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Sample records for modifies neuroprotecting globins

  1. Running, swimming and diving modifies neuroprotecting globins in the mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Terrie M; Zavanelli, Mary; Miller, Melissa A; Goldbeck, Robert A; Morledge, Michael; Casper, Dave; Pabst, D. Ann; McLellan, William; Cantin, Lucas P; Kliger, David S

    2007-01-01

    The vulnerability of the human brain to injury following just a few minutes of oxygen deprivation with submergence contrasts markedly with diving mammals, such as Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii), which can remain underwater for more than 90 min while exhibiting no neurological or behavioural impairment. This response occurs despite exposure to blood oxygen levels concomitant with human unconsciousness. To determine whether such aquatic lifestyles result in unique adaptations for avoiding ischaemic–hypoxic neural damage, we measured the presence of circulating (haemoglobin) and resident (neuroglobin and cytoglobin) oxygen-carrying globins in the cerebral cortex of 16 mammalian species considered terrestrial, swimming or diving specialists. Here we report a striking difference in globin levels depending on activity lifestyle. A nearly 9.5-fold range in haemoglobin concentration (0.17–1.62 g Hb 100 g brain wet wt−1) occurred between terrestrial and deep-diving mammals; a threefold range in resident globins was evident between terrestrial and swimming specialists. Together, these two globin groups provide complementary mechanisms for facilitating oxygen transfer into neural tissues and the potential for protection against reactive oxygen and nitrogen groups. This enables marine mammals to maintain sensory and locomotor neural functions during prolonged submergence, and suggests new avenues for averting oxygen-mediated neural injury in the mammalian brain. PMID:18089537

  2. Utility of heme analogues to intentionally modify heme-globin interactions in myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Neya, Saburo; Nagai, Masako; Nagatomo, Shigenori; Hoshino, Tyuji; Yoneda, Tomoki; Kawaguchi, Akira T

    2016-05-01

    Myoglobin reconstitution with various synthetic heme analogues was reviewed to follow the consequences of modified heme-globin interactions. Utility of dimethyl sulfoxide as the solvent for water-insoluble hemes was emphasized. Proton NMR spectroscopy revealed that loose heme-globin contacts in the heme pocket eventually caused the dynamic heme rotation around the iron-histidine bond. The full rotational rate was estimated to be about 1400 s(-1) at room temperature for 1,4,5,8-tetramethylhemin. The X-ray analysis of the myoglobin containing iron porphine, the smallest heme without any side chains, showed that the original globin fold was well conserved despite the serious disruption of native heme-globin contacts. Comparison between the two myoglobins with static and rotatory prosthetic groups indicated that the oxygen and carbon monoxide binding profiles were almost unaffected by the heme motion. On the other hand, altered tetrapyrrole array of porphyrin dramatically changed the dissociation constant of oxygen from 0.0005 mm Hg of porphycene-myoglobin to ∞ in oxypyriporphyrin-myoglobin. Heme-globin interactions in myoglobin were also monitored with circular dichroism spectroscopy. The observation on several reconstituted protein revealed an unrecognized role of the propionate groups in protoheme. Shortening of heme 6,7-propionates to carboxylates resulted in almost complete disappearance of the positive circular dichroism band in the Soret region. The theoretical analysis suggested that the disappeared circular dichroism band reflected the cancellation effects between different conformers of the carboxyl groups directly attached to heme periphery. The above techniques were proposed to be applicable to other hemoproteins to create new biocatalysts. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson

  3. The Neuroprotective Disease-Modifying Potential of Psychotropics in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lauterbach, Edward C.; Fontenelle, Leonardo F.; Teixeira, Antonio L.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroprotective treatments in Parkinson's disease (PD) have remained elusive. Psychotropics are commonly prescribed in PD without regard to their pathobiological effects. The authors investigated the effects of psychotropics on pathobiological proteins, proteasomal activity, mitochondrial functions, apoptosis, neuroinflammation, trophic factors, stem cells, and neurogenesis. Only findings replicated in at least 2 studies were considered for these actions. Additionally, PD-related gene transcription, animal model, and human neuroprotective clinical trial data were reviewed. Results indicate that, from a PD pathobiology perspective, the safest drugs (i.e., drugs least likely to promote cellular neurodegenerative mechanisms balanced against their likelihood of promoting neuroprotective mechanisms) include pramipexole, valproate, lithium, desipramine, escitalopram, and dextromethorphan. Fluoxetine favorably affects transcription of multiple genes (e.g., MAPT, GBA, CCDC62, HIP1R), although it and desipramine reduced MPTP mouse survival. Haloperidol is best avoided. The most promising neuroprotective investigative priorities will involve disease-modifying trials of the safest agents alone or in combination to capture salutary effects on H3 histone deacetylase, gene transcription, glycogen synthase kinase-3, α-synuclein, reactive oxygen species (ROS), reactive nitrogen species (RNS), apoptosis, inflammation, and trophic factors including GDNF and BDNF. PMID:22254151

  4. B6 peptide-modified PEG-PLA nanoparticles for enhanced brain delivery of neuroprotective peptide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongyang; Gao, Xiaoling; Kang, Ting; Jiang, Mengyin; Miao, Deyu; Gu, Guangzhi; Hu, Quanyin; Song, Qingxiang; Yao, Lei; Tu, Yifan; Chen, Hongzhuan; Jiang, Xinguo; Chen, Jun

    2013-06-19

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB), which is formed by the brain capillary wall, greatly hinders the development of new drugs for the brain. Over the past decades, among the various receptor-mediated endogenous BBB transport systems, the strategy of using transferrin or anti-transferrin receptor antibodies to facilitate brain drug delivery system is of particular interest. However, the application of large proteins still suffers from the drawbacks including synthesis procedure, stability, and immunological response. Here, we explored a B6 peptide discovered by phase display as a substitute for transferrin, and conjugated it to PEG-PLA nanoparticles (NP) with the aim of enhancing the delivery of neuroprotective drug across the BBB for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. B6-modified NP (B6-NP) exhibited significantly higher accumulation in brain capillary endothelial cells via lipid raft-mediated and clathrin-mediated endocytosis. In vivo, fluorescently labeled B6-NP exhibited much higher brain accumulation when compared with NP. Administration of B6-NP encapsulated neuroprotective peptide-NAPVSIPQ (NAP)-to Alzheimer's disease mouse models showed excellent amelioration in learning impairments, cholinergic disruption, and loss of hippocampal neurons even at lower dose. These findings together suggested that B6-NP might serve as a promising DDS for facilitating the brain delivery of neuropeptides. PMID:23718945

  5. A phylogenomic profile of globins

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradov, Serge N; Hoogewijs, David; Bailly, Xavier; Arredondo-Peter, Raúl; Gough, Julian; Dewilde, Sylvia; Moens, Luc; Vanfleteren, Jacques R

    2006-01-01

    Background Globins occur in all three kingdoms of life: they can be classified into single-domain globins and chimeric globins. The latter comprise the flavohemoglobins with a C-terminal FAD-binding domain and the gene-regulating globin coupled sensors, with variable C-terminal domains. The single-domain globins encompass sequences related to chimeric globins and «truncated» hemoglobins with a 2-over-2 instead of the canonical 3-over-3 α-helical fold. Results A census of globins in 26 archaeal, 245 bacterial and 49 eukaryote genomes was carried out. Only ~25% of archaea have globins, including globin coupled sensors, related single domain globins and 2-over-2 globins. From one to seven globins per genome were found in ~65% of the bacterial genomes: the presence and number of globins are positively correlated with genome size. Globins appear to be mostly absent in Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi, Chlamydia, Lactobacillales, Mollicutes, Rickettsiales, Pastorellales and Spirochaetes. Single domain globins occur in metazoans and flavohemoglobins are found in fungi, diplomonads and mycetozoans. Although red algae have single domain globins, including 2-over-2 globins, the green algae and ciliates have only 2-over-2 globins. Plants have symbiotic and nonsymbiotic single domain hemoglobins and 2-over-2 hemoglobins. Over 90% of eukaryotes have globins: the nematode Caenorhabditis has the most putative globins, ~33. No globins occur in the parasitic, unicellular eukaryotes such as Encephalitozoon, Entamoeba, Plasmodium and Trypanosoma. Conclusion Although Bacteria have all three types of globins, Archaeado not have flavohemoglobins and Eukaryotes lack globin coupled sensors. Since the hemoglobins in organisms other than animals are enzymes or sensors, it is likely that the evolution of an oxygen transport function accompanied the emergence of multicellular animals. PMID:16600051

  6. Editing the genome to introduce a beneficial naturally occurring mutation associated with increased fetal globin.

    PubMed

    Wienert, Beeke; Funnell, Alister P W; Norton, Laura J; Pearson, Richard C M; Wilkinson-White, Lorna E; Lester, Krystal; Vadolas, Jim; Porteus, Matthew H; Matthews, Jacqueline M; Quinlan, Kate G R; Crossley, Merlin

    2015-01-01

    Genetic disorders resulting from defects in the adult globin genes are among the most common inherited diseases. Symptoms worsen from birth as fetal γ-globin expression is silenced. Genome editing could permit the introduction of beneficial single-nucleotide variants to ameliorate symptoms. Here, as proof of concept, we introduce the naturally occurring Hereditary Persistance of Fetal Haemoglobin (HPFH) -175T>C point mutation associated with elevated fetal γ-globin into erythroid cell lines. We show that this mutation increases fetal globin expression through de novo recruitment of the activator TAL1 to promote chromatin looping of distal enhancers to the modified γ-globin promoter. PMID:25971621

  7. Mitochondrial therapy for Parkinson’s disease: Neuroprotective pharmaconutrition may be disease-modifying

    PubMed Central

    Kones, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Progressive destruction of neurons that produce dopamine in the basal ganglia of the brain, particularly the substantia nigra, is a hallmark of Parkinson’s disease. The syndrome of the Parkinsonian phenotype is caused by many etiologies, involving multiple contributing mechanisms. Characteristic findings are pathologic inclusions called Lewy bodies, which are protein aggregates inside nerve cells. Environmental insults are linked with the disease, and a number of associated genes have also been identified. Neuroinflammation, microglia activation, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction are central processes producing nerve damage. In addition, protein misfolding, driven by accumulation and condensation of α-synuclein, compounded by inadequate elimination of defective protein through the ubiquitin- proteasome system, promote apoptosis. Current pharmacologic therapy is palliative rather than disease- modifying, and typically becomes unsatisfactory over time. Coenzyme Q10 and creatine, two agents involved in energy production, may be disease-modifying, and able to produce sufficient beneficial pathophysiologic changes in preclinical studies to warrant large studies now in progress. Use of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D in PD are also topics of current interest. PMID:22291504

  8. Repair of Thalassemic Human β -globin mRNA in Mammalian Cells by Antisense Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierakowska, Halina; Sambade, Maria J.; Agrawal, Sudhir; Kole, Ryszard

    1996-11-01

    In one form of β -thalassemia, a genetic blood disorder, a mutation in intron 2 of the β -globin gene (IVS2-654) causes aberrant splicing of β -globin pre-mRNA and, consequently, β -globin deficiency. Treatment of mammalian cells stably expressing the IVS2-654 human β -globin gene with antisense oligonucleotides targeted at the aberrant splice sites restored correct splicing in a dose-dependent fashion, generating correct human β -globin mRNA and polypeptide. Both products persisted for up to 72 hr posttreatment. The oligonucleotides modified splicing by a true antisense mechanism without overt unspecific effects on cell growth and splicing of other pre-mRNAs. This novel approach in which antisense oligonucleotides are used to restore rather than to down-regulate the activity of the target gene is applicable to other splicing mutants and is of potential clinical interest.

  9. Globin gene switching in primates.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robert M; Gumucio, Deborah; Goodman, Morris

    2002-11-01

    Evolutionary approaches to the identification of DNA sequences required for transcription of the genes of the beta-globin cluster are reviewed. Sequence alignments of non-coding regions from widely divergent species revealed many conserved motifs (phylogenetic footprints) that were putative transcription factor binding sites and candidate binding proteins were identified. The differential timing of the prosimian and simian gamma-globin genes was analyzed by identifying base changes in the vicinity of the phylogenetic footprints. These differential phylogenetic footprints were shown to bind different nuclear factors, and the behavior of constructs with human or galago gamma-promoters in transgenic mice indicated that DNA motifs near the gamma-globin genes are sufficient to determine the developmental stage of expression. Locus control region alignments have identified many conserved sequence differences outside of the hypersensitive sites. Globin protein and mRNA expression profiles during embryological development in a series of catarrhine (Old World monkeys and apes) and platyrrhine (New World monkeys) primates have been determined. While all catarrhines examined to date have globin expression patterns that are highly similar to the well-established human switching behavior, platyrrhines have inactivated their gamma 1 genes by a variety of mechanisms, and have an earlier gamma-beta switch. PMID:12443943

  10. The Full Globin Repertoire of Turtles Provides Insights into Vertebrate Globin Evolution and Functions

    PubMed Central

    Schwarze, Kim; Singh, Abhilasha; Burmester, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Globins are small heme proteins that play an important role in oxygen supply, but may also have other functions. Globins offer a unique opportunity to study the functional evolution of genes and proteins. We have characterized the globin repertoire of two different turtle species: the Chinese softshell turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis) and the western painted turtle (Chrysemys picta bellii). In the genomes of both species, we have identified eight distinct globin types: hemoglobin (Hb), myoglobin, neuroglobin, cytoglobin, globin E, globin X, globin Y, and androglobin. Therefore, along with the coelacanth, turtles are so far the only known vertebrates with a full globin repertoire. This fact allows for the first time a comparative analysis of the expression of all eight globins in a single species. Phylogenetic analysis showed an early divergence of neuroglobin and globin X before the radiation of vertebrates. Among the other globins, cytoglobin diverged first, and there is a close relationship between myoglobin and globin E; the position of globin Y is not resolved. The globin E gene was selectively lost in the green anole, and the genes coding for globin X and globin Y were deleted in chicken. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction experiments revealed that myoglobin, neuroglobin, and globin E are highly expressed with tissue-specific patterns, which are in line with their roles in the oxidative metabolism of the striated muscles, the brain, and the retina, respectively. Histochemical analyses showed high levels of globin E in the pigment epithelium of the eye. Globin E probably has a myoglobin-like role in transporting O2 across the pigment epithelium to supply in the metabolically highly active retina. PMID:26078264

  11. Neuroprotective effects of a chromatin modifier on ischemia/reperfusion neurons: implication of its regulation of BCL2 transactivation by ERα signaling.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jun; Zhang, Tao; Yu, Jia; Li, Hong-Zeng; Zhao, Cong; Qiu, Jing; Zhao, Bo; Zhao, Jie; Li, Wei; Zhao, Tian-Zhi

    2016-06-01

    An understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)-mediated neuroprotective effects is valuable for the development of therapeutic strategy against neuronal ischemic injury. Here, we report the upregulated expression of metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1), a master chromatin modifier and transcriptional regulator, in the murine middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model. Inhibition of MTA1 expression by in vivo short interfering RNA treatment potentiated neuronal apoptosis in a caspase-3-dependent manner and thereafter aggravated MCAO-induced neuronal damage. Mechanistically, the pro-survival effects of MTA1 required the participation of ERα signaling. We also provide in vitro evidence that MTA1 enhances the binding of ERα with the BCL2 promoter upon ischemic insults via recruitment of HDAC2 together with other unidentified coregulators, thus promoting the ERα-mediated transactivation of the BCL2 gene. Collectively, our results suggest that the augmentation of endogenous MTA1 expression during neuronal ischemic injury acts additionally to an endocrinous cascade orchestrating intimate interactions between ERα and BCL2 pathways and operates as an indispensable defensive mechanism in response to neuronal ischemia/reperfusion stress. Future studies in this field will shed light on the modulation of the complicated neuroprotective effects by estrogen signaling. PMID:26728277

  12. Genome scan identifies a locus affecting gamma-globin expression in human beta-cluster YAC transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.D.; Cooper, P.; Fung, J.; Weier, H.U.G.; Rubin, E.M.

    2000-03-01

    Genetic factors affecting post-natal g-globin expression - a major modifier of the severity of both b-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia, have been difficult to study. This is especially so in mice, an organism lacking a globin gene with an expression pattern equivalent to that of human g-globin. To model the human b-cluster in mice, with the goal of screening for loci affecting human g-globin expression in vivo, we introduced a human b-globin cluster YAC transgene into the genome of FVB mice . The b-cluster contained a Greek hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH) g allele resulting in postnatal expression of human g-globin in transgenic mice. The level of human g-globin for various F1 hybrids derived from crosses between the FVB transgenics and other inbred mouse strains was assessed. The g-globin level of the C3HeB/FVB transgenic mice was noted to be significantly elevated. To map genes affecting postnatal g-globin expression, a 20 centiMorgan (cM) genome scan of a C3HeB/F VB transgenics [prime] FVB backcross was performed, followed by high-resolution marker analysis of promising loci. From this analysis we mapped a locus within a 2.2 cM interval of mouse chromosome 1 at a LOD score of 4.2 that contributes 10.4% of variation in g-globin expression level. Combining transgenic modeling of the human b-globin gene cluster with quantitative trait analysis, we have identified and mapped a murine locus that impacts on human g-globin expression in vivo.

  13. Roles of fetal G gamma-globin promoter elements and the adult beta-globin 3' enhancer in the stage-specific expression of globin genes.

    PubMed

    Perez-Stable, C; Costantini, F

    1990-03-01

    The human fetal G gamma-globin and adult beta-globin genes are expressed in a tissue- and developmental stage-specific pattern in transgenic mice: the G gamma gene in embryonic cells and the beta gene in fetal and adult erythroid cells. Several of the cis-acting DNA sequences thought to be responsible for these patterns of expression are located 5' to the G gamma-globin gene and 3' to the beta-globin gene. To further define the locations and functional roles of these elements, we examined the effects of 5' truncations on the expression of the G gamma-globin gene, as well as the ability of G gamma-globin upstream sequences to alter the developmental regulation of a beta-globin gene, as well as the ability of G gamma-globin upstream sequences to alter the developmental regulation of a beta-globin gene. We found that sequences between -201 and -136 are essential for expression of the G gamma-globin gene, whereas those upstream of -201 have little effect on the level or tissue or stage specificity of G gamma-globin expression. The G gamma-globin upstream sequences from -201 to -136 were, furthermore, capable of activating a linked beta-globin gene in embryonic blood cells; however, a G gamma-globin fragment from -383 to -206 was similarly active in this assay, and the complete fragment from -383 to -136 was considerably more active than either of the smaller fragments, suggesting the presence of multiple cis-acting elements for embryonic blood cells. Our data also suggested the possibility of a negative regulatory element between -201 and -136. These results are discussed in relation to several DNA elements in the G gamma-globin upstream region, which have been shown to bind nuclear factors in erythroid cells. Finally, we observed that removal of the beta-globin 3'-flanking sequences, including the 3' enhancer, from the G gamma-globin upstream-beta-globin hybrid gene resulted in a 25-fold reduction in expression in embryonic blood cells. This suggests that the beta-globin

  14. Neuroprotection For Huntington’s Disease: Ready, Set, Slow

    PubMed Central

    Hersch, Steven M.; Rosas, H. Diana

    2008-01-01

    Summary The ultimate goal for Huntington’s disease (HD) is to develop disease-modifying neuroprotective therapies able to delay or prevent illness in those who are at genetic risk and able to slow progression in those who are affected clinically. Neuroprotection is the preservation of neuronal structure, function, and viability and neuroprotective therapy is thus targeted at the underlying pathology of HD, rather than at its specific symptoms. Preclinical target discovery research in HD is identifying numerous distinct targets and options for modulating them with some proceeding into large-scale efficacy studies in early symptomatic HD subjects. The first pilot studies of neuroprotective compounds in premanifest HD are also soon to begin. This review discusses the opportunities for neuroprotection in HD, clinical methodology in premanifest and manifest HD, the clinical assessment of neuroprotection, molecular targets and therapeutic leads, and the current state of clinical development. PMID:18394565

  15. A Phylogenetic Analysis of the Globins in Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Hoogewijs, David; Dewilde, Sylvia; Vierstraete, Andy; Moens, Luc; Vinogradov, Serge N.

    2012-01-01

    Background All globins belong to one of three families: the F (flavohemoglobin) and S (sensor) families that exhibit the canonical 3/3 α-helical fold, and the T (truncated 3/3 fold) globins characterized by a shortened 2/2 α-helical fold. All eukaryote 3/3 hemoglobins are related to the bacterial single domain F globins. It is known that Fungi contain flavohemoglobins and single domain S globins. Our aims are to provide a census of fungal globins and to examine their relationships to bacterial globins. Results Examination of 165 genomes revealed that globins are present in >90% of Ascomycota and ∼60% of Basidiomycota genomes. The S globins occur in Blastocladiomycota and Chytridiomycota in addition to the phyla that have FHbs. Unexpectedly, group 1 T globins were found in one Blastocladiomycota and one Chytridiomycota genome. Phylogenetic analyses were carried out on the fungal globins, alone and aligned with representative bacterial globins. The Saccharomycetes and Sordariomycetes with two FHbs form two widely divergent clusters separated by the remaining fungal sequences. One of the Saccharomycete groups represents a new subfamily of FHbs, comprising a previously unknown N-terminal and a FHb missing the C-terminal moiety of its reductase domain. The two Saccharomycete groups also form two clusters in the presence of bacterial FHbs; the surrounding bacterial sequences are dominated by Proteobacteria and Bacilli (Firmicutes). The remaining fungal FHbs cluster with Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria. The Sgbs cluster separately from their bacterial counterparts, except for the intercalation of two Planctomycetes and a Proteobacterium between the Fungi incertae sedis and the Blastocladiomycota and Chytridiomycota. Conclusion Our results are compatible with a model of globin evolution put forward earlier, which proposed that eukaryote F, S and T globins originated via horizontal gene transfer of their bacterial counterparts to the eukaryote ancestor, resulting from

  16. Platypus globin genes and flanking loci suggest a new insertional model for beta-globin evolution in birds and mammals

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vidushi S; Cooper, Steven JB; Deakin, Janine E; Fulton, Bob; Graves, Tina; Warren, Wesley C; Wilson, Richard K; Graves, Jennifer AM

    2008-01-01

    Background Vertebrate alpha (α)- and beta (β)-globin gene families exemplify the way in which genomes evolve to produce functional complexity. From tandem duplication of a single globin locus, the α- and β-globin clusters expanded, and then were separated onto different chromosomes. The previous finding of a fossil β-globin gene (ω) in the marsupial α-cluster, however, suggested that duplication of the α-β cluster onto two chromosomes, followed by lineage-specific gene loss and duplication, produced paralogous α- and β-globin clusters in birds and mammals. Here we analyse genomic data from an egg-laying monotreme mammal, the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus), to explore haemoglobin evolution at the stem of the mammalian radiation. Results The platypus α-globin cluster (chromosome 21) contains embryonic and adult α- globin genes, a β-like ω-globin gene, and the GBY globin gene with homology to cytoglobin, arranged as 5'-ζ-ζ'-αD-α3-α2-α1-ω-GBY-3'. The platypus β-globin cluster (chromosome 2) contains single embryonic and adult globin genes arranged as 5'-ε-β-3'. Surprisingly, all of these globin genes were expressed in some adult tissues. Comparison of flanking sequences revealed that all jawed vertebrate α-globin clusters are flanked by MPG-C16orf35 and LUC7L, whereas all bird and mammal β-globin clusters are embedded in olfactory genes. Thus, the mammalian α- and β-globin clusters are orthologous to the bird α- and β-globin clusters respectively. Conclusion We propose that α- and β-globin clusters evolved from an ancient MPG-C16orf35-α-β-GBY-LUC7L arrangement 410 million years ago. A copy of the original β (represented by ω in marsupials and monotremes) was inserted into an array of olfactory genes before the amniote radiation (>315 million years ago), then duplicated and diverged to form orthologous clusters of β-globin genes with different expression profiles in different lineages. PMID:18657265

  17. Genomic organization and gene expression of the multiple globins in Atlantic cod: conservation of globin-flanking genes in chordates infers the origin of the vertebrate globin clusters

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The vertebrate globin genes encoding the α- and β-subunits of the tetrameric hemoglobins are clustered at two unlinked loci. The highly conserved linear order of the genes flanking the hemoglobins provides a strong anchor for inferring common ancestry of the globin clusters. In fish, the number of α-β-linked globin genes varies considerably between different sublineages and seems to be related to prevailing physico-chemical conditions. Draft sequences of the Atlantic cod genome enabled us to determine the genomic organization of the globin repertoire in this marine species that copes with fluctuating environments of the temperate and Arctic regions. Results The Atlantic cod genome was shown to contain 14 globin genes, including nine hemoglobin genes organized in two unlinked clusters designated β5-α1-β1-α4 and β3-β4-α2-α3-β2. The diverged cod hemoglobin genes displayed different expression levels in adult fish, and tetrameric hemoglobins with or without a Root effect were predicted. The novel finding of maternally inherited hemoglobin mRNAs is consistent with a potential role played by fish hemoglobins in the non-specific immune response. In silico analysis of the six teleost genomes available showed that the two α-β globin clusters are flanked by paralogs of five duplicated genes, in agreement with the proposed teleost-specific duplication of the ancestral vertebrate globin cluster. Screening the genome of extant urochordate and cephalochordate species for conserved globin-flanking genes revealed linkage of RHBDF1, MPG and ARHGAP17 to globin genes in the tunicate Ciona intestinalis, while these genes together with LCMT are closely positioned in amphioxus (Branchiostoma floridae), but seem to be unlinked to the multiple globin genes identified in this species. Conclusion The plasticity of Atlantic cod to variable environmental conditions probably involves the expression of multiple globins with potentially different properties. The

  18. Globin gene structure in a reptile supports the transpositional model for amniote α- and β-globin gene evolution.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vidushi S; Ezaz, Tariq; Deakin, Janine E; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall

    2010-12-01

    The haemoglobin protein, required for oxygen transportation in the body, is encoded by α- and β-globin genes that are arranged in clusters. The transpositional model for the evolution of distinct α-globin and β-globin clusters in amniotes is much simpler than the previously proposed whole genome duplication model. According to this model, all jawed vertebrates share one ancient region containing α- and β-globin genes and several flanking genes in the order MPG-C16orf35-(α-β)-GBY-LUC7L that has been conserved for more than 410 million years, whereas amniotes evolved a distinct β-globin cluster by insertion of a transposed β-globin gene from this ancient region into a cluster of olfactory receptors flanked by CCKBR and RRM1. It could not be determined whether this organisation is conserved in all amniotes because of the paucity of information from non-avian reptiles. To fill in this gap, we examined globin gene organisation in a squamate reptile, the Australian bearded dragon lizard, Pogona vitticeps (Agamidae). We report here that the α-globin cluster (HBK, HBA) is flanked by C16orf35 and GBY and is located on a pair of microchromosomes, whereas the β-globin cluster is flanked by RRM1 on the 3' end and is located on the long arm of chromosome 3. However, the CCKBR gene that flanks the β-globin cluster on the 5' end in other amniotes is located on the short arm of chromosome 5 in P. vitticeps, indicating that a chromosomal break between the β-globin cluster and CCKBR occurred at least in the agamid lineage. Our data from a reptile species provide further evidence to support the transpositional model for the evolution of β-globin gene cluster in amniotes. PMID:21116705

  19. O-Linked N-Acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) Transferase and O-GlcNAcase Interact with Mi2β Protein at the Aγ-Globin Promoter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Costa, Flávia C; Tan, Ee Phie; Bushue, Nathan; DiTacchio, Luciano; Costello, Catherine E; McComb, Mark E; Whelan, Stephen A; Peterson, Kenneth R; Slawson, Chad

    2016-07-22

    One mode of γ-globin gene silencing involves a GATA-1·FOG-1·Mi2β repressor complex that binds to the -566 GATA site relative to the (A)γ-globin gene cap site. However, the mechanism of how this repressor complex is assembled at the -566 GATA site is unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that the O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) processing enzymes, O-GlcNAc-transferase (OGT) and O-GlcNAcase (OGA), interact with the (A)γ-globin promoter at the -566 GATA repressor site; however, mutation of the GATA site to GAGA significantly reduces OGT and OGA promoter interactions in β-globin locus yeast artificial chromosome (β-YAC) bone marrow cells. When WT β-YAC bone marrow cells are treated with the OGA inhibitor Thiamet-G, the occupancy of OGT, OGA, and Mi2β at the (A)γ-globin promoter is increased. In addition, OGT and Mi2β recruitment is increased at the (A)γ-globin promoter when γ-globin becomes repressed in postconception day E18 human β-YAC transgenic mouse fetal liver. Furthermore, we show that Mi2β is modified with O-GlcNAc, and both OGT and OGA interact with Mi2β, GATA-1, and FOG-1. Taken together, our data suggest that O-GlcNAcylation is a novel mechanism of γ-globin gene regulation mediated by modulating the assembly of the GATA-1·FOG-1·Mi2β repressor complex at the -566 GATA motif within the promoter. PMID:27231347

  20. Widespread occurrence of N-terminal acylation in animal globins and possible origin of respiratory globins from a membrane-bound ancestor.

    PubMed

    Blank, Miriam; Burmester, Thorsten

    2012-11-01

    Proteins of the (hemo-)globin superfamily have been identified in many different animals but also occur in plants, fungi, and bacteria. Globins are renowned for their ability to store and to transport oxygen, but additional globin functions such as sensing, signaling, and detoxification have been proposed. Recently, we found that the zebrafish globin X protein is myristoylated and palmitoylated at its N-terminus. The addition of fatty acids results in an association with the cellular membranes, suggesting a previously unrecognized globin function. In this study, we show that N-terminal acylation likely occurs in globin proteins from a broad range of phyla. An N-terminal myristoylation site was identified in 90 nonredundant globins from Chlorophyta, Heterokontophyta, Cnidaria, Mollusca, Arthropoda, Nematoda, Echinodermata, Hemichordata, and Chordata (including Cephalochordata), of which 66 proteins carry an additional palmitoylation site. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses identified five major globin families, which may mirror the ancient globin diversity of the Metazoa. Globin X-like proteins form two related clades, which diverged before the radiation of the Eumetazoa. Vertebrate hemoglobin (Hb), myoglobin, cytoglobin, globin E, and globin Y form a strongly supported common clade, which is the sister group of a clade consisting of invertebrate Hbs and relatives. The N-terminally acylated globins do not form a single monophyletic group but are distributed to four distinct clades. This pattern may be either explained by multiple introduction of an N-terminal acylation site into distinct globin lineages or by the origin of animal respiratory globins from a membrane-bound ancestor. Similarly, respiratory globins were not monophyletic. This suggests that respiratory globins might have emerged independently several times and that the early metazoan globins might have been associated with a membrane and carried out a function that was related to lipid protection or

  1. Comparison of ligand migration and binding in heme proteins of the globin family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karin, Nienhaus; Ulrich Nienhaus, G.

    2015-12-01

    The binding of small diatomic ligands such as carbon monoxide or dioxygen to heme proteins is among the simplest biological processes known. Still, it has taken many decades to understand the mechanistic aspects of this process in full detail. Here, we compare ligand binding in three heme proteins of the globin family, myoglobin, a dimeric hemoglobin, and neuroglobin. The combination of structural, spectroscopic, and kinetic experiments over many years by many laboratories has revealed common properties of globins and a clear mechanistic picture of ligand binding at the molecular level. In addition to the ligand binding site at the heme iron, a primary ligand docking site exists that ensures efficient ligand binding to and release from the heme iron. Additional, secondary docking sites can greatly facilitate ligand escape after its dissociation from the heme. Although there is only indirect evidence at present, a preformed histidine gate appears to exist that allows ligand entry to and exit from the active site. The importance of these features can be assessed by studies involving modified proteins (via site-directed mutagenesis) and comparison with heme proteins not belonging to the globin family.

  2. α-Globin as a molecular target in the treatment of β-thalassemia

    PubMed Central

    Mettananda, Sachith; Gibbons, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    The thalassemias, together with sickle cell anemia and its variants, are the world’s most common form of inherited anemia, and in economically undeveloped countries, they still account for tens of thousands of premature deaths every year. In developed countries, treatment of thalassemia is also still far from ideal, requiring lifelong transfusion or allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Clinical and molecular genetic studies over the course of the last 50 years have demonstrated how coinheritance of modifier genes, which alter the balance of α-like and β-like globin gene expression, may transform severe, transfusion-dependent thalassemia into relatively mild forms of anemia. Most attention has been paid to pathways that increase γ-globin expression, and hence the production of fetal hemoglobin. Here we review the evidence that reduction of α-globin expression may provide an equally plausible approach to ameliorating clinically severe forms of β-thalassemia, and in particular, the very common subgroup of patients with hemoglobin E β-thalassemia that makes up approximately half of all patients born each year with severe β-thalassemia. PMID:25869286

  3. Determination of Ligand Pathways in Globins

    PubMed Central

    Salter, Mallory D.; Blouin, George C.; Soman, Jayashree; Singleton, Eileen W.; Dewilde, Sylvia; Moens, Luc; Pesce, Alessandra; Nardini, Marco; Bolognesi, Martino; Olson, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Although molecular dynamics simulations suggest multiple interior pathways for O2 entry into and exit from globins, most experiments indicate well defined single pathways. In 2001, we highlighted the effects of large-to-small amino acid replacements on rates for ligand entry and exit onto the three-dimensional structure of sperm whale myoglobin. The resultant map argued strongly for ligand movement through a short channel from the heme iron to solvent that is gated by the distal histidine (His-64(E7)) near the solvent edge of the porphyrin ring. In this work, we have applied the same mutagenesis mapping strategy to the neuronal mini-hemoglobin from Cerebratulus lacteus (CerHb), which has a large internal tunnel from the heme iron to the C-terminal ends of the E and H helices, a direction that is 180° opposite to the E7 channel. Detailed comparisons of the new CerHb map with expanded results for Mb show unambiguously that the dominant (>90%) ligand pathway in CerHb is through the internal tunnel, and the major (>75%) ligand pathway in Mb is through the E7 gate. These results demonstrate that: 1) mutagenesis mapping can identify internal pathways when they exist; 2) molecular dynamics simulations need to be refined to address discrepancies with experimental observations; and 3) alternative pathways have evolved in globins to meet specific physiological demands. PMID:22859299

  4. Duplication and Divergence: The Evolution of Nematode Globins

    PubMed Central

    McNally, J.; Barris, W.; Blaxter, M. L.

    2009-01-01

    In common with many other groups, nematodes express globins with unknown functions. Nematode globin-like genes can be divided into class 1 globins, similar to vertebrate myoglobins, and a wide range of additional classes. Here we show that class 1 nematode globins possess a huge amount of diversity in gene sequence and structure. There is evidence for multiple events of gene duplication, intron insertion and loss between species, and for allelic variation effecting both synonymous and non-synonymous sites within species. We have also examined gene expression patterns in class I globins from a variety of species. The results show variation in the degree of gene expression, but the tissue specificity and temporal specificity of expression may be more conserved in the phylum. Because the structure-function relationships for the binding and transport of oxygen by globins are well understood, the consequences of genetic variation causing amino acid changes are explored. The gene family shows great promise for discovering unique insights into both structure-function relationships of globins and their physiologial roles. PMID:22661776

  5. Phylogenetic Diversification of the Globin Gene Superfamily in Chordates

    PubMed Central

    Storz, Jay F.; Opazo, Juan C.; Hoffmann, Federico G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Phylogenetic reconstructions provide a means of inferring the branching relationships among members of multigene families that have diversified via successive rounds of gene duplication and divergence. Such reconstructions can illuminate the pathways by which particular expression patterns and protein functions evolved. For example, phylogenetic analyses can reveal cases in which similar expression patterns or functional properties evolved independently in different lineages, either through convergence, parallelism, or evolutionary reversals. The purpose of this paper is to provide a robust phylogenetic framework for interpreting experimental data and for generating hypotheses about the functional evolution of globin proteins in chordate animals. To do this we present a consensus phylogeny of the chordate globin gene superfamily. We document the relative roles of gene duplication and whole-genome duplication in fueling the functional diversification of vertebrate globins, and we unravel patterns of shared ancestry among globin genes from representatives of the three chordate subphyla (Craniata, Urochordata, and Cephalochordata). Our results demonstrate the value of integrating phylogenetic analyses with genomic analyses of conserved synteny to infer the duplicative origins and evolutionary histories of globin genes. We also discuss a number of case studies that illustrate the importance of phylogenetic information when making inferences about the evolution of globin gene expression and protein function. Finally, we discuss why the globin gene superfamily presents special challenges for phylogenetic analysis, and we describe methodological approaches that can be used to meet those challenges. PMID:21557448

  6. Neuroprotection in Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Doozandeh, Azadeh; Yazdani, Shahin

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is a degenerative optic neuropathy characterized by retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss and visual field defects. It is known that in some glaucoma patients, death of RGCs continues despite intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction. Neuroprotection in the field of glaucoma is defined as any treatment, independent of IOP reduction, which prevents RGC death. Glutamate antagonists, ginkgo biloba extract, neurotrophic factors, antioxidants, calcium channel blockers, brimonidine, glaucoma medications with blood regulatory effect and nitric oxide synthase inhibitors are among compounds with possible neuroprotective activity in preclinical studies. A few agents (such as brimonidine or memantine) with neuroprotective effects in experimental studies have advanced to clinical trials; however the results of clinical trials for these agents have not been conclusive. Nevertheless, lack of compelling clinical evidence has not prevented the off-label use of some of these compounds in glaucoma practice. Stem cell transplantation has been reported to halt experimental neurodegenerative disease processes in the absence of cell replacement. It has been hypothesized that transplantation of some types of stem cells activates multiple neuroprotective pathways via secretion of various factors. The advantage of this approach is a prolonged and targeted effect. Important concerns in this field include the secretion of unwanted harmful mediators, graft survival issues and tumorigenesis. Neuroprotection in glaucoma, pharmacologically or by stem cell transplantation, is an interesting subject waiting for broad and multidisciplinary collaborative studies to better clarify its role in clinical practice. PMID:27413504

  7. Neuroprotection in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Doozandeh, Azadeh; Yazdani, Shahin

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is a degenerative optic neuropathy characterized by retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss and visual field defects. It is known that in some glaucoma patients, death of RGCs continues despite intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction. Neuroprotection in the field of glaucoma is defined as any treatment, independent of IOP reduction, which prevents RGC death. Glutamate antagonists, ginkgo biloba extract, neurotrophic factors, antioxidants, calcium channel blockers, brimonidine, glaucoma medications with blood regulatory effect and nitric oxide synthase inhibitors are among compounds with possible neuroprotective activity in preclinical studies. A few agents (such as brimonidine or memantine) with neuroprotective effects in experimental studies have advanced to clinical trials; however the results of clinical trials for these agents have not been conclusive. Nevertheless, lack of compelling clinical evidence has not prevented the off-label use of some of these compounds in glaucoma practice. Stem cell transplantation has been reported to halt experimental neurodegenerative disease processes in the absence of cell replacement. It has been hypothesized that transplantation of some types of stem cells activates multiple neuroprotective pathways via secretion of various factors. The advantage of this approach is a prolonged and targeted effect. Important concerns in this field include the secretion of unwanted harmful mediators, graft survival issues and tumorigenesis. Neuroprotection in glaucoma, pharmacologically or by stem cell transplantation, is an interesting subject waiting for broad and multidisciplinary collaborative studies to better clarify its role in clinical practice. PMID:27413504

  8. Triplex-forming Peptide Nucleic Acids Induce Heritable Elevations in Gamma-globin Expression in Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Joanna Y; Reza, Faisal; Glazer, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    Potentiating homologous recombination using triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) can be used to mediate targeted sequence editing by donor DNAs and thereby induce functional gene expression to supplant non-functional counterparts. Mutations that disrupt the normal function of the β-globin subunit cause hemoglobinopathies such as sickle cell disease and β-thalassemias. However, expression of the functional γ-globin subunit in adults, a benign condition called hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH), can ameliorate the severity of these disorders, but this expression is normally silenced. Here, we harness triplex-forming PNA-induced donor DNA recombination to create HPFH mutations that increase the expression of γ-globin in adult mammalian cells, including β-yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) bone marrow and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). Transfection of human cells led to site-specific modification frequencies of 1.63% using triplex-forming PNA γ-194-3K in conjunction with donor DNAs, compared with 0.29% using donor DNAs alone. We also concurrently modified the γ-globin promoter to insert both HPFH-associated point mutations and a hypoxia-responsive element (HRE), conferring increased expression that was also regulated by oxygen tension. This work demonstrates application of oligonucleotide-based gene therapy to induce a quiescent gene promoter in mammalian cells and regulate its expression via an introduced HRE transcription factor binding site for potential therapeutic purposes. PMID:23337982

  9. Neurogenic neuroprotection: clinical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Mauricio; Fonoff, Erich Talamoni; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Chadi, Gerson

    2012-01-01

    Summary Neurogenic neuroprotection is a promising approach for treating patients with ischemic brain lesions. In rats, stimulation of the deep brain nuclei has been shown to reduce the volume of focal infarction. In this context, protection of neural tissue can be a rapid intervention that has a relatively long-lasting effect, making fastigial nucleus stimulation (FNS) a potentially valuable method for clinical application. Although the mechanisms of neuroprotection induced by FNS remain partially unclear, important data have been presented in the last two decades. A 1-h electrical FNS reduced, by 59%, infarctions triggered by permanent occlusion of the middle cerebral artery in Fisher rats. The acute effect of electrical FNS is likely mediated by a prolonged opening of potassium channels, and the sustained effect appears to be linked to inhibition of the apoptotic cascade. A better understanding of the neuronal circuitry underlying neurogenic neuroprotection may contribute to improving neurological outcomes in ischemic brain insults. PMID:23597434

  10. Globin X is a six-coordinate globin that reduces nitrite to nitric oxide in fish red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Corti, Paola; Xue, Jianmin; Tejero, Jesús; Wajih, Nadeem; Sun, Ming; Stolz, Donna B; Tsang, Michael; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B; Gladwin, Mark T

    2016-07-26

    The discovery of novel globins in diverse organisms has stimulated intense interest in their evolved function, beyond oxygen binding. Globin X (GbX) is a protein found in fish, amphibians, and reptiles that diverged from a common ancestor of mammalian hemoglobins and myoglobins. Like mammalian neuroglobin, GbX was first designated as a neuronal globin in fish and exhibits six-coordinate heme geometry, suggesting a role in intracellular electron transfer reactions rather than oxygen binding. Here, we report that GbX to our knowledge is the first six-coordinate globin and the first globin protein apart from hemoglobin, found in vertebrate RBCs. GbX is present in fish erythrocytes and exhibits a nitrite reduction rate up to 200-fold faster than human hemoglobin and up to 50-fold higher than neuroglobin or cytoglobin. Deoxygenated GbX reduces nitrite to form nitric oxide (NO) and potently inhibits platelet activation in vitro, to a greater extent than hemoglobin. Fish RBCs also reduce nitrite to NO and inhibit platelet activation to a greater extent than human RBCs, whereas GbX knockdown inhibits this nitrite-dependent NO signaling. The description of a novel, six-coordinate globin in RBCs with dominant electron transfer and nitrite reduction functionality provides new insights into the evolved signaling properties of ancestral heme-globins. PMID:27407144

  11. Molecular cloning and expression of α-globin and β-globin genes from crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis).

    PubMed

    Anwised, Preeyanan; Kabbua, Thai; Temsiripong, Theeranan; Dhiravisit, Apisak; Jitrapakdee, Sarawut; Araki, Tomohiro; Yoneda, Kazunari; Thammasirirak, Sompong

    2013-03-01

    The first report of complete nucleotide sequences for α- and β-globin chains from the Siamese hemoglobin (Crocodylus siamensis) is given in this study. The cDNAs encoding α- and β-globins were cloned by RT-PCR using the degenerate primers and by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends method. The full-length α-globin cDNA contains an open reading frame of 423 nucleotides encoding 141 amino acid residues, whereas the β-globin cDNA contains an open reading frame of 438 nucleotides encoding 146 amino acid residues. The authenticity of both α- and β-globin cDNA clones were also confirmed by the heterologous expression in Escherichia coli (E. coli). This is the first time that the recombinant C. siamensis globins were produced in prokaryotic system. Additionally, the heme group was inserted into the recombinant proteins and purified heme-bound proteins were performed by affinity chromatography using Co(2+)-charged Talon resins. The heme-bound proteins appeared to have a maximum absorbance at 415 nm, indicated that the recombinant proteins bound to oxygen and formed active oxyhemoglobin (HbO2). The results indicated that recombinant C. siamensis globins were successfully expressed in prokaryotic system and possessed an activity as ligand binding protein. PMID:23463382

  12. Genetics Home Reference: methemoglobinemia, beta-globin type

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood cells. Specifically, it alters a molecule called hemoglobin within these cells. Hemoglobin within red blood cells attaches (binds) to oxygen ... in tissues throughout the body. Instead of normal hemoglobin, people with methemoglobinemia, beta-globin type have an ...

  13. Neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Feng-yan; Yang, Le; Tian, Zhen; Zhao, Ming-gao; Liu, Shui-bing; An, Jia-ze

    2014-01-01

    In the central nervous system, Asiaticoside has been shown to attenuate in vitro neuronal damage caused by exposure to β-amyloid. In vivo studies demonstrated that Asiaticoside could attenuate neurobehavioral, neurochemical and histological changes in transient focal middle cerebral artery occlusion animals. In addition, Asiaticoside showed anxiolytic effects in acute and chronic stress animals. However, its potential neuroprotective properties in glutamate-induced excitotoxicity have not been fully studied. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside in primary cultured mouse cortical neurons exposed to glutamate-induced excitotoxicity invoked by N-methyl-D-aspartate. Pretreatment with Asiaticoside decreased neuronal cell loss in a concentration-dependent manner and restored changes in expression of apoptotic-related proteins Bcl-2 and Bax. Asiaticoside pretreatment also attenuated the upregulation of NR2B expression, a subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, but did not affect expression of NR2A subunits. Additionally, in cultured neurons, Asiaticoside significantly inhibited Ca2+ influx induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate. These experimental findings provide preliminary evidence that during excitotoxicity induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate exposure in cultured cortical neurons, the neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside are mediated through inhibition of calcium influx. Aside from its anti-oxidant activity, down-regulation of NR2B-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors may be one of the underlying mechanisms in Asiaticoside neuroprotection. PMID:25221579

  14. Fetal Globin Gene Inducers: Novel Agents & New Potential

    PubMed Central

    Perrine, Susan P.; Castaneda, Serguei A.; Chui, David H.; Faller, Douglas V.; Berenson, Ronald J.; Fucharoen, Suthat

    2013-01-01

    Inducing expression of endogenous fetal globin (γ-globin) gene expression to 60-70% of alpha globin synthesis produces β-thalassemia trait globin synthetic ratios and can reduce anemia to a mild level. Several classes of therapeutics have induced γ-globin expression in beta thalassemia patients and subsequently raised total hemoglobin levels, demonstrating proof-of-concept of the approach. Butyrate treatment eliminated transfusion requirements in formerly transfusion-dependent patients with treatment for as long as 7 years. However, prior generations were not readily applicable for widespread use. Currently, a novel oral dual-action therapeutic sodium 2,2-dimethylbutyrate is in clinical trials, an oral decitabine formulation is under development, and agents with complementary mechanisms of action can be applied in combined regimens. Identification of 3 major genetic trait loci which modulate clinical severity provides avenues for developing tailored regimens. These refinements offer renewed potential to apply fetal globin induction as a treatment approach in patient-friendly regimens that can be used world-wide. PMID:20712788

  15. Asynchronous DNA replication within the human. beta. -globin gene locus

    SciTech Connect

    Epner, E.; Forrester, W.C.; Groudine, M. )

    1988-11-01

    The timing of DNA replication of the human {beta}-globin gene locus has been studied by blot hybridization of newly synthesized BrdUrd-substituted DNA from cells in different stages of the S phase. Using probes that span >120 kilobases across the human {beta}-globin gene locus, the authors show that the majority of this domain replicates in early S phase in the human erythroleukemia cell line K562 and in middle-to-late S phase in the lymphoid cell line Manca. However, in K562 cells three small regions display a strikingly different replication pattern than adjacent sequences. These islands, located in the inter-{gamma}-globin gene region and approximately 20 kilobases 5' to the {epsilon}-globin gene and 20 kilobases 3' to the {beta}-globin gene, replicate later and throughout S phase. A similar area is also present in the {alpha}-globin gene region in K562 cells. They suggest that these regions may represent sites of termination of replication forks.

  16. Neuroprotection in glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Sushil K; Gupta, Viney; Crowston, Jonathan G

    2011-01-01

    Glaucoma is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of retinal ganglion cells and their axons. Recent evidence suggests that intraocular pressure (IOP) is only one of the many risk factors for this disease. Current treatment options for this disease have been limited to the reduction of IOP; however, it is clear now that the disease progression continues in many patients despite effective lowering of IOP. In the search for newer modalities in treating this disease, much data have emerged from experimental research the world over, suggesting various pathological processes involved in this disease and newer possible strategies to treat it. This review article looks into the current understanding of the pathophysiology of glaucoma, the importance of neuroprotection, the various possible pharmacological approaches for neuroprotection and evidence of current available medications. PMID:21150020

  17. Transcriptional promiscuity of the human /alpha/-globin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Whitelaw, E.; Hogben, P.; Hanscombe, O.; Proudfoot, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    The human /alpha/-globin gene displays the unusual property of transcriptional promiscuity: that is, it functions in the absence of an enhancer when transfected into nonerythroid cell lines. It is also unusual in that its promoter region lies in a hypomethylated HpaII tiny fragment (HTF) island containing multiple copies of the consensus sequence for the SP1-binding site. The authors have investigated whether there is a relationship between these two observations. First, they investigated the mouse /alpha/-globin gene since it does not lie in an HTF island. They have demonstrated that it was not transcriptionally promiscuous. Second, they studied the transcriptional activity of the human /alpha/-globin gene in the absence of the GC-rich region containing putative SP1-binding sites and found a small (two- to threefold) but consistent positive effect of this region on transcriptional activity in both nonerythroid and erythroid cell lines. However, this effect did not account for the promiscuous nature of the human /alpha/-globin gene. They found that in a nonreplicating system, the human //a/-globin gene, like that of the mouse, required a simian virus 40 enhancer in order to be transcriptionally active in nonerythroid and erythroid cell lines. Since they only observed enhancer independence of the human /alpha/-globin gene in a high-copy-number replicating system, they suggest that competition for trans-acting factors could explain these results. Finally, the authors' experiments with the erythroid cell line Putko suggest that there are no tissue-specific enhancers within 1 kilobase 5' of the human /alpha/-globin cap site or within the gene itself.

  18. Human fetal globin gene expression is regulated by LYAR

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Junyi; Wang, Ying; Liu, Ronghua; Zhang, Yichong; Xu, Zhen; Wang, Yadong; Wu, Yupeng; Liu, Ming; Cerruti, Loretta; Zou, Fengwei; Ma, Chi; Fang, Ming; Tan, Renxiang; Jane, Stephen M.; Zhao, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Human globin gene expression during development is modulated by transcription factors in a stage-dependent manner. However, the mechanisms controlling the process are still largely unknown. In this study, we found that a nuclear protein, LYAR (human homologue of mouse Ly-1 antibody reactive clone) directly interacted with the methyltransferase PRMT5 which triggers the histone H4 Arg3 symmetric dimethylation (H4R3me2s) mark. We found that PRMT5 binding on the proximal γ-promoter was LYAR-dependent. The LYAR DNA-binding motif (GGTTAT) was identified by performing CASTing (cyclic amplification and selection of targets) experiments. Results of EMSA and ChIP assays confirmed that LYAR bound to a DNA region corresponding to the 5′-untranslated region of the γ-globin gene. We also found that LYAR repressed human fetal globin gene expression in both K562 cells and primary human adult erythroid progenitor cells. Thus, these data indicate that LYAR acts as a novel transcription factor that binds the γ-globin gene, and is essential for silencing the γ-globin gene. PMID:25092918

  19. Human fetal globin gene expression is regulated by LYAR.

    PubMed

    Ju, Junyi; Wang, Ying; Liu, Ronghua; Zhang, Yichong; Xu, Zhen; Wang, Yadong; Wu, Yupeng; Liu, Ming; Cerruti, Loretta; Zou, Fengwei; Ma, Chi; Fang, Ming; Tan, Renxiang; Jane, Stephen M; Zhao, Quan

    2014-09-01

    Human globin gene expression during development is modulated by transcription factors in a stage-dependent manner. However, the mechanisms controlling the process are still largely unknown. In this study, we found that a nuclear protein, LYAR (human homologue of mouse Ly-1 antibody reactive clone) directly interacted with the methyltransferase PRMT5 which triggers the histone H4 Arg3 symmetric dimethylation (H4R3me2s) mark. We found that PRMT5 binding on the proximal γ-promoter was LYAR-dependent. The LYAR DNA-binding motif (GGTTAT) was identified by performing CASTing (cyclic amplification and selection of targets) experiments. Results of EMSA and ChIP assays confirmed that LYAR bound to a DNA region corresponding to the 5'-untranslated region of the γ-globin gene. We also found that LYAR repressed human fetal globin gene expression in both K562 cells and primary human adult erythroid progenitor cells. Thus, these data indicate that LYAR acts as a novel transcription factor that binds the γ-globin gene, and is essential for silencing the γ-globin gene. PMID:25092918

  20. Alpha-globin loci in homozygous beta-thalassemia intermedia.

    PubMed

    Triadou, P; Lapoumeroulie, C; Girot, R; Labie, D

    1983-01-01

    Homozygous beta-thalassemia intermediate (TI) differs from thalassemia major (TM) in being less severe clinically. Associated alpha-thalassemia could account for the TI phenotype by reducing the alpha/non-alpha chain imbalance. We have analyzed the alpha loci of 9 TI and 11 TM patients by restriction endonuclease mapping. All the TM and 7 of the TI patients have the normal complement of four alpha-globin genes (alpha alpha/alpha alpha). One TI patient has three alpha-globin genes (alpha alpha/-alpha), and another TI patient has five alpha genes (alpha alpha/alpha alpha alpha). PMID:6305827

  1. Neuroprotective Actions of Neurosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Borowicz, Kinga K.; Piskorska, Barbara; Banach, Monika; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J.

    2011-01-01

    Neurosteroids were initially defined as steroid hormones locally synthesized within the nervous tissue. Subsequently, they were described as steroid hormone derivatives that devoid hormonal action but still affect neuronal excitability through modulation of ionotropic receptors. Neurosteroids are further subdivided into natural (produced in the brain) and synthetic. Some authors distinguish between hormonal and regular neurosteroids in the group of natural ones. The latter group, including hormone metabolites like allopregnanolone or tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone, is devoid of hormonal activity. Both hormones and their derivatives share, however, most of the physiological functions. It is usually very difficult to distinguish the effects of hormones and their metabolites. All these substances may influence seizure phenomena and exhibit neuroprotective effects. Neuroprotection offered by steroid hormones may be realized in both genomic and non-genomic mechanisms and involve regulation of the pro- and anti-apoptotic factors expression, intracellular signaling pathways, neurotransmission, oxidative, and inflammatory processes. Since regular neurosteroids show no affinity for steroid receptors, they may act only in a non-genomic mode. Multiple studies have been conducted so far to show efficacy of neurosteroids in the treatment of the central and peripheral nervous system injury, ischemia, neurodegenerative diseases, or seizures. In this review we focused primarily on neurosteroid mechanisms of action and their role in the process of neurodegeneration. Most of the data refers to results obtained in experimental studies. However, it should be realized that knowledge about neuroactive steroids remains still incomplete and requires confirmation in clinical conditions. PMID:22649375

  2. Neuroprotection in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Berger, R.; Söder, S.

    2015-01-01

    Preterm infants born before the 30th week of pregnancy are especially at risk of perinatal brain damage which is usually a result of cerebral ischemia or an ascending intrauterine infection. Prevention of preterm birth and early intervention given signs of imminent intrauterine infection can reduce the incidence of perinatal cerebral injury. It has been shown that administering magnesium intravenously to women at imminent risk of a preterm birth leads to a significant reduction in the likelihood of the infant developing cerebral palsy and motor skill dysfunction. It has also been demonstrated that delayed clamping of the umbilical cord after birth reduces the rate of brain hemorrhage among preterm infants by up to 50%. In addition, mesenchymal stem cells seem to have significant neuroprotective potential in animal experiments, as they increase the rate of regeneration of the damaged cerebral area. Clinical tests of these types of therapeutic intervention measures appear to be imminent. In the last trimester of pregnancy, the serum concentrations of estradiol and progesterone increase significantly. Preterm infants are removed abruptly from this estradiol and progesterone rich environment. It has been demonstrated in animal experiments that estradiol and progesterone protect the immature brain from hypoxic-ischemic lesions. However, this neuroprotective strategy has unfortunately not yet been subject to sufficient clinical investigation. PMID:25650134

  3. Transcriptional activity of the human pseudogene psi alpha globin compared with alpha globin, its functional gene counterpart.

    PubMed Central

    Whitelaw, E; Proudfoot, N J

    1983-01-01

    Transcriptional analysis of the human pseudogene psi alpha globin has revealed the following features: (1) The promoter with a 23 bp deletion between the CCAAT and ATA boxes is functional both in vitro and in vivo, 3 fold and 10 fold less efficient, respectively, than alpha. (2) Both the psi alpha and alpha globin gene promoters are active in the absence of transcriptional enhancers, either a gene-encoded or viral enhancer. (3) The mutated poly(A) addition signal in psi alpha (AATGAA) appears to be completely nonfunctional. This result provides an explanation for the absence of psi alpha transcripts in human erythroid cells. Images PMID:6316269

  4. Transcriptional interference among the murine β-like globin genes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao; Eszterhas, Susan; Pallazzi, Nicolas; Bouhassira, Eric E.; Fields, Jennifer; Tanabe, Osamu; Gerber, Scott A.; Bulger, Michael; Engel, James Douglas; Groudine, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian β-globin loci contain multiple genes that are activated at different developmental stages. Studies have suggested that the transcription of one gene in a locus can influence the expression of the other locus genes. The prevalent model to explain this transcriptional interference is that all potentially active genes compete for locus control region (LCR) activity. To investigate the influence of transcription by the murine embryonic genes on transcription of the other β-like genes, we generated mice with deletions of the promoter regions of Ey and βh1 and measured transcription of the remaining genes. Deletion of the Ey and βh1 promoters increased transcription of βmajor and βminor 2-fold to 3-fold during primitive erythropoiesis. Deletion of Ey did not affect βh1 nor did deletion of βh1 affect Ey, but Ey deletion uniquely activated transcription from βh0, a β-like globin gene immediately downstream of Ey. Protein analysis showed that βh0 encodes a translatable β-like globin protein that can pair with alpha globin. The lack of transcriptional interference between Ey and βh1 and the gene-specific repression of βh0 did not support LCR competition among the embryonic genes and suggested that direct transcriptional interference from Ey suppressed βh0. PMID:17077320

  5. Acute chest syndrome is associated with single nucleotide polymorphism-defined beta globin cluster haplotype in children with sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Bean, Christopher J; Boulet, Sheree L; Yang, Genyan; Payne, Amanda B; Ghaji, Nafisa; Pyle, Meredith E; Hooper, W Craig; Bhatnagar, Pallav; Keefer, Jeffrey; Barron-Casella, Emily A; Casella, James F; Debaun, Michael R

    2013-10-01

    Genetic diversity at the human β-globin locus has been implicated as a modifier of sickle cell anaemia (SCA) severity. However, haplotypes defined by restriction fragment length polymorphism sites across the β-globin locus have not been consistently associated with clinical phenotypes. To define the genetic structure at the β-globin locus more thoroughly, we performed high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mapping in 820 children who were homozygous for the sickle cell mutation (HbSS). Genotyping results revealed very high linkage disequilibrium across a large region spanning the locus control region and the HBB (β-globin gene) cluster. We identified three predominant haplotypes accounting for 96% of the β(S) -carrying chromosomes in this population that could be distinguished using a minimal set of common SNPs. Consistent with previous studies, fetal haemoglobin level was significantly associated with β(S) -haplotypes. After controlling for covariates, an association was detected between haplotype and rate of hospitalization for acute chest syndrome (ACS) (incidence rate ratio 0·51, 95% confidence interval 0·29-0·89) but not incidence rate of vaso-occlusive pain or presence of silent cerebral infarct (SCI). Our results suggest that these SNP-defined β(S) -haplotypes may be associated with ACS, but not pain or SCI in a study population of children with SCA. PMID:23952145

  6. Functional Identification of Neuroprotective Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Cheng; Liang, Dong; Li, Huiwu; Sasaki, Masayuki; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2010-01-01

    The central nervous system has the capacity to activate profound neuroprotection following sub-lethal stress in a process termed preconditioning. To gain insight into this potent survival response we developed a functional cloning strategy that identified 31 putative neuroprotective genes of which 28 were confirmed to provide protection against oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) or excitotoxic exposure to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) in primary rat cortical neurons. These results reveal that the brain possesses a wide and diverse repertoire of neuroprotective genes. Further characterization of these and other protective signals could provide new treatment opportunities for neurological injury from ischemia or neurodegenerative disease. PMID:21124846

  7. Neuroprotection and antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Lalkovičová, Maria; Danielisová, Viera

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia as a serious neurodegenerative disorder causes together with reperfusion injury many changes in nervous tissue. Most of the neuronal damage is caused by complex of biochemical reactions and substantial processes, such as protein agregation, reactions of free radicals, insufficient blood supply, glutamate excitotoxicity, and oxidative stress. The result of these processes can be apoptotic or necrotic cell death and it can lead to an irreversible damage. Therefore, neuroprotection and prevention of the neurodegeneration are highly important topics to study. There are several approaches to prevent the ischemic damage. Use of many modern therapeutical methods and the incorporation of several substances into the diet of patients is possible to stimulate the endogenous protective mechanisms and improve the life quality. PMID:27482198

  8. Therapeutic Hypothermia for Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Karnatovskaia, Lioudmila V.; Wartenberg, Katja E.

    2014-01-01

    The earliest recorded application of therapeutic hypothermia in medicine spans about 5000 years; however, its use has become widespread since 2002, following the demonstration of both safety and efficacy of regimens requiring only a mild (32°C-35°C) degree of cooling after cardiac arrest. We review the mechanisms by which hypothermia confers neuroprotection as well as its physiological effects by body system and its associated risks. With regard to clinical applications, we present evidence on the role of hypothermia in traumatic brain injury, intracranial pressure elevation, stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, spinal cord injury, hepatic encephalopathy, and neonatal peripartum encephalopathy. Based on the current knowledge and areas undergoing or in need of further exploration, we feel that therapeutic hypothermia holds promise in the treatment of patients with various forms of neurologic injury; however, additional quality studies are needed before its true role is fully known. PMID:24982721

  9. Neuroprotection and antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Lalkovičová, Maria; Danielisová, Viera

    2016-06-01

    Ischemia as a serious neurodegenerative disorder causes together with reperfusion injury many changes in nervous tissue. Most of the neuronal damage is caused by complex of biochemical reactions and substantial processes, such as protein agregation, reactions of free radicals, insufficient blood supply, glutamate excitotoxicity, and oxidative stress. The result of these processes can be apoptotic or necrotic cell death and it can lead to an irreversible damage. Therefore, neuroprotection and prevention of the neurodegeneration are highly important topics to study. There are several approaches to prevent the ischemic damage. Use of many modern therapeutical methods and the incorporation of several substances into the diet of patients is possible to stimulate the endogenous protective mechanisms and improve the life quality. PMID:27482198

  10. Neuroprotective potential of phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G Phani; Khanum, Farhath

    2012-07-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is a major health problem in the 21st century, and many neuropsychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative disorders, such as schizophrenia, depression, Alzheimer's Disease dementia, cerebrovascular impairment, seizure disorders, head injury and Parkinsonism, can be severly functionally debilitating in nature. In course of time, a number of neurotransmitters and signaling molecules have been identified which have been considered as therapeutic targets. Conventional as well newer molecules have been tried against these targets. Phytochemicals from medicinal plants play a vital role in maintaining the brain's chemical balance by influencing the function of receptors for the major inhibitory neurotransmitters. In traditional practice of medicine, several plants have been reported to treat cognitive disorders. In this review paper, we attempt to throw some light on the use of medicinal herbs to treat cognitive disorders. In this review, we briefly deal with some medicinal herbs focusing on their neuroprotective active phytochemical substances like fatty acids, phenols, alkaloids, flavonoids, saponins, terpenes etc. The resistance of neurons to various stressors by activating specific signal transduction pathways and transcription factors are also discussed. It was observed in the review that a number of herbal medicines used in Ayurvedic practices as well Chinese medicines contain multiple compounds and phytochemicals that may have a neuroprotective effect which may prove beneficial in different neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. Though the presence of receptors or transporters for polyphenols or other phytochemicals of the herbal preparations, in brain tissues remains to be ascertained, compounds with multiple targets appear as a potential and promising class of therapeutics for the treatment of diseases with a multifactorial etiology. PMID:23055633

  11. Neuroprotective potential of phytochemicals

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, G. Phani; Khanum, Farhath

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is a major health problem in the 21st century, and many neuropsychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative disorders, such as schizophrenia, depression, Alzheimer's Disease dementia, cerebrovascular impairment, seizure disorders, head injury and Parkinsonism, can be severly functionally debilitating in nature. In course of time, a number of neurotransmitters and signaling molecules have been identified which have been considered as therapeutic targets. Conventional as well newer molecules have been tried against these targets. Phytochemicals from medicinal plants play a vital role in maintaining the brain's chemical balance by influencing the function of receptors for the major inhibitory neurotransmitters. In traditional practice of medicine, several plants have been reported to treat cognitive disorders. In this review paper, we attempt to throw some light on the use of medicinal herbs to treat cognitive disorders. In this review, we briefly deal with some medicinal herbs focusing on their neuroprotective active phytochemical substances like fatty acids, phenols, alkaloids, flavonoids, saponins, terpenes etc. The resistance of neurons to various stressors by activating specific signal transduction pathways and transcription factors are also discussed. It was observed in the review that a number of herbal medicines used in Ayurvedic practices as well Chinese medicines contain multiple compounds and phytochemicals that may have a neuroprotective effect which may prove beneficial in different neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. Though the presence of receptors or transporters for polyphenols or other phytochemicals of the herbal preparations, in brain tissues remains to be ascertained, compounds with multiple targets appear as a potential and promising class of therapeutics for the treatment of diseases with a multifactorial etiology. PMID:23055633

  12. A physiological delay in human fetal hemoglobin switching is associated with specific globin DNA hypomethylation.

    PubMed

    Perrine, S P; Greene, M F; Cohen, R A; Faller, D V

    1988-02-01

    The human fetal-to-adult globin switch normally occurs on a fixed schedule, beginning at 32-34 weeks gestation, and recent studies have suggested an association between this developmental inactivation of the fetal (gamma) globin genes and the appearance of methylation within and around these genes. We have studied a population of infants in whom this switch does not occur before birth (infants of diabetic mothers, IDM) and examined the patterns of methylation surrounding their active gamma-globin genes, in comparison to the gamma-globin genes of age-matched controls who have switched their pattern of globin gene expression on schedule. All genomic DNA samples from infants with delays in the globin switch demonstrated extensive hypomethylation in the region of the gamma-globin genes, comparable to that found in the genomes of fetuses of less than 21 weeks gestation. DNA from the erythroid cells of infants of 32-40 weeks gestation had no detectable hypomethylation in the gamma-globin region. These findings support the concept that hypomethylation is an accurate developmental marker of globin gene switching, and suggest that globin gene expression in IDM may be arrested at an early preswitch stage. PMID:2449361

  13. Zebrafish globin Switching Occurs in Two Developmental Stages and is Controlled by the LCR

    PubMed Central

    Ganis, Jared J.; Hsia, Nelson; Trompouki, Eirini; de Jong, Jill L.O.; DiBiase, Anthony; Lambert, Janelle S.; Jia, Zhiying; Sabo, Peter J.; Weaver, Molly; Sandstrom, Richard; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Zhou, Yi; Zon, Leonard I.

    2012-01-01

    Globin gene switching is a complex, highly regulated process allowing expression of distinct globin genes at specific developmental stages. Here, for the first time, we have characterized all of the zebrafish globins based on the completed genomic sequence. Two distinct chromosomal loci, termed major (chromosome 3) and minor (chromosome 12), harbor the globin genes containing α/β pairs in a 5′-3′ to 3′-5′ orientation. Both these loci share synteny with the mammalian α-globin locus. Zebrafish globin expression was assayed during development and demonstrated two globin switches, similar to human development. A conserved regulatory element, the locus control region (LCR), was revealed by analyzing DNase I hypersensitive sites, H3K4 trimethylation marks and GATA1 binding sites. Surprisingly, the position of these sites with relation to the globin genes is evolutionarily conserved, despite a lack of overall sequence conservation. Motifs within the zebrafish LCR include CACCC, GATA, and NFE2 sites, suggesting functional interactions with known transcription factors but not the same LCR architecture. Functional homology to the mammalian α-LCR MCS-R2 region was confirmed by robust and specific reporter expression in erythrocytes of transgenic zebrafish. Our studies provide a comprehensive characterization of the zebrafish globin loci and clarify the regulation of globin switching. PMID:22537494

  14. Insulin Neuroprotection and the Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Li-Yun; Pei, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the mechanism of neuroprotection of insulin and which blood glucose range was benefit for insulin exerting neuroprotective action. Data Sources: The study is based on the data from PubMed. Study Selection: Articles were selected with the search terms “insulin”, “blood glucose”, “neuroprotection”, “brain”, “glycogen”, “cerebral ischemia”, “neuronal necrosis”, “glutamate”, “γ-aminobutyric acid”. Results: Insulin has neuroprotection. The mechanisms include the regulation of neurotransmitter, promoting glycogen synthesis, and inhibition of neuronal necrosis and apoptosis. Insulin could play its role in neuroprotection by avoiding hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. Conclusions: Intermittent and long-term infusion insulin may be a benefit for patients with ischemic brain damage at blood glucose 6–9 mmol/L. PMID:25836621

  15. Alternative sites of transcription initiation upstream of the canonical cap site in human gamma-globin and beta-globin genes.

    PubMed Central

    Grindlay, G J; Lanyon, W G; Allan, M; Paul, J

    1984-01-01

    Using S1 mapping and primer extension analysis, we have identified a number of human kappa-globin and beta-globin 5' RNA termini originating in the 200 bp upstream of the canonical mRNA cap sites. Upstream initiation sites have previously been reported for the human epsilon-globin gene (4,5) and the present work indicates that this is a general feature of the human beta-type globin genes. We have attempted to identify features common to such sites between the three genes. One site 170 bp upstream of the major beta-globin cap site and a site 1400 bp upstream of the major epsilon-globin cap site are located near putative PolIII promoter sequences and may therefore be transcribed by this enzyme. Alternative initiation sites located 200 bp and 50-100 bp upstream of the epsilon-globin and kappa-globin cap sites respectively are located within S1 hypersensitive regions of chromatin. Images PMID:6701091

  16. Butyrate Infusions in the Ovine Fetus Delay the Biologic Clock for Globin Gene Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrine, Susan P.; Rudolph, Abraham; Faller, Douglas V.; Roman, Christine; Cohen, Ruth A.; Chen, Shao-Jing; Kan, Yuet Wai

    1988-11-01

    The switch from fetal to adult hemoglobin expression is regulated in many mammalian species by a developmental clock-like mechanism and determined by the gestational age of the fetus. Prolonging fetal globin gene expression is of considerable interest for therapeutic potential in diseases caused by abnormal β -globin genes. Butyric acid, which is found in increased plasma concentrations in infants of diabetic mothers who have delayed globin gene switching, was infused into catheterized fetal lambs in utero during the time of the normal globin gene switch period. The globin gene switch was significantly delayed in three of four butyrate-treated fetuses compared with controls and was entirely prevented in one fetus in whom the infusion was begun before the globin switch was under way. These data provide a model for investigating and arresting the biologic clock of hemoglobin switching.

  17. Microglia and neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhihong; Trapp, Bruce D

    2016-01-01

    Microglia were first identified over a century ago, but our knowledge about their ontogeny and functions has significantly expanded only recently. Microglia colonize the central nervous system (CNS) in utero and play essential roles in brain development. Once neural development is completed, microglia function as the resident innate immune cells of the CNS by surveying their microenvironment and becoming activated when the CNS is challenged by infection, injury, or disease. Despite the traditional view of microglia as being destructive in neurological diseases, recent studies have shown that microglia maintain CNS homeostasis and protect the CNS under various pathological conditions. Microglia can be prophylactically activated by modeling infection with systemic lipopolysaccharide injections and these activated microglia can protect the brain from traumatic injury through modulation of neuronal synapses. Microglia can also protect the CNS by promoting neurogenesis, clearing debris, and suppressing inflammation in diseases such as stroke, autism, and Alzheimer's. Microglia are the resident innate immune cells of the CNS. Despite the traditional view of microglia as being destructive in neurological diseases, recent studies have shown that they maintain tissue homeostasis and protect the CNS under various pathological conditions. They achieve so by clearing debris, promoting neurogenesis, suppressing inflammation and stripping inhibitory synapses. This review summarizes recent advances of our understanding on the multi-dimensional neuroprotective roles of microglia. PMID:25693054

  18. Genomic evidence for independent origins of β-like globin genes in monotremes and therian mammals

    PubMed Central

    Opazo, Juan C.; Hoffmann, Federico G.; Storz, Jay F.

    2008-01-01

    Phylogenetic reconstructions of the β-globin gene family in vertebrates have revealed that developmentally regulated systems of hemoglobin synthesis have been reinvented multiple times in independent lineages. For example, the functional differentiation of embryonic and adult β-like globin genes occurred independently in birds and mammals. In both taxa, the embryonic β-globin gene is exclusively expressed in primitive erythroid cells derived from the yolk sac. However, the “ε-globin” gene in birds is not orthologous to the ε-globin gene in mammals, because they are independently derived from lineage-specific duplications of a proto β-globin gene. Here, we report evidence that the early and late expressed β-like globin genes in monotremes and therian mammals (marsupials and placental mammals) are the products of independent duplications of a proto β-globin gene in each of these two lineages. Results of our analysis of genomic sequence data from a large number of vertebrate taxa, including sequence from the recently completed platypus genome, reveal that the ε- and β-globin genes of therian mammals arose via duplication of a proto β-globin gene after the therian/monotreme split. Our analysis of genomic sequence from the platypus also revealed the presence of a duplicate pair of β-like globin genes that originated via duplication of a proto β-globin gene in the monotreme lineage. This discovery provides evidence that, in different lineages of mammals, descendent copies of the same proto β-globin gene may have been independently neofunctionalized to perform physiological tasks associated with oxygen uptake and storage during embryonic development. PMID:18216242

  19. The Caenorhabditis globin gene family reveals extensive nematode-specific radiation and diversification

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Globin isoforms with variant properties and functions have been found in the pseudocoel, body wall and cuticle of various nematode species and even in the eyespots of the insect-parasite Mermis nigrescens. In fact, much higher levels of complexity exist, as shown by recent whole genome analysis studies. In silico analysis of the genome of Caenorhabditis elegans revealed an unexpectedly high number of globin genes featuring a remarkable diversity in gene structure, amino acid sequence and expression profiles. Results In the present study we have analyzed whole genomic data from C. briggsae, C. remanei, Pristionchus pacificus and Brugia malayi and EST data from several other nematode species to study the evolutionary history of the nematode globin gene family. We find a high level of conservation of the C. elegans globin complement, with even distantly related nematodes harboring orthologs to many Caenorhabditis globins. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis resolves all nematode globins into two distinct globin classes. Analysis of the globin intron-exon structures suggests extensive loss of ancestral introns and gain of new positions in deep nematode ancestors, and mainly loss in the Caenorhabditis lineage. We also show that the Caenorhabditis globin genes are expressed in distinct, mostly non-overlapping, sets of cells and that they are all under strong purifying selection. Conclusion Our results enable reconstruction of the evolutionary history of the globin gene family in the nematode phylum. A duplication of an ancestral globin gene occurred before the divergence of the Platyhelminthes and the Nematoda and one of the duplicated genes radiated further in the nematode phylum before the split of the Spirurina and Rhabditina and was followed by further radiation in the lineage leading to Caenorhabditis. The resulting globin genes were subject to processes of subfunctionalization and diversification leading to cell-specific expression patterns. Strong purifying

  20. The Evolution of the Globins: We Thought We Understood It

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesk, Arthur M.

    Protein crystallography achieved its first results in the late 1950s with the structure determinations of sperm whale myoglobin and human haemoglobin. These gave us our first glimpse of the structural changes that take place during protein evolution. Many other structures of proteins in the globin family have continued to reveal interesting and important details of the coordinated divergence during evolution of amino acid sequences and protein structures and functions.

  1. Globin-coupled sensors, protoglobins, and the last universal common ancestor.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Tracey Allen K; Saito, Jennifer A; Hou, Shaobin; Alam, Maqsudul

    2005-01-01

    The strategy for detecting oxygen, carbon monoxide, nitric oxide, and sulfides is predominantly through heme-based sensors utilizing either a globin domain or a PAS domain. Whereas PAS domains bind various cofactors, globins bind only heme. Globin-coupled sensors (GCSs) were first described as regulators of the aerotactic responses in Bacillus subtilis and Halobacterium salinarum. GCSs were also identified in diverse microorganisms that appear to have roles in regulating gene expression. Functional and evolutionary analyses of the GCSs, their protoglobin ancestor, and their relationship to the last universal common ancestor (LUCA) are discussed in the context of globin-based signal transduction. PMID:15598488

  2. Decitabine Increases Fetal Hemoglobin in P. Anubis by Increasing γ-globin Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Akpan, Imo; Banzon, Virryan; Ibanez, Vinzon; Vaitkus, Kestis; DeSimone, Joseph; Lavelle, Donald

    2014-01-01

    1) Objective The mechanism responsible for increased fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels following decitabine treatment remains controversial. These experiments were performed to evaluate the role of transcriptional versus translational mechanisms in the ability of decitabine to increase HbF levels in vivo. 2) Methods Three normal, nonanemic baboons were treated with decitabine subcutaneously (0.5mg/kg/d) for 10 days. The effect of decitabine on globin chain synthesis and globin mRNA levels was measured in pre- and post-treatment bone marrow (BM) aspirates by biosynthetic radiolabelling with [3H] leucine followed by separation of globin chains by HPLC, and real time PCR, respectively. The effect on DNA methylation of the ε- and γ-globin gene promoters was determined by bisulfite sequence analysis. 3) Results Decitabine treatment of normal, nonanemic baboons induced similar increases in the γ/γ+β chain synthetic ratio and the γ/total β-like globin RNA ratio and also increased expression of ε-globin transcripts. Increased expression of ε- and γ-globin was associated with decreased DNA methylation of the ε- and γ-globin gene promoters. 4) Conclusion Decitabine increases HbF in vivo by transcriptional activation of the γ-globin gene. PMID:20713129

  3. Original Research: Generation of non-deletional hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin β-globin locus yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mouse models: -175 Black HPFH and -195 Brazilian HPFH.

