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Sample records for modifies protein complexes

  1. Modified bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay to study the inhibition of transcription complex formation by JAZ proteins.

    PubMed

    Qi, Tiancong; Song, Susheng; Xie, Daoxin

    2013-01-01

    The jasmonate (JA) ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana repress JA signaling and negatively regulate the JA responses. Recently, JAZ proteins have been found to inhibit the transcriptional function of several transcription factors, among which the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) (GLABRA3 [GL3], ENHANCER OF GLABRA3 [EGL3], and TRANSPARENT TESTA8 [TT8]) and R2R3-MYB (GL1 and MYB75) that can interact with each other to form bHLH-MYB complexes and further control gene expression. The bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay is a widely used technique to study protein-protein interactions in living cells. Here we describe a modified BiFC experimental procedure to study the inhibition of the formation of the bHLH (GL3)-MYB (GL1) complex by JAZ proteins. PMID:23615997

  2. Plant nuclear pore complex proteins are modified by novel oligosaccharides with terminal N-acetylglucosamine.

    PubMed Central

    Heese-Peck, A; Cole, R N; Borkhsenious, O N; Hart, G W; Raikhel, N V

    1995-01-01

    Only a few nuclear pore complex (NPC) proteins, mainly in vertebrates and yeast but none in plants, have been well characterized. As an initial step to identify plant NPC proteins, we examined whether NPC proteins from tobacco are modified by N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc). Using wheat germ agglutinin, a lectin that binds specifically to GlcNAc in plants, specific labeling was often found associated with or adjacent to NPCs. Nuclear proteins containing GlcNAc can be partially extracted by 0.5 M salt, as shown by a wheat germ agglutinin blot assay, and at least eight extracted proteins were modified by terminal GlcNAc, as determined by in vitro galactosyltransferase assays. Sugar analysis indicated that the plant glycans with terminal GlcNAc differ from the single O-linked GlcNAc of vertebrate NPC proteins in that they consist of oligosaccharides that are larger in size than five GlcNAc residues. Most of these appear to be bound to proteins via a hydroxyl group. This novel oligosaccharide modification may convey properties to the plant NPC that are different from those of vertebrate NPCs. PMID:8589629

  3. Structure of UvrA nucleotide excision repair protein in complex with modified DNA

    PubMed Central

    Jaciuk, Marcin; Nowak, Elżbieta; Skowronek, Krzysztof; Tańska, Anna; Nowotny, Marcin

    2012-01-01

    One of the primary pathways for removal of DNA damage is nucleotide excision repair (NER). In bacteria, the UvrA protein is the component of NER that locates the lesion. A notable feature of NER is its ability to act on many DNA modifications that vary in chemical structure. So far, the mechanism underlying this broad specificity has been unclear. Here, we report the first crystal structure of a UvrA protein in complex with a chemically modified oligonucleotide. The structure shows that the UvrA dimer does not contact the site of lesion directly, but rather binds the DNA regions on both sides of the modification. The DNA region harboring the modification is deformed, with the double helix bent and unwound. UvrA uses damage-induced deformations of the DNA and a less rigid structure of the modified double helix for indirect readout of the lesion. PMID:21240268

  4. On the confocal images and the rheology of whey protein isolated and modified pectins associated complex.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Rachel; Aserin, Abraham; Portnoy, Yariv; Gottlieb, Moshe; Garti, Nissim

    2009-02-15

    The conditions necessary to form an associated complex between whey protein isolate (WPI) and enzymatically modified pectin in water, at pH values above the isoelectric point of the protein, have been documented. The existence of the complex is not easily verified and its characterization in solution is even more complicated, since the structure is an intermediate entity between the non-interacting, incompatible aqueous soluble mixture of the biopolymers, and a strongly interacting coacervated precipitating complex. Evidence for the formation of this associated complex is provided from confocal laser scanning microscope images and rheological behavior of the aqueous mixtures. The associated complex is characterized by small fluorescent "patches" interpreted as small aggregates. The viscosity of this solution is greater than that of its individual biopolymer constituents, indicating a synergy of attractive interactions that occurs in the solution. While individually, the pectin and the WPI solutions at the studied range of concentrations exhibit moderately non-Newtonian behavior, at specific weight ratios, mixtures of the two behave either as highly entangled polymeric structures or as weak gels. The values of the storage modulus G' are equal to or greater than those of the loss modulus G''. We conclude that the associated complexes are formed at pH 6, and at 4 wt% WPI with a pectin concentration ranging from 0.1 to 0.75 wt%. The influence of the charge distribution (degree of order of the carboxylic groups) of pectin on the associated complex was also investigated, and it was found that the more "ordered" pectin (U63) favors the formation of the associated soluble complex. PMID:19070469

  5. Awake Intranasal Insulin Delivery Modifies Protein Complexes and Alters Memory, Anxiety, and Olfactory Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Marks, D.R.; Tucker, K.; Cavallin, M.A.; Mast, T.G.; Fadool, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    The role of insulin pathways in olfaction is of significant interest with the widespread pathology of Diabetes mellitus and its associated metabolic and neuronal co-morbidities. The insulin receptor kinase (IR) is expressed at high levels in the olfactory bulb (OB), where it suppresses a dominant Shaker ion channel (Kv1.3) via tyrosine phosphorylation of critical N- and C-terminal residues. We optimized a seven day intranasal insulin delivery (IND) in awake mice to ascertain the biochemical and behavioral effects of insulin to this brain region, given that nasal sprays for insulin have been marketed notwithstanding our knowledge of the role of Kv1.3 in olfaction, metabolism, and axon targeting. IND evoked robust phosphorylation of Kv1.3, as well as increased channel protein-protein interactions with IR and post-synaptic density 95. IND-treated mice had an increased short- and long-term object memory recognition, increased anxiolytic behavior, and an increased odor-discrimination using an odor habituation protocol but only moderate change in odor threshold using a two-choice paradigm. Unlike Kv1.3 gene-targeted deletion that alters metabolism, adiposity, and axonal targeting to defined olfactory glomeruli, suppression of Kv1.3 via IND had no effect on body weight nor the size and number of M72 glomeruli or the route of its sensory axon projections. There was no evidence of altered expression of sensory neurons in the epithelium. In mice made pre-diabetic via diet-induced obesity, IND was no longer effective in increasing long-term object memory recognition nor increasing anxiolytic behavior, suggesting state dependency or a degree of insulin resistance related to these behaviors. PMID:19458242

  6. MAGGIE Component 1: Identification and Purification of Native and Recombinant Multiprotein Complexes and Modified Proteins from Pyrococcus furiosus

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Michael W.; W. W. Adams, Michael

    2014-01-07

    Virtualy all cellular processes are carried out by dynamic molecular assemblies or multiprotein complexes (PCs), the composition of which is largely unknown. Structural genomics efforts have demonstrated that less than 25% of the genes in a given prokaryotic genome will yield stable, soluble proteins when expressed using a one-ORF-at-a-time approach. We proposed that much of the remaining 75% of the genes encode proteins that are part of multiprotein complexes or are modified post-translationally, for example, with metals. The problem is that PCs and metalloproteins (MPs) cannot be accurately predicted on a genome-wide scale. The only solution to this dilemma is to experimentally determine PCs and MPs in biomass of a model organism and to develop analytical tools that can then be applied to the biomass of any other organism. In other words, organisms themselves must be analyzed to identify their PCs and MPs: “native proteomes” must be determined. This information can then be utilized to design multiple ORF expression systems to produce recombinant forms of PCs and MPs. Moreover, the information and utility of this approach can be enhanced by using a hyperthermophile, one that grows optimally at 100°C, as a model organism. By analyzing the native proteome at close to 100 °C below the optimum growth temperature, we will trap reversible and dynamic complexes, thereby enabling their identification, purification, and subsequent characterization. The model organism for the current study is Pyrococcus furiosus, a hyperthermophilic archaeon that grows optimally at 100°C. It is grown up to 600-liter scale and kg quantities of biomass are available. In this project we identified native PCs and MPs using P. furiosus biomass (with MS/MS analyses to identify proteins by component 4). In addition, we provided samples of abundant native PCs and MPs for structural characterization (using SAXS by component 5). We also designed and evaluated generic bioinformatics and

  7. Insights into molecular plasticity in protein complexes from Trm9-Trm112 tRNA modifying enzyme crystal structure

    PubMed Central

    Létoquart, Juliette; van Tran, Nhan; Caroline, Vonny; Aleksandrov, Alexey; Lazar, Noureddine; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Liger, Dominique; Graille, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Most of the factors involved in translation (tRNA, rRNA and proteins) are subject to post-transcriptional and post-translational modifications, which participate in the fine-tuning and tight control of ribosome and protein synthesis processes. In eukaryotes, Trm112 acts as an obligate activating platform for at least four methyltransferases (MTase) involved in the modification of 18S rRNA (Bud23), tRNA (Trm9 and Trm11) and translation termination factor eRF1 (Mtq2). Trm112 is then at a nexus between ribosome synthesis and function. Here, we present a structure-function analysis of the Trm9-Trm112 complex, which is involved in the 5-methoxycarbonylmethyluridine (mcm5U) modification of the tRNA anticodon wobble position and hence promotes translational fidelity. We also compare the known crystal structures of various Trm112-MTase complexes, highlighting the structural plasticity allowing Trm112 to interact through a very similar mode with its MTase partners, although those share less than 20% sequence identity. PMID:26438534

  8. Insights into molecular plasticity in protein complexes from Trm9-Trm112 tRNA modifying enzyme crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Létoquart, Juliette; van Tran, Nhan; Caroline, Vonny; Aleksandrov, Alexey; Lazar, Noureddine; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Liger, Dominique; Graille, Marc

    2015-12-15

    Most of the factors involved in translation (tRNA, rRNA and proteins) are subject to post-transcriptional and post-translational modifications, which participate in the fine-tuning and tight control of ribosome and protein synthesis processes. In eukaryotes, Trm112 acts as an obligate activating platform for at least four methyltransferases (MTase) involved in the modification of 18S rRNA (Bud23), tRNA (Trm9 and Trm11) and translation termination factor eRF1 (Mtq2). Trm112 is then at a nexus between ribosome synthesis and function. Here, we present a structure-function analysis of the Trm9-Trm112 complex, which is involved in the 5-methoxycarbonylmethyluridine (mcm(5)U) modification of the tRNA anticodon wobble position and hence promotes translational fidelity. We also compare the known crystal structures of various Trm112-MTase complexes, highlighting the structural plasticity allowing Trm112 to interact through a very similar mode with its MTase partners, although those share less than 20% sequence identity. PMID:26438534

  9. Electric properties of thylakoid membranes from pea mutants with modified carotenoid and chlorophyll-protein complex composition.

    PubMed

    Dobrikova, A; Morgan, R M; Ivanov, A G; Apostolova, E; Petkanchin, I; Huner, N P; Taneva, S G

    2000-01-01

    Surface electric properties of thylakoid membranes from wild type and two mutant forms, Coeruleovireus 2/16 and Costata 2/133, of pea are investigated by electric light scattering and microelectrophoretic measurements. Characterization of the chlorophyll-protein complexes in thylakoid membranes reveals that the relative ratio of oligomeric (LHC II(1)) to monomeric (LHC II(3)) forms of the light-harvesting Chl a/b complex of Photosystem II is lower (3.34) in 2/133 mutant and higher (6.62) in 2/16 mutant than in wild type (4.57). This is accompanied by elevated amounts and a considerable reduction of all carotenoids in 2/16 and 2/133 mutant, respectively, as compared to the wild type. The concomitant variations of the permanent dipole moment (transversal charge asymmetry), electric polarizability and electrokinetic charge of the thylakoid membranes from both the mutants are discussed in terms of the differences in the supramolecular (oligomeric) organization of the light-harvesting complexes II within the photosynthetic apparatus. PMID:16228483

  10. Pigment-protein complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Siegelman, H W

    1980-01-01

    The photosynthetically-active pigment protein complexes of procaryotes and eucaryotes include chlorophyll proteins, carotenochlorophyll proteins, and biliproteins. They are either integral components or attached to photosynthetic membranes. Detergents are frequently required to solubilize the pigment-protein complexes. The membrane localization and detergent solubilization strongly suggest that the pigment-protein complexes are bound to the membranes by hydrophobic interactions. Hydrophobic interactions of proteins are characterized by an increase in entropy. Their bonding energy is directly related to temperature and ionic strength. Hydrophobic-interaction chromatography, a relatively new separation procedure, can furnish an important method for the purification of pigment-protein complexes. Phycobilisome purification and properties provide an example of the need to maintain hydrophobic interactions to preserve structure and function.

  11. Adhesives from modified soy protein

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Susan; Wang, Donghai; Zhong, Zhikai; Yang, Guang

    2008-08-26

    The, present invention provides useful adhesive compositions having similar adhesive properties to conventional UF and PPF resins. The compositions generally include a protein portion and modifying ingredient portion selected from the group consisting of carboxyl-containing compounds, aldehyde-containing compounds, epoxy group-containing compounds, and mixtures thereof. The composition is preferably prepared at a pH level at or near the isoelectric point of the protein. In other preferred forms, the adhesive composition includes a protein portion and a carboxyl-containing group portion.

  12. Application of modified complex Tremblay operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esa, Zainab; Kilicman, Adem; Ibrahim, Rabha W.; Ismail, Mat Rofa; Husain, Sharifah Kartini Said

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new fractional integral operator defined by modified fractional derivative Tremblay operator of analytic functions and show that the univalence of this integral operator is preserved under certain sufficient conditions in complex domain

  13. Function of the cytoplasmic tail of human calcitonin receptor-like receptor in complex with receptor activity-modifying protein 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwasako, Kenji; Kitamura, Kazuo; Nagata, Sayaka; Hikosaka, Tomomi; Kato, Johji

    2010-02-12

    Receptor activity-modifying protein 2 (RAMP2) enables calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) to form an adrenomedullin (AM)-specific receptor. Here we investigated the function of the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail (C-tail) of human (h)CRLR by co-transfecting its C-terminal mutants into HEK-293 cells stably expressing hRAMP2. Deleting the C-tail from CRLR disrupted AM-evoked cAMP production or receptor internalization, but did not affect [{sup 125}I]AM binding. We found that CRLR residues 428-439 are required for AM-evoked cAMP production, though deleting this region had little effect on receptor internalization. Moreover, pretreatment with pertussis toxin (100 ng/mL) led to significant increases in AM-induced cAMP production via wild-type CRLR/RAMP2 complexes. This effect was canceled by deleting CRLR residues 454-457, suggesting Gi couples to this region. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that CRLR truncation mutants lacking residues in the Ser/Thr-rich region extending from Ser{sup 449} to Ser{sup 467} were unable to undergo AM-induced receptor internalization and, in contrast to the effect on wild-type CRLR, overexpression of GPCR kinases-2, -3 and -4 failed to promote internalization of CRLR mutants lacking residues 449-467. Thus, the hCRLR C-tail is crucial for AM-evoked cAMP production and internalization of the CRLR/RAMP2, while the receptor internalization is dependent on the aforementioned GPCR kinases, but not Gs coupling.

  14. Metabolic Adaptation and Protein Complexes in Prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Beate; Liang, Chunguang; Prell, Florian; Fieselmann, Astrid; Moya, Andres; Schuster, Stefan; Völker, Uwe; Dandekar, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Protein complexes are classified and have been charted in several large-scale screening studies in prokaryotes. These complexes are organized in a factory-like fashion to optimize protein production and metabolism. Central components are conserved between different prokaryotes; major complexes involve carbohydrate, amino acid, fatty acid and nucleotide metabolism. Metabolic adaptation changes protein complexes according to environmental conditions. Protein modification depends on specific modifying enzymes. Proteins such as trigger enzymes display condition-dependent adaptation to different functions by participating in several complexes. Several bacterial pathogens adapt rapidly to intracellular survival with concomitant changes in protein complexes in central metabolism and optimize utilization of their favorite available nutrient source. Regulation optimizes protein costs. Master regulators lead to up- and downregulation in specific subnetworks and all involved complexes. Long protein half-life and low level expression detaches protein levels from gene expression levels. However, under optimal growth conditions, metabolite fluxes through central carbohydrate pathways correlate well with gene expression. In a system-wide view, major metabolic changes lead to rapid adaptation of complexes and feedback or feedforward regulation. Finally, prokaryotic enzyme complexes are involved in crowding and substrate channeling. This depends on detailed structural interactions and is verified for specific effects by experiments and simulations. PMID:24957769

  15. Suppressor of hairy-wing, modifier of mdg4 and centrosomal protein of 190 gene orthologues of the gypsy insulator complex in the malaria mosquito, Anopheles stephensi.

    PubMed

    Carballar-Lejarazú, R; Brennock, P; James, A A

    2016-08-01

    DNA insulators organize independent gene regulatory domains and can regulate interactions amongst promoter and enhancer elements. They have the potential to be important in genome enhancing and editing technologies because they can mitigate chromosomal position effects on transgenes. The orthologous genes of the Anopheles stephensi putative gypsy-like insulator protein complex were identified and expression characteristics studied. These genes encode polypeptides with all the expected protein domains (Cysteine 2 Histidine 2 (C2H2) zinc fingers and/or a bric-a-brac/poxvirus and zinc finger). The mosquito gypsy transcripts are expressed constitutively and are upregulated in ovaries of blood-fed females. We have uncovered significant experimental evidence that the gypsy insulator protein complex is widespread in vector mosquitoes. PMID:27110891

  16. Length, protein protein interactions, and complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Taison; Frenkel, Daan; Gupta, Vishal; Deem, Michael W.

    2005-05-01

    The evolutionary reason for the increase in gene length from archaea to prokaryotes to eukaryotes observed in large-scale genome sequencing efforts has been unclear. We propose here that the increasing complexity of protein-protein interactions has driven the selection of longer proteins, as they are more able to distinguish among a larger number of distinct interactions due to their greater average surface area. Annotated protein sequences available from the SWISS-PROT database were analyzed for 13 eukaryotes, eight bacteria, and two archaea species. The number of subcellular locations to which each protein is associated is used as a measure of the number of interactions to which a protein participates. Two databases of yeast protein-protein interactions were used as another measure of the number of interactions to which each S. cerevisiae protein participates. Protein length is shown to correlate with both number of subcellular locations to which a protein is associated and number of interactions as measured by yeast two-hybrid experiments. Protein length is also shown to correlate with the probability that the protein is encoded by an essential gene. Interestingly, average protein length and number of subcellular locations are not significantly different between all human proteins and protein targets of known, marketed drugs. Increased protein length appears to be a significant mechanism by which the increasing complexity of protein-protein interaction networks is accommodated within the natural evolution of species. Consideration of protein length may be a valuable tool in drug design, one that predicts different strategies for inhibiting interactions in aberrant and normal pathways.

  17. Algorithmic complexity of a protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewey, T. Gregory

    1996-07-01

    The information contained in a protein's amino acid sequence dictates its three-dimensional structure. To quantitate the transfer of information that occurs in the protein folding process, the Kolmogorov information entropy or algorithmic complexity of the protein structure is investigated. The algorithmic complexity of an object provides a means of quantitating its information content. Recent results have indicated that the algorithmic complexity of microstates of certain statistical mechanical systems can be estimated from the thermodynamic entropy. In the present work, it is shown that the algorithmic complexity of a protein is given by its configurational entropy. Using this result, a quantitative estimate of the information content of a protein's structure is made and is compared to the information content of the sequence. Additionally, the mutual information between sequence and structure is determined. It is seen that virtually all the information contained in the protein structure is shared with the sequence.

  18. Proteins, fluctuations and complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Frauenfelder, Hans; Chen, Guo; Fenimore, Paul W

    2008-01-01

    Glasses, supercooled liquids, and proteins share common properties, in particular the existence of two different types of fluctuations, {alpha} and {beta}. While the effect of the {alpha} fluctuations on proteins has been known for a few years, the effect of {beta} fluctuations has not been understood. By comparing neutron scattering data on the protein myoglobin with the {beta} fluctuations in the hydration shell measured by dielectric spectroscopy we show that the internal protein motions are slaved to these fluctuations. We also show that there is no 'dynamic transition' in proteins near 200 K. The rapid increase in the mean square displacement with temperature in many neutron scattering experiments is quantitatively predicted by the {beta} fluctuations in the hydration shell.

  19. Preparation and Analysis of Native Chromatin-Modifying Complexes.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Y; Côté, J

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosomes, the basic units of chromatin, are decorated with a myriad of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) by the action of chromatin modifiers. These enzymes function almost exclusively as part of stable protein complexes that assist their recruitment to specific genomic loci, specify their substrate, and provide allosteric control. By altering the interactions within nucleosomes or with neighboring nucleosomes and serving as a platform to engage effector proteins, PTMs deposited by histone-modifying complexes influence virtually every nuclear process and are at the heart of the epigenetic mechanisms. Hence, it is critical to identify their components, define their structures, and characterize their biochemical activities. Here we describe protocols for tandem affinity purification (TAP) of native histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and methyltransferase (HMT) complexes from human cells engineered to express bait proteins from a genomic safe harbor or their endogenous chromosomal genes, using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), TAL effector nucleases (TALENs), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 systems. The approaches presented aim to preserve natural transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation and minimize biochemical artifacts due to ectopic expression. Near homogenous preparations of native complexes are obtained in sufficient amounts to perform biochemical assays and characterize their components. PMID:27372759

  20. Binding Efficiency of Protein-Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Day, Eric S.; Cote, Shaun M.; Whitty, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    We examine the relationship between binding affinity and interface size for reversible protein-protein interactions (PPI), using cytokines from the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily and their receptors as a test case. Using surface plasmon resonance, we measured single-site binding affinities for the large receptor TNFR1 binding to its ligands TNFα (KD = 1.4 ± 0.4 nM) and lymphotoxin-α (KD = 50 ± 10 nM), and also for the small receptor Fn14 binding to TWEAK (KD = 70 ± 10 nM). We additionally assembled data for all other TNF/TNFR family complexes for which reliable single site binding affinities have been reported. We used these values to calculate the binding efficiency – defined as binding energy per Å2 of surface area buried at the contact interface – for the nine of these complexes for which co-crystal structures are available, and compared the results to those for a set of 144 protein-protein complexes with published affinity values. The results show that the most efficient PPI complexes generate ~20 cal.mol−1/Å2 of binding energy. A minimum contact area of ~500 Å2 is required for a stable complex, required to generate sufficient interaction energy to pay the entropic cost of co-localizing two proteins from 1 M solution. The most compact and efficient TNF/TNFR complex was BAFF/BR3, which achieved ~80% of the maximum achievable binding efficiency. Other small receptors also gave high binding efficiencies, while the larger receptors generated only 44-49% of this limit despite interacting primarily through just a single small domain. The results provide new insight into how much binding energy can be generated by a PPI interface of a given size, and establish a quantitative method to predict how large a natural or engineered contact interface must be to achieve a given level of binding affinity. PMID:23088250

  1. Receptor activity-modifying proteins; multifunctional G protein-coupled receptor accessory proteins.

    PubMed

    Hay, Debbie L; Walker, Christopher S; Gingell, Joseph J; Ladds, Graham; Reynolds, Christopher A; Poyner, David R

    2016-04-15

    Receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) are single pass membrane proteins initially identified by their ability to determine the pharmacology of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), a family B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). It is now known that RAMPs can interact with a much wider range of GPCRs. This review considers recent developments on the structure of the complexes formed between the extracellular domains (ECDs) of CLR and RAMP1 or RAMP2 as these provide insights as to how the RAMPs direct ligand binding. The range of RAMP interactions is also considered; RAMPs can interact with numerous family B GPCRs as well as examples of family A and family C GPCRs. They influence receptor expression at the cell surface, trafficking, ligand binding and G protein coupling. The GPCR-RAMP interface offers opportunities for drug targeting, illustrated by examples of drugs developed for migraine. PMID:27068971

  2. Solid-phase preparation of protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Pengo, Paolo; Veggiani, Gianluca; Rattanamanee, Kwanchai; Gallotta, Andrea; Beneduce, Luca; Fassina, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    Protein-protein conjugation is usually achieved by solution phase methods requiring concentrated protein solution and post-synthetic purification steps. In this report we describe a novel continuous-flow solid-phase approach enabling the assembly of protein complexes minimizing the amount of material needed and allowing the repeated use of the same solid phase. The method exploits an immunoaffinity matrix as solid support; the matrix reversibly binds the first of the complex components while the other components are sequentially introduced, thus allowing the complex to grow while immobilized. The tethering technique employed relies on the use of the very mild synthetic conditions and fast association rates allowed by the avidin-biotin system. At the end of the assembly, the immobilized complexes can be removed from the solid support and recovered by lowering the pH of the medium. Under the conditions used for the sequential complexation and recovery, the solid phase was not damaged or irreversibly modified and could be reused without loss of binding capacity. The method was specifically designed to prepare protein complexes to be used in immunometric methods of analysis, where the immunoreactivity of each component needs to be preserved. The approach was successfully exploited for the preparation of two different immunoaffinity reagents with immunoreactivity mimicking native squamous cell carcinoma antigen-immunoglobulin M (SCCA-IgM) and alphafetoprotein-immunoglobulin M (AFP-IgM) immune complexes, which were characterized by dedicated sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblot. Besides the specific application described in the paper, the method is sufficiently general to be used for the preparation of a broad range of protein assemblies. PMID:21038355

  3. Receptor Activity-Modifying Proteins (RAMPs): New Insights and Roles.

    PubMed

    Hay, Debbie L; Pioszak, Augen A

    2016-01-01

    It is now recognized that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), once considered largely independent functional units, have a far more diverse molecular architecture. Receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) provide an important example of proteins that interact with GPCRs to modify their function. RAMPs are able to act as pharmacological switches and chaperones, and they can regulate signaling and/or trafficking in a receptor-dependent manner. This review covers recent discoveries in the RAMP field and summarizes the known GPCR partners and functions of RAMPs. We also discuss the first peptide-bound structures of RAMP-GPCR complexes, which give insight into the molecular mechanisms that enable RAMPs to alter the pharmacology and signaling of GPCRs. PMID:26514202

  4. Modified localized attack on complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Gaogao; Du, Ruijin; Hao, Huifang; Tian, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Since a shell structure contains a wealth of information, it is not only very important for understanding the transport properties of the network, but also essential to identify influential spreaders in complex networks. Nodes within each shell can be classified into two categories: protected nodes and unprotected nodes. In this paper, we propose a generalization of the localized attack, modified localized attack, which means that when a randomly chosen node (root node) is under attack, protected nodes will not be removed, but unprotected nodes in the nearest shells will fail. We numerically and analytically study the system robustness under this attack by taking an Erdös-Rényi (ER) network, a regular random (RR) network and a scale-free (SF) network as examples. Moreover, a fraction of nodes belonging to giant component S and a critical threshold q c , where S approaches to zero, are given. The result implies that increasing connection density has been found to be useful to significantly improve network robustness.

  5. Chromatin-modifying and -remodeling complexes.

    PubMed

    Kornberg, R D; Lorch, Y

    1999-04-01

    Nucleosomes have long been known to inhibit DNA transactions on chromosomes and a remarkable abundance of multiprotein complexes that either enhance or relieve this inhibition have been described. Most is known about chromatin-remodeling complexes that perturb nucleosome structure. PMID:10322131

  6. GECluster: a novel protein complex prediction method

    PubMed Central

    Su, Lingtao; Liu, Guixia; Wang, Han; Tian, Yuan; Zhou, Zhihui; Han, Liang; Yan, Lun

    2014-01-01

    Identification of protein complexes is of great importance in the understanding of cellular organization and functions. Traditional computational protein complex prediction methods mainly rely on the topology of protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks but seldom take biological information of proteins (such as Gene Ontology (GO)) into consideration. Meanwhile, the environment relevant analysis of protein complex evolution has been poorly studied, partly due to the lack of high-precision protein complex datasets. In this paper, a combined PPI network is introduced to predict protein complexes which integrate both GO and expression value of relevant protein-coding genes. A novel protein complex prediction method GECluster (Gene Expression Cluster) was proposed based on a seed node expansion strategy, in which a combined PPI network was utilized. GECluster was applied to a training combined PPI network and it predicted more credible complexes than peer methods. The results indicate that using a combined PPI network can efficiently improve protein complex prediction accuracy. In order to study protein complex evolution within cells due to changes in the living environment surrounding cells, GECluster was applied to seven combined PPI networks constructed using the data of a test set including yeast response to stress throughout a wine fermentation process. Our results showed that with the rise of alcohol concentration, protein complexes within yeast cells gradually evolve from one state to another. Besides this, the number of core and attachment proteins within a protein complex both changed significantly. PMID:26019559

  7. Structural Analysis of a Complex between Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier 1 (SUMO1) and the ZZ Domain of CREB-binding Protein (CBP/p300) Reveals a New Interaction Surface on SUMO.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Carl; Akke, Mikael; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels; Streicher, Werner; Wikström, Mats

    2016-06-10

    We have recently discovered that the ZZ zinc finger domain represents a novel small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) binding motif. In this study we identify the binding epitopes in the ZZ domain of CBP (CREB-binding protein) and SUMO1 using NMR spectroscopy. The binding site on SUMO1 represents a unique epitope for SUMO interaction spatially opposite to that observed for canonical SUMO interaction motifs (SIMs). HADDOCK docking simulations using chemical shift perturbations and residual dipolar couplings was employed to obtain a structural model for the ZZ domain-SUMO1 complex. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments support this model by showing that the mutation of key residues in the binding site abolishes binding and that SUMO1 can simultaneously and non-cooperatively bind both the ZZ domain and a canonical SIM motif. The binding dynamics of SUMO1 was further characterized using (15)N Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersions, which define the off rates for the ZZ domain and SIM motif and show that the dynamic binding process has different characteristics for the two cases. Furthermore, in the absence of bound ligands SUMO1 transiently samples a high energy conformation, which might be involved in ligand binding. PMID:27129204

  8. Investigation of modified cottonseed protein adhesives for wood composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several modified cottonseed protein isolates were studied and compared to corresponding soy protein isolates for their adhesive properties when bonded to wood composites. Modifications included treatments with alkali, guanidine hydrochloride, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and urea. Wood composites...

  9. Antifreeze Proteins in Winter Rye Leaves Form Oligomeric Complexes1

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiao-Ming; Griffith, Marilyn

    1999-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) similar to three pathogenesis-related proteins, a glucanase-like protein (GLP), a chitinase-like protein (CLP), and a thaumatin-like protein (TLP), accumulate during cold acclimation in winter rye (Secale cereale) leaves, where they are thought to modify the growth of intercellular ice during freezing. The objective of this study was to characterize the rye AFPs in their native forms, and our results show that these proteins form oligomeric complexes in vivo. Nine proteins were separated by native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis from apoplastic extracts of cold-acclimated winter rye leaves. Seven of these proteins exhibited multiple polypeptides when denatured and separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. After isolation of the individual proteins, six were shown by immunoblotting to contain various combinations of GLP, CLP, and TLP in addition to other unidentified proteins. Antisera produced against individual cold-induced winter rye GLP, CLP, and TLP all dramatically inhibited glucanase activity in apoplastic extracts from cold-acclimated winter rye leaves, and each antiserum precipitated all three proteins. These results indicate that each of the polypeptides may be exposed on the surface of the protein complexes. By forming oligomeric complexes, AFPs may form larger surfaces to interact with ice, or they may simply increase the mass of the protein bound to ice. In either case, the complexes of AFPs may inhibit ice growth and recrystallization more effectively than the individual polypeptides. PMID:10198095

  10. The Protein-Sparing Modified Fast Diet

    PubMed Central

    Bakhach, Marwan; Shah, Vaishal; Harwood, Tara; Lappe, Sara; Bhesania, Natalie; Mansoor, Sana; Alkhouri, Naim

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The protein-sparing modified fast (PSMF) is a rigorous way of rapidly losing a large amount of weight. Although adult studies have shown the PSMF to be effective, data in adolescents are lacking. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and safety of the PSMF in severely obese adolescents. Methods: 12 subjects who were evaluated in the Obesity Management Program at the Cleveland Clinic from 2011 to 2014 were included. The subjects were initiated on the PSMF after failing other conventional methods of weight loss. Once the goal weight was achieved, subjects were transitioned to the refeeding phase for weight maintenance. Results: Follow-up was scheduled at 3-month (11 patients) and 6-month (6 patients) intervals. At the 6-month follow-up visit, the average weight loss was 11.19 kg (95% confidence interval = -5.4, -27.8, P = .028), with average of 9.8% from baseline. Fifty percent of subjects had >5% weight loss and 20% had >10% weight loss. Four patients were lost to the follow-up (40%). An improvement was noted in total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein. Due to a small sample size these results were not statistically significant. Side effects reported by subjects were mild dehydration due to nausea (2 patients), decreased energy (1 patient), and transient labile mood (1 patient). No life-threatening side effects were reported. Conclusion: Our results show that the PSMF diet can be used as an effective and safe method in the outpatient setting for rapid weight loss in adolescents with severe obesity. PMID:27335996

  11. Structure Prediction of Protein Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Brian; Weng, Zhiping

    Protein-protein interactions are critical for biological function. They directly and indirectly influence the biological systems of which they are a part. Antibodies bind with antigens to detect and stop viruses and other infectious agents. Cell signaling is performed in many cases through the interactions between proteins. Many diseases involve protein-protein interactions on some level, including cancer and prion diseases.

