01

    Polymeric materials are modified to serve as stationary phase in chromatographic columns used for separation of atmospheric gases. Materials simplify and improve separation of atmospheric gases in terms of time, quantity of material needed, and sharpness of separation.

  20. MS Disease-Modifying Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contents Injectable treatments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral treatments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Intravenous infusion treatments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Managing side effects of disease- modifying ... or subcutaneous), oral and intravenous (into the vein) infusion. INJECTABLE TREATMENTS Treatment (chemical name) Manufacturer Avonex ® (interferon ...

  1. Topology of modified helical gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Zhang, J.; Handschuh, R. F.; Coy, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    The topology of several types of modified surfaces of helical gears is proposed. The modified surfaces allow absorption of a linear or almost linear function of transmission errors. These errors are caused by gear misalignment and an improvement of the contact of gear tooth surfaces. Principles and corresponding programs for computer aided simulation of meshing and contact of gears have been developed. The results of this investigation are illustrated with numerical examples.

  2. Modified acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Cahoon, Edgar B.; Shanklin, John; Lindgvist, Ylva; Schneider, Gunter

    1998-01-06

    Disclosed is a methods for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity.

  3. Modified Acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Cahoon, Edgar B.; Shanklin, John; Lindqvist, Ylva; Schneider, Gunter

    1999-03-30

    Disclosed is a method for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity.

  4. Group B Strep Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Return to Web version Group B Strep Infection Overview What is group B strep? Group B streptococcus, or group B strep for short, is a certain kind of bacteria (germ) that lives in the intestine, rectum, and ...

  5. Group Dynamic Processes in Email Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpay, Esat

    2005-01-01

    Discussion is given on the relevance of group dynamic processes in promoting decision-making in email discussion groups. General theories on social facilitation and social loafing are considered in the context of email groups, as well as the applicability of psychodynamic and interaction-based models. It is argued that such theories may indeed…

  6. Interagency mechanical operations group numerical systems group

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report consists of the minutes of the May 20-21, 1971 meeting of the Interagency Mechanical Operations Group (IMOG) Numerical Systems Group. This group looks at issues related to numerical control in the machining industry. Items discussed related to the use of CAD and CAM, EIA standards, data links, and numerical control.

  7. Incorporating More Individual Accountability in Group Activities in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Charles T., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    A modified model of cooperative learning known as the GIG model (for group-individual-group) designed and implemented in a large enrollment freshman chemistry course. The goal of the model is to establish a cooperative environment while emphasizing greater individual accountability using both group and individual assignments. The assignments were…

  8. Conformational switching of modified guest chains in polymer brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeis, D.; Sommer, J.-U.

    2013-07-01

    Using a numerical quasi off-lattice self-consistent field method which describes heterogeneous chains of spherical monomers we study the case of a densely grafted polymer brush with a fraction of free chain ends being replaced by a modified end-group differing in size and solvent selectivity. We can confirm the observation from molecular dynamics simulations that upon changing the solvent conditions, a switching in location of end-groups which are bigger than monomers from a state "exposed" to the solvent (on the top of the brush) to a "hidden" state (inside the brush) takes place. Our numerical method allows a detailed study of the switching effect as a function of the relevant parameters, such as grafting density, chain length, size of end-groups and their volume fraction. We find that the switching effect is enhanced for long chains, low fractions of modified chains, and big end-groups. We consider the case of low fraction of modified chains in more detail using a test chain method. Here, we explore the optimal grafting density as a function of the size of the end-groups, where the switching is most sensitive. These values can be in the experimental range for end-groups which are at least 3-4 times bigger than the monomers. The end-groups can be realized by attaching nano-particles to the last monomer of a brush-chain.

  9. Introduction to Sporadic Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boya, Luis J.

    2011-01-01

    This is an introduction to finite simple groups, in particular sporadic groups, intended for physicists. After a short review of group theory, we enumerate the 1+1+16=18 families of finite simple groups, as an introduction to the sporadic groups. These are described next, in three levels of increasing complexity, plus the six isolated ''pariah'' groups. The (old) five Mathieu groups make up the first, smallest order level. The seven groups related to the Leech lattice, including the three Conway groups, constitute the second level. The third and highest level contains the Monster group M, plus seven other related groups. Next a brief mention is made of the remaining six pariah groups, thus completing the 5+7+8+6=26 sporadic groups. The review ends up with a brief discussion of a few of physical applications of finite groups in physics, including a couple of recent examples which use sporadic groups.

  10. Stellar oscillations in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakstein, Jeremy

    2013-12-01

    Starting from the equations of modified gravity hydrodynamics, we derive the equations of motion governing linear, adiabatic, radial perturbations of stars in scalar-tensor theories. There are two new features: first, the eigenvalue equation for the period of stellar oscillations is modified such that the eigenfrequencies are always larger than predicted by general relativity. Second, the general relativity condition for stellar instability is altered so that the adiabatic index can fall below 4/3 before unstable modes appear. Stars are more stable in modified gravity theories. Specializing to the case of chameleonlike theories, we investigate these effects numerically using both polytropic Lane-Emden stars and models coming from modified gravity stellar structure simulations. We find that the change in the oscillation period of Cepheid star models can be as large as 30% for order-one matter couplings and the change in the inferred distance using the period-luminosity relation can be up to three times larger than if one had only considered the modified equilibrium structure. We discuss the implications of these results for recent and upcoming astrophysical tests and estimate that previous methods can produce new constraints such that the modifications are screened in regions of Newtonian potential of O(10-8).

  11. Model selection for modified gravity.

    PubMed

    Kitching, T D; Simpson, F; Heavens, A F; Taylor, A N

    2011-12-28

    In this article, we review model selection predictions for modified gravity scenarios as an explanation for the observed acceleration of the expansion history of the Universe. We present analytical procedures for calculating expected Bayesian evidence values in two cases: (i) that modified gravity is a simple parametrized extension of general relativity (GR; two nested models), such that a Bayes' factor can be calculated, and (ii) that we have a class of non-nested models where a rank-ordering of evidence values is required. We show that, in the case of a minimal modified gravity parametrization, we can expect large area photometric and spectroscopic surveys, using three-dimensional cosmic shear and baryonic acoustic oscillations, to 'decisively' distinguish modified gravity models over GR (or vice versa), with odds of ≫1:100. It is apparent that the potential discovery space for modified gravity models is large, even in a simple extension to gravity models, where Newton's constant G is allowed to vary as a function of time and length scale. On the time and length scales where dark energy dominates, it is only through large-scale cosmological experiments that we can hope to understand the nature of gravity. PMID:22084296

  12. Ion binding capacity of enzyme modified citrus peel and pectin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A wide ranging group of enzyme modified pectin and polygalacturonic acid (PGA) samples were tested for their biosorption potential, specifically their ability to bind Pb. Two sample sets were the pH 4.5 and 7.5 demethylated series obtained from demethylation of a model homogalacturonan produced usi...

  13. Structural and energetic characteristics of silicas modified by organosilicon compounds.

    PubMed

    Gun'ko, V M; Sheeran, D J; Augustine, S M; Blitz, J P

    2002-05-01

    Silica gels Davisil 633 and 643, and fumed silica Cab-O-Sil HS-5 with grafted 3-aminopropyl dimethylsilyl (APDMS), butyl dimethylsilyl (BDMS), octadecyl dimethylsilyl (ODDMS), and trimethylsilyl (TMS) groups of different concentrations were studied using the nitrogen adsorption method. Changes in the textural and energetic characteristics of modified silicas depend on features of the oxide matrices and grafted OSC. PMID:16290577

  14. Modified Elliptic Gamma Functions and 6d Superconformal Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiridonov, Vyacheslav P.

    2014-04-01

    We construct a modified double elliptic gamma function which is well defined when one of the base parameters lies on the unit circle. A model consisting of 6d hypermultiplets coupled to a gauge field theory living on a 4d defect is proposed whose superconformal index uses the double elliptic gamma function and obeys W( E 7)-group symmetry.

  15. Small Group Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Joseph E.

    1978-01-01

    Summarizes research on small group processes by giving a comprehensive account of the types of variables primarily studied in the laboratory. These include group structure, group composition, group size, and group relations. Considers effects of power, leadership, conformity to social norms, and role relationships. (Author/AV)

  16. Modified Acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Cahoon, E.B.; Shanklin, J.; Lindqvist, Y.; Schneider, G.

    1999-03-30

    Disclosed is a method for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity. 2 figs.

  17. Modified acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Cahoon, E.B.; Shanklin, J.; Lindgvist, Y.; Schneider, G.

    1998-01-06

    Disclosed is a method for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity. 1 fig.