    PubMed

    Braghini, Carolina A; Costa, Flavia C; Fedosyuk, Halyna; Neades, Renee Y; Novikova, Lesya V; Parker, Matthew P; Winefield, Robert D; Peterson, Kenneth R

    2016-04-01

    Fetal hemoglobin is a major genetic modifier of the phenotypic heterogeneity in patients with sickle cell disease and certain β-thalassemias. Normal levels of fetal hemoglobin postnatally are approximately 1% of total hemoglobin. Patients who have hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin, characterized by elevated synthesis of γ-globin in adulthood, show reduced disease pathophysiology. Hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin is caused by β-globin locus deletions (deletional hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin) or γ-globin gene promoter point mutations (non-deletional hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin). Current research has focused on elucidating the pathways involved in the maintenance/reactivation of γ-globin in adult life. To better understand these pathways, we generated new β-globin locus yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mice bearing the (A)γ-globin -175 T > C or -195 C > G hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin mutations to model naturally occurring hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin. Adult -175 and -195 mutant β-YAC mice displayed a hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin phenotype, as measured at the mRNA and protein levels. The molecular basis for these phenotypes was examined by chromatin immunoprecipitation of transcription factor/co-factor binding, including YY1, PAX1, TAL1, LMO2, and LDB1. In -175 HPFH versus wild-type samples, the occupancy of LMO2, TAL1 and LDB1 proteins was enriched in HPFH mice (5.8-fold, 5.2-fold and 2.7-fold, respectively), a result that concurs with a recent study in cell lines showing that these proteins form a complex with GATA-1 to mediate long-range interactions between the locus control region and the (A)γ-globin gene. Both hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin mutations result in a gain of (A)γ-globin activation, in contrast to other hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin mutations that result in a loss of repression. The mice provide additional tools to

  4. Generation of non-deletional hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin β-globin locus yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mouse models: −175 Black HPFH and −195 Brazilian HPFH

    PubMed Central

    Braghini, Carolina A; Costa, Flavia C; Fedosyuk, Halyna; Neades, Renee Y; Novikova, Lesya V; Parker, Matthew P; Winefield, Robert D; Peterson, Kenneth R

    2016-01-01

    Fetal hemoglobin is a major genetic modifier of the phenotypic heterogeneity in patients with sickle cell disease and certain β-thalassemias. Normal levels of fetal hemoglobin postnatally are approximately 1% of total hemoglobin. Patients who have hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin, characterized by elevated synthesis of γ-globin in adulthood, show reduced disease pathophysiology. Hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin is caused by β-globin locus deletions (deletional hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin) or γ-globin gene promoter point mutations (non-deletional hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin). Current research has focused on elucidating the pathways involved in the maintenance/reactivation of γ-globin in adult life. To better understand these pathways, we generated new β-globin locus yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mice bearing the Aγ-globin −175 T >C or −195 C >G hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin mutations to model naturally occurring hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin. Adult −175 and −195 mutant β-YAC mice displayed a hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin phenotype, as measured at the mRNA and protein levels. The molecular basis for these phenotypes was examined by chromatin immunoprecipitation of transcription factor/co-factor binding, including YY1, PAX1, TAL1, LMO2, and LDB1. In −175 HPFH versus wild-type samples, the occupancy of LMO2, TAL1 and LDB1 proteins was enriched in HPFH mice (5.8-fold, 5.2-fold and 2.7-fold, respectively), a result that concurs with a recent study in cell lines showing that these proteins form a complex with GATA-1 to mediate long-range interactions between the locus control region and the Aγ-globin gene. Both hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin mutations result in a gain of Aγ-globin activation, in contrast to other hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin mutations that result in a loss of repression. The mice provide additional tools to study

  5. Clinical trials for neuroprotection in ALS.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, G; Carlesi, C; Pasquali, L; Piazza, S; Pietracupa, S; Fornai, F; Ruggieri, S; Murri, L

    2010-07-01

    Owing to uncertainty on the pathogenic mechanisms underlying motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) riluzole remains the only available therapy, with only marginal effects on disease survival. Here we review some of the recent advances in the search for disease-modifying drugs for ALS based on their putative neuroprotective effetcs. A number of more or less established agents have recently been investigated also in ALS for their potential role in neuroprotection and relying on antiglutamatergic, antioxidant or antiapoptotic strategies. Among them Talampanel, beta-lactam antibiotics, Coenzyme Q10, and minocycline have been investigated. Progress has also been made in exploiting growth factors for the treatment of ALS, partly due to advances in developing effective delivery systems to the central nervous system. A number of new therapies have also been identified, including a novel class of compounds, such as heat-shock protein co-inducers, which upregulate cell stress responses, and agents promoting autophagy and mitochondriogenesis, such as lithium and rapamycin. More recently, alterations of mRNA processing were described as a pathogenic mechanism in genetically defined forms of ALS, as those related to TDP-43 and FUS-TLS gene mutations. This knowledge is expected to improve our understanding of the pathogenetic mechanism in ALS and developing more effective therapies. PMID:20406180

  6. Hydroxymethylcytosine and demethylation of the γ-globin gene promoter during erythroid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Maria Armila; Rivers, Angela; Ibanez, Vinzon; Vaitkus, Kestis; Mahmud, Nadim; DeSimone, Joseph; Lavelle, Donald

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for developmental stage-specific regulation of γ-globin gene expression involves DNA methylation. Previous results have shown that the γ-globin promoter is nearly fully demethylated during fetal liver erythroid differentiation and partially demethylated during adult bone marrow erythroid differentiation. The hypothesis that 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5 hmC), a known intermediate in DNA demethylation pathways, is involved in demethylation of the γ-globin gene promoter during erythroid differentiation was investigated by analyzing levels of 5-methylcytosine (5 mC) and 5 hmC at a CCGG site within the 5' γ-globin gene promoter region in FACS-purified cells from baboon bone marrow and fetal liver enriched for different stages of erythroid differentiation. Our results show that 5 mC and 5 hmC levels at the γ-globin promoter are dynamically modulated during erythroid differentiation with peak levels of 5 hmC preceding and/or coinciding with demethylation. The Tet2 and Tet3 dioxygenases that catalyze formation of 5 hmC are expressed during early stages of erythroid differentiation and Tet3 expression increases as differentiation proceeds. In baboon CD34+ bone marrow-derived erythroid progenitor cell cultures, γ-globin expression was positively correlated with 5 hmC and negatively correlated with 5 mC at the γ-globin promoter. Supplementation of culture media with Vitamin C, a cofactor of the Tet dioxygenases, reduced γ-globin promoter DNA methylation and increased γ-globin expression when added alone and in an additive manner in combination with either DNA methyltransferase or LSD1 inhibitors. These results strongly support the hypothesis that the Tet-mediated 5 hmC pathway is involved in developmental stage-specific regulation of γ-globin expression by mediating demethylation of the γ-globin promoter. PMID:25932923

  7. Hydroxymethylcytosine and demethylation of the γ-globin gene promoter during erythroid differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Maria Armila; Rivers, Angela; Ibanez, Vinzon; Vaitkus, Kestis; Mahmud, Nadim; DeSimone, Joseph; Lavelle, Donald

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for developmental stage-specific regulation of γ-globin gene expression involves DNA methylation. Previous results have shown that the γ-globin promoter is nearly fully demethylated during fetal liver erythroid differentiation and partially demethylated during adult bone marrow erythroid differentiation. The hypothesis that 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), a known intermediate in DNA demethylation pathways, is involved in demethylation of the γ-globin gene promoter during erythroid differentiation was investigated by analyzing levels of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and 5hmC at a CCGG site within the 5′ γ-globin gene promoter region in FACS-purified cells from baboon bone marrow and fetal liver enriched for different stages of erythroid differentiation. Our results show that 5mC and 5hmC levels at the γ-globin promoter are dynamically modulated during erythroid differentiation with peak levels of 5hmC preceding and/or coinciding with demethylation. The Tet2 and Tet3 dioxygenases that catalyze formation of 5hmC are expressed during early stages of erythroid differentiation and Tet3 expression increases as differentiation proceeds. In baboon CD34+ bone marrow-derived erythroid progenitor cell cultures, γ-globin expression was positively correlated with 5hmC and negatively correlated with 5mC at the γ-globin promoter. Supplementation of culture media with Vitamin C, a cofactor of the Tet dioxygenases, reduced γ-globin promoter DNA methylation and increased γ-globin expression when added alone and in an additive manner in combination with either DNA methyltransferase or LSD1 inhibitors. These results strongly support the hypothesis that the Tet-mediated 5hmC pathway is involved in developmental stage-specific regulation of γ-globin expression by mediating demethylation of the γ-globin promoter. PMID:25932923

  8. Hypothermia as a clinical neuroprotectant.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Andrew L; Wang, Michael Y

    2014-08-01

    Applying therapeutic hypothermia (TH) for the purposes of neuroprotection, originally termed "hibernation," started nearly 100 years ago. Because TH cooling systems have improved to the point where it is practical and safe for general application, interest in providing such treatment in conditions such as spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, stroke, and cardiac arrest has increased. This article reviews the mechanisms by which TH mitigates secondary neurologic injury, the clinical scenarios where TH is being applied, and reviews selected published studies using TH for central nervous system neuroprotection. PMID:25064786

  9. The 3' noncoding region of beta-globin mRNA is not essential for in vitro translation.

    PubMed Central

    Kronenberg, M N; Roberts, B E; Efstratiadis, A

    1979-01-01

    Rabbit beta globin DNA sequence, excised from plasmid pbetaG1, directs in vitro synthesis of beta-globin in a transcription-translation cell-free system, even after specific elimination of the entire 3'-noncoding region. A DNA restriction fragment carrying this 3' noncoding region and hybridized to globin mRNA cannot arrest the cell-free translation of beta-globin mRNA. Images PMID:424286

  10. Neuroprotective therapies in glaucoma: II. Genetic nanotechnology tools

    PubMed Central

    Nafissi, Nafiseh; Foldvari, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Neurotrophic factor genome engineering could have many potential applications not only in the deeper understanding of neurodegenerative disorders but also in improved therapeutics. The fields of nanomedicine, regenerative medicine, and gene/cell-based therapy have been revolutionized by the development of safer and efficient non-viral technologies for gene delivery and genome editing with modern techniques for insertion of the neurotrophic factors into clinically relevant cells for a more sustained pharmaceutical effect. It has been suggested that the long-term expression of neurotrophic factors is the ultimate approach to prevent and/or treat neurodegenerative disorders such as glaucoma in patients who do not respond to available treatments or are at the progressive stage of the disease. Recent preclinical research suggests that novel neuroprotective gene and cell therapeutics could be promising approaches for both non-invasive neuroprotection and regenerative functions in the eye. Several progenitor and retinal cell types have been investigated as potential candidates for glaucoma neurotrophin therapy either as targets for gene therapy, options for cell replacement therapy, or as vehicles for gene delivery. Therefore, in parallel with deeper understanding of the specific protective effects of different neurotrophic factors and the potential therapeutic cell candidates for glaucoma neuroprotection, the development of non-invasive and highly specific gene delivery methods with safe and effective technologies to modify cell candidates for life-long neuroprotection in the eye is essential before investing in this field. PMID:26528114

  11. Molecular nature of alpha-globin genes in the Saudi population

    PubMed Central

    Borgio, J. Francis

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-thalassemia (α-thal) is a disorder caused by the deletion of single or double α-globin genes, and/or point mutations in the α-globin genes. There are 2 common types of α-globin genes; HBA2 and HBA1. Recently, it has been discovered that the HBA2 gene is replaced by a unique HBA12 gene convert in 5.7% of the Saudi population. The α-globin genes have been emerging as a molecular target for the treatment of β-thalassemia (β-thal). Hence, it is essential to understand the molecular nature of α-globin genes to treat the most prevalent hemoglobin disorders, such as sickle cell disease, α-thal, and β-thal prevalent in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Thirty-two different α-globin genotypes have been observed in the Saudi population. This review outlines the classification of the α-globin genes on the basis of their molecular nature and complex combinations of α-globin genes, and their variants predominant in Saudis. PMID:26593158

  12. Genomic remnants of alpha-globin genes in the hemoglobinless antarctic icefishes.

    PubMed Central

    Cocca, E; Ratnayake-Lecamwasam, M; Parker, S K; Camardella, L; Ciaramella, M; di Prisco, G; Detrich, H W

    1995-01-01

    Alone among piscine taxa, the antarctic icefishes (family Channichthyidae, suborder Notothenioidei) have evolved compensatory adaptations that maintain normal metabolic functions in the absence of erythrocytes and the respiratory oxygen transporter hemoglobin. Although the uniquely "colorless" or "white" condition of the blood of icefishes has been recognized since the early 20th century, the status of globin genes in the icefish genomes has, surprisingly, remained unexplored. Using alpha- and beta-globin cDNAs from the antarctic rockcod Notothenia coriiceps (family Nototheniidae, suborder Notothenioidei), we have probed the genomes of three white-blooded icefishes and four red-blooded notothenioid relatives (three antarctic, one temperate) for globin-related DNA sequences. We detect specific, high-stringency hybridization of the alpha-globin probe to genomic DNAs of both white- and red-blooded species, whereas the beta-globin cDNA hybridizes only to the genomes of the red-blooded fishes. Our results suggest that icefishes retain inactive genomic remnants of alpha-globin genes but have lost, either through deletion or through rapid mutation, the gene that encodes beta-globin. We propose that the hemoglobinless phenotype of extant icefishes is the result of deletion of the single adult beta-globin locus prior to the diversification of the clade. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7892183

  13. Identification and characterization of globin genes from two lepidopteran insects, Bombyx mori and Samia cynthia ricini.

    PubMed

    Kawaoka, Shinpei; Katsuma, Susumu; Meng, Yan; Hayashi, Nobumitsu; Mita, Kazuei; Shimada, Toru

    2009-02-15

    We describe the characterization of hemoglobin-like genes from two lepidopteran insects, Bombyx mori (Bmglobin) and Samia cynthia ricini (Scglobin). Bmglobin and Scglobin are predicted to be intracellular proteins and contain amino acids required for heme and oxygen binding. Expression profiles of two lepidopteran globins, especially Bmglobin, were different from that of other insect globins. Although other insect globins are mainly associated with the tracheal system, Bmglobin was expressed almost exclusively in the Malpighian tubules, and the strongest signal for Scglobin was detected in the fat body. Furthermore, biochemical fractionation analysis revealed that both Bmglobin and Scglobin were localized in the cytoplasm. These results suggest that each lepidopteran globin has a distinct role in the tissues in which it is expressed and that the functions of insect globins are more divergent than previously thought. PMID:19059317

  14. Evolution of the globin gene family in deuterostomes: lineage-specific patterns of diversification and attrition.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Federico G; Opazo, Juan C; Hoogewijs, David; Hankeln, Thomas; Ebner, Bettina; Vinogradov, Serge N; Bailly, Xavier; Storz, Jay F

    2012-07-01

    In the Metazoa, globin proteins display an underlying unity in tertiary structure that belies an extraordinary diversity in primary structures, biochemical properties, and physiological functions. Phylogenetic reconstructions can reveal which of these functions represent novel, lineage-specific innovations, and which represent ancestral functions that are shared with homologous globin proteins in other eukaryotes and even prokaryotes. To date, our understanding of globin diversity in deuterostomes has been hindered by a dearth of genomic sequence data from the Ambulacraria (echinoderms + hemichordates), the sister group of chordates, and the phylum Xenacoelomorpha, which includes xenoturbellids, acoelomorphs, and nemertodermatids. Here, we report the results of a phylogenetic and comparative genomic analysis of the globin gene repertoire of deuterostomes. We first characterized the globin genes of the acorn worm, Saccoglossus kowalevskii, a representative of the phylum Hemichordata. We then integrated genomic sequence data from the acorn worm into a comprehensive analysis of conserved synteny and phylogenetic relationships among globin genes from representatives of the eight lineages that comprise the superphylum Deuterostomia. The primary aims were 1) to unravel the evolutionary history of the globin gene superfamily in deuterostomes and 2) to use the estimated phylogeny to gain insights into the functional evolution of deuterostome globins. Results of our analyses indicate that the deuterostome common ancestor possessed a repertoire of at least four distinct globin paralogs and that different subsets of these ancestral genes have been retained in each of the descendant organismal lineages. In each major deuterostome group, a different subset of ancestral precursor genes underwent lineage-specific expansions of functional diversity through repeated rounds of gene duplication and divergence. By integrating results of the phylogenetic analysis with available

  15. Methylation of alpha-type embryonic globin gene alpha pi represses transcription in primary erythroid cells.

    PubMed

    Singal, Rakesh; vanWert, Jane M; Ferdinand, Larry

    2002-12-01

    The inverse relationship between expression and methylation of beta-type globin genes is well established. However, little is known about the relationship between expression and methylation of avian alpha-type globin genes. The embryonic alpha(pi)-globin promoter was unmethylated, and alpha(pi)-globin RNA was easily detected in 5-day chicken erythroid cells. A progressive methylation of the CpG dinucleotides in the alpha(pi) promoter associated with loss of expression of alpha(pi)-globin gene was seen during development in primary erythroid cells. A 315-bp alpha(pi)-globin promoter region was cloned in an expression construct (alpha(pi)pGL3E) containing a luciferase reporter gene and SV40 enhancer. The alpha(pi)pGL3E construct was transfected into primary erythroid cells derived from 5-day-old chicken embryos. Methylation of alpha(pi)pGL3E plasmid and alpha(pi)-globin promoter alone resulted in a 20-fold and 7-fold inhibition of expression, respectively. The fully methylated but not the unmethylated 315-bp alpha(pi)-globin gene promoter fragment formed a methyl cytosine-binding protein complex (MeCPC). Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays were combined with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to assess histone acetylation associated with the alpha(pi)-globin gene promoter. Slight hyperacetylation of histone H3 but a marked hyperacetylation of histone H4 was seen in 5-day when compared with 14-day erythroid cells. These results demonstrate that methylation can silence transcription of an avian alpha-type embryonic globin gene in homologous primary erythroid cells, possibly by interacting with an MeCPC and histone deacetylase complex. PMID:12393573

  16. Locus assignment of alpha-globin structural mutations by hybrid-selected translation.

    PubMed Central

    Liebhaber, S A; Cash, F E

    1985-01-01

    The two human alpha-globin genes, alpha 1 and alpha 2 located 3.4 kilobases apart on chromosome 16, encode identical alpha-globin proteins. A mutation in either gene could result in a structural hemoglobinopathy. It has only recently become possible to assign an alpha-chain mutant to one of these two loci by using recombinant DNA technology. While definitive, this approach has necessitated the cloning and sequencing of the specific gene in question. We present an alternative approach which results in rapid and definitive assignment of an alpha-globin mutation to its encoding genetic locus. This approach uses the technique of hybrid-selected translation. Reticulocyte RNA from individuals with alpha-globin mutations can be fractionated into beta-, alpha 9 (total)-, alpha 1-, and alpha 2-globin mRNA by selective hybridization of each mRNA species to its respective complementary DNA (cDNA) immobilized on nitrocellulose paper. Each mRNA purified in this way can be translated in vitro, and the mRNA species (and hence gene locus) encoding the globin mutant can then be directly identified by gel analysis of the radiolabeled translation products. This procedure can be used to identify globin mutants as alpha or beta and to localize alpha-globin mutants to the alpha 1 or alpha 2 gene. We have used this technique to localize the two alpha-globin mutants, alpha 125Pro (Hb Quong Sze) and alpha 47HIS (Hb Hasharon), to the alpha 2 locus. This approach could potentially be expanded to serve as an alternative to peptide analysis for the initial characterization of all globin structural mutants. Images PMID:2981252

  17. Hb Wilde and Hb Patagonia: two novel elongated beta-globin variants causing dominant beta-thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Scheps, Karen G; Hasenahuer, Marcia A; Parisi, Gustavo; Fornasari, María S; Pennesi, Sandra P; Erramouspe, Beatriz; Basack, Felisa N; Veber, Ernesto S; Aversa, Luis; Elena, Graciela; Varela, Viviana

    2015-06-01

    We describe here the molecular and hematological characteristics of novel frameshift mutations in exon 2 of the HBB gene (in heterozygous state) found in two Argentinean pediatric patients with dominant β-thalassemia-like features. In Hb Wilde, HBB:c.270_273delTGAG(p.Glu90Cysfs*67), we detected the deletion of the third base of the codon 89 (T) and the codon 90 (GAG), whereas in Hb Patagonia, HBB:c.296_297dupGT(p.Asp99Trpfs*59), the frameshift mutation was due to a duplication of a 'GT' dinucleotide after the second base of codon 98 (GTG). The Hb Patagonia and Hb Wilde mutations would result in elongated β-globin chains with modified C-terminal sequences and a total of 155 and 157 amino acids residues, respectively. Based on bioinformatics and structural analysis, as well as protein modeling, we predict that the elongated β-globins would affect the formation of the αβ dimers and their stability, which would further support the mechanism for the observed clinical features in both patients. PMID:25284604

  18. Peptide nucleic acids targeting β-globin mRNAs selectively inhibit hemoglobin production in murine erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Montagner, Giulia; Gemmo, Chiara; Fabbri, Enrica; Manicardi, Alex; Accardo, Igea; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Finotti, Alessia; Breveglieri, Giulia; Salvatori, Francesca; Borgatti, Monica; Lampronti, Ilaria; Bresciani, Alberto; Altamura, Sergio; Corradini, Roberto; Gambari, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    In the treatment of hemoglobinopathies, amending altered hemoglobins and/or globins produced in excess is an important part of therapeutic strategies and the selective inhibition of globin production may be clinically beneficial. Therefore the development of drug-based methods for the selective inhibition of globin accumulation is required. In this study, we employed peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) to alter globin gene expression. The main conclusion of the present study was that PNAs designed to target adult murine β-globin mRNA inhibit hemoglobin accumulation and erythroid differentiation of murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells with high efficiency and fair selectivity. No major effects were observed on cell proliferation. Our study supports the concept that PNAs may be used to target mRNAs that, similar to globin mRNAs, are expressed at very high levels in differentiating erythroid cells. Our data suggest that PNAs inhibit the excess production of globins involved in the pathophysiology of hemoglobinopathies. PMID:25405921

  19. Hemoglobin Agenogi--A rare abnormal beta globin chain variant.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sunita; Sharma, Geetika; Chandra, Jagdish; Colah, Roshan

    2016-01-01

    Haemoglobin (Hb) Agenogi is clinically asymptomatic, rare β-globin chain variant characterized by a substitution of glutamic acid by lysine at position 90 of β-chain. It elutes in the C-window on high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). We report a 10-year-old male with easy fatigability, lethargy, pallor, and mild splenomegaly. Hematological parameters revealed microcytic hypochromic anemia and mildly raised red blood cells count, suggestive of thalassemia trait. On HPLC, a predominant peak was observed in the C-window (82.6%) along with raised HbA 2 level (9.3%). Based on these findings, a possibility of HbC disease/β-thalassemia trait doubly heterozygous was considered. Family studies were advised. HPLC findings in father were suggestive of β-thalassemia trait, while both his mother and brother had an abnormal peak in the C-window of 42.7% and 40.8%, respectively, with elevated HbA 2 values of 5% and 4.9%, respectively. Direct DNA sequencing revealed intervening sequences 1-5 (G ; C) in father, confirming β-thalassemia trait. His mother and brother had heterozygous gene mutation at codon 90 of β-globin chain (G ; A) suggestive of Hb Agenogi. The child carried mutations for both β-thalassemia trait as well as Hb Agenogi. PMID:26960650

  20. Intronless β-Globin Reporter: A Tool for Studying Nuclear RNA Stability Elements.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jessica A; Steitz, Joan A

    2016-01-01

    The intronless β-globin reporter, whose mRNA is intrinsically unstable due to the lack of introns, is a useful tool to study RNA stability elements in a heterologous transcript. Insertion of a stability element leads to the accumulation of intronless β-globin mRNA that can be visualized by conventional Northern blot analyses. In this chapter, we explain how to perform the β-globin reporter assay using the ENE (expression and nuclear retention element), a triple-helix-forming RNA stability element that protects reporter mRNA from 3'- 5' decay. A list of considerations is included for the use of ENEs as a tool to stabilize other RNAs. In this chapter, we provide a brief description of how to insert an ENE sequence into the 3'-untranslated region of an intronless β-globin reporter plasmid using basic cloning technology. Then, we provide a detailed protocol for quantitative measurements of steady-state levels of β-globin mRNA. This entails the transient transfection of mammalian cells with β-globin reporter plasmids, isolation of total cellular RNA, and detection of reporter mRNA via Northern blot. This methodology can be applied for the study of any nuclear RNA stability element using the intronless β-globin reporter. PMID:27236793

  1. Potential neuroprotective properties of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG).

    PubMed

    Singh, Neha Atulkumar; Mandal, Abul Kalam Azad; Khan, Zaved Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) enforce an overwhelming social and economic burden on society. They are primarily characterized through the accumulation of modified proteins, which further trigger biological responses such as inflammation, oxidative stress, excitotoxicity and modulation of signalling pathways. In a hope for cure, these diseases have been studied extensively over the last decade to successfully develop symptom-oriented therapies. However, so far no definite cure has been found. Therefore, there is a need to identify a class of drug capable of reversing neural damage and preventing further neural death. This review therefore assesses the reliability of the neuroprotective benefits of epigallocatechin-gallate (EGCG) by shedding light on their biological, pharmacological, antioxidant and metal chelation properties, with emphasis on their ability to invoke a range of cellular mechanisms in the brain. It also discusses the possible use of nanotechnology to enhance the neuroprotective benefits of EGCG. PMID:27268025

  2. Duality of Antidepressants and Neuroprotectants.

    PubMed

    Tizabi, Yousef

    2016-07-01

    The co-morbidity of neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly major depressive disorder (MDD) with neurodegenerative diseases, in particular Parkinson's disease (PD) is now well recognized. Indeed, it is suggested that depressive disorders, especially in late life, may be an indication of latent neurodegeneration. Thus, it is not unreasonable to expect that deterrents of MDD may also deter the onset and/or progression of the neurodegenerative diseases including PD. In this review, examples of neuroprotective efficacy of established as well as prospective antidepressants are provided. Conversely, mood-regulating effects of some neuroprotective drugs are also presented. Thus, in addition to currently used antidepressants, ketamine, nicotine, curcumin, and resveratrol are discussed for their dual efficacy. In addition, potential neurobiological substrates for their actions are presented. It is concluded that pharmacological developments of mood-regulating or neuroprotective drugs can have cross benefit in co-morbid conditions of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and that inflammatory and neurotrophic factors play important roles in both conditions. PMID:26613895

  3. Transcription in vivo of an Alu family member upstream from the human epsilon-globin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Allan, M; Paul, J

    1984-01-01

    The more distal Alu repeat flanking the epsilon-globin gene is transcribed in K562 cells to generate transcripts 350-400 nucleotides in length. Initiation occurs at the start of the repeat, upstream of a putative PolIII control signal. These transcripts originate from the strand which does not code epsilon-globin and are oriented in the opposite direction from the gene. They are non-polyadenylated, nucleus-confined and are only detectable in association with expression of the epsilon-globin gene. Images PMID:6320117

  4. β-Thalassemia Due to Intronic LINE-1 Insertion in the β-Globin Gene (HBB): Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Reduced Transcript Levels of the β-GlobinL1 Allele

    PubMed Central

    Lanikova, Lucie; Kucerova, Jana; Indrak, Karel; Divoka, Martina; Issa, Jean-Pierre; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Prchal, Josef T.; Divoky, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    We describe the molecular etiology of β+-thalassemia that is caused by the insertion of the full-length transposable element LINE-1 (L1) into the intron-2 of the β-globin gene (HBB). The transcript level of the affected β-globin gene was severely reduced. The remaining transcripts consisted of full-length, correctly processed β-globin mRNA and a minute amount of three aberrantly spliced transcripts with a decreased half-life due to activation of the nonsense-mediated decay pathway. The lower steady-state amount of mRNA produced by the β-globinL1 allele also resulted from a reduced rate of transcription and decreased production of full-length β-globin primary transcripts. The promoter and enhancer sequences of the β-globinL1 allele were hypermethylated; however, treatment with a demethylating agent did not restore the impaired transcription. A histone deacetylase inhibitor partially reactivated the β-globinL1 transcription despite permanent β-globinL1 promoter CpG methylation. This result indicates that the decreased rate of transcription from the β-globinL1 allele is associated with an altered chromatin structure. Therefore, the molecular defect caused by intronic L1 insertion in the β-globin gene represents a novel etiology of β-thalassemia. PMID:23878091

  5. Ancient Duplications and Expression Divergence in the Globin Gene Superfamily of Vertebrates: Insights from the Elephant Shark Genome and Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Opazo, Juan C.; Toloza-Villalobos, Jessica; Burmester, Thorsten; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Storz, Jay F.

    2015-01-01

    Comparative analyses of vertebrate genomes continue to uncover a surprising diversity of genes in the globin gene superfamily, some of which have very restricted phyletic distributions despite their antiquity. Genomic analysis of the globin gene repertoire of cartilaginous fish (Chondrichthyes) should be especially informative about the duplicative origins and ancestral functions of vertebrate globins, as divergence between Chondrichthyes and bony vertebrates represents the most basal split within the jawed vertebrates. Here, we report a comparative genomic analysis of the vertebrate globin gene family that includes the complete globin gene repertoire of the elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii). Using genomic sequence data from representatives of all major vertebrate classes, integrated analyses of conserved synteny and phylogenetic relationships revealed that the last common ancestor of vertebrates possessed a repertoire of at least seven globin genes: single copies of androglobin and neuroglobin, four paralogous copies of globin X, and the single-copy progenitor of the entire set of vertebrate-specific globins. Combined with expression data, the genomic inventory of elephant shark globins yielded four especially surprising findings: 1) there is no trace of the neuroglobin gene (a highly conserved gene that is present in all other jawed vertebrates that have been examined to date), 2) myoglobin is highly expressed in heart, but not in skeletal muscle (reflecting a possible ancestral condition in vertebrates with single-circuit circulatory systems), 3) elephant shark possesses two highly divergent globin X paralogs, one of which is preferentially expressed in gonads, and 4) elephant shark possesses two structurally distinct α-globin paralogs, one of which is preferentially expressed in the brain. Expression profiles of elephant shark globin genes reveal distinct specializations of function relative to orthologs in bony vertebrates and suggest hypotheses about

  6. The 5' flanking region of human epsilon-globin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Baralle, F E; Shoulders, C C; Goodbourn, S; Jeffreys, A; Proudfoot, N J

    1980-01-01

    The structural analysis of the 2.0 kb region upstream from the epsilon-globin gene has been carried out. A genomic DNA map around the gene was worked out in some detail to ensure that the cloned DNA was representative of the actual chromosomal arrangement. Furthermore, a new technique was developed to precisely map a reiterated DNA sequence present 1.5 kb to the 5' side of the gene. The complete nucleotide sequence of the 2.0 kb 5' flanking region was then determined and overlapped with the gene. The sequence included the reiterated DNA sequence which is homologous to the so-called AluI family of repeats. Unusual stretches of sequence 50 nucleotides long, where A + T represent about 90% of the bases, are present at both the 5' and 3' sides of the repeat. Images PMID:6253916

  7. alpha-Thalassemia caused by an unstable alpha-globin mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Liebhaber, S A; Kan, Y W

    1983-01-01

    In a previous study, molecular cloning of the alpha-globin genes from a patient with nondeletion Hb-H disease (genotype--/alpha alpha) showed that a single nucleotide mutation (CTG to CCG) in one of the genes resulted in a leucine to proline substitution. This paper describes the approach we used to detect the abnormal alpha-globin chain. The chain was identified using a cell-free translation system. It turned over rapidly both in vitro and in vivo in the patient's reticulocytes. The unusual feature of this unstable alpha-globin is that the alpha-globin deficiency causes alpha-thalassemia. Simple heterozygotes for this lesion (alpha Pro alpha/alpha alpha) resemble alpha-thalassemia carriers and do not exhibit the hemolytic anemia usually associated with unstable hemoglobins. Images PMID:6826718

  8. Structure and Properties of a Bis-Histidyl Ligated Globin from Caenorhabditis elegans†

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jungjoo; Herzik, Mark A.; Winter, Michael B.; Tran, Rosalie; Olea, Charles; Marletta, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Globins are heme-containing proteins that are best known for their roles in oxygen (O2) transport and storage. However, more diverse roles of globins in biology are being revealed, including gas and redox sensing. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, 33 globin or globin-like genes have been recently identified, some of which are known to be expressed in the sensory neurons of the worm and linked to O2 sensing behavior. Here, we describe GLB-6, a novel globin-like protein expressed in the neurons of C. elegans. Recombinantly expressed full-length GLB-6 contains a heme site with spectral features that are similar to those of other bis-histidyl ligated globins, such as neuroglobin and cytoglobin. In contrast to these globins, however, ligands such as CO, NO, and CN− do not bind to the heme in GLB-6, demonstrating that the endogenous histidine ligands are likely very tightly coordinated. Additionally, GLB-6 exhibits rapid two-state autoxidation kinetics in the presence of physiological O2 levels as well as a low redox potential (−193 ± 2 mV). A high resolution (1.40 Å) crystal structure of the ferric form of the heme-domain of GLB-6 confirms both the putative globin-fold and bis-histidyl ligation and also demonstrates key structural features that can be correlated with the unusual ligand binding and redox properties exhibited by the full-length protein. Taken together, the biochemical properties of GLB-6 suggest that this neural protein would most likely serve as a physiological sensor for O2 in C. elegans via redox signaling and/or electron transfer. PMID:20518498

  9. Characterization of histone H3K27 modifications in the {beta}-globin locus

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yea Woon; Kim, AeRi

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} The {beta}-globin locus control region is hyperacetylated and monomethylated at histone H3K27. {yields} Highly transcribed globin genes are marked by H3K27ac, but H3K27me2 is remarkable at silent globin genes in erythroid K562 cells. {yields} Association of PRC2 subunits is comparable with H3K27me3 pattern. {yields} Modifications of histone H3K27 are established in an enhancer-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Histone H3K27 is acetylated or methylated in the environment of nuclear chromatin. Here, to characterize the modification pattern of H3K27 in locus control region (LCR) and to understand the correlation of various H3K27 modifications with transcriptional activity of genes, we analyzed the human {beta}-globin locus using the ChIP assay. The LCR of the human {beta}-globin locus was enriched by H3K27ac and H3K27me1 in erythroid K562 cells. The highly transcribed globin genes were hyperacetylated at H3K27, but the repressed globin genes were highly dimethylated at this lysine in these cells. However, in non-erythroid 293FT cells, the {beta}-globin locus was marked by a high level of H3K27me3. EZH2 and SUZ12, subunits of polycomb repressive complex 2, were comparably detected with the H3K27me3 pattern in K562 and 293FT cells. In addition, H3K27ac, H3K27me1 and H3K27me3 were established in an enhancer-dependent manner in a model minichromosomal locus containing an enhancer and its target gene. Taken together, these results show that H3K27 modifications have distinctive correlations with the chromatin state or transcription level of genes and are influenced by an enhancer.

  10. Therapeutic fetal-globin inducers reduce transcriptional repression in hemoglobinopathy erythroid progenitors through distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yan; Sangerman, Jose; Luo, Hong Yuan; Fucharoen, Suthat; Chui, David H K; Faller, Douglas V; Perrine, Susan P

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacologic augmentation of γ-globin expression sufficient to reduce anemia and clinical severity in patients with diverse hemoglobinopathies has been challenging. In studies here, representative molecules from four chemical classes, representing several distinct primary mechanisms of action, were investigated for effects on γ-globin transcriptional repressors, including components of the NuRD complex (LSD1 and HDACs 2-3), and the downstream repressor BCL11A, in erythroid progenitors from hemoglobinopathy patients. Two HDAC inhibitors (MS-275 and SB939), a short-chain fatty acid derivative (sodium dimethylbutyrate [SDMB]), and an agent identified in high-throughput screening, Benserazide, were studied. These therapeutics induced γ-globin mRNA in progenitors above same subject controls up to 20-fold, and increased F-reticulocytes up to 20%. Cellular protein levels of BCL11A, LSD-1, and KLF1 were suppressed by the compounds. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated a 3.6-fold reduction in LSD1 and HDAC3 occupancy in the γ-globin gene promoter with Benserazide exposure, 3-fold reduction in LSD-1 and HDAC2 occupancy in the γ-globin gene promoter with SDMB exposure, while markers of gene activation (histone H3K9 acetylation and H3K4 demethylation), were enriched 5.7-fold. These findings identify clinical-stage oral therapeutics which inhibit or displace major co-repressors of γ-globin gene transcription and may suggest a rationale for combination therapy to produce enhanced efficacy. PMID:26603726

  11. Correlation of BACH1 and Hemoglobin E/Beta-Thalassemia Globin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tze Yan; Muniandy, Logeswaran; Teh, Lai Kuan; Abdullah, Maha; George, Elizabeth; Sathar, Jameela; Lai, Mei I

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The diverse clinical phenotype of hemoglobin E (HbE)/β-thalassemia has not only confounded clinicians in matters of patient management but has also led scientists to investigate the complex mechanisms involved in maintaining the delicate red cell environment where, even with apparent similarities of α- and β-globin genotypes, the phenotype tells a different story. The BTB and CNC homology 1 (BACH1) protein is known to regulate α- and β-globin gene transcriptions during the terminal differentiation of erythroid cells. With the mutations involved in HbE/β-thalassemia disorder, we studied the role of BACH1 in compensating for the globin chain imbalance, albeit for fine-tuning purposes. Materials and Methods: A total of 47 HbE/β-thalassemia samples were analyzed using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and correlated with age, sex, red blood cell parameters, globin gene expressions, and some clinical data. Results: The BACH1 expression among the β-thalassemia intermedia patients varied by up to 2-log differences and was positively correlated to age; α-, β-, and γ-globin gene expression level; and heme oxygenase 1 protein. BACH1 was also negatively correlated to reticulocyte level and had a significant correlation with splenectomy. Conclusion: This study indicates that the expression of BACH1 could be elevated as a compensatory mechanism to decrease the globin chain imbalance as well as to reduce the oxidative stress found in HbE/β-thalassemia. PMID:26377036

  12. Developmental- and differentiation-specific patterns of human gamma- and beta-globin promoter DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Mabaera, Rodwell; Richardson, Christine A; Johnson, Kristin; Hsu, Mei; Fiering, Steven; Lowrey, Christopher H

    2007-08-15

    The mechanisms underlying the human fetal-to-adult beta-globin gene switch remain to be determined. While there is substantial experimental evidence to suggest that promoter DNA methylation is involved in this process, most data come from studies in nonhuman systems. We have evaluated human gamma- and beta-globin promoter methylation in primary human fetal liver (FL) and adult bone marrow (ABM) erythroid cells. Our results show that, in general, promoter methylation and gene expression are inversely related. However, CpGs at -162 of the gamma promoter and -126 of the beta promoter are hypomethylated in ABM and FL, respectively. We also studied gamma-globin promoter methylation during in vitro differentiation of erythroid cells. The gamma promoters are initially hypermethylated in CD34(+) cells. The upstream gamma promoter CpGs become hypomethylated during the preerythroid phase of differentiation and are then remethylated later, during erythropoiesis. The period of promoter hypomethylation correlates with transient gamma-globin gene expression and may explain the previously observed fetal hemoglobin production that occurs during early adult erythropoiesis. These results provide the first comprehensive survey of developmental changes in human gamma- and beta-globin promoter methylation and support the hypothesis that promoter methylation plays a role in human beta-globin locus gene switching. PMID:17456718

  13. Nucleotide sequence of 3' untranslated portion of human alpha globin mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J T; deRiel, J K; Forget, B G; Marotta, C A; Weissman, S M

    1977-01-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of 75 nucleotides of the 3'-untranslated portion of normal human alpha globin mRNA which corresponds to the elongated amino acid sequence of the chain termination mutant Hb Constant Spring. This was accomplished by sequence analysis of cDNA fragments obtained by restriction endonuclease or T4 endonuclease IV cleavage of human globin cDNA synthesized from globin mRNA by use of viral reverse transcriptase. Analysis of cRNA synthesized from cDNA by use of RNA polymerase provided additional confirmatory sequence information. Possible polymorphism has been identified at one site of the sequence. Our sequence overlaps with, and extends the sequence of 43 nucleotides determined by Proudfood and coworkers for the very 3'-terminal portion of human alpha globin mRNA. The complete 3'-untranslated sequence of human alpha globin mRNA (112 nucleotides including termination codon) shows little homology to that of the human or rabbit beta globin mRNAs except for the presence of the hexanucleotide sequence AAUAAA which is found in most eukaryotic mRNAs near the 3'-terminal poly (A). Images PMID:909779

  14. KLF1 stabilizes GATA-1 and TAL1 occupancy in the human β-globin locus.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yujin; Kim, Yea Woon; Yun, Jangmi; Shin, Jongo; Kim, AeRi

    2015-03-01

    KLF1 is an erythroid specific transcription factor that binds to regulatory regions of erythroid genes. Binding sites of KLF1 are often found near binding sites of GATA-1 and TAL1. In the β-globin locus, KLF1 is required for forming active chromatin structure, although its role is unclear. To explore the role of KLF1 in transcribing the human γ-globin genes, we stably reduced the expression of KLF1 in erythroid K562 cells, compromising its association in the β-globin locus. The γ-globin transcription was reduced with disappearance of active chromatin structure of the locus in the KLF1 knockdown cells. Interestingly, GATA-1 and TAL1 binding was reduced in the β-globin locus, even though their expressions were not affected by KLF1 knockdown. The KLF1-dependent GATA-1 and TAL1 binding was observed in the adult locus transcribing the β-globin gene and in several erythroid genes, where GATA-1 occupancy is independent from TAL1. These results indicate that KLF1 plays a role in facilitating and/or stabilizing GATA-1 and TAL1 occupancy in the erythroid genes, contributing to the generation of active chromatin structure such as histone acetylation and chromatin looping. PMID:25528728

  15. Amoebozoa possess lineage-specific globin gene repertoires gained by individual horizontal gene transfers.

    PubMed

    Dröge, Jasmin; Buczek, Dorota; Suzuki, Yutaka; Makałowski, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    The Amoebozoa represent a clade of unicellular amoeboid organisms that display a wide variety of lifestyles, including free-living and parasitic species. For example, the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum has the ability to aggregate into a multicellular fruiting body upon starvation, while the pathogenic amoeba Entamoeba histolytica is a parasite of humans. Globins are small heme proteins that are present in almost all extant organisms. Although several genomes of amoebozoan species have been sequenced, little is known about the phyletic distribution of globin genes within this phylum. Only two flavohemoglobins (FHbs) of D. discoideum have been reported and characterized previously while the genomes of Entamoeba species are apparently devoid of globin genes. We investigated eleven amoebozoan species for the presence of globin genes by genomic and phylogenetic in silico analyses. Additional FHb genes were identified in the genomes of four social amoebas and the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum. Moreover, a single-domain globin (SDFgb) of Hartmannella vermiformis, as well as two truncated hemoglobins (trHbs) of Acanthamoeba castellanii were identified. Phylogenetic evidence suggests that these globin genes were independently acquired via horizontal gene transfer from some ancestral bacteria. Furthermore, the phylogenetic tree of amoebozoan FHbs indicates that they do not share a common ancestry and that a transfer of FHbs from bacteria to amoeba occurred multiple times. PMID:25013378

  16. Pharmacological Induction of Human Fetal Globin Gene in Hydroxyurea-Resistant Primary Adult Erythroid Cells.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yu-Chi; Chen, Ruei-Lin; Lai, Zheng-Sheng; Song, Jen-Shin; Chao, Yu-Sheng; Shen, Che-Kun James

    2015-07-01

    Pharmacological induction of the fetal γ globin gene and the consequent formation of HbF (α2/γ2) in adult erythroid cells are one feasible therapeutic strategy for sickle cell disease (SCD) and severe β-thalassemias. Hydroxyurea (HU) is the current drug of choice for SCD, but serious side effects limit its clinical use. Moreover, 30 to 50% of patients are irresponsive to HU treatment. We have used high-throughput screening to identify benzo[de]benzo[4,5]imidazo[2,1-a]isoquinolin-7-one and its derivatives (compounds I to VI) as potent γ globin inducers. Of the compounds, I to V exert superior γ globin induction and have better therapeutic potential than HU, likely because of their activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway and modulation of expression levels and/or chromosome binding of γ globin gene regulators, including BCL11A, and chromatin structure over the γ globin promoter. Unlike sodium butyrate (NaB), the global levels of acetylated histones H3 and H4 are not changed by compound II treatment. Remarkably, compound II induces the γ globin gene in HU-resistant primary human adult erythroid cells, the p38 signaling pathway of which appears to be irresponsive to HU and NaB as well as compound II. This study provides a new framework for the development of new and superior compounds for treating SCD and severe β-thalassemias. PMID:25986606

  17. Understanding α-globin gene regulation and implications for the treatment of β-thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Mettananda, Sachith; Gibbons, Richard J; Higgs, Douglas R

    2016-03-01

    Over the past three decades, a vast amount of new information has been uncovered describing how the globin genes are regulated. This knowledge has provided significant insights into the general understanding of the regulation of human genes. It is now known that molecular defects within and around the α- and β-globin genes, as well as in the distant regulatory elements, can cause thalassemia. Unbalanced production of globin chains owing to defective synthesis of one, and the continued unopposed synthesis of another, is the central causative factor in the cellular pathology and pathophysiology of thalassemia. A large body of clinical, genetic, and experimental evidence suggests that altering globin chain imbalance by reducing the production of α-globin synthesis ameliorates the disease severity in patients with β-thalassemia. With the development of new genetic-based therapeutic tools that have a potential to decrease the expression of a selected gene in a tissue-specific manner, the possibility of decreasing expression of the α-globin gene to improve the clinical severity of β-thalassemia could become a reality. PMID:26695885

  18. [γ-Globin Inductive Therapy of β-thalassemia and Its Relationship with MicroRNA].

    PubMed

    Li, Yao-Yao; Gu, Jian; Yu, Duo-Nan

    2016-04-01

    β-thalassemia is a chronic hemolytic anemia characterized by the reduction or absence of synthesis of β-globin chains because of the β-globin gene mutations. β-thalassemia belongs to the inherited hemoglobin disease, and occurs in some provinces of China, such as in Guangdong, Guangxi, Fujian, its prevalence is about 2%. The treatment of this disease include transfusion, iron chelating agent, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, splenectomy, induced expression of Fetal Hemoglobin (HbF) and gene therapies. However, the mortality rate of this disease is still higher, thus some new treatments are urgently needed. In recent years, the study was mainly concentrated in 2 aspects: the normal β-globin gene transfer and endogenous γ-globin re-activation. Some studies showed that the expression of miRNAs was dysregulated in β-thalassemia. Some miRNAs could regulate γ-globin at posttranscriptional level, thus, the clarification of relationship between miRNAs and β-thalassemia is expected to provide experimental bases to β-thalassemia therapy. In this review, the induced therapy of γ-globin for β-thalassemia and its relationship with the miRNA are summarized. PMID:27151042

  19. Neuroprotective compounds of Tilia amurensis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bohyung; Weon, Jin Bae; Eom, Min Rye; Jung, Youn Sik; Ma, Choong Je

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tilia amurensis (Tiliacese) has been used for anti-tumor and anti-inflammatory in Korea, China, and Japan. Objective: In this study, we isolated five compounds from T. amurensis and determined whether protected neuronal cells against glutamate-induced oxidative stress in HT22 cells. Materials and Methods: Compounds were isolated using chromatographic techniques including silica gel, Sephadex LH-20 open column and high performance liquid chromatography analysis, and evaluated neuroprotective effect in HT22 cells by 3-(4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay. Results: β-D-fructofuranosyl α-D-glucopyranoside (1), (-)-epicatechin (2), nudiposide (3), lyoniside (4), and scopoletin (5) were isolated by bioactivity-guided fractionation from the ethyl acetate fraction of T. amurensis. Among them, (-)-epicatechin, nudiposide, lyoniside, and scopoletin had significant neuroprotective activities against glutamate-injured neurotoxicity in HT22 cells. Conclusion: These results demonstrated that compound two, three, four, and five have a pronounced protective effect against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in HT22 cells. PMID:26664019

  20. Neuroprotection in vascular dementia: a future path.

    PubMed

    Skoog, Ingmar; Korczyn, Amos D; Guekht, Alla

    2012-11-15

    The burden of cognitive disorders is likely to increase over the coming years due to both increased longevity and altered risk factor patterns, arising from changes in lifestyle, healthcare and society. Vascular dementia with its underlying heterogeneous pathology, is a challenge for clinicians, and is frequently further aggravated by overlap with other neurodegenerative processes. Current Alzheimer's disease drugs have had limited clinical efficacy in treating vascular dementia and none have been approved by major regulatory authorities specifically for this disease. Moving forward, a valid choice may be a multimodal therapy, as has already been successfully proven in Alzheimer's disease. Actovegin, a hemodialysate derived from calf blood, has been shown to have effects on a variety of cellular processes and a recent experimental study has revealed its neuroprotective mechanisms of action. These data, coupled with positive results from clinical trials in mixed dementia populations, have served as a foundation for the design of a new trial investigating the efficacy and disease-modifying effects of Actovegin in post-stroke cognitive impairment. PMID:22472726

  1. Characterization of the transcriptome profiles related to globin gene switching during in vitro erythroid maturation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The fetal and adult globin genes in the human β-globin cluster on chromosome 11 are sequentially expressed to achieve normal hemoglobin switching during human development. The pharmacological induction of fetal γ-globin (HBG) to replace abnormal adult sickle βS-globin is a successful strategy to treat sickle cell disease; however the molecular mechanism of γ-gene silencing after birth is not fully understood. Therefore, we performed global gene expression profiling using primary erythroid progenitors grown from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to characterize gene expression patterns during the γ-globin to β-globin (γ/β) switch observed throughout in vitro erythroid differentiation. Results We confirmed erythroid maturation in our culture system using cell morphologic features defined by Giemsa staining and the γ/β-globin switch by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis. We observed maximal γ-globin expression at day 7 with a switch to a predominance of β-globin expression by day 28 and the γ/β-globin switch occurred around day 21. Expression patterns for transcription factors including GATA1, GATA2, KLF1 and NFE2 confirmed our system produced the expected pattern of expression based on the known function of these factors in globin gene regulation. Subsequent gene expression profiling was performed with RNA isolated from progenitors harvested at day 7, 14, 21, and 28 in culture. Three major gene profiles were generated by Principal Component Analysis (PCA). For profile-1 genes, where expression decreased from day 7 to day 28, we identified 2,102 genes down-regulated > 1.5-fold. Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) for profile-1 genes demonstrated involvement of the Cdc42, phospholipase C, NF-Kβ, Interleukin-4, and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. Transcription factors known to be involved in γ-and β-globin regulation were identified. The same approach was used to generate profile-2

  2. Globin synthesis in hybrid cells constructed by transplantation of dormant avian erythrocyte nuclei into enucleated fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, J; Reich, N; Lucas, J J

    1981-01-01

    The polypeptides synthesized by mature embryonic erythrocytes prepared from the peripheral blood of 14- to 15-day-old chicken embryos were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Fewer than 200 species of polypeptides were detected; the major polypeptides made at this time were identified as the alpha A-, alpha D-, and beta-globin chains. The dormant erythrocyte nuclei were next reactivated to transcriptional competence by transplantation into enucleated mouse or chicken embryo fibroblasts, with frequencies of cytoplast renucleation of about 50 and 90%, respectively. Since large numbers of hybrid cells could be constructed, a biochemical analysis was possible. Electrophoretic analysis of the [35S]methionine-labeled polypeptides made in the hybrid cell types showed that polypeptides having the mobilities of only two (alpha A and alpha D) of the three major adult globin chains were made as major constituents of the hybrid cells. However, analysis of 14C-amino acid-labeled polypeptides revealed that a beta-like polypeptide that lacked methionine was also synthesized in large amounts. This polypeptide was tentatively identified as the early embryonic globin species rho. Globin synthesis was detected as early as 3 h after nuclear transplantation and as late as 18 h, the last time measured in these experiments. It appeared that globin polypeptides made at very early times were translated at least partially from chicken messenger ribonucleic acid introduced into the hybrid cells during fusion, whereas those made at later times were translated primarily from newly synthesized globin messenger ribonucleic acid. The potential usefulness of this hybrid cell system in analyzing mechanisms regulating globin gene expression is discussed. Images PMID:7346715

  3. Globin mRNAs are primers for the transcription of influenza viral RNA in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bouloy, Michele; Plotch, Stephen J.; Krug, Robert M.

    1978-01-01

    Because influenza viral RNA transcription in vitro is greatly enhanced by the addition of a primer dinucleotide, ApG or GpG, we have proposed that viral RNA transcription in vivo requires initiation by primer RNAs synthesized by the host cell, specifically by RNA polymerase II, thereby explaining the α-amanitin sensitivity of viral RNA transcription in vivo. Here, we identify such primer RNAs, initially in reticulocyte extracts, where they are shown to be globin mRNAs. Purified globin mRNAs very effectively stimulated viral RNA transcription in vitro, and the resulting transcripts directed the synthesis of all the nonglycosylated virus-specific proteins in micrococcal nuclease-treated L cell extracts. The viral RNA transcripts synthesized in vitro primed by ApG also directed the synthesis of the nonglycosylated virus-specific proteins, but the globin mRNA-primed transcripts were translated about 3 times more efficiently. The translation of the globin mRNA-primed, but not the ApG-primed, viral RNA transcripts was inhibited by 7-methylguanosine 5′-phosphate in the presence of S-adenosylhomocysteine, suggesting that the globin mRNA-primed transcripts contained a 5′-terminal methylated cap structure. We propose that this cap was transferred from the globin mRNA primer to the newly synthesized viral RNA transcripts, because no detectable de novo synthesis of a methylated cap occurred during globin mRNA-primed viral RNA transcription. Preliminary experiments indicate that other purified eukaryotic mRNAs also stimulate influenza viral RNA transcription in vitro. Images PMID:283399

  4. Isolation and characterization of the complete chicken beta-globin gene region: frequent deletion of the adult beta-globin genes in lambda.

    PubMed Central

    Villeponteau, B; Martinson, H

    1981-01-01

    A library of bacteriophage lambda clones containing chicken chromosomal DNA was screened, using the adult beta-globin cDNA plasmid pHb 1001 as a probe. Sixteen overlapping clones were isolated containing 35 kilobase pairs (kbp) of chicken DNA. Characterization of these clones revealed four beta-like globin genes, some genomically repeated sequences, but no pseudo-genes. The four beta-like genes have an average intergenic distance of less than half of that found for the mammalian beta-like globin gene clusters so far characterized. The overall features of the map were confirmed by genomic Southern analysis. Frequent deletions were shown to occur between the various beta-like globin genes during phage propagation. The presumptive hatching gene in particular was always associated with abnormal lambda clones although we were able to find one such clone that did contain a normal copy of the hatching gene itself. Probably such deletions explain the failure to recover this gene in previous attempts. Images PMID:6269092

  5. Neuroprotective effects of Lepidium meyenii (Maca).

    PubMed

    Pino-Figueroa, Alejandro; Nguyen, Diane; Maher, Timothy J

    2010-06-01

    The neuroprotective activity of the plant Lepidium meyenii (Maca) was studied in two experimental models: in vitro and in vivo. Crayfish neurons were pretreated with vehicle or the pentane extract from Maca, subjected to H(2)O(2), and their viability determined microscopically and chemically. A significant concentration-neuroprotective effect relationship was demonstrated. The pentane extract was then administered intravenously to rats prior to and following middle cerebral artery occlusion. While infarct volumes were decreased for the lower dose, higher doses increased infarct volumes compared to controls. These results suggest a potential application of Maca as a neuroprotectant. PMID:20633111

  6. Neurodegeneration and Neuroprotection in Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Angela C; Liu, Ji

    2016-03-01

    Glaucoma is the principal cause of irreversible blindness in the world. The disease leads to progressive optic nerve degeneration with a gradual loss of retinal ganglion cells. Neurodegeneration in glaucoma extends beyond the eye into the lateral geniculate nucleus and visual cortex, and the disease even shares some characteristics with other central nervous system degenerative disorders. Glaucoma destroys neurons through oxidative stress, impairment in axonal transport, neuroinflammation, and excitotoxicity. Autophagy may promote or inhibit disease progression. Currently, lowering intraocular pressure is the only way proven to delay glaucoma advancement. However, many new therapies are being developed, including antioxidants, adenosine receptor antagonists, Rho-pathway inhibitors, stem cell therapy, and neurotrophic factors. These therapies focus on neuroprotection, and they may eventually halt glaucoma progression or reverse the process of the disease itself. PMID:27505018

  7. Neuroprotective flavonoids from Flemingia macrophylla.

    PubMed

    Shiao, Young-Ji; Wang, Chuen-Neu; Wang, Wan-Yu; Lin, Yun-Lian

    2005-09-01

    Using an Abeta-induced neurotoxicity blocking assay to direct fractionation, three new flavonoids, fleminginin (1), flemingichromone (2), and flemingichalcone (3), and twenty known compounds were isolated from the active fractions of the aerial parts of Flemingia macrophylla. The structures of 1 - 3 were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data. When tested for neuroprotective activity, compound 2, osajin ( 4), 5,7,4'-trihydroxy-6,8-diprenylisoflavone (5), 5,7,4'-trihydroxy-6,3'-diprenylisoflavone (6), and aureole (7) protected neuronal cells from Abeta-induced damage with EC50 values of 31.43 +/- 3.16, 5.01 +/- 1.28, 11.25 +/-1.51, 4.47 +/- 0.65, 12.09 +/- 2.55 microM, respectively. PMID:16206038

  8. Neurodegeneration and Neuroprotection in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Angela C.; Liu, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is the principal cause of irreversible blindness in the world. The disease leads to progressive optic nerve degeneration with a gradual loss of retinal ganglion cells. Neurodegeneration in glaucoma extends beyond the eye into the lateral geniculate nucleus and visual cortex, and the disease even shares some characteristics with other central nervous system degenerative disorders. Glaucoma destroys neurons through oxidative stress, impairment in axonal transport, neuroinflammation, and excitotoxicity. Autophagy may promote or inhibit disease progression. Currently, lowering intraocular pressure is the only way proven to delay glaucoma advancement. However, many new therapies are being developed, including antioxidants, adenosine receptor antagonists, Rho-pathway inhibitors, stem cell therapy, and neurotrophic factors. These therapies focus on neuroprotection, and they may eventually halt glaucoma progression or reverse the process of the disease itself.

  9. [Evolution of the neuroprotection concept].

    PubMed

    Ostrovskaia, R U

    2003-01-01

    Although the modern concept of neuroprotection has been formulated quite recently, the basis of this approach was laid about four decades ago when Zakusov initiated the study of mechanisms involved in the neuroprotector action of GABA shunt metabolites (in particular, alpha-hydroxybutyric acid and succinic semialdehyde) during hypoxia. It was suggested to consider these agents as a system of endogenous neuroprotectors. The interest of Zakusov in endogenous regulators (including oligopeptides) had stimulated research in this direction and gave impact to the investigations of A. P. Skoldinov and T. A. Gudasheva initiated in the early 1980s. Proceeding from the original concept of the possibility of imitation of the action of neurotropic agents by their structural-conformational oligopeptide analogs, a number of biologically active stable dipeptides were obtained, based on pyroglutamate and proline, and high specific bioaccessibility of these dipeptides for the brain was established. Our investigations showed that these compounds not only possess nootropic activity (in a dose 1000 times lower than that of piracetam), but produce a pronounced neuroprotector action as well. Most thoroughly studied in this respect were substituted acyl-prolyl dipeptides, in particular, the drug noopept exhibiting a combined neuroprotector effect both in vitro and in vivo. Noopept decreases the extent of necrotic damage caused by photoinduced thrombosis of cortical blood vessels. It was established that the neuroprotector effect of noopept is related to its action upon the well-known "triad", whereby the drug reduces neurotoxic effects of excess extracellular calcium, glutamate, and free radicals. Two additional components of the neuroprotector action of noopept are related to the antiinflammatory and antithrombotic activity. The prospects of using direct and indirect action upon neurotrophin system for neuroprotection purposes are considered. Taking into account common secondary

  10. Mutation of a transcriptional motif of a distant regulatory element reduces the expression of embryonic and fetal globin genes

    PubMed Central

    Navas, Patrick A.; Swank, Richard A.; Yu, Man; Peterson, Kenneth R.; Stamatoyannopoulos, George

    2010-01-01

    High-level β-globin gene expression is dependent on the presence of the locus control region (LCR), a powerful regulatory element physically characterized by five DNase I-hypersensitive sites (HS), designated HS1–HS5. Of these, HS3 contains seven GT motifs that are essential for its activity. One of the motifs, GT6, has been shown by in vivo footprinting to display the largest difference in signal between fetal and adult globin expressing cells. We assessed the contribution of GT6 on the downstream globin gene expression by mutating this motif in a 248 kb β-globin locus yeast artificial chromosome and measuring the activity of β-globin genes in GT6m β-YAC transgenic mice. Seven transgenic lines were established, three of which contained at least one intact copy of the β-globin locus and were further investigated. The mutation of the GT6 motif reduced the expression of ε- and γ-globin genes during embryonic erythropoiesis. During definitive erythropoiesis, γ-globin gene expression was significantly reduced while β-globin gene expression was virtually indistinguishable from wild-type controls. We conclude that the GT6 motif of hypersensitive site 3 of the LCR is required for normal ε- and γ-globin gene expression during embryonic erythropoiesis and for γ-globin gene expression during definitive erythropoiesis in the fetal liver. Our results provide evidence that mutations of single transcriptional motifs of distant regulatory elements can have profound effects on gene expression. PMID:14506128

  11. Secondary neuroprotective effects of hypotensive drugs and potential mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Grace C; Calkins, David J

    2012-01-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma, a long-term degenerative ocular neuropathy, remains a significant cause of vision impairment worldwide. While many risk factors have been correlated with increased risk for primary open-angle glaucoma, intraocular pressure (IOP) remains the only modifiable risk factor and primary therapeutic target. Pharmacologic therapies are administered topically; these include α2-agonists, β-antagonists, prostaglandin analogs and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Some of these topical medications exhibit secondary neuroprotective effects independent of their effect on IOP. This review covers the possible mechanisms of neuroprotection stimulated by drugs currently marketed for the lowering of IOP, based on known literature. While the neuroprotective properties of many glaucoma pharmaceuticals are promising from an experimental standpoint, key challenges for the development of new clinical practices include unknown systemic side effects, limited methods of drug delivery to the retina and optic nerve, and development of extended-release formulations. PMID:22737176

  12. Translation of globin messenger RNA by the mouse ovum

    PubMed Central

    Brinster, R. L.; Chen, H. Y.; Trumbauer, M. E.; Avarbock, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the Xenopus oocyte can translate rabbit haemoglobin messenger RNA (mRNA) following microinjection of the message into the cell1. The Xenopus oocyte has since been shown to be capable of translating a variety of messenger RNAs from different species2–4. This system has proved useful in understanding the mechanism of message translation and has also provided information about the translation capability of the Xenopus oocyte5,6. Several other cell types, including HeLa cells and fibroblasts, can also translate exogenous message injected into the cell7,8. However, there have been no reports of injection of mRNA into oocytes or fertilised one-cell ova of mammalian species. Nevertheless, the latter system could be of considerable use in studying the processing of exogenous messages in a mammalian system undergoing development, as well as providing insight into the way the early embryo processes injected messages and the protein products of such messages. We report here the results of injecting message into the fertilised one-cell mouse ovum and show that both mouse and rabbit globin mRNA are translated in this system. PMID:7352032

  13. Globin gene expression in correlation with G protein-related genes during erythroid differentiation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate cell growth, proliferation and differentiation. G proteins are also implicated in erythroid differentiation, and some of them are expressed principally in hematopoietic cells. GPCRs-linked NO/cGMP and p38 MAPK signaling pathways already demonstrated potency for globin gene stimulation. By analyzing erythroid progenitors, derived from hematopoietic cells through in vitro ontogeny, our study intends to determine early markers and signaling pathways of globin gene regulation and their relation to GPCR expression. Results Human hematopoietic CD34+ progenitors are isolated from fetal liver (FL), cord blood (CB), adult bone marrow (BM), peripheral blood (PB) and G-CSF stimulated mobilized PB (mPB), and then differentiated in vitro into erythroid progenitors. We find that growth capacity is most abundant in FL- and CB-derived erythroid cells. The erythroid progenitor cells are sorted as 100% CD71+, but we did not find statistical significance in the variations of CD34, CD36 and GlyA antigens and that confirms similarity in maturation of studied ontogenic periods. During ontogeny, beta-globin gene expression reaches maximum levels in cells of adult blood origin (176 fmol/μg), while gamma-globin gene expression is consistently up-regulated in CB-derived cells (60 fmol/μg). During gamma-globin induction by hydroxycarbamide, we identify stimulated GPCRs (PTGDR, PTGER1) and GPCRs-coupled genes known to be activated via the cAMP/PKA (ADIPOQ), MAPK pathway (JUN) and NO/cGMP (PRPF18) signaling pathways. During ontogeny, GPR45 and ARRDC1 genes have the most prominent expression in FL-derived erythroid progenitor cells, GNL3 and GRP65 genes in CB-derived cells (high gamma-globin gene expression), GPR110 and GNG10 in BM-derived cells, GPR89C and GPR172A in PB-derived cells, and GPR44 and GNAQ genes in mPB-derived cells (high beta-globin gene expression). Conclusions These results

  14. Membrane-bound globin X protects the cell from reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Koch, Jonas; Burmester, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Globin X (GbX) is a member of the globin family that emerged early in the evolution of Metazoa. In vertebrates, GbX is restricted to lampreys, fish, amphibians and some reptiles, and is expressed in neurons. Unlike any other metazoan globin, GbX is N-terminally acylated and anchored in the cell membrane via myristoyl and palmitoyl groups, suggesting a unique function. Here, we compared the capacity of GbX to protect a mouse neuronal cell line from hypoxia and reactive oxygen species (ROS) with that of myoglobin. To evaluate the contribution of membrane-binding, we generated a mutated version of GbX without acyl groups. All three globins enhanced cell viability under hypoxia, with myoglobin having the most pronounced effect. GbX but not myoglobin protected the cells from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced stress. Membrane-bound GbX was significantly more efficient than its mutated, soluble form. Furthermore, myoglobin and mutated GbX increased production of ROS upon H2O2-treatment, while membrane-bound GbX did not. The results indicate that myoglobin enhances O2 supply while GbX protects the cell membrane from ROS-stress. The ancient origin of GbX suggests that ROS-protection reflects the function of the early globins before they acquired a respiratory role. PMID:26631962

  15. Antioxidant activity, cellular bioavailability, and iron and calcium management of neuroprotective and nonneuroprotective flavones.

    PubMed

    Echeverry, Carolina; Arredondo, Florencia; Martínez, Marcela; Abin-Carriquiry, Juan Andrés; Midiwo, Jacob; Dajas, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have been undertaken on the relationship of the structure of flavones and neuroprotection. Previously, we described the structural determinants of the neuroprotective activity of some natural flavones in cerebellar granule neurons in culture against an oxidative insult (H2O2). In the present work, we analyzed anti-oxidant activity, cellular iron, and Ca(2+) levels and cellular bioavailability of neuroprotective and nonneuroprotective flavones in the same experimental paradigm. Oxidative cellular damage produced by H2O2 was prevented by all of the studied flavones with rather similar potency for all of them. Labile Iron Pool was neither affected by protective nor nonprotective flavones. Intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis was not affected by protective flavones either. Nonetheless, fisetin, the nonprotective flavone, decreased Ca(2+) levels modifying Ca(2+) homeostasis. Methylation of the catechol group, although weakens anti-oxidant capacity, keeps the neuroprotective capacity with less degradation and lower toxicity, constituting promising structural alternatives as leads for the design of neuroprotective molecules. PMID:24972590

  16. α:Non-α and Gγ:Aγ globin chain ratios in thalassemia intermedia patients treated with hydroxyurea

    PubMed Central

    Najjari, Abbas; Asouri, Mohsen; Gouhari, Ladan Hosseini; Niaki, Haleh Akhavan; Nejad, Amir Sasan Mozaffari; Eslami, Seyyedeh Masoumeh; Abolghasemi, Hassan; Ataee, Ramin; Ebrahimi, Abdol Ali; Moshaei, Masoumeh Rezaei; Ahmadi, Ali Asghar

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To elucidate the possible ways by which hydroxyurea molecules affect globin chain (α or β-like) synthesis. Methods A total of 23 thalassemia intermedia patients (13 male and 10 female) aged between 5 and 26 years were treated for five months with 15 mg/(kg·day) of hydroxyurea. Hemoglobins electrophoresis and globin chain electrophoresis was performed on each sample at different time points before and during the treatment. Results Fetal hemoglobin increased significantly in most patients and average episodes of transfusion decreased. Both Gγ and Aγ-globin chains increased significantly and α-globin:Nonα-globin chain as well as Gγ-globin:Aγ globin chains ratios decreased. Conclusions Improvement in α:non-α ratio and consequent decrease of free α-globin chain might be the cause of beneficial effects of hydroxyurea therapy. Two patients who felt better didn't show significant increase in their fetal hemoglobin level, and this is in contradiction with the hypothesis claiming that the HbF level increase is the cause of such therapeutic effect. In spite of the unclear mechanism of action of this drug, hydroxyurea therapy had noticeable impacts on thalassemia intermedia and also sickle cell disease and even patients suffering from thalassemia major. PMID:25183077

  17. Autoinduction, purification, and characterization of soluble α-globin chains of crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) hemoglobin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kabbua, Thai; Anwised, Preeyanan; Boonmee, Atcha; Subedi, Bishnu P; Pierce, Brad S; Thammasirirak, Sompong

    2014-11-01

    We have established a method to express soluble heme-bound recombinant crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) α-globin chain holo-protein in bacteria (Escherichia coli) using an autoinduction system without addition of exogenous heme. This is the first time that heme-bound crocodile α-globin chains have been expressed in bacteria without in vitro heme reconstitution. The observed molecular mass of purified recombinant α-globin is consistent with that calculated from the primary amino acid sequence of native crocodile (C. siamensis) α-globin. Both the monomeric and the dimeric protein configuration formed by intermolecular disulfide bond could be purified as soluble protein. Spectroscopic characterization [UV-visible, circular dichroism (CD), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)] of purified recombinant α-globin demonstrates nearly identical properties as reported for hemoglobin and myoglobin isolated from other organisms. For comparison, cyanide and nitric oxide binding of purified α-globin was also investigated. These results suggested that C. siamensis α-globin expressed in E. coli was folded correctly with proper incorporation of the heme cofactor. The expression method we now describe can facilitate production and isolation of individual globin chains in order to further study the mechanism and assembly of crocodile hemoglobin. PMID:25175288

  18. Regulation of Gγ-Globin Gene by ATF2 and Its Associated Proteins through the cAMP-Response Element

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Ruby; Mahajan, Milind; Choudhury, Alina; Weissman, Sherman; Pace, Betty S.

    2013-01-01

    The upstream Gγ-globin cAMP-response element (G-CRE) plays an important role in regulating Gγ-globin expression through binding of ATF2 and its DNA-binding partners defined in this study. ATF2 knockdown resulted in a significant reduction of γ-globin expression accompanied by decreased ATF2 binding to the G-CRE. By contrast, stable ATF2 expression in K562 cells increased γ-globin transcription which was reduced by ATF2 knockdown. Moreover, a similar effect of ATF2 on γ-globin expression was observed in primary erythroid progenitors. To understand the role of ATF2 in γ-globin expression, chromatographically purified G-CRE/ATF2-interacting proteins were subjected to mass spectrometry analysis; major binding partners included CREB1, cJun, Brg1, and histone deacetylases among others. Immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated interaction of these proteins with ATF2 and in vivo GCRE binding in CD34+ cells undergoing erythroid differentiation which was correlated with γ-globin expression during development. These results suggest synergism between developmental stage-specific recruitments of the ATF2 protein complex and expression of γ-globin during erythropoiesis. Microarray studies in K562 cells support ATF2 plays diverse roles in hematopoiesis and chromatin remodeling. PMID:24223142

  19. A redox signalling globin is essential for reproduction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Henau, Sasha; Tilleman, Lesley; Vangheel, Matthew; Luyckx, Evi; Trashin, Stanislav; Pauwels, Martje; Germani, Francesca; Vlaeminck, Caroline; Vanfleteren, Jacques R.; Bert, Wim; Pesce, Alessandra; Nardini, Marco; Bolognesi, Martino; de Wael, Karolien; Moens, Luc; Dewilde, Sylvia; Braeckman, Bart P.

    2015-12-01

    Moderate levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are now recognized as redox signalling molecules. However, thus far, only mitochondria and NADPH oxidases have been identified as cellular sources of ROS in signalling. Here we identify a globin (GLB-12) that produces superoxide, a type of ROS, which serves as an essential signal for reproduction in C. elegans. We find that GLB-12 has an important role in the regulation of multiple aspects in germline development, including germ cell apoptosis. We further describe how GLB-12 displays specific molecular, biochemical and structural properties that allow this globin to act as a superoxide generator. In addition, both an intra- and extracellular superoxide dismutase act as key partners of GLB-12 to create a transmembrane redox signal. Our results show that a globin can function as a driving factor in redox signalling, and how this signal is regulated at the subcellular level by multiple control layers.

  20. Complete amino acid sequence of globin chains and biological activity of fragmented crocodile hemoglobin (Crocodylus siamensis).

    PubMed

    Srihongthong, Saowaluck; Pakdeesuwan, Anawat; Daduang, Sakda; Araki, Tomohiro; Dhiravisit, Apisak; Thammasirirak, Sompong

    2012-08-01

    Hemoglobin, α-chain, β-chain and fragmented hemoglobin of Crocodylus siamensis demonstrated both antibacterial and antioxidant activities. Antibacterial and antioxidant properties of the hemoglobin did not depend on the heme structure but could result from the compositions of amino acid residues and structures present in their primary structure. Furthermore, thirteen purified active peptides were obtained by RP-HPLC analyses, corresponding to fragments in the α-globin chain and the β-globin chain which are mostly located at the N-terminal and C-terminal parts. These active peptides operate on the bacterial cell membrane. The globin chains of Crocodylus siamensis showed similar amino acids to the sequences of Crocodylus niloticus. The novel amino acid substitutions of α-chain and β-chain are not associated with the heme binding site or the bicarbonate ion binding site, but could be important through their interactions with membranes of bacteria. PMID:22648692

  1. A redox signalling globin is essential for reproduction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    De Henau, Sasha; Tilleman, Lesley; Vangheel, Matthew; Luyckx, Evi; Trashin, Stanislav; Pauwels, Martje; Germani, Francesca; Vlaeminck, Caroline; Vanfleteren, Jacques R.; Bert, Wim; Pesce, Alessandra; Nardini, Marco; Bolognesi, Martino; De Wael, Karolien; Moens, Luc; Dewilde, Sylvia; Braeckman, Bart P.