  12. Immunoisolation of Protein Complexes from Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, Frank L.; Miteva, Yana; Kaltenbrun, Erin; Waldron, Lauren; Greco, Todd M.; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2013-01-01

    The immunoaffinity isolation of protein complexes is an essential technique for the purification and concentration of protein complexes from cells and tissues. In this chapter we present the methodologies for the purification of proteins and protein complexes from Xenopus laev is and Xenopus tropical is. Specific to this protocol are the techniques for the cryolysis of Xenopus cells and tissues, a procedure that limits contamination from yolk proteins while preserving endogenous protein complexes, the methodologies for immunoaffinity purification of proteins using magnetic beads, and the protocols for western blot analysis. In addition, the procedures in this chapter can be extended to use with proteomic analysis of protein complexes as presented in the following chapter. PMID:22956099

  13. Protein camouflage in cytochrome c-calixarene complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGovern, Róise E.; Fernandes, Humberto; Khan, Amir R.; Power, Nicholas P.; Crowley, Peter B.

    2012-07-01

    Small molecules that recognize protein surfaces are important tools for modifying protein interaction properties. Since the 1980s, several thousand studies concerning calixarenes and host-guest interactions have been published. Although there is growing interest in protein-calixarene interactions, only limited structural information has been available to date. We now report the crystal structure of a protein-calixarene complex. The water-soluble p-sulfonatocalix[4]arene is shown to bind the lysine-rich cytochrome c at three different sites. Binding curves obtained from NMR titrations reveal an interaction process that involves two or more binding sites. Together, the data indicate a dynamic complex in which the calixarene explores the surface of cytochrome c. In addition to providing valuable information on protein recognition, the data also indicate that the calixarene is a mediator of protein-protein interactions, with potential applications in generating assemblies and promoting crystallization.

  14. Mass Spectrometry of Intact Membrane Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Laganowsky, Arthur; Reading, Eamonn; Hopper, Jonathan T.S.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry of intact soluble protein complexes has emerged as a powerful technique to study the stoichiometry, structure-function and dynamics of protein assemblies. Recent developments have extended this technique to the study of membrane protein complexes where it has already revealed subunit stoichiometries and specific phospholipid interactions. Here, we describe a protocol for mass spectrometry of membrane protein complexes. The protocol begins with preparation of the membrane protein complex enabling not only the direct assessment of stoichiometry, delipidation, and quality of the target complex, but also evaluation of the purification strategy. A detailed list of compatible non-ionic detergents is included, along with a protocol for screening detergents to find an optimal one for mass spectrometry, biochemical and structural studies. This protocol also covers the preparation of lipids for protein-lipid binding studies and includes detailed settings for a Q-ToF mass spectrometer after introduction of complexes from gold-coated nanoflow capillaries. PMID:23471109

  15. Investigation of a protein complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashaghi, A. R.; Ramezanpour, A.; Karimipour, V.

    2004-09-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the first eukaryote whose genome has been completely sequenced. It is also the first eukaryotic cell whose proteome (the set of all proteins) and interactome (the network of all mutual interactions between proteins) has been analyzed. In this paper we study the structure of the yeast protein complex network in which weighted edges between complexes represent the number of shared proteins. It is found that the network of protein complexes is a small world network with scale free behavior for many of its distributions. However we find that there are no strong correlations between the weights and degrees of neighboring complexes. To reveal non-random features of the network we also compare it with a null model in which the complexes randomly select their proteins. Finally we propose a simple evolutionary model based on duplication and divergence of proteins.

  16. Trapping mammalian protein complexes in viral particles

    PubMed Central

    Eyckerman, Sven; Titeca, Kevin; Van Quickelberghe, Emmy; Cloots, Eva; Verhee, Annick; Samyn, Noortje; De Ceuninck, Leentje; Timmerman, Evy; De Sutter, Delphine; Lievens, Sam; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Gevaert, Kris; Tavernier, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Cell lysis is an inevitable step in classical mass spectrometry–based strategies to analyse protein complexes. Complementary lysis conditions, in situ cross-linking strategies and proximal labelling techniques are currently used to reduce lysis effects on the protein complex. We have developed Virotrap, a viral particle sorting approach that obviates the need for cell homogenization and preserves the protein complexes during purification. By fusing a bait protein to the HIV-1 GAG protein, we show that interaction partners become trapped within virus-like particles (VLPs) that bud from mammalian cells. Using an efficient VLP enrichment protocol, Virotrap allows the detection of known binary interactions and MS-based identification of novel protein partners as well. In addition, we show the identification of stimulus-dependent interactions and demonstrate trapping of protein partners for small molecules. Virotrap constitutes an elegant complementary approach to the arsenal of methods to study protein complexes. PMID:27122307

  17. Improved method for protein complex detection using bottleneck proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Detecting protein complexes is one of essential and fundamental tasks in understanding various biological functions or processes. Therefore accurate identification of protein complexes is indispensable. Methods For more accurate detection of protein complexes, we propose an algorithm which detects dense protein sub-networks of which proteins share closely located bottleneck proteins. The proposed algorithm is capable of finding protein complexes which allow overlapping with each other. Results We applied our algorithm to several PPI (Protein-Protein Interaction) networks of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Homo sapiens, and validated our results using public databases of protein complexes. The prediction accuracy was even more improved over our previous work which used also bottleneck information of the PPI network, but showed limitation when predicting small-sized protein complex detection. Conclusions Our algorithm resulted in overlapping protein complexes with significantly improved F1 score over existing algorithms. This result comes from high recall due to effective network search, as well as high precision due to proper use of bottleneck information during the network search. PMID:23566214

  18. Predicting Physical Interactions between Protein Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Clancy, Trevor; Rødland, Einar Andreas; Nygard, Ståle; Hovig, Eivind

    2013-01-01

    Protein complexes enact most biochemical functions in the cell. Dynamic interactions between protein complexes are frequent in many cellular processes. As they are often of a transient nature, they may be difficult to detect using current genome-wide screens. Here, we describe a method to computationally predict physical interactions between protein complexes, applied to both humans and yeast. We integrated manually curated protein complexes and physical protein interaction networks, and we designed a statistical method to identify pairs of protein complexes where the number of protein interactions between a complex pair is due to an actual physical interaction between the complexes. An evaluation against manually curated physical complex-complex interactions in yeast revealed that 50% of these interactions could be predicted in this manner. A community network analysis of the highest scoring pairs revealed a biologically sensible organization of physical complex-complex interactions in the cell. Such analyses of proteomes may serve as a guide to the discovery of novel functional cellular relationships. PMID:23438732

  19. Nanobody-targeted E3-ubiquitin ligase complex degrades nuclear proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ju Shin, Yeong; Kyun Park, Seung; Jung Jung, Yoo; Na Kim, Ye; Sung Kim, Ki; Kyu Park, Ok; Kwon, Seung-Hae; Ho Jeon, Sung; Trinh, Le A.; Fraser, Scott E.; Kee, Yun; Joon Hwang, Byung

    2015-01-01

    Targeted protein degradation is a powerful tool in determining the function of specific proteins or protein complexes. We fused nanobodies to SPOP, an adaptor protein of the Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, resulting in rapid ubiquitination and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation of specific nuclear proteins in mammalian cells and zebrafish embryos. This approach is easily modifiable, as substrate specificity is conferred by an antibody domain that can be adapted to target virtually any protein. PMID:26373678

  20. A Protein Complex Map of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Vaibhav; Najafabadi, Hamed S.; Moshiri, Houtan; Jardim, Armando; Salavati, Reza

    2016-01-01

    The functions of the majority of trypanosomatid-specific proteins are unknown, hindering our understanding of the biology and pathogenesis of Trypanosomatida. While protein-protein interactions are highly informative about protein function, a global map of protein interactions and complexes is still lacking for these important human parasites. Here, benefiting from in-depth biochemical fractionation, we systematically interrogated the co-complex interactions of more than 3354 protein groups in procyclic life stage of Trypanosoma brucei, the protozoan parasite responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. Using a rigorous methodology, our analysis led to identification of 128 high-confidence complexes encompassing 716 protein groups, including 635 protein groups that lacked experimental annotation. These complexes correlate well with known pathways as well as for proteins co-expressed across the T. brucei life cycle, and provide potential functions for a large number of previously uncharacterized proteins. We validated the functions of several novel proteins associated with the RNA-editing machinery, identifying a candidate potentially involved in the mitochondrial post-transcriptional regulation of T. brucei. Our data provide an unprecedented view of the protein complex map of T. brucei, and serve as a reliable resource for further characterization of trypanosomatid proteins. The presented results in this study are available at: www.TrypsNetDB.org. PMID:26991453

  1. Proteins as paradigms of complex systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Fenimore, P. W.; Frauenfelder, Hans,; Young, R. D.

    2003-03-26

    The science of complexity has moved to center stage within the past few decades. Complex systems range from glasses to the immune system and the brain. Glasses are too simple to possess all aspects of complexity; brains are too complex to expose common concepts and laws of complexity. Proteins, however, are systems where many concepts and laws of complexity can be explored experimentally, theoretically, and computationally. Such studies have elucidated crucial aspects. The energy landscape has emerged as one central concept; it describes the free energy of a system as a function of temperature and the coordinates of all relevant atoms. A second concept is that of fluctuations. Without fluctuations, proteins would be dead and life impossible. A third concept is slaving. Proteins are not isolated systems; they are embedded in cells and membranes. Slaving arises when the fluctuations in the surroundings of a protein dominate many of the motions of the protein proper.

  2. Label-free detection of protein-protein interactions using a calmodulin-modified nanowire transistor

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tsung-Wu; Hsieh, Po-Jen; Lin, Chih-Lung; Fang, Yi-Ya; Yang, Jia-Xun; Tsai, Chia-Chang; Chiang, Pei-Ling; Pan, Chien-Yuan; Chen, Yit-Tsong

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we describe a highly sensitive and reusable silicon nanowire field-effect transistor for the detection of protein-protein interactions. This reusable device was made possible by the reversible association of glutathione S-transferase-tagged calmodulin with a glutathione modified transistor. The calmodulin-modified transistor exhibited selective electrical responses to Ca2+ (≥1 μM) and purified cardiac troponin I (∼7 nM); the change in conductivity displayed a linear dependence on the concentration of troponin I in a range from 10 nM to 1 μM. These results are consistent with the previously reported concentration range in which the dissociation constant for the troponin I-calmodulin complex was determined. The minimum concentration of Ca2+ required to activate calmodulin was determined to be 1 μM. We have also successfully demonstrated that the N-type Ca2+ channels, expressed by cultured 293T cells, can be recognized specifically by the calmodulin-modified nanowire transistor. This sensitive nanowire transistor can serve as a high-throughput biosensor and can also substitute for immunoprecipitation methods used in the identification of interacting proteins. PMID:20080536

  3. Genetically modified proteins: functional improvement and chimeragenesis

    PubMed Central

    Balabanova, Larissa; Golotin, Vasily; Podvolotskaya, Anna; Rasskazov, Valery

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the emerging role of site-specific mutagenesis and chimeragenesis for the functional improvement of proteins in areas where traditional protein engineering methods have been extensively used and practically exhausted. The novel path for the creation of the novel proteins has been created on the farther development of the new structure and sequence optimization algorithms for generating and designing the accurate structure models in result of x-ray crystallography studies of a lot of proteins and their mutant forms. Artificial genetic modifications aim to expand nature's repertoire of biomolecules. One of the most exciting potential results of mutagenesis or chimeragenesis finding could be design of effective diagnostics, bio-therapeutics and biocatalysts. A sampling of recent examples is listed below for the in vivo and in vitro genetically improvement of various binding protein and enzyme functions, with references for more in-depth study provided for the reader's benefit. PMID:26211369

  4. Preparation and evaluation of tara-modified proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quebracho, a vegetable tannin, can be used to modify gelatin to produce a product that has been applied effectively as a filler in leather processing, as described in our previous report. In this ongoing study, another vegetable tannin tara is examined for its possible application in protein modifi...

  5. Complex Reconstitution from Individual Protein Modules.

    PubMed

    Basquin, Jérôme; Taschner, Michael; Lorentzen, Esben

    2016-01-01

    Cellular function relies on protein complexes that work as nano-machines. The structure and function of protein complexes is an outcome of the specific combination of protein subunits, or modules, within the complex. A major focus of molecular biology is thus to understand how protein subunits assemble to form complexes with distinct biological function. To this end, in vitro reconstitution of complexes from individual subunits to study their assembly, structure and activity is of central importance. With purified individual subunits and sub-modules at hand one can systematically dissect the hierarchical assembly of larger complexes using direct protein-protein interaction assays. Furthermore, activity assays can be carried out with individual subunits or smaller sub-complexes and compared to those of the fully assembled complex to precisely map functional sites and provide a molecular basis for in vivo observations. In this chapter we review methods for protein complex assembly from individual subunits and provide examples of advantages and potential pitfalls to this approach. PMID:27165333

  6. Identifying protein complexes in protein-protein interaction networks by using clique seeds and graph entropy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bolin; Shi, Jinhong; Zhang, Shenggui; Wu, Fang-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    The identification of protein complexes plays a key role in understanding major cellular processes and biological functions. Various computational algorithms have been proposed to identify protein complexes from protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. In this paper, we first introduce a new seed-selection strategy for seed-growth style algorithms. Cliques rather than individual vertices are employed as initial seeds. After that, a result-modification approach is proposed based on this seed-selection strategy. Predictions generated by higher order clique seeds are employed to modify results that are generated by lower order ones. The performance of this seed-selection strategy and the result-modification approach are tested by using the entropy-based algorithm, which is currently the best seed-growth style algorithm to detect protein complexes from PPI networks. In addition, we investigate four pairs of strategies for this algorithm in order to improve its accuracy. The numerical experiments are conducted on a Saccharomyces cerevisiae PPI network. The group of best predictions consists of 1711 clusters, with the average f-score at 0.68 after removing all similar and redundant clusters. We conclude that higher order clique seeds can generate predictions with higher accuracy and that our improved entropy-based algorithm outputs more reasonable predictions than the original one. PMID:23112006

  7. Heat Modifiability of Outer Membrane Proteins from Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Kuszak, Adam J.; Buchanan, Susan K.

    2016-01-01

    Summary β-barrel membrane proteins are somewhat unique in that their folding states can be monitored using semi-native SDS-PAGE methods to determine if they are folded properly or not. This property, which is commonly referred to as heat modifiability, has been used for many years on both purified protein and on whole cells to monitor folded states of proteins of interest. Additionally, heat modifiability assays have proven indispensable in studying the BAM complex and its role in folding and inserting β-barrel membrane proteins into the outer membrane. Here, we describe the protocol our lab uses for performing the heat modifiability assay in our studies on outer membrane proteins. PMID:26427675

  8. Heat Modifiability of Outer Membrane Proteins from Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Kuszak, Adam J; Buchanan, Susan K

    2015-01-01

    β-barrel membrane proteins are somewhat unique in that their folding states can be monitored using semi-native SDS-PAGE methods to determine if they are folded properly or not. This property, which is commonly referred to as heat modifiability, has been used for many years on both purified protein and on whole cells to monitor folded states of proteins of interest. Additionally, heat modifiability assays have proven indispensable in studying the BAM complex and its role in folding and inserting β-barrel membrane proteins into the outer membrane. Here, we describe the protocol our lab uses for performing the heat modifiability assay in our studies on outer membrane proteins. PMID:26427675

  9. [Carbonyl stress and oxidatively modified proteins in chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Bargnoux, A-S; Morena, M; Badiou, S; Dupuy, A-M; Canaud, B; Cristol, J-P

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly observed in chronic renal failure patients resulting from an unbalance between overproduction of reactive oxygen species and impairement of defense mechanisms. Proteins appear as potential targets of uremia-induced oxidative stress and may undergo qualitative modifications. Proteins could be directly modified by reactive oxygen species which leads to amino acid oxydation and cross-linking. Proteins could be indirectly modified by reactive carbonyl compounds produced by glycoxidation and lipo-peroxidation. The resulting post-traductional modifications are known as carbonyl stress. In addition, thiols could be oxidized or could react with homocystein leading to homocysteinylation. Finally, tyrosin could be oxidized by myeloperoxidase leading to advanced oxidative protein products (AOPP). Oxidatively modified proteins are increased in chronic renal failure patients and may contribute to exacerbate the oxidative stress/inflammation syndrome. They have been involved in long term complications of uremia such as amyloidosis and accelerated atherosclerosis. PMID:19297289

  10. Protein Complex Purification by Affinity Capture.

    PubMed

    LaCava, John; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Rout, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Affinity capture has become a powerful technique for consistently purifying endogenous protein complexes, facilitating biochemical and biophysical assays on otherwise inaccessible biological assemblies, and enabling broader interactomic exploration. For this procedure, cells are broken and their contents separated and extracted into a solvent, permitting access to target macromolecular complexes thus released in solution. The complexes are specifically enriched from the extract onto a solid medium coupled with an affinity reagent-usually an antibody-that recognizes the target either directly or through an appended affinity tag, allowing subsequent characterization of the complex. Here, we discuss approaches and considerations for purifying endogenous yeast protein complexes by affinity capture. PMID:27371601

  11. Systematic Characterization of Human Protein Complexes Identifies Chromosome Segregation Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, James R.A.; Toyoda, Yusuke; Hegemann, Björn; Poser, Ina; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Sykora, Martina M.; Augsburg, Martina; Hudecz, Otto; Buschhorn, Bettina A.; Bulkescher, Jutta; Conrad, Christian; Comartin, David; Schleiffer, Alexander; Sarov, Mihail; Pozniakovsky, Andrei; Slabicki, Mikolaj Michal; Schloissnig, Siegfried; Steinmacher, Ines; Leuschner, Marit; Ssykor, Andrea; Lawo, Steffen; Pelletier, Laurence; Stark, Holger; Nasmyth, Kim; Ellenberg, Jan; Durbin, Richard; Buchholz, Frank; Mechtler, Karl; Hyman, Anthony A.; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2010-01-01

    Chromosome segregation and cell division are essential, highly ordered processes that depend on numerous protein complexes. Results from recent RNA interference (RNAi) screens indicate that the identity and composition of these protein complexes is incompletely understood. Using gene tagging on bacterial artificial chromosomes, protein localization and tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry, the MitoCheck consortium has analyzed about 100 human protein complexes, many of which had not or only incompletely been characterized. This work has led to the discovery of previously unknown, evolutionarily conserved subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C) and the γ-tubulin ring complex (γ-TuRC), large complexes which are essential for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. The approaches we describe here are generally applicable to high throughput follow-up analyses of phenotypic screens in mammalian cells. PMID:20360068

  12. Systematic analysis of human protein complexes identifies chromosome segregation proteins.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, James R A; Toyoda, Yusuke; Hegemann, Björn; Poser, Ina; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Sykora, Martina M; Augsburg, Martina; Hudecz, Otto; Buschhorn, Bettina A; Bulkescher, Jutta; Conrad, Christian; Comartin, David; Schleiffer, Alexander; Sarov, Mihail; Pozniakovsky, Andrei; Slabicki, Mikolaj Michal; Schloissnig, Siegfried; Steinmacher, Ines; Leuschner, Marit; Ssykor, Andrea; Lawo, Steffen; Pelletier, Laurence; Stark, Holger; Nasmyth, Kim; Ellenberg, Jan; Durbin, Richard; Buchholz, Frank; Mechtler, Karl; Hyman, Anthony A; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2010-04-30

    Chromosome segregation and cell division are essential, highly ordered processes that depend on numerous protein complexes. Results from recent RNA interference screens indicate that the identity and composition of these protein complexes is incompletely understood. Using gene tagging on bacterial artificial chromosomes, protein localization, and tandem-affinity purification-mass spectrometry, the MitoCheck consortium has analyzed about 100 human protein complexes, many of which had not or had only incompletely been characterized. This work has led to the discovery of previously unknown, evolutionarily conserved subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex and the gamma-tubulin ring complex--large complexes that are essential for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. The approaches we describe here are generally applicable to high-throughput follow-up analyses of phenotypic screens in mammalian cells. PMID:20360068

  13. Eukaryotic LYR Proteins Interact with Mitochondrial Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    Angerer, Heike

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, mitochondria host ancient essential bioenergetic and biosynthetic pathways. LYR (leucine/tyrosine/arginine) motif proteins (LYRMs) of the Complex1_LYR-like superfamily interact with protein complexes of bacterial origin. Many LYR proteins function as extra subunits (LYRM3 and LYRM6) or novel assembly factors (LYRM7, LYRM8, ACN9 and FMC1) of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) core complexes. Structural insights into complex I accessory subunits LYRM6 and LYRM3 have been provided by analyses of EM and X-ray structures of complex I from bovine and the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, respectively. Combined structural and biochemical studies revealed that LYRM6 resides at the matrix arm close to the ubiquinone reduction site. For LYRM3, a position at the distal proton-pumping membrane arm facing the matrix space is suggested. Both LYRMs are supposed to anchor an acyl-carrier protein (ACPM) independently to complex I. The function of this duplicated protein interaction of ACPM with respiratory complex I is still unknown. Analysis of protein-protein interaction screens, genetic analyses and predicted multi-domain LYRMs offer further clues on an interaction network and adaptor-like function of LYR proteins in mitochondria. PMID:25686363

  14. An allosteric role for receptor activity-modifying proteins in defining GPCR pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    J Gingell, Joseph; Simms, John; Barwell, James; Poyner, David R; Watkins, Harriet A; Pioszak, Augen A; Sexton, Patrick M; Hay, Debbie L

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are allosteric proteins that control transmission of external signals to regulate cellular response. Although agonist binding promotes canonical G protein signalling transmitted through conformational changes, G protein-coupled receptors also interact with other proteins. These include other G protein-coupled receptors, other receptors and channels, regulatory proteins and receptor-modifying proteins, notably receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs). RAMPs have at least 11 G protein-coupled receptor partners, including many class B G protein-coupled receptors. Prototypic is the calcitonin receptor, with altered ligand specificity when co-expressed with RAMPs. To gain molecular insight into the consequences of this protein–protein interaction, we combined molecular modelling with mutagenesis of the calcitonin receptor extracellular domain, assessed in ligand binding and functional assays. Although some calcitonin receptor residues are universally important for peptide interactions (calcitonin, amylin and calcitonin gene-related peptide) in calcitonin receptor alone or with receptor activity-modifying protein, others have RAMP-dependent effects, whereby mutations decreased amylin/calcitonin gene-related peptide potency substantially only when RAMP was present. Remarkably, the key residues were completely conserved between calcitonin receptor and AMY receptors, and between subtypes of AMY receptor that have different ligand preferences. Mutations at the interface between calcitonin receptor and RAMP affected ligand pharmacology in a RAMP-dependent manner, suggesting that RAMP may allosterically influence the calcitonin receptor conformation. Supporting this, molecular dynamics simulations suggested that the calcitonin receptor extracellular N-terminal domain is more flexible in the presence of receptor activity-modifying protein 1. Thus, RAMPs may act in an allosteric manner to generate a spectrum of unique calcitonin receptor

  15. Interacting proteins as genetic modifiers of Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Jiang; Friedman, Meyer; Li, Shihua

    2007-11-01

    Huntington disease is caused by polyglutamine expansion in huntingtin, a 350 kD protein that is ubiquitously expressed and widely distributed at the subcellular level. Recently, Kaltenbach et al. identified a large collection of novel huntingtin-interacting proteins, several of which modify mutant huntingtin toxicity in Drosophila. Thus, the interaction of mutant huntingtin with certain protein partners can influence its toxicity and therefore the severity and/or progression of Huntington disease. PMID:17961788

  16. A Modified Tactile Brush Algorithm for Complex Touch Gestures

    SciTech Connect

    Ragan, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Several researchers have investigated phantom tactile sensation (i.e., the perception of a nonexistent actuator between two real actuators) and apparent tactile motion (i.e., the perception of a moving actuator due to time delays between onsets of multiple actuations). Prior work has focused primarily on determining appropriate Durations of Stimulation (DOS) and Stimulus Onset Asynchronies (SOA) for simple touch gestures, such as a single finger stroke. To expand upon this knowledge, we investigated complex touch gestures involving multiple, simultaneous points of contact, such as a whole hand touching the arm. To implement complex touch gestures, we modified the Tactile Brush algorithm to support rectangular areas of tactile stimulation.

  17. Retinal proteins modified by 4-hydroxynonenal: identification of molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Kapphahn, Rebecca J; Giwa, Babatomiwa M; Berg, Kristin M; Roehrich, Heidi; Feng, Xiao; Olsen, Timothy W; Ferrington, Deborah A

    2006-07-01

    The reactive aldehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), is a product of lipid peroxidation that can covalently modify and inactivate proteins. Previously, we reported increased HNE modification of select retinal proteins resolved by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis in aged Fisher 344 x Brown Norway rats (Louie, J.L., Kapphahn, R.J., Ferrington, D.A., 2002. Proteasome function and protein oxidation in the aged retina. Exp. Eye Res. 75, 271-284). In the current study, quantitative assessment of HNE molar content using slot blot immunoassays showed HNE content is increased 30% in aged rat retina. In contrast, there was no age-related difference in HNE content in individual spots resolved by 2D gel electrophoresis suggesting the increased modification is likely on membrane proteins that are missing on 2D gels. The HNE-immunoreactive proteins resolved by 2D gel electrophoresis were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. These proteins are involved in metabolism, chaperone function, and fatty acid transport. Proteins that were frequently modified and had the highest molar content of HNE included triosephosphate isomerase, alpha enolase, heat shock cognate 70 and betaB2 crystallin. Immunochemical detection of HNE adducts on retinal sections showed greater immune reaction in ganglion cells, photoreceptor inner segment, and the inner plexiform layer. Identification of HNE modified proteins in two alternative model systems, human retinal pigment epithelial cells in culture (ARPE19) and human donor eyes, indicated that triosephosphate isomerase and alpha enolase are generally modified. These results identify a common subset of proteins that contain HNE adducts and suggest that select retinal proteins are molecular targets for HNE modification. PMID:16530755

  18. Role of Histone-Modifying Enzymes and Their Complexes in Regulation of Chromatin Biology.

    PubMed

    DesJarlais, Renee; Tummino, Peter J

    2016-03-22

    In 1964, Alfrey and colleagues proposed that acetylation and methylation of histones may regulate RNA synthesis and described "the possibility that relatively minor modifications of histone structure, taking place on the intact protein molecule, offer a means of switching-on or off RNA synthesis at different loci along the chromosome" [Allfrey, V., Faulkner, R., and Mirsky, A. (1964) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 51, 786]. Fifty years later, this prescient description provides a simple but conceptually accurate model for the biological role of histone post-translational modifications (PTMs). The basic unit of chromosomes is the nucleosome, with double-stranded DNA wrapped around a histone protein oligomer. The "tails" of histone proteins are post-translationally modified, which alters the physical properties of nucleosomes in a manner that impacts gene accessibility for transcription and replication. Enzymes that catalyze the addition and removal of histone PTMs, histone-modifying enzymes (HMEs), are present in large protein complexes, with DNA-binding proteins, ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes, and epigenetic reader proteins that bind to post-translationally modified histone residues [Arrowsmith, C. H., Bountra, C., Fish, P. V., Lee, K., and Schapira, M. (2012) Nat. Rev. Drug Discovery 11, 384-400]. The activity of HME complexes is coordinated with that of other chromatin-associated complexes that, together, regulate gene transcription, DNA repair, and DNA replication. In this context, the enzymes that catalyze addition and removal of histone PTMs are an essential component of the highly regulated mechanism for accessing compacted DNA. To fully understand the function of HMEs, the structure of nucleosomes, their natural substrate, will be described. Each major class of HMEs subsequently will be discussed with regard to its biochemistry, enzymatic mechanism, and biological function in the context of a prototypical HME complex. PMID:26745824

  19. Effects of Chemically Modified Messenger RNA on Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Luo, Xiao; Dong, Yizhou

    2016-03-16

    Chemically modified nucleotides play significant roles in the effectiveness of mRNA translation. Here, we describe the synthesis of two sets of chemically modified mRNAs [encoding firefly Luciferase (FLuc) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), respectively], evaluation of protein expression, and correlation analysis of expression level under various conditions. The results indicate that chemical modifications of mRNAs are able to significantly improve protein expression, which is dependent on cell types and coding sequences. Moreover, eGFP mRNAs with N1-methylpseudouridine (me(1)ψ), 5-methoxyuridine (5moU), and pseudouridine (ψ) modifications ranked top three in cell lines tested. Interestingly, 5moU-modified eGFP mRNA was more stable than other eGFP mRNAs. Consequently, me(1)ψ, 5moU, and ψ are promising nucleotides for chemical modification of mRNAs. PMID:26906521

  20. Modified Taylor Complex Figure: normative data from 290 adults.

    PubMed

    Casarotti, Alessandra; Papagno, Costanza; Zarino, Barbara

    2014-09-01

    Data for copying and delayed recall (after a 15-min delay) of the Modified Taylor Complex Figure (MTCF), an alternative form of the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure (ROCF), were collected from 290 healthy participants. Normative data are provided. Age and education were significantly correlated with MTCF scores and must be corrected for to interpret results accurately. More specifically, increasing age adversely affected performance, whereas a higher education resulted in a better performance. Twenty-five participants were tested with both complex figures (MTCF and ROCF) in two separate sessions to assess correlation, which proved to be high. The collected data allow using the MTCF as a valid alternative material for testing visual long-term memory avoiding implicit learning that can occur when the same version of the ROCF is used for repeated testing sessions. PMID:23647550

  1. Membrane Protein Solubilization and Composition of Protein Detergent Complexes.

    PubMed

    Duquesne, Katia; Prima, Valérie; Sturgis, James N

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are typically expressed in heterologous systems with a view to in vitro characterization. A critical step in the preparation of membrane proteins after expression in any system is the solubilization of the protein in aqueous solution, typically using detergents and lipids, to obtain the protein in a form suitable for purification, structural or functional analysis. This process is particularly difficult as the objective is to prepare the protein in an unnatural environment, a protein detergent complex, separating it from its natural lipid partners while causing the minimum destabilization or modification of the structure. Although the process is difficult, and relatively hard to master, an increasing number of membrane proteins have been successfully isolated after expression in a wide variety of systems. In this chapter we give a general protocol for preparing protein detergent complexes that is aimed at guiding the reader through the different critical steps. In the second part of the chapter we illustrate how to analyze the composition of protein detergent complexes; this analysis is important as it has been found that compositional variation often causes irreproducible results. PMID:27485340

  2. Generation and purification of highly-specific antibodies for detecting post-translationally modified proteins in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Arur, Swathi; Schedl, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational modifications alter protein structure, affecting activity, stability, localization and/or binding partners. Antibodies that specifically recognize post-translationally modified proteins have a number of uses including immuno-cytochemistry and immuno-precipitation of the modified protein to purify protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid complexes. However, antibodies directed at modified sites on individual proteins are often non-specific. Here we describe a protocol to purify polyclonal antibodies that specifically detect the modified protein of interest. The approach uses iterative rounds of subtraction and affinity purification, using stringent washes to remove antibodies that recognize the unmodified protein and low sequence complexity epitopes containing the modified amino acid. Dot and western blots assays are employed to assess antibody preparation specificity. The approach is designed to overcome the common occurrence that a single round of subtraction and affinity purification is not sufficient to obtain a modified protein specific antibody preparation. One full round of antibody purification and specificity testing takes 6 days of discontinuous time. PMID:24457330

  3. Protein-protein interaction networks (PPI) and complex diseases

    PubMed Central

    Safari-Alighiarloo, Nahid; Taghizadeh, Mohammad; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa; Goliaei, Bahram

    2014-01-01

    The physical interaction of proteins which lead to compiling them into large densely connected networks is a noticeable subject to investigation. Protein interaction networks are useful because of making basic scientific abstraction and improving biological and biomedical applications. Based on principle roles of proteins in biological function, their interactions determine molecular and cellular mechanisms, which control healthy and diseased states in organisms. Therefore, such networks facilitate the understanding of pathogenic (and physiologic) mechanisms that trigger the onset and progression of diseases. Consequently, this knowledge can be translated into effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Furthermore, the results of several studies have proved that the structure and dynamics of protein networks are disturbed in complex diseases such as cancer and autoimmune disorders. Based on such relationship, a novel paradigm is suggested in order to confirm that the protein interaction networks can be the target of therapy for treatment of complex multi-genic diseases rather than individual molecules with disrespect the network. PMID:25436094

  4. Chitinase modifying proteins from phylogenetically distinct lineages of Brassica pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chitinase modifying proteins (CMPs) are secreted fungal proteases that truncate specific plant class IV chitinases by cleaving peptide bonds in their amino termini. We recently identified a CMP from the Zea mays (maize) pathogen Fusarium verticillioides and found that it is a member of the fungalysi...