  18. A modified submental orotracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Savitha, Keelara Shivalingaiah; Kujur, Abha Rani; Vikram, M S; Joseph, Shirley

    2016-01-01

    In patients with concomitant occurrence of maxillofacial and basilar skull fractures, open reduction and internal fixation is the treatment. It requires intermittent intra operative dental occlusion which precludes oral or nasal intubation. In such cases submental intubation (SMI) is a recognized technique in practice. We describe a modified technique for smooth exteriorization of the endotracheal tube (ETT) during SMI. As the SMI technique is unusual for the performer, emphasis is laid on the applied aspects to minimize probable complications during the procedure. With the modified technique we performed SMI uneventfully on five patients. PMID:26957708

  19. A modified submental orotracheal intubation

    PubMed Central

    Savitha, Keelara Shivalingaiah; Kujur, Abha Rani; Vikram, M. S.; Joseph, Shirley

    2016-01-01

    In patients with concomitant occurrence of maxillofacial and basilar skull fractures, open reduction and internal fixation is the treatment. It requires intermittent intra operative dental occlusion which precludes oral or nasal intubation. In such cases submental intubation (SMI) is a recognized technique in practice. We describe a modified technique for smooth exteriorization of the endotracheal tube (ETT) during SMI. As the SMI technique is unusual for the performer, emphasis is laid on the applied aspects to minimize probable complications during the procedure. With the modified technique we performed SMI uneventfully on five patients PMID:26957708

  20. Synthesis of chemically modified DNA.

    PubMed

    Shivalingam, Arun; Brown, Tom

    2016-06-15

    Naturally occurring DNA is encoded by the four nucleobases adenine, cytosine, guanine and thymine. Yet minor chemical modifications to these bases, such as methylation, can significantly alter DNA function, and more drastic changes, such as replacement with unnatural base pairs, could expand its function. In order to realize the full potential of DNA in therapeutic and synthetic biology applications, our ability to 'write' long modified DNA in a controlled manner must be improved. This review highlights methods currently used for the synthesis of moderately long chemically modified nucleic acids (up to 1000 bp), their limitations and areas for future expansion. PMID:27284032

  1. Redefining Cohesiveness in Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keyton, Joann; Springston, Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Attempted to replicate and extend research on work of Kelly and Duran in assessing relationship of group member perceptions of group interaction to group effectiveness. Concludes perceived similarity may not always align with perceptions of cohesiveness. (Author/ABL)

  2. Dissolution from solid lipid extrudates containing release modifiers.

    PubMed

    Güres, Sinan; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2011-06-30

    The influence of different types of release modifiers on the dissolution from solid lipid extrudates was investigated. Diprophylline was extruded together with 45% tristearin and 5% (w/w) of a release modifier to suitable extrudates. Three groups of release modifiers were defined: Hydrocolloids, disintegrants and pore formers. All of the release modifier-containing extrudates showed a faster release compared to the reference extrudate, which contained 50% (w/w) of each, API and lipid. Increasing the amount of diprophylline in the binary mixture up to 55% (w/w) also increased its release rate. Compared to this new reference, not all of the release modifier-containing extrudates exhibited an increased dissolution rate. Within the group of pore formers, there was a great discrepancy concerning the dissolution rates. Extrudates containing polyethylene glycol (PEG) exhibited a much higher release rate compared with extrudates containing sodium chloride or mannitol. This behaviour was assumed to be based on the extrusion temperature of 65°C at which PEG exists in the molten state. The hypothesis was tested using different PEGs and another solid lipid. PMID:21515350

  3. Modifying muscular dystrophy through TGFβ

    PubMed Central

    Ceco, Ermelinda; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy arises from ongoing muscle degeneration and insufficient regeneration. This imbalance leads to loss of muscle with replacement by scar or fibrosis resulting in muscle weakness and, eventually, loss of muscle function. Human muscular dystrophy is characterized by a wide range of disease severity, even when the same genetic mutation is present. This variability implies that other factors, both genetic and environmental, modify the disease outcome. There has been an ongoing effort to define the genetic and molecular bases that influence muscular dystrophy onset and progression. Modifier genes for muscle disease have been identified through candidate gene approaches as well as genomewide surveys. Multiple lines of experimental evidence have now converged on the TGFβ pathway as a modifier for muscular dystrophy. TGFβ signaling is upregulated in dystrophic muscle as a result of a destabilized plasma membrane and/or altered extracellular matrix. Given the important biological role of the TGFβ pathway, and its role beyond muscle homeostasis, we review modifier genes that alter the TGFβ pathway and approaches to modulate TGFβ activity to ameliorate muscle disease. PMID:23551962

  4. Cosmological hints of modified gravity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Valentino, Eleonora; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Silk, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The recent measurements of cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies made by the Planck satellite have provided impressive confirmation of the Λ CDM cosmological model. However interesting hints of slight deviations from Λ CDM have been found, including a 95% C.L. preference for a "modified gravity" (MG) structure formation scenario. In this paper we confirm the preference for a modified gravity scenario from Planck 2015 data, find that modified gravity solves the so-called Alens anomaly in the CMB angular spectrum, and constrains the amplitude of matter density fluctuations to σ8=0.81 5-0.048+0.032 , in better agreement with weak lensing constraints. Moreover, we find a lower value for the reionization optical depth of τ =0.059 ±0.020 (to be compared with the value of τ =0.079 ±0.017 obtained in the standard scenario), more consistent with recent optical and UV data. We check the stability of this result by considering possible degeneracies with other parameters, including the neutrino effective number, the running of the spectral index and the amount of primordial helium. The indication for modified gravity is still present at about 95% C.L., and could become more significant if lower values of τ were to be further confirmed by future cosmological and astrophysical data. When the CMB lensing likelihood is included in the analysis the statistical significance for MG simply vanishes, indicating also the possibility of a systematic effect for this MG signal.

  5. Genetically Modified Foods and Social Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Maghari, Behrokh Mohajer; Ardekani, Ali M.

    2011-01-01

    Biotechnology is providing us with a wide range of options for how we can use agricultural and commercial forestry lands. The cultivation of genetically modified (GM) crops on millions of hectares of lands and their injection into our food chain is a huge global genetic experiment involving all living beings. Considering the fast pace of new advances in production of genetically modified crops, consumers, farmers and policymakers worldwide are challenged to reach a consensus on a clear vision for the future of world food supply. The current food biotechnology debate illustrates the serious conflict between two groups: 1) Agri-biotech investors and their affiliated scientists who consider agricultural biotechnology as a solution to food shortage, the scarcity of environmental resources and weeds and pests infestations; and 2) independent scientists, environmentalists, farmers and consumers who warn that genetically modified food introduces new risks to food security, the environment and human health such as loss of biodiversity; the emergence of superweeds and superpests; the increase of antibiotic resistance, food allergies and other unintended effects. This article reviews major viewpoints which are currently debated in the food biotechnology sector in the world. It also lays the ground-work for deep debate on benefits and risks of Biotech-crops for human health, ecosystems and biodiversity. In this context, although some regulations exist, there is a need for continuous vigilance for all countries involved in producing genetically engineered food to follow the international scientific bio-safety testing guidelines containing reliable pre-release experiments and post-release track of transgenic plants to protect public health and avoid future environmental harm. PMID:23408723

  6. Genetically modified foods and social concerns.

    PubMed

    Maghari, Behrokh Mohajer; Ardekani, Ali M

    2011-07-01

    Biotechnology is providing us with a wide range of options for how we can use agricultural and commercial forestry lands. The cultivation of genetically modified (GM) crops on millions of hectares of lands and their injection into our food chain is a huge global genetic experiment involving all living beings. Considering the fast pace of new advances in production of genetically modified crops, consumers, farmers and policymakers worldwide are challenged to reach a consensus on a clear vision for the future of world food supply. The current food biotechnology debate illustrates the serious conflict between two groups: 1) Agri-biotech investors and their affiliated scientists who consider agricultural biotechnology as a solution to food shortage, the scarcity of environmental resources and weeds and pests infestations; and 2) independent scientists, environmentalists, farmers and consumers who warn that genetically modified food introduces new risks to food security, the environment and human health such as loss of biodiversity; the emergence of superweeds and superpests; the increase of antibiotic resistance, food allergies and other unintended effects. This article reviews major viewpoints which are currently debated in the food biotechnology sector in the world. It also lays the ground-work for deep debate on benefits and risks of Biotech-crops for human health, ecosystems and biodiversity. In this context, although some regulations exist, there is a need for continuous vigilance for all countries involved in producing genetically engineered food to follow the international scientific bio-safety testing guidelines containing reliable pre-release experiments and post-release track of transgenic plants to protect public health and avoid future environmental harm. PMID:23408723

  7. The reactivity of the thiol groups of calf thymus deoxyribonucleohistone

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, J.E.; Walker, I.O.