    2015-01-01

    Moderate levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are now recognized as redox signalling molecules. However, thus far, only mitochondria and NADPH oxidases have been identified as cellular sources of ROS in signalling. Here we identify a globin (GLB-12) that produces superoxide, a type of ROS, which serves as an essential signal for reproduction in C. elegans. We find that GLB-12 has an important role in the regulation of multiple aspects in germline development, including germ cell apoptosis. We further describe how GLB-12 displays specific molecular, biochemical and structural properties that allow this globin to act as a superoxide generator. In addition, both an intra- and extracellular superoxide dismutase act as key partners of GLB-12 to create a transmembrane redox signal. Our results show that a globin can function as a driving factor in redox signalling, and how this signal is regulated at the subcellular level by multiple control layers. PMID:26621324

  2. Alpha globin gene analysis in a Sardinian family with interacting alpha and beta thalassaemia genes.

    PubMed

    Melis, M A; Galanello, R; Cao, A

    1983-04-01

    This paper reports the results of alpha globin gene analysis in a Sardinian family with interacting alpha and beta thalassaemia genes. The propositus, who was identified in a newborn survey as he had 26.0% Hb Bart's and 74.0% Hb F, successively developed the clinical and haematological picture of a transfusion-dependent thalassaemia major. According to the haemoglobin pattern, restriction endonuclease analysis of the DNA from this patient showed the deletion of three of the four alpha-globin structural genes. Thus beta 0-thalassaemia homozygotes with the delection of three alpha-structural genes seem to have a severe clinical phenotype similar to that of patients with a full complement of four alpha-globin structural genes. PMID:6299325

  3. Evolutionary pathway of pseudogenization of globin genes, α5 and β5, in genus Oryzias.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Kouichi; Wang, Bing; Ishikawa, Yuji; Yasumasu, Shigeki; Iuchi, Ichiro

    2015-09-01

    Hemoglobin transports oxygen in many organisms and consists of α- and β-globin chains. Previously, using molecular phylogenetic analysis, we proposed that both α- and β-globins of teleost could be classified into four groups. We also showed that the Hd-rR strain of medaka (Oryzias latipes) inhabiting southern Japan had all four groups of globin genes but that the α- and β-globin genes of group III were pseudogenized (α5(ψα), β5(ψβ)). Based on the small degree of nucleotide variations, the pseudogenization of β5 was assumed to have occurred at a relatively late stage of evolution. Here, we compared the α5(ψα)-β5(ψβ) of two other strains of O. latipes and found that both α5(ψα) and β5(ψβ) of the northern Japanese and Korean strains were pseudogenized similar to those of Hd-rR. In a Philippine population (Oryzias luzonensis), α5(ψα) was also pseudogenized, but the structure was different from that of O. latipes, and β5(ψβ) was almost deleted. Interestingly, an Indonesian population (Oryzias celebensis) had α5 and β5 genes that were deduced to be functional. Indeed, they were expressed from the young to adult development stages, and this expression pattern was consistent with the expression of α2 and ad.α1 in Hd-rR. Because α2 and ad.α1 in Hd-rR were assigned to groups I and II, respectively, we speculate that their expression patterns might be altered by pseudogenization of group III genes. These results provide a basis for further investigations of recruiting and changing expression patterns of one globin gene after pseudogenization of other globin genes during evolution. PMID:26199047

  4. Evidence on primate phylogeny from epsilon-globin gene sequences and flanking regions.

    PubMed

    Porter, C A; Sampaio, I; Schneider, H; Schneider, M P; Czelusniak, J; Goodman, M

    1995-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among various primate groups were examined based on sequences of epsilon-globin genes. epsilon-globin genes were sequenced from five species of strepsirhine primates. These sequences were aligned and compared with other known primate epsilon-globin sequences, including data from two additional strepsirhine species, one species of tarsier, 19 species of New World monkeys (representing all extant genera), and five species of catarrhines. In addition, a 2-kb segment upstream of the epsilon-globin gene was sequenced in two of the five strepsirhines examined. This upstream sequence was aligned with five other species of primates for which data are available in this segment. Domestic rabbit and goat were used as outgroups. This analysis supports the monophyly of order Primates but does not support the traditional prosimian grouping of tarsiers, lorisoids, and lemuroids; rather it supports the sister grouping of tarsiers and anthropoids into Haplorhini and the sister grouping of lorisoids and lemuroids into Strepsirhini. The mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus) and dwarf lemur (Cheirogaleus medius) appear to be most closely related to each other, forming a clade with the lemuroids, and are probably not closely related to the lorisoids, as suggested by some morphological studies. Analysis of the epsilon-globin data supports the hypothesis that the aye-aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis) shares a sister-group relationship with other Malagasy strepsirhines (all being classified as lemuroids). Relationships among ceboids agree with findings from a previous epsilon-globin study in which fewer outgroup taxa were employed. Rates of molecular evolution were higher in lorisoids than in lemuroids. PMID:7714911

  5. Specific repression of β-globin promoter activity by nuclear ferritin

    PubMed Central

    Broyles, Robert H.; Belegu, Visar; DeWitt, Christina R.; Shah, Sandeep N.; Stewart, Charles A.; Pye, Quentin N.; Floyd, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Developmental hemoglobin switching involves sequential globin gene activations and repressions that are incompletely understood. Earlier observations, described herein, led us to hypothesize that nuclear ferritin is a repressor of the adult β-globin gene in embryonic erythroid cells. Our data show that a ferritin-family protein in K562 cell nuclear extracts binds specifically to a highly conserved CAGTGC motif in the β-globin promoter at −153 to −148 bp from the cap site, and mutation of the CAGTGC motif reduces binding 20-fold in competition gel-shift assays. Purified human ferritin that is enriched in ferritin-H chains also binds the CAGTGC promoter segment. Expression clones of ferritin-H markedly repress β-globin promoter-driven reporter gene expression in cotransfected CV-1 cells in which the β-promoter has been stimulated with the transcription activator erythroid Krüppel-like factor (EKLF). We have constructed chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter plasmids containing either a wild-type or mutant β-globin promoter for the −150 CAGTGC motif and have compared the constructs for susceptibility to repression by ferritin-H in cotransfection assays. We find that stimulation by cotransfected EKLF is retained with the mutant promoter, whereas repression by ferritin-H is lost. Thus, mutation of the −150 CAGTGC motif not only markedly reduces in vitro binding of nuclear ferritin but also abrogates the ability of expressed ferritin-H to repress this promoter in our cell transfection assay, providing a strong link between DNA binding and function, and strong support for our proposal that nuclear ferritin-H is a repressor of the human β-globin gene. Such a repressor could be helpful in treating sickle cell and other genetic diseases. PMID:11481480

  6. A Globin Domain in a Neuronal Transmembrane Receptor of Caenorhabditis elegans and Ascaris suum

    PubMed Central

    Tilleman, Lesley; Germani, Francesca; De Henau, Sasha; Helbo, Signe; Desmet, Filip; Berghmans, Herald; Van Doorslaer, Sabine; Hoogewijs, David; Schoofs, Liliane; Braeckman, Bart P.; Moens, Luc; Fago, Angela; Dewilde, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    We report the structural and biochemical characterization of GLB-33, a putative neuropeptide receptor that is exclusively expressed in the nervous system of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. This unique chimeric protein is composed of a 7-transmembrane domain (7TM), GLB-33 7TM, typical of a G-protein-coupled receptor, and of a globin domain (GD), GLB-33 GD. Comprehensive sequence similarity searches in the genome of the parasitic nematode, Ascaris suum, revealed a chimeric protein that is similar to a Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-amide neuropeptide receptor. The three-dimensional structures of the separate domains of both species and of the full-length proteins were modeled. The 7TM domains of both proteins appeared very similar, but the globin domain of the A. suum receptor surprisingly seemed to lack several helices, suggesting a novel truncated globin fold. The globin domain of C. elegans GLB-33, however, was very similar to a genuine myoglobin-type molecule. Spectroscopic analysis of the recombinant GLB-33 GD showed that the heme is pentacoordinate when ferrous and in the hydroxide-ligated form when ferric, even at neutral pH. Flash-photolysis experiments showed overall fast biphasic CO rebinding kinetics. In its ferrous deoxy form, GLB-33 GD is capable of reversibly binding O2 with a very high affinity and of reducing nitrite to nitric oxide faster than other globins. Collectively, these properties suggest that the globin domain of GLB-33 may serve as a highly sensitive oxygen sensor and/or as a nitrite reductase. Both properties are potentially able to modulate the neuropeptide sensitivity of the neuronal transmembrane receptor. PMID:25666609

  7. Gene duplication, genome duplication, and the functional diversification of vertebrate globins

    PubMed Central

    Storz, Jay F.; Opazo, Juan C.; Hoffmann, Federico G.

    2015-01-01

    The functional diversification of the vertebrate globin gene superfamily provides an especially vivid illustration of the role of gene duplication and whole-genome duplication in promoting evolutionary innovation. For example, key globin proteins that evolved specialized functions in various aspects of oxidative metabolism and oxygen signaling pathways (hemoglobin [Hb], myoglobin [Mb], and cytoglobin [Cygb]) trace their origins to two whole-genome duplication events in the stem lineage of vertebrates. The retention of the proto-Hb and Mb genes in the ancestor of jawed vertebrates permitted a physiological division of labor between the oxygen-carrier function of Hb and the oxygen-storage function of Mb. In the Hb gene lineage, a subsequent tandem gene duplication gave rise to the proto α- and β-globin genes, which permitted the formation of multimeric Hbs composed of unlike subunits (α2β2). The evolution of this heteromeric quaternary structure was central to the emergence of Hb as a specialized oxygen-transport protein because it provided a mechanism for cooperative oxygen-binding and allosteric regulatory control. Subsequent rounds of duplication and divergence have produced diverse repertoires of α- and β-like globin genes that are ontogenetically regulated such that functionally distinct Hb isoforms are expressed during different stages of prenatal development and postnatal life. In the ancestor of jawless fishes, the proto Mb and Hb genes appear to have been secondarily lost, and the Cygb homolog evolved a specialized respiratory function in blood-oxygen transport. Phylogenetic and comparative genomic analyses of the vertebrate globin gene superfamily have revealed numerous instances in which paralogous globins have convergently evolved similar expression patterns and/or similar functional specializations in different organismal lineages. PMID:22846683

  8. Decreased Globin Messenger RNA in Thalassemia Detected by Molecular Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Kacian, D. L.; Gambino, R.; Dow, L. W.; Grossbard, E.; Natta, C.; Ramirez, F.; Spiegelman, S.; Marks, P. A.; Bank, A.

    1973-01-01

    In previous studies of patients with β thalassemia, mRNA extracted from reticulocytes in peripheral blood when added to cell-free systems reproduces the deficient β-chain synthesis characteristic of intact cells. The present studies with specific probes for α and β mRNA were designed to decide whether the decreased β mRNA activity is due to the presence of abnormal or reduced β globin mRNA in these cells. Purified α and β complementary DNAs (cDNAs) have been synthesized with RNA-instructed DNA polymerase; α and β mRNAs isolated from heavy (β-producing) and light (α-producing) polyribosomes of rabbit reticulocytes were used as templates. Each of the cDNAs is more than 80% pure by the criterion of biological activity. The α cDNA labeled with [32P]dCTP and the β cDNA labeled with [3H]dCTP have been added simultaneously to reaction mixtures containing various concentrations of mRNA from thalassemic and nonthalassemic subjects. The extent and rate of hybridization were determined, permitting a comparison of relative α and β mRNA content in the same annealing mixture. In six nonthalassemic patients, relatively equal amounts of hybridizable α and β mRNA appear to be present. In five of seven patients with β-thalassemia, significantly decreased amounts of β mRNA compared to α mRNA can be demonstrated. In two patients with Hemoglobin H disease, there is a decreased amount of α mRNA compared to β mRNA. PMID:4124307

  9. Nucleotides in neuroregeneration and neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Miras-Portugal, M Teresa; Gomez-Villafuertes, Rosa; Gualix, Javier; Diaz-Hernandez, Juan Ignacio; Artalejo, Antonio R; Ortega, Felipe; Delicado, Esmerilda G; Perez-Sen, Raquel

    2016-05-01

    Brain injury generates the release of a multitude of factors including extracellular nucleotides, which exhibit bi-functional properties and contribute to both detrimental actions in the acute phase and also protective and reparative actions in the later recovery phase to allow neuroregeneration. A promising strategy toward restoration of neuronal function is based on activation of endogenous adult neural stem/progenitor cells. The implication of purinergic signaling in stem cell biology, including regulation of proliferation, differentiation, and cell death has become evident in the last decade. In this regard, current strategies of acute transplantation of ependymal stem/progenitor cells after spinal cord injury restore altered expression of P2X4 and P2X7 receptors and improve functional locomotor recovery. The expression of both receptors is transcriptionally regulated by Sp1 factor, which plays a key role in the startup of the transcription machinery to induce regeneration-associated genes expression. Finally, general signaling pathways triggered by nucleotide receptors in neuronal populations converge on several intracellular kinases, such as PI3K/Akt, GSK3 and ERK1,2, as well as the Nrf-2/heme oxigenase-1 axis, which specifically link them to neuroprotection. In this regard, regulation of dual specificity protein phosphatases can become novel mechanism of actions for nucleotide receptors that associate them to cell homeostasis regulation. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Purines in Neurodegeneration and Neuroregeneration'. PMID:26359530

  10. Distinctive Patterns of Evolution of the δ-Globin Gene (HBD) in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Moleirinho, Ana; Lopes, Alexandra M.; Seixas, Susana; Morales-Hojas, Ramiro; Prata, Maria J.; Amorim, António

    2015-01-01

    In most vertebrates, hemoglobin (Hb) is a heterotetramer composed of two dissimilar globin chains, which change during development according to the patterns of expression of α- and β-globin family members. In placental mammals, the β-globin cluster includes three early-expressed genes, ε(HBE)-γ(HBG)-ψβ(HBBP1), and the late expressed genes, δ (HBD) and β (HBB). While HBB encodes the major adult β-globin chain, HBD is weakly expressed or totally silent. Paradoxically, in human populations HBD shows high levels of conservation typical of genes under strong evolutionary constraints, possibly due to a regulatory role in the fetal-to-adult switch unique of Anthropoid primates. In this study, we have performed a comprehensive phylogenetic and comparative analysis of the two adult β-like globin genes in a set of diverse mammalian taxa, focusing on the evolution and functional divergence of HBD in primates. Our analysis revealed that anthropoids are an exception to a general pattern of concerted evolution in placental mammals, showing a high level of sequence conservation at HBD, less frequent and shorter gene conversion events. Moreover, this lineage is unique in the retention of a functional GATA-1 motif, known to be involved in the control of the developmental expression of the β-like globin genes. We further show that not only the mode but also the rate of evolution of the δ-globin gene in higher primates are strictly associated with the fetal/adult β-cluster developmental switch. To gain further insight into the possible functional constraints that have been shaping the evolutionary history of HBD in primates, we calculated dN/dS (ω) ratios under alternative models of gene evolution. Although our results indicate that HBD might have experienced different selective pressures throughout primate evolution, as shown by different ω values between apes and Old World Monkeys + New World Monkeys (0.06 versus 0.43, respectively), these estimates corroborated a

  11. Coinheritance of a Rare Nucleotide Substitution on the β-Globin Gene and Other Known Mutations in the Globin Clusters: Management in Genetic Counseling.

    PubMed

    Vinciguerra, Margherita; Passarello, Cristina; Leto, Filippo; Crivello, Anna; Fustaneo, Maria; Cassarà, Filippo; Cannata, Monica; Maggio, Aurelio; Giambona, Antonino

    2016-08-01

    A large number of methods for DNA analysis are available to identify defects in globin genes associated with hemoglobin (Hb) disorders. In this study, we report a rare nucleotide (nt) substitution on the β-globin gene, nt 781 in the second intron [IVS-II-781 (C > G); HBB: c.316-70C > G], identified in four patients. This nt substitution was previously described only as a personal communication to the HbVar database and indicated as a β(0) or β(+) mutation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical implication of this nt change, particularly when coinherited with severe β-thalassemia (β-thal), in order to be able to conduct appropriate genetic counseling. Genetic studies were performed on two subjects, one carried Hb S [β6(A3)Glu→Val; HBB: c.20A > T], and the other carried IVS-I-110 (G > A) (HBB: c.93-21G > A). All these subjects showed this new β nt substitution in association with Hb A2' (or Hb B2) [δ16(A13)Gly→Arg; HBD: c.49G > C]. Another 16 samples, carrying the same δ variant as the probands, were processed by β-globin gene sequencing in order to better understand the correlation between this Hb variant and the rare nt substitution reported in this study. The present investigation emphasizes the importance of sharing the observed nt changes in the globin gene cluster, especially in the case of new or rare undefined mutations, in order to facilitate the determination of their phenotypic expression, the possible interactions with known molecular defects and to formulate appropriate genetic counseling for at-risk couples. PMID:27258795

  12. Neuroprotective Effects of Psychotropic Drugs in Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lauterbach, Edward C.

    2013-01-01

    Psychotropics (antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, antidepressants, anxiolytics, etc.) are commonly prescribed to treat Huntington’s disease (HD). In HD preclinical models, while no psychotropic has convincingly affected huntingtin gene, HD modifying gene, or huntingtin protein expression, psychotropic neuroprotective effects include upregulated huntingtin autophagy (lithium), histone acetylation (lithium, valproate, lamotrigine), miR-222 (lithium-plus-valproate), mitochondrial protection (haloperidol, trifluoperazine, imipramine, desipramine, nortriptyline, maprotiline, trazodone, sertraline, venlafaxine, melatonin), neurogenesis (lithium, valproate, fluoxetine, sertraline), and BDNF (lithium, valproate, sertraline) and downregulated AP-1 DNA binding (lithium), p53 (lithium), huntingtin aggregation (antipsychotics, lithium), and apoptosis (trifluoperazine, loxapine, lithium, desipramine, nortriptyline, maprotiline, cyproheptadine, melatonin). In HD live mouse models, delayed disease onset (nortriptyline, melatonin), striatal preservation (haloperidol, tetrabenazine, lithium, sertraline), memory preservation (imipramine, trazodone, fluoxetine, sertraline, venlafaxine), motor improvement (tetrabenazine, lithium, valproate, imipramine, nortriptyline, trazodone, sertraline, venlafaxine), and extended survival (lithium, valproate, sertraline, melatonin) have been documented. Upregulated CREB binding protein (CBP; valproate, dextromethorphan) and downregulated histone deacetylase (HDAC; valproate) await demonstration in HD models. Most preclinical findings await replication and their limitations are reviewed. The most promising findings involve replicated striatal neuroprotection and phenotypic disease modification in transgenic mice for tetrabenazine and for sertraline. Clinical data consist of an uncontrolled lithium case series (n = 3) suggesting non-progression and a primarily negative double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of lamotrigine. PMID:24248060

  13. An embryonic stage–specific enhancer within the murine β-globin locus mediates domain-wide histone hyperacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Fromm, George; Cadiz-Rivera, Brenda; de Vries, Christina; Getman, Michael; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Kingsley, Paul D.; Fields, Jennifer; Fiering, Steven

    2011-01-01

    In mammalian nuclei, a select number of tissue-specific gene loci exhibit broadly distributed patterns of histone modifications, such as histone hyperacetylation, that are normally associated with active gene promoters. Previously, we characterized such hyperacetylated domains within mammalian β-globin gene loci, and determined that within the murine locus, neither the β-globin locus control region nor the gene promoters were required for domain formation. Here, we identify a developmentally specific erythroid enhancer, hypersensitive site-embryonic 1 (HS-E1), located within the embryonic β-globin domain in mouse, which is homologous to a region located downstream of the human embryonic ϵ-globin gene. This sequence exhibits nuclease hypersensitivity in primitive erythroid cells and acts as an enhancer in gain-of-function assays. Deletion of HS-E1 from the endogenous murine β-globin locus results in significant decrease in the expression of the embryonic β-globin genes and loss of the domain-wide pattern of histone hyperacetylation. The data suggest that HS-E1 is an enhancer that is uniquely required for β-like globin expression in primitive erythroid cells, and that it defines a novel class of enhancer that works in part by domain-wide modulation of chromatin structure. PMID:21321362

  14. Open and Lys–His Hexacoordinated Closed Structures of a Globin with Swapped Proximal and Distal Sites

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Aik-Hong; Saito, Jennifer A.; Najimudin, Nazalan; Alam, Maqsudul

    2015-01-01

    Globins are haem-binding proteins with a conserved fold made up of α-helices and can possess diverse properties. A putative globin-coupled sensor from Methylacidiphilum infernorum, HGbRL, contains an N-terminal globin domain whose open and closed structures reveal an untypical dimeric architecture. Helices E and F fuse into an elongated helix, resulting in a novel site-swapped globin fold made up of helices A–E, hence the distal site, from one subunit and helices F–H, the proximal site, from another. The open structure possesses a large cavity binding an imidazole molecule, while the closed structure forms a unique Lys–His hexacoordinated species, with the first turn of helix E unravelling to allow Lys52(E10) to bind to the haem. Ligand binding induces reorganization of loop CE, which is stabilized in the closed form, and helix E, triggering a large conformational movement in the open form. These provide a mechanical insight into how a signal may be relayed between the globin domain and the C-terminal domain of HGbRL, a Roadblock/LC7 domain. Comparison with HGbI, a closely related globin, further underlines the high degree of structural versatility that the globin fold is capable of, enabling it to perform a diversity of functions. PMID:26094577

  15. A Novel Mutation in the Promoter Region of the β-Globin Gene: HBB: c.-127G > C.

    PubMed

    Bilgen, Turker; Canatan, Duran; Delibas, Serpil; Keser, Ibrahim

    2016-08-01

    Novel β-globin gene mutations are still occasionally being reported, especially when evaluating milder phenotypes. We report here a novel putative mutation in the promoter region of the β-globin gene and assess its clinical implications. A family, parents and four siblings, with hematological and clinical features suspected of being β-globin gene mutation(s), were involved in this study. In addition to hematological and clinical evaluations of the whole family, molecular analyses of the β-globin gene were performed by direct sequencing. Sequencing of the β-globin gene revealed a novel genomic alteration in the regulatory region of the gene. This novel genomic alteration was defined as HBB: c.-127G > C according to the Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) nomenclature. Two siblings were found to be carriers of the HBB: c.-127G > C mutation, while the other two siblings were carriers of the codon 8 (-AA) (HBB: c.25_26delAA) deletion of the β-globin gene. The mother was a compound heterozygote for the codon 8 and HBB: c.-127G > C mutations. Based on hematological and clinical evaluations, we conclude that this novel β-globin gene promoter region change would be associated with a mild phenotype of β-thalassemia (β-thal). PMID:27349616

  16. Association of Xmn I Polymorphism and Hemoglobin E Haplotypes on Postnatal Gamma Globin Gene Expression in Homozygous Hemoglobin E

    PubMed Central

    Ekwattanakit, Supachai; Monteerarat, Yuwarat; Riolueang, Suchada; Tachavanich, Kalaya; Viprakasit, Vip

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives. To explore the role of cis-regulatory sequences within the β globin gene cluster at chromosome 11 on human γ globin gene expression related to Hb E allele, we analyze baseline hematological data and Hb F values together with β globin haplotypes in homozygous Hb E. Patients and Methods. 80 individuals with molecularly confirmed homozygous Hb E were analyzed for the β globin haplotypes and Xmn I polymorphism using PCR-RFLPs. 74 individuals with complete laboratory data were further studied for association analyses. Results. Eight different β globin haplotypes were found linked to Hb E alleles; three major haplotypes were (a) (III), (b) (V), and (c) (IV) accounting for 94% of Hb E chromosomes. A new haplotype (Th-1) was identified and most likely converted from the major ones. The majority of individuals had Hb F < 5%; only 10.8% of homozygous Hb E had high Hb F (average 10.5%, range 5.8–14.3%). No association was found on a specific haplotype or Xmn I in these individuals with high Hb F, measured by alkaline denaturation. Conclusion. The cis-regulation of γ globin gene expression might not be apparent under a milder condition with lesser globin imbalance such as homozygous Hb E. PMID:23049556

  17. Silencing of Aγ-Globin Gene Expression during Adult Definitive Erythropoiesis Mediated by GATA-1-FOG-1-Mi2 Complex Binding at the −566 GATA Site▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Harju-Baker, Susanna; Costa, Flávia C.; Fedosyuk, Halyna; Neades, Renee; Peterson, Kenneth R.

    2008-01-01

    Autonomous silencing of γ-globin transcription is an important developmental regulatory mechanism controlling globin gene switching. An adult stage-specific silencer of the Aγ-globin gene was identified between −730 and −378 relative to the mRNA start site. A marked copy of the Aγ-globin gene inserted between locus control region 5′ DNase I-hypersensitive site 1 and the ɛ-globin gene was transcriptionally silenced in adult β-globin locus yeast artificial chromosome (β-YAC) transgenic mice, but deletion of the 352-bp region restored expression. This fragment reduced reporter gene expression in K562 cells, and GATA-1 was shown to bind within this sequence at the −566 GATA site. Further, the Mi2 protein, a component of the NuRD complex, was observed in erythroid cells with low γ-globin levels, whereas only a weak signal was detected when γ-globin was expressed. Chromatin immunoprecipitation of fetal liver tissue from β-YAC transgenic mice demonstrated that GATA-1, FOG-1, and Mi2 were recruited to the Aγ-globin −566 or Gγ-globin −567 GATA site when γ-globin expression was low (day 18) but not when γ-globin was expressed (day 12). These data suggest that during definitive erythropoiesis, γ-globin gene expression is silenced, in part, by binding a protein complex containing GATA-1, FOG-1, and Mi2 at the −566/−567 GATA sites of the proximal γ-globin promoters. PMID:18347053

  18. Neuroprotective Mechanisms of Taurine against Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Menzie, Janet; Prentice, Howard; Wu, Jang-Yen

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic stroke exhibits a multiplicity of pathophysiological mechanisms. To address the diverse pathophysiological mechanisms observed in ischemic stroke investigators seek to find therapeutic strategies that are multifaceted in their action by either investigating multipotential compounds or by using a combination of compounds. Taurine, an endogenous amino acid, exhibits a plethora of physiological functions. It exhibits antioxidative properties, stabilizes membrane, functions as an osmoregulator, modulates ionic movements, reduces the level of pro-inflammators, regulates intracellular calcium concentration; all of which contributes to its neuroprotective effect. Data are accumulating that show the neuroprotective mechanisms of taurine against stroke pathophysiology. In this review, we describe the neuroprotective mechanisms employed by taurine against ischemic stroke and its use in clinical trial for ischemic stroke. PMID:24961429

  19. Neuroprotection in Stroke: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Arshad

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a devastating medical condition, killing millions of people each year and causing serious injury to many more. Despite advances in treatment, there is still little that can be done to prevent stroke-related brain damage. The concept of neuroprotection is a source of considerable interest in the search for novel therapies that have the potential to preserve brain tissue and improve overall outcome. Key points of intervention have been identified in many of the processes that are the source of damage to the brain after stroke, and numerous treatment strategies designed to exploit them have been developed. In this review, potential targets of neuroprotection in stroke are discussed, as well as the various treatments that have been targeted against them. In addition, a summary of recent progress in clinical trials of neuroprotective agents in stroke is provided. PMID:24579051

  20. Epigenetics and therapeutic targets mediating neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Irfan A; Mehler, Mark F

    2015-12-01

    The rapidly evolving science of epigenetics is transforming our understanding of the nervous system in health and disease and holds great promise for the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches targeting neurological diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that epigenetic factors and mechanisms serve as important mediators of the pathogenic processes that lead to irrevocable neural injury and of countervailing homeostatic and regenerative responses. Epigenetics is, therefore, of considerable translational significance to the field of neuroprotection. In this brief review, we provide an overview of epigenetic mechanisms and highlight the emerging roles played by epigenetic processes in neural cell dysfunction and death and in resultant neuroprotective responses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroprotection. PMID:26236020

  1. Differential loss of embryonic globin genes during the radiation of placental mammals

    PubMed Central

    Opazo, Juan C.; Hoffmann, Federico G.; Storz, Jay F.

    2008-01-01

    The differential gain and loss of genes from homologous gene families represents an important source of functional variation among the genomes of different species. Differences in gene content between species are primarily attributable to lineage-specific gene gains via duplication and lineage-specific losses via deletion or inactivation. Here, we use a comparative genomic approach to investigate this process of gene turnover in the β-globin gene family of placental mammals. By analyzing genomic sequence data from representatives of each of the main superordinal clades of placental mammals, we were able to reconstruct pathways of gene family evolution during the basal radiation of this physiologically and morphologically diverse vertebrate group. Our analysis revealed that an initial expansion of the nonadult portion of the β-globin gene cluster in the ancestor of placental mammals was followed by the differential loss and retention of ancestral gene lineages, thereby generating variation in the complement of embryonic globin genes among contemporary species. The sorting of ε-, γ-, and η-globin gene lineages among the basal clades of placental mammals has produced species differences in the functional types of hemoglobin isoforms that can be synthesized during the course of embryonic development. PMID:18755893

  2. RNA sequencing for increasing gene discovery and and coverage using globin RNA reduced porcine blood samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Transcriptome analysis in porcine whole blood will provide major insights to decipher genetic mechanisms for host responses to viral infection. The abundance of porcine globin transcripts, however, impedes the ability to detect less abundant transcripts. The objective of our study was to...

  3. Nonsense mutations in the human. beta. -globin gene affect mRNA metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Baserga, S.J.; Benz, E.J. Jr. )

    1988-04-01

    A number of premature translation termination mutations (nonsense mutations) have been described in the human {alpha}- and {beta}-globin genes. Studies on mRNA isolated from patients with {beta}{sup 0}-thalassemia have shown that for both the {beta}-17 and the {beta}-39 mutations less than normal levels of {beta}-globin mRNA accumulate in peripheral blood cells. (The codon at which the mutation occurs designates the name of the mutation; there are 146 codons in human {beta}-globin mRNA). In vitro studies using the cloned {beta}-39 gene have reproduced this effect in a heterologous transfection system and have suggested that the defect resides in intranuclear metabolism. The authors have asked if this phenomenon of decreased mRNA accumulation is a general property of nonsense mutations and if the effect depends on the location or the type of mutation. Toward this end, they have studied the effect of five nonsense mutations and two missense mutations on the expression of human {beta}-globin mRNA in a heterologous transfection system. In all cases studied, the presence of a translation termination codon correlates with a decrease in the steady-state level of mRNA. The data suggest that the metabolism of a mammalian mRNA is affected by the presence of a mutation that affects translation.

  4. Vascular damage by unstable hemoglobins: the role of heme-depleted globin.

    PubMed

    Tsemakhovich, V A; Bamm, V V; Shaklai, M; Shaklai, N

    2005-04-15

    The study compared the damage inflicted to endothelial cells (ECs) by intact hemoglobin (Hb) and isolated chains. To compare optional in vivo contact of acellular Hb with the endothelium, oxy-forms of Hb and its isolated alpha- and beta-chains existing in the thalassemias were added to primary confluent cultures of bovine aorta EC. Cell damage was followed by morphological changes or leakage of lactic dehydrogenase and pre-inserted 51Cr from the cells, followed for 27 h. Under these experimental conditions, Hb did not affect the cells but its chains inflicted damage, beta- more than alpha-chains. Based on the literature and our data, we hypothesized that hemin and/or globin should be responsible for the increased endothelial damage by beta-chains. While hemin hardly affected ECs, globin, unlike the plasma protein hemopexin, was harmful. Since hemin release leaves globin with a large hydrophobic surface, the globin-damage appears to result from adsorptive pinocytosis to endothelial membrane. PMID:15797243

  5. Beta-globin gene cluster haplotype frequencies in Khalkhs and Buryats of Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Koji; Tokimasa, Kozue; Takeuchi, Yukiko; Gereksaikhan, Tudevdagva; Tanabe, Yuichi; Omoto, Keiichi; Imanishi, Tadashi; Harihara, Shinji; Hao, Luping; Jing, Feng

    2006-12-01

    Beta-globin gene cluster haplotype frequencies of 169 Khalkhs and 145 Buryats were estimated, and their characteristics were compared with those of Evenkis, Oroqens, Koreans, Japanese, and three Colombian Amerindian groups. The present study suggests that Colombian Amerindians diverged first from Asian populations and then Buryats diverged from other Asian populations. PMID:17564253

  6. Wine Polyphenols: Potential Agents in Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Basli, Abdelkader; Soulet, Stéphanie; Chaher, Nassima; Mérillon, Jean-Michel; Chibane, Mohamed; Monti, Jean-Pierre; Richard, Tristan

    2012-01-01

    There are numerous studies indicating that a moderate consumption of red wine provides certain health benefits, such as the protection against neurodegenerative diseases. This protective effect is most likely due to the presence of phenolic compounds in wine. Wine polyphenolic compounds are well known for the antioxidant properties. Oxidative stress is involved in many forms of cellular and molecular deterioration. This damage can lead to cell death and various neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's or Alzheimer's diseases. Extensive investigations have been undertaken to determine the neuroprotective effects of wine-related polyphenols. In this review we present the neuroprotective abilities of the major classes of wine-related polyphenols. PMID:22829964

  7. Evidence that the recently discovered theta 1-globin gene is functional in higher primates.

    PubMed

    Shaw, J P; Marks, J; Shen, C K

    A new subfamily of the alpha-globin-like family has recently been identified in higher primates, rabbit, galago and possibly the horse. One member of this subfamily, theta 1, is downstream from the adult alpha 1-globin gene. In orang-utan, but not in rabbit or galago, the theta 1-gene appears to be structurally intact, suggesting that it may be functional in this species. The orang-utan theta 1-gene possesses initiation and termination codons, and the predicted polypeptide differs from the orang-utan alpha 1-globin by 55 amino acids. The upstream promoter boxes CCAAT and ATA are present, although approximately 150 base pairs (bp) farther upstream than in the alpha 1-gene. This structural difference in the promoter between the orang-utan theta 1- and alpha 1-genes has led Proudfoot to speculate that the theta 1-gene may be inactive. We have now cloned the theta 1- and alpha 1-globin genes from the olive baboon, and have compared their sequences with those of orang-utan. The unique promoter structure of the orang-utan theta 1-gene is highly conserved in baboon, although the orang-utan and baboon diverged nearly 30 million years ago. The coding sequences of the two theta 1-genes differ by only 6.3% with 22 out of 27 nucleotide substitutions being codon third position silent changes. These data support the view that the theta 1-gene has been functional in the baboon, orang-utan, and by implication, in man. We also estimate that the duplication event generating the theta 1- and alpha-globin-like subfamilies may have occurred as much as 260 million years ago. PMID:3561513

  8. Gene Turnover in the Avian Globin Gene Families and Evolutionary Changes in Hemoglobin Isoform Expression

    PubMed Central

    Opazo, Juan C.; Hoffmann, Federico G.; Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Witt, Christopher C.; Berenbrink, Michael; Storz, Jay F.

    2015-01-01

    The apparent stasis in the evolution of avian chromosomes suggests that birds may have experienced relatively low rates of gene gain and loss in multigene families. To investigate this possibility and to explore the phenotypic consequences of variation in gene copy number, we examined evolutionary changes in the families of genes that encode the α- and β-type subunits of hemoglobin (Hb), the tetrameric α2β2 protein responsible for blood-O2 transport. A comparative genomic analysis of 52 bird species revealed that the size and membership composition of the α- and β-globin gene families have remained remarkably constant during approximately 100 My of avian evolution. Most interspecific variation in gene content is attributable to multiple independent inactivations of the αD-globin gene, which encodes the α-chain subunit of a functionally distinct Hb isoform (HbD) that is expressed in both embryonic and definitive erythrocytes. Due to consistent differences in O2-binding properties between HbD and the major adult-expressed Hb isoform, HbA (which incorporates products of the αA-globin gene), recurrent losses of αD-globin contribute to among-species variation in blood-O2 affinity. Analysis of HbA/HbD expression levels in the red blood cells of 122 bird species revealed high variability among lineages and strong phylogenetic signal. In comparison with the homologous gene clusters in mammals, the low retention rate for lineage-specific gene duplicates in the avian globin gene clusters suggests that the developmental regulation of Hb synthesis in birds may be more highly conserved, with orthologous genes having similar stage-specific expression profiles and similar functional properties in disparate taxa. PMID:25502940

  9. A Novel High-Content Immunofluorescence Assay as a Tool to Identify at the Single Cell Level γ-Globin Inducing Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Durlak, Marta; Fugazza, Cristina; Elangovan, Sudharshan; Marini, Maria Giuseppina; Marongiu, Maria Franca; Moi, Paolo; Fraietta, Ivan; Cappella, Paolo; Barbarani, Gloria; Font-Monclus, Isaura; Mauri, Mario; Ottolenghi, Sergio; Gasparri, Fabio; Ronchi, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    The identification of drugs capable of reactivating γ-globin to ameliorate β-thalassemia and Sickle Cell anemia is still a challenge, as available γ-globin inducers still have limited clinical indications. High-throughput screenings (HTS) aimed to identify new potentially therapeutic drugs require suitable first-step-screening methods combining the possibility to detect variation in the γ/β globin ratio with the robustness of a cell line. We took advantage of a K562 cell line variant expressing β-globin (β-K562) to set up a new multiplexed high-content immunofluorescence assay for the quantification of γ- and β-globin content at single-cell level. The assay was validated by using the known globin inducers hemin, hydroxyurea and butyric acid and further tested in a pilot screening that confirmed HDACs as targets for γ-globin induction (as proved by siRNA-mediated HDAC3 knockdown and by treatment with HDACs inhibitors entinostat and dacinostat) and identified Heme-oxygenases as novel candidate targets for γ-globin induction. Indeed, Heme-oxygenase2 siRNA knockdown as well as its inhibition by Tin protoporphyrin-IX (TinPPIX) greatly increased γ-globin expression. This result is particularly interesting as several metalloporphyrins have already been developed for clinical uses and could be tested (alone or in combination with other drugs) to improve pharmacological γ-globin reactivation for the treatment of β-hemoglobinopathies. PMID:26509275

  10. Prehospital Use of Magnesium Sulfate as Neuroprotection in Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Saver, Jeffrey L.; Starkman, Sidney; Eckstein, Marc; Stratton, Samuel J.; Pratt, Franklin D.; Hamilton, Scott; Conwit, Robin; Liebeskind, David S.; Sung, Gene; Kramer, Ian; Moreau, Gary; Goldweber, Robert; Sanossian, Nerses

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Magnesium sulfate is neuroprotective in preclinical models of stroke and has shown signals of potential efficacy with an acceptable safety profile when delivered early after stroke onset in humans. Delayed initiation of neuroprotective agents has hindered earlier phase 3 trials of neuroprotective agents. METHODS We randomly assigned patients with suspected stroke to receive either intravenous magnesium sulfate or placebo, beginning within 2 hours after symptom onset. A loading dose was initiated by paramedics before the patient arrived at the hospital, and a 24-hour maintenance infusion was started on the patient’s arrival at the hospital. The primary outcome was the degree of disability at 90 days, as measured by scores on the modified Rankin scale (range, 0 to 6, with higher scores indicating greater disability). RESULTS Among the 1700 enrolled patients (857 in the magnesium group and 843 in the placebo group), the mean (±SD) age was 69±13 years, 42.6% were women, and the mean pretreatment score on the Los Angeles Motor Scale of stroke severity (range, 0 to 10, with higher scores indicating greater motor deficits) was 3.7±1.3. The final diagnosis of the qualifying event was cerebral ischemia in 73.3% of patients, intracranial hemorrhage in 22.8%, and a stroke-mimicking condition in 3.9%. The median interval between the time the patient was last known to be free of stroke symptoms and the start of the study-drug infusion was 45 minutes (interquartile range, 35 to 62), and 74.3% of patients received the study-drug infusion within the first hour after symptom onset. There was no significant shift in the distribution of 90-day disability outcomes on the global modified Rankin scale between patients in the magnesium group and those in the placebo group (P = 0.28 by the Cochran–Mantel–Haenszel test); mean scores at 90 days did not differ between the magnesium group and the placebo group (2.7 in each group, P = 1.00). No significant between

  11. Erythropoietin: still on the neuroprotection road

    PubMed Central

    del Barco, Diana García; Coro-Antich, Rosa M.

    2012-01-01

    Acute stroke is one of the major causes of death and disabilities. Since the 1980s many clinical studies have been conducted to evaluate neuroprotective approaches to treat this important brain vascular event. However, to date the only drug approved (recombinant tissue plasminogen activator [rtPA]) represents a thrombolytic, nonneuroprotective approach. An important neuroprotective strategy is based on erythropoietin (EPO). Exogenously administered EPO exhibits neuroprotective effects in numerous animal models, through the activation of anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory pathways as well as through the stimulation of angiogenic and neurogenic events. The capability of EPO to cross the blood–brain barrier after systemic administration and its effective therapeutic window are advantages for human acute stroke therapy. However, a multicenter stroke trial where recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) was combined with rtPA had negative outcomes. The present paper reviews the EPO neuroprotective strategy and its mechanisms in ischemic stroke and in other human nervous system diseases. PMID:22590480

  12. NAP (davunetide) provides functional and structural neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Gozes, Illana

    2011-01-01

    NAP (davunetide) is an eight amino acid peptide (NAPVSIPQ) that has been shown to provide potent neuroprotection, in vitro and in vivo. In human clinical trials, NAP has been shown to increase memory scores in patients suffering from amnestic mild cognitive impairment, a precursor to Alzheimer's disease and to enhance functional daily behaviors in schizophrenia patients. NAP is derived from activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) a molecule that is essential for brain formation, interacting with chromatin associated protein alpha and the chromatin remodeling complex SWI/SNF and regulating >400 genes during embryonic development. Partial loss in ADNP results in cognitive deficits and pathology of the microtubule associated protein tau (tauopathy) that is ameliorated in part by NAP replacement therapy. Recent studies increased the scope of NAP neuroprotection and provided further insights into the NAP mechanisms of action. Thus, it has been hypothesized that the presence of tau on axonal microtubules renders them notably less sensitive to the microtubule-severing protein katanin, and NAP was shown to protect microtubules from katanin disruption in the face of reduced tau expression. Parallel studies showed that NAP reduced the number of apoptotic neurons through activation of PI-3K/Akt pathway in the cortical plate or both PI-3K/Akt and MAPK/MEK1 kinases in the white matter. The interaction of these disparate yet complementary pathways is the subject of future studies toward human brain neuroprotection in the clinical scenario. PMID:21524250

  13. Progress in Neuroprotective Strategies for Preventing Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Munjal M.; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Shetty, Ashok K.

    2008-01-01

    Neuroprotection is increasingly considered as a promising therapy for preventing and treating temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The development of chronic TLE, also termed as epileptogenesis, is a dynamic process. An initial precipitating injury (IPI) such as the status epilepticus (SE) leads to neurodegeneration, abnormal reorganization of the brain circuitry and a significant loss of functional inhibition. All of these changes likely contribute to the development of chronic epilepsy, characterized by spontaneous recurrent motor seizures (SRMS) and learning and memory deficits. The purpose of this review is to discuss the current state of knowledge pertaining to neuroprotection in epileptic conditions, and to highlight the efficacy of distinct neuroprotective strategies for preventing or treating chronic TLE. Although the administration of certain conventional and new generation antiepileptic drugs is effective for primary neuroprotection such as reduced neurodegeneration after acute seizures or the SE, their competence for preventing the development of chronic epilepsy after an IPI is either unknown or not promising. On the other hand, alternative strategies such as the ketogenic diet therapy, administration of distinct neurotrophic factors, hormones or antioxidants seem useful for preventing and treating chronic TLE. However, long term studies on the efficacy of these approaches introduced at different time-points after the SE or an IPI are lacking. Additionally, grafting of fetal hippocampal cells at early time-points after an IPI holds considerable promise for preventing TLE, though issues regarding availability of donor cells, ethical concerns, timing of grafting after SE, and durability of graft-mediated seizure suppression need to be resolved for further advances with this approach. Overall, from the studies performed so far, there is consensus that neuroprotective strategies need to be employed as quickly as possible after the onset of the SE or an IPI for

  14. Molecular cloning and sequencing of mRNAs coding for minor adult globin polypeptides of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed Central

    Knöchel, W; Meyerhof, W; Hummel, S; Grundmann, U

    1983-01-01

    Globin mRNA was isolated from immature red blood cells of an adult Xenopus laevis female. mRNA/cDNA hybrids were integrated in the Pst I cleavage site of pBR 322 by G/C tailing, and cloned in Escherichia coli strain HB 101. By restriction site analysis as well as hybridization behaviour we identified two clones coding for minor adult alpha and beta globin chains. Nucleotide sequence analysis and derived amino acid sequences are presented. PMID:6298748

  15. Inhibition of G9a methyltransferase stimulates fetal hemoglobin production by facilitating LCR/γ-globin looping.

    PubMed

    Krivega, Ivan; Byrnes, Colleen; de Vasconcellos, Jaira F; Lee, Y Terry; Kaushal, Megha; Dean, Ann; Miller, Jeffery L

    2015-07-30

    Induction of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) production in adult erythrocytes can reduce the severity of sickle cell disease and β-thalassemia. Transcription of β-globin genes is regulated by the distant locus control region (LCR), which is brought into direct gene contact by the LDB1/GATA-1/TAL1/LMO2-containing complex. Inhibition of G9a H3K9 methyltransferase by the chemical compound UNC0638 activates fetal and represses adult β-globin gene expression in adult human hematopoietic precursor cells, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here we studied UNC0638 effects on β-globin gene expression using ex vivo differentiation of CD34(+) erythroid progenitor cells from peripheral blood of healthy adult donors. UNC0638 inhibition of G9a caused dosed accumulation of HbF up to 30% of total hemoglobin in differentiated cells. Elevation of HbF was associated with significant activation of fetal γ-globin and repression of adult β-globin transcription. Changes in gene expression were associated with widespread loss of H3K9me2 in the locus and gain of LDB1 complex occupancy at the γ-globin promoters as well as de novo formation of LCR/γ-globin contacts. Our findings demonstrate that G9a establishes epigenetic conditions preventing activation of γ-globin genes during differentiation of adult erythroid progenitor cells. In this view, manipulation of G9a represents a promising epigenetic approach for treatment of β-hemoglobinopathies. PMID:25979948

  16. Conservation of the primary structure, organization, and function of the human and mouse beta-globin locus-activating regions.

    PubMed Central

    Moon, A M; Ley, T J

    1990-01-01

    DNA sequences located in a region 6-18 kilobases (kb) upstream from the human epsilon-globin gene are known as the locus-activating region (LAR) or dominant control region. This region is thought to play a key role in chromatin organization of the beta-like globin gene cluster during erythroid development. The beta-globin LAR activates linked globin genes in transiently or stably transfected erythroleukemia cells and in erythroid cells of transgenic mice. Since the human beta-globin LAR is functional in mice, we reasoned that critical LAR sequence elements might be conserved between mice and humans. We therefore cloned murine genomic sequences homologous to one portion of the human LAR (site II, positions -11,054 to -10,322 with respect to the human epsilon gene). We found that this murine DNA fragment (mouse LAR site II) and sequences homologous to human LAR sites I and III are located upstream from the mouse beta-like globin gene cluster and determined that their locations relative to the cluster are similar to that of their human counterparts. The homologous site II sequences are 70% identical between mice and humans over a stretch of approximately 800 base pairs. Multiple core sequences with greater than 80% identity were present within this region. Transient and stable transfection assays of K562 erythroleukemia cells demonstrated that both human and mouse LAR elements contain enhancer activity and confer hemin inducibility on a linked human gamma-globin promoter. These results suggest that primary structural elements--and the spatial organization of these elements--are important for function of the beta-globin LAR. Images PMID:2217202

  17. Analysis of β-globin chromatin micro-environment using a novel 3C variant, 4Cv.

    PubMed

    Pink, Ryan C; Eskiw, Christopher H; Caley, Daniel P; Carter, David R F

    2010-01-01

    Higher order chromatin folding is critical to a number of developmental processes, including the regulation of gene expression. Recently developed biochemical techniques such as RNA TRAP and chromosome conformation capture (3C) have provided us with the tools to probe chromosomal structures. These techniques have been applied to the β-globin locus, revealing a complex pattern of interactions with regions along the chromosome that the gene resides on. However, biochemical and microscopy data on the nature of β-globin interactions with other chromosomes is contradictory. Therefore we developed a novel 4C variant, Complete-genome 3C by vectorette amplification (4Cv), which allows an unbiased and quantitative method to examine chromosomal structure. We have used 4Cv to study the microenvironment of the β-globin locus in mice and show that a significant proportion of the interactions of β-globin are inter-chromosomal. Furthermore, our data show that in the liver, where the gene is active, β-globin is more likely to interact with other chromosomes, compared to the brain where the gene is silent and is more likely to interact with other regions along the same chromosome. Our data suggest that transcriptional activation of the β-globin locus leads to a change in nuclear position relative to the chromosome territory. PMID:20927371

  18. Tissue specific transcription of the human epsilon-globin gene following transfection into the embryonic erythroid cell line K562.

    PubMed Central

    Allan, M; Montague, P; Grindlay, G J; Sibbet, G; Donovan-Peluso, M; Bank, A; Paul, J

    1985-01-01

    We have introduced a plasmid containing the human epsilon-globin gene either stably or transiently into a number of erythroid or non-erythroid cell lines, and analysed the accuracy and efficiency of transcription. In non-erythroid cells (or in mouse erythroleukaemia (MEL) cells in which adult but not embryonic globin genes are expressed) transcription of the epsilon-globin gene occurs mainly from a site 200 bp upstream of the major cap site (the -200 cap site). In the human K562 cell line, in which the endogenous epsilon-globin gene is transcribed at high levels, transcription initiation from the introduced gene occurs mainly from the major cap site. Transcriptional activity of the epsilon-globin gene introduced into K562 cell is quantitatively similar to that of the endogenous gene. This suggests the presence (or absence) in K562 cells of factor(s) which activate (or repress) the epsilon-globin gene in a tissue specific manner. Images PMID:2995916

  19. An N-Myristoylated Globin with a Redox-Sensing Function That Regulates the Defecation Cycle in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Tilleman, Lesley; De Henau, Sasha; Pauwels, Martje; Nagy, Nora; Pintelon, Isabel; Braeckman, Bart P.; De Wael, Karolien; Van Doorslaer, Sabine; Adriaensen, Dirk; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Moens, Luc; Dewilde, Sylvia

    2012-01-01

    Globins occur in all kingdoms of life where they fulfill a wide variety of functions. In the past they used to be primarily characterized as oxygen transport/storage proteins, but since the discovery of new members of the globin family like neuroglobin and cytoglobin, more diverse and complex functions have been assigned to this heterogeneous family. Here we propose a function for a membrane-bound globin of C. elegans, GLB-26. This globin was predicted to be myristoylated at its N-terminus, a post-translational modification only recently described in the globin family. In vivo, this globin is found in the membrane of the head mesodermal cell and in the tail stomato-intestinal and anal depressor muscle cells. Since GLB-26 is almost directly oxidized when exposed to oxygen, we postulate a possible function as electron transfer protein. Phenotypical studies show that GLB-26 takes part in regulating the length of the defecation cycle in C. elegans under oxidative stress conditions. PMID:23251335

  20. Neuroprotective effect of alkyl hydroxytyrosyl ethers in rat brain slices subjected to a hypoxia-reoxygenation model.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, A; De la Cruz, J P; Muñoz-Marín, J; López-Villodres, J A; Madrona, A; Espartero, J L; González-Correa, J A

    2012-10-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the antioxidant and possible neuroprotective and antioxidant effects of five alkyl hydroxytyrosyl (HT) ethers (ethyl, butyl, hexyl, octyl and dodecyl) in rat brain slices. None of the compounds modified lipid peroxidation or glutathione concentrations (GSH) in oxygenated samples. The effects of oxidative stress were investigated with ferrous salts to induce lipid peroxidation and diethylmaleate (DEM) to reduce GSH. All compounds inhibited lipid peroxidation with an inhibitory concentration 50% (IC(50)) one tenth that of HT. These compounds, especially the butyl derivative, prevented GSH depletion after incubation with DEM. We also explored the neuroprotective effect of these compounds in an experimental model of hypoxia-reoxygenation in rat brain slices. All compounds showed neuroprotective and antioxidant effects. Our results established a relationship between these effects and the length of the carbon chain (maximum effect in the range of C4-C8). PMID:23442672

  1. Prolactin mediates neuroprotection against excitotoxicity in primary cell cultures of hippocampal neurons via its receptor.

    PubMed

    Vergara-Castañeda, E; Grattan, D R; Pasantes-Morales, H; Pérez-Domínguez, M; Cabrera-Reyes, E A; Morales, T; Cerbón, M

    2016-04-01

    Recently it has been reported that prolactin (PRL) exerts a neuroprotective effect against excitotoxicity in hippocampus in the rat in vivo models. However, the exact mechanism by which PRL mediates this effect is not completely understood. The aim of our study was to assess whether prolactin exerts neuroprotection against excitotoxicity in an in vitro model using primary cell cultures of hippocampal neurons, and to determine whether this effect is mediated via the prolactin receptor (PRLR). Primary cell cultures of rat hippocampal neurons were used in all experiments, gene expression was evaluated by RT-qPCR, and protein expression was assessed by Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry. Cell viability was assessed by using the MTT method. The results demonstrated that PRL treatment of neurons from primary cultures did not modify cell viability, but that it exerted a neuroprotective effect, with cells treated with PRL showing a significant increase of viability after glutamate (Glu)--induced excitotoxicity as compared with neurons treated with Glu alone. Cultured neurons expressed mRNA for both PRL and its receptor (PRLR), and both PRL and PRLR expression levels changed after the excitotoxic insult. Interestingly, the PRLR protein was detected as two main isoforms of 100 and 40 kDa as compared with that expressed in hypothalamic cells, which was present only as a 30 kDa variant. On the other hand, PRL was not detected in neuron cultures, either by western blot or by immunohistochemistry. Neuroprotection induced by PRL was significantly blocked by specific oligonucleotides against PRLR, thus suggesting that the PRL role is mediated by its receptor expressed in these neurons. The overall results indicated that PRL induces neuroprotection in neurons from primary cell cultures. PMID:26874070

  2. Real-Time Impedance-based Cell Analyzer as a Tool to Delineate Molecular Pathways Involved in Neurotoxicity and Neuroprotection in a Neuronal Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Marinova, Zoya; Walitza, Susanne; Grünblatt, Edna

    2014-01-01

    Many brain-related disorders have neuronal cell death involved in their pathophysiology. Improved in vitro models to study neuroprotective or neurotoxic effects of drugs and downstream pathways involved would help gain insight into the molecular mechanisms of neuroprotection/neurotoxicity and could potentially facilitate drug development. However, many existing in vitro toxicity assays have major limitations – most assess neurotoxicity and neuroprotection at a single time point, not allowing to observe the time-course and kinetics of the effect. Furthermore, the opportunity to collect information about downstream signaling pathways involved in neuroprotection in real-time would be of great importance. In the current protocol we describe the use of a real-time impedance-based cell analyzer to determine neuroprotective effects of serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor agonists in a neuronal cell line under label-free and real-time conditions using impedance measurements. Furthermore, we demonstrate that inhibitors of second messenger pathways can be used to delineate downstream molecules involved in the neuroprotective effect. We also describe the utility of this technique to determine whether an effect on cell proliferation contributes to an observed neuroprotective effect. The system utilizes special microelectronic plates referred to as E-Plates which contain alternating gold microelectrode arrays on the bottom surface of the wells, serving as cell sensors. The impedance readout is modified by the number of adherent cells, cell viability, morphology, and adhesion. A dimensionless parameter called Cell Index is derived from the electrical impedance measurements and is used to represent the cell status. Overall, the real-time impedance-based cell analyzer allows for real-time, label-free assessment of neuroprotection and neurotoxicity, and the evaluation of second messenger pathways involvement, contributing to more detailed and high-throughput assessment of potential

  3. Globin mRNA reduction for whole-blood transcriptome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Krjutškov, Kaarel; Koel, Mariann; Roost, Anne Mari; Katayama, Shintaro; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Jouhilahti, Eeva-Mari; Söderhäll, Cilla; Jaakma, Ülle; Plaas, Mario; Vesterlund, Liselotte; Lohi, Hannes; Salumets, Andres; Kere, Juha

    2016-01-01

    The transcriptome analysis of whole-blood RNA by sequencing holds promise for the identification and tracking of biomarkers; however, the high globin mRNA (gmRNA) content of erythrocytes hampers whole-blood and buffy coat analyses. We introduce a novel gmRNA locking assay (GlobinLock, GL) as a robust and simple gmRNA reduction tool to preserve RNA quality, save time and cost. GL consists of a pair of gmRNA-specific oligonucleotides in RNA initial denaturation buffer that is effective immediately after RNA denaturation and adds only ten minutes of incubation to the whole cDNA synthesis procedure when compared to non-blood RNA analysis. We show that GL is fully effective not only for human samples but also for mouse and rat, and so far incompletely studied cow, dog and zebrafish. PMID:27515369

  4. Binding of Protein Factor CTCF within Chicken Genome Alpha-Globin Locus.

    PubMed

    Kotova, E S; Akopov, S B; Didych, D A; Petrova, N V; Iarovaia, O V; Razin, S V; Nikolaev, L G

    2016-01-01

    A systematic search for DNA fragments containing potential CTCF transcription factor binding sites in the chicken alpha-globin domain and its flanking regions was performed by means of the two-dimension electrophoretic mobility shift assay. For the alpha-globin domain fragments selected, the occupancy by the CTCF in erythroid and lymphoid chicken cells was tested by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Only one of 13 DNA fragments capable of CTCF binding in vitro was efficiently bound to this protein in vivo in erythroid cells, and somewhat less efficiently - in lymphoid cells. So, binding of CTCF to the DNA fragment in vitro in most cases does not mean that this fragment will be occupied by CTCF in the cell nucleus. Yet, CTCF binding in vivo, as a rule, is accompanied by the binding of the protein to this DNA region in vitro. During the erythroid differentiation, no significant changes in CTCF binding to the DNA fragments studied were detected. PMID:27099788

  5. Binding of Protein Factor CTCF within Chicken Genome Alpha-Globin Locus

    PubMed Central

    Kotova, E. S.; Akopov, S. B.; Didych, D. A.; Petrova, N. V.; Iarovaia, O. V.; Razin, S. V.; Nikolaev, L. G.

    2016-01-01

    A systematic search for DNA fragments containing potential CTCF transcription factor binding sites in the chicken alpha-globin domain and its flanking regions was performed by means of the two-dimension electrophoretic mobility shift assay. For the alpha-globin domain fragments selected, the occupancy by the CTCF in erythroid and lymphoid chicken cells was tested by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Only one of 13 DNA fragments capable of CTCF binding in vitro was efficiently bound to this protein in vivo in erythroid cells, and somewhat less efficiently – in lymphoid cells. So, binding of CTCF to the DNA fragment in vitro in most cases does not mean that this fragment will be occupied by CTCF in the cell nucleus. Yet, CTCF binding in vivo, as a rule, is accompanied by the binding of the protein to this DNA region in vitro. During the erythroid differentiation, no significant changes in CTCF binding to the DNA fragments studied were detected. PMID:27099788

  6. Precise nucleosome positioning in the promoter of the chicken beta A globin gene.

    PubMed

    Kefalas, P; Gray, F C; Allan, J

    1988-01-25

    Histone octamers were reconstituted onto 5' end-labelled DNA fragments derived from the promoter region of the chicken beta A globin gene. The location of the reconstituted histone octamer with respect to the DNA sequence of each fragment was assessed by Exonuclease III digestion of purified nucleosome monomers. By this approach we have found a strong preference for histone octamers to be positioned over nucleotides -206 to -62 relative to the gene cap site. This stretch of DNA contains all those 5' beta globin sequences which, by DNase footprinting, bind specific protein factors and incorporates three promoter consensus sequence motifs. The upstream terminal 32 base pairs of this DNA segment contains the binding sites for the erythrocyte specific G-string binding protein and transcription factor Spl and appears to be relatively weakly bound to the histone octamer. PMID:3340546

  7. Nitrite binding to globins: linkage isomerism, EPR silence and reductive chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu; Svistunenko, Dimitri A.; Cioloboc, Daniela; Bischin, Cristina; Scurtu, Florina; Cooper, Chris E.

    2014-01-01

    The nitrite adducts of globins can potentially bind via O- or N- linkage to the heme iron. We have used EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) and DFT (density functional theory) to explore these binding modes to myoglobin and hemoglobin. We demonstrate that the nitrite adducts of both globins have detectable EPR signals; we provide an explanation for the difficulty in detecting these EPR features, based on uniaxial state considerations. The EPR and DFT data show that both nitrite linkage isomers can be present at the same time and that the two isomers are readily interconvertible in solution. The millisecond-scale process of nitrite reduction by Hb is investigated in search of the elusive Fe(II)-nitrite adduct. PMID:25172022

  8. Recombination within and between the human insulin and beta-globin gene loci.

    PubMed Central

    Lebo, R V; Chakravarti, A; Buetow, K H; Cheung, M C; Cann, H; Cordell, B; Goodman, H

    1983-01-01

    We detected a large number of polymorphic insulin restriction fragments in black Americans. These different size fragments were probably generated by unequal recombination on both sides of the human insulin gene. Population genetic analysis indicates that recombination occurred 33 times more frequently than expected to generate this large number of polymorphic fragments. Specific properties of the unique repeated 14- to 16-base-pair sequences 5' to the insulin gene suggest that this sequence would promote increased unequal recombination. Additional pedigree analysis showed that the recombination rate between the structural insulin and beta-globin gene loci was 14% with strong evidence for linkage. Since both insulin and beta-globin have been mapped to the short arm of human chromosome 11, this study establishes that the genetic map distance between these genes is 14.2 centimorgans. PMID:6348773

  9. Diversity of [beta]-globin mutations in Israeli ethnic groups reflects recent historic events

    SciTech Connect

    Filon, D.; Oron, V.; Krichevski, S.; Shaag, A.; Goldfarb, A.; Aker, M.; Rachmilewitz, E.A.; Rund, D.; Oppenheim, A. )

    1994-05-01

    The authors characterized nearly 500 [beta]-thalassemia genes from the Israeli population representing a variety of ethnic subgroups. They found 28 different mutations in the [beta]-globin gene, including three mutations ([beta][sup S], [beta][sup C], and [beta][sup O-Arab]) causing hemoglobinopathies. Marked genetic heterogeneity was observed in both the Arab (20 mutations) and Jewish (17 mutations) populations. On the other hand, two ethnic isolates - Druze and Samaritans - had a single mutation each. Fifteen of the [beta]-thalassemia alleles are Mediterranean in type, 5 originated in Kurdistan, 2 are of Indian origin, and 2 sporadic alleles came from Europe. Only one mutant allele-nonsense codon 37-appears to be indigenous to Israel. While human habitation in Israel dates back to early prehistory, the present-day spectrum of [beta]-globin mutations can be largely explained by migration events that occurred in the past millennium. 26 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Spectrum of Common α-Globin Deletion Mutations in the Southern Region of Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Bui Thi Kim, Ly; Phu Chi, Dung; Hoang Thanh, Chi

    2016-06-01

    The common deletion mutations of α-globin genes in the Vietnamese population is not well known. Here we report the presence of five deletional mutations of Southeast Asia in the southern region of Vietnam. The - -(SEA) (NG_000006.1: g.26264_45564del19301) mutation is the most common type of deletion (87.35%), followed by the -α(3.7) (rightward) (NG_000006.1: g.34164_37967del3804) deletion (9.64%), -α(4.2) (leftward) (AF221717) deletion (2.41%) and - -(THAI) (NG_000006.1: g.10664_44164del33501) (0.6%) mutation in this region. The - -(FIL) (NG_000006.1: g.11684_43534del31581) mutation was not detected in this study. This result provided a view of the distribution of common α-globin gene mutations in Vietnam and could serve as a baseline for further investigations into these genetic defects. PMID:27117571

  11. Globin mRNA reduction for whole-blood transcriptome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Krjutškov, Kaarel; Koel, Mariann; Roost, Anne Mari; Katayama, Shintaro; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Jouhilahti, Eeva-Mari; Söderhäll, Cilla; Jaakma, Ülle; Plaas, Mario; Vesterlund, Liselotte; Lohi, Hannes; Salumets, Andres; Kere, Juha

    2016-01-01

    The transcriptome analysis of whole-blood RNA by sequencing holds promise for the identification and tracking of biomarkers; however, the high globin mRNA (gmRNA) content of erythrocytes hampers whole-blood and buffy coat analyses. We introduce a novel gmRNA locking assay (GlobinLock, GL) as a robust and simple gmRNA reduction tool to preserve RNA quality, save time and cost. GL consists of a pair of gmRNA-specific oligonucleotides in RNA initial denaturation buffer that is effective immediately after RNA denaturation and adds only ten minutes of incubation to the whole cDNA synthesis procedure when compared to non-blood RNA analysis. We show that GL is fully effective not only for human samples but also for mouse and rat, and so far incompletely studied cow, dog and zebrafish. PMID:27515369

  12. Precise nucleosome positioning in the promoter of the chicken beta A globin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kefalas, P; Gray, F C; Allan, J

    1988-01-01

    Histone octamers were reconstituted onto 5' end-labelled DNA fragments derived from the promoter region of the chicken beta A globin gene. The location of the reconstituted histone octamer with respect to the DNA sequence of each fragment was assessed by Exonuclease III digestion of purified nucleosome monomers. By this approach we have found a strong preference for histone octamers to be positioned over nucleotides -206 to -62 relative to the gene cap site. This stretch of DNA contains all those 5' beta globin sequences which, by DNase footprinting, bind specific protein factors and incorporates three promoter consensus sequence motifs. The upstream terminal 32 base pairs of this DNA segment contains the binding sites for the erythrocyte specific G-string binding protein and transcription factor Spl and appears to be relatively weakly bound to the histone octamer. Images PMID:3340546

  13. Characteristic beta-globin gene cluster haplotypes of Evenkis and Oroqens in north China.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Koji; Marubayashi, Azusa; Tokimasa, Kozue; Harihara, Shinji; Omoto, Keiichi; Imanishi, Tadashi; Hao, Luping; Jin, Feng

    2004-10-01

    Haplotype frequencies of the beta-globin gene cluster were estimated for 114 Evenkis and 81 Oroqens from northeast China, and their characteristics were compared with those in Japanese, Koreans, and three Colombian Amerindian groups of South America (Wayuu, Kamsa, and Inga tribes). A major 5' subhaplotype (5' to the delta-globin gene) was + - - - - in Evenkis, whereas + - - - -, - + + - +, and - + - + + were the major subhaplotypes in Oroqens. One possible candidate for an ancestral 5' subhaplotype, - - - - -, was found in one Evenki (0.5%) and three Oroqen chromosomes (2.0%). They were observed as heterozygous forms for + ---- and -----. Major haplotypes were +-----+, + -----+-, and + - - - - + + in Evenkis, whereas they were +-----+,-++-+-+, +----+-, and -+-++-+ in Oroqens. The lowest Nei's genetic distance values of Evenkis or Oroqens based on the 5' subhaplotype frequency distributions were observed in relation to the Wayuu or Koreans, respectively, but those of Evenkis and Oroqens based on the haplotype frequency distributions were found in relation to Koreans. PMID:15757246

  14. Characterization of two globin genes from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae: divergent origin of nematoceran haemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Burmester, Thorsten; Klawitter, Sabine; Hankeln, Thomas

    2007-04-01

    The chironomid midges are the only insects that harbour true haemoglobin in their haemolymph. Here we report the identification of haemoglobin genes in two other nematoceran species. Two paralogous haemoglobin genes (glob1 and glob2) from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae were cloned and sequenced. Furthermore, we identified two orthologous haemoglobin genes in the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti. All four haemoglobins were predicted to be intracellular proteins, with the amino acids required for heme- and oxygen-binding being conserved. In situ-hybridization studies showed that glob1 and glob2 expression in An. gambiae is mainly associated with the tracheal system. This pattern resembles that of other insect intracellular globins. We also observed expression of glob2 in visceral muscles. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the globins of the mosquitoes and the Chironomidae are not orthologous. The chironomid haemoglobins share a recent common origin with the brachyceran glob1 proteins. The mosquito glob1 and glob2 proteins, which separated by gene duplication around 170 million years ago, form a distinct clade of more ancient evolutionary origin within the insects. The glob1 genes have introns in the ancestral globin positions B12.2 and G7.0. An additional intron was observed in Ae. aegypti glob1 helix position E18.0, providing evidence for a recent intron gain event. Both mosquito glob2 genes have lost the B12.2 intron. This pattern must be interpreted in terms of dynamic intron gain and loss events in the globin gene lineage. PMID:17298561

  15. Correction of human. beta. sup S -globin gene by gene targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Shesely, E.G.; Hyungsuk Kim; Shehee, W.R.; Smithies, O. ); Papayannopoulou, T. ); Popovich, B.W. )

    1991-05-15

    As a step toward using gene targeting for gene therapy, the authors have corrected a human {beta}{sup S}-globin gene to the normal {beta}{sup A} allele by homologous recombination in the mouse-human hybrid cell line BSM. BSM is derived from a mouse erythroleukemia cell line and carries a single human chromosome 11 with the {beta}{sup S}-globin allele. A {beta}{sup A}-globin targeting construct containing a unique oligomer and a neomycin-resistance gene was electroporated into the BSM cells, which were then placed under G418 selection. Then 126 resulting pools containing a total {approx}29,000 G418-resistant clones were screened by PCR for the presence of a targeted recombinant: 3 positive pools were identified. A targeted clone was isolated by replating one of the positive pools into smaller pools and rescreening by PCR, followed by dilution cloning. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that the isolated clone had been targeted as planned. The correction of the {beta}{sup S} allele to {beta}{sup A} was confirmed both by allele-specific PCR and by allele-specific antibodies. Expression studies comparing the uninduced and induced RNA levels in unmodified BSM cells and in the targeted clone showed no significant alteration in the ability of the targeted clone to undergo induction, despite the potentially disrupting presence of a transcriptionally active neomycin gene 5{prime} to the human {beta}{sup A}-globin gene. Thus gene targeting can correct a {beta}{sup S} allele to {beta}{sup A}, and the use of a selectable helper gene need not significantly interfere with the induction of the corrected gene.

  16. Investigating alpha-globin structural variants: a retrospective review of 135,000 Brazilian individuals

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Elza Miyuki; Oliveira, Denise Madureira; Jorge, Susan Elisabeth; Ribeiro, Daniela Maria; Zaccariotto, Tânia Regina; Santos, Magnun Nueldo Nunes; Almeida, Vanessa; Albuquerque, Dulcinéia Martins; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; Sonati, Maria de Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Background Brazil has a multiethnic population with a high diversity of hemoglobinopathies. While screenings for beta-globin mutations are far more common, alterations affecting alpha-globin genes are usually more silent and less well known. The aim of this study was to describe the results of a screening program for alpha-globin gene mutations in a representative sample of the Southeastern Brazilian population. Methods A total of 135,000 individuals, including patients with clinical suspicion of hemoglobinopathies and their family members, randomly chosen individuals submitted to blood tests and blood donors who were abnormal hemoglobin carriers were analyzed. The variants were screened by alkaline and acid electrophoreses, isoelectric focusing and cation-exchange high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and the abnormal chains were investigated by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Mutations were identified by molecular analyses, and the oxygen affinity, heme–heme cooperativity and Bohr effect of the variants were evaluated by functional tests. Results Four new and 22 rare variants were detected in 98 families. Some of these variants were found in co-inheritance with other hemoglobinopathies. Of the rare hemoglobins, Hasharon, Stanleyville II and J-Rovigo were the most common, the first two being S-like and associated with alpha-thalassemia. Conclusion The variability of alpha-globin alterations reflects the high degree of racial miscegenation and an intense internal migratory flow between different Brazilian regions. This diversity highlights the importance of programs for diagnosing hemoglobinopathies and preventing combinations that may lead to important clinical manifestations in multiethnic populations. PMID:25818820

  17. Analysis of α1 and α2 globin genes among patients with hemoglobin Adana in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lee, T Y; Lai, M I; Ismail, P; Ramachandran, V; Tan, J A M A; Teh, L K; Othman, R; Hussein, N H; George, E

    2016-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) Adana [HBA2: c179G>A (or HBA1); p.Gly60Asp] is a non-deletional α-thalassemia variant found in Malaysia. An improvement in the molecular techniques in recent years has made identification of Hb Adana much easier. For this study, a total of 26 Hb Adana α-thalassemia intermedia and 10 Hb Adana trait blood samples were collected from patients. Common deletional and non-deletional α-thalassemia genotypes were determined using multiplex gap polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and multiplex ARMS PCR techniques. Identification of the Hb Adana location on the α-globin gene was carried out using genomic sequencing and the location of the mutation was confirmed via restriction fragment length polymorphism-PCR. Among the 36 samples, 24 (66.7%) had the -α(3.7)/α(Cd59)α mutation, while the -α(3.7)/α(Cd59)α mutation accounted for 2 samples (5.6%) and the remaining 10 (27.8%) samples were α/α(Cd59)α. All 36 samples were found to have the Hb Adana mutation on the α2-globin gene. The position of the α-globin gene mutation found in our cases was similar to that reported in Indonesia (16%) but not to that in Turkey (0.6%). Our results showed that the Hb Adana mutation was preferentially present in the α2-globin genes in Malays compared to the other ethnicities in Malaysia. Thus, the Malays might have similar ancestry based on the similarities in the Hb Adana position. PMID:27173219

  18. Quantification of tertiary structural conservation despite primary sequence drift in the globin fold.

    PubMed

    Aronson, H E; Royer, W E; Hendrickson, W A

    1994-10-01

    The globin family of protein structures was the first for which it was recognized that tertiary structure can be highly conserved even when primary sequences have diverged to a virtually undetectable level of similarity. This principle of structural inertia in molecular evolution is now evident for many other protein families. We have performed a systematic comparison of the sequences and structures of 6 representative hemoglobin subunits as diverse in origin as plants, clams, and humans. Our analysis is based on a 97-residue helical core in common to all 6 structures. Amino acid sequence identities range from 12.4% to 42.3% in pairwise comparisons, and, despite these variations, the maximal RMS deviation in alpha-carbon positions is 3.02 A. Overall, sequence similarity and structural deviation are significantly anticorrelated, with a correlation coefficient of -0.71, but for a set of structures having under 20% pairwise identity, this anticorrelation falls to -0.38, which emphasizes the weak connection between a specific sequence and the tertiary fold. There is substantial variability in structure outside the helical core, and functional characteristics of these globins also differ appreciably. Nevertheless, despite variations in detail that the sequence dissimilarities and functional differences imply, the core structures of these globins remain remarkably preserved. PMID:7849587

  19. Pomalidomide reverses γ-globin silencing through the transcriptional reprogramming of adult hematopoietic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Dulmovits, Brian M; Appiah-Kubi, Abena O; Papoin, Julien; Hale, John; He, Mingzhu; Al-Abed, Yousef; Didier, Sebastien; Gould, Michael; Husain-Krautter, Sehba; Singh, Sharon A; Chan, Kyle W H; Vlachos, Adrianna; Allen, Steven L; Taylor, Naomi; Marambaud, Philippe; An, Xiuli; Gallagher, Patrick G; Mohandas, Narla; Lipton, Jeffrey M; Liu, Johnson M; Blanc, Lionel

    2016-03-17

    Current therapeutic strategies for sickle cell anemia are aimed at reactivating fetal hemoglobin. Pomalidomide, a third-generation immunomodulatory drug, was proposed to induce fetal hemoglobin production by an unknown mechanism. Here, we report that pomalidomide induced a fetal-like erythroid differentiation program, leading to a reversion of γ-globin silencing in adult human erythroblasts. Pomalidomide acted early by transiently delaying erythropoiesis at the burst-forming unit-erythroid/colony-forming unit-erythroid transition, but without affecting terminal differentiation. Further, the transcription networks involved in γ-globin repression were selectively and differentially affected by pomalidomide including BCL11A, SOX6, IKZF1, KLF1, and LSD1. IKAROS (IKZF1), a known target of pomalidomide, was degraded by the proteasome, but was not the key effector of this program, because genetic ablation of IKZF1 did not phenocopy pomalidomide treatment. Notably, the pomalidomide-induced reprogramming was conserved in hematopoietic progenitors from individuals with sickle cell anemia. Moreover, multiple myeloma patients treated with pomalidomide demonstrated increased in vivo γ-globin levels in their erythrocytes. Together, these data reveal the molecular mechanisms by which pomalidomide reactivates fetal hemoglobin, reinforcing its potential as a treatment for patients with β-hemoglobinopathies. PMID:26679864

  20. Construction of a recombinant bacterial plasmid containing DNA sequences for a mouse embryonic globin chain.

    PubMed

    Fantoni, A; Bozzoni, I; Ullu, E; Farace, M G

    1979-08-10

    Messenger RNAs for mouse embryonic globins were purified from yolk sac derived eyrthroid cells in mouse fetuses. Double stranded DNAs complementary to these messengers were synthesized and blunt end ligated to a EcoRI digested and DNA polymerase I repaired pBR322 plasmid. Of the ampicillin resistant transformants, one contained a plasmid with globin-specific cDNA. The inserted sequence is about 350 base pairs long. It contains one restriction site for EcoRI and one restriction site for HinfI about 170 and 80 base pairs from one end. The insert is not cleaved by HindIII, HindII, BamHI, PstI, SalI, AvaI, TaqI, HpaII, BglI. A mixture of purified messengers coding for alpha chains and for x, y and z embryonic chains was incubated with the recombinant plasmid and the hybridized messenger was translated in a mRNA depleted reticulocyte lysate protein synthesizing system. The product of translation was identified as a z chain by carboxymethylcellulose cromatography. The recombinant plasmid is named "pBR322-egz" after embryonic globin z. PMID:493112

  1. Homologous globin cell-free transcription system with comparison of heterologous factors.

    PubMed Central

    Tolunay, H E; Yang, L; Kemper, W M; Safer, B; Anderson, W F

    1984-01-01

    Mouse erythroleukemia (MEL) cells provide a useful model system to examine the regulation of globin gene expression. MEL cells ordinarily do not express globin genes, but in the presence of inducers, such as dimethyl sulfoxide or hexamethylene bisacetamide, they mimic erythroid differentiation. We have developed a cell-free transcription system from uninduced MEL cells to determine the requirements for mRNA synthesis. The MEL system directs accurate transcription of adenovirus type 2 major late DNA and mouse betamaj-globin with an efficiency comparable to those of HeLa and KB cell extracts. Using the procedure of Matsui et al. (T. Matsui, J. Segall, P.A. Weil, and R.G. Roeder, J. Biol. Chem. 255:11992-11996, 1980), we have isolated three active fractions from both MEL and HeLa cell extracts which are required for accurate transcription and have shown that equivalent fractions from MEL and HeLa cell extracts are interchangeable. Our findings suggest that the components required for initiation of transcription are similar in different cell types, at least to the extent that they can be assayed in these in vitro systems. Images PMID:6583493

  2. Oral decitabine reactivates expression of the methylated gamma-globin gene in Papio anubis.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Donald; Chin, Janet; Vaitkus, Kestis; Redkar, Sanjeev; Phiasivongsa, Pasit; Tang, Chunlin; Will, Roselle; Hankewych, Maria; Roxas, Bryan; Singh, Mahipal; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Desimone, Joseph

    2007-11-01

    The silencing of tumor suppressor genes associated with increased DNA methylation of the promoter regions is a frequent observation in many forms of cancer. Reactivation of these genes using pharmacological inhibitors of DNA methyltransferase such as 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (decitabine) is a worthwhile therapeutic goal. The effectiveness and tolerability of low-dose intravenous and subcutaneous decitabine regimens to demethylate and reactivate expression of the methylated gamma-globin gene in baboons and in patients with sickle cell disease led to successful trials of low-dose regimens of this drug in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome. Since these low-dose regimens are well-tolerated with minimal toxicity, they are suitable for chronic dosing to maintain promoter hypomethylation and expression of target genes. The development of an orally administered therapy using DNA methyltransferase inhibitors would facilitate such chronic approaches to therapy. We tested the ability of decitabine and a new salt derivative, decitabine mesylate, to reactivate the methylated gamma-globin gene in baboons when administered orally. Our results demonstrate that oral administration of these drugs at doses 17-34 times optimal subcutaneous doses of decitabine reactivates fetal hemoglobin, demethylates the epsilon- and gamma-globin gene promoters, and increases histone acetylation of these promoters in baboons (Papio anubis). PMID:17696208

  3. Construction of a recombinant bacterial plasmid containing DNA sequences for a mouse embryonic globin chain.

    PubMed Central

    Fantoni, A; Bozzoni, I; Ullu, E; Farace, M G

    1979-01-01

    Messenger RNAs for mouse embryonic globins were purified from yolk sac derived eyrthroid cells in mouse fetuses. Double stranded DNAs complementary to these messengers were synthesized and blunt end ligated to a EcoRI digested and DNA polymerase I repaired pBR322 plasmid. Of the ampicillin resistant transformants, one contained a plasmid with globin-specific cDNA. The inserted sequence is about 350 base pairs long. It contains one restriction site for EcoRI and one restriction site for HinfI about 170 and 80 base pairs from one end. The insert is not cleaved by HindIII, HindII, BamHI, PstI, SalI, AvaI, TaqI, HpaII, BglI. A mixture of purified messengers coding for alpha chains and for x, y and z embryonic chains was incubated with the recombinant plasmid and the hybridized messenger was translated in a mRNA depleted reticulocyte lysate protein synthesizing system. The product of translation was identified as a z chain by carboxymethylcellulose cromatography. The recombinant plasmid is named "pBR322-egz" after embryonic globin z. Images PMID:493112

  4. GATA-1 modulates the chromatin structure and activity of the chicken alpha-globin 3' enhancer.

    PubMed

    Escamilla-Del-Arenal, Martín; Recillas-Targa, Félix

    2008-01-01

    Long-distance regulatory elements and local chromatin structure are critical for proper regulation of gene expression. Here we characterize the chromatin conformation of the chicken alpha-globin silencer-enhancer elements located 3' of the domain. We found a characteristic and erythrocyte-specific structure between the previously defined silencer and the enhancer, defined by two nuclease hypersensitive sites, which appear when the enhancer is active during erythroid differentiation. Fine mapping of these sites demonstrates the absence of a positioned nucleosome and the association of GATA-1. Functional analyses of episomal vectors, as well as stably integrated constructs, revealed that GATA-1 plays a major role in defining both the chromatin structure and the enhancer activity. We detected a progressive enrichment of histone acetylation on critical enhancer nuclear factor binding sites, in correlation with the formation of an apparent nucleosome-free region. On the basis of these results, we propose that the local chromatin structure of the chicken alpha-globin enhancer plays a central role in its capacity to differentially regulate alpha-globin gene expression during erythroid differentiation and development. PMID:17984219

  5. Thalassaemia mutations within the 5'UTR of the human beta-globin gene disrupt transcription.

    PubMed

    Sgourou, Argyro; Routledge, Samantha; Antoniou, Michael; Papachatzopoulou, Adamantia; Psiouri, Lambrini; Athanassiadou, Aglaia

    2004-03-01

    The mechanisms by which mutations within the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of the human beta-globin gene (HBB) cause thalassaemia are currently not well understood. We present here the first comprehensive comparative functional analysis of four 'silent' mutations in the human beta-globin 5'UTR, namely: +10(-T), +22(G --> A), +33(C --> G) and +(40-43)(-AAAC), which are present in patients with beta-thalassaemia intermedia. Expression of these genes under the control of the beta-globin locus control region in stable transfected murine erythroleukaemia cells showed that all four mutations decreased steady state levels of mRNA to 61.6%, 68%, 85.2% and 70.6%, respectively, compared with the wildtype gene. These mutations did not interfere with either mRNA transport from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, 3' end processing or mRNA stability. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrated that mutations +10(-T) and +33(C --> G) reduced the rate of transcription to a degree that fully accounted for the observed lower level of mRNA accumulation, suggesting a disruption of downstream promoter sequences. Interestingly, mutation +22(G --> A) decreased the rate of transcription to a low degree, indicating the existence of a mechanism that acts post-transcriptionally. Generally, our data demonstrated the significance of functionally analysing mutants of this type in the presence of a full complement of transcriptional regulatory elements within a stably integrated chromatin context in an erythroid cell environment. PMID:15009072

  6. Current perspective of neuroprotection and glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Kailin; Shibata-Germanos, Shannon; Pahlitzsch, Milena; Cordeiro, M Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness worldwide and is most notably characterized by progressive optic nerve atrophy and advancing loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The main concomitant factor is the elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). Existing treatments are focused generally on lowering IOP. However, both RGC loss and optic nerve atrophy can independently occur with IOP at normal levels. In recent years, there has been substantial progress in the development of neuroprotective therapies for glaucoma in order to restore vital visual function. The present review intends to offer a brief insight into conventional glaucoma treatments and discuss exciting current developments of mostly preclinical data in novel neuroprotective strategies for glaucoma that include recent advances in noninvasive diagnostics going beyond IOP maintenance for an enhanced global view. Such strategies now target RGC loss and optic nerve damage, opening a critical therapeutic window for preventative monitoring and treatment. PMID:26635467

  7. Exosomes: Mediators of Neurodegeneration, Neuroprotection and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Kalani, Anuradha; Tyagi, Alka

    2014-01-01

    Exosomes have emerged as prominent mediators of neurodegenerative diseases where they have been shown to carry disease particles such as beta amyloid and prions from their cells of origin to other cells. Their simple structure and ability to cross the blood-brain barrier allow great opportunity to design a “makeup” with drugs and genetic elements, such as siRNA or miRNA, and use them as delivery vehicles for neurotherapeutics. Their role in neuroprotection is evident by the fact that they are involved in the regeneration of peripheral nerves and repair of neuronal injuries. This review is focused on the role of exosomes in mediating neurodegeneration and neuroprotection. PMID:23999871

  8. Neuroprotective Strategies after Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Brandon J.; Reis, Cesar; Ho, Wing Mann; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a devastating disease that primarily causes neuronal and white matter injury and is among the leading cause of death among infants. Currently there are no well-established treatments; thus, it is important to understand the pathophysiology of the disease and elucidate complications that are creating a gap between basic science and clinical translation. In the development of neuroprotective strategies and translation of experimental results in HIE, there are many limitations and challenges to master based on an appropriate study design, drug delivery properties, dosage, and use in neonates. We will identify understudied targets after HIE, as well as neuroprotective molecules that bring hope to future treatments such as melatonin, topiramate, xenon, interferon-beta, stem cell transplantation. This review will also discuss some of the most recent trials being conducted in the clinical setting and evaluate what directions are needed in the future. PMID:26389893

  9. Neuroprotective Strategies after Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Brandon J; Reis, Cesar; Ho, Wing Mann; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a devastating disease that primarily causes neuronal and white matter injury and is among the leading cause of death among infants. Currently there are no well-established treatments; thus, it is important to understand the pathophysiology of the disease and elucidate complications that are creating a gap between basic science and clinical translation. In the development of neuroprotective strategies and translation of experimental results in HIE, there are many limitations and challenges to master based on an appropriate study design, drug delivery properties, dosage, and use in neonates. We will identify understudied targets after HIE, as well as neuroprotective molecules that bring hope to future treatments such as melatonin, topiramate, xenon, interferon-beta, stem cell transplantation. This review will also discuss some of the most recent trials being conducted in the clinical setting and evaluate what directions are needed in the future. PMID:26389893

  10. Neuritogenic and neuroprotective activities of fruit residues.

    PubMed

    Tadtong, Sarin; Kanlayavattanakul, Mayuree; Lourith, Nattaya

    2013-11-01

    Neuritogenic and neuroprotective activities of litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn., Sapindaceae) and salacca (Salacca edulis Reinw., Arecaceae) pericarp, and sapodilla (Achras sapota L., Sapotaceae) and tamarind Srichompu cultivar (Tamarindus indica L., Caesalpiniaceae) seed coat extracts were evaluated on cultured cholinergic P19-derived neurons. All the extracts, at a very low concentration (1 ng/mL of litchi and salacca pericarp extracts, 10 ng/mL of sapodilla and 100 ng/mL of tamarind seed coat extracts), enhanced the survival of cultured neurons (% viability more than 100%) by XTT reduction assay. The extracts were further evaluated for their neuritogenicity by observing cell morphology by phase-contrast microscopy and neuroprotective activity in serum deprivation and pre- and co-administration of hydrogen peroxide models. The phase-contrast micrographs displayed that all of the extracts possessed neurogenic activity by promoting the neurite outgrowth of the cultured neurons. Moreover, these extracts can protect neurons from oxidative stress-caused cell death in a serum deprivation model, and prevent and protect neuron cells from the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide. In this study we assured that the neuritogenic and neuroprotective activities of these extracts derived from the phenolic components and flavonoids contained in the extracts by acting as signaling molecules to enhance neuron survival and promote neurite outgrowth. These results suggest that all of the extracts are potentially sources of neuritogenic and neuroprotective components which might be used either as pharmaceutical products or dietary supplements for neurodegenerative disorder patients, for example, those suffering from Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24427947

  11. Polyphenols and neuroprotection against ischemia and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Lin, B

    2011-12-01

    Neuroprotection of polyphenols in medical plants is getting attention in the world. Scutellaria baicalensis, paeonia veitchii and paeonia suffruticosa have been extensively studied in the last 10 years and show multi-function. They are neuroprotectants, antioxidants, anti-inflammatory and antithrombic agents as well as vasoconstriction inhibitors and amyloid-peptide (Aβ) cleaners by means of their polyphenols: baicalin, baicalein, wogonin (in scutellaria), and paeonol, paeonoside, paeoniflorin (PF) and 1, 2, 3, 4, 6-Penta-O-galloyl-beta-D-glucose (PGG) (in paeonia veitchii and paeonia suffruticosa). Other 4 medical plants: astragali, ligusticum wallichii, angelica sinensis and carthamus tinctorius (saffron) have been the major medicines to treat ischemia for hundreds of years in China, Korea and Japan. Our recent experimental studies demonstrated the neuroprotective efficacy of the combination of these phyotmedicines on mitigating brain infarction and global ischemia as well as preventing the neurodegeneration following ischemia. Owing to their multi-function, including improving cerebral blood circulation, they therefore have the potential to alleviate the symptoms of degenerative diseases, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Pharmacology of the 7 herbs and their major relative polyphenols is depicted in the article. PMID:22070681

  12. Ginseng: a promising neuroprotective strategy in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Vaibhav; Santiago-Moreno, Juan; Doré, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Ginseng is one of the most widely used herbal medicines in the world. It has been used in the treatment of various ailments and to boost immunity for centuries; especially in Asian countries. The most common ginseng variant in traditional herbal medicine is ginseng, which is made from the peeled and dried root of Panax Ginseng. Ginseng has been suggested as an effective treatment for a vast array of neurological disorders, including stroke and other acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. Ginseng’s neuroprotective effects are focused on the maintenance of homeostasis. This review involves a comprehensive literature search that highlights aspects of ginseng’s putative neuroprotective effectiveness, focusing on stroke. Attenuation of inflammation through inhibition of various proinflammatory mediators, along with suppression of oxidative stress by various mechanisms, including activation of the cytoprotective transcriptional factor Nrf2, which results in decrease in reactive oxygen species, could account for its neuroprotective efficacy. It can also prevent neuronal death as a result of stroke, thus decreasing anatomical and functional stroke damage. Although there are diverse studies that have investigated the mechanisms involved in the efficacy of ginseng in treating disorders, there is still much that needs to be clarified. Both in vitro and in vivo studies including randomized controlled clinical trials are necessary to develop in-depth knowledge of ginseng and its practical applications. PMID:25653588

  13. Non-covalent and covalent modifications modulate the reactivity of monomeric mammalian globins.

    PubMed

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Marino, Maria; Polticelli, Fabio; Coletta, Massimo; Gioia, Magda; Marini, Stefano; Pesce, Alessandra; Nardini, Marco; Bolognesi, Martino; Reeder, Brandon J; Wilson, Michael T

    2013-09-01

    Multimeric globins (e.g., hemoglobin) are considered to be the prototypes of allosteric enzymes, whereas monomeric globins (e.g., myoglobin; Mb) usually are assumed to be non-allosteric. However, the modulation of the functional properties of monomeric globins by non-covalent (or allosteric) and covalent modifications casts doubts on this general assumption. Here, we report examples referable to these two extreme mechanisms modulating the reactivity of three mammalian monomeric globins. Sperm whale Mb, which acts as a reserve supply of O2 and facilitates the O2 flux within a myocyte, displays the allosteric modulation of the O2 affinity on lactate, an obligatory product of glycolysis under anaerobic conditions, thus facilitating O2 diffusion to the mitochondria in supporting oxidative phosphorylation. Human neuroglobin (NGB), which appears to protect neurons from hypoxia in vitro and in vivo, undergoes hypoxia-dependent phosphorylation (i.e., covalent modulation) affecting the coordination equilibrium of the heme-Fe atom and, in turn, the heme-protein reactivity. This facilitates heme-Fe-ligand binding and enhances the rate of anaerobic nitrite reduction to form NO, thus contributing to cellular adaptation to hypoxia. The reactivity of human cytoglobin (CYGB), which has been postulated to protect cells against oxidative stress, depends on both non-covalent and covalent mechanisms. In fact, the heme reactivity of CYGB depends on the lipid, such as oleate, binding which stabilizes the penta-coordination geometry of the heme-Fe atom. Lastly, the reactivity of NGB and CYGB is modulated by the redox state of the intramolecular CysCD7/CysD5 and CysB2/CysE9 residue pairs, respectively, affecting the heme-Fe atom coordination state. In conclusion, the modulation of monomeric globins reactivity by non-covalent and covalent modifications appears a very widespread phenomenon, opening new perspectives in cell survival and protection. This article is part of a Special Issue

  14. Essential role of NF-E2 in remodeling of chromatin structure and transcriptional activation of the epsilon-globin gene in vivo by 5' hypersensitive site 2 of the beta-globin locus control region.