  5. Defective Expression of the Mitochondrial-tRNA Modifying Enzyme GTPBP3 Triggers AMPK-Mediated Adaptive Responses Involving Complex I Assembly Factors, Uncoupling Protein 2, and the Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier

    PubMed Central

    Esteve, Juan M.; Villarroya, Magda; Aguado, Carmen; Enríquez, J. Antonio; Knecht, Erwin; Armengod, M.-Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    GTPBP3 is an evolutionary conserved protein presumably involved in mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA) modification. In humans, GTPBP3 mutations cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with lactic acidosis, and have been associated with a defect in mitochondrial translation, yet the pathomechanism remains unclear. Here we use a GTPBP3 stable-silencing model (shGTPBP3 cells) for a further characterization of the phenotype conferred by the GTPBP3 defect. We experimentally show for the first time that GTPBP3 depletion is associated with an mt-tRNA hypomodification status, as mt-tRNAs from shGTPBP3 cells were more sensitive to digestion by angiogenin than tRNAs from control cells. Despite the effect of stable silencing of GTPBP3 on global mitochondrial translation being rather mild, the steady-state levels and activity of Complex I, and cellular ATP levels were 50% of those found in the controls. Notably, the ATPase activity of Complex V increased by about 40% in GTPBP3 depleted cells suggesting that mitochondria consume ATP to maintain the membrane potential. Moreover, shGTPBP3 cells exhibited enhanced antioxidant capacity and a nearly 2-fold increase in the uncoupling protein UCP2 levels. Our data indicate that stable silencing of GTPBP3 triggers an AMPK-dependent retrograde signaling pathway that down-regulates the expression of the NDUFAF3 and NDUFAF4 Complex I assembly factors and the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC), while up-regulating the expression of UCP2. We also found that genes involved in glycolysis and oxidation of fatty acids are up-regulated. These data are compatible with a model in which high UCP2 levels, together with a reduction in pyruvate transport due to the down-regulation of MPC, promote a shift from pyruvate to fatty acid oxidation, and to an uncoupling of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation. These metabolic alterations, and the low ATP levels, may negatively affect heart function. PMID:26642043

  6. Chemical and Biological Tools for the Preparation of Modified Histone Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Cecil J.; Yu, Ruixuan R.; Gardner, Miranda L.; Shimko, John C.; Ottesen, Jennifer J.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromatin is a complex and dynamic system in which the DNA double helix is organized and protected by interactions with histone proteins. This system is regulated through, a large network of dynamic post-translational modifications (PTMs) exists to ensure proper gene transcription, DNA repair, and other processes involving DNA. Homogenous protein samples with precisely characterized modification sites are necessary to better understand the functions of modified histone proteins. Here, we discuss sets of chemical and biological tools that have been developed for the preparation of modified histones, with a focus on the appropriate choice of tool for a given target. We start with genetic approaches for the creation of modified histones, including the incorporation of genetic mimics of histone modifications, chemical installation of modification analogs, and the use of the expanded genetic code to incorporate modified amino acids. Additionally, we will cover the chemical ligation techniques that have been invaluable in the generation of complex modified histones that are indistinguishable from the natural counterparts. Finally, we will end with a prospectus on future directions of synthetic chromatin in living systems. PMID:25863817

  7. Solvation dynamics in a protein surfactant complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Partha; Sen, Pratik; Halder, Arnab; Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Sen, Sobhan; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2003-08-01

    Solvation dynamics in the denatured state of a protein, lysozyme (denatured by sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) is markedly slower than that in the native state. For coumarin 153 bound to lysozyme, the average solvation time, < τs> is 330 ps. In the lysozyme-SDS complex, the solvation dynamics is markedly slower with < τs>=7250 ps. On addition of dithiothreitol (DTT) to the lysozyme-SDS complex, when the di-sulfide bonds are destroyed, < τs> is found to be 1140 ps. The slow dynamics in the denatured protein is attributed to the polymer chain dynamics and the exchange of bound and free water molecules.

  8. Competitive Protein Adsorption on Polysaccharide and Hyaluronate Modified Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ombelli, Michela; Costello, Lauren; Postle, Corinne; Anantharaman, Vinod; Meng, Qing Cheng; Composto, Russell J.; Eckmann, David M.

    2011-01-01

    We measured adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and fibrinogen (Fg) onto six distinct bare and dextran- and hyaluronate-modified silicon surfaces created using two dextran grafting densities and three hyaluronic acid (HA) sodium salts derived from human umbilical cord, rooster comb and streptococcus zooepidemicus. Film thickness and surface morphology depended on HA molecular weight and concentration. BSA coverage was enhanced on surfaces upon competitive adsorption of BSA:Fg mixtures. Dextranization differentially reduced protein adsorption onto surfaces based on oxidation state. Hyaluronization was demonstrated to provide the greatest resistance to protein coverage, equivalent to that of the most resistant dextranized surface. Resistance to protein adsorption was independent of the type of hyaluronic acid utilized. With changing bulk protein concentration from 20 to 40 µg ml−1 for each species, Fg coverage on silicon increased by 4×, whereas both BSA and Fg adsorption on dextran and HA were far less dependent of protein bulk concentration. PMID:21623481

  9. Heparin modifies the immunogenicity of positively charged proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chudasama, Shalini L.; Espinasse, Benjamin; Hwang, Fred; Qi, Rui; Joglekar, Manali; Afonina, Galyna; Wiesner, Mark R.; Welsby, Ian J.; Ortel, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    The immune response in heparin-induced thrombocytopenia is initiated by and directed to large multimolecular complexes of platelet factor 4 (PF4) and heparin (H). We have previously shown that PF4:H multimolecular complexes assemble through electrostatic interactions and, once formed, are highly immunogenic in vivo. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that other positively charged proteins would exhibit similar biologic interactions with H. To test this hypothesis, we selected 2 unrelated positively charged proteins, protamine (PRT) and lysozyme, and studied H-dependent interactions using in vitro and in vivo techniques. Our studies indicate that PRT/H and lysozyme/H, like PF4/H, show H-dependent binding over a range of H concentrations and that formation of complexes occurs at distinct stoichiometric ratios. We show that protein/H complexes are capable of eliciting high-titer antigen-specific antibodies in a murine immunization model and that PRT/H antibodies occur in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. Finally, our studies indicate that protein/H complexes, but not uncomplexed protein, directly activate dendritic cells in vitro leading to interleukin-12 release. Taken together, these studies indicate that H significantly alters the biophysical and biologic properties of positively charged compounds through formation of multimolecular complexes that lead to dendritic cell activation and trigger immune responses in vivo. PMID:20852126

  10. Peroxisome protein import: a complex journey

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Alison; Hogg, Thomas Lanyon; Warriner, Stuart L.

    2016-01-01

    The import of proteins into peroxisomes possesses many unusual features such as the ability to import folded proteins, and a surprising diversity of targeting signals with differing affinities that can be recognized by the same receptor. As understanding of the structure and function of many components of the protein import machinery has grown, an increasingly complex network of factors affecting each step of the import pathway has emerged. Structural studies have revealed the presence of additional interactions between cargo proteins and the PEX5 receptor that affect import potential, with a subtle network of cargo-induced conformational changes in PEX5 being involved in the import process. Biochemical studies have also indicated an interdependence of receptor–cargo import with release of unloaded receptor from the peroxisome. Here, we provide an update on recent literature concerning mechanisms of protein import into peroxisomes. PMID:27284042

  11. Metal complexes as "protein surface mimetics".

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Sarah H; Wilson, Andrew J

    2016-07-28

    A key challenge in chemical biology is to identify small molecule regulators for every single protein. However, protein surfaces are notoriously difficult to recognise with synthetic molecules, often having large flat surfaces that are poorly matched to traditional small molecules. In the surface mimetic approach, a supramolecular scaffold is used to project recognition groups in such a manner as to make multivalent non-covalent contacts over a large area of protein surface. Metal based supramolecular scaffolds offer unique advantages over conventional organic molecules for protein binding, including greater stereochemical and geometrical diversity conferred through the metal centre and the potential for direct assessment of binding properties and even visualisation in cells without recourse to further functionalisation. This feature article will highlight the current state of the art in protein surface recognition using metal complexes as surface mimetics. PMID:27353704

  12. On protein abundance distributions in complex mixtures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry, an analytical technique that measures the mass-to-charge ratio of ionized atoms or molecules, dates back more than 100 years, and has both qualitative and quantitative uses for determining chemical and structural information. Quantitative proteomic mass spectrometry on biological samples focuses on identifying the proteins present in the samples, and establishing the relative abundances of those proteins. Such protein inventories create the opportunity to discover novel biomarkers and disease targets. We have previously introduced a normalized, label-free method for quantification of protein abundances under a shotgun proteomics platform (Griffin et al., 2010). The introduction of this method for quantifying and comparing protein levels leads naturally to the issue of modeling protein abundances in individual samples. We here report that protein abundance levels from two recent proteomics experiments conducted by the authors can be adequately represented by Sichel distributions. Mathematically, Sichel distributions are mixtures of Poisson distributions with a rather complex mixing distribution, and have been previously and successfully applied to linguistics and species abundance data. The Sichel model can provide a direct measure of the heterogeneity of protein abundances, and can reveal protein abundance differences that simpler models fail to show. PMID:23360617

  13. Assembly reflects evolution of protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Levy, Emmanuel D; Boeri Erba, Elisabetta; Robinson, Carol V; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2008-06-26

    A homomer is formed by self-interacting copies of a protein unit. This is functionally important, as in allostery, and structurally crucial because mis-assembly of homomers is implicated in disease. Homomers are widespread, with 50-70% of proteins with a known quaternary state assembling into such structures. Despite their prevalence, their role in the evolution of cellular machinery and the potential for their use in the design of new molecular machines, little is known about the mechanisms that drive formation of homomers at the level of evolution and assembly in the cell. Here we present an analysis of over 5,000 unique atomic structures and show that the quaternary structure of homomers is conserved in over 70% of protein pairs sharing as little as 30% sequence identity. Where quaternary structure is not conserved among the members of a protein family, a detailed investigation revealed well-defined evolutionary pathways by which proteins transit between different quaternary structure types. Furthermore, we show by perturbing subunit interfaces within complexes and by mass spectrometry analysis, that the (dis)assembly pathway mimics the evolutionary pathway. These data represent a molecular analogy to Haeckel's evolutionary paradigm of embryonic development, where an intermediate in the assembly of a complex represents a form that appeared in its own evolutionary history. Our model of self-assembly allows reliable prediction of evolution and assembly of a complex solely from its crystal structure. PMID:18563089

  14. Embracing proteins: structural themes in aptamer-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Gelinas, Amy D; Davies, Douglas R; Janjic, Nebojsa

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the structural rules that govern specific, high-affinity binding characteristic of aptamer-protein interactions is important in view of the increasing use of aptamers across many applications. From the modest number of 16 aptamer-protein structures currently available, trends are emerging. The flexible phosphodiester backbone allows folding into precise three-dimensional structures using known nucleic acid motifs as scaffolds that orient specific functional groups for target recognition. Still, completely novel motifs essential for structure and function are found in modified aptamers with diversity-enhancing side chains. Aptamers and antibodies, two classes of macromolecules used as affinity reagents with entirely different backbones and composition, recognize protein epitopes of similar size and with comparably high shape complementarity. PMID:26919170

  15. Identification of Proteins that Modify Cataract of the Eye Lens

    PubMed Central

    Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Tang, Yajun; Ackermann, Renate; Pleissner, Klaus-Peter; Schmid, Monika; Stein, Robert; Zimny-Arndt, Ursula; Kumar, Nalin M.; Jungblut, Peter R.

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence of a nuclear cataract in the eye lens due to disruption of theα3Cx46 connexin gene, Gja3, is dependent on strain background in a mouse model, implicating factors that modify the pathology. The differences upon cataractogenesis in the urea soluble proteins of the lens of two mouse strains, C57BL/6J and 129/SvJ, were analyzed by a comparative proteomics approach. Determination of the complete proteome of an organ offers the opportunity to characterize at a molecular level, differences in gene expression and post-translational modifications occurring during pathology and between individuals. The abundance of 63 protein species was altered between the strains. A unique aspect of this study is the identification of chaperonin subunit 6A, mortalin, ERp29 and syntaxin binding protein 6 in the eye lens. DNA polymorphisms resulting in non-conservative amino acid changes that led to altered physicochemical properties of the proteins were detected for mortalin, chaperonin subunit 6A, annexin A1 and possibly gamma N crystallin. The results show HSP27/25 and/or ERp29 are the likely major modifying factors for cataractogenesis. Extension of the results suggests that small heat shock proteins have a major role for influencing cataract formation in humans. PMID:19003866

  16. Protein-protein complex structure predictions by multimeric threading and template recombination

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Srayanta; Zhang, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Summary The number of protein-protein complex structures is nearly 6-times smaller than that of tertiary structures in PDB which limits the power of homology-based approaches to complex structure modeling. We present a new threading-recombination approach, COTH, to boost the protein complex structure library by combining tertiary structure templates with complex alignments. The query sequences are first aligned to complex templates using a modified dynamic programming algorithm, guided by ab initio binding-site predictions. The monomer alignments are then shifted to the multimeric template framework by structural alignments. COTH was tested on 500 non-homologous dimeric proteins, which can successfully detect correct templates for half of the cases after homologous templates are excluded, which significantly outperforms conventional homology modeling algorithms. It also shows a higher accuracy in interface modeling than rigid-body docking of unbound structures from ZDOCK although with lower coverage. These data demonstrate new avenues to model complex structures from non-homologous templates. PMID:21742262

  17. Metal complex modified azo polymers for multilevel organic memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yong; Chen, Hong-Xia; Zhou, Feng; Li, Hua; Dong, Huilong; Li, You-Yong; Hu, Zhi-Jun; Xu, Qing-Feng; Lu, Jian-Mei

    2015-04-01

    Multilevel organic memories have attracted considerable interest due to their high capacity of data storage. Despite advances, the search for multilevel memory materials still remains a formidable challenge. Herein, we present a rational design and synthesis of a class of polymers containing an azobenzene-pyridine group (PAzo-py) and its derivatives, for multilevel organic memory storage. In this design, a metal complex (M(Phen)Cl2, M = Cu, Pd) is employed to modify the HOMO-LUMO energy levels of azo polymers, thereby converting the memory state from binary to ternary. More importantly, this approach enables modulating the energy levels of azo polymers by varying the coordination metal ions. This makes the achievement of high performance multilevel memories possible. The ability to tune the bandgap energy of azo polymers provides new exciting opportunities to develop new materials for high-density data storage.Multilevel organic memories have attracted considerable interest due to their high capacity of data storage. Despite advances, the search for multilevel memory materials still remains a formidable challenge. Herein, we present a rational design and synthesis of a class of polymers containing an azobenzene-pyridine group (PAzo-py) and its derivatives, for multilevel organic memory storage. In this design, a metal complex (M(Phen)Cl2, M = Cu, Pd) is employed to modify the HOMO-LUMO energy levels of azo polymers, thereby converting the memory state from binary to ternary. More importantly, this approach enables modulating the energy levels of azo polymers by varying the coordination metal ions. This makes the achievement of high performance multilevel memories possible. The ability to tune the bandgap energy of azo polymers provides new exciting opportunities to develop new materials for high-density data storage. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00871a

  18. Optimized Affinity Capture of Yeast Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    LaCava, John; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Rout, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe an affinity isolation protocol. It uses cryomilled yeast cell powder for producing cell extracts and antibody-conjugated paramagnetic beads for affinity capture. Guidelines for determining the optimal extraction solvent composition are provided. Captured proteins are eluted in a denaturing solvent (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis sample buffer) for gel-based proteomic analyses. Although the procedures can be modified to use other sources of cell extract and other forms of affinity media, to date we have consistently obtained the best results with the method presented. PMID:27371596

  19. Dynamic interactions of proteins in complex networks

    SciTech Connect

    Appella, E.; Anderson, C.

    2009-10-01

    Recent advances in techniques such as NMR and EPR spectroscopy have enabled the elucidation of how proteins undergo structural changes to act in concert in complex networks. The three minireviews in this series highlight current findings and the capabilities of new methodologies for unraveling the dynamic changes controlling diverse cellular functions. They represent a sampling of the cutting-edge research presented at the 17th Meeting of Methods in Protein Structure Analysis, MPSA2008, in Sapporo, Japan, 26-29 August, 2008 (http://www.iapsap.bnl.gov). The first minireview, by Christensen and Klevit, reports on a structure-based yeast two-hybrid method for identifying E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes that interact with the E3 BRCA1/BARD1 heterodimer ligase to generate either mono- or polyubiquitinated products. This method demonstrated for the first time that the BRCA1/BARD1 E3 can interact with 10 different E2 enzymes. Interestingly, the interaction with multiple E2 enzymes displayed unique ubiquitin-transfer properties, a feature expected to be common among other RING and U-box E3s. Further characterization of new E3 ligases and the E2 enzymes that interact with them will greatly enhance our understanding of ubiquitin transfer and facilitate studies of roles of ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like proteins in protein processing and trafficking. Stein et al., in the second minireview, describe recent progress in defining the binding specificity of different peptide-binding domains. The authors clearly point out that transient peptide interactions mediated by both post-translational modifications and disordered regions ensure a high level of specificity. They postulate that a regulatory code may dictate the number of combinations of domains and post-translational modifications needed to achieve the required level of interaction specificity. Moreover, recognition alone is not enough to obtain a stable complex, especially in a complex cellular environment. Increasing

  20. Preparation of Modified Films with Protein from Grouper Fish.

    PubMed

    Valdivia-López, M A; Tecante, A; Granados-Navarrete, S; Martínez-García, C

    2016-01-01

    A protein concentrate (PC) was obtained from Grouper fish skin and it was used to prepare films with different amounts of sorbitol and glycerol as plasticizers. The best performing films regarding resistance were then modified with various concentrations of CaCl2, CaSO4 (calcium salts), and glucono-δ-lactone (GDL) with the purpose of improving their mechanical and barrier properties. These films were characterized by determining their mechanical properties and permeability to water vapor and oxygen. Formulations with 5% (w/v) protein and 75% sorbitol and 4% (w/v) protein with a mixture of 15% glycerol and 15% sorbitol produced adequate films. Calcium salts and GDL increased the tensile fracture stress but reduced the fracture strain and decreased water vapor permeability compared with control films. The films prepared represent an attractive alternative for being used as food packaging materials. PMID:27597950

  1. Preparation of Modified Films with Protein from Grouper Fish

    PubMed Central

    Tecante, A.; Granados-Navarrete, S.; Martínez-García, C.

    2016-01-01

    A protein concentrate (PC) was obtained from Grouper fish skin and it was used to prepare films with different amounts of sorbitol and glycerol as plasticizers. The best performing films regarding resistance were then modified with various concentrations of CaCl2, CaSO4 (calcium salts), and glucono-δ-lactone (GDL) with the purpose of improving their mechanical and barrier properties. These films were characterized by determining their mechanical properties and permeability to water vapor and oxygen. Formulations with 5% (w/v) protein and 75% sorbitol and 4% (w/v) protein with a mixture of 15% glycerol and 15% sorbitol produced adequate films. Calcium salts and GDL increased the tensile fracture stress but reduced the fracture strain and decreased water vapor permeability compared with control films. The films prepared represent an attractive alternative for being used as food packaging materials. PMID:27597950

  2. Tuning of protein-surfactant interaction to modify the resultant structure.

    PubMed

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2015-09-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering and dynamic light scattering studies have been carried out to examine the interaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein with different surfactants under varying solution conditions. We show that the interaction of anionic BSA protein (pH7) with surfactant and the resultant structure are strongly modified by the charge head group of the surfactant, ionic strength of the solution, and mixed surfactants. The protein-surfactant interaction is maximum when two components are oppositely charged, followed by components being similarly charged through the site-specific binding, and no interaction in the case of a nonionic surfactant. This interaction of protein with ionic surfactants is characterized by the fractal structure representing a bead-necklace structure of micellelike clusters adsorbed along the unfolded protein chain. The interaction is enhanced with ionic strength only in the case of site-specific binding of an anionic surfactant with an anionic protein, whereas it is almost unchanged for other complexes of cationic and nonionic surfactants with anionic proteins. Interestingly, the interaction of BSA protein with ionic surfactants is significantly suppressed in the presence of nonionic surfactant. These results with mixed surfactants thus can be used to fold back the unfolded protein as well as to prevent surfactant-induced protein unfolding. For different solution conditions, the results are interpreted in terms of a change in fractal dimension, the overall size of the protein-surfactant complex, and the number of micelles attached to the protein. The interplay of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions is found to govern the resultant structure of complexes. PMID:26465504

  3. Tuning of protein-surfactant interaction to modify the resultant structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K.; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2015-09-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering and dynamic light scattering studies have been carried out to examine the interaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein with different surfactants under varying solution conditions. We show that the interaction of anionic BSA protein (p H 7 ) with surfactant and the resultant structure are strongly modified by the charge head group of the surfactant, ionic strength of the solution, and mixed surfactants. The protein-surfactant interaction is maximum when two components are oppositely charged, followed by components being similarly charged through the site-specific binding, and no interaction in the case of a nonionic surfactant. This interaction of protein with ionic surfactants is characterized by the fractal structure representing a bead-necklace structure of micellelike clusters adsorbed along the unfolded protein chain. The interaction is enhanced with ionic strength only in the case of site-specific binding of an anionic surfactant with an anionic protein, whereas it is almost unchanged for other complexes of cationic and nonionic surfactants with anionic proteins. Interestingly, the interaction of BSA protein with ionic surfactants is significantly suppressed in the presence of nonionic surfactant. These results with mixed surfactants thus can be used to fold back the unfolded protein as well as to prevent surfactant-induced protein unfolding. For different solution conditions, the results are interpreted in terms of a change in fractal dimension, the overall size of the protein-surfactant complex, and the number of micelles attached to the protein. The interplay of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions is found to govern the resultant structure of complexes.

  4. Radiolysis of DNA-protein complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Běgusová, Marie; Gillard, Nathalie; Sy, Denise; Castaing, Bertrand; Charlier, Michel; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie

    2005-02-01

    We discuss here modifications of DNA and protein radiolysis due to the interaction of these two partners in specific complexes. Experimental patterns of frank strand breaks (FSB) and alkali revealed breaks (ARB) obtained for DNA lac operator bound to the lac repressor and for a DNA containing an abasic site analog bound to the formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase are reported. Experimental data are compared to predicted damage distribution obtained using the theoretical model RADACK.

  5. 40 CFR 721.10089 - Modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Modified salicylic acid, zirconium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10089 Modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (PMN P-00-552) is subject to reporting under...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10089 - Modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Modified salicylic acid, zirconium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10089 Modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (PMN P-00-552) is subject to reporting under...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10089 - Modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Modified salicylic acid, zirconium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10089 Modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (PMN P-00-552) is subject to reporting under...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10089 - Modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified salicylic acid, zirconium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10089 Modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (PMN P-00-552) is subject to reporting under...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10089 - Modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Modified salicylic acid, zirconium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10089 Modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (PMN P-00-552) is subject to reporting under...

  10. PCDq: human protein complex database with quality index which summarizes different levels of evidences of protein complexes predicted from H-Invitational protein-protein interactions integrative dataset

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Proteins interact with other proteins or biomolecules in complexes to perform cellular functions. Existing protein-protein interaction (PPI) databases and protein complex databases for human proteins are not organized to provide protein complex information or facilitate the discovery of novel subunits. Data integration of PPIs focused specifically on protein complexes, subunits, and their functions. Predicted candidate complexes or subunits are also important for experimental biologists. Description Based on integrated PPI data and literature, we have developed a human protein complex database with a complex quality index (PCDq), which includes both known and predicted complexes and subunits. We integrated six PPI data (BIND, DIP, MINT, HPRD, IntAct, and GNP_Y2H), and predicted human protein complexes by finding densely connected regions in the PPI networks. They were curated with the literature so that missing proteins were complemented and some complexes were merged, resulting in 1,264 complexes comprising 9,268 proteins with 32,198 PPIs. The evidence level of each subunit was assigned as a categorical variable. This indicated whether it was a known subunit, and a specific function was inferable from sequence or network analysis. To summarize the categories of all the subunits in a complex, we devised a complex quality index (CQI) and assigned it to each complex. We examined the proportion of consistency of Gene Ontology (GO) terms among protein subunits of a complex. Next, we compared the expression profiles of the corresponding genes and found that many proteins in larger complexes tend to be expressed cooperatively at the transcript level. The proportion of duplicated genes in a complex was evaluated. Finally, we identified 78 hypothetical proteins that were annotated as subunits of 82 complexes, which included known complexes. Of these hypothetical proteins, after our prediction had been made, four were reported to be actual subunits of the

  11. Modified Scaled Hierarchical Equation of Motion Approach for the Study of Quantum Coherence in Photosynthetic Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J.; Kais, S.; Rebentrost, P.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2011-02-17

    We present a detailed theoretical study of the transfer of electronic excitation energy through the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) pigment-protein complex, using the newly developed modified scaled hierarchical approach (Shi, Q.; et al. J. Chem. Phys.2009, 130, 084105). We show that this approach is computationally more efficient than the original hierarchical approach. The modified approach reduces the truncation levels of the auxiliary density operators and the correlation function. We provide a systematic study of how the number of auxiliary density operators and the higher-order correlation functions affect the exciton dynamics. The time scales of the coherent beating are consistent with experimental observations. Furthermore, our theoretical results exhibit population beating at physiological temperature. Additionally, the method does not require a low-temperature correction to obtain the correct thermal equilibrium at long times.

  12. Interaction of receptor-activity-modifying protein1 with tubulin.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Thomas H; Mueller-Steiner, Sarah; Schwerdtfeger, Kerstin; Kleinert, Peter; Troxler, Heinz; Kelm, Jens M; Ittner, Lars M; Fischer, Jan A; Born, Walter

    2007-08-01

    Receptor-activity-modifying protein (RAMP) 1 is an accessory protein of the G protein-coupled calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR). The CLR/RAMP1 heterodimer defines a receptor for the potent vasodilatory calcitonin gene-related peptide. A wider tissue distribution of RAMP1, as compared to that of the CLR, is consistent with additional biological functions. Here, glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down, coimmunoprecipitation and yeast two-hybrid experiments identified beta-tubulin as a novel RAMP1-interacting protein. GST pull-down experiments indicated interactions between the N- and C-terminal domains of RAMP1 and beta-tubulin. Yeast two-hybrid experiments confirmed the interaction between the N-terminal region of RAMP1 and beta-tubulin. Interestingly, alpha-tubulin was co-extracted with beta-tubulin in pull-down experiments and immunoprecipitation of RAMP1 coprecipitated alpha- and beta-tubulin. Confocal microscopy indicated colocalization of RAMP1 and tubulin predominantly in axon-like processes of neuronal differentiated human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. In conclusion, the findings point to biological roles of RAMP1 beyond its established interaction with G protein-coupled receptors. PMID:17493758

  13. Modeling and fitting protein-protein complexes to predict change of binding energy

    PubMed Central

    Dourado, Daniel F.A.R.; Flores, Samuel Coulbourn

    2016-01-01

    It is possible to accurately and economically predict change in protein-protein interaction energy upon mutation (ΔΔG), when a high-resolution structure of the complex is available. This is of growing usefulness for design of high-affinity or otherwise modified binding proteins for therapeutic, diagnostic, industrial, and basic science applications. Recently the field has begun to pursue ΔΔG prediction for homology modeled complexes, but so far this has worked mostly for cases of high sequence identity. If the interacting proteins have been crystallized in free (uncomplexed) form, in a majority of cases it is possible to find a structurally similar complex which can be used as the basis for template-based modeling. We describe how to use MMB to create such models, and then use them to predict ΔΔG, using a dataset consisting of free target structures, co-crystallized template complexes with sequence identify with respect to the targets as low as 44%, and experimental ΔΔG measurements. We obtain similar results by fitting to a low-resolution Cryo-EM density map. Results suggest that other structural constraints may lead to a similar outcome, making the method even more broadly applicable. PMID:27173910

  14. Mapping energy transfer channels in fucoxanthin-chlorophyll protein complex.

    PubMed

    Gelzinis, Andrius; Butkus, Vytautas; Songaila, Egidijus; Augulis, Ramūnas; Gall, Andrew; Büchel, Claudia; Robert, Bruno; Abramavicius, Darius; Zigmantas, Donatas; Valkunas, Leonas

    2015-02-01

    Fucoxanthin-chlorophyll protein (FCP) is the key molecular complex performing the light-harvesting function in diatoms, which, being a major group of algae, are responsible for up to one quarter of the total primary production on Earth. These photosynthetic organisms contain an unusually large amount of the carotenoid fucoxanthin, which absorbs the light in the blue-green spectral region and transfers the captured excitation energy to the FCP-bound chlorophylls. Due to the large number of fucoxanthins, the excitation energy transfer cascades in these complexes are particularly tangled. In this work we present the two-color two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy experiments on FCP. Analysis of the data using the modified decay associated spectra permits a detailed mapping of the excitation frequency dependent energy transfer flow with a femtosecond time resolution. PMID:25445318

  15. A Least Square Method Based Model for Identifying Protein Complexes in Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Qiguo; Guo, Maozu; Guo, Yingjie; Liu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yang; Teng, Zhixia

    2014-01-01

    Protein complex formed by a group of physical interacting proteins plays a crucial role in cell activities. Great effort has been made to computationally identify protein complexes from protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. However, the accuracy of the prediction is still far from being satisfactory, because the topological structures of protein complexes in the PPI network are too complicated. This paper proposes a novel optimization framework to detect complexes from PPI network, named PLSMC. The method is on the basis of the fact that if two proteins are in a common complex, they are likely to be interacting. PLSMC employs this relation to determine complexes by a penalized least squares method. PLSMC is applied to several public yeast PPI networks, and compared with several state-of-the-art methods. The results indicate that PLSMC outperforms other methods. In particular, complexes predicted by PLSMC can match known complexes with a higher accuracy than other methods. Furthermore, the predicted complexes have high functional homogeneity. PMID:25405206

  16. Quality Control of a Cytoplasmic Protein Complex

    PubMed Central

    Scazzari, Mario; Amm, Ingo; Wolf, Dieter H.

    2015-01-01

    For the assembly of protein complexes in the cell, the presence of stoichiometric amounts of the respective protein subunits is of utmost importance. A surplus of any of the subunits may trigger unspecific and harmful protein interactions and has to be avoided. A stoichiometric amount of subunits must finally be reached via transcriptional, translational, and/or post-translational regulation. Synthesis of saturated 16 and 18 carbon fatty acids is carried out by fatty acid synthase: in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a 2.6-MDa molecular mass assembly containing six protomers each of two different subunits, Fas1 (β) and Fas2 (α). The (α)6(β)6 complex carries six copies of all eight enzymatic activities required for fatty acid synthesis. The FAS1 and FAS2 genes in yeast are unlinked and map on two different chromosomes. Here we study the fate of the α-subunit of the complex, Fas2, when its partner, the β-subunit Fas1, is absent. Individual subunits of fatty acid synthase are proteolytically degraded when the respective partner is missing. Elimination of Fas2 is achieved by the proteasome. Here we show that a ubiquitin transfer machinery is required for Fas2 elimination. The major ubiquitin ligase targeting the superfluous Fas2 subunit to the proteasome is Ubr1. The ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes Ubc2 and Ubc4 assist the degradation process. The AAA-ATPase Cdc48 and the Hsp70 chaperone Ssa1 are crucially involved in the elimination of Fas2. PMID:25564609

  17. Antitumor cell-complex vaccines employing genetically modified tumor cells and fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Antonio; Herrero, María José; Sendra, Luis; Botella, Rafael; Diaz, Ana; Algás, Rosa; Aliño, Salvador F

    2014-02-01

    The present study evaluates the immune response mediated by vaccination with cell complexes composed of irradiated B16 tumor cells and mouse fibroblasts genetically modified to produce GM-CSF. The animals were vaccinated with free B16 cells or cell complexes. We employed two gene plasmid constructions: one high producer (pMok) and a low producer (p2F). Tumor transplant was performed by injection of B16 tumor cells. Plasma levels of total IgG and its subtypes were measured by ELISA. Tumor volumes were measured and survival curves were obtained. The study resulted in a cell complex vaccine able to stimulate the immune system to produce specific anti-tumor membrane proteins (TMP) IgG. In the groups vaccinated with cells transfected with the low producer plasmid, IgG production was higher when we used free B16 cell rather than cell complexes. Nonspecific autoimmune response caused by cell complex was not greater than that induced by the tumor cells alone. Groups vaccinated with B16 transfected with low producer plasmid reached a tumor growth delay of 92% (p ≤ 0.01). When vaccinated with cell complex, the best group was that transfected with high producer plasmid, reaching a tumor growth inhibition of 56% (p ≤ 0.05). Significant survival (40%) was only observed in the groups vaccinated with free transfected B16 cells. PMID:24556729

  18. Antitumor Cell-Complex Vaccines Employing Genetically Modified Tumor Cells and Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Miguel, Antonio; Herrero, María José; Sendra, Luis; Botella, Rafael; Diaz, Ana; Algás, Rosa; Aliño, Salvador F.