    1974-01-01

    The reactivities of the two cysteine thiol groups of calf thymus F3 histone were investigated using 5,5′-dithiobis-[2- nitrobenzoic acid], (DTNB). In isolated histone, both thiol groups were available for reaction. However, analysis of reaction profiles of native deoxyribonucleohistone, (DNH), in various solvent conditions, together with gel electrophoresis studies of DNH modified with DTNB, showed that only one of the thiol groups is normally modified by the reagent. If NaCl is present (above 1.OM) the other thiol group can also be modified. The reactivities of both groups were largely independent of the degree of DNH supercoiling and of the binding of F3 to the DNA. PMID:4472380

  8. Modified Supraorbital Keyhole Approach to Anterior Circulation Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yuhee; Park, Cheol Wan; Kim, Myeong Jin; Choi, Dae Han; Kim, Yeon Jun; Park, Kawngwoo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To select a surgical approach for aneurysm clipping by comparing 2 approaches. Materials and Methods 204 patients diagnosed with subarachnoid hemorrhage treated by the same neurosurgeon at a single institution from November 2011 to October 2013, 109 underwent surgical clipping. Among these, 40 patients with Hunt and Hess or Fisher grades 2 or lower were selected. Patients were assigned to Group 1 (supraorbital keyhole approach) or Group 2 (modified supraorbital approach). The prognosis according to the difference between the two surgical approaches was retrospectively compared. Results Supraorbital keyhole approach (Group 1) was performed in 20 aneurysms (50%) and modified supraorbital approach (Group 2) was used in 20 aneurysms. Baseline characteristics of patients did not differ significantly between two groups. Total operative time (p = 0.226), early ambulation time (p = 0.755), length of hospital stay (p = 0.784), Glasgow Coma Scale at discharge (p = 0.325), and Glasgow Outcome Scale scores (p = 0.427) did not show statistically significant differences. The amount of intraoperative hemorrhage was significantly lower in the supraorbital keyhole approach (p < 0.05). Conclusion The present series demonstrates the safety and feasibility of the two minimal invasive surgical techniques for clipping the intracranial aneurysms. The modified supraorbital keyhole approach was associated with more hemorrhage than the previous supraorbital keyhole approach, but did not exhibit differences in clinical results, and provided a better surgical view and convenience for surgeons in patients with Hunt and Hess or Fisher grades 2 or lower. PMID:27114960

  9. [Adsorption mechanism of furfural onto modified rice husk charcoals].

    PubMed

    Deng, Yong; Wang, Xianhua; Li, Yunchao; Shao, Jing'ai; Yang, Haiping; Chen, Hanping

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the absorptive characteristics of furfural onto biomass charcoals derived from rice husk pyrolysis, we studied the information of the structure and surface chemistry properties of the rice husk charcoals modified by thermal treatment under nitrogen and carbon dioxide flow and adsorption mechanism of furfural. The modified samples are labeled as RH-N2 and RH-CO2. Fresh rice husk charcoal sample (RH-450) and modified samples were characterized by elemental analysis, nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and Boehm titration. The results show that fresh rice husk charcoal obtained at 450 degrees C had a large number of organic groups on its surface and poor pore structure. After the modification under nitrogen and carbon dioxide flow, oxygenic organics in rice husk charcoals decompose further, leading to the reduction of acidic functional groups on charcoals surface, and the increase of the pyrone structures of the basic groups. Meanwhile, pore structure was improved significantly and the surface area was increased, especially for the micropores. This resulted in the increase of π-π dispersion between the surfaces of rice husk charcoals and furfural molecular. With making comprehensive consideration of π-π dispersion and pore structure, the best removal efficiency of furfural was obtained by rice husk charcoal modified under carbon dioxide flow. PMID:26964338

  10. Assertive Training in Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sansbury, David L.

    1974-01-01

    This article describes a group approach to helping the nonassertive client. After describing the group composition and goals, he presents a session by session description for conducting the assertive training group. In addition, he presents suggestions based on experiences in leading the group. (Author)

  11. Interdependence and Group Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wageman, Ruth

    1995-01-01

    Investigated the differential effects of task design and reward system design on group functioning in a large U.S. corporation; the effectiveness of "hybrid" groups (having tasks and rewards with both individual and group elements); and how individuals' autonomy preferences moderate their responses to interdependence. Groups performed best when…

  12. Modified kernel-based nonlinear feature extraction.

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, J.; Perkins, S. J.; Theiler, J. P.; Ahalt, S.

    2002-01-01

    Feature Extraction (FE) techniques are widely used in many applications to pre-process data in order to reduce the complexity of subsequent processes. A group of Kernel-based nonlinear FE ( H E ) algorithms has attracted much attention due to their high performance. However, a serious limitation that is inherent in these algorithms -- the maximal number of features extracted by them is limited by the number of classes involved -- dramatically degrades their flexibility. Here we propose a modified version of those KFE algorithms (MKFE), This algorithm is developed from a special form of scatter-matrix, whose rank is not determined by the number of classes involved, and thus breaks the inherent limitation in those KFE algorithms. Experimental results suggest that MKFE algorithm is .especially useful when the training set is small.

  13. Zolpidem modified-release in insomnia.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, Cynthia; Neill, Jason; Breden, Ericka

    2007-01-01

    Zolpidem modified-release (MR) is the first hypnotic agent to be marketed in an extended-release formulation. Zolpidem MR is a two-layered, biphasic release tablet indicated for the management of induction of sleep and sleep maintenance. The pharmacokinetics of the drug are similar to those of immediate-release zolpidem. Two double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trials demonstrated efficacy in adults and elderly patients treated with zolpidem MR for 3 weeks without significant impairment in next-day psychomotor functioning. The most common adverse effects with zolpidem MR were dizziness, somnolence, and headache. A starting dose of zolpidem MR 12.5 mg is recommended for adults and 6.25 mg for elderly patients. PMID:19300582

  14. Modified Retroperitoneoscopic Port Sites for Surgery of Upper Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Dongliang; Hu, Wanli

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Our objective was to introduce our experience using modified retroperitoneoscopic port positions for operations of the upper urinary tract. Methods: We designed different trocar positions or incisions according to different surgical procedures and specimen sizes. A total of 116 patients, comprising patients with common adrenal, kidney, and ureter diseases, underwent retroperitoneoscopic operations by use of modified incisions. These patients comprised 23 with adrenal diseases, 84 with kidney diseases, and 9 with ureter diseases. The specimen was retrieved, as much as possible, through a transverse incision to produce a hidden scar after recovery. By contrast, 143 patients underwent the same or similar procedures using classical 3-port incisions. The operative time was defined as the time from skin incision to skin closure. Results: There were no significant differences in age, estimated blood loss, oral intake, and hospital stay between groups. A significant difference in favor of the modified group was noted with respect to analgesia use (diclofenac sodium, 50 mg vs 100 mg; P < .05) in all 3 modified methods, as well as in cosmetic outcome in the groups undergoing the first modification (score, 8.9 ± 2.2 VS 7.3 ± 2.8; P < .05) and second modification (score, 8.7 ± 2.5 VS 7.1 ± 2.4; P < .05). In addition, the mean operative time in patients undergoing ureter operations was shorter than that in the conventional group using classical 3-port positions (55 ± 11 minutes vs 70 ± 15 minutes, P < .05). Conclusions: Our modified retroperitoneoscopic incision is a safe, cosmetic alternative procedure for operations of the upper urinary tract. Different diseases and specimen sizes can be treated with the personalized or suitable incisions that we have introduced. PMID:25392615

  15. The influence of unstable modified wall squat exercises on the posture of female university students

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoonmi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of unstable modified wall squat exercises on the posture of female university students. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 30 female university students who were equally and randomly allocated to an unstable modified wall squat exercises group the experimental group and a stable modified wall squat exercises group the control group. [Methods] Both groups performed their respective exercises for 30 minutes three times per week over a six-week period. Using BackMapper, trunk inclination, trunk imbalance, pelvic position, pelvic torsion, pelvic rotation, and position of the scapulae were evaluated. [Results] The unstable modified wall squat exercises group obtained significant results for trunk inclination, trunk imbalance, pelvic position, pelvic torsion, position of the scapulae, while the stable modified wall squat exercises group obtained significant results for trunk imbalance and pelvic position. [Conclusion] Unstable modified wall squat exercises may be applied as a method to correct the posture of average adults. PMID:26356770

  16. Modified World Café Discussion Model for Conference and Course Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Alice; Fox, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    A group facilitation technique called World Café usually involves dividing a large number of people into smaller groups at tables, exploring a variety of topics around a key focus, and collecting ideas from the discussions to debrief later as a large group. We used a modified version of World Café during the new Cracker Barrel session format at…

  17. Reduced modified Chaplygin gas cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jianbo; Geng, Danhua; Xu, Lixin; Wu, Yabo; Liu, Molin

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we study cosmologies containing the reduced modified Chaplygin gas (RMCG) fluid which is reduced from the modified Chaplygin gas p = Aρ - Bρ -α for the value of α = -1 /2. In this special case, dark cosmological models can be realized for different values of model parameter A. We investigate the viabilities of these dark cosmological models by discussing the evolutions of cosmological quantities and using the currently available cosmic observations. It is shown that the special RMCG model ( A = 0 or A = 1) which unifies the dark matter and dark energy should be abandoned. For A = 1 /3, RMCG which unifies the dark energy and dark radiation is the favorite model according to the objective Akaike information criteria. In the case of A < 0, RMCG can achieve the features of the dynamical quintessence and phantom models, where the evolution of the universe is not sensitive to the variation of model parameters.