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Q H; McDowell, J C; Dean, A

    1996-01-01

    Much of our understanding of the process by which enhancers activate transcription has been gained from transient-transfection studies in which the DNA is not assembled with histones and other chromatin proteins as it is in the cell nucleus. To study the activation of a mammalian gene in a natural chromatin context in vivo, we constructed a minichromosome containing the human epsilon-globin gene and portions of the beta-globin locus control region (LCR). The minichromosomes replicate and are maintained at stable copy number in human erythroid cells. Expression of the minichromosomal epsilon-globin gene requires the presence of beta-globin LCR elements in cis, as is the case for the chromosomal gene. We determined the chromatin structure of the epsilon-globin gene in both the active and inactive states. The transcriptionally inactive locus is covered by an array of positioned nucleosomes extending over 1,400 bp. In minichromosomes with a (mu)LCR or DNase I-hypersensitive site 2 (HS2) which actively transcribe the epsilon-globin gene, the nucleosome at the promoter is altered or disrupted while positioning of nucleosomes in the rest of the locus is retained. All or virtually all minichromosomes are simultaneously hypersensitive to DNase I both at the promoter and at HS2. Transcriptional activation and promoter remodeling, as well as formation of the HS2 structure itself, depended on the presence of the NF-E2 binding motif in HS2. The nucleosome at the promoter which is altered upon activation is positioned over the transcriptional elements of the epsilon-globin gene, i.e., the TATA, CCAAT, and CACCC elements, and the GATA-1 site at -165. The simple availability of erythroid transcription factors that recognize these motifs is insufficient to allow expression. As in the chromosomal globin locus, regulation also occurs at the level of chromatin structure. These observations are consistent with the idea that one role of the beta-globin LCR is to maintain promoters free

  15. Carbamylated Erythropoietin: A Prospective Drug Candidate for Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianmin; Yang, Zheng; Zhang, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Carbamylated erythropoietin (cEpo), which is neuroprotective but lacks hematopoietic activity, has been attracting rising concerns. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the process of neuroprotection of cEpo are not well known. Based on several recent reports, the neuroprotective effects of cEpo are illustrated, and signaling pathways involved in the different effects of erythropoietin and cEpo are discussed. These newly reported researches may shed new light on the development and application of cEpo, a prospective drug candidate for neuroprotection. PMID:26862298

  16. Generation of a high-titer retroviral vector capable of expressing high levels of the human beta-globin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Sadelain, M; Wang, C H; Antoniou, M; Grosveld, F; Mulligan, R C

    1995-01-01

    Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer into hematopoietic cells may provide a means of treating both inherited and acquired diseases involving hematopoietic cells. Implementation of this approach for disorders resulting from mutations affecting the beta-globin gene (e.g., beta-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia), however, has been hampered by the inability to generate recombinant viruses able to efficiently and faithfully transmit the necessary sequences for appropriate gene expression. We have addressed this problem by carefully examining the interactions between retroviral and beta-globin gene sequences which affect vector transmission, stability, and expression. First, we examined the transmission properties of a large number of different recombinant proviral genomes which vary both in the precise nature of vector, beta-globin structural gene, and locus control region (LCR) core sequences incorporated and in the placement and orientation of those sequences. Through this analysis, we identified one specific vector, termed M beta 6L, which carries both the human beta-globin gene and core elements HS2, HS3, and HS4 from the LCR and faithfully transmits recombinant proviral sequences to cells with titers greater than 10(6) per ml. Populations of murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells transduced by this virus expressed levels of human beta-globin transcript which, on a per gene copy basis, were 78% of the levels detected in an MEL-derived cell line, Hu11, which carries human chromosome 11, the site of the beta-globin locus. Analysis of individual transduced MEL cell clones, however, indicated that, while expression was detected in every clone tested (n = 17), the levels of human beta-globin treatment varied between 4% and 146% of the levels in Hu11. This clonal variation in expression levels suggests that small beta-globin LCR sequences may not provide for as strict chromosomal position-independent expression of beta-globin as previously suspected, at least in the context of

  17. Glucocorticoids inhibit coordinated translation of. cap alpha. - and. beta. -globin mRNAs in Friend erythroleukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Papaconstantinou, J.; Stewart, J.A.; Rabek, J.P.; McClintock, P.R.; Wong, E.Y.

    1983-12-01

    The dimethylsulfoxide (Me/sub 2/SO)-mediated induction of hemoglobin synthesis in Friend erythroleukemia cells is inhibited by the glucocorticoids hydrocortisone, dexamethasone, and fluocinolone acetonide; hydrocortisone, at concentrations of 10/sup -5/ to 10/sup -8/ M inhibits by 90-30% and fluocinolone acetonide at concentrations of 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -11/ M shows a greater than 90% inhibition. At these concentrations the hormones have no effect on cell growth or viability. In this study it has been shown that there is a group of proteins, including the ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-globins, whose regulation is associated with the induction of Friend erythroleukemia cell differentiation, and that the expression of these, in addition to ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-globin, is affected by glucocorticoids. It is concluded that, although the translation of ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-globin mRNA is a major site of inhibition by glucocorticoids, there is a detectable amount of ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-globin mRNA translation which results in unequal amounts of globin synthesis and an overall more potent inhibition of hemoglobin formation.

  18. A New Intergenic α-Globin Deletion (α-α(Δ125)) Found in a Kabyle Population.

    PubMed

    Rabbind Singh, Amrathlal; Lacan, Philippe; Cadet, Estelle; Bignet, Patricia; Dumesnil, Cécile; Vannier, Jean-Pierre; Joly, Philippe; Rochette, Jacques

    2016-03-01

    We have identified a deletion of 125 bp (α-α(Δ125)) (NG_000006.1: g.37040_37164del) in the α-globin gene cluster in a Kabyle population. A combination of singlex and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assays have been used to identify the molecular defect. Sequencing of the abnormal PCR amplification product revealed a novel α1-globin promoter deletion. The endpoints of the deletion were characterized by sequencing the deletion junctions of the mutated allele. The observed deletion was located 378 bp upstream of the α1-globin gene transcription initiation site and leaves the α2 gene intact. In some patients, the α-α(Δ125) deletion was shown to segregate with Hb S (HBB: c.20A>T) and/or Hb C (HBB: c.19G>A) or a β-thalassemic allele. The α-α(Δ125) deletion has no discernible effect on red cell indices when inherited with no other abnormal globin genes. The family study demonstrated that the deletion is heritable. This is the only example of an intergenic α2-α1 non coding DNA deletion, leaving the α2-globin gene and the α1 coding part intact. PMID:26911300

  19. Erythroid activator NF-E2, TAL1 and KLF1 play roles in forming the LCR HSs in the human adult β-globin locus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yea Woon; Yun, Won Ju; Kim, AeRi

    2016-06-01

    The β-like globin genes are developmental stage specifically transcribed in erythroid cells. The transcription of the β-like globin genes requires erythroid specific activators such as GATA-1, NF-E2, TAL1 and KLF1. However, the roles of these activators have not fully elucidated in transcription of the human adult β-globin gene. Here we employed hybrid MEL cells (MEL/ch11) where a human chromosome containing the β-globin locus is present and the adult β-globin gene is highly transcribed by induction. The roles of erythroid specific activators were analyzed by inhibiting the expression of NF-E2, TAL1 or KLF1 in MEL/ch11 cells. The loss of each activator decreased the transcription of human β-globin gene, locus wide histone hyperacetylation and the binding of other erythroid specific activators including GATA-1, even though not affecting the expression of other activators. Notably, sensitivity to DNase I was reduced in the locus control region (LCR) hypersensitive sites (HSs) with the depletion of activators. These results indicate that NF-E2, TAL1 and KLF1, all activators play a primary role in HSs formation in the LCR. It might contribute to the transcription of human adult β-globin gene by allowing the access of activators and cofactors. The roles of activators in the adult β-globin locus appear to be different from the roles in the early fetal locus. PMID:27026582

  20. Role of the GATA-1/FOG-1/NuRD Pathway in the Expression of Human β-Like Globin Genes▿

    PubMed Central

    Miccio, Annarita; Blobel, Gerd A.

    2010-01-01

    The human β-globin genes are expressed in a developmentally controlled fashion. Studies on the molecular mechanisms underlying the stage-specific regulation of globin genes have been fueled by the clinical benefit of elevated fetal γ-globin expression in patients with sickle cell anemia and thalassemia. Recent reports suggested a role of the hematopoietic transcription factor GATA-1, its cofactor FOG-1, and the associated chromatin remodeling complex NuRD in the developmental silencing of HBG1 and HBG2 gene expression. To examine whether FOG-1 via NuRD controls HBG1 and HBG2 silencing in vivo, we created mice in which the FOG-1/NuRD complex is disrupted (A. Miccio et al., EMBO J. 29:442-456, 2010) and crossed these with animals carrying the entire human β-globin gene locus as a transgene. We found that the FOG-1/NuRD interaction is dispensable for the silencing of human HBG1 and HBG2 expression. In addition, mutant animals displayed normal silencing of the endogenous embryonic globin genes. In contrast, a significant reduction of adult-type human and murine globin gene expression was found in adult bone marrows of mutant animals. These results suggest that, unexpectedly, NuRD is required for FOG-1-dependent activation of adult-type globin gene expression but is dispensable for human γ-globin silencing in vivo. PMID:20439494

  1. Generation and Characterization of a Transgenic Mouse Carrying a Functional Human β-Globin Gene with the IVSI-6 Thalassemia Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Irene; Lampronti, Ilaria; Salvatori, Francesca; Fabbri, Enrica; Zuccato, Cristina; Cosenza, Lucia C.; Montagner, Giulia; Borgatti, Monica; Altruda, Fiorella; Fagoonee, Sharmila; Carandina, Gianni; Aiello, Vincenzo; Breda, Laura; Rivella, Stefano; Gambari, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models that carry mutations causing thalassemia represent a suitable tool to test in vivo new mutation-specific therapeutic approaches. Transgenic mice carrying the β-globin IVSI-6 mutation (the most frequent in Middle-Eastern regions and recurrent in Italy and Greece) are, at present, not available. We report the production and characterization of a transgenic mouse line (TG-β-IVSI-6) carrying the IVSI-6 thalassemia point mutation within the human β-globin gene. In the TG-β-IVSI-6 mouse (a) the transgenic integration region is located in mouse chromosome 7; (b) the expression of the transgene is tissue specific; (c) as expected, normally spliced human β-globin mRNA is produced, giving rise to β-globin production and formation of a human-mouse tetrameric chimeric hemoglobin muα-globin2/huβ-globin2 and, more importantly, (d) the aberrant β-globin-IVSI-6 RNAs are present in blood cells. The TG-β-IVSI-6 mouse reproduces the molecular features of IVSI-6 β-thalassemia and might be used as an in vivo model to characterize the effects of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides targeting the cryptic sites responsible for the generation of aberrantly spliced β-globin RNA sequences, caused by the IVSI-6 mutation. These experiments are expected to be crucial for the development of a personalized therapy for β-thalassemia. PMID:26097845

  2. Cis-vaccenic acid induces differentiation and up-regulates gamma globin synthesis in K562, JK1 and transgenic mice erythroid progenitor stem cells.

    PubMed

    Aimola, Idowu A; Inuwa, Hajiya M; Nok, Andrew J; Mamman, Aisha I; Bieker, James J

    2016-04-01

    Gamma globin induction remains a promising pharmacological therapeutic treatment mode for sickle cell anemia and beta thalassemia, however Hydroxyurea remains the only FDA approved drug which works via this mechanism. In this regard, we assayed the γ-globin inducing capacity of Cis-vaccenic acid (CVA). CVA induced differentiation of K562, JK1 and transgenic mice primary bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor stem cells. CVA also significantly up-regulated γ-globin gene expression in JK-1 and transgenic mice bone marrow erythroid progenitor stem cells (TMbmEPSCs) but not K562 cells without altering cell viability. Increased γ-globin expression was accompanied by KLF1 suppression in CVA induced JK-1 cells. Erythropoietin induced differentiation of JK-1 cells 24h before CVA induction did not significantly alter CVA induced differentiation and γ-globin expression in JK-1 cells. Inhibition of JK-1 and Transgenic mice bone marrow erythroid progenitor stem cells Fatty acid elongase 5 (Elovl5) and Δ(9) desaturase suppressed the γ-globin inductive effects of CVA. CVA treatment failed to rescue γ-globin expression in Elovl5 and Δ(9)-desaturase inhibited cells 48 h post inhibition in JK-1 cells. The data suggests that CVA directly modulates differentiation of JK-1 and TMbmEPSCs, and indirectly modulates γ-globin gene expression in these cells. Our findings provide important clues for further evaluations of CVA as a potential fetal hemoglobin therapeutic inducer. PMID:26879870

  3. S1 nuclease analysis of alpha-globin gene expression in preleukemic patients with acquired hemoglobin H disease after transfer to mouse erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Helder, J; Deisseroth, A

    1987-04-01

    The loss of alpha-globin gene transcriptional activity rarely occurs as an acquired abnormality during the evolution of myeloproliferative disease or preleukemia. To test whether the mutation responsible for the loss of alpha-globin gene expression (hemoglobin H disease) in these patients is linked with the alpha-globin genes on chromosome 16, we transferred chromosome 16 from preleukemic patients with acquired hemoglobin H disease to mouse erythroleukemia cells and measured the transcriptional activity of the human alpha-globin genes. After transfer to mouse erythroleukemia cells, the expression of human alpha-globin genes from the peripheral blood or marrow cells of preleukemic patients with acquired hemoglobin H disease was similar to that of human alpha-globin genes transferred to mouse erythroleukemia cells from normal donors. These data showed that factor(s) in the mouse erythroleukemia cell can genetically complement the alpha-globin gene defect in these preleukemia patients with acquired hemoglobin H disease and suggest that altered expression of a gene in trans to the alpha-globin gene may be responsible for the acquisition of hemoglobin H disease in these patients. PMID:3031681

  4. Prucalopride exerts neuroprotection in human enteric neurons.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Francesca; Bonora, Elena; Natarajan, Dipa; Vargiolu, Manuela; Thapar, Nikhil; Torresan, Francesco; Giancola, Fiorella; Boschetti, Elisa; Volta, Umberto; Bazzoli, Franco; Mazzoni, Maurizio; Seri, Marco; Clavenzani, Paolo; Stanghellini, Vincenzo; Sternini, Catia; De Giorgio, Roberto

    2016-05-15

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) and its transporters and receptors are involved in a wide array of digestive functions. In particular, 5-HT4 receptors are known to mediate intestinal peristalsis and recent data in experimental animals have shown their role in neuronal maintenance and neurogenesis. This study has been designed to test whether prucalopride, a well-known full 5-HT4 agonist, exerts protective effects on neurons, including enteric neurons, exposed to oxidative stress challenge. Sulforhodamine B assay was used to determine the survival of SH-SY5Y cells, human enteric neurospheres, and ex vivo submucosal neurons following H2O2 exposure in the presence or absence of prucalopride (1 nM). Specificity of 5-HT4-mediated neuroprotection was established by experiments performed in the presence of GR113808, a 5-HT4 antagonist. Prucalopride exhibited a significant neuroprotective effect. SH-SY5Y cells pretreated with prucalopride were protected from the injury elicited by H2O2 as shown by increased survival (73.5 ± 0.1% of neuronal survival vs. 33.3 ± 0.1%, respectively; P < 0.0001) and a significant reduction of proapoptotic caspase-3 and caspase-9 activation in all neurons tested. The protective effect of prucalopride was reversed by the specific 5-HT4 antagonist GR113808. Prucalopride promotes a significant neuroprotection against oxidative-mediated proapoptotic mechanisms. Our data pave the way for novel therapeutic implications of full 5-HT4 agonists in gut dysmotility characterized by neuronal degeneration, which go beyond the well-known enterokinetic effect. PMID:26893157

  5. Krüppel-Like Transcription Factor KLF1 Is Required for Optimal γ- and β-Globin Expression in Human Fetal Erythroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Vinjamur, Divya S.; Alhashem, Yousef N.; Mohamad, Safa F.; Amin, Parth; Williams, David C.; Lloyd, Joyce A.

    2016-01-01

    In human adult erythroid cells, lower than normal levels of Krüppel-like transcription factor 1 (KLF1) are generally associated with decreased adult β- and increased fetal γ-globin gene expression. KLF1 also regulates BCL11A, a known repressor of adult γ-globin expression. In seeming contrast to the findings in adult cells, lower amounts of KLF1 correlate with both reduced embryonic and reduced fetal β-like globin mRNA in mouse embryonic erythroid cells. The role of KLF1 in primary human fetal erythroid cells, which express both γ- and β-globin mRNA, is less well understood. Therefore, we studied the role of KLF1 in ex vivo differentiated CD34+ umbilical cord blood cells (UCB erythroblasts), representing the fetal milieu. In UCB erythroblasts, KLF1 binds to the β-globin locus control region (LCR), and the β-globin promoter. There is very little KLF1 binding detectable at the γ-globin promoter. Correspondingly, when cultured fetal UCB erythroblasts are subjected to lentiviral KLF1 knockdown, the active histone mark H3K4me3 and RNA pol II recruitment are diminished at the β- but not the γ-globin gene. The amount of KLF1 expression strongly positively correlates with β-globin mRNA and weakly positively correlates with BCL11A mRNA. With modest KLF1 knockdown, mimicking haploinsufficiency, γ-globin mRNA is increased in UCB erythroblasts, as is common in adult cells. However, a threshold level of KLF1 is evidently required, or there is no absolute increase in γ-globin mRNA in UCB erythroblasts. Therefore, the role of KLF1 in γ-globin regulation in fetal erythroblasts is complex, with both positive and negative facets. Furthermore, in UCB erythroblasts, diminished BCL11A is not sufficient to induce γ-globin in the absence of KLF1. These findings have implications for the manipulation of BCL11A and/or KLF1 to induce γ-globin for therapy of the β-hemoglobinopathies. PMID:26840243

  6. Krüppel-Like Transcription Factor KLF1 Is Required for Optimal γ- and β-Globin Expression in Human Fetal Erythroblasts.

    PubMed

    Vinjamur, Divya S; Alhashem, Yousef N; Mohamad, Safa F; Amin, Parth; Williams, David C; Lloyd, Joyce A

    2016-01-01

    In human adult erythroid cells, lower than normal levels of Krüppel-like transcription factor 1 (KLF1) are generally associated with decreased adult β- and increased fetal γ-globin gene expression. KLF1 also regulates BCL11A, a known repressor of adult γ-globin expression. In seeming contrast to the findings in adult cells, lower amounts of KLF1 correlate with both reduced embryonic and reduced fetal β-like globin mRNA in mouse embryonic erythroid cells. The role of KLF1 in primary human fetal erythroid cells, which express both γ- and β-globin mRNA, is less well understood. Therefore, we studied the role of KLF1 in ex vivo differentiated CD34+ umbilical cord blood cells (UCB erythroblasts), representing the fetal milieu. In UCB erythroblasts, KLF1 binds to the β-globin locus control region (LCR), and the β-globin promoter. There is very little KLF1 binding detectable at the γ-globin promoter. Correspondingly, when cultured fetal UCB erythroblasts are subjected to lentiviral KLF1 knockdown, the active histone mark H3K4me3 and RNA pol II recruitment are diminished at the β- but not the γ-globin gene. The amount of KLF1 expression strongly positively correlates with β-globin mRNA and weakly positively correlates with BCL11A mRNA. With modest KLF1 knockdown, mimicking haploinsufficiency, γ-globin mRNA is increased in UCB erythroblasts, as is common in adult cells. However, a threshold level of KLF1 is evidently required, or there is no absolute increase in γ-globin mRNA in UCB erythroblasts. Therefore, the role of KLF1 in γ-globin regulation in fetal erythroblasts is complex, with both positive and negative facets. Furthermore, in UCB erythroblasts, diminished BCL11A is not sufficient to induce γ-globin in the absence of KLF1. These findings have implications for the manipulation of BCL11A and/or KLF1 to induce γ-globin for therapy of the β-hemoglobinopathies. PMID:26840243

  7. Synthesis and Evaluation of Neuroprotective Selenoflavanones

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yong-Sung; Kim, Dong-Myung; Kim, Yoon-Jung; Yang, Sai; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Ryu, Jong Hoon; Jeong, Jin-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The physicochemical properties and antioxidant activity of a molecule could be improved by the substitution of an oxygen atom in a molecule with selenium. We synthesized selenoflavanones and flavanones to evaluate their neuroprotective effects. The selenoflavanones showed improved physicochemical properties, suggestive of the ability to pass through the blood-brain barrier (BBB). They showed in vitro antioxidant effects against hydrogen peroxide, and did not result in severe cytotoxicity. Moreover, infarction volumes in a transient ischemia mouse model were significantly reduced by the selenoflavanone treatments. PMID:26690420

  8. Cerium and yttrium oxide nanoparticles are neuroprotective

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, David . E-mail: schubert@salk.edu; Dargusch, Richard; Raitano, Joan; Chan, S.-W.

    2006-03-31

    The responses of cells exposed to nanoparticles have been studied with regard to toxicity, but very little attention has been paid to the possibility that some types of particles can protect cells from various forms of lethal stress. It is shown here that nanoparticles composed of cerium oxide or yttrium oxide protect nerve cells from oxidative stress and that the neuroprotection is independent of particle size. The ceria and yttria nanoparticles act as direct antioxidants to limit the amount of reactive oxygen species required to kill the cells. It follows that this group of nanoparticles could be used to modulate oxidative stress in biological systems.

  9. Small-Molecule Anticonvulsant Agents with Potent in vitro Neuroprotection and Favorable Drug-like Properties

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Garry R.; Brenneman, Douglas E.; Zhang, Yan; Du, Yanming; Reitz, Allen B.

    2014-01-01

    Severe seizure activity is associated with reoccurring cycles of excitotoxicity and oxidative stress that result in progressive neuronal damage and death. Intervention with these pathological processes is a compelling disease-modifying strategy for the treatment of seizure disorders. We have optimized a series of small molecules for neuroprotective and anticonvulsant activity as well as altered their physical properties to address potential metabolic liabilities, to improve CNS penetration and to prolong the duration of action in vivo. Utilizing phenotypic screening of hippocampal cultures with nutrient medium depleted of antioxidants as a disease model, cell death and decreased neuronal viability produced by acute treatment with glutamate or hydrogen peroxide were prevented. Modifications to our previously reported proof of concept compounds have resulted in a lead which has full neuroprotective action at < 1 nM and antiseizure activity across six animal models, including the kindled rat, and displays excellent pharmacokinetics including high exposure to the brain. These modifications have also eliminated the requirement for a chiral molecule, removing the possibility of racemization and making large scale synthesis more easily accessible. These studies strengthen our earlier findings which indicate that potent, multifunctional neuroprotective anticonvulsants are feasible within a single molecular entity which also possesses favorable CNS-active drug properties in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24277343

  10. Enhanced Delivery of Erythropoietin Across the Blood-Brain Barrier for Neuroprotection against Ischemic Neuronal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Xing, Juan; Liou, Anthony Kian-Fong; Wang, Suping; Gan, Yu; Luo, Yumin; Ji, Xuming; Stetler, R. Anne; Chen, Jun; Cao, Guodong

    2010-01-01

    Due to limited penetration of the BBB, many therapeutic agents in clinical use require higher doses in order to reach effective concentrations in brain. In some instances, these high doses elicit severe side effects. In the case of erythropoietin (EPO), an established neuroprotectant against ischemic brain injury, its low BBB permeability requires such a high therapeutic dose that it can induce dangerous complications such as polycythmia and secondary stroke. The purpose of this study is to generate a modified EPO that has increased facility crossing the BBB without losing its neuroprotective element. We have engineered a fusion protein (EPO-TAT) by tagging a protein transduction domain derived from HIV TAT to the EPO protein. This sequence enhanced the capacity of EPO to cross the BBB in animals at least twofold when IP administered and up to five-fold when IV administered. In vitro experiments showed that this EPO fusion protein retained all its protective properties against neuronal death elicited by oxygen-glucose deprivation and NMDA insults. The needed therapeutic dose of the EPO-TAT was decreased by ~10-fold compared to that of regular EPO to achieve equivalent neuroprotection in terms of reducing volume of infarction induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice. Our results support the approach of using a protein transduction domain coupled to therapeutic agents. In this way, not only can the therapeutic doses be lowered, but agents without BBB permeability may now be available for clinical applications. PMID:20577577

  11. Gene Therapy of the β-Hemoglobinopathies by Lentiviral Transfer of the β(A(T87Q))-Globin Gene.

    PubMed

    Negre, Olivier; Eggimann, Anne-Virginie; Beuzard, Yves; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Bourget, Philippe; Borwornpinyo, Suparerk; Hongeng, Suradej; Hacein-Bey, Salima; Cavazzana, Marina; Leboulch, Philippe; Payen, Emmanuel

    2016-02-01

    β-globin gene disorders are the most prevalent inherited diseases worldwide and result from abnormal β-globin synthesis or structure. Novel therapeutic approaches are being developed in an effort to move beyond palliative management. Gene therapy, by ex vivo lentiviral transfer of a therapeutic β-globin gene derivative (β(AT87Q)-globin) to hematopoietic stem cells, driven by cis-regulatory elements that confer high, erythroid-specific expression, has been evaluated in human clinical trials over the past 8 years. β(AT87Q)-globin is used both as a strong inhibitor of HbS polymerization and as a biomarker. While long-term studies are underway in multiple centers in Europe and in the United States, proof-of-principle of efficacy and safety has already been obtained in multiple patients with β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease. PMID:26886832

  12. Gene Therapy of the β-Hemoglobinopathies by Lentiviral Transfer of the βA(T87Q)-Globin Gene

    PubMed Central

    Negre, Olivier; Eggimann, Anne-Virginie; Beuzard, Yves; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Bourget, Philippe; Borwornpinyo, Suparerk; Hongeng, Suradej; Hacein-Bey, Salima; Cavazzana, Marina; Leboulch, Philippe; Payen, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    β-globin gene disorders are the most prevalent inherited diseases worldwide and result from abnormal β-globin synthesis or structure. Novel therapeutic approaches are being developed in an effort to move beyond palliative management. Gene therapy, by ex vivo lentiviral transfer of a therapeutic β-globin gene derivative (βAT87Q-globin) to hematopoietic stem cells, driven by cis-regulatory elements that confer high, erythroid-specific expression, has been evaluated in human clinical trials over the past 8 years. βAT87Q-globin is used both as a strong inhibitor of HbS polymerization and as a biomarker. While long-term studies are underway in multiple centers in Europe and in the United States, proof-of-principle of efficacy and safety has already been obtained in multiple patients with β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease. PMID:26886832

  13. Human beta-globin gene polymorphisms characterized in DNA extracted from ancient bones 12,000 years old.

    PubMed Central

    Béraud-Colomb, E; Roubin, R; Martin, J; Maroc, N; Gardeisen, A; Trabuchet, G; Goosséns, M

    1995-01-01

    Analyzing the nuclear DNA from ancient human bones is an essential step to the understanding of genetic diversity in current populations, provided that such systematic studies are experimentally feasible. This article reports the successful extraction and amplification of nuclear DNA from the beta-globin region from 5 of 10 bone specimens up to 12,000 years old. These have been typed for beta-globin frameworks by sequencing through two variable positions and for a polymorphic (AT) chi (T) gamma microsatellite 500 bp upstream of the beta-globin gene. These specimens of human remains are somewhat older than those analyzed in previous nuclear gene sequencing reports and considerably older than those used to study high-copy-number human mtDNA. These results show that the systematic study of nuclear DNA polymorphisms of ancient populations is feasible. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8533755

  14. Human {beta}-globin gene polymorphisms characterized in DNA extracted from ancient bones 12,000 years old

    SciTech Connect

    Beraud-Colomb, E. |; Maroc, N.; Roubin, R.

    1995-12-01

    Analyzing the nuclear DNA from ancient human bones is an essential step to the understanding of genetic diversity in current populations, provided that such systematic studies are experimentally feasible. This article reports the successful extraction and amplification of nuclear DNA from the P-globin region from 5 of 10 bone specimens up to 12,000 years old. These have been typed for P-globin frameworks by sequencing through two variable positions and for a polymorphic (AT){sub x}(T){sub y} microsatellite 500 bp upstream of the P-globin gene. These specimens of human remains are somewhat older than those analyzed in previous nuclear gene sequencing reports and considerably older than those used to study high-copy-number human mtDNA. These results show that the systematic study of nuclear DNA polymorphisms of ancient populations is feasible. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. [Neuroprotective effects of peptides bioregulators in people of various age].

    PubMed

    Umnov, R S; Lin'kova, N S; Khavinson, V Kh

    2013-01-01

    The review presents comparative characteristics of 2 peptide neuroprotective groups: polypeptide complexes (cortexin, cerebrolizin) and short peptides (semax, kortagen, pinealon). The data of clinical applying of peptides in elderly and old age people and cellular and molecular mechanisms of their neuroprotective activity is described. PMID:24738258

  16. Polymorphism and divergence in the beta-globin replication origin initiation region.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, S M; Bond, J; Schneider, J A; Hamilton, B; Harding, R M; Boyce, A J; Clegg, J B

    2000-01-01

    DNA sequence polymorphism and divergence was examined in the vicinity of the human beta-globin gene cluster origin of replication initiation region (IR), a 1.3-kb genomic region located immediately 5' of the adult-expressed beta-globin gene. DNA sequence variation in the replication origin IR and 5 kb of flanking DNA was surveyed in samples drawn from two populations, one African (from the Gambia, West Africa) and the other European (from Oxford, England). In these samples, levels of nucleotide and length polymorphism in the IR were found to be more than two times as high as adjacent non-IR-associated regions (estimates of per-nucleotide heterozygosity were 0.30% and 0.12%, respectively). Most polymorphic positions identified in the origin IR fall within or just adjacent to a 52-bp alternating purine-pyrimidine ((RY)n) sequence repeat. Within- and between-populations divergence is highest in this portion of the IR, and interspecific divergence in the same region, determined by comparison with an orthologous sequence from the chimpanzee, is also pronounced. Higher levels of diversity in this subregion are not, however, primarily attributable to slippage-mediated repeat unit changes, as nucleotide substitution contributes disproportionately to allelic heterogeneity. An estimate of helical stability in the sequenced region suggests that the hypervariable (RY)n constitutes the major DNA unwinding element (DUE) of the replication origin IR, the location at which the DNA duplex first unwinds and new strand synthesis begins. These findings suggest that the beta-globin IR experiences a higher underlying rate of neutral mutation than do adjacent genomic regions and that enzyme fidelity associated with the initiation of DNA replication at this origin may be compromised. The significance of these findings for our understanding of eukaryotic replication origin biology is discussed. PMID:10666717

  17. Gamma-interferon alters globin gene expression in neonatal and adult erythroid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.A.; Perrine, S.P.; Antognetti, G.; Perlmutter, D.H.; Emerson, S.G.; Sieff, C.; Faller, D.V.

    1987-06-01

    The effect of gamma-interferon on fetal hemoglobin synthesis by purified cord blood, fetal liver, and adult bone marrow erythroid progenitors was studied with a radioligand assay to measure hemoglobin production by BFU-E-derived erythroblasts. Coculture with recombinant gamma-interferon resulted in a significant and dose-dependent decrease in fetal hemoglobin production by neonatal and adult, but not fetal, BFU-E-derived erythroblasts. Accumulation of fetal hemoglobin by cord blood BFU-E-derived erythroblasts decreased up to 38.1% of control cultures (erythropoietin only). Synthesis of both G gamma/A gamma globin was decreased, since the G gamma/A gamma ratio was unchanged. Picograms fetal hemoglobin per cell was decreased by gamma-interferon addition, but picograms total hemoglobin was unchanged, demonstrating that a reciprocal increase in beta-globin production occurred in cultures treated with gamma-interferon. No toxic effect of gamma-interferon on colony growth was noted. The addition of gamma-interferon to cultures resulted in a decrease in the percentage of HbF produced by adult BFU-E-derived cells to 45.6% of control. Fetal hemoglobin production by cord blood, fetal liver, and adult bone marrow erythroid progenitors, was not significantly affected by the addition of recombinant GM-CSF, recombinant interleukin 1 (IL-1), recombinant IL-2, or recombinant alpha-interferon. Although fetal progenitor cells appear unable to alter their fetal hemoglobin program in response to any of the growth factors added here, the interaction of neonatal and adult erythroid progenitors with gamma-interferon results in an altered expression of globin genes.

  18. Repeated evolution of chimeric fusion genes in the β-globin gene family of laurasiatherian mammals.

    PubMed

    Gaudry, Michael J; Storz, Jay F; Butts, Gary Tyler; Campbell, Kevin L; Hoffmann, Federico G

    2014-05-01

    The evolutionary fate of chimeric fusion genes may be strongly influenced by their recombinational mode of origin and the nature of functional divergence between the parental genes. In the β-globin gene family of placental mammals, the two postnatally expressed δ- and β-globin genes (HBD and HBB, respectively) have a propensity for recombinational exchange via gene conversion and unequal crossing-over. In the latter case, there are good reasons to expect differences in retention rates for the reciprocal HBB/HBD and HBD/HBB fusion genes due to thalassemia pathologies associated with the HBD/HBB "Lepore" deletion mutant in humans. Here, we report a comparative genomic analysis of the mammalian β-globin gene cluster, which revealed that chimeric HBB/HBD fusion genes originated independently in four separate lineages of laurasiatherian mammals: Eulipotyphlans (shrews, moles, and hedgehogs), carnivores, microchiropteran bats, and cetaceans. In cases where an independently derived "anti-Lepore" duplication mutant has become fixed, the parental HBD and/or HBB genes have typically been inactivated or deleted, so that the newly created HBB/HBD fusion gene is primarily responsible for synthesizing the β-type subunits of adult and fetal hemoglobin (Hb). Contrary to conventional wisdom that the HBD gene is a vestigial relict that is typically inactivated or expressed at negligible levels, we show that HBD-like genes often encode a substantial fraction (20-100%) of β-chain Hbs in laurasiatherian taxa. Our results indicate that the ascendancy or resuscitation of genes with HBD-like coding sequence requires the secondary acquisition of HBB-like promoter sequence via unequal crossing-over or interparalog gene conversion. PMID:24814285

  19. Repeated Evolution of Chimeric Fusion Genes in the β-Globin Gene Family of Laurasiatherian Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Gaudry, Michael J.; Storz, Jay F.; Butts, Gary Tyler; Campbell, Kevin L.; Hoffmann, Federico G.

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary fate of chimeric fusion genes may be strongly influenced by their recombinational mode of origin and the nature of functional divergence between the parental genes. In the β-globin gene family of placental mammals, the two postnatally expressed δ- and β-globin genes (HBD and HBB, respectively) have a propensity for recombinational exchange via gene conversion and unequal crossing-over. In the latter case, there are good reasons to expect differences in retention rates for the reciprocal HBB/HBD and HBD/HBB fusion genes due to thalassemia pathologies associated with the HBD/HBB “Lepore” deletion mutant in humans. Here, we report a comparative genomic analysis of the mammalian β-globin gene cluster, which revealed that chimeric HBB/HBD fusion genes originated independently in four separate lineages of laurasiatherian mammals: Eulipotyphlans (shrews, moles, and hedgehogs), carnivores, microchiropteran bats, and cetaceans. In cases where an independently derived “anti-Lepore” duplication mutant has become fixed, the parental HBD and/or HBB genes have typically been inactivated or deleted, so that the newly created HBB/HBD fusion gene is primarily responsible for synthesizing the β-type subunits of adult and fetal hemoglobin (Hb). Contrary to conventional wisdom that the HBD gene is a vestigial relict that is typically inactivated or expressed at negligible levels, we show that HBD-like genes often encode a substantial fraction (20–100%) of β-chain Hbs in laurasiatherian taxa. Our results indicate that the ascendancy or resuscitation of genes with HBD-like coding sequence requires the secondary acquisition of HBB-like promoter sequence via unequal crossing-over or interparalog gene conversion. PMID:24814285

  20. A globin domain in a neuronal transmembrane receptor of Caenorhabditis elegans and Ascaris suum: molecular modeling and functional properties.

    PubMed

    Tilleman, Lesley; Germani, Francesca; De Henau, Sasha; Helbo, Signe; Desmet, Filip; Berghmans, Herald; Van Doorslaer, Sabine; Hoogewijs, David; Schoofs, Liliane; Braeckman, Bart P; Moens, Luc; Fago, Angela; Dewilde, Sylvia

    2015-04-17

    We report the structural and biochemical characterization of GLB-33, a putative neuropeptide receptor that is exclusively expressed in the nervous system of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. This unique chimeric protein is composed of a 7-transmembrane domain (7TM), GLB-33 7TM, typical of a G-protein-coupled receptor, and of a globin domain (GD), GLB-33 GD. Comprehensive sequence similarity searches in the genome of the parasitic nematode, Ascaris suum, revealed a chimeric protein that is similar to a Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-amide neuropeptide receptor. The three-dimensional structures of the separate domains of both species and of the full-length proteins were modeled. The 7TM domains of both proteins appeared very similar, but the globin domain of the A. suum receptor surprisingly seemed to lack several helices, suggesting a novel truncated globin fold. The globin domain of C. elegans GLB-33, however, was very similar to a genuine myoglobin-type molecule. Spectroscopic analysis of the recombinant GLB-33 GD showed that the heme is pentacoordinate when ferrous and in the hydroxide-ligated form when ferric, even at neutral pH. Flash-photolysis experiments showed overall fast biphasic CO rebinding kinetics. In its ferrous deoxy form, GLB-33 GD is capable of reversibly binding O2 with a very high affinity and of reducing nitrite to nitric oxide faster than other globins. Collectively, these properties suggest that the globin domain of GLB-33 may serve as a highly sensitive oxygen sensor and/or as a nitrite reductase. Both properties are potentially able to modulate the neuropeptide sensitivity of the neuronal transmembrane receptor. PMID:25666609

  1. Compounds of the anthracycline family of antibiotics elevate human gamma-globin expression both in erythroid cultures and in a transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Spyrou, Pandelis; Phylactides, Marios; Lederer, Carsten W; Kithreotis, Lucas; Kirri, Andriani; Christou, Soteroulla; Kkolou, Elena; Kanavakis, Emanuel; Anagnou, Nicholas P; Stamatoyannopoulos, George; Kleanthous, Marina

    2010-01-01

    We examined the effect of the anthracyclines aclarubicin, bleomycin, daunorubicin, doxorubicin and idarubicin on human gamma- and beta-globin promoter activity in an in vitro luciferase assay, ex vivo in erythroid cultures and in vivo in transgenic mice carrying the human gamma-globin gene. Effects in erythroid liquid cultures derived from healthy donors were assayed by evaluating HbF production with high performance liquid chromatography and by measuring mRNA levels of the globin genes and the proportion of erythroblasts containing HbF. Compounds testing positive in the in vitro and ex vivo assays were applied to erythroid cultures derived from thalassaemic patients. Doxorubicin, idarubicin and daunorubicin increased HbF production in cultures of both, healthy and thalassaemic donors. Daunorubicin induced HbF in thalassaemic cells ex vivo with the highest statistical significance and, importantly and in contrast to the clinical HbF inducer hydroxyurea, showed specific induction of gamma-globin without associated induction of alpha-globin. Daunorubicin was screened in transgenic mice carrying the human (A)gamma-globin gene, and it resulted in increased (A)gamma-globin mRNA levels. Our results indicate that anthracyclines are a promising group of compounds with the potential to provide lead substances for the synthesis of new agents with clinical applications as gamma-globin gene inducers. In parallel, future studies of the epigenetic effects of the five anthracyclines on the beta-globin locus will generate possible mechanistic leads on the regulation of the globin genes. PMID:19914848

  2. Transfer of 5′-terminal cap of globin mRNA to influenza viral complementary RNA during transcription in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Plotch, Stephen J.; Bouloy, Michele; Krug, Robert M.

    1979-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that globin mRNAs are effective primers for influenza viral RNA transcription in vitro catalyzed by the virion transcriptase [Bouloy, M., Plotch, S. J. & Krug, R. M. (1978) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 75, 4886-4890]. Here, we present direct evidence that the 5′-terminal methylated cap of the globin mRNAs is transferred to viral complementary RNA (cRNA) during transcription. Chemical (β-elimination) or enzymatic removal of the cap of globin mRNAs eliminated essentially all their priming activity. Much of this activity could be restored by recapping the β-eliminated globin mRNAs with the vaccinia virus guanylyl and methyl transferases. Globin mRNAs containing 32P label only in the cap (m7G32pppm6Am-) were prepared by recapping β-eliminated globin mRNAs with the vaccinia virus enzymes, [α-32P]GTP, and unlabeled S-adenosylmethionine. By using this labeled globin mRNA as primer and unlabeled nucleoside triphosphates as precursors, the viral cRNA segments that were synthesized were shown to contain a 32P-labeled 5′-terminal cap structure. Gel electrophoretic analysis indicated that the globin mRNA-primed cRNA segments were 10-15 nucleotides longer at their 5′ end than ApG-primed cRNA segments, which initiate exactly at the 3′ end of the virion RNA templates. This suggests that, in addition to the cap, about 10-15 other nucleotides are also transferred from the globin mRNA to viral cRNA. A mechanism for the priming of influenza viral cRNA synthesis by globin mRNA is proposed. Images PMID:287003

  3. Can we switch microglia's phenotype to foster neuroprotection? Focus on multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Giunti, Debora; Parodi, Benedetta; Cordano, Christian; Uccelli, Antonio; Kerlero de Rosbo, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Microglia cells, the resident innate immune cells in the brain, are highly active, extending and retracting highly motile processes through which they continuously survey their microenvironment for ‘danger signals’ and interact dynamically with surrounding cells. Upon sensing changes in their central nervous system microenvironment, microglia become activated, undergoing morphological and functional changes. Microglia activation is not an ‘all-or-none’ process, but rather a continuum depending on encountered stimuli, which is expressed through a spectrum of molecular and functional phenotypes ranging from so-called ‘classically activated’, with a highly pro-inflammatory profile, to ‘alternatively activated’ associated with a beneficial, less inflammatory, neuroprotective profile. Microglia activation has been demonstrated in most neurological diseases of diverse aetiology and has been implicated as a contributor to neurodegeneration. The possibility to promote microglia’s neuroprotective phenotype has therefore become a therapeutic goal. We have focused our discussion on the role of microglia in multiple sclerosis, a prototype of inflammatory, demyelinating, neurodegenerative disease, and on the effect of currently approved or on-trial anti-inflammatory therapeutic strategies that might mediate neuroprotection at least in part through their effect on microglia by modifying their behaviour via a switch of their functional phenotype from a detrimental to a protective one. In addition to pharmaceutical approaches, such as treatment with glatiramer acetate, interferon-β, fingolimod or dimethyl fumarate, we address the alternative therapeutic approach of treatment with mesenchymal stem cells and their potential role in neuroprotection through their ‘calming’ effect on microglia. PMID:24116890

  4. Synthesis and characterization of brain penetrant prodrug of neuroprotective D-264: Potential therapeutic application in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Dholkawala, Fahd; Voshavar, Chandrashekhar; Dutta, Aloke K

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the major debilitating neurodegenerative disorders affecting millions of people worldwide. Progressive loss of dopamine neurons resulting in development of motor dysfunction and other related non-motor symptoms is the hallmark of PD. Previously, we have reported on the neuroprotective property of a potent D3 preferring agonist D-264. In our goal to increase the bioavailability of D-264 in the brain, we have synthesized a modified cysteine based prodrug of D-264 and evaluated its potential in crossing the blood-brain barrier. Herein, we report the synthesis of a novel modified cysteine conjugated prodrug of potent neuroprotective D3 preferring agonist D-264 and systematic evaluation of the hydrolysis pattern of the prodrug to yield D-264 at different time intervals in rat plasma and brain homogenates using HPLC analysis. Furthermore, we have also performed in vivo experiments with the prodrug to evaluate its enhanced brain penetration ability. PMID:26994936

  5. Biophysical Characterisation of Globins and Multi-Heme Cytochromes Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Optical Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmet, Filip

    Heme proteins of different families were investigated in this work, using a combination of pulsed and continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, resonance Raman spectroscopy and laser flash photolysis. The first class of proteins that were investigated, were the globins. The globin-domain of the globin-coupled sensor of the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens was studied in detail using different pulsed EPR techniques (HYSCORE and Mims ENDOR). The results of this pulsed EPR study are compared with the results of the optical investigation and the crystal structure of the protein. The second globin, which was studied, is the Protoglobin of Methanosarcina acetivorans, various mutants of this protein were studied using laser flash photolysis and Raman spectroscopy to unravel the link between this protein's unusual structure and its ligand-binding kinetics. In addition to this, the CN -bound form of this protein was investigated using EPR and the influence of the strong deformation of the heme on the unusual low gz values is discussed. Finally, the neuroglobins of three species of fishes, Danio rerio, Dissostichus mawsoni and Chaenocephalus aceratus are studied. The influence of the presence or absence of two cysteine residues in the C-D and D-region of the protein on the EPR spectrum, and the possible formation of a disulfide bond is studied. The second group of proteins that were studied in this thesis belong to the family of the cytochromes. First the Mouse tumor suppressor cytochrome b561 was studied, the results of a Raman and EPR investigation are compared to the Human orthologue of the protein. Secondly, the tonoplast cytochrome b561 of Arabidopsis was investigated in its natural form and in two double-mutant forms, in which the heme at the extravesicular side was removed. The results of this investigation are then compared with two models in literature that predict the localisation of the hemes in this

  6. Same. beta. -globin gene mutation is present on nine different. beta. -thalassemia chromosomes in a Sardinian population

    SciTech Connect

    Pirastu, M.; Galanello, R.; Doherty, M.A.; Tuveri, T.; Cao, A.; Kan, Y.W.

    1987-05-01

    The predominant ..beta..-thalassemia in Sardinia is the ..beta../sup 0/ type in which no ..beta..-globin chains are synthesized in the homozygous state. The authors determined the ..beta..-thalassemia mutations in this population by the oligonucleotide-probe method and defined the chromosome haplotypes on which the mutation resides. The same ..beta../sup 39(CAG..-->..TAG)/ nonsense mutation was found on nine different chromosome haplotypes. Although this mutation may have arisen more than once, the multiple haplotypes could also be generated by crossing over and gene conversion events. These findings underscore the frequency of mutational events in the ..beta..-globin gene region.

  7. Neuro-protective Mechanisms of Lycium barbarum.

    PubMed

    Xing, Xiwen; Liu, Fenyong; Xiao, Jia; So, Kwok Fai

    2016-09-01

    Neuronal diseases, including retinal disorders, stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and spinal cord injury, affect a large number of people worldwide and cause heavy social and economic burdens. Although many efforts have been made by scientists and clinicians to develop novel drug and healthcare strategies, few of them received satisfactory outcomes to date. Lycium barbarum is a traditional homology of medicine and food in Chinese medicine, with the capability to nourish the eyes, liver and kidneys. Recent studies have also explored its powerful neuro-protective effects on a number of neuronal diseases. In the current review, we collected key recent findings regarding the neuro-protective effects and mechanisms of L. barbarum derivatives, primarily its polysaccharide (LBP) , in some common diseases of the nervous system. A comprehensive comparison with currently available drugs has also been discussed. In general, LBP is a promising neuronal protector with potent ameliorative effects on key pathological events, such as oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis and cell death with minimal side effects. PMID:27033360

  8. Neuroprotective Mechanisms Mediated by CDK5 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Gohar; Greig, Nigel H; Anwar, Firoz; Al-Abbasi, Fahad A; Zamzami, Mazin A; Al-Talhi, Hasan A; Kamal, Mohammad A

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase belonging to the family of cyclin-dependent kinases. In addition to maintaining the neuronal architecture, CDK5 plays an important role in the regulation of synaptic plasticity, neurotransmitter release, neuron migration and neurite outgrowth. Although various reports have shown links between neurodegeneration and deregulation of cyclin-dependent kinases, the specific role of CDK5 inhibition in causing neuroprotection in cases of neuronal insult or in neurodegenerative diseases is not wellunderstood. This article discusses current evidence for the involvement of CDK5 deregulation in neurodegenerative disorders and neurodegeneration associated with stroke through various mechanisms. These include upregulation of cyclin D1 and overactivation of CDK5 mediated neuronal cell death pathways, aberrant hyperphosphorylation of human tau proteins and/or neurofilament proteins, formation of neurofibrillary lesions, excitotoxicity, cytoskeletal disruption, motor neuron death (due to abnormally high levels of CDK5/p25) and colchicine- induced apoptosis in cerebellar granule neurons. A better understanding of the role of CDK5 inhibition in neuroprotective mechanisms will help scientists and researchers to develop selective, safe and efficacious pharmacological inhibitors of CDK5 for therapeutic use against human neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and neuronal loss associated with stroke. PMID:26601962

  9. Thrombolysis and neuroprotection in cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, M; Díez Tejedor, E; Alonso de Leciñana, M; Fuentes, B; Carceller, F; Roda, J M

    2006-01-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. The resulting burden on society grows with the increase in the incidence of stroke. The term brain attack was introduced to describe the acute presentation of stroke and emphasize the need for urgent action to remedy the situation. Though a large number of therapeutic agents, like thrombolytics, NMDA receptor antagonists, calcium channel blockers and antioxidants, have been used or are being evaluated, there is still a large gap between the benefits of these agents and the properties of an ideal drug for stroke. So far, only thrombolysis with rtPA within a 3-hour time window has been shown to improve the outcome of patients with ischemic stroke. Understanding the mechanisms of injury and neuroprotection in these diseases is important to target news sites for treating ischemia. Better evaluation of the drugs and increased similarity between the results of animal experimentation and in the clinical setting requires critical assessment of the selection of animal models and the parameters to be evaluated. Our laboratory has employed a rat embolic stroke model to investigate the combination of rtPA with citicoline as compared to monotherapy alone and investigated whether neuroprotection should be provided before or after thrombolysis in order to achieve a greater reduction of ischemic brain damage. PMID:16651822

  10. Nutraceutical Antioxidants as Novel Neuroprotective Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kelsey, Natalie A.; Wilkins, Heather M.; Linseman, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    A variety of antioxidant compounds derived from natural products (nutraceuticals) have demonstrated neuroprotective activity in either in vitro or in vivo models of neuronal cell death or neurodegeneration, respectively. These natural antioxidants fall into several distinct groups based on their chemical structures: (1) flavonoid polyphenols like epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG) from green tea and quercetin from apples; (2) non-flavonoid polyphenols such as curcumin from tumeric and resveratrol from grapes; (3) phenolic acids or phenolic diterpenes such as rosmarinic acid or carnosic acid, respectively, both from rosemary; and (4) organosulfur compounds including the isothiocyanate, L-sulforaphane, from broccoli and the thiosulfonate allicin, from garlic. All of these compounds are generally considered to be antioxidants. They may be classified this way either because they directly scavenge free radicals or they indirectly increase endogenous cellular antioxidant defenses, for example, via activation of the nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) transcription factor pathway. Alternative mechanisms of action have also been suggested for the neuroprotective effects of these compounds such as modulation of signal transduction cascades or effects on gene expression. Here, we review the literature pertaining to these various classes of nutraceutical antioxidants and discuss their potential therapeutic value in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21060289

  11. Nutraceutical antioxidants as novel neuroprotective agents.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, Natalie A; Wilkins, Heather M; Linseman, Daniel A

    2010-11-01

    A variety of antioxidant compounds derived from natural products (nutraceuticals) have demonstrated neuroprotective activity in either in vitro or in vivo models of neuronal cell death or neurodegeneration, respectively. These natural antioxidants fall into several distinct groups based on their chemical structures: (1) flavonoid polyphenols like epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG) from green tea and quercetin from apples; (2) non-flavonoid polyphenols such as curcumin from tumeric and resveratrol from grapes; (3) phenolic acids or phenolic diterpenes such as rosmarinic acid or carnosic acid, respectively, both from rosemary; and (4) organosulfur compounds including the isothiocyanate, L-sulforaphane, from broccoli and the thiosulfonate allicin, from garlic. All of these compounds are generally considered to be antioxidants. They may be classified this way either because they directly scavenge free radicals or they indirectly increase endogenous cellular antioxidant defenses, for example, via activation of the nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) transcription factor pathway. Alternative mechanisms of action have also been suggested for the neuroprotective effects of these compounds such as modulation of signal transduction cascades or effects on gene expression. Here, we review the literature pertaining to these various classes of nutraceutical antioxidants and discuss their potential therapeutic value in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21060289

  12. Neuroprotective strategies against calpain-mediated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Yildiz-Unal, Aysegul; Korulu, Sirin; Karabay, Arzu

    2015-01-01

    Calpains are calcium-dependent proteolytic enzymes that have deleterious effects on neurons upon their pathological over-activation. According to the results of numerous studies to date, there is no doubt that abnormal calpain activation triggers activation and progression of apoptotic processes in neurodegeneration, leading to neuronal death. Thus, it is very crucial to unravel all the aspects of calpain-mediated neurodegeneration in order to protect neurons through eliminating or at least minimizing its lethal effects. Protecting neurons against calpain-activated apoptosis basically requires developing effective, reliable, and most importantly, therapeutically applicable approaches to succeed. From this aspect, the most significant studies focusing on preventing calpain-mediated neurodegeneration include blocking the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptor activities, which are closely related to calpain activation; directly inhibiting calpain itself via intrinsic or synthetic calpain inhibitors, or inhibiting its downstream processes; and utilizing the neuroprotectant steroid hormone estrogen and its receptors. In this review, the most remarkable neuroprotective strategies for calpain-mediated neurodegeneration are categorized and summarized with respect to their advantages and disadvantages over one another, in terms of their efficiency and applicability as a therapeutic regimen in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25709452

  13. Neuroprotective Mechanisms Mediated by CDK5 Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Mushtaq, Gohar; Greig, Nigel H.; Anwar, Firoz; Al-Abbasi, Fahad A.; Zamzami, Mazin A.; Al-Talhi, Hasan A.; Kamal, Mohammad A.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase belonging to the family of cyclin-dependent kinases. In addition to maintaining the neuronal architecture, CDK5 plays an important role in the regulation of synaptic plasticity, neurotransmitter release, neuron migration and neurite outgrowth. Although various reports have shown links between neurodegeneration and deregulation of cyclin-dependent kinases, the specific role of CDK5 inhibition in causing neuroprotection in cases of neuronal insult or in neurodegenerative diseases is not well-understood. This article discusses current evidence for the involvement of CDK5 deregulation in neurodegenerative disorders and neurodegeneration associated with stroke through various mechanisms. These include upregulation of cyclin D1 and overactivation of CDK5 mediated neuronal cell death pathways, aberrant hyperphosphorylation of human tau proteins and/or neurofilament proteins, formation of neurofibrillary lesions, excitotoxicity, cytoskeletal disruption, motor neuron death (due to abnormally high levels of CDK5/p25) and colchicine-induced apoptosis in cerebellar granule neurons. A better understanding of the role of CDK5 inhibition in neuroprotective mechanisms will help scientists and researchers to develop selective, safe and efficacious pharmacological inhibitors of CDK5 for therapeutic use against human neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and neuronal loss associated with stroke. PMID:26601962

  14. Ocular neuroprotection by siRNA targeting caspase-2

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Z; Kalinski, H; Berry, M; Almasieh, M; Ashush, H; Slager, N; Brafman, A; Spivak, I; Prasad, N; Mett, I; Shalom, E; Alpert, E; Di Polo, A; Feinstein, E; Logan, A

    2011-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss after optic nerve damage is a hallmark of certain human ophthalmic diseases including ischemic optic neuropathy (ION) and glaucoma. In a rat model of optic nerve transection, in which 80% of RGCs are eliminated within 14 days, caspase-2 was found to be expressed and cleaved (activated) predominantly in RGC. Inhibition of caspase-2 expression by a chemically modified synthetic short interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) delivered by intravitreal administration significantly enhanced RGC survival over a period of at least 30 days. This exogenously delivered siRNA could be found in RGC and other types of retinal cells, persisted inside the retina for at least 1 month and mediated sequence-specific RNA interference without inducing an interferon response. Our results indicate that RGC apoptosis induced by optic nerve injury involves activation of caspase-2, and that synthetic siRNAs designed to inhibit expression of caspase-2 represent potential neuroprotective agents for intervention in human diseases involving RGC loss. PMID:21677688

  15. Insulation of the Chicken β-Globin Chromosomal Domain from a Chromatin-Condensing Protein, MENT

    PubMed Central

    Istomina, Natalia E.; Shushanov, Sain S.; Springhetti, Evelyn M.; Karpov, Vadim L.; A. Krasheninnikov, Igor; Stevens, Kimberly; Zaret, Kenneth S.; Singh, Prim B.; Grigoryev, Sergei A.

    2003-01-01

    Active genes are insulated from developmentally regulated chromatin condensation in terminally differentiated cells. We mapped the topography of a terminal stage-specific chromatin-condensing protein, MENT, across the active chicken β-globin domain. We observed two sharp transitions of MENT concentration coinciding with the β-globin boundary elements. The MENT distribution profile was opposite to that of acetylated core histones but correlated with that of histone H3 dimethylated at lysine 9 (H3me2K9). Ectopic MENT expression in NIH 3T3 cells caused a large-scale and specific remodeling of chromatin marked by H3me2K9. MENT colocalized with H3me2K9 both in chicken erythrocytes and NIH 3T3 cells. Mutational analysis of MENT and experiments with deacetylase inhibitors revealed the essential role of the reaction center loop domain and an inhibitory affect of histone hyperacetylation on the MENT-induced chromatin remodeling in vivo. In vitro, the elimination of the histone H3 N-terminal peptide containing lysine 9 by trypsin blocked chromatin self-association by MENT, while reconstitution with dimethylated but not acetylated N-terminal domain of histone H3 specifically restored chromatin self-association by MENT. We suggest that histone H3 modification at lysine 9 directly regulates chromatin condensation by recruiting MENT to chromatin in a fashion that is spatially constrained from active genes by gene boundary elements and histone hyperacetylation. PMID:12944473

  16. A Luciferase Reporter Gene System for High-Throughput Screening of γ-Globin Gene Activators.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wensheng; Silvers, Robert; Ouellette, Michael; Wu, Zining; Lu, Quinn; Li, Hu; Gallagher, Kathleen; Johnson, Kathy; Montoute, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Luciferase reporter gene assays have long been used for drug discovery due to their high sensitivity and robust signal. A dual reporter gene system contains a gene of interest and a control gene to monitor non-specific effects on gene expression. In our dual luciferase reporter gene system, a synthetic promoter of γ-globin gene was constructed immediately upstream of the firefly luciferase gene, followed downstream by a synthetic β-globin gene promoter in front of the Renilla luciferase gene. A stable cell line with the dual reporter gene was cloned and used for all assay development and HTS work. Due to the low activity of the control Renilla luciferase, only the firefly luciferase activity was further optimized for HTS. Several critical factors, such as cell density, serum concentration, and miniaturization, were optimized using tool compounds to achieve maximum robustness and sensitivity. Using the optimized reporter assay, the HTS campaign was successfully completed and approximately 1000 hits were identified. In this chapter, we also describe strategies to triage hits that non-specifically interfere with firefly luciferase. PMID:27316998

  17. Complexity of the alpha-globin genotypes identified with thalassemia screening in Sardinia.

    PubMed

    Origa, Raffaella; Paglietti, Maria E; Sollaino, Maria C; Desogus, Maria F; Barella, Susanna; Loi, Daniela; Galanello, Renzo

    2014-01-01

    α-Thalassemia commonly results from deletions or point mutations in one or both α-globin genes located on chromosome 16p13.3 giving rise to complex and variable genotypes and phenotypes. Rarely, unusual non-deletion defects or atypical deletions down-regulate the expression of the α-globin gene. In the last decade of the program for β-thalassemia carrier screening and genetic counseling in Sardinia, the association of new techniques of molecular biology such as gene sequencing and Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) to conventional methods has allowed to better define several thalassemic genotypes and the complex variability of the α-cluster with its flanking regions, with a high frequency of different genotypes and compound heterozygosity for two α mutations even in the same family. The exact molecular definition of the genotypes resulting from the interactions among the large number of α-thalassemia determinants and with β-thalassemia, is important for a correct correlation of genotype-phenotype and to prevent underdiagnosis of carrier status which could hamper the effectiveness of a screening program particularly in those regions where a high frequency of hemoglobinopathies is present. PMID:23896219

  18. Determination of ligand pathways in globins: apolar tunnels versus polar gates.

    PubMed

    Salter, Mallory D; Blouin, George C; Soman, Jayashree; Singleton, Eileen W; Dewilde, Sylvia; Moens, Luc; Pesce, Alessandra; Nardini, Marco; Bolognesi, Martino; Olson, John S

    2012-09-28

    Although molecular dynamics simulations suggest multiple interior pathways for O(2) entry into and exit from globins, most experiments indicate well defined single pathways. In 2001, we highlighted the effects of large-to-small amino acid replacements on rates for ligand entry and exit onto the three-dimensional structure of sperm whale myoglobin. The resultant map argued strongly for ligand movement through a short channel from the heme iron to solvent that is gated by the distal histidine (His-64(E7)) near the solvent edge of the porphyrin ring. In this work, we have applied the same mutagenesis mapping strategy to the neuronal mini-hemoglobin from Cerebratulus lacteus (CerHb), which has a large internal tunnel from the heme iron to the C-terminal ends of the E and H helices, a direction that is 180° opposite to the E7 channel. Detailed comparisons of the new CerHb map with expanded results for Mb show unambiguously that the dominant (>90%) ligand pathway in CerHb is through the internal tunnel, and the major (>75%) ligand pathway in Mb is through the E7 gate. These results demonstrate that: 1) mutagenesis mapping can identify internal pathways when they exist; 2) molecular dynamics simulations need to be refined to address discrepancies with experimental observations; and 3) alternative pathways have evolved in globins to meet specific physiological demands. PMID:22859299

  19. Distribution of beta-globin haplotypes among the tribes of southern Gujarat, India.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Aastha; Khurana, Priyanka; Mitra, Siuli; Raicha, Bhavesh; Saraswathy, K N; Italia, Yazdi M; Kshatriya, Gautam K

    2013-06-01

    The present study was carried out in Indo-European speaking tribal population groups of southern Gujarat (India) to elucidate the allelic and haplotypic content of β-globin system in individuals with HbAA genotypes. 6 neutral restriction sites of the β-globin system were analysed and various statistical parameters were estimated to draw meaningful interpretations. All the 6 sites were found to be polymorphic and most were in Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium in the studied group. Haplotypes were constructed using two different combinations of the 6 restriction sites analysed. Analysis of the 5 sites revealed a set of three predominant haplotypes, '+----', '-++-+' and '-+-++'; and haplotypes '+--', '++-' and '+++' were found to be the most frequent when the 3 sites were used to construct the haplotypes. Haplotypic heterozygosity levels (>83%) observed in the present study group were comparable to those observed in African and Afro-American populations and greater than other world populations. All the ancestral haplotypes, +-----, -++-+, -+-++ and ----+ were found in the study group. The distribution pattern of various haplotypes was consistent with the global pattern. The paucity of comparable data from other Indian populations restricted one from making interpretations about the study group's relationships with other Indian populations but the results were indicative of older population histories or experience of gene flow by the study group and their affinities with populations of southern India. PMID:23500448

  20. Effect of AGM and fetal liver-derived stromal cell lines on globin expression in adult baboon (P. anubis) bone marrow-derived erythroid progenitors.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Donald; Vaitkus, Kestutis; Ruiz, Maria Armila; Ibanez, Vinzon; Kouznetsova, Tatiana; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Mahmud, Nadim; DeSimone, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the hypothesis that the erythroid micro-environment plays a role in regulation of globin gene expression during adult erythroid differentiation. Adult baboon bone marrow and human cord blood CD34+ progenitors were grown in methylcellulose, liquid media, and in co-culture with stromal cell lines derived from different developmental stages in identical media supporting erythroid differentiation to examine the effect of the micro-environment on globin gene expression. Adult progenitors express high levels of γ-globin in liquid and methylcellulose media but low, physiological levels in stromal cell co-cultures. In contrast, γ-globin expression remained high in cord blood progenitors in stromal cell line co-cultures. Differences in γ-globin gene expression between adult progenitors in stromal cell line co-cultures and liquid media required cell-cell contact and were associated with differences in rate of differentiation and γ-globin promoter DNA methylation. We conclude that γ-globin expression in adult-derived erythroid cells can be influenced by the micro-environment, suggesting new potential targets for HbF induction. PMID:22693559

  1. Effect of AGM and Fetal Liver-Derived Stromal Cell Lines on Globin Expression in Adult Baboon (P. anubis) Bone Marrow-Derived Erythroid Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Lavelle, Donald; Vaitkus, Kestutis; Ruiz, Maria Armila; Ibanez, Vinzon; Kouznetsova, Tatiana; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Mahmud, Nadim; DeSimone, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the hypothesis that the erythroid micro-environment plays a role in regulation of globin gene expression during adult erythroid differentiation. Adult baboon bone marrow and human cord blood CD34+ progenitors were grown in methylcellulose, liquid media, and in co-culture with stromal cell lines derived from different developmental stages in identical media supporting erythroid differentiation to examine the effect of the micro-environment on globin gene expression. Adult progenitors express high levels of γ-globin in liquid and methylcellulose media but low, physiological levels in stromal cell co-cultures. In contrast, γ-globin expression remained high in cord blood progenitors in stromal cell line co-cultures. Differences in γ-globin gene expression between adult progenitors in stromal cell line co-cultures and liquid media required cell-cell contact and were associated with differences in rate of differentiation and γ-globin promoter DNA methylation. We conclude that γ-globin expression in adult-derived erythroid cells can be influenced by the micro-environment, suggesting new potential targets for HbF induction. PMID:22693559

  2. Duplication of the gamma-globin gene mediated by L1 long interspersed repetitive elements in an early ancestor of simian primates.

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, D H; Bailey, W J; Tagle, D A; Goodman, M; Sieu, L; Slightom, J L

    1991-01-01

    Regions surrounding the single gamma-globin gene of galago and the duplicated gamma 1- and gamma 2-globin genes of gibbon, rhesus monkey, and spider monkey were sequenced and aligned with those from humans. Contrary to previous studies, spider monkey was found to have not one but two gamma-globin genes, only one of which (gamma 2) is functional. The reconstructed evolutionary history of the gamma-globin genes and their flanking sequences traces their origin to a tandem duplication of a DNA segment approximately 5.5 kilobases long that occurred before catarrhine primates (humans, apes, and Old World monkeys) diverged from platyrrhines (New World monkeys), much earlier than previously thought. This reconstructed molecular history also reveals that the duplication resulted from an unequal homologous crossover between two related L1 long interspersed repetitive elements, one upstream and one downstream of the single ancestral gamma-globin gene. Perhaps facilitated by the redundancy resulting from the duplication, the gamma-globin genes escaped the selective constraints of embryonically functioning genes and evolved into fetally functioning genes. This view is supported by the finding that a burst of nonsynonymous substitutions occurred in the gamma-globin genes while they became restructured for fetal expression in the common ancestor of platyrrhines and catarrhines. PMID:1908094

  3. Revisiting the Term Neuroprotection in Chronic and Degenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Marco; Nascimento, Osvaldo J M; Matta, Andre P C; Reis, Carlos Henrique Melo; de Souza, Olivia Gameiro; Bastos, Victor Hugo; Moreira, Rayele; Ribeiro, Pedro; Fiorelli, Stenio; Novellino, Pietro; Pessoa, Bruno; Cunha, Mariana; Pupe, Camila; Morales, Pedro S; Filho, Pedro F Moreira; Trajano, Eduardo Lima; Oliveira, Acary Bulle

    2016-04-01

    Thanks to the development of several new researches, the lifetime presented a significant increase, even so, we still have many obstacles to overcome - among them, manage and get responses regarding neurodegenerative diseases. Where we are in the understanding of neuroprotection? Do we really have protective therapies for diseases considered degeneratives such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and its variants, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and many others? Neuroprotection is defined by many researches as interactions and interventions that can slow down or even inhibit the progression of neuronal degeneration process. We make some considerations on this neuroprotective effect. PMID:27127599

  4. Revisiting the Term Neuroprotection in Chronic and Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Orsini, Marco; Nascimento, Osvaldo J.M.; Matta, Andre P.C.; Reis, Carlos Henrique Melo; de Souza, Olivia Gameiro; Bastos, Victor Hugo; Moreira, Rayele; Ribeiro, Pedro; Fiorelli, Stenio; Novellino, Pietro; Pessoa, Bruno; Cunha, Mariana; Pupe, Camila; Morales, Pedro S.; Filho, Pedro F. Moreira; Trajano, Eduardo Lima; Oliveira, Acary Bulle

    2016-01-01

    Thanks to the development of several new researches, the lifetime presented a significant increase, even so, we still have many obstacles to overcome – among them, manage and get responses regarding neurodegenerative diseases. Where we are in the understanding of neuroprotection? Do we really have protective therapies for diseases considered degeneratives such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and its variants, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and many others? Neuroprotection is defined by many researches as interactions and interventions that can slow down or even inhibit the progression of neuronal degeneration process. We make some considerations on this neuroprotective effect. PMID:27127599

  5. [Amides of creatine: perspectives of neuroprotection].