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluates the immune response mediated by vaccination with cell complexes composed of irradiated B16 tumor cells and mouse fibroblasts genetically modified to produce GM-CSF. The animals were vaccinated with free B16 cells or cell complexes. We employed two gene plasmid constructions: one high producer (pMok) and a low producer (p2F). Tumor transplant was performed by injection of B16 tumor cells. Plasma levels of total IgG and its subtypes were measured by ELISA. Tumor volumes were measured and survival curves were obtained. The study resulted in a cell complex vaccine able to stimulate the immune system to produce specific anti-tumor membrane proteins (TMP) IgG. In the groups vaccinated with cells transfected with the low producer plasmid, IgG production was higher when we used free B16 cell rather than cell complexes. Nonspecific autoimmune response caused by cell complex was not greater than that induced by the tumor cells alone. Groups vaccinated with B16 transfected with low producer plasmid reached a tumor growth delay of 92% (p ≤ 0.01). When vaccinated with cell complex, the best group was that transfected with high producer plasmid, reaching a tumor growth inhibition of 56% (p ≤ 0.05). Significant survival (40%) was only observed in the groups vaccinated with free transfected B16 cells. PMID:24556729

  19. Intensity of anxiety is modified via complex integrative stress circuitries.

    PubMed

    Smith, Justin P; Prince, Melissa A; Achua, Justin K; Robertson, James M; Anderson, Raymond T; Ronan, Patrick J; Summers, Cliff H

    2016-01-01

    Escalation of anxious behavior while environmentally and socially relevant contextual events amplify the intensity of emotional response produces a testable gradient of anxiety shaped by integrative circuitries. Apprehension of the Stress-Alternatives Model apparatus (SAM) oval open field (OF) is measured by the active latency to escape, and is delayed by unfamiliarity with the passageway. Familiar OF escape is the least anxious behavior along the continuum, which can be reduced by anxiolytics such as icv neuropeptide S (NPS). Social aggression increases anxiousness in the SAM, reducing the number of mice willing to escape by 50%. The apprehension accompanying escape during social aggression is diminished by anxiolytics, such as exercise and corticotropin releasing-factor receptor 1 (CRF1) antagonism, but exacerbated by anxiogenic treatment, like antagonism of α2-adrenoreceptors. What is more, the anxiolytic CRF1 and anxiogenic α2-adrenoreceptor antagonists also modify behavioral phenotypes, with CRF1 antagonism allowing escape by previously submissive animals, and α2-adrenoreceptor antagonism hindering escape in mice that previously engaged in it. Gene expression of NPS and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the central amygdala (CeA), as well as corticosterone secretion, increased concomitantly with the escalating anxious content of the mouse-specific anxiety continuum. The general trend of CeA NPS and BDNF expression suggested that NPS production was promoted by increasing anxiousness, and that BDNF synthesis was associated with learning about ever-more anxious conditions. The intensity gradient for anxious behavior resulting from varying contextual conditions may yield an improved conceptualization of the complexity of mechanisms producing the natural continuum of human anxious conditions, and potential therapies that arise therefrom. PMID:26555428

  20. Probing protein complexes inside living cells using a silicon nanowire-based pull-down assay.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sojoong; Kim, Hyunju; Kim, So Yeon; Yang, Eun Gyeong

    2016-06-01

    Most proteins perform their functions as interacting complexes. Here we propose a novel method for capturing an intracellular protein and its interacting partner out of living cells by utilizing intracellular access of antibody modified vertical silicon nanowire arrays whose surface is covered with a polyethylene glycol layer to prevent strong cell adhesion. Such a feature facilitates the removal of cells by simple washing, enabling subsequent detection of a pulled-down protein and its interacting partner, and further assessment of a drug-induced change in the interacting complex. Our new SiNW-based tool is thus suitable for authentication of protein networks inside living cells. PMID:27198202

  1. [Protein assay by the modified Dumas method applied to preparations of plasma proteins].

    PubMed

    Blondel, P; Vian, L

    1993-01-01

    Quantify protein according Pharmacopoeia method, based on Kjeldahl method, needs a long time to do. The development of an automaton which used the modified Dumas method divide the analysis time by 15 (6 minutes versus over 90 minutes). The results show no statistical differences between official method and this one. PMID:8154798

  2. GalaxyRefineComplex: Refinement of protein-protein complex model structures driven by interface repacking.

    PubMed

    Heo, Lim; Lee, Hasup; Seok, Chaok

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein docking methods have been widely used to gain an atomic-level understanding of protein interactions. However, docking methods that employ low-resolution energy functions are popular because of computational efficiency. Low-resolution docking tends to generate protein complex structures that are not fully optimized. GalaxyRefineComplex takes such low-resolution docking structures and refines them to improve model accuracy in terms of both interface contact and inter-protein orientation. This refinement method allows flexibility at the protein interface and in the overall docking structure to capture conformational changes that occur upon binding. Symmetric refinement is also provided for symmetric homo-complexes. This method was validated by refining models produced by available docking programs, including ZDOCK and M-ZDOCK, and was successfully applied to CAPRI targets in a blind fashion. An example of using the refinement method with an existing docking method for ligand binding mode prediction of a drug target is also presented. A web server that implements the method is freely available at http://galaxy.seoklab.org/refinecomplex. PMID:27535582

  3. GalaxyRefineComplex: Refinement of protein-protein complex model structures driven by interface repacking

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Lim; Lee, Hasup; Seok, Chaok

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein docking methods have been widely used to gain an atomic-level understanding of protein interactions. However, docking methods that employ low-resolution energy functions are popular because of computational efficiency. Low-resolution docking tends to generate protein complex structures that are not fully optimized. GalaxyRefineComplex takes such low-resolution docking structures and refines them to improve model accuracy in terms of both interface contact and inter-protein orientation. This refinement method allows flexibility at the protein interface and in the overall docking structure to capture conformational changes that occur upon binding. Symmetric refinement is also provided for symmetric homo-complexes. This method was validated by refining models produced by available docking programs, including ZDOCK and M-ZDOCK, and was successfully applied to CAPRI targets in a blind fashion. An example of using the refinement method with an existing docking method for ligand binding mode prediction of a drug target is also presented. A web server that implements the method is freely available at http://galaxy.seoklab.org/refinecomplex. PMID:27535582

  4. Probing nanoparticle effect in protein-surfactant complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2015-06-01

    SANS experiments have been carried to probe the role of anionic silica nanoparticles in the anionic BSA protein-cationic DTAB surfactant complexes. In protein-surfactant complex, surfactant molecules aggregate to form micelle-like clusters along the unfolded polypeptide chains of the protein. The nanoparticle aggregation mediated by oppositely charged protein-surfactant complex coexists with the free protein-surfactant complexes in the nanoparticle-protein-surfactant system. There is rearrangement of micelles in adsorbed protein-surfactant complex on nanoparticles in leading to their (nanoparticle) aggregation. On the other hand, the unfolding of protein in free protein-surfactant complex is found to be significantly enhanced in presence of nanoparticles.

  5. Polyethyleneimine-modified graphene oxide nanocomposites for effective protein functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Yejing; Jiang, Bo; Yang, Kaiguang; Sui, Zhigang; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2015-08-01

    A facile method to prepare a biocompatible graphene oxide (GO)-based substrate for protein immobilization was developed to overcome the drawbacks of GO, such as the strong electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions which could potentially alter the conformation and biological activity of proteins. The GO was coated with hydrophilic branched polyethyleneimine (BPEI), while Concanavalin A (Con A) as a model lectin protein was employed to fabricate the functionalized composites to evaluate the feasibility of this strategy. The composites exhibit an extremely high binding capacity for glycoproteins (i.e. IgG 538.3 mg g-1), which are superior to other immobilized materials. Moreover, they can work well in 500-fold non-glycoprotein interference and even in complex biological samples. All these data suggest that the GO@BPEI composites will have great potential as scaffolds for proteins fully exerting their biofunctions.A facile method to prepare a biocompatible graphene oxide (GO)-based substrate for protein immobilization was developed to overcome the drawbacks of GO, such as the strong electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions which could potentially alter the conformation and biological activity of proteins. The GO was coated with hydrophilic branched polyethyleneimine (BPEI), while Concanavalin A (Con A) as a model lectin protein was employed to fabricate the functionalized composites to evaluate the feasibility of this strategy. The composites exhibit an extremely high binding capacity for glycoproteins (i.e. IgG 538.3 mg g-1), which are superior to other immobilized materials. Moreover, they can work well in 500-fold non-glycoprotein interference and even in complex biological samples. All these data suggest that the GO@BPEI composites will have great potential as scaffolds for proteins fully exerting their biofunctions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Cell viability assay, enrichment of standard glycoprotein, pretreatment and analysis of real

  6. Identifying protein interactions with metal-modified DNA using microarray technology.

    PubMed

    Stansfield, Hope E; Kulczewski, Bethany P; Lybrand, Kyle E; Jamieson, Elizabeth R

    2009-02-01

    Protein microarrays have been used extensively to identify protein-protein interactions; however, this technology has not been widely applied to protein-DNA interactions. In particular, this work demonstrates the utility of this technique for rapidly identifying interactions of proteins with metal-modified DNA. Protein macroarray experiments were carried out with high mobility group protein 1 (HMG-1) and cisplatin- and chromium-modified 50-mer oligonucleotides to demonstrate "proof of principle." Commercially available protein microarrays containing many different classes of human proteins were then employed to search for additional interactions with cisplatin-modified DNA. The results of the microarray experiments confirmed some known interactions and, more importantly, identified many novel protein interactions, demonstrating the utility of this method as a rapid, high-throughput technique to discover proteins that interact with metal-modified DNA. PMID:18936984

  7. Characterization of Protein Complexes and Subcomplexes in Protein-Protein Interaction Databases

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Nazar; Mohamed, Elfadil A.; Mora, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The identification and characterization of protein complexes implicated in protein-protein interaction data are crucial to the understanding of the molecular events under normal and abnormal physiological conditions. This paper provides a novel characterization of subcomplexes in protein interaction databases, stressing definition and representation issues, quantification, biological validation, network metrics, motifs, modularity, and gene ontology (GO) terms. The paper introduces the concept of “nested group” as a way to represent subcomplexes and estimates that around 15% of those nested group with the higher Jaccard index may be a result of data artifacts in protein interaction databases, while a number of them can be found in biologically important modular structures or dynamic structures. We also found that network centralities, enrichment in essential proteins, GO terms related to regulation, imperfect 5-clique motifs, and higher GO homogeneity can be used to identify proteins in nested complexes. PMID:25722891

  8. Identification and analysis of multi-protein complexes in placenta.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuqiang; Wang, Ling; Xu, Zhiyang; Liang, Gaolin

    2013-01-01

    Placental malfunction induces pregnancy disorders which contribute to life-threatening complications for both the mother and the fetus. Identification and characterization of placental multi-protein complexes is an important step to integratedly understand the protein-protein interaction networks in placenta which determine placental function. In this study, blue native/sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN/SDS-PAGE) and Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) were used to screen the multi-protein complexes in placenta. 733 unique proteins and 34 known and novel heterooligomeric multi-protein complexes including mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes, integrin complexes, proteasome complexes, histone complex, and heat shock protein complexes were identified. A novel protein complex, which involves clathrin and small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channel protein 2, was identified and validated by antibody based gel shift assay, co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence staining. These results suggest that BN/SDS-PAGE, when integrated with LC-MS/MS, is a very powerful and versatile tool for the investigation of placental protein complexes. This work paves the way for deeper functional characterization of the placental protein complexes associated with pregnancy disorders. PMID:23638173

  9. Active Site Structure and Peroxidase Activity of Oxidatively Modified Cytochrome c Species in Complexes with Cardiolipin.

    PubMed

    Capdevila, Daiana A; Oviedo Rouco, Santiago; Tomasina, Florencia; Tortora, Verónica; Demicheli, Verónica; Radi, Rafael; Murgida, Daniel H

    2015-12-29

    We report a resonance Raman and UV-vis characterization of the active site structure of oxidatively modified forms of cytochrome c (Cyt-c) free in solution and in complexes with cardiolipin (CL). The studied post-translational modifications of Cyt-c include methionine sulfoxidation and tyrosine nitration, which lead to altered heme axial ligation and increased peroxidase activity with respect to those of the wild-type protein. In spite of the structural and activity differences between the protein variants free in solution, binding to CL liposomes induces in all cases the formation of a spectroscopically identical bis-His axial coordination conformer that more efficiently promotes lipid peroxidation. The spectroscopic results indicate that the bis-His form is in equilibrium with small amounts of high-spin species, thus suggesting a labile distal His ligand as the basis for the CL-induced increase in enzymatic activity observed for all protein variants. For Cyt-c nitrated at Tyr74 and sulfoxidized at Met80, the measured apparent binding affinities for CL are ∼4 times larger than for wild-type Cyt-c. On the basis of these results, we propose that these post-translational modifications may amplify the pro-apoptotic signal of Cyt-c under oxidative stress conditions at CL concentrations lower than for the unmodified protein. PMID:26620444

  10. HKC: an algorithm to predict protein complexes in protein-protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaomin; Wang, Zhengzhi; Ye, Jun

    2011-01-01

    With the availability of more and more genome-scale protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks, research interests gradually shift to Systematic Analysis on these large data sets. A key topic is to predict protein complexes in PPI networks by identifying clusters that are densely connected within themselves but sparsely connected with the rest of the network. In this paper, we present a new topology-based algorithm, HKC, to detect protein complexes in genome-scale PPI networks. HKC mainly uses the concepts of highest k-core and cohesion to predict protein complexes by identifying overlapping clusters. The experiments on two data sets and two benchmarks show that our algorithm has relatively high F-measure and exhibits better performance compared with some other methods. PMID:22174556

  11. Engineering of complex protein sialylation in plants.

    PubMed

    Kallolimath, Somanath; Castilho, Alexandra; Strasser, Richard; Grünwald-Gruber, Clemens; Altmann, Friedrich; Strubl, Sebastian; Galuska, Christina Elisabeth; Zlatina, Kristina; Galuska, Sebastian Peter; Werner, Stefan; Thiesler, Hauke; Werneburg, Sebastian; Hildebrandt, Herbert; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Steinkellner, Herta

    2016-08-23

    Sialic acids (Sias) are abundant terminal modifications of protein-linked glycans. A unique feature of Sia, compared with other monosaccharides, is the formation of linear homo-polymers, with its most complex form polysialic acid (polySia). Sia and polySia mediate diverse biological functions and have great potential for therapeutic use. However, technological hurdles in producing defined protein sialylation due to the enormous structural diversity render their precise investigation a challenge. Here, we describe a plant-based expression platform that enables the controlled in vivo synthesis of sialylated structures with different interlinkages and degree of polymerization (DP). The approach relies on a combination of stably transformed plants with transient expression modules. By the introduction of multigene vectors carrying the human sialylation pathway into glycosylation-destructed mutants, transgenic plants that sialylate glycoproteins in α2,6- or α2,3-linkage were generated. Moreover, by the transient coexpression of human α2,8-polysialyltransferases, polySia structures with a DP >40 were synthesized in these plants. Importantly, plant-derived polySia are functionally active, as demonstrated by a cell-based cytotoxicity assay and inhibition of microglia activation. This pathway engineering approach enables experimental investigations of defined sialylation and facilitates a rational design of glycan structures with optimized biotechnological functions. PMID:27444013

  12. Engineering of complex protein sialylation in plants

    PubMed Central

    Kallolimath, Somanath; Castilho, Alexandra; Strasser, Richard; Grünwald-Gruber, Clemens; Altmann, Friedrich; Strubl, Sebastian; Galuska, Christina Elisabeth; Zlatina, Kristina; Galuska, Sebastian Peter; Werner, Stefan; Thiesler, Hauke; Werneburg, Sebastian; Hildebrandt, Herbert; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Steinkellner, Herta

    2016-01-01

    Sialic acids (Sias) are abundant terminal modifications of protein-linked glycans. A unique feature of Sia, compared with other monosaccharides, is the formation of linear homo-polymers, with its most complex form polysialic acid (polySia). Sia and polySia mediate diverse biological functions and have great potential for therapeutic use. However, technological hurdles in producing defined protein sialylation due to the enormous structural diversity render their precise investigation a challenge. Here, we describe a plant-based expression platform that enables the controlled in vivo synthesis of sialylated structures with different interlinkages and degree of polymerization (DP). The approach relies on a combination of stably transformed plants with transient expression modules. By the introduction of multigene vectors carrying the human sialylation pathway into glycosylation-destructed mutants, transgenic plants that sialylate glycoproteins in α2,6- or α2,3-linkage were generated. Moreover, by the transient coexpression of human α2,8-polysialyltransferases, polySia structures with a DP >40 were synthesized in these plants. Importantly, plant-derived polySia are functionally active, as demonstrated by a cell-based cytotoxicity assay and inhibition of microglia activation. This pathway engineering approach enables experimental investigations of defined sialylation and facilitates a rational design of glycan structures with optimized biotechnological functions. PMID:27444013

  13. Detecting Overlapping Protein Complexes by Rough-Fuzzy Clustering in Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Gao, Lin; Dong, Jihua; Yang, Xiaofei

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel rough-fuzzy clustering (RFC) method to detect overlapping protein complexes in protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. RFC focuses on fuzzy relation model rather than graph model by integrating fuzzy sets and rough sets, employs the upper and lower approximations of rough sets to deal with overlapping complexes, and calculates the number of complexes automatically. Fuzzy relation between proteins is established and then transformed into fuzzy equivalence relation. Non-overlapping complexes correspond to equivalence classes satisfying certain equivalence relation. To obtain overlapping complexes, we calculate the similarity between one protein and each complex, and then determine whether the protein belongs to one or multiple complexes by computing the ratio of each similarity to maximum similarity. To validate RFC quantitatively, we test it in Gavin, Collins, Krogan and BioGRID datasets. Experiment results show that there is a good correspondence to reference complexes in MIPS and SGD databases. Then we compare RFC with several previous methods, including ClusterONE, CMC, MCL, GCE, OSLOM and CFinder. Results show the precision, sensitivity and separation are 32.4%, 42.9% and 81.9% higher than mean of the five methods in four weighted networks, and are 0.5%, 11.2% and 66.1% higher than mean of the six methods in five unweighted networks. Our method RFC works well for protein complexes detection and provides a new insight of network division, and it can also be applied to identify overlapping community structure in social networks and LFR benchmark networks. PMID:24642838

  14. Detecting overlapping protein complexes by rough-fuzzy clustering in protein-protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Gao, Lin; Dong, Jihua; Yang, Xiaofei

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel rough-fuzzy clustering (RFC) method to detect overlapping protein complexes in protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. RFC focuses on fuzzy relation model rather than graph model by integrating fuzzy sets and rough sets, employs the upper and lower approximations of rough sets to deal with overlapping complexes, and calculates the number of complexes automatically. Fuzzy relation between proteins is established and then transformed into fuzzy equivalence relation. Non-overlapping complexes correspond to equivalence classes satisfying certain equivalence relation. To obtain overlapping complexes, we calculate the similarity between one protein and each complex, and then determine whether the protein belongs to one or multiple complexes by computing the ratio of each similarity to maximum similarity. To validate RFC quantitatively, we test it in Gavin, Collins, Krogan and BioGRID datasets. Experiment results show that there is a good correspondence to reference complexes in MIPS and SGD databases. Then we compare RFC with several previous methods, including ClusterONE, CMC, MCL, GCE, OSLOM and CFinder. Results show the precision, sensitivity and separation are 32.4%, 42.9% and 81.9% higher than mean of the five methods in four weighted networks, and are 0.5%, 11.2% and 66.1% higher than mean of the six methods in five unweighted networks. Our method RFC works well for protein complexes detection and provides a new insight of network division, and it can also be applied to identify overlapping community structure in social networks and LFR benchmark networks. PMID:24642838

  15. Regulation of Vaccinia Virus E3 Protein by Small Ubiquitin-Like Modifier Proteins ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    González-Santamaría, José; Campagna, Michela; García, María Angel; Marcos-Villar, Laura; González, Dolores; Gallego, Pedro; Lopitz-Otsoa, Fernando; Guerra, Susana; Rodríguez, Manuel S.; Esteban, Mariano; Rivas, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    The vaccinia virus (VACV) E3 protein is essential for virulence and has antiapoptotic activity and the ability to impair the host innate immune response. Here we demonstrate that E3 interacts with SUMO1 through a small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-interacting motif (SIM). SIM integrity is required for maintaining the stability of the viral protein and for the covalent conjugation of E3 to SUMO1 or SUMO2, a modification that has a negative effect on the E3 transcriptional transactivation of the p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) and APAF-1 genes. We also demonstrate that E3 is ubiquitinated, a modification that does not destabilize the wild-type protein but triggers the degradation of an E3-ΔSIM mutant. This report constitutes the first demonstration of the important roles that both SUMO and ubiquitin play in the regulation of the VACV protein E3. PMID:21957283

  16. Interaction graph mining for protein complexes using local clique merging.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Li; Tan, Soon-Heng; Foo, Chuan-Sheng; Ng, See-Kiong

    2005-01-01

    While recent technological advances have made available large datasets of experimentally-detected pairwise protein-protein interactions, there is still a lack of experimentally-determined protein complex data. To make up for this lack of protein complex data, we explore the mining of existing protein interaction graphs for protein complexes. This paper proposes a novel graph mining algorithm to detect the dense neighborhoods (highly connected regions) in an interaction graph which may correspond to protein complexes. Our algorithm first locates local cliques for each graph vertex (protein) and then merge the detected local cliques according to their affinity to form maximal dense regions. We present experimental results with yeast protein interaction data to demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed method. Compared with other existing techniques, our predicted complexes can match or overlap significantly better with the known protein complexes in the MIPS benchmark database. Novel protein complexes were also predicted to help biologists in their search for new protein complexes. PMID:16901108

  17. Probing protein complexes inside living cells using a silicon nanowire-based pull-down assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sojoong; Kim, Hyunju; Kim, So Yeon; Yang, Eun Gyeong

    2016-06-01

    Most proteins perform their functions as interacting complexes. Here we propose a novel method for capturing an intracellular protein and its interacting partner out of living cells by utilizing intracellular access of antibody modified vertical silicon nanowire arrays whose surface is covered with a polyethylene glycol layer to prevent strong cell adhesion. Such a feature facilitates the removal of cells by simple washing, enabling subsequent detection of a pulled-down protein and its interacting partner, and further assessment of a drug-induced change in the interacting complex. Our new SiNW-based tool is thus suitable for authentication of protein networks inside living cells.Most proteins perform their functions as interacting complexes. Here we propose a novel method for capturing an intracellular protein and its interacting partner out of living cells by utilizing intracellular access of antibody modified vertical silicon nanowire arrays whose surface is covered with a polyethylene glycol layer to prevent strong cell adhesion. Such a feature facilitates the removal of cells by simple washing, enabling subsequent detection of a pulled-down protein and its interacting partner, and further assessment of a drug-induced change in the interacting complex. Our new SiNW-based tool is thus suitable for authentication of protein networks inside living cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials, experimental methods and Fig. S1-S8. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00171h

  18. PROSTAGLANDIN E2 MODIFIES SMAD2 AND PROMOTES SMAD2-SMAD4 COMPLEX FORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chen; Chen, Chen; Sorokin, Andrey

    2014-01-01

    We report that PGE2 promotes Smad2-Smad4 complex formation and this phenomenon could be blocked by DIDS, an anion transporter inhibitor. Our data suggest that PGE2 had no effects on Smad2 phosphorylation, suggesting that PGE2-mediated Smad2-Smad4 complex formation is independent of TGF-β signaling and that PGE2 induced Smad2 modification which is different from TGF-β-mediated phosphorylation. We demonstrate that in primary human glomerular mesangial cells PGE2 caused modification of Smad2 as detected by Smad2N antibody, raised against a peptide near the N-terminus of Smad2. We hypothesize that Smad2 protein is post-translationaly modified by PGE2. Direct evidence of Smad2 modification by PGE2 was achieved by avidin pulldown assay which showed that endogenous Smad2 and recombinant Smad2 protein were attached by biotin-labeled PGE2. Taken together, our results provided evidence that post-translational modification of Smad2 could be a mechanism for the action of PGE2 in the pathogenesis of human pathologies. PMID:24613014

  19. Magnetic Resonance Access to Transiently Formed Protein Complexes**

    PubMed Central

    Sára, Tomáš; Schwarz, Thomas C; Kurzbach, Dennis; Wunderlich, Christoph H; Kreutz, Christoph; Konrat, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions are of utmost importance to an understanding of biological phenomena since non-covalent and therefore reversible couplings between basic proteins leads to the formation of complex regulatory and adaptive molecular systems. Such systems are capable of maintaining their integrity and respond to external stimuli, processes intimately related to living organisms. These interactions, however, span a wide range of dissociation constants, from sub-nanomolar affinities in tight complexes to high-micromolar or even millimolar affinities in weak, transiently formed protein complexes. Herein, we demonstrate how novel NMR and EPR techniques can be used for the characterization of weak protein–protein (ligand) complexes. Applications to intrinsically disordered proteins and transiently formed protein complexes illustrate the potential of these novel techniques to study hitherto unobserved (and unobservable) higher-order structures of proteins. PMID:25050230

  20. Chemoselective small molecules that covalently modify one lysine in a non-enzyme protein in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Sungwook; Connelly, Stephen; Reixach, Natàlia; Wilson, Ian A.; Kelly, Jeffery W.

    2010-02-19

    A small molecule that could bind selectively to and then react chemoselectively with a non-enzyme protein in a complex biological fluid, such as blood, could have numerous practical applications. Herein, we report a family of designed stilbenes that selectively and covalently modify the prominent plasma protein transthyretin in preference to more than 4,000 other human plasma proteins. They react chemoselectively with only one of eight lysine {epsilon}-amino groups within transthyretin. The crystal structure confirms the expected binding orientation of the stilbene substructure and the anticipated conjugating amide bond. These covalent transthyretin kinetic stabilizers exhibit superior amyloid inhibition potency compared to their noncovalent counterparts, and they prevent cytotoxicity associated with amyloidogenesis. Though there are a few prodrugs that, upon metabolic activation, react with a cysteine residue inactivating a specific non-enzyme, we are unaware of designed small molecules that react with one lysine {epsilon}-amine within a specific non-enzyme protein in a complex biological fluid.

  1. Structural Basis for Receptor Activity-Modifying Protein-Dependent Selective Peptide Recognition by a G Protein-Coupled Receptor.

    PubMed

    Booe, Jason M; Walker, Christopher S; Barwell, James; Kuteyi, Gabriel; Simms, John; Jamaluddin, Muhammad A; Warner, Margaret L; Bill, Roslyn M; Harris, Paul W; Brimble, Margaret A; Poyner, David R; Hay, Debbie L; Pioszak, Augen A

    2015-06-18

    Association of receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMP1-3) with the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) enables selective recognition of the peptides calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and adrenomedullin (AM) that have diverse functions in the cardiovascular and lymphatic systems. How peptides selectively bind GPCR:RAMP complexes is unknown. We report crystal structures of CGRP analog-bound CLR:RAMP1 and AM-bound CLR:RAMP2 extracellular domain heterodimers at 2.5 and 1.8 Å resolutions, respectively. The peptides similarly occupy a shared binding site on CLR with conformations characterized by a β-turn structure near their C termini rather than the α-helical structure common to peptides that bind related GPCRs. The RAMPs augment the binding site with distinct contacts to the variable C-terminal peptide residues and elicit subtly different CLR conformations. The structures and accompanying pharmacology data reveal how a class of accessory membrane proteins modulate ligand binding of a GPCR and may inform drug development targeting CLR:RAMP complexes. PMID:25982113

  2. Structural Basis for Receptor Activity-Modifying Protein-Dependent Selective Peptide Recognition by a G Protein-Coupled Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Booe, Jason M.; Walker, Christopher S.; Barwell, James; Kuteyi, Gabriel; Simms, John; Jamaluddin, Muhammad A.; Warner, Margaret L.; Bill, Roslyn M.; Harris, Paul W.; Brimble, Margaret A.; Poyner, David R.; Hay, Debbie L.; Pioszak, Augen A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Association of receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMP1-3) with the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) enables selective recognition of the peptides calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and adrenomedullin (AM) that have diverse functions in the cardiovascular and lymphatic systems. How peptides selectively bind GPCR:RAMP complexes is unknown. We report crystal structures of CGRP analog-bound CLR:RAMP1 and AM-bound CLR:RAMP2 extracellular domain heterodimers at 2.5 and 1.8 Å resolutions, respectively. The peptides similarly occupy a shared binding site on CLR with conformations characterized by a β-turn structure near their C termini rather than the α-helical structure common to peptides that bind related GPCRs. The RAMPs augment the binding site with distinct contacts to the variable C-terminal peptide residues and elicit subtly different CLR conformations. The structures and accompanying pharmacology data reveal how a class of accessory membrane proteins modulate ligand binding of a GPCR and may inform drug development targeting CLR:RAMP complexes. PMID:25982113

  3. An overview of the structures of protein-DNA complexes

    PubMed Central

    Luscombe, Nicholas M; Austin, Susan E; Berman , Helen M; Thornton, Janet M

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of a structural analysis of 240 protein-DNA complexes contained in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), we have classified the DNA-binding proteins involved into eight different structural/functional groups, which are further classified into 54 structural families. Here we present this classification and review the functions, structures and binding interactions of these protein-DNA complexes. PMID:11104519

  4. Wrap-and-Strip Technology of Protein-Polyelectrolyte Complex for Biomedical Application.

    PubMed

    Shiraki, Kentaro; Kurinomaru, Takaaki; Tomita, Shunsuke

    2016-01-01

    A polyelectrolyte is a polymer composed of repeating units of an electrolyte group that enables reversible complex formation with proteins in aqueous solutions. This review introduces "wrap-and-strip" technology of protein-polyelectrolyte complex (PPC) by noncovalent interaction. Storage: protein is stabilized against physical and chemical stresses. Enrichment: precipitation through PPC can be used as an enrichment method without irreversible unfolding. Catalytic activity switch: a complementary charged pair of polyelectrolytes functions as a reversible enzyme activity switch. Hyperactivation: a specific combination of a polyelectrolyte and substrate enhances enzyme activity by one order of magnitude compared with an enzyme alone. Stabilization: PPC increases protein stability against chemical and physical stresses, such as covalently modified polyethylene glycosylated protein. Simple PPC-based technology can expand the applicable fields of soluble proteins in aqueous solutions. PMID:26630921

  5. Modified electronic population analysis for transition-metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Noell, J.O.

    1982-01-01

    A modification to the Mulliken electronic population analysis designed primarily for use on transition-metal systems is presented. All terms arising from the metal basis functions including diagonal terms are repartioned between the metal and the ligands. This reapportionment is an attempt to reflect more accurately the actual electron density in well-defined areas of space, which characterize the metal and the ligand. This modified analysis appears to yield more reasonable charge assignments than a conventional Mulliken analysis. The cost of the analysis is negligible in comparison with that of calculating the wave function.

  6. The multifaceted roles of intrinsic disorder in protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2015-09-14

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDPRs) are important constituents of many protein complexes, playing various structural, functional, and regulatory roles. In such disorder-based protein complexes, functional disorder is used both internally (for assembly, movement, and functional regulation of the different parts of a given complex) and externally (for interactions of a complex with its external regulators). In complex assembly, IDPs/IDPRs serve as the molecular glue that cements complexes or as highly flexible scaffolds. Disorder defines the order of complex assembly and the ability of a protein to be involved in polyvalent interactions. It is at the heart of various binding mechanisms and interaction modes ascribed to IDPs. Disorder in protein complexes is related to multifarious applications of induced folding and induced functional unfolding, or defines the entropic chain activities, such as stochastic machines and binding rheostats. This review opens a FEBS Letters Special Issue on Dynamics, Flexibility, and Intrinsic Disorder in protein assemblies and represents a brief overview of intricate roles played by IDPs and IDPRs in various aspects of protein complexes. PMID:26073257

  7. Novel Cul3 binding proteins function to remodel E3 ligase complexes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cullins belong to a family of scaffold proteins that assemble multi-subunit ubiquitin ligase complexes to recruit protein substrates for ubiquitination via unique sets of substrate adaptor, such as Skp1 or Elongin B, and a substrate-binding protein with a conserved protein-protein interacting domain, such as leucine-rich repeats (LRR), a WD40 domain, or a zinc-finger domain. In the case of the Cullin3 (Cul3), it forms a BTB-Cul3-Rbx1 (BCR) ubiquitin ligase complex where it is believed that a BTB domain-containing protein performs dual functions where it serves as both the substrate adaptor and the substrate recognition protein. Results Tandem affinity purification and LC/MS-MS analysis of the BCR complex led to the identification of 10,225 peptides. After the SEQUEST algorithm and CDART program were used for protein identification and domain prediction, we discovered a group of Cul3-bound proteins that contain either the LRR or WD40 domain (CLWs). Further biochemical analysis revealed that the LRR domain-containing CLWs could bind both Cul3 and BTB domain-containing proteins. The dual binding role for the LRR domain-containing CLWs results in causing the BTB-domain protein to become a substrate instead of an adaptor. To further distinguish potential substrates from other components that are part of the BCR ubiquitin ligase complex, we altered the parameters in the SEQUEST algorithm to select for peptide fragments with a modified lysine residue. This method not only identifies the potential substrates of the BCR ubiquitin ligase complex, but it also pinpoints the lysine residue in which the post-translational modification occurs. Interestingly, none of the CLWs were identified by this method, supporting our hypothesis that CLWs were not potential substrates but rather additional components of the BCR ubiquitin ligase complex. Conclusion Our study identified a new set of Cul3-binding proteins known as CLWs via tandem affinity purification and LC

  8. Chlorophyll-Protein Complexes of the Cyanophyte, Nostoc sp. 1

    PubMed Central

    Rusckowski, Mary; Zilinskas, Barbara A.