  18. Modified muscle sparing posterolateral thoracotomy.

    PubMed Central

    Ashour, M

    1990-01-01

    A modified posterolateral thoracotomy is described that combines the advantages of complete muscle sparing through a thoracolumbar fascial slide with excellent exposure. The technique is easy to perform. The procedure was associated with relatively little postoperative pain, coughing was effective, and early ambulation was achieved. Experience with this approach in the first 49 patients suggests that it offers an attractive alternative to the standard muscle cutting posterolateral thoracotomy approach for elective procedures. PMID:2281426

  19. Comment on Modified Stokes Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, D.M.; Utku, C.

    2009-01-01

    It is common practice in passive microwave remote sensing (microwave radiometry) to express observables as temperatures and in the case of polarimetric radiometry to use what are called "Modified Stokes Parameters in Brightness Temperature" to describe the scene. However, definitions with slightly different normalization (with and without division by bandwidth) have appeared in the literature. The purpose of this manuscript is to present an analysis to clarify the meaning of terms in the definition and resolve the question of the proper normalization.

  20. Estimating the Modified Allan Variance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, Charles

    1995-01-01

    The third-difference approach to modified Allan variance (MVAR) leads to a tractable formula for a measure of MVAR estimator confidence, the equivalent degrees of freedom (edf), in the presence of power-law phase noise. The effect of estimation stride on edf is tabulated. A simple approximation for edf is given, and its errors are tabulated. A theorem allowing conservative estimates of edf in the presence of compound noise processes is given.

  1. Mystic Reflection Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazlov, Yuri; Berenstein, Arkady

    2014-04-01

    This paper aims to systematically study mystic reflection groups that emerged independently in the paper [Selecta Math. (N.S.) 14 (2009), 325-372] by the authors and in the paper [Algebr. Represent. Theory 13 (2010), 127-158] by Kirkman, Kuzmanovich and Zhang. A detailed analysis of this class of groups reveals that they are in a nontrivial correspondence with the complex reflection groups G(m,p,n). We also prove that the group algebras of corresponding groups are isomorphic and classify all such groups up to isomorphism.

  2. Changing Group and Organizational Cultures To Support Healthy Lifestyles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Judd

    Group and organizational cultures play an important role in helping people to adopt healthier lifestyles. Culture can be assessed by looking at social expectations for behavior, called group norms. Cultural norms can be changed to support healthy lifestyles through a systematic and participatory process. Such a change effort would modify: (1)…

  3. What Makes Groups Tick.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allcorn, Seth

    1985-01-01

    By reviewing this analysis of the behavior of both groups and individuals in groups, human resources managers can learn to tell whether committees, task forces, and departments may be encouraging or inhibiting the work they set out to do. (Author)

  4. GROUP ASPIRATIONS AND GROUP COPING BEHAVIOR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MEDOW, HERMAN; ZANDER, ALVIN

    THIS RESEARCH PROJECT WAS CONCERNED WITH THE EFFECTS OF CERTAIN INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL CONDITIONS UPON THE SELECTION OF A GROUP'S LEVEL OF ASPIRATION AND THE EFFECTS OF THESE CONDITIONS ON MEMBERS' COPING BEHAVIOR. SEVEN EXPERIMENTS WERE DESIGNED WHICH UTILIZED MALE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS OF SUBURBAN SCHOOLS AS SUBJECTS. RESULTS OBTAINED FROM THE…

  5. The GROOP Effect: Groups Mimic Group Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Jessica Chia-Chin; Sebanz, Natalie; Knoblich, Gunther

    2011-01-01

    Research on perception-action links has focused on an interpersonal level, demonstrating effects of observing individual actions on performance. The present study investigated perception-action matching at an inter-group level. Pairs of participants responded to hand movements that were performed by two individuals who used one hand each or they…

  6. Integrated Play Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glovak, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    As an occupational therapist running social play groups with sensory integration for children on the autism spectrum, the author frequently doubted the wisdom of combining several children on the spectrum into a group. In fact, as the owner of a clinic she said, "No more!" The groups seemed like a waste of parents' time and money, and she refused…

  7. Internet Discussion Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Glen; Bull, Gina; Sigmon, Tim

    1997-01-01

    Discusses newsgroups, listservs, and Web-based discussion groups. Highlights include major categories of international USENET discussion groups; newsgroups versus mailing lists; newsreaders; news servers; newsgroup subscriptions; newsgroups versus Web discussion groups; linking newsgroups, mailing lists, and the Web; and setting up a news host. A…

  8. Change through Group Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAllan, Les; Friedman, Amy; Spears, Evans

    Perhaps the most well known treatment modalities in the field of prevention and treatment of addiction are groups. Group settings serve to bring individuals with addictions together at one time in one place to work on relevant issues together. Groups may serve as a safe environment for learning new social and relationship skills, gaining…

  9. Infant Group Care Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, Earline D.

    Children under 3 years of age who are in group care face special health risks. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control indicate the existence of a causal relationship between infant group day care and certain diseases that are spread through contact at day care centers. Children in group care who are still in diapers are especially vulnerable to…

  10. The Wisdom of Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2009-01-01

    What is it about small groups that make them so powerful? The answer is straightforward: Groups tend to solve problems better than even the brightest individuals because "many hands make light work," and "two heads are better than one." This is especially true when the groups are diverse and individuals act somewhat independently. In this month's…

  11. Working Group 7 Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev S.; Berg J.

    2012-06-10

    The primary subject of working group 7 at the 2012 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop was muon accelerators for a muon collider or neutrino factory. Additionally, this working group included topics that did not fit well into other working groups. Two subjects were discussed by more than one speaker: lattices to create a perfectly integrable nonlinear lattice, and a Penning trap to create antihydrogen.

  12. Internet minimal group paradigm.

    PubMed

    Amichai-Hamburger, Yair

    2005-04-01

    Over many years, social psychologists have sought to understand what causes individuals to form themselves into groups. Initially, it was believed that groups were formed when people bonded around a common goal. Later, it was found that, when individuals were divided into groups on a random basis, this in itself was sufficient for them to feel part of a group and show a preference for their own group over others. Since the environment in cyberspace is different from that of the offline world, for example, there is no physical proximity between participants; it may be assumed that it would be difficult to achieve feelings of affiliation among potential or actual group members. This pioneer study seeks to discover which components are requisite to the creation of a group identity among individuals surfing the Internet. For this experiment, 24 people were divided into two Internet chat groups according to their intuitive preference in a decision-making task. It was found that group members perceived their own group performance as superior on a cognitive task as compared with that of the other group. These results demonstrate that for surfers, the Internet experience is very real and even a trivial allocation of people to a group is likely to create a situation of ingroup favoritism. PMID:15938653

  13. Practice and Group Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hager, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Although learning has always been a central topic for philosophy of education, little attention has been paid to the notion of group learning. This article outlines and discusses some plausible examples of group learning. Drawing on these examples, various principles and issues that surround the notion of group learning are identified and…

  14. Parent Group Spotlight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parenting for High Potential, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This issue's "Parent Group Spotlight" features Deborah Simon, president of West Sound Gifted, Talented & Twice-Exceptional (WSGT2e), who started a parent group in Washington in 2013. In just one year, this small, but mighty group has held community forums, attended school board meetings, and helped influence local gifted programming.…

  15. Inter-Rater Reliability of the Modified Ashworth Scale and Modified Modified Ashworth Scale in Assessing Poststroke Elbow Flexor Spasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaya, Taciser; Goksel Karatepe, Altinay; Gunaydin, Rezzan; Koc, Aysegul; Altundal Ercan, Ulku

    2011-01-01

    The Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) is commonly used in clinical practice for grading spasticity. However, it was modified recently by omitting grade "1+" of the MAS and redefining grade "2". The aim of this study was to investigate the inter-rater reliability of MAS and modified MAS (MMAS) for the assessment of poststroke elbow flexor spasticity.…