    PubMed

    Vlasov, T D; Chefu, S G; Baĭsa, A E; Leko, M V; Burov, S V; Veselkina, O S

    2011-07-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of derivatives of creatine and amino acids (CrAA) for decreasing cerebral injury in rats with transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Neuroprotective effects of amides of creatine and glycine (CrGlyOEt), phenylalanine (CrPheNH2), thyrosine (CrTyrNH2), and GABA (CrGABAOEt) were investigated. Brain injury was evaluated on day 2 after transient MCAO using a TTC staining of brain slices. Compared with the MCAO control group, all the CrAms showed decreased cerebral injury (p < 0.05). However CrPheNH2, CrTyrNH2, and CrGABAOEt were toxic after intravenous administration and investigated only after intraperitoneal injection. CrGlyOEt did not show any toxicity at dose of 1 mmol/kg. These data evidenced that creatinyl amides can represent promising candidates for the development of new drugs useful in brain ischemia treatment. PMID:21961295

  6. Neuroprotective dibenzylbutyrolactone lignans of Torreya nucifera.

    PubMed

    Jang, Y P; Kim, S R; Kim, Y C

    2001-07-01

    The methanolic extract of the bark of Torreya nucifera Sieb. et Zucc. (Taxaceae) significantly protected primary cultures of rat cortical cells exposed to the excitotoxic amino acid, L-glutamate. (-)-Arctigenin (1), (-)-traxillagenin (2), arctiin (4), traxillaside (5), and a newly-reported compound 3 (-)-4'-demethyltraxillagenin [(2R,3R)-2-(4''-hydroxy-3''-methoxybenzyl)-3-(4'-hydroxy-3',5'-dimethoxybenzyl)-butyrolactone] were isolated by bioactivity-guided fractionation and further separation using chromatographic techniques. These lignans and their glycosides had significant neuroprotective activities against glutamate-induced toxicity in primary cultures of rat cortical cells at concentrations ranging from 0.01 microM to 10.0 microM. PMID:11488466

  7. Modeling Emergence in Neuroprotective Regulatory Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Haack, Jereme N.; McDermott, Jason E.; Stevens, S.L.; Stenzel-Poore, Mary

    2013-01-05

    The use of predictive modeling in the analysis of gene expression data can greatly accelerate the pace of scientific discovery in biomedical research by enabling in silico experimentation to test disease triggers and potential drug therapies. Techniques that focus on modeling emergence, such as agent-based modeling and multi-agent simulations, are of particular interest as they support the discovery of pathways that may have never been observed in the past. Thus far, these techniques have been primarily applied at the multi-cellular level, or have focused on signaling and metabolic networks. We present an approach where emergence modeling is extended to regulatory networks and demonstrate its application to the discovery of neuroprotective pathways. An initial evaluation of the approach indicates that emergence modeling provides novel insights for the analysis of regulatory networks that can advance the discovery of acute treatments for stroke and other diseases.

  8. Versatile Cosmid Vectors for the Isolation, Expression, and Rescue of Gene Sequences: Studies with the Human α -globin Gene Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Yun-Fai; Kan, Yuet Wai

    1983-09-01

    We have developed a series of cosmids that can be used as vectors for genomic recombinant DNA library preparations, as expression vectors in mammalian cells for both transient and stable transformations, and as shuttle vectors between bacteria and mammalian cells. These cosmids were constructed by inserting one of the SV2-derived selectable gene markers-SV2-gpt, SV2-DHFR, and SV2-neo-in cosmid pJB8. High efficiency of genomic cloning was obtained with these cosmids and the size of the inserts was 30-42 kilobases. We isolated recombinant cosmids containing the human α -globin gene cluster from these genomic libraries. The simian virus 40 DNA in these selectable gene markers provides the origin of replication and enhancer sequences necessary for replication in permissive cells such as COS 7 cells and thereby allows transient expression of α -globin genes in these cells. These cosmids and their recombinants could also be stably transformed into mammalian cells by using the respective selection systems. Both of the adult α -globin genes were more actively expressed than the embryonic zeta -globin genes in these transformed cell lines. Because of the presence of the cohesive ends of the Charon 4A phage in the cosmids, the transforming DNA sequences could readily be rescued from these stably transformed cells into bacteria by in vitro packaging of total cellular DNA. Thus, these cosmid vectors are potentially useful for direct isolation of structural genes.

  9. Bergamot (Citrus bergamia Risso) fruit extracts as γ-globin gene expression inducers: phytochemical and functional perspectives.

    PubMed

    Guerrini, Alessandra; Lampronti, Ilaria; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Zuccato, Cristina; Breveglieri, Giulia; Salvatori, Francesca; Mancini, Irene; Rossi, Damiano; Potenza, Rocco; Chiavilli, Francesco; Sacchetti, Gianni; Gambari, Roberto; Borgatti, Monica

    2009-05-27

    Epicarps of Citrus bergamia fruits from organic farming were extracted with the objective of obtaining derived products differently rich in coumarins and psoralens. The extracts were chemically characterized by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) for detecting and quantifying the main constituents. Both bergamot extracts and chemical standards corresponding to the main constituents detected were then assayed for their capacity to increase erythroid differentiation of K562 cells and expression of γ-globin genes in human erythroid precursor cells. Three experimental cell systems were employed: (a) the human leukemic K562 cell line, (b) K562 cell clones stably transfected with a pCCL construct carrying green-enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) under the γ-globin gene promoter, and (c) the two-phase liquid culture of human erythroid progenitors isolated from healthy donors. The results suggest that citropten and bergapten are powerful inducers of differentiation and γ-globin gene expression in human erythroid cells. These data could have practical relevance, because pharmacologically mediated regulation of human γ-globin gene expression, with the consequent induction of fetal hemoglobin, is considered to be a potential therapeutic approach in hematological disorders, including β-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia. PMID:19371028

  10. The relationship between the presence of extra α-globin genes and blood cell traits in Altamurana sheep

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Additional α-globin genes in sheep might produce extra α-globin chains and, consequently, the subject carrying triplicated (ααα) or quadruplicated (αααα) haplotypes may exhibit different hematological phenotypes when compared to the normal duplicated (αα) homozygotes (NN). Both ααα and αααα heterozygous (ND) and ααα and αααα homozygous (DD) individuals were obtained by selection and inbreeding. Chromatographic RP-HPLC analyses of the globin chains of 65 subjects (15 DD, 20 ND and 30 NN) were performed. A highly significant linear regression (r2 = 0.967) of the α/β ratio on the number of α-globin genes was found, and the α/β ratio ranged on average from 1.0 in NN individuals to 1.2 in the ND and 1.6 in the DD subjects. Values for blood fell within the range of normality but were rather peculiar as a whole. When the erythrocytes of individuals carrying normal arrangements were compared with those of subjects with extra α-genes, the latter had fewer erythrocytes that were bigger in size and had a higher Hb content and a greater osmotic fragility. This hematological picture is consistent with the existence of an unbalanced α/β ratio. PMID:12927085

  11. Analysis of beta-globin mutations shows stable mixed chimerism in patients with thalassemia after bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kapelushnik, J; Or, R; Filon, D; Nagler, A; Cividalli, G; Aker, M; Naparstek, E; Slavin, S; Oppenheim, A

    1995-10-15

    Beta-thalassemia major (TM) is caused by any of approximately 150 mutations within the beta-globin gene. To establish the degree of chimerism after bone marrow transplantation (BMT), we have performed molecular analysis of beta-globin mutations in 14 patients with TM over a period of 10 years. All patients underwent T cell-depleted allogeneic BMT from HLA-identical related donors, using either in vitro T-cell depletion with CAMPATH 1M and complement or in vivo depletion using CAMPATH 1G in the bone marrow collection bag. To date, at different time periods after BMT, seven patients have some degree of chimerism; six of these patients, all blood transfusion-independent, have donor cells in the range of 70% to 95%, with stable mixed chimerism (MC). The seventh patient has less than 10% donor cells with, surprisingly, only minimal transfusion requirements. The detection of beta-globin gene point mutation, as used here, is a highly specific and sensitive marker for engraftment and MC in patients with thalassemia. In light of its specificity, the method is applicable in all cases of TM, as it is independent of sex and other non-globin-related DNA markers. The high incidence of MC found in our patients may be a consequence of the pre-BMT T-cell depletion. Because MC was associated with transfusion independence, complete eradication of residual host cells for effective treatment of TM and possibly other genetic diseases may prove not to be essential. PMID:7579421

  12. HbVar: A relational database of human hemoglobin variants and thalassemia mutations at the globin gene server.

    PubMed

    Hardison, Ross C; Chui, David H K; Giardine, Belinda; Riemer, Cathy; Patrinos, George P; Anagnou, Nicholas; Miller, Webb; Wajcman, Henri

    2002-03-01

    We have constructed a relational database of hemoglobin variants and thalassemia mutations, called HbVar, which can be accessed on the web at http://globin.cse.psu.edu. Extensive information is recorded for each variant and mutation, including a description of the variant and associated pathology, hematology, electrophoretic mobility, methods of isolation, stability information, ethnic occurrence, structure studies, functional studies, and references. The initial information was derived from books by Dr. Titus Huisman and colleagues [Huisman et al., 1996, 1997, 1998]. The current database is updated regularly with the addition of new data and corrections to previous data. Queries can be formulated based on fields in the database. Tables of common categories of variants, such as all those involving the alpha1-globin gene (HBA1) or all those that result in high oxygen affinity, are maintained by automated queries on the database. Users can formulate more precise queries, such as identifying "all beta-globin variants associated with instability and found in Scottish populations." This new database should be useful for clinical diagnosis as well as in fundamental studies of hemoglobin biochemistry, globin gene regulation, and human sequence variation at these loci. PMID:11857738

  13. Progesterone receptor signalling in retinal photoreceptor neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Alice C Wyse; Roche, Sarah L; Byrne, Ashleigh M; Ruiz-Lopez, Ana M; Cotter, Thomas G

    2016-01-01

    'Norgestrel', a synthetic form of the female hormone progesterone has been identified as potential drug candidate for the treatment of the degenerative eye disease retinitis pigmentosa. However, to date, no work has looked at the compound's specific cellular target. Therefore, this study aimed to identify the receptor target of Norgestrel and begin to examine its potential mechanism of action in the retina. In this work, we identify and characterize the expression of progesterone receptors present in the C57 wild type and rd10 mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa. Classical progesterone receptors A and B (PR A/B), progesterone receptor membrane components 1 and 2 (PGRMC1, PGRMC2) and membrane progesterone receptors α, β and γ were found to be expressed. All receptors excluding PR A/B were also found in the 661W photoreceptor cell line. PGRMC1 is a key regulator of apoptosis and its expression is up-regulated in the degenerating rd10 mouse retina. Activated by Norgestrel through nuclear trafficking, siRNA knock down of PGRMC1 abrogated the protective properties of Norgestrel on damaged photoreceptors. Furthermore, specific inhibition of PGRMC1 by AG205 blocked Norgestrel-induced protection in stressed retinal explants. Therefore, we conclude that PGRMC1 is crucial to the neuroprotective effects of Norgestrel on stressed photoreceptors. The synthetic progestin 'Norgestrel' has been identified as a potential therapeutic for the treatment of Retinitis Pigmentosa, a degenerative eye disease. However, the mechanism behind this neuroprotection is currently unknown. In this work, we identify 'Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1' as the major progesterone receptor eliciting the protective effects of Norgestrel, both in vitro and ex vivo. This furthers our understanding of Norgestrel's molecular mechanism, which we hope will help bring Norgestrel one step closer to the clinic. PMID:26447367

  14. Characterization of a large deletion in the {beta}-globin gene cluster in a newborn with hemoglobin FE

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, E.; Dietz, L.; Shafer, F.

    1994-09-01

    A sample on a newborn with hemoglobin FE screen results was obtained to investigate whether E/E or B/{beta}{degrees} thalassemia was present using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methodology. The newborn appeared homozygous for the hemoglobin E mutation in our initial study, but the parents` genotypes did not support this diagnosis. The father is homozygous for the absence of the hemoglobin E mutation (non E/non E) and the mother is heterozygous (E/non E) for this mutation. The limitation of PCR analysis is an assumption that the amplification of the two {beta}-globin alleles is equivalent. A large deletion on one {beta}-globin gene, which would produce E/{beta}{degrees} thalassemia, would be missed if it included part or the entire region subjected to amplification. The family results were consistent with either non-paternity, sample mix-up or such a deletion of the {beta}-globin gene in the father and child. To rule out the possibility of non-paternity, two polymorphic loci (HLA on chromosome 6 and a VNTR system of chromosome 17) that are outside of the {beta}-globin gene were analyzed and show that inheritance is consistent and the likelihood of a sample mix-up is then reduced. We therefore believe there is a gene deletion in this family. At the present time, analyses of the RFLPs that are 5{prime} of the {beta}-globin gene cluster show that the polymorphisms most distal from the 5{prime} {beta}-globin gene are not being inherited as expected. These results support our interpretation that a deletion exists in the father and was inherited by the child. The father`s clinical picture of possible HPFH (the father has 12% hemoglobin F) also supports the interpretation of a deletion in this family. Deletions of the {beta}-globin gene within this ethnic group are rare. Currently, Southern blots on the family are being probed to determine the extent of the putative deletion.

  15. Effects of increased anionic charge in the beta-globin chain on assembly of hemoglobin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Adachi, K; Yamaguchi, T; Pang, J; Surrey, S

    1998-02-15

    Studies on assembly in vitro of alpha-globin chains with recombinant beta16 Gly-->Asp, beta95 Lys-->Glu, beta120 Lys-->Glu and beta16 Gly-->Asp, 120 Lys-->Glu human beta-globin chain variants in addition to human betaA- and betaS-globin chains were performed to evaluate effects of increased anionic charge in the beta chain on hemoglobin assembly using soluble recombinant beta-globin chains expressed in bacteria. A beta112 Cys-->Asp change was also engineered to monitor effects on assembly of increased negative charge at alpha1beta1 interaction sites. Order of tetramer formation in vitro under limiting alpha-globin chain conditions showed Hb betaG16D, K120E = Hb betaK120E = Hb betaK95E > Hb betaG16D > Hb A > Hb S > Hb betaC112D. In addition, beta112 Cys-->Asp chains exist as monomers rather than beta4 tetramers in the absence of alpha chains, and the beta chain in Hb betaC112D tetramers was readily exchanged by addition of betas. These results suggest that affinity between alpha and beta chains is promoted by negatively-charged beta chains up to a maximum of two additional net negative charges and is independent of location on the surface except at the alpha1beta1 interaction site. In addition, our findings show that beta112 Cys on the G helix is critical for facilitating formation of stable alphabeta dimers, which then form functional hemoglobin tetramers, and that beta112 Cys-->Asp inhibits formation of stable alpha1beta1 and beta1beta2 interactions in alpha2beta2 and beta4 tetramers, respectively. PMID:9454775

  16. Altitudinal Variation at Duplicated β-Globin Genes in Deer Mice: Effects of Selection, Recombination, and Gene Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Storz, Jay F.; Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Cheviron, Zachary A.; Hoffmann, Federico G.; Kelly, John K.

    2012-01-01

    Spatially varying selection on a given polymorphism is expected to produce a localized peak in the between-population component of nucleotide diversity, and theory suggests that the chromosomal extent of elevated differentiation may be enhanced in cases where tandemly linked genes contribute to fitness variation. An intriguing example is provided by the tandemly duplicated β-globin genes of deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), which contribute to adaptive differentiation in blood–oxygen affinity between high- and low-altitude populations. Remarkably, the two β-globin genes segregate the same pair of functionally distinct alleles due to a history of interparalog gene conversion and alleles of the same functional type are in perfect coupling-phase linkage disequilibrium (LD). Here we report a multilocus analysis of nucleotide polymorphism and LD in highland and lowland mice with different genetic backgrounds at the β-globin genes. The analysis of haplotype structure revealed a paradoxical pattern whereby perfect LD between the two β-globin paralogs (which are separated by 16.2 kb) is maintained in spite of the fact that LD within both paralogs decays to background levels over physical distances of less than 1 kb. The survey of nucleotide polymorphism revealed that elevated levels of altitudinal differentiation at each of the β-globin genes drop away quite rapidly in the external flanking regions (upstream of the 5′ paralog and downstream of the 3′ paralog), but the level of differentiation remains unexpectedly high across the intergenic region. Observed patterns of diversity and haplotype structure are difficult to reconcile with expectations of a two-locus selection model with multiplicative fitness. PMID:22042573

  17. Total beta-globin gene deletion has high frequency in Filipinos

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, N.; Miyakawa, F.; Hunt, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    The distribution of {beta}-thalassemia [{beta}{sup Th}] mutations is unique to each ethnic group. Most mutations affect one or a few bases; large deletions have been rare. Among families screened in Hawaii, [{beta}{sup Th}] heterozygotes were diagnosed by microcytosis, absence of abnormal hemoglobins on isoelectric focusing, and raised Hb A{sub 2} by chromatography. Gene frequency for {beta}{sup Th} was 0.02 in Filipinos. In Filipinos, polymerase chain reaction [PCR] with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis for {beta}{sup Th} mutations detected a mutation in only 6 of 42 {beta}{sup Th} heterozygotes; an IVS2-666 C/T polymorphism showed non-heterozygosity in 37 and heterozygosity in only 5 of these {beta}{sup Th} heterozygotes. One {beta}{sup Th}/{beta}{sup Th} major patient and his mother had no mutation detected by allele-specific oligomer hybridization; PCR failed to amplify any DNA from his {beta}-globin gene. After a total {beta}-globin gene deletion [{beta}{sup Del}] was found in a Filipino family in Ontario, specific PCR amplification for {beta}{sup Del} detected this in 43 of 53 {beta}{sup Th} Filipino samples tested; the above {beta}{sup Th}/{beta}{sup Th} patient was a ({beta}{sup Del}/{beta}{sup Del}) homozygote. The {beta}{sup Del} may account for over 60% of all {beta}{sup Th} alleles in Filipinos; this is the highest proportion of a deletion {beta}{sup Th} mutation reported from any population. Most but not all {beta}{sup Del} heterozygotes had high Hb F [5.13 {plus_minus} 3.94 mean {plus_minus} 1 s.d.] compared to the codon 41/42 four base deletion common in Chinese [2.30 {plus_minus} 0.86], or to {beta}{sup Th} heterozygotes with normal {alpha}-globin genes [2.23 {plus_minus} 0.80].

  18. Quality of ham pâté containing bovine globin and plasma as fat replacers.

    PubMed

    Viana, F R; Silva, V D M; Delvivo, F M; Bizzotto, C S; Silvestre, M P C

    2005-05-01

    The effect of the incorporation of globin (10%), plasma (10%) and both combined (5% each) as fat replacers on the quality of ham paté was investigated. The chemical composition, the sensorial analysis (color, flavor and consistency) and the instrumental analysis of the texture (hardness, adhesiveness, elasticity, cohesiveness and tackiness) were evaluated. The results showed an increase of moisture and protein contents after the fat replacement, while the fat reduction of 25-35% led to the preparation of light products. No change was observed for the aroma, taste and the consistency of fat replacing products, but an intensification of the cohesivity and a reduction of color, hardness and tackiness were detected in some samples. PMID:22063291

  19. Genetic dissection of the α-globin super-enhancer in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hay, Deborah; Hughes, Jim R; Babbs, Christian; Davies, James O J; Graham, Bryony J; Hanssen, Lars L P; Kassouf, Mira T; Oudelaar, A Marieke; Sharpe, Jacqueline A; Suciu, Maria C; Telenius, Jelena; Williams, Ruth; Rode, Christina; Li, Pik-Shan; Pennacchio, Len A; Sloane-Stanley, Jacqueline A; Ayyub, Helena; Butler, Sue; Sauka-Spengler, Tatjana; Gibbons, Richard J; Smith, Andrew J H; Wood, William G; Higgs, Douglas R

    2016-08-01

    Many genes determining cell identity are regulated by clusters of Mediator-bound enhancer elements collectively referred to as super-enhancers. These super-enhancers have been proposed to manifest higher-order properties important in development and disease. Here we report a comprehensive functional dissection of one of the strongest putative super-enhancers in erythroid cells. By generating a series of mouse models, deleting each of the five regulatory elements of the α-globin super-enhancer individually and in informative combinations, we demonstrate that each constituent enhancer seems to act independently and in an additive fashion with respect to hematological phenotype, gene expression, chromatin structure and chromosome conformation, without clear evidence of synergistic or higher-order effects. Our study highlights the importance of functional genetic analyses for the identification of new concepts in transcriptional regulation. PMID:27376235

  20. Heme-based Globin-coupled Oxygen Sensors: Linking Oxygen Binding to Functional Regulation of Diguanylate Cyclase, Histidine Kinase, and Methyl-accepting Chemotaxis*

    PubMed Central

    Martínková, Markéta; Kitanishi, Kenichi; Shimizu, Toru

    2013-01-01

    An emerging class of novel heme-based oxygen sensors containing a globin fold binds and senses environmental O2 via a heme iron complex. Structure-function relationships of oxygen sensors containing a heme-bound globin fold are different from those containing heme-bound PAS and GAF folds. It is thus worth reconsidering from an evolutionary perspective how heme-bound proteins with a globin fold similar to that of hemoglobin and myoglobin could act as O2 sensors. Here, we summarize the molecular mechanisms of heme-based oxygen sensors containing a globin fold in an effort to shed light on the O2-sensing properties and O2-stimulated catalytic enhancement observed for these proteins. PMID:23928310

  1. alpha-Amanitin-insensitive transcription of mouse beta major-globin 5'-flanking and structural gene sequences correlates with mRNA expression.

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, D P; Ross, J

    1984-01-01

    A small proportion of the RNAs of mouse reticulocytes consists of beta major-globin mRNA sequences linked to sequences transcribed from the 5'-flanking region of the beta major-globin gene. These upstream RNAs are polyadenylylated and contain 700-800 nucleotides, and their 5' regions are heterogeneous. RNAs with similar or identical 5' regions are transcribed in cell-free extracts from a circular mouse beta major-globin gene template. Synthesis of most of the upstream RNAs in vitro is not inhibited by low levels (1 microgram/ml) of alpha-amanitin, indicating that they are transcribed by an enzyme(s) different from RNA polymerase II. During culture of mouse erythroleukemia cells with dimethyl sulfoxide, globin mRNA and upstream RNAs accumulate with similar kinetics. In contrast, upstream RNAs are not detected in hemin-treated cells. Images PMID:6595660

  2. Characterization of a globin-coupled oxygen sensor with a gene-regulating function.

    PubMed

    Thijs, Liesbet; Vinck, Evi; Bolli, Alessandro; Trandafir, Florin; Wan, Xuehua; Hoogewijs, David; Coletta, Massimiliano; Fago, Angela; Weber, Roy E; Van Doorslaer, Sabine; Ascenzi, Paolo; Alam, Maqsudul; Moens, Luc; Dewilde, Sylvia

    2007-12-28

    Globin-coupled sensors (GCSs) are multiple-domain transducers, consisting of a regulatory globin-like heme-binding domain and a linked transducer domain(s). GCSs have been described in both Archaea and bacteria. They are generally assumed to bind O(2) (and perhaps other gaseous ligands) and to transmit a conformational change signal through the transducer domain in response to fluctuating O(2) levels. In this study, the heme-binding domain, AvGReg178, and the full protein, AvGReg of the Azotobacter vinelandii GCS, were cloned, expressed, and purified. After purification, the heme iron of AvGReg178 was found to bind O(2). This form was stable over many hours. In contrast, the predominant presence of a bis-histidine coordinate heme in ferric AvGReg was revealed. Differences in the heme pocket structure were also observed for the deoxygenated ferrous state of these proteins. The spectra showed that the deoxygenated ferrous derivatives of AvGReg178 and AvGReg are characterized by a penta-coordinate and hexa-coordinate heme iron, respectively. O(2) binding isotherms indicate that AvGReg178 and AvGReg show a high affinity for O(2) with P(50) values at 20 degrees C of 0.04 and 0.15 torr, respectively. Kinetics of CO binding indicate that AvGReg178 carbonylation conforms to a monophasic process, comparable with that of myoglobin, whereas AvGReg carbonylation conforms to a three-phasic reaction, as observed for several proteins with bis-histidine heme iron coordination. Besides sensing ligands, in vitro data suggest that AvGReg(178) may have a role in O(2)-mediated NO-detoxification, yielding metAvGReg(178) and nitrate. PMID:17925395

  3. β-globin matrix attachment region improves stable genomic expression of the Sleeping Beauty transposon.

    PubMed

    Sjeklocha, Lucas; Chen, Yixin; Daly, Meghan C; Steer, Clifford J; Kren, Betsy T

    2011-09-01

    The liver is an attractive target for gene therapy due to its extensive capability for protein production and the numerous diseases resulting from a loss of gene function it normally provides. The Sleeping Beauty Transposon (SB-Tn)(1) system is a non-viral vector capable of delivering and mediating therapeutic transgene(s) insertion into the host genome for long-term expression. A current challenge for this system is the low efficiency of integration of the transgene. In this study we use a human hepatoma cell line (HuH-7) and primary human blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) to test vectors containing DNA elements to enhance transposition without integrating themselves. We employed the human β-globin matrix attachment region (MAR) and the Simian virus 40 (SV40) nuclear translocation signal to increase the percent of HuH-7 cells persistently expressing a GFP::Zeo reporter construct by ∼50% for each element; while combining both did not show an additive effect. Interestingly, both elements together displayed an additive effect on the number of insertion sites, and in BOECs the SV40 alone appeared to have an inhibitory effect on transposition. In long-term cultures the loss of plasmid DNA, transposase expression and mapping of insertion sites demonstrated bona fide transposition without episomal expression. These results show that addition of the β-globin MAR and potentially other elements to the backbone of SB-Tn system can enhance transposition and expression of therapeutic transgenes. These findings may have a significant influence on the use of SB transgene delivery to liver for the treatment of a wide variety of disorders. PMID:21520245

  4. Evaluation of α-Globin Gene Mutations Among Different Ethnic Groups in Khuzestan Province, Southwest Iran.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Abbas; Jalali-Far, Mohammadali; Saki, Najmaldin; Hosseini, Hossein; Galehdari, Hamid; Kiani-Ghalesardi, Omid; Paridar, Mostafa; Azarkeivan, Azita; Magaji-Hamid, Kabir

    2016-01-01

    α-Thalassemia (α-thal) is one of the most common inherited hemoglobin (Hb) disorders in the world. In addition to large deletions, over 50 different α-thal point mutations were detected around the world, thus, patients showed different phenotypes with regard to genotype. This study evaluated the genetic frequency of α-thal in Khuzestan Province, Southwest Iran, to help implement premarital and prenatal screening programs. The study was conducted on couples proposing to get married and parents who were referred to the genetic center of Shafa Hospital, Ahvaz, Iran, for prenatal diagnosis (PND) in 2012. Genomic DNA was purified by the salting-out method and tested using multiplex gap-polymerase chain reaction (gap-PCR), amplification refractory mutation system-PCR (ARMS-PCR), reverse hybridization test strips and DNA sequencing. Overall, 11 mutations were found on the α-globin genes. Based on gene frequency, the most common mutant allele was -α(3.7) (rightward) (71.3%) followed by the two gene deletion - -(MED) (9.7%). Other common mutations were α(codon 19)α (GCG>GC-, α2) (8.4%), the polyadenylation (polyA1) site α(polyA1)α (AATAAA>AATAAG) (2.8%), and α(-5 nt)α (-TGAGG) (2.0%). In addition, an extremely rare mutation at α(codon 21)α [Hb Fontainebleau, HBA2: c.64G > C (or HBA1)] was also found. The results of this study are critical for correct diagnosis of α-thal carriers, premarriage counseling and PND. This study suggests that the distribution of mutations on the α-globin genes differs among the ethnic groups in Khuzestan Province as well as in other provinces. PMID:26878087

  5. Accuracy of Reverse Dot-Blot PCR in Detection of Different β-Globin Gene Mutations.

    PubMed

    El-Fadaly, N; Abd-Elhameed, A; Abd-Elbar, E; El-Shanshory, M

    2016-06-01

    Prevention programs for β-thalassemia based on molecular diagnosis of heterozygous carriers and/or patients require the use of reliable mutation screening methods. The aim of this study was to compare between direct DNA sequencing, and reverse dot-blot PCR in detection of different β-globin gene mutations in Egyptian children with β-thalassemia. Forty children with β-thalassemia were subjected to mutation analysis, performed by both direct DNA sequencing and β-globin Strip Assay MED™ (based on reverse dot-blot PCR). The most frequent mutant alleles detected by reverse dot-blot PCR were; IVSI-110 G>A (31.25 %), IVS I-6 T > C (21.25 %), and IVS I-1 G>A (20 %). Relatively less frequent mutant alleles detected by reverse dot-blot PCR were "IVSII-1 G>A (5 %), IVSII-745 C>G (5 %), IVSII-848 C>A (2.5 %), IVSI-5 G>C (2.5 %), -87 C>G(2.5 %), and cd39 C>T (2.5 %)", While the genotypes of three patients (6 alleles 7.5 %) were not detected by reverse dot-blot PCR. Mutant alleles detected by direct DNA sequencing were the same as reverse dot-blot PCR method except it revealed the genotypes of 3 undetected patients (one patient was homozygous IVSI-110 G>A, and two patients were homozygous IVS I-1 G>A. Sensitivity of the reverse dot-blot PCR was 92.5 % when compared to direct DNA sequencing for detecting β-thalassemia mutations. Our results therefore suggest that, direct DNA sequencing may be preferred over reverse dot-blot PCR in critical diagnostic situations like genetic counseling for prenatal diagnosis. PMID:27065589

  6. Understanding the contrasting spatial haplotype patterns of malaria-protective β-globin polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Hockham, Carinna; Piel, Frédéric B; Gupta, Sunetra; Penman, Bridget S

    2015-12-01

    The malaria-protective β-globin polymorphisms, sickle-cell (β(S)) and β(0)-thalassaemia, are canonical examples of human adaptation to infectious disease. Occurring on distinct genetic backgrounds, they vary markedly in their patterns of linked genetic variation at the population level, suggesting different evolutionary histories. β(S) is associated with five classical restriction fragment length polymorphism haplotypes that exhibit remarkable specificity in their geographical distributions; by contrast, β(0)-thalassaemia mutations are found on haplotypes whose distributions overlap considerably. Here, we explore why these two polymorphisms display contrasting spatial haplotypic distributions, despite having malaria as a common selective pressure. We present a meta-population genetic model, incorporating individual-based processes, which tracks the evolution of β-globin polymorphisms on different haplotypic backgrounds. Our simulations reveal that, depending on the rate of mutation, a large population size and/or high population growth rate are required for both the β(S)- and the β(0)-thalassaemia-like patterns. However, whilst the β(S)-like pattern is more likely when population subdivision is high, migration low and long-distance migration absent, the opposite is true for β(0)-thalassaemia. Including gene conversion has little effect on the overall probability of each pattern; however, when inter-haplotype fitness variation exists, gene conversion is more likely to have contributed to the diversity of haplotypes actually present in the population. Our findings highlight how the contrasting spatial haplotype patterns exhibited by β(S) and β(0)-thalassaemia may provide important indications as to the evolution of these adaptive alleles and the demographic history of the populations in which they have evolved. PMID:26394108

  7. Understanding the contrasting spatial haplotype patterns of malaria-protective β-globin polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Hockham, Carinna; Piel, Frédéric B.; Gupta, Sunetra; Penman, Bridget S.

    2015-01-01

    The malaria-protective β-globin polymorphisms, sickle-cell (βS) and β0-thalassaemia, are canonical examples of human adaptation to infectious disease. Occurring on distinct genetic backgrounds, they vary markedly in their patterns of linked genetic variation at the population level, suggesting different evolutionary histories. βS is associated with five classical restriction fragment length polymorphism haplotypes that exhibit remarkable specificity in their geographical distributions; by contrast, β0-thalassaemia mutations are found on haplotypes whose distributions overlap considerably. Here, we explore why these two polymorphisms display contrasting spatial haplotypic distributions, despite having malaria as a common selective pressure. We present a meta-population genetic model, incorporating individual-based processes, which tracks the evolution of β-globin polymorphisms on different haplotypic backgrounds. Our simulations reveal that, depending on the rate of mutation, a large population size and/or high population growth rate are required for both the βS- and the β0-thalassaemia-like patterns. However, whilst the βS-like pattern is more likely when population subdivision is high, migration low and long-distance migration absent, the opposite is true for β0-thalassaemia. Including gene conversion has little effect on the overall probability of each pattern; however, when inter-haplotype fitness variation exists, gene conversion is more likely to have contributed to the diversity of haplotypes actually present in the population. Our findings highlight how the contrasting spatial haplotype patterns exhibited by βS and β0-thalassaemia may provide important indications as to the evolution of these adaptive alleles and the demographic history of the populations in which they have evolved. PMID:26394108

  8. Differential regulation of the α-globin locus by Krüppel-like factor 3 in erythroid and non-erythroid cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Krüppel-like Factor 3 (KLF3) is a broadly expressed zinc-finger transcriptional repressor with diverse biological roles. During erythropoiesis, KLF3 acts as a feedback repressor of a set of genes that are activated by Krüppel-like Factor 1 (KLF1). Noting that KLF1 binds α-globin gene regulatory sequences during erythroid maturation, we sought to determine whether KLF3 also interacts with the α-globin locus to regulate transcription. Results We found that expression of a human transgenic α-globin reporter gene is markedly up-regulated in fetal and adult erythroid cells of Klf3−/− mice. Inspection of the mouse and human α-globin promoters revealed a number of canonical KLF-binding sites, and indeed, KLF3 was shown to bind to these regions both in vitro and in vivo. Despite these observations, we did not detect an increase in endogenous murine α-globin expression in Klf3 −/− erythroid tissue. However, examination of murine embryonic fibroblasts lacking KLF3 revealed significant de-repression of α-globin gene expression. This suggests that KLF3 may contribute to the silencing of the α-globin locus in non-erythroid tissue. Moreover, ChIP-Seq analysis of murine fibroblasts demonstrated that across the locus, KLF3 does not occupy the promoter regions of the α-globin genes in these cells, but rather, binds to upstream, DNase hypersensitive regulatory regions. Conclusions These findings reveal that the occupancy profile of KLF3 at the α-globin locus differs in erythroid and non-erythroid cells. In erythroid cells, KLF3 primarily binds to the promoters of the adult α-globin genes, but appears dispensable for normal transcriptional regulation. In non-erythroid cells, KLF3 distinctly binds to the HS-12 and HS-26 elements and plays a non-redundant, albeit modest, role in the silencing of α-globin expression. PMID:24885809

  9. Pridopidine, a dopamine stabilizer, improves motor performance and shows neuroprotective effects in Huntington disease R6/2 mouse model.

    PubMed

    Squitieri, Ferdinando; Di Pardo, Alba; Favellato, Mariagrazia; Amico, Enrico; Maglione, Vittorio; Frati, Luigi

    2015-11-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder for which new treatments are urgently needed. Pridopidine is a new dopaminergic stabilizer, recently developed for the treatment of motor symptoms associated with HD. The therapeutic effect of pridopidine in patients with HD has been determined in two double-blind randomized clinical trials, however, whether pridopidine exerts neuroprotection remains to be addressed. The main goal of this study was to define the potential neuroprotective effect of pridopidine, in HD in vivo and in vitro models, thus providing evidence that might support a potential disease-modifying action of the drug and possibly clarifying other aspects of pridopidine mode-of-action. Our data corroborated the hypothesis of neuroprotective action of pridopidine in HD experimental models. Administration of pridopidine protected cells from apoptosis, and resulted in highly improved motor performance in R6/2 mice. The anti-apoptotic effect observed in the in vitro system highlighted neuroprotective properties of the drug, and advanced the idea of sigma-1-receptor as an additional molecular target implicated in the mechanism of action of pridopidine. Coherent with protective effects, pridopidine-mediated beneficial effects in R6/2 mice were associated with an increased expression of pro-survival and neurostimulatory molecules, such as brain derived neurotrophic factor and DARPP32, and with a reduction in the size of mHtt aggregates in striatal tissues. Taken together, these findings support the theory of pridopidine as molecule with disease-modifying properties in HD and advance the idea of a valuable therapeutic strategy for effectively treating the disease. PMID:26094900

  10. Developmental changes in DNA methylation and covalent histone modifications of chromatin associated with the epsilon-, gamma-, and beta-globin gene promoters in Papio anubis.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Donald; Vaitkus, Kestis; Hankewych, Maria; Singh, Mahipal; DeSimone, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    The baboon is a suitable and relevant animal model to study the mechanism of human globin gene switching. This investigation addresses the role of DNA methylation and histone coding in globin gene switching in the baboon, Papio anubis. Bisulfite sequencing and chromatin immunoprecipitation studies were performed in erythroid cells purified from fetuses of varying gestational ages and from adult bone marrow to analyze the manner that changes in DNA methylation of the epsilon-, gamma-, and beta-globin promoters and association of ac-H3, ac-H4, H3-dimeK4, H3-dimeK36, and H3-dimeK79 with the epsilon-, gamma-, and beta-globin promoters occur during development. Changes in DNA methylation of the epsilon- and gamma-globin gene promoters during transitional stages of globin gene switching were consistent with the stochastic model of methylation and a role of DNA methylation in gene silencing. Enrichment of ac-H3, ac-H4, and pol II at the promoters of developmentally active genes was observed, while the pattern of distribution of H3-dimeK4 and H3-dimeK79 suggests that these modifications are found near both currently and formerly active promoters. Enrichment of H3-dimeK36 at the silenced epsilon-globin gene promoter was observed. These studies demonstrate that coordinated epigenetic modifications in the chromatin structure of the beta-like globin gene promoters accompany the highly regulated changes in expression patterns of these genes during development. PMID:16527500

  11. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated expression of a human gamma-globin gene in human progenitor-derived erythroid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, J L; Donahue, R E; Sellers, S E; Samulski, R J; Young, N S; Nienhuis, A W

    1994-01-01

    Effective gene therapy for the severe hemoglobin (Hb) disorders, sickle-cell anemia and thalassemia, will require an efficient method to transfer, integrate, and express a globin gene in primary erythroid cells. To evaluate recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) for this purpose, we constructed a rAAV vector encoding a human gamma-globin gene (pJM24/vHS432A gamma). Its 4725-nucleotide genome consists of two 180-bp AAV inverted terminal repeats flanking the core elements of hypersensitive sites 2, 3, and 4 from the locus control region of the beta-globin gene cluster, linked to a mutationally marked A gamma-globin gene (A gamma) containing native promoter and RNA processing signals. CD34+ human hematopoietic cells were exposed to rAAV particles at a multiplicity of infection of 500-1000 and cultured in semisolid medium containing several cytokines. A reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay distinguished mRNA signals derived from transduced and endogenous human gamma-globin genes. Twenty to 40% of human erythroid burst-forming unit-derived colonies expressed the rAAV-transduced A gamma-globin gene at levels 4-71% that of the endogenous gamma-globin genes. The HbF content of pooled control colonies was 26%, whereas HbF was 40% of the total in pooled colonies derived from rAAV transduced progenitors. These data establish that rAAV containing elements from the locus control region linked to a gamma-globin gene are capable of transferring and expressing that gene in primary human hematopoietic cells resulting in a substantial increase in HbF content. Images PMID:7524085

  12. Physical exercise, reactive oxygen species and neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Radak, Zsolt; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Higuchi, Mitsuru; Balogh, Laszlo; Boldogh, Istvan; Koltai, Erika

    2016-09-01

    Regular exercise has systemic beneficial effects, including the promotion of brain function. The adaptive response to regular exercise involves the up-regulation of the enzymatic antioxidant system and modulation of oxidative damage. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important regulators of cell signaling. Exercise, via intensity-dependent modulation of metabolism and/or directly activated ROS generating enzymes, regulates the cellular redox state of the brain. ROS are also involved in the self-renewal and differentiation of neuronal stem cells and the exercise-mediated neurogenesis could be partly associated with ROS production. Exercise has strong effects on the immune system and readily alters the production of cytokines. Certain cytokines, especially IL-6, IL-1, TNF-α, IL-18 and IFN gamma, are actively involved in the modulation of synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis. Cytokines can also contribute to ROS production. ROS-mediated alteration of lipids, protein, and DNA could directly affect brain function, while exercise modulates the accumulation of oxidative damage. Oxidative alteration of macromolecules can activate signaling processes, membrane remodeling, and gene transcription. The well known neuroprotective effects of exercise are partly due to redox-associated adaptation. PMID:26828019

  13. Piperlonguminine is neuroprotective in experimental rat stroke.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tiansong; Sun, Shixiao; Wang, Tiegang; Tong, Xin; Bi, Junhui; Wang, Yulin; Sun, Zhongren

    2014-12-01

    Inflammatory damage plays an important role in cerebral ischemic pathogenesis and may represent a target for treatment. Piperlonguminine (PE) has been proved to have anti-inflammatory actions. In this study, we investigated the effects of PE on cultured neuronal cell line, SH-SY5Y in vitro and experimental rat ischemic stroke in vivo. For oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) stimulated SH-SY5Y cell line in vitro, SH-SY5Y cells were incubated with PE. In vivo, rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MACO) for 1h, followed by reperfusion for 23 h. The results of this study showed that treatment of SH-SY5Y cells with PE reduced the OGD-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis and blocked TNF-α-induced activation of NF-κB and MAPK. Intraperitoneal injection of PE (2.4 mg/kg) produced a significant neuroprotective potential in rats with cerebral ischemia. PE attenuated neurological deficit scores, brain infarct volume and brain water content in rats, and inhibited activation of NF-κB and MAPK. These data show that PE protects the brain against ischemic cerebral injury via alleviating blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, which may be mediated via inhibiting NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:25257731

  14. Neuroprotective effects of tetrandrine against vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Yan-ling; Wu, Ze-zhi; Chen, Li-xue; Wu, Bai-xue; Chen, Lian-lian; Qin, Guang-cheng; Gui, Bei; Zhou, Ji-ying

    2016-01-01

    Tetrandrine is one of the major active ingredients in Menispermaceae Stephania tetrandra S. Moore, and has specific therapeutic effects in ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Its use in vascular dementia has not been studied fully. Here, we investigated whether tetrandrine would improve behavioral and cellular impairments in a two-vessel occlusion rat model of chronic vascular dementia. Eight weeks after model establishment, rats were injected intraperitoneally with 10 or 30 mg/kg tetrandrine every other day for 4 weeks. Behavioral assessment in the Morris water maze showed that model rats had longer escape latencies in training trials, and spent less time swimming in the target quadrant in probe trials, than sham-operated rats. However, rats that had received tetrandrine showed shorter escape latencies and longer target quadrant swimming time than untreated model rats. Hematoxylin-eosin and Nissl staining revealed less neuronal necrosis and pathological damage, and more living cells, in the hippocampus of rats treated with tetrandrine than in untreated model rats. Western blot assay showed that interleukin-1β expression, and phosphorylation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate 2B receptor at tyrosine 1472, were lower in model rats that received tetrandrine than in those that did not. The present findings suggest that tetrandrine may be neuroprotective in chronic vascular dementia by reducing interleukin-1β expression, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2B phosphorylation at tyrosine 1472, and neuronal necrosis. PMID:27127485

  15. Neuroprotective effects of tetrandrine against vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yan-Ling; Wu, Ze-Zhi; Chen, Li-Xue; Wu, Bai-Xue; Chen, Lian-Lian; Qin, Guang-Cheng; Gui, Bei; Zhou, Ji-Ying

    2016-03-01

    Tetrandrine is one of the major active ingredients in Menispermaceae Stephania tetrandra S. Moore, and has specific therapeutic effects in ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Its use in vascular dementia has not been studied fully. Here, we investigated whether tetrandrine would improve behavioral and cellular impairments in a two-vessel occlusion rat model of chronic vascular dementia. Eight weeks after model establishment, rats were injected intraperitoneally with 10 or 30 mg/kg tetrandrine every other day for 4 weeks. Behavioral assessment in the Morris water maze showed that model rats had longer escape latencies in training trials, and spent less time swimming in the target quadrant in probe trials, than sham-operated rats. However, rats that had received tetrandrine showed shorter escape latencies and longer target quadrant swimming time than untreated model rats. Hematoxylin-eosin and Nissl staining revealed less neuronal necrosis and pathological damage, and more living cells, in the hippocampus of rats treated with tetrandrine than in untreated model rats. Western blot assay showed that interleukin-1β expression, and phosphorylation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate 2B receptor at tyrosine 1472, were lower in model rats that received tetrandrine than in those that did not. The present findings suggest that tetrandrine may be neuroprotective in chronic vascular dementia by reducing interleukin-1β expression, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2B phosphorylation at tyrosine 1472, and neuronal necrosis. PMID:27127485

  16. The proton permeability of self-assembled polymersomes and their neuroprotection by enhancing a neuroprotective peptide across the blood-brain barrier after modification with lactoferrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yuan; Jiang, Xinguo; Gong, Shuyu; Feng, Liang; Zhong, Yanqiang; Pang, Zhiqing

    2014-02-01

    Biotherapeutics such as peptides possess strong potential for the treatment of intractable neurological disorders. However, because of their low stability and the impermeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), biotherapeutics are difficult to transport into brain parenchyma via intravenous injection. Herein, we present a novel poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) polymersome-based nanomedicine with self-assembled bilayers, which was functionalized with lactoferrin (Lf-POS) to facilitate the transport of a neuroprotective peptide into the brain. The apparent diffusion coefficient (D*) of H+ through the polymersome membrane was 5.659 × 10-26 cm2 s-1, while that of liposomes was 1.017 × 10-24 cm2 s-1. The stability of the polymersome membrane was much higher than that of liposomes. The uptake of polymersomes by mouse brain capillary endothelial cells proved that the optimal density of lactoferrin was 101 molecules per polymersome. Fluorescence imaging indicated that Lf101-POS was effectively transferred into the brain. In pharmacokinetics, compared with transferrin-modified polymersomes and cationic bovine serum albumin-modified polymersomes, Lf-POS obtained the greatest BBB permeability surface area and percentage of injected dose per gram (%ID per g). Furthermore, Lf-POS holding S14G-humanin protected against learning and memory impairment induced by amyloid-β25-35 in rats. Western blotting revealed that the nanomedicine provided neuroprotection against over-expression of apoptotic proteins exhibiting neurofibrillary tangle pathology in neurons. The results indicated that polymersomes can be exploited as a promising non-invasive nanomedicine capable of mediating peptide therapeutic delivery and controlling the release of drugs to the central nervous system.

  17. The proton permeability of self-assembled polymersomes and their neuroprotection by enhancing a neuroprotective peptide across the blood-brain barrier after modification with lactoferrin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yuan; Jiang, Xinguo; Gong, Shuyu; Feng, Liang; Zhong, Yanqiang; Pang, Zhiqing

    2014-03-21

    Biotherapeutics such as peptides possess strong potential for the treatment of intractable neurological disorders. However, because of their low stability and the impermeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), biotherapeutics are difficult to transport into brain parenchyma via intravenous injection. Herein, we present a novel poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) polymersome-based nanomedicine with self-assembled bilayers, which was functionalized with lactoferrin (Lf-POS) to facilitate the transport of a neuroprotective peptide into the brain. The apparent diffusion coefficient (D*) of H(+) through the polymersome membrane was 5.659 × 10(-26) cm(2) s(-1), while that of liposomes was 1.017 × 10(-24) cm(2) s(-1). The stability of the polymersome membrane was much higher than that of liposomes. The uptake of polymersomes by mouse brain capillary endothelial cells proved that the optimal density of lactoferrin was 101 molecules per polymersome. Fluorescence imaging indicated that Lf101-POS was effectively transferred into the brain. In pharmacokinetics, compared with transferrin-modified polymersomes and cationic bovine serum albumin-modified polymersomes, Lf-POS obtained the greatest BBB permeability surface area and percentage of injected dose per gram (%ID per g). Furthermore, Lf-POS holding S14G-humanin protected against learning and memory impairment induced by amyloid-β25-35 in rats. Western blotting revealed that the nanomedicine provided neuroprotection against over-expression of apoptotic proteins exhibiting neurofibrillary tangle pathology in neurons. The results indicated that polymersomes can be exploited as a promising non-invasive nanomedicine capable of mediating peptide therapeutic delivery and controlling the release of drugs to the central nervous system. PMID:24503971

  18. Identification of a stage selector element in the human gamma-globin gene promoter that fosters preferential interaction with the 5' HS2 enhancer when in competition with the beta-promoter.

    PubMed

    Jane, S M; Ney, P A; Vanin, E F; Gumucio, D L; Nienhuis, A W

    1992-08-01

    The erythroid-specific enhancer within hypersensitivity site 2 (HS2) of the human beta-globin locus control region is required for high level globin gene expression. We investigated interaction between HS2 and the gamma- and beta-promoters using reporter constructs in transient assays in human erythroleukemia (K562) cells. The beta-promoter, usually silent in K562 cells, was activated by HS2. This activity was abolished when a gamma-promoter was linked in cis. Analysis of truncation mutants suggested that sequences conveying the competitive advantage of the gamma-promoter for HS2 included those between positions -53 and -35 relative to the transcriptional start site. This sequence, when used to replace the corresponding region of the beta-promoter, increased beta-promoter activity 10-fold when linked to HS2. The modified beta-promoter was also capable of competing with a gamma-promoter modified internally in the -53 to -35 region, when the two promoters were linked to HS2 in a single plasmid. The corresponding sequences from the Galago gamma-promoter, a species which lacks fetal gamma-gene expression, were inactive in analogous assays. We have identified and partially purified a nuclear protein found in human (fetal stage) erythroleukemia cells, but present in much lower concentration in murine (adult stage) erythroleukemia cells, that binds the -53 to -35 sequence of the gamma-promoter. We speculate that this region of the gamma-promoter functions as a stage selector element in the regulation of hemoglobin switching in humans. PMID:1639067

  19. Correction of a splice-site mutation in the beta-globin gene stimulated by triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Chin, Joanna Y; Kuan, Jean Y; Lonkar, Pallavi S; Krause, Diane S; Seidman, Michael M; Peterson, Kenneth R; Nielsen, Peter E; Kole, Ryszard; Glazer, Peter M

    2008-09-01

    Splice-site mutations in the beta-globin gene can lead to aberrant transcripts and decreased functional beta-globin, causing beta-thalassemia. Triplex-forming DNA oligonucleotides (TFOs) and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have been shown to stimulate recombination in reporter gene loci in mammalian cells via site-specific binding and creation of altered helical structures that provoke DNA repair. We have designed a series of triplex-forming PNAs that can specifically bind to sequences in the human beta-globin gene. We demonstrate here that these PNAs, when cotransfected with recombinatory donor DNA fragments, can promote single base-pair modification at the start of the second intron of the beta-globin gene, the site of a common thalassemia-associated mutation. This single base pair change was detected by the restoration of proper splicing of transcripts produced from a green fluorescent protein-beta-globin fusion gene. The ability of these PNAs to induce recombination was dependent on dose, sequence, cell-cycle stage, and the presence of a homologous donor DNA molecule. Enhanced recombination, with frequencies up to 0.4%, was observed with use of the lysomotropic agent chloroquine. Finally, we demonstrate that these PNAs were effective in stimulating the modification of the endogenous beta-globin locus in human cells, including primary hematopoietic progenitor cells. This work suggests that PNAs can be effective tools to induce heritable, site-specific modification of disease-related genes in human cells. PMID:18757759

  20. Production of β-globin and adult hemoglobin following G418 treatment of erythroid precursor cells from homozygous β039 thalassemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Salvatori, Francesca; Breveglieri, Giulia; Zuccato, Cristina; Finotti, Alessia; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Borgatti, Monica; Feriotto, Giordana; Destro, Federica; Canella, Alessandro; Brognara, Eleonora; Lampronti, Ilaria; Breda, Laura; Rivella, Stefano; Gambari, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    In several types of thalassemia (including β039-thalassemia), stop codon mutations lead to premature translation termination and to mRNA destabilization through nonsense-mediated decay. Drugs (for instance aminoglycosides) can be designed to suppress premature termination, inducing a ribosomal readthrough. These findings have introduced new hopes for the development of a pharmacologic approach to the cure of this disease. However, the effects of aminoglycosides on globin mRNA carrying β-thalassemia stop mutations have not yet been investigated. In this study, we have used a lentiviral construct containing the β039- thalassemia globin gene under control of the β-globin promoter and a LCR cassette. We demonstrated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis the production of β-globin by K562 cell clones expressing the β039-thalassemia globin gene and treated with G418. More importantly, after FACS and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses, erythroid precursor cells from β039-thalassemia patients were demonstrated to be able to produce β-globin and adult hemoglobin after treatment with G418. This study strongly suggests that ribosomal readthrough should be considered a strategy for developing experimental strategies for the treatment of β0-thalassemia caused by stop codon mutations. PMID:19810011

  1. Disease Modifying Therapy in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Williams, U. E.; Oparah, S. K.; Philip-Ephraim, E. E.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system characterized by inflammatory demyelination and axonal degeneration. It is the commonest cause of permanent disability in young adults. Environmental and genetic factors have been suggested in its etiology. Currently available disease modifying drugs are only effective in controlling inflammation but not prevention of neurodegeneration or accumulation of disability. Search for an effective neuroprotective therapy is at the forefront of multiple sclerosis research. PMID:27355035

  2. The Role of Crowding Forces in Juxtaposing β-Globin Gene Domain Remote Regulatory Elements in Mouse Erythroid Cells.

    PubMed

    Golov, Arkadiy K; Gavrilov, Alexey A; Razin, Sergey V

    2015-01-01

    The extremely high concentration of macromolecules in a eukaryotic cell nucleus indicates that the nucleoplasm is a crowded macromolecular solution in which large objects tend to gather together due to crowding forces. It has been shown experimentally that crowding forces support the integrity of various nuclear compartments. However, little is known about their role in control of chromatin dynamics in vivo. Here, we experimentally addressed the possible role of crowding forces in spatial organization of the eukaryotic genome. Using the mouse β-globin domain as a model, we demonstrated that spatial juxtaposition of the remote regulatory elements of this domain in globin-expressing cells may be lost and restored by manipulation of the level of macromolecular crowding. In addition to proving the role of crowding forces in shaping interphase chromatin, our results suggest that the folding of the chromatin fiber is a major determinant in juxtaposing remote genomic elements. PMID:26436546

  3. Identification of a Novel β-Globin Mutation (HBB: C.189_195delTCATGGC) in a Chinese Family.

    PubMed

    He, Sheng; Lin, Li; Wei, Yuan; Chen, Biyan; Yi, Shang; Chen, Qiuli; Qiu, XiaoXia; Wei, Hongwei; Li, Guojian; Zheng, Chenguang

    2016-08-01

    β-Thalassemia (β-thal) is one of the most common genetic disorders worldwide. Molecular characterization of β-thal is essential for prevention and understanding the biology of the disease. More and more rare and novel mutations are being reported. Here, we report a novel 7 bp deletion at codons 63-65 (HBB: c.189_195delTCATGGC) in exon 2 of the β-globin gene in a family from Guangxi Province, China. This novel mutation causes a shift in the normal reading frame of the β-globin coding sequence and created a stop codon at codon 87 in exon 2, which leads to a β(0)-thal phenotype. PMID:27492766

  4. The three-dimensional folding of the α-globin gene domain reveals formation of chromatin globules.

    PubMed

    Baù, Davide; Sanyal, Amartya; Lajoie, Bryan R; Capriotti, Emidio; Byron, Meg; Lawrence, Jeanne B; Dekker, Job; Marti-Renom, Marc A

    2011-01-01

    We developed a general approach that combines chromosome conformation capture carbon copy (5C) with the Integrated Modeling Platform (IMP) to generate high-resolution three-dimensional models of chromatin at the megabase scale. We applied this approach to the ENm008 domain on human chromosome 16, containing the α-globin locus, which is expressed in K562 cells and silenced in lymphoblastoid cells (GM12878). The models accurately reproduce the known looping interactions between the α-globin genes and their distal regulatory elements. Further, we find using our approach that the domain folds into a single globular conformation in GM12878 cells, whereas two globules are formed in K562 cells. The central cores of these globules are enriched for transcribed genes, whereas nontranscribed chromatin is more peripheral. We propose that globule formation represents a higher-order folding state related to clustering of transcribed genes around shared transcription machineries, as previously observed by microscopy. PMID:21131981

  5. Self-catalytic DNA depurination underlies human β-globin gene mutations at codon 6 that cause anemias and thalassemias.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Amosova, Olga; Fresco, Jacques R

    2013-04-19

    The human β-globin gene contains an 18-nucleotide coding strand sequence centered at codon 6 and capable of forming a stem-loop structure that can self-catalyze depurination of the 5'G residue of that codon. The resultant apurinic lesion is subject to error-prone repair, consistent with the occurrence about this codon of mutations responsible for 6 anemias and β-thalassemias and additional substitutions without clinical consequences. The 4-residue loop of this stem-loop-forming sequence shows the highest incidence of mutation across the gene. The loop and first stem base pair-forming residues appeared early in the mammalian clade. The other stem-forming segments evolved more recently among primates, thereby conferring self-depurination capacity at codon 6. These observations indicate a conserved molecular mechanism leading to β-globin variants underlying phenotypic diversity and disease. PMID:23457306

  6. Inhalation gases or gaseous mediators as neuroprotectants for cerebral ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Brad A; Harrison, Joanne C; Nair, Shiva M; Sammut, Ivan A

    2013-01-01

    Ischaemic stroke is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. While recombinant tissue plasminogen activator can be administered to produce thrombolysis and restore blood flow to the ischaemic brain, therapeutic benefit is only achieved in a fraction of the subset of patients eligible for fibrinolytic intervention. Neuroprotective therapies attempting to restrict the extent of brain injury following cerebral ischaemia have not been successfully translated into the clinic despite overwhelming pre-clinical evidence of neuroprotection. Therefore, an adequate treatment for the majority of acute ischaemic stroke patients remains elusive. In the stroke literature, the use of therapeutic gases has received relatively little attention. Gases such as hyperbaric and normobaric oxygen, xenon, hydrogen, helium and argon all possess biological effects that have shown to be neuroprotective in pre-clinical models of ischaemic stroke. There are significant advantages to using gases including their relative abundance, low cost and feasibility for administration, all of which make them ideal candidates for a translational therapy for stroke. In addition, modulating cellular gaseous mediators including nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen sulphide may be an attractive option for ischaemic stroke therapy. Inhalation of these gaseous mediators can also produce neuroprotection, but this strategy remains to be confirmed as a viable therapy for ischaemic stroke. This review highlights the neuroprotective potential of therapeutic gas therapy and modulation of gaseous mediators for ischaemic stroke. The therapeutic advantages of gaseous therapy offer new promising directions in breaking the translational barrier for ischaemic stroke. PMID:23170797

  7. The Neuroprotective Functions of Transforming Growth Factor Beta Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dobolyi, Arpád; Vincze, Csilla; Pál, Gabriella; Lovas, Gábor

    2012-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) proteins are multifunctional cytokines whose neural functions are increasingly recognized. The machinery of TGF-β signaling, including the serine kinase type transmembrane receptors, is present in the central nervous system. However, the 3 mammalian TGF-β subtypes have distinct distributions in the brain suggesting different neural functions. Evidence of their involvement in the development and plasticity of the nervous system as well as their functions in peripheral organs suggested that they also exhibit neuroprotective functions. Indeed, TGF-β expression is induced following a variety of types of brain tissue injury. The neuroprotective function of TGF-βs is most established following brain ischemia. Damage in experimental animal models of global and focal ischemia was shown to be attenuated by TGF-βs. In addition, support for their neuroprotective actions following trauma, sclerosis multiplex, neurodegenerative diseases, infections, and brain tumors is also accumulating. The review will also describe the potential mechanisms of neuroprotection exerted by TGF-βs including anti-inflammatory, -apoptotic, -excitotoxic actions as well as the promotion of scar formation, angiogenesis, and neuroregeneration. The participation of these mechanisms in the neuroprotective effects of TGF-βs during different brain lesions will also be discussed. PMID:22942700

  8. A bioinformatics insight to rhizobial globins: gene identification and mapping, polypeptide sequence and phenetic analysis, and protein modeling.

    PubMed Central

    Gesto-Borroto, Reinier; Sánchez-Sánchez, Miriam; Arredondo-Peter, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    Globins (Glbs) are proteins widely distributed in organisms. Three evolutionary families have been identified in Glbs: the M, S and T Glb families. The M Glbs include flavohemoglobins (fHbs) and single-domain Glbs (SDgbs); the S Glbs include globin-coupled sensors (GCSs), protoglobins and sensor single domain globins, and the T Glbs include truncated Glbs (tHbs). Structurally, the M and S Glbs exhibit 3/3-folding whereas the T Glbs exhibit 2/2-folding. Glbs are widespread in bacteria, including several rhizobial genomes. However, only few rhizobial Glbs have been characterized. Hence, we characterized Glbs from 62 rhizobial genomes using bioinformatics methods such as data mining in databases, sequence alignment, phenogram construction and protein modeling. Also, we analyzed soluble extracts from Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA38 and USDA58 by (reduced + carbon monoxide (CO) minus reduced) differential spectroscopy. Database searching showed that only fhb, sdgb, gcs and thb genes exist in the rhizobia analyzed in this work. Promoter analysis revealed that apparently several rhizobial glb genes are not regulated by a -10 promoter but might be regulated by -35 and Fnr (fumarate-nitrate reduction regulator)-like promoters. Mapping analysis revealed that rhizobial fhbs and thbs are flanked by a variety of genes whereas several rhizobial sdgbs and gcss are flanked by genes coding for proteins involved in the metabolism of nitrates and nitrites and chemotaxis, respectively. Phenetic analysis showed that rhizobial Glbs segregate into the M, S and T Glb families, while structural analysis showed that predicted rhizobial SDgbs and fHbs and GCSs globin domain and tHbs fold into the 3/3- and 2/2-folding, respectively. Spectra from B. japonicum USDA38 and USDA58 soluble extracts exhibited peaks and troughs characteristic of bacterial and vertebrate Glbs thus indicating that putative Glbs are synthesized in B. japonicum USDA38 and USDA58. PMID:26594329

  9. Genomic organization and differential signature of positive selection in the alpha and beta globin gene clusters in two cetacean species.

    PubMed

    Nery, Mariana F; Arroyo, José Ignacio; Opazo, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    The hemoglobin of jawed vertebrates is a heterotetramer protein that contains two α- and two β-chains, which are encoded by members of α- and β-globin gene families. Given the hemoglobin role in mediating an adaptive response to chronic hypoxia, it is likely that this molecule may have experienced a selective pressure during the evolution of cetaceans, which have to deal with hypoxia tolerance during prolonged diving. This selective pressure could have generated a complex history of gene turnover in these clusters and/or changes in protein structure themselves. Accordingly, we aimed to characterize the genomic organization of α- and β-globin gene clusters in two cetacean species and to detect a possible role of positive selection on them using a phylogenetic framework. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogeny reconstructions revealed that both cetacean species had retained a similar complement of putatively functional genes. For the α-globin gene cluster, the killer whale presents a complement of genes composed of HBZ, HBK, and two functional copies of HBA and HBQ genes, whereas the dolphin possesses HBZ, HBK, HBA and HBQ genes, and one HBA pseudogene. For the β-globin gene cluster, both species retained a complement of four genes, two early expressed genes-HBE and HBH-and two adult expressed genes-HBD and HBB. Our natural selection analysis detected two positively selected sites in the HBB gene (56 and 62) and four in HBA (15, 21, 49, 120). Interestingly, only the genes that are expressed during the adulthood showed the signature of positive selection. PMID:24259315

  10. Perturbation of chromatin structure in the region of the adult beta-globin gene in chicken erythrocyte chromatin.

    PubMed

    Caplan, A; Kimura, T; Gould, H; Allan, J

    1987-01-01

    An EcoRI chromatin fragment containing the adult beta-globin gene and flanking sequences, isolated from chicken erythrocyte nuclei, sediments at a reduced rate relative to bulk chromatin fragments of the same size. We show that the specific retardation cannot be reversed by adding extra linker histones to native chromatin. When the chromatin fragments are unfolded either by removing linker histones or lowering the ionic strength, the difference between globin and bulk chromatin fragments is no longer seen. The refolded chromatin obtained by restoring the linker histones to the depleted chromatin, however, exhibits the original sedimentation difference. This difference is therefore due to a special property of the histone octamers on the active gene that determines the extent of its folding into higher-order structure. That it is not due to the differential binding of linker histones in vitro is shown by measurements of the protein to DNA ratios using CsCl density-gradients. Both before and after selective removal of the linker histones, the globin gene fragment and bulk chromatin fragments exhibit only a marginal difference in buoyant density. In addition, we show that cleavage of the EcoRI fragment by digestion at the 5' and 3' nuclease hypersensitive sites flanking the globin gene liberates a fragment from between these sites that sediments normally. We conclude that the hypersensitive sites per se are responsible for the reduction in sedimentation rate. The non-nucleosomal DNA segments appear to be too long to be incorporated into the chromatin solenoid and thus create spacers between separate solenoidal elements in the chromatin, which can account for its hydrodynamic behaviour. PMID:3586025

  11. Genomic Organization and Differential Signature of Positive Selection in the Alpha and Beta Globin Gene Clusters in Two Cetacean Species

    PubMed Central

    Nery, Mariana F.; Arroyo, José Ignacio; Opazo, Juan C.

    2013-01-01

    The hemoglobin of jawed vertebrates is a heterotetramer protein that contains two α- and two β-chains, which are encoded by members of α- and β-globin gene families. Given the hemoglobin role in mediating an adaptive response to chronic hypoxia, it is likely that this molecule may have experienced a selective pressure during the evolution of cetaceans, which have to deal with hypoxia tolerance during prolonged diving. This selective pressure could have generated a complex history of gene turnover in these clusters and/or changes in protein structure themselves. Accordingly, we aimed to characterize the genomic organization of α- and β-globin gene clusters in two cetacean species and to detect a possible role of positive selection on them using a phylogenetic framework. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogeny reconstructions revealed that both cetacean species had retained a similar complement of putatively functional genes. For the α-globin gene cluster, the killer whale presents a complement of genes composed of HBZ, HBK, and two functional copies of HBA and HBQ genes, whereas the dolphin possesses HBZ, HBK, HBA and HBQ genes, and one HBA pseudogene. For the β-globin gene cluster, both species retained a complement of four genes, two early expressed genes—HBE and HBH—and two adult expressed genes—HBD and HBB. Our natural selection analysis detected two positively selected sites in the HBB gene (56 and 62) and four in HBA (15, 21, 49, 120). Interestingly, only the genes that are expressed during the adulthood showed the signature of positive selection. PMID:24259315

  12. Memantine - neuroprotective drug in aging brain.

    PubMed

    Karolczak, Dominika; Sawicka, Emilia; Dorszewska, Jolanta; Radel, Anna; Bodnar, Magdalena; Błaszczyk, Agata; Jagielska, Joanna; Marszałek, Andrzej

    2013-10-01

    Aging is the process of progressive accumulation of changes over time, which is additionally connected with increasing susceptibility to some diseases and ultimately leads to death. Aging is associated mainly with loss of permanent cells, e.g. in heart, skeletal muscle and brain. During aging neurons die mainly in the apoptotic way. Apoptosis can be divided into three phases: initiation, execution and degradation. During the execution phase activation of specific enzymes, caspases, is observed. These enzymes are responsible for initiation of the death machinery. Caspase-9 is connected with the internal pathway of apoptosis, which begins at the mitochondrium in response to apoptotic stimulants, such as free radicals, UV radiation or chemotherapeutics. Before the executive phase starts, cytochrome c leaks from the mitochondrium to the cytoplasm, where it joins to the protein Apaf-1 and procaspase-9 and forms a complex called the apoptosome. Then procaspase-9 is converted by autolysis to caspase-9, which subsequently activates procaspase-3 to the active form which ultimately leads to apoptosis. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated a small decrease in caspase-9 and caspase-3 activation during normal aging and an increase in this process after application of stress factors. Also increased apoptosis in the cerebrum after administration of a drug for Alzheimer disease, memantine, to aging rats was observed. Taken together, the results obtained in this study seem to confirm the neuroprotective effect of memantine on increasing levels of cells with active caspase-3 and active caspase-9. It probably improves caspase-dependent apoptosis in the aging brain. PMID:24166606

  13. [Neuroprotective effects of sulfated polysaccharides from seaweed].

    PubMed

    Besednova, N N; Somova, L M; Guliaev, S A; Zaporozhets, T S

    2013-01-01

    Currently, neurodegenerative diseases (NDD) occupy a significant place in the structure of disease of the elderly, which dictates the need to find new and effective treatment and prevention of this pathology. At the heart of NDD development is a violation of the metabolism and the conformational change of cellular proteins with subsequent accumulation and aggregation of their in certain groups of neurons. The immediate cause of the death of the affected neurons in NDD is initiated by intracellular proteins apoptosis, during which a large number ofneurotransmitter glutamate is released. The consequence of an imbalance in the synthesis and release of neurotransmitters are related the memory impairment, motor coordination and cognitive abilities of human. Based on the analysis of the extensive literature domestic and predominantly foreign authors of the last decade the modern data on the effect of sulfated polysaccharides (SPS) of algae in vivo and in vitro in degenerative processes of the nervous system. Found that due to its multi-point impact, SPS have on the body antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiapoptotic, antihyperlipidemic, anti-toxic effects. Consequently, SPS can arrest a number of secondary pathological effects observed in neurodegenerative diseases (oxidative stress, inflammation, the phenomenon of increased neuronal apoptosis, toxic effects etc.). Varieties of pathogenic mechanisms underlying NDD makes possible the combined use of neuroprotective compounds acting sequentially in different stages of a pathological process. Accumulated a lot of experimental evidence to assume that the SPS may be the basis for the creation of next-generation drugs for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24000668

  14. Electrical stimulation and tinnitus: neuroplasticity, neuromodulation, neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Shulman; Barbara, Goldstein; Arnold, Strashun

    2013-01-01

    Neuroplasticity (NPL), neuromodulation (NM), and neuroprotection (NPT) are ongoing biophysiological processes that are linked together in sensory systems, the goal being the maintenance of a homeostasis of normal sensory function in the central nervous system. It is hypothesized that when the balance between excitatory - inhibitory action is broken in sensory systems, predominantly due to neuromodulatory activity with reduced induced inhibition and excitation predominates, sensory circuits become plastic with adaptation at synaptic levels to environmental inputs(1). Tinnitus an aberrant auditory sensation, for all clinical types, is clinically considered to reflect a failure of NPL, NM, and NPT to maintain normal auditory function at synaptic levels in sensory cortex and projected to downstream levels in the central auditory system in brain and sensorineural elements in ear. Clinically, the tinnitus sensation becomes behaviorally manifest with varying degrees of annoyance, reflecting a principle of sensory physiology that each sensation has components, i.e. sensory, affect/behavior, psychomotor and memory. Modalities of tinnitus therapies, eg instrumentation, pharmacology, surgery, target a particular component of tinnitus, with resultant activation of neuromodulators at multiple neuromodulatory centers in brain and ear. Effective neuromodulation at sensory neuronal synaptic levels results in NPL in sensory cortex, NPT and tinnitus relief. Functional brain imaging, metabolic (PET brain) and electrophysiology quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG) data in a cochlear implant soft failure patient demonstrates what is clinically considered to reflect NPL, NM, NPT. The reader is provided with a rationale for tinnitus diagnosis and treatment, with a focus on ES, reflecting the biology underlying NPL, NM, NPT. PMID:24995902

  15. siDNMT1 Increases γ-globin Expression in Chemical-Inducer-of-Dimerization (CID)-Dependent Mouse βYAC Bone Marrow Cells and in Baboon Erythroid Progenitor Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Banzon, Virryan; Ibanez, Vinzon; Vaitkus, Kestis; Ruiz, Maria Armila; Peterson, Kenneth; DeSimone, Joseph; Lavelle, Donald

    2014-01-01

    1) Objective These studies were performed to test the hypothesis that DNMT1 is required for maintenance of DNA methylation and repression of the γ-globin gene in adult stage erythroid cells. 2) Methods DNMT1 levels were reduced by nucleofection of siRNA targeting DNMT1 in chemical-inducer-of-dimerization (CID)-dependent multipotential mouse bone marrow (BM) cells containing the human β-globin gene locus in the context of a yeast artificial chromosome (βYAC) and in primary cultures of erythroid progenitor cells derived from CD34+ baboon BM cells. The effect of reduced DNMT1 levels on globin gene expression was measured by real time PCR and the effect on globin chain synthesis in primary erythroid progenitor cell cultures was determined by biosynthetic radiolabelling of globin chains followed by HPLC analysis. The effect on DNA methylation was determined by bisulfite sequence analysis. 3) Results Reduced DNMT1 levels in cells treated with siDNMT1 were associated with increased expression of γ-globin mRNA, an increased γ/γ+β chain ratio in cultured erythroid progenitors, and decreased DNA methylation of the γ-globin promoter. Similar effects were observed in cells treated with decitabine, a pharmacological inhibitor of DNA methyltransferase inhibitor. 4) Conclusion DNMT1 is required to maintain DNA methylation of the γ-globin gene promoters and repress γ-globin gene expression in adult-stage erythroid cells. PMID:20974210

  16. In vivo binding of trimethylpsoralen detects DNA structural alterations associated with transcribing regions in the human beta-globin cluster.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Ruiz, A; Zhang, Q; Shen, C K

    1995-12-01

    In order to increase our knowledge about the mechanisms that regulate expression of human beta-like globin genes, we have used a novel technique to analyze the chromatin structure in living cells. This approach allowed us to detect specific DNA regions in vivo where nucleosome folding or unconstrained DNA supercoiling in erythroid cells differs from that in non-erythroid cells. In this method, we use 4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen (TMP) as a probe capable of detecting altered chromatin conformations. Our results show that TMP binds to DNA with a higher affinity over the regions in the locus that are actively expressed, including both the promoter and the transcribed region. This higher affinity detected when comparing erythroid cells with non-erythroid cells does not extend to other regions inside the beta-globin cluster. Our data suggest that the observed effect is likely due to nucleosome displacement. Alternatively, it could result from localized DNA supercoiling, but not from widespread torsional stress across the entire beta-like globin locus as hypothesized previously. PMID:7499429

  17. Fetal Hemoglobin in Tunisian Sickle Cell Disease Patient: Relationship with Polymorphic Sequences Cis to the β-Globin Gene.

    PubMed

    Moumni, Imen; Ben Mustapha, Maha; Ben Mansour, Ikbel; Zoraï, Amine; Douzi, Kaïs; Sassi, Sarah; Chaouachi, Dorra; Mellouli, Fethi; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Abbes, Salem

    2016-03-01

    Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) plays a dominant role in ameliorating morbidity and mortality of hemoglobinopathies. We evaluated the effects of polymorphic markers within the β-globin gene cluster to identify the genetic mechanics that influence HbF on Tunisian sickling patients (n = 242). Haplotype analysis was carried out by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and the framework polymorphism was established by PCR-sequencing, four independent regions of interest were identified: the 5' region of β-LCR-HS2 site, the intervening sequence II (IVSII) region of two fetal (Gγ and Aγ) genes and the 5' region of β-globin gene. The correlation of these various Haplotypes and SNPs with HbF expression and clinical data was studied. Our data showed that among the various polymorphic markers analyzed, only the sequence (AT)xN12(AT)y in LCR HS2 region was significantly associated (p < 0.05) with increased HbF levels, suggesting that the β-globin gene cluster exerts a significant effect on HbF in sickle cell patients. This study can improve understanding of the physiopathology of the disease and aid to increase our ability to predict clinical severity. PMID:26855518

  18. The human ankyrin 1 promoter insulator sustains gene expression in a β-globin lentiviral vector in hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Zulema; Campo-Fernandez, Beatriz; Wherley, Jennifer; Kaufman, Michael L; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Cooper, Aaron R; Hoban, Megan D; Baldwin, Kismet M; Lumaquin, Dianne; Wang, Xiaoyan; Senadheera, Shantha; Hollis, Roger P; Kohn, Donald B

    2015-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors designed for the treatment of the hemoglobinopathies require the inclusion of regulatory and strong enhancer elements to achieve sufficient expression of the β-globin transgene. Despite the inclusion of these elements, the efficacy of these vectors may be limited by transgene silencing due to the genomic environment surrounding the integration site. Barrier insulators can be used to give more consistent expression and resist silencing even with lower vector copies. Here, the barrier activity of an insulator element from the human ankyrin-1 gene was analyzed in a lentiviral vector carrying an antisickling human β-globin gene. Inclusion of a single copy of the Ankyrin insulator did not affect viral titer, and improved the consistency of expression from the vector in murine erythroleukemia cells. The presence of the Ankyrin insulator element did not change transgene expression in human hematopoietic cells in short-term erythroid culture or in vivo in primary murine transplants. However, analysis in secondary recipients showed that the lentiviral vector with the Ankyrin element preserved transgene expression, whereas expression from the vector lacking the Ankyrin insulator decreased in secondary recipients. These studies demonstrate that the Ankyrin insulator may improve long-term β-globin expression in hematopoietic stem cells for gene therapy of hemoglobinopathies. PMID:26029723

  19. Using lithium as a neuroprotective agent in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Khasraw, Mustafa; Ashley, David; Wheeler, Greg; Berk, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Neurocognitive impairment is being increasingly recognized as an important issue in patients with cancer who develop cognitive difficulties either as part of direct or indirect involvement of the nervous system or as a consequence of either chemotherapy-related or radiotherapy-related complications. Brain radiotherapy in particular can lead to significant cognitive defects. Neurocognitive decline adversely affects quality of life, meaningful employment, and even simple daily activities. Neuroprotection may be a viable and realistic goal in preventing neurocognitive sequelae in these patients, especially in the setting of cranial irradiation. Lithium is an agent that has been in use for psychiatric disorders for decades, but recently there has been emerging evidence that it can have a neuroprotective effect.This review discusses neurocognitive impairment in patients with cancer and the potential for investigating the use of lithium as a neuroprotectant in such patients. PMID:23121766

  20. [Pharmacological neuroprotection against brain damage in ischemiai/reperfusion experiment].