    1980-01-01

    Four chlorophyll-protein complexes have been resolved from the cyanophyte, Nostoc sp., by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at 4 C. Complexes solubilized by SDS from Spinacia oleracea were run for comparison. As has been well documented, the P700-chlorophyll a-protein complex from the higher plant and blue-green algal samples are similar, and the light-harvesting pigment protein complex is present only in the former. Most noteworthy are two closely migrating chlorophyll proteins in Nostoc sp. which have approximately the same mobility as a single chlorophyll-protein band resolvable from spinach. The absorption maximum of the complex from spinach is at 667 nanometers, and those of the two complexes from Nostoc sp. are at 667 and 669 nanometers; the fluorescence emission maximum at −196 C is at 685 nanometers, and the 735 nanometer fluorescence peak, characteristic of the P700-chlorophyll a-protein complex, is absent. The apoproteins of these new complexes from Nostoc sp. and spinach are in the kilodalton range. It appears that at least one of these two chlorophyll-protein complexes from Nostoc sp. compares with those recently described by others from higher plants and green algae as likely photosystem II complexes, perhaps containing P680, although no photochemical data are yet available. Images PMID:16661198

  9. Hysteresis as a Marker for Complex, Overlapping Landscapes in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Benjamin T.; Capraro, Dominique T.; Sulkowska, Joanna I.; Onuchic, José N.; Jennings, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Topologically complex proteins fold by multiple routes as a result of hard-to-fold regions of the proteins. Oftentimes these regions are introduced into the protein scaffold for function and increase frustration in the otherwise smooth-funneled landscape. Interestingly, while functional regions add complexity to folding landscapes, they may also contribute to a unique behavior referred to as hysteresis. While hysteresis is predicted to be rare, it is observed in various proteins, including proteins containing a unique peptide cyclization to form a fluorescent chromophore as well as proteins containing a knotted topology in their native fold. Here, hysteresis is demonstrated to be a consequence of the decoupling of unfolding events from the isomerization or hula-twist of a chromophore in one protein and the untying of the knot in a second protein system. The question now is- can hysteresis be a marker for the interplay of landscapes where complex folding and functional regions overlap? PMID:23525263

  10. Advances in protein complex analysis using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gingras, Anne-Claude; Aebersold, Ruedi; Raught, Brian

    2005-02-15

    Proteins often function as components of larger complexes to perform a specific function, and formation of these complexes may be regulated. For example, intracellular signalling events often require transient and/or regulated protein-protein interactions for propagation, and protein binding to a specific DNA sequence, RNA molecule or metabolite is often regulated to modulate a particular cellular function. Thus, characterizing protein complexes can offer important insights into protein function. This review describes recent important advances in mass spectrometry (MS)-based techniques for the analysis of protein complexes. Following brief descriptions of how proteins are identified using MS, and general protein complex purification approaches, we address two of the most important issues in these types of studies: specificity and background protein contaminants. Two basic strategies for increasing specificity and decreasing background are presented: whereas (1) tandem affinity purification (TAP) of tagged proteins of interest can dramatically improve the signal-to-noise ratio via the generation of cleaner samples, (2) stable isotopic labelling of proteins may be used to discriminate between contaminants and bona fide binding partners using quantitative MS techniques. Examples, as well as advantages and disadvantages of each approach, are presented. PMID:15611014

  11. Mesoscale assembly of chemically modified graphene into complex cellular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barg, Suelen; Perez, Felipe Macul; Ni, Na; Do Vale Pereira, Paula; Maher, Robert C.; Garcia-Tuñon, Esther; Eslava, Salvador; Agnoli, Stefano; Mattevi, Cecilia; Saiz, Eduardo

    2014-07-01

    The widespread technological introduction of graphene beyond electronics rests on our ability to assemble this two-dimensional building block into three-dimensional structures for practical devices. To achieve this goal we need fabrication approaches that are able to provide an accurate control of chemistry and architecture from nano to macroscopic levels. Here, we describe a versatile technique to build ultralight (density ≥1 mg cm-3) cellular networks based on the use of soft templates and the controlled segregation of chemically modified graphene to liquid interfaces. These novel structures can be tuned for excellent conductivity; versatile mechanical response (elastic-brittle to elastomeric, reversible deformation, high energy absorption) and organic absorption capabilities (above 600 g per gram of material). The approach can be used to uncover the basic principles that will guide the design of practical devices that by combining unique mechanical and functional performance will generate new technological opportunities.

  12. Mesoscale assembly of chemically modified graphene into complex cellular networks

    PubMed Central

    Barg, Suelen; Perez, Felipe Macul; Ni, Na; do Vale Pereira, Paula; Maher, Robert C.; Garcia-Tuñon, Esther; Eslava, Salvador; Agnoli, Stefano; Mattevi, Cecilia; Saiz, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The widespread technological introduction of graphene beyond electronics rests on our ability to assemble this two-dimensional building block into three-dimensional structures for practical devices. To achieve this goal we need fabrication approaches that are able to provide an accurate control of chemistry and architecture from nano to macroscopic levels. Here, we describe a versatile technique to build ultralight (density ≥1 mg cm−3) cellular networks based on the use of soft templates and the controlled segregation of chemically modified graphene to liquid interfaces. These novel structures can be tuned for excellent conductivity; versatile mechanical response (elastic-brittle to elastomeric, reversible deformation, high energy absorption) and organic absorption capabilities (above 600 g per gram of material). The approach can be used to uncover the basic principles that will guide the design of practical devices that by combining unique mechanical and functional performance will generate new technological opportunities. PMID:24999766

  13. Protein-protein binding affinities by pulse proteolysis: application to TEM-1/BLIP protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Hanes, Melinda S; Ratcliff, Kathleen; Marqusee, Susan; Handel, Tracy M

    2010-10-01

    Efficient methods for quantifying dissociation constants have become increasingly important for high-throughput mutagenesis studies in the postgenomic era. However, experimentally determining binding affinity is often laborious, requires large amounts of purified protein, and utilizes specialized equipment. Recently, pulse proteolysis has been shown to be a robust and simple method to determine the dissociation constants for a protein-ligand pair based on the increase in thermodynamic stability upon ligand binding. Here, we extend this technique to determine binding affinities for a protein-protein complex involving the β-lactamase TEM-1 and various β-lactamase inhibitor protein (BLIP) mutants. Interaction with BLIP results in an increase in the denaturation curve midpoint, C(m), of TEM-1, which correlates with the rank order of binding affinities for several BLIP mutants. Hence, pulse proteolysis is a simple, effective method to assay for mutations that modulate binding affinity in protein-protein complexes. From a small set (n = 4) of TEM-1/BLIP mutant complexes, a linear relationship between energy of stabilization (dissociation constant) and ΔC(m) was observed. From this "calibration curve," accurate dissociation constants for two additional BLIP mutants were calculated directly from proteolysis-derived ΔC(m) values. Therefore, in addition to qualitative information, armed with knowledge of the dissociation constants from the WT protein and a limited number of mutants, accurate quantitation of binding affinities can be determined for additional mutants from pulse proteolysis. Minimal sample requirements and the suitability of impure protein preparations are important advantages that make pulse proteolysis a powerful tool for high-throughput mutagenesis binding studies. PMID:20669180

  14. Global landscape of protein complexes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Krogan, Nevan J; Cagney, Gerard; Yu, Haiyuan; Zhong, Gouqing; Guo, Xinghua; Ignatchenko, Alexandr; Li, Joyce; Pu, Shuye; Datta, Nira; Tikuisis, Aaron P; Punna, Thanuja; Peregrín-Alvarez, José M; Shales, Michael; Zhang, Xin; Davey, Michael; Robinson, Mark D; Paccanaro, Alberto; Bray, James E; Sheung, Anthony; Beattie, Bryan; Richards, Dawn P; Canadien, Veronica; Lalev, Atanas; Mena, Frank; Wong, Peter; Starostine, Andrei; Canete, Myra M; Vlasblom, James; Wu, Samuel; Orsi, Chris; Collins, Sean R; Chandran, Shamanta; Haw, Robin; Rilstone, Jennifer J; Gandi, Kiran; Thompson, Natalie J; Musso, Gabe; St Onge, Peter; Ghanny, Shaun; Lam, Mandy H Y; Butland, Gareth; Altaf-Ul, Amin M; Kanaya, Shigehiko; Shilatifard, Ali; O'Shea, Erin; Weissman, Jonathan S; Ingles, C James; Hughes, Timothy R; Parkinson, John; Gerstein, Mark; Wodak, Shoshana J; Emili, Andrew; Greenblatt, Jack F

    2006-03-30

    Identification of protein-protein interactions often provides insight into protein function, and many cellular processes are performed by stable protein complexes. We used tandem affinity purification to process 4,562 different tagged proteins of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Each preparation was analysed by both matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to increase coverage and accuracy. Machine learning was used to integrate the mass spectrometry scores and assign probabilities to the protein-protein interactions. Among 4,087 different proteins identified with high confidence by mass spectrometry from 2,357 successful purifications, our core data set (median precision of 0.69) comprises 7,123 protein-protein interactions involving 2,708 proteins. A Markov clustering algorithm organized these interactions into 547 protein complexes averaging 4.9 subunits per complex, about half of them absent from the MIPS database, as well as 429 additional interactions between pairs of complexes. The data (all of which are available online) will help future studies on individual proteins as well as functional genomics and systems biology. PMID:16554755

  15. Profiling of Protein Interaction Networks of Protein Complexes Using Affinity Purification and Quantitative Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Kaake, Robyn M.; Wang, Xiaorong; Huang, Lan

    2010-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are important for nearly all biological processes, and it is known that aberrant protein-protein interactions can lead to human disease and cancer. Recent evidence has suggested that protein interaction interfaces describe a new class of attractive targets for drug development. Full characterization of protein interaction networks of protein complexes and their dynamics in response to various cellular cues will provide essential information for us to understand how protein complexes work together in cells to maintain cell viability and normal homeostasis. Affinity purification coupled with quantitative mass spectrometry has become the primary method for studying in vivo protein interactions of protein complexes and whole organism proteomes. Recent developments in sample preparation and affinity purification strategies allow the capture, identification, and quantification of protein interactions of protein complexes that are stable, dynamic, transient, and/or weak. Current efforts have mainly focused on generating reliable, reproducible, and high confidence protein interaction data sets for functional characterization. The availability of increasing amounts of information on protein interactions in eukaryotic systems and new bioinformatics tools allow functional analysis of quantitative protein interaction data to unravel the biological significance of the identified protein interactions. Existing studies in this area have laid a solid foundation toward generating a complete map of in vivo protein interaction networks of protein complexes in cells or tissues. PMID:20445003

  16. Design and characterization of complex protein films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Holt P.

    Once a biomaterial is implanted into biological system, a layer of protein is immediately deposited on the surface of that material. The newly formed protein film will dictate how the implanted material will interact with the surrounding biological environment and lead to either the acceptance or rejection of the biomaterial. One method to enhance performance involves the activation the surface of the biomaterial with one or more proteins to direct specific interactions with the host environment. The focus of my dissertation was to develop and characterize model biomaterials surfaces that are activated with one or more proteins to help understand how the protein films may affect biological processes and a biomaterial's performance. One model system consisted of a patterned film of two proteins on a gold surface. Characterization of this protein pattern indicated that patterning protein films with a focused ion beam produced protein patterns with high biological contrast and high spatial control. The second model protein film involved the adsorption of fibronectin on surfaces with different surface energies. The characterization of the adsorbed fibronectin films suggest that fibronectin adsorbed on a hydrophilic surface is in an orientation that projects hydrophilic amino acid residues towards surface of the protein and dehydration causes reorientation to project hydrophobic amino acids towards the surface. In contrast, fibronectin is adsorbed onto a hydrophobic surface in a manner that resulted in dehydration and denaturation during the adsorption process. The last model protein film studied in this work consisted of fibronectin patterned in a manner so that the film consisted of spatially controlled domains of fibronectin adsorbed onto a hydrophilic surface as well as a hydrophobic surface. Lateral characterization of this pattern demonstrated a difference in secondary structure of fibronectin adsorbed on the two domains with varying surface energies.

  17. Multi-LZerD: Multiple protein docking for asymmetric complexes

    PubMed Central

    Esquivel-Rodríguez, Juan; Yang, Yifeng David; Kihara, Daisuke

    2012-01-01

    The tertiary structures of protein complexes provide a crucial insight about the molecular mechanisms that regulate their functions and assembly. However, solving protein complex structures by experimental methods is often more difficult than single protein structures. Here, we have developed a novel computational multiple protein docking algorithm, Multi-LZerD, that builds models of multimeric complexes by effectively reusing pairwise docking predictions of component proteins. A genetic algorithm is applied to explore the conformational space followed by a structure refinement procedure. Benchmark on eleven hetero-multimeric complexes resulted in near native conformations for all but one of them (a root mean square deviation smaller than 2.5Å). We also show that our method copes with unbound docking cases well, outperforming the methodology that can be directly compared to our approach. Multi-LZerD was able to predict near native structures for multimeric complexes of various topologies. PMID:22488467

  18. Principles of assembly reveal a periodic table of protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Ahnert, Sebastian E; Marsh, Joseph A; Hernández, Helena; Robinson, Carol V; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2015-12-11

    Structural insights into protein complexes have had a broad impact on our understanding of biological function and evolution. In this work, we sought a comprehensive understanding of the general principles underlying quaternary structure organization in protein complexes. We first examined the fundamental steps by which protein complexes can assemble, using experimental and structure-based characterization of assembly pathways. Most assembly transitions can be classified into three basic types, which can then be used to exhaustively enumerate a large set of possible quaternary structure topologies. These topologies, which include the vast majority of observed protein complex structures, enable a natural organization of protein complexes into a periodic table. On the basis of this table, we can accurately predict the expected frequencies of quaternary structure topologies, including those not yet observed. These results have important implications for quaternary structure prediction, modeling, and engineering. PMID:26659058

  19. LINC complex proteins in cardiac structure, function, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Stroud, Matthew J; Banerjee, Indroneal; Lowe, Jennifer; Chen, Ju

    2014-01-01

    The LINC (LInker of Nucleoskeleton and Cytoskeleton) complex, composed of proteins within the inner and the outer nuclear membranes, connects the nuclear lamina to the cytoskeleton. The importance of this complex has been highlighted by the discovery of mutations in genes encoding LINC complex proteins, which are causative for skeletal or cardiac myopathies. Herein, this review summarizes structure, function, and interactions of major components of the LINC complex, highlights how mutations in these proteins may lead to cardiac disease, and outlines future challenges in the field. PMID:24481844

  20. Physicochemical properties of protein-modified silver nanoparticles in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Hangyue

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the physicochemical properties of silver nanoparticles stabilized with casein protein in seawater. UV?vis spectrometry, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were applied to measure the stability of silver nanoparticles in seawater samples. The obtained results show an increased aggregation tendency of silver nanoparticles in seawater, which could be attributed its relatively high cation concentration that could neutralize the negatively charges adsorbed on the surface of silver nanoparticles and reduce the electrostatic repulsion forces between nanoparticles. Similarly, due to the surface charge screening process, the zeta potential of silver nanoparticles in seawater decreased. This observation further supported the aggregation behavior of silver nanoparticles. This study also investigated the dissolution of silver nanoparticles in seawater. Result shows that the silver nanoparticle dissolution in DI water is lower than in seawater, which is attributed to the high Cl? concentration present in seawater. As Cl? can react with silver and form soluble AgCl complex, dissolution of silver nanoparticles was enhanced. Finally, this study demonstrated that silver nanoparticles are destabilized in seawater condition. These results may be helpful in understanding the environmental risk of discharged silver nanoparticles in seawater conditions.

  1. Multiscale Model for the Assembly Kinetics of Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhong-Ru; Chen, Jiawen; Wu, Yinghao

    2016-02-01

    The assembly of proteins into high-order complexes is a general mechanism for these biomolecules to implement their versatile functions in cells. Natural evolution has developed various assembling pathways for specific protein complexes to maintain their stability and proper activities. Previous studies have provided numerous examples of the misassembly of protein complexes leading to severe biological consequences. Although the research focusing on protein complexes has started to move beyond the static representation of quaternary structures to the dynamic aspect of their assembly, the current understanding of the assembly mechanism of protein complexes is still largely limited. To tackle this problem, we developed a new multiscale modeling framework. This framework combines a lower-resolution rigid-body-based simulation with a higher-resolution Cα-based simulation method so that protein complexes can be assembled with both structural details and computational efficiency. We applied this model to a homotrimer and a heterotetramer as simple test systems. Consistent with experimental observations, our simulations indicated very different kinetics between protein oligomerization and dimerization. The formation of protein oligomers is a multistep process that is much slower than dimerization but thermodynamically more stable. Moreover, we showed that even the same protein quaternary structure can have very diverse assembly pathways under different binding constants between subunits, which is important for regulating the functions of protein complexes. Finally, we revealed that the binding between subunits in a complex can be synergistically strengthened during assembly without considering allosteric regulation or conformational changes. Therefore, our model provides a useful tool to understand the general principles of protein complex assembly. PMID:26738810

  2. SnapShot: SMC Protein Complexes Part II.

    PubMed

    Haering, Christian H; Gruber, Stephan

    2016-02-11

    This second of two SnapShots on SMC proteins depicts their roles at different stages of the eukaryotic cell cycle. The composition and architecture of SMC protein complexes and their regulators appear in SMC Protein Complexes Part I (available at http://www.cell.com/cell/pdf/S0092-8674%2815%2901690-6.pdf). To view this SnapShot, open or download the PDF. PMID:26871638

  3. Alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex-dependent succinylation of proteins in neurons and neuronal cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Gary E; Xu, Hui; Chen, Huan-Lian; Chen, Wei; Denton, Travis T; Zhang, Sheng

    2015-07-01

    Reversible post-translation modifications of proteins are common in all cells and appear to regulate many processes. Nevertheless, the enzyme(s) responsible for the alterations and the significance of the modification are largely unknown. Succinylation of proteins occurs and causes large changes in the structure of proteins; however, the source of the succinyl groups, the targets, and the consequences of these modifications on other proteins remain unknown. These studies focused on succinylation of mitochondrial proteins. The results demonstrate that the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) can serve as a trans-succinylase that mediates succinylation in an α-ketoglutarate-dependent manner. Inhibition of KGDHC reduced succinylation of both cytosolic and mitochondrial proteins in cultured neurons and in a neuronal cell line. Purified KGDHC can succinylate multiple proteins including other enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle leading to modification of their activity. Inhibition of KGDHC also modifies acetylation by modifying the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. The much greater effectiveness of KGDHC than succinyl-CoA suggests that the catalysis owing to the E2k succinyltransferase is important. Succinylation appears to be a major signaling system and it can be mediated by KGDHC. Reversible post-translation modifications of proteins are common and may regulate many processes. Succinylation of proteins occurs and causes large changes in the structure of proteins. However, the source of the succinyl groups, the targets, and the consequences of these modifications on other proteins remains unknown. The results demonstrate that the mitochondrial α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) can succinylate multiple mitochondrial proteins and alter their function. Succinylation appears to be a major signaling system and it can be mediated by KGDHC. PMID:25772995

  4. Metal adsorption and desorption characteristics of surfactant-modified clay complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Malakul, P.; Srinivasan, K.R.; Wang, H.Y.

    1998-11-01

    Several modified clays have been designed and created for selective removal and recovery of heavy metals such as Cd, Cu, Cr, etc. These surfactant-clay complexes were prepared using hectorite or montmorillonite as the base clay. A simple two-step approach has been developed to synthesize these modified-clay complexes through ion exchange and hydrophobic anchoring of several surfactants such as long-chain alkyldiamines, long-chain dialkylamines, and long-chain carboxylic acids onto the clay matrices. The adsorption capacities and affinity constants of the modified clays can be found to approach those of commercial chelating resin (Chelex 100, Bio-Rad). Using cadmium as a model metal and montmorillonite-cetylbenzyldimethylammonium-palmitic acid (M-CBDA-PA) as a model modified-clay complex, the maximum adsorption capacity of the modified clay is found to be 42 {+-} 0.8 mg/g of clay and the affinity constant is 3.0 {+-} 0.1 mg/L. The metal adsorption has been shown to be mainly through chemical complexation rather than ion exchange. The immobilization of the metal ions is pH dependent, and thus, pH can act as a molecular switch to regenerate the modified-clay complexes.

  5. Exposing the subunit diversity within protein complexes: a mass spectrometry approach.

    PubMed

    Rozen, Shelly; Tieri, Alessandra; Ridner, Gabriela; Stark, Ann-Kathrin; Schmaler, Tilo; Ben-Nissan, Gili; Dubiel, Wolfgang; Sharon, Michal

    2013-03-01

    Identifying the list of subunits that make up protein complexes constitutes an important step towards understanding their biological functions. However, such knowledge alone does not reveal the full complexity of protein assemblies, as each subunit can take on multiple forms. Proteins can be post-translationally modified or cleaved, multiple products of alternative splicing can exist, and a single subunit may be encoded by more than one gene. Thus, for a complete description of a protein complex, it is necessary to expose the diversity of its subunits. Adding this layer of information is an important step towards understanding the mechanisms that regulate the activity of protein assemblies. Here, we describe a mass spectrometry-based approach that exposes the array of protein variants that comprise protein complexes. Our method relies on denaturing the protein complex, and separating its constituent subunits on a monolithic column prepared in-house. Following the subunit elution from the column, the flow is split into two fractions, using a Triversa NanoMate robot. One fraction is directed straight into an on-line ESI-QToF mass spectrometer for intact protein mass measurements, while the rest of the flow is fractionated into a 96-well plate for subsequent proteomic analysis. The heterogeneity of subunit composition is then exposed by correlating the subunit sequence identity with the accurate mass. Below, we describe in detail the methodological setting of this approach, its application on the endogenous human COP9 signalosome complex, and the significance of the method for structural mass spectrometry analysis of intact protein complexes. PMID:23296018

  6. Modified spontaneous emissions of europium complex in weak PMMA opals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Song, Hongwei; Bai, Xue; Liu, Qiong; Zhu, Yongsheng

    2011-10-28

    Engineering spontaneous emission by means of photonic crystals (PHC) is under extensive study. However PHC modification of line emissions of rare earth (RE) ions has not been thoroughly understood, especially in cases of weak opal PHCs and while emitters are well dispersed into dielectric media. In this study, poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) opal PHCs containing uniformly dispersed europium chelate were fabricated with finely controlled photonic stop band (PSB) positions. Measurements of luminescent dynamics and angle resolved/integrated emission spectra as well as numerical calculations of total densities of states (DOS) were performed. We determined that in weak opals, the total spontaneous emission rate (SER) of Σ(5)D(0)-(7)F(J) for Eu(3+) was independent of PSB positions but was higher than that of the disordered powder sample, which was attributed to higher effective refractive indices in the PHC rather than PSB effect. Branch SER of (5)D(0)-(7)F(2) for Eu(3+) in the PHCs, on the other hand, was spatially redistributed, suppressed or enhanced in directions of elevated or reduced optical modes, keeping the angle-integrated total unchanged. All the results are in agreement with total DOS approximation. Our paper addressed two unstudied issues regarding modified narrow line emission in weak opal PHCs: firstly whether PSB could change the SER of emitters and whether there exist, apart from PSB, other reasons to change SERs; secondly, while directional enhancement and suppression by PSB has been confirmed, whether the angle-integrated overall effect is enhancing or suppressing. PMID:21938288

  7. Immersion freezing of ice nucleating active protein complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, S.; Augustin, S.; Clauss, T.; Voigtländer, J.; Niedermeier, D.; Wex, H.; Stratmann, F.

    2012-08-01

    Biological particles, e.g. bacteria and their Ice Nucleating Active (INA) protein complexes, might play an important role for the ice formation in atmospheric mixed-phase clouds. Therefore, the immersion freezing behavior of INA protein complexes generated from a SnomaxTM solution/suspension was investigated as function of temperature in a range of -5 °C to -38 °C at the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS). The immersion freezing of droplets containing small numbers of INA protein complexes occurs in a temperature range of -7 °C and -10 °C. The experiments performed in the lower temperature range, where all droplets freeze which contain at least one INA protein complex, are used to determine the average number of INA protein complexes present, assuming that the INA protein complexes are Poisson distributed over the droplet ensemble. Knowing the average number of INA protein complexes, the heterogeneous ice nucleation rate and rate coefficient of a single INA protein complex is determined by using the newly-developed CHESS model (stoCHastic model of idEntical poiSSon distributed ice nuclei). Therefore, we assume the ice nucleation process to be of stochastic nature, and a parameterization of the INA protein complex's nucleation rate. Analyzing the results of immersion freezing experiments from literature (SnomaxTM and Pseudomonas syringae bacteria), to results gained in this study, demonstrates that first, a similar temperature dependence of the heterogeneous ice nucleation rate for a single INA protein complex was found in all experiments, second, the shift of the ice fraction curves to higher temperatures can be explained consistently by a higher average number of INA protein complexes being present in the droplet ensemble, and finally the heterogeneous ice nucleation rate of one single INA protein complex might be also applicable for intact Pseudomonas syringae bacteria cells. The results obtained in this study allow a new perspective on the

  8. Recording information on protein complexes in an information management system

    PubMed Central

    Savitsky, Marc; Diprose, Jonathan M.; Morris, Chris; Griffiths, Susanne L.; Daniel, Edward; Lin, Bill; Daenke, Susan; Bishop, Benjamin; Siebold, Christian; Wilson, Keith S.; Blake, Richard; Stuart, David I.; Esnouf, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    The Protein Information Management System (PiMS) is a laboratory information management system (LIMS) designed for use with the production of proteins in a research environment. The software is distributed under the CCP4 licence, and so is available free of charge to academic laboratories. Like most LIMS, the underlying PiMS data model originally had no support for protein–protein complexes. To support the SPINE2-Complexes project the developers have extended PiMS to meet these requirements. The modifications to PiMS, described here, include data model changes, additional protocols, some user interface changes and functionality to detect when an experiment may have formed a complex. Example data are shown for the production of a crystal of a protein complex. Integration with SPINE2-Complexes Target Tracker application is also described. PMID:21605682

  9. Mass Spectrometry of Protein Complexes: From Origins to Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmood, Shahid; Allison, Timothy M.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2015-04-01

    Now routine is the ability to investigate soluble and membrane protein complexes in the gas phase of a mass spectrometer while preserving folded structure and ligand-binding properties. Several recent transformative developments have occurred to arrive at this point. These include advances in mass spectrometry instrumentation, particularly with respect to resolution; the ability to study intact membrane protein complexes released from detergent micelles; and the use of protein unfolding in the gas phase to obtain stability parameters. Together, these discoveries are providing unprecedented information on the compositional heterogeneity of biomacromolecules, the unfolding trajectories of multidomain proteins, and the stability imparted by ligand binding to both soluble and membrane-embedded protein complexes. We review these recent breakthroughs, highlighting the challenges that had to be overcome and the physicochemical insight that can now be gained from studying proteins and their assemblies in the gas phase.

  10. Expanding the chemical toolbox for the synthesis of large and uniquely modified proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondalapati, Somasekhar; Jbara, Muhammad; Brik, Ashraf

    2016-05-01

    Methods to prepare proteins that include a specific modification at a desired position are essential for understanding their cellular functions and physical properties in living systems. Chemical protein synthesis, which relies on the chemoselective ligation of unprotected peptides, enables the preparation of modified proteins that are not easily fabricated by other methods. In contrast to recombinant approaches, chemical synthesis can be used to prepare protein analogues such as D-proteins, which are useful in protein structure determination and the discovery of novel therapeutics. Post-translationally modifying proteins is another example where chemical protein synthesis proved itself as a powerful approach for preparing samples with high homogeneity and in workable quantities. In this Review, we discuss the basic principles of the field, focusing on novel chemoselective peptide ligation approaches such as native chemical ligation and the recent advances based on this method with a proven record of success in the synthesis of highly important protein targets.

  11. Detection and identification of protein citrullination in complex biological systems.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Kathleen W; Weerapana, Eranthie; Thompson, Paul R

    2016-02-01

    Protein citrullination is a post-translational modification of arginine that is catalyzed by the Protein Arginine Deiminase (PAD) family of enzymes. Aberrantly increased citrullination is associated with a host of inflammatory diseases and cancer and PAD inhibitors have shown remarkable efficacy in a range of diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, atherosclerosis, and ulcerative colitis. In rheumatoid arthritis, citrullinated proteins serve as key antigens for rheumatoid arthritis-associated autoantibodies. These data suggest that citrullinated proteins may serve more generally as biomarkers of specific disease states, however, the identification of citrullinated residues remains challenging due to the small 1Da mass change that occurs upon citrullination. Herein, we highlight the available techniques to identify citrullinated proteins/residues focusing on advanced MS techniques as well as chemical derivatization strategies that are currently being employed to identify citrullinated proteins as well as the specific residues modified within those proteins. PMID:26517730

  12. Proteomic comparison of etioplast and chloroplast protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Plöscher, Matthias; Reisinger, Veronika; Eichacker, Lutz A

    2011-08-12

    Angiosperms grown in darkness develop etioplasts during skotomorphogenesis. It is well known that etioplasts accumulate large quantities of protochlorophyllideoxidoreductase, are devoid of chlorophyll and are the site to assemble the photosynthetic machinery during photomorphogenesis. Proteomic investigation of the membrane protein complexes by Native PAGE, in combination with CyDye labelling and mass spectrometric analysis revealed that etioplasts and chloroplasts share a number of membrane protein complexes characteristic for electron transport, chlorophyll and protein synthesis as well as fatty acid biosynthesis. The complex regulatory function in both developmental states is discussed. PMID:21440687

  13. Alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex-dependent succinylation of proteins in neurons and neuronal cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Gary E.; Xu, Hui; Chen, Huan-Lian; Chen, Wei; Denton, Travis; Zhang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Reversible post-translation modifications of proteins are common in all cells and appear to regulate many processes. Nevertheless, the enzyme(s) responsible for the alterations and the significance of the modification are largely unknown. Succinylation of proteins occurs and causes large changes in the structure of proteins; however, the source of the succinyl groups, the targets, and the consequences of these modifications on other proteins are unknown. These studies focused on succinylation of mitochondrial proteins. The results demonstrate that the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) can serve as a trans-succinylase that mediates succinylation in an α-ketoglutarate-dependent manner. Inhibition of KGDHC reduced suc-cinylation of both cytosolic and mitochondrial proteins in cultured neurons and in a neuronal cell line. Purified KGDHC can succinylate multiple proteins including other enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle leading to modification of their activity. Inhibition of KGDHC also modifies acetylation by modifying the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. The much greater effectiveness of KGDHC than succinyl CoA suggests that the catalysis due to the E2k suc-cinyltransferase is important. Succinylation appears to be a major signaling system and it can be mediated by KGDHC. PMID:25772995

  14. Characteristics and safety assessment of intractable proteins in genetically modified crops.

    PubMed

    Bushey, Dean F; Bannon, Gary A; Delaney, Bryan F; Graser, Gerson; Hefford, Mary; Jiang, Xiaoxu; Lee, Thomas C; Madduri, Krishna M; Pariza, Michael; Privalle, Laura S; Ranjan, Rakesh; Saab-Rincon, Gloria; Schafer, Barry W; Thelen, Jay J; Zhang, John X Q; Harper, Marc S

    2014-07-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops may contain newly expressed proteins that are described as "intractable". Safety assessment of these proteins may require some adaptations to the current assessment procedures. Intractable proteins are defined here as those proteins with properties that make it extremely difficult or impossible with current methods to express in heterologous systems; isolate, purify, or concentrate; quantify (due to low levels); demonstrate biological activity; or prove equivalency with plant proteins. Five classes of intractable proteins are discussed here: (1) membrane proteins, (2) signaling proteins, (3) transcription factors, (4) N-glycosylated proteins, and (5) resistance proteins (R-proteins, plant pathogen recognition proteins that activate innate immune responses). While the basic tiered weight-of-evidence approach for assessing the safety of GM crops proposed by the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) in 2008 is applicable to intractable proteins, new or modified methods may be required. For example, the first two steps in Tier I (hazard identification) analysis, gathering of applicable history of safe use (HOSU) information and bioinformatics analysis, do not require protein isolation. The extremely low level of expression of most intractable proteins should be taken into account while assessing safety of the intractable protein in GM crops. If Tier II (hazard characterization) analyses requiring animal feeding are judged to be necessary, alternatives to feeding high doses of pure protein may be needed. These alternatives are discussed here. PMID:24662477

  15. Preparation of probe-modified RNA with 5-mercapto-UTP for analysis of protein-RNA interactions.

    PubMed Central

    He, B; Riggs, D L; Hanna, M M

    1995-01-01

    We report a modified synthesis for 5-mercapto-UTP (5-SH-UTP) and its use for analysis of protein-RNA interactions utilizing Escherichia coli and T7 RNA polymerases and yeast RNA polymerases I and III. 5-SH-UTP did not affect transcriptional pausing, Rho-independent termination or recognition of the E. coli transcription complex by NusA. RNA containing 5-SH-UMP did not crosslink to polymerase when irradiation was 302 or 337 nm. Transcription complexes containing RNA substituted with 5-SH-UMP were post-transcriptionally modified to attach a photocross-linking group to thiol-tagged nucleotides in the RNA on the surface of the polymerase of free in solution. The pKa for 5-SH-UTP was determined to be 5.6, so modification of the thiol groups in the RNA with p-azidophenacyl bromide could be carried out at pH 7. Addition of the transcription termination factor Rho, a RNA binding protein, to E. coli transcription complexes resulted in RNA crosslinking to Rho and to the beta and beta' subunits of polymerase. Using 5-SH-UTP, one can distinguish RNA binding domains on the surface of RNA polymerases or other RNA binding proteins from those buried within the protein. Images PMID:7537876

  16. Sizing Large Proteins and Protein Complexes by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Ion Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Kaddis, Catherine S.; Lomeli, Shirley H.; Yin, Sheng; Berhane, Beniam; Apostol, Marcin I.; Kickhoefer, Valerie A.; Rome, Leonard H.; Loo, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) and ion mobility with electrospray ionization (ESI) have the capability to measure and detect large noncovalent protein-ligand and protein-protein complexes. Using an ion mobility method termed GEMMA (Gas-Phase Electrophoretic Mobility Molecular Analysis), protein particles representing a range of sizes can be separated by their electrophoretic mobility in air. Highly charged particles produced from a protein complex solution using electrospray can be manipulated to produce singly charged ions which can be separated and quantified by their electrophoretic mobility. Results from ESI-GEMMA analysis from our laboratory and others were compared to other experimental and theoretically determined parameters, such as molecular mass and cryoelectron microscopy and x-ray crystal structure dimensions. There is a strong correlation between the electrophoretic mobility diameter determined from GEMMA analysis and the molecular mass for protein complexes up to 12 MDa, including the 93 kDa enolase dimer, the 480 kDa ferritin 24-mer complex, the 4.6 MDa cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV), and the 9 MDa MVP-vault assembly. ESI-GEMMA is used to differentiate a number of similarly sized vault complexes that are composed of different N-terminal protein tags on the MVP subunit. The average effective density of the proteins and protein complexes studied was 0.6 g/cm3. Moreover, there is evidence that proteins and protein complexes collapse or become more compact in the gas phase in the absence of water. PMID:17434746

  17. Simple Protein Complex Purification and Identification Method Suitable for High- throughput Mapping of Protein Interaction Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Markillie, Lye Meng; Lin, Chiann Tso; Adkins, Joshua N.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Hill, Eric A.; Hooker, Brian S.; Moore, Priscilla A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Shi, Liang; Wiley, H. S.; Kery, Vladimir

    2005-04-11

    Most of the current methods for purification and identification of protein complexes use endogenous expression of affinity tagged bait, tandem affinity tag purification of protein complexes followed by specific elution of complexes from beads, gel separation, in-gel digestion and mass spectrometric analysis of protein interactors. We propose a single affinity tag in vitro pulldown assay with denaturing elution, trypsin digestion in organic solvent and LC ESI MS/MS protein identification using SEQUEST analysis. Our method is simple, easy to scale up and automate thus suitable for high throughput mapping of protein interaction networks and functional proteomics.