  16. Insights into the electrocatalysis of nitrobenzene using chemically-modified carbon nanotube electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Yutao; Wang, Baoyan; Wang, Qinchao; Zhao, George; Guo, Peizhi

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of nitrobenzene and its derivatives at chemically-functionalized multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) modified electrodes was studied. Experimental results showed that hydroxyl-containing MWNTs exhibited the highest electrocatalytic activity among the used MWNTs because of its weak capacitive features and oxygen-containing functional groups. The cycle voltammetrys of nitrobenzene derivatives on the MWNTs modified electrodes can be easily tuned by changing the substituted groups of nitrobenzene. Based on the experimental data, the electrochemical reaction mechanisms of nitrobenzene and its derivatives on the MWNTs modified electrodes have been discussed and analyzed. PMID:25204889

  17. Treatment of lumbar disc herniation by percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) and modified PLDD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Xiao fei; Li, Hong zhi; Wu, Ru zhou; Sui, Yun xian

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To study the micro-invasive operative method and to compare the effect of treatment of PLDD and modified PLDD for Lumbar Disc Herniation. Method: Vaporized part of the nucleus pulposus in single or multiple point after acupuncture into lumbar disc, to reach the purpose of the decompression of the lumbar disc. Result: Among the 19 cases of the regular PLDD group, the excellent and good rate was 63.2%, and among the 40 cases of the modified PLDD group, the excellent and good rate was 82.5%. Conclusion: The modified PLDD has good effect on the treatment for lumbar disc herniation.

  18. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Coit, William George; Griffin, Peter Terry; Hamilton, Paul Taylor; Hsu, Chia-Fu; Mason, Stanley Leroy; Samuel, Allan James; Watkins, Ronnie Wade

    2012-07-31

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  19. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Coit, William George; Griffin, Peter Terry; Hamilton, Paul Taylor; Hsu, Chia-Fu; Mason, Stanley Leroy; Samuel, Allan James; Watkins, Ronnie Wade

    2010-11-09

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  20. Phenoxy resins containing pendent ethynyl groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.; Jensen, B. J.; Havens, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    As part of an effort on tougher/solvent resistant matrix resins for composites, research was directed towards exploring methods to improve the solvent resistance of linear amorphous thermoplastics. Ethyl reactive groups were placed on the ends of oligomers and pendent along the polymer chain and subsequently thermally reacted to provide crosslinking and thus improvement in solvent resistance. This concept is extended to another thermoplastic, a phenoxy resin. A commercially available phenoxy resin (PKHH) was systematically modified by reaction of the pendent hydroxyl groups on the phenoxy resin with various amounts of 4-ethynylbenzoyl chloride. As the pendent ethynyl group content in the phenoxy resin increased, the cured resin exhibited a higher glass transition temperature, better solvent resistance and less flexibility. The solvent resistance was further improved by correcting a low molecular weight diethynyl compound, 2,2-bis(4-ethynylbenzoyloxy-4'-phenyl)propane, with a phenoxy resin containing pendent ethynyl groups.

  1. Surface-modified bacterial nanofibrillar PHB scaffolds for bladder tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Karahaliloğlu, Zeynep; Demirbilek, Murat; Şam, Mesut; Sağlam, Necdet; Mızrak, Alpay Koray; Denkbaş, Emir Baki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study is in vitro investigation of the feasibility of surface-modified bacterial nanofibrous poly [(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB) graft for bladder reconstruction. In this study, the surface of electrospun bacterial PHB was modified with PEG- or EDA via radio frequency glow discharge method. After plasma modification, contact angle of EDA-modified PHB scaffolds decreased from 110 ± 1.50 to 23 ± 0.5 degree. Interestingly, less calcium oxalate stone deposition was observed on modified PHB scaffolds compared to that of non-modified group. Results of this study show that surface-modified scaffolds not only inhibited calcium oxalate growth but also enhanced the uroepithelial cell viability and proliferation. PMID:24863802

  2. CVD aluminiding process for producing a modified platinum aluminide bond coat for improved high temperature performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagaraj, Bangalore A. (Inventor); Williams, Jeffrey L. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method of depositing by chemical vapor deposition a modified platinum aluminide diffusion coating onto a superalloy substrate comprising the steps of applying a layer of a platinum group metal to the superalloy substrate; passing an externally generated aluminum halide gas through an internal gas generator which is integral with a retort, the internal gas generator generating a modified halide gas; and co-depositing aluminum and modifier onto the superalloy substrate. In one form, the modified halide gas is hafnium chloride and the modifier is hafnium with the modified platinum aluminum bond coat comprising a single phase additive layer of platinum aluminide with at least about 0.5 percent hafnium by weight percent and about 1 to about 15 weight percent of hafnium in the boundary between a diffusion layer and the additive layer. The bond coat produced by this method is also claimed.

  3. Crystallization modifiers in lipid systems.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana Paula Badan; Masuchi, Monise Helen; Miyasaki, Eriksen Koji; Domingues, Maria Aliciane Fontenele; Stroppa, Valter Luís Zuliani; de Oliveira, Glazieli Marangoni; Kieckbusch, Theo Guenter

    2015-07-01

    Crystallization of fats is a determinant physical event affecting the structure and properties of fat-based products. The stability of these processed foods is regulated by changes in the physical state of fats and alterations in their crystallization behavior. Problems like polymorphic transitions, oil migration, fat bloom development, slow crystallization and formation of crystalline aggregates stand out. The change of the crystallization behavior of lipid systems has been a strategic issue for the processing of foods, aiming at taylor made products, reducing costs, improving quality, and increasing the applicability and stability of different industrial fats. In this connection, advances in understanding the complex mechanisms that govern fat crystallization led to the development of strategies in order to modulate the conventional processes of fat structuration, based on the use of crystallization modifiers. Different components have been evaluated, such as specific triacyglycerols, partial glycerides (monoacylglycerols and diacylglycerols), free fatty acids, phospholipids and emulsifiers. The knowledge and expertise on the influence of these specific additives or minor lipids on the crystallization behavior of fat systems represents a focus of current interest for the industrial processing of oils and fats. This article presents a comprehensive review on the use of crystallization modifiers in lipid systems, especially for palm oil, cocoa butter and general purpose fats, highlighting: i) the removal, addition or fractionation of minor lipids in fat bases; ii) the use of nucleating agents to modify the crystallization process; iii) control of crystallization in lipid bases by using emulsifiers. The addition of these components into lipid systems is discussed in relation to the phenomena of nucleation, crystal growth, morphology, thermal behavior and polymorphism, with the intention of providing the reader with a complete panorama of the associated mechanisms

  4. Cosmological tests of modified gravity.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kazuya

    2016-04-01

    We review recent progress in the construction of modified gravity models as alternatives to dark energy as well as the development of cosmological tests of gravity. Einstein's theory of general relativity (GR) has been tested accurately within the local universe i.e. the Solar System, but this leaves the possibility open that it is not a good description of gravity at the largest scales in the Universe. This being said, the standard model of cosmology assumes GR on all scales. In 1998, astronomers made the surprising discovery that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, not slowing down. This late-time acceleration of the Universe has become the most challenging problem in theoretical physics. Within the framework of GR, the acceleration would originate from an unknown dark energy. Alternatively, it could be that there is no dark energy and GR itself is in error on cosmological scales. In this review, we first give an overview of recent developments in modified gravity theories including f(R) gravity, braneworld gravity, Horndeski theory and massive/bigravity theory. We then focus on common properties these models share, such as screening mechanisms they use to evade the stringent Solar System tests. Once armed with a theoretical knowledge of modified gravity models, we move on to discuss how we can test modifications of gravity on cosmological scales. We present tests of gravity using linear cosmological perturbations and review the latest constraints on deviations from the standard [Formula: see text]CDM model. Since screening mechanisms leave distinct signatures in the non-linear structure formation, we also review novel astrophysical tests of gravity using clusters, dwarf galaxies and stars. The last decade has seen a number of new constraints placed on gravity from astrophysical to cosmological scales. Thanks to on-going and future surveys, cosmological tests of gravity will enjoy another, possibly even more, exciting ten years. PMID:27007681

  5. Cosmological tests of modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Kazuya

    2016-04-01

    We review recent progress in the construction of modified gravity models as alternatives to dark energy as well as the development of cosmological tests of gravity. Einstein’s theory of general relativity (GR) has been tested accurately within the local universe i.e. the Solar System, but this leaves the possibility open that it is not a good description of gravity at the largest scales in the Universe. This being said, the standard model of cosmology assumes GR on all scales. In 1998, astronomers made the surprising discovery that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, not slowing down. This late-time acceleration of the Universe has become the most challenging problem in theoretical physics. Within the framework of GR, the acceleration would originate from an unknown dark energy. Alternatively, it could be that there is no dark energy and GR itself is in error on cosmological scales. In this review, we first give an overview of recent developments in modified gravity theories including f(R) gravity, braneworld gravity, Horndeski theory and massive/bigravity theory. We then focus on common properties these models share, such as screening mechanisms they use to evade the stringent Solar System tests. Once armed with a theoretical knowledge of modified gravity models, we move on to discuss how we can test modifications of gravity on cosmological scales. We present tests of gravity using linear cosmological perturbations and review the latest constraints on deviations from the standard Λ CDM model. Since screening mechanisms leave distinct signatures in the non-linear structure formation, we also review novel astrophysical tests of gravity using clusters, dwarf galaxies and stars. The last decade has seen a number of new constraints placed on gravity from astrophysical to cosmological scales. Thanks to on-going and future surveys, cosmological tests of gravity will enjoy another, possibly even more, exciting ten years.