    PubMed

    Petrov, V I; Ponomarev, É A; Maskin, S S; Strepetov, N N

    2011-01-01

    Experiment carried out on laboratory animals (rats) were aimed at comparative evaluation of the effect of several neuroprotective drugs under the conditions of model brain ischemia-reperfusion. The experimental methods included staining of brain tissue sections by hematoxiline-eosine, Nissl staining, and expression of NOS1, NOS3, TRAIL by imunnohistological means. The intensity of damage in various parts of brain and the nature of apoptosis without neuroprotection and with popular neuroprotectors (cytoflavin, actovegin, mexidol) and a test drug at the stage ofpreclinical trial (AKF-90-7) were evaluated. Characteristic cytotoxic (coagulative pycnomorphic and colliquative necrosis of neurons) and vascular (hemostasia, erythropedesis) changes were revealed. The neuroprotective effectof drugs decreases in the following order: AKF-90-7 > cytoflavin > actovegin > mexidol. PMID:22232908

  1. Neuroprotective Strategies for Traumatic Brain Injury: Improving Clinical Translation

    PubMed Central

    Kabadi, Shruti V.; Faden, Alan I.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces secondary biochemical changes that contribute to delayed neuroinflammation, neuronal cell death, and neurological dysfunction. Attenuating such secondary injury has provided the conceptual basis for neuroprotective treatments. Despite strong experimental data, more than 30 clinical trials of neuroprotection in TBI patients have failed. In part, these failures likely reflect methodological differences between the clinical and animal studies, as well as inadequate pre-clinical evaluation and/or trial design problems. However, recent changes in experimental approach and advances in clinical trial methodology have raised the potential for successful clinical translation. Here we critically analyze the current limitations and translational opportunities for developing successful neuroprotective therapies for TBI. PMID:24445258

  2. Is longer sevoflurane preconditioning neuroprotective in permanent focal cerebral ischemia?

    PubMed

    Qiu, Caiwei; Sheng, Bo; Wang, Shurong; Liu, Jin

    2013-08-15

    Sevoflurane preconditioning has neuroprotective effects in the cerebral ischemia/reperfusion model. However, its influence on permanent cerebral ischemia remains unclear. In the present study, the rats were exposed to sevoflurane for 15, 30, 60, and 120 minutes, followed by induction of permanent cerebral ischemia. Results demonstrated that 30- and 60-minute sevoflurane preconditioning significantly reduced the infarct volume at 24 hours after cerebral ischemia, and 60-minute lurane preconditioning additionally reduced the number of TUNEL- and caspase-3-positive cells in the ischemic penumbra. However, 120-minute sevoflurane preconditioning did not show evident neuroprotective effects. Moreover, 60-minute sevoflurane preconditioning significantly attenuated neurological deficits and infarct volume in rats at 4 days after cerebral ischemia. These findings indicated that 60-minute sevoflurane preconditioning can induce the best neuroprotective effects in rats with permanent cerebral ischemia through the inhibition of apoptosis. PMID:25206521

  3. Neuroprotective Effects of Intravenous Anesthetics: A New Critical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bilotta, Federico; Stazi, Elisabetta; Zlotnik, Alexander; Gruenbaum, Shaun E.; Rosa, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Perioperative cerebral damage can result in various clinical sequela ranging from minor neurocognitive deficits to catastrophic neurological morbidity with permanent impairment and death. The goal of neuroprotective treatments is to reduce the clinical effects of cerebral damage through two major mechanisms: increased tolerance of neurological tissue to ischemia and changes in intra-cellular responses to energy supply deprivation. In this review, we present the clinical evidence of intravenous anesthetics on perioperative neuroprotection, and we also provide a critical perspective for future studies. The neuroprotective efficacy of the intravenous anesthetics thiopental, propofol and etomidate is unproven. Lidocaine may be neuroprotective in non-diabetic patients who have undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CBP) or with a 48-hour infusion, but conclusive data are lacking. There are several limitations of clinical studies that evaluate postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), including difficulties in identifying patients at high-risk and a lack of consensus for defining the “gold-standard” neuropsychological testing. Although a battery of neurocognitive tests remains the primary method for diagnosing POCD, recent evidence suggests a role for novel biomarkers and neuroimaging to preemptively identify patients more susceptible to cognitive decline in the perioperative period. Current evidence, while inconclusive, suggest that intravenous anesthetics may be both neuroprotective and neurotoxic in the perioperative period. A critical analysis on data recorded from randomized control trials (RCTs) is essential in identifying patients who may benefit or be harmed by a particular anesthetic. RCTs will also contribute to defining methodologies for future studies on the neuroprotective effects of intravenous anesthetics. PMID:24669972

  4. Neuroprotective gases--fantasy or reality for clinical use?

    PubMed

    Deng, Jiao; Lei, Chong; Chen, Yu; Fang, Zongping; Yang, Qianzi; Zhang, Haopeng; Cai, Min; Shi, Likai; Dong, Hailong; Xiong, Lize

    2014-04-01

    The neuroprotective properties for certain medical gases have been observed for decades, leading to extensive research that has been widely reported and continues to garner interest. Common gases including oxygen, hydrogen, carbon dioxide and nitric oxide, volatile anesthetics such as isoflurane, sevoflurane, halothane, enflurane and desflurane, non-volatile anesthetics such as xenon and nitrous oxide, inert gases such as helium and argon, and even gases classically considered to be toxic (e.g., hydrogen sulfide and carbon monoxide) have all been supported by the evidence alluding to their use as potential neuroprotective agents. A wide range of neural injury types such as ischemic/hemorrhagic, stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, traumatic brain injury, perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injuries, neurodegenerative disease as well as spinal cord ischemia have been used as platforms for studying the neuroprotective effects of these gases, yet until now, none of the gases has been widely introduced into clinical use specifically for protection against neural injury. Insufficient clinical data together with contradictory paradigms and results further hinders the clinical trials. However, pre-clinical models suggest that despite the various classes of gases and the broad range of injuries to which medical gases confer, protection, several underlying mechanisms for their neuroprotective properties are similar. In this review, we summarize the literature concerning the neuroprotective effect of each gas and its underlying mechanisms, extract common targets reported for the neuroprotective effects of different gases, highlight the conflicting observations from clinical trials and further discuss the possible hindrances impeding clinical applications in order to propose future research perspectives and therapeutic exploitations. PMID:24440817

  5. Calcium preconditioning triggers neuroprotection in retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Sean K.; Weatherly, Monique E.; Ware, Lillian; Linn, David M.; Linn, Cindy L.

    2010-01-01

    In the mammalian retina, excitotoxicity has been shown to be involved in apoptotic retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death and is associated with certain retinal disease states including glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and retinal ischemia. Previous studies from this lab (Wehrwein et al., 2004) have demonstrated that acetylcholine (ACh) and nicotine protects against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in isolated adult pig RGCs through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Activation of nAChRs in these RGCs triggers cell survival signaling pathways and inhibits apoptotic enzymes (Asomugha et al., 2010). However, the link between binding of nAChRs and activation of neuroprotective pathways is unknown. In this study, we examine the hypothesis that calcium permeation through nAChR channels is required for ACh-induced neuroprotection against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in isolated pig RGCs. RGCs were isolated from other retinal tissue using a two step panning technique and cultured for 3 days under different conditions. In some studies, calcium imaging experiments were performed using the fluorescent calcium indicator, fluo-4, and demonstrated that calcium permeates the nAChR channels located on pig RGCs. In other studies, the extracellular calcium concentration was altered to determine the effect on nicotine-induced neuroprotection. Results support the hypothesis that calcium is required for nicotine-induced neuroprotection in isolated pig RGCs. Lastly, studies were performed to analyze the effects of preconditioning on glutamate-induced excitotoxicity and neuroprotection. In these studies, a preconditioning dose of calcium was introduced to cells using a variety of mechanisms before a large glutamate insult was applied to cells. Results from these studies support the hypothesis that preconditioning cells with a relatively low level of calcium before an excitotoxic insult leads to neuroprotection. In the future, these results could provide important information

  6. Neuroprotective effects of high affinity sigma 1 receptor selective compounds

    PubMed Central

    Luedtke, Robert R.; Perez, Evelyn; Yang, Shao-Hua; Liu, Ran; Vangveravong, Suwanna; Tu, Zhude; Mach, Robert H.; Simpkins, James W.

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that the antipsychotic drug haloperidol, a multifunctional D2-like dopamine and sigma receptor subtype antagonist, has neuroprotective properties. In this study we further examined the association between neuroprotection and receptor antagonism by evaluating a panel of novel compounds with varying affinity at sigma and D2-like dopamine receptors. These compounds were evaluated using an in vitro cytotoxicity assay that utilizes a hippocampal-derived cell line, HT-22, in the presence or absence of varying concentrations (5 to 20 mM) of glutamate. While haloperidol was found to be a potent neuroprotective agent in this in vitro cell assay, the prototypic sigma 1 receptor agonist (+)-pentazocine was found not to be neuroprotective. Subsequently, the potency for the neuroprotection of HT-22 cells was evaluated for a) three SV series indoles which have nMolar affinity at D2-like receptors but varying affinity at sigma 1 receptor and b) two benzyl phenylacetamides sigma 1 receptor selective compounds which bind with low affinity at D2-like receptors but have nMolar affinity for the sigma 1 receptor. We observed that cytoprotection correlated with the affinity of the compounds for sigma 1 receptors. Based upon results from the HT-22 cell-based in vitro assay, two phenylacetamides, LS-127 and LS-137, were further evaluated in vivo using a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (t-MCAO) model of stroke. At a dose of 100 µg/kg, both LS-127 and LS-137 attenuated infarct volume by approximately 50%. These studies provide further evidence that sigma 1 receptor selective compounds can provide neuroprotection in cytotoxic situations. These results also demonstrate that sigma 1 receptor selective benzyl phenylacetamides are candidate pharmacotherapeutic agents that could be used to minimize neuronal death after a stroke or head trauma. PMID:22285434

  7. AUF-1 and YB-1 independently regulate β-globin mRNA in developing erythroid cells through interactions with poly(A)-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    van Zalen, Sebastiaan; Lombardi, Alyssa A.; Jeschke, Grace R.; Hexner, Elizabeth O.; Russell, J. Eric

    2015-01-01

    The normal expression of β-globin protein in mature erythrocytes is critically dependent on post-transcriptional events in erythroid progenitors that ensure the high stability of β-globin mRNA. Previous work has revealed that these regulatory processes require AUF-1 and YB-1, two RNA-binding proteins that assemble an mRNP β-complex on the β-globin 3′UTR. Here, we demonstrate that the β-complex organizes during the erythropoietic interval when both β-globin mRNA and protein accumulate rapidly, implicating the importance of this regulatory mRNP to normal erythroid differentiation. Subsequent functional analyses link β-complex assembly to the half-life of β-globin mRNA in vivo, providing a mechanistic basis for this regulatory activity. AUF-1 and YB-1 appear to serve a redundant post-transcriptional function, as both β-complex assembly and β-globin mRNA levels are reduced by coordinate depletion of the two factors, and can be restored by independent rescue with either factor alone. Additional studies demonstrate that the β-complex assembles more efficiently on polyadenylated transcripts, implicating a model in which the β-complex enhances the binding of PABPC1 to the poly(A) tail, inhibiting mRNA deadenylation and consequently effecting the high half-life of β-globin transcripts in erythroid progenitors. These data specify a post-transcriptional mechanism through which AUF1 and YB1 contribute to the normal development of erythropoietic cells, as well as to non-hematopoietic tissues in which AUF1-and YB1-based regulatory mRNPs have been observed to assemble on heterologous mRNAs. PMID:25720531

  8. Neuroprotective effects of berry fruits on neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Subash, Selvaraju; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Al-Adawi, Samir; Memon, Mushtaq A.; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Akbar, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Recent clinical research has demonstrated that berry fruits can prevent age-related neurodegenerative diseases and improve motor and cognitive functions. The berry fruits are also capable of modulating signaling pathways involved in inflammation, cell survival, neurotransmission and enhancing neuroplasticity. The neuroprotective effects of berry fruits on neurodegenerative diseases are related to phytochemicals such as anthocyanin, caffeic acid, catechin, quercetin, kaempferol and tannin. In this review, we made an attempt to clearly describe the beneficial effects of various types of berries as promising neuroprotective agents. PMID:25317174

  9. The soy phytoestrogens genistein and daidzein as neuroprotective agents against anoxia-glucopenia and reperfusion damage in rat urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Valeri, A; Fiorenzani, P; Rossi, R; Aloisi, A M; Valoti, M; Pessina, F

    2012-10-01

    Some bladder disorders, such as obstructive bladder and hyperactivity, may be caused partly by ischemia/reperfusion injury (I/R). The neuroprotective effects of estrogens were demonstrated in in vitro studies and a great interest in soy isoflavones (genistein and daidzein) as alternative to the synthetic estrogen receptor modulators for therapeutic use has been pointed out. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of genistein and daidzein, on rat detrusor smooth muscle contractility and their possible neuroprotective role against I/R-like condition. Whole rat urinary bladders were subjected to in vitro anoxia-glucopenia (A-G) and reperfusion (R) in the absence or presence of drugs and response to electrical field stimulation (EFS) of intrinsic nerves evaluated. Furthermore rats were treated in vivo for 1 week with the phytoestrogens and the same in vitro protocol was applied to the ex vivo bladders. Antioxidant activity of genistein and daidzein on the A-G/R model was determined by measuring malonyldialdehyde (MDA). Moreover, hormones plasma levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. Genistein and daidzein administered either in vitro or in vivo showed significant neuroprotective effect and antioxidant activity. Testosterone and 17β-estradiol plasma levels were not modified by daidzein, while a significant decrease of testosterone in genistein treated rats was evident. Moreover both phytoestrogens significantly decreased detrusor contractions induced by EFS in a concentration-dependent manner. For being either neuroprotective and myorelaxant, genistein and daidzein could be considered a good lead for new therapeutic agents to protect the urinary bladder from hyperactivity and nerve damage. PMID:22743170

  10. Involvement of ferryl in the reaction between nitrite and the oxy forms of globins.

    PubMed

    Hathazi, Denisa; Mahuţ, Sonia Diana; Scurtu, Florina-Violeta; Bischin, Cristina; Stanciu, Corina; Attia, Amr Ali; Damian, Grigore; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu

    2014-10-01

    The reaction between nitrite and the oxy forms of globins has complex autocatalytic kinetics with several branching steps and evolves through chain reactions mediated by reactive species (including radicals) such as hydrogen peroxide, ferryl and nitrogen dioxide, starting with a lag phase, after which it proceeds onto an autocatalytic phase. Reported here are UV-Vis spectra collected upon stopped-flow mixing of myoglobin with a supraphysiological excess of nitrite. The best fit to the experimental data follows an A → B → C reaction scheme involving the formation of a short-lived intermediate identified as ferryl. This is consistent with a mechanism where nitrite binds to oxy myoglobin to generate an undetectable ferrous-peroxynitrate intermediate, whose decay leads to nitrate and ferryl. The ferryl is then reduced to met by the excess nitrite. DFT calculations reveal an essentially barrierless reaction between nitrite and the oxy heme, with a notable outer-sphere component; the resulting metastable ferrous-peroxynitrate adduct is found to feature a very low barrier towards nitrate liberation, with ferryl as a final product-in good agreement with experiment. PMID:25064750

  11. Limited proteolysis of myoglobin opens channel in ferrochelatase-globin complex for iron to zinc transmetallation.

    PubMed

    Paganelli, Marcella O; Grossi, Alberto B; Dores-Silva, Paulo R; Borges, Julio C; Cardoso, Daniel R; Skibsted, Leif H

    2016-11-01

    Recombinant ferrochelatase (BsFECH) from Bacillus subtilis expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) was found by UV-visible spectroscopy to bind the model substrate tetraphenylporphyrin-sulfonate, TPPS, with Ka=3.8 10(5)mol/L in aqueous phosphate buffer pH 5.7 at 30°C, and to interact with metmyoglobin with Ka=1.07±0.13 10(5)mol/L at 30°C. The iron/zinc exchange in myoglobin occurring during maturation of Parma hams seems to depend on such substrate binding to BsFECH and was facilitated by limited pepsin proteolysis of myoglobin to open a reaction channel for metal exchange still with BsFECH associated to globin. BsFECH increased rate of zinc insertion in TPPS significantly and showed saturation kinetics with an apparent binding constant of Zn(II) to the [enzyme-TPPS] complex of 1.3 10(4)mol/L and a first-order rate constant of 6.6 10(-1)s(-1) for dissociation of the tertiary complex, a similar pattern was found for zinc/iron transmetallation in myoglobin. PMID:27211675

  12. Incidence of Alpha-Globin Gene Defect in the Lebanese Population: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Rose; Badra, Rebecca; el Rafei, Rym; Charafeddine, Lama

    2015-01-01

    Background. It is well established that the Mediterranean and Arab populations are at high risk for thalassemias in general and for alpha-thalassemia in particular. Yet, reports on alpha-thalassemia in Lebanon are still lacking. In this study, we aim at assessing the incidence of alpha-thalassemia in the Lebanese population. Methods. 230 newborns' dried blood cards remaining from routine neonatal screening at the American University of Beirut Medical Center were collected for DNA extraction. Samples were screened for the 21 most common α-globin deletions and point mutations reported worldwide, through multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and Reverse-Hybridization technique. Results. Upon analyses, the carrier rate of α-thalassemia was found to be 8%. Two mutations detected the −α3,7 single gene deletion found in 75% of cases and the nongene deletion α2 IVS1 [−5nt] in the remaining samples. Conclusion. This study is the first dedicated to investigate α-thalassemia trait incidence in Lebanon. Data obtained demonstrates a high carrier rate in a relatively, highly consanguineous population; it also highlighted the presence of two common mutations. These results may be of an important impact on premarital and newborn screening policies in our country. PMID:25834820

  13. High diversity of alpha-globin haplotypes in a Senegalese population, including many previously unreported variants.

    PubMed Central

    Martinson, J J; Excoffier, L; Swinburn, C; Boyce, A J; Harding, R M; Langaney, A; Clegg, J B

    1995-01-01

    RFLP haplotypes at the alpha-globin gene complex have been examined in 190 individuals from the Niokolo Mandenka population of Senegal: haplotypes were assigned unambiguously for 210 chromosomes. The Mandenka share with other African populations a sample size-independent haplotype diversity that is much greater than that in any non-African population: the number of haplotypes observed in the Mandenka is typically twice that seen in the non-African populations sampled to date. Of these haplotypes, 17.3% had not been observed in any previous surveys, and a further 19.1% have previously been reported only in African populations. The haplotype distribution shows clear differences between African and non-African peoples, but this is on the basis of population-specific haplotypes combined with haplotypes common to all. The relationship of the newly reported haplotypes to those previously recorded suggests that several mutation processes, particularly recombination as homologous exchange or gene conversion, have been involved in their production. A computer program based on the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm was used to obtain maximum-likelihood estimates of haplotype frequencies for the entire data set: good concordance between the unambiguous and EM-derived sets was seen for the overall haplotype frequencies. Some of the low-frequency haplotypes reported by the estimation algorithm differ greatly, in structure, from those haplotypes known to be present in human populations, and they may not represent haplotypes actually present in the sample. PMID:7485171

  14. Copy number polymorphism in the α-globin gene cluster of European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus)

    PubMed Central

    Campos, R; Storz, J F; Ferrand, N

    2012-01-01

    Comparative genomic studies have revealed that mammals typically possess two or more tandemly duplicated copies of the α-globin (HBA) gene. The domestic rabbit represents an exception to this general rule, as this species was found to possess a single HBA gene. Previous electrophoretic surveys of HBA polymorphism in natural populations of the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) revealed extensive geographic variation in the frequencies of three main electromorphs. The variation in frequency of two electromorphs is mainly partitioned between two distinct subspecies of European rabbit, and a third is restricted to the hybrid zone between the two rabbit subspecies in Iberia. Here we report the results of a survey of nucleotide polymorphism, which revealed HBA copy number polymorphism in Iberian populations of the European rabbit. By characterizing patterns of HBA polymorphism in populations from the native range of the European rabbit, we were able to identify the specific amino-acid substitutions that distinguish the previously characterized electromorphs. Within the hybrid zone, we observed the existence of a second HBA gene duplicate, named HBA2, that mostly represents a novel sequence haplotype, which occurs in higher frequency within the hybrid zone, and thus appears to have arisen in hybrids of the two distinct subspecies. Although this novel gene is also present in other wild Iberian populations, it is almost absent from French populations, which suggest a recent ancestry, associated with the establishment of the post-Pleistocene contact zone between the two European rabbit subspecies. PMID:22146981

  15. Allele-specific enzymatic amplification of. beta. -globin genomic DNA for diagnosis of sickle cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D.Y.; Ugozzoli, L.; Pal, B.K.; Wallace, B. )

    1989-04-01

    A rapid nonradioactive approach to the diagnosis of sickle cell anemia is described based on an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (ASPCR). This method allows direct detection of the normal or the sickle cell {beta}-globin allele in genomic DNA without additional steps of probe hybridization, ligation, or restriction enzyme cleavage. Two allele-specific oligonucleotide primers, one specific for the sickle cell allele and one specific for the normal allele, together with another primer complementary to both alleles were used in the polymerase chain reaction with genomic DNA templates. The allele-specific primers differed from each other in their terminal 3{prime} nucleotide. Under the proper annealing temperature and polymerase chain reaction conditions, these primers only directed amplification on their complementary allele. In a single blind study of DNA samples from 12 individuals, this method correctly and unambiguously allowed for the determination of the genotypes with no false negatives or positives. If ASPCR is able to discriminate all allelic variation (both transition and transversion mutations), this method has the potential to be a powerful approach for genetic disease diagnosis, carrier screening, HLA typing, human gene mapping, forensics, and paternity testing.

  16. Recent advances in globin research using genome-wide association studies and gene editing.

    PubMed

    Orkin, Stuart H

    2016-03-01

    A long-sought goal in the hemoglobin field has been an improved understanding of the mechanisms that regulate the switch from fetal (HbF) to adult (HbA) hemoglobin during development. With such knowledge, the hope is that strategies for directed reactivation of HbF in adults could be devised as an approach to therapy for the β-hemoglobinopathies thalassemia and sickle cell disease. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) led to identification of three loci (BCL11A, HBS1L-MYB, and the β-globin cluster itself) in which natural genetic variation is correlated with different HbF levels in populations. Here, the central role of BCL11A in control of HbF is reviewed from the perspective of how findings may be translated to gene therapy in the not-too-distant future. This summary traces the evolution of recent studies from the initial recognition of BCL11A through GWAS to identification of critical sequences in an enhancer required for its erythroid-specific expression, thereby highlighting an Achilles heel for genome editing. PMID:26866328

  17. Globin gene-associated restriction-fragment-length polymorphisms in southern African peoples.

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, M; Jenkins, T

    1987-01-01

    The combination of polymorphic restriction-enzyme sites in the 3' region of the beta-globin gene cluster shows very little variation in southern-African Bantu-speaking black and Kalahari !Kung San populations. The sites of the 5' region, on the other hand, show marked variation, and two common haplotypes are present--the "Negro" type (- - - - +) and the "San" type (- + - - +)--in frequencies of .404 and .106, respectively, in the Bantu-speakers and .262 and .405, respectively, in the San. Twenty of 23 beta s-associated haplotypes in southern-African Bantu-speaking black subjects were the same as that found commonly in the Central African Republic (CAR)--i.e., the "Bantu" type--a finding providing the first convincing biological evidence for the common ancestry of geographically widely separated speakers of languages belonging to the Bantu family. The (-alpha) haplotype has a frequency of .21 in the Venda, .07 in both the Sotho-Tswana and the Nguni, and .06 among the !Kung San. These data are interpreted in the light of Plasmodium falciparum malaria selection and population movements in the African subcontinent. PMID:2891298

  18. Discovery of KLS-13019, a Cannabidiol-Derived Neuroprotective Agent, with Improved Potency, Safety, and Permeability.

    PubMed

    Kinney, William A; McDonnell, Mark E; Zhong, Hua Marlon; Liu, Chaomin; Yang, Lanyi; Ling, Wei; Qian, Tao; Chen, Yu; Cai, Zhijie; Petkanas, Dean; Brenneman, Douglas E

    2016-04-14

    Cannabidiol is the nonpsychoactive natural component of C. sativa that has been shown to be neuroprotective in multiple animal models. Our interest is to advance a therapeutic candidate for the orphan indication hepatic encephalopathy (HE). HE is a serious neurological disorder that occurs in patients with cirrhosis or liver failure. Although cannabidiol is effective in models of HE, it has limitations in terms of safety and oral bioavailability. Herein, we describe a series of side chain modified resorcinols that were designed for greater hydrophilicity and "drug likeness", while varying hydrogen bond donors, acceptors, architecture, basicity, neutrality, acidity, and polar surface area within the pendent group. Our primary screen evaluated the ability of the test agents to prevent damage to hippocampal neurons induced by ammonium acetate and ethanol at clinically relevant concentrations. Notably, KLS-13019 was 50-fold more potent and >400-fold safer than cannabidiol and exhibited an in vitro profile consistent with improved oral bioavailability. PMID:27096053

  19. Evolution of the sulfide-binding function within the globin multigenic family of the deep-sea hydrothermal vent tubeworm Riftia pachyptila.

    PubMed

    Bailly, Xavier; Jollivet, Didier; Vanin, Stephano; Deutsch, Jean; Zal, Franck; Lallier, François; Toulmond, André

    2002-09-01

    The giant extracellular hexagonal bilayer hemoglobin (HBL-Hb) of the deep-sea hydrothermal vent tube worm Riftia pachyptila is able to transport simultaneously O(2) and H(2)S in the blood from the gills to a specific organ: the trophosome that harbors sulfide-oxidizing endosymbionts. This vascular HBL-Hb is made of 144 globins from which four globin types (A1, A2, B1, and B2) coevolve. The H(2)S is bound at a specific location (not on the heme site) onto two of these globin types. In order to understand how such a function emerged and evolved in vestimentiferans and other related annelids, six partial cDNAs corresponding to the six globins known to compose the multigenic family of R. pachyptila have been identified and sequenced. These partial sequences (ca. 120 amino acids, i.e., 80% of the entire protein) were used to reconstruct molecular phylogenies in order to trace duplication events that have led to the family organization of these globins and to locate the position of the free cysteine residues known to bind H(2)S. From these sequences, only two free cysteine residues have been found to occur, at positions Cys + 1 (i.e., 1 a.a. from the well-conserved distal histidine) and Cys + 11 (i.e., 11 a.a. from the same histidine) in globins B2 and A2, respectively. These two positions are well conserved in annelids, vestimentiferans, and pogonophorans, which live in sulfidic environments. The structural comparison of the hydrophobic environment that surrounds these cysteine residues (the sulfide-binding domain) using hydrophobic cluster analysis plots, together with the cysteine positions in paralogous strains, suggests that the sulfide-binding function might have emerged before the annelid radiation in order to detoxify this toxic compound. Moreover, globin evolutionary rates are highly different between paralogous strains. This suggests that either the two globin subfamilies involved in the sulfide-binding function (A2 and B2) have evolved under strong directional

  20. Observation of large, non-covalent globin subassemblies in the approximately 3600 kDa hexagonal bilayer hemoglobins by electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Green, B N; Gotoh, T; Suzuki, T; Zal, F; Lallier, F H; Toulmond, A; Vinogradov, S N

    2001-06-01

    A non-covalent globin subassembly comprising 12 globin chains (204 to 214 kDa) was observed directly by electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry in the native hexagonal bilayer hemoglobins from the oligochaetes Lumbricus terrestris and Tubifex tubifex, the polychaetes Tylorrhynchus heterochaetus, Arenicola marina, Amphitrite ornata and Alvinella pompejana, the leeches Macrobdella decora, Haemopis grandis and Nephelopsis oscura and the chlorocruorin from the polychaete Myxicola infundibulum, over the pH range 3.5-7.0. The Hb from the deep-sea polychaete Alvinella exhibited in addition, peaks at approximately 107 kDa and at approximately 285 kDa, which were assigned to subassemblies of six globin chains and of 12 globin chains with three non-globin linker chains, respectively. The experimental masses decreased slightly with increased de-clustering potential (60 to 160 V) and were generally 0.1 to 0.2 % higher than the calculated masses, due probably to complexation with cations and water molecules. PMID:11397079

  1. Globin chain synthesis in single erythroid bursts from cord blood: studies on gamma leads to beta and G gamma leads to A gamma switches.

    PubMed

    Comi, P; Giglioni, B; Ottolenghi, S; Gianni, A M; Polli, E; Barba, P; Covelli, A; Migliaccio, G; Condorelli, M; Peschle, C

    1980-01-01

    Erythroid bursts from cord or adult blood were grown in methylcellulose cultures (3 international units of erythropoietin per plate). On day 13, single bursts were picked up and reincubated for 16-24 hr with [3H]leucine. Radioactive globin chains [alpha,beta,G gamma, and A gamma (Ala-136)] were analyzed by either isoelectric focusing on polyacrylamide gels and fluorography or carboxymethylcellulose chromatography. In all cases, alpha to non-alpha globin radioactivity ratios were close to 1. In single cord blood bursts, the values of both gamma-to-beta and G gamma-to-A gamma ratios were spread over a large spectrum and further characterized by a continuous rather than a bimodal distribution. Morever, the G gamma-to-A gamma ratios demonstrated in single bursts appeared to be directly correlated with the respective gamma-to-beta ratios. These data suggest that both the gamma leads to beta and the G gamma leads to A gamma switches are mediated via mechanisms modulating the relative activities of the different genes in the non-alpha globin gene cluster rather than via selection of clones committed to the preferential synthesis of beta and A gamma globins. In contrast with the results obtained with cord blood, individual adult blood bursts synthesize a lower and hence relatively more uniform amount of gamma globin chains. PMID:6153796

  2. High Fractional Occupancy of a Tandem Maf Recognition Element and Its Role in Long-Range β-Globin Gene Regulation.

    PubMed

    Stees, Jared R; Hossain, Mir A; Sunose, Tomoki; Kudo, Yasushi; Pardo, Carolina E; Nabilsi, Nancy H; Darst, Russell P; Poudyal, Rosha; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Huang, Suming; Kladde, Michael P; Bungert, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Enhancers and promoters assemble protein complexes that ultimately regulate the recruitment and activity of RNA polymerases. Previous work has shown that at least some enhancers form stable protein complexes, leading to the formation of enhanceosomes. We analyzed protein-DNA interactions in the murine β-globin gene locus using the methyltransferase accessibility protocol for individual templates (MAPit). The data show that a tandem Maf recognition element (MARE) in locus control region (LCR) hypersensitive site 2 (HS2) reveals a remarkably high degree of occupancy during differentiation of mouse erythroleukemia cells. Most of the other transcription factor binding sites in LCR HS2 or in the adult β-globin gene promoter regions exhibit low fractional occupancy, suggesting highly dynamic protein-DNA interactions. Targeting of an artificial zinc finger DNA-binding domain (ZF-DBD) to the HS2 tandem MARE caused a reduction in the association of MARE-binding proteins and transcription complexes at LCR HS2 and the adult βmajor-globin gene promoter but did not affect expression of the βminor-globin gene. The data demonstrate that a stable MARE-associated footprint in LCR HS2 is important for the recruitment of transcription complexes to the adult βmajor-globin gene promoter during erythroid cell differentiation. PMID:26503787

  3. High Fractional Occupancy of a Tandem Maf Recognition Element and Its Role in Long-Range β-Globin Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Stees, Jared R.; Hossain, Mir A.; Sunose, Tomoki; Kudo, Yasushi; Pardo, Carolina E.; Nabilsi, Nancy H.; Darst, Russell P.; Poudyal, Rosha; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Kladde, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Enhancers and promoters assemble protein complexes that ultimately regulate the recruitment and activity of RNA polymerases. Previous work has shown that at least some enhancers form stable protein complexes, leading to the formation of enhanceosomes. We analyzed protein-DNA interactions in the murine β-globin gene locus using the methyltransferase accessibility protocol for individual templates (MAPit). The data show that a tandem Maf recognition element (MARE) in locus control region (LCR) hypersensitive site 2 (HS2) reveals a remarkably high degree of occupancy during differentiation of mouse erythroleukemia cells. Most of the other transcription factor binding sites in LCR HS2 or in the adult β-globin gene promoter regions exhibit low fractional occupancy, suggesting highly dynamic protein-DNA interactions. Targeting of an artificial zinc finger DNA-binding domain (ZF-DBD) to the HS2 tandem MARE caused a reduction in the association of MARE-binding proteins and transcription complexes at LCR HS2 and the adult βmajor-globin gene promoter but did not affect expression of the βminor-globin gene. The data demonstrate that a stable MARE-associated footprint in LCR HS2 is important for the recruitment of transcription complexes to the adult βmajor-globin gene promoter during erythroid cell differentiation. PMID:26503787

  4. [Joint locus of a/b-globin genes in Danio rerio is segregated into structural subdomains active at different stages of development].

    PubMed

    Dolgushin, K V; Petrova, N V; Iudinkova, E S; Razin, S V; Iarovaia, O V

    2015-01-01

    In the domain model of eukaryotic genome organization, the functional unit of the genome, along with the relevant regulatory elements, is considered to be a gene or a gene family. In hot-blooded vertebrate animals, the domains of a- and b-globin genes are positioned at different chromosomes and are organized and regulated in different fashion. In cold-blooded animals, in particular in tropical fish Danio rerio, a- and b globin genes are located in a common gene cluster. However, the joint a/b-globin gene cluster is subdivided into two development stage-specific subdomains, the adult one and the embryonic-larval one. In an attempt to find out whether this functional segregation correlates with structural segregation of the domain we compared the DNase I sensitivity and profiles of histone modifications of adult and embryonic-larval segments of the domain in cultured D. rerio fibroblasts. We have demonstrated that, in these nonerythroid cells, adult and embryonic- larval subdomains possess different DNase I sensitivities and different profiles of H3K27me3, a histone modification introduced by PRC2 complex. These observations suggest that joint a/b globin gene domain of Danio rerio is segregated into two structural subdomain harboring adult and embryonic-larval globin genes. PMID:26107904

  5. Neuroprotective oleanane triterpenes from the roots of Bupleurum chinense.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan-Qi; Zhou, Le; Wang, Di; Wu, Jie; Li, Ling-Zhi; Huang, Xiao-Xiao; Liu, Qing-Bo; Wu, Ying-Ying; Lin, Song; Yang, Jing-Yu; Song, Shao-Jiang; Wu, Chun-Fu

    2016-03-15

    The discovery of new natural compounds with pharmacological properties is an increasingly important field, and a continuous phytochemical investigation of the roots of Bupleurum chinense D.C. has led to the isolation of 17 triterpenoids, including three new oleanane triterpenes (1-3) together with 14 known ones. Their structures were determined on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR spectra as well as HR-ESI-MS data. The cytotoxicities of all compounds against five selected human cancer cell lines were assayed. Only compounds 9 and 14 exhibited moderate activities. Recently, a number of investigations have focused on the neuroprotective properties of triterpenoids in B. chinense. In order to expand our knowledge about this herb, the neuroprotective effects of compounds 1-17 against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced neuronal cell damage in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells were evaluated. Compounds 1-3, 6-7 showed significant neuroprotective effects against H2O2-induced SH-SY5Y cell death. Preliminary structure-activity relationships (SARs) between neuroprotective effects and the isolates were also discussed. PMID:26883148

  6. Neuroprotective effect of lidocaine: is there clinical potential?

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Tiandong; Gao, Xiuren; Dilger, James P; Lin, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Local anesthetic lidocaine has been shown to be protective in animal models of focal and global ischemia as well as in in vitro hypoxic models. Lidocaine has been tested in patients for its potential protective effect on postoperative cognitive dysfunction. This mini-review summarizes the laboratory and clinical evidences and discusses its clinical applications as neuroprotective agent. PMID:27186318

  7. Neuroprotective Activity of Hypericum perforatum and Its Major Components

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Ana I.; Pinho, Cláudia; Sarmento, Bruno; Dias, Alberto C. P.

    2016-01-01

    Hypericum perforatum is a perennial plant, with worldwide distribution, commonly known as St. John’s wort. It has been used for centuries in traditional medicine for the treatment of several disorders, such as minor burns, anxiety, and mild to moderate depression. In the past years, its antidepressant properties have been extensively studied. Despite that, other H. perforatum biological activities, as its neuroprotective properties have also been evaluated. The present review aims to provide a comprehensive summary of the main biologically active compounds of H. perforatum, as for its chemistry, pharmacological activities, drug interactions and adverse reactions and gather scattered information about its neuroprotective abilities. As for this, it has been demonstrated that H. perforatum extracts and several of its major molecular components have the ability to protect against toxic insults, either directly, through neuroprotective mechanisms, or indirectly, through is antioxidant properties. H. perforatum has therefore the potential to become an effective neuroprotective therapeutic agent, despite further studies that need to be carried out. PMID:27462333

  8. Neuroprotective Activity of Hypericum perforatum and Its Major Components.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ana I; Pinho, Cláudia; Sarmento, Bruno; Dias, Alberto C P

    2016-01-01

    Hypericum perforatum is a perennial plant, with worldwide distribution, commonly known as St. John's wort. It has been used for centuries in traditional medicine for the treatment of several disorders, such as minor burns, anxiety, and mild to moderate depression. In the past years, its antidepressant properties have been extensively studied. Despite that, other H. perforatum biological activities, as its neuroprotective properties have also been evaluated. The present review aims to provide a comprehensive summary of the main biologically active compounds of H. perforatum, as for its chemistry, pharmacological activities, drug interactions and adverse reactions and gather scattered information about its neuroprotective abilities. As for this, it has been demonstrated that H. perforatum extracts and several of its major molecular components have the ability to protect against toxic insults, either directly, through neuroprotective mechanisms, or indirectly, through is antioxidant properties. H. perforatum has therefore the potential to become an effective neuroprotective therapeutic agent, despite further studies that need to be carried out. PMID:27462333

  9. Neuroprotective effects of chrysin: From chemistry to medicine.

    PubMed

    Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Braidy, Nady; Habtemariam, Solomon; Orhan, Ilkay Erdogan; Daglia, Maria; Manayi, Azadeh; Gortzi, Olga; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-11-01

    The World Health Organization estimated that the proportion of older people (over 60 years) will increase from 11% to 22% during next 40 years throughout the world. With respect to this, the morbidity and mortality rates of age-related diseases will increase. Mental diseases are the most common and important health problems among elderly people. Therefore, much attention has been paid to the discovery of neuroprotective drugs with high efficacy and negligible adverse effects. A growing body of scientific evidence has shown that phytochemicals possess neuroprotective effects and also mitigate neurodegeneration under both in vivo and in vitro conditions. Polyphenolic compounds, especially flavonoids, are known as most common chemical class of phytochemicals which possess a multiple range of health promoting effects. Chrysin, belonging to the flavone class, is one of the most important bioactive constituents of different fruits, vegetables and even mushrooms. Chrysin possesses potent neuroprotective effects and suppress neuroinflammation. In addition, chrysin improves cognitive decline and possesses a potent anti-amyloidogenic and neurotrophic effects. Furthermore, beneficial effects of chrysin on both depression and epilepsy have been reported. The present paper aimed to critically review the available literature data regarding the neuroprotective effects of chrysin as well as its chemistry, sources and bioavailability. PMID:26386393

  10. Selective blockade of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 is neuroprotective.

    PubMed

    Bruno, V; Ksiazek, I; Battaglia, G; Lukic, S; Leonhardt, T; Sauer, D; Gasparini, F; Kuhn, R; Nicoletti, F; Flor, P J

    2000-09-01

    We have used potent and selective non-competitive antagonists of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) -- 2-methyl-6-phenylethynylpyridine (MPEP), [6-methyl-2-(phenylazo)-3-pyridinol] (SIB-1757) and [(E)-2-methyl-6-(2-phenylethenyl)pyridine] (SIB-1893) - to examine whether endogenous activation of this particular metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype contributes to neuronal degeneration. In cortical cultures challenged with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), all three mGlu5 receptor antagonists were neuroprotective. The effect of MPEP was highly specific because the close analogue, 3-methyl-6-phenylethynylpyridine (iso-MPEP), which did not antagonize heterologously expressed mGlu5 receptors, was devoid of activity on NMDA toxicity. Neuroprotection by mGlu5 receptor antagonists was also observed in cortical cultures challenged with a toxic concentration of beta-amyloid peptide. We have also examined the effect of mGlu5 receptor antagonists in in vivo models of excitotoxic degeneration. MPEP and SIB-1893 were neuroprotective against neuronal damage induced by intrastriatal injection of NMDA or quinolinic acid. These results indicate that mGlu5 receptors represent a suitable target for novel neuroprotective agents of potential application in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:10974306

  11. Resveratrol Neuroprotection in a Chronic Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca-Kelly, Zoe; Nassrallah, Mayssa; Uribe, Jorge; Khan, Reas S.; Dine, Kimberly; Dutt, Mahasweta; Shindler, Kenneth S.

    2012-01-01

    Resveratrol is a naturally occurring polyphenol that activates SIRT1, an NAD-dependent deacetylase. SRT501, a pharmaceutical formulation of resveratrol with enhanced systemic absorption, prevents neuronal loss without suppressing inflammation in mice with relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of multiple sclerosis (MS). In contrast, resveratrol has been reported to suppress inflammation in chronic EAE, although neuroprotective effects were not evaluated. The current studies examine potential neuroprotective and immunomodulatory effects of resveratrol in chronic EAE induced by immunization with myelin oligodendroglial glycoprotein peptide in C57/Bl6 mice. Effects of two distinct formulations of resveratrol administered daily orally were compared. Resveratrol delayed the onset of EAE compared to vehicle-treated EAE mice, but did not prevent or alter the phenotype of inflammation in spinal cords or optic nerves. Significant neuroprotective effects were observed, with higher numbers of retinal ganglion cells found in eyes of resveratrol-treated EAE mice with optic nerve inflammation. Results demonstrate that resveratrol prevents neuronal loss in this chronic demyelinating disease model, similar to its effects in relapsing EAE. Differences in immunosuppression compared with prior studies suggest that immunomodulatory effects may be limited and may depend on specific immunization parameters or timing of treatment. Importantly, neuroprotective effects can occur without immunosuppression, suggesting a potential additive benefit of resveratrol in combination with anti-inflammatory therapies for MS. PMID:22654783

  12. T-type Calcium Channel Blockers as Neuroprotective Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kopecky, Benjamin J.; Liang, Ruqiang; Bao, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    T-type calcium channels are expressed in many diverse tissues, including neuronal, cardiovascular, and endocrine. T-type calcium channels are known to play roles in the development, maintenance, and repair of these tissues but have also been implicated in disease when not properly regulated. Calcium channel blockers have been developed to treat various diseases and their use clinically is widespread due to both their efficacy as well as their safety. Aside from their established clinical applications, recent studies have suggested neuroprotective effects of T-type calcium channels blockers. Many of the current T-type calcium channel blockers could act on other molecular targets besides T-type calcium channels making it uncertain whether their neuroprotective effects are solely due to blocking of T-type calcium channels. In this review, we discuss these drugs as well as newly developed chemical compounds that are designed to be more selective for T-type calcium channels. We review in vitro and in vivo evidence of neuroprotective effects by these T-type calcium channel blockers. We conclude by discussing possible molecular mechanisms underlying neuroprotective effects by T-type calcium channel blockers. PMID:24563219

  13. Neuroprotection as a Therapeutic Target for Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Cristina; Simó, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a multifactorial progressive disease of the retina and a leading cause of vision loss. DR has long been regarded as a vascular disorder, although neuronal death and visual impairment appear before vascular lesions, suggesting an important role played by neurodegeneration in DR and the appropriateness of neuroprotective strategies. Upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), the main target of current therapies, is likely to be one of the first responses to retinal hyperglycemic stress and VEGF may represent an important survival factor in early phases of DR. Of central importance for clinical trials is the detection of retinal neurodegeneration in the clinical setting, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography seems the most indicated technique. Many substances have been tested in animal studies for their neuroprotective properties and for possible use in humans. Perhaps, the most intriguing perspective is the use of endogenous neuroprotective substances or nutraceuticals. Together, the data point to the central role of neurodegeneration in the pathogenesis of DR and indicate neuroprotection as an effective strategy for treating this disease. However, clinical trials to determine not only the effectiveness and safety but also the compliance of a noninvasive route of drug administration are needed. PMID:27123463

  14. Stuck at the bench: Potential natural neuroprotective compounds for concussion

    PubMed Central

    Petraglia, Anthony L.; Winkler, Ethan A.; Bailes, Julian E.

    2011-01-01

    Background: While numerous laboratory studies have searched for neuroprotective treatment approaches to traumatic brain injury, no therapies have successfully translated from the bench to the bedside. Concussion is a unique form of brain injury, in that the current mainstay of treatment focuses on both physical and cognitive rest. Treatments for concussion are lacking. The concept of neuro-prophylactic compounds or supplements is also an intriguing one, especially as we are learning more about the relationship of numerous sub-concussive blows and/or repetitive concussive impacts and the development of chronic neurodegenerative disease. The use of dietary supplements and herbal remedies has become more common place. Methods: A literature search was conducted with the objective of identifying and reviewing the pre-clinical and clinical studies investigating the neuroprotective properties of a few of the more widely known compounds and supplements. Results: There are an abundance of pre-clinical studies demonstrating the neuroprotective properties of a variety of these compounds and we review some of those here. While there are an increasing number of well-designed studies investigating the therapeutic potential of these nutraceutical preparations, the clinical evidence is still fairly thin. Conclusion: There are encouraging results from laboratory studies demonstrating the multi-mechanistic neuroprotective properties of many naturally occurring compounds. Similarly, there are some intriguing clinical observational studies that potentially suggest both acute and chronic neuroprotective effects. Thus, there is a need for future trials exploring the potential therapeutic benefits of these compounds in the treatment of traumatic brain injury, particularly concussion. PMID:22059141

  15. Accurate initiation of human epsilon-globin RNA synthesis by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase in isolated nuclei of K562 erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmour, R S; Allan, M; Paul, J

    1984-01-01

    The human epsilon-globin gene was transcribed in vitro in isolated K562 cell nuclei by using exogenous Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (EC 2.7.7.6). Newly formed RNA transcripts were distinguished from nuclear RNA molecules by (i) incorporating mercurated UTP into RNA under conditions in which the endogenous polymerase II is inactive and (ii) subsequently isolating the mercurated RNA by affinity chromatography on thiolated Sepharose. A specific 5'-end-labeled probe spanning the epsilon-globin gene cap site was used in nuclease S1 mapping studies to examine the in vitro initiation site of the isolated transcripts. It was found that transcription occurred from the coding strand only and originated almost entirely from a point that was identical to that of the major cap site for epsilon-globin mRNA in vivo. Images PMID:6330734

  16. Stepwise colonization of the Andes by ruddy ducks and the evolution of novel β-globin variants.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Fuentes, V; Cortázar-Chinarro, M; Lozano-Jaramillo, M; McCracken, K G

    2013-03-01

    Andean uplift played a key role in Neotropical bird diversification, yet past dispersal and genetic adaptation to high-altitude environments remain little understood. Here we use multilocus population genetics to study population history and historical demographic processes in the ruddy duck (Oxyura jamaicensis), a stiff-tailed diving duck comprising three subspecies distributed from Canada to Tierra del Fuego and inhabiting wetlands from sea level to 4500 m in the Andes. We sequenced the mitochondrial DNA, four autosomal introns and three haemoglobin genes (α(A), α(D), β(A)) and used isolation-with-migration (IM) models to study gene flow between North America and South America, and between the tropical and southern Andes. Our analyses indicated that ruddy ducks dispersed first from North America to the tropical Andes, then from the tropical Andes to the southern Andes. While no nonsynonymous substitutions were found in either α globin gene, three amino acid substitutions were observed in the β(A) globin. Based on phylogenetic reconstruction and power analysis, the first β(A) substitution, found in all Andean individuals, was acquired when ruddy ducks dispersed from low altitude in North America to high altitude in the tropical Andes, whereas the two additional substitutions occurred more recently, when ruddy ducks dispersed from high altitude in the tropical Andes to low altitude in the southern Andes. This stepwise colonization pattern accompanied by polarized β(A) globin amino acid replacements suggest that ruddy ducks first acclimatized or adapted to the Andean highlands and then again to the lowlands. In addition, ruddy ducks colonized the Andean highlands via a less common route as compared to other waterbird species that colonized the Andes northwards from the southern cone of South America. PMID:23346994

  17. Origin and Ascendancy of a Chimeric Fusion Gene: The β/δ-Globin Gene of Paenungulate Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Opazo, Juan C.; Sloan, Angela M.; Campbell, Kevin L.

    2009-01-01

    The δ-globin gene (HBD) of eutherian mammals exhibits a propensity for recombinational exchange with the closely linked β-globin gene (HBB) and has been independently converted by the HBB gene in multiple lineages. Here we report the presence of a chimeric β/δ fusion gene in the African elephant (Loxodonta africana) that was created by unequal crossing-over between misaligned HBD and HBB paralogs. The recombinant chromosome that harbors the β/δ fusion gene in elephants is structurally similar to the “anti-Lepore” duplication mutant of humans (the reciprocal exchange product of the hemoglobin Lepore deletion mutant). However, the situation in the African elephant is unique in that the chimeric β/δ fusion gene supplanted the parental HBB gene and is therefore solely responsible for synthesizing the β-chain subunits of adult hemoglobin. A phylogenetic survey of β-like globin genes in afrotherian and xenarthran mammals revealed that the origin of the chimeric β/δ fusion gene and the concomitant inactivation of the HBB gene predated the radiation of “Paenungulata,” a clade of afrotherian mammals that includes three orders: Proboscidea (elephants), Sirenia (dugongs and manatees), and Hyracoidea (hyraxes). The reduced fitness of the human Hb Lepore deletion mutant helps to explain why independently derived β/δ fusion genes (which occur on an anti-Lepore chromosome) have been fixed in a number of mammalian lineages, whereas the reciprocal δ/β fusion gene (which occurs on a Lepore chromosome) has yet to be documented in any nonhuman mammal. This illustrates how the evolutionary fates of chimeric fusion genes can be strongly influenced by their recombinational mode of origin. PMID:19332641

  18. Phylogenetic comparisons suggest that distance from the locus control region guides developmental expression of primate beta-type globin genes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robert M; Prychitko, Tom; Gumucio, Deborah; Wildman, Derek E; Uddin, Monica; Goodman, Morris

    2006-02-28

    Phylogenetic inferences drawn from comparative data on mammalian beta-globin gene clusters indicate that the ancestral primate cluster contained a locus control region (LCR) and five paralogously related beta-type globin loci (5'-LCR-epsilon-gamma-psieta-delta-beta-3'), with epsilon and gamma expressed solely during embryonic life. A gamma locus tandem duplication (5'-gamma(1)-gamma(2)-3') triggered gamma's evolution toward fetal expression but by a different trajectory in platyrrhines (New World monkeys) than in catarrhines (Old World monkeys and apes, including humans). In platyrrhine (e.g., Cebus) fetuses, gamma(1) at the ancestral distance from epsilon is down-regulated, whereas gamma(2) at increased distance is up-regulated. Catarrhine gamma(1) and gamma(2) acquired longer distances from epsilon (14 and 19 kb, respectively), and both are up-regulated throughout fetal life with gamma(1)'s expression predominating over gamma(2)'s. On enlarging the platyrrhine expression data, we find Aotus gamma is embryonic, Alouatta gamma is inactive at term, and in Callithrix, gamma(1) is down-regulated fetally, whereas gamma(2) is up-regulated. Of eight mammalian taxa now represented per taxon by embryonic, fetal, and postnatal beta-type globin gene expression data, four taxa are primates, and data for three of these primates are from this laboratory. Our results support a model in which a short distance (<10 kb) between epsilon and the adjacent gamma is a plesiomorphic character that allows the LCR to drive embryonic expression of both genes, whereas a longer distance (>10 kb) impedes embryonic activation of the downstream gene. PMID:16488971

  19. Molecular cloning of the alpha-globin transcription factor CP2.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, L C; Swendeman, S L; Sheffery, M

    1992-01-01

    CP2, a transcription factor that binds the murine alpha-globin promoter, was purified and subjected to amino acid sequence analysis. Oligonucleotide primers derived from the sequence were used to obtain murine and human cDNA clones for the factor. The murine cDNA spans approximately 4 kb and contains two coextensive open reading frames (ORFs) which encode deduced polypeptides of 529 (ORF-1; molecular weight, 59,802) and 502 (ORF-2; molecular weight, 56,957) amino acids, slightly smaller than the purified factor as estimated from its mobility in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels (64,000 to 66,000). The human cDNA contains a single ORF of 501 amino acids that is nearly contiguous with murine ORF-2. Indeed, comparison of deduced human and murine amino acid sequences shows that the two polypeptides are 96.4% identical. A strictly conserved region is rich in serine and threonine (17.5%) and in proline (11%) residues (S-T-P domain). This S-T-P domain is immediately amino terminal to a string of 10 glutamines (in the human sequence) or a tract of alternating glutamine and proline residues (in the mouse sequence). Bacterial expression of the full-length (502-amino-acid) murine factor or of a core region comprising amino acids 133 to 395 generated polypeptides with the DNA binding specificity of CP2. These results confirmed the cloning of CP2 and delimited the region sufficient for specific DNA sequence recognition. Antisera produced against the core region recognized polypeptide species with Mrs of 64,000 and 66,000 in immune blots of nuclear extracts prepared from both murine and human cell lines, consistent with the size of the purified factor. Lastly, a data base search revealed that amino acids 63 to 270 of the murine factor are distantly related to a domain in the Drosophila gene regulatory factor Elf-1. Images PMID:1732747

  20. β-globin gene transfer to human bone marrow for sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Zulema; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Geiger, Sabine; Cooper, Aaron R.; Wherley, Jennifer; Kaufman, Michael L.; Hollis, Roger P.; Ruiz de Assin, Rafael; Senadheera, Shantha; Sahagian, Arineh; Jin, Xiangyang; Gellis, Alyse; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gjertson, David; DeOliveira, Satiro; Kempert, Pamela; Shupien, Sally; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Walters, Mark C.; Meiselman, Herbert J.; Wenby, Rosalinda B.; Gruber, Theresa; Marder, Victor; Coates, Thomas D.; Kohn, Donald B.

    2013-01-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy is an approach to treating sickle cell disease (SCD) patients that may result in lower morbidity than allogeneic transplantation. We examined the potential of a lentiviral vector (LV) (CCL-βAS3-FB) encoding a human hemoglobin (HBB) gene engineered to impede sickle hemoglobin polymerization (HBBAS3) to transduce human BM CD34+ cells from SCD donors and prevent sickling of red blood cells produced by in vitro differentiation. The CCL-βAS3-FB LV transduced BM CD34+ cells from either healthy or SCD donors at similar levels, based on quantitative PCR and colony-forming unit progenitor analysis. Consistent expression of HBBAS3 mRNA and HbAS3 protein compromised a fourth of the total β-globin–like transcripts and hemoglobin (Hb) tetramers. Upon deoxygenation, a lower percentage of HBBAS3-transduced red blood cells exhibited sickling compared with mock-transduced cells from sickle donors. Transduced BM CD34+ cells were transplanted into immunodeficient mice, and the human cells recovered after 2–3 months were cultured for erythroid differentiation, which showed levels of HBBAS3 mRNA similar to those seen in the CD34+ cells that were directly differentiated in vitro. These results demonstrate that the CCL-βAS3-FB LV is capable of efficient transfer and consistent expression of an effective anti-sickling β-globin gene in human SCD BM CD34+ progenitor cells, improving physiologic parameters of the resulting red blood cells. PMID:23863630

  1. Towards a "Golden Standard" for computing globin stability: Stability and structure sensitivity of myoglobin mutants.

    PubMed

    Kepp, Kasper P

    2015-10-01

    Fast and accurate computation of protein stability is increasingly important for e.g. protein engineering and protein misfolding diseases, but no consensus methods exist for important proteins such as globins, and performance may depend on the type of structural input given. This paper reports benchmarking of six protein stability calculators (POPMUSIC 2.1, I-Mutant 2.0, I-Mutant 3.0, CUPSAT, SDM, and mCSM) against 134 experimental stability changes for mutations of sperm-whale myoglobin. Six different high-resolution structures were used to test structure sensitivity that may impair protein calculations. The trend accuracy of the methods decreased as I-Mutant 2.0 (R=0.64-0.65), SDM (R=0.57-0.60), POPMUSIC2.1 (R=0.54-0.57), I-Mutant 3.0 (R=0.53-0.55), mCSM (R=0.35-0.47), and CUPSAT (R=0.25-0.48). The mean signed errors increased as SDM

  2. Haptoglobin Binding Stabilizes Hemoglobin Ferryl Iron and the Globin Radical on Tyrosine β145

    PubMed Central

    Schaer, Dominik J.; Buehler, Paul W.; Wilson, Michael T.; Reeder, Brandon J.; Silkstone, Gary; Svistunenko, Dimitri A.; Bulow, Leif; Alayash, Abdu I.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Hemoglobin (Hb) becomes toxic when released from the erythrocyte. The acute phase protein haptoglobin (Hp) binds avidly to Hb and decreases oxidative damage to Hb itself and to the surrounding proteins and lipids. However, the molecular mechanism underpinning Hp protection is to date unclear. The aim of this study was to use electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, stopped flow optical spectrophotometry, and site-directed mutagenesis to explore the mechanism and specifically the role of specific tyrosine residues in this protection. Results: Following peroxide challenge Hb produces reactive oxidative intermediates in the form of ferryl heme and globin free radicals. Hp binding increases the steady state level of ferryl formation during Hb-catalyzed lipid peroxidation, while at the same time dramatically inhibiting the overall reaction rate. This enhanced ferryl stability is also seen in the absence of lipids and in the presence of external reductants. Hp binding is not accompanied by a decrease in the pK of ferryl protonation; the protonated ferryl species still forms, but is intrinsically less reactive. Ferryl stabilization is accompanied by a significant increase in the concentration of the peroxide-induced tyrosine free radical. EPR spectral parameters and mutagenesis studies suggest that this radical is located on tyrosine 145, the penultimate C-terminal amino acid on the beta Hb subunit. Innovation: Hp binding decreases both the ferryl iron and free radical reactivity of Hb. Conclusion: Hp protects against Hb-induced damage in the vasculature, not by preventing the primary reactivity of heme oxidants, but by rendering the resultant protein products less damaging. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2264–2273. PMID:22702311

  3. β-globin haplotypes in normal and hemoglobinopathic individuals from Reconcavo Baiano, State of Bahia, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Five restriction site polymorphisms in the β-globin gene cluster (HincII-5‘ ε, HindIII-G γ, HindIII-A γ, HincII- ψβ1 and HincII-3‘ ψβ1) were analyzed in three populations (n = 114) from Reconcavo Baiano, State of Bahia, Brazil. The groups included two urban populations from the towns of Cachoeira and Maragojipe and one rural Afro-descendant population, known as the “quilombo community”, from Cachoeira municipality. The number of haplotypes found in the populations ranged from 10 to 13, which indicated higher diversity than in the parental populations. The haplotypes 2 (+ - - - -), 3 (- - - - +), 4 (- + - - +) and 6 (- + + - +) on the βA chromosomes were the most common, and two haplotypes, 9 (- + + + +) and 14 (+ + - - +), were found exclusively in the Maragojipe population. The other haplotypes (1, 5, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14 and 16) had lower frequencies. Restriction site analysis and the derived haplotypes indicated homogeneity among the populations. Thirty-two individuals with hemoglobinopathies (17 sickle cell disease, 12 HbSC disease and 3 HbCC disease) were also analyzed. The haplotype frequencies of these patients differed significantly from those of the general population. In the sickle cell disease subgroup, the predominant haplotypes were BEN (Benin) and CAR (Central African Republic), with frequencies of 52.9% and 32.4%, respectively. The high frequency of the BEN haplotype agreed with the historical origin of the afro-descendant population in the state of Bahia. However, this frequency differed from that of Salvador, the state capital, where the CAR and BEN haplotypes have similar frequencies, probably as a consequence of domestic slave trade and subsequent internal migrations to other regions of Brazil. PMID:21637405

  4. Globin mRNA contains a sequence complementary to double-stranded region of nuclear pre-mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Ryskov, A P; Tokarskaya, O V; Georgiev, G P; Coutelle, C; Thiele, B

    1976-01-01

    Melted ds RNA isolated from rabbit bone marrow pre-mRNA was hybridized with excess of globin mRNA which was prepared from rabbit reticulocytes. 7-9% of ds sequences became RNAase-stable and about 30% of the sequences could be bound to poly(U)-Sepharose through poly (A) of mRNA. The size of RNAase-stable hybrid is about 30 nucleotides, that is one fourth of the length of one strand of the ds RNA. PMID:986644

  5. Enhancements of the production of bilirubin and the expression of β-globin by carbon monoxide during erythroid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Mu, Anfeng; Li, Ming; Tanaka, Masakazu; Adachi, Yasushi; Tai, Tran Tien; Liem, Pham Hieu; Izawa, Shingo; Furuyama, Kazumichi; Taketani, Shigeru

    2016-05-01

    Heme is degraded by heme oxygenase to form iron, carbon monoxide (CO), and biliverdin. However, information about the catabolism of heme in erythroid cells is limited. In this study, we showed the production and export of bilirubin in murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells. The production of bilirubin by MEL cells was enhanced when heme synthesis was induced. When mouse bone marrow cells were induced with erythropoietin to differentiate into erythroid cells, the synthesis of bilirubin increased. The expression of β-globin was enhanced by CO at the transcriptional level. These results indicate that constant production of CO from heme regulates erythropoiesis. PMID:27087140

  6. Dynamics of α-globin locus chromatin structure and gene expression during erythroid differentiation of human CD34+ cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Milind C; Karmakar, Subhradip; Krause, Diane; Weissman, Sherman M

    2009-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study has been to establish serum free culture conditions for the ex vivo expansion and differentiation of human CD34+ cells into erythroid lineage and to study the chromatin structure, gene expression and transcription factor recruitment at the α–globin locus in the developing erythron. Methods A basal IMDM cell culture medium with 1% bovine serum albumin as a serum replacement and a combination of cytokines and growth factors was used for the expansion and differentiation of the CD34+ cells. Expression patterns of the alpha and beta like genes at various stages of erythropoiesis was studied by Reverse transcriptase (RT)-qPCR analysis, profile of key erythroid transcription factors was investigated by western blotting, and the chromatin structure and transcription factor recruitment at the alpha globin locus was investigated by ChIP-qPCR analysis. Results Human CD34+ cells in the serum free medium undergo near synchronous erythroid differentiation to yield large amount of cells at different differentiation stages. We observe distinct patterns of the histone modifications and transcription factor binding at the α-globin locus during erythroid differentiation of CD34+ cells. NF-E2 was present at upstream activator sites even before addition of erythropoietin (Epo), while bound GATA-1 was only detectable after Epo treatment. After seven days of erythropoietin treatment, H3K4Me2 modification uniformly increases throughout the α–globin locus. Acetylation at H3K9 and binding of Pol II, NF-E2 and GATA-1 were restricted to certain HS sites of the enhancer and theta gene, and were conspicuously low at the α-like globin promoters. Rearrangement of the insulator binding factor CTCF took place at and around the α-globin locus as CD34+ cells differentiated into erythroid pathway. Conclusion Our results indicate that remodeling of the upstream elements may be the primary event in activation of α–globin gene expression. Activation of

  7. A novel δ-globin gene mutation (HBD: c.323G>A) masking the diagnosis of β-thalassemia: a first report from India.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sachin; Edison, Eunice S; Mathews, Vikram; Shaji, R V

    2012-05-01

    An elevated HbA(2) (α2δ2) level (>3.5%) is a well-established diagnostic test for heterozygous β-thalassemia. Mutations in the δ-globin gene can cause decreased expression of HbA(2), resulting in heterozygous β-thalassemia with normal levels of HbA(2). In this report, we describe a novel missense mutation in δ-globin (HBD: c.323G>A, Gly > Asp) in an Indian family with heterozygous β-thalassemia with normal HbA(2) levels. PMID:22477537

  8. A New δ-Globin Gene Variant: Hb A2-Fengshun [δ121(GH4)Glu→Lys (HBD: c.364G > A)].

    PubMed

    Yan, Jin-Mei; Zhou, Jian-Ying; Xie, Xing-Mei; Li, Jian; Li, Dong-Zhi

    2016-06-01

    An elevated Hb A2 (α2δ2 level) is a diagnostic marker for heterozygous β-thalassemia (β-thal). Mutations in the δ-globin gene can cause decreased expression of Hb A2, compromising screening for heterozygous β-thal. In this report, we describe a novel missense mutation of the δ-globin [Hb A2-Fengshun or δ121(GH4)Glu→Lys, HBD: c.364G > A] in a Chinese individual who had coinherited a heterozygous β-thal with a normal Hb A2 level. PMID:27117573

  9. Calcium preconditioning triggers neuroprotection in retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Brandt, S K; Weatherly, M E; Ware, L; Linn, D M; Linn, C L

    2011-01-13

    In the mammalian retina, excitotoxicity has been shown to be involved in apoptotic retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death and is associated with certain retinal disease states including glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and retinal ischemia. Previous studies from this lab [Wehrwein E, Thompson SA, Coulibaly SF, Linn DM, Linn CL (2004) Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 45:1531-1543] have demonstrated that acetylcholine (ACh) and nicotine protects against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in isolated adult pig RGCs through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Activation of nAChRs in these RGCs triggers cell survival signaling pathways and inhibits apoptotic enzymes [Asomugha CO, Linn DM, Linn CL (2010) J Neurochem 112:214-226]. However, the link between binding of nAChRs and activation of neuroprotective pathways is unknown. In this study, we examine the hypothesis that calcium permeation through nAChR channels is required for ACh-induced neuroprotection against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in isolated pig RGCs. RGCs were isolated from other retinal tissue using a two step panning technique and cultured for 3 days under different conditions. In some studies, calcium imaging experiments were performed using the fluorescent calcium indicator, fluo-4, and demonstrated that calcium permeates the nAChR channels located on pig RGCs. In other studies, the extracellular calcium concentration was altered to determine the effect on nicotine-induced neuroprotection. Results support the hypothesis that calcium is required for nicotine-induced neuroprotection in isolated pig RGCs. Lastly, studies were performed to analyze the effects of preconditioning on glutamate-induced excitotoxicity and neuroprotection. In these studies, a preconditioning dose of calcium was introduced to cells using a variety of mechanisms before a large glutamate insult was applied to cells. Results from these studies support the hypothesis that preconditioning cells with a relatively low level of calcium before

  10. NEUROPROTECTION FOR ISCHEMIC STROKE: PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Myron D.

    2008-01-01

    Neuroprotection for ischemic stroke refers to strategies, applied singly or in combination, that antagonize the injurious biochemical and molecular events that eventuate in irreversible ischemic injury. There has been a recent explosion of interest in this field, with over 1000 experimental papers and over 400 clinical articles appearing within the past 6 years. These studies, in turn, are the outgrowth of three decades of investigative work to define the multiple mechanisms and mediators of ischemic brain injury, which constitute potential targets of neuroprotection. Rigorously conducted experimental studies in animal models of brain ischemia provide incontrovertible proof-of-principle that high-grade protection of the ischemic brain is an achievable goal. Nonetheless, many agents have been brought to clinical trial without a sufficiently compelling evidence-based pre-clinical foundation. At this writing, around 160 clinical trials of neuroprotection for ischemic stroke have been initiated. Of the approximately 120 completed trials, two-thirds were smaller early-phase safety-feasibility studies. The remaining one-third were typically larger (>200 subjects) phase II or III trials, but, disappointingly, only fewer than one-half of these administered neuroprotective therapy within the 4–6 hour therapeutic window within which efficacious neuroprotection is considered to be achievable. This fact alone helps to account for the abundance of “failed” trials. This review presents a close survey of the most extensively evaluated neuroprotective agents and classes and considers both the strengths and weakness of the pre-clinical evidence as well as the results and shortcomings of the clinical trials themselves. Among the agent-classes considered are calcium channel blockers; glutamate antagonists; GABA agonists; antioxidants/radical scavengers; phospholipid precursor; nitric oxide signal-transduction down-regulator; leukocyte inhibitors; hemodilution; and a miscellany

  11. Astaxanthin as a Potential Neuroprotective Agent for Neurological Diseases.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haijian; Niu, Huanjiang; Shao, Anwen; Wu, Cheng; Dixon, Brandon J; Zhang, Jianmin; Yang, Shuxu; Wang, Yirong

    2015-09-01

    Neurological diseases, which consist of acute injuries and chronic neurodegeneration, are the leading causes of human death and disability. However, the pathophysiology of these diseases have not been fully elucidated, and effective treatments are still lacking. Astaxanthin, a member of the xanthophyll group, is a red-orange carotenoid with unique cell membrane actions and diverse biological activities. More importantly, there is evidence demonstrating that astaxanthin confers neuroprotective effects in experimental models of acute injuries, chronic neurodegenerative disorders, and neurological diseases. The beneficial effects of astaxanthin are linked to its oxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic characteristics. In this review, we will focus on the neuroprotective properties of astaxanthin and explore the underlying mechanisms in the setting of neurological diseases. PMID:26378548

  12. Control of Intracellular Calcium Signaling as a Neuroprotective Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, R. Scott; Goad, Daryl L.; Grillo, Michael A.; Kaja, Simon; Payne, Andrew J.; Koulen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Both acute and chronic degenerative diseases of the nervous system reduce the viability and function of neurons through changes in intracellular calcium signaling. In particular, pathological increases in the intracellular calcium concentration promote such pathogenesis. Disease involvement of numerous regulators of intracellular calcium signaling located on the plasma membrane and intracellular organelles has been documented. Diverse groups of chemical compounds targeting ion channels, G-protein coupled receptors, pumps and enzymes have been identified as potential neuroprotectants. The present review summarizes the discovery, mechanisms and biological activity of neuroprotective molecules targeting proteins that control intracellular calcium signaling to preserve or restore structure and function of the nervous system. Disease relevance, clinical applications and new technologies for the identification of such molecules are being discussed. PMID:20335972

  13. Bioactive Compounds and Their Neuroprotective Effects in Diabetic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Yoon Sin

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and impaired insulin signaling during the development of diabetes can cause diabetic complications, such as diabetic neuropathy, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Although various therapeutics are available for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy, no absolute cure exists, and additional research is necessary to comprehensively understand the underlying pathophysiological pathways. A number of studies have demonstrated the potential health benefits of bioactive compounds, i.e., flavonoids and vitamins, which may be effective as supplementary treatments for diabetes and its complications. In this review, we highlight the most recent reports about the mechanisms of action of bioactive compounds (flavonoids and vitamins) possessing potential neuroprotective properties in diabetic conditions. Additional clinical studies are required to determine the appropriate dose and duration of bioactive compound supplementation for neuroprotection in diabetic patients. PMID:27483315

  14. Neuroprotective Transcription Factors in Animal Models of Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Blaudin de Thé, François-Xavier; Rekaik, Hocine; Prochiantz, Alain; Fuchs, Julia; Joshi, Rajiv L.

    2016-01-01

    A number of transcription factors, including En1/2, Foxa1/2, Lmx1a/b, Nurr1, Otx2, and Pitx3, with key roles in midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neuron development, also regulate adult mDA neuron survival and physiology. Mouse models with targeted disruption of some of these genes display several features reminiscent of Parkinson disease (PD), in particular the selective and progressive loss of mDA neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). The characterization of these animal models has provided valuable insights into various mechanisms of PD pathogenesis. Therefore, the dissection of the mechanisms and survival signalling pathways engaged by these transcription factors to protect mDA neuron from degeneration can suggest novel therapeutic strategies. The work on En1/2-mediated neuroprotection also highlights the potential of protein transduction technology for neuroprotective approaches in PD. PMID:26881122

  15. 5th Annual Global College of Neuroprotection and Neuroregeneration.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Hari Shanker

    2008-06-01

    The 5th Global College of Neuroprotection and Neuroregeneration (GCNN) was held in the historic charming capital city of Bucharest, Romania in JW Marriott Grand Hotel on 3-6 March, 2008. The meeting was a unique blend of basic researchers and clinicians across the Globe presenting their recent findings in neuroprotection and neuroregeneration in a beautiful exotic ambience. More than 300 students and researchers attended the congress and participated in deliberations. Over 60 representatives from various pharmaceutical industries from all over the world supported this event. This meeting was held for the first time as a joint venture with GCNN and the Society for study on Neuroproetction and Neuroplasticity (SSNN), and was a grand success both scientifically and socially. Thus, these joint meetings of the two societies (GCNN and SSNN) will continue in future in different European cities for the coming 5 years. PMID:18505353

  16. Potential neuroprotective strategies for perinatal infection and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ranchhod, S M; Gunn, K C; Fowke, T M; Davidson, J O; Lear, C A; Bai, J; Bennet, L; Mallard, C; Gunn, A J; Dean, J M

    2015-10-01

    Preterm born infants have high rates of brain injury, leading to motor and neurocognitive problems in later life. Infection and resulting inflammation of the fetus and newborn are highly associated with these disabilities. However, there are no established neuroprotective therapies. Microglial activation and expression of many cytokines play a key role in normal brain function and development, as well as being deleterious. Thus, treatment must achieve a delicate balance between possible beneficial and harmful effects. In this review, we discuss potential neuroprotective strategies targeting systemic infection or the resulting systemic and central inflammatory responses. We highlight the central importance of timing of treatment and the critical lack of studies of delayed treatment of infection/inflammation. PMID:25702527

  17. Astaxanthin as a Potential Neuroprotective Agent for Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haijian; Niu, Huanjiang; Shao, Anwen; Wu, Cheng; Dixon, Brandon J.; Zhang, Jianmin; Yang, Shuxu; Wang, Yirong

    2015-01-01

    Neurological diseases, which consist of acute injuries and chronic neurodegeneration, are the leading causes of human death and disability. However, the pathophysiology of these diseases have not been fully elucidated, and effective treatments are still lacking. Astaxanthin, a member of the xanthophyll group, is a red-orange carotenoid with unique cell membrane actions and diverse biological activities. More importantly, there is evidence demonstrating that astaxanthin confers neuroprotective effects in experimental models of acute injuries, chronic neurodegenerative disorders, and neurological diseases. The beneficial effects of astaxanthin are linked to its oxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic characteristics. In this review, we will focus on the neuroprotective properties of astaxanthin and explore the underlying mechanisms in the setting of neurological diseases. PMID:26378548

  18. Bioactive Compounds and Their Neuroprotective Effects in Diabetic Complications.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yoon Sin

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and impaired insulin signaling during the development of diabetes can cause diabetic complications, such as diabetic neuropathy, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Although various therapeutics are available for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy, no absolute cure exists, and additional research is necessary to comprehensively understand the underlying pathophysiological pathways. A number of studies have demonstrated the potential health benefits of bioactive compounds, i.e., flavonoids and vitamins, which may be effective as supplementary treatments for diabetes and its complications. In this review, we highlight the most recent reports about the mechanisms of action of bioactive compounds (flavonoids and vitamins) possessing potential neuroprotective properties in diabetic conditions. Additional clinical studies are required to determine the appropriate dose and duration of bioactive compound supplementation for neuroprotection in diabetic patients. PMID:27483315

  19. Neuroprotective effects of resveratrol in Alzheimer disease pathology

    PubMed Central

    Rege, Shraddha D.; Geetha, Thangiah; Griffin, Gerald D.; Broderick, Tom L.; Babu, Jeganathan Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive loss of cognitive and behavioral abilities. Extracellular senile plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles are hallmarks of AD. Researchers aim to analyze the molecular mechanisms underlying AD pathogenesis; however, the therapeutic options available to treat this disease are inadequate. In the past few years, several studies have reported interesting insights about the neuroprotective properties of the polyphenolic compound resveratrol (3, 5, 4′-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) when used with in vitro and in vivo models of AD. The aim of this review is to focus on the neuroprotective and antioxidant effects of resveratrol on AD and its multiple potential mechanisms of action. In addition, because the naturally occurring forms of resveratrol have a very limited half-life in plasma, a description of potential analogs aimed at increasing the bioavailability in plasma is also discussed. PMID:25309423

  20. Olesoxime (TRO19622): A Novel Mitochondrial-Targeted Neuroprotective Compound

    PubMed Central

    Bordet, Thierry; Berna, Patrick; Abitbol, Jean-Louis; Pruss, Rebecca M.

    2010-01-01

    Olesoxime (TRO19622) is a novel mitochondrial-targeted neuroprotective compound undergoing a pivotal clinical efficacy study in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and also in development for Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA). It belongs to a new family of cholesterol-oximes identified for its survival-promoting activity on purified motor neurons deprived of neurotrophic factors. Olesoxime targets proteins of the outer mitochondrial membrane, concentrates at the mitochondria and prevents permeability transition pore opening mediated by, among other things, oxidative stress. Olesoxime has been shown to exert a potent neuroprotective effect in various in vitro and in vivo models. In particular olesoxime provided significant protection in experimental animal models of motor neuron disorders and more particularly ALS. Olesoxime is orally active, crosses the blood brain barrier, and is well tolerated. Collectively, its pharmacological properties designate olesoxime as a promising drug candidate for motor neuron diseases.

  1. Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Cognitive Function in Midlife: Neuroprotection or Neuroselection?