  18. Protein structures in SDS micelle-protein complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, W; Song, P S

    1992-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) is used more often than any other detergent as an excellent denaturing or "unfolding" detergent. However, formation of ordered structure (alpha-helix or beta-sheet) in certain peptides is known to be induced by interaction with SDS micelles. The SDS-induced structures formed by these peptides are amphiphilic, having both a hydrophobic and a hydrophilic face. Previous work in this area has revealed that SDS induces helical folding in a wide variety of non-helical proteins. Here, we describe the interaction of several structurally unrelated proteins with SDS micelles and the correlation of these structures to helical amphiphilic regions present in the primary sequence. It is likely that the ability of native nonordered protein structures to form induced amphiphilic ordered structures is rather common. PMID:1600087

  19. PEGylated Albumin-Based Polyion Complex Micelles for Protein Delivery.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanyan; Lu, Hongxu; Chen, Fan; Callari, Manuela; Pourgholami, Mohammad; Morris, David L; Stenzel, Martina H

    2016-03-14

    An increasing amount of therapeutic agents are based on proteins. However, proteins as drug have intrinsic problems such as their low hydrolytic stability. Delivery of proteins using nanoparticles has increasingly been the focus of interest with polyion complex micelles, prepared from charged block copolymer and the oppositely charged protein, as an example of an attractive carrier for proteins. Inspired by this approach, a more biocompatible pathway has been developed here, which replaces the charged synthetic polymer with an abundant protein, such as albumin. Although bovine serum albumin (BSA) was observed to form complexes with positively charged proteins directly, the resulting protein nanoparticle were not stable and aggregated to large precipitates over the course of a day. Therefore, maleimide functionalized poly(oligo (ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (MI-POEGMEMA) (Mn = 26000 g/mol) was synthesized to generate a polymer-albumin conjugate, which was able to condense positively charged proteins, here lysozyme (Lyz) as a model. The PEGylated albumin polyion complex micelle with lysozyme led to nanoparticles between 15 and 25 nm in size depending on the BSA to Lyz ratio. The activity of the encapsulated protein was tested using Sprouty 1 (C-12; Spry1) proteins, which can act as an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor. Condensation of Spry1 with the PEGylated albumin could improve the anticancer efficacy of Spry1 against the breast cancer cells lowering the IC50 value of the protein. Furthermore, the high anticancer efficacy of the POEGMEMA-BSA/Spry1 complex micelle was verified by effectively inhibiting the growth of three-dimensional MCF-7 multicellular tumor spheroids. The PEGylated albumin complex micelle has great potential as a drug delivery vehicle for a new generation of cancer pharmaceuticals. PMID:26809948

  20. Immobilization of immunoglobulin-G-binding domain of Protein A on a gold surface modified with biotin ligase.

    PubMed

    Miyao, Hiroki; Ikeda, Yusuke; Shiraishi, Arata; Kawakami, Yuji; Sueda, Shinji

    2015-09-01

    Protein A from Staphylococcus aureus specifically binds to the Fc region of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and is widely used as a scaffold for the immobilization of IgG antibodies on solid supports. It is known that the oriented immobilization of Protein A on solid supports enhances its antibody-binding capability in comparison with immobilization in a random manner. In the current work, we developed a novel method for the oriented immobilization of the IgG-binding domain of Protein A based on the biotinylation reaction from archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii. Biotinylation from S. tokodaii has a unique property in that the enzyme, biotin protein ligase (BPL), forms a stable complex with its biotinylated substrate protein, biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP). Here, BCCP was fused to the IgG-binding domain of Protein A, and the resulting fusion protein was immobilized on the BPL-modified gold surface of the sensor chip for quartz crystal microbalance through complexation between BCCP and BPL. The layer of the IgG-binding domain prepared in this way successfully captured the antibody, and the captured antibody retained high antigen-binding capability. PMID:25998102

  1. A modified radius fractal dimension for capturing spatial complexity of a polycentric city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Tian; Zhang, Hong; Wu, Xun; Cao, Weiwei; He, Jing

    2015-12-01

    As one of the most important indexes for describing spatial complexity of urban road networks, radius fractal dimension has been proved to be useful in single-central cities. The method needs to choose a traffic hub as the center of measurement, but if the city has more than one traffic center, it will be difficult to choose a proper center and portray spatial complexity of the whole road network. The modified method proposed in this paper regards all the nodes of a network as centers of measurement and considers the whole effect of traffic centers in a polycentric city, so the modified radius fractal dimension describes the spatial complexity of a road network from an overall perspective and overcomes the problem that the traditional method relies on only one center. The experimental results show the modified radius fractal dimension is reliable, which can describe urban road networks in a new perspective.

  2. Method For Determining And Modifying Protein/Peptide Solubilty

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.

    2005-03-15

    A solubility reporter for measuring a protein's solubility in vivo or in vitro is described. The reporter, which can be used in a single living cell, gives a specific signal suitable for determining whether the cell bears a soluble version of the protein of interest. A pool of random mutants of an arbitrary protein, generated using error-prone in vitro recombination, may also be screened for more soluble versions using the reporter, and these versions may be recombined to yield variants having further-enhanced solubility. The method of the present invention includes "irrational" (random mutagenesis) methods, which do not require a priori knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of the protein of interest. Multiple sequences of mutation/genetic recombination and selection for improved solubility are demonstrated to yield versions of the protein which display enhanced solubility.

  3. Treatment of hides with tara-modified protein products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In prior research, we demonstrated that gelatin could be modified with quebracho to produce products whose physicochemical properties would enable them to be used effectively as fillers in leather processing, and that leather resulting from this treatment had improved subjective properties with litt...

  4. Protein interaction module-assisted function X (PIMAX) approach to producing challenging proteins including hyperphosphorylated tau and active CDK5/p25 kinase complex.

    PubMed

    Sui, Dexin; Xu, Xinjing; Ye, Xuemei; Liu, Mengyu; Mianecki, Maxwell; Rattanasinchai, Chotirat; Buehl, Christopher; Deng, Xiexiong; Kuo, Min-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Many biomedically critical proteins are underrepresented in proteomics and biochemical studies because of the difficulty of their production in Escherichia coli. These proteins might possess posttranslational modifications vital to their functions, tend to misfold and be partitioned into bacterial inclusion bodies, or act only in a stoichiometric dimeric complex. Successful production of these proteins requires efficient interaction between these proteins and a specific "facilitator," such as a protein-modifying enzyme, a molecular chaperone, or a natural physical partner within the dimeric complex. Here we report the design and application of a protein interaction module-assisted function X (PIMAX) system that effectively overcomes these hurdles. By fusing two proteins of interest to a pair of well-studied protein-protein interaction modules, we were able to potentiate the association of these two proteins, resulting in successful production of an enzymatically active cyclin-dependent kinase complex and hyperphosphorylated tau protein, which is intimately linked to Alzheimer disease. Furthermore, using tau isoforms quantitatively phosphorylated by GSK-3β and CDK5 kinases via PIMAX, we demonstrated the hyperphosphorylation-stimulated tau oligomerization in vitro, paving the way for new Alzheimer disease drug discoveries. Vectors for PIMAX can be easily modified to meet the needs of different applications. This approach thus provides a convenient and modular suite with broad implications for proteomics and biomedical research. PMID:25385071

  5. Identification of Post-translational Modifications of Plant Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Piquerez, Sophie J. M.; Balmuth, Alexi L.; Sklenář, Jan; Jones, Alexandra M.E.; Rathjen, John P.; Ntoukakis, Vardis

    2014-01-01

    Plants adapt quickly to changing environments due to elaborate perception and signaling systems. During pathogen attack, plants rapidly respond to infection via the recruitment and activation of immune complexes. Activation of immune complexes is associated with post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins, such as phosphorylation, glycosylation, or ubiquitination. Understanding how these PTMs are choreographed will lead to a better understanding of how resistance is achieved. Here we describe a protein purification method for nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR)-interacting proteins and the subsequent identification of their post-translational modifications (PTMs). With small modifications, the protocol can be applied for the purification of other plant protein complexes. The method is based on the expression of an epitope-tagged version of the protein of interest, which is subsequently partially purified by immunoprecipitation and subjected to mass spectrometry for identification of interacting proteins and PTMs. This protocol demonstrates that: i). Dynamic changes in PTMs such as phosphorylation can be detected by mass spectrometry; ii). It is important to have sufficient quantities of the protein of interest, and this can compensate for the lack of purity of the immunoprecipitate; iii). In order to detect PTMs of a protein of interest, this protein has to be immunoprecipitated to get a sufficient quantity of protein. PMID:24637539

  6. Protein Connectivity in Chemotaxis Receptor Complexes.

    PubMed

    Eismann, Stephan; Endres, Robert G

    2015-12-01

    The chemotaxis sensory system allows bacteria such as Escherichia coli to swim towards nutrients and away from repellents. The underlying pathway is remarkably sensitive in detecting chemical gradients over a wide range of ambient concentrations. Interactions among receptors, which are predominantly clustered at the cell poles, are crucial to this sensitivity. Although it has been suggested that the kinase CheA and the adapter protein CheW are integral for receptor connectivity, the exact coupling mechanism remains unclear. Here, we present a statistical-mechanics approach to model the receptor linkage mechanism itself, building on nanodisc and electron cryotomography experiments. Specifically, we investigate how the sensing behavior of mixed receptor clusters is affected by variations in the expression levels of CheA and CheW at a constant receptor density in the membrane. Our model compares favorably with dose-response curves from in vivo Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements, demonstrating that the receptor-methylation level has only minor effects on receptor cooperativity. Importantly, our model provides an explanation for the non-intuitive conclusion that the receptor cooperativity decreases with increasing levels of CheA, a core signaling protein associated with the receptors, whereas the receptor cooperativity increases with increasing levels of CheW, a key adapter protein. Finally, we propose an evolutionary advantage as explanation for the recently suggested CheW-only linker structures. PMID:26646441

  7. Protein Connectivity in Chemotaxis Receptor Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Eismann, Stephan; Endres, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    The chemotaxis sensory system allows bacteria such as Escherichia coli to swim towards nutrients and away from repellents. The underlying pathway is remarkably sensitive in detecting chemical gradients over a wide range of ambient concentrations. Interactions among receptors, which are predominantly clustered at the cell poles, are crucial to this sensitivity. Although it has been suggested that the kinase CheA and the adapter protein CheW are integral for receptor connectivity, the exact coupling mechanism remains unclear. Here, we present a statistical-mechanics approach to model the receptor linkage mechanism itself, building on nanodisc and electron cryotomography experiments. Specifically, we investigate how the sensing behavior of mixed receptor clusters is affected by variations in the expression levels of CheA and CheW at a constant receptor density in the membrane. Our model compares favorably with dose-response curves from in vivo Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements, demonstrating that the receptor-methylation level has only minor effects on receptor cooperativity. Importantly, our model provides an explanation for the non-intuitive conclusion that the receptor cooperativity decreases with increasing levels of CheA, a core signaling protein associated with the receptors, whereas the receptor cooperativity increases with increasing levels of CheW, a key adapter protein. Finally, we propose an evolutionary advantage as explanation for the recently suggested CheW-only linker structures. PMID:26646441

  8. Coupling protein complex analysis to peptide based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiang; Madian, Ashraf G; Liu, Xiuping; Adamec, Jiri; Regnier, Fred E

    2010-12-01

    Proteolysis is a central component of most proteomics methods. Unfortunately much of the information relating to the structural diversity of proteins is lost during digestion. This paper describes a method in which the native proteome of yeast was subjected to preliminary fractionation by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) prior to trypsin digestion of SEC fractions and reversed phase chromatography-mass spectral analysis to identify tryptic peptides thus generated. Through this approach proteins associated with other proteins in high molecular mass complexes were recognized and identified. A focus of this work was on the identification of Hub proteins that associate with multiple interaction partners. A critical component of this strategy is to choose methods and conditions that maximize retention of native structure during the various stages of analysis prior to proteolysis, especially during cell lysis. Maximum survival of protein complexes during lysis was obtained with the French press and bead-beater methods of cell disruption at approximately pH 8 with 200 mM NaCl in the lysis buffer. Structure retention was favored by higher ionic strength, suggesting that hydrophobic effects are important in maintaining the structure of protein complexes. Recovery of protein complexes declined substantially with storage at any temperature, but storage at -20°C was best when low temperature storage was necessary. Slightly lower recovery was obtained with storage at -80°C while lowest recovery was achieved at 4°C. It was concluded that initial fractionation of native proteins in cell lysates by SEC prior to RPC-MS/MS of tryptic digests can be used to recognize and identify proteins in complexes along with their interaction partners in known protein complexes. PMID:21036361

  9. Characterizing Protein Complexes with UV absorption, Light Scattering, and Refractive Index Detection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trainoff, Steven

    2009-03-01

    Many modern pharmaceuticals and naturally occurring biomolecules consist of complexes of proteins and polyethylene glycol or carbohydrates. In the case of vaccine development, these complexes are often used to induce or amplify immune responses. For protein therapeutics they are used to modify solubility and function, or to control the rate of degradation and elimination of a drug from the body. Characterizing the stoichiometry of these complexes is an important industrial problem that presents a formidable challenge to analytical instrument designers. Traditional analytical methods, such as using florescent tagging, chemical assays, and mass spectrometry perturb the system so dramatically that the complexes are often destroyed or uncontrollably modified by the measurement. A solution to this problem consists of fractionating the samples and then measuring the fractions using sequential non-invasive detectors that are sensitive to different components of the complex. We present results using UV absorption, which is primarily sensitive to the protein fraction, Light Scattering, which measures the total weight average molar mass, and Refractive Index detection, which measures the net concentration. We also present a solution of the problem inter-detector band-broadening problem that has heretofore made this approach impractical. Presented will be instrumentation and an analysis method that overcome these obstacles and make this technique a reliable and robust way of non-invasively characterizing these industrially important compounds.

  10. Sonochemical synthesis of (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane-modified monodispersed silica nanoparticles for protein immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Shou-Cang; Ng, Wai Kiong; Chia, Leonard; Dong, Yuan-Cai; Tan, Reginald B.H.

    2011-10-15

    Graphical abstract: 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane modified monodispersed silica nanoparticles were synthesized by rapid sonochemical co-condensation to achieve high capability for protein immobilization. Highlights: {yields} Amino-modified monodispersed silica nanoparticles were synthesized by rapid co-condensation. {yields} Strong positive charge was created by aminopropyl-modification. {yields} Capability for immobilization of negatively charged protein was enhanced. {yields} Electrostatic interaction between proteins and surface contributed to the enhanced adsorption. -- Abstract: 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane modified monodispersed silica nanoparticles were synthesized by a rapid sonochemical co-condensation synthesis procedure. The chemical nature of surface organic modifier on the obtained modified silica nanoparticle was characterized by {sup 13}C and {sup 29}Si MAS Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopies, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)- differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Due to the strengthened positive surface charge of the silica nanoparticles by the modification with aminopropyl groups, the capability for bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption was significantly increased as compared with bare silica nanoparticles. 80 mg/g BSA was adsorbed on modified silica nanoparticles, whereas only 20 mg/g BSA could be loaded on pure silica nanoparticles. The enhanced positive surface charge repelled proteins with net positive charge and the modified silica nanoparticles exhibited negligible adsorption of lysozyme, thus a selective adsorption of proteins could be achieved.

  11. Building a Hierarchical Organization of Protein Complexes Out of Protein Association Data

    PubMed Central

    Stojmirović, Aleksandar; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2014-01-01

    Organizing experimentally determined protein associations as a hierarchy can be a good approach to elucidating the content of protein complexes and the modularity of subcomplexes. Several challenges exist. First, intrinsically sticky proteins, such as chaperones, are often falsely assigned to many functionally unrelated complexes. Second, the reported collections of proteins may not be true “complexes” in the sense that they bind together and perform a joint cellular function. Third, due to imperfect sensitivity of protein detection methods, both false positive and false negative assignments of a protein to complexes may occur. We mitigate the first issue by down-weighting sticky proteins by their occurrence frequencies. We approach the other two problems by merging nearly identical complexes and by constructing a directed acyclic graph (DAG) based on the relationship of partial inclusion. The constructed DAG, within which smaller complexes form parts of the larger, can reveal how different complexes are joined. By merging almost identical complexes one can deemphasize the influence of false positives, while allowing false negatives to be rescued by other nearly identical association data. We investigate several protein weighting schemes and compare their corresponding DAGs using yeast and human complexes. We find that the scheme incorporating weights based on information flow in the network of direct protein–protein interactions produces biologically most meaningful DAGs. In either yeast or human, isolated nodes form a large proportion of the final hierarchy. While most connected components encompass very few nodes, the largest one for each species contains a sizable portion of all nodes. By considering examples of subgraphs composed of nodes containing a specified protein, we illustrate that the graphs' topological features can correctly suggest the biological roles of protein complexes. The input data, final results and the source code are available at ftp

  12. Cross-linking Measurements of In Vivo Protein Complex Topologies*

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Chunxiang; Yang, Li; Hoopmann, Michael R.; Eng, Jimmy K.; Tang, Xiaoting; Weisbrod, Chad R.; Bruce, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Identification and measurement of in vivo protein interactions pose critical challenges in the goal to understand biological systems. The measurement of structures and topologies of proteins and protein complexes as they exist in cells is particularly challenging, yet critically important to improve understanding of biological function because proteins exert their intended function only through the structures and interactions they exhibit in vivo. In the present study, protein interactions in E. coli cells were identified in our unbiased cross-linking approach, yielding the first in vivo topological data on many interactions and the largest set of identified in vivo cross-linked peptides produced to date. These data show excellent agreement with protein and complex crystal structures where available. Furthermore, our unbiased data provide novel in vivo topological information that can impact understanding of biological function, even for cases where high resolution structures are not yet available. PMID:21697552

  13. Graph theory and stability analysis of protein complex interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Hung; Chen, Teng-Hung; Ng, Ka-Lok

    2016-04-01

    Protein complexes play an essential role in many biological processes. Complexes can interact with other complexes to form protein complex interaction network (PCIN) that involves in important cellular processes. There are relatively few studies on examining the interaction topology among protein complexes; and little is known about the stability of PCIN under perturbations. We employed graph theoretical approach to reveal hidden properties and features of four species PCINs. Two main issues are addressed, (i) the global and local network topological properties, and (ii) the stability of the networks under 12 types of perturbations. According to the topological parameter classification, we identified some critical protein complexes and validated that the topological analysis approach could provide meaningful biological interpretations of the protein complex systems. Through the Kolmogorov-Smimov test, we showed that local topological parameters are good indicators to characterise the structure of PCINs. We further demonstrated the effectiveness of the current approach by performing the scalability and data normalization tests. To measure the robustness of PCINs, we proposed to consider eight topological-based perturbations, which are specifically applicable in scenarios of targeted, sustained attacks. We found that the degree-based, betweenness-based and brokering-coefficient-based perturbations have the largest effect on network stability. PMID:26997661

  14. Biochemical isolation of Argonaute protein complexes by Ago-APP

    PubMed Central

    Hauptmann, Judith; Schraivogel, Daniel; Bruckmann, Astrid; Manickavel, Sudhir; Jakob, Leonhard; Eichner, Norbert; Pfaff, Janina; Urban, Marc; Sprunck, Stefanie; Hafner, Markus; Tuschl, Thomas; Deutzmann, Rainer; Meister, Gunter

    2015-01-01

    During microRNA (miRNA)-guided gene silencing, Argonaute (Ago) proteins interact with a member of the TNRC6/GW protein family. Here we used a short GW protein-derived peptide fused to GST and demonstrate that it binds to Ago proteins with high affinity. This allows for the simultaneous isolation of all Ago protein complexes expressed in diverse species to identify associated proteins, small RNAs, or target mRNAs. We refer to our method as “Ago protein Affinity Purification by Peptides“ (Ago-APP). Furthermore, expression of this peptide competes for endogenous TNRC6 proteins, leading to global inhibition of miRNA function in mammalian cells. PMID:26351695

  15. SnapShot: SMC Protein Complexes Part I.

    PubMed

    Haering, Christian H; Gruber, Stephan

    2016-01-14

    This first of two SnapShots on SMC proteins depicts the composition and architecture of SMC protein complexes and their regulators. Their roles at different stages of the cell cycle will appear in Part II. To view this SnapShot, open or download the PDF. PMID:26771499

  16. Linking structural features of protein complexes and biological function.

    PubMed

    Sowmya, Gopichandran; Breen, Edmond J; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2015-09-01

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) establishes the central basis for complex cellular networks in a biological cell. Association of proteins with other proteins occurs at varying affinities, yet with a high degree of specificity. PPIs lead to diverse functionality such as catalysis, regulation, signaling, immunity, and inhibition, playing a crucial role in functional genomics. The molecular principle of such interactions is often elusive in nature. Therefore, a comprehensive analysis of known protein complexes from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) is essential for the characterization of structural interface features to determine structure-function relationship. Thus, we analyzed a nonredundant dataset of 278 heterodimer protein complexes, categorized into major functional classes, for distinguishing features. Interestingly, our analysis has identified five key features (interface area, interface polar residue abundance, hydrogen bonds, solvation free energy gain from interface formation, and binding energy) that are discriminatory among the functional classes using Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test. Significant correlations between these PPI interface features amongst functional categories are also documented. Salt bridges correlate with interface area in regulator-inhibitors (r = 0.75). These representative features have implications for the prediction of potential function of novel protein complexes. The results provide molecular insights for better understanding of PPIs and their relation to biological functions. PMID:26131659

  17. Rho-modifying bacterial protein toxins from Photorhabdus species.

    PubMed

    Jank, Thomas; Lang, Alexander E; Aktories, Klaus

    2016-06-15

    Photorhabdus bacteria live in symbiosis with entomopathogenic nematodes. The nematodes invade insect larvae, where they release the bacteria, which then produce toxins to kill the insects. Recently, the molecular mechanisms of some toxins from Photorhabdus luminescens and asymbiotica have been elucidated, showing that GTP-binding proteins of the Rho family are targets. The tripartite Tc toxin PTC5 from P. luminescens activates Rho proteins by ADP-ribosylation of a glutamine residue, which is involved in GTP hydrolysis, while PaTox from Photorhabdus asymbiotica inhibits the activity of GTPases by N-acetyl-glucosaminylation at tyrosine residues and activates Rho proteins indirectly by deamidation of heterotrimeric G proteins. PMID:26026623

  18. The tandem affinity purification method: an efficient system for protein complex purification and protein interaction identification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoli; Song, Yuan; Li, Yuhua; Chang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Hua; An, Lizhe

    2010-08-01

    Isolation and identification of protein partners in multi-protein complexes are important in gaining further insights into the cellular roles of proteins and determining the possible mechanisms by which proteins have an effect in the molecular environment. The tandem affinity purification (TAP) method was originally developed in yeast for the purification of protein complexes and identification of protein-protein interactions. With modifications to this method and many variations in the original tag made over the past few years, the TAP system could be applied in mammalian, plant, bacteria and other systems for protein complex analysis. In this review, we describe the application of the TAP method in various organisms, the modification in the tag, the disadvantages, the developments and the future prospects of the TAP method. PMID:20399864

  19. Proteome-wide enrichment of proteins modified by lysine methylation

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Scott M; Moore, Kaitlyn E; Green, Erin M; Martín, Glòria Mas; Gozani, Or

    2015-01-01

    We present a protocol for using the triple malignant brain tumor domains of L3MBTL1 (3×MBT), which bind to mono- and di-methylated lysine with minimal sequence specificity, in order to enrich for such methylated lysine from cell lysates. Cells in culture are grown with amino acids containing light or heavy stable isotopic labels. Methylated proteins are enriched by incubating cell lysates with 3×MBT, or with the binding-null D355N mutant as a negative control. Quantitative liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) are then used to identify proteins that are specifically enriched by 3×MBT pull-down. The addition of a third isotopic label allows the comparison of protein lysine methylation between different biological conditions. Unlike most approaches, our strategy does not require a prior hypothesis of candidate methylated proteins, and it recognizes a wider range of methylated proteins than any available method using antibodies. Cells are prepared by growing in isotopic labeling medium for about 7 d; the process of enriching methylated proteins takes 3 d and analysis by LC-MS/MS takes another 1–2 d. PMID:24309976

  20. Bringing single-molecule spectroscopy to macromolecular protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Chirlmin; Fareh, Mohamed; Kim, V. Narry

    2013-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy offers real-time, nanometer-resolution information. Over the past two decades, this emerging single-molecule technique has been rapidly adopted to investigate the structural dynamics and biological functions of proteins. Despite this remarkable achievement, single-molecule fluorescence techniques must be extended to macromolecular protein complexes that are physiologically more relevant for functional studies. In this review, we present recent major breakthroughs for investigating protein complexes within cell extracts using single-molecule fluorescence. We outline the challenges, future prospects and potential applications of these new single-molecule fluorescence techniques in biological and clinical research. PMID:23200186

  1. Electrophoresis of proteins and protein-protein complexes in native polyacrylamide gels using a horizontal gel apparatus.

    PubMed

    Su, C; Wang, F; Ciolek, D; Pan, Y C

    1994-11-15

    Electrophoresis of proteins and protein-protein complexes in polyacrylamide gels under native conditions using a horizontal gel apparatus is described. The advantage of this system is that it permits the detection of both negatively and positively charged proteins as well as protein-protein complexes in the same gel. During electrophoresis, a continuous gel sandwiched between two glass plates is placed horizontally on the platform and submerged in a reservoir buffer. The sample wells are made along the center of the gel, allowing positively and negatively charged proteins to migrate toward the cathode and anode, respectively. Several proteins with varying molecular weights and isoelectric point (pI) values and pairs of proteins capable of forming protein-protein complexes were chosen as model systems to illustrate the methodology. The effects of several parameters on the performance of the gel system including protein molecular weight, pI, and gel concentration were also examined and the results obtained by this method are comparable to those obtained by the vertical system. Following electrophoresis, both negatively and positively charged proteins as well as protein-protein complexes can be transferred by electroblotting onto polyvinylidene difluoride membranes for further analyses. PMID:7695108

  2. Molecular Design of Bisphosphonate-Modified Proteins for Efficient Bone Targeting In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Katsumi, Hidemasa; Sano, Jun-ichi; Nishikawa, Makiya; Hanzawa, Keiko; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2015-01-01

    To establish a rational molecular design for bisphosphonate (BP)-modified proteins for efficient bone targeting, a pharmacokinetic study was performed using a series of alendronate (ALN), a nitrogen-containing BP, modified proteins with various molecular weights and varying degrees of modification. Four proteins with different molecular weight—yeast glutathione reductase (GR; MW: 112,000 Da), bovine serum albumin (BSA; MW: 67,000 Da), recombinant human superoxide dismutase (SOD; MW: 32,000 Da), and chicken egg white lysozyme (LZM; MW: 14,000 Da)—were modified with ALN to obtain ALN-modified proteins. Pharmacokinetic analysis of the tissue distribution of the ALN-modified and unmodified proteins was performed after radiolabeling them with indium-111 (111In) by using a bifunctional chelating agent. Calculation of tissue uptake clearances revealed that the bone uptake clearances of 111In-ALN-modified proteins were proportional to the degree of ALN modification. 111In-GR-ALN and BSA-ALN, the two high-molecular-weight proteins, efficiently accumulated in bones, regardless of the degree of ALN modification. Approximately 36 and 34% of the dose, respectively, was calculated to be delivered to the bones. In contrast, the maximum amounts taken up by bone were 18 and 13% of the dose for 111In-SOD-ALN(32) and LZM-ALN(9), respectively, because of their high renal clearance. 111In-SOD modified with both polyethylene glycol (PEG) and ALN (111In-PEG-SOD-ALN) was efficiently delivered to the bone. Approximately 36% of the dose was estimated to be delivered to the bones. In an experimental bone metastasis mouse model, treatment with PEG-SOD-ALN significantly reduced the number of tumor cells in the bone of the mice. These results indicate that the combination of PEG and ALN modification is a promising approach for efficient bone targeting of proteins with a high total-body clearance. PMID:26287482

  3. Proteins associated with RNase E in a multicomponent ribonucleolytic complex.

    PubMed Central

    Miczak, A; Kaberdin, V R; Wei, C L; Lin-Chao, S

    1996-01-01

    The Escherichia coli endoribonuclease RNase E is essential for RNA processing and degradation. Earlier work provided evidence that RNase E exists intracellularly as part of a multicomponent complex and that one of the components of this complex is a 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease, polynucleotide phosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.8). To isolate and identify other components of the RNase E complex, FLAG-epitope-tagged RNase E (FLAG-Rne) fusion protein was purified on a monoclonal antibody-conjugated agarose column. The FLAG-Rne fusion protein, eluted by competition with the synthetic FLAG peptide, was found to be associated with other proteins. N-terminal sequencing of these proteins revealed the presence in the RNase E complex not only of polynucleotide phosphorylase but also of DnaK, RNA helicase, and enolase (EC 4.2.1.11). Another protein associated only with epitope-tagged temperature-sensitive (Rne-3071) mutant RNase E but not with the wild-type enzyme is GroEL. The FLAG-Rne complex has RNase E activity in vivo and in vitro. The relative amount of proteins associated with wild-type and Rne-3071 expressed at an elevated temperature differed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8632981

  4. Systemic delivery of recombinant proteins by genetically modified myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, E.; Leiden, J.M. )

    1991-12-06

    The ability to stably deliver recombinant proteins to the systemic circulation would facilitate the treatment of a variety of acquired and inherited diseases. To explore the feasibility of the use of genetically engineered myoblasts as a recombinant protein delivery system, stable transfectants of the murine C2C12 myoblast cell line were produced that synthesize and secrete high levels of human growth hormone (hGH) in vitro. Mice injected with hGH-transfected myoblasts had significant levels of hGH in both muscle and serum that were stable for at least 3 weeks after injection. Histological examination of muscles injected with {beta}-galactosidase-expressing C2C12 myoblasts demonstrated that many of the injected cells had fused to form multinucleated myotubes. Thus, genetically engineered myoblasts can be used for the stable delivery of recombinant proteins into the circulation.