  6. Observational tests of modified gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Bhuvnesh; Zhang Pengjie

    2008-09-15

    Modifications of general relativity provide an alternative explanation to dark energy for the observed acceleration of the Universe. Modified gravity theories have richer observational consequences for large-scale structures than conventional dark energy models, in that different observables are not described by a single growth factor even in the linear regime. We examine the relationships between perturbations in the metric potentials, density and velocity fields, and discuss strategies for measuring them using gravitational lensing, galaxy cluster abundances, galaxy clustering/dynamics, and the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. We show how a broad class of gravity theories can be tested by combining these probes. A robust way to interpret observations is by constraining two key functions: the ratio of the two metric potentials, and the ratio of the gravitational 'constant' in the Poisson equation to Newton's constant. We also discuss quasilinear effects that carry signatures of gravity, such as through induced three-point correlations. Clustering of dark energy can mimic features of modified gravity theories and thus confuse the search for distinct signatures of such theories. It can produce pressure perturbations and anisotropic stresses, which break the equality between the two metric potentials even in general relativity. With these two extra degrees of freedom, can a clustered dark energy model mimic modified gravity models in all observational tests? We show with specific examples that observational constraints on both the metric potentials and density perturbations can in principle distinguish modifications of gravity from dark energy models. We compare our result with other recent studies that have slightly different assumptions (and apparently contradictory conclusions)

  7. Metabolomics of genetically modified crops.

    PubMed

    Simó, Carolina; Ibáñez, Clara; Valdés, Alberto; Cifuentes, Alejandro; García-Cañas, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomic-based approaches are increasingly applied to analyse genetically modified organisms (GMOs) making it possible to obtain broader and deeper information on the composition of GMOs compared to that obtained from traditional analytical approaches. The combination in metabolomics of advanced analytical methods and bioinformatics tools provides wide chemical compositional data that contributes to corroborate (or not) the substantial equivalence and occurrence of unintended changes resulting from genetic transformation. This review provides insight into recent progress in metabolomics studies on transgenic crops focusing mainly in papers published in the last decade. PMID:25334064

  8. Modified QKLOOK program, change 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-07-01

    Recently, the four QKLOOK programs, in the earlier reports, were extensively modified. The modification were made to increase the usefulness and ease of use of the QKLOOK model. The changes made (1) increase the user's control of the PK/H functions used in QKLOOK, (2) allow the user to select true or incremental vulnerable areas, and (3) brought the programs in line with the FORTRAN 77 standards. All the changes are thoroughly documented. The program VAMERGE, which re-formats the QKLOOK output into a form usable by the ASALT program, has been documented and is also included in this change.

  9. Metabolomics of Genetically Modified Crops

    PubMed Central

    Simó, Carolina; Ibáñez, Clara; Valdés, Alberto; Cifuentes, Alejandro; García-Cañas, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomic-based approaches are increasingly applied to analyse genetically modified organisms (GMOs) making it possible to obtain broader and deeper information on the composition of GMOs compared to that obtained from traditional analytical approaches. The combination in metabolomics of advanced analytical methods and bioinformatics tools provides wide chemical compositional data that contributes to corroborate (or not) the substantial equivalence and occurrence of unintended changes resulting from genetic transformation. This review provides insight into recent progress in metabolomics studies on transgenic crops focusing mainly in papers published in the last decade. PMID:25334064

  10. Ionene modified small polymeric beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Linear ionene polyquaternary cationic polymeric segments are bonded by means of the Menshutkin reaction (quaternization) to biocompatible, extremely small, porous particles containing halide or tertiary amine sites which are centers for attachment of the segments. The modified beads in the form of emulsions or suspensions offer a large, positively-charged surface area capable of irreversibly binding polyanions such as heparin, DNA, RNA or bile acids to remove them from solution or of reversibly binding monoanions such as penicillin, pesticides, sex attractants and the like for slow release from the suspension.

  11. Estimating the Modified Allan Variance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, Charles

    1995-01-01

    A paper at the 1992 FCS showed how to express the modified Allan variance (mvar) in terms of the third difference of the cumulative sum of time residuals. Although this reformulated definition was presented merely as a computational trick for simplifying the calculation of mvar estimates, it has since turned out to be a powerful theoretical tool for deriving the statistical quality of those estimates in terms of their equivalent degrees of freedom (edf), defined for an estimator V by edf V = 2(EV)2/(var V). Confidence intervals for mvar can then be constructed from levels of the appropriate 2 distribution.

  12. Effect of modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching on hamstring muscle flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Hashim; Iqbal, Amir; Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of present study was to compare the effectiveness of modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching in improving the hamstring muscle flexibility. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-five male subjects with hamstring tightness were included in this study. The subjects were randomly placed into three groups: the modified hold-relax stretching, static stretching and control groups. The modified hold-relax stretching group performed 7 seconds of isometric contraction and then relaxed for 5 seconds, and this was repeated five times daily for five consecutive days. The static stretching group received 10 minutes of static stretching with the help of a pulley and weight system for five consecutive days. The control group received only moist heat for 20 minutes for five consecutive days. A baseline reading of passive knee extension (PKE) was taken prior to the intervention; rest measurements were taken immediate post intervention on day 1, day 3, day 5, and after a 1 week follow-up, i.e., at the 12th day. [Results] On comparing the baseline readings of passive knee extension (PKE), there was no difference noted between the three groups. On comparing the posttest readings on day 5 between the 3 groups, a significant difference was noted. However, post hoc analysis revealed an insignificant difference between the modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching groups. There was a significant difference between the static stretching and control groups and between the modified hold-relax stretching and control groups. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicate that both the modified hold-relax stretching technique and static stretching are equally effective, as there was no significant difference in improving the hamstring muscle flexibility between the two groups. PMID:25729210

  13. Biocatalytic transformation of petroporphyrins by chemical modified cytochrome C.

    PubMed

    García-Arellano, Humberto; Buenrostro-Gonzalez, Eduardo; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2004-03-30

    A semi-synthetic biocatalyst was prepared by a double chemical modification of cytochrome c. Free amino groups were modified with poly(ethylene glycol) while free carboxylic groups were alkylated to form methyl esters. The double chemically modified protein, PEG-Cyt-Met, oxidized synthetic porphyrins in a ternary solvent mixture composed by methylene chloride, methanol, and phosphate buffer. The highest activity was found in the ternary systems with low water content (5%). The use of relatively hydrophobic peroxides, such as tert-butyl and cumene hydroperoxides, extended the operational life of the biocatalyst, which, in turn, resulted in an extended oxidation of the substrates tested. PEG-Cyt-Met is able to transform asphaltenes, a highly recalcitrant petroleum fraction. The huge energetic resource found as asphaltene-rich deposits is the driving force to investigate and to innovate upgrading technologies, including biotechnological strategies. PMID:14991657

  14. Polythioether Particles Armored with Modifiable Graphene Oxide Nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Rodier, Bradley J; Mosher, Eric P; Burton, Spencer T; Matthews, Rachael; Pentzer, Emily

    2016-06-01

    Facile and scalable fabrication methods are attractive to prepare materials for diverse applications. Herein, a method is presented to prepare cross-linked polymeric nanoparticles with graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets covalently attached to the surface. Alkene-modified GO serves as a surfactant in a miniemulsion polymerization, and the alkene functionalities of GO exposed to the oil-phase are incorporated into the polymer particle through thiol-ene reactions, leaving the unreacted alkene functional groups of the other face of GO available for further functionalization. The surface of GO-armored polymer particles is then modified with a small molecule fluorophore or carboxylic acid functional groups that bind to Fe2 O3 and TiO2 nanoparticles. This methodology provides a facile route to preparing complex hybrid composite materials. PMID:27076068

  15. The Modifier Effect and Property Mutability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, James A.; Passanisi, Alessia; Jonsson, Martin L.