    PubMed Central

    Belsky, Daniel W.; Caspi, Avshalom; Israel, Salomon; Blumenthal, James A.; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if better cognitive functioning at midlife among more physically fit individuals reflects “neuroprotection,” in which fitness protects against age-related cognitive decline, or “neuroselection,” in which children with higher cognitive functioning select into more active lifestyles. Methods Children in the Dunedin Longitudinal Study (N=1,037) completed the Wechsler Intelligence Scales and the Trail-Making, Rey-Delayed-Recall, and Grooved-Pegboard tasks as children and again at midlife (age-38). Adult cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed using a submaximal exercise test to estimate maximum-oxygen-consumption-adjusted-for-body-weight in milliliters/minute/kilogram (VO2max). We tested if more-fit individuals had better cognitive functioning than their less-fit counterparts (which could be consistent with neuroprotection), and if better childhood cognitive functioning predisposed to better adult cardiorespiratory fitness (neuroselection). Finally, we examined possible mechanisms of neuroselection. Results Participants with better cardiorespiratory fitness had higher cognitive test scores at midlife. However, fitness-associated advantages in cognitive functioning were present already in childhood. After accounting for childhood-baseline performance on the same cognitive tests, there was no association between cardiorespiratory fitness and midlife cognitive functioning. Socioeconomic and health advantages in childhood, and healthier lifestyles during young adulthood explained most of the association between childhood cognitive functioning and adult cardiorespiratory fitness. Interpretation We found no evidence for a neuroprotective effect of cardiorespiratory fitness as of midlife. Instead, children with better cognitive functioning are selecting into healthier lives. Fitness interventions may enhance cognitive functioning. But, observational and experimental studies testing neuroprotective effects of physical fitness should consider

  2. Alzheimer’s Disease, Neuroprotection, and CNS Immunosenescence

    PubMed Central

    Streit, Wolfgang J.; Xue, Qing-Shan

    2012-01-01

    This review is focused on discussing in some detail possible neuroprotective functions of microglial cells. We strive to explain how loss of these essential microglial functions might contribute toward the development of characteristic neuropathological features that characterize Alzheimer’s disease. The conceptual framework guiding our thinking is provided by the hypothesis that microglial senescence accounts for impaired neuronal protection and consequent neurodegeneration. PMID:22822399

  3. Progesterone for Neuroprotection in Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Courtney L.; Fidan, Emin; Stanley, Rachel M.; MHSA; Noje, Corina; Bayir, Hülya

    2016-01-01

    Objective To provide an overview of the preclinical literature on progesterone for neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury (TBI), and to describe unique features of developmental brain injury that should be considered when evaluating the therapeutic potential for progesterone treatment after pediatric TBI. Data Sources National Library of Medicine PubMed literature review. Data Selection The mechanisms of neuroprotection by progesterone are reviewed, and the preclinical literature using progesterone treatment in adult animal models of TBI are summarized. Unique features of the developing brain that could either enhance or limit the efficacy of neuroprotection by progesterone are discussed, and the limited preclinical literature using progesterone after acute injury to the developing brain is described. Finally, the current status of clinical trials of progesterone for adult TBI is reviewed. Data Extraction and Synthesis Progesterone is a pleotropic agent with beneficial effects on secondary injury cascades that occur after TBI, including cerebral edema, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and excitotoxicity. More than 40 studies have used progesterone for treatment after TBI in adult animal models, with results summarized in tabular form. However, very few studies have evaluated progesterone in pediatric animal models of brain injury. To date, two human Phase II trials of progesterone for adult TBI have been published, and two multi-center Phase III trials are underway. Conclusions The unique features of the developing brain from that of a mature adult brain make it necessary to independently study progesterone in clinically relevant, immature animal models of TBI. Additional preclinical studies could lead to the development of a novel neuroprotective therapy that could reduce the long-term disability in head-injured children, and could potentially provide benefit in other forms of pediatric brain injury (global ischemia, stroke, statue epilepticus). PMID

  4. Recent Updates in Neuroprotective and Neuroregenerative Potential of Centella asiatica

    PubMed Central

    Lokanathan, Yogeswaran; Omar, Norazzila; Ahmad Puzi, Nur Nabilah; Saim, Aminuddin; Hj Idrus, Ruszymah

    2016-01-01

    Centella asiatica, locally well known in Malaysia as pegaga, is a traditional herb that has been used widely in Ayurvedic medicine, traditional Chinese medicine, and in the traditional medicine of other Southeast Asian countries including Malaysia. Although consumption of the plant is indicated for various illnesses, its potential neuroprotective properties have been well studied and documented. In addition to past studies, recent studies also discovered and/or reconfirmed that C. asiatica acts as an antioxidant, reducing the effect of oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo. At the in vitro level, C. asiatica promotes dendrite arborisation and elongation, and also protects the neurons from apoptosis. In vivo studies have shown that the whole extract and also individual compounds of C. asiatica have a protective effect against various neurological diseases. Most of the in vivo studies on neuroprotective effects have focused on Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, learning and memory enhancement, neurotoxicity and other mental illnesses such as depression and anxiety, and epilepsy. Recent studies have embarked on finding the molecular mechanism of neuroprotection by C. asiatica extract. However, the capability of C. asiatica in enhancing neuroregeneration has not been studied much and is limited to the regeneration of crushed sciatic nerves and protection from neuronal injury in hypoxia conditions. More studies are still needed to identify the compounds and the mechanism of action of C. asiatica that are particularly involved in neuroprotection and neuroregeneration. Furthermore, the extraction method, biochemical profile and dosage information of the C. asiatica extract need to be standardised to enhance the economic value of this traditional herb and to accelerate the entry of C. asiatica extracts into modern medicine. PMID:27540320

  5. Progesterone neuroprotection: The background of clinical trial failure.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Michael; Denier, Christian; Oudinet, Jean-Paul; Adams, David; Guennoun, Rachida

    2016-06-01

    Since the first pioneering studies in the 1990s, a large number of experimental animal studies have demonstrated the neuroprotective efficacy of progesterone for brain disorders, including traumatic brain injury (TBI). In addition, this steroid has major assets: it easily crosses the blood-brain-barrier, rapidly diffuses throughout the brain and exerts multiple beneficial effects by acting on many molecular and cellular targets. Moreover, progesterone therapies are well tolerated. Notably, increased brain levels of progesterone are part of endogenous neuroprotective responses to injury. The hormone thus emerged as a particularly promising protective candidate for TBI and stroke patients. The positive outcomes of small Phase 2 trials aimed at testing the safety and potential protective efficacy of progesterone in TBI patients then provided support and guidance for two large, multicenter, randomized and placebo-controlled Phase 3 trials, with more than 2000 TBI patients enrolled. The negative outcomes of both trials, named ProTECT III and SyNAPSE, came as a big disappointment. If these trials were successful, progesterone would have become the first efficient neuroprotective drug for brain-injured patients. Thus, progesterone has joined the numerous neuroprotective candidates that have failed in clinical trials. The aim of this review is a reappraisal of the preclinical animal studies, which provided the proof of concept for the clinical trials, and we critically examine the design of the clinical studies. We made efforts to present a balanced view of the strengths and limitations of the translational studies and of some serious issues with the clinical trials. We place particular emphasis on the translational value of animal studies and the relevance of TBI biomarkers. The probability of failure of ProTECT III and SyNAPSE was very high, and we present them within the broader context of other unsuccessful trials. PMID:26598278

  6. p53 isoforms regulate astrocyte-mediated neuroprotection and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Turnquist, C; Horikawa, I; Foran, E; Major, E O; Vojtesek, B; Lane, D P; Lu, X; Harris, B T; Harris, C C

    2016-09-01

    Bidirectional interactions between astrocytes and neurons have physiological roles in the central nervous system and an altered state or dysfunction of such interactions may be associated with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Astrocytes exert structural, metabolic and functional effects on neurons, which can be either neurotoxic or neuroprotective. Their neurotoxic effect is mediated via the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) involving pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-6), while their neuroprotective effect is attributed to neurotrophic growth factors (e.g., NGF). We here demonstrate that the p53 isoforms Δ133p53 and p53β are expressed in astrocytes and regulate their toxic and protective effects on neurons. Primary human astrocytes undergoing cellular senescence upon serial passaging in vitro showed diminished expression of Δ133p53 and increased p53β, which were attributed to the autophagic degradation and the SRSF3-mediated alternative RNA splicing, respectively. Early-passage astrocytes with Δ133p53 knockdown or p53β overexpression were induced to show SASP and to exert neurotoxicity in co-culture with neurons. Restored expression of Δ133p53 in near-senescent, otherwise neurotoxic astrocytes conferred them with neuroprotective activity through repression of SASP and induction of neurotrophic growth factors. Brain tissues from AD and ALS patients possessed increased numbers of senescent astrocytes and, like senescent astrocytes in vitro, showed decreased Δ133p53 and increased p53β expression, supporting that our in vitro findings recapitulate in vivo pathology of these neurodegenerative diseases. Our finding that Δ133p53 enhances the neuroprotective function of aged and senescent astrocytes suggests that the p53 isoforms and their regulatory mechanisms are potential targets for therapeutic intervention in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27104929

  7. Recent Updates in Neuroprotective and Neuroregenerative Potential of Centella asiatica.

    PubMed

    Lokanathan, Yogeswaran; Omar, Norazzila; Ahmad Puzi, Nur Nabilah; Saim, Aminuddin; Hj Idrus, Ruszymah

    2016-01-01

    Centella asiatica, locally well known in Malaysia as pegaga, is a traditional herb that has been used widely in Ayurvedic medicine, traditional Chinese medicine, and in the traditional medicine of other Southeast Asian countries including Malaysia. Although consumption of the plant is indicated for various illnesses, its potential neuroprotective properties have been well studied and documented. In addition to past studies, recent studies also discovered and/or reconfirmed that C. asiatica acts as an antioxidant, reducing the effect of oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo. At the in vitro level, C. asiatica promotes dendrite arborisation and elongation, and also protects the neurons from apoptosis. In vivo studies have shown that the whole extract and also individual compounds of C. asiatica have a protective effect against various neurological diseases. Most of the in vivo studies on neuroprotective effects have focused on Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, learning and memory enhancement, neurotoxicity and other mental illnesses such as depression and anxiety, and epilepsy. Recent studies have embarked on finding the molecular mechanism of neuroprotection by C. asiatica extract. However, the capability of C. asiatica in enhancing neuroregeneration has not been studied much and is limited to the regeneration of crushed sciatic nerves and protection from neuronal injury in hypoxia conditions. More studies are still needed to identify the compounds and the mechanism of action of C. asiatica that are particularly involved in neuroprotection and neuroregeneration. Furthermore, the extraction method, biochemical profile and dosage information of the C. asiatica extract need to be standardised to enhance the economic value of this traditional herb and to accelerate the entry of C. asiatica extracts into modern medicine. PMID:27540320

  8. Polycyclic propargylamine and acetylene derivatives as multifunctional neuroprotective agents.

    PubMed

    Zindo, Frank T; Barber, Quinton R; Joubert, Jacques; Bergh, Jacobus J; Petzer, Jacobus P; Malan, Sarel F

    2014-06-10

    The aim of this study was to design drug-like molecules with multiple neuroprotective mechanisms which would ultimately inhibit N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, block L-type voltage gated calcium channels (VGCC) and inhibit apoptotic processes as well as the monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B) enzyme in the central nervous system. These types of compounds may act as neuroprotective and symptomatic drugs for disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. In designing the compounds we focused on the structures of rasagiline and selegiline, two well known MAO-B inhibitors and proposed neuroprotective agents. Based on this consideration, the compounds synthesised all contain the propargylamine functional group of rasagiline and selegiline or a derivative thereof, conjugated to various polycyclic cage moieties. Being non-polar, these polycyclic moieties have been shown to aid in the transport of conjugated compounds across the blood-brain barrier, as well as cell membranes and have secondary positive neuroprotective effects. All novel synthesised polycyclic derivatives proved to have significant anti-apoptotic activity (p < 0.05) which was comparable to the positive control, selegiline. Four compounds (12, 15 and 16) showed promising VGCC and NMDA receptor channel inhibitory activity ranging from 18% to 59% in micromolar concentrations and compared favourably to the reference compounds. In the MAO-B assay, 8-phenyl-ethynyl-8-hydroxypentacycloundecane (10), exhibited MAO-B inhibition of 73.32% at 300 μM. This compound also reduced the percentage of apoptotic cells by as much as 40% when compared to the control experiments. PMID:24769350

  9. Neuroprotective 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromones of Imperata cylindrica.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jeong Seon; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Sung, Sang Hyun; Kim, Young Choong

    2006-02-01

    Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the methanolic extract of the rhizomes of Imperata cylindrica afforded a new compound, 5-hydroxy-2-(2-phenylethyl)chromone (1), together with three known compounds, 5-hydroxy-2-[2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)ethyl]chromone (2), flidersiachromone (3), and 5-hydroxy-2-styrylchromone (4). Among these four compounds, 1 and 2 showed significant neuroprotective activity against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in primary cultures of rat cortical cells. PMID:16499335

  10. Analysis of the contribution of the globin and reductase domains to the ligand-binding properties of bacterial haemoglobins

    PubMed Central

    Farrés, Judith; Burckhardt-Herold, Susanna; Scherrer, Jan; Frey, Alexander D.; Kallio, Pauli T.

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial Hbs (haemoglobins), like VHb (Vitreoscilla sp. Hb), and flavoHbs (flavohaemoglobins), such as FHP (Ralstonia eutropha flavoHb), have different autoxidation and ligand-binding rates. To determine the influence of each domain of flavoHbs on ligand binding, we have studied the kinetic ligand-binding properties of oxygen, carbon monoxide and nitric oxide to the chimaeric proteins, FHPg (truncated form of FHP comprising the globin domain alone) and VHb-Red (fusion protein between VHb and the C-terminal reductase domain of FHP) and compared them with those of their natural counterparts, FHP and VHb. Moreover, we also analysed polarity and solvent accessibility to the haem pocket of these proteins. The rate constants for the engineered proteins, VHb-Red and FHPg, do not differ significantly from those of their natural counterparts, VHb and FHP respectively. Our results suggest that the globin domain structure controls the reactivity towards oxygen, carbon monoxide and nitric oxide. The presence or absence of a reductase domain does not affect the affinity to these ligands. PMID:17617059

  11. Splicing promotes the nuclear export of β-globin mRNA by overcoming nuclear retention elements

    PubMed Central

    Akef, Abdalla; Lee, Eliza S.; Palazzo, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    Most current models of mRNA nuclear export in vertebrate cells assume that an mRNA must have specialized signals in order to be exported from the nucleus. Under such a scenario, mRNAs that lack these specialized signals would be shunted into a default pathway where they are retained in the nucleus and eventually degraded. These ideas were based on the selective use of model mRNA reporters. For example, it has been shown that splicing promotes the nuclear export of certain model mRNAs, such as human β-globin, and that in the absence of splicing, the cDNA-derived mRNA is retained in the nucleus and degraded. Here we provide evidence that β-globin mRNA contains an element that actively retains it in the nucleus and degrades it. Interestingly, this nuclear retention activity can be overcome by increasing the length of the mRNA or by splicing. Our results suggest that contrary to many current models, the default pathway for most intronless RNAs is to be exported from the nucleus, unless the RNA contains elements that actively promote its nuclear retention. PMID:26362019

  12. A novel deletion/insertion caused by a replication error in the β-globin gene locus control region.

    PubMed

    Joly, Philippe; Lacan, Philippe; Garcia, Caroline; Meley, Roland; Pondarré, Corinne; Francina, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Deletions in the β-globin locus control region (β-LCR) lead to (εγδβ)(0)-thalassemia [(εγδβ)(0)-thal]. In patients suffering from these rare deletions, a normal hemoglobin (Hb), phenotype is found, contrasting with a hematological thalassemic phenotype. Multiplex-ligation probe amplification (MLPA) is an efficient tool to detect β-LCR deletions combined with long-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing to pinpoint deletion breakpoints. We present here a novel 11,155 bp β-LCR deletion found in a French Caucasian patient which removes DNase I hypersensitive site 2 (HS2) to HS4 of the β-LCR. Interestingly, a 197 bp insertion of two inverted sequences issued from the HS2-HS3 inter-region is present and suggests a complex rearrangement during replication. Carriers of this type of thalassemia can be misdiagnosed as an α-thal trait. Consequently, a complete α- and β-globin gene cluster analysis is required to prevent a potentially damaging misdiagnosis in genetic counselling. PMID:21797698

  13. Characterization of a DNA binding activity in DNAse I hypersensitive site 4 of the human globin locus control region.

    PubMed Central

    Walters, M; Kim, C; Gelinas, R

    1991-01-01

    A portion of the beta-globin Locus Control Region (LCR), which included DNAse I hypersensitive site 4 (HS4), was analyzed for its interactions with nuclear extracts and its contribution to LCR activity in a functional assay. In gel retardation assays, a short fragment from HS4 formed complexes with nuclear extracts from both erythroid and nonerythroid cells, and a core protected sequence 5'GACTGGC3' was revealed by DNAse I protection and methylation interference studies. This sequence resembles the binding sites of CCAAT-family members. Purified CP-2 but not CP-1 was shown to bind this HS4 sequence in a gel shift reaction, suggesting that the HS4 binding activity shares some sequence specificity with the CCAAT-factor family. Utilizing a transient expression assay in murine erythroleukemia cells, steady-state RNA levels were measured from pairs of LCR constructs linked to distinguishable beta-globin reporter genes. A short DNA fragment from HS4 which included the binding site for this novel binding activity accounted for most of the contribution to high level expression made by the entire HS4 region. Images PMID:1923823

  14. Amelioration of murine sickle cell disease by nonablative conditioning and γ-globin gene-corrected bone marrow cells

    PubMed Central

    Pestina, Tamara I; Hargrove, Phillip W; Zhao, Huifen; Mead, Paul E; Smeltzer, Matthew P; Weiss, Mitchell J; Wilber, Andrew; Persons, Derek A

    2015-01-01

    Patients with severe sickle cell disease (SCD) are candidates for gene therapy using autologous hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), but concomitant multi-organ disease may contraindicate pretransplant conditioning with full myeloablation. We tested whether nonmyeloablative conditioning, a regimen used successfully for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation of adult SCD patients, allows engraftment of γ-globin gene-corrected cells to a therapeutic level in the Berkeley mouse model of SCD. Animals transplanted according to this regimen averaged 35% engraftment of transduced hematopoietic stem cells with an average vector copy < 2.0. Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels ranged from 20 to 44% of total hemoglobin and approximately two-thirds of circulating red blood cells expressed HbF detected by immunofluorescence (F-cells). Gene therapy treatment of SCD mice ameliorated anemia, reduced hyperleukocytosis, improved renal function, and reduced iron accumulation in liver, spleen, and kidneys. Thus, modest levels of chimerism with donor cells expressing high levels of HbF from an insulated γ-globin lentiviral vector can improve the pathology of SCD in mice, thereby illustrating a potentially safe and effective strategy for gene therapy in humans. PMID:26665131

  15. STATINS AND NEUROPROTECTION: A PRESCRIPTION TO MOVE THE FIELD FORWARD

    PubMed Central

    Wood, W. Gibson; Eckert, Gunter P.; Igbavboa, Urule; Müller, Walter E.

    2009-01-01

    There is growing interest in the use of statins, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, for treating specific neurodegenerative diseases (cerebrovascular disease, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis) and possibly traumatic brain injury. Neither is there is a consensus on the efficacy of statins in treating the aforementioned diseases nor are the mechanisms of the purported statin-induced neuroprotection well-understood. Part of the support for statin-induced neuroprotection comes from studies using animal models and cell culture. Important information has resulted from that work but there continues to be a lack of progress on basic issues pertaining to statins and brain which impedes advancement in understanding how statins alter brain function. For example, there are scant data on the pharmacokinetics of lipophilic and hydrophilic statins in brain, statin-induced neuroprotection versus cell death and statins and brain isoprenoids. The purpose of this mini-review will be to examine those aforementioned issues and to identify directions of future research. PMID:20633110

  16. Neuroprotective levels of IGF-1 exacerbate epileptogenesis after brain injury.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu; Pimentel, Corrin; Walters, Katherine; Boller, Lauren; Ghiasvand, Shabnam; Liu, Jing; Staley, Kevin J; Berdichevsky, Yevgeny

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) is neuroprotective in animal models of brain injury, and has been considered as a potential therapeutic. Akt-mTOR and MAPK are downstream targets of IGF-1 signaling that are activated after brain injury. However, both brain injury and mTOR are linked to epilepsy, raising the possibility that IGF-1 may be epileptogenic. Here, we considered the role of IGF-1 in development of epilepsy after brain injury, using the organotypic hippocampal culture model of post-traumatic epileptogenesis. We found that IGF-1 was neuroprotective within a few days of injury but that long-term IGF-1 treatment was pro-epileptic. Pro-epileptic effects of IGF-1 were mediated by Akt-mTOR signaling. We also found that IGF-1 - mediated increase in epileptic activity led to neurotoxicity. The dualistic nature of effects of IGF-1 treatment demonstrates that anabolic enhancement through IGF-1 activation of mTOR cascade can be beneficial or harmful depending on the stage of the disease. Our findings suggest that epilepsy risk may need to be considered in the design of neuroprotective treatments for brain injury. PMID:27561791

  17. Activating transcription factor 6 derepression mediates neuroprotection in Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Naranjo, José R.; Zhang, Hongyu; Villar, Diego; González, Paz; Dopazo, Xose M.; Morón-Oset, Javier; Higueras, Elena; Oliveros, Juan C.; Arrabal, María D.; Prieto, Angela; Cercós, Pilar; González, Teresa; De la Cruz, Alicia; Casado-Vela, Juan; Rábano, Alberto; Valenzuela, Carmen; Gutierrez-Rodriguez, Marta; Li, Jia-Yi; Mellström, Britt

    2016-01-01

    Deregulated protein and Ca2+ homeostasis underlie synaptic dysfunction and neurodegeneration in Huntington disease (HD); however, the factors that disrupt homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we determined that expression of downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, is reduced in murine in vivo and in vitro HD models and in HD patients. DREAM downregulation was observed early after birth and was associated with endogenous neuroprotection. In the R6/2 mouse HD model, induced DREAM haplodeficiency or blockade of DREAM activity by chronic administration of the drug repaglinide delayed onset of motor dysfunction, reduced striatal atrophy, and prolonged life span. DREAM-related neuroprotection was linked to an interaction between DREAM and the unfolded protein response (UPR) sensor activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). Repaglinide blocked this interaction and enhanced ATF6 processing and nuclear accumulation of transcriptionally active ATF6, improving prosurvival UPR function in striatal neurons. Together, our results identify a role for DREAM silencing in the activation of ATF6 signaling, which promotes early neuroprotection in HD. PMID:26752648

  18. Curcumin: a potential neuroprotective agent in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mythri, R B; Bharath, M M Srinivas

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-associated neurodegenerative disease clinically characterized as a movement disorder. The motor symptoms in PD arise due to selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of the ventral midbrain thereby depleting the dopamine levels in the striatum. Most of the current pharmacotherapeutic approaches in PD are aimed at replenishing the striatal dopamine. Although these drugs provide symptomatic relief during early PD, many patients develop motor complications with long-term treatment. Further, PD medications do not effectively tackle tremor, postural instability and cognitive deficits. Most importantly, most of these drugs do not exhibit neuroprotective effects in patients. Consequently, novel therapies involving natural antioxidants and plant products/molecules with neuroprotective properties are being exploited for adjunctive therapy. Curcumin is a polyphenol and an active component of turmeric (Curcuma longa), a dietary spice used in Indian cuisine and medicine. Curcumin exhibits antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties, crosses the blood-brain barrier and is neuroprotective in neurological disorders. Several studies in different experimental models of PD strongly support the clinical application of curcumin in PD. The current review explores the therapeutic potential of curcumin in PD. PMID:22211691

  19. Creatinyl amino acids: new hybrid compounds with neuroprotective activity.

    PubMed

    Burov, Sergey; Leko, Maria; Dorosh, Marina; Dobrodumov, Anatoliy; Veselkina, Olga

    2011-09-01

    Prolonged oral creatine administration resulted in remarkable neuroprotection in experimental models of brain stroke. However, because of its polar nature creatine has poor ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) without specific creatine transporter (CRT). Thus, synthesis of hydrophobic derivatives capable of crossing the BBB by alternative pathway is of great importance for the treatment of acute and chronic neurological diseases including stroke, traumatic brain injury and hereditary CRT deficiency. Here we describe synthesis of new hybrid compounds-creatinyl amino acids, their neuroprotective activity in vivo and stability to degradation in different media. The title compounds were synthesized by guanidinylation of corresponding sarcosyl peptides or direct creatine attachment using isobutyl chloroformate method. Addition of lipophilic counterion (p-toluenesulfonate) ensures efficient creatine dissolution in DMF with simultaneous protection of guanidino group towards intramolecular cyclization. It excludes the application of expensive guanidinylating reagents, permits to simplify synthetic procedure and adapt it to large-scale production. The biological activity of creatinyl amino acids was tested in vivo on ischemic stroke and NaNO(2) -induced hypoxia models. One of the most effective compounds-creatinyl-glycine ethyl ester increases life span of experimental animals more than two times in hypoxia model and has neuroprotective action in brain stroke model when applied both before and after ischemia. These data evidenced that creatinyl amino acids can represent promising candidates for the development of new drugs useful in stroke treatment. PMID:21644247

  20. Neuroprotective levels of IGF-1 exacerbate epileptogenesis after brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yu; Pimentel, Corrin; Walters, Katherine; Boller, Lauren; Ghiasvand, Shabnam; Liu, Jing; Staley, Kevin J.; Berdichevsky, Yevgeny

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) is neuroprotective in animal models of brain injury, and has been considered as a potential therapeutic. Akt-mTOR and MAPK are downstream targets of IGF-1 signaling that are activated after brain injury. However, both brain injury and mTOR are linked to epilepsy, raising the possibility that IGF-1 may be epileptogenic. Here, we considered the role of IGF-1 in development of epilepsy after brain injury, using the organotypic hippocampal culture model of post-traumatic epileptogenesis. We found that IGF-1 was neuroprotective within a few days of injury but that long-term IGF-1 treatment was pro-epileptic. Pro-epileptic effects of IGF-1 were mediated by Akt-mTOR signaling. We also found that IGF-1 – mediated increase in epileptic activity led to neurotoxicity. The dualistic nature of effects of IGF-1 treatment demonstrates that anabolic enhancement through IGF-1 activation of mTOR cascade can be beneficial or harmful depending on the stage of the disease. Our findings suggest that epilepsy risk may need to be considered in the design of neuroprotective treatments for brain injury. PMID:27561791

  1. Argon gas: a potential neuroprotectant and promising medical therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Argon is a noble gas element that has demonstrated narcotic and protective abilities that may prove useful in the medical field. The earliest records of argon gas have exposed its ability to exhibit narcotic symptoms at hyperbaric pressures greater than 10 atmospheres with more recent evidence seeking to display argon as a potential neuroprotective agent. The high availability and low cost of argon provide a distinct advantage over using similarly acting treatments such as xenon gas. Argon gas treatments in models of brain injury such as in vitro Oxygen-Glucose-Deprivation (OGD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), as well as in vivo Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion (MCAO) have largely demonstrated positive neuroprotective behavior. On the other hand, some warning has been made to potential negative effects of argon treatments in cases of ischemic brain injury, where increases of damage in the sub-cortical region of the brain have been uncovered. Further support for argon use in the medical field has been demonstrated in its use in combination with tPA, its ability as an organoprotectant, and its surgical applications. This review seeks to summarize the history and development of argon gas use in medical research as mainly a neuroprotective agent, to summarize the mechanisms associated with its biological effects, and to elucidate its future potential. PMID:24533741

  2. Stem Cell-Based Neuroprotective and Neurorestorative Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chia-Wei; Liou, Ying-Jay; Lu, Shao-Wei; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Kao, Chung-Lan; Chen, Shih-Jen; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Chang, Charn-Jung

    2010-01-01

    Stem cells, a special subset of cells derived from embryo or adult tissues, are known to present the characteristics of self-renewal, multiple lineages of differentiation, high plastic capability, and long-term maintenance. Recent reports have further suggested that neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from the adult hippocampal and subventricular regions possess the utilizing potential to develop the transplantation strategies and to screen the candidate agents for neurogenesis, neuroprotection, and neuroplasticity in neurodegenerative diseases. In this article, we review the roles of NSCs and other stem cells in neuroprotective and neurorestorative therapies for neurological and psychiatric diseases. We show the evidences that NSCs play the key roles involved in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders, including depression, stroke and Parkinson’s disease. Moreover, the potential and possible utilities of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS), reprogramming from adult fibroblasts with ectopic expression of four embryonic genes, are also reviewed and further discussed. An understanding of the biophysiology of stem cells could help us elucidate the pathogenicity and develop new treatments for neurodegenerative disorders. In contrast to cell transplantation therapies, the application of stem cells can further provide a platform for drug discovery and small molecular testing, including Chinese herbal medicines. In addition, the high-throughput stem cell-based systems can be used to elucidate the mechanisms of neuroprotective candidates in translation medical research for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:20559500

  3. Neuroprotection and its molecular mechanism following spinal cord injury☆

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nai-Kui; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Acute spinal cord injury initiates a complex cascade of molecular events termed ‘secondary injury’, which leads to progressive degeneration ranging from early neuronal apoptosis at the lesion site to delayed degeneration of intact white matter tracts, and, ultimately, expansion of the initial injury. These secondary injury processes include, but are not limited to, inflammation, free radical-induced cell death, glutamate excitotoxicity, phospholipase A2 activation, and induction of extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways, which are important targets in developing neuroprotective strategies for treatment of spinal cord injury. Recently, a number of studies have shown promising results on neuroprotection and recovery of function in rodent models of spinal cord injury using treatments that target secondary injury processes including inflammation, phospholipase A2 activation, and manipulation of the PTEN-Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. The present review outlines our ongoing research on the molecular mechanisms of neuroprotection in experimental spinal cord injury and briefly summarizes our earlier findings on the therapeutic potential of pharmacological treatments in spinal cord injury. PMID:25624837

  4. Activating transcription factor 6 derepression mediates neuroprotection in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, José R; Zhang, Hongyu; Villar, Diego; González, Paz; Dopazo, Xose M; Morón-Oset, Javier; Higueras, Elena; Oliveros, Juan C; Arrabal, María D; Prieto, Angela; Cercós, Pilar; González, Teresa; De la Cruz, Alicia; Casado-Vela, Juan; Rábano, Alberto; Valenzuela, Carmen; Gutierrez-Rodriguez, Marta; Li, Jia-Yi; Mellström, Britt

    2016-02-01

    Deregulated protein and Ca2+ homeostasis underlie synaptic dysfunction and neurodegeneration in Huntington disease (HD); however, the factors that disrupt homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we determined that expression of downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, is reduced in murine in vivo and in vitro HD models and in HD patients. DREAM downregulation was observed early after birth and was associated with endogenous neuroprotection. In the R6/2 mouse HD model, induced DREAM haplodeficiency or blockade of DREAM activity by chronic administration of the drug repaglinide delayed onset of motor dysfunction, reduced striatal atrophy, and prolonged life span. DREAM-related neuroprotection was linked to an interaction between DREAM and the unfolded protein response (UPR) sensor activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). Repaglinide blocked this interaction and enhanced ATF6 processing and nuclear accumulation of transcriptionally active ATF6, improving prosurvival UPR function in striatal neurons. Together, our results identify a role for DREAM silencing in the activation of ATF6 signaling, which promotes early neuroprotection in HD. PMID:26752648

  5. Erythropoietin as a Neuroprotectant for Neonatal Brain Injury: Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Traudt, Christopher M.; Juul, Sandra E.

    2016-01-01

    Prematurity and perinatal hypoxia-ischemia are common problems that result in significant neurodevelopmental morbidity and high mortality worldwide. The Vannucci model of unilateral brain injury was developed to model perinatal brain injury due to hypoxia-ischemia. Because the rodent brain is altricial, i.e., it develops postnatally, investigators can model either preterm or term brain injury by varying the age at which injury is induced. This model has allowed investigators to better understand developmental changes that occur in susceptibility of the brain to injury, evolution of brain injury over time, and response to potential neuroprotective treatments. The Vannucci model combines unilateral common carotid artery ligation with a hypoxic insult. This produces injury of the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, hippocampus, and periventricular white matter ipsilateral to the ligated artery. Varying degrees of injury can be obtained by varying the depth and duration of the hypoxic insult. This chapter details one approach to the Vannucci model and also reviews the neuroprotective effects of erythropoietin (Epo), a neuroprotective treatment that has been extensively investigated using this model and others. PMID:23456865

  6. Mechanisms of Neuroprotection by Quercetin: Counteracting Oxidative Stress and More

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Lucio G.; Garrick, Jacqueline M.; Roquè, Pamela J.; Pellacani, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Increasing interest has recently focused on determining whether several natural compounds, collectively referred to as nutraceuticals, may exert neuroprotective actions in the developing, adult, and aging nervous system. Quercetin, a polyphenol widely present in nature, has received the most attention in this regard. Several studies in vitro, in experimental animals and in humans, have provided supportive evidence for neuroprotective effects of quercetin, either against neurotoxic chemicals or in various models of neuronal injury and neurodegenerative diseases. The exact mechanisms of such protective effects remain elusive, though many hypotheses have been formulated. In addition to a possible direct antioxidant effect, quercetin may also act by stimulating cellular defenses against oxidative stress. Two such pathways include the induction of Nrf2-ARE and induction of the antioxidant/anti-inflammatory enzyme paraoxonase 2 (PON2). In addition, quercetin has been shown to activate sirtuins (SIRT1), to induce autophagy, and to act as a phytoestrogen, all mechanisms by which quercetin may provide its neuroprotection. PMID:26904161

  7. Microglia trigger astrocyte-mediated neuroprotection via purinergic gliotransmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozaki, Youichi; Nomura, Masatoshi; Iwatsuki, Ken; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Gachet, Christian; Koizumi, Schuichi

    2014-03-01

    Microglia are highly sensitive to even small changes in the brain environment, such as invasion of non-hazardous toxicants or the presymptomatic state of diseases. However, the physiological or pathophysiological consequences of their responses remain unknown. Here, we report that cultured microglia sense low concentrations of the neurotoxicant methylmercury (MeHglow) and provide neuroprotection against MeHg, for which astrocytes are also required. When exposed to MeHglow, microglia exocytosed ATP via p38 MAPK- and vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT)-dependent mechanisms. Astrocytes responded to the microglia-derived ATP via P2Y1 receptors and released interleukin-6 (IL-6), thereby protecting neurons against MeHglow. These neuroprotective actions were also observed in organotypic hippocampal slices from wild-type mice, but not in slices prepared from VNUT knockout or P2Y1 receptor knockout mice. These findings suggest that microglia sense and respond to even non-hazardous toxicants such as MeHglow and change their phenotype into a neuroprotective one, for which astrocytic support is required.

  8. The neuroprotective roles of BDNF in hypoxic ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ai; Xiong, Li-Jing; Tong, Yu; Mao, Meng

    2013-03-01

    Hypoxia-ischemia (H/I) brain injury results in various degrees of damage to the body, and the immature brain is particularly fragile to oxygen deprivation. Hypothermia and erythropoietin (EPO) have long been known to be neuroprotective in ischemic brain injury. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has recently been recognized as a potent modulator capable of regulating a wide repertoire of neuronal functions. This review was based on studies concerning the involvement of BDNF in the protection of H/I brain injury following a search in PubMed between 1995 and December, 2011. We initially examined the background of BDNF, and then focused on its neuroprotective mechanisms against ischemic brain injury, including its involvement in promoting neural regeneration/cognition/memory rehabilitation, angiogenesis within ischemic penumbra and the inhibition of the inflammatory process, neurotoxicity, epilepsy and apoptosis. We also provided a literature overview of experimental studies, discussing the safety and the potential clinical application of BDNF as a neuroprotective agent in the ischemic brain injury. PMID:24648914

  9. Drugs That Bind to α-Synuclein: Neuroprotective or Neurotoxic?

    PubMed

    Kakish, Joe; Lee, Dongsoo; Lee, Jeremy S

    2015-12-16

    The misfolding of α-synuclein is a critical event in the death of dopaminergic neurons and the progression of Parkinson's disease. Drugs that bind to α-synuclein and form a loop structure between the N- and C-terminus tend to be neuroprotective, whereas others that cause a more compact structure tend to be neurotoxic. The binding of several natural products and other drugs that are involved in dopamine metabolism were investigated by nanopore analysis and isothermal titration calorimetry. The antinausea drugs, cinnarizine and metoclopramide, do not bind to α-synuclein, whereas amphetamine and the herbicides, paraquat and rotenone, bind tightly and cause α-synuclein to adopt a more compact conformation. The recreational drug, cocaine, binds to α-synuclein, whereas heroin and methadone do not. Metformin, which is prescribed for diabetes and is neuroprotective, binds well without causing α-synuclein to adopt a more compact conformation. Methylphenidate (ritalin) binds to sites in both the N- and C-terminus and causes α-synuclein to adopt a loop conformation. In contrast, amphetamine only binds to the N-terminus. Except for cinnarizine and metoclopramide, there is a good correlation between the mode of binding to α-synuclein and whether a drug is neuroprotective or neurotoxic. PMID:26378986

  10. Neurotropic and neuroprotective activities of the earthworm peptide Lumbricusin

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dae Hong; Lee, Ik Hwan; Nam, Seung Taek; Hong, Ji; Zhang, Peng; Hwang, Jae Sam; Seok, Heon; Choi, Hyemin; Lee, Dong Gun; Kim, Jae Il; Kim, Ho

    2014-06-06

    Highlights: • 11-mer peptide Lumbricusin, a defensin like peptide, is isolated from earthworm. • We here demonstrated that Lumbricusin has neurotropic and neuroprotective effects. • p27 degradation by Lumbricusin mediates effects of Lumbricusin on neuronal cells. - Abstract: We recently isolated a polypeptide from the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris that is structurally similar to defensin, a well-known antibacterial peptide. An 11-mer antibacterial peptide (NH{sub 2}-RNRRWCIDQQA), designated Lumbricusin, was synthesized based on the amino acid sequence of the isolated polypeptide. Since we previously reported that CopA3, a dung beetle peptide, enhanced neuronal cell proliferation, we here examined whether Lumbricusin exerted neurotropic and/or neuroprotective effects. Lumbricusin treatment induced a time-dependent increase (∼51%) in the proliferation of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Lumbricusin also significantly inhibited the apoptosis and decreased viability induced by treatment with 6-hydroxy dopamine, a Parkinson’s disease-mimicking agent. Immunoblot analyses revealed that Lumbricusin treatment increased ubiquitination of p27{sup Kip1} protein, a negative regulator of cell-cycle progression, in SH-SY5Y cells, and markedly promoted its degradation. Notably, adenoviral-mediated over-expression of p27{sup Kip1} significantly blocked the antiapoptotic effect of Lumbricusin in 6-hydroxy dopamine-treated SH-SY5Y cells. These results suggest that promotion of p27{sup Kip1} degradation may be the main mechanism underlying the neuroprotective and neurotropic effects of Lumbricusin.

  11. Mitochondria: the missing link between preconditioning and neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Correia, Sónia C; Santos, Renato X; Perry, George; Zhu, Xiongwei; Moreira, Paula I; Smith, Mark A

    2010-01-01

    The quote "what does not kill you makes you stronger" perfectly describes the preconditioning phenomenon - a paradigm that affords robust brain tolerance in the face of neurodegenerative insults. Over the last few decades, many attempts have been made to identify the molecular mechanisms involved in preconditioning-induced protective responses, and recent data suggests that many of these mechanisms converge on the mitochondria, positing mitochondria as master regulators of preconditioning-triggered endogenous neuroprotection. In this review, we critically discuss evidence for the involvement of mitochondria within the preconditioning paradigm. We will highlight the crucial targets and mediators by which mitochondria are integrated into neuroprotective signaling pathways that underlie preconditioning, putting focus on mitochondrial respiratory chain and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channels, mitochondrial permeability transition pore, uncoupling proteins, and mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme manganese superoxide dismutase. We also discuss the role of mitochondria in the induction of hypoxia-inducible factor-1, a transcription factor engaged in preconditioning-mediated neuroprotective effects. The identification of intrinsic mitochondrial mechanisms involved in preconditioning will provide new insights which can be translated into potential pharmacological interventions aimed at counteracting neurodegeneration. PMID:20463394

  12. [Caffeinol: a neuroprotective action in ischemic brain damage].

    PubMed

    Bednarski, Jerzy; Gasińska, Karolina; Straszewski, Tomasz; Godek, Magdalena; Tutka, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Caffeinol--a combination of ethanol and caffeine in appropriate concentrations--exerts neuroprotective and anticonvulsive action. Research conducted on rats in models of ischemic brain damage have shown that caffeinol decreases the size of cortical damage by about 80%, improves motional coordination and memory. The sooner caffeinol was administered, the better were beneficial therapeutic effects. What is more, the medicine may be safely combined with other methods used in stroke treatment, such as hypothermia and thrombolysis, what additionally increases its neuroprotective influence. Research on people have shown that caffeinol is less effective as neuroprotective agent in patients abusing alcohol, while chronic intake of caffeine does not influence its activity. Mechanism of its activity is not known yet, however, it is assumed that it bases on an antagonism of NMDA receptors. Regarding the fact that the most of strokes in humans concern subcortical areas, it is justified to conduct further research on caffeinol, which would involve other brain structures, thus allowing to define its use in clinical practice. PMID:27012130

  13. Neuropharmacological Mechanisms Underlying the Neuroprotective Effects of Methylphenidate

    PubMed Central

    Volz, T.J

    2008-01-01

    Methylphenidate is a psychostimulant that inhibits the neuronal dopamine transporter. In addition, methylphenidate has the intriguing ability to provide neuroprotection from the neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine and perhaps also Parkinson’s disease; both of which may likely involve the abnormal accumulation of cytoplasmic dopamine inside dopaminergic neurons and the resulting formation of dopamine-associated reactive oxygen species. As delineated in this review, the neuroprotective effects of methylphenidate are due, at least in part, to its ability to attenuate or prevent this abnormal cytoplasmic dopamine accumulation through several possible neuropharmacological mechanisms. These may include 1) direct interactions between methylphenidate and the neuronal dopamine transporter which may attenuate or prevent the entry of methamphetamine into dopaminergic neurons and may also decrease the synthesis of cytoplasmic dopamine through a D2 receptor-mediated signal cascade process, and 2) indirect effects upon the functioning of the vesicular monoamine transporter-2 which may increase vesicular dopamine sequestration through both vesicle trafficking and the kinetic upregulation of the vesicular monoamine transporter-2 protein. Understanding these neuropharmacological mechanisms of methylphenidate neuroprotection may provide important insights into the physiologic regulation of dopaminergic systems as well as the pathophysiology of a variety of disorders involving abnormal dopamine disposition ranging from substance abuse to neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease. PMID:19587858

  14. BBB-Permeable, Neuroprotective, and Neurotrophic Polysaccharide, Midi-GAGR.

    PubMed

    Makani, Vishruti; Jang, Yong-Gil; Christopher, Kevin; Judy, Wesley; Eckstein, Jacob; Hensley, Kenneth; Chiaia, Nicolas; Kim, Dong-Shik; Park, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    An enormous amount of efforts have been poured to find an effective therapeutic agent for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Among those, neurotrophic peptides that regenerate neuronal structures and increase neuron survival show a promise in slowing neurodegeneration. However, the short plasma half-life and poor blood-brain-barrier (BBB)-permeability of neurotrophic peptides limit their in vivo efficacy. Thus, an alternative neurotrophic agent that has longer plasma half-life and better BBB-permeability has been sought for. Based on the recent findings of neuroprotective polysaccharides, we searched for a BBB-permeable neuroprotective polysaccharide among natural polysaccharides that are approved for human use. Then, we discovered midi-GAGR, a BBB-permeable, long plasma half-life, strong neuroprotective and neurotrophic polysaccharide. Midi-GAGR is a 4.7kD cleavage product of low acyl gellan gum that is approved by FDA for human use. Midi-GAGR protected rodent cortical neurons not only from the pathological concentrations of co-/post-treated free reactive radicals and Aβ42 peptide but also from activated microglial cells. Moreover, midi-GAGR showed a good neurotrophic effect; it enhanced neurite outgrowth and increased phosphorylated cAMP-responsive element binding protein (pCREB) in the nuclei of primary cortical neurons. Furthermore, intra-nasally administered midi-GAGR penetrated the BBB and exerted its neurotrophic effect inside the brain for 24 h after one-time administration. Midi-GAGR appears to activate fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) and its downstream neurotrophic signaling pathway for neuroprotection and CREB activation. Additionally, 14-day intranasal administration of midi-GAGR not only increased neuronal activity markers but also decreased hyperphosphorylated tau, a precursor of neurofibrillary tangle, in the brains of the AD mouse model, 3xTg-AD. Taken together, midi-GAGR with good BBB

  15. BBB-Permeable, Neuroprotective, and Neurotrophic Polysaccharide, Midi-GAGR

    PubMed Central

    Makani, Vishruti; Jang, Yong-gil; Christopher, Kevin; Judy, Wesley; Eckstein, Jacob; Hensley, Kenneth; Chiaia, Nicolas; Kim, Dong-Shik; Park, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    An enormous amount of efforts have been poured to find an effective therapeutic agent for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Among those, neurotrophic peptides that regenerate neuronal structures and increase neuron survival show a promise in slowing neurodegeneration. However, the short plasma half-life and poor blood-brain-barrier (BBB)-permeability of neurotrophic peptides limit their in vivo efficacy. Thus, an alternative neurotrophic agent that has longer plasma half-life and better BBB-permeability has been sought for. Based on the recent findings of neuroprotective polysaccharides, we searched for a BBB-permeable neuroprotective polysaccharide among natural polysaccharides that are approved for human use. Then, we discovered midi-GAGR, a BBB-permeable, long plasma half-life, strong neuroprotective and neurotrophic polysaccharide. Midi-GAGR is a 4.7kD cleavage product of low acyl gellan gum that is approved by FDA for human use. Midi-GAGR protected rodent cortical neurons not only from the pathological concentrations of co-/post-treated free reactive radicals and Aβ42 peptide but also from activated microglial cells. Moreover, midi-GAGR showed a good neurotrophic effect; it enhanced neurite outgrowth and increased phosphorylated cAMP-responsive element binding protein (pCREB) in the nuclei of primary cortical neurons. Furthermore, intra-nasally administered midi-GAGR penetrated the BBB and exerted its neurotrophic effect inside the brain for 24 h after one-time administration. Midi-GAGR appears to activate fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) and its downstream neurotrophic signaling pathway for neuroprotection and CREB activation. Additionally, 14-day intranasal administration of midi-GAGR not only increased neuronal activity markers but also decreased hyperphosphorylated tau, a precursor of neurofibrillary tangle, in the brains of the AD mouse model, 3xTg-AD. Taken together, midi-GAGR with good BBB

  16. Delayed globin synthesis leads to excess heme and the macrocytic anemia of Diamond Blackfan anemia and del(5q) myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhantao; Keel, Siobán B; Shimamura, Akiko; Liu, Li; Gerds, Aaron T; Li, Henry Y; Wood, Brent L; Scott, Bart L; Abkowitz, Janis L

    2016-05-11

    Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with isolated del(5q) are severe macrocytic anemias; although both are associated with impaired ribosome assembly, why the anemia occurs is not known. We cultured marrow cells from DBA (n = 3) and del(5q) MDS (n = 6) patients and determined how heme (a toxic chemical) and globin (a protein) are coordinated. We show that globin translation initiates slowly, whereas heme synthesis proceeds normally. This results in insufficient globin protein, excess heme and excess reactive oxygen species in early erythroid precursors, and CFU-E (colony-forming unit-erythroid)/proerythroblast cell death. The cells that can more rapidly and effectively export heme or can slow heme synthesis preferentially survive and appropriately mature. Consistent with these observations, treatment with 10 μM succinylacetone, a specific inhibitor of heme synthesis, improved the erythroid cell output of DBA and del(5q) MDS marrow cultures by 68 to 95% (P = 0.03 to 0.05), whereas the erythroid cell output of concurrent control marrow cultures decreased by 4 to 13%. Our studies demonstrate that erythropoiesis fails when heme exceeds globin. Our data further suggest that therapies that decrease heme synthesis (or facilitate heme export) could improve the red blood cell production of persons with DBA, del(5q) MDS, and perhaps other macrocytic anemias. PMID:27169803

  17. Expression of a cellular gene cloned in herpes simplex virus: rabbit beta-globin is regulated as an early viral gene in infected fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Smiley, J R; Smibert, C; Everett, R D

    1987-01-01

    We constructed nondefective herpes simplex virus type 1 recombinants bearing the intact rabbit beta-globin gene inserted into the viral gene for thymidine kinase to study the expression of a cellular gene when it is present in the viral genome during lytic viral infections. The globin promoter was activated to high levels during productive infection of Vero cells, giving rise to properly spliced and processed cytoplasmic globin transcripts. Expression of globin RNA occurred with early kinetics, was not affected by blocking viral DNA replication, and was strongly inhibited by preventing viral immediate-early protein synthesis with cycloheximide. These results support the hypothesis that temporal control of herpes simplex virus early gene expression is accomplished by mechanisms that are not restricted to viral promoters. In addition, these data show that a cellular transcript can be correctly processed and can accumulate to high levels during viral infection; this indicates that the mechanisms of virally induced shutoff of host RNA accumulation and degradation of host mRNAs do not depend on sequence-specific differentiation between host and viral RNAs. These findings also suggest that herpesviruses have considerable potential as high-capacity gene transfer vectors for a variety of applications. Images PMID:3037101

  18. Developmental regulation of the human embryonic beta-like globin gene is mediated by synergistic interactions among multiple tissue- and stage-specific elements.

    PubMed Central

    Trepicchio, W L; Dyer, M A; Baron, M H

    1993-01-01

    The stage-specific regulation of mammalian embryonic globin genes has been an experimentally elusive problem, in part because of the developmentally early timing of their expression. We have carried out a systematic analysis of truncation and internal deletion mutations within the 5'-flanking region of the human embryonic beta-like globin gene (epsilon) in erythroid and nonerythroid cell lines. Within a 670-bp region upstream from the constitutive promoter are multiple positive and negative control elements. Of these, a positive regulatory element (epsilon-PRE II) which is active only in embryonic erythroid cells is of particular interest. Remarkably, although it is inactive on its own, in the presence of other sequences located further upstream, it confers tissue- and developmental stage-specific expression on a constitutive epsilon-globin or heterologous promoter. The activity of epsilon-PRE II is also modulated by another positive regulatory domain located further downstream to direct erythroid cell-specific, but little or no embryonic stage-specific, transcription. A nuclear factor highly enriched in embryonic erythroid cells binds specifically within a 19-bp region of epsilon-PRE II. Nuclei from adult erythroid cells also contain a factor that binds to this region but forms a complex of faster electrophoretic mobility. We speculate that interactions between epsilon-PRE II and other upstream control elements play an important role in the developmental regulation of the human embryonic beta-like globin gene. Images PMID:8246963

  19. Variation in Gamma-Globin Expression before and after Induction with Hydroxyurea Associated with BCL11A, KLF1 and TAL1.

    PubMed

    Grieco, Amanda J; Billett, Henny H; Green, Nancy S; Driscoll, M Catherine; Bouhassira, Eric E

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms governing γ-globin expression in a subset of fetal hemoglobin (α2γ2: HbF) expressing red blood cells (F-cells) and the mechanisms underlying the variability of response to hydroxyurea induced γ-globin expression in the treatment of sickle cell disease are not completely understood. Here we analyzed intra-person clonal populations of basophilic erythroblasts (baso-Es) derived from bone marrow common myeloid progenitors in serum free cultures and report the level of fetal hemoglobin production in F-cells negatively correlates with expression of BCL11A, KLF1 and TAL1. We then examined the effects of hydroxyurea on these three transcription factors and conclude that a successful induction of γ-globin includes a reduction in BCL11A, KLF1 and TAL1 expression. These data suggests that expression changes in this transcription factor network modulate γ-globin expression in F-cells during steady state erythropoiesis and after induction with hydroxyurea. PMID:26053062

  20. A new Frameshift mutation on the α2-globin gene causing α⁺-thalassemia: codon 43 (TTC>-TC or TTC>T-C).

    PubMed

    Joly, Philippe; Lacan, Philippe; Garcia, Caroline; Barro, Claire; Francina, Alain

    2012-01-01

    We report a new mutation on the α2-globin gene causing α(+)-thalassemia (α(+)-thal) with a deletion of a single nucleotide (T) at amino acid residue 43 [HBA2:c.130delT or HBA2:c.131delT]. This frameshift deletion gives rise to a premature termination codon at codon 47. PMID:22738776

  1. Cooperativeness of the Higher Chromatin Structure of the β-Globin Locus Revealed by the Deletion Mutations of DNase I Hypersensitive site 3 of the LCR

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xiangdong; Xiang, Ping; Yin, Wenxuan; Stamatoyannopoulos, George; Li, Qiliang

    2010-01-01

    High-level transcription of the globin genes requires the enhancement by a distant element, the locus control region (LCR). Such long-range regulation in vivo involves spatial interaction between transcriptional elements, with intervening chromatin looping out. It has been proposed that the clustering of the HS sites of the LCR, the active globin genes, as well as the remote 5′ hypersensitive sites (HSs) (HS-60/-62 in mouse, HS-110 in human) and 3′HS1 forms a specific spatial chromatin structure, termed active chromatin hub (ACH). Here we report the effects of the HS3 deletions of the LCR on the spatial chromatin structure of the β-globin locus as revealed by the chromatin conformation capture (3C) technology. The small HS3 core deletion (0.23 kb), but not the large HS3 deletion (2.3 kb), disrupted the spatial interactions among all the HS sites of the LCR, the β-globin gene and 3′HS1. We have previously demonstrated that the large HS3 deletion barely impairs the structure of the LCR holocomplex, while the structure is significantly disrupted by the HS3 core deletion. Taken together, these results suggest that the formation of the ACH is dependent on a largely intact LCR structure. We propose that the ACH indeed is an extension of the LCR holocomplex. PMID:17056066

  2. Why the DNA self-depurination mechanism operates in HB-β but not in β-globin paralogs HB-δ, HB-ɛ1, HB-γ1 and HB-γ2.

    PubMed

    Amosova, Olga; Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Fresco, Jacques R

    2015-08-01

    The human β-globin, δ-globin and ɛ-globin genes contain almost identical coding strand sequences centered about codon 6 having potential to form a stem-loop with a 5'GAGG loop. Provided with a sufficiently stable stem, such a structure can self-catalyze depurination of the loop 5'G residue, leading to a potential mutation hotspot. Previously, we showed that such a hotspot exists about codon 6 of β-globin, with by far the highest incidence of mutations across the gene, including those responsible for 6 anemias (notably Sickle Cell Anemia) and β-thalassemias. In contrast, we show here that despite identical loop sequences, there is no mutational hotspot in the δ- or ɛ1-globin potential self-depurination sites, which differ by only one or two base pairs in the stem region from that of the β-globin gene. These differences result in either one or two additional mismatches in the potential 7-base pair-forming stem region, thereby weakening its stability, so that either DNA cruciform extrusion from the duplex is rendered ineffective or the lifetime of the stem-loop becomes too short to permit self-catalysis to occur. Having that same loop sequence, paralogs HB-γ1 and HB-γ2 totally lack stem-forming potential. Hence the absence in δ- and ɛ1-globin genes of a mutational hotspot in what must now be viewed as non-functional homologs of the self-depurination site in β-globin. Such stem-destabilizing variants appeared early among vertebrates and remained conserved among mammals and primates. Thus, this study has revealed conserved sequence determinants of self-catalytic DNA depurination associated with variability of mutation incidence among human β-globin paralogs. PMID:26042536

  3. betaMinor-globin messenger RNA accumulation in reticulocytes governs improved erythropoiesis in beta thalassemic mice after erythropoietin complementary DNA electrotransfer in muscles.

    PubMed

    Samakoglu, S; Fattori, E; Lamartina, S; Toniatti, C; Stockholm, D; Heard, J M; Bohl, D

    2001-04-15

    Mechanisms governing the induction of effective erythropoiesis in response to erythropoietin (Epo) oversecretion have been investigated in beta thalassemic C57Bl/6(Hbbth) mice. Naked DNA encoding an expression vector for mouse Epo was introduced into skeletal muscles by electrotransfer. A transient increase of serum Epo concentrations with a proportional augmentation of hematocrit values was observed. Various parameters relevant to beta thalassemia were surveyed in blood samples taken before treatment, at the peak of Epo secretion, and when the phenotype reverted to anemia. We measured globin messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in reticulocytes by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, globin chain synthesis levels, and several indicators of erythrocyte membrane quality, including bound alpha chains, bound immunoglobulins, main protein components, and iron compartmentalization. Data indicated that high serum Epo levels primarily affect betaminor-globin mRNA accumulation in reticulocytes. Other changes subsequent to intense Epo stimulation, like increased betaminor/alpha-globin chain synthesis ratio, reduced levels of alpha chains and immunoglobulins bound to membranes, improved spectrin/band 3 ratio, increased red blood cell survival, and improved erythropoiesis appeared as consequences of increased betaminor-globin mRNA levels. This conclusion is consistent with models postulating that intense Epo stimulation induces the expansion and differentiation of erythroid progenitors committed to fetal erythropoiesis. Although phenotypic correction was partial in mice, and comparable achievements will probably be more difficult to obtain in humans, naked DNA electrotransfer may provide a safe and low-cost method for reassessing the potentials of Epo as an inducer of fetal erythropoiesis reactivation in patients with beta thalassemia. PMID:11290581

  4. In vitro Splicing of Influenza Viral NS1 mRNA and NS1-β -globin Chimeras: Possible Mechanisms for the Control of Viral mRNA Splicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotch, Stephen J.; Krug, Robert M.

    1986-08-01

    In influenza virus-infected cells, the splicing of the viral NS1 mRNA catalyzed by host nuclear enzymes is controlled so that the steady-state amount of the spliced NS2 mRNA is only 5-10% of that of the unspliced NS1 mRNA. Here we examine the splicing of NS1 mRNA in vitro, using nuclear extracts from HeLa cells. We show that in addition to its consensus 5' and 3' splice sites, NS1 mRNA has an intron branch-point adenosine residue that was functional in lariat formation. Nonetheless, this RNA was not detectably spliced in vitro under conditions in which a human β -globin precursor was efficiently spliced. Using chimeric RNA precursors containing both NS1 and β -globin sequences, we show that the NS1 5' splice site was effectively utilized by the β -globin branch-point sequence and 3' splice site to form a spliced RNA, whereas the NS1 3' splice site did not function in detectable splicing in vitro, even in the presence of the β -globin branch-point sequence or in the presence of both the branch-point sequence and 5' exon and splice site from β -globin With the chimeric precursors that were not detectably spliced, as with NS1 mRNA itself, a low level of a lariat structure containing only intron and not 3' exon sequences was formed. The inability of the consensus 3' splice site of NS1 mRNA to function effectively in in vitro splicing suggests that this site is structurally inaccessible to components of the splicing machinery. Based on these results, we propose two mechanisms whereby NS1 mRNA splicing in infected cells is controlled via the accessibility of its 3' splice site.

  5. Two novel copy number variations involving the α-globin gene cluster on chromosome 16 cause thalassemia in two Chinese families.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lingling; Shang, Xuan; Yi, Sheng; Cai, Ren; Li, Zhetao; Liu, Cuixian; Liang, Yidan; Cai, Decheng; Zhang, Feng; Xu, Xiangmin

    2016-06-01

    Copy number variations (CNVs) can cause many genetic disorders and the structure analysis of unknown CNVs is important for clinical diagnosis. The human α-globin gene cluster lies close to the telomere of the short arm on chromosome 16. Copy number variations of this region produce excessive or insufficient α-globin chains which imbalances the β-globin chains, resulting in thalassemia. However, these CNVs usually cannot be precisely defined by traditional methods. Here, we designed a technique strategy and applied it to identify two CNVs involving the α-globin gene cluster causing thalassemia in two Chinese families. A novel 282 kb duplication (αααα(282)) was identified in family A and a novel 235 kb deletion (--(235)) in family B. Proband A is a coinheritance of β(CD41-42) and αααα(282) and showed severe β-thalassemia intermedia phenotype. Proband B is a compound heterozygote of --(235)/α(CS)α genotype and was diagnosed with hemoglobin H disease. The clinical phenotypic features of the CNVs carriers were described, together with a complete picture of molecular structure of these rearrangements. Two CNVs are novel rearrangements in α-globin clusters and the αααα(282) is the first to identify the exact insert position of a duplication region from the telomere on chromosome 16. In a conclusion, successful identification and characterization of these two novel CNVs not only demonstrates the precision and effectiveness of our strategy in analyzing the structure of unknown CNVs, but also extended the spectrum of thalassemia and provide new examples for studying genomic recombination. PMID:27000657

  6. Modified cyanobacteria

    DOEpatents

    Vermaas, Willem F J.

    2014-06-17

    Disclosed is a modified photoautotrophic bacterium comprising genes of interest that are modified in terms of their expression and/or coding region sequence, wherein modification of the genes of interest increases production of a desired product in the bacterium relative to the amount of the desired product production in a photoautotrophic bacterium that is not modified with respect to the genes of interest.

  7. Neuroprotective Effects of Inhibiting Fyn S-Nitrosylation on Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Damage to CA1 Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Lingyun; Wei, Xuewen; Guo, Peng; Zhang, Guangyi; Qi, Suhua

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) can regulate signaling pathways via S-nitrosylation. Fyn can be post-translationally modified in many biological processes. In the present study, using a rat four-vessel-occlusion ischemic model, we aimed to assess whether Fyn could be S-nitrosylated and to evaluate the effects of Fyn S-nitrosylation on brain damage. In vitro, Fyn could be S-nitrosylated by S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO, an exogenous NO donor), and in vivo, endogenous NO synthesized by NO synthases (NOS) could enhance Fyn S-nitrosylation. Application of GSNO, 7-nitroindazole (7-NI, an inhibitor of neuronal NOS) and hydrogen maleate (MK-801, the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist) could decrease the S-nitrosylation and phosphorylation of Fyn induced by cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Cresyl violet staining validated that these compounds exerted neuroprotective effects against the cerebral I/R-induced damage to hippocampal CA1 neurons. Taken together, in this study, we demonstrated that Fyn can be S-nitrosylated both in vitro and in vivo and that inhibiting S-nitrosylation can exert neuroprotective effects against cerebral I/R injury, potentially via NMDAR-mediated mechanisms. These findings may lead to a new field of inquiry to investigate the underlying pathogenesis of stroke and the development of novel treatment strategies. PMID:27420046

  8. Neuroprotection by 6-(methylsulfinyl)hexyl isothiocyanate in a 6-hydroxydopamine mouse model of Parkinson׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Morroni, Fabiana; Sita, Giulia; Tarozzi, Andrea; Cantelli-Forti, Giorgio; Hrelia, Patrizia

    2014-11-17

    A number of pathogenic factors have been implicated in the progression of Parkinson׳s disease (PD), including oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation, excitotoxicity, and signals mediating apoptosis cascade. 6-(methylsulfinyl)hexyl isothiocyanate (6-MSITC) is a major component in wasabi, a very popular spice in Japan and a member of the Brassica family of vegetables. This study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective effects of 6-MSITC in a PD mouse model. Mice were treated with 6-MSITC (5mg/kg twice a week) for four weeks after the unilateral intrastriatal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). On the 28th day, 6-OHDA-injected mice showed behavioral impairments, a significant decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and an increase in apoptosis. In addition, lesioned mice showed reduced glutathione levels and glutathione-S-transferase and glutathione reductase activities. Notably, 6-MSITC demonstrated neuroprotective effects in our experimental model strongly related to the preservation of functional nigral dopaminergic neurons, which contributed to the reduction of motor dysfunction induced by 6-OHDA. Furthermore, this study provides evidence that the beneficial effects of 6-MSITC could be attributed to the decrease of apoptotic cell death and to the activation of glutathione-dependent antioxidant systems. These findings may render 6-MSITC as a promising molecule for further pharmacological studies on the investigation for disease-modifying treatment in PD. PMID:25257035

  9. Encapsulation of curcumin in polyelectrolyte nanocapsules and their neuroprotective activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepanowicz, Krzysztof; Jantas, Danuta; Piotrowski, Marek; Staroń, Jakub; Leśkiewicz, Monika; Regulska, Magdalena; Lasoń, Władysław; Warszyński, Piotr

    2016-09-01

    Poor water solubility and low bioavailability of lipophilic drugs can be potentially improved with the use of delivery systems. In this study, encapsulation of nanoemulsion droplets was utilized to prepare curcumin nanocarriers. Nanosize droplets containing the drug were encapsulated in polyelectrolyte shells formed by the layer-by-layer (LbL) adsorption of biocompatible polyelectrolytes: poly-L-lysine (PLL) and poly-L-glutamic acid (PGA). The size of synthesized nanocapsules was around 100 nm. Their biocompatibility and neuroprotective effects were evaluated on the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line using cell viability/toxicity assays (MTT reduction, LDH release). Statistically significant toxic effect was clearly observed for PLL coated nanocapsules (reduction in cell viability about 20%–60%), while nanocapsules with PLL/PGA coating did not evoke any detrimental effects on SH-SY5Y cells. Curcumin encapsulated in PLL/PGA showed similar neuroprotective activity against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cell damage, as did 5 μM curcumin pre-dissolved in DMSO (about 16% of protection). Determination of concentration of curcumin in cell lysate confirmed that curcumin in nanocapsules has cell protective effect in lower concentrations (at least 20 times) than when given alone. Intracellular mechanisms of encapsulated curcumin-mediated protection engaged the prevention of the H2O2-induced decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) but did not attenuate Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) formation. The obtained results indicate the utility of PLL/PGA shell nanocapsules as a promising, alternative way of curcumin delivery for neuroprotective purposes with improved efficiency and reduced toxicity.

  10. Methylene blue provides behavioral and metabolic neuroprotection against optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Julio C; John, Joseph M; Lee, Jung; Gonzalez-Lima, F

    2009-04-01

    Methylene blue (MB) is a diaminophenothiazine with potent antioxidant and unique redox properties that prevent morphologic degenerative changes in the mouse retina induced by rotenone, a specific mitochondrial complex I inhibitor. This study evaluated pigmented rats to determine whether MB's neuroprotective effects against rotenone-mediated retinal neurotoxicity have functional relevance and whether these effects are mediated by an improvement in neuronal energy metabolism in vivo. Visual function was behaviorally assessed by determining differences in the illuminance sensitivity threshold pre- and post-bilateral intravitreal injection of rotenone (200 microg/kg) or rotenone plus MB (70 microg/kg). Retinal degeneration was morphologically studied using unbiased stereological tools. Changes in histochemically determined cytochrome oxidase activity in the visual pathway were used to evaluate the impact of treatments on neuronal energy metabolism. Rotenone induced a 1.4 log unit increase in the illumination threshold compared to baseline, as well as a 32% decrease in ganglion cell layer cell (GCL) density, and a 56% decrease in GCL layer + nerve fiber layer thickness. Co-administration of MB prevented the changes in visual function and the retinal histopathology. Furthermore, rotenone induced a functional deafferentation of the visual system, as revealed by decreases in the metabolic activity of the retina, superior colliculus, and visual cortex. These metabolic changes were also prevented by MB. The results provided the first demonstration of MB's behavioral and metabolic neuroprotection against optic neuropathy, and implicate MB as a candidate neuroprotective agent with metabolic-enhancing properties that may be used in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:19384599

  11. Neurometabolic mechanisms for memory enhancement and neuroprotection of methylene blue

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Julio C.; Bruchey, Aleksandra K.; Gonzalez-Lima, F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides the first review of the memory-enhancing and neuroprotective metabolic mechanisms of action of methylene blue in vivo. These mechanisms have important implications as a new neurobiological approach to improve normal memory and to treat memory impairment and neurodegeneration associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Methylene blue’s action is unique because its neurobiological effects are not determined by regular drug-receptor interactions or drug-response paradigms. Methylene blue shows a hormetic dose-response, with opposite effects at low and high doses. At low doses, methylene blue is an electron cycler in the mitochondrial electron transport chain, with unparalleled antioxidant and cell respiration-enhancing properties that affect the function of the nervous system in a versatile manner. A major role of the respiratory enzyme cytochrome oxidase on the memory-enhancing effects of methylene blue is supported by available data. The memory-enhancing effects have been associated with improvement of memory consolidation in a network-specific and use-dependent fashion. In addition, low doses of methylene blue have also been used for neuroprotection against mitochondrial dysfunction in humans and experimental models of disease. The unique auto-oxidizing property of methylene blue and its pleiotropic effects on a number of tissue oxidases explain its potent neuroprotective effects at low doses. The evidence reviewed supports a mechanistic role of low-dose methylene blue as a promising and safe intervention for improving memory and for the treatment of acute and chronic conditions characterized by increased oxidative stress, neurodegeneration and memory impairment. PMID:22067440

  12. Encapsulation of curcumin in polyelectrolyte nanocapsules and their neuroprotective activity.

    PubMed

    Szczepanowicz, Krzysztof; Jantas, Danuta; Piotrowski, Marek; Staroń, Jakub; Leśkiewicz, Monika; Regulska, Magdalena; Lasoń, Władysław; Warszyński, Piotr

    2016-09-01

    Poor water solubility and low bioavailability of lipophilic drugs can be potentially improved with the use of delivery systems. In this study, encapsulation of nanoemulsion droplets was utilized to prepare curcumin nanocarriers. Nanosize droplets containing the drug were encapsulated in polyelectrolyte shells formed by the layer-by-layer (LbL) adsorption of biocompatible polyelectrolytes: poly-L-lysine (PLL) and poly-L-glutamic acid (PGA). The size of synthesized nanocapsules was around 100 nm. Their biocompatibility and neuroprotective effects were evaluated on the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line using cell viability/toxicity assays (MTT reduction, LDH release). Statistically significant toxic effect was clearly observed for PLL coated nanocapsules (reduction in cell viability about 20%-60%), while nanocapsules with PLL/PGA coating did not evoke any detrimental effects on SH-SY5Y cells. Curcumin encapsulated in PLL/PGA showed similar neuroprotective activity against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cell damage, as did 5 μM curcumin pre-dissolved in DMSO (about 16% of protection). Determination of concentration of curcumin in cell lysate confirmed that curcumin in nanocapsules has cell protective effect in lower concentrations (at least 20 times) than when given alone. Intracellular mechanisms of encapsulated curcumin-mediated protection engaged the prevention of the H2O2-induced decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) but did not attenuate Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) formation. The obtained results indicate the utility of PLL/PGA shell nanocapsules as a promising, alternative way of curcumin delivery for neuroprotective purposes with improved efficiency and reduced toxicity. PMID:27454207

  13. SIRT1 Activation Confers Neuroprotection in Experimental Optic Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Shindler, Kenneth S.; Ventura, Elvira; Rex, Tonia S.; Elliott, Peter; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Axonal damage and loss of neurons correlate with permanent vision loss and neurologic disability in patients with optic neuritis and multiple sclerosis (MS). Current therapies involve immunomodulation, with limited effects on neuronal damage. The authors examined potential neuroprotective effects in optic neuritis by SRT647 and SRT501, two structurally and mechanistically distinct activators of SIRT1, an enzyme involved in cellular stress resistance and survival. Methods Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS, was induced by immunization with proteolipid protein peptide in SJL/J mice. Optic neuritis developed in two thirds of eyes with significant retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss detected 14 days after immunization. RGCs were labeled in a retrograde fashion with fluorogold by injection into superior colliculi. Optic neuritis was detected by inflammatory cell infiltration of the optic nerve. Results Intravitreal injection of SIRT1 activators 0, 3, 7, and 11 days after immunization significantly attenuated RGC loss in a dose-dependent manner. This neuroprotective effect was blocked by sirtinol, a SIRT1 inhibitor. Treatment with either SIRT1 activator did not prevent EAE or optic nerve inflammation. A single dose of SRT501 on day 11 was sufficient to limit RGC loss and to preserve axon function. Conclusions SIRT1 activators provide an important potential therapy to prevent the neuronal damage that leads to permanent neurologic disability in optic neuritis and MS patients. Intravitreal administration of SIRT1 activators does not suppress inflammation in this model, suggesting that their neuroprotective effects will be additive or synergistic with current immunomodulatory therapies. PMID:17652729

  14. Limonoids with neuroprotective activity from the stems of Clausena emarginata.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Guo-Qing; Li, Chuang-Jun; Yang, Jing-Zhi; Ma, Jie; Li, Li; Peng, Ying; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Dong-Ming

    2016-10-01

    Two new limonoids, clauemargines M-N (1-2), together with five known compounds (3-7), were isolated from the stems of Clausena emarginata, and compounds 6 and 7 were gained from this plant for the first time. Their structures were established and elucidated on the basis of comprehensive spectroscopic analysis. The absolute configurations of 1-2 were further determined by the octant rule of saturated cyclic ketone. Compounds 1, 2, 4, and 5 showed moderate neuroprotective effects against L-glutamic acid-induced cellular damage in human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells at 10 μM. PMID:27268442

  15. Neuroprotective naphthalene and flavan derivatives from Polygonum cuspidatum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu; Li, Fu-shuang; Feng, Zi-ming; Yang, Ya-nan; Jiang, Jian-shuang; Li, Li; Zhang, Pei-cheng

    2015-02-01

    Ten naphthalene derivatives including two unusual glycosides possessing a naphthalene-fused piceid via a [C8'-O-C6-C5-C7']-trans-dihydrofuran ring, two flavan derivatives, as well as sixteen known phenolic compounds, were isolated from Polygonum cuspidatum. The structures were determined by extensive NMR, MS, CD data, and chemical evidence. In the in vitro neuroprotective assays, at the concentration of 10 μM, five of these compounds exhibited significant effects against PC12 cells injured by rotenone. PMID:25553583

  16. Ketogenic Diet Provides Neuroprotective Effects against Ischemic Stroke Neuronal Damages

    PubMed Central

    Shaafi, Sheyda; Mahmoudi, Javad; Pashapour, Ali; Farhoudi, Mehdi; Sadigh-eteghad, Saeed; Akbari, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of death and disability in the world. Many mechanisms contribute in cell death in ischemic stroke. Ketogenic diet which has been successfully used in the drug-resistant epilepsy has been shown to be effective in many other neurologic disorders. The mechanisms underlying of its effects are not well studied, but it seems that its neuroprotective ability is mediated at least through alleviation of excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and apoptosis events. On the basis of these mechanisms, it is postulated that ketogenic diet could provide benefits to treatment of cerebral ischemic injuries. PMID:25671178

  17. Neuroprotective therapy for argon-laser-induced retinal injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkin, Michael; Rosner, Mordechai; Solberg, Yoram; Turetz, Yosef

    1999-06-01

    Laser photocoagulation treatment of the central retina is often complicated by an immediate side effect of visual impairment, caused by the unavoidable laser-induced destruction of the normal tissue lying adjacent to the lesion and not affected directly by the laser beam. Furthermore, accidental laser injuries are at present untreatable. A neuroprotective therapy for salvaging the normal tissue might enhance the benefit obtained from treatment and allow safe perifoveal photocoagulation. We have developed a rat model for studying the efficacy of putative neuroprotective compounds in ameliorating laser-induced retinal damage. Four compounds were evaluated: the corticosteroid methylprednisolone, the glutamate-receptor blocker MK-801, the anti-oxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase, and the calcim-overload antagonist flunarizine. The study was carried out in two steps: in the first, the histopathological development of retinal laser injuries was studied. Argon laser lesions were inflicted in the retinas of 18 pigmented rats. The animals were sacrificed after 3, 20 or 60 days and their retinal lesions were evaluated under the light microscope. The laser injury mainly involved the outer layers of the retina, where it destroyed significant numbers of photoreceptor cells. Over time, evidence of two major histopathological processes was observed: traction of adjacent nomral retinal cells into the central area of the lesion forming an internal retinal bulging, and a retinal pigmented epithelial proliferative reaction associated with subretinal neovascularization and invations of the retinal lesion site by phagocytes. The neuroprotective effects of each of the four compounds were verified in a second step of the study. For each drug tested, 12 rats were irradiated wtih argon laser inflictions: six of them received the tested agent while the other six were treated with the corresponding vehicle. Twenty days after laser expsoure, the rats were sacrificed and their lesions were

  18. Heterozygosis deficit of polymorphic markers linked to the β-globin gene cluster region in the Iranian population

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Tahereh; Vallian, Reihaneh; Fazeli, Zahra; Haghighatnia, Asieh; Vallian, Sadeq

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Iran is considered as one of the high-prevalence areas for β-thalassemia with a rate of about 10% carrier frequency. Molecular diagnosis of the disease is performed both by direct sequencing and indirectly by the use of polymorphic markers present in the beta globin gene cluster. However, to date there is no reliable information on the application of the markers in the Iranian population. Here we report the results of an extended molecular analysis of five RFLP markers, XmnI, HindIIIA, HindIIIG, RsaI and HinfI, located within the β-globin gene cluster region in four subpopulations of Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 552 blood samples taken from the Iranian subpopulations including Isfahan, Chaharmahal-O-Bakhtiari, Khuzestan and Hormozgan were genotyped using PCR-RFLP and sequencing. The allele frequency, the expected and observed heterozygosity, and Shannon’s information index (I) of these markers were calculated. Results: Distribution of the allele frequencies for XmnI, HindIIIA, HindIIIG, RsaI and HinfI polymorphic markers did not differ significantly among the subpopulations examined. Overall observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.1706 for HindIIIA to 0.4484 for RsaI. The Shannon index was <1 for all the polymorphic markers in the populations studied. The data indicated that heterozygosity of these markers was low in the Iranian population. Conclusion: The results suggested that genotyping of these markers is not informative enough once used as single markers for prenatal diagnosis and carrier detection of β-thalassemia in the Iranian population. However, haplotyping of these markers may provide more useful data in linkage analysis and prenatal diagnosis as well as carrier detections for β-thalassemia in Iranians. PMID:26229579

  19. Interactions of Haptoglobin with Monomeric Globin Species: Insights from Molecular Modeling and Native Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fatunmbi, Ololade; Abzalimov, Rinat R; Savinov, Sergey N; Gershenson, Anne; Kaltashov, Igor A

    2016-03-29

    Haptoglobin (Hp) binds free hemoglobin (Hb) dimers to prevent negative consequences of Hb circulation in the extracellular environment. Although both monomeric Hb and myoglobin (Mb) species also present potential risks, their interactions with Hp have not been extensively studied. Mb is homologous to both the α- and β-chains of Hb and shares many conserved Hb/Hp interface residues, yet whether Hp binds Mb remains unclear. To address this, computational biology tools were used to predict the interactions required for Hp to bind monomeric globins, and the predicted association was tested using native electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The Hb/Hp crystal structure was used as the template to create molecular models of two Mb molecules bound to an Hp heterodimer (Mb2/Hp). Molecular modeling suggests that Mb can bind at the Hp α-chain binding site, where 73% of the globin/Hp interactions are conserved. By contrast, several ionic β-chain residues involved in complementary electrostatic interactions with Hp correspond to residues with the opposite charge in Mb, suggesting unfavorable electrostatic Hp/Mb interactions at the β-chain binding site. As shown by native ESI-MS, isolated monomeric Hbα subunits can form 2:1 complexes with Hp heterotetramers in the absence of Hb β-chains. Native ESI-MS also confirmed that Mb can bind to Hp heterotetramers in solution with stoichiometries of 1:1 and 2:1 at physiological pH and ionic strength. The affinity of Hp for Mb appears to be diminished relative to that of Hb α-chains. Our in silico experiments rationalize this change and demonstrate that molecular modeling of protein/protein interactions is a valuable aid for MS experiments. PMID:26937685

  20. Genetic modifiers of Hb E/β0 thalassemia identified by a two-stage genome-wide association study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with Hb E/β0 thalassemia display remarkable variability in disease severity. To identify genetic modifiers influencing disease severity, we conducted a two-stage genome scan in groups of 207 mild and 305 severe unrelated patients from Thailand with Hb E/β0 thalassemia and normal α-globin genes. Methods First, we estimated and compared the allele frequencies of approximately 110,000 gene-based single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in pooled DNAs from different severity groups. The 756 SNPs that showed reproducible allelic differences at P < 0.02 by pooling were selected for individual genotyping. Results After adjustment for age, gender and geographic region, logistic regression models showed 50 SNPs significantly associated with disease severity (P < 0.05) after Bonferroni adjustment for multiple testing. Forty-one SNPs in a large LD block within the β-globin gene cluster had major alleles associated with severe disease. The most significant was bthal_bg200 (odds ratio (OR) = 5.56, P = 2.6 × 10-13). Seven SNPs in two distinct LD blocks within a region centromeric to the β-globin gene cluster that contains many olfactory receptor genes were also associated with disease severity; rs3886223 had the strongest association (OR = 3.03, P = 3.7 × 10-11). Several previously unreported SNPs were also significantly associated with disease severity. Conclusions These results suggest that there may be an additional regulatory region centromeric to the β-globin gene cluster that affects disease severity by modulating fetal hemoglobin expression. PMID:20353593

  1. [Glaucoma neuroprotection--how far is it from a dream to reality].