  5. Capillary Isoelectric Focusing-Mass Spectrometry of Proteins and Protein Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Martinovic, Suzana; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Smith, Richard D.

    2004-10-01

    Complex proteome samples require efficient separation and detection methods in order to characterize their protein components. On-line combination of capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF) with electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) is shown as an effective method to analyze complex protein mixtures. Our experience with several microorganisms allowed us to establish successful experimental protocol. Here we use the example of E. coli whole cell lysate for the CIEF separation and MS detection on the intact protein level. The protocol was further adapted for the analysis of the mixture of non-covalent complexes on the intact complex level.

  6. The Histone Deacetylase Complex 1 Protein of Arabidopsis Has the Capacity to Interact with Multiple Proteins Including Histone 3-Binding Proteins and Histone 1 Variants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Craig; Asensi-Fabado, Maria A.; Donald, Naomi A.; Hannah, Matthew A.; Amtmann, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins can adopt multiple conformations, thereby enabling interaction with a wide variety of partners. They often serve as hubs in protein interaction networks. We have previously shown that the Histone Deacetylase Complex 1 (HDC1) protein from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) interacts with histone deacetylases and quantitatively determines histone acetylation levels, transcriptional activity, and several phenotypes, including abscisic acid sensitivity during germination, vegetative growth rate, and flowering time. HDC1-type proteins are ubiquitous in plants, but they contain no known structural or functional domains. Here, we explored the protein interaction spectrum of HDC1 using a quantitative bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) epidermal cells. In addition to binding histone deacetylases, HDC1 directly interacted with histone H3-binding proteins and corepressor-associated proteins but not with H3 or the corepressors themselves. Surprisingly, HDC1 also was able to interact with variants of the linker histone H1. Truncation of HDC1 to the ancestral core sequence narrowed the spectrum of interactions and of phenotypic outputs but maintained binding to a H3-binding protein and to H1. Thus, HDC1 provides a potential link between H1 and histone-modifying complexes. PMID:26951436

  7. Negative Ions Enhance Survival of Membrane Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    Liko, Idlir; Hopper, Jonathan T S; Allison, Timothy M; Benesch, Justin L P; Robinson, Carol V

    2016-06-01

    Membrane protein complexes are commonly introduced to the mass spectrometer solubilized in detergent micelles. The collisional activation used to remove the detergent, however, often causes protein unfolding and dissociation. As in the case for soluble proteins, electrospray in the positive ion mode is most commonly used for the study of membrane proteins. Here we show several distinct advantages of employing the negative ion mode. Negative polarity can yield lower average charge states for membrane proteins solubilized in saccharide detergents, with enhanced peak resolution and reduced adduct formation. Most importantly, we demonstrate that negative ion mode electrospray ionization (ESI) minimizes subunit dissociation in the gas phase, allowing access to biologically relevant oligomeric states. Together, these properties mean that intact membrane protein ions can be generated in a greater range of solubilizing detergents. The formation of negative ions, therefore, greatly expands the possibilities of using mass spectrometry on this intractable class of protein. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27106602

  8. Negative Ions Enhance Survival of Membrane Protein Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liko, Idlir; Hopper, Jonathan T. S.; Allison, Timothy M.; Benesch, Justin L. P.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2016-06-01

    Membrane protein complexes are commonly introduced to the mass spectrometer solubilized in detergent micelles. The collisional activation used to remove the detergent, however, often causes protein unfolding and dissociation. As in the case for soluble proteins, electrospray in the positive ion mode is most commonly used for the study of membrane proteins. Here we show several distinct advantages of employing the negative ion mode. Negative polarity can yield lower average charge states for membrane proteins solubilized in saccharide detergents, with enhanced peak resolution and reduced adduct formation. Most importantly, we demonstrate that negative ion mode electrospray ionization (ESI) minimizes subunit dissociation in the gas phase, allowing access to biologically relevant oligomeric states. Together, these properties mean that intact membrane protein ions can be generated in a greater range of solubilizing detergents. The formation of negative ions, therefore, greatly expands the possibilities of using mass spectrometry on this intractable class of protein.

  9. Negative Ions Enhance Survival of Membrane Protein Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liko, Idlir; Hopper, Jonathan T. S.; Allison, Timothy M.; Benesch, Justin L. P.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2016-04-01

    Membrane protein complexes are commonly introduced to the mass spectrometer solubilized in detergent micelles. The collisional activation used to remove the detergent, however, often causes protein unfolding and dissociation. As in the case for soluble proteins, electrospray in the positive ion mode is most commonly used for the study of membrane proteins. Here we show several distinct advantages of employing the negative ion mode. Negative polarity can yield lower average charge states for membrane proteins solubilized in saccharide detergents, with enhanced peak resolution and reduced adduct formation. Most importantly, we demonstrate that negative ion mode electrospray ionization (ESI) minimizes subunit dissociation in the gas phase, allowing access to biologically relevant oligomeric states. Together, these properties mean that intact membrane protein ions can be generated in a greater range of solubilizing detergents. The formation of negative ions, therefore, greatly expands the possibilities of using mass spectrometry on this intractable class of protein.

  10. A Local Discontinuous Galerkin Method for the Complex Modified KdV Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Li Wenting; Jiang Kun

    2010-09-30

    In this paper, we develop a local discontinuous Galerkin(LDG) method for solving complex modified KdV(CMKdV) equation. The LDG method has the flexibility for arbitrary h and p adaptivity. We prove the L{sup 2} stability for general solutions.

  11. A-Kinase Anchoring Proteins: From protein complexes to physiology and disease

    PubMed Central

    Carnegie, Graeme K.; Means, Christopher K.; Scott, John D.

    2009-01-01

    Protein scaffold complexes are a key mechanism by which a common signaling pathway can serve many different functions. Sequestering a signaling enzyme to a specific subcellular environment not only ensures that the enzyme is near its relevant targets, but also segregates this activity to prevent indiscriminate phosphorylation of other substrates. One family of diverse, well-studied scaffolding proteins are the A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). These anchoring proteins form multi-protein complexes that integrate cAMP signaling with other pathways and signaling events. In this review we focus on recent advances in the elucidation of AKAP function. PMID:19319965

  12. Chromatographic and traditional albumin isotherms on cellulose: a model for wound protein adsorption on modified cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Albumin is the most abundant protein found in healing wounds. Traditional and chromatogrpahic protein isotherms of albumin binding on modified cotton fibers are useful in understanding albumin binding to cellulose wound dressings. An important consideration in the design of cellulosic wound dressin...

  13. Effect of microfluidized and stearic acid modified soy protein in natural rubber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microfluidized and stearic acid modified soy protein aggregates were used to reinforced natural rubber. The size of soy protein particles was reduced with a microfluidizing and ball milling process. Filler size reduction with longer ball milling time tends to increase tensile strength of the rubber ...

  14. Modification of recombinant maize ChitA chitinase by fungal chitinase-modifying proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In commercial maize, there are at least two different alleles of the chiA gene that encode alloforms of ChitA chitinase, a protein that is abundant in developing seed. Both known alloforms are modified by Bz-cmp, a protein secreted by the fungal pathogen Bipolaris zeicola. One alloform (ChitA-B73) i...

  15. Loss of PEG chain in routine SDS-PAGE analysis of PEG-maleimide modified protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun; Liu, Yongdong; Feng, Cui; Wang, Qi; Shi, Hong; Zhao, Dawei; Yu, Rong; Su, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    SDS-PAGE represents a quick and simple method for qualitative and quantitative analysis of protein and protein-containing conjugates, mostly pegylated proteins. PEG-maleimide (MAL) is frequently used to site-specifically pegylate therapeutic proteins via free cysteine residue by forming a thiosuccinimide structure for pursuing homogeneous products. The C-S linkage between protein and PEG-MAL is generally thought to be relatively stable. However, loss of intact PEG chain in routine SDS-PAGE analysis of PEG-maleimide modified protein was observed. It is a thiol-independent thioether cleavage and the shedding of PEG chain exclusively happens to PEG-MAL modified conjugates although PEG-vinylsulfone conjugates to thiol-containing proteins also through a C-S linkage. Cleavage kinetics of PEG40k-MAL modified ciliary neurotrophic factor showed this kind of degradation could immediately happen even in 1 min incubation at high temperature and could be detected at physiological temperature and pH, although the rate was relatively slow. This may provide another degradation route for maleimide-thiol conjugate irrespective of reactive thiol, although the specific mechanism is still not very clear for us. It would also offer a basis for accurate characterization of PEG-MAL modified protein/peptide by SDS-PAGE analysis. PMID:25265901

  16. Effect of Phthalic Anhydride Modified Soy Protein on Viscoelastic Properties of Polymer Composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phthalic anhydride (PA) modified soy protein isolates (SPI), both hydrolyzed and un-hydrolyzed, are investigated as reinforcement fillers in styrene-butadiene (SB) composites. The modification of SPI by PA increases the number of carboxylic acid functional groups on the protein surface and therefor...

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation strategies for protein-micelle complexes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xi; Kim, Jin-Kyoung; Kim, Yangmee; Bowie, James U; Im, Wonpil

    2016-07-01

    The structure and stability of membrane proteins can vary widely in different detergents and this variability has great practical consequences for working with membrane proteins. Nevertheless, the mechanisms that operate to alter the behavior of proteins in micelles are poorly understood and not predictable. Atomic simulations could provide considerable insight into these mechanisms. Building protein-micelle complexes for simulation is fraught with uncertainty, however, in part because it is often unknown how many detergent molecules are present in the complex. Here, we describe several convenient ways to employ Micelle Builder in CHARMM-GUI to rapidly construct protein-micelle complexes and performed simulations of the isolated voltage-sensor domain of voltage-dependent potassium-selective channel and an antimicrobial peptide papiliocin with varying numbers of detergents. We found that once the detergent number exceeds a threshold, protein-detergent interactions change very little and remain very consistent with experimental observations. Our results provide a platform for future studies of the interplays between protein structure and detergent properties at the atomic level. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov. PMID:26679426

  18. Identifying hierarchical and overlapping protein complexes based on essential protein-protein interactions and "seed-expanding" method.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jun; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Many evidences have demonstrated that protein complexes are overlapping and hierarchically organized in PPI networks. Meanwhile, the large size of PPI network wants complex detection methods have low time complexity. Up to now, few methods can identify overlapping and hierarchical protein complexes in a PPI network quickly. In this paper, a novel method, called MCSE, is proposed based on λ-module and "seed-expanding." First, it chooses seeds as essential PPIs or edges with high edge clustering values. Then, it identifies protein complexes by expanding each seed to a λ-module. MCSE is suitable for large PPI networks because of its low time complexity. MCSE can identify overlapping protein complexes naturally because a protein can be visited by different seeds. MCSE uses the parameter λ_th to control the range of seed expanding and can detect a hierarchical organization of protein complexes by tuning the value of λ_th. Experimental results of S. cerevisiae show that this hierarchical organization is similar to that of known complexes in MIPS database. The experimental results also show that MCSE outperforms other previous competing algorithms, such as CPM, CMC, Core-Attachment, Dpclus, HC-PIN, MCL, and NFC, in terms of the functional enrichment and matching with known protein complexes. PMID:25143945

  19. Identifying Hierarchical and Overlapping Protein Complexes Based on Essential Protein-Protein Interactions and “Seed-Expanding” Method

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jun; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Many evidences have demonstrated that protein complexes are overlapping and hierarchically organized in PPI networks. Meanwhile, the large size of PPI network wants complex detection methods have low time complexity. Up to now, few methods can identify overlapping and hierarchical protein complexes in a PPI network quickly. In this paper, a novel method, called MCSE, is proposed based on λ-module and “seed-expanding.” First, it chooses seeds as essential PPIs or edges with high edge clustering values. Then, it identifies protein complexes by expanding each seed to a λ-module. MCSE is suitable for large PPI networks because of its low time complexity. MCSE can identify overlapping protein complexes naturally because a protein can be visited by different seeds. MCSE uses the parameter λ_th to control the range of seed expanding and can detect a hierarchical organization of protein complexes by tuning the value of λ_th. Experimental results of S. cerevisiae show that this hierarchical organization is similar to that of known complexes in MIPS database. The experimental results also show that MCSE outperforms other previous competing algorithms, such as CPM, CMC, Core-Attachment, Dpclus, HC-PIN, MCL, and NFC, in terms of the functional enrichment and matching with known protein complexes. PMID:25143945

  20. Detecting Protein Complexes in Protein Interaction Networks Modeled as Gene Expression Biclusters

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Eileen Marie; Zaki, Nazar; Amin, Amr

    2015-01-01

    Developing suitable methods for the detection of protein complexes in protein interaction networks continues to be an intriguing area of research. The importance of this objective originates from the fact that protein complexes are key players in most cellular processes. The more complexes we identify, the better we can understand normal as well as abnormal molecular events. Up till now, various computational methods were designed for this purpose. However, despite their notable performance, questions arise regarding potential ways to improve them, in addition to ameliorative guidelines to introduce novel approaches. A close interpretation leads to the assent that the way in which protein interaction networks are initially viewed should be adjusted. These networks are dynamic in reality and it is necessary to consider this fact to enhance the detection of protein complexes. In this paper, we present “DyCluster”, a framework to model the dynamic aspect of protein interaction networks by incorporating gene expression data, through biclustering techniques, prior to applying complex-detection algorithms. The experimental results show that DyCluster leads to higher numbers of correctly-detected complexes with better evaluation scores. The high accuracy achieved by DyCluster in detecting protein complexes is a valid argument in favor of the proposed method. DyCluster is also able to detect biologically meaningful protein groups. The code and datasets used in the study are downloadable from https://github.com/emhanna/DyCluster. PMID:26641660

  1. Detecting Protein Complexes in Protein Interaction Networks Modeled as Gene Expression Biclusters.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Eileen Marie; Zaki, Nazar; Amin, Amr

    2015-01-01

    Developing suitable methods for the detection of protein complexes in protein interaction networks continues to be an intriguing area of research. The importance of this objective originates from the fact that protein complexes are key players in most cellular processes. The more complexes we identify, the better we can understand normal as well as abnormal molecular events. Up till now, various computational methods were designed for this purpose. However, despite their notable performance, questions arise regarding potential ways to improve them, in addition to ameliorative guidelines to introduce novel approaches. A close interpretation leads to the assent that the way in which protein interaction networks are initially viewed should be adjusted. These networks are dynamic in reality and it is necessary to consider this fact to enhance the detection of protein complexes. In this paper, we present "DyCluster", a framework to model the dynamic aspect of protein interaction networks by incorporating gene expression data, through biclustering techniques, prior to applying complex-detection algorithms. The experimental results show that DyCluster leads to higher numbers of correctly-detected complexes with better evaluation scores. The high accuracy achieved by DyCluster in detecting protein complexes is a valid argument in favor of the proposed method. DyCluster is also able to detect biologically meaningful protein groups. The code and datasets used in the study are downloadable from https://github.com/emhanna/DyCluster. PMID:26641660

  2. Tyrosine-selective protein alkylation using pi-allylpalladium complexes.

    PubMed

    Tilley, S David; Francis, Matthew B

    2006-02-01

    A new protein modification reaction has been developed based on a palladium-catalyzed allylic alkylation of tyrosine residues. This technique employs electrophilic pi-allyl intermediates derived from allylic acetate and carbamate precursors and can be used to modify proteins in aqueous solution at room temperature. To facilitate the detection of modified proteins using SDS-PAGE analysis, a fluorescent allyl acetate was synthesized and coupled to chymotrypsinogen A and bacteriophage MS2. The tyrosine selectivity of the reaction was confirmed through trypsin digest analysis. The utility of the reaction was demonstrated by using taurine-derived carbamates as water solubilizing groups that are cleaved upon protein functionalization. This solubility switching technique was used to install hydrophobic farnesyl and C(17) chains on chymotrypsinogen A in water using little or no cosolvent. Following this, the C(17) alkylated proteins were found to associate with lipid vesicles. In addition to providing a new protein modification strategy targeting an under-utilized amino acid side chain, this method provides convenient access to synthetic lipoproteins. PMID:16433516

  3. Models for the Binary Complex of Bacteriophage T4 Gp59 Helicase Loading Protein. GP32 Single-Stranded DNA-Binding Protein and Ternary Complex with Pseudo-Y Junction DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hinerman, Jennifer M.; Dignam, J. David; Mueser, Timothy C.

    2012-04-05

    The bacteriophage T4 gp59 helicase assembly protein (gp59) is required for loading of gp41 replicative helicase onto DNA protected by gp32 single-stranded DNA-binding protein. The gp59 protein recognizes branched DNA structures found at replication and recombination sites. Binding of gp32 protein (full-length and deletion constructs) to gp59 protein measured by isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrates that the gp32 protein C-terminal A-domain is essential for protein-protein interaction in the absence of DNA. Sedimentation velocity experiments with gp59 protein and gp32ΔB protein (an N-terminal B-domain deletion) show that these proteins are monomers but form a 1:1 complex with a dissociation constant comparable with that determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) studies indicate that the gp59 protein is a prolate monomer, consistent with the crystal structure and hydrodynamic properties determined from sedimentation velocity experiments. SAXS experiments also demonstrate that gp32ΔB protein is a prolate monomer with an elongated A-domain protruding from the core. Moreover, fitting structures of gp59 protein and the gp32 core into the SAXS-derived molecular envelope supports a model for the gp59 protein-gp32ΔB protein complex. Our earlier work demonstrated that gp59 protein attracts full-length gp32 protein to pseudo-Y junctions. A model of the gp59 protein-DNA complex, modified to accommodate new SAXS data for the binary complex together with mutational analysis of gp59 protein, is presented in the accompanying article (Dolezal, D., Jones, C. E., Lai, X., Brister, J. R., Mueser, T. C., Nossal, N. G., and Hinton, D. M. (2012) J. Biol. Chem. 287, 18596–18607).

  4. Detecting protein complexes in protein interaction networks using a ranking algorithm with a refined merging procedure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Developing suitable methods for the identification of protein complexes remains an active research area. It is important since it allows better understanding of cellular functions as well as malfunctions and it consequently leads to producing more effective cures for diseases. In this context, various computational approaches were introduced to complement high-throughput experimental methods which typically involve large datasets, are expensive in terms of time and cost, and are usually subject to spurious interactions. Results In this paper, we propose ProRank+, a method which detects protein complexes in protein interaction networks. The presented approach is mainly based on a ranking algorithm which sorts proteins according to their importance in the interaction network, and a merging procedure which refines the detected complexes in terms of their protein members. ProRank + was compared to several state-of-the-art approaches in order to show its effectiveness. It was able to detect more protein complexes with higher quality scores. Conclusions The experimental results achieved by ProRank + show its ability to detect protein complexes in protein interaction networks. Eventually, the method could potentially identify previously-undiscovered protein complexes. The datasets and source codes are freely available for academic purposes at http://faculty.uaeu.ac.ae/nzaki/Research.htm. PMID:24944073

  5. Functional expression of the taste-modifying protein, miraculin, in transgenic lettuce.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hyeon-Jin; Cui, Min-Long; Ma, Biao; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2006-01-23

    Taste-modifying proteins are a natural alternative to artificial sweeteners and flavor enhancers and have been used in some cultures for centuries. The taste-modifying protein, miraculin, has the unusual property of being able to modify a sour taste into a sweet taste. Here, we report the use of a plant expression system for the production of miraculin. A synthetic gene encoding miraculin was placed under the control of constitutive promoters and transferred to lettuce. Expression of this gene in transgenic lettuce resulted in the accumulation of significant amounts of miraculin protein in the leaves. The miraculin expressed in transgenic lettuce possessed sweetness-inducing activity. These results demonstrate that the production of miraculin in edible plants can be a good alternative strategy to enhance the availability of this protein. PMID:16406368

  6. Aptamer-modified magnetic beads in affinity separation of proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guohong; Walter, Johanna-Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers are valuable alternative ligands for affinity separations. Here, we describe the aptamer-based affinity separation of His-tagged proteins using an aptamer directed against the His-tag. The immobilization of the aptamer to magnetic beads is described as well as the aptamer-based purification and proper methods for the characterization of the process. Moreover, indications for the transfer of the process to other aptamers are given. PMID:25749947

  7. Biocontainment of genetically modified organisms by synthetic protein design

    PubMed Central

    Mandell, Daniel J.; Lajoie, Marc J.; Mee, Michael T.; Takeuchi, Ryo; Kuznetsov, Gleb; Norville, Julie E.; Gregg, Christopher J.; Stoddard, Barry L.; Church, George M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are increasingly deployed at large scales and in open environments. Genetic biocontainment strategies are needed to prevent unintended proliferation of GMOs in natural ecosystems. Existing biocontainment methods are insufficient either because they impose evolutionary pressure on the organism to eject the safeguard, because they can be circumvented by environmentally available compounds, or because they can be overcome by horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Here we computationally redesign essential enzymes in the first organism possessing an altered genetic code to confer metabolic dependence on nonstandard amino acids for survival. The resulting GMOs cannot metabolically circumvent their biocontainment mechanisms using environmentally available compounds, and they exhibit unprecedented resistance to evolutionary escape via mutagenesis and HGT. This work provides a foundation for safer GMOs that are isolated from natural ecosystems by reliance on synthetic metabolites. PMID:25607366

  8. Biocontainment of genetically modified organisms by synthetic protein design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandell, Daniel J.; Lajoie, Marc J.; Mee, Michael T.; Takeuchi, Ryo; Kuznetsov, Gleb; Norville, Julie E.; Gregg, Christopher J.; Stoddard, Barry L.; Church, George M.

    2015-02-01

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are increasingly deployed at large scales and in open environments. Genetic biocontainment strategies are needed to prevent unintended proliferation of GMOs in natural ecosystems. Existing biocontainment methods are insufficient because they impose evolutionary pressure on the organism to eject the safeguard by spontaneous mutagenesis or horizontal gene transfer, or because they can be circumvented by environmentally available compounds. Here we computationally redesign essential enzymes in the first organism possessing an altered genetic code (Escherichia coli strain C321.ΔA) to confer metabolic dependence on non-standard amino acids for survival. The resulting GMOs cannot metabolically bypass their biocontainment mechanisms using known environmental compounds, and they exhibit unprecedented resistance to evolutionary escape through mutagenesis and horizontal gene transfer. This work provides a foundation for safer GMOs that are isolated from natural ecosystems by a reliance on synthetic metabolites.

  9. Biocontainment of genetically modified organisms by synthetic protein design.

    PubMed

    Mandell, Daniel J; Lajoie, Marc J; Mee, Michael T; Takeuchi, Ryo; Kuznetsov, Gleb; Norville, Julie E; Gregg, Christopher J; Stoddard, Barry L; Church, George M

    2015-02-01

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are increasingly deployed at large scales and in open environments. Genetic biocontainment strategies are needed to prevent unintended proliferation of GMOs in natural ecosystems. Existing biocontainment methods are insufficient because they impose evolutionary pressure on the organism to eject the safeguard by spontaneous mutagenesis or horizontal gene transfer, or because they can be circumvented by environmentally available compounds. Here we computationally redesign essential enzymes in the first organism possessing an altered genetic code (Escherichia coli strain C321.ΔA) to confer metabolic dependence on non-standard amino acids for survival. The resulting GMOs cannot metabolically bypass their biocontainment mechanisms using known environmental compounds, and they exhibit unprecedented resistance to evolutionary escape through mutagenesis and horizontal gene transfer. This work provides a foundation for safer GMOs that are isolated from natural ecosystems by a reliance on synthetic metabolites. PMID:25607366

  10. Rapid purification of protein complexes from mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Dan; Moskowitz, Neal; Khan, Subarna; Christopher, Scott; Germino, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    The evaluation of the protein binding partner(s) of biologically important proteins is currently an area of intense research, especially since the development of the yeast two-hybrid assay. However, not all protein–protein interactions uncovered by this assay are biologically relevant and another confirmatory assay must be performed. Ideally, this assay should be rapid, versatile and performed under conditions which mimic the ‘normal’ physiological state as closely as possible. Towards this goal, we have constructed two eukaryotic expression vectors that facilitate the purification of a protein of interest, along with any associated proteins, from mammalian cells. These vectors incorporate the following features: (i) a tetracycline-responsive promoter so that the level of protein production can be regulated; (ii) an N-terminal glutathione S-transferase tag or a triple repeat of the HA1 epitope, to facilitate purification of the protein either by glutathione affinity chromatography or immunoprecipitation, respectively, followed by a multiple cloning site; (iii) the gene for the enhanced green fluorescent protein (for detection of the presence of the fusion protein and subcellular localization); (iv) a puromycin marker for the selection of stable transformants; (v) a truncated EBNA protein and oriP sequence for episomal replication of the vector. These latter two features permit expansion of small cultures of transfected cells under puromycin selection, thereby increasing the amount of tagged protein that can be purified. We show that these vectors can be used to direct the doxycycline-inducible expresssion of tagged proteins and to recover tagged CIP1–p21 protein complexes from HeLa cells. Furthermore, we show that these tagged p21-purified complexes contain both cyclin A and Cdk2, which are known to interact with p21, but not β-actin. PMID:10871384

  11. Identification of a novel protein complex containing ASIC1a and GABAA receptors and their interregulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dongbo; Ning, Nannan; Lei, Zhen; Sun, Hua; Wei, Chuanfei; Chen, Dawei; Li, Jingxin

    2014-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) belong to the family of the epithelial sodium channel/degenerin (ENaC/DEG) and are activated by extracellular protons. They are widely distributed within both the central and peripheral nervous systems. ASICs were modified by the activation of γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAA), a ligand-gated chloride channels, in hippocampal neurons. In contrast, the activity of GABAA receptors were also modulated by extracellular pH. However so far, the mechanisms underlying this intermodulation remain obscure. We hypothesized that these two receptors-GABAA receptors and ASICs channels might form a novel protein complex and functionally interact with each other. In the study reported here, we found that ASICs were modified by the activation of GABAA receptors either in HEK293 cells following transient co-transfection of GABAA and ASIC1a or in primary cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Conversely, activation of ASIC1a also modifies the GABAA receptor-channel kinetics. Immunoassays showed that both GABAA and ASIC1a proteins were co-immunoprecipitated mutually either in HEK293 cells co-transfected with GABAA and ASIC1a or in primary cultured DRG neurons. Our results indicate that putative GABAA and ASIC1a channels functionally interact with each other, possibly via an inter-molecular association by forming a novel protein complex. PMID:24923912

  12. Analyzing Large Protein Complexes by Structural Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kirshenbaum, Noam; Michaelevski, Izhak; Sharon, Michal

    2010-01-01

    Living cells control and regulate their biological processes through the coordinated action of a large number of proteins that assemble themselves into an array of dynamic, multi-protein complexes1. To gain a mechanistic understanding of the various cellular processes, it is crucial to determine the structure of such protein complexes, and reveal how their structural organization dictates their function. Many aspects of multi-protein complexes are, however, difficult to characterize, due to their heterogeneous nature, asymmetric structure, and dynamics. Therefore, new approaches are required for the study of the tertiary levels of protein organization. One of the emerging structural biology tools for analyzing macromolecular complexes is mass spectrometry (MS)2-5. This method yields information on the complex protein composition, subunit stoichiometry, and structural topology. The power of MS derives from its high sensitivity and, as a consequence, low sample requirement, which enables examination of protein complexes expressed at endogenous levels. Another advantage is the speed of analysis, which allows monitoring of reactions in real time. Moreover, the technique can simultaneously measure the characteristics of separate populations co-existing in a mixture. Here, we describe a detailed protocol for the application of structural MS to the analysis of large protein assemblies. The procedure begins with the preparation of gold-coated capillaries for nanoflow electrospray ionization (nESI). It then continues with sample preparation, emphasizing the buffer conditions which should be compatible with nESI on the one hand, and enable to maintain complexes intact on the other. We then explain, step-by-step, how to optimize the experimental conditions for high mass measurements and acquire MS and tandem MS spectra. Finally, we chart the data processing and analyses that follow. Rather than attempting to characterize every aspect of protein assemblies, this protocol

  13. Emergence of Complexity in Protein Functions and Metabolic Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andzej

    2009-01-01

    In modern organisms proteins perform a majority of cellular functions, such as chemical catalysis, energy transduction and transport of material across cell walls. Although great strides have been made towards understanding protein evolution, a meaningful extrapolation from contemporary proteins to their earliest ancestors is virtually impossible. In an alternative approach, the origin of water-soluble proteins was probed through the synthesis of very large libraries of random amino acid sequences and subsequently subjecting them to in vitro evolution. In combination with computer modeling and simulations, these experiments allow us to address a number of fundamental questions about the origins of proteins. Can functionality emerge from random sequences of proteins? How did the initial repertoire of functional proteins diversify to facilitate new functions? Did this diversification proceed primarily through drawing novel functionalities from random sequences or through evolution of already existing proto-enzymes? Did protein evolution start from a pool of proteins defined by a frozen accident and other collections of proteins could start a different evolutionary pathway? Although we do not have definitive answers to these questions, important clues have been uncovered. Considerable progress has been also achieved in understanding the origins of membrane proteins. We will address this issue in the example of ion channels - proteins that mediate transport of ions across cell walls. Remarkably, despite overall complexity of these proteins in contemporary cells, their structural motifs are quite simple, with -helices being most common. By combining results of experimental and computer simulation studies on synthetic models and simple, natural channels, I will show that, even though architectures of membrane proteins are not nearly as diverse as those of water-soluble proteins, they are sufficiently flexible to adapt readily to the functional demands arising during

  14. Towards the development of Bacillus subtilis as a cell factory for membrane proteins and protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Zweers, Jessica C; Barák, Imrich; Becher, Dörte; Driessen, Arnold JM; Hecker, Michael; Kontinen, Vesa P; Saller, Manfred J; Vavrová, L'udmila; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2008-01-01

    Background The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis is an important producer of high quality industrial enzymes and a few eukaryotic proteins. Most of these proteins are secreted into the growth medium, but successful examples of cytoplasmic protein production are also known. Therefore, one may anticipate that the high protein production potential of B. subtilis can be exploited for protein complexes and membrane proteins to facilitate their functional and structural analysis. The high quality of proteins produced with B. subtilis results from the action of cellular quality control systems that efficiently remove misfolded or incompletely synthesized proteins. Paradoxically, cellular quality control systems also represent bottlenecks for the production of various heterologous proteins at significant concentrations. Conclusion While inactivation of quality control systems has the potential to improve protein production yields, this could be achieved at the expense of product quality. Mechanisms underlying degradation of secretory proteins are nowadays well understood and often controllable. It will therefore be a major challenge for future research to identify and modulate quality control systems of B. subtilis that limit the production of high quality protein complexes and membrane proteins, and to enhance those systems that facilitate assembly of these proteins. PMID:18394159

  15. Integrating Mass Spectrometry of Intact Protein Complexes into Structural Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Hyung, Suk-Joon; Ruotolo, Brandon T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Mass spectrometry analysis of intact protein complexes has emerged as an established technology for assessing the composition and connectivity within dynamic, heterogeneous multiprotein complexes at low concentrations and in the context of mixtures. As this technology continues to move forward, one of the main challenges is to integrate the information content of such intact protein complex measurements with other mass spectrometry approaches in structural biology. Methods such as H/D exchange, oxidative foot-printing, chemical cross-linking, affinity purification, and ion mobility separation add complementary information that allows access to every level of protein structure and organization. Here, we survey the structural information that can be retrieved by such experiments, demonstrate the applicability of integrative mass spectrometry approaches in structural proteomics, and look to the future to explore upcoming innovations in this rapidly-advancing area. PMID:22611037

  16. A secretory kinase complex regulates extracellular protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jixin; Xiao, Junyu; Tagliabracci, Vincent S; Wen, Jianzhong; Rahdar, Meghdad; Dixon, Jack E

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous extracellular phosphoproteins have been identified, the protein kinases within the secretory pathway have only recently been discovered, and their regulation is virtually unexplored. Fam20C is the physiological Golgi casein kinase, which phosphorylates many secreted proteins and is critical for proper biomineralization. Fam20A, a Fam20C paralog, is essential for enamel formation, but the biochemical function of Fam20A is unknown. Here we show that Fam20A potentiates Fam20C kinase activity and promotes the phosphorylation of enamel matrix proteins in vitro and in cells. Mechanistically, Fam20A is a pseudokinase that forms a functional complex with Fam20C, and this complex enhances extracellular protein phosphorylation within the secretory pathway. Our findings shed light on the molecular mechanism by which Fam20C and Fam20A collaborate to control enamel formation, and provide the first insight into the regulation of secretory pathway phosphorylation. PMID:25789606

  17. Displacement affinity chromatography of protein phosphatase one (PP1) complexes

    PubMed Central

    Moorhead, Greg BG; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Nimick, Mhairi; De Wever, Veerle; Campbell, David G; Gourlay, Robert; Lam, Yun Wah; Lamond, Angus I

    2008-01-01

    Background Protein phosphatase one (PP1) is a ubiquitously expressed, highly conserved protein phosphatase that dephosphorylates target protein serine and threonine residues. PP1 is localized to its site of action by interacting with targeting or regulatory proteins, a majority of which contains a primary docking site referred to as the RVXF/W motif. Results We demonstrate that a peptide based on the RVXF/W motif can effectively displace PP1 bound proteins from PP1 retained on the phosphatase affinity matrix microcystin-Sepharose. Subsequent co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed that each identified binding protein was either a direct PP1 interactor or was in a complex that contains PP1. Our results have linked PP1 to numerous new nuclear functions and proteins, including Ki-67, Rif-1, topoisomerase IIα, several nuclear helicases, NUP153 and the TRRAP complex. Conclusion This modification of the microcystin-Sepharose technique offers an effective means of purifying novel PP1 regulatory subunits and associated proteins and provides a simple method to uncover a link between PP1 and additional cellular processes. PMID:19000314

  18. Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shangjin; Han, Yun; Paramasivam, Sivakumar; Yan, Si; Siglin, Amanda E.; Williams, John C.; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Polenova, Tatyana

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are vital for many biological processes. These interactions often result in the formation of protein assemblies that are large in size, insoluble and difficult to crystallize, and therefore are challenging to study by structure biology techniques, such as single crystal X-ray diffraction and solution NMR spectroscopy. Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy is emerging as a promising technique for studies of such protein assemblies because it is not limited by molecular size, solubility or lack of long-range order. In the past several years, we have applied magic angle spinning SSNMR based methods to study several protein complexes. In this chapter, we discuss the general solid-state NMR methodologies employed for structural and dynamics analyses of protein complexes with specific examples from our work on thioredoxin reassemblies, HIV-1 capsid protein assemblies and microtubule-associated protein assemblies. We present protocols for sample preparation and characterization, pulse sequences, SSNMR spectra collection and data analysis. PMID:22167681

  19. Data presenting a modified bacterial expression vector for expressing and purifying Nus solubility-tagged proteins.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nidhi; Wu, Heng; Terman, Jonathan R

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria are the predominant source for producing recombinant proteins but while many exogenous proteins are expressed, only a fraction of those are soluble. We have found that a new actin regulatory enzyme Mical is poorly soluble when expressed in bacteria but the use of a Nus fusion protein tag greatly increases its solubility. However, available vectors containing a Nus tag have been engineered in a way that hinders the separation of target proteins from the Nus tag during protein purification. We have now used recombinant DNA approaches to overcome these issues and reengineer a Nus solubility tag-containing bacterial expression vector. The data herein present a modified bacterial expression vector useful for expressing proteins fused to the Nus solubility tag and separating such target proteins from the Nus tag during protein purification. PMID:27547802

  20. Conformal Nanopatterning of Extracellular Matrix Proteins onto Topographically Complex Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Jallerat, Quentin; Szymanski, John M.