    2011-01-01

    The modifier effect is the reduction in perceived likelihood of a generic property sentence, when the head noun is modified. We investigated the prediction that the modifier effect would be stronger for mutable than for central properties, without finding evidence for this predicted interaction over the course of five experiments. However…

  16. Modified Dovetail-Plasty in Scar Revision

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Suk Joon; Yang, Jihoon; Kim, Seon Gyu; Jung, Sung Won; Koh, Sung Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Scar revision is one of the fundamental techniques in the field of plastic and reconstructive surgery. Local flaps, such as a Z-plasty, W-plasty, or geometric broken-line closure, have been used for scar revision. Camouflaging a scar during scar revision for marginal scars from skin grafts and flaps, trapdoor scars, and linear scars is difficult. We describe our experience with the use of modified dovetail-plasty for scar revision in these difficult areas. Our study group consisted of 28 cases among 22 patients (9 males and 13 females) with a mean age of 33.6 years (range, 6–61 years). The conspicuous scars were located on the face (50%) and extremities (50%). The authors designed Y-shaped incision lines to relax the skin tension lines on one side of the excision line and trapezoid incision lines on the other side. There were 16 follow-up operations performed over 6 months after the initial operation among a total of 22 patients. There were scar depressions (2 patients) and a hypertrophic scar (1 patient) at the interval area between the dovetail flaps. A diffuse hypertrophic scar occurred in 1 patient with a dorsal foot scar. The overall success rates of the procedure as assessed by the surgeons were as follows: excellent (75%), good (12.4%), fair (6.3%), and poor (6.3%). This new local flap can achieve an inconspicuous scar using a blurred scar line and reducing tension. The authors recommend a modified dovetail-plasty for the revision of trapdoor scars and scars under excessive tension. PMID:24577307

  17. Group Psychotherapy in Italy.

    PubMed

    Giannone, Francesca; Giordano, Cecilia; Di Blasi, Maria

    2015-10-01

    This article describes the history and the prevailing orientations of group psychotherapy in Italy (psychoanalytically oriented, psychodrama, CBT groups) and particularly group analysis. Provided free of charge by the Italian health system, group psychotherapy is growing, but its expansion is patchy. The main pathways of Italian training in the different group psychotherapy orientations are also presented. Clinical-theoretical elaboration on self development, psychopathology related to group experiences, and the methodological attention paid to objectives and methods in different clinical groups are issues related to group therapy in Italy. Difficulties in the relationship between research and clinical practice are discussed, as well as the empirical research network that tries to bridge the gap between research and clinical work in group psychotherapy. The economic crisis in Italy has led to massive cuts in health care and to an increasing demand for some forms of psychological treatment. For these reasons, and because of its positive cost-benefit ratio, group psychotherapy is now considered an important tool in the national health care system to expand the clinical response to different forms of psychological distress. PMID:26401793

  18. Genetic modifiers of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Gusella, James F; MacDonald, Marcy E; Lee, Jong-Min

    2014-09-15

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that directly affects more than 1 in 10,000 persons in Western societies but, as a family disorder with a long, costly, debilitating course, it has an indirect impact on a far greater proportion of the population. Although some palliative treatments are used, no effective treatment exists for preventing clinical onset of the disorder or for delaying its inevitable progression toward premature death, approximately 15 years after diagnosis. Huntington's disease involves a movement disorder characterized by chorea, as well as a variety of psychiatric disturbances and intellectual decline, with a gradual loss of independence. A dire need exists for effective HD therapies to alleviate the suffering and costs to the individual, family, and health care system. In past decades, genetics, the study of DNA sequence variation and its consequences, provided the tools to map the HD gene to chromosome 4 and ultimately to identify its mutation as an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat in the coding sequence of a large protein, dubbed huntingtin. Now, advances in genetic technology offer an unbiased route to the identification of genetic factors that are disease-modifying agents in human patients. Such genetic modifiers are expected to highlight processes capable of altering the course of HD and therefore to provide new, human-validated targets for traditional drug development, with the goal of developing rational treatments to delay or prevent onset of HD clinical signs. PMID:25154728

  19. Stroke prevention: modifying risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Romero, José Rafael; Morris, Jane; Pikula, Aleksandra

    2009-01-01

    Risk factor modification remains as the principal aspect of care for stroke prevention. Understanding of risk factors has advanced and several options are now available to treat modifiable risk factors. However, effective treatment remains a challenging task in clinical practice. Prevention begins with awareness of risk factors by patients and clinicians. Risk factor assessment along with overall stroke risk estimation should be part of evaluation of patients with stroke, and used with careful clinical judgment. In this review we discuss the impact of modifiable traditional vascular risk factors on ischemic stroke, interventions for stroke prevention, and evidence for early treatment of risk factors where available as well as areas of research progress. Emphasis should be paid in education of patients, the community and medical personnel. Future research in the field of genetic determinants of vascular risk factors and stroke will increase our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of cerebrovascular disease and likely result in development of new therapies and individualized programs for stroke prevention. PMID:19124428

  20. Investigation of modified asphalt concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimich, Vita

    2016-01-01

    Currently the problem of improving the asphalt quality is very urgent. It is used primarily as topcoats exposed to the greatest relative to the other layers of the road, dynamic load - impact and shear. The number of cars on the road, the speed of their movement, as well as the traffic intensity increase day by day. We have to upgrade motor roads, which entails a huge cost. World experience shows that the issue is urgent not only in Russia, but also in many countries in Europe, USA and Asia. Thus, the subject of research is the resistance of asphalt concrete to water and its influence on the strength of the material at different temperatures, and resistance of pavement to deformation. It is appropriate to search for new modifiers for asphaltic binder and mineral additives for asphalt mix to form in complex the skeleton of the future asphalt concrete, resistant to atmospheric condensation, soil characteristics of the road construction area, as well as the growing road transport load. The important task of the work is searching special modifying additives for bitumen binder and asphalt mixture as a whole, which will improve the quality of highways, increasing the period between repairs. The methods described in the normative-technical documentation were used for the research. The conducted research allowed reducing the frequency of road maintenance for 7 years, increasing it from 17 to 25 years.

  1. Modified sonourethrography assists urethral catheterization.

    PubMed

    Minagawa, Tomonori; Suzuki, Toshiro; Domen, Takahisa; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Masakuni; Hirakata, Shiro; Nagai, Takashi; Nakazawa, Masaki; Ogawa, Teruyuki; Ishizuka, Osamu

    2016-07-01

    Sonourethrography (SUG) is an infrequently used modality to observe the male urethra. We modified SUG to examine the reasons for difficulty in urethral catheterization and to determine a safe approach to resolve these problems. Following retrograde urethral jelly injection, modified SUG (mSUG) was performed in male patients with difficulty in urethral catheterization. mSUG was performed using transcutaneous ultrasonography in patients for whom the catheter became lodged in the penile urethra. In other patients, mSUG was performed using transrectal ultrasonography. We divided the causes of difficult indwelling urethral catheterization into physiological and pathological conditions. With regard to physiological conditions, the urethral catheter became stuck in the bulbous portion, membranous urethra, and prostatic urethra. mSUG distinguished the problematic part of the urethra in real time, and it assisted in overcoming the problem. With regard to pathological conditions, urethral stricture after trauma or surgery was clearly demonstrated in the penile and prostatic portions of the urethra. As with physiological conditions, mSUG images assisted in navigating the catheter through the problematic pathological areas or demonstrated the need to abandon the catheterization. mSUG can visualize the male urethra clearly during urethral catheterization and provide real-time assistance with the procedure. PMID:26847624

  2. Modified Bootstrap Sensitometry In Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    1981-04-01

    A new modified bootstrap approach to sensitometry is presented which provides H and D curves that show almost exact agreement with those obtained using conventional methods. Two bootstrap techniques are described; both involve a combination of inverse-square and stepped-wedge modulation of the radiation field and provide intensity-scale sensitometric curves as appropriate for medical radiography. H and D curves obtained with these modified techniques are compared with those obtained for screen-film combinations using inverse-square sensitometry as well as with those obtained for direct x-ray film using time-scale sensitometry. The stepped wedge of the Wisconsin X-Ray Test Cassette was used in the bootstrap approach since it provides sufficient exposure latitude to encompass the useful density range of medical x-ray film. This approach makes radiographic sensitometry quick and convenient, allowing accurate characteristic curves to be obtained for any screen-film cassette using standard diagnostic x-ray equipment.