    PubMed

    Ge, Jian

    2008-05-01

    Although the drugs, such as Memantine, Calpain, Erythropoietin, have demonstrated exciting results for neuroprotection in laboratories, the phase III clinical trial of Memantine failed to prove such activity. So far, none of neuroprotection drugs has been approved by FDA for clinical use with the failure of Memantine clinical trail indicating that the gap between basic science research and clinical application in glaucomatous optic neuroprotection remains to be filled. This paper offers a new insight into the field of neuroprotection in glaucoma. To make the dream of optic neuroprotection to reality, we have to implement new perspective strategies to integrate technologies and findings from the researches of human genomics, proteomics, stem cells, and gene-transferred animal models. PMID:18953889

  2. Neuroprotective efficacy of lifarizine (RS-87476) in a simplified rat survival model of 2 vessel occlusion.

    PubMed Central

    McBean, D. E.; Winters, V.; Wilson, A. D.; Oswald, C. B.; Alps, B. J.; Armstrong, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    1. A new, modified rat two vessel occlusion model (with hypotension) was established and the neuroprotective efficacy of the novel agent lifarizine (RS-87476) was examined. 2. The two vessel occlusion model used in the study was a modification of the model described in the literature, whereby we have obviated the need to use a muscle relaxant and intubate the trachea to provide ventilatory support by providing a tight fitting face mask attached to the ventilator. Furthermore, the need to combine exsanguination and additional pharmacological means of inducing the mandatory hypotension (50 mmHg), required to decrease brain blood perfusion pressure, has been removed by simply manipulating the concentration of the already present halothane anaesthetic. 3. The appropriate level of hypotension having been reached, microvascular clips were applied to bilaterally occlude the common carotid arteries for 12 min. This resulted in a loss of the cortical EEG activity. Local cerebral blood flow was measured 6 min into the occlusion period, using the fully quantitative [14C]-iodoantipyrine autoradiographic technique, in a separate group of rats (n = 5). This illustrated the lack of any blood flow, in the areas under study, during the period when there was an isoelectric cortical EEG pattern. 4. The high grade global ischaemic lesion which occurred gave quantifiable neuronal damage in several vulnerable regions of the brain, namely, the hippocampal CA1 sub-field, cortex, thalamus, striatum, and cerebellar brain stem (Purkinje cells). 5. Following the global ischaemic insult the rats were allowed to recover for 72 h before assessment of the damage, during which time one group of rats (n = 11) received 100 micrograms kg-1 lifarizine i.a. 5 min post-occlusion, 500 micrograms kg-1 lifarizine i.p. 15 min post-occlusion, and 500 micrograms kg-1 lifarizine i.p. twice daily for 72 h. A second group of rats (n = 12) was treated with appropriate volumes of vehicle (0.4 ml kg-1 i.a. and 2 ml

  3. Neuroprotective measures in children with traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Shruti; Branco, Ricardo Garcia

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability in children. Severe TBI is a leading cause of death and often leads to life changing disabilities in survivors. The modern management of severe TBI in children on intensive care unit focuses on preventing secondary brain injury to improve outcome. Standard neuroprotective measures are based on management of intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) to optimize the cerebral blood flow and oxygenation, with the intention to avoid and minimise secondary brain injury. In this article, we review the current trends in management of severe TBI in children, detailing the general and specific measures followed to achieve the desired ICP and CPP goals. We discuss the often limited evidence for these therapeutic interventions in children, extrapolation of data from adults, and current recommendation from paediatric guidelines. We also review the recent advances in understanding the intracranial physiology and neuroprotective therapies, the current research focus on advanced and multi-modal neuromonitoring, and potential new therapeutic and prognostic targets. PMID:26855892

  4. Ethoxyquin provides neuroprotection against cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing; Carozzi, Valentina Alda; Reed, Nicole; Mi, Ruifa; Marmiroli, Paola; Cavaletti, Guido; Hoke, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Ethoxyquin was recently identified as a neuroprotective compound against toxic neuropathies and efficacy was demonstrated against paclitaxel-induced neurotoxicity in vivo. In this study we examined the efficacy of ethoxyquin in preventing neurotoxicity of cisplatin in rodent models of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and explored its mechanism of action. Ethoxyquin prevented neurotoxicity of cisplatin in vitro in a sensory neuronal cell line and primary rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. In vivo, chronic co-administration of ethoxyquin partially abrogated cisplatin-induced behavioral, electrophysiological and morphological abnormalities. Furthermore, ethoxyquin did not interfere with cisplatin's ability to induce tumor cell death in ovarian cancer cell line in vitro and in vivo. Finally, ethoxyquin reduced the levels of two client proteins (SF3B2 and ataxin-2) of a chaperone protein, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) when co-administered with cisplatin in vitro. These results implied that the neuroprotective effect of ethoxyquin is mediated through these two client proteins of Hsp90. In fact, reducing levels of SF3B2 in tissue-cultured neurons was effective against neurotoxicity of cisplatin. These findings suggest that ethoxyquin or other compounds that inhibit chaperone activity of Hsp90 and reduce levels of its client protein, SF3B2 may be developed as an adjuvant therapy to prevent neurotoxicity in cisplatin-based chemotherapy protocols. PMID:27350330

  5. 6th Global College of Neuroprotection and Neuroregeneration, annual meeting.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Hari Shanker; Sharma, Aruna

    2009-07-01

    The 6th Global College of Neuroprotection and Neuroregeneration (GCNN) and 5th Society for Study on Neuroplasticity and Neuroregeneration (SSNN) conference was held jointly in the Hilton Hotel, Vienna, Austria, 1-4 March 2009. This was the second annual joint conference of the two societies and it was highly successful from a scientific point of view, as it saw a gathering of the top basic and clinical scientists whose research is currently at the cutting edge of neuroscience. This conference saw 86 invited lectures from carefully selected leading scientists from around the world, along with 56 posters of young scientists researching of a focal theme. Over the 3 days, in 32 sessions, new developments in neuroprotection and new ways to enhance neuroregeneration were discussed intensively among more than 600 delegates. In addition, approximately 40 representatives of drug companies, five representatives from scientific publishers and 14 representatives from scientific instruments and supplies-related industries also actively participated in this huge neuroscience event. The GCNN and SSNN conference achieved a new milestone in scientific success in Vienna and established an excellent new working collaboration among the participants in a pleasant, enriched environment with several social gatherings. PMID:19589044

  6. Ethoxyquin provides neuroprotection against cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jing; Carozzi, Valentina Alda; Reed, Nicole; Mi, Ruifa; Marmiroli, Paola; Cavaletti, Guido; Hoke, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Ethoxyquin was recently identified as a neuroprotective compound against toxic neuropathies and efficacy was demonstrated against paclitaxel-induced neurotoxicity in vivo. In this study we examined the efficacy of ethoxyquin in preventing neurotoxicity of cisplatin in rodent models of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and explored its mechanism of action. Ethoxyquin prevented neurotoxicity of cisplatin in vitro in a sensory neuronal cell line and primary rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. In vivo, chronic co-administration of ethoxyquin partially abrogated cisplatin-induced behavioral, electrophysiological and morphological abnormalities. Furthermore, ethoxyquin did not interfere with cisplatin’s ability to induce tumor cell death in ovarian cancer cell line in vitro and in vivo. Finally, ethoxyquin reduced the levels of two client proteins (SF3B2 and ataxin-2) of a chaperone protein, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) when co-administered with cisplatin in vitro. These results implied that the neuroprotective effect of ethoxyquin is mediated through these two client proteins of Hsp90. In fact, reducing levels of SF3B2 in tissue-cultured neurons was effective against neurotoxicity of cisplatin. These findings suggest that ethoxyquin or other compounds that inhibit chaperone activity of Hsp90 and reduce levels of its client protein, SF3B2 may be developed as an adjuvant therapy to prevent neurotoxicity in cisplatin-based chemotherapy protocols. PMID:27350330

  7. Antenatal magnesium sulfate: Neuro-protection for preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Oddie, S; Tuffnell, D J; McGuire, W

    2015-11-01

    The neuro-protective effect of antenatal magnesium sulfate on very preterm infants has been demonstrated in good-quality randomised controlled trials and meta-analyses. Magnesium administered prior to preterm delivery crosses over to the foetal circulation and acts via several pathways to reduce perinatal neuronal damage. Meta-analysis of the trial data indicates that antenatal magnesium sulfate reduces the risk of cerebral palsy by one-third, and results in one fewer case in every 50 women treated. Treatment is associated with discomfort and flushing in some women, but maternal side-effects are mostly transient and manageable. Magnesium sulfate has also been found to be without any serious adverse consequences in newborn infants. Consensus recommendations and guidelines have been developed and implemented internationally, and endorsed by the UK Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. However, magnesium sulfate for neuro-protection of very preterm infants has not yet become established widely in UK practice. Paediatricians, neonatologists and advocacy groups for preterm infants and their families could contribute to raising awareness and engage in dissemination activities and implementation initiatives to develop local protocols for adoption of this safe, effective and cost-effective intervention to reduce the burden of cerebral palsy in children born very preterm. PMID:25896966

  8. In vitro neuroprotective activities of compounds from Angelica shikokiana Makino.

    PubMed

    Mira, Amira; Yamashita, Shuntaro; Katakura, Yoshinori; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Angelica shikokiana is widely marketed in Japan as a dietary food supplement. With a focus on neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, the aerial part was extracted and through bio-guided fractionation, fifteen compounds [α-glutinol, β-amyrin, kaempferol, luteolin, quercetin, kaempferol-3-O-glucoside, kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside, methyl chlorogenate, chlorogenic acid, hyuganin E, 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furaldehyde, β-sitosterol-3-O-glucoside, adenosine (isolated for the first time from A. shikokiana), isoepoxypteryxin and isopteryxin] were isolated. Isolated compounds were evaluated for in vitro neuroprotection using acetylcholine esterase inhibitory, protection against hydrogen peroxide and amyloid β peptide (Aβ25-35)-induced neurotoxicity in neuro-2A cells, scavenging of hydroxyl radicals and intracellular reactive oxygen species and thioflavin T assays. Quercetin showed the strongest AChE inhibition (IC50 value = 35.5 µM) through binding to His-440 and Tyr-70 residues at the catalytic and anionic sites of acetylcholine esterase, respectively. Chlorogenic acid, its methyl ester, quercetin and luteolin could significantly protect neuro-2A cells against H2O2-induced neurotoxicity and scavenge hydroxyl radical and intracellular reactive oxygen species. Kaempferol-3-O-rutinoiside, hyuganin E and isoepoxypteryxin significantly decreased Aβ25-35-induced neurotoxicity and Th-T fluorescence. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report about neuroprotection of hyuganin E and isoepoxypteryxin against Aβ25-35-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:25786165

  9. Neuroprotection for the new millennium. Matchmaking pharmacology and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    A major theme of the 1990s in the pathophysiology of nervous system injury has been the multifactorial etiology of irreversible injury. Multiple causes imply multiple opportunities for therapeutic intervention--hence the abandonment of the "magic bullet" single pharmacologic agent for neuroprotection in favor of pharmacologic "cocktails". A second theme of the 1990s has been the progress in technology for neuroprotection, minimally- or non-invasive monitoring as well as treatment. Cardiac stenting has eliminated the need, in many cases, for open heart surgery; deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease has offered significant improvement in quality of life for many who had exhausted cocktail drug treatment for their disease. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus offers a novel treatment for Parkinson's disease where a technological advance may actually be an intervention with effects that are normally expected from pharmacologic agents. Rather than merely "jamming" the nervous system circuits involved in Parkinson's disease, deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus appears to improve the neurotransmitter imbalance that lies at the heart of Parkinson's disease. It may also slow the progression of the disease. Given the example of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus for Parkinson's disease, in future one may expect other technological or "hardware" interventions to influence the programming or "software" of the nervous system's physiologic response in certain disease states.

  10. Neuroprotective effects of rutaecarpine on cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chunlin; Zhang, Ji; Wang, Shu; Xue, Guiping; Hou, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Rutaecarpine, an active component of the traditional Chinese medicine Tetradium ruticarpum, has been shown to improve myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury. Because both cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases are forms of ischemic vascular disease, they are closely related. We hypothesized that rutaecarpine also has neuroprotective effects on cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. A cerebral ischemia reperfusion model was established after 84, 252 and 504 μg/kg carpine were given to mice via intraperitoneal injection, daily for 7 days. Results of the step through test, 2,3,5-triphenyl tetrazolium chloride dyeing and oxidative stress indicators showed that rutaecarpine could improve learning and memory ability, neurological symptoms and reduce infarction volume and cerebral water content in mice with cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. Rutaecarpine could significantly decrease the malondialdehyde content and increase the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase in mouse brain. Therefore, rutaecarpine could improve neurological function following injury induced by cerebral ischemia reperfusion, and the mechanism of this improvement may be associated with oxidative stress. These results verify that rutaecarpine has neuroprotective effects on cerebral ischemia reperfusion in mice. PMID:25206511

  11. Neuroprotective role of the TREK-1 channel in decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Vallee, Nicolas; Meckler, Cédric; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2012-04-01

    Nitrogen supersaturation and bubble formation can occur in the vascular system after diving, leading to death and nervous disorders from decompression sickness (DCS). Bubbles alter the vascular endothelium, activate platelets, and lead to focal ischemia with neurological damage mediated by the mechanosensitive TREK-1 neuronal potassium ion channel that sets pre- and postsynaptic resting membrane potentials. We report a neuroprotective effect associated with TREK-1. C57Bl6 mice were subjected to decompression from a simulated 90 msw dive. Of 143 mice that were wild type (WT) for TREK-1, 51.7% showed no DCS, 27.3% failed a grip test, and 21.0% died. Of 88 TREK-1 knockouts (KO), 26.1% showed no DCS, 42.0% failed a grip test, and 31.8% died. Mice that did not express TREK-1 had lower DCS resistance and were more likely to develop neurological symptoms. We conclude that the TREK-1 potassium channel was neuroprotective for DCS. PMID:22323654

  12. Neuroprotective effects of adenosine deaminase in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Risa; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Satoh, Yasushi; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Nishida, Yasuhiro; Nibuya, Masashi

    2016-04-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) is a ubiquitous enzyme that catabolizes adenosine and deoxyadenosine. During cerebral ischemia, extracellular adenosine levels increase acutely and adenosine deaminase catabolizes the increased levels of adenosine. Since adenosine is a known neuroprotective agent, adenosine deaminase was thought to have a negative effect during ischemia. In this study, however, we demonstrate that adenosine deaminase has substantial neuroprotective effects in the striatum, which is especially vulnerable during cerebral ischemia. We used temporary oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) to simulate ischemia in rat corticostriatal brain slices. We used field potentials as the primary measure of neuronal damage. For stable and efficient electrophysiological assessment, we used transgenic rats expressing channelrhodopsin-2, which depolarizes neurons in response to blue light. Time courses of electrically evoked striatal field potential (eFP) and optogenetically evoked striatal field potential (optFP) were recorded during and after oxygen/glucose deprivation. The levels of both eFP and optFP decreased after 10 min of oxygen/glucose deprivation. Bath-application of 10 µg/ml adenosine deaminase during oxygen/glucose deprivation significantly attenuated the oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced reduction in levels of eFP and optFP. The number of injured cells decreased significantly, and western blot analysis indicated a significant decrease of autophagic signaling in the adenosine deaminase-treated oxygen/glucose deprivation slices. These results indicate that adenosine deaminase has protective effects in the striatum. PMID:26746865

  13. Magnesium treatment for neuroprotection in ischemic diseases of the brain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews experimental and clinical data on the use of magnesium as a neuroprotective agent in various conditions of cerebral ischemia. Whereas magnesium has shown neuroprotective properties in animal models of global and focal cerebral ischemia, this effect could not be reproduced in a large human stroke trial. These conflicting results may be explained by the timing of treatment. While treatment can be started before or early after ischemia in experimental studies, there is an inevitable delay of treatment in human stroke. Magnesium administration to women at risk for preterm birth has been investigated in several randomized controlled trials and was found to reduce the risk of neurological deficits for the premature infant. Postnatal administration of magnesium to babies after perinatal asphyxia has been studied in a number of controlled clinical trials. The results are promising but the trials have, so far, been underpowered. In aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), cerebral ischemia arises with the onset of delayed cerebral vasospasm several days after aneurysm rupture. Similar to perinatal asphyxia in impending preterm delivery, treatment can be started prior to ischemia. The results of clinical trials are conflicting. Several clinical trials did not show an additive effect of magnesium with nimodipine, another calcium antagonist which is routinely administered to SAH patients in many centers. Other trials found a protective effect after magnesium therapy. Thus, it may still be a promising substance in the treatment of secondary cerebral ischemia after aneurysmal SAH. Future prospects of magnesium therapy are discussed. PMID:23618347

  14. Chemical Modification of the Multi-Target Neuroprotective Compound Fisetin

    PubMed Central

    Chiruta, Chandramouli; Schubert, David; Dargusch, Richard; Maher, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    Many factors are implicated in age-related CNS disorders making it unlikely that modulating only a single factor will provide effective treatment. Perhaps a better approach is to identify small molecules that have multiple biological activities relevant to the maintenance of brain function. Recently, we identified an orally active, neuroprotective and cognition-enhancing molecule, the flavonoid fisetin, that is effective in several animal models of CNS disorders. Fisetin has direct antioxidant activity and can also increase the intracellular levels of glutathione (GSH), the major endogenous antioxidant. In addition, fisetin has both neurotrophic and anti-inflammatory activity. However, its relatively high EC50 in cell based assays, low lipophilicity, high tPSA and poor bioavailability suggest that there is room for medicinal chemical improvement. Here we describe a multi-tiered approach to screening that has allowed us to identify fisetin derivatives with significantly enhanced activity in an in vitro neuroprotection model while at the same time maintaining other key activities. PMID:22192055

  15. Neuroprotective effects of Withania somnifera dunal.: A possible mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Maheep; Sharma, Durgesh; Salvi, Mahendra

    2009-11-01

    Present study was carried out to understand the possible mechanism of neuroprotective action of the root extract of Withania somnifera Dunal (WS). The study is focused on WS mediated inhibition of nitric oxide production, which is known to mediate neurodegeneration during stress. Adult mice (28 +/- 5 g) were exposed to restraint stress for 30 days. Activity of NADPH diaphorase (NADPH-d) and factors (Acetylcholine, serotonin and corticosterone), which regulates NADPH-d activity were studied. Treatment with WS extract for 30 days during stress, significantly reversed the stress induced NADPH-d activation. Observations suggest that inhibition of NADPH-d by WS is not a direct effect of extract on NADPH-d, instead it inhibits via suppressing corticosterone release and activating cholineacetyltransferase, which in turn increase serotonin level in hippocampus to inhibit NADPH-d. Together, the main mechanism underlying the neuroprotective effects of WS can be attributed to its role in the down regulation of nNOS and neurochemical alterations of specific neurotransmitter systems. These observations thus suggest that WS root extract could be developed as a potential preventive or therapeutic drug for stress induced neurological disorders. PMID:19444606

  16. Plant-derived neuroprotective agents in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Wenyu; Zhuang, Wenxin; Zhou, Shuanhu; Wang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is one of the most common degenerative disorders of the central nervous system among the elderly. The disease is caused by the slow deterioration of the dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Treatment strategies to protect dopaminergic neurons from progressive damage have received much attention. However there is no effective treatment for PD. Traditional Chinese medicines have shown potential clinical efficacy in attenuating the progression of PD. Increasing evidence indicates that constituents of some Chinese herbs include resveratrol, curcumin, and ginsenoside can be neuroprotective. Since pathologic processes in PD including inflammation, oxidative stress, apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, and genetic factors lead to neuronal degeneration, and these Chinese herbs can protect dopaminergic neurons from neuronal degeneration, in this article, we review the neuroprotective roles of these herbs and summarize their anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-apoptotic effects in PD. In addition, we discuss their possible mechanisms of action in in vivo and in vitro models of PD. Traditional Chinese medicinal herbs, with their low toxicity and side-effects, have become the potential therapeutic interventions for prevention and treatment of PD and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26328004

  17. Hypoxic-Ischemic Neonatal Encephalopathy: Animal Experiments for Neuroprotective Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ikenoue, Tsuyomu

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic neonatal encephalopathy and ensuing brain damage is still an important problem in modern perinatal medicine. In this paper, we would like to share some of the results of our recent studies on neuroprotective therapies in animal experiments, as well as some literature reviews. From the basic animal studies, we have now obtained some possible candidates for therapeutic measures against hypoxic-ischemic neonatal encephalopathy. For example, they are hypothermia, rehabilitation, free radical scavenger, neurotrophic factors and growth factors, steroid, calcium channel blocker, vagal stimulation, some anti apoptotic agents, pre- and post conditioning, antioxidants, cell therapy with stem cells, modulators of K(+)-ATP channels, and so on. Whether combination of these therapies may be more beneficial than any single therapy needs to be clarified. Hypoxia-ischemia is a complicated condition, in which the cause, severity, and time-course are different in each case. Likewise, each fetus has its own inherent potentials such as adaptation, preconditioning-tolerance, and intolerance. Therefore, further extensive studies are required to establish an individualized strategy for neuroprotection against perinatal hypoxic-ischemic insult. PMID:23533962

  18. Neuroprotective and Cytotoxic Phthalides from Angelicae Sinensis Radix.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wenxia; Zhou, Yuzhi; Li, Xiao; Gao, Xiaoxia; Tian, Junsheng; Qin, Xuemei; Du, Guanhua

    2016-01-01

    Seven phthalides, including a new dimeric one named tokinolide C (7), were isolated from Angelicae Sinensis Radix and characterized. The structures of these compounds were elucidated on the basis of comprehensive analysis of spectroscopic data and comparison with literature data. All of the compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxic activities against the A549, HCT-8, and HepG2 cancer cell lines. Riligustilide (4) showed cytotoxicity against three cancer cell lines, with IC50 values of 13.82, 6.79, and 7.92 μM, respectively. Tokinolide A (6) and tokinolide C (6) exerted low cytotoxicity in these cancer cell lines, while the remaining compounds were inactive. Flow cytometry analysis was employed to evaluate the possible mechanism of cytotoxic action of riligustilide (4). We observed that compound 4 was able to arrest the cell cycle in the G1, S phases and induce apoptosis in a time-dependent manner in HCT-8 cell lines. In addition, these compounds were evaluated for neuroprotective effect against SH-SY5Y cells injured by glutamate. The result showed that ligustilide (1), Z-butylidenephthalide (3) and tokinolide A (6) exhibited significant neuroprotective effects. PMID:27128890

  19. Pharmacological treatment of laser eye injuries by neuroprotection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solberg, Yoram; Rosner, Mordechai; Belkin, Michael

    1996-04-01

    Many retinal injuries result in an irreversible neuronal loss, which can not yet be reduced by pharmacological methods. To determine whether glutamate-receptor blockers can serve as neuroprotective agents in the retina, as they do in the central nervous system, we examined the effects of MK-801, an NMDA-receptor antagonist, on laser-induced retinal injury in a rat model. Immediately and 8 h after argon laser retinal photocoagulation, rats were treated with intraperitoneal injections of MK-801 (3 mg/kg) or saline. After 3, 20 or 60 days the animals were sacrificed and their retinal lesions were evaluated histologically and morphometrically. Photoreceptor cell loss, both immediately and up to 2 months after laser irradiation, was significantly smaller in MK-801-treated rats than controls. MK-801 exhibits neuroprotective property in the retina. This points to the involvement of glutamate in the laser-induced retinal neuronal damage. Glutamate-receptor blockers should be further investigated for therapy of retinal diseases characterized by neuronal cell destruction.

  20. Treatment of laser-induced retinal injuries by neuroprotection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solberg, Yoram; Rosner, Mordechai; Belkin, Michael

    1997-05-01

    Retinal laser photocoagulation treatments are often complicated with immediate side-effect of visual impairment. To determine whether glutamate-receptor blockers can serve as adjuvant neuroprotective therapy, we examined the effect of MK-801, an NMDA-receptor antagonist, on laser-induced retinal injury in a rat model. Argon laser retinal lesions were created in the retina of 36 DA rats. Treatment with intraperitoneal injections of MK-801 or saline was started immediately after the laser photocoagulation. The animals were sacrificed after 3, 20 or 60 days and the retinal lesions were evaluated histologically and morphometrically. Photoreceptor-cell loss was significantly smaller in MK-801-treated rats than controls. The proliferative membrane composed of retinal pigment epithelial cells which was seen at the base of the lesion in control retinas, was smaller in the MK-801-treated retinas. MK-801 exhibited neuroprotective and anti-proliferative properties in the retina. Glutamate-receptor blockers should be further investigated for serving as adjuvant therapy to retinal photocoagulation treatments.

  1. Neurotropic and neuroprotective activities of the earthworm peptide Lumbricusin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Hong; Lee, Ik Hwan; Nam, Seung Taek; Hong, Ji; Zhang, Peng; Hwang, Jae Sam; Seok, Heon; Choi, Hyemin; Lee, Dong Gun; Kim, Jae Il; Kim, Ho

    2014-06-01

    We recently isolated a polypeptide from the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris that is structurally similar to defensin, a well-known antibacterial peptide. An 11-mer antibacterial peptide (NH2-RNRRWCIDQQA), designated Lumbricusin, was synthesized based on the amino acid sequence of the isolated polypeptide. Since we previously reported that CopA3, a dung beetle peptide, enhanced neuronal cell proliferation, we here examined whether Lumbricusin exerted neurotropic and/or neuroprotective effects. Lumbricusin treatment induced a time-dependent increase (∼51%) in the proliferation of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Lumbricusin also significantly inhibited the apoptosis and decreased viability induced by treatment with 6-hydroxy dopamine, a Parkinson's disease-mimicking agent. Immunoblot analyses revealed that Lumbricusin treatment increased ubiquitination of p27(Kip1) protein, a negative regulator of cell-cycle progression, in SH-SY5Y cells, and markedly promoted its degradation. Notably, adenoviral-mediated over-expression of p27(Kip1) significantly blocked the antiapoptotic effect of Lumbricusin in 6-hydroxy dopamine-treated SH-SY5Y cells. These results suggest that promotion of p27(Kip1) degradation may be the main mechanism underlying the neuroprotective and neurotropic effects of Lumbricusin. PMID:24796676

  2. Synthesis and biological evaluation of aryloxyacetamide derivatives as neuroprotective agents.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yan; Xu, Yi; Zhang, Ai-Xia; Li, Xiao-Feng; Xu, Zhao-Ying; Li, Ping; Wu, Bin

    2016-05-15

    A series of new aryloxyacetamide derivatives 10a-s and 14a-m are designed and synthesized. Their protective activities against the glutamate-induced cell death were investigated in differentiated rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC12 cells). Most compounds exhibited neuroprotective effects, especially for 10m, 10r, 14b and 14c, which showed potential protection of PC12 cells at three doses (0.1, 1.0, 10μM). MTT assay, Hoechst 33342/PI double staining, and high content screening (HCS) revealed that pretreatment of the cells with 10m, 10r, 14b and 14c has significantly decreased the extent of cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The results of western blot analysis demonstrated these compounds suppressed apoptosis of glutamate-induced PC12 cells via caspase-3 pathway. These compounds can be lead compounds for further discovery of neuroprotective agents for treating cerebral ischemic stroke. Basic structure-activity relationships are also presented. PMID:27038495

  3. Neuroprotective Effect of Radix Trichosanthis Saponins on Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Sun, Haiyan; Huang, Liyong; Li, Juxiang; Zhou, Wenke; Chang, Jingling

    2015-01-01

    Redox homeostasis has been implicated in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). As a result, antioxidants and/or free radical scavengers have become an important therapeutic modality. Considering that radix trichosanthis (RT) saponins exhibited strong antioxidant ability both in vivo and in vitro, the present study aimed to reveal whether the neuroprotective activities of RT saponins were mediated by p38/p53 signal pathway after SAH. An established SAH model was used and superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), nitric oxide (NO), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), p-p38, and p53 activation were detected after 48 h of SAH. The results showed that RT saponins inhibited iNOS expression to restore NO to basal level. Moreover, compared with Cu/Zn-SOD, RT saponins (2 mg/kg/d dosage) significantly increased Mn-SOD activity after SAH. Accompanied with lowered NO and elevated SOD, decreased p38 phosphorylation and p53 activities were observed, especially for RT saponins at 2 mg/kg/d dosage. In this setting, the neurological outcome was also improved with less neuronal cells damage after RT saponins pretreatment. Our findings demonstrated the beneficial effects of RT saponins in enhancing neuroprotective effects by deducing iNOS activity, normalizing SOD level, and inhibiting p-p38 and p53 expression, hence offering significant therapeutic implications for SAH. PMID:26089937

  4. Neuroprotection by pramipexole against dopamine- and levodopa-induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zou, L; Jankovic, J; Rowe, D B; Xie, W; Appel, S H; Le, W

    1999-01-01

    Pramipexole, a novel non-ergoline dopamine (DA) agonist, has been applied successfully for treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). We report here that pramipexole can protect dopaminergic cell line Mes23.5 against dopamine- and levodopa-induced cytotoxicity possibly through a mechanism related to antioxidant activity. In the MES 23.5 cultures, DA and L-DOPA induce a dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity, as determined by tetrazolium salt and trypan blue assays. Furthermore, an in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase assay demonstrates that DA-induced cell death is apoptotic. Pretreatment with pramipexole in a concentration range (4-100 microM) significantly attenuates DA- or L-DOPA-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis, an action which is not blocked by D3 antagonist U-99194 A or D2 antagonist raclopride. Pramipexole also protects MES 23.5 cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner. In cell-free system, pramipexole can effectively inhibit the formation of melanin, an end product resulting from DA or L-DOPA oxidation. These results indicate that pramipexole exerts its neuroprotective effect possibly through a mechanism, which is independent of DA receptors but related to antioxidation or scavenging of free radicals (e.g. hydrogen peroxide). As a direct DA agonist and potentially neuroprotective agent, pramipexole remains attractive in the treatment of PD. PMID:10227583

  5. A novel 26 bp deletion [HBB: c.20_45del26bp] in exon 1 of the β-globin gene causing β-thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Edison, Eunice S; Venkatesan, Rajkumar S; Govindanattar, Sankari Devi; George, Biju; Shaji, Ramachandran V

    2012-01-01

    Molecular characterization of β-thalassemia (β-thal) is essential in prevention and in understanding the biology of the disease. Deletion mutations are relatively uncommon in β-thal. In this report, we describe a novel 26 bp deletion from codon 6 to codon 14 in the β-globin in a consanguineous family from Tamil Nadu, India. This novel mutation causes a shift in the normal reading frame of the β-globin coding sequence, and consequently, a premature chain termination of translation due to the creation of a stop codon at the position of codon 21. The identification of this novel deletional mutation adds to the repertoire of β-thal mutations in India. PMID:22233277

  6. Characterization of the mouse beta maj globin transcription termination region: a spacing sequence is required between the poly(A) signal sequence and multiple downstream termination elements.

    PubMed Central

    Tantravahi, J; Alvira, M; Falck-Pedersen, E

    1993-01-01

    For the majority of mRNA encoding eukaryotic transcription units, there is little or no knowledge of the elements responsible for transcription termination or how they may interact with RNA polymerase. In this report, we have used recombinant adenovirus reporter vectors to characterize the mouse beta maj globin sequence elements that cause transcription termination. Within the globin 3' termination region, we have identified at least three sequence elements which induce significant levels of transcription termination (> 50%). The smallest functionally active element (64% termination) is 69 bp in length. The natural arrangement of these elements results in a cumulative termination which is greater than 90%. Recognition of the termination elements by RNA polymerase II depends on the presence of a functional poly(A) signal sequence. We demonstrate that efficient transcription termination depends on appropriate spacing between the poly(A) signal sequence and the termination element. Images PMID:8417354

  7. Poly-arginine and arginine-rich peptides are neuroprotective in stroke models.

    PubMed

    Meloni, Bruno P; Brookes, Laura M; Clark, Vince W; Cross, Jane L; Edwards, Adam B; Anderton, Ryan S; Hopkins, Richard M; Hoffmann, Katrin; Knuckey, Neville W

    2015-06-01

    Using cortical neuronal cultures and glutamic acid excitotoxicity and oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) stroke models, we demonstrated that poly-arginine and arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), are highly neuroprotective, with efficacy increasing with increasing arginine content, have the capacity to reduce glutamic acid-induced neuronal calcium influx and require heparan sulfate preotoglycan-mediated endocytosis to induce a neuroprotective effect. Furthermore, neuroprotection could be induced with immediate peptide treatment or treatment up to 2 to 4 hours before glutamic acid excitotoxicity or OGD, and with poly-arginine-9 (R9) when administered intravenously after stroke onset in a rat model. In contrast, the JNKI-1 peptide when fused to the (non-arginine) kFGF CPP, which does not rely on endocytosis for uptake, was not neuroprotective in the glutamic acid model; the kFGF peptide was also ineffective. Similarly, positively charged poly-lysine-10 (K10) and R9 fused to the negatively charged poly-glutamic acid-9 (E9) peptide (R9/E9) displayed minimal neuroprotection after excitotoxicity. These results indicate that peptide positive charge and arginine residues are critical for neuroprotection, and have led us to hypothesize that peptide-induced endocytic internalization of ion channels is a potential mechanism of action. The findings also question the mode of action of different neuroprotective peptides fused to arginine-rich CPPs. PMID:25669902

  8. Mechanism of neuroprotection by donepezil pretreatment in rat cortical neurons chronically treated with donepezil.

    PubMed

    Takada-Takatori, Yuki; Kume, Toshiaki; Ohgi, Yuta; Izumi, Yasuhiko; Niidome, Tetsuhiro; Fujii, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Hachiro; Akaike, Akinori

    2008-12-01

    Previously, we showed that in rat cortical neurons, chronic donepezil treatment (10 microM, 4 days) up-regulates nicotinic receptors (nAChR) and makes neurons more sensitive to the neuroprotective effect of donepezil. Here we examined the mechanism of donepezil-induced neuroprotection in neurons chronically treated with donepezil. The mechanism of neuroprotection was examined under different conditions of exposure to glutamate, acute and moderate, that induce cell death associated with necrotic and apoptotic cell death, respectively. Concomitant treatment with antagonists of nAChRs but not muscarinic receptors inhibited donepezil pretreatment-induced neuroprotection against acute glutamate treatment-induced death. Donepezil pretreatment prevented acute glutamate- and ionomycin-induced neurotoxicity, but not S-nitrosocysteine-induced neurotoxicity, suggesting that donepezil protects neurons via nAChR at levels before nitric oxide synthase activation against acute glutamate neurotoxicity. Concomitant treatment with antagonists of nAChR or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling inhibitors significantly inhibited neuroprotection against moderate glutamate neurotoxicity and decreased the phosphorylation level of Akt. Neuroprotection was also inhibited by treatment with inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase. These results suggest that donepezil protects neurons against moderate glutamate neurotoxicity via nAChR-PI3K-Akt and MAPK signaling pathways. This study provides novel insight into the mechanism of donepezil-induced neuroprotection that involves nAChR up-regulation. PMID:18655200

  9. Poly-arginine and arginine-rich peptides are neuroprotective in stroke models

    PubMed Central

    Meloni, Bruno P; Brookes, Laura M; Clark, Vince W; Cross, Jane L; Edwards, Adam B; Anderton, Ryan S; Hopkins, Richard M; Hoffmann, Katrin; Knuckey, Neville W

    2015-01-01

    Using cortical neuronal cultures and glutamic acid excitotoxicity and oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) stroke models, we demonstrated that poly-arginine and arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), are highly neuroprotective, with efficacy increasing with increasing arginine content, have the capacity to reduce glutamic acid-induced neuronal calcium influx and require heparan sulfate preotoglycan-mediated endocytosis to induce a neuroprotective effect. Furthermore, neuroprotection could be induced with immediate peptide treatment or treatment up to 2 to 4 hours before glutamic acid excitotoxicity or OGD, and with poly-arginine-9 (R9) when administered intravenously after stroke onset in a rat model. In contrast, the JNKI-1 peptide when fused to the (non-arginine) kFGF CPP, which does not rely on endocytosis for uptake, was not neuroprotective in the glutamic acid model; the kFGF peptide was also ineffective. Similarly, positively charged poly-lysine-10 (K10) and R9 fused to the negatively charged poly-glutamic acid-9 (E9) peptide (R9/E9) displayed minimal neuroprotection after excitotoxicity. These results indicate that peptide positive charge and arginine residues are critical for neuroprotection, and have led us to hypothesize that peptide-induced endocytic internalization of ion channels is a potential mechanism of action. The findings also question the mode of action of different neuroprotective peptides fused to arginine-rich CPPs. PMID:25669902

  10. Ghrelin-AMPK Signaling Mediates the Neuroprotective Effects of Calorie Restriction in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, Jacqueline A; Lemus, Moyra B; Stark, Romana; Santos, Vanessa V; Thompson, Aiysha; Rees, Daniel J; Galic, Sandra; Elsworth, John D; Kemp, Bruce E; Davies, Jeffrey S; Andrews, Zane B

    2016-03-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) is neuroprotective in Parkinson's disease (PD) although the mechanisms are unknown. In this study we hypothesized that elevated ghrelin, a gut hormone with neuroprotective properties, during CR prevents neurodegeneration in an 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) model of PD. CR attenuated the MPTP-induced loss of substantia nigra (SN) dopamine neurons and striatal dopamine turnover in ghrelin WT but not KO mice, demonstrating that ghrelin mediates CR's neuroprotective effect. CR elevated phosphorylated AMPK and ACC levels in the striatum of WT but not KO mice suggesting that AMPK is a target for ghrelin-induced neuroprotection. Indeed, exogenous ghrelin significantly increased pAMPK in the SN. Genetic deletion of AMPKβ1 and 2 subunits only in dopamine neurons prevented ghrelin-induced AMPK phosphorylation and neuroprotection. Hence, ghrelin signaling through AMPK in SN dopamine neurons mediates CR's neuroprotective effects. We consider targeting AMPK in dopamine neurons may recapitulate neuroprotective effects of CR without requiring dietary intervention. PMID:26961958

  11. Genetic modifiers of sickle cell anemia in the BABY HUG cohort: influence on laboratory and clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Vivien A; Luo, Zhaoyu; Flanagan, Jonathan M; Howard, Thad A; Thompson, Bruce W; Wang, Winfred C; Kutlar, Abdullah; Ware, Russell E

    2013-07-01

    The recently completed BABY HUG trial investigated the safety and efficacy of hydroxyurea in infants with sickle cell anemia (SCA). To investigate the effects of known genetic modifiers, genomic DNA on 190 randomized subjects were analyzed for alpha thalassemia, beta-globin haplotype, polymorphisms affecting endogenous fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels (XmnI, BCL11A, and HBS1L-MYB), UGT1A1 promoter polymorphisms, and the common G6PD A(-) mutation. At study entry, infants with alpha thalassemia trait had significantly lower mean corpuscular volume, total bilirubin, and absolute reticulocyte count. Beta-globin haplotypes associated with milder disease had significantly higher hemoglobin and %HbF. BCL11A and XmnI polymorphisms had significant effects on baseline HbF, while UGT1A1 promoter polymorphisms significantly influenced baseline serum bilirubin. At study exit, subjects randomized to placebo still exhibited laboratory effects of alpha thalassemia and other modifiers, while those assigned hydroxyurea had treatment effects that exceeded most genetic influences. The pain phenotype was influenced by HbF modifiers in both treatment groups. These data document that genetic polymorphisms do modify laboratory and clinical phenotypes even in very young patients with SCA. The hydroxyurea effects are more potent, however, indicating that treatment criteria should not be limited to certain genetic subsets, and supporting the use of hydroxyurea for all young patients with SCA. PMID:23606168

  12. Food, nutrigenomics, and neurodegeneration--neuroprotection by what you eat!

    PubMed

    Virmani, Ashraf; Pinto, Luigi; Binienda, Zbigniew; Ali, Syed

    2013-10-01

    Diet in human health is no longer simple nutrition, but in light of recent research, especially nutrigenomics, it is linked via evolution and genetics to cell health status capable of modulating apoptosis, detoxification, and appropriate gene response. Nutritional deficiency and disease especially lack of vitamins and minerals is well known, but more recently, epidemiological studies suggest a role of fruits and vegetables, as well as essential fatty acids and even red wine (French paradox), in protection against disease. In the early 1990s, various research groups started considering the use of antioxidants (e.g., melatonin, resveratrol, green tea, lipoic acid) and metabolic compounds (e.g., nicotinamide, acetyl-L-carnitine, creatine, coenzyme Q10) as possible candidates in neuroprotection. They were of course considered on par with snake oil salesman (women) at the time. The positive actions of nutritional supplements, minerals, and plant extracts in disease prevention are now mainstream and commercial health claims being made are subject to regulation in most countries. Apart from efficacy and finding, the right dosages, the safety, and especially the level of purification and lack of contamination are all issues that are important as their use becomes widespread. From the mechanistic point of view, most of the time these substances replenish the body's deficiency and restore normal function. However, they also exert actions that are not sensu stricto nutritive and could be considered pharmacological especially that, at times, higher intake than recommended (RDA) is needed to see these effects. Free radicals and neuroinflammation processes underlie many neurodegenerative conditions, even Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Curcumin, carotenoids, acetyl-L-carnitine, coenzyme Q10, vitamin D, and polyphenols and other nutraceuticals have the potential to target multiple pathways in these conditions. In summary, augmenting neuroprotective pathways using

  13. Adenosine A3 receptor activation is neuroprotective against retinal neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Galvao, Joana; Elvas, Filipe; Martins, Tiago; Cordeiro, M Francesca; Ambrósio, António Francisco; Santiago, Ana Raquel

    2015-11-01

    Death of retinal neural cells, namely retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), is a characteristic of several retinal neurodegenerative diseases. Although the role of adenosine A3 receptor (A3R) in neuroprotection is controversial, A3R activation has been reported to afford protection against several brain insults, with few studies in the retina. In vitro models (retinal neural and organotypic cultures) and animal models [ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) and partial optic nerve transection (pONT)] were used to study the neuroprotective properties of A3R activation against retinal neurodegeneration. The A3R selective agonist (2-Cl-IB-MECA, 1 μM) prevented apoptosis (TUNEL(+)-cells) induced by kainate and cyclothiazide (KA + CTZ) in retinal neural cultures (86.5 ± 7.4 and 37.2 ± 6.1 TUNEL(+)-cells/field, in KA + CTZ and KA + CTZ + 2-Cl-IB-MECA, respectively). In retinal organotypic cultures, 2-Cl-IB-MECA attenuated NMDA-induced cell death, assessed by TUNEL (17.3 ± 2.3 and 8.3 ± 1.2 TUNEL(+)-cells/mm(2) in NMDA and NMDA+2-Cl-IB-MECA, respectively) and PI incorporation (ratio DIV4/DIV2 3.3 ± 0.3 and 1.3 ± 0.1 in NMDA and NMDA+2-Cl-IB-MECA, respectively) assays. Intravitreal 2-Cl-IB-MECA administration afforded protection against I-R injury decreasing the number of TUNEL(+) cells by 72%, and increased RGC survival by 57%. Also, intravitreal administration of 2-Cl-IB-MECA inhibited apoptosis (from 449.4 ± 37.8 to 207.6 ± 48.9 annexin-V(+)-cells) and RGC loss (from 1.2 ± 0.6 to 8.1 ± 1.7 cells/mm) induced by pONT. This study demonstrates that 2-Cl-IB-MECA is neuroprotective to the retina, both in vitro and in vivo. Activation of A3R may have great potential in the management of retinal neurodegenerative diseases characterized by RGC death, as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, and ischemic diseases. PMID:26297614

  14. Development of a High-Resolution Melting Approach for Scanning Beta Globin Gene Point Mutations in the Greek and Other Mediterranean Populations.

    PubMed

    Chassanidis, Christos; Boutou, Effrossyni; Voskaridou, Ersi; Balassopoulou, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    Beta-thalassaemia is one of the most common autosomal recessive disorders worldwide. The disease's high incidence, which is observed in the broader Mediterranean area has led to the establishment of molecular diagnostics' assays to prevent affected births. Therefore, the development of a reliable, cost-effective and rapid scanning method for β globin gene point mutations, easily adapted to a routine laboratory, is absolutely essential. Here, we describe, for the first time, the development of a High-Resolution Melting Analysis (HRMA) approach, suitable for scanning the particularly heterogeneous beta globin gene mutations present in the Greek population, and thus adaptable to the Mediterranean and other areas where these mutations have been identified. Within this context, β globin gene regions containing mutations frequently identified in the Greek population were divided in ten overlapping amplicons. Our reactions' setup allowed for the simultaneous amplification of multiple primer sets and partial multiplexing, thereby resulting in significant reduction of the experimental time. DNA samples from β-thalassaemia patients/carriers with defined genotypes were tested. Distinct genotypes displayed distinguishable melting curves, enabling accurate detection of mutations. The described HRMA can be adapted to a high-throughput level. It represents a rapid, simple, cost-effective, reliable, highly feasible and sensitive method for β-thalassaemia gene scanning. PMID:27351925

  15. Development of a High-Resolution Melting Approach for Scanning Beta Globin Gene Point Mutations in the Greek and Other Mediterranean Populations

    PubMed Central

    Chassanidis, Christos; Boutou, Effrossyni; Voskaridou, Ersi; Balassopoulou, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    Beta-thalassaemia is one of the most common autosomal recessive disorders worldwide. The disease’s high incidence, which is observed in the broader Mediterranean area has led to the establishment of molecular diagnostics’ assays to prevent affected births. Therefore, the development of a reliable, cost-effective and rapid scanning method for β globin gene point mutations, easily adapted to a routine laboratory, is absolutely essential. Here, we describe, for the first time, the development of a High-Resolution Melting Analysis (HRMA) approach, suitable for scanning the particularly heterogeneous beta globin gene mutations present in the Greek population, and thus adaptable to the Mediterranean and other areas where these mutations have been identified. Within this context, β globin gene regions containing mutations frequently identified in the Greek population were divided in ten overlapping amplicons. Our reactions’ setup allowed for the simultaneous amplification of multiple primer sets and partial multiplexing, thereby resulting in significant reduction of the experimental time. DNA samples from β-thalassaemia patients/carriers with defined genotypes were tested. Distinct genotypes displayed distinguishable melting curves, enabling accurate detection of mutations. The described HRMA can be adapted to a high-throughput level. It represents a rapid, simple, cost-effective, reliable, highly feasible and sensitive method for β-thalassaemia gene scanning. PMID:27351925

  16. The polyoma virus enhancer cannot substitute for DNase I core hypersensitive sites 2-4 in the human beta-globin LCR.

    PubMed Central

    Tanimoto, K; Liu, Q; Bungert, J; Engel, J D

    1999-01-01

    The polyoma virus enhancer (PyE) is capable of conferring integration position-independent expression to linked genes in stably transfected erythroid cells after joining to DNase I hypersensitive site (HS) 5 of the human beta-globin locus control region (LCR). In attempting to separate the chromatin opening activity of the LCR from its enhancer activity and to investigate contributions of the individual HS core elements to LCR function, the human beta-globin LCR HS2, HS3 and HS4 core elements were replaced with the PyE within the context of a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) bearing the whole locus. We show here that, in contrast to its function in cultured cells, the PyE is unable to replace HS core element function in vivo. We found that the PyE substitution mutant LCR is unable to provide either chromatin opening or transcriptional potentiating activity at any erythroid developmental stage in transgenic mice. These data provide direct evidence that the human beta-globin LCR core elements specify unique functions that cannot be replaced by a ubiquitous enhancer activity. PMID:10454609

  17. Superior neuroprotective effects of cerebrolysin in nanoparticle-induced exacerbation of hyperthermia-induced brain pathology.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aruna; Muresanu, Dafin Fior; Mössler, Herbert; Sharma, Hari Shanker

    2012-02-01

    In recent years, the incidence of heat stroke and associated brain pathology are increasing Worldwide. More than half of the world's population are living in areas associated with high environmental heat especially during the summer seasons. Thus, new research is needed using novel drug targets to achieve neuroprotection in heat-induced brain pathology. Previous research from our laboratory showed that the pathophysiology of brain injuries following heat stroke are exacerbated by chronic intoxication of engineered nanoparticles of small sizes (50-60 nm) following identical heat exposure in rats. Interestingly, in nanoparticle-intoxicated animals the known neuroprotective agents in standard doses failed to induce effective neuroprotection. This suggests that the dose-response of the drugs either requires modification or new therapeutic agents are needed to provide better neuroprotection in nanoparticle-intoxicated animals after heat stroke. This review is focused on the use of cerebrolysin, a mixture of several neurotrophic factors and active peptide fragments, in relation to other neuroprotective agents normally used to treat ischemic stroke in clinics in nanoparticle-induced exacerbation of brain damage in heat stroke. It appears that cerebrolysin exerts the most superior neuroprotective effects in heat stress as compared to other neuroprotective agents on brain pathology in normal rats. Interestingly, to induce effective neuroprotection in nanoparticle-induced exacerbation of brain pathology a double dose of cerebrolysin is needed. On the other hand, double doses of the other drugs were quite ineffective in reducing brain damage. These observations suggest that the drug type and doses are important factors in attenuating nanoparticle-induced exacerbation of brain pathology in heat stroke. The functional significance and possible mechanisms of drug-induced neuroprotection in nanoparticle-treated, heat-stressed rats are discussed. PMID:22229316

  18. Neuroprotective action of cycloheximide involves induction of bcl-2 and antioxidant pathways.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, K; Estus, S; Fu, W; Mark, R J; Mattson, M P

    1997-03-10

    The ability of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (CHX) to prevent neuronal death in different paradigms has been interpreted to indicate that the cell death process requires synthesis of "killer" proteins. On the other hand, data indicate that neurotrophic factors protect neurons in the same death paradigms by inducing expression of neuroprotective gene products. We now provide evidence that in embryonic rat hippocampal cell cultures, CHX protects neurons against oxidative insults by a mechanism involving induction of neuroprotective gene products including the antiapoptotic gene bcl-2 and antioxidant enzymes. Neuronal survival after exposure to glutamate, FeSO4, and amyloid beta-peptide was increased in cultures pretreated with CHX at concentrations of 50-500 nM; higher and lower concentrations were ineffective. Neuroprotective concentrations of CHX caused only a moderate (20-40%) reduction in overall protein synthesis, and induced an increase in c-fos, c-jun, and bcl-2 mRNAs and protein levels as determined by reverse transcription-PCR analysis and immunocytochemistry, respectively. At neuroprotective CHX concentrations, levels of c-fos heteronuclear RNA increased in parallel with c-fos mRNA, indicating that CHX acts by inducing transcription. Neuroprotective concentrations of CHX suppressed accumulation of H2O2 induced by FeSO4, suggesting activation of antioxidant pathways. Treatment of cultures with an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide directed against bcl-2 mRNA decreased Bcl-2 protein levels and significantly reduced the neuroprotective action of CHX, suggesting that induction of Bcl-2 expression was mechanistically involved in the neuroprotective actions of CHX. In addition, activity levels of the antioxidant enzymes Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase, Mn-superoxide dismutase, and catalase were significantly increased in cultures exposed to neuroprotective levels of CHX. Our data suggest that low concentrations of CHX can promote neuron survival by

  19. Does the intrathecal propofol have a neuroprotective effect on spinal cord ischemia?

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Murat; Gullu, Huriye; Peker, Kemal; Sayar, Ilyas; Binici, Orhan; Yildiz, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    The neuroprotective effects of propofol have been confirmed. However, it remains unclear whether intrathecal administration of propofol exhibits neuroprotective effects on spinal cord ischemia. At 1 hour prior to spinal cord ischemia, propofol (100 and 300 µg) was intrathecally administered in rats with spinal cord ischemia. Propofol pre-treatment greatly improved rat pathological changes and neurological function deficits at 24 hours after spinal cord ischemia. These results suggest that intrathecal administration of propofol exhibits neuroprotective effects on spinal cord structural and functional damage caused by ischemia. PMID:26807119

  20. [Advance in studies on neuroprotective mechanism of Uncariae Ramulus Cum Uncis].

    PubMed

    Wei, Fang-Fang; Zeng, Chang-Qing; Zhao, Yu-Hong; Liu, Lin

    2014-07-01

    The Uncariae Ramulus Cum Uncis is a commonly used traditional Chinese medicine. In recent years, many studies have revealed its prominent neuroprotection function. The active ingredients in Uncariae Ramulus Cum Uncis could protect the nervous system in a multi-path and multi-target manner. Uncariae Ramulus Cum Uncis shows the neuroprotective effect by resisting oxidation, scavenging free radicals, modulating neurotransmitters and their related receptors, regulating the inflammatory factors and their related pathways, attenuating neuron apoptosis, reducing intracellular Ca2+ overloads and mitigating neurodegeneration. In this paper, the authors summarized the advance in studies on neuroprotective mechanisms of Uncariae Ramulus Cum Uncis. PMID:25272481

  1. Methylprednisolone exerts neuroprotective effects by regulating autophagy and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Chen, Shu-rui; Wu, Meng-yao; Gao, Kai; Li, Yuan-long; Wang, Hong-yu; Li, Chen-yuan; Li, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Methylprednisolone markedly reduces autophagy and apoptosis after secondary spinal cord injury. Here, we investigated whether pretreatment of cells with methylprednisolone would protect neuron-like cells from subsequent oxidative damage via suppression of autophagy and apoptosis. Cultured N2a cells were pretreated with 10 µM methylprednisolone for 30 minutes, then exposed to 100 µM H2O2 for 24 hours. Inverted phase contrast microscope images, MTT assay, flow cytometry and western blot results showed that, compared to cells exposed to 100 µM H2O2 alone, cells pretreated with methylprednisolone had a significantly lower percentage of apoptotic cells, maintained a healthy morphology, and showed downregulation of autophagic protein light chain 3B and Beclin-1 protein expression. These findings indicate that methylprednisolone exerted neuroprotective effects against oxidative damage by suppressing autophagy and apoptosis. PMID:27335569

  2. Perspectives of drug-based neuroprotection targeting mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Procaccio, V; Bris, C; Chao de la Barca, J M; Oca, F; Chevrollier, A; Amati-Bonneau, P; Bonneau, D; Reynier, P

    2014-05-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been reported in most neurodegenerative diseases. These anomalies include bioenergetic defect, respiratory chain-induced oxidative stress, defects of mitochondrial dynamics, increase sensitivity to apoptosis, and accumulation of damaged mitochondria with instable mitochondrial DNA. Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the pathophysiology of inherited mitochondrial disorders but most have no effective therapies. The development of new metabolic treatments will be useful not only for rare mitochondrial disorders but also for the wide spectrum of common age-related neurodegenerative diseases shown to be associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. A better understanding of the mitochondrial regulating pathways raised several promising perspectives of neuroprotection. This review focuses on the pharmacological approaches to modulate mitochondrial biogenesis, the removal of damaged mitochondria through mitophagy, scavenging free radicals and also dietary measures such as ketogenic diet. PMID:24792485

  3. Multiple sclerosis at menopause: Potential neuroprotective effects of estrogen.

    PubMed

    Christianson, Mindy S; Mensah, Virginia A; Shen, Wen

    2015-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune demyelinating and neurodegenerative condition of the central nervous system that preferentially afflicts women more than men. Low estrogen states such as menopause and the postpartum period favor exacerbations of multiple sclerosis in women with the disease. Existing and emerging evidence suggests a role for estrogen in the alleviation of symptoms and reversal of pathology associated with MS. While clinical evidence is sparse regarding the benefit of estrogen therapy for women at risk for MS exacerbations, scientific data demonstrates that estrogen potentiates numerous neuroprotective effects on the central nervous system (CNS). Estrogens play a wide range of roles involved in MS disease pathophysiology, including increasing antiinflammatory cytokines, decreasing demyelination, and enhancing oxidative and energy producing processes in CNS cells. PMID:25544310

  4. Neuroprotective Activity of (-)-Epigallocatechin Gallate against Lipopolysaccharide-Mediated Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Biao; Zhou, Li; Wang, Yi-Zhong; Wang, Xu; Zhou, Yu; Ho, Wen-Zhe; Li, Jie-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) mediated systemic inflammation plays a critical role in neurodegenerative diseases. The present study was conducted to evaluate the protective effects of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the major component in green tea, on LPS-mediated inflammation and neurotoxicity. LPS treatment of macrophages induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6). However, EGCG pretreatment of macrophages significantly inhibited LPS-mediated induction of these cytokines. In addition, EGCG significantly diminished LPS-induced inflammatory cytokines in the peripheral mononuclear blood cells (PBMCs). Supernatant from EGCG-pretreated and LPS-activated macrophage cultures was found to be less cytotoxic to neurons than that from non-EGCG-pretreated and LPS-activated macrophage cultures. Furthermore, EGCG treatment of neurons could inhibit LPS-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Thus EGCG represents a potent and useful neuroprotective agent for inflammation-mediated neurological disorders. PMID:27191001

  5. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease: Pathogenesis and Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Mounsey, Ross B.; Teismann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are vitally important organelles involved in an array of functions. The most notable is their prominent role in energy metabolism, where they generate over 90% of our cellular energy in the form of ATP through oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondria are involved in various other processes including the regulation of calcium homeostasis and stress response. Mitochondrial complex I impairment and subsequent oxidative stress have been identified as modulators of cell death in experimental models of Parkinson's disease (PD). Identification of specific genes which are involved in the rare familial forms of PD has further augmented the understanding and elevated the role mitochondrial dysfunction is thought to have in disease pathogenesis. This paper provides a review of the role mitochondria may play in idiopathic PD through the study of experimental models and how genetic mutations influence mitochondrial activity. Recent attempts at providing neuroprotection by targeting mitochondria are described and their progress assessed. PMID:21234411

  6. Fluoxetine is neuroprotective in slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haipeng; Grajales-Reyes, Gary E; Alicea-Vázquez, Vivianette; Grajales-Reyes, Jose G; Robinson, KaReisha; Pytel, Peter; Báez-Pagán, Carlos A; Lasalde-Dominicci, Jose A; Gomez, Christopher M

    2015-08-01

    The slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome (SCS) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease that caused mutations in the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) affecting neuromuscular transmission. Leaky AChRs lead to Ca(2+) overload and degeneration of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) attributed to activation of cysteine proteases and apoptotic changes of synaptic nuclei. Here we use transgenic mouse models expressing two different mutations found in SCS to demonstrate that inhibition of prolonged opening of mutant AChRs using fluoxetine not only improves motor performance and neuromuscular transmission but also prevents Ca(2+) overload, the activation of cysteine proteases, calpain, caspase-3 and 9 at endplates, and as a consequence, reduces subsynaptic DNA damage at endplates, suggesting a long term benefit to therapy. These studies suggest that prolonged treatment of SCS patients with open ion channel blockers that preferentially block mutant AChRs is neuroprotective. PMID:25448156

  7. Methylprednisolone exerts neuroprotective effects by regulating autophagy and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Chen, Shu-Rui; Wu, Meng-Yao; Gao, Kai; Li, Yuan-Long; Wang, Hong-Yu; Li, Chen-Yuan; Li, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Methylprednisolone markedly reduces autophagy and apoptosis after secondary spinal cord injury. Here, we investigated whether pretreatment of cells with methylprednisolone would protect neuron-like cells from subsequent oxidative damage via suppression of autophagy and apoptosis. Cultured N2a cells were pretreated with 10 µM methylprednisolone for 30 minutes, then exposed to 100 µM H2O2 for 24 hours. Inverted phase contrast microscope images, MTT assay, flow cytometry and western blot results showed that, compared to cells exposed to 100 µM H2O2 alone, cells pretreated with methylprednisolone had a significantly lower percentage of apoptotic cells, maintained a healthy morphology, and showed downregulation of autophagic protein light chain 3B and Beclin-1 protein expression. These findings indicate that methylprednisolone exerted neuroprotective effects against oxidative damage by suppressing autophagy and apoptosis. PMID:27335569

  8. Detection of a major gene for heterocellular hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin after accounting for genetic modifiers.

    PubMed

    Thein, S L; Sampietro, M; Rohde, K; Rochette, J; Weatherall, D J; Lathrop, G M; Demenais, F

    1994-02-01

    "Heterocellular hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin" (HPFH) is the term used to describe the genetically determined persistence of fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) production into adult life, in the absence of any related hematological disorder. Whereas some forms are caused by mutations in the beta-globin gene cluster on chromosome 11, others segregate independently. While the latter are of particular interest with respect to the regulation of globin gene switching, it has not been possible to determine their chromosomal location, mainly because their mode of inheritance is not clear, but also because several other factors are known to modify Hb F production. We have examined a large Asian Indian pedigree which includes individuals with heterocellular HPFH associated with beta-thalassemia and/or alpha-thalassemia. Segregation analysis was conducted on the HPFH trait FC, defined to be the percentage of Hb F-containing cells (F-cells), using the class D regressive model. Our results provide evidence for the presence of a major gene, dominant or codominant, which controls the FC values with residual familial correlations. The major gene was detected when the effects of genetic modifiers, notably beta-thalassemia and the XmnI-G gamma polymorphism, are accounted for in the analysis. Linkage with the beta-globin gene cluster is excluded. The transmission of the FC values in this pedigree is informative enough to allow detection of linkage with an appropriate marker(s). The analytical approach outlined in this study, using simple regression to allow for genetic modifiers and thus allowing the mode of inheritance of a trait to be dissected out, may be useful as a model for segregation and linkage analyses of other complex phenotypes. PMID:7508182

  9. Erythropoietin for Neuroprotection in Neonatal Encephalopathy: Safety and Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Larry A.; Ballard, Roberta A.; Ferriero, Donna M.; Glidden, David V.; Mayock, Dennis E.; Chang, Taeun; Durand, David J.; Song, Dongli; Bonifacio, Sonia L.; Gonzalez, Fernando F.; Glass, Hannah C.; Juul, Sandra E.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the safety and pharmacokinetics of erythropoietin (Epo) given in conjunction with hypothermia for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). We hypothesized that high dose Epo would produce plasma concentrations that are neuroprotective in animal studies (ie, maximum concentration = 6000–10 000 U/L; area under the curve = 117 000–140 000 U*h/L). METHODS: In this multicenter, open-label, dose-escalation, phase I study, we enrolled 24 newborns undergoing hypothermia for HIE. All patients had decreased consciousness and acidosis (pH < 7.00 or base deficit ≥ 12), 10-minute Apgar score ≤ 5, or ongoing resuscitation at 10 minutes. Patients received 1 of 4 Epo doses intravenously: 250 (N = 3), 500 (N = 6), 1000 (N = 7), or 2500 U/kg per dose (N = 8). We gave up to 6 doses every 48 hours starting at <24 hours of age and performed pharmacokinetic and safety analyses. RESULTS: Patients received mean 4.8 ± 1.2 Epo doses. Although Epo followed nonlinear pharmacokinetics, excessive accumulation did not occur during multiple dosing. At 500, 1000, and 2500 U/kg Epo, half-life was 7.2, 15.0, and 18.7 hours; maximum concentration was 7046, 13 780, and 33 316 U/L, and total Epo exposure (area under the curve) was 50 306, 131 054, and 328 002 U*h/L, respectively. Drug clearance at a given dose was slower than reported in uncooled preterm infants. No deaths or serious adverse effects were seen. CONCLUSIONS: Epo 1000 U/kg per dose intravenously given in conjunction with hypothermia is well tolerated and produces plasma concentrations that are neuroprotective in animals. A large efficacy trial is needed to determine whether Epo add-on therapy further improves outcome in infants undergoing hypothermia for HIE. PMID:23008465

  10. Can imaging techniques measure neuroprotection and remyelination in multiple sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Zivadinov, Robert

    2007-05-29

    MRI is the most important paraclinical measure for assessing and monitoring the pathologic changes implicated in the onset and progression of multiple sclerosis (MS). Conventional MRI sequences, such as T1-weighted gadolinium-enhanced and spin-echo T2-weighted imaging, are unable to provide full details about the degree of inflammation and underlying neurodegenerative changes. Newer nonconventional MRI techniques have the potential to detect clinical impairment, disease progression, accumulation of disability, and the neuroprotective effects of treatment. Unenhanced T1-weighted imaging can reveal hypointense black holes, a measure of chronic neurodegeneration. Two- and three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences allow better identification of cortical lesions. Ultrahigh-field strength MRI has the potential to detect subpial cortical and deep gray matter lesions. Magnetization transfer imaging is increasingly used to characterize the evolution of MS lesions and normal-appearing brain tissue. Evidence suggests that the dynamics of magnetization transfer changes correlate with the extent of demyelination and remyelination. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which provides details on tissue biochemistry, metabolism, and function, also has the capacity to reveal neuroprotective mechanisms. By measuring the motion of water, diffusion imaging can provide information about the orientation, size, and geometry of tissue damage in white and gray matter. Functional MRI may help clarify the brain's plasticity-dependent compensatory mechanisms in patients with MS. High-resolution microautoradiography and new contrast agents are proving to be sensitive means for characterizing molecular markers of disease activity, such as activated microglia and macrophages. Optical coherence tomography, a new research technique, makes it possible to investigate relevant physiologic systems that provide accurate measures of tissue changes secondary to the MS disease process

  11. Pleiotropic neuroprotective and metabolic effects of Actovegin's mode of action.

    PubMed

    Machicao, Fausto; Muresanu, Dafin Fior; Hundsberger, Harald; Pflüger, Maren; Guekht, Alla

    2012-11-15

    This article reviews the mechanisms of action of Actovegin in the context of its preclinical effects and new concepts in the pharmacological treatment of neurological disorders. Actovegin is an ultrafiltrate of calf blood, composed of more than 200 biological substances. The drug is used for a broad spectrum of diseases, including disturbances of peripheral and cerebral blood circulation, burns, impaired wound healing, radiation-induced damage and diabetic polyneuropathy. Actovegin is composed of small molecules present under normal physiological conditions, therefore pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies to determine its active substance are not feasible. Preclinical data have revealed that it improves metabolic balance by increasing glucose uptake and improving oxygen uptake under conditions of ischemia. Actovegin also resists the effects of gamma-irradiation and stimulates wound healing. More recent preclinical studies have suggested that anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic mechanisms of action specifically underlie the neuroprotective properties of Actovegin. The drug has been found to exert these beneficial effects experimentally, in primary rat hippocampal neurons and in an STZ-rat model of diabetic polyneuropathy, while also providing evidence that it positively affects the functional recovery of neurons. Latest data suggest that Actovegin also has a positive influence on the NF-κB pathway, but many molecular and cellular pathways remain unexplored. In particular, Actovegin's influence on neuroplasticity, neurogenesis and neurotrophicity are questions that ideally should be answered by future research. Nevertheless, it is clear that the multifactorial and complex nature of Actovegin underlies its pleiotropic neuroprotective mechanisms of action and positive effect on clinical outcomes. PMID:22910148

  12. In Vivo Therapeutic Gas Delivery for Neuroprotection with Echogenic Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Britton, George L.; Kim, Hyunggun; Kee, Patrick H.; Aronowski, Jaroslaw; Holland, Christy K.; McPherson, David D.; Huang, Shao-Ling

    2010-01-01

    Background Ischemia-related neurologic injury is a primary cause of stroke disability. Studies have demonstrated that xenon (Xe) may have potential as an effective and nontoxic neuroprotectant. Xe delivery is, however, hampered by lack of suitable administration methods. We have developed a pressurization-freeze method to encapsulate Xe into echogenic liposomes (Xe-ELIP) and have modulated local gas release with transvascular ultrasound exposure. Methods and Results Fifteen microliters of Xe were encapsulated into each 1 mg of liposomes (70% Xe and 30% argon). Xe delivery from Xe-ELIP into cells and consequent neuroprotective effects were evaluated with oxygen-glucose deprived and control neuronal cells in vitro. Xe-ELIP were administered into Sprague-Dawley rats intravenously or intraarterially following right middle cerebral artery occlusion. 1-MHz low-amplitude (0.18 MPa) continuous wave ultrasound directed onto the internal carotid artery triggered Xe release from circulating Xe-ELIP. Effects of Xe delivery on ischemia-induced neurologic injury and disability were evaluated. Xe-ELIP delivery to oxygen-glucose deprived neuronal cells improved cell viability in vitro and 48% infarct volume decrease in vivo. Intravenous Xe-ELIP administration in combination with the ultrasound directed onto the carotid artery enhanced local Xe release from circulating Xe-ELIP and demonstrated 75% infarct volume reduction. This was comparable to the effect following intraarterial administration. Behavioral tests on limb placement and grid and beam walking correlated with infarct reduction. Conclusions This novel methodology may provide a noninvasive strategy for ultrasound-enhanced local therapeutic gas delivery for cerebral ischemia-related injury while minimizing systemic side effects. PMID:20921443

  13. Neuroprotective copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes promote neurite elongation.

    PubMed

    Bica, Laura; Liddell, Jeffrey R; Donnelly, Paul S; Duncan, Clare; Caragounis, Aphrodite; Volitakis, Irene; Paterson, Brett M; Cappai, Roberto; Grubman, Alexandra; Camakaris, James; Crouch, Peter J; White, Anthony R

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal biometal homeostasis is a central feature of many neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and motor neuron disease. Recent studies have shown that metal complexing compounds behaving as ionophores such as clioquinol and PBT2 have robust therapeutic activity in animal models of neurodegenerative disease; however, the mechanism of neuroprotective action remains unclear. These neuroprotective or neurogenerative processes may be related to the delivery or redistribution of biometals, such as copper and zinc, by metal ionophores. To investigate this further, we examined the effect of the bis(thiosemicarbazonato)-copper complex, Cu(II)(gtsm) on neuritogenesis and neurite elongation (neurogenerative outcomes) in PC12 neuronal-related cultures. We found that Cu(II)(gtsm) induced robust neurite elongation in PC12 cells when delivered at concentrations of 25 or 50 nM overnight. Analogous effects were observed with an alternative copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex, Cu(II)(atsm), but at a higher concentration. Induction of neurite elongation by Cu(II)(gtsm) was restricted to neurites within the length range of 75-99 µm with a 2.3-fold increase in numbers of neurites in this length range with 50 nM Cu(II)(gtsm) treatment. The mechanism of neurogenerative action was investigated and revealed that Cu(II)(gtsm) inhibited cellular phosphatase activity. Treatment of cultures with 5 nM FK506 (calcineurin phosphatase inhibitor) resulted in analogous elongation of neurites compared to 50 nM Cu(II)(gtsm), suggesting a potential link between Cu(II)(gtsm)-mediated phosphatase inhibition and neurogenerative outcomes. PMID:24587210

  14. Biological characterization of PM226, a chromenoisoxazole, as a selective CB2 receptor agonist with neuroprotective profile.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Cañas, M; Morales, P; García-Toscano, L; Navarrete, C; Muñoz, E; Jagerovic, N; Fernández-Ruiz, J; García-Arencibia, M; Pazos, M R

    2016-08-01

    instead cultured BV2 cells was not effective. PM226 has also been studied in an in vivo model of mitochondrial damage generated by intrastriatal application of malonate in rats. MRI analysis showed that PM226 administration decreased the volume of the striatal lesion caused by malonate, effect that was confirmed after the histopathological evaluation (Nissl staining, Iba-1 immunostaining and TUNEL assay) of striatal sections derived from malonate-lesioned rats in the absence or presence of PM226. Again, the beneficial effects of PM226 were dependent on the activation of CB2 receptors as they were reversed by blocking these receptors with AM630. Overall, PM226 has shown to have a promising neuroprotective profile derived from its ability to selectively activate CB2 receptor, so that it could be a useful disease-modifying agent in those neurodegenerative pathologies in which the activation of these receptors may have therapeutic value. PMID:27013280

  15. Mi2β Is Required for γ-Globin Gene Silencing: Temporal Assembly of a GATA-1-FOG-1-Mi2 Repressor Complex in β-YAC Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Flávia C.; Fedosyuk, Halyna; Chazelle, Allen M.; Neades, Renee Y.; Peterson, Kenneth R.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of γ-globin gene expression in adults is known to be therapeutic for sickle cell disease. Thus, it follows that the converse, alleviation of repression, would be equally effective, since the net result would be the same: an increase in fetal hemoglobin. A GATA-1-FOG-1-Mi2 repressor complex was recently demonstrated to be recruited to the −566 GATA motif of the Aγ-globin gene. We show that Mi2β is essential for γ-globin gene silencing using Mi2β conditional knockout β-YAC transgenic mice. In addition, increased expression of Aγ-globin was detected in adult blood from β-YAC transgenic mice containing a T>G HPFH point mutation at the −566 GATA silencer site. ChIP experiments demonstrated that GATA-1 is recruited to this silencer at day E16, followed by recruitment of FOG-1 and Mi2 at day E17 in wild-type β-YAC transgenic mice. Recruitment of the GATA-1–mediated repressor complex was disrupted by the −566 HPFH mutation at developmental stages when it normally binds. Our data suggest that a temporal repression mechanism is operative in the silencing of γ-globin gene expression and that either a trans-acting Mi2β knockout deletion mutation or the cis-acting −566 Aγ-globin HPFH point mutation disrupts establishment of repression, resulting in continued γ-globin gene transcription during adult definitive erythropoiesis. PMID:23284307

  16. Dynamic changes in pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in microglia after PPAR-γ agonist neuroprotective treatment in the MPTPp mouse model of progressive Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pisanu, Augusta; Lecca, Daniela; Mulas, Giovanna; Wardas, Jadwiga; Simbula, Gabriella; Spiga, Saturnino; Carta, Anna R

    2014-11-01

    colocalization compared with the MPTPp treatment. CD206 was gradually reduced by the chronic MPTPp treatment, while rosiglitazone restored control levels, suggesting that M2 anti-inflammatory microglia were stimulated and inflammatory microglia were inhibited by the neuroprotective treatment. The results show that the dopaminergic degeneration was associated with a gradual microglia polarization to the inflammatory over the anti-inflammatory phenotype in a chronic mouse model of PD. Neuroprotective treatment with rosiglitazone modulated microglia polarization, boosting the M2 over the pro-inflammatory phenotype. PPAR-γ agonists may offer a novel approach to neuroprotection, acting as disease-modifying drugs through an immunomodulatory action in the CNS. PMID:25134730

  17. Design and Synthesis of Neuroprotective Methylthiazoles and Modification as NO-Chimeras for Neurodegenerative Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zhihui; Luo, Jia; VandeVrede, Lawren; Tavassoli, Ehsan; Fa’, Mauro; Teich, Andrew; Arancio, Ottavio; Thatcher, Gregory R. J.

    2012-01-01

    Learning and memory deficits in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) result from synaptic failure and neuronal loss, the latter caused in part by excitotoxicity and oxidative stress. A therapeutic approach is described, which uses NO-chimeras directed at restoration of both synaptic function and neuroprotection. 4-Methylthiazole (MZ) derivatives were synthesized, based upon a lead neuroprotective pharmacophore acting in part by GABAA receptor potentiation. MZ derivatives were assayed for protection of primary neurons against oxygen-glucose deprivation and excitotoxicity. Selected neuroprotective derivatives were incorporated into NO-chimera prodrugs, coined nomethiazoles. To provide proof of concept for the nomethiazole drug class, selected examples were assayed for: restoration of synaptic function in hippocampal slices from AD-transgenic mice; reversal of cognitive deficits; and, brain bioavailability of the prodrug and its neuroprotective MZ metabolite. Taken together the assay data suggest that these chimeric nomethiazoles may be of use in treatment of multiple components of neurodegenerative disorders, such as AD. PMID:22779770

  18. Dantrolene: mechanisms of neuroprotection and possible clinical applications in the neurointensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Muehlschlegel, Susanne; Sims, John R.

    2009-01-01

    Background and aims Calcium plays a central role in neuronal function and injury. Dantrolene, an inhibitor of the ryanodine receptor, inhibits intracellular calcium release from the sarcoendoplasmic reticulum and might serve as novel agent for neuroprotection and other applications in the Neurointensive Care Unit. Methods We reviewed the available data of dantrolene as a potential neuroprotective agent through literature searches on Ovid, Pubmed and Google Scholar. Results Dantrolene provides neuroprotection in multiple in vitro models and some in vivo models of neural injury. Its efficacy has an early and narrow time-window of protection. We briefly summarize its other pharmacologic effects that may have potential applications for patients in the neurointensive care unit. Areas with the need for continued research are identified. Conclusion Targeted use of dantrolene in selected ICU disease models of anticipated neural injury, such as impending ischemia from vasospastic syndromes, might provided neuroprotection. PMID:18696266

  19. Design and synthesis of neuroprotective methylthiazoles and modification as NO-chimeras for neurodegenerative therapy.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhihui; Luo, Jia; VandeVrede, Lawren; Tavassoli, Ehsan; Fa', Mauro; Teich, Andrew F; Arancio, Ottavio; Thatcher, Gregory R J

    2012-08-01

    Learning and memory deficits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) result from synaptic failure and neuronal loss, the latter caused in part by excitotoxicity and oxidative stress. A therapeutic approach is described that uses NO-chimeras directed at restoration of both synaptic function and neuroprotection. 4-Methylthiazole (MZ) derivatives were synthesized, based upon a lead neuroprotective pharmacophore acting in part by GABA(A) receptor potentiation. MZ derivatives were assayed for protection of primary neurons against oxygen-glucose deprivation and excitotoxicity. Selected neuroprotective derivatives were incorporated into NO-chimera prodrugs, coined nomethiazoles. To provide proof of concept for the nomethiazole drug class, selected examples were assayed for restoration of synaptic function in hippocampal slices from AD-transgenic mice, reversal of cognitive deficits, and brain bioavailability of the prodrug and its neuroprotective MZ metabolite. Taken together, the assay data suggest that these chimeric nomethiazoles may be of use in treatment of multiple components of neurodegenerative disorders, such as AD. PMID:22779770

  20. XENON in medical