    2015-01-01

    We report a method for conformal nanopatterning of extracellular matrix proteins onto engineered surfaces independent of underlying microtopography. This enables fibronectin, laminin, and other proteins to be applied to biomaterial surfaces in complex geometries inaccessible using traditional soft lithography techniques. Engineering combinatorial surfaces that integrate topographical and biochemical micropatterns enhances control of the biotic-abiotic interface, used here to understand cardiomyocyte response to competing physical and chemical cues in the microenvironment. PMID:25506720

  1. Biclustering Protein Complex Interactions with a Biclique FindingAlgorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Chris; Zhang, Anne Ya; Holbrook, Stephen

    2006-12-01

    Biclustering has many applications in text mining, web clickstream mining, and bioinformatics. When data entries are binary, the tightest biclusters become bicliques. We propose a flexible and highly efficient algorithm to compute bicliques. We first generalize the Motzkin-Straus formalism for computing the maximal clique from L{sub 1} constraint to L{sub p} constraint, which enables us to provide a generalized Motzkin-Straus formalism for computing maximal-edge bicliques. By adjusting parameters, the algorithm can favor biclusters with more rows less columns, or vice verse, thus increasing the flexibility of the targeted biclusters. We then propose an algorithm to solve the generalized Motzkin-Straus optimization problem. The algorithm is provably convergent and has a computational complexity of O(|E|) where |E| is the number of edges. It relies on a matrix vector multiplication and runs efficiently on most current computer architectures. Using this algorithm, we bicluster the yeast protein complex interaction network. We find that biclustering protein complexes at the protein level does not clearly reflect the functional linkage among protein complexes in many cases, while biclustering at protein domain level can reveal many underlying linkages. We show several new biologically significant results.

  2. Deciphering preferential interactions within supramolecular protein complexes: the proteasome case

    PubMed Central

    Fabre, Bertrand; Lambour, Thomas; Garrigues, Luc; Amalric, François; Vigneron, Nathalie; Menneteau, Thomas; Stella, Alexandre; Monsarrat, Bernard; Van den Eynde, Benoît; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Bousquet-Dubouch, Marie-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, intracellular protein breakdown is mainly performed by the ubiquitin–proteasome system. Proteasomes are supramolecular protein complexes formed by the association of multiple sub-complexes and interacting proteins. Therefore, they exhibit a very high heterogeneity whose function is still not well understood. Here, using a newly developed method based on the combination of affinity purification and protein correlation profiling associated with high-resolution mass spectrometry, we comprehensively characterized proteasome heterogeneity and identified previously unknown preferential associations within proteasome sub-complexes. In particular, we showed for the first time that the two main proteasome subtypes, standard proteasome and immunoproteasome, interact with a different subset of important regulators. This trend was observed in very diverse human cell types and was confirmed by changing the relative proportions of both 20S proteasome forms using interferon-γ. The new method developed here constitutes an innovative and powerful strategy that could be broadly applied for unraveling the dynamic and heterogeneous nature of other biologically relevant supramolecular protein complexes. PMID:25561571

  3. Architecture and function of IFT complex proteins in ciliogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Taschner, Michael; Bhogaraju, Sagar; Lorentzen, Esben

    2014-01-01

    Cilia and flagella (interchangeable terms) are evolutionarily conserved organelles found on many different types of eukaryotic cells where they fulfill important functions in motility, sensory reception and signaling. The process of Intraflagellar Transport (IFT) is of central importance for both the assembly and maintenance of cilia, as it delivers building blocks from their site of synthesis in the cell body to the ciliary assembly site at the tip of the cilium. A key player in this process is the multi-subunit IFT-complex, which acts as an adapter between the motor proteins required for movement and the ciliary cargo proteins. Since the discovery of IFT more than 15 years ago, considerable effort has gone into the purification and characterization of the IFT complex proteins. Even though this has led to very interesting findings and has greatly improved our knowledge of the IFT process, we still know very little about the overall architecture of the IFT complex and the specific functions of the various subunits. In this review we will give an update on the knowledge of the structure and function of individual IFT proteins, and the way these proteins interact to form the complex that facilitates IFT. PMID:22118932

  4. Economy of operon formation: cotranscription minimizes shortfall in protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Sneppen, Kim; Pedersen, Steen; Krishna, Sandeep; Dodd, Ian; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2010-01-01

    Genes of prokaryotes and Archaea are often organized in cotranscribed groups, or operons. In contrast, eukaryotic genes are generally transcribed independently. Here we show that there is a substantial economic gain for the cell to cotranscribe genes encoding protein complexes because it synchronizes the fluctuations, or noise, in the levels of the different components. This correlation substantially reduces the shortfall in production of the complex. This benefit is relatively large in small cells such as bacterial cells, in which there are few mRNAs and proteins per cell, and is diminished in larger cells such as eukaryotic cells. PMID:20877578

  5. Discovery of host-viral protein complexes during infection

    PubMed Central

    Rowles, Daniell L.; Terhune, Scott S.; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Viruses have co-evolved with their hosts, developing effective approaches for hijacking and manipulating host cellular processes. Therefore, for their efficient replication and spread, viruses depend on dynamic and temporally-regulated interactions with host proteins. The rapid identification of host proteins targeted by viral proteins during infection provides significant insights into mechanisms of viral protein function. The resulting discoveries often lead to unique and innovative hypotheses on viral protein function. Here, we describe a robust method for identifying virus-host protein interactions and protein complexes, which we have successfully utilized to characterize spatial-temporal protein interactions during infections with either DNA or RNA viruses, including human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), pseudorabies virus (PRV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), Sindbis, and West Nile virus (WNV). This approach involves cryogenic cell lysis, rapid immunoaffinity purification targeting a virus or host protein, followed by identification of associated proteins using mass spectrometry. Like most proteomic approaches, this methodology has evolved over the past few years and continues to evolve. We are presenting here the updated approaches for each step, and discuss alternative strategies allowing for the protocol to be optimized for different biological systems. PMID:23996249

  6. Native Elution of Yeast Protein Complexes Obtained by Affinity Capture.

    PubMed

    LaCava, John; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Rout, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes two options for the native (nondenaturing) elution of protein complexes obtained by affinity capture. The first approach involves the elution of complexes purified through a tag that includes a human rhinovirus 3C protease (PreScission protease) cleavage site sequence between the protein of interest and the tag. Incubation with the protease cleaves immobilized complexes from the affinity medium. The second approach involves the release of protein A-tagged protein complexes using a competitive elution reagent called PEGylOx. The degree of purity of the native assemblies eluted is sample dependent and strongly influenced by the affinity capture. It should be noted that the efficiency of native elution is commonly lower than that of elution by a denaturing agent (e.g., SDS) and the release of the complex will be limited by the activity of the protease or the inhibition constant (Ki) of the competitive release agent. However, an advantage of native release is that some nonspecifically bound materials tend to stay adsorbed to the affinity medium, providing an eluted fraction of higher purity. Finally, keep in mind that the presence of the protease or elution peptide could potentially affect downstream applications; thus, their removal should be considered. PMID:27371597

  7. Functional expression of miraculin, a taste-modifying protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Tomomi; Satoh, Makiko; Nakata, Rieko; Aoyama, Takashi; Inoue, Hiroyasu

    2009-04-01

    Miraculin isolated from red berries of Richadella dulcifica, a native shrub of West Africa, has the unusual property of modifying a sour taste into a sweet one. This homodimer protein consists of two glycosylated polypeptides that are cross-linked by a disulfide bond. Recently, functional expression of miraculin was reported in host cells with the ability to glycosylate proteins, such as lettuce, tomato and the microbe Aspergillus oryzae, but not Escherichia coli. Thus, a question remains as to whether glycosylation of miraculin is essential for its taste-modifying properties. Here we show that recombinant miraculin expressed in E. coli has taste-modifying properties as a homodimer, not as a monomer, indicating that glycosylation is not essential for the taste-modifying property. PMID:19122203

  8. Incorporation of single dinitrophenyl-modified proteins in to the 30S subunit of Escherichia coli ribosomes by total reconstitution for localization by immune electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Olah, T.V.

    1989-01-01

    The ribosome is a structurally defined organelle whose function is central to the existence of all organisms. It is the unique site of protein biosynthesis in all cells. A detailed understanding of ribosome structure is essential in understanding the process of translation. This thesis represents a new approach to the systematic localization of individual proteins contained in the small subunit of Escherichia coli ribosomes using immunoelectron microscopy. All 30S proteins were purified using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and eight isolated proteins (S12,S21,S14,S19,S18,S17,S16 and S13) were derivatized with 2,4-(3,5-{sup 3}H)dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB). The extent of modification of these proteins was estimated by both radioactivity and integrated peak areas, using dual wavelength monitoring at 214nm to detect protein and 360nm (to detect dinitrophenyl groups). Each dinitrophenylated protein was introduced in place of the corresponding unmodified protein into totally reconstituted 30S subunits. Antibodies raised against the DNP-hapten bound effectively to such reconstituted subunits and did not cause dissociation of the modified protein from the subunit. Electron microscopy of the immune complexes was used to localize the modified protein on the subunit surface. Incorporation of any of the DNP-modified proteins, with the exception of DNP-S18, does not interfere with the functionality of the ribosome as measure by the binding of Phe-tRNA{sup Phe} or the synthesis of poly(Phe) in a poly(U)-dependent manner. Results show that unmodified protein competes with DNP-protein and that DNP-protein can function, as its native counterpart, in stimulating uptake of specific proteins during reconstitution. This data provides evidence that each DNP-protein occupies the same position in 30S subunits as does the corresponding unmodified protein.

  9. Identification of a chitinase modifying protein from Fusarium verticillioides: truncation of a host resistance protein by a fungalysin metalloprotease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chitinase modifying proteins (cmps) are proteases, secreted by fungal pathogens, which truncate the plant class IV chitinases ChitA and ChitB during maize ear rot. Cmp activity has been characterized for Bipolaris zeicola and Stenocarpella maydis, but the identities of the proteases are not known. H...

  10. Isotopically coded cleavable cross-linker for studying protein-protein interaction and protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V; Olkhovik, Vyacheslav K; Borchers, Christoph H

    2005-08-01

    An emerging approach for studying protein-protein interaction in complexes is the combination of chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometric analysis of the cross-linked peptides (cross-links) obtained after proteolysis of the complex. This approach, however, has several challenges and limitations, including the difficulty of detecting the cross-links, the potential interference from non-informative "cross-linked peptides" (dead end and intrapeptide cross-links), and unambiguous identification of the cross-links by mass spectrometry. Thus, we have synthesized an isotopically coded ethylene glycol bis(succinimidylsuccinate) derivate (D12-EGS), which contains 12 deuterium atoms for easy detection of cross-links when applied in a 1:1 mixture with its H12 counterpart and is also cleavable for releasing the cross-linked peptides allowing unambiguous identification by MS sequencing. Moreover, hydrolytic cleavage permits rapid distinguishing between different types of cross-links. Cleavage of a dead end cross-link produces a doublet with peaks 4.03 Da apart, with the lower peak appearing at a molecular mass 162 Da lower than the mass of the H12 form of the original cross-linked peptide. Cleavage of an intrapeptide cross-link leads to a doublet 8.05 Da apart and 62 Da lower than the molecular mass of the H12 form of the original cross-linked peptide. Cleavage of an interpeptide cross-link forms a pair of 4.03-Da doublets, with the lower mass member of each pair each shifted up from its unmodified molecular weight by 82 Da because of the attached portion of the cross-linker. All of this information has been incorporated into a software algorithm allowing automatic screening and detection of cross-links and cross-link types in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectra. In summary, the ease of detection of these species through the use of an isotopically coded cleavable cross-linker and our software algorithm, followed by mass spectrometric sequencing of the

  11. Information-driven modeling of protein-peptide complexes.

    PubMed

    Trellet, Mikael; Melquiond, Adrien S J; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    2015-01-01

    Despite their biological importance in many regulatory processes, protein-peptide recognition mechanisms are difficult to study experimentally at the structural level because of the inherent flexibility of peptides and the often transient interactions on which they rely. Complementary methods like biomolecular docking are therefore required. The prediction of the three-dimensional structure of protein-peptide complexes raises unique challenges for computational algorithms, as exemplified by the recent introduction of protein-peptide targets in the blind international experiment CAPRI (Critical Assessment of PRedicted Interactions). Conventional protein-protein docking approaches are often struggling with the high flexibility of peptides whose short sizes impede protocols and scoring functions developed for larger interfaces. On the other side, protein-small ligand docking methods are unable to cope with the larger number of degrees of freedom in peptides compared to small molecules and the typically reduced available information to define the binding site. In this chapter, we describe a protocol to model protein-peptide complexes using the HADDOCK web server, working through a test case to illustrate every steps. The flexibility challenge that peptides represent is dealt with by combining elements of conformational selection and induced fit molecular recognition theories. PMID:25555727

  12. 40 CFR 174.529 - Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN-IR67B-1 in cotton; exemption from the requirement... Tolerance Exemptions § 174.529 Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD... Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN-IR67B-1...

  13. 40 CFR 174.529 - Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN-IR67B-1 in cotton; exemption from the requirement... Tolerance Exemptions § 174.529 Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD... Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN-IR67B-1...

  14. 40 CFR 174.529 - Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN-IR67B-1 in cotton; exemption from the requirement... Tolerance Exemptions § 174.529 Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD... Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN-IR67B-1...

  15. 40 CFR 174.529 - Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN-IR67B-1 in cotton; exemption from the requirement... Tolerance Exemptions § 174.529 Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD... Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN-IR67B-1...

  16. Protein corona – from molecular adsorption to physiological complexity

    PubMed Central

    Docter, Dominic; Maskos, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Summary In biological environments, nanoparticles are enshrouded by a layer of biomolecules, predominantly proteins, mediating its subsequent interactions with cells. Detecting this protein corona, understanding its formation with regards to nanoparticle (NP) and protein properties, and elucidating its biological implications were central aims of bio-related nano-research throughout the past years. Here, we discuss the mechanistic parameters that are involved in the protein corona formation and the consequences of this corona formation for both, the particle, and the protein. We review consequences of corona formation for colloidal stability and discuss the role of functional groups and NP surface functionalities in shaping NP–protein interactions. We also elaborate the recent advances demonstrating the strong involvement of Coulomb-type interactions between NPs and charged patches on the protein surface. Moreover, we discuss novel aspects related to the complexity of the protein corona forming under physiological conditions in full serum. Specifically, we address the relation between particle size and corona composition and the latest findings that help to shed light on temporal evolution of the full serum corona for the first time. Finally, we discuss the most recent advances regarding the molecular-scale mechanistic role of the protein corona in cellular uptake of NPs. PMID:25977856

  17. Protein Ligand Complex Guided Approach for Virtual Screening.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Muthukumarasamy; Pandit, Deepak; Vyas, Renu

    2015-01-01

    The target ligand association data is a rich source of information which is not exploited enough for drug design efforts in virtual screening. A java based open-source toolkit for Protein Ligand Network Extraction (J-ProLiNE) focused on protein-ligand complex analysis with several features integrated in a distributed computing network has been developed. Sequence alignment and similarity search components have been automated to yield local, global alignment scores along with similarity and distance scores. 10000 proteins with co-crystallized ligands from pdb and MOAD databases were extracted and analyzed for revealing relationships between targets, ligands and scaffolds. Through this analysis, we could generate a protein ligand network to identify the promiscuous and selective scaffolds for multiple classes of proteins targets. Using J-ProLiNE we created a 507 x 507 matrix of protein targets and native ligands belonging to six enzyme classes and analyzed the results to elucidate the protein-protein, protein-ligand and ligand-ligand interactions. In yet another application of the J-ProLiNE software, we were able to process kinase related information stored in US patents to construct disease-gene-ligand-scaffold networks. It is hoped that the studies presented here will enable target ligand knowledge based virtual screening for inhibitor design. PMID:26138572

  18. Evaluation of the Use of Complex Mineral Concentrate as a Modifier Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gizatulin, R. A.; Fedoseev, S. N.; Dariev, R. S.

    2016-04-01

    Increasing customer demands for quality of the resulting metal, and in the first place, the impurities, metallurgists dictate need to develop new and improved technologies. Thus, a significant reduction in metal losses can be achieved by developing new complex alloy steels, special purpose, improving technology of their production and developing new technology of smelting to improve the physical, mechanical, foundry and operational characteristics by influencing the structure of the steel by modifying the liquid melt, change more favorable morphology of nonmetallic inclusions. For complex-alloyed steels expensive and scarce alloying elements Ti, Nb, Zr, etc., are used, which are inaccessible to conventional structural steels. In this regard, the paper also presents the results of applying of innovative modifiers containing alloying elements (Ti, Nb, Zr, etc.) based on mineral concentrates in the Tomsk region.

  19. Pigment Analysis of Chloroplast Pigment-Protein Complexes in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Eskins, Kenneth; Duysen, Murray E.; Olson, Linda

    1983-01-01

    Pigment-protein complexes separated from wheat (Triticum aestivum L. selection ND96-25 by two gel electrophoresis techniques were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography for chlorophylls and carotenoids. The two techniques are compared, and pigment analyses are given for the major reaction centers and light-harvesting complexes. Reaction centers contain mostly chlorophyll a, carotene, and lutein, whereas light-harvesting complexes contain chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, lutein, and neoxanthin. The amounts of violaxanthin are variable. Images Fig. 1 PMID:16662906

  20. Cardiac mitochondrial matrix and respiratory complex protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Covian, Raul

    2012-01-01

    It has become appreciated over the last several years that protein phosphorylation within the cardiac mitochondrial matrix and respiratory complexes is extensive. Given the importance of oxidative phosphorylation and the balance of energy metabolism in the heart, the potential regulatory effect of these classical signaling events on mitochondrial function is of interest. However, the functional impact of protein phosphorylation and the kinase/phosphatase system responsible for it are relatively unknown. Exceptions include the well-characterized pyruvate dehydrogenase and branched chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase regulatory system. The first task of this review is to update the current status of protein phosphorylation detection primarily in the matrix and evaluate evidence linking these events with enzymatic function or protein processing. To manage the scope of this effort, we have focused on the pathways involved in energy metabolism. The high sensitivity of modern methods of detecting protein phosphorylation and the low specificity of many kinases suggests that detection of protein phosphorylation sites without information on the mole fraction of phosphorylation is difficult to interpret, especially in metabolic enzymes, and is likely irrelevant to function. However, several systems including protein translocation, adenine nucleotide translocase, cytochrome c, and complex IV protein phosphorylation have been well correlated with enzymatic function along with the classical dehydrogenase systems. The second task is to review the current understanding of the kinase/phosphatase system within the matrix. Though it is clear that protein phosphorylation occurs within the matrix, based on 32P incorporation and quantitative mass spectrometry measures, the kinase/phosphatase system responsible for this process is ill-defined. An argument is presented that remnants of the much more labile bacterial protein phosphoryl transfer system may be present in the matrix and that the

  1. Polymeric human Fc-fusion proteins with modified effector functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekhaiel, David N. A.; Czajkowsky, Daniel M.; Andersen, Jan Terje; Shi, Jianguo; El-Faham, Marwa; Doenhoff, Michael; McIntosh, Richard S.; Sandlie, Inger; He, Jianfeng; Hu, Jun; Shao, Zhifeng; Pleass, Richard J.

    2011-10-01

    The success of Fc-fusion bio-therapeutics has spurred the development of other Fc-fusion products for treating and/or vaccinating against a range of diseases. We describe a method to modulate their function by converting them into well-defined stable polymers. This strategy resulted in cylindrical hexameric structures revealed by tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). Polymeric Fc-fusions were significantly less immunogenic than their dimeric or monomeric counterparts, a result partly owing to their reduced ability to interact with critical Fc-receptors. However, in the absence of the fusion partner, polymeric IgG1-Fc molecules were capable of binding selectively to FcγRs, with significantly increased affinity owing to their increased valency, suggesting that these reagents may prove of immediate utility in the development of well-defined replacements for intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. Overall, these findings establish an effective IgG Fc-fusion based polymeric platform with which the therapeutic and vaccination applications of Fc-fusion immune-complexes can now be explored.

  2. Study of protein complexes via homology modeling, applied to cysteine proteases and their protein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tastan Bishop, Ozlem; Kroon, Matthys

    2011-12-01

    This paper develops and evaluates large-scale calculation of 3D structures of protein complexes by homology modeling as a promising new approach for protein docking. The complexes investigated were papain-like cysteine proteases and their protein inhibitors, which play numerous roles in human and parasitic metabolisms. The structural modeling was performed in two parts. For the first part (evaluation set), nine crystal structure complexes were selected, 1325 homology models of known complexes were rebuilt by various templates including hybrids, allowing an analysis of the factors influencing the accuracy of the models. The important considerations for modeling the interface were protease coverage and inhibitor sequence identity. In the second part (study set), the findings of the evaluation set were used to select appropriate templates to model novel cysteine protease-inhibitor complexes from human and malaria parasites Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. The energy scores, considering the evaluation set, indicate that the models are of high accuracy. PMID:21365221

  3. Modified Hilbert transform pair and Kramers-Kronig relations for complex permittivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Modified versions of the Hilbert transform pair and the Kramers-Kronig relations are derived for the complex permittivity of a plasma/dielectric medium which is singular at the frequency of the applied electric field equal to 0. Such a complex permittivity exists when the plasma/dielectric model allows a loss term but no restoring term. Permittivity, in which both loss and restoring terms are included, is shown to satisfy the standard Hilbert transform pair and, thus, the Kramers-Kronig relations.

  4. Immunoprecipitation and Characterization of Membrane Protein Complexes from Yeast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parra-Belky, Karlett; McCulloch, Kathryn; Wick, Nicole; Shircliff, Rebecca; Croft, Nicolas; Margalef, Katrina; Brown, Jamie; Crabill, Todd; Jankord, Ryan; Waldo, Eric

    2005-01-01

    In this undergraduate biochemistry laboratory experiment, the vacuolar ATPase protein complex is purified from yeast cell extracts by doing immunoprecipitations under nondenaturing conditions. Immunoprecipitations are performed using monoclonal antibodies to facilitate data interpretation, and subunits are separated on the basis of their molecular…

  5. Protein import and the origin of red complex plastids.

    PubMed

    Gould, Sven B; Maier, Uwe-G; Martin, William F

    2015-06-15

    The number and nature of endosymbioses involving red algal endosymbionts are debated. Gene phylogenies have become the most popular tool to untangle this issue, but they deliver conflicting results. As gene and lineage sampling has increased, so have both the number of conflicting trees and the number of suggestions in the literature for multiple tertiary, and even quaternary, symbioses that might reconcile the tree conflicts. Independent lines of evidence that can address the issue are needed. Here we summarize the mechanism and machinery of protein import into complex red plastids. The process involves protein translocation machinery, known as SELMA, that arose once in evolution, that facilitates protein import across the second outermost of the four plastid membranes, and that is always targeted specifically to that membrane, regardless of where it is encoded today. It is widely accepted that the unity of protein import across the two membranes of primary plastids is strong evidence for their single cyanobacterial origin. Similarly, the unity of SELMA-dependent protein import across the second outermost plastid membrane constitutes strong evidence for the existence of a single red secondary endosymbiotic event at the common origin of all red complex plastids. We furthermore propose that the two outer membranes of red complex plastids are derived from host endoplasmic reticulum in the initial red secondary endosymbiotic event. PMID:26079086

  6. Cell separation by immunoaffinity partitioning with polyethylene glycol-modified Protein A in aqueous polymer two-phase systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Laurel J.; Van Alstine, James M.; Snyder, Robert S.; Shafer, Steven G.; Harris, J. Milton

    1988-01-01

    Previous work has shown that polyethylene glycol (PEG)-bound antibodies can be used as affinity ligands in PEG-dextran two-phase systems to provide selective partitioning of cells to the PEG-rich phase. In the present work it is shown that immunoaffinity partitioning can be simplified by use of PEG-modified Protein A which complexes with unmodified antibody and cells and shifts their partitioning into the PEG-rich phase, thus eliminating the need to prepare a PEG-modified antibody for each cell type. In addition, the paper provides a more rigorous test of the original technique with PEG-bound antibodies by showing that it is effective at shifting the partitioning of either cell type of a mixture of two cell populations.

  7. Utilization of modified surfactant-associated protein B for delivery of DNA to airway cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Baatz, J E; Bruno, M D; Ciraolo, P J; Glasser, S W; Stripp, B R; Smyth, K L; Korfhagen, T R

    1994-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant lines the airway epithelium and creates a potential barrier to successful transfection of the epithelium in vivo. Based on the functional properties of pulmonary surfactant protein B (SP-B) and the fact that this protein is neither toxic nor immunogenic in the airway, we hypothesized that SP-B could be modified to deliver DNA to airway cells. We have modified native bovine SP-B by the covalent linkage of poly(lysine) (average molecular mass of 3.3 or 10 kDa) to the N terminus of SP-B and formed complexes between a test plasmid and the modified SP-B. Transfection efficiency was determined by transfection of pulmonary adenocarcinoma cells (H441) in culture with the test plasmid pCPA-RSV followed by measurement of activity of the reporter gene encoding chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT). Transfections were performed with DNA.protein complexes using poly(lysine)10kDa-SP-B ([Lys]10kDa-SP-B) or poly(lysine)3.3kDa-SP-B ([Lys]3.3kDa-SP-B), and results were compared with transfections using unmodified poly(lysine).DNA, unmodified SP-B.DNA, or DNA only. For [Lys]10kDa-SP-B.pCPA-RSV preparations, CAT activity was readily detectable above the background of [Lys]3.3kDa-SP-B or unmodified SP-B. The SP-B-poly(lysine) conjugates were effective over a broad range of protein-to-DNA molar ratios, although they were optimal at approximately 500:1-1000:1. Transfection efficiency varied with the tested cell line but was not specific to airway cells. Addition of replication-defective adenovirus to the [Lys]10kDa-SP-B.pCPA-RSV complex enhanced CAT activity about 30-fold with respect to that produced by the [Lys]10kDa-SP-B.pCPA-RSV complex alone. This increase suggests routing of the adenoviral.[Lys]10kDa-SP-B.pCPA-RSV complex through an endosomal pathway. Effects of covalent modification on the secondary structure of SP-B were examined by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). Results of FTIR indicated that the conformation of [Lys]10kDa-SP-B was

  8. Folding Behaviors of Protein (Lysozyme) Confined in Polyelectrolyte Complex Micelle.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fu-Gen; Jiang, Yao-Wen; Chen, Zhan; Yu, Zhi-Wu

    2016-04-19

    The folding/unfolding behavior of proteins (enzymes) in confined space is important for their properties and functions, but such a behavior remains largely unexplored. In this article, we reported our finding that lysozyme and a double hydrophilic block copolymer, methoxypoly(ethylene glycol)5K-block-poly(l-aspartic acid sodium salt)10 (mPEG(5K)-b-PLD10), can form a polyelectrolyte complex micelle with a particle size of ∼30 nm, as verified by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The unfolding and refolding behaviors of lysozyme molecules in the presence of the copolymer were studied by microcalorimetry and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Upon complex formation with mPEG(5K)-b-PLD10, lysozyme changed from its initial native state to a new partially unfolded state. Compared with its native state, this copolymer-complexed new folding state of lysozyme has different secondary and tertiary structures, a decreased thermostability, and significantly altered unfolding/refolding behaviors. It was found that the native lysozyme exhibited reversible unfolding and refolding upon heating and subsequent cooling, while lysozyme in the new folding state (complexed with the oppositely charged PLD segments of the polymer) could unfold upon heating but could not refold upon subsequent cooling. By employing the heating-cooling-reheating procedure, the prevention of complex formation between lysozyme and polymer due to the salt screening effect was observed, and the resulting uncomplexed lysozyme regained its proper unfolding and refolding abilities upon heating and subsequent cooling. Besides, we also pointed out the important role the length of the PLD segment played during the formation of micelles and the monodispersity of the formed micelles. Furthermore, the lysozyme-mPEG(5K)-b-PLD10 mixtures prepared in this work were all transparent, without the formation of large aggregates or precipitates in solution as frequently observed in other protein

  9. Structural study of asparagine-linked oligosaccharide moiety of taste-modifying protein, miraculin.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, N; Hitotsuya, H; Hanzawa, H; Arata, Y; Kurihara, Y

    1990-05-15

    The structures of the N-linked oligosaccharides of miraculin, which is a taste modifying glycoprotein isolated from miracle fruits, berries of Richadella dulcifica, are reported. Asparagine-linked oligosaccharides were released from the protein by glycopeptidase (almond) digestion. The reducing ends of the oligosaccharide chains thus obtained were aminated with a fluorescent reagent, 2-aminopyridine, and the mixture of pyridylamino derivatives of the oligosaccharides was separated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on an ODS-silica column. More than five kinds of oligosaccharide fractions were separated by the one chromatographic run. The structure of each oligosaccharide thus isolated was analyzed by a combination of sequential exoglycosidase digestion and another kind of HPLC with an amidesilica column. Furthermore, high resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) measurements were carried out. It was found that 1) five oligosaccharides obtained are a series of compounds with xylose-containing common structural core, Xyl beta 1----2 (Man alpha 1----6) Man beta 1----4-GlcNAc beta 1----4 (Fuca1----3)GlcNAc, 2) a variety of oligosaccharide structures are significant for two glycosylation sites, Asn-42 and Asn-186, and 3) two new oligosaccharides, B and D, with unusual structures containing monoantennary complex-type were characterized. (formula; see text) PMID:2335505

  10. Co-expression of RNA–protein complexes in Escherichia coli and applications to RNA biology

    PubMed Central

    Ponchon, Luc; Catala, Marjorie; Seijo, Bili; El Khouri, Marguerite; Dardel, Frédéric; Nonin-Lecomte, Sylvie; Tisné, Carine

    2013-01-01

    RNA has emerged as a major player in many cellular processes. Understanding these processes at the molecular level requires homogeneous RNA samples for structural, biochemical and pharmacological studies. We previously devised a generic approach that allows efficient in vivo expression of recombinant RNA in Escherichia coli. In this work, we have extended this method to RNA/protein co-expression. We have engineered several plasmids that allow overexpression of RNA–protein complexes in E. coli. We have investigated the potential of these tools in many applications, including the production of nuclease-sensitive RNAs encapsulated in viral protein pseudo-particles, the co-production of non-coding RNAs with chaperone proteins, the incorporation of a post-transcriptional RNA modification by co-production with the appropriate modifying enzyme and finally the production and purification of an RNA–His-tagged protein complex by nickel affinity chromatography. We show that this last application easily provides pure material for crystallographic studies. The new tools we report will pave the way to large-scale structural and molecular investigations of RNA function and interactions with proteins. PMID:23804766