  3. A Multicenter, Retrospective Study of Early Weightbearing for Modified Lapidus Arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Prissel, Mark A; Hyer, Christopher F; Grambart, Sean T; Bussewitz, Bradly W; Brigido, Stephen A; DiDomenico, Lawrence A; Lee, Michael S; Reeves, Christopher L; Shane, Amber M; Tucker, Daniel J; Weinraub, Glenn M

    2016-01-01

    The modified Lapidus arthrodesis is a long-established surgical technique for management of hallux valgus that provides reproducible results and quality patient outcomes. The data from 367 consecutive patients undergoing unilateral modified Lapidus arthrodesis from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2008 at participating centers were retrospectively evaluated. The included patients were categorized into early weightbearing (≤ 21 days) and delayed weightbearing (> 21 days) groups. A total of 24 nonunions (6.5%) were identified, with 13 (7.1%) in the early weightbearing group and 11 (6.0%) in the delayed weightbearing group. To date, the present study is the largest multicenter investigation to evaluate early weightbearing after modified Lapidus arthrodesis and the only large study to directly compare early and delayed weightbearing. The findings of the present study have shown that early weightbearing for modified Lapidus arthrodesis does not increase the risk of nonunion when evaluating various fixation constructs. PMID:26763868

  4. Modifying enzymes related aminoglycoside: analyses of resistant Acinetobacter isolates

    PubMed Central

    Atasoy, Ali Riza; Ciftci, Ihsan Hakki; Petek, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by nucleotidyltransferases, acetyltransferases and/or phosphotransferases accounts for the majority of aminoglycoside-resistant Acinetobacter isolates. In this study, we investigated the relationship between aminoglycoside resistance and the presence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes in Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolate groups with different resistance profiles. Thirty-two clinical A. baumannii isolates were included in this study. Acinetobacter isolates were divided into 4 groups according to results of susceptibility testing. The presence of genes encoding the following aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes; aph (3’)-V1, aph (3’)-Ia, aac (3)-Ia, aac (3) IIa, aac (6’)-Ih, aac (6’)-Ib and ant (2’)-Ia responsible for resistance was investigated by PCR in all strains. The acetyltransferase (aac (6’)-Ib, aac (3)-Ia) and phosphotransferase (aph (3’)-Ia) gene regions were identified in the first group, which comprised nine imipenem, meropenem, and gentamicin-resistant isolates. The acetyltransferase (aac (6’)-Ib, aac (3)-Ia), phosphotransferase (aph (3’)-VI) and nucleotidyltransferase (ant2-Ia) gene regions were identified in the second group, which was composed of nine imipenem-resistant, meropenem-resistant and gentamicin-sensitive isolates. The acetyltransferase (aac (3)-Ia) and phosphotransferase (aph (3’)-Ia) regions were identified in the fourth group, which comprised eight imipenem-sensitive, meropenem-sensitive and gentamicin-resistant isolates. Modifying enzyme gene regions were not detected in the third group, which was composed of six imipenem, meropenem and gentamicin-sensitive isolates. Our data are consistent with previous reports, with the exception of four isolates. Both acetyltransferases and phosphotransferases were widespread in A. baumannii clinical isolates in our study. However, the presence of the enzyme alone is insufficient to explain the resistance rates. Therefore, the

  5. Rebellion in group.

    PubMed

    Billow, Richard M

    2003-07-01

    Rebellion is a strategy of social action: to overthrow the group's status quo or to adamantly oppose its revision. Rebellion occurs when other avenues of influence seem futile or unattractive-a judgment that depends on the group's genuine receptivity to discussion and change, and equally, on the state of mind of the rebel. There are different pathways of rebellion: defiance, secession/exile, anarchy, or revolution. Although rebellion represents an individual's mental attitude toward a group, it is useful to think of group process and rebellion as an attempt to move the group in a different direction. Similar to other group members, the therapist has rebellious feelings and thoughts, and may take on the multiple roles of defiant instigator, exiled outcast, anarchist, and revolutionary. PMID:12841098

  6. Blood groups systems

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Ranadhir; Mishra, Nitasha; Rath, Girija Prasad

    2014-01-01

    International Society of Blood Transfusion has recently recognized 33 blood group systems. Apart from ABO and Rhesus system, many other types of antigens have been noticed on the red cell membranes. Blood grouping and cross-matching is one of the few important tests that the anaesthesiologist orders during perioperative period. Hence, a proper understanding of the blood group system, their clinical significance, typing and cross-matching tests, and current perspective are of paramount importance to prevent transfusion-related complications. Nonetheless, the knowledge on blood group system is necessary to approach blood group-linked diseases which are still at the stage of research. This review addresses all these aspects of the blood groups system. PMID:25535412

  7. Blood groups systems.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Ranadhir; Mishra, Nitasha; Rath, Girija Prasad

    2014-09-01

    International Society of Blood Transfusion has recently recognized 33 blood group systems. Apart from ABO and Rhesus system, many other types of antigens have been noticed on the red cell membranes. Blood grouping and cross-matching is one of the few important tests that the anaesthesiologist orders during perioperative period. Hence, a proper understanding of the blood group system, their clinical significance, typing and cross-matching tests, and current perspective are of paramount importance to prevent transfusion-related complications. Nonetheless, the knowledge on blood group system is necessary to approach blood group-linked diseases which are still at the stage of research. This review addresses all these aspects of the blood groups system. PMID:25535412

  8. Organic dyes removal using magnetically modified rye straw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldikova, Eva; Safarikova, Mirka; Safarik, Ivo

    2015-04-01

    Rye straw, a very low-cost material, was employed as a biosorbent for two organic water-soluble dyes belonging to different dye classes, namely acridine orange (acridine group) and methyl green (triarylmethane group). The adsorption properties were tested for native and citric acid-NaOH modified rye straw, both in nonmagnetic and magnetic versions. The adsorption equilibrium was reached in 2 h and the adsorption isotherms data were analyzed using the Langmuir model. The highest values of maximum adsorption capacities were 208.3 mg/g for acridine orange and 384.6 mg/g for methyl green.

  9. Adsorption of water vapor on modified methacrylate polymeric sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Platonova, N.P.; Tataurova, O.G.; Vartapetyan, R.Sh.

    1995-12-31

    Adsorption of water vapor on methacrylate copolymers and terpolymers was studied. An increase in the content of the cross-linking agent gives rise to increase in the limiting adsorption of water vapor at the saturation pressure (a{sub s}) and to decrease in the concentration of primary adsorption centers. Modification of the initial copolymer containing 60% of 2,3-epoxypropyl methacrylate (EPMA) monomer and 40% of cross-linking agent, ethylene dimethacrylate, with diethylenetriamine (DETA) results in an increase in the a{sub s} value, while modification with C{sub 12} and C{sub 18} alkyl, benzyl, and phenyl groups gives rise to decrease in the a{sub s} values for the copolymeric sorbents. The concentration of primary adsorption centers (a{sub m}) increases considerably on modification of the copolymer with DETA and C{sub 12} groups and decreases markedly on modification with benzyl and phenyl groups. For terpolymers, containing EPMA and styrene, an increase in the styrene/EPMA ratio reduces the a{sub s}, and a{sub m} values. The copolymer modified with DETA groups possesses the most hydrophilic properties, while the copolymer modified with benzyl group exhibits the most hydrophobic properties. The mechanism of adsorption of water molecules on the polymers is discussed.

  10. Genetic variation modifies risk for neurodegeneration based on biomarker status

    PubMed Central

    Hohman, Timothy J.; Koran, Mary Ellen I.; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: While a great deal of work has gone into understanding the relationship between Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, brain atrophy, and disease progression, less work has attempted to investigate how genetic variation modifies these relationships. The goal of this study was two-fold. First, we sought to identify high-risk vs. low-risk individuals based on their CSF tau and Aβ load and characterize these individuals with regard to brain atrophy in an AD-relevant region of interest. Next, we sought to identify genetic variants that modified the relationship between biomarker classification and neurodegeneration. Methods: Participants were categorized based on established cut-points for biomarker positivity. Mixed model regression was used to quantify longitudinal change in the left inferior lateral ventricle. Interaction analyses between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and biomarker group status were performed using a genome wide association study (GWAS) approach. Correction for multiple comparisons was performed using the Bonferroni procedure. Results: One intergenic SNP (rs4866650) and one SNP within the SPTLC1 gene (rs7849530) modified the association between amyloid positivity and neurodegeneration. A transcript variant of WDR11-AS1 gene (rs12261764) modified the association between tau positivity and neurodegeneration. These effects were consistent across the two sub-datasets and explained approximately 3% of variance in ventricular dilation. One additional SNP (rs6887649) modified the association between amyloid positivity and baseline ventricular volume, but was not observed consistently across the sub-datasets. Conclusions: Genetic variation modifies the association between AD biomarkers and neurodegeneration. Genes that regulate the molecular response in the brain to oxidative stress may be particularly relevant to neural vulnerability to the damaging effects of amyloid-β. PMID:25